The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03024

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
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Full Text
"dfewlshi IFlo^idHao
M. 60 No. 3
Miami Friday, January 16,1987
150 Cents
EACE MISSION. American Middle East envoy Richard Murphy (left) talks
rith King Hussein last Wednesday (Jan. 7) at the King's royal palace in Amman.
was the first stop on Murphy's tour to explore prospects for reviving Arab-
AP/Wide World Photo
Israeli peace prospects specifically, the possibility of King Hussein joining such
talks with Israel and Egypt s President Hosni Mubarak.
srael, Egypt, Jordan Meet Possible
(JERUSALEM (JTA) A "three-way
immit" meeting between Israel, Egypt and
)rdan was described as "possible" by a top
|de to Premier Yitzhak Shamir following
lamir's meeting Thursday (Jan. 8) with U.S.
ssistant Secretary of State Richard Murphy
io arrived from Jordan, Israel Radio
toorted.
rn Paris
Peace Must Come Soon,
Or Chaos WillHussein
The radio report quoted a remark by Yosef Ben-
Aharon, director general of the Prime Minister's Office,
in a television interview taped for broadcast Thursday
evening.
ACCORDING to the report. Ben-Aharon said "It is
possible to expect a three-way summit between Premier
Shamir, the President of Egypt (Hosni Mubarak) and
King Hussein" (of Jordan). He said the meeting would be
held "in Aqaba (Jordan) or El Arish" in Egypt.
In Havana
Ben-Aharon was also quoted as saying that Shamir
would meet shortly with Palestinian leaders in the West
Bank to urge them to form a delegation for peace talks
with Israel and Jordan.
Murphy, who is Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern
and South Asian Affairs and the State Department's
leading expert on the Middle East, is on his first visit to
the region since last September. His mission has been
Continued on Page 11-A
Castro Sends Five Jews to Venezuela
By EDWIN EYTAN
JARIS (JTA) King
Bsein of Jordan, warning
chaos unless there is
iy movement in the
fdle East peace process,
ed Monday the conven-
fof an international peace
ference on the Middle
St with the participation
the five permanent
ibers of the United Na-
te Security Council and
"all those concerned by this
problem, including the
Palestinians."
"Something must be done rapid-
ly. Otherwise, all hope will be lost
and the entire region will be
plunged into a chaotic situation,"
Hussein said in an interview with
Le Monde, published as the Jorda-
nian monarch arrived here for an
official three-day visit.
HE WAS greeted at Orly Air-
port by President Francois Mit-
Continued on Page 3-A
NEW YORK-(JTA)-A
rabbi from Caracas recently
obtained personal permis-
sion from President Fidel
Castro to bring five Cuban
Jews to Venezuela to be
reunited with their families
there, the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America disclosed
Monday.
Rabbi Pynchas Brener, spiritual
leader of the Union Israelite de
Caracas, quoted Castro as telling
him he was allowing the Jews to
leave "on humane grounds of
reuniting families, a worthy
cause, and we are going to permit
Fidel Castro
them to leave with you."
ACCORDING TO Rabbi Milton
Polin, president of the Rabbinical
Council, Brener flew to Havana
last Nov. 24, accompanied by
Bishop Alfredo Rodriguez, vice
president of the Committee of
Relations Between Synagogues
and Churches in Venezuela, of
which Brener is president.
After meeting with Castro and
other Cuban officials, and with
Jewish community leaders,
Brener was permitted to take the
five Jews back with him on the
same plane that brought him from
Venezuela.
Continued on Page 16-A
'a/i A Woman Make It As President of B'nai B'rith?... Page 14-A
I \;.SH*atf*j*effi&iHAsSsg6aBa-v I


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
O'Connor Visibly Angered
By American Jewry's
Statement on His Trip
A Lecture on Stereotyping Page 15-A
II Kl SM.r.M
NEW YORK (JTA) -
John Cardinal O'Connor
was taken aback and visibly
angered Sunday by a state-
ment sharply critical of his
conduct and remarks during
his visit to Israel and Jordan
last week. The statement,
which expressed disquiet
and distress about some of
his remarks, was released
Saturday.
It was signed by the leaders of
53 major American Jewish
groups, including community, rab-
binical, Zionist and fund-raising
organizations.
O'Connor, the Archbishop of
New York, told reporters after
conducting Sunday Mass at St.
Patrick's Cathedral, that he
feared the "fruits" of his trip and
his meetings afterwards at the
Vatican could be "destroyed" by
the response of the Jewish
organizations.
HE EXPRESSED "deep, deep
disappointment" at the state-
ment. "I hope there is nothing in
that statement that will make it
more difficult than it has been for
me in trying to support the Jewish
cause," he said.
He described his trip to the Mid-
dle East as the most difficult he
ever made, one that involved
"great personal and professional
risk." He went to Israel "in good
faith," the Cardinal said.
The trip was fraught with con-
troversy and embarrassment. The
Cardinal was forced to cancel ap-
pointments he had made with
Israeli leaders because Vatican
policy which does not recognize
the status of Jerusalem as Israel's
capital, forbade him to meet with
them at their offices in Jerusalem.
He did meet, however, with
President Chaim Herzog at the
Presidential residence in
Jerusalem and with Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres at the latter's home.
THE CARDINAL apologized
profusely during his trip for any
offense he might have given the
Israeli people and their leaders
and faulted himself for failing to
recognize the ramifications of the
constraints placed upon his
movements by Vatican policy.
The Jewish leaders said in their
statement that they were "dis-
quieted and distressed" by
remarks made by O'Connor sym-
pathetic to the Palestinians and
that they "found disturbing and
painful" his statement at the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial in
Jerusalem that the Holocaust
"may be an enormous gift that
Judaism has given the world."
O'Connor was particularly
stung by the latter criticism. He
said he meant it as "an enormous
compliment to the Jewish people
... If this is considered demean-
ing to the Holocaust, then it de-
means my entire theology because
mine is a theology of suffering,"
he said.
HE ALSO said that the compas-
sion he expressed when visiting a
Palestinian refugee camp in Gaza
was not meant as an indictment of
Israel. "I said repeatedly that this
was not to be blamed on Israel,"
the Cardinal declared, adding that
the blame rests on the entire Mid-
dle East. Both Arabs and Jews
are "involved and responsible."
The Israel government promptly
dissociated itself from the state-
ment by the Jewish leaders.
Barukh Binah, press spokesman
for the Israel Consulate in New
York said Sundav 'hat "It was an
American response and not an
Israeli response."
The statement acknowledged
that the Cardinal has been an
outspoken foe of anti-Semitism
and a strong supporter of Jewish
causes, particularly the struggle
of Soviet Jews for civil rights and
the right to emigrate.
O'Connor, however, saw the
statement as a whole as amoun-
ting "to a unilateral censure,
which I do not appreciate and
which makes it difficult for me to
move farther toward peace.
Serious damage could be done if
this line is pursued," he said.
IRONICALLY, O'Connor last
week sent flowers to Israel's Con-
sul General in New York, Moshe
Yegar, thanking the Israeli of-
ficial for having helped arrange
his trip to Israel. The Archbishop
sent the flowers upon his arrival
in Rome through his New York
office.
A handwritten letter by O'Con-
nor accompanied the flowers sent
"in gratitude for your wonderful
assistance" in arranging the
Israel visit. Yegar was instrumen-
tal in arranging the details of the
Cardinal's trip from the
beginning.
Cardinal John O'Connor meets with
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek in Jerusalem
during the Cardinal's visit to Israel last week.
But O'Connor specifically refused to go on a
AP/WVk World rVu
guided tour with the Mayor on the ground that
it would constitute Vatican acknowledgement
of Jerusalem as Israel's capital city. APWifc
According to an Israeli official
here, O'Connor's aides kept
Yegar regularly informed
throughout the Cardinal's stay in
the Mideast "The flowers and the
letter to Yegar are a clear sign
that the Cardinal came out froa
his visit to Israel with a good feel-
ing," the Israeli official said.
Vatican Careful
No Modofication on 'Prerequisites' for Recognition
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Vatican is taking pains to
allay any notion that the
visit to Israel by John Car-
dinal O'Connor, the Ar-
chbishop of New York, in-
dicates a modification of the
"prerequisites" it has set
for establishing diplomatic
relations with the Jewish
State.
O'Connor, who arrived here
last Tuesday (Jan. 6) from Israel,
said he encountered not the
''slightest evidence of
displeasure" by the Holy See over
his trip and the fact that he met
with two Israeli leaders, Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog and Vice
Premier and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, at their homes in
Jerusalem.
VATICAN spokesman Joaquin
Navarro Vails issued a statement
to the press last Wednesday
noting that Pope Paul VI met with
Golda Meir in 1964, and Pope
John Paul II met with Peres in
1985.
"The State of Israel or its
sovereignty is not at issue," he
added.
"As is known, the issue regards
the status of the city of Jerusalem,
the problem of the occupied ter-
ritories and the Palestinian issue.
I think the acts of courtesy of Car-
dinal O'Connor do not involve
these problems which must be
solved in appropriate
circumstances."
Journalists were reminded that
the contents of Pope John Paul
H's Apostolic Letter on Jerusalem
of April 20, 1984, are still valid.
THE LETTER stated: "I am
convinced the failure to find an
adequate solution to the question
of Jerusalem and the .
postponement of the problem, on-
ly compromise the longed-for
peaceful and just settlement of the
crisis of the whole Middle East."
The letter called for the applica-
tion of "special status" to "not on-
ly the monuments of the sacred
places, but the whole historical
Jerusalem and the existence of
religious communities, their situa-
tion and future" which "cannot
but affect everyone and interest
everyone."
A month before that letter was
issued, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was given a background
briefing by a ranking official of
the Roman Curia. The official said
that one of the primary concerns
of the Holy See was that each
religious community receive
guarantees for complete freedom
to develop and grow physically
and economically, including rights
of ownership, investments and the
possibility of urban expansion
The official said the Yatiar
sought a "three-fold agreement
between Jewish, Christian and
Islamic authorities" in Jerusakir.
because Israel's guarantees alone
were not sufficient. They had tc
be of an international character
he said.
THE VATICAN'S second de-
mand, creation of "a homeland for
the Palestinian people.'' is con-
tained in all of its documents
relating to the Middle East. TV
Vatican perceives this to be inei
tricably tied to "the necessit) of
simultaneously guaranteeing the
Continued on Page 15-A
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Dr. Gordis
He'll Speak At Bet Shira
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Yeshiva U. To Honor Dr. Lamm,
Play Basketball in South Florida
Dr. David Gordis, ex-
ecutive vice president of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee, will make a major policy
address Tuesday evening,
Jan. 20, 8 p.m., at Con-
fregation Bet Shira, 7500
W 120th St. His topic will
be: "The Jewish Agenda in
the 80's and Beyond."
This will be Dr. Gordis' first
public address since returning
from Israel and meetings with key
Israeli officials, including Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres.
The meeting is free and open to
the public.
Dr. Gordis is a noted educator
and administrator with a
distinguished record of participa-
tion in many areas of American
Jewish life. As AJC's chief ex-
ecutive officer, Dr. Gordis directs
a 300-member staff in New York,
as well as in 33 local offices across
the United States, and in
Jerusalem, Paris, and Mexico
City.
BEFORE COMING to AJC,
Dr. Gordis, a Conservative rabbi,
was vice president of the Univer-
sity of Judaism in Los Angeles
and vice president of the
Theological Seminary of America,
with which the University of
Judaism is affiliated. He was also
associate professor of Talmud at
the University of Judaism and ex-
ecutive director of the Foundation
for Conservative (Mesorati)
.'udaism in Israel.
From 1966 to 1972, Dr. Gordis
was -an of students and instruc-
tor in Talmud at the Teachers' In-
stitute of the Seminary College of
Jewish Studies of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America.
He has also been a visiting lec-
turer in Talmud at Brandeis
University, a visiting lecturer in
Religion at Vassar College and a
lecturer in Jewish law at UCLA
Law School.
Peace Must
Come Hussein
Continued from Page 1-A
terrand and Premier Jacques
Chirac, both of whom he will be
meeting later during his stay.
Hussein is expected to urge
France and other Western Euro-
pean countries to convene a
preparatory conference on the
Middle East at the earliest
moment.
According to Arab diplomats
j here, Hussein will call on France
and Western Europe to persuade
the United States not to veto an
international peace conference.
The U.S. and Israeli leaders are
opposed to any forum that would
Ireplace direct Arab-Israel
negotiations and reintrodiy the
Soviet Union into Middle East
I affairs.
U.S. Assistant Secretary of
IState Richard Murphy reiterated
I Washington's position in Cairo
ISunday at the end of a Middle
Bait tour that took him to Jordan,
jlsrael and Egypt. He called for
Idirect talks between Israel and its
[Arab neighbors.
HUSSEIN TOLD reporters
Ihere he has discerned no visible
jchanges in Israeli polciy since the
potation of power last October
when Likud leader Yitzhak
Shamir replaced Laborite Shimon
^eres as Prime Minister.
He also said that despite his
break with Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir Arafat
'st February, after a year of
fruitless efforts to agree on a com-
non negotiations formula, he still
F?c(ignizes the pI- as "the only
egitimate representative of the
alestinian people."
Dr. David Gordis
A native New Yorker, Dr Gordis
earned an AB and MA in Jewish
history from Columbia University,
a Master of Hebrew Literature
from the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, and a PhD
in Talmud, also from the
Seminary. He was ordained a rab-
bi by the Seminary in 1964.
HE IS a member of the Ex-
ecutive Council of the Rabbinical
Assembly, a Board of Directors
member of Jewish Television Net-
work, and a Board of Directors
member of Bet Tzedek Jewish
Legal Project. In Los Angeles, he
was a chairman of the Standing
Committee of the Jewish
Academy of Los Angeles, a
member of the Los Angeles
Jewish Federation's Council on
Jewish Life, an Executive Com-
mittee member and chairman of
the Interreligious Affairs Com-
mittee of Los Angeles AJC, and a
member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the Commission on
Soviet Jewry.
He is also a former chairman of
the United Synagogue Council on
Jewish Education, a former
member of the Bio-ethics Commit-
tee of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, and a former
member of the Board of directors
of the Religious Education
Association.
Dr. Gordis has published on
Jewish ethics, law, and
philosophy; the Jewish family; the
Conservative movement; Jewish
views of medical issues; aspects of
Israeli life, and Jewish education.
Yeshiva University will visit
South Florida Jan. 24-26 for a
weekend program that will in-
clude a reception honoring Dr.
Norman Lamm, president of the
University, a special Shabbat pro-
gram, and two basketball games
featuring the University's
Maccabees.
Dr. Lamm, who is marking his
tenth year as president of the in-
stitution, will be feted at a recep-
tion Sunday, Jan. 25, 3:30 p.m., at
Young Israel of Hollywood-Fort
Lauderdale.
Featured speaker during the
special Sabbath program at the
synagogue will be Dr. Jeffrey
Gurock, associate professor of
American Jewish History and
holder of the Libby Klaperman
Chair in American Jewish History
at the University. Dr. Gurock is
also the assistant basketball coach
at the University.
The Maccabees, the basketball
team of the University, will play
games against Barry University
on Saturday, Jan. 24, starting at 8
p.m., and Nova University Mon-
day, Jan. 26, starting at 7:30 p.m.
The Maccabees-Barry Universi-
ty contest will take place at the
Northwest Boys Club, 10915 NW
14th Ave. in Miami.
The Maccabees-Nova University
game will be played at Lutheran
High School. 3801 SW 76th Ave.
in Davie.
Members of the Maccabees will
spend the wekend in Florida at
the homes of members of the
Young Israel of Hollywood-Fort
Lauderdale some of whom are
alumni of the University.
, Pathologist
Due for Bundle
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
American plant pathologist, Dr.
Theodor Diener, will be this years
recipient of the Wolf Foundation's
$100,000 prize for agriculture, the
Education Ministry has announc-
ed. Diener will be cited "for his
discovery and pioneering fun-
damental research on viroids, the
smallest subviral pathogens, and
his applied work on viroid detec-
tion in crops." Diener was born in
Zurich in 1921 and educated in
Switzerland. He has been a
pathologist at the Plant Protec-
tion Institute of the U.S.
Agricultural Research Service in
Beltsville, Md., since 1959.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16. 1987
President Reagan
Unfurls His Defense
The powers that be in Jerusalem may well
have cause to be concerned now that the
White House has gone public with two
memoranda one having to do with Presi-
dent Reagan's January 17. 1986 authoriza-
tion of clandestine operations by the United
States with respect to Iran; the second, a
document in the form of a brief memo to the
President by Admiral John Poindexter.who
was at the time National Security Adviser,
in which Poindexter referred to "a plan by
which Israel can create conditions to
help bring about a more moderate govern-
ment in Iran."
It is difficult to tell which is more damag-
ing to Israel. Reckoned in these terms,
perhaps neither is as bad as what both
together produced a media report the day
before the two memoranda were revealed by
the White House which stated that Reagan
had been told as late as last September that
Israel was shipping arms to the Contras.
The source, according to the report, was
American intelligence, hence placing the
alleged Israeli shipments in the clandestine
category. It does not matter that not even
President Reagan is purported to have
known about the Israeli connection until he
was filled in on the intelligence reports on
the eve of his Sept. 30 meeting with then-
Prime Minister Peres.
Sudden Candor
More significant is that the Administra-
tion's intent now is to go scapegoat-hunting.
All of this sudden White House candor ap-
pears to have as its purpose to shove the
burden from the shoulders of the President
where it frankly belongs onto Israel.
Indeed, there is something in the maneuver
that reminds us of a petulant child who,
when caught after having misbehaved,
ruefully blames someone else with the plea,
"He made me do it."
Can anyone honestly picture Israel mak-
ing the Administration do anything the Ad-
ministration didn't want to do?
Beyond these matters, a sadder issue yet
is the seeming schizophrenia in the Ad-
ministration's scapegoat-hunting, par-
ticularly in the assurance voiced Monday by
U.S. Ambassdor Thomas Pickering to Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir that the White
House's release of the two memoranda did
not mean to carry with it any intention to
cast blame on Israel. Said an Administration
official who reported Pickering's assurance:
"We wanted to explain the background, to
tell the Israelis, we definitely did not intend
to cast aspersions."
Will Shultz Resign?
If all of this nonsense adds up to anything
coherent so far, it is that the Administra-
tion's backstage maneuverings after all of
its clandestine and perhaps even illegal
operations may well mean the impending
resignation of Secretary of State George
Shultz, together with Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger, is said to have
opposed the Iran operation from the beginn-
ing of his learning about it. There is some
variance at question as to iust when Shultz
did find out about the Poindexter-Col. Oliver
North (another now-ousted National Securi-
ty Council aide) scheme.
Apart from this, Shultz is one of the few
Jewish Floridian
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inside Administration officials close to the
President who can honestly say that not only
did some of the Reaganites circumvent
State Department powers by carrying out
foreign policy maneuvers without letting the
Congress know about them but by cir-
cumventing what may well be the law, ftS
well.
Because the White House memoranda
were made public last week when Shultz was
6,000 miles away in Africa, the offense to
him may now appear to be redoubled and his
impulse to resign overwhelming.
And that would be a pity of enormous
magnitute.
Martin Luther King
Monday, Jan. 19 is a day in our national
consciousness that will focus on Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., the internationally
revered black civil rights leader who strove
to achieve through peaceful means the
liberation of all people from bigotry and the
agony of discrimination.
There is little doubt that Dr. King had his
black brothers and sisters dominantly in his
mind. But there is also clear evidence that
he set himself apart as the enemy of racism
and prejudice of every kind.
In this enlightened approach to the family
of humankind, he rose rapidly as the
spokesman for tolerance and mutal respect
among all people. In this context, he once
said, "Through our scientific genius, we
have made of our nation and even of the
world a neighborhood, but we have failed
to employ our moral and spiritual genius to
make of it a brotherhood."
It is painfully tragic that such a man as Dr.
King, imbued as he was with the principles
of Ghandi's satyagraha the force of love
should have had his life snuffed out in the
prime of his power of peaceful persuasii >n by
the force of an assassin's bullet.
In honoring Dr. King on Monday, we wfl]
be saving as a nation that was blessed by the
presence of such a son among its people that
his force of love has not been forgotten.
That it will yet inspire us again and again to
the achievement of his dream.
'Neshira'
It Dominated Opening of Zionist Assembly
1? 00 Out o town covnMv uix>"
r, M<.< W
Friday. January 16, 1987
Volume 60
15TEVETH5747
Number 3
By MARGIE OLSTER
Philadelphia
The urgent need
for North American aliya
and the problems of Soviet
Jewish emigration and drop
outs (neskira) dominated
the opening session of the
First Zionist Assembly
here.
Leon Dulzin. chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, and
Israeli Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy addressed about 1,000
delegates of American Zionist
organizations, youth movements
and aliya support groups atten-
ding the convention organized by
the American Zionist Federation.
Highlight of the opening session
was a live satellite broadcast by
Israeli President Chaim Herzog
from the presidential residence in
Jerusalem.
HERZOG, who answered ques-
tions from the delegates over the
phone, quipped: "The fact that
your opening plenary session is
devoted entirely to aliya is no less
than a landmark in American
Zionist history. I would even dare
to suggest that the Skekeckeyanu
blessing would be appropriate."
Herzog reminded the assembly
that not long ago, the subject of
aliya was taboo at Jewish gather-
ings in the "affluent diaspora."
He called on Zionists to come to
Israel, not only for the benefit of
the State, but for their own per-
sonal growth. "Aliya is most
precious when it is a response to
the ideal of Zion rather than to
brutal necessity ... We need you
and we know how much you can
mean to democracy in Israel. But
your olim will not only give, they
will surely also receive."
Levy echoed Herzog's call in a
passionate speech delivered in
Hebrew with a simultaneous
English translation. "The essence
of Zionism is the return to Zion. A
free people in its own country,
master of its destiny." Levy sug-
gested that Zionists have divided
into two camps, one in Israel and
one in the diaspora and this divi
Leon Dulzin
sion can only cause problems.
DULZIN FORCEFULLY ad
dressed the problems of Soviet
Jewish emigration and neskira, or
Soviet Jews who choose to settle
in the U.S. instead of Israel.
"The issue of Soviet Jewry must
be raised constantly by the Zionist
movement, by the State of Israel
and by Jewish communities
everywhere." He noted that the
Soviet government's oppressive
emigration policies are not the on-
ly cause for the plight of Soviet
Jews. Those Soviet Jews who do
receive exit visas but choose to
settle in America are hurting the
struggle for freedom im-
measurably, he said. Neskira
should be condemned in the
strongest terms as should all the
organizations that assist them
soviet Jews are not refugees
Neskira undermines the effort to
open the gates of the Soviet Union
and provides the Soviet Union
with an excuse not to open them."
Dulzin also pointed out that
assimilation of Jews in the
diaspora and decreasing birth
*? are hP biggest threats to
Jewish ex:.,t*nce. "One of the
most serious problems of our time
is the safeguarding of oui
national existence." Du
the assembly.
Regarding th- plight of ws ii
Syria and Ethiopia, Du
declared: "Securing their n
is the historic mis-.
generation."
Herzog. responding to
several questions from the youth
movement delegates over the
phone, also discussed the pn>
hlems of Soviet Jewry
"THE PRESSURE Israel e
bring from an international point
of view is very limited. We are not
a major power or an important
power. We can do our best with
feeling. When it comes to
pressure, this must be the duty of
the diaspora Jewry and in par-
ticular of American Jewry It is
the Western world in the final
analysis that can bring about a
change."
Levy said the two major pro-
blems facing the Zionist move-
ment are yerida, the massive im-
migration of Israelis to the West,
and assimilation. It is paradoxical
that Jews survived centuries of
oppression but that in this era of
wealth and equality, Jews are
assimilating and disappearing,
Levy said.
Herzog was also questioned on
the tensions between Orthodox
extremists and non-Orthodox in
Israel. This is the most serious
problem Israel faces today, he
said.
"I would say that the source of
many of these problems lies in the
United States, in the American
Jewish community .. But I have
to emphasize here again that
many of the peripheral problems
that we have, racist problems, ex-
treme fanatical forms of Or-
thodoxy that really do not
recognize the State of Israel,
these are problems that have
come from the United States and
are incidentally to this day funded
from the United States."
ONE OF Herzog's questioners.
Sam Shube. national chairman of
Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Arms
By LEORA FRUCHT
The Israeli government
has reacted cautiously to
news reports that Israel has
been helping the United
States to supply arms to
Iran. While Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir has em-
phatically denied the
charge, the reactions of
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin have been
more equivocal.
Peres, who was in the United
States when the story appeared
on the covers of Time and
Newsweek, refused to confirm or
deny the reports, but said:
Whether they are correct or not,
in my view Isrel did what it had to
do. if they are correct, everyone
understands it; if they're incor-
rect, then there is certainly no
problem."
Elaborating, Peres said that
"... in principle, if the United
States asked us for help to
liberate hostages, in my view,
from the viewpoint of moral com-
mitment and political common
sense, Israel should accede, and
would certainly do so."
DEFENSE MINISTER Rabin
maintained that Israel is a
sovereign state and, as such, "will
decide to whom and when to sell.
If we want to make this public, we
will; in most cases we prefer not
to do so. And we do not consider
ourselves obligated to report to
anyone in the world on this sub-
ject." Rabin insisted, however,
that Israel had never sold
American arms or weapons con-
taining American components
"without having received
authorization from the United
States."
Sources here say that even if the
news reports are accurate,
Shamir's outright denial could be,
at least, technically true. It is like-
ly that any arms deals with Iran
were negotiated by private in-
dividuals and not by the State of
Israel. Further, if only spare parts
and ammunition were involved,
that would not technically-
speaking constitute "arms." say
the sources.
Even the Knesset is still in the
dark regarding the alleged arms
sales. In an address to the

The Iranian Connection
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Relations Committee, Peres said
that the wisest course for Israel
would be to ignore the many er-
roneous news reports linking
Israel to the arms issue.
THE GOVERNMENT has
hinted that any alleged arms deals
with Iran were undertaken only in
order to help the United States
win back its hostages. "A
democratic state does everything
it can to save human lives," com-
mented Peres.
But that argument has been met
with skepticism by analysts here.
Ron Ben-Yishai of the Hebrew
daily Yediot Achronot raises this
issue: A year ago, two Israeli
soldiers were taken prisoner in
south Lebanon by Hezbollah, the
same organization that was
holding the American hostages.
Why hasn't the Israeli govern-
ment been able to negotiate their
safety, or at least ascertain their
whereabouts? "Charity," he
writes, "begins at home."
Writing in the Jerusalem Post,
Gideon Rafael, former director
general of the Foreign Ministry,
questions the whole premise of
trading arms for hostages. "Has
anyone in Israel, of sound mind,
ever contemplated trading
rockets for prisoners with Ahmed
Jibril?" he asks. "Why then sug-
gest such an eccentricity to our
best friends?"
WHILE acknowledging that
Israel would and should go out of
its way to help the United States,
analysts say that any alleged
Israeli involvement in arms sales
to Iran was likely undertaken in
order to serve Israel's own policy
a policy that may have been in
effect long before the American
arms for hostages deal was
struck.
The thrust of this policy is
believed to be the desire to stave
off an Iraqi victory in the Gulf
War and to establish a relation-
ship with the moderate elements
in the Iranian government.
These are the arguments former
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon is
said to have raised, in trying to
convince Washington of the
wisdom of providing arms to Iran
in 1981. There are conflicting
reports as to the outcome of the
meeting.
But in light of the recent
reports, these policy objectives
have become the subject of debate
in Israel.
WHILE MANY Iran-watchers
agree that it may have been in
Israel's best interests to help
bolster Iran's fledgling military at
the beginning of the war, an Ira-
nian victory now seems imminent.
A win for Islamic fundamentalism
would not be to Israel's advantage
any more than an Iraqi victory
would be. Many Israelis think the
longer the war drags on the bet-
Continued on Page 12-A
Who Is Vanunu?
From Nude Modeling to Leftwinger
By JAMES CHESKY
Perhaps the only Israelis
not shocked that nuclear
reactor technician
Mordechai Vanunu sold
what he claimed are the
secrets of Israel's atomic
weapons program are those
who knew him personally
students and lecturers at
Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev, where he was a
Master's degree candidate.
"I'm only surprised that it took
the Shin Bet (the General Security
Services) so long to find out that
he was a potential traitor." sug-
gested David Zigdon, the
manager of the university
cafeteria, where Vanunu spent
much of his free time arguing on
l*-half of a Palestinian state.
"He felt deeply that the State of
Israel was discriminating against
the Arabs." said David Yussub,
who served with Vanunu on the
student council. "If any Israeli
could sell Israel's most highly
guarded secrets, it would have to
In- Motti."
a
* MORDECHAI VANUNI 32,
-><,,,, *,mis near the port of Basra. was ^^ in Marakesh, Morocco in
Uranian forces strike at Iraqi positions near
Mordechai Vanunu during his
army service.
1954. His father, Solomon, ran a
small store n Morocco until 1963.
when he, nis wife, Mazal, and
their six sons and three daughters
immigrated to Israel and settled
in Beersheba.
Solomon Vanunu, 75, says that
his second son "Motti" was his
favorite. "He had a head for learn-
ing Torah, and I sent him to the
Wolfson Yeshiva (an ultra-
Orthodox school). I used to take
him there every day and would
take an interest in his studies."
After his second year at the
yeshiva, Vanunu lost interest in
Jewish studies and left Wolfson
the following year.
He volunteered for the army
three months before his 18th bir-
thday, hoping to become a pilot.
After he was rejected from pilots'
training, he went into the combat
engineering corps, rising to the
rank of first sergeant. Soldiers
who served with Vanunu describe
him as anything from an indif-
ferent to a naive, ineffective com-
mander. Although his unit has had
numerous reunions, Vanunu has
attended none of them.
AFTER MILITARY service,
Vanunu began to study physics at
Tel Aviv university, but quit dur-
ing his first year. He got a job at
Israel's experimental nuclear
reactor in the southern town of
Dimona, where he worked until he
was dismissed last November.
While working as a reactor
Continued on Page 12-A


Page 6-A The Jewish FToridi&n/Friday, January 16, 1987
Israel Forced To Repeat
Denial of Complicity
In Weapons To 'Contras'
BY DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel was forced once again
over the weekend to
reiterate forcefully that it
was in no way involved in
the shipment of weapons to
the Nicaraguan rebels,
known as Contras, and that
it acted in American arms
sales to Iran only at the
behest of the United States.
A government spokesman said
Sunday that Israel was prepared
to answer any questions by the
U.S. with respect to the Iran arms
affair.
These responses were to reports
that surfaced in Washington last
Thursday (Jan. 8) and Friday (Jan.
9) alleging that Israel had in fact
initiated the U.S.-Iran arms sale
and was shipping weapons to the
Contras last year, apparently on
its own initiative.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
characterized as "distorted and
baseless" information leaked from
the unpublished Senate In-
telligence Committee's interim
report on the Iran arms sale that
cast Israel in the role of initiator.
VICE PREMIER and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, who flew
to Rome Friday morning (Jan. 9)
for a 36-hour visit in connection
with the 40th anniversary celebra-
tions of the Italian Social
Democratic Party, strongly
denied any Israeli link to the
transfer of funds from the Iranian
weapons purchases to the
Contras.
The matter came up briefly at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting.
Cabinet Secretary Elyakim
Rubinstein referred reporters to
earlier official government
statements disclaiming any link
between Israel and Contra fun-
ding. Rubinstein also reiterated
earlier official statements to the
effect that Israel was only respon-
ding to an American request in
the Iran arms deal.
"If the United States poses
questions to us, we will answer
those questions," Rubinstein told
reporters after the Cabinet
meeting.
Shamir advised the Cabinet that
the entire matter would be subject
to detailed review by the Inner
Cabinet (five Labor and five Likud
Ministers) which meets in camera.
Communications Minister Amnon
Rubinstein urged that Israel hold
a full-scale inquiry of its own to
counter the reports coming out of
Washington.
THERE IS GROWING concern
here and among Israeli diplomatic
circles in Washington that leaks
and disclosures in the Iran affair
could barm U.S.-Israel relations.
Israeli sources in Washington
were quoted by Israel Radio Sun-
day as "fearing that Israel was
now being made a scapegoat" by
the White House.
The developments giving rise to
these fears and putting Israel
once more on the defense were:
The release by the White House
Friday of two key documents on
Iran policy. One was President
Reagan's "Intelligence Finding"
of Jan. 17, 1986 authorizing
clandestine operations by the U.S.
government with respect to Iran.
The other document was a brief-
ing memorandum to Reagan by
his then National Security Ad-
viser Admiral John Poindexter,
which stated that an emissary of
then Premier Shimon Peres came
to Washington with "a plan by
which Israel, with limited
assistance from the U.S., can
create conditions to help bring
about a more moderate govern-
ment in Iran."
A media report Thursday (Jan.
8) stated that Reagan was told by
his advisers last September that
American intelligence had
detected Israeli arms shipments
to the Contras. Congressional and
Administration sources were
reported to have seen a White
House memorandum on that
subject.
REAGAN WAS said to have
been advised of the alleged Israeli
weapons shipments to the Contras
on the eve of a White House
meeting with Peres last
September. According to the
sources who purportedly saw the
memorandum, Reagan was advis-
ed by his aides to thank the Israeli
Premier. But the subject appears
not to have come up at their
60-minute meeting on Sept. 15.
There were no indications in any
of the reports what Israel's
motivation could have been for
allegedly unilaterally arming the
Contras. One source alleged that
Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin favored Contra aid.
A spokesman for the Israeli
Foreign Ministry, Ehud Gol,
issued a statement Thursday say-
ing: "We can only reiterate our
previous unequivocal denial.
Israel has not sold, delivered or
transferred arms to the
Nicaraguan Contras. The subject
never came up in the conversation
between President Reagan and
Prime Minister Peres."
ISRAEL HAS yet to address
itself directly to the content of
Poindexter's memorandum to the
President. It stated, in part:
"The Israelis are very concern-
ed that Iran's deteriorating posi-
tion in the war with Iraq, the
potential for further radicalization
in Iran and the possibility of
enhanced Soviet influence in the
Gulf all pose significant threats to
the security of Israel. They believe
it is essential that they act to at
least preserve the balance of
power in the region.
"The Israeli plan is premised on
the assumption that moderate
elements in Iran can come to
power if these factions
demonstrate their credibility in
defending Iran against Iraq and in
deterring Soviet intervention.
"To achieve the strategic goal
of a more moderate Iranian
government, the Israelis are
prepared to unilaterally com-
mence selling military materiel to
Western-oriented Iranian factions
. The Israelis are convinced
that the Iranians are so desperate
for military materiel, expertise
and intelligence that the provision
of these resources will result in
favorable long term changes in
personnel and attitude within the
Iranian government. ."
"AS DESCRIBED by the
Prime Minister's (Peres)
emissary, the only requirement
the Israelis have is an assurance
that they will be allowed to pur-
chase U.S. replenishments for the
stocks they sell to Iran. The
Israelis are also sensitive to a
strong U.S. desire to free our
Beirut hostages and have insisted
that the Iranians demonstrate
both influence and good intent by
an early release of the five
Americans. Prime Minister
Peres had his emissary pointedly
note that they well understood our
position on not making conces-
sions to terrorists .. ."
The memorandum did not name
the Israeli emissary but described
him as the Prime Minister's
"special adviser on terrorism."
In another development Thurs-
day, the White House
Cardozo Bet Tzedek Legal Semites Clinic of
Yeshiva University's Benjamin N. Cardozo
School of Law has received the Eleanor
Roosevelt Community Service Award. The
Clinic is one of 11 winners out of afield oj 500
nominees from throughout New York State.
The Cardozo Bet Tzedek Clinic provides free
legal services to the elderly poor and disabled
primarily in the field of health care,
Medicaid, and Medicare. Shown at the
Roosevelt Awards ceremony in Albany are
(left to right) Matilda Cuomo, New York
State's First Lady; Tony Feldmexser. a
second-year student at Cardozo. who
represented his student colleagues; Toby
Golick. Bet Tzedek director; and Bishop
Joseph Sullivan, chairman of the judging
panel.
White House Memos May Push Shultz To Resign
WASHINGTON Reagan Administration
officials declared Monday that U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel Thomas Pickering has
assured Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir that
the White House's release of documents last
Friday of two key documents on Iran policy
was not intended to cast blame on Israel.
"WE WANT to explain the background, to
tell the Israelis we definitely did not intend to
cast aspersions," said one Administration
official.
Meanwhile, sources close to Secretary of
State George Shultz revealed Monday that
White House publication of President
Reagan's "Intelligence Finding" of Jan. 17,
1986 and of a briefing memorandum to
Reagan by the President's former National
Security Adviser Admiral John Poindexter
may well have pushed Shultz closer to a deci-
sion to resign.
Shultz and Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger are both described in the memo
as having opposed the Iran arms sale.
THE SOURCES close to Secretary Shultz
said that the White House publication of the
documents has jeopardized his ability to con-
tinue functioning as Secretary of State.
Shultz was on a trip to Africa when the
documents were revealed last Friday.
acknowledged that it had deleted
information about high level U.S.
contacts with Israel from the un-
published Senate Intelligence
Committee report. One deletion
concerned Vice President George
Bush's meeting in Jerusalem last
July 29 with an Israeli counter-
terrorism expert, Amiram Nir. at
which U.S. hostages in Beirut
Continued on Page 7-A
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Five Years After Death
Swashbuckler Dayan Still Arouses Many Passions
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By SIMON GRIVER
Five years after his death,
Moshe Dayan remains a
figure who arouses pas-
sions. To some he was the
swashbuckling hero who
brought swift victory in the
Six-Day War, while to
others he was a turncoat
who treacherously legitimiz-
ed the Likud by changing
parties after the 1977 elec-
tion. To some he was a
romantic hero who epitomiz-
ed the bravery of the
modern sabra, while to
others he was an irresponsi-
ble womanizer.
Dayan's influence over issues of
war and peace remains monumen-
tal. As Chief of Staff in the early
1950's, he built the IDF into a
modern fighting force and led it to
victory in the Sinai Campaign. As
Defense Minister in 1967, he par-
ticipated in the stunning successes
of the Six-Day War ana in the
public eye became the main hero.
Though Defense Minister dur-
ing the Yom Kippur War of 1973,
the Agranat Commission of In-
quiry cleared him of responsibility
for initial losses during that war.
Nevertheless, his reputation suf-
fered enormously as a conse-
quence and marked the beginning
of his decline and eventual
resignation.
But Dayan was as much a
peacemaker and statesman as a
soldier. He met with Jordan's
Emir Abdullah and helped
negotiate the armistice after the
War of Independence. He conceiv-
ed the policy of an open border
with Jordan after 1967 and, most
important, as Foreign Minister in
Menachem Begin's government
(which he joined after controver-
sially leaving his own party), he
was one of the architects of the
Camp David Peace Accords with
Egypt
FOR MUCH of world Jewry
and supporters of Israel. Dayan
symbolized the sabra or native
Israeli. Born in 1915 in Deganya,
the first kibbutz, he grew up on
Nahalal. the first moshav. His
father. Shmuel Dayan, was a
Knesset member and a leader of
the moshav movement, and his
mother was a popular and forceful
figure in the Socialist Zionist
movement.
Dayan was endowed with a
fierce individualism and in-
dependence that often alienated
Israel Denies Role
Continued from Page 6-A
|were discussed.
Another deletion was a letter to
I Reagan from an unnamed head of
I slate. According to media reports,
I the letter was from Peres urging
I the President not to give up on his
[arms to Iran policy and assuring
I him it would eventually succeed.
pointed Minister of Defense. It
was generally felt that Prime
Minister Levy Eshkol and his
cabinet did not have the daring
imagination to defeat the coun-
try's enemies.
HISTORY HAS proven that
Dayan was the right man for the
job. What was incredible was the
sense of security that Dayan was
able to instill even before battle
commenced. Dayan's first wife,
Ruth, recalls overhearing some
women chatter on the eve of the
Six-Day War. "Now that Dayan is
Minister of Defense," one said, "I
can sleep soundly at nights."
Dayan possessed a charisma
which is the privilege of few peo-
ple. This charisma often got into
deep waters, and he gained a
reputation for sexual profligacy.
His womanizing as well as his
rather high-handed attitude to
people and especially his attitude
to archeological artifacts which he
would acquire sometimes by
dubious methods in support of his
consuming hobby, were often used
to depict him as a ruthless man
who took whatever he wanted.
This was somewhat of an unfair
caricature. The austere socialism
of Degania and Nahalal always re-
mained in his blood as did a keen
sense of justice. He once caused a
traffic accident through reckless
driving. Unlike many of his
Knesset colleagues, he waived his
parliamentary immunity and in-
sisted on standing trial. He was
found guilty and had his drivers'
license suspended for three
months.
THOUGH IN the words of Ruth
Dayan, "Women he had never
met would throw themselves at
his feet." Moshe Dayan was
essentially a family man. Divorced
from Ruth in 1971, he married his
second wife Rachel, with whom he
lived until his death. Dayan is also
survived by two sons Udi, who
works the family plot at Nahalal;
Assi, an actor and film producer;
and his daughter, Yael, an ac-
complished novelist and Labor
Party activist who is tipped to
follow her father and grandfather
into the Knesset.
Perhaps the most telling tribute
to Dayan was that though he
never became Prime Minister, he
is still remembered as a symbol
and icon of the nation. Five years
after his death, his memory is still
very much alive.
HERO MOSHE DAYAN: A scoundrel too?
him from Israel's establishment.
After the War of Independence,
the IDF was made up of officers
who had joined the British army
and those who had fought in the
Palmach.
Dayan antagonized them both.
He despised British spit and
polish, and when he was Com-
mander of Jerusalem in 1949. he
dismissed his aide-de-camp for
persistently saluting and taking
too much care over his dress. On
the other hand, he felt that
Palmach veterans had injected a
form of elitism into the IDF that
was harmful and nationally
divisive.
Indeed Dayan's particular
talents might never have shone
through if it were not for the fact
that Ben-Gurion saw him as a kin-
dred spirit and fellow maverick.
IT WAS Ben-Gurion who in-
sisted that Dayan become Chief of
Staff, ensured that he be elected
to the Knesset in 1959 and ap-
pointed him Minister of
Agriculture. In his five years in
that ministry, Dayan
characteristically performed the
unexpected. A child of the settle-
ment movement, the agricultural
establishment expected Dayan to
favor their cause. But at cabinet
sessions, Dayan would insist that
more money was needed for in-
dustrial growth, while agriculture
had limited potential.
In 1965, Dayan followed, albeit
reluctantly, his mentor, Ben-
Gurion when he split from the
Mapai (Labor) Party and formed
his own Rafi list, together with
others of his closest supporters
such as Shimon Peres, Yitzhak
Navon and Teddy Kollek. The
split was repaired before the Six-
Day War of 1967 when national
unity became the pressing
priority.
It was during this period that
Dayan's popularity in Israel
became apparent. As Egyptian
President Gamal Abdel Nasser
threatened Israel in May, 1967,
there was an irresistible ground-
swell of opinion that Dayan be ap-
Defense Ministry Says 'No'
Refuses To Allow Two
Arabs To Attend Meeting
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Defense Ministry has
refused to allow two prominent Palestinians to attend an
international symposium on the Middle East at the Univer-
sity of San Diego in southern California next week. The ban
apparently does not apply to three other Palestinians in-
vited to the symposium.
The two denied permission to leave are Mustapha Abd
A-Nabi Natshe, the former Mayor of Hebron, and Fayez
Abu-Rahme, a lawyer from Gaza. Security sources said
there was concern they would use the occasion to meet with
hostile elements but did not elaborate.
NATSHE AND ABU-RAHME were to have been part
of a large Israeli delegation. The invitees include Abba
Eban, chairman of the Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee; Knesset members, David Libai and
Shulamit Aloni; Prof. Shimon Shamir, a leading expert on
Middle East affairs; Hanna Seniora, editor of the East
Jerusalem Arabic daily El-Fajer; Hatem Abu-Ghazale, a
Palestinian educator from Gaza; and Dr. Sari Nusseibeh of
Bir Zeit University in the West Bank.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987

U.S. Official In Strong Pitch To Ditch Lavi Jet Fighter
Pentagon
Believes It's
Too Costly
By DAVID LANDAU
. JERUSALEM (JTA) -
U.S. Deputy Secretary of
Defense Dov Zackheim
wound up his visit to Israel
last Wednesday (Jan. 7)
with a strong pitch for alter-
natives to the Lavi, Israel's
second generation jet
fighter plane which the Pen-
tagon believes is too costly
to produce/
Zackheim, who arrived with a
number of proposed alternatives
to the Lavi, held a press con-
ference at the U.S. Embassy in
Tel Aviv following a meeting
earlier with Premier Yitzhak
Shamir. He also met during his
visit with Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
and Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin.
THE AMERICAN official
stressed that the alternatives to
which Israel's defense establish-
ment promised to give serious
consideration were all aircraft
"that have been flown," whereas
the Lavi. except for the initial test
flight of a prototype recently, re-
mains an unknown quantity.
Details of the alternative air-
craft offered by Zackheim were
not released. Unofficial reports
said the most realistic option
would be based on the F-16,
manufactured by General
Dynamics. It would involve in-
creased purchases of that plane by
Israel and its modification by the
introduction of avionic and elec-
tronics systems developed by
Israel for the Lavi.
Zackheim challenged Israel's
cost projections for the Lavi, con-
tending that the plane would pro-
bably cost even more than the $55
million annually, currently an-
ticipated according to Israeli
calculations.
HE GAVE assurances that the
U.S. alternative proposals "would
provide work for Israeli industry,
including high technology work."
U.S. aid to Israel originally ear-
marked for the Lavi would then be
available for "other projects" he
said, but did not elaborate.
Zackheim stressed that Israel
could i".: 'ealistically expect an
mcrea- American military aid
above the present $1.8 hi I linn a
year "in the current budget
environment."
The Lavi prototype had its first
test flight on Dec. 31, which it
reportedly passed with flying col-
ors. Peres said after a meeting
with Zackheim that he still sup-
ports the Lavi project.
Vote
Postponed
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
religious parties agreed last
Wednesday (Jan. 7) to postpone a
Knesset vote on the controversial
Who is a Jew amendment to the
Law of Return after a headcount
indicated they lacked the vote to
pass it.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, who
said he supports the measure in
principle, suggested that its spon-
sors wait a few weeks. The Labor
Party served notice it would vote
en bloc against the amendment
which would invalidate conver-
sions by non-Orthodox rabbis.
When a bill is defeated in the
Knesset, six months must pass
before it can be reintroduced. The
Who is a Jew amendment has
been consistently defeated over
the year g.
Lavi fighter jet takes off on its maiden flight on Dec SI. Dh
its 26-minute flight. the Law 'performed beyond expectations,' ac-
JTA/WZN \.
- pilot Menahem ShmuL
Alternatives Offered
Peres Continues To Support Lavi Despite Pressure
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres said last week that he continues to
support the Lavi, Israel's second generation jet fighter
plane, despite U.S. efforts to persuade Israel to abandon
the project on grounds of excessive costs.
Peres spoke to reporters following a meeting with U.S.
Deputy Secretary of Defense Dov Zackheim who came to
Israel to propose alternatives to the Israel-built. American-
financed aircraft. Israel is under heavy pressure by the
Reagan Administration to give careful consideration to
Zackheim's report and proposals.
Cabinet Convenes
U.S. AMBASSADOR Thomas Pickering delivered a
personal message from Defense Secretary Cas
Weinberger to Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin, gupp irting
Zackheim's report. It is expected to be reviewed bj
defense establishment during the next few week
Rabin raises the matter with the Cabinet.
A meeting between Zackheim and Rabin was n
ly devoted to alternatives to the Lavi, but there was
broad discussion of them. The Pentagon official
have brought with him at least five options, com] with
estimates and production schedules for con "ion
by Israel.
In All-Out Effort To Reach Budget Agreement
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet convened Mon-
day evening in an all-out at-
tempt to reach agreement
on a budget for the next
fiscal year.
The session, expected to last
well into the night, was preceded
by a meeting of the four-member
Ministerial Economic Committee
consisting of Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres,
Finance Minister Moshe Nissim
and Economic Coordination
Minister Gad Yaacobi.
THE MINISTERS and their
aides reportedly grappled with the
Defense Ministry's adamant op-
position to any further cuts in the
defense budget, an issue which
will now be addressed by the full
Cabinet.
Nissim was said to have backed
off from his original 180 million
Shekel cut in defense expen-
ditures but insists on a minimum
reduction of 80 million Shekels.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
remains firmly opposed. Shamir
and Peres are also opposed to
significant defense cuts but
Shamir conceded -last week that
some cuts were unavoidable.
Another battle shaping up is
over the education budget. Educa-
tion Minister Yitzhak Navon said
the proposed cuts were too drastic
and he would vote against them.
Navon has the backing of elemen-
tary school teachers who have
threatened a strike if the cuts are
made.
PERES HELD last-minute
talks with trade union leaders and
industrialists before the Cabinet
convened. He was hoping to put
together a package of wage and
price restraints to enable the
Treasury to proceed with its plan-
ned tax reforms and restructuring
of the capital market.
Treasury sources said Monday
that they still hoped to cut the top
income tax brackets from the pre-
sent 60 percent to under 50 per-
cent. But the Treasury has ap-
parently waived its ambitious
plans to eliminate >,. myriad of
exemptions and loopholes in the
tax code, in face of strenuous op-
position from Histadrut.
The labor federation seems
neutral toward urgings by the
Manufacturers Association for a
ablation of tl el which
* uld stimulate exp >rts. The
Cabinet was expected to decide
that issue Monday night in fa. .
growing public concern Rumors
of devaluation triggered a buying
spree m the Tel Aviv Stock Ex-
change Monday
THE MAIN argument for
devaluation is the growing gap in
Israel s trade balance and a desire
to maintain economic stability and
Israel s greatly improved foreign
currency reserves which amount
currently to about $4 billion.
Histadrut Secretary' General
i Kener Mid ''
the decision on deval I
the government's alone
Histadrut would not obji
as wage-earners are comp
for the loss in buying
cost-of-living increments Some
Treasury officials had hoped to
persuade Kessar to forego part of
the COL compensation.
Nissim promised Sunday that
the government would take no
steps "which could shake the
stability of the economy If the
Shekel is devalued it is not ex-
pected to exceed 10 percent.
PLO Ferries Disguised Aircraft
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Palestine Organization
is using civilian aircraft with Red Crescent markings to
terry FLO fighters from a base in Sanaa, North Yemen, to
Beirut by way of Jedda in Saudia Arabia, the Arab affairs
correspondent of Voice of Israel Radio has reported.
ACCORDING to the report, El Fatah, the PLO's
military branch, acquired four DC-8 transports for the pur-
pose. They are painted with the Red Crescent, the symbol
ot the Islamic equivalent of the Red Cross, to deceive the
fcaudi authorities, Syrian intelligence and the Shiite Amal
mintia which has been battling Palestinians in Lebanon.


'oil Shows
Christian Faith Doesn't Spur Anti-Semitism in Some
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
IEW YORK Results
ie public of a nationwide
i-ev of evangelical and
idamentalist Christian at-
ides towards Jews
llenge some commonly
assumptions, according
the Anti-Defamation
igue of B'nai B'rith
jeh commissioned the
lucted among a sampling of
In religiously conservative
Istiana in September and Oc-
jr by the Houston-based Tar-
k, Hill. Newport and Ryan
arch organization, the survey
.aled that most of them do not
fsciously use their deeply-held
Istian faith and convictions as
"k-ation for anti-Semitic views
vs" and gave the following
hples:
S)n percent disagreed with a
i- .ni that "Christians are
Ified in holding negative at-
s towards Jews since the
killed Christ," five percent
jed and five percent said they
"unsure."
percent felt that God views
re favorably than other
:;ins" based on their
Iftl .lews are God's chosen
1 the fact that Jesus
elf a Jew. Ten percent
|- God views Jews "less
than other non-
The survey noted a statistically
significant relationship between
belief in a literal reading of the Bi-
ble and expression of one or more
secular anti-Semitic views.
The seven statements reflected
stereotypical attitudes towards
Jews, including the following:
"because Jews are not bound by
Christian ethics, they do things to
get ahead that Christians general-
ly do not do," 27 percent agreed:
"Jews are tight with money," 51
percent agreed; "Jews want to re-
main different from other people,
and yet they are touchy if people
notice these differences," 39 per-
cent agreed; "Jews are more loyal
to Israel than to the U.S.," 27 per-
cent agreed.
BUT sizeable percentages of
those who accepted these
characterizations felt they were
"positive" traits. For example, of
those who believe Jews are tight
with money," 60 percent thought
that was a positive trait. On the
statement about greater loyalty to
Israel, 4'.* percent of those who
agreed thought it was a positive
trait, and 30 percent of those who
saw Jews as wanting to be "dif-
ferent," viewed the characteristic
r
. ->
rcent disagreed with the
"God does not hear
: a .lew.'* And. among
the statement wai
le in 1981 by the
of the Southern
vention, the Rev.
ith only 12 percent
-nt said Jews are view-
"no differently than
Christians" because
ive ti"t accepted Jesus, 20
: they may be judged
ily" and 12 percent
.re."
>I. NATIONAL director
I'erlmutter said the
part of the agency's
. H a of Christian at-
a aril .lews and that
findings of this par-
.r'- significant in view
i i prominence in re-
religiously conser-
-Mans m this country
iboul which Jews
. d apprehension."
are areas of impor-
ment between the
immunity and
and fundamentalists,
>er in schools and the
linj; of evolution, these
ring values. Their sup-
of voluntary prayers in the
oi. for instance, is no more
aril) anti-Semitic than our
sition to prayer is anti-
loua In a culturally pluralistic
ty. it is possible to be at op-
ends of an issue without
^Kious bigotry being
ative."
I* ADL official cited as
uhling" the survey's finding
although 57 percent of the
pling revealed no secular anti-
Itic attitudes as measured by
\f responses to seven
pnents in an "anti-Semitic in-
[ 22 percent agreed with one
ne anti Semitic characteriza-
i and another 21 percent with
or more,
flW FIVE percent of those
eyed accepted four or more of
statements as valid. It was
that 49 percent of those bet-
18 and 34 years of age
' with at least one of the
Semitic characterizations
^ed to 34 percent of those
over.
positively.
Five of the seven statements
were taken from a 1966 study
"Christian Beliefs and anti-
Semitism," conducted for the
League by Charles Y. Glock and
Rodney Stark of the University of
California Survey Research
Center. That study, which dealt
with Catholic and Protestant
denominations, including
evangelicals and fundamentalists,
found linkage between religion
and anti-Semitism and concluded
that religious orthodoxy and par-
ticularism operated to produce
secular hostility towards Jews.
ADDITIONAL findings in the
new study which ADL described
as being "troubling" were:
59 percent of the sampling
replied in the affirmative when
asked if they agreed that "Jews
can never be forgiven for what
they did to Jesus until they accept
him as the true savior." (28 per-
cent disagreed and 13 percent
were unsure.)
50 percent of those polled said
Christians should "actively help
lead Jews to accept Jesus Christ
as savior."
While 85 percent said there
was "no doubt" that six million
Jews died at the hands of the
Nazis in World War II, 10 percent
were "unsure" and five percent
said there was "no direct
evidence" of the Holocaust.
In commenting on the survey,
Perlmutter said: "While I am
discomfited by those who claim to
have 'The Truth,' whether in
religion or in politics, it is our
responsibility to seriously explore
their attitudes and understand
their mindsets. The fact that their
thinking and values are different
from ours does not mean per se
that they are anti-Semitic."
PERLMUTTER added that the
League is planning to convene a
meeting with the leadership of
religiously conservative Chris-
tians to discuss in detail the fin-
dings of the survey and to explore
ways to improve mutual
understanding and friendship bet-
ween the Jewish community and
theirs.
The survey sampling was made
up of 36 percent Baptists, 12 per-
cent Methodists, 10 percent
Lutherans, 7 percent members of
the Church of Christ and the re-
mainder included other Protes-
tant evangelicals such as
Pentecostal, Mormon and
Assembly of God.
Divided into questions relating
to "religiously based anti-
Semitism" and "secular anti-
Semitism," the survey included
these results under the "secular"
section:
49 percent of the sampling
had a "very favorable" or
"somewhat favorable" opinion of
Jews, 40 percent were "about
average" and 4 percent admitted
to unfavorable attitudes.
56 percent had "very
favorable" or "favorable" opi-
nions of Israel, 28 percent gave
"average" as an answer and 10
percent had "unfavorable"
attitudes.
On their perceptions of how
much power is wielded in America
today by six selected groups big
business, organized labor, Arabs,
Catholics, blacks and Jews, 67
percent thought big business has
too much power; 55 percent cited
organized labor; 38 percent,
Arabs; 23 percent, Catholics. 11
percent said blacks have too much
power; 31 percent felt blacks do
not have enough power. 7 percent
said Jews have too much power
and 11 percent said they have too
little power.
"THE FINDINGS on blacks
Continued on Page 13-A
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Page W-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
Offended by Religious
Symbols in Public
Places? You Can Sue
NEW YORK A citizen
who avoids using a public
facility because it displays a
religious symbol that of-
fends his or her beliefs is
legally entitled to bring suit
to have the symbol remov-
ed, says the American
Jewish Congress.
In an .imim.. or friend-of-the-
court, brief submitted on behalf of
itself and the Jewish Federation
of Hawaii. AJCongress argues
that a group of 15 civilian tax-
payers are entirely within their
rights in requesting that the
United States District Court for
the District of Hawaii order the
U.S. Marine Corps to remove a
66-foot-high lighted cross from
public display on a hillside at
Camp Holland M Smith, outside
of Honolulu.
EARLIER THIS year, the
Navy's Judge Advocate General,
its chief legal officer, ruled that
the presence of the cross on the
base violated church-state separa-
tion. The base commander. Col.
Gene Castagnetti. ordered the
symbol removed. But he was
reversed by the Marine Corps
commandant. Gen. Paul X.
Kelley.
The 15 civilian plaintiffs, in-
cluding seven Christians, two
Buddhists, four Jews, a Unitarian
and a Quaker, brought suit in the
U.S. District Court, contending
that the maintenance of the cross
on military property "symbolized
governmental approval, sponsor-
ship, preference and endorsement
of a specific religion."
They also asserted that the
display "demeans, trivializes and
attempts to secularize a profound-
ly religious symbol."
U.S. GOVERNMENT at
torneys. defending the presence
of the cross, asked that the suit be
dismissed on the grounds that the
civilian plaintiffs do not have
"standing" legal entitlement
to bring such a suit because they
are not directly affected by the
display.
The AJCongress-Federation
brief rejects this argument. It
points out that at least some of the
plaintiffs have assumed "special
burdens" to avoid the
government-sponsored cross.
"It is by now well settled that
persons who are forced to assume
special burdens to avoid
(unwelcome religious exercises),
particularly if these persons are
'impressionable school children'
. have standing to challenge
those exercises." the brief
declares.
"Standing" is not limited to
those who suffer economic losses,
says the brief, which calls atten-
tion to a series of federal Circuit
Court decisions upholding the
standing of persons who are forc-
ed to assume "special burdens" in
order to avoid the impact of
government-sponsored religious
displays.
The brief cites an affidavit by a
Jewish plaintiff who stated that
the presence of the cross at Camp
Smith caused her children anxie-
ty. She added that "as a result of
the presence of the cross on the
hillside. I avoid going to that area
unless absolutely necessary
because I feel like an alien when I
am in the area." The presence of
the cross on the military base, she
said, had caused her children "to
question their status as American
citizens."

*~V
of*
/
y

<*
/* '
Actress Victoria Principal is shown with her
husband. Dr. Harry Glassman. on their visit
ttAOTZNtimnJ
last month to Masada during a trip to IsrqA
torian Publicizes
Ida Nudel's Appeal to West
Shamir Due To Meet
With Reagan in D.C.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir is scheduled to meet President Reagan Feb. 17 at
the White House, a spokesman for the Israeli Consulate
here said Monday.
ACCORDING TO the spokesman. Shamir will arrive in
New York Feb. 15 to begin a 10-day U.S. visit with
meetings and appearances in New York, Washington. Los
Angeles and Houston. The spokesman stressed, however,
that the Premier" s itinerary is not complete and many
changes are likely to take place.
The main topic of discussion between Reagan and
Shamir will be American-Israeli relations, the spokesman
said.
ASKED IF the Iran arms sales crisis will figure in the
talks between the two leaders, the spokesman said: "Israel
has aleady made its position known and said all it had to sav Bomb Dismantled
on the issue."
Shamir's upcoming state visit is his first since he
assumed the Premiership last October, replacing Shimon
Peres, now Israel's Foreign Minister, under the terms of
the rotation agreement. Shamir last visited the U.S. as
Israel's Foreign Minister last Sertember.
By SUZAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An appeal to the West by
refusenik Ida Nudel has
been publicized by British
historian Martin Gilbert.
Gilbert, who campaigns
worldwide on behalf of
Soviet Jews and has written
several books about them,
wrote a letter on Nudel's
behalf for the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews.
Gilbert read this letter, which
includes Nudel's appeal for
freedom, at a gathering in Tel
Aviv on Dec. 25 commemorating
Prisoners of Conscience Day. At
that time. Gilbert and Natan
Sharansky placed a phone call to a
Moscow apartment in which
refuseruks and former Prisoners
of Conscience were gathered to
discuss their present situation in
light of the pardon of Andrei
Sakharov.
THE DISSIDENT physicist
and spokeperson for human rights
and Jewish refuseniks and
prisoners was allowed to leave his
six-year exile in the dosed city of
Gorky and return to Moscow with
his wife. Yelena Bonner. who was
also pardoned. Nudel is exiled to
the closed city of Bendery.
"With the return of Academi-
cian Sakharov from Gorky to
Moscow." Gilbert wrote." "a
leading dissident and courageous
spokesman for human rights has
been allowed home Jews
throughout the world recall with
gratitude his long and outspoken
championship of the right of the
Jews of Russia to be reunited with
their people in Israel .
"Academician Sakharov returns
to Moscow, but one of those Jews
on whose behalf he many times
protested, remains in enforced ex-
ile in southern Russia, in the
remote town of Bendery Ida
Nudel first applied to leave
Russia for Israel in the very year.
1971, in which Sakharov set up his
Human Rights Committee."
GILBERT NOTED that in
Nudel's letter of appeal she
"writes of that festive moment
when the people of Israel, and
Jewish throughout the world,
light the candles which symbolize
the resistance of the Maccabees."
Nudel wrote: "Remember thoJ
who are so far off. so isolated bil
distance and hostility who*]
life is being destroyed now a|
punishment cells, half hungry.
half getting frozen for no crime it
all. but only for being a Jew.
Remember those who, despite ]
persecutions and harassment, wil \
celebrate our holiday, who wil I
light up candles, who will tell the},
children about the history udj
dignity of the people thev beloif
to."
Gilbert, writing from Oxford
University, asked. "la it beyonel
the ability of the Western world ltd
end her 16-year separation froal
the Jewish State, to enable hem
light the candles of freedom nea
vear at her sister's side"'
TEL AVTV (JTA> A bomb
disposal squad safely dismantled a
rooby-trapped car at a busv in-
tersection in Beersheba. thev
were alerted by a passer-bv who
fecaroe suspicious of the way the
car. a white Subaru, was parked
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In depth Itinerary via private
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Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Tax Reform
AMING EAGLES IN NEW POSITIONS. Two U.S.
s from the Wist Airborne Division (The Screaming
es) stand guard in their mostly northern positions on the
tied Taba Beach area on the edge of the Sinai Desert. The
AP/Wide World Photo
U.S. troopers are serving with the peacekeeping forces in the
Sinai between Israel and Egypt. The question of who has jurisdic-
tion over Taba is currently under international arbitration.
\sraeli IDF Wounded
Shamir Shaken By Death of Irish UNIFIL Soldier
By HUGH ORGEL
:L AVIV (JTA) An
li soldier was wounded
'iith Lebanon securi-
[zime Monday morning
his armored personnel
ier struck a land mine
\t kilometers from the
lx>rder. The soldier
taken by helicopter to
ibam Hospital in Haifa.
banwhile Maj. Gen. Yossi Pel-
Commander of the northern
Wi. has ordered a full in-
jation into the circumstances
death of an Irish soldier
fire from an Israel Defense
Patrol in south Lebanon
Saturday night.
Tripartite
alk Possible
ontinued from Page 1-A
fibed as exploratory, to see
I the stalled peace process
I be advanced. But American
rials have cautioned against
ations of a breakthrough at
|me.
tPHY scheduled meetings
IVice Premier and Foreign
fter Shimon Peres and
fcse Minister Yitzhak Rabin
pr Cairo Friday.
Vmman Wednesday (Jan. 7),
ny indicated that the U.S.
not favor a joint preparatory
pittee for an international
^ence on Middle East peace.
I and Mubarak agreed to set
fch a committee when they
n Alexandria last November.
tory Prof. Named
jlCAGO (JTA) Joaef
Wz. history professor at the
ersity of Minnesot is th
Jew to serve as pre*kk~4f
American Catholic Historical
ciation.
THE SOLDIER, Cpl. Dermot
McLaughlin, 33, a member of the
Irish contingent of the United Na-
tions Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) was hit by shell
fragments when the IDF tank
patrol opened fire on "a large ter-
rorist squad in the village of
Barashit" at the edge of the
security zone, an IDF spokesman
said Sunday.
According to the IDF, the
soldier was at a UNIFIL post
close to the terrorist positions and
"was accidentally killed by the
shots."
Premier Yitzhak Shamir called
the incident a "tragic mistake."
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe
Levy have already apologized and
expressed regrets. The Irish
government lodged a strong pro-
test with Israel. McLaughlin was
married and the father of five
children.
THERE WAS initial confusion
here over who was responsible.
Early reports said he was killed by
soldiers of the Israel-backed
South Lebanon Army (SLA) who
opened fire on "suspicious" per-
sons. Later reports confirmed the
responsibility of an IDF unit that
took up positions in what was
previously an SLA stronghold in
Barashit near a UNIFIL outpost.
The SLA position was overrun
by the Shiite extremist Hezbollah
last month resulting in the deaths
of six SLA soldiers. The post was
later retaken by the SLA and tem-
porarily occupied by an IDF tank
unit.
UNIFIL spokesman Timor
Goksel said Sunday that the
UNIFIL post in the village has
been there since 1978 and was
clearly marked by a large sign and
a United Nations flag which is
floodlit at night.
HE SAID when the first tank
shell hit the UNIFIL structure the
unit commander went to the roof
and fired red flares, an identifica-
tion signal agreed upon with the
IDF. But the firing continued, he
said. One shell exploded in a room
where McLaughlin was sleeping.
UNIFIL has complained fre-
quently about what it describes as
"indiscriminate shooting" by SLA
units. Goksel said shells fired by
the SLA have exploded on or near
UNIFIL positions 59 times in the
past three weeks. He said
UNIFIL was reconsidering its
standing orders not to return fire.
Marrack Goulding, UN
Undersecretary for Special
Political Affairs, who was in Israel
last week in connection with the
impending renewal of the
UNIFIL mandate, said that 20
UNIFIL soldiers were killed in
1986 as a result of attacks by
"various armed groups in the
area." A total of 139 UNIFiL
soldiers have been killed since the
international peacekeeping force
was sent to Lebanon more than 10
years ago.
FRANCE RECENTLY reduc-
ed its contribution to UNIFIL
from 1,400 to 500 soldiers because
of severe casualties. UNIFIL
sources indicated Monday that
Ireland might pull its trops out
altogether. Goulding held the
SLA responsible for most of the
UNIFIL casualties. He charged
that it often "deliberately fires on
UN positions."
The SLA claims that terrorists
often use UNIFIL positions as
cover and that UN casualties oc-
cur when their men are caught in
cross-fire. The IDF said that while
it supplies and trains the SLA it
does not give it orders.
Worries Arabs
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Arab governments are con-
cerned over the effects of
the Tax Reform Act of 1986
on investments by foreign
governments in U.S. enter-
prises, according to Boycott
Report, a bulletin on
developments and trends af-
fecting the Arab boycott of
Israel and Arab influence in
the U.S., published here by
the American Jewish
Congress.
The oil-rich Persian Gulf state of
Kuwait is a case in point. It may-
lose its tax-exempt status on so-
called passive investments in the
United States. Kuwait, a heavy in-
vestor, was exempt under Section
892 of the old Internal Revenue
Code from federal taxes on
stocks, bonds or other domestic
securities it owned and interest
from deposits in American banks.
THE OLD code declared as tax-
able, income derived from com-
mercial activities including that
earned by a "controlled entity" of
a foreign government. Commer-
cial activities were defined as
those "ordinarily conducted with
a view toward the current or fur-
ther production of income," the
Boycott Report said.
Section 892, as amended in the
new tax law, makes taxable in-
come derived from the conduct of
any commercial activity "whether
within or outside the United
States." If the foreign govern-
ment owns at least 50 percent of
the stock of the enterprise engag-
ed in such commercial activity, the
exemption on its "passive in-
vestments" in the U.S. could be
jeopardized.
The Kuwaitis could thereby lose
their exempt status on the passive
investments of the Kuwait
Petroleum Co. in Santa Fe Inter-
national, an American oil explora-
tion company it purchased several
years ago for $2.5 billion, the
Boycott Report said.
Center Honors
96 Survivors
T LOUIS (JTA) The
Center for Holocaust Studies here
has honored the 96 people,
primarily Holocaust survivors,
who have given their oral history
to the center's archives. In other
local news, Nobel Prize-winning
novelist Saul Bellow has received
the 19th St. Louis Literary Award
from St. Louis University.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
From Nude Posing to Leftwing:
Who Is Mordechai Vanunu?
Continued from Page 5-A
technician. Vanunu registered to
study economics at Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev in Beer-
sheba. He transferred from
economics to geography and then
to philosophy, in which he obtain-
ed a BA after eight years of study.
"He was one of the students we
called 'the founding genera-
tion,* says one university stu-
dent who did not want to be
quoted by name. "It seemed as if
Motti had always been here and
would always be here."
"When Vanunu first entered
the university, his views were ex-
treme right wing." says Avner, a
student who has known Vanunu
for eight years. "He gradually
shifted to the left and then to the
extreme left."
MANY OF the students believe
Vanunu's political views were an
expression of extreme loneliness
and craving for attention. Several
recall one particularly odd inci-
dent at a student clubhouse in
which Vanunu stood on a chair
and, for no apparent reason, drop-
ped his pants.
Other students said that
Vanunu suffered from an in-
feriority complex as a Sephardi
Jew. "He just never seemed to fit
in with the Jewish students," says
Avner. "Although many Sephardi
Jews fill positions of responsibility
here, he saw his own isolation as
part of an overall system of
discrimination by Ashkenazi Jews
against Sephardi Jews. So he
started eating with the Arab
students and soon became their
defender at meetings."
Vanunu founded the BGU
chapter of the leftist group Cam-
pus and attended dozens of
demonstrations on behalf of Arab
rights at Ben-Gurion University.
Photographs in Israeli
newspapers show Vanunu
demonstrating on behalf of a
Palestinian state.
"He is a person who cares about
the underdog," says Fawzi Mussa.
head of the Arab Students Com-
mittee at BGU. "He believed that
we were not getting our fair share
of dormitory rooms and grants.
And he was willing to come out
and say so publicly."
IN OCTOBER, 1985. Vanunu
attended an Arab student gather-
ing at the University. After a
huge PLO flag was unfurled on
the stage, Vanunu stood up and
called for the establishment of a
Palestinian state.
Vanunu was fired from his job
at the nuclear reactor in
November, 1985. The next month,
he applied for membership in the
Rakah Communist Party. On his
application, he answered the ques-
tion as to why he wanted to join
with the statement, "because I
identify with your position."
Shortly after his dismissal,
Vanunu tried nude modelling at
the School of Visual Arts in Beer-
sheba. He received IS50 ($33) for
a three-hour session. Interviewed
by an Israeli newspaper at the
time. Vanunu said that he was
also considering performing nude.
After his second session as a
model, Vanunu was told that he
was "not suitable." One of the art
instructors at the school, who did
not want to be identified by name,
said that Vanunu was "too ner-
vous and moved too much."
Several days later, Vanunu told
his classmates that he was leaving
Israel for an indeterminate time.
He sold his apartment and board-
ed a ship for Greece and the Far
East.
HE FINALLY surfaced in
August in Sydney, Australia,
where he converted to Christiani-
ty. He sold information on Israel's
nuclear capability to the London
Sunday Times for a reported half
million dollars. But before the
story was published and before he
could collect, Vanunu
disappeared.
On Nov. 9, the Israeli govern-
ment announced that Vanunu was
being held in an Israeli prison and
would be tried for treason.
Vanunu's father says he no
longer regards Mordechai as his
son. Solomon Vanunu, who sells
religious articles in the Beersheba
market, disowned his son when he
converted to Christianity.
"Whatever Mordechai did," says
his father, "he will have to pay for
it. Perhaps that will clear the
family of the shame he has
brought on us."
Israel Scene
Israel Reacts With Concern
To Iran Scandal in U.S.
Continued from Page 5-A
ter. Analysts ask why Israel did
not foresee that Iran was getting
the upper hand in the war.
Said Aharon Yariv, a former
head of military intelligence: "We
have a long-term interest in rela-
tions with Iran. I can understand
selling arms to Iran when the
country is in a difficult situation
. What I do not understand, and
I hope this did not happen, would
be the sale of arms to Iran in quan-
tity and kind that could result in
victory for the Khomeini regime
because this could be a disaster
for us."
Also being questioned is the
assumption that there are any
"moderates" in the Iranian
government. What assurances are
there that any so-called moderates
would emerge in control of the
country? And how likely is it that
they would be grateful to the
Jewish State for having supplied
them with arms?
THE LEFTIST daily Al
Hamishmar. questions whether
Israel's alleged aid to Iran did not
jeopardize relations with the one
Arab country with whom she is at
least officially at peace Egypt.
The paper suggests that at one
point Egypt was struggling to
draw Jordan and Iraq into a
moderate pro-Western alliance
which might have been willing to
talk to Israel.
However, in supplying arms to
Iran, writes the paper, Israel sid-
ed with the radical Arab states
(Syria and Libya), alienating
Egypt and frustrating the chances
of forming such a moderate Arab
alliance.
Above all, the reports concern-
ing Israel's alleged arms sales to
Iran have prompted a debate on
how such decisions are arrived at
and by whom. There is fear that
the interests of the country's arms
dealers may be influencing
foreign policy.
THE GOVERNMENT is sup-
posed to raise all arms transac-
tions at a subcommittee of the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and Rela-
tions committee. But in this case,
it seems that only the prime
minister and foreign and defense
ministers know the full story
behind the reports.
Several members of the subcom-
mittee have complained that this
is not the first time the govern-
ment has failed to keep them in-
formed of its arms transactions.
The latest reports on arms sales to
Iran have already triggered a call
for a reevaluation of that policy.
Israel Scene
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Friday, January 16. 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Christian Faith Doesn't Spur
Anti-Semitism in Some, Poll Shows
ITA/WZN News Photo
lionian religion* leaders, 'kesim,' look on
Shlomo Hillel, Speaker of the Knesset,
lights the fourth Chanukah candle in Israel's
Knesset during the recent holiday celebration.
etters to Editor
No Voice of Outrage Heard
r<)K. The Jewish Floridian:
full page of pictures in the
[9 edition of The Jewish
Jan about the Alexander S.
Hebrew Academy's 39th
scholarship affair brought
ck to a recent, intense and
felt discussion among a
of intelligent people about
removal of the Hebrew
iv sign from the building
Is replacement with a new
Fana Holtz High School.
[if us. in unison, expressed a
if outrage and anger
only about the
'P.ounced ego-name-
also anger about
r Hebrew Academy and
mi Kioridian who failed to
| and opposition to
the changing of a
Arties Trade
Charges
t DAVID LANDAU
HJSALEM (JTA) The
Orthodox Shas Party and
how mainstream National
MIS Party traded charges
Thursday (Jan. 8) over the
>f converts to Judaism.
ai Yitzhak Peretz, leader of
who resigned as Interior
er last week rather than
with a Supreme Court
to register American im-
tit Shoshana Miller as a Jew,
she was converted by a
rabbi, charged that the
when it held the Interior
portfolio, "registered
es as Jews."
etz was responding to NRP
es that he had mishandled
Jler case. Shas has threaten-
quit the unity coalition
wnent unless the definition
pw in the Law of Return is
according to Orthodox
Ms. Shas has four seats in
l>esset. as does the NRP.
fhas leaves the coalition it
factions to remain, par-
/ 'I a non-Orthodox person
Dinted to replace Peretz and
frs Miller as a Jew, as
y the court.
I'gious parties planned to
ne controversial Who is a
nendment to the Knesset
[ote last week. They backed
*n it became clear they lack-
| votes to pass it.
-ket Explodes
AVIV (JTA) A
sha rocket exploded in nor-
^ahlee last week causing
casualties nor damage.
name synonymous with Judaism,
Jewish learning and Jewish roots
and tradition.
The new name should be remov-
ed and the name, Hebrew
Academy School, restored so that
the multitude may still point with
pride as alumni of the Academy.
In expressing these sentiments, I
must, however, point to the
satisfaction I felt that only the
name of the Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy was mentioned
in The Jewish Floridian picture
page.
It is proper and of tremendous
benefit to have a building or wing
of a hospital, school, university, or
any institution of academic intent
named after the generous donor.
But it is an affront and a sacrilege
to uproot for a price an old and
sacred, hallowed name to be
replaced by the name of the
donor.
This goes also for imposing for a
price the names of Gil and Adela
Holtz, Abel Holtz's parents, on
Rabbi Abraham Korf s yeshiva.
For that, Rabbi Korf is also to be
blamed, as well as those responsi-
ble at the Hebrew Academy.
It is also embarrassing to the
Jewish community to see the
change of name of an historic
Miami Beach landmark and
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I read the article regarding
Chanukah Menorahs in public
places, and I was disappointed
that Greater Miami was not men-
tioned as one of the cities in which
the Lubavitcher Chassidim had
erected the giant Chanukah
Menorahs.
As a member of the local Jewish
community I can only say that it
did my heart good and gave me a
sense of pride to see those lovely
symbols of our holiday displayed
in prominent places.
I give the Lubavitcher great
credit for their spunk and
perseverance. We need more
Jewish awareness, and they're the
ones who are spreading it.
HARRIET ALON
Miami Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Reader Alon
refers to the column by Andrew
Muchin in the Jan. 9 edition of
The Jewish Floridian whose in-
tent was not to praise the
Lubavitcher for the program of
placing menorahs in public
places. On the contrary
Muchin reported on a series of
Supreme Court cases brought
by litigants against the pro-
gram as a isolation of the
teparation of church and stait
principle
recreation facility in a public park
and public property from Flam-
ingo Park Stadium to the Abel
Holtz Stadium, and hitting the
streets, roads and byways with
diverting Abel Holtz Stadium
direction signs. Even the Flam-
ingo Park Tennis Court has been
changed to Capital Bank Tennis
Center, Abel Holtz's bank.
For old traditional and
established names, we now have
an Abel Holtz Stadium, we have a
Fana Holtz High School, and we
have a Gil and Adela Holtz yeshiva
wing. What's next?
HERSCHEL LEVITZ
Miami Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Reader
Herschel Levitz errs*. The
name of the school of which
he is a proud alumnus re-
mains the Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross Hebrew Academy.
Continued from Page 9-A
and Jews." Perlmutter said, "are
particularly instructive. The old
canard that Jews have too much
power in this country is over-
whelmingly rejected by the inter-
viewees. Regarding blacks, the
fact that nearly a third of the sam-
ple, the largest percentage by far,
felt that they do not have enough
power suggests that the view that
evangelicals and fundamentalists
are disinterested in the blacks'
struggle for social justice may not
be justified."
The poll, which was conducted
by telephone, was based on a
series of "screen questions" re-
quiring a potential respondent to
meet "specific minimum criteria."
These included persons who
belong to what was defined as
"conservative or moderate
American denominations, who
reported that religion was of ma-
jor importance to them in their
daily lives and who reported fre-
quent church attendance."
ADDITIONAL measures, not
"screen questions," of religious
fundamentalism and orthodoxy
used were assertions by in-
dividuals that they were "born
again," that the Bible is literally
true and who professed varying
degrees of ''religious
particularism."
In addition to direct question-
ing, the pollsters used a "projec-
tive technique" to try to uncover
hidden anti-Semitism. The 1,000
evangelicals and fundamentalists
were asked to describe why other
Christians might be prejudiced
against Jews.
The majority, 68 percent, said
they didn't know why other Chris-
tians might be prejudiced or that
they didn't think "true Chris-
tians" would be prejudiced. The
responses of the remaining 32 per-
cent included assertions that
other Christians might be anti-
Semitic because Jews have dif-
ferent religious beliefs and
because they do not accept Jesus.
Of these, 4- percent cited
crucifixion.
THE POLLSTERS noted that
the respondents perceived more
anti-Semitism among groups far
removed from themselves. For ex-
ample, 81 percent said there was
"not very much" anti-Semitism
among the people with whom they
go to church, and 34 percent said.
"a great deal or some" when ques-
tioned about anti-Jewish attitudes
among "Christians like yourself
across the country." 61 percent of
the sample, however, replied "a
great deal or some" when asked
how much anti-Semitism exists
among "all Americans."
'Neshira' Big
Session Topic
In Philly
Continued from Page 4-A
Telem Movement for Zionist
Fulfillment challenged the
Zionist establishment's concep-
tion of aliya. "The American
Zionist Federation is promoting
the slogan that a real Zionist is
one who pays dues. Do you agree
with this statement and what kind
of dues do you want from
American Zionists?" Shube asked
Herzog.
Herzog replied, "The dues I
want from the American Zionists
are the American Jews. That's
really what is the most important
thing of all." He stressed that
Israel is short of manpower,
especially in the high technology
fields, and needs a critical mass of
people to retain its independence.
"I would say that while paying
dues is very important in the
American Zionist Federation and
everywhere else the most im-
portant task world Jewry and
American Jewry has is to come as
far as they can to Israel. and in
particular to encourage the youth
to come to Israel."
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
Too Early To Tell
Will BB Vote for Woman President?
By ANDREW MUCHIN
How can an American
Jewish woman lead a power-
ful international organiza-
tion to which technically she
doesn't belong? She can join
a local co-ed B'nai B'rith
unit in the United States
and get elected president of
B'nai B'rith International.
BBI, the worldwide service and
activist organization for men in
the United States and both sexes
abroad, decided last August to
open its American doors to
women, although not as wide as
some men had hoped. B'nai B'rith
Women approved the same plan
at its convention in March.
The new plan, hashed out by a
joint blue ribbon committee,
declares immediately that "For
women in the United States B'nai
B'rith Women is the only vehicle
for membership in B'nai B'rith."
HOWEVER, female members
of the units may hold office above
the local level either in BBI or
BBW, although not simultaneous-
ly. Men who belong to units can't
hold office in BBW, but they can
in BBI and can vote at BBW
conventions.
It's too early to determine
which leadership ladders women
will hope to climb, said Jeff Katz,
BBI membership director,
because for the BBI district and
international levels won't take
place until summer, So far, he
noted, about a third of the 150
units have female presidents.
About 10 American women serve
on district boards of governors.
Non-American women already
seek high office within BBI, ex-
plained BBI President Seymour
Reich. At the August convention,
Sylvia Lewin. president of B'nai
B'rith District 15 in Great Britain,
placed second in an election with
two men for senior international
vice president. In Israel, Pnina
Bor is president of District 14, he
added.
And some day, a woman may
seek the presidency. "I'd love to
see it happen," Reich said.
ADMINISTRATIVELY, the
units fall under BBI, according to
Katz, although he added that "the
women will become more involv-
ed." Unit female members' dues
are sent to BBW, men's to BBI.
The new plan also calls for the
formation of a Joint Executive
Council, composed equally of
16-20 men and women, to plan
and coordinate the organizations'
cooperative efforts and discuss
the possibility of joint
conventions.
This co-ed idea isn't new. As
B'nai B'rith outside the U.S.,
American women since 1971 have
been permitted to form local B'nai
B'rith units with men. For men
only, there are B'nai B'rith
lodges. For women only, there
still are the BBW chapters.
Approximately 13,300 men and
women belong to the 150 units in
the United States, according to
Katz, and another 50 units are in
formation. Total BBW chapter
membership in the U.S. and
Canada is 120,000, while
150,000 men belong to BBI lodges
in the United States.
There would be only one mean-
ingful membership figure to
report had the joint BBI BBW
blue-ribbon committee agreed on
the proposal that brought it
together.
DELEGATES TO the 1984 BBI
international convention had ap-
proved a resolution mandating the
formation of a special planning
committee, with the possible
cooperation of BBW, "to develop
a plan for full and equal member-
ship for women in B'nai
B'rith. ." In other words, the
men wanted women to be permit-
ted to join B'nai B'rith lodges.
BBW opposed the idea as well
as a merger with BBI, and for a
time considered seceding from
B'nai B'rith altogether.
Before matters could get too far
out of hand, 14 top leaders from
two organizations began a series
of nine intense monthly meetings
from 1985-86. "We presented our
arguments with fervor and can-
dor," wrote committee chairs
Philip Klutznick and Dorothy
Binstock in their final report.
"A great deal was at stake,"
recalled one of the participants,
BBW president Irma Gertler.
Through long and challenging
negotiations, she indicated, the
new plan was formulated.
An added benefit was that the
participants learned to better
understand one another. "Com-
munication up until then had not
been as constant. as now," she
said.
BOTH GERTLER and Reich
said they were satisfied with the
plan. Besides healing an organiza-
tional rift, the organization
becomes more attractive to young
members, Reich said, allowing
even young couples to join
together.
Reich himself has belonged to a
unit for three years, after being a
lodge member for about 20.
Gertler
member.
> a BBW
chapj
So. Mr. and Madame pw
what we would you tell a f*
unit-member interested in I
ing a B'nai B'rith leader but,
between BBI and BBW?'
Reich said he would advc
free choice, t depends J,
own predilections, where
comfortable."
Gertler agreed that it's "Sb
personal choice. I would noti
to influence her in any wav
depends what her interests ,
Needless to say, I think there,
wonderful opportunities in {jM
B'rith Women, but either chokJ
good."
'
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1
1
'
1
'
1
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[New York Cardinal John 0'Conner meets
Lath President Chaim Herzog at the Presi-
\dent 'a residence last week. The visit was a con-
JTA/WZN News Photo
troversial one due to the Vatican position on
Israel and Jerusalem.
'Connor Chides Jews
On 'Stereotyping' of Palestinians
JEL AVIV (JTA) -
|hn Cardinal O'Connor last
ek ended his tour of
^ael by chiding Americans
stereotyping Arabs. "I
I we have a stereotype in
U.S. for the Arab and
tlestinian. If you use
her term, Arab or Palesti-
many people see ter-
ist," he told reporters at
bn-Gurion Airport last
anday evening (Jan. 5),
Bt before leaving for
>me.
[We are talking about an an-
nt, noble people with which we
ve much in common," he said,
here are very many Arab and
jlestmian leaders looking for a
ceful solution" of the Middle
st conflict, the Roman Catholic
fchbishop of "New York
dared.
IE ADDED that he "was en-
raged to find so "much talk of
ce in Israel. You don't hear in
Arab world now things you
just a few'. years ago:
i'e're going to push the Israelis
the sea.' "
)'Connor said he would inform
I John Paul II in'Roroe that "I
ik there's good will on all aides,
that's what you need. I see a
of good will here, in the Arab
brld and in Israel toward the Ho
ISee."
Jut O'Connor's visit to Israel
i fraught with controversy and
uns since he crossed the Allen-
Bridge from Jordan. The
.elate made it clear, that he
puld have to abide by Vatican
fidelities not to meet with Israeli
tders in their official capacity at
eir offices in Jerusalem because
Vatican does not recognize
Jem as Israel's capital.
IE APOLOGIZED profusely
' any offense he% might have
pen Israelis and their leaders
i faulted himself for not fully
dizing before this* trip the con-
_aints put upon him by Vatican
I)icy. Nevertheleas.the,Cardinal
^t with President Chaim Herzog
the Presidential resilience in
rusalem and breakfasted with
Ice Premier and 'Foreign
Inister Shimon Peres at the lat-
F's home. .
le described Peres as a
.fiend" and said he was
lighted to have been able to
|urn Peres' visit to his residence
|New York last October. It was
that occasion that Peres in-
1 the Cardinal to visit Israel.
-'Connor emphasized repeated-
ly in his remarks to reporters that
the visits to Herzog and Peres
were entirely informal and unof-
ficial. On both occasions he wore
plain clerical garb instead of the
crimson robes and decorations of
a Cardinal which he displayed
elsewhere during his stay in
Israel.
HE SEEMED nonplussed when
reporters reminded him that the
Presidential residence (Beit
Hanassi) also serves as Herzog's
office. "If it is not the President's
residence, then there has been a
gross mistake, because ... it was
very clear that it would not be ap-
propriate for me within my
guidelines to visit the President
officially in his office in
Jerusalem," O'Connor said.
The problem did not arise at
Peres' home, which is not used as
an office. Peres himself implied
that the nature of the Cardinal's
visit lay in the eyes of the
beholder. "Jerusalem is the
capital of Israel and it makes no
differences if anybody recognizes
that fact or not. And if someone
comes to me and says I am coming
to you as a private individual so
what? Does that make me a
private individual?" Peres asked.
The final event of O'Connor's
tour was a visit to the ad-
ministered Gaza Strip where he
inspected the Shatti refugee camp
housing some 40,000 Palestinians.
Earlier, O'Connor visited the
Western Wall in the Old City of
Jerusalem where he kissed the
stones, and the Yad Vashem
Holocaust Memorial in West
Jerusalem. Near tears, he found it
difficult to express in words the
horror he felt at viewing the
Holocuast exhibits.
THE INVITATION to visit
Israel, extended to O'Connor by
Peres stemmed in large measure
from concern over the Ar-
chbishop's relationship with the
Jewish State. Peres said he in-
vited the Roman Catholic leader
to learn the Israeli side of the Mid-
dle East conflict.
Last July, during a visit to
Lebanon, O'Connor said the
Vatican would establish
diplomatic relations with Israel
only after three preconditions
were satisfied: Israel should
"assist substantially" in finding
"a Palestinian homeland"; it
should help achieve peace in
Lebanon; and should also aid the
security of some eight million
Christians living in the Arab
World.
On that occasion, the Cardinal
made no mention of Syria the
Shiite and Sunni Moslems, Iran or
Libya, all of which have con-
tributed to the destabilization of
Lebanon and the massacre of
Lebanese Christians.
Before leaving Israel, O'Connor
seemed to indicate that he
thought Vatican-Israel relations
could develop in the future.
HE TOLD reporters, after
meeting with Peres, that "I have
found, contrary to disappointment
I found in New York, I found here
that the Foreign Minister is open
to an extraordinary number of
possibilities."
He did not elaborate on the
"possibilities" but said, "My
understanding is that until the
Holy See is satisfied that those
concerns (regarding the status of
Jerusalem and its holy places) can
be appropriately resolved, it will
maintain its current position."
Where era fM7
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On the Ocwn at m Strew Mum. BehBon Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Bank's Board Recoils in Horror
At $4.5 Million Severance Pay
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Board of Directors of
Bank Leumi, Israel's
largest bank, seemed to
recoil in horror late last
Thursday night (Jan. 8)
from the outsized pension
and severance deal they had
made with the bank's
former chairman and chief
executive officer, Ernst
Japhet, when he resigned
last spring.
Japhet was one of the top ex-
ecutives of Israel's five largest
banks forced to resign after a
committee of inquiry found that
the banks had artificially inflated
the value of their shares to
mislead the investing public. The
scandal came to light after bank
shares collapsed in 1983, wiping
out the savings of thousands of
Israelis.
UNDER FIERCE denunciation
from the Knesset last Wednesday
(Jan. 7) and with angry bank
employees camped in the cor-
ridors outside the executive of-
fices, the Board decided to sus-
pend the $30,000 a month pension
awarded to Japhet. But they could
take no action on the $4.5 million
in severance pay which Japhet has
already received.
In a statement released just
before midnight, the directors
said the legality and
reasonableness of the terms of
Japhet's resignation were ques-
tionable. Japhet was unavailable
for comment. Eli Hurwitz, the
new Board chairman who replac-
ed Japhet, said after the meeting.
"I was not at peace with the
agreement. My conscience was
not quiet and my nights were not
quiet after I heard of the sums
Japhet was to receive."
Meanwhile, Leon Dulzin, Gover-
nor of Bank Leumi, lashed back at
media and Knesset critics who ac-
cused him of allowing Japhet to
receive excessive compensation.
Dulzin, who is chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, said
he first learned of Japhet's $4.5
million "golden handshake" when
he read about it in the
newspapers.
HE SAID he urged Board chair-
man Hurwitz to cancel the deal
but was told it was too late
because the severance had been
paid.
But he ordered the board to res-
cind the $30,000 a month pension.
Dulzin said. He said he considered
Japhet's terms "scandaious." He
also stressed that his position as
Governor was ex-officio, without
compensation and stemmed from
the fact that the Jewish Agency is
the majority shareholder in Bank
Leumi.
Dulin said he attended "some
seven or eight board meetings a
year that hardly means I was
involved in the running of the
bank." He said he saw no cause
for him to resign.
'Modification'
Is Out
Continued from Page 2-A
security of all peoples in the
region."
The Pope told the international
diplomatic corps accredited to the
Vatican on January 14, 1984 that
these principles imply a com-
prehensive peace treaty for the
area. They are the only conditions
under which the Vatican would
establish diplomatic relations with
Israel, formalizing what already
exists on an "unofficial" level.
The Vatican maintains an
Apostolic Delegate in Jerusalem
to represent its interests and
there is an almost daily flow of
contacts on the cultural, religious
and even political levels which the
Vatican authorities freely admit
and encourage.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. January 16, 1987
Castro Sends Five Jews to Venezuela on 'Humane Grounds'
Continued froai Page 1-A
The five were identified as Dr.
Julio Imiak and Dr. Solomon
Mitrani; Imiak's mother: and
Alberto Fernandez Vinas and
Abraham Shujman, all who have
kin in Venezuela. The Cuban
authorities had previously forbid-
den the physicians to leave
because of the local shortage of
medical doctors.
BRENER REPORTED that
Castro expressed interest in
knowing more about the Jewish
people and that he had explained
to him the history and travails of
the Jews, the Holocaust and the
importance of Israel to them.
Brener said that 12,000 Jews
lived in Cut* prior to the revolu-
tion led by Castro in 1959. Today
only about 1,000 Jews remain in
Havana and 300-400 elsewhere in
Cuba. Brener said he brought with
him prayer books and religious
items for the community.
As a gift for Castro, he brought
a Hebrew Bible printed in Israel
with an inscription on the inside
back cover: "Man is the crown of
God's creation. Therefore,
whoever labors on behalf of man
and of human society is acting in
the spirit of these holy
scriptures."
">Xe give our patients
cxjnndence, security..all
the benefits of our experience.
That's why we do more open
heart surgery than anyone else'
-v
Few surgical procedures are
more critical to life itself than open
heart surgery. .And, clearly, there are
few procedures where the experience
of the physician is more critical, more
essential.
So if you must have open heart
surgery, it should be of great comfort
to know that, led by Dr. James Jude.
the surgeons at The North Ridge
Heart Institute perform more open
heart procedures than any other hos-
pital in South Florida
In fact, over 4.000 people have
come to us for open heart surgery in
the last 10 years. For the experience
of our physicians. And the excellence
of our care.
Because along with our physi-
cians. Cardiovascular Clinical Nurse
Specialists give individual attention
and support to you and your family
throughout your hospital stay.
And after surgery, a comprehen-
sive rehabilitation program helps you
return to your normal life as quickly
as possible.
But we'd rather help you avoid
open heart surgery entirely. So we
offer one of the most advanced diag-
nostic testing and alternative treat-
ments available. Backed by the exper-
tise of Dr. Ali Ghahramani, who has
i
performed more than 10,000 cardiac
catheterizations and over 600 balloon
angioplasties.
If you'd like to learn more about
our cardiac services, talk with your doc-
tor or call us. In Broward, at 776-6000,
extension 1408. Or 1-800-523-2561,
toll-free. And if you dont have a
physician, well help you find one.
At AMI North Ridge Medical
Center, we believe you should accept
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Because your health can only be as
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The North Ridge Heart Institute^lVII North Ridge Medical Center
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Owr
IJ111111! i i i
*y
Friday, January 16, 1987 Tha Jewish Florldian Section B
Jews And Judaism
In Catholic Education
The first in a series of major meetings to develop guidelines on
the presentation of Jews and Judaism in Catholic education con-
vened in Miami Tuesday.
The Anti-Defamation League and the Catholic Archdiocese of
I Miami are initiating the project to create lesson plans for
Catholic instruction on the subject of the Gospel of John and
other New Testament scriptures which have an impact on how
Catholics view Jews. Around the United States, the project is
sponsored jointly by the Anti-Defamation League, the National
Conference of Catholic Bishops Secretariat for Christian-
[ Jewish Relations and the local Archdiocese.
The Miami guidelines, as well as those that result from subse-
j quent meetings elsewhere in the United States, will be published
jointly by the Anti-Defamation League and the National Con-
I ference of Catholic Bishops.
Arrangements have been made with the Latin American
I Bishops' Conference (CELAM) to translate and publish the
Iguidelines. They will be distributed throughout South and Cen-
Itral America to Catholic educators, thus making this one of the
[largest such efforts ever undertaken toward addressing the pro-
|hlem of religious based anti-Semitism.
This project is an important step forward in inter faith rela-
tions," said Arthur N. Teitelbaum, Southern Area Director of
khe Anti-Defamation League. "Religious education is the source
of enduring opinions, and the fact that Catholics and Jews will
cooperate on what is essentially a project to reformulate
Continued on Pafe 8-B
'Federation's CRC Is
Active On Many Fronts'
On Jan. 7. Dr. Douglas Miller, chairman of the Communi-
ty Relations Committee Sub-committee on the Middle East
and Foreign Jewry, sent letters to the Prime Minister of
Franco, the Japanese Ambassador to the United States and
Pope John Paul II. on liohalf of CRC and its concerns.
The Greater Miami .Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee (CRC) keeps an eye on world politics
and its effect on Israel and world Jewry, he said.
The tetter to France's Prime Minister Jacques Chirac ex-
pressed pleasure at the release of French national Aurel
cornea by his Moslem kidnappers t>ut warned that the
world must never dignify terrorism.
"Fran rtiO for obtaining Mr Cornea's freedom handed terrorism
a triumphant victory. When a major partner in the
Western democratic alliance kneels tefnre the forces of
tyranny, then the West loses," said the CRC letter.
A second letter, to Japans Ambassador to the United
States. Nobun Matsunaga, urged the Japanese to maintain
a solid front with the democracies of the world, of which
Japan is a part I 'urrently, Japan participates in the Arab
economic boycott of Israel
"When Japan participates in the economic boycott of
Israel, it plays into the hands of radical Islamic states that
wish to divide and conquer the democratic countries. This
gives aid and comfort to the communist regimes in their
Struggle agaii 'fie free world." the letter state.-. "Japan
need'; to show strength and resist the Aral) boycott of
Israel, Coop* rating with tin.- unconscionable boycott is not
only had diplomatic and political policy, it is also bad
business"
The Vatican was the address on the final letter to Cope
John Paul II. who is expected to be in Miami in 1988. II
spoke to the Catholic Church's lack of recognition oi the
State of Israel arid the lack of diplomatic relation.- between
the Vatican and the Jewish homeland.
^oui me \ aiican I'Vi^nu.^ wrc '- ------
tending her official diplomatic relations, the'hurcn will De
perceived l>\ manv as a part of the conflict (between Arabs
and Jews).'. In doing so you will help to heal serious
wounds and revive the moribund Arab-Israel peace
process
./The letter went on to point out that the Church has
democratic State of Israel, which allow.- religious freedom,
is not afforded the .-ame recognition.
Elaine Silverstein To Lead Area
Businesswomen On Mission To Israel
Elaine Silverstein, president of Beber
Silverstein and Partners, the highly suc-
cessful Miami-based advertising agency, will
lead a unique seven-day mission to Israel in
early March on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
"We are hoping to attract professional
women who may not currently be involved
in Federation activities but who are capable
of assuming significant leadership roles if
properly motivated," said Silverstein.
The group will be small enough to allow
participants to get to know one another
while in Israel and the itinerary will include
meetings with women in all walks of Israeli
life.
"Because Federation is anxious to attract
new leadership potential, prospective par-
ticipants will find the terms and conditions
of the mission extremely attractive," said
Silverstein.
Further information on the mission can be
obtained from Nick Simmonds at
Federation.
Elaine Silverstein
Hadassah's Major Gifts
Luncheon Set For Feb. 1
Mrs. Jean Temkin, President of the Miami
Beach Region of Hadassah, announced that
Hadassah's "Major Gifts Luncheon" will be
held on Feb. 1, at the Fontainebleau Hotel,
Miami Beach.
Guest speaker of the day will be Dr. Miriam
Freund-Rosenthal, who is an Honorary Vice
President and a Past National President of
Hadassah. Dr. Freund-Rosenthal serves as
Hadassah's "National Historian" and co-
chairwoman, Norm Central, for National
Hadassah's Endowment Fund campaign. She
is also Past Editor of Hadassah Magazine and
Past National Education Chairwoman.
Dr. Freund-Rosenthal has served as
Hadassah National Vocational Education
Chairwoman, as National Youth Aliyah
Chairwoman and as National Affairs
Chairwoman.
She carried out a special mission to French
Morocco for Youth Aliyah and her recommen-
dations brought about the expansion of Youth
Aliyah facilities to provide training for North
African Jewish children which took into ac-
count major aspects of their native
environment.
Youth Aliyah has named a synagogue in
Ramat Hadassah Szold "Ohel Miriam" in
tribute. Dr. Freund-Rosenthal represented
Hadassah in the Conference of Presidents of
Major Jewish Organizations and is a Past
Vice President of the American Zionist
Dr. Miriam Freund-Rosenthal
Federation. She has made more than 70 trips
to Israel since the State was established. Her
first visit to Palestine took place in 1935.
The Anti-Defamation League's
Young Leadership Diinsion
ADL Network) will \unor
Michael M. Adler at their
Third A nnual Dinner on April
30.
Index
Give A Day... 2-B
Importance of
Martin Luther King Day... 2-B
Walk For Freedom ... 3-B
Trialogue at Beth David ... 3-B
ARMDI Awards Luncheon ... 4-B
Destroy Golda Meir's Home? ... 6-B
The IDF Recruits an Arab Virtuoso... 7-B
Organization News... 8-B
Synagogue Listing ... 11-B
Obituaries... 13-B


rage v-tt The Jewish Horidian/Friday, January 16,1987
Give A Bay
To The Combined Jewish Appeal
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation is instituting a new
program for the 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal (CJA) in order to
make better use of the time spent
on face to face solicitation.
The program is called. "Give A
Day." Federation volunteers are
being asked to mark off one day
on their calendars to be devoted
entirely to face to face solicita-
tions. Two weeks before the day
which has been selected, the
worker meets with Federation's
campaign staff and reviews their
prospect list and makes appoint-
ments with the people they have
selected to visit.
"The program is designed with
the professional in mind." accor-
ding to Donald Lefton. 1987 CJA
chairman. "Instead of carrying
five or six prospect cards for mon-
ths, this is an opportunity to get
all of one's solicitations completed
in one day." he explained.
Unlike programs, such as
Federation's "Buddy-Up Day"
where campaign solicitations are
made unannounced, everything
will be pre-planned. "The pro-
gram is designed for maximum ef-
ficiency and minimum inconve-
nience," says Federation
associate executive vice president
Elton J. Kerness. "We all miss a
day from work, either for illness,
vacation or personal days and I've
never heard of anyone going out
of business because of it." he said.
If you would like to give a day to
help support the Combined Jewish
Appeal, call Marty Barasch at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, Kerness added.
CRC: Importance Of
Martin Luther King Day
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee (CRC) is actively
encouraging local rabbis, Jewish
educators and community leaders
to recognize the importance of the
second official observance of Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Day on Mon-
day, Jan. 19. The CRC has sent
resource materials on the subject
to provide insight on Martin
Luther King Jr., in particular, and
on black-Jewish relations, in
general.
The pamphlets, distributed in
cooperation with the local chapter
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee are, "The Moral Legacy of
Martin Luther King, Jr.," and
"Black-Jewish Relations in the
United States A selected
Bibliography of Books, Pamphlets
and Articles since 1976."
According to Jeffrey Berkowitz,
chairman of the Community Rela-
tions Committee, "The informa-
tion and its intent go well beyond
marking the birthday of this great
""SJ""" \ y /
KOSHER DINING ^ J I
man. They go to the heart of those
things in which he believed and
those things for which he
ultimately died."
"We feel what made Dr. King
such a compelling national
spokesman for America's civil
rights revolution was his clear
agreement with the principle of
the indivisibility of human rights
the same principle that guides
the field of Jewish community
relations," added Nan Rich, chair-
woman of the Domestic Concerns
Committee of CRC.
Additional copies of the
materials are available in limited
quantities from the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee and from
the American Jewish Committee.
Adath Yeshurun To Host Bonds
Through The Ages
KOSHER^ e^
"STEAKfHOUSE
EARLY BIRD
DINNER
OirwMr IndudM jIAl For
FiMCoutm
Special Menu
4 M 5:30 P M
CATERING FACILITIES SO to 200
TRADITIONAL FRIDAY
MIGHT DINNER
Including a
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will pay tribute to 19
members of the Adath Yeshurun
Congregation, who represent the
past, present and future sup-
porters of Israel, during a special
Bond Through The Ages Brunch
on Sunday, Feb. 1. at the Temple.
The Brunch will begin at 10:30
a.m. in the temple's social hall,
North Miami Beach.
The Honorees consist of
members from the congregation
of various ages, from young
children to adults. Recognized at
the Brunch will be youngsters Jac-
queline Salk, Jason Glaser, Ivan
and Deborah Halberstein, and
Yiddish Branch 697
Workmens Circle
Yiddish Branch 697,
Workmen's Circle will stage a
gala concert on Sunday, Jan. 25 at
1 p.m. at the Seville Hotel on
Miami Beach.
Guest entertainers include
Jaime Bronsztein Klezmer Band
in Jewish soul music, and featur-
ing Canadian singer Bracha
Shlien, in a special program of
Yiddish songs.
A full-course dinner will be serv-
ed. Reservations are in charge of
M. Lubelski and C. Infeld.
Hatikvah Hadassah
Hatikvah Hadassah will be hav-
ing their life member dinner on
Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m. at the home of
Adele Bernstein. All life members
will be honored.
Mark and Jaime Halberstein. The
adults, who will be honored, in-
clude Herbert and Miriam Blank,
Michael and Marcella Cohen, Leo
and Anna Helman, Hy and Faye
Rubin, Joshua and Rebecca
Steiner, Howard and Carol
Ullman, and Lee Feldman.
Appearing at the Brunch as
guest speaker will be veteran
newsman and film-maker, Robert
Mayer Evans, who has lived and
worked in several dozen countries
spread over five continents. He is
a former CBS News Foreign Cor-
respondent, CBS News Bureau
Chief in Moscow, and has worked
on both sides of the Iron Curtain.
He has also traveled as a jour-
nalist in Egypt and oil-producing
countries around the Persian Guff
and to Israel, Egypt and Lebanon,
covering wars, as well as peace
negotiations.
Acting as General Chairman is
Dr. Joseph Singer, with Lois
Danis and Fran Band serving as
Brunch Chairmen.
Erevan refusenik Dr. Vili PalanJcer (right) and his son Bvgm
(Naehman) belatedly celebrate the Sukkot "holiday in the forest,
holding an etrog and lulav which made their way into the USSR
in a photo just obtained by the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
Evgeny, 90, is under strong threat of a forced Red Army draft,
despite his exemption due to his epilepsy.
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FREE. EASY PARKING


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Three Rabbis To Trialogue At Beth David
Florida House of Representatives Majority Leader Ron Silver
left and Deputy Majority Leader Elaine Bloom, are visited in the
House Majority Office by Johnny Wayne, Miami Beach Housing
Authority official, and Commissioner Sidney Weisburd, during
the inaugural celebration of Governor Bob Martinez and the
Cabinet members of the State.
Walk For Freedom To
Be Held At FIU Feb. 1
A Walk For Freedom Festival
will be held Feb. 1 at Florida In-
ternational University's Bay Vista
Campus in North Miami to raise
funds and bring awareness to the
plight of oppressed Jews in the
Soviet Union.
The six-kilometer walk will be
followed by a concert by Israeli
rock star David Broza. The
festival also includes arts and
crafts, Israeli foods and con-
tinuous entertainment.
At 11 a.m., before the 11:30
walk. Rick Wolfish will speak on
the "Problems Facing Jews in the
AZF Elect Three
Local Community
Leaders
Three Greater Miami Jewish
community leaders have been
elected to two-year terms on the
national board of directors of the
American Zionist Federation.
With more than a million dues-
paying members, the AZF is the
umbrella agency of all Zionist
organizations in the United
States.
Elected at the ninth biennial
convention of the American
Zionist Federation, were former
State Rep. Barry Kutun, Harriet
Green and Gerald Schwartz.
Schwartz also was elected na-
tional vice president of the AZF.
The Zionist Assembly made
plans for the 31st Zionist Con-
gress, which will be held in
Jerusalem in December, 1987,
with elections of American
delegates scheduled this June. On-
ly those individuals belonging to
Zionist organizations as of Feb. 1,
will be eligible to vote, Schwartz
said.
The AZF of South Florida has
offices at Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach.
Sisterhood
Luncheon
Annual Mid-Winter Luncheon
of the Temple Emanu-El
Sisterhood will feature an in-
depth book review of "When All
You've Ever Wanted Isn't
Enough" by Dr. Irving Lehrman,
rbbi of the Miami Beach
congregation.
The 11:30 a.m. event Wednes-
day, in the Friedland Ballroom of
Temple Emanu-El, is open to the
Public. Mrs. Hal Kaye was named
^airman of the day by Martha
Mishcon, president of the Temple
tmanu-EI Sisterhood.
Soviet Union."
At 1 p.m., the festival begins
with the Hillel Community Day
School Choir, followed by the
Lehrman Day School Choir,
Niguila Dancers, Shajar in Con-
cert and an award and prize
ceremony. The Broza concert will
be at 3 p.m.
The FIU Student Government
Association is sponsoring the
event as part of their annual
"Jewish Awareness Celebration.
Over 2,000 participants are ex-
pected, according to festival chair-
man Norman Richman.
Other events being produced by
the Jewish Awareness Celebra-
tion Committee include an art ex-
hibition by Rabbi S. Raphaely
through Feb. 1 and a midnight
fashion show Jan. 29.
The Second in a series of "tri-
alogues" between the rabbis of
the community will take place on
Sunday evening, Feb. 15 at 8 p.m.
at Beth David Congregation.
The participants will be Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard of Temple
Beth Am, National President of
the Synagogue Council of
America, Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz of Temple Menorah,
a national leader of Israel Bonds
and Rabbi Sol Schiff, Executive
Director of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association and Na-
tional President of the Associa-
tion of Executive Directors of
Boards of Rabbis.
The three will exchange views
on the topic of "Where does
American Jewry Stand Now and
Which Direction Should We be
Going?" The program is under the
auspices of the Adult Education
Committee of Beth David Con-
gregation which is chaired by
Judy Portnoy and Enid Pliner.
In announcing this program,
Rabbi Jack Riemer, the siritual
leader of Beth David, explained
"that we live in a time when it is
of the greatest importance for all
of us to achieve understanding
across organizational lines that so
often separate us. We are a small
people and we all share the same
fate of not the same faith and so
we cannot afford the luxuries of
divisiveness and bickering and
competition. It is time, and more
than time, for us to come together
to explore the tasks we share in
common and the ways in which we
can work together. This program
is intended to build bridges bet-
ween all the Jewish people in our
community."
Biblical Lecture
Rachel and Leah, will be
described and analyzed by Martha
Aft, educational director of Bet
Breira Congregation, at the public
lecture in the series, "Spiritual
Giants of the Past," Jan. 21, at
10:30 a.m., at the Miami Beach
Public Library.
Rabbi Abramowitz Rabbi Baumgard
Rabbi Schiff
Professor Shaked To Speak At
Florida Friends Of Dropsie
The Florida Friends of Dropsie
Fellowship of the Annenberg
Research Institute will feature
Prof. Haim Shaked at their mon-
thly meeting, Thursday, noon,
Jan. 22 at the Ocean Pavillion
Restaurant, Miami Beach.
Prof. Shaked, visiting professor
of Middle Eastern Studies and
director of the Middle East Pro-
gram at the University of Miami,
will speak on "Israel In The
World's Eyes."
Israeli-bom and educated, he
was awarded a PhD degree by the
School of Oriental and African
Studies at the University of Lon-
don. He has specialized in the field
of modern history and politics of
the Middle East, with special em-
phasis on Islam as a political force
and is the co-founder and
academic editor of what has
become the standard annual
reference work on the Middle
East.
Reservations for the luncheon
may be made by telephoning
Lillian Racow.
Na'Amat USA To Double Its Pledge
Harriet Green of Coral Gables,
national vice president of capital
funds and development for
Na'amat USA, the women's labor
Zionist Organization of America,
has announced that Na'amat has
agreed to double its pledge and
raise money to build two com-
munity centers to commemorate
the David Ben-Gurion centennial.
Delegates to the Na'amat World
Conference in Israel attended the
cornerstone-laying ceremony for
the project in Carmiel; the other
center will be built in Arad in
Southern Israel. Mrs. Green also
announced that Na'amat was set-
ting up a new college scholarship
fund to pay for the full four-year
college tuition of students in
Israel majoring in social work,
child psychology or teaching, in
recognition of the terrible budget
crunch facing higher education in
Israel.
\bu Always Knew Success
Would TasteThis Good.
Fillyuurcuptotherlm
with the lull, rich taste < >i Brim'
I
HISIIKH
IoSh < 1986 Gwal Foods Corpo^jw"


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridiari/Friday. January 10, iwu
Pearl Stahl Is Guest Speaker
At ARMDI Awards Luncheon
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation recently held a joint
meeting of the Jewish Agency for Israel Committee and Federa-
tion's Board of Directors. During the meeting there was a panel
discussion by local rabbis, representing the different branches of
Judaism about "The relationships in Israel between the Reform.
Conservative and Orthodox branches of Judaism with the Jewish
Agency. Guests on the panel included from left. Rabbi Menachem
Raab for the Orthodox branch. Rabbi Haskell Bernat represen-
ting the Reform movement and Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
representing the Conservative view.
Yehoram Gaon In Concert
Actor'singr Yehoram Gaon.
Israel's famous artist, will appear
in concert, for one show only.
Saturday, at the Konover Theatre
in the Konover Hotel.
Four-time winner of Israel's
Grammy Award, three-time win-
ner of the "Harp of David
Award." Israel's answer to the
Boston Rebbe
Guest Here
ROFEH International, the
organisation providing special
health services via Boston's
leading medical centers and physi-
cians, will tender a brunch in
honor of its founder. Grand Rabbi:
Levy Yitxchak Horowitz. Shlita.
the Bostoner Rebbe. hosted by
Professor and Mrs. Jacquin Bier-
man at their home on Miami
Beach. Sunday morning at 11 am.
"ROFEH has helped many
thousands of people in its 30-year
history and has been Lauded for its
activities by the leading medical
authorities of the world." stated
Grand Rabbi Horowitz, a member
of the Presidium of Agudath
Israel of America.
"The Rabbi is renowned for his
successful reachout program to
estranged Jewish youth and most
recent accomplishment to initiate
Project Tikvah which counsels
families of those suffering from
life-threatening diseases, as well
as the patients themselves, and
provides s support system for
them." Mr Barman said.
Dr. Klepfisz To Speak
At YIVO Forum
The YTVO Forum will present
Dr Hessd Klepfisz. speaking on
"Light and Shadow m the Per-
sonality o/ Moses Mendeison." 1
p.m.. Wednesday at Temple Beth
ShoJom The forum is continuing
its 40 years of weekly lectures in
Yiddish.
The yearly YIVO Committee of
Miami banquet will be Sunday.
Feb 15 at noon at the Eden Roc
Hotel.
Lined up for its Jan. 28. 1 p.m..
presentation is Professor Arthur
Lermar. who will speak on
"'Perspectives of American
Jewish Life: How Certain is the
Future of s 'Certain People.' '
STAR LAKES
Lake front.
1 *
Hal and Post Wa* to T
$375 month.
945-7995
Oscar for Best Actor and twice
winner of Israel's Tony Award.
Yehoram is crowned the "King of
Israel's Entertainment World."
Starring in the stage production
of "Kazablan" for 606 perfor-
mances in Israel. Yehoram was
asked to recreate his stage role in
the film version. Other films
followed including "Operation
Thunderbolt (The Entebbe
Raid)."
Critics have called Yehoram:
. the uncontested King of
Song...." "...an Israeli
paradox...," "a unique
phenomenon in Israeli broad-
casting ." and "... an idol with
a heart .
Showtime for Yehoram Gaon In
Concert is 8:30 p.m.
ARMDI National Director, Pearl Stahl, is
visiting the South Florida area to apprise the
Southeast Regional Leaders of the latest in
developments concerning ARMDI, the
American Red Magen David for Israel, and
the organization it supports in Israel, Magen
David Adorn. Israel's Red Cross Society.
Mrs. Stahl, who works closely with the 162
ARMDI Chapters in the United States, will
be the first speaker at the Southeast Regional
ARMDI First Annual Awards Luncheon on
Tuesday at Beth Torah Congregation. Having
visited Israel, keeping abreast of the latest in
developments on the services of Magen David
Adorn, Mrs. Stahl will enlighten the group on
these vital areas.
She also has led seminars on fundraising.
programming, education and organizational
structure with the Chapter Leaders.
Scheduled meetings include a meeting of
Palm Beach Leaders on Jan. 21 at the Golden
Lakes Village Clubhouse. West Palm Beach,
at 2:30 p.m.
North Central Broward Leaders will be
meeting with Mrs. Stahl on Thursday. Jan. 22
at 2:30 p.m. at the Fort Lauderdale JCC.
Mrs. Stahl, who travels throughout the
United States to meet with the Chapters on
public relations and Chapter leadership was
one of the organizing leaders of Women's
American ORT and served as Women's Divi-
sion Chairperson for Israel Bonds in her
community.
Pearl Stahl
Information or for Luncheon reservations
may be had by contacting the Southeast
Regional Office. North Miami Beach.
Cuban Jewish Writers Adult Education Series
As part of the 25th Anniversary
celebration, the Adult Education
Program of Temple Beth Shmuel
will present "A Salute to Cuban-
Jewish Writers." on Tuesday
evening starting at 8:30 p.m. in
the Gimelstein Hall Authors, as
well as people familiar with their
works, will read and discuss their
writing, explaining how their
literature reflects the Jewish ex-
perience in Cuba. Sender Kaplan
will speak on the writings of
Abraham Dubelman at the next
session, followed by Osher
Shuchinski and Kaplan will
discuss the works of Eliezer
Aronowski with readings bj Ron
Lusky on Jan. 27.
Lectures and discussion.- wfD
combine the Yiddish. Spanish, and
English Languages, thus
the Seminars that same unique
flavor that character.z.
Cuban Hebrew community
Bagels and Lox and
Maxwell House Coffee.
It couldn't be
anything but
At last theres time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhumed conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
nch. dekaous Maxwel House* Coffee it
couldn't be anyih.ng but Sunday morning
* fa? t? IB?
K KOSHER
MA>(WELL
GSSSEt
i *
t, >..


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
ARMDI At The Southeast Regional
Lillian Kaye, ARMDI Luncheon
Chairperson, announces that two
outstanding philanthropic couples
were chosen by the organization
to be their honorees for their for-
thcoming Southeast Region Lun-
cheon David and Davida Col-
eman, and Irene and Jack
Kwartner.
The Luncheon, taking place on
Tuesday at noon at Beth Torah
Congregation, will have members
:
Jack and Irene Kwartner
and friends attending from the
Region, encompassing Florida
and Georgia, as well as National
Representatives from New York.
Gottilth Hammer, chairman of
the Florida Region of the
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science,
nil speak on the history of the
State of Israel at two lectures
it Nm>a University on Jan. 21
and 28 sponsored by the
University's Institute for
Retired Persons.
Business Note
The Zoological Society of
t lorida, a private non-profit
organization which serves as the
principal fund-raising and support
group for Metrozoo, has named
Ronald Levitt Associates of Coral
(iables as its public relations
representative.
Levitt Associates will assist
staff in developing a program to
increase public awareness of
Florida's zoological movement
and its role in enhancing the quali-
ty and success of Metrozoo, said
Joseph Ferrer, executive director
of the Zoological Society of
Florida.
FOR RENT
3 bd 2 bth house and
flaraga. Near synagogues.
NE. 175th St. $650.
652-4028,944-1100

Both sets of honorees have
distinguished themselves for their
work for ARMDI, as well as for
the Greater Miami Jewish Com-
munity. David Coleman was
awarded the Israeli Victory Medal
by General Itzak Rabin for con-
tributions as co-chairman of the
Material for Israel Organization.
In this capacity he procured
strategic materials for Israel both
before and during the War of
Liberation. He and his wife
Davida were presented with the
"Keter Shem Tov" Award by the
Jewish National Fund having
established a forest with 100,000
trees in Israel.
The Colemans donated a vital
Underground Shelter and First
Aid Station in Ashkelon, Israel to
Magen David Adorn in memory of
his Mother, Anna Blau Cohen.
Jack and Irene Kwartner
demonstrated their commitment
to Israel and the Jewish people
through a variety of philanthropic
causes. They have been honored
by the Jewish National Fund and
Israel Bonds and have been pillars
of various synagogues in which
they were associated.
When in New York, they were
leaders in the Young Israel of
Avenue K in Brooklyn, and now
they are supporters of Temple
B'nai Zion in Sunny Isles and a
synagogue in Netanya which is
currently under construction.
The Kwartners made possible
six Emergency Vehicles for
Magen David Adorn since 1971,
including one Bloodmobile and
one Mobile Intensive Care Unit,
soon to be dedicated.
Joseph Han die man, National
Chairman and Pearl Stahl, Na-
tional Director will participate at
the function.
Entertainment for the Lun-
David and Davida Coleman
cheon will include an Israeli Fest
featuring Israeli vocalist Dina
Yefet and Israeli comedian Danny
Tadmore. Dancing to Jerry Brock
and his Orchestra.
All proceeds of this event and of
the Journal to be presented will be
donated to the American Red
Magen David For Israel, the sole
support wing of Magen David
Adorn, Israel's Red Cross Society,
its national emergency, medical,
blood, ambulance and disaster
service.
The same family?
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fe;3*23ferJiyyS6


Page6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
Former Denver Home Of Golda Men-
May Face Demolition This Month
DENVER (JTA) The City of Denver
may succeed in doing what the combined
Arab armies never could destroying Golda
Meir's home. The Denver Building Depart-
ment board of appeals was set to vote Thurs-
day whether to order the demolition of the
Golda Meir House, the home of the late Israeli
premier from 1913-14.
The board decided last month to postpone
its final decision of an appeal by local
residents Mel and Esther Cohen of a demoli-
tion decision reportedly backed by Mayor
Federico Pena.
THEY WERE representing the Golda Meir
Memorial Association. To save the house, the
board ordered the association to demonstrate
by Jan. 15 that it can restore, relocate and
utilize the building, entailing an extensive list
of conditions that could cost up to $150,000.
Meanwhile, the association must provide
additional security for the ramshackle struc-
ture, now stored on girders in the park here.
Building Department inspectors told the
board that the house is dangerous because of
structural weakness that could not practically
be restored due to deterioration.
Paul Hoakins, director of the city's Com-
munity Development Agency, said that the ci-
ty has spent upward of $27,000 and staff time
on utilizing the house over the last six years.
THE ASSOCIATION asked for six months
to begin its efforts to create a memorial to
Meir with the house. It now is seeking fun-
ding from foundations as well as voluntary
labor. A structural engineer it hired said the
building would not immediately collapse and
could be restored.
There was better news regarding the Pearl
Street Temple here, which the City and Coun-
ty of Denver plan to purchase.
Mayor Pena called the building historically
and architecturally important. "It was the
center of the Jewish community for 60
years," said Rabbi Raymond Zwerin.
The city will invest $1 million. The Pearl
Street Temple Emanuel Foundation, the
organization formed in 1983 to prevent the
scheduled razing of the building, must raise
$250,000 to finalize the purchase.
Renovation of systems and addition of han-
dicap access will be funded by a $200,000 city
grant and $350,000 from the foundation,
which hopes to create a community center.
Dick Shawn To Appear Al
New Leadership Dinner-Dance
Comedian Dick Shawn will be
the guest entertainer at the Star-
dust Dinner/Dance on Saturday,
Jan. 24, sponsored by the South
Dade New Leadership Division of
the Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization. The Stardust Din-
ner/Dance will be held at the
Hyatt Regency Hotel, in Miami
and will begin with cocktails at
7:30 p.m. followed by the dinner.
The event is black tie optional.
Also appearing will be the local
Chase Band.
The show he conceived, wrote,
choreographed, staged, directed,
sung and performed, "The Second
Greatest Entertainer in the
Whole Wide World," won both
the Bay Area and the Los Angeles
Drama Critics Award for Outstan-
ding Production.
He has been seen in many films,
including "Love at First Bite,"
"It's a Mad. Mad, Mad, Mad
World" and Mel Brooks' "The
Producers." His television credit.
include numerous appearances
The Tonight Show and ARr
Hail to the Chief. ^'
The South Dade New Leadr.
ship is a division of the Isr^i
Bonds Organization, consisting of
young professional businessmen
and women who help the State of
Israel's economic development
through the promotion of the sale
of Israel Bonds.
Major economic advances which
have been made through the sale
of Israel Bonds have included har
bor expansion; pipeline and ter-
minal construction; development
of telecommunication systems
the national water carrier; the
development of towns and the
high-tech and science based
industries.
Ticket reservations are
available through the Israel Bonds
office.
Israel Bonds To Honor Residents Of Point East
The Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization will honor the
residents of the Point East con-
dominium during a "Salute to
Israel" on Thursday. Jan. 29, in
the building's Rose Samuels
Room. The event will begin at
7:30 p.m. and is open to the public
at no charge.
The residents will be recognized
for their strong commitment to
the Point East and North Miami
Beach communities and for their
support of Israel over the years
through the Israel Bond program.
FPL Cuts
Customer Rates
Florida Power and Light's 2.7
million customers, for the third
year in a row, can expect lower
utility rates for the summer, the
company reported this week. FPL
projects a 1,000 kilowatt-hour
residential bill of 171.31. or $2.20
below last summer and $13.98
below electric charges in 1985.
The documents for the rate
decreases, are currently being
reviewed by the Florida Public
Service Commission and are bas-
ed on lower overall fuel costs. If
approved by the PSC in February,
the reduced charges would be ef-
fective from April 1 through Sept.
30. 1987
Special guest will be Emil
Cohen, American-Jewish folk
humorist.
The event is being sponsored by
the Point East Israel Bond Com-
mittee, with Sol and Eleanor
Osheroff acting as co-
chairpersons for the second year.
Ernest Samuels is the honorary
chairman; Anne Ackerman and
Molly Lovinger are the vice
chairpersons; and Ruth Norton is
the financial secretary.
PRINCIPAL OF
JUDAIC STUDIES
FOR THE SOLOMON SCHECHTER SCHOOL
OF QUEENS
Large prestigious Conservative Jewish Day School
grades K/8. Classroom and administrative experience
essential with emphasis on curriculum development
and faculty supervision. Ability to work well with
children, teachers and parents. Send resume immedi-
ately to: Search Committee
c/o Anne Lupkln, Cc-ChIrman
58-24 211 Street, Bayside, NY 11364
Some Of Us Will
Be Pampered
This Passover.
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I


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
The IDF Recruits
An Arab Virtuoso
Haya's parents have always lived in Jewish
neighborhoods within Jerusalem, and being
the only Arab child at school has often had its
problems. "Inevitably there has been racism,'
she says. "As a small child, I used to get very
upset by the nasty things people said about
Arabs, but there has never been any animosity
aganist me personally."
By SIMON GRIVER
Her long black hair, cap-
Itivating eyes and excep-
tional singing talent attract
both the eye and ear. Yet it
is not so much 18-year-old
Haya Samir's beauty and
[musical ability that have
(won her the hearts of
1 Israelis as her decision to
[volunter for the army, even
[though she is an Arab and a
IMoslem.
Early in 1987, she will undergo
asic training in the Negev and
then join the Entertainment
Torps of the Southern Command
i.- a singer in their musical troupe.
he is eagerly anticipating the day
k-hen she can don the uniform of
IDF. though she concedes that
Ishe would not be so enthusiastic if
[she were being asked to fight
father than sing.
THE DECISION to join the ar-
mj was a difficult one which she
iiscussed carefully with her
parents. "We decided it was my
Juty to join the army," she
stresses. "Israel has given us so
nuch. It is my country, and I feel I
ttwe it to do national service."
Haya claims her debt is much
reater than that of most Israeli
citizens. Her father is Youssef
Samir. an Egyptian journalist
vho received political asylum in
srael in 1968 after strongly
criticizing the late Egyptian
eader (amel Abdul Nasser. To-
day. Youssef Samir works for the
Irabic Department of Israel
ladio and has written several
ooka about the Middle East.
lava's mother is a kindergarten
eacher.
Haya was born in Israel and is
ivowedly Israeli. "I cannot
iinderstand why people want to
'ave Israel," she says. "I love the
Country and the people, whether
ihey be Jews or Arabs, and
Jerusalem will always be my
home."
Haya's parents have always liv-
W in Jewish neighborhoods within
Jerusalem, and being the only
Vrab child at school has often had
Its problems. "Inevitably there
pas been racism," she says. "As a
femall child, I used to get very
apset by the nasty things people
lid about Arabs, but there has
never been any animosity against
ne personally.
HAYA HAS many Arab friends
nd concedes that all of them have
been against her decision to join
Ihe army. But, she stresses, they
're broad-minded enough to
"''rate the step she is taking. "I
tope to use my music as a bridge
M understanding between Jews
*nd Arabs," she says.
Haya describes herself as a
Nversalist, believing all the
religions worship the same God
M values. However, this does
[W mean that her beliefs can be
ent to suit circumstances. "I will
narry the man I love," she
ssrts. "regardless of whether he
is a Jew, Moslem or Christian. But
I will not convert out of conve-
nience. I was born a Moslem, and
that's the religion that will remain
on my identity card."
She also defends the Islamic at-
titude towards women. "I do not
believe that Islam has to sub-
jugate women," she claims. "It is
up to individuals and societies to
interpret the Koran in the way
that they want. It is the same as
Judaism. European and American
Jewish women are much more
liberated than Oriental Jewish
women, yet they are no less Jews.
So it is with Islam. Even in the
Arab world, we see that the posi-
tion of women is far worse in
Saudi Arabia than in Egypt."
She emphasizes that her own
mother enjoys equality with her
father. This spirit clearly shines
through with Haya, who at pre-
sent manages her own career.
Though a member of the Hora
Yerushalayim choir, Haya is very
much an individualist. At every
performance, she sings at least
one solo number in Arabic, which
is always a great hit with the
audiences.
AFTER COMPLETING her ar
my service. Haya intends study-
ing music in London, after which
she hopes to return to Israel to
take up a professional career. She
writes some of her own songs in
both Hebrew and Arabic and is
planning to bring out a solo album
in the near future. She exudes
confidence but not arrogance and
is already in great demand: she is
often asked to meet touring
musical stars like Isaac Stern and
is interviewed regularly by both
the domestic and foreign media.
Haya, however, possesses a
fiery determination not to be ex-
ploited when it is suggested to her
that she might, as an Arab in the
IDF, be used as a propaganda
weapon for Israel. "Nobody is go-
ing to feed me lines. I have my
own opinions about Israel and the
Arabs. I deeply respect Zionism.
The Jews fought with blood for
this land, and they deserve to
keep it. But they must learn to
have more respect for the
Palestinians.
Haya is earnest and naive and
knows she has much to learn. She
is bound for stardom and is level-
headed enough to cope with the
twin pressures of being a star and
being a high profile Arab in a
Jewish state. Haya Samir says
that she is an optimist, but then
she has much to be optimistic
about.
Sm here are participants in the Seminar in Tel Aviv on the
International Finance Corporation as a Framework for Joint
Ventures Left to right: Bank Hapoalim executive Alexander
Yuhitman who is chairman of the Chamber of Commerce of
Israel-Latin America, Spain and Portugal, which co-sponsored
tZ event with the Bank of Israel; Professor Michael Bruno,
GovZZr of the Bank of Israel, and Professor Eitan Berglas,
Chairman of the Board of Bank Hapoalim.
Concert To Benefit Hillel Day School
The Hallandale Jewish Center
will host a Cantorial Concert on
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. to benefit the
Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School Scholarship Fund.
Internationally renowned guest
Cantors Shimon Farkas of
Sydney, Australia, and Benzion
Miller of Brooklyn, will perform.
Opening the program will be the
Hillel Student Choir directed by
Marlena Tuchinsky.
The program was organized by
Hillel Vice President, Irving Kut-
tler. in cooperation with the
Hallandale Jewish Center, Rabbi
Carl Klein, Myer Pritsker and
Concert Committee.
Haya Samir appearing at the Songs of Peace Festival in
Jerusalem, May 1986.
Condo Apt.
1 Br, 1 Bath, 16400 N.E. 17th Ave., No. Miami
Beach 7th Floor Great Location, One Block
from 163rd St. Mall and Public Tran. Excellent
For Elderly People. Great Value, All Furn.
Under *25,000.
944-0970
Cremation.......................From 325
Shipping to Northern .
Funeral Home....................From 395
Jewish Graveside Funeral.........From 865
FLORIDA MORTUARY
DADE BROWARD
325-1171 524-1404
NASSAU GARDENS
163 St. Mall Area
Adult Community
1 bedrooms available.
Call:
1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
1495 NE 167 St.
947-9163
For Sale
15 Passenger 1985 Dodge Van (Like New)
Good for school, condo, medical clinic hospital
or any other purpose. Low mileage. Reason-
able. Can be seen at Hebrew Home for the
Aged, 1800 N.E. 168 St., North Miami Beach
or call 947-3445 and ask for Stuart Siegel.
smok
H ?,?;'''7fcs'&&a!i8*63


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
Happenings
A World of Difference an ADL Initiate is the topic William
F Sauhon will speak about with the Naranja Lakes Chapter of
B'nai B'rith Women at the Clubhouse Wednesday at 1 p.m.
The North Shore Chapter No 645 of B'nai B'rith will meet
Monday at the Surfside Community Center and will feature a
book review A gala luncheon is planned for the Dora! Roof Jan
28 at noon
The Bruce Barnbaum Photographs Exhibition will be featured
ai the Barry Lmversit> Library Gallery through Feb 9 The ex-
hibition is co-sponsored by Photogroup and Barry University. An
opening reception and lecture will be held Friday, in Wiegand
Hall, at 7.30 p m
In conjunction with the exhibition Hollywood Legend and
Realit>. the Center for the Fine Arts will present a lecture/film
series scheduled on Sundays. Jan 18. Feb 1 and Feb 8 at 2 p m
in the Center for the Fine Arts Auditorium Each afternoon will in-
clude a lecture, follow -up comparative film dips and a showing of a
classic film
The Fantasucks. a musical play produced by the Miami
Repertory Theater at Apple City will hold performances Jan 23.
30 and Feb 6 at Snapper Creek Plaza
A luncheon meeting of Tropical Cancer League will be held
noon Friday at the Ocean Pavuuon. Miami Beach Entertainment
will be by international vocalist Ann Parker, provided by Flagler
Federal Bank
Jan 17 and 18 Alan Thicke. joined by a host of other
celebrities will support l-nited Cerebral Palsy in its annual fund-
raising telethon The program will be broadcast live from the
Grand Ballroom of Kings Bay Yacht and Countrv Club on
WPLG-TY Channel 10 Miami's ABC affiliate
I ailing Miami Beach Jewish Community to attend outstanding
cultural forum Sunday, at 10 a m Beth Israel Congregation will
present Rabbi Abraham Chill, author and lecturer from the State
of Israel who will speak on a vital and timely subject The Jewish
Concept of Marriage Social period, coffee and cake
Weizmann Golf Tournament
At Coral Creek CC Jan. 26
The second annual Florida
Region Golf Tournament spon-
sored by the American Committee
for the Weizmann Institute of
Science will be held on Monday.
Jan. 26 at the Coral Creek Coun-
try Club. North Miami Beach.
Entrants will tee off at 9 a.m..
with the field limited to 36 four-
somes. men and women.
Breakfast at 8 a.m.. and buffet
lunch following the Shotgun Golf
Tournament, are included in the
entry fee. Non-players may make
reservations for lunch by sponsor-
ship of tees or gifts to this fund-
raising event.
Prizes will be awarded to the
winners and runners-up of men
and women teams in the Partners
Best Ball Tournament, in addition
to Long Drive and Closest-to-the-
Pin Contests
David Millman. director of the
Institute for Retired Profes-
sionals, and a National Education
Professor at Nova University in
Fort Lauderdaie. is chairman of
the Weizmann Golf Tournament
and a member of the Weizmann
Florida Region Executive
Committee.
A former three-sport athlete at
Sew York University, Mflhnan
also plaved professional football
David Millman
with the Baltimore Colts and
coached at Columbia University.
The Weizmann Institute of
Science today is ranked among
the world's foremost centers
devoted to research and teaching
in the natural sciences. The In-
stitute has made major contribu-
tions in the studies of cancer,
multiple sclerosis, children's
diseases, aging, neurological and
immunological disorders, energy
and industrial research, to name a
few
Jews And Judaism
Pagel-B
Catholic educational strategies is indicative of the maturity and
the strength of the dialogue."
Rabbi Leon Klenjcki. Director of Interfarth Affairs for the
Anti-Defamation League, will address the Miami meetings,
which will involve local Catholic educators and religious leaders.
Father Elias D. Mallon of the Graymoor Ecumenical Institute
will present a paper on "Jews in the Fourth Gospel." which will
serve as the basis for the working groups who will prepare the
lesson plans.
Israeli Consul General Rachamim Timor held
a reception in his Miami apartment for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
merce and Professions Mission. Pictured from
left are Lee Spiegelman. Co-Chairman of the
Commerce and Professions Mission, Shoshana
Timor, Ambassador Rachamim Timor, and
Mel Kartzmer, also a co-chairman of the mis-
sion. The mission will take place Feb. 15 to
Feb 22. The trip will offer first-hand insights
into the business community of Israel along
with tours of historic and tibkcal tites.
Organization \Tcw$
The South Florida Women's Committee
for Shaare Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem will
honor Rosalie (Rocky) Futterman at the
Tenth Annual Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. on
Wednesday. Jan. 28. at Temple Emanu-El.
Miami Beach.
The Miami-Coral Gables-Dade Chapter.
Women's Division American Society for
Technion. will meet for luncheon at the
University of Miami Faculty Club, on Monday
at 11:30 a.m.
A membership Dessert Party and Fashion
Show are the features of the next general
meeting of the Sisterhood of Temple
Zamora. Wednesday, at 1 p.m. at the Temple
in Coral Gables.
"Hasidism Yesterday And Today'' will be
the discussion at the Temple Beth Am
Brotherhood Breakfast Forum on Sunday
$:30 a.m. in the Temple Youth Lounge.
Speaker will be Rabbi Abraham Korf.
regional director of the Florida Lubavitch
community.
The Young Israel Sisterhood of Greater
Miami will have its Annual Membership Tea
on Wednesday. Jan. 28. at 8 p.m. There will
be entertainment by the Magen Miami Duo
and a Sing-a-Long. Refreshments will be
served.
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood will
observe "Sisterhood Sabbath" sponsored by
the National Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism, on Saturday morning, in the
main sanctuary of Temple Ner Tamid. A kid-
dush will follow the services.
The Miami-Coral Gables-Dade Chapter,
Women's Division American Society for
Technion. will meet for luncheon a; the
University of Miami Faculty Club, on Monday
at 11:30 a.m.
Temple lYews
Congregation Bet Breira announces fourth
presentation of the Jewish Film Festival -
"The Dreyfus Affair." with discussion leader
FIU Professor Phil Pomeranz. an Austrian-
born Jew who escaped the Nazis at age 13. on
Sunday. Feb. 1. 7 p.m.
Entertainment.
Arts
Temple Beth Sholom will co-sponsor the
1987 season of the American Ballet Theater
at the Miami Beach Theater of the Perform-
ing Arts.
Two Miami premieres will highlight the
gala benefit performance 8 p.m., Jan 27 with
Paquita Murder and Pas de Deux Violin Con-
certo. Performances will also be held Jan.
28-31.
The drawings and prints of Richard Danes,
featuring Miami Beach Art Deco buildings
will be on display starting Friday through
Feb. 2 at the Barbara Gillman Gallery in
Miami. An opening reception to meet the ar-
tist will be Friday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. at
the celebration of Art Deco Weekend with the
Miami Design Preservation League.
Shown here are four leaders of American
Jewry at a National Conference Dialogue on
the Jewish future sponsored by American
Jewish Heritage Committee, who recently af-
firmed Jewish pluralism and unity, as sym-
bolized by the different branches of the
Chanukah menoraA At the Dialogue
AJHentage Committee President Rabbi
WiZJiam Berkowitz announced that the
organisation would undertake a year-long
program to strengthen Jewish unity nation-
wide. The leaden are: Rabbi Alfred Gf-
schalk. President, Hebrew Union LoW
(Reform); Rabbi William Berkowitz. Nat**
President, American Jewish Heritage Com-
mittee; Rabbi Wolfe Kelman. Ezecutu* HJ
President. Rabbinical Assembly 1 Conser-
vative); and Rabbi Emanuel Rackma*.
Chanesllor. Bar /km University (OrthodaP-
mmmmm


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Na'Amat Chapter To
Honor Rose Kamlet
e Kamlet of Miami Beach
|bt> honored for her dedication
1 humanitarianism at the An-
\ward Luncheon of the Beba
on Chapter of Na'amat USA
held Sunday, at noon at the
.1 Roc Hotel.
U Kamlet is a life member of
Organization and is a life-long
list. She belongs to numerous
r organizations which support
State of Israel.
Let speaker will be Harriet
En. national vice president of
tmat and a national board
hl>er of the American Zionist
Oration. She has just returned
Israel as a delegate to the
tmat World Conference where
helped lay the cornerstone for
new community center in the
of Carmiel. a project sup-
ed by Na'amat USA. Her
will "be "Na'amat Always
le Forefront."
j-ah Fershko, internationally
kwned singer will render a
repertoire of Hebrew, English
and Yiddish songs. She will be ac-
companied by pianist Esther
Baret.
Irene Raczkowski, president, is
in charge of reservations.
Entertainment and a gourmet
luncheon in honor of the 61st an-
niversary of Na'amat is on tap
Sunday, at 1 p.m. for the Chai
Chapter of Na'amat. The event
will be held at president Eva
Kaufman's home.
Games and cards will follow the
regular monthly meeting of the Hi
Rise Tikvah Chapter of Na'amat
when they meet Monday, at noon
in the Club Room of Forte
Towers.
Sally Gersten, acting president,
said a mini lunch will be served
and members and prospects in the
West Avenue area are asked to
attend.
Evelyn Sommer To Lead
imbership Drive In Fla. For WIZO
Evelyn Sommer WIZO's
1 president, will lead the open-
[f the 1987 Membership Drive
[paign in Florida. Mrs. Som-
[w;ll l>e guest speaker in dif-
\\ activities programmed by
i Florida chapters from Jan.
She will be present at
|ter activities of WIZO Miami,
f-Yonit and Yahalom's open-
day of the 1987 Membership
e Ohrly's at the Lowe Art
turn. Aviv-Ilanit at Grove
ami the opening of a new
Lter in Hollywood.
JIZO Florida has three pro-
in Israel: a youth club in
jit Gan (Miami Beach Com-
Kty Center), a day care center
Ichon -Le-Zion and a center for
I in distress in Holon.
Mrs. Evelyn Sommer
jelyn Sommer, founding
Ident of WIZO USA. is the
Tesentative of WIZO at
ISOC and Vice-Chairman of Corporation.
the non-governmental Organiza-
tions Committee on UNICEF. She
has recently been elected as
Member of the Executive on the
World Jewish Congress,
American Section and is an Ex-
ecutive on the Jewish Organiza-
tions Caucus at the United Na-
tions, Director of Ampal,
American-Israel Investment
Adath Yeshurun Continues
Adult Education Seminar
lath Yeshurun continues
It Education Seminars star-
| Monday morning, and Tues-
kveiung.
schedule on Monday morn-
|Jan. 19 Mar. 2 presents The
ih: Our Way of Life by Rabbi
ha Freedman; Pirke Avot
cs from Sinai by Roz Seidel,
Exploring Current Literature
rlene Ditchek.
iesday evenings, Jan. 20-Mar.
kenta Judaism, Sexuality and
Medical Ethics by Rabbi Dr.
Grant; The Jewish Home
Beautiful by Mrs. Yetta Herman;
The Siddur by Cantor Ian Alpern;
Rashi on the Sedra by Rabbi
Freedman; The Prophets by Rabbi
Dr. J. Unterman; Witness to the
Holocaust by Rabbi Freedman;
The Musical Cantillation: Trop
and Niggun by Cantor Alpern,
and Bnot Mitzva Class by Mrs
Yetta Herman and Rabbi
Freedman.
daica Exhibit At Antiques Show
extensive collection of
Mca, including rare antiques
Icontemporary items is one of
featured exhibits at this year's
ni National Antiques Show
pale which runs Jan. 23-26 at
iliami Expo Center.
Judaica collection is
presented by Arthur Feldman,
Judaica dealer and former direc-
tor of Chicago's Museum of
Judaica. Feldman's 12 years at
Spertus was preceded by curator
positions at The Renwick Gallery
and London's Victoria and Albert
Museum.
'Recent Glassworks' By David Goldhagen.
Glassworks, Oils On View At
Temple Beth Sholom
PERSONALS
HARMING, ATTRACTIVE,
feet-tempered gentle-
fn. 65 + with fine cul-
fal values, and very fine
location, would like to
ft gentlewoman with
r>e features and nobility
I heart and mind. Write
[* SR, Jewish Floridian,
7- Box 012973, Miami,
'33101.
'PENINGS SINGLES is
having an Outstanding
Singles Party on Friday,
January 23, 1987 at 9:00
P.M., at the Diplomat Coun-
try Club, 501 Diplomat
Parkway, Hallandale,
Florida. There will be
Dancing, Live Band, Con-
tinuous Hors D'oeuvres,
Gift Drawings and Sur-
prises. Admission is $6.00.
For more information call
Sharon Silver 385-1255.
Florals in glass and impres-
sionistic views of the Mideast are
explored in this month's gallery
offerings at Temple Beth Sholom.
"Recent Glassworks" by David
Goldhagen and oil paintings by
Ahuva Sherman depicting "Israel:
From My Private Eye" will be on
view at the Lowe-Levinson Art
Gallery of Temple Beth Sholom
through Feb. 10.
Miami native David Goldhagen
crafts his myriad glassworks, in-
cluding color-streaked vessels,
platters and perfume bottles from
his studio in scenic Hayesville,
North Carolina.
Goldhagen traces his recent
obsession to a Florida boyhood
surrounded by crocus, hibiscus
and orchids. What triggered the
desire to capture the florals in his
work was a postcard "with a
wonderful orchid" sent by a
girlfriend.
A graduate of Coral Gables
High School, Goldhagen
discovered the school's emerging
program in glass midway through
his studies at Tulane University,
rekindling a long-time interest in
crafts.
Israel-born Ahuva Sherman
produces her oil paintings,
pastels, tapestries and mixed
media from a studio located on
Mount Carmel in Haifa.
Stylistically, her painted works
constitute a fusion between
realism and imaginary composi-
tions, influenced by the Mediter-
ranean in their color and bold
approach.
"The motifs and colors of my
work are inspired by my roots in
the spirit and soil of Israel. They
have a special effect which com-
bines the present with the hidden
layers of the past," the artist
explains.
In recent years she has
discovered the technique of hand-
tuffeted wall tapestries. The
tapestries are designed and
created by Ahuva Sherman, while
the technical execution is carried
out by artisans under her
supervision.
She is a member of the Painters
and Sculptors Association in
Israel. In 1986 the Society of
Layerists in Multi-Media (SLMM)
invited her to become the first
non-American to become a
member. She has been awarded
the Herman Shtruck Award for
Art.
Belle Faber, a fund-raising and
marketing specialist, has been
named director of development
for the American Jewish Con-
gress, announces Henry
Siegman, executive director of
the organization.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. January 16, 1987
Beth Am Observes Martin Luther
King Day With Special Programs
John Due, for many years one of
Dade County's leaders in the Na-
tional Association of Colored Peo-
ple, and Community Relations
Board official, will speak at Tem-
ple Beth Am on both Saturday
and Sunday mornings, in connec-
tion with Martin Luther King
Day. Due will address the
Religious School of Beth Am on
the topic. "What Martin Luther
King Means To Black People?"
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard.
Senior Rabbi of Beth Am, in
South Dade. will follow Due's
remarks speaking on the topic.
"What Martin Luther King Means
To White People And To Jews."
Rabbi Baumgard is a past Chair-
man of the Community Relations
Board and has been for many
vears a Life Member of the
NAACP.
At the congregation's Friday
evening service of Jan. 16, special
reference to Martin Luther King
will be made at the memorial por-
tion of the service. The Beth Am
Day School will be closed on Jan.
19. as will the Temple Office in
honor of King's memory.
Community Corner
"Woman to Woman: Prevention and Coping With
Breast Diseases" will be presented by Miami Heart In-
stitute's Education Department on Jan. 22. from
1:30-2:30 p.m. It will be held in the Education Center at
the Institute on Miami Beach.
The Dialysis Unit at St. Francis Hospital on Miami
Beach has recently acquired 10 new dialysis machines
belonging to a new method of dialytic technology.
The next meeting of Mount Sinai Medical Center's
Alzheimer's Disease support group is Jan. 28, at 1 p.m.
in the hospital's Chernin Auditorium.
Ambassador Philip Habib. ap-
pointed this month by Presi-
dent Reagan as special envoy to
Latin America, will be the
guest speaker Tuesday. Jan. g?
at the second event of Temple
Emanu-Els 1986-87 "Cultural
Series.
Israel Concerned Over
SLA Casualties
h
Gerald Lewis, State of Florida Comptroller,
has been selected by the State of Israel Bonds to
be honored at a Statewide Israel Bond Bank-
ing Dinner on March 1 at the Holiday Inn,
Plantation. For his leadership in behalf of the
community and the State of Israel, Lewis will
be presented with the prestigious Israel Bonds
City of Peace Medal. Pictured as Gerald LJJ
is congratulated, are from left Alan
and Joel Reinstein, Co-Chairmen. fid
Baskin, National Chairman of the StaU j
Israel Bonds Public Employees Fund
gram, Gerald Lewis and Chairman fill
Robert Uchin.
Artist's rendering of the Sew Beit HaShoah
Museum of Tolerance of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center in Los Angeles. Groundbreaking
ceremonies were held Sunday. Dec. T before an
audience of some UOO guests. The U million.
150.000 So. Ft. complex will house a museum,
library and research facility, auditorium
theatre and memorial garden. Design*
Karl Katz of Sew York. James Gardner \
London and Herb Rosenthal of Lot Al
will document the origins of hatred and |
judice. the rise of anti-Semitism and
history of the Sazi Holocaust. Opening
scheduled for 1989.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israeli officials are worried over
the mounting casualties suffered
by the Israel-backed South
Lebanon Army (SLA) in recent
days. Four SLA sokhers were kill-
ed in a roadside bomb ambush in
the south Lebanon security rone
last week on Monday, and a fifth
died of his wounds Tuesday
Six SLA soldiers were kilied
and two were wounded the
previous Friday when their posi-
tions at Barashit village were
overrun by forces of the pro-
Iranian Shihe extremist group
Hexbuilah. More than 100 SLA
soldiers have bees killed and 100
wounded in the security zone
nee May. 1965
Prerr.-.er Yitzhak Shamir has
promised that Israel would assist
the SLA in its present difficulties
He said on a television interview
that the SLA commanders were
officers who underv
ts not to aban-
don the local puhux>n to ter-
rorists- According to Shamir, the
at the SLA in no
Foreign news reports said the
Israel Air Force staged a second
helicopter attack on Hezbullah
strongholds in south Lebanon last
Monday, following a helicopter at-
tack Sunday. A military
spokesman denied the second
attack.
Meanwhile. Minister-Without-
Portfolk) Moshe Arens accused
Christian forces in Lebanon of col-
laborating with the Palestine
Liberation Organization to permit
PLO fighters to reinfiltrate
Lebanon. He told reporters that
the Christian Phalangists. once an
ally of Israel, would suffer most if
they continued to support
terrorists-
A spokesman for the Christian
militia denied Arens' charge. But
riki dwMi mm hmwi kg
other Israeli officials in recent
days. The Israel Navy has halted
two Cypnot car ferries on the
nigh seas on the suspicion they
were carrying armed PLO ter-
rorists to Lebanon. The ferries pry
between Larnaca and the
Christian-controlled Lebanese
of Jumeh^oorth af Beirut

-S'C*-i
1
r>?7
r
Mayor Teddy Kollek i rightt presents Elie
Wiesel with a medal in honor of his winino the
Sobel Peace Prize in a cer.
Jerusalem's Ramada Renaissance Hotti

MHHl

HIHMI
M



' '

Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
B'nai Mttzvah
DAVID GOLDFARB
rid Lee Goldfarb son of Mrs.
, Goldfarb, grandson of Rab-
i Mrs. Maxwell Berger will
lied to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
bn Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at
le Emanu-El. He attends
inan Day School Junior High
i in the eighth grade. He is on
bbi's Honor Roll each mark-
riod. He is editor of the
9k; treasurer of the student
He plays the clarinet and
l,s"all sports. He is an all
pd fine young man, and is lik-
his peers.
Mrs. Karen Goldfarb will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion and a lun-
cheon reception will be held on
Saturday at Temple Emanu-El.
Special Guests will include: Rab-
bi and Mrs. Goldfarb, Grand-
parents of Miami, Timmi
Goidfarb, Great-grandmother of
Fort Lauderdale, Levenson fami-
ly, aunt, uncle, and cousins of Pitt-
sburgh, Anthone family, Aunt, un-
cle, and cousins of Bufalo, N.Y.
Cappe Family Aunt, Uncle,
Cousins of Toronto, Canada, Mr.
\ Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon
Ihraim's head, who was the younger, and his left hand upon
inasseh's head"
(Genesis U8.1U)
VAYEHI
IYEHI Jacob lived in Egypt 17 years. On his death bed, he
ssed his sons, predicting the destiny of the tribes that were to
icend from each of them. Ephraim and Manasseh, Joseph's two
:. were included in the roster of Jacob's sons, the heads of
rv tribes. Jacob died; the Egyptian physicians embalmed his
|v. after the custom of the country. Jacob was buried in the
I of Canaan, in the Cave of Machpelah, together with his
estors. Joseph continued to provide for his brothers after their
hers death. Before his own death, Joseph made his brothers
ear that when they returned to Canaan they would take his
Of- with them to the Promised Land, Joseph died; meanwhile,
| embalmed body was placed in a coffin, awaiting the return to
naan.
i recounting of the Weakly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
mr $15. published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
riouting the volume.)
[ount Sinai Medical Center At
'orefront Of Technology With
^evolutionary New CT Scanner
lint Sinai Medical Center is
f nine sites nationwide to ac-
revolutionary high-speed
anner that can clearly image
eart, despite the organ's mo-
This new state-of-the-art
ostic tool will enable physi-
to evaluate specific struc-
and functions of the heart.
ine CT, as it is known, is the
krred non-invasive method for
pruning the adequacy of
Bs grafts while quantifying
Son of the left and right ven-
I," said Dr. Philip Samet,
It Sinai's Chief of Car-
J. "It also evaluates the
:>r blood clots and tumors,
es the heart muscle, and
ns for congenital heart pro-
i in adults." When applied to
eart, the Cine CT will expand
physicians' diagnostic
'litiea before invasive
es become necessary.
high-speed Cine CT
faintly improves the resolu-
* the image, despite cardiac
5n. The system uses x-ray im-
enhanced by a computer
to price clear two-
isional pictures of the heart.
CT provides multiple ex-
es of eight levels of the heart
than one second. With this
a scanning sequence can
erformed within a single
eat, enabling physicians to
cardiac contraction,
ine CT it a major
hrough in the field of
1c imaging." said Dr.
I Viamonte, Jr., Director of
ft Sinai's Radiologic Ser-
lt is also extremely useful
e-dimensional studies of the
1 ana joints."
tt Sinai has the irst ha-Jt-
jaon Cine CT that is u^aajjae-
"ted to high-quality cardbc
[^ Because of its unusual
ction, it can produce im-
ages in a unique motion picture
form which gives a totally dif-
ferent perspective than a static
picture. It can, however, also be
used for static imaging, as any
other conventional CT machine.
Cine CT is performed as an out-
patient procedure that lasts ap-
proximately 30 to 45 minutes. The
patient is given an intravenous in-
jection of contrast medium, a
special substance that is visible by
x-ray. As the substance circulates
through the heart and blood
vessels, it is detected by the x-ray
outlining the inside of these struc
tures. Immediately following tht
procedure, the patient may returr
to work or home.
At the helm of Mount Sinai's
Cine CT program is Dr. Frank J.
Hildner, Division of Cardiology,
and Dr. William M. Smoak, III,
Division of Diagnostic Imaging.
Veteran Zionist leader
Menachem Jaeotnhas been
recently appointed\<"*9
treasurer of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
David Goldfarb
and Mrs. Resnick, aunt and uncle
of Los Angeles, The Berger's,
aunt and uncles of Toronto, Las
Vegas, Nevada, Mr. and Mrs. Ted
Hurwitz, and cousins of Montreal.
ALLISON RUTTER
Allison Sue Rutter, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. David Rutter will be
called to the Torah as Bat Mitzvah
on Friday evening at 8 p.m. at
Adath Yeshurun.
Allison is a student in the Hai
Class at Adath Yeshurun. She at-
tends Highland Oaks Junior High
School where she is in the 7th
grade.
She is on the honor roll and is in
the gifted program at Highland
Oaks Junior High School, and is
on the honor roll in the Hebrew
School.
Mr. and Mrs. David Rutter will
host the Oneg Shabbat in honor of
the occasion.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Bernard Dubow of Mon-
treal, Canada, Dr. Harry Dubow
of Dallas, Texas and Senator and
Mrs. Sherman Wynn of Miami.
BENJAMIN BIERSTEIN
Benjamin Samuel Bierstein, son
of Iris and Leonard Bierstein will
be called to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday at 8:30 a.m. at
Temple Adath Yeshurun.
The celebrant is a student in the
Hai Class of the Religious School
of Adath Yeshurun and has
always been an A student.
He is not very active but he does
attend the Jr. Congregation Ser-
vices. He attends John F. Ken-
nedy Jr. High and is in the 7th
grade. He is in all the Honors
classes.
At 6th grade promotion, he was
awaraded 10 different awards for
service, scholastics and physical
education. He was also awarded
the Chamber of Commerce Award
for "Best all-around male stu-
dent." Benjamin also belongs to
the North Miami Beach Optimists
Club where he plays football and
soccer.
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Bierstein
will host the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the
occasion.
There will also be a Russian
Twinning Mikhail Mulaev from
Uzbek, USSR will be Bar-
Mitzvahed simultaneously "in
absence" with Benjamin. Inciden-
tally our Russian twin Mikhail has
a sister named Malika as does
Benjamin.
Special Guests will include:
Grandmother, Nancy Rosenfeld of
North Miami Beach, Grand-
parents Morris and Estelle Siegel
of New Jersey and Freeport,
Bahamas, Aunt Susan Dawdy of
New Lebanon, New York; Great
Aunt Eleanor of New Jersey;
great aunt Molly and Uncle Phil
Weinstein of Whitestone, New
York; great aunt Shirley, Long
Island, N.Y. cousin Marilyn
Sutton, New Jersey, cousins, Mur-
ray and Holly Wenstein, Orlando,
Florida, Friend Bub Berkowitz -
San Francisco, Calif. Many other
guests and friends and relatives
from Miami and Broward area.
Benjamin's brother is Malachi
and his sisters are Malika and
Chandra.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelight.ng Time:
5:34 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONQREQATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. S31 -2120
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg
Dally 7:201.111. Afternoon 5:30 p.m.
Sat.g*.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Bench
534 7213 534 7214 _
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi fjy
Moan* Buryn. Cantor JJV
Sergio Grobler. President
Shclem Epelbaum. President
Religious Committee
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Garden. Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conaervatlve
)
Fit. t p.m. Bat Mitzvah Alllaon Sue Rutter.
Sal. 9:30 a m Bar Mitzvah Ban|amln
Blsrstsln Russian twinning Mikhail Mulaev.
Uftrtyn: Joseph Cohen.
MHnyan 7:30 a.m. 5:15 p.m.
Sat. Sun. lam. 4 5:15 p.m.
Ftt.tpjn.
TEMPLE BETH AM
SBS0 N. Kendall Dr.
S Miami 887-8887
Or Hertoort Baumgard
JSHIKK Mi DO!
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Fit. US p.m. Rebel Schoolman artU speak on
"Making It Big or Hejajr. Ivan Boaaky.
Dennis Levtne end The Rest"
Sal 11 15 a.m. Bar Mitzvah Dean Warhalt
Bat Mltweh Anne Marcus Sermon: "The
Blessings ot OrandcMldren."
TEMPLE EMANU-EL ^.
1701 Washington Avenue 'KM
Miami Beach v?S/
Or Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shitman. Canto*
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
LataFrl.avaaor.ip.m.
Rabbi MsjwsM Beret will presoh on "gtrtka
Tha'A' Cantor Shltman will chant
Sal Sam. Dr Irving Lehman will preach
on the weekly portion ot the brble
Bar Mitzvah DavW Laa QoKMartj
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetrae Drive. Miami Beach
532-8421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon SchrH
TEMPLE ISRAEL
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
2825 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Fri 8:30 p.m. K.II.h Weekend Shabbat
Dmnar presented by the Sisterhood Bar. pus
Quasi apeeker Dr. Abe Qlttetoon ot CAJfc
Sat Ser. t a.m. Mnohah 5:35 p.m. Sat.
Dally ssrv.: Sun. 1a.m. A 5:30 p.m.
Mon. A Thuis. 7:10 a.m. A 5:30 p.m.
Tuss.. Wed.. A Fit. 7:14 s.m. A :S0 p.m
Sst s.m. A '', hr. bslors aunsst.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Kriesei
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
m
SSB-6334
Sabbath Sarvlcaa A:46 a.m.
Sat. S p.m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
8015508 Coneervatlve
Or. Israel Jecobs, Rabbi _
Dr Joseph A. Gortlnkel. ftt\
Rabbi Emeritus *%'
Moshe Frtedler, Cantor
Fit. p.m.
Sat. :45 a.m.
Family Shabbat Service.
Of Greater Miam
Mrami'i Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frtlp-m.
Downtown: Rabbi Rax 0 Perimeter In Empty
Fullness of Days, liturgy: Cantonal Soloist
Harve Kautman. KendaM: Service at Camp
Owetass Bauer, 17001 8W 8M St, Homee*eed.
TEMPLE JUOCA
5500 Granada Brvd
Coral Qablea 887 5*57
Michael B. Eleenetet, Rabbi
Fit. Brt8aaV Aeettlrmatton asnioe.
Sal 11:15 am
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rosa
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Sarvlcaa Fit. 7:30 p.m
Sat. 9.30 s.m.
Onsg Shabbat will follow.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkis. Assoc Rabbi (
Cantor Murray Yavneh %
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath service.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
8 s.m. and 5 p m
Sst. 9 s.m. and 5:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S4S Jettaraon Ave.. MB, FL 331!
Te4. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr Johuda Melbow
Canter Nlaaim Benyamim
Dallyaarvtcaaaa.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat H 5 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7800 S.W. 120th Street
238-2801 /.
RabM David H. Auertoach \ W),
Cantor Stephen Freedman "^
Fri.ApJtt-FsaMrySsr. Day School Orsds 2
will participate, let ear. 9:30 a.m. Women's
League Shabbat
TEMPLE BEtHsh6lOM 538 .W
Chase Ave .8 4 let St.
o leon KRONiBM. Eeeejtaya
OARV A. QLICKSTllN. RabM
marry JOLT, AeaBlory Reel
PAUL 0. C APIAN, AlShWSRt
CANTOR DAVID CONVISCR
Fit. S: 1S p.m. RsbM ullckatewi will speek en
tsreel: The and ot the b lebinbiB." Bat Hetl
am eer.Bun.' 10a.m.ausetapeeker
r.tifflllAft,
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or Max A Lipschitz Rabbt
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave ,
Miami Boach 33141
RabM Eugene LabovNi a-,
Cenlor Edwerd Klein | (Mb j 1
Dally Services t s.m. and )<''
5:30 p.m.
Sat 9:45 s.m. Fit lets service 9 p.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beech
851 1582
Yaafcov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0898
Rabbi Hershel Becker Maaare onnodea
Sat 9:30 a.m. asrvtcs at
TampU Samu-EI
93SlSW1S2A*s..
S. ot N. Kendall Dr.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dede's Reform Corvgregatto
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbt 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Fit p-m. Re. trvwi fBtssan, Jr, ajBj be
guMl apaakar Trvama: Martk. Luthar Kmg:
19 yaara later."
Sat Sabbath aa.
Bet Mitzvah Sandra Daren.
Dsay Senrtcea: Mon. Fri. 7:10 OJ.
A 5:30 pm
SatAWam A 9:15 p.m.
Ben. S a.m. A t p.m.
Lets servtoe Fri. I p.m.
:N
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 ^-,
Dr Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi 'St)
Benjamin Adter, Cantor 3&
David Roaenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
ninyan 7 a.m. Monday A Thursdey.
Sunday S.m.. Fri 1:15pm
Bel. 9 s.m. laMsBt Service
Tettter Chepel


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy is greeted by
children at Yad Kennedy, the John F. Ken-
nedy memorial near Jerusalem. Left is his
sister, Jean Smith, who accompanied him on
his four-day visit to Israel.
Sv Syrns (right), the clothing retailer whose
chain of apparel stores is located in the Nor-
theastern and Middle Atlantic Regions and in
Florida, meets Paul A. Voleker (second from
left), chairman of the Board of the Federal
Reserve System, at Yeshiva University's na-
tional Centennial Chanukah dinner and con-
vocation in New York. Syms, chairman of the
board and chief executive officer of the Syms
Corporation, presented the University with a
major gift that help to establish the Sy Syms
School of Business. Announcement of the new
school was made at the Dinner before some
1,500 guests by Dr. Norman Lamm (second
from right), now marking his 10th year as
president. Voleker delivered the address
preceding the dinner. Herbert Temer (left)
chairman of the University's Board of
Trustees, participated in a special tribute to
Dr. Lamm.


The Fa irways of Emerald Hills was "on the air ree
announce their grand opening,Jeaturing a livt brooSJI
from the community hosted by Ron Harrison, snorts A~
tor for WINZ-AMW NEWS). In between his ret......
The Fairways' exceptional country clul, lifestyl
elaborate residences. Harrison (front seat ^ ,fi
"golf cart tour" of the community, led by Sales D
Paul Stern (right). Located in Hollywood '
Emerald Hills community. The Fairways' attractive con]
dominiums offer splendid golf course or garden iievt\
Lengthy corner terraces enhance each resideiwe. along w\A\
new General Electric kitchen appliances and *tul\&\
bathroom vanities. Buyers have the opportunity to join f/J
Emerald Hills Country Club, and to enjoy The Fairuxm'
own recreational and social facilities. For more informa-
tion about The Fairways at Emerald Hills, call 98.i^sso
Investiture Of Judge Gelber
Dade Circuit Court Judge
Seymour Gelber will swear in his
nephew, newly-elected Dade
County Court Judge Roy T.
Gelber, at investiture ceremonies
for the jurist Friday, Jan. 23 at
12:15 p.m. at the Dade County
Courthouse.
Speakers at the investiture, at
which Chief Judge Gerald T.
Wetherington will preside, will in-
clude Judge Seymour Gelber and
Judge Roy T. Gelber's former law
partner. Stephen A. Glass.
Also taking part in the official
ceremonies will be Hank Harnage.
president of the Dade County Bar
Association, and Burton Young,
former president of the Florida
Bar.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-EI, will offer the
invocation. Judge Roy T. Gelber's
wife, Anna, will robe the judge
following his swearing in by his
uncle, administrative judge of the
juvenile division of the 11th
Judicial District.
Judge Gelber, who for several
years was an assistant Dade State
Attorney, has been a resident of
South Dade and of Miami Beach
for the past 37 years. He is a
graduate of the University of
Florida, Miami-Dade Community
College and of Miami Beach
Judge Roy T. Gerber
Senior High School. He eamedlaj
Juris Doctor degree >:|
Cumberland University School i\
Law in Alabama, and in IS
earned a master's degree
criminal justice at Nova I'nive
ty. In 1975, he served as an i '
in the Dade State Attorney's*!
fice, before being named a pro-]
secutor for that office.
Proceedings Pending Against
Some 1,200 Suspected Nazi War
Criminals In West Germany
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The federal
prosecutor's office in Lud-
wigshaven reported that pro-
ceedings are pending against
some 1,200 suspected Nazi war
criminals, but few if any are ex-
pected to be brought to trial
because of their advanced age and
the reluctance of many witnesses
to testify.
The suspects are mainly former
guards at Nazi concentration
camps who were involved in the
mass killings of Jews and others.
Most of them range in age from 75
to 80 and the average age of
witnesses is 73.
ACCORDING TO the pro
secutor's office, state attorneys
encountered tremendous dif-
ficulties compiling evidence]
against individual suspects, a pro-
cess that took years in mm
cases. In addition, many Pttn|
witnesses refuse to testify, or sal
fer severe health problems or aI
unable to remember events J
identify suspects.
If any are brought to trial. |
prosecution would have to W
mainly on written testimony fr
other countries, mostly in Easte"
Europe, and it is questionable u*
convincing cases could be made l
those circumstances. |
Nevertheless, a spokesper**!
for the prosecutor's office saw *
will continue to function as long>
proceedings are pending agjun-
any suspected war criminals m
West Germany.


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
[CSJ Report Rebukes USSR For
'Hollow' Humanitarian Moves
IBy SUSAN BIRNBAUM
|[EW YORK (JTA) -
e National Conference on
net Jewry, in its year-
j report, rebukes the
tiet Union for "a year of
Jmatic, but largely disp-
uting developments" in
nan rights and Jewish
fcgration.
i an 18-page wrap-up of Soviet
tes and statements on human
Its released last week at a
L- conference in Washington,
|NCS.T assails the new policy of
It is being called glasnost, or
liiness. in the USSR since
(hail Gorbachev assumed
iership as merely a tactical
Ft. more cosmetic than real.
I decries the new Soviet
jmanitarian campaign" as
now."
blE NCSJ reports that Jewish
^jration dropped 20 percent
the already low 1985 figure,
inly 914 Jews leaving the
|riet I'nion last year as corn-
ed to 1.140 in 1985.
NCSJ also accuses the
5R of attempting to "close the
m Jewish emigration by
king statements such as that at
[Hern follow-up conference on
Helsinki Accords in April,
In they said that "they could
Jpermit the sending of Jews to
fwar danger zone' of Israel."
kch statements have been
lived, says the NCSJ, by the
pete new emigration regula-
which went into effect Jan.
lich "fixed in law the narrow
riefined family" of parents,
Iren and siblings who may in-
Irelatiws to join them abroad,
| ''ing hundreds of
bands of Jews from ever ap-
\f, for. much less receiving.
fission to emigrate."
IK NCSJ report says that
rrlv 380,000" have begun the
of applying to emigrate.
he 380,000, the NCSJ inden-
over 11,000 as refuseniks.
cases, states the NCSJ,
been repeatedly raised with
et officials, notably by Presi-
Reagan at the Reykjavik
bit last October.
NCSJ report, tided "The II-
ln of Glasnost: A survey on
[Status of Soviet Jewry in
I," notes that in April, a top
pow specialist on nationality
tions delivered a lecture
a leading Soviet propagan-
iy in which he "acknowledg-
^at 10 to 15 percent of Soviet
currently would seek to
rate," a figure which tallies
more with Western figures than
with official Soviet statements on
the number of Jews wishing to
emigrate.
This acknowledgement, says the
NCSJ, was rendered "hollow" by
the actual number of Jews permit-
ted to emigrate.
THE "good news" of the
release of "several prominent
former POC's and long-term
ref usenik s. .. allowed to
emigrate," was accompanied by
"a cynical twist" of the release of
Inessa Flerova and her family to
go to Israel to give her bone mar-
row to her leukemia-stricken
brother, Michael Shirman, when it
appeared to be far too late for the
procedure.
The NCSJ report also noted
that David Goldfarb. released sud-
denly in October and brought to
the U.S. aboard Armand Ham-
mer's private jet, was subsequent-
ly found to have lung cancer,
"tragic proof," it says, "that he
had not received adequate medical
attention in the Soviet Union."
The NCSJ report notes that
nearly half the number of
Prisoners of Conscience were
sentenced to prison or labor camp
since Gorbachev took the reins of
the Soviet government. Just
within the past eight months, the
report says, "alarming news con-
tinued to reach the West of the
physical abuse of several Jewish
prisoners, especially Aleksei
Magarik, Yuli Edelshtein, Iosif
Begun and Vladimir Lifshitz."
THE REPORT also notes the
tightening of the vice on religious
observances, inluding the shor-
tage of matzoh at Passover, raids
on private homes at Purim, warn-
ings of prominent teachers of
Jewish culture and religion, and
the denial of basic rights of
religious observance as written in-
to the Helsinki Accords.
Gorbachev's promise at the
Geneva summit of November.
1985, as well as in other public
statements, to resolve
"humanitarian cases in the spirit
of cooperation," writes the NCSJ.
remains "mere words."
Saulson Guest Speaker
Al Postal has arranged a special
event for the residents of Marlin
Gardens Condominiums in their
recreational facility 8 p.m., Thurs-
day, Jan. 22. Speaker will be
William F. Saulson, topic will be:
"Continuity or Incongruity?"
Saulson, family consultant, is
director of the public service
Speakers Bureau and vice presi-
dent of the Riverside Memorial
Chapels.
Bernard Stein
Passes
Bernard Stein, 80, of Surfside,
passed away January 9. He had
been a member of Temple Israel
for 43 years. He was past presi-
dent of the Social Club of Four
Winds Condo for three years.
He is survived by his wife of 43
years, Mildred.
Services were held at Norman-
dy Drive chapel of The Riverside.
Obituaries
STERN, Gussie, 86. of North Miami Beach.
Services held in New York. Levitt-
Weinstein.
CHAPLIN, Rae, 86. of North Bay Village.
January 12. The Riverside.
GOLDFARB, Louis. 75. of Gainesville,
January 11. Services were held.
SCHIEBEL. Bernard. 67. of Miami,
January 11. The Riverside.
SILVER, Herman. January 12. The
Riverside.
LANGER. Eva E.. of Miami. Rubin-Zilbert.
COHEN. Eva, of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
GENTRY. David, 89. of North Miami
Beach. January 7. The Riverside.
Rl'BIN. Esther Thurman. Services private.
SCHNEIDER, Annette of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
WEINZIMMER. Esther, of Bell Isle.
January 7. The Riverside.
ROSENBERG. Leon. 88, January 7 The
Riverside.
RIVKEES. Harry. 88, of North Miami.
January 7. The Riverside.
FINE, Betty of North Miami Beach.
Menorah Chapels.
GLICKEN, Morris. 80. of Naranja l-akes.
January 9. Services were held.
STARK. Anne K. of North Miami Beach.
Services held in New York.
ABRAMS, Fred, 94, of Miami Beach.
January 9. The Riverside.
FAGENHOLZ. Myrtle A., 83, of Miami
Reach, January 10. Menorah Chapels.
GALE, Sadie C. 93. of Miami, January 7.
The Riverside.
LIFSHUTZ. Emanual. MD. 82, January 9.
Services held in New York.
COHEN, Max, 93. of North Miami Beach,
January 6. Services and interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
COOK. Anne C. 75. of Kendall. January 7.
Services were held.
HALFON. Joseph H., of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert.
LANDSMAN, Ruth of Miami Beach.
January 7. Menorah Chapels.
SIEGEL. Clara. 95. of North Miami,
January 6. Services were held.
STR1CKLER. John. 59. of Miami, January
6. Services and interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
^de County
M2-2099
Broward County
5.12-2009
K. I>r.s.r.....1 in Kiwr-ul. Memorial < happl In.
I*'* York:(-lL'i-.;:i 7..iMiyu.TM-Hlv.l \- 7iih K.l. Kon1 Hi
"J
TODD
Robert S., 97, of Miami Beach passed away
January 11. Mr. Todd had made his home
here for 34 years coming from Forest Hills.
New York. He was a member of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, a veteran of WWl.
having fought with the 5th Division in
France. He is survived by his daughters
Violett (Arthur) Kahn of Miami Beach and
Sonya (Simon) Piller of Coconut Creek. Ser-
vices were held.
SCHREIBER
Pearl L., 76, of Richmond, Va. passed away
on January 8. She is survived by her
daughters Natalie Schreiber and Maxine
Friedman and son Barry Schreiber. Burial
will take place in Richmond, Va.
SSSST
5 e I 4 3 t t
sax
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
KADISON,Beatrice. 82, of Miami Beach.
January 13. Levitt-Weinstein.
MORSE. Maxine. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
NEMEROFSKY. Freida. of Miami Beach.
January 13. The Riverside.
WEISMAN. Rose, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
WUENSCH. Harry, of North Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
BERKOWITZ. Charlotte L.. of North
Miami Beach, January 11 The Riverside.
BORROW, Louis. 90. of Bay Harbor
Islands, January 11. Interment at Mt.
Nebo. Blaaberg Chapel.
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With five
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens in Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing. And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
to Menorah where your last choice is vour best choice.
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6OO0
Margate: 975-0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
Cemeteries Funeral Chapels Mausoleum I're Need Planning
RUBIN
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
MONUMINT CO
CIMITIRY COUNSILINO
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
PALM BEACH
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538*6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
IsraA
The Greater Miami
Bonds Organization receM
honored two couples who rW
in the Aventura-TumCz\
community in North uZJi
Beach during the Israel Bo2\
Brunch at Turnberry /Tf
Recognized for their support A
Israel through the Israel Bonl\
program were Arnold Roselyn Meyer of Tumbeml
and Richard and Rose Aur\
bach ofAventura, who receive]
the Heritage Award. A ttmdm
the Brunch were, from leftl\
right: Turnberry Chnirnun\
Joseph Handler; Roselyn and
Arnold Meyer; Guest Speaker]
Gerda Weissmann Klein, an
author, columnist, historianj
and lecturer; Richard and
Rose Auerbach; and Avenhtn]
Chairman Harry Roaen,
Michael Wohl Named Partner
In Miami Law Firm
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Herzfeld and Rubin, PC, a
40-year-old Wall Street law firm
known internationally for product
and professional liability defense
law has opened a Miami office at
801 Brickell Ave. (Suite 1000),
and has named two Miamians as
resident partners.
Named managing partners of
the new Miami office were
Michael Wohl, formerly of
Steinberg Wohl and Merlin, and
Terrance Schwartz, formerly of
Rogovin and Schwartz.
Herzfeld and Rubin, in practice
40 years, represents several inter-
national corporations such as
AMC, Volkswagen, Pepsi-Cola
and Krupps.
Wohl, of South Miami, is a
member of both the Florida and
New York Bar Associations and is
a graduate of Syracuse Universi-
ty. He is a past president of the
Progress Club of Miami.
. Schwartz, of Miami, is a Univer-
sity of Miami graduate, and a
Michael Wohl
member of the Florida Bar
Association, American Bar
Association and the Association of
Trial Lawyers of America.
_
Vanunu Stages
Hunger Strike
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Mordechai Vanunu, accusing his
jailers of cruel treatment, has gone on a hunger strike, his
brother, Asher Vanunu, told reporters after visiting him at
Ramie prison last week.
VANUNU, a former technician at the Dimona nuclear
facility, is on trial for allegedly selling Israeli nuclear
secrets to a British newspaper. His brother said he told him
and other family members on their first visit that he was
being punished for communicating with reporters when he
was driven to Jerusalem District Court to be remanded in
custody for the duration of his trial.
On that occasion, Vanunu displayed the palm of his
hand on which was a printed message that he had been kid-
napped by Israeli agents in Rome last Sept. 30.
"They bring me food like a dog, isolate me for 23 hours
a day in a closed room, trying to break me. I don't need
their food, and I am therefore going on a hunger strike,"
Asher said his brother told him.
HE ALSO quoted his brother as saying he received no
money from the British newspaper which published his
story alleging that Israel has been manufacturing nuclear
weapons for 20 years.
The prisoner maintained that he gave the information
because his conscience was disturbed by "all that is going
on in the atomic plant." According to Vanunu's brother.
"Moti (Mordechai) is not a spy but a naive person who tried
to improve the country.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EDGEWATER
PLAZA at 7899 NE 4 Ct.. Miami
Fla. 33137 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MICHAEL PATELLA
14790 SW 14 St.
DA VIE, FLA. 33325
13444 January 2. 9, 16. 23. 1987
PUBLIC NOTICE
"The annual report of Victor
Posner Foundation, Inc. is
available for public inspection at
6917 Office Building. 6917 Collins
Avenue. Miami Beach. Fl. 866-771.
for 180 days from this date.
January 16. 1987,
13451 January 16. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
at 1111 Kane Concourse, Bay Har-
bor Islands. Fl. intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Edward R. Wataon. M.D.. P.A.
President
Martin Starr
Attorney for Gynecological
Associates of Bay Harbor Islands
13452 January 16. 23. 30;
February 6. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Communication Con-
trol Systems of Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Logistic Development Inc.
13431 December 26, 1986;
January 2. 9,16, 1987
NOTICS UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BE. KOSHER at
1436 Alton Road, Miami Beach,
FL. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
BRODY ENTERPRISES, INC.
Avrohom Brody Pr*a./Sec.
13446
January 2, 9. 16, 23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FINE AUTO SALES
at 2075 NE. 160th Street. North
Miami Beach. Fl. 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SHIMON A. BOVELNIAK
13442 January 2. 9, 16. 23. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CONSOLIDATED
INSURANCE OF MIAMI at 1123
- 71 STREET. MIAMI BEACH.
FLORIDA 33141 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
FRANK GOLDMAN & SONS.
INC.
1123-71 Street
Miami Beach. FL 33141
13434 December 26. 1986;
January 2, 9.16,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FicTrnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Sender Tragash
Alvarino at 419 Espanola Way,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Sender-Tragash-Alvarino Inc.
A Florida corporation
Lee J. Osiason
Attorney for Sender-Tragash-
Alvarino Inc.
13446 January 2, 9,16, 23, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 84V&43M
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JUAN ANTONIO ESTEBAN,
Petitioner,
and
VICTORIA REVEREND
ESTEBAN,
Respondent.
TO: VICTORIA REVEREND
ESTEBAN. Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 Nor
thweat 12th Ave.. Miami. Florida.
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before January 30.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 23. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13437 December 26, 1986;
January 2, 9.16, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO; 86-54503
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CLAUDIN JULIEN.
Petitioner,
and
SONYA LASHAUN JULIEN.
Respondent.
TO: SONYA LASHAUN JULIEN
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12tn
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 38136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before January 23. 1987; otherwise
a default will be entered
December 19, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: JOHN BRANDA
13433 December 26.1986;
January- 2, 9. 16. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-S4087
IN RE: The Marriage of
NUVIA VICTORIA AYALA.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JAIME AYALA,
Respondent/Husband
TO: JAIME AYALA
Calle36
No. 3313
Barrio Diamante. Call.
COLOMBIA. S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY N0T1
FIED that an action for Dissohi-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVIDS
BERGER, attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 100 North Bu<
cayne Blvd. No. 1707, New World
Tower Building, Miami. Florida
33132. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 23, 1987.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four eon
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of December. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
100 North Biacayne Blvd.
No. 1707
Miami, Florida 33132
Telephone: (305) 371-4556
Attorney for Petitioner
13438 December 26 1!86;
January 2. 9. 16.1987



. .
.' '.' '
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-42162
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION. .
United States corporation.
Plaintiffis)
WESLEY T. CURRAN. et ml..
Notice" is hereby given
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash 6n the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Darie County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M.. on the 23rd day of
January. 1987. the following
deerribed property:
Lot 15. in Block 3. of LEISURE
HEIGHTS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
93, at Page 39. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 7th day of January,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthkl & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
| Pabliahed 1/9-16
For Legal
Publication Forms
Call 373-4605
NOTICE OF SALE
PIRSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
[THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
[CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
IgENERAL JURISDICTION
[DIVISION
[CASE NO. 86-40376
SEC 02
[first federal savings
[and loan association of
[ROCHESTER, a federal aavings
[& loan association tiki*
|F RAN KLIN SOCIETY
EDERAL SAVINGS AND
[LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Iplaintiffis)
\s
OBERT BOYNTON. et al..
[Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
ow pending in said Court, the
Mflc of which is indicated above. I
mO to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
rill HI) FLOOR of the Dade
<>int> Courthouse in Miami.
IDade County. Florida at 11:00
lock A.M.. on the 23rd day of
January. 1987. the following
described property:
M 8, in Block 4. ofPERRINE
GARDENS SUBDIVISION NO.
B, according to the Plat thereof, as
Recorded in Plat Book 103. at
Page 11, of the Public Records ot
iade County, Florida.
DATED the 7th day of January.
|tt?.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
Circuit (ourt Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Utorney for Plaintiff
Wnthal & Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800
50 Biscayne Boulevard
Jiami, Florida 33137
ublished 1/9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
at the undersigned, desiring to
in business under the fic-
name Citizens Financial
enter at 999 BrickeU Avenue,
liami. Florida. 33131 intends to
[ister said name with the Clerk
pf the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
Florida.
UCCELLO IMMOBILIEN GmbH,
a German Corporation
By: ROBERT VOGEL.
Managing Director (President)
Barton S. Udell. Esq..
pmith & Mandler, P.A.
attorney for
^Vcello Immobilien GmbH
'<*> BrickeU Avenue, Suite 700
liami, Florida 33131
>3459 January 16.23.30:
February 6, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-54021 08
Florida Bar No. 065939
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FITZGERALD D. HANOVER,
Petitioner,
and
ROSE MARIE SCHUTZMAN
HANOVER,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
PETITION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
To: ROSE MARIE SCHUTZMAN
HANOVER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
You, ROSE MARIE SCHUTZ-
MAN HANOVER, the above nam-
ed Respondent, are hereby notified
that a Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you. You are required to serve a
copy of your reply to said Petition
on the Petitioner's attorney, Ken-
neth N. Rekant, Suite 208, One
Lincoln Road Building. Miami
Beach, Florida 33139. and file the
original reply in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. on or before the 23 day of
January, 1987.
If you fail to do so, judgment by
default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded in the said
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewiah
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of the Court at Miami. Florida, this
17 day of December, 1986.
Richard P. Brinker.
As Clerk of said Court
Dade County, Florida
By: CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
Kenneth N Rekant. P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
Suite 208. One Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Tel: (305) 531-2225
13427 December 26. 1986;
January 2. 9, 16, 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-43105
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSEPH D. RENE.
Petitioner,
and
BRENDA KAYE RENE,
Respondent.
TO: BRENDA KAYE RENE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before January 30, 1987; otherwise
a default will be entered.
December 24. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
13443
January 2. 9. 16. 23. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-52452 (21'
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTIOi
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MORSTA WALKER
and
ROBERT L. WALKER
TO: ROBERT L WALKER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on JOY
BARKAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach, Florida
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 20, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 13 day of January. 1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18468 January' 16' *"
February 6, 1987
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 46
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-28806
SEC. 26
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
DAVID ALVAREZ, and the
unknown spouse, et al..
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above, I
will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade
County Courthouse in Miami,
Dade County, Florida at 11:00
o'clock A.M.. on the 23rd day of
January. 1987. the following
described property:
Lot 20. in Block 3, of BUENA
VISTA HEIGHTS, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 3. a Page 22. of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 7th day of January,
1987.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit (ourt Seal)
by Maria Sama
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Rosenthal 4 Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Published 1/9-16
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BARBARA LEIGH
SALES at 9240 West Bay Harbor
Drive, Bay Harbor Islands, Florida
33154 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
BARBARA LEIGH
CORPORATION
9240 West Bay Harbor Drive
Bay Harbor Islands, Florida 33154
Attorney:
Martin Starr
9703 South Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33156-2812
666-9520
13416 December 19.26, 1986;
January 2.9. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7205
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL WASSERMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
SAMUEL WASSERMAN,
deceased. File Number 86-7205, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler St., Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 16, 1987.
Personal Representative:
Marcia D. Essig
801 Navajo Drive
Riverside. Calif. 92507
Paul Wasserman
1 Rockledge Road
Hartsdale, NY 10531
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
For Marcia D. Essig:
Herbert J. Lerner. Esq.
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
Telephone: 305 673-3000
For Paul Wasserman:
Arnold Spiegel. Esq.
50 E. 42nd Street
New York. NY 10017
Telephone: 212 687 5225
13457 January 16.23, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-54088
IN RE: The Marriage of
PASCAL BERNARD OUDIN,
Petitioner/Husband
and
BARBARA COLLINS OUDIN
Respondent/Wife
TO: BARBARA COLLINS
OUDTN
38675 12th Street
East No. 5
Palmdale,
California 93550
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVID S.
BERGER, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is New World
Tower Building. No. 1707, 100
North Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33132, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of December, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
No. 1707, 100 North Biscayne
Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33132
Telephone: (305) 371-4665
Attorney for Petitioner
13439 December 26,1986;
January 2.9,16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Smoke Shop II; Mall
Smoke Shop at 420 Hollywood
Mall, Hollywood Fl. 33021 intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Fort Pitt Corp.
Lee J. Osiason
Attorney for Fort Pitt, Corp.
13449 January 2.9.16. 23, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 87-00985 (12)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
Carolyn Pratt
Petitioner/Wife
and
William Pratt
Respondent/Husband
TO: William Pratt
1570 N.W. 159th Street
Opa-Locka, Fl. 33054
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 633 N.E. 167th Street,
(Suite 619) North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 13,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Florida on this 9
day of January. 1987.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th Street (Suite 619)
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
(305) 653-3535
13456 January 16. 23. 30:
February 6, 1987
DN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7229
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH A. SCHRAGER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSEPH A. SCHRAGER.
deceased, File Number 86-7229, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 16, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
JANET A. SCHRAGER
9273 Collins Avenue
Surfside. FL 33154
BARNETT BANKS
TRUST CO.. N.A.
1108 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands.
FL 33154
By: ROBT. ALBRIGHT.
Trust Officer
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Island, FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
13455 January 16.23.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, Ui AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 87-4)0895 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
Unite States Corporation,
Plaintiff.
vs.
GERALD BEYER, as Personal
Representative of the Estate of
GEORGE P BULLOCK.
Deceased, a/k/a GEORGE
BULLOCK, a/k/a GEORGE D.
BULLOCK, et al..
Defendants.
TO: All of the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienholders, creditors, trustees
or otherwise claiming by,
through, under or against
GEORGE P. BULLOCK.
Deceased, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described, whose
residences are unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 309
of CORAL ISLE WEST, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, dated Oc-
tober 13. 1972. filed for
record October 17. 1972.
under Clerk's File No.
72R-232618, in Official
Records Book 7942. at Page
1, of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida, as
amended, together with the
Mortgagor's undivided share
in the common elements ap-
purtenant thereto
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami, Florida 33132. on or before
February 13, 1987, and filed the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 8 day of January.
1987.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputv Clerk
13454 January 16. 23.30:
February 6, 1987


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 16, 1987
Distinguished Artists And Diplomats Honor Wiesel
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) A glit-
tering assembly of famous and
distinguished artists and
diplomats gathered here last
Tuesday night (Jan. 6) to pay
tribute to Elie Wiesel, winner of
the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize. Dur-
ing the two-and-a-half-hour pro-
gram of readings, singing and
short speeches by some of the
celebrities, Wiesel's own message
of never forgetting the Holocaust
was repeatedly echoed.
Investment
Seminar
Carteret Savings Bank's Miami
Gardens branch will offer, free to
the public, a financial services
seminar at Temple Adath
Yeshurun, located at 1025 Miami
Gardens Drive, North Miami
Beach, Jan. 20 at 4 p.m.
Guest speaker Andy Reinken,
Carteret's annuity coordinator,
will discuss tax-deferred annuities
in relation to other investment
products.
Temple Beth
Moshe Lecture
The significance and beauty of
the traditional sabbath will be ex-
plained and discussed in detail at
Temple Beth Moshe, Wednesday,
Jan. 21 at 8 p.m.
Rabbi and Mrs. Jacobs will con-
duct a sabbath workshop that
evening.
Members of the North Miami
community are invited to this in-
structive lecture.
Tax Seminar
A seminar on taxes and estate
planning will feature a meeting of
the Temple Emanu-El Forty-
Niners Thursday, Jan. 22 in Sirkin
Hall at the Temple. President
Henrietta London said attorney
Ronald Brodie will present the
seminar, highlighting revisions in
the 1987 tax laws.
Shaaray
Tefilah To
Honor Schreibers
Barry and Bonny Schreiber
Metro-Dade Commissioner
Barry Schreiber and his wife Bun-
ny will be honored at the Eighth
Annual Congregation Shaaray
Tefilah Dinner Feb. 1 at the Ex-
ecutive Caterers in North Miami
Beach.
The Schreibers have worked
together as a team pooling their
leadership qualities of service to
their synagogue and to their com-
munity, congregation officials
said. The Schreibers are one of the
15 families who started the
synagogue.
Chairmen of the event are Max
and Saundra Rothenberg. Journal
Chairman for the event is Mrs.
Marlene Richter and co-chairmen
are Dr. Stanley and Maria Frohl-
inger and Melvin and Marsha
Ness.
Former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, actresses
Shelley Winters and Ellen
Burstyn, actor Jason Robards,
opera singers James McCracken
and Roberta Peters, composer
and conductor Leonard Bernstein,
and Israel's Consul General in
New York, Ambassador Moshe
Yegar, were among the 150
celebrity guests who came to the
Tavern on the Green restaurant in
Central Park to pay tribute to the
Holocaust survivor, author,
teacher and philosopher, who
became the unofficial spokesper-
Course In Reading
The Siddur
Rabbi Barry Konovitch Teaches
Siddur Literacy Tuesday evenings
at 8 p.m., a course in the reading
of the Siddur to beginners. The
rabbi observed "that people who
never learned to read the Siddur
feel like outsiders in the
synagogue and without basic
reading tools they can't par-
ticipate and rarely attend.
son for the six million Jews who
died in the Holocaust.
The reception and tribute was
organized and sponsored by
Writers and Artists for Peace in
the Middle East. Actress Kitty
A iii i t Women
The Geula Chapter of Amit
Women will hold its next open
meeting Wednesday, Jan. 28, 7:30
p.m., at the Jewish Community
House on Miami Beach. The pro-
gram will feature Phyllis
Lazarow, in a presentation called
"Color Me Better Than
Beautiful."
Dvorah Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, at 1 p.m. in the
Roney Plaza, with refreshments
and a planned program.
Florida Council of Amit Women
is in the midst of preparations for
a Mini-Convention to take place
on Monday, Feb. 9 at the Palace
Playhouse of Seacost Towers
East, chaired by Regina Wang.
Carlisle Hart was the chairperson
of the event, and actor Warner Le
Roy was the host.
WIESEL, visibly touched by
the occasion, said, "I am really
moved. It is always good to see ar-
tists and writers get together. It
is even better to see them get
together for the sake of peace."
George Will, the noted colum-
nist and commentator, said, "Elie
Wiesel is a man who speaks for all
of us." Sister Carol Rittner, an ex-
ecutive of the Religious Sisters of
Mercy in Washington, D.C., said,
"For me, Elie Wiesel is a teacher.
He taught me that a religion is a
window through which we can see
the plight of others."
Kissinger, who said he first met
Wiesel while he was Secretary of
State, recalled that he himself lost
13 members of his family during
the Holocaust. Winters movingly
told about an uncle of hers who
lost all the members of his family
in the Holocaust and how she
witnessed his tormented soul
many years thereafter until he
died recently in Israel.
BERNSTEIN presented Wiesel
with the Distinguished Award of
S;
the Writers and Artist* f.,
in the Middle Ea?t ^
was a painting by MiltonV,
Other guests at the triwl
eluded sculptors Louise 39
and Chaxm Gross, pia^
Dichter, Manhattan S?
torney Robert MortfenthT,
Telford Taylor. wTo"^1,
special U.S. prosecutor
Nuremberg trials. '
Hope Center'
Annual Lunchc
A "Splash of Color "the j
Center's Annual Luncheon 1
Fashion Show will be ThT
Jan. 29 at the FontaiL.
Hilton Hotel's Grand BaliiJJ|
This year's Fashion Show,
be presented by the 24 Col
and will feature haute coo
French designer Paul
Orrier.
The reception starts at 111
followed by lunch at noon. Alti
ceeds will benefit the devekw i
tally disabled clients of theM
Center.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
\ /"
Available at PuMU Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Mada with Just tha
Right Amount of Spices
Pumpkin Pie
$169
Available at S* Publix Store*
and Fraah Danish Bakarias
Blueberry
Muffins
59
6~$1
\ r
Available at Publix Stores with
Frash Danish Bakarias Only.
French Stick
2- loaf
Available at ail Publix Stores
and Frash Danish Bakeries
Banana
Nut Loaf
?149
i
teCUSi^Vv Quantity
Y,
. 't*. '.V f Ob -"
Prices Effective
wmmmi
^M


Full Text
Page 8-A The Jewish FVjndanFndai
V.
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}oll Shows
IChristian Faith Doesn't Spur Anti-Semitism in Some
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
j;W YORK Results
fle public of a nationwide
fey of evangelical and
rja'mentalist Christian at-
ides towards Jews
Uenge some commonly
I assumptions, according
(the Anti-Defamation
rue of B'nai B'rith
commissioned the
inducted among a sampling of
religiously conservative
fenans in September and Oc-
by the Houston-based Tar-
t. Hill. Newport and Ryan
rch organization, the survey
.. I that most of them do not
.ciously use their deeply-held
,tian faith and convictions as
jkation for anti-Semitic views
.v, s" and gave the following
|ples:
percent disagreed with a
nent that "Christians are
Bed in holding negative at-
i '.wards Jews since the
killed Christ," five percent
i and five percent said they
' unsure."
: rcent felt that God views
"more favorably than other
ins" based on their
"Jews are God's chosen
ih' fact that Jesus
a Jew. Ten percent
. God views Jews "less
than other non-
l'
n( disagreed with the
that "God does not hear
. Jew." And. among
the statement wai
ide in 1981 by the
nt of the Southern
nvention, the Rev.
only 12 percent
it said Jews are view
"no differently than
Christians" because
n accepted Jesus, 20
t' : they may be judged
I ihly" and 12 percent
ire."
KL NATIONAL director
u IVrlmutter said the
- of th<- agency's
i if Christian at-
I Jews and that
h< findings of this par-
." significant in view
i ed prominence in re-
if religiously conser-
ins in this country
about which .lews
d apprehension."
n are areas of impor-
. reement between the
in m u n i t y and
and fundamentalists.
it in schools and the
-' of evolution, these
ift differing values. Their sup-
0! voluntary prayers in the
I. for instance, is no more
larilj anti-Semitic than our
?tion to prayer is anti-
ous In a culturally pluralistic
p. it is possible to be at op-
"'ids of an issue without
"'us bigotry being
Jive."
ADL official cited as
Wing" the survey's finding
although 57 percent of the
Jing revealed no secular anti-
Jo attitudes as measured by
responses to seven
IHfflta in an "anti-Semitic in-
[m percent agreed with one
ami Semitic characteriza-
laii.i another 21 percent with
|f iin >re.
LY FIVE percent of those
fed accepted four or more of
-itements as valid. It was
I that 49 percent of those bet-
1H and 34 years of age
with at least one of the
Semitic characterizations
M"ed to 34 percent of those
over.
The survey noted a statistically
significant relationship between
belief in a literal reading of the Bi-
ble and expression of one or more
secular anti-Semitic views.
The seven statements reflected
stereotypical attitudes towards
Jews, including the following:
"because Jews are not bound by
Christian ethics, they do things to
get ahead that Christians general-
ly do not do," 27 percent agreed:
"Jews are tight with money," 51
percent agreed; "Jews want to re-
main different from other people,
and yet they are touchy if people
notice these differences," 39 per-
cent agreed; "Jews are more loyal
to Israel than to the U.S.," 27 per-
cent agreed.
BUT sizeable percentages of
those who accepted these
characterizations felt they were
"positive" traits. For example, of
those who believe 'Jews are tight
with money," 60 percent thought
that was a positive trait. On the
statement about greater loyalty to
Israel, 4'. percent of those who
agreed thought it was a positive
trait, and 30 percent of those who
saw Jews as wanting to be "dif-
ferent," viewed the characteristic
positively.
Five of the seven statements
were taken from a 1966 study
"Christian Beliefs and anti-
Semitism." conducted for the
League by Charles Y. Glock and
Rodney Stark of the University of
California Survey Research
Center. That study, which dealt
with Catholic and Protestant
denominations, including
evangelicals and fundamentalists,
found linkage between religion
and anti-Semitism and concluded
that religious orthodoxy and par-
ticularism operated to produce
secular hostility towards Jews.
ADDITIONAL findings in the
new study which ADL described
as being "troubling" were:
59 percent of the sampling
replied in the affirmative when
asked if they agreed that "Jews
can never be forgiven for what
they did to Jesus until they accept
him as the true savior." (28 per-
cent disagreed and 13 percent
were unsure.)
50 percent of those polled said
Christians should "actively help
lead Jews to accept Jesus Christ
as savior."
While 85 percent said there
was "no doubt" that sue million
Jews died at the hands of the
Nazis in World War II, 10 percent
were "unsure" and five percent
said there was "no direct
evidence" of the Holocaust.
In commenting on the survey.
Perlmutter said: "While I am
discomfited by those who claim to
have 'The Truth,' whether in
religion or in politics, it is our
responsibility to seriously explore
their attitudes and understand
their mindsets. The fact that their
thinking and values are different
from ours does not mean per se
that they are anti-Semitic."
PERLMUTTER added that the
League is planning to convene a
meeting with the leadership of
religiously conservative Chris-
tians to discuss in detail the fin-
dings of the survey and to explore
ways to improve mutual
understanding and friendship bet-
ween the Jewish community and
theirs.
The survey sampling was made
up of 36 percent Baptists, 12 per-
cent Methodists, 10 percent
Lutherans, 7 percent members of
the Church of Christ and the re-
mainder included other Protes-
tant evangelicals such as
Pentecostal, Mormon and
Assembly of God.
Divided into questions relating
to "religiously based anti-
Semitism" and "secular anti-
Semitism," the survey included
these results under the "secular"
section:
49 percent of the sampling
had a "very favorable" or
"somewhat favorable" opinion of
Jews, 40 percent were "about
average" and 4 percent admitted
to unfavorable attitudes.
56 percent had "very
favorable" or "favorable" opi-
nions of Israel, 28 percent gave
"average" as an answer and 10
percent had "unfavorable"
attitudes.
On their perceptions of how
much power is wielded in America
today by six selected groups big
business, organized labor, Arabs,
Catholics, blacks and Jews, 67
percent thought big business has
too much power; 55 percent cited
organized labor; 38 percent,
Arabs; 23 percent, Catholics. 11
percent said blacks have too much
power; 31 percent felt blacks do
not have enough power. 7 percent
said Jews have too much power
and 11 percent said they have too
little power.
"THE FINDINGS on blacks
Continued on Page 13-A
V^-): "
It Costs So Little
And It Means So Much.
Southern Bell Long Distance is a great
way to stay in touch with friends and
family at reasonable rates.
A 10-MINUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
Ft. Lauderdale $1.89
Boca Raton $1.89
Miami $2.49
Ft. Pierce $1.89
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