The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03031

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
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Full Text
heater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. Special Insert
i60-No. 10
Miami Friday, March 6,1987
50 Cents
Mideast Cities In Israel's A-Sights
AP/Wide World Photo
me 1,000 Palestinian people demonstrated in Bonn last week for the recognition of the Palestine Liberation Organua-
*on by the Federal Republic of West Germany.
>harisma Still There
Rabbi Kronish Fights Back Effects of '84 Stroke
Bj ALISA KWTTNEY
*"* Floridian Staff Writer
?at remains of the
Pant speaker he was are
eyes: Dark and alert,
y convey the humor, the
Ration and the struggle
* man whose eloquence
been perhaps ir-
*0ty silenced.
ji Leon Kronish of Temple
1 Shlom, Miami Beach, still
fighting the effects of a stroke in
1984 which affected the right side
of his body and left him at first
totally unable to speak, has not
been robbed of the charisma
which made him the guiding force
of his Temple for over 40 years.
THE TEMPLE, which will
celebrate its 45th anniversary
along with Rabbi Kronish's 70th
birthday in April, began as a
storefront center in 1942. His ac-
tual birthday, Feb. 21, was mark-
ed on that Saturday. Ehe Wiesel
was among the nearly 2,000 well-
wishers who attended.
The first rabbi, Samuel Machtai,
came for the High Holidays to
lead the congregation of what was
then called the Beth Sholom
Jewish Center.
In 1944, when the Congregation
decided to hire a full-time rabbi,
Rabbi Kronish was chosen.
Kronish went door-to-door,
wherever he saw a mezuzak, seek-
ing new members for the Temple
he renamed Temple Beth Sholom.
And he looked for a new site for
the Temple, trying first a tract of
land right next to a Catholic
church, which the church objected
to, before finally settling on a
warehouse which had once been
used as an Air Force barracks.
THE DILAPIDATED two-
story building, originally called
the Chase Avenue Hotel, has been
transformed over the years into
Continued on Page 7-A
Nuclear
Program
'Advanced'
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel appears to have the
nuclear potential to level
every major Middle Eastern
city, according to a book
released last week by the
Carnegie Endowment for
International Peace.
Israel's nuclear program "is far
more advanced than previously
believed and accordingly, the
pace of proliferation in the region
in recent years has been more
rapid than generally acknowledg-
ed," Leonard Spector writes in
"Going Nuclear," the third annual
Carnegie Endowment for Peace
report on nuclear war.
SPECTOR BASES his discus-
sion on Israel on disclosures by
Mordechai Vanunu, a former
Israeli nuclear technician, who
provided the basis for a detailed
account of Israel's nuclear pro-
gram published in the London
Sunday Times last October.
Vanunu's disclosures revealed
that Israel may "now possess
more than 100 nuclear weapons
not the 20 to 25 previously
thought and that some of them
may employ nuclear fusion, the
principle of the H-bomb, which
would make them tens of times
more powerful than the atom
bombs used in World War II,"
Spector writes.
Evidence also suggests that
Israel deployed a sophisticated
short-range missile, the Jericho
II, during the early 1980's, which
it could equip with a nuclear
Continued on Page 12-A
Rabbi Kronish


3
i
i
z
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Peres' Cairo Trip
Leaves Crisis on Hold
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The anticipated Labor-
Likud crisis which many
believe would spell the end
of the unity coalition
government remained on
hold Thursday (Feb. 26) as
Israel awaited the outcome
of Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres' meeting with Egyp-
tian President Hosni
Mubarak in Cairo.
Peres announced in Cairo late
Thursday that he would have
another round of talks with
Mubarak on Friday, which was
unscheduled. The two men met to
discuss matters still outstanding
with respect to an international
peace conference for the Middle
East, including Soviet and Palesti-
nian participation and procedural
arrangements.
PERES SAID "new ideas"
were raised at their meeting
Thursday, but would not say what
they were. This aroused the ire of
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, who told
a caucus of Likud Ministers that
Peres had "not bothered" to
report to him, and he had no
knowledge of what new ideas
were raised.
Shamir is adamantly opposed to
an international conference in-
cluding the Soviet Union on
grounds that Israel would be
isolated and pressured to return
to its pre-1967 borders. Peres
went to Cairo Wednesday (Feb.
25) while Shamir was still enroute
home from a 10-day visit to the
U.S., a fact that further irritated
the Likud leader and his
colleagues.
On landing in Israel Wednesday
night, Shamir told reporters that
the Peres-Mubarak meeting could
well determine the fate of the uni-
ty government. Peres met with
Mubarak in Alexandria last
September, when he was Premier.
They agreed in principle to an in-
ternational conference. Shamir,
then Foreign Minister, was sharp-
ly critical.
BUT NOTHING emerged from
the Likud caucus Thursday to fur-
ther aggravate the tense situation
between the coalition partners.
Shamir warned, however, that
Peres had no right or mandate to
agree to anything on Israel's
behalf with respect to an interna-
tional forum.
The Premier said earlier that
any agreement Peres brought
back from Cairo would have to be
submitted to the full Cabinet for
approval.
Egypt's Foreign Minister Esmat Abdel
Maguid (left) welcomes Israel's Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres last week (Feb. 25) at a
military airport east of Cairo. Peres came to
Cairo without the blessing of Israel's Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, who arrived back
APWide World PU]
in Jerusalem from a visit with President
Reagan in Washington fuming over Peres'in-
itiative. Peres' visit with President A/omi
Mubarak was his first since he came to Ala-
andria last September.
Peres Says
He Represents Entire Israel Gov't.
Reform Converts Asked to Hold
Appeals to Supreme Court
TEL AVTV (JTA) Three
immigrants converted to Judaism
by Reform rabbis were asked by
Attorney General Yosef Harish to
postpone for six months their ap-
peal to the Supreme Court to be
registered as Jews.
The three are Julia Ann
Biglaizer and Murilo Pinto Varela
of Kibbutz Mishmar Hanegev, and
Gail Mosacowitch of Kibbutz
Gonen. Their attorney, Yosef
Ben-Menashe, was approached by
Harish who reportedly was acting
at the behest of Premier Yitzhak
Shamir.
The Supreme Court issued a
show cause order on Feb. 1 requir-
ing the Interior Ministry to ex-
plain why the converts should not
be registered. Harish, in seeking
to postpone action, was criticized
by senior legal figures who said he
should have rejected Shamir's re-
quest outright instead of convey-
ing it to the appellants.
Shamir temporarily holds the
portfolio of Interior Minister
which is being administered for
him by Deputy Minister Ronnie
Milo, a Likud MK. Interior
Minister Yitzhak Peretz of the
ultra-Orthodox Shas Party resign-
ed last month rather than comply
with a Supreme Court order to
issue a Jewish identification card
to Shoshana Miller, an American
immigrant converted to Judaism
by a Reform rabbi.
According to the media reports,
the six-month delay sought by
Shamir would give him time to
persuade Peretz to revoke his
resignation and return Shas to the
unity coalition government. His
request reportedly cited the
deliberations of the recently ap-
pointed Interministerial Commit-
tee on Conversions which has
been given six months to find an
acceptable formula for registering
immigrants converted by non-
Orthodox rabbis.
2fr
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice Premier and Labor
Party leader Shimon Peres
declared in Cairo Wednes-
day (Feb. 25) that he was
representing the entire
Israeli government in his
talks there with Egypt's
leaders.
But Likud leaders here
reiterated Premier Yitzhak
Shamir's warnings that the unity
government could fall if Peres
persisted in pursuing the option of
an international conference for
the Middle East.
SHAMIR HIMSELF was still
en route for home, following a
10-day trip to the U.S., as Peres
left for Cairo.
Peres' timing plainly was
regarded by Likud as an open in-
^
suit to the Premier, and political
circles said Wednesday that the
crisis between the two main coali-
tion partners was at its deepest.
One important indication of the
political atmosphere was a state-
ment by National Religious Party
leader Zevulun Hammer, Minister
of Religions. Long an ardent sup-
porter of the unity government,
Hammer said Wednesday that
with the two leaders so at log-
gerheads, it was 'hard to see v
the value of this unity is" and t
perhaps the best alternitm
would indeed be elections.
PERES MET President HoaJ
Mubarak Thursday (Feb.
the second day of his trip i
Egypt. After his arrival he I
talks with Foreign Minisl
Esmat Abdel-Meguid, and
visited the Cairo Synagogue
Singer Anderson Receives Award
NEW YORK Renowned
opera star Marian Anderson will
celebrate her 85th birthday with
the presentation of an honorary
Fellowship award from the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Miss Anderson, one of the
world's leading contraltos, is be-
ing honored by the Hebrew
University for "her lifelong strug-l
gle for human rights, her ten
sense of justice, her caring forl
people and her avowed friendsha I
for Israel."
The Fellowship Scroll will bel
presented by University
Chancellor Avraham Harmandur
ing a luncheon ceremony on Fn-
day at University House here
Tkis Summer,
fJenisti FkridHan
Phone: (305) 373-4605
Published weekly every Friday
since 1927 by The Jewish Flori-
dian. Office and Plant 120 N.E.
6th St., Miami, Fla. 33132. Phone
(305) 373-4605. Second-Class
Postage paid in Miami, Fla.
USPS 275320. Postmaster: Form
3579 return to Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla.
33101. Fred Shochet. The
Jewish Floridian does not
guarantee the Kashruth of the
merchandise advertised in its
columns.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: In ad-
vance (Local Area) One Year
$9.00; Two Years $16.00; Three
Years $22.00 Supplemental
Issue (Local Area) First Friday
each monfh (10 issues)
Sept. June $2.00. Out of town,
country, upon request. By Mail
$1 35 per copy.
< m
---- ----_,
Escape To A Friendlier Climate.
Don't let the Florida heat get to you!
Head north far the Fallsview. You'll he
greeted with eool. comfortable surrounding*
and warm, friendly receptions.
Flan to make your summer reservations
now and take advantage of our speeial
Extended Stay Rates. At that rate, you'll enjoy
the Fallsview activities even more.
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and
swimming, a championship Rohcrt Trent
Jones golf course, racquethall. hoating and so
much more. There's even a choice of two or
three sumptuous meals a day.
So this summer, come to where the
atmosphere is as inviting as the weather.
EujlsvieW
CAM. TOIL FREE: 1-800-4*1-0152
EI.LENVILI.E, N.Y. 12428
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"Waterfront Rental Apartments"
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2 & 3 Yr. Leases Available Pool & Shuffleboard
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Planned social activities Lounge
to fill your hours happily
,-..FURN- 0NFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
i-. Jt"'.'L*.rY>i:H*<.-!*


Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
How Riverside
Earned ks Reputation
In the Jewish community a
funeral home is judged by its service.
And that service must always meet
the high standards of Jewish
tradition.
At Riverside, our dedication
to service has been proven day in and
day out, year after year, for over six
decades. This commitment
began with people such as
Charles Rosenthal and
Carl Grossberg Today
that commitment to
service continues
under the leadership
of Kenneth J.
Lassman and a
new generation
of Riverside
managers.
For more than sixty years,
caring people have worked to en-
hance the Riverside reputation And
that's how Riverside became the most
respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.
Kenneth I Lassman
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, Inc./Funeral Directors
Miami Beaih North Miami, Hollywood, Tamarac West Calm Beach
Also serving the New York Metropolitan Area


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Israel's A-Power
Greater Than Thought
A new book by the Carnegie Endowment
for International Peace assures us that
Israel has the capacity to level all major
cities in the Middle East with its nuclear
capability which, the book declares, "is far
more advanced than previously believed."
About the only reassuring thing in this is
that the capability is Israel's and does not lie
in Arab hands. Given the reverse in the
situation, we are not reasonably certain
that, say, Iraq or Iran would exercise the
same land of .restraint that lies in Israel's
assertion that it "will not be the first to in-
troduce nuclear weapons in the Middle
East."
But Israel's restraints and Israel's asser-
tions, even under these happier cir-
cumstances, do not dim the Carnegie En-
dowment's chilling assessment of Israel's
nuclear capability that it is laced by its suc-
cessful achievement of nuclear fusion, which
is basic to the Hydrogen Bomb and yields
bombs minimally ten times more powerful
than those used against Japan in World War
II.
Israel's scientific and technical capability
may be awesome, but its ability to destroy
the major cities of the Middle East is an
even more awesome consequence and
nothing, in the end, to be satisfied about.
No Satisfaction
Even more worrisome is that we live at a
time during which warfare has taken a turn
from "organized" combat to the random
nature of terrorism as a result of which it is
entirely possible that terrorists can engage
in the kind of operation that would allow
them to seize some of these bombs for their
own purposes, namely the destruction of
Israel.
This is hardly farfetched. The information
on the basis of which the Carnegie Endow-
ment for International Peace published its
findings last week came from the activity of
Mordechai Vanunu, the former Israeli
nuclear technician who sold his detailed ac-
count of Israel's nuclear program to the
Sunday Times of London last October.
Given that information can be stolen, so
too can Israel's bombs themselves. And even
if not, it is precisely these less than
hypothetical terrorists who may one day buy
nuclear bombs or steal them from less
vigilant or less restrained sources. Used
against Israel, it is doubtless that Israeli
retaliation will yield the Carnegie Endow-
ment's ultimate nightmare the destruc-
tion of major Middle Eastern cities at the
hands of Israel.
Under any of these circumstances, Israel
would not, indeed, be the first to introduce
nuclear weapons into that part of the world.
By its retaliation, it would be the second.
But what sort of satisfaction would lie in
that?
Answering Questions
For some time now, President Reagan has
been on record that, while Israel may have
initiated the Iran arms deal by suggesting
U.S. participation, it was in the end an
American decision to become involved and
therefore America's responsibility that it did
so.
Other Reagan Administration spokesmen
have since said precisely the same tiling, in-
cluding among others Secretary of State
Shultz.
But the Tower Commission findings
released last week are somewhat less gentle
so far as Israel's role was concerned. In-
deed, all of the members of the Commission
- former Secretary of State Edmund
Muskie, former Sen. John Tower and former
National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft
were frank in their statement upon the
release of the report that Israel can not be
regarded as blameless because it had its own
agenda in the Middle East.
Indeed, they were equally frank to suggest
that Israel's agenda was and, by implication
remains, at odds with that of the United
States.
This is an uncomfortable conclusion. In
our view, it would be damaging in the ex-
treme for Israel to continue to remain at a
distance from the U.S. Iran scandal on the
basis that Israel is not obliged to testify
before U.S. investigation bodies.
At the very least, the questions that the
Tower Commission submitted to the govern-
ment of Israel as an alternative to direct in-
terrogation ought to be answered fully and
soon.
Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin
Sunday begins the third in a series of three
Jewish-Christian lectures at Barry Universi-
ty, when Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, presi-
dent of Barry, will discuss "A Catholic
University President Reflects on the Rela-
tionship Between the Catholic Church and
the Jewish Community."
It is entirely praiseworthy that Barry has
long responded to the presence of an active
and vibrant Jewish community in South
Florida with which the university shares not
only communal interests but academic, in-
tellectual and religious interests, as well.
The Jewish-Christian lectures are a case in
point. They show Barry University's deter-
mination to bridge what has too frequently
been a hiatus between Catholicism and
0ION1* *TUPV BECAUSE I pRttMfD a
TERRORIST STOLE 1WE EX/*^ I U
Judaism by emphasizing the common ties
that bind rather than the differences that
separate.
In this spirit, Barry deserves our praise
and we are heartened that the Jewish com'
munity agrees. For Sister Jeanne will be
this year's recipient of the Woman of
Achievement Award presented to her by the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
next Thursday (Mar. 12) at the Omni Hotel
for her enlightened leadership, generous
spirit, and her love of humanity and
country."
It is an apt presentation with which all of
us must agree.
The 'Jewish Machine'
It Was Never A Dodge or A Ford
By JIM SHIPLEY
"The Machine," my grand-
mother called it. It was a Buick, I
think. I was young, very young,
and the time has lent a gentle haze
to the model and the design. What
I do remember is that it was
something awesome, well beyond
what Nissan tries to claim today.
It was an automobile, a car, with
running boards and a long power-
ful looking hood and an interior
like a plush apartment. But to my
Bubba, it was "The Machine."
My Uncle Henry owned it. I
mean, he was the one in the family
who held the title. He was a little
guy with a big belly and a wonder-
ful smile. He loved my Bubba, who
was his mother-in-law. Matter of
fact, he loved most of mankind.
He owned a tire store on North
Broad Street in Philadelphia, and
even in those depression years, he
did pretty well.
IN MOST emerging middle
class Jewish families of the thir-
ties, there was one car in the fami-
ly. I mean in the/am%, not in the
house. Among the uncles and the
aunts, the cousins and the grand-
parents there was usually one car.
At the most: two. The primary use
was usually business, of course, by
the family member affluent
enough to maintain possession.
But, when it came to outings,
events, rimchas and funerals, it
served everyone. The splendor of
this incredible device was over-
whelming to the first generation
of European patriarchs and
matriarchs who watched their
families grow in this Goldene
Medina called America.
It is no wonder that my grand-
mother referred to my uncle
Henry's car as "The Machine."
How wonderful it must have
seemed to her) that carriage, with
its interior crafted like an expen-
sive piece of furniture; burnished
dash board, actual window
shades! It purred, it roared. It had
a back seat you could almost stand
up in as you entered and room for
the entire family, no matter how
many that was.
WE WOULD squeeze in; we
would climb over; we would find a
way for everyone to have a place.
"How will we get there, Grand-
mom?" was the juvenile whine.
"The Machine will take us." Done.
Well, that Buick or whatever it
was, that hazy memory from my
knickered boyhood is long a part
of recycled steel, probably used
for war material of some sort -
my Uncle Henry's magnificent
touring machine dropped on some
distant Pacific atoll by a farm boy
from Iowa turned army pilot.
Just as probably, it was recycled
into a soup pot, but my boyhood
dreams would not allow that
Nothing that mundane for "The
Machine." By the time 1937 rolled
around, we were doing very well
ourselves, thank you. My dad
worked for the Crosley Corpora-
tion in Cincinnati, Ohio. We
became the proud owners of a
1937 Lincoln.
IT HAD 12, counfem. 12
cylinders. We'd pull up to a ser-
vice station (for that indeed is
what they were in those days), and
all the guys would come out to
peer under the hood and into the
engine at those 12 cylinders.
My grandmother only got to
ride in that car a few times. She
lived in Philadelphia, and there we
were all those miles away. But
the war came on, and my dad was
in the Signal Corps in procure-
ment (he fought WWI in the
Navy). So, the family and the 1937
Lincoln headed back east to be
together and wait out the duration
as we called it.
By the end of the war. there
were gaps in the floorboards
Continued on Page 13-A
Our Readers Write: We Support
Kahane in Every Way
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I was very surprised to see an
article fan the Jewish Floridian by
MK Rabbi Meir Kahane. It was an
excellent article and explained
clearly about Vatican-Israel
relations.
As for your editorial about him,
whether the polls indicate it or
not, the Rabbi is doing very well.
There are many people, myself in-
cluded, who might not get asked
what we think.
This is no problem. We just
simply go on supporting the Rabbi
in every way possible.
LYNNHANDELMAN
North Miami Beach
Fred K. Shochet
Editor and Publisher
eJewish Floridian
Leo Mindlin
Associate Editor
William T. Brewer
Director of Operations
Suzanne Shochet
Executive Editor
Joan C. Teglas
Director of Advertising
Friday, March 6,1987
Volume 60
5ADAR5747
Number 10


. ..,,.': .,' '-
Friday,_March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
THE REV. ZACHARIAH MOKGOEBO AND RABBI BEN ISSACSON
Johannesburg Rabbi:
Something Sick Has Happened to the Jews of South Africa
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
Copt/right Baltimore Jewish Times
All Publication Rights Reserved
In South Africa, Jews, for once,
have been part of the Master
Race. That country has given
Jews a unique experience that will
not go down as one of the glorious
periods. How, with our ex-
perience, can a Jew be a racist?
Their "sickness," Rabbi, has
been duly put in the story. But it
must be noted that your
judgments on South African Jews
were less temperate than those of
your traveling companion. Rev.
Zachariah Mokgoebo of the Black
Dutch Reformed Church in the
township of Soweto.
MOKGOEBO DOES not at-
'lf Desmond Tutu visits,
they threaten to walk out.'
How, with our Torah and pro-
phetic teaching, can a Jew involv-
ed with the black struggle be call-
ed a 'traitor' by other Jews?"
The rabbi from South Africa
leaned over the table in Puffin's, a
rikesville, Md. vegetarian
restaurant accustomed to gentle
discussions about tofu and bean
sprouts. There would be none of
| that at our table.
Instead, there would be talk of
the murders of children by South
Alncan soldiers and clandestine
I israeh arms shipments to the
wmie regime and inquiries into
e true racial leanings of the
average South African Jew. It
IdiJcussion"01 bC a Plea8ant
EGGING GENTLY at my
iC for,emphasis- Rabbi Ben
fcswson of Johannesburg's Con-
E!nHar'El-atemple of
Mwindlmg membership and, accor-
Kr, S,Spiritual leader- dwindl"
WEX? ~ said- "Something
mv m^>untry. I have been told by
EmonHrnyT.CngreKation that if
VSSi ^tu Comes to the
^agogue, they will walk out.
the Ar?hKhKUld ** honored that
Nobel ihblshP of Capetown a
Rl'EB1 and leader of 28
th m Tple ~ would come to
KSy*."*sick- Put ** in
tribute a "sickness" to the Jews of
South Africa. In fact, like most
South African blacks, he barely
distinguishes them from the other
five million whites of his country.
"Jews," said Mokgoebo, "are
part of the white problem. They
are not seen as a separate com-
munity by the blacks of South
Africa. They share the same fears
as the white South Africans."
Aside from his contact with
such men as Issacson, who has
scolded fellow South African rab-
bis for their "breathtaking
silence" on apartheid, Mokgoebo
has had little contact with the
120,000 South African Jews (and
with South African whites in
general).
"I have trid to speak with
them," he said, "but by doing
that, I arouse their fears. Maybe
they think that someone will
report them to the police for talk-
ing with someone who thinks as I
do. I have decided they are
unteachable.
MOKGOEBO AND Issacson
were in Baltimore recently, the
sixth stop on their 21-city tour of
the United States under the
auspices of the New Jewish
Agenda.
The tour's purpose was to raise
$400,000 for proposed Centers of
Peace and Justice in South Africa
integrated, inter-faith centers
for living, education, and prayer.
Issacson and Mokgoebo also hope
to enlist more U.S. Jews in their
struggle against apartheid.
'If American Jews lobbied for
the blacks of South Africa one
fraction of how much they lobby
for Israel," said Issacson, "we in
South Africa would feel the
difference."
IF NOT, for their anti-
apartheid work, Issacson and
Mokgoebo probably would not
have met. "I was raised in the
privileged class," said Issacson.
"As a child, I did not know the
Rev. Mokgoebo, I knew the boy
who shined my shoes, I did not
know the black refugees from
South Africa who are now in the
United States, I knew the girl who
brought me breakfast in the
morning."
The two men met, so to speak,
on the front lines. "I had heard of
this Jewish rabbi who was crazy in
a white area," said Mokgoebo. "I
had read about him. Together on
picket lines and at the funerals of
black children killed by white
soldiers, this guy came to life for
me."
That Issacson was a Jew had lit-
tle bearing on his friendship with
Mokgoebo. "For me, Ben was not
a Jew," said Mikgoebo. "He was a
comrade, a fighter."
"ZACK'S FIRST reaction to
me," said Issacson, "was, 'The
police are beating everybody up.
What are you a white man
doing here?' "
As the two men got to know
each other, their religions' histpry
and morality influenced their
friendship and their tactics. "I
have always thought," said Issac-
son, "that we Jews stand for the
widowed, the orphaned, the poor,
the exploited. This is what Jewish
prophetic teaching is all about."
But not until 1985, said Issac-
son, did the South African Board
of Jewish Deputies issue a stand
aainst apartheid. This was 25
years after Issacson had begun his
own anti-apartheid work.
"And now having issued a state-
ment," said Issacson, "they think
they can come to the United
States and say they have always
been in the struggle. But I have
never seen these people in jail. I
have never seen them in trouble at
all."
ISSACSON DISPARGED
those "who seek glory in America
over the bodies of those they've
ostracized and excommunicated,
such as myself and a few others."
According to the rabbi, only
three of South Africa's 70 rabbis
have been active in their country's
fight against apartheid.
"Over the years," he said,
"many Jews have been involved in
the anti-apartheid struggle, but
not those who claim to have been.
Those most active have been
dismissed by the organized Jewish
community as being 'peripheral
Jews," not really Jews. Dennis
Goldberg spent 23 years in prison
with Nelson Mandela, but he's
called a Communist/A.N.C.
revolutionary.
"THERE ARE Jews now in
detention in South Africa, but the
Jewish establishment doesn't
seem to give a damn about them
because they don't follow the
usual liberal line of such people as
Helen Suzman, who is worshipped
by organized Jewry around the
world."
Suzman, a Jewish member of
the South African Parliament, is
often cited by American Jews as
an example of South African
Jewry's anti-apartheid stand. A
founder of the Progressive Party,
she has spoken in Parliament
against apartheid and abroad
against economic divestment.
Speaking last Spring in New
York to the graduating class of
the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, Suzman said
of divestments, "I don't see how
wrecking the economy of the
country will insure a more stable
and just society."
WHILE NOTING that "for
years, Helen Suzman was a lonely
and courageous voice in Parlia-
ment," both Issacson and
Mokgoebo were critical of her ser-
ving in a political body that ex-
cludes blacks and is elected by
South Africa's white minority.
They were especially harsh about
what they perceive as her
patronizing attitude toward
blacks.
"Helen Suzman speaks for the
black people without dealing with
us as people," said Mokgoebo.
"She is working within the racist
premise of deciding for us without
consulting us. Liberals such as she
speak only of economics. They do
not treat blacks as human beings.
People who make political excuses
Continued on Page 12-A
'If'American Jews Lobbied for South Africa blacks
instead of Israel, we would feel the difference.'
ttifeRtS-W3A-.K_


Page 6-A The Jewish noridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Witness Points
To Demjanjuk
As 'Ivan'
Bv DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-
In a scene of anguish and
unrestrained emotion, a se-
cond prosecution witness
positively identified accused
war criminal John Demjan-
juk in Jerusalem district
court Wednesday (Feb. 25)
as the brutal guard known
as "Ivan the Terrible" who
operated the gas chambers
at the Treblinka death
camp.
Kliahu Rosenberg. 66. who was
-1 wher he was taken with his
family to Treblinka from the War-
saw Ghetto, made the identifica-
tion after clearly describing in
detail how thousands of Jews
were slaughtered in the gas
chambers and later burned in
mass graves. He related his own
job as a member of a squad of in-
mates forced to clean the gas
chambers and recalled Ivan's duty
as operator of the death
machinery.
HE SAID he saw Ivan daily at
the gas chambers. Later, when his
task was to burn bodies that ac-
cumulated in the pit. he said he
had occasion to fetch kerosine
from where Ivan stood. Obviously
overcome by the horror of his
recollections. Rosenberg momen-
tarily lost control and cried out
that he could identify- Ivan by his
"murderous eyes."
But the climax of the session
came when the prosecutor.
Michael Shaked. asked the
witness if he saw Ivan in the cour-
troom 'That is Ivan. I have not a
shadow if a doubt.'" Rosenberg
replied, pointing to the 66-year-
old Ukrainian-born prisoner
Nevertheless, he asked that the
eeand :o remove his glasses
'.\-- ar.juk asked the witness tit
aproata him to make a closer ir.-
qaectma. They stared at each
other for a moment.
Ther. IBM ad BU
Rosenberg rece ad
"Menkrar Reel dare
-or hand to me. a avareerar
he shouted Badaai
. s i oat tB< eoar 1
Roaaaban > wife Adaaa, collaps-
v earned
tkaovv
Earlier rv.-rvarjuk was iden-
tified bj aaotaer Treblinka sur-
. Ph H Epatt i a bo was 11
at arrived al the death
.a.- r
JTA/WZN News Photo
John Demjanjuk (second left) accused of being Treblinka extermination camp guard 'Ivan the Terrible,' at his trial in
Jerusalem s Bin\anei HaOoma.
Key Witness
Steadfast in Face of Questioning
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
former inmate of Treblinka
recited ghastly details of
mass murder at the death
camp under sharp cross ex-
amination Tuesday (Feb. 24)
in the trial here of accused
war criminal John
Demjanjuk.
Pinhas Epstein, who electrified
IB* eawl Monday when he
pointed to Derr.;ar.;uk as the
bnMaJ camp guard known as
"Ivan the Terrible." coaNaaead his
pfeaaaatioa testimony under
BMNHBg by Den
American Bttorae) Mark
O'Connor
The .ierer.se ..vr. tends that the
'.'k-v:-. _l-;v-- lV~;.i-.;.>. > :.
rietaa nl Its
strategy :> to demonstrate the
faiHbt.::;. .-:' *-.tresses -
aa -; years arter the
tn er.ts
BIT EPSTEIN id not faher
aeeatieaad about ieta -
the camp s MfeUaie, the people
in charge of the extermination
process and such minutiae as
where the laundry was hung.
He described the mass graves
into which bodies were dumped.
Chlorine powder was poured on
the corpses to hasten their
disintegratior.. "The powder sank
down, causing blood to burst from
the ground. Then they added
more bodies and more powder."
the witness said.
Epstein, who was brought to
Trebonka at tBc age :' "." bmBc
' "the mar. ir. the white coat."
an to inmates otl\ as Erwn
it tea e^t of ifac mam
~i'-e .l :'
: ; e: iead.
When i woaaaed pars i vat
IfBI the e-ige ::" tbe grave.
on his bands and knees, naked at
pat Then he would
signal a tin-am a- juari
ar and shoot the victim through
- bead." Eaeteai >aid.
THE TRIAL, baiara a three-
;uige aaad af the Jerusa.e~
Dtstrict Court has beer aawBad
increasingly by emotional out-
bursts from spectators, many of
them Holocaust survivors. At a
recess Tuesday, several survivors
huried oaths at the defendant's
son. John Demjanjuk Jr.. and
against Ukrainians who were in-
volved in the murder of their
families. Police intervened to
restore order.
Demjanjuk. 66. a retired
automobile worker from
Cleveland. Ohio, is the first
tec Nazi war criminal ex-
tradited to Israel and the first to
: -. trie I here since A I
' J? years ago. He is
charged with several counts of
mes, crimes against
' "; .ir: i cT-.rv.es iig-.v.r.s:
lean I: convicted he faces -.:.-
penalty. The trial ia ex-
pected to laat for three months.
At the end of the session, the
court thanked Epstein for the
-:ned and dignified manner
-. afckb he related the terrible
events at Treblinka.
cL
Rabbi Was
'Misrepresented'
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset Interior Committee
found Thursday (Feb. 19) that
Rabbi David Grossman, the
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi of Migdal
Haemek. was misrepresented by
the media when it reported that
he had issued a ban on women at-
tending funerals together with
men.
Grossman, who appeared before
the committee, was cleared
unanimously, and committee
members expressed regre: for the
damage done his reputation. "If
there is anyone capable of building
bridges between the religious and
secular communities :: Rabbi
Grossman who acts to foster unity
and mutual respect." tl
tee said in a statement.
Grossman, often refer
the "disco rabbi." is kr
work with prisoners at.
taged youths. He explained "."the
committee that "The matter of
women and men attending
funerals separately or in one
group is entirely up to the family
and is not covered by halachl
He added. "I gave no ruling, and'
made no comment on the issue.
-KOSHER^
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Hh-jfjj O Gtaas of Wine
Sentenced Lebanese Terrorist
Had 5 Jewish Targets on Hit List
ROME (JTA> Lebanese terrorist Bashir Khodr.
sentenced Sunday to 13 years" imprisonment for smuggling
explosives into Italy, had five Jewish targets on his "hit
hst." two of them schools, according to papers found in a
room he rented here before his arrest at Muan airport Jan
12.
THE TARGETS WERE the CRT Scientific School
and Middle School: the editorial offices of Shalom, monthly
organ of the Union of Italian Jewish Communities; the
home of its editor and the Jewish museum iocaed in
Rome's main synagogue.
Khodr was convicted after a one-day trial for artemp-
jggie .2 kilos of explosives eoccea.ee
frames. Easter eggs and a portable radio. The dtarion read
at nts amuwing stated chat he intended :
plosives for attacks on Jews. He also wa.- -- -
ore-
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BM


Rabbi
Kronish
Fights Back
Continued from Page 1-A
the spacious, light-filled structure
which occupies the site today.
The Temple's school, which has
produced such writers as Mark
Medoff and Barbara Gordon, was
. vital interest of Kronish's from
the very beginning, and the fact
that the Temple has become an ex-
tremely active and important
cultural center for the Greater
Miami area was, and remains, in
keeping with Kronish s vision of a
Temple as a place for community
as well as worship.
Rabbi Gary Glickstein, who was
chosen to lead the congregation a
year and a half after Kronish's
stroke, speaks with admiration of
his predecessor, and of his con-
gregations attachment to him.
"THERE WAS a salad at Ar-
thur's Restaurant called 'the
Kronish salad,' says Glickstein
of the older rabbi's popularity in
the area.
"Then, in the middle of building
the new building, he had a massive
stroke. It devastated both him and
the congregation."
Dr. Yehuda Shamir, who is
writing the biography of the Tem-
ple and its leader of so many
years, says that "The major
thrust of the Rabbi's work was to
try and build a bridge between
Israel and this Temple." The
book, to be written in honor of the
Temple's anniversary, will
hopefully have two completed
chapters by the time the April
celebrations come around.
In an interview, when asked,
"Are you a fighter?" Rabbi
Kronish answered with a strong,
affirmative "Yes."
"FIVE DAYS a week therapy,"
he added, naming each day of the
week with fatigue yet also with a
kind of amused resignation.
"Biofeedback. physical therapy,
speech therapy ." says Lillian,
the Rabbis' wife, adding, "At
first, after the stroke, he couldn't
talk at all."
"Didn't know how," explains
Kronish. "Didn't remember." The
words which Kronish knew in his
mind got lost on the mysterious
path to speech, leaving him a
prisoner within himself.
But he could sing.
"He could sing before he could
talk," says Mrs. Kronish, because
the stroke affected the left
hemisphere of his brain, and it's
the right side of the brain which
controls singing. He still does Kid-
dushon Friday night."
"YOU KNOW, his bags were
packed to lead 700 people on a
mission to Israel," says Dr.
Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Some Of Us Will
Be Pampered
This Passover.
.

/-.
UAnw\2^J^oacuwvi
'""ousokish.kpv.sowni-.n;
\<2/, COAS1 KFSORI
Z^ Palm ( liasl Mnrl.l:
UKFMORn
INNRF.SORI
fairleo. Vermont
"' *"***y. Nmr York. NY 10036
121219217740
>"of NY SUU 1800-8474)700
Rabbi Leon Kronish (center) is flanked by Nobel Peace Prize-winning author Elie Wiesel (left) and his son. Rabbi Ron
Kronish,
Shamir, Kronish's biographer, of
the fateful day when Kronish lost
much of the use of his right side
along with his ability to speak.
"1984 stroke," states
Kronish. "Jan. 11," and the stark
words say more than any descrip-
tion ever could about the devasta-
tion that event wrought on a man
who numbered public speaking
among his chief talents.
Did his faith ever waver? "No,"
says Kronish. "Saturday, 1,800
people," he explains, speaking of
the crowd which attended his bir-
thday celebration.
"Two ovations," he says, and
his eyes try to make the connec-
tion; I did not lose my faith
because of the love of my
congregation.
DID HE ever question God why
this should happen to him?
"Yes. But it doesn't matter.
Eighteen weeks in hospital. Every
hope that Rosh Hashanah ..."
says Kronish, struggling to con-
vey his thoughts.
"He gave bracha?" suggests his
wife.
Victims Still
In Hospital
JERUSALEM (JTA) Only
three of the nine persons injured
when a bomb ripped through a
Jerusalem-bound bus in Hadera
remained hospitalized Monday.
All were reported in good condi-
tions, including a victim whose
badly mangled foot was saved by
surgeons at the Hillel Yaffe
Hospital in Hadera.
There were no reports of pro-
gress no the police investigation
of the terrorist act. All suspects
detained for questioning im-
mediately after the bombing have
been released.
THE BUS was on a return trip
from Haifa to Jerusalem. Police
are trying to determine whether
the bomb was planted when the
vehicle was at a Jerusalem park-
ing lot before starting its run to
Haifa.
The driver, however, insists he
checked the bus thoroughly before
he left Jerusalem. According to
eyewitnesses, the bomb appears
to have been concealed undr the
driver's seat. The blast hurled him
into the air. But he managed to
stop the vehicle safety, avoiding
injury to most of the 52
passengers aboard.
"Yes," he replies.
Does he mean that just as each
new year brings new blessings,
each Rosh Hashanah brings new
hope?
"Yes," he says. "Yes."
"Don't forget," interjects Mrs.
Kronish, "that you need a strong
wife, someone to push you, so-
meone you can push around. You
forgot to say that."
His eyes twinkling, Kronish
replies, "No, I didn't."
It's true. In some way, husband
and wife both speak through her
mouth now, a fact which Rabbi
Kronish seems to accept with a
combination of humor, frustra-
tion, affection and sadness.
THE KRONISHS' son, Ron.
also a rabbi, who has lived for
many years in Israel, will be at the
April dual celebration of the Tem-
ple and the man who helped build
it both physically and spiritually,
as will be Maxine, their daughter,
director of Jewish Campus Ac-
tivities in the Greater Washington
area.
AJComm. Regional Office Will
Plant Trees in Jose Marti Forest
The Southeast Regional Office
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee in Miami will plant 175 trees in
the Jose Marti Forest in Israel.
The donated trees will be pur-
chased with contributions col-
lected from AJC members across
the state in response to a letter
from Miami Chapter President
Roger Bernstein and Florida Area
Advisory Council Chairman Bar-
ton Udell, which said, in part:
"We feel in theory and practice
that adding to the forest is the
right kind of program for AJC."
The ten-thousand-acre forest is
named for Jose Marti, a Cuban na-
tional hero killed in 1895 during
the fight for Cuba's independence
from Spain.
The park will be established in
tin Judean Hills, near Jerusalem,
by the Jewish National Fund
Keren Kayemeth Leisrael-Latin
Division, and will have 430,000
trees.
25 DAY TOUR 114 TOURING 0*YS|
r NET ANY A
INC AIR FARE FROM NY
ISRAEL'S "RIVIERA"'1795
I nmflB l-m mmm i en)/ WWI "
2 MEALS DAILYFULLY ESCORTED IN
fw**3h ISRAEL-SUPERIOR 1ST CLASS HOTELS
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Come To Israel Come Slay With Friends
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DOOOOOOCK
"Create Land From Sand'


DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $-------------------
Name
Address
Phone
Apt No
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone: 538^tt>4


loridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Tower Report
U.S. Responsible for Iran Arms Sales
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Reagan's
special review board on the
Iranian-Contra affair said
Thursday (Feb. 26) that
while Israel was heavily in-
volved and may have in-
itiated the United States ef-
forts in Iran, the decision to
sell arms to Iran was an
American one for which the
U.S. bears full
responsibility.
"There was heavy Israeli in-
volvement," former Sen. John
Tower, chairman of the three-
member board, said at a White
House press conference. "Of
course, the final decision of our
own participation was our own."
The board, which the President
appointed last Dec. 1, released its
findings Thursday. Reagan ap-
peared briefly at the start of the
press conference to say that he
would read the report carefully
and report to the nation on it over
television next week.
Former Sen. Edward Muskie,
(D., Maine), who was Secretary of
State in the Carter Administra-
tion, said that it was not clear who
originated the idea of the U.S.
seeking influence in Iran.
It was an "initiative that began
either in Iran, in Israel or in the
United States," he said.
BRENT SCOWCROFT. na
tional security advisor in the Ford
Administration and the third
member of the board, added that
the board did not have the "full
picture" on Israel's involvement.
"There is no question that the
Israelis encouraged, if (they) did
not initiate this policy, and that
they did whatever they could
when it appeared to be flagging
from time to time to renew its
vigor," Scowcroft said.
"I think the problem is that our
goals and the Israeli goals were
not synonymous," he added.
"Indeed, in some respects they
have been in conflict."
While Scowcroft did not
describe the difference in goals.
the report does list them:
"Israel had long-standing in-
terests in a relationship with Iran
and in promoting its arms export
industry. Arms sales to Iran could
further both objectives. It also of-
fered a means of strengthening
Iran against Israel's a old adver-
sary, Iraq.
"MUCH OF Israel's military
equipment came originally from
the United States, however. For
both legal and political reasons,
Israel felt a need for U.S. ap-
proval of, or at least acquiescence
in, any arms sale to Iran.
"In addition, elements in Israel
undoubtedly wanted the United
States involved for its own sake so
as to distance the United States
from the Arab world and ultimate-
ly to establish Israel as the only
real strategic partner of the
United States in the region."
The report added that "Iran
badly wanted" the U.S. Tow and
Hawk missiles that Israel could
provide to counter Iraqi superiori-
ty in planes and armor. "Israel
was more than willing to provide
these weapons to Iran, but only if
the United States approved the
transfer and would agree to
replace the weapons," the report
said.
TOWER SAID that the board
believes that Reagan approved
Israel's first sale of arms to Iran
in Agusut 1985, before the ship-
ment took place. Reagan, in his
first testimony to the board, said
he approved the sale in August,
but then later told the board his
approval came after the shipment.
Since then he has said he cannot
remember when his approval
came. Tower pointed out that one
reason why the board could not
come to any conclusions on the ex-
tent of Israel's involvement was
that the Israeli government refus-
ed to allow it to interview the
Israelis involved. The Israeli
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government had agreed to reply
to written questions, but had not
done so before the report was
completed.
Israeli Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
during his visit to Washington last
week, promised to cooperate with
the Senate and House committees
investigating the Iran/Contra af-
fair. But it was not clear whether
he would allow the Israelis involv-
ed to be interviewed.
Israeli Embassy spokesman
Yosef Gal said last Thursday that
the Embassy received the board's
questions on Feb. 16. He said they
were very detailed, and it was
"impossible" to provide the infor-
mation in time. But he said "we
are cooperating" with all the
investigations.
TOWER ALSO said the board
had not come to any conclusions
on the transfer of funds from the
sale of arms to Iran to the Con-
tras. He said the board was denied
access to the Swiss banks involv-
ed, and Adm. John Poindexter,
the former National Security Ad-
visor, and Marine Lt. Col. Oliver
North, the former National
Security Council employee involv-
ed in the Iran affair, among
others, refused to testify before
the board.
However, the report noted, as
previously made public, that

North, under questioning from
Attorney General Edwin Meese,
said the diversion of funds "was
an Israeli idea."
Shamir denied in Washington
last week any Israeli involvement
in the diversion of funds.
He also stressed that Israel
acted in the Iran affair as an ally
and friend of the U.S.
"Even if the government of
Israel actively worked to begin
the initiative and to keep it going,
the U.S. government is responsi-
ble for its own decisions," the
board's report stressed.
IT ADDED that "Although
Israel dealt with those portions of
the U.S. government that it deem-
ed were sympathetic to the in-
itiative, there is nothing improper
per se about this tact. U.S.
decision-makers make their own
decisions and must bear resnon
sibility for the consequences^
Tower said that while the U S
effort started out as a way to seek
influence with moderates in Iran
it "yery quickly became an aiW
for-hostages affair." He noted
that while Reagan could be
faulted for his management style
the fault lay with his advisors whd
did not provide him with the tyr*
of advice needed. The board
members specifically blamed
Poindexter, former Central In.
telligence Agency director
William Casey and White House
Chief of Staff Donald Regan, who
was ousted last week.
The report details the entire Ira-
nian affair in chronological order
but there was little information
not already publicly known.
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Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Golan Druze
Still Hope for Heights' Return to Syria
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
I rive years after Israel for-
W annexed the Golan
'Shts, the 12,000-strong
nruze community there con-
tinues to resist the political
reality that they are part of
the Israel" state.
Initially, their resistance took
the form of sullen refusal to ac-
cept Israeli indentaty cards. More
recently there have been open
demonstrations against Israeli
rule.
Though overshadowed by the
wave of violence that spread in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip last
week an incident on Feb. 14
underlined the seriousness of the
situation there.
AN OUTBURST of pro-Syrian
emotions among the Golan Druze
was triggered by the scheduled
unveiling of a statute of Sultan El
Atrash, the legendary leader of
the Druze revolt against the
French Mandate authorities in
1925.
It occurred in Majdal Shams,
the largest Druze village on the
Golan. Israeli police assembled at
the village early in the morning, a
Saturday, as a precaution against
possible demonstrations. Druze
youths did indeed demonstrate.
Some throwing stones, others
armed with chains and clubs,
chanting anti-Israel and pro-
Syrian slogans, they clashed with
police.
Eight policemen were injured
and at least 11 Druze were ar-
rested. The demonstration coin-
cided with the fifth anniversary of
Israeli annexation.
THE SITUATION is ironic.
When Israel captured the Golan
Heights in the 1967 Six-Day War,
the Druze, alone among the
populations of the occupied ter-
ritories, proved friendly. Their
four villages surrendered without
bloodshed. Relations with the
Israeli authorities developed the
same patterns of friendship and
cooperation which characterized
Israel's relations with the Druze
minority within its own borders.
The Druze in Israel are con-
sidered the most loyal minority.
Like all Israeli citizens, except
Arabs, they do compulsory
military service and have proven
dependable and often heroic
soldiers in Israel's wars with its
neighbors. There are 45,000
Israeli Druze in 18 villages.
Many hold senior positions in
the border police. The declared
policy of the government was to
integrate the Druze as much as
Possible into Israeli society,
[hough this policy often has not
|w*n implemented.
THE DRUZE are fiercely in-
dependent. They broke away from
islam m the 11th century.
[Although they are considered to
I" ethnic Arabs, many regard
EE!"*? a separate ethnic
|tty. They have their own
ESf leaders- And **!*
p'a,nts, of discrimination,
ItheSti? Dme 'dentify ***
liSS??1*! t116 ^an Druze
B^S* to Syria-which
UL"*ard, f8 the legitimate
2E.0fthI <** Heights.
nevertheless, ^ ^ gggJJ
IEL y Tmed to co"Pt that
I wel was there to stay oendine
I Israel-Arab conflict.
Shem? t0k Jbs 'n Kiryat
^%ahnd other Jewishborder
K. ter ch,,ldren studied
\ES isSently-and raany
ItheZ, T**'1 ""vereities. At
lk tme\ the ho"*" with
PS CI relativ,ely pen-
ICfcZP6 frequently visited
many of whom hold senior posi-
tions in the Damascus
establishment.
BUT PEACEFUL coexistence
changed in 1982 when the Likud
government, with the backing of
the Labor Alignment, annexed
the Golan Heights, terminating
military rule and subjecting the
territory to Israeli civil law.
The Druze community balked at
carrying Israeli ID cards. Rallying
around their religious leaders,
they staged a silent revolt. For
five months they remained within
the confines of their villages,
refusing to present Israeli ID
cards at police barriers.
The self-imposed confinement
gradually ended. In June, 1982,
the Lebanon war shifted public at-
tention away from the Golan
Heights. More and more Druze
reluctantly accepted Israeli ID
cards. But the Heights became a
center of political unrest.
annexation as an attempt to en-
force a new loyalty upon them.
They refused to give up their
loyalty to Syria, which they
regard as their country, and
because of family ties there.
SOME ISRAELIS believe the
Druze loyalty to Syria is only an
expedience. Frequent talk by
various Israeli leaders of possible
negotiations with Syria over the
Golan has caused many Druze to
wonder if the Israeli presence was
indeed permanent. Israel's return
of the Sinai to Egypt in exchange
for a peace treaty heightened
Basically, the Golan Druze saw Continued on Page 11-A
Anyquestion
about who's lowest?
Now is lowest
ByUS.Gov't. testing method.
I** tall
lently
>es on the Syrian side,
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
be replaced," the report stated.
AS FOR North American yor-
dim who returned to live in Israel,
the report noted that 2,109 who
lived in the United States and
Canada from two-11 years return-
ed to Israel in 1986. "This is an in-
crese of 17.5 percent compared to
1985, during which 1.776 Israelis
returned to Israel from the United
States and Canada," the report
stated. The yordim returned
through the offices of the Labor
Minnistry Delegation in the
United States, the report noted.
The report also provided the fin-
dings of a 1986 survey among the
yordim on their reasons for living
abroad. The survey included 760
heads of Israeli families living h,
the United States and cSa
562 of whom were academician,
and 198 non-academicians TV
reasons were: economic, quaijtVof
life in Israel, employment. Israel
bureaucratic red tape and educa
tional opportunity. "None of the
respondents cited Israel's security
problems as a cause for verida '
the report stated.
The survey also found that
about 60 percent of the Israelis
who left Israel for America did so
before 1980. About 33 percent left
Israel between 1980-1983 whiles
percent left in 1984. Information
on the number of yordim after
1984 was not available.
S. Africa Olim Arrive in Israel
Congressman Dante Fascell (D., Fla.), chair-
man of the House Foreign Affairs Committee,
hosts a coffee meeting for Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir during his visit in
Washington last week. Left to right are
Israel's Ambassador Meir Rosenne, Fascell,
Shamir, and Sen. Claiborne Pell (D., RL),
chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee.
Yordim
Their Numbers Seen Highest Ever
TEL AVIV (JTA) Minister
of Immigration Yaacov Tsur,
greeting 50 youthful olim from
South Africa at Ben-Gurion Air-
port, made clear that Israel totally
rejects the apartheid regime but
must leave it to the Western
powers to establish policy toward
the Pretoria government.
"We must be part of the
western world, including the U.S.,
in our policy toward the South
African governments, but I do not
recommend that Israel play a
leading role on this issue," Tsur
said. He stressed that "Israel op-
poses the apartheid regime in
South Africa and rejects
everything related to it. However
Israel's responsibility and com-
mitment to the Jewish community
calls for a warm and continuous
connection with the Jews there in
order to encourage their immigra-
tion to Israel."
Meanwhile, Mayor Harold
Rudoph of Johannesburg, who
was visiting Israel, said economic
sanctions against South Africa
would not harm the Jewish com-
munity. But he said he would be
disapponted nevertheless, were
Israel to impose sanctions, "since
sanctions don't solve a thing, and
don't help anyone."
Yordim Must Be Enticed Back ... 1-1-A
Shamir's Jewish Agenda ... 15-A
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) A
new report by the Israeli
Ministry of Labor puts the
number of Israeli yordim
(immigrants) in the United
States and Canada at about
480,000, the highest ever of-
ficial Israeli estimate.
The report, recently submitted
to Labor and Welfare Minister
Moshe Katzav by consul Amos
Haddad, head of the Labor
Ministry Delegation in the United
States, characterized the new
estimate as "astonishing." It said
that the number was derived from
information supplied by the
United States Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS)
authorities and files from the
Israeli consulates in the United
States and Canada.
ACCORDING to the report, in
December, 1986 alone about
70,000 Isrelis were registered at
INS, awaiting the immigrant
status that includes the coveted
"Green Card" that will allow
them to work. The report noted
that INS data show that from
1966-79, 96,000 Israelis received
the status of immigrants, while
30,000 more were granted the
same status between 1980-86.
The new estimate of 480,000
yordim includes the American-
born children of the Israeli im-
migrants and Israelis who im-
migrated to the Untied States and
Canada after living for many
years in other countries, former
Israeli students and academicians
who came to study here and then
remained, and "many Israelis who
live in the United States illegal-
ly," the report said.
The report claimed that about
50,000 Israeli immigrants are liv-
ing in Canada in addition to
"many" illegal Israelis.
"These numbers (on the yor-
dim), although they might not be
completed accurate, indicate a
trend of mass migration of
Israelis, among them tens of
thousands of the best of Israeli
youths Israeli-born, kibbutzniks
and Israeli 'brains' who cannot
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Vandals Devastate Jewish Center
PARIS (JTA) Vandals devastated a Jewish com-
munity center at St. German El Laye near Paris Monday.
Community leaders estimate the damage in tens of
thousands of Francs but said religious services will be
resumed Friday.
TORAH SCROLLS were torn, prayer books were
desecrated, furniture was broken and anti-Semitic slogans
were daubed on the walls.
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Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
ANTI-ISRAEL DEMONSTRATION: A
demonstrator burns a replica of the flag of
Israel last Thursday (Feb. 26) in front of the
Cairo Bar Association. The demonstration
in Jerusalem from a visit with President
AP/Wide World Photo
Reagan in Washington fuming over Peres' in-
itiative. Peres' visit with President Hosni
Mubarak was his first since he came to Alex-
andria last September.
15 Iranian Immigrants Study Course in Farsi
NEW YORK (JTA) Fifteen
of the 40 Iranian immigrants who
are undergraduates at Yeshiva
University here are taking what is
considered the only university-
level Jewish studies
North America
course in
taught in Farsi,
the native language of Iran.
The course on Sephardic
religious laws and customs is of-
fered in Farsi "because we feel
these students should learn about
their own customs in their own
idiom," explained Rabbi M. Mit-
Contact
HADASSAH
W|LLS & BEQUESTS
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p1one: (212)303-8062
Amos and Avraham are blind,
but they can now see clearly into
their futures.
That's because they enrolled in
the Hadassah Community College,
Israel's only institution of higher
learning to train blind as well
as sighted students in computer
sciences. Here they found
advanced technology in a warm
and open environment.
Amos searched five years for a
computer programming course
which would accept him and
was advised to find a less demand-
ing profession. Today he is a
computer programmer for the police.
Avraham, one of 14 children,
must help support the family. Despite
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find employment. When he
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Because Hadassaha pioneer
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To assure career education for
the future, participate in Hadassah's
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Inquire today about providing a
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chell Serels, associate director of
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Sephardic Studies at the
university.
The lecturer is Nader Fayazi,
22, a native of Iran who grew up
in Detroit and studies at Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan Seminary.
Barbie Trial Scheduled Again
This Time for May 11
PARIS (JTA) Klaus
Barbie, "the Butcher of
Lyon", will go on trial May
11 in that same city which
he ruled and terrorized as
Gestapo chief during the
German occupation of
France in World War II. He
is charged with war crimes
and crimes against
humanity.
Barbie has been confined to a
maximum security prison, St. Luc
Fort, in Lyon since he was taken
into French custody after his
ouster from Bolivia in February
1983. Over the past four years,
several dates have been set for his
trial, only to be postponed as pro-
secution and defense lawyers
sifted through thousands of
documents and battled over legal
technicalities.
A TURNING point occurred
last year, when the Supreme
Court ruled that crimes commit-
ted against resistance fighters
could be considered crimes
against humanity, not subject to
the 20-year statute of limitations.
Barbie is held responsible for
the murder of a French resistance
leader as well as for the deporta-
tion to death camps of 894 Lyon
civilians, most of them Jews, in-
cluding more than 100 children.
A special courtroom is being
enlarged in preparation for the
trial. It will accommodate
lawyers, the media, more than 100
individuals who have filed private
charges against Barbie and an
estimated 700 spectators. Police
said stringent security measures
would be taken during the trial.
Only people with passes will be ad-
mitted to the courtroom.
BARBIE WILL be defended by
Jacques Verges. He is presently
defending Lebanese terrorist
George Ibrahim Abdullah, who is
on trial in Paris for mastermin-
ding the 1984 murders of Israeli
diplomat Yaakov Barsimantov
and Col. Charles Ray, who was
deputy military attache at the
U.S. Embassy in Paris.
Druze Hope for Golan Return
Continued from Page 9-A
those concerns.
The pro-Syrian demonstrations
are seen in some Israeli quarters
as a hedge against the possibility
that the Golan, or part of it, may
one day be returned to Syria.
Israelis who insist that the Golan
is an eternal part of Israel say that
if Israel makes the Heights non-
negotiable as it has East
Jerusalem, the Anti-Israel mood
among the Druze will change.
Meanwhile, Druze Knesset
member Zeidan Atashe of the op-
position Shinui Party blamed the
police presence for the violence at
Majdal Shams.
ALTHOUGH THE Heights are
an integral part of Israel with a
different legal status than the ad-
ministered territories, the policy
there remains the same as in the
territories. Political demonstra-
tions likely to incite the population
are forbidden.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
South African Jews Called 'Sick'
By Johannesburg Rabbi
Continued from Page 5-A
based on economics indicate the
very premise upon which they
predicate black people."
Of Suzman's opposition to
disvestments. Issacson said, "If
anyone is wrecking the South
African economy, it is the white
regime that doesn't want to
change. Suzman is part of the
system that has brought this
about.
"I OFTEN say that people vote
for Helen Suzman, but in their
hearts pray that (President
Pieter) Botha wins. These are the
people who are most adamant
about my stand and who hate Des-
mond Tutu. As if without Tutu,
South Africa would be a heavenly
paradise.
While Issacson and Mokgoebo
said they are concentrating on
cessation of trade and arms sup-
plies to South Africa from the
U.S., West Germany, France, the
United Kingdom and Japan, they
were critical of what Issacson call-
ed "the horrendous military rela-
tionship" between South Africa
and Israel.
The exact nature of Israel's
military relationship with South
Africa is a well-kept secret, but
Israeli military officials have said
that it involves hundreds, if not,
thousands of jobs in Israeli
military industries and several
hundred million dollars in
earnings.
ISRAEL'S COMMERCIAL
trade with South Africa is quite
tiny, especially compared to that
of the United States or Western
Europe. In 1985, for instance,
Israel imported about $100 million
worth of goods from South Africa
and exported about $44 million, or
one percent of Israel's total
exports.
"Any country that gives our
enemies the power to destroy peo-
ple will not be seen in a good
Report Says Yes
light," said Mokgoebo. "Any
meaningful relationship with that
country in the future will depend
on what that country did during
this period of crisis. If Israel is
judged by the teachings of its own
tradition of justice and peace,
then it is worthy of criticism."
Issacson acknowledged that
criticism of Israel for this trade
has often been unfair, especially
since African or Arab nations
often have larger trade. "But the
sort of aid that Israel gives is
perceived aid," he said. "Oil ar-
rives secretly in South Africa. But
you do see the Gabriel missiles
and the torpedo boats that come
from Israel. And you do see the
riot equipment made in Israel.
And you see it being used, too."
A STRANGER in his own land,
Issacson has virtually been excom-
municated from the Jewish
establishment of South Africa. A
few weeks ago, an editorial in the
Jewish Times of South Africa tag-
ged him "a Nazi Jew-baiter." For
nine years, he has not been invited
to speak at a public Jewish plat-
form in South Africa (other than
his own congregation).
But the rabbi has surely found a
home among the 28 million blacks
of his country. As Issacson and
Mokgoebo were frying to the
United States a few weeks ago,
Mokgoebo, sitting in the seat next
to Issacson, stared chuckling. Tur-
ning to him, Issacson asked what
was so funny.
"I can see what will happen in
the end," said Mokgoebo. "There
will be a black majority govern-
ment and the Jewish leadership
will make a call on the new
government. And the new black
leaders will say, "Tell me
something. Where were you? Dur-
ing all those years, where were
you?"
"And the Jews will say, "What
are you talking about? We had
Issacson.' "
Can Israel's A-Power Wipe
Out Major Mideast Cities?
Continued from Page 1-A
warhead.
ISRAEL HAS declared that it
"will not be the first to introduce
nuclear weapons in the Middle
East," a statement repeated by
Premier Yitzhak Shamir during
his recent trip to Washington.
Israel continued its nuclear
buildup while the U.S. "at least
partially aware of the direction of
events, turned a blind eye." Spec-
tor writes. State Department
spokesman Charles Redman
refused to comment during a
press conference about Spector's
assertions.
Three other Middle Eastern
countries, Libya, Iran and Iraq,
have long been interested in ac-
quiring nuclear weapons, but
made little progress towards
Policeman
Wounds Girl
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli policeman wounded a
16-year-old Palestinian girl in the
leg when he opened fire on a
crowd after his vehicle was stoned
in the Gaza Strip town of Khan
Yunis last week. The policeman
said he fired into the air to
disperse the stone-throwers and
then fired at their feet.
The incident was the latest in
the wave of unrest that has swept
the Gaza Strip and West Bank.
nuclear arming last year, accor-
ding to the report.
Libyan leader Muammar
Khadafy's interest in obtaining
nuclear weapons has been
thwarted by a 1983 global em-
bargo on nuclear transfers to
Libya, says the report.
"ALTHOUGH Tripoli has turn-
ed to clandestine nuclear dealings
in the past, it remains unlikely
that Libya will be able to obtain
nuclear arms or nuclear-weapons
material by that means because
such commodities remain
unavailable." Spector writes.
Iraq's nuclear program is at
"standstill" as a result of the
destruction of its reactor by Israel
in 1981. declining oil revenues and
the costs of its war with Iran, the
report states.
Iran has "extensive nuclear
hardware, materials and
technology" that had been built
up by the Shah, although it has
made no recent progress in its
nuclear program, Spector notes.
But Iran's "nuclear activities pose
a future proliferation threat and
deserve to be monitored."
Pakistan made considerable
progress in its nuclear activities in
1986 so "it is at a nuclear-
weapons threshold: it either
possesses all of the components
needed to manufacture one or
several atom bombs or else just re-
mains short of this goal," Spector
writes. But the U.S. and Soviet
Union may prevent Pakistan from
conducting a nuclear test, he
adds.
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A group of pro-Yasir Arafat youth
demonstrate in Gaza in a week of violence
there and in the West Bank. They raise V-for-
victory symbols against Shiite militiamen
M
AP/Wide World Photo
fighting Palestinians in refugee camps in
Lebanon. The youths hold up a photo ofPLO
chairman Arafat.
Jews Not a Race
But Vandalism Is Racist Act
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
I- The lawyer for a subur-
ban Washington synagogue
Ithat had been desecrated
[argued before the United
States Supreme Court last
Wednesday (Feb. 25) that
while Jews cannot be con-
sidered a race, the van-
dalism was a racist act.
h/utricia Brannan, a
[Washington lawyer, said that the
lPit men who sprayed swastikas
PM anti-Semitic slogans on the
Pure Tefila Congregation
synagogue in Silver Spring, Md.,
In Nov. l, 1982, acted because
|SnSidered Jews to be non-
However Deborah Garren, a
pnnm lawyer representing
U of the vandals, claimed that
EJ! act was one of religious
E22W9 [t was not ract as
|med by federal civil rights laws
Squadron
Appointed
l25 WRK (JTA) _
K ,n\Uadron has been ap-
llewish tLf.Major American
Bft**'l national
BSTbJ &* 40th an-
BrfT^ is a former
eHratinn ne Conference. The
adopted in 1866.
SHAARE TEFILA, a Conser
vative congregation, was defaced
with swastikas and other Nazi
symbols and such slogans as
"Death to the Jude."
Eight persons were later ar-
rested for the vandalism and two
of them were convicted of damag-
ing the synagogue. The
synagogue filed a suit in federal
court against all eight charging
that the congregation's civil
rights had been violated.
The suit seeks $3,000 to cover
the cost of repainting the
synagogue's walls with any other
money awarded going to the Mon-
tgomery County Human Relations
Commission. The synagogue is in
Montgomery County, which
borders Washington.
However, the Fourth U.S. Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals in Rich-
mond, Va., rejected the suit in a
2-1 decision which said Jews could
not use the civil rights law for pro-
tection, as they were not a
separate non-white race.
AT THE same time, the U.S.
Court of Appeals in Philadelphia
ruled that Majid Ghaidan Al-
Khazraji, an Iraqi-born professor,
could sue under the 1866 acts over
his charge that St. Francis Col-
lege in Pennsylvania denied him
tenure because he was an Arab.
His case was also heard before the
Supreme Court Wednesday.
Brannan, the synagogue's
lawyer, argued that the intent of
the law was to bar racist acts.
While she stressed that she did
not want the Supreme Court or
any other court to rule on whether
Jews were a race, she said that
the ideology of the Nazis in Ger-
many and neo-Nazis and groups
like the Ku Klux Klan in the U.S.
is that Jews were non-whites.
She said this was the belief of
the vandals and that their intent
was racist.
Brannan is a member of the law
firm of Hogan Hartson, which is
co-counsel in the suit with the
Jewish Advocacy Center, a non-
profit group founded to bring
legal action against those commit-
ting anti-Semitic acts.
KENNETH LIPSON, a co
founder of the Jewish Advocacy
Center, told reporters after the
hearing, that the purpose of the
suit was to send a "clear message
that anti-Semitic violence would
not be tolerated."
Rabbi Martin Halpern, the con-
gregation's religious leader,
stressed that "our generation has
been traumatized by the
Holocaust, which has taught us
that silence is not the answer to
bigotry When one human be-
ing or one institution suffers
debasement, then we debase all of
the human family."
Brannan told reporters that she
was particularly pleased that the
congregation's appeal to the
Supreme Court had been joined by
groups such as the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, the NAACP Legal Defense
and Educational Fund, the Inter-
national Network of Children of
Holocaust Survivors and the
American Gathering and Federa-
tion of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors.
A decision is not expected for
several months.
Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
The 'Jewish Machine': It Was
Never A Dodge or Ford
Continued from Page 4-A
(remember floorboards?) and on a
rainy road you had to lift your feet
or get wet.
SHORTLY AFTER the war,
the Lincoln was finally, after nine
years of magnificent service,
given a decent burial. The boom
years of the late forties and fifties
began. Suddenly there were plen-
ty of cars. The emerging Jewish
middle class began its march on
the suburbs and bought cars to fill
the new garages.
Now it was no longer "The
Machine." And everyone had at
least one. Sons drove, daughters
drove. My grandmother did not
drive. Her function was to ride
like a queen in the front seat of
many cars now and be driven by
the family as before. My mother
does not drive either. She won't
even sit in the front seat. If you
drove with my dad in his younger
days, you'd understand that.
As cars became more common
to every family, the mystique
changed. "The Machine" was in
its way the embodiment of all the
wonder of America to the genera-
tion of immigrants and the
generation that followed them. It
was this second generation that
made the automobile an icon of a
rising society.
TODAY? Well, most driveways
boast two to three cars. Jewish
princesses have little 16-thousand
dollar BMW's with vanity license
plates which proclaim: "Sheila's
Toy." The Jewish mother drives.
Oh boy, does she drive! She logs
more miles in a yearly car pool
than my Uncle Henry did shlepp-
ing my grandmother around for
ten years.
The ads on TV no longer talk
about "touring cars" or
"roadsters." The sports cars are
magnificently styled and no doubt
perform better than those huge
monsters of days gone by, but I
don't know.
I really miss the majesty of
those things. Over the years, cer-
tain cars have been stamped with
the symbol of Jewish ownership.
Right after the war and for many
years afterward, the symbol of af-
fluence for a Jewish family was of
course, the Cadillac.
Well, not everyone could afford
a Cadillac. So, Buick also took its
place as a "Jewish" car. A Dodge?
Never. Nor a DeSoto. Certain
cars were Jewish, certain ones
were not. Yes to Cadillac, Buick,
even Chevrolet. No to Dodge,
Chrysler. Packard and LaSalle.
And certainly no to Ford.
MY, MY. No to Ford? Why not?
Well, I don't know if you
remember, but Henry Ford Sr.
was a virulent anti-Semite. So, of
course no Fords for Jews. Funny
when you consider the preeminent
symbol of Jewish affluence for the
eighties. You got it friend. The M
word.
Well, today's cars may be more
roadworthy, better on gas and
safer than those of a generation
gone by, but I want to tell you
there can never again be that feel-
ing of pride, of wonderment, of
adventure as when my grand-
mother would announce to all of
us that this Sunday we would all
ride to Atlantic City in "The
Machine."
Charismatic Protestant Church
Will Appeal Ruling in Philly
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) The New Life Church, a
charismatic Protestant church that has attracted the ire of
neighboring Jews here, will appeal a Philadelphia Zoning
Board denial of a zoning variance for the church's
sanctuary.
THE CHURCH'S attorney, Jeffrey Lowenthal, said
the board ruled on unreliable evidence and that it voted in
closed session, which may be in violation of state law.
The city Bureau of Licenses and Inspections has per-
mitted the church's Sunday school and office to function in
a converted adult movie theater in a suburban shopping
center. The center is zoned commercial. About 70 local
residents, many of them Jewish, protested the church's re-
quest for the variance on Dec. 18.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Shamir Vows
Yordim Must Be Enticed Back to Life in Israel
By ANDREW MUCHIN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The business of government
was not Israeli Premier Yit-
zhak Shamir's only reason
for visiting the United
States last week. He also
came with Jewish concerns.
And as of Monday morning
(Feb. 23), when he met with a
dozen editors of the Jewish press
at the Regency Hotel here,
Shamir said he had found willing
listeners to his worries about
Israelis and Soviet Jews going to
live in the United States and the
various branches of Judaism go-
ing at each other. "Since the last
year I have tried to concentrate
my efforts on Jewish problems."
he explained.
THE PREMIER said he of
fered to 1,200 yordim (Israeli
emigrants) he spoke to Sunday in
Encino, Calif., the services of the
Absorption Ministry to help them
find jobs and housing in Israel and
cope with personal problems.
"It was a start of a campaign,"
he said. "It will not be the only
meeting." He asserted that he
hoped yordim could establish
ongoing contact with Israeli con-
sulates, which are working with
the Jewish Agency.
Several hundred thousand
Israelis are thought to live outside
Israel. "We would like to get them
back if not the parents, then the
children," Shamir said.
He contended that living outside
Israel was most painful for the
children, who are uprooted from
their native language and culture.
Moreover, he claimed that many
of the yordim of all ages would
have a better lifestyle in Israel, as
they're not doing so well financial-
ly in the United States and since
the Israeli economy is on the
rebound.
HE ADMITTED that Israelis,
even the leaders, used to feel "a
kind of contempt" toward the yor-
dim. "We never spoke directly
with them. Now we have deter-
mined that it's useless to ignore
them."
The Premier also reiterated his
and his government's desire to
have the United States stop gran-
ting refugee status to Soviet
Jewish emigrants. That would
mean all emigres would go direct-
ly to Israel, as their visas indicate.
Shamir made this point publicly in
Washington last week, and the
Israel Bond Drive
Targets Synagogues
NEW YORK (JTA) The
State of Israel Bonds campaign
will target synagogues nationwide
during Purirr (March 15 and 16) to
encourage reinvestment of bonds
purchased during the 1973 war.
In other Bonds news, 90 of the
120 North American rabbis who
participated in a recent rabbinic
tourism mission to Israel have
pledged to lead congregational
groups on visits to Israel this
year. The rabbis so declared at the
end of the four-day conference on
Feb. 10, according to State of
Israel Bonds.
Their trip was organized by
Israel Bonds, the Israeli Ministry
of Tourism and El Al Israel
Airlines in a joint effort to pro-
mote North American Jewish
tourism to Israel.
Finance Minister Moshe Nissim
told the rabbis that 80 percent of
U.S. Jews have never visited
Israel. Following the first rabbinic
tourism mission early last year,
North American rabbis organized
and led 113 congregational trips
under Bonds' auspices, according
to the organization.
Cabinet echoed him on Sunday.
About 80 percent of the most re-
cent emigres have come first to
the United States and stayed, he
said. To allow this to continue
undermines Israeli efforts on their
behalf, according to Shamir. He
said the Soviet government has
"partially accepted" Israel's
ongoing contention that Jews
have no ethnic place in the USSR
and instead belong in Israel.
FINALLY, the Premier said he
was concerned about "the pro-
blem of the Law of Return and, as
it is defined in Israel and here,
"Who is a Jew?" The laws allow
all Jews citizenship in Israel;
however, certain religious
elements have sought to amend
the law to define Jewishness
religiously. The issue becomes
especially volatile when focused
on non-Orthodox converts to
Judaism.
Shamir recently appointed a
ministerial committee, which he
chairs, to examine solutions to the
issue, and he said he would meet
with leaders of American Conser-
vative, Orthodox and Reform
Judaism and invite them to make
suggestions to the committee.
In response to questions, ft.
Premier downplayed the dif
ferences between himself and fa
Reagan Administration on tk
prospect of an international eon
Middle East. ^
HE DIDN'T indicate if hj.
disagreement over the conference
with Foreign Minister Shimo
Peres could rupture the Labor
Likud government, as he did later
to another group of journalists.
As for the Lavi, Israel's %hter
plane that the Pentagon wants to
discontinue because of cost
estimates that exceed Israel's
Shamir said, "I think we will find
another solution together with the
American government."
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InU.S.
Shamir Pursued His Jewish Agenda
Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
By YITZHAK RABI
MEW YORK (JTA) r
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
wound up his officia1 visit.to
the U.S. Tuesday (Feb. 24)
with summations of the ma-
jor issues of concern to
Israel and world Jewry that
engaged him during the
past 10 days here, and the
possible government crisis
facing him when he return-
ed home Wedneday (Feb.
25).
His last 48 hours in the country
were packed with literally end-to-
end meetings with national and
local Jewish community leaders
Jewish vouth. educators and
religious'leaders. He addressed
himself repeatedly to the subject
of Soviet Jews who immigrate to
the United States rather than to
Israel. And, mainly in response to
the persistent questions of
reporters, he spoke frankly of the
serious rift between himself and
Vice Premier/Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres over an interna-
tional peace conference for the
Middle East to which Shamir is
adamantly opposed.
HE HINTED, on more than one
occasion, that if not resolved, that
issue may well bring down the
Labor-Likud unity coalition
government.
Shamir spoke before the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations-
here Monday afternoon (Feb. 23).
On Monday night, he addressed
1,500 young leaders of the New
York Jewish community at
Hunter College.
He described to both audiences
his meetings in Washington with
President Reagan and other top
administration officials, and spoke
in glowing terms of the state of
U.S.-Israel relations. It is "great,
close and very friendly," Shamir
declared.
He disclosed that he told
Reagan at their White House
meeting that, contrary to some
reports, the U.S. has not lost
prestige in the Middle East and is
still the most important factor in
that region.
"THE ARABS know that
without the U.S. nothing could be
achieved in the Middle East," the
Premier declared. He said he
assured the President that the
U.S. enjoys the confidence of
Israel and most of the Arab na-
tions. "I think that the Ad-
ministration accepted my ap-
proach and my assessment" of the
Middle East situation, Shamir told
his audiences in New York.
He acknowledged that the Ad-
ministration takes a different
view on an international con-
ference, but said he found many
reservations in official
Washington toward such a forum
in which the Soviet Union would
most likely participate. He stress-
ed that in his opinion there is only
one way to achieve peace for the
Middle East direct negotia-
tions. "The U.S. will go for an in-
ternational peace conference as a
way of bringing about direct talks
between the parties," Shamir
said.
The issue has divided the Israeli
government. Peres advocates
Israel's participation in such a
conclave. In a briefing for Israeli
journalists Tuesday, Shamir in-
directly accused the Foreign
Minister of violating government
guidelines.
"There have been and there are
different opinions between the
two parties (Labor and Likud)
which make up the government,"
Shamir said. "In order to over-
come that problem, we have basic
guidelines of the unity govern-
ment. If there are crises in the
government, it is because so-
meone is not adhering to the
guidelines."
HE SAID he knew of Peres'
visit to Cairo, beginning Wednes-
day (Feb. 25), to meet with Egyp-
tian President Hosni Mubarak.
But nobody can impose a position
that is not accepted by the
Cabinet and the Knesset, Shamir
declared. He indicated that if a
crisis arises and is not solved,
there is a possibility of new elec-
tions in Israel.
Shamir also spoke to Soviet
Jewry activists and other com-
munity leaders here Tuesday. He
is reported to have said that
Soviet Jews who leave the USSR
with visas for Israel but go instead
to the U.S. "deceive" not only the
Soviet government but the Israeli
government.
He said the Soviets have in-
dicated they are thus reluctant to
increase Jewish emigration. He
said he had pressed the Ad-
ministration in Washington to
stop granting the special refugee
status to Soviet Jewish im-
migrants which enables them to
come to the U.S. instead of Israel.
THE MEETING was closed to
the press. But several Jewish
leaders who attended said after-
wards that they disagreed with
Shamir's approach to the issue.
At a meeting with 70 Jewish
educators here Tuesday, Shamir
observed that only 50 percent of
American Jewish school-age
children receive any kind of a
Jewish education. "Jewish educa-
tion makes a difference in the
future of the Jewish people," he
said. "The only way to save our
people is by providing them with a
Jewish education."
Shamir warned that the lack of
Jewish education "is a cultural
disaster. We are going to lose
more Jews because of it than we
lost in the Holocaust." He cited in-
termarriage, assimilation and the
influence of other religions and
cults on many Jews as possible
consequences.
Shamir urged American Jews to
come to Israel on aliya. He called
specifically on Reform and Con-
servative Jews who complain of
discrimination in Israel to live in
Israel. There they can influence
the decisions of the Knesset and
government and participate in
Israel's political life, he noted.
SHAMIR was scheduled to
meet late Tuesday afternoon with
leaders of Reform, Conservative
and Orthodox Judaism to discuss
such issues as "Who is a Jew?"
and the Law of Return.
Later in the evening, he was to
address businessmen at a meeting
of the New York Economic Club.
He left on his return flight to
Israel sometime after midnight.
EEC Endorses Mideast Peace
Talks Under UN Auspices
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) An in-
ternational conference for Middle
tast peace was endorsed in prin-
ciple Monday (Feb. 24) by the 12
member-states of the European
Economic Community. It was the
rst formal statement of support
'or such a conference by the EEC
foreign Ministers, meeting here
under the chairmanship of Belgian
"reign Minister Leo Tindemans,
current president of the EEC
Council of Ministers.
The statement did not address
m form or composition of such a
fiergh Elected
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
mil a" I)en Ber?h. a Labor
XT uf Parliament, has been
t !i ,^hairman of the Interna-
BJ^/arliarnentary Union on
SfMf Soviet Jews. He suc-
J^Nora Salmons.
conference, but suggested it be
held under United Nations
auspices with the participation of
the parties concerned and any
other parties that could make a
positive contribution to peace in
the Middle East and the region's
economic and social development.
Tindemans disclosed that he
received a message from the
Soviet Union last week outlining
its position on an international
conference. He did not divulge the
contents, but said he would con-
vey the EEC's position verbally to
the Soviet Ambassador in
Brussels.
The EEC statement said an in-
ternational conference should pro-
vide a suitable framework for the
necessary negotiations between
the disputing parties and that it
was prepared to contribute, both
as an international body and as in-
dividual states, to bringing closer
the positions of the parties
concerned.
AP/Wide World Photo
Never Mind He Was Hitler Youth
NOT RESIGNING: Newly-appointed White House Communica-
tions director, John Koehler, speaks at a Washington news con-
ference, during which he said that he has no intention of resigning
and expressed surprise that the Administration did not previous-
ly know of his childhood membership in a Nazi youth organiza-
tion.
~s/'.
fm^
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Page 14-A JTheJewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
<
He and Grandma didn't have many rooms.
But every one was a guest room.
When another Jew was just off the boat or
out of work, he opened his heart and his door.
Your grandparents may not be around any-
more, but homeless Jews still are. Thousands of
Jews in 32 countries are living in fear or hunger
or both.
Hundreds of Jews in Israel, too old and
weak to live by themselves, are on waiting lists
for homes for the elderly.
They need more man a cot in Grandma's
kitchen or a blanket on Grandpa's couch. And
thisyear, we may be hard pressed to provide it
Because in spite of some very generous gifts
to the Jewish Federation, the average pledge
would barely cover one night in a decent motel
You don't have to put up anyone in your
family room or dining room But when the
Federation volunteer calk, please open your
checkbwktheway Grandpa opened his door.
He cant do it for you
Now it's your turn.
1
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137


She's Back In Force
Sexual Revolution, Fear Of AIDS,
Make Time Ripe For Matchmaker
HI*
B ALISA KWITNEY
jewdh Florida* Staff Writer
I Now that the weary war-
Lors of the sexual revolu-
tion are suffering from the
battle fatigue of too many
Ueles' bars and the shell-
khock of AIDS, the time is
Hpe for the return of the
matchmaker.
Bobbi Heiman is a modern mat-
thmaker who runs a service called
introductions." Strong minded
knd outspoken about her opinions,
Cr training as a social worker has
Llped Heiman become an atten-
tve and retentive listener.
"My forte is remembering what
.eoplesay," states Heiman. "Sud-
lenly something a person says
Ml remind me of someone else
tho said that they were looking
br that sort of person.
"BUT PEOPLE don't always
bow what they want," adds
Heiman with a smile. "We look
br the difference in personalities,
thich is often the basis for the
exual attraction, but it's the
imeness of values and interests
Chich keeps people together."
] Heiman, who has two cats and a
ge black poodle, met her hus-
nd. from whom she is now
|vorced, at the age of 15 at Miami
each High. They married six
pars later, after Heiman was
fleased from the tuberculosis
pspital where she had spent two
ears.
| "I was a typical partner of a
an in the 1950's," says Heiman
[ her 14-year marriage. "My job
as to keep a lovely home, take
ire of the children and entertain,
lit don't get me wrong. I was
) ["But coming from a long line of
dependent women, I had strong
opinions, and my husband needed
more of a follower."
YET HEIMAN would not have
chosen the path of divorce herself.
"I couldn't see myself adjusting
to another person. Now people
say, 'you're in the business of mat-
ching people, so why can't you
find anybody?'
"But when you sit across from
someone looking for certain,
specific things in a woman, they
become like a neuter gender for
me.
"Listening to people talk about
their relationships are all I do all
day," says Heiman, "and I get
jaded from hearing stories from
clients which are not too
positive."
ANOTHER THING which
Heiman has learned from her
clients is to be extremely cautious
about revealing her age.
"I hear men calling all the time,
asking for a woman who is bet-
ween this age and that age. The
only thing that they respect is
youth."
Besides youth, what else do men
look for in a woman? Just what
your mother always warned you
about, according to Heiman.
"Men think with their genitals
when they're attracted," Heiman
says bluntly. "A man might say
'I'm only attracted to women with
long legs.' And that's what I'll
give hime long legs.
"Men tend to think first about
the physical attraction, and they
usually have a particular physical
type in mind."
AND WHAT are women look-
ing for?
"At the very base, most women
are looking to get married and
have children," says Heiman, as
generations of matchmakers have
said before her. "But with a man
who will accept her career," she
adds.
Finding that man may not be
easy, warns Heiman.
"If a woman gets married and
has children, most men seem to
think that it's up to her to juggle
her career, his needs, and the
needs of the children."
Heiman contends that in the
realpolitik of dating, "Women
might have to give up their
careers for a period of time" or
hire someone to help at home with
the children, if they want to have
it all.
"Men don't really want very ag-
gressive women," contends
Heiman, "except maybe as
business partners. If women are
looking to get married, they need
to unlearn the brainwashing of the
1960's and learn what men are
really looking for."
THE CHILDREN of the sexual
revolution and inheritors of the
legacy of the Women's Liberation
movement, now women in their
30's, "don't know how to act with
men, what's attractive to them,"
states Heiman.
Heiman also says that she
believes that "Men have more of a
need for women than women do
for men, because women have
other women friends as a support
system. For a man, the woman is
his support system." Which is
why, according to Heiman, many
men are intolerant when the
woman's career interferes with
his needs.
"Love and sex are so interm-
ingled for a woman men have
more of an ability to separate
them," says Heiman. "My obser-
Continued on Page 20-B
Community
Friday, March 6, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
Bobbi Heiman
Cornelia Sadat
lia Sadat
*
The Missing Link
Page 2-B
CJA Shabbat
Page 3-B
'Very Pleased To Be My Father's Daughter'
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
It seems fitting that
Camelia Sadat, daughter of
the late President of Egypt
Anwar Sadat, should speak
at a banquet held by the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, side by side
with Alice Golembo, grand-
niece of the late Golda Meir.
After all, it was Sadat's father
who, with his visit to Jerusalem in
1977. first bridged the distance
that war and politics had created
between Israel and Egypt.
Sadat, speaking at the Queen of
Hearts Banquet honoring
volunteers of the Women's Divi-
sion, said that she was "very
pleased to be my father's
daughter."
SHE SPOKE of her father's
career as a soldier and journalist,
and of how, as president, one of
his first acts was to release
political prisoners, among them
the Moslem Brotherhood, the
group who later assasinated him.
Of the 1973 Yom Kippur War,
which the Egyptians refer to as
the October War, Sadat said that
"It restored Arab pride after the
1967 defeat." That war was the
foundation for later peace, con-
tended Sadat.
"The Moslem religion is
misrepresented as a violent
religion," she continued. Sadat
has a Master's degree in corn-
Continued on Page 16-B
Organized By B'nai B'rith
Local Soviet Rally
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The winds of freedom blew
gently on a sunny day at the
Dade County Courthouse,
marking an obvious contrast
to the pictures of Soviet
Jews behind bars who are
imprisoned and not allowed
to leave the Soviet Union.
The rally for Soviet Jewry in
two Dade County locations last
week took place at the same time
similar rallies were being held in
43 nations around the world. At
the rallies, organized by B'nai
B'rith International, the names of
400,000 refuseniks were read
aloud.
"Till all men are free, no man is
free," said speaker William F.
Saulson. "We stand here on the
courthouse steps and can stand
here looking at the signs of the
freeist land of the world."
ALTHOUGH THE crowd at the
courthosue rally was rather small,
many passerby stopped to hear
Continued on Page 5-B
Wedding Section
Page 7-B
Synagogue Listing
Page 12-B
Obituaries
Page 16-B
d


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Aley Sheer Finds
'The Missing Link'
What began as an experiment in
Rabbi Leon Kronish's confirma-
tion program at Temple Beth
Sholom on Miami beach is rapidly
becoming the hottest 'new item'
in Jewish education, and a veteran
South Florida youth worker has
been receiving standing ovations
across the country.
The concept is called "Rock 'n
Roll Religion," and it is the brain-
child of Aley Sheer, a talented
musician, currently youth director
of Temple Beth Shalom
(Hollywood), and director of Camp
Fire, the summer camp of the
Deed Club Children's Cancer
Clinic.
"Rock 'n Roll 'n Religion (RRR)
uses Rock music and lyrics as
religious education and as trig-
gers for a myriad of activities and
lessons.
SHEER HAS researched and
catalogued hundreds of songs by
over 100 major Rock artists. In
RRR, Rock voices join an eternal
chorus of teachers, poets and
writers.
"Rock 'n Roll has gotten some
bad press of late," says Sheer,
"but the truth is that the best of
Rock reflects the highest inspira-
tions and aspirations of our
culture of humankind. It puts
ancient beliefs in a modem light,
and the kids just eat it up."
Not content with just serving up
other people's music, Aley has
composed some of his own. the
collision of his talent and com-
mitments has led him to write and
record an RRR concept album,
"The Missing Link." The first
record of its kind, eight songs ad-
dress religious concerns which are
expanded on in a 12-page booklet
enclosed inside the album.
Containing many of the
elements of RRR curriculum,
"The Missing Link" is "state of
the art Jewish education
creative, relevant and contem-
porary," says Aley.
A UNIQUE programming
resource for teachers and youth
workers, it is also a tool for expos-
ing unaffiliated young people to
Jewish ideas and ideals in an
entertaining, familiar format.
Taking the project one step fur-
ther, Sheer has created multi-
media presentations which syn-
chronize video, slides and film
with his music, characterizations
and lectures. A recent trip to New
York resulted in his being signed
and promoted nationally by the
JWB Lecture Bureau.During one
week in December, Aley spoke to
750 teens at engagements in
Miami, Orlando, Ocala, Denver,
Austin and New Orleans. He has
spoken to national conventions of
directors of Bureaus of Jewish
Education and to directors of
Jewish Summer Camps.
Bookings in the next few mon-
ths will take him to Toronto,
Dallas, Nashville, Indianapolis,
Washington and Atlanta. This
coming summer, Sheer will do a
coast-tc-coast tour of Jewish sum-
mer camps, and is considering ad-
ding Israel to his itinerary.
Aley's video for the song "The
Valley of Tears" is being shown
regularly on Jewish Federation
Cable Television (JFTV), and the
single from the album, "Tame the
Flames," has received radio
airplay in Miami, Denver and on
"the Voice of Peace" radio in the
Middle East.
TWO NEW Videos are in the
works, and Aley says, "I expect
we will perform live eventually,
but for now I'm very happy doing
what I'm doing. When people ask
me why I don't play clubs, I tell
them I prefer mitzvahs to bars."
Sheer dedicated "The Missing
Link" to "my two strongest in-
fluences," Rabbi Kronish and Elie
Wiesel.
Academy Women And PTA
To Honor Dahlia Lipner
Members of the Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Women and PTA will honor
Dahlia Lipner, an Academy
parent who serves as president of
the Hebrew Academy Women, a
fund raising auxiliary arm of the
school, at the organization's an-
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Dahlia Lipner
nual Binyan Brick luncheon on
Wednesday, March 26, 11:30 a.m.
at the Biacayne Bay Marriott
Hotel.
Chairperson of the day, Ahuva
Retter, has explained that the
theme and decor of the after-
noon's luncheon honoring Dahlia
will be baaed upon the prophetic
vision of the Prophet Ezkeil who
describes the Dahlia as a beautiful
protective flower: "In the
shaodow of the Dahlia shall they
dwell." (17:21).
The Binyan Brick luncheon is an
annual event at which time tribute
is paid to those members and
friends of the Hebrew Academy
Women who have raised or given
gifts to the building fund of the
school through their Binyan
Banks.
Besides her duties as president
of the Hebrew Academy Women,
Dahlia Lipner serves on the Board
of Directors and Executive Com-
mittee of the school. She is a
former vice president of the PTA
of the Lehrman Day School amd is
active and well known in many
religious and cultural groups in
the Greater Miami Area, including
Hadassah and the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women.
NMB
Lakefront 1 Br. 1 y, Bth, paneled
Fla. Rm. Fully fum Mirror* Fans
Ceramic Tile. Synagogue on
Pramlaee. Low SCa. 662-1527.
Rock 'n Roll musician Aley Sheer (center) is shown with Rabbi.
Leon Kronish of Temple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach (left), and
Nobel Peace Prize-winner Elie Wiesel, to both of whom Sheer has
dedicated his 'Missing Link' album. Sheer is youth director of
Hollywood's Temple Beth Shalom.
NASSAU GARDENS
1 Bedroom Adult Apt.
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North Miami Beach
947-9163
Not since the matzo ball has
something so tiny made it so big.
Is Tetleys liny little tea leaves They've been making it big m
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chops and tmy peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
rue tor tea leaves So for rich, refreshing flavor, take time out
tor Tetley tea Because tiny is tastier1
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"Tiny is tattirr"


Local Leader Heads National
Super Sunday Campaign
Michael Adler, a board member
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and chairman of
Federation's Summit Division is
the national chairman of the 1987
United Jewish Appeal Super
Sunday.
According to Adler approx-
imately 150 U.S. communities will
participate in the United Jewish
Appeal's seventh annual
telephone marathon.
Super Sunday, in Miami and
across the country, is a day when
thousands of Jews take to the
telephones to call other Jews in
the community asking for their
support of the campaign.
"Here in Miami, there are over
50 000 Jews that we will try to
reach. We'll need almost 2,000
volunteers making telephone calls
to accomplish this task," said
Sabv Behar. chairman of Super
Sunday for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
"Locally, our campaign has a
goal of $21,750,000. We're more
than half way there and Super
Sunday will allow us to make
great strides to reaching that
goal,'' he added.
Last year, according to Adler,
nearly 40.000 volunteers par-
ticipated in 151 U.S. communities
raising over $40 million.
"Super Sunday raises more
than just funds. It raises the con-
sciousness and commitment of
thousands of uninvolved Jews,"
concluded Adler.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will hold its Super
Sunday phonathon on Sunday,
March 22, at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, 137 N.E. 19th
Street, Miami. To volunteer for a
telephone shift call Federation at
576-4000, ext. 215.
Vice chairmen for Super Sun-
day in Miami are Paul Berkowitz,
Judi Billig, Richard Berkowitz,
and Ellen Rose.
Important Israeli institution
SMks lull-time acratary/rcap-
tlonlat. Excellent English typing
essential. Knowledge of Hebrew
and/or Spanish an advantage
though not neceaaary.
Call 532-1499
passover1967
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Come and enjoy delightful
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families at Sefarady Bun-
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on
Michael Adler
Saby Behar
Rabbinical Association
Declares March 6, 7
CJA Shabbat
The Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has
declared March 6 and 7 to be the Combined Jewish Appeal
(CJA) Shabbat. According to Rabbi Carl Klein, president of
the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami and Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, executive vice president, the special Shab-
bat is planned to precede Super Sunday on March 22.
"This year we're asking the members of the Rabbinical
Association to encourage their congregants to participate
in the campaign by making a meaningful gift and offer
their services by volunteering on Sunday, March 22," add-
ed Klein and Schiff. "We are also encouraging them to
organize other fundraising functions to support the CJA."
"In the past we have found the CJA Shabbat an excellent
means for recruiting Super Sunday volunteers."
'Friday, March 6', 198'7/The Jewish Floridian Page3-B
Gittlins Named Chairmen
Of Lehrman Day
School Scholarship Ball
Mr. and Mrs. B. Morton Gittlin
of Bal Harbour have been named
general chairmen of the 19th An-
nual Scholarship Ball of the
Lehrman Day School of Temple
Emanu-El located at 727
Lehrman Lane. The black-tie, din-
ner and dance will be held in the
Friedland Ballroom on Saturday
evening, March 28.
A 7:30 p.m. reception will
precede the 8:30 p.m. dinner-
dance, according to Temple
Emanu-El president Lawrence M.
Schantz. Proceeds from the event
will be used to provide scholarship
assistance for students at the
Hebrew day school named in
honor of Dr. Irving Lehrman, rab-
bi of the congregation since 1943.
Serving as honorary chairmen
of the Scholarship Ball will be
Mrs. Samuel N. Friedland, Mrs.
Alexander Muss, Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Stein and Dr. and Mrs.
George S. Wise.
A goal of 450 scholarships, at
$1,000 each, has been established
for this year's event, according to
Bernice and Mort Gittlin, who
hosted a planning reception for
the Scholarship Ball at their Bal
Harbour home.
That single party raised some
284 scholarships, more than half
of the goal, Schantz announced.
Morton Gittlin
Reservations for the dinner and
dance, always one of the social
highlights of the Jewish communi-
ty calendar, may be made at the
Temple office.
Yiddish Culture Winkle Cultural Activities
"Yiddish Culture Winkle" will
hold their cultural activities pro-
gram on Thursday, March 12,
10:30 a.m. at Temple Ner Tamid.
Professor Arthur Lerner will
lecture on "Gorbachev's
Breakthrough: What This Move
Will Mean to Russia, For Us Jews
and For the World."
Rosa Luski will recite poems,
and Cantor Moshe Buryn will sing
Yiddish, Hebrew and Liturgical
songs accompanied by Sally Glass.
Menasha Feldstein, president,
will be the chairman. Members are
invited to bring friends.
At last theres time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhurried conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
rich, delicious Maxwell House* Coffee. It
couldn't be anything but Sunday morning
K KOSHER
* t9e6 0oe'#'otxKl wrffJtw'
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE:


Page 4-B The Jewish Floiidian/Friday, March 6, 1987
CRC, YLC To Hold A
Special Legislative Forum
Labor leader Danny Rozolio (second from
left), secretary general of Israel's General
Cooperative of Labor and a member of the Ex-
ecutive Bureau of Histadrut, is greeted by
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland (far right)
during a ceremony at the annual meeting of
the AFL-CIO leadership honoring Rozolio's
contributions to the international trade union
movement. Sharing in the tribute to Rozolio
were Uzi Vardy-Zer (far left) president of the
North American Region of Israel's largest
bank. Bank Hapoalim; and Nat Lindenthal
'second from right), vice president of the Trade
Union Department of the bank.
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland Honors
Israeli Labor Leader Danny Rozolio
AFL-CIO President Lane
Kirkland and Secretary-Treasurer
Thomas R. Donahue honored
trade union leader Danny Rozolio,
secretary general of Israel's
General Cooperative of Labor
(Hevrat Ha'Ovdim), during the
annual meeting of the U.S. labor
movement leadership in Bal
Harbour.
Rozolio, who is also a member of
the Executive Bureau of
Histadrut, Israel's General
Federation of Labor, and chair-
man of the Executive Committee
of Haifa University, was feted at a
special reception in his honor on
Feb. 16 at the Sheraton Bal Har-
bour Hotel.
BANK HAPOALIM. Israel's
largest bank with worldwide
assets of over $23 billion, and the
National Committee for Labor
Israel-Histadrut also participated
in paying tribute to Rozolio's long
career.
Kirkland, in noting Rozolio's
role in the Israel labor movement,
said, "The strong relationship bet-
ween the AFL-CIO and Histadrut
represents a long and fruitful
fraternal relationship in providing
needed services to working people
in both countries."
Representing Bank Hapoalim in
honoring Rozolio were L'zi Vardy-
Zer. president of Bank Hapoalim* s
North American Region; Jacob
Elinav. executive vice president
and manager of the New York
Branches: Noam Pintov, senior
vice president: Nat Lindenthal.
vice president. Trade Union
Department and Naomi Brooks,
vice president, marketing.
ATTENDING ON behalf of the
National Committee for Labor
Israel-Histadrut was Eliezer
Rafaeli. executive vice president
Chevra Kadisha
Marks 12th Year
The 12th Annual Dinner of the
Chevra Kadisha of Toras Ernes
Academy of Miami will be held
Sunday at 7 p.m. at Congregation
Shaaray Tefilah in North Miami
Beach.
Rabbi Dov Bidnick, chairman of
the dinner, noted that the event
comes on the heels of a special lec-
ture given to the Chevra Kadisha
by Rabbi Elchonon Zohn of New
York. The day will also serve as a
welcome to new members and
memorial to those departed, who
the Chevra Kadisha assisted this
past year.
and the North American
representative of Histadrut.
Bank Hapoalim, now one of the
100 largest banking institutions in
the world, was founded as the
commercial banking affiliate of
Israel's General Federation of
Labor over 60 years ago.
Well-known for providing
specialized financial services to
the world trade union movement
both in Israel and overseas, the
bank operates in 15 foreign coun-
tries and has nine FDIC-insured
branches in six U.S. cities New
York, Los Angeles, Chicago, San
Francisco, Philadelphia and
Boston, plus an agency office in
Miami.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee (CRC) and
Young Leadership Council (YLC)
will hold a special legislative
forum on Thursday, March 12,
from 5:30-8:30 p.m. with the Dade
County Legislative Delegation.
The Forum is designed to in-
form participants about the fac-
tors that go into the legislative
decision-making process on the
state level and to inform the
legislature about Federation and
its family of agencies.
"One of our major respon-
sibilities in the Community Rela-
tions Committee is to keep the
community apprised of Federa-
tion and the way it interfaces with
the rest of the community," said
Jeffrey Berkowitz, chairman of
the Community Relations Com-
mittee. Our legislators need to
understand what Federation does
and to know that everything we
do vitally effects the entire com-
munity," he added.
According to Nan Rich, chair-
woman of CRC's Domestic Con-
cerns Committee, "We have had a
good response from the Dade
County Legislative Delegation.
Among those who will be in atten-
dance at the Forum are: Senators
Jack D. Gordon, Gwen Margolis,
and Lawrence H. Plummer.
House of Representative
members will include Elaine Gor-
don, Michael Friedman, Lincoln
Diaz-Balart, Luis Morse, Betty
Metcalf, Susan Guber, John
Cosgrove, Art Simon, Javier
Souto, and Arnhilda Gonzalez-
Quevedo."
"The Forum will give those pre-
sent an understanding of the in-
terests and concerns of our
legislators," said Samuel J. Dub-
bin, YLC chairman of the 1987
State Legislative Forum. "It jn
address what we need to do toad
vance the welfare of Federation's
beneficiary agencies throueh
Tallahassee and the legislature"
added Dubin.
"Federation works within a
community that has very special
needs and concerns. This Forum
with our state legislators goes a
long way to further our
understanding of each other and
the work that we do," concluded
Berkowitz.
March Is
Lions Eye
Bank Month
March is the month when
Lions Eye Banks, located in
Miami, Tampa and
Gainesville, are being
recognized for their work,
which includes providing cor-
neas and other ocular tissue
for patients undergoing op-
thalmic surgery, among other
important services.
Governor Bob Martinez has
urged Floridians to consider
becoming donors in the pro-
gram. The goal of Lions Eye
Bank Month is to reach
potential donors and offer
them the chance to par-
ticipate. Every pair of eyes
has the potential to restore
sight to two individuals or to
add understanding of the
disease process through
research.
eddMoi2
7lufaot(ftet$&

1MeB1,e2onONZOKr
Jumbo Shells
/.aT^ozl-mar.nara sauce
- teaspoon salt
. teaspoon pepper
-teaspoon oregano
Cnopped Spinach
2 pounds r.cotta cheese
2 Sespoons grated Pafmesan
cheese
Pour mannara sauce into
mmer gemty
,...
mm, eneus according to package d"**0" Q w b01| and simmer
remaining sauce janommico--- ,,.,n.
For this lesson
in Italian we want to
msegnare (teach) you
how to select the best
pasta for your bambini
(children) and manto
(husband)
Everything you
need to know can
be summed up in
one word Ronzoni*
(old family name)
'to ^IwjL semo
For over 70 years
Ronzoni* has used
only the finest, natu-
ral ingredients like
103% durum wheat
semolina m its pasta
That's why all 70
different shapes
and varieties
have a wonderful
sapore (flavor) and
robustezza (robustness)
Ronzoni is also low in
cholesterol and has no
added salt And it's certified
Kosher and Rarve so it's
perfetto (perfect)
-- with all your meat or
^ cheese sauces
Before we say ciao
(goodbye), please tell us
everything you've learned
Ready?
Ronzoni Sono Buoni-
Ronzoni Is So Good-
Eccellente (excellent)
" RONZONI SONO BUONI
RONZONI IS SO GOOD*
u Kosher and Parve

:.:,/ -
.......


Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Local Soviet Rally
Continued from Page 1-B
the speeches. The other rajy in
Dade County was held in North
Miami Beach.
"This rally is for people who
cannot speak for themselves in
freedom," said Arthur
Teitelbaum, director of the
Florida Anti-Defamation League.
"We are expressing the cons-
cience of the free world on these
courthouse steps today in memory
of those who died in freedom and
those who wish to remain in
freedom."
Proclamations from several
Dade County and state officials
were presented at the rally and
songs of freedom were sung by
the crowd who gathered for the
midday rally.
"We ban together determined
that, one day in the near future,
freedom will ring out all over the
world," said Miami Beach Mayor
Alex Daoud.
PROCLAMATIONS also were
presented by Metro Dade Mayor
Steve Clark and State Rep. Elaine
Bloom, who carried a message "of
solidarity" from Gov. Bob
Martinez.
Throughout the rally, it was
stressed that Americans would
not give up the fight to free their
Jewish brothers and sisters and
that this demonstration showed
their support of Americans
toward not only Soviet refuseniks,
but of prisoners of conscience
(POCs) throughout the world.
The names of Soviet prisoners
and refuseniks were read aloud.
Their birthdate was given. Their
occupations were stated. The
numbers of their family members
were read. And, after each name
and biography, the number of
years they have been trying to
leave the Soviet Union was read.
Nine years, 13 years .
SEVERAL RALLY members
carried pictures on placards of
Soviet prisoners. They included
Ida Nudel, who was sentenced to
four years of exile in Siberia.
"Her sister lives in Israel.
Because Nudel put a pillowcase on
her balcony that said, 'Let me go
to my sister in Israel' she was in-
carcerated," Saulson said.
Not only Jews attended the ral-
ly, which several people noted was
on the steps of a court of justice.
Sister Kathleen Flanagan, speak-
ing on behalf of the Archdiocese of
Miami, said, "I stand here in
solidarity with you."
One poster had a picture of
Moscow in the backdrop and said,
"It's a touph place to live. It's a
tougher place to leave." On the
back of the poster were the loca-
tions of some 1,976 Soviet slave
labor camps, some 275 prisons
and some 85 psychiatric hospitals.
"SOME 400,000 people who
have applied to leave and have
been denied" are risking their
ety Saulson said. "Once they
aPPly they lose their jobs, they are
So. Dade
JCC Annual
Purim Run
The South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center is sponsoring its
ihird Annual 5-mile Purim Run
on Sunday, March 15, at 8 a.m.
^arp at the JCC. This annual
event attracts the runners in Dade
and Broward Counties. The scenic
course covers five miles through
genual South Dade with one
bndge overpass. There are two
aw states on the course and split
tomes will be given every mile
**? coordinators are Michael
A llr Um' Paul Breitner and
is r; bo"1*'"*- Race consultant
ivJkS Stern" Information is
available at the JCC
ostracized, they may even lose
their apartments. They are con-
sidered either psychiatric cases or
traitors."
Several young members of the
Jewish community were
represented at the rally, including
Valerie Shalom, of the Anti-
Defamation League.
"The Jews in the Soviet Union
are my brethren and we must not
forsake them as they struggle to
live freely in the Soviet Union,"
she said.
HINDA CANTOR, vice presi-
dent of the Union of Council for
Soviet Jews, was among the
representatives of several
organizations working toward the
release of Soviet Jews. Her
organization has begun an
"Adopt-a- Family" program, in
which Americans write at least
one letter a month to a refusenik.
"They're my brothers and
sisters. I'm in this until every
Soviet Jew who wants to leave is
given permission," Cantor
declared.
"In 1976, my daughter started
writing to a young girl in
Kharkov, and I started writing to
her parents. We got the whole
congregation at Bet Breira to help
adopt this family. It does work.
Pressure from the community
helps. Even if the letters don't
help get them out, it lets them
know people care and are working
for them.
"Two years later, when this lit-
tle girl got out, she slept in my
daughter's bed, and I cried for
five days."
WHEN THE names of freed
Soviet prisoners such as Anatoly
Sharansky are brought up, "we
must remember those who were
murdered by the KGB," Saulson
said. He referred to Soviet
refusenik Ina Meiman, who died
shortly after she was allowed to
come to the United States for
treatment of cancer.
"She died because Glasnost (the
new Russian policy of "openess")
came too late, and her husband
was not only denied the right to
come here but the right to go to
her funeral."
Hermione Spahn, a represen-
tative of B'nai B'rith Women who
helped coordinate the rally, said
she was pleased that "we had peo-
ple from all faiths and all ethnic
backgrounds. We may be focusing
today on Soviet Jewry but we will
cooperate and stand behind other
ethnic groups who have a similar
problem.
Participants in a rally for Soviet Jewry on the steps of the Dade County Cour-
thouse last week held various signs to signal opposition to the continued imprison-
ment of Soviet Jews and refusal of the government to grant exit visas to some
1*00,000 Soviet refuseniks. The rally was one of hundreds of rallies held at the same
time in JtS countries around the world.
TEMPLE SHIR AMI
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
announces
Dedication Weekend
Festivities
for its new facility at
Sunset Drive &
S.W. 125 Avenue
DEDICATORY SABBATH SERVICE
Friday, March 20th, at 7:45 p.m.
OPEN HOUSE CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH
Sunday, March 22nd, at 11:30 a.m.
open to the entire community for information, call 253-9666
THIS PASSOVER, BREAK MATZ0H WITH A RABBI
The World's First Passover Video Tape Now
Available Thru Masada Conducted by Rabbi Langner
NOW
YOU
CAN
Learn how to make a Seder
Learn the history, songs and
rituals of a Seder.
Have a Rabbi conduct the Seder
Give a great gift to children
Proceeds will go the the broadcasting of the Tree of Life Program which airs:
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AMOUNT ENCLOSED $


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Israel Histadrut Honors
Workmen's Circle At Breakfast Confab

By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
There were bagels and lox and
plenty of praise for the innovative
Amal Israel vocational school
system at the breakfast con-
ference held by the Israel
Histadrut Campaign of South
Florida in honor of the
Workmen's Circle at the Konover
Hotel.
Elliot Engelbaum, executive
director of the Israel Histadrut
Campaign of South Florida, says
that the breakfast conference was
also in honor of Irving Gordon, the
late executive director, after
whom a new laboratory for optics
has been named at one of the
Amal schools, in Rishon-Leziyon.
Israel.
SPEAKERS AT the conference
included Uri Agami, chairman of
the Amal School network; Dr.
Fred C. Schollmeyer, executive
director of the Vocational Educa-
tion Dade County School System;
and Miami Beach Mayor Alex A.
Daoud. David Silverbush, chair-
man of the Israel Histadrut Cam-
SE Region Of AJCongress
To Honor George Firestone
Florida Secretary of State
George Firestone will be honored
by the Southeast Region of the
American Jewish Congress at the
Horace M. Kallen Award Dinner
starting at 6 p.m. on March 19 at
the Eden Roc Hotel.
Firestone will be recognized for
many years of service to the
citizens of Florida. According to
the organization, Firestone was
instrumental in establishing
broad-based arts programming to
reach special population groups
including the handicapped and
minorities. He also helped to
establish a State Touring Pro-
gram which takes high-quality
performing arts groups into less
populated areas of the state.
"George Firestone carries an
extraordinary portfolio of ac-
complishment," said dinner chair-
man Tibor Hollo, president of
Florida East Coast Properties.
"He is fully committed to the prin-
ciples of social justice, equal op-
portunity and the defense of
human rights both at home and
abroad."
Prior to his election as
Secretary of State in 1978,
Firestone served in the Florida
legislature for 12 years.
The keynote address at the din-
ner will feature Phil Baum, an ex-
pert on terrorism and domestic
Jewish affairs who is the national
Session On
Barry U. Summer
In Israel Set
An information session on the
1987 Barry University Summer
Program in Israel will be held
Wednesday in the Andreas School
of Business Building, Room 111,
7-8 p.m. Dr. Hugo Hervitz,
associate professor of economics
and director of the Israel pro-
gram, will conduct the meeting.
The three weeks course to be
held in August at the Hebrew
Univesity of Jerusalem includes
lectures, seminars and field trips
throughout Israel.
Students are able to earn up to
five college credits in the three
weeks in Israel. They have a
choice of three tracks: 1) The In-
ternational Business track based
on a 3-credit course on the theory
and practice of international
business, using the experience of
Israel as a primary case-study; 2)
The Social Science Track, offering
a choice of elective courses in in-
ternational politics of the Middle
East, archaeology, sociology of
the Kibbutz and film studies; 3)
The Humanities Track, offering a
choice of elective courses in Bible,
literature, music, dance and the
arts.
associate executive director of
AJCongress.
Joining Hollo on the Dinner
Committee are John Berenyi,
Myrna Bricker, Arlene and
Harvey Chaplin, Bobbi and Mel
Dick, Niety and Gary Gerson,
Senator Jack Gordon, Louise and
Herbert Kaplan, Andrew
Lefkowitz, Nancy and Norman
Lipoff, Ellen and Bernard
Mandler, William C. McFarland,
Norma and Michael Orovitz, Jill
and Richard Preston, Joyce M.
Siemon, Lee Spiegelman, Sylvia
and Charles Silvers, Congressman
Larry Smith and Henry Wolff, Jr.
paign of South Florida, welcomed
the other speakers.
Agami, a robust man with a
moustache, spoke with the help of
an interpreter. He explained the
Amal system, whereby the ratio of
general education, technical
education and practical working
experience is determined by the
interests and capabilities of each
student.
"What is special about Amal,"
says Agami, "is that we have a
school for all the different types of
students, giving the strong ones a
chance to go on to the university
level, and bringing the weaker
ones to a higher level of education,
as well as supplying them with a
field of expertise so that they can
support themselves."
"WE HAVE full integration
between the weak and strong
students, the students from upper
and lower classes, and even bet-
ween the Arab and Jewish
students," adds Agami. "It is
very important for our country
that we work together."
Amal, which also has adult
education classes and is spread
throughout Israel, parallels the
principles and methods of the
Dade County vocational schools,
according to Schollmeyer.
Says Agami of his school's
philosophy of education, "We
want a student to be a humanist
and not a robot We are trying not
only to teach our kids a trade, but
to educate them to be human
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beings."
ACCORDING TO Beach Mayor
Daoud, "The Israeli vocational
system is better than ours."
Daoud, who recently visited some
of the Amal schools during his trip
to Israel for the seventh Con-
ference of Mayors in Jerusalem,
speaks glowingly of the Israeli
spirit.
As for the schools, he explains
that they are better because "in
Israel they train everyone, not on-
ly those who can't learn practical
studies. The result is that no one
looks down at vocational
training."
"I remember that when I was in

high school, there was an unfair
stigma attached to vocational
schools," recalls Daoud.
Agami, in his presentation
noted that "If it U possible f0r 2
to dream and a dream is a very
nice thing then my dream I
that the Amal school in Rishon
Lenyon will have close ties to
Miami. I also dream of an ex-
change of students and teachers
between Miami and Israel, and
that we will find a way to ex-
change knowledge."
"As we are all young," added
Agami with a smile that belied the
grey in his hair, "our dreams will
surely come true."
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Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
^y ^0V
V;


The Ketubah
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Rent a 20, 22 or 25 foot power boat and experience a day
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over 23 franchisee! locations
Call 673-2502 to Reserve your Day of Fun.
YOUR WEDDING
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436 N.E. 125th
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Gift Certificates Available
Every young couple married in
a Jewish ceremony has a prenup-
tial agreement. It is the ketubah
the Jewish marriage contract.
The ketubah, which dates to
about 1,800 years ago, originally
came about as protection for the
wife. It specifies a minimum
amount of money the wife is en-
titled to. The settlement, a one-
f time payment is determined in ad-
vance whether the marriage ends
in divorce or the death of the
husband.
Today, the lost art of producing
hand-printed etchings from a
painting is being revived thanks to
the efforts of Anita Pearlman of
the Joyous Ketubah of Miami and
Miriam Karp of Atlanta, Georgia.
"Producing a hand-printed et-
ching from a painting is a complex
process, only a small part of which
is accomplished by mechanical
means," states Miriam Karp.
First, four to five photographic
color separations are made from
the original design. Next, zinc
plates coated with a photosen-
sitive emulsion are exposed to
each film. The rest of the process
is done by hand: applying the ac-
quatint layers (tiny granules of
resin which resist acid and are us-
ed to produce the larger areas of
color) then etching and re-etching
the plates in acid.
When a satisfactory proof has
been achieved, printing the edi-
tion may begin. Each plate is
hand-inked and wiped, a pro-
cedure which must be repeated for
every print pulled. The edition
size of each ketubah by Miriam
Karp is limited to 70 etchings
printed on Arches 100 percent rag
paper. Each print is numbered
and signed by the artist.
Unlike prints reproduced by
mechanical means, each hand-
printed etching is valued as an
original print.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
a*
GslaA/iAAec^ uv csojua, tjutc& I960
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A professional presentation and distinctive decoration adds
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Catering also available at amjor hotels, country clubs,
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For Information, Please Call-
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RINA KRAMER: 532-2201 861-6308 374-3900
Your party will not be complete without our fine
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Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-i.
Wedding Planning Begins Months In Advance
Unless time is short, most
weddings are plumed mon-
ths in advance of the date.
Firstly, most important, is
to determine your wedding
budget and the type of wed-
ding you want. Once tins
been established, the
planning can begin.
Claudine Uzan
Traiteur Caterer
Everyone loves a beautiful,
elegant party and so Rina Kramer
whose French education and
background in this exclusive
catering business would like to
help you make your wedding
reception the most exciting and
lovely affair.
Unlike the usual celebrations,
Claudine Uzan Traiteur -
Caterer will offer you an Interna-
tional selection from which to
choose: American, French,
Sephardic and Spanish. A profes-
sional presentation and a distinc-
tive decoration add this Touch of
Class that Claudine Uzan Traiteur
- Caterer from Paris is able to
give.
Rina Kramer, whose mother is
the famed Claudine Uzan of Paris
caterers, is married to Baruch
Kramer, a certified chef from Le
Cordon Bleu School of Paris. He
also worked at Fauchon caterer in
Paris, the caterer of kings and
presidents. He is also famed for
his catering at the "Stage" in
Maxim's in Paris.
Osceola Lake Inn
Begins 47th Season
Rubin's Osceola Lake Inn, a
resort in the Blue Ridge moun-
tains in Hendersonville, N.C. an-
nounces that its 47th season will
begin May 20.
The resort, which features
Jewish-American cuisine, includes
a swimming pool, nine hole put-
ting green, golf driving cage, all
weather tennis court, badmitton,
horseshoes, shuffleboard, ping-
pong, boating, fishing, indoor
Jetstream whirlpool and movie
room.
A good rule of thumb is 6
to 12 months prior to the
wedding date. This allows
you time to make careful
decisions and check details
and arrangements.
1. Choose your attendants
2. Make your invitation
list
3. Select location for
reception
4. Choose your wedding
dress
5.Select men's
formalwear
6.Decide on
photographer
7. Select florist and
flowers
8. Select china and silver
patterns
9. Enroll in a bridal
registry
10. Plan music for both
wedding and reception
11. Plan your honeymoon

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12. Order invitations,
thank you notes, napkins,
etc.
13. Make arrangements
for rehearsal dinner
14. Select caterer
15. Order wedding cake
16. Confirm plans and ar-
rangements with your rabbi
17. Select gifts for
attendants
18. Send wedding an-
nouncement to media
If you plan carefully by
the time the wedding day
arrives the bride and groom
will be free from the last
minute details. All the plan-
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details will surely pay off as
the bride and groom enjoy
and remember the happiest
day of their lives.
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With more theme parties and
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In short, we cater to special
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to golfers.
So, before you plan your next
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ext. 2203 to find out how we can
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Even if your group's a bit larger
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Fashion Show at 12 Noon and 3 PM.
Featuring Italian wedding gowns and
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in the Bakery Centre (U.S. 1 at Red Road)
Sposaltalia 661-9899


&n4jux4i LIPCONTOBOLSKY
Mr and Mrs. Mitorwl! J. Lipcon arv pleased to
announce the engagement of their daughter. Staci
Patrice, to Frank N. Tobolsk)-, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Nelson Tobolsk) of Cherry Hill. N.J.
Staci will graduate from University of Penn-
sylvania in May. While attending school Staci has
been very active in Jewish Studies and Jewish
organuations on the University Campus. Frank
wil! graduate from the University of Pennsylvania
School of Law in May. and has been recruited by a
Philadelphia law firm. They will both begin their
careers in Philadelphia after a September 6 wed-
ding at Temple Emanuel in Miami Beach.
BARENBERGMAN
Michelle Baren. daughter of Gloria and Milton
Barer, oi Miami has become engaged to Steven L.
Bergman. son of RocheUe and Philip Bergman of
Miami.
Ms. Baren. a graduate of Sunset High School, is
a senior at Florida International University where
she is a Fashion Merchandising major.
Mr. Bergman, a graduate of Palmetto High
School, is a senior at Florida International Univer-
sity majoring in mathemabcai science.
A November. 1987 wedding is planned.
Frank ToUbky. Staci Lipeoa
BtNWrau)
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18496 N.W. 67th Avenue 822-6646
13735 S.W. 152nd Street 255-5385


>agel2-l
Jewish FIoridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Moreover thou shall make the tabernacle with ten curtains"
(Exodus t6.1).
... "And thou shall hang up the veil under the clasps, and shall
bring in thither within ike veil the ark of the testimony"
(Exodus t6.33).
TERUMAH
TERUMAH The children of Israel were asked for an offering
toward the construction of the Tabernacle and its vessels: "Gold,
and silver, and brass; and blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine
linen, and goats' hair; and rams' skins dyed red, and sealskins,
and acacia-wood; oil for the light, spices for the anointing oil, and
for the sweet incense, onyx stones, and stones to be set, for the
ephod, and for the breastplate" (Exodus 25.3-7. The ark was to be
made of acacia-wood, covered inside and out with gold. The table
too was to be made of acacia-wood. There were to be a golden
candelabra, a tent of curtains and boards, outer curtains and in-
ner curtains, and an altar of acacia-wood, covered with copper.
Finally, the construction of the court-yard of the Tabernacle was
described.
Community vCoruer
Congregation Magen David of the Sephardic Jewish
Center of North Miami Beach will host a Purim Brunch
on March 15 immediately after services at 8:30 a.m.
"Ben Gurion: A Biography" by Michael Bar Zohar,
will be reviewed by Rabbi Akiva Brilliant, spiritual
leader of Temple Zamora, on Thursday, March 19,1:30
p.m., at the Miami Beach Public Library.
Dr. Norman Bloom, Biblical scholar, will lecture on
"The Golden Calf; Idol Talk on False Gods" on Sunday,
10 a.m., at Beth Israel Synagogue.
This event will be the last of the Cultural Forums for
the year. Rabbi Dr. Meir Felman, is chairman of the
Forums.
Bet Shira Congregation will be holding its annual
Purim Party on Sunday, March 15, from 11 to 3 p.m. at
the Temple.
There will be prizes, games and food. The proceeds
go to support the Youth Dept.
The Sisterhood at Temple Menorah will hold a
regular meeting at Carlyle Avenue on March 18 at noon.
Refreshments and entertainment are planned.
An in-depth analysis of the Tower Commission
Report will highlight a talk by television commentator
and newspaper columnist Mark Russell at Temple
Emanu-EI of Greater Miami, Wednesday, at 8 p.m. His
message will be a highlight of the 1986-87 Forum
Series of the Miami Beach congregation, which has
presented its annual series of cultural events for the
past 35 years, according to Temple Emanu-EI president
Lawrence M. Schantz.
Yiddish Branch 679, Workmen's Circle will hold a
Purim party on Sunday, March 15, at 1 p.m. at the
Seville Beach Hotel. The Epstein Brothers Trio will pro-
vide music for both listening and dancing, and there
will be a special Purim program. A full-course dinner
will be served. For reservations contact Molly Lubelski
or Charles Infeld in Broward.
Workmen's circle, Miami Beach Branch 1059, will
hold their monthly meeting Wednesday at noon in the
Surfside Community Center. A Purim program is plann-
ed and there will be a guest speaker.
The Association for Jewish Special Education will
hold its 10th Annual Purim Party, a picnic lunch with
carnival games and prizes from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sunday
at Oak Grove Park, North Miami Beach.
A table tennis tournament will be held Thursday,
March 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center. The round-robin event will be open to
both males and females with cash prizes for the
winners.
"Anti-Semitism Alive and Well" will be addressed
by William F. Saulson during the 7:30 p.m. meeting
Monday of the Carmel Lodge of B'nai B'rith at Temple
Adath Yeshurun.
The North Dade-Broward Chapter of the National
Jewish Center will hold their annual Bazaar and Auc-
tion on March 14, with a preview starting at 6 p.m. at
the McDonald Senior Center Auditorium in r
Miami Beach.
Lee Pamela Zebede
B'nai
Mitzvah
LEE ZEBEDE
Lee Pamela Zebede daughter of
Mr. Julius Zebede and Mrs. San-
dra Zebede will be called to the
torah as Bat Mitzvah on Saturday,
March 7, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Emanu-EI. She attends Hillel
Community School. She is in the
7th grade and is an Honor Roll
student. She has attended Temple
Emanu-El's Afternoon Religious
School for one year. She also at-
tended Temple Emanu-El's Sum-
mer camp this past summer.
Many friends and relatives will
be here to help celebrate the
simcha.
JANE GRODNICK
Jane Nicole Grodnick. daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. William Grodnick
will be called to the Torah as Bat
Mitzvah of Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
at Bet Shira Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in the
religious school at Bet Shira.
She attends Southwood Junior
High School where she is in the
7th grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Grodnick will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion.
DANIEL BRAUSE
Daniel Jonathan Brause, son of
Ilene and Steven Brause will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at Tem-
ple Sinai of North Dade.
The celebrant is a student in the
religious school.
He attends' Highland Oaks
Junior High School. His favorite
activities are traveling with his
family and attending Blue Star
Camp.
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Brause will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of occasion and a
reception at Temple Sinai.
Special guests will include fami-
ly and friends from New York,
California and Pennsylvania.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellghting Time
6:07 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg
531-2120
Dalty 7:20 ..m. Aftamoon 5:30 p.m
rt.aa.rn.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Garden. Drive
North Miami Beach 047-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Coneervattve
(
Mlnyan 7:30 ..m. a p.m
at 4 Sun. t ..m 1 Irtl p.m.
Frl. (p.m.
Bat M itiYiti Robyn Man
)
TEMPLE BETH AM
5060 N. Kandall Dr.
& Miami 017 0017
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. eve 7:30 p.m. Family aarv. Rabbi Baumgard
will apaak on "Tha Right Way to Maka
Hamentaacnen."
Sal. 11:1 S a.m. Bat Mitzvah Hertnar Hall*.
Sermon "I Will Mart You There."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2025 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911
Jack Rlamar, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
m
Sal. ( a.m. aarv. Mlnchah 8:10 p.m.
Dally Mlnyan held morning a evening
7 daya a wartt. Pi.... call lor achadula.
Sat. 9 a.m. will honor Arthur Shalr lor 25
yeere aarvtca. Sun. noon-4 p.m. Picnic
Bird Drtve. Sal. Mlnchah 9:10 p.m.
Sarmon "Why Man Faar Woman."
BETH KODESH
Conaorvathna
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joeoph Krteael
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
m
050-0334
Sabbath Sanrtcaa (:45 a.m.
Sat. $ p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE'121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
001-5500 Conaervatrve
Dr. Kraal Jacobe. Rabbi
Dr. Joaeph A. GorfInkel. f
Rabbi Emeritus %
Moshe Frledler, Cantor
Frt(p.m.
Sat.(:46i.m.
Weekday aarv. Mon. Frl. I a.m.
Mon. Thura. S p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPeE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeffereon Ave., MB, FL 33130
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Ntasim Benyemini
Dairy aarvlcaa ( a.m. and 7 p.m
Bat. (:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
230-2001 .*.
Rabbi David H. Auorbach \W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman "*
Frl. ( pjn. Trlalogua on "Tha Daatructlon
oil ha Jaw."
trt. 9:30 ajn. Bat Mrtnah Jana Qrodnlck.
Dally aarvlcaa: Sunday B:30 a.m.
Mon. Tuae. a Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Wad. 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE 8ET,H$H0L6Mstt 723,
CheeeAve. 8 41etSt. umm-
0R l-EONKRONIBH.FatmdlnaSanlorRaMM
OA*YA.Ol.CKT!hV--
HARRY JOLT, Au.lll.r, RabtM
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. *.. ,nl Rabbi
CAMTOB DAVID COmfHKR
SLKSaffl.""** 9**4*n ami apaak on
a*E BtnWfja Ben.
10:30 am Quasi apaafcer Rabbi Frar*YondhMm
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beech Bivd
Or Mil A. Lipschitz Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
DeBy Barvtcaa: Mon.Fri. 7:30 a.m.
4 5:30 p.m. i~ .
al.(:Ma.m.A(:1(p.m. :S|
Bun.(a.m.ASp.m; *S
Lavaaarvloa Frl. ip.m.
It ear Mrttvah Jaaaa HoetiaaaiL
CUBAN HEBREW CONGReqTT
Temple Both Shmuei tQAT*,
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami R.
534-7213-534-7214 "*lch
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi ,*>
Moehe Buryn, Canto, [M
S^loGroolor.Preaident -V
Sholom Epelbaum President
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue M
Miami Beach \w)
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Beroa.
Yehuda ShHman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbal.tSh.bb., 5 p.m
Lava Frl. ave ear. a p.m.
^SSmSSSBsasi a "* ""*
Into ma Jawteh Future." Cantor &miJ?7
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plrvetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-0421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami s P%ont ftarorm Congtmqition
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595 5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex 0. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L Sparks
Frl. ( p.m
Downtown: Rabbi Dr. H.akall Bam.l "SkioOii
Spirit." Liturgy: Cantor R.ch.ll. N.lson
Shabbat family dlnnar 8:45 p.m Israeli Folk
ICIoaadlor
Dancing. Kandall I
rsarvlcas.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Btvd Reform
Coral Qeblee M7-Me7
Mtchaol B. Eleenetat. Rabbi
FrtaaOp-m.
Bat. (a.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Roae
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvtoaa Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sal. 9'30 am
Onag Shabbat will follow
TEMPLE MENORAH
020-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkis, Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. ( a.m. Sabbath same.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5.15 p.m

TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave B86M31
Miami Beach 33141 co~ww
Rabbi Eugene LeboviU
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally aarv. Mon. Frl. ( a.m. A 6 15 p.m
Sal. Mmcha8:15p.m.Sun.(:30a.m.(:15piR
Frl. aye ( p.m. Incl. Symphonic Choi'
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
071 Northeest 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0898
Rabbi Hershel Becker Moor- .""*"
Sat. 9:30 a.m. aarvlca .1
Tampla Samu-EI
9353 SW 152 Ava..
S. of N. Kandall Dr
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava
North Dade s Relorm CcaveBatwri
Ralph P Ktngsley. Rabbi 932 90
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkea. Cantor
Barbara S Ramaay. Adm.n*ir(">'
Shabbat Family aarv. Frl. ( P-J. "JJ*
Sat Sabbath aarv. 10:30 a.m. Bar Mllnt"
D.m.i Brauaa.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTj'l
8000 Miller Dr. Conaarvatlva
271-2311 ,.
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, RabbL V)
Benjamin Adler, Cantor ~'
David Rooenthal, AuxUtary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 ^fBrtsday a Thuraday.
Fit early aerv. MoJ^Jt'"*^'^
ChMdranBlaialnoSrt.(am mt> *V
1 i7T71^iTl-aieM. m^ -


Friday, MaTch 6, I3>g7/The Jewish Fldridlan Page 13-B
Organisation UTews
The American Society for Technion,
Women's Division, Miami Beach Chapter,
will hold its Scholarship Luncheon Meeting at
the Shelborne Hotel on Thursday, March 12,
at noon. Entertainment will follow. For infor-
mation about reservations, contact Jean
Zaben, president, or Diane Scherer.
Janice Alter, president of the Abe Hor-
rowitz Ladies Auxiliary 682, Jewish War
Veterans, is donating a color TV set to the
Baby House in North Miami Beach, one of the
many projects that the auxiliary sponsors.
The set was given to Alter for her outstan-
ding performance as president of the
auxiliary.
Grevnolds Park Chapter of Women's
American ORT will hold its next meeting
Tuesday, 11:30 a.m., at the home of Louise
Weinthal in Hallandale.
The meeting will be followed by a luncheon
and a discussion by Marvin Segal entitled:
Cults Not Just For Kids!
Baritone Sherrill Milnes will sing the title
role in the Greater Miami Opera's Interna-
tional Series performance of Ambroise
Thomas' Hamlet on March 9, 11 and 14 at the
Dade County Auditorium. Gaetan Laperriere
will make his Miami Opera debut as the
Prince of Denmark in the National Series on
March 10 and 15.
Delta Players performs "Milk And Honey"
directed by Seenie Hurwitz and translated by
Kantor Wolf and Ben Raphael into Yiddish on
Wednesday, March 11, at 2 p.m. at Konover
Hotel. Delta Players a non-profit organization
devoted to raising money for Israel, performs
musical theatre in Yiddish. "Milk And
Honey" is Jerry Herman's musical about the
adventure of a group of Jewish widows
traveling in Israel.
The Miami Beach Children's Theater is
presenting a musical version of the Wizard of
Oz, featuring a cast of 18 between the ages of
4 and 17 in the Miami Beach Senior High
School Auditorium on Thursday at 7 p.m.,
and at 1 p.m. on March 8 and 15.
There will be an exhibit of the works of Mel
Bochner, the internationally recognized con-
temporary artist, Saturday, March 14
through April 19 at the Center for Fine Arts.
The exhibition was organized by Elaine King,
director of the Carnegie-Melon University
Art Gallery Hewlett Gallery.
There will be a members' preview of the
Mel Bochner exhibit and of another exhibit
called "Changing Light" on Friday, March
13, 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., at the Center for the
Fine Arts.

Jack Chester, left, presents the prestigious President's Award on
Khalfofthe Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organization to Carlos
\rboleya, riee-chairman of the board and chief executive officer of
tarnett Bank, in recognition of the bank's continued support oj
Israel's economic development through the Israel Bonds program.
Mster is a member of the Board of Governors of the local Israel
Sonds Organization.
YOUR ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO A RECEPTION IN HONOR OF
TORAH UMESORAH
The National Society for Hebrew Day Schools
at the home of
Mrs. Shirley Gross,
3542 Flamingo Drive, Miami Beach
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11th 8:00 P.M.
RABBI BERELYWEIN
Rabbi Congregation Bais Torah
Dean Yeshiva Shaare Torah, Monsey, New York
will be the guest speaker

{j^n'eil CommlttM: Rabbi Amram Amsalem, Rabbi Yeruchem
oensinger, Rabbi Edward Davis, Rabbi Avrohom C. Feuer, Rabbi
Sal?* Groner. R"bbl David Lehrfleld, Rabbi Mordecal Shapiro,
Bahk' e M" s,mon. *& Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi Tlbor Stern.
"obi Pmchas A. Weberman, Rabbi Yochanan Zwelg.
!=**<* Committee: Rabbi Kalman Baumann. Rabbi Ben-Zlon Chalt,
Rahh Aklva Qrunbla,t. Rbbl Ralph GHxman, Rabbi Yossie Heber,
Rahh' Ilsroel Janowski, Rabbi Efralm Lelzerson, Rabbi Jay Neufeld,
"odi Dr. Menachem Raab, Rabbi Harvey Silbersteln.
Had assail
Events
Ko'ach Chapter of Miami Beach
Hadassah, organized for younger
professional women, will hear
State Attorney Janet Reno speak
at their meeting Tuesday, 8 p.m.,
in the Cadillac Hotel.
Ko'ach chapter, Jackie Hechter,
president, meets every second
Tuesday of the month in the
Cadillac Hotel.
The Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
meeting on Monday at 1 p.m. in
the Southgate Terrace Room.
William Saulson will talk and
demonstrate exercises for senior
citizens. His topic will be, "No
Time for Exercise? Exercise in No
Time!" ____
The Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Monday at
12:30 p.m. at the Morton Towers
Auditorium. The program will
feature a book review.
The Kinneret Chapter of
Hadassah will present Cantor
Robert Albert, Music Director of
Beth David Congregation on
March 17 at 12:30 p.m. at the El
Conquistador Clubhouse. Pearl
Furgang will accompany on the
piano.
Amit Women
Amit Women, Hadar chapter,
will hold their annual auction
Thursday, from 11 a.m. at Byron
Hall to raise funds for the Amit
Fresh Air Project. Martha
Rosenfeldt is chairman.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach Chapter
will hold a Purim Celebration
Thursday, noon, in the Kneseth
Israel Social Hall. Rabbi Meir
Felman will be guest speaker,
refreshments will be served.
Shalom Chapter will have a Gala
Purim Party Tuesday, 11:30 a.m.
in the Club Room of 100 Lincoln
Road. Helen Fishman, "Queen
Esther" will reign over a program
which will include the music of
Cantor Joseph Berger and guest
speaker Rose Shapiro.
Lunch and Hamantashen will be
served.
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
47th Anniversary
Principals at Generatxon-U7tk Anniversary Luncheon of the
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El pose with Dr. Irving
Lehrman after walking the runway as fashion models:
Front, Belle Lehrman, Rabbi Lehrman: top, from the left,
Martha Mishcon, president of the Sisterhood; Leslie Cassel
and Harriet Shapiro, co-chairmen of the event. Below three
generations parading at the fashion show are, from left,
Kathy Schwarz, her granddaughter, Jennifer and her
daughter Nancy Goldstein. Kathy is former president of the
Sisterhood. Proceeds from the luncheon will go towards the
project to furnish a new science lab for the Lehrman Day
School.
r
MAKEYOlR
PASSOVER RESERVATIONS NOW!
I 4
lit
APRIL 13-22
10 DAYS-9 NIGHTS
SINGLE $650.00
DOUBLE $495.00 p.p.
3 DAILY STRICTLY KOSHER GOURMET MEALS WITH
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SYNAGOGUE ON PREMISES CENTRAL A/C
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FREE PARKING ENTERTAINMENT
DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTHLY A YEARLY RATES AVAILABLE
The Continental Hotel
4000 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
538^721
Come and enjoj our new In
mid rt'iii'-. at '' '"" "


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987

ARTIST'S RENDERING OF JEWISH CENTER FACILITIES FOR WHICH GROUND WAS DEDICATED SUNDAY.
'Building The Dream'
Lakeside Site Will House New South Dade Jewish Center

By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
With colorful balloons say-
ing, "Building the Dream,"
a 21-acre lakeside site that
will house South Dade's on-
ly full-service Jewish Com-
munity Center was nudged
to reality at a ground
dedication ceremony
Sunday.
A rainbow was part of the "I'm
a dream-maker" theme, symboliz-
ing the use the facility will get
from toddlers in strollers to
seniors.
THE NEW facility at
Southwest 112th Avenue and
112th Street will house a
Holocaust Memorial, Israeli
Resource Center, theater, library,
education center, game room,
child care and nursery, teen
lounge, film lab, health clubs and
atrium.
"It's a very long-awaited day,
and we're very excited. We feel
nothing can stop us now," said
Naomi Olster, coordinator of the
campaign which already raised
about $5 million of the $9.5 million
needed for construction costs and
initial funds for the programs.
The Community Center will be
called the Dave and Mary Alper
Jewish Community Center, nam-
ed after the couple who left in
their will a $2 million gift that the
executors of their estate decided
to give for this project.
Dave and Mary Alper each
emigrated from Russia when they
were only 14 years old. Dave
headed to the "boomtown" of
Miami in 1926 and opened up the
Rosedale Deli on Northwest Se-
cond Avenue and Third Street.
AFTER IT was destroyed by
the big hurricane that year, he
reopened with one of his partners
at Northwest Fifth Street and Se-
cond Avenue, right next to a drug
store owned by Mary's brother.
They met and courted for a couple
of years and married.
In the late 1930s and early
1940s, Dave and Mary first began
investing in real estate. They used
their savings to buy lots zoned for
commercial property on 41st
Street in Miami Beach.
Barbara Bornstein, Sara two-and-a-half.
Rosedale deli
ive downtown
Years ago, the
gave way to
expansion.
They wert generous people,
always sharing their fortune with
those less fortunate.
"THIS IS an area in which a lot'
Community Center will be named after
Dave and Mary Alper, donors of $2
million.
of young people were settling,"
said Anne Alper, daughter-in-law
of the donors who attended the
ceremony with her husband,
William Alper. "We wanted to
have a place where Jewish
children could meet to socialize
and play."
The groundbreaking is schedul-
ed for September, but another $2
million will have to be raised
before then, Olster said. Starting
April 1, a fundraising campaign
will go into full force.
"We're very optimistic," Olster
said. "We feel that once the com-
munity knows this is absolutely |
happening, we will be very sue
cessful in raising funds."
Ed Rosen, director of the Com-1
munity Center, estimated that
7,000 people would use the ne* |
100,000-square-foot facility,
which will be located next door to I
Federation Gardens, a low-cost
housing development which coin
tains about 80 percent Jewish
residents. There are an estimated
70,000 Jewish individuals living in |
the South Dade area.
WITH A commercial-sized kit-
chen planned for the new center. |
Rosen said he hopes activities will
include the serving of hot meals.
"It's important to note the sup-1
port the Greater Miami Jewish |
Federation is giving us," said
Rosen. "They gave us the proper-
ty (valued at an estimated $3
million), and they encouraged the
money to be used in this area."
The problem, said Rosen, had
been that there was lots of subur-
bia and not really a place for teen-
agers.
ABOUT 200 people attended
the ground dedication ceremony.
a tradition involving the dedica-
tion of man's efforts to God, a
biblical concept that is as old as
the Jewish people. Rabbi Leonard
Schoolman of Temple Beth Am
led the audience in a special
prayer.
Sam Nevel, a Miami developer.
is one of the major donors. "I W
got two grandchildren. I really
feel strongly that if we're going to
attract people in South Dade. it
we don't have a facility like this,
we're going to lose people. It s so
long-overdue in this area."
Larry Suchman, 26, is on the
Center's Board of Directors, and
is charged with the task rt
soliciting donations of $10,000
and more from residents in the
age group primarily between *
and 40. Suchman said his father,
Clifford Suchman, was among a
group who owned the site and sola
it "at a gift price" to the Jewish
Federation.
"HE AND his generation have
brought the Jewish Federation
and the JCC to where it is today
It will now take not only their ei-
forts but that of the next genera-
tion as well. And we can do that so
Continued on Following Patf*


New South Dade Jewish Center
On Lakeside Site
Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Continued from Preceding Page
posed community center ten years
ago with the expectation that it
would someday be built.
ihe next generation after us will
Enjoy the fruits of our efforts,"
guchman said.
Guest speakers included Myron
hrndie ofthe Greater Miami
Lish Federation and area State
pPn Art Simon, who said he mov-
j across the street from the pro-
Mikki Futernick, who is co-
chairman with her husband, Mor-
ris, of the Capital Fund Commit-
tee said the Center, like the spec-
trum of the rainbow, "Will have
something for everyone."
Among Speakers At Dedication
Myron J. Brodie
William M. Alper
ARMDI Purim Breakfast
The Sunny Isles Chapter of
I American Red Magen David for
I Israel with the assistance of Tem-
l pie Bnai Zion is planning a Purim
Breakfast for members and
friends of ARMDI at Temple Bnai
| Zion at 10 a.m. on March 15.
The guest speaker will be Dr.
I Harry La Fontaine, a protector of
Jews during World War II and
Group Commander of the Danish
[ underground.
Special awards will be
I presented to Max Kreiger, Presi-
dent of Temple Bnai Zion and
Jack Kwartner, a philanthropist
and donor of seven ambulances to
the State of Israel.
The award-winning film "A
Commitment to Life" will be
shown.
Honored guests include
Regional Director Robert L.
Schwartz, Regional President
Murray Kaye, Ruth Spivak, Presi-
dent of the Sunny Isles Chapter,
Charles Skupsky, President
Emeritus of the Chapter and Rab-
bi Stanley Burstein, spiritual
leader of Temple Bnai Zion.
Happening
A Fabulous Fifties Bazaar, sponsored by the Better Business
Bureau Lducational Foundation, will be held at the Surf side Beach
Hotel, on Saturday and Sunday. March 14 and Iff, from 11 to 6
p.m. The event is co-sponsored by Michael Dezer. owner of the
hotel. Barry University and WLVE FM radio 94.
A ponion of the proceeds will go towards a business scholarship
at Barry University.
An open meeting with Congressman Dante Fascell. chairman of
the Foreign Relations Committee, will be held at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour Hotel. Sunday. March 15. at 10:30 a.m.. hosted by the
American Society for Technion.
Paul B Steinberg is brunch chairman, and Jay E. Leshaw is
Greater Miami Chapter president.
CID (Children In Distress) will hold a Luncheon Card Party.
I 30 a m Monday. March 16. at the Marriott Hotel on the
Day
There will be games set up for Pan. Canasta. Bridge. Scrabble.
Mi long. Gin Rummy and Rummy Kub.
"AWbeach GENERAL CARE FOR FUNGUS NAILS MIAMI beach

Uw sttnr Avf ^g&r [Podiatrist Foot Surgeon |
jp '674 Meridian Avenue. Ste. 104
v* (Acrois from Burdine's)
s*-m^CIo. | 53f-0414
WE ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENTS
lVa'amat
USA
The annual Child Rescue Lun-
cheon of the Hi Rise Tikvah
Chapter of Na'amat USA, featur-
ing musical entertainment,
speaker national vice president
Harriet Green and honoring Sally
Gersten, president, will be held
Monday, March 16 at noon at the
Shelborne Hotel, 1801 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach.
A recitaton of the Megillah
reading will be conducted by
Esther Weinstein, at the Wednes-
day meeting of the Beba Idelson
Chapter. The 11:30 a.m. session
will be held in the club room of the
100 Lincoln Road Building, Miami
Beach.
Anna Chaet, one of the founders
of the chapter, will be honored as
Queen Esther during the Purim
celebration. She has been an ac-
tive member of the world-wide
organization for nearly 50 years
and heads a four-generation fami-
ly membership in Na'amat.
Esther Weinstein will also
entertain with her repertoire of
Hebrew, Yiddish and English
songs.
According to Irene Raczkowski,
president, the public is welcome at
no charge and Sarah Kerbs and
Mildred Frank will serve as
hostesses.
RABBI AVAILABLE
FOR HIGH HOLIDAYS
Rabbi ordalmd 26 yaara axpartanca. Saa
High Holiday poalllon with Conaarvatlva
or Traditional Congregation, can alao aarra
aa Baal Koran (Torah Roadar). Wrlta P.O.
Bo. 19-1 IBB. Miami Baach. FL 33119
BLUE
etmmtmum
For Boys ark ft-16
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PART OF CROWD AT SUNDAY'S COLORFUL EVENT.
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CALL
531-3446


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Cornelia Sadat
Continued from Page 1-B
munications from Boston Univer-
sity, where she will soon register
for PhD studies.
ANWAR SADAT, whose early
schooling was in the Koran,
"believed war was like an infec-
tious disease, and he wanted to be
the one to check its spread," his
daughter said.
"He knew the cost would be
high (peace with Israel)," said
Sadat. "He knew the cost would
be his life."
Sadat once asked her father
how he, a soldier "fed war in the
bottle," decided that peace was
the correct path. He replied that it
was because he was a soldier, and
had seen what war can wreak,
that he chose peace.
"I look on the possibility of war
as a mother and an aunt," stated
Sadat. "We remember the history
between Israel and Egypt because
that is our background, but we
cannot let the past destroy the
future.
"We cannot wait for peace 100
years until another man like An-
war Sadat, willing to pay the price
of his life for peace, comes along,"
said Sadat.
ONCE, when the other Arab
leaders were calling Anwar Sadat
a traitor for having made a
separate peace with Israel, his
daughter asked him, "How can
you stand all these accusations?"
"This is not the generation
which will understand," replied
Sadat, who believed that the
peace process would take about 50
years.
"He wrote his own epitah in
1977," recalled Sadat, "Man of
war, and man of peace."
"If we could all put our hands
together," said Sadat at the end
of her talk here "then we would
see that people are people,
whether Egyptian, Israeli or
Palestinian. I ask you to put your
hands together and pray for
peace."
SADAT, her hands in the air,
her eyes closed, prayed for a mo-
ment as the audience, hands link-
ed, did the same.
Camelia Sadat, who came to the
United States shortly before her
father's 1981 assasination, divorc-
ed the army officer with whom her
Public Notices
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-08469
IN RE: The Marriage of:
VICTOR RODRIGUE
LAURENT,
Petitioner,
and
ETTA DIANA LAURENT,
Respondent.
TO: ETTA DIANA LAURENT,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
14566 March 6, 13, 20, 27, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-8482 17
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN AMBROISE.
Petitioner,
and
VALENCIA L. AMBROISE,
Respondent.
TO: VALENCIA L. AMBROISE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: M. GENDRON
14564 March 6. 13, 20,27,1987
father had arranged a marriage
for her when she was 12 in order
to continue her education.
In an interview after her talk at
the Federation function, Sadat
said that "Like any father, he
didn't want to see his daughter
divorced." She was 20 when she
divorced her husband, 17 years
her senior.
"But I went back to continue
my education with my father's
support," added Sadat, whose
father, she explained, had broken
the law when he arranged her
marriage.
"He did a lot for women's rights
in Egypt," she added.
SADAT, who does not want to
get involved in the politics of her
country, said that she believes
women are natural peace-makers.
"I believe in the role of women
as peace-makers because they are
mothers. It is a woman's natural
job to make peace at home bet-
ween her children, that is a
woman's role."
Camelia Sadat is the founder of
the Sadat Peace Institutue, a non-
profit organization. She has writ-
ten one book, "My Father And I,"
and is currently working on
another novel, dealing with Arab
women in Moslem societies.
For her, peace is at the center of
her thought processes. Her
father, she never forgets to say,
"after all forfeited his life for the
peace between Israel and Egypt
which he helped to create."
"I did not think," she added sad-
ly, "that they would ever kill a
man of peace."
Obituaries
KIRSCHNER
Jeanette, 67, of Miami Beach, passed away
February 22. She is survived by a son Brucn
Kirschner of New York City; a daughter
Rons Kirschner of Marietta. Ga.; two
sisters, Mildred Grassman of New York Ci-
ty, Mary Gladstone of New York City; a
brother Abbey Loff of Atlanta, Ga. and four
grandchildren. Services were held February
23. Arrangements handled by Riverside
Alton Road Chapel. Donations in memory
may be made to the American Cancer
Society.
KRENSKY
Herbert, 56, of Miami, on March 2. He was
an attorney for 28 years in the Miami area.
He is survived by his wife, Arlene;
daughters, Leslie and Andrea and mother
lues. Interment at M t. Nebo Cemetery. Ser-
vices held at The Riverside Alton Road
Chapel.
SHANTZEK, Michael, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
BLOOM, Anna, 90, of Kendall, March 2.
Services were held.
HERSH, Beatrice, of North Miami Beach.
Levitt-Weinstein.
HOLLAND, Abe, of Miami Beach, March 2.
Interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Blasberg Chapel.
CHERNOW. Herman, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
EMOFF, Florence, of Miami Beach, March
2. Blasberg Chapel.
SASSOON, Ezequiel, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
ROBERTS, Robert, 75, of North Miami
Beach. March 3. Menorah Chapels.
FRIEDMAN. Jacob Lewis, of Golden
Beach, Fla. Menorah Chapels.
JOSEPH, Nathan, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert
RENNERT, Max, of Kendall. March 1. Ser-
vices were held.
ROSENBAUM, Lawrence I., February 26.
Levitt-Weinstein.
KRONICK, Charles, of North Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert
ABRAMS. Charles, 62. of Miami. February
27. The Riverside.
HELLER, Sally S., 86, of North Miami
Beach. Interment at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
The Riverside.
KULLA, Jack of Jenkintown, Pa. and North
Miami Beach, February 27. Hie Riverside.
KUWTNT, Max. of Miami Beach. Interment
in Long Island. Eternal Light.
EMOFF, Florence, of Miami Beach, March
2. Blasberg Chapel.
HERMAN. Sally, of North Miami Beach.
Eternal Light.
PETERMAN, Charles Wolf, of Surfside.
Eternal Light
LERNER, Helene E., March 2. Levitt-
Weinstein.
Fredric Mann, Former
U.S. Ambassador, Passes
Fredric R. Mann died Thursday
(Feb. 26) at the Miami Heart In-
stitute. He was 83.
Mann leaves a legacy of activity
in a variety of causes. He was
especially well known for his role
in the construction of the Fredric
R. Mann Auditorium in Tel Aviv
and another music center that J
bears his name in Philadelphia
Born in Russia, Mr. Mann i
U.S. Ambassador to the Ba
in the late 1960's.
Services were held LWiJ
(March 1) in Philadelphia a??1
Congregation Rodeph Sholom.
26640 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
(313) 5431622
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* '


Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
| foreclose Sales
^.riRCUIT COURT FOB
ffinmrnr. Florida
dA2Lbatedivision
Wb.r 87-455
i BE ESTATE OF
rif'BESA LONDON,
R TFSSIE LONDON
liW16"*8 Deceased
NOTICE OF
^S OR DEMANDS
T HE ABOVE
lS. AND ALL OTHER
Ens interested in
8Enr?REE HEREBY NOTI-
EDVt 5-e admirusu^tion of
-ute of THERESA LON-
,/SiI File Number
GfiS Spending in the Circuit
. for DADE County. Florida
*?L. the address of
Z is 73 W. Flagler Street.
^i Florida 33130. The per
i representative of the estate
**%> A. DREILING. Sr
Jse address is 1711 W 57th
Ek 10019. The name and ad-
^ of the personal represen-
attorney are set forth
Public Notices
claims or
ttives
elow.
I All persons having
wnds against the estate are re-
rT WITHIN THREE MON-
BFROMTHEDATEOFTHE
.KT PUBLICATION OF THIS
I0TICE. to file with the clerk of
above court a written state-
it of any claim or demand they
have. Each claim must be in
ing and must indicate the basis
the claim, the name and ad-
, of the creditor or his agent or
gt and the amount claimed.
[tie daim is not yet due, the date
it will become due shall be
I. If the claim is contingent or
[t*d, the nature of the
Jnty shall be stated. If the
_ U secured the security shall
described. The claimant shall
. sufficient copies of the
to the derit to enable the
to mail one copy to each per-
ms! representative.
All persons interested in the
Hate to whom a copy of this
lotice of Administration has been
tiled are required. WITHIN
1 MONTHS FROM THE
ATE OF THE FIRST
UBLICATION OF THIS
I0TICE, to file any objections
hey may have that challenge the
ilidity of the decedent's will, the
islifications of the personal
"presentative, or the venue or
Nrisdicbon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
iND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
D WILL BE FOREVER
IARRED.
Date of the first publication of
Notice of Administration:
iMarch 6, 1987.
David A. Dreiling
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
THERESA LONDON a/k/a
TESSIE LONDON
I W>('I' 'tsiM1
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LYNN W. FROMBERG. ESQ.
Fromberg. Fromberg, Gross,
Shore, Lewis and Rogel, P.A.
No. 800.2500 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd.
Hallandale, Florida 33009
Telephone: (SOS) 940-0709
K569 March 6, 13. 1987
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLOBIDA
PBOBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-349
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER WEINZIMMER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PEBSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of ESTHER WEINZIM
MER, deceased, File Number
87-349 PC (01), is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Third Floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representatives of the estate are
PHYLLIS ACKERMAN and
RUTH BROFSKY, whose address
is c/o ALBOUM and FURLONG,
333 Arthur Godfrey Rd., No. 104,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the daim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THBEE MONTHS FBOM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOBEVEB
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
March 6, 1987.
PHYLLIS ACKERMAN
and RUTH BROFSKY
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ESTHER WEINZIMMER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ALBOUM and FURLONG
333 Arthur Godfrey Road, No. 104
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 538-6741
14562 March 6. 13. 1987
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENEBAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-6753 CA 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
LLOYDS BANK OF
CALIFORNIA, a California state
chartered bank,
Plaintiff,
v.
RAFAEL RONCALLO, HILDA
RONCALLO, and the unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees
creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under or
against them,
Defendants.
To: Rafael Roncallo and Hilda Run
callo, whose residence address is
Calle 76 No. 5629, Barranquilla,
Colombia. South America, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claiming in-
terest by, through, under or
against said Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Unit No. 416, in Building No.
250. of THE ISLES CON-
DOMINIUM, a Con-
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 9964. at
Pages 212 through 261, in
dusive, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Boeenthal & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida S31S7, on or before April 3
1987, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys or immediately thereafter,
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 2, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BABBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
SWD No. 215800-3-320-G
Lloyds No. 0215800
14571 March 6.13, 20, 27,1987
IN THE CIBCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 87-362 CA 14
NOTICE OF ACTION
WATERTOWN SAVINGS
BANK, a Massachusetts savings
bank,
Plaintiff,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Mt the undersigned, desiring to
*ge in business under the fic-
titious name International Com-
modities at 75(1 S.W. 10 Ave.
iami FL 33130 intends to
"gister said name with the Clerk
f the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
M&J Systems Supplies Inc.
Owner
14557 March 6,13, 20.27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
"nTTIOUS NAME LAW
thVV E IS HEREBY GIVEN
* the undersigned, desiring to
g> business under the fic-
TLT* Fami|y Pe8t Control
S"*N-W- 82nd Court. Miami.
!J*. 33015 intends to register
" me with the Clerk of the
ted,Coun of
Mi
LOBENE ABDOOL and
ABDOOL, her husband, if
married; MON1QUE M.
DUBERCEAU;STEPHEN
KREIMER. LESLEY
KREIMER, ALISA KREIMER,
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by,
through, under or against them;
and PROFIT SHARING TRUST
COMMITTEE for the PAPER
MART, INC., and the unknown
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or others claiming by,
through, under or against it; and
PEOPLES EQUITY
MORTGAGE, INC., individually
and as trustee;
Defendants.
TO: Monique M. Duberceau,
whose residence is
2201 N.W. 93rd Avenue,
Pembroke Pines,
Florida 33023.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 39. in Block 108. of
LESLIE ESTATES SEC-
TION SEVEN, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 97, at Page 28.
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami.
Florida 33137. on or before April
3, 1987. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on February 25,1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BABBABA BODBIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
14551 March 6,13.20,27, 1987
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 1040
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Ernest Peter Goldring,
a/k/a E. Peter Goldring,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Ernest Peter Goldring, a/k/a E.
Peter Goldring, deceased, File
Number 87-1040, is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenge the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 6, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Lydia Goldring and
Kenneth Goldring
4560 Prairie Avenue,
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Elliott Harris
111 SW 3rd St., 6th Floor
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: 305/368-0146
14572 March 6,13.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name E.G. Truck at 1068
West 38 St. Hialeah FL 33012 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Elio Cruz
Owner
14555 March 6. 13, 20, 27, 1987
Dade County.
r Raymond Bourbeau. President
"' Motor Analyst, Inc.
"ARKBSLAVIN
W..G2n,l Street
w;M'ami K"ach' Fla 33162
iS*ne;305-y44-6556
March 6,13,20,27, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-08408
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LOUIS MICHEL V.
DESROSIERS,
Petitioner,
and
BETTY J. DESROSIERS,
Respondent.
TO: BETTY J. DESROSIERS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherw.se a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
14564 March 6, 13.20. 27, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 874)8207 (10)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BRUCE CRAIG BROCKWAY
Petitioner,
and
MARIE MYRIAM BROCKWAY
Respondent
TO: MARIE MYRIAM
BROCKWAY
1415 Leavenworth
Apt. No. 4
San Francisco,
California 94109
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN, ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 909 East 8th Avenue,
Hialeah. Florida 33010. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 3, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 27th day of February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY E. GOODMAN. Esq.
Hialeah, Florida 33010
Attorney for Petitioner
14567 March 6, 13, 20, 27, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87-07301 FC 23
IN RE: The Marriage of:
STELLA JOYCE SNARKE,
Petitioner/Wife
and
JEFF GUITTARRI SNARKE,
Respondent/Husband
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: Jeff Guittarri Snarke
610 8th Street -
Apartment 7
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(last known address)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Bruce J.
Scheinberg, attorney for Peti- .
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road-Suite 512. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 10th.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal ot
said court at Miami, Florida on this
3rd day of March, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kwitney, Kroop and Scheinberg,
P.A.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
14575 March 6, 13.20,27,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-08430-17
DM RE: The Marriage of:
MECENE C1LLYS,
Petitioner,
and
ELOUISE CILLYS,
Respondent.
TO: ELOUISE CILLYS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
14552 March 6. 13.20,27,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 87-08429-17
IN RE: The Marriage of:
BONY JEUNE.
Petitioner,
and
LINDA DIANE JEUNE,
Respondent.
TO: LINDA DIANE JEUNE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 25, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
14553 March 6. 13,20. 27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Via Veneto Jewelry
at 36 N.E. First Street Suite 615
Miami, Florida 33132 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Knortonom
President
Gema International Corp.
36 N.E. First Street, Suite 615
Miami, Florida 33132
14561 March 6. 13,20, 27. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-2870 FC 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN RICHELET REBECA,
Petitioner,
and
CAROLYN D. REBECA,
Respondent.
TO: CAROLYN D. REBECA
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before April 3, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 26, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
14565 March 6. 13, 20, 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIBCUIT OF FLOBIDA IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
GENEBAL JUBISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-09455
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
LINCOLN SERVICE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
CARL C. PANTIN, et al..
Defendants.
TO: LARRY J. SISLER
Rt. 1 Box 60
Friendsville. Maryland 21531
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14. in Block 2, of ADDI-
TION "J" SO. MIAMI
HEIGHTS, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 68, at Page 74. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
April 10, 1987 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 3 day of March.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
14574 March 6,13,20. 27, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Wholesales of Florida
at 13126 W. Dixie H.Way Suit.- B
N Miami. FL 33161 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
SaFar ShahPouri
14573 March 6, 13,20,27, 1987
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLOBIDA
PBOBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-776
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX M. ORNSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Max M. Ornstein, deceased. File
Number 87-776, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative anil the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
] representative, venue, or jurisdic-
: tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 6, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Stella Krainin and
Philip Krainin
6161 N.W. 2nd Avenue,
Apt. 619
Boca Raton. Florida 33431
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
GEORGE GILBERT
One Lincoln Road Bldg.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-4312
14563 March 6. 13. 1987


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 86-55161 FC 22
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SANTOS PEREZ
Petitioner,
and
PAULA L. PEREZ, a/k/a
PAULA L. BARROSO
Respondent,
TO: PAULA L. PEREZ, a/k/a
PAULA L. BARROSO
('all,- 80 No. 6506
Guanajay, Provincia La
Habana,
Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on CARLOS
M. MENDEZ, ESQ. Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 200
West 49th Street Hialeah, Florida
33012, and file the original with
the Clerk of the styled Court on or
before March 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive week in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami, Florida, on
this 10 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ,
LAW OFFICES
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33012
By: Carlos Mendez
Attorney for Petitioner
14617 February 13, 20,27;
___________________March 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name King George Apart-
ments at 1101 Marseilles Drive,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Jorge Torrecillas
Migdalia Torrecillas
Owners
Paul Kwitney, P.A.
K witney Kroop & Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Attorneys for
King George Apartments
14612 February 13,20,27;
__________________March 6,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-4*852 (31)
IS RE: The Marriage of:
FRITZ ANNEAS,
Petitioner,
and
MARY H. ANNEAS,
Respondent.
TO: MARY H. ANNEAS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14631 February 20, 27;
March 6 13, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-0*849 (03)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JULIO MONDELUS.
Petitioner,
and
NADJA R. MONDELUS,
Respondent.
TO: NADJA R. MONDELUS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14533 February 20,27;
March 6 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-03077 CA23
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
MELLON BANK (EAST),
N.A.,
Plaintiff
vs.
ELAINE M. PULEO,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: ELAINE M. PULEO
10090 N.W. 80th Court.
No. 1128
Hialeah. Florida 33016
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Unit No. 1128,
in SAMARI LAKE EAST, a
Condominium located in the
City of Hialeah Gardens,
Dade County. Florida, pur-
suant to the Declaration of
Condominium for Samari
Lake East, a condominium,
recorded in Official Records
Book 9831, at Page 1411. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
March 27. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 20 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14546 February 27;
March 6,13,20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-208
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS CHRISTIAN
McGARRY
a/k/a
THOMAS C. McGARRY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of THOMAS
CHRISTIAN McGARRY a/k/a
THOMAS C. McGARRY, deceas-
ed, File Number 87-208, is pending
in the Circuit Court for DADE
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 27, 1987.
Personal Representative:
JOSEPHINE PUTZER
McGARRY
508 DeSoto Drive
Miami Springs, Florida 33166
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Herbert Z. Marvin
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, Florida 33173
Telephone: (305) 279-0730
14540 February 27. March 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Car Stereo at
3930 SW 8 St. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Mobil Security Systems Inc.
3930 SW 8 St.
Miami 33134
14516 February 13.20, 27;
March 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-36146 CA-27
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
VALLEY NATIONAL
BANK OF ARIZONA.
Plaintiff
vs.
SISTER DONUT. INC.,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: THE FRYDENBURG
CORPORATION, a dissolved
Florida corporation
HORSE WORLD. INC., a
dissolved Florida corporation
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 3, Block 2. PANACHE,
SECTION 1, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 126, Page 37, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
March 20. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 13 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14526 February 20, 27;
March 6,13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4)7779 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PIEDAD JIMENEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: PIEDAD JIMENEZ
Ave. Principal
Lomas de Chuao
Quints A rue
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade Country, Florida:
Condominium Unit No.
10700-1, Building 10700
N.W. 7th Street, of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium filed in Official
Records Book 9009, at Page
1608. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended; together with all
improvements, appliances
and fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132. on or before
March 27, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 20 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
14545 February 27;
____________March 6,13,20.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GrVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AIRPORT TAXIST
CLUB at 3660 Coral Way Miami
FL 33145 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Aurelio V. Tapia,
Principal Partner of
Alfredo Avello,
Angel M. Hernandez
and Aurelio V. Tapia Partnership
14544 February 27;
March 6, 13.20, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-4028 FC 29
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH SERRANO,
Petitioner
vs.
LUIS A. SERRANO,
Respondent
TO: LUIS A. SERRANO,
Residence Unknown shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS, At-
torney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 18, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
14536 February 27;
March 6.13. 20. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-06846-12
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ABEL BARONVILLE.
Petitioner,
and
PRISCILLA BARONVILLE.
Respondent.
TO: PRISCILLA BARONVILLE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14534 February 20, 27;
March 6 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Le Mienne For Her at
8870 SW 40 St. No. 2 Miami FL
33166 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
YENISEY INC.
8870 SW 40 St. No. 2
Miami, FL 33166
14548 February 27;
March 6,13,20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nutber 87-845
Division (03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE E. BLAIR
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: BARBARA A. LATHER
80Q1 N.W. 166 Street
Royal Oaks
(Miami Lakes),
Florida 33016
TO: JAMES L. BLAIR
262 West 43 Street
Hialeah, FL 33012
and all unknown parties who may
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees
or beneficiaries of the Estate of
the late MARIE E. BLAIR, be
they minors, incompetents or
otherwise not sui juris
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for The Determination of
Beneficiaries and Heirs has been
filed in this court and you are re-
quired to file your written defenses
to the petition with the clerk of this
court and to serve a copy thereof
not later than April 6, 1987, on
petitioner's attorney, whose name
and address is:
HAYS, GRUNDWERG AND
VANN, 28 West Flagler Street,
Suite 800, Miami, Florida 33130
If you fail to do so. judgment
may be entered in due course upon
the petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on February 27 1987
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY Reina E. Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
First publication or posting on
March 6. 1987.
14668 March 6,13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names Halen Products -
Blue Cologne by Halen Day and
Night by Halen at 4160 NW 7 St.
Miami, Fla. 33126 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Ricardo Palacio
Owner
14558 March 6, 13,20, 27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JLuffi
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. florin,
GENERAL JURISDlS
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-08536-02
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI a
United States Corporation '
Plaintiff,
vs.
ENRIQUE BARRIGA and M
OLGA de BARRIGA, a/k/a u
OLGA TUNON de BARRIGA his
wife, et al., '
Defendants.
TO: ENRIQUE BARRIGA and
M. OLGA de BARRIGA
a/k/a M. OLGA TUNON de
BARRIGA, his wife
Ave. Colon 3386
Santiago, Chile
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that m
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: X
Condominium Unit No
S-701, SOUTH TOWER OF
FAIRVIEW HOUSE CON-
DOMINIUM. accor.iir.g to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium, recorded in Of-
ficial Records Book 10628, at
Page 1114, of the I'ublic
Records of Dado County,
Florida, together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if anv. to it
on Keith. Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st. Street,
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
April 3, 1987. and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torneys or immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a Default will he
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 25 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. CASAMAYOR
Deputy Clerk
14669 March 6.13.20.27.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 1100
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAY HOFFMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RAY HOFFMAN, deceased,
File Number 87-1100, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jections by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 6. 1987.
Personal Representative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBIN
Broad & Cassel
1 Biscayne Tower No. 3333
Miami, Florida 33131
(305) 371-9100
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Michael A. Dribin
Broad & Cassel
1 Biscayne Blvd. No. 3333
Miami, Florida 33131
FLORIDA BAR NO: 205656
Telephone: (306) 371-9100
14.^60 March6.13,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Enchanted Child
at 7130 SW 117 Ave. Miami FL
33183 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
De Los Rios, Inc.
Owner
14556 March 6, 13,20,27,1987


Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page l')-B
foreclosure Sales Public Notices
eiKVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
Effi COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-00848-14
Petitioner,
JSephjurignycoqmard.
^sSjurigny
COQMARD,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for DiwoJufaon of Mar
SeTpon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Xney 612 Northwest 12th
irSinu. Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27.1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
..con February 20,27;
1 March 6 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Sound Design at 1943
NE 148 St. No. Miami FL 33181
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Rudy Tones Inc.
1943 NE 148 St.
No. Miami. FL 33181
14515 February 13, 20,27;
March 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-937
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SIDNEY HASKOE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of SIDNEY
HASKOE. deceased. File Number
87-937, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is THERESA F. HASKOE, whose
address is 600 Biltmore Way, Apt.
901, Coral Gables, FL 33134. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the chum is not yet due, the date
"ben it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
cairn to the clerk to enable the
derk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
te to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
W are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
y may have that challenge the
"J'dity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
"Presentative. or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
.*{, CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
D OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
baVedLL BE forever
ihD*tt.of the first Publication of
*> Notice of Administration:
Kbruary 27. 1987.
Theresa Hascoe
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SIDNEY HASKOE
2"? Dadeland Blvd. Suite 600
S3 ^rida 33166
ij-(306) 66*0401
1 'ebruary27,March6.1987,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-04724 FC04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FREDDY PACHECO
Petitioner
and
MARGARITA ENRIQUEZ
PACHECO
Respondent
TO: MARGARITA ENRIQUEZ
PACHECO
Resident and address
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Mark
J. Friedman, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 350 Lin-
coln Rd., Suite 422 Miami Beach,
Fl. 33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 20, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARK J. FRIEDMAN
Attorney at Law
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 422
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone: 305-532-5409
Attorney for Petitioner
14523 February 20, 27;
March 6, 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JESSPORT at 1036
East 31 Street, Hialeah, Florida
33013 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
// STEVEN SIEGLER
Secretary Treasurer
NUMBER ONE STORE, INC.
JOSHUA D. BASH, ESQ.
Attorney for
NUMBER ONE STORE, INC.
1926 Hollywood Blvd.
Suite 228
Hollywood, FL 33020
805-940-1200/922-1400
14627 February 20, 27;
March 6, 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICT1TIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TOLL FREE at
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue, Opa-
Locka, Florida 33055 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
JERRY SUE FASHIONS, INC.
13170 NW 48rd Ave.
Opa-Locka, Fl. 33055
HARVEY D. ROGERS. ESQ.
Attorney for
JERRY SUE FASHIONS, INC.
14521 February 20, 27;
March 6, 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SILK NATUREL at
12301 S.W. 195 Terrace, Miami,
Fla. 33177 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
court of Dade County, Florida.
Manuel A. Alvarez
14539 February 27;
March 6. 23, 20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuiber 87 780
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
DAVID BUTTERMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DAVID BUTTERMAN, deceas-
ed, File Number 87-780, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33103. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 20, 1987.
Personal Representative:
RHODA RUBIN
17-08 Bellair Avenue
Fairlawn, New Jersey 07410
ARNOLD SLOTKIN, C.P.A.
300 71st Street, Suite 600
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN, ESQ.
CYPEN & CYPEN
P.O. BOX 402099
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
14524 February 20,27,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-06845 (17)
In Re: The Marriage of
NELSI BEJARANO,
Petitioner,
and
GUILLERMO BEJARANO,
Respondent.
TO: GUILLERMO BEJARANO
Cra. 31 No. 26B-83
Barrio Jardin
Cali, Valle, Colombia
Last known address
You shall serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon: Nelsi Be
jarano, 2815 S.W. 37 Ct Miami,
Florida 33134, and file original
with the Clerk on or before March
27, 1987. otherwise a default will
be entered.
February 18, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
BY BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
14687 February 27;
March 6.13,20,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-04847 (17)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
EDMOND ABNER FENELON,
Petitioner,
and
GWENDOLYN D. FENELON
Respondent
TO: GWENDOLYN D.
FENELON.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27,1987; otherwise s
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14529 February 20,27;
March 6, 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name R & S INSURANCE
II at 2291 N.W. 28th Street,
Miami, Fl 33142 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
LATIN INSURANCE CENTER,
INC.
OSCAR R. SANTANA, President
14628 February 20,27;
March 6. 13, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
87-07896
Case No.: 01
IN RE: The Marriage of:
THEODULE CHARLES,
Petitioner,
and
MAXINE CHARLES,
Respondent.
TO: MAXINE CHARLES.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27.1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 23, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
14549 February 27;
March 6, 13,20, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-05832-23
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN ROBERT SEVERE,
Petitioner,
and
RONALDA LORAINE SEVERE,
Respondent.
TO: RONALDA LORAINE
SEVERE, Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before March 20, 1987,
otherwise a default will be entered.
February 10, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
14519 February 13.20,27;
March 6, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-03256 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
RIGAUD FRANCOIS,
Petitioner,
and
CAROLYN L. FRANCOIS,
Respondent.
TO: CAROLYN FRANCOIS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27, 1987, other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13481 January 30;
February 6.13,20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-1038
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THOMAS CLAYTON
ANDERSON
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: ALLEN ANDERSON
1455 West Avenue, No. 203
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
and all unknown parties who may
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees
or beneficiaries of the Estate of
the late THOMAS CLAYTON
ANDERSON, be they minors, in-
competents or otherwise not sui
juris.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for The Determination of
Beneficiaries and Heirs has been
filed in this court You are required
to serve written defenses to the
petition not later than March 30,
1987, on petitioner's attorney,
whose name and address are:
HAYS, GRUNDWERG & VANN,
28 West Flagler Street, Suite 800,
Miami, Florida 33130 and to file
the original of the written defenses
with the clerk of this court either
before service or immediately
thereafter. Failure to serve writ-
ten defenses ss required may
result in a judgment or order for
the relief demanded in the petition,
without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on February 20,1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
14547 February 27, March 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of ELEVENTH U.S.
JUDICIAL MANAGEMENT
CORP., d/b/a U.S. MANAGE-
MENT at 12490 NE. 7th Avenue,
North Miami, FL intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
LESLIE RATTET
Carl A. Schmitt
Attorney for Eleventh Judicial
Management Corp.. d/b/a U.S.
Management
14509 February 13, 20, 27;
__________________March 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Apple's Drywall
Spraying Specialists at 1880 Sea
Grape Avenue, Pembroke Pines,
Fl. 33026 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Amy Espinola
Owner
14613 February 13.20,27;
March 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
Ficnnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desirin; to
engage in business under tht fic-
titious name Sunshine Holida s at
4300 N.W. 135 Street, Opa-Lc cka,
Miami, Florida 33054 into: d to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade ."oun-
ty, Florida.
Sunshine Holidays, Inc.
4300 N.W. 136 Street
Opa-Locka, Miami, Florida
Attorneys for Applicants
Steven D. Tishler, Esquire
8625 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 754-1001
14635 February 20, 27;
March 6,13,1987
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 87 846
DIVISION 03
(Florida Bar No. 032230)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE E. BLAIR
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MARIE E.
BLAIR, deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, File Number 87
845, is pending in the Circuit Court
in and for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Courthouse
73 West Flagler Street, Miami
Florida 33130. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons interested in the
estate are required to file with this
court, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
son on whom this notice was serv-
ed that challenges the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Personal Representative:
BARBARA A. LATHER
8001 N.W. 166 Street
Royal Oaks (Miami Lakes),
Florida 38016
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 27 day of
February, 1987.
Moses J. Grundwerg
Of Law Offices of
HAYS, GRUNDWERG A VANN
28 West Flagler St., Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33130
(306) 3794435
Attorney for Personal
Representative
14538 February 27; March 6, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-068(1-15
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SYLVANA ROBERTSON,
Petitioner,
and
JEROME ROBERTSON,
Respondent.
TO: JEROME ROBERTSON,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14532 February 20, 27;
March 6 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desirinsr te '<
engage in business under the fi<
titious name Joseph D. Ventura -,
and Associates at 67 NW 166 '
Street. North Miami Beach. Fla. ';
33169 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Ventura Enterprises, Inc.
Marvin I. Moss
Attorney for Applicant
14543 February 27;
March 6,13,20. 1987


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
-
She *s Back In Force
Dr. Joel Roth To Speak At
Beth Torah Congregation
Continued from Page 1-B
vation is that when a woman has
an orgasm, she starts nesting.
"WOMEN ADMIT to me that
when they get sexually involved,
the man becomes terribly impor-
tant and occupies a new space in
their lives. When a woman's body
is penetrated, it's penetrated emo-
tionally as well as physically.
"Women tend to lose their
creativity when they're in love
they want to cook and be taken
care of," she adds.
One of the key factors which has
contributed to the switch back to
more traditional values, and has
made matchmaking services such
as Bobbi Heiman's popular once
again, is the public's fear of con-
tracting incurable sexually
transmitted diseases, such as
herpes or AIDS.
"I'm seriously thinking in the
next two months or so about blood
testing for AIDS," admits
Heiman, "although I don't know if
the public is ready yet.
"Right now, at the end of an in-
terview, just before signing the
contract, a client reads questions
about drug-use, criminal record,
alcohol problems and venereal
disease," says Heiman. "You
could never ask a person in a bar,
'excuse me, but have you ever
committed a felony and are you an
alcoholic?"
BUT DO Heiman's clients tell
her the truth?"
"I have a way of being able to
pull down people's veneers," she
says. "Some people have lied, but
then later they always cancel the
contract," and eventually tell her
the truth, she says.
"The media have scared people
about herpes it's not such a ter-
rible thing. It's been around for
hundreds of years," argues
Heiman, who says that she is plan-
ning to add to the questionnaire or
the contract questions ascertain-
ing whether a person would be
willing to date a handicapped per-
son or a person with herpes.
PERSONALS-
THE AVENTURA JEWISH
Center Singles 40 Plus will
have a special perform-
ance for Purlm. This will be
held during their monthly
meeting on Monday, March
16, at 7:30 p.m. The famous
singer star from Broadway
musicals, Phyllis Green,
will entertain with the
renowned pianist, Sy
Greene. Members $3, non-
members $4. Refresh-
ments and social hour will
follow. For more informa-
tion call Shula 935-3742 or
Doris 932-9382.
N.Y. BUSINESSMAN in
M.B. till March 15-20. Hand-
some, athletic, non-
smoker, 57", looking for
pretty, slim girl 27-37. Write
Box TD, c/o Jewisrffclorid-
ian, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami 33101.
BETH TORAH SINGLES
Ages 25-45 presents Dr.
Michael Andron, founder of
the Kodesh Center. This
will be a program on
"Stress Management."
This will be held Thursday,
March 12, 1987, 7:30 p.m.
at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, Benny Rok Campus,
1051 North Miami Beach
Boulevard, North Miami
Beach, Florida in our
Gennie Gherman Youth
Center Building. Admis-
sion $5.00 which includes
refreshments.
As for ADOS, the blood test
which Heiman is considering, has
already been implemented by one
members-only singles' bar, which
requires its members to be tested
for AIDS every six months. There
has also been talk in the media of
making the test a requirement for
couples looking to get married and
for pregnant women.
"AIDS HAS wrought a tremen-
dous change back to old-fashioned
values," states Heiman, who
predicts that there will be some
regression back to the mores and
morals of the 1950's in the upcom-
ing years.
"Having less choice made it
simpler in the 1950's," says
Heiman.
When the Bubonic plague
devastated Europe in the Middle
Ages, it also changed the very
structure of European society.
Already AIDS is affecting the way
men and women date. Soon it may
effect the way they get married
and have children.
How far the swing back to tradi-
tional values will go remains to be
seen, but one thing is certain; for
as long as AIDS remains a lethal
threat, more and more men and
women will turn away from
singles' bars and, instead, turn to
the matchmaker to provide them
with a partner.
Dr. Joel Roth, Associate Pro-
fessor of Talmud and Rabbinics at
the Jewish Theological Seminary
will be the featured guest speaker
at the Evelyn and Monroe Mit-
chell and Family Jewish Educa-
tion and Enrichment Program
Scholar-in-Residence Series on
March 13 and 14 in the main sanc-
tuary of Beth Torah Congregation
Benny Rok Campus.
Dr. Roth will speak Friday night
on "Jewish Law in the Conser-
vative Movement," and Saturday
morning on "Processes for
Change Within Halacha." At a
special patron luncheon at noon
Sunday in Deakter Hall, Rabbi
Roth will speak on "Women in
Ritual and Ordination: Halachic
Issues and Responses."
Dr. Joel Roth
Temple Israel To Feature
'Welcome Back To The Frat House'
Hospice To Hold Volunteer Drive
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
will feature "Welcome Back to he
Frat House," a male's only con-
versation and comraderie union
on March 11 from 12:15 to 1:55
p.m. at The Miami Club.
Topics at the luncheon fraterni-
ty with Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat,
sponsored by the Temple Israel
Brotherhood, include: "A Good
Jewish Boy How Good is He?'
"Who Is a Man?" An Exclusive
Fraternity?"; "Where Have All
the Flowers Gone?" and "Early
Life, Mid Life and Late Life
Crisis."
The Dade County chapter of
Hospice will have a countywide
volunteer recruitment campaign
in March and April called, "A
Celebration of Life."
Hospice, a nationally recognized
organization, cares for the ter-
minally ill and their families by
providing a range of profes*
and volunteer services which 1
support at this critical tj,
Volunteers assist th< program
supplementing direct caretoi
tients and families as well aji
ing administrative and pn
development roles.
where shopping is a pleasure
Publlx
DANISH
BAKERY
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Assorted Fruit Toppings
Meltaway
Coffee Cake
$179
each
Available at All Publix Stores
and Fresh Danish Bakeries
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Topped with Fresh
Strawberries, Heavy
Cheesecake
M50
Available at Ail Publix Stores
and Fresh Danish Bakeries
A Delicious Variety
Assorted
Cookies
$|99
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Baked Fresh Daily, Sliced or
Unsliced
36-ct.
box

I
Available at AH Publix Stores
and Fresh Danish Bakeries
Deep South
Carrot Cake
$949
each
2
&$&&&& Ri9hu
Quantity g. \,
Reserved. .&&&*?
9



MM ffl?
Special insert: Jewish High School of South Florida
Super Sunday 1987
ITS OUR TURN TO MAKE IT
Help make it a Super Day!
SP&eblotu tmfwipe 3


Save the Date
Israel 39
May 17, 1987
CAMPAIGN 3
Give a Day to the Combined Jewish Appeal
Super Sunday It's Our Turn To Make It Super
Super Sunday Committee
Super Sunday Sign-Up Coupon
WOMEN'S DIVISION 4
Campaign chairwoman's message
Women's Division Nominating Committee
Hold the Date
Installation
Mission to Washington, D.C.
OTZMA 6
A personal view of the Otzma program
Recruitment for second year of Otzma
Otzma information coupon
YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL/ 7
ALLIANCE DIVISION
YLC and the Community Relations Committee hold
special legislation forum
"Side by Side" by Sondheim
Purim party
Super Sunday
Upcoming Alliance Division events
CAMPAIGN 8
"A letter from Belle"
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA 9-12
Special insert
FOUNDATION 13
Alternative minimum tax may impact charitable giving
An update on the charitable uses of life insurance
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE/AGENCIES 14
XJCRAC Plenum report
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital begins new program
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION
JFTV program schedule
.Jerusalem Cafe
Check-Up Mount Sinai schedule
Ruth Elias-Holocaust survivor
Purim program
AGENCIES
Tal Clein describes her Aliyah
CAJE honors Rabbis Baumgard and Lehrman
CAJE executive director elected to chair Bureau
Directors' Fellowship
Holocaust Memorial Center holds fourth annual
Testimonial
COMMERCE AND PROFESSIONS
Chairman's message
Spotlight on Lee Spiegelman
Anatomy of an office meeting
Save the date for C & P end of year celebration
CAMPAIGN/AGENCIES
Cuban Hebrew Committee holds dinner dance
Drs. Eiber and Reyler head Cuban Hebrew Committee
Comedy Clinic opens at Mount Sinai Medical Center
JFS forms support group for troubled teens
CALENDAR
15
16
17
18
20
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
March 6 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
President
Aaron Podhurst
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman. Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel

Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark D. Friedman
I,
2 Federation. March 1987


Give a Day Participants *
Samuel I. AdJer
Bill Baros
Jim Baros
Saby Behar
Jack Bellock
Helene Berger
Jeffrey L. Berkowitz
Paul Berkowitz
Richard Berkowitz
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Jack Burstein
Tom Borin
Herb Canarick
Amy Dean
Terry Drucker
Sam Dubbin
Rabbi Michael Ei sens tat
Myra Farr
Martin Fine
Pat Fine
Mike Fischer
As of 2/12/87
David Fleeman
Harvey Friedman
Morris Futernick
Al Golden
Goldie Goldstein
Elliot Gordon
Emil Gould
Alex Halberstein
Sam Harte
Charlotte Held
Arthur Horowitz
Marvin Jacobson
Martin Kalb
Robert Kaplan
Ezra Katz
Shepard King
Alan J. Kluger
Steven J. Kravitz
Bemie Landers
William Lehman, Jr.
Moises Levin
Jack H. Levine
Harry A. "Hap" Levy
Nancy Lipoff
Norman H. Lipoff
Jose Lurie
Ellen Mandler
Bob Merlin
Dr. Douglas Miller
Linda Minkes
Stanley C. Myers
Gail Newman
Jeffrey Newman
Jerry Olin
Michael Olin
Nedra Oren
David Paul
Aaron Podhurst
Dorothy Podhurst
Norman Rachlin
Forrest Raffel
Nan Rich
Lou Rones
Ellen Rose
Herschel Rosenthal
Bill Saulson
Howard R. Scharlin
Michael Scheck
Marc Schectman
Gerald K. Schwartz
Norman Sholk
Marc Sheridan
Fred K. Shochet
Norman Sholk
Elaine Silverstein
Harry B. Smith
Shirley Spear
Eli Timoner
Rick Turesky
Harold Winick
Salomon Wainberg
Harvey Weinberg
Norman Weiner
Dr. George S. Wise
Barry S. Yarchin
Sunday, March 22 "It'* our turn to make it Super!"
Super Sunday
is an exciting, massive
phonathon held by Federation
on behalf of the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal. This year, the
Federation's in Broward and Palm
Beach counties are following our lead
by holding their phonathon's on the
same day.
"This cooperative effort will insure
that every Jewish household in South
Florida, from the Palm Beaches to
South Dade are contacted," said Saby
Behar, Super Sunday chairman for
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. "Our job in Dade County is as
tough as the other two counties com-
bined. There are approximately
500,000 Jews in South Florida, half of
whom reside in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's area of
operation."
To contact that many people,
Federation needs to have 1,800
volunteers to staff the phones in two
hour shifts at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, 137 N.E. 19th Street,
Miami, between 10:00 a.m. and 9:00
p.m. Each volunteer will be given a
brief training session before getting
on the phone.
44
A
lthough the goal for the
day is to raise funds for
the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal; funds
which support our local beneficiary
agencies, plus programs overseas and
in Israel, we want people to have fun
in the process," added Behar.
To help add to the "spirit" of the
day, there will be a "Ruach Center"
at Temple Israel during Super Sun-
day, complete with displays and
videos from Federation's family of
beneficiary agencies. "It helps people
to make the solicitation calls if they
can see what the campaign is all
about. These displays from our local
agencies will show them where the
dollars go," explained Behar.
Participants will also be asked for
their pledge to the 1987 Campaign
since they won't be home to receive a
Super Sunday call.
If you haven't already signed up to
volunteer for Super Sunday, mail the
coupon below to:
Super Sunday
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
or call Federation at 576-4000, ext.
215.
Clip and return to Federation.
Name
Address
City
? I will need day care services- (Ages 3 please!)
Number of children---------
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19th Street. Miami
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Zip
Home Phone Business Phone
I will be representing:
(Organization, Synagogue, Agency, Youth Group,
Federation Women's Division)
SUPER SUNDAY*
March 22.1987
I'll do my part as a
phone volunteer
D 10-12 am D 4-6 pm
D 12-2 pm D6-9pm
? 2-4 pm
You may volunteer for one
or more sessions.
'MOP UP" MONDAY
at Federation -
March 23
? 10-12 am
D 2-5 pm
D 5-8 pm
IiII-7LlrJaI>nZ2Ii !-- '.
Super Sunday
Committee
Super Sunday is a massive effort that
requires the time and dedication of many
individuals. The following people make up
the committees that make it all possible:
Super Sunday Executive Committee
Saby Behar, chairman
Paul Berkowitz, vice-chairman
Richard Berkowitz, vice-chairman
Judi Billig, vice-chairman
Ellen Rose, vice-chairman
Super Sunday Steering Committee
Barbara Black
Joan Bloom
Susana Eckstein
Ellen Elbrand
Ike Fisher
Jay Gamberg
Howard Glass
Esther Glicken
David Goldweitz
Ken Hoffman
Zena Inden
Eric Kaplan
Alan Kluger
Nadine Laham
Jeff Levine
Joel M. Levy
Arden Magoon
Hilda Mitrani
Michael Novak
Barry Reiner
Lorraine Soloman
Barry Yarchin
Federation, March 1987 3


/
Gail Newman
Campaign message
This year, the Combined Jewish Appeal
has taken off with a renewed spirit of
commitment from the entire community.
Women's Division, now more than ever,
is a part of that spirit. We've had a ter-
rific response this year to our campaign
efforts. More women are joining us, mak-
ing their commitment to Jewish needs to
enhance the quality of Jewish life in the
community through their pledges to the
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Women's Division has a $4.5 million
campaign goal for 1987. To date we have
raised $2,140,945. That's a 12 percent in-
crease over this time last year. The cam-
paign is moving along at full speed.
But it's not over yet. If you haven't
been involved up to this point, please join
us on Super Sunday. This will afford you
the opportunity to demonstrate your
commitment and show your solidarity
with Jews in Miami and Israel. We have
found that the main reason people do not
make a financial commitment is because
they have never been asked. So come join
the force of "askers" and have fun on
Sunday. March 22. It's your turn to make
it super!
Gail Newman
Women's Division
Campaign Chairwoman
The Nominating Committee of the
Women'* Division it accepting
recommendation* for Women's Divi-
sion officer*. Nomination* need to be
received by the Women 's Division no
later than March 10, 1987. Thank
you.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
NOMINATING COMMITTEE
Maxine E. Schwartz
Chairwoman
ELECTED
South Dade
Elly Wolff
North Dade
Lenore Elias
Miami Beach
Adria Rasken
S.W. Dade
Stella Haas
B.P.W.
Amy Dean
APPOINTED
South Dade
Micki Hochberg
Marvis Schaecter
North Dade
Debbie Edelman
Sandy Belkind
Miami Beach
Meryle Loring
Betty Cooper
S.W. Dade
Judy Adler
Heidi Friedland
B.P.W.
Maryanne Witkin
Lisa Leuchter Treister
PAST PRESIDENTS
Helene Berger
Nancy Lipoff
LAST YEARS'S CHAIRWOMAN
Charlotte Held
Women's Division recently held its Southwest Dade
Event at the Grand Bay Hotel in support of the 1987 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal. Pictured from left to right are Gail
Newman, Women's Division Campaign chairwoman;
Heidi Friedland, Southwest Dade lice chairwoman,
leadership development; Valerie Katz, Southwest Dade
event co-chairwoman; Judi Let enshon. Southwest Dndf
event co-chairwoma ; Judy Adler, chairwoman.
Southwest Dade. Tat? Katz, Southwest Dade vice chair-
woman, campaign; Erica Cantor, Southwest Dad*
secretary; and Amy Dean, Women '$ Division, vice /> .
dent, campaign designate.
Pictured at the Southwest Dade campaign event (from left
to right) are (standing) Dorothy Podhurst, Women's
Division president; Barbara Aronson; Michael Adler,
Summit Division Chairman; Bunny Adler, Ruby 10
chairwoman; Donald E. Lefton, 1987 CJA chairman.
Seated (from left) are Amy Dean. Women's Division vice
Hold the Date
WOMEN'S DIVISION
INSTALLATION
Tuesday, May 19, 1987
9:30 a.m.
Biltmore Hotel
president, campaign designate; Robbie Herskowitz,
Women's Division vice president, leadership develop-
ment; Gail Newman. Women's Division Campaign
chairwoman; Ellen Anker; Judy Adler, Southwest Dade
chairwoman.
Women's Division
Hold the Date
Tuesday. March 10
W.D. Nominating Committee
GMJF
10:00 a.m.
Wednesday. March 11
City-wide Event Evaluation Meeting
GMJF
10:00 a.m.
Monday, March 16
Inter-faith Day
Temple Beth Sholom. Miami Beach
9:00 a.m.
Tuesday. March 17
Long Range Campaign Planning
Committee Meeting
GMJF
10:00 a.m.
Tuesday. March 17
Business and Professional Women
Networking Program
Biscayne Bay Marriott
5:45 p.m.
Wednesday. March 18
Super Sunday Batch 'N Brunch
GMJF
10:00 a.m.
Wednesday. March 18
Business and Professional Women
Nominating Committee Meeting
GMJF
6 p.m.
Thursday. March 19
Executive and Campaign Steering
Committee Meeting
GMJF
10:00 a.m.
Executive Officers Meeting
GMJF
Noon
Sunday, March 22
Super Sunday
Temple Israel
Tuesday. March 24
Miami Beach Area Board Meeting
9:30 a.m.
Thursday. April 2
South Dade Area Board Meeting
9:30 a.m.
South Dade Area Nominating Committee
Meeting
Noon
North Dade Area Board Meeting
10:00 a.m.
Interfaith Day

Women's Division, in cooperate :
with Archdiocese Council ot"
Catholic Women and Church
Women United, will hold an "Inter
faith Day." on Monday. March 16 a:
Temple Beth Shalom. 4144 Chase
Avenue. Miami Beach, beginning at
9:00 a.m. The topic will be. "The
Changing Role of Women in
Religion Together as Women We
Can Make a Difference."
Speakers will include:
Rabbi Rachel Hertzman, Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, Southeast Council;
Cantor Rachelle Nelson, Temple
Israel of Greater Miami;
Sitter Noelle Boggs' O.P.. Saint
James Parish;
Reverend Debbie McLeod,
Wesley United Methodist Church;
Revered Lisa Sounders, St.
Phillips Episcopal Church.
The moderator for the question
and answer period will be Rabbi
Norman Lipson.
The cost for this event is $1.50.
which covers registration and
refreshments.
For more information contact
Women's Division at 576-4000, ext.
231.
!
lii
'4'"'Federaivon,March 1987


Martin Fine
Chairman
Chairman's message
Everyone has responded well to
Give A Day. If you haven't given
your day do it now! We're in the
heart of the campaign and we
need everyone's support. Call Federation
and sign up today. It's your turn, now.
Some of you might not be able to give
one entire day. If that should be our situa-
tion then give two half days. Meet a pro-
spective giver for breakfast, a coffee
break, or lunch, when you would most
likely be away from your office anyway.
You could potentially do three face to face
solicitations and still respond to the needs
of your office.
At this critical juncture in the 1987
campaign we need more people to step
forward and help. If you've already given
your day, get colleagues to do the same.
Recommend their names to Federation
staff if you think they can be approached
to help in our efforts. If you feel it
wouldn't be appropriate for you to ap-
proach them, we'll do it.
Office meetings are also a terrific way
to get people into the campaign spirit.
Many members of the various Commerce
and Profession's Divisions have held
these meetings at their place of business
before or after work to talk with
members of their firm. The logistics for
accomplishing this are simple and are laid
out on this page. This is a terrific oppor-
tunity for bringing a Federation
representative to your office to present
the case for giving, as well as getting
feedback as to the concerns of the
contributors.
We need to speak to as many people as
possible and you are our conduit. Take the
lead and let's keep on working towards
our campaign goal of $21,750,000.
The Campaign is now at $12.4 million -
. P2C2?t ahead of ** time last year on
a card for card basis. Your participation
m Oive A Day could help to sustain that
momentum.
Martin Fine
Chairman
Commerce and Professions
Anatomy of an
office meeting
Any firm with four or more Jewish
employees, willing to discuss the needs of
the Jewish community, should hold an of-
fice meeting.
A lead member of the firm, not
necessarily the senior partner, takes the
initiative to contact Federation and coor-
dinates a time and place for the meeting.
One hour is needed for the presentation
and an opportunity for questions and
answers. Many firms choose 8:00 to 9:00
a.m. prior to work, others choose to meet
after work. Bagels and coffee are the
most popular refreshment served.
Two formats are available, solicitation
and non-solicitation. The preference is for
individuals to make their gifts to the
Combined Jewish Appeal at the time of
the meeting. The alternative is for the
person at the firm, who organized the
meeting, to speak to each employee on a
one-to-one basis about his or her gift after
the meeting.
These meetings are not just a time to
collect gifts for the CJA. It is a time to
learn. Many younger staff members who
have never had the opportunity to learn
about their Jewish community, world
Jewry and Israel or about how Federation
meets the needs in these communities,
find the meetings to be a wealth of
knowledge.
These young professionals were hired
because of the outstanding capabilities
and potential they possess. It is essential
that they also be given the opportunity to
use these skills for the good of the Jewish
community.
Federation's Builders and Real Estate Division held a meeting to discuss its role in the
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured from left are Harry B. Smith, Arnold Leider,
Lee A. Spiegelman, Chairman of the Builders and Real Estate Division; David Smith,
Herschel Rosenthal and Eliot Treister. Not pictured is committee member Joseph Folk.
Lee Spiegelman leads Real Estate
and Builders Division
Each month the Commerce and Profes-
sions Division highlights one of Us
outstanding leaders.
Lee Spiegelman
This month we feature Lee A.
Spiegelman, chairman of the Real Estate
and Builders Division.
Spiegelman is chairman of the board
and founder of Florida Fidelity Financial,
Inc., a diversified financial service
corporation specializing in mortgage
brokerage and banking.
It is his hope that in his role as
chairman of the Real Estate and Builders
Division, he can expand the group. While
doing face-to-face solicitations during
"Give a Day," he is asking each current
Division member to bring in five new
members. "We need 'askers' as well as
givers," said Spiegelman.
He considers himself to be an
"emotional Jew," and gets involved
because he feels, "when it comes right
down to it, Jews take care of Jews, and
we are truly alone when it comes to the
needs of our people. If we don't do, no one
else will."
If you would like to join the Builders
and Real Estate Division contact Marty
Barasch at 576-4000.
Who does your
books?. .
SAVE THE DATE
Commerce and Professions
End of the year
Celebration and Awards
Evening
Thursday, May 21
Omni Hotel
Who writes your insurance policies?
Who redecorated your office,
straightened your kids' teeth or
restored a youthful look to your face?
Are the Jewish professionals that you
use as committed to helping the CJA
as you are? Call Dan Lepow at Federa-
tion, 576-4000, if you would be willing
to ask these professionals for a gift to
the Combined Jewish Appeal. If you
feel that these individuals should be
giving, but you are not the proper per-
son to ask, we would still value your in-
formation about them and suggestions
as to who can best i
Fedtration, March 1987 5


A personal view of the Otzma program
by Sally Friedman
(Editor' Note: The writer's daughter
i* one of the 56 students currently in
Israel at the firwt group of "Otzma"
participant*.)
"Be brave for her ." "Be brave
for her ."
In my head, I had rehearsed the
scene a hundred times, but my heart
had stubbornly refused to learn the
script.
So there I stood on a late summer after-
noon, crowds swirling around me at Ken-
nedy Airport, crying the tears I'd promis-
ed myself I wouldn't as I said goodbye to
our Amy.
Ibis was no ordinary goodbye, no
countdown till Thanksgiving or Parent's
Weekend. This time, the goodbye stret-
ches over ten months, over continents,
over miles too awesome to contemplate.
A ay is off to Israel, the land of
her fathers, and she goes gladly,
with the zest of a modern
pioneer. She goes to Israel to
learn what no college or graduate school
could teach her about devotion to a
dream.
The first time we heard the word Otzma
was months before this August day. Back
then, Otzma was a vague concept, just
another program that Amy was explor-
ing. "She's not serious," we told
ourselves about Amy's determination to
spend her 22nd year in Israel.
We had much to learn about our middle
daughter...
We realized by the spring of Amy's
senior year at the University of Penn-
sylvania that Israel was no fleeting no-
tion, no detour from the world beyond the
halls of ivy. Nor was Otzma just another
program.
"It's wonderful just what I'm looking
for!" Amy had insisted. And we felt a
surge of panic.
Enclosed within this year had been
lunatic bombings by a madman named
Quaddafi and heart-stopping newspaper
photos of airport massacres. If our fears
about our daughter's safety were irra-
tional, they were still mighty.
So we cajoled and offered compromises.
Our dinner table conversations were
punctuated with entreaties and "Won't
you consider's?"
Lake a patient sculptor, Amy chipped
away at our fears, fashioning reason and
passion that ultimately prevailed.
In the end, Amy asked nothing more of
us than our blessing. It was painfully long
in coming.
Recruitment begins for second
year of Otzma
-
Recruitment for the second year
of Project Otzma has begun.
Federation is seeking five young
Jewish people, between the ages
of 18 and 24, with a sense of purpose and
adventure, who may be eligible for a year
of study and work in Israel.
The first participants, in Israel less
than five months, are sending rave
reviews of the program home to their
families and friends.
More than a vacation. Project Otzma
(Hebrew for "strength") provides an op-
portunity to learn first-hand about
Israel's history, language, culture and
lifestyle. At the same time, it deepens
participants' understanding through con-
tact with peers and "adoption" by
selected Israeli families.
"Do you realize what a great place you
have sent us to?" wrote Beth Phillips, a
participant from the University of
Michigan. Phillips said that her first three
months were divided between intensive
language study, work and integration in-
to the social and cultural iife of the
kibbutz.
In their fourth through seventh mon-
ths, participants work on a farm, provide
direct services to children at a Youth
Aliyah Village and get hands-on ex-
perience at reforestation camps and ar-
cheologkal sites.
Otzma is taking extremely good care of
us. They've taken us to archeological sites
where we've seen and touched pottery,
chairs, lanterns and houses that were
anywhere between 2,000 and 4,000 years
old," added Phillips.
The remaining five months are devoted
to public service in a Project Renewal
neighborhood. The five participants from
Miami will go to Or Akiva, Miami's
"sister city."
The core of the program will consist of
the communal service in the Project
Renewal neighborhoods supported by
those Federations sponsoring Otzma
participants.
Added components will include a month
with Youth Aliyah, a month and a hah' on
a moshav and a one-month educational
program. In all, the volunteers will live,
learn and work in virtually every part of
the Jewish Homeland. They will also have
the opportunity to visit with leading
Israeli educators, politicians, scientists
and authors. Upon their return, the par-
ticipants will have the opportunity to
serve their local Jewish community and
share much of what they have learned
during their year in Israel.
All Jewish men and women bet-
ween the ages of 18 and 24, in-
terested in Otzma must apply im-
mediately. The final selection of
five candidates will be completed by April
30, 1987. Applicants will be screened by a
committee that will judge them on the
following basis: leadership qualities,
defined as strength of character to take
on new challenges and see them through,
and the discipline to perform necessary, if
unappealing tasks; strong Jewish motiva-
tion, interests and knowledge; posititve
life direction (goal oriented, realistic self-
image); commitment to service and to the
Jewish community; maturity to handle an
intensive, group experience, sharing liv-
ing quarters with other North Americans;
independent, but able to fit into a struc-
tured group setting; flexibility to relate to
life and conditions in Israel; physical
capacity to perform strenuous
agricultural work in sub-tropical climate;
realistic understanding of the program,
its expectations, demands and rewards;
previous experience living away from
home; free of health problems such as
allergies, headaches, severe dietary
restrictions, back ailments, etc.
If chosen, there is a cost of $750 as a
registration fee. All other charges, in-
cluding airfare, lodging and monthly sti-
pend are paid by Project Otzma.
For more information on applying for
the program, write to Yieroel Cohen, at
the Greater Miami Jewieh Federation,
4200 Bsmeayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, or call S70-4O0O. ext.
343.
Otzma has beckoned Amy in its
first year of life. The shining hope
of the program is as simple and
as profound as this: bring
young adults to Israel for a year of ser-
vice, educate them in the Hebrew
language and culture, ask them to work
with their hands, their hearts and their
minds, and you will create a corps of
future leaders dedicated to the dream of
Zion.
Otzma dares to suggest that the notion
of Jews serving Jews can transcend old
notions of "obligation." That by exposing
young volunteers to the realities and com-
plexities of Israeli society, they will truly
share in nation buildng.
Visionary? Indeed.
But what a vision!
With Amy, we assimilated the details:
once selected by a participating federa-
tion, Amy would become part of a nation-
wide program coordinated by the Council
of Jewish Federations in cooperation with
the Jewish Agency, the Israeli Forum, a
newly-established group dedicated to
strengthening ties to American Jewry,
and WZO.
Suddenly, our Amy was linked with
agencies and planners and activists on
two continents. Like her, we were dazzled
by the scope and spirit of Otzma. And all
of us were unabashedly awed by a pro-
gram structured to guarantee immersion
and challenge.
We devoured the information as it
arrived, and, beyond apprehen-
sion now, shared in the dream.
It will be our touchstone to
Amy's next ten months. And somewhere
in Tel Aviv is a family that will be Amy's
for those months. If Ulpan and Kibbutz,
agricultural work on a moshav and social
service in a Project Renewal town are
central to the Otzma program, so, too, is
something far more elusive. Amy has
already been linked with an Israeli family
which will welcome her, host her on
holidays, ease her cultural odyssey, and
hopefully, provide emoti'onai
nourishment.
The night before Amy left for her New
York orientation, I wrote that family a
letter. I tried to tell its members what it
will mean to us to know that across the
world, Amy has a home. No words were
adequate to express our gratitude.
Do we have anxieties about our
daughter and what lies ahead for her'
Yes! Yes! Yes!
How will it feel for her on February
nights when she is on a moskav
harvesting crops, bone-tired, homesick,
perhaps, and straining every muscle in
her body?
How will it be for her in a Project
Renewal town where she may serve the
elderly, the sick, or school children with
exotic faces?
Of course we worry, we are parents!
But then we think of the final airport
meeting at which these young men and
women sang and cheered and embraced
like family.
We picture Amy climbing the ancient
hills, drinking in the sights and sounds of
Jerusalem, that ultimate seductress. We
try to imagine her adventures, her link to
an ancient heritage that spans centuries,
generations, oceans of tears and we re-
joice that for now, our daughter belongs
to Otzma. This blink of time wul always
be hers to claim.
At Kennedy Airport, when that in-
evitable moment of parting came, I chose
to be last, standing back as Amy's father
held her in his arms for a long moment, as
her sisters embraced her, reluctant to let
go-
What could I say? How could I say it?
What message to send with a beloved
daughter to sustain her for ten months?
I chose a single word.
"Shalom'" I whispered to Amy.
And we both smiled through our tears.
YFQT
-L^ fc^ I want to live an adventure in Israel.
Please send me more information about Project OTZMA
and an application.
Name
Home Address
Age
Telephone No.
School_______
School Address
Telephone No.
Send this coupon to:
Yisroel Cohen
OTZMA
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
6 Federation, Match 1987


YLC and CRC
hold legislative
forum
The Young Leadership Council (YLC)
in conjunction with the Community Rela-
tions Committee (CRC) of Federation are
sending a delegation of young leaders to
Tallahassee to join with the Florida
Association of Jewish Federations in its
annual State Legislative Day. This year's
trip will be held on Wednesday, May 6.
In order to maximize the value of the
Tallahassee trip, YLC and CRC are
organizing a legislative forum designed to
inform participants about the factors that
go into the legislative decision-making
process in Tallahassee.
"The Forum is designed to give those in
attendance an understanding of the in-
terests and concerns of our legislators,"
said Samuel J. Dubbin, YLC chairman of
the 1987 State Legislative Forum. "It
will also address what we need to do to
advance the welfare of Federation's
beneficiary agencies through Tallahassee
and the legislature. At the same time, the
group hopes to inform the state
legislators about the crucial work of the
Federation and its concern about a varie-
ty of state issues. Our legislators need to
understand what Federation does and to
know that everything we do vitally ef-
fects the entire community; not just the
Jewish community." added Dubbin.
The Forum will be held on the evening
of March 12. from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,
with members of the Dade County
Legislative Delegation. The evening's
program will begin with a buffet dinner.
Call the YLC office at 576-4000, ext.
290 for more information.
Couples to enjoy
"Side by Side"
by Sondheim
1
Lori and Joseph Smith
A performance of "Side by Side" by
Sondheim will entertain members of the
Young Leadership Council on Saturday,
March 7. The evening, presented by the
YLC Couples Committee, will be held at
the Coconut Grove Theatre and will be
followed by a dessert and coffee party at
the home of Susan and Sandor Lenner in
the Grove. Twenty-five couples are ex-
cepted to attend. The Couples Commitee
chairmen are Paul and Maureen
Berkowtiz; vice-chairmen are Richard
and Felicia Schwartz. Event co-chairmen
are Joseph and Lori Smith and Sandor
and Susan Lenner.
"Purim Blast" planned for
YLC
YLC will hold a Purim party and
Megillah reading on Saturday,
March 14, at 8:30 p.m. The
festivities will be held at Temple
Menorah's Olemberg Hall, located on
Dickens Avenue at 75th Street, on Miami
Beach.
"The evening opens with a social hour
and a cash bar in the reception room,"
said Zena F. Inden, Purim Program co-
chairman. "No matter how many times in
your life you've heard the megillah
reading; you've never heard it the way it
will be presented at our Purim party,"
she added.
Following the social hour, the evening
continues in the sanctuary with a
humorous rendition of the megillah
reading with musical accompaniment.
This will be followed by more socializing
and dancing in the Social Hall with coffee,
hamantashen, fruits, and other holiday
treats.
According to Isaac K. Fisher,
Purim committee co-chairman,
"The entire evening has a
western-style theme. The bar will
look like a saloon in the old West, and we
are requesting that all guests wear
western costumes."
The cost is $12 per person. For more in-
formation contact the YLC office at
576-4000, ext. 290.
This program is sponsored by the YLC
Program and Education Committee,
Zena Inden, chairman; Ike Fisher, vice
chairman; in cooperation with the YLC
Singles Committee, Sanford Freedman,
chairman; Arden Magoon, vice chairman;
and the YLC Couples Committee, Paul
and Maureen Berkowitz, chairmen;
Richard and Felicia Schwartz, vice
chairmen.
Super Sunday ...
YLC will help make it super
Remember to sign up for your Super
Sunday telephone shift at our registra-
tion table or by phoning the YLC office.
The Young Leadership Council will
also be sponsoring a Super Party
following the YLC shift.
Harbour House/Carlton Terrace
Harbour House and Carlton Terrce will
hold a meeting at the White Cypress
Restaurant on March 8 featuring guest
speaker Israel Amitai. The co-chairmen
for this event are Al Goodman and Dr.
Elton Resnick. Mrs. Ruth Herscher will
host the brunch.
Aventura
The Aventura 1987 UJA Federation
Community Brunch will be held on March
15 at 10:30 a.m. The brunch will feature
guest speaker Dr. Gerald Meister and at-
tendance requires a $100 minimum gift to
the 1987 campaign. Hazel Canarick is the
chairman. The buildings participating are
Biscaya, Bonavida, Bonavista, Bravura,
Coronado, Del Vista Towers, Eldorado,
Ensenada, Flamenco, Hamptons, Villa
Dorada, Waterview and Waterways.
Winston Towers Complex
A meeting featuring speaker Dr.
Gerald Meister will be held at the
Winston Towers Complex, "100"
Building on March 15. The coordinator is
Jerome Berliner.
Costa Brava
The Costa Brava 1987 UJA/Federation
Dinner will be held at the Costa Brava
Restaurant on March 19. Attendance at
the dinner requires a minimum gift of
$500 to the 1987 campaign. The chairman
is Al Isaacson; reception chairman is Bea
Durchslag; executive committee
members include Stanley Barnett, Lou
Harris, and Stanley C. Myers.
Del Prado
A Del Prado brunch will be held in the
Del Prado Auditorium on March 29, at
10:30 a.m. The featured speaker will be
Jerome Gleekel. The meeting will honor
Bella Eisenbaum's devotion to Israel. The
chairman is Charles Wilder.
Point East
A cocktail reception and dinner for ad-
vanced gifts will be held at Point East,
hosted by Ernest Samuels, Arthur
Kepers and Max Schoen. The dinner will
be held March 29 at 5:00 p.m. in the Rose
Samuels Room. Attendance at this event
requires a minimum gift of $250 to the
Combined Jewish Appeal. Kenneth and
Ruth Lewitter are the chairpersons,
Anne Ackerman and Mollye Lovinger
Fox are associate chairpersons, Ruth
Norton is financial secretary and Ernest
Samuel is honorary chairman.
Point East Rally
Point East residents will hold their an-
nual rally on Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00
p.m. in the Point East Auditorium. The
featured guest speaker will be Israel
Amitai. Entertainment will be provided
by Patricia Gayle. There is no minimum
gift required for this event. All Point
East residents and their guests are
welcome.
California Club
The California Club Community will
hold a dinner dance on Sunday, March 29
at the Coral Creek Country Club. The
guest speaker will be Howard Stone. The
Community will honor Herb Polow. Lou
Rones is campaign chairman. There is a
$300 minimum gift and $30 per person
couvert.
Balmoral
The Balmoral will hold a Brunch in the
Blue Room on Sunday, March 29. Howard
Stone will be guest speaker. Betty
Kopelowitz is Reception Chairman,
Selma Kramer and Florence Mescon are
Reception Co-Chairmen.
Further information on Alliance Divi-
Mion event* can be obtained by contac-
ting Federation at 576-4000.
Federation, March 1987 7 \


A letter from Belle
Federation recently received a letter about its new advertising
campaign. We wanted to share it with you.
He and Grandma didn't have many rooms.
But even- one was a guest room.
When another Jew was just off the boat or
out of \wrk. he opened his heart and his door.
Your grandparents may not be around any-
more, but homeless Jews still are. Thousands of
Jews in 32 countries are living in fear or hunger
or both.
Hundreds ofjeus in Israel too old and
weak to live by themselves, are on waiting lists
far homes fer the elderh
They need more than a cot in Grandma's
kitchen or a blanket on Grandpa's couch. And
this year, we may be hard pressed to provide it
Because in spite of some very generous gifts
to the Jewish Federation, the average pledge
\wuld barely cover one night in a decent motel
You don't have to put up anyone in your
tamily room or dining room But when the
Federation volunteer calls, please open your
checkbook the way Grandpa opened his door.
He can't do it for vou.
Now it's your turn.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation ^k ^
f^Combtncdlewish Appeal ^^ ^9
1200Ba.-a>TicBoukAariM1jmi.F133ir J* 4\
3 rft
6*. 2

T
a
a-
!~#ImA
$4- fi~.*jd,'\iHMJ'
Dear Federation.
I used to sleep on 2 chairs in Poland when we had
visitors.
Here's the donation you did it. The ad was
beautiful It brought tears to my eyes.
Thank you.
Belle
8 FtderxOum. Mart* J**\*
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation would like to thank
BelBe for taking the time to let us know her feelings about our
advertising campaign and for her gift to the Combined Jewish
Appeal.
Belle cunt do it atone it's your tmm, now!


JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL
OF SOUTH FLORIDA
Quality high school education combined with
maximum exposure to Jewish traditions and values.
The Jewish High School of South Florida it beneficiary of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal.
FIVE YEARS OLD AND WELCOMED BY THE IVY LEAGUE
Daren Grosman at the Miami Heart Institute where he was an intern this past summer.
Grosman, a JHS student, is applying to a six year medical program. He has a four year
cumulative GPA of 4.59, and recently won first place in a Dade County essay competition.
Jewish High School Students Excel in College Area
What makes Jewish High students do so well
in college acceptances? "A superior education
at the hands of an exceptional faculty," said
Howard Fellman, now at Ohio State University.
We did more in our Pascal course with Judy
Vogel," said Marcus Gutt, now at Cornell
University. "I had an excellent basic high school
education," said Jacob Kiriaty. Jacob earned
four As and one B at FIU in his first semester of
College with a GPA of 3.77. Gary Plotkin who is
a freshman at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
and is majoring in Aerospace Engineering,
says, "the excellent science and lab facilities at
the Jewish High School helped me to prepare
for my rough schedule at R PI. Dr. Irving Kay
who taught me two years of physics was a
marvelous inspiration."
"It's here if you want it," said Daren Grosman,
presently a senior in the school. Grosman has
just been offered a full four year tuition paid
scholarship by the President of FIU.
New York State Regents
Exams In Jewish High
Biology and Chemistry at Jewish High
follow the New York Board of Regents
curriculum. "Our results compare very, very
favorably with New York's best," said Gary
Feilich, Science Department Chair and Dean
of Students. Biology students may take an
accelerated honors class which is a blend of
high school honors and college biology. This
semester Mr. Feilich gave his first 100 ever to
a grade 9 student in this class. "It is almost
like the end of an era," he said.
The strength of the Science Department
at the Jewish High School is its small
classes. With more one to one instruction
students can pursue their own interests in
the field without compromising the
curriculum itself. The school's science lab is
as well equipped as a college lab and
supplies are more than ample. Several
recent pre-med alumni attest to the high
quality science program at the school.
JHS Alumnus New
Emory University
Student Council Pres.
Gary Mars, a 1984 graduate of the Jewish
High School and salutatorian of his class,
was this past week elected President of the
College Council at Emory University, in his
junior year. This honor is normally reserved
for exceptional seniors.
At the Jewish High School, Gary was
Student Council President his senior year
and at that time wrote in his Yearbook
message, "I thank the Jewish High School
for giving me the privilege of being there."
Gary, son of Beverly and the late William
Mars of North Miami Beach, graduated from
Lehrman Day School (his elementary school).
We salute Gary and his family for this
extraordinary achievement and know that he
will continue on to national leadership.
Another JHS alumnus, Howard Fellman,
was previously appointed sophomore
representative to the President's Council at
Ohio State University.
The following is a list of colleges that have
accepted Jewish High School students:
American University
Arizona State College
Bar llan University-Israel
Barry University
Brandeis University
Bauder College
Broward Community College
Boston University
Carnegie Mellon University
Clark University
Cornell University
Curry College
C. W. Post
Dawson College
Daniel Webster College
Emory
Edward Williams
Florida International University
George Washington University
Hebrew UniversityIsrael
Military ServiceIsrael
Military ServiceUS Navy
McGill UniversityCanada
Florida State University
Marymount
Oberlin College
Bryant College
Northwestern University
Ohio State University
Northeastern University
Palm Beach Junior College
Purdue University
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Tulane University
Tulane University/School of Architecture
University of Maryland
University of Hartford
University of Georgia
University of MassachusettsAmherst
Mercer University
University of Miami
University of Michigan
University of Pennsylvania
University of Pittsburgh
University of South Florida
University of Texas
University of Witwatersand, So. Africa
Miami Dade Community College
Nova University
New York University
Oglethorpe
Sophie Newcomb
Tufts
Yeshiva University
University of Tampa
Syracuse University
Indiana University
100% College Acceptance
Rate At Jewish High School
Since its inception five years ago, all
Jewish High School graduates have been
accepted to colleges. One student chose to
enter the US Navy, several the Israeli Army
and one student went to the University of
Witwatersand in Johannesburg, South
Africa; one went to McGill in Canada and
several students were accepted to Israeli
SchoolsHebrew University, Bar llan and
Tel Aviv University. Jonathan Passik skipped
12th grade and gained early admission to
college and went on to excel in his studies.
Among the several students who gained
early acceptances to college was Amy
Solomon who entered the School of
Architecture at Tulane University.


1 '...... ...... '"
ORT and Jewish
High School
A view to the future
The Jewish High School of South Florida
in collaboration with its co-founder, ORT, is
initiating the use of computers across the
curriculum. The school, recognizing that
computers are fast becoming indispensable
in most areas of life, commissioned Mark
Churney, ORT's representative from
England, to head their innovative computer
department.
In addition to courses in computer literacy
and word processing that students are
required to take for graduation, programs are
being developed in science (stimulation
experiments) Math, English (poem writing,
grammar) and Hebrew (script capability).
"Computers aren't going to replace standard
methods of education, rather they will
enhance them," says Churney.
One of the programs being offered is a
history simulation. "What we intend to do,"
says Stephanie King, Head of the Social
Studies Department, "after the students
have spent half a year thoroughly studying
the nature of the world, they are going to
have a chance to play world leaders using
the computers to make decisions,
confronting all geographical, political and
economic realities. It is going to be brilliant."
Computers will be used as well to enrich
extra curricular activities. A program is
currently being developed to generate an
electronic newsletter. The school plans to
install a computer in each class. The
school's excellent computer programs to
date have helped students to be accepted to
top ranking universities such as Carnegie
Mellon, the pre-eminent computer university
in the country.
Students are enthusiastic about the
program. "Mr. Churney offers a great deal to
this school because of his knowledge in
computers and his insight into teaching the
material successfully," says Michael
Chernys, a student at the school. "It's a
pretty good class," agrees fellow student
Stephen McLaughlin. Students even spend
their free periods in the computer lab.
Seven Jewish High School students were recently inducted into
the National Honor Society. They were Michael Chernys, Shaw
Condiotte, Ronit Fefer, Rebecca Ghen, Philippa Greenberg,
Daren Grosman and Jennifer Guindi.
Four prayer services offer
options to the students who
come from Orthodox,
Conservative and Reform
Backgrounds. Pictured above
is a Traditional service.
Shaw Condiotte
explaining the
intricacies of
the American
Way To Mr. Alan
Mint/, His
American
Government
Teacher.
ORT's Computer Outreach Program
i
ORT is a co-founder of the Jewish High
School of South Florida. One of its
contributions to the educational philosophy
of the school was to emphasize the pivotal
nature of computers as a teaching tool.
"Computers are to teaching today what
pencil and paper or the blackboard were to
teaching in the past," said Rabbi Louis
Herring, founding Principal of the school.
"With the pedagogic expertise of World
ORT behind us, it is no surprise that our
former students are excelling in computer
courses at the college level. Several are
teaching entry-level courses in the
community."
The Jewish High School is providing an
outreach computer program to individuals,
several day schools, synagogues and the
Michael Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center. For mdre information contact Mark
Churney, Director of Computer Education at
the Jewish High School.
Jewish High School
teaches "Love
thy neighbor"
A good education is more than just a
stepping stone to college or the job market.
It provides a sense of responsibility toward
other people. The Jewish High School of
South Florida, realizing this, participates in a
community service program allowing
students to practice the golden rule.
Students earn credits in Judaic Studies by
giving 30 hours of community service during
the school year. Students giving 50 hours or
more of service are entitled to membership
in the Service Honors Society of the school.
Last year three students achieved this
honorJenny Ivcher, Jenny Guindi and
Jackie Abadi each contributed over 100
hours doing volunteer work at the school.
Students have collected food for the "Feed
Miami" program; have helped teachers with
projects and one Sunday a few weeks ago,
15 students, led by the Student Council and
their President, Jennifer Cristal, gave up their
afternoon to run booths for the Michael Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center's
Chanukah Happening.
Jewish High School students gave up their
first day of winter break to fill in for non-
Jewish workers and volunteers who wished
to spend Christmas with their families but
would have had to work that day.
The students view community service as
part of the school curriculum and the school
hopes this valuable experience will teach
them the most important lesson of all -
LOVE THY NEIGHBOR.
Leat Apel, a senior, has been organizing
students to visit children in hospitals.
Students of the school are Hebrew and
Jewish studies instructors at various
congregations and community agencies in
the neighborhood of the school. One such
student, Richard Nezvadovitz, has made
important contributions as a computer
instructor at the Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center.
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
Providing excellence In general and Jewish education
* Honors classes Computer literacy
* College preparatory (including robotics)
* Individualized curriculum New building since Sept. '85
* Superior Faculty Transportation avail.
* Scholarships available
Applications now being accepted for 1987-88
18900 N.E. 25 Ave. N. Miami Beach, FL33180
Call (305) 935-5620 For Further Information


Ten students gave over 30 hours after school to complete a
mural for the school cafeteria. The mural is one of several
projects that the art club plans to complete by year end.
t&Oti M*
t ^^M 1 *i

wBjc 1
ftMM^A J w
*2
/
^a

Mr. Mark Churney, ORT's
London Emissary, and
Director Of Computer
Education at the school,
shows Benji Delman how
to program a computer
the easy way.
Students "acting up" during drama class
Young Jews who are
proud to be Jews
"A major goal of the Jewish High School of
South Florida is aimed at enhancing and
strengthening a sense of Jewish identity in
our students," said Rabbi Chaim Messinger,
Chairman of the Jewish Studies Division at
the school. The goal of the Jewish com-
ponent of the carefully crafted curriculum is
designed to prepare the students for Jewish
life on the college campus and the years
beyond when they will be Jewish adults.
The students of the Jewish High School
are confronted Jewishly on two levels. The
academic level attempts to inculcate a deep
sense of appreciation and love for Jewish
traditions. On the practical level the
students are instilled with a strong sense of
service and commitment to the Jewish
community. The Community Service
Program, the hospital visitation program and
the tutorial program available to youngsters
from neighborhood schools are just a few
examples of this commitment to the
community at large.
How does modern Jewish education
successfully reach Jewish youngsters who
have been nurtured on a secular curriculum
for most of their formative years? To this
most important question, Rabbi Messinger
responded by saying, "we search the Biblical
texts until they shed light on modern
problems. We study Jewish History in order
to understand the secrets of Jewish survival
in a world too often inhospitable to Jews. We
study ethics to better understand the
implications of our everyday behavior. We
stress the unity of the Jewish People, and
consider the contemporary state of Jewish
life in America, in Russia, in Israel and
elsewhere." Rabbi Messinger further
stressed that the most crucial difference
between the old approach and the approach
at the Jewish High School is that no
student's question is considered to be
insignificant or inappropriate. "It is hoped,''
said Messinger, "that this nurturing and
multi-dimensional approach will instill pride in
our students. We want our youngsters to
identify with their people's past and insure
their place in their future."
Many JHS students take advantage of the
opportunity to earn college credit during
their senior year at the school. Contact Diane
Kallman for more information.
Student Activities'A Full Life9 At The Jewish High School
Student Government sponsors an Annual
Teacher Pie Toss that raises scholarship
funds and shrieks of laughter; the Senior Class
Slave Auction raises money for the senior class
tr"P;ancf regular Saturday night socials raise the
spirits (and money) for school activities.
The Art Club has recently painstakingly
completed a mural and the school Newsletter
has the writing support of half the student body.
Yearbook and class meetings and week-end
retreats all add to the full life of students at the
Jewish High School.
History comes alive
at Jewish High School
The characters and events of the past do
not stay stifled between the pages of history
textbooks at the Jewish High School. The
social studies department, headed by
Stephanie King, promotes learning through
experience.
In October of this year, students of the
World History class journeyed through time
to an ancient civilization and for one night
lived as natives of a primitive tribe. Students
were able to sample the lifestyle of ancient
civilizations by sculpting utensils out of clay,
cooking their dinner on an open fire and
sleeping under the stars.
In January these students were guests at
a Renaissance banquet hosted by Federigio
da Montefeldiso (Mrs. King). Each student
came in period dress and feasted to the
strains of a troubadour. Henry VIII naturally
sat at a separate table from Anne Boleyn
who had lost her head preparing for the
banquet.
History classes, though not all simulated,
are still stimulating. The Jewish High School
offers a course in APUS history allowing
students who successfully pass the exam to
earn college credit.
Geography classes often take students
outdoors. Recent excursions have included a
canoe trip on the Oleta River and the
mapping of a hill using a transit.
Mrs. King, who also teaches Government
and American History, often combines her
class with that of Alan Mintz, another social
studies teacher, for debates or conventions.
They also co-advised their students who
participated in the tola Shaw writing
competition which earned Daren Grosman, a
senior of the school, the first place in the
Dade County competition.
Mintz and King will also head The Second
History Maccabia to be held in the spring,
with a prize of $100 going to the best
student.
On a recent visit to the Jewish High
School, Congressman William Lehman said,
"I think you have a very involved student
body that really cares about social and
political problems of this country, the Mid
East and the whole world."
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL
OF SOUTH FUDRIDA
^A1*
Doron Volkman and Mirit
Hochman look on as Rabbi
Louis Herring, principal, cuts
the challah at the Succah party.
Ms. Judy Vogel, the advanced
math teacher at the school,
stays close at hand to calcu-
late the distribution curve.


JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
A VERY DEMANDING HIGH SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
If you want your children to grow up proud of our people, fascinated by our
long history and enthralled by our unique faith,
If you want the teenagers in
your family to receive the
highest quality education
from excellent faculty,
THEN
SELECT
THEIR
HIGH SCHOOL
WITH CARE
Because the high school
years are the most important
years of their schooling.
You are invited to consider the JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL
OF SOUTH FLORIDA,
a school committed to academic
excellence. Ambitious students entering
9th, 10th, or 11th grades are eligible to
enroll for the fall of 1987.
THIS COULD BE THE MOST IMPORTANT DECISION IN YOUR CHILD'S LIFE
For information call Barbara Eisenberg, Director of Admissions: 305/935-5620
All Work and No Flay... No Way!
You don't have to be a supe'star to gain a place in a sports team at a small school. That's
the way it should be. High school sports should teach skills, mature team values, team spirit
and provide physical exercise and recreation to all students. Jewish High School fields tennis,
basketball, cheerleading, soccer, volleyball, bowling, softball and cross-country teams.
THE BOWLING TEAM IS A WINNER!
Shaw Condiotte, Elliot Zvi, Josh
Messer, Erk Sublin. Jon Cymberknopf,
Steven Sanfbnl, Benji Delman, Billy
Feldman. Scott Radin With Mr. Fred
Wolven, Athletic Director.
THE CHEERLEADERS AT THE SCHOOL
Included On The Squad Are Lori
Ehrlkh, Jenny Guindi, Debbie Semel,
Heidi Walfish, Jackie Abadi, And Leal
Apel.
JHS SUMMER SCHOOL
COURSE
For acceleration or make-up, day/night
sessions available, small classes with
master teachers. Don t be closed out.
Call Mrs. Eisenberg, 935-5620
.
Teamwork is the motto for the newsletter co-
editors, Vdina Applebaum and Shaw Condiotte.
Foreign Languages
Are Emphasized
"Distances are becoming shorter between
nations and different cultures are making
more and more contact. Facility with foreign
languages is going to be more crucial in the
future than ever before," said Mali Lipson.
Head of Foreign Languages at the school. A
6 year veteran of the Jewish High School
and the daughter of a distinguished Israeli
family, Mrs. Lipson teaches Hebrew at the
school at 6 different levels.
Simone Benchimol, who teaches French
and Spanish at the school, also teaches at
FIU and Miami Dade Community College
where she was in charge of the Governor's
Foreign Language Summer Program.

Partners in a
caring community...
It's Our Turn Now
O
Support The Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
The Jewish High School of South
Florida is a beneficiary agency of
the Greater Miami Jew ish
Federation. We gratefully
acknowledge the donation of this
space so that the story of the
Jewish High School can he told.
Sponsorship
>fj}r
Jewish Federation
of (jreater Jrort Lauderdale
JF.WISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD
Chairman of the BoardRichard Levy
PresidentEllie Katz
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL
OFSOUTH FUDRIDA
Conveniently located between the
Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center
and the
Hillel Community Day School
The location of the school places it
within convenient reach of communities
from Boca Raton to South Dade.
18900 Northeast 25th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 33180
Telephone (305) 935-5620
Transportation Available


{Alternative minimum tax may impact charitable giving
By Howard A. Levenaon
Most taxpayers are already well
aware that the reduced tax rates
brought about by the Tax
Reform Act of 1986 mean that,
in most cases, the government will be
subsidizing a smaller portion of their
charitable contributions. Toward the end
of 1986, there was much publicity on the
advantage of prefunding several years'
contributions prior to 1987 when the
maximum tax rate for individuals declines
from 50 percent to 38.5 percent. Similar
advantages may exist for prefunding
contributions in 1987, since the rate is
scheduled to drop to 28 percent beginning
in 1988.
In addition to the tax rate reduction, a
lesser publicized tax reform change.
involving gifts of appreciated property,
may require your consideration in 1987
and future years. A contribution after
1986 of property that has appreciated in
value may increase your tax liability
under the alternative minimum tax.
T
he alternative minimum tax is
computed by applying a 21 percent
iti to your taxable income
after making certain adjustments
and incn \able income by certain
"tax preference items." If your
alternative minimum tax exceeds your
regular tax liability you pay the greater
amount.
The 1986 Tax Act reduction in regular
tax rates and the expansion of required
adjustments and tax preference items
makes it more likely that taxpayers will
find themselves in an alternative
minimum tax position after 1986. One of
the tax preference items added by the
1986 Tax Act is the portion of your
charitable contribution deduction that is
attributable to the net appreciation in
value in all of your donated capital gain
property.
For example, let's say you contribute to
the Federation, stock with a value of
$10,000, for which you originally paid
$4,000. You would be entitled to a
charitable contribution deduction of
$10,000 if you itemize your deductions.
However, the $6,000 appreciation in
value is a tax preference item potentially
subject to alternative minimum tax at a
21 percent tax rate. Note that the same
contribution made and deducted in 1986
also would have generated a $10,000
deduction but no tax preference item for
the appreciation in value.
When capital gain property is
donated to charity, the
contribution deduction is equal
to the property's fair market
value even if the property has declined in
value while held by the donor. The
greatest tax benefit from donations of
such property traditionally has been
obtained by first selling the property
(realizing a potentially deductible loss)
and then donating the proceeds. For
taxpayers subject to the new alternative
minimum tax, however, the benefit of the
loss may be realized without a pre-
donation sale. For example, if both
appreciated property and property which
has declined in value are donated, the tax
preference item for the unrealized gain
would be automatically reduced by the
unrealized loss, thus giving the taxpayer
the full benefit of the loss for purposes of
the alternative minimum tax, while
avoiding the costs of selling the loss
property (e.g.. broker's commissions).
Because taxes in general, and the
alternative minimum tax in particular,
are complicated, taxpayers should consult
their tax advisors before taking any
action based on this article.
Howard Levenson
Howard A. Levenson is a senior tax
manager in the Miami office of Ernst
and Whinney. He is a member of the
Professional Advisory Committee and
the Publications Committee of the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
as well as the Florida Institute of
Certified Public Accountants, the
American Institute of Certified Public
Accountants, the Florida Bar, the
Washington, D.C. Bar and the Tax
Section of the American Bar
Association.
The Ernst and Whinney booklet
"Charitable Giving" is available in
limited quantities-, free of charge, by
calling Howard at 358-4111.
An update on the charitable uses of life insurance
By Jeffrey E. Newman, CLU ChFC
The utilization of life insurance by
a concerned contributor of the
Jewish community has never been
greater or more advantageous to
all parties involved. The advent of im-
proved life expenctancy tables, favorable
tax laws relating to life insurance and
policies that have higher investment
returns create an environment in which
the use of life insurance for philanthropic
purposes is highly recommended.
Fj'raf, a quick review: Essentially,
there are only two types of life insurance
contracts available in the marketplace;
everything else is just an extended ver-
sion of one or the other, or a combination
ot the two. Term insurance is in force for
a specific time period, it has no cash value
and, while the cost is lower than perma-
nent insurance initially, it continues to in-
"ease' usual'y on a vear'y Da8'55' to a
Point where premiums become quite exor-
bitant. Permanent insurance is just that;
k remains in force for the entire life of the
'"sured, and, while it has a higher
premium requirement in the beginning,
.k .ls evel and there substantial
values available that equal and ex
W total Prem'ums paid in just a few
snort years.
Jhv charitable uses of life insurance
iraoitionally involve one of two methods
Policy ownership. In the tint instance,
henJ ty is "^e ^e owner and
oeneficiary of the policy and all future
Mt. a Pavment8 made by the donor
deductible. If the policy has a cash
value available at the time of the transfer
to the charity, these values would also be
deductible by the donor. In the second
situation, the donor makes the charity
the beneficiary, but retains the rights of
ownership. Assuming that the donor is
also the insured, at his death, his estate
will receive an estate tax charitable
deduction when the benefits are paid to
the charity.
Let's highlight a few of the many
creative uses of the latest policies
and techniques available for
donors. Many individuals through
their businesses have substantial amounts
of group life insurance in effect that are
subject to income tax on face amounts in
excess of $50,000. By changing the
beneficiary on a revocable basis, the ef-
fect is to eliminate the current income tax
and supply the charity with a substantial
benefit at death. If, at some point in the
future, the donor's personal needs re-
quire the insurance protection, the
beneficiary designation can be changed
once again. Also, in business situations,
donors can employ corporate funds to pay
premiums on an individual's life, with the
business being fully reimbursed for the
premiums paid, usually between the 5th
and the 15th policy year, depending on
such factors as the insured's age and
health at the time the policy was issued.
Regardless, the corporation will be made
whole at the insured's death and general-
ly without any reduction to the amount
the charity receives. There are usually
substantial cash values developed, which
can fund a supplemental retirement
benefit to the donor or make additional
funds available to the charity. One of the
more innovative concepts that life in-
surance companies have made available in
recent times is the new shorter premium
payment period. Again, because of cer-
tain tax laws passed in the last few years,
better returns on investments and im-
proved life expectancy, insurance com-
panies provide policies that are effective-
ly paid up in only a few years, generally
six to eight years. In fact, arrangements
can be made so that only one premium
payment is required at a remarkably low
cost and a policy will be in force for the
life of the insured.
These are many of the methods that
donors should consider in endowing a
charity with a life insurance arrange-
ment. The benefits can certainly be enor-
mous and life insurance is one asset that
is designed to be liquid in substantial
sums at a time when other assets may not
be. There is also a minimal amount of ef-
fort involved in setting up the kinds of
programs described.
Each donor considering the use of life
insurance in his or her philanthropic plans
should consult with an attorney, accoun-
tant and life underwriter to be sure that
the best method is employed for both the
family and the charity.
Jeffrey E. Newman
Jeffrey E. Newman is a Founder and
President of the National Planning
Corporation, a Miami-based financial
consulting firm. He is also a partner in
Rabin, Newman and Associates, a
general agency of the Guardian Life
Insurance Company of America. Mr.
Newman has been in the life insurance
business since 1969, and has been in-
volved in private real estate investing
as a partner of Rabin, Newman Pro-
perties since the late 1970's.
He holds professional designations
as Chartered Life Underwriter (CLU),
Registered Representative (NASD),
Registered Health Underwriter
(RHU), and Chartered Financial Con-
sultant. He is currently completing the
final requirements for a Masters
Degree in Financial Services.
Newman has worked actively for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
United Way Big Brothers-Sisters Pro-
gram, and is currently President of
Miami's Jewish Family and Children's
Service and serves on the board of
directors of Federation and Temple
Israel of Greater Miami. He is involved
with several other civic and philan-
thropic organizations.
:. -. .

Federation, March 1987 13


Dade County delegation attends 42 annual NJCRAC session
Led by Jeffrey Berkowitz, Federation's
Community Relations Committee
chairman and Donald E. Lefton,
chairman of the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal, who also serves as chairman of
the International Commission of the
National Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council, (NJCRAC), a
substantial delegation of Dade County
Jewish community leaders took part in
the 42nd Annual NJCRAC Plenary
Session which was held from February
15-18 at the Bonaventure Hotel in Ft.
Lauderdale.
Berkowitz took an important role in the
Plenary, leading a workshop on "Getting
out the Jewish Vote." Lefton presided at
the Chairman's Dinner at which NJCRAC
Chairman Michael Pelavin set the tone
and the direction of the four day session
as he called for vigilance and action on a
range of issues important to the Jewish
community.
"The NJCRAC Plenum was a
fascinating experience. It supplied
absolutely unique opportunities for
people in the Community Relations field
across the nation to discuss the issues
that will impact on our community during
the coming year and beyond," said
Berkowitz.
"We were able to develop joint policies
and strategies that will help maintain and
strengthen Jewish security at home and
abroad," added Lefton.
Some 500 representatives of
NJCRAC's 11 national agencies and 113
community member agencies attended
the Plenum, the organization's highest
policy-making body.
Leading American and foreign
personalities were present to discuss of
critical issues that are high on the Jewish
agenda.
In a keynote address marking the
Constitution's 200th anniversary,
Supreme Court Justice Harry A.
Blackmun spoke with passion about the
achievements made possible by that
historic document and the challenges it
has faced over the years and continues to
face today. Senator Paul Simon of
Illinois, a member of the Senate Judiciary
Committee, covered the Senate's role in
meeting what many see as a major threat
to the Federal judiciary in the filling of
judicial vacancies during the next two
years of the present Administration.
Pictured at the Plenary Session from left to right (standing) are Dr. Douglas Miller, Chair-
man, Middle East and Foreign Jewry Committeee, Community Relations Committee (CRC);
Aliza Brenner, Member, CRC; Mark Freedman, Regional Director, American Jewish Con-
gress; Elaine Bloom, Member, Florida House of Representatives; Myra Farr, past chair-
woman, CRC; (seated, from left) Anna Mae Ross, past chairwoman, Domestic Concerns Com-
mittee, CRC; Nan Rich, chairwoman. Domestic Concerns Committee, CRC.
Senator Paul Sarbanes, a member of
the Senate Select Committee
investigating military assistance to Iran
and the Nicaraguan Contras, discussed
the United States' foreign policy in the
Middle East after Iran, with an Israeli
perspective offered by Nimrod Novik, a
key political advisor to Israel's Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres.
Herman Nickel, former U.S.
Ambassador to South Africa, id
Representative Howard Woipe,
Chairman of the House Foreign Affairs
Subcommittee on Africa, disagreed
sharply on the question of U.S. sanctions
against South Africa.
Recent actions by Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev and their impact on Soviet
Jewry, were examined by a panel of
leading authorities on the Soviet Union,
including Thomas W. Simons, Jr., Deputy
Assistant Secretary of State for
European and Canadian Affairs; Morris
Abram, Chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Organizations; and Eliyahu Essas, a
former Refusenik, once characterized as
the unofficial rabbi of Moscow, who now
resides in Jerusalem.
Debates during the Joint Program
Planning sessions were the beginning of a
process that will lead over the coming
months to the 1987-88 Joint Program
Plan which will record the consensus and
action plans of the Jewish community
relations field on a wide range of
domestic and international matters.
Sandwiched between the programs of
the extensive Plenum agenda was a
meeting of delegates from Florida
Organized by Bernie Friedman
consultant to the Government Affairs
Committee of the Florida Association of
Jewish Federations, the meeting
presented Representatives Elaine Bloom
of Dade County, and Norman Ostrau of
Broward County. The discussion covered
legislative and governmental matters of
importance to Florida's Jewish
community.
Among those who participated in the
Plenary Session in addition to Berkowitz
and Lefton were: Adolph and Helene
Berger, Sol and Mitzi Center, Myra Farr,
Harvey and Gloria Friedman, Melvin and
Gertrude Kartzmer, Anna Mae Ross,
William and Lila Saulson, Dorothy and
Maurice Serotta, Mark Freedman,
regional director of the American Jewish
Congress; Dr. Douglas Miller, chairman
of the CRC's Middle East and Foreign
Jewry Committee; Nan Rich, chairwoman
of CRC's Domestic Concerns Committee;
Ainslee Ferdie of National Jewish War
Veterans; Rabbi Herbert Baumguard,
president of the Synagogue Council of
America; Edward Rosenthal and Judy
Gilbert, director and associate director of
the Community Relations Department;
and Nicholas Simmonds, Federation's
director of Communications.
New program provides emergency help to the elderly
Without help, an emergency can
become a disaster. For a frail
elderly person in particular, an
emergency can be a serious
threat to independence and quality of life.
Over the next three years, a total of 900
elderly in the North Dade and Hialeah
areas will receive emergency assistance
because of a revolutionary new program
... the Short-Term Emergency Manage-
ment Systems (STEMS). Developed by
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged in conjunction with 19 other
agencies in the area, STEMS will break
down the bureaucratic barriers to im-
mediate care.
The STEMS program is being made
possible through the Living-At-Home
Program with a generous grant from the
Arthur Vining Davis Foundation and ad-
ministered through a consortium of
charitable foundations. Out of 300 ap-
plicants, the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged was one of only 19
sites nationwide, and the only site in the
Southwest chosen to be the recipient of
these funds. As a result, more than
$300,000 over the coming three years will
be made available to older adults in need
of emergency care.
"While all of the services provided by
the STEMS program are provided by
other agencies as well, only STEMS can
overcome the critical time factor in an
emergency," explained MJHHA
Associate Executive Director Elliot
Stern. "Emergency care for the elderly is
a sadly neglected area of social services
and we are pleased to have been able to
develop an effective way to cope with this
problem."
In cases of illness, hospitalization of
the spouse or caregiver, discharge
from a hospital or nursing home
when no help is available at home, or
other temporary situations, STEMS will
be there to help. Within 24 to 48 hours,
the program can make available crisis ser-
vices such as homemaker care, meals,
medical intervention, transportation and
assistive devices. Emergency services
will be available for up to three weeks
duration.
Heading up the STEMS program is pro-
ject director Michael Weston. He holds a
master's degree in human services from
Nova University and comes to the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
most recently from the Health Council of
A______
14 Federation, March 1987
7- .;
South Florida, Inc. Weston has also serv-
ed with the Stanley C. Myers Community
Health Center of Miami Beach and the
Broward County Gerontology Program.
"Beoause of the Miami Jewish Home's
long experience with provider agencies in
the community, we can be extremely ef-
fective," noted Mr. Weston. "We are able
to designate the appropriate services and
get those services to the elderly when
they need them and where they need
them."
The STEMS program is scheduled to go
into operation on March 1. For further in-
formation contact Michael Weston at
576-9020.
Over 20,000 South Floridians are serv-
ed each year through the spectrum of
community and residential services of-
fered by the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged is a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged Partners in a caring
community.


\Ruth Elias
\One woman's struggle
\for survival
JFTV's Kaleidoscope presents the
[tragic but heartwarming tale of one
woman's struggle against impossible
I odds to survive the Holocaust.
While on a recent trip to Israel, the
JFTV crew went to visit Ruth Elias who
I lives in a suburb of Tel Aviv. Elias shared
I her story, one that began more than 45
years ago in Teresienstadt concentration
camp, where she was sent with her family
[ by the Nazis.
During the one hour special presenta-
tion Elias, tells of losing her entire family
I to the gas chambers. She tells of tricking
I Josef Mengele to protect her unborn child
I and the cruel twist of fate that had her kill
I her own child rather than to have him suf
Ifer the torture of Mengele's cruel
| experiments.
Liberated in 1945 by the Americans,
after spending three years in Auschwitz,
Elias has rebuilt her life in the Jewish
| Homeland.
Watch this JFTV exclusive on Tuesday
lat 6:00 p.m. and Saturday at 5:00 p.m.
{Jerusalem Cafe
Where can you find a musical buf-
fet of Jewish bluegrass, Jewish
jazz and Russian folk songs all
in one program?
On JFTV's Jerusalem Cafe.
This unique, live nightclub show pro-
Ivides a half-hour of friendly ambiance
llow lights, upbeat entertainment and an
enthusiastic audience. Performances in-
Iclude Jewish songs, music, dance, comedy
|and even magic.
Jerusalem Cafe can be seen
I Wednesdays and Fridays only on Jewish
I Federation Television.
\Check-Up
Mount Sinai
Check-Up/Mount Sinai with Lila Heat-
|r. past president, and honorary chair-
I omari of the board of trustees for Mount
I ima. Medical Center, can be seen on
rv every Monday and Thursday at
l*flP'" and Saturday at 6:00 p.m. Each
I ml? j- PrP"am features an infor-
mative discussion on the latest in
I medicine.
IjwLl" Cardiology and Rehabilitation
IW. Arthur Agatston
En !! Othopedics
l* Lloyd Goldman
ft1* p -Neurology
V* Joel Dokson
Jj* 30 -Breast Disease
^ooieOrmos, R.D.M.S.
Watch a Kaleidoscope Special!
See this interview with a remarkable Israeli
woman Ruth Elias as she talks about
her confrontation with the infamous Dr. Mengelel
Tuesday, March 3rd & 24th at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 7th & 21st at 5 p.m.
PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE MARCH 1987
Tim* Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5:00 Eenie's Kitchen A Aleph Eenie's Kitchen B Aleph Film Special Kaleidoscope Special (Mar 7 & 21) Pillow Talk Underwritten by Jordan Marsh
5:30 Check-Up/ Mount Sinai Jewish TV National Magazine (Mar 10 4 24) Film Special (Mar 3. 17 4 31) Hello Jerusalem Underwritten by Signature Gardens Check-Up/ Mount Sinai Eenie's Kitchen B
.-00 We Remember The Holocaust Kaleidoscope Special (Mar 3 4 24) Punm Special (Mar 5 4 12) Film Special (Mar 19&26) Eenie's Kitchen A Check-Up/ Mount Sinai We Remember The
JFTV Bulletin Board Holocaust
6:30 Still Small Voice or Viewpoint Jerusalem Cafe Teen Scene Jerusalem Cate President's Corner Teen Scene
Federation Today
7:00 President's Corner Jewish Television Network Specials Pillow Talk ** Underwritten by Jordan Marsh Still Small Voice Or" Viewpomt Hello Jerusalem Underwitten by Signature Gardens Jewish TV National Magazine (Mar 14&28) Film Special (Mar 7 4 21) Hello Jerusalem Underwritten
Federation Today
7:30 Programs Are Pillow Talk Underwritten by Jordan Marsh Film Special President's Corner Film Special Jewish Television Network Specials by Signature Gardens
Subiecl to Change "* Underwrite* Federation Today JFTV Bulletin Board JFTV Bulletin Board
You Can See It Only On JFTV
Watch JFTV on Your Local Cable System
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29 Dynamic Channel 38
Storer (South Dade) Channel 14 Miami Cablevision Channel 4
Harte-Hanks Channel 2 Adelphia Channel 21 or 28A
Purim special
In the spirit of Purim, JFTV presents
"Singin' and Spielin," a holiday special
with Cantor Jeff Klepper and storyteller
Sid Lieberman.
Centering around the Jewish heroine
Queen Esther, and Haman, the King's
tyrannical prime minister, the story
celebrates the liberation of Jews from
destruction.
JFTV will be conducting inter-
views with various dignitaries and
celebrities during Super Sunday.
It's your turn. Make it a Super
Sunday!
Jordan Marsh continues
to underwrite Pillow Talk
Due to the success of "Pillow Talk," a program that
discusses the issues affecting today's single Jewish
adults, Jordan Marsh will continue to underwrite the
program for Jewish Federation Television.
.
Federation, March 1987 15


CAJE honors Rabbis Baumgard and Lehrman]
Two-month visit leads
to a lifetime in Israel
The Aliyah Council of South Florida
promotes and develops community
awareness and understanding of the con-
cept of aliy ah (moving to Israel), and pro-
vides encouragement and support to in-
dividuals who plan to emigrate to Israel.
The following story was sent to Federa-
tion by Tal Clein, a new resident to the
State of Israel.
a
M
> name is Tal Clein.
Before I moved to Israel I
was known as Joy. Tal, a
Hebrew word meaning
morning dew, is one of the newer Hebrew
names. When I became an Israeli, I
decided I wanted an Israeli name and Tal
is the name I chose.
I first became interested in Israel when
I was about 12 years old. That was eight
years ago. I read many books about Israel
and knew that one day I would visit the
Jewish homeland. After my Bat Mitzvah I
decided to save money towards the trip to
Israel. I heard about a program called
High School in Israel. The program is two
months in Israel, studying the history of
the Jewish people and visiting many
historic sites. I decided that was exactly
what I was looking for. In September,
1982 I went on the program. It was the
best experience in my life. I learned
everything I could.
After my stay in Israel I knew I wanted
to spend some more time there, this time
on a kibbutz. I decided to do a kibbutz
"ulpan," on which are intensive study
classes to learn to read, write and speak
Hebrew. Half the day is spent learning
Hebrew and the other half is spent work-
ing on the kibbutz. I participated in a HVi
month ulpan on Kibbutz Ma'agan Michael
which is near Caesarea. I learned how to
speak Hebrew pretty well. I stayed on the
kibbutz for another six months as a
volunteer. That was a fantastic year. Dur-
ing that year I decided I wanted to live in
Israel and go into the army.
Before changing my status to "new
immigrant" and joining the army I
decided to visit my family in Miami
and tell them of my decision. My
whole family was very supportive. After
2Vi months in Miami I returned to Israel.
For my army service I joined a garin (a
group of people who join together to work
on a project) of new immigrants and we
went to Kibbutz Ortal on the Golan
Heights. My army service was in Nahal.
This is a special branch where you spend
part of your army service working on a
kibbutz. Israeli boys spend from one to
three years in the army, depending on
their age. Girls all spend two years and
more than one year of this time is spent
on a kibbutz.
After the army I think I would like to
stay on the kibbutz. This is a young kib-
butz with about 130 young people bet-
ween the ages of 20 to 40."
Tal is the daughter of Judy and
Robert Clein. She grew up in Miami,
graduating from Miami Suneet High
School in 1984. In December 1986 Tal
came to Miami for a visit and to in-
troduce her fiance, Natan Peeach to her
family and friend* here. Tal and Natan
will be married in August 1987 on Kib-
butz Ortal.
The Aliyah Council of South Florida is a
beneficiary of The Combined Jewish
Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
the Aliyah Council of South Florida ..
Partners in a caring community.
Two outstanding founding rabbis of the
Miami community will be honored at the
annual dinner of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education to be held on March 10
at Temple Emanu-El.
In addition to the tremendous contribu-
tions of both Rabbi Dr. Herbert
Baumgard of Temple Beth Am and Rabbi
Dr. Irving Lehrman of Temple Emanu-El
in the Miami community, they have both
been integrally involved in dialogue and
active participation in the movement
towards bringing peace and harmony
amongst all Jews.
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard is the
founding rabbi of Temple Beth Am, in
South Miami since 1965. He presently
serves as the national president of the
Synagogue Council of America, having
been elected in July of 1985.
Some of the positions held by Rabbi
Baumgard include: chairperson of the
Dade County Community Relations
Board, Youth Advisory commission, City
of Miami; Religious Leaders Coalition of
Greater Miami; president of the
Southeast Region, Central Conference of
American Rabbis; president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater Miami;
chairperson of the Inter-Faith Committee
of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith; member of the Advisory Board of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Rabbi Baumgard has received numerous
awards throughout the years, and has
taught religious courses at most major
universities throughout the state of
Florida.
Rabbi Baumgard and his wife. Selma,
have three children, Daniel, Jonathan,
and Shira, and two grandchildren, Jason
and Dara.
Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard
M.
Dr. Irving Lehrman has been rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El of Greater Miami since
1943. He received the degree of Doctor of
Hebrew Literature from the Jewish
Theological Seminary which also bestow-
ed on him an honorary Doctor of Divinity
degree Seminary.
Rabbi Lehrman served two terms as
the national president of the Synagogue
Council of America.
Other positions he has held include:
chairman of the Greater Miami Combined
Jewish Appeal for two campaigns; chair-
man of the Board of Governors of the
Greater Miami State of Israel Bonds;
president of the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami; Foundation Chairman of
the Jewish National Fund of Greater
Miami; and numerous other national and
local positions.
The Lehrman Day School of Temple
Emanu-El was named in his honor on the
occasion of his 25th anniversary with the
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
congregation, and recently the bordering
street was also named in his honor.
Rabbi Lehrman and his wife, Belle,
have two children, Dr. David and Dr!
Rosalind. They have four grandchildren,
Michael, Robert, Richard and Steven.
In honoring these two outstanding rab-
bis, Nan Rich, President of CAJE, has
said, "We are happy to honor these two
prominent members of our Jewish com-
munity for their strong concern in
developing the concept of Kehillah in the
Greater Miami Jewish Community."
Master of ceremonies, Al Golden,
welcomes all interested members of the
community to attend. Please call CAJE at
576-4030 for reservations.
CAJE is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
The Central Agency for Jewish Education
. Partners in a caring community.
CAJE director
elected Chairman
Gene Greenzweig, Executive Director
of the Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, has been elected Chairman of the
Bureau Directors' Fellowship, a national
organization comprised of directors of
bureaus of Jewish education in the United
States and Canada.
Greenzweig joined CAJE in 1973 and
became its Executive Director in 1976.
Under his direction the agency has
become a major force in the community.
Recently he served as the chairman of
the annual Council for Jewish Education
Convention, which was held concurrently
with the Bureau Directors' Fellowship
(BDF) Convention in West Palm Beach,
and it was at this time that Mr. Greenz-
weig was elected. "I look forward to an
exciting and dynamic year for the BDF,
and I look forward to working with the
professionals in Jewish education from
throughout the North American conti-
nent," said Greenzweig.
CAJE is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
CAJE Partners in a caring
community.
Holocaust Memorial Center
holds fourth annual Testimonial
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center is pleased to announce
its fourth annual Testimonial, at which it
will be paying tribute to the presidents of
the ten Survivor Clubs of Southeastern
Florida, on Wednesday, March 25. The
Testimonial will honor Mildred Nitzberg
and Joe Unger.
The presidents of the Survivor Clubs,
who represent their officers and
members, have worked closely with the
Holocaust Memorial Center to ensure
that the memory of the Holocaust will
never be forgotten. Through the dedica-
tion and devotion of Mildred Nitzberg and
Joe Unger, the oral history program of
the Center has been strengthened and
enriched. The testimonies of the sur-
vivors, their protectors and liberators
have created "A Living Memorial
Through Education."
The evening will feature Mike Burstyn,
best known for his characterization in the
movie, "Kuni Leml," and his starring role
in the Broadway production of "Bar-
num." The event will take place at the
Konover Hotel, American Ballroom, 5445
Collins Avenue on Miami Beach beginn-
ing at 7:30 p.m. There is a tax deductible
contribution of $15 per person for atten-
dance at the Testimonial evening.
Dessert and coffee will be served. For fur-
ther information, please call 940-5690.
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center is a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
the Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center. Partners in a caring
community.
16 Federation, March 1987


At Grandma's table,
there was always
room for one more.
*
4Z
*^ Vl
f
>
Sometimes the chicken soup was a little
thin. But she always made sure there was
enough to go around.
No matter how little food was in her
pantry or icebox, she could never say no to
another Jew who had none.
Grandma and Grandpa may not be here
anymore, but hunger still is. Thousands of
Jews, old enough to be grandparents them-
selves, are starving. Living alone, on fixed
incomes. Living on crackers and tea for lunch,
com flakes and milk for supper.
A wholesome kosher hot meal every day,
along with what may be the day's only contact
with the outside world, can keep their bodies
and spirits from wasting away.
But the Jewish Vocational Service's
Nutritional Project can serve only 1,800 meals
a day. The Jewish Federation helps provide
the funds, and this year there's not enough to
go around.
Because in spite of some very generous
gifts to Federation, the average pledge barely
covers a restaurant dinner for two.
You have so much more to share than
your grandmother had. So this year, when
the Federation volunteer calls, please open
your checkbook the way Grandma opened
her heart
She can't do it for you.
Now it's your turn.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation bA mm
1987 Combined lewish Appeal ^
rTl|]t
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137
Fed^rhiiik,MaH^f^7 17



Cuban Hebrew Committee
holds dinner-dance
The Cuban Hebrew Committee of Federation will celebrate
Israel's 39th anniversary on Saturday, March 21, with a dinner and
dance in the social hall of Temple Moses, 1200 Normandy Drive in
Miami Beach. The evening begins at 8:00 p.m. The guest speaker will
be Jerome Gleekel, expert in Israel and Near East Affairs.
Ambassador Rahamim Timor, Consul General from Israel in Miami,
will bring special greetings.
Dancing will be accompanied by the famous "Orchestra Miguel
Mejias." Couvert is $25. Reservations are required. Call Sender
Kaplan at 576-4000, ext. 288.
Federation gave scholarship money to area synagogues, to assist students who might
not be able to afford a Jewish education, as part of the Supplementary Schools
Scholarship Program. Pictured from left to right are Dr. Jack Sparks, Educational
Director, Temple Israel; Debby Schwartz, Adult Education Committee, Central
Agency for Jewish Education; Steven Kraus, Educational Director, Temple Samu-
El Or Olom; Barry Weinberger, vice chairman. Education Committee, Greater
Miami Jewish Federation; Martha Aft, Educational Director, Congregation Bet
Breira; Rabbi Norman Lipson, Administrator, Supplementary Schools
Scholarship Program, Central Agency for Jewish Education; Dorothy Herman,
Educational Director, Temple Beth Am; Rochelle Baltuch, Educational Director,
Temple Adath Yeshurun; Orly Alexander, Educational Director, Beth Moshe
Congregation; Rhea Schwartzberg, Educational Director, Beth Torah Congregation.
Drs. Eiber and Reyler lead
Cuban Hebrew Committee
Dr. Enrique Eiber
Dr. Enrique Eiber is the Chairman
cf Federation's Cuban Hebrew
Committee. He is a graduate of
Havana University Medical
School and practiced radiology in Cuba
until 1961.
Dr. Eiber has been the president of
several organizations including Hillel and
the Cuban Jewish Community Center and
Synagogue. After his arrival in the
United States in 1961 he became an assis-
tant professor of radiology at Case
Western Reserve University Medical
School. At present he practices diagnostic
radiology in Miami.
Dr. Felix Reyler
Dr. Felix H. Reyler currently
serves as the Campaign Chairman
for the Cuban Hebrew Commit-
tee. He is chairman of the Pan
American Bank International and has a
distinguished career of community ser-
vice and civic involvement. After his ar-
rival in Miami in the early 1960s, he was
among the founders, and served as presi-
dent of the Cuban Hebrew Congregation
of Miami. He also was a founder and
president of the B'nai B'rith Miami Latin
Lodge and he is a member of the ex-
ecutive committee of the American
Jewish Committee's Miami chapter.
If you would like to join the Cuban
Hebrew Committee contact Sender
Kaplan at 576-4000.
JFS forms support group for troubled teei
In response to the growing concern
among parents and schools over troubled
teenagers, Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami (JFS) has formed a teens'
support group in Kendall. Troubled teens
in the 10th, 11th and 12th grades are in-
vited to participate in this ongoing group
to share common feelings and concerns.
According to JFS clinical social worker
Elsie Manton, facilitator for the group,
"The new group is for teenagers who feel
uncomfortable socially, who are shy or
withdrawn, feeling depressed or lonely,
acting impulsively, having trouble talking
with their parents, or have poor school
performance. The supportive setting of-
fers a safe, comfortable place where they
can 'let it all hang out.' "
The group meets weekly on Thursdays
from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. at the JFS Kendall
Office, 8905 S.W. 87th Avenue. In-
dividual counseling for teens and family
counseling are also available. For further
information call 279-6611.
Jewish Family Service is a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
Jewish Family Service Partners in a
caring community.
Comedy Clinic opens at Mount Sinai Medical Center
Physicians at Mount Sinai Medical
Center have been prescribing a special
medication for their patients, one that
doesn't come from the pharmacy. Turn on
the television and take one dose of Laurel
and Hardy, followed by some George
Burns and a little Bill Cosby. This won't
cure one's medical problems, but it is sure
to induce laughter and help patients feel a
little bit better.
The "Comedy Clinic," as it is ap-
propriately named, can be seen on Mount
Sinai's closed circuit television. Monday
through Thursday at 4:15 p.m. It was in-
stituted based on research done by the
University of Akron that indicated there
was a positive benefit from laughter, said
coordinator of the Medical Center's pa-
tient administrative representatives
Adrienne Franco, who was instrumental
in developing this program at Mount
Sinai. "Subjects in the study felt good,
relaxed, and glad to be alive. Laughter
provided an emotional release to ease
stress, anxiety and tension."
"It has been suggested that humor may
have healing, as well as coping qualities,"
said Dr. Jamie Barkin, Chief of Mount
Sinai's Division of Gastroenterology, and
a .SP*1* force behind the "Comedy
Clinic." According to the University of
Akron research paper, depression, defin-
ed as anger turned within, is a passive
emotion. Humor and laughter are active
emotions, making them incompatible
responses with depression. There is a
large set of data which indicates that
negative psychological states, such as
depression, will affect a person's
physiological health. If one can get a
depressed individual to laugh, this will
tend to remove the debilitating emotional
state of depression and may give the im-
mune system a chance to recover.
Mount Sinai's "Comedy Clinic"
features such greats as the Marx
Brothers, Bill Cosby, Laurel and Hardy
and George Burns. "Patients have been
responding very favorably," said Franco.
"We developed our pilot program on
closet circuit television because we
wanted to reach all patients and felt that
a laughing room, which is now being im-
plemented in other hospitals across the
country, would not be accessible to those
patients who are bedridden."
"So next time you hear laughter when
walking down the halls in Mount Sinai, be
careful the laughter could be con-
tagious," added Franco.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
Mount Sinai Medical Center. Partners
in a caring community.
18 Federation, March 1987


* *

Grandma's purse
was never full.
But it was never
too empty for giving.
*


A*

There weren't any credit carcL or
checkbooks. And with Grandpa making
$12.50 a week, there wasn't much cash.
But somehow, there was always enough
to help another Jew who had less.
And when there were no organized
charities to help Jews in need, she and
Grandpa worked to organize them: Hospitals.
Vocational schools. Family services.
Benevolent societies. Community centers.
The kind of charities the Jewish
Federation helps support today.
Your grandparents may not be hero
anymore, but the need for help still is. From
day care for kids ol single Jewish parents
to hot meals and transportation for the
elderly.
Yet, in spite of some very generous gifts
to Federation, the average pledge is barely
more than the price of dinner out for two.
So this year, when the Federation
volunteer calls, please open your checkbook
the wav Grandma would open her purse.
She can't do it for you.
Now it's your turn.
w
Greater Miami Jewish Federation ^k
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal ^^ ^^
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137 #**%
'-cow



. I
priii
I
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
Isaac Bashevis Singer will speak at Con-
gregation Bet Breira, 9400 S.W. 87th
Avenue, at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are available
at the door for $10 and $15. Call 595-1500
for more information.
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged will hold a Board of Directors
meeting in the Ruby Auditorium beginn-
ing at 10:00 a.m. Contact Steve Rose at
751-8626 for more information.
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
A "BRUNCH FOR ISRAEL" will be held
at 11:00 a.m. for the residents of the
Ocean Point Condominium. The guest
speaker will be State Representative
.Elaine Bloom. For more information call
Sender Kaplan at 576-4000.
MONDAY, MARCH 9
The Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive, is hosting
its annual Jewish Essay Contest. The con-
test is open to all Miami Beach public and
private, junior or senior high school
students. The theme is "Israel's Scientific
Contributions to the World Since 1948."
Call the Center at 534-3206 for further
information.
MONDAY, MARCH 9
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah will hold
a general meeting featuring guest
speaker Rabbi Akiva Brilliant at Temple
Zamora in Coral Gables. For more infor-
mation call 649-7134.
TUESDAY. MARCH 10
The South Dade Branch of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation will hold its
next Vision Group meeting at the home of
Dr. David and Nancy Billings. Those who
wish to learn more about Federation and
its many roles in the local community and
world-wide are invited. If you are in-
terested in attending call Michele Jaffe at
251-9334.
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
The South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry will hold its monthly meeting on
Tuesday, March 10, beginning at 7:30
p.m. For more information call 576-4000,
ext. 291.
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
Ben Gurian Hadassah will hold its regular
meeting and Purim Program beginning at
12:45 p.m. For more information call
Clara Fellerman at 891-3015.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center will hold a seminar for
Dade County Teachers on the subject of
"Teaching the Holocaust using critical
thinking skills," from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00
p.m. The seminar is open to world history
teachers in public, private and parochial
schools. It will be held at Florida Interna-
tional University, Bay Vista Campus,
N.E. 151st Street and Biscayne
Boulevard. Call 940-5690 for further in-
formation and R.S.V.P.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged will hold its "Founders" dinner
meeting in the May Visitors Center at
6:00 p.m. Contact Steve Rose at 751-8626
for more information.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
FRIDAY, MARCH 13
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged will hold an Alliance for Care
Conference at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
Contact Irma Emery at 751-8626.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
Temple Emanu-El 1987 Cultural Arts
Series will begin at 8:00 p.m. in the main
sanctuary, 1701 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach. Political humorist Mark
Russell will be featured. For information
and tickets call 538-2503.
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
The Southeast Region of the American
Jewish Congress and the Florida
Women's Division will hold their annual
Golden Builders' Luncheon at the
Diplomat Hotel, 3515 S. Ocean Dr.,
Hollywood at 12:00 noon. Chapter
presidents, the Women's Division presi-
dent and the regional president are the
special honorees. Entertainemnt by the
Momentum Ballet. For more information
call Mildred Berlin at 944-3984.
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center, Senior Adult Depart-
ment, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue will hold
"Yiddish for Fun," with Bette Shalloway
beginning at 7:30 p.m. It will be an even-
ing of conversation and songs in Yiddish.
Refreshments will be served. The pro-
gram is free to JCC members, $1 for non-
members. Call Vicki Burns at 932-4200,
ext. 213 for more information.
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center, Senior Adult Department
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, will be going to
Coconut Grove Theater to see a perfor-
mance of "Side by Side by Sondheim."
Tickets are $18 for JCC members. $19.50
for non-members and includes admission
and transportation. Departure from the
JCC will be promptly at 12:45 p.m. Call
Vicki Burns at 932-4200 for more
information.
TUESDAY, MARCH 17
The Judaic Studies Program at the
University of Miami will present the se-
cond installment in its annual Jewish
Film Festival beginning at 7:30 p.m. The
film will be "Private Benjamin," starring
Goldie Hawn and will be shown at the
Beaumont Cinema at the University of
Miami. Tickets are $3 and may be pur-
chased at the door. For more information
call 284-4375.
TUESDAY, MARCH 17
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center, Senior Adult Depart-
ment, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, will hold
its AARP "55 Alive-Mature Driving
Class" from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The
class is taught in two separate four-hour
sessions. Participants will receive a cer-
tificate of completion plus eligibility for a
premium discount. Pre-registration for
this course is required. Register in the
Senior Adult Department. The fee is $7.
Call Vicki Burns at 932-4200.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar items
(Please print or type)
Deadline for April events is March 11
Organization
Event _____
Place_______
Day
Date.
Time
(a.m.
)p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No.
MAILTO:

Mm
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33137
TUESDAY, MARCH 17
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, Junior Auxiliary board meeting
will be held at the Singapore Hotel at
noon. For more information contact Stef-
fi Cohen at 751-8626.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
Residents of the Admiral's Tower Con-
dominium are invited to attend "Israel
Solidarity Night" in the condominium's
social hall beginning at 7:00 p.m. There
will be entertainment, and refreshments
will be served. For more information con-
tact Sender Kaplan at 576-4000.
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
The Southeast Region of the American
Jewish Congress will honor Florida
Secretary of State George Firestone at
the Horace M. Kallen Award Dinner at
the Eden Roc Hotel, 4525 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach at 6:00 p.m. Guest speaker
is Phil Baum, associate executive director
of the American Jewish Congress. For
more information call the regional office
at 673-9100.
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
The Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary of
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged will hold a general meeting at
Crystal House on Miami Beach beginning
at 11:30 a.m. Contact Steffi Cohen at
751-8626 for more information.
THURSDAY. MARCH 19
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, South Dade Friends of Douglas
Gardens board meeting will be held at
8:00 p.m. For more information contact
Steffi Cohen at 751-8626.
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
The Sisterhood of Menorah Temple will
hold its regular meeting in the Temple
Social Hall, 7435 Carlyle Avenue on
Miami Beach, beginning at noon. For
more information call 865-1133.
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
The Judaic Studies Program at the
University of Miami presents the Judaic
Studies Lecture Series featuring Dr.
Mort Weinfeld, chairman of the Depart-
ment of Sociology at McGill University.
Dr. Weinfeld will discuss, "Canadian
Jewry: Making it as a Minority Group."
The lecture, which will be held in the
Learning Center, room 190, at the
University of Miami begins at 8:00 p.m.
Call 284-4375 for more information.
FRIDAY, MARCH 20
The Judaic Studies Program at the
University of Miami presents Dr. Mort
Weinfeld, chairman of the Department of
Sociology at McGill University as part of
its Judaic Studies Lecture Series. Dr.
Weinfeld will lecture on the topic,
"Cultural Pluralism in Canada: Ethnicity
and Public Policy," at noon in the Merrick
building, Sociology Seminar Room. Bring
your lunch to this meeting. Call 284-4375
for more information.

SUNDAY, MARCH 22
SUPER SUNDAY! Help make it
Super by doing your part aa a
phone volunteer for the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. Call
Federation at 576-4000.
MONDAY, MARCH 23
"MOP UP" MONDAY at Federa-
tion. Volunteer your time as a
telephone volunteer for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
by calling 576-4000.
MONDAY, MARCH 23
The Chaim Weizmann Branch Farband is
sponsoring a "Brunch for Israel" beginn-
ing at 12:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the
American Savings Bank located on Alton
Road and Lincoln Road. The guest
speaker ,s Sender M. Kaplan, fomer
Israel. Consul in Cuba. There will SI
musical program of Yiddish and Hebrew
songs for reservations call Sheva
TUESDAY, MARCH 24
The Miami Jewish Home and Ho**,.
the Aged. 151 N.E. 52nd StreeXu
its Alzheimer's Care Committee Z
in the Ruby Auditorium at 11^
Contact Lou Fischer at 751-8626forJ
information.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25
The Southeastern Florida Hok
Memorial Center will hold a t
evening in honor of Millie ,
Ph.D Joe Unger Esq. JS
presidents of ten Survivor Cmb
Southeast Florida. Mike Buretyn >ai
known for his character portrayals'JnflJ
movie, "Kuni Lend" and who just stand
as P.T. Barnum in the Broadway proA*|
tion of "Barnum" will perform for |S
in attendance. Couvert is $15 per perm
Dessert and coffee will be served, fc I
evening begins at 7:30 p.m. at tail
Konover Hotel's American BaUroml
5445 Collins Avenue. For more infornJ
tion call 940-5690. J
THURSDAY. MARCH 26
The North Miami Beach Auxiliary tffr I
Miami Jewish Home and Hospitallath |
Aged will hold a Donor Luncheon sty
Turnberry Isle Country Club hnpiakj
noon. Contact Steffi Cohen at "5i-8 I
for more information.
FRIDAY, MARCH 27
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish C|
munity Center, Senior Adult Deartl
ment, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, i|
cooperation with Mount Sinai Medical
Center/Project Sinai will present, "M
impact of drug misuse from Grant I
parents to Grandchildren." The speakerl
will be Doreen Barton, Community Rea-I
tions Specialist from Spectrum Pro-I
grams, Inc. This lecture, which will bcl
held from 11:00 a.m. to noon, is free atll
open to the public. Call 932-4200, ext. 2Q|
for more information.
SATURDAY, MARCH 28
The Miami Beach Jewish Commu
Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive, will |
sent an evening of fun and excitement I
its "Goods and Services Auction." f
more information contact the JCC |
534-3206.
SUNDAY, MARCH 29
The Southeast Region of the
Jewish Congress will hold a seminar
tax and estate planning and planned j
ing. Guest speaker is Martin Kalb.'
seminar will be held at Belle Plan. I
Island Ave., Miami Beach beginninfi
10:00 a.m. Refreshments will be serial
For more information call the regions]*]
fice at 673-9100.
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 ,
Temple Sinai of North Dade, 18801NJ
22nd Avenue will hold its 12th anal
Spring Music Festival. The concert HI
be a salute to the Miss Liberty CenteMJill
and the Bicentennial of our U.S. Consl
tion. Featured in the program "J
Cantor Irving Shulkes of Temple B
and guest Cantor Zvee Aroni. In addM
there will be selections by Rabbi m I
Kingsley, Rabbi Julian Cook, Shirei Hi*
and the Temple Sinai Choir. For more*
formation contact Temple Sir*
932-9010.
EVERY WEDNESDAY .
The South Dade Branch of the t>re*
Miami Jewish Federation in r*"J
with the Central Agency for J Education is sponsoring a classinrjr
Avot, Ethics of the Fathers, as p"
Community Education prograB-^TJ
meet every Wednesday n^rM*".!
7:30-9:00 a.m. at the South Dade"**
office, 12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue^WJ:
and cream cheese, juice and con
available for $1. The cost of the W*fl
ings of the Fathers, is $3. AflJJJJ
terested in attending shouW |
Michele Jaffe at 251-9334.

20 Federation, March 1987


Full Text
New South Dade Jewish Center
On Lakeside Site
Friday, March 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
L next generation after us will
IStf the fruits of our efforts,
ISuchman said.
Continued from Preceding Page
posed community center ten years
ago with the expectation that it
would someday be built.
Mikki Futernick, who is co-
chairman with her husband, Mor-
ris, of the Capital Fund Commit-
tee said the Center, like the spec-
trum of the rainbow, "Will have
something for everyone."
finest speakers included Myron
InSl ofthe Greater Miami
5 Federation and area State
I En Art Simon, who said he mov-
Ijfcross the street from the pro-
Among Speakers At Dedication
Myron J. Brodie
William M. Alper
ARMDI Purim Breakfast
The Sunny Isles Chapter of
American Red Magen David for
Israel with the assistance of Tem-
ple Bnai Zion is planning a Purim
Breakfast for members and
friends of ARMDI at Temple Bnai
Zion at 10 a.m. on March 15.
The guest speaker will be Dr.
Harry La Fontaine, a protector of
Jews during World War II and
Group Commander of the Danish
underground.
Special awards will be
presented to Max Kreiger, Presi-
dent of Temple Bnai Zion and
Jack Kwartner, a philanthropist
and donor of seven ambulances to
the State of Israel.
The award-winning film "A
Commitment to Life" will be
shown.
Honored guests include
Regional Director Robert L.
Schwartz, Regional President
Murray Kaye, Ruth Spivak, Presi-
dent of the Sunny Isles Chapter,
Charles Skupsky, President
Emeritus of the Chapter and Rab-
bi Stanley Burstein, spiritual
leader of Temple Bnai Zion.
Happening
A Fabulous Fifties Bazaar, sponsored by the Better Business
Bureau Lducational Foundation, will be held at the Surf side Beach
Hotel, on Saturday and Sunday. March 14 and 15. from 11 to 6
p.m. The event is co-sponsored by Michael Dezer. owner of the
hotel. Barry University and WLVE FM radio 94
A portion of the proceeds will go towards a business scholarship
at Barry University.
An open meeting with Congressman Dante Fascell. chairman of
the Foreign Relations Committee, will be held at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour Hotel. Sunday. March 15. at 10:30 a.m.. hosted by the
American Society for Technion.
Paul B. Steinberg is brunch chairman, and Jay E. Leshaw is
Greater Miami Chapter president.
CID (Children In Distress) will hold a Luncheon Card Party.
1130 a.m.. Monday. March 16. at the Marriott Hotel on the
Bay.
There wdl be games set up for Pan. Canasta, Bridge. Scrabble.
*N long. Gin Rummy and Rummy Kub.
STa'amat
USA
The annual Child Rescue Lun-
cheon of the Hi Rise Tikvah
Chapter of Na'amat USA, featur-
ing musical entertainment,
speaker national vice president
Harriet Green and honoring Sally
Gersten, president, will be held
Monday, March 16 at noon at the
Shelborne Hotel, 1801 Collins
Ave., Miami Beach.
A recitaton of the Megillah
reading will be conducted by
Esther Weinstein, at the Wednes-
day meeting of the Beba Idelson
Chapter. The 11:30 a.m. session
will be held in the club room of the
100 Lincoln Road Building, Miami
Beach.
Anna Chaet, one of the founders
of the chapter, will be honored as
Queen Esther during the Purim
celebration. She has been an ac-
tive member of the world-wide
organization for nearly 50 years
and heads a four-generation fami-
ly membership in Na'amat.
Esther Weinstein will also
entertain with her repertoire of
Hebrew, Yiddish and English
songs.
According to Irene Raczkowski,
president, the public is welcome at
no charge and Sarah Kerbs and
Mildred Frank will serve as
hostesses.
RABBI AVAILABLE
FOR HIGH HOLIDAYS
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CANTOR
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA
Small Conservative Congregation seeks a part-
itime Cantor for Shabbat Services and all
Holiday Services and training of our B'nai
Mitzvah students, September through June.
Total compensation $16,000.
Send detailed resume and audition tape to:
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Road, Clearwater, Fl. 33546.
i Passover Seders
Deauville
GIATT
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ON THE OCEAN AT 67TH STREET
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
CONDUCTED BY
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1st SEDER-APRIL 13
2nd SEDER-APRIL 14
SAH per person, per Seder
tw including tax & gratuities
^75 ,o,bo,,isDERs
RESERVATONS AVAILABLE FOR
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CALL
531-3446


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FILES


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 6, 1987
ARTISTS RENDERING OF JEWISH CENTER FACILITIES FOR WHICH GROUND WAS DEDICATED SUNDAY.
'Building The Dream'
Lakeside Site Will House New South Dade Jewish Center
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
With colorful balloons say-
ing, "Building the Dream,"
a 21-acre lakeside site that
will house South Dade's on-
ly full-service Jewish Com-
munity Center was nudged
to reality at a ground
dedication ceremony
Sunday.
A rainbow was part of the "I'm
a dream-maker" theme, symboliz-
ing the use the facility will get
from toddlers in strollers to
seniors.
THE NEW facility at
Southwest 112th Avenue and
112th Street will house a
Holocaust Memorial, Israeli
Resource Center, theater, library,
education center, game room,
child care and nursery, teen
lounge, film lab, health clubs and
atrium.
"It's a very long-awaited day,
and we're very excited. We feel
nothing can stop us now," said
Naomi Olster, coordinator of the
campaign which already raised
about $5 million of the $9.5 million
needed for construction costs and
initial funds for the programs.
The Community Center will be
called the Dave and Mary Alper
Jewish Community Center, nam-
ed after the couple who left in
their will a $2 million gift that the
executors of their estate decided
to give for this project.
Dave and Mary Alper each
emigrated from Russia when they
were only 14 years old. Dave
headed to the "boomtown" of
Miami in 1926 and opened up the
Rosedale Deli on Northwest Se-
cond Avenue and Third Street.
AFTER IT was destroyed by
the big hurricane that year, he
reopened with one of his partners
at Northwest Fifth Street and Se-
cond Avenue, right next to a drug
store owned by Mary's brother.
They met and courted for a couple
of years and married.
In the late 1930s and early
1940s, Dave and Mary first began
investing in real estate. They used
their savings to buy lots zoned for
commercial property on 41st
Street in Miami Beach.
Years ago, the Rosedale deli
gave way to oncplosive downtown
expansion. /
They were generous people,
always sharing their fortune with
those less fortunate.
"THIS IS an area in which a lot
Barbara Bornstein, Sara two-and-a-half.
Community Center will be named after
Dave and Mary Alper, donors of $2
million.
of young people were settling,"
said Anne Alper, daughter-in-law
of the donors who attended the
ceremony with her husband,
William Alper. "We wanted to
have a place where Jewish
children could meet to socialize
and play."
The groundbreaking is schedul-
ed for September, but another $2
million will have to be raised
before then, Olster said. Starting
April 1, a fundraising campaign
will go into full force.
"We're very optimistic," Olster
said. "We feel that once the com-
munity knows this is absolutely
happening, we will be very sue
cessful in raising funds."
Ed Rosen, director of the Com-
munity Center, estimated thai
7,000 people would use the new
100,000-square-foot facility.
which will be located next door to I
Federation Gardens, a low-cost
housing development which con-
tains about 80 percent Jewish
residents. There are an estimated
70,000 Jewish individuals living in
the South Dade area.
WITH A commercial-sized kit-
chen planned for the new center.
Rosen said he hopes activities will
include the serving of hot meals.
"It's important to note the sup-
port the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation is giving us." said
Rosen. "They gave us the proper-
ty (valued at an estimated $3
million), and they encouraged the
money to be used in this area."
The problem, said Rosen, had
been that there was lots of subur-
bia and not really a place for teen
agers.
ABOUT 200 people attended
the ground dedication ceremony.
a tradition involving the dedica-
tion of man's efforts to God, a
biblical concept that is as old as
the Jewish people. Rabbi Leonard
Schoolman of Temple Beth Am
led the audience in a special
prayer.
Sam Nevel, a Miami developer,
is one of the major donors. "I've
got two grandchildren. I really
feel strongly that if we're going to
attract people in South Dade. if
we don't have a facility like this,
we're going to lose people. It's so
long-overdue in this area."
Larry Suchman, 26, is on the
Center's Board of Directors, and
is charged with the task of
soliciting donations of $10,000
and more from residents in the
age group primarily between 24
and 40. Suchman said his father,
Clifford Suchman, was among a
group who owned the site and sold
it "at a gift price" to the Jewish
Federation.
"HE AND his generation have
brought the Jewish Federation
and the JCC to where it is today.
It will now take not only their ef-
forts but that of the next genera-
tion as well. And we can do that so
Continued on Following Pa*6