The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03027

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert
AP/Wide World Photo
SOVIET HUMAN RIGHTS: Soviet dissidents
pn OrUrv (left) and Anatoly Sharansky ap- Human Rights Violations that met on Capitol
before a Commission of Inquiry on Soviet Hill last week.
Release 400,
Or Hostages
Will Be Killed
Page 6-A
Condom Advertising
In The Jewish Floridian,
What Do You Think?
Page 2-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Condom Ads Stir Heated Debate Among Jewish Floridian Read
ers
;
By ALISA KW1TNEY
And ELLEN STEIN
Should condoms be adver-
tised in the pages of The
Jewish Floridian? As media
throughout the nation wage
a heated debate over the
issue of condom advertising,
The Jewish Floridian is also
in the process of deciding
whether or not to run the
ads.
This ancient birth control
device, purportedly invented by a
doctor at the court of King
Charles II of England, but pro-
bably in use for thousands of years
before, is enjoying renewed
popularity due to what some are
calling "the AIDS epidemic."
CONDOMS, which traditionally
have been used as protection
against the spread of venereal
diseases, can also prevent the
AIDS virus from being transmit-
ted, according to the Surgeon
General. In response to the
public's concern about AIDS, con-
dom advertisements have begun
to emphasize the health issue
rather than the contraceptive
aspect of their product.
In light of this, some
newspapers, such as the New
York Times, have taken op the
business of condom companies,
while others, such as the Miami
Herald, refuse to run the ads on
the grounds that they are not in
good taste or would be unaccep-
table to the general public.
For a paper such as The Jewish
Floridian, the question of whether
or not to run the ads is made more
complex by the issue of traditional
Jewish family values. The most
Orthodox sector of the Jewish
community frowns upon the use of
any birth control, which is pro-
scribed by Jewish law.
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
wanted to know how readers
would respond to seeing condoms
avertised in its columns, and so
undertook a poll asking for the
reactions of rabbis from the three
main movements (Orthodox, Con-
servative, and Reform), readers
selected at random from its
subscription files, doctors and
representatives of Jewish
organizations.
The result, much like the na-
tional debate, was mixed. The
responses ranged from those who
would not be at all offended to
those who would be strongly of-
fended, with views that ran the
gamut from medical to moral.
Some of the people questioned
refused to comment, others re-
quested that the Jewish Floridian
print their replies but not their
narnes, and often the most liberal
and unabashed responses came
from the older segments of its
readership.
"I WOULD like for them to
advertise. They're for the safety
of people who are active. Why
would I be insulted? Anything to
K help people is a great thing," said
I Mrs. Florence Merlin, an 80-year-
$> old Miami woman, retired from
" sales.
"I didn't have any idea that peo-
,c pie stopped using condoms," she
j added, "because this was always a
measure of birth control for many
jg years. If you're going to have dif-
' ferent sexual partners, as it seems
to be now, they should use con-
doms for health and for birth
control."
Henry Kramarz, 59, retired
from the manufacturing
automotive line, is in agreement.
"There are people around who
don't know that they (condoms)
will help, especially the younger
generation. It's a hell of a thing. If
they thought of this advertising
years ago, diseases might have
been prevented a long time ago."
ONE 68-year-old grandmother
of five says, "I'm from the old
'Some newspapers have taken on the
business of condom companies, while
others refuse to run the ads on the
grounds that they are not in good taste
or would be unacceptable to the
general public.'
school. I positively would not be
offended. I think it would be a
wonderful thing. I feel people ir.
our stage of life would approve."
A young businessman in
another stage of life, has a dif-
ferent point of view. "I would ob-
ject to it," he says. "My guess is
that those members of the Or-
thodox community are against it.
I'm Orthodox."
"The fundamental issue is not
getting involved in the negative
relationships that cause the pro-
blem," states Rabbi Sholom Lip-
skar of the Shul of Bal Harbour.
"In the Hassidic and Torah-
oriented community, the AIDS
issue is not prevalent because
premarital and extramarital sex is
not within the structure of Torah
law. Men and women know who
Rabbi Sholom Lipskar
In the Hassidic and Torah-
oriented community, the
AIDS issue is not prevalent
because premarital and
extramarital sex is not
within the structure of
Torah law.
their partners are and have been
with."
Rabbi Lipskar says that he
believes that the condom issue is
"going down the wrong path"
because the advertisement of con-
doms, in his opinion, encourages
people to continue with the kind of
sexual behavior which has caused
the health problem in the first
place.
'It's like a sore which you just
cover with a cream and 'don't
treat," he adds about the con-
troversial ads.
SAYS DAVID FAIGEN, "I
would find condom adver-
PASSOVER
David Faigen
'From an Orthodox point of
view, condoms are not
permitted. From a secular
point of view. I would just
find this kind of advertising
offensive. It's a private,
personal matter.'
tisements offensive." Faigen. 35,
is executive director of the
Talmudic University.
"From an Orthodox point of
view, condoms are not permitted.
From a secular point of view. I
would just find this kind of adver-
tising offensive It's a private,
personal matter, and I don't think
that it's anything that should be
aired in the media.
"I don't think it's something
which any little 7-or-8-year-old kid
could take a look at and just start
asking questions. If his parents
want him to know about sex or
condoms, they'll tell him." he said,
rather than discovering these
things in a newspaper.
"People know that they exist,
and if they're interested in that
sort of thing they know where to
get them," he continued. "The
Jewish Floridian is one of the few
papers I know that I can pick up
and know that I'm not going to be
reading something offensive to
me, and I'm not going to have to
look at advertisements which 1
don't want to look at."
A MORE measured response
comes from Regina Cussell, 52, a
bird trainer:
"It depends on how it (the
advertising) is done, really. The
commercial they wanted to put on
TV offended me because to me it's
AT THE KOSHER
k^J *- norm. .
MIAMI BEACH

. OCEANFSONT Htn Street
10 DAYS/9 NWHTS
APRIL 13-22
3 Glatt Kosher meals daily
Traditional Seders by a Renowned Cantor
Exciting Entertainment in Our
Famous Starlight Nightclub
Daily Social Activities
Color TV
Pool & private beach
CALL NOW!
Miami
WBeach,
kFia
*W Hosts
'fie 0*but FtiTMvl
(305) 551-1271
promoting promiscuity. I think
that the purpose for trying to
advertise condoms is to prevent
people from getting AIDS and
other diseases."
"It's when they say 'making
love can mean death' that offends
me. It gives me the impression
that they're saying it would be OK
to have sex as long as you use
condoms.
"I have a daughter who is 12,
and I wouldn't want her to see
that type of commerical. An ad in
the paper would be fine. I think
it's wondeful for people to have
protection against disease, but we
don't want to encourge our young
to have intercourse."
REFORM RABBI Herbtrt
Baumguard of Temple Beth Am in
South Miami has no personal ob-
jection. Says Rabbi Baumguard:
Reform Judaism is not opposed
to a reasonable amount of birth
control. We don't believe people
should use birth control methods
not to have any children, but we
think individuals have a right to
use birth control so families would
not be huge."
But Rabbi Baumguard is not
sure that it would be appropriate
for a Jewish newspaper to run
condom advertisements.
it would be rather difficult if
you consider the feelings and the
"principles of traditional Jews," he
admits, it's like serving non-
kosher food at a general gathering
where there might be some Or-
thodox people you wouldn't do
it."
CONSERVATIVE Rabbi David
Auernach of Temple Beth Shira is
less conservative in his opinion on
the matter. "I'm in favor of it .
I would even go stronger than be-
ing in favor of it. 1 would say it's
absolutely mandatory.
"And I don't understand why in
this culture of ours arc continually
hide our heads in the sand.
Whether we like it or not. people
are going to be sexually active.
For them to be unprotected
because of somebody'a moral posi-
tion is simply not right."
Yossi Teitelhaum. executive
director of Hehraica's Miami
Community Center, is in
agreement.
"Ever] sexually-related thing,
especially when it helps to save
lives, is not only good but essen-
tial." he states
"In the beginning of the cen-
tury, syphilis was a very big issue.
Then there was a large scale pro-
phylactic campaign in spite of
Rabbi Herbert Baumgwj
Reform Judaism is not
opposed to a reasonable
amount of binh control
We don't believe people
should use binh control
methods not to have am
children.'
Rabbi David Auernach
And I don't understand
why in this culture of our>
we continually hide our
heads in the sand \\ hethr
we like it or not people art
going to be sexualh acme
many prejudices, which M
much stronger at the time.
"In this more liberal age I
Continued on Page IS-A
%^A TNI f IKST...
'AND STILL THt FINIST
J
6^ou.tKg8Lte lowe
Hotels & Apartments
"Waterfront Rental Apartments
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
1 2 & 3 Yr Leases Available
' Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
Pool & Shuttleboa'd
Restaurant a
Lounge
FURN. ft UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises
M-2-6-87 M-2-S-87
M-2-6-87


'nday, February
How Riverside
Earned Its Reputation.
In the Jewish community a
funeral home is judged by its service.
And that service must always meet
the high standards of Jewish
tradition.
At Riverside, our dedication
to service has been proven day in and
day out, year after year, for over six
decades. This commitment
began with people such as
Charles Rosenthal and
Carl Grossberg Today
commitment to
service continues
under the leadership
of Kenneth J.
Lassman and a
new generation
of Riverside
managers.
For more than sixty years,
caring people have worked to en-
hance the Riverside reputation And
that's how Riverside became the most
respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.
Kenneth J Lassman
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, Inc./ Funeral Directors
Miami Beach, North Miami, Hollywood, Tamarac, West Palm Beach
Also serving the New York Metropolitan Area


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
E
Israel Should Reveal
Arms Role
Several weeks ago, we opined in these col-
umns that Israel must come clean about its
role in the Iran arms deal that is now shak-
ing the Reagan Administration apart
precisely because it has thus far failed to do
the same. Despite Administration
spokesman Larry Speakes' declaration over
the weekend that Americans are by now
"bored" with the Iran scandal, an opinion he
could well afford to air since, as of Friday he
quit the job, Americans are anything but
bored with it.
It is our belief, and the belief of every
clear-thinking individual, that things will be
getting worse for the Administration, not
better, if it continues on its current
stonewalling course. If for no other reason,
Israel should long since have made a clean
breast of its role. The longer it waits, the
more difficult will it become for that nation
to approximate the innocent plea it has
clung to from the very beginning that it
was a mere facilitator of the sale of arms,
and at the request of the Reagan
Administration.
Senate Questions Innocence
For the Senate Intelligence Committee's
most recent report on the scandal now
focuses the spotlight on the Israeli role
beyond a shadow of a doubt and as a role
that was far from innocent. Indeed, the
report insists that the arms deal was initially
iroposed by Israel as a means of having U.S.
ostages in Lebanon released and of repair-
ing the poor relations between the United
States and Iran preparatory to the passing
on of the Ayatollah Khomeini and the
hopeful establishment in his stead of a more
moderate regime.
Furthermore, the report declares that the
diverting of funds from the profits of the
arms safes to the activity of the contra* in
Nicaragua was specifically an Israeli notion
which Israel pursued independently.
What all this means is either that Israel
has already come clean, and the Senate In-
telligence Committee report has come to
many false conclusions, or else that Israel,
for its own reasons, has been trying to
preserve the secrecy of a series of deals long
since gone awry and, need one add, no
longer secret.
As of now, the latter seems highly unlike-
ly. The Senate Committee's report is clearly
more reliable than are the Israeli denials
believable.
Stonewalling Must End
What is at stake now is the image of Israel
as a genuine friend of the United States
rather than as an agent for its own agenda
which it pursued while manipulating U.S.
foreign policy. Is it possible that Israel was
able to tweak the nose of Uncle Sam?
This is a question we asked in these col-
umns several weeks ago and concluded that
it was hardly likely. Now, we are essentially
convinced otherwise. If individuals on the
lowest echelons of Reagan Administration
power, such as Lt. Col. Oliver North and Ad-
miral John Poindexter, were able to pursue
agendas of their own without President
Reagan or even Secretary of State Shultz
knowing about them, then why not Israel?
The result of all of this soul-searching, no
less than a search of the mounting evidence
that places in profound question the Israeli
Jewish Floridian
?TTKl-Mri H.ANT IMS t. (* HiMuFblJIJl
__. POlMCimiHmFhruUliil
Mil SMOCMrr L>.<) HINDUS
S ZA*. SMITHKT
>ml>*ur
1inirHi rm*mMmm Fit UlM*af?fcjj
rfl Ji.miflnii o lull u *_ f am
MMI
_ -'
. Immm Ana law !k
proclamation of innocence in the matter, is
that there has opened a dangerously-wide
door through which enemies of the
U S.-Israeli alliance can pour in order to pur-
sue all sorts of mischief, in short, their oum
agendas.
Indeed, it is remarkable thus far how low
key has been the careful reaction ot
members of both the Senate and House of
Representatives to the conclusions about
Israel's role as described in the Senate In-
telliguence Committee report and to the
conclusions being reached by the House in
its own investigation into the scandal.
Nor is the Administration any less careful
in its repeated assertion at the highest
echelons that Israel was merely a friend
seeking to facilitate a deal between the
United States and Iran.
For Israel to continue to stonewall what
appears to be the increasingly clear conclu-
sions of Congressional inquiries is to gamble
with unleashing the capacity for anti-Israel
mischief by enemies of the alliance of friend-
ship between the two nations now lurking on
Capitol Hill who are thus far being held at
bay by the Administration and the Con-
gress' own low key handling of Israel *s role
in all this.
There can be no doubt that Israel must
bite the bullet now and tell the truth. To con-
tinue to try to keep secret what is no longer
secret will not work for Israel. Certainly, it
isn't working for the Reagan Administra-
tion or. indeed, for the President himself
both of whom essentially have tin- nation's
sympathy. Israel can not lay claim to the
same kind of sympathy.
Nor can Israel any longer let pass the
same amount of time that the U.S. accords
its own government in coming clean. The
time for Israel to act is now.
More Than Demonstration
It Was Collective Show of Solidarity
TO" "ATfS In 0.... aocal A/Ml On* TM, MOO |1*0O !>.
'Art IHOO SupOMWW"' '*>.* iLOCAl AA( r*v FndAy AACA wnln [to AwI Sam Jvm -
UB OKAMmm UBO"'MOW [lAallJS
Friday, February 6, 1987
Volume 60
7 SHEVAT 5747
Number 6
By RICHARD BONO
Atlanta
The massive march on rural
Forsyth County, Ga., on
Jan. 24 was more than a
demonstration against the
hostile racism that occurred
there one week earlier.
Rather, according to consensus,
it was a collective show of solidari-
ty against the racial intolerance
that has occurred recently in
Howard Beach, N.Y., at The
Citadel in Charleston, S.C., and in
recent racial incidents in
Philadelphia and Boston.
"This thing developed a life of
its own," said Sherry Frank,
Southeastern director of the
American Jewish Committee.
Frank commented that the Ku
Klux Klan's hostile appearance
Jan. 17 in Forsyth County,
situated 38 miles north of Atlanta,
shocked the sensibilities of the na-
tion and was the straw that broke
the camel's back.
THE LARGEST civil rights
march in more than two decades,
estimated at 15,000 to 20,000,
bore witness to the change that
has occurred with the passing of
time. Nearly half the marchers on
Jan. 24 in Forsyth County were
white and this time the law was on
the side of the demonstrators, not
against them as it was in the
1960's.
In fact, the scene of the
demonstration resembled an army
camp: Some 1,700 Georgia Na-
tional Guardsmen in riot regalia
were joined by law enforcement
officials from the Georgia Bureau
of Investigation, the Georgia
State Patrol and a myriad of law
enforcement officials from
jurisdictions in and around
metropolitan Atlanta.
In all, a force of nearly 3,000
kept an angry group of 1,000
counter-demonstrators at bay,
staving off a potential confronta-
tion with the marchers.
Prior to leaving Atlanta for the
ride to Cumming, the county seat
of Forsyth, 175 busloads of par-
ticipants, including this reporter,
waited anxiously, not knowing
what lay ahead.
FRANK SAID that Jews, from
In both Howard Beach and
Forsyth County you have
white youths expressing a
territorial impulse against a
different race.'
SSSSSHMMSSMSBSBSSSSSSSSMSk
Atlanta and elsewhere, were well
represented in proportion to their
percentage of the country's
population. And if it had not been
for the Shabbat. she said, more
Jews would have participated.
"The words of the counter-
demonstrators that day (Jan. 17)
were an affront to Jews as well as
to blacks," she said.
On Jan. 17. about 90 people,
men. women, children, both black
and white, went to Forsyth Coun-
ty to march for brotherhood in the
all-white county. Blacks have not
been welcome there for 75 years.
But, to the surprise of everyone,
the brotherhood marchers were
met by 400 screaming Ku Klux
Kiansmen and their allies.
Obscene racial epithets were hurl-
ed at the group as was a barrage
of bottles and rocks.
The organizer of the march, civil
rights veteran Rev. Hosea
Williams, said afterward it was
the most violent, hate-filled group
he had ever encountered.
Representatives of three Jewish
groups joined with Atlanta's black
leaders to plan the second march
for brotherhood in Forsyth Coun-
ty. They were the Atlanta
chapters of the American Jewish
Committee, the Black-Jewish
Coalition and the American
Jewish Congress.
A PERMIT was secured. Law
enforcement, housing and
transportation were arranged.
But, no one anticipated the out-
pouring of support that came from
tnroughout the nation.
Frank said Jews lent much in
the way of support for the second
brotherhood march. A local hotel
owned by a Jewish Atlantan'
made 100 rooms available to the
dignitaries who came in to march.
And, Atlanta's largest Reform
Temple opened its doors for other
demonstrators who had no place
to sleep. Those arrangement*
were made by the Temple's rabbi,
Alvin Sugarman.
"We share a history of oppres-
sion with blacks," Sugarman toid
the Atlanta Jewish Times "It's in
different forms and to different
degrees, but we know what it
means to be in an underclass, to
be oppressed solely by virtue of
birth we as Jews, they as
blacks.
For most of those who came to
demonstrate against racial in-
tolerance, the march provided
their first glimpse at the
vehemence some Americans fee!
toward Jews and blacks Many of
the Klan sympathizers wore
swastikas and many were young
teenagers, striking a sense of fear
in some observers that the seeds
of intense racial hatred are once
again being sown.
THE ANTI-DEFAMATION
League of B'nai B'rith said there
are probably 10 Klan sym-
pathisers for each of the 200 Klan
members who they estimate
reside in Georgia.
"We've known for years that
Forsyth County is s whit* enclave
and that the people there u*
determined to keep it that way
said Charles Wittenstetn. the
ADL's southern civil rights direc-
tor. "In both Howsrd Beach and
Forsyth County, you have white
youths expressing s territorial iifr
pulse, which is to defend their turf
against outsiders, particularly of
different rsce."
Wittenstein also noted that
ADL's estimates on the numbers
of Klan members sre difficult to
sttain. Often, he said, KW
leaders themselves don't las*
how many members they've got
What will become of Forsyth
County now that the histonc
march through that
southern county is done and gone
"BLACKS WILL move bad
into Forsyth," ssid Sugsrmjn-
"But. it won't be tomorrow and a
may not be next yesr Eventual!)
the 'good leadership.' and Imp*
ting that in quotes, will am
charge. But, it's not going to or
easy to integrate Forsym
County."
BSBSBl


Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Israeli Generates Solar Energy for California Company
By SIMON GRIVER
rnold Goldman
^nerates energy in more
&ys than one. He is the
ssident and co-founder of
International Limited,
Jerusalem-based enter-
[ise that has signed power-
rchase agreements with
le Southern California
tison Company for the in-
lation of 19 large solar
:tric generating systems.
ady operational, these
tilities will produce elec-
city for 270,000 homes.
sldman, 43, is a man of decep-
i appearances. His soft spoken,
srved and almost bashful man-
make him different than the
usual type of aggressive personali-
ty one associates with an en-
trepreneur whose company has
manual sales of over $100 million.
Goldman's friends, colleagues
and employees unanimously hail
him as a genius. He was bom in
ie Island and graduated in
jeering from the University
Jifornia. In the early 1970's
funded a company called Lex-
which developed and
keted the first word pro-
jr, long before IBM developed
Arnold Goldman, president and co-founder ofLuz International Limited, posing in front of
a solar collector made by his company.
CSPITE THE lure of more
and fortune, Goldman, his
Karen, and their three
en packed their bags in 1977
[immigrated to Israel. "I had
i writing a book for 18 years,"
Us Goldman. "When we
finished marketing the first
gSBSration word processor, my
company asked me to make a four-
commitment for the next
ct, but I declined. I wanted to
my book and Israel seemed
atural place to do it."
The book is a philosophical
treatise tracing the connection
bstween Jewish history and
thought, mathematics, and the
ethical and social goals of in-
dustrial production. While it
never became a bestseller, several
hundred copies were printed and
Goldman distributes them to
MeMs who show an interest in
the topic. In the book's conclusion,
Goldman outlined several ideas
wUeh could make Israel wealthy;
one Of them is solar energy.
After Arnold completed the
book, the Goldmans decided to
stay in Israel. "We found Israel to
be a rewarding experience," says
Goldman. "Despite the language
sad cultural differences, we felt a
cooaection to the community and
the country. In Los Angeles we
had essentially been anonymous,
especially as Jews."
GOLDMAN STARTED to put
his theories into practice in 1979
by establishing Luz together with
Patrick Francois, an immigrant
from France. The company is
named after Luz, the place, accor-
ding to Genesis where Jacob
dreamed of a ladder ascending to
heaven. The combination of
Goldman's scientific wizardry and
Francois' financial skills have
made Luz the success it is today.
The technology involves a series
of special mirrors which focus
sunlight on a central pipe through
which fluid is fed. The heat of this
liquid, an oil-like heat transfer
medium, is used to boil water.
This creates steam, which drives
power-generating turbines.
The commercial know-how,
which is equally important, involv-
ed third-party financing. Luz sells
each solar electricity generating
power plant to a group of private
investors who then contract with
Luz to manage it. These investors
include First Interstate Bank of
California and Great Western
Savings.
Goldman concedes that Luz has
succeeded despite rather than
with the help of the Israeli govern-
ment, but says, "People who say
they cannot make it in business in
Israel because of the government
are searching for excuses. The
government doesn't help as much
as it could, but if you don't ask for
anything the bureaucrats won't
interfere."
GOLDMAN BEARS no grudge
against the Israeli government for
not investing in a Luz project until
seeing the technology succeed in
California. The Ministry of
. Energy and the Israel Electric
Corp, are now negotiating with
Luz for a power-purchase agree-
ment, for a 25mw system in the
Negev.
Many of Luz's investors are
American Jews, but Goldman in-
sists that they commit their
money on the basis of good
business sense, not sentiment. He
does, however, admit that during
the difficult formative years,
those investors had more patience
than non-Jewish businessmen
might have had.
The only personal cloud in Luz's
success, for Goldman, is the fact
that he must spend large amounts
of time abroad, away from his
Continued on Page 12-A
'Right Place' for Handicapped Children Said
To Be Nursery Program at Alyn Hospital
By RICK ISRAEL
"From the moment we
entered Alyn, we knew that
we had found the right place
for our child," said Elaine
Weissman of Jerusalem.
"More than anything else,
the Alyn staff gave us hope
and encouragement about
our daughter," commented
another parent, Nani
Feigenbaum, also from
Jerusalem.
Both are mothers of young han-
dicapped children currently
enrolled in the nursery program
at Alyn Orthopaedic Hospital and
Rehabilitation Center. Their com-
ments reflect the attitudes of
many whose children attend pro-
grams or receive treatment from
this unique children's hospital in
Jerusalem.
Alyn (an acronym from the
Hebrew Agudah Le'ezrat Yeladim
Nech.m Organization to Aid
Handicapped Children) is Israel's
only long-term orthopaedic
hospital and rehabilitation center
for physically handicapped
children. It is a non-profit
organization which treats and
cares for children, regardless of
religion or ethnic background (10
percent come from Israeli-Arab
families). A high percentage of the
children suffer from crippling
neuro-muscular disease or from
trauma after accidents, and many
come from socially and
economically disadvantaged
homes.
ALYN PROVIDES comprehen-
sive health care that meets the
wide range of children's
developmental needs, while pro-
viding the parents with much
needed support and information
about their child's condition. More
than 5,000 patients visit Alyn's
out-patient clinic annually, after
hydrotherapy treatment in the
Alyn pool. Therapists also teach
such daily living skills as eating,
dressing and participating in play
activities. Other facilities include
a music room where children sing
and learn to play instruments, and
a synagogue designed to enable
the children to participate in
services.
Tirzah Dan, director of social
services at Alyn, leads a staff of
five social workers who help
families come to terms with their
Daily living skills taught are
eating, dressing and play
tng child suffering from cerebral palsy is treated at the Alyn pool by physiotherapist
I Sternfeld.
being referred by doctors and
health clinics from all parts of
Israel.
Each child undergoes a com-
prehensive examination and a
team of personnel led by hospital
director Dr. Shirley Meyer,
prescribes treatment. The staff
believe that long-term hospitaliza-
tion should be avoided whenever
possible preferring to send a staff
social worker to help the family
obtain essential care within their
community.
The majority of children who
enter Alyn have a physical illness
called spina bifida, a congenital
spinal column defect in which part
of the spinal cord and bones are
not formed, or muscular
dystrophy, a chronic illness
characterized by degeneration
and atrophy of the muscles. Alyn
also cares for children with
diseases such as cerebal palsy,
scoliosis and childhood
rheumatoid arthritis.
ALYN PROVIDES individual
physiotherapy treatment in-
cluding muscle strengthening and
respiratory training, as well as
children's handicaps. "The first
few minutes after birth are ex-
tremely critical for the natural
bonding to take place between in-
fant and mother," related Ban.
"Yet when children are born with
a handicap, this bonding process is
often disrupted."
The social work staff play a
crucial role in trying to re-
establish the natural connections
between child and parents as well
as giving parents whatever social,
emotional and financial support
they need. "We give parents the
feeling that they are not alone in
all this," observed Han, "and we
at Alyn share the responsibility in
helping their child develop."
Parental reactions to their han-
dicapped son or daughter vary
with the nature of the disability.
Ilan noted that parents whose
first child is handicapped ex-
perience a particular kind of
trauma, so the staff recently
organized a support group where
these parents can share their feel-
ings of anger and frustration.
THE STAFF at Alyn also assist
Continued on Page 12-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
The three-day meeting was attended by +!*
representatives of ICO Arab member nations.
At the conference, Mubarak heard Syria's
President Assad demand that Egypt break Us
peace treaty uhth Israel.
MUBARAK AT THE SUMMIT: Egypt's
President Hosni Mubarak (left) talks with his
Foreign Minister. Esmat Abdel Maguid, and
political adviser, Osama El-Baza, during the
second day of the fifth Islamic Conference
Organization Summit in Kuwait (Jan. 27).
Israel Told
Free 400, Or Hostages Will Die
AP/Wide World Phot..
JERUSALEM If Israel
does not free 400 prisoners
this week, then terrorists
who claim to be holding
three Americans and an In-
dian kidnapped last week
said Saturday in Beirut that
they would kill them.
But Israel's Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin said Sunday that
Israel will not act as an "interna-
tional bank" for terrorists.
According to Rabin, Israel has
not received "any requests from
anyone claiming responsibility for
these kidnap victims," except
through news reports from
Beirut.
PRIOR TO the terrorist de-
mand Saturday. Druze leader
Court To
Study Appeal
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
Jerusalem district court postpon-
ed until this week its decision on
an appeal by Mordechai Vanunu
to lift punitive measures taken
against him by his jailers.
The former technician at the
Dimona nuclear facility, on trial
for selling information about
Israel's alleged nuclear
capabilities to a British
newspaper, is in the 28th day of a
hunger strike to protest his
treatment.
The court said it would rule next
week on Vanunu's request that he
be allowed to meet privately with
his American woman friend, Judy
Zimet.
She visited him Sunday, but he
refused to see her under the condi-
tions imposed by prison
authorities. The latter insisted
they communicate through a plate
glass window by exchanging notes
which would be read first by a
censor.
Vanunu has also asked for
reading material and to see a
priest. He converted to the Chris-
tian faith in Australia. The court
said it would take those requests
into consideration.
Punishment was imposed on
Vanunu after he flashed a
message to the media, while being
driven to court, alleging that
Israeli agents had kidnapped him
in Rome last Sept. 30.
Walid Jumblatt said he was
prepared to offer himself as a
hostage in place of Terry Waite if
the Anglican Church envoy in
Beirut has. indeed, been
kidnapped.
A handwritten statement, sign-
ed "Islamic Jihad Organization
for the Liberation of Palestine,"
declared that 400 prisoners being
held prisoner by Israel should be
flown in an International Red
Cross plane to Damascus."
Otherwise, "the detention of the
four hostages alive becomes
useless." the statement said.
"They will be executed and their
bodies tossed at the garbage lots
of Cyprus." Should Israel,
however, free the prisoners, "dur-
ing that time we shall set the
hostages free," it said, adding
that the one-week deadline for the
exchange was "not renewable."
THE TERRORISTS' state
ment was given to the Beirut
newspaper an-Nahar with a photo
of Jesse Turner, 39, of Boise,
Idaho, a visiting math professor.
It showed him smiling slightly.
Turner was taken hostage from
Beirut University College on Jan.
24 with Alann Steen, 47, of
Boston, a communications in-
structor; Robert Polhill, 53, of
New York, a lecturer in accoun-
ting; and Milthileshwar Singh, 60,
an Indian and resident U.S. alien
who was a visiting finance
professor.
Earlier Saturday, at least three
state and privately-owned radio
stations broadcast Jumblatt's of-
fer to replace Waite as a hostage.
Waite, personal assistant to the
Archbishop of Canterbury, was
reported last week to have laid
blame for the hostage situation on
Israel.
SPEAKING in an interview
from Beirut with NBC TVs To
day Show" on Jan. 20. Waite
charged that the Middle East
policies of the United States and
Israel either caused, exacerbated
or prolonged the situation of
Palestinian refugees that were the
root cause of the hostage-taking
dilemma.
Waite said that "this Jewish na-
tion" was often "excessively
hypersensitive" to criticism of the
Palestinian situation, and that
Israel failed to be adequately sen-
sitive to the needs of Palestinians.
Waite, himself, was reported
missing last week after days of in-
tensive bargaining with his Arab
contacts in Beirut for the release
of hostages. His kidnapping still
appears to be marked by
mysterious sightings of him in the
Bekaa Valley alternated with
reports on his detention by other
Moslem groups in Beirut sup-
ported by Iran.
?t ^ flKl Glatt Kosher
, Passover
Deauville
AT
THE
1987
5747
HOTEL
BEACH A
TENNIS
CLUB
ON THE OCEAN AT 67tn STREET MIAMI BEACH. FLORIOA
Or* of Miami toocSt'i
LorajMt ond Most
luxurious MMB
eOOKlno-Sto
MM 0DM BMCft
2 toots CNUwi's
>On-
Dandng Emu
ftabwnoni A Shows
ObMbM Cuhtm
ComoHmontory Too
Boom
Gtan Kosher
8-9*10
NIGHT PACKAGES
from
$599
INCLUDING
3 MEALS DAILY
SEOUWM SERVICES
WILL BE CONOUCTH)
BY CANTOR
ASHEftSCHARf
P* omvjf douM occ
Wus io A Tips
STRICTLY GLATT KOSHER
Under Supervision or National Kashruth
Headed by RABBI YACOV UPSCHUI7
Fo Inkxmahon A Reservations Com
Phone: 531-3446
Labor, Likud Clash
Over Peres' Words
On European Trip
For Related Story, See Pag* 8-A
national conference Sha
own opinion, expressed seT
days ago. was that such a ^
ference would pose a *
danger to Israel. pa;'
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Labor and Likud are
clashing again over the
issue of an international
conference for Middle East
peace, specifically whether
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres step-
ped beyond the bounds of
government policy when he
states during his trip to
Europe last week that Israel
was amenable to such a con-
ference under certain
conditions.
At a Labor Party caucus here.
calls were heard to dissolve the
unity coaliton government
because of Likud attacks on Peres
while he was abroad. But most
pundits believe the latest flare-up
will subside, as others have in the
past. Nevertheless, fundamental
differences exist between the
coalition partners over how to
pursue peace, new Jewish set-
tlements in the administered ter-
ritories and other issues.
ON MONDAY, Minister
Without-Portfolio Moshe Arens of
Likud accused the Foreign
Minister of "creating policies"
which other members of the
government learned of only from
the newspapers.
When he returned from Europe
Wednesday (Jan 28). Peres in-
sisted that his remarks about an
international conference and the
conditions for participation by the
Palestinians and the Soviet I'nion
conformed with government
policies approved by the Knesset.
But Premier Yitzhak Shamir
told the Knesset Wednesday, an
hour before Peres landed, that the
Cabinet has as yet reached "..
decisions with respect to an inter
PERES, who held an imwwM
tu press conference at Ben-Gum
Airport, said his views werVj
tamed in a speech he made to
Knesset last September aft*
returning from the Tnited vj
tions Genera] Ass. mbly in
York. He said the Knesset'
eluding the Likud faction vow
confidence in his speech
this was a resolution of a. I
parliament."
<
Peres also referred to his an* I
ment with President Host
Mubarak of Egypt when therm,
in Alexandria last year to setioi i
joint preparatory group for an & |
ternational conference. "I ,[ I
sider this the official position Israel, and no person can chug /
it unless there will be a majority.; '
do so." Peres said.
He said there were also poia I
of agreement with Jordan on im j
the conference could be strjt
tured. The chief provision **
that it would have no power to m
pose a solution and would notbn
substitute for direct negotiations
Nor would any nation that has *
diplomatic relations with Israel
allowed to participate, Peres sue
In an obvious reference to tin
Soviet Union, he said the par
ticipants not only must have of-
ficial ties with Israel, but the;
must not maintain i">!icies whii
discriminate against the JeiU
people. Peres said that in Br.
he had urged tl Fon. ,V
Ministers of the Europe*:
Economic Commur.it> to pra
Moscow to relax
toward Soviet Jews and towjr:
Israel.


Rebbe of Levow Dead in Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) Rabbi
Moshe Mordechai Biderman. the
Rebbe of Lelov. died in Bnei Brak
last week and was buried on the
Mount of Olives in Jerusalem.
Although the Hasidic sect he led
was small, he was admired in
Israel and abroad for his long and
fervent worship
The Rebbe wa- bom "
Jerusalem around the turn of tht
century. His grandfather. Rate
David of Lelov. was one of tbe
foremost Hasidic rebbes in tin
Holy Land during the ltt
Century.
Passover
at the Concord
Mon April 13 lues April 21
Outstanding leaders
from Government Press
the Arts ond Literature.
Great films Music day
ond night on weekdoys
Special programs for tots
tweeners ond teens
Rabbi Simon Cohen
will oversee constant
Kashruth supervision and
Oetory Low observance
Raymond Drilling Rituo'
Director
RESORT HOTL/
Kiomesha Lake NY 1271m1 \j^
The observance of
tradition the mognrficence
of the Sedonm. the
beauty of the Services.
the brilliance of the Holi
day Programming
Cantor Herman
Molomood assisted by
the Concord 45 voice
Symphonic Chorale di-
rected by Matthew Lazor
ond Dan vbgel to of-
ficiate ot the Services
and Sedanm
TrV
111
MAJOR
CREDIT CAWX
Q4 400C
Hotel (014 ----,.
Ton Free 600-43l-3?
TWX 510 240-8336 Tele* 0A**V
See your Tra^e' _


McFarlane,
Kimche Tie
Senate Report
Says Israel
Was Behind
Iran Deals
fASHINGTON -
fan Administration in-
circle spokesmen have
I Kn great pains during the
past few weeks to assert
IK Israel had nothing to do
ifth the sale of U.S. arms to
Iran or the diversion of
funds from these sales to
the Nicaragua contras other
than to serve as a mid-
dleman at the behest of the
United States.
Particular, the State Depart
K two weeks ago, and
Btary of State George Shultz
- P prior to that, emphasized
Jarael's role was mainly as a
tor.
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
OBJECT of all of these
.^pents was to slow down a
Hng sense of anxiety in the
ustration, and also in Con
K about what appears to be
Bng evidence to the contrary
r more active Israeli role in
th U.S. arms deal to Iran than
appears on the surface.
Daapite American denials, not
to mention the Israeli govern-
ment1 s own insistence that it was
no More than a middleman acting
at tht request of a good friend, the
Senate Intelligence Committee
report on the affair apparently
bows Israel as a key performer in
the Reagan Administration's rela-
tiocship with the Khomeini
according to the Miami
Herald's Washington Bureau,
whoa that relationship seemed to
rout in December, 1985, it
I Iarael that urged its renewal.
ACCORDING TO the Herald
i, contrary to Israel's own
of active participation in
the arms deals, including the
diversion of arms profits to the
contort, it was a high-ranking
Israeli intelligence official who
firat proposed the idea at a
meeting on Jan. 6, to ex-National
Security Council aide Lt. Col.
Oliver North, who was fired when
the arms deal first broke into the
world's headlines.
Aoaording to the report, Israel
on itl own made available to the
contrmi "a significant quantity" of
captured Soviet bloc weapons.
Rap. Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.),
i of the House Committee
AP/Wide World Photo
ROYAL SMILE: King Hussein of Jordan attends the second day
of the Islamic Conference Organization meeting last week. At the
fifth ICO Conference in Kuwait, Hussein made an impassioned
appeal for a ceasefire in the Iran-Iraq war and criticized the Ira-
nian leadership for spurning the summit meeting. Hussein also
met with PLO leader Yasir Arafat for the first time since break-
ing off a joint peace initiative in February last year. According to
Arafat, he has buried the hatchet with Hussein and is prepared to
enter into talks with Israel under an international conference
aegis.
investigating the Iran arms deals,
said last week that he is
negotiating with the Israeli
government to obtain its coopera-
tion in investigating the entire
affair.
And the Senate Committee has
said that Israel had "a strong in-
terest" of its own in promoting
contacts with Iran.
REPEATEDLY, as in the past,
since the arms scandal first broke
into the news, the name of David
Kimche, then director general of
Israel's Foreign Ministry, is men-
tioned. Kimche is supposed to
have spoken to then-National
Security Council adviser Robert
Mc Far lane on July 3, 1985, when
he told McFarlane that Iran was
interested in talking with the
United States.
Kimche is alleged to have said
that the Iranians offered to use
their influence to get the U.S.
hostages relased. He also is said to
have told McFarlane that the Ira-
nians might be interested in buy-
ing weapons. Kimche then press-
ed McFarlane to get approval to
begin the contacts. Then-Prime
Minister Shimon Peres, it is alleg-
ed, sent a "private emissary" to
Washington on July 14 to urge the
same as Kimche.
A FEW DAYS later, McFarlane
is reported to have convinced
President Reagan to approve an
approach to Iran through Israel's
contact, Iranian arms dealer
Manucher Ghorbanifar.
On Aug. 30, according to the
Senate Intelligence Committee
report, Israel shipped 508 TOW
anti-tank missiles to Iran. Fur-
thermore, according to
McFarlane, Reagan cleared the
shipment in advance.
On Sept. 15, the Rev. Benjamin
Weir, one of six Americans held
hostage by pro-Iranian terrorists
Continued on Page 16-A
OPEN ALL YEAR
Make The
SHORE CLUB HOTEL
YOUR YEAR ROUND HOME
1*2 Meals daily plus lunch Private
Beach Olympic Pool, right on the
ocean Rooms with COLOR TV &
, Fridge Entertainment Synogogue
& Mashgtoch on Premises Free
Porting Peraonol Attention
Your HO*. WM BWMMMZ ft Onrntood Fomilws
phon. 538-7811
FREE!!
JUICE TEA
and SNACKS
SERVED TO
YOUR ROOM
THROUGHOUT
THE NIGHT
BY REQUEST
Cnat9 Land From Sand'
OOOOOOOOOOCH
I
a;liH<
Deluxe accommodations at the Perfect Location
QLATT
KOSHER
Under Strict Rabbinical Super
vision of Va ad HaKashruth of
Baltimore. Rabbi Moshe Heine-
mann Administrator Syna
gogue on premises.
Located on the white sandy
beach of the Atlantic
Ocean where Collins Ave.
& Lincoln Road meet 3
delcfous gourmet meals
daily prepared under the
experienced management
ofMenasheHirsch.

* Olympic Size Swimming Pool & Lounge Area
* Jacuzzi Children's Day Camp (with it's own
pool) nightly Entertainment Daily Activities
* Babysitting Senjice Tea room Special Family
___________________Rates __________________
CALL RIGHT NOW FOR OUR LOW RATES
iM0*sa7-*i*S or (!S) 53S-OMI
Evening Calla: (S&f) 531791*
rotm
MllintNUT
orXT. TOV ENTERPRISES ~7

DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!



Pge 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987

New Rift
Over Peres' Statements in Europe
Don't Think of Chemical Weapons
Against Israel, Syript Warned
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
returned from a one-week
trip to Europe Wednesday
(Jan. 28) to confront a new
rift between his Labor Par-
ty and its Likud coalition
partners over statements he
made abroad indicating that
Israel was prepared to sup-
port an international peace
conference on the Middle
East if certain firm condi-
tions were met.
Peres, who visited Paris, Lon-
don and Brussels, told reporters
at Ben Gurion Airport that
whatever he said overseas con-
formed with national policy ap-
proved by the Knesset, including;
its Likud faction. He said Premier
Yitzhak Shamir, the Likud leader,
was fully aware before he left of
what he would say on the subject
of the Middle East peace process
and had raised no objections.
Peres has also come under fire
in Likud circles for alleged im-
propriety when he accepted a
''gold watch'' from a
businessman, David Balas, as a
birthday present in August, 1984,
shortly before he took office as
Premier. Balas is presently on
trial for allegedly defrauding the
kibbutz movement of some $20
million.
THE LIKUD critics imply that
the watch was a "bribe" and claim
that Balas illegally made a
$600,000 contribution to the
Labor Party's electiln campaign.
The attacks on Peres are com-
ing mainly from Likud back-
benchers, and Shamir is reported-
ly trying to defuse the situation.
The Labor and Likud Knesset fac-
tions and the leadership of both
parties were due to meet to
discuss the growing coalition
dispute. The Labor faction, which
met in the afternoon, said the uni-
ty coalition should be dissolved.
They assailed Likud for attacking
the Foreign Minister while he was
abroad.
Peres dismissed Likud charges
as "demagogy." He said the cam-
paign contribution from Balas was
reported to the State Comptroller
in accordance with the law. He
Death of Irish Soldier
Sparks DDF Disciplining
JERUSALEM (JTA) Two senior officers of the
Israel Defense Force have been disciplined as a result of
the death of an Irish UNIFIL soldier by Israeli tank fire in
the south Lebanon security zone on Jan. 10, the IDF an-
nounced Wednesday. The officers were not identified.
IN ADDITION to the disciplinary measures, the
nature of which was not stated, the IDF has reportedly
issued new operational instructions to its units based on
lessons learned from the incident and is examining new
methods of identifying and safeguarding positions and per-
sonnel of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon.
The Irish soldier, Dermot McLaughlin, 33, was killed
when an Israeli tank squad opened fire on suspected ter-
rorist positions in Barashit village where a UNIFIL com-
mand post is located. Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe Levy called
the incident a "shameful mistake." Meanwhile,
McLaughlin's widow angrily rejected an Israeli offer of
60,000 Pounds in compensation. She called it "arrogant, in-
sensitive and ill-timed." McLaughlin was the father of five
children.
&r
This Summer-
Escape To A Friendlier Climate
Don't let the Florida heat get to you!
Head north for the Fallsview. You'll he
greeted with cool. comfortable surroundings
and warm, friendly receptions.
Plan to make your summer reservations
now and take advantage of our special
Extended Stay Rates. At that rate, you'll enjoy
the Fallsview activities even more.
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and
swimming, a championship Robert Trent
Jones golf course, racquet ball, boating and so
much more. There's even a choice of two or
three sumptuous meals a day.
So this summer, come to where the
atmosphere is as inviting as the weather.
FallsvhW
< aii ion mu i wmi acknowledged that he received a
watch from the businessman,
"and I don't regard that as any
crime," he said.
MEMBERS OF the Herut
young guard filed complaints with
the police fraud squad over Balas'
contributions to the Labor Party
campaign fund and to Ezer Weiz-
man's Yahad Party which is align-
ed with Labor and over the
watch given Peres. The police
have yet to decide whether to in-
vestigate the charges or seek an
opinion from the Attorney
General.
Meanwhile, Peres explained
that he had agreed to Palestinian
participation in a Jordanian
delegation to peace talks provided
the Palestinians were not known
members of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and opposed
terrorism.
He noted that he has always
maintained that an international
peace confernece could serve as
the framework for direct negotia-
tions between Israel and Jordan
and other Arab states. He said
Israel would accept Soviet par-
ticipation only if Moscow lifted
emigration restrictions on Soviet
Jews and moved to restore
diplomatic relations with Israel.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said Tuesday (Jan. 27)
that Israel has information
that Syria possesses
chemical weapons more po-
tent than those used by Iraq
in its war with Iran. He
warned Damascus not even
to contemplate chemical
warfare against Israel
because it knew full well
what the consequences
would be. He did not
elaborate.
Addressing Jerusalem high
school students, Rabin said the
Israel Defense Force has taken
measures to protect soldiers and
civilians against poison gas at-
tacks. He said four million gas
masks are in stock at central
warehouses and that a practice
drill indicated they could be
distributed swiftly throughout the
country.
GAS MASKS and chemical
resistant clothing and equipment
would be distributed if and when
the government thought the situa-
tion warranted it, Rabin said.
Meanwhile, Syria's President
Hafez Assad reportedly called on
Egypt to sever its relations with
time "be with Israel," aceoT*
to media reports from g*
Assad and President H*.
Mubarak of Egypt wil! %J
meeting of the 46.member
organ.zat.on of the Islamic gj
ference in Kuwait. Mubarak m*
no response, the reports said
A8^f X*? rePrted to have
warned that relations betw^n
Israel and "certain other Arab."
must be ended. Israel and Eirvn,
signed a peace treaty in 1970
followed by the establishment of
full diplomatic relations.
Assad also denounced the
United States and claimed that
American Middle East policy was
dictated by Israel and
plemented by Washington
im-
High Priest
Buried
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Yaacov Ben Uri HaCohen, the
High Priest of the Samaritan com
munity, was buried on Mt
Geririm in Nablus Monday (Jan
26). He died at the age of 87
Almost the entire Samaritan com
munity of 528 attended the
funeral, along with HaCohen's
many Jewish and Arab friends.
The path to successful investing
begins with knowing all the steps.
iniS^L^e,hntel3Est v,ow' ?,aws ^ 'n a state of transition. The
SgggTg^*N^ Yet ne fact remains the same. Success is the direct
T^SKS^S "" u*- ** are the investment tools Northern Thist.
ftSSfSft 0ffeR C BBS?* we <*" Pen the doors to vour financial goals.
iJJ Wu^^^TS^^JS8^ speaks for itse,f ^ of *19 investment
fSSSSSSSSSS!S!!iX ^in F,ori^ont-performed the Standard and
o er $1^11 nn in E !" ** ** because ** ** an>und, "#* added
if 3L 525 Under management in the past two Vears in Florida alone.
Rank exn^ CfiS ,nvestm,ents pw Pe financial goal, The Private
SS^iA Miami' NorthemThist Baiik-
ThePrlva&Bmik


MAYOR MEETS REPORTERS: New York
Mayor Ed Koch (left.) speaks to reporters at a
mress conference with Solidarity leader Lech
AP/Wide World Photo
Walesa following their meeting last week (Jan.
27) at Gdansk's St. Brygida's Church in
Poland.
wsrael Protests
Denies Responsibility for Shooting
By HUGH ORGEL
JL AVIV (JTA) Israel
ragbtered a sharp protest with
tfca'United Nations Interim Force
in Lebanon (UNIFIL) Thursday
(Jan. 29) branding as false a
charge that Israel was responsible
for wounding six soldiers of the
Iriah contingent whose billet in
the aouth Lebanon village of Tib-
nin was ripped by an explosion
last Wednesday morning.
The soldiers were asleep at the
time. Maj. Gen. Yossi Peled, com-
mander of the Israel Defense
Force in the northern region,
handed the protest to UNIFIL's
commanding general Gustav
Haglund after the Irish com-
mander accused the IDF of open-
ing "tank fire" on the two-story
billet. Unknown persons are
believed to have planted the
explosives.
The incident was the second this
month involving Israel with
UNIFIL's Irish troops. Israel
apologized to Ireland earlier for
accidentally causing the death of
an Irish soldier, Cpl. Dermot
McLaughlin, on Jan. 10 when IDF
tanks fired on suspected terrorist
positions in the south Lebanon
security zone and inadvertently
hit a UNIFIL command post.
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
High Court Refuses To Hear
Appeal By Convicted Nazi
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The United States
Supreme Court Tuesday
(Jan. 27) declined to recon-
sider its Dec. 1 refusal to
hear an appeal by convicted
Nazi war criminal Karl Lin-
nas against his deportation
to the Soviet Union. The
court's action prompted
demands by prominent
Republicans and Democrats
that Attorney General Ed-
win Meese carry out Linnas'
deportation as soon as
possible.
In 1981, the Federal District
Court on Long Island, NY, strip-
ped Linnas, now 67, of his U.S.
citizenship, after finding him
responsible for multiple acts of
murder committed during his war-
time service as chief of the Nazi
concentration camp at Tartu,
Estonia.
According to the Justice
Department, more than 12,000
persons were murdered at the
camp. Linnas was ordered
deported in 1983 and has been
held since April 1986 at the
Metropolitan Correction Center in
New York City.
PRAISING THE Supreme
Court decision for "upholding the
laws of our nation and bringing to
justice a man whose actions are
directly responsible for some of
the most brutal murders of our
time," Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R.,
NY) declared that "Linnas must
and will be deported from the
United States."
Also urging Meese to act swiftly
was Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman, who as a
Democratic Congresswoman
sponsored the 1978 federal
legislation that specifically
authorized the deportation of Nazi
war criminals.
She said Tuesday that the
Supreme Court's final decision
"brings to an end Linnas' effort to
forestall the inevitable his
deportation from this country.
The United States should not pro-
vide a safe haven even one day
longer for this Nazi criminal," she
said.
Reacting to the Supreme Court
decision, World Jewish Congress
vice president Kalman Sultanik,
himself a Holocaust survivor,
declared: "At long last, justice has
been done. There is no statute of
limitations on crimes against
humanity." The Justice Depart-
ment has not disclosed what, if
any, transportation arrangements
have been made for Linnas. His
deportation papers must in any
event be signed by or on behalf of
Meese before the expulsion can
actually be carried out.
Pensions Confab
Elects Landes
SAVANNAH. GA. (JTA) -
Leo Landes of New York has been
elected the first Jewish president
of the Church pensions Con-
ference at the organization's 72nd
annual conference here. CPC com-
prises more than 80 Protestant
and Catholic and two Jewish
organizations.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 11:00 A.M.
SIUM: "ISRAEL 1987"
YIDDISH BRUNCH SESSION
Guest Speaker
a
Dr. Sol Stein
President. IHF
Shelomo ben-Israel
Popular Radio Commentator. WEVD
"Die Vichtiqste Nayes Fun Der Voch"

A SPECIAL l It 1111" i r: BY
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
Spiritual Leader ot Temple Beth Shalom. Hollywood
Chairman. IHF National Board of Directors
GUESTS OF HONOR
Moi i to Friedman Shimon Dettch Morris Fish
I

Mu:
In recognition to their lifetime dedication to the
"Golden Chain of Yiddish Culture"
Meal Entertainment Provided by:
MINNA BERN-SHOSHANA RON
COUVERT: $10.00
MAESTRO SHMUEL FERSHKO
Chairman
Dr. Sol Stein
FULL BRUNCHEON
Attendance by Reservation
531-8702
#
T
H
E
I
S
R
A
E
L
I
S
T
A
D
R
IT
T
F
O
U
X
D
A
T
I
O
N
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 6:00 P.M.
FESTIVE BANQUET
TXEK RAl 1M ; TOE 6 m li
BUHHDAY OF H1STADRUT
Honored Guest
Greetings by:
Yosef VanJkov
Consul General of Israel, Washington. DC
and Minister-Counsellor at Embassy of Israel
Hon. Rahaitiln Timor
Consul General Miami
PARTICIPANTS
Judge Herbert S. Shapiro
Member. IHF Board
Dr. Leon Kronlsh
Honorary Chairman. IHF Board
Rabbi Irving Lehman
Spiritual Leader, Temple Emanuel
Miami Beach
Chairman
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Spiritual Leader of Temple Beth Shalom. Hollywood
Chairman, IHF National Board of Directors
Special Presentation to Dorothy
Entertainment by
Bronsotein and the
Featuring
McwfehJNHilMusIc*
COUVERT: $20.00
DIETARY LAWS OBSERVED
Attendance by Reservation
531-8702


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Man With Mission
Novelist Wants To Give Floridians Sense of History
By ALISA KWITNEY
David K a .felt is a man with a
mission. Ht wants to give Flori-
dians a seme of their history. As
he himself prefers to learn from
novels rather than dry historical
tomes, he has written a book,
"American Tropic," which blends
Florida's colorful history with the
passionate story of three families.
Kaufelt's book begins in the
16th Century with the first arrival
of the Spanish to these shores,
and ends in the 1960's with their
return to Florida, in what the
author describes as a kind of
"Aristotelian circle."
THE NOVEL traces the lives
and families of two men and one
woman, a rebellious Spanish
nobleman, a young Jew whose
family has been burned at the
stake, and a beautiful red-headed
actress accused of witchcraft, who
escape from the persecution of the
Spanish Inquisition.
These three fulfill an ancient
frophecy of the Tequestas, native
loridian Indians, which foretells
that three "Black Doves" will
come to settle in the Tequestas'
land and, through their descen-
dants, make the land their own.
The author, an attractive man in
his 40's, says that he invented the
prophecy of the "Black Doves" in
order to symbolize through myth a
certain destruction which has
taken place in Florida, but his
book also reflects pride in the
growth of what Kaufelt calls "the
state with the most exciting
history."
KAUFELT, who observes that
most Floridians do not know what
their roots are, also wants his
readers to become aware of the
long standing Jewish presence in
Florida.
"There were five Marranos
(Christianized Jews of medieval
Spain) on Christopher Columbus'
ship," contends Kaufelt. "Jews
were trying to flee Spain (and the
Inquisition) as quickly as
possible."
The author asserts that Jews
were not mentioned in most books
recounting Florida's history
because of anti-Semitism. The
WPA guide to Florida, much of
which was written by Jews in the
1930's, does not even mention the
fact that David Yulee, who was in-
strumental in helping Florida
Synagogue To
Be Memorial
JOHANNESBURG (JTA) -
The Raleigh Street Synagogue in
Central, Port Elizabeth, will be
turned into a memorial to Jewish
pioneers in the city if a proposal
to have it proclaimed a national
monument is approved. The
synagogue, the oldest surviving
one in Port Elizabeth, fell into
disuse in the late 1960's.
The proposal to have it pro-
claimed a national monument was
recently supported by the City
Council. It was rescued by the
Synagogue and Youth Foundation
from the vandalism and destruc-
tion that have overtaken many of
the city's historic buildings.
A spokesman for the Founda-
tion said that they planned to
develop the building as a
memorial to the Jewish pioneers
"who contributed so much, not on-
ly to the development of their own
community but also to the
economic, civic and cultural pro-
gress of the city and its
hinterlands." He said the history
of the Jewish community in the
Eastern Cape dates back to 1820
when 18 Jews arrived with the
British settlers.
David Kaufelt's father and uncle were turned
away from the Kennelworth hotel in the late
1940s.
become a state, was the first
Jewish senator.
"Anti-Semitism was rabid "
states Kaufelt, "and Jews wanted
to see themselves as part of the
mainstream." (In "American
Tropic," Kaufelt models one of his
characters, Mac Levy, after David
Yulee.)
KAUFELT ALSO used some of
his family's personal history in the
writing of his book. His father and
uncle were turned away from the
Kennelworth Hotel in the late
1940's because, they were told, no
members of the "Hebrew race"
were allowed. The author incor-
porated this scene into the latter
half of his novel.
Some of the facts which
Kaufelt's research uncovered sur-
prised him, such as the Caucasian
Clause in leases which prohibited
the sale or renting of land in
Miami and much of Miami Beach
to non-Caucasians, including
Semites.
"I always thought Miami Beach
was a Jewish enclave," says the
author.
The Jewish family in "American
Tropic" wants to preserve their
traditions, yet there are two inter-
marriages which occur. The
author, who is himself married to
a Japanese-American wife, says
that this reflects a dichotomy
within himself.
"JEWS HAVE to go on being
Jews," states Kaufelt who,
although neither religious nor
traditional, thinks of himself as a
Jew first and an American second.
He adds that he wants to transmit
his sense of Judaism to his son
through his books, many of which
reflect Jewish themes.
Kaufelt wrote his first novel at
mrma ********
AlXftOOflMNtoMKllW
Cotor TV* ***
Strict* DMary L**" ,
HugteWH lafcHnom
SocM Program* G<
nooJ.frChaw M
Cs**toMM*JOIi
o^oWfWcaSuprri*to
RMMantl
M^ddBitrpooMdm
^jr^s^s-^^--8"'
U*Enmflnn*ntD"*
PASSOVER
APWL13-22
INCLUDES 3 FULL
OV D*
tXM occ
10 DAYS/9 NIGHTS $j
ll 11-22 ^m-------
MEALS DAILY-SEDERS-BEMOWMED CANTOR j
imOUT 1-eCUL RATES FO lONOEASTAVS
305-538-5721
the age of 33, after working as an
advertising copywriter (he came
up with "Choosy mothers choose
Jif" and "Take Ex-Lax tonight
and have a great day tomorrow")
and later as a fundraiser for the
Henry Street Settlement.
The Settlement, originally set
up by the Jewish middle class to
help the Jewish lower class,
created the program which brings
hot meals to the elderly aino
copied throughout the country
w.,,I*fntfrom1thebiglietothe
big truth, explains Kaufelt v\l
prefers to write about the hi'ston-
of the middle class (and underdo^
rather than the history of
leaders and conquerors.
ASKED ABOUT what he
thinks might be in the future for
Florida, Kaufelt replied with a
smile that, by the year 2000
Florida might well have replaced
New York as the "capital of the
world."
Only time will tell whether the
man who knows so much about
Florida's past and present can
also foretell its future.
U.S. Jews Still Show Strong
Orientation Toward Liberal Politics
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Despite their relative af-
fluence, U.S. Jews showed a
strong orientation toward
liberal politics and the
Democratic Party in the
1986 congressional and
gubernatorial elections, ac-
cording to Dr. David Singer,
director of information and
research services for the
American Jewish
Committee.
But Jewish voters also sup-
ported moderate and even conser-
vative Republicans perceived to
be supportive of basic Jewish con-
cerns, he concluded in the recently
released study, "American Jews
As Voters: The 1986 Election."
SINGER FOUND that gender,
social class and religiosity all
played roles in how different
groups of Jews voted. Jewish
women tended to be more liberal
than did men, unprosperous Jews
more Democratic than were pro-
sperous Jews, and Orthodox more
conservative than were Reform.
Singer noted that Jews voted
for Democrats 25 percent more
than the general electorate in
every presidential election since
1924.
The traditional pattern also held
in races for the House of
Representatives, the study show-
ed, with 70 percent of Jews voting
Democratic in comparison to 52
percent of the general public. The
pattern again applied to the
senatorial races in California,
Florida and Maryland
However, another explanation
is required in the reelections of
Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.), who
received 56 percent Jewish sup
port, and Sen. Alfonse D'Amato
(R., N. Y.), whose 34 percent of the
Jewish vote was up from 8 per-
cent in 1980.
SINGER NOTED that the
senators' strong voting records on
issues that concern the Jewish
community, particularly Israel
and Soviet Jewry, aided their
cause.
The report also noted that Jews
play significant roles in the
political process as volunteers, ex-
pert professionals, lobbyists.
sources of funds and, more recent-
ly, candidates.
Moreover, Singer reported.
although Jews comprise less than
3 percent of the U.S. population.
Jews make up nearly 6 percent of
voters and are concentrated in
large states crucial to presidential
victory.
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS
OorrT
row
OOPACABANA
POSADA Dfl SOL
AMBASSADOR BfACH
MISSION HILLS Pf SORT
ftVnSjOMpi
RrvifRA HILTON
HOnKMEACSM
*~aB*Kt> DUPONTPLAZA
ATLAS AMBASSADOR KOSHER TOURS
a**m.*rcimM.(m,s7*mmo**,M.r.smT*m
"fed thenv*ul uxuh tfiwfmnii uttii \) yam ofapamwt"
Florida
fOUNTAINBl IAU MIL TON
iNNISBROOx RESORT
SHfRAIONBAI HARBOUR
^ANSSOUCl
M.V.
lAMIUeNTRfSORT
txonoMs PA
RVl TOWN HUT ON
HARBOR ISLAND SPA
lonQ&ancn Nj
4iA aOout out O0IUM0
Hinlw Ptctors Ml
Pvrto Hico
Acaouico
PASSOVER1987
UNIVERSAL KOSHER TOURS INC.
PRESENTS
A TRADITIONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
AT THE "NEW"
DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
FROM
APRIL HTH
THRU
APRIL 21ST
< ample* cian Ko-rn-f Hobday "najan
Fmm $1029* i $1299* ,.. pmon rJoubb (<(U1M1HV
Plus 18% tof M> and tfr.it,Hi,,.,
for Additional Information (onlatl:
Universal Kosher Tours Inc.
5 Penn Pla/a
New York, New York 10001
212-594-0836 800-221-2791
.N



At Feb. 28 Dinner
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Kovens, Adams, Arboleya To Receive Medallions
^
The Silver Medallion,
ighest award of the Na-
ional Conference of Chris-
lans and Jews, will be
resented to three outs tail-
ing Miamians at the 35th
Innual Brotherhood
Iwards dinner on Feb. 28 at
e Omni International
totel.
The honorees, representing the
ttholic, Jewish and Protestant
pths, were selected because of
leir community service and their
Bvotion to the ideals and prin-
B)les advocated by the NCCJ.
THE 1987 AWARDS commit-
He. chaired by Harry Hood
^fcssett, has selected Larry
Pams, Carlos Arboleya and Cal
>vens. Archbishop Edward A.
cCarthy has been selected to
?M:eive the NCCJ Distinguished
mmunity Service Award.
rry Adams, vice president.
ithern Division. Florida Power
Light Company, is being
kored for his service to the
ater Miami area in a number
ipacities including the Greater
tii Chamber of Commerce,
ere he served as its chairman
11985.
her civic involvement has
been with United Way of Dade
inty, Florida Memorial Col-
L Greater Miami United, Dade
tners Advisory Board (Dade
County Public Schools), and
Coconut Grove Playhouse. Adams
Hadassah Week
NEW YORK (JTA) Gov.
Mario Cuomo has declared Feb.
1-7 to in' Hadassah Week in the
State of New York in honor of the
women's Zionist organization's
75th anniversary.
Carlos Arboleya
Cal Kovens
Larry Adams
is president-elect of the Orange
Bowl Committee.
CARLOS ARBOLEYA, vice
chairman and chief operating of-
ficer, Barnett Bank of South
Florida, in addition to giving time
to a vast number of community
organizations, has a special in-
terest in children and youth.
He is involved with the Boy
Scouts of America and various
youth activities organizations, as
well as, the United Way of Dade
County, Spanish American
League Against Discrimination,
The Dade Foundation and the
James L. Knight International
Center.
Cal Kovens, chairman of the
board, Kovens Enterprises, has
been involved for many years in
providing leadership in civic af-
fairs. He has found time to devote
to community humanitarian pro-
jects locally, nationally and inter-
nationally for more than a quarter
century.
KOVENS IS chairman of the
board of Mount Sinai Medical
Center. He has served the United
Way of Dade County, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the
University of Miami and the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, among other
endeavors.
The Awards committee has
bestowed the NCCJ Distinguished
Community Service Award on the
Most Rev. Edward A. McCarthy,
Archbishop of Miami. His concern
for refugees of all nations who
have came to the South Florida
area, along with his active par-
ticipation in community affairs,
prompted this recognition.
MCCARTHY is founder and
Archbishop McCarthy
chairman of the Greater Miami
Religious Leaders Coalition and
chairman of the Religious
Heritage Committee for Miami
Citizens Against Crime. He serv-
ed two terms as chairman of the
interfaith Clergy Dialogue group
of the NCCJ.
Spearheading the Feb. 28 com-
munity event is Robert H.
Traurig, general chairman. Funds
generated at the Brotherhood
Awards dinner will provide NCCJ
with the resources to continue and
expand their educational pro-
grams in good intergroup
relations.
Coroners'
Powers
Curtailed
MANCHESTER, England -
(JTA) A High Court ruling in
London has effectively curtailed
the power of coroners to perform
autopsies not pertaining to official
inquests into a death.
Thecourt found in favor of the
sacred burial society here and a
Jewish widow from Salford,
England, whose husband died at
the wheel of his car after crashing
last August. They were complain-
ing that Coronor Brian North had
no cause to hold the body of acci-
dent victim Cheski Worch body
for a brief inquest.
The Jewish Telegraph reports
that Lord Justice Watkins noted
how Judism seeks to bury the
body quickly and avoid autopsies.
He said the coroner invalidly held
the body under the 1926 Coronors
Act "unless the only thing in his
mind was a suspicion that death
had occurred suddenly from a
cause unknown."
Sarah Worch and the society
claimed that the cause of death
was obvious. In the United States,
the states of California, New
Jersey, New York and Ohio have
similar laws.
A society spokesman said the
case should set a precedent for
more lenient rulings by local cor-
oners.
Ir
PURIM
AT THE
GLATT KOSHER
IMH R*t*micl
Supfwsioo
BEACH HOTEL
OCEAN FRONT AT 18 th STREET-MIAMI BEACH
*125
pe-pets
dble occ
4 DAYS/3 NIGHTS
March 13-16
THE WHOLE MAGILLAH INCLUDESi
2 Glatt Koaher Meal, daily
Dally Social Activity*
Exciting Entertalnment In our Starlight nightclub
Rafrigarator In Every Room
PootaMa Chalaa Loungaa
Fruit Basket on Arrival
All Gratuities and Sak lax
GROUP INQUIRIES WELCOME
CALL NOW! (305)531-1271
sts Th Galbul Family
In a world of changes
a wise investor often
chooses a classic
pre-owned
luxury motor car*
For those who choose
to do the same,
we offer
Special Low Rate
financing and
extended terms.
^Including Rolls Royce, BMW
Mercedes, Jaguar and the like.
JEFFER*SON
NATIONAL BANKS
OUR STRENGTH IS TOUR SECURITY.
MIAMI BEACH SUNNY ISLES KEY BISCAYNE
For superb rales and terms contact:
Lina Macld. Senior Installment Loan Officer
532-6451
SubsidiariesolJellerson Bancorp Inc 'Members FD1Cand Federal Reserve System


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
If Ousted Bank Chairman Won't
Negotiate, He'll Go To Court
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A two-man committee set
up to study excessive
severance pay and pension
awarded to former Bank
Leumi chairman Ernst
Japhet when he was forced
to resign last spring, has
recommended that the mat-
ter be resolved through
negotiations with Japhet or
by legal action in court.
The committee, composed of Eli
Hurvitz, who succeeded Japhet as
chairman and then resigned on
Sunday, and former Justice
Minister Haim Zadok, also recom-
mended that the pension
payments be placed in escrow un-
til the matter is settled. It main-
tained that a suitable severance
and pension should be calculated
on the basis of a "suitable salary."
BUT JAPHET'S salary and
emoluments in 1986, his final year
as Bank Leumi chairman and
chief executive officer, exceeded
$800,000, a sum the committee
plainly does not consider
"suitable."
Japhet was forced to resign as a
result of his role in the bank
shares manipulation scandal
which touched off a panic on the
Tel Aviv Stock Exchange in 1983,
with severe losses to thousands of
Israelis who had invested their
savings in shares issued by the
country's largest banks.
The committee"s report contain-
ed disclosures embarrassing to
the former Board members who
resigned en-bloc Sunday when a
new Board was installed.
It reported, for example, that
Japhet managed to delay his final
act of resignation until the com-
pliant bank directors agreed to his
demands for severance pay of $4.5
million and a $30,000 a month life
pension.
THE COMMITTEE also
revealed that payments of hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars were
made to several other top ex-
ecutives of Bank Leumi, in salary
and later pension and severance
pay.
The committee believes that the
payments to Japhet can be
brought in line with normal Israeli
standards either through negotia-
tions with him, binding arbitration
or by going to court. According to
the committee. Bank Leumi could
legally cut back the payments and
win in a court action.
Hurvitz. who was replaced as
chairman by Meir Heth Sunday,
urged that the committee's
recommendations be accepted in
order to end the affair so that
Bank Leumi, under its new chair-
man and Board of Directors, can
rebuild public confidence. Apart
from the scandal, the bank is con-
sidered sound.
Young Handicapped Children in
Program Said To Be in Right Place'
Continued from Page 5-A
parents whose children suffer
from progressive diseases, such as
muscular dystrophy where symp-
toms may not be observable until
age three or five. Ilan asserts,
"We tell parents that a handicap-
ped child can still lead a produc-
tive life and we often help over-
protective parents to see that they
need not devote their whole life to
a handicapped child." By stress-
ing the child's healthy attributes
and playing down the handicap,
the staff at Alyn help parents
cope, thus allowing the children to
grow with the sense that a "han-
dicap" is a diagnostic term and
not a definition of who they are.
Despite many obstacles, Alyn
staffers strive to integrate each
handicapped child into his or her
community school system. For ex-
Israeli Helps
U.S. Edison Co.
Continued fro* Page 5-A
family. "But in general, Israel has
enabled me to spend more time
with my family," he says. "It has
changed our lifestyle. We are now
observant Jews, keeping Shabbat
and Kashrut. We have had two
more children, something we
would not have done if we had
stayed in the States. I have
become more of a conversa-
tionalist. In America, few people
we>-e interested in my ideas about
Jewish philosophy. Now I have a
circle of friends who share my
interests."
GOLDMAN RECALLS that
when his family decided to move
to Israel, his friends thought he
was crazy and many members of
his family were hostile. His
business success has helped
change these attitudes.
Luz's 340 employees recently
moved into a new headquarters
building in Jerusalem. The com-
pany's great success clearly
disproves the old adage which
says that to make a small fortune
in Israel you have to start with a
large one.
ample most schools are inaccessi-
ble to a child in a wheelchair so
Alyn has built numerous access
ramps, thus enabling over 30
youngsters in the Jerusalem area
to be placed in various
kindergartens, primary schools
and high schools.
Alyn's on-site elementary school
and kindergarten are operated
under the supervision of the
Department of Special Education
and staffed with teachers who are
trained to work with physically
handicapped children of normal
intelligence. In this program, 30
young people receive instruction
in all subjects. Students learn
about the Jewish festivals and
avidly participate in each celebra-
tion. A Friday afternoon visitor to
the hospital will likely see children
lighting Sabbath candles and sing-
ing traditional songs.
THREE YEARS AGO, a day
care center was established to
serve the needs of the growing
number of infants hospitalized at
Alyn. It provided infants with dai-
ly stimulation and development
programs in a home-like
atmosphere.
Staff at Alyn speak with pride
about former patients who have
excelled in such fields as com-
puters and electronics. Some at-
tend classes at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem and the
Haifa Technion. Yet the signifi-
cant difficulties that healthy
young people face when adjusting
to the social and occupational
demands of society often are
significantly compounded for
young handicapped adults.
Fifteen years ago, three
wheelchair-bound young women
who were employed and able to
care for themselves, requested to
leave Alyn and move into the com-
munity. A flat was rented and
adaptations made. Despite many
difficulties the young women
managed well. Today 58 flats
house 74 former Alyn residents in
the Jerusalem area alone. The
social work staff report that each
individual's success depends not
on the severity of his or her han-
dicap but on the young person's
emotional strength and resilience.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
Jergens
Lotion
Regular
Extra Dry
10 02.
1.99
CHICLETS
Peppermint
Flavor
6 Pak
89C
HERSHEY'S
KISSES
Dentyne
10Pak
1.09
j^
3
=
TRIDENT
Spearmint
Bubble Gum
Cinnamon
8 Pak
1.11
GELUSIL
Antacid-Anti-Gas
100 Tablets s3.49
165 Tablets s4.99
ROLO
11 oz
s1.69
9o2. s1.69
i4oz. s2.69
HERSHEY'S
MINIATURES
sssr
KIT KAT
6 Pak
1.95
ROLO
6 Pack
1.95
9oz.
14oz
*1.69
s2.69
HERSHEY'S
MILK CHOCOLATE
m&
6 Pack S1.95
REESE'S
9 0Z
s1.69
HERSHEY'S
MILK CHOCOLATE
REESE
*sss?
W.th
Almond
6 Pack s1.95
GELUSIL

6 Pack
1.95

omiBAr
ROACH CONTROL SYSTBrf
12 s s2.99
LARGE ROACH
n$3.19
ANT CONTROL
3i*1.29
FIRE ANTS
12 s s2.99
BROMO
SELTZER
Acid Indigestion
And Headache
2-5/8 oz. *1.49
4.25 oz
9 oz.
*1.99
s3.39
Liquid
Antacid
And Gas
1; 01
3.19
LAVACOL
Rubbing
Alcohol
16 oz.
*1.29
HYDROGEN
PEROXIDE
tINE
Throat Lozenges
All Types
24s
1.99


Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
r<
P
^

*
/
tng Chassidic boy is shown with elder Chassidic men as they listen to an ad-
88 by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, who heads the Lubavitcher move-
quartered in Brooklyn, N.Y. Rabbi Schneerson's movement now encom-
AP/Wide World Photo
passes programs throughout the United States and abroad, and its activity is
broadcast nationwide on cable television.
Not Israelis
Defendants in Iran Case Allowed To Return To Native Countgries
By MARGIE OLSTER
JEW YORK (JTA) r
/eral of the defendants in
arms to Iran case here
e received the court's
lission to return to their
le countries until their
1. But the court is delay-
granting similar re-
^sts by Israeli defendants
wise the Israeli govern-
it has refused to give
ranees sought by the
).S. District Judge Leonard
said in a hearing on the bail
ensions last Wednesday (Jan.
that he is seeking written or
assurances from the Israeli
rernment that it will in no way
ie the return of the Israeli
endants to the U.S. for a trial
Dther proceedings in the case.
)UR OF the 17 defendants
?ed with conspiracy to sell
weapons to Iran Brig.
Avraham Bar-Am, Guri and
el Eisenberg, and William
op have all asked to ex
the conditions of their bail to
them to return to their
lies in Israel because the trial
has been postponed to May
[at the earliest.
lie court last week granted
i permission to one British and
ne German defendant and to
Evans, the alleged mid-
in the conspiracy, who is
led in every count in the
ctment.
de prosecutor in the case, U.S.
Di-ney Loraa Schofield, told
court that she had contacted
U.S. State Department to
cuss the issue. The State
nent had forwarded the
t's request to the Israeli
rernment. But the Israeli
ernment "was not prepared to
Ice any such assurances,"
liofield said.
SAL HURWITZ, attorney
for the Eisenbergs, said he
believes the Israeli government's
position is the only impediment
preventing the Eisenbergs from
receiving permission to go home.
The Israeli defendants have in-
dicated in the past that they were
working with the knowledge and
tacit approval of the Israeli
government. After the hearing,
one of the Israeli defendants said
he was working on behalf of the
Israeli government. But the
Israeli government has totally
dissociated itself from the defen-
dants in the case and has not in-
tervened to assist them in any
way.
The indictment handed up in
April charged the four Israelis
and other defendants with con-
spiracy to sell American made
weapons to Iran, some of which
were in Israeli stockpiles, and
with breaking American laws for-
bidding any such transactions. In
the same time period covered in
the indictment, January through
April 1986, President Reagan
secretly authorized the sale of
American weapons to Iran. Some
of those transactions involved
Israel as a third party.
IN PAST MONTHS, attorneys
in the case have filed papers with
the court tying certain defendants
in this case to those involved in
the government-sanctioned arms
deals with Iran.
Paul Grand, attorney for Evans,
has recently filed a new document
with the court which links Evans
and the other defendants even
more intimately with major
players in the U.S. government
Iran arms deals, including Adnan
Khashoggi, Roy Furmark and
Manucher Ghorbanifar and of-
ficials of the Israeli, American and
British governments.
The Grand document tells the
following story: American-born
Evans lived and worked as a
lawyer in London. One of his
clients was Khashoggi. Evans was
aware of the covert U.S. foreign
policy from information he receiv-
ed from Khashoggi and a number
of other independent and reliable
sources, according to Grand.
In January, 1985, Roy Furmark,
another client of Evans, introduc-
ed Evans to Cyrus Hashemi, an
Iranian arms buyer who turned
U.S. government informant in the
case and set up the "sting"
leading to the defendants' arrest
and indictment. Furmark, a close
friend of CIA director William
Casey, reportedly alerted Casey
in October, 1986 that money from
secret arms sales to Iran was be-
ing diverted to Nicaraguan rebels
or Contras.
FURMARK, at this time, in-
formed Evans that Casey had told
him the U.S. had supplied and ap-
proved the supply of U.S. arms to
Iran. As a result of this informa-
tion and the introductions,
Khashoggi, Hashemi and Fur-
mark formed World Trade Group,
a joint venture which would,
among other things, supply U.S.
arms to Iran. Khashoggi assured
Evans on many occasions between
early 1985 and mid-1986 that the
U.S. would approve covert arms
sales to Iran, according to Grand.
Khashoggi met with then Na-
tional Security Adviser Robert
McFarlane in early 1985 to
discuss covert arms sales to Iran,
according to media reports.
To further the business of
World Trade Group, the principals
held a series of meetings in Ham-
burg, West Germany between
Jan. 13 and 17. Among others at-
tending the meetings were,
Evans, Khashoggi, Furmark,
Hashemi and Manucher Ghor-
banifar, the central Iranian mid-
dleman involved in all U.S. sanc-
tioned arms sales to Iran during
1985 and 1986.
AS A RESULT of these
meetings, Khashoggi and
Hashemi went to Israel and met
then Prime Minister Shimon
Peres to discuss arms sales. Fur-
ther contacts between Israeli and
U.S. officials followed.
Khashoggi and Hashemi even-
tually split up and pursued arms
deals separately, according to the
Grand document. Khashoggi was
successful. Hashemi was not.
Grand contends that Evans had
no criminal intent in negotiating
with Hashemi and other defen-
dants in the case for the arms
deals because he believed ap-
proval from the U.S. government
would be forthcoming.
Grand asked the court not to ac-
cept the prosecutor's assurances
that this case has no connection to
the U.S.-approved covert arms
sales without a further
investigation.
Schofield said she was told by an
unnamed Justice Department of-
ficial that there was no connection
between this case and the approv-
ed deals.
Water Harvesting'
Trees Grow in Negev Desert
Where They Never Grew Before
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Trees
are growing in the Negev desert
in areas where they have never
grown before, thanks to the ef-
forts of Hebrew University Prof.
Aharon Yair, who has developed a
method of "water harvesting"
that allows trees to be grown in
areas where there are only four in-
ches of rain a year.
Water harvesting is not new. It
was used extensively by the an-
cient Nabatean people who farm-
ed the Negev 2,000 years ago.
They planted their crops in the
small areas of soil at the foot of
hills using runoff water that they
directed through channels from
the rocky hill tops.
YAIR AND his colleagues at
the Hebrew University and at the
Blaustein Institute of Desert
Research at the Ben Gurion
University in the Negev found
that more water is in fact caught
in the middle of slopes, in a "fer-
tile belt," where most of the
runoff water from the rocks at the
top of the ridge is absorbed and
held at depth without
evaporating.
The water collected in this belt
is equivalent to some 10-12 inches
of rainfall, and would suffice to
grow trees in areas with only four
inches of rain a year.
Four years ago, the Jewish Na-
tional Fund helped Yair conduct
an experimental planting of carob
and pine saplings in basin-like fur-
rows he designed in the fertile belt
below a rocky ridge near Sde
Boker, David Ben Gurion's
kibbutz.
THE FIRST two years of the
experiment were drought years
and the runoff was the sparsest in
25 years, yet the saplings
developed well without irrigation,
and grew as well as trees planted
in more northerly and wetter
regions.
The JNF is planning to unveil
Yair's grove of trees as part of the
Ben Gurion centenary celebra-
tions, and is planning to use the
technique for growing several
thousand trees, including trees of
economic value such as olive trees,
on hitherto uncultivated slopes in
the Negev.


age -,-n a 11c ucwisn rlonaian/rnaay, February 6, 1987
Opinion
No Justifying Waites' Scapegoating
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
Terry Waite, the Anglican envoy, is a
most impressiveman, morally as well as
physically. Who cannot be moved by his
perseverance and determination to try to
save the lives of the hostages from the
maws of the fanatical Shiite Muslims in
Lebanon?
Last week, he was profiled on the NBC-
TV "Today Show," and I cannot refrain
from expressing how deeply upset I
become over his gratuitous sermon to the
Jews over "their insensitdvity to Arab
refugees" and their supposed "hypersen-
sitdvity to criticism."
IT IS ALTOGETHER appropriate and
justified for Waite and other Christian
leaders to feel compassion and distress
over the plight of Arab refugees in-
deed, for all of the estimated 12 million
refugees in the world.
Having spent much of my 25 years as a
Jewish public servant seeking to bring
relief to refugees and ease their hunger,
together with many other Jews, I share
that depth of concern and have tried to
help, however modestly.
But that legitimate concern of Mr.
Waite and other Christian leaders
can in no way justify scapegoating Israel
and Jews as being solely or primarily
responsible for the Palestinian tragedy.
WHY DO NOT the Terry Waites of the
Christian world ever have the courage
and honesty to address public criticism to
Syria's Assad, Libya's Khadafy or the
PLO's Arafat, who cynically and ruthless-
ly perpetuate the Palestinian plight?
Or are Israel and the Jews supposed to
be the only "Christians" in the world who
are to turn the other cheek and love their
enemies?
A flickering in th dark
Rabin Vows Candor With U.S.
Regarding Ties to South Africa
Clarification Needed
Distinction Between Politics, Religion
ORLANDO (JTA) The
president of the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America said last Wednes-
day (Jan. 28) that the burning
issues of personal status such as
"Who Is A Jew," "what is a
legitimate conversion," and a get
(Jewish divorce) should not be
debated in the political arenas of
Jewish life, the media or major
American Jewish organizations.
"The average American Jew
hears these questions discussed in
the lecture circuit or in the media
and gets the impression these are
political issues, when, in fact, they
are religious issues," declared
Rabbi Milton Polin.
"Politics is the art of the possi-
ble and, therefore, involves give
Politics is the art of the
possible. Religion
doesn't play politics with
God's law.'
and take. These issues are
halachic and in many instances
are based on divine imperative.
We don't play politics with God's
law."
Polin, in an address at the clos-
ing session of the 38th Annual
Midwinter Conference of the rab-
binical Council of America, at the
Orlando Hyatt, pointed out that
issues of personal status are now
being debated in the political
arena without reference to
halachic underpinnings.
"A Jew is one who is born of a
Jewish mother or has been con-
verted according to Jewish law. It
is not the ritual of conversion
alone but also the commitment to
the total Jewish way of life that
makes a convert a Jew. Rabbinical
groups which have allowed these
issues to be placed on the political
agenda have abdicated their rab-
binic responsibility and authori-
ty," Polin stated.
"Decisions of personal status
must be determined by religious
authorities and not lay leaders,"
he stressed.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said Tuesday (Jan. 27)
that Israel will be absolutely
candid with the United
States regarding its rela-
tionships with South Africa.
Rabin, briefing the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee, referred to a
Newsweek magazine report that
he visited South Africa recently to
warn the Pretoria government
that Israel would have to curtail
its relations because of pressures
from the U.S.
The U.S. and Western Europe
have adopted a policy of sanctions
against the apartheid regime. In
the case of the U.S., Congress
overrorde a Presidential veto of
sanctions and requires the Ad-
ministration to report by April on
any military supply relationships
between countries receiving
American aid and South Africa.
ACCORDING TO reports leak
ed from the Knesset committee,
Rabin observed that acts of Con-
gress are "stricter than resolu-
tions of the United Nations
because they are backed by real
sanctions." Israel is the recipient
of $1.8 billion a year in U.S.
military assistance and cannot af-
ford either to alienate Congress or
embarrass the Administration.
Rabin said the issue was com-
plex for Israel and it must main-
tain, above all, its ties of trust
with Washington.
Israel's relations with South
Africa have become increasing!]
controversial. Likud members of
the Knesset committee criticized
Yossi Beilin. Director General of
the Foreign Ministry for Political
Affairs and a close adv
Foreign Minister Shimon Feres
for pressing his view that Israe i
must distance itself from
Pretoria.
SOME PEOPU LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE UVES WITHOUT EVER
TASTING WATER.
Some people have never tasted water
that's fresh and pure as a spring Water
without sodium, pollutants, or carbonation
Water with nothing added, nothing taken
away. Some people have never tasted
dean, clear Mountain valley Water from a
natural spring in Hot Springs, Arkansas
If you're one of those people, try
Mountain valley Water. You'll be tasting
water for the very first time
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM MOT SPRINGS ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114
-A. SPRING*.
' CARBONATE.
You've
w | 1


T + +
Got What
It
Takes...
(And You May Not Even Know It)
Help Those In Need... Hospital for the Aged. For free
And Help Yourself To A
Tax Deduction At The
Same Time.
The Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops can use your
gifts of resaleable furniture,
appliances, and household
goods. Items YOU may no
longer need will buy life-
giving medicines and
medical supplies for the
indigent residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and
pick-up of your donations
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
D
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
Two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Ave Miami
5829 Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Hallandale
A division ol the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital lor the Aged at Douglas Gardens


V/>''
Tt
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Condom Ads
Stir Heated Debate Among Jewish Floridian Readers
Continued from Page 2-A
est solution I can think of is for
tie media to take part in
preading the word."
Louis Herring, 43, principal of
he Jewish High School of South
Tlorida and father of three sons,
me teenaged, says he
nderstands why the New York
lines might run condom adver-
tisements. "New York City has a
remendous problem with both
enage pregnancy and AIDS,"
states.
"I would argue against The
swish Floridian running the ads
two grounds," he continues.
jFirst because the Jewish com-
munity does not have a statistical-
significant teenage pregnancy
AIDS problem. Second, the
Bwish community does not need
get its sex education from the
jes of The Jewish Floridian."
look to The Jewish Floridian
reflect where the Jewish com-
jnity in Florida is at," observes
erring, who thinks that an
ucational program strengthen-
traditional values would be a
tter solution to current health
Iicerns.
IS FOR his own teenaged
^dents, Herring is not worried
Dut them. "I think that the
^nagers in my school reflect
fish values more than they do
values of downtown Miami,"
| says.
jinda Bogin, 35, PTA president
local religious school and the
^ther of two small girls, says she
Jd not be offended.
think it is a preventive
sure in today's sexually per-
sive society," she explains.
LABBI GARY Glickstein.
ritual leader of Temple Beth
slom, Miami Beach, has already
a condom ad in U.S. News
World Report, and "I was not
ended. I was pleased.'' But
obi Glickstein is not sure "how
n in general would react."
Recording to the Rabbi: "My
i is that information on a vital
ie that affects our community
the lives of its individuals
buld be publicized and made
liable in all media," including
Jewish Floridian.
think that the advertising is
sntial for all the members of
community and that
wledge in and of itself in
case (condom advertising)
inot be destructive."
tEADERS differed on the
estion of whether or not con-
advertisements were in bad
Bte. In fact, even those readers
do agreed that the ads were not
I bad taste differed on why they
fere not.
'We have a lot of things today
bad taste," observes a 68-year-
woman active in the Jewish
munity, who preferred to re-
n anonymous; "but everything
taste has come out of the
t. We should do everything
can to avoid such a sickness, in
opinion."
ut Martin Goodman, 59, a
der/developer, contends: "I
't think to eliminate a possible
th sentence or discourage the
ng kind of sex is in bad taste."
'I wouldn't object to seeing it
re I'm not a prude," says
Anker, 65, an associate
tor, who adds that "it's going
be all over television, so why
t?" His only reservations are in
e interest of practicality.
"The people I know who
bscribe to The Jewish Floridian
usually retired people in the
;e group of 55 and up I don't
ink that age group is particular-
involved in the subject."
ONE SUBSCRIBER, who is
ily 29, Rick Wodnicki, a Miami
Rabbi Gary Glickstein
'My sense is that
information on a vital issue
that affects our community
and the lives of its
individuals should be
publicized and made
available in all media.'
Dr. Arthur Shapiro
If there's no objection to
having advertisements of
products such as tampons
and menstrual medication. I
don't see any reason why
you can't have
advertisements of condoms.
Granted, one has more to
do with normal body
functions."
businessman, is also for the idea
of running the ads.
"I've seen a lot of ads around
for cigarettes, which are contra-
health, and this would be pro-
health," he points out. "We
should concern ourselves with
things that might and will effect
us short or longterm health-wise.
If this is the only approach which
seems effective, it should be pur-
sued via whatever media possible
are available."
"Condom ads are no more
offensive than tampon ads,"
states Dr. Arthur Shapiro,
Head of the Department of
Obstetrics/Gynecology at Mount
Sinai Medical Center. "If there's
no objection to having adver-
tisements of products such as tam-
pons and menstrual medication, I
don't see any reason why you
can't have advertisements of con-
doms. Granted, one has more to
do with normal body functions,
but so in a way does
contraception."
Dr. Shapiro, himself a father of
high school children, thinks that
there is a great need for more sex
education, especially in the school
system.
AS FOR the use of condoms to
prevent the transmission of AIDS
and other diseases, Dr. Shapiro
agrees that they are an effective
method of dealing with the
problem.
"Now it's up to Madison Avenue
to come up with something pretty
inocuous," he concludes.
Dr. Judith Pardo, also a
gynecologist, says that she thinks
that "if the advertisement states
some of the medical benefits of
condom use, it would be educa-
tional, because many people are
not aware of the fact that the con-
dom can prevent the transmission
of certain contagious diseases."
Pardo, who assumes that
Madison Avenue would come up
Dr. Judith Pardo
'If the advertisement states
some of the medical
benefits of condom-use. it
would be educational,
because many people are
not aware of the fact that
the condom can prevent the
transmission of certain
contagious diseases.'
with something tasteful, adds that
she would not be offended
neither as a doctor, nor as a
mother.
"IT'S A VERY complex issue,"
says David Saltman, 46, executive
director of the Jewish Family Ser-
vice of Greater Miami and the
father of two teenaged daughters.
"Because we serve a large,
diverse section of the Jewish com-
munity, we face similar issues.
Like us, I believe that you (The
Jewish Floridian) are a sectarian,
not a religious, organization.
Perhaps you have the right or
even the responsibility to serve
the information needs of the en-
tire Jewish community."
"I'm not sure what our reaction
would be to it (the ads). The issue
isn't that different from advertis-
ing non-kosher food items. If it's
the paper's policy to advertise on-
ly kosher food, then you should be
consistent and not advertise items
which would not be used by the en-
tire Jewish community, such as
non-kosher food. The same applies
to birth control devices."
"What complicates the issue is
the question of disease control.
There is certainly an argument for
disease control, but there is still
the implication that people who
are not married are engaging in
sexual acts.
"THE ISSUE of disease con-
trol is certainly a real one,"
Saltman admits, "but methods of
disease control which may also be
methods of birth control pose the
individual (and the newspaper)
with a moral issue. Is the goal of
your paper to advertise in relation
to disease, or in relation to birth
control?"
"There are a lot of Jews who
pick and choose what traditions to
follows, and if they are part of the
readership, the newspaper would
need to serve their needs as well.
Again, it's similar to the adver-
tisement of non-kosher food.
Many, many Jews do not keep
kosher.
"If The Jewish Floridian ac-
cepts non-kosher food advertis-
ing, it would be consistent to also
advertise birth control devices,"
Saltman concluded with a laugh,
adding that he realized that he
had not given an answer to the
question.
THE TRUTH of the matter is
that there is no one answer to the
question of whether or not con-
dom advertisements should be run
in newspapers and on television.
There are many reasons for runn-
ing the ads, and at least as many
against it. If you have an opinion
on the matter, write your com-
ments down and send them to The
Jewish Floridian at: P.O. Box
012973, Miami, FL 33101.
Police Detain
Three Yeshiva
Students
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Three yeshiva students in the
West Bank were detained by
police this week for allegedly fir-
ing rifles illegally in the Balata
refugee camp near Niblus.
They are Ben Zion Stern, Haim
Ben-Zion and Roman Aldoubi, all
students at the Od Yosef Hai
Yeshiva at Joseph tomb in
Nablus.
They were driving to the
yeshiva last Thursday when rocks
were hurled at their car. The
three left the car ana chased the
rock-throwers into the Balata
camp where they allegedly fired
shots into the air.
Tired of Low Rates?
Open Your High Rate CD with
BANK OF FLORIDA
Rate
6 Years compounded 7.50
Monthly
Annual -j j*
Yield #./0
Rate
7 Years fSSSX?*" 7.75 W 8.13
Monthly
And You Can Do It By Mail.
Please Fill Out and Enclose with Your Check.
Nam*
Address
Social Security #
Telephone # ___
Minimum Deposit $2,000
Substantial Penalty For Early Withdrawal
Bank of Florida
6101 Sunset Drive
Miami, Florida 33143 665-1106
Member F.D.I.C.


Page 16-A The JewishjToridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Robert McFarlane
David Kimche
Senate Report
Fingers Israel
Continued from Page 7-A
in Beirut, was freed. Meanwhile,
Iranian demands for more
weapons followed, but another
Israeli shipment of anti-aircraft
missiles in November failed to win
the release of more hostages
because the Iranians were alleged
to be unhappy with the quality of
the merchandise.
IN DECEMBER, at the
reported urging of McFarlane,
President Reagan ordered the
suspension of all arms deals with
Iran. Kimche is alleged to have ad-
vised against the suspension.
Then, in January, 1986, Prime
Minister Peres is supposed to
have sent his counter-terrorism
expert, Amiram Nir, to
Washington to urge Reagan to
resume the arms deals. On Jan.
17, Reagan signed a secret order
allowing the resumption of arms
to Iran directly from U.S. sup-
plies. Peres, in February, con-
gratulated Reagan for his
decision.
According to the Senate report,
it was Nir who was probably the
first to propose funneling profits
from the arms sales to Iran to the
contras. Attorney General Edwin
Meese told the Senate Committee
investigating the scandal that Nir
made the contra* suggestion to
Col. Oliver North in a meeting on
Jan. 6.
Century Mark
HOLLYWOOD (JTA) -
Jacob Borstein of Beverly Hills,
Calif., celebrated his 100th birth-
day Jan. 10 at Temple Beth El
here, of which he was a co-founder
60 years ago. Born in Lomza,
Poland, he is a father of four,
grandfather of nine and great-
grandfather of 10.
i
Anyquestion
about who's lowest?
B
I
at
ii
a
:
F
a
B
1
s
Now is lowest.
By US.Gov't. testing method
n
C
n
d
si
fj
H
H
n
tl
T
b
n
k
s<
S<
il
a
C
oi
tl
Vi
I
H
T
1
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
Causes Lung Cancer. Heart Disease,
Emphysema. And Mny Complicate Pregnancy.
Competitive u* level leflects the Ji 85 FTC Repent
NOW THE LOWEST Of All BRANDS
SOFT PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL 3 mo. "t". 0.3 mg. mcow*
av. pet cigareni by FTC method.


IJII I II I! I ) I
*y
y, February 6, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
I Designer Oberson At
*Spirit Of Life' Luncheon
,~
ELLEN ANN STEIN
fashion designer Gideon
will be presented along
with H collection of bathing suits
and Kh fashion at the City of
!.;-. J"Spirit of Life" luncheon.
Beach community leader
Mishcon will be honored
I Butnitarian of the Year dur-
.. t luncheon set for 11:30
fconday, at the Biscayne
Kt Hotel and Marina.
fcsEEING the event is
Ehrlich, who founded the
>.- Kh*opkin Chapter of the Ci-
ty Blope 13 years ago, which
year after Mrs. Ehrlich
Miami Beach from New
with her late husband,
hrlich named the Chapter
er daughter, Phyllis
who died of cancer at an
Bty of Hope is a national
on Barian hospital in Duarte,
I arif .|which offers advanced
are at no personal
> its patients. The 93-acre
includes various medical
and the Beckman
Institute. The City of
stains one of six cancer
centers designated by
anal Health Institute.
MRS. EHRLICH mov-
|kmi Beach, there were on-
Jchapters in the South
rea. Now there are 44.
Hjrllis Dropkin Chapter,
ith about nine women,
Boers some 270 members.
very good feeling to
>u're working for
that does so much for
said Mrs. Ehrlich, who
Jy president of the City
Southeastern Regional
pint of Life" luncheon is
biggest fundraisers of
Martha Mishcon is in-
many civic and social
including Project
I Variety Children's
and is president of the
Kmanu-El Women's Aux-
Gideon Oberson
iliary and a Founder of Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
"She has always supported City
of Hope functions," said Mrs.
Ehrlich.
CITY OF HOPE was establish-
ed in 1913 by five businessmen
and used two tents to help people
suffering from tuberculosis. If
$25,000 is raised, a medical
fellowship is established at the
research institute in the
humanitarian award honoree's
name.
Chairpersons of the Monday
event are Rosalyn Gross, Debbie
Matzkin and Selma Silverman.
Chairperson Debbie Matzkin's
husband, Giora, is the sole
distributor of Oberson's fashions
in the United States and arranged
for Oberson to donate his time and
fashions for the gala.
"We're thoroughly delighted
and we think it will be the best
luncheon yet," said Mrs. Ehrlich.
"His collection is exquisite. I saw
the video. It's going to be an ex-
citing program."
idex
Israel Histadrut
21st Conference... Page 2-B
Gala For Hope... Page 2-B
Hebrew Academy Concert... Page 3-B
Readers Write... Page 4-B
Holocaust Survivors
A Neglected Group ... Page 5-B
Organization News ... Page 6-B
Amit Women ... Page 7-B
Hadassah Events... Page 8-B
Synagogue Listing ... Page 11-B
Obituaries... Page 12-B
Israeli fashion designer Gideon Oberson's bathing
suits will be among fashions in swimwear and
haute couture at the City of Hope's 'Spirit of Life'
luncheon Monday at the Biscayne Bay Marriott
Hotel and Marina. Oberson's fashions have won the
designer top awards.
Matzkin's First Introduced
Oberson's Swimwear To U.S.
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
The appearance of Israeli
fashion designer Gideon
Oberson at the City of Hope
"Spirit of Life" luncheon
slated for Monday, Feb. 9,
at the Biscayne Bay Mar-
riott Hotel and Marina was
made possible by the Bal
Harbour couple who first in-
troduced Oberson's
fashionable swimwear line
to the United States.
Giora Matzkin, a 43-year-old
Israeli American, spotted Ober-
son's fashions at a mini-market in
New York in 1974 featuring a
group of Israeli designers.
"I thought what they were mak-
ing had tremendous possibility,"
said Matzkin, whose wife, Debbie,
is co-chairperson of the City of
Hope luncheon.
MATZKIN WAS correct about
his first impressions of Oberson's
work. They launched his first line
of swimwear in 1979, and distribu-
tion is now nationwide, including
Hawaii and Puerto Rico, at
specialty stores and better depart-
ment stores such as Neiman Mar-
cus, Saks Fifth Avenue, Burdines,
Bloomingdale's and Nordstrom's
in California.
Giora and Debbie live in Bal
Harbour with their two children,
liana, 6 and Annie, 4, who both at-
tend the Hillel Day School.
Debbie was born in New York
and grew up in Colombia. She at-
tended boarding school in
Switzerland for two years before
returning to Colombia where she
graduated from the National
University of Colombia with a
degree in psychology.
Giora was born in Israel and
came to the United States after
serving two years in the Israeli
Army. The couple met in Miami
through mutual friends of their
parents.
GIORA RECEIVED his MBA
from Ohio State University in
1968 and worked in New York and
California as an executive with
Schenley Liquors.
In 1976, Giora and his brother,
Debbie Matzkin
Doron, founded the company,
GDM Enterprises, featuring
Oberson's swimwear. It was a
business familiar to Matzkin. His
father, Hanoch, has been in the
apparel retail and manufacturing
business in Israel for over 56
years, where the family owns Mat-
zkin's Department Stores.
Oberson, born in Italy and rais-
ed and educated in Israel, has
been called Israel's foremost
designer. He received his fashion
training in Paris at the Ecole Syn-
dicate de la Couture Parisien. His
haute couture collection has earn-
ed him top design awards.
OBERSON SAYS that more
than any other piece of clothing,
the female bathing suit has to ex-
press the unique characteristics of
the wearer "to flatter her body
and shape, and to give her a com-
fortable feeling and a fashionable
look."
His 1987 beach wear collection
features glamorous textured
prints on high quality Italian
fabrics used for his extensive line.
The entire collection is coor-
dinated with matching coverups
and sportswear.
The Matzkins' headquarters are
in Miami, but they have
showrooms in New York, Dallas,
Los Angeles and Chicago.
"It is just at the beginning,"
Giora Matzkin
says Giora, adding that he never
went head-to-head with Israeli
designer Gottex because Oberson
is "more fashion-forward, more
contemporary."
THE BUSINESS is not as basic
as it used to be, Giora says. "To-
day you have sportswear mat-
ching swimwear and swimwear
matching sporstwear." They are
also introducing a children's line
of swimwear.
"It's a very challenging
business. It's very high fashion,"
Gloria says. "It's a chancy
business. You try to predict
fashions for the future, especially
when you're a leader."
Debbie Matzkin is active in
Wizo, an organization that pro-
motes the welfare of women and
children in ISrael and families
through schools, day care centers
and counseling. Debbie's grand-
mother, among the first Jews to
move to Colombia, organized a
Wizo chapter there, and her
mother was also active in Wizo.
DEBBIE ALSO is involved
with the National Council of
Jewish Women and the Matzkins
are Young Presidents of Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
Oberson's last appearance in
South Florida was at the 1985 an-
nual luncheon for Mt. Sinai
Founders.


I
.
/
.
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Israel Histadrut $94
Million In Commitment
Established in 1960 at the in-
itiative of Dr. Sol Stein, then Ex-
ecutive Director of the National
Committee for Labor Israel, the
Israel Histadrut Foundation has
developed a program of deferred
giving for the benefit of the social,
health, vocational training and
related services provided by
Histadrut in Israel to 85 percent
of the population. During its first
quarter century, the Foundation
has secured some $94 million in
commitments for its humanitarian
endeavors.
Dr. Stein, who made his mark
as an effective director of the
Jewish National Fund in Belgium
before World War II, and then in
Philadelphia after his arrival in
America, has devoted six decades
to assist in the promotion of the
"financial health" of Israel,
before and after the State's in-
dependence. His crowning
achievement is the Israel Histadrut Foundation, which has
pioneered new forms of deferred giving, innovative programs in
the field of testamentary bequests, high-yield annuities, and
Israel-related charitable remainder trusts.
"When the Foundation was born in 1960, we had modest
goals, a few millions at a time," says Dr. Stein. "But the idea
caught on, as thousands of American Jews made commitments,
that benefitted themselves as well as Israel, and the total has
swelled. A hundred million dollars in those days was as remote as
the moon. But man shortly after that did reach the moon, and we
hope to reach our target in the near future, too."
r
Histadrut Foundation Nears 100 Million Go,
As final plans are being com-
pleted for the 21st annual Florida
national conference of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation at the
Konover Hotel Feb. 22 and 23,
Foundation president Dr. Sol
Stein announced that the
humanitarian effort on behalf of
the people of Israel was neanng
its $100 million goal in the form of
deferred gifts, annuities and
testamentary bequests and trusts.
The conference will salute
Histadrut, the great labor federa-
tion of Israel, on its 66th anniver-
sary, a historic period which saw
the creation of the State of Israel
and the growth of a new society
imbued with the ideals of social
justice.
Established in 1961 with
Associate Justice Arthur J.
Goldberg as its founding chairman
and Dr. Stein, a noted economist
as its guiding spirit, the Founda-
tion has provided a channel for
thousands of American Jews to
share in the promotion of
numerous health, educational and
social welfare programs in Israel.
A highlight of the conference in
the Miami area will be a gala ban-
quet Monday. Feb. 23 at the
Konover Hotel. The Honorable
Yosef Yaakov, Minister-
Gala For Hope Set For Feb. 22
Dr. Sol Stein
The National Parkinson Foun-
dation's 29th annual "Gala for
Hope," featuring comedian Bob
Hope and benefitting the Founda-
tion's research, treatment and
rehabilitation programs, will be
Feb. 22 at the Fountainebleau
Hilton Hotel.
Hope will present the Founda-
tion's 1987 Humanitarian Award
to businessman and developer
Stephen H. Muss.
The Foundation, in association
with the University of Miami
School of Medicine, will feature a
cocktail reception, gourmet din-
ner, and performances by Hope,
the Foundation's National Chair-
man, his wife Delores, singer Con-
nie Haines and the cast of La
Cage Aux Folles.
Counselor at the kw
Israel. Consul GwJjgJ
Waahington, will be ^M
speaker. Greetings will kT**
ed by the HonfraS!S
Timor, Consul General o?S?
Miami. **:
t ger Participants in tfce^
to Histadrut and Isr&T?J
R*bbi Leon Knjfjjj
chairman of the Israel i5l
Foundation Board ^ ffi* 5
R*bbi Irving Lehnl^
leader of Temple EmanK
Judge Herbert S. Sh, I
member of the IMF k3
Directors. Rabbi MortonT
sky, spiritual leader of C
Beth Shalom Hollywood j
chairman of the IHF Boy*
preside.
A soecial presentation i 1
made to Dorothy Brenner 1
jor benefactor of the Founds j
Dr. Stein will render a repor"A
the achievements of the Foo,|
tion during its first
century.
!
1
qiar,
Entertainment will be pronj
by Jaime Bronsztein nd J
Klermer Band, featuring "Jm
Soul Music." Reservations for;
gala banquet may be ^
through the regional Founds
office on Miami Beach It-
Goldberg, Florida IFH Direr*
in charge of arrangementt
Steven Moss
Dr. Frymer To Speak At
Observance Of David Ben-Gurion
Parker Thomson To Be
Honored At Award Luncheon
Dr. Berel Frymer, national
chairman of the education and
program committee of the Labor
Zionist Alliance, will be the prin-
cipal speaker at a communitywide
observance of the centenary of
David Ben-Gurion scheduled
Thursday, Feb. 12, at Temple
Emanu-El.
The LZA, a member organiza
tion of the American Zionist
Federation, is sponsoring the
salute in memory of Ben-Gurion,
Israel's first prime minister and
founder of Israel's Labor Party.
The 1:30 p.m. event is free and
open to the general public.
Harriet Green of Miami Beach,
national vice president of Na'amat
USA and chairman of the board of
the American Zionist Federation
f South Florida, is chairperson of Yiddish Culture Winkle L'a^dT^e^te'^of
better human relations and con
Activities Program
Attorney Parker D. Thomson
will be honored at the Leonard L.
Abess Human Relations Award
Luncheon of Anti-Defamation
League Florida Region at noon
Sunday, at the Omni International
Hotel.
Thomson, senior partner in the
law firm of Thomson, Zeder,
Bohrer, Werth and Razook, will
THE ULTIMATE
IN
KOSHER DINING
KOSHER^*
GSTEAJ(J:HOUSL
EARLY BIRD
DINNER
Wnnf include* dMttflAIfo,
FuM Course
Spcta< Menu
SQ95
the centennial celebration.
Joseph Bernhaut of Miami
Beach, chairman of the coor-
dinating committee for the Labor
Zionist Alliance in South Florida,
will extend greetings. Readings
and poetry on Ben-Gurion will be
presented by Rose Luski of Miami
Beach.
Dr. Frymer of New York is a
former executive of the cultural
department of Histadrut in Israel.
Consul David Cohen of the State
of Israel, who serves in the Israeli
Consulate General in Miami, will
represent the Government at the
fete marking the 100th birthday
of Ben-Gurion.
Yiddish Culture Winkle will
hold a program of cultural ac-
tivities Thursday. Feb. 12 at 10:30
a.m. in Temple Ner Tamid.
Featured will be Mina Bern.
Yiddish actress, raconteur and
mistress of ceremonies, and
Shoshana Ron. Israeli singer who
has arranged a program of com-
edy, drama and song. Accompany
ing Ms. Ron will be virtuosi
pianist Shmuel Fershko. Menasha
Feldstein, president, will be
chairman.
tributing substantially to the well-
being of the citizens of Florida."
Thomson has been chairman of
the Governor's Commission on
Advocacy for Persons With
Disabilities and helped form the
Dade County Fair Campaign
Practices Committee. In volun-
tary endeavors, he serves on the
executive committees of the
Center for Fine Arts, the Florida
Board of Historic Preservation.
and the Greater Miami Opera
Association.
4 to 5 30 PM Mofim, ttMfH Ttow
lMi In i,imm UMn *w> 'W*HI'I
CATERING FACILITIES SOtoM
TRADITIONAL FRIDi'
NIGHT DINNER
HQ Including i
13
Glass ol Win
III & lip incluM SMI
bf Pripiid Sy Fritiy 3M
Mgulir Mniu Available SMiMM
TiHiftdi* 4 n 8 P M
F Rmrvitiont Ptwie
672-0003
Ocun il ttlh St m Br
SASSON HOTEL
Miami Beach civic leader Alien
Goldberg, immediate vast
president of the Presidents
Club ofSoulk Florida, has been
elected chairman of the board
of directors of the Presidents
Club, an organization compris-
ed of the presidents of social
clubs or of condominium
associations of both high rise
condominiums and rental
apartment complexes in Dade
and south Broward counties.
Goldberg is past president of
the Civic League of Miami
Beach, past president of the
Men'8 Club of Temple Emanu-
El, and past president of the
Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai
B'rith.
William
HABER
ART AUCTION
Temple lerael 137 N.E. 19th St., Miami
Saturday, February 7th at 8 PM
Modern Art Collection Old Masters
Picasso "Flying Dove", Chagall "Psalms of David",
Toulouse Lautrec "Ta Bouche", Braque, Mucha, Mlro,
Cassatt, Laurenchin, Vasarely, Cheret, Agam, Appel,
Alvar, Finl, Dali, Icart, Calder, Cassigneul, Zorn, Whistler,
Renoir, Robbe, Erte, Mcknight, Leger, Rubin, Utrillo,
Ernst, Rayo, Valentin, Rembrandt "The Return of the
Prodigal Son", and "Rembrandt and his Wife Saskia",
Tissot, Steinlen, Helleu, Villon "Les Bucoliques"!
Maillot, Tamayo, Bonnard, Vlaminck, Tobiasse.
Auctioneers Note: This exciting show marks my 25th
year here. Please attend!
Exhibition: Saturday 2:00 PM to 7:30 PM
William Haber Auctioneer 573-5900
Contact:
HADASSAH
WILUS A
BKQUKSTS
DEPARTMENT
50 West 58th Street
New York. NY 10019
(212)303-8062
Kive fart tall. Seventy pounds. I -
\cars old...and alrvad\ .1 ruiddint
Israeli tennis star.
Vuchai, born 14 weeks prv.in.iiun.
weighed 2 pounds at birth. So
Ins survival, let alone Ins promise*
an athlete, is another miracle
of love, eoneem and modern meiW
seienee made possible b\ I ladasvik
He is one ol hundreds <>l Israefi
children living full and health}
lives hccuu.se the Neonatal Intel""*
Cure I nil of the lladassah
Univarait} Hospital. Mi. Sepu\
prm ides skilled eure combined ,
highl\ sophisticated cuuip>-,nt-
Hadassahs contribution l rcducnt V.
Israel's premature infant mortals
rate to one of the lowest in HK
world, is another in a long line "'.
medical achievements in I ludus"
75 year hiKtorx.
Because iludassali cares...and
because \ou cure...we can assiin.
medical miracles for the future
through Hadassahs Wills A M* '
program.
Well gladK answer >our iltoug
on how to provide your own
of love."
ft<


[ebrew Academy's Third
Annual Gala Concert
ar

iree renowned cantors will be
at the Rabbi Alexander
Gross Hebrew Academy's
Annual Gala Concert on
19, along with the school's
[lember Student Choir.
ring in the program, which
Jins at 7:30 p.m. in the school's
Diium, will be Cantors David
{ley, of Toronto, Yaakov
en of Montreal and David
of Philadelphia, who will
ent a program of Classical,
sratic, Jewish, Israeli,
iassidic and Cantorial
etions.
le Academy choir will present
lusical variation under the
ion of school musical direc-
Aliza Sebag.
itor Bagley is known for his
Somatic tenor voice and his deep
pderstanding and interpretation
the liturgy. He emigrated to
Israel from Mexico City where he
pved as Cantor of Nidchei Israel
Aflhkenazi Congregation. He has
served as a cantor in the Israeli
Armed Forces, where he made
frequent appearances for the
benefit of soldiers, the wounded
and the Bet Halochem.
Cantor Motzen, born in Tel Aviv
into a fifth generation of Cantors,
began his studies at an early age
with his father and continued his
studies with the late Chazan
Slomo Ravitz and Cantor Yotz-
chak Eshyel in Israel. He was
formerly Chief Cantor in
synagogues in Givatayem, Haifa
and Ramat Gan and has appeared
in concerts for the Israeli Army
and has performed in the United
States, Europe and Australia.
Cantor Gildar, a native of
Cleveland, began his studies as a
cantor at the age of five and was
educated in music, theory and har-
mony at the Cleveland Institute of
Music and at the Cantors Institute
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, studying
under cantors such as David
Kusevitsky and Max Wohlberjr.
Greater Miami
NCJW To Hold
Legislation Day
The Greater Miami Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its "State
Legislation Day" on Feb. 11 at
9:30 a.m. in the Greater Miami
Federation auditorium.
Members of the Dade County
Legislature Delegation will report
on their respective committees on
which they serve and any new
legislation they are planning to in-
troduce in the coming session.
Sylvia Oberstein, NCJW Sec-
tion, Vice President of Public Af-
fairs, says, "This annual event
provides the opportunity for our
members and their guests to meet
their state senators and represen-
tatives on an informal and per-
sonal basis and to ask questions as
informed advocates."
Nan Rich, a member of the
NCJW's National Board and past
president of the Greater Miami
Section and currently its Florida
State Public Affairs Committee
chairwoman, will chair the event.
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Man Of The Year
Award To Louis Stein
Two Brothers Will Be Anshei Lubavitch
Highlighted At TOPA
ii
Ml
M
M
ati
brothers who have had
1 successful careers as can-
^^Eon four continents North
America. Africa. Asia and
Australia will be highlighted in
a aommunitywide cantorial con-
cert at the Miami Beach Theater
of Ihe Performing Arts Monay
evening, Feb. 18.
The program, sponsored by
Temple Emanu-El, will feature
i
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
presents
Yehuda and Friends
Yehuda
* Shifman
In concert
FEBRUARY 16, 1987
8:00 P.M.
Theater Of Performing Arts
Call: 538-2503, ext. 14
Select A Seat or
Charge-By-Phone:
1-800-323-7328
Cantor Yehuda Shifman of Miami
Beach and his brother, Cantor
Baruch Shifman of Columbus,
Ohio. Both are six generation can-
tors and have had cantorial
assignments in South Africa, the
State of Israel, the United States
and Australia.
Also on the program will be
Cantor Moshe Stern, former chiel
cantor at the Great Synagogue in
Jerusalem, and Cantor Benzion
Miller, now at Beth-El Congrega-
tion in Brooklyn.
Lecture Series
The Anshei Lubavitch of
Greater Miami will present a
series of five lectures by Rabbi
Leibel Schapiro, rabbi of Ocean
Spray Synagogue and Rosh
Yeshiva of Yeshiva Gedolah of
Greater Miami at the Cadillac
Hotel.
The lectures at 8 p.m. followed
by open discussions, are scheduled
for Feb. 4,"God's Relationship to
Man"; Feb. 11, "Kabbalah Jewish
Mysticism, Part I"; Feb. 18,
"Kabbalah Jewish Mysticism,
Part II"; Feb. 25, "Teshuva -
When Sin Becomes a Virtue";
March 4, "The Messianic Era."
Louis. Stein, Miami Beach
philanthropist and former chair-
man of the board of Food Fair
Stores, will be honored as "Man of
the Year" by the Men's Club of
Temple Emanu-El Sunday, Feb.
22, at a 9:30 a.m. breakfast at the
Miami Beach congregation.
Announcement of Stein's selec-
tion was made by Dr. John
Berger, president of the Men's
Club and by Dr. Irving Lehrman,
rabbi. The breakfast is open to the
public.
Stein will be honored, Dr.
Lehrman said, "in appreciation of
a lifetime of consecrated service
to his faith, his people and to
mankind."
A vice president of Temple
Emanu-El, Stein moved here
after his retirement as head of
Food Fair, a national chain of
grocery stores headquartered in
Philadelphia where he was a top
leader of the United Jewish Ap-
peal and State of Israel Bonds.
Stein is vice president of the
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged of Miami, where he is presi-
dent of its Society of Founders.
He also is a Founder and Trustee
of Mount Sinai Medical Center in
Miami Beach, and a member of
the boards of trustees of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
Louie Stein
America and of the Technion-
Israel Institute of Technology in
Haifa.
Last year the Jewish
Theological Seminary honored
Stein by presenting him an
honorary Doctor of Laws degree.
He is an attorney, who practiced
more than 30 years in Penn-
sylvania before his retirement.
---^ FIELD REPRESENTATIVE
Are you a "people" person? Leading Women's
Zionist Organization has challenging and
rewarding opportunity for you to assist in the
development of chapter membership. Prior
fund-raising experience helpful. Flexible hours.
Must have car.
Please call: 1-800-221-3117
we>e>^e>+e>-) ^-~-
_------
S
in. ^
e*
Temple
Administrator
lum sized, well established
nta reform synagogue re-
quires an experienced, proles
Iona I administrator. Position
Malls lull responsibility man
gement lunctluon covering ell
3p*cts of steff, office, and I
Hiding progrems. Flexible
combination package of econom-
ise, and moet attractive working
conditions affords en excellent
>wth opportunity. The cendi-
le should poetess a positive,
Bwgetlc, people-oriented atti
lode, along with quality work
experience, including financial
ad administrative management
kMls. A nonsmoker Is requested.
d resume to:
TEMPLE SINAI
I c/o Dr. David M. Taylor,
President
960 Johnson Ferry Road, N.E.
Suite 346
L Atlanta. Georgle 30342
The warmth of tradition
and Maxwell House Coffee.
It couldn't be anything bat Shabbos dinner.



Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Readers Write
'Who Is A Jew'
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian:
I have just returned from a
10-day conference in Jerusalem,
which I attended upon the invita-
tion of the Chief Rabbinate and
the Minister of Religions, to
discuss the issue of the Law of
Registration related to "Who is a
Jew." During the conference, I
presented the following solution
to what has become a hotly-
debated international question:
"The Government of Israel can
only and should only rule on 'Who
is an Israeli.' Torah law is the fac-
tor to decide the question, 'Who is
a Jew.' Therefore, all documents
that Jews hold in Israel should
identify them as 'Israeli,' which
would not discriminate against
any religious group or denomina-
tion among the Jewish people.
"For security reasons, because
of Arab terrorist infiltration, it is
proposed that the Hebrew name
of both parents should be added to
identification documents. Those
who wish to identify themselves
also as Jews would have to turn to
the Chief Rabbinate for this addi-
tional identification. The Chief
Rabbinate would have offices at
all major Israeli consulates
throughout the world in order to
process these requests."
In principle, this measure would
solve all of the present problems
relating to the "Who is a Jew"
question because it would remove
Brotherhood Of Temple Israel
Sponsors Luncheon Lectures
A program for "men's ears on-
ly" called "Welcome Back to the
Frat House," sponsored by the
Brotherhood of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami is a series of lun-
cheon lectures with Rabbi Haskell
M. Beraat.
Featured Wednesdays, Feb. 18,
Mar. 11, and April 29 from 12:15
p.m. to 1:55 p.m. at The Miami
Club, topics will include: "A Good
Jewish Boy How Good is He
(Ethics and the Business Com-
munity)"; Who is a Man? (The
Myths of Macho)"; "An Exclusive
Fraternity (The Jewish Male in a
Christian World Have the Bar-
riers Really come down)";
"Where Have All the Flowers
Gone/ (The Fulfillments and
Disillusion merits of Contemporary
Marriage and Non-Traditional
Relationships)"; and "Early Life,
Mid Life and Late Life Crises
(Since When is the Middle the
Problem?)."
Community Corner
The Forte Forum will present Dr. Miles Bunder
speaking on "From Ben Gurion to Peres: Is Peace
Possible?" Tuesday, at 1 p.m. in the auditorium. Dr.
Bunder is Director, Department of Synagogue Schools,
Central Agency for Jewish Education, Miami.
The Temple Israel Siserhood will present E.L Doc-
torow's "World Fair, Dr. Jack L. Sparks, "Of Childhood
and Nostalgia," review at 11 a.m., refreshments at
10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, at Temple Israel.
Sholem Lodge 1024, B'nai B'rith, will present ac-
countant Bert Brown speaking on "Living with the New
Tax Law" at the Sunday meeting at 10 a.m. In the
Auditorium of the Hillel House on the University of
Miami campus.
Ambassador Rachamim Timor, Israeli Consul
General of Florida and Puerto Rico, will be the guest
speaker at the next Temple Beth Am Congregational
Brotherhood Breakfast Forum on Sunday morning,
Feb. 15, at 9:30 a.m. in the Temple Youth Lounge.
Temple Beth Moshe of North Miami will hold an open
house and registration for its new youth program and
will introduce its youth director, Steve Sandier, Sun-
day, at 11 a.m. at the Rochelle and Harold Fein Youth
House.
The David Ben-Gurion Culture Club will hold a
dinner-dance-show to celebrate the 100th birthday of
David Ben-Gurion, former prime minister of Israel. The
dinner will be held at the Konover Hotel, Miami Beach,
Sunday, at 6 p.m. For reservations call Aaron Gopman.
Wiesel Reflects On The
State Of World Jewry
from the State of Israel the
responsibility of ruling on intra-
religious Jewish issues between
Reform and Orthodoxy.
My proposal was publicized in
the Israeli press and on television.
It was warmly welcomed by the
Minister of Religions, the Chief
Rabbis, and even the ultra-
Orthodox movement headed by
such personalities as Rabbi
Shlomo Zalman Auerbach, who
gave his blessing to me on this
issue. The Lubavitch movement
was also made aware of my pro-
posal through their represen-
tative, Rabbi Chefer, who was
very sympathetic to the idea.
The matter is now in the hands
of the Chief Rabbis and the
Ministry of Religions to be im-
plemented by a Chief Rabbis Em-
bassy in the Diaspora and by the
offices attached to Israeli con-
sulates worldwide. Incidentally,
this Embassy would also be in
charge of divorces, adoptions and
conversions pertaining to Israeli
citizens or future olim. The Em-
bassy would also oversee all
kosher supervision for companies
that export kosher food to Israel
from abroad.
As vice president of the Union
of Orthodox Rabbis of the United
States, I will make my report on
these issues at the Union's for-
thcoming conference in Miami.
RABBI TIBOR H. STERN
Miami Beach
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Elie Wiesel delivered his
State of World Jewry ad-
dress to a packed house at
the 92nd Street Y in
Manhattan recently and ex-
pressed his concern about
the disunity within Jewish
ranks.
"I am disturbed by the inner
process of polarization," he
reflected, "... by the rancor and
hatred ... the turning of politics
into religion or religion into
politics." He observed that "Even
Hillel and Shammai sat down at
the same table together and
let their children intermarry .
We need to know that we are
brother and sister. Somehow, this
isn't so. Have we forgotten our
tradition of tolerance0"
in danger of disappearing," he
said. We know "how to touch
them, to reach them."
HE WAS optimistic about
several aspects of the plight of
Soviet Jewry, including the fact
that there are now reportedly only
a dozen Prisoners of Zion, and
that the anti-Zionist propaganda
machine has lost much of its clout.
"If it's not heartwarming," he
said, "at least it's not so terrible."
He spoke less of the Holocaust
than expected, noting, however,
that "the subject that was once
taboo for so many years" is now a
focal point. He mentioned "the
new wave" in Germany "not to
deny the tragedy but to normalize
it the philosophy of (Chancellor
Helmut) Kohl and the new
historians."
Wiesel warned against the evils
of war for the world and especially
for Jews, because "Whenever
there is conflict between two na-
tions, the .lews are their first
victims."
Dl AN ERA of terrorism L
satd Jews are singled 35
hostages just because thev .?
Jews^Citing the killings j
in Lebanon in the past year nt
because they fcJSTft
Jewish^ Wiesel read out the rjt
of eight Jews murdered "2
should be remembered." he said
Wiesel's concern for issue, of
justice beyond the Jewish
garnered him an award, when k
was presented with the Freedom
Award of the Internationa1
Rescue Committee (IRC) Dv njr
international vice president ac
tress Liv Ullmann. -for his
lifelong commitmen! to refue
assistance."
The IRC provides emers
medical health, edu
relocation assistance
in Pakistan, the Sudan Th
Hong Kong. Centra
Europe.
IN THIS vein, he struck a chill-
ing chord by linking the issue of
the failure of Allied leaders to
save Jews during the Holocaust
a word which he coined but which
he said he doesn't like anymore
and the problem of disunity
among Jews. "So little was done
'aStefSaTZSi* Yad Vashem Medal Of The Right
unity among the Jews
themselves."
Woman Who Sheltered Dutch Jews
In Her Home During WWII Receives
eous
His address, which also dealt
with Israeli-diaspora relations,
Soviet Jewry and international
terrorism, was delivered with his
usual fervor but was also punc-
tuated with levity and wit.
During the question period,
Wiesel was asked for his defini-
tion of "Who is a Jew." His
response was: "To me, a Jew who
links his destiny to the destiny of
his people is a Jew. I don't need to
go further." But he also observed
that "I cannot imagine a Jewish
people without a religious
commitment."
THE WORLD-FAMED author
and lecturer and winner of the
1986 Nobel Peace Prize addressed
himself at length to the relation-
ship between Israel and diaspora
Jewry and the resistance of
Israelis to accept as fact Jews whof
don't wish to live in Israel.
This rift, he said, puts diaspora
Jewry "on the defensive." "The
diaspora poses problems." Wiesel
reflected. As a child growing up in
the Carpathian mountains. "Had
anyone told me there would be a
Jewish State, I would not have
believed it. But had anyone told
me there would be a Jewish State
and I wouldn't live there, I'd
believe it even less."
The dual pull in the Jewish
psyche is troubling, he agreed.
"We have to constantly confront
this. And there is no answer. I ad-
mit it," he said. "The Israelis re-
sent us What does it really
mean that someone should be
measured by where he lives?"
"Sure," he said, "the diaspora
is unnatural to Israel," but, he
asked, "What do we do with the
self-imposed obligation to help
Israel? '
MATTERS IN Israel, he said,
are as important to Jews in the
diaspora as events happening on
the next street. But as residents
of the diaspora, "Do we have the
right or duty to take a position on
Israel's policies?"
Wiesel spoke also about Soviet
Jews, who are united in the Soviet
Union against a common oppres-
sion, "united with a solidarity that
is inspiring."
He expressed cautious optimism
about the situation of Soviet Jews,
but did not refrain from criticizing
the Soviet regime. "True," he
said, "the Kremlin has harshened
its position, but some refuseniks
have been freed." Soviet Jews
now know, he said, that "they are
not abandoned. They are not
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
NEW YORK (JTA) A
93-year-old great-great-
grandmother received a Yad
Vashem Medal of the Righteous
here, with four generations of her
descendants attending the
ceremony at the Israel Consulate.
Wilhelmine Asbeek Brusse. who
sheltered many Dutch Jews in her
home during World War II, was
presented with the Yad Vashem
certificate and medallion by
Moshe Yegar. Consul General of
Israel.
One of Asbeek's two daughters,
Marian Leisen, had married a
Jewish doctor before the war. She
was 25 when the Nazis occupied
Holland. Dr. Leisen was a leader
of the Dutch underground, and
the entire Asbeek family was ac-
tive in the resistance movement.
In an act of defiance against the
Nazis. Marian and her sister
Wilhelmine (later Esther) con-
verted to Judaism in 1941.
ASBEEK'S underground ac-
tivities started as early as the
beginning of the war in" Holland,
when she took Jewish refugees in-
?
to her home. She also perform*
dangerous tasks outside her home
for the resistance movement. Sh
hid not only people but the.-
possessions.
After the war, she returned u
Jewish friends the valuables she
had hidden for them in her attic
Asbeek, whose code name was
"Tante Cos" or "Oma." was ar-
rested for her resistance ac
tivities. After escaping frotr.
Westerbork Concentration Camt
on September 3, 1944, she cor.
tinued to shelter Jews until libera-
tion in May 1945.
After the war. Asbeek-
daughter Esther married Manfrec
Klafter, one of the Jews he:
mother had hidden. The couple-
adopted son, an orphaned concer.
tration camp survivor, made aliys
in 1976. The Klafters followed hir.
and moved to Israel, whert
Esther died six years ago.
Asbeek now lives in SttX
Plains, New Jersey, as does he-
daughter, Marian, her granc
daughter Daisy Wexler. some o:
her five great-grandchildren, aiw
some of her six great-great
grandchildren.
i /
SWEETHEART BIRD FESTIVAL
Sponsored By: MIAMI PARROT CLUB
In Conjunction With AMERICA'S ART BEAJ
."' *s
Exotic Bird
Exhibition
and
Sale
12:00 Noon To 5:30 P.M.
Sunday February 8.1987
FREE ADMISSION
KENDALL TOWN & COUNTRY PAVILION
ON THE LAKE
Corner of Kendall Drive and 117th Avenue
?


Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B

A Neglected Group In The Study
Of Holocaust Survivors
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
studies done till now on
Holocaust and its vic-
is, on; group has been
Bglected. They are the sur-
tvors who were children at
lie time. It is only within
last six years that a
imulative study has
sveloped to deal with the
lumatization of those who
re no older than 13 when
Jorld War II began.
In Sands Point, Long Island, a
Haiet suburb of New York City, a
ivately funded study began in
$1 compiling testimonies of the
ildren who came through the
locaust. reaching out to ar-
/es and private individuals in
rope. Israel and throughout the
ited States and Canada in
ch of written accounts of
fiories.
ie Jerome Riker International
iy of Organized Persecution of
iren has to date collected 500
/jews with child survivors,
iteer interviewers continue
(ferret out these people and
record their personal experience,
More during and after the
Holocaust
Htecific interest in child sur-
vivors arose from the work of a
husband-and-wife team directing
the Riker Study. Milton and Dr.
Judith Kestenberg. Milton
Kestenberg is a N'ew York at
tomey whose work in challenging
refused West (German reparations
claims by Holocaust survivors
who claimed psychological impair-
ment led him to question the
reasons for the refusals.
1 IN WORKING on these claims,
be found they had been refused
because German-authorized
psychiatrists eonteneded they
could not validate that the stated
psychological problems were ac-
tually induced by the Holocaust.
Aa Kestenberg questioned sur-
vivors about their experiences in
order to refile their claims with
the German government, the in-
for*at; >r> he gathered made him
increasingly aware of the
psychological makeup of child sur-
vivors and the emotional legacy
pasted on to their own children.
Dr. Judith Kestenberg, the
Riker Study project director, is a
psychoanalyst specializing in child
development. In 1972, she found-
ed Child Development Research
(CDR), a non-profit organization.
whose purpose is the prevention
of emotional disorders in children.
CDR runs a center for parents
and children, babies, pregnant
women, mothers with babies
and/or toddlers up to age four.
Through these years," she
said, "we have learned to com-
municate with these babies and
have taught parents to com-
municate with them. We invented
methods of communicating with
children non-verbally before they
could speak fluently." CDR
ipists work with movement,
[and music therapists in order
study non-verbal communica-
with children.
noring altogether the Holocaust
as a major contributing factor to
mental illness, witnessed by the
fact that therapists found it dif-
ficult to identify with the impact
the Holocaust had on their clients.
The result was that the therapist
became what one called "a part-
ner to the denial of the impact."
Psychotherapists in America,
said Milton Kestenberg, shared
the resistence to the Holocaust
and its experience with the rest of
America. "This was taboo," he
said, emphasizing that readiness
to discuss the Holocaust is only re-
cent. "It was quiet because we
(the U.S.) didn't do anything
about it."
THE GUILT was felt not only
by America, he said, but by the
survivors themselves, for having
survived when others did not. This
was fueled by a lack of sympathy
from people regarding the sur-
vivors* Holocaust experiences.
Milton Kestenberg recalled a
woman who had been adopted by
an American family as a "second
daughter" on condition that she
never speak about her Holocaust
experiences. She kept her promise
not to talk about them, he said,
"but she never forgot them,
either, and their memory con-
stantly gnawed at her. She nur-
tured these memories inside her
and she developed a neurosis."
Eva Fogelman, a
psychotherapist who is a research
associate and Board member of
the Riker Study, said that during
her work with groups of children
of survivors she found some
parents who were themselves only
children during the Holocaust.
Fogelman said that therapists,
in interviewing the child sur-
vivors, found that these people
had not previously had the oppor-
tunity to talk about their ex-
periences. "It's such a great sense
of relief to finaly share it with
somebody and get a chance to talk
about it," she said.
MOST PEOPLE, said
Fogelman, don't ask child sur-
vivors what they went through
during the Holocaust because they
feel they don't remember, that
children couldn't have a memory
of such things. "It's as if they
didn't see anything, hear
anything, feel anything,"
Fogelman observed. "On the con-
trary, said Fogelman, "they are
completely left with nightmares
and the horrors that they
experienced."
Fogelman said that child sur-
vivors have actually related in the
interviews that their parents said
to them, "You were too young to
remember anything." But in reali-
ty. Fogelman said, child sur-
vivors, with the guidance of ex-
perienced interviewers, have a lot
of memory that is pertinent to
how children experience trauma.
"They have a lot to teach us about
how children cope under stressful
conditions," she said.
Until now, Fogelman said, there
has been no systematic research
on the effect of the massive
psychic trauma on children as
compared to adults. But now, 40
years later, "we are trying to
understand from a psychological
perspective from people who had
different kinds of experiences"
what varied reactions arose from
experiencing childhood during the
unprecedented persecutions of the
Holocaust.
"We don't know a lot of this.
Today in psychology there is a
whole new filled on stress and cop-
ing, but even in that literature
there's no differentiation between
children and adults." Fogelman
explained.
SHE SAID that during the in-
terviews with child survivors,
many of them said they felt they
didn't belong anywhere. They felt
they did not belong with the se-
Continued on Page 16-B
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Young Leadership
Council held the first meeting of its "Classical Jewish Texts" lec-
ture series at the home of Rabbi HaskeU Bernat of Temple Israel
of Greater Miami. Rabbi Bernat pictured left led the group in a
discussion of what classical Jewish sources have to say about
issues individuals face today as leaders in the Jewish community.
Pictured are Bernat, Saby Behar, Roberto Kassin and Maureen
Berkowitz. Future meetings will be held on February 19, with
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz of Temple Menorah discussing what
the traditional writings have to say about responsibilities to
ourselves; and on March 19 with Rabbi Yochanan Zweig of the
Talmudic University of Florida discussing what the tradition
has to say about responsibilities to families. More information
may be had from Milt Heller at Federation.
Bnos Agudath Israel To
Expand Torah Programming
Bnos Agudath Israel of America
is planning to expand its network
of Torah programming for girls in
the Greater Miami area, it was an-
nounced at a meeting of youth
leaders.
The girl's Youth Movement of
Agudath Israel of America aims
to foster a sense of oneness
among girls throughout the Or-
thodox Jewish world while instill-
ing a sense of communal respon-
sibility and unity of purpose
through multi-faceted Torah and
Chesejd programs and leisure-time
activities.
The recent gathering of
volunteer leaders included
Devorah Pollack, director of the
national Bnos Agudath Israel of-
fice in New York, event coor-
dinator Rivka Bensiger of Miami
Beach, director of Bnos Agudath
Israel in South Florida, supported
by Rabbi Ephraim Leizerson,
menahel of Bais Yaakov of Miami.
v
GO STIR CRAZY
frm
fr*,* Mixture f
ssawssstn
Bamboo Shoots
K Kosher
IS THIS experience that
re us a new understanding of
babies think. These observa-
tions enabled us to begin to study
on a new key how children felt
when they were traumatized by
the Holocaust," Dr. Kestenberg
explained.
Dr. Kestenberg repeatedly
noticed that in therapy, the
Holocaust experience was not fac-
tored into the behavior of sur-
ssars and their children as a con
3jting element,
oreover, psychotherapists
leded that they themselves
I guilty of minimizing or ig-
Make a delicious oriental stir fried dish in a snap AM it takes is one of the
oriental-style vegetables from BIRDS EYE" and our quick and easy
recipe Its an absolutely Kosher way to enjoy the flavor of the East.
SHANGHAI BEEFY
Combine H teaspoon ginger. 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 minced garlic clove in a bowl Slice
V* pound Hank steak into thin strips, toss with soy sauce mixture Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a
skillet or wok. add beet and saute until lightly brown Remove seasoning pouch trom 1 pack-
age (10 oz) BIRDS EYE- Stir-Fry Vegetables' any variety Add vegetables to skillet Stir
reduce heat Cover and simmer 3 minutes, stirring once Sprinkle contents ol seasoning
pouch over vegetables Combine v, cup water and 1 teaspoon comstarch. pour into skillet
Cook and stir about 1 minute until thickened Makes about 3 cups or 3 servings Serve with
rice, it desired
To use BIRDS EYE" Farm Fresh Mixtures Caulillower Baby Whole Carrots and Snow Pea Pods or
Broccoli Red Peppers. Bamboo Shoots and Straw Mushroom* Prepare -ecipe as directed without season-
ing packet using H pacxage (2 cups) vegetables and increasing soy sauce to 2 tablespoons
c tut 9mm* tmm Ckupwor


I
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Lillian Lichtenstein To Receive
Woman Of The Year Award
Lillian Lichtenstein will receive
a Woman of the Year award from
the Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion of the American Friends of
the Hebrew University during a
luncheon at the Doral Beach
Hotel, Feb. 17 at 11:30 a.m.
"Lichtenstein richly deserves
this award for her leadership and
dedication to the community, to
civic and educational institutions
and programs, and to the welfare
of her fellow man," said Bertha
Kirsch, luncheon chairman.
Dr. Bernard Cherrick, vice
president of Hebrew University,
will be the guest speaker. A
musical interlude is scheduled.
Lillian and Samuel Lichtenstein
are Founders of the Hebrew
University-Hadassah Medical
Center and have given a research
grant to the Department of
Immunology.
Lillian Lichtenstein
They are also Founders of the
Wall of Healing, Mount Sinai
Medical Center, the Papanicolaou
Cancer Research Foundation and
are members and benefactors of
American Israel PAC.
Samuel Lichtenstein was presi-
dent and owner of Spectro In-
dustries, now a subsidiary of
McKesson. Lillian is a Life
Member of the Women's Division,
American Friends of the Hebrew
University, Hadassah, Douglas
Gardens, Jewish Home for the
Aged, Women's American ORT,
Hope School and is a member of
Sisterhood of Temple Menorah.
"Growth through Education" is
the luncheon's theme. Committee
members include Sarah Gould,
Esther Molasky, Viola Char-
cowsky, Ruth Platt, Irene Rac-
zkowski, Sarah Kaufman, Ann
Weithorn, Daisy Herschlag and
Elizabeth Mintz. Florence D.
Feldman, director of the Greater
Miami Women's Division is
coordinator.
Organisation IVews
;
Opti-Mrs. of Miami Beach will hold a lun-
cheon Wednesday at Harbor House South,
featuring astrologer and psychic Iris
Salzman. The organization supports emo-
tionally disturbed children at Montanari
Hospital and School in Hialeah. South Florida
State Hospital Childrens' Home Society,
Crisis Nursery and others.
The Beth David Congregation Sisterhood
will present their annual book review and lun-
cheon on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at 10 a.m. at
fjBeth David Congregation in Spector Hall.
Miriam Saffer will review, "The Martkoff
Women," by June Flaum Singer, about the
strength of women behind men."
The Bnai Brith North Shore Chapter
No. 645 will feature a book review by Arlene
Ditchek on Monday, Feb. 16 at 12:30 p.m. at
the Surfside Community Center.
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach Branch
1059, will hold their monthly meeting at noon
on Wednesday in the Surfside Community
Center. The guest will be Doris Bass, Direc-
tor of Elders Institute at Florida Interna-
tional University, who will speak on "The
University with Relation to the Elderly
Community."
A Valentine's Concert featuring Civic
Chorale of Greater Miami, Ballet Company of
the Cultural Arts Society of Sooth Florida,
Paul Posnak, piano, Phi Mu Alpha Saxophone
Quintet and Spotlight Soloists, will be held at
Gusman Concert Hall Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. The
event is presented by the Civic Chorale of
Greater Miami in conjunction with the
University of Miami School of Music.
The American Friends of Beit Halochem
a Bnai Zion Foundation Project, would like to
meet with groups in order to tell the story of
Beit Halochem. Mitch Chupak, National
Director, will be in this area through Feb. 10.
Arthur Klein is in charge at the Bnai Zion of-
fice, Hallandale.
Entertainment, Arts
The Miami Dade Community College Lun-
chtime Lively Arts Series will present the
Mendelssohn String Quartet at noon,
Wednesday, at Gusman Cultural Center.
Formed seven years ago by Laurie Smukler
and Nicholas Mann, violinist; Ira Weller,
violist and cellist Marcy Rosen, the Quartet
won the 1981 Young Concert Artist
Auditions.
The Greater Miami Opera has announced
the results of its Board of Directors Election,
according to Robert M. Heuer, General
Manager.
Elected to the board for their first three
year term were: Phil de Montmollin, Marilyn
Holifield, Aaron Podhurst, Audrey H. Ross,
Scott Bailey.
Re-elected to an additional three-year term
were: James M. Herron, Tina Hills, Ronald J.
Korn, Dr. Sergio Marti, Leonard M. Miller,
Dr. Adelio J. Montanari, Robert Traurig and
Alberto Vadia.
Award-winning violinist Peter Zazofsky
will appear with pianist Michele Levin at the
Theatre of the Performing Arts Feb. 17 at 8
p.m. in the third of six concerts presented by
Community Concert Association in its 30th
anniversary season.
A work in progress by a young
choreographer will be part of the program
performed by the Miami City Ballet when the
company makes its third appearance at the
Colony Theater on Miami Beachu at 8 p.m. on
Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday.
Art critic Judith Crist will be featured
Saturday at 11 a.m. in the Gusman Cultural
Center in conjunction with the Critics' Lec-
ture Series VII, the fourth annual Miami Film
Festival and the art museum at Florida Inter-
national University.
Champagne glasses will toast at least a
dozen of America's well-known contemporary
artists at a premiere celebration of "After
Matisse" March 7 at 9:30 p.m. at the Bass
Museum of Art.
The event is being sponsored by the Friends
of the Bass Museum and will begin with a
number of private dinner parties hosted by
collectors and art patrons including Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Abess, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Ted
Arison, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Constanza, Mr.
and Mrs. Gerald Katcher, Mr. and Mrs. R.
Kirk Landon, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Luria,
Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood Weiser and Mr. Mit-
chell Wolfson, Jr.
The artists who will be in Miami Beach for
the event include Gary Bower, Susan Crile
Michael Goldberg, Red Grooms, Al Heidi
Alex Katz, Robert Kushner, Kim MacConnel,'
Jules Olitski, Susan Smith, Marianne Stikas|
Tom Wlman and Jack Youngerman.
Temple STews
Gottlieb Hammer, noted zionist, will be the
guest speaker at Temple Beth Moshe, 2225
NE 121st St., North Miami this Friday even-
ing Feb. 6, at 8 p.m.
Mr. Hammer is the author of "Good Faith
And Credit," which provides a fascinating in-
sight into the founding of the State of Israel
and his personal involvement in those
dramatic events.
Dade South Region Women's American ORT honored the Fj
ward J. DeBartolo family at the annual Friends of ORT Trift
Dinner at the Omni Hotel, and were themselves honored in/A
Proclamation from Dade County for their work in suprj* J
their network of vocational and technical schools in Israel' other countries, and their participation in career education m-
jects in the county and state. Representing Mayor Stepk
Clark, his Executive Ast-istant John McDermott makes I
jects in the county and state. Representing Mayor Stephen P
Clark, his Executive Assistant John McDermott makes '
presentation to Tribute Dinner Co-Chairman Joan <;>hen
Region President Laurel Shapiro.
Artists Paint Free At Vizcaya
The gardens of Vizcaya will be
open free to artists carrying their
painting equipment through the
three weeks prior to "Artists
Days At Vizcaya." Saturday and
Sunday. Feb. 21 and 22.
The paintings, which must be of
Vizcaya, the Farm Village and
other subject matter relating to
the estate, will be judged on
Saturday, Feb. 21. at 1 p.m. in the
Mendel Art Gallery. There will be
two prizes of $250 each for th.
best depiction of the Vlzca,,
Museum and Gardens, and forth.
best depiction of the Vizcan
Farm Village. These will be pur.
chase awards and the paintaip
will be hung in areas through^
the Vizcaya estate rooms and
offices.
"Artists Days At Vizcaya'
be free to the public.
v.
******** *"\
GRAND OPENING
Rhinestones Naitheads Costume Jewelry
Beaded & Sequin Appliques Rhinestone Machines
Blank T-Shirts & Sweatshirts Nailhead Adapters
Flintstone & Gumby Shirts Sneakers
865-0006
7328(oilim. An. MB
PERSONALITIES II
ObbbHbU. ln.n. Sum
(Look far la* Ptak 4 Aqaa An
f(>f l<"" '' "WdOW
in tlteltontei ImspiM
We can help
ft Medical Personnel Pool
N. Miami
891-5092
Coral Gables
445-2541
Kendall
2790924
Family Members
of Alzheimer's Patients
As another community service,
Villa Maria Adult Day Health
Care Center now offers a weekend
day care program for Alzheimer's
patients. Applications are now
being accepted. Call Betty Lawson,
director at (305) 891-9751
for more information.
*
VILLA MAR!A
ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE CENTER
io.on.e. 125th St., North Miami, Florida HIM


Doris Cromer Wins $10,000
lloomingdale's Gift Certificates
ii Beach resident Doris
er bought only one ticket to
pie Israel's "Ultimate Prize"
ing from her sister-in-law
pyn Cromer. But one was
rh for both of them. A fun-
ng effort by Temple Israel of
iter Miami offered the
late Prize" to both the
and seller of the winning
tickets; a $10,000 gift cer-
to each, plus a trip to New
: City to get them in the spen-
im Mishnayos
At Chabad
Lubavitch
fcbi Abraham Korf, Florida
onal Director of Chabad
ivitch has announced that the
jinical students of the
__Siva Gedolah, under the
. Knee of the Rosh Yeshiva,
Rabbi Leibel Schapiro, will con-
doBt a Siyum Mishnayos com-
pktibn of the six orders of the
Milbnah. dedicated to the
mMpry of two individuals whose
Ban Dr. and Mrs. Daniel
Bach and Dr. and Mrs. Alvin
Stan have endowed the boys and
girls schools at the Lubavitch
EdutttionaJ Center.
tonored at the memorial
tribute will be Mr. Harry
WuMMch, who was noted for his
love relate to them. Mr. Wuensch was
an onhan at birth, but came to
America as a young child and
through hard work realized the
Amancan Dream, raising a family
and giving them love and security.
Alao memorialized will be Mrs.
Gusaia Stern, matriarch of the
Stern Family, who when widowed
as a young woman with little
children dedicated her life to rais-
ing her family and through work
at the family business, giving
them every opportunity to make
the iBierican dream a reality
Tha Siyum Mishnayos will be
held on Thursday evening, Feb.
12.
Amit
Women
Amit Women's Galil Chapter
will bold their annual Honoree
Luncheon on Wednesday, Feb. 11
at noon at the Konover Hotel in
Miami Reach. This year's
honorees are Roselyn Kaolin.
Irene Weil and, Martha
Greanberg. Kella Gold and Helene
Kollman. Each honoree will
receive a plaque, and baritone Lee
Baity will entertain.
Amit Women's Shalom Cnipter
will meet on Tuesday, at 11:30
a.m. fa) the Club Room of 100 Lin-
coln Boad. A lunch will be served
and tee program will include a
candle lighting ceremony by Millie
Schaehtman and a book review en-
titled "When All You Ever
Wanted Isn't Enough" by Rabbi
Harold Kushner, and narrated by
Emm Goldman.
Diet And
Arthritis
Arthritis Caring Together, a
support group sponsored by the
Arthritis Foundation for arthritis
patients and their families, will
hold their monthly meeting on
Wednesday, Feb. 12, beginning at
10:10 a.m., at Parkway Regional
Medical Center, Classroom A.
Mary Simmons, Registered Dieti-
curiArill present an overview of
curfpt research on the relation-
veen diet and the disease.
ding mood at New York's
Bloomingdale's.
The fund-raising drive, chaired
by Robert Levinson and produced
by Edythe Kerness, was based on
an idea suggested by Kerness'
husband, Elton. Over $70,000 was
raised, and after covering the gift
certificates and travel, nearly
$50,000 will be available for use in
continuing and expanding the
Temple's educational outreach
programs at its Downtown and
Kendall locations.
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Ruth Popkin, National Presi-
dent o/Hadassah, will address
the Miami Region ofHadassah
Diamond Jubilee Celebration
on Feb. 15 at Temple Israel.
Happenings
H. Steve Fisher, son of Howard H. Fisher of Miami, has been
commissioned a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force upon
graduation from Officer Training School at Lackland Air Force
Base. Texas.
A day-long conference on immigration and the future of ethnic
relations in Dade County will be held at the Wolfson Campus of
Miami Dade Community College on Tuesday. 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The conference is sponsored by Greater Miami United. Metro-
Dade Community Relations Board and the Wolfson Campus.
the ORIGINAL
Wolfie's 21
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DELI-RESTAURANT
"WHERE THE ELITE MEET TO EAT!"
Collins Avenue & 21st Street on Miami Beach
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS!
"In the heart of Miami Beach's Historic Art Deco District"
W SPECIALS ^
WOLFIE'S FAMOUS ROLLS OH
BAG ELS, CREAM CHEESE,
UTTER, COFFEE OR TEA.........
on
2-EGOS. ANY STYLE, GRITS
OR POTATOES. CREAM CHEESE. |aa>
BUTTER ROLLS. MINI DANISH. 9~J*%
I COFFEE OR TEA...!............. Mi
19
SPECIALS
CHOOSE FROM 6 DELICIOUS
ENTREES!
$095
FROM
2
SPECIALS
CHOOSE FROM 12 ENTREES!
$495
FROM "
. ^ TH4 > .
'^WOLFIE'S A
SPECIAL
"MIDNIGHT SNACKS
MENU"
11 PMT0 4 AM
o
TRADITIONAL
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNER
0
Special Menu
Includes: Choice of Two
Appetizers; Choice of Soup;
Choice of Entree; Choice of
6 Desserts. Plus: Choice of
Potatoes; Tzimmess; Vegetable
or Apple Sauce. Rolls & Butter.
Coffee, Tea or Fountain
Beverage. Our famous table
relishes!
ENTREES:
Roast Brisket of Beef.
Broiled Filet of Sole _
Stuffed Cabbage.
Roast Vt-Chicken .
Chicken in the Pot
9.95
7.95
.7.95
7.95
8.95
Complimentary Glass of Wine
*~~~~~
-*.
Owned and operated by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT, INC., Joseph Novel, Chairman; David H. Novel, President


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Ambassador Timor To Speak
At Na'Amat USA Luncheon
Ambassador Rahamim 'llmor,
recently-appointed Consul
General of the State of Israel in
Florida, will be the principal
speaker at the annual Spiritual
Adoption Luncheon of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat USA.
The event is slated to be at noon,
Monday, Feb. 16 at the Cuban
Hebrew Congregation of Miami,
Beth Shmuel Miami Beach.
Judge Gisela Cardonne of Miami
Beach will receive the second an-
nual "Celebration of Women"
award from the South Florida
Council at the luncheon. Reserva-
tions may be made at the Na'amat
offices.
Announcement of Ambassador
Timor's acceptance was made by
Harriet Green, president of the
South Florida Council and natinal
vice president of Na'amat USA,
the Women's Labor Zionist
Organization of America.
Mrs. Green also appointed Mrs.
Raquel Rub, president of the Or
Chapter and leader of the Cuban
Jewish community, as co-
chairperson of the luncheon. Also
named was Mrs. Felice Schwartz,
vice president of the South
Ambassador Rahamin Timor
Florida Council.
Ambassador Timor, a former
major in the Israeli army, was
Israel's ambassador to Brazil
from 1983 until moving to Miami
as consul general in November,
1986. He previously served as
Israeli ambassador to three other
nations, gaining ambassadorial
rank in 1963 after entering the
foreign sen-ice in 1956.
\a ainaJ
Women
The book. "A Certain People"
by Charles Silberman. will be
reviewed by Lillian Ship at the
Thursday, Feb. 19, noon meeting
of the Golda Meir Chapter of
Na'amat to be held in the civic
auditorium of 100 Lincoln Road
Building.
Sophie Kemper, program chair-
man, said refreshments will be
served and the public is welcome
at no charge.
Katherine Lippman, president,
will conduct the business portion
of the monthly session.
Shirley Bogen, former officer of
the national board will speak at
the Wednesday. Feb. 11, 11:30
a.m. meeting of the Beba Idelson
Chapter to take place in the
auditorium of 100 Lincoln Road
Building.
Bogen, a former seminarist of
the organization, will speak on the
progress of Na'amat in Israel
towards building a society based
on the principles of justice and
equality.
Esther Weinstein will head the
musical portion of the program.
Refreshments will be provided
by Sarah Kerbs and Mildred
Frank, hostesses.
President Irene Raczkowski
urges members and friends to
attend.
Ilailassah
Events
Model wearing a classic Sybil design from her newest Summer '87
line as she walks down the runway at the Sybil showcase at the
Miami Merchandise Mart. The showcase, which honored Los
Angeles based designer, Linda Harrison, featured tU -pieces from
her Summer '87 line. This outfit displays the well-known
sophistication and fine details of Linda Harrison's designs with
thepaddedshoulders, the intricate bell, the versatility, and the
""POSITION WANTED^
Part Time Executive Director/Administrator
SKILLED IN:
Fundraising Programming
Financial Planning Leadership Training
Membership Construction Programs
Motivation Catering
Please send Name and Phone # to:
Box WP c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
-? e
The Henrietta Szold Hadassah
Chapter of Miami Beach will hold
their meeting on Monday at 10:30
p.m., at a new meeting place, 100
Lincoln Road.
There will be a board meeting
and then the regular meeting will
follow. A luncheon will be served.
The Aviva Chapter will present
William F. Saulson speaking on
"Another View of the Mid East"
at the 8 p.m. Monday meeting in
the home of Jean Vogel.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter will
meet at its new location, The
American Savings and Loan Bank
Building, Miami Beach, Tuesday,
at 1 p.m. The Hadassah Medical
Organization project will be
highlighted.
The Hatikvah Chapter will hold
a program on anti-Semitism, 730
p.m., Thursday, Feb. 12 at Har-
mony School.
The Ko'ach Chapter will present
Jim Mullins, Chairman of the
American Civil Liberties Union of
Greater Miami, speaking on "Ter-
rorism" on Tuesday, at 8 p.m in
the Cadillac Hotel. P
Rosalie "Rocky" Futterman (center) was chosen W<,man ofik,
Yea r by the South Florida Woman's Committee for SkaartZdl
Hospital in Jerusalem and honored at the 10th annual lundu^
Shown with the honoree are Luncheon Coordinator Selm K
Denburg (left) and Luncheon Chairman Bea Young.
Temple Emanu-El Auxiliary
To Celebrate 47th Anniversary
Mothers, grandmothers, great-
grandmothers and children the
generations which comprise the
Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El
will celebrate the 47th anniver-
sary of the auxiliary' of the Miami
Beach synagogue Wednesday.
Feb. 25. in the Friedland
Ballroom of the Temple.
An 11 a.m. champagne recep-
tion will precede the noon lun-
cheon, according to Martha
Mishcon. president of Sisterhood.
She designated Leslie Cassel and
Harriet Shapiro as chairman and
co-chairman of the "Generations"
anniversary observance.
Highlighting the event will be a
Full Circle Fashion Show featur-
ing fashions by Amnesia and Hugs
'N Kisses boutiques, with model-
ing by Sisterhood members and
their families.
Harriet Shapiro, past president
of the PTA of the Lehrman Day
School and Temple Emanu-El,
said more than 30 students at the
Lehrman Day School also will
model children's clothing at the
luncheon.
Proceeds from the luncheon will
be u.-cd to complete the
Harriet Shapiro
Sisterhood's $100,000 pledge to
furnish a new science laboratory
for the Lehrman Kay School.
which recently completed a C
million expansion and renovation
at 727 Lehrman Drive. Miami
Beach.
Reservations for th< luncheon
and fashion show may be made a!
the Temple Sisterho Aleph Students Of Adath Yeshurun
To Take Part In Service
The Aleph students of Adath
Yeshurun will take part in a con-
secration service at late services
on Friday. Feb. 13. They will pre
sent a Cantata under the supervi-
sion of their teacher. Mrs. Sara
Ungar. In addition, this year's
service will include adults, each of
whom has a child in Aleph Class
and has committed themself to
study one night a week in a course
of study parallel to that of their
children.
The consecrants are: Adam
Avnet, Jamie Becker, Matthew
Brown, Marisa Chapkanov
Joshua Coba, Michael Cohen, Irit
Eliav, Robert Franco, Jason Kauf
man. Sarah Samuel Kerii
Waldstein. Allison Behrman
Mark Geller. Brian Stahinski.Jod
Arnold, Daniel Cohen. Jasoi
Evans, Adam Flam. David Fried
liana Kahan, Brian Koch, Jordar
Krams. Saul Mankes, Nicoi.
Neustein, Joshua Preiant
Adrienne Segal and Jasor.
Waaser.
The parents of the Parenl
Education Program (PEP) taught
by Roz Seidel are Gersie Arnold
Barbara Becker. Tina Cohen. Har
net Franco, Bonnie Koch, Bar
bara Samuels and Myri
Waldstein.
Alumni Of UM School
Of Medicine To Reunite
Alumni of the University of
Miami School of Medicine will
reunite Mar. 6-8 at the old
Biltmore Hotel, the site of the
Medical Schools first home.
When the school first opened in
September 1952, becoming the
first medical school in Florida it
was located in the two-story
Anastasia Building, which like the
Hlne,T 8 Admi"istration
Hospital was part of the Biltmore
Hotel, which was recently reopen-
ed after a major renovation.
Among the alumni attending
the reunion will be Bernard^
Fogel, MD, a 1961 graduate W
is now UM vice president w
medical affairs and dean of u*
medical school.
The weekend of activities in-
cludes a continuing medical edu
tion course of risk management
reception, dinner/dance, goo "
tennis tournaments and a fare*
brunch.

i


Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Grandpa's heart
was bigger
than his home.
\
n
He and Grandma didn't have many rooms.
But every one was a guest room
When another Jew was just off the boat or
out of work, he opened his heart and his door.
Your grandparents may not be around any-
more, but homeless Jews still are. Thousands of
Jews in 32 countries are living in fear or hunger
or both.
Hundreds of Jews in Israel, too old and
weak to live by themselves, are on waiting lists
for homes for the elderly.
They need more man a cot in Grandma's
kitchen or a blanket on Grandpa's couch. And
mis year, we may be hard pressed to provide it
Because in spite of some very generous gifts
to the Jewish Federation, the average pledge
would barely cover one night in a decent motel.
You don't have to put up anyone in your
family room or dining room. But when the
Federation volunteer calls, please open your
checkbook the way Grandpa opened his door.
He can't do it for you.
Now it's your turn.
w
Greater Miami Jewish Federation ^ Ai
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal ^^ ^f
4200 Biscavne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137 ^^ ^J


PagelO-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
i



i
.-. -..
%..-.
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping,
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism. This tradition is continued in the Gardens.
Mount Nebo's latest expansion.
V*',. t
':''.


Law* ** i y*; */%**.*., w
nM( yfc ft-
SPECIAL PRE-OPENING PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT:
281-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 n.w. 3rd Street, Miami. FL 33126
*
1
A


Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"And ye shall eat it in haste it is the Lord's passover"
(Exodus 12.11).
. "The Lord smote all the first-born in the land of Egypt"
(Exodus 12.S9).
BO
BO God sent Moses to Pharaoh once more with the following
words: "Go in unto Pharaoh and tell him: '. If thou
refuse to let My people go, behold, tomorrow will I bring locusts
unto thy border' (Exodus 10.1-U). Pharaoh would not be moved.
Then God punished Egypt with a thick darkness. Yet Pharaoh re-
mained adamant. Finally, Moses warned the King of Egypt that
God would send the most fearful plague on all, the death of all the
first-born in the land, both of men and beasts. The Israelites were
given the ordinance of the Passover, so named because God pass-
ed over the homes of the Israelites when he killed the first-born of
the Egyptians, on midnight of the fifteenth day of the first month
(Nissan). Pharaoh was shaken, at last. He sent the children of
Israel from the land. They consisted of "about six hundred thou-
sand men on foot, beside children." In their haste to leave Egypt,
the Israelites baked matzoh from dough that was not leavened.
Hence the prohibition against eating leavened bread on Passover.
(The recounting of the WeeKly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Woilman-
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.) w
From left, from Bnai: Jon C. Aaron, Norman T. Ditchek,
Daniel Averbook. From Hillel: Marshall Baltuch, Rabbi
Jay Neufeld.
Bnai Israel Answers
HUM'S Prayers
In a gesture of Chanukah goodwill, Bnai Israel Rehabilitation
and Convalescent Center, a new "OU" kosher skilled center adja-
cent to the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center at
18905 N.E. 25th Ave., North Miami Beach, presented its
neighbor, Samuel Hecht Hillel Day School, with a Bema for their
childrens chapel in the school's auditorium.
Marshall Baltuch, Executive Director of Hillel, stated, "The
school and children are very appreciative of the Bema presented
for their services. We look forward to a very warm relationship
between Bnai and Hillel, and sometime in the future it will be our
pleasure to have our children entertain the residents of Bnai."
The children's chapel, which was in need of a new Bema, ac-
cepted it after Bnai had it custom made in their own in-house
cabinetry workshop.
Bnai Israel Rehabilitation and Convalescent Center has been
built in honor of the elderly, to help them celebrate life in comfort,
dignity and surrounded by people who respect and understand
their very special needs. The center is scheduled to open in the
spring of 1987. For further information, please call 932-6239.
Independent Insurance Agents of Dade County hosted the
Delegation of the Florida Legislature for lunch recently to
s their legislative pr' Hies. Pictured at the luncheon are
la House Deputy Mc ty Leader Elaine Bloom, President
Florida Senate John Vogt, Cocoa Beach and Ed Gillman of
tlin and Company. Senator Vogt was the guest speaker.
BAR MITZVAH
Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
James Steven Orlowsky
JAMES ORLOWSKY
James Steven Orlowsky, son of
Mr. and Mrs. David (Esther)
Orlowsky will be called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Emanu-EI. He attends Nautilus
Junior High school and is in the
seventh grade. He is in all honors
classes. He enjoys working with
computers. He also enjoys collec-
ting coins and stamps. He has at-
tended Temple Emanu-El's after-
noon religious school for the past
six years and has been on the
Rabbi's honor roll every marking
period.
Mr. and Mrs. David Orlowsky
(Esther) will host the Kiddush
following the services in honor of
the occasion and an evening
reception will be held at the
Hebrew Congregation.
ARI BETH ISAACKSON
Ari Beth Isaakson, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Mortimer Isaackson
will be called to the Torah as Bat
Mitzvah on Friday, at 8 p.m. at
Temple Adath Yeshurun.
The celebrant is a student in the
Hey Class at Adath Yeshurun
Religious School. She attends
Highland Oaks Junior High
School where she is in the seventh
grade. Ari enjoys playing the
piano and taking care of her
aquarium.
Dr. and Mrs. Mortimer
Isaackson will host the Oneg
Shabbat following the services in
honor of the occasion.
Special Guests will include:
grandmother, Erna Schindler and
friends.
Dr. Daniel Seckinger, past
president of the Dade County
Medical Association, has been
appointed chief of pathology of
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center. He will con-
tinue to serve as director of
clinical laboratories at South
Shore, which is affiliated with
the University of Miami School
of Medicine. Dr. Seckinger's
appointment was announced
by Marshall H. Berkson, presi-
dent and chairman of the
board, and by Dr. William
Zubkoff, executive director of
South Shore.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:50 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fir
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg
531-2120
Dally 7:20 a.m. Afternoon 5:30 p.m.
Sal.ll.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 847-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. 4 5:15 p.m.
Sat a Sun. t a.m. a 5:16 p.m.
Frl. p.m
Frl t p.m. Bat Mltnah Ari Bath laaackaon.
TEMPLE BETH AM
SBS0 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 867 8687
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Sank* Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. 7:30 p.m. family aarvlca. Rabbi Schoolman
will apeak on 'rail Coma'
Sal. 8 15 a.m Bar Mltnah Danlal Katcher.
Sat. 11 15 a.m. Bat Mltnah Adam Stam.
Sarmon theme Going Fraa Together."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert, f
Cantor %
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Olrector
Frl. 5:30 p.m.
Sat. a.m. Bat Mltnah (Una Samola
Mlnehah Sat. 5 55 p.m. Registration
Adult Education.
Mlnyan twice dairy. Call tor ttma.
BETH KODESH
Coneervathre
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Kriaaai
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
858-6334
Sabbath Servlcea 9:45 a.m.
Sat. 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami, FL 33181
891 5508 Coneervathre
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Qorflnkel. (
Rabbi Emeritus *
Moshe Frtedler, Cantor
Frl. I p.m.
Sat 5:45 am
Waakday aara. Mon.-Fri. a.m.
Mon.-Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. a.30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S46 JeMereon Ave.. MB, FL 3312
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mother
Cantor Nlaaim Benyemini
Dally eervtcee I a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat. 1:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 '**.,
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \ W)
Ca ntor Stephen Freedman
Friday rught aervlcee i p.m
Family aervice Primary Oradea of Rel
._^ ehod >* pWfielpata.
Saturday morning eervtcee 8:30 a.m.
Bar Mltnah Davtd Schur
Dairy aarvieaa: Sunday 9:30 a.m
Mon.Tuee. a Thura. 7:0 e.m.
Wad 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SH6LOM 538 7231'
Chase Ave. 6 41 at St. *...
DM LEON KRONISM. Founding Senior Rabbi
GARY A QLICKSTEIN. AatMx
MARRY JOLT. Au.lllary Rebrx
PAUL 0 CAPLAN, Aaalatani Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID CON VISER
Frl. a 15 p.m Rabbi Ollckataln will apaak on
Forty Five and Beyond." Sat 10:46 a.m. Bar
Mltnah Forraat warren. Sun.guaat author
David A. Kaufelt.______________
8ETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Baach Blvd
Or Max A Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally Servlcea: Mon. Frl. 7:30 a.m.
4 5 30pm
Sat 825a ma 15pm
Sun. I a.m. i S p.m.
Late aarvlca Frl. 8 p.m.
Frl. Bat Mltnah Carolina Stupoel
Sat. Bar Mltnah Scott Smith
(fj)
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
TempleBethShmoel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534 7213- 534 7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi fWit
Moshe Buryn. Cantor
Sergio Grobier. President
Sholem Epelbeum. President
Religious Committee
m
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bergar
Yehuda Shitman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 5 p.m.
La ta Frl. eve ear. p.m.
Or. Mii wall Borgor will preach on
"Schamaa. Oreame a Reality."
Sat. ( a.m. Rabbi Bergar will preach on
the weakly portion of the Mbla.
Bar Mltnah James Orlowaky.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schift
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami ..
Miami's Pioneer fliioim Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskeli Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming. Jack L. Sparks
Frl. S p.m.
Downtown: Dr. Jack L. Sparka "Moeee. One
ol the 36 Righteous?" Liturgy Cantor Rachelle
F. Neleon
Randall; Rabbi Rei D. Perimeter "A Matter of
Tniat." Liturgy Harvey Kaufman,
Cantorlal Soloiat
Reform
667-5667
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd
Coral QabNM
Michael B. Eleonatat.
Frl. 6 p.m. Aleph Claaa will conduct aerv.
Dinner 6:15; t.15 gueat epeeker
Father Dennlaon.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel S34-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Servlcea Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:so a.r-
Oneg Shabbat wu ollow.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami B- jch 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramovvltz
Ari Fridkis, Assoc. Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbeth aervice.
Dally Mlnehah Sunday-Friday
0a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.

TEMPLE NERTAMID
7602 Cartyle Ave..
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz
Cantor Edward KWn
m
Dally Servtcee a.m. and JJa>'
5:30 p m
Frl. lete aervice 1 p.m
Sat. 8.45 am
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
661 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382 0898
Rabbi Hershel Becker Modem onkastja
Sat. 9 30 a.m. aervice at
Temple Samu-EI
9353 SW 152 Ave..
S. ol N. Kendall Or.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade'S Rotorm Congregation
Ralph P Kingsiey. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbaras Ramsay. Administrator
Frl I p.m Family Sen. Rabbi Klngeley
"Reform Judalam It la really lereeTa Number
One Problem." Shabbat dinner to follow.
Sat Bar Mltnah Bryan Fine.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTEK
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 a-w
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi S})
Benjamin Adler, Cantor tT-
David Roaenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday a Thursday.
Sunday 9 a.m. Frl. 8:15 aer Adult Forum
Quest apeeker Leonard Ellaa.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Arnold Stern Passes
Arnold J. Stern of North Miami
Beach, passed away February 1.
Mr. Stern was an active
member of Temple Beth Moshe, a
past President of the North Dade
Jewish Center, former member of
Board of Directors and Budgetary
Committees of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, past President
Sam Don Passes
Sam Don, who with his brothers
and sisters started the Edward
Don and Company food service
supply distributorship from their
family home in Chicago, died
January 28 in Miami. He was 82.
Mr. Don is survived by his wife,
Esther; son Robert; sister Mildred
Dubrow and three grandchildren.
Services were held at the Piser-
Weinstein Menorah Chapel in
Chicago. The Menorah North
Miami Beach Chapel in charge of
arrangements.
We take a sensible
approach to Jewish
Funeral Arrangements
Find out ho :he graveside service
can bring down ihe cost of funerals
and still preserve ihe beM of Jewish
tradition. Funerals from $""9<
including casket. Sponsors ol the
"Eternal Light Trust" pre-need
plan
ikereRNAL
UqItc
Funeral Director.
anal Counaelon
: "020 W Dun* Hwy
S Mum. B.-^fh 13160
Da4> 9489900 Broward 761 8800
S. Kenneth M Kay F D
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FlCmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring u.
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PS. Consultants at
12555 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite
902. Miami. Florida 33181 intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Pat Skubish
Sole Owner
134% February 6. 13 20. 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Caae No. 8C-53083 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
v.
VIRGINIA WOOD, et al..
Defendants.
TO: VIRGINIA WOOD
275 Linden Blvd.
No. D17
Brooklyn. New York 11226
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Unit 203 of
ORDUNA COURT CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, recorded
in Official Records Book
11527, Page 1417, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
March IS, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 3 day of
February, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
14604 February 6. 13,20.27. 1987
of Jewish Family and Children's
Service, member of AICPA and
FICPA.
He is survived by his wife Bun-
ny; son Michael Alan Stern;
daughters Barbara (Michael)
Lubin and Joanne (William)
Lopatin.
Services were held. The
Riverside.
AUERBACH. Margie of Miami Beach.
January 31. The Riverside.
BORNSTEDN. Abraham. 93. of Miami.
January 31. Interment at Mt. Nebo.
DORSKY. Mae Services in Cleveland. Ohio.
FELDMAN. Harry of North Miami Beach.
Januarv 30. The Riverside.
HERTER. Saul. 86. Levitt-Weinstein.
KLINGER, Felix, of Miami. Rubin-Zilbert.
WODNICKI. Levi. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
BIC0FF. Mrs. Sonia. of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert
LONDON. Samuel. 68. of Key Largo,
January 29. Levitt-Weinstein.
ZUCKERBERG. Nathan, 70, of North
Miami Beach. January 28. The Riverside.
HASKOE. Sidney "Sid." 71, of Coral
Gables, February 2. The Riverside.
KLAUSNER. Joseph. January 31 The
Riverside.
DENENBERG. Ida. 91. of Miami Reach.
February 2. The Riverside.
MCFSON. Anne The Riverside
WALL. I^eonard S.. 71. of Miami. Levitt-
Weinstein.
"vVINN. Frances, 86. of Miami. Levitt-
Weinstein.
PTASHEK. Murray. 82, of North Miami
Beach. January 27. Menorah Chapels.
ROSNER. Lillian. 75. of North Miami
Beach. February 3. Levitt-Weinstein
WOLFF, Fay. f Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
GRANE, Jack, of Miami Beach.
LEIBMAN? Abraham, of Mahonpac, New
York and Miami, January 21. Services in
New York. The Riverside.
Hebrew Academy
Mourns Benefactor
Arthur Goldstein
Arthur Goldstein, major
benefactor of the Arthur and
Anna Goldstein Hebrew
Academy of South Dade,
passed away on Thursday,
Jan. 22 at the age of 91.
Goldstein, who never had
children of his own, was
honored last June at a dedica-
tion dinner when the former
South Dade Hebrew
Academy was named for
himself and his late wife An-
na. He was born in
Menominee, Michigan, a
small community just outside
an Indian reservation which
had few, if any, Jewish
residents. At the time of his
death, Goldstein was a resi-
dent of Brooklyn, New York.
Goldstein is survived by
nieces and nephews. Funeral
se.'vices were held in New
York on Friday, January23.
264H(ireenfield Kd
Oak Park. Michigan 18237
1313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
I* Shipping Service From Florida Ami
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
Cremation.......................From 325
Shipping to Northern
Funeral Home....................From 395
Jewish Graveside Funeral.........From $865
FLORIDA MORTUARY
DADE BROWARD
325-1171 524-1404
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7333
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
JACOB SAMET
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACOB SAMET. deceased. File
Number 86-7333. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below-
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WTTHrN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 6, 1967.
Personal Representative:
Judith Raab
1812 56 Street
Brooklyn, New York 11204
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JOSHUA D. MANASTER, ESQ.
1428 BrickaU Avenue
Eighth Floor
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (806) 8744762
14508 February 6,13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-8012
Division Probate 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
DORA WEISS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DORA WEISS, deceased. File
Number 84-8012, is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Room 307, Dade
County Court House, 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WTTHrN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the persona]
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 28, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Peter Weiss
364 Harbor Drive
Lido Beach, New York 11661
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
PAUL SILBERBERG, ESQ.
No. 176046
Barman Koerner Silberberg, P.C.
88 Irving Place 11th Floor
New York, New York 10003
Telephone: (212) 460-8600
13496 February 6.13.1987
APPLEBAUM. Herman. 88, of North
Miami, January 30. Menorah Chapels.
BERNSTEIN, Samuel J., 96, January 30.
Services held in New York.
KAUSNER, Joseph. January 81. Services
held in New York. The Riverside.
OSMAN, Miriam, 77. of Miami, February 1.
Services were held.
DON. Sam. 82. of North Miami Rat*
Chiajgo, January 28 Menorah tW|*d
HOFSTEIN, Polly, of North
Services were held. Wlch
KAUFMAN. MauraS. (Sprite), 34 of Mi.
Beach. January 29 CSmZm^S^
WATSTEIN. Pearl. 80. of Bav Hart
Island. January 30. The Riverside ^r
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLAS8ERG
F UNERAL D'BECTOfl
Past President Jewish Funeral
Directors ot America
VOSEvENTv -F.P.ST STREET
8652353
Funeral DirectO'
MlAMi BEACH ELORlL.4
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Browdrd County
5:12-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills. NY
When you shop
pre-aifangemenl
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With five
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens in Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah Is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" flrsL Then come
to Menorah where your last choice Is your best choice.
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6000
Margate: 975-0011 Deerfleld Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
Cemeteries Funeral Chapels Mausoleum Pre Need Harming
l


Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Odissey for Girls at
2831 S.W. 117 Ave. Miami. FI.
33165 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Dulce Vilches
13490 February 6,13, 20, 27, 1987
Friday, February 6, 1987/the Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-3586-17
IN RE: The Marriage of
JEAN DULAND GILBERT,
Petitioner
vs.
JANICE JEAN GILBERT,
Respondent
TO: JANICE JEAN GILBERT
Residence Unknown
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before March 6. 1987. otherwise a
default will be entered.
January 27. 1987
RICHAD HRINKEK
By: M. CENDRoN
13494 February 6. 13. 20. 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-349
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER WEINZIMMER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ESTHER
WEINZIMMER. deceased. File
Number 87-349 PC (01), is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen
tatives of the estate are PHYLLIS
ACKERMAN and RUTH BROF-
SKY, whose address is c/o
ALBOUM and FURLONG. 333
Arthur Godfrey Rd., No. 104.
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persona interested in the
I estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
[THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
[NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
I validity of the decedent's will, the
Iqualifications of the personal
J representative, or the venue or
| jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
| AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
[BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
I this Notice of Administration:
| February 6, 1987.
PHYLLIS ACKERMAN
and RUTH BROFSKY
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ESTHER WEINZIMMER
[)('i'i''i"-("ii
lATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
[REPRESENTATIVE:
VLBOUM and FURLONG
ttB Arthur Godfrey Road, No. 104
'*iami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 538-6741
14502 February 6. 13, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-032M 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
RIGAUD FRANCOIS.
Petitioner,
and
CAROLYN L. FRANCOIS,
Respondent.
TO. CAROLYN FRANCOIS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27. 1987, other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13481 January 30;
February 6. 13, 20, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Jesus Torres D/B/A
Torres Construction at 100 SW
110 Ave No. 130 Miami. FI 33174
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Jesus Torres
14505 February 6. 13. 20. 27. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87 527
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SALLY R. SCHWARTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of SALLY R.
SCHWARTZ, deceased, File
Number 87-527, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
prsonal representative of the
estate is CRYSTAL E. HOWARD,
whose address is 174 Laurel Hill
Road, Mountain Lakes. New
Jersey 07046. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
state to whom a copy of this Notice
of Administration has been mailed
are required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any objec-
tions they may have that challenge
the validity of the decedent's will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
February 6, 1987.
CRYSTAL HOWARD
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SALLY R. SCHWARTZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT JAY COHEN. ESQ.
COHEN & CHASE. P.A.
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 600
Miami. Florida 33156
Telephone: (305) 666-0401
14501 February'6, 13, 1987
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-00895 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERALD BEYER, as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
GEORGE P. BULLOCK,
Deceased, a/k/a GEORGE
BULLOCK, a/k/a GEORGE D.
BULLOCK, et al..
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors, trustees
or otherwise claiming by.
through, under or against
GEORGE P. BULLOCK.
Deceased, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described, whose
residences are unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 309
of CORAL ISLE WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, dated Oc-
tober 13. 1972, filed for
record October 17. 1972.
under Clerk's File No.
72R-232618. in Official
Records Book 7942, at Page
1. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended, together with the
Mortgagor's undivided share
in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
February 13. 1987, and filed the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of January,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
13454 January 16. 23, 30;
February 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name T L C and Friends at
12210 N.E. 13 Court, North
Miami, Florida intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
John P. Mem
and Donna Lieberman-Mern
d/b/a T L C and Friends
12210 N.E. 13 Court
North Miami. FI.
Steven D. Tishler
Attorney for Applicants
8625 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 754-1001
13464 January 23, 30;
February 6. 13. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7192
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUANA F. DUMOIS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JUANA F. DUMOIS, deceased.
File Number 86-7192, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 6, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HELEN P. NICHOLS
8820 S.W. 18 Terrace
Miami. Florida 33165
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JOSHUA D. MANASTER. ESQ.
1428 Brickell Avenue
Eighth Floor
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-6762
14507 February 6. 13. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions of
Hammocks, Inc. at 3316 NW 7 St.
Miami Fla. 33125 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo, Jr.
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami, FI. 33173
13491 February 6, 13.20,27. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-48051-22
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MICHELLE L. ZAKKOUT.
Petitioner/Wife,
and MAZEN A ZAKKOUT.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: MAZEN A. ZAKKOUT
Present Residence: Unknown
Last mailing address:
Safe!
P.O. Box 1188
KUWAIT
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
ROBERT O. SCHWARZ, ESQ.,
of. MARKUS & WINTER, P.A ,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2251 S.W. 22nd St.,
Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March 6,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of February, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARKUS & WINTER, P.A.
2251 S.W. 22nd St.
Miami. Fla. 33145
Telephone: 856-6910
ROBERT 0. SCHWARZ, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
14500 February 6. 13. 20.
27. 1987
Coneolldeted Report of Condition of
of Miami, Florida ______
Croveqate baru.
Duct-nbor 3 I ,
.i?8*
And Foreign and Dooaetlc Subsidiaries, at the cleaad of buelneo
, etate banking lnatltutlon organised and operating under tke
hanking leva of tblfl atete and a Beaker of the Federal Reaerve Syotea. Published in accordance with a call
Bade by the State Banking Authority and by the Federal lank of thle Olatrlct.
Ceeh end balancee due froa depository laetltutlone
Nontntereat-beerlng balancee and currency and coin.....................
Intereet-bearing balancee..............................................
Securltlea...............................................................
Federal funde eold and eecurltleo pwrchaeed under egraeaente to reeell In
of the bank and of Ite Edge end Agreeseat aubeldlerlee. end In ItPa......
loan a and leaae financing racelveblee:
Loana and leaaea, net of unearned lncoete...............................
LESS: Allowance for loan and leaae loaeaa..............................
LESS: Allocated trenefer rlak reaerve..................................
Th tstlc afflcee
W\\ I
.'"'r'
~rrn-
-Lb_
Assets held In trading accounts ....................................
Frealeee and fUed aaaeta (Including capitalized leaeee)............
Other real eetete owaed ............................................
Inveotewate la wacoaeolldated ewbeldlarlee and aeeoclated ceasyaalea
Cuatoejera' liability to thle beak on acceptances outstanding.......
Intangte aaaeta ....................................................
Other Aaaete .......................................................
Total Aaaete .......................................................
^555=
31
nntir.
SiMalu
In Doaaatlc offices .....................
ItalMiiui-Mnlq...................
lataraat-aaartog .....................
Mml faaa frcK...< aaa elm aola .. ..' M ..a.cKaaa i.
office* of the aaah ,J of It* Uf* Agra*
J^
32E
962
H769
ewbeldlarlee aa4 la ItPa
nd not i
Tre
Other borrowed aoaoy ......................................
Mortgage ladebcadaeaa and obllgatlena aaalar capitalized la*
lank liability aa acceptance siecuted and outstanding ..
MOtes ana debeetwree evbordlnated to depoalte .............
Other llaklllclee .........................................
Total Mobilities .........................................
Llalted-llfe preferred stock ..............................
NONL
NONE
-MffleE-
31
rff
Perpetual preferred etocn ..............................
Cbbbpw Stack ...........................................
Undivided proflte and capital reeervee .................
Cwsulatlve foreign carreacy translation adjaetejeate ------
Total ee^ilt* capital ...................................
Tatal liabilities ll-ited--llfe preferred etack end ewl
IUUU
3ET
unM
US
, da hsreby declare that tble Report of
I, Goriy Dominquez- yp and Cashier. ot th# .fc^,-
Mesa ead title of officer authorlied ta alga report
Condition has keen prepeied In conformance wit* the laotrwetlea* leaved by the taetd of Coveraore of the Federel Reeer
Syotea and the State Ranking Authority aad la trwe to the beat *f-ma; knowledge and^llaf.
We. the undarelgned dlrectore. atteat to the correctaas* or thla RepoYt of CoadltloA and declare that It baa been
e-ealned ky M end to the beet of knowledge and belief haa been prepeied In conforaakaca with the Inetructlona loeued
by the board of Coveraore of the Fedorel Itaeervo lye tea end the State! banking authority and la true end correct.
Signature of *f(IcJr author 11
ed to elga report
af _
County of -* < [.
.b-.'ilbed before an thla___-
PuneX'^'aK K.iv.i:-.... j!.
Dl recto* ^~
day af _;_
r-----'
y '**___*' '--i ..-' l
Hoiirv Public
Sal',?. I.
Director
14503
I'-UllOtf^
February 6, 1987



Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 6, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COUBT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-30084 (CA 03)
NOTICE OF ACTION
EDGAR LEWIS, Trustee,
Plaintiff,
?a.
DONALD FLETCHER, a single
man.
etal..
Defendants.
TO: WEST ENTERPRISES.
LTD., a British Virgin Islands
corporation
Peat, Marwiek, Mitchell and Co.
Bank of Nova Scotia Building
P.O. Box 438
WickamsCay
Road Town, Tortola
British Virgin Islands
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 1, in Block 2, of
RIDGELINE ESTATES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 50, at
Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis A Allison,
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132. on or before
February 27, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plain tiff s attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 22nd day of
January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13473 January 30:
February 6. 13. 20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 87-02898 (18)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LADY REYES DE IZURIETA
and AUGUSTO SHAKSPEARE
IZURIETA VALDIVIESO. her
husband, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: LADY REYES DE
IZURIETA and AUGUSTO
SHAKSPEARE IZURIETA
VALDIVIESO, her husband.
Calle Cuarta
Numero 610
Eficus. Urdesa
Guayaquil. Ecuador
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit 401 of
Building 9110 of THE
PARKSIDE CON
DOMINIUM NO 1 according
to the Declaration of Con-
dominium as recorded in Of-
ficial records Book 9104.
Page 80, and in Con-
dominium plan Book 46, Page
24 of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida,
together with the Mortagor's
undivided share in the com-
mon elements appurtenant
thereto. Together with the
parking space assigned to
said unit,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
February 27, 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 22 day of
January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. Casamayor
Deputy Clerk
13472 January 30.
February 6.13.20, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 87-166*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALBERT EFERGAN,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
BERNADETTE ANN
EFERGAN.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: BERNADETTE ANN
EFERGAN
17 Elgar Close
Clevedon
Avon
BS21-5BS
ENGLAND
UOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve s copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MARKUS k WTNTER, P.A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2251 S.W. 22nd Avenue,
Miami, Florida USA 38145, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
February 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By VICTOR M. BORRERO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROBERT 0. SCHWARZ. ESQ.
(Of Counsel)
MARKUS & WINTER. P.A.
2261 S.W. 22nd Street
Miami, Florida 33145
856-6910
Attorney for Petitioner
13467 January 23. 30;
February 6. 13. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE |
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. No. 87-02038 FCM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SANTORO
and
ROSE SANTORO, a/k/a
ROSE MARIE SANTORO,
584 E 89th Street
Brooklyn, N.Y., N.Y.
TO: ROSE SANTORO a/k/a
ROSE MARIE SANTORO
584 E 89th Street
Brooklyn, N.Y., N.Y.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Edwin
A. Willinger. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is Suite 209
Lincoln-Drexel Bldg., 1655 Drexel
Ave Miami Beach. FLA 33139.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 27, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORJDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWIN A. WILLINGER
Suite 209 Lincoln-Drexel Building
1655 Drexel Ave.
Miami Beach. FLA 33139
Attorney for Pettioner
Telephone: 538-5756
13484 January 30;
February 6. 13. 20. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52452 (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSTA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 13 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13458 January 16. 23. 30;
February 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ANTIGUA FUR-
NITURE. INC. d/b/a CFG. Pro-
motions at 10800 Biscayne Blvd..
Suite 640. Miami, Florida 33161 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ANTIGUA FURNITURE. INC
d/b/a CFG. Promotions
BY: Jorge Iker
Carl A. Schmitt
Attorney for
ANTIGUA FURNITURE. INC.
d/b/a CFG. Promotions
13463. January 23.30;
February 6. 13,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-03647 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
Fl Bar 368016
In re the marriage of
EUNICE C BODDEN
Petitioner
and
THEOPHLLIUS E. BODDEN
Respondent
TO: THEOPHLLIUS E.
BODDEN
Lakeside Park.
Discovery Bay P.O..
St. Ann. Jamaica. W.I.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before March 6, 1987 and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
January 30;
February 6. 13. 20. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. No. 84-62452 (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSIA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L. WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20, 1987;
otherwise s default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
ones each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 13 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13458 January 23, 30;
Februarv 6. 13.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GP7EN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of CREATIVE
BRONZE, INC., d/b/a A CON-
CEPT IN BRONZE at number
8106 N.W. 103rd Street, in the Ci-
ty of Hialeah. Florida, intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Dated at North Miami Beach.
Florida, this 16 day of January.
1987.
ZIVA GROMAN. President
8106 N.W. 103rd Street
Hialeah Gardens, Florida 33016
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue.
Suite 111
North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162
(305) 949-4237
13466 January'23. 30;
February 6, 13. 1987
13486
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Home Library at
244 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami,
Florida 33132 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Bank Marketing. Inc.
244 Biscayne Boulevard
Second Floor,
Miami, Florida 33132
13476 January 30;
February 6. 13. 20. 1987
NOTICE
WAREHOUSEMAN'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT BY VIRTUE OF
CHAPTER 678. FLORIDA
STATUTES ANNOTATED (1941)
WAREHOUSEMAN AND
WAREHOUSES RECEIPTS
WHEREIN, A.B. VAN LINES. A
FLORIDA CORPORATION BY
VIRTUE OF ITS WAREHOUSE
LIENS HAS IN ITS POSSES
SION THE FOLLOWING
DESCRIBED PROPERTY:
HOUSEHOLD GOODS AS THE
PROPERTY OF:
JAMES W. ROBBINS. last known
address: 460 N.W. 29 Terrace. Ft.
Lauderdale 33311
and that on the 20TH DAY OF
FEBRUARY. 1987 DURING THE
LEGAL HOURS OF SALE
MAINLY BETWEEN 10:00
FORENOON AND 2:00 IN THE
AFTERNOON AT 2136 NW 24
AVE.. MIAMI. FLA. THE
UNDERSIGNED SHALL OF
FER FOR SALE TO THE
HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH
IN HAND THE ABOVE
DESCRIBED PROPERTY.
DATED THIS 6TH DAY OF
FEBRUARY. 1987.
14506 February, 6. 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artioa No. 87-01248 FC 16
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LYDL*. SHAKAROV.
Petitioner
v.
AVNER SHAKAROV,
Respondent
TO: AVNER SHAKAROV
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on USHER
BRYN, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2301 Col-
lins Ave., Suite M-8, Miami Beach,
Fl. 33139, (305) 532-1156. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above iyled court on or before
March 6, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 27 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Victor M. Borrero
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
2301 Collins Ave., M-8
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1156
13485 January 30;
February 6. 13.20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-353
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY C. WALDER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HENRY C. WALDER. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-353. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
JERROLD P WALDER
14200 Chadwick Lane
Rockville. Maryland
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARVIN I. MOSS, P.A.
P.O. Box 6250
Surf side, Florida 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-6736
13489 January 30;
February 6.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No.: 87-04637-17
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MAXIMENA MILLER DAWSON
and
AUGUSTA DAWSON
TO: Augusta Dawson
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Fob
DADE COUNTY. FLOR,ih R
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaaber 87-353
Diviiio. 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY C WALDER
NOTICE OF D"*Med
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the esut.
of HENRY C WALDER dec^T
ed. File Number 87-353. is pendja-
in the Circuit Court for Dad!
County. Florida. Probate Division J
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Flork*.
33130. The names and address*
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATIN OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claim,
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC'i
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice hat
begun on January 30. 1987
Personal Representative:
JERROLD P. WALDER
21110 NE 23rd Court
North Miami Beach, Fl 33180
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARVIN I. MOSS. P.A
P.O. Box 6260
Surf side. Florida 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-6736
13489 January 30;
February 6.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-03713 FC 11
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LOUIS JOSEPH
Petitioner/Husband
and
DIANNA MAINOR JOSEPH
Respondent-Wife
TO DIANNA MAINOR JOSKI'H
RESIDENCE UNKN< >WN
YOU ARE HER K BY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage ha
filed against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy of yur writ
ten defenses, if any. to it on
DOUGLAS D. STRATTiiN. at
torney for Petitioner, wh id
dress is 505 Lincoln Rii Miarr.:
Beach FL 33139. and :
original with the clerk of th<
styled court on or before V
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you f.....
demanded in the GMOpla '
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four wtv
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 2 day of February. 1987
RICHARD P. BRINK! K
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIG' BZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DOUGLAS D. STRATTON
506 Lincoln Rd.
Miami Beach, FL 33139
672-7772
Attorney for Petitioner
13499 February 6. 13, 20. 2~ 1*8"
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of CLARIVEL FUR-
NITURE at 3296-98 N.W. 31st
Street. Miami, Dade. FL 33142 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
YARUBA FURNITURE. INC.
By: Juan Luis Pedroso, President
13497 February 6, 13, 20, 27. 1987
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN serve a copy of your written
that the undersigned, desiring to defenses on Alec Ross, attorney
engage in business under the fie- for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
titious name Gynecological Ave., Miami. Fla. and file the
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands original with the clerk of the above
at 1111 Kane Concourse. Bay Har- court on or before March 6, 1987;
bor Islands. Fl. intend to register otherwise a default will be entered
said name with the Clerk of the against you
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Edward R. Watson. M.D.. P.A.
President
Martin Starr
Attorney for Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
13452 January 16, 23. 30:
February 6, 1987
Dated in Miami on February 2.
1H87.
RICHARD BRINKER. Clerk
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13498 Februarys. 13, 20. 27. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO: 87-3586
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN DULAND GILBERT
Petitioner,
JANICE JEAN GILBERT
Respondent.
TO: JANICE JEAN
GILBERT
Residence unknown
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for I >is0
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612 S
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida.
33136, and file original with *
Clerk on or before Marcl *
otherwise a default will t-
January 27, 1987
RICHARD BRINKKK
By: M. Gendron
13487 Jar-
February 6. IS


Friday, February 6, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-50138 CA-22
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
APPLE BANK FOR
SAVINGS, f/k/a CENTRAL
SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
DONALD L. WOLLARD.
JR.. individually and
as trustee, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: DONALD L. WOLLARD,
JR., individually and as trustee
263 N.E. 8th Street
Homestead, Florida 33030
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lots 16, 17 and 18, Block 11,
SOUTH MIAMI HEIGHTS
SECTION "E." according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 23. Page 74, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
February 27, 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 23rd day of
January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
13474 January 30;
February 6, 13.20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nwnber: 84-2836
Division (01)
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
EDNA S. COLER,
Incompetent
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that DOROTHY AR-
THUR, Guardian of the person and
property of Edna S. Coler. In-
competent, has filed her Final Ac-
counting in the above matter in
this Court and you are required to
file any objections to the said ac-
counting with the Clerk of this
Court and serve a copy thereof
within thirty (30) days hereof on
Petitioner's attorneys, whose
names and address are:
HARRY ZUKERNICK. ESQ. and
MILTON FELLER, ESQ
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 329
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
(305) 672-0099
and you are further notified that
application for discharge will be
made on the 5th day of March,
1987 at 1:30 P.M. before the
Honorable Harold Featherstone,
and that jurisdiction of the Ward
will be transferred to Georgia, a
State of foreign jurisdiction.
WINTESS my hand and seal this
23 day of January, 1987
CLERK OF COURT
BY: RICHARD P BRINKER.
CLERK
BY: FRANCES T. SWEEMMY
DEPUTY CLERK
HARRY ZUKERNICK
420 Lincoln Rd
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Attorney for Guardians
First publication of this Notice
will be on 80 day of January, 1987.
13475 January 30;
February 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Citisens Financial
Center at 999 BrickeU Avenue,
Miami, Florida, 88181 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
UCCELLO IMMOBIUEN GmbH,
a German Corporation
By: ROBERT VOGEL,
Managing Director (President)
Barton S. Udell, Esq.,
Smith & Mandler, PA.
Attorney for
Uccellp Immobilien GmbH
800 BrickeU Avenue, Suite 700
Miami, Florida 38131
18459 January 16, 23, 30;
February 6,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nmaber 87-78
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERTO GRUNZEUG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALBERTO GRUNZEUG,
deceased, File Number 87-78, Div.
02, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Dade County
Courthouse, Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30. 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street.
Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street,
Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
13477 January SO;
February 6.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuiber 8C-7SM
Division OS
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ARNOLD RENKOFF
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Arnold Renkoff, deceased, File
Number 86-7319 (03), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami, FL. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) al! claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30. 1987.
Personal Representative:
Estelle Renkoff
945 N. Still water Drive
Miami, FL
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Paul H. Freeman
9100 S. Dadeland Blvd., Suite 1406
Miami. FL 33156
Telephone: (305) 662-5999
13478 January 30;
February 6, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-03256 05
IN RE: The Marriage of:
EXALEME POLIMUS.
Petitioner,
and
VALERIE DENISE POLIMUS.
Respondent.
TO: VALERIE DENISE
POLIMUS. residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before February 27,
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered.
January 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13480 January 30;
February 6,13,20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-008*5 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
Unite States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERALD BEYER, as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
GEORGE P. BULLOCK,
Deceased, a/k/a GEORGE
BULLOCK, a/k/a GEORGE D.
BULLOCK, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors, trustees
or otherwise claiming by,
through, under or against
GEORGE P. BULLOCK,
Deceased, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described, whose
residences are unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 309
of CORAL ISLE WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, dated Oc-
tober 13. 1972. filed for
record October 17, 1972,
under Clerk's File No.
72R-232618. in Official
Records Book 7942, at Page
1, of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida, as
amended, together with the
Mortgagor's undivided share
in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132. on or before
February 13, 1987, and filed the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of January.
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
13454 January 16. 23,30;
February 6.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-00985 (12)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
Carolyn Pratt
Petitioner/Wife
and
William Pratt
Respondent/H usband
TO: William Pratt
1570 N.W. 159th Street
Opa-Locka, Fl. 33054
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 633 N.E. 167th Street,
(Suite 619) North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 18,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Florida on this 9
day of January, 1987.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ.
633 N:E. 167th Street (Suite 619)
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
(305) 653-3535
13456 January 16. 23.30;
February 6,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-41757 CA 22
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE WESTERN AND
SOUTHERN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY, an
Ohio corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
ALPHONSO NORRIS,
JEANETTE P. NORRIS. DR.
THOMAS J. CAHILL, JR., and
the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by,
through, under or against him,
BAPTIST HOSPITAL OF
. MIAMI, INC., a Florida non-
profit corporation. STANLEY
DAVIDSON, as Trustee for
DAVIDSON LUMBER
COMPANY, a dissolved Florida
corporation, BENNIE M.
BRAKE, and LAURA L.
BRAKE.
Defendants.
To: Dr. Thomas J. Cahill. Jr.,
whose residence is 2300
Nacogooches, Apartment 249-L,
San Antonio, Texas 78209.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
"County, Florida:
Lot 15, in Block 55, of
SEVENTH ADDITION TO
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 94, at Page 29, of
the Public Records of Dade
county, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida SS1S7, on or before
February 27. 1987, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on January 26, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13482 January 30;
February 6.13.20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-00237 FC31
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEONARD MALCOLM.
Petitioner
and
DOREEN MALCOLM.
Respondent.
TO: DOREEN MALCOLM
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any", to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road
- Suite 309 Miami Beach. FL 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 27, 1987; other
wise a deafult will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Phone) (305)532-1156
13483 January 30;
February 6,13,20.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name J A S ENTER-
PRISES at 8286 N.W. 64 St. Bay
No. 4 Miami Fla. S3166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Sergio M. Novo
13461 January 28,30;
February 6,13,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-307
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OK
EDWARD EARL FRENCH
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of EDWARD
EARL FRENCH, deceased. File
Number 87-307, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Dade County. Florida. The
personal representative of the
estate is Harold A. Turtletaub,
whose address is 9995 Sunset
Drive, Suite 108, Miami, FL
33173. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the persons!
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 30, 1987.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Edward Earl French
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Harold A. Turtleta .:
9995 Sunset Drive Suite 108
Miami. FL 33173
Telephone: (305) 2" 1 4000
13488 January 30;
r-hruarv6. 1987
ELEVENTH CIR( LIT COURT
DADE COUNTi. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: *7-03254 30
IN RE: The Marriage of
JAIME SANDOVAL.
Petitioner/Husband.
vs.
ANA C. CASTRO-SANDOVAL.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ANA C. CASTRO-
SANDOVAL
5 Calle. 236 Zona No. 7, Colonia
Jardenas
San Juan
Guatemala. Central America
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27. 1987. other-
wise s default will be entered.
January 26. 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
13479 January SO;
February 6, 13, 20, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions
Inc. at 297 NE 2nd Ave. Miami Fl.
33132 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo Jr.
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami. Fla. 33173
13465 January 23, 30;
February 6, 13, 1987
>
-
'


A-i The
flTrUUHlJ '1AV
i. HH
Dr. King's Pro Israel
Forgotten On L\S. Campuses
3ari a x aauca
it Jr
3i vnca
J
B JOB IT "ilfica-
? *
2*
at a
IMQV^QQBAfl
Zf
mx-ivmEsn. *v> af '
XSQB3T fHQB JIV'Ufi ^3
t a 3o wnriac aer
TftHantr 'jrmesaK
na iluiHi iinafM rf^a
-1.. yii -a jmmc jnc-ianinr aac-n**
WMAl CAS M ma*" *L *
aaaravv-v >rat aartama mist
mi! m n n*r<3
ra-tgrMtt Iiiiium kit-
. *bb saac SB ft -im n
m *aadi Jaw saw m? faBBC
MC. THar* a nan i
nam aar aac tif
auiiaiM rf aaaana ui aaaaa ik*
lffniac^a aesan aateamt
rmnnflB- fnais Hbcbb and Jaaai
.am BW> aiare.
.'nac at 5m. Car Lra B
Kea. saa naawi Jcaat 4w
utt-iimna; i ane^e-ncar^at p-um
or ac eaac jawa m Qi aa
atled 5nr ui aamif
a aaaa mi ibbsht v. 'seat
T^f-nna. !. M -1
Gcteia 'aae w.r" rail
-p^iar a|
ami -.n man ana ampaa aaaai r^T: """ "" ?^aaiB(
Tmx. vnt -d. marmat a *ar 'J~mqmanmi -waaa,
TnnorT? yiupg. ""la "^ajart "a *_1,f,** JfaaBr^aatf 3*aWjty
^a*L nsTxaia. jamciueQ uut aW L* _zx^> i.. 4^^
Bmin Tiuac % jr-or-rt ai aesl uaa Saaaraaaat 1 r' 3b "
3* anr? if lanaTi acwapmant Jfiaaaa. "^i t i
cao. 1 larmmrr jf-jig
tfafatms. Snma-t if T-,
!
ana a *flmr 2 ua
ar*aann( irxm
a 3*

*re*e 5"cccrc c. z cw=os-re
a i-JO i.a
ft *o
nuts
\ t
\ /
rwwia^allaMalamOMy
Pi Baal (IbMIIiI
1 nmnaun nator-a.
wm
"\ A
ruGu-a
'v
n 1 ai"
'ax. a:
at k
WaosSMw*
50%OFF sn
11.1M7
- "- : -:--.xer -.tvss
a> .
[ a iia,
'""" naaaM*

r 1.5*

Publlx


-


:
*
fthnwy 108?
Mi

Slite&n o vfuaabfo tttx^iatiet
%

6^^^^^^^P^

gTtie&clciy,, Special Campaign Section, pages 7-10:
A message from Donald E. Lefton, 1987 CJA chairman.
Photo highlights from the Campaign Opening Dinner.


CAMPAIGN 3
"Give a Day" to the CJA
Multiple Appeals Guidelines
WOMEN'S DIVISION 4
Women's Division "Queen of Hearts" Banquet
Southwest Dade "Generation to Generation Luncheon"
BPW Campaign Event
Interfaith Women's Day
Women's Division Hold the Date
ALLIANCE DIVISION 4
Upcoming events
YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL 6
Shabbat service and dinner
Sandra C. Goldstein lecture series
FOUNDATION 6
Gift of remainder interest in your residence
CAMPAIGN 7
CJA 1987: Miami must not permit unthinkable cutbacks
in services
CAMPAIGN OPENING DINNER 810
Photo highlights
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE/AGENCIES 11
CRC commemorates Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday
Supreme Court Justice Blackmun to be keynote speaker
at Plenary session.
Federation begins first full time Jewish hospice
program in the country.
COMMERCE AND PROFESSIONS 12
Chairman's message
Give a Day to the CJA
Profile: Marc Schectman, chairman of Stockbrokers Division
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION 13
JFTV program schedule
Jewish Television Magazine
Check-up Mount Sinai schedule
AGENCIES 14
Hedva to perform for South Dade JCC
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged starts
Alzheimer's care program
Jewish High School students learn about responsibility
BBYO holds regional convention
SUPER SUNDAY 15
CALENDAR 16
A
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
February 6 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Aaron Podhurst
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel
o
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark D. Friedman
*
12 Federation, February 1987
1


Give a Day to the Combined Jewish Appeal
'?

'X
The Combined Jewish Appeal is
in full swing with the successful
Campaign Opening Dinner
behind us. Our 1987 campaign goal of
$21,750,000, is set and we all have to
work together to reach it. Every
dollar is needed to support our local
beneficiary agencies, our Project
Renewal "sister city," Or Akiva, and
programs in Israel and Jewish com-
munities throughout the Diaspora.
Time is of the essence and is
valuable. We know that your time
availability is limited and we have
come up with a program to make the
best use of the hours you give to sup-
port the CJA. We're all busy in our
professions and often the pledge
cards that we meant to solicit end up
in a desk drawer until the end of the
year.
"Understanding the needs of those
who work with us, we created the
'Give A Day* program so that as
many solicitations as possible can be
handled in one day," said Donald E.
Lefton, 1987 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal chairman. The way it works is as
follows:
Pick a day on the calendar and
mark it off for the Combined Jewish
Appeal. Then call Federation and let
them know which day you have
chosen. Two weeks prior to the day a
campaign staff worker will sit down
with you, go over your prospects, and
schedule the five or six appointments
for solicitation of pledges on your
chosen day.
Help us reach our goal for 1987 by
giving a day to the Combined Jewish
Appeal. It can make a big difference.
For more information about this
program contact Miriam Zatinsky at
576-4000, ext. 215.
L FEBRUARY 1
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
1
(C MARCH ))
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
Federation reiterates Multiple
Appeals Guidelines
i*
The foundation of the "federated
system" of community organization is a
broad based consensus to the effect that a
disciplined process of fund-raising and
fund allocation is in the general interest.
Federation's Multiple Appeals
Guidelines, enacted several years ago, are
intended to be a clear statement of that
consensus.
"We're partners in this community
with our 32 local beneficiary agencies,"
said Eli Timoner, chairman of the Multi-
ple Appeals Committee. "The guidelines
that were established by Federation are
in the spirit of that partnership. They
help to avoid competition and divisiveness
which can drain our resources," he added.
To assure the continuing success of the
Combined Jewish Appeal, and in turn, the
continuation of the vital social services
provided by its many local, international
and Israeli beneficiaries, Federation's
Multiple Appeals Committee will not ap-
prove or endorse any fund raising cam-
paign publicized or conducted by any
Jewish organization during the period
between January 1 and March 15. In this
way Federation protects the interests of
the entire Jewish community.
"There must be an orderly, coordinated
framework to enhance the success of the
endeavors of the local Jewish agencies.
The guidelines facilitate more effective
fund raising efforts throughout the entire
Greater Miami Jewish community," said
Donald E. Lefton, 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal Chairman.
Other key provisions of the guidelines:
beneficiary agencies of the Combined
Jewish Appeal may conduct supplemental
membership campaigns provided that the
maximum individual membership dues or
charge for dinner, concerts and other
benefit events shall not exceed $200 per
year, per person. Non-beneficiary agen-
cies of the Combined Jewish Appeal are
requested, in the best interests of the
Jewish community, to observe the timing
of the CJA and not conduct campaigns
during that period, and to clear with the
Multiple Appeals Committee the goal,
purpose and character of their campaign
at least three months prior to any
solicitation.
Federation is prepared to assist non-
beneficiaries to plan an orderly approach
to campaigning.
Federation, February 1987 3
^mt


"Queen of Hearts Banquet
99
v
Southwest Dade
Luncheon
The Southwest Dade Women's Division
will hold its annual "Generation to
Generation Luncheon and Fashion Show"
at the Grand Bay Hotel on Wednesday,
February 11. Featured will be fashions
from Gianni Versace and Kidding
Around. A minimum gift of $75 to the
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal is required
to attend this event. Couvert is $25.
Co-chairwomen are Judi Levenshon
and Val Katz.
For more information contact the
Women's Division at 576-4000.
BPW
campaign
event
Elizabeth Holtzman, District Attorney
of Kings County in Brooklyn, New York,
will be the featured speaker at the
Business and Professional Women's Din-
ner at the Omni International Hotel on
February 17. Holtzman is the first female
District Attorney in the history of New
York City. She served as a member of the
United States House of Representatives
for eight years becoming the youngest
woman ever elected. She served on the
House Judiciary Committee during the
impeachment hearings of Richard Nixon
and is internationally acclaimed for her
work against Nazi war criminals living in
America.
She will speak on the topic, "From
Watergate to Iran Scam One Woman's
Political Journey."
The dinner begins at 5:45 p.m. Atten-
dance at this event requires a minimum
gift to the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
of $200. Couvert is $23, which includes
wine, a light supper, dessert and coffee.
For more information, please call the
Federation's Women's Division at
576-4000.
Interfaith Day
Women's Division will hold an "Inter-
faith Day," on Monday, March 16 at Tem-
ple Beth Shalom beginning at 9:00 a.m.
The topic will be, "The Changing Role of
Women in Religion Together As
Women We Can Make The Difference."
Spemkert will include:
** Rmekel Hertzmuui
Cmmter RmckeUe MUsm
DehbieMcUod
Sitter NoeUe Bo' O.P.
The moderator for the question and
answer period will be Rabbi Norman
Lipson.
The cost for this event is $1.50 which
covers registration and refreshments.
For more information contact Women's
Division at 576-4000, ext. 231.
Two very special international
celebrities will appear at the Women's
Division "Queen of Hearts" banquet on
March 3.
Confirmed as one of the guest speakers
will be Casselia Sadat, daughter of the
late Anwar Sadat, former president of
Egypt. Camelia came to the United
States shortly before her father's
assassination in 1981. Living here for five
years she earned a Masters Degree in
Communications from Boston University
and published a book, My Father and I.
Camelia is the president and one of the
founders of the Sadat Peace Institute, a
non-profit organization designed to fur-
ther the peace which cost her father his
life. She is lecturing throughout the
United States while researching her se-
cond book dealing with Arab women in
Moslem societies. Camelia is also prepar-
ing to register for Ph.D. studies at Boston
University.
Also scheduled to attend The Queen of
Hearts Banquet (but unconfirmed at the
time of publication) is Chassiah Begin
Milo, daughter of Israel's former Prime
Minister, Menachem Begin.
The banquet will be held on Tuesday,
March 3, at the Fontainebleau-Hilton
Hotel and requires a minimum pledge of
$150 to the 1987 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal. Couvert is $40. Dietary laws will be
observed. The chairwoman for this event
is Sandy Landy.
More information about the banquet
can be obtained by contacting Federa-
tion's Women's Division at 576-4000, ext.
231.
Camelia Sadat
Women's Division
Hold the Date
Alliance Division events
8aay, February 8
BPW Phonathon
11:00 am.
GMJF Building
ay, February 10
Miami Beach Phonathon
9:30 a.m.
GMJF Building
North Dade Board Meeting
9:30 a.m.
South Dade Phonathon
5:30 p.m.
Caplan, Morrison, Brown
Wednesday. February 11
Southwest Dade Campaign Event
10:00 am.
Grand Bay Hotel
Thursday. February 12
I Love Miami Bus Tour
9:30 am.
GMJF Building
South Dade Phonathon
5:30 p.m.
Caplan, Morrison, Brown
Tuday, February 17
Miami Beach Board Meeting
9:45 am.
BPW Campaign Event
5:45 p.m.
Omni International
WsduMday, February 25
Miami Beach Phonathon
9:30 am.
GMJF Building
Tuesday, March 2
Citywide Campaign Event
"Queen of Hearts Banquet"
9:30 am.
Fontainebleau Hilton
Thursday. March 5
Campaign Steering Committee Meeting
10:00 am.
GMJF Building
The following is a list of upcoming
Alliance Division events:
Star Lakes
On Sunday, February 8, a breakfast
meeting sponsored by Adele and Isaac
Rand will be held in the Star Lakes
auditorium. The event begins at 9:30 a.m.
Maurice Mehlman is the chairman.
Imperial House
Sunday, February 15, at 11:00 a.m. will
find guest speaker Danny Pinkas address-
ing 150 guests at the Imperial House din-
ing room. Co-chairmen are Milton Jacob-
son and Sylvia Farber Friedman.
Kenilworth-Tiffany Building*
A United Jewish Appeal (UJA) function
wil be held at the Jockey Club on Sunday
morning, February 15. The speaker will
be Howard Stone. A noted international
author, Stone helped smuggle Jews out of
North Africa. Coordinators of the
meeting are Dr. Bernice Miller for
Kenilworth and Sy Cohen for Tiffany.
Admirals Port
On Sunday, February 22, at 7:30 p.m.
Danny Pinkas will be the guest speaker at
the Admiral "s Port Cocktail Party which
will be held in the Admiral's Port East
Card Room. The event has an expected
attendance of well over 200 people. The
chairman is Nate Katzen; co-chairman is
Milton Engelman.
'Fabulous Fifty Alliance
Celebration
The Alliance Division will hold a
"Fabulous Fiftys" celebration on March
1, at 10:30 a.m. The event will feature
guest speaker, Elton J. Kerness,
associate executive vice president of
Federation. The following buildings are
participating: Carriage House, Carriage
Clubs, Corinthian, Crystal House, 5600,
5701, Maison Grande, Seacoast Towers!
and Tower House. The celebration will
take place at the Konover Hotel. Over
1,000 people are invited. Co-chairmen for
this event are Harold Medow and Ida
Kesselman.
Galahad-Dade
On Sunday, March 1, Galahad-Dade will
hold their annual United Jewish Appeal
brunch sponsored by the Ben Yehuda
Lodge of B'nai B'rith. The guest speaker
will be Al Golden. Aaron Soroker is the
general chairman.
California Club Community
The annual United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation dinner for the California
Club Community will be held on Sunday
evening, March 15, at the Coral Creek
Country Club. The guest speaker will be
Dr. Gerald Meister.
Aventara
The Aventura UJA/Federation breakfast
will be held on Sunday, March 15, featur
ing guest speaker Dr. Gerald Meister.
Chairman for the event is Hazel
Canarick. The buildings participating are
Biscaya, Bonavida, Bonavista, Bravura,
Coronado, Del Vista Towers, El Dorado,
Ensenada, Flamenco, Hamptons, Villa
Dorado, and Waterview.
Costa Brava
The residents will host the Costa Brava
1987 UJA/Federation Dinner on Thurs
day, March 19, beginning at 6:00 p.m.
The guest speaker will be Dr. Gerald
Meister The chairman is Al Isaacson;
reception chairman is Bea Durchsiag.
More information about Alliance Divi-
sion events can be obtained by calling
Federation, 576-4000, ext. 216.
UM
JLLL
4 Federation, February 1987


*> *
Grandma's purse
was never full.
But it was never
too empty for giving.
^
/V.


.

There weren't any credit cards or
checkbooks. And with Grandpa making
$1250 a week, there wasn't much cask
But somehow, there was always enough
to help another Jew who had less.
And when there were no organized
charities to help Jews in need, she and
Grandpa worked to organize them: Hospitals.
Vocational schools. Family services.
Benevolent societies. Community centers.
The kind of charities the Jewish
Federation helps support today.
Your grandparents may not be here
anymore, but the need for help still is. From
day care for kids of single Jewish parents
to hot meals and transportation for the
elderly.
Yet, in spite of some very generous gifts
to Federation, the average pledge is barely
more man the price of dinner out for two.
So mis year, when the Federation
volunteer calls, please open your checkbook
the way Grandma would open her purse.
She can't do it for you.
Now it's your turn.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation ml ^m
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal ^^^ ^^
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33137 #*%


Antisemitism: The Latin Ameican experience
YLC to hold Shabbat
service and dinner
The Young Leadership Council
(YLC) is planning a Shabbat Service
and Dinner for Friday evening,
February 20 at Beth David Congrega-
tion, 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue on Coral
Way. Services begin at 7:00 p.m. For
more information contact the YLC of-
fice at 576-4000, ext. 290.
Shabbat Dinner co-chairmen are
Lorraine Solomon and T.R. Beer.
The Young Leadership Council (YLC)
will present the second lecture in the San-
dra C. Goldstein series on Tuesday,
February 10. The lecture, which will be
held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 400
S.E. 2nd Avenue, features Dr. Haim Av-
ni. Director of Latin and Hispanic Af-
fairs, Institute of Contemporary Jewry at
Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He will
discuss, "Antisemitism: The Latin
American Experience."
Avni holds a doctorate degree from the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem in the
field of Jewish history and is fluent in six
languages.
The lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. It is
preceded by a happy hour which begins at
6:00 p.m. The cost is $5 in advance, $7 at
the door.
For more information contact the
Federation's Young Leadership Council
at 576-4000, ext. 290.
The co-chairmen for this event are
Michelle D. Merlin and Brian Daniels;
Event Chairmen are Hilda Mitrani and
Scot Bennett.
The Sandra C. Goldstein Lecture
Series wot established in the memory of
Sandy Goldstein, whose dedication and
commitment to the continuity of Jewish
life touched all of us. It is Federation'
hope that this series will enlighten,
enrich, and inspire others to advance
the work that was so very much a part
of Sandy's life.
"Give
A
Day"
to the
CJA
I;
Gift of remainder interest in your residence
By Dennis Ginsburg
There are many year-round and
seasonal residents of our area who
may be missing an unusual oppor-
tunity whereby they may spend
many happy years in their homes in South
Florida, while benefitting the Foundation
of Jewish Philanthropies and securing a
current income tax deduction.
How?
By making a contribution of a re-
mainder interest in their personal
residence.
What is a charitable contribution of a
remainder interest in a personal
residence?
A charitable contribution deduction is
allowed for income estate and gift tax
purposes in a situation where an in-
dividual makes a gift of his personal
residence to the Foundation but retains
the right to live there for the remainder
of his life.
The term "personal residence," for this
purpose, is defined as any property used
by the taxpayer as his personal residence
even though it is not used as his principal
residence. For example, a vacation home
that is used as a personal residence will
qualify. Furthermore, stock owned by a
tenant-stockholder in a cooperative hous-
ing corporation will also qualify if the unit
occupied is used as the stockholder's per-
sonal residence. However, no deduction
will be allowed for any portion of the
value of furnishings or other personal
property on the premises.
If the idea is beginning to appeal to you,
then you should also note that provisions
may be made for the use of the residence
during the life of another individual (for
example, your spouse) or for a specific
number of years. You may also obtain a
similar deduction for a remainder interest
in a farm.
How does the donor benefit?
Although you have retained the right to
live in the residence for your lifetime, you
are entitled to a current charitable deduc-
tion for the present value of the re-
mainder interest (i.e., the value of the
Foundation's right to receive the proper-
ty upon your death or, for example, upon
the death of both you and your spouse).
Thus, you obtain an immediate tax sav-
ings at the cost of knowing that your
home will eventually belong to the
Foundation.
How do you calculate the value of a gift
of a remainder interest in a personal
residence?
The calculation of a deduction for the
remainder interest in a personal
residence is rather complicated, but
carefully detailed in the Internal Revenue
Regulations. Suffice it to say that your ac-
countant or attorney will need to
calculate the present value to the Founda-
tion of its right to receive your home a
number of years from now. For simplici-
ty, a technical explanation has been omit-
ted; you should consult your tax advisor
for more detailed information.
Example
In 1987, Mr. Cohen, who is 62, donates
to the Foundation a remainder interest in
a personal residence he purchased several
years ago subject to his right to live there
for the rest of his life. At the time of the
gift, the land and house are appraised at
values of $21,000 and $75,000, respec-
tively, and the house has an estimated
useful life of 45 years, at the end of which
time it is expected, to be worth $15,000.
There is no mortgage on the property.
Based on these facts, the value of the re-
mainder interest in the property for
which Mr. Cohen obtains a charitable
deduction is approximately $42,000.
It is important to remember that this
method of making a contribution to the
Foundation places constraints on your
ability to dispose of the property.
However, for those donors in the ap-
propriate circumstances, the contribution
of a remainder interest in their personal
residence may provide them with another
opportunity to both benefit the Founda-
tion and obtain significant immediate tax
benefits. As always, we urge you to meet
with your tax advisor in order to evaluate
this method of contribution in light of
your particular situation.

Dennis Ginsburg is an attorney
with the Miami firm of
Packman, Neuwhal and
Rosenberg, PA. He is a member
of the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies' Professional A d-
visory Committee.
k
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa
tion recently held a joint meeting of
the Jewish Agency for Israel Com-
mittee and Federation's Board of
Directors. Representing the Jewish
Agency was Neale Katz. Director
General and Israel Representative
of the United Israel Appeal. He
presented the group with an over-
view of the Jewish Agency. Pictured
(from left to right) are Herb
Canarick, chairman of the Jewish
Agency for Israel Committee and
Neale Katz.
6 Federation, February 1987


CJA 1987:
Miami Must Not Permit
Unthinkable Cutbacks in Services

By DONALD E. LEFTON
Combined Jewish Appeal
Campaign Chairman
On January 15, more than a thou-
sand people gathered at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton to celebrate the
kick-off of the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal. Between that date and Super
Sunday on March 22, it will be the
turn of all of us in Dade County to
shoulder our full share of responsibili-
ty for the continuing viability of our
own community's agencies and in-
stitutions and, at the same time, to
assist fellow Jews in Israel and Jews
in need in 33 countries around the
world.
In recent years, we seem to have
lost sight of the concept of collective
responsibility, and too many of us
have found refuge in complacency.
We assume that others will fulfill the
obligation of tzedakah, the traditional
Jewish concept of helping those in
need.
This complacency, or passivity, has
created a situation in which it has
become more and more difficult for
Federation's annual campaign to sus-
tain ^equate levels of funding to our
local agencies for the provision of
vitally important human services. At
the same time, our capacity to main-
tain our appropriate share of respon-
sibility to Israel and world Jewry,
through the United Jewish Appeal,
has been diminished.
If the 1987 Campaign manages to
raise only as much as 1986, the an-
ticipated deficit for 1987-88 alloca-
tions will cause cutbacks in local ser-
vices and in our contribution to
Israel.
The idea of collective responsibility
which I alluded to earlier and which is
at the core of Jewish giving, is encap-
sulated in our 1987 Campaign theme
"It's our turn."
We have to rediscover the
volunteer spirit which, during the
past 20 years, has helped to make
Miami one of the most dynamic and
innovative Jewish communities in
North America. We have much to be
proud of:
The JVS Nutritional Project, ser-
ving nearly 2,000 kosher meals a day,
including 600 delivered to the
homebound;
The Jewish Family Service's
award-winning "Family Lifeline,"
helping to provide emergency
response and contact for dispersed
families with aging loved ones in
Greater Miami;
The JCC Infant and Child Day
Care Program for single parent
families;
The exciting High School in Israel
program, which was pioneered in
Miami, went national and recently
won the State of Israel's prestigious
"President's Award" as the out-
standing overseas student program;
Federation Housing Inc., Miami's
landmark non-profit housing corpora-
tion, providing high quality housing
for those most in need.
In all, 32 local health, education and
social service agencies count upon the
Combined Jewish Appeal for support.
But it doesn't end here in Miami. A
very significant portion of CJA cam-
paign dollars is allocated every year
to the United Jewish Appeal for
Israel. This allocation is vital.
It helped in the rescue from star-
vation and persecution of 16,000
Ethiopian Jews and enabled them to
be resettled in Israel;
It helped to build nearly 600 kib-
butzim and moshavim;
It made it possible for Israel to
overcome an annual inflation rate of
495 percent by providing funds to
ease the strain when the government
was forced to cut vital subsidies for
food, transportation, utilities and
social services;
Through Youth Aliyah, it pro-
vides important technical training to
young immigrants and gives Israel a
tremendously important pool of
"brain power";
Through the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee, it pro-
vides life-sustaining services to Jews
in 33 countries from kosher kitchens
and free clinics in Rumania to sum-
mer camps for Jewish children in
Morocco and Yugoslavia.
None of this can continue if we sit
back and do nothing. Without our in-
volvement, the very fabric of Jewish
life in our community is threatened.
Think about the 400, otherwise im-
mobile, frail elderly Jews who are
transported daily to hot meal sites, to
the doctor or the drugstore by the
Jewish Community Centers' Senior
Ride Program. The program is in
danger. Four-hundred elderly people
are threatened with the prospect of
being isolated in their homes. Isola-
tion leads to premature
institutionalization.
Think about those 2,000 hot kosher
meals. In this affluent community of
Miami, are we willing to allow this
nutritional program to be cut back?
Are we willing to see our fellow Jews
go hungry?
Think about having to tell a work-
ing parent that his or her child cannot
be in our infant day care program at
the JCC, because we must cut back,
or think about informing a resident at
Douglas Gardens that he or she can
no longer be cared for due to a lack of
funds.
Finally, think again about those
UJA dollars. Today, we share the joy
of knowing that Israel's borders are
quiet and her people are secure. This
security has been purchased at enor-
mous cost both human and
material. Without our continuing
help in funding human service pro-
grams, Israel will be incapable of con-
centrating so single-mindedly on its
defense.
It's our turn to step forward. If we
choose to act, we can make the dif-
ference. We can help to develop and
preserve a strong, vibrant, caring
community that our children and
grandchildren will be proud to
inherit.
We have a 1987 Campaign goal of
$21,750,000. With your help that goal
will become a reality, and all of the
programs offered by our beneficiary
agencies will continue to be there for
those in need.
It's our turn now.
Federation, February 1987 7


Federation held its annual Campaign Opening Dinner to launch the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal on January 15, at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel on Miami
Beach. 1,200 guests attended, showing their support for Jewish needs in Miami,
Israel and around the world. The keynote speaker was newly elected Florida
Governor Bob Martinez. Also featured at the dinner was the premier of Federation's
music video. "It's Our Turn To Be The Heroes." Pledges to the campaign totalled $4.4
million.
Photo* by Aaron Euenberg



Governor Bob Martinez and Harvey Friedman,
chairman of the Campaign Opening Dinner.
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION SONG
ITS OUR TURN TO BE THE HEROES
It's our turn to be the heroes, it's our turn.
It's our turn to be the heroes, it's our turn.
Heroes made the desert bloom
Now it's yours and mine
That spirit lives in you and me
We'll make tomorrow shine.
CHORUS:
It's our turn to be the heroes
We're Federation, one family
Yes now it's our turn to be the heroes
We are one people, one destiny.
Federation President Aaron Podhurst (right)
thanks Governor Martinez for his remarks.
Raffx Miller, is joined by
Donald Lefton, 1987 CJA
chairman in the singing
of "It's Our Turn To Be
The Heroes."
Our fathers fed the hungry
Helped the tired and poor
Were making that happen
Even better than before.
Repeat Chorus
It's our turn to be the heroes, it's our turn.
It's our turn to be the heroes, it's our turn.
The torch we've been handed
Must keep burning strong.
Lighting dreams of freedom
Filling hearts with song.
Gail Newman, Women's Division Campaign chair-
woman presents the "Guardian Pin" to Rhalda
Prystavsky at the Campaign Opening Dinner.
and direc-
j Our Turn
in singing
The premier of Federation's music video,
It's Our Turn To Be The Heroes."
Mel Kartzmer updates those in attendance of upcoming Commerce and Profes-
sions activities.
Federation, February 1987 9


Pictured at the YLC
cocktail reception
are Susan Vogel.
Elaine Berkowitz,
Nancy Berkowitz
and Mark Vogel.
From left: Governor Bob Martinez with Myron J.
Brodie, executive vice president of Federation and
past Federation presidents Harry A. 'Hap'' Levy and
Samuel I. Adler.
0
mm
Pictured (seated from left) are Myron J. Brodie, executive vice presi-
dent of Federation; Charlotte Brodie; Donald E. Lefton, 1987 CJA
chairman; Ambassador Rachamim Timor, Consul General from the
State of Israel; Shoshana Timor. Standing (from left) are Steven
Brodie; Rich Bernstein; Aaron Podhurst, president of Federation;
Dorothy Podhurst, Women's Division president; Edythe Kerness;
and Elton J. Kerness, associate executive vice president of
Federation.
U.U million was pledged to the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal dur-
ing the course of the evening.

Rabbi HaskeU Bernat of Temple Israel of Greater Miami delivtrs the
invocation.
10 Federation, February 1987
.......


CRC helps commemorate
\Martin Luther King Jr. 's
birthday
he Community Relations Com-
mittee of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation was among
the official group of supporter
organizations of the Solidarity March and
.lly on Sunday, January 18, to com-
aemorate the birthday of Martin Luther
ting Jr. The march began at the Caleb
Center at 26th Avenue and 54th Street
id ended with the Rally at the Martin
uther King Park at Northwest 27th
Vvenue and 62nd Street Martin Luther
Ling Boulevard.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami offered an
jpening prayer. Israeli Consul General
ambassador Rahamim Timor, offered
/ords of greeting from the State of
rael, bringing word, to those assembled,
the Martin Luther King Jr. Forest,
established in Israel, as he called for
peace and understanding throughout the
world.
In a statement issued on behalf of Mar-
tin Luther King Commemorations, the
Community Relations Committee stated,
"We find that what made Martin Luther
King such a compelling national figure,
was his clear enunciation of the principle
of the indivisibility of human rights, a
principle that has been central to the
Jewish community relations field."
Pictured, left to right, are Dr. Douglas
Miller, Chairman of the Middle East and
Foreign Jewry Committee of the Com-
munity Relations Committee, and CRC
members Dorothy Serotta, Dr. Maurice
Serotta and William Saulson. Also par-
ticipating was CRC Director Edward
Rosenthal.
Federation begins first full time
Jewish hospice program
upreme Court Justice
eynote speaker of
}lenary Sessions
Issues of concern to Jews around
the world will be the focus of
discussions at the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC) Plenary Session to
February 15-18.
"It is a completely issue-oriented set of
meetings and the issues cut across a
of human problems from the Mid-
lie "East to Soviet Jewry, to Church
State separation, to problems of welfare
id the underpriviledged," said Jeffrey
Jerkowitz, chairman of Federation's
immunity Relations Committee.
"This meeting will bring together the
B8t minds in the nation, from Communi-
Relations Committees, Federations
id national agency leaders," added
maid E. Lefton, chairman of the
JJCRAC Commission on International
incerns.
upreme Court Justice Harry A.
Blackmun will be the keynote
speaker at the Plenum on Sunday,
February 15, marking the 200th
jiniversary of the United States Con-
titution. In a related vein, Senator Paul
non of Illinois, one of the stalwarts of
j Senate Judiciary Committee, who
lyed a major role in the confirmation
ties last summer, will address the
pic of "The threat to the Federal
iiciary: The role of the Senate."
The two aforementioned speakers
represent only the tip of the
iceberg of the full agenda of
general sessions, forums and
workshops that will be held during the
Plenum. Topics will include: U.S. foreign
policy after Iran; religious pluralism in
Israel and the role of the Jewish com-
munity relations field; the Soviet Jewry
movement after Reykjavik; welfare: is it
ripe for reform?; civil rights: does the
Jewish community relations field have an
agenda?; teaching moral values in the
public schools without preaching spiritual
values: can it be done?; English as the of-
ficial language: is it divisive or binding?;
dialogue with Arab Americans: oppor-
tunity or risk?; counteracting terrorism
after Iran?; reconciling the Jewish en-
vironment of communal agencies with the
first amendment: can it be done?;
escalating sanctions against South
Africa: where are they leading?; action on
the recommendations of the NJCRAC
review committee.
The Plenum will not be all work. There
will be a cruise along the inland water-
way, hosted by the CRC of the Jewish
Federations of Ft. Lauderdale and of
South Broward.
Registration for the full plenum is $175.
For information about the program or
single day participation contact the Com-
munity Relations Committee office at
576-4000, ext. 317.
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Benjamin Botwinick, chairman
of the Chaplaincy Advisory
Committee of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation an-
nounced that Rabbi Warren Kasztl has
been appointed to serve the patients and
families of Hospice Incorporated of Dade
County in the capacity of Hospice
Chaplain and Coordinator of Bereave-
ment Services. "In this first of its kind ar-
rangement, Hospice has contracted with
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
through its Chaplaincy Department, to
provide the services of a full time rabbi to
meet the religious, cultural and bereave-
ment needs of Jewish patients and
families on the Hospice program," ex-
plained Botwinick. "It is actually the
first, full time, Jewish hospice service in
the country," he added.
As Hospice Chaplain, Rabbi Kasztl will
participate as a member of the patient
care team to ensure that each patient's
pastoral care needs are met. He will visit
patients and families at home, at Hospice
House, and at nursing homes as well as
act as a liaison between the community
rabbi and the Hospice team. Additionally,
he will provide training and education to
their staff and volunteers on Jewish
spiritual and cultural customs and issues.
In his capacity as Coordinator of Bereave-
ment Services, his major goal will be to
direct the Hospice Bereavement Team in
assisting surviving family members to af-
firm life and to make adjustments to life
without the person who has died.
a
A
s we begin our third decade
of Chaplaincy service, I am
delighted at the new direc-
tion we are taking, pro-
viding this much needed community ser-
vice," said Rabbi Solomon Schiff, director
and founder of the Chaplaincy Service at
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
"Since 1966 we have reached out to the
community, educating people and offer-
ing comfort in their times of need," he
added.
Hospice, Inc., is the only such organiza-
tion in Dade County. It is licensed by the
State of Florida and certified by Medicare
to provide services to terminally ill pa-
tients and their families. These services
are provided in the home, the inpatient
setting and in nursing homes. The focus
of the program is on alleviation of the
stressful symptoms associated with ter-
minal illness.
The choice for hospice care is made by
patients and their physicians when there
is little hope that curative measures will
be successful. The plan of care is coor-
dinated by the hospice in conjunction with
the physician. It addresses the medical,
physical, emotional, social and spiritual
needs of the patient and the family with
the goal of enhancing their quality of life.
Hugh Westbrook, founder and presi-
dent of Hospice, Inc., and a Methodist
minister, sees the cooperative effort with
the Federation's Chaplaincy program and
his organization as an idea whose time
has come. "The Hospice program in
Miami is community based, and must
recognize and respond to the rich cultural
fabric that makes up our community. By
working side by side with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, Hospice will be
able to assure the Jewish segment of our
community that its special concerns are
being addressed."
Rabbi Schiff added, "The
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Community Chaplaincy
Service has as its purpose, bik-
kur cholim, visiting Jewish persons con-
fined to hospitals, rehabilitation centers,
nursing homes, correctional institutions
and other facilities in Dade County.
Hospice, which is a relatively new idea in
patient care, can now be added to that
list."
The Community Chaplaincy Service of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation is a
cooperative program with the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
Federation, February 1987 11



Martin Fine
Chairman
Stephen Bittel
Vice-Chairman
nhwum
Arnold Altman
Vice-Chairman
Chairman's message
Dear Friends:
Our 1987 Campaign is off to a great
start. Going into our successful Campaign
Opening Dinner on January 15, we were
17 percent ahead of last year. The
business and professional community has
responded very well to date. Summit.
Vanguard and Pacesetter Divisions all
have shown success in their efforts to
raise funds for the CJA.
As successful as we seem to be at the
moment, the next three months are a
time to roll up our sleeves and make sure
that the job gets done. There is a limited
amount of time and a lot to do.
One of the new programs Federation
has created is called, "Give A Day." This
program is designed with the professional
individual in mind.
In past years, after a worker has been
assigned certain prospects and given
their cards, the cards would sit in a brief-
case or a jacket pocket for the better part
of the campaign season. We realize that
your time is both valuable and limited, so
we have created the "Give A Day"
program.
For "Give A Day," you put aside one
day to cover five or six prospects. Two
weeks prior to the donated day, a Federa-
tion campaign staff worker will sit down
with you and go over your list and help
you set up appointments. We all miss a
day of work due to illness or vacation and
I've never heard of anyone going out of
business because of it.
We really need your help. It's easy to
become involved. Just clip out the coupon
on this page, circling the day you wish to
give to the Combined Jewish Appeal and
return it to us.
Now it's your turn Give a day to the
CJA.
Cordially,
Martin Fine
Chairman
Commerce and Professions
"Give a Day"
This new program is designed to help you make the best use of
your time while trying to get others to support the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal.
Federation asks that you give us one entire day to do all of
your solicitations.
To participate, circle the date on the calendar on this page, clip
it out and return it to:
"Give a Day" Program
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 83137
or call Marty Barasch at 576-4000, ext. 274.
Thank you.
???????????????????????????#???.???????.????????????t
?
?
t
?
?
?
?
?
?
Marc Schectman heads
Stockbroker's Division
Marc Schectman
Chairman
Each month the Commerce and Pro fee-
tion* Division highlight* one of it*
outstanding leaden.
Marc Schectman is the chairman
of the Commerce and Profes-
sions' Stockbrokers Division.
In that capacity he has
motivated his fellow stockbrokers to
become interested in helping Jews in
Miami, Israel and around the world
through their involvement in Federa-
tion's Combined Jewish Appeal.
Schectman, originally from Newark,
New Jersey, went to George Washington
University and received has Bachelor of
Arts Degree in Political Science. He later
received his Masters Degree in Business
Administration from the University of
Miami.
He has been active in the Jewish com-
munity for many years. Schectman has
been on numerous missions to Israel and
was one of the leaders of the National
Singles Mission last August. He is a
member of the Young Leadership Cabinet
and is active in the Young Leadership
Council's singles campaign as well as
other committees.
Predating his arrival in Miami's Jewish
community, he was very active in
Washington D.C.. Bergen County, New
Jersey, and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Schectman's cousin is the late Max
Bressler, former chairman of the Zionist
Organization of America. His uncle is
Moses Hornstein, a major contributor to
the South Broward Federation and a
member of the board of many Jewish
organizations.
"With relatives like that I would have
been excommunicated from my family
had I not been involved in an endeavor
like the Greater Miami Jewish Federa
tion," said Schectman.
He is currently employed as an account
executive and office coordinator for Dean
Witter Reynolds, Inc., a local stock
brokerage firm and is the recipient of the
Dean Witter National Sales Leadership
Award. Schectman has used this exper-
tise to give many lectures and financial
planning seminars throughout Dade
County.
"I feel with the proper guidance, the
stockbroker division could become one of
the most important and fastest growing
divisions of Federation, and I'm going to
do everything in my power to try and see
that it happens.
'Give a Day" to the Combined Jewish Appeal
Name.
Firm.
Phone.
FEBRUARY MARCH
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 II 12 13 14 8 9 10 II 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
APRIL
S M T W T F S
12 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 II
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
29 30 31
MAY
s M T W T F S 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 1 1 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
/3i 25 26 27 28 29 30
12 Federation, February 1987


Ihcharansky
I featured on
\JFTV
Three segments in the February edition
[of "Jewish Television Magazine," produc-
led by the Council of Jewish Federations,
[bridge the distance between Israel and
[North America. The first provides an up-
rdate on a group of young North American
[volunteers who have traveled to Israel to
I participate in Otzma, a year-long pro-
Igram of service and education sponsored
Iby the Council of Jewish Federations and
[several local Jewish federations in the
Jnited States and Canada. The second
features former Soviet Refusenik Natan
Jhcharansky in a "live" satellite
>roadcast.
The third segment which will air was
produced by JFTV during its recent trip
Israel. The segment takes viewers to
hsit Hai Bar, a nature preserve in Israel,
fome to some of the rarest animals in the
vorld. The story is hosted by Suzanne
ky.
The monthly programs which make up
he "Jewish Television Magazine" series,
ature stories supplied by Federation
elevision agencies across the United
ftates, including JFTV. The show, now in
second year, is made available to
Jewish Federations affiliated with the
suncil of Jewish Federations, which
ten obtain air time on their local televi-
sion stations. The program is currently
sing shown in 58 communities from
Joast to coast.
The host of "Jewish Television
fagazine" is film and television actor
ephen Macht, currently best known to
ewers for his featured role on "Cagney
' Lacey."
I of these programs can be seen locat-
ion Jewish Federation Television.
Wanted:
If you're a "domestic engineer"
(housewife), retired, bored, or anxious
to do some outside work that won't
take up all of your time, and if you
have any sales or fundraising ex-
perience in your background, we need
your help, part time. Please call us at
576-4000 for details. Just ask for
JFTV.
fJheck-Up
rount Sinai
jCheck-Up/Mount Sinai with Lila Heat-
T\ past president and honorary chair-
>man of the board of trustees for Mount
Medical Center, call "be seen on
every Monday and Thursday at
'p.m. and Saturday at 6:00 p.m. Each
ek the program features informative
cussion on the latest breakthroughs in
dicine.
February 2 Nephrology
Of. Ronald Shane
February 9 Oncology
%. Judith Ratzan
bruary 16 Anesthesiology
Monte Lichtiger
>ruary 23 Endocrinology
Lee Bicker
rch 2 Pathology
Les Rosen
Hosts:
Watch the Provocative
Teen Scene" Program Dealing with
Issues of Concern to Today's Teenagers
Adler, Jewish Family Service / Helen Leibowitz, Jewish Community Center
PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE FEBRUARY 1987
Tim* Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5:00 p.m. Eenie's Kitchen A Aleph Eenie's Kitchen B Aleph Film Special Film Special Pillow Talk
5:30 p.m. Check-Up/ Mount Sinai Jewish TV National Magazine (Feb 10 4 24) Film Special (Fee 3 4 17) Hello Jerusalem *" Underwritten by Signature Gardens Check-Up/ Mount Smai Kaleidoscope Eenie's Kitchen B
6:00 p.m. We Remember The Holocaust Film Special Film Special Eenie's Kitchen A Check-Up/ Mount Sinai We Remember The
JFTV Bulletin Board Holocaust
6:30 p.m. Still Small Voice or Viewpoint Jewish Family Forum Teen Scene Jewish Family Forum President's Corner Teen Scene
Federation Today
7:00 p.m. President's Corner Jewish Television Network Specials Pillow Talk Still Small Voice or Viewpoint Hello Jerusalem '* Underwitten by Signature Gardens Jewish TV National Magazine (Feb 14 4 28) Film Special (Feto 7 4 21)
Federation Today Hello Jerusalem Underwritten
7:30 p.m. Pillow Talk Kaleidoscope President's Corner Film Special Jewish Television Network Specials by Signature Gardens
Programs A/e Subiect to Change Underwriter Federation Today JFTV Bulletin Board JFTV Bulletin Board
Watch JFTV on Your Local Cable System
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29 Dynamic Channel 38
Storer (South Dade) Channel 14 Miami Cablevision Channel 4
Harte-Hanks Channel 2 Adelphia Channel 21 or 28A
JFTVVIDEO PRODUCTIONS
Quality Work
Experienced Profes-
sional Staff
E.N.G. Units
Commercials
Cable/Broadcast
Shows
Industrials
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION TELEVISION
3950 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000 576-4021 after 5:15 p.m. Suzanne Lasky, Director
F#Hnatm;Vtbrita+$ mt l$v


Hedva to perform for South Dade JCC
Hedva
Hedva will perform at the Hotel
Sofitel, Monte Carlo Ballroom on
Saturday evening, February 7. The
show, which begins at 8:30 p.m., is
being brought to Miami by the South
Dade Jewish Community Center's
Cultural Arts Department.
Hedva has been known as the "Voice of
Israel," since she first introduced the
world famous song, Bashana Habaah. In
drawing on her background and ex-
perience, she will bring her unique sound
and style of contemporary music to the
United States.
Hedva sings and records fluently in
seven languages and has appeared widely
on American, European and Japanese
television and stage.
During the celebration of Israel's 25th
anniversary she was chosen as one of 25
individuals who have made the most
significant contribution to the Jewish
Homeland since its birth.
She has established herself as a major
international singing and recording star
from Tel Aviv to Tokyo to Europe and
the United States.
Cost for the evening is $50 for patrons,
$30 for sponsors, which includes a lavish
dessert reception of french pastries
following the program.
Denise Wolpert and Carol Cantor are
the Cultural Arts Committee
Chairpersons.
For more information call the South
Dade Jewish Community Center at
251-1394.
The South Dade Jewish Community
Center is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and the South Dade Jewish Community
Center Partners in a caring
community.
JVS offers
employment
assistance
The Jewish Vocational Service,
Employment Assistance Program con-
tinues to offer opportunities for job
seekers to learn more about the current
job market in Dade County. Although
seeking a job may be frustrating and
stressful, it can also be seen as a challeng-
ing and rewarding experience. Whether
changing careers or first entering the
world of work, professional support from
a JVS Employment Specialist may be all
that is needed to insure success.
The JVS Employment Assistance Pro-
gram of the Community Service Depart
ment focuses on teaching those skills
needed to obtain appropriate employ
ment. Individual vocational counseling
and group seminars can aid in upgrading
interviewing techniques, resume prepara
tion and networking skills. If you require
assistance in marketing yourself to get a
job that is right for you, call Patricia
Winter at JVS, 576-3220, or Claire
Savitt, 235-9482 in South Dade.
JVS is a beneficiary agency of the Com
bined Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
Jewish Vocational Service Partners
in a caring community.
Alzheimer's programs
begin in Miami
Alzheimer's Disease is deadly for
the afflicted as well as devastating
to those who care for them. There
is no known cure for this disease
that cripples the minds and the bodies of
more than 1.5 million elderly Americans,
but there is help. The Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens now operates two programs
specially tailored to meet the needs of
Alzheimer's victims while providing pro-
fessional support for their families.
The Douglas Gardens Alzheimer's
Respite Care Center, which opened in
January, provides services to Alzheimer's
patients who are still able to live within
the community. Subsidized in part by the
Florida Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services and United Way
of Dade County as well as by grants from
the Einstein, Kramer and Potamkin
Foundations, this Respite Center serves
residents of North Dade and South
Broward counties.
Each day. Monday through Friday,
the Respite Center provides
Alzheimer's patients with a con-
stantly stimulating environment
and realistic challenges necessary to
maintain their diminished abilities and re-
learn forgotten skills. Under the supervi-
sion of specially trained professionals,
with a staff-to-client ratio of 1:4, patients
of the Respite Center benefit from a uni-
que program of activities designed to
keep them alert, healthy and independent
for as long as possible. Such activities in-
clude reality orientation, movement and
music therapy, remotivation training,
continence training, group and individual
activities as well as lunch, two snacks and
transportation within limited areas.
The Respite Care Center also offers
services to families of Alzheimer's pa-
tients including group and individual
counseling, training and behavior
management techniques and a "respite"
or "time off' from caregiving.
Eligibility for care at the Respite
Center is based on assessment by the Pro-
ject Coordinator and a current medical
evaluation by a private physician or one
affiliated with the Miami Jewish Home.
On the Douglas Gardens campus,
the Rood Alzheimer's Program
began operation of its 28 bed unit
on January 15. The program was
made possible by an endowment from the
Roddy C. Rood Foundation, and provides
assessment, care and maintenance of
Alzheimer's patients as well as the train-
ing of professional and care staff who
deal with them. The program is the first
of its kind in Florida to combine
Alzheimer's research, training and care
components in a long-term care facility.
Dr. Sondra Weiss is Program Manager of
the unit.
For further information on the Respite
Center, contact Ruth Rothschild, R.N.,
Project Director, Douglas Gardens
Alzheimer's Respite Care Centerk, 1733
Northeast 162nd Street, North Miami
Beach, FL 33162, or call (305) 531-8660.
For additional information on tl-e Rood
Alzheimer's Program, contact th<- Office
of Admissions at the Miami Jewish Home,
151 Northeast 52nd Street, Miami, FL
33137, or call (305) 751-8626.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged is a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged Partners in a caring
community.
Jewish High School
students learn about
responsibility
"A good education is more than just a
stepping stone to college or the job
market.
It provides a sense of responsibility
toward other people."
The Jewish High School of South
Florida, recognizing the truth of
this statement, encourages
students to participate in com-
munity service programs. Students earn
credits in Judaic Studies by giving 30
hours of community service during the
school year. Students giving 50 hours or
more of service are entitled to member-
ship in the School's Service Honors
Society.
Last year three students achieved this
honor Jenny Ivcher, Jenny Guindi and
Jackie Abadi, each contributing over 100
hours of volunteer work.
Projects have included collecting food
for the "Feed Miami" program; helping
teachers with projects and running
booths for the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center's "Chanukah
Happening." Jewish High School
students also gave up their first day of
winter break to fill in for non-Jewish
workers and volunteers at various social
service agencies, allowing these
employees to spend Christmas with their
families.
The students view community service
as part of the school curriculum and the
school hopes this valuable experience will
teach them the most important lesson of
all "Love thy neighbor.'1
The Jewish High School is a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the Jewish
High School partners in a caring
community.
BBYO holds
regional
convention
"All for one and one for all," was the
theme at this year's annual B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization's (BBYO) regional
convention held recently in Eustis,
Florida.
The idea of "All for one ," was
designed to demonstrate that American
Jews are "one" with their Soviet counter-
parts. Participants at the convention
were able to experience everything from
the difficulties in acquiring a "Soviet j
visa" to being held in a mockup of a
Soviet prison. The purpose of these exer-
cises was to show the youths the problems 4
encountered by Soviet Jews and to make
them aware of how they can help.
Another convention highlight was the
Chanukah Torch Run organized by com
munity Shaliach, Raffi Miller, from
Federation's Israel Programs Office.
Osnat Yanoshevsky, an Israeli, carried
the torch into the camp, handing it over
to the BBYO members as they made their
way to the center of the camp complex
Yanoshevsky then spoke to the group
about what it's like to live in Israel and
about Soviet Jewry.
The main purpose of the regional con
vention was to elect new regional of-
ficers. The new 1987 Florida Region Ex-
ecutive Board: presidents: Adrian
Neiman, BBG, and Adam Silverman.
AZA; vice presidents: Stacey Goodman.
BBG, and David Schimmel, AZA:
Secretaries: Lauren Horowitz, BBG, and jM
Brett Berlin, AZA; Messenger, Lisa
Steinman, BBG; Membership, Brad Ber
man, AZA.
BBYO wishes them all the best of luck
in the year ahead.
If your son or daughter is interested in
becoming a part of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization, call 253-7400.
BBYO is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal. The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and BBYO Part-
ners in a caring community.
14 Federation, February 1987


Save the date.
MARCH 22,
IT'S OUR TURN TO MAKE IT
Help make it a Super Day!
Volunteer by calling Federation
at 576-4000, ext. 215.
Super Sunday 1987
It's Our Turn To Make It Super!
March 22 will be Super Sunday in
South Florida. An exciting, massive
phonathon on behalf of the 1987 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal, this year's
Super Sunday will be an important
first for our region. The Greater
Miami Jewish Federation will be join-
ing forces with the Federations of
South Broward, Fort Lauderdale,
Boca Raton and West Palm Beach to
reach the entire South Florida Jewish
community.
Super Sunday which promises to
be the largest phonathon ever held in
South Florida will be a campaign
"clean-up" effort and will acquaint
people with the critical challenges
facing Jews in South Florida, Israel
and in communities around the world.
In addition to offering the opportuni-
ty to millions of people to make a
pledge to the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal, it will be a day when
thousands of devoted people will
volunteer their efforts to make the
day a tremendous success.
The event will be held at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, 137 NE 19th
Street, Miami, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
"For this year's Super Sunday
we've adopted the theme, >It's our
turn to make it Super,' said Saby
Behar, chairman of the community-
wide event. "No theme could be more
appropriate. Super Sunday is a very
special day when Jews reach out to
their fellow Jews around the world.
We intend to reach every Jewish
household throughout South Florida,
and we hope every individual will
make a really 'super' expression of
their commitment.'
Serving as vice chairmen of Super
Sunday are Judi Billig, Paul
Berkowitz, Richard Berkowitz and
Ellen Rose.
As in years past, members of
Federation's Young Leadership
Council will be handling the phones
from 6 to 9 p.m., and they will host a
party later in the evening.
Be part of the most thrilling event
in the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity, a day that's a fun and satisfy-
ing experience for all who par-
ticipate. To find out how YOU can be
part of Super Sunday '87, please call
Federation at 576-4000, ext. 215.
Federation, February 1987 15


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
The Graduate Program of Jewish
Studies at Barry University presents
a lecture by Professor Shalom Paul,
chair of the Bible department at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The
topic will be, "New insights into an
old Biblical tale." This meeting,
which is free to the public begins, at
7:30 p.m. in Wiegand Hall, room
116E. Professor Paul is one of the
outstanding public lecturers of
Jewish academic life. Professor
Paul's four books and dozens of
scholarly articles on the Bible and the
ancient Near East have earned him
an international reputation in the
scholarly community. For more infor-
mation contact Barry University at
758-3392.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah will
hold its Youth Aliyah Pledge Lun-
cheon at the Sofitel Hotel in Miami
beginning at 11:30 a.m. For more in-
formation contact 279-3758.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
The Mini Convention of Amit
Women, Florida Council, will take
place at Seacoast Towers East,
Palace Playhouse. For more informa-
tion contact 651-1444.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9
The Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center, 610 Espanola Way, will hold
its Grief Support Group for the
recently bereaved at 1:00 p.m. For
more information call 673-6060.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10
The Forte Forum will feature Miles
Bunder from the Central Agency for
Jewish Education discussing the
topic, "From Ben Gurion to Peres: is
Peace Possible?" at 1:00 p.m. in the
north Building, located at 1000 West
Avenue in Miami Beach. Call
673-1979 for more information.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry will meet at 7:30 p.m. at
Federation, 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard. For more information call
576-4000, ext. 291.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
The Graduate Program of Jewish
Studies of Barry University and the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center present "The War
against the Jews: Perception of the
Holocaust." The guest lecturer will
be Professor Haim Avni. He is a pro-
fessor of contemporary Jewish
history at the Institute of Contem-
porary Jewry, the Hebrew University
of Jerusalem and the author of six
books and many scholarly articles.
This lecture, will be held at the JCC,
18900 N.E. 25th Ave., at 8:00 p.m.
and is free and open to the public.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach Br.
1059 will hold its monthly meeting at
the Surfside Community Center,
9301 Collins Avenue beginning at
noon. Call 864-5236 for more
information.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Founders Din-
ner meeting will be held at 6:00 p.m.
in the Ruby Auditorium at Douglas
Gardens, 151 Northeast 52nd Street.
Contact Steve Rose for more infor-
mation at 751-8626.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
American Jewish Congress Justine
Louise Wise Chapter will meet at
12:30 p.m. at the American Savings
and Loan Association bank building
located at Alton and Lincoln roads.
This meeting will be a general pro-
gram. Guests are invited. For more
information call 864-1355.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
The Hebrew Technical School for
Girls Alumnae will hold their monthly
meeting at Flagler Federal Savings
and Loan Association, 1050 Alton
Road, Miami Beach beginning at
12:30 p.m. For more information con-
tact Rhoda Geist at 861-7205.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
The South Dade Jewish Community
Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue
will hold a Summer Day Camp Open
House for parents at 8:00 p.m. Ask
questions, meet the camp supervisors
and learn about the JCC's summer
camp program. For more information
call 2511394.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, North Miami
Beach Auxiliary Board Meeting, will
be held at 10:00 a.m. at the Denny's
restaurant on Miami Gardens Drive.
Contact Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for
more information.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14
Bet Shira Congregation will present
"Hazzanut: the Cantor's Art, begin-
ning at 8:00 p.m. The concert, featur-
ing Cantor Stephen Freedman of Bet
Shira, coincides with the observance
of Shabbat Shira and the beginning of
Jewish Music Season. For additional
information, please call the
synagogue office at 238-2601.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15
The Miami region of Hadassah will
hold its Diamond Jubilee celebration
at Temple Israel of Greater Miami
beginning at 1:00 p.m. For more in-
formation call 932-7771 or 748-8400.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar items
(Please print or type)
Deadline for March events is February 12
Organization
Event _____
Place ______
Day
Date
Time-----( )a.m. ( )p.m.
Your name
Title ____
Phone No.
MAILTO:
I
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 15
The First Beitcher Society meeting
will be held at Truman Savings and
Loan Association beginning at 12:30
p.m. This is an organization of people,
who came from the Town of Beicz, in
the foothills of the Carpathian moun-
tains in Austria (now Poland). For
more information contact Bernard
Citron at 947-5746.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
The Menorah Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its Youth Aliyah Luncheon!-
Sl Hotel, 5800 Blue Lagoon Drive,
beginning at noon. Call 382-2546 for
more information.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School Parent Teacher Associa-
tion will hold a luncheon and fashion
show at at the Sofitel Hotel, 5800
Blue Lagoon Drive, beginning at
noon. Call 382-2546 for more
information.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School Parent Teacher Associa-
tion will hold a luncheon and fashion
show at the Fontainebleau Hilton
Hotel, 4441 Collins Avenue on Miami
Beach. The luncheon will honor
Rochelle Baltuch. Dietary laws will be
observed. Costs vary. Call 931-2831
for more information.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Junior Aux-
iliary General Meeting will be held at
noon at the Singapore Hotel. Contact
Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for more
information.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16
Alzheimers Caregivers Support
Group meeting will be held at the
Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center Senior Center, 610
Espanola Way, beginning at 3:00
p.m. Call 673-6060 for more
information.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17
U.S. Airforce Major Earl Phippen
will discuss, "The Soviet Influence In
Nicaragua," during this installment
of the Forte Forum. The meeting will
be held at 1:00 in the north building,
located at 1000 West Avenue. Call
673-1979 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18
The South Dade Branch of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, in
conjunction with the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, will be spon-
soring a class in Pirkei Avot (Ethics
of the Fathers) as part of its Com-
munity Education program. Rabbi
David Auerbach of Bet Shira Con-
gregation will lead this meeting
which will be held from 7:30-9:00 a m
S\i?e South Dade Branch. 12401
S.W. 102nd Avenue. The cost is $3
for the textbook, plus a nominal fee
for breakfast. For more information
contact Michelle Jaffe at 251-9334.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18
The Cultural Forum on Great Jewish
Personalities sponsored by the Miami
Beach Jewish Community Center
4221 Pine Tree Drive, will take place
on Wednesday, February 18, beginn-
ing at 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Meir Felman
will speak on rabbinical luminaries of
the 19th century. Helen Feiman will
address the topic of the Rothschild
women and their contributions to
Jewish life. For more information
contact the JCC at 534-3206
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19
The Women's Division, North Dn. \
Chapter of the Israel Insuwjtj
Technology will hold a meetiU *
Rolling Green, Building D fJLJ !
floor. The meeting will be'held!
12:30 p.m., preceded by coffee aJ A
cake. The program will be a "wS
Elephant Sale." For further info?
tion call Celia C. Mandel at 651-g^
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24
Rabbi Harry Jolt will discuss, "ijjj
A year of anniversaries: What do
they mean for us today?" at 1:00 pm
as part of the Forte Forum. TV
discussion will be held at Fon,t
Towers North. Call 673-1979 fa 3
more information.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, North Miair
Beach Auxiliary Card Party ami
Membership Dnve will meet at the.
A venture Jewish Center. Contact *
Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for nxw
information.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26
The Brandeis University Nation!
Women's Committee, Miami Bead
Chapter will honor its "New Ijfc
Members" at a luncheon on February
26 at noon. The luncheon will be held
at Dominique's in the Alexander
Hotel, 5225 Collins Avenue. Al
members are welcome. For reaero
tions call Ada Andelman at 861-18%
or Marge Berger at 861-2667.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Greater Mian,
Women's Auxiliary will hold
general meeting in the Rob;
Auditorium at Douglas Gardens, 151
Northeast 52nd Street, beginning U
11:30 a.m. Contact Steffi Cohen it
751-8626 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4
The South Dade Branch of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, in
conjunction with the Central Agent?
for Jewish Education will be sponsor-
ing a class in Pirkei Avot, Ethics i
the Fathers, as part of its Communitj
Education program. Rabbi Michael I
Eisenstat of Temple Judea will tack
this class which meets from 7:30-WJ
a.m. at the South Dade Brand
12041 S.W. 102nd Avenue The cc*
is $3 for the textbook, plus a nomial I
fee for breakfast. For more inforn*
tion contact Michelle Jaffe *
251-9334.
EVERY TUESDAY
The Miami Beach Jewish CommuBj
Center Senior Center, *
Espanola Way, holds a Binp
meeting every Tuesday evening fro"
7:00-8:30 p.m. For more informant"
call 673-6060.
EVERY TUESDAY ,
The Jewish Community Centers"
Greater Miami, Miami Beach SJ
Center, 610 Espanola Way bo
meetings of its Elderly Hearing
paired program at 11:15 am. Anjr
with a hearing problem is encov^,
to attend and join the support gW
share ideas, suggestions and
developments in helping the nearui
impaired. Call 673-6060 for mc*
information.
16 Federation, February 1987


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EJAGWIMNG_BDR9S0 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-24T21:50:09Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03027
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES