The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03029

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T ll 60 No. 8
Miami Friday, February 20,1987
50 Cents
]
Ife

/



tU
7
- .-.;
AP/Wide World Photo
week. The group of demonstrators were protesting against reported plans by
Israel to trade U00 Arab prisoners for hostages in Lebanon.
tOR VICTIM PROTESTS: Police block mother of terrorist victim Moshe
tn, a soldier murdered by Palestinian guerrillas, as she and other angry
ives of Israeli victims tried to burst into the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem last
rab Lawyer Masarwa
Israel's New Consul In Atlanta
By GIL SEDAN
ERUSALEM (JTA) -
approaches the end of
J9th year since its foun-
the State of Israel has
an historic and un-
dented move it has
Dinted a young Israeli
to an important and
igious diplomatic post
lhammad Masarwa, a
u-old lawyer from Kufer
[village near Hadera, will be
b next Consul General in
, a post he assumes next
er. He will be the first non-
head an Israeli diplomatic
n anywhere, and his ap-
pointment demonstrated Israel's
confidence in itself and in its
750,000 Arab citizens.
MASARWA IS Moslem. He
speaks Hebrew with fluency and
eloquence, as he does English and
Arabic. He heads a successful law
firm in Hadera and has often
represented the mainstream of
Israel's Arab society at public
events. He combines boyish good
looks and silvery curly hair with
the shrewd intelligence often at-
tributed to his profession.
Masarwa is not particularly ex-
cited by his elevation to the
highest position ever held by an
Israeli Arab. "This should have
been done a long time ago, in
other offices as well. The excite-
ment is over the fact that after
much talk something was done,"
he told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency in an interview after his
appointment was announced last
week.
PREVIOUSLY the highest
position held by an Arab in Israel
was Deputy Minister of Health,
occupied until the early 1970s by
the late Abdul Aziz Zuabi of
Nazareth, a Mapam Knesset
member. A Druze, Sheik Jaber
Muadi, was Deputy Minister of
Communications and Agriculture.
But there have been no Arabs in
senior positions since 1977. There
has been talk recently of appoin-
ting an Arab to the Supreme
Court, but this has yet to
materialize.
"There is no reason why an
Arab should not be appointed
director general or deputy direc-
tor general of a government
ministry," Masarwa said.
But he does not favor a "sym-
bolic" appointment of an Arab as
a Minister or a Supreme Court
Justice just because he is an Arab.
"I believe that Arab citizens of
Israel should have an equal oppor-
tunity to put forward their can-
didacy to any civil service open-
ing," Masarwa said. "Once this is
done, I believe that Israel's Arabs
will become full partners to the
Continued on Pare 14-A
Inside
Shamir in Talks With Reagan ... Page 3-A
Sen. Graham's Proposal of Marriage'... Page 5-A
A 'First': Conservative Women Cantors... Page 7-A
Donahue's Program from Moscow ... Page 8-A
Is Soviet 'Glasnosf for Real?... Page 9-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
Peres Aide
His Views Range Over Iran Scandal, Peace Talks in Middle East
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
"The Israeli American
relationship has long been
typified by the "gevalt syn-
drome," said Nimrod Novik,
policy advisor to Shimon
Peres, at the National
Jewish Community Ad-
Juatice Blackmail 5-A
Sarbanes on Contras 13-A
visory Council (NJCRAC)
Plenary Session Sunday at
the Bonaventure Hotel in
Ft. Lauderdale.
The syndrome. Novik said, is
best described as "The sky is fall-
ing today, or else it will fall tomor-
row, or worst of all, perhaps it fell
yesterday, and we were all too
stupid to notice."
Novik was referring to some of
the doomsday predictions about
the future of the Israeli-American
relationship in the aftermath of
the Iran affair.
REGARDING THE objections
of some Americans to a proposed
International Peace Conference
on peace in the Middle East,
Novik stated that "We are not in
the peace process because of the
quality of our neighbors.
"We are disappointed that King
Hussein of Jordan does not see
the equation as we do. But we are
in the peace process because our
primary objective, our first com-
mandment, is to avoid war.
"We want to make sure," con-
tinued Novik,"that if we do have
to go to war again, we can look the
soldiers, their wives and mothers
in the eye and say that we did not
miss an opportunity for peace.
"This has concrete political im-
plications. Every time we make a
gesture and get frustrated we
don't take the lazy way out, but in-
stead we try again."
OPPONENTS OF the proposed
conference fear that Israel will be
forced to make dangerous conces-
sions. Novik argued that this was
not the case.
"No one will drag us to where
we don't want to go," said Novik,
"so why do we hear opposition as
if we were handing the scissors to
Delilah so that she can make us
impotent?"
Novik explained that Israel
would only concede to Hussein on
marginal issues, and that an Inter-
national Conference could be an
umbrella that would not disturb
the bilateral negotiations between
Israel and a Palestinian/Jordanian
delegation. A "ten point paper"
specifying Israeli stipulations
would not be open to compromise,
he said.
Novik added that the proposed
conference would be contingent
upon the resolution of two grey
areas who will represent the
Palestinian people and the issue of
Soviet participation.
"PERHAPS THIS is the first
chance for Israel to have some
leverage with Russia," said
Novik, who stated that the Soviet
Union would have to have
diplomatic relations with Israel
and allow Soviet Jews to emigrate
to Israel before Israel would agree
to have the Soviet Union par-
ticipate in the conference.
"The USSR cannot afford
another Pax Americana like Camp
David," added Novik.
On the subject of the Iran affair,
Novik stated that President
Reagan had possessed his own
four-point agenda, and that Israel
had agreed on two of the points
rescuing the hostages and gather-
ing intelligence, the context of
No one will drag us where we
don t want to go.' Nimrod Novik
wanting to help a friend and to
demonstrate on who's who in
Iran.
"There was a convergence of
needs in intelligence that the
friendship was a two-way street,"
said Novik.
ECHOING THE World War II
dictum that the Jews in Palestine
must fight the British as if there
were no war on, and fight the Ger-
mans as if there were no white
paper, Novik said, "We are pursu-
ing the policy of contradictions.
"We must fight the terrorists as
if there were no hostages and
negotiate for the hostages as if
there were no terrorists. The deci-
sion of which to uphold at a given
moment is a lonely one." said
Novik.
"I have no regrets and no
apologies," he added.
In an interview with the Jewish
Floridian later Sunday, Novik
elaborated on some of the issues
he had touched upon earlier. On
the question of whether or not
Israel had been scapegoated in the
Iran affair, Novik replied that "If
there is a tendency to scapegoat,
it is not an administration policy."
"The Reagan administration is
too smart to think that the
American people and Congress
will believe that a few Israelis
determined U.S. foreign policy,"
he said flatly.
AS TO the extent of actual
Israeli involvement, Novik
declared that then Prime
Minister Shimon Peres has not
denied anything that Israel did.
"The Israeli government decid-
ed not to comment on anything
when the Irangate story first
broke," he said. The reason was
we felt that what we did was a
sincere effort to help a friend.
"All of a sudden, we found out
that the operation was controver-
sial in two ways one, between
the administration and Congress,
and two, within the administra-
tion itself.
"We knew that any comment
coming from Israel would almost
by definition be an intervention in
both conflicts, and we were deter-
mined to avoid it. We have friends
on both sides of the fence."
ISRAEL BROKE silence when
kUtaMii
it was accused of involvement in
the diversion of funds to the Con-
tras, because, according to Novik,
Israel had not even known about
that aspect of the Iran affair until
it was announced by the media.
Should Israel have checked to
ascertain that Congress knew
about the Iran arms affair before
going ahead and helping the
American administration?
"The responsibility of the ex-
ecutive vis-a-vis the legislature is
different in Israel," said Novik.
"Most of the members of the
Cabinet are also members of the
Knesset. They report to
themselves, so to speak.
"Had the arms for hostages
part of the deal succeeded, and all
six hostages been released, all
those involved would have been
heroes," stated Novik.
ON THE issue of the proposed
International Peace Conference,
Novik said that although Prime
Minister Shamir faced objections
from within the Likud Party, he
has stated that there is a "man-
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date to explore, but no govern-
ment decision on the matter."
And who would represent the
Palestinians if the conference
came to pass?
"Any resident of the West Bank
qualifies." said Novik, "and they
all identify with the PLO. What
we won't accept is a member of
the PLO organization, but there's
a very big difference between ac-
tive membership in the PLO and
vague philosophical identification
with it."
"Neither Israel nor the Palesti-
nians nor Jordan are ready for the
kind of decisions that are
necessary for the ultimate resolu-
tion of the conflict," said Novik,
but I do believe that all three are
much closer than is commonly
assumed to the kind of decisions
that are required in order to get
into negotiations and reach an in-
terim agreement.
"Once we leave a negotiating
table with that, confidence can
build on all sides, and then maybe
we will be able to tackle the last
few remaining decisions."
THE FIRST phase, according
to Novik, would concentrate on
autonomy for the Palestinians,
which, Novik says, would be
enough to reach that interim
stage.
Novik was studying in Tel Aviv,
in Israel's only strategic think
tank, when Peres approached him
and asked him to join a team of
seven experts who were to put
together a blueprint of what Peres
would accomplish in his first 100
days as Prime Minister if he were
elected. The day that the Unity
government was formed, Peres
asked Novik to take the position
of policy advisor.
Working with the man \w
calls his "childhood hSo"T-
SX eX?tllg ?nd humbl'ng I
cording to Novik, who had sTudi
and received his MA and PhD^
international relations prior tak
stint at the Center for sS
Studies in Tel Aviv. ***
" I thought he would have a bf
ter general overview than any J
the experts, but that he wouM,'
have the same expertise in a Z
field, recalled Novik. In ,
Peres "was consistently two st** 1
ahead of us. >* *
"WHEN YOU sit in acadeJ
in Tel Aviv, and vou cnticia
government policy, you believe
that wisdom ends at the gates o'
Jerusalem, tired from the climbm
the hill. But when you're 1
government in Jerusalem, n
feel that much of the criticism i
based on insufficient appreciate &
of the issues and the constrains
within which the decision make
has to function."
Novik has a wife, Ruth, whom
professor at Tel Aviv University
and two children, Ariel, 10 air,
Raz, 3 Vt. His son, Raz, was rul-
ed after a young soldier who d*c
in Lebanon, the only son of i
Holocaust survivor whose entm
family had perished.
'That family survived tfe
Holocaust but not Lebanon," sir.
Novik. "But at least within m
family, they are remembered."
Novik's own name, Nimrod, m
the pseudonym his father, w
established the Counter In?
telligence Division of the Israel
Police, had used in the Haganai
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Shamir in U.S.
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
About Reagan Talks: 'We'll Discuss Many Subjects'
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
said on his arrival here from
Israel Monday that he is still
i waiting "for the verifica-
tion" of reports that Soviet
Jewish dissident Iosif
Begun has been released
from prison, but offered
congratulations to Begun's
family should the reports
prove correct.
Shamir, here for a 10-day visit
which was to include a meeting
with President Reagan at the
White House Wednesday, pledged
[that Israel "will continue the
struggle on behalf of Soviet
|jewry."
Asked to comment on the latest
ISoviet "gesture," the release, ac-
Icording to Moscow last week, of
|140 imprisoned dissidents, the
Israeli leader replied: "We are not
nterested in gestures. We are in-
erested in meaningful change."
SHAMIR, asked by reporters if
Bis talk with Reagan will include
tie Iran-contra arms sale affair
eplied, "We will discuss many
abjects." Pressed on that matter,
owever, he answered, "Maybe."
Braeli sources here said the
Shamir-Reagan meeting would
leal primarily with bilateral
sues, the Middle East situation
rid other topics, but they did not
link Iran would be among them.
Before leaving Israel, Shamir
dared that Israel is now "an of-
Terrorist
Victims'
Relatives
Protest
Related Photo 1-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
elatives of Israelis killed by ter-
>rists created serious distur-
nces in the Supreme Court last
Wednesday (Feb. 11) and Thurs-
iy (Feb.12) in connection with
ieir demand for an order
estraining the government from
reeing jailed terrorists in ex
je for Israeli and other
stages held by extremist groups
Lebanon.
The government insits it has no
itention of negotiating such a
Peal. A three-judge panel of the
court postponed a hearing
lat was due Thursday until police
ertained whether the persons
irho lodged the appeal were
long the demonstrators.
The bereaved relatives were in-
riated because the panel refused
issue a restraining order
rithout a prior hearing. The court
eld that the demonstrations were
form of public pressure which
ould not be countenanced. The
>anel consists of Justices
Lvraham Halima, Avraham
larak and Eliezer Goldberg. They
lied in police to disperse the
Jemonstrators.
The Attorney General's office,
esponding to the appeal, said
lere was no truth to reports of an
ipending prisoner-hostage swap,
stated that any consideration of
Efforts to secure the release of
sraeli prisoners held by a "cruel
Inemy" would take into account
lie feelings of the families of vic-
Sms of terrorism.
But the government also has a
ity to ensure the safety and
reedom of its soldiers and the
^ros and cons will be carefully
Weighed before any decisions are
ten, the statement said.
ficial ally of the United States."
Questioned about this here, he
stated that "Israel is a major non-
NATO ally of the United States"
but did not elaborate. According
to reports. Secretary of State
George Shultz and Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
asked Congress to grant Israel the
status of an official, special ally of
the U.S.
Israel has sought the status
which is conferred upon non-
NATO allies including Japan and
Australia. The change will allow
Israeli firms to bid for valuable
defense-related projects in the
U.S. which could garner Israel up
to $300 million in additional
revenue. The step towards for-
malizing bilateral relations bet-
ween Israel and the U.S. comes
after the U.S. and Israel have
already signed a strategic
cooperation agreement to hold
joint military exercises.
SHAMIR MET at his hotel here
with Gov. Thomas Kean of New
Jersey, whom he met when the
latter visited Israel two years ago.
Gov. Mario Cuomo of New York is
presently out of the State. Shamir
also met Monday afternoon with
Mayor Edward Koch of New York
City.
A spokesman for Shamir briefed
reporters following the meeting
with Koch. He said that the Mayor
had asked Shamir the purpose of
his present visit to the U.S., to
which the Premier replied that
since Israel has become a major al-
ly of the U.S., he wants to clarify
the definition and contents of this
new relationship.
Shamir also discussed Soviet
Jewry with Koch and expressed
dissatisfaction that Soviet Jews
come to the U.S. with refugee
status. They are not refugees, he
said, because they leave the USSR
with Israeli visas. He said he
would raise this matter with U.S.
officials when he is in
Washington.
THE SPOKESMAN said Koch
and Kean had both urged that
Israel not enter into negotiations
with terrorists for the release of
hostages and that Shamir told
them Israel has no intention of do-
ing so.
The spokesman said Shamir lun-
ched Monday with members of the
Jewish Task Force for the
Economic Development of Israel,
at the Regency Hotel. The
meeting was chaired by David
Hermelin, international chairman
of the Israel Bond Organization.
Shamir told the group that
Israel is very much concerned
with building and establishing its
economy on solid grounds. He said
he has confidence in the goals of
the Task Force and believes that if
they are correctly implemented,
Israel will stabilize its economy in
10 years.
According to the spokesman,
Shamir is satisfied with the at-
mosphere surrounding his
American visit, despite media
reports about Israel's involvment
in the Iran-contra arms scandal.
HE LEFT FOR Washington
Tuesday and will remain there un-
til Friday, when he leaves for Los
Angeles. Shamir will return to
New York on Feb. 23 for meetings
with Jewish leaders and student
groups.
The Premier is accompanied on
his trip by four senior aides: Avi
Pazner. his communications ad-
visor; Elyakim Rubinstein,
Cabinet secretary; Gen. Azriel
Nevo, his aide de camp; and Yosef
Ben-Aharon, director general of
the Prime Minister's Office.
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Passover al Brown s Our own personal
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beautiful Sedar and religious services
Luxurious accomodations great sports
lacilities and 3 gourmet meals a day
that have become a tradition at
Brown s Beauty warmth and tradition
Now that s a special Passover
REOPENING APRIL 3
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Sedar and Religious Services
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Subsidiaries at Jetfaoon Bancorp, toe MoirU3M^f1>ICaod federal Reserva^iJtern


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
these municipalities will, in effect, &&*
franchise Jewish voters unless they p*
through the inconvenience of voting {
go
in
^0 ^^rS^HUr
^
Reagan, Shamir: Peace Talks And Arms
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir was in
Washington this week for talks with Presi-
dent Reagan and other high government of-
ficials. Shamir said in New York Monday
that he was prepared to discuss "anything"
and everything with the Reagan
Administration.
This means two things: Iran and the con-
tras; and an international conference for
peace in the Middle East.
In terms of the conference, the Reaganites
have long held the view that such a con-
ference is out of the question, since two of
the permanent Security Council members,
all of whom as United Nations represen-
tatives would be invited to such a con-
ference, do not even have diplomatic ties
with Israel: China and the Soviet Union.
But a letter to Prime Minister Shamir last
week from Secretary of State George Shultz
suggests otherwise. The United States has
apparently changed its mind because, as
Shultz said in the letter, Jordan's King Hus-
sein would never assent to a role in the talks
without UN sponsorship, and without Hus-
sein, what kind of talks would they be
anyway?
Catch-22 Situation
The proverbial Catch-22 situation is thus
clear, and it was this impossible tangle that
Shamir kept in mind as the dominant item
on his agenda in Washington with the avow-
ed purpose of reverting the Administra-
tion s position on peace talks to its former
frame of reference.
With respect to Iran and the contras, both
Shamir and Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, who was Prime Minister at the height
of the activity involving the sale of arms to
Iran, have said time and again that Israel
served as no more than an intermediary for
a friend who had asked the United States.
Meanwhile, David Kimche, then director
general of the Foreign Ministry, this week
revealed that he was prepared to go to
Washington to talk about his own role in the
sales a role that places Kimche high on
Jewish Floridiam
Pt.ANT IIDSEUI, M-.FWMIJ ^
the list of those allegedly secretly involved,
according to fired National Security Council
aide Col. Oliver North.
Under such circumstances, Kimche's in-
tentions and Shamir's unconcerned air that
he would have little more to say to President
Reagan on Iran than both he and Peres have
said time and again before, should serve to
clear the air about Israel's role. May all
three leaders be found to have revealed all
there was to reveal in the past and
precisely as they have consistently stated it
was.
Elections on Passover
The Jewish community in Dade County is
big enough and, dare one say it, influential
enough, no longer to have to suffer the in-
sensitivity of community officials and their
manner of scheduling municipal elections.
The sad fact is that, in April, three of
absentia.
Elections in Coral Gables and Miami
Shores will be held on April 14, the first daV
of Passover. And in North Miami Beach
that community's officials have scheduled
elections for April 21, the last day 0f
Passover.
Already, these officials are hiding behind
the lame excuse that, either they knew
nothing about the conflict in date with
Passover, or else that the scheduling was
unfortunate but irreversible.
We are aware of some ethnic groups in
Dade County that would turn the city halls
involved upside down and get their way with
much fanfare. They would not be satisfied
with lame excuses. Why should the Jewish
community have to suffer a simple "sorry"?
It's about time we let our political
bureaucrats know that they are paid to
serve us, and not their own indifferent
efforts.
Histadrut Conference
The Israeli Histadrut Foundation's 21st
annual mid-winter conference Sunday and
Monday at the Konover Hotel will be a
splendid occasion for tuning in to the Foun-
dation's latest developments.
At the conference, will be such
distinguished leaders as Dr. Sol Stein, presi-
dent of the Foundation; honored guest,
Yosef Yaakov, Consul General of Israel in
Washington; and Miami's Consul General,
Rahamin Timor.
Beginning in 1960, the Foundation has
pioneered a new dimension of support for
the health and social service agencies of
Histadrut. These programs benefit some 85
percent of Israel's population.
At the Sunday-Monday conference here,
new light will be shed on the Israel
Histadrut Foundation's "$94 million tree"
sown from seeds planted 27 years ago
through deferred-giving plans comprising
bequests and testamentary trusts, as well as
a wide array of living trusts which pay a
generous life income to donors or their
beneficiaries.
These Histadrut plans put American Jews
in touch with Israel's basic health and social
service needs and give them a direct role in
helping the plans to be fulfilled.
Justice Dep't.
Fails To Deport Nazi Convict Lrinnas
orricK
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*2 00 Out of (own country upC" ;! ByMati|1 X, '"" "**"' **"* Jun*
Friday, February 20,1987
Volume 60
21SHEVAT5747
Number 8
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
Rabbi Marvin Heir, dean
of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center, has criticized the
U.S. Justice Department for
failing to deport Karl Lin-
nas, a convicted Nazi war
criminal, to the Soviet
Union.
"There is no reason for Karl
Linnas, a man charged with hor-
rific crimes, to spend an additional
free day in the United States,"
Hier said at a press conference
here last week. "It's an insult to
democracy and an insult to the
victims which he so callously .and
brutally murdered during the .Se-
cond World War."
THE PRESS conference was
held after the Los Angeles-based
Center presented a list of 74
suspected Nazi war criminals liv-
ing in the U.S. to Neal Sher, direc-
tor of the Justice Department's
Office of Special Investigations
(OSI), which investigates and pro-
secutes Nazi war criminals who il-
legally immigrated to the U.S
after World War II.
Hier, who was accompanied by
Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the
Center's associate dean, and Mar-
tin Mendelson, its Washington-
based legal counsel, said Sher pro-
mised to "vigorously" investigate
the cases along with the hundreds
of other cases the OSI is now
pursuing.
The Linnas case was linked to
the 74 new names because the
Wiesenthal Center does not want
it to be a "signal to all of them"
that they could stall legal pro-
ceedings for "a quarter of a cen-
tury," Hier explained. He noted
that the 74 ranged in age from 64
to 85.
LINNAS, 67, was stripped of
his U.S. citizenship in 1981 by the
Federal District Court on Long
Island, NY, after it found him
responsible for the murder of
thousands of people when he was
chief of the Nazi concentration
camp at Tartu, Estonia.
The U.S. Supreme Court last
December and again last month
refused to hear an appeal against
the Linnas deportation order.
Hier said he was "very concern-
ed about the effors of conser-
vative groups to prevent the
deportation. He said the issue of
Nazi war criminals was not one in
u i-i ^"^atives and liberals
should differ. He said the Wiesen-
thal Center and others would
5*J$Lft* ^ a"empt to pre-
vent the deportation.
THE 74 names presented to the
UbI included persons who were
members of the Ypatinga Buras, a
Lithuanian squad which murdered
cmlians; chief officers of prisoS
and concentration camps and of-
ficers and officials of the 11th,
12th an 13th battalions of the
Lithuanian Security Police which
was attached to the German SS,
Hier said.
The list presented to reporters
included birthdates, their war
crimes, date of emigration to the
U.S. and destination, but no
names. Hier explained that the
Center wants the persons listed to
"be investigated by a government
body. We do not want to try them
in the press."
HIER INDICATED that most
of the 74 are still alive, noting that
62 other names were eliminated
because they had died.
He said this was only the begin-
ning, since the Center had not
completed its investigation of
other war criminals from
Lithuania, the Ukraine and Ger-
many believed to have come to the
U.S.
Hier said that the Center has
been able to conduct its investiga-
tion because it has legally ac-
quired its own access to immigra-
tion data.
"This is not a question of an eye
for an eye," Hier said. "Our
future will be weak if the record
reads you can be a mass murderer
and a Nazi war criminal and live
out the rest of your life m
freedom."


Action Must Follow
Crisis, Graham Says
Of U.S.-Latin Ties
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
And ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writers
The relationship between
Latin America and the
United States is illustrative
of our nation's history. "We
get interested when there's
a crisis," said Sen. Bob
Graham, Florida's former
governor who was elected
as the state's new member
of the U.S. Congress.
"There's a tremendous interest
in a marriage between North and
South America, and that should
take place in Miami," Graham
said during a meeting Monday
with editorial staff of The Jewish
Floridian.
"THE RELATIONSHIP
should be similar to the political,
i cultural and economic ties this na-
| tion has to England and France, a
relationship maintained on a sus-
| taining basis.
"Latin America is rich in
I resources and deficient in
[technology," Graham added,
I noting that the opposite goes for
the United States, and thus could
[forge a path to the "marriage."
Graham is serving on three com-
Imittees in Washington: the Com-
[mittee on Banking, Housing and
[Urban affairs; the Committee on
[Environment and Public Works;
and the Committee on Veterans
Affairs. Each is an area he said
| holds a special interest for him.
THE ENVIRONMENT is a
keen concern to Graham, a South
Florida native, and he said the
state, through following examples
such as the height and density
[restrictions placed on
[developments in Stuart, need not
[create the feeling "of going down
|a canyon of concrete."
"People have sort of an idyllic
I view of what Florida was like
I before all this stuff was man-
made. I'll tell you one thing it was.
It was hot, and there were a lot of
mosquitos. Effective mosquito
control and air-conditioning have
made it a place where people want
to live. Growth has changed
Florida, but in some ways it
changed it to a place where people
want to live.
"Quality costs money. As
Florida moves away from its long
history of poverty, we can afford
to make investments in quality, in
design, landscaping, parks, better
education and health care."
THE EVERGLADES, Graham
said, is a premier example of the
change of attitude toward our en-
vironment. From the 1870s to
1960s, they were viewed as
something to be drained,
something uninhabited.
"Beginning in the '60s, we
realized the Everglades were an
integral part of our fresh water
supply, home to wildlife and a part
of the unique character of South
Florida, like the Rocky Mountains
are to Colorado," Gaham added.
A typical day for the Senator
begins about 7:30 a.m., with a
10-minute walk to his office from
his Washington townhome. His
wife, Adele, is still living in
Tallahassee, while his daughter,
Kendall, 17, finishes her senior
year at Leon High School.
Graham has three other
daughters. Suzanne, 19, is a
sophomore at University of
florida; Cissy, 22, is working on a
Master's degree in elementary
education at the University of
Florida; and Gwen Logan is going
to the American Unviersity Law
School.
WITH AREAS such as the art
deco district in South Miami
Beach being renovated to include
higher cost housing, Graham said
this area is just beginning to face
a "serious and difficult" question
that areas such as Key West have
already struggled with.
'Latin America
is rich in
resources,
deficient in
technology,'
says Sen.
Graham, who
proposes a
'marriage' with
U.S.
I I
"Yes, there might be a small
crisis," Graham said. "What we
need to do is anticipate those
needs well in advance and provide
for them. That's why I wanted to
serve on the Housing Committee.
This administration has not shown
any interest in housing as a
domestic issue. I think we can
develop some future plans.
"As the nation's problem of
homelessness increases, so will
Florida's proportionately. It leads
me to believe the issue of the
homeless must be addressed on a
national level."
ADDRESSING the issue of im-
migration, Graham said, "I
believe in America's tradition of
providing a place of refuge and a
sanctuary for the politically op-
pressed and also for those who
want to share in our freedom and
economic prosperity what at-
tracted yours and my ancestors to
the United States.
"But what is happening today is
that we have the most liberal im-
Continued on Page 12-A
Justice Blackmun Warns
U.S. Constitution Needs Protection
'Let's be compassionate
and courageous/
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The letter to U.S.
Supreme Court Justice
Harry A. Blackmun did not
mince words.
It began, "It was with a great
deal of astonishment. that you
nine feeble, overworked idiots
have decided that you can decide
what's an island ."
The letter was written in opposi-
tion to the High Court's decision
that the ownership of the seabed
under Long Island Sound belong-
ed to the states of Connecticut,
Rhode Island and New York and
not the United States
government.
CALL IT fan mail, but call it
free exercise of speech.
Blackmun shared that letter last
Sunday with a ballroom filled with
delegates at the 43rd Annual Na-
tional Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council (NJCRAC)
Plenary Session in Fort
Lauderdale.
Blackmun's talk was on the up-
coming Sept. 17 celebration of the
200th anniversary of the U.S.
Constitution.
"We must not, we dare not,
weaken it (the Constitution),"
Blackmun said. "Let's be
courageous and compassionate,
and I think in the long run our 200
years will be succeeded by 200 and
200 and 200."
Blackmun received applause
several times during his speech,
and during his introduction, as the
Justice who wrote the landmark
opinion in the Roe vs. Wade case
permitting legal abortion.
BLACKMUN REMINDED the
audience of the narrow margins
by which the Constitution was
ratified by the states. The final
vote in Massachusetts was
187-168, he said. In New York, it
was 30-27. In Virginia, it was
89-79.
The reason for hesitation was
the absence of the Bill of Rights,
which was not adopted until four
years later.
"In my view, the first 10 amend-
ments adopted on Dec. 15, 1791
can be seen as just as important. I
hope we celebrate through Dec.
15, 1991," he said.
BLACKMUN SAID he is startl-
ed when he learns how few people
read the Constitution. "There are
45 simple words in the first
amendement that begins,
"Congress Shall Make No Law
. that abridges freedom of
speech, press, assembly ."
"Someone once said the words
mean Congress can make 'some'
law, and I wondered what I came
into," said Blackmun, 78, who was
appointed to the nation's highest
judicial bench in June, 1970.
Blackmun told the delegates
that he and his wife, Dottie. were
in Jerusalem last March for a
seminar on the role of courts in
society at the Hebrew University.
"I HAVE no idea the emotional
impact that had on both of us,"
Blackmun said. "We visited the
Western Wall, and I placed a note
there for one of my clerks. It was
an emotional moment as we of-
fered prayer and saw others from
all over the world.
"I realized then how massively
meaningful it was for those people
and me, and I realized why they
returned. They departed renewed
in meaning and faith. I unders-
tand the words said at the end of a
seder, 'Next year in Jerusalem.'
Roots are so important in our
lives."
The Constitution plus the Bill of
Rights are "our roots of politics
and government and religious
freedom, and we had better pro-
tect them every day and constant-
ly," he warned. "I'll take the con-
troversy if I can have the roots."
BLACKMUN SPENT a majori-
ty of his speech citing cases that
showed the challenges that have
been made to the first amend-
ment, and he said there is still ten-
sion between the clauses on free
exercise of religion and the
establishment of religion.
For example, he said, property
for religious facilities is exempt
from real estate taxes. Can that
place a state in a position of com-
promise? "An atheist may well
Continued on Page 12-A



Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
t

i

a
and
ABOARD USS KENNEDY: Crew members are shown servicing
one of the jet fighters on the Sixth Fleet aircraft carrier USS Ken-
nedy, which arrived in Haifa last Friday with k.700 crew
members and 90 aircraft aboard. Officers on shore leave were ask-
AP/Widt World Photo
ed to stay in touch with their shore station because of tension
caused by death threats against four hostages, including three
Americans held in Beirut.
In New Orleans I
Rights Activists Slam ABA's Ties to Soviet Lawyers
By MARGIE OLSTEK
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Human rights and Jewish
groups converged on the
American Bar Association's
mid-year meeting last
weekend in New Orleans to
protest the ABA's ties to
the Association of Soviet
Lawyers (ASL) which pro-
testors called an anti-
Semitic arm of the KGB.
The Task Force on ABA-Soviet
Relations, Inc., a Phoenix-based
group formed specifically to op-
pose the ties, has fought to
dissolve a 1985 Declaration of
Cooperation between the ASL
and the ABA. The Task Force,
some of whose members are at-
torneys, branded the ASL a pup-
pet of the KGB whose attorneys
were handpicked by the Soviet
authorities.
MEMBERS OF the Jewish
community of Baton Rouge, La.,
Ukrainian American groups and
the Task Force members were
among those represented at the
demonstration in New Orleans.
The Task Force sponsored a
forum on ABA-Soviet Relations
simultaneous with the ABA con-
vention and in the same hotel, the
New Orleans Marriott.
The Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, Natan
Sharansky and other Soviet
Jewry activists have all opposed
the ABA-ASL pact and have call-
ed on the ABA to abrogate the
agreement.
The Jewish Federation of
Greater Baton Rouge issued a
statement saying "The Associa-
tion of Soviet Lawyers (ASL) is
one of the more virulent arms of
the Soviet regime and an instru-
ment of repression of Soviet Jews
and other activists. The American
Bar Association's agreement with
the ASL gives that organization a
legitimacy it does not deserve and
does nothing to promote the
welfare of Soviet Jews or true
U.S. Soviet understanding."
RICHARD COLLINS. ABA
spokesperson, said the ABA
debated the agreement extensive-
ly at an August meeting with
critics in New York. In that
meeting, Collins said, ABA
members overwhelmingly sup-
ported continuing the agreement
to keep a dialogue open. The
members agreed there was a
greater risk in not talking than in
talking, Collins said.
Morris Abram, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
who is an attorney, addressed the
debate in New York saying he
favored continuation of a revised
form of the agreement on condi-
tion that human rights be high on
the agenda of all contacts and that
the agreement should only be
maintained if there was some pro-
gress on human rights, Collins
said.
With the exception of a few
organizations, the "principle
Jewish groups did not oppose the
continuation of the declaration,"
Collins said.
The Task Force claimed that in
a meeting with the president of
the Supreme Soviet of the USSR,
Andrei Gromyko, in Moscow,
former ABA president William
Falsgraf and president-elect
Eugene Thomas presented the
issue of Jewish emigration as a
"minority concern of Jewish
groups" in the U.S. and of
"Jewish members of the
American Bar Association." A
Task Force letter to the press said
this was revealed in an ABA inter-
nal memo on the meeting.
FALSGRAF HAS denied this
report numerous times. Although
there is no formal transcript of
the meeting, Collins said the situa-
tion was never characterized in
those words.
The Task Force also claimed
that ABA has failed to fulfil a
commitment to put human rights
high on the agenda of all contacts
with the ASL.
But this, too, was denied by the
ABA. Collins said human rights
enters into the exchanges on
many topics, including the right to
earlier counsel and the laws on
anti-State activities or "what
Americans call freedom of
speech," Collins said.
Collins also noted that the
changes recently instituted in the
Soviet Union seem to address
those charged with anti-State
crimes and the right to earlier
counsel.
ALSO IN the August debate,
the Task Force letter said the
ABA leadership acknowledged
that the ASL is "similar to or
maybe worse than the Goebbels
Propaganda Ministry" of Hitler's
Third Reich. Collins said a former
member of the ABA Board of
Governors, Federal Judge Frank
Kaufmann, who was not con-
sidered a member of ABA leader-
ship, did indeed make that com-
ment. Collins added that Kauf-
mann favored continuation of the
agreement.
A spokeswoman for the Task
Force, Patience Huntwork, said
the Soviets pressured the ABA in-
to signing the agreement to use as
propaganda.
PASSOVER
Krieger Quits
Council
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON frr.,
Richard Krieger has rjgju
executive director of ffW
Holocaust Memorial Council ,
post he has held since May, ijgj
Krieger told the j'ewi,h
SSffJK Ass w (Feb. 11) that he had acceptedhi,
post to work with Elie WW
then the Council's chairman, and
when Wiesel resigned as chair
man in December he said "1
decided to leave."
He said he held up his resit
tion until February 6 when Presi
dent Reagan appointed a new
chairman. Harvey Meverhoff
Baltimore develop
philanthropist.
A former executive director of
the Jewish Federation of North
Jersey, Krieger came to
Washington in 1980 as the Jewish
liaison with the Republican Nfr
tional Committee. He then served
in the State Department as
associate U.S. coordinator for
refugee affairs.
In his letter of resignation to
Reagan Krieger noted that 'Your
dedication to remembering the
lessons of the Holocaust is a cor-
nestone of this Administration.
"You have demonstrated an
overwhelming compassion and a
willingness to take political risks
on behalf of the United States to
bring human beings to safety and
freedom when you wholeheartedly
supported and permitted my in-
itiatives to rescue Ethiopian
Jewry." He added for "that
alone" Reagan will be "recorded
in the annals of history."
Krieger, who now plans to do in-
ternational consulting, also ex
pressed satisfaction with the pro-
gress of the Council which is plan
rung and raising funds for a
Holocaust Museum to be built
here. Reagan is expected to name
a successor to Krieger soon.
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Two
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
A 'First': Their Diplomas in Conservative Cantorate
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
vo women expected to be
he first to receive the
fewish Theological
-eminary of America's
iploma of Hazzan (cantor)
treed that the landmark
Jecision was long overdue in
Die Conservative
lovement.
Erica Lippitz, 30, and Maria
jsenfeld Barugel, 31, are
tieduled to graduate from JTS in
1987 commencement. Both
ill have completed a five-year
?urse in the JTS Cantor's
Btitute-Seminary College of
irish Music.
rRADITIONALLY, only men
eived the diploma of Hazzan in
iition to a Bachelor's Degree in
cred Music after completing the
riculum. But women who com-
I the identical curriculum on-
received the degree.
TS Chancellor Ismar Schorsch
nounced last Thursday that JTS
I begin granting the diploma of
in to women also in the 1987
juation. The diploma will cer-
I women to lead prayers in Con-
vative synagogues, although
nen already function as can-
in some Conservative
rogues.
ne decision to certify women
ktors followed a landmark
with Conservative tradition
1983 when JTS decided to or-
women rabbis. Currently 11
nen out of 25 students study in
I Cantor's Institute.
IPPITZ AND Barugel discuss-
tie decision during a press con-
snce Thursday. Although the
policy was long awaited, Lip-
said she wouldn't have
ited such important changes to
istituted rashly.
/omen wanted the decision to
the framework of halacha,"
)itz said. "I'm glad we have
in responsibilities to take
^ppitz referred to the halachic
jning JTS drew on to support
I decision to give women more
iive leadership in the
fogue. According to this
ming, a woman can take on
the time-bound obligations
ch traditionally applied only to
and perform the role of rabbi
in tor.
oth Lippitz and Barugel came
TS from careers they found
Settlement
Delayed
IL AVIV (JTA) Premier
i.'ik Shamir said last week
the dispute between Labor
Likud over budgetary alloca-
te kibbutzim, development
is and Jewish settlements in
[West Bank was delaying the
Brnment's presentation of its
trillion Shekel ($23.8 billion) na-
' budget to the Knesset.
he budget, approved by the
pnet, was to have gone to the
Bsset for a vote last week. But
Labor Party said it would not
srt the budget unless Likud
ibers of the Knesset Finance
imittee supported a Treasury-
roved plan to ease the 266
|ion ($193 million) debt burden
He Labor-affiliated United Kib-
Movement.
ikud countered with demands
the same concessions be ap-
to development towns and
t Bank settlements. This trig-
1 demands from other parties
as the Agudat Israel and
which want 30 million
wls ($22 million) for their af-
' yeshivas.
did not satisfy all their Jewish or
musical interests. Lippitz
graduated college with a degree in
Music Therapy but said she was
"hungry for more Jewish
knowledge." She went on to com-
plete a Master's degree in Jewish
Communal Service at Brandeis
University. She then worked as
the Hillel director at Loyola
University in Chicago before com-
ing to JTS.
"I WAS compelled to work in
music and in the Jewish communi-
ty," Lippitz said. "This role will
enable me to do so many things; to
build a community, to work with
people. I think it is a tremendous
honor and responsibility to deal
with people in life-cycle events so
critical in their lives."
Lippitz said her family also
played an influential role in her
decision to become a cantor. One
of her grandfathers was a cantor
and one grandmother worked in a
Jewish women's organization
campaigning vigorously for
women to be permitted to read the
Torah on Shabbat. "I'm following
in her footsteps, I guess," Lippitz
said.
Barugel, the mother of a five-
month old baby, said her route to
cantorial school was "long and
circuitous."
Barugel worked as a Spanish
?ooooooo
teacher and international banker
and then began taking courses in
music at the Hebrew School of
Music. "Music was becoming a
dominant force in my life and
Judaism has always dominated my
life," she said.
"IT SEEMS I was always
teaching people about Judaism. So
I thought I could combine
teaching with my Judaism and
languages," Barugel said. With
that in mind, she enrolled in the
School of Jewish Music, not inten-
ding to become a cantor initially.
During her studies, Barugel
served as a student cantor in a
Reform synagogue in South
Salem, N.Y.
ooo&
Both women also discussed the
need for women role models in
synagogue leadership, noting that
the cantor is one of the most in-
fluential figures for the Bar or Bat
Mitzvah-aged child.
Schorsch said he hoped women
cantors will fill a critical shortage
of cantors in North America, say-
ing "Cantors were a dying
breed."
MEANWHILE, the Cantors
Assembly issued a statement Fri-
day expressing a similar hope to
alleviate the cantors' shortage.
"We are pleased that the Jewish
Theological Seminary has lifted
the cloud of indecision that has
hovered over this issue for some
time. The Executive Council of
the Cantors Assembly will give
the matter a fair and thorough
hearing in deciding what action
we should take in admitting
women members," the statement
said.

Come and Rejoice in the Celebration of Purim
and the Reclamation of the Land of Israel
(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEl) INC.



M
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H
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Hfoutn Qlueen. 4987
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@tenc46&
JENNIE KUBEL
tAl&ulecAtu
ROSE K ASS
LILLIAN PERLOW
MAESTRO SHMUEL FERSHKO
SmtHmM
CfConove*. 3ole4, *M*Gvnu ffie&cA
(J)an<-in .Jed< Muititt (tcAe^/lft

Ernest Samuels
V.P.JNF Or. Miami
For Information and Reservations:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 538-6464
oooooooo



- p.. iu>. vwwii i iuiluiaii/! imay, r euruary zu, 15*8/
Still No *Z
Word Of
Begun's
'Freedom'
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Relatives of Iosif Begun in
Moscow still had no word on
his rumored release when
contacted Monday after-
noon, the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry reported
Monday.
Chaim and Zelda Tepper,
cousins of Begun's in New York,
who spoke with Begun's wife Inna
in Moscow Monday, said they
received the following message
from Inna:
Bad news from the penal of-
ficials. There is no statement
about Iosefs liberation, not at the
Ministry of Internal Affairs, not
in Chistopol prison (where Begun
is imprisoned). He is still in
Chistopol. Mr. Arbatov told a lie.
My husband has not been released
and they are not going to liberate
him. I have this from the chief
reception desk on the Ministry of
Internal Affairs."
GEORGI ARBATOV, a Soviet
Central Committee member, said
Sunday on CBS's "Face the Na-
tion" that Begun had been freed.
The announcement followed a
week-long demonstration in
Moscow by Begun's family and
friends to rally for his release.
Jacob Birnbaum, director of the
Center for Russian Jewry and of
SSSJ. said the announcement was
probably intended to diffuse an
"enormously embarrassing situa-
tion" for Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev. The demonstrations in
Moscow on behalf of Begun ended
in violence and coincided with an
international peace conference
called by Gorbachev in Moscow.
The announcement of Begun's
release may have been simply a
propaganda ploy to ease criticism,
Birnbaum said. But it is also possi-
ble that Gorbachev gave Arbatov
the information on the release
which has not yet trickled to the
lower echelons of the prison
system or the Internal Affairs
Ministry. Begun's son Boris was
scheduled to begin a 15-day prison
sentence Monday for heading up
last week's demonstrations, SSSJ
reported.
IN AT LEAST two U.S. cities
Monday, Soviet Jewry activists
demonstrated on Begun's behalf.
In New York, a group undaunted
by freezing temperatures
gathered outside the Soviet Mis-
sion to the United Nations. A
similar protest was staged at the
San Francisco Soviet Consul by
the Bay Area Council for Soviet
Jewry.
Six of Begun's relatives, New
York City Councilman Noach
Deer and seven others were ar-
rested for disorderly conduct
when they attempted to march to
the gates of the Soviet Mission.
The protesters, blocked by police,
ARRESTED: Two plain clothes Soviet police arrest Boris Begun
(center), son of imprisoned activist Josef Begun released this
week, during a demonstration in Moscow last Thursday. Security
agents beat protestors and drove them off the street, also roughing
up Western newspeople covering the event. Boris Begun wan later
fined 50 Rubles (about $75). AP/Wide WorM Photo
sat down in the street in front of
the Mission and then were ar-
rested. About 100 people turned
out for the demonstration.
Meanwhile, in Jerusalem, six
people demonstrating on Begun's
behalf chained themselves to rail-
ings outside the Prime Minister's
office Sunday. Police forcibly
removed the demonstrators, who
represented the Soviet Jewry In-
formation Center in Jerusalem,
headed by former Soviet Jewish
prisoner Yosef Mendelevich.
SPEAKERS AT the rally ex-
coriated the Israeli government
for what they called a failure to
express public support for the dai-
ly demonstrations in Moscow last
Begun's family and
week by
friends.
Another rally was held opposite
the Finnish Embassy in Tel Aviv
by the Public Council for Soviet
Jewry. Finland represents Soviet
interests in Israel.
Donahue 9 Show
Moscow Refuseniks Mum Before His TV Cameras
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The 30-minute segment
on Soviet Jewry shown
Wednesday (Feb. 11) on Phil
Donahue's syndicated
television show
demonstrated why it is dif-
ficult to carry out in the
Soviet Union his normal for-
mat in which a controversial
issue is debated by the
audience.
Jewish refuseniks, with whom
he met in a Moscow apartment,
rejected an opportunity to explain
their plight to the large audience
of Americans that watch the "Phil
Donahue Show," apparently
because they did not trust
Donahue since his week-long
broadcasts from the USSR were
in cooperation with Soviet
television.
Other Jews, who, as Donahue
pointed out, were selected by the
Soviet government to appear on
the program, refused to answer
his questions about refuseniks and
instead denounced conditions in
the United States.
DONAHUE POINTED out that
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he had gotten an agreement from
the Soviets to have 50 official
Jews and 50 refuseniks debate the
issue of Jewish life in the Soviet
Union. But the day after Donahue
got the agreement of the
refuseniks to this, the Soviets cut
the number to 25 on each side.
The refuseniks then declined to
appear.
Donahue then met with the
refuseniks in an apartment of one
of them, stressing that he was us-
ing his own camera crew, rather
than the Soviet television crew he
used for all his other segments
during the week he spent in the
USSR at the end of January.
One refusenik said they had re-
jected the cut in the number of
refuseniks because the "group
should be representative." He
said it had to include 11 wives of
prisoners, five former prisoners,
12 Jews from cities throughout
the Soviet Union, and longtime
refuseniks.
ONE WOMAN said she feared
the Soviets would use the film
against them on Soviet TV. She
said the Jews "desire' to live in
Israel," but when Donahue asked
her how long she had been waiting
to emigrate, she refused to say.
The group had agreed not to
answer any personal questions.
DONAHUE SAID they were
being preoccupied with the Soviet
breaking of the agreement "at the
expense of sharing important in-
formation about your situation
with the American people."
He noted that some wives of
prisoners had wanted to speak but
went along with, the decision of
the group not to be interviewed.
Donahue stressed that before
going to the USSR he had con-
tacted them through the National
Conference on Soviet Jewrv
(NCSJ). *
"With whom are you cavor-
ting?" one of the refuseniks ask-
ed. Donahue said he did not
understand this at the time, but
later realized that this was a
reference to his "partnership"
with the Soviets during his week
in the USSR. "It is clear for some
of these refuseniks I cannot be
trusted," he said.
In his segment in the television
study, Donahue met with 25 Jews
who he called "contended Jews,"
who are "the Jews the Russians
want the West to see." They were
apparently members of the official
Anti-Zionist Committee.
WHEN DONAHUE noted that
the NCSJ reports that 380,000
Jews want to emigrate, one of
these Jews called the figure "ab-
solute fantasy."
Another said he had no objec-
tion to those who wanted to leave
to emigrate, but said "1 don't feel
there is any kind of problem'' for
Jews. Another declared that
emigration is "not the major pro-
blem" for Soviet Jews.
When a writer suggested that
Donahue ask about the life of the
Jews present, the television host
replied "I don't tell you how to
write your books so you won't tell
me what questions to ask.''
Samuil Zivs, deputy director of
the Anti-Zionist Committee of the
Soviet Republic the only Jew to be
identified, claimed that 500 Jews
had been given permission to
leave in January. Less than 1,000
emigrated in all of 1986.
DONAHUE WAS challenged
by a Jewish military officer, who
asked whv he was not concerned
Continued on Page 9-A
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Strong Skepticism
Rights Change in Soviet Union?
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian_ Page 9-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(Washington)
And WILLIAM SAPHIRE
(New York)
Soviet Jewry activists,
trying to assess recent
changes in Soviet policy on
migration rights and
jissidents in general, have
welcomed the unexpected
elease of political
)risoners, including Jewish
'risoners of Conscience but
remain strongly skeptical as
/> whether these moves in-
jicate a genuine change of
Jirection by the Soviet
leadership or are merely a
Cosmetic device for pro-
paganda purposes.
The consensus is that while the
elf-proclaimed Soviet policy of
kasnost ("openness") gives rise to
lope, much more has to be done to
Irove Moscow's good faith, par-
|cularly with respect to Soviet
ewry. Morris Abram, chairman
the National Conference on
sviet Jewry observed Monday
at "it is imperative to separate
ct from fantasy."
[HE NOTED that while the
pviet Union enacted what it calls
liberal new emigration decree
id Soviet Foreign Minister Gen-
iiiy Gerasimov spoke of a
ssive acceleration of Jewish
nigration, "only 98 Jews were
anted exit visas in January, up
am 77 in December, hardly a
ssive acceleration."
|The Reagan Administration has
ken a similar view. It urged
londay that the release of the 42
isoners be followed by the
ilease of all political prisoners
ad POCs. as well as permission
i emigrate to all Soviet Jews who
fcint to do so.
| "As we have consistently made
ear to the Soviet government,
attach the greatest importance
improvements in the field of
jman rights, including the right
emigrate," State Department
skesman Charles Redman said.
I'WE HOPE the recent
atements by Soviet officials,
it large numbers of Soviet Jews
1 being granted exit permission,
be followed by steps to allow
departure of all those who
|sh to exercise the right to
ve," Redman said.
IHe was apparently referring to
statement in Moscow by Samuil
|vs, chairman of the Soviet anti-
onist Committee, that 500 Jews
ere granted exit visas in
Inuary. Fewer than a thousand
ere allowed to emigrate in all of
6,
iRedman urged that all prisoners
and POCs in "confinement and
exile" be freed and that they
should not be required to "recant
their past activities or limit future
activities." He stressed that the
U.S. will be keeping a close watch
on Soviet actions in the human
rights area which "will have a
positive impact on the climate of
U.S.-Soviet relations."
PAMELA COHEN, president
of the Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, responded Monday to the
unexpected release from a labor
camp of POC Roald (Alex)
Zelichonok. "We are pleased by
the announcement of Zelichonok's
release, but our joy is tempered
with the knowledge that nearly a
dozen other Soviet Jews remain in
prison in labor camps," she said.
"I call upon the Soviet leader-
ship to move expeditiously in
releasing the remaining Prisoners
of Conscience and in processing
the emigration applications of
thousands of Soviet Jews who
wish to leave the USSR." Cohen
stated.
Abram stressed in his statement
the wide gap between Soviet pro-
mises and performance. "Soviet
officials are guilty, not only of
massive human rights violations,
but of speaking out of both sides
of their mouths," he said,
'glasnost' from one side, and
grievous misstatements from the
other. These Janus-like utterances
have the effect of throwing sand
in the eyes of Soviet Jews and
human rights activists
everywhere."
ABRAM SAID Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev must be asked
"why did the Soviet Union begin
its repression of the Jewish
minority in the first place? And
why, in the light of current
representation of glasnost are
Jews still denied their human
rights? Why are there still
Prisoners of Conscience?"
The Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry reported an unusual
occurrence in Moscow Monday
where about 15 people
demonstrated in front of the
Palace of Culture on behalf of
POC Iosif Begun. They included
Begun's wife, Inna, and his son,
Boris. The demonstrators held
signs and posters in support of
Begun's right to be allowed to
emigrate to go to Israel, the LIC-
SJ reported.
They were not interfered with
by the authorities and while some
passersby shouted anti-Semitic
epithets, others showed support
by signing their names on the
posters. According to the LICSJ,
the demonstrations are continu-
ing daily, joined by well known
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refuseniks.
Begun, 54, was sentenced in
1983 to 12 years in prison and in-
ternal exile. An electronics
engineer, he was fired from his
scientific research job after apply-
ing for an exit visa. At the time of
his arrest in 1982, he had been
giving Hebrew lessons which are
banned in the Soviet Union.
BEGUN WAS one of several
prominent POCs referred to by
Jeane Kirkpatrick, former U.S.
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions, at a press conference in
Geneva Monday after her return
from a visit to Moscow. She noted
that he was imprisoned for
teaching Hebrew and confined to
a punishment cell for wearing a
yarmulke.
The Soviet Union, she said, will
have to give serious reconsidera-
tion to the problem of refuseniks
denied the right to emigrate,
denied religious expression and, in
some cases, imprisoned and suf-
fering malnutrition and lacking
desperately needed medical care.
Nevertheless, Kirkpatrick,
whose militant anti-Communism
was a hallmark of her tenure at
the UN, said the new "glasnost"
policy gives new hope for
separated spouses, refuseniks and
others who want to emigrate.
LATER, addressing a session of
the 43-member United Nation
Human Rights Commission in
Geneva, Kirkpatrick said she
heard from high level Soviet of-
ficials some extremely interesting
accounts of changes planned and
changes already underway in the
USSR. She said they spoke of new
thinking and democratization,
though democratization Soviet
style in a one-party system.
Kirkpatrick visited Moscow last
week as part of a private delega-
tion that included two former U.S.
Secretaries of State, Henry Kiss-
inger and Cyrus Vance. They had
a three hour meeting with
Gorbachev.
JTA Services
UJA National Chairman Martin Stein (right) presents a special
award to Israeli Ambassador Meir Rosenne (left) during the re-
cent UJA Washington Connection II program. The award was
given in appreciation of Ambassador Rosenne's 'dedication,
friendship and support of our common cause.' Two hundred
Jewish community leaders, under the leadership of National Vice
Chairman Jerome Dick, attended the two-day program.
Moscow Refuseniks Mum Before
Donahue's TV Cameras
Continned from Page 8-A
about the Palestinians. "We are
all internationalist; we all must be
equal, the Americans, the Jew,
the Palestinians."
Another said that instead of
worrying about Soviet Jews,
"why are you not concerned about
the fate of the poor Blacks" in the
U.S. He charged that many of the
Soviet Jews living in New York's
Brighton Beach section "are suf-
fering, they are hungry."
When another suggested that
only 20 percent of the Jewish
emigrants have gone to Israel
with most living in New York and
Canada, Donahue replied "why do
you care?"
He said he was willing to con-
cede that the Jews in the audience
were "happy," free to pursue
their careers and free of pre-
judice, but asked why they were
angry when he raised the real
plight of the Jews who wanted to
leave and were being persecuted
for that.
WHILE THE broadcast may
have revealed to some the Soviet
Union's desire to hide the real
situation of Soviet Jewry,
whatever opportunity there was
to demonstrate the real situation
for thousands of Jews was lost.
Perhaps there was never a chance
since it is impossible to bring the
give-and-take of the Donahue
show to a totalitarian society.
This summer a group of out-
standing Jewish teenagers
Announcing
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987

Foreign Ministry Official Say8
Now Is Best Time for Peace Talks
AIR RAID: Palestinian guerrillas inspect the
damage at their PLO training base on the edge
of Sidon's refuge camp of Mieh Mieh in
Lebanon which was blasted by four Israeli
AP/Wide World Photo
warplanes in a daybreak raid last Thursday.
One civilian was killed and three injured, in-
cluding two guerrillas, in Israel's fifth air
strike into Lebanon this year.
Tough Policy Urged
In Report on Cult Threats in Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
interministerial committee
examining the activities of
cults in Israel has submitted
a 500-page report to Educa-
tion Minister Yitzhak Navon
urging a tough policy to
crack down on the various
sects it investigated.
The report maintained that the
religious-mystical cults posed a
serious threat to Israeli society
and said the leaders of the various
groups were enriching
themselves. The committee chair-
man, Likud MK Miriam Glazer-
Taasa, told an Israel Radio inter-
viewer that membership in the
sects was "a form of dependence,
bondage, self-enslavement and
sometimes the handing over of an
individual's property to the
leaders who are soul-traders and
abuse our laws."
BUT CIVIL RIGHTS lawyer
Avigdor Feldman dissented
sharply. He charged that the
report only "encouraged the
persecution of those in our society
who do not conform. The area of
self-expression is one with which
the law should not deal."
The interministerial committee
was established in 1982 by then
Education Minister Zevulun Ham-
mer of the National Religious Par-
ty. It investiaged 10 groups, in-
cluding Scientology, EST,
Transcendental Meditation, the
Unity Church, the Divine Light
Mission, and Hare Krishna. The
Unity Church members are known
as "Moonies" after their founder,
the Korean businessman Rev. Sun
Yung Moon.
A statement issued by the
Education Ministry after receipt
of the report said: "The inter-
departmental committee which
looked into the issue of new sects
operating in Israel warns against
the emergence of a deliberate
severance between the individual
and society in some of the groups,
both as a result of physical isola-
tion and psychological and com-
munication methods."
THE STATEMENT warned
that such rifts between individual
and society "can significantly af-
fect the individual's judgement,
autonomy and ability to make a
choice."
The committee decided by ma-
jority vote not to include in its in-
vestigation groups promoting
"return to Judaism" or the ac-
tivities of ultra-Orthodox Jews
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Foreign Ministry Political
Director General Yossi
Beilin says that now is the
best possible time for peace
initiatives.
Speaking to the Israel-America
Chamber of Commerce, here, he
said that "In view of the U.S. Ad-
ministration's strong backing of
Israel, the apparent changes tak-
ing place in the Soviet regime,
Egypt's stated commitment to
peace and Syria's dire financial
straits, it is difficult to imagine a
more convenient time for policy
initiatives than right now."
"WHILE IT'S VERY difficult
to read the present situation in
the Soviet Union, changes are un-
doubtedly taking place," he ex-
plained. "Some say this is only a
facade, others say it's a real
change, but in any event the situa-
tion can be utilized to our
advantage."
Beilin said that foreign policy
must express "the voice of na-
tional values," and noted that
cynical, so-called pragmatic
foreign policy is harmful to
Israel's genuine national
interests.
"We cannot be contemptuous of
human rights in certain coun-
tries," Beilin stated, "while striv-
ing to convince the world to join
us in the struggle for Soviet
Jewry on the basis of human
rights. Nor can we condemn the
world for ignoring a racist or
anti-Semitic regime, while at the
same time we, too, ignore such
regimes.
Beilin said two examples of
"pragmatic" foreign policy which
have been counter-productive and
harmful to this country's genuine
interests were Israel's arms sales
to the former Somoza regime in
Nicaragua, and its indifferent at-
titude toward the Iran-Iraq war.
HE SAID it would be both
moral and pragmatic for Israel to
encourage an end to the Gulf war,
not merely because of the terrible
loss of life, but because Iraq is
becoming increasingly stronger
and more dangerous militarily as
it receives new weapons systems
and gains battlefield experience.
And while noting it was unclear
what kind of dialogue Israel might
have entered into with the San-
dinistas, Beilin said that, "in
retrospect, moral policies vis-a-vis
Nicaragua could have been very
pragmatic."
In response to a question on
Israel's South Africa policy, Beilin
said he concurred with Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin's recent
statement to the effect that, if
Israel is forced to make decisions
to ensure continued U.S. aid, "we
will opt for American aid."

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'
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
brave friend, with sadness and
great anger. For over three years,
Soviet authorities repeatedly and
cruelly denied her a medical visa
to seek treatment abroad for
cancer. Permission was granted
deliberately only at the very end,
three weeks before she expired.
Her long-suffering husband
himself refused emigration for 12
years, now is forcibly separated
from his beloved wife even in
death. The true, inhumane anti-
Jewish policy of the Kremlin is
again revealed."
Morris Abram, chairman of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, said that for years, friends
ONE YEAR AFER RELEASE: Freed
Soviet dissident Natan Sharansky and his
wife. Avital, prior to a news conference in
Jerusalem last week. The conference was call-
AP/Wide World Photo
ed to mark his first year of freedom since his
release from a Soviet prison and his arrival in
Israel. AP Wide World Photo.
reiman's Tumor
Finally Stills Her Hunger for Freedom
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Inna Meiman of Moscow,
/ho was allowed to go
sroad last month for treat-
of a tumor on her
keck, died Monday last
/eek, in the Lombardi
dancer Research Center of
Jeorgetown University
lospital. She was 54 years
1. She had refused to leave
le Soviet Union earlier
?ecause her husband,
Jaum, a refusenik since
1975, was not allowed to ac-
smpany her.
leiman was admitted to the
aspital on Jan. 20 and was
ndergoing tests for the start of
lemotherapy. When she applied
i go abroad, she said she wanted
undergo specialized radiation
reatment, her only hope for sur-
ival. The Soviets granted
leiman a temporary visa for one
fear's stay.
THE SOVIETS would not allow
ker husband to come with her and
kad turned down his visa request
in grounds of knowing "state
fcrets." He is also characterized
a dissident by dint of his
riembership in the now disbanded
loscow Helsinki monitoring
Nip.
Dr. Gerald Ratist of Montreal, a
research oncologist and founder
of the International Cancer Pa-
tients Solidarity Committee, said
at the time Inna and Naum were
both seeking to leave the USSR
together that it was extremely im-
portant that the couple remain
together in face of Inna's critical
medical condition.
When she arrived in
Washington last month, Inna
Meiman described her own pro-
gnosis as "very grim." But, she
added, "I haven't come to
America to die; I have come to
recover and to help others to get
out of the Soviet Union."
ADMITTING THAT she had
left the USSR, and her husband,
with mixed emotions, Meiman
said she was "delighted" to help
others to leave and to prove "We
are not slaves but people with
rights." She added that she was
also dismayed that her husband,
her son and his family were not
permitted to join her. "My arriv-
ing alone shows how bad things
are in the Soviet Union. People
are just desperate. If I had been
allowed to come three years ago,
my chances would be better."
Last December, Sen. Gary Hart
(D., Colo.) met in Moscow with top
Soviet officials, including Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev and
Foreign Minister Eduard
M
in the United States, Israel and
other Western countries
"implored the Soviet authorities
to allow Meiman permission to
travel outside the USSR for
medical treatment.
"Unfortunately, permission was
granted when her condition
became untreatable. Meiman's
death is all the more poignant in
the knowledge that she died
thousands of miles away from her
husband. Inna Meiman lived and
died in great dignity. To the last,
her thoughts were with her hus-
band and all her fellow Jews in the
Soviet Union who struggle for
freedom."
BB Prexy Appeals to Pope
To Intervene in Convent Tiff
Shevardnadze, and raised the
issue of about 12 people who
wanted to emigrate, among them
cancer patients with relatives in
the West. High on the Senator's
list was Inna Meiman, whose hus-
band's daughter, Olga Plum, lives
in Boulder, Colo.
Shortly afterwards, the Soviet
Foreign Ministry confirmed to
U.S. Ambassador Arthur Hart-
man that Inna would be permitted
to leave but had no comment
about Naum being allowed to ac-
company her. Inna, a teacher of
English, was married to Naum, a
mathematician, in 1981.
COMMENTING on the tragedy
of Inna's plight and death, the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry said Tuesday:
"We remember Inna Meiman, a
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Seymour Reich, interna-
tional president of B'nai
B'rith, has appealed directly
to Pope John Paul II
Wednesday "to intervene"
to have a Carmelite convent
being established on the site
of the Auschwitz death
camp relocated to another
site not marked by Jewish
suffering.
Reich, in a letter to the Vatican
Ambassador to the U.S., Ar-
chbishop Pio Laghi, referred to
the group of Carmelite nuns who
have occupied a building on the
site of the Auschwitz-Birkenau
death camp since 1984 and with
permission of the Polish govern-
ment intend to establish a convent
there.
REICH NOTED that "World
Jewry along with much of the
rest of the world recognizes
Auschwitz, in fact and in symbol,
as the ghastly emblem of Hitler's
genocide against European
Jewry." He added that the
presence of another religious
group there "distorts" the unique
experience of the Holocaust.
"Recently, one of our European
representatives Samuel Hof-
fenberg of Paris, a French citizen
of Polish birth met with Church
leaders in Poland in hope of
resolving this problem. He was
not encouraged by what he
heard," Reich wrote.
"I am therefore appealing
directly to the Vatican and to
His Holiness John Paul II to in-
tervene directly so that the
Carmelite convent can be
relocated outside the Auschwitz
grounds."
A 1972 UNESCO Convention -
signed by Poland and 13 other
countries requires "the
Auschwitz site to remain un-
changed.
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"Craata Land From Sand"
W? invite you to join us
celebrate the glorious
I /(tliday of Liberation:
PASSOVER
Monday April 13
Tuesday, April 21
We proudly offer
Cantor
Lawrence
Tuchinsky
assisted by the Nadel Choir
for services and sedarim.
Dr. Chaim Israel Etrog
Mil be offering a program of lectures
and conduct seminars during the holiday.

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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
Florida's Sen. Graham
Says Action Must Follow Crisis
Our Readers Write: Elections
On Passover Are Regrettable
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
It is unfortunate that the up-
coming City
charter mandates this
situation
We understand that Council"^
Continued from Page 5-A
migration laws in the world. We
have 700,000 who come in legally
each year, and three or four times
that number who come in
illegally."
Florida would probably rank
behind the southwestern states
such as Texas for illegal immigra-
tion, although this area tends to
attract immigrants who come fron
unfriendly environments such as
Nicaragua and Haiti, and general-
ly don't want to come back. A new
law which penalizes businessmen
who knowingly hire illegal aliens
is helpful, Graham said.
AS A MEMBER of the
Veteran's Committee, Graham
said he currently involved with
hearings on the reauthorization of
the GI, or veteran's education bill.
"The administration has sug-
gested mderations," such as
shortening the period of eligibility
and raising the amount the
veteran contributes to his
education.
"I'm in favor of the current pro-
gram," Graham said. "We don't
have a draft, and inducements to
the military have to be
attractive."
Health care is another issue
Graham said will be reviewed by
his committee and one which has a
particular influence on Florida
and other sunbelt states.
Constitution Must Be Protected,
Justice Blackmun Tells NJCRAC
Continued from Page 5-A
think so," he said.
He cited the case of a Wisconsin
school law that said students must
attend classes until they are 16
years of age, yet the Amish refuse
to send their children after the
age of 14. The court decided the
students could continue their
education at home.
ANOTHER example of a con-
flict between the two clauses, he
said, was evident in an issue of
whether the school board should
provide free text books to children
of parochial schools, as well as
public schools.
"You, as members of various
Jewish organizations, know the
problems that seem inevitable as
one who lives as a minority,"
Blackmun said.
There are cases, he continued,
of prayer in public schools,
moments of silence, learning of
the topic of evolution.
"In some of these cases, the
court said the state had no right to
wrap itself around religious prac-
tices. Some cases seemed to
discriminate against religions.
"Can a school board supplement
teachers who go into sectarian
schools? May a state issue bonds
for establishment of a parochial
college? Can a state allow a school
to be used for parochial meetings?
Can a public office holder declare
his belief in God? May a state bar
clergyman from holding office?"
THE AUDIENCE laughed
when Blackmun observed, "I raise
of course only questions and
answer nothing."
But, he concluded, we "operate
on a belief in the United States
that there is and must be a wall of
separation between religion and
state.
"There are signs that wall is
crumbling a little. I think there
still is a strong and continuing
urge to keep that wall in place.
"What will be the effect of a
growing power of the religious
right as they reach power?
Religious clauses are constantly in
litigation. So how far have we
come? I'm not sure we've come
very far and a lot has to be settled
before a level of quiet is reached in
that area," said Justice
Blackmun.
"A PERSON who
20-years-old on Dec. 7,
was
1941,
Pearl Harbor Day, is today 66. We
are just at the leading edge of the
largest number of World War II
veterans retiring from civilian
employment. Many will move to
Florida, putting an even greater
st res:; on our health facilities.
"The Miami Veterans Hospital
was built to serve about 200 a day
in the outpatient clinic and gets
about 1,000 a day. States in the
sunbelt have to have the dollars
follow the veteran."
On last week's catastrophic il-
lness insurance package recom-
mended by President Reagan.
Graham said it is "the minimum."
and "we have to go beyond the
President in two areas: long-term
care and prevention what can
we do to lessen the incidence of
catastrophic illness."
GRAHAM, who issued 130
death warrants during his two
terms as governor, said there is
strong national support for capital
punishment.
"The big issue is will there be
reform in federal procedures
which will make the death penalty
more predictable and less full of
game playaing."
On his move from governor to
his current status as a junior
senator, Graham said, "It's very
fulfilling that you get to apply a
lot of what you learned as gover-
nor. Governor is a high intensity,
hands on" position compared to
the Senate role as "more reflec-
tive," he said.
of North Miami Joe Moff*t brought up the Z
BeaclTelection is scheduled to be f^^"1^0^ meeting. W
held on April 21, which coincides *.J the Council will follow
with the last day of Passover, and UP on "*> problem and work to
which is not only a Jewish holiday, ****& charter so that this
but is a day when Yizkor (prayer f^"^*^" may be prevented
AJPUSS?^ media
should publicize when and who,
absentee ballots may be obtained
and if those affected may vote
prior to April 21, 1987.
MAX HEIM0WIT2
North Miami Beach
for the dead) is recited in the
synagogue.
Certain government entities in
the United States have legally
amended their election lawB to
correct this discrimination against
the Jewish faith.
It is regrettable that the city
Ready to Cooperate
Kimche Says He'll Give
Evidence to U.S. on Arms Sales
TEL AVIV (JTA) David Kimche, former direc-
tor general of the Foreign Ministry who was one of the top
Israeli officials most closely linked to the U.S.-Iran arms
sale, said that he is ready to cooperate with the U.S.
authorities investigating the affair.
ASKED BY an Israel Radio interviewer if he was
ready to give evidence to U.S. investigators, Kimche said,
"I am doing whatever the government of Israel asks me to
do. I shall certainly be very happy to cooperate. It is a
positive thing to cooperate.'
He added, "But I shall be doing what I can, within the
framework of what the government of Israel decides,
together with the government of the U.S."Israel has
already stated that it would not permit its officials to
testify before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
conducting the probe but would reply to its questions in
writng.
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Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
[he Israel cabinet accepted Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabins recommendation and has ap-
ointed Aluf (General) Dan Shomron, U9, as
i IDF's ISth Chief of General Staff. He will
JTA/WZN Newg Photo
replace Rav Aluf (Major General) Moshe Levy
in April or May. Shomron (right) and Levy
(left) are seen here at Beit Hanassi on the 10th
anniversary of the Entebbe rescue operation.
'emperature-Taking
It Assures You'll Certainly Have One
I Bv ELLEN ANN STEIN
And ALISA KWITNEY
jfevvih Floridian Staff Writers
[Checking on the relation-
between Israel and
Rerica all the time is like
ting a person to take
lir temperature all night
Ig; if they didn't have one
[begin with, they'll have
by morning."
\o said U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sar-
es as he began to tackle the
tc of U.S. foreign policy in the
Idle East after Iran at the
TRAC Plenary Session in Fort
^derdale Sunday.
IERE ARE three reasons
the Iran-confra affair has not
I a serious effect on Israeli-U.S.
ktions said Sarbanes: the
fength of the underlying rela-
pship, shared culture and
pes, and increasing financial
I military independence.
It is argued by some that Israel
[America down this path" with
i. "I'm very frank to tell you
the reaction of the Congress
people is that we are a very
I power and ought to be able to
le our own judgments about
it is in our best interest," said
banes, a member of the Senate
bet Committee on the Military
distance to Iran and the
araguan Opposition.
he problem that Sarbanes said
anticipates is not from a
eriorated relationship due to
Iran affair but the future of
L foreign aid to Israel, which is
ate, at $3 billion annually, the
^est single beneficiary of U.S.
US WE face budget deficits,
| the administration seeks to
the defense budget ... if
res only heavy assault on
pestic programs," Sarbanes
"I don't think at the
sroots level we can explain
hestic cuts at the same time
I we talk about increasing the
feign budget."
hat happens, Sarbanes said, is
I as the size of the foreign aid
get shrinks the portion that
I to Israel and Egypt becomes
ter and larger. This makes that
pion an attractive target for
uction.
e have to loosen tension, ad-
fes domestic needs. In the long
I the nature of American socie-
>t home reflects its ability to
|pact and influenece
elopments abroad."
DRESSING the peace pro-
We have to loosen tension ...
address domestic needs ...'
with terrorists has been
undermined?
"We'll encounter skepticism
when we reenunciate the foreign
policy," Sarbanes admitted, but
said that he felt time would
restore America's credibility.
Is Congress in a mood to punish
cess in the Middle East, Sarbanes
said, "The more we look at it, we
have to come to the conclusion
that Camp David holds the
framework for peace. I think we
tend to forget how much was
achieved there. Difficult as things
are, imagine if Israel and Egypt
were still hostile.
"Arafat and the PLO have been
exposed for what they are
basically terrorists and I think
we can continue the peace process
without them," concluded
Sarbanes.
Peace in the Middle East should
also be approached with the
understanding that peace should
come before arms, he added.
But, Sarbanes said, the U.S.
should make it very clear that it is
not neutral. "Israel is our best
friend. We want other countries
to be our friends but not at the ex-
pense of Israel."
SARBANES said the U.S.
should move in two directions at
once, that of actively pushing the
peace process forward and of hav-
ing a "fall-back position" if it does
not succeed.
those found guilty in the Iran
affair?
"A special prosecutor has been
appointed who can punish," said
Sarbanes, "but former Judge
Walsh's findings are under wraps,
and we are not privy." Sarbanes
added the final reports would be
in by October.
"We have a tendency to go one
way or the other," like Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev, Sar-
banes said.
Quoting the words of Nobel
Prize winning author Elie Weisel,
Sarbanes said, "We must always
take sides. Neutrality affects the
oppressor, not the victim."
IN A LATER interview with
The Jewish Floridian, Sarbanes
spoke again about the Iran affair,
saying "America's position as
mediator has been damaged, but
we remain a great power, we can
still play a role."
Sarbanes, when asked if he
thought a recurrence of an
"Irangate" was possible, replied
that he did not believe it could
happen again in the near future,
but that the question of whether it
would ever happen again was
more difficult to answer.
"We went through this once
before and thought we had
figured out how to work through
it," said Sarbanes.
WHAT KIND of foreign policy
can the United States have now
that its old policy of not dealing
New Violence Erupts
In West Bank and Gaza
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Violence erupted anew in
the West Bank and Gaza
Strip last Wednesday and
Thursday (Feb. 11-12) as
Israeli security forces
dispersed rock-throwing
gangs with tear gas and ar-
rested 30 Palestinian youths
in a sweep of the Balata
refugee camp near Nablus.
A Palestinian boy was wounded
by gunfire after Israeli vehicles
were stoned in the vicinity of
Khan Yunis in the southern Gaza
Strip. He was taken to a Gaza
hospital. An investigation was
ordered to find out who fired the
shot. Israeli forces used tear gas
after the windshield of one vehicle
was shattered.
JEWISH SETTLERS from
Katiffin the Gaza Strip tried to
block the main highway to Arab
traffic. Israeli troops and border
police forced them to leave.
Rioting in the West Bank was
centered in Nablus, Ramallah and
Hebron to protest the arrests at
Balata. Israeli sources said nine of
the 30 youths taken into custody
have been placed in ad-
ministrative detention for three to
six months. They are aged 19-25
and are suspected of incitement,
stone-throwing, raising Palesti-
nian flags and harassing residents
of the refugee camp who allegedly
cooperate with the Israeli
authorities.
Administrative detention means
incarceration without formal
charges or trial. More than 50
Palestinians are presently in ad-
ministrative detention.
IN NABLUS, youthful rioters,
stoned Israeli soldiers who came'
to restore order. Al-Rwdah Col-
lege in Nablus was ordered closed
for the day.
At Hebron University, tear gas
was used to drive students back to
the campus after they raised a
Palestinian flag and stoned pass-
ing vehicles.
Stones were thrown at Israeli
vehicles in Ramallah. The drivers
fired shots into the air but the
roads were not cleared until
security forces arrived with tear
gas.
According to Israeli sources, the
disturbances Thursday were
motivated in part by anger over
reports that Palestians are starv-
ing in refugee campas near Beirut
maintained by the Shiite Amal
militia.
Security forces announced,
meanwhile, that they uncovered a
gang in the Hebron area smuggl-
ing arms and explosives from Jor-
dan by truck. They were reported-
ly recruited by El Fatah and for
the past six months have been
concealing the weapons in trucks
carrying goods across the Jordan
River bridges into West Bank.
The authorities have ordered a
two-day halt in truck traffic over
the bridges, starting Friday, in
order to improve checking and
security arrangements.
TV Techs
Black Out
Game
TEL AVIV (JTA) Insult
was heaped on injury for Israel's
hundreds of thousands of basket-
ball fans, and other viewers, when
striking technicians blacked out
television last week after cutting
short the live, via satellite,
transmission of the East-West
basketball championship tourna-
ment from the U.S. in the wee
hours of the morning.
The technicians said their
wildcat strike was to protest the
earlier suspension of Zion Swiri,
chairman of their workers com-
mittee, for "pulling the plug" on
the basketball match. Swiri said
he was simply abiding by
Histadrut's agreement with the
Broadcast Authority management
stipulating the maximum number
of hours the technical staff should
work.
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Fage 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
him as a traitor. He also
has
no
Arab Lawyer Masarwa
He'll Be Israel's Consul General in Atlanta
qualms about his ability to a
municate with the lare jZ
community in Atlanta and
Continued from Page 1-A
Jews in Israel and gain the place
they deserve in the society."
HE IS convinced there are plen-
ty of Arabs capable of filling such
jobs. But they face a "technical
limitation" the condition often
demanded by Israeli employers,
public and private alike, that only
veterans of the Israel Defense
Force be hired.
Israeli Arabs are not permitted
to serve in the IDF for security
reasons. But Masarwa believes
this is often used as a pretext not
to employ Arabs. "One should do
away with this barrier," he said.
Masarwa began his public life in
1963 as secretary of the Arab Stu-
dent Union at the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem. At that time,
there was a campaign to abolish
the military government which
had been in charge of Israel's
Arab population since the war for
independence in 1948. Masarwa
was active in that campaign.
In 1976, he became the first
and youngest Arab elected
Mayor of his village when the
system of direct elections was in-
stituted. He held office for two
years. He was elected Mayor
again in 1983. Last May he resign-
ed, in compliance with a rotation
of power agreement, and now
serves as Deputy Mayor.
Masarwa was not affiliated with
any political party until Ezer
Weizman invited him to join his
new Yahad Party before the 1984
Knesset elections.
HE WAS sixth on Yahad's list,
but the party won only three
Knesset seats. When Yahad merg-
ed with the Labor Party last
month, Masarwa officially became
aLaborite.
It is believed that Masarwa's ap-
pointment to Atlanta was due in
large measure to Weizman's in-
fluence with the Foreign Ministry,
headed by Labor Party leader
Shimon Peres. He was one of four
candidates considered for the
post.
Masarwa says he and Weizman
"have a lot in common, both on
local issues and on Israel's foreign
and peace policies." He does not
see any possible conflict of in-
terest between his private views
and the official policy of the
government he will be
representing.
"My views reflect the Israeli
mainstream, and they were well
WJC Studies
State Dep't. Role
In Trif a Burial
NEW YORK (JTA) The
World Jewish Congress has begun
an investigation into the possible
role played by the State Depart-
ment in facilitating the transport
of the body of Rumanian Or-
thodox Archbishop Valerian Trifa
from Portugal where he died of a
heart attack last month for burial
in Grass Lake, Mich, in a church
cemetery on Episcopate property.
Trifa, who was stripped of
American citizenship in 1982 for
concealing his Nazi past, fled in
1984 to Portugal under the threat
of deportation. American courts
found he had secured entry into
the U.S. in 1950 by hiding his role
in anti-Jewish pogroms as a leader
of Rumania's fascist Iron Guard
movement.
Trifa's body was accompanied
to the U.S. by officials of the
Rumanian Orthodox Episcopate
of the United States in Grass Lake
where Trifa was the head of a
large congregation.
known to those who appointed me
to the job," he said. Although he
has no previous diplomatic ex-
perience, Masarwa has a native
diplomatic finesse.
HE ADROITLY avoids such
sensitive and emotionally charged
questions as the demand for an in-
dependent Palestinian state which
is shared by a majority of Israeli
Arabs. For the record he said:
"The Foreign Service, and the
:*******'
!
1 i
1
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1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
'
i
1
i
1
1
1 i
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1
1
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Foreign Ministry included, strive
toward peace with the Arab coun-
tries, toward solving the Palesti-
nian problem. This can be done
through a number of avenues."
On the controversial issue of an
international conference for Mid-
dle East peace, Masarwa observed
that: "Presently on the agenda is
an international umbrella for
peace talks. This is accepted by
both the Arab countries and the
Palestinian leaders." He made a
point of not mentioning the
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
"Nothing is guaranteed," he ad-
ded. "We shall try different ways
to reach some progress on thew
course to peace."
AT LEAST outwardly, Masar-
wa appears untroubled by the
that Palestinian
southern region'of"the vf j
his Consulate covers.
"I think that I will achiev*
greater credibility because nl
person representing the State of
Israel will be an Arab." Masarwa
said. He will go to Atlanta next
summer with his wife, Hitam and
their three children. Amir' 14
Bashir, 10, and Nazir, seven!
Masarwa said he has not vet
decided whether as the new Con-
sul General of Israel he will attend
all local Jewish events. "I have
not yet decided if I will attend
Yom Kippur service. I will follow
my conscience," he added.
possibility that Palestinian pro-
paganda in the U.S. might depict
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H
TERRORIST BOAT SEIZED: The Israel
Navy seized a boat thai was headed to Lebanon
from Cyprus last week and detained 50
Palestinian terrorist suspects as part of a
campaign to block infiltration attempts by
JTA/WZN News Photo
PLO terrorist forces attempting to return to
Lebanon. The ship (left), which was sailing to
the Lebanese port of Khalde, was carrying a
Honduran flag.
Deschenes Report
Canada Revises Nazi Criminal Study
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
The government has revised
portions of the Deschenes
Commission's report on
Nazi war criminals in
Canada in order to protect
the privacy and civil rights
of persons investigated,
Justice Minister Ray
Hnatyshyn disclosed to the
House of Commons in
Ottawa.
He denied vigorously that the
report is being purged for political
reasons or as a result of pressure
from East European ethnic
groups which fear they may be
branded as Nazi collaborates.
Leading Canadian Jewish
organizations have decided to
withhold comment until the report
is made public. According to
knowledgeable source, this will be
"soon."
THE ONLY goal is to avoid
publicly identifying people and
making sure the innocent are pro-
tected, Hnatyshyn said. He said
parts of the report will have to be
reprinted but refused to say when
it will be presented to the House
of Commons. He also would not
speculate on when the govern-
ment will respond to any recom-
mendations for action against
suspected war criminals living in
Canada.
The Commission, headed by
Quebec Superior Court Justice
Jules Deschenes spent 22 months
investigating and compiling its
report which fills 1,200 pages and
was presented to the government
of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney
last Dec. 30.
It is divided into two sections, a
public portion which contains no
names but enumerates case
studies, and a private section
which names persons against
whom there may be grounds for
action. The Commission examined
about 30 cases in detail and came
up with approximately 12
suspects against whom there is
serious evidence.
DURING ITS nearly two years
of investigation, the Commission
did not have an opportunity to
gather evidence in Eastern Euro-
pean countries.
Government sources reportedly
fear that the public portion of the
report, although it names no one,
might offer clues to the identity of
individuals investigated by men-
tioning such facts as their port of
"^7 into Canada, their place of
residence or their national origin.
Ukrainian and Baltic groups in
Canada have been especially sen-
sitive to any suggestion of collec-
tive guilt for war crimes.
Several conservative back-
benchers in Parliament support
those groups, arguing against
identifying suspects by nationali-
ty.
He did not say who did the ac-
tual revisions but said they were
handled in consultation with
Judge Deschenes who will com-
ment on the matter when the

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Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Sentencing of Pollard, Wife
Postponed Until March 4
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Sentencing of Jonathan
Pollard, a former U.S. Navy
civilian intelligence analyst
who has pleaded guilty to
spying for Israel, which was
to have taken place last
week (Feb. 10) has been
postponed until Mar. 4.
The delay was at the request of
the lawyers for Pollard, who could
be sentenced to a maximum of life
imprisonment. Also to be sentenc-
ed is his wife, Anne Henderson
Pollard, who has pleaded guilty to
conspiring to receive embezzled
government property and faces
up to 10 years in prison.
BOTH POLLARDS entered
their pleas last June before Chief
Judge Aubrey Robinson Jr. of the
United States District Court for
the District of Columbia. Pollard
has been in federal prison in
Petersburg. Va., while his wife
has been free on bail.
While Pollard has admitted to
receiving $2,500 a month for his
espionage activities, he has main-
tained in interviews and a letter to
a Boston doctor that he is a "loyal
son" of Israel and acted when he
discovered that a "new genera-
tion of ultra-sophisticated military
equipment" was going to the Arab
countries without Israel being told
about this new danger in its
security.
Meanwhile, it was reported that
the Justice Department may move
against four Israelis implicated in
the Pollard espionage case which
Israel has officially called a
"renegade" operation.
THE JUSTICE Department
has reportedly told Avi Sella, a
senior Israel Air Force com-
mander, who was identified as
Pollard's first "handler," that he
may be indicted.
The Justice Department is also
planning to revoke the diplomatic
immunity of three other Israelis
involved with Pollard Rafael
Eitan, a former terrorism adivser
to Israeli Premiers; Joseph
Yagur, a former science consul at
the Israel Consulate in New York;
and Irit Erb, a former secretary
at the Israel Embassy here.
None is expected to stand trial.
But if they return to the U.S. they
would be subject to arrest.
report is made public.
DESCHENES IS is believed to
have recommended that the
Criminal Code be amended to per-
mit trials in Canada for war
criminals whose crimes were com-
mitted elsewhere. That proposal
was supported by all sides at
public hearings by the Commis-
sion, despite the fact that the
previous Liberal government ex-
pressed concern that such legisla-
might violate civil liberties by
ting retroactive crimes.
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to Israel
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with Ampal.
Ampal is an American company with assets
of more than $1.2 billion, whose stock is
listed on the American Stock Exchange.
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mandate to raise capital in the United States
to finance and invest in Israel's private
sector economy.
Now you can enable Israel to advance
towards economic independence by selling
Ampal securities.
Ampal is expanding its operations in the
Southeast. Ampal will assist you in registering
with the NASD and provide the necessary
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To receive more information about becoming
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YOUR AMERICAN CORPORATE
CONNECTION TO ISRAEL


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
i.
Grandpa was always
giving away his most
cherished possession.
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His learning.
He didn't have much of it But what he
had, he cherished
And tried to share as best he could.
He desperately wanted for his children to
learn more than he had. "No child of mine."
he'd say, "will ever work in a sweatshop."
So he didn't work just to feed and clothe
his children. He worked to pay for religious
studies and music lessons. And to help
support Hebrew schools, Jewish vocational
schools, and yeshivas.
Your grandfather may not be here to
help Jewish education anymore.
Today, the Jewish Federation is. And
believe us, it isn't easy.
Many single parents can't give men-
children Jewish day care because we can't
give out enough scholarships. Other parents
can't afford to give their children bar or bat
mitzvah training.
Because in spite of some very generous
gifts to Federation, the average pledge
would just about cover four textbooks.
So this year, when the Federation
volunteer calls, open your checkbook the way
Grandpa opened his prayer book.
He can't do it for vou.
Now it's your turn
Greater Miami Jewish Federation mk A
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal ^
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami. FL33137 t



111?
immunity
Friday, February 20,1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
Hadassah Celebrates
Diamond Jubilee
Mrs. Jean Temkin, president of
he Miami Beach Region of
iiadassah, will head a large
delegation from Miami Beach to
Israel on Mar. 8 for the 75th An-
niversary Mission.
Hadassah was created in 1912
vhen Henrietta Szold, the first
voman to enroll in the Jewish
Theological Seminary, decided to
transform her small New York
tudy circle into a national
Organization dedicated to pro-
noting Zionist ideals among
American Jewish women and
lelping to provide basic health
are in Israel (then Palestine.)
Hadassah is best known for its
luge medical centers in
Jerusalem. The 4,000 doctors,
nurses and other staff members at
the Ein Karem center now serve a
half-million patients a year, and
2,000 students attend its medical,
dental amd public health schools.
Important research has been done
in such areas as post-operative
coronary care, bone-marrow
transplants, cancer and
neurological diseases.
In America, Hadassah holds
cultural, educational and
consciousness-raising activities,
and now local groups have begun
to conduct seminars on career,
family, public-affairs and Jewish
issues in order to recruit younger
men.
f.S. Buys Steel From Israel
A new chapter in the history of
|ie State of Israel will open when
Feb. 27 the first shipment of
kraeli-made steel will arrive in
he U.S. at the port of Miami.
With this shipment, Israel will
bin the ranks of the major steel
roducing nations of the world.
.Milton Gordon, president of
f ulf Atlantic Trading Corporation
\{ Miami, said: "We are proud to
the first American steel
.ading company to exclusively
epresent an Israeli steel mill in
the western hemisphere."
Gulf Atlantic has signed ex-
clusive distribution contracts with
Ram Metal and Building In-
dustries Ltd. of Ashdod. This is
the newest and most technically
advanced reinforcing bar mill in
the Middle East.
To celebrate the event, the
Israel-America Chamber of Com-
merce of Florida, together with
the Israeli Consulate General and
Zim-American Israeli Shipping
Co., will host an arrival reception.
AJCommittee Plants 175
Trees In Marti Forest
The Southeast Regional Office
the American Jewish Commit-
|ee has planted 175 trees in the
DM Marti Forest in Israel. The
fees were purchased with dona-
Ions from members of AJC's
Jagship chapter in Miami, as well
members in the Boca Raton,
Palm Beach, and Sarasota
fhapters. Members across the
ate, in non-chapter cities par-
cipated as well. The response
ime to a letter from Miami
Chapter President Roger Berns-
tein and Florida Area Advisory
founcil Chairman Barton Udell,
Vho have pointed to AJC's
lioneering history of pluralism
and inter-ethnic activities.
The Jose Marti Forest is the
10,000 acre park that will be
established in the Judean Hills
near Jerusalem by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael-Latin Division. It will
have 430,000 trees 10,000 for
each year of Jose Marti's life.
Jose Marti was killed in 1895
during the fight for Cuba's in-
dependence from Spain. As a na-
tional hero, he is compared to
George Washington and is
revered by Cubans who fled
Castro's regime.
Index
AJCongress Seminar... page 2-B
'Gala For Hope'... page 3-B
Rachelle Nelson:
Following Her Heart... page 5-B
Federation Project Otzma... page 6-B
Gaby Art Show... page 6-B
Organization News... page 7-B
Happenings... page 7-B
Don Softer Honored... page 8-B
Synagogue Listing ... page 11-B
Obituaries... page 12-B
Susan Lichtman Thrives
In Pressure Cooker
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
When Miami's Channel 4 was looking
for a a co-anchor to complement John
Hambrick, a nationwide search was
undertaken, and it took a year and a half
to find just the right person.
Enter Susan Lichtman, 30, the choice of the sta-
tion to share the limelight in one of the top 15
markets in the United States.
Among her biggest fans are her grandparents,
Cele and Fred Lichtman of Fort Lauderdale.
"They watch every night, and they tell all their
friends to watch so if the ratings go up, I'm going
to have to attribute that to my grandparents," she
says, with a laugh that comes easily.
LICHTMAN "paid her dues," working her way
up from her first job at a small station in Alberta,
Canada to stations in Hartford, Dallas and San
Diego to the position in Miami.
"I think if you're willing to go to a small market,
you can get a job right out of college. A lot of kids
coming out of college don't want to pay their
dues."
After graduating from the Boston University
School of Public Communications, Lichtman began
what she calls "a nomadic existence," moving
from market to market, all the while making ad-
vancements in her career. When Miami tapped
her, Lichtman was working at KFMB, a CBS-
affiliate in San Diego.
"THEY BELIEVE John and I have the right
chemistry," says Lichtman, who was born in Pitt-
sfield, Mass. and raised in Stamford, Conn.
"John presents a very strong personality on the
air. He has a commanding presence. I guess they
needed someone who could complement him. I
think I present a certain intelligence on the air. I'm
not a bubble-headed bleached blond."
Lichtman's mother, Vivian, is an art dealer to
corporations, and her father, Robert, is a real
estate developer. Two of her cousins are in the
news business, including Bill Schechner, who had
co-anchored the NBC Evening Night News with
Linda EUerbee.
"THIS IS an uncompromising business. The
competition is fierce," says Lichtman. "It requires
Susan Lichtman
150 percent dedication, concentration, and there
are always 50 people looking over your shoulder
waiting for you to make a mistake so they can
come and take your job. So I feel extremely lucky
to be where I am, extremely lucky."
Lichtman, who is single, is well aware that the
"business can own you if you let it" and says, "You
have to work very hard to achieve the balance of
personal life and professional life."
With an eye on moving into a position such as a
host of a show like "Today," Lichtman cannot see
herself "sitting at home, going to luncheon with
'the girls.'
"I'M FROM the generation that believes you
Continued on Page 2-B
Gerri Helfman Mixes
Marriage and Career
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
When the television camera switches to
"Live" Miami's Channel 10 news reporter
Gerri Helfman must be on her toes, and,
as they say in the business, ready to roll.
In the back of her mind are the words of one
former news director who told her that in order to
make it in this business, where ratings are so im-
portant, you have to be memorable.
FROM THE attention that Helfman gets when
she is spotted in public, it is obvious that she has
taken that advice. ^
The 28-year-old television news reporter was
launched into her career before she even
graduated from college. She broke the family
tradition of attending the University of Florida
and instead went to its athletic rival, Florida State
University in Tallahassee.
From there, she went to Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University, a predominantly black
school, because she heard their Journalism Depart-
ment had state of the art equipment.
THAT'S WHEN things started to roll.
"I was pretty fortunate. I interned in my senior
year for a guy who was a stringer (news gatherer
for several stations) in Tallahassee," she says.
"Because he was working by himself, I had time to
do interviews and rewrite stories. I worked pretty
hard at that job, and after two months I had a tape,
which is pretty hard for a student to do.
Helfman, who was Gerri Cohen at the time, took
the tape to a CBS affiliate in Tallahassee, WCTB-
TV, and was able to get a much-coveted internship
there.
"I remember the news director taking me into
his office I was pretty agressive and he said,
'just follow people around, don't do any stories,
just pretty much observe.' "
The next day, there happened to be a breaking
story and no reporter around to cover it. And there
was Cohen, "more eager than ever" to do the
story.
"YOU HEAR about it all the time," she says.
"Throw 'em to the lions. Something happens, and
you get your feet wet right away."
Gerri Helfman
The story was about a man, allegedly drunk, who
was holding his wife hostage. After doing about
"20 takes just to get it perfect, I had the story
ready to air on that evening's 6 o'clock news.
"From that day on, I was no longer an intern
following around reporters. I was on the news
every day."
Midway through the internship, she was hired
and now says, "it was the classic situation of when
you are in the right place at the right time."
A YEAR hadn't passed before she got her next
opportunity. A Tallahassee capitol correspondent
for Miami television station Channel 4 was leaving
his job and called Helfman to tell her about the
opening. It was back at the time when Ralph
Renick ran the show, she recalls.
Helfman had met Renick once before through an
introduction made by her father, the late
developer, Stanley Cohen. At that time, Renick
Continued on Page 2-B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
Susan Lichtman Thrives
In Pressure Cooker
Continued from Page 1-B
can have it all. Now, maybe that's unrealistic, but 1
believe if you work hard enough on your profes-
sional life and your personal life, you can make the
two work. So now that I've gotten my professional
life up to speed, I can take some time to work on
the personal part."
Lichtman swims, loves the beach, runs, works
out in weight rooms and has a freelance photojour-
nalism background on the side. Intrigued by other
cultures and how they all fit together, Lichtman
travels a lot and writes mostly travel stories that
have been published in magazines such as Omni
and Savvy, and newspapers including the Orlando
Sentinel and Chicago Sun Times.
WITH ALL THIS, she finds time at least twice
a year to attend large family gatherings.
"I think Judaism equals family," she says. "I'm
certainly proud of the fact that I'm Jewish. My
grandparents ran a Conservative household. My
family ran a Reform household. Religion is a vehi-
cle that brings our family together. I can
remember my grandparents in New Jersey used to
have family weekend get-togethers of 30-40
people.
"I think family's real important. We've lost a lot
of these values in this fast-paced technological
society."
LICHTMAN SAID she feels fortunate that she
came from a family that was very close and had no
divorces. Her grandparents celebrated their 65th
anniversary last year.
"And even though I've lived in all parts of the
country and the family is scattered, we all gather
for Thankagiving and Passover."
But back to work, live television is what
Lichtman says gets her adrenalin going.
"It doesn't permit you to be lazy. You have to
give it 150 percent everytime you go out there
because you don't get a second chance. I work very
well under pressure. Pressure cookers." she says.
"are fun."
AND PRESSURE she has. With an earphone,
the anchors are often getting directions from the
news producer to change the format or in one re-
cent case, shorten copy which put ner in the posi-
tion of editing a story as she was broadcasting.
When she makes a mistake, she tends to shrug it
off with a laugh.
"We put ourselves out before those people every-
day, and we're not perfect. Of course we make
mistakes. If we can laugh at them so much the
better."
Her energy, she says, is more of a curiosity than
anything, "an incredible curiosity. I want to know
what's going on everywhere."
WHEN SHE first joined Channel 4 in November
as an anchor on the 11 o'clock news, the newsstaff.
who she says are genuinely, "nice, generous, very
caring people." kept asking her if she was nervous.
Was the pressure getting to her?
"I didn't feel the pressure." she says on reflec-
tion. "If anything, there was excitement. I was
like a horse at the gate, chomping at the bit saying
let's go.* "
Every day she says she gets more comfortable
with the job, and three weeks ago she was added as
co-anchor to the 6 o'clock news.
Somewhere in Fort Lauderdale there are some
pretty proud grandparents watching.
Gerri Helfman Mixes
Marriage And Career
Continued from Page 1-B
had told her to go to college and call him later. She
did. And was hired within a week.
She remembers a Channel 4 reporter who was on
assignment in Tallahassee seeing her on the news
there and calling the station to say he spotted "so-
meone good." Ruth Sperling, who was assistant
news director, told the reporter, "I know. I just
hired her."
HELFMAN, born in Kansas, came to Miami
.with her family when she was three months old
and attended Killian High School, graduating with
the Class of "77.
Her mother, Martha, is an accountant who lives
in Kendall. Her father was a well-known builder
and developer, and Helfman became the first
member of the family to enter the field of
journalism.
What makes a good television reporter? "You
have to be a good communicator," Helfman says.
"Obviously, you have to assess a story and put all
the parts in a minute. 30 seconds.
"I think on my resume tape I had an exclusive
story. TV people like that. It's obvious television
gets a lot of its stories from newspapers because
they have a lot more resources. When (television)
reporters are able to go out and get stories before
newspapers do. that's a good sign. It means they
know how to dig for stories."
BEFORE HELFMAN knew it. six years had
passed, and she didn't have many opportunities to
visit her family in Miami. She wanted to come
home.
"I was sort of a victim of my own good work.
When I asked Channel 4 if I could come to Miami,
they said 'We like what you're doing in the capitol
and want you to stay there.' After I realized they
weren't going to bring me to Miami, I called*Chan
nel 10."
The only opening at Channel 10 at the time was
in the Public Affairs Department, doing spots such
as Sunday morning talk shows. She took the job
but noticed reporters scampering around the first
floor on news deadlines and started to miss that
aspect of the news business.
A FEW months later. Helfman grabbed an open-
ing in the news division of the Broward Bureau
and has been there since.
She lives in Coral Gables with her husband.
Stephen, an attorney with the law firm of Fine.
Jacobson. Schwartz. Nash. Block and England,
which coinodentally, had been a merger including
another lawfirm which Helfman's brother, Gary
Cohen, works for.
Gerri met Stephen at a Friday night happy hour
at the Grand Bay Hotel Lounge and says, "He
came to me with that old line. 'You look better in
person than you do on TV.' We fell in love pretty
fast."
THE WEDDING was three weeks away, when
Helfman's father was murdered. (An arrest still
has not been made). She says Rabbi Haskell Ber-
nat of Temple Israel of Greater Miami was a great
help through that difficult time, advising her to
proceed with the wedding. "He said we had one
bad thing happen and shouldn't have another. It
was really a good decision."
A move to the networks is not in Helfman's
plans because, she says, having a family is her first
priority.
"I'm not a feminist by any stretch," she quickly
says, adding "I'm fairly traditional and family is
very important to me."
EVEN THOUGH she didn't grow up in a verv
religious home. Helfman says. "I was brought up
in a Jewish home. The tradition is there."
Part of that tradition was changing her name to
that of her husband's, something that many news
reporters choose not to do. At that time, Helfman
had a new news director who hand't known her
that long as Gerri Cohen. After two weeks of sign-
ing off as Gerri Cohen Helfman. she was permit-
ted, with some hesitation, to simply sign off as
Gerri Helfman.
For any young women interested in journalism.
Cohen advises that "you can hever be "too ag-
gressive." Think, she says, of how many students
graduate from journalism schools each year, com-
pared to the smaller number of openings.
"IT'S A frustrating business." she concludes
"One day. you're ecstatic you have a great story
and the next day you're totally down in the dumps
when you do a story that's not so good. Your entire
mood is developed each day. I think most reporters
take their stories pretty personally because
they re associated with it.
"some days. I go home after a not-so-good story
and In not in a good mood, and mv husband will
say. Find another job. I don't like you like this.
"But I've never really found anything else I
want to do." *
Jewish Affairs Seminar
At Temple Beth Sholcm
The Women's Division of the
Southeast Region of American
Jewish Congress will sponsor its
annual Jewish Affairs Seminar on
Thursday. Feb. 26 at Temple Beth
Sholom at 9:30 a.m. The theme of
this year's seminar is "Understan-
ding our Jewish Roots" and will
feature presentations by Rabbi
Jack Riemer. spiritual leader of
Beth David Congregation and
Rochelle F. Nelson, cantor at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
Rabbi Riemer's seminar topic
will be "Our Present Spiritual
Situation: Form versus Fire in
Jewish Life."
He is the editor of New Pray.rs
for the High Holy Days which is
used in hundreds of congregations
throughout the United States. He
is also the editor of Jewish Reflec-
tions on Death and the co-editor of
Ethical Wills: A Modern Jewish
Treasury.
Rabbi Riemer has led study mis-
school of SiQsl
graduate of J
Miami School J
sions to the Soviet Union
Eastern and Western Eu^*1.
Cantor Nelson will speak I
perform on "The EvohS*'
isiJSrFrom *
A graduate
Union College
Music, and a
University of
Music, she has garnered 2]
wide acclaim for her origiiudTI
positions in the areas of faS
worship and folk song and L]
accomplished songleader sloM
with instruments of guitar ful
and piano.
The Jewish Affairs Seminar
be Chaired by Judith Teppe,
gram co-chairman of AJCow
Point East Chapter. The j^,
is open to the public and b*h
charge. Coffee and danish will J
served. Additional informatioinl
available at the American JnJ
Congress regional office.
"Legends In ConcertVSouthern
Bell Talent Search To Benefit
North Dade Culturefest
"Legends in Concert," the hit
show at the Marco Polo Hotel, and
Southern Bell have joined
together to sponsor a young peo-
ple's talent contest and benefit
performance in support of
Culturefest, the annual North
Dade cultural event held at the
FIU Bay Vista Campus.
Youngsters age six through ||
are invited to audition on Sut
day in the Persian Room of
Marco Polo Hotel from 11 tail
2 p.m., solo acts only, no gra
Six finalists selected that day n
perform in a final compebtB
Tuesday during the regular m j
ing performance of "Legendu"
Concert" at the hotel.
Shul Of Bal Harbour
Annual Dinner March 4
The Shul of Bal Harbour's Fifth
Annual Dinner will take place in
the Friedland Ballroom on Mar. 4
at 6:30 p.m.
The event marks the celebration
of the congregation's recent ac-
quisition of a site for the construc-
tion of a new synagogue complex
which will serve the Bal Harbour.
Bay Harbor and Surfside
community.
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar is the
spiritual leader of the Shul of Bal
Harbour, which has held its ser-
vices for the past three years at
the hotel Sheraton Bal Harbour.
During the dinner program, the
synagogue's annual award for
outstanding leadership will be
given to Sami Rohr of Bal Har-
bour. Rohr is a charter member of
the religious institution and a
leading force in its new building
effort. Rohr has also helped to
Sami Rohr
found the main synagogw
Bogota. Colombia and pioo
the establishment and prognH
the Chabad movement a
country.
SOUTH FLORIDA WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
I
Shaare Zedek Hospital
In Jerusalem
I PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
Passover'87
I \Jkachmotb.
Supervision by National Kashruth NC
Foe information A rfvatloi8. pl*.. call A. Marks. 531-W*


Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
National Parkinson
Foundation 'Gala
For Hope' 1
Soviet Jews Ambassador Dinitz To Speak
Rally
At 31st Zionist Congress
ke National Parkinson Foun-
bon will hold its 29th annual
ala for Hope" on Sunday at the
antainbleau Hotel, when the
initiation's national chairman,
i Hope, will perform.
lope will present the Founda-
I's 1987 Humanitarian Award
[Stephen H. Muss during the
rse of the evening.
.he gala, which will benefit the
Initiation's research, treatment
rehabilitation program, will
include performances by
,e's wife, Dolores, singer Con-
Haines, and the cast of La
Aux Folles.
i association with the Universi-
pf Miami School of Medicine,
Foundation is increasingly
nized as one of the nation's
^cipal centers for research,
jnosis and treatment of
kinson's Disease and related
^ological disorders.
ttthan Slewett is president of
National Parkinson
ndation.
A Mobilization of Concern for
Human Rights and Solidarity with
Soviet Jews rally will be held
Thursday, Feb. 26 from noon to 2
p.m. at the Dade County Cour-
thouse and North Miami Beach Ci-
ty Hall. The rally will be taking
place simultaneously in the capitol
and major cities in 43 countries
throughout the world. There will
be songs of freedom and the
names read of 3,000 Jewish
families denied their right to leave
the USSR.
The public is urged to bring
friends, home made signs, posters
and American flags.
The event is being coordinated
internationally by the men and
women of B'nai B'rith with the
cooperation of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Com-
munity Relations Department,
South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, the Rabbinical
Association and the Association of
Cantors.
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz,
member of Israel's Knesset and
former chief envoy of the Jewish
State to the United States, will
speak to a communitywide
meeting on the forthcoming 31st
Zionist Congress Tuesday, at 7:30
p.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Dinitz, vice president of the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
was one of the key negotiators of
the Camp David accords which led
to the historic peace treaty bet-
ween Egypt and Israel.
He was Israeli ambassador to
America at the time of the Yom
Kippur War in 1973, and was a
protege of the late Golda Meir,
former primer minister of Israel.
The rally at Temple Emanu-El
is free and open to the public, ac-
cording to meeting chairperson
Harriet Green, national vice presi-
dent of Na'amat USA and chair-
man of the board of the American
Zionist Federation of South
Florida.
Dinitz will explain procedures
for an election to be held this spr-
ing among the more than one
million dues-paying Zionists in the
United States. The balloting will
select delegates to the Zionist
Congress, held every four years in
Jerusalem.
Bob Hope
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
th Anniversary Gala Wednesday
committee chairpersons for
17th Anniversary Luncheon
fashion Show of the Temple
nu-El Sisterhood have been
unced by Mrs. Marwin Cassel
Irs. John Shapiro, chairman
co-chairman of the event
iuled for 11 a.m. Wednesday,
Miami Beach congregation.
srvations for the "Genera-
luncheon and fashion show
rer 100 Federation
lers To Attend CJF
Jadership Institute
SW YORK, N.Y. Over 100
ng North American Jewish
nunky leaders will gather in
Jem Feb. 18-25, for the
kil of Jewish Federations
Leadership Institute being
lin Israel for the first time.
Fe at CJF are looking forward
rengthening the bond bet-
Federation leadership and
ilis in different sectors of
fcr," said CJF President
ana S. Cardin. "The pur-
lof this Institute is both to
[about Israel and its people in
ger depth and to share with
lis leaders the concepts of
fnteer-led community
[lizations as practiced in
America."
Free Tax
| Counseling
' tax counseling for all per-
160 years of age or older is
ble at South Shore Hospital
Medical Center every Thurs-
hrough April 10, from 10
i 2 p.m.
junteers trained by the Inter-
evenue Service will provide
ance in filling out income tax
for senior citizens in Room
Ion the penthouse floor of the
|e Pavillion of South Shore,
P is affiliated with the
rsity of Miami School of
Cine.
shall H. Berkson, president
medical center, said "We
forking with the American
fcmtion for Retired Persons
p) in making this program
ible throughout the tax
may be made at the Temple ac-
tivities office, according to
Sisterhood president Martha
Mishcon.
Selected as chairmen of Angels
and Patrons were Mrs. Irving
Cypen and Mrs. Sherman Kaplan.
Mrs. Richard Schwarz was named
decorations chairman and Mrs.
Alice Sheffman was named door
control chairman. Hostess chair-
man is Mrs. Jerome Potashnik
with Mrs. Yetta Rosenkrantz as
telephone committee chairman.
Mrs. Irving Cypen
TEMPLE EMANU-EL OF GREATER MIAMI
1701 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
Friday, February 20 8 p.m.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
will preach on
"Israel Revisited -
Another Look"
Cantor Yehuda Shlf man will chant
assisted by the Temple Choir
A Reception for young singles will follow the service.
Yini A l ways Knew Success
Would TasteThis Good.
Fill MHir cup to (he rim
wilh tlie lull, rk.li taste ol Brim!
kllMIIK
Jo1 I 1986 General Foods Corporation


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
0F
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Builders and Real Estate Division held a
meeting to discuss its role in the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal. Pictured from left are
Harry B. Smith, Arnold Leider, Lee
Spiegelman, Chairman of the Builders and
Real Estate Division; David Smith, Herschel
Rosenthal and Eliot Treister. Not pictured is
committee member Joseph Falk.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federations
Alliance Division held its Key Biscayne An-
nual Dinner Dance, at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel on behalf of the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal Pictured from left (standing) are Jean
Jacobson, David Jacobson, chairman; Rebecca
Kronhart, Judge Alexander Kronhart; Dr.
Harry Shpiner, and Susan Shpiner Smith.
Seated are (from left) Edythe Kerness, Elton J.
Kerness, associate executive vice president of
Federation; Zelig Chinitz, guest speaker; Mrs.
Chinitz, and Edna Shpiner.
Michael Exelbert To Be Installed
As President Of Temple Zion
Concluding 8:15 p.m. services
on Friday night, Feb. 27,
designated as "Installation Sab-
bath," Michael If. Exelbert. local
educator, will be installed for
another term as president of Tem-
ple Zion Israelite Center.
Exelbert is a community leader
involved in civic, cultural, socio-
educational and religious com-
munity activities. He is vice presi-
dent of the Southern Council of
Southeast Region, United
Synagogue of America, the parent
organization of Conservative
Judaism.
He has served two terms as
Worshipful Master of the Miracle
Masonic Lodge, and four years as
president of the South Dade
Hebrew Academy. Exelbert is
past president of the South Dade
Hebrew Academy. Exelbert is
past president and a current
member of several professional
organizations involving excep-
tional, handicapped and retarded
youth. He is also a member of
Omicron Delta Kappa. Order of
Omega, and Iron Arrow at the
University of Miami, where be
received the Master's degree in
special education.
A senior staff administrator of
the Dade County School System,
he is a Yeshiva graduate, with
honors and scholastic awards in
Hebrew language.
Also to be installed are David
Cohei. David Boas, Florence
Washerman. George Cohen and
Gloria Cohen, vice presidents;
Neven Brail, treasurer; Harold
Rosenfeld, Al Landskroner, Alan
Fisher. Secretaries; Sheldon Bott.
Men's Club president; Sybil
Lueoff, Sisterhood president; Jere
Chait, theatre guild.
Elected to the board of directors
are Keith Agress. Sheldon
Becher, Sharon Boas, Stanley
Cannon, Peggy Cohen, Honey
Cohen, Maurice Coulton, Kenneth
Cutler, Morris Dan, William
Drucker, Lewis Fishman and Sari
Friedman. Gerald Godfarb, Ellin
Goldstein, Leonard Greenbaum,
David Guttenmacher, Wendy
Hameroff-Cohen. Carol Kamin-
sky, Hyman Kirsner, Franklin
Kreutzer, Lee Lasris. Gerald
Laub, Chester Leiter. Lorraine
Lei tin an.
Also, Paul Mendelson, Evelyn
Pawliger, Diana Raphael. Irma
Rashkind, Robert Rosen, Lester
Rosenberg, Eugen Rubin. Merle
Sidle, Robert Sirull. Marvin
Solomon, Jesse Teitler. Joel
Vogel, Martin Wasserman and
Joseph Zipper.
CANTOR/BAAL KOREH
NEEDED
Traditional Synagogue. Send
resume, alar? expectations, ref-
erence* Congregation Ahavath
Shotom, 4060 South Hulen. Ft
Worth, TX.7B1 Of
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PHm other dairy specials... ^.
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Rabbi Mandelbaum To Speak At
'Man Of The Year' Breakfast
Rabbi Bernard Mandelbaum,
president emeritus of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America,
will speak at the annual "Man of
the Year" breakfast of the Men's
Club of Temple Emanu-El Sun-
day. Feb. 22, at the Miami Beach
Congregation. 1701 Washington
Ave.
The 9:30 event will honor Louis
Stein. Miami Beach philanthropist
and former Chairman of the
Board of Food Fair Stores, who is
a vice president of Temple
Kmanu-El.
Rabbi Mandelbaum, author of
"Art and Judaism: A conversation
with Yaacov Agam and Bernard
Mandelbaum.'* also wrote
"Choose Life" and "Add Life to
Your Years." He earned a doc-
torate in 1*53 from the fta-j.
where he was ordainedTfi
l^ltlEaWtt.^
tsjj
"The Eternal'LiKhT.'""11"5^'
the Seminary's awani..
NBC television and Sfc?
Rabbi Mandelbaum is fonJ
Commissioner of the New \1\
Commission on Human RjJJ
former president of the Ameni
Israel Cultural Federation
former national vice president*
the Synagogue Council
America.
Dr. IrvinKLehrrnanwillpr?J
the award to Stein, togetherS
Men s ( bib president, Dr u.
Berger.
90th Anniversary Of
The Jewish Forward
The Jewish Forward Florida
Committee will be holding a Gala
Celebration to commemorate its
90th anniversary on Thursday,
Feb. 26, at noon at the Seville
Beach Hotel.
Simon \Veln?r. editor of the
Jewish Forward. Rabbi Solomon
Shiff. vice president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami. Rabbi Karl Klein of the
Hallandale Jewish Center. Rabbi
LrV'ng r,Lehrman of T>mJ
hmanu-LI. and Moshc Fisheri,,
Will Stern, chairmen. \r] |
participating.
Included in the Musical ArtHft]
Program will be rectatioNl
Rose Luski and Cantor Mot]
Burin, as well as I: erf rmanai
J. Bronstein. clarinetist.
There will be a peeling foal
Isaac Basnet S ger and i|
brunch will In- served.
Yeshiva and Mesivta I]
Torah Vodaath I
cordially invite you to attend the
Annual Florida Region Dinner
HONORING
Benjamin and Etia Terner
SUNDAY-6 p.m.
Crown Hoftl Miami Beach
1545 COLLINS AVE.
HOLIDAY PACKAGE
April 13 thru April 24
12 DAYS and 11 NIQHTS INCLUDES
3 Kosher Meats Daily Fresh Water Swimming
Jjlgfrtly Entertainment Facilities
S1? Sod*' ArtMtto. Sightseeing Tour*
Dally Religious Services WeicomeGift
'693
OH Per Person
V** Double Occupancy
Tax N Tip Incl.
CALL FOR RESERVATIONS 531-7381
We Welcome You Like FAMILY..
and Treat You ROYALLY!"
PACKAGE SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY


allowing Her Heart:
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Rachelle Nelson Bridges Distance Between
Husband in New York and Career in Miami
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Rachelle Nelson, cantor at
hemple Israel, seems to
lave found the perfect
ecipe for a fulfilling life, a
ireer in which she can ex-
press herself creatively and
3iritually, and a new hus-
md whom she calls her
jst friend.
j What are the ingredients for
his recipe? Patience and the will-
Egness to endure a bit of
fneliness, according to Nelson.
"I'm so thankful that life ar-
Lnged it so that I married late."
kys Nelson. 30, who married
arvey Saunders. a New York li-
por broker, last June.
(I WAS engaged at age 22,
jht after I graduated from the
liversity of Miami with a
tchelor's degree in music. I
Jink I got engaged because I was
esh out of college and scared of
iat the future might hold."
f'But when we broke up, I decid-
to go to Cantorial School in
^w York, to do what I loved,"
ys Nelson.
I'As a young woman, I had the
ge to submerge myself into a
itionship. Once I developed a
riM of myself as a successful
eer woman, I knew that I could
pet ion without a man at my
t. If a woman allows herself to
(it. she'll have a different sense
|marriage. Most women are too
of being lonely."
KELSON EXPERIENCED
leliness herself while studying
(be a cantor at Hebrew Union
age.
It wasn't like my mother
|ami's famed impresaria, Judy
Bckerl said it would be," recalls
(son. "She thought that being
rg. I would meet people. 1 was
ily; I had no time to go out on
That time in New York was
culture shock for me," she
lits.
^elson grew up in Bay Harbor,
was a very simple, very inno-
pt childhood," she recalls. "I
never involved with bad kids
Irugs." In her first year of can-
Hi college, Nelson lived in
oklyn in a little blue room of a
ce which belonged to another
(lily. During her second year of
lies, she got a job as a cantorial
j>ist in Armonk, N.Y., and mov-
Riverdale.
The third and fourth years
the great transition for me,"
Nelson. "A lot of my
pliness ended when, at the end
ly second year, I decided to
he back to Miami for a year's
itical.
BECAME a cantorial soloist
at Temple Israel, and
pended Rabbi Haskell Bernat,
Temple's spiritual leader. I
^posed the music for the ser-
I must have prepared at
three cantatas that year."
appy at last. Nelson never-
ess faced a dilemma.
still had two more years of
d1, and I had to go back and
^h them to be considered a full
or, and not just a cantorial
list."
elson discussed her problem
the rabbis and a Solomonic
tion was reached; she would
aid a salary that would allow
|to commute from her school in
York to the Temple every
kend.
fTERESTINGLY enough,
once-commuter-cantor now
la commuter marriage.
I have my husband much more
most women have their
ands," says Nelson of the ar-
ement. "Thursday through
lay I have him completely, not
and distracted after a day's
Nelson met her husband at Tem-
ple Israel, during the Bar Mitzvah
of a member of his family. Pic-
tures of him are proudly displayed
in the cantor's office, and she
speaks of him with the enthusiasm
of a bride.
"I married my best friend," she
says. "We haven't had a fight yet
because we have such a strong
friendship. If you don't have that,
you have nothing love and lust
will wear out."
"My husband is mature, sen-
sitive ... he has the best sense of
humor," Nelson continues on, ad-
ding that "I know I'll be talking
about him the same way in five
years."
THE SECRET may be the fact
that Nelson and her husband have
that commuter marriage, an
aspect of their relationship which
others might view as a flaw in the
fabric of their life together, but
which Nelson herself views as be-
ing positive.
"We are thinking seriously
about living full time together, but
I don't know," she says. "This
arangement gives partners a
chance to miss each other, which
being together seven days a week
does not. Apartness preserves the
mystery and the romance."
And what about children?
"We're waiting for God to shine
her light down upon us," says
Nelson with a laugh. "We want to
have two eventually the world
comes in two's.
NELSON SAYS she does not
believe that the addition of a child
to her life would make the com-
muter marriage untenable.
"I would have to have full time
help at home," she admits, "but
my husband would be fully atten-
tive to the child four days a week,
without stress, which is more than
most children have. It's not the
norm the norm is a father who
is home seven days a week. But is
he really? He comes home tired,
late at night, wanting a drink and
needing to rest."
Nelson, who is happy about the
ordination of women cantors in
the Conservative movement, says
that she does not think that there
will be an Orthodox woman cantor
in her lifetime.
"That's the extremist side of
our religion," she explains, "but I
understand it. I'm sensitive to it."
"In the Reform and Con'
Continued on Page 10-B
Rachelle Nelson
Eat in Good Health
With Fleischmann's Margarine
"^SvveetUNSALTED
Fleischmanns
c*
**"*.
Ss
^JOO% cornal
Margarine
L*;.o*KX)%cornoii
wsariae
:,**"'
"*
-?
*2
^_
Now it's easy to mate delicious, low cholesterol Challah
jfil I i^- (see recipe below) and make sure Fleischmann s Margarine
and Fleischmanns Egg Beaters are part of the recipe
Fleischmann's Margarine is made Irom 100% com oil has 0 h
cholesterol and is low in saturated tai
So if you want to enjoy good eating and good health, one
thing's lor certain: There's never been a better lime lor the
great taste of Fleischmann's.
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH FRENCH TOAST
M cup EGG BEATERS
Cholesterol Free 99% Real
Egg Product
't teaspoon vanilla extract
Vi teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 ('A-mcn truck) sices Low
Cholesterol Challah (recipe tollows)
1 tablespoon FLEISCHMANN'S
Sweet Unsalted Margarine
Syrup. iam or confectioners sugar
LOW CHOLESTEROL CHALLAH Ms?*es
6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Dash powdered saffron, optional
1 package FLEISCHMANNS"
RapidRise" Mast
1 cup hot water (125* to 130F)
14 cup FLEISCHMANN S Sweet
Unsalted Margarine softened
1 cup FLEISCHMANN'S EGG
BEATERS Cholesterol Free 99%
Real Egg Product, at room
temperature
Sesame or poppy seed
In shallow dish, beat FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters, vanilla and cin-
namon Dip challah into mixture, turning to coat well In skillet over
medium heat, melt FLEISCHMANN'S Sweet Unsalted Marganne Add
Challah. cook lor 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden brown
Serve with syrup iam or confectioners sugar
ft WHMtOMMS MC
Fleischmann's gives every meal a holiday flavor.
Set aside I cup flour In large bowl, mix remaining flour sugar, salt,
saffron and FLEISCHMANN S RapidRise yeast, stir in hot water and
FLEISCHMANN S Sweet Unsalted Margarine Mix in Y> cup
FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters and enough reserved flour to make soft
dough Knead until smooth and elastic. 8 to 10 minutes Cover, let rest
10 minutes
Divide dough in half Divide one half into 2 pieces, one about M of dough
and the other about M ol dough Divide larger piece into 3 equal pieces
roll each into 12-inch rope Braid the ropes, seal ends Divide smaller
piece into 3 equal pieces, roll each into 10-inch rope Braid ropes, place
on top of large braid Seal together at ends Place on greased baking
sheet Repeat with remaining dough Cover, let nse in warm draft-tree
place until doubled in size about 1 hour
Brush loaves with remaining Egg Beaters, spnnkle with seeds Bake at
37F for 20 to 25 minutes or until done Remove from sheets
cool on wire racks
15C
Mack!
wcwmcww | nwws mm n. mi]
SAVE 15C
When you buy any package of
Fleischmanns Margarine
835156

RfTHUR One en. p.* pp. duiliuw o. p.odw.1
irhMJIfti An* **i BM DPmMlllW *.*od Con
s^TK. to p*. *-<*d l.*"Mf"ffl
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ompv4 *-m w> cny. ftimi L.^ M8ISCI) BRlWOi UK MPT W ll *SO
IIUS ''


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
Federation Seeks Five
Students For 'Otzma' Program
Recruitment for the second year of Project Otana has begun as
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation seeks five young people
with a sense of purpose and adventure.
The selection committee, chaired by Ralph Chernin, is seeking
five Jewish students ages 18-24, who would be eligible for the
"Otana" program, a year of study and work in Israel.
"The first year participants, in Israel for less than five months,
are sending rave reviews of the program home to their families
and friends." said Chernin. "It's not a vacation. 'Otana' is the
Hebrew word for strength. It provides an opportunity for these
young people to learn first-hand about their Jewish Homeland."
Participants chosen will spend the year in a variety of ways ex-
ploring Israel. The year will include a wide variety of social ser-
vice projects, work on a kibbutz, sharing with an Israeli family
and meeting with educators, politicians, scientists, authors and
artists.
The first three months of the program are spent at a kibbutz
ulpan, working, learning Hebrew and integrating into kibbutz
society. During the middle period of the Otana program, par-
ticipants will do agricultural work and assist with immigrant
children at Youth Aliyah villages. The final month will be in Or
Akiva, Miami's Project Renewal "sister city," working with
Israeli volunteer groups.
"The objective of this program is to identify gifted young
leaders, at an early point in their careers, and then bond them to
Israel and the Jewish community in a way that will stimulate
them to become Jewish communal professionals or active
volunteer leaders," added Chernin.
Anyone interested in "Otana" must apply immediately.
Federation's final selection of this year's five participants will
take place on April 30. Among the qualities required for ap-
plicants are: leadership ability, strong Jewish motivation, in-
terests and knowledge, positive life direction (goal-oriented,
realistic self-image), commitment to service and to the Jewish
community, maturity to handle intensive group experiences, in-
dependent but able to fit into a structured group setting.
Also flexibility to relate to life and conditions in Israel, physical
capacity to perform strenuous agricultural work in a sub-tropical
climate; realistic picture of the program (its expectations,
demands and rewards) previous experience living away from
home and freedom from such health problems as allergies,
headaches, severe dietary restrictions, and back ailments.
Those meeting the above criteria and want to apply for the
"Otana" program, write to: Yisroel Cohen, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida
33137.
Adult Education Classes
Resume At Temple Sinai
The Winter semester of Adult
Classes has reconvened at Temple
Sinai of North Dade with classes
offered on Tuesday evenings from
7:30 to 10 p.m. in the North Dade
reform congregation's Rosenblum
School Building.
The Adult Education Commit-
tee which helped put together the
program was headed by Rhea
Bertelli.
Course offerings include classes
in Yiddish and Jewish History, as
well as an Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah
course given by the congrega-
tion's Rabbi, Ralph P. Kingsley. A
special offering called "Dear
Abraham. Dear Abby: The Family
in Crisis" is given by Rabbi Stuart
Grant.
Dr. Meir Heth was elected as
the new Chairman of the Board
for Bank Leumi in Israel. Heth
was born in Haifa in 19S2 and
studied economics and law at
the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem and at Harvard
University.
Cantor Motzen At
Agudath Israel
Cantor Yaakov Motzen, born in
Israel and a fifth generation Chaz-
zan, will render the Liturgical
Services at Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute on Saturday
morning starting at 8:30 a.m.
Cantor Motzen was the chief
cantor in the Israeli Army and
Head of Givat Yam-Haifa-Ramat
Gan territory. He has performed
world-wide and is presently the
cantor in Montreal.
The public is invited. Tickets are
not required.
PERSONALS"
CHARMING ATTRACTIVE,
sweet-tempered gentle-
man, 72 +, with fine cultur-
al values, and very fine
education, would like to
meet gentlewoman, 65-75,
with same features and
nobility of heart, retired,
self-supporting, loves
traveling and owns car.
Dade Co. only. Write SR c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami 33101.
THE MOST TALKED ABOUT RESTAURANT IN FLORIDA
HAS BEEN REBORN!
Opening Tuesday, Feb. 24
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Your host Bob (Big Daddy) Napp

MJHHA Executive Director Marc Lichtman lied) preset^
tribute to Murray Gaby on behalf of those being helped by (V,
Alzheimer's programs.
Gaby Art Show
It was not just for art's sake that over 150 people gathered I
Williams Island's Clubhouse on Jan. 28. The evening, featuru^i
sale of the works of artist Murray Gaby and a champagne rec
tion. courtesy of Williams Island, was a benefit for Alzheimer's
Disease.
All of the proceeds from the sale of Mr. Gaby's work that nigh
were donated to the Alzheimer's care and treatment progrm
sponsored by the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
at Douglas Gardens.
Both Mr. Gaby and his wife, Julie, are members of the Mian I
Jewish Home's Alzheimer's Care Committee. Founded by Bdk
Goldstein, this committee is responsible for hosting education
programs, seminars and special events to raise communtj
awareness and funds for Alzheimer's programs.
"In a very short time, the Alzheimer's Care Committee and|
Alzheimer's Notables have done a tremendous job of invofon
some of the real movers and shakers in Miami," noted MJHHA
Executive Director Marc Lichtman. "Their special events arep
ing to be a lot of fun and they will contribute a great deal to tfe I
new programs that the Miami Jewish Home has developed for 1
Alzheimer's patients."
The Miami Jewish Home has two such programs: one in the or I
sing facility and another in the community. For residents of tin I
nursing home, the Nathan and Roddy C. Rood Alzheimer's Vb I
provides around-the-clock skilled nursing care in a staff intensm I
environment.
For Alzheimer's patients living in the community, the Soph I
and Nathan Gumenick Alzheimer's Respite Center provides dr '
care for Alzheimer's sufferers, counseling for those who carefa i
them and a structured, therapeutic environment. At the Respn I
Center, patients participate in an activities program that aims f I
keeping them as alert and as independent as possible.
At the Gaby Art Show on Williams Island wen- left torA
MJHHA Executive Director Marc Lichtman. Cindyjj
Rogers, Dr. Ferdie Pacheco, Dorothy St. Jean and Ml
Assistant Director of Development Louis C. Fischer.
Kids find us fun,
but our pastel's no joke.
Chef Boyardee* Pac-Man? Smurf,'" ABC's
& 1. 2. 3's. and Tic Tac Toes pasta is
serious food kids love to eat While we
make our pasta in shapes kids find fun to
eat. we also make sure they're filled with
good ingredients like: rich, ripe tomatoes,
aged cheese and enriched wheat flour. So
Chef Boyardee pasta is a source of protein
that's also 95% fat free, and contains com-
plex carbohydrates without any preserv-
atives. No wonder both kids and moms
thank goodness for Chef Boyardee
Thank Goodness or Chef Boyardee
frjtll
'"o Mm***"
PicMv'Mfl. I9 l9t?&MS M>}, Mg Ct> *.R^msS f 'M '985 Pfyo .WiiiB*mn.<
Brills To Be
Honored At
Young Israel
Young Israel of Gnj^jj
will hold its 29th annual JJJ
in honor of Myra "J*|
Brill on March 1 at bp.m"
pie Emanu-El-
The Brills' joined Young
13 years ago. Yehoshw
pointed Youth Ctawntf*
and served for fcorjg
,rganized many activity
md girls. In 1984. te"#*m
president of the congreP^J
is currently a member m
Board of Directors.
member of the touthUja
uidaGabbai.Myraha-^
nusband in all his endea^


:.
......

Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
X^
Wi
ildie Cohen, president of Sisterhood ofTem-
Ner Tamid, left, is seen with Bea
irkowitz, who was named "Woman of
Valor," Rabbi Eugene Labowitz and Chair-
woman Sadie Cohen, at the Temple's
Sisterhood Annual Eternal Light Luncheon.
rganization ISTews
I The Gold Coast Council of the B'nai
Trith Youth Organization is making plans
its 1987 Spring Convention to be held May
l at the Airport Hilton in West Palm Beach,
theme for the annual event, attracting
sns from area chapters, will be "Enter a
^orld of Pure Imagination." The weekend
include slide shows, speakers and discus-
3n groups centered around the theme. The
jnual Convention is being coordinated by
Council's Vice Presidents, Lawrence
imbert and Lisa Steinman.
[West Miami Post 223 Jewish War
jterans will present its third annual pro-
im honoring the four chaplains who gave
lives for others during World War II, at
[program Thursday, Feb. 26 at 8 p.m. at
;mple Beth Tov.
|The program will feature the following
?mbers of the clergy representing the four
^aplains: Father William Myhchrrest, Rev.
Mil Vogen, Dr. Richard Neal and Rabbi
lathan Bryn.
The Sisterhood at Temple Menorah will
Id a luncheon, card and game party at the
cial Hall Wednesday at noon.
Eastern Shores Lodge No. 2954 of B'nai
will present William F. Saulson speak-
on "Baubles, Bangles and Beads Soviet
yelry" at Eden Isles Condominium Mon-
ry at 7:30 p.m.
The next program and meeting of the Yid-
ih Vincle at Aventura Jewish Center will
Tuesday at 2 p.m. A Yiddish musical pro-
im will be presented and refreshments will
I served.
ielaine Lipinsky and Blanche Brass,
vn as Miami's First Drama Duet, will ap-
' in a program sponsored by Temple
Ba Sisterhood at the Temple on Wednes-
at 10:30 a.m.
The duo will present a dramatization of
The Two of Us," by French writer Claude
ftrri, depicting the relationship of an elderly
frenchman and a young Jewish boy.
(The Sinai-Hatikvah Unit of B'nai B'rith
Jll hold its next meeting on Wednesday at 1
|rn. in the Morton Towers Auditorium.
IThe chapter will hold a luncheon for the
pefit of the Anti-Defamation League on
irch 3 at noon in Morton Towers
estaurant.
Metro Dade Career Women's Chapter of
[ade South Region Women's American
ml is holding a dinner meeting at the Sea
nanty Restaurant in Coral Gables, on
Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. The featured speaker
is Noreen Chervinski.
Congregation Bet Breira announces the
fifth film of the Jewish Film Festival, "Lies
My Father Told Me," 7 p.m. March 1. The
March discussion leader is Dr Richard Rubin,
child and adolescent psychiatrist who will
speak on "Family Dynamics of the
Generations."
The New Wave Chapter of Women's
American ORT is having its Spring Lun-
cheon and Fashion Show on March 4 at 11:30
a.m. at The Hamptons. Fashions by Oxygene
and Mini Oxygene of Bal Harbour.
The South Dade Chapter of Women's
American ORT will meet at Sylvia Kirschen-
baum's home on Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. A
movie will be shown of the ORT schools in
Israel and its operations. Lunch will be
served.
The Abe Horrowitz Ladies Auxiliary 682,
Jewish War Veterans, will hold their next
breakfast meeting on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. at
NE 160th St. and 19th Place. At this meeting
the Auxiliary will hold election of officers for
the ensuing year.
"Side by Side by Sondheim," an award-
winning, internationally acclaimed collection
of excerpts from composer-lyricist Stephen
Sondheim's most brilliant works, will open
for public previews Feb. 24-26, and will have
a run at the Coconut Grove Playhouse from
Feb. 27-March 29.
The Miami City Ballet with artistic director
Edward Villella will give its third perfor-
mance of its premier season Feb. 20-22 at 8
p.m. with a matinee at 2 p.m. on Feb. 22 at
Gusman Center for the Performing Arts. The
program will include ballets choreographed
by George Balanchine.
The Delta Players will perform their cur-
rent play, "Milk and Honey," about a group
of Jewish widows during their trip to Israel,
throughout the month of March. The play,
directed by Seenie Hurwitz, will be held 2
&m. on March 1,15, and 29 at South Broward
igh School; 2 p.m. March 8 at Deerfield
Beach High School; 2 p.m. March 22 at Coral
Springs High School; and 2 p.m. March 11 at
the Konover Hotel.
Happenings
The next luncheon meeting of Tropical Cancer League will take
place Friday at 11 )- > a.m. at the Ocean Pavillion. Life members
will be saluted and receive a special gift. Entertainment will feature
international singer Adrian Dussault.
Simon Gray's theatrical comedy. "Stagestruck." the fourth of-
fering of Ruth Foreman Theatre's 1986-87 season, will play
through Mar 15. with matinee performances on Wednesday.
Thursday. Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. and evening perfor-
mances Wednesday through Sunday at 8 p.m.
The 42nd annual International Miami Orchid Show, featuring
more than half a million blooming plants in an exhibit titled "Or-
chids in Splendor'' will be at the Coconut Grove Exhibition Center
Friday through Sunday. The center will be open from 10 a.m. to
10 p.m. Feb. 27 and 28 and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday.
"Walk-a-miie for-a-child" is the theme of this years walk a-
thon and 5K run benefiting the National Jewish Center for Im-
munology and Respiratory Medicine last Sunday. Participants in
the opening ceremony included Congressman William Lehman,
state representatives Mike Friedmen and Michael Abrams. and
North Miami Beach Mayor Mariorie MacDonald.
On Monday evening, at Grove Isle, from 5-7 p.m.. Mid/Life
Services Foundation will celebrate its fifth anniversary by honor-
ing Saul and Dalia Glottmann. active community and business
leaders and supporters of the arts and cultural institutions for the
major role they played in the success of the Foundation.
Shaare Zedek Hospital South Florida Women's Committee will
meet Wednesday. Feb. 25. noon, at the Tower Suite Restaurant.
There will be a kosher lunch and a fashion show put on by Cugine
of the Caribbean Hotel.
The Mount Sinai Medical Center's Cancer Support Group in-
vites those suffering from cancer to join the group for emotional
support. The group meets regularly on the second and fourth
Wednesday of each month at 930 a.m. in the hospital's Radia-
tion Oncology Clinic on the first floor of the Blum Pavilion.
Robert Gale, MD. the U.S. physician who aided Russia in the
Chernobyl nuclear disaster will be one of many world known
physicians to speak at the Fourth Annual International Breast
Cancer Conference Mar. 12. 15. and 14. at the Hotel Inter-
continental Miami.
Advances in surgery'- radiation, chemotherapy and reconstruc-
tion will be among the topics of discussion during this year's
conference.
Dan Friedman and P.O. Sanchez, noted New York post-
modernist artists, will conduct a Visual Arts Workshop at the
Wolfson Campus of Miami-Dade Community College.
Friedman will present a two-hour slide lecture on post-
modernism on Monday, from noon to 2 p.m. in Room 1101 at the
Wolfson Campus. The lecture is free and open to the public.
The next meeting of the Alzheimer's Disease support group will
be held on Wednesday, at 1 p.m. in Mount Sinai Medical Center's
Chernin Auditorium. The free support group meets regularly on
the fourth Wednesday of each month. For more information,
please call the Center for Alzheimer's Disease and Memory
Disorders at Mount Sinai or the Alzheimer's Disease and Related
Disorders Association of Greater Miami.
Round Table Discussion
On U.S.-Cuba Relations
The University of Miami
presents a lunch and round table
discussion on U.S.-Cuba relations
on the occasion of the release of
Dr. Irving Louis Horowitz' book,
"Cuban Communism" at 12:30
p.m. at the Faculty Club. Dr.
Horowitz, professor of sociology
and political science at Rutgers
University will be presented
together with Dr. Edward Gon-
zales, professor of political science
at UCLA and a resident consul-
tant to the Rand Corporation and
Dr. Jaime Suchlicki, professor of
history and Director of the In-
stitute of Interamerican Studies
at the University of Miami.
Beth Jacob To Celebrate 65th Anniversary
Beth Jacob, to commemorate its
65th anniversary will issue a
"Journal of Memory" at a lun-
cheon on Mar. 15 at 1 p.m. at the
Shelborne Hotel. The guest
speaker will be Congressman
Dante Fascell.
The synagogue is trying to
reach former members, their
children, persons who were mar-
ried and Bar Mitzvahed at the
synagogue for a reunion at the
function.
Lupus Balloon Launch
One thousand balloons will fly
over South Florida on Saturday,
Feb. 28, 7:15 p.m. at Mark Light
Field at the University of Miami in
honor of the tenth year that the
Dade/Broward Lupus Foundation
has served the Lupus patients and
families in this area.
The launch will be followed by
the baseball game between the
University of Miami and the
University of Florida, and both
teams will participate in the
festivities.


V
J "I "*"
Genung-Mindlin
Engagement Told
The engagement of Miss Karen Olivia
Genung to Mr. Jeremy Isaac Mindlin is an-
nounced by Miss Genung's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. John P. Delaney Jr. of Bradenton, Fla.
The groom-to-be is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Leo Mindlin. of South Miami.
Miss Genung is a merchandising executive.
Mr. Mindlin is a graduate of Florida State
University and president of Diversified In-
vestment Consultants of Houson, Tex., and
Phoenix, Ariz.
The couple will be married on May 2 in
ceremonies at Congregation Beth Israel in
Houston, with Rabbi Mordechai Kaplan of-
ficiating. A reception will follow at the Grand
Hotel there.
Karen Olivia Genung: and Jeremy Isaac Mindlin
Amit Women
The Florida Council of Amit
Women's Cocktail Reception will
honor Cherish A Child con-
tributors who have either made or
pledged $600 and up.
The reception will be held at the
home of Presidium member Saun-
dra Rothenberg on Sunday,
March 1, at 1 p.m. Special guests
Marvin Leff, national executive
director and Chaim Ripple, prin-
cipal of the Junior High division of
Amit High in Safed, will be flying
in from New York.
Chai Chapter will hold a
"Bingo" night at the home of Bet-
ty Kaplan on Wednesday at 8 p.m.
There will be food and prizes.
Geula Chapter will hold their
monthly meeting on Wednesday
at 7:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome.
Migdal Chapter will hold a par-
ty for Rose Shapiro in honor of
her birthday on Wednesday at
noon at Forte Towers, Building
1000. A lunch will be served,
entertainment and door prizes will
be provided.
Shoahana Chapter will meet on
Sunday at noon at the Konover
Hotel to celebrate the birthday of
Rose Shapiro. The party will
feature a special luncheon, door
prizes and professional
entertainment.
Simcha Chapter will hold a
- celebration meeting in honor of
Rose Shapiro's birthday on Mon-
day at noon, at Winston Towers,
Building 200. Lunch will be serv-
ed, and their will be prizes and a
special program.
Marvin Leff
Dr. Winer To Speak
At YIVO Forum
YIVO Forum presents Dr. Ger-
shon Winer speaking on "Israel in
the Writings of A. Suskever.I.
Bashevis Singer and Chaim
Grade" at 1:15 p.m. Wednesday
at Temple Beth Sholom.
The YIVO Forum presents its
final lecture of 1987 with a special
program presented by Sender and
Mindelle Wajsman "Abraham
Raysin and Manie Leib in Song
and Verse," March 4 at 1:15 p.m.
at Temple Beth Sholom.
CONCORD-COLONIAL APTS.
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For Information, Please Call. 861-6306
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Hadassah
Events
Masada Chapter of Hadassah will
meet on Monday, at Adath
Yeshurun, at noon. The meeting
will be sponsored by Sunny and
Sol Buxbaum in honor of their
55th wedding anniversary. Pro-
gram chairperson Rose Model has
arranged a program to celebrate
Jewish Music Month, including
the singing of Greta Fleisig.
Reservations are also being
taken for the annual Purimshpeil,
to be held on Wednesday evening,
Mar. 18, at Beth Torah. The work-
ing cast will perform "Review and
Revue" in honor of Hadassah's
Diamond Jubilee. A kosher
gourmet dinner will be served
prior to the play.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be "tur-
ning on" to electrical and com-
puter art with neon, graphic and
lasers at the Miami Youth
Museum on Saturday at 8:30 p.m.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be hav-
ing their board meeting on Thurs-
day, Feb. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at the
house of Susan Penn. An Italian
dinner will be provided. Members
are welcome.
Don Soffer, developer and owner of Turnberry UU
Yacht and Country Club, will be honored by the Simon
Wiesenthal Center at its first annual Miami tribute
on Thursday evening, March 16. Keynote address for
the dinner, which will take place at the Turnberry
Country Club, will be given by Simon Wiesenthal, the
famous Nazi hunter. A member of the Simon Wiesen-
thal Center s Board of Trustees, Mr. Soffer has been a
long time supporter of many worthwhile organiza-
tions including the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
Mount Sinai Medical Center, the City of Hope,
Brandeis University and the Diabetes Research In-
stitute. The black tie affair will feature a special
tribute to liberators and survivors.
NASSAU GARDENS
1 Bedroom Adult Apt.
1495 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach
653-2217
ow...Bal Harbour
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facility ot the Sheraton loi Harbour on
.the teach With all the elegance and
mury only a Penthouse locotion with a
panoramic view ol the beoch ond
beautiful Sheraton fjai Harbour grounds
coutd possibly offer
All chrome Nautilus equipment
Aeroocs
Supervised personal instruction
life cycle machines
A luice bar
Joggma on the beach *
Use of Sheraton indoor ond outdoor
pools
leochtroni plus Penthouse sun deck
bathing lor men ond women
Sounas steam rooms, whirlpools
Manage *^
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Sot. & Sun. 10 A.M.-6 P.M.
for appointment coll 865 9990 or 865 9991


nday, February 20,
le Jewish r londian rap
Your 1987 tour
begins on February 24
For further details, call:
(Toll-free) 800-221-4694
(Dade) 305-576-4330
(Broward) 305-763-8177
(W. Palm Bch) 305-689-0258
If you can't make it on February 24, call
For your free 144-page World Travel Guide!
* Located on A1A between the Atlantic
and the Intracoastal Waterway, one
block from the Oiplomat.
American Jewish Congress, 420 Lincoln Road, Ste. 601, Miami Beach, FL. 33139
(The AJCongress International Travel Program Is a membership service of the American Jewish Congress).
-
vSiSv&S&s^sfe''''
.aHSii


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20^ 1987
j
-
Shoum are Mr. and Mrs. Meyer turning a shovel of earth, aided
by some of the Early Childhood students. Arlene Lasko, director
of the Synagogue's Early Childhood Program, all smiles, is in the
background.
Groundbreaking For Childhood
Education Center At Temple Sinai
The new Early Childhood Education Center at Temple
Sinai was underway with a groundbreaking ceremony last
month led by the congregation's president George J. Berlin
and its Rabbi, Ralph P. Kingsley.
The facility, which will have 13 classrooms and house
over 200 children from one to five years of age, was made
possible by a major gift from Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Meyers,
formerly of Chicago and now residents of North Miami
Beach and members of the synagogue.
Carmela Kalmanson, a Na-
tional Vice President and
Zionist Affairs Chairman of
Hadassah, the Women's
Zionist Organization of
America, has been elected
Chairman of the Executive
Committee of the American
Zionist Federation.
Rachelle Nelson
Continued from Page 5-B
vative movements, women have
begun to be viewed as being fuly
capable of doing everything in the
can to rate that a man can," adds
Nelson.
HAS NELSON experienced
any objection to her being a
woman cantor? "In the Reform
movement, I've had to deal very
little with the problems of being a
woman being considered ritual-
ly unclean or whatever. And as for
the new generation who come to
this congregation, they are used
to hearing a female voice
dovening."
There has been a turn about in
the ratio of women to men study-
ing to become cantors, according
to Nelson.
"At Hebrew Union College, the
incoming class is 99 percent
women. The decrease in men may
be due to the fact that being a can-
tor is not financially lucrative
enough for some men," she
remarks.
Yet Nelson, despite her ap-
proval of the increasing numbers
of women becoming rabbis and
cantors, does not feel that it is
necessary to change the service so
as to accommodate women by
the inclusion of the matriarchs,
for example.
"I PRETTY much like the
tradition," she says, "and have no
terrific hunger to hear the liturgy
said in both the masculine and
feminine."
"I have a strong sense of securi-
ty as a woman I don't need a
torch in my hand," adds Nelson,
who says that Rabbi Bernat has
great respect for women in
Judaism and puts in references to
them whenever possible and
appropriate.
At Temple Israel, Assistant
Rabbi Rex Perimeter is married to
the only woman rabbi in Miami,
Rachel Hertzman, who has a part-
time pulpit and will be doing a
seminar on "Women in the
Clergy" together with Cantor
Nelson.
"I think religion is taking a
wonderful turn for the better by
allowing women to function as
Jewish professionals," concludes
Nelson.
NELSON, who sings, plays
piano, flute and guitar, sat down
at the piano to play a piece which
she had written to the Mee
Chamocha, part of the liturgy
which comes from the Song of
Miriam.
Clear and full and rich, despite
the fact that she had not yet sung
that day, her voice gave a hint of
what the perfect recipe for a
fulfilling life tastes like when it's
finally made.
Cantor Nelson will be speaking
on "The Evolution of Jewish
Music: From Moses to Modernity"
at Temple Beth Sholom on Feb. 26
at 9:30 a.m. .
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Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
.. "And it came to pass on the third day, when it was morning
that there were thunders and lightnings and a thick cloud upon the
mount, and the voice of a horn exceeding loud"
(Exodus 19.16).
YITRO
YITRO Word reached Jethro, Moses' father-in-law, and a
priest of Midian, of what God had done for the Israelites. He went
to meet Moses in the desert, Jethro advised Moses to appoint
judges, in c-der to ease the burden of his sole leadership; Moses
should confine himself to the most difficult questions. In the third
month, the children of Israel heard the Ten Commandments at
Mount Sinai. God's voice declared: "I am the Lord by God
Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. Thou shalt not make un-
to thee a graven image Thou shalt not take the name of the
Lord thy God in vain Remember the sabbath day, to keep it
holy Honor thy father and thy mother Thou shalt not
murder Thou shalt not commit adultery Thou shalt not
steal Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor
. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house wife nor
any thing that is thy neighbor's (Exodus 20.2-W.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and Based
upon The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P Wollman
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at T> Mairton
Lane. New York, NY. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.) '
Community Corner
Coffee, Culture and Conversation Program will
feature guest speaker Arthur Lermer, who will discuss
"How Certain is the Future of a 'Certain' People" at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Beth Sholom.
Harmony Lodge B'nai B'rith will hold their Annual In-
stallation Dinner and Dance on Sunday at the Pythian
Hall, North Miami Beach, starting at 4:30 p.m.
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School
will be hosting its sixth annual Arts and Science Ex-
position on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the school's
Friedman-Uhlar Auditorium. Students at the Hillel
School will have hundreds of exhibits on display. These
will include science projects, artwork, and examples of
creative writing.
The South Florida Chug Aliyah Group will hold a
meeting on Mar. 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The guest speaker will be Dan
Krakow, regional director of the Israel Aliyah Center in
Philadelphia. He will address the "Western Absorption
of Olim."
Branch 679 of Workman's Circle will host a concert
featuring opera soprano Ginetta LaBianca and a dinner
beginning at 1 p.m. Sunday at the Seville Beach Hotel.
Rabbi Norman Lipson will speak on "An Analysis of
Jewish Humor" at the Florida Friends of Dropsie
Fellowship's Member Bring a Member luncheon Thurs-
day, Feb. 26 at noon at the Ocean Pavillion Restaurant.
The Young Israel Sisterhood of Greater Miami will
have its "Women of the Year" Luncheon on Sunday at
noon. The honorees are Beatrice Kutner and Hannah
Katz. There will also be a meeting on Wednesday at 8
p.m. Miriam Lehrfield will give a cooking demonstra-
tion and refreshments will be served.
The Beth David Early Childhood Center will present
Robin Stillwell, MA, LMFT, who will speak on "Dual
Career Families Perils and Payoffs" Wednesday at
7:30 p.m.
Registration has begun for organized T-Ball at the
South Dade Jewish Community Center. The 10-week
program, open to boys and girls ages 5-8, will meet for
practice on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 4:15 p.m. with
games played on Sunday mornings.
miami beach GENERAL CARE FOR FUNGUS NAILS miami beach
IDW. MICHAEL GREENFIELD]
^fr [Podiatrist Foot burgeon |
Lar Suwwv Available
p 1674 Meridian Avenue. Ste. 104
(Across from Sordine's)
Spo*. Mdleln
531-0414
WE ACCEPT MEDICARE ASSIGNMENTS
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Scott Adam Bloom
SCOTT BLOOM
Scott Adam Bloom son of Mr.
and Mrs. Stephen Bloom (Donna)
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, at 10:30
a.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Scott is a 7th grade student at
Nautilus Junior High School. He is
involved on year book staff and is
president elect of Jr. Chamber of
Commerce.
Scott has attended Temple
Emanu-El's Afternoon Religious
School for the past six years.
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Bloom
(Donna) will host a reception at
the Konover Hotel in honor of the
occasion.
Many friends and relatives will
attend to help celebrate the
simcha.
SHARON TANNENBAUM
Sharon Gail Tannenbaum,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Richard
Tannenbaum will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah on Saturday
at 9:30 a.m. at Bet Shira
Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in the
Bet Shira, Solomon Shcechter
religious school.
She attends Arvida Junior High
School where she is in the seventh
grade.
Dr. and Mrs. Tannenbaum will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion.
Special guests will include
grandmother Mrs. H.B. Garb;
grandparents Mr. and Mrs. J.
Spund; Mr. and Mrs. M. Tannen-
baum; Mr. and Mrs. Meyers; Bar-
bara Spund; Martin Spund; Miles
Spund; Mr. and Mrs. S. Spund;
great aunts Anne Spar and Helen
Meyer.
DEBORAH and DIANE NABAT
Deborah Gail and Diane Nicole
Nabat will be called to the Torah
as Bnot Mitzvah on Friday, at 8
p.m. at Temple Adath Yeshurun,
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive,
North Miami Beach Florida.
The celebrants are students in
the Hai Class of Adath Yeshurun
Religious School. They attend
Highland Oaks Junior High
School where they are in the 7th
grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Nabat will
host the Oneg Shabbat following
the service in honor of the
occasion.
Special Guests will include:
Grandparents Phyllis and Dave
Nabat, aunts and uncles Camila
and Fabio Silberman of Bogota,
Colombia, SA, and Carl and
Keven Stevens of Dallas, Texas.
Diabetes
Series
A six-week series of programs
that emphasize a personal ap-
proach to living with diabetes will
begin on Wednesday, Feb. 25 at
Baptist Hospital of Miami. The
classes will be held in the Diabetes
Care Center conference room
from 7:30-9:80 p.m.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlel ight Ing Time
5:59 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONQREQATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
531-2120
Dally 7:20 a.m. Atlamoon 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 9471435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. a 5 15 p.m.
Sat. A Sun. I a.m. ft 5:15 p.m.
Fri. 6 p.m
Snot Mitzvah Deborah and Diana Nabat.
Sat HO a.m. Birthday Shabbat
TEMPLE BETH AM
S9S0 N. Kendall Dr.
S Miami 867 6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Fri. 6:1 6 p.m. Rabbi Baumgard will apeak on
"Armafor Hoategaa Sat 11:15 a.m. aarv
Bar Mltzvahe Paul Sharp and Lawrenca Saw
ae ^^^ ^ aaWaLaaakak ua ** J --- a ni^.ib. >i
iiiiuii xnmmm a KsnQOOfn of rtiMcS.
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
U
Sat a.m. aerv. Mlneheh 6:05 p.m
Dairy Mlnyan held morning a evening
7 deye a vreak. Pleaaa call lot aohaduw.
r
W
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor. Joseph Krissei
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
656-6334
Sabbath Sarvlcaa 8:45 a.m.
Sat. S p.m.
rEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33161
6915506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Qorfinkel. (H6\
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
)
Fri 6 p.m
Sat Ba m
Weekday aerv. Mon.Fri. a.m.
Mon.'Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 6:30 a.m.
Fri. nlta: Hadaaaah evening lor
Bay Harbor S Ben Qurton.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. MB, FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Or. Jertuda Metber
Cantor Nlssim Benyemim
Dally aenrlcea 8 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Set. 8:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 A
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \'
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Dally aenrlcea: Sunday :30 a.m.
Mon.-Tuea. 1 Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Wad. 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 5M 7231
Chaae Ave. 6 41 at St. \ .*...
OR LEON KRONISH, FaunrJing Senior Rabbi
GARY A. OLrCKSTtlN, Rabbi
HARRY JOLT. AeaaHary Rabbi
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. Aaeretont Rebbi
CANTOR DAVIOCONVistR
Fri. 115 p.m. Rebbi ailckatain will apeak on
ThaSlgoeet 10 "Sunday 10*0 am Omnlbua
LecturerTet 10:46 Sal Mnzvari Bawl Ann Bfcjrnm
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or M. A Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dairy Servtcoe: Mon Fri 7:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m. .W<
Sat. 6:25 a.m. 6:15 p.m 8P '
Sun 8am 5pm jt
Late aerviea Fri. i p.m
Fit Bet Mattvoh Wnkiah Aitecheler. Sat Bar
Mrttvoh JeWery Potter B'nai B'rith Shabbat
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Baach
534-7213 534- 7214
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi f gN
Moshe Buryn. Cantor \WJ
Seug.0 Grobier. President
Snolem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Exacutiva Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 5 p.m.
Late Fri. eve eer. p.m
Dedicated to Young Singiee Dr. Lehrman will
preach on iarael Ra .lalted Another Look."
Cantor Shllman will chant Sat. 9 a.m.,
Dr. Lehrman will preach en the weekly
portion or the Bible. Bar Mitzvah Scott
Adam Bloom
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rebbi Solomon Schlff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mum/ i Piontui Rmlorm Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
M.6am
Downtown. Rebbi Rex 0. Perimeter "A Matter
el Treat" IMmmr. Harvey Kaufman, Camorlai
Bolalat Kendall: Rabbi HaefceW Bemat "ken-
acam. The Meed In Iarael." Liturgy: Cantor
RaohiMiF.Nilaon.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada BtvO
Coral Oabfee
Mfcheal B. Elaenetat,
Fri. 6:30 p.m.
SatS a.m.
867 5667
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvlcaa Fri. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 9 30 a.m.
Oneg Shabbat win lollow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
An Fridkis, Assoc. Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat 9 a.m. Sabbath service
Dally Mmchah Sunday Friday
8 a.m and 6 p.m.
Sal. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
%
TEMPLE NER TAMID 8681315
7B02 Carlyte Ave.. 666-6633
Miami Beech 33141
Rebbi Eugene LabovtU
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Sarvlcaa 8 a.m and 5:30 p.m.
Fri. late aarvlca 8 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Sat. 7 30 p.m let Annual Heart Ball
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
Nonh Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382 0898
Rabbi Hershel Becker Meetex ormooo.
Sat. 9-30 a.m. aenrice at
Tampla Samu-EI
9353 SW 152 Ave..
S. ol N. Kendall Or
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22 Ave
North Dado's Reform Congregetion
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Ba-bara S Ramsay. Administrator
Fit. early Shebbet aerv. p.m.
Regu lariy aohedulad Shabbat aerv. 6 p.m. Sat
tar BMttveh Jay Natkow.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTEK
6000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 ^
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi/ 'S>*l
Benjamin Adler, Cantor > *>'
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m Monday Thuraday
Sunday 6am 6:15 pm Fri Slaterhood
BliaBBaei.SatSaje.eecv.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, FebmaryjO^ 1987_
At the JNF Assembly:
U.S. Envoy Lauds
U.S.-Israel Relations
Susan Birnbaum is in Israel
to cover the Jewish National
Fund of America's Third Na-
tional Assembly.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
TEL AVIV (JTA) Thomas
Pickering, United States Am-
bassador to Israel, told the open-
ing convocation of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of America that
U.S.-Israel relations "couldn't be
better, and our capabilities to
withstand what always arises in
the relationship between two
countries as close as ours" sur-
mount the obstacles of 'the
Pollard case and what has come
up in the past year."
Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Sunshine Holidays at
4300 N.W. 136 Street, Opa-Locka.
Miami, Florida 33054 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Sunshine Holidays, Inc.
4300 N.W. 135 Street
Opa-Locka. Miami, Florida
Attorneys for Applicants
Steven D. Tishler. Esquire
8625 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33138
(305) 754-1001
14535 February 20. 27;
March 6, 13.1987
Traditional Jewish
funerals can
cost a lot less.
Find out how the graveside service
can bring down the cost of funerals
and still preserve (he best of Jewish
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including casket. Sponsors of the
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exreRNAL
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and Counselors
17020 W Dixie Hwy
N Miami Beach 331t>0
Dade 948-9900 Broward: 761-8800
South Florida and Out-of-State
Kenneth M Kav F D
Pickering arrived at the opening
ceremonies of the JNF Third Na-
tional Assembly in Israel, in the
community center of Neve Eliezer
in Tel Aviv's Hatikva quarter,
directly from the Ramat Aviv
airport.
There, he witnessed the arrival
of the first three F-16C fighter
jets, which he called "an indica-
tion of the renewed cooperation
between our countries" and the
"further strengthening of the
very significant strategic relation-
ship between Israel and the
United States."
He spoke of U.S. "commitment
to provide Israel with a qualitative
edge."
Pickering referred favorably to
the recent visit to Israel and the
Middle East by a senior
U.S.-government official
presumably Assistant Secretary
of State for Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs Richard Mur-
phy as an indication of strong
cooperation for the Middle East
peace process, which Pickering
called "second to nothing" among
American priorities.
Although "we have a way to
go," he said, it is possible to find
some acceptable Palestinian par-
ticipation "to come forward with
King Hussein." Pickering added
that he felt "cautiously
optimistic."
In the spheres of military and
defense cooperation between the
two countries and U.S. aid to
Israel, Pickering said that follow-
ing U.S. aid to Israel's military
security and her economic stabili-
ty, Israel has now taken "a
number of very difficult decisions
to bring its economy first into a
period of stability and
restructuring."
Israel, he said, is "now facing a
series of hard economic decisions,
taken after close consultations
with the U.S., to try to mold the
economy from what I call a
plateau of stability into an era of
economic growth."
This would not be easy, he said,
but he looked forward to the open-
ing of the capital market in Israel
to the private sector, the
privatization of public companies,
and the process of tax reform.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
5:12-2099
Peter Goldring
Passes
Peter Goldring of Miami Beach
passed away February 13. Mr.
Goldring had been a resident here
for the past 27 years.
He was President of Florida
Friends of Bar-Ilan University.
An active member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, former
member of Dade County Zoning
Appeals Board and former Presi-
dent of Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University.
He is survived by his wife,
Lydia; son, Kenneth, of Miami
Beach; two daughters, Joanne
(Dr. Gerald) Tepler of New York
City. Deborah (Judd) Zisquit of
North Miami Beach and four
grandchildren, Justin, Noah,
Atara and Johan.
Services were held. The
Riverside.
Sharansky
Named Golda
Meir Fellow
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Natan Sharansky (who has chang-
ed the spelling of his last name
from Shcharansky) was one of 35
scientists and scholars from
throughout the world and Israel
recently named Golda Meir
Fellows at the Hebrew Universi-
ty. Sharansky received the
fellowship award at the recent
third annual Golda Meir
Fellowship Awards Assembly.
Speaking on behalf of all of the
award recipients, Sharansky
described the great difference bet-
ween scientists in the Soviet
Union, who must sacrifice their
own convictions, and scientists in
democratic countries like Israel,
with freedom of expression.
SHARANSKY, a mathemati-
cian and computer scientist, will
devote the year of his fellowship
to his research and to work on his
memoirs. The resources of the
university's Marjorie May rock
Center for Soviet and East Euro-
pean Research will be made
available to him for his work.
The Golda Meir Fellowship pro-
gram was created as a living
memorial to the late Israeli Prime
Minister as a way of attracting
outstanding university graduates
and postgraduates from
throughout the world to pursue
research and study at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
Dr. Charles J. Glasser Pass
Dr. Charles J. Glasser, an elec-
trical engineer who was co-
inventor of the portable EKG,
died February 6 at Doctor's
Hospital after a long illness.
During World War II, Dr.
Glasser received the Army and
Navy Production E flag for his
service, the highest military
award bestowed on a civilian.
Until his most recent illness. Dr.
(1AM. Jaime, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert. .... .
ALTHEIMER, Herbert J.. of Miami Beach.
The Riverside.
BLl'STEIN. Irving W 68. of Miami.
February 10. Services were held. Inter-
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
KEYSER. Adolph. 91. of Miami, hebruary
11. Services were held Interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery- .
KATZ. Lillian. 73. of North Miami Beach.
Eternal Light .
SCHWARTZ. Rose, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert. .
STEINBERC. Ethel, of Miami Beach. .Ser-
vices in Pa. Kubin-Zilbert.
NEUMANN, Nina. 76. of Miami. February
12. The Riverside.
CORDOVA. Esther. 79. of Miami. February
14 Services were held.
KANNER. Artley. 83. of Miami Beach.
February 13. The Riverside
Sl'CHMAN. Rose, of Bay Harbor Island.
February 14 Services in New York The
Riverside.
BROWN. Helen S of Surfside. February
13. The Riverside.
CiARFINKEL. Ann of Miami. February 11.
The Riverside
SCHOCHET. Paula. (Polly) of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert.
es
Glasser was very activp in >
tional Parkins/n Fotn
organizat,on founded in 19 >
his mother, Jeanne u2*J
served as Chairman EmeriL*
the Board of Directors *""
He is survived bv tw .
Laurence Glasser. aiii3LA I
Seattle and Charles J.GlC1/1
manager of the rock groT^I
Trust" of New York City P 1 '
LAXER. Jack. 78. of Bav Hart u
LEAVrTtf. Dorothy I. Service, WdmS
LEFKOWITZ. Mort.mer ,Mortv) 7, J
Miami Shores, February II n
Riverside. l5 "*\
PRICE, Kathenne, 77 ,,f (or^ r...
February 14. The KmA, ^
YOUNGER. RuthS ,NinhBv,
February 13 The K,v.Td<. *
LEHNER. Michael Steven of Miami .
Rubin-Zilbert
PICKER. Irving. 96. of Mam, *-
February 11 ScrvtCCt in N>w V. I
Uvitt-Weinstein. "*l
MACKLER. Floren,-,- A M, f Biv hW
Islands. February 12 The Rivers*
WOLF. Ernestine. 71, of Miami. Frtran
11. Services were held
5RATZ. Harry. Februan 14. ServKaWi
in New York. The Riverside
LEIBOWITZ. Herman 88, f MiamiB*t
February 5. Services were held
DANZIGER. Felix, of Miami Beach Rd*
ZJbert.
MEDOW, (lenevieve Rymer of Kan,
Beach. February 16 Services held in | |
diana. The Riverside
2M>40 Greenfield Rd
Oak Park. Michigan 4H2:7
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Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
ForeclstHie>SaJes Public Notices
NOTICE OF SALE
RSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
F ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
iCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
fillNTV. FLORIDA
EBAL JURISDICTION
VISION
SE NO. 86-44687
DERAL NATIONAL MOR-
,AGE ASSOCIATION.
luted States corporation.
intiffls)
IIS ROJAS. et al.
IOWE"l8 HEREBY GIVEN
suanl to an Order or Final
^..nt entered in this case
. pending in said Court, the
L|f of which is indicated above. I
hi M|| to the highest and best
Bder for cash on the TWENTY
HIRD FLOOR of the Dade
buntv Courthouse in Miami.
Li,. County. Florida at 11:00
Em A.M., on the 6th day of
,rch. 1987. the following
ribed property:
403 of THE HOMES OF
?ST FLAGLER ESTATES, a
.ndominium. according to the
fcclaration of Condominium
reof. as recorded on January 9,
B5, in Official Records Book
377. at page 1520, of the Public
ordi of Dade County. Florida.
ider Clerk's File No.
|r "7487, as subsequently
idified and amended.
DATED the 18th day of
bruary. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
krcuit Court Seal)
T by V Clark
Deputy Clerk
;ornev for Plaintiff
(rid K Webster
icnthal and Yarchin
I
tyne Blvd.
in,:. FL 33187
IbliHhed 2/20-27
NOTICE OF SALE
[RSI ANT TO CHAPTER 45
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
|e ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
RCLTT. IN AND FOR DADE
,1'NTY. FLORIDA
(NERAL JURISDICTION
VISION
SE NO. 86-46019
,: 22
fOCKTON. WHATLEY,
pVIN A COMPANY, a Honda
oration,
Untiffts)
vs.
IWRENCE HOLLAND, et al.
]fendant(s)
JIOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
suant to an Order or Final
nent entered in this case
pending in said Court, the
fie of which is indicated above, I
sell to the highest and best
der for cash on the TWENTY
(IRD FLOOR of the Dade
unty Courthouse in Miami,
de County, Florida at 11:00
tfock A.M.. on the 6th day of
rch. 1987. the following
cribed property:
3, in Block 24, of COUN-
|tY LAKE MANORS SECTION
iREE, according to the Plat
ereof. as recorded in Plat Book
at Page 50, of the Public
cords of Dade County, Florida.
United States of America
ill have the right of redemption
ovided by 28 U.S.C. Sec.
flOfc) for the period provided
erein, running from the date of
Certificate of Title issued
DATED the 18th day of
bruary, lt87.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circait Cort
wit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
orney for Plaintiff
vid R. Webster
enthal and Yarchin
lite 800
I Biscayne Blvd.
. FL 33137
nbliihed 2/20-27
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Ui THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-41659
SEC. 11
AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK.
FSB f/k/a FRANKLIN SAVINGS
BANK OF NEW YORK f/k/a
KINGS HIGHWAY SAVINGS
BANK.
Plaintiffts)
vs.
GUY W. HERRERA. et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 13th day of March. 1987. the
following described property:
Beginning at a point on the West
line 110 feet North of the
Southwest corner of Tract 88. of
REVISED PLAT OF VENETIAN
GARDENS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
31, at Page 37, of the Public
Records of Dade County, running
thence Easterly and parallel with
the South line of said Tract 88.
107.41 feet, thence Northerly and
parallel with the West line of said
Tract 88. 74.99 feet, thence
Westerly and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 88, 107.41
feet to the West line of said Tract
88. thence Southerly along the
West line of said Tract 88. 74.99
feet to the Point of Beginning.
Also described as: Lots 6 and 7. in
Block 88. of VENETIAN-
GARDENS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
17, at Page 37, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 18th day of
February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
David R. Webster
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 2/20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
in business under the fie
pous name R 4 S INSURANCE
. 2291 N.W. 28th Street.
n>. Fl 33142 intends to
nster said name with the Clerk
I the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
i Florida.
WIN INSURANCE CENTER.
INC.
CAR R SANTANA. President
February 20,27;
March 6. 13.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-04724 FC04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FREDDY PACHECO
Petitioner
and
MARGARITA ENRIQUEZ
PACHECO
Respondent
TO: MARGARITA ENRIQUEZ
PACHECO
Resident and address
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on Mark
J. Friedman, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 350 Lin-
coln Rd.. Suite 422 Miami Beach,
Fl. 33189, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 20,1987; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARK J. FRIEDMAN
Attorney at Law
350 Lincoln Road. Suite 422
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone: 305-532-5409
Attorney for Petitioner
14523 February 20, 27:
March 6, 13, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-34457
SEC. 06
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. a
United States corporation,
Plaintiffts)
vs.
JEROLD K. FORD. DEIRDRE
A. FORD, and the unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against them.
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuan' to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Dade County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M., on the 6th day of
March. 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 11. in Block 14, ofHEFTLER
HOMES SECTION ONE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as record-
ed in Plat Book 65, at Page 149,
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
DATED the 18th day of
February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
David R. Webster
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscavne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 2/20-27
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-36678
SEC. 28
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffts)
vs.
SONIA JOSHUA, and the
unknown spouse, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Dade County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M.. on the 6th day of
March, 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 13, Block 2. DIXIE
GARDENS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
44. at Page 30. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 18th day of
February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
David R. Webster
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 2/20-27
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JESSPORT at 1035
East 31 Street, Hialeah. Florida
33013 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
/$/ STEVEN SIEGLER
Secretary/Treasurer
NUMBER ONE STORE. INC.
JOSHUA D. BASH. ESQ.
Attorney for
NUMBER ONE STORE. INC.
1926 Hollywood Blvd
Suite 228
Hollywood. FL 33020
305-940-1200/922-1400
14527 February 20, 27;
March 6. 13.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-42864
SEC. 10
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiffts)
vs.
ARNOLD O. LEEDS, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami.
Dade County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M., on the 6th day of
March. 1987, the following
described property:
Lot 5. in Block 6. of CUTLER
CREEK CLUB SECTION ONE.
according ot the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 114, at
Page 30. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 18th day of
February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
David R. Webster
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 2/20-27
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-50138 CA-22
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
APPLE BANK FOR
SAVINGS, f/k/a CENTRAL
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
DONALD L. WOLLARD.
JR., individually and
as trustee, et al..
Defendants.
TO: DONALD L. WOLLARD.
JR., individually and as trustee
263 N.E. 8th Street
Homestead, Florida 33030
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lots 16, 17 and 18. Block 11,
SOUTH MIAMI HEIGHTS
SECTION "E," according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 23, Page 74, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 27, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 23rd day of
January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
13474 January 30;
February 6,13,20,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO: 87-3586
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN DULAND GILBERT,
Petitioner,
vs.
JANICE JEAN GILBERT,
Respondent.
TO: JANICE JEAN
GILBERT
Residence unknown
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida.
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before March 6, 1987
otherwise a default will be entered.
January 27, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M. Gendrftn
13487 JMWnry 30;
February 6, 13,20, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 86-55161 FC 22
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SANTOS PEREZ
Petitioner,
and
PAULA L. PEREZ, a/k/a
PAULA L. BARROSO
Respondent.
TO: PAULA L. PEREZ, a/k/a
PAULA L. BARROSO
Calle 80 No. 6506
Guanajay. Provincia La
llahana.
Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it. on CARLOS
M. MENDEZ. ESQ. Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 200
West 49th Street Hialeah. Florida
33012. and file the original with
the Clerk of the styled Court on or
before March 20. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive week in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami, Florida, on
this 10 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade Countv, Florida
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ.
LAW OFFICES
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33012
By: Carlos Mendez
Attorney for Petitioner
14517 February 13.20. 27;
March 6.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TOLL FREE at
13170 N.W. 43rd Avenue, Opa-
Locka. Florida 33055 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
JERRY SUE FASHIONS, INC.
13170 NW 43rd Ave.
Opa-Locka. Fl. 33055
HARVEY D. ROGERS. ESQ.
Attorney for
JERRY SUE FASHIONS. INC.
14521 February 20,27;
March 6,13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 780
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID BUTTERMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DAVID BUTTERMAN. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-780. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33103. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate arid (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 20, 1987.
Personal Representative:
RHODA RUBIN
17-08 Bellair Avenue
Fairlawn, New Jersey 07410
ARNOLD SLOTKIN. C.P.A.
300 71st Street. Suite 600
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN, ESQ.
CYPEN &CYPEN
P.O. BOX 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
14524 February 20, 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FO
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 774
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DONALD ARONOW.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of DONALD
ARONOW. deceased. File Number
87-774. is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The Co
Personal Representatives of the
.state are LILLIAN ARONOW
and MURRAY B. WEIL, JR..
whose address is c/o M.B. WEIL,
JR. ESQ.. 166679th St.
Causeway, Suite 608, Miami
Beach, FL 33141. The name and
address of the personal represen
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
February 20. 1987.
LILLIAN ARONOW and
MURRAY B. WEIL. JR.
As Co-Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
DONALD ARONOW
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666-79th Street Causeway,
Suite 608
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
14520 February 20. 27.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No.: 87-04637-17
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MAXIMENA MILLER DAWSON
and
AUGUSTA DAWSON
TO: Augusta Dawson
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
Ave.. Miami, Fla. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
court on or before March 6, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated in Miami on February 2,
1987.
RICHARD BRINKER, Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13498 February 6, 13, 20.27, 1987


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 20, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-01248 PC 16
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LYDIA SHAKAROV.
Petitioner
v.
AVNER SHAKAROV.
Respondent
TO: AVNER SHAKAROV
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on USHER
BRYN. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2301 Col-
lins Ave.. Suite M-8. Miami Beach.
Fl. 33139. (305) 532-1155. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 6. 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Victor M. Borrero
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner: ,
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
2301 Collins Ave., M-8
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
13485 January 30;
February 6,13, 20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 87-03713 FCU
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LOUIS JOSEPH
Petitioner/Husband
and
DIANNA MAWOR JOSEPH
Respondent/Wife
TO: DIANNA MATNOR JOSEPH
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
DOUGLAS D. STRATTON, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 505 Lincoln Rd. Miami
Beach FL 33139, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March 6,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DOUGLAS D. STRATTON
505 Lincoln Rd.
Miami Beach, FL 33139
672-7772
Attorney for Petitioner
13499 February 6. 13, 20. 27, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-06846-12
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ABEL BARONVILLE,
Petitioner,
and
PRISCILLA BARONVILLE,
Respondent.
TO: PRISCILLA BARONVILLE,
~- Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before March 27. 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
' V RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14534 February 20.27;
March 6 13. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Case No. 86-53083 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
VIRGINIA WOOD, et al..
Defendants.
TO: VIRGINIA WOOD
275 Linden Blvd.
No. D-17
Brooklyn. New York 11226
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Unit 203 of
ORDUNA COURT CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, recorded
in Official Records Book
11527. Page 1417. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
March 13, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 3 day of
February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14504 February 6. 13.20.27. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-48051-22
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MICHELLE L. ZAKKOUT.
Petitioner/Wife,
and MAZEN A. ZAKKOUT,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: MAZEN A. ZAKKOUT
Present Residence: Unknown
Last mailing address:
Safat
P.O. Box 1188
KUWAIT
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
ROBERT 0. SCHWARZ, ESQ.,
of. MARKUS & WINTER. PA.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2251 S.W. 22nd St..
Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March 6,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of February. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARKUS & WINTER, P.A.
2251 S.W. 22nd St.
Miami, Fla. 33145
Telephone: 856-6910
ROBERT 0. SCHWARZ. ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
14500 February 6, 13. 20.
27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Home Library at
244 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33132 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
# Bank Marketing, Inc.
244 Biscayne Boulevard
Second Floor,
Miami, Florida 33132
13476 January 30;
February 6. 13, 20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 622
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER T. RUBIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
FLA BAR No. 205540
The administration of the estate
of ESTHER T. RUBIN, deceased.
File Number 87-622, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
St., Miami Florida. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 13. 1987.
Personal Representative:
ELEANOR R. CRISTOL
244 South Coconut Lane
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
WAYNE A. CYPEN. ESQ.
CYPEN & CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
14511 February 13. 20. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that thj undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions of
Hammocks, Inc. at 3315 NW 7 St.
Miami Fla. 33125 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Manuel Lacayo. Jr.
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami. Fl. 33173
13491 Februarv6. 13.20,27, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-3586-17
IN RE: The Marriage of
JEAN DULAND GILBERT,
Petitioner
vs.
JANICE JEAN GILBERT.
Respondent
TO: JANICE JEAN GILBERT
Residence Unknown
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 NW. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida, 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before March 6, 1987, otherwise a
default will be entered.
January 27. 1987.
RICHAD BRINKER
By: M. GENDRON
13494 February 6. 13. 20.27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-6322
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAE SPIES
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MAE SPIES, deceased. File
Number 86-6322. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Courthouse, 73
West Flagler Street, Miami. Dade
County. Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
Al) interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice ha?
begun February 13. 1987.
Personal Representative:
PATRICIA RUSSELL
1811 N.E. 114th Street No. 1403
Miami, Florida 33181
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN STARR
9703 South Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33156-2812
14518 February 13, 20. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Apple's Drywall
Spraying Specialists at 1880 Sea
Grape Avenue. Pembroke Pines,
Fl. 33026 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Amy Espinola
Owner
14513 February 13, 20. 27;
March 6, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Jesus Torres D/B/A
Torres Construction at 100 SW
110 Ave No. 130 Miami, Fl 33174
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Jesus Torres
14505 February 6.13, 20, 27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-705
Division (03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FERNAND S. CANTER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of Fernand S.
Canter, deceased, File Number
87-705(03), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33131. The
personal representative of the
estate is Stanley C. Myers, whose
address is 1428 Bricket) Avenue.
Suite 700, Miami. Florida 33131.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
February 20. 1987.
Stanley C. Myers
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Fernand S. Canter
. Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Kathleen Markey. Esq.
Myers. Kenin. Levinson &
Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 371-9041
14522 February 20. 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-620
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
STANLEY SILVERN
a/k/a SAMUEL S. SILVERN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of STANLEY SILVERN, a/k/a
SAMUEL S. SILVERN, deceased,
File Number 87-520, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Prolate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 20. 1987.
Personal Representative:
LOIS WOLPERT
29356 Laro Drive
Agoura Hills. California 91301
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBLT. GALBUT. A MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
14525 February 20. 27, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA Us'
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-36146 CA-27
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
VALLEY NATIONAL
BANK OF ARIZONA.
Plaintiff
vs.
SISTER DONUT. INC..
et al..
Defendants.
TO: THE FRYDENBURG
CORPORATION, a dissolved
Florida corporation
HORSE WORLD. INC.. a
dissolved Florida corporation
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 3. Block 2. PANACHE,
SECTION 1. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 126. Page 37. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
March 20. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 13 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
14526 February 20. 27;
March 6. 13, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-03256 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
RIGAUD FRANCOIS.
Petitioner,
and
CAROLYN L. FRANCOIS.
Respondent.
TO: CAROLYN FRANCOIS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27, 1987, other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 26. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13481 January 30;
February 6. 13. 20. 1987
and
GWENDOLYN D. FENFi/*,
Respondent EL0N
TO: GWENDOLYN D
FENELON.
Residence unknown, you _
serve copy of your a*. *|l
Petitioner GSM
nage upon GEORGE NlCHo/??
Attorney. 612 NorE "
Ave.. Miami. Florid!^*
file original with Court CIpH, I
before March 27. IwIfiH
default will be enteredI **''
February 17. lyx?
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T Casamavor
March6,l3,ijjj|
ELEVENTH CIRCUITCOIB
DADE COUNTY. FLORlf1
CA8E NO: 8746852 (3i,
IN RE: The Marriage of.
FRITZ ANNEAS.
Petitioner,
and
MARY H. ANNEAS.
Respondent
TO: MARY H ANNEAS,
Residence unknown, you M
serve copy of your Answer to 4
Petition for Dissolution of lb.
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney. 612 Northwest 31
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136 mrt
file original with Court Clerk out,
before March 27. la87;othenrS(1
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T Casamayor
14531 February 20, It,
March 613, mi
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COW
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-06848-14
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ESTHER REFUSE COQMARD.
Petitioner,
and
JOSEPH JURIGNY COQMARD,
Respondent.
TO: JOSEPH JURIGNY
COQMARD.
Residence unknown, you sisll
serve copy of your Answer to tie J
Petition for Dissolution of H*f
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest lit
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136, m
file original with Court Clerk cat I
before March 27. 1987; otherviii |
default will be entered.
February 17, 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14530 February 20. t: I
March 613.1*
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COM
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-06851-15
IN RE: The Mamage of:
SYLVANA ROBERTSON.
Petitioner,
and
JEROME ROBERTSON.
Respondent
TO: JEROME ROBERTSON.
Residence unknown, you *
serve copy of your Answer to
Petition for Dissoluuon of a*
nage upon GEORCE NICHOLAS
Attorney. 612 Northwest 13
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33I.
file original with Court Cleric**
before March 27, 1987; other*"
default wiU be entered
February 17. 1987
RICHARD BRISKER
BY: T. Casamayor
14532 Fet,7^,,*
March 6131*
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COjn
DADE COUNTY. FL0RIW
CASENO:87-0684>
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JULIO MONDELUS.
Petitioner,
NADJA R. MONDELl'S.
Respondent.
TO: NADJA R. MONDELU^
Residence unknown, you
serve copy of your Answe
Petition for ^"X-H0U
nage upon GEORGE NK"fl
AXney, 612 N*&5
Ave.. Miami, rhndj-gfj
fUeorigiiialwithtourtCW" (
beforeMarch27, 1987 other-
default will be entered.
February 17. 19*7 FR
RICHARD BRINK*"
BY: T. Casamayor ^
KcS&l


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, February 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Ifventh circuit court
r*de county, Florida
I CASE NO: 87-06832-23
IrE The Marriage of:
AN ROBERT SEVERE,
fetitioner,
IALDA LORAINE SEVERE.
.'^ONALDA LORAINE
VERE. Residence unknown,
. shall serve copy of your
Ler to the Petition for Dissolu
I of Marriage upon GEORGE
iHOLAS, Attorrey. 612 Nor-
Lest 12th Ave.. Miami. Florida.
Ts6 and file original with Court
k on or before March 20. 1987.
trwise a default will be entered.
february 10. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY C.P COPELAND
|.q February 13. 20, 27;
March 6. 1987
notice under
.ctitious name law
dtice is hereby given
.he undersigned, desiring to
,ge in business under the fic-
us name Sound Design at 1943
148 St. No. Miami FL 33181
.ds to register said name with
["lerk of the Circuit Court of
County. Florida.
Rudv Tones Inc.
1943 NE 148 St.
No Miami. FL 33181
| February 13. 20. 27;
March 6. 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
RSI-ANT TO CHAPTER 45
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
. ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
..r. FLORIDA
HERAL JURISDICTION
BOON
! NO. 86-31243
.20
)CKTON. WHATLEY.
IN A COMPANY, a Florida
oration,
btifffs)
|x LEON, et al.
nKs)
I-ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
nt to an Order or Final
nent entered in this case
[pending in said Court, the
! of which is indicated above, I
II to the highest and best
for cash on the TWENTY
FLOOR of the Dade
nty Courthouse in Miami,
County. Florida at 11:00
ck A.M.. on the 27th day of
v, 1987, the following
ribed property:
in Block 22. of KINGS
JENS SECTION THREE.
ding to the Plat thereof, as
ded in Plat Book 95. at Page
bf the Public Records of Dade
pty. Florida.
DATED the Uth day of
uarv. 1987.
IICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
cuit Court Seal)
ky V Clark
Deputy Clerk
brnev for Plaintiff
Yarchin
fcnthal and Yarchin
NIMI
Biscayne Blvd.
m. Florida 88187
llished 2 13-20
NOTICE UNDER
PCTITIOUS NAME LAW
TICK IS HEREBY GIVEN
undersigned, desiring to
Re in liusiness under the fic-
fc> name of ELEVENTH U.S.
^lCIAl. MANAGEMENT
d/ba U.S. MANAGE-
Tat 12490 NE. 7th Avenue.
Miami. FL intends to
per said name with the Clerk
f Circuit Court of Dade Coun
Porida
LESLIE RATTET
|A. Schmitt
Jmey for Eleventh Judicial
igement Corp.. d/b/a U.S.
ement
February 13.20. 27;
March 6, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-03254 30
IN RE: The Marriage of
JAIME SANDOVAL,
Petitioner/Husband,
vs.
ANA C. CASTRO-SANDOVAL.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ANA C. CASTRO
SANDOVAL
5 Calle. 236 Zona No. 7, Colonia
Jardenas
San Juan
Guatemala, Central America
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27, 1987, other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 26. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
13479 January 30;
February 6. 13. 20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-696
Diviaion 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SARAH GARNET.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of SARAH
GARNET, deceased. File Number
87-6%. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Diviaion, the address of
which is 78 West Flagier Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Julia V. Moore, whose address is
11011 S.W. 112th Court, Miami,
Florida S3186.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the deric of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedenfs will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
February 13. 1987.
JULIA V. MOORE
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Sarah Garnet
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SILVER & SILVER
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
By: MAX R. SILVER
14510 February 13, 20, 1987
nJ?"CE UNDER
FIUTIOUS NAME LAW
F'CE IS HEREBY GIVEN
we undersigned, desiring to
* in business under the fic-
f name PS. Consultants at
Hiscayne Boulevard, Suite
*mi. Florida 33181 intend
fler said name with the
of the Crcuit Court of Dade
flty. Florida.
Pat Skubish
Sole Owner
" rehmary6, 13,20.27. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Car Stereo at
3930 SW 8 St. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Mobil Security Systems Inc.
3930 SW 8 St.
Miami S81S4
14516 February 13. 20, 27;
March 6, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-26996
SEC. 09
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
JAMES R. KUKAR and -
KUKAR, his wife, if married, et
al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Dade County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M., on the 27th day of
February. 1987. the following
described property:
Unit 2986, described as
follows:
COMMENCE at the intersection
of the Northerly Right-of-Way line
of Bird Avenue and the Westerly
Right-of-Way line of Mary Street;
thence due West along said Bird
Avenue a distance of 62.17 feet to
a point; thence due North depar-
ting said Bird Avenue a distance
of 45.67 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING: thence due West a
distance of 62.00 feet to a point;
thence due North a distance of
14.00 feet to a point; thence due
East a distance of 62.00 feet to a
point; thence due South a distance
of 14.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.
TOGETHER with the exclusive
use of Parking Space P2986
located in the Common Area, and
which exclusive use shall be con-
tinuous and run with the land
described in Unit 2986.
The West 18.00 feet of the
aforesaid real property is subject
to easements for the installation,
use and maintenance of utilities.
The aforesaid real property being a
subdivision of:
PARENT TRACT, described as
follows:
Lots 14. 16. 16 and 17 of
CHARLES M. MUNDY'S SUB
DIVISION, as recorded in Plat
Book 3 at Page 16 among the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT the
South 20.00 feet of Lota 14. 16.
16 and 17. and the East 6.6 feet of
Lot 14, lying and being in Section
16, Township 54 South, Range 41
East, Dade County. Florida, being
more particularly described as
follows:
BEGINNING at the intersection
of the Northerly Right-of-Way line
of Bird Avenue and the Westerly
Right-of-Way line of Mary Street;
thence due West along said Nor-
therly line of Bird Avenue a
distance of 194.50 feet to a point;
thence N 00 degrees 12'45" W
departing said Bird Avenue a
distance of 130.00 feet to a point;
thence due East a distance of
194.50 feet to a point on the
aforementioned Westerly Right-
of-Way line of Mary Street: thence
S 00 degrees 12"45" E along said
Mary Street a distance of 130.00
feet to the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.
DATED the 11th day of
February'. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Published 2/13-20
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-03255 05
IN RE: The Marriage of:
EXALEME POLIMUS.
Petitioner,
and
VALERIE DENISE POLIMUS.
Respondent.
TO: VALERIE DENISE
POLIMUS, residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
Uon of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor
tiiwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before February 27,
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered.
January 26. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13480 January 30;
February 6. 13.20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-30084 (CA 03)
NOTICE OF ACTION
EDGAR LEWIS, Trustee.
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD FLETCHER, a single
man,
et al.,
Defendants.
TO: WEST ENTERPRISES,
LTD., a British Virgin Islands
corporation
Peat. Marwick. Mitchell and Co.
Bank of Nova Scotia Building
P.O. Box 438
Wickams Cay
Road Town, Tortola
British Virgin Islands
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 1. in Block 2, of
RIDGELINE ESTATES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 50, at
Page 97. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith. Mack. Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33132. on or before
February 27. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 22nd day of
January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13473 January 30;
February 6.13,20.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 87-02898 (18)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff.
vs.
LADY REYES DE IZURIETA
and AUGUSTO SHAKSPEARE
IZURIETA VALDIVIESO. her
husband, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: LADY REYES DE
IZURIETA and AUGUSTO
SHAKSPEARE IZURIETA
VALDIVIESO. her husband.
Calle Cuarta
Numero 610
Eficus, Urdesa
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit 401 of
Building 9110 of THE
PARKSIDE CON-
DOMINIUM NO. 1 according
to the Declaration of Con-
dominium as recorded in Of-
ficial records Book 9104.
Page 80, and in Con-
dominium plan Book 46, Page
24 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
together with the Mortagor's
undivided share in the com-
mon elements appurtenant
thereto. Together with the
parking space assigned to
said unit,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132. on or before
February 27, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the -22 day of
January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. Casamayor
Deputy Clerk
13472 January 30;
February 6.13.20.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-02038 FC30
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SANTORO
and
ROSE SANTORO, a/k/a
ROSE MARIE SANTORO.
584 E 89th Street
Brooklyn. N.Y.. NY.
TO: ROSE SANTORO a/k/a
ROSE MARIE SANTORO
584 E 89th Street
Brooklyn. N.Y., N.Y.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Edwin
A. Willinger, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is Suite 209
Lincoln-Drexel Bldg., 1655 Drexel
Ave., Miami Beach. FLA 33139.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 27, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWIN A. WILLINGER
Suite 209 Lincoln-Drexel Building
1666 Drexel Ave.
Miami Beach. FLA 33139
Attorney for Pettioner
Telephone: 538-6756
13484 January 30;
February 6,13.20.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-03647 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
Fl Bar 368016
In re the marriage of
EUNICE C. BODDEN
Petitioner
and
THEOPHLLIUS E. BODDEN
Respondent
TO: THEOPHLLIUS E.
BODDEN
Lakeside Park,
Discovery Bay P.O.,
St. Ann. Jamaica. W.I.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before March 6, 1987 and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
13486 January 30;
February 6, 13,20. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name King George Apart
ments at 1101 Marseilles Drive,
Miami Beach. Fla. 33141 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Jorge Torrecillas
Migdalia Torrecillas
Owners
Paul Kwitney, PA.
Kwitney Kroop & Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Attorneys for
King George Apartments
14512 February 13, 20,27;
March 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of CLARIVEL FUR-
NITURE at 3296-98 N.W. 31st
Street, Miami, Dade, FL 33142 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
YARUBA FURNITURE, INC.
By: Juan Luis Pedroso, President
13497 February 6, 13, 20, 27, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Odissey for Girls at
2881 S.W. 117 Ave. Miami. Fl.
33166 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Duke Vilches
13490 February 6, 13, 20, 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-41757 CA 22
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE WESTERN AND
SOUTHERN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY, an
Ohio corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
ALPHONSO NORRIS.
JEANETTE P. NORRIS. DR.
THOMAS J. CAHILL. JR., and
the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by.
through, under or against him.
BAPTIST HOSPITAL OF
MIAMI. INC., a Florida non-
profit corporation. STANLEY
DAVIDSON, as Trustee for
DAVIDSON LUMBER
COMPANY, a dissolved Florida
corporation, BENNIE M.
BRAKE, and LAURA L.
BRAKE.
Defendants.
To: Dr. Thomas J. Cahill. Jr.,
whose residence is 2300
Nacogooches, Apartment 249-L,
San Antonio, Texas 78209.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 16, in Block 66, of
SEVENTH ADDITION TO
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 94, at Page 29, of
the Public Records of Dade
county, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami.
Florida 83187, on or before
February 27. 1987. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on January 26, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13482 January 30;
February 6. 13,20. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-00237 FC31
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEONARD MALCOLM,
Petitioner
and
DOREEN MALCOLM.
Respondent.
TO: DOREEN MALCOLM
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road
Suite 309 Miami Beach. FL 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 27, 1987; other
wise a deafult will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
13483 January 30;
February 6, 13,20. 1987


.

Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday^ February 20, 1987
Hammer Shares Details Of Goldfarb
Release With 800 Guests At Bar-Han
LOS ANGELES Ar-
mand Hammer has revealed
hitherto undisclosed details
of his role in effecting the
release of Dr. and Mrs.
David Goldfarb from the
Soviet Union in an address
to supporters of Israel's
Bar-nan University here.
The industrialist and philan-
thropist, who chaired the annual
dinner of the West Coast Friends
of Bar-Ilan, explained how, while
discussing trade matters with
Soviet officials in Moscow during
the Reykjavik summit, he had met
with Anatoly Dobrynin, the
USSR's former Ambassador to
the United States, now Secretary
of the Communist Party's Central
Committee.
"I want to take David Goldfarb
back to the United States with
me," he told Dobrynin.
DOBRYNIN RESPONDED,
"That's impossible. Matters of
this kind take a great amount of
time to decide."
But Armand Hammer was per-
sistent in his demands. "You've
known me for 25 years, and you
know that I'm accustomed to do-
ing the impossible," he told the
Soviet official. "Why don't you
try?"
A few hours later Dobrynin call-
ed and said, "Permission has been
granted, providing Dr. Goldfarb
wants to go, and his doctors think
he is well enough to travel."
Dr. Hammer immediately drove
to the Vishensky Institute for
Probe Of Israelis
Who Gave
Interviews To
Jordan Television
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
'Premier Yitzhak Shamir
said Wednesday (Feb. 11)
that he would order an in-
vestigation into interviews
given last week by four
Israelis to Jordan Televi-
sion. Two are Knesset
members, Abba Eban and
Yossi Sarid.
Shamir told a meeting of
Cabinet Ministers that the in-
vestigation would find out
whether Jordan Television has a
representative in Israel and if
Israelis who appear on Jordan
Television are contravening the
law.
EBAN, a former Labor Foreign
Minister and currently chairman
of the Knesset's Foreign Affairs
and Security Committee, has been
accused by rightwing and na-
tionalist activists of "consorting
with the enemy." He was inter-
viewed Monday (Feb. 9) for the
Hebrew-language news service of
Amman Television by an Arab
journalist from Haifa. The inter-
view will be broadcast next week.
It was conducted at the King
David Hotel in Jerusalem because
the journalist was not allowed into
the Knesset building. Eban told
Israel Radio Wednesday that he
thought it was important for Jor-
danian viewers to learn of Israel's
official viewpoint on current
issues, as well as those of the op-
position. Sarid, of the Citizens
Rights Movement (CRM), is an op-
position MK.
Surgery where Dr. Goldfarb, who
had lost a leg at the Battle of Stal-
ingrad during World War II and
was suffering from gangrene in
the other, was confined to an in-
tensive care unit. "Dr. Goldfarb,
I've come to take you to the
United States tomorrow. Are you
ready to
words.
go?" where his first
THE LONGTIME refusenik's
eyes filled with tears of joy as he
said: "This is my dream, but can
my wife go with me? I can't go
without her."
This request precipitated
another frantic effort to reach
Ambassador Dobrynin. When he
was finally located late that night
at his country home, Dr. Hammer
told him, "Dr. Goldfarb cannot
leave without his wife."
"There was a pause that seemed
to last an eternity," Dr. Hammer
told the Bar-Ilan dinner. "Then
Dobrynin replied, 'Go ahead, you
have permission to take his wife
as well."
The next morning, Dr. Hammer
climbed the stairs to the Goldfarb
apartment on the outskirts of
Moscow. Her first words were,
"What shall i do about my job at
the clinic?" He replied: "Mrs.
Goldfarb, you are going to
America. You do not need a job.
Your son will take care of you."
THEY DROVE to the passport
office, where a three-star general
greeted them with exit permits
for her and her husband. Then it
was on to the hospital, where Dr.
Goldfarb was sitting up in bed,
dressed in a brand new warm-up
suit his wife had brought him the
night before, a bright smile on his
face. Dr. Hammer wheeled Dr.
Goldfarb to the stairway and the
doctors and orderlies carried him
down to a car waiting below.
At the airport David Goldfarb
said goodbye to his daughter and
his grandchildren. Then they
boarded the Hammer private jet,
where Mrs. Hammer made a bed
for Dr. and Mrs. Goldfarb in the
study. As the plane cleared Rus-
sian airspace, David Goldfarb
beamed contentedly and Ar-
mand Hammer shared in the
warm glow of that happiness.
JOURNEY TO FREEDOM: Armand Hammer (right) shared
details of how he was able to obtain the release of long-time Smnet
rejusenik Dr. Jacob Goldfarb and his wife with a group of Bar-
Ilan University supporters in Los Angeles. The industrialist and
philanthropist chaired the annual dinner of the West Coast
Friends of Bar-Ilan, at which Chancellor Emanuel Rodman
(left) was cited for his decade of service to the University. Ham-
mer told the 800 guests, 'One success cannot make us complacent.
Our work is not over until everyone in the world can live in digni-
ty and peace.'
----------------
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