The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03026

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
dfewish IFlojfidliainL
fo\. 60 No. 5
Miami Friday, January 30,1987
50 Cents
Lvt Ohayon, H, receives first aid treatment shortly after being stabbed last week
n the Old City of Jerusalem. Also stabbed was Avis brother. ShaUrm, 17. Both brothers
JTA/WZN News Photo
were walking in the Arab bazaar. The PLO has claimed responsibility.
\abbi in Georgia March
Survival
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Hacks and whites, Chris-
ans and Jews,
,000-strong, joined the
rgest civil rights march
iturday in dimming, Ga.,
ice Martin Luther King,
led the 1965 march in
Jlma, Ala.
Hie march marked a reaffirma-
?'i of the black-Jewish coalition
' civil rights which blossomed in
1%0's, according to Rabbi A.
nes Rudin, American Jewish
>mmittee director of inter-
ligious affairs, who was a
atured speaker at the march.
Inside
It's 50 Years
For the IPO
... Pag* 5-A
First Conservative
Woman Rabbi
Speaks... Page 8-A
Nonessential
Autopsy Ban
Page 11 A
Wrecking Ball
For Golda's House?
... Page 14-A
RUDIN CALLED the march an
awesome display by Americans
asserting their right to march and
demonstrate peacefully anywhere
in this country.
Saturday's march came exactly
one week after the little town of
Cumming. population 2,000, was
the scene of a smaller but more
violent march, brought to an
abrupt and premature halt when
Ku KJux Klansmen hurled bottles
and rocks at an interracial
brotherhood march.
Within a week, civil rights
leaders, Jewish community
leaders and Christian clergy
organized a massive response to
the violence. But the outpouring
of support overwhelmed the
organizers who did not expect the
huge turnout, Rudin told the JTA
Sunday after returning to New
York.
A convoy of some 200 buses car-
ried the marchers from their
meeting point in Atlanta to the
outskirts of Cumming in Forsyth
County, north of Atlanta. But
they were not the only ones
demonstrating Saturday. Several
hundred counter-demonstrators, a
handful of them Klansmen donn-
ing white sheets, awaited the
demonstrators in Cumming
Continued on Page 7-A
Want a 'Get'?
Pressure Recalcitrant Ex-Husband
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Haskel Lookstein,
president of the New York
Board of Rabbis, has urged
his colleagues in all three
trends of Judaism to
"undertake a major in-
itiative" aimed at solving
one of the most vexing and
divisive problems in Jewish
community and family life
the get, or religious
divorce.
Lookstein, who is rabbi of Con-
gregation Kehilat Jeshurun in
Manhattan, defined the central
problems and offered solutions at
the Board of Rabbis annual
meeting here last Wednesday
(Jan. 21) at which he was
reelected to another one-year
term as president.
"The first problem concerns en-
couraging Jews to obtain a get
prior to remarriage," he said. The
second "results from a
recalcitrant partner to a previous
marriage who refuses to give or
accept a get after a civil divorce
has been granted."
THE get is not a universal re-
quirement. Many Reform rabbis
will perform a second marriage
where one or both of the previous-
ly married partners has not ob-
tained a religious divorce. Or-
Continued on Page 10-A
Rabbi Rudin
J


Page 2 A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. January 30. 1987
Israel Will Back Int'l.
Confab If Mideast
Peace Process Hastened
i eve
Bv EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Vfcse
Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
asserted here Saturday that
Israel would back an inter-
national conference for
peace in the Middle East but
warned that speed is essen-
tial in advancing the peace
frocess because the Iran-
raq war. continued unrest
be by independent Palestinians
prepared to accept Israels ex-
istence and to seek a peaceful
solution to their conflict not
Palestine Liberation iVganizanor.
delegates-
Peres reportedly told the
French leaders, who themselves
recently met with Kins Husseir. of
Jordan, that "Hussein :s the key
:o peace' m the region and that
Western Europe should use its in-
fluence to bring him to the
Absolutely Not, Says Shamir
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir strongiy
rejected an international peace
conference on the Middle East
over the weekend because, he
maintained, at least three of the
major participants France, the
People's Repuhoc of China and
the Soviet Union would demand
that Israel withdraw to its 196"
borders. He thought that ever, the
1 > would insist on such a
repeat, though it would probably
agree to minor border changes
Such a conference would 'leave
us isolated, confronting the whole
world.'' Shamir said, addressing a
seminar of Russian immigrants in
Rama: Gan. It "will not bring
peace or blessings to Israel. The
only way to achieve peace is by-
direct negotiations without prior
conditions.'' Shamir declared His
remarks underlined a fundamen-
tal division between Likud and the
Labor Party, its partner in the
unity coalition government.
in Lebanon and Arab
economic difficulties
threaten to destabilize the
entire region.
But while Peres, at separate
r>e*cng5 with Presxier.t Francois
V "errand and Premier Jacques
Chirac, was elucidating m some
ieaul the conditions Israei would
Attach so such a conference and
-. :: .igr: :>e .rgar.-.jed.
Premier Yitshak Shamir flatly re-
jected the xiea. Ar. j-.:emaaocal
.vcfererce 'VI peace
.v :*essir.gs : Is.-*;, re saio
PERES. mini ban from
London Saruriay met w~tr. Mit-
terrand a: Am E SBM Man for
ate. arc j.:c- Bavfanud ~~~
."---a; He -e: >_- -
vita Foreign Mr -
Beraar- Ra_-ood
A: those eecrgs *e stressed
Israel s desire tc see tre peace
BMcess resumed a: tre ear es:
tvissaNe zr-e and jL.-ta.red that
tie recent -> : '_-* Modal bat
r. ".' S \ss^>ca=: Secre tar-
>tat* L-.-ta-- V_- -cceeoed
.-* "_-e -i. i_- -: t>.ca> >rac f.v^r-
However Fere?
"--e< -ts _s: :r -e-t.ed
Israei .vesaaerj ta< rartx-^paaaa
::' tre Sense Vaaoe z a wace ooe-
fererce r* osuj after
M.tscvw renews rciccrjLtx* ties
-tr Israei and restores soe-ass.
reiacccs w-~ tre .'erac Staae.
Sewec- _-r r_-i: : -_-e
.-vcfervoc* ificund >? arctics' m ssV
TS- .-ociercsKw ttsscf
>e i strati? f.r-ra. iSlt
=>eg':Cao.-cs
Saw aart>es A r_a
'vy.cjttxaa saaaH *e csaataRed
a.:* i Lecaoese-l>c-fce; sucwes-
. ttee aaxaer aaasposec : Stts
aaa Isrmti ami a star: :" Israei.
i Paiescsaa anega
negotiating table Mitterrand and
Chirac reportedly told Peres that
Husseir. was prepared to attend
an international conference but
also feh some preliminary points
had to be settled-
Peres said that Israel s poiicy ir.
the administered territories has
not changed since the rotation of
power Last October when Likud
leader Sham:.- too*, mm as Prime
Minister Israel still wants to im-
prove the quality :' life :r. the :er
-es and ensure their seaat
e.opmect. w-.tr. Jordar. s par-
ocipatioc. Peres sai-i
HE SaIP brad ^ i wslessss
il _-:cea- -; ---.
Weal Rar.s. Its aahr coa
'.rat the mvestmer.^ re r_-.-e.e-:
_;- Israe I lobm
M gc at -jsiependec: .-cgarah
^;rs *- :- j-h: <-. e asaeover
for the PLO
Peres *: ~:r French Jewish
eaoers Sarj_-"2ay He sa>i se was
jstae atvvi: Israe- s r-r^-e
re i: > :- tse Peor.es
aaaaN t : ;- -a :.: -..- ^r-
Meat
:^c*ro -
.
ij.r
-t >vi_.: -j ; r-car.;. : -
~-a_ '- -es :. Israe-. s the
Sswaaa that itrectxm.
Lffi to right are Finance Minister Moshe
ArMsaav Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres; Israel Kessar, head of
the Labor Federation: and Dor Lautman.
president of the Industrialists Union, at the
JTAWZN
close of inconclusive discussions betuven the
Treasury and the Histadrut over government
aid for the Histadrut's Kupat Holim Fund).
Peres Declares
Jews More Important Than Ties
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Vice
Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres in-
dicated here Thursday (Jan.
22) that Israel considers
Soviet action to ease the
plight of Jews in the USSR
more important than the
restoration of diplomatic
ties between Israel and the
Soviet L'nion.
He hinted that such action could
ease Israel's objections : -
participation in an international
conference or Middle East peace
Israel is not averse to Soviet par-
te said bal Moscow
must "pay the price r;. rrakmg
in aaa peace w-.tr. Israe. and
Israr nor.ty are the rifts*
- -- 4 iSoviet leas
ADDRESSING as audience of
Aagio-Je* sfc eiiers Peres
recalled that Israe: raised that
--.-. :/ -..-- --,: -
",
esezta
a Hebank: as: Ajgus: wm\ --.
R^ssans we-e furvxis that a small
.ourtry iare>: ai ay j.m cotaav
: -5 :. i su^rpower
The F._si-i.-s 4-a.--.e-:
status of Ruasxac Orshc: I
Caorcr. properoes :r. ^se Holy
Land. Peres said .A-er : people
m x--_i_-: aar. pa party?
-.e asaeo
We aoee they itae Sonet
leadersj ral change their artitade
tc-wsiw R.fwa- Jews. Then we
won't place so much importance
on having Russian diplomats in
Ramat Gan Ramat Gan is a
suburb of Te A -e many
embassies are located.
PERES ALSO stressed the
need to maintain the impetus of
the peace process with Jordan. He
-ned that Israei has "paved the
way" by modifying i:- :-
the West Bank!
The Israe.. F reigr. Minister
called for Brush and European
economic aid to Jordan and other
Arab countries of the Middle East
suffering economically from the
drop in oil pnces At tBS ^a:
hanger you 11 sheaf* have an
assembly of b::trr-.ess and
It." he warned. He -
- -.e Irao-Irar. aw srfc Im
called a no-w-.r. situa:
-. -
redgious menace :' rtas Aral
Iraq wins. :: _. :^- a re.^rous
menace : -ar-1 sraeii I peace
process. Peres sa>i
HE DELIVERED i ai*
ster Ma.-ga.-r-.
eher and with leaders of >ther
pai r a
prepansg M raat Moscow
about ail *r-er res .s ap-
pareaatjp seeking her seed (Bess
to probe Soviet leader "
Gorbachev's attitude : *a"
Israel.
But his main purpose
with Thatcher is appar*--
build on the good reia:
established with her abea he m
Pnme Minister of Israe. i.--.t-
the first two years at
coalition governmer.-
High-Tech Firm
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JERUSALEM 'JTA How
does a higr.-tecr. BBBa
- rts of Jerusa.-
[ rr.j Bdasan
trie power at msjnmu.-
to some 50.000 hor -
GoWer. State 9.000 m; -
The answer is remote
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Desert to capture solar
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Iraqi Air Force
May Soon Pose Threat to Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
[Israel is increasingly con-
Icerned that the battle-
hardened Iraqi air force will
[pose a serious threat once
J Iraq's war with Iran is end-
led. Israel Air Force Com-
Imander Gen. Amos Lapidot
Ihas told a group of foreign
Imilitary attaches that Iraqi
pilots are currently flying
^hundreds of sorties per
day."
He said Israeli and outside
observers have discerned a signifi-
Icant improvement in the quality of
I Iraqi air power.
Their planes attack at much
flower levels than before, and their
[bombing and ground support is
[more accurate, he said. Though
[some outside observers maintain
that foreign, mainly Pakistani,
pilots are flying for Iraq, there is
o confirmation of such reports.
LAPIDOT SAID the improved
capabilities of the Iraqi air force
vould enable it to fly sorties
against Israel in a future war from
Iraqi territory without the need
for bases in Jordan or Syria.
The Iran-Iraq war is now in its
\ nuch greater manpower, appears
^t the moment to have the edge on
r (.'round. Iraqi air power is con-
superior to Iran's by most
cperta here and abroad.
According to foreign sources,
|owever, the advanced anti-
jrcraft and anti-tank weapons
bid to Iran covertly by the U.S.
id Israel, has been able to blunt
ra.| s superior air force and
rmor.
Meanwhile, Vice Premier and
foreign Minister Shimon Peres
trongly defended Israel's role in
he I'. S.I ran arms deal, at a press
inference in Jerusalem. He
naintained that it was less of an
rms deal than mutual probing for
fpragmatist" elements in Iran
rho might one day succeed the
ring Ayatullah Ruhollah Khc-
neini, an avowed enemy of Israel
ad the West.
IT WAS "a window of oppor-
mity." Peres said, adding that
here was nothing wrong with ex-
ploring the possibility of a more
IDF Kills
3 Terrorists
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
irael Defense Force patrol killed
pee terrorists last week near
rkabe village in the central sec-
br of the south Lebanon security
>ne. According to a military
okesman, the terrorists were
icountered about a mile from
ibbutz Manara in Upper Galilee
here they apparently intended
| infiltrate across the border into
rael.
[The incident brought to seven
e number of terrorists killed in
be previous 24 hours. Four were
lied Sunday (Jan. 18) night in a
sh with the IDF just north of
He security zone.
[IDF sources told Israel Radio
uesday that the latest intercep-
n probably averted a "major in-
lent," as the terrorists were
avily armed. Kalachnikov rifles,
reivers, hand grenades, rockets
a quantity of explosives were
covered near their bodies.
inuring the past 10 weeks, the
IF killed 12 terrorists in the
Cunty zone or just north of it.
I apparently were attempting to
Iltrate into Israel.
friendly Iran in the future.
Peres also insisted that the
value of arms shipped to Iran in
1985 did not exceed $5 million to
$6 million, a drop in the bucket
compared to the $400 billion Iran
has spent in its war with Iraq over
the last six years.
Peres reiterated that Israel
agreed to facilitate the American
arms shipments to help secure the
release of American hostages held
by pro-Iranian elements in
Lebanon.
Peres leaves for Europe
Wednesday for meetings with
British Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher. President Francois Mit-
terrand of France and with the
Foreign Ministers of the Euro-
pean Economic Community
(EEC) in Brussels.
AT HIS briefing for foreign
military attaches, Lapidot also
spoke of the potential menace of
the Syrian air force which is ex-
pected soon to absorb Soviet
MIG-29 comabt aircraft. He said
Israel is studying the capabilities
of the MIG-29s in order to develop
counter-measures. He said Syria's
anti-aircraft defenses have not
limited Israel's freedom of move-
ment in the skies over Lebanon,
but the Israel Air Force now has
to be "more careful than in the
past."
Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
PLO's Military Strength Seen
Back to June, 1982 Level
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Almost five years after the
Lebanon war, the military strength of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization in Lebanon has been restored to almost
the same level as it was when the Israel Defense Force in-
vaded that country in June, 1982, a senior military officer
told an audience in Tel Aviv Monday.
THE OFFICER, who holds the rank of Lt. Colonel but
was not identified by name, said PLO terrorists were retur-
ning to their old bases in Sidon and Tyre and their presence
can be felt by the increased incidence of attempted attacks
on Israel.
The officer noted that Sidon and Tyre, on the Lebanese
coast, provide the terrorists with bases for night attacks on
Israel by sea.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
How Would Begin
Respond to PLO Now?
What would former Prime Minister
Menachem Begin say, were he to make any
public statements at all these days, about an
Israel Defense Forces announcement
Monday?
According to a senior IDF military officer,
the military strength of the Palestine
Liberation Organization in Lebanon has
been restored to almost the same level as it
was when the IDF invaded that country in
June, 1982.
It is more than idle speculation to wonder
about Mr. Begin's reaction. He might say
that Israel had to bow to the wishes of a one-
sided international press that had long since
given up on Israel as a favorite, and now
shifted its support to the "Palestinians" in
the form of a new underdog.
Mr. Begin might say that Israel was never
given a genuine opportunity to wage Opera-
tion Peace for Galilee as it saw fit. He and
other members of the government and the
IDF had to take the often blackmailing
wishes of other "friendly" nations into ac-
count: the United States, Great Britain,
France, even the Soviet Union, which not
only threatened but in fact interceded as an
antagonist if not in numbers, certainly in
intimidating presence.
Friendly Blackmail
The French, for example, when PLO
chairman Yasir Arafat lost in Beirut and
shifted his operation to Tripoli, only to lose
there, as well, demanded that Israel give up
on trying finally to bring Arafat to heel, sent
a ship to Tripoli and ordered Israel to permit
Arafat to board the ship and leave Lebanon
not in defeat, but in pride.
The United States, for its part, insisted
that the defeated and in-tatters Syrian
forces be permitted to exit Lebanon back
toward Damascus, also unmolested and also
in pride. Syria began its march home, but
suddenly moved south into the Bekaa valley,
where its troops still are today, fully equip-
ped anew by the Soviet Union, and its air
force, also revitalized by the Soviets, is now
a major worry to its Israeli counterpart in
the event of war.
Throughout this time, the United States
suffered agonizingly humiliating attacks
upon its presence in Lebanon as a peace
emissary notably in Beirut, where some
260 Marines perished in one act of terrorism
at first claimed by a diversity of Arab-
inspired terrorists and terror groups, but to-
day dominantly assumed to have been
masterminded by Iran.
Media 'Impartiality'
Nor did Israel's war in Lebanon, once end-
ed, bring peace to that country which, at the
hands of the international television brigade
and the print media, raked Israel daily for
its "barbarism," but which they suddenly ig-
nored as sidebar news when the IDF went
home. Not a single TV war spectacular from
Beirut since then, except on the rarest of oc-
casions, to show the daily carnage wrought
by the ongoing war there. Not a single
newspaper column since then, except on the
same rarest of occasions, to wonder whether
Israel had really started the war in the first
place or responded to yet another civil war
long in progress which it saw as a threat to
its security.
Jewish Floridian
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Meanwhile, the terrorists improved their
"sights," modifying them to mere kidnapp-
ings or occasional murders of Americans,
Frenchmen, Germans, even a Saudi Arabian
businessman this week, doing business in
Beirut.
If the United States gave the agonizing
nations a moment of respite with the attack
upon Libya, it was a brief experience ex-
cept, of course, for our French friends, who
refused to cooperate in an overflight of their
territory. For the fact is that it is Syria and
Iran who are the greatest sources of
strength to terrorism in the Middle East to-
day, not Libya. And the United States is
clearly disinclined to involve itself in a
military operation mounted against either.
Libya, afterall, and madman Khadafy were
easy pickings. Not so either Syria or Iran.
Reagan's Silence
And speaking of Iran, about which Presi-
dent Reagan in his State of the Union
Message to Congress Tuesday night did
precious little, look what that nation has
brought upon us since it took our embassy in
Teheran hostage during the Carter Ad-
ministration in 1979 if one can forget
about the incredible arms-for-hostages
operation Mr. Reagan authorized, and which
he now wishes all of us frankly would forget.
And forget, too, about his demand during
Prime Minister Begin's operation in
Lebanon to permit the Syrians to go back
home in pride. Or his support for France's
demand in behalf of Arafat.
It is hardly likely that Mr. Begin will be
saying anything anymore in public on this or
any other subject. So we thought we would
say these things for him because they must
surely be on his tortured mind.
Putting Tiff to Rest
If we can accept as true the assertions by
Jewish leaders who have met with New
York's Cardinal O'Connor that he was
himself a victim of embarrassment brought
on by the sudden Vatican interdiction of his
Rabbi Says
trip to Israel and that the irritation between
O'Connor and American Jewry is now at an
end, then an interview that'the Cardinal
gave to the Voice of Israel Radio from New
York is clear.
Said the Cardinal: the Vatican is movingin
the right direction with respect to recogniz-
ing Israel, but changes in Vatican policy are
historically slow.
According to the Jewish leaders, members
all of the Conference of Presidents of Major
Jewish Organizations. O'Connor saw no
reason why he should not visit Israel's top
political leaders in Jerusalem but had. with
embarrassment, to bow to the wishes of his
superiors in the Vatican who had informed
him of their wishes only after his arrival
there.
This certainly gives credence to Cardinal
O'Connor's radio interview, which essential-
ly restated what he said well before he left
on his trip to the Middle East. This also sug-
gests that the Jewish leaders are correct in
their assumption. May it be so. Cardinal
O'Connor should be a valued friend, not a
distant antagonist.
Reform Conversions Are Long, Arduous
Friday, January 30,1987
Volume 60
29TEVETH5747
Number 5
By RABBI
SANFORD SELTZER
On the last day of
December, Israel's Minister
of the Interior, Rabbi Yit-
zhak Peretz, resigned
rather than obey a Supreme
Court ruling ordering rum to
register as a Jew Shoshana
Miller, an American-born
immigrant to Israel con-
verted to Judaism by a
Reform rabbi.
The Supreme Court ruling and
the controversy over the right of
persons converted by non-
Orthodox rabbis to enter Israel
under the Law of Return has
focussed new attention on Reform
conversion, which is responsible
for the great majority of all new
adherents to Judaism, currently
numbering several thousand per
year.
IN REFORM as in other
branches of Judaism conversion
is not a step to be taken hastily or
impulsively, and Reform rabbis
spend a great deal of time with
prspective converts helping them
examine and clearly understand
their reasons for making such a
decision.
They also discuss with them the
implications of a commitment of
this magnitude in terms of family,
friends and colleagues at work or
at school. Caution is urged lest
this step be taken hastily or
impulsively.
But counseling is only one step
in the lengthy and deliberate pro-
Rabbi Seltzer is director of
the Task Force on the Jewish
Family of the Union of
American Hebrew
Congregations.
cess of Reform conversion. Per-
sons wishing to become Jews are
expected to undergo a period of
formal instruction covering the
history, theology, rituals
philosophy and customs of
Judaism, along with the dif-
ferences and similarities between
Judaism and Christianity, as well
as other religions.
THE LENGTH of the course
will vary, depending on the rabbi,
but the average study period
ranges from three to six months.
In addition to formal instruc-
tion, prospective converts are ex-
pected to participate in the
celebration of Jewish festivals it
home, in the community and in the
synagogue. In not a few instances.
prospective converts have chang
ed their minds during the course
of study and their exposure to
Jewish customs and practices.
Many people initially consider
becoming Jewish because of t
romantic involvement with a born
Jew. (One in three Jews marries a
non-Jew, according to current
data.).
Reform rabbis customarily
stress that becoming Jewish only
to please a future spouse and/or
the spouse's family is an insuffi-
cient reason and can lead to
regrettable consequences.
Love alone is not enough;
rather, conversion should be bss-
Coatinued on Page 8-A
Our Readers Write: There's No
Conflict Between Light, Sunlight
EDITOR. The Jeunsh Floridian:
-AfttS ^ J*n- 23 edition
of The Jewish Floridian entitled
Can Modern Science and Its
Practitioners Be Reconciled To-
day? by Arthur J. Magida
quotes Dr. JacobovuTof
Baltimore as stating that the ac-
Jt of light being cYeated ol
first day of creation is inconsis-
S^ the account of Sn8u;
being created on the fourth day
There is no inconsistency in this
that I can see.
The midrash. Braiahit R^:^
3, provides the answer. The HP
of the first day emanated from the
creator. See Psalms 104. versed
The light of the first day h*
been replaced by sunlight, and it *
not scheduled to shine again unoi
the messianic age. In this context.
see the commentary' of K8n1'
Genesis, ch. 1, verse 4.
HYMANSHEINFIELD
Surfs'^


Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
50 Years Ago That The Israel Philharmonic Was Born
On December 26, 1936,
[Arturo Toscanini, perhaps
[the greatest conductor of
[his day, stood before 72 men
I most of them refugees
from Europe lifted his
[baton, and ushered in a new
[era in the musical life of
llsrael.
The concert took place in the
it her uncongenial setting of an
[auditorium at the Levant Fair
|Grounds in Tel Aviv. The pro-
ram, a long one, featured the
msic of Brahms, Schubert,
lendelssohn, Rossini and Weber.
[Tie house was full; the mood
tubilant. The Israel Philharmonic
)rchestra was born.
BRONISLAW HI BERMAN, a
'olish-born violin virtuoso of in-
rnational reputation, had found-
! the orchestra in order to "unite
le desire of the country for an or-
lestra with the desire of the
Jewish musicians for a country,"
luberman had grasped the mean-
ng of the darkening clouds over
Europe early on. The orchestra's
birth was an answer to the Nazi
ireat in the terms he understood
est. Jewish musicians, deemed
\racially" unsuitable to perform
the orchestras of their native
inds, were welcomed to
Jestine, haven and home.
A dedicated anti-fascist as well
a musical giant. Toscanini's
esence at the birth of what was
ken called the Palestine Or-
liestra was as much a political
itement as a musical one. The
ening page of the program for
first concert quoted his words
Huberman: "It's everybody du-
to fight and help in this cause
cording to his means."
[Like Huberman, he put his
isical genius at the service of
: anti-fascist cause. His boycott
| the Bayreuth Festival was seen
the world as a slap in the face
the Nazis just as he had in-
aded it to be. (In Nazi propagan-
Toscanini was referred to as
fosenstein," which, it is said,
ire the Maestro considerable
Bure.)
SVEN IN the pinched im-
irerishment and tense climate of
i-war Palestine, the new or-
stra dominated conversation.
I least expensive seat for a con-
in Toscanini's inaugural
i was 60 piasters, a large sum
those days. But "Toscanini
rer" had gripped the land
clamor for tickets was
aultuous. On one occasion, the
Btra staff required police
ction from unruly ticket
ters.
i weather that December was
Jly cold, but hundreds of
lovers who had not been
the lucky 3,000 to obtain
) in the auditorium bundled up
Today's IPO music director, Zubin Mehta. on the podium. Both the orchestra and Mehta have just turned 50.
and braved the frigid wind to
stand outside and hear what they
could of the concert.
The orchestra anticipated
Toscanini's arrival with fear and
trembling. They had but little ex-
perience in playing together and
were perfectly aware that they
were not yet the kind of orchestra
the Maestro who had a well-
deserved reputation as a merciless
martinet on the podium was ac-
customed to leading.
WITH NO common language
between them, conducter William
Steinberg did his best to prepare
the nascent orchestra for the
great day. But Toscanini was sur-
prisingly gentle. Music historian
Ruth Jordan related the following
story in her delightful memoir of
pre-war Palestine, "Daughter of
the Waves:" "Toscanini arrived at
the Tel Aviv rehearsal hall, made
straight for the podium and
without a word of preamble began
conducting Brahms' Second Sym-
phony. At the end of the rehearsal
he declared himself satisfied. The
musicians were incredulous. At
the end of the second rehearsal he
said nothing. The musicians were
despondent. During the third
rehearsal, he lost his temper and incorrect note issuing from the
thundered in every language he viola section), he was also known
knew. The musicians were ex- for his generosity. Sensing that
huberant. At last they were being the Yishuv's boundless hunger for
By ANN HARRISON
treated like a professional
orchestra."
As tyrannical as Toscanini could
be (and the story is told that he bit
his baton in two in anger over an
music had not been sated by the
scheduled concerts, he prepared
an additional, all-Beethoven pro-
gram, which he performed in Tel
Aviv, Haifa and Jerusalem.
Toscanini waived reimburse-
ment of his travel expenses and
never accepted a fee for conduc-
ting the orchestra.
AN ESSENTIAL part of
Huberman's vision was that the
orchestra carry a message of
peace and friendship to
Palestine's Middle East
neighbors. "The mission of
Continued on Page 12-A
Toscanini Said
Someday, They'll Amount to Something
If the 1936 debut of the
Palestine Orchestra was an
event of great political
significance, the orchestra's
first concert was less
notable from a musical
standpoint. When later ask-
ed by his friend, the cellist
Zelinsky, how the new or-
chestra played, conductor
Arturo Toscanini was said
to have replied, "They're
good boys. Someday, they'll
be a wonderful orchestra."
In the early days, there were
many impediments. The war
prevented many fine musicians
from traveling to Israel to aid in
the orchestra's development In
some instances, the orchestra per-
formed without a conductor. The
musicians played well enough
under good guest conductors with
strong personalities, but less well
under lesser lights who were
unable to transform them from a
collection of soloists into a
cohesive musical body.
It wasn't until 1969 that a per-
manent conductor, Zubin Mehta,
was appointed. And not until 1957
did the IPO have a permanent
home. Before the completion of
the Mann Auditorium in Tel Aviv,
the Philharmonic played in a
series of unsatisfactory halls
erected for other purposes.
IT HAS BEEN many years now
since the players of the Philhar-
monic have anticipated the immi-
nent arrival of a conductor of in-
ternational reputation with
trepidation. While there are few
conductors today, if any, who can
strike terror into the heart of an
instrumentalist as Toscanini
could, the Israel Philharmonic no
longer fears the wrath of a George
Solti or an Erich Leinsdorf. To-
day's Philharmonic is securely
ranked among the select or-
chestras categorized as "world
class." It has toured extensively
over the last 30 years, playing to
packed houses and excellent
reviews all over the world.
The history of the IPO has
always been linked inextricably to
the history of the Jewish state. As
such, the Philharmonic is perhaps
unique in the world of music, serv-
ing a national function normally
outside the province of a musical
institution.
When David Ben-Gurion
declared the establishment of the
independent State of Israel on
May 14, 1948, the Philharmonic
was there to play the new nation's
national anthem. And during a
brief ceasefire in the War of In-
dependence, the Philharmonic,
along with its young conductor,
Leonard Bernstein, traveled the
treacherous "Burma Road" to
Continued on Page 13-A
IPO lias played to packed
, ,l conductor Arturo Toscanini (left) at a rehear- llUliSeS, GXGLLe7lb TeVlAsWb.
Bttnisiaw; Huberman,.
mthe Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, unth
MB


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
APWidc World Photo
WELCOME TO THE U.S.: Inna Meiman, wife of Soviet dissi-
dent S'aum Meiman. is escorted by Andrea Hart, daughter of
former Sen. Gary Hart (D.. Colo.), through Dulles International
Airport last week in Chantilly. Va. Meiman left her husband
behind in Moscow so she could begin cancer treatment at
Georgetown I'niiersity Hospital in Washington.
Pravda's Editor-in-Chief Declares
Soviet Bureaucrats Slow Process
Of Getting Exit Visas to Emigres
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA A rare
public remark by an editor of an
official Soviet newspaper, chastis-
ing bureaucratic foul-ups in the
emigration process, casts a ray of
hope for Soviet Jews awaiting exit
%-isas
According to press reports from
Moscow. Pravda editor-in-chief
Viktor Afanasyev has criticired
Soviet emigration policy by saving
that delays in the processing of
exit visas were creating negative
publicity for the Soviet Union in
the West.
Afanasyev's remarks in the of-
ficial Communist Party
newspaper are seen as another in-
stance of glasnott. the campaign
of public openness put into effect
by Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev in an alleged attempt to
make a change in social and
economic problems facing the
Soviet Union and causing
negative publicity in the West.
AFANASYEVS comments
were made in a report on his re-
cent visit to Canada, where he
said the issue of Soviet Jewish
emigration was raised in a
'sharp'' discussion of human
rights with about 20 Canadian
Parliament members.
"It seems to us that all is not
right here." wrote Afanasyev it.
Pravda. Afanasyev. who is a
member of the Communist Party
Central Committee and holds
other official positions in addition
to his editorial position, remarked
that "Bureaucratic behavior has
penetrated here as well. Questions
are not always resolved smoothly
and quickly."
Afanasyev said. "We are dragg
ing out. dragging out decisions
about the departure of a dissi-
Althoujrh refraining from
specific mention of any dissident,
he nevertheless said that people
wishing to leave the Soviet Union
acquired "her status" in the West
as their requests for emigration
visas were prolonged. "Having
thoughts about it for a long time,
sometimes too long." Afanasyev
said, "we release this great per-
son' and provide an occasion for
the next round of anti-Soviet
campaigning.
Cancer Refusenik
Undergoing Treatment in Washington
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Soviets have made disparate deci-
sions on two critically ill refusenik
cancer patients who have been
struggling for many years to leave
the Soviet Union for treatment
and reunification with family in
the West.
Inna Meiman, 54. of Moscow ar-
rived Sunday (Jan. 18) in
Washington, D.C., to undergo
evaluation and treatment of a
recurrent neck tumor. Meiman ar-
rived at Dulles Airport accom-
panied only by a nurse provided
by the American Embassy in
Moscow. The Soviets would not
allow her husband, Naum. 75, and
ailing, to accompany her. and
would only grant Inna a tem-
porary visa for one year's stay.
Naum is an 11-year refusenik and
human rights activist.
HOWEVER, Leah Maryasin. a
16-year refusenik from Riga who
suffers from multiple myeloma,
received an exit visa Monday,
along with her husband. Alex-
ander, and daugher. Faina. The
61-year-old woman is expected to
join her sister and brother-in-law.
Mara and Eugene Katz, in Toron-
to in two weeks, according to
B'nai Brith Canada.
Meiman. describing her own
prognosis as "very grim," told the
crowned press conference conven-
ed by the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry. "I haven't come to
America to die; I have come to
recover and to help others to get
out of the Soviet Union."
Admitting that she had left the
USSR, and her husband, with
mixed emotions. Meiman said she
was "delighted" to help others to
leave and to prove "We are not
slaves but people with rights." yet
dismayed that her husband, her
son and his family were not per-
mitted to join her. "My arriving
alone shows how bad things are in
the Soviet Union. People are just
desperate. If I had been allowed to
come three years ago. my chances
would be better."
THE ARRIVAL of Meiman.
and the expected release of
Maryasin. brings to four of a
group of five the number of cancer
patient refuseniks who have
received visas since October.
The other two are Tanya
Bogomolny. who now lives in San
Francisco with her husband. Ben-
jamin, who as a 20-year refusenik
made the Guiness Book of World
Records as the longest refusenik
on record; and Rimma Brawe,
who arrived in Rochester, N.Y., in
December with her husband
Vladimir after waiting nearly
eight years to emigrate.
The remaining member of the
International Cancer Patients
Solidarity Committee is Benjamin
Charny of Moscow. Charny suf-
fers from severe cardiac problems
as well as several forms of cancer,
and has been unable to receive
cancer surgery because of his car-
diac condition.
LEON CHARNY. Benjamin's
brother, said he was heartened by
Passover
at the Concord
Mod April 13 Tues April 21
The observance of
tradition the mogmficence
of the Sedonm the
beauty of the Services
the brilliance of the Holi
dav Programming
Cantor Hetmon
Molomood assiyed by
the Concord 45 vex e
Symphonic Chorale di-
reaed by Matthew Lozar
and Dan Vogei to of
ficiate at the Services
Outstanding leaders
from Government Press
the Arts and Literature
Greot films Musk: day
and mght on weekdays
Special programs for tots
tweeners and teens
Rabbi Simon Cohen
will oversee constant
Kashruth supervision and
Dietary Low observance
Roymond Drilling Ritual
Director
and Sedonm
CDNOORD
RESORT HOTEL/i
e **
%
MAjOaCtXECMT CARDS
note- 914 794-400C
To! Free 800-431-3650
TVX 510 240-8336 *e-e- 32363'
See yov^ave4 Age^?
the news that Maryasin had b*.
given a visa and saw a eoori r-5
in it for his brother .^1^
Terete .****!
Leon Charny told JTA tin,
"any positive development sho*d
be positively acknowledged I am
very happy for the Maryasins 2
happy for Inna that she has a new
chance for treatment But of
course, I am especially anxious to
see the same happening for my
brother's family. And frankly 1
am hopeful that Inna's family tf
be able to join her too."
17-Year-0ld Dead
As Legal Abortions
Increase by 15 Percent
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Legal abortions increased by
15 percent in Israel since a law limiting the right to abor-
tion was passed by the Knesset nine years ago.
ACCORDING TO figures released Monday, the Health
Ministry approved 9,300 abortions in the first six months of
1986. Health authorities estimate that 10,000 abortions are
performed illegally every year by private physicians.
The main grounds for approved abortions are pregnan-
cies which endanger the lives of the mothers, physically
deformed fetuses and pregnancies resulting from extra-
marital relations by married women.
The latest figures on abortions were released after a
17-year-old girl from Safed died of complications during an
illegal abortion.
THE INCIDENT prompted a delegation from Naama;
the Labor Zionist women's organization, to call on Educa-
tion Minister Yitzhak Navon and the Knesset Education
Committee Monday to urge sex education in school.
According to a Naamat survey, a third of Israeli
parents refuse to educate their children about sex because
thev fear it would lead them to have sexual relations.
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Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Rabbi in Georgia Feared
For His 'Physical Survival'
Continued from Page 1-A
DESCRIBED the
the buses neared
REMEMBERING JUDY: Sarah Belfer looks
at a sculpted bas relief of her daughter,
astronaut Judy Resnik, in the library of
Akron. Ohio's Firestone High School follow-
ing ceremonies dedicating a learning resource
center in her honor. Judy Resnik died last
January in the explosion of the Space Shuttle
Challenger. AP/Wide World Photo
Vandalism in U.S.
Said To Drop 7 Percent Over '85
NEW YORK (JTA) -
I Acts of anti-Semitic van-
dalism, including bombings
and arson, directed against
Jews, Jewish institutions
and property totaled 594
across the United States in
1986 a drop of 7 percent
from the 638 incidents
| reported in 1985.
Assaults, harassment and
I threats against Jewish individuals
land institutions showed virtually
I no change in 1986 a total of 312
I such incidents as against 306
|reported in 1985.
THESE WERE the principal
indings of the annual audit con-
tacted by the Anti-Defamation
-.eague of B'nai B'rith and made
Jublic Thursday (Jan. 22). The
Burvey described as "troubling" a
ise in serious anti-Semitic in-
cidents on college campuses, up
|from 12 in 1985 to 19 in 1986.
According to Burton Levinson,
| ADL's national chairman, the
I overall 1986 figures reflect a
[general downward trend in anti-
|Semitic incidents over the past
ive years which "in all likelihood
Js due to passage of anti-bias
crime laws, more vigorous law en-
forcement and counteraction pro-
ims." In the past few years, 29
States have adopted stricter laws
imed at curbing ethnic van-
Jism, many of them baaed on
LDL model legislation.
The ADL audit revealed that
few York, with 186 vandalism in-
idents (down from 199 in 1985)
1 the nation, followed by Florida
79 (up from 47 in 1985),
California, 62 (down from 85) and
New Jersey, 48 (down from 74).
FIFTY-SEVEN arrests were
reported in connection with 33
vandalism incidents across the
country compared to 78 arrested
in 48 vandalism incidents the year
before. As in past years, the over-
whelming number of those ar-
rested were in their teens.
Particularly noted was the fact
that despite efforts by anti-
Semitic extremists to scapegoat
Jews for the economic hardships
of farmers, the number of van-
dalism incidents in the Midwest's
major farm states remained low
and showed no significant change.
The 19 anti-Semitic incidents
reported on college campuses in-
cluded the vandalizing of succahs
at four colleges, the defacement of
Jewish student property, the pain-
ting of anti-Semitic graffiti on
campus buildings, and harassment
of Jewish students stemming
from friction with supporters of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization and other anti-Israel
groups.
NOTING THAT the anti-
Semitic incidents took place
against a background of recent in-
creases in racial incidents on cam-
puses, the audit said that "any ex-
pression of prejudice or at-
mosphere of intolerance toward
any minority at any education in-
stitution merits urgent action."
The ADL's survey, the eighth
since 1979, was based on data
reported in 33 states and the
District of Columbia as gathered
through the monitoring activities
of the agency's 31 regional
offices.
The audit report was prepared
by the Research Department of
the ADL's Civil Rights Division
headed by Justin Finger.
behind a human wall of security
forces.
RUDIN
scene as
Cumming.
"It was one of the only times in
my life I feared for my physical
survival. We saw the security
forces on the roof with automatic
weapons," Rudin said. "Then I
saw about 15 men in white sheets,
some of them extending their
right arms in a Nazi salute. The
but got very quiet, very tense. I
had seen pictures of them. But it
was the first time in my life I had
ever seen the KKK in their white
sheets, in broad daylight, with
Confederate flags and the Nazi
salutes."
Rudin rode in a leadership bus,
the second in the convoy, which
also carried slain civil rights
leader Martin Luther King, Jr.'s
widow, Coretta Scott King. "We
had been warned about snipers
who might want to hit the leaders,
especially Mrs. King," Rudin said.
After reaching the starting
point of the march, Rudin and
other leaders addressed the march
in front of the county courthouse.
"ONCE AGAIN, our nation has
seen the ugly face of racism and
bigotry, this time in Forsyth
County, Ga., but fear and in-
timidation will never stop
Americans of good will from
asserting their right to assemble
peaceably," Rudin told the
marchers.
"I am proud to represent the
American Jewish Committee in
this historic march. Bigots and
racists everywhere must learn
that Americans who stand for
justice and equality will do
whatever it takes, for as long as it
takes, to eradicate racist hatred
from our midst."
As the marchers moved through
the streets of Cumming, the
counter-demonstrators on the
other side of the human security
wall called out "Nigger lovers .
go home Niggers Commie fag-
gots." Rudin said he was shocked
to see one of them holding up a
sign saying "James Earl Ray,
American Hero." James Earl Ray
assassinated King. Another ban-
ner proclaimed, "Trade with
South Africa Our blacks for
their whites." Some of the
counter-demonstrators tried to
spit on the marchers.
SOME OF the marchers flashed
the V sign for love and peace.
Some sang, "We Shall
Overcome."
Rabbi Alvin Sugarman of The
Temple in Atlanta also addressed
the march, and about 40 members
of a black-Jewish coalition from
Atlanta participated.
Rudin contrasted the Cumming
march with Hattiesburg, Miss., in
1964, where he marched for
voting rights. The civil rights
movement has come a long way
since then but is still fighting the
battle. "We will do it again and
again and again," Rudin said.
The most dramatic difference
between 1964 and 1987, according
to Rudin, was the support and
solidarity of the security forces.
He noted that the combined forces
of the FBI, the Georgia Bureau of
Investigation, National Guard-
smen, and local police were clearly
supportive of the peaceful
demonstration.
"In Hattiesburg, I looked on the
local police and the sheriff as am-
bivalent. Whose side were they
on? Saturday there was no ques-
tion that the whole state ap-
paratus was on our side."
Hospital Workers
Still on Strike
TEL AVIV (JTA) Some
10,000 government hospital
employees on strike since Monday
(Jan. 19) were ordered by a
Jerusalem labor court Wednesday
to return to their jobs immediate-
ly. But a spokesperson for the
strikers indicated tha the court
order would not be observed.
The strike by administrative,
service and maintenance person-
nel hit 29 government hospitals all
over the country. The workers are
demanding that their salaries be
equalized with those of employees
of Kupat Holim, the Histadrut
sick-fund.
"Craata Land From Sand"
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW.
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $ _
. WHEN?
Phone
. Apt No
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464



Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
CARDINAL MEETS JEWISH LEADERS:
Cardinal John J. O'Connor (right) speaks to
reporters during his meeting with Jewish
leaders at his residence in New York as Mor-
ris Abram, president of the Conference of
Presidents of Mfijor Jewish Organizations,
listens. O'Connor met with eight top Jewish
Conference leaders in an attempt to clear up
misunderstandings that resulted from his con-
troversial trip to Israel. AP/Wid* World Photo.
Burying the Hatchet
O'Connor, Jewish Leaders End Tiff
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jewish leaders and Catholic
Archbishop of New York
John Cardinal O'Connor
have closed another stormy
chapter in the book of
Vatican relations with Israel
in a lengthy exchange on
controversial issues.
The controversy that began
before O'Connor even set foot in
Israel for the first time earlier this
month was not the first eruption
between O'Connor and the Jews
over Middle East politics. Last
summer, he disturbed Jewish
leadership by calling for a Palesti-
nian homeland afer visiting
Lebanon
The Vatican's continued refusal
to recognize Israel diplomatically
and to accept Jerusalem as
Israel's capital will most likely
prevent the events of the past
months from being the final
chapter in that book.
ALTHOUGH a cautiously-
worded joint statement issued
Monday (Jan. 19) by O'Connor
and eight leaders of major Jewish
organizations, following a three-
hour meeting at the Cardinal's
home, dealt little with the issues,
Nathan Perlmutter, director of
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, said "not an issue was
avoided."
Nevertheless, the joint state-
ment highlighted agreements, not
disagreements.
"The meeting underscored the
fundamental agreement of both
the Cardinal and Jewish represen-
tatives on Israel's right to secure
and recognized boundaries, on the
importance of addressing the
Palestinian problem and the plight
of the refugees as well as the need
to move toward peace in the
region,"the statement said.
The statement also noted that
the Jewish leaders recognized the
restraints placed upon O'Connor
by Vatican policy and expressed
appreciation for his apology over
cancelled meetings with some
Israeli leaders. O'Connor did,
however, meet with President
Histadrut Joins Body To Aid
Families of 30,000 'Disappeareds'
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Israeli branch of an international
body set up to aid the families of
the 30,000 people who disap-
peared during the rule of the
military junta in Argentina during
the 1970's will be headed by
Histadrut, Israel's labor
federation.
Histadrut Secretary General
Yisrael Keasar, who made the an-
nouncement over the weekend.
urged other Israeli organizations
to join. Addressing leaders of the
Organization of Argentine
Mothers of Missing People,
Kessar said Jews must be as sen-
sitive as other people all over the
world to the fate of the missing in
Argentina.
An estimated 3,000 of the miss-
ing were Jewish, many of them
teenagers.
Chaim Herzog and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres in their
homes.
"THE JEWISH leaders regard
the Cardinal's visit as a helpful
contribution toward greater
understanding between the two
communities," the statement
said.
The Jewish leaders explained
that they were concerned over
O'Connor's calls for Palestinian
self-determination and over a
statement about the Holocaust
which struck a raw nerve among
many Jews.
O'Connor elaborated on the con-
text of some of his statements in
trying to explain clearly his in-
tended meaning, Perlmutter said.
For example, O'Connor told the
leaders that there was a widely-
reported statement by him con-
cerning Palestinian self-
determination delivered in a
church in Jordan. What was not
widely reported, O'Connor said,
was that he followed up this call
by stressing the importance of any
kind of solution not endangering
Israel's security in any way,
Perlmutter said.
O'CONNOR ALSO elaborated
on his intended meaning in his
statement upon visiting Yad
Vashem in Jerusalem that the
Holocaust was "an enormous gift
that Judaism has given the
world." O'Connor had explained
earlier that suffering in Catholic
theology brings people closer to
the Almighty.
Perlmutter also said O'Connor
told the Jewish leaders that he
would have preferred for them to
draw their conclusions about his
trip after first discussing it with
him instead of from newspaper
reports. He was referring to a
critical statement issued by 53
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Jewish organizations on his trip
before he even returned to New
York. The ADL was not a
signatory on that statement.
JEWISH LEADERS attending
Monday's meeting were Morris
Abram, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations;
Rabbi Haskel Lookstein, presi-
dent of the New York Board of
Rabbis; Theodore Mann, presi-
dent of the American Jewish Con-
gress; Rabbi Henry Michelman,
executive vice president.
Synagogue Council of America;
Lester Pollack, president. New
York Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council; Rabbi James Rudin,
director of interreligious affairs,
American Jewish Committee;
Rabbi Ronald B. Sobel, Temple
Emanu-EI.
"Both parties wanted tn .
differences behind/^fiCS?
said. "The Cardinal hZ*
Vatican and American **
not the Israeli Cabinet r? !?
portance of what took ri
yesterday (Monday) was t,
Catholic-Jewish relations bwk*
the track," he said. k 0r'
There was a danger that tb
concern exclusively with tk
Vatican's recognition of 1-2
would overshadow other in^
tant issues of CatholicJeS
relations, Perlmutter said H
said he would like to see thefocn!
return to issues of curriculum;!
schools, teaching non-Jews about
Jews, and cleaning up hundreds of
years of anti-Semitic literature
and teachings.
Rabbi Notes Reform Conversion
Is Lengthy, Arduous Process
Continued from Page 4-A
ed on the conviction that member-
ship in the Jewish people will br-
ing spiritual, religious and
cultural fulfillment. Many doubts
may arise, and Reform rabbis do
not hesitate to warn that if am-
bivalent feelings persist, conver-
sion should be delayed until these
feelings have been analyzed and
resolved.
BECAUSE THE process of
becoming Jewish is one of growth
and development, the Reform
Jewish community conducts ongo-
ing study groups and sponsors
week-end retreats and social
gatherings for those who have
completed the course of study and
become converts. In this way,
Jews-by-choice (as they are called)
become part of a congenial en-
vironment that helps them adjust
to a new way of life and a unique
religious frame of reference.
Reform Judaism also places
special emphasis on helping born
Jews to be understanding and sup-
portive of those who have volun-
tarily become Jews. Jews-by-birth
are reminded that Judaism has
always considered converts to be
full-fledged members of the
Jewish community.
More than 800 years ago, the
great Jewish physician and
teacher Maimonides was asked bv
the convert Obadiah whether, i
his prayers, he had the right to ut-
ter the words "Our God and God
of our fathers." Maimonides
answer is as fitting today as it was
then. He said in part:
"WHOEVER adopts Judaum
and confesses the unity of the
Divine Name, as it is prescribed in
the Torah, is counted among the
disciples of Abraham our Father
. since you have come under the
wings of the Divine Presence and
confessed the Lord, no difference
exists between you and us, and all
miracles done to us have been
done as it were to us and to
you .
"Do not consider your origin as
inferior," Maimonides wrote to
Obadiah. "While we are the
descendants of Abraham. Isaac
and Jacob, you derive from Him
through whose word the world
was created."
Jacobson Named
NEW YORK (JTAI -
Charlotte Jacobson, former presi-
dent of Hadassah, the Jewish Na
tional Fund and the Women's
Zionist Organization of America.
has been named the fourth World
Patron of Youth Aliyah.
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Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Irst Conservative Woman Rabbi
She Combines Feminism With Love of Torah
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
I Combine feminism with a love
. Torah, and you have Rabbi
Lmy Eilberg, the first woman or-
bined as a Conservative rabbi by
[je Jewish Theological Seminary
| America.
[The title came in 1985, follow-
Lg a 10-year fight to gain admit-
knce to the seminary. Even to-
Jy, there are still debates about
thether a woman can officiate as
Ibbi according to Jewish law.
IRABBI EILBERG, who will
jdress the Temple Beth Torah
jongregation Feb. 13 and 14, told
pe Jewish Floridian in a phone in-
krview from her home in In-
anapolis that she will give her
Jks on those two issues: her
oumey" and the challenges she
[till faces today.
["There are many people in the
onservative movement who
tlebrated and continue to
ilebrate with me the fact that the
onservative movement has
ken this important step into the
Century by embracing the
ill equality of women.
f'There are others, including in
> Conservative movement itself,
ko are still afraid that, in some
ty, women's equality represents
danger for Conservative
daism," Rabbi Eilberg says.
IABBI EILBERG, who was
. and raised in Philadelphia,
r serves as the Jewish Chaplain
Methodist Hospital of Indiana
J the Community Rabbi for the
yish Welfare Federation of
eater Indianapolis. She lives
ere with her husband, Prof,
[ward Eilberg-Schwartz, of In-
na University with their five-
onth-old daughter, Penina.
|Her mother is a social worker,
. father an attorney, and her
other is also an attorney. She
kid she was raised in a conser-
ktive home that was committed
pt "not terribly observant."
first cousin, Efraim
enberg, is an Orthodox rabbi
no lives in Israel, but Rabbi
Jlberg traces her rabbinical
Bve to a more subtle influence
jierated by her grandparents,
braham and Gittel Greenberg.
[THEY WERE old Eastern
Uropean elders. They were old
Drld Jews embodied, I think, in
ne of the best of traditional
rish culture. When they came
America, my grandmother,
fiose Yiddish was much better
jm her English, was very com-
litted to making sure her
pilciren made a successful ac-
llturation in American life."
[That meant an inclusion of "old
Drld values," such as family
yalty, respect for Jewish tradi-
^n and commitment to education
ove all.
lere are some 130 women rab-
today, and all but four, in-
ding Rabbi Eilberg, belong to
more liberal Reform and
Bconstructionist movements.
fce Conservative movement was
latest to permit the ordination
women as rabbis, but Rabbi
|Dberg says she doesn't expect
Orthodox academic circles to
Imit women for rabbinical
idies.
["I'VE HEARD from renowned
lodox feminist Blu Greenberg
it she believes she will live to
i the ordination of women in the
lodox movement. I hope she
kes a long life," Rabbi Eilberg
ps cynically. A Conservative
f, Rabbi Eilberg believes, "can
re it both ways."
|"It seems that Conservative
laism represents to me what is
best synthesis between a oom-
jtment to traditional Judaism
a strong identity as a modern
son.
issue and its
Contemporary feminism believes that western
society as a whole has tended to view males as
the predominant examples of humanness, while it
relegates women, in many cases, to a secondary
position.'
"As a Conservative Jew, I live
my life very much in accordance
with Jewish law. At the same
time, I can maintain my commit-
ment to intellectual autonomy and
openness and ability to ask any
question about my religion and its
development," she says.
RABBI EILBERG, 32, says
her first lecture at Beth Torah on
Friday evening, Feb. 13, will
detail her personal journey of a
traditional young woman, how she
encountered the secular feminist
movement and found a way to
forge a synthesis between the two
movements.
"Although I was raised in a
Conservative Jewish home, it was
not a home of observance of
Jewish law. As a teenager, I
became involved with activities of
the Conservative youth
movements, I took on a traditional
Jewish lifestyle.
"Then, as a high school student,
around 1970, I also developed an
affinity for the feminist move-
ment so that by the time I reached
college age and the course of my
studies at Brandeis, I needed to
find a way to synthesize myself as
a traditional Jew with my growing
recognition that women were in
many ways excluded from the cen-
tral roles of Jewish life."
RABBI EILBERG says she
hopes to convince the congrega-
tion that the synthesis she made
was "a plausible" one. "It certain-
ly has given a sense of satisfaction
to me," she says.
When Eilberg graduated from
college, a number of her male
friends were applying to^rab-
binical school, and she said, I
wanted to join them.
"At that point, in 1976, that was
impossible. A woman was barred
from making an application."
What followed was a 10-year
period during which Rabbi
Eilberg now says, "I wasn't sure I
would realize that long-standing
dream."
So what did convince the
seminary to accept women?
"A number of things," she says.
"Although the issue of women's
ordination has threatened to split
the Conservative movement in a
way in which few issues have, I
think in the 10-year period of
debate there has been an unusual-
ly high level of dialogue among
the arms of the movement in ex-
ploring this
ramifications.
"ALTHOUGH the faculty of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America, in whose hands the
decision lay, were hesitant, after a
period of years they began to
listen to what the Conservative
congregations and what the Con-
servative rabbis had."
There still are some issues in-
volving Jewish law that are not
resolved, and they are so key that
Rabbi Eilberg said she will devote
her second lecture at the North
Miami Beach congregation on
Saturday to that issue.
"The most problematic issue of
Jewish law has to do with a
women's capability of serving as a
witness in the eyes of Jewish
law," she says. "In order to of-
ficiate at a divorce, or marriage or
conversion ceremony, a rabbi is
required to serve as witness. So
for those people who believe that
Jewish law could not be
understood to permit the accep-
tance of women's testimony,
women could not then justifiably
serve as rabbis."
Other legal issues involve
liturgical life, whether a women
can read from the Torah or lead a
congregation in prayer.
WHILE THE issue of law is im-
portant, Rabbi Eilberg says there
"are very deep emotional issues"
which have contributed powerful-
ly to the resistance of treating
women as equals in the Jewish
community.
"Contemporary feminism has
uncovered the insight that
western society as a whole has
tended to view males as the
predominant examples of human-
ness, while it relegates women, in
many cases, to a secondary
position.
"I think that has certainly been
the case in many ways in tradi-
tional Judaism. Even people who
are ideologically committed to
granting women equal rights in
Jewish life often feel threatened
at the prospect that women's
equality may overturn Jewish life
as we know it or threaten to take
power away from them."
THERE HAVE been some
feminists, Rabbi Eilberg says,
who have chosen to leave their
Judaism behind in the pursuit of
feminist beliefs. "But in my opi-
nion," she says, "the vast majori-
ty of Jewish feminists have chosen
to pursue the very rocky road" of
that synthesis only because their
Judaism is so precious to them.
"These issues would not be as
much central to my life as they are
if I were not very much devoted to
Torah and a love of mitzvot."
Rabbi Eilberg was a summa
cum laude graduate of Brandeis
University before beginning
graduate studies in Talmud at the
Seminary. She completed all her
academic training in Talmud until
all but the dissertation re-
quirements for a doctoral degree
were completed.
She then earned a Master's
degree in Social Work from Smith
College before returning to the
first class of women entering the
Seminary's Rabbinical School.
SHE HELD a faculty post at
the Seminary's College of Jewish
Studies in New York and its
yeshiva-like program for Conser-
vative collegians in Jerusalem.
She has worked with various
Raman camps, United Synagogue
Youth and a curriculum-writing
project at the Israeli Ministry of
Education.
Finally, Rabbi Eilberg feels that
women have a special contribution
to make in Judaism.
"I think that since women have
been raised very differently in our
society than men are, women tend
to have a more relational ap-
proach to life than most men do.
As women come into their own in
Jewish communities, I believe
that one will begin to see the
evolution of a more cooperative,
interdependent, intimate form of
community sharing and leader-
ship because those are areas of
strength to women."
Calif. Grapes
Called 'Unkosher'
NEW YORK (JTA) Follow-
ing the lead of the Board of Rabbis
of Southern California and on the
heels of the Rocky Mountain Rab-
binical Council and the Synagogue
Council of Greater Denver, the
New York Board of Rabbis has
declared California table grapes
to be ethically unkosher.
The Dec. 19 declaration is in
support of the United Farm
Workers of America, AFL-CIO in
its dispute with California grape
growers.
"We urge all rabbis and their
congregants to promote the
boycott of California table grapes
not bearing the UFW label as a
form of ethical kashrut," the
declaration says, adding that it
hopes the boycott will contribute
to the growers meeting the
workers' "reasonable demands."
Future TEXAS LONGHORNS:
Live at THE dormitory of THE University
DDBIE
CENTER
Cornerstone of the University of Texas campus
2021 Guadalupe
Austin, TX18705
(512)472-8411
Please send me information about Doble Center!
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(JFLA)


Fage 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
Want a 'Get'?
Pressure a Recalcitrant Ex-Husband
Continued from Page 1-A
thodox and Conservative rabbis
generally will not.
Lookstein pointed out that a se-
cond marriage where there has
been no get is considered
adulterous under Jewish religious
law, and the offspring of such
marriages are mamzerim il-
legitimate, i appeal to all of my
colleagues :o compromise on this
and to require a get before remar-
riage," said Lookstein, whose
stated goal is to "avoid all future
mamzerut :n America."
He pointed out that illegitimate
persons nay never marry
religiously into the Jewish com-
munity and have no recourse, such
as conversion, to alter their
status.
LOOKSTEIN called on the
Board of Rabbis to resolve that
none of its members should of-
ficiate at a second marriage unless
and until every possible effort has
been made to obtain a get for the
partner who needs it.
With respect to the second pro-
blem, the Hoard of Rabbis presi-
dent noted that "there are at pre-
sent thousands of men and women
mostly women who have
received a civil divorce but who
are prevented from entering a se-
cond marr age because of a vindic-
tive or awiricious former spouse
who refuses to cooperate in the
get process "
He proposed the strongest
possible sanctions against such a
spouse, including denial of all
honors or privileges of member-
ship in a synagogue or temple.
"This kind of social pressure will
have a great impact on
recalcitrant spouses and may go a
long way toward eliminating the
problem," Lookstein said, adding
that "the publicity alone which
will attend the acceptance of such
a proposal may greatly enhance
the get process."
IN URGING that the get re-
quirement be made universal in all
trends of Judaism, Lookstein
acknowledged "problems with the
non-egalitarian structure of a get.
Under Jewish law only the male
partner to the marriage can give a
get. But "the problem of
mamzerut is sufficiently grave to
warrant a compromise on the
issue of egalitarianism," Looks-
tein maintained.
Ironically, the issue of non-
egalitarianism has arisen in con-
nection with New York State
legislation enacted several years
ago, known as the Get Law. which
is intended to protect women
seeking a get from a spouse who
refuses to give one.
The law requires that in order to
obtain a civil divorce decree in
New York State, the complainant
must remove all barriers to future
Defense Ministry's Travel Ban
Dismays 3 Jewish Leaders
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Three prominent American
Jews have expressed
dismay over the Israeli
Defense Ministry's decision
last week not to issue travel
passes to two leading
Palestinians from the West
Bank and the Gaza Strip to
attend an international sym-
posium on the Middle East
at the San Diego State
University.
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, vice
president of the World Jewish
Congress, Dr. Rita Hauser,
former U.S. delegate to the
United Nations, and Stephen
Shalom, said in a joint statement
that the decision not to allow
former Hebron Mayor Mustapha
abd A-Nabi Natshe and Gaza
lawyer Fayez Abu-Rahme to join
them in high level meetings to ex-
plore ways to move the Mideast
peace process forward harms the
cause of peace and damages
Israeli's image as a serious seeker
of peace.
THEY NOTED that, ironically,
Abu-Rahme is one of two Palesti-
nians who was appointed by the
Israeli government as a potential
Palestinian representative in
peace talks between Israel and a
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation.
"If he was acceptable then, why is
he a security risk now?" the three
asked.
Israeli security sources said the
two Palestinians were denied
travel permits because there was
a concern they would use the occa-
sion to meet with hostile
elements, but did not elaborate.
"Denying travel permits to
these Palestinians because of
'hostile elements' with whom they
might meet does not seem to con-
stitute sufficient ground for such
action," the joint statement said.
"Barring Palestinians known for
their moderate voice from par-
ticipating in a constructive
dialogue appears to be a political
and not a security act."
The San Diego conference,
which had been scheduled to take
place Jan. 19-23, has been
postponed, as all participants, in-
cluding the Israelis, felt that
Palestinian participation from the
West Bank and Gaza Strip was
essential to such discussions.
Hertzberg, Shalom and Hauser
noted. They expressed the hope
that the Defense Ministry's deci-
sion "would to reversed and that
it would not constitute a prece-
dent for future actions."
NATSHE and Abu-Rahme were
to have been part of a large Israeli
delegation. The invitees included
Knesset members Abba Eban,
David Libai and Shulamit Aloni;
Prof. Shimon Shamir, a leading
expert on Mideast affairs; Hanna
Seniora, editor of the East
Jerusalem Arabic daily El-Fajer;
Hatem Abu-Ghazale, a Palestinian
educator from Gaza; and Dr. Sare
Nusseibeh of Bir Zeit University
in the West Bank. The latter three
Palestinians were apparently not
subject to the Defense Ministry's
travel ban.
remarriage of the other party.
Julie Frank, of New York City
Council President Andrew Stein's
office who is knowledgeable on
the Get Law, said that it works
only when the male partner is the
complainant. A woman complai-
nant may agree to remove all bar-
riers to future remarriage of her
spouse but it is meaningless
because a woman cannot give a
get, Frank said.
LOOKSTEIN offered as
another solution to the problem of
a recalcitrant spouse that
members of the Board of Rabbis
urge all prospective brides and
grooms to sign a pre nuptial, civil
agreement pledging to cooperate
in giving and receiving a get
should their marriage end in
divorce.
He said he has been using such
an agreement at his congregation
for the past five years which pro-
vides a model and which conforms
with New York State law and is
halachically acceptable.
Lookstein's presentation was
generally supported by members
of the Board of rabbis. There were
two responses at the meeting,
however.
Rabbi Marc Gel man of Temple
Beth Torah in Dix Hills, Long
Island, asserted that the entire
subject of egalitarianism and sex-
ism in the get process requires
much more study. He said many
Reform rabbis find the process in
conflict with the principle that
men and women should have equal
control over their lives, which in-
cludes marriage and divorce.
HE ALSO expressed qualms
about the idea of sanctions against
a recalcitrant husband. Since
Reform rabbis do not at present
require the get as a prerequisite
for remarriage, it is unfair to app-
ly sanctions to a husband in a tem-
ple where the rabbi does not con-
sider the get necessary, he said.
Rabbi Gilbert Rosenthal of Tem-
ple Beth El in Cedarhurst. N.Y.,
said he agreed with Lookstein's
proposals but was concerned by
the fact that there are many
agunot (abandoned wives) who
cannot obtain a get.
He said a prenuptial agreement
would solve the problem for the
future but leaves unresolved the
problem of abandoned spouses
now. Similarly, it may reduce or
eliminate mamzerut in the future,
"but it will not solve the tragic
dilemma for tens of thousands of
mamzerim who already exist,"
Rosenthal said.
The Board of Rabbis voted
unanimously to appoint a commit-
tee of Orthodox, Conservative and
Reform rabbis to study the pro-
posals further and to report back
to a plenary meeting with specific
suggestions for action.
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VANUNU'S GIRL FRIEND: Judy Zimmet, American git |
friend of alleged Israeli nuclear spy Mordechai Vanunu. who uru
prevented from visiting Vanunu in jail after initially receinnc i
permission to visit, talks to reporters in Tel Aviv last week. Ask-
ed about her feelings toward Vanunu. she said she loved him.
London Theatre Cancels Play
Depicting Zionists As Collaborators
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) The Royal
Court Theatre has announced that
it has cancelled the presentation
of a play which depicts Zionists as
collaborators with the Nazis in the
mass destruction of Hungarian
Jewry during World War II.
The play, titled "Perdition."
was due to open shortly for a five-
week run at the prestigious West
End theater. It was withdrawn
following angry protests by the
Jewish community and by
scholars and historians who
branded it a vicious travesty, after
reading the script.
THE PLAYWRIGHT. Jim
Allen, is a Trotskyist who makes
no secret of his antipathy for
Zionists though he claims to be
pro-Jewish. "Perdition" is
loosely on the desperate attempts
of Jewish leaders in Budapest to
save Jewish lives by offering the
Nazis trucks and money
the last year of the war.
Dr. David Cesarani. a London
University historian, called the
play "one of the most serious ex-
amples of anti-Semitic thinkiof
seen in this country for many
years. It revives the ami
Semitism that goes back to 'The
Merchant of Venice.' '
Allen called the cancellation "at
absolutely disgraceful form of cen-
sorship" and accused the Roya.
Court of succumbing to pressure
The cast also deplored the
cancellation. Allen is reportedly
looking for another theater tc
stage his play.
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Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
;ohl Back in Office In Razor-Thin
rictory; Neo-Nazis Given Tiny Vote
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) West
ermany's oldest establish-
neo-Nazi political group,
fie National Democratic
farty (NPD), won 0.6 per-
cent of the popular vote in
Sunday's general elections,
Inough to qualify for State
inancial aid but far below
he five percent needed for
?>resentation in
iament.
Nevertheless, the NPD, which
arnered about 250,000 votes,
.erformed better than in the last
Jundestag elections in 1983 when
I drew only 0.2 percent.
THE COMBINED vote for the
>JPD and all other extreme
[ightwing factions Sunday
Chancellor Kohl
lounted to one percent of the
Btal votes cast.
'The Patriots," the European
ranch of the Lyndon LaRouche
[roup in the U.S., the
[Courageous Citizens" and
Imilar groupings on the radical
ight drew 0.4 percent between
Tiem.
Although the NPD achieved one
?rcent in the elections to the
Itrasbourg-based Parliament of
Europe two years ago mainly
ecause of a poor turn-out
leither it nor any other faction on
tie far right has emerged as a
Dlitical force of any consequence
in West Germany.
One reason is that they are
ideologically divided and split the
extremist vote between them.
Another is that the conservative
Christian Democratic Union
(CDU) headed by Chancellor
Helmut Kohl and its Bavarian
sister party, the Christian Social
Union (CSU), made a strong bid
for rightwing votes during the
election campaign.
FRANZ-JOSEF STRAUSS,
leader of the CSU, campaigned on
the premise that it is time for Ger-
mans to "step out of Hitler's
shadow" and develop "normal"
national feelings. He also publicly
supported the thesis of those
historians who maintain that the
Holocasut, as bad as it was, was
no worse than other catastrophic
events in recent history.
The CDU, and its junior coali-
tion partner, the Free Democratic
Party (FDP) won Sunday's elec-
tions with 53.4 percent of the
popular vote which translates into
266 of the 4% seats in the
Bundestag.
But Kohl's party, which achiev-
ed 44.3 percent Sunday compared
to 48.8 percent in the 1983 elec-
tions, registered its poorest per-
formance since the Federal
Republic was founded in 1949.
The centrist FDP and the anti-
NATO, environmentalist Green
Party chalked up the largest
gains. The former increased its
share of the vote to 9.1 percent,
from seven percent in 1983. The
Greens won 8.3 percent, up from
5.6 percent four years ago.
THE SOCIAL Democratic Par-
ty (SPD) remains the largest op-
position faction in parliament. It
drew 37 percent of the popular
vote, down form 38.2 percent in
1983, but better than predicted by
the pre-election opinion polls.
It is not possible to determine
how Jews cast their votes. There
are 30,000 Jews in West Ger-
many's more than 20,000 are eligi-
ble to vote. Observers here
assume they supported the CDU
or the FDP. But the Jewish vote is
too marginal to play any role in
national politics.
The Jewish community is scat-
tered, most living in West Berlin
and Frankfurt. But West
Berliners do not participate in the
national elections because of the
special status of the city which is
governed by the three Allied
powers.
[Chancellor Kohl Calls on Germans
Not To Forget Nazi Crimes
BONN (JTA) Chancellor Helmut Kohl, on the 45th
iniversary of the "Final Solution," has called on Germans
ever to forget the crimes of the Nazi era.
"We Germans must never forget, repress or trivialize
ie crimes of Nazism because only by remembering them
nil we be capable of reconciliation," Kohl said. The
memory of those who were deported in Germany s name,
Enslaved, humiliated and murdered in the extermination
amps of Auschwitz, Treblinka, Birkenau, Maidanek and
Sobibor obliges us never again to stir feelings of hatred.
ON JAN. 20,1942, leaders of the Third Reich, meeting
the Wannsee suburb of Berlin, drafted the "Final Son>
ion" to the Jewish problem the mass extermination ot
Europe's Jewish population. On Tuesday (Jan. 20), a
memorial service was held at the villa where the meeting
ok place. One of the speakers, Heinz Galinski, chairman
.x West Germany's Jewish community, warned that many
lerman politicians and historians were attempting to bury
ie past.
Kohl's statement was seen in part as a response to
imilar charges by the ^position Social Democratic Party
SPD) which faced an- .nday lost to the Chancellor s rui-
ng Christian Democratic Union (CDU) in a general
lection.
Sephardic leaders David Levy (right), Deputy become a historic memory' unless 'adequate
Prime Minister of Israel, and Nissim Gaon, and modern educational, cultural and
president of the World Sephardi Federation, religious facilities' are provided to the
were key speakers at the annual conference of younger generation of Sephardim both in
the American Sephardi Federation in Israel and the Diaspora. Among 12 million
Philadelphia last month. In a major address, Jews living outside Israel, he said, Sephardim
Gaon warned that Sephardi Jewry will number 1.2 million, or 10 percent.
Ohio Joins
*
Ban Against Nonessential Autopsy
COLUMBUS, Ohio -
(JTA) Ohio has joined
California, New Jersey and
New York in providing pro-
tection against nonessential
autopsies, according to
Agudath Israel of America.
Gov. Richard Celeste signed in-
to law last month a procedure to
allow either friends or relatives of
a deceased person or the
deceased's signed statement to in-
form the coroner and the courts
that an autopsy would violate the
deceased's religious beliefs.
Yet, autopsies on Orthodox
Jews may still be performed under
the new law, initiated by Aguda
and co-sponsored by State Sen.
Stanley Aronoff and State Rep.
Judy Sheerer.
IN CRIMINAL investigations
or if the coroner determines for
another reason that an autopsy is
a "compelling public necessity,"
notification of religious opposition
of the autopsy shall halt any pro-
cedure for 48 hours.
The coroner may seek a waiver
of the period altogether. If so, the
objecting relatives or friends must
be informed, and may file suit to
stop the autopsy. The county
court may then decide.
A similar procedure will take
place if the coroner concludes the
autopsy is not a compelling public
necessity but nevertheless
necessary to determine cause of
death. The coroner may file a peti-
tion seeking court authorization of
the autopsy, and a hearing will
take place within 48 hours.
FRIENDS and relatives of the
deceased will be summoned, and
will file an affidavit backing up
their claim against the autopsy.
The court will decide.
In either instance, a court-
permitted autopsy "shall be per-
formed using the least intrusive
procedure," the law states.
Schickman Elected
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
Mark Schickman of San Francisco
has been elected chairman of the
Jewish Public Affairs Committee
of California, succeeding Lucille
Brotman of San Diego. The
organization represents the 10
Jewish federations in the state to
the state government.
When you're not quite ready
to go home ...we can help.
The Miami Jewish Home &
Hospital lor the Aged at Douglas
Gardens now offers the finest
short-term rehabilitation available
featuring:
the latest in rehabilitative and
diagnostic equipment and
individual therapy;
kosher meals and the full
spectrum of social and medical
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professional, skilled care in our
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The Harold and ftitnc habitation Center s tunded in part by a grant Ire/-
' Greater Miami Je.\ .'on


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 80, 1987
JTA/WZN News Photo
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir in green, pajama-like hospital
clothing and surgical mask enters an operating theater to watch
an open-heart operation, while visiting Jerusalem's Hadassah
University Hospital last week.
Allegations of Firearms Misuse
Lead To Investigation of Settlers
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has ordered an im-
mediate investigation into
the alleged misuse of
firearms by Jewish settlers
in the West Bank. His order
followed a briefing he was
S'ven about an incident
onday evening in the
Balata refuge camp near
Nablus.
According to reports, Jewish
settlers driving to prayers at
Joseph's Tomb on the outskirts of
the city were stoned by Arabs.
The settlers gave chase, entered
the refugee camp and fired three
shots into the air. Security forces
rushed to the scene and demanded
that the settlers leave. Rabin said
50 Years
For IPO
Continued fro* Page 5-A
music," he said, "is an instrument
of international goodwill."
Towards that end, two weeks
after its premiere performances,
the orchestra embarked on its
first tour. It was to Egypt "a
symbol of the new spirit in the
Orient, and of the fraternity
among races and nations," pro-
claimed the program.
Toscanini conducted the con-
certs for enthusiastic audiences in
Cairo and Alexandria.
These were only the first of the
Philharmonic's many perfor-
mances in Egypt and Lebanon, in-
cluding a number of benefit con-
certs. The orchestra also perform-
ed before Allied troops stationed
in the region during the Second
World War. With the end of the
war, the concerts in Egypt and
Lebanon ceased, the political
realities of the Middle East having
sullied that aspect of Huberman's
bright vision for now.
Israel Scene
he wants a thorough investigation
to determine whether the settlers
used firearms according to
regulations.
THE DEFENSE Minister also
spent Tuesday morning (Jan. 20)
in Nablus meeting with heads of
Arab universities in the West
Bank to discuss the increasing in-
cidence of student violence. While
he was touring Nablus, a stone
was thrown at Rabin's convoy.
The assailant was caught and held
for questioning.
During his meeting with Hafez
Toukan, the Israel-appointed
Mayor of Nablus, and the head-
masters of five universities, Rabin
stressed that Israel does not want
to interfere in academic affairs
but that he would not permit the
campuses to become centers of
unrest for the entire area. Accor-
ding to Rabin, the universities
have replaced the refugee camps
as the main source of disorder in
the West Bank during the past
five months.
Two students were fatally shot
by Israeli soldiers during a riot at
Bir Zeit University near Ramallah
on Dec. 4. A-Najah University in
Nablus has been shut down
periodically because of student
violence. It was ordered closed
again Monday for four days in an-
ticipation of violent demonstra-
tions said to be planned by
students.
Hikmat al-Masri, chairman of
the university's board, complain-
ed that A-Najah was the target of
discrimination because Bir Zeit
has been allowed to remain open.
Rabin explained that the latest
closure order was a preventive
measure.
HE SAID at a press conference
later that it was not necessary to
wait until violence breaks out
before taking measures to avoid
it. Rabin also maintained that
there was no political significance
in the fact that a ranking Cabinet
Minister held meetings with
Palestinians in the West Bank.
He said there is no independent
political leadership in the ter-
ritories at present willing to enter
into negotiations because they
fear terrorist reprisals
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Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
\Two Institutions
IPO, Conductor Mehta Both Turn 50 At Same Time
By ANN HARRISON
Almost everyone in Israel
Jows who Zubin Mehta is.
}en people who haven't
least interest in the
isic that emanates from
icert halls and who never
ar a symphony unless it's
^olutely unavoidable can
Jntify the music director
the Israel Philharmonic
chestra.
?art of the reason for this is
the Philharmonic itself is a
Israeli institution and
efore, anyone so essentially
nected with it is bound to gain
,j national renown beyond that
ch the average orchestra con-
tor might expect. But the
ater part of Zubin Mehta's
. fame stems from the fact
people here feel comfortable
him.
doesn't, somehow, seem as
ipian a figure as conductors
illy are. If he seems friendly,
ile. accessible and most of all
tiah (down-to-earth), it's only
kuse he's all of those things.
r' is cheerful irony in the fact
the IPO's music director is
| nil. of the many Jewish Con-
ors who reign in the world of
IC, but rather a Zoroastrian
in Bombay. But our Indian
kks Yiddish and that single
I explains a lot.
THE COURSE of this inter-
Mehta often found it
pssary to stop and translate a
dish expression into English
the benefit of this writer,
fcw is it you don't speak Yid-
I?" he queried, clerly appalled.
i the 25 years of his association
the IPO, Zubin Mehta has
as comfortable a presence
tie Jewish state as he is a
iliar face to its people. His
b identification with Israel in
bs of trouble and in times of joy
ndeared him to all here. He is
[a Jew, and yet he's one of us;
elongs to us and he is loved for
vo incidents will suffice to il-
ite; in June, 1967, with the
[ of a war that seemed to
iten Israel's very existence,
; people who didn't have to be
were clamoring to leave.
i'hta, however, canceled all
professional commitments
I rushed to Israel for a series of
erts. "It was a demonstration
ourage and solidarity that peo-
here have not forgotten,"
11s Moshe Aumann, who at
}led the concert Mehta gave at
isalem's Binyanei Ha'uma
i year.
ie country was in a somber
people were in bomb
ers. In that atmosphere, in
| dark hour, the only word that
describe that concert was
trifying.' "
MOTHER such demonstration
| place a few years later when
\Ui was music director of the
Angeles Philharmonic. A
esentative of the Soviet Peo-
Concert Bureau was in Los
eles to formalize the ar-
ements for the orchestra's
led tour of the Soviet Union.
the contract signing session
about to get underway,
a extended his hand to the
Bian and said: "On behalf of
State of Israel, I want to
you for all the wonderful
[lists you've sent us."
lie Russian gathered his
^rs and left in a huff. The
ving day, the management of
IL.A. Philharmonic was in-
^ed that the orchestra was
ome to make the arranged
provided it found itself
her conductor. The tour was
jlptly canceled.
ZUBIN MEHTA was born in
Bombay in 1936, the same year
Arturo Toscanini conducted the
Philharmonic's inaugural concert.
Music was in the genes. His
father, Mehli Mehta, a violinist
and conductor, led the Bombay
Symphony. Currently, he con-
ducts the American Youth Sym-
phony. The young Mehta received
violin and piano training from his
father before leaving for Vienna,
where he studied piano, string
bass, composition and conducting
with Hans Swarowsky at the
Musikacademie, graduating in
1957.
Two professional milestones
were reached the following year;
first, a debut with the Vienna
Philharmonic, following a stint as
guest conductor of the L.A.
Philharmonic, he became its music
director, the youngest man ever
to fill that position. Already direc-
tor of the Montreal Symphony, he
was also the only man to hold two
orchestra directorships
simultaneously in North America.
Nineteen-sixty-one also marked
the beginning of his association
with the IPO. He was named
music adviser to the orchestra in
1969 and music director in 1979,
the same year he became music
director for the New York
Philharmonic as well. He con-
tinues to hold both positions
today.
HOW HAS the IPO changed
since he first conducted it?
"It was really a lopsided or-
chestra," he says, "as far as stan-
dards are concerned. Only the
violins were good, the other (str-
ings) were adequate, celli and
basses were at really quite a low
level. The brass section had a few
good players, percussion was non-
existent." His impact on the or-
chestra has been significant.
"One day I'll go through the or-
chestra and really count how
many (of the current players) I
engaged and I think you'll have 90
percent."
Do orchestras have national
characteristics?
"I can tell as soon as I hear a
non-Viennese orchestra playing
Johann Strauss. It's like an ac-
cent. An American orchestra play-
ing Gershwin will just have that
certain rhythm that you can't
really write out, that certain lilt,
certain swing. The same thing
with the swing in Vienese music.
One can sense the same thing with
a French orchestra in a piece by
Debussy; it's a sort of feathery
way with sound which they do
quite naturally."
EVEN THOUGH the individual
and national character of an or-
chestra's sound should be valued
and preserved, the music must be
the first consideration, he says.
"We, the conductors, insists that
the brass in a Wagner piece, or in
Mahler, sound Germanic. So,
therefore the French, American
and Israeli orchestras doing that
particular work are starting to
sound the same way."
The mention of Mahler prompts
the observation that the Israel
Philharmonic sounds, somehow,
especially at home in the music of
Mahler. Does he agree?
"As I said, they have a certain
accent. It comes from a basic
knowledge of the folk element of
Mahler's music. It's central Euro-
pean, and this is very close to
Ashkenazic Israel; they unders-
tand that language very, very
easily. And." he adds, "the
Jewishness in Mahler comes out
with the Israel Philharmonic quite
prominently.
THIS LEADS to a discussion of
programming. Is there music he
would just as soon never have to
perform or hear again? He smiles.
"Oh yes, some modern works. We
do one because it looks interesting
and when we finally play it, it
deserves to be on the shelf. It will
disappear like a lot of the music of
the nineteenth century had disap-
peared. Everv age has its Salieris.
right!
"I think I make a pretty balanc-
ed season. Newspapers never
think there are enough modern
works and the public thinks
there's too much. So. I have to
take the middle road.
"In New York, this season, I
have four world premieres. And
what is the headline in the Village
Voice? So, What's New at the
Philharmonic?'
Talk about programming brings
us to a subject which is always cer-
tain to raise hackles in Israel.
"Let's talk abut Wagner and
Strauss."
HE CHUCKLES. It's nice to
talk about; we don't play them."
In 1981, Mehta breached the
unofficial ban on the playing of
music by Richard Wagner in
Israel with the prelude to
"Tristan und Isolde." The piece
was played at the end of the
scheduled program. Mehta an-
nounced what would be played so
that anyone who might be offend-
ed could leave. Some people did
leave, but others who stayed caus-
ed a minor fracas.
Mehta completed the perfor-
mance of the piece through a
Continued on Page 15-A
Toscanini Said
IPO Would Amount to Something
Continued from Page 5-A
reach besieged Jerusalem for a
morale-building concert.
IMMEDIATELY after the Six-
Day War, the Philharmonic, again
under Bernstein's baton, perform-
ed a Victory Concert on Mount
Scopus, in newly-united
Jerusalem. The deck of a naval
vessel served as a stage when, in
1973, the IPO performed for
troops at Sharm-el-Sheikh in the
Sinai.
Zubin Mehta conducted in 1977
when the orchestra performed at
the "Good Fence" on the
Lebanese border to demonstrate
solidarity with the Lebanese peo-
ple at a time of civil war.
Fifty years ago, most of the or-
chestra's 72 members were Euro-
pean refugees. Since then, the
Philharmonic has grown in size
and diversity. There are now 112
permanent members of the IPO:
51 were born and trained in
Israel, with others coming from
the United States, Canada,
Argentina, Belgium, Germany,
Austria, Romania, Poland and
Bulgaria. The Soviet Union, with
inadvertent generosity, has con-
Continued on Page 15-A
How has
the IPO
changed
under
Zubin
Mehta's
baton? 'It
was real-
ly a lop-
sided or-
chestra, '
he says.


Fage 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
Finally Doomed?
Wrecking Ball Destined To Demolish Golda's House
By CHRIS LEPPEK
DENVER (JTA) The
former home of Golda Meir
has lost the latest and
perhaps last round in its
six-year battle for survival.
The City's Building Depart-
ment Board of Appeals
voted unanimously Jan. 15
to demolish the house unless
a savior appears within 30
days.
The Board concluded that the
house presents a public health
hazard and that funds to fix it are
not readily available. The
dilapidated duplex, home of the
late Israeli Premier from 1913-14,
is resting on girders in a local
park. The city is paying for liabili-
ty insurance.
THE BOARD also decided, for
purposes of the ruling, that the Ci-
ty and County of Denver own the
house. This means that the fledgl-
ing Golda Meir Memorial Associa-
tion is no longer the designated
custodian of the house, which is
widely believed to be the last U.S.
structure still standing in which
Meir resided.
The Board would consider a re-
quest for a rehearing if
$150.000-$250.000 were commit-
ted within 30 days for restoration
and a plan were approved by the
City's Community Development
Agency (CDA). according to
Board chairman Ralph
Nordhauser.
The demolition also could be
delayed through court action.
"We're going to have to talk with
counsel before we decide what to
do," said Association member Mel
Cohen.
The Board had earlier set condi-
tions for restoration and use of
the building, including a
guarantee of available funds, pro-
vision of security and a schedule
of renovation. The Association
replied in writing, but Cohen con-
tended that the Board didn't
regard it seriously.
NORDHAUSER responded
IDF Repulsed
Several Attacks
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin disclosed
Wednesday (Jan. 21) that an
Israel Defense Force unit
operating irregularly in south
Lebanon repulsed several attacks
in recent days by the Shiite ex-
tremist Hezbullah on units and
positions of the Israel-backed
South Lebanon Army (SLA).
Replying to questions in the
Knesset, Rabin said the attacks
were repelled with no casualties to
either the IDF or SLA. He
estimated that at least five at-
tackers were killed and 10
wounded.
Rabin noted that the attacks
were launched some distance from
the Israel border which only con-
firmed the importance of the
south Lebanon security zone as a
buffer against attacks on Israel.
Christian Studies
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
has established a specialty leading
to a Bachelor of Arts degree in
Christian studies through the
Department of Comparative
Religion. Special emphasis will be
placed on Christianity's basis in
Judaism, its development as an in-
dependent religion and its central
role in Western Culture.
that the Board considered the
response unsatisfactory in terms
of safety of the building and
availability of funds for restora-
tion. The 15-member Association
has drained its funds in moving
the home to the park and pro-
viding security.
Nordhauser said that he has in-
spected the house. He added, coin
cidentally, that he lived in the
home as a child and is Jewish.
Cohen charged that the city has
violated its own commitment to
work with the Association in
restoration of the home. Since the
election of Mayor Federico Pena
in 1983, Cohen said, the city has
relentlessly pressured the
Association with "unreasonable"
deadlines.
The home has faced the wreck-
ing ball before. In 1981, just hours
away from being demolished by its
then owners, the Boys Club of
America, its historical nature was
discovered. A grassroots effort
prevented that demolition and
gained the support of the city to
help finance moving the house
from its original West Side
location.
SEVERAL restoration efforts
at the new site failed, and the
building survived vandalism, in-
cluding the painting of swastikas,
and a fire. It was moved to ft.
park last summer in an ajrrem
with the City that set atK?
for the Association on resSj
In November, after 8evn.
deadlines passed, CDA \~
pressing to either restored
demolish the house.
The Allied Jewish Federation of
Denver has not endorsed Z
restoration project or assisted ft!
effort financially, citing budge,
restraints and the need for com
munity resources in more press.
ing areas.
Meir attended high school dur
ing the time she resided in the
house with her sister and brother-
in-law, Shana and Sam Korngold.
who owned the building.
r
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/
Friday, January 30, 1987/The^ewish Floridian PageJ5-A
Someday, IPO Would Amount
To Something, Toscanini Said
IContinued from Page 13-A
J>ute fmbers of the orchestra's cur-
jt roster are women.
LIKE ALL CITIZENS of
lei, the players of the IPO have
liury duties to fulfil. In some
fS IPO reservists perform at
nv bases, and the entire or-
Ltra makes appearances at
*< military installations. Dur-
fwar. the orchestra performs at
battlefronts.
today's Philharmonic is a self-
Terning co-operative which
Lte most of its own expenses
pugh ticket sales. The govern-
nt of Israel, the America-Israel
.tural Foundation and private
lors take up the financial slack.
k by far the most renowned of
kel's six orchestras, which in-
5e the Jerusalem Symphony
fhestra, the Israel Chamber Or-
stra. the Haifa Symphony, the
fcrsheba Sinfonietta and the
mitz Chamber Orchestra.
ert'ormances by the IPO have
er l>een confined to the concert
of large cities. The orchestra
t,i.- the country to kibbutzim,
t. pment towns, border
Iges and settlements, perform-
|on every sort of improvised
h It is not always possible, in
le remote areas, to find a
Ue which can accommodate the
orchestra. In such cases
mber ensembles stand in for
the Philharmonic. Open air con-
certs in city squares and parks are
another feature of the orchestra's
concert season, enabling
thousands, most of whom are not
regular concertgoers, to enjoy the
music of the IPO, free of charge.
MOST OF THE greatest musi-
cians of the age among them
such conductors as Koussevitzky,
Mitropoulos. Monteux. Ormandy,
Barbirolli, Barenboim and Giulini;
and soloists, Heifetz, Rubinstein,
Piatigorsky, Stern, Rostropovich,
Sills, and Pavarotti have ap-
peared with the Philharmonic dur-
ing its 50-year history.
The remarkable roster of guest
artists appearing with the or-
chestra in this, the Jubilee season,
includes most of the great names
in music today. This embarrass-
ment of musical riches is both
testimony and tribute to the
Philharmonic's standing as one of
the world's most highly-regarded
orchestras. It is. perhaps, also a
tribute to an exceptional au-
dience. With 37.000 subscribers,
the IPO has a larger subscription
population than any other or-
chestra in the world.
The New York Philharmonic,
serving a population of 9 million,
has, by comparison, 12,000
subscribers. Artists enjoy perfor-
ming before appreciative au-
diences; in Israel they've found
them.
1$ rael Scene
Mehta and IPO Both Turned
Age 50 At Same Time
.'ontinued from Page 13-A
Irus of shouts and some
Icuffs. It should be noted that
music of Wagner has been
\/v>\ in Israel under no less
kinguished a baton than
Icanini's, '"Wagner," said
amr.i, "belongs to the world.
he world must not let the
I -e exclusive possession of
nusic."
1 news of Kristallnacht
Palestine in November,
a work by Wagner which
been scheduled for a Philhar-
tic concert a few days later
canceled. Since then,
tier's music had not been
r I Mehta's 1981 experiment.
one here is in any disagree-
ht over the loathsome
racter of Wagner's
ial political beliefs; he was
ler's spiritual mentor. The case
nst Richard Strauss is not
so clear-cut.
[WAGNER WAS." Mehta
"indecently, pathetically
11 Percent Drop
Emigration Noted
Jerusalem (jta> im-
ration to Israel totaled 9,500
1986, an 11 percent drop from
previous year, according to
ires released last week by the
Mral Bureau of Statistics. The
line was mainly in olim from
j Soviet Union and Africa.
the 914 Jews reported to
left the USSR last year, only
came to Israel. Although 565
>s arrived from South Africa,
than double the number in
I, immigration from Africa as
Bole fell by 58 percent.
Jbout 2.000 American Jews im-
rated to Israel in 1986. only
more than in the previous
About 1.000 immigrants ar-
from France, 800 from
tentina, 600 from the United
jdom and the rest from other
opean and Latin American
utries.
anti-Semitic Strauss, in my opi-
nion, was not a Nazi. He made the
mistake of accepting a very high
position in the first two years of
the Reich, which everyone knows,
and he's been vilified. I feel, for
that reason."
The major portion of the debate
stems not from the orchestra or
the concert-going audience, he
says. "It's the non-musical au-
dience. When we did Wagner a
couple of years ago, it was the out-
side people (not regular concert-
goers) who screamed. When we
finished Wagner, there were
shouts of victory. People loved
it."
Mehta loves this music and per-
forms it with distinction
elsewhere, but he wants the Israel
Philharmonic to perform it for
Israeli audiences, and he con-
tinues to hope that in time, it will.
APART FROM his hopes for
the Philharmonic future, what of
Zubin Mehta's aspirations? In
1987. he begins sabbatical year off
from his duties with the New York
PHilharmonic. His calender,
however, is filled with other pro-
fessional commitments. There are
new opera projects in the works,
including a "Tristan" in Los
Angeles with Jonathan Miller and
David Hockney to which he looks
forward with evident relish, and
some touring with both his or-
chestras which he says he enjoys
immensely.
But the coming year will pro-
vide him with some unaccustomed
breathing space. What are his
plans for that free time? After
some silent musing, he says, I U
study. I'll read. I'll do nothing. I
don't know what it is to do
nothing. I'll see how long I can do
nothing. I have a feeling I can do
it now. 1 wasn't capable
before ..."
What are his ambitions?
"I have no ambitions. I used to.
I was overwrought with ambition
as a young man. I don't have any
ambition now. My life is sailing: I
float with it."
Israel Scene
Examiner of Banks Galia Maor (left.) and
Bank of Israel Governor Michael Bruno at a
press conference at the Bank of Israel in which
they explain how they intend to act in the
crisis which has arisen around ex-Bank
JTA/WZN News Photo
Leumi Chairman Ernst Japhet upor, publica-
tion of the details of Japhet's $4.5 million
severance pay and pension terms.
Banker's Ex- Wife
Aims To Seize Half His Assets
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
troubles of Ernst Japhet, former
Board chairman of Bank Leumi,
were compounded last week when
a Tel Aviv district court seized all
his assets in Israel.
The court acted on the petition
of his former wife, Ella Japhet, to
whom he was married for 35 years
and who is the mother of his five
children. But the assets, put at
some $2 million, are much less
than the former wife expected.
She is trying to find out if Japhet
has additional assets overseas.
She also asked the income tax
authorities to investigate whether
he concealed assets from her at
the time of their divorce settle-
ment. As the complainant, she
originally petitioned the court to
award her half of the $4.5 million
severance payment awarded
Japhet by the Bank L'-umi direc-
tors when he stepped down last
spring. She also asked for half of
his $30,000-a-month pension.
Two weeks ago the bank's
Board resigned after expressing
"horror" over the excessive com-
pensation to Japhet who was forc-
ed to resign as a consequence of
the 1983 bank shares scandal.
Israel, Hungary Will Exchange Representatives
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel
and Hungary will soon exchange
resident trade representatives.
Israel Radio reported Sunday,
citing authoritative sources here.
The report followed a statement
over the weekend by Joszeg
Gyorke. head of the Communist
Party's Foreign Affairs Depart-
ment in Budapest, that Hungary
is interested in ties with Israel,
though it was "not timely" to
speak of full diplomatic relations.
Israel Radio also disclosed a
meeting two months ago between
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry Ariel Sharon and
Hungary's Minister for Foreign
Trade. Peter Verecz. Trade bet-
ween Hungary and Israel is
estimated at about $20 million a
year.
HUNGARY BROKE diplomatic
relations with Israel, as did all
Communist bloc states except
Rumania, after the 1967 Six-Day
War. Recently there have been
signs of a thaw. Israel and Poland
established interest sections in
Warsaw and Tel Aviv, respective-
ly, late last year. But full
diplomatic ties seem elusive at
present.
Israeli observers have noted a
marked easing of travel access to
Hungary by holders of Israeli
passports in recent years. Many
Israelis of Hungarian origin have
visited their former homeland as
individuals or in organized
iTroups.
There are an estimated
80,000-90.000 Jews in Hungary
today, the largest Soviet bloc
Jewish community outside the
USSR. Although they enjoy
relative religious freedom and
have a lively cultural life, the
Hungarian Jewish community is
eroding due to a high level of in-
termarriage and assimilation.
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p-
Page I6-A The Jewish FlandMn. Friday.
i*r
Dissidents Warn U.S.
Soviet Benefits Hinge on Emigration
Is Terry Waite Kidnapped?,
He Blames Terrorism on Israel
By D.4VTD F1HDM.LV
WASHINGTON 'JTA>
Natan Sharansky ace
Yuri Oriov. the two leading
-an rights activists who
were recently allowed to
emigrate from the Soviet
- ma, warned r
ICWW *Tar.aog dM CSSB
race oenefts before there
i i raraed -crease in
*" --- .-:- ----- :" -.jfi
z>:r.. aen jnpnant of awta
a.i; w~. vxi ae :\'ir.eer
: ae M<:sc:w H!smic Monitor
ng I-nop. "Bat aoc n reverse
dar
OBLOV AND SflaranscT sBa
ere -"sease-; ~ -.et ac:r
i.-:s r. apparent gescires :.: ae
ieagx.- .Aa^inisaaava. aaajfiad
- re i .iamisBi:r. "-.. -
an :f r-:an-
-ls > -_ '- ws :n ."a.:
:err<:n3C-aci a- I ^"
".uiasL-c :f ae rZeisa*: Asaaiaa
*rv aiesccned fey Sens
"^iha-r arsaawaag B. d
laarsas I-rasaiey ?.. !: vi
::rr.er >*r. ?-cTar: Sttaa I
Pa> ar.c Baawt I.aensta^ dM
CCSJ*J egs. rounse: are 1 frrrer
i assistant :-: PfeaasB
lataar
B:tr .T!cv anc Shanes*/ sa.e
ae "*"t snciud act ae aaen
gestures sucn as aeir reiease
Sbarxnsay oc aere a a aare
n ae West x ae aeceivec" If
sice $esta-es because ;f ae fear
:f aucear war
BOTH FOBMEB law M
praoners said aat Sov.ec eaoer
sTkn*:". Gonacaev seems a
^f ae West w-a gestures
sues as ac reiease :f some Soviet
prscners and atlowmg emigrsccc
for at reumficaccc :f amiiies.
oat rue aaisnces 2s wrtn aarsner
^flrcscu at some.
Sharansay acted sac ae aew
amjnccr aw waa vent ate
Jan. 1 starts by .-Jiming a
free emigration pcocy Bat dlcn.
ae acted, x makes emigi aouu pro-
:eduies sere restneeve adowmaj
eatagracoc imy for aoee wrc
v i^i: :e MaaBad afl ::<^
-iarres. faed as parents.
anicrec aa: rrrcnere anc asters.
He .: aa: as far as BaffM
38.Oa* # fit ae aocve azegrrv
er aJi:wec ^: eave. .t vouic >
aereent ae !.s: <.
*"-: 2a?e earuer reoavec nvm-
; from '..in*-, ace lave 3een
5H-*JLO'SST 2T&*: : rjr-ess
aoc a ioacnue wkm npai afls
::r ncrase': -irr.jiici:c. bBjbbBj
v:ci.: '-. K4 n L98I
*et faen ;-i;i:e!ir;e5. H-i sue
'<} Jew? sere i.i'W: ~.
Berate r.e ^:rcess;:c *: :e
r.ace r" : -r i.-.:caer ice
f u. vnn lana: "-: ea^e *~
aa aaaaaa-Taaft
-. : : :* .r---:.
Baaattl aal Aai
after 5) )). ."ew^ very uicwec
rrr.jmce le tr":uir"._ '.tntt l
:r c^sa. fr;rr "ner ?^?c r>a.-*r-
*<"an_< I >. v.r r-3cnsi
-_-.e ac.ecimcaK caat -.< ^-i.:^
ter-en-^ :;r -.-.e -"'--:
aaaaari *rr.jr~iz>:r.. M ".em-
: ..-.tf vk; :<:r.e :-ause Sen.
u.--<-i. r I air. ace
r.;st ,'ew-^c ^T~:uc were jcocs-
-:. ai
ae aotec ae -eit /ear
emigracon nrrcc*: "-: -1 +~" ice
*jk& faJen Tear.y ever smce. He
wonoerec wnetaer ae Carter Ae-
anstraccc aae aiaae a austase.
Box Sharacssy ate -.e Geneves
ae arge enugraccn n BVJ at a
anc wnen ae was n prson. was
an e&rt ay a* Soviet Vaicr. So
dean aouae. He ia.e aac v. ae
same ane Mceccw was ;esu;c-
ai^ aew nvrtanons for aoee who
wanted a eave
SHjULLNSKT reiectetx ae
aarge aar ae arye aumber :t
S:v.et emigrants woo go a ae
Vaitec States, nstead :i Israel, a
POC Znnshain To Be Released
From Siberian Labor Camp
By SL'SA>' BOLVBaLU
NEW YOBi iJTA. -
Praoner if Conscence Zamar
aaataafcl a Kseauwd a be re*eaa-
ea form a Siberan aoor anc as
weeas aefore us aree-jear arm
for ann-Sc vet TtwtPJm*'' s ski-
pteted anc atloweo a eave for
Israel aree says ater acccrnng
a die Union Jews and die Scadcnt Struggle for
Sovet Jewry SSS-".
7imim s ife. Tatyana. auc
iaat weea aat Soviet autnerrces
aid aer *ne aicuia saomit an s:t
apciicacons for aeiseif and aer
KMJaaa The coapta has aeen
semed ^saa ance 19^0.
ZUNSHAIVS atntence a a
JXF Dog Dies
ME LAI MINT .\ostraua -
JTA. baaaj die anme wara
of die Jewaa Saconai Paid acre
and a ocat Jewnn aiedia *e*enrty
itaa fled at age 14 if a snaae bate.
Lumtn' owner, die late Berta
[mm. aad aft bar estate a JXF
lav /ears ago except for SIO.'MM)
a aae are if Lumpi. The log
aioved ato a canine iid age acme.
woere ae aeeame a aaf? fawirrte.
according a ae Aastraiian
aoor amp followed is arrest
Marm -5. 1984. for 'arouatan if
faorcacons mown a ae fiaise
wnich iefame ae Sovet state and
socai system. The marges were
bated a ecers ae annseif wrcte
M Soviet aathorrces asaag aem
a revoae bis Sovet nczenscip
and aJow aim a eave for Israel
wot ns wife.
According a ae SSSJ ae was
atso arrested fcilowag a 5ve-
aunute lemonstraccn r. front if
ae Boahoi Theater r. Moscow
asaag for emigration r-aaa.
Zansnain :s a lo-jear-nd
pcysicat from Riga wno aas seen
mprsoned r. ae IrSutsa aoor
amp n Sibera.
IN A BELATED development.
die SSSJ reported aat two
refaaemks wQo are aiao nvoived
n ae nuiffnai peace asovement
n ae Sowwt t'mon are aiao saad
a be about a be reinsert- Ysrt
rhesanovsdy 42. a five-year
refoaemk. named and die atner
if aree aiidren. and Yir-
40 nfuaad .even
fatner if aree. In
Lumpi frequently received JNT
officats. in aemniil]! far pfioco op-
Tie remasadar of Lampt's anac
ftaad wiO fee taraad over a JSW
Ma? l8 botn families
lemonatrated n Bad Sqoare a
Moaeow for exit vaaa.
Another nrmber if a* inof-
ncai peace aiovement. Vadimir
Brodsky. was released in
September LSBfi after serving m-
y me Tear if a aree year
sentence far 'hoaaganiam" and
allowed leawe for Israel witn ais
wife. Dina.
die riaaoB for ae lroc a emigra-
aon. He saad dtat waie as an
Lsraeu ^naeo ae wooid jke a see
aaore Jews, from die 0 S. as wed
as die USSR, go a Israei. ae
arge aumoer if iropoots a miy
an excuse jsee ay Moscow
Meanwruie. Lynn Singer ex-
ecunve areetor rf die Locg
Istaad Committee ret
Jewry anc a former president :f
ae l'CSJ
-irrapcic .Agency gsafl me
earaee Fr-oay aa: Lev BficaV
i 5i-7ear-3id M:scow
-"f^er..< wi: -a.: :eer. teme-: v.
rrr.^i~ aaatsaai -^fisa. waa :a*:
jurp:see ccweiige :f aaaaai
rejjarang near storage.
Bmantem waa iir-.&i ~ :: rre
:.s rfe. Bums, sc aac y.e
s.*\r aiieren. 3< rs mo iaj aa
: -irrjfij The- : -
ae Caaad SfeMasj nan -
"*ir accee -".a:. :.:'.-r.'^\~ tas
:ver '~m /ear; i..
leipfii t hasaa
?*:nere :t ronasaaaai
By 51 SAN BIB-VBALU
NEW YORK (JTA Terrv Waite. persetsai a^
ant to the Archbishop of Canterbary. this weex hirnSI
reported iodnappeci by the very terrorists with whoffii,
had been negotiating in an effort to release boataaa|
peareii to lay blame for the hostage situation -.. ."?-_
Lsraei"3 'ioorstep. ^
Speaking in an interview from Beirut with MJT.tv
"Today Show"' ast Treek (Jan. 20). Angiicar. enml
Waite a^eged that the Middle East pohcie^
Sllw lirae: OtBd caused, exacerbatec -
the Wtmtkm of Palestinian refugees that wer
:i.^*r : the -jstage-taicng i^emnta.
THEN. : ommg m more specifically or. brae VTa|
;a.>: that -s-.-r. mritm wis r.^-
ersens:~ve t.: rrrti'nsrr. :' the Paiesnrjar -
d thai l-ne: faaW : be adequately sens -
-.eeds ::' the RrigjRmiar -
vi.".e r:crr^ssr-: r^rr-se thai a natior. ::' pe -.-,,
had: rirfered ppressionand per^- .1
be bcurei: t. e suSemg :: the Paiestir^ar. J
:arr.c pied 'err'-
SBC iMcrTHved Wale speai g -I
MCB0 otjam *"'" arid tihal -ontil the pr 1
rscr.iar..-8 "arai s*:ivei. the :r
;"ti_"':'r-; : stage-takmg !".: terr ~-~
Not a lot of dough
for a full day in Israel.
If* just $39 c*r aenor.* sms arank* cxg 5 ^rt "Suroaocna" Viik and Hone* aadiagr Slccct
atrornrnodaocrs. Fee -terr car -eroi. Pee 'saen "reairfass. Di5trint ccupons with cat
Thanfer 5 -igro. But f **. art rtxse lar.uaa asar erf raprmg Isad. B. AL"* watte rfre^v at
ccreti xxre 'arge frorn c r 2C -icjrtt.
=01*ree. araMea anor prodiwe. n* & *L QRAL *.R^ *
Vft* & -wnev auoore.
BBMssasaa
Vw Hem. \v OQci
Iftth ade trps tj otc. Eilat and Londbr.
EL AL'i VtiH arc Hcrev Dadcaon cfter
you the rnosr Israw tar +veas -rtcnev. Ar%
*av you ^lice her", trv'-? For more rtcrmanor. ee vour Tavei
igert or caff EL AL at -SOC-EL AL SUN
(1-800-352-5786).
-f^ c aws toi whjO 9. -m*wge a mufami
^iW iiTSKKin* ;
ffKtnie^*
aedMss
M*W
*ocr5

Tr
.^-
The
Th*
COME TO SRAL COME SXW WTTM


IJ11111 ii i i I
My
-riday, January 30, 1987 The Jewish Floridian Section B
Rebbetzin Jungreis In
[iami For Lecture Series
"Children are sacrificed on
(their parent's) altar of hap-
piness/ and refers to early
Jewish education as "Bar Mitz-
vah factories."
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis is
bt short on terms when she
fecries the decline of Jewish
iucation and family life.
yhi'iher it is on her national cable
llevision show, "Hineni," Good
lorning America, or at a lecture
Iwide, she will make
lau-ments such as, "Children are
Vrficed on (their parent's) altar
1 happiness,*' and refers to early
fcwish education as "Bar Mitzvah
ctories."
I li anything, Rebbetzin Jungreis.
\h will be in Miami to give two
ctures Monday and Tuesday.
eh. 2 and Feb. 3, cannot stand to
a Jew who is categorized as
thodox. Conservative, Reform,
Reconstructionist.
[ SHE WILL admit her religious
anings are toward those shared
\j many Orthodox Jews, but that
assification becomes a destruc-
(vt harrier, she says.
Forget the stereotypes, forget
e labeling. We are a nation
united by a spirit, by a command-
ment, by a proclamation that
transcends thousands of years.
When you meet someone, don't
ask if he is Conservative, Reform
or Orthodox. He is a Jew. He is
your brother."
Jungreis, who is married to
Rabbi Theodore Jungreis, leader
of Congregation Ohr Tora of
North Woodmere Jewish Center
in Long Island, will speak Mon-
day, 7:30 p.m., at the Saxony
Hotel on "How to Communicate."
She will speak Tuesday evening at
the Crown Hotel on "Jewish Sur-
vival in the 1980s."
JUNGREIS TOLD The Jewish
Floridian in an interview this
week that the commandment, "Ye
Shall Teach it to the Children," is
being violated. That is obvious she
says, by the fact that divorce is on
the rise, couples are choosing not
even to have children, 33 percent
of Jewish youth join cults, and
Jewish education often stops after
Continued on Page 4-B
Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis
Evelyn Sommers:
Wizo Is Still Working For The Welfare
Of Women And Children In Israel
oking on are Evelyn Sommer (center), president of Wizo U.S.A.; Lea
ind (left) Wizo chairwoman for Florida; and Mercedes Ivcher
<)ht), chairwoman of membership for Florida.
index
Federation Cable Television ... Page 2-B
An Old Man Can't Go Home... Page 4-B
Dr. Lehrman at JNF National Assembly Page 5-B
Yud Shevat Farbrengen On
on Local Television ... Page 6-B
Happenings ... Page 6-B
Hadassah Events ... Page 8-B
Amit Women ... Page 8-B
Community Corner... Page 9-B
Israel Histadrut Breakfast Conference Page 9-B
Obituaries... Page 13-B
^1
By ALISA KWITNEY
Idealism has far from weakened
in Israel today, and the honey-
moon period of Zionist idealism is
not yet over, says Evelyn Som-
mer, president of Wizo U.S.A.
There are 50,000 volunteers in
Israel alone helping to make the
marriage between ideals and reali-
ty work.
Sommer rejects as untrue the
notion that idealism appears to be
on the wane in Israel as ex-
emplified by the increase in the
number of yordim (Israelis who
emigrate from Israel). Or of the
rise in white collar crime, teenage
pregnancy, abortion and even the
use of drugs.
On the contrary, according to
Sommer, Wizo, which was
established in 1920, is still work-
ing towards the goal of helping to
promote the welfare of women
and children in Israel by providing
day care centers, homes for girls
in distress and battered women,
but has branched out to also pro-
vide services for the elderly,
bereaved families, and schooling
for children from underprivileged
backgrounds, in addition to other
programs.
"WIZO USED to have a cook-
ing course," says Sommer, "but
now we have courses in com-
puters, aeronautical engineering,
whatever you like."
Does this mean that the role of
"Wizo used to have a cooking
course," says Sommer, "but now
we have courses in computers,
aeronautical engineering,
whatever you like."
women in Israeli society is chang-
ing? Sommer contends that it is.
"If we have this conversation in
15 years, providing that there are
no more wars, and Israeli society
continues developing as it has
been, there will be a large percen-
tage of women in political par-
ties," predicts Sommer, who
observes that there are several
reasons why up until now
women's participation in govern-
ment has been minimal.
The role of women's rights in
Israel is complicated, says Som-
mer, not only because of the
strong influence of Middle
Eastern values (a large percen-
tage of the Israeli population
originally came from Middle
Eastern countries) but also
because of the effect of the ten-
sions created by the constant
threat of war.
"WHEN YOU know that any
day your husband or son might go
off to fight, you want to be a more
traditional wife and mother,
because that is the role which
seems most important," explains
Sommer, who says that she
believes that with a lessening of
the general tension, things will
change.
"The pie in Israel is very small,"
she admits, but adds that Wizo is
helping to educate Israeli women
to desire their piece of it. Wizo,
though not political, is trying to
teach women in Israel that it is im-
portant that they have a role in
participating in the political pro-
cess in their country.
Active in 50 countries, Wizo,
although present in the United
States as a political Zionist lobby
since 1960, has only existed as an
organization on these shores for
five years.
SOMMER, who was born
Argentina and is a third g<
tion Wizo member, expla
Continued on ''age 4-B
J


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. January 30. 1987
'Federation's Cable Television Station
Has Special Programs For February'
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation maintains a cable
television station for the purpose
of showing Jewish programming
in the Miami area. Jewish Federa-
tion Television (JFTV has pro-
grams covering a wide range of
topics
During the month of February.
JFTV will be airing the nationally
syndicated. "Jewish Television
Magazine" featuring segments on
"Refusenik" Natan Sharansky
and on the "Otzmah" program.
These programs can be seen on
Tuesdays, from 5:3 p.m. and
Saturdays from 7-7:30 p.m.
Also on JFTV are three talk
shows, each with a uniquely dif-
ferent focus,
"President's Corner." produced
and hosted by JFTV president
Samuel Harte features profes-
sionals from the business com-
munity. During the month of
February guests will include.
Elaine Suversteui (Feb. 2): Irving
Cypen (Feb. 9k Pat Fine (Feb. 16V.
and Martin Kalb (Feb. 23). all of
whom are Federation board
members as well as local com-
munity leaders.
Sam Harte
"Federation Today." is produc-
ed and hosted by Jack Levine.
Guests for February include
Milton Heller (Feb. 2): Director of
Federation's Young Leadership
Council: Hinda Cantor (Feb. 9i.
co-chairperson of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jerry; Mary Ann Witkin (Feb.
16. chairman of Federation's
Business and Professional
Women: and David Abramowiu
(Feb. 23), chairman of the Young
Leadership for Israeli Bonds.
Check-up Mount Sinai with host
Lila Heatter. past president and
honorary chairman of the board of
trustees of Mt. Sinai Medical
Center, features the latest in
medical developments.
Throughout the month of
February, guests will include Dr.
Ronald Shane discussing
nephrology (Feb. 2V. Dr. Judith
Ratzan. oncology (Feb. 9V. Dr.
Monte Lichtiger. anesthesioiogy
(Feb. 16V and Dr. Lee Bricker. en-
docrinology (Feb. 23).
"Presidents Corner" and
"Federation Today" appear back
to back from 7-7:30 p.m. on Mon
days, and from 6:30-7 p.m. on
Saturdays. "Check-up Mount
Sinai" can be seen on Mondays
and Wednesdays from 5:30-6 p.m.
and on Saturdays from 6-6:30
p.m.
Jewish Federation television is
a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Daxid Kane, a 101-year-old artist, will donate proceed* :,
of his wyrks to the American Red Magen David for ItnuL T\i
display, which will include landscapes, seascapes. .-
paintings for children, will be exhibited on Saturday I
Sunday. Feb. I.m>m 1-5 p.m. in the lobby of SouthgVf Trmen

Kane, who has been a professional artist for over 75 year*
gallery in downtown Manhattan.
Kan
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation $
Women s Division held the first installment m
its I Love Miami' lecture series. Pictured
ifrom left) are Dorothy Podhurst. president of
Women's Diiision. Terry Drucker. Elly
Wolfe. Arva Parks, guest speaker, and Rabbi
Sorman L ipson. Central Agency for Jewish
Education-
JFS Forming Teen Support Group
c/COSHERj,
gStea/c:house
EARLY BIRD
DINNER
tmuM'm.
=- *m
CA
~ ~~m *.....
FAOunes to ?
TKAMTIOMAL FRIOAY
&1*&L
The Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami is forming a teen
HHoft group, where teens us the
10th. 11th and 12th grades are in-
vited tc participate in the ongoing
group to share common feeing?
and concerns.
The new grotq> s bang formed
m If to the documentary
Generation at Risk. which was
broadcast on Channel 2. It is a se-
iTiiri to the leie i utmi documen-
tary. The Chemical People."
JFS dnneal sooal worker Elsie
Manton. facilitator for the group,
said teens who feel uncomf ortabie
especially, are shy or withdrawn,
who fed depressed or lonely, who
act impulsively, have trouble talk-
ing with their parents, or have
poor school performance, will find
the group a safe and comfortable
place where they can let it all hang
out.
The group will meet on
Thursdays beginning in Februarv
from 3:30-5 p.m. at the JFS Ken-
dall office.
"POSITION WANTED
Part Tim* Executive Director/Administrator
SKILLED IN:
Programming
Leadership Training
Construction Programs
Fundraismg
Financial Planning
Memoersnip
Motivation
Please se*d Nam* and Phon* to:
Box WP c>o Jewish Ftortdian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami. Fla. 33101
NASSAU GARDENS
163 St. Mall Area
Adult Community
1 bedrooms available.
1495 NE 167 St.
1p.m. to 5 p.m. 947"9l63
CONCORD-COLONIAL APTS.
1 or 2 Bdrm. Garden Apts.
Adult & Family Areas.
Temple, schools, shops.
981 NE169ST.
653-2217
9-5 daily or Wkends by Appointment.

>
SWEETHEART BIRD FESTIVAL
Sponsored By: MIAMI PARROT CLUB
tin Conjunction With AMERICA'S ARTBEAJ
/
Exotic Bird
Exhibition
and
Sale
S^
12) Noon To 5:30 P.M. j
Sunday February a 1967
FREE ADMISSION
KENDALL TOWN & COUNTRY PAVILION
ON THE LAKE i
Corner of Kendall Drive and 117th Avenue] j
e.eeeeeeeeei'"<


'emple Emanu-El
Tribute To Jewish
Music Month
Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
I In tribute to Jewish Music
onth, Temple Emanu-El will
iesent "An Evening With
ehuda and Friends" Monday,
eb 16, at 8 p.m. in the Miami
ch Theater of the Performing
. he musical highlight of Temple
nanu-El's 1987 Cultural Series,
program will feature Cantor
fchuda Shifman of the Miami
ch congregation and master
ntors Moshe Stern, Baruch
fcfman and Benzion Miller.
Cantor Yehuda Shifman, a
. _j generation Israeli who has
ved in Israel, Australia, South
rica and the United States as a
cantor, will be participating in his
second major cantorial concert
sponsored by his congregation as
part of the annual Cultural Series.
Cantor Stern has served as chief
cantor in the Great Synagogue of
Jerusalem. Cantor Baruch Shif-
man is a sixth generation cantor
who has served in Israel, South
Africa and the United States.
Cantor Miller is chief cantor of the
prestigious Beth El Synagoguue
in New York, where he followed
renowned Cantors Hershman,
Loussevitsky and Stern.
Reservations for the concert
may be made at the Temple
Emanu-El box office.
Bet Breira Celebrates First Year
Students Learning Aleph-Bet
"orty three first year Hebrew
|jdents celebrated their Siyyum
k-Sefer, completion of the
prew alphabet this January at
lily services held at Congrega-
Beth Breira.
t
\mple Beth Sholom
Uherhood will sponsor a
rts Lunch on Sunday at 12
ck in the Temple Banquet
1. They urill feature as guest
\aker Sam Jankovich,
'Hie Director of the Univer-
of Miami, who urill speak
{"Everything You Wanted
Know About The UM
Hies, But Were Afraid To
*" The program will also
ire games for the children,
Hesy of Beth Sholom Youth
ip.
The children assisted Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff and Cantor
Stuart Pittle in conducting family
service.
Prepared by their teachers
Ellen Mirowitz, Devorah Phillips,
Lisa Segal, and Paula
Tabachnikoff, the students were
presented with their own copy of
the prayerbook, engraved with
their names in both Hebrew and
English.
The children, now beginning to
study from the prayerbook, are:
David Auerbach, Ryan Baron,
Seth Berger, Jonathan Berkey,
Marisa Binder, Andrew Blau,
Amy Cooper, Phillip Darrow,
Kevin Diemar, Natalie Efland,
Rebecca Epstein, Myles Feder,
Jill Firestone, Jason Freeman,
Gregg Gelber, Melissa Glaser,
Casey Gomberg.
Greg Graboyes, Betsy
Grossman, Lon Haber, Mindy
Hakerim, Greg Haller, Jennifer
Jacobs, Lisa Kaplan, Stephanie
Korn, Carey Lapidus, Noah Lee,
Sarah Littauer, Daniel Mann,
Mollye Mirowitz, David Plotkin,
Lisa Pollack, Craig Rabinowitz,
Rebecca Rothman.
Danny Rubin, Stephen Rutchik,
Merrit Sacks, Samantha Schatz-
man, Joanna Scheff, Jill Sloto,
Jeffrey Snyder, Joshua Spalding,
Lindsay Spalding, Ben Stern-
baum, Todd Wechter, Jennifer
Weiselberg, Michael Wendschuh,
Danette Wolpert.
RIME OFFICE SPACE
FOR RENT
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
,500 Square feet, Includes access to on site
leeting facilities, ample parking, and 24 hour
jcurity.
prospective tenants must be compatible with
ie building's existing tenants.
[lease call:
office manager
greater miami jewish federation
576-4000, ext. 300
?.?.?.?.?.?.?.?.?.?.?.???.?.?.?.??????????????*
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Cantor Yehuda Shifman Cantor Benzion Miller Cantor Moahe Stern Cantor Baruch Shifman
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
merce and Professions Division held its
assignment and worker training meeting for
the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured
from left are Arnold Altman, Commerce and
Professions co-chairman; Martin Barasch,
director; Martin Fine, chairman, Commerce
and Professions, and Mikki Futernick,
worker training liaison.
I
Manischewitz
1987 PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE





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Request tvi" not be processed without zip code
Offer good while supply lasts
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY


Page 4-B The Jewish FToridian/Friday. January 80. 1987
Rebbetzin Jungreis In Miami
For Lecture Series
Ceatiaaed
Page IB
I
earry teenage years when
should be a lifetime process
"The family ts the baas of sur-
vival in Jewish life, and today we
are experiencing a decline, a
daintegraboc in our families."
Jungreis' own ancestral one
descends from a rabbinic dynasty
that can be traced back to the
days of King David. She was born
in Hungary, where So rabbis bear-
ing the name Jungreis hved poor
to the Holocaust. Following
World War II. only seven
remained.
JUNGREIS herself was an in-
mate of Bergen-Befaen. When she
came to America from
Switzerland m 1947. the rebbetan
said she made two discoveries.
"Thank God. there is much
freedom, and everyone has the op-
boo of communicating But very
few people do because of Jewish
uhteracT."
Thus, another Jungreis term:
Bloodless Holocaust." That, she
says, is the effect of mterraca.
marriage, aaaimuaooo. abenabon.
general apathy, plus aero populs-
boo growth.
"The trend today is to hve for
yourself. To enjoy your career."
There are three factors that
contribute to this problem.
says-
she .
duct
. jhe says, ts that
young Jew today is the pro-
of a ">ery superfieai"
"The Bar Mjtxvah does not grn
the background, the educa-
tion which is ,f>* of conduc-
ting a im ailing fin1 Jewish hfe At
the age of IS. that hfe terminates.
It term mares before it ever began.
"Chanting a prayer at the age of
IS a jMfmiw and having an
education for a few years does not
prepare him for a hfe of mteihgent
Jewish bring. We have rased a
of Jewish illiterates."
The second factor is the family
which Jungress says is "no kasgei
the cohesive uort. and father and
mother are Wssssssssss to bebeve
that thar first responsibility is to
thesr own sacafacooc-
WHEN THE faaary "no
touches the hearts or the
the children, it becomes very
easy to than to tarn their backs
on that family and the Jewnh peo-
ple as wefl."
The third factor. Jungress says.
that spotbghts the nooon of Irving
for fawJawa ceuteied oa an
amors, society abeie anything
and everything goes, provided
that you can say thai makes you
that it
If you can
you happy to josn a
group, yossr
i't bothtr you
ty endorses it.
Jungreis refers to the biblical
character Joseph, who was on his
own st age 17 as the only Jew in
his surroundings.
"He had to survive many con-
flicts and difficulties, spiritually.
emotionally and morally It was
not his emotional stamina or his
physkal strength or his scholar -
snap that helped him overcome.
Rather, it is written in the Btte
that in his mind and heart there
was a constant picture of his
elderly father.
"Joseph kept saying. 'How can I
bring shame on my father? How
can I hurt that magnificent man
who taught me everything I
possess** That kept him going.
Every father and mother most
ask himself or herself: if they
would not be present, what image
would their children conjure up**'
BUT DESPITE all the trends
away from traditional Judaism.
Jungreis said she has hope for the
American Jew. whom she calls
"very gutsy."
"He wants to make a better
world. He's a visionary. He's
charitable. He just has' to be
challenged-"
Jungreis has done her share to
make that challenge a reality. In
1973. Jungreis founded "Hmeni."
an internaoooal movement to
awaken the Jewish people to their
heritage and to inspire Jewish
youth to return to their roots.
At the first rally. 14 j
the Miami Beach
Center, the numbers were small.
she recalls. Now. standing room
only crowds have gathered to hear
the Rebbetsn at Madison Square
Garden, the Miami Beach Conven-
tion Center. Hollywood
Palladium. Johannesburg Col-
osseum and Cinerama in Tel Aviv
Hmeni has opened a heritage
center m atw>4rTn The multi-
media center uses modern
technology to communicate the
essence of the Jewish faith and
also has nightly singles groups.
'ipi and seminars.
HINENI" TELEVISION
Show is broadcast to more than
seven w*i~flin homes coast-to-
coast, including Miami, on cable
television Sundays at 3:30 pjn.
Hineni now has chapters
throughout the United States, m-
dudmg Miami, as wefl as Israel.
South Africa. England. Canada
and Australia.
The Rebbetxm's book. The
Jewish Soul on Fire." is in its fifth
pnB*sss]
"I have never seen a Jew who is
reminded of hat or her heritage
who ignores that reminder." she
concludes, it s lice a candle It
iights up. I attribute that to a
mystical element that is m everv
Jewish sou:."
Wiio Is Still Working For The
Welfare Of Women And Children
Wa members from all over
the world. "
AN ELEGANT woman who a
dearry devoted to Woo and its
concerns m the DM, Israel.
A?* America and wherever else
with Won m thesr
efi. The attiatf
Wiao has far .
haw to do with the opauitai
to be ss dvect
who ssamed to a
York areasteet sad has two
for the
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Alliance Division held a meeting at the Four
Winds Condominium. Pictured from left are
Robert Greenhill. acting campaign chairman
of Four Winds Condominium: State
Representative Elaine Bloom, guest speaker;
William Feinberg. honorary chairman. Eve
Semmel. acting chairperson; Ben Koplot^,
committee member; and Ben Lt9u\ acttu
chairman, feinberg was presented with a or-
tificate of appreciation from Federation fa
his many years of dedicated service as cam-
paign chairman at the Four Winfa
Condominium.
An Old Man Can't
Go Home Again
By MURRAY ZUCEOFF
NEW YORK (JTA) -
As old man who was the
practicing Chief Rabbi of
Lodz from the late 1940s to
about 1979 wants to return
for occasional visits to his
home, but the Polish
government won't let him.
Rabbi Zev Moremo. who now
lives in Brooklyn and has a small
congregation, says he doesn't
know why the Pohsh government
will not allow him and his wife to
return. Friends and sympathetic
legislators who have intervened
on his behalf have not been able to
get a straightforward answer
from Polish isTn ish and. on the
face of it. even Pohah "^^*H no
longer seem to remember why he
won't be allowed to return.
MOREINO'S and his wife's
Pobafa passports have expired and
the Pobsh government r trusts to
renew them. Both retain thesr
Pohsh dtoecship and a huge
apartment m Lodz with hundreds
of books that are moidenng.
The Pnhsh-born rabbi, described
by some as an outstanding m-
folirniil. with an acerbic wit. a
prolific writer who is prone to
disputations and vitnohc prose
when artadrrag enemies, and &
champion of lost Pohsh Jewish
cinaei. said that be wants to
retain to Lodz occasionally "to
fulfil my holy nbbgaooos" to the
roughly 350-member congrega
aon he left behind some 15 years
ago when he came to the L'S
after strikes of the Gdansk port
workers toppled the autoerabc
eader of the Pohsh Cossssssssjat
Party. Wadyssaw GomuDo.
The tail, gaunt, intense white-
bearded rabbi who ts well into ha
70"a. sasd that until five years age
he was able to visit Lods for a few
weeks each year to meet with ha
coogregation but that ha passport
has smce expired.
HE SAID that as Chief Rabbi of
Lods he was also the prisahiu of
the Union of Jewish Communities
a Poland and claimed that as the
only ordained Orthodox rabbi be
was also, by extension, the Chief
Rabbi of Poland.
there is neither a Chief Rabbi nor
a community religious leader. "I
am being persecuted without hav-
ing been tried." he said, "nor is
there any weening mobvaboo for
bemg deprived of the opportunity
to return." be said m Yiddish.
Hebrew and m faltering Enghsh.
Smce he can no longer return.
But there does seem to be a
reason, albeit unofficial and
unspoken, for the Pobsh govern-
ment's refusal to renew his
passport. A student sf the Lodz
Jewish community who met the
Chief Rabcx x Lodz and m New
York and spent eonsderabie tune
talking with him. said that
Moreinc and Pohsh authorities
had been in chspute over a number
ACCORDING TO the student.
Moreino has been xvolved over
the years in a campaign tc have
the Pohsh government pay com-
peesaoor. Is the Jewish communi-
ty for hundreds of buixhngs which
were owned by Jews before World
War II but which were declared
hetriess" after the war Moremo
feeis that compensation for these
properties former schools.
hospitals, communal buildings
Talmud Torahs should be paid
to its rightful owner to be used as
needed to revrtahse Jewish educa-
tioc and culture.
According to the student.
Moremo has sac uiuused the
Pohah government for its insen-
srtmty to Jewish needs, not only
for its attitude toward the former
Jewish properties but also for its
neglect of Jewish cemeteries,
many of which are m a state of
disrepair Moremo also i:n:*and
swords with government
bureaucrats The student cited
one small modest.
An official of the state-owned
telephone company came to
Moremo s home one mornang to
tell the rabbi that he would not in-
stall a long-awaited phone
Moremo. dressed m the trad)
bonal garb of an Orthodox rabbi
stood ha ground. He argued with
the man in fluent Pohsh for s few
mmutes and convmced him to in-
stall a phone right there and then
EARLIER THIS month. New
York City Councilman Noacfa
Dear had urged Mayor Edward
r. - tion while visiting P..and las
week where his parents w
born. Dear wrote to Kocr. pomta*,
out that the refusal of the Pott
government to renew Moreino'!
passport "is sn :r.:.\enb>
dammnanon not ocv renr. j
to the Chief Rabbi sad ah RebbK-
nn. but also in respect to the
tire Jewish population Poiinc
deprived of the serv.cr< :>f the:
ooe and only rabc:
country."
.-.
New York State Asserrhiyant
Dov Hikmd also appea.<-: to K.c
to mtercede. noting that the
rabbi's plight might be .-:nstn*d
by some "as an effort M :^uxhtt
the only rabbinate office it
Poland."
Moreino and ha supporter] c
the U.S. have pointed Oat thai*
rabcx is asking no more for tfc
Pohah Jewah aawawZswty the
that acorded m other East la*
pean countnes where J awJDJtias have their swb *&
and spokespersons Moreuw at*
Rumania specifically where tat
Jewah community has Cbfl'
Rabbi and spokesperv' .-" the
government, Moses Roser. Afte
all. Moreino reflected : '*
much to ask for.
Lehrman Day School
Students To Be
Honored Saturday
Honor roll students of
Lehrman Day Sebooi sod *
Temple Emanu-El iwhjva *
will be paid tribute Batafdn
the 9 am Sabbath sernc* of Tea-
pie Emanu-El.
Studenu who achieved <**
the Ojswawasll or Derech t*1
(conduct and obsensh:?' f*
rows wiD be bieased by Dr Imfll
Lehrman. rabbi of Tempt'
Emanu-El at tha \TP (Vl *
tereated Parenu) Sabbath
Honor aao wiB be reodered1
the teacaaag staff of both the*?
and the rihgiwH sehooi


a-LV'
fr & -
m~
\\
Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Dr. Lehrman Keynote Speaker In
Haifa To JNF's National Assembly
*v
pwo students from the Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy,
{eshiva University High School for Boys in New York, examine
in eUctric/battery-operated 'Havdalah Light' and 'Memorial
light' by Japanese artist Kenji Ekuan featured in a new exhibi-
tion of more than 100 Jewish ceremonial lamps at the Yeshiva
University Museum called 'Nerot Mitzvah.' Made of painted plex-
^jlass, the Havdalah Light' is used for the ceremony marking the
i of the Sabbath. The exhibition features the works of 18 world-
ss artists.
Simcha Aventura B'nai B'rith
Elects Former U.S. Naval
Commander President
lorton Gooze, retired president
the GandM Electrical Com-
ny, of Chicago, was elected
fsident of the Simcha Aventura
ige of B'nai Brith.
Gooze, who has his doc-
ite in the field of electrical
ineering, grew up in Eastern
rope before moving to the
kited States where he establish
I his company.
fhen Japan bombed Pearl Har-
Gooze volunteered for im-
iiate active duty as a common
nan, but was eventually pro
|>ted to the rank of senior com-
nder. Gooze was also wounded
[combat.
laving since turned over his
npany to his three children, for
im he acts as a consultant,
>ze is now active in many
lie and non-ethnic charities,
is vice-president of the Aven-
North Miami
teach Support
>f Soviet Jewry
ie Mayor and City Council of
i h Miami Beach have passed a
Jlution declaring "continued
^port for Soviet Jewry" and
the formation of a Soviet
rry rally at North Miami Beach
Hall Thursday, Feb. 26 from
n until 2 p.m.
the resolution states that
riet Jewry "continues to be a
rldwide human rights problem
* t the Soviet Union continues
treat its Jewish citizens
uely."
ie resolution is in response to
ills of B'nai B'rith Interna-
and B'nai B'rith Women in
junction with the Anti-
imation League of B'nai
i, B'nai B'rith Hillel and the
B'rith Youth Organization
world rally to protest the
ilin treatment of Jews.
tura Jewish Center.
He and his wife Ruth will soon
be celebrating their 55th wedding
anniversary.
Bet Shira Congregation will
present "Hazzanut: The Can-
tor's Art" on Feb. H. at 8 p.m.
Featuring Cantor Stephen
Freedman of Bet Shira, the
concert coincides with the
observance of Shabbat Shira
and the beginning of Jewish
Music Season. Stephen Mar-
torella, a concert pianist from
Providence, Rhode Island, will
serve as accompanist.
Hebrew Academy
Annual Concert
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy will sponsor its
Third Annual Gala Concert
featuring three visiting cantors
and the school's 65-member Stu-
dent Choir on Thursday, Feb. 19
at 7:30 p.m. in the school's
auditorium.
The program will feature Can-
tors David Bagley of Toronto,
Yaakov Motzen of Montreal and
Daniel Gildar of Philadelphia, per-
forming Yiddish, Israeli and
Chassidic selections. The
Academy choir will perform under
musical director Aliza Sebag.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, chairman
of the Jewish National Fund
Foundation for Florida, will make
a keynote address in Haifa, Israel,
during the JNF's Third National
Assembly in the Jewish State. He
will speak Wednesday, Feb. 11 at
the Dan Carmel Hotel in Haifa, a
hotel he helped build through his
leadership in founding the Miami
Group which began the Dan hotel
chain in Israel.
Dr. Lehrman, who has served as
national chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal's Rabbinic Cabinet
and is chairman of the board of
governors of the State of Israel
Bonds Organization in Greater
Miami, will speak on "The
American Jew and Israel."
He also will join with Dr.
Samuel I. Cohen, national ex-
ecutive vice president of the
Jewish National Fund, in presen-
ting a special award to Dr. Zev
Rabbi Lehrman
Jerusalem and the Negev will be
visited by delegates from
throughout the United States.
Kogan of Miami Beach, president
of the JNF's southern region.
The JNF Assembly in Israel,
scheduled for Feb. 8-18, also will
mark the centennial of the birth of
the late David Ben-Gurion, first
prime minister of the State of
Israel. JNF projects in the Galilee,
ARTSfest At Sea III Made Available
To All Nonprofit Organizations
The National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts has
opened the "boarding ramp" for
the inaugural cruise of Carnival
Cruise Lines newest luxury
Super Liner, the Celebration, as a
fundraising benefit for other non-
profit organizations who wish to
participate in ARTSfest at Sea III
a Celebration of Giving March
12-14.
Through NFAA's 'Revenue
Sharing Plan,' purchasers of out-
side cabins at $2,500 can
designate $1,000 as a donation to
the nonprofit organization of their
choice, according to ARTSfest
chairman Arthur Horowitz.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30. 1987
Yud Shevat Farbrengen
Yud Shevat Farbrengen
On Local Cable TV
The local Chabad and Jewish
community will be joining forces
with Jews throughout the world
when they will tune in to the Yud
Shevat Farbrengen of the
Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi
Menachem M. Schneerson, which
will be carried live on Monday on
Harte Hanks Cable, Miami Beach
Channel 2 from 9:30 p.m.-1:30
a.m.
Yud Shevat commemorates the
Yahrtzeit of Rabbi Joseph Isaac
Schneerson, sixth Rebbe of the
Chabad Lubavitch Chassidic
dynasty. Rabbi Schneerson was
born in the city of Lubavitch in
White Russia in 1880, and as
leader of Russian Jewry, he stood
in the forefront against the Rus-
sian government which sought to
assimilate and eradicate Judaism.
Rabbi Joseph I. Schneerson,
fought tirelessly against the Rus-
sian dictators, maintaining
underground Yeshivas, Mikvaos,
and Shochtim, assuring that
Kosher meat was available to Rus-
sian Jewry.
Because of these "criminal" ac-
tivities he was arrested by the
Soviet regime seven times and
finally sent into exile to Kastrama
in Asiatic Russia.
It was only through foreign in-
tervention, mainly by American
diplomats and statesman that the
Rebbe was freed and allowed to
leave Soviet Russia.
Rabbi Abraham Korf, Regional
Director of Chabad in Florida, an-
nounced that the Rebbe's live ad-
dress can also be viewed via
satellite at the Landow Yeshiva,
Miami Beach.
Israel Bonds To Honor
George Wapnick
The Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization and the California
Club Community will honor
George Wapnick at a Luncheon at
the Coral Creek Country Club,
North Miami Beach, on Tuesday,
Feb. 17 at noon.
Wapnick, who will receive the
Gates of Jerusalem Award, is be-
ing recognized for his affiliation
with various philanthropic and
community organizations, as well
as his support of the Israel Bonds
program.
Former president of Knicker-
bocker Smoking Pipe Company in
New York, Wapnick moved to
Florida in 1972. He was elected to
the Royal Oaks Condominium
Board of Directors and was its
president for eight years. He cur-
rently serves on the Board of
Directors of Hadasaah Associates
and B'nai B'rith and is an active
member of Congregation Beth
To rah in North Miami Beach.
Guest speaker at the Luncheon
will be Gerda Weissman Klein,
who is an accomplished author,
journalist, historian and lecturer.
She has written three books, in-
cluding two on her experiences in
Nazi-occupied Europe and the
Holocaust. Bom in Poland, she is
married to Kurt Klein who, as a
U.S. Intelligence Officer, rescued
her from the Nazis. This story is
part of a documentary, "You Are
Free" which received an Oscar
nomination by the Academy of
Motion Pictures in 1984.
Acting as sponsors are the Lake
Carmel B'nai B'rith Unit 5342 and
George Wapnick
the California Club Community.
Serving as co-chairmen of the
Israel Bonds Committee are
Harvey Berman, Jack Gel I man
and Herman Sacks.
For reservations or more infor-
mation, contact the Israel Bonds
office.
Bnai Zion Reception
A reception for all new friends
and members of the Young
Leadership Division of Bnai Zion
Southeast Region will be held at
Hollywood Beach Hilton on Satur-
day, Feb. 7. Consul General David
Cohen will speak at 9:30 p.m. A
party will follow at Club Bananas.
U. of M. To
Present Jewish
Film Festival
The University of Miami Judaic
Studies Program will present a
spring film festival focusing on
the theme of second generation
Jewish immigrants, their ac-
culturation into mainstream life
and their efforts to preserve their
unique heritage and identity.
Four films: The Apprenticeship
of Duddy Kravitz, Feb. 3; The
Chosen, Feb. 17; American Pop,
March 3; and Private Benjamin,
March 17.
All films will be shown at 7:30
p.m. in the University of Miami's
Beaumont Cinema. The series is
co-sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
The University's Spring Lec-
ture program will include:
Mordecai Richler, "The Jew in
Literature and Film, Feb. 4 at 8
p.m. at Learning Center 190; Dr.
Morton Weinfeld, "Canadian
Jewry: Making it a Minority
Group," March 19, 8 p.m. at Lear-
ning Center 190; Dr. William
Fishman, "American and Anglo-
Jewish History: A Contemporary
Reading," 10:50 a.m. in the
Memorial Building.
Prof. Shalom Paul
Jewish Studies
Program Of
Barry University
The graduate program of
Jewish Studies at Barry Universi-
ty will present a special guest lec-
ture by Professor Shalom Paul,
chair of the Bible Department at
the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem on Monday, Feb. 9 in
the Wiegand Lecture Hall, at 7:30
p.m.
Prof. Paul's subject will be
'New Insights into An Old
Biblical Tale."
The Israeli professor is one of
the outstanding public lecturers of
Jewish academic life. After study-
ing at Temple University and
Gratz College, he received a
Master's of Hebrew Letters and
rabbinic ordination from the
Jewish Theological Seminary.
The program at the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center will present "The War
Against Jews: Perception of the
Holocaust," by Professor Haim
Avni, on Wednesday, Feb. 11, at 8
p.m.
Prof. Avni is professor in con-
temporary Jewish history of the
Institute of contemporary Jewry
at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. He is the author of six
books and many scholarly articles.
Happenings
A 1 OK run and two-day health fitness expo will be held Friday
and Saturday, at the Biscayne Bay Marriott. The event. sponi
sored by the Greater Miami Chapter of the American Red Crow
in conjunction with the Orange Bowl Running Series, will feature
the race 10 a.m. Saturday and the latest sports fashions, equip-
ment and products. The Expo will be open from 10 a.m. until 8
p.m. on Friday and from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturday.
The North Dade Chapter of Friends for Life will host its annual
luncheon and fashion show on Feb. 2 at the Sheraton Bal Har-
bour. Boutique at 11 a.m.. luncheon 12:30 p.m.
A grand opening and dedication of the $7 million Mercy Outpa-
tient Center will be Sunday, from 1-4 p.m. The Center is located
on the Mercy Hospital Campus.
"Love/Sexuality and People Who are Handicapped." a
seminar for professionals working with developmentally. physical-
ly, and/or emotionally handicapped individuals, will be held Friday.
Feb. 6. at the Intercontinental Hotel from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m The
seminar is presented by the Sunflower Society. Inc.. a non-profit
organization dedicated to improving the quality of life for han-
dicapped persons, and Barry University.
The Harry H. Cohen Aux. No. 723 of the Jewish War
Veterans will hold its monthly meeting 10 a.m. Sunday. Feb. 1/5
at the Surfside Community Center. Nomination and election of of
ficers will take place.
South Florida residents can participate in a FREE colorecta
cancer screening program sponsored by the Women's Cancer
League of Mount Sinai Medical Center, the Eckerd Drug Com-
pany and WPLG-TV. Channel 10. Free screening kits will be
available at all Eckerd Drug Stores in Dade. Broward. Palm
Beach and Monroe counties. Feb 9 through Mar. 7
The Forum Committee of Beth Israel will welcome Israeli Con-
sul General Rachamim Timor, who will speak on the "Present
Situation in Israel'' on Sunday, at 10 a.m. at the Temple
A six kilometer walk to raise funds on behalf of oppressed Jews
in the Soviet Union will begin 10 am Sunday, at the Bay Vista
Campus of Florida International University The walk, part of the
Student Government's annual "Jewish Awareness Celebration.'"
will be followed by cultural activities, ethnic foods and conclude
with a 3 p.m. concert by Israeli rock star David Broza
Excerpts from the musical "Showboat" will be presented noon
Wednesday at the Wotfson Campus of Miami Dade Junior Col-
lege as part of its Lunchtime Lively Arts Series The production
will be performed by the Miami Artists Guild
Women who have had breast cancer are invited to Baptist
Hospital's mastectomy education and discussion group Thursday
Feb 5 from 10-1 1 30 am in Classroom 1 on the third floor of
the South Building at Baptist Hospital
Dr Jose Antonio Alvarado will be sworn in as the newesl
member of the Miami Dade Junior College Board of Trustees
Tuesday 8 am at the Wolfson campus.
Kendall Business and Professional Women, is conducting an in
dividual Development Workshop to be held on three alternating
Saturdays: Feb. 7. 21 and March 7 The workshop will begin at
8:30 a.m and conclude by 430 p.m. and will take place at the
Kendall Ramada Inn. Lunch will be served to participants The
cost of the workshop is $30 for all three days, or $12 50 per day
(including lunch.) For any additional information call Harriet
Kurtz.
Luv-in-Lunch Sponsored By
So. Shore Hospital Auxiliary
A Luv-In-Lunch" celebrating
Valentine's Day and the annual
Member Bring a Member open
meeting sponsored by the Aux-
iliary of South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center will be held Thurs-
day, Feb. 12 at 11:30 a.m. in the
penthouse of the Glass Tower
Building of South Shore Hospital.
Entertainment will be provided
by Lee Barry, baritone, who will
render songs of Broadway.
Flagler Federal Savings and Loan
Association is underwriting the
cost of the entertainment pro-
gram, according to Auxiliary co-
presidents Ruth Roney and
Helene Owen.
Chairman of the gala event is
Mollie Peal with Bernice Troop
serving as co-chair.
Reservations may be secured by
contacting Ms. Jay Greenlaw at
the hospital.
Dr. William Zubkoff, executive
Dr. William Zubkoff
director of South Shore, will
deliver a brief message on recent
developments at the hospital.


Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
At JNF Dinner
Senator Edward M. Kennedy Speaks On
Arms Sales, Soviet Jews And Terror
PHILADELPHIA "While
Israel bravely struggles to make
peace with her neighbors, the
Reagan Administration has
repeatedly attempted to launch
yet another unacceptable round of
arms sales to Jordan, Saudi
Arabia and other nations that are
the sworn enemies of Israel," said
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy
11).,Mass.) at a recent testimonial
dinner here sponsored by the
Jewish National Fund.
"I oppose these arm sales,"
Sen. Kennedy continued. "We do
not seek a confrontation with the
Administration, but neither will
we remain silent while they pur-
sue arms deals that could en-
danger Israel."
ON THE issue of Soviet Jewry
and emigration, Kennedy said,
"We plead for the freedom of our
brothers and sisters condemned in
the Soviet Union to prison cells or
exile for their heritage."
He added, "Jewish emigration
is still at unacceptably low levels.
Only 1,100 were permitted to
depart in 1985, compared to a
high of 51,000 in 1979. The red
flag of the Soviet Union may sym-
bolize the forces that oppress
Jews, but no hammer can ever
blunt their spirit, and no sickle can
ever destroy their faith."
"We must fight oppression and
terror wherever they occur," the
Senator said, turning his atten-
tion to world terrorism. "The
events of the last year once again
proved to all the world that the
PLO terrorists are not freedom-
fighters. They are cold-blooded
pirates who slaughtered Leon Kl-
inghoffer, an elderly man in
wheelchair. They are cowards
who murdered Jews worshipping
at the Western Wall in Jerusalem
and in the Neve Shalom
Synagogue in Istanbul."
"WE CANNOT remain silent
while nations such as Syria, Libya
and Iran provide safe haven and
support for these fanatics," he ad-
ded. "The thugs who prey on inno-
cent civilians deserve no hiding
place, any place on earth."
Kennedy assserted, "Justice
shall prevail not through the
bomb or the bullet, but through
the path of peace,"
Sen. Kennedy's relationship
with JNF dates back over 20
years to 1966, when he planted a
tree in memory of his late brother,
President John F. Kennedy, in the
Kennedy Peace Forest which sur-
rounds JNF's Kennedy Memorial,
near Jerusalem. During a recent
trip to Israel, Sen. Kennedy
returned to the Memorial and
planted another tree in a private
ceremony.
At the Philadelphia dinner, he
said, "I know my brother, Jack,
would be proud of the John F.
Kennedy Memorial and Peace
Forest in Israel, which JNF has
created. The eternal light from
that monument is a shining
beacon of our determination to
complete the unfinished agenda of
progress and justice to which
President Kennedy dedicated his
life. And the green forest surroun-
ding the memorial is an eternal
reminder of our dedication to the
cause of Israel."
Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (left) joins Allan Mar-
mon, president, Philadelphia JNF, and Mrs. Marmon at a recent
JNF testimonial dinner honoring two strong supporters of JNF
and Israel, Allen K. Fox, chief financial officer, Careercom
Corp., and Suzan Fox, accomplished graphic artist.

MJHHA Alzheimers Program
Appoints Two Executives
Dr. Sondra Weiss has been ap-
pointed Program Manager of the
new Nathan and Roddy C. Rood
Alzheimer's Program at the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at Douglas Gardens.
151 Northeast 52nd St.
Dr. Weiss was most recently a
program director at the Abbott
Northwestern Sister Kenny In-
stitute, a 55-bed rehabilitation
facility in Minneapolis, Minn. She
l>egan working with the elderly in
rehabilitation programs in 1966.
"We are very excited that a pro-
fessional of Dr. Weiss' qualifica-
tions is heading up the Rood
Alzheimer's Unit," said Terry
Goodman, Associate Executive
Director of Operations at the
Miami Jewish Home. "Dr. Weiss
will provide leadership not only in
the care of patients, but also in the
design of a comprehensive train-
ing and sensitizing program which
will educate staff in the special
care needs of Alzheimer's pa-
tients," noted Goodman. All staff
members of the Miami Jewish
Home will be rotated through the
new unit as part of this special
training program.
wmmw jmmmmmmmm
Dr. Sondra Weiss
Clitie Bullock. RN, recently
joined the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens as Head Nurse
of its new Nathan and Roddy C.
Rood Alzheimer's Program.
Ms. Bullock has been in nursing
for 20 years and received special
training in psychiatry at Park
Pruett Hospital in England. She
also trained at Red Hill County
Hospital and the Leeds Maternity
Child Psychologist And Author
To Be Temple Sinai's
Scholar-In-Residence
Dr. Sol Gordon, author, lecturer
and educator who presently is
Professor of Child and Family
Studies at Syracuse University,
and Director of the Institute for
Family Research and Education,
will be Temple Sinai's Scholar-in-
Residence at the North Dade
Reform Congregation during this
weekend starting on Friday.
Dr. Gordon and his wife, Judith,
are the authors of "Raising A
Child Conservatively In A Sexual-
ly Permissive Age," a book which
such experts as Dr. Mary
Calderone, Dr. Lee Salk and Dr.
W. Walter Menninger have prais-
ed as being a helpful, sensible, suc-
cinct and thoughtful guidebook
for parents.
His latest book "When Living
Hurts" is the first indepth book on
suicide prevention and crisis in-
tervention geared specifically to
young people.
Dr. Gordon will present three
lectures. The first, entitled
"Preparing Today's Child For
Tomorrow's Jewish Family" will
be given as part of the Sabbath
Eve service at Temple Sinai on
Friday evening at 8 p.m. The se-
cond, entitled "Why Do Jews
Have To Worry About Sex?" a
session intended for teenagers
and parents, will take place on
Saturday afternoon at 3:30 p.m.
The third, entitled "When Living
Hurts" will be offered as part of
Temple Sinai's Brotherhood
Breakfast on Sunday morning at
9:30.
Clitie Bullock
Hospital in England.
As head Nurse of the new pro-
gram, Ms. Bullock will be involved
in the treatment of Alzheimer's
patients in a 28-bed unit on the
Douglas Gardens campus of the
Miami Jewish Home. The pro-
gram will provide assessment,
care and maintenance of
Alzheimer's patients as well as
training of professional and care
staff who will deal with the
patients.
Marvin Segal
To Speak
Marvin Segal, scholar and lec-
turer, will speak of "Cults Not
Just For Kids" for the Coral
Gables Chapter of the B'nai B'rith
Women during their meeting at 1
p.m., Thursday, Feb. 5, at the
Sylvia Martin Community Center
in South Beach. Segal is appear-
ing under the auspices of The
Speakers Bureau, a community
service of the Riverside Memorial
Chapter.
Business Note
Stephen M. Alper, a licensed
broker, has been named
AmeriFirst Securities Corp.'s
Registered Representative for the
AmeriFirst Winston Towers
Banking Center.
Alper previously served as
president of Financial Federal's
brokerage operation and vice
president-manager of Brenner
Steed.
Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (right foreground) and
Moshe Rivlin, world chairman, Jewish National Fund, leave the
John F. Kennedy Memorial outside Jerusalem after visiting the
monument's memorial flame and bas relief of the late U.S. Presi-
dent. At the adjoining Kennedy Peace Forest, they participated
in a tree-planting ceremony at the Kennedy Family Planting Cir-
cle. Sen. Kennedy's sister, Jean Smith Kennedy, planted a sapl-
ing in honor of her mother. Rose Kennedy, while Sen. Kennedy
planted a sapling in memory of his brother Robert Francis
Kennedy.
#[;/*
for v>i" Inufdcvm
it) the home ot Imspitnl
We cat\ help
Medical Personnel Pool.
N. Miami Coral Gables Kendall
8915092 445-2541 279-0924


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
Carmela Kalmanson
Hadassah Guest Speaker
Mrs. Jean Temkin, President of
the Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah and Mrs. Mildred
Reisenberg, President of the
Miami Region, announced that a
special meeting of all Chapter
Presidents and Zionist Affairs
Chairwomen, will be held on
Wednesday, Feb. 11 at 10:15 a.m.,
in the Miami Beach Region office.
The guest speaker will be
Carmela Kalmanson, Mrs.
Kalmanson is a National Vice
President of Hadassah, the
Women's Zionist Organization of
America, which is the largest
women's volunteer organization
in the United States. She is
presently Chairwoman of the Na-
tional Zionist Affairs department,
and immediate past Chairwoman
of the Committee for Long Range
Planning.
Mrs. Kalmanson has visited
Israel many times and par-
ticipated in the Dedication of the
Hadassah University Hospital on
Mt. Scopus.
She was a Hadassah delegate to
Carmela Kalmanson
Na'amat Women
A mini lunch and a discussion of
Jewish humor by Oscar Goldstein
is on tap at the Tuesday, 11:30
a.m. session of the liana Chapter
of Na'amat to take place at the
auditorium of Winston Tower 100,
Sunny Isles.
Lillian Hoffman, president, said
prospective members of the
organization are welcome to
attend.
the 29th and 30th World Zionist
Congress meetings held in
Jerusalem in February, 1978 and
January, 1982 respectively. Mrs.
Kalmanson is a member of the
Zionist General Council that
meets annually in Israel to imple-
ment policy and approve budgets
of the World Zionist Organization
and the Jewish Agency.
Her mother, a Sabra, graduated
in the first class of the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem. Mrs.
Kalmanson studied at the Herzl
Institute and the Teachers' In-
stitute of the Jewish Theological
Seminary.
% 1
V
,
'*.
Regina Wang, Bea Young, Jeanne Finkelstein committee
members make plans for Mini Conference sponsored by Florida
Council ofAmit Women.
Florida Council Of
Amit Women Conference
The Florida Council of Amit
Women will sponsor a mini con-
ference on Monday, Feb. 9 from
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Seacoast
Towers East, Palace Playhouse.
Delegates to the mini con-
ference, executive board
members, chapter presidents and
members of leadership quality will
be sharing ideas, concerns and
work on image building, Amit
membership, problem solving,
programming and more. Also on
the agenda will be a luncheon
sponsored by Rose Shapiro.
Amit's latest video, entitled
"Heart to Heart" will be shown
for the first time in South Florida.
Mini conference guest leaders
from New York are Rhonda
Miller, National Organization co-
chairwoman, and Muriel
Shuchatowitz, National Organiza-
tion director, who will lead the
seminars.
The conference will be chaired
by Regina Wang, along with her
committee, Ida Arluk, Jeanette
Bash, Jeanne Finkelstein, Bella
Kott, Betty Kugelmas, Lena Mir-
vis, Mimi Rabinowitz, Saundra
Rothenberg, Bunny Schreiber,
Rose Shapiro, Ida Suasman, Bea
Young and Ruth Zellner.
PERSONALS"
CHARMING, ATTRACTIVE
gentleman, 72 +, with fine
cultural values, and excel-
lent education would like
to meet a gentle lady,
65-75, retired and self-
supporting, with above
similar features, and
nobility of heart & mind,
travel loving and with a car.
Box SR c/o Jewish Floridi-
an, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101.
Hadassah
Events
The Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will host an Eye Bank
Luncheon and Jai Alai on Mon-
day, Feb. 9 starting with bus
transportation at 10:30 a.m. at the
parking lot on Collins Avenue and
72nd Street.
The Torah chapter of Hadassah
will have its annual Youth Aliyar
Pledge Luncheon Monday, Feb. 9
11:30 a.m. at the Sofitel Hotel
Guest speaker is Gail Tucker
Miami Region Founder's
Chairperson.
Cantor Jacob Bornstein, of
Temple Israel, will make a presen-
tation celebrating Jewish Music
Month at the Monday, Feb. 9
meeting of the Naomi Chapter of
Hadassah at 8 p.m at the
Tamarind Apartments.
The Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will present a play call-
ed "The Last Jew" at its meeting
Monday, Feb. 9 at 1 p.m. in the
Terrace Room. The cast of the
play, directed by Muriel Kovinow,
includes Esther Meltzer, Ruth
Katz, Lillian Adelson, Selma
Paris, Kitty Freeman, Florence
Tubelle, Anne Weinstein, Lillian
Bledger and Clara Or kin.
The Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will honor Ricki Igra at
its Third Annual Gala on Sunday,
Feb. 8 at 6:30 p.m. in the ballroom
of Temple Emanu-El. The pro-
ceeds will benefit the Hadassah
Medical Organization.
Judge Cardonne To Be
Honored By Na'amat
The Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will feature slides of
Youth Aliyah Settlements by
Mildred Rose at its meeting 1 p.m.
Feb. 9 in the auditorium.
The Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will meet 12:30 p.m.
Feb. 9 in the auditorium.
The Miami region of Hadassah
is celebrating its Diamond Jubilee
on Sunday, Feb. 15, at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami at 1 p.m.
Amit
Women
Coral Gables Chapter celebrates
on Tuesday, at noon, the birthday
of their president, Rose Shapiro,
will host a party at the Zamora
Temple. A special lunch will be
served. Entertainment and door
prizes are on the program.
Galil Chapter will hold their an-
nual Jewish National Fund Lun-
cheon on Monday, at noon at the
Young Israel Synagogue in North
Miami Beach. The luncheon will
be sponsored by kosher tours, and
films will be shown. Admittance is
the purchase of one or more trees.
Moorings Chapter will meet on
Tuesday, in the auditorium of
Moorings Tower at noon.
The Florida Council of Amit
Women is sponsoring a mini con-
vention on Monday, Feb. 9 from
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Seacoast
Towers East, Miami Beach.
Muriel Schuchatovitz, special
guest from Amit National Head-
quarters in New York, will con-
duct the seminars. Invitees are ex-
ecutive board members, chapter
presidents and members of leader-
ship quality. Regina Wang is
chairman of this function.
Dade County Court Judge
Gisela Cardonne of Miami Beach
has been selected as the 1987
"Celebration of Women" annual
award of the South Florida Coun-
cil of Na'amat USA, the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America.
Judge Cardonne will receive the
honor at the yearly Spiritual
Adoption Luncheon of the South
Florida Council, which includes 20
Na'amat clubs and chapters in
Dade and south Broward counties.
The luncheon is scheduled at
noon, Monday, Feb. 16, at the
Cuban Hebrew Congregation,
Beth Shmuel.
Reservations may be made at
the offices of Na'amat.
Judge Cardonne is a member of
Temple Beth Moshe in North
Miami and of Na'amat and visited
Israel on a Greater Miami Jewish
Federation mission.
The South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center'8 Cultural Arts
Committee will present Israel's
First Lady of Song "Hedva "
on Saturday, Feb. 7 at 8:30
p.m. at the Hotel Sofitel.
Chairpersons for the evening
are Carol Cantor and Denise
Wolpert. Hedva has been
known as the "Voice of Israel"
since she first introduced the
world famous song "LShana
Habaah. "Marsha Botkin is in
charge of information.
Judge Gisela Cardonne
YIVO Forum
Lecture Series
The YIVO Forum weekly Yid-
dish lecture series will present
prize-winning author Yehudah
Elberg speaking on "the Music of
a Jewish Siah," at Temple Beth
Sholom, Wednesday at 1:15 p.m.
The Forum will present Dr. Berl
Frymer speaking on "Rotation
and Israel" at the Temple,
Wednesday, Feb. 11 at 1:15 p.m.
The yearly YIVO Banquet will
be Sunday, Feb. 15 at noon at
Temple Emanu-El.
Rabbi And Mrs.
Felman To Speak
Rabbi Dr. and Mrs. Meir
Felman will be the guests at the
fourth lecture on Great Jewish
Personalities of the 19th Century,
hosted by the Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center on Pine Tree
Drive, Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
Rabbi Felman will speak on the
Life and Achievements of the
Vilna Gaon. Mrs. Felman will
discuss the achievements of Mrs.
Nathan (Hannah) Rothschild in
her efforts to enable her son to
become the first Jewish member
of British Parliament.


Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Rose Ellen Greene (left), President of the
Miami City Ballet Guild and Gerald Greene
join Jackie, Irunn and Lisa Kott at the cham-
pagne/supper following the opening night per-
formance of the Miami City Ballet. The even-
ing was hosted by Hotel Inter-Continental and
the Miami Center honoring Benefactors and
Patrons of the Miami City Ballet.
Israel Histadrut Campaign
Breakfast Set For Feb. 10th
The Israel Histadrut Campaign
II hold a Breakfast Conference
In Feb. 10 at the Konover Hotel
eginning at 9:30 a.m.
Guests expected to attend in-
clude Uri Agami, chairman of the
Amal Israeli School System, Dr.
Fred C. Schollmeyer, Executive
Director of Vocational Education
|)ade County School System and
jiami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud.
The Histadrut Amal Vocational
Jigh School System helps Israeli
routh gain a better economic posi-
tion through the study of com-
puter science, electronics and
other technical skills also
necessary for Israel to maintain a
strong economic and military posi-
tion in the world. The Histadrut
Scholarship fund founded in 1957
provides deserving underprivileg-
ed Israeli youth with the oppor-
tunity to secure an education in
the field of advanced technology.
Following the Conference, an
honorarium will be presented to
the Workmen's Circle for their
years of dedication to the com-
munity and the State of Israel.
Histadrut was created in 1920
by the early pioneers of the then
Palestine who believed that the
establishment of a single
organization for their mutual
benefit would enable them to cope
with primitive conditions of the
country at the time. Since then,
Histadrut has grown to cover
many areas of Israeli life including
health, education, economy and
culture.
The Israel Histadrut Campaign
of South Florida concentrates on
health and education.
Community Corner
Kathy and Lee Simkins will host the 10th Annual
Godmother's Luncheon for Temple Israel of Greater
Miami on Feb. 4 at noon at their home on Miami Beach.
Godmothers enable the Temple to take care of and
educate children of families who would not otherwise
be able to afford the education.
The South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith will
celebrate the 100th birthday of David Ben-Gurion, a
founder of the State of Israel, at a service Feb. 13 at
Temple B'nai Zion. The guest speaker will be biblical
scholar Col. Itzchak Itzchaki.
An Oneg Shabbat will follow the service led by Rabbi
Stanley Burstein.
The South Dade Jewish Community Center is seek-
ing new members to join several clubs for married
couples and welcomes inquiries from couples seeking
educational and social activities.
The Theatre Guild of the Temple Zion Israelite Center
will hold auditions for the Lerner and Lowe Musical
Brigadoon on Feb. 8 at 2 p.m. and Feb. 9 and 11 at 7:30
p.m., at the Temple Zion Israelite Center.
The North Dade Chamber of Commerce monthly
Breakfast Club Meeting will be held Thursday, Feb. 5 at
7:30 a.m. at Tumberry Isle Country Club. The program
will be "Youth: 2000" and topics will Include the
number of high school dropouts, illiteracy, unemploy-
ment and teenage pregnancies. The breakfast will also
serve to kickoff the chamber's "Fight Illiteracy
Campaign."
The North Dade-Broward Chapter of the National
Jewish Center will hold their annual rummage sale on
Sunday and Monday Feb. 8 and 9 starting at 8 a.m. at
the West Hollywood Citizens League at 805 Glen
Parkway in Hollywood.
Proceeds will help children with breathing problems.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 11:00 A.M.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 6:00 P.M.
[SYMPOSIUM: "ISRAEL 1987"
YIDDISH HIU \ 11 SESSION
Guest Speaker
Dr. Sol Stein
President. IHF
Shelomo ben-Israel
Popular Radio Commentator. WEVD
"Die Vichtiqste Nayes Fun Der Voch"
A SWA IAI 1KIIHIT 111
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY
Spiritual Leader of Temple Beth Shalom. Hollywood
Chairman. IHF National Board ot Directors
GITESTS OF HONOR
/YN
orris Friedman Shimon DeiU-h Morris Fisher
In recognition to their lifetime dedication to the
"Golden Chain of Yiddish Culture"
lusical Entertainment Provided by:
MINNA BERN-SBOSBANA RON
and
N AESTOO SMMITEL fKRSBKO
Chairman
Dr. Sol Stein
>UVERT: $10.00
FULL BRUNCHEON
r ----------
Attendance by Reservation
531-8702
FESTIVE BANQUET
C ELEBRATIXG TOE BIRTODAY OF HISTADRITT
Honored Guest

Greetings by:
Yosef Yaakov
Consul General ot Israel. Washington. DC
and Minister-Counsellor at Embassy ot Israel
Hon. Italumiln Timor
Consul General Miami
PARTICIPANTS
Judge Berber! S. Shapiro
Member. IHF Board
Dr. Leon Kronlsh
Honorary Chairman. IHF Board
Rabbi Irving Lehman
Spiritual Leader, Temple Emanuel
Miami Beach
Chairman
Rabbi Morton Malavsky
Spiritual Leader of Temple Beth Shalom, Hollywood
Chairman, IHF National Board of Directors
Special Presentation to Dorothy Brenner
Entertainment by
Jaime Bronsztein and the Klecmer Band
Featuring
"Jewish Soul Musle"
COUVERT: $20.00
DIETARY LAWS OBSERVED
Attendance by Reservation
531-8702
Hvm^ma
ll5Mlwi8M8BBnBMHmMBBMIfieflrari*iJri


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping,
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism This tradition is continued in the Gardens.
Mount Nebo's latest expansion.
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261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street, Miami, FL 33126




.

J
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
, "As he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day; and he lifted
up his eyes and looked, and, la, three men stood ever against him"
(Genesis 18.1-2).
VAYERA
YERA God appeared to Abraham as he sat at the door of his
tent in the heat of the day. Lifting up his eyes, Abraham beheld
three men (actually, angels in the form of men). Abraham ran
toward them, took them into his tent, and treated them
hospitably. One of the angels foretold that in a year Sarah would
bear a son. The other angels went on to Sodom to destroy the city
because of its wickedness; only Lot, Abraham's righteous
nephew, was to be saved. God revealed this plan to Abraham, who
pleaded that Sodom be saved for the sake of the righteous persons
living in it. But it turned out that Sodom could not be saved
there were not 10 righteous persons in the whole city. Lot was
saved, and lived in a cave. There his two daughters bore him two
sons: Benammi, or Ammon, and Moab. In fulfillment of the
angel's prophecy, Sarah bore a son, who was named Isaac. When
the lad grew up, God tested Abraham's devotion by bidding him
offer Isaac as a sacrifice. Abraham prepared to carry out God's
bidding; at the last moment, an angel intervened, and Isaac was
saved. Abraham had passed the hardest trial of all.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon 'The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,' edited by PWollman
Tsamlr, $15, published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maid
han,eKN.?W ,?*' ,NY ,10038 J0S6ph Schlan0 ls P"WeVt of'th. safety
distributing the volume.) mmmtr
|UIA Gets $25 Million
Grant From U.S.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The United Israel Appeal
has received a U.S. govern-
ment refugee resettlement
grant of $25 million for
1987. This grant, the latest
to UIA since 1973, was
again initiated by Congress
and is twice the amount pro-
vided in 1986. The an-
nouncement was made by
H. Irwin Levy, chairman of
UIA's U.S. Government
Relations Committee, at the
organization's recent Board
of Directors meeting in New
York City.
Henry Taub, UIA's chairman,
stated that thus far UIA has
received 12 refugee grants total-
ing $310,077 million to assist in
the absorption of refugees in
Israel.
The grants, which are sup-
ported in both Houses of Congress
and in the State Department and
the White House, reflect the U.S.
I government's desire to link its
support of refugee resettlement in
Israel directly to the philanthropic
support of Israel by the American
Jewish community, Taub said.
HE SAID that during the same
period the grants were made,
some $4 billion was given to Israel
by American Jews to assist the
country with these immigration
and absorption programs.
Taub called the grant program
"one of the most successful such
programs ever funded by the U.S.
government." He pointed out that
in recent years the absorption of
Ethiopian Jews has been much
more costly than the absorption of
any other group thus far, thus
justifying the need for additional
financial support.
Levy said that the 1987 grant
funds will be used for refugee
resettlement, as follows: enroute
care and maintenance, transpor-
tation, maintenance at absorption
centers, hostels and ulpanim,
maintenance at youth aliya in-
stitutions, financial assistance to
the needy or handicapped,
maintenance and financial
assistance for students and for
vocational training, maintenance
at homes for the elderly, and con-
struction and/or acquisition of
apartments.
IRVING KESSLER, UIA's ex
ecutive vice chairman, indicated
that $125,000 of grant funds will
be allocated for the support of a
grassroots organization of Ethio-
pian immigrants in Israel.
BAR MITZVAH
K
Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Alan Abraham Tempkins
ALAN TEMPKINS
Alan Abraham Tempkins, son
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tempkins
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at 8:30 a.m.
at Adath Yeshrun.
The celebrant is a student in the
Adath Yeshrun religious school.
Alan was a former student of
Hillel and is currently enrolled in
the eighth grade at Highland Oaks
Junior High School, where he is in
the gifted program. He also at-
tends Hebrew High School one
night a week to further his studies
in Jewish history.
His many interests include
writing short essays, entering
poster contests, collecting
baseball cards, and hacking at the
computer. His main interests
though revolve around sports. He
was selected as most valuable
player for three years on the
baseball league at North Miami
Beach Optimist Club. Besides be-
ing an all around athlete, Alan
also has been playing the violin
since five years of age. His late
grandfather, Albert Abraham
Tempkins was a concert violinist
for the Jackie Gleason Show,
Philharmonic Symphony and the
Miami Beach Symphony.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tempkins
will host the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the occa-
sion and a reception will be held at
Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood.
Special guests will include
Alan's five year old brother
Michael, grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Alexander Weinberger;
grandmother, Ida Tempkins; out
of town guests; Mr. and Mrs.
Maury Goodman, Mrs. Zel
Shapiro, Dr. Linda Weinberger,
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon Wexler, Mr.
and Mrs. Kenneth Weisberg, Ms.
Vickie Weisberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Tony Cacioppa, Mrs. Bemice
Tempkins and Ms. Nancy
Tempkins.
Organization News
Biscayne Chapter Women's American
ORT will meet on Thursday, Feb. 5 at 1 p.m.
in Morton Towers Auditorium.
The American Society for Technion,
Miami Beach Chapter of the Women's Divi-
sion, will hold its MEP luncheon at the
Shelborne Hotel, on Thursday, Feb. 12 at
noon. A fashion show will follow.
The National Council of Jewish Women,
Coral Section, will meet Feb. 4 at 12:30 p.m.
at King's Creek Village Clubhouse. Helen
Fagin will discuss the Koran.
Temple Israel Sisterhood will hold its an-
nual art auction Saturday, Feb. 7 at 8 p.m.
Auctioneer William Haber will present
"Modern Art Collection Old Masters." A
preview wil be held that afternoon from
2-7:30 p.m. at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami.
Entertainment* Arts
"Singin' in the Rain." *he 1952 Hollywood
musical, will hit Soi Florida in a new
Broadway version when the National Touring
Company opens in preview performance
Tuesday, to be followed by its gala premiere
Wednesday, through Sunday, Feb. 15, as the
third of Zev Bufman's five-production
theatrical season at the Miami Beach Theater
of the Performing Arts.
Celebrated by critics as one of the best
musicals ever made in Hollywood about
Hollywood, it was the play's original authors,
Betty Comden and Adolph Green, who
reversed the usual pattern and brought the
Hollywood film back to the Broadway stage.
The winning script in the 1987 Bob Clark
new play festival, Sunday Mornings" by
Emmet O'Byrne of New York, will be
presented at the University of Miami's Ring
Theatre Feb. 4-14 in Brockway Hall at the
Richter Library on the Coral Gables campus.
There are no performances on Feb. 8 and 9.
A dramatic reading of playwright Eugene
O'Neill's "More Stately Mansions," will be
held Monday, at 7 p.m. at the Coconut Grove
Playhouse.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:45 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 5312120
Rabbi Dow Rozoncwalg
Dally 7:20 a.m. Allarnoon S:M p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Both Shmutl
1700 Michigan Ae Miami Beach
534-721 3 534 7214
Barry J Konovltch. Rabbi fgN
Moan* Buryn. Cantor \Wl
Sergio Grobior. President
Sholem Epelbaum Prosidont.
Religious Committoo
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drivo
North Miami Boach 947 143S
Rabbi Slmcha Froodman
Cantor Ion Alpom Coneervatlve
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. I 5:15 p.m.
Sat. 4 Sun. S a.m. a 5:15 p m
Fri.ap.m.
Sal. 830 a.m. Bar Mlinah Alan Tampkln*
Frl. ( p.m. Bat Mitzvah Mlchalla Warhaltlq.
TEMPLE BETH AM
SBSO N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 887-6687
Dr. Hofbort Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Baumgard "Aak l ha
Rabbi Your Quaatlona Am Sollc lta<1
Sat. 11:15 a.m. B'nal MItivah Marc Hate and
Nataaha Cooper. Sermon "A Qod Who
Knowa Your Pain."
TEMPLE EMANU EL _.%
1701 Washington Avenue fflft)
Miami Boach S.
Or Irving Lohrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Borgor
Yehuda Shitman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Garald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalal Shabbai 5 p m
Lata Frl. > aar. I p.m.
Dr. Ma*wall Bergar will praach on
"Alma. Rolaa and Qoala."
Sat. t a.m. Or. Irving Lahrman win praach
on ma waakly portion ol ma blfal.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beech
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitf
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
2825 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlamar, Rabbi
Robert Albert, (
Cantor
Rav. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Frl. 8 p.m. sen. Sat. 8 a.m. Bat Mltnah
Dabby Simon Sovlat twinning
Euganya Chamobllaky. Mlnchah 5:46 p.m. Sat
Mlnyan twlea dairy. Call tor n ma
BETH KODESH .-..;.
Conearvatlve \^f)
1101S.W.12A-O. ^.IL
Rabbi Max Shapiro 656-6334
Cantor Joseph Kriaaol
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
Sabbath Sanrlcaa 8:45 a.m.
Sat. 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
881 5508 ConaMrvatlve
Dr. Israel Jecobe. Rabbi
Dr. Joeeph A Gorf Inkel. (
Rabbi Emeritus \
Moshe Frledler. Cantor
Frl. 8 p.m.
Sal 8:45 am
Waakday aan. Mon.Frl. 8 a.m.
Mon.-Thura. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami t Ptonr Rarorm Conoragalion
137 NE. 19th St., Miami. 5735900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frl. 8p.m.
Downtown Rabbi Rai 0. Part malar "Strangar
In a Familiar Land." Liturgy Harvay Kaufman
Cantorlal Solc4at.
Kandall. Rabbi Or Haakall M. Bam a I aarmon
"Halping Ood Grow Up." Liturgy: Cantor
Rachalla F. Nalaon Bat Claaa 8 Canto*'. Club
_______________mm participate._______________
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Brvd
Coral Qablea 887 5667
MtohaMi B. Elsonatat, PutbM
Frt. 8:15 p.m. RaattlrmaUon aarvlca.
Sal. 11:18 a.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Roae
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Senrioae Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 am.
Onag Shabbat will lollow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer AbramowHz _
Arl Frtdkls, Assoc. Rabbi f ""
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. 8 a.m Sabbath aarvlca.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday
8 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
*
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jetfereort Avo.. MB.. FL 331:
Tel. 53*4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Metbar
Cantor Nlaeim Bertyemim
Dally aervtcee 8 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat. 8:15 a.m
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 /
RabM David H. Auerbach V
Cantor Stephen Froodman
Friday night aarvlcaa 8 p.m.
Saturday morning aarvlcaa 9:30 a n
Dally aarvlcaa: Sunday 8:30 a.m.
Mon. Tuaa. 8 Thura. 7:30 a.m.
Wad 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH Sh6lOM S38 7231
Chase Avo. i 41 at St. i......
OR LEON KNONISM, Faartdtng Sanlor Rabbi
GARY A OLICKSTEiN. I~
HARRY JOLT, AuaWary R
PAUL D CAPLAN. Aaalaiant RabM
CANTOR DAVIO CONVISER
Frl. 8:15 p.m Rabbi Qltckataln will apaak on
Naw Moon Now Month, Now Members."
Sat. 10 45 a.m. Bar Mltnah
_____________DankH Jordulovlch.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or Max A Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally Sarvtoaa: Mon frl 7:30 a.m.
8 5:30 p.m.
Sat.8:25 a.m. 8 8:1 5 p.m
Sun. 8a.m. 8 8 p.m
i.ata aarvlca Frl. i p.m
Frt. Bat Mltnah Llaa Wabar
KV>
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartylaj Ave..
Miami Boach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Lebovitt
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Sarvlcaa 8 a.m. and
5:30 p.m.
Frt. lata aarvlca 8 p.m.
Sat 8:45 am
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1582
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
362 0698
Rabbi Hershel Becker Mam Oretaa*
Sat. 9 30 a.m. aarvlca at
Tampla Samu-EI
9353 SW 152 A.a
S.olN Kandall Or
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Avo
North Dade's Rolorm Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Frt. 8 p.m. Scholar In Raaldanca Waakand
Dr. Sol Gordon "Preparing Today a Jawlah
Child lor Tomorrow'a Jawlah Family "
Sat. 10:30 a.m. Bar Mltnah Sath Yealow
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTEK
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 ,-ju
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi St i
Benjamin Adler, Cantor X-
David Rosonthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday 8 Thuraday.
Frl. 8 p.m guest speaker William
F. Sautoen "A World ol Dtttatanea."
Sat. 8 a.m. Sabbath Sarvtca
Taltlar Chapal
siiv.yffii-a&'L&ii&;Si BB 1 y'sS:'^^^^^i^ii{^ii-'' SBM


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
Benjamin Levich Dead At 69
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Dr.
Benjamin Levich, a former
refusenik whose effort to im-
migrate to Israel garnered
worldwide support from scientific
communities, died Monday night
(Jan. 18) of a heart attack in Fort
Lee. N.J. He was 69 years old. He
was buried last Thursday in Israel
next to his wife, Tanya, who died
in 1983.
Levich, creator of a new science
known as "physico-chemical
hydrodynamics," divided his time
equally between New York and
Tel Aviv, holding simultaneously
the positions of professor of
engineering at Tel Aviv Universi-
ty, and Albert Einstein Professor
if Sciences, as well as director of
the Institute of Applied Chemical
Physics and Distinguished Pro-
fessor of Chemical Engineering
and Physics at the City College of
the City University of New York.
LEVICH immigrated to Israel
in December, 1978 after a nearly
seven-year struggle to leave the
Soviet Union. At the time of his
application to emigrate, in
February, 1972. Levich became
the highest-ranking scientist to
apply to leave.
Prior to his visa application,
Levich was department head of
electrochemistry at the Institute
of Hydrodynamics of the Soviet
Academy of Science and held a
professorial chair at Moscow
University. He was expelled from
both positions following his ap-
plication to emigrate.
During his period of refusal,
Levich was deprived of all oppor-
tunity to engage in scientific ac-
tivity, and he and his family were
constantly harassed by the
authorities.
Levich was a test-case for the
Soviets, and as a result of his ap-
plication for an exit visa, other
Jews in high scientific positions
were also emboldened to seek
visas.
IN MAY, 1976, some 1,000
scientists in New York called upon
the Soviet Academy of Sciences to
use its influence in urging the
Soviets to allow Levich and his
wife, Tanya, to join their sons
Evgeny and Alexander in Israel.
In July 1977, more than 100
Western scientists held a three-
day conference at Oxford,
England, to draw attention to
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel, Inc.
New York: (718) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills, N.Y.
Shalom Memorial Garden
15700 N.E. 18 Avo.
No. Miami Baach, Fla. 33161
Phono 947-3331

ARTHUR JACOBS
TO ALL OUR PATRONS:
As Our General Manager, Mr. Jacobs, Is a
Cemeterlan experienced in serving the
Jewish Community, and he has a strong
desire to serve you.
Please call upon Mr. Jacobs for all your
cemetery needs.
Levich's case.
Levich's arrival in Israel was
greeted by Israeli government of-
ficials, representatives of univer-
sities, other Soviet immigrants
and relatives. But Levich seemed
particularly pleased by the hand-
shake of a policeman. "I had a
good feeling shaking the hand of a
friendly policeman," Levich said.
Levich was the author of more
than 150 papers in theoretical
physics, electrochemistry and
hydrodynamics. He also wrote a
four-volume textbook on
theoretical physics that was
translated into English, German,
Spanish, Czech, Portuguese and
Chinese.
UTAL. Rudolph. 89. of Miami Beach.
January 21. The Riverside
DRESNER. Dorothy M 58. of North
Miami. January 21. Levitt-Weinstein.
FELIX. Max. of Miami Beach Robin-
Zilbart.
WEINBERGER. Flora. 86. of Coral Gables.
Services and interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
WOLFF. Fay. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
GRANE, Jack, of Miami Beach.
LEIBMAN? Abraham, of Mahonpac. New
York and Miami. January 21. Services in
New York The Riverside.
SKPIN. Ray, 86. of Miami Beach, January
24. The Riverside.
SHAPIRO. Lawrence. 62. of North Miami
Beach. January' 22. Menorah Chapels
HOROWITZ. Reuben. 86. January 23 The
Riverside.
VOGEL. Sol. of North Miami Beach
January 24. The Riverside.
BENSON. Joseph The Riverside.
CHEN1. Jacob.. 87. of Miami Beach
January 24. The Riverside.
WISE. Jack E.. 67, of North Miami Beach
January 23. Levitt-Weinstein.
WOHLREICH, Abraham J.. 76. The
Riverside.
JACOBSON. Harry of North Miami Beach
January 25. The Riverside.
RASKIN, Stanley, of Miami Beach. January
25. Interment at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
WINN. Frances. 86. of Miami. January 25
Levitt-Weinstein.
VALADJI. Charles Benjamin of Bay Har
bor Islands. Rubin-Zilbert.
RAIFAIZEN. Claude H 35 The Riverside
Nathan Winokur, 84, Passes
Nathan Winokur, a Coral
Gables community activist for
whom Winokur Park is named,
pased away January 23 at the age
of 84.
Mr. Winokur moved to Coral
Gables shortly after World War
II. Here he established Sherry's
Shoes on Miracle Mile. He
operated the business for nearly
40 years.
He was active in the Citizens
Advisory Board for HUD, the
Coral Gables sister city program
and was a past president and
founding member of Temple
Judea. He was also the recipient
of the Massada Award for Bonds
for Israel.
Mr. Winokur is survived by hi,
wife, Florence; son, Stan tL
sisters Sarah Rifkin, RoseWiit
and Dorothy Guard. SerikS
were held.
GER. Jade C. of Silver Spring, Md .
Miami Beach. Rubin-Zilbert Md
SAKS, Benjamin, of N. Bay Village RuW
Zilbert.
KAY. Barry, of Miami Beach. Rubin7ilh 'J
KOPPEL. Goldie of Miami RuhmzZT "
MARGOLIUS. Ruth, of Miami rSL
Zilbert. """
SCHEFF? Dorothy, of Miami Beach. Rm>
Zilbert.
WEISMAN, William A, of Bav H*_
Islands. Menorah Chapels. ^
EVER. Elliot, of Miami Beach Bla*-.
Chapel. ^^
ROSENBAUM. Sarah. 91. of Miami Be*+
Levitt-Weinstein. ^^
SCHIFF, Ida Rose, of Miami Beach Se
vices were held.
MINTZER. Helen. January 21 Service! it
Worcester. Mass.
Cremation.......................From 325
Shipping to Northern
Funeral Home....................From 395
Jewish Qraveeide Funeral.........From s865
FLORIDA MORTUARY
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325-1171 524-1404
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
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quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
to Menorah where your last choice Is your best choice.
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Margate: 975-0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
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RUBIN-ZILBERT
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538-6371
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920-6660
ZILBERT^RUBIN


Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
J
fobel laureate Elie Wiesel (left,) was keynote
peaker at Bar-Ilan University's dinner and
cademic convocation in Los Angeles last
\ieek. With him are Armand Hammer,
rary dinner chairman, and Blanca
Roven Wintner, vice president of the West
Coast Friends of Bar-Ilan University. Mrs.
Wintner was awarded an honorary doctorate
by the university at the dinner, which was at-
tended by 800 friends and supporters ofBIU.
lank Leumi Has New Board Of Directors
TEL AVIV (JTA) The new
Joard of Directors of Bank Leumi
k-as formally ratified Sunday by
le members of the outgoing
Joard whose resignations became
effective immediately. But con-
troversy continued to simmer
fever the new chairman, Meir
leth, a former president of the
Tel Aviv Stock Exchange.
One member of the new Board,
ded Winkler, quit even before it
ok over in protest against the
hoice of Heth. Winkler, director
general of the Federation of Kib-
butz Industries, announced his
resignation saying he was
lissatisfied with the selection of
Jeth who was reproved by the
jjfisky Commission last year in its
eport on the 1983 bank shares
andal and the stock market
nic which ensued.
Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions
Inc. at 297 NE 2nd Ave. Miami Fl.
33132 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo Jr.
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami, Fla. 33173
13465 January 23, 30:
February 6, 13.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aftion No. 87-01248 FC 1C
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LYDIA SHAKAROV.
Petitioner
v.
AVNER SHAKAROV.
Respondent
TO: AVNER SHAKAROV
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on USHER
BRYN, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2301 Col-
lins Ave., Suite M-8, Miami Beach,
Fl. 33139, (306) 532-1156, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 6, 1987; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Victor M. Borrero
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
2301 Collins Ave., M-8
Miami Beach, Fl. 38189
Telephone: (306) 532-1166
13486 Januarys*
February*. 18.80, 1987
The report found that he was
aware of the manipulation of bank
shares by the country's leading
banks but did nothing about it
when he headed the Tel Aviv
Exchange.
ACCORDING to Heth, he had
in fact warned against the prac-
Ui THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT TS AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 87-03*47 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
Fl Bar 368016
In re the marriage of
EUNICE C. BODDEN
Petitioner
and
THEOPHLLIUS E. BODDEN
Respondent
TO: THEOPHLLIUS E.
BODDEN
Lakeside Park.
Discovery Bay P.O.,
St. Ann, Jamaica. W.I.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before March 6, 1987 and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
13486 January 30;
February 6,13, 20,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nmaiber 87-363
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
HENRY C. WALDER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HENRY C. WALDER. deceas-
ed. File Number 87-353, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all cUms
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court. ___mm
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
JERROLD P. WALDER
14200 Chadwick Lane
Rockville, Maryland
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARVIN I. MOSS. PA.
P.O. Box 6250
Surfside, Florida 33154
Telephone: (306) 866-6736
,0400 January 30;
1 February*, 1987
tice and no longer headed the ex-
change when the scandal broke.
He noted that he would receive
compensation as chairman of the
Bank Leumi Board but unlike his
predecessors, it would be "within
normal, acceptable Israeli
standards."
m THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Kile Number 87-307
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
EDWARD EARL FRENCH
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of EDWARD
EARL FRENCH, deceased. File
Number 87-307, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Dade County, Florida. The
personal representative of the
estate is Harold A. Turtletaub,
whose address is 9995 Sunset
Drive. Suite 108. Miami, FL
33173. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 30. 1987.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Edward Earl French
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Harold A. Turtletaub
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami. FL 33173
Telephone: (306) 271-4000
134gg January 30;
February 6.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-03255 05
IN RE: The Marriage of:
EXALEME POLIMUS.
Petitioner,
and
VALERIE DENISE POLIMUS,
Respondent.
TO: VALERIE DENISE
POLIMUS, residence unknown
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida.
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before February 27,
1987, otherwise a default will be
entered.
January 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13480 January 30;
February 6,13, 20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-00237 FC31
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEONARD MALCOLM.
Petitioner
and
DOREEN MALCOLM.
Respondent.
TO: DOREEN MALCOLM
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road
- Suite 309 Miami Beach. FL 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 27, 1987; other-
wise a deafult will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BROIKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
13483 January 30;
February 6,13,20,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
Oi THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
Civil Action No. 87-00*86 (12)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
Carolyn Pratt
Petitioner/Wife
and
William Pratt
Respondent/Husband
TO: William Pratt
1570 N.W. 159th Street
Opa-Locka. Fl. 33064
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 633 N.E. 167th Street,
(Suite 619) North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 13.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Florida on this 9
day of January. 1987.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSHUA S. GALITZER, ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th Street (Suite 619)
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
(306) 653-3535
13466 January 16, 23.30;
February 6.1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO: 87-3586
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN DULAND GILBERT.
Petitioner,
vs.
JANICE JEAN GILBERT.
Respondent.
TO: JANICE JEAN
GILBERT
Residence unknown
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue, Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before March 6, 1987
otherwise a default will be entered.
January 27. 1987
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M. Gendron
13487 January 30;
February 6,13, 20.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name T L C and Friends at
12210 N.E. 13 Court, North
Miami, Florida intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
John P. Mern
and Donna Lieberman-Mern
d/b/a T L C and Friends
12210 N.E. 13 Court
North Miami, Fl.
Steven D. Tiahler
Attorney for Applicants
8625 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 754-1001
13464 January 23, 30;
February 6, 13,1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 87-03256 03
IN RE: The Marriage of:
RIGAUD FRANCOIS.
Petitioner,
and
CAROLYN L. FRANCOIS,
Respondent.
TO: CAROLYN FRANCOIS.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27, 1987, other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
13481 January 30;
February 6.13.20.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRC L IT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 87-0X038 FC30
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SANTORO
and
ROSE SANTORO. s/k/a
ROSE MARIE SANTORO.
584 E 89th Street
Brooklyn. N.Y., N.Y.
TO: ROSE SANTORO a/k/a
ROSE MARIE SANTORO
584 E 89th Street
Brooklyn. NY., N.Y.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Edwin
A. Willinger, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is Suite 209
Lincoln Drexel BMg.. 1656 Drexel
Ave., Miami Beach, FLA 33139,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 27, 1987; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWIN A. WILLINGER
Suite 209 Lincoln Drexel Building
1666 Drexel Ave.
Miami Beach, FLA 33139
Attorney for Pettioner
Telephone: 538-5756
13484 January 30;
February 6.13.20,1987
^naHnScRH 9BBH


i* w nw tfewimi nunuian/rnaay, January 30, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-60138 CA-22
NOTICE OF ACTION
0024S1
APPLE BANK FOR
SAVINGS, f/k/a CENTRAL
SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
DONALD L. WOLLARD.
JR., individually and
as trustee, et al..
Defendants.
TO: DONALD L. WOLLARD,
JR., individually and as trustee
263 N.E. 8th Street
Homestead, Florida 33030
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac-
tion for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lots 16. 17 and 18. Block 11.
SOUTH MIAMI HEIGHTS
SECTION "E," according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 23. Page 74, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
February 27. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 23rd day of
January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
13474 January 30;
February 6. 13, 20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 86-2836
Division (01)
IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF
EDNA S. COLER,
Incompetent
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that DOROTHY AR
THUR, Guardian of the person and
property of Edna S. Coler. In-
competent, has filed her Final Ac-
counting in the above matter in
this Court and you are required to
file any objections to the said ac-
counting with the Clerk of this
Court and serve a copy thereof
within thirty (30) days hereof on
Petitioner's attorneys, whose
names and address are:
HARRY ZUKERNICK. ESQ. and
MILTON FELLER. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 329
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
(306) 672-0099
and you are further notified that
application for discharge will be
made on the 5th day of March,
1987 at 1:30 P.M. before the
Honorable Harold Featherstone,
and that jurisdiction of the Ward
will be transferred to Georgia, a
State of foreign jurisdiction.
WINTESS my hand and seal this
23 day of January, 1987.
CLERK OF COURT
BY: RICHARD P. BRINKER.
CLERK
BY: FRANCES T. SWEEMMY
DEPUTY CLERK
HARRY ZUKERNICK
420 Lincoln Rd
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Attorney for Guardians
First publication of this Notice
will be on 30 day of January. 1987.
13475 January 30;
February 6, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Citizens Financial
Center at 999 Bricked Avenue,
Miami, Florida. 33131 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
UCCELLO IMMOBILIEN GmbH,
a German Corporation
By: ROBERT VOGEL.
Managing Director (President)
Barton S. Udell. Esq..
Smith & Mandler. PA.
Attorney for
Uccello Immobilien GmbH
800 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
13459 January 16, 23, 30;
February 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-8012
Diviais* Probate 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DORA WEISS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DORA WEISS, deceased. File
Number 84-8012. is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Room 307, Dade
County Court House. 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 23, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Peter Weiss
354 Harbor Drive
Lido Beach, New York 11561
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
PAUL SILBERBERG. ESQ.
No. 176046
Berman, Koerner & Silberberg,
PC.
405 Lexington Avenue. N.Y..
N.Y. 10174
Telephone: (212) 953-1112
13460 January 23, 30, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 4fi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-32196
SEC. 14
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN ft COMPANY, a Florid.
carporatisn,
Plaintiffis)
vs.
MICHAEL P. JOHNSON a/k/a
MICHAEL PERCIVAL
JOHNSON, and the umknown
spa***, si al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Dade County. Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M.. on the 6ta day of
February. 1M7, the fsllowiag
f4f>f-riKarri nrrtraarrti"
Lot 2. in Block 3. of AVOCADO
VILLAS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
97. at Page 15. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 21st day of January,
1M7.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Cosrt
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney far Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biacayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
NHtmmw 1-H-JO
ia
Roaeutkal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3060 Biacayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 331S7
Published 1-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTrnOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name J A S ENTER-
PRISES at 8285 N.W. 64 St. Bay
No. 4 Miami Fla. 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Sergio M. Novo
13461 January 23, 30;
February 6, 13. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-78
Dtristea02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERTO GRUNZEUG
Deceased
NOTICE OP
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALBERTO GRUNZEUG.
deceased. File Number 87-78, Div.
02, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Dade County
Courthouse, Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHD* THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street,
Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street.
Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
13477 January 30;
February 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7319
Division 03
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ARNOLD RENKOFF
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Arnold Renkoff. deceased. File
Number 86-7319 (03). is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagier
Street. Miami. FL. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 30, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Estelle Renkoff
945 N. Stillwater Drive
Miami, FL
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Paul H. Freeman
9100 S. Dadeland Blvd.. Suite 1406
Miami. FL 33156
Telephone. (306) 662-5999
13478 January 30;
February 6. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DALE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 87-03264 30
IN RE The Marriage of
JAIME SANDOVAL.
Petifconer/Husband.
vs.
ANA C. CASTRO SANDOVAL,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ANA C. CASTRO-
SANDOVAL
5 Calle. 236 Zona No. 7. Colonia
Jardenas
San Juan
Guatemala, Central America
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before February 27, 1987, other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 26, 1987.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
13479 January 30;
February 6, 13,20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-41757 CA 22
NOTICE OF ACTION
THE WESTERN AND
SOUTHERN LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY, an
Ohio corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
ALPHONSO NORRIS.
JEANETTE P. NORRIS. DR.
THOMAS J. CAHILL. JR.. and
the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties churning by.
through, under or against him,
BAPTIST HOSPITAL OF
MIAMI, INC.. a Florida non-
profit corporation, STANLEY
DAVIDSON, as Trustee for
DAVIDSON LUMBER
COMPANY, a dissolved Florida
corporation, BENNIE M.
BRAKE, and LAURA L.
BRAKE.
Defendants.
To: Dr. Thomas J. Cahill, Jr.,
whose residence is 2300
Nacogooches. Apartment 249-L,
San Antonio. Texas 78209.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 15. in Block 55, of
SEVENTH ADDITION TO
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 94. at Page 29. of
the Public Records of Dade
county, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on David R. Webster, Esquire, of
Rosenthal ft Yarchin. PA.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 33137, on or before
February 27, 1987, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on January 26. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13482 January 30;
February 6, 13,20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3400
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUIS J. GROSSMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LOUIS J. GROSSMAN, deceas-
ed. File Number 86-8400, is pen-
ding in the Circuij. Court for
DADE County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami,
Florida. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 23. 1987.
Personal Representatives:
ALLAN GROSSMAN
740 Mobile Road
Far Rockaway. New York, NY
11691
TOBA GROSS
Lincoln A-2004
Century Village
Boca Raton, Florida
JOSEPH GROSSMAN
2306 Shipley Road
Wilmington. Delaware 19803
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBIT. GALBUT ft MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
Florida Bar No. 210889
13462 January 23. 30.1
THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAI
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-00895 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI a
Unite States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERALD BEYER, as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
GEORGE P. BULLOCK,
Deceased, a/k/a GEORGE
BULLOCK, a/k/a GEORGE D
BULLOCK, et al..
Defendants
TO: All of the unknown heirs
devisees, grantees, assignees!
lienholders, creditors, trustees
or otherwise claiming by,
through, under or against
GEORGE P. BULLOCK
Deceased, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described, whose
residences are unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 3(19
of CORAL ISLE WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, dated Oc-
tober 13, 1972. filed for
record October 17, 1972
under Clerk's File No
72R-232618, in Official
Records Book 7942, at Page
1, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended, together with the
Mortgagor's undivided share
in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a oopj of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith. Mack. Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
February 13. 1987, and filed the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of Januarv,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
13454 January 16, 23.30;
February 6.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7205
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL WASSERMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
SAMUEL WASSERMAN.
deceased. File Number 86-7205. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagier St., Miami, Florid*
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at
tomey are set forth below
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 16, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Marcia D. Esaig
801 Navajo Drive
Riverside. Calif 92507
Paul Wasserman
1 Rockledge Road
Hartsdale. NY 10531
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
For Marcia D. Essig:
Herbert J. Lemer. Esq.
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
Telephone: 306 673-3000
For Paul Wasserman:
Arnold Spiegel, Esq.
50 E. 42nd Street
New York. NY 10017
Telephone: 212 687-5225
13457 January 16.23. 1987



<,
Friday, January 30, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-1656
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALBERT EFERGAN.
Petitioner/Husband,
ind
BERNADETTE ANN
EFERGAN.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: BERNADETTE ANN
EFERGAN
17 Elgar Close
Clevedon
Avon
BS21-5BS
ENGLAND
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
MARKUS & WINTER. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2251 S.W. 22nd Avenue,
Miami, Florida USA 33145. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
February 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
fur the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall bo published
>nce each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
i if said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By VICTOR M BORRERO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROBERT O. SCHWARZ. ESQ.
i Of Counsel)
MARKUS & WINTER, PA.
2li.il S.W. 22nd Street
Miami, Florida 33145
856-6910
Attorney for Petitioner
13467 January 23, 30;
February 6.13.1987
B Y
for
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52452 (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSTA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L. WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HERE
NOTIFIED that an action
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20. 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 13 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13458 January 16. 23,30;
February 6.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Home Library at
244 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami,
Florida 33132 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Bank Marketing, Inc.
244 Biscayne Boulevard
Second Floor,
Miami, Florida 33132
13476 January 30;
February 6. 13.20. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 86-595
IN RE:ESTATE OF
JAMES J. STEWART
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of JAMES J.
STEWART, deceased, File
Number 86-595, is pending in the
Circuit Cout for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Miami, Fl. 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Helen McDermott. whose address
is 930 NE 159th St. N. Miami
Beach, Fl. 33162 The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 23, 1987.
Helen McDermott
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JAMES J. STEWART
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
William O'Neil III
1111 Lincoln Rd No. 505
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: 305-532-1761
13471 January 23.30. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ANTIGUA FUR-
NITURE. INC. d/b/a C.F.G. Pro-
motions at 10800 Biscayne Blvd.,
Suite 640, Miami, Florida 33161 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ANTIGUA FURNITURE. INC
d/b/a C.F.G. Promotions
BY: Jorge Iker
Carl A. Schmitt
Attorney for
ANTIGUA FURNITURE. INC.
d/b/a C.F.G. Promotions
13463 January 23,30;
February 6,13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
at 1111 Kane Concourse, Bay Har
bor Islands, Fl. intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Edward R. Watson, M.D.. P.A.
President
Martin Starr
Attorney for Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
13452 January 16, 23,30;
February 6. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7204
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX COHEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MAX COHEN,
deceased, File Number 86-7204, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Miami, Fl. 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Lillian Daniels, whose ad-
dress is 6770 Indian Creek Dr No.
7-F. The name and address of the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
.state to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 23, 1986.
Lillian Daniels
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MAX COHEN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
William O'Neil III
1111 Lincoln Rd No. 505
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Telephone: 305-532-1761
13470 January 23,30,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52452 (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSIA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L. WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 13 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13458 January 23,30;
February 6.13.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 87-198
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX GREENSPAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MAX GREENSPAN, deceased,
File Number 87-198, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 23, 1987.
Personal Representative:
HAL W. SPAET
800 West Ave., Ste. 906
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Jerri Pollak
5825 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HAL W. SPAET. ESQ.
800 West Avenue, Suite 906
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 531-1700
13469 January 23. 30,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7260
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LILLIAN MIRROP
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Lillian Mirrop, deceased. File
Number 86-7260. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 23. 1987.
Personal Representative:
Jeanne Racow
9740 Bay Harbor Terrace
Bay Harbor Islands. Florida 33154
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Louis H. Stallman
400 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 532-9939
lJUfiR January 23, 30,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of CREATIVE
BRONZE, INC., d/b/a A CON-
CEPT IN BRONZE at number
8106 N.W. 103rd Street, in the Ci-
ty of Hialeah, Florida, intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at North Miami Beach,
Florida, this 16 day of January.
1987.
ZIVA GROMAN. President
8106 N.W. 103rd Street
Hialeah Gardens. Florida 33016
MORTON B. ZEMEL. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite HI
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162
(305) 949-4237
13466 January 23, 30;
February 6,13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. UN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 87-02898 (18)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LADY REYES DE IZURIETA
and AUGUSTO SH AKSPEARE
IZURIETA VALDIVIESO. her
husband, et al..
Defendants.
TO: LADY REYES DE
IZURIETA and AUGUSTO
SHAKSPEARE IZURIETA
VALDrVIESO, her husband,
Calle Cuarta
Numero 610
Eficus, Urdesa
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an.
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida
Condominium Unit 401 of
Building 9110 of THE
PARKSIDE CON-
DOMINIUM NO. 1 according
to the Declaration, of Con-
dominium as recorded in Of-
ficial records Book 9104,
Page 80, and in Con-
dominium plan Book 46, Page
24 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
together with the Mortagor's
undivided share it. the com-
mon elements appurtenant
thereto. Together with the
parking space assigned to
said unit,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132 on or before
February 27, 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my har.d and seal of
this Court on the 22 day of
January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the I ourt
By: T. Casamayor
Deputy Clerk
13472 January 30;
February'i. 13.20, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-30084 (CA 03)
NOTICE OF ACTION
EDGAR LEWIS. Trustee,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DONALD FLETCHER, a single
man,
etal..
Defendants.
TO: WEST ENTERPRISES.
LTD.. a British Virgin Islands
corporation
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co.
Bank of Nova Scotia Building
P.O. Box 438
Wickams Cay
Road Town, Tortola
British Virgin Islands
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 1, in Block 2, of
RIDGELINE ESTATES, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 50, at
Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida 33132. on or before
February 27. 1987 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 22nd day of
January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13473 January 30;
February 6. 13. 20, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 30, 1987
Italy And Israel Sign
Agreement For Tourism
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) Italy and
Israel signed an agreement here
last week for the joint promotion
of tourism between the two coun-
tries and to each of them from
North America and other areas of
the world. Both countries have
suffered a slump in tourism over
the past year.
The agreement, signed by
Israel's Minister of Tourism
Avraham Sharir and his Italian
counterpart. N'icola Capria. con-
tains a strong condemnation of
terrorism. Terrorist acts in the
Mediterranean area, particularly
the hijacking of the Italian cruise
ship Achille Lauro in 1985. is con-
sidered responsible in large
measure for the lag in tourist
traffic.
The agreement provides for the
tourism ministries of both coun-
tries to create vacation packages
that include stop-overs in Rome
and Jerusalem. The ministries will
try to arrange direct flights bet-
ween Milan and Tel Aviv by
Raphael Danziger, a specialist
in Middle East ana North
Africa affairs has been named
assistant director of the Com-
mission on International Af-
fairs of the American Jewish
Congress.
Tony Bennett At
Coconut Grove
Playhouse
Singer Tony Bennett will give a
performance Sunday Feb. 15 at
8:15 p.m. at the Co;onut Grove
Playhouse. The bent fit coincides
with the Coconut Grove Arts
Festival and the Playhouse's 30th
anniversary. A selection of Ben-
nett's paintings will be on display-
in the Playhouse lobby.
The event is being coordinated
by Lenore Toby, Director of
Benefits and Special Funding for
the Playhouse. Chairpersons are:
Bobbi Berkman, Oorita
Feldenkreis, Judy George, Estelle
Gould, Mrs. Nathan S. Gumenick.
Bobbee Hofmann, Barbara Fried-
son Hornsby, Elanor Kosow,
Carol Lang, Martha Miahcon.
Brenda Nestor, Christy Powell,
Terril Stone-Ketover, Joan
Weiner, Lynn Wilson, Dorothy
Winston. Sonja Zuckerman and
Judy Weiser, Coordinator of
Special Events for the Playhouse.
Saulson At Golden
Age Friendship Club
"Israel Up Beat" is a discus-
sion to be led by William F.
Saulson for the Golden Age
Friendship Club of South Dade
Jewish Community Center, dur-
ing their 1 p.m. meeting Sunday,
at the The Federation Gardens.
Saulson, a family consultant,
widely active in the Jewish and
secular communities of South
Florida, is a vice president of the
Riverside Memorial Chapels and
iirector of their public service
Speakers Bureau.
Alitalia and El Al. the national air
lines of Italy and Israel, respec-
tively. Sharir signed a similar
agreement recently with Greece.
"Israel Weeks" will be in-
augurated for Italian tourists and
"Italy Weeks" for Israelis. Both
countries will promote health
cures based on the many thermal
spas in Italy and the curative pro-
perties of the high saline waters of
the Dead Sea and the hot springs
at Tiberias.
Because more Israelis visit Italy
than Italians visit Israel, a special
inducement for the latter will be
the establishment of a duty-free
zone at Israel's Red Sea resort of
Eilat.
Sharir also discussed tourism
with Vatican officials. They spoke
at length about encouraging
Christian pilgrimages to Israel
and how the churches can
publicize such trips. Sharir also
met with regional representatives
from Naples. Sorrento and
Positano who expressed interest
in tour packages.

KSiOd LOUIS Ml*
At the Hadassah-Hebreu- University Medical
Center m Jerusalem. Marilyn and Edward
BeUet, daughter and son-in-law of Bessie and
Louis Stein, of Miami Beach, stand by a pla-
que which commemorates the gift by Mr. and
Mrs. Stein to Hadassah of a fund for equipp-
ing an Emergency Operating Theater, Jfrl
and Mrs. BeUet were attending th> dedicatM
ceremony of a Biohazard Unit for tbl
preparation of dangerous cytotoxic drm\
which they had given to Hadast
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days o week
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