The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03025

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
dfewisln Floif idliam
fol. 60 No. 4
Miami Friday, January 23,1987
50 Cents

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Congressman Bill Lehman makes a point in discussions with Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres during Lehman's recent trip to the Middle East.
Rep. Lehman on Tour
Unhappy Political Realities in Israel
Lead to Some Very Strange Behavior
.S. Rep. William
?hman (D., Miami) joined
Iher House members and
\y State Department of-
pijils on a trip overseas in
November to get a first-
md assessment of
nerican security needs
id to consult on plans to
|>grade embassy security in
veral Middle East and
ruth Asian countries.
i Miami last week, Lehman
The Jeu-ish Floridian that, on
occasion of the trip, he travel-
by car from Aman, Jordan to
Jerusalem for meetings with
Israeli officials and American
diplomats.
SURFACE TRAVEL bet
ween Israel and Jordan may be
commonplace," he said, "but it
still shows tensions and paranoia
in that part of the world. In order
to cross the Jordan River into the
West Bank, we had to leave the
Jordanian vehicle, walk across the
Allenby Bridge and get into an
Israeli car on the other side."
Lehman added: "I also needed
two passports one stamped by
Israeli officials when I entered the
country, and another to show to
Jordanian officials upon my
return which showed no trace of
my having been in Israel."
Lehman is a member of the
House Appropriations Commit-
tee, which has allocated for Fiscal
Year 1987 $4 billion to combat ter-
rorism and to strengthen security
for U.S. facilities and personnel
overseas.
DURING HIS trip, he and other
members of the delegation in-
spected the present U.S. embassy
in Amman and visited the site
where ten scattered U.S. facilities
will be combined into one new em-
bassy compound to improve
security.
To emphasize these and other
points he enumerated in Miami
last week. Lehman recently wrote
in a Report from Washington that
"In Israel, it would be counter-
productive to discuss specific defi-
Continued on Page 7-A
Murphy Sure
Peace Can
Be Reached
Only Means Still Impede
Israel-Egypt-Jordan Move
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
U.S. Assistant Secretary of
State Richard Murphy, win-
ding up a two-week tour of
the Middle East, said here
that he was "convinced"
that Israel, Egypt and Jor-
dan are serious about ad-
vancing the peace process,
though they remain at odds
over how to go about it.
Murphy, who arrived here from
Saudi Arabia Wednesday (Jan. 14)
and returned to the U.S. by the
end of the week, briefed Premier
Yitzhak Shamir on his talks in Jor-
dan and Egypt His stopover in
Jerusalem was his second since he
came to the region two weeks ago
on his first visit since September.
HE TOLD reporters, "I am
returning to Washington convinc-
ed of the seriousness of purpose
about advancing the peace pro-
cess here, in Jordan and in
Egypt." A spokesman for Shamir
said Murphy informed the
Premier that there was no change
in the basic disagreement among
the three countries over how to
revive the peace process.
"There are good intentions, but
there is disagreement over how to
proceed," the spokesman quoted
Murphy as saying.
Egypt and Jordan are pressing
for an international peace con-
ference on the Middle East with
the participation of the five per-
manent members of the United
Nations Security Council and all
parties concerned, including the
Continued on Page 14-A
A Jewish Covenant
Miami Rabbi Bernat Voices Opposition
Rabbi Bernat
By MARK WINER
NEW YORK Should
rabbis officiate at mixed
marriages?
David Belin of Des
Moines, who chairs the
Commission on Reform
Jewish Outreach, calls this
"the most divisive issue on
the agenda of the Reform
to Mixed Marriage
movement." The Central
Conference of American
Rabbis, the rabbinical body
of Reform Judaism, has
declared its opposition to
participation by its
members "in any ceremony
which solemnizes a mixed
marriage,'' while
acknowledging the freedom
of every rabbi "to hold
divergent interpretation of
Jewish tradition."
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler,
Continued on Page 10-A
Prime Minister Shamir
Shamir
Says
Contras Won't
Figure In
Reagan Talks
Bv DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir said Monday the
Iran-Contra affair would
not be the focal issue of
talks with the Reagan Ad-
ministration during his up-
coming visit to Washington.
Shamir is to visit the U.S.
capital in mid-February and will
meet with President Reagan and
top administration and Congres-
sional leaders. But he conceded
that he expected the media to
focus on Irangate in their
coverage of his visit to the U.S.
HE SAID the Administration
continued to be engaged in
Mideast peacemaking efforts and
its involvement had not been
sidetracked by the Iran affair.
Shamir deplored the positions of
Continued on Page 10-A
Supreme Court Justice Gerald Kogan Heads for Tallahassee ,.1-B
fcfiS&t*:.?.1 I I I I 11 B-iifi,'.-sHsSyjI


Tage-2-A The Jewish FIOrirJiari/Friday, January 28, 1987
. TT_ APAVide World Photo
IN CAIRO: U.S. special envoy Richard Murphy (left) meets last
week with Egyptian President Hosni.Mubarak to discuss Middle Jerusalem, Murphy said he appeared certain that the trio of
East peace prospects. Murphy arrived here folhunng talks in governments want peace more than ever but that they are still
Amman with Jordan's King Hussein. At the conclusion of his wrestling with the means of establishing a mutually acceptable
meetings with Mubarak, Hussein and leaders of Israel in framework for discussion.
SLA Weakened
But Israel Intends To Continue Support in S. Lebanon
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel intends to maintain
its present policy of suppor-
ting the South Lebanese Ar-
my (SLA) while keeping its
own military presence in the
area to a minimum, this
despite the weakened condi-
tion of the SLA, a condition
which is giving Israeli
military policy-makers much
cause for concern.
This resolve to adhere to the
policy that has been in force since
Israel withdrew from Lebanon in
June 1985. and to strengthen the
SLA wherever possible, was
enunciated this week by Chief of
Staff Gen. Moshe Lew.
HE INDICATED that the deci
sion followed exhaustive delibera-
tions within the defense
establishment.
Thirteen SLA soldiers were kill
ed in a number of recent clashes
with Shiite Hizbullah units
usually attacks by the Shiites at
night on poorly staffed SLA posi-
tions. Last weekend one such inci
dent resuled in a Shiite defeat a
development warmly welcomed in
Israel. But the graver problem of
defections from the SLA ranks,
continues to concern Israeli policy
makers.
According to informed
estimates, some 20 percent of the
1.500-member force have melted
away into the hills and villages of
south Lebanon over recent weeks.
Israel has sought to stanch this
Israel Offers To Compensate
Family of Slain Irish Soldier
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel has offered to pay
compensation to the family of Cpl. Dermot McLaughlin, a
soldier in the Irish contingent of the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) killed by Israeli shells
fired at a suspected terrorist position in the south Lebanon
security zone Jan. 10.
THE SUM OFFERED was not disclosed but was
described as substantial. McLaughlin, 33, was the father of
five children.
Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe Levy told reporters Sunday
that the incident was a "shameful mistake. He said he had
received a report by a special investigating officer, and it
will be up to the Military Adjutant General to decide
whether further action will be taken.
MARK HADASSAH'S
75th ANNIVERSARY
WITH A
LEGACY OF LOVE
HADASSAH V\ilU & Brquntv Department
ill ,\,.,t '.Htli Street N'* Vork N> 10011
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When you put Hadassah
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and the continuity of
programs that will endure
lor the People of Israel
hemorrhage by increasing the
salaries that it pays the SLA men
these are henceforth to be paid
in U.S. dollars, no longer in "he
steadily plummeting Lebanese
currency and bv insisting that
south Lebanese civilians can only
ross the border daily to work in-
side Israel if they have a member
of their family serving in the SLA
IN ADDITION to Israel's wor
nes over the complement and
fighting-fitness of the SLA. then-
are deepening concerns here over
the steady buildup of PLO i trees
in south Lebanon north of the
I'nited Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL) line.
Some Israeli sources have r>een
quoted as citing a figure >f 3,000
Palestinian fighting men now
grouped in the areas around Tyre
and Sidon. These Palestinian
units, moreover, are buoyed by
their recent success in holding
their own against numerically
superior Shiite Amal forces -
especially around the village of
Maghdoushe where the Amal was
beaten in pitched battles.
Israel was peripherally involved
in that fighting: its naval craft
shelled PLO positions on the
coast. Also, the Israel Air Force
has been used frequently of late to
bomb and strafe Palestinian -
and occasionally Hizbullah ter-
rorist targets in various parts of
Lebanon.
BUT THERE is a feeling
among some observers here that
Israel may have been
overestimating the military
strength of Amal. which, though
0ROWARD
Qaper &
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numerically large, seems badly
organized and badly commanded.
Particular!) chastening to isra<'.
is the fact and it is by now a pro-
ven fact that the PLO has
enlisted the aid of the Reirut
Thnstian forces in infiltrating
men and materiel back into >.
Lebanon Israel ha.- near evidence
that the Christians both the
government circles around Presi
lent Amin demayei and
Phalanges havt actively
enabled the PLO I .-. the
Christian-controlled port of
Junieh. north of Beirut, as an en
tint.
While Israeli naval craft fre-
quently arrest and search craft en
route to Lehanon. and have
recently turned back the regular
ferry from Cyprus because it was
carrying PLO reinforcements.
Israel cannot impose total
blockade on the liusy waters off
Lebanon.
In .June. 1982, when Israel in-
vaded Lebanon, the enemy was
the PLO. and the ally was the
Christian community.
shifting pattern of alliancL'
accompanies Lebanon's -I
civil strife the hnstian ^
moving towards Svria aj ^
PLO." and d.savo'win? *
vestigial involvement with hT
Last week, in a ChriatianjE
Broadcast monitored here -
was referred t., &| ,,.,. '7srat'
enemy." l
This setback, from the fa
standpoint, could he betu
countenanced if Israels efforts J
reach a reliable understand!^
with Amal seemed likely ,7
succeed.
But. as throughout tne pj-
years, Amal is still proving
reluctant and unj.redictahU
target of Israel's overtures
Moreover, its own failure
defeat the PLO in battle, and the
steady rise of the fanatical Hu
bullah within the Lenanese Shiite
Community, has rendered Ami
itself a less attractive target for
su h overtures
Behind the rise of Hizbullah, ac
cording to Israeli experts, lurks
an increasingly active and influer,
tial Iranian involvement in the
religious, political and military'life
of Lebanon.
ISRAEL, therefore, is faced bv
two equally unpleasant prospects
across its northern border j
growing PLO presence and
ascendant, Iranian-backed Hiz-
bullah which is driving the Shiite
moderates onto the defensive.
And if Israel's outlwk for ac-
commodation with the indigenous
forces in south Lehanon is bad, its
relations with UNIFIL have
reached an all-time low
The killing last week of an [rial
corporal by Israel tank Bl
triggered a flurr,
demnatory sta ei
I NIFII. officers in th field. ai
by I'N official- and pi ntribul
nations. The incident -
topping a wave if SLA
UNIFIL positions
I'N directl) blarm
l>rael. whld il
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______


Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
At Israel Embassy
King Birthday Brings Renewal Call for Coalition
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
J The anniversary of the
1 birthday of the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. was com-
memorated at the Israel
Embassy here Wednesday
[(Jan. 14) with calls for the
j restoration of the coalition
I of whites and blacks which
marked the civil rights
I movement that was led by
| the slain black leader.
Coretta Scott King, widow of
I the civil rights leader, took note
that the Embassy was packed
[with more than 200 Washington
[area Jews and blacks for the
[ceremony.
"Whenever we gather in the
[name of Martin Luther King Jr. it
[must be done as an interracial, a
multiracial, a multicultural kind of
[v. ay," she said. She said her hus-
[band stressed that "we are all
part of he same human family."
THIS IS the fourth consecutive
, .ir that the Embassy has mark-
(1 the birthday of King, who
ivould have been 58 Thursday
Jan. 15). The Embassy held the
fevent in cooperation with the Mar-
pn Luther King Jr. Federal Holi-
iv Commission, the Jewish Na-
bonal Fund of America and the
.merica-Israel Friendship
|ieague<
Asher Nairn, the Embassy's
linister of Information, noted
that Israelis and Jews everywhere
have always admired King's
"courageous leadership" for civil
rights and his "rejection of anti-
Semitism along with all forms of
bigotry."
Israeli Ambassador Meir
Rosenne read a message from
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres in
which Peres noted King had made
"a singular contribution to the
moral heritage of humankind."
Peres said that King "identified
with the history, faith and ideals
of the Jewish people" and was a
true heir to the "prophetic
vision."
CORETTA KING said the
observance of her husband's birth-
day, of which the official federal
holiday was on Monday, is an op-
portunity to begin a "new tradi-
tion." She urged a restoration of
the cooperation between black
and white students, which marked
the civil rights movement of the
1960s.
James Farmer, founder and
former national director of the
Congress of Racial Equality, also
urged the "restoration of the
coalition."
Farmer, who organized the
Freedom Bus Rides through
Mississippi in the 1960s, stressed
that one-third of the persons who
rode the buses to bring about in-
tegration on the interstate buses
in the South were Jews.
He said they did so because
"they believed in the brotherhood
Hospital Official in Zaire
To Organize Medical Facility
KINSHASHA (JTA) An
Israeli hospital administrator has
trrived in Zaire's capital city to
krj;anize operation of the nation's
lewest medical facility a new
lospital being built jointly by a
pal Christian sect, the United
States Agency for International
L>evelopment and Hadassah.
Eli Mor. Administrator of the
lailassah-University Hospital in
Jerusalem, will lead the Kin-
piasha hospital's staff of 157
nedical and support personnel
h rough the early stages of its
operations over the next 30 mon-
ths. The facility occupies seven
buildings on the site of a small
hospital run by the Kimbanguist
Church and will serve about
(50,000 Kinshasha residents.
Mor will be joined in six months
by the first of several teams of
doctors and nurses from the
Hadassah Medical Organization in
Israel who have volunteered for
rotating two-month stints at the
new hospital to help train its staff
in the latest techniques in patient
care.
Funding to expand and upgrade
the site and to equip the hospital
was provided through a $1.5
million AID grant awarded last
September. The hospital includes
departments in pediatrics,
gynecology and obstetrics,
surgery and internal medicine and
is equipped with operating
theaters, recovery room,
diagnostic laboratories and inten-
sive care and radiology units.
The project has the support of
the governments of both Israel
and Zaire.
Kahane Told To Prepare
For April Trial in Kansas City
KANSAS CITY (JTA) A suburban Kansas City
judge, William Cleaver of the Overland Park Municipal
^ourt, told the attorneys representing Israeli Knesset
nember Meir Kahane and two local Palestinians to be
prepared for a mid-April trial. The three men face charges
Itemming from a Nov. 18 incident here at which Kahane
ppoke.
Kahane, a founder of the Jewish Defense League and
low leader of Israel's ultra-right Kach Party, faces a
lisorderly conduct charge in conjunction with his ap-
earance at a meeting, during which he allegedly attacked
lousa Shukair, a member of the Palestinian Human Rights
"oalition, for disrupting his speech.
Shukair and Rezek Muslet, another Coalition member,
lso face a disorderly conduct charge in connection with the
icident. Shukair is charged with resisting arrest.
According to Kevin Moriarity, an Overland Park at-
>mey defending Shukair and Muslet, the target date for
" trial is Apr. 8.
of man and were compelled by
their belief to do something about
it."
RUSTY JACKSON, communi-
ty relations director for the
Adolph Coors Co., who along with
Nairn was co-master of
ceremonies for the commemora-
tion, also stressed that "Jews and
blacks have shared much." They
"have suffered together and very
often against the same enemies,
prejudice, bigotry and discrimina-
tion," she said.
Also participating were
Washington Mayor Marion Barry
Jr., and Isaiah Robinson, vice
president of the America-Israel
Friendship League. The two black
leaders stressed the need to use
the commemoration of King's bir-
thday for a recommitment to the
problems still existing in the U.S.
and abroad. This should be done
"whether in south Alabama or
South Africa, whether in
Mississippi or the Soviet Union,"
Barry said.
Both also stressed King's role as
a leader for peace with Barry
noting King's hope for peace for
Israel and the Middle East.
Coretta King thanked the
Israeli government for holding a
memorial for her husband last
year and Israelis and our "Jewish
brothers and sisters" in the
United States for the King Forest
in Israel.
JEFFREY COHEN, represen
ting the JNF, said the forest now
has 10,000 trees. He pointed to
Lenore Siegelman, program
director of the American-Israel
On display at the Embassy was
the American-Israel Committee's
travelling exhibit, "Hand in Hand
for Justice," which highlights
King's career, as well as Jewish
involvement in the civil rights
struggle. It includes statements
by King against anti-Semitism
and in support of Israel and Soviet
Committee to Commemorate ^'
Martin Luther King Jr., who Siegelman said that the exhibit
planted the first 39 trees, marking can be rented by schools or
King's age when he was slain in organizations and can be used
1968. throughout the year.
.....I I I I i.....II in I I I I II111111 I I I I I I 11 111111 M IIII2
i
J. LOUIS SHOCHET
FounderThe Jewish Floridian
Called to His Eternal Rest on
TEVETH 25th, 5699-JANUARY 16th, 1939
s to Sifte ^emm"
"i ii i mi 11111 in ii 11 i in i.....H mi" ii i iiiiii i -
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1


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23. 1987
Levi Jet-Fighter
May Be Grounded
The Lavi iet-fighter, which has flown so
exquisitely through two test runs, may yet
be grounded. The Lavi is financed by U.S.
production grants. It is also too expensive to
build, according to Reagan Administration
officials, who believe that it would be
cheaper for Israel to purchase F-16 jet-
fighters made in the U.S., or even F-18's,
both to be equipped with Lavi avionic and
electronic systems.
Not so, argues Israel. In the first place,
say Israeli experts, the American estimates,
as repeated last week by Deputy Defense
Secretary Dov Zackheim in five days of
meetings with the Israelis in Tel Aviv, are
based on American production figures.
These figures, they say, would be substan-
tially lower if computed on the basis of
Israeli costs.
More important, in their view, to redesign
thousands of tailor-made Lavi components
for use in the U.S. jet-fighers, as Zackheim
suggested, would be excessively costly even
if the components could, in fact, be redesign-
ed. Indeed, Israel's experts argue that they
cannot. New development of these com-
ponents would have to occur from scratch,
they say.
Essential Issue Avoided
The constant U.S. argument that the Lavi
would be too costly to produce sounds
reasonable enough on its face. But even dis-
counting U.S. arguments, it studiously
avoids a far more essential issue the ge-
nuine American wish to avoid bankrolling
yet another achievement produced by Israeli
aviation designers and high-tech genius.
No clearer example of this can be seen
, thai), in, earlier runrins between the United
States and Israel over the sale of Israeli-
manufactured jet-fighters, even of a far-
lower military and scientific order, to coun-
tries in Latin America and elsewhere. Under
those circumstances, the American denial of
permission for the proposed sales was based
on the fact that the Israeli planes incor-
porated U.S.-produced jet engines.
A Catch-22 exists in Israel's latest Lavi
dilemma because it was precisely for this
reason the right of the United States to
veto Israel's ultimate power over its fighter
force that Israel sought to produce a first-
class combat plane of its own and without
U.S. incumbrances. Nor, clearly, does Israel
have in mind American exceptions based en-
tirely on economics.
Israel's operation in Lebanon produced
U.S. threats to embargo more planes and/or
parts until Israel ceased the operation. In
the 1967 Six-Day War, when Israel's Air
Force was still based heavily on the French
Mirage fighter, France closed down all
shipments to Israel in an embargo that only
recently began to show signs of letting up.
What all this amounted to was political
blackmail rather than economic
consideration.
Freedom from Encumbrances
In the end, Israeli experts see the Lavi as
an instrument designed to free their country
from the vagaries of shifting Middle East
foreign policies aimed against Israel,
whether these policies are formulated in
Washington or London or anywhere else.
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No doubt, the economic issue also weighs
as a factor, but in different terms. Should
the Lavi be grounded, it is estimated that
somewhere between 3,000 and 4.000
workers employed on the project would lose
their jobs.
Who, in the end, is likely to win the argu-
ment? Air Force Commander Maj. Gen.
Amos Lapidot has said that he likes the per-
formance of the Lavi in its initial test runs,
but that the Air Force could live without it
were it necessary. This may well mean that,
already, the handwriting is on the wall.
'We Shall Overcome'
The official national celebration of Martin
Luther King Jr.'s birthday on Monday was
in stark contrast to the realities of the status
of American civil rights today. In the past
few weeks, there have been reports of racial
incidents that strike at the very heart of Dr.
King's "I have a dream" address which he
delivered shortly before his assassination
and which was the very essence of his vision
of freedom for all Americans.
Some of these incidents included five
white cadets at the Citadel, the four-year
military college in Charleston, S.C., who car-
ried a burning paper cross into the barracks
of a black cadet and taunted him. The cadet
subsequently resigned from the Citadel, but
the Klansmen-like cadets were merely
penalized, not expelled.
Then, there is the case of Philadelphia,
where blacks buying homes in so-called
white areas have watched their dwellings
put to the torch. And in Boston, where a
black U.S. seaman was beaten severely dur-
ing shore leave.
Not to mention the eruption in the
Howard Beach section of Queens. N.Y.
where white teenagers accosted three black
men walking on "their turf' with baseball
bats and a tree limb, and one block man. 23.
was killed by an auto as he fled onto a
parkway and what he believed would \\e his
get-away from the confrontation.
What would Dr. King say about any of this
if he could speak today? Or about the
reference to New York Mayor Ed Koch bv
Mayor W.W. Goddbold of Brookhaven.
Miss., as "that Jew bastard"?
Thinking in Dr. King's terms, one can only
declare: "We shall overcome." But none of
this becomes the spirit of his birthday which
the nation was happy enough to stay home
Monday in celebration of.
Bishops' Conference
Issues Guide for Catholic-Jewish Dialogue
U m Owl > row cowwi
Friday.January 23, 1987
Volume 60
-a Ona .... W 00 1.0 r.a/, |>6 0C '~.a
22TEVETH5747
Number 4
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
New York
The National Bishops' Con-
ference of Brazil has issued
a 187-page "Guide for a
Catholic-Jewish Dialogue in
Brazil," according to Rabbi
Henry Sobel, coordinator of
the National Commission
for Catholic-Jewish
Dialogue sponsored by the
Bishop's Conference there.
Sobel, who heads the commis-
sion of five Jewish and five
Catholic leaders, is rabbi at Con-
gregacao Israelita Paulista in Sao
Paulo, the largest synagogue in
Latin America.
The guide was prepared by the
commission and distributed last
month to Brazil's 229 Catholic ar-
chdioceses and dioceses by the Na-
tional Bishops" Conference, and it
covers such subjects as Israel.
Jewish history, the Holocaust,
roots of anti-Semitism, Judaism in
Brazil, and interfaith cooperation,
Sobel said during his visit to New
York last week to speak to the
American Jewish Committee.
BRAZIL HAS the largest
Catholic population in the world,
some 117 million, and the"Jewish
population is only about 150,000.
"The mere fact that the Catholic
Church reaches out to the small
Jewish minority reflects
theological and political sensitivi-
ty, commitment and vision,"
Sobel said.
Most significant is the fact that
the book acknowledges the
legitimate existence of the State
of Israel within secure boun-
daries. Sobel said. He emphasized,
however, that the Bishops' Con-
ference does not have within its
powers the ability to recognize or
not recognize Israel. "This can on-
ly come from the Vatican." Sobel
said. "But the mere fact that the
Brazilian Bishops speak of 'the
right of the Jews to a peaceful
political existence in their land of
origin' reflects tremendous
sensitivity."
The introduction to the guide
says its objective is "helping
Catholics in Brazil to understand
better the historical, religious and
national aspirations of the Jewish
people."
Written in simple language, the
guide is designed to stimulate
discussion on Judaism in the
Catholic churches and schools in
Brazil. Suggested questions in-
clude: Does anyone know a Jew?
Are there prejudices in this socie-
ty? To what extent is the figure of
Judas used to strengthen pre-
judices against Jews? The manual
points out the sources of tradi-
tional and continuing distruct bet-
ween Catholics and Jews.
THE BISHOPS' Conference is
known for its political activism for
social justice in Brazil. In addition,
"they are ecumenical in spirit and
action and deeply committed to
dialogue with the Jewish com-
munity." according to Sobel.
In November. 1985. in com-
memoration of the 20th anniver-
sary of Nostra AetaU, the first
Pan-American Conference on
Catholic-Jewish Relations was
held in Sao Paulo, under the spon-
sorship of the Brazilian Bishops-
Conference. Seven resolutions
were adopted, including one that
stated "Zionism is not racism," to
mark the 10th anniversary of the
United Nations General Assembly
adoption of the infamous Zionism
is racism resolution.
In his remarks to the AJCom-
miUee, Sobel said that the major
problem confronting Jews in
Brazil was not anti-Semitism but
Sem.tism the preservation of
Jewish identity.
"If we are mesmerized by anti-
Semitism." Sobel stated "we
divert our energy from many
more urgent problems on our
agenda: Jewish identity, Jewish
education. Jewish values. Jew sh
i 5 may *>me day be
died the right to be Jews thaS
we neglect our duty to remain
Jews.
"OUR MOST urgent task in
Brazil today is not only to combat
possible anti-Semitic trends.
Brazilians are among a most
tolerant people, and consequently.
anti-Semitism is not a major
threat. The prominent task ia to
motivate Jews to remain Jews."
Sobel emphasized that he was
not discounting difficulties facing
Jews in Brazil. He noted that:
Brazil is Ifigfiing more on oil-
producing countries to cope with
a mounting international debt of
$120 billion; pro-PLO groups have
used the Israeli operation in
Lebanon as a excuse to itei
their public demonstrations: the
Methodist University of
Piracicaba recently joined with
the PLO in seminars on the
"Zionist threat"; and Brazil,
major arms manufacturer,
sensitive relations with Saudi
Arabia, Iraq, and other anti I-
Arab nations.
Present-day uncertainty
ting Brazil's Jews, Sobel told the
AJCommittee, center largely on
their former tendency to keep
their distance from social justue
movements. Unit! recently, he
stated, because of the rightwing
government, any movement for
human rights was automatically
interpreted as a leftist movement
against the government.
BUT NOW, he pointed out.
Brazil is on the way to becoming
one of hte world's largest
democracies. Moreover, he said,
the Roman Catholic Church in
Latin America has bi*n opposing
the "conservative power struc-
ture" and Jews are less inclined to
avoid association with human
rights causes.
As a result. Sobel asserted, the
ethical values of Judaism have
more space to express themselv -
and more of an opportunity to at
feet the lives of Jews. "The pro
blem Jews face." he said, "is how
Continued on Page 9-A


Can Modern Science
And Its Practitioners
Be Reconciled Today?
Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
I'.'pifnght Baltimore Jewish Tinea
All Publication Right* Reserved
Something deeply hidden had
to be behind things.
God is very subtle, but He is not
malicious.
Albert Einstein
Fifteen years ago, Eli
Schmell was beginning
research for his doctorate at
Johns Hopking. His major
was in biochemistry. His
thesis was about fertiliza-
tion. One day at the univer-
sity laboratory, Schmell
peered through a
microscope as there was a
sudden flurry of cells
dividing.
He called over his adviser, a
thin, ascetic, slightly Germanic
man. He took a quick glance
through the microscope lens and
stated, with an evenhanded,
clinical thoroughness, "Umm,
there's a lot of biochemistry going
on in there."
SCHMELL, intrigued by the
phenomenon, if not by his ad-
viser's reaction, again looked
through the lens. The apparently
unstoppable division of the cells
seemed even more determined
than before. Under his breath,
Schmell whispered in Hebrew a
verse from Psalms:
How great are Thy works, 0
Lord! Thy thoughts are very deep!
Schmell is the son of very tradi-
tional Orthodox Jews. He had at-
tended rabbinical college in New
York until he realized that he
would make a better scientist than
a rabbi. Schmell may have aban-
doned his formal training in the
rabbinate, but he had not aban-
doned his sense of the divine.
To Schmell, the cells' division
transcended the mechanics of
biology. What he was witnessing,
he felt, could have only been in-
spired by a "force" that did not
ordinarily enter into the equations
and hypotheses and laws of pure
science.
SCHMELL SUSPECTED that
his adviser, a dedicated man of
science, was confused and maybe
a bit put off by his Hebraic salute
to his Creator and, especially,
his lack of an equivalent salute to
biochemistry. After all, this was a
laboratory dedicated to science. It
was not a synagogue. For
Schmell's own good, it was best to
keep his religion distinct from his
science for two crucial reasons.
l)To keep his scientific in-
vestigations pure and
unadulterated.
2) To get through his graduate
program.
At least since Copernicus was
ridiculed in the 1500's for propos-
ing a heliocentric universe and
Galileo was tried for heresy for
similar ideas in the 1600s, the
popular mind has assumed that
science and religion are forever at
loggerheads, constantly jockeying
for supremacy in a world that
precludes peaceful co-existence.
Religion, laymen often think,
seeks to raise man's gaze to the
stars and beyond. It attempts
to invoke awe and humility before
whatever force gave the cosmos
life and meaning.
But science, in the frequent
view of the public, is content to
stop at the stars, to analyze their
gases, their patterns, their mo-
tions across the black unknowns
of space. It proceeds carefully and
deliberately from hypothesis to
proof, from a not-so-wild hunch to
what scientists hope will be ir-
refutable evidence. It may seem
Biologist
Michael Edidin
cold and logical, maybe even
impregnable.
Yet the two disciplines are not
that discrete despite Eli
Schmell's experience with his doc-
toral adviser in the Hopkins
University biochemistry lab. They
are both searching for knowledge
about our world, both grappling to
comprehend a mysterious, often
mind-boggling universe. Science's
emphasis is on the depth of reali-
ty; religion's is on its meaning.
TO A JEW, science cannot be
easily shunted aside as if it were a
nasty inconvenience. As the
Jewish philosopher, Hillel, said
2,000 years ago, "The ignorant
man cannot be pious." By turning
his back on knowledge, man also
turns his back on wisdom, on the
ways of the world, on the ways of
God.
Science and religion are also not
at irreconcilable loggerheads for
the simple sake of the scientist. If
science were pure reason and
religion pure intuition, scientists
would be two-dimensional and
schizoid, content with severing
their intellectual life from their
spiritual life from 9 to 5 and their
spiritual life from their intellec-
tual at sundown each Friday.
Few scientists are willing to
tolerate such splits in their lives.
Albert Einstein, for instance, that
almost mythical embodiment of
the 20th Century scientist, was
virtually a mystic. He wrote about
"the harmony of natural law,
which reveals an intelligence of
such superiority" that human
thinking is "utterly insignificant"
by comparison.
EINSTEIN'S FAITH in this
order came from religion, which
inspired an "aspiration toward
truth and understanding."
"I cannot conceive of a genuine
scientist without that profound
faith ...," Einstein wrote, "I
maintain that the cosmic religious
feeling is the strongest and
noblest motive for scientific
research."
The public's belief that conflicts
rage between science and religion,
said Dr. Julian Jakobovits of
Baltimore's Sinai Hospital, "has
more to do with perceptions of
what the two fields do than what
they actually do."
"Science and religion are ac-
tually very complementary," said
Jakobivits, whose father, the chief
rabbi of the British Com-
monwealth, has written widely on
science and religion. "These two
piece together different aspects of
a giant jig-saw puzzle. I don't
know anyone with a scientific
education who has been torn bet-
ween the two areas.
IN FACT? there is nothing
about science that would inherent-
ly pull someone away from
religion. Just the opposite. One
cannot but be dumbfounded by the
Creation and how everything fits
in so perfectly even down to the
smallest molecule. Realizing that
a masterful architect must have
designed all this is a religious
exercise."
Rabbi Ephraim Buchwald of
New York's Lincoln Square
Synagogue agreed that little
strife marks science and religion.
The two disciplines, he noted, may
even have more similarities than
one might expect.
"Scientific reasoning is close to
Talmudic reasoning," he said.
"Both are based on carefully
made observations. Both seek
proof."
While these respective "proofs"
may differ, Buchwald noted, they
do not disagree on the essential
phenomena or on its previously
unsuspected order.
"SCIENCE PREVIOUSLY
said that molecules have random
movement," said Buchwald, "but
it could not account for that move-
ment. Now, we see that there is a
pattern to molecular movement.
Genesis (the first book of the bi-
ble) may indicate that the world is
about 5,700 years old, but its
description of the sequence of
Creation from the simplest to
the most complex does not dif-
fer with the pattern of evolution.
Science also admits that it has no
explanation for the origin of the
Big Bang (the cosmic explosion
that may have created the
universe). They call it a 'force.'
We call it 'God.'
Quantum mechanics, the para-
mount theory of current physics,
postulates that arbitrary,
capricious energy pure chance
rules the world. It suggests that
the world is ultimately
unknowable and unpredictable.
An atom's location or its speed,
for instance, can be determined
but not both. Electrons and other
particles pop about at random,
without rhyme or reason.
Continued on Page 12-A
Computers
Can They Be Counted in 'Minyan?'
Biochemist
Eli Schmell
As computers' power and "intelligence"
have increased, there has been occasional
speculation about whether they may be
counted in a minyan. This is a debate that has
persisted, in one form or another, since at
least the story of the golem the robot
created by kabbalistic rites in the 16th
century.
Perhaps a bit puckishly, Azriel Rosenfeld,
an Orthodox rabbi who is also a professor of
computer science at the University of
Maryland, is inclined to include highly in-
telligent robots in minyans. Rosenfeld's
criteria for minyan membership rests on
whether a prospective member has a soul.
"If it's intelligent," he said, "it has a soul."
Rosenfeld would determine whether ar-
tificial intelligence equaled human in-
tellligence by submitting a computer to "Tur-
ing's Test," a crude gauge of intellect devised
by a pioneering cyberneticist in 1950. Under
"Turing's Test," an interrogator would con-
verse by teletype with a computer which con-
ducts its end of the conversation, to the best
of its ability, as if it was a human. If the inter-
rogator cannot detect the deception, the com-
puter is "intelligent."
Nonsense, said Avram Goldfinger. "Jews
are chosen for certain tasks," said this Or-
thodox computer scientist at "the Johns
Hopkins University Applied Physics
Laboratory. "We have different obligations
than robots."
"And anyway," added Goldfinger, "I don't
know what intelligence is."
A.J.M.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
U.S., Not Israel, Responsible
For Iran Decision State Dep't.

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion has stressed again that
the United States govern-
ment, not Israel, is responsi-
ble for the Administration's
decision to sell arms to Iran.
"Israel does not make
decisions for the U.S.
government," State Depart-
ment deputy spokesperson
Phyllis Oakley said. "We
make our own decisions and
accept responsiblity for our
own actions."
Oakley noted that over the past
three days there have been news
reports in which members of the
Administration appeared to be
blaming Israel for the decision to
sell arms to Iran in exchange for
the release of American hostages
in Lebanon and for diverting ex-
cess funds from the sale to the
Contras.
THE WHITE HOUSE released
two weeks ago a memorandum
dated January 17, 1986, by the
then National Security Adviser,
John Poindexter, to President
Reagan which indicated that
Israel promoted U.S. contacts in
Iran in an effort to bring about a
more moderate government there
and suggested selling arms in
return for the release of the
hostages. The President did not
read the memorandum but was
briefed orally from it.
The release of the document
was followed by reports alleging
that Israel pressed the U.S. to
continue dealing with Iran despite
the reluctance of White House
aides.
Oakley denied reports that
Reagan or any other Administra-
tion official had apologized to
Israel for the attempt to blame
U.S. policy on Jerusalem. But she
confirmed that Thomas Pickering,
the U.S. Ambassador to Israel,
discussed the "issue" with
Premier Yitzhak Shamir on Sun-
day (Jan. 11). She said Pickering
did not present Shamir with a let-
ter from Washington, but orally
gave the U.S. position that it
assumed responsibility for its
action.
HOWEVER, Shamir's
spokesman, Avi Pazner. said in
Jerusalem that Pickering assured
the Premier that the Administra-
tion was not trying "to make
Israel a scapegoat for the decision
made by Washington."
Oakley's comments came as
Yossi Beilin, director general of
Israel's Foreign Ministry, was
conducting two days of talks here
with Michael Armacost, Assistant
Secretary of State for Political
Affairs.
She noted that the talks were
part of the periodic discussions
between Armacost and the direc-
tor general of the Foreign
Ministry which began in 1983,
although this was Beilin's first
participation since becoming
director general.
The talks covered "the full
range of bilateral, regional and in-
ternational issues of mutual in-
terest to the U.S. and Israel,"
Oakley said.
Shamir Says He Has Received
Assurances of No Scapegoating
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir has
received assurances from
Washington that the
Reagan Administration was
not trying to scapegoat
Israel in the Iran arms sales-
Contra affair. Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres confirmed
this to the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Securi-
ty Committee last week.
He also disclosed that he sent a
message of his own to Vice Presi-
dent George Bush reiterating
Israel's denial that it was involved
in the transfer of proceeds from
Iranian weapons purchases to the
Nicaraguan rebels, known as Con-
tras, or that Israel initiated the
U.S. arms sales to Iran in 1985.
THE IMPRESSION that Israel
was the prime mover in the arms
sales was contained in a briefing
memorandum to President
Reagan by his then National
Security Adviser, Admiral John
Poindexter, released by the White
House.
Israel was also agitated by
reports in the U.S. media, at-
tributed to Administration and
Congressional sources, that it was
shipping weapons to the Contras
at its own initiative in 1985,
unknown to the U.S. until
"detected" by American
intelligence.
Israeli diplomatic sources in
Washington were quoted by Israel
Radio as expressing concern "that
Israel was now being made a
scapegoat" by the White House.
Peres confirmed that a message
from the White House was con-
veyed orally to Shamir by U.S.
Ambassador Thomas Pickering,
assuring Israel that the
documents released last week
were not intended as criticism of
Israel.
A STATE DEPARTMENT of
ficial said that the White House
realized after the documents were
released that they were potential-
ly damaging to U.S.-Israel
relations.
A State Department source was
quoted in the American media as
saying that "Tom Pickering was
told to tell Shamir that the White
House release of the documents
was not an attempt to point
fingers and accuse Israel of
anything, but that so much partial
and incorrect information had
been leaked out, and the Presi-
dent had a commitment to get
everything out to the public, that
the White House felt it was impor-
tant to get them on the record."
The Poindexter memo stated
that an emissary from Peres, who
was Prime Minister at the time,
brought to Washington a plan to
sell weapons to Iran as a means of
securing the release of American
hostages held by pro-Iranian
elements in Lebanon and for
mutually beneficial strategic in-
terests of Israel and the U.S.
The memorandum reportedly
was prepared by Lt. Col. Oliver
North, an aide to Poindexter at
the time.
PERES, in his appearance
before the Knesset committee,
blasted the Israeli media for
"drawing fire" down on Israel by
publishing reports of its role in the
Iran arms sale and transfer of
funds to the Contras. Israel has
maintained that it facilitated the
arms shipments solely at the re-
quest of the Reagan Administra-
tion to help an ally obtain the
release of its hostages. It has
vigorously denied any Contra
connection.
OVAL OFFICE PROMOTION: President
Reagan talks with Chief U.S. Arms Control
Negotiator Max Kampelman during a meeting
in the Oval Office at the White House last
week. Appearing to match a move by the
Kremlin, the President announced that
AP/Wide World Photo
Kampelman. who received final instructions
before .flying to Geneva for the resumption of
talks on Thursday (Jan. 15), will serve both as
the head of the U.S. delegation there and as
State Department counselor.
In Vienna
Kreisky Quits Party Posts in Snit
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) -
Former Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky resigned Thursday
(Jan. 15) from his posts in
the Socialist Party to pro-
test the selection of People's
Party leader Alois Mock as
Foreign Minister. The two
parties comprise Austria's
coalition government.
Socialist leaders said last Thurs-
day that they hoped Kreisky
would reconsider his decision to
step down as honorary chairman
of the party and president of the
Institute for International Policy
and the Renner Institute, his
party's academy.
ACCORDING TO a Socialist
daily newspaper, Kreisky said he
couldn't go along with a foreign
policy designed by Mock, who was
head of the People's Party during
Kurt Waldheim's successful run
for the Presidency last spring. Ug-
ly anti-Semitic statements surfac-
ed during the campaign as the
World Jewish Congress repeated-
ly raised allegations about
Waldheim's Nazi affiliations and
military activities during World
War II.
Kreisky, who was controversial
himself for his contacts with the
PLO, Libya and North Korea,
allegedly is afraid that a Conser-
vative Foreign Minister will be
unable to diminish the harm done
by the Waldheim campaign to
Austria's image abroad.
Moreover, foreign policy had
been a Socialist domain for many
years. Kreisky served as
Secretary of State in the Foreign
Ministry and later as Foreign
Minister before serving as
Chancellor from 1970-83.
Reaction varied to Kreisky's
decision, telephoned Wednesday
night to newly elected Chancellor
Franz Vranitzky from the hospita'
bed here where Kreisky is ill with
influenza.
MOCK CALLED it incom
prehensible, and both Vranitzky
and Socialist Party chairman Fred
Sinowatz said they wanted to ask
Kreisky whether his decision was
irrevocable.
Vranitzky down-played the im-
portance of a Conservative
Foreign Minister, explaining that
foreign policy would be designed
through close cooperation within
government. He added that
Austria has more important pro-
blems than a struggle over Mock
The Socialist Party Council ap-
proved the coalition agreement
Thursday.
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Unhappy Political Realities
Encourage Strange Behavior
Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A_
Continued from Page 1-A
tiencies in U.S. facilities,
lowever. an obvious example is
Jie U.S. Consulate building in
Jerusalem."
This is an old, graceful structure
iating from the Turkish Empire.
Today, scaffolding keeps the roof
From collapsing. This facility's
location only a few feet from the
Street makes it a serious security
risk.
SAID LEHMAN: "U.S. Am
.^issador Tom Pickering told me
[that the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv
. in even worse shape. Only the
jfconcern and diligence of Israeli In-
telligence services have prevented
tragedy."
In Lehman's view, "The
deplorable condition of our em-
assy and consulate underscores
_.he need to construct a new em-
Ibassy in Jerusalem in a protec-
|table compound."
This raises the question of
lAmerican policy with respect to
the status of Jerusalem as Israel's
national capital a status the
ll'nited States does not accept and
Ithat is symbolized by the U.S. em-
|bassy in Tel Aviv.
But according to Rep. Lehman:
"An amendment sponsored by
Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.) pro-
hibits the State Department from
spending funds on any U.S. em-
bassy in Israel that is not located
i Jerusalem, Israel's capital."
SAID LEHMAN: "While I sup-
ort the transfer of our embassy
[rom Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, I do
tot foresee a U.S. policy change
n this question until progress is
iade on peace negotiations bet-
ween Israel and Jordan.
Referring to his discussions
R-ith Ambassador Pickering, U.S.
Consul Morris Draper and top
Israeli leaders, Lehman
elaborated on what he
locumented in his recent
Washington Report.
"The focus," he said, "was on
pvo new initiatives supported by
b<>th the U.S. and Israel to
stimulate development on the
ftest Bank. First, the Jordanian
National Bank recently opened a
branch office on the West Bank.
At present, it makes only con-
sumer loans, but it will soon be ex-
panding into a full-service finan-
cial institution.
"Second, Congress has made
available to the government of
Jordan up to $15 million to sup-
port a Jordanian development
program to improve West Bank
roads, schools, clinics and utilities.
This year, the U.S. will provide $7
million for these projects."
ACCORDING to Lehman, while
both the U.S. and Israel support
these efforts with great en-
thusiasm, "no one believes they
will solve the problems on the
West Bank. Rather, the purpose is
to diminish PLO influence by
developing alternative leadership
and methods to improve the quali-
ty of life for West Bank Arabs."
Referring to a meeting he had
with Moshe Arens, a former
Israeli Ambassador to the United
States and a former Minister of
Defense, Lehman noted that
"Arens' office is in East
Jerusalem, which was in Jorda-
nian territory before the 1967
war.
"I was accompanied to his office
building by a high-ranking officer
from the U.S. embassy, but he re-
mained in the car in the parking
lot. In keeping with U.S. policy,
our diplomatic personnel are for-
bidden to conduct business with
Israeli government officials in
East Jerusalem another exam-
ple of the strange ways of the Mid-
dle East.
Concluded Lehman: "Among
the subjects I discussed with
Arens was the Lavi jet-fighter,
which was developed by Israel
with U.S. economic support. Re-
cent test flights give reason for
optimism for the future. The Lavi
will make Israeli defense more
self-reliant, create new export op-
portunities, and develop Israeli
high-tech industries to help pre-
vent the country's most
knowledgeable and skilled resear-
chers and workers from pursuing
better opportunities elsewhere."
[Public Losing Confidence in Labor,
Likud Coalition, Poll Shows
TEL AVIV (JTA) The public is losing confidence
Labor and Likud, the principal partners in the unity
coalition government, according to a poll published Friday.
\t indicated that both would lose votes if elections were
leld now. The beneficiaries would be parties on the left and
right of the political spectrum.
ACCORDING TO the poll by the Hanoch Smith
.tesearch Institute, published in Davar, 38 percent of the
electorate would vote for Labor and 27 percent for Likud.
This represents a 4 percent loss for the Labor Party and 1
?rcent decline for Likud since a similar poll was conducted
September 1986.
Support for the leftist Citizens Rights Movement
:RM) rose from 4.5 percent last September to 6 percent
kow. The rightwing Tehiya Party went from 6 to 8 percent
Approval by the respondents.
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Long Beach, L.I. The conference updated
students on current Israeli issues. The Broad-
way play, 'Hanna Senesh' was staged as part
of the program.
Israel Consul General Moshe Yagar speaks to
students before the annual University Service
Department Midyear Conference of the State
University of New York at a gathering in
French Say
Jews of Lebanon Should Flee Country
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The
Representative Council of
Major French Jewish
Organizations (CRIF) has
urged Lebanon's remaining
Jewish community to flee
the country at the earliest
possible moment to save
their lives. Fewer than 100
Jews are believed to remain
in Lebanon.
Roger Pinto, head of CRIF's
committee for imperiled Jewish
communities, made his plea a day
after a Shiite terrorist group in
Lebanon announced the "execu-
tion" of another Jewish hostage,
bringing to nine the number of
Lebanese Jews kidnapped and
murdered in less that two years.
THE LATEST victim has iden-
tified by the killers as Yehoudah
Benesti, 70, whose two sons,
Ibrahim and Youssuf, were slain
by the same group last year.
Pinto stressed that Lebanese
Jews "belong to no community"
as do Moslems and Christians,
"have no militias of their own and
do not enjoy the help or protection
of any foreign powers." Accor-
ding to Pinto, "They remain in
Lebanon because they love their
country," but the time has come
for them to flee.
Two Lebanese Jewish hostages
are believed here to be still alive.
They are Isaac Sasson, the former
president of the Lebanese Jewish
community, who was kidnapped
on March 31. 1985; and Selim
Jamous, the community's former
secretary, who was kidnapped
from his office on August 14,
1984.
They are believed held by the
same extremist terrorist group
responsible for the murders of
Jews.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 28, 1987
No Confidence
London theatre Oj^ftay
Showing Zionist 'Collaborators'
Gov't. Beats Back Five Motions
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The government has
defeated five non-
confidence motions in the
Knesset over the new
economic plan approved by
the Cabinet. But it remains
locked in dispute with
Histadrut over a proposed
$30 million cut in subsidies
to the Kupat Holim (sick
fund) which was excised
from the Health Ministry's
budget.
The imbroglio forced postpone-
ment of the ceremonial signing of
the economic plan by the govern-
ment, Histadrut and the Associa-
tion of Manufacturers and
Employers. It had been scheduled
for Tuesday night (Jan. 13).
Talks continued throughout
Wednesday between Finance
Minister Moshe Nissim, the heads
of the Treasury's Budget Depart-
ment, and Yisrael Kessar,
secretary general of Histadrut.
The labor federation has dug in
its heels against the subsidy cut.
Kupat Holim, which provides com-
prehensive health care benefits, is
a major inducement for Israelis to
join Histadrut.
Meanwhile, the Education
Ministry is conducting its own bat-
tle against cuts in the education
budget. Members of the Histadrut
Teachers Association, mainly
elementary and junior high school
teachers, staged a one-day strike
Thursday (Jan. 15) against the
cuts and the education tax which
is another feature of the new
economic program. Classes were
held for only the first two grades.
DURING THE Knesset debate,
the government's plan was attack-
ed by both the left and rightwing
parties. Yair Tsaban of Mapam,
pointing to Labor Party leader
Shimon Peres, the Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister, who is a
strong supporter of the economic
plan, declared, "You will go down
as the man who organized the
counter-revolution against social
security in Israel."
Rafael Eitan of the Tehiya Par-
Swiss Air Force
Plans To Buy 40 Teleguided
Military Aircraft From Israel
GENEVA (JTA) The Swiss Air Force plans to
buy 48 Scout teleguided military aircraft from Israel at a
cost of 50 million Swiss Francs, the Lausanne daily Le
Matin reported last week.
AIR FORCE CHIEF Gen. Walter Duerig said Scouts
Eurchased in 1985 were tested and found acceptable under
>cal conditions. Hans Rudolf Strasser, a Defense Ministry
spokesman, confirmed the Le Matin report.
He said Switzerland wants to reach a licensing agree-
ment with Israel so that local enterprise can have a hand in
manufacturing the aircraft.
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^^"*~ohPnncon
ty charged that the coalition
government encouraged"destruc-
tive apathy" among the public. He
said Israelis have no confidence in
the government and have lost
hope for the future.
Shulamit Aloni of the Citizens
Rights Movement (CRM) attacked
the devaluation of the Shekel, a
major feature of the economic
plan. She said it was part and
parcel of the government's skew-
ed priorities.
MATITYAHU PELED of the
Progressive List noted that the
military's refusal of cuts in the
defense budget was accepted by
the government, while it slashed
the budgets for health, education
and housing.
Communist Party leader Meir
Vilner assailed Histadrut for
"helping off the legs of the
workers." He added that the
government "wants to cut off
their arms as well."
Nissim, replying for the gover-
nment, was repeatedly heckled by
Yaacov Shamai, who heads the
Likud faction in Histadrut. When
a hand vote was taken on the non-
confidence motions, both Shamai
and Histadrut chief Kessar were
absent from the chamber.
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) The
Royal Court Theater, one of
the most prestigious in Lon-
don's West End, will shortly
present a play titled "Perdi-
tion" which depicts Zionists
as willing collaborators with
the Nazis in the mass exter-
mination of Hungarian
Jews.
The play has already drawn
angry protests from British Jews,
Holocaust survivors and others as
an insidious libel and propaganda
windfall for the Soviet Union and
anti-Israel hatemongers in Libya
and Iran.
Scholars of the Holocaust, in-
cluding Winston Churchill's
biographer, Martin Gilbert, and
Dr. Stephen Roth, director of the
Institute of Jewish Affairs and
himself a member of the Zionist
movement in Hungary during
World War II. have called the play
"preposterous" after reading it in
script.
ACCORDING TO Gilbert, it is a
"vicious travesty of the facts."
Roth branded it "a libel against all
those who lived through, fought
and mostly perished in the
Holocaust."
The playwright, Jim Allen, a war.
former miner, admits to being an
outspoken foe of Israel but claims
to be "very pro-Jewish" and that
he is "rescuing the Jews from
Zionism."
In an interview published in The
Guardian, Allen maintained that
the Zionists were 'Hitler's
favorite Jews" because their in-
terests coincided with his "on the
basis of opportunism."
Allen's rationale is that "Hitler
wanted the Jews out of Europe
and the Jews wanted a state in
Palestine. It was almost a wlkxtt
(folk) thing, blood and land. Hitler
was fond of the Zionists, they
were good Jews, prepared to fight
for land."
IRONICALLY, the Royal
Court Theater has several
wealthy Jews among its patrons,
and its chief fund-raiser in the
U.S. is believed to be the im-
presario Joseph Papp, a strong
supporter of Israel.
Allen's play is loosely based on
events in Hungary in 1944 when
the Zionist leader, Rudolf
Kastner, engaged in hopeless
negotiations with Adolf Eichmann
to buy Jewish lives in exchange
for trucks and money. Kastner's
activities were the subject of bit-
ter controversy in Israel after the
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Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
to'
Knesset Erupts in Flying Fists,
Insults As Soviets Look On
Present among 900 top executives and stars
honoring NBC President Brandon Tartikoff
\at a recent Jewish National Fund dinner in
Universal City, Calif, are (left to right) actor
George Peppard; Mrs. Samuel I. Cohen; Dr.
New Plan
Samuel I. Cohen, executive vice president,
Jewish National Fund; NBC talk-show host
Johnny Carson, and Alex Afaas, Carson's
fiancee. (See story, Page 1S-A).
Aims At 'Permanent' Solution
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
TA) Israel has offered
le Security Council a new
Ian aimed at reaching "a
jrmanent solution" to the
istable situation in south
sbanon.
[The Israeli plan calls for "an im-
ediate and total ceasefire in the
tire area of South Lebanon for a
^riod of at least six months,"
Dhanan Bein, Israel's Acting
nbassador to the UN, declared.
Bin introduced the Israeli plan
hursday night (Jan. 15) after the
} member Council unanimously
j>proved the extension of the
indate of the United Nations In-
rim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL)
another sue months.
THE ISRAELI delegate told
Council that once the ceasefire
[established in south Lebanon,
will then be possible to
Catholic,
Jewish Guide
[Continued from Page 4-A
adapt to this period of
eralization. Just as we have the
erty to manifest ourselves as
vs. so do anti-Semites have the
Brty to manifest themselves as
.i-Semites."
porn in Lisbon, Portugal, of
rian refugees from Hitler,
?1 was raised in New York Ci-
He received his ordination
Hebrew Union College-
fish Institute of Religion in
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negotiate the territorial and
obligational aspects of a perma-
nent solution. These principles
should in Israel's view constitute
an accepted framework for a
dialogue on lines similar to those
envisaged in Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338."
Bein stressed that Israel does
not consider the security zone it
established in 1984 in south
Lebanon to be permanent.
Moreover, he said, Israel is wor-
ried that the current stalemate is
harmful to all parties concerned.
Israel, therefore, is interested in
reaching a permanent solution for
the security of its northern
border, Bein said, adding: "For
this purpose, Israel is willing to
negotiate and cooperate with the
Government of Lebanon or any
other credible partner in that
country that genuinely seeks and
can ensure peace in Lebanon."
THE AMBASSADOR praised
the contribution of UNIFIL in
maintaining stability in the area.
He rejected, however, the charge
made last week by UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de Cuellar
that Israel was the major cause of
the deteriorating security situa-
tion in south Lebanon.
Israeli diplomats said Friday
that they had not received any
response to their new initiative.
A spokesman for the Israeli UN
Mission said that Israel forwarded
its new plan for south Lebanon to
UN Undersecretary General for
Political Affairs Marrack
Goulding.
Israel withdrew its forces from
Lebanon in 1985. It maintained,
however, a "security belt" in
south Lebanon, extending three
to 15 miles north from the Israeli-
Lebanese border, as a buffer zone
against terrorist attacks on Israeli
villages and settlements in upper
Galilee.
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By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Knesset ushers and guards
were forced to intervene
Monday in a clash between
left- and right-wing
members during a visit by a
Soviet delegation.
The three-member delegation
from the Soviet Peace Committee,
visiting Israel at the invitation of
the Hadash (Communist) Party,
was taken to the Knesset by their
hosts, who wished to show them
the parliament and introduce
them to members.
THEY MET in a private dining
room for about two hours with
Knesset members from the Labor
Party and leftwards, but when
they entered the Knesset
members' lounge and cafeteria
they were met by Geula Cohen,
Yuval Neeman and Eliezer
Waldman of the rightwing Tehiya
Party displaying posters deman-
ding free emigration for Soviet
Jewry.
Communist member Charley
Biton grabbed the banner from
Cohen and tore it up. But the fiery
Cohen, who had apparently an-
ticipated his reaction, unfurled
another poster.
Insults soon gave way to shov-
ing and fisticuffs, and the Knesset
ushers intervened to stand bet-
ween the rival factions, but not
before Kach member Meir Kahane
physically attacked Biton.
COHEN FELL to the floor. She
later claimed that she had been
pushed down by Biton, but he
claimed that she had lain down on
the floor with her poster.
The guards escorted the Soviet
visitors, appearing white and
shaken, from the building.
Knesset Speaker Shlomo Hillel
denounced the incident, described
by parliamentary correspondents
as one of the most serious ever
seen in the Knesset. He said that
he would ask the House Commit-
tee to give him increased powers
to punish members who interfere
with the normal work of the
parliament and prevent visitors
from coming to see Israel's
parliamentary democracy in
action.
Cohen and other rightwing
members demanded that Biton be
removed from the Knesset "for at
least a year."
Jews Urged
To Shun
Non-Kosher
SYDNEY, Australia (JTA) -
The head of the Beth Din (rabbinic
court) here has urged Orthodox
Jews to avoid non-kosher func-
tions to protect their own and
Judaism's dignity.
Rabbi Dr. Y. Kemelman said
that to attend a non-kosher func-
tion, sit in a corner and eat from
"a second or third-rate menu .. .
looks to me as the adoption of a
ghetto status."
Moreover, the rabbi said an
Orhtodox Jew's attendance at a
public non-kosher function is to be
interpreted as a sanction, the
Australian Jewish Times reports.
The rabbi went on to advocate
kashrut at all public Jewish
events. "It should be clearly
pointed out to people that even if
their Jewish observance in private
is not what it should be, there is
nothing hypocritical about
upholding traditional sanctities
and amenities in their public
celebrations of Jewish religions
occasions," he said.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
A Jewish Covenant
Mixed Marriage Rapped by Rabbis
Continued from Page 1-A
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
the central body of Reform
Judaism, supports this stance,
asserting: "Intermarriage
represents a potential drain on the
numeric strength of the Jewish
people and on its inner commit-
ment. Whether I like it or not, my
officiati. >n would be seen as a seal
of approval and would therefore
become encouraging of intermar-
riage. If I participate. I give
license to those who say, 'Well,
the rabbis are officiating, why in
heaven's name is there anything
wrong with my intermarrying? '
MOST RABBIS justify their
refusal to officiate at interfaith
weddings by arguing that the
Jewish idea of marriage is that of
a covenant between two Jews.
Rabbi Haskell Bernat of Miami ex-
plains the rabbi's role: "Contrary
to what is often thought, the rabbi
neither confers God's blessings on
the bride and groom nor does the
rabbi 'marry' the couple. As a
m'sader kiddushin. the rabbi
serves as a witness on behalf of
the Jewish people. Symbolically,
the rabbi is the Jewish people at
the ceremony, and through the
rabbi we enter into the covenant
with the bride and groom."
But some rabbis and many lay
people believe that the normative
rabbinic stance is out of touch
with modern realities. Alfred
Miller of Montreal is among those
who urge rabbis to perform mixed
marriages. He says: "It is impossi-
ble to stress too strongly how bit-
ter the Jew feels when the rabbi
refuses to marry him. He feels he
is being rejected by the Jewish
people, leaving a scar from which,
he rarely recovers. If a religious
marriage is refused, it does not
stop the couple from getting mar-
ried it only turns them away
from the synagogue."
Contras Won't
Figure in Talks,
Shamir Says
Continued from Page 1-A
certain Arab states which called
for Soviet involvement in a peace
forum on the grounds that
Washington had lost credibility in
the region as a result of the sale of
arms to Iran.
He spoke to reporters after
briefing the Knesset Foreign Af-
fairs and Defense Committees in
Jerusalem.
The Premier told Committee
members earlier that while he
might support posible changes of
tactics, he did not support the no-
tion of territorial concessions in
Judaea and Samaria.
HE WAS responding to queries
about an interview he gave last
week to Reuters news agency in
which he was quoted as indicating
that Israel might, in the course of
a negotiation, move to a position
favoring some territorial
flexibility.
Shamir has been attacked for
this statement by Gush Emunim
and there have been signs of dis-
quiet within his own Likud Party.
Meanwhile. Vice Premier
Shimon Peres is preparing for a
European visit that will take him
to three capitals. He is to meet
with Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher in London, with Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand in
Paris, and with the Foreign
Ministers of the European
Economic Community countries
in Brussels. He leaves Israel later
this week.
Dr. Mark Winer, a sociologist,
is senior rabbi of Tempi* Beth
David in Commack, N. Y., and
director of the Research Task
Force for the Future of Reform
Judaism.
According to Mel Merrians of
Larchmont, N.Y., rabbis should
solemnize mixed marriages "only
if the partners have agreed to
study Judaism seriously, maintain
a Jewish home and rear their
children as Jews." Merrians
criticizes those rabbis who co-
officiate with Christian clergy. "I
don't think you can be married
within two religious traditions,"
he says.
AMONG THE Reform rabbis
who officiate at weddings bet-
ween Jews and non-Jews, most in-
sist that the couple commit
themselves to maintaining a
Jewish home, joining a temple and
rearing the children as Jews.
Some, like Rabbi Harry Danziger
of Memphis, require that the cou-
ple study the same program as
those preparing for conversion.
These rabbis believe that of-
ficiating at an interfaith wedding
brings the couple closer to the
synagogue and to Judaism. Rabbi
Danziger says, "I see them after
the wedding just as often as I see
Jews who marry Jews."
Recent Jewish community
studies indicate that approximate-
ly one in three Jews currently
enters marriage with a partner
who was not born Jewish. Yet,
despite this rise in the frequency
of Jewish intermarriages, fewer
rabbis appear willing to solemnize
mixed marriage ceremonies than
might have done so 15 years ago.
The trend is particularly notable
among rabbinic students. Dr.
Alfred Gottschalk, president of
the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, sees the
tendency away from officiation as
"the temper of the times." Unlike
rabbinic students in earlier
generations, most students now
come from Reform homes but in
many respects feel closer to tradi-
tional Judaism.
Congregations that will employ
only those rabbis who officiatesat
mixed marriages are finding
fewer candidates to choose from.
Paul Uhlmann, Jr. of Kansas City,
who supports this kind of litmus
test in the selection of rabbis, feels
that the rabbi's position on this
issue should be a part of his or her
curriculum vitae. Rabbi Kenneth
Segel of Montreal compares a con-
gregation's choice to the selection
of a husband or wife. "If the con-
gregation feels that a rabbi's of-
ficiating at mixed marriages is im-
portant, it's right," he says.
BUT UAHC board chairman
Charles Rothschild Jr. rejects
such a test, and CCAR executive
vice president Joseph Glaser calls
it "self-defeating for congrega-
tions to refuse consideration of a
rabbi who will not perform mixed
marriages. In so doing," he says,
"they eliminate over half of the
members of the CCAR, reducing
the odds of finding the kind of rab-
bi they ought to have as leader,
teacher and pastor. It's unfair not
only to the rabbis, but also to the
congregations."
Rabbi Bernat of Miami declines
to officiate at interfaith weddings
out of ideological conviction. But
he also believes that his converts
have a special claim on him as the
guardian of the boundaries of the
Jewish people. He reasons, "Were
I to officiate, could they not con-
front me with, 'How can you give
to those unwilling to make our
commitment the same benefits
and sacred privileges?
Many thousands of others not
born to Judaism are married to
Jews affiliated with Reform
temples. Although they may not
convert formally to Judaism, they
rear their children as Jews,
observe Jewish holidays at home,
and sometimes become active in
their temples. These "de facto
Jews" have become numerous in
some temples, especially in
smaller Jewish communities The
CCAR's 1983 resolution on
patrilineal descent legitimized the
Jewishness of the children of such
intermarriages in which the
mother is not Jewish, provided
that the children are raised as
Jews.
THE CONNECTION between
the refusal by rabbis to officiate at
interfaith weddings and Reform
Judaism's program of Outreach to
non-Jews is widely misunderstood
as a rejection of couples who in-
tend to intermarry and an accep-
tance of those who have already
done so. But Rabbi Schindler does
not find the two strategies in-
congruous. "Outreach is predicted
on the asssumption that we can
oppose intermarriage without re-
jecting the intermarried," he
says.
Passover
at the Concord
Mon April 13 Tues April 21
The observance of
tradition, the magnificence
of the Sedanm, the
beauty of the Services
the brilliance of the Holi
day Programming
Cantor Herman
Molamood assisted by
the Concord 45 voice
Symphonic Chorale, di-
rected by Matthew Lazor
and Don Vogel to of-
ficiate at the Services
Outstanding leaders
from Government. Press
the Arts and Literature
Great films Music day
and night on weekdays
Special programs for tots
tweeners and teens
Rabbi Simon Cohen
will oversee constant
Koshruth supervision and
Dietary Law observance
Raymond Drilling Ritual
Director
and Sedanm
nr\,
CONCORD
RESORT HOTEL/
Kiamesho Lake NY 12751

During a recent visit to Israel, Sen. Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.)
met with the leadership of the General Federation of Labor, the
Hi8tadrut, including Masha Lubelsky, secretary general of
Na'amat Israel, to discuss the impact of Israel's proposed
economic program. Lubelsky pointed out that the proposals would
be detrimental to working women, in effect reducing their net
salaries by nine percent and discouraging them from continuing
to work.
"The rabbi who does not choose
to officiate should spend extra
energy striving to convince the
couple that there is no rejection
involved. I invariably spend far
more time counseling the couple
to whom I have to say 'no' than
with the couple whom I will
marry. If possible, I attend their
wedding to demonstrate sym-
bolically my embracing them,
even though I could not myself
officiate."
Lydia Kukoff of Los Angeles,
director of Reform Judaism's
Outreach Commission, sees no
contradiction between refusing to
officiate at interfaith marriages
and programs of Outreach to the
intermarried. Combining these
contrary strategies, she says,
reflects the distinction in Jewish
law between I'chatchila (at the
outset) and b'diavad (once it has
happened). Each of these cir-
cumstances, she notes, tradi-
tionally calls for a different
response.
Rabbi Leslie Gutterman of Pro-
vidence works with interfaith
couples to "help them articulate
their own commitments and
enable them to write their own
service to be officiated at by a
judge. These couples usually come
away feeling that I have helped to
facilitate a meaningful beginning
to their married life. They know I
wish them God's blessings and
that what we have done is honest
and written with an integrity that
the couple can convey to family
and friends, whose support and
encouragement will be important
in nurturing their marriage.''
INTERMARRIAGE, which to-
day affects most American Jewish
families, brings into conflict two
fundamental values full in-
tegration into American society
and the preservation of Jewish
distinctiveness. Nothing
dramatizes this conflict more
sharply than the interfaith wed
ding. In order to bring more
knowledge to bear on this complex
topic, the newly-formed Research
Task Force for the Future of
Reform Judaism has begun a five
year investigation into every facet
of Jewish intermarriage, in-
cluding conversion, unaffiliated
mixed marriages, and rabbinic of-
ficiation at interfaith weddings.
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Cabinet Okays
New Program To Stimulate Growth
Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet has approved a
lew economic program
irhich its proponents say
,-jll stimulate economic
rowth and exports, curb in-
jlation and assure economic
Stability without causing
{ardship to wage-earners or
u-reasing unemployment.
.he main features of the plan,
Icreed to after an exhausting all-
.dit session and intensive con-
jTtations with labor and manage-
(ifiit, are a 10 percent devalua-
lon of the Shekel; a 400 million
Ihekel reduction in the national
idget; some minor tax reforms;
id a new levy on education.
ALTHOUGH the prices of some
jbsidized goods and services will
up as a result of devaluation,
v are expected to be neutraliz-
tiv wage-price constraints
freed to by Histadrut and the
[anufacturers Association. A
toposed 30 percent hike in
fansportation fares was dropped.
> price of gasoline was not rais-
A total price freeze will be in
feet until April.
|The budget itself, the subject of
[" debate within and outside of
Cabinet for the past month,
nerged with the defense budget
kscathed. The modest 80 million
kekel cut in defense expen-
jtures urged by Finance Minister
Dshe Nissim with the support of
emier Yitzhak Shamir was
ed down by a majority of the
listers, a singular victory for
kfense Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
|e 80 million Shekels will be ex
ed instead from the budget
;rves.
major and even more con-
pversial change of policy was
decision to impose an annual
jeation tax of between 100-400
ekels per child, the amount con-
sent on the parents' income.
Cabinet thereby deviated
km the principle of free com-
|sory education which has been
effect since the founding of the
State.
BUT ACCORDING to govern
ment sources, about 43 percent of
the population will be exempt.
Parents of more than three
children, residents of develop-
ment towns and families with a
monthly income of 1,000 Shekels
or less will not have to pay the tax.
The Treasury's ambitious plans
for major tax reforms, including
the elimination of loopholes and
exemptions, went by the board.
What emerged in the new
economic program was a reduc-
tion of the top income tax bracket
from 60 to 48 percent on incomes
of up to 9,000 Shekels a month.
Families earning more will pay a
surtax of 53 percent on the dif-
ference. Corporate taxes were put
in the 40 percent bracket.
Under heavy pressure from
Histadrut, the Finance Minister
was forced to abandon plans to
eliminate tax exemptions for new
development towns, working
mothers and the handicapped.
Nissim also backed away from
health care fees. Histadrut called
those proposals anti-social and
regressive.
The 10 percent devaluation of
the Shekel may have the greatest
impact. Nissim gave assurances
Tuesday that it would not usher in
a new era of periodic
devaluations.
TEL AVIV Stock Exchange
reacted favorably. Virtually all
shares advanced in price following
the announcement. Investors
were apparently convinced that
the currency rate adjustment will
spur exports and business in
general.
At a joint press conference with
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, Histadrut
Secretary General Yisrael Kessar
and Dov Lautman, chairman of
the Manufacturers Association,
Nissim declared:
"Let me assure our public that
this is a one-time action ... It will
not upset our hard-won stability
. We have seized the oppor-
tunities to ensure that the effects
of the devaluation are neutralized
. and therefore the exchange
Hospital Administrators Strike,
Psychiatric Services Hit Hardest
By HUGH ORGEL
/EL AVIV (JTA) -
lore than 10,000 service
pd administrative person-
al at the 29 government
kpitals throughout the
Juntry began an indefinite
rike of the hospital system
|onday, in what was
Jscribed by Health
piistry officials as one of
most serious crises in
strike-plagued govern-
^nt health services.
"ring the past three years the
pitals have been struck by
Irsicians and nurses.
lardest hit were the country's
fit state-owned geriatric and
110 psychiatric hospitals, which
Ud not function Sunday night,
the 11 general hospitals,
ny patients were sent home.
fR. MOSHE MASHIACH, in
finor Earthquake
5RUSALEM (JTA) A
or earthquake, 5.0 on the
liter scale, was recorded in
tern Israel Thursday (Jan.
[There were no cast* ties, or
ia8e An earthqiufce Sial
Bured 5.1 on the Richtcr scale
recorded in Cyprus some
rs earlier.
charge of the Health Ministry's
hospital department, said that
while food and some laundry ser-
vices could be contracted for from
outside sources, the operation of
the hospitals' electricity, provi-
sion of oxygen, sterile laundry
services and janitoring services
including sanitation, cleaning and
garbage collections, could only be
provided by in-house hospital
staff.
The admission and discharge of
patients were also hampered by
the absence of clerical staff.
Operations were kept to the
minimum Monday.
The hospital staffs are deman-
ding improvements in their pay
and conditions which they say
have been promised them
repeatedly in recent years but not
carried out to bring the level of
their salaries up to that of similar
personnel employed in the
hospitals of the Histadrut's Kupat
Holim (sick fund).
THE STRIKING workers have
threatened to step up their job ac-
tions beginning Tuesday
without divulging what their next
steps would be.
Meantime, their spokesmen
denied statements by Health
Ministry spokesmen that patients'
lives were being endangered.
They stressed that they had
emergency staffs standing by in
all hospitals to deal with unfore-
seen conditions.
rate will stand for a long time to
come."
The official rate now stands at
1.64 Shekels to the Dollar and
1.68 Shekels to a "basket" of
currencies.
By "neutralization," Nissim
was referring to the government's
decision to waive 2.7 percent of
employers' payments to National
Insurance and Histadrut's agree-
ment to waive 2.7 percent of cost-
of-living increments occasioned by
devaluation. But Kessar warned
that if inflation rose despite these
efforts, Histadrut would demand
that the full COL increment be
paid.
PERES AND NISSIM main
tained that the new economic plan
"created the conditions for a con-
tinuation of the stability in the
economy and renewal of growth."
Its purpose, they said, was to
avoid unemployment and not
widen the social gap. They con-
tended that industry and exports
would benefit.
The entire plan is subject to ap-
proval by the Knesset where it is
expected to encounter some stiff
opposition. Three motions of non-
confidence were introduced by
Mapam, the Hadash (Communist)
Party and the Progressive List.
Yair Tsaban of Mapam attacked
the tax reform measures. He said
they would cost the government
upwards of 1 billion Shekels in lost
revenues. But President Chaim
Herzog has called on the nation to
"continue giving unified support"
to the efforts for economic
recovery.
Jeremy Frankel, general manager of the Jerusalem Hilton (left),
and Peter van der Vliet. general manager of the Tel Aviv Hilton,
plant a tree to celebrate the unveiling of a plaque for the Jewish
National Fund's Hilton Forest in the Ramot neighborhood of
Jerusalem
Calif. Won't Pay Settlement
Of Libel Suit for Senator
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (JTA) The State Senate
will not pay the $20,000 out-of-court settlement of a libel
suit on behalf of former state Sen. John Schmitz, who
described attorney Gloria Allred as a "slick butch
lawyeress" and an audience she addressed as containing
"hard, Jewish and (arguably) female faces.
ALLRED, OF LOS ANGELES, brought the suit
against Schmitz in 1982. Schmitz eventually agreed to
publicly apologize to Allred and provide $20,000. He hoped
the state Senate would pay the sum, as it did for his at-
torney's fees. But the senate Rules Committee voted Dec.
30 not to pay the settlement.
A Call to Every American JewRegister by Feb. 9
Vote for ZOA-
Zionist Action Slate
For the first time since 1978, elections will be held this year lor the 31st
World Zionist Congress, the parliament of the Jewish people. Every American Jew
over 18 is eligible to register and cast a mail ballot by joining a Zionist organization.
You are invited to join and vote for ZOAthe Zionist Organization of
America, founder of the American Zionist movement. Our past presidents include
some of the greatest Jews in our country's history: Justice Louis I). Brandeis,
Rabbi Stephen Wise, Kabbi Abba Hillel Silver. For 90 years we have worked for:
Jewish unity... Religious freedom... Democracy in Jewish life...
The right of Jews to settle everywhere in the Land of Israel
Regardless of the Zionist body to which you belong.
You Can Vote for ZOASlate #3, a Platform for All Zionists:
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p


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. January 23, 1987
Miracles Explained
Orthodox Scientists Still Struggling
Continued from Page 5-A
IN "God and the New Physics,"
Paul Da vies wrote that "the rules
of clockwork might apply to
familiar objects such as snooker
balls, but when it comes to atoms,
the rules are those of roulette."
Despite the wide currency that
quantum mechanics has in the
scientific community, a minority
has always disputed the theory.
Einstein, one of its chief critics,
said. "I shall never believe that
God plays dice with the world."
Avram Goldfinger, an Orthodox
Jewish physicist in Baltimore,
suggested that quantum
mechanic's assumption of the ran-
domness of the universe "only in-
dicates our inability to predict the
universe. It stresses our limita-
tions, not God's."
Goldfinger, who works in com-
puter science at the Johns
Hopkins University Applied
Physics Laboratory, said quantum
mechanics cannot "fully explain"
the universe because it is "an in-
complete system. According to
the standard interpretation of
quantum mechanics, the
'Copenhagen School of Thought,'
there is a 'classical observer' a
person or an intelligence that
observes the physical system. This
observer is not subject to the laws
of quantum mechanics."
"THE THEORY implies," said
Goldfinger, "that there are beings
who are different from the rest of
the physical world. They cannot
be described by the laws of
physics. They are different from
the rest of the world because they
have intelligence or a soul."
"The more I learn about the
structure of the universe," said
Goldfinger, "the more I see the
presence of a Creator. Everything
proceeds from simple systems and
simple concepts. In molecular
biology, for instance, RNA and
DNA's control of the pattern of all
life indicates that simple prin-
ciples yield unbelievable complexi-
ty and richness."
"And in physics, a few basic
laws try to explain the entire
structure of the universe. These
seem to be getting fewer and
fewer. For a long time, it seemed
that the universe could be reduced
to four forces the gravitational
force, the electromagnetic force
and, at the subatomic level, the
'strong' force and the 'weak'
force. (The former holds together
an atom's nuclei; the latter causes
certain types of decay.) But
recently, it has begun to appear
that the electromagnetic and
'weak' forces are both examples
of a particular underlying force
Physicist
Avram Goldfinger
that is sometimes called the
'electro-weak force.' "
"TO ME," said Goldfinger, "all
the great advances of science find
simpler and simpler explanations
of the universe. This fits in with
the Jewish concept of how the
world is constituted. When we
say, 'God is one,' we are making a
statement of immense simplicty,
one that is much too simple for us
to understand."
This sense that there is an
underlying order to the universe
may also contradict the Darwinian
view that the long train of evolu-
tionary adaptation was accidental.
But no conflict was perceived by
Avram Nelkin, an Orthodox
molecular biologist at the Johns
Hopkins Oncology Center and a
believer in the bible's literal ac-
count of creation.
"The mechanism of evolution
exists," said Nelkin. "From the
time of Creation on, organisms
have changed due to selective ad-
vantage. This may be shown in
test tubes with bacteria. Or it can
be shown with cancer cells:
Cancer develops becuase it has an
advantage over other, less healthy
cells."
NELKIN ALSO dismissed the
Darwinian idea that homo sapiens
descended from apes. "Phylogen
(lines of descent) indicates that
the genes of apes and man are
close," he said. "Whether we
evolved from apes doesn't even
enter into the debate."
Other aspects of classical Dar-
winian theory are also disputed by
Nelkin and other Orthodox scien-
tists. As Darwin and his followers
extrapolated backwards over
time, say the dissenters, they
assumed that contemporary laws
of nature were constant.
But Paul Dirac, a Russian
Jewish physicist who taught at
Cambridge University, believed
that the laws of physics and,
especially, the force of gravity
change over millenia. "If Dirac is
correct," said physicist Avram
Goldfinger, "then all bets are off.
If the laws of nature change, then
we can not extrapolate past
them."
EVOLUTION OFTEN has the
aura of scientific orthodoxy for
the layman. Frequently forgotten
is science's inability to take evolu-
tion beyond the status of a theory,
to move it beyond hunches and
guesses that will forever be only
partially supported by evidence.
"Evolution can be neither pro-
ven or disproven," said Simeon
Sticky Point
Can Science, Religion Be Reconciled?
Presumably, miracles are a sticky point for
scientists. Miracles defy the very physical
laws that give the universe a certain logic, a
reassuring law and order upon which the
scientist relies.
Medieval Jewish philosophers, who believed
in a rational explanation of the universe,
devised elaborate natural reasons for
miracles. The Red Sea divided because an
east wind arose, the tides were right and
the fleeing Jews' timing was impeccable. The
burning bush was only a play of the desert
light upon certain crystals on the bush's
leaves. The sun did not stand still during the
Battle of Gibeon. It just seemed that way
because the battle was over so quickly.
Orthodox scientists of today are still strug-
gling with miracles. To some, such as
physicist Avram Goldfinger and geneticist
Avram Nelkin miracles do not conflict with
science because they are outside the laws of
nature. By abrogating the natural principles
postulated by science, miracles are also
beyond them.
To biochemist Eli Schmell, "miracles occur
via the laws of nature. God plays by the rules
that he has set up. It would be very unsettling
if we have a God who keeps changing the
rules."
And according to gastroenterologist Julian
Jakobovits, "Certain laws were laid down in
God's blueprint at the time of Creation. These
included miracles that would not occur for
millenia. At the time that each occurred,
there was probably a scientific explanation
for them. But more important was the moral
lesson that we can learn from each."
Krumbein. a physical chemist in
Baltimore. "Orthodox biologists I
know admit that they use the
language of evolution in their pro-
fessional life. But they use it as a
model. Many people, unfortunate-
ly, end up mistaking their model
for reality."
Whether the Bible's account of
Creation meshes with the scien-
tific account is moot to most Con-
servative and Reform scientists.
To them. Genesis' purpose is more
existential than historical.
"IT OFFERS a philosophical
answer to a question that troubled
Israelites at a particular phase,"
said Baltimore Hebrew College
archeologist Barry Gitlin, a Con-
servative Jew. "The question was,
'What am I doing here?' The
answer of the sages in Genesis
was that man was the steward of
God's creation, that the universe
was an orderly place and that man
has an orderly place in it."
"I see the Bible as a record of
the aspirations, traditions and no-
tions of our ancestors during their
very early history," said Gitlin.
"It is a subjective record of God's
great actions on behalf of the
Jews as they saw them
together with the laws that bound
Jewish society. At the heart of it
all is the promise of the Jews to
act in a certain way toward
humanity and toward God."
Perhaps the most glaring con-
tradiction between strict Or-
thodox scientists and much of
science is the time required for the
laborious process of creation.
About 500 million years are said
to have elapsed between the
Paleozoic Era and the present.
THE PREHISTORIC era that
preceded the Paleozoic time has
been calculated at between 1.5
billion to 2.5 billion years. In the
"big bang" theory of the universe,
100,000 years were required for
the cosmic gases from the birth of
the universe to cool just to the
type of temperatures now found
on the sun's surface. These ideas
are clearly rejected by strict Or-
thodox Jews who believe that God
created the world in seven days
5,746 years ago.
Some Orthodox counter that the
date of the Creation is an oblique
reference to the origins of civiliza-
tion. Some use Kabbalistic inter-
pretations to suggest that
previous worlds existed before the
one whose creation is cited in the
Bible. Others, such as i u
Jakobovits and Avram Neiw;tUllan
that Creation did wenr,^
5.700 years ago. but God^fc'
works appear to be much older
This divine deception. '
Jakobovits. was intended to ,
sure that man had free will
"IF I COULD convince you i
scientific way," he said, "thatnl!!
had created the world\C I
would be no choice. \n
wisdom. He covered his tracks I
He had created the world in a Dr;
vable way, we would all have li
choice but to be angels. And C\
would eliminate free will."
Jakobovits admitted
Book of Genesis is
that the
internally m.
consistent. "Light." for "j
stance, is mentioned on the Fim
and Second Days of Creation, yet
the sun, presumably the source of
this light, is not created until the
Third Day. Also, three days elapse j
until the creation of the sun, the
celestial body which "makes"
days.
"To some extent, Genesis is i|
metaphor," said Jakobovits. "Itj|,
not an accurate, historical descripj
tion of these events. But what hail
gone wrong is that people believe
that science is historically ac|
curate and that the Bible claims to I
be literal and accurate. Science is I
only a body of knowledge aj|
perceived by available technology
It examines evidence and makes!
certain suppositions."
"Religion, on the other hand. I
does not pretend to be a body
fact," said Jakobovits. "It direct* I
people to where they should be. It
gives us a certain goal a moral
goal. It sensitizes us above mere |
physical occurrences.
"FOR INSTANCE, wil
recognize that there is a physic*
reason for a rainbow, but we also
look for a more spiritual reasot'
for its existence. Likewise, I as]
bothered by those who say that]
the laws of kaskrutk are for]
reasons of health or by those win
observe skabbat because the;
need to be regenerated. This tyjn
of thinking is too limiting, v*\
mechanistic."
"The tools of scientific u-l
vestigation are limited," agreea
Hebert Goldstein, professor i\
nuclear science and engineerinf
at Columbia University. "Only
certain logical, empirical method!
are allowed. This excludes a whole
realm of other possibilities."
Continued on Page 15-A
Molecular biologist
Avram Nelkin


Friday, January 23. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Drilling for Oil Begins,
Hopes High for Negev Results
f'
Xfi.
"1
Vr. Samuel I. Cohen, executive trice president
the Jewish National Fund (second from
\iijht), presents Brandon Tartikoff, president
if SRC Entertainment (second from left), with
Tree of Life Award at a recent dinner in
the latter's honor in Universal City, Calif.
Also present, from JNF's San Fernando
Valley region, are Ernest Goodman, presi-
dent, and Marcia Rosenthal, director (right).
JBC Solon Honored
Receives JNF Tree of Life Award
.OS ANGELES (JTA) -
ie 900 top executives and stars
|the television and motion pic-
industries attended a recent
fish National Fund black-tie
ler honoring Brandon Tar-
iff, president of NBC Enter-
iment, at the Sheraton-
bmiere in Universal City.
BBC stars paying tribute to
rtikoff included Johnny Carson.
| McMahon, Michael J. Fox, Ted
nson, Kim Fields, Charlotte
Cloris Leachman, Betty
^ite, Jack Klugman, George
ppard, Dan Travanti and Soleil
3n Frye. The honoree is the
credited with organizing
NBC's first winning prime-time
schedule in 30 years.
TARTIKOFF, appointed at age
31 as the youngest division presi-
dent in NBC history, was praised
for his accomplishments by Grant
Tinker, former chairman and
chief executive officer of NBC; B.
Donald Grant, president of CBS
Entertainment; Fred Silverman,
former president of NBC;
Lawrence Lytlle. senior vice
president for creative affairs,
Warner Brothers; and performers
Michael Landon, Jay Leno and
Nell Carter.
Eytan Bentsur, Israel's Consul
General in Los Angeles, and Dr.
Samuel I. Cohen, JNF executive
vice president, presented Tar-
tikoff with JNF's Tree of Life
Award for outstanding profes-
sional and humanitarian
leadership.
Proceeds will go toward the
establishment of the Brandon Tar-
tikoff Forest and Recreation Area
in the American Independence
Park near Jerusalem. Referring
to the project, Ernest B. Good-
man, of MCA Inc., and president
of JNF's San Fernando Valley
region, stated "It is appropriate
that a man who has demonstrated
such a high commitment to profes-
sional excellence will now be
associated with improving the
quality of life in Israel."
Execution' Revealed
Shiites List Another Jewish Hostage
NEW YORK Isramco.
an American company with
oil and gas interests in
Israel, reported last week
that drilling activities have
begun on the Agur test well
in Israel's Negev Desert.
The well is targeted for the
14,500-foot depth at a cost of
ssome $4 million. Some $10
million has been allocated for an
initial series of wells to be drilled
in Israel.
Isramco's partners in the activi-
ty, known as the Negev Joint Ven-
ture, include Dr. Armand Ham-
mer and other U.S. individual in-
vestors and a number of Israeli
companies. Isramco owns an eight
percent interest in the joint
venture.
IN ANNOUNCING the spud
ding, Dr. Joseph Elmaleh, chair-
man, said, "The Agur site was the
first chosen for drilling as a result
of geophysical and geological
studies which indicate the
presence of previously unknown
deep geological traps in the
Negev, running parallel to the
Mediterranean between the
Mediterranean Sea and the Dead
Sea.
"These deep traps could contain
reservoirs of hydrocarbons in the
upper and lower Triassic, the
Jurassic and the upper and lower
Cretaceous formations, which are
historically oil and gas producing.
The traps are believed to have
prevented the migration and
subsequent dissipation of
hydrocarbons from the source
rock."
The joint venture group's
studies, part of an ongoing ex-
ploration program in the Negev
and offshore in the Mediterra-
nean, included 2,500 kilometers of
seismic lines and has cost more
than $8 million, thus far, Dr.
Elmaleh said.
"THE AGUR structure, which
is thought to contain gas, is very
large, approximately 7,500 acres
in area. Based on that size, and
also the thickness, porosity and
permeability of hydrocarbon bear-
ing reservoir rock, the Agur struc-
ture could have reserves equaliing
400 million barrels of oil." he said.
Isramco, Inc. and its partners
have the rights to explore
2,000.000 acres in the Negev
Desert which comprises 40 per-
cent of Israel's uncontested land
mass.
The joint venture also has a
1,000,000 acre permit in the
Mediterranean Sea off of the
Israeli coast. Nearby in Egyptian
waters an oil well, the Mango I,
was recently discovered, which
was tested at approximately
15,000 barrels a day from the up-
per and lower Cretaceous
formations.
Wolf, 96
Passes Away
In Ontario
TORONTO (JTA) Bernard
Wolf, a prominent merchant and
civic leader who successfully
challenged racial covenants in
Canada, has died in London, On-
tario at the age of 96. He had been
the first president of the Jewish
Community Council in London
and a member of the national
board of the Canadian Friends of
the Hebrew University.
Born Pinchas Baer in the
Ukraine, he came to Canada with
his parents early in the century
and built up a prosperous retail
business. He came to national pro-
minence in 1948 when he brought
legal action against an anti-Jewish
racial covenant on property he
wanted to buy in the resort area of
Grand Bend, Ontario.
When the covenant was upheld
by a lower court, Wolf appealed to
the Canadian-" Supreme "Court
which voided the covenant in what
entered Canadian law as the No-
ble and Wolf vs. Beach O'Pines
case. The court barred clauses in
land or property deeds which
state that the property may not be
sold or rented or in any way used
by persons of a given race or
religion.
Although not religious, Wolf
was active in many Jewish causes.
He was a strong supporter of
Jewish culture and of the
Workmen's Circle when it had a
branch in London.
n
[ARIS (JTA) A
|ite terrorist group in
)anon announced last
?k that it "executed"
)ther Jewish hostage,
louda Benesti, 70. He is
feved to be the ninth
janese Jew murdered by
group which calls itself
ie Organization of the
)ressed (Mustadafin) in
World."
is also believed to be the
er of two other murdered
Bsh hostages; Ibrahim Benesti,
who was killed on February
J986, and Youssuf Benesti, 33,
dered on Dec. 30.
IE EXACT identity and rela-
ship of the victims is not en-
ly clear because there is no
>nized Jewish community in
Hit. Jewish organizations here
only sketchy documentation
nissing Jews believed taken
ke Mustadafin said it executed
Jtest victim because of his ac-
Jes "on behalf of Israeli in-
Pgence." It released a
ograph of an elderly bald-
^d man with a well-trimmed
beard.
>rding to the group's an-
pments, 10 Lebanese Jews
taken prisoner during the
0 months and nine have been
Only three bodies have
recovered, however. Those
were identified as Haim Cohen,
38. kidnapped on March 30, 1985
and murdered on December 24,
1985; Isaac Tarrab, 70, murdered
in late December 1985; and
Ibrahim Benesti.
The French Jewish community
has appealed to the French
government and to President
Amin Gemayel of Lebanon to try
to secure the release of Jewish
hostages still alive and the return
of the bodies of those put to death.
NEITHER the French Govern-
ment nor Gemayel seems to have
influence with the Shiite ex-
tremists in Lebanon. Terry Waite,
the Englishman representing the
Archbishop of Canterbury in try-
ing to secure the release of
hostages in Lebanon, has in-
tervened on behalf of the Jewish
victims, so far without success.
He told a press conference in
Beirut Monday night that he was
also trying to act on behalf of
Israeli prisoners of war in the
hands of various groups in
Lebanon but could do nothing
unless Israel "stops bombing
(south Lebanon) and opens the
way to a peaceful solution" in that
region.
Shiites claiming to speak for the
Mustadafin were quoted as saying
they would return the bodies of
the slain Lebanese Jews only if
Israel releases Lebanese and
Palestinian prisoners in custody of
the Israel-backed South Lebanon
Army (SLA).
Four students representing Yeshiva Universi-
ty took first place in the Greater New York
regional programming competition of the
Association for Computing Machinery. The
students, who competed with representatives
from 12 colleges and universities, earned the
right to participate in ACM's International
Programming Competition next month in St.
Limis. Representing Yeshiva University were
(from left, clockwise) Andrew Linder, Yosef
Gold, Zvi Sebrow, and Eric Safern. The
students, who are seniors at Yeshiva College,
solved three computer problems in only six
hcwrs.
^M^r^^


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987

Convert Quits
Controversy Sends Her Back To Colorado
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Shoshana Miller, the con-
vert to Judaism from the
U.S. whose right to status
as a Jew was upheld by the
Supreme Court although
she was converted by a
Reform rabbi, appears to
have temporarily defused
the fierce controversy
aroused by her case.
The Jerusalem Post reports that
Miller, who returned to the U.S.
to care for her ailing father, has
elected to remain there and not
claim the Israeli citizenship the
high court said she is entitled to.
HOWEVER, the rabbi who con-
verted her and whose Reform con-
gregation employed her as a can-
tor. Rabbi David Kline of Temple
Shalom, Colorado Springs, Colo.,
said last Wednesday (Jan. 14) that
Miller "hasn't announced her final
decision" about remaining in the
United States.
He said she is one of "three of
four candidates" for her old job,
and that the synagogue would
decide on a cantor by the end of
the month. Kline added, "There
are plenty of people in the temple
who would love to have her for a
cantor."
Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz, of the
ultra-Orthodox Shas Party,
resigned as Interior Minister
three weeks ago rather than com-
ply with the Supreme Court's
order to issue Miller an identifica-
tion card as a Jew, without the
description "converted" or any
other qualification.
Murphy Sure
Peace Can
Be Reached
Continued from Page 1-A
Palestinians. Both countries
recognize the Palestine Liberation
Organization as spokesman for
the Palestinians.
Israel refuses to negotiate with
the PLO. It insists that any inter-
national forum must be a
framework for direct negotia-
tions, not a substitute for them,
and it is determined to prevent
the reentry of the Soviet Union in-
to Middle Eastern affairs.
THE U.S. APPEARS to favor
the Israeli position. Murphy, who
is Assistant Secretary for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
will meet Shamir again when the
latter comes to Washington next
month for meetings with Presi-
dent Reagan and top Administra-
tion officials. During his visits to
Israel, Murphy met with Vice
Premier and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres and Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Israeli sources believe Murphy
will return to the region after the
Islamic Conference in Kuwait
later this month. They believe
much depends on whether the con-
ference will give Egypt and Jor-
dan a freer hand to act. President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt is due to
visit Washington a week after
Shamir's visit.
Israeli sources also maintain
that a major purpose of Murphy's
current Mideast tour was to allay
Arab fears over the Reagan Ad-
ministration's covert shipment of
arms to Iran and to restore
Washington's credibility in the
Arab world.
If that is the case, his success
was only partial, the sources said.
They noted that King Hussein of
Jordan, presently on an official
visit to France, said in Paris that
because of the Iran affair,
American credibility has sunk to
"nearly zero."
Deputy Minister Ronnie Milo of
Likud, whom Premier Yitzhak
Shamir put in direct charge of the
Interior Ministry until a new
Minister is appointed, has an-
nounced that he was prepared to
issue the ID card to Miller as soon
as she applied for it. But her ap-
plication must be made in Israel,
not from abroad, Milo said.
His statement further enraged
the Orthodox religious establish-
ment, particularly because Milo
acknowledged to the Knesset that
the Supreme Court's decision
established a precedent which will
have to be honored by the Interior
Ministry in the future. The Or-
thodox parties are reported
seriously considering leaving the
Labor-Likud unity coalition
government over this issue.
THE UNION for Progressive
Judaism, as the Reform move-
ment is known in Israel, says it
has 15 converted olim waiting to
apply for ID cards in the wake of
the Miller decision. But it is ap-
parently undecided whether to in-
itiate another test case at this
time.
The Jerusalem Post, in an inter-
view with Rabbi Kline, reported
him as saying that Miller Was k.
ing interviewed for the ioh 2" ?
tor in his temple. Buill**
say unequivocally that sh?J2
decided not to return to lS|^
saidthatshe-hadamiseSj
penence in Israel" and now Wa!
time "out of the limelight"35
she considers her future.
The rabbi added, "Her aliv,
didn't work out ??"*
ashamed of her having come bS
After all, the great major? f
American ohm end up g^
Savenor Elected
SAN JOSE, Calif. (JTA) _
Charles Savenor of N'eedham
Mass., has been elected president
of United Synagouge Youth.
the ORIGINAL
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Orthodox Jews Say 'Yes'

t .

Friday. January 23. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Can Science and Religion Be Brought Together?
Continued from Page 12-A
To indicate what is disallowed
from pure scientific inquiry.
Goldstein told an anecdote about
the 19th Century French
mathematician Pierre de LaPlace.
Alter writing his definitive work.
'Methods of Celestial
Mechanics.*' he was invited to an
audience with Napoleon. The
monarch flipped through the ar-
cane tome uncomprehendingly.
He turned to LaPlace.
And where is God in al> this?"
asked Bonaparte.
Sir." replied LaPlace. "I have
no need for that hypothesis."
IT IS THIS very hypothesis
I that could conceivably color an Or-
thodox scientist's professional in-
quiries. But after an extensive
I round of interviews of such scien-
tists, no such bias was unearthed.
For one thing, Orthodox scientists
seem to have avoided those fields
in which persistent conflict might
I arise.
The current roster of the
Association of Orthodox Scien-
tists, for instance, lists plenty of
computer scientists and
[biologists, but no one astronomer,
I astrophysicist or archeologist,
[areas whose implicit cosmology
could challenge Biblical
[cosmology.
But also, as Azriel Rosenfeld. a
: -or of computer science at
tin- niversity of Maryland, said,
- ;>erfectly possible to be in a
in l>e a chemist and not care
r H how the world ame about
can design computer circuits
[ iorig and not think about
nderful the universe is."
"HOW MANY people in any
ife really think about
do and have conflicts""
Michael Kdidin. a 'ohns
biology professor.
| Jeremiah and Socrates
' -< issues to the fore.
got very, very unruly."
scientists who do ex-
inflicta may be suffer-
m a misunderstanding of
irpose of science and
A.- Azriel Rosenfeld said.
- is utilitarian and religion
Thev operate on dif-
I levels of intellectual
r ir."
And yet. it is to science that
usually looks when it
I answers" and "proof."
ps that has something to do
pith the American insistence of
Itrict separation of government
kti'i religion, maybe on the
kssumption that "proof comes
but of a test tube and not from
kraclea and prophets.
Several centuries ago. the com-
lenta of a clergyman probably
kould have been sought on the
ralue of the space program if
icre had been one in those less
"enlightened" times. But now
hat we know that God is not "in"
heaven, it is to the men in
^hite lab jackets that we turn.
"IF YOU want the "truth" in our
jociety, you quote a scientist,"
faid Julian Jakobovits, "but scien-
tists don't always deal with facts,
lypothesis educated
iesswork is a staple of the
cientific method."
"Neither religion nor science
lave an edge on truth," said Eli
Ichmell, a biochemist with the Of-
lice of Naval Research
laboratories in Arlington,
[irginia. "Both camps can be
*ther pretentious about their
futhfulness. In both, you can see
e same type of dogmatic
tarlatans."
Ironically, some aspects of
Cience that alleged bastion of
woe and empiricism require as
puch faith as religion. Faith for
[li Schmell, for instance, is re-
mred to accept the conventional
and the patently contradictory
light is both a wave and a particle.
"This duality is no more difficult
than the God concept." he said.
"We speak of God as being in-
finite. I have the same problem
understanding infinity as I do
understanding nature."
"EXTRAORDINARY faith is
required to accept some of the
basic premises of science,"
acknowledged Herbert Goldstein
of Columbia University. "We have
faith that the 'laws ofnature' will
not be one thing one day and dif-
ferent another day. I interpret the
Torah passage about God renew-
ing his wonders every day as His
assurance that these laws will not
arbitrarily change."
"In a sense," said Baltimore
physical chemist Simeon Krum-
bein, "religious belief is now
easier because modern science
makes a clear distinction between
the physical and the spiritual. We
know, for instance, that if you go
to another planet, you do not find
a physical God. Even a concept as
esoteric as the resurrection of the
dead is easier to believe in our
scientifically oriented world
because we know that God works
on a spiritual plane and we work
on a physical plane. This may not
have been clear to scientists of
centuries ago who confused the
physical with the spiritual."
This may also not be clear to the
lay public of today that occasional-
ly confuses scientific theory with
hard fact and religion with
antedeluvian explanations for
what may be. according to quan-
tum mechanics, an intrinsically
unexplainable universe.
BUT THAT does not mean the
search should cease, that it should
yield to impediments of cant or
dogma. In a sense, the inquiries of
science and religion may be more
important than their ultimate
answers if, indeed, there are
any. For as long as humans in-
quire into the ways of the
universe, complacency and indif-
ference are in abeyance and
challenge and, perhaps, even con-
tradiction are in the offing.
Science, said Baltimore Hebrew
College archeologist Barry Gitlin,
is "the quest for the truth. It
moves us toward an understan-
ding of who we are and what we
are."
The same could be said of
religion.
Albert Einstein once said,
"Religion without science is blind.
Science without religion is lame."
Science and religion are each in-
lispensable to the other: Each
tries to make sense out of what
might be a nonsensical world
By envisioning science and
'eligion as two brawling, squabbl-
ing dogmas, faith is pitted against
reason, God is pitted against the
cooly rational men ir. white lab
coats. It makes religion appear
fearful of the tide of modernity; it
makes science appear fearful of
elements that cannot be reduced
to the hieroglyphics of formulae
and hypotheses. It makes, as
Einstain said, religion blind and
science lame.
For Slain Passenger
Italians Dedicate Forest
In Klinghoffer's Memory
TEL AVIV (JTA) A forest in the memory of Leon
Klinghoffer was dedicated in Yatir near Beersheba on Sun-
day by Deputy Prime Minister Arnaldo Forlani of Italy.
The Ambassadors of Italy and the United States also
planted trees in the memorial forest in memory of Kl-
inghoffer, the 69-year-old American Jew killed during the
1985 hijacking of the Achille Lauro cruise ship. Palestinian
terrorists killed him and then threw his body overboard.
"ISRAEL AND ITALY are united in the war against
terrorism," Forlani said at the dedication ceremony. He
said it was important that Italy should be represented at
the dedication because Klinghoffer was killed on an Italian
ship. The Klinghoffer forest sponsored by the Italian
government, is part of a five-million-trees forest donated
by Italian Jews.
v, .^^m These charoes do not apply lo person to-person coin, hotel guest, calling card, collect calls, calls charged to another number. Of to time and
Dial Station |t i cnarges aJJ"1M"J Daytime rates are higher Rates do I*" '=tlect applicable lederal state and local taxes Applies to mtra-lATA long distance calls only


Page 16-A The Jewish Flondian/Friday, January 23, 1987
JNF Award
Going to Dr. Kogan in Haifa
Sharon Criticizes Unity Gov't.
Says Leadership Is 'Paralyzed'
Dr. Zev Kogan. president
of the Jewish National
Fund's southern region bas-
ed in Miami Beach, will
receive JNF's National
Israel Leadership Award at
a dinner in his honor on Feb.
11 at the Dan Carmel Hotel
in Haifa, Israel.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman of Tem-
ple Emanu-El in Miami Beach,
and Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, ex-
ecutive vice president of JNF, will
present the award to Dr. Kogan.
"I will take great pleasure in
presenting this award to Judge
Kogan, a great inspiration to the
Jewish community in Florida,
throughout the U.S., and in South
America," said Rabbi Lehrman,
who is also honorary chairman of
JNF's Foundation Committee.
"I know of no person who has
given more of himself to the cause
of Israel than this man whom I
have worked with for over 30
years. I call him 'Mr. JNF," he
said.
DR. KOGAN has worked on
Waldheim Is
Blind To
His Past
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) President
Kurt Waldheim has suggested to
his fellow Austnans that their
country has a problem with its
past which "we have tried to sup-
press in recent years" and advised
them to learn from experience. He
also warned against evading the
past.
The President spoke at the
traditional New Year reception
for the diplomatic corps at the
Hofburg Palace. It was his first
allusion, since his election last Ju-
ly, to historical agents that con-
tinue to haunt Austria. He did not
intimate that his own personal
past was part of the problem.
Austrians, he said, "have had to
learn to live with more interna-
tional criticism than ever before.
We consider much of it unjust, but
we may have heard some ques-
tions that were justly asked. Many
things we have tried to suppress
in recent years have returned
even more intensely."
But "it is never too late to learn
from these experiences,"
Waldheim said. "We have learned
there is no collective guilt for a
people but there is such a thing as
a heavy common heritage which
no individual can evade. Only by
being ready to draw the conclu-
sions from this past do we have
the chance to master the problems
of today and tomorrow."
The reception was Waldheim's
first meeting with the U.S. Am-
bassador Ronald Lauder, who was
absent from Vienna when the
President was inaugurated.
Diplomats from all other Em-
bassies, except Israel's, were
present.
Israel has yet to replace its Am-
bassador, Michael Elizur, who
retired several months ago.
Jerusalem has made clear it does
not want an Israeli envoy to pre-
sent credentials to an Austrian
President whose Nazi past was ex-
posed during the election cam-
paign last summer.
Actress Cited
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Hadassah honored actress Shelley
Winters and the Israeli design
firms of Gideon Oberson and Got-
tex at the fashion pageant here
Jan. 13 that launched the interna-
tional celebration of Hadassah s
75th anniversary.
Dr. Zev Kogan
behalf of JNF, the United Jewish
Appeal, Israel Bonds and the
Zionist Organization of America
throughout the United States and
South America in his efforts to
contribute to the political and
economic strength of Israel.
A former Miami Beach
municipal judge, Dr. Kogan
received a Master of International
Law from Yale University and a
Juris Doctor from the University
of Miami. He represented the
United States Government at the
European Economic Conference
in Geneva and has published
several studies on the politics and
economics of the Middle East.
Dr. Kogan will be participating
in JNF's Third National Assembly
in Israel Feb. 8-18, when he
receives the award. The Assembly
will gather in the Jewish state to
celebrate the centennial birth of
David Ben-Gurion, founding
father and first prime minister of
Israel.
Participants will visit JNF pro-
jects in the Galilee, Jerusalem and
the Negev, as well as attend
receptions featuring top Israeli
and American officials.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Ariel
Sharon sharply criticized the
Labor-Likud unity coalition
government in which he serves as
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry Sunday night and told a
rally of 2,000 members of his own
Herat Party that their leadership
was "paralyzed."
Sharon, an outspoken Likud
hardliner who advocates massive
Jewish settlement of the ad-
ministered territories, derided the
unity government on that issue.
He said this was the first year
since the 1967 Six-Day War that
no budget has been allocated to
purchase land in the territories.
Speaking at the Tel Aviv
Fairgrounds, he demanded the
sort of education that would make
Israeli youngsters proud Jews. He
decried the "slackening of convic-
tion (of Jews) over all of Eretz
Israel and the erosion of nation,] i
pnde.
"This is what leads to tk,
weakening of the State more
any security or economic Z<
blem," Sharon said. *
The Tel Aviv Fairgrounds M i
the site last March of an aborted
Herat convention. The convention
broke up in chaos as a result of.
power struggle for partv leader
ship between Yitzhak Shamir i
then Foreign Minister and Depu&
Premier, and Housing Minister
David Levy. Sharon's faction
aligned itself at the time win
Levy.
In his speech Sunday. Sharon
urged that the convention c*
reconvened at the earliest mo-
ment to instill new life into the
Herat movement. "There is no
need to wait for another two mon-
ths,'' he said.

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And going to fancy country club
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Considering how
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we're talking to you
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Because now it's
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H


Ij 11 i 111 III
t*
Friday, January 23,1987 The Jewish Florldian Section B
Judge Gerald Kogan
Second Jewish Member On
State's Supreme Court
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
The phone keeps ringing
ind visitors stop by as Dade
Circuit Judge Gerald Kogan
prepares to become the se-
rmd Jewish member on the
's highest judicial
ench.
"A quick Maul Tov to you!,"
ays Dade County Court Judge
Arthur Winton, as he pops his
ead into Kogan's chambers on
third floor of the Metro
istice Building, where he has sat
ace 1980.
[KOGAN'S appointment to the
Joruia Supreme Court, one of
to made last week by Gov. Bob
artinez. has a sad twist. Kogan
replace Justice Joseph Boyd,
ho after serving 18 years on the
lurt, was forced to retire this
- because he passed the state's
andatory retirement age of 70
judges. Kogan is 53.
he mandatory retirement law
unfair," Kogan says. "People
i still be-very active and alert at
at age and make great contribu-
^ns to our society. And also," he
ys. "it can deprive society of ex-
igence and talent some of the
Jges have by the time they
ch 70."
logan, who moved to Miami
ach from Brooklyn at age 14
(ien his father retired from the
nbulance supply business, says
he is ready to move to Tallahassee
Saturday. He will begin to serve
on the bench next Monday (Jan.
26). A few days later, he will at-
tend a robing ceremony and his
father, Moms, will be at his side.
MORRIS AND his wife, Yetta,
live in Boca Raton. Before that,
they lived in Miami Beach for 35
years, where Yetta had served as
president of the Miami Beach
Chapter of Hadassah and the
Miami Beach Chapter of the
American Jewish Congress.
Kogan's academic achievements
came quickly. As a student in
Brooklyn, he skipped two grades
and had graduated from high
school (Miami Beach, Class of
1950) by the time he was 17. His
earliest professional leanings,
however, were not toward law.
"I think at one time I wanted to
be a doctor, and I think my father
discouraged that. He said doctors
spend a third of their lives being
educated, a third of their lives
establishing their practice, and
when they reach the last third of
their life, they are too old to enjoy
it "
SO KOGAN went to the Univer-
sity of Miami and, again at an ac-
celerated pace, graduated both
from undergraduate and law
school in five years, all the while
working jobs such as polishing
Continued on Page 6-B
Judge Gerald Kogan
"0/ course I was happy," about the
appointment to the Florida Supreme
Court, he says. "To me it's another
challenge, and I enjoy challenges,
and I want to be able to do things that
will be positive contributions to the
system of justice."

.-.
*5
r
/
Among participants at the
first gathering of Sephar-
dim in the United States
since 1975, members of the
American Sephardi
Federation, are (left to
right) Liliane Shalom,
honorary ASF president;
Rabbi Marc Angel; Dr.
Jose Nessim, founder the
Sephardic Educational
Center in Jerusalem;
Solomon Garazi, active
leader in the Greater
Miami Jewish community;
and Haham Dr. Solomon
Goon. The gathering was
held last weekend in
Philadelphia.
See Story
Page 4-B
HabibAt
Temple Emanu-EI
... Page 2-B
Traurig To
Chair NCCJ
... Page 3-B
Federation
Kicks Off
1987 Campaign
... Page 8-8
Focus On
Issues
... Page 12-B


i
2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987

Habib Guest Speaker At
Temple Emanu-El Series
Ambassador Philip Habib. ap-
pointed this month by President
Reagan as special envoy to Latin
America, will be the guest speaker
Tuesday at the second event of
Temple Emanu-El's 1986-87
Cultural Series.
Reservations for the 8 p.m. talk
and additional information may be
secured at the Temple.
Ambassador Habib will speak in
the main sanctuary of the con-
gregation, according to Temple
Emanu-El president, Lawrence
M. Schantz. Ron Wayne is chair-
man of the Forum Series.
Habib, who has been nominated
for the Nobel Peace Prize, was the
winner in 1982 of the Presidential
Medal of Freedom, the nation's
highest civilian award. In 1979,
President Carter presented him
with the President's Award for
Distinguished Federal Service.
In May, 1981, Habib came out of
retirement to serve as represen-
tative of President Reagan in a
successful effort to keep the
Lebanese civil war from widening
into a conflict between Israel and
Syria.
He served in 1976 under Presi-
dent Ford as Undersecretary of
State for Political Affairs, the
highest career position in the
State Department, and in 1967
was a member of the United
States Delegation to the Paris
Ambassador Philip Habib
Peace Talks which helped to end
American involvement in
Vietnam.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El who coor-
dinates the Cultural Series, said
Ambassador Habib also is ex-
pected to outline his goals for the
new Latin American mission he
has just begun.
The Ford Foundation, the $3
billion strong national foundation
has announced a $500,000 grant
to the Dade Foundation as part of
its "Leadership Program for
Community Foundations."
The Dade Foundation is one of
eight foundations chosen nation-
wide to receive the Vi million
dollar challenge grants to be used
to target significant issues in their
community. The Ford Foundation
grant must be matched 2-1 by
locally raised funds. These funds
will become a part of the Dade
Foundations' unrestricted
endowment.
Ruth Shack, executive director
of the Dade Foundation stated
that the "funds will allow us the
opportunity to build a more
cohesive community."
Olmos Named Honorary
Chairman For 'WalkAmerica'
Edward James Olmos of NBC-
TV's Miami Vice has been named
Honorary Chairman for the
March of Dimes "WalkAmerica
1987" in South Florida. The an-
nouncement was made by Alan
Rosen thai, a member of the Board
of Trustees of the national March
of Dimes Birth Defects
Foundation.
Olmos will serve the South
Florida market area for the March
of Dimes, encompassing Dade.
j THE ULTIMATE \\J /
KOSHER DINING <** / /
Broward, Monroe, Palm Beach
and Martin counties. In 1986,
Olmos served as Honorary Chair -
man for the Dade
"WalkAmerica," which subse-
quently was the most successful
walkathon ever held in the State
of Florida.
"WalkAmerica" will take place
April 4, 1987 in Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach, and on April 25
in Martin County. Nationally,
"WalkAmerica" will involve more
than 2 million walkers in 1,500
cities. In 1986, "WalkAmerica"
raised $1,013,873 for the South
Florida Chapter.
KOSHER^ J~
cSTEAKfHOUSE
EARLY BIRD
DINNER
(Know inciudM dmirt AM For
F^Cour- $Q95
Special Mnu
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$ 1 O Including a
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m u fcaTM Mm* mmi
to PriaM tf FrMty 3 P.M.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
presents
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Yehuda
Shifman
In
FEBRUARY 16,19*7
8:00 P.M.
Theater Of Performing Arts
Call: 538-2503, ext. 14
S*toctA-8eet or
Charge By Phon:
1 SOO-323-7328
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division recently held its "Lion of
Judah"luncheon on behalf of the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal. The minimum gift to the
campaign for this event was $5,000. Pictured
from left are Gail Newman, Women's Zhw-
sion campaign chairwomen; Dorothy
Podhurst, president of Women's Dxvisum;
Meryl Loring, and Amy Dean, Federation
board member.
Couples To Host Temple Beth Am Israel Bonds Brunch
Dade Foundation Awarded $500,000
Morris and Mikki Futernick will
host Temple Beth Am's Annual
State of Israel Bonds Brunch at
their Miami home on Sunday, Feb.
15, beginning at 10:30 a.m. In ad-
dition to being members of Tem-
ple Beth Am. the Futernicks have
also been staunch supporters of
Israel through the Israel Bonds
program.
Guest speaker at the Brunch
will be Commodore Chaim Snak-
ed, the Naval Attache at the Israel
Embassy in Washington, and
former Head of Personnel in the
Israel Navy. Commodore Chaim
Snaked has had a distinguished
naval career. He served as Com-
mander of the Missile Boat
Flotilla in 1978-79 and of the Red
Sea Command in 1979-81. He has
also held the post of Deputy Com-
mander of the Israeli Navy Sailor
School.
Commodore Snaked has a BA in
History and an MA in Manage
ment and Strategy. In study stints
abroad, he took part in an artillen
officers course with the Bnosi
Royal Navy and with the I'.S
Naval Command College for
Senior Foreign Officers.
Serving as Temple Beth Art
Israel Bonds chairman is Robert
Berrin.
For more information, contac
the Israel Bonds office.
Organization STews
The South Dade Chapter of Women's
American ORT will meet 10:30 a.m. Tuesday
at the Kendall Acres Clubhouse. Caroline
Wulf, of the Homestead library, will give a
book review.
The South Florida Chug Aliyah Group
will meet 7 p.m. Feb. 1 at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The guest speaker will be
New York businessman Sol Shoiock and the
subject will be designed for those interested
in beginning a new life in Israel: "Moving and
Insurance.'
Other club meetings are held the first Sun-
day of the month at 7 p.m.
The South Seaa Chapter of Women's
American ORT will hold a luncheon member-
ship meeting 11:30 a.m. Feb. 3 at Temple
Adath-Yeshurun.
The South Florida Women's Committee
for Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem will
honor Rosalie (Rocky) Futterman at the
Tenth Annual Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on
Wednesday, Jan. 28, at Temple Emanu-El,
Miami Beach.
Entertainment, Arts
The unveiling of a bronze and pewter
sculpture, "The Tree of Life," will occur dur-
ing a ceremony beginning 6 p.m. Tuesday at
the American Heart Association.
Creator Laszlo Buday, who carved the 8- by
18-foot piece, will be introduced, culminating
the efforts of the AHA volunteers and the
Planned Giving Committee.
The goal to "create something significant"
was first formed three years ago, according
to Paul C. Bremer, Chairman of the Planned
Giving Committee.
Award winning conductor Andre Watts will
perform 8:15 p.m. Friday in the third concert
af the Prestige Series.
The concert will be at the Dade County
Auditorium, and will feature works by
Mozart, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff, accor
ding to Judy Drucker, president of the con-
cert Association of Greater Miami.
Congregation Bet Breira announces fourth
presentation of the Jewish Film Festival -
"The Dreyfus Affair," with discussion leader
FIU Professor Phil Pomerturz, an Austrian
born Jew who escaped the Nazis at age 13. on
Sunday, Feb. 1, 7 p.m.
PASSOVER CHOCOLATE
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9
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Temples, don't be late for Passover fundraising! Call:
Pat Westman, Gulf Distribution, Inc. (305) 634-6800 ext. 206
tj


Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Fundraiser For Alzheimer's Disease
To Benefit Program At MJHHA
Planning "A Luncheon to Remember" were Irela Saumat
(left), Martha Mischon and Lou Fischer, Assistant Director
of Development for the Miami Jewish Home.
'A Luncheon To Remember'
Bella Goldstein, Founder and President of the
Alzheimer's Care Committee, and 70 of her friends are
joining forces to combat Alzheimer's Disease, a chronic
disorder that is destroying the minds and bodies of 1.5
million Americans, almost 95,000 of whom are in South
Florida. Funds raised by the new group will be used for
new Alzheimer's programs operated by the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens, sup-
plementing a $50,000 grant from United Way of Dade
County".
An overflow crowd attended the first planning meeting
at the home of Martha Mishcon. Joining Mrs. Goldstein as
charter members of the Alzheimer's Care Notables are:
Irela Saumat, Carolyn Miller, Betty Rothbart, Eleanor
Kosow, Hildene Potashnick, Sonja Zuckerman and Susie
Rogers. Notables are those people who have gone "one
step further" and donated $1,000 each in support of
Alzheimer's Respite Care.
The first fundraising effort of the Committee, to be co-
chaired by Irela Saumat and Martha Mishcon will be called
"A Luncheon to Remember." Scheduled for Monday, Apnl
27 at 10 a.m. at the Jockey Club. Tennis, backgammon, ex-
ercise classes and a visit from a memory expert are some of
the special events planned. The luncheon and a fashion
show chaired by Jockey Club owner Joan Stevens, Dorothy
St. Jean and Brenda Nester will follow at 12:30 p.m.
"We formed this group because of the great need for
Alzheimer's care in our community, and these women care
about the community," said Mrs. Goldstein. "We chose to
donate our proceeds to the Miami Jewish Home because of
its excellent reputation in geriatrics and its innovative pro-
grams for Alzheimer's victims."
"The great thing about this luncheon is that it will allow
people not only to support a cause, but also to enjoy their
favorite activities at the same time," continued Mrs.
Goldstein.
Information on the upcoing luncheon or on the
Alzheimer's programs of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, may be had by contacting the Home.
Planning "A Luncheon to Remember" are (left to right)
Luncheon and fashion show chairperson Joan btevent.
Committee member Cindy Carr Rogers and Founder and
President of the Alzheimer's Care Committee Bella
Goldstein.
Traurig To Chair NCCJ
Brotherhood Awards Dinner
Robert H. Traurig, Attorney,
has been named the Chairman of
the 35th Annual Brotherhood
Awards Dinner of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews. The Awards Dinner will be
held on Saturday evening, Feb. 28
at the Omni International Hotel.
Traurig, a recipient in 1982 of
the NCCJ Silver Medallion "for
service to Brotherhood," is a part-
ner in the firm of Greenberg,
Traurig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff,
Rosen and Quentel, P.A.
Thoroughly involved with the civic
and cultural development of Dade
County, Traurig currently serves
as President of the Greater Miami
Opera Association. He has
dedicated much of his life to
several sigfinicant endeavors in-
cluding service as Vice Chairman,
Greater Miami Chamber of Com-
merce and as a member of the
Chamber Board of Governors;
member of the Citizens Board of
the University of Miami; and has
been an officer, director and
member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Greater Miami
Moadon Ivri
Hebrew Cultural
Forum Lecture
The image of a father as depicted
in the poetry of Hayim Nachman
Bialik will be the theme of a lec-
ture of the Moadon Ivri Hebrew
Cultural Forum Feb. 3, at 1:30
p.m., at the auditorium of the
Miami Beach Public Library.
Miriam Schneid-Ofseyer,
poetess, critic and teacher will
analyze the poem "Avi" and will
describe the poets feelings and
emotions as expressed in the
poem.
Robert H. Traurig
Jewish Federation.
Assisting Traurig with the 1987
Brotherhood Awards Dinner is
Harry Hood Bassett, Chairman of
the NCCJ Awards Committee,
along with Hank Meyer, Chair-
man of the National Headliner
Award Committee.
ABT To Offer
Master Classes
Area dance pupils 13 years of
age and older will once again be
eligible to participate in Master
Classes during the American
Ballet Theatre residency in
Miami, Jan. 27-31, at the Miami
Beach Theater of Performing
Arts.
The classes have been made
possible through a grant from the
Southeast Banking Corporation
Foundation for the fourth con-
secutive year.
The series of master classes will
be conducted by Jurgen
Schneider, ballet master to
Mikhail Baryshnikov and the com-
pany, said Judy Drucker, cultural
director for Temple Beth Sholom,
Miami's ABT sponsor.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. January 23. 1987
American Sephardi Federation Sets Future Directions;
Israeli Deputy Prime Minister Levy Takes An Active Role
PHILADELPHIA A turning
point in the history of the
American Sephardi Federation
took place last weekend at the
first major gathering of Sephar-
dim in the I'nited States since
1975. More than 300 leaders and
delegates representing Sephardic
communities all over the United
States and around the world
assembled here to discuss issues
of critical importance facing
Sephardim.
Active Greater Miami Jewish
community leader Solomon Garazi
was among participants at the
convention.
In addition to delivering the
keynote address at the Federa-
tion's dinner dance on Saturday
night. Israeli Deputy Prime
Minister David Lew played a ma-
jor role in demonstrating his sup-
port for the Federation and its ob-
jectives. In his address. Levy em-
phasized the vital role of Sephar-
dim in striving towards a united
Jerusalem. He also stressed the
significance of 'returning to our
sources and to our roots, (for) he
who knows not his past, cannot
build his future."
LEON LEVY, president of the
ASF. in his introduction during
the opening plenary session, call-
ed for a plan of action proposing
that the following resolution be
voted on and put into effect im-
mediately: the creation of a fund
for the support of 1) the im-
plementation of the Israel Ex-
perience through scholarships,
for Sephardic programs, including
long term and short term leader-
ship training programs; 2) local
Sephardi summer camps, inter-
session retreats. ;hafehatnup-
(weekend retreats); 3) tljfcp^bhce*
tion of a national periodical involv-
ing our prominent leaders and
scholars; 4) a resource center for
information and education to be
made available to Sephardim and
all Jewish communities on
everything Sephardic. ranging
from books, records and films to
audio visual materials; 5) the
development of local adult educa-
tion programs.
The immediate implementation
of the plan received a unanimous
vote, and a board of directors was
elected to oversee the Fund. Some
of the members elected to the
board include: Edward Alcosser.
convention chairman: Dr. Irving
Benveniste; Irma M. Lopes Car-
doso. Albert Emsellem. Solomon
Garazi. Rachel El-Hassid. Salim
Mahlab. A. Nassimi. Marc
Ribacoff, David Rousso. Joseph
Saleh, Victor Tarry. Morrie Yohai
and Morad Zamir.
Liliane Shalom, past president
of the Federation, was elected
honorary president of the
Federation.
AT THE opening plenary ses-
sion, Nessim Gaon. president ot
the World Sephardi Federation
based in Geneva, set forth the
agenda of the World Sephardi
Federation.
Representing Sephardi Federa-
tions from around the world were
Rafaello Fellah, president of the
Italian Sephardi Federation;
Aryeh Konik. president of the
Latin American Sephardi Federa-
tion; Leon Oziel, president of the
Canadian Sephardi Federation;
and A\*i Shlush. director general
of the Sephardic communities
Department of the World Zionist
Organization in Israel.
Highlights of the convention in-
cluded Sephardic Shabbat ser-
vices at Congregation Mikveh
Israel led by Rabbi Dr. Joshua
Toledano and Hazzan Marc
Hazan; the development of a Rab-
binic Advisory Board of Sephardic
congregations under the auspices
of the ASF and chaired by
Haham. Dr. Solomon Gaon; and a
presentation of the Sephardic
Educational Center in Jerusalem
by Dr. Jose Nessim. the Center's
founder.
ISRAELI CONSUL General in
Philadelphia David Ben-Dov
welcomed the convention par-
ticipants to Philadelphia, and
Stephen Shalom, a Sephardic
community leader and vice presi-
dent of the ASF, introduced the
Deputy Prime Minister. Aryeh
Dulzin. head of the World Zionist
Organization, was among the
manv notables seated on the dais.
City of Hope's first 'Distinguished Physician.'
Dr. Henry Rappaport (center), receives a
crystal sculpture signifying the honor from
City of Hope President Abraham S. Bolshy
(left), and Dr. Sanford M. Shapero, chief ex-
ecutive officer of the Duarte, Calif, medical
Center and research institute. Dr. Shapero
formerly served as lice president oj Aort/i
American Biologicals in Miami, as regional
director for the Southu-estern States of Miami-
based Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, and as rabbi at Temple Emanuel, Fort
Lauderdale. City of Hope maintains a
Regional office in North Miami Beach.
Elaine EUish, will be the
featured guest speaker at
Hadassah's Oncology luncheon
Feb. it at the Cuban Hebrev
Congregation Temple on
Miami Beach. Mrs. EII\sh. of
Defray Beach, is a member of
the National Associates of
Hadassah.
Shabbat Services To
Help Students
A special Shabbat service a ill be
held Saturday to help students ob-
tain scholarship funds to study in
Israel. Adath Yeshurun will host
the program. "Dor L'Dor Shab-
hat." or generation to generation.
The program was initiated by the
donation of Mrs. Jean Mar.rin, in
memory of her husband Manus.
The Dor L' Dor program requires
three years of study, synagogue
participation, attendance as well
as youth activities and fund-
raising projects.
Survival Of The
Jewish Family Classes
Adult education classes f-cusing
on the survival of the Jewish
Family will continue with two
classes at the Temple taught bv
Rabbi Hershel Becker of Con-
gregation Shaare Tefillah of
Kendall.
On Feb. 1 at 8 p.m.. the topic
will be "Are We in Control or Fly
ing out of Control." On March 1 at
8 p.m.. the topic will lean toward
joy: "In pursuit of Happiness.
Have We Missed the Point' "
?
?
?
?
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Rabbi and Cantor Wanted
A Conservative temple looking for a Rabbi
and Cantor.
Inquiries call: Julius Levine, President, at
Temple 9-12 1-433-5957. After 12 p.m. call:
1-439-1541.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
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Send Educational Background, Experience
and References. Contact:
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co The Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, FL 33101
Serve Your Guests the Best.
For any kind of get-together, please your guests with delicious
selections from Empire Kosher. Grill a fresh Empire fryer, or
select a pre-cooked mesquite orbarbeque chicken. Empire's
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Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Sewly appointed Israeli Consul Rahamim Timor, left, presents
the President's Award on behalf of the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization to Sunset Commercial Bank chairman, Jer-
rold Levine, in recognition of the bank's new purchase of an Israel
Bond in support of the nation's economic development. Timor ar-
rived in Miami to assume the position of Consul General of Israel
in Miami covering Florida this past December.
Sy Fishman, left, Southeast Region Director of the American
Associates ofBen-Gurion University ofNegev, presents a check to
Howard Klein, center. Executive Director of the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds Organization, for the purchase of an Israel Bond.
Looking on at the presentation is Sidney Cooperman, Florida
chairman of State of Israel Bonds and a Centennial Fellow of the
Ben-Gurion University. Cooperman is also a member of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds Board of Governors and a National
Vice Chairman of the State of Israel Bonds Organization.
CAJE Sponsoring Classes
In 'Pirkei Avot'
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's South Dade
Branch in conjunction with the Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE) will be sponsoring classes ui Pirkei
Avot," Ethics of the Fathers. The first class will be held on
Wednesday, Feb. 4 and will be taught by Rabbi Norman
Lipson, Director of the Institute for Jewish Studies, CAJE.
There is a $3 charge to cover the cost of the textbook, Say-
ings of the Fathers. All of the classes will be held at the
South Dade Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, 12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue from 7:30-9 a.m. A nominal
fee will be charged for breakfast. For more information
251-9334.
Noted British historian Martin Gilbert
(center) discussed his growing involvement
with Jewish history and causes in a lecture at
Yeshiva University's Stern College for Women
at the University's Midtown Center. Dr.
Gilbert recently completed the final volume oj
Winston Churchill's official biography. With
Dr. Gilbert prior to his lecture are (from left
to right) Dr. Egon Brenner, executive vice
president of the University; Dr. Jeffrey S.
Gurock, Libby Klaperman Professor of Jewish
History at the University's Bernard Revel
Graduate School; Dr. Solomon Gaon, director
of the Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic
Studies, and holder of the Professorial Chair
in of Sephardic Studies at Yeshiva University
and the Maxwell R. Maybaum Chair in
Talmud and Sephardic Codes at the
University-affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary; and Mrs. Sarrah Mir-
sky, wife of the late Dr. David Mirsky, who
was dean of Stern College for Women and the
University's acting vice president for
academic affairs.
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Take 1-95 to
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
Judge Gerald Kogan
Second Jewish Member On
State's Supreme Court
...
Continued from Page IB
silver and sweeping floors at an
auction company, carrying chaise
lounges as a pool cabana boy and a
stint on the loading platform at
Burdines.
With law degree in hand, he
started practicing law in 1955 in
Miami Beach but was drafted into
the Army that same year. While
he was in the Army, he graduated
from the Army Intelligence
School and then spent the rest of
his duty- as a special agent with
the Counter Intelligence Corps
based in Atlanta.
After he left the Army, Kogan
returned to Miami and established
a private practice until he joined
the Dade State Attorney's Office
under former Dade State At-
torney Richard Gerstein, even-
tually becoming the chief
homicide prosecutor.
ASKED WHAT his most
memorable case was as a judge,
Kogan points to a yellowing
newsclip on his wall. It was the
Candy Mossier case.
"She was charged with murder-
ing her multi-millionaire husband,
Jacques. It was the type of case
that had all the ingredients the
tabloids like murder, sex,
money." The verdict: not guilty.
Kogan was first appointed to
Dade Circuit Court by Gov. Bob
Graham in 1980 and then ran suc-
cessfully for reelection the follow-
ing year. He declined to say there
were any special connections that
got him this most recent
prestigious post. Seven justices sit
on the Supreme Court.
"First, you have to be
nominated by the Judicial
Nomination Commission." he
begins. Three names were finally
sent to Gov. Martinez. Besides
Kogan. Judge Allan Schwartz of
the Third District Court of Ap-
peals in Miami and Donald Mid-
dlebrooks. a Miami attorney, also
were nominated for the post,
which, as of Feb. 1. will pay
$85,000 annually. The rest, his
own appointment, made
headlines.
KOGAN DESCRIBES himsels
as a "middle-of-the-roader,'* as
far as his views are concerned,
and he says it would be
"unethical" to discuss any par-
ticular issue he has an interest in
reviewing while on the bench.
Speaking of his viewpoint,
Kogan declared:
"I don't like right-wing or left-
wing terms. Everyone has view-
points on different issues, and it's
rare to find someone who stays on
Temple Beth
Ahm Shabbat
Dinner
Temple Beth Ahm will hold a
special Shabbat dinner Feb. 6 in
honor of the Aleph Class.
Members of the class are Daniel
Aranow, David Bearman, Jaime
Bka, Jeffrey Btodaky. Rachel
Coei. Ari Cohen, Lucas Cohen,
Jeffrey Eiebd, Jaime Endkk.
Tara Evans, Marc Flash,
Meredith Friedman. Tara
Giaaaman. Michael Glcher. Marc
Graham. Philip Greenberg, Elliot
Herahey, Bradley Hurewitz, Sari
Kirschenbaum, Cheryl Klein,
Jason Leas. Jason Lesser, Jeffrey
Levy, Melanie Milgram, Leon
Morris, Ian Price, Paul Ravinoff.
Matthre Roland, Leslie
Rosenblatt, Ruas Simon. Zachary
Solov, Andrew Tuch, Lawrence
Tuch, Rebecca Willis and Shanna
Wolk.
In other Temple news: Camp
Chai will have their reunion at
noon Feb. 8. and the Sisterhood
Board will meet Feb. 10 and 7:30
the straight and narrow on issues
and never budges.
"On those issues where you
have to show compassion, I can
show compassion. On those issues
where you have to be tough as
nails, I can be tough as nails."
During his terms on the Dade
bench, Kogan said he never issued
the death penalty.
BUT HE SAID the death penal-
ty "is a necessary part of criminal
law because it gives the communi-
ty a chance to express its outrage
at certain acts that are so
atrocious and heinous that the
type of penalty may be justified."
Any cases that made him toss
and turn at night?
"I've been in this business so
long," he now says comfortably
seated in his chamber, "that it
really takes something highly
unusual. I've learned to accept
and adjust. I did have one case, for
example, where a woman gave
birth to a child and put it in a
plastic bag and threw it in a demp-
sty dumpster. There were a lot of
pressures from both sides. A lot of
people said the mother was under
stress. After considering the
facts, I felt it didn't seem to me to
be a distraught mother. I gave her
20 years."
Kogan is ready to admit that his
answers reflect a nature he says is
'very controlled."
"OF COURSE I was happy,"
about the appointment to the
Florida Supreme Court, he says.
"To me it's another challenge, and
I enjoy challenges, and I want to
be able to do things that will be
positive contributions to the
system of justice."
Kogan said he would like to see
"a better understanding of the
law by citizens of the state." Most
appellate court opinions are writ-
ten for judges and lawyers, and
the average person has little
understanding, he says. "I'd like
to write my opinions so they can
be understood by citizens."
Kogan also said he would like to
make a contribution to the state
administration through the
court's rule-making power. "I
think jury instructions can be
made even simpler." he says.
SENTENCING guidelines are
another issue Kogan said he may-
tackle. "In many instances they
are too lenient, in many instances
they are too hard."
In any event, judges throughout
the state will be increasingly over-
whelmed as the state's population
continues to boom, now die fifth
most populated, heading toward
third.
"In Miami alone in the past
seven years, our civil case load has
gone up 40 percent Criminal
cases in the last two years have
gone up over 25 percent"
"I wish I had all these
answers," Kogan admits. "If I
did, I wouldn't be a judge. I'd just
set up an office and give out ad-
vice. But we can work on these
things. I feel confident we can
meet these challenges."
And what will his contribution
be based on? The teachings of his
father "Do what's right. And
work hard."
KOGAN WILL move to
Tallahassee with his wife of 35
years, Irene. He has a son,
Robert, 27, who is a management
information chief for the city of
Phoenix Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
His daughter. Debbie. 24. has a
degree in Human Growth and
Development from the University
of Alabama. His other daughter,
Karen, is a senior at the Universi-
ty of Arizona in Tucson, where
Judge Gerald Kogaa
she is studying fashion
merchandising.
Kogan and his family have
visited Israel several times, and a
few years ago. he and his wife at-
tended an adult session of the high
school in Israel to study the
history of Israel.
ARE THERE any Jewish
values in particular he will take
with him to Tallahassee.
"I think compassion, understan-
ding are probably the two main
values," he says.
And, finally, is he nervous?
"I've been around too long to be
nervous," he smiles.
Schwartz Elected President
Of Tiger Bay Political Club
Gerald Schwartz, president of a
South Florida public relations and
public affairs agency, has been
elected president of Tiger Bay
Political Club. He succeeds Mur-
ray Sisselman. president of the
United Teachers of Dade County
Stephen Paul Ross, owner of a
Miami lobbying firm, was re-
elected chairman of the board of
Tiger Bay. a club he helped found
23 years ago.
Lynn Dannheiser, of the Miami
law firm of Steel Hector and
Davis, was re-elected first vice
president. Seth Gordon, vice
president of Citicorp Savings of
Florida, was elected second vice-
president, David Rose, a baliff in
Dade courts for many years, was
re-elected treasurer. Pat Skubish
continues as executive director.
Members of the Tiger Bay board
of directors for 1987 include Dade
County Commissioners Sherman
Winn and Barry Schreiber; City of
Miami Commissioner J.L. Plum-
mer; Dade County Commissioner
Clara Oesterie; and former United
States Senator Richard Stone.
State Sen. Jack D. Gordon of
Miami Beach, former State Rep.
Murray Dubbin, LTD executive
director Pat Tornillo and former
Miami Beach Vice Mayor Elayne
Weisburd also were elected to the
Tiger Bay board. Other members
are Yvonne Burkholz, Eli
Feinberg. Bill Freixas, Irving
Goldman, Armando Gutierrez,
William Hamilton, Don Hickman,
Eston Melton, George
Nach waiter. Alan Rosen thai. Dick
Rundell, Rick Sisser. Mark Vogel.
Peter Weiner. Cynthia Yrabedra
and Blair I. Zimmett.
Schwartz is former deputy
chairman of the Democratic
Midwest Conference and served
as press secretary to the late
Governor Ralph G. Brooks of
Nebraska and a public relations
director of the Democratic Pai-y
in Nebraska and other
Midwestern states.
He has served as campaign
manager for more than 50 judges
Gerald Seawartx
and has directed the successful
mayoral campaigns of Miami
Beach candidates for the past 34
years. A former editur <
defunct Miami Beach Sun-
Reporter, he was a member of the
staff of The Miami Herald for
three years and worked for two
wife services which have since
merged into United Pr< 1 <
national. He is a member of the
American Association of Political
Consultants, an accredited
member of the Public R.
Society of America, a member of
the Florida Public Relations
Association and of the Advertis-
ing Club of Greater Miami.
Schwartz is president of the
Civic League of Miami Beach.
president of the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida, n*
tional vice president of the AZF
vice president of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce and a
board member of the Urban
League of Greater Miami and of
the Miami Beach Taxpayers
Association. He is a graduate of
the University of Miami and of
North Carolina State University.
1 -W^ [1X1 GJott KosrxH
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or mm Pauovw 87 P1 pa toi 402MT Miami BMCti. HorMa J3I40


Do-It-Yourself Vacation Plan
For College Students
A do-it-yourself summer vacation plan in Israel will be offered
to college students through B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations.
The program includes a wide variety of special interest areas
and travel seminars.
"It's a sort of a smorgasbord of programs ranging from a three-
week introductory tour of Israel to a week of hiking and snorkel-
ing in Southern Israel to specialized seminars for social work,
business and law students, to a month in a development town and
more," said Richard K. Goldstein, Florida Director of B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations.
Each package has its own theme, such as "Exploring the
Land," with highlights special political and military briefings,
visits to Israeli Universities, kibbutzim and settlements.
The "Business Students" summer, for example, would include
visits to Israeli public and private enterprises.
Adult faculty members also can partake in a program, in its
sixth year, that is designed specifically for members of the
academic community.
Richard K. Goldstein at t)g Hillel area office, Coral Gables, has
further information.
Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
1
Happenings
The Dade County Women's Political Caucus will hold a general
membership meeting 10:30 a.m Feb. 7 at the Brickell Point Holi-
day Inn. The program includes a discussion on pay equity by at-
torney Moira Abeln.
The Association of Parents of North American Israelis (PNAI)
will meet 1 p.m Feb 1 at the Greater Miami Federation Building.
The competition is on for students in grades one through 6. in a
new program Chodesh HaTnua. sponsored by Bnei Akiva of
Greater Miami. The groups will compete in various Shabbat and
weekday activities in a three-week competition to learn about the
history and ideology of the movement. The group with the most
points will be crowned the best "Kvutza" (group) of the year.
Temple Samu-El/Or Olom Men's Club will have a special pro-
gram 8 p.m. Jan 27 featuring Arthur Teitelbaum of the B'nai
B nth Anti-Defamation League, who will speak on "Is A World of
Difference Working."
bagels, children s programs and a display of objects dart are
.\mong the evens and eats at Brunch at the Bakery Centre.'' Feb.
1 from 1 to A p.m
I he Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will host the fami-
l\ bagel brunch Activities include a display of art. antiques and
home furnishings in 10 galleries The childrens program, for
vges three through 13, will be conducted at the Miami Youth
Museum
Mordecai Richler. author of The Apprenticeship of Duddy
hr,mtir. will be guest speaker during the University of Miami's
Jewish Film Festival Part II. sponsored by the Judaic Studies
gram on Feb > at 7:30 p.m. at the University
I his portion of the festival will continue the theme of The Im-
migrant in the New World, featuring films which portray the
lives &i second generation Jewish immigrants, their acculturation
into ihe mainstream of American life, and their efforts to preserve
iheir unique cultural identitv
The second in a series of three Jewish-Christian lectures will be
held at Barry University. 2 p.m. Sunday, in the Andreas Building.
Guest speaker will be Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein whose topic will be
Contemporary Challenges to Jewish-Christian Relations." Rabbi
Eckstein is the founder and president of Holyland Fellowship for
Christians and Jews in Chicago. Ill He is the author of "What
( hnstians Should Know about Jews and Judaism.
Temple Sinai of North Dade will present Tonja" on Monday.
Jan 26 at 645 p.m. Tonja is a famed children folk artist and
educator She will sing and share songs with the children during
the show Tickets may be purchased at the door
fl
The North Dade Bar Association will hold its first luncheon
meeting of the new year at noon Wednesday at the Peppercorn
Restaurant.
The Environmental Nutrition Center of Miami-Dade Communi-
ty College is sponsoring a lecture on "Diet and Osteoporosis.
Liver and Kidney Disease the Harms of Eating Too Much Pro-
tein" by George L. Eisman. nutritionist, dietitian, and author of
The Most Noble Diet.'" on Jan. 31 at 430 p.m. at the En-
vironmental Center of Miami-Dade South.
The rules and regulations affecting Adult Congregate Living
Facilities will be discussed by Miami Beach Planning Director Jud
Kurlancheek and David Wallach. an ACLF director 1 30 p.m.
Monday at the 21st Street Community Center on Miami Beach
The class, part of the "How Miami Beach Functions'' series, is
sponsored by the Ida Fisher Aduh Education Program and
moderated by Stanley K. Shapiro.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
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g0

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14.8 oz.
99$
ROBITUSSIN
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8oz.
s2.59
REVLON
MILK
PLUS 6
SHAMPOO
8oz.S1.99
i2oz.s2.59
Revlon
Colorsilk
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Haircolor
s2.99
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Colorsilk
REVLON
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2V4 0Z.
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SJCARE
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12 oz.
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Facial
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4 oz.
M.49
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Dinner Officially Kicked Off
1987 Campaign
Florida Governor Bob Martinez was the keynote
speaker at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Campaign Opening Dinner at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel. The dinner officially launched the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal which raises funds for vital
Jewish social services in Miami, Israel and
throughout the Diaspora. $44 million was pledged
during the course of the evening. Pictured (from left)
are Governor Martinez and Harvey Friedman, chair-
man of the Opening Dinner.
During the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Campaign Opening Dinner, Israeli community
"shaliach," Raffi Miller led the singing of Federa-
tion's music video, "It's Our Turn To Be The
Heroes." Miller directed the music video.
Pictured, at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Campaign Opening
Dinner which kicked off the
1987 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal, are (seated from left)
Myron J. Brodie, Federa-
tion executive vice presi-
dent; Charlotte Brodie;
Donald E. Lefton, 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal
chairman; Ambassador
Rachamim Timor, Consul
General from the State oj
Israel; Shoshana Timor.
Standing (from left) are Steven Brodie, Rich Bernstein, Aaron Podhurst. Federation president-
Dorothy Podhurst, Women's Division president; Edythe Kerness, and Elton J. Kerness, associate
executive vice president of Federation.
The Cuban Hebrew Com-
mittee of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
recently held a special
meeting to discuss plans
for the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal. Pictured
from left (standing) are:
Moises Levin, vice
treasurer; Joseph Lurie,
treasurer; Jacobo
Biniakonski, committee
member; Marcos Kerbel, vice president; Benjamin Terner, committee member; Yoshua Sal Behar,
committee campaign director; Sender M. Kaplan, Federation staff coordinator. Seated from left
are: Dr. Enrique Eiber, president of the Cuban Hebrew Committee; Eva Kokiel, campaign vice
president; and Dr. Felix H. Reyler, campaign president of the committee. The Cuban Hebrew
represents approximately 1,500 families in the Miami area.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation held a special
reception for Young
Leadership Council (YLC)
members who gave a
minimum gift of ft, 500 to
the 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal. The reception was
held prior to the Campaign
Opening Dinner. Pictured,
from left, are Governor
Bob Martinez, keynote
speaker at the Opening
Dinner, who also came o
the reception to extend
greetings; Larry Elbrand,
chairman of the special
YLC reception; Ellen
Elbrand; and Federation
President Aaron
Podhurst.
Hadassah!
Events
setTBPSr'irias
Chapter of Hadassah TJ*
Thursday, Jan. 22 in the T^2
Room. Sophie Primak will 3?
book review. pve
The ^Phie Tucker Chapter.
H"1*8**. North Miami 1Zl
will hold their Hadassah &
Organization luncheon on TW
day at the Bal Harbour Shera^
Aliyah Hadassah Spr.B,
Fashion Show will be Feb 19'v
11 a.m at the Miami Airpor.
Hilton, featuring fashions by Firt
Lignarolo.
Reservations also are beiw
taken for the March 10 dinner 2
Steak and Ale on 97th Avenue
Dr. R. Toister, child psychologist
will talk on parenting.
Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will have a luncheon !
meeting Feb. 2 at noon at the I
Shelborne Hotel.
A luncheon meeting of the
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah will be held 11:30 a.m.
Feb. 2 at the Ocean Pavilion.
Commssioner Ben Z Grenaldof
Miami Beach will speak
"Medicine and Drugs"
N
Ami*
Women
Geula Chapter will meet
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the
Jewish Community (enter on
Miami Beach.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach Chapter
will have a luncheon meeting
Thursday. Jan. 22 in the Social
Hall of Kneseth Israel The special
guest will be Shulamith Cohen
who will present a program called
"Pot Pourri."
Migdal Chapter celebrated their
fifth year and invites family and
friends to join them for wine and
song, entertainment and a lun-
cheon on Wednesday, at 12:30
p.m. at Forte Towers.
Shoshana Chapter will hold a
special luncheon meeting to
celebrate their 15th year Tuesday A
at noon at Seacoast 1
South.
Simcha Chapter invites family
and friends to help celebrate their
7th year as a chapter and partake
in an afternoon program of food
and entertainment on Monday at
noon in Winston Towers.
Yiddish Classes
Yiddish, says teacher Girt
Boasak. is more than just knowuj
the aounda of that "colorful,
musical" language.
"You can't learn Yiddish, says
Boaaak. "without examining m
folkways, beliefs and culture
our people. It was the *g
language spoken by the jnajont)
of those Jews who lost their WJ
in the gas chambers
crematoria of the Third Rj
We're keeping the language
alive."
Bosaak recently announcedIU*
her classes in Yiddish are enters
their seventh year,
vocabulary, personal anecdou*
laughter and serious discussion.
Classes are held at the-Sk*"
Dade Jewish Community 1en
on Tuesday, from 1:30-2:30 P-n>-


\i Friday, January 23, 1987/Thej Jewish Floridian. Page 9-B
BURGERGREENBERG
Susan Rae Burger, daughter of Al and
Sandee Burger of Miami became the bride of
Bennett Saul Greenberg, son of Sylvia
Greenberg and the late Jack Greenberg of
Miami, on Jan. 1, at Temple Judea in Coral
Gables. Rabbi Michael Eisenstat officiated.
Attending the bride as Maid of Honor was
Julie Krantz with bridesmaids Sheryl Biren-
burm, Debbie Joslin, Lin Burger, Stacey
Miller. Cande Friedman, Lori Wise, and Midy
Fever. Allyson Harmon and Annie
Wolfenden attending the bride as flower
girls.
Serving as best man was Mitchell
Greenberg. Ushers were Andy Burger,
Howard Silver, Mark Glauser, Lee Sinoff, Bill
Green, Bruce Cohen and Jeffrey Krantz. Jack
Wolfenden served as ringbearer.
The Bride wore an Alencon lace sheath
wedding gown; worn off-the-shoulder with
sleeves of pure silk taffeta. The train of pure
silk taffeta was detailed and appliqued with
beaded alencon lace. The pill box hat of bead-
ed alencon lace was attached to a cathedral
length pearled-sequined veil of two teirs.
The ceremony and cocktail party were held
I at Temple Judea in Coral Gables, followed by
| a dinner party at the Omni Hotel.
The bride is a life member of Hadassah,
visited Israel six times including high school
in Israel, Young Judaea's Year Course and
I'JA's Summer Singles Mission. Susan is cur-
rently Director of Customer Relations for
["Bugs" Burger Bug Killers, Inc.
Mrs. Bennett Saul Greenberg
The groom is an aspiring author in the field
of political science.
The couple will reside in Miami following a
minimoom at Cable Beach, Nassau followed
by a honeymoon in March in Tahiti.
^
CHALALENGLEMAN
Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth Chalal of Palm Beach
and Margate, NJ announce the marriage of
their daughter. Jo Ann, to Bruce E.
Engleman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Engleman of Upper Darby, PA and Atlantic
City, NJ. The bridegroom is a former resident
of Miami Beach.
The ceremony took place June 28 at Har
Zion Temple, Penn Valley, PA. Rabbi Gerald
I. Wolpe and Cantor Isaac Wall officiated.
Randi Yogel, sister of the bride, was matron
of honor. Richard B. Pell, cousin of the groom
and a resident of Coral Gables, was best man.
The couple reside in New York City where
the bride is a physician specializing in on-
cology and hematology at New York Univer-
sity Medical Center and the groom is Director
of Public Relations for American Friends of
Tel Aviv University.
I" Ann and Bruce Engleman
&tio4ii2e4ne4tfo
KAZERRIEDMANN
[Gayle L. Riedmann, daughter of Louis
ledman and Janet McCoy of Omaha,
ebraska, became engaged to Ralph R.
zer, son of Esther R. Razer and the late
8n P. Kazer of Boynton Beach. Ms. Ried-
inn is a certified nurse midwife and Dr.
zer is a productive endocrinologist. They
|>th practice at Northwestern University in
*
Chicago. A May 31, 1987 wedding is planned.
KOFFSKYPODHURST
Laura Shirl Podhurst, daughter of Dorothy
and Aaron Podhurst of Miami Lakes, has
become engaged to Daniel Robert Koffsky,
son of Judi and David Koffsky of Westport,
Connecticut. A November 7, 1987 wedding is
planned.
tocky Futterman To Be Honored
te South Florida Women's
imittee of Shaare Zedek
Bpital in Jerusalem will honor
tky Futterman as "Woman of
i Year," at the 10th annual lun-
on 11:30 a.m. on Wednesday at
| Temple Emanu-El ballroom.
Irs. Futterman, formerly of
York, has channelled efforts
'lew York, Canada and Miami
lach to projects as the
Jimonides Home and the Corn-
Jewish Appeal. Since corn-
to Miami Beach, she helped
nd the SFWC, and supports
ed, UJA Israel Bonds and
nple Ner Tamid.
Rosalie Futterman
Dance Classes
By Yusi Yanich
Israel folkdance/folklore classes
directed by Yusi Yanich have
begun for the winter season.
Classes are conducted on:
Monday: Surfside Community
Center, 9:30 a.m., Congregation
Bet Shira, 7:30 p.m.; Tuesday:
Michael Anne Russel Jewish Com-
munity Center, 10:30 a.m.,
Seacoast Towers South, 12:45
p.m.; Wednesday: Surfside Com-
munity Center, 9:30 a.m.,
McDonald Center, 12:30 p.m.;
Thursday: Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, 7:30 p.m.; Friday: Jade
Winds Condo, 10 a.m., JCC
Senior Center, 1:30 p.m.
Na'amat Women
"Na'amat, the Movement for
Social Justice," will be the topic of
a talk by Leah Benson at the Tues-
day, 1 p.m. meeting of the Sharon
Chapter of Na'amat. The event
will take place in the 15th floor
auditorium of Four Freedoms
House, Miami Beach.
Benson, membership vice presi-
dent of the South Florida Council
and former national board
member, will also discuss the need
for an increased membership to
help achieve the goals in Israel of
social justice and bringing equali-
ty between the sexes.
Lorita Markcity, pianist, will
head the musical portion of the
program.
Charlotte Cohen, acting presi-
dent, said refreshments will be
served.
The Annual Card Party and
Luncheon of the Golda Meir
Chapter will take place Thursday,
Jan. 29 at noon in the social room
of 100 Lincoln Road Building,
Miami Beach.
Yetta Fisher and Ida Chabin are
co-chairmen of the day. Monies
raised will go towards the Child
Rescue Fund in Israel.
Katherine Lippman is president
of the active club.
A Tot Lot To Be Established
To Honor Dr. Grossman
A tot lot to honor the late Miami
city physician Dr. Leo Grossman
will be established at Island View
Park, a 3.3 acre recreational area
which opened last year between
Dade Boulevard and 18th Street
on Purdy Avenue.
The Miami Beach City Commis-
sion approved the establishment
of a trust fund to raise money for
the memorial playground.
Dr. Grossman served as city
physician for over 22 years and
set up a practice on Lincoln Road
when he moved to Miami Beach
with his family in 1947.
The idea for the park was
generated by Dr. Haroward
Engle. Dr. Grossman's former
partner and longtime friend.
As a pediatrician. Dr. Grossman
served three generations of local
residents. As city physician, he
administered physicals for 1,700
municipal employees, treated vic-
tims of job-related injuries, ran
immunization programs and over-
saw fire-rescue medical
operations.
He was a native New Yorker
who was a graduate of New York
University and New York Medical
College. In Florida, he had served
as past-president of the Florida
Board of Medical Examiners. He
was a founding member of the
American Association Police
Physicians and Surgeons, a
lifetime member of both the
Florida Medical and Dade County
Medical Associations and a
diplomat of the National Board of
Medical Examiners.
Manischewitz Offers Free
Passover Recipe Guide
The B. Manischewitz Company is now offering their 1987
Passover Recipe Guide. It's filled with recipes that are
perfect for your Seder and throughout the Passover
holiday.
You'll find recipes for everything from appetizers and
main dishes to desserts. Several of these delicious desserts
are made with Manischewitz cake mixes and included in the
recipe guide is a 25 cents coupon good on your next pur-
chase of any Manischewitz Cake Mix. A 15 cents coupon is
also included for Manischewitz Matzo Ball and Soup Mix or
Matzo Ball Mix for a total savings of 40 cents.
For your free copy of the Manischewitz Passover Recipe
Guide, write to Recipe Guide, P.O. Box 484A, Jersey City,
N.J. 07303.
^ -- <<
FIELD REPRESENTATIVE
Are you a "people" person? Leading Women's
Zionist Organization has challenging and
rewarding opportunity for you to assist in the
development of chapter membership. Prior
fund-raising experience helpful. Flexible hours.
Must have car.
Please call: 1-800-221-3117
0 ?
aLLen morris
and George W. Hektner,
Senior Vice President
are pleased to announce that
Sidney L. Goldstein, CCIM
has joined the firm
and will be specializing in
Investment properties, sales/
leasebacks, exchanges
(305)368-1000


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping.
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism. This tradition is continued in the Gardens
Mount Nebos latest expansion.
****** W? ***** ;*J*> "ji^JT

4V>*yiH
+ SPECIAL PRE-OPENING PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT
261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street, Miami, FL 53126


Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
'And he looked, and, behold, the bush burned with fire, and the
fold was not consumed"
(Exodus S.g).
. "And Moses hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God"
(S.6)
SHEMOT
SHEMOT The children of Israel increased and multiplied and
the land of Goshen was filled with them. But a new king arose in
Egypt;one wno nac*not known Joseph. He said to his people: 'The
children of Israel are too many and too mighty for us; come, let us
deal wisely with them, lest they multiply, and it come to pass,
that, when there befalleth us any war, they also join themselves
unto our enemies, and fight against us, and get them up out of the
land" (Exodus 1.9-10). The new Pharaoh made slaves of the
Hebrews. He also commanded that every new-born male infant
was to be cast into the River Nile. However, Moses was saved
from this infanticide by the king's daughter and grew up in
F'haraoh's court. He was forojrd to flee Egypt after slaying an
Egyptian whom he found mistreating a Hebrew slave. Moses
went to Midian, where he tended sheep for his father-in-law
.lethro in the desert near Mount Horeb. God appeared to Moses in
a burning bush and told him to return to Egypt, for it was his mis-
sion to liberate the children of Israel and lead them to the land of
Canaan. With the help of his brother Aaron, Moses united the
Hebrew slaves into a people. Then he came before Pharaoh with
God'a demand the he "let My people go."
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P Wollman-
Tsamir. $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
ll'iiai Mit/vali
\titin style food, games and sports competitions highlighted the
pen House celebration last Sunday to mark the third year of
ebraica. Founded three years ago as a community center for the
\ merican Jewish population in Florida, the center serves
minted 3.000 families or 10,000 people. Among those seated
tht head table during the recent celebration include Hebraica
resident Aloises Gorin, Isaac Mildenberg, vice president. Rabbi
Ussin Gambach and other members of the Hebraica committee.
i
)
'ABLO TACHMES IB
8URGECK
r. Pablo Tachmes of Aft. Sinai Medical Center was the Latin
urgical representative when the first press conference was heia.
ecently at the Omni to encourage organ donors from the
fispanic community. Dr. Tachmes spoke with heart transplant
^tient, Oscar Padron (center) of Cutler Ridge. Dr. Tachmes was
tly appointed to the South Florida Health Planning Council.
mm
lot voiaim>eJones
in the I unite orj /''<'
We can help
Medkal Personnel Pool
M. Miami
881-5092
Coral Gables
445-2541
Kendall
279-0924
Amy Eiseman
I
Hanna Kierson
m
AMY EISEMAN
Amy Eiseman, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Elliot Eiseman, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah celebrant on Saturday at
Temple Beth Moshe.
Amy is a 7th grade student at
North Miami Junior High and ex-
cels in the fine arts department of
music and drama. Amy is a stu-
dent in the 7th grade of Hebrew.
Mr. and Mrs. Eiseman have
been active members of Temple
Beth Moshe for the past 10 years.
Elliot Eiseman holds the distinc-
tion of having served as president
of the Temple for four consecutive
terms.
Amy's parents will host the kid-
dush following the services in
honor of the occasion in the Clara
and Seymour Smoller Ballroom.
HANNA KIERSON
Hanna Elisa Kierson, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs Jacob (Celia) Kier-
son, will be called to the Torah as
a Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, 10:30
a.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Hanna is a 7th grade student
and attends Hillel Community
Day School. She excel Is in Judaic
studies and is on the Honor Roll,
and is eligible for National Junior
Honor Society. She is an all-
around student and well-liked by
her peers. She has been attending
Temple Emanu-El's Afternoon
Religious School for the past year.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Kierson will
host the Kidduah at Temple
Emanu-El following the services.
Many friends and relatives will
be here in honor of the special
occasion.
Omnibus Lecture At
Temple Beth Sholom
Rabbi and author Haskell
Lookstein will be featured at the
Omnibus Lecture Program at
Temple Beth Sholom 10:30 a.m.
Sunday, Jan.25.
Rabbi Lookstein is president of
the New York Board of Rabbis, a
vice-chairman of the Coalition to
Free Soviet Jews and the author
of "Were We Our Brothers
Keepers? The Public Response of
American Jews to the Holocaust
1938-1944."
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:40 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONGREGATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tempi* Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534 7213 5347214
Barry J Konovltch. Rabb. fOjy
Moth* Buryn. Cantor \WJ,
Sergio Groblet President
Snolem Epolbaum. President
Religious Committee
531-2120
Dally 7:20 a.m. Afternoon 5:30 p.m
Sat. t a.m.
A0ATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach |4! 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpom Conservative
>)
Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. 4 5:15 p.m.
Sat. I Sun. a.m. a 5:15 p.m
F rl S p.m
Bat Mltnah ( p.m. Frt.
Yaal Yariv
Sat. 8:30 a.m. Dor L'Dor Shabbat
9
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Ma .well Borger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gera'd Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat I p.m.
Late Frt. w. I p.m
Dr. Irving Lehrman will praach on "Through
A Rabbi's Eyes."
Sat. a.m. Dr. Irving Lehrman will praach
on the weekly ponton of Ha bible.
Bat Mttxvoh Hame Ellea Kierson
TEMPLE BETH AM
5980 N. Kendall Or.
S Miami 867-8667
Or. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frt. t:15 p.m. Rabbi Beumgerd "The Burning
Both." Bat. 1116 a.m. Sermon -I know rn.it
eta."
B'nal Mttxvah JMI Oraopan and
Brian Wrahom.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 654-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert. (
Cantor 1
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Bat aerv. a.m. Mlnehah 5:46 p.m
Sat. 7:30 p.m. 40 + Slnglea Party
Sunday 11 a.m. First Florida CMMrsn's
Concert. Men. 7:1 S p.m. Program -What Do
Wa Really Want tor Our Children."
Mlnyan twice dally. Call lor time
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beech
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitt
TEMPLE ISRAEL
01 Greater Miami
Miami's Pionaar Reform Congregation
137 NE. 19th St.. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
MlM
Downtown: Rabbi HeekeN M. Bomat "How
Jewteh is Freud Arryhewr' Liturgy. Cantor
Rachelle F. Nsieon.
Kendall: Rabbi Ra. D. Perimeter "Stranger In
A Familiar Land." Liturgy. Harvey Kaufman.
Cantonal Soloist.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Brvd Reform
CorelOab.ee 847 5667
Michael B. Elaenstat, Rabbi
Frt. B 15 p.m. Reattlrmatton service
Sal 11 15 am
BETH KODESH
Coneervatlve
1101 S.W 12Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joeeph Krleeei
Rom Berlin Executive Secretary
8566334
Sabbath Servlcea 8:45 am
Sat. S p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8915506 Coneervatlve
Or. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Or. Joseph A. GorfInkel. (
Rabbi Emeritus ,
Moshe Frledler. Cantor
(9
Frt. $ p.m
Sat. a 46 am
Bet MMxveh Amy Elsaman
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1546 Jeffereon Ave MB FL 3313*
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Or Jeboda Metber
Cantor Nlaeim Benyemini
Dallyservtees am and7p.m
Bet.nt a.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Servlcea Frt. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 am.
Oneg Shabbat will loilow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abremowitz
An Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath service.
Dally Mlnehah Sunday-Friday
8 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Sat. 9 am. and 5:15 p.m.
(9
TEMPLE NER TAMI0
7802 Cartyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene labovlti
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Servlcea 8 a.m. and
5:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m. Frt. lets service 8 p.m.
Caneenalnm
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
861 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 ;
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \ W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman "
Friday nfcjht sent see p.m.
aturdey morning eervtoee 8: JO
Bel Mltavah Leoh Keetan
TEMPLE BETH SH6LOM S34 723 i"
Chase Ave. 4 41 st St i.ee.o>
OR LEON KRONIBH, Fasjaasng Senior Rabbi
QARY A QLICKSTIlN. Ra*>i
MARRY JOLT. AusiilanB_.
PAUL 0 CAPLAN, Aeeletont Rao*.
CANTOR 0AVID CONVIBER
Frt. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi aMokateta will epeek on
"Whet's In e Nemo." Sal. 10:48 a.m. sen.
Sunday 10:*0 a.m. Omnibus Lecture Progrem
lit. Rabbi lookstein
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beech Blvd
Or Max A Ltpschiti. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Dally Servlcea: Mon Frt T 30 a.m.
* 5:30 pm
Sat. 8 25 a m 8 8.15 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. 8 5 p.m.
Late service Frt. 8 p.m.
Frt Bat Mitzvah Vivian Mayer.
Sat. Bar Mitzvah Jordan Linn.
It)
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
3624)696
Rabbi Hershel Becker isodwn otr>o.
Sat 8:30 a.m. esrvtoe et
Tampte Ismu El
S363SW1S2A*e..
S of N Kendall Or

TEMPLE SINAI 16*01 NE 22 Ave
North Dado's Reform Corvaregetion
Ralph P Kingsley, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Frt. 8 p.m. Rabbi Ktagaley "The Cardinal end
thei -tatara **
Bet. Bar Mlti.ah Merc Fermen.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 .
Dr Norman N Shapiro, Rabbi St)
Benjamin Adler, Cantor m '
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday A Thursday
Frt. a p.m. gueet speaker wiiuam
F. Seulaon -A Work) et DHtereriee."
Bat. 8 a.m. Sabbath Servtoe
Tsltler Chapel


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
Tribute To Dr. Martin Luther King
Jesse Grauman (left, ^
Gregory Brenner.'fy^
ffraders at the R^
School in Manhattan
deliver joint tribute to Dr
Martin Luther King jr
American Jewish CorurrZ
observance honoring %
bUick Uader. SwJ JJ
elementary school children
and grownups attended the
memorial which featured
the opening of exhibit tf
photographs m the lobby
the organization's ni
tional headquarters. Other
speakers included Con
gressman William Green
New Yorki City Com-
ptroller Harrison J
Goldin and Manhattan
Borough President Daiid
Dinkins who. alluding u,
the recent racial attack m
Howard Beach, recalled
the words of Dr. King
'You can't meet violence
with inolenee.'
Shiite Terrorists Renew Threats Against Lebanese Jews
Dr. George Gruen is director
of Middle East Affairs of the
American Jewish Committee.
By DR. GEORGE GRUEN
The radical Shiite Moslem
group that has claimed
responsibility for kidnapp-
ing and Killing seven
Lebanese Jews in the past
21 months has now stepped
up its campaign of terror by
again threatening to kill all
remaining hostages unless
its demands are met.
What makes this particularly
ominous is that the renewed
threat by the self-styled
"Organization of the Oppressed
Mustadafini in the World" was
delivered to the Beirut paper An-
Nahar on Jan. 6, only a week after
the terrorist group had announced
the execution of three Lebanese
Jewish hostages.
THE SHIITE terrorist group
contended that the men had been
executed because they were
"spies for the Israeli Mossad"
who had supplied Israel with in-
formation on the Islamic
Resistance, a coalition of
Lebanese anti-Israeli groups. The
timing of the latest executions, it
declared, was "in retaliation for
Israel's attacks against the south
and western Bekaa (Valley) and
the terrorist attacks against our
people in occupied Palestine."
A spokesman for the Israeli
Foreign Ministry responded that
"the gratuitous murder of three
innocents reveals the true nature
of terrorist movements in
Lebanon," and Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir vowed that Israel
would seek out and punish "these
barbarians" who again had "used
defenseless Jews as a means of
hitting at Israel."
The latest victims were
reported to be Elie Srour, an elec-
trical engineer, near 50, who had
been kidnapped on March 28,
1985; Youssef (Joseph) Benesti,
33, kidnapped in mid-May, 1985;
and Henri Menn, a man in his fif-
ties who lived alone in Moslem-
controlled west Beirut. Until the
publication of Menn's photograph
and the announcement of his "ex-
ecution" by the Organization of
the Oppressed, there had been no
information that he had been
abducted.
THE KIDNAPPING and
murder of Menn provides further
evidence that this fanatical group
was deadly serious when it first
declared, on December 28, 1985,
that it would strike against other
Jews "on whom we may lay our
hands" unless its demands against
Israel were met.
That threatening statement was
issued at the time of the murder of
the first two hostages: Haim
Cohen, 38, a department store ac-
countant, on December 24, 1985;
and Prof. Isaac Tarrab, 70, a
retired professor of mathematics,
whose body was found at the end
of the month.
Neither Cohen nor Tarrab was
involved in partisan Lebanese
politics or in the Arab-Israel con-
flicts in any way. Indeed, it was
precisely because they felt
themselves deeply rooted in
Lebanon that they and the other
Jews who have become victims of
Shiite terrorism remained behind
when the vast majority of
Lebanese Jews emigrated either
to Israel or to join relatives in
other countries during the decade
of turmoil that has engulfed
Lebanon.
Dr. Rosemary Cohen, the sister-
in-law of Haim Cohen, has
declared that he "was given the
opportunity to go to Israel. But he
did not want to go so as not to
have to face the possibility of kill-
ing his Arab frienda."
A NEIGHBOR and former stu-
4 dent of Tarrab stressed to me that
he was not a Zionist and in fact
had virtually no connection with
Jewish life. "He was not in-
terested in anything but his
figures and his pipe." The killing
of this gentle old man, she said,
was "a senseless death."
The kidnap and murder victims
are of diverse backgrounds and
ages. They have only two things in
common: they were known to be
Jews and they had the bad fortune
of living in west Beirut, which
made them targets of opportunity
for the radical Moslem elements.
There are fewer than 10 Jews in
West Beirut and about 70 in east
Beirut.
The third murder victim was
Ibrahim Benesti, 34, the brother
of Joseph. Ibrahim's body was
found by the police on February
19, 1986. The coroner's office
reported that he had been shot
twice and strangled. The body
also bore signs of torture and
beatings to the head. Both
Ibrahim and the father of the two
men, Yehuda Benesti, 70, had
been kidnapped earlier in
February.
It is tragically ironic that when
Joseph had been abducted the
previous May, the father at first
did not report the disappearance
to the police, because he believed
that his friends and customers of
his shop within the surrounding
Shiite and Palestinian com-
munities would discreetly in-
tervene on behalf of his son and
secure his release.
THE FOURTH victim was Dr.
Elie Hallak, 58, vice president of
the Lebanese Jewish community.
Hallak was one of the four Jews
kidnapped over the last weekend
in March. Reportedly, armed men
in uniform had dragged him from
his home on a Friday night, during
the Sabbath meal. His "execu-
tion" was announced in a state-
ment published on Feb. 19 in the
Lebanese press.
The Organization of the Op-
pressed said that it would not
release his body until Israel "stop-
ped its criminal operations" in
southern Lebanon, withdrew from
"all of the occupied territories"
and released "all our brothers de-
tained in Khiyam," a South
Lebanese Army detention camp.
The same conditions were
reiterated by the group when it
refused to release the bodies of
the latest three victims. It is
speculated that the bodies have
not been released either because
the Shiite terrorist group does not
want to reveal evidence that it had
also tortured them or because
they may have been killed some
time ago.
Rachel Hallak still vainly hopes
that her husband may yet be alive.
In public appeals to the kidnap-
pers, she has stressed how her
husband, a noted pediatrician,
was known as "the doctor of the
poor," because he would not col-
lect fees from those who could not
pay, "whatever their religion."
HIS PATIENTS included many
Shiites in Beirut and in the
villages of the south. His
neighbors, she writes, all "could
bear witness that he was totally
apolitical, for the simple reason
that his profession had shaped his
entire life." In fact, one of his pa-
tients was the son of a prominent
PLO leader.
The Organization of the Op-
pressed has stated that it is still
holding the following persons:
Isaac Sasson, 66. the president of
the Lebanese Jewish community,
who was kidnapped on March 31,
1985, on his way from the airport
in west Beirut on his return from
a business trip for the phar-
maceutical firm he directed; and
Yehuda Benesti, whose two sons
were among those murdered by
the group.
It is generally believed that the
group may also be holding Salim
Jammous, 56, the secretary-
general of the Lebanese Jewish
community, who was abducted
near the synagogue in west Beirut
on August 15, 1984. Nothing i j
known of the whereabouts of Cfe- j
ment Dana, an elderly man n J
lived alone and disappeared il
April, 1985.
the formation of a worl
group under the name of "tkl
Party of the Oppressed" was sum
gested by Ayatollah Khomenl
diu~ing a meeting with the Syria I
Foreign Minister on August 16.
1979. in which Khomeini declared I
it to be "the same as the Party of |
God' (Hezbullah)."
AT A MEMORIAL meeting ill
New York on January 8, 1986 ce
behalf of the first two Jewish vie- ]
tims. the Rev. Joseph O'Hare |
president of Fordham 1'niversitj.
poignantly declared: "It is once j
again a cruel irony that tfrj
murderers of Haim Cohen ucj
Isaac Tarrah should dare to all
themselves representatives of |
oppressed of the world. S
greater human oppression
possible than the reduction of ]
dividual human beings
nameless symbols whose lives m
snuffed out in some stenk
political gesture."
United Cerebral Palsy
Miami Telethon Successful
Jan Pfeiffer, senior vice presi-
dent of Jefferson National Bank,
served as VIP Panel chairman of
the highly successful United
Cerebral Palsy of Greater Miami
annual telethon Jan. 17 and 18.
She is past president of the UCP
Association and a member of the
board of the organization which
raised more than $530,000 in the
weekend effort.
Jefferson National Bank itself
contributed $1,000 to the
telethon, with A. Anthony Noboa,
executive vice president, joining
Mrs. Pfeiffer in the presentation.
Noboa also is a past president and
board member of the United
Cerebral Palsy Association of
Greater Miami.
Mrs. Pfeiffer, first woman ever
elected as president of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce,
said "the response of the Miami
Beach and Sunny Isles areasi serv
ed by Jefferson National Bant
played a vital role in achievingm
success of this years teletboa
Our communities again na
shown the way in support"!
causes essential to the health W
welfare of our less fortune
citizens."
Book Review
The spiritual odyssey portray*
in the book "The Gate BehindI*
Wall," by Samuel Heilman. wiD
reviewed by Rabbi Menachtf
Raab, Director of the Departm* |
of Day Schools of the Centra
Agency for Jewish Educate
Feb. 5 at i:30 p.m., at the Mi**
Beach Public Library.


arles Gottlieb, 64, Miami Developer
Lrles E. Gottlieb, one of
Lni's first developers, died of
[apparent heart attack Satur-
L in his Coconut Grove home.
| was 64.
ftorn in Asheville, N.C. and rais-
fin Washington. D.C., Mr. Got-
lb graduated from the Universi-
[of Maryland with a bachelor's
gree in mechanical engineering.
Je served in the U.S. Navy dur-
I World War II. After the war,
|. Gottlieb settled in Miami and
I lived here since.
|jr. Gottlieb started his career
Uding houses in Dade County.
t construction accomplishments
Huded the Suniland Shopping
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7260
Division (01)
In re estate of
lillian mikrop
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
. Iministrmtk>n of the estate
Lillian Miirop, i-<-ease 86 7260, is pending in the
ircuit <"urt fur bade County,
probate I liviaion, the ad-
*-hich is 73 West Flakier
tree! Miami, Flonda. The names
11 Iresaoa ><( the personal
tativo and the personal
tttonwy are set
All :nierest*d persons are re-
o file with this court.
[THIN THREE MONTHS OF
IE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
.- NOTICE: (1) all claims
rat the estate and (2) any ob-
ti"n by an interested person to
m thi> notice was mailed that
allengei the validity of the will.
e qualifications of the personal
:-- Mtive, venue, or jurisdic-
the court.
1.1. I.AIMS AND OBJEC
II INS N< >T SO FILED WILL BE
OREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Nouce has
'Kun on January 23, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Jeanne Racow
9740 Bay Harbor Terrace
v Harbor Islands. Florida 33154
torney for Personal
presentative:
ilia H Stallman
) Lincoln Road
i Beach. Florida 33139
(phone: 532-9939
January 23. 30, 1987
THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
MADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Kile Number 87-198
Division 02
i.r KSTATE OF
MAX GREENSPAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
[The administration of the estate
[MAX GREENSPAN, deceased.
Number 87-198, is pending in
Circuit Court for Dade County.
1'rotate Division, the ad-
- >f which is 73 West Flakier
Miami. Florida 33130. The
' ind addresses of the per-
btial representative and the per-
bnal representative's attorney are
Y r'h Mow.
VB interested persons are re-
hired u> file with this court.
[ITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
BE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
HIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
punst the estate and (2) any ob-
ction by an interested person on
horn this notice was served that
Menses the validity of the will,
p? qualifications of the personal
presentative. venue, or jurisdk-
"i f the court.
LL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
PONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
JREVER BARRED.
| Publication of this Notice has
un on January 23. 1987.
Personal Representative:
HAL W. SPAET
800 West Ave.. Ste. 906
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Jerri PoUak
5825 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Itorney for Personal
^presentative:
U- W SPAET, ESQ.
n West Avenue. Suite 906
ami Beach. FL 33139
HePhone: (305) 531 1700
January 23. 30. 1987
Plaza, a post office in South Dade,
and scores of buildings in Miami.
During the early 1960's Mr.
Gottlieb served as campaign
manager for Congressman Dante
Fascell.
Survivors include sons Jay Got-
tlieb and Craig Gottlieb;
daughters Laurie Gottlieb and
Joan Gottlieb; two brothers and
one sister.
Servies were held at the River-
side Douglas Road Chapel.
SCHWAM
Joseph, a resident of Bay Harbor Islands,
for 47 years. Survived by his wife. Esther:
son Alan (Juell) Kadet: 6 grandchildren: 4
great-grandchildren. Member of B'nai
B'rith. The Riverside
KRIVAL. Sol, 87. of North Miami Beach.
January 16. Levitt-Weinstein.
ZITTER. Solomon of North Miami Beach.
January 16. The Riverside.
ADAMSKY. Anne. 66, of Miami, January
It The Riverside
FEIN. Sally. 78 Burial in Long Island. New
York.
MISTKIN. Leon, if Miami Bead), January
16. The Riverside
SHEVTrZ, Reuben. January lti. Rubin
zqhi
RITCHIE. Miriam. Services held in
Rockville Centre. New York
/AKIN Jack M 78, January 14 Service*
held in Brooklyn. New York.
BERGER, Matthew Services held in Long
Island. New York.
EDELSTEIN. Jack, of North Miami Beach.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7204
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX COHEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MAX COHEN,
deceased. File Number 86-7204. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Miami. Fl. 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Lillian Daniels, whose ad-
dress is 6770 Indian Creek Dr No.
7-F. The name and address of the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
i\. All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publicaUon of
this Notice of Administration:
January 23. 1986.
Lillian Daniels
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MAX COHEN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
William O'Neil III
1111 Lincoln Rd No. 505
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Telephone: 305-532-1761
,3470 January 23. 30. 198.
Leo Star Of
Monarch Wine
Passes
Leo Star, founder and president
of Monarch Wine Company pass-
ed away January 19. He was born
in Bradford, Penn.
Mr. Star is survived by his wife,
Paula; daughers, Clair Adelson
and Shirley Moss; son-in-laws,
Cliff Adelson, Chet Moss; Marlyn
Aronoff and Norman Aronoff;
grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. Services held at
Riverside Alton Road Chapel.
GOLDBERG
Bertha. 64, an extraordinary person, sister,
aunt, cousin and friend, passed away on
January 19. She is survived by her sister,
Esther Lobel Nadler of Miami Beach:
brothers, Lewis Lobel and Ruth of Tamarac.
Herman Lobel and Regina of New York;
aunt of Barbara Howard and Shaynie Goren
of Miami Beach, Lawrence, Shelly and Gila
Nadler of Clearwater, Sanford Nadler of
Miami Beach: eight nieces and nephews of
New York and California. Bertha was one of
the guiding forces behind the late Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, of blessed memory. She
was an inspiration to the many children of
the Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami
which was founded by her parents, the late
Solomon and Rose Lobel. She devoted her
life to Torah and Torah Institutions, such as.
Bath Israel Synagogue, also founded by the
Lobel family. Misifta High School was one
of the institutions especially dear to her
heart Bertha was an exemplary woman,
worthy of the name Ashet Hayil. Her
selflessness was known throughout the com-
munity and she touched everyone who knew
her. In lieu of flowers, donations in Bertha's
memory should be made to the Hebrew-
Academy of Greater Miami. Beth Israel
Synagogue and the Misifta High School.
Services held at the Alton Road Riverside
Chapel followed by interment in Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
NASH
Rose. 84. of Miami. January 18. Mrs. Nash
had been a resident here for 25 years com-
ing from the Bronx, New York. She was a
lifetime member of Temple Ner Tamid
Sisterhood. She is survived by her husband
Irving, sons. Martin (Ruth) Nash. Coral
Gables. Robert (Gloria) Nash. St. Louis and
daughter Cecile (Herbert) Katz. Miami. Ser-
vices were held at The Riverside.
GROSS, Rita. Services held.
KRAVITZ. Benjamin. 93. of North Miami
Beach, January 20. The Riverside.
VOLBERT. Morris A.. 78. of Miami.
January 19. Services were held.
ZAICHICK, Abraham. 80. of Kendall.
January 20. Services were held.
BELL, Ruth. 82. Services held in Brooklyn.
New York.
ZEMEL. Rena. 92, of Miami Beach.
January 16. Services held in New Jersey.
SILVERBERG, Mildred (nee Goodfriend),
80, of Miami Beach, January 17 Blasberg
Chapel.
FELDMAN, Harold. 86. January 17. Levitt-
Weinstein.
Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open E*eiy Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
ZEMEL
Rena. 92, of Miami Beach, January 16.
Funeral services were held in New Jersey.
Born in Newark. N.J.. she lived in South
Orange before moving, to Miami Beach 20
years ago. She was a member of Hadassah
and AMIT Women, both of Miami Beach,
also a member of the Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School, N.M.B. She had
been the Chaplain of the Dvorah Chapter of
Hadassah, Miami Beach, a member of Beth
El Congregation, Miami Beach, member of
the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy, Greater Miami, member of the
Order of the Golden Chain and a member of
the United Order of True Sisters. Newark.
She had been one of the founders of the
South Orange Chapter of Hadassah. She is
survived by four sons, Sylvan of
Brideewater. N.J.. Nathan of Orange City,
Fla ."Herbert of Miami Beach, and Morton
B. of North Miami Beach: three daughters.
Shirley Kaufman of Miami Beach, Estelle
Frank of West Orange. N.J., and Margi
Wulwick of Monsey. NY., and 22 grand
children. Morton Zemel will be observing
Shiva at his residence beginning Jan 19.
SOMBERG
Rose. 91, of Miami Beach, January 13. Mrs.
Somberg had made her home here for the
past 53 years She is survived by her son
Norman (Paula) Somberg of Miami; a sister,
Rae Stambler of New York and 7 grand
children. Services and interment held at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
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Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 23, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7229
Diviaioa 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH A. SCHRAGER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSEPH A. SCHRAGER.
deceased, File Number 86-7229. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagier Street. Miami. FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
AH interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 16. 1987.
Personal Representatives:
JANET A. SCHRAGER
9273 Collins Avenue
Surfside. FL 33154
BARNETT BANKS
TRUST CO., N.A.
1108 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands.
FL 33154
By: ROBT. ALBRIGHT,
Trust Officer
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Island. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
13455 January 16. 23, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-5245: (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSTA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L. WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20. 1987:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 13 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13458 January 16, 23, 30;
February 6, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 87-1(56
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
ALBERT EFERGAN.
Petitioner/Husband.
ad
BERNADETTE ANN
EFERGAN,
Respondent/Wife
IX): BERNADETTE ANN
EFERGAN
17 Elgar Close
Clevedon
Avon
BS21-6B8
ENGLAND
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
MARKUS A WINTER. P.A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whoae ad-
dress is 2251 S.W. 22nd Avenue,
Miami. Florida USA 33145. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
February 20, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 15 day of January, 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By VICTOR M. BORRERO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROBERT O SCHWARZ. ESQ
(Of Counsel)
MARKUS & WINTER. P.A.
2251 S.W. 22nd Street
Miami. Florida 33145
856-6910
Attorney for Petitioner
13467 January 23.30;
February 6,13.1987
For Legal
Publication Forms
Call 373-4605
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 86-695
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAMES J. STEWART
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of JAMES J.
STEWART, deceased. File
Number 86-595. is pending in the
Circuit ('out for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 W. Flagler
Miami, Fl. 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Helen McDermott, whose address
is 930 NE 159th St. N. Miami
Beach, Fl. 33162. The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's wiH, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
January 23. 1987.
Helen McDermott
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JAMES J STEWART
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
William O'Neil HI
1111 Lincoln Rd No. 506
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone 906 '.32 1761
13471 Januarv 23. 30. 1987
Metaltvorking students at I'Ecole de Travail
in Paris, an apprenticeship center in the ORT
France network, create a menorah for the
school's annual Chanukah celebration.
Chtmukak projects are a basic part of the cur-
riculum at ORT schools in 17 countries, serv-
ing 158,000 students, according to Marc J
Berkman, president of the Chicago chapter or
the A merican ORT Federation.
Persistence, Talent Paid
Off For Lou Jacobi
By GERRY MORRIS
Louis Jacobovitch is a
Toronto boy who has made
good in a big way. As Lou
Jacobi, he has been featured
in popular movies and recor-
dings and has a streak of
five long-running Broadway
plays.
Recall him as: the bread-
stealing Mr. Van Dann in the
Pulitzer Prize-winning "Diary of
Anne Frank"; the atheist
Schlissel in Paddy Chayefsky's
"The Tenth Man"; the domineer-
ing father in Neil Simon's "Come
Blow Your Horn"; the Hollywood
producer, co-starring with Carol
Burnett, in "Fade-In Fade-Out";
and in "Don't Drink the Water,"
written with him in mind by
Woody Allen.
Seated with his wife recently in
his Manhattan apartment, he
recalled his career, which began
informally 70 years ago when he
was three. His father, Jacobi
recalled, taught him the Yiddish
song, "God Don't Desert Me in
My Old Age." His mother, he said,
thought his father "mishuga.
'Why teach a three-year-old a
song like that?' she asked. With
amiable outrage my father bellow-
ed, 'Let him know what it is to
grow old,' Jacobi said.
JACOBI WAS one of four
children. His mother ran a boar-
ding house for Jewish actors, and
young Jacobi became incurably in-
fected by the virus of the theater.
At age 12, he made his stage
debut at the Princess Theatre in a
little something called "The Rabbi
and The Priest."
"When I was 10, my scholarly
father, a cloak operator, spent a
small fortune trying to make me
into a violinist," Jacobi said.
In 1927, Jacobi won a bronze
medal for violinists under 16 at
the Canadian National Exhibition.
He eventually hung up his violin
case and became a comedian, and
Joseph Jacobovitch was convinced
that his son was not quite right in
the head.
"You're a bum, and you'll stay a
bum," the old man brusquely con-
cluded. "It was 1933. the Great
Depression," Jacobi said. "What
can I tell you of a young, sensitive
boy who had nowhere to go
whose father couldn't afford
university?"
YOUNG JACOBI kept the wolf
from the door by romping around
with his own one-man repertory
company, worked in a straw hat
factory and sold socks and other
products door-to-door until he
sprang to prominence as a natural
storyteller. Thereafter, the only
product he sold was Lou Jacobi.
In 1951, he left for London.
Jacobi had his share of loneliness
and heartache there. Survival
seemed dubious at times. "I got a
flat nose from doors being slamm-
ed in my face. My sights were low
all I wanted was a walk-on in
the West End everything else I
did was a bonus," he remembered.
Finally the breaks came. Ciro's,
a top night spot, bought his act.
Now successfully showcased, he
graduated to the West End stage
in "Remains To Be Seen." follow-
ed by "Guys and Dolls." "Pal
Joey," "Into Thin Air" (which
was where it went), and a film for
Sir Carol Reed, "A Kid For Two
Farthings."
His period of struggle ended
when New York playwright-
director Garson Kanin spotted
him in "The World of Sholom
Aleichem" and brought him to
New York for the supporting role
of Van Dann in "Diary of Anne
Frank." edging out serious con-
tenders such as Lee J. Cobb and
Eli Wallach.
Lou married in 1957. "I was 42
Even Lloyds of London wouldn't
take a chance," he said.
ONE OF the finest things about
Jacobi is his wife, the former Ruth
Ludwin of Jersey City. She
graduated in theater at college
and went off to Israel to help
found Kibbutz Hasollelim. "My
wife is an intelligent and
understanding woman. Because of
her influence I have become a
more committed Jew," he said.
The couple have no children, but
visits Toronto regularly to see
family.
Jacobi is careful about money
and at the same time generous
He has given freely of his time and
talent to many Jewish causes and
proudly displays scrolls and cita-
tions. "These to me are my Jewish
Oscars. I don't have to go to
Hollywood to get them. When the
Jewish people give you an (Is.ar
that's an Oscar," he said, jump-
ing up to accentuate his point.
In spite of all his magic I
moments in the theater, he claim
the biggest thrill of all was sen- ]
ding his parents to Israel in 1960
"It was their realization of 11
lifelong dream, I lost my father:
1965, my mother in 1979. A bf I
loss. I was very close to them, and]
they are in my mind all the time. |
he said.
"I do 'Come Blow Your Horn
again and again because I have a
wonderful opportunity of being
with my father for two-and-a-half
hours. I say 'Pa. how'm I dow*
Look. I'm talking like you I loved
both my parents for different
reasons. They gave me my Jewish
soul my heritage and when 1
am on stage my family is up there
with me. I draw from my roots'
The offstage Jacobi reads and
walks a lot, still-plays the fiddle
and loves to paint. He uses pastel'
and charcoals well enough to haw
a one-man show. His laughing
eyes had a sparkle of pride as he
quotes Ed Wynn. "Lou." sud
Wynn, "the difference ivtweeni
comic and a comedian is, a com*
says funny things and a i "median
says things funny. You say things
funny."
In a prolific movie career spann-
ing nearly 35 years he has cap-
tured a slew of favorabl. rev**
The great comic role of Moustache
in irma Le Douce" i>
favorite. A segment of his 1**
record. "When You're in Lo"
The Whole World Is .lewish is
still played everv morning "
WNEW. New York, which well in-
dicates his mainstream popu*
appeal.
Recentlv he successful!.1, starred
in a Canadian Broadcast
film called "Isaac Littlefi-attars.
playing a compassionate
storekeeper who adopt- a na..-
breed boy. "I was -
tracted to the project, and I *
mend the CBC for tin**
presentation, which I
during the Keegstra
anti-Semitic outpourii
' anada.
Who did the veterai
actor feel was his bigg"
tion. He chuckled, and uiiabasl*
ly replied: "There's lots.'ntfrn*11
the top."
JTA Serviet




I'
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, January 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
at 1111 Kane Concourse. Bay Har-
nor Islands, Fl. intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
Edward R. Watson, M.D P.A.
President
Martin Starr
Attorney for Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
1U52 January 16, 23, 30;
February 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7205
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL WASSERMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
SAMUEL WASSERMAN.
deceased. File Number 86-7205, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler St., Miami, Florida
33130 The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
ajrainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January' 16. 1987.
Personal Representative
Marcia D. Essig
801 Navajo Drive
Riverside. Calif. 92507
Paul Wasserman
1 Rockledge Road
Hartadale. NY 10531
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
Fur Marcia D. Essig:
Hertart J. Lerner. Esq.
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Fl. 33140
Telephone: 305 673-3000
For Paul Wasserman:
Arnold Spiegel, Esq.
60 E. 42nd Street
New York. NY 10017
Telephone: 212 687-5225
I :i4r>7 January 16. 23. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-00*85 (12)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
Carolyn Pratt
Petitioner/Wife
and
William Pratt
Respondent/H usband
TO: William Pratt
1570 N.W. 159th Street
Opa-Locka. Fl. 33054
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Ihssolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 633 N.E. 167th Street.
(Suite 619) North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 13,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Florida on this 9
day of January, 1987.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
County. Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th Street (Suite 619)
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
(305) 653-3535
13456 January 16. 23. 30;
February 6.1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-32196
SEC. 14
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
MICHAEL P. JOHNSON a/k/a
MICHAEL PERCIVAL
JOHNSON, and the unknown
spouse, et a).
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Dade County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M.. on the 6th day of
February. 1987. the following
deacribed property:
Lot 2. in Block 3. of AVOCADO
VILLAS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
97. at Page 15, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
DATED the 21st day of January,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V.Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosen thai and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscay tie Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 1-23-30
in
Roaenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 1-23-30
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of CREATIVE
BRONZE, INC.. d/b/a A CON-
CEPT IN BRONZE at number
8106 N.W. 103rd Street, in the Ci-
ty of Hialeah, Florida, intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at North Miami Beach.
Florida, this 16 day of January.
1987.
ZIVA GROMAN, President
8106 N.W. 103rd Street
Hialeah Gardens. Florida 33016
MORTON B ZEMEL. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite HI
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162
(305) 949-4237
13466 January 23, 30.
February 6,13,1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52452 (21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSIA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L. WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 13 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13458 January 23.30;
February 6. 13.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FINE AUTO SALES
at 2075 N.E. 160th Street, North
Miami Beach. Fl. 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SHIMON A. BOVELNIAK
13442 January 2,9.16.23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Sender-Tragash-
Alvarino at 419 Espanola Way,
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Sender-Tragash-Alvarino Inc.
A Florida corporation
Lee J. Osiason
Attorney for Sender-Tragash-
Alvarino Inc.
13446 January 2.9. 16,23. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-43105
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSEPH D. RENE,
Petitioner,
and
BRENDA KAYE RENE.
Respondent.
TO: BRENDA KAYE RENE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before January 30.1987; otherwise
a default will be entered.
December 24, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
13443
January 2. 9.16.23. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-00895 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
Unite States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GERALD BEYER, as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
GEORGE P. BULLOCK,
Deceased, a/k/a GEORGE
BULLOCK, a/k/a GEORGE D.
BULLOCK, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors, trustees
or otherwise claiming by.
through, under or against
GEORGE P. BULLOCK,
Deceased, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described, whose
residences are unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 309
of CORAL ISLE WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, dated Oc-
tober 13. 1972, filed for
record October 17, 1972.
under Clerk's File No.
72R-232618. in Official
Records Book 7942. at Page
1. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended, together with the
Mortgagor's undivided share
in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith. Mack. Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33132. on or before
February 13, 1987, and filed the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of January,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
13454 January 16. 23, 30;
February 6,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name B.E. KOSHER at
1436 Alton Road Miami Beach
FL. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
BRODY ENTERPRISES. INC
Avrohom Brody Pres./Sec.
13445
January 2.9. 16, 23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Citizens Financial
Center at 999 Brickell Avenue.
Miami. Florida, 33131 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
UCCELLO IMMOBILIEN GmbH,
a German Corporation
By: ROBERT VOGEL.
Managing Director (President)
Barton S. Udell. Esq.,
Smith & Mandler, P.A
Attorney for
Uccello Immobilien GmbH
800 Brickell Avenue. Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
13459 January 16, 23. 30;
February 6, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name J & S ENTER-
PRISES at 8285 N.W. 64 St. Bay
No. 4 Miami Fla. 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Sergio M. Novo
13461 January 23. 30;
February 6, 13, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ANTIGUA FUR-
NITURE, INC. d/b/a CFG. Pro-
motions at 10800 Biscayne Blvd.,
Suite 640, Miami. Florida 33161 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ANTIGUA FURNITURE. INC
d/b/a CFG. Promotions
BY: Jorge Iker
Carl A. Schmitt
Attorney for
ANTIGUA FURNITURE, INC.
d/b/a C.F.G. Promotions
13463 January 23,30;
February 6, 13. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-8012
Division Probate 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DORA WEISS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DORA WEISS, deceased, File
Number 84-8012, is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is Room 307. Dade
County Court House. 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 23, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Peter Weiss
354 Harbor Drive
Lido Beach, New York 11561
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
PAUL SILBERBERG, ESQ.
No. 176046
Herman, Koerner & Silberberg,
PC.
405 Lexington Avenue, N.Y..
N.Y. 10174
Telephone: (212) 953-1112
13460 January 23.30. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EDGEWATER
PLAZA at 7899 NE 4 Ct.. Miami
Fla. 33137 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MICHAEL PATELLA
14790 SW 14 St.
DAVIE. FLA. 33325
13444 January 2. 9. 16. 23.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Smoke Shop II; Mall
Smoke Shop at 420 Hollywood
Mall, Hollywood Fl. 33021 intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Fort Pitt Corp.
Lee J. Osiason
Attorney for Fort Pitt. Corp.
13449 January 2. 9, 16. 23,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name T L C and Friends at
12210 N.E. 13 Court. North
Miami, Florida intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
John P. Mern
and Donna Lieberman-Mern
d/b/a T L C and Friends
12210 N.E. 13 Court
North Miami. Fl.
Steven D. Tishler
Attorney for Applicants
8625 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33138
(305) 754-1001
13464 January 23.30;
February 6, 13,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Regina's Fashions
Inc. at 297 NE 2nd Ave. Miami Fl.
33132 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo Jr.
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami. Fla. 33173
13465 January 23. 30;
February 6. 13, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3400
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
LOUIS J. GROSSMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LOUIS J. GROSSMAN, deceas-
ed. File Number 86-3400, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 23, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
ALLAN GROSSMAN
740 Mobile Road
Far Rockaway. New York, NY
11691
TOBA GROSS
Lincoln A-2004
Century Village
Boca Raton, Florida
JOSEPH GROSSMAN
2306 Shipley Road
Wilmington, Delaware 19803
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
Florida Bar No. 210889
13462 January 23. 30, 1987
Eisisserfc?^"&a4Sw.te


r*ge lt>-B rue jewian r torxnan/f TKiay, January za, a7
Police Security Increased In Jerusalem
By HUGH OSGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Police have increased
security here following the
stabbing of two brothers on
Saturday in an Old City
bazaar. The victims, Avi
Chayon. 24, and his brother,
Shalom, 17, were reported
in satisfactory condition
after undergoing surgery.
According to eyewitnesses, the
two brothers were stabbed in the
back by several Arabs who ap-
parently had been lurking in an
alley.
The brothers were stabbed in
the Kahn E-Zeit bazaar where
they had been strolling with Avi
Chayon's fiancee. Lean Azuiai.
She was not harmed. Police sealed
all gates to the Old City im-
mediately afterwards and ordered
Arab shops in the area closed for
their protection. The closure
order was later rescinded.
THE INCIDENT brought to
eight the number of Jews stabbed
by Arab assailants in the Old City
and other parts of East Jerusalem
since August 1985. Last
November a yeshiva student was
stabbed to death. This touched off
a wave of anti-Arab violence by
Jewish militant*. Mayor Teddy
Kollek appealed to Jews following
Saturday's incident not to attack
Arabs or their property as they
did in November.
But a number of Arabs were
Applications For Jewish
Peace Corps Service
Applications for Jewish Peace
Corps Service are now being ac-
cepted by the Congregation Kol
Yisroel Chaverim on Miami Beach
and its community service arm.
the International Council for
Jewish Community Service. Rabbi
Rubin R. Doom, spiritual leader of
the national congregation, said
that the project is being conducted
with the cooperation of the World
Union of Jewish Students which is
headquartered in Jerusalem.
The project is called Artivcim,
"concerned responsible people."
Young Jewish motivated people
between the ages at 23 to 35 from
all over the world are urged to ac-
cept the responsibility to
volunteer for a year of service to
communities who seek help in
organizing the Jewish youth of
their areas.
Rabbi Dobih explained that "the
Jewish Peace Corps seeks to
enroll young people who feel a
sense of responsibility to the
Jewish people and the State of
Israel and who want to devote
their energies to a year of service
to their Jewish tradition by work-
ing with students on the college
campus, leading youth groups,
teaching, and working on com-
munity projects"
The program now has
volunteers in small communities
of Europe, Canada and South
America.
Accepted volunteers are given
an extensive training course in
Israel, and all their expenses from
Israel to their host country are
provided. In addition, the host
country provides room, board.
and $150 a month for pocket
money. At the end of the suc-
cessful vear of service, the host
Amit Women
Shabbat Feb. 14
Synagogues throughout the
United States will celebrate
Amit Women Shabbat" Feb. 14
to launch a national membership
dnve to support child-care, social
services and educational pro-
grams run by Amit Women in
Chaim Weizman
Farband Branch 343
Chaim Weizman Farband
Branch 343 will meet noon Mon-
day at the American Savings
Bank on Ij*Jii Road and the
movie "The Diary of Anne
Frank" will be shown. Other
entertainment will include singer
Regina Bailee, who has prepared
a medley at Israeli. English and
Yiddish songs with Helen Skolnik
to accompany. Jean Brody will
give a recitation.
community- grants the volunteer
as much as a 11.000 bonus. Rabbi
Dobin said.
beaten up near the scene of the at-
tack and four Jewish residents of
the Musrara quarter where the
Chayons live were detained for at-
tacking Arab passersby. Riot
ponce patrolled the streets in and
around the quarter Saturday
night and Sunday. A Jewish man
was arrested Sunday evening
near the Damascus Gate in posses
sion of five Molotov cocktails. He
was questioned about his intent.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir called
for increased police presence in
Jerusalem. "Police have orders to
strengthen security, to increase
their guard and alertness," he
said Sunday, "and we shall use all
means to ensure such incidents do
not recur."
POLICE MINISTER Haim
Bariev briefed the Cabinet on the
stabbing which police described as
the work of Arab terrorists. He
toured the Old City and complain-
ed afterward that although there
were many eyewitnesses to the
stabbing, no one. neither Jew nor
Arab, came forward to tell police
what actually happened.
Vice Premier Shimon Peres.
who heads the Ministerial Com-
mittee on Jerusalem, said security
forces were taking all necessary
measures to apprehend the
assailants. Israeli Police Chief
David Kraus said his officers
alone cannot solve the problem.
He told reporters that Jerusalem
is "an integrated city, and we
must create conditions by which
we (Jews and Arabs) can live side
by side."
After the assault on the Chayon
brothers, there were few touri*
in the normally busthT
marketplace. Bariev told fi
Voice of Israel Sunday fi
Jerusalem is one of the saf^
cities in the world. He urged mo*
Jews and tourists in jrenerJT
visit the OW City, but & caJw
ed that they should do *
preferably in groups and to L
aware of what is going on aro^
them.
Israel To Adopt Sanctions
Against South Africa
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
The sanctions taken by the
U.S. and Western European
countries against the apar-
theid regime in South Africa
will also be adopted by
Israel, the director general
of the Foreign Ministry,
Yossi Beilin, said in an in-
terview with Israel Radio
from Washington Thursday
(Jan. 15).
Beilin was in Washington for a
periodic discussion with American
officials that cover bilateral,
regional, international and other
issues of mutual interest to Isra*l
and the U.S.
The State Department k
preparing a report for Congrt*
on countries that are not comply.
ing with the arms embam
against South Africa. According
to Israel Radio, countries defying
the ban will be subject to coti|
U.S. aid.
Israel Radio quoted Beilin at
saying that Israel has signed no
arms agreements with, South
Africa for 10 years.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a wee*
Pubh* Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Rrigfa
IMHOfll
BlMliMAVMIAI#ill
Bran
$129
1
atPvMxStoraawKh
0Q9 Will ft r rWft oOWMlTtvV
Cheesecake
*$3"
AvaUaMa at PvMx Storas with
Oatmeal
Cookies
$149
1
AvaMabta at afl Pubflx Storas and Frash Danish Bakaris* Chocoiata Paean FudqeCake
$5 >19
aach
AvaMaMa at PuMx Storas with
Fraah Danish Bakartaa Only.
A Otlcioua Asauilmawl,
Gourmet Hors
d'Oeuvres
$795
Prices Effective
^M Jan. 22 thru 28. 1987


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