The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03022

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert
Vol.60 Number 1
Miami Friday, January 2,1987
50 Cents
An armed Israeli
soldier walks past
Arab women selling
vegetables and fruit
in the Gaza
marketplace. Some
of the women have
covered their clothes
with plastic sheets to
protect themselves
from the rain which
has been falling
steadily in Israel,
bringing to a halt
many of the
dcmonstratiohs
which had been
taking place in tfu
West Bank imd
Gaza.
Jewish Woman Most
Likely To Be Raped
'
NEW YORK If a Jewish woman is sex-
ually assaulted, she is more likely to be raped
than to successfully resist or escape her at-
tacker, sociologist Dr. Pauline Bart told
Lilith, the independent Jewish women's
magazine, in an exclusive interview on her
recently published study of rape resistance.
'Index'
West Germany Channeled Arms
To Iran Through larael... 9-A
Centuries Of Chanukah
Lights ... M
The Future of Judaism... 10-A
Controversy Over Archbishop's
Visit To Middle East 7-A
Jews Must Better Address
Drug Abuse... 5-A
Preserving Tradition... 5-A
Reagan's Message To
Gorbachev... t-A
The interview with Bart, a professor of
psychiatry and sociology at the University of
Illinois at Chicago, appears in the latest issue
of Lilith now in its 10th year of publication.
Bart's book. "Stopping Rape: Successful Sur-
vival Strategies, co-authored with Patricia
O'Brien, is unique in that interviews with
women of different ethnic groups included
questions about their backgrounds, including
socialization experiences as children.
Bart pinpointed in the Lilith interview four
major factors that emerged from the study
that make Jewish women more vulnerable to
rape. They are: their use of ineffective
strategies of resistance; responding with an
intellectual rather than a visceral reaction;
their lack of experience and training in pro-
tecting themselves physically; and their lack
of suspiciousness and "street smarts."
Jewish women, she said, tend to follow the
traditional and mistaken advice given to
women of trying to talk their way out of a
sexual assault. "In stopping rape, pleading is
relatively useless," claimed Bart. "Crying
Continued on Pfe *-A
Most Significant Impact
On Jews During 1986
Terrorism
Four of the ten events that had the most significant im-
pact on Jews during 1986 were connected with interna-
tional terrorism, according to Nathan Perbnutter, national
director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
They were the. massacre of 21 Jews in an Istanbul
synagogue, Britain's breaking-off of diplomatic relations
wiht Syria because of that nation's involvement in ter-
rorism, the American bombing at Libya and the U. S. sale of
arms to "terrorist" Iran.
According to Perlmutter, "if (the bombing of) Libya
represented American resolve that are will not be in-
timidated by terrorism, the sale of arms to 'terrorist' Iran
was a monumental misjudgement. If there was a retrieving
virtue in trading anna for hostages it was the indignant
r*tk>nuft*wArrncanpeopk-*rctionso8trogato
render leas rikeh/ renewed American genuflection to
terrorists."
Perimutter'B hat of the moat significant event* of 1986
foSows:
1. The massacre of 21 Jews in the Istanbul synagogue by
Ceatmewl en fnge 7-A
-\
.


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
President Reagan meets with
leaders of Yeshiva University
in the White House to receive
an honorary degree. As a gift
from the University, the Presi-
dent was presented urith a
Menorah. Pictured with the
President (from left) are Dr.
Norman Lamm, president of
Yeshiva University; Max J.
Etra, chairman emeritus.
Board of Trustees; Herbert
Tenzer. chairman of the board
and former Congressman from
New York; Stanley Stern, nee
chairman of the board; and Dr.
Israel Miller, senior nee
president.
'86 Election Results
Show 'Significant
Defeat' For
Christian Right
NEW YORK The 1986
election results marked a
"significant defeat" for the
Christian Right, which
focused its efforts on 36
Senate, House and guber-
natorial races and lost 23 of
them, according to an
analysis just published by
the Religious Action Center
of Reform Judaism.
In the premiere issue of its
quarterly magazine, "Tzedek
Society Capitol Line," the
Religious Action Center says the
Christian Right proved "unable to
break the American people's com-
mitment to separation of church
and state."
AS A RESULT, the magazine
says, it will be "substantially more
difficult for the Christian Right to
push the 100th Congress to pass
legislation in such areas as prayer
in the public schools, abortion
rights or federal aid for parochial
schools."
The magazine observes that the
only state where the Christian
Right's gain was significant was
Texas, where William Clements
who had a "Christian liaison" on
his staff ousted Gov. Mark
White, and where five of six
House candidates backed by the
Christian Rights won office.
All three Jews targeted for
defeat by the Christian Right re-
tained their seats in the House of
Representatives by substantial
margins, the magazine notes.
They were Mel Levine (Cal.),
Larry Smith (Fla.), and Howard
Woloe (Mich.).
DURING THE California cam
paign, the magazine reports.
Levine's opponent. Bob Scribner,
charged Levine with being
"diametrically opposed to nearly
everything the Lord's Church
stands for in this nation." He call-
ed on his supporters to help "link
arms with us as we literally "take
territory' for our Lord Jesus
Christ."
In the Florida race, Mary Col-
lins, running against Smith, said
his positions were "the antithesis
of what the Christian community
in the district would prefer."
During the 1986 campaign, the
Religious Action Center, head-
quartered in Washington, alerted
the Jewish community to the
Christian Right's introduction of
religion into these and other elec-
toral contests.
JDC Approves 1987 Budget
~3* .Bo*Td of Directors of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee approved a $57 million budget for 1987
at its annual meeting.
The budget represents a six percent increase over the 1986
budget of $54 million. It will fund JDC programs in Israel and
more than 30 other countries. JDC President Heinz Eppler call
ed it a responsible budget and said: "It addresses the needs of
the Jewish communities around the world."
The annual meeting was the culmination of a week of
meetings and programs that illustrate the national and interna-
tional scope of JDC activities. Committees organized by areas of
the world reviewed operations and deliberated questions of oro-
gram and budget. F
In a world of changes
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For those who choose
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2-87


Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A

What IfEkesTb Be
A Riverside.
It takes years.
It took nearly 60 years to
build trust in a name It took
leadership who helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service
decades ago. Throughout the
years leaders such as Charles
Rosenthal and Carl Grossberg
exemplified their belief that Jewish
funeral service is not merely a
business, but a solemn trust held
by funeral directors on behalf
of the families they serve.
Today the
Riverside tradi-
tion continues
under the
leadership of Kenneth J. Lassman
and a new generation of caring
managers. And today the name
Riverside, nurtured through six
decades, remains the most
respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.
Kenneth J. Lassman
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel, Inc./Funeral Directors
Miami Beach. North Miami, Hollywood. Tamarac, West Palm Beach
Also serving the New York Metropolitan Area
Ma


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
1987 What Lies Ahead
The day after New Year's Day, all of us
are inclined to focus on events during the
months ahead. One of these surely will be
the growing political activity on the home
front as the nation gears up for the presiden-
tial election campaign.
The last two campaigns were unhappy for
many members of the Jewish communitv
who felt themselves left out of almost all
political consideration. So persuasive and
powerful were both Reagan campaigns in
1980 and 1984, that there was little need felt
in the victory-sensing Republican strategy
to deal with Jewish issues.
And, in the Democratic campaign, there
was an inadvertent opening of the door to
less than subtle anti-Israel and indeed anti-
Jewish sentiment in the oratory of Jesse
Jackson with his admittance to splinter
populist opinion on the rostrum of that party
at its 1983 national convention.
Where's The Magic
There is something strange about the win-
some comment by First Lady Nancy Reagan
that the President has done all that he can to
persuade ousted National Security person-
nel such as John Poindexter and Oliver
North to talk to congressional investigators
as they look closely into the Iran arms
scandal.
Both Poindexter and North have refused
to tell what they know about the arms sales
and the siphoning off of funds from the sales
to aid the Contras in Nicaragua.
The President himself says that he has
asked everyone in the Administration to be
open and forthcoming with information.
Mrs. Reagan's comment suggests that there
is little more her husband can do. After all,
the Fifth Amendment guarantee against
self-mcrimination is a right belonging to
every American, even to those who are nigh
and mighty and situated in the stratosphere
of power.
Go Ahead, Make My Day
We wonder what ever happened to the
Ronald Reagan who challenged members of
Congress to "Go ahead, make my day" when
they seemed disinclined to do his bidding in
a variety of the Administration's pet pro-
jects military, the Contras, tax reform,
caps on the national debt?
In these and other issues, Mr. Reagan
adopted the stance of a 19th Century gun-
fighter, or else a contemporary Dirty Harry
detective, most recently brought to life by
one of his movie idols, Clint Eastwood. On
other occasions, the President has made
pointed reference to another of his movie
favorites, Rambo, the creature of Sylvester
Stallone, when he was taking on the
Establishment quite as if he weren't one of
them, indeed its quintessential presence.
Where has all of this power gone to Mr.
Reagan's capacity to twist arms, wrestle
elbows, bend opponents to his will behind
the scenes? It does seem strange to us,
especially now that there is great question
about just what he did and did not know
about the arms sales and the sudden siphon-
ing off of funds to the Contras from the pro-
ceeds of the sales, that he has suddenly
weakened, that he has gone as far as he can.
We can only hope that he will find the will
to go further once he recovers from his
surgery due Jan. 5.
Jewish Florxdian
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SOCWIWIOW MTU **" (Loc*l *.* Ont It 00 Two n |1t ,,.
UOO Ort eo-^qu~. (tHMl
But in 1987, especially given the strongly
pro-Israel sentiment of the Reagan Ad-
ministration during the last few years, both
parties are likely to court Jews as they never
have been courted before, thus reversing the
sense of isolation from the political process
that Jewish voters felt in the 1980 and 1984
campaigns.
Preferable To Be Pandered
On the one hand, being "pandered" to
may make Jews feel somewhat sensitive,
particularly about the Israel issue. But, as
Washington columnist Morris Amitay has
noted, "it is always preferable to be
'pandered' to than to be ignored."
Within the context of the perspective of
the day after New Year's Day, it also seem
that a decision early in 1987 is likely to be
made as to whether Israel will go into full-
scale production of its Lavi fighter-bomber.
The current struggle over the new budget in
Israel itself has Drought outcries against
military cuts by no less an authority than
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin who cau-
tioned this week that such proposed cuts
would jeopardize the Lavi.
As things turn out in Washington, what
happens to the Lavi will to a large extent
determine future defense relationships bet-
ween Israel and the United States.
A final word: In the earliest days of
Iranscam, it appeared that high Administra
tion officials caught in the wringer of that
ongoing scandal were aiming at Israel as the
likely party to be the scapegoat. But as 1987
shapes up before us, we're now inclined to
suggest that negative fallout from Israeli in-
volvement in that affair will be minimal.
As Amitay suggests, and we agree, the
multiple investigations in Washington will
undoubtedly focus on the Reagan Ad-
ministration's actions rather than on the
participation of a growing cast of interna-
tional characters in the scandal.
Happy New Year.
Gorbachev's 'Potemkin Villages'
Friday, January 2, 1987
Volume 60
1 TEVETH 5747
Number 1
Dr. William Korey is the
director of International
Policy Research of B'nai
B'rith. Last month, he served
as a 'public member' of the U.S.
delegation to the Vienna review
conference on the Helsinki
accord.
By WILLIAM KOREY
Two hundred years ago, in
1787, Catherine the Great
put on an extraordinary
public relations effort to
convince a Western
monarch, Joseph II of
Austria, of her benevolence
and popularity.
The Tsarina's principal adviser,
Prince Gregory Potemkin, had
supervised the erection in the
Ukraine and Crimea of entire ar-
tificial villages containing but one
street, and arranged for peasant
masses to greet exultantly the
traveling Russian Empress ac-
companied by her Hapsburg col-
league. The "Potemkin villages"
almost worked but, in the end, the
Western monarch failed to suc-
cumb to the Russian public rela-
tions gambit.
REMARKABLY, today's
Kremlin ruler, Mikhail Gorbachev,
has put on a similar fabulous show
in Vienna where the third review
conference of the Helsinki Final
Act is being held. (The others took
place in Belgrade in 1977-78 and
in Madrid in 1980-83).
The aim of the current
"Potemkin villages" is to
demonstrate to Western leaders
and populace the Soviet Union's
"new look" of benevolence in the
field of human rights and
humanitarian affairs. But
whether this artful image-
building even if at times
awkwardly managed, has succeed-
ed in convincing anyone is open to
question.
That a massive Soviet public
relations effort was extended in
the absence of positive hu-.in
rights steps could easi' re
understood. The Helsinki '. ,1
Act, while sanctioning the Soviet
objective of making the post-war
borders of Eastern Europe "in-
violable," also made "human
rights and fundamental
freedoms" a regulating "princi
pie" of interstate relations and
obligated the 35 signatories to
adhere to the various
"humanitarian" purposes spelled
out in Basket 8 of the accord.
MOSCOW'S non-compliance
and monumental abridgements of
the Helsinki provisions were self-
evident. It was not only that the
Helsinki monitors in the I'SSR,
legitimized by the language of the
accord, had been smashed,
dispersed, or jailed, but Jewish
emigration had reached the lowest
level in over two decades.
Refuseniks were trapped in a
Kafkaesque world of helplessness
and ostracism. Despite Gor-
bachev's promise on French
television in October 1985 that
Jewish refuseniks would be allow-
ed to leave after 5 to 10 years
some 10,000 in this category' re-
main caged, with almost no hope
of obtaining exit visas.
Targeted by world public opi-
nion as the principal abuser of
human rights and inevitably plac-
ed on the defensive, Moscow in
the late 1970's and early 1980's
became increasingly indifferent to
the promotion of the Helsinki ac-
cord. The hereto exalted agree-
ment was unceremoniously droo-
ped in 1980 from the Communist
Party slogans, annually issued on
the anniversary of the Bolshevik
revolution.
But Gorbachev decided to
reverse this trend. Benefit* from
SSSSSSaccord in the ^""ty
field (Basket 1). including the ex
pectaUon of a disarmament con-
!"yK Stockholm, were too
meaningful and palpable. He even
Proposed ,n his unprecedented
Vladivostok address in July thaTa
Helsinki-type accord be drXd
for Asia and the Pacific area
WITH HELSINKI once again.
centerpiece of Soviet policrnoi
to deal w,th human righL 23
humanitarianism? Orwellian in-
version was required: Simplv
claim that the USSR embraced
the concepts, indeed championed
them. That's precisely what the
cynical Gorbachev did in his policy
address to the 27th Party I
gress last February and in a
speech greeting French President
Francois Mitterrand in July.
The new Soviet posture
necessitated a fundamental
change of style at the Vienna
meeting. No longer would inquir-
ing reporters, non-governmenta!
representatives, divided spouses
and even aggrieved family
members of human rights victims
be brushed aside or avoided The
contrary was the case.
The Western media was
meticulously cultivated An
unheard-of six press conferences
during the opening week of the
Vienna meeting in November was
called by Soviet public relations
officials, headed by Ambassador
at-large Vladimir Lomeiko and
Gennadi Gerasimov. Western
journalists were deliberately
sought out and advised: "You
know things are changing since
the bad old days."
SOVIET DELEGATES
responded to almost every request
for a meeting (only Andrei
Sakharov's stepson, Aleksei Se-
myenov, wat refused) and
courteously, even sympathetical-
ly, they listened to pleas about
emigration restrictions and
refuseniks.
Promises to look into individual
case* were made and assurances
were given of either arranging
meetings with top Soviet officials
or reporting bade to the inquirer.
But the promises were rarely, if
ever, kept.
As to whether the Soviet Union
would change its emigration
policy, Kremlin officials repeated
ly pointed to the forthcoming
publication of rules and regula
tions covering exit visas beginn
ing on Jan. 1. While this stirred
hope in some quarters, concern
Continued on Page 9-A


Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Preserving Tradition: Yemenite Wedding Customs
By CAROL GREEN
One of the sadder byproducts of
the process of modernization is
the standardization of modem life
and ritual. Take the wedding, for
example; all too often today's
Jewish bride walks down the aisle
to the strains of the traditional
wedding march in a ceremony her
grandmother would certainly
have frowned upon.
In Israel, however, the process
of modernization has taken a bit
longer and, as a result, much of
the old flavor remains. For
Israelis, especially those who
trace their roots to Arabic or
Levantine countries, weddings
are a time for "something old,"
though that "something old" is
more likely to be a veiled
Yemenite kaftan than a veil of an-
tique Belgian lace.
"Weddings are really the only
time we take out our traditional
clothing and sing songs from the
old country," explains Yemenite
community leader Naomi Sharabi.
SHARABI, who comes from an
ancient Yemenite family her
family on her father's side can
trace itself to the period of the
Talmud is a Yemenite culture
afficionado. Singlehandedly, she
founded and directs Ezrat Avot, a
cultural and community center
serving the Yemenite community
of Jerusalem. She has plans to add
a museum of Yemenite culture
and art to the center, including an
exhibit on Yemenite wedding
customs.
These days, Sharabi explains,
most Yemenites marry in typical
Israeli style. The real highlight of
the Yemenite wedding celebration
Lakes place the night before the
wedding, after the bride has gone
to the mxkvah or ritual bath to
purify herself. This evening is call-
ed the henna because of the
special red dye that is prepared
and applied to the palms of the
hands and soles of the feet of the
bride and female guests at the
ceremony.
"It is considered to give protec-
tion from the 'evil eye,' explains
Sharabi. The dye, which is made
from ground up leaves of the
Hawsonia alba plant, was known
throughout the ancient world for
its healing qualities. Maimonides
recognized its value and prescrib-
ed it as a cure for excema. "Ac-
tually, variations of the henna
ceremony are performed
throughout the Middle East by
Arabs as well as Jews," adds
Sharabi.
IN YEMEN, the reddish dye
was applied to the bride's hands
and face in decorative patterns.
A large
percentage of the
younger
generation
marry non-
Yemenites and,
inevitably, their
children feel even
less of a
connection to the
Yemenite
tradition, but
many are also
returning to
their roots and
once again
coming to
appreciate the
beauty of their
culture.
So coveted was the privilege of
dyeing the bride that a notable
woman of the community would
pay for this honor with a gift to
the young couple. Today, the most
revered and pious of the older
female relatives applies the dye to
the bride's palm. "The hands and
face, however, are no longer
decorated." says Sharabi.
On henna night, both bride and
groom don the garb of Yemenite
royalty. For the bride, this is a
Jalay'eh or silk kaftan em-
broidered with gold threads on
which are hung gold coins and
other ornaments. Among the or-
naments, small pomegranates are
hung, traditional symbols of fer-
tility, as well as coins and other
trinkets arranged in groups of
threes, fives and sevens, all
numbers with kabbalistic
significance. Beneath her robe,
the bride wears pantaloons which
are also decorated with gold coins.
In Yemen, the coins were the
bride's dowry, though in Israel
they are purely decorative.
To match her gown, the bride
wears an elaborate headdress. In
wealthier families, this headdress
would contain mother of pearl in-
lays and precious metals, explains
Sharabi. The groom dons a
qalatnya, or gold embroidered kaf-
tan, the garment of the kings of
Yemen. In traditional Yemenite
henna ceremonies, the bride and
groom are kept separated from
each other. In modern Israel,
however, the separation is less
strictly enforced, and the groom is
often present as a guest at the
henna ceremony.
The young couple are serenaded
with songs in Yemenite, and an-
cient Judeo-Arabic dialect combin-
ing elements of Arabic, Aramaic
and Hebrew. Interestingly, the
songs do not celebrate the beauty
of the bride but warn the couple
that they face a difficult road
ahead of them. "The songs don't
say your life will be as happy as it
is now. They say you can expect to
have difficulties, but they can
work it out," explained Sharabi.
IN ACCORDANCE with
Jewish law, the male and female
guests separate for singing and
dancing of intricate Yemenite folk
dances, which are performed to
the accompaniment of a Yemenite
style mandolin and a steel drum.
Sometimes guests perform these
dances with lighted cakes on their
heads for the bride's
entertainment.
A large percentage of the
younger generation marry non-
Yemenites and, inevitably, their
children feel even less of a connec-
tion to the Yemenite tradition, but
many are also returning to their
roots and once again coming to
appreciate the beauty of their
culture.
A Sephardi ketuba (marriage contract).
Jews Must Better Address Drug Abuse,
Says Rabbi/Psychiatrist
By BEN GALLOB
A Hasidic rabbi and psychiatrist
asserts that, "if anything," Jews
are "over represented in
substance abuse." Rabbi
Abraham Twerski, medical direc-
tor of the Gateway Rehabilitation
Center in Alquippa, Pa., recently
told a Newton, Mass., synagogue
audience that alcohol and drug ad-
diction commonly afflict
American Jews, according to the
Jewish Advocate of Boston.
He said the Jewish community
must acknowledge "this truth"
and act on it. Twerski, who was
ordained in 1951, began studies in
psychiatry when he observed that
Jews in trouble sought counseling
from psychiatrists rather than
rabbis.
ALONG WITH marijuana,
New Feature Film Looks At An
Israeli Intermarriage Problem
By MARGIE OLSTER
Moshe Mizrachi has returned to
Israel after a 10-year hiatus to
write and direct a new film about
a traditional Sephardic family in
Jerusalem facing intermarriage
during the British mandate.
Mizrachi, the Oscar-winning
Israeli director who has spent the
past 10 years making movies in
Paris, based the plot of "Every
Time We Say Goodbye" on a per-
sonal recollection of an event in
his own family.
The film, starring Tom
("Nothing in Common,"
"Splash") Hanks and Cristina
Marsillach, a well-known Spanish
actress, was filmed entirely in
Jerusalem. Hanks plays an
American pilot in World War II,
David Bradford, who has
volunteered for the British Royal
Army and is recovering from an
injury in Jerusalem and awaiting
further orders.
In the meantime. Hanks' non-
Jewish squadron leader, played by
British actor Benedict Taylor,
plans to wed a young, traditional.
Sephardic Jewish girl. Victoria
played by Israeli actress Anat
("Lemon Popsicle") Atzmon.
VICTORIA INTRODUCES her
friend Sarah (Marsillach) to
David, and the two fall in love
against a "Romeo and Juliet
background. Sarah must choose
hetween the love of her closely-
knit and staunchly traditional
Sephardic family, and her roman-
S love with the non-Jevnsh
soldier.
Producer Sharon Harel. who
also produced "HaLahaka (The
) and several other braeh
films said Mizrachi came to her
two years ago with his simple but
moving story, and she asked him
to write a script based on it. "It
took him 20 years to do it. He car-
ried the pain in his life of how this
woman was tortured," Harel said.
The story is based loosely, ac-
cording to Harel, on a similar
drama that happened to one of
Mizrachi's aunts who lived in his
family's home when he was a
young boy. Harel would not say if
the movie and the real life event
had the same outcome.
Harel, the daughter od Yossi
Harel, commander of the ship Ex-
odus, said she was personally
fascinated by the script because
she is the daughter of an
American mother and an Israeli
father. But beyond that, Harel
said the film tackles a prevalent
social problem during the British
Continued on Page 8-A
The rabbi said
the Jewish
community must
acknowledge
"this truth" and
act on it.
Twerski, who
was ordained in
1951, began
studies in
psychiatry when
he observed that
Jews in trouble
sought
counseling from
psychiatrists
rather than
rabbis.
alcohol and cocaine, Twerski
listed numerous prescription
drugs in medicine chests in Jewish
homes which he said are abused
daily He declared that the only
time to take a drug is during il-
lness. He said "coming home from
work tense is not sick. The only
people who are not tense are
dead." He urged Jews to find
natural ways to relax.
The Gateway Center offers a
drug and detoxification program.
It provides kosher diet for pa-
tients who ask for it.
Twerski said that low self-
esteem characterizes substance
abusers, and that this is common
in Jewish families, where guilt
often exists and tends to create
feelings of inadequacy. Such feel-
ings are usually unjustified he
noted, because the guilt-ridden
often are intelligent and likeable.
Many of his listeners were
alcoholics, drug addicts or com-
pulsive overeaters. Most, it was
reported, were getting help in
Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics
Anonymous or Overeaters
Anonymous, programs which
Twerski said he supported as safe
for Jews. Many listeners also
belonged to the Boston chapter of
Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically
Dependent Persons and Signifi-
cant Others (JACS), which spon-
sored the rabbi's talk.
HE URGED his listeners to let
their rabbis know that sermons on
alcoholism and other drug addic-
tion were welcome and to place
notices in their synagogue
bulletins giving information on
the rehabilitation programs for
alcoholics and addicts in the
Greater Boston area.
In a talk the previous day, Twer-
ski urged an assembly of Boston
.......is to discuss alcoholism and
addiction from their pulpits and
open their synagogues to self-help
groups.
Jeff Neipris of Boston, vice
president of JACS and editor of
the organization's journal, said
that support for such programs
was improving in the Boston
Jewish community. Twerski, in
his synagogue talk, said that ad-
diction is often handled badly in
the Jewish community.
Neipris said that the Boston
JACS chapter was receiving funds
from the Combined Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater Boston and
that he hoped to see a substance
abuse education program
established for Jews in the Boston
area.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Centuries Of Channkah Lights
By CARRIE GLASSER
Menorahs crafted in glass, clay, silver, stone, or any
other substance, attest to the fact that religious, social, and
artistic expression are limited only by the materials and im-
agination of the artist. Ancient menorahs reveal attitudes
and styles of the time and place in which they are credited.
The collection of Chanukah menorahs in the Skirball
Department of Judaica at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem
is a testament to the centuries-old celebration of the
Festival of Lights in numerous countries.
The museum's oldest menorah, dating from the 14th Cen-
tury, is a small, triangular, bronze one from southern
France. In the 14th Century many french Jewish scholars
and artisans settled in the south of France and produced
decorated and richly illuminated manuscripts and other
religious items. Their work was influenced by the architec-
ture of the buildings that surrounded them. The menorah
has a triangular back wall with a simply carved rose win-
dow and a row of horseshoe-shaped arch windows below. It
reflects the facades of cathedrals of the late Romanesque
and Early Gothic periods and the gabled roofs of 14th Cen-
tury homes.
A Chanukah lamp from 18th Century Poland epitomizes
a far different Jewish community. This large, brass
menorah with two chimneys in its roof is fashioned as a
facade of the wooden synagogues in Poland at the time,
which were heated by large fireplaces. Animals from
Jewish literature decorate the menorah two lions guard
the synagogue while graceful birds sit atop the frame. This
Chanukah lamp was of practical household use. Its
Shamash candle, a ninth candle used to light the eight
Chanukah candles, probably served as a Shabbat candle as
well, and its legs enable it to sit on a kitchen table or
windowsill.
An Algerian copper and brass menorah from the 19th
Century depicts a two-story Moorish-style building. The
lacelike facade is crowned by a dome with the star and cres-
cent, the Islamic symbol of eternity of Heaven and Earth.
Oil containers are cleverly disguised by eight pointed ar-
ches at the base. The Shamash is set below the center of the
three arches above.
Despite the disparate cultural influences represented in
these Chanukah menorahs, they all celebrate Chanukah
and the dream to rebuild the Temple. Jews all over the
world have always shared a bond that surpasses
geographic differences. This tradition will be repeated this
year when Jews all over the globe light their menorahs and
kindle the shared hope and joy that glows in the Chanukah
lights.
Eighteenth century brass menorah from Poland.


Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Most Significant Impact
On Jews During 1986
Terrorism
Continued from Page 1-A
Arab terrroists. It underscored, as if underscoring were
needed, the lie that Arab terrorism is really anti-Israel and
not anti-Semitic. And the inane responses, including
former President Jimmy Carter's that the reason for the
hlood splattered walls of the synagogue and for its jaggedly
torn bodies was "lack of progress in the Middle East."
2. Belatedly, the exposure of the Syrian connection to
terrorism in London, in Rome, in West Berlin. The
significance here is not so much in the bloodiness of Syria's
hands as in Great Britain's immediate breaking of relations
with Syria. Britain, once again, role model.
8 The United States' bombing of Libya. Terrorism has
ever In-en more vulnerable to retaliation than to a deplor-
ing editorial.
4. And if Libya represented American resolve that we wil
not be intimidated by terrorism, the sale of arms to terr-
orist Iran was a monumental misjudgement. If there was a
retrieving virtue in trading arms for hostages it was the in-
dignant reaction of the American people a reaction so
strong as to render less likely renewed American genuflec-
tion to terrorists.
5. I'ope John Paul IPs visit to the Central Synagogue in
Rome. A long, oh so long journey, some 2000 years in the
traveling. It was a reminder of the long darkness in
(,'atholic-Jewish relations past, and a promise of a poten-
tially warmly lit future.
6. The release of Natan Sharansky and the Nobel Peace
Prize to Eli Wiesel. Sharansky, because no matter the
Soviet cage remains bolted shut, his courage, his dignity
and his political acumen are inspiration for prisoners of
conscience the world over. Wiesel, because his Jewish
values are a reflection of Judaism's most cherished
teachings, and because be himself is a great teacher.
Humanity walks taller because there is a Sharansky,
because there is a Wiesel.
7. The shame of Waldheim. Not so much because the
President of Austria is a revealed liar; the real shame of
Waldheim is that no matter he is a liar and on such a sub-
ject! a majority of his countrymen simply didn't care
enough. They voted the Nazi liar their approbation.
Waldheim shamed, the Austrian electorate shamed.
8. In March, two Lyndon LaRouche candidates prevailed
in the Illinois Party primaries. Heady with victory,
LaRouche fielded 234 candidates in state primaries. Only
13 managed to make it to the November elections. All -
each and every one of them were defeated. The lesson?
That the American people, when the facts are given them,
reject bigotry. And significantly, that the LaRouchites, on
stage, in the spotlight, are their own most effective
prosecutors.
9. The sentencing of ten members of the Nazi-like group
known as The Order. The Justice Department's vigorous
prosecution of hate-activists stands as an unmistakable
warning to neo-Nazis that bigotry inspired crimes will no
be tolerated. Will, instead, be vigorously prosecuted.
10. The new set of emigration rules announced in
November by the Soviet Union. They augur even fewer exit
visas for those seeking freedom. Through November. 198b
onlj 873 Jews were permitted to leave, a fraction of the
4ihi.o Sharansky, and Orlov, loosens the leash on a Sakharoy. a
Bonner. and basks in his "public relations" victories. Hut
the hundreds of thousands who are not celebrities, do not
make headlines, but continue to molder in the Communist
prison-state they are the real measure of his character.
Controversy Flares Over
Archbishop's Visit To The Mideast
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By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) A
diplomatic controversy has
flared over New York Ar-
chbishop John Cardinal
O'Connor's visit this week
to the Middle East. He is in
Jordan on an official visit
meeting with King Hussein,
but his visit to Israel is a
private one. The Vatican
and Israel have no
diplomatic relations.
Last-minute changes in O'Con-
nor's itinerary in Jerusalem,
which appear to shun any official
contacts, have dampened en-
thusiasm for the Catholic leader's
scheduled arrival Thursday.
O'Connor will not meet with
Israel's President Chaim Herzog,
F'rime Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
and Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
Kollek in their offices but has ask-
ed to meet with them privately in
their homes, according to reports
over the weekend.
ISRAELI leaders said Sunday
they will not meet O'Connor if he
insists on seeing them outside of
their offices.
He also declined a tour of Chris-
tian holy places in Jerusalem with
Kollek, designed to show the Car-
dinal investments the city has
made in restoring and preserving
such sites, the reports said. The
changes are apparently designed
in part to avoid recognizing
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
Delicate Relations Disrupted
Officially, O'Connor claimed he
had to cut short his visit because
he was scheduled to be in Rome
Jan. 6 to attend the appointment
of a new Auxiliary Bishop for New
York, William McCormack.
THE SCHEDULED changes
have disrupted the delicate rela-
tions between Jerusalem and the
Archbishop, who first prompted
an official invitation to visit Israel
after making statements last sum-
mer in the press sympathetic to
Palestinian nationalism.
"Somehow, a homeland has to
be provided for the Palestinian
peoples," O'Connor told a New
York Times reporter upon his ar-
rival in Rome in June. "But from a
moral perspective, those people
have to be given a homeland.
Otherwise everything spills over
into every area and that has to
result in a very volatile situation.
So I think that's imperative."
In efforts to show O'Connor the
problem from an Israeli perspec-
tive, Peres, who was then Prime
Minister, extended a personal in-
vitation to O'Connor when the
two met in New York in October.
NOW, SOME Israeli and
American Jewish officials say, it
might have been better to cancel
the visit rather than face a
diplomatic controversy over
O'Connor avoiding official
contacts.
Reactions By U.S. Jewish
Leaders
Meanwhile, officials here and in
Israel have been careful not to
criticize O'Connor, saying the
:hanges were directed by the
Vatican in Rome.
Rabbi Ronald Sobel of Temple
Emanu-El, a friend of O'Connor,
said that although O'Connor
would not be going to Israel as an
official envoy of the Vatican,
there was much hope of improving
relations between Israel and the
Holy See.
"THESE LATEST events lead
one to sadly conclude that perhaps
it would have been better had the
trip not been planned at all at this
time," Sobel said.
Nathan Perlmutter, National
Director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, agreed
that O'Connor would have been
better off to not have scheduled
his visit under these
circumstances.
"The Vatican has embarrassed
John Cardinal O'Connor and itself
more than it embarrasses Israel.
The Vatican's long-expressed and
genuine concern with theological
anti-Semitism is welcome. But its
concern is compromised by this
kind of cynical, political
gamesmanship," Perlmutter said.
RABBI Alexander Schindler,
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
said it was disappointing that
O'Connor would snub Israeli
leaders immediately following an
official reception by Jordan's King
Hussein.
A Question of Equal Treatment
Seymour Reich, president of
B'nai B'rith International, said,
"It is a simple question of equal
treatment. If the Vatican permits
Cardinal O'Connor to be received
by the King of Jordan I cannot see
why he is apparently barred from
calling on the President of
Israel."
Morris Abram, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
said:
"WE REGARD Cardinal
O'Connor as a friend but Israel is
right to expect that it be dealt
with as any sovereign state should
be. A prince of the church cannot
make a private visit to Israel when
he makes an official visit to
Israel's neighbor, Jordan. I still
hope that an equitable solution
can be found with good will so that
Cardinal O'Connor's visit to Israel
will be a wholly successful one."
O'Connor, who left New York
Saturday for Amman, Jordan, ar-
rived there Sunday. He will travel
overland, crossing the Allenby
Bridge to Israel on Thursday. He
had to cancel a scheduled stop in
Egypt for the ceremony in Rome.
Vanunu Pleads
Not Guilty
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mordechai Vanunu, the former
technician at the Dimona nuclear
facility, pleaded not guilty to
charges of treason, grave es-
pionage and passing information
without authorization, as his trial
opened officially in Jerusalem
District Court Sunday.
"He denied the facts in the
charge sheet," Vanunu's at-
torney, Aharon Zichroni, told
reporters after a 90-minute closed
session. The trial will resume in
six weeks. If convicted, Vanunu
could face life imprisonment.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Jewish Woman Most
Likely To Be Raped
Continued from Page 1-A
and pleading appealing to the mercy of the
attacker are associated with being raped"
rather than successfully resisting sexual
assault, the study showed.
"If you could finesse, argue, use verbal
techniques, offer money and this would be ef-
fective, then Jewish women would be very ef-
fective in countering rape," she said.
This "accommodative strategy" of "you
give a little, and you take a little and you sur-
vive" used historically by Jews in op-
pressive societies does not work in a sexual
situation, Bart said. She compared the failure
of this strategy in a rape situation to its
failure in dealing with the Nazis, where "it
did not work because it was a death
machine."
Jewish women's intellectual response to
sexual assault, Bart continued, contrasts
sharply with the most effective defense
against rape which was more likely to be used
by women of other ethnic groups, "a combina-
tion of physical resistance yelling and flee-
ing, or trying to flee, and taking advantage of
environmental intervention (passersby or
distraction of some sort)."
The women who successfully resisted a sex-
ual assault, Bart added, "had a gut reaction
of rage that someone would dare do this to
them." This rage reaction was rooted in
"strong self-esteem the primary feeling
that no creep is going to do this to you."
Jewish women were less likely as children
to have developed "an alternative way of feel-
ing like a competent, effective human being in
ways not simply related to intellect." This,
she says, contrasts with childhood ex-
periences of other women, who, if they grew
up in large families, tended to have major
household responsibilities when they were
young helping them to feel self-confident
and capable of making quick decisions and
handling emergencies wisely.
Jewish women are also less likely than
women of other ethnic groups to fight back
because their family socialization the way
they were raised as children tries to
minimize physical combat, Bart told Lilith.
"Jewish parents are very unwilling to tell
their kids to go downstairs and fight their
own battles."
Jewish women are also "not raised to
understand that the world is a jungle that
we'll have to cope with ourselves," Bart
stressed. "Somehow, many Jewish women
feel that there's this invisible shield around
them that is going to protect them." black
women, by contrast, were given as children
information and techniques of rape avoidance
by their female relatives.
The major difference between Jewish
women and black women is that Jewish
women are less suspicious of men and tend to
be less vigilant against potential assault, Bart
said in the Lilith interview. "They are more
trusting and are very vulnerable to the con-
man approach." Black women, on the other
hand, recognize trouble and quickly "mobilize
themselves against it."
There are also environmental factors that
make Jewish women more vulnerable to rape,
according to Bart. The growing incidence of
date rape and acquaintance gang-rape on col-
lege campuses discussed in a related piece
in Lilith also leaves Jewish women par-
ticularly vulnerable, because a vast majority
attend college.
Bart also scored the role of pornography in
diminishing women's self-esteem, which she
told Lilith is central to women's ability to
resist rape. Pornography, which some Jewish
men support in their role as lawyers for
purveyors of such material, also conveys the
pernicious view that "rape produces only
positive effects for women," she said.
Other articles in the current issue of Lilith
include an account of an Argentine Jewish
mother's struggle to learn the fate of her ab-
ducted children who are among the 30,000
people "disappeared" by the fascist junta
during its 1976-1983 reign of terror; a
Reform rabbi's enthusiastic account of her
mikvah experience; and news of events in-
volving and concerning Jewish women
worldwide.
A Message From
Reagan To Gorbachev
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Reagan told
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev in Reykjavik that
"sustained improvement in
Soviet human rights perfor-
mance, including the treat-
ment of Soviet Jews, is in-
dispensable for an improve-
ment in overall U.S.-Soviet
relations," it was reported
here last Friday.
At a news conference, Morris
Abram, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
made public a letter he had receiv-
ed from the White House in which
the President described his con-
versations with the General
Secretary of the Soviet Com-
munist Party in Iceland last
October.
The President's letter, dated
Dec. 5, states: "Please accept my
assurances that the tragic cir-
cumstances of Soviet Jews will
continue to be an issue of the
highest priority in all our dealings
with the Soviet Union." He added:
"We will not forget how much
they suffer because of their desire
to live in freedom and practice
their religion without persecution,
and we will do everything in our
power to help them."
Asserting that "the plight of
Soviet Jewry is a matter of deep
personal concern I o me and to the
other members' of the U.S.
government," Rejffvn said in his
letter to Abram: "Private
organizations such as those vou
represent make an important con-
tribution to our efforts to bring
about an improvement in the
human rights situation in the
Soviet Union. Your commitment
and activism provide a concrete
example of how deeply Americans
care about human rights and
freedom of movement."
Of his conversations in Rey-
jkavik, the President wrote: "We
discussed with the Soviets many
areas in which progress is possi-
ble, such as regional issues and
the vitally important area of arms
Continued on Page 11-A
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Beauty Parlor on Promises
New Feature Film On
Israeli Intermarriage Problem
Continued from Page 5-A
mandate that is relevant today.
"THERE WERE many stories
like that in Israel," Harel said.
"The whole society was opposed
to intermarriage. Either the fami-
ly intervened, or the girl moved to
Liverpool The British culture
was very tempting and very
promising."
Harel noted that even Eser
Weizman, a member of the Israeli
Knesset and nephew of Israel's
first President, Chaim Weizmann.
had a sister who married a British
non-Jew and moved to England.
Atzmon plays the girl who has
defied her family and agreed to
marry the British captain, David's
friend. Her family disowns her,
and she is lonely and depressed
after the marriage.
Even though Atzman comes
from a non-traditional Israeli
family, she said, "It would hurt
my father a lot if I married a non-
Jew. I would have a problem that
exists all over Israel today."
The actress won Israel's version
of the Oscar for best actress in the
movie "Dead End Street." in
which she played a prostitute
discovered by a television crew
that wants to make a movie about
the rehabilitation of prostitutes.
After rehabilitation, the crew
abandons her and she is left at the
turning point.
ATZMON ALSO has starred in
nine other movies, including
"Dizengoff 99," a film also pro-
duced by Harel. At 28. Atzmon
has reached the top of Israel's film
industry and is ready to try to
break into the ultra-competitive
international film scene.
"I would like to have the oppor-
tunity to do things outside Israel
because (working only in Israel)
can be limiting," she said. "But I
love my country, and I want peo-
ple to know that I am an Israeli
actress."
Marsillach, 23, is, like Atzmon,
making her international film
debut in "Every Time We Say
Goodbye." Her parents are two of
the leading theatrical per-
sonalities in Spain. Father
Adolpho Marsillach js
playwright, stage director, actor
and director of the National
Classical Theatre of Spain
Mother Teresa Del Rio is an
internationally-knwon actress
Marsillach, who is not Jewish
had never visited Israel prior to
filming the movie. Mizrachi coach-
ed her in the ways of Sephardic
Jewish families. "I understood im
mediately because in the South of
Spain, people have the same tradi
tions, the traditions of the
Catholic religion," Marsillach
said.
SHE SAID she approached her
role emotionally, not intellectual
ly. Marsillach found Israel to be
friendly and similar to Spanish
culture in many aspects.
"TTie first shock is that you are
in the Holy Land everything is
mystical." she said. Marsillach liv-
ed in Jerusalem from last
February to April, but said she
had too little time to explore.
Marsillach is now on a scholar
ship in New York to study acting
The actresses and producers
had only words of praise for
American film star Hanks, whc
like Marsillach visited Israel for
the first time during the filming
They described him as highly pro-
fessional and hard working, char
ming, witty and anxious to learn
about his role. That interest land
ed him a tour of an Israeli Air
Force base with one of the best
imaginable tour guides, Ezer
Weizman, the father of the Israeli
Air Force.
JTA Service*
Israel Candidate For
Best Foreign
Film For 1986
TEL AVIV (JTA) The film
"Avanti Popolo," set against tht
background of the 1967 Six Day
War, will be Israel's candidate for
an Oscar in the category of "Best
Foreign Film" of 1986. the
Ministry of Commerce and In
dustry informed the Academy of
Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
in Los Angeles.
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Report: Israel Was A Conduit
For W. German Arms To Iran
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) West Germany supplied arms to Iran as
early as 1973 but channeled them through Israel in order to keep
the deals secret at a time when Bonn officially embargoed arms
sales to areas of tension, including the Middle East, according to
reports that surfaced here recently.
Die Welt, a leading conservative daily, reported that in 1973,
Iran, then ruled by the Shah, obtained rights to produce two
West German tank cannons and the ammunition for them. A
year later, West Germany shipped 58,000 hand grenade fuses to
Iran, through Israeli channels, the paper said.
Israel was used to avoid embarrassment and to head off
possible Arab criticism. Israel was then governed by a Labor-led
government. The information is based on government leaks to
counter an opposition campaign against the sale of submarine
blueprints to South Africa.
The conservative government of Chancellor Helmut Kohl ap-
parently seeks to show that previous governments led by the op-
position Social Democratic Party (SPD) had a record of selling
arms to any country, regardless of officially stated policies.
Shipments were also made to Chile, Argentina and Peru.
Friday. January 2, 1987fThe Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Yeskiva University raised $150 million in gifts and pledges at its
national Centennial Chanukah dinner before some 1.500 guests in
New York last week. Dr. Norman Lamm (right), marking ku
tenth year as president of the institution, is shown being
presented with a $150 million check by Ludwig Jesselson. chair-
man of the University's Century Campaign, a seven-year effort
which began in 1979.
Gorbachev's 'Potemkin Villages'
Continued from Page 4-A
was registered that talk about the
rules remained vague.
Later, when the regulations
became available, all optimism
was shattered. The only signifi-
cant change that the new rules of-
fered was that an applicant for an
exit visa would be given an
answer within a month. The shape
of things to come was indicated in
the monthly Jewish emigration
figures, which averaged a mere
"6.
FOR A FITTING climax to the
new Kremlin style, Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevardnadze
dropped a public relations bomb-
shell. After contending that the
I'SSR "attaches paramount
significance" to the Helsinki
"principle" on "human rights and
fundamental freedoms" (it was in
fact the first time that a Soviet of-
ficial had even referred in a
positive manner to this Helsinki
"principle"), he then proposed
holding in Moscow "a represen-
tative conference" of the Helsinki
signatories to discuss a whole
range of "humanitarian"
problems.
Shevardnadze, of course, said
nothing about whether ordinary
So\ iet citizens, including activists
snd dissidents, and international
human rights non-governmental
representatives would have m*^es8
to delegates (as in tha- ea* < a"
Helsinki meetings)
Soviet public relation.- vii* >
in Vienna were extraordinarily
'ague in responding to normal
reporters' queries on the
"Potemkin village" proposal.
Whatever illusions may have ex-
isted began crumbling once the
delegates moved from the public
forum to the closed meetings
where sharp questions on Soviet
conduct would be posed. Here con-
crete case studies of refuseniks
and of Helsinki monitors were
movingly presented by the head of
the U.S. delegation, Ambassador
Warren Zimmerman, and by Rep.
Steny Hoyer (D., Md.), chairman
of the U.S. Helsinki Commission.
THE "NEW LOOK" suddenly
evaporated. Soviet delegates
retorted with the standard
response: what about the millions
of homeless and unemployed in
the United States?
Yet the Gorbachev "Potemkin
villages" can be expected to con-
tinue. Kremlin talk about human
rights and humanitarian affairs
will extend beyond goverment
bureaus (the Foreign Ministry
houses a new department in-
credibly called ''Humanitarian
and Cultural Affairs") and shortly
to-be-created "citizens" commis-
sions on human rights to regular
state-issued reports on the
presumed human rights condition
of Helsinki signatories.
Meanwhile, little if nything
projected beyond to"*"*
release of a tir,. baadW *
Uvists. cancer vHt--and divided
spouses. The 'Toi.mKir. villages
strategy serves r,ut w luU a.urid
53S&- while ^mg vrtuany
nothing in the human rights field.
Congratulations are in order following the
signing of a coalition agreement involving
Herut. Teehiya and Tami. three American
Zionist organizations whose agendas call for
Israel's peace with security, settlement of
Judea and Samaria, and a free enterprise
economy. Establishing the United Israel-
Zionist Coalition are Heft to right) Rabbi Mit-
chell Serels. Tami; Harry S. TaubenfeUL
Herut; and Michael I. Teplou: Teehiya.
You've
"Got What


** 1
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Htssital fw Hm Afsd at (Mafias


sc xv-sl a ue tiewisn r lonaian/f nday, January 2, 1987
The Future Of Judaism In The U.S.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Despite divisions among
American Jews the future
of Judaism is bright, accor-
ding to prominent Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform Judaism leaders.
They agreed in a symposium
at Fordham University that
the unity of the Jewish peo-
ple depends on civility,
respect and cooperation by
the three major streams of
contemporary Judaism.
"Pluralism exists in Jewish life.
This is a fact," Rabbi Emanuel
Rackman, a leader of Orthodox
Judaism in America and
Chancellor of Bar Ilan University,
asserted. "Unity, however, is
hard to achieve. I am concerned
with civility. It is impossible to say
that all groups are equally right.
But we should learn from each
other," he said.
RABBI Alfred Gottschalk, a
leader of Reform Judaism and
president of the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, concurred about civility,
but he said that pluralism in the
Jewish community should be en-
couraged. He said he believes in
"unity in Jewish life but not in
uniformity. Jewish life can only be
enriched by diversity and
pluralism," he claimed.
In the view of Rabbi Wolfe
Kelman, a leader of Conservative
Judaism and executive vice presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Assembly,
there is "a de facto unity" in the
American Jewish community.
But, Kelman maintained, there is
no de jure unity in Judaism here
because one branch of Judaism
does not recognize "the
legitimacy" of the other groups.
"No one has a monopoly on
holiness," Kelman said
emphatically.
He added, however, that "we
have come a long way" recalling
the "ferocious fights" between
different groups in Judaism when
he was growing up in Toronto,
Canada. "The fights then were in
Yiddish and now they are in
English." he observed to the
laughter of some 300 members of
the audience.
THE SYMPOSIUM was
organized and moderated by Rab-
bi William Berkowitz, national
president of the American Jewish
Heritage Committee in associa-
tion with The Dialogue Forum
Series, which is sponsored by
Berkowitz.
The three rabbis agreed that the
American Jewish community "has
never been in a better shape" as
Kelman asserted. Noting that 40
and 50 years ago many Jews con-
verted to Christianity, "today
many return to Judaism, in almost
unprecedented numbers in the
last 150 years." He said that the
amount of books published in
America on Jewish subjects and
the number of people who study
and learn Judaism and other
Jewish subjects has no parallel in
Jewish history.
"This is the greatest golden age
of Jewish life since the golden age
of the Jews in Spain," Gottschalk
said. He pointed out, however,
that at the same time the vast ma-
jority of American Jews are still
unaffiliated and only a small
percentage is in the "Torah move-
ment." Rackman contended that
for most Jews "Jewishness is
most superficial. They use it as a
rite of passage, for birth, wedding
and death," he said.
He said that in his view, the
Torah is "eternal," and should be
able, therefore, to cope with
modernity. The most controver-
sial issue confronting the three
panelists was the "Who is a Jew"
question, a controversy that has
caused a political uproar in Israel
and in the American Jewish
community.
THE ORTHODOX want to
amend the Law of Return in Israel
to recognize as converts to
Judaism only those who were con-
verted according to halacha, or by
Orthodox rabbis. Conversions by
Conservative and Reform rabbis
would not be valid, according to
the proposed amendment.
"This is a heinous thing, to ques-
tion the authenticity of Jews,"
Gottschalk said. The question is
not only who is a Jew but also
"who is a rabbi," he pointed out,
stating that the issue has caused
the Reform movement "more pain
than any other issue." He said
that when Hitler killed the Jews
he knew exactly who was a Jew.
"This dispute creates a lot of
animosity," he exclaimed.
Kelman said that the issue of
"Who is a Jew" has become an at-
tempt by "rightwing Orthodox to
delegitimize the Reform and Con-
servative movements." He said
that he believes in the separation
of state and church.
RACKMAN, who is regarded as
a moderate Orthodox, said that
he, too, is against the "Who is a
Jew" amendment. But he sain k
and church although he believed
depohticizing religion. n
Concluding the evening
Berkowitz read a short 5228
calling for the unity of the 532
people. He stated: "The AmerSJ
Jewish Heritage Committee PC
to undertake a program of action
during the forthcoming year and
urge special days of unity between
all Jewish denominations."
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Asia: Increasing Economic And
Geopolitical Importance To Israel
Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
NEW YORK Asia is a
region of increasing
economic and geopolitical
importance, and Israel's ef-
forts to cultivate good rela-
.,ons with several Asian na-
tions have often been
hampered by Arab or Com-
munist pressures on those
nations to distance
themselves politically and
economically from Israel,
according to a study publish-
ed by the American Jewish
Committee.
Harrj Milkman, research
in the Israel and Middle
I. ,- Iffairs division of AJC's In-
, Relations Depart-
ind Jordana Schein-Levi,
; r gran issistanf '<> the Deputy
tor if the hum department,
"Israel and Asia
Bilateral Relations," of-
fer th- following accounts of
. irying diplomatic and
n itions with several Asian
-
lapan is Israel's lar^<"-: Asian
ng partner; however,
IC Israeli relations reflect
- heavy reliance -.n Aral'
1976, the VIA) was allowed
rlish an office in Tokyo. To-
* rule Japan is attempting to
..- iiplomatic relations, it is
>itant to increase economic
a th Israel in the face of the
i lycott
Hong Kong is Israel's second
Asian trading partner
: relations have heen
tained since 1958.
Singapore is Israel's third
largest Asian trading partner
Iiplomatic relations have
maintained since 1969.
gapora has supported Israel on
a numlier of important UN resolu-
At the same time.
Sii ga| nre's government is careful
nm to antagonize Malaysia, one of
the most populous Muslim nations
i Hostile attitude toward
ind Jews, and upon whom it
es heavily for its water.
Thailand is Israel's fourth
Asian trading partner.
l recognized Israel in
established consular rela
'.n> in 1954 and embassy status
- Since then the two coun-
tries have worked together in the
>f trade, agriculture, avia-
tion, defense and nuclear energy.
Thailand has been somewhat sup-
portive of Israel in the UN.
India is Israel's fifth largest
Asian trading partner, diamonds
constituting the bulk of the trade.
Not wanting to alienate itself
from the Arab nations or its own
84 million Muslim citizens. India
has not established full diplomatic
relations with Israel. India has
been consistently hostile toward
Israel in the UN, and maintains
close relations with the PLO.
However, there are cooperative
efforts between Israel and India
in the area of the technical
assistance.
South Korea is Israel's sixth
largest Asian trading partner.
Diplomatic relations were
established in l%li despite Arab
opposition However, the Israeli
mbaSBJ in Seoul was closed in
197s and ha.~ not been allowed to
reopen. Once again, lependence
on Aral, til u well is profital
construction pre, :,,- Arab
(lulf have strained South K ire
relations wit! Israel Israe has
pro\ ided S >uth K irea -^ ith
technical l< i pment a sistance
The Peoj .- Republii
was recogniz"
the first West< racies t"
do so. in i960 I lespite its rela-
tions with severs Islamic coun-
tries and its active support of the
PLO since 1966 China's attitude
toward Israel continues to show
sign.- of improvement. The two
countries have recently been
engaged in talks regarding
cooperative projects in the fields
of agriculture and high
technolog) A recent contract
calls for Israeli equipment to be
used to establish a model irrigated
farm in China. Although China
does not allow the direct import of
l>raeli goods, millions of dollars
worth of Israeli arms have
reportedly l>een purchased by the
Chinese.
Taiwan does not have formal
diplomatic relations with Israel
but is engaged in some trade and
cooperative developments
projects
The Philippines formally
Reagan's Message
Continued from Page 8-A
control. I made it very clear to the
Soviet leaders, however, that sus
tamed improvement in human
rights performance, including the
treatment of Soviet Jews, is in-
dispensable for an improvement
in overall U.S.-Soviet relations.
"The American people simply
will not have it otherwise,"
Reagan wrote
recognized Israel in 1949, and
during the next 20 years
diplomatic and trade relations im-
proved and expanded. Under the
Marcos regime. Israeli develop-
ment projects in the Philippines
were drastically reduced but are
now being renewed by President
Aquino.
Burma was the first Asian
country to recognize Israel, in
1949, and the two nations
developed full diplomatic relations
over the next 10 years. Israel has
assisted in developing Burma's
agriculture, industry and military.
In recent years, Burma has been
the most supportive Asian coun-
try of Israel in the UN.
Nepal established full
diplomatic relations with Israel in
. 'on and had established several
rat i ve technical and
nil.' projects. Since the Yom
Kippur War of 1973. Arab
rest ire has resulted in strained
relations, although some of the
are still in existence.
Nepal's trade with Israel con-
iee on a small scale, and Nepal
voted in Israel's favor on a
number of relevant UN resolu-
tions I*, is rumored that Israeli
president Chaim Herzog may viit
Nepal in the near future.
Sri Lanka voted in favor of
the 1976 UN resolution equating
Zionism with racism. However,
months of negotiations in 1984
-suited in the establishment of an
Israeli interests section in the
U.S. embassy in Colombo. Cur-
rently. Israel is expected to par-
ticipate in a major Sri Lankan
agricultural development project.
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years in Israel.
Competition will be held in the Hebraka with the Presi-
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team training camp and travel arrangements takes time,
please contact Jeffrey Laikind at U.S. Committee Sports
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The Israel Histadrut Foundation
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on Israel's Independence Day
Every Year For The Next 20 Years*
By Contributing $ 1800 to the
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gc v-rk inv jewisn r ionaian/r ridav, Jaiywrv 9 la*1?
x ge xc-a ine mm riondian/Kriaay, January ^jvbi^
i
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D
F
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An Early Opponent Of Hitler
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
"One of the most
courageous early opponents
of Hitler" was now one in-
fluential West German
newspaper described Prince
Hubertus zu Loewenstein-
Wertheim-Freudenberg,
who had actively challenged
Hitler and the leadership of
Nazi Germany. A prominent
German Roman Catholic
layman, he called them
"cowards to the very bone."
His valiant efforts to warn
against Hitler even before he
became to full power were follow-
ed by an illustrious career after
World War II as a politician and
historian. When the Prince died in
1984 at the age of 78 in Bonn, he
was remembered well by those
whose lives he touched and by
those he helped save during the
Holocaust.
IT WAS in part to acknowledge
his lifelong fight against Nazism
and anti-Semitism, his commit-
ment to freedom and justice, and
to draw attention to the efforts of
non-Jews who spoke out about the
dangers of Hitler that led the
Anti-Defamation League of B"nai
B'rith's International Center for
Holocaust Studies to pay tribute
to Loewenstein.
At an emotional ceremony at
ADL national headquarters in
New York, old friends and ac-
quaintances reminisced about
Loewenstein's activities in the
1930's and 1940's in Germany
and later, after Hitler came to
power, in the United States. He
was forced to flee his homeland
after his life was threatened by
the Nazis.
Loewenstein's widow. Princess
Helga zu Loewenstein. Volkmar
von Zuhlsdorf, recalled that they
first sought refuge in Austria in
A. and finally came to the
I'nited States. "1 ask you to
remember." she said, "that to the
outside world, you ;ire always the
land of the free and the hope of all
refugee-
A FORMER close associate of
Prince Loewenstein, described
the Prince as "a distinguished
man, a scholar, and a writer of
outstanding achievements, a
political leader of visionary in-
sight and a fighter for freedom,
justice and human rights
throughout his life."
Indeed, Prince Loewenstein
was an extraordinary figure of
unique insight. He was born in
Schonworth Castle near Kufstein
in western Austria to an old noble
family with its roots in Franconia,
a region in southern Germany.
His father was Prince Max-
imillian zu Loewenstein
Wertheim-Freudenberg a
cavalry officer in a Bavarian regi-
ment and a man of letters and
his mother, Constance, was the
younger daughter of the first
Baron Pirbright, an Englishman.
As a youth he attended schools
in Austria and Germany, and the
universities of Munich, Hamburg
and Geneva. He earned a doc-
torate in 1931 at the University of
Hamburg after writing a thesis
entitled, "Outlines and Ideas of
the Fascist State and Its
Realization."
He became a writer for
VoBsitcke Zeitung, a left-liberal
newspaper. In an early editorial,
he warned against Hitler's rise to
power and its implications for
world peace. Later, while active in
the Catholic Center Party, he
founded the Republican Youth
Movement in Berlin and wrote
editorials for another newspaper,
"Berliner Tageblatt," all ad-
vocating support for the failing
Weimar Republic.
ACCORDING to Zuhlsdorf,
Loewenstein was quickly becom-
ing a rising force in Germany
against Hitler and Nazism, earn-
ing nationwide attention and ac-
claim. "In particular, Hubertus
Loewenstein campaigned against
the infamy of anti-Semitism,"
recalled Zuhlsdorf.
"He was one of the first to take
Hitler's hateful, depraved rattling
against the Jews seriously and to
denounce him with all the power
at his command. He warned
against the dangers ahead, but all
too many people, even some of his
Jewish friends among them,
thought that he must be exag-
gerating," Zuhlsdorf said.
Loewenstein arrived in the U.S.
in 1937. It was here that, speaking
in his fluent English at univer-
sities across the country, he warn-
ed of the dangers of Hitler, anti-
Semitism, and totalitarianism. His
lecture topics included, "Anti-
Semitism: Lowest Pit of Abomina-
tion," "Hitler Talks Peace While
Preparing War," and "Hitler
Won't Last, Democratic Germany
Will Be Reborn."
WHILE IN the U.S. where
he was a visiting professor of the
Carnegie Foundation on many
campuses Loewenstein also
helped found the Free Germany
Committee, consisting of German
emigres, who sought to lay the
foundation for "a genuine na-
tional German government with
freedom for all people" after the
war.
After nearly a decade here,
Loewenstein and his family
returned to Germany in 1946
where he committed himself to
assisting in the rebuilding of Ger-
man democracy. He was elected
to the West German Parliament
as a member of the liberal Free
Democratic Party, and soon
became an internationally
recognized spokesman on behalf
of the West German government,
lecturing and teaching in more
than 60 countries.
He wrote more than 40 books,
including "The Tragedy of a Na-
tion" (1934), "The Germans in
History" (1945), "NATO and the
Defense of the West" (1962) and
an autobiography, "Towards the
Further Shore" (1968). At the
time of his death, he was reported-
ly working on a book about what
he called "the Creators of Chris-
tian Europe." He was also the
long-time head of the Free Ger-
man Authors Association.
LOEWENSTEIN
distinguished career renr.2 S
"the finest traditions of&5
culture which the Hitler ^
the ADL gathering. "HefoLSL
that the Nariregewa.U5J
workt^^*^*
Barbie Trial
PARIS (JTA) The tj
Klaus Barbie might l>egin
March, according to Jmjj
Minister Albin Challandon B,
bie's trial will be in the Li
Criminal Court. He will be ch
ed with "crimes against hua
ty" as his war crimes are bvi
covered by the statut,
limitations
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Ouif
Community
Frtd.y, J.nu.ry z, gj Th. j.W|.h ?i^i^~i^^
A Rescuer Comes
Out Of The Shadows
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A man
who has secretly worked to rescue
Jew- from lands of persecution
for rrore than 40 years has finally
come <>ut of the shadows.
Shaika Dan, 76. is the subject of
l hour television documentary
to be screened in Israel on this
year's Independence Day. In it, he
: t- honored by many of those
he brought to the safety of Eretz
Yisrael and by Israeli leaders, in-
cluding some of the people who
worked alongside him.
Last week a group of leading
British Jews were shown extracts
of the program at a special
ew at the home of the Israeli
Ambassador in London, Yehuda
\..-" It was attended by Dan
elf and his wife Eva. a
ber of an illegal aliya
trai port he organized from
V ,c -.avia in 1946.
tall, white-haired man
with a wry sense of humor.
emerges as a person of great
determination for whom helping a
single Jew to reach Israel is as im-
portant as helping 1.000.
Among those who pay tribute to
his work are Tony Simonds.
former commander of M19. the
British intelligence unit in Cairo
which organized the escape of
Allied prisoners from Nazi-
occupied Europe; former
parachutist Reuven Dafne, assis-
tant director of Yad Vashem;
former Premier Shimon Peres-
former President Yitzhak Navon
and Knesset member Yitzhak
Artzi.
The program is entitled "Blind
Jump." a reference to Dan's ex-
ploits as one of the 26 Jews from
Palestine parachuted into Nazi-
occupied Europe in the midst of
World War II. Several lost their
lives in this highly risky operation,
including two women Manna
S.Tn-sh and Haviva Reik.
Their mission, organized by
Continued on Page 16-B
t'hutua: Uuj Fnman
Muxmi Beach City Commvisxoner Abe Resnick, presented a city
proclamation to Jens Bossen, coach of the Danish basketball team
Ithat played th* Academy Warriors in an exhibition game.
Resnick joined attorney Larry Fexngold in thanking the Danish
\]*oplefor their help to Jews during World War II.
Elton J. Kerness (left), associate executive vice
president of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, prepares a hot meal at the Salva-
tion A rmy Men s Red Shield Lodge during the
second annual "Help Your Neighbors
Celebrate Christmas" program. The program
provides Jewish volunteers from Federation
and the Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami pictured in the serving line to replace
their Christian counterparts, on Christmas
Day, allowing them to stay home and celebrate
their holiday.
Botwinicks In New York
For Carnegie Hall Gala
By ELLEN STEIN
A Miami Beach couple watched with special
pride as the newly renovated Carnegie Hall in
New York City opened with a star-studded
performance.
Benjamin and Bessie Botwinick flew to
New York to watch the performance with
their son-in-law James D. Wolfensohn who
has been Chairman of the Board of Carnegie
Hall for the past six years.
"It was our decision to go. I wasn't going to
miss it." said Mr. Botwinick, a retired CPA
who moved to Miami Beach with Bessie in
1970.
The evening started with a buffet dinner at
Hotel Parker Meridien, located on the same
block as Carnegie Hall.
"The concert was supposed to begin at 8
p.m. but the jam was so terrific with people
coming to look that it didn't start until later,"
Botwinick said. But the curtain finally did go
up to such musical greats as Zubin Mehta,
Frank Sinatra, the New York Philharmonic
with conductor Leonard Bernstein and a
special appearance by Vladimir Horowitz.
Carnegie Hall first opened in 1891 and the
first concert there was performed by none
other than Tchaikovsky, making his
Continued on Pag* 2-B
Benjamin Botwinick
ebrew Academy Hosts Danish Youth Basketball Team
By ELLEN STEIN
.During their one month stay in America, a
''siting Danish youth basketball team did not
'ant to miss a chance to meet with the team
rom the Rabbi Alexander Gross Hebrew
academy.
The Danes' curiosity had been piqued after
ley read about the trouble the Academy var-
sity basketball team had when referees would
r? let them play early season games. The
referees claimed the bobby pins on their
engious head coverings, yarmulkes, created
safety hazard.
Had the Danes not been on their first visit
> America, had the problem of the Academy
'arriors not drawn national attention, had
nere not been an historic significant link bet-
ffik? nmark *** Israel. the meeting and
^nimtion game might never have taken
But it wasn't the first time the Danes had
taken an interest in the plight of the Jewish
people. And that made last week's game
much more than a long dribble down court.
"Our students play with kipahs and they
(the Danish team) read about us and said
we'd like to play you,' said Marlene Schim-
mel, president of the Hebrew Academy PTA.
"We all remembered what the Danish peo-
ple did for Jews. They were the only country
to stand up against the Nazis.
"This Mrs. Schimmel said, referring to
the exhibition game, "is an incredible
opportunity."
Academy officials took advantage of that
opportunity, preparing a welcome that the
young Danish team was not likely to forget.
* Three hundred and fifty Academy students
Continued on Page 11-B
Index
AJCommittee Donates Library Collection... 4-B
Argentinian Teenagers Visit Miami... 4-B
Search and Destroy Mission 6-B
Talmudic U. Dinner... 10-B
Zionist History Lectures... 10-B
Religious Directory... 11-B
Hadassah Events... 9-B
Tribute To Rabbi Leon Kronish... M
Obituaries ... 13-B
SE


1 .' \*-. V1U,IV".M
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Botwinicks In New York For
Carnegie Hall Gala
Continued from Page 1-B
American debut. In 1960, when the aging
grand dame of concert halls was going to be
torn down to make way for a modern office
complex, a major campaign was launched to
raise $50 million for its renovation and
restoration. The successful drive was led by
renowned violinist Isaac Stern.
At the grand opening performance Dec. 15,
the Botwinicks snared aisles with the likes of
Maureen Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Beverly
Sills, Leontyne Price, Senator Daniel Patrick
Moynihan, former Governor Hugh C. Carey
and guests who donated anywhere from more
than $1 million toward the renovation to
those who paid $2,500 for the dinner and
concert.
"I knew a fantastic number of people were
there from all walks of life," Mr. Botwinick
said. "It was an event more than a concert,
people walked around from box to box
greeting everyone. The interior was just
Fantastic."
Wolfensohn, a native of Australia who mar-
ried the Botwinicks' daughter Elaine, played
the cello during the performance of Mahler
Symphony Number 2 in C Minor, known as
The Resurrection.
Wolfensohn, a financier with his own in-
vestment banking company, received his law
degree from Sydney University and an MBA
from the Harvard School of Business.
Elaine Wolfensohn, also musically inclined
on the piano, was educated at Wellesley and
received a masters degree in French from
Columbia University. She also studied for a
vear at Sorbonne.
The Botwinicks' granddaughter. Sara,
studied at the Juilliard School of Music.
Wolfensohn, a past president of the
Jerusalem Foundation, also is president of
the Institute of Advanced Studies at
Princeton and is on the board of CBS.
The Botwinicks had been to Carnegie Hall
many times when they lived in New York.
But the opening was a special event not to
be missed.
"It was very, very exciting," Mr. Botwinick
said. "You had people from all over the world
there."
No Change In Israel-Austrian Relations
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice Premier and foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
received the Austrian Am-
bassador, Otto Pleinert,
here Monday. But the ques-
tion remained open as to the
Happenings
Federal Judge Alcee L. Hastings will be the guest speaker at the
first 1987 meeting of the Tiger Bay Political Luncheon Club Jan
7 at noon.
Honda International University Professor Steve Remsen. say-
ing that he would donate the entire $6,000 salary to charity and
needy individuals, announced that he will run for a seat on the
Miami Beach City Commission in November
The oil paintings of Deborah Schneider and the sculptural con-
structions and wall installations of Barbara Schwartz will be on
display for one month after openings Jan 8 and 9 at the Gloria
Luna gallery in Bay Harbor.
"The Race is On! Which will win: Enlightened Civilization or
Massive Human Destruction?" That question will be the topic of
Dr. Robert Sandier, guest speaker at the Forte Forum at 1 p.m.
Tuesday. Dr. Sandier is Professor of English at the University of
Miami, specializing in American Literature and Contemporary
American Culture.
Dade County legislators have been invited to meet with the League
of Women Voters of Dade County at its Jan. 22 luncheon, noon
at Tio Pepe Restaurant.
The Young Israel of Sunny Isles, hoping to spur Orthodox
Jewish tourism, has set up a Jewish Visitors Information Service,
offering information about area motels that cater to these visitors,
lists of restaurants and food establishments that provide kosher
diets, guides to purchasing or renting homes and apartments and a
list of religious and day school facilities
Rabbi Rubin R Dobin. spiritual leader of the congregation, said
that Orthodox Jewish tourists, particularly from the Northeast.
Midwest and Canada, have needs to be filled in their wish to
observe Jewish traditions including kosher foods. Sabbath obser-
vance and religious services.
A spectacular ball will toast the reopening of the grand hilt more
Hotel and its designation on the National Register of Historic
Places. The Jan. 16 event will recapture the excitement of the
hotel's original opening in January. 1926 with period swank
fashions, historical exhibits, vintage automobiles and a iazz
orchestra.
The affair is being sponsored by the Dade Heritage Trust along
with the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation and the National
Trust.
The Beth Israel Cultural Forum will present Rabbi Dr Herbert
Bomzer. author and rabbinic scholar who will speak at 10 a.m..
Sunday on "Conversion or Reaction What Is the Answer?"
Rabbi Bomzer is assistant professor at Yeshiva University and
past president of the Brooklyn Orthodox Rabbinate
future level of diplomatic
relations between the two
countries.
Pleinert reportedly expressed
his government's desire that the
former level be restored, and
Peres responded that this was
also the wish of the Israeli govern-
ment. Pleinert also expressed
hope that Israel would soon ap-
point a new Ambassador to Vien-
na. It is not known what Peres
replied.
Israel has had no Ambassdor in
the Austrian capital since its en-
voy, Michael Elizur, retired
several months ago. A successor
to Elizur has not been named
because the government does not
want an Ambassador of Israel to
present credentials to the
Austrian President, Kurt
Waldheim.
Yiddish Culture
Winkle Meet
A musical morning will bring in
the new season of Yiddish Culture
Winkle starting 10:30 a.m. Thurs-
day at Temple Ner Tamid.
Yaakov Blank, the lecturer and
pedagogue, will speak on the com-
poser of the Hatikvah and his life.
Cantor Moshe Friedler has ar-
ranged an entertaining program
of Yiddish, Hebrew and Liturgical
songs.
An Evening Of Art And
Music At Temple Sinai
"Artuoso "87" An Evening to
delight your Senses is the
theme of a special program at
Temple Sinai of North Dade on
Saturday evening, Jan. 10. Song
stylist Ed Linderman will be
featured in concert with a touch of
Broadway.
Linderman has appeared in
New York where Howard Thomp-
son of the New York Times says:
"His repertoire spells diligence
and show-biz savvy." And he
holds forth during the summer in
the Tanglewood area in the
Berkshires of Massachusetts. His
Vaudeville Revue, Fanny and
Sophie and Jolie and Eddie Invite
you to come to a party, played suc-
cessfully at the Sans Souci Hotel
in Miami Beach last winter.
Israeli and Judaic theme Fine
Crafts and Art provided by Ari
South Beach
Elementary
To Reopen
An increase in school-age
children in Miami Beach led city
commissioners to approve $2.3
million to acquire land leading to
the reopening of South Beach
Elementary School.
Built in 1935. the school closed
in 1978 when enrollment decreas-
ed. The Dade County School
Board is expected to contribute
another $2 million to make the
project possible, including the ac-
quisition of land surrounding the
school between Third and Fourth
Street on Alton Road.
lVa'amat
Women
A Chanukah program including
holiday refreshments will
highlight the Wednesday, 12:30
p.m. meeting of the Masada
Chapter of Na'amat at the Council
offices, Miami Beach.
Bertha Liebmann, president of
the chapter, will discuss the mean-
ing of Chanukah, the festival of
freedom.
FOR SALE
300 Silwerman Shabbat A
Freestob prayer books in
good condition. Can be
purchased at a vary reason
able price. 891-5508
>*
Air Force 1st Lt Pamela H. Roth, daughter of Constance Roth
of Miami Beach, has arrived for duty with the 380th Combat Sup-
port Group. Ptattsburgh Air Force Base. NY Roth is a iiidge ad-
vocate officer
STANDING OVATIONS!
COME SEE WHY!
Jerry Grant
prntt.
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Performed by our young A vibrant i.n,er. A d.ncert
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Wine, tidbits and delectable
desserts will round out the even-
ing. The Art preview will begin at
8 p.m. Reservations can be maiie
by calling the Temple office.
MITCI TNUtmS IICIUSIII (aSAUMII
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Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy 39th Annual Scholarship Dinner
honoring Fana Holtz, took place at the Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel on December 7.
Chairpersons, Tania Lapcuic and Ellen Gelman planned a most elegant and lively
evening which was enjoyed by the more than 500 guests who attended.
Quest of honor, Fana Holtz, is presented with a specially designed Menorah
by Academy president. Dr. David Reinhard as husband Abel (left) and sons
Daniel and Javier look on.
Joining in the fun are Elaine Bloom, Elaine Dobin, Joan Ciment, Rosa
Sklar (Fana's mother) Anna Sklar and Arlene Ditchek.
Abel and Fana are raised high on the dance floor during the evening's
festivities.
Those most responsible for the successful affair are: Isaac and Tania Lap-
cuic, Sandi and Myron Samole, Ellen and Ted Gelman. Tania and Ellen
were dinner chairmen and Sandi chaired the most successful Scholarship
Journal in Academy history.
Fundraising chairmen, Marlena and Howard
Schimmel warmly great special guests Dora and
Sadye Miller, and Senator Paul and Sandra
Steinberg.
Count De S. George Elkaim is greeted by Shirley
Gross and Sharon and Stewart Mirmelli,
Academy parents and Alumni.
One of the Academy's first families, the Galbuts,
shown here in part are: Dr. David and Gita
Galbut, Captain Hyman and Bess GaUmt,
Lillian Horowitz, and Abraham and Nancy
Galbut.
Dr. Robert and Rita Galbut chat with other
Academy parents Marlene Heller and Wendy
and Joseph Finkelstein.
Jimmy and Lidia Resnick, Academy parents
and Alumni talk with Mayor Alex Daoud and
Vivian and Mauricio Gluck. Mauricio is chair-
man of the Academy's Board of Education.
Julio and Patricia Astacio, and Robert and
Evelyn Sanders were special guests ofGUda and
Jack Burstein.

Alumnus Dr. Lawrence Ciment and wife Helen
chat with alumnus Oralee and her husband Dr.
Michael Kanner.
Shown enjoying the evening's unique program
are: Leo Hack, Howard and Eileen Maltz,
Lillian Chabner, Ginette and Irving Sultan.
Dr. Irving and Charna Moskowitz are welcomed
by Gilda and Jack Burstein.
Dr. Elias and Dana Herschman
socializing with Shirley and Seymour
Friend.
tmmmti
Fundraising vice-presidents Howard
and Marlena Schimmel and Drs
Joan and Joseph Harris are pleased
with the evening's proceedings.______
Shown spending the evening together
are Marc and Sarah Sheridan with
friends Pamela and Eric Turetsky.
Sam Rohr and Michael Fischer,
executive vice president of the
Academy discuss future plans of
the Academy with Academy
parent Evelyn Katz.


Pige 4-B The Jewish Floridijun/Fridsy, January 2,1987

f 1
Children from Manhattan's Rodeph Sholom
Day School meet at the JNF House in New
York City with Jonathan Miller (center), an
Israeli actor featured in 'Grandpa's Tree,' a
video which was filmed in Israel and produced
by the Jewish National Fund's Education
Department. The young critics enthusiastical-
ly responded to the I'ideo's theme of Tu
B'Shevat. the Jewish Mm Year of the Trees,
which uill fall on Feb. U.
Teenagers From Argentina Learn
About Jewish Life In America
Four teenagers from Buenos
Aires Argentina, arrived in
Miami last week to learn about
Jewiah life in America in a pro-
gram sponsored by the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Program leaders are hoping
that next year students from the
community centers Teen Leader-
ship Club can travel to Buenos
Aires to complete the exchange.
The new program is called Pro-
ject Hemschech. which means
"continuity of Jewish life."
"It is part of a special inter-
change educational project
designed to teach American
Jewiah teenagers all about Jewish
life in other parts of the world,"
said Daniel Yoffe, director of the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center in North Miami
Beach.
The Argentinian guests, chosen
from the Maccabee JCC's School
of Leadership program, will be in
Miami until Sunday. Jan. 10 and
will be staying with families to
establish a homelike hospitality.
Yoffe. who created the
Hemschech concept, fonneriy
served as executive director of the
Jewish Community Center it
Buenos Aires.
Organisers are hoping tia: :r*
success of the exchange :ir:^rar:
will lead to a proposa. i:
presented to the Variri Con-
federation of Jewish Coeununitv
Centers for all JCC's m the
United States, Israel and South
America to join this teen
change program.
ex-
Young Artists
Audition
America's young artists in
muse, theater and dance will
aacbbor. for cash awards and
scholarship opportunities Tuesday
through Sunday in the National
Arts Recognition and Talent
Search.
A.i:Sons will be held at
Gasman Hail, the University of
Miami. Coral Gables, the I'niver-
f Miami Ring Theater and
the Pawiey Arts Center at the
north campus of Miami- Dade
Community College.
ARTS is a program of the
Miami-based National Foundation
for Advancement in the Arts.
AJCommittee Donates A Library
Collection To Barry University
A library collection of almost 500 books, papers and
studies on human relations has been donated to Barry
University. The gift accompanies the efforts of the Miami
Chapter of the American Jewish Committee to support
Catholic-Jewish relations.
The collection is entitled the Seymour Samet Human
Relations Library, named after the man who was in-
strumental in the founding of the Dade County Community
Relations Board during the turbulent civil rights era.
The collection focuses on human relations in theory and
practice, practical aspects of intergroup and interethnic
relations and Judaic literature on anti-Semitism and the
Holocaust. It includes classic works such as Jules Issac's,
"The Teachings of Contempt," Digby BaJtzell's, "The Pro-
testant Establishment," some original research studies on
Gentile attitudes toward Jews and the personal papers of
Samuel Kipness, a Jewish immigrant from Russia who was
a pioneer in Miami's Jewish life.
Roger Bernstein, AJC president, said the collection is be-
ing placed with a Catholic institution in the spirit of
Vatican II and in honor of the impending visit of Pope John
Paul II.
Since the two-day commemoration of the 20th anniver-
sary of Vatican II held in conjunction with the Archdiocese
of Miami, the AJCommittee has sponsored several
meetings which brought together Catholics and Jews.
Bernstein said.
"With the establishment of a Department of Judaic
studies, an advisory board for the program, and many
ongoing involvements between the school and Jewish in-
dividuals and institutions, Barry has shown itself to be a
leader in this field," Bernstein said.
Fundraiser-
National Development Director
The National PAC, Washington, D.C. based, is
searching for a fundraiser. Jewish community,
political, or Israel experience a plus. Excellent
salary and benefits.
555 New Jersey Ave. NW, #718
Washington, DC 20001
Phone #202*879-7710
Call or write:
The warmth of tradition
and Maxwell House Coffee,
ft couldn't be anything but Shabbos
Gi*n
THE ULTIMATE
IN
KOSHER DINING
^TEAKJHOVSE
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Dtonor tocfadoa doaMrt Al For
spc*Mu *fILy
CATERING F ACILIT1ES 90 to 200
TRADITIONAL FRIDAY
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$| Q Including a
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to PrttoitoMto-3P
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Its a special time of the week when families
gather, traditions are renewed and there's
plenty of time to relax and enpy the rich
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It couldn't be anything but Shabbos dinner
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% -r '

Pat Fine was honored as "Woman of the Year" of the Greater
\l ami Women's Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hosvit(Ufor the Aged. More than 250 people attended the luncheon
,; l^bration at Omni International Hotel. Mrs. Fine was joined by
Judge Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board of the Miami Jewish
Home; Marilyn Weil, president of the Greater Miami Women's
. 1 'tiiluiry and Myra Farr.
irh6
Helen G. Rechtsckaffer was honored as "Woman of the Year" by
the Junior Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at an affair at the Sheraton Bal Harbour attended by
more than 500 guests. From left to right are Auxiliary President
Jean Tesser, Mrs. Rechtsckaffer, Mae Cowan and Ruddy
Goldberg.
Temple Beth-El
Men's Club Begin
Yiddish Classes
Under the sponsorship of the
Men's Club of Temple Beth El in
North Bay Village, a Yiddish Club
is being formed. The Club will ap-
peal to those who have little or no
knowledge of Yiddish, and those
too who are conversant in
Yiddish.
For the beginner there will be
12 weekly lessons in Conversa-
tional Yiddish, beginning on
Wednesday evening, Jan. 8. For
those who already have a
knowledge of Yiddish, there will
be a meeting once a month, star-
ting Wednesday evening. At the
meeting only Yiddish will be
spoken.
A full program of activities is
planned for the Club prominent
Jewish speakers, vaudeville, song
fests, games such as a Yiddish
cross word puzzle and "20" ques-
tions, with prizes. A series of
"Hit" movies in Yiddish will be
shown.
It is also planned to serve tradi-
tional Jewish dinners from time to
time.
Persons enrolled in course of in-
struction may also attend the Club
meetings.
Registration for the course and
the club has proceeded rapidly and
since space is limited enrollment is
urged.
Friday, January 2,1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
The National Conference Of
Christians And Jews
Name 1987 Honorees
The National Conference of Christians and Jews has
named three businessmen and community leaders to
receive its prestigious silver medallion awards.
The honorees for 1987 are Cal Kovens, chairman of the
board of Cal Kovens Enterprises; Carlos J. Arboleya, vice
chairman and COO of Barnett Banks of South Florida and
Larry Adams, vice president, southern division, of Florida
Power and Light Company.
A special community service award will be presented to
the Most Rev. Edward A. McCarthy, archbishop of Miami.
The awards will be presented Feb. 28 at the 35th Annual
Brotherhood Awards Dinner in the International Ballroom
of the Omni Hotel.
NEEDED
HEBREW
TYPEWRITER
538-0404
3vt/lfry W<>/4 Sonny Levitt
Cantor Manny Mandel
Norman Cutler
Joel Weinstein
LevlttWalrutaln Memorial Chapala
Alfred Golden
Arthur Gross berg
Robert Burstein
Bath David Mamortal Qaroana
Master of Arts
in Jewish Studies
Are you interested in enhancing your Jewishness?
Are you interested in learning more about the Bible, Talmud, Jewish ethics,
history, philosophy, mysticism, Hebrew?
Are you interested in a career in Jewish education?
Are you interested in increasing your Jewish knowledge for a career in Jewish communal service?
If you answered "yes" to any of these questions then we have what you need!
THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT BARRY UNlVERSrTY ANNOUNCES ITS SPRING SEMESTER SCHEDULE:
January 13 May 1
Biblical Literature (RJS 602)
Will examine the medieval rabbinic commentators
who focused on the "plain" meaning of Scripture:
RashL Ibn Ezra, Radak, Rashbam, etc.
Monday evenings, 6:30-9:15 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
Medieval lewlsh History (RJS 621)
From the period of the Talmud until the emancipa-
tion in the 18th century. Topics will Include the
Golden Age of Spanish Jewry and the historical
development of Jewish mysticism (The Kabbalah).
Thursday evenings, 6:30-9:15 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir
GENEROUS FINANCIAL AID
AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS!
For further Information, please call the
Jewish Studies Program at 758-3392,
ext. 524, or send in the attached coupon.
Jewish Ethics (RJS 634)
An analysis of Jewish law and Ideology on such
ethical Issues as war, the death penalty, abortion,
euthanasia, business dealings, charity, and the
role of women.
Tuesday afternoons, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
Hebrew Studies 11 (RJS 402)
Intensive review of Hebrew grammatical patterns;
reading comprehension; familiarization of student
with variety of Hebrew written sources.
Wednesday evenings, 6:30-9:15 p.m.
Instructor: Dr. Rachel Abramowitz
Barry University, Jewish Studies Program 11300 N.E. 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, FL 33161 NAME
ADDRESS
CITY STATE ZIP HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE
IFl/87



Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Burger Family, Of Miami
Helps Hadassah In
Jerusalem On Search
And Destroy Mission
JERUSALEM Hospitals, like hotels and restaurants, need constant
pest control to kill off roaches and other insects lurking in the boxes con-
taining vast quantities of food and equipment brought into the kitchens and
store-rooms every day. If these pests are not dealt with effectively, they
spread like wildfire throughout the building.
Hadassah, being the unusual and great voluntary organization that it is,
has solved its pest control problem in its two hospitals by getting
remarkable volunteer help from three generations of a devoted Hadassah
family living in Miami Sandy and Al Burger and their family. Al Burger
is Chairman of the Board of the family's multi-million dollar pest control
company.
When Sandy Burger heard from Mrs. Ruth Popkin, National President
of Hadassah, that the company's expertise was required for dealing with
the pest problem in Hadassah's two medical centers in Jersualem, at Ein
Karem and Mount Scopus, Al Burger immediately offered to help. He flew
to Jerusalem with a crew of six workers, taking with him as a gift all the
necessary equipment, including respirators, helmets, spray equipment,
motors for making chemical sprays and a host of other parts of equipment.
The search and destroy mission was on!
Burger and his crew were welcomed with great enthusiasm by
Hadassah's administration and workers, who had been fighting a losing
battle against the roaches. They were accommodated in the Hadassah
Rhymland Residence and their pest control campaign was planned with the
military precision for which the company is famous.
The first phase of the campaign was completed in September. A crew of
two Burger men came back to Israel in October for a second campaign, and
they returned in December for the third phase of the campaign. The plan is
to continue coming every three months after this to keep up the level of the
search and destroy mission. The arrangement is that Burger brings the
crew and Hadassah accommodates them.
"The way we deal with the problem is very thorough. The kitchen,
store-rooms and wards are emptied one after the other, patients are moved
temporarily together with their belongings, which are taken out of their
cabinets. Then we do two things: we pour chemical fog into the cracks in
the walls and cracks in the furniture. This brings the roaches out and they
die. After the fog, we spray odorless chemicals into the cracks. The residue
of the chemicals lasts for 30 days. We rotate five or six different chemicals
so that they don't build up a resistance. The roaches carry their egg sacs on
the abdomen. When they sense the danger, they drop their egg sacs in the
crevices but the residual spray is there to kill the offspring. Hatching takes
7-14 days, but the chemicals last 30 days. The secret of our company's
methods is that we do such a thorough job with crews of dedicated
workers."
Four members of the creu- came to Jerusalem for the Hadassah Medical Otganiza-
hon on a search and destroy mission. Top (left to right): Joel Scheinfeld. M
Gilbert Lopez. Dallas. Bottom (let} to nqht): James Murray, Houston; Peter Me-
Cullum. Boston.
Martinez explains that he has a "licence to
kill" from the Israeli Ministry of Health. His
aim is to train Hadassah workers in the art of
pest control so that they can eventually
become independent of their American
friends. Burger plans to go international and
to bring its expertise to Europe as well.
Al Burger, of Miami, Chairman of the Board of
"Bugs' Burger Bug Killers Incorporated who
volunteered his company's services and expertise
and came to Jerusalem with a crew on a pest con-
trol mission for the Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion. The Burgers, of Miami, are a three genera-
tion Hadassak-devoted family.

/_/ /
FREE ESTATE PLANNING SEMINAR
sponsored by MIAMI BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY
and
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3. Question and Answer Period
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Tad Cypen, "Disciple." color photo, 14 "XtO"
Cypeo Pictures
To Be Exhibited
Tad Richard Cypen, a
Miami Beach native and
photographer, has taken
pictures of Israeli life that
will be exhibited for the first
time.
The exhibit will open Sun-
day as part of "What's
New," a mixed media ex-
hibition at the South Florida
Art Center Gallery on Lin-
coln Road. The artist's
reception will be held Jan. 9
from 6-11 p.m.
Tad Cypen
Cypen, born in Miami Beach in 1952, studied art at the
University of South Florida and the Penland School of
Crafts. He apprenticed under Lynn Pelham and has work-
ed freelance since 1978.
Also featured at the exhibit will be the sculptures of
Kevin Duffy and the paintings of Shirley Loeffler.
Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Southeast Region Of AJC
Tribute To
Rabbi Leon Kronish
The Southeast Region of American Jewish
Congress held its annual Century Club recep-
tion at the Doral Beach Hotel and paid tribute
to Rabbi Leon Kronish. the region's founding
president. Theodore R. Mann, national presi-
dent of American Jewish Congress was the
guest speaker.
Theodore R. Mann presents Rabbi Leon
Kronish with an award as Board of Trustee
member Bernard Mandler fat left) looks on.
Sylvia Kaplan and Rabbi Haskell Bernat.
Kaplan served on the Club's Steering Commit-
tee along with her husband Irving.
Theodore R. Mann (left) with regional Board
of Trustees chairman Charles Stivers.
Norma A. Orovitz (left), regional president,
shares a moment with Ruth Druker and
regional executive director, Mark Freedman.
Park In Tel Aviv In
Honor Of Rabbi Lehrman
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of Temple Emanu-El, will be
recognized for 43 years of service to the Greater Miami
Jewish community, with a park to be established in his
honor on Vilu Street in Tel Aviv.
A Jan. 20 dinner tribute at the Fontainebleau Hotel will
be given by the Tel Aviv Foundation, which provides
special cultural and educational programs for children, the
aged and educationally handicapped in Israel's largest
metropolitan area.
The dinner committee includes project chairmen Mr. and
Mrs. Ted Arison and members Jacklyn Simkin, Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Kluger, Dr. and Mrs. George Wise, Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Friedman, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Braman, Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Adler, Mr. and Mrs. Cal Kovens and Mr. and
Mrs. Stephen Muss.
Aventura Jewish Center
Celebrates 10th Anniversary
Jacob Cohen, president of the Aventura Jewish Center,
will be honored at a dinner dance Jan. 11 at the Konover
Hotel, one of several events planned for a special weekend
to commemorate the Jewish Center's 10th anniversary
celebration.
Other events include a Jan. 9 service at which Rabbi
David B. Saltzman will discuss the future of the synagogue
in the modern world.
Hadassah To Celebrate
75th Anniversary
The Miami region of Hadassah will toast the 75th an-
niversary celebration with a Diamond Jubilee gala on Feb.
15 at Temple Israel.
Charlotte Jacobson, of National Hadassah, will be the
keynote speaker.
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist Organization of
America, will observe its 75th anniversary with a six-
month celebration of its role in Jewish life in Israel and the
United States.
Ami i Women
Several chapters of AMIT
Women will hold meetings next
week.
The Coral Gables Chapter will
celebrate its fourth anniversary
Tuesday with a New Year celebra-
tion luncehon at noon at Zamora
Temple in Coral Gables.
The Galil Chapter will celebrate
Chanukah with a mini luncheon,
noon. Monday at the Young Israel
Synagogue in North Miami Beach
The Hadar Chapter will hold a
luncheon meeting Monday at noon
at Byron Hall in Miami Beach,
with guest speaker Rabbi Yehuda
Melber.
The Moorings Chapter will met-1
at noon Tuesday in the auditorium
of Moorings Tower in North
Miami Beach.
The Israel Histadrut
Foundation
Cordially Invites You To Attend A
"Not For Women Only" Women's Day
(Men are cordially invited as well)
BRUNCHEON Sunday, January 11th, 1987 11A.M.
Konover Hotel Miami Beach, Florida
Central Theme:
Using The Third Dimension In Your Personal
Financial Planning
Chairperson: Elaine Bloom State Representative
PROG
1. Who Will Be Our Heirs?
OB SOL STEIN PUD Ecooomc,
Unnersity 0( Ghent Belgium
President. IMF
2. Basic Estate Planning For
The Woman... Single,
Widowed, or Married
AL^LFLLOf,BER Memo' 'tor*. Be.
Member. IMF Board
RAM
3. Safeguarding Your Estate
Against Negative Effects
Of Aging
Elainelevitt,ma Peycnowgy.oc
College, N V IMF Emecutive Board
4. Summing Up
RABBI MORTON MALAVSKY. Cnewwv
Boerd of Directors IMF
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Hadassah Events
The Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its Hadassah
[Medical Organization Luncheon
111:30 a.m., Jan. 12 at the Place
| for Steak on Miami Beach.
The Henrietta Srold Chapter of
I Hadassah will hold its board and
Iregular meeting 10:30 a.m., Jan.
12 followed by lunch at their new
Quarters at City National Bank,
0-71 St., Miami Beach.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
neeting Jan. 12 at 12:30 p.m. at
Horton Towers Auditorium.
The chapter will hold its Youth
lliyah Luncheon noon, Jan. 14 at
femple Emanu-El.
The Youth Aliyah Diamond
lubilee Dinner and Dance of
jlatar.ya Chapter of Hadassah will
ke place at Beth Torah on Jan.
at 6 p.m. The drawing of the
weted "Imah" Mother of the
fear in Israel will be revealed this
lening by the Imah Club.
| A lunch and bingo will be held
nn. Monday by the Sisterhood
uriple Bnai Zion in Miami Beach.
IThe North End Chapters of
Hadassah will hold their annual
Shabbat Feb. 13 at Adath
Yeshurun. A kiddish will follow.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman will
officiate.
T.ne Masada Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first
meeting of the year on Jan. 26 at
Adath Yeshurun, at noon. Come-
dian Oscar Goldstein will
entertain.
A Barnett Lerner film, "Jews of
France," will be shown 1 p.m.
Jan. 12 by the Forte Towers
Chapter of Hadassah.
"Button Creation," a fashion
show with buttons, is the program
to be presented by the Southgate
Chapter of Hadassah at its
regular meeting Jan. 12. Beverly
Michlin will host the program at 1
p.m. in the Terrace Room.
The Albert Einstein Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its anniversary
luncheon at noon Jan. 12 at Tem-
ple Adath Yeshurun. Host Betty
Kantor will be celebrating her
60th wedding anniversary to hus-
band Lou at the event, which will
also feature a book review by
Sophie Weissman.
n
\
!
K
?* -
.


w -
f^ST*
'
.
jnn Elbling of Pittsburgh, national president of Na'amat
A, the Women's Labor Zionist Organization of America,
res \"a 'amat 's floral tribute to David Ben-Gurion on his grave
Me Boker during the Na 'amat World Conference held in Israel
month. Delegates from 10 countries attended the conference to
Irk Ben-Gurion's centenary year.
PERSONALS
[eth torah singles
jges 25-45 presents, "Our
Vinter Dance," Thursday,
anuary 15, 1987 at Beth
[orah Congregation,
?nny Rok Campus, 1051
3rth Miami Beach Boule-
rd, North Miami Beach,
Porida, in our beautifully
fmodeled Deakter Hall
Ulroom. Time: 7:30 P.M.,
Emission: $5.00 donation
inch includes refresh-
es. Dance to the
mds of Disc Jockey
>ol Lou."
OPENINGS SINGLES is
lv'ng an Outstanding
^Q'es Party on Friday,
luary 23, 1987 at 9:00
'.atthe Diplomat Coun-
Club, 501 Diplomat
!rkway, Hallandale,
>nda. There will be
Dancing, Live Band, Con-
tinuous Hors D'oeuvres,
Gift Drawings and Sur-
prises. Admission is $6.00.
For more information call
Sharon Silver 385-1255.
GENTLEMAN WITHOUT
dependent 70s, 5"4 tall,
wishes to meet attractive
lady age 65-75, willing to
observe Jewish dietary
laws, object matrimony.
Strictly confidential. Reply:
HR c/o P.O. Box 390876,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33119.
BETH DAVID JEWISH
Singles (ages 2545) bay-
side rendezvous party at
the luxurious Atlantis, 2025
Brickell Avenue, clubhouse
building, Miami. Sunday,
January 18 at 7:00 P.M. For
more information call
854-3911. Couvert: $5.00.
Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
A member of the Miami Shores Running Club
gleefully took the lead, crashing through the
Harbour House banner, helping to dedicate the
Bal Harbour Village Jogging Path on Satur-
day, Dec. 19. The banner read: "Harbour
House The Turning Point of a Healthier
Bal Harbourite."
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987

Tn 1111 ii Dinner A Sueeess
The Talmudic University received additional financial sup-
port for Torah study and research at a recent dinner at the
Crown Hotel in Miami Beach.
Dr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Swire presented the annual Celia Q.
Swire fellowship in memory of their mother, beginning the ap-
peal with an additional grant of $36,000 to the Alfred and Sadye
Swire College of Judaic Studies.
Stressing the importance of supporting the younger genera-
tion in their education and self-sacrifice, Dr. Swire said,
"History has shown and will continue to show that our people
can and will rise up against all odds to preserve and perpetuate
our traditions in a world filled with unrest, social upheaval,
moral degradation and cataclysmic changes. Let others say and
predict as their whims direct them the Jewish people under
divine guidance will outlive all challenges and threatening
times."
Among the new founders of the Talmudic University are Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Lipton, Dr. and Mrs. William Rand, Mr. and
Mrs. David Gray and Mr. and Mrs. David Dardashti, who each
pledged $25,000. Professor and Mrs. Jacquin Bierman, vice-
chairman of the board of Talmudic University became founders
for the second time.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Moss were honorees at the event, Dr.
Donald Kass, who has treated and taken care of the university
students' needs since its inception, received the Chesed award.
Left to right: Rabbi J. Burstyn, Executive Vice President, Rabbi
R. Pelcovitz, Guest Speaker, Dr. Alfred E. Swire, Honorary
President, TUOF, Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, Dean, Dr. and Mrs.
Donaid M. Kass, Chesed Awardees, Morris Moss, Guest of Honor.
Seated: Mrs. Sadye Swire, and Mrs. Annie Moss.
Left to right: Prof, and Mrs. Jacquin Bierman, Vice Chairman of
the Board, Talmudic University of Florida, Rabbi Ralph
Pelcovxtz, Guest Speaker.
tlMMvro -'-.
Temple Israel
Jewish Knowledge
Courses Begin
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami's academy for the advance-
ment of Jewish knowledge, will
present its winter courses at three
locations.
Tuesdays at Kendall will feature
a course on a Basic Introduction
to Jewish Ethics taught by Rabbi
Haskell M. Bernat. Topics will in-
clude The Ethics of Economic
Justice, The Ethics of Criminal
Justice, Medical Ethics: The
Patient-Doctor Relationship and
Comparative Ethics: Jewish.
Christian, Moslem, Buddhist.
Three courses will be held on
Tuesdays on the Beach program.
They include. Our Heritage in
Song, a four-week course on the
joy and diversity of Jewish music
taught by Cantor Rachelle F.
Nelson; Does God Care? Jewish
Literature Through the Ages,
taught by Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
and Hebrew Reading, taught by
Dr. Jack L. Sparks.
Always on Sunday, the
downtown program will include
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter's course
on Jewish literature, and The Pro-
phet Jeremiah, Savior of His Peo-
ple's Future, taught by Professor
Jeremiah Unterman and The
World in Israel's Eyes, Israel in
the World's Eyes, taught by Pro-
fessor Chaim Snaked.
Judge Breger
Invested
Newly elected Dade County
Judge Eli Breger will be invested
into office at a robing ceremony
12:15 p.m., Jan. 9 at the Dade
County Courthouse.
Breger has been a Dade County
attorney for more than 35 years
and is a former City of North
Miami Beach municipal judge.
Chief Judge Gerald T. Wether-
ington will preside.
Speakers at the ceremony will
include Anne Ackerman. the
North Dade activist and communi-
ty leader and Osvaldo N. Soto,
president of SALAD, the Spanish
American League Against
Defamation and past president of
the Cuban American Bar Associa-
tion. Rabbi Max Lipschitz,
spiritual leader of Beth Torah
Congregation will offe,r the
invocation.
Judge Breger's wife Toby and
son, Richard, an attorney with
whom he has been a partner, will
share the robing honors.
Left to right: Dais: Mr. and Mrs. Morris Moss, Honorees, Dr.
and Mrs. Donald M. Kass, Chesed Awardees, Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig, Dean Talmudic University.
Judge Breger, a graduate of
Miami Beach Senior High School,
did his undergraduate studies at
the University of Texas
Oklahoma State University and
Southern Methodist University
and received his law degree at the
University of Miami.
WhSP ?,reger moved to So"*
Florida 53 years ago and his
memberships include the Jewish
War Veterans and B'nai B'rith.
$1 Million Chair
In Jewish History
The Annenberg Research In-
stitute for Judaic and Near
Eastern Studies announces a
pledge of one million dollars from
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Rothfeld
of Philadelphia to establish the
Charles W. and Sally Rothfeld
Chair in Jewish History. Walter
Annenberg, Chairman of the
Board of the Institute, made the
announcement to the Trustees
Sen. Lawton Chiles is presented with the First Perinatal Net-
work Annual Award by Allan G.W. McLeod, MD, during a
ceremony at Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami.
Chiles was recognized for his initiative to create a National Com-
mittee to Prevent Infant Mortality, and he focused attention on-
high infant mortality and low birth weight problem, calling for a
National Action Agenda.
Zionist History Lectures
At Nova University
A series of three lectures on "A
Century of Zionist History," will
be given by businessman and
author Gottlieb Hammer in a pro-
gram sponsored by Nova Univer-
sity's Institute for Retired
Professionals.
Hammer, a Bay Harbor resi-
dent, will speak Jan. 14 on
"Development of Modern
Zionism," Jan. 21 on "Israel's
Miracle Birth." and Jan. 28 on
"Israel-l'.S.A.: Jewish Communi-
ty. Problems and Promises." The
lectures will begin at 10 a.m. at
Nova University Parlor Building.
Hammer's close work with
Jewish leaders as Chaim Weiz-
mann. David Ben Gurion, Golda
Meir. Abba Hillel Silver and
Meyer Weisgel. resulted in his
recently published book. "Good
Faith and Credit." an account of
the events preceding the
establishment and the subsequent
development of the State of
Israel.
Following World War II. Ham
mer was president of Zim
American Israel Shipping Com-
pany and Chairman of the Nen
York Advisory Board of Bank
Leumi. A founder of the Weiz
mann Institute's American Com-
mittee, he was named Governor
Emeritus of the Institute last
year.
For more than 30 years Hani
mer. a native of Brooklyn arrang-
ed for more than $1.5 billion in
loans for Israel from bank- and in-
surance companies.
?*??*???????????????????????????????????????????
Needed
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Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion


And Joseph's
(Genesis 1,2.61.

'And Joseph was the governor over the land .
brethren came, and bowed down to him "
MIKETZ
- MIKETZ Two years later, Pharaoh dreamt a dream in two
slightly different versions. The dream terrified the king of Egypt;
but none of his sages could explain it satisfactorily. Pharaoh's
butler remembered Joseph's masterly interpretations of dreams,
and informed Pharaoh. Joseph was brought before Pharaoh and
explained the dream as forecasting seven years of plenty that
were to come to the land of Egypt, only to be succeeded by seven
years of famine. He advised Pharaoh to appoint a wise overseer to
collect wheat during the years of plenty and distribute it during
the years of famine. Pharaoh appointed Joseph himself to this
post as his viceroy. As Joseph had forecast, the Egyptian stores of
wheat were in great demand during the seven years of famine.
Among those who came to buy wheat in Egypt were Joseph's
older brothers. Joseph recognized them, but they did not know
him. Joseph so contrived that the brothers came to Egypt a se-
cond time, bringing Benjamin, Joseph's full brother with them.
Joseph received them cordially; but then he made it seem as
though Benjamin had stolen a goblet, and insisted that he stay
behind as a servant. The brothers refused to abandon Benjamin,
ted ;ill decided to return to Joseph's home.
(The recounting ot the Weekly Portion of the Lew is extracted ana based
upon "The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage.' edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir. $15. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York. NY 10038 Joseph Schlang is president ol the society
distributing the volume.)
Ephraim Katzir, president of
the World ORT Union and
former President of the State of
Israel, will be featured speaker
at the American ORT Federa-
tion national conference to be
held in New York Jan. 2S-25.
Alvin L. Gray will conclude his
four-year term of office as
American ORT president at
the conference.
Hebrew Academy Hosts Danish
Youth Basketball Team
Continued from Page 1-B
cheered and applauded as the Danish team.
the Elsingore Basket Club, made their way to
the Academy's auditorium stage in their
white uniforms with green, red and blue
stripes.
The team, from a town about 30 miles north
pf Copenhagen, consisted of two coaches, 10
male players and another team of 11 women.
Then the Hebrew Academy team, wearing
pale blue sweatsuits, took their seats on the
stage, wearing their yarmulkes with the new
inside fastener whose placement led to a
peaceful resolution of the safety issue
Everyone rose for the Danish national an-
Ithem, the Hatikvah and the Star-Spangled
Banner.
"We are gathered here today to confer on
the Danish people the honor they merit in the
annals of our people and perhaps in the annals
ii our time," said Academy principal Rabbi
Yossi Heber.
"Here was a tiny nation in the grip of an
bmnipotent conqueror the Nazis; yet in the
|i"ery hour when it became stripped of its arms
md its Democratic rule was violently
uspended, it suddenly rose and snatched a
landful of Jews out of the very hands of their
ppressors and spirited them away to safety
n Sweden."
Miami Beach Commissioner Abe Resnick, a
lolocaust survivor, read a proclamation that
ieclared Wednesday, Dec. 24 Danish Youth
^ay in Miami Beach.
"There were not too many countries like
>enmark," Resnick said. "I salute the Danish
>ple, the children that came here ... I am
Jure they are the children or the grand-
children of the heroic people who stood by
heir side to help them survive."
Later, at the basketball game, Resnick said
?e. too, had heard many stories about the
Danish people during the Nazi terror.
"When the Germans invaded Denmark
!ey tried to separate the Jews," Resnick
"d- "When they mentioned to the king of
snmark (Christian the 10th) that they
wanted all Jews identified and wearing a
fellow star on their chest, that was Friday
Tid Monday was deadline!
"Monday, every Dane in the country, in-
jtodmg the King, wore a yellow star, adding
^at he heard that story when he was in a con-
entration camp in Kouno, the capital of
-'thuania.
ne of the highlights of the ceremony was a
Jving speech from Miami businessman
farry LaFontaine, who talked about his ex-
erience as a leader of rite Saniah resistance
wing World War II.
"We found in 1943 a cattle ship was coming
take all 8,500 Jews. We had a warning -
r b *
r^HM w?* m~;
H J
^B
V
Harry LaFontaine, left, received a standing
ovation from students and faculty at the Rabbi
Alexander Gross Hebrew Academy after he
spoke of his role as a leader in the Danish
resistance during World War II and his ef-
forts to save Jews from the Nazis as he poses
with Miami Beach City Commissioner Abe
Resnick, a Holocaust survivor, after the
ceremony.
three days," said LaFontaine, now 74.
His resistance group swung into action, he
said, and it didn't matter "whether you were
a Methodist, a Catholic or a Jew. It was a
question of helping a neighbor."
LaFontaine received laughs when he told
how the Danes cleverly hid some of the Jews
in the contagious wards of hospitals to keep
Nazi searchers from finding them, telling
them the disease in the ward was "German
measles."
The Jews also were in his apartments and
"night after night we got them to Sweden."
Academy basketball coach Mark Baranek
said, "it is estimated that less than two per-
cent of the Danish Jewry perished during the
Holocaust, a dramatically reduced number
when compared to the figure of some of the
Eastern European countries."
After the ceremony, everyone poured into
the auditorium where the Danish team beat
the Warriors 62-59. That wasn't so bad of a
loss considering the early premonition of Dr.
Joan Harris, a vice-president of the
Academy's Executive Committee. Dr. Hams
had taken one look at the Danish team and
declared, "I'm afraid of the score. They're so
big."
But everyone agreed the score was the
least important event of the day.
Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:24 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH CHAIM
CONQREQATION
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla.
Rabbi Dow Rozencwalg
531-2120
Dally 7:20 IA Aftamoon 5 30 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
(\
'I
Mlnyan 7: JO a.m. I ft 1S p.m
Sat. 8 Sun. I MM. 8 5.15pm
Frl. 6 p.m.
Bat Mltnah Haathar Brooka
TEMPLE BETH AM
SB90 N. Kendall Dr.
S Miami 607-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
M 7:30 p.m. Family Sarvlca Rabbi Baumgard
aarmon: "Starting Ow." Sat. 11:1S a.m.
KImbariy Main and Jannll.. ulllmancaiied
to ma Torah. Sarmon: "And Ptiaraoh Droamad."
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
m
Mlnchah 5:25 p.m. Sat.
Sat. 9 a.m.
Mr. and Mra. Richard Sukal.
35th Wadding Annlvoraary.
Dally tarv Sun. 8 a.m. a 5:30 p.m.
Mon. 8 Thurt. 7.30 a.m. t 5:30 p.m
Tuai Wad., t Frl. 7:45 a.m. 8 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. a V, hr. balora aunaat.
(m
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krlaaol
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
656-6334
Sabbath Sarvlcaa 8:45 a.m.
Shloah Saudoa. Mlncha. Sat. S p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33161
8615506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A Qorf inkel. (*h\
Rabbi Emeritus V
Moshs Frledler, Cantor
Frl. 8 p.m.
Sat. 8:48 a.m.
Bar Mltnah Paul Raban.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeltereon Ave MB FL 33136
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehude Mslber
Canto* Niaaim Benyemini
Dally aarvtcaa 8 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat. 8:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7500 S.W 120th Street
236-2601 f
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frl night aarv. 8 p.m
Shabbat Chanutah II
Sat. fr.30 a.m. aarv
TEMPLE BETHSH6LOM S3* 723l"
Chase Ave. 6 41 at St i,a*.ai
ON LEON KRONISM, FaynaUng Son lot Rabbi
GARY A. QlrCKSTtm. fuNaM
MARRY JOLT, AuiMlary Rabbi
RAUL O CARLAN, AaalaUnt Rabbi
CANTON DAVID CON VIS! R
Frl. 8:18 p.m AabM QHpXatala: "To Draam Via
Roaalbla Dmam. Sat 10:48 am Bar Mrtnah
Mara Steven Cake. San. 1030 sat "BntaMaat
aV
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N Miami Beech Blvd
Or Me x A Ltpschitz. Rebtx
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L Brown, Exec. Director
Oaey Sarvtoaa: Mon Fn 7:30 am
8 5:30 p.m.
Sal.8:28 a.m 8 8 15pm
San. 8 a.m. 8 5 p.m.
Lata aaotca Frl 8 p m
m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miemi Beech
534 7213- 534 7214
Berry J. Konovltch. Rabbi (
Moshe Buryn Cantor *.
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epslbaum. President
Religious Committee
)
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miemi Beech
Or Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shitman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Frl. 5 p.m Kabbalal Shabbat
Frl. 8 p.m. Rabbi Bargar aarmon: "What
Am Wa Ca+abratmg?"
Sat 9 a.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetroe Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schltf
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Ptonnr Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor: Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frl. 8 p.m : Kandall: Rabbi Bamat "What A
Yaar That Wee." Liturgy: Cantonal Soloul
Harvey Kaufman. Downtown: Rabbi Perimtt.t
"Getting Back to B.iic. you Can Oo Homa
Again." Liturgy- Cantor Richalla F. Nalaon.
TEMPLEJUDEA
550C Granada Blvd
Coral Gable*
Michael B. Eisenstet.
Rstorm
667-5667
Rabbi
Frl. 8:15p.m.
Sat. 11:16 a.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab.Cantor
Sarvlcaa Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 9 30 a.m.
Onag Shabbat will follow.
TEMPLE MENORAH
62075th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkis. Assoc. Rabbi
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath sarvlca.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday
8 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.

TEMPLE NER TAMID 6B6 63IB
7902 Certyle Ave.. 66SV6633
Miami Beach 33141 Conaaei..e
Rabbi Eugene Laboviu r^-<-
Cantor Edward Kioto ( B M
DalfySorvloaaSa.m.and --^V'
6:30 p.m
I Sat. 8:45 a.m. Frl. lata eervtee 8 p.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
362 0698
Rabbi Hershel Becker Moda>n om>odo*
Sat 9-30 a.m. aarvlca at
Temple Samu El
9383 SW 152 An.,
S. of N. Kandall Or.
TEMPLE SINAI 16601 NE 22 Ave
North Dede'S Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associete Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Frl. Spun.
Sat. 10:30 a.m. Baby Naming:
Joanna Bath Kam, Laejnw laartaaa Tranaao.
TEMPLE ZION ISHAtLITE CENTER
8000 Miller Or Conservative
2712311 /Si%
Or Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi fl
Benjamin Adler. Cantor VX-
Devid Rosenthel. Auxiliary Cantor
Hinyen 7 a.m. Monday 8 Thursday
Sunday 9 a.m., Frl. 8:16 p.m
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath Sarvlca
Tail la-Chap*


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Organization Sews
Continuing its celebration of 40 years of
weekly lectures in Yiddish, the YIVO Forum
presents Jacob Blank, lecturing on "Joseph
Apatoshu" at Temple Beth Sholom at 1 p.m..
Jan. 14.
Rabbi Mark Kram, Director of the Hillel
Foundation, University of Miami, will
discuss his recent trip to the Soviet Union at
Shabbat evening services Friday, Jan. 9 at
Temple Samu-El/Or Olom. The 8:15 p.m. ser-
vices will take place in the synagogue's main
sanctuary.
The Cultural Forum on Great Jewish Per-
sonalities sponsored by the Jewish Com-
munity Center of Miami Beach will take
place on Wednesday morning at 10:30. Rabbi
Dr. Meir Felman will speak on Rabbinical
Luminaries of the 19th Century. Mrs. Helen
Felman will speak on The Rothschild Women
and their contributions to Jewish Life.
The Biscayne Chapter Women's
American ORT will hold their next meeting 1
p.m., Wednesday ir> Morton Towers
auditorium.
The Dade/Broward Lupus Foundation
will host a special medical meeting at Baptist
Medical Center on Jan. 21 at 8 p.m. Guest
speakers will be Dr. Steven Moskowitz, a
psychiatrist and Judy Schwartz, a licensed
family therapist, both from South Miami. The
program is "Living With A Chronic Illness."
Long-time South Florida librarian Mary
Brandt will give a book review at a luncheon
meeting planned by the Greater Miami
Women's Division of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University. The luncheon will
be 11:45 a.m., Jan. 15 at the Mimosa
Restaurant on Miami Beach. Miss Brandt,
librarian of Temple Sinai of North Dade, was
the iunior-senior librarian of the Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami for 13 years and
also is active with the local and national
Jewish Library Service.
Temple HTews
On Sunday, Jan. 11 the Temple Beth Moshe
Men's Club will present "An Evening of
Musical Theater. A musical production
featuring soprano Cheryl Cavendish and
guest appearance by Cantor Moshe Friedler.
Beverage and dessert will be served. The per-
formance will be held in the Clara and
Seymour Smoller Ballroom at 7:30 p.m.
Entertainment,
Arts
The Florida Shakespeare Festival will
celebrate its fifth anniversary season of
Shakespeare's 'best' beginning Jan. 3, with a
modern musical adaptation of the comedy
classic Two Gentlemen of Verona. This
musical hit of hte 1985 Florida Shakespeare
Festival season wil have four Command per-
formances at Miami Beach's Colony Theatre
before it goes on State tour. Called "rollick-
ing and irreverent" by Miami News critic
John Eldridge, Two Gentlemne of Verona will
return Feb. 24 and become part of the '87
season at Vizcaya.
The Art Museum at Florida International
University will display a collection of 25
postwar paintings from Brandeis University.
The opening reception Jan. 16 will follow at 8
p.m. with a lecture by Dr. Carl Belz, director
of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis Univer-
sity. The works include such major American
artists as Johns, Avery, de Kooning, Rosen-
quist, Motherwell, Frankenthaler, Rivers and
Dine.
| Temple Beth Sfiolom's Sundays at 4 Concert Series
Unforgettable Concerts For An Unbelievable
$3.75 Each With the Artists of Tomorrow
January 18,1987
4 P.M.
"Keyboard
Conversations"
with
PIANIST
A rare opportunity
for the audience to
exchange ideas with
the artist.
March 22, 1987
4 P.M.
March 29,1987
4 P.M.

PIANIST
In 1982 she made
her debut and Is
currently studying at
The lullliard School
fyuoal^tie
One of the finest trios
on the international
scene The three artists.
all natives of Israel, are:
#
IONATHAN ZAK. Pianist
URI PIANKA. Violinist
SIMCA HELED. Cellist
April 5, 1987
4 P.M.
PIANIST
At the age of nine she
gave her first recital *t
ten. Miss Suh received a
nine year scholarship to
the Curtis Institute of
Music In Philadelphia.
.l .. nAn4L..* Resented this year with
tbe cooperation of the U film St Savings Bank and the Greater Miami Youth Symphony
We urge all parents to bring their children to this enjoyable afternoon series. These ealbStealn.
and entertaining programs will introduce young listeners to the world of great music
Temple Beth Sholom "SUNDAYS AT 4"
ALL CONCERTS HELD H TEMPLE SANCTUARY
-luMrnoftont
1 D
3D
JAN 18 198?
JEFFREY SCGEl
MARCH
NAVAH PERLMAN
p [1 MARCH 12
the lmh tpjo
apri.5
ajmei suh

SUBSCfUPTIONS (FOR ALL 4 CONCWTS)
ANGELS WS00
SPONSORS v .
MOVCUAL CONCERTS 7S0 400
CMLDREN AND STUDENTS WITH O HALF pnCE
RM
cnargr 10
VS UAS'taCADD
wew mwjss
S^"isr
'* iog.T, ukh B, Iwnpw Both
SJWMii. na wl By m. N*ml I noom^.!
2**** >Sl.oltio.,d. Dwmk
HMftflMM of Cuitu Art* Council
All PROGRAMS ARTISTS DATES SUBJECT
"J2 ""W" Snowr.
"MQumww Itrniaa fl jjio
Sharing holiday cheer, more than 125 visually-impaired clients
of the Miami Lighthouse for the Blind joined for a seasonal meal
and dancing with some of the volunteers who help others in the
non-profit institution learn to expand their lives despite blind-
ness. Enjoying the annual affair are volunteers Molly Hatchfield
(left). Max Siegel (also a former client) and Bill and Ann Anchel,
all of Miami Beach.
til
a
Dr
ir.
hi
Cedars Medical Center audiologist Jane O'Brien adjusts head-
phones to perform a hearing test.
A woman who worked to earn advanced degrees despite
her own hearing handicap has been selected to become the
nrst audiologist at the new Joseph Freeman, MD Hearing
and Speech Center at Cedars Medical Center.
Jane O'Brien, a Rhode Island native, had suffered a hear-
ing loss as a child afflicted with scarlet fever, hospital of-
ficials said Ms. O'Brien, encouraged by her parents to
overcome her handicap, went on to earn degrees in speech
pathology and audiology at the University of Rhode Island.
Miami ** **** '" Rhde IsUnd heton moving to
nf^! h^2ng center was established based on the dream
unti?^r/^^UMD' who "* t the medical center
SS ^th ,n 1984- In *< to the audiologist, the
S2SLf5S! a sPeech Pathologist, both trained to
diagnose and treat the communicatively handicapped.
ti
in


Assisting Frail Elderly To
Avoid Institutionalization
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK Frail
elderly who have difficulty
taking care of themselves
need not be candidates for
hospitals and nursing
homes. A program of a
lourish social welfare agen- despite some obvious health pro-
blems. She was disheveled, had
but who often forgets to pay her
bills. She trusts only her accoun-
tant, but he cannot serve as her
conservator, and referred her to
JASA.
When a JASA social worker
met with Mrs. W., she refused to
take a medical examination.
cy here, which has begun its
second year with 22 clients,
provides an intermediary
service.
The Management Assistance
Program of the Jewish Associa-
tion for Services for the Aged, one
of three such program under
Jewish auspices in the United
States, has been described as pro-
B^ective service for mentally im-
paired older adults who no longer
can manage their own affairs.
Clients, most of whom are Jewish,
range in age from their 70s up to
97. and most are in their 80s.
Twelve of them are conser-
vatees. I'nder New York State's
ental Hygiene Law, a conser-
vator is a court-appointed guar-
dian of property for persons who
have suffered a "substantial im
irment of their ability to care
or their property."
THE LAW specifies that a fin-
ing of "substantial impairment"
is not to be equated with a finding
f "incompetence," the latter
hich results in a major loss of
ts.
MAP director Edith Goldensohn
id that it was difficult to find
respective beneficiaries, as they
Idom have contact with the
ncies that may be able to help
em.
Once a potential recipient is
dentified. the MAP aid process
gins with careful and lengthy
eliberations by the director and a
aseworker as to just what the
respective client will need. Solu-
ions can include a variety of ar-
angements, such as home care,
elivered meals and arranging for
nvolvemnet of the family.
The deliberations stem in part
rom the need to prevent MAP
rom entering into a conservator-
hip too soon "because that status
I a very serious matter," Golden
jhn said. "It takes away a per-
>n's right to conduct his or her
wn affairs and manage his or her
wn finances."
UNLIKE LAWYERS, who are
<>urt-appointed as individuals, the
onservatorship for MAP clients
appointed to a JASA as a whole.
his assures both continuity and
Jl integrated range of services,
>ldensohn said.
Referrals to the MAP program
re made by friends and relatives
nd by other agencies of UJA-
ederation of Jewish Philan-
hropies of Greater New York.
MAP serves only JASA clients.
t works in close cooperation with
ASA social services throughout
York City and on Long
'and. Goldensohn added that
AP "takes cases only from
A8A social workers. We are
Jmply not equipped to provide
nancial management services to
tter agencies, but we do offer
onsultation to other agencies on
low a case should best be
Undled.
A determined effort is made to
'olve families in the process. In
Et, rather than to apply to be a
mservator. JASA has helped
me half dozen families
"emselves to become
3nservators.
Goldensohn said that MAP con-
fines "to work jointly with fami-
I members to assure the ongoing
e" being" of the new
neficiary.
SHE CITED the case of Mrs.
a childless widow who has
ugn money to support herself.
not bathed recently and could not
remember whether she had eaten
that day.
Adrienne Roydan. the JASA
caseworker, gradually won the
trust of Mrs. W., who had initially-
been very disturbed at the
thought of strangers "interfering
in her life."
Now, an attendant hired by
JASA straightens up her apart-
ment and makes sure she eats pro-
perly and baths regularly. Golden-
sohn said it took three months to
achieve that much "and we were
lucky because the accountant
could tell us about her finances,
saving us a great deal of time and
trouble." The process of getting a
conservatorship can take six
months.
Once the conservatorship is
granted, the MAP and the JASA
caseworker plan a budget, im-
plementing JASA investment pro-
cedures, when that is appropriate;
set up separate bank accounts for
each conservatee; and prepare ac-
counting reports.
GOLDENSOHN SAID that
while other Jewish social agencies
have similar programs, MAP is
probaly the largest of its kind and
the most formally organized. The
Boston Jewish Family and
Children's Service and Jewish
Social Services of Madison. Wis.,
have similar programs.
MAP services, as described by a
JASA spokesperson, include
assessment to decide what the in-
dividual needs and protect the
person's safety; arrangement for
home care, constant if needed; ar-
rangement for delivered meals
and medical attention; providing
escorts to medical appointments;
making monthly home visits to
assure continued supervision;
making contacts with relatives or
close friends; providing ongoing
information to out-of-town
relatives; testifying at legal pro-
ceedings; managing finances; and
arranging to clean the person's
apartment, including getting any-
needed furniture.
JASA makes an annual report
to the court about the
beneficiaries' finances and makes
quarterly reports to JASA
trustees, funding sources and
others who have a right to know.
The MAP unit is funded by
grants from the UJA-New York
Federation, the Schemer Family
Foundation and other such
sources.
GOLDENSOHN NOTED that
conservatorship is not always
needed, explaining that when the
income of a mentally-impaired
person comes mostly from Social
Security or another government
source, "many problems can often
be solved by designation of a
representative payee," who can
then get the individual's benefit
checks and pay the person's bills
while the person remains at home.
She said she believed that in the
absence of relatives or friends, the
agencies have a responsibility to
take on this task.
Asked how many New York Ci-
ty Jews are theoretically eligible
for MAP help, Goldensohn said
that, according to an unverified
1985 estimate by the Human
Resources Administration, the
city-wide overall health and
welfare agency, there were near-
ly, 1,130 eligible Jews.
Barbie Trial
PARIS (JTA) The trial of
Klaus Barbie might begin next
March, according to Justice
Minister Albin Challandon. Bar-
bie's trial will be in the Lyon
Criminal Court. He will be charg-
ed with "crimes against humani-
ty" as his war crimes are by now
covered by the statute of
limitations.

$&
Mount Nobo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
<5P
?x

Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Obituaries
GLEIBERMAN
Max, of Miami Beach. Mr. Gleiberman was
secretary of the Southern Region of
Workmen's Circle for 21 years, teacher and
principal at the IX. Perez School, Chairman
of Branch No. 699 Workmen's Cirde, co-
chairman YIBO, Board Member of
Histadrut and Workmen's Circle Represen-
tative to Jewish Federation. Survived by his
wife Sarah; son Albert (Goldie) Gleiberman
of Miami: grandsons Dr. Ira (Susan) Gleiber-
man of Coral Springs. Dr. Jeffery Gleiber-
man of Miami and Steven (Rachael) Gleiber
man of Pembroke Pines and granddaughter
Brenda Gleiberman of Miami. Services were
held at the Chapel of Rubin-Zilbert.
MAI.TZMAN
Betty, of Miami, passed away December 29.
Ms. Maltzman had made her home here for
the past 50 years, coming from Asbury
Park, N.J. She was a member of Beth David
Synagogue. She is survived by two brothers.
Stanley of Warrington, Pa and Edgar of
Miami; a sister. Sylvia Maltzman of Miami
and a nephew Robert. Services were held
with interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
BEERMAN. Teasie of Miami. Services were
held.
BLUM, Mrs. Gertrude of Miami Beach. Ser
vice at and interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery. Rubin-Zilbert.
LEIB, Rosamond F., 79, of New York,
Chicago, and Miami. December 29. Ser-
vices held in New York.
BLOOM. Sally Silverstein. of North Miami
Beach, December 24. Services held in
Brookline, Mass.
SCHEINER, Tully H.. 73, of North Miami
Beach, December 24. Menorah Chapels
NANES, Teodoro (Teska), 67, of Mexico Ci-
ty, December 24. Services held in Mexico
City.
EICHEL, TeUie, 93. of Coral Gables.
December 23. The Riverside.
ENFIELD. Evelyn Louise of Miami Beach,
December 23. The Riverside.
ROSEN, Mrs. Sara, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
SCHEINER
Tully H., 73. of North Miami Beach, died
December 24. Mr. Scheiiier was born and
educated in New York City. A decorated
Veteran of World War II, discharged from
the service in 1946. Mr. Scheiner began a
successful and highly respected career in
chain store management, retiring as Presi-
dent of Lerner Shops. He permanently mov
ed to North Miami Beach in 1976 where he
was active on the Board of Directors of
Temple Adath Yeahurun, Lake Carmel
Lodge, B'nai B'rith. Hillel Foundation,
volunteered his services to the Small
Business Administration, and Dade County
HRS. Served on the Presidents Counsel of
Retail Executives. Life member of the
Masons F and AM. Mr Scheiner is survived
by his beloved wife, Elizabeth; devoted
children. Carole and Jeffrey Fink, Joan and
J. David Scheiner; sister Lillian Kramer and
his greatest joy. his grandchildren, Michelle,
Gareth, Brett and Michael. Services were
held at Menorah Chapels. North Miami
Beach.
NATHANSON. (Toister) Elizabeth, of
Miami. Services were held.
EISENMAN. Mendele (Max), 56, of Sunny
Isles. Menorah Chapel.
STEMPEL, Adolph, 93. of Miami.
December 24. Services were held.
TUNICK. Samuel, of Aventura/Turnberry,
December 27. Menorah Chapels.
FRIED. Howard, of North Miami Beach
Services were held.
COHEN, Pauline, of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
GRUNZEUG, Alberto, 82, of Miami Beach,
December 26. The Riverside.
GARMIZO, Chana, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
STAYMAN, Sadie, 95, of North Miami
Beach. December 29. Blaaberg Chapel
NADLER, Lillian. 81. of Miami Beach,
December 22. Interment at Mt. Nebo.
MORROW, Murray L., 53, of North Miami
Beach, December 19. Levitt-Weinatein.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
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Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, January 2, 1987
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-07136
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JEAN CLAUDE METTELLUS
and
CAROL JOSTENA METTELLUS
TO: CAROL JOSTENA
METTELLUS
Current Residence Unknown
Last Known Address
2701 N.W. 13th Ave.
Miami. Fla. 33142
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on Mark
J. Friedman, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 350 Lin-
coln Road, Suite 422 Miami Beach.
Fl. 33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 9, 1987;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 4 day of December. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARK J. FRIEDMAN
Attorney at Law
350 Lincoln Road. Suite 422
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone: 305-532-5409
Attorney for Petitioner
12396 December 12.19. 26. 1986
January. 2.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File N amber 84-6883
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
JOSEPH MORSKI,
a/k7a JOSEPH MORSKY.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSEPH MORSKI. a/k/a
JOSEPH MORSKY. deceased.
File Number 86-6883, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26. 1986
Personal Representative:
DAVID FELDMAN. ESQ.
Penthouse, Financial
Federal Bldg.
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SYDNEY S. TRAUM 093392
Sydney S. Traum, P.A.
c/o Myers, Kenin, Levinson &
Richards
1428 BrickeO Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 371-9041
13432 December 26. 1986;
January 2.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CONSOLIDATED
INSURANCE OF MIAMI at 1123
71 STREET. MIAMI BEACH.
FLORIDA 33141 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
FRANK GOLDMAN & SONS,
INC.
1123- 71 Street
Miami Beach. FL 33141
13434 December 26, 1986;
January 2. 9. 16. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-54021 08
Florida Bar No. 065939
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FITZGERALD D. HANOVER.
Petitioner,
and
ROSE MARIE SCHUTZMAN
HANOVER,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
PETITION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
To: ROSE MARIE SCHUTZMAN
HANOVER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
You, ROSE MARIE SCHUTZ-
MAN HANOVER, the above nam
ed Respondent, are hereby notified
that a Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you. You are required to serve a
copy of your reply to said Petition
on the Petitioner's attorney. Ken-
neth N Rekant. Suite 208, One
Lincoln Road Building, Miami
Beach. Florida 33139, and file the
original reply in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami. Florida
33130. on or before the 23 day of
January. 1987.
If you fail to do so, judgment by
default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded in the said
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of the Court at Miami, Florida, this
17 day of December. 1986.
Richard P. Brinker,
As Clerk of said Court
Dade County. Florida
By: CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
Kenneth N. Rekant, P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
Suite 208, One Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Tel: (305) 531-2225
13427 December 26.1986;
January 2, 9, 16, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuber 86-6887
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARION LERNER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARION LERNER. deceased,
File Number 86-6887. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami, FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1986.
Personal Representative:
BARNETT M. LERNER
Unit 504C, Admirals Port
2801 N.E. 183rd Street
No. Miami Beach, FL 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. PA
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
13430 December 26,1986,
_^^^^ January 2,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name of Electronics
Showplace at 11900 W. Dixie
Highway, North Miami, FL 33161
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Ronald R. Fieldstone,
Attorney for
Rice International Sales, Inc.
Ronald R. Fieldstone, Esquire
Attorney for
Rice International Sales, Inc.
13410 December 12.19.26.1986;
January 2,1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naatber 86-4745
Division 01
FB 072774
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SARA BECHERANO MITRANI,
also known as SARA
BECHERANO MITRANI VDA.
DE BENABIB. also known as
SARA BENABIB ERGAS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SARA BECHERANO
MITRANI. also known as SARA
BECHERANO MITRANI VDA.
DE BENABIB. also known as
SARA BENABIB ERGAS.
deceased. File Number 86-6745. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims,
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26. 1986.
Personal Representative:
EL1AS BENABIB BECHERANO
8010 East Drive, Apt. 210
North Bay Village, Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Herbert S. Shapiro
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666 79th St. Cswy,
No. 608
Miami Beach. FL 33141
Telephone: (305) 864-2369
13428 December 26. 1986;
January 2. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7187
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PIROSKA SURANYI.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PIROSKA SURANYI, deceas
ed. File Number 86-7187. is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami, Florida
33131. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice wss served that
challenges the validity cf the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1986.
Personal Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
ALAN R. LORBER, P.A.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: ALAN R LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
13435 December 26.1986;
January 2.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name NEW DESIGN
DECOR TILE. INC at 220 N W
57 Ave No. 3 Miami Fla. 33126 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
GUIDO MARIN
220 NW 57 Ave No. 3
Miami. Fla. 33126
13407 December 12, 19, 26,1986;
January 2, 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. FOE
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7024
Division (04)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ERNA GRUSHKA,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ERNA GRUSHKA. deceased.
File Number 86-7024 (04), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagier Street, 3rd floor. Miami.
Florida 33130. The name and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 2. 1987.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street.
Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street. Suite 1201
Miami. Fla. 33130
Telephone: (306) 374-3116
13450 January 2, 9. 1987
For Legal
Publication Forms
Call 373-4605
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-54396
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JUAN ANTONIO ESTEBAN,
Petitioner,
and
VICTORIA REVEREND
ESTEBAN,
Respondent
TO: VICTORIA REVEREND
ESTEBAN, Residence Unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor
thwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida,
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before January 30.
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered.
December 23, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk
BY: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
13437 December 26. 1986;
January 2, 9. 16. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO; 86-54503
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CLAUDIN JULIEN,
Petitioner,
and
SONYA LASHAUN JULIEN,
Respondent.
TO: SONYA LASHAUN JULIEN
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before January 23, 1987, otherwise
a default will be entered.
December 19, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: JOHN BRANDA
13433 December 26,1986;
January 2, 9, 16, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE 8ERVICF
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. 86-54Qxs
IN RE: The Marriage of
PASCAL BERNARD OUDIN
Petitioner/Husband
and
BARBARA COLLINS OUDIN
Respondent/Wife
TO: BARBARA COLLINS
OUDIN
38675 12th Street
East No. 5
Palmdale.
California 9355I I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disaolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVID S
BERGER, attorney for Petitioner
whose address is New World
Tower Building, No. 1707. 100
North Biscayne Boulevard. Miami
Florida 33132. and file the origins]
with the clerk of the above .nlea
court on or before January 23,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida <>n
this 22nd day of December. :>
RICHARD P BRINKKK
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
No. 1707. 100 North Biscavne
Blvd.
Miami. Florida 33132
Telephone: (306) 371-4555
Attorney for Petitioner
13439 December 26.1986.
January 2. 9. 16.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
( ivil Action No. 86-54087
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NUV1A VICTORIA AYALA
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JAIME AYALA.
Respondent/Husband
TO: JAIME AYALA
Calls 36
No. 3313
Barrio Diamante, Call.
COLOMBIA. S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Ihssolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVID 8
BERGER. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 100 North Bis-
cayne Blvd. No. 1707, New W rid
Tower Building, Miami, Florida
33132. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 23, 1987.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be pubhsneo
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida or,
this 22nd day of December. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKEK
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
100 North Biscayne Blvd
No. 1707
Miami, Florida 33132
Telephone: (306) 371-4656
Attorney for Petitioner
13438 December 26, 1986.
January 2.9.16.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Communication Con-
trol Systems of Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
i-nif**1* DevelPn>*nt Inc.
ld*3I December 26,1986.
January 2.9. 16,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
engage in business under the fie-
titious name Sender-Tragash
Alvarino at 419 Enpanola Way.
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139 intend?
to register said name with 0
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Sender-Tragash-Alvarino lnc
A Florida corporation
Lee J. Osiason
Attorney for Sender Tragash
Alvarino Inc.
13446 January 2. 9. 16, 23,198,


foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, January 2, 1987/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
in THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CiTil Artioa No. 86-63171 FC28
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CYNTHIA M. DUNCAN.
Petitioner
And
BERENGUER T. DUNCAN
Respondent
TO BERENGUER T. DUNCAN
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOl' ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED th*t a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE,
his heen filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
wrve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on USHER
BRVN. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach.
FL 3313y and file the original with
the clerk 'if the above styled court
in or before January 16, 1987,
.therwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of December, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN ESQ
HO Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
13420 December 19. 26. 1986;
January. 2. 9.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-41472
Florida Bar No. 549551
ACTION FOR ANNULMENT
IN RE: The Marriage of
JUVENTTNA DE JESUS
vs.
ULPIANO DE JESUS.
TO:
Re: ULPIANO DE JESUS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Annul-
ment of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MARIA
LIPINSKI. plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is 3144 Coral Way.
Miami, Florida 33145, on or before
January 16. 1987. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED: December 15. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As the Clerk of Court
BY Victor M Borrero
As Deputy Clerk
13423 December 19.26, 1986;
January 2.9, 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
.AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Ci*il Actioa No. 8*48061-22
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
N RE The Marriage of
MICHELLE L. ZAKKOUT.
Petitioner Wife
nd
AZEN A ZAKKOUT.
' Respondent/Husband
lo HAZEN A. ZAKKOUT
Present Residence Unknown
Last Mailing Address:
Bofat. P.O Box 8811 Kuwait
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
lhss.ilu.tion of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
ROBERT O. SCHWARZ. ESQ. of
MARKUS & WINTER. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
drest. is 2251 S.W. 22nd St..
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before January
}6. 1987; otherwise a default will
entered against you for the
elief demanded in the complaint
If petition.
This notice shall be published
Mice each week for four con-
ecutive weeks in THE JEWISH
n.ORIMAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
>f said court at Miami, Florida on
ha 11th day of December. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
B> BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
1 ircuit Court Seal)
MARKUS A WINTER. P.A.
1251 S.W. 22nd St.
Miami, Florida 33145
1564810
Attorney for Petitioner
ROBERT 0. SCHWARZ, ESQ.
December 19, 26.1986;
January 2. 9.1987
13417
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
,at U>e undersigned, desiring to
1Kage in business under the fie
Jtious name of BAY HARBOR IN
[ERNATIONAL REALTY st
11(19 Kane Concourse. Bay Harbor
[Wand. Florida 38164 intends to
^ister said name with the Clerk
f the Circuit Court of Dsde Coun-
>. Florida.
BAY HARBOR
INTERNATIONAL
REALTY, INC.
'Khael A. Frank
ttorney for
AYHARBOR
TERNATIONAL
(EALTY. INC.
a* December 12.19. 26.1986;
January 2. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
Di THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
ciRCurr of Florida, in
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil ActkM No. 86-32012 (02)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
TERESA DIAZ TORRES
Petitioner,
and
ORLANDO TORRES
Respondent.
TO: ORLANDO TORRES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that petition for Dissolution
of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on USHER BRYN, ESQ.. at
tomey for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is 420 Lincoln Rosd Suite
309. Miami Beach, FL 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January 16, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of December, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Usher Bryn. Esq.
420 Lincoln Rosd Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
13424 December 19. 26.1986;
January 2, 9,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name The Magnum Group
at 6649 SW 62nd Terrace. Miami.
Fl. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Margaret Klauder. Pres.
Bruce J. Scheinberg
Attorney for The Magnum Group
13419 December 19, 26. 1986;
January 2. 9. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File N saber 86-7095
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
LAURA A. CASSIDY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Laura A. Cassidy. deceased.
File Number 86-7095, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, Miami. Fla. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representatives, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 2, 1987.
Personal Representatives:
Elton H. Hodges, Jr.
12800 S.W. 255 Tr..
Princeton. Fla.
Catherine Virginia Heineman
6025 S.W. 37 St.,
Minimar Fla.
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
Walter J Migoski
14299 N.E. South Biscayne River
Drive
Miami. Fla 33161
Telephone: 681-8401
13447 January 2. 9. 1987
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-43105
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSEPH D RENE.
Petitioner,
and
BRENDA KAYE RENE,
Respondent.
TO: BRENDA KAYE RENE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before January 30, 1987; otherwise
a default will be entered.
December 24, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Barbara Rodriguez
13443
January 2, 9,16, 23,1987
NOTICE UNDER
ncnnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name COLBRIN AIR
CRAFT EXCHANGE at 13601
S.W. 128 Street, No. 114, Miami.
Florida 33186 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Phoenix Aviation
International, Inc.
Ronald A. Johnston
Attorney for
Phoenix Aviation International.
Inc.
10725 S.W 104th Street
Miami. Florida 33175
,3426 December 19. 26 19^
January 2. 9,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Electronics
Showplace at 11900 W. Dixie
Highway. North Miami, FL 33161
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Ronald R. Fieldstone.
Attorney for
Rice International Sales. Inc.
Ronald R. Fieldstone, Esquire
Attorney for
Rice International Sales, Inc.
13410 December 12, 19, 26, 1986;
January 2, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NEW DESIGN
DECOR TILE. INC. at 220 N.W.
57 Ave No. 3 Miami Fla. 33126 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GUIDO MARIN
220 NW 57 Ave No. 3
Miami. Fla. 33126
13407 December 12, 19, 26, 1986;
January 2, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name B.E. KOSHER at
1436 Alton Rosd. Miami Beach.
FL. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
BRODY ENTERPRISES, INC.
Avrohom Brody Pres./Sec.
January 2.9.16, 23, 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FINE AUTO SALES
at 2075 N.E. 160th Street. North
Miami Beach, Fl. 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dsde Coun-
ty, Florida.
SHIMON A. BOVELNIAK
13442 January 2.9,16, 23,1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Smoke Shop II; Mall
Smoke Shop at 420 Hollywood
Mall. Hollywood Fl. 33021 intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Fort Pitt Corp.
Lee J. Osiason
Attorney for Fort Pitt, Corp.
13449 January 2. 9, 16. 23. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-63108 FC03
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
WHITEY B. COLLINS
Petitioner
and
CYNTHIA D. COLLINS
Respondent
TO: CYNTHIA D. COLLINS
1450 Anzio Court
Cannon. New Mexico 88101
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on USHER
BRYNN. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach,
FL 33139 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 16, 1987;
otherwise s default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 15 day of December. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
13421 December 19. 26. 1986;
January 2.9. 1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name BARBARA LEIGH
SALES at 9240 West Bay Harbor
Drive Bay Harbor Islands. Florida
33154' intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
BARBARA LEIGH
CORPORATION
9240 West Bay Harbor Drive
Bay Harbor Islands, Florida 33154
Attorney:
Martin Starr
9703 South Dixie Highway
Miami. Florida 33156-2812
SSuf December 19. 26, 1986;
"" January 2.9.1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
Oi THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Actioa No.: 86-60038 FC 03
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RETA EBANKS ALLEN
and
RAFUS ALLEN
TO: RAFUS ALLEN
Residence Unknown
A petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed in this
court and you are required to serve
s copy of your written defenses on
Alec Ross, attorney for Petitioner,
at 16400 N.E. 19 Ave., Miami. Fla.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above court on or before
January 16, 1987; otherwise a
default will be entered against you.
Dated in Miami on December 10,
1986.
RICHARD BRINKER, Clerk
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13413 December 12, 19. 26, 1986;
January 2. 1987
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 86-46248 (26)
ACTION FOR DAMAGES AND
GARNISHMENT OF
PROPERTY WITHIN THE
JURISDICTION OF THE
COURT
AMERICAN BRIESS CORPORA-
TION AND CEREAL PRO-
DUCTS CORPORATION,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
CERVECERIA REGIONAL.
C.A..
Defendant.
TO: CERVECERIA
REGIONAL, C.A.
Avenida 17
Nr. 112-113
Los Haticos
4001 Maricaibo.
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
and Garnishment of Property
within the Jurisdiction of the Court
to wit: Three Hundred Twenty
One Thousand Six Hundred
Eighty Five and 28/100
($321,685.28) U.S. Dollars in an ac-
count in the name of Cerveceria
Regional C.A., in the possession of
Bankers Trust International, 1
Biscayne Tower, Suite 2300.
Miami. Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Silver and
Silver attorney for the Plaintiff,
whose address is 150 S.E. 2nd
Avenue, Suite 1326. Miami.
Florida 33131, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 16,
1987; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 15 day of December. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
IRA S. SFVLER
Attorney for Plaintiffs
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
13425 December 19. 26.1986;
January 2.9.1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. Ui AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 86-42720
Florida Bar No. 549551
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARTA D. CORREA
vs.
RAUL H. CORREA
TO:
Re: RAUL H. CORREA
Cro-67, No. 79-1111.
Barranquilla,
Atlantic".
Colombia,
South America.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MARIA
LIPINSKI. plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is 3144 Coral Way.
Miami, Florida 33145, on or before
January 16, 1987, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED: December 15. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As the Clerk of Court
BY Victor M. Borrero
As Deputy Clerk
13422 December 19.26, 1986;
January 2.9.1987
(Circuit Court Seal)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 86-52418 (21)
THE NEW WAY FELLOWSHIP
BAPTIST CHURCH OF OPA
LOCKA. INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATRICIA WATKINS. a/k/a
PATRICIA V. KIENLE.
and ALL PERSONS CLAIMING
INTEREST OR TITLE TO PRO
PERTY UNDER OR THROUGH
HER,
Defendant.
NOTICE OF
SUIT-TO QUIET TITLE
Florida Bar No: 347183
In the Name of the State of
Florida:
To the Defendants:
PATRICIA WATKINS, also
known as PATRICIA KIENLE.
and ALL PERSONS CLAIMING
INTEREST OR TITLE TO PRO-
PERTY UNDER OR THROUGH
HER. AND ALL OTHERS
WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
And to: All Unkown Spouses of
said above named natural
defendant.
And to: All Parties Having or
Claiming to have any right, title or
interest in and to the following
described property, situate in
Dade County, Florida, to-wit:
Lot 265. less the east 25 feet
of RADIO GARDENS, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 8. at
Page 97 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
You. and Each of You, are
notified that a suit to quiet title to
the above-described property has
been filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy of
your Answer to the Complaint on
the plaintiffs' attorney, BER-
NARD BOBER. ESQ.. c/o LEFF.
PESETSKY & ZACK. PA., 1367
N.E. 162nd Street. No. Miami
Beach, Fl. 33162. and file the
original in the office of the Clerk of
the Circuit Court on or before the
9th day of January, 1987; other-
wise the allegations of said Com-
plaint will be taken as confessed.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
Dated this 8 day of December.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
BY: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
DEPUTY CLERK
(Circuit Court Seal)
13406
December 12. 19,26, 1986;
January 2.1987
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious nsme EDGEWATER
PLAZA at 7899 NE 4 Ct., Miami
Fla. 33137 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MICHAEL PATELLA
14790 SW 14 St.
DAVIE, FLA. 33325
13444 January 2,9. 16, 23. 1987
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasiber 86-6781
Division 02
Fla. Bar No. 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEN CHARLES ASHER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BEN CHARLES ASHER.
deceased, File Number 86-6781. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dsde County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami, FL
33130. The names snd addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 26, 1986.
Personal Representative:
JULIE F. ASHER
1135 103rd Street
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
13429 December 26, 1986;
January 2, 1987


.
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday,
2,1987
'
International JWV Auxiliary 223 To Meet
Youth Day'
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO) is sponsor-
ing an International Youth Day on
Sunday, Jan. 11, at Miami Dade
Community College, South Cam-
pus, from 1 to 5 p.m.
Valerie Shalom, Assistant
Director of the Florida Regional
office, of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. will be the
Keynote speaker. She will be ad-
dressing the issue of "Prejudice
and acceptance of others."
West Miami Auxiliary No. 223,
Jewish War Veterans, will hold
their regular meeting on Thurs-
day. Jan. 8 at 8:15 p.m. at the
home of Pearl Fegarsky, Miami.
Carol Gold, Auxiliary President,
states that a program will be
presented by Peter Lauritzen.
Director of Miami Ability Center
for Stress Management. Also on
the agenda will be a report on the
recent "Tag Week," the Aux-
iliary's annual fundraising pro-
ject, by Chairman, Shirley
Achtman.
Officers of the Auxiliary wUl ,1
tend the Dade QnFS*
Meeting on Sunday, Jan \aT,
on the Bay. A luncheon will foi:
the meeting, at which time ,
Dade County Auxiliary PrwidJ
will be honored.
Members of the Auxiliary
sponsor an "After Holiday"',
for Snapper Creek Coomb'
Home in January.
Many projects are underway in Israel's
Galilee region, the northern area within
Israel s pre-1967 borders construction that
depends in part, on American Jews through
the UJ'A/Federation Campaign.
A Rescuer
Comes Out Of
The Shadows
Continued from Page IB
British intelligence, was to
organize escape routes for cap-
tured British and American pilots
from occupied Europe. But they
also made contact with Jewish
community leaders and other anti-
German forces.
In the program, Simonds says
that the parachutists had only a 10
percent chance of themselves
escaping capture by the Nazis.
They were double heroes, he says:
if caught they could be shot twice
as enemy agents and as Jews.
Simonds, a pro-Jewish officer
who served with Orde Wingate in
Palestine, says that M19 had to
keep its wartime collaboration
with the Jews a strict secret not
only because of the Nazis but
because of the Palestine police
whom he calls "'a bloody
nuisance." They were so anti-
Jewish, he says, that "you would
think they were on the wrong side
in the war."
Dan is portrayed in the program
as the single most important
Zionist in organizing aliya from
Eastern Europe boUi during the
war and in the decades which
followed. He was also involved in
tracking war criminals and in
securing staging posts for the
Zionist arms lift to Palestine in
1948-49.
He was a man of many different
aliases, one of which featured in
the anti-Semitic Slansky trial in
Communist Czechoslovakia.
The program suggests a link
between this and the mysterious
murder in Prague in 1968 of
Charles Jordan, the American
Jewish head of the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee. Dan is said to
have confirmed that he himself
was the intended victim of Jor-
dan's killers, who had been con-
fused by the slight similarity in
their second names.
Now You Can
Learn Hebrew
During the coming winter
semester, the Wolfson Campus of
Miami-Dade Community College
will be offering new conversa-
tional beginning courses in
Hebrew, German and Italian. In
addition, the campus will continue
offering its regular intensive
Spanish and French courses.
These credit programs can be us-
ed to fulfill the foreign language
entrance requirements at all
state-funded universities in
Florida.
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g &Pee> bfotou tvnfuiipe 3


This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
January 2 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscay? Boulevard
Miami, Florida 83137
President
Aaron Podhurst
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Forrest Raff el
<5
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark D. Friedman
CAMPAIGN OPENING DINNER 3
WOMEN'S DIVISION 4
Special cocktail reception prior to Campaign Opening Dinner
"I Love Miami" program highlights Miami's Jewish community
"Women then and now" lecture
Westview Luncheon
January Hold the Date
February upcoming events highlights
Ruby 10 photos
COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMITTEE 5
Hinda Cantor attends Helsinki Review Conference
SOUTH DADE BRANCH 5
First mini-event is successful
Jewish education and the Jewish family
South Dade branch welcomes newcomers
YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL 6-7
"Am Echad" mission
Special reception at Campaign Opening Dinner
YLC calendar of events
South African Jews are the topic of fifth annual public
, affairs forum
Photos from YLC "Evening of Old World Elegance"
SUPER SUNDAY 7
ALLIANCE DIVISION 8
North Dade Alliance Dinner
Bal Harbor 101 Dinner Dance
Admiral's Port cocktail party
Martin Kalb speaks at Crystal House
Joseph Lazar to be honored at Arlen House Chanukah brunch
Key Biscayne Annual Dinner Dance planned for February
COUNCIL OF COMMERCE AND PROFESSIONS 9
Chairman's message
Select 1987 prospects at upcoming meeting
Norman S. Rachiin organizes parlor meetings
Mount Sinai Medical Center 100 percent campaign
Commerce and Professions mission set for February
JEWISH FEDERATION TELEVISION 11
New programs on JFTV
Wanted: various items for use as stage props
Check-Up Mount Sinai schedule
President's Corner and Federation Today schedule
JFTV program schedule
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES 12-13
Guidelines for preparing your will
Glossary of terms for giving
Memorial service
Arnold Ganz receives award from CJF
Jewish Community Trust Fund 1986 allocations
AGENCIES 13-15
BBYO sports update "Beta Sip"' and "822" triumph
South Dade JCC presents "Aladdin"
Jewish Family Service sponsors care giver support group
Interface between religion and medicine held at Mount Sinai
Medical Center
Jewish Vocational Service receives reaccreditation
Central Agency for Jewish Education sponsors annual
Day School Teachers Institute
Jewish High School offers unique program
Judaic Studies Program to hold "Winter Lecture Series"
Jewish Film Festival begins in February
CALENDAR 16
ffWviK/w. A 1QS7


V
The Campaign Opening Dinner Committee (from left to right): Elaine
Richman, vice-chairman, Harvey Friedman, chairman, Elaine Berkowitz and
Ellen Mandler, vice chairmen. Not pictured are Elaine Bloom, co-chairman
and Bonnie Lang, vice chairman.
*
Campaign Opening Dinner
launches the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
^

Federation's annual Campaign Opening
Dinner, which formally launches the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal, will be held on
Thursday, evening, January 15, at Miami
Beach's Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel.
Bob Martinez, who was elected Gover-
nor of Florida on November 4 and who
will be inaugurated as Florida's 40th
Governor on January 6, will be the guest
speaker.
"With nearly 2,000 people expected to
attend, the Opening Dinner will provide a
strong beginning for the 1987 Cam-
paign," said Harvey Friedman, chairman
of the event.
"The Opening Dinner provides this
community with the opportunity to
demostrate its commitment to aid our
fellow Jews," added Elaine Bloom, co-
chairman of the dinner.
In 1979, Martinez was elected Mayor of
Tampa without a runoff from a field of
five candidates and re-elected in 1983
with 81 percent of the vote. He is im-
mediate past president of the Florida
League of Cities and was a member of the
National League of Cities board of direc-
tors. Martinez was a featured speaker at
the 1984 Republican National Convention
and was recently appointed by President
Reagan to the Advisory Commission on
Intergovernmental Relations.
"Another highlight of the dinner will be
the premier showing of the new Federa-
tion video 'It's Our Turn to Be The
Heroes,' said Friedman.
"I believe the video will capture the
spirit of the evening and will add to the
atmosphere as we officially launch our
1987 Campaign," he said.
The Campaign Opening Dinner will
begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m., dinner
at 7:30 p.m., with dietary laws observed.
Couvert is $55 per person. Attendance at
the dinner requires a minimum $1,000
gift to the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal.
Vice Chairmen for the event are Elaine
Berkowitz, Bonnie Lang, Ellen Mandler
and Elaine Richman.
More information about the Campaign
Opening Dinner can be obtained by call-
ing Marty Barasch at 576-4000.
Federation, January 1987 3


Lectures deal
with Miami's
Jewish community
ILoTeMiuu
This four session program chaired by
Elly Wolff is a series of lectures dealing
with the Miami Jewish community.
SeMioa I, to be held on Wednesday,
January 21 will explore the history of our
community with an overview of Miami.
This session will be held at the Historical
Museum of South Florida in the Cultural
Center and will be followed by a museum
tour of the South Florida Exhibit.
Session II, scheduled for Wednesday,
January 28, looks at the history of the
secular and religious Miami Jewish com-
munity with Malvina Liebman and Rabbi
Sol Schiff, director of Federation's
Chaplaincy Service.
8essioa III. planned for Wednesday.
February 4, will allow participants to
learn of the problems which the Miami
Jewish community has faced over the
decades Art Teitelbaum, executive direc-
tor of the Anti-Defamation League and
Myra Farr of Federation's board of direc-
tirs will be the guest speakers.
Session IV, to be held on Thursday,
February 12 will be a bus tour
highlighting Jewish places of interest in
Miami and concluding with a luncheon at
Mount Sinai Medical Center with guest
speaker Harry B. Smith.
The cost for this program is $30 per
person. Advanced registration only.
Payments must be received by .January
11. There will be no solicitation of funds
during the series.
Call 576-4000, ext. 231 for information
and registration.
"Women then
and now"
"Women Then and Women Now," will
be the topic at the next Women's Division
recruitment and retention event to be
held on Thursday, January 22. Rabbi
Norm Lipson, director of the Institute for
Jewish Studies, will be the guest speaker
at this breakfast meeting beginning at
9:45 a.m. Call 576-5635 to reserve your
place.
Elaine Ross is the Recruitment and
Retention chairwoman. Robbie Her-
skowitz is vice president for leadership
development.
Special cocktail reception
Prior to the Federation's Campaign
Opening Dinner, Women's Division in
conjunction with Young Leadership
Council, will hold a special cocktail recep-
tion for those in the Division who have
contributed $2,500 or more to the 1987
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Governor Bob Martinez, the evening's
guest speaker, will make a special ap-
pearance, together with Aaron Podhurst,
president of Federation and Donald E.
Lefton, 1987 CJA chairman.
Ruby 10
Pictured at the Ruby 10 luncheon are (from left) Gloria
Raffel, Nancy Lipoff, Federation vice president, Mikki
Futerniek, Dorothy Podhurst, Women's Division
president, Helene Berger, Federatom board mt
and Shankeu Raffel.
''

Jewish A.
d are (fron I ighi
Dorothy Podhurst, pn cL I >) u i. i
D B >>>, A "- r, Ruby H> cha
GloriaSch irlin. Women'sPac*.-> I
' '' '' wi Seated is Mathilda
low. guest speaker.
Ruby 10 an (from le/V /.
Adler, S Dad, chairu*
Robt rta Segal, Paa r Dinw r chairwom

Westview luncheon
Donald E. Lefton, 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal chairman, will be the guest
speaker at the Westview Annual Lun-
cheon held on behalf of the CJA on Thurs-
day, January 29, beginning at 11:00 a.m.
The meeting, which will be held at the
Westview Country Club, for members on-
ly, will be followed by informal modeling
by Jaeger International and duplicate
bridge.
For more information call 576-4000
ext. 231.
February highlights
Southwest Dade Event
Wednesday, February 11
jrand Bay Hotel
\nnual Generation to Generation Lun-
cheon and Fashion Show.
Insiaess and Professional Women
ruesday, February 17
>mni International Hotel
Juest speaker: Elizabeth Holtzman,
>istrict Attorney in Kings County, New
'ork
Women's Division Hold the Date
Tuesday. January 6
Lion of Judah Luncheon
11 a.m.
Fontainebleau Hilton
Wednesday. January7
North Dade Board Meeting
10 a.m.
Jewish H.S. of So. Fla.
Wednesday. Janary 7, 14, 28
South Dade Learn-in
Maimonides, Part II
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
South Dade Federation Office
Thursday, January 8
Executive Committee/Campaign Steering
Committee
10 am.
Federation Bldg.
Thursday, January 8
Women's Division Phonathon
4 p.m.-8 p.m.
Federation Bldg.
Thursday. January 8, 15. 22, 29
February 5, 19
Downtown Learn-in
Book of Exodus
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Federation Bldg.
Monday. January 12
Interfaith Day Planning Meeting
10 a.m.
Federation Bldg
Tuesday. January 13
South Dade Board Meeting
10 a.m.
Wednesday. January 14
Long Range Committee Meeting
10 am. *
Federation Bldg.
Thursday, January 15
Campaign Opening Dinner
Fontainebleu Hilton
Tuesday, January 20
Miami Beach Executive Officers
9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, January 20
BPW Networking
Jewish Survival
5:45 p.m.
Biscayne Bay Marriott
Wednesday. January 21
I Love Miami
10 a.m.
Historical Museum
4 Federation, January 1987
Thursday. January 22
Kvruitment ami Retention Event
1" a.m.
Grova Isle
Tuesday. January 27
BPW Campaign Phonathon and Networking
Committee Meeting
6 p.m.
Federation Bldg.
Wednesday. January 28
I Love Miami
10 a.m.
Federation Bldg.
Thursday. January 29
Westview C-Club Luncheon
II am.
Westview Country Club
Thursday. January 29
BPW Campaign Event Phonathon
6 p.m.
Federation Bldg.
Tuesday. February 3
North Dade Board Meeting
10 a.m.
Wednesday. February 4
I Love Miami
10 a.m.
Federation Bldg


Hindu Cantor attends Helsinki Review
Hinda Cantor, Co-Chairman of the
South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, an arm of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Community Rela-
tion* Committee, travelled to Vienna in
November a* a representative of the
Union of Councils for Soviet Jews, of
irhich she is a national vice-president.
The Vienna Helsinki Review Con-
ference is a major international forum
which will run for approximately one
year. Its mandate is to monitor the acts
of the signatories in regard to their
compliance with or violations of the Ar-
ticles of the Final Act of the Conference
on Security and Cooperation in Europe,
with particular regard to the provisions
relating to Human Rights. The United
States, Canada, the USSR and 31 other
West and East European nations are
signatories to the Helsinki Final Act.
Article by Hinda Cantor
It was obvious to those attending
the opening week of the Helsinki
Review Conference in Vienna that
the Soviet Union is trying to pre-
sent itself as a more open, liberal society.
In fact, Soviet officials went out of their
way in public discussions of the issue to
create an impression of concern and
friendliness about human rights. No more
shoebanging or stonewalling. Moscow's
men now appeared eager to address
human rights concerns. But Soviet Jewry
activists know better, and are wary of
such tactics.
Soviet new conferences in Vienna were
filled with incredible statements about
the I'SSR's adherence to the human
rights principles of the Helsinki Accords.
\ Soviet spokesman assured the interna-
tional media that the "ten principles of
the Accords are part of Soviet law, and
our children are taught these principles in
school."
1 wonder how Vladimir Magarik would
respond to those statements. He is the
father of a Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Con-
science, Alexei Magarik. His son's crime
was to teach Hebrew and to request per-
mission to emigrate. He has been tried on
trumped-up drug charges, imprisoned,
Pictured (from left) Congressman Steny H. Hoyer. (Md.), co-chairman of the
U.S. Helsinki Commission, Hinda Cantor, co-chairman of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry and vice president of the Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews and Dennis Prager, United States public member to the Helsinki
Conference.
and savagely beaten by cellmates, with
the encouragement of prison officials.
Desperate to call attention to his son's
plight, the elder Magarik came to Vienna,
spoke to news media and demonstrated
outside the Soviet embassy in Vienna.
But far from being sympathetic, Viennese
police hastily and violently removed
Magarik from his protest area and put
him under arrest.
Such actions suit Soviet purposes
exactly. The Soviets did not want
to admit in Vienna that such
unpleasantries exist. Instead the
Soviets chose Vienna to announce a
modification of their emigration law.
They insisted the modifications would
speed up the emigration process.
But, a closer look at the law's provi-
First South Bade mini-event
is a success
Participants in the first "mini-
event," held by Federation's South
Dade Branch, indicated that they
had a better understanding of
Federation as a result of hearing, first
hand, about the services provided by its
beneficiary agencies. A recipient of fami-
ly counseling services provided by Jewish
Family Service (JFS) was invited to
discuss how she was helped. Robert
Newman, director of the South Dade of-
fice of Jewish Family Service followed up
with a brief presentation explaining the
nature of the services his agency pro-
vides. JFS is a beneficiary of the Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal.
Cindy Lewin, who along with her hus-
band Dr. Alan Lewin, opened her home
for this event, made a solicitation for CJA
pledges during the evening.
Many other mini-events are scheduled
for the upcoming months, at the homes
of:
Norman Lieberman, (January 24);
Richard Grossman, (January 29); Steven
Brodie, (February 3); Paul Berkowitz,
(February 5); Daniel Zelonker, (February
8); Dr. Robert Karl, (February 11); Tom
Borin, (February 26); Samuel Harte,
(March 11).
Phyllis Harte, chairman of the Mini-
Event Committee, extends an invitation
to anyone wanting to host an event on
behalf of the Combined Jewish Appeal or
to attend one, to contact her at 251-9334.
sions reveals it will shut out completely
from the emigration process, persons who
have no family abroad to extend invita-
tions to leave, and will close off the doors
of emigration for persons who are current
or former "prisoners of conscience." It is
curious, as well, that the Soviets chose to
overlook the fact that the human rights
principles of the Helsinki Accords already
provide for the expeditious processing of
emigration requests.
It is especially puzzling, that after 11
years of ignoring the human rights prin-
ciples of the Accords, the Soviets are sud-
denly concerned. It is equally puzzling
that the modified Soviet emigration law
now includes provisions to quickly pro-
cess applications for reunification of
relatives who suffer from illness. That is
curious because throughout 1986 the
Soviets did everything they could to block
Jewish education
and the Jewish
family
An update on Middle Eastern Affairs
was the topic at the meeting of the
Medical Group, Human Resource
Outreach Committee hosted by Drs.
Robert and Nilza Karl. The presentation
was made by Dr. Douglas Miller, chair-
man of Federation's Middle East and
Foreign Jewry Committee.
The next meeting will be held on Thurs-
day, January 15, at which time Rabbi Ed-
win Farber of Temple Samue-El/Or Olom
will speak on Jewish education and the
Jewish family.
Robert Berrin is the chairman of the
Human Resource Outreach Committee.
Dr. Robert Karl is chairman of the
Medical Group which provides a forum for
physicians to explore, discuss and develop
educational programs to meet their needs
and interests.
For additional information, please con-
tact Michele Jaffe at 251-9334.
?

the emigration of the Inessa Flerov fami-
ly from Moscow. Inessa desperately need-
ed to join her emigre brother Michael in
Israel to supply bone marrow, which
Michael needed to battle acute leukemia.
By the time the Soviets granted the
emigration request in late October.
Michael was too weak and ill to receive
the transplant. If Michael dies, his death
will be a chilling and cruel indication of
the enormous gap between Soviet
rhetoric about human rights, and the
reality.
But Vienna waa the showplace for
much more. The Soviets continual-
ly clouded the truth about the
human rights abuses of its two
million Jewish citizens. Soviet Foreign
Minister Shevardnadze proposed that a
human rights conference be held in
Moscow early in 1987 and invited all na-
tions participating in the Helsinki process
to attend. That announcement prompted
Dennis Prager, a public member of the
U.S. delegation to Vienna and a board
member of the Washington-based Union
of Councils for Soviet Jews, to quip that
the idea of the Soviets holding a human
rights conference in Moscow is a bit like
having a conference about snow in the
Sahara Desert.
Aside from removing human rights
from the main arena of the Helsinki
Review process, the conference would
serve as the perfect foil in the Soviet's
continued campaign of disinformation
and its carefully cultivated image as a na-
tion concerned about human rights abuse.
If there is a glimmer of hope in all of
this disinformation from the Soviets, it is
that the United States and its allies re-
main unconvinced by Soviet rhetoric and
remain committed to the Helsinki Ac-
cords. Our delegation met with the chief
of the American delegation, Warren Zim-
mermann. He gave us assurances that the
United States would press the Soviets for
a balanced consideration of the three sec-
tions of the Helsinki Accords, including
the third section dealing with human
rights. Zimmermann perfectly captured
our view with his simple, but eloquent,
commentary in his opening address. Said
the Ambassador: "There have been
enough words from the Soviets about
human rights. Now the international com-
munity waits for those words and pro-
mises to be turned into deeds."
South Dade Branch
welcomes newcomers
???<
?
i 4 O h*,OBI Welcoae to our
^^ community. This greeting is
h South Dade Jewish communi-
ty and is delivered by members of the
Shalom Committee from Federation's
South Dade Branch.
The committee identifies and welcomes
newcomers to the local Jewish communi-
ty. Committee members visit the family
in their home and bring "welcome
baskets" consisting of Shabbat candles,
wine, candy and literature about the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and the
local South Dade Jewish community.
During the year the committee also
hosts an informal gathering to familiarize
the newcomers with the organizations in
the Jewish community and Federation
activities.
If you are interested in joining the
Shalom Welcoming Committee, or if you
know of new Jewish residents in our com-
munity, please contact Michele Jaffe,
community development associate at
251-9334.
.. ...... e\c\Q


<(
'Am Echad" mission
Amy Dean
On March 25, 400 young Jewish men
land women from across the United
States will participate in the Am
Echad (One People) mission with
simultaneous pre-missions to Amster-
dam, London, Milan, Paris, Stockholm
and Zurich, followed by seven days in
Israel. This mission is co-sponsored by the
United Jewish Appeal's (UJA) Young
Leadership Cabinet and Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet.
The European programming for Am
Echad will be unique. In Paris, for exam-
ple, with its 600,000 French and North
African Jews, there will be an opening
cocktail party hosted by David de
Rothschild, briefings by Serge Klarafeld
(the renowned Nazi hunter), and visits to
the Marie section (the old Jewish
Quarter), the Rothschild Synagogue and
other historic sites.
The program in London will include
workshops at the House of Commons, a
Soviet Jewry briefing by historian Martin
Gilbert (author of "The Jews of Hope"
and the biography of Anatoly Shcharan-
sky), Shabbat services at the Marble Arch
Synagogue and tours of Carmel College (a
prep school for elite Jewish studies) and
the historic East End.
Visiting Milan, the home of 9,000 Jews,
will be a more intimate experience in-
troducing the travelers to a unique mix of
traditional Italian Jews and more recent
Sephardic immigrants, and to the state-
sponsored Union structure which collects
taxes and distributes funds for Jewish
education and services.
The 8,000 well-integrated Jews of
Stockholm also have a central
Jewish community tax. which they
pay to the Judiska Forsamligen. In
Stockholm the Am Echad group will have
Shabbat services at the Great Synagogue,
and visit the Wallenberg Library and the
Jewish museum.
In Amsterdam the highlights will be the
Joods Historisch Museum, the Anne
Frank House and the Portuguese
Synagogue.
Specifics of the itineraries and special
highlights are still being worked out for
each of the cities to which the Am Echad
mission will travel.
"This mission is a unique and exciting
opportunity to meet young Jewish leaders
from all over Europe and then to travel
together with them and experience our
Jewish Homeland," said Amy Dean, Na-
tional Young Leadership Am Echad co-
chairperson and a member of Federa-
tion's board of directors.
Locally, the mission will be coor-
dinated through Federation's
Young Leadership Council. Serv-
ing in leadership positions on the
mission are Susan Kleinberg, a member
of the UJA Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet as a co-chairman of recruitment
for Florida. Alan J. Kluger, a member of
the UJA Young Leadership Cabinet and
Federation's Attorney's Division chair-
man, will lead the delegation that will be
traveling to Zurich, Switzerland on the
first leg of its mission.
Anyone interested in joining the Am
Echad mission or in finding out more
about it, should contact Milt Heller at
576-4000.
YLC Calendar of Events
Thursday, January 15
YLC $2,500 Minimum Gift Cocktail
Reception and Federation Opening Cam-
paign Dinner
Fontainebleau Hilton
6:30 pjB.
Tuesday, January 20
Sandra C. Goldstein Jewish Public Af-
fairs Forum "The Jews of South Africa:
What Dam the Future Hold?" Dr. Rela
Geffen Momon, Grats College,
Philadelphia
Hyatt Recency
6:00 p.m. Happy Hour
7:30 p.m Program
Wedaeaday, January 21
Young Leadership Council Board
Meeting
Federation Bidding
7:00 p.m.
TM day, February 10
Sandra C. Goldstein Jewish Public
Affairs Forum
"Anti-Semitism: The Latin
American Experience" Dr. Haim Avni,
Hebrew University, Jerusalem
Hyatt Regency
6:00 p.m. Happy Hour
7:30 p.m. Program
Monday, February 1C
Mini-Mission to Miami
Late afternoon
Monday, February 16
Young Leadership Council Board
Meeting
Mount Sinai Medical Center
6:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Meeting
Friday. February 20
Shabbat Dinner
Beth David Congregation
Rabbi Jack Riemer
6:00 p.m.
Special cocktail reception
Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal kick-off Opening Din-
ner on Thursday, January 15, is less than two weeks away. On
that evening, the Young Leadership Council (YLC) will be
holding a private cocktail reception to honor those YLC
members, and members of Women's Division, who give $2,500
or more to the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal.
The reception, at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel, will be held
from 6:30-7:30 p.m., the hour prior to the Opening Dinner.
Special guest appearances will be made by Florida Governor Bob
Martinez, Aaron Podhurst, president of Federation and Donald
E. Lefton, 1987 CJA chairman.
"YLC is very excited about the upcoming reception and looks
forward to a very successful fundraising effort," said Larry
Elbrand, reception chairman, "We expect that this effort on
behalf of the 1987 CJA will set the pace for the rest of the cam-
paign to follow," he added.
"The men and women attending this reception are setting an
example as part of our community's future leadership," said
Ellen Rose, chairman of Young Leadership Council.
Vice chairmen for the reception are Saby Behar, Norman
Lieberman, Robert Maland. Steven Messing and Dr. Douglas
Miller.
South African Jews are topic
of fifth annual Sandra C. Goldstein
Jewish Public Affairs Forum
Dr. Rela Geffen Monson, a sociologist
and chairwoman of the faculty at Gratz
College in Philadelphia, spent six weeks
in South Africa studying its Jewish com-
munities. She learned a great deal and
will be in Miami on Tuesday, January 20,
as part of the fifth annual Sandra C.
Goldstein Jewish Public Attain Forum
sponsored by Federation's Young
Leadership Council to share what she has
learned.
An estimated 12,000 Jews live in South
Africa^ with about half in Johannesburg
and another 28,000 in Cape Town. Many
are visible financial successes and "while
they may be liberal for South Africa, they
haven't been active opponents of the
apartheid system," said Dr. Monson,
"The Jews are caught in a precarious
tightrope situation. There is no question
that in the minds of blacks, Jews are
white. The question is whether, come the
revolution, blacks are going to distinguish
good whites from bad whites."
Many are making decisions about leav-
ing or staying. South African law, which
restrict* the amount of money that can
leave the country, has made many of the
Jews, "prisoners of their possessions," as
Dr. Monson terms it.
She also explains that Israel is at the
bottom of the list of places they would
choose to go if they ever decide to leave or
are forced by circumstance to emigrate
The first choice of South African Jews is
Australia, foUowed by the United States
and Canada, then England. Israel is a
place of last resort.
"Israel is seen as a difficult place to
live, with a different laiuruaire and a
fcfe* -id. "uTSnic Siat
the fact that Israel is available enables the
Jews to stay in South Africa. They know
that even at the last moment they will
have a place to go."
Dr. Monson's unique, firsthand ex
perience will be the focus of the forum
which will be held at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel. '
The cost is $5 per person. The forum,
which begins at 7:30 p.m. will be proceed
ed by a Happy Hour at 6:00 p.m. with a
cash bar.
For more information contact Milton
Heller at 576-4000.
I
Sandra C. Goldstein
The Sandra C. Goldstein lecture
tries was established in memory of
Sand* Goldstein, whose dedication
emd commitment to the continuity of
Jewish life touched us all. It is our
hop* this series will enliohen. enrich,
and inspire others to advance the
"x>rk that was so very much a mart of
her life.
'
J
L
Federation, January 1987
------------------ *"
HUUUUUUUi
m^smm


YLC holds an "Evening of Old World Elegance"
YLC member Laurie
Zigman and Barry S. Yar-
chin, Federation board
member enjoy the am-
biance of Fisher Island.
From left to right are Susana Eckstein, Michael
Novak, Bernard Werner, Zena Inden, Lyn J.
Pont, Fredric Epstien, and Mark Vogel.
<
Save the Date

MARCH 22, 1987
| IT'S OUR TURN TO MAKE IT QyPEEli
Federation, January 1987 7
W*a4.'ii-f; I


Mm i
North Bade Alliance Dinner
The North Dade Alliance Dinner saw an attendance of over 800, raising $1,00,000
for the Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured (from left to right) are Hazel Canarick,
Brenda handy of London, England, Herb Canarick, Alliance Division chairman
and guest speaker Zelig Chinitz.
Bal Harbour 101
Members of the Bal Harbour 101
UJA/Federation Executive Committee are
(sitting left to right) Charles Merwitzer,
Edith Legum and guest sneaker Joseph
Lapid; standing (from left) are Harold
Warren, Leon Cohen, Sam Rosenfield, Ed
Shapiro, Jules Gerson, Irv Kovens and
Isidore Abrams. Committee members not
pictured are Louis Handler, Col Kovens,
Jack MiUstein and Murray Puterman.
Admiral's Port
On December 10, Ilse and Eric Salm co-hosted a lovely cocktail
party in their Admiral's Port home. The keynote speaker was
Gerald Meister. The success of this event was due to the efforts
of the Executive Committee, Nate Katzen, Milton Engleman
Dr. Arthur LeVine and Belle Tuch. Pictured, (fromleft) are
Gerald Meister, guest speaker, and Ilse and Eric Salm.
Key Biscay ne
I^j ? held at theCasaDel Mar in Key Biscayne featuring
guest speaker Elton J. Kemess, associate executive
incepresident of Federation. Pictured (from left to
right) are Jean Jacobson. Sandra Shapiro, reception
chairman, David Jacobson, chairman. Birdie Sachs
reception chairman, and Muriel Ross
Crystal House
Key Biscayne Dinner Dance
The Key Biscayne 1987 Annual Dinner
Dance on behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal will be held on Sunday, February
1, 1987 at 6:00 p.m. The guest speaker
will be Zelig Chinitz.
Chinitz is the executive director for
North America of Operation In-
dependence. This is a private enterprise
dedicated to moving Israel toward
economic independence by increasing its
exports, expanding tourism and attrac-
ting capital investments. He will talk to
the group about Israel, its needs and what
local Jewish communities in America can
do to fulfil] those needs.
Attendance at the dinner dance re-
quires a $500 minimum gift to Federa
tion's 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal.
Couvert for the evening is $30 per
person.
David Jacobson is chairman for Key
Biscayne, Herman Rubin is vice chair-
man, Birdie Sachs and Sandra Shapiro
are reception co-chairmen.
8 Federation, January 1987
The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's
Alliance Division
held its Crystal
House cocktail party
as the division's kick-
off event for the 1987
Combined Jewish Ap
peal. Pictured from
left to right are Shara
Stock, co-chairman of
Crystal House, Mar-
tin Kalb, chairman of
Federation's Foun-
dation of Jewish
Philanthropies and
Benjamin Botwinick,
co-chairman of
Crystal House.
msjHi
sMHH


n
Martin Fine
Chairman
Stephen Bittel
Vice-Chairman
Chairman's message
Dear Friends:
The 1987 CJA is off to a good start with
a lot of energy and enthusiasm as
demonstrated by the luncheon at the
Jewish Home and Hospital held recently.
I'd like to thank the following people for
their efforts on behalf of Federation and
the Council of Commerce and Profes-
sions. First is Alan J. Kluger, chairman
of the Attorney's Division, many thanks
for a successful Judicial reception.
Norman S. Rachlin, as chairman of the
Accountant's Division has encouraged
local accounting firms to hold parlor
meetings for members of their firms for
the first time. This allows Miami accoun-
tants to learn about Jewish needs in
Miami and Israel and to help through
their generosity.
Dr. Douglas Miller and Dr. Joseph
Harris, co-chairmen of Mount Sinai
Hospital's 100 percent participation cam-
paign have gotten the medical staff of the
hospital to help the CJA. The campaign is
off to an excellent start.
1 would also like to welcome Stephen
j Jack man as the Insurance Division chair-
man and Lee Spiegelraan as chairman of
the Real Estate and Allied Trades
Division.
A special thanks in advance also needs
to be extended to Southeast Bank for
planning a cocktail reception on behalf of
bthe 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal. The
meeting will be held on Wednesday.
January 28 from 5:30-7:00 p.m. at the
Southeast Bank Financial Center, 200
South Biscayne, 55th floor Penthouse.
All tenants of the Southeast Bank
huilding and Miami Center (Ball) Building
are invited.
I'd also like to remind you that Federa-
tion's Opening Dinner will be on Thurs-
day evening, January 15.1 hope to see all
Commerce and Professions people there
as we officially kick-off the 1987 Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal.
Cordially,
Martin Fine
Chairman
Council of Commerce and Professions
Arnold Altman
Vice-Chairman
1987 prospects to be
selected at meeting
The 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
is now in full swing. On January 7,
1987 from 8:00-9:30 a.m. the Coun-
cil of Commerce and Professions
Division will be hosting a breakfast
meeting at Federation to enable you to
select your prospects to solicit for the
1987 campaign.
We need your help!
Although you have heard many times
about our need for people willing to ask
for gifts, this year it is even more crucial.
At breakfast you will also have the oppor-
tunity to make your own 1987 gift.
If you have any questions or concerns,
please contact Marty Barasch at Federa-
tion, 576-4000, ext. 274.
Harry B. Smith, Federation board member, addressed the staff of Mount Sinai
Medical Center to kick off the "Mount Sinai 100 Percent Federation Campaign."
This campaign is an effort to get all medical personnel at Mount Sinai Medical
Center to give to the Combined Jewish Appeal. Pictured (from left) are Dr.
Douglas Miller, co-chairman of the Mount Sinai 100 Percent Campaign, Dr.
Ronald Shane, president of the hospital's medical staff, Harry B. Smith, FredD.
Hirt chief executive officer and president of Mount Sinai Medical Center and Dr.
Joe Harris, co-chair of the Mount Sinai 100 Percent Campaign.
Rachlin organizes
parlor meetings
Norman S. Rachlin
Each month the Council of Commerce
and Professions will highlight one of its
outstanding leaders.
This month we feature Norman
S. Rachlin. Rachlin is the chair-
man of the Accountants Divi-
sion. In this role, he has been
organizing CJA parlor meetings for
members of his firm and other accounting
firms in Miami.
Rachlin is the founding managing part-
ner of Rachlin and Cohen, Certified
Public Accountants. He received his BSC
from Roosevelt University in Chicago,
and holds CPA certificates in both Illinois
and Florida. He has served as chairman
and as a member on several committees
for the Florida Institute of Certified
Public Accountants and the American In-
stitute of Certified Public Accountants.
He has authored or co-authored several
CPE programs, including How to Develop
a Profitable Estate Practice, and has writ-
ten and edited articles for the Journal of
Accountancy, The Practicing CPA and
The Practical Accountant. He has been a
discussion leader at a number of regional
and national CPE programs, and has con-
ducted over 100 professional seminars in
all parts of the country. His book,
"Eleven Steps to a Profitable Accounting
Practice," was published by McGraw Hill
in 1983.
Commerce and Professions mission set for February
'e Spiegelman
Melvin Kartzmer
One of the unique aspects of Commerce
and Professions* 1987 programming will
be a mission to Israel planned to take
place between February 15 and February
22. "Preaklenfs Day/* a legal holiday,
falls on Monday, February 16, so par-
ticipants will only need to be out of their
office for a total of four days. Those able
to stay longer are encouraged to do so by
taking advantage of the special extension
packages that will be made available to
them.
Mel Kartzmer and Lee Spiegelman will
be leading the mission which will provide
first-hand insights into the business com-
munity of Israel. Besides touring
historical and biblical sites, there will be
meetings with professional counterparts
and with financial experts and govern-
ment representatives.
The cost of the mission is $1,400 but on-
ly $200 is needed as a deposit to hold a
place for anyone who is interested in join-
ing the group. Spouses are also welcome.
"This mission will give the profes-
sionals in Miami a chance to meet their
Israeli counterparts as well as to network
with other Miami professionals," said
Martin Fine, chairman of the Council of
Commerce and Professions.
More information concerning the mis-
sion can be obtained by contacting Marty
Barasch at 576-4000.
tv-v-.*.-,...
r..-.
J


"I F NOT NOW...
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WHEN
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should
we care about those hit hardest
by Israel's economic crisis?
Fellow Jews who need homes,
health care, jobs, education,
guidance...
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lion
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Please give generously to
Federation's 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
TODAY.
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It's Our Turn
One People W
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31
One Destiny
10 Federation, January 1987


New programs
mJFTV
r y here can you go to see actors
W/ Jane Fonda and Robert
|* Clary, and comedian A very
Schrieber?
Go to your television set and turn on the
PTV channel.
'January marks the beginning of a new
kear. and with it Jewish Federation
Television is providing a wide range of
hew programming as part of its exchange
Irogram with California's Jewish Televi-
lion Network (JTN). Federation's Cable
television station will present four new
Programs for your enjoyment.
*The first of these programs features
lane Fonda, actress, author, business
koman. political activist and wife of
California Assemblyman Tom Hayden.
She will be featured on "Diane Glazer
Show." Among the topics Fonda
Jiscusses during her half-hour interview
B her visit in the Soviet Union with Ida
Kudell. the Russian refusenik who spent
jour years as a political prisoner in
Siberia for her activities on behalf of
foviet Jewry.
"In understood after I met her why I
Las so attracted to her," says Fonda of
lie 53 year old, 4-foot, 11-inch "little
Inge!'' of the Soviet dissident movement.
[She is one of the bravest people I have
|\er met."
In the program Fonda also discusses
Jer personal life, her father, physical
alt of thiness" in this country, as well as
ker role as a chain smoking psychiatrist in
|ne of her recent films, "Agnes of God."
obert Clary, most familiar to many-
TV viewers as the French P.O.W.
fin the 1960's television program
"Hogan's Heroes." will also be
leatured in January.
Clan-, the survivor of 31 months in a
lazi death camp in real life tells his per-
nal story and ruminates on the best
|rays of combating racism and bigotry in
>nU'mporary society.
'You have to slap people in the face and
vake them up," says Clary. "The world is
i fragile place and people will continue to
Repeat history unless they are forced to
pee the truth."
very Schriber is also making an ap-
pearance of JFTV this month. This
master comedian brings his own
special brand of whimsy to three
Jewish folk tales. As Mullah the
bhilosopher he tells the city of "Know
vlls" about the meaning of life.
Continuing the balance from serious to
Sghthearted is, "Th Plain Wrap Comedy
phow." The show brings together Pennie
ieeker, Marty "Noodless" Levenstein
nd Scott Jensen, three of America's best
(p and coming young comedians. The pro-
gram also includes appearances by TV
pid Borscht Belt veteran Stanley Myron
landleman, so there is something for
fcvery funny bone in this program.
Together they put together a slightly
bizarre half hour of sharp, witty and
Mginal comedy that will have audiences
pysterical.
*JFTV and California's Jewish Televi-
sion Network have formed a mutual trade
fjreement whereby programs will be ex-
hanged. JTN has shown great interest in
he programs produced by JFTV and has
bffered four programs in exchange for be-
" able to air JFTV's shows in Los
Consult the program schedule on this
ije for the times and channels to watch
of these Jewish Television Network
cial presentations, seen locally only on
Wanted:
If you're a "domestic engineer"
(housewife), retired, bored, or anxious
to do some outside work that won't
take up all of your time, and if you
have any sales or fundraising ex-
perience in your background, we need
your help, part time. Please call us at
576-4000 for details. Just ask for
JFTV.
Check-Up Mount Sinai
Check-Up/Mount Sinai with Lila Heat-
ter, past president and honorary chair-
woman of the board of trustees for Mount
Sinai Medical Center, can be seen on
JFTV every Monday and Thursday at
5:30 p.m. and Saturday at 6:00 p.m. Each
week the program features informative
discussion on the latest breakthroughs in
medicine.
A new program u featured each week:
January 5 Pediatrics
Dr. Howard Engle.
January 12 Gastroenterology
Dr. Jamie Barkin
January 19 In Vitro Fertilization
Dr. Arthur Shapiro.
January 26 Internal Medicine
Dr. Fred Rosenbloom.
_... .^, ^ ^ .-..- q <. >>> *> ^~^
.
JFTV VIDEO PRODUCTIONS
Quality Work
Experienced Profes-
sional Staff
E.N.G. Units
Commercials
M Cable/Broadcast
Shows
Private Parties
Industrials
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION TELEVISION
3950 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000 576-4021 after 5:15 p.m. Suzanne Lasky, Director
, ?
<


w
f
Enjoy the new Jewish
Television Specials from California
Comedy Drama Jewish Folk Tales
Interviews with Celebrities
Program Note Hello Jerusalem moves to Sundays at 700 p.m
PROGRAMMING SCHEDULE JANUARY 1987
Tame Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5:00 lo 5:30 p.m fcemes Kitchen a Aiepn Eene's Kitchen B Aieph Film Special Film Special PillOW Talk
5:30 to :00 pm Cnoc-UD' Mount S-nai Jewish TV National Magazine UV. 'Jail F*" Specai ija- 6al Hello Jerusalem Oaroana Check-Up/ Mount Smai Kaleidoscope Femes Kitchen B
.-00 to :30 p.m. We Remember The Holocaust FHm Special Film Special Eeme's Kitchen A Check-Up/ Mount Smai We Remember The Holocaust
JFTV Bulletin Board
:30IO 7:00 pm Still Small Voice or Viewpoint Jewish Family Forum Teen Scene jew^h Family Forum President's Comer Teen Scene
Federation Today
740 to 7:30 pm Presidents Comer Jewis" Television Network Specials Pillow Talk Stm SmaH Voice c Viewpoint Heo Jerusalem *'l*xm*nan o> Sgnmrm Ga/Oar* Jewish TV National Magazne (Jan TO a. 3M Film Special Ulan 3 \ .' Reno
Federation Today Jerusalem ununwnffw By Sow* Gavdans
7:30 lo .-00 p.m Paow Talk Kaleidoscope President s Comer Film Special Jewish Television Network Specials
Pogram **a Sunact k> Chanoa UndawaaW Federation Today JFTV Bulletin Board JFTV Bulletin Board
President's Corner
and Federation
Today
"President's Corner," produced and
hosted by Samuel Harte, president of
JFTV, will feature the following guests
throughout the month of January:
January 5 Michael M. Adler, treasurer,
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
January 12 Dorothy Podhurst, presi-
dent. Women's Division.
January 19 Jeffrey Berkowitz, chair-
man, Federation's Community Relations
Committee.
January 26 Jeffrey Newman, Federa-
tion board member.
This month, featured on "Federation
Today," hooted and produced by Jack
H. Levine will be:
January 5 Barbara Aronson, executive
director of NACPACK.
January 12 Milton Heller, director of
Federation's Young Leadership Council
and director of the Human Resources
Development Committee.
J- *vy 26 Isaac Fisher, vice chairman
-'munity Relations Committee's
Midoiv and Foreign Affairs Sub-
Committee and vice chairman of the
Young Leadership Council's Program
and Education Committee.
January 19 Nan Rich, president of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education and
chairwoman of the Community Relations
Commtitee's Domestic Concerns
Committee.
Watch JFTV on Your Local Cable System
-.. -. ri-w rhannet p-?q Dy amic Channel 38
Storer (North Dade) onannei r *v
Storer (South Dade) Channel 14
Hade-Hanks Channel 2
Miami CaWevision Channel 4
Amencable Channel 28A
Federation, January 1987 11


Guidelines for preparing your will
Property always belongs to so-
meone. It may belong to one per-
son, or it may be owned in some
form of multiple ownership. The
owner of property has certain rights, in-
cluding the right to give the property to
someone else. At death, the law permits
an individual property owner to pass his
property on to others by means of a will.
If you own property and do not dispose
of it. then the State of Florida will see
that this is done for you by appointing so-
meone to settle your estate and
distributing your property according to
special intestacy laws.
These laws, developed over a long
period of time are designed to fit the
average estate and to distribute property
in specified proportion, based on what the
state legislature may believe the average
person desires. These plans are necessari-
ly impersonal and may not fit your par-
ticular situation. They will distribute your
property solely on a basis of relationship
(wife or husband, children, parents)
whereas there may be others whom you
may wish to remember.
REASONS FOR MAKING A WILL
For family tupport and protection
A will is a personal document. It per-
mits you to have your property used,
after you are gone, in special ways, to
support and protect those near and dear
to you according to both your wishes and
their individual needs and circumstances.
For example, you would almost certain-
ly make one sort of estate distribution if
your spouse were sick and needed special
care, another if your spouse is in the best
of health; one kind of distribution if your
children were not yet of age. and another
if they were grown, happily married and
self-supporting.
In one situation you might leave proper-
ty outright; in another you might leave it
in trust, letting someone with experience
and other special qualifications manage it
for the benefit of your wife, children or
others.
Again, by will you can assure adequate
funds for your family's living expenses
while your estate is being settled a
point often overlooked. Designate who
shall act as guardian for minor children if
there is no surviving parent to act in that
capacity. Continue programs of giving to
charities or other causes which you have
supported. You can distribute personal
belongings where you think they will be
most appreciated. None of this is possible
under the intestacy laws.
For Property management
A will is also good business. It permits
you to choose an executor (or personal
representative, as the job is sometimes
called) who can help save money in the
course of estate settlement and therebv
leave your heirs the largest possible ne"t
estate.
You can also direct how a business shall
be continued or liquidated or arrange to
Glossary of Terms for Giving
The following glossary contains a
partial listing of terms associated
with the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies, the deferred giving
arm of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. Subsequent issues will
contain additional terms for your
information.
Annuity
A specified Income, payable at stated
intervals for a fixed or contingent
period, often for the recipients' life.
Bequest
A gift by will of personal property;
legacy
Charitable Remainder
Annuity Trust
A trust that pays you and/or anyone
you designate a fixed dollar amount (at
least 5 percent of the initial fail-market
value of the property placed in the
trust) annually for life. As the name
implies, upon the death of the income
beneficiary, or beneficiaries, the re-
mainder goes to Federation, or to the
charity named as the remainderman in
the trust instrument.
Charitable Remaider Unitnut
A trust similar to the annuity trust ex-
cept that the income beneficiary of the
unitrust receives payment which may
increase or decrease depending upon
the fair market value of the trust
assets, as redetermined annually. The
percent return to the income
beneficiary must be stated in the trust
instrument.
Deferred Gift
Any arrangement whereby money or
property is irrevocably set aside for
the future use of charity, i.e., property
may be transferred to the Foundation
12 Federation, January 1987
under an arrangement whereby, we
will manage and invest it and pay all
the income to the donor for his life. At
the donors death, the Foundation is
free to use the property for its
organizational purposes.
Although the right to use and enjoy
the property is deferred, there is an
immediate gift and immediate income
deduction for the present value of our
interest. Deferred gifts can be very
flexible. The donor can name anyone
he wishes as an income beneficiary. In
fact, several beneficiaries may be nam-
ed. A formal trust arrangement is
possible or a less formal arrangement
can be used and the period of defer-
ment can be measured in years rather
than lives.
Endow
To provide with a permanent fund or
source of income.
Endowment Fond
A fund established by an individual
donor, family or foundation consisting
of gifts that provide a source of income
for the future. The term of endowment
may be in perpetuity or may be for a
specific period of time. This term is
usually established by the donor at the
time of the gift.
Estate Tax
The tax imposed by the Federal or
other Governments on the assets of a
decedent.
Letter of Intent
A declaration stating your intent to
make a deferred gift to the Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies through a be-
quest in your will or other charitable
instrument.
protect valuable assets from possible loss
through forced sale to raise ready cash. A
will also allows your heirs to save the cost
of bonding an administrator or guardian,
reduces taxes, and saves an entire set of
administration cost by establishing trust
funds instead of leaving property
outright. Almost none of these business
advantages are possible under intestacy.
ACTIONS
Have an attorney draw up your will
Your will is a technical legal instrument
calling for specialized knowledge. An at-
torney specially trained in such matters
should draw up your will, expressing your
wishes in legally correct terms seeing
that it is properly signed and witnessed.
Otherwise your will may prove invalid
and may not accomplish your wishes.
Your will must be probated, meaning
that it is accepted by the court and made
part of a public record. It will then have
the full protection of the law. The courts
jealously guard the process of will-making
and do not look lightly on an attempt by
anyone to defeat the will-maker's wishes.
When there is any doubt about a provi-
sion in a will, the courts may have to
decide its meaning. Not many wills that
have been prepared with the proper legal
advice of an attorney are successfully
attacked.
Avoid making your own will. Unless all
of the legal "t"s are crossed and "i"s dot-
ted, it may not be accepted by a court as a
valid will, and the intestacy laws will
prevail, letting the state decide how vour
property will be divided.
Review your will regularly
Remember, your will is never final until
it takes effect at death. You can always
have it revised or entirely rewritten dur-
ing your lifetime.
Never try to change your will by
yourself by informal addition or marginal
notes. Let your attorney add a codicil (a
supplement or appendix), which is
sometimes sufficient, or draft a new will.
Similarly, as your personal or financial
circumstances change, review your will
with your lawyer. He or she can tell you if
marriage, the birth or adoption of a child,
changes in the law, moving to a new home
or other developments have affected your
will.
ANOTHER REASON YOU NEED A
WILL
To make a charitable bequett
When you are considering a charitable
bequest in your will, you'll be interested
to know that there are a number of ways
to accomplish this goal. You may:
Make a cash gift. You might simply
state that you wish to leave a specific cash
amount to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation or it might be stated as a cer-
tain percentage of your estate. It could be I
the amount left after all other'
beneficiaries have received their bequest
the "residue'" of your estate.
Make a gift of property. You n
want to give us specific property such as
stocks, life insurance or real estate.
Make a gift in trust. You can arrange) I
to leave cash or property to a beneficiary'
for his or her life and then have the pro-
perty pass to us upon the beneficiary^
death. You may also give cash or properfl
to us for a period of time and then have
the property pass to a beneficiary. A trust
arrangement allows you to design a
charitable gift in a wide variety of ways.
As with gifts made during life, the emo-
tional satisfaction is not the only benefit
derived from your contribution. There
may be tax advantages to charitable giv-
ing as well. The staff of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies would be glad to sit
down with you, your legal and tax ad-
visers to discuss the best strategy in your
particular circumstances.
TAKE ACTION NOW .
Careful estate planning can successful-
ly achieve both family and philanthropic
objectives with significant tax Savings.
The Board of Trustees and staff wi( h
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
would like to share with you and youi
visors creative ways to maximize tl
<>f your assets and. at the same
make it possible for you to include The
Foundation in your giving plans
Traditionally, many people have assum
ed that the only possible charitable dona-
tion is a cash gift made outhpht.
Although the Foundation welcomes and
encourages such gifts, there are. in fact.
many other ways to support the Founda-
tion financially through what is known as
planned giving.
Generally, planned gifts may be made
during your lifetime or through your
estate. They may include a gift of life in-
surance, a gift in trust or a bequest.
There are even ways by which you can
give something to the Foundation yet still
retain the right to use it and because the'
tax lawB actually encourage charitable
giving, you can often obtain substantial
tax deductions now for gifts received
later.
The future growth and development of
our Jewish community depends upon the
support we receive from committed sup
porters. Please contact the Foundation
office at 576-4000 for additional
information.
Memorial Service
A memorial service is
held each year by the
Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies to
honor those who have
contributed $5,000 or
more as a bequest to
the Foundation. Pic-
tured conducting the
service are Martin
Kalb, Foundation
chairman and Rabbi
Solomon Schiff,
director of the
Federation s
Chaplaincy Service.


\nz receives CJF award
? \<

mold Gam (left) is presented with an award from the Council of Jewish
(derations by Foundation chairman Martin Kalb.
undation of Jewish Philan-
he Greater Miami Jewish
pleased to announce that
1I ianz, chairman of the investment
ind a member of the executive
tl Foundation, has re
- Endowment Achievement
* the < >un< i >f Jewish Fedi
'.'.. i in dl ..- the na< i
. making I dj r the
\ irtl v
\ i Award
to those who h i
vision
. ed in the successful
endown
testimony to Arnold's
and concern for the future of
inity and worldwide Jewry,"
a l Podhurst. president of the
Miami Jewish Federation.
ng to Neal Kurn, national chair
the Kndowment Steering Com-
Council of Jewish redera
>ar. nationally, we expect
en kiwiuant funds to reach a
ilmost 1.5 billion dollars The
utd outstanding leadership ot'
the Endowment Achievement Award
recipients have helped make this
possible."
Martin Kalh. chairman >t' the Founda-
I a member of th< Greater Miami
Federa directors,
nt that Ga on t>ehalf
n were par-
... hair-
mmittei

a gu on our
. program is suostantiai-
arketing concept."
funds provide resources
for the future of our Jewish communities
for innovative and important programs
and to meet emergency needs. These
fund.- serve SS an additional resource for
Federations to use in the deliver,' of com-
munal services now and in generations to
come
The Council of Jewish Federations.
Hies this award. the national
inization representing 200 Jewish
Federations and serves a Jewish popula-
tion of more than 5.7 million in the United
States ami Canada.
Jewish Community Trust Fund
1986 allocations
The Jewish Community Trust Fund
was established to provide a vehicle to
assure the continuity of future program-
ming in Miami's Jewish community. All
gifts made by bequest to the Federation
are placed in the fund. Its income is used
to support emerging needs within our
community as determined by the Federa-
tion's lay leadership.
How does your contribution to the
Foundation help? The following is a sum-
mary of local and non-local services and
maintenance programs that the Founda-
tion was able to support in 1986 because
of gifts made to the Jewish Community
Trust Fund.
B'nai B'rith Youth Organizatin
$1,902
To maintain a program for the educable
mentally retarded and to provide an an-
nual training program for approximately
20 adult volunteer youth group advisors.
Central Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE)
$47,116
To continue funding the Community
Services and Jewish Special Education
Departments by providing materials.
films, and speakers on Israel, the
Holocaust and the Jewish community in
A.IK is the only formal link bet-
the organized Jewish community
ic and non-Jewish school
ems. It al wish learning
idents.
Dav Schools
$7.H40
1 improve the quality of tea
- day school education, this funding
is n<........: to maintain Federation's for
mula allocation level to eight local day
schools.
Federation Cable Television (JFTV)
$13,000
Additional funding was provided to
maintain popular programs such as
"Hello Jerusalem." and to assist in finan-
cing a full advertising campaign to
publicize the station.
Alexander Muss High School in Israel
(Miami Students)
$2,686
To move toward asserting that the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation assum-
ed greater responsibility for the local of-
fice of admission.
Hillel Jewish Student Centers and
Hillel Foundations of Florida
$25,708
To continue the program known as "My
Brother's Keeper," (an internship pro-
gram for students), to continue "Adopt-a-
Grandparent," a program in which
students provide assurance and compa-
nionship to the elderly; and to reinstate
85 percent of inter-campus activities.
Israel Programs Office
$5,500
To reestablish existing levels of finan-
cial aid and subsidies for students par-
ticipating in Israel programs.
Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami
$56,920
To support major programming and
classes at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center.
Jewish Family Service
$62,461
To provide clinical and prevention ac-
tivities including home visits to frail
elderly, school consultations, psychiatric
services, JFTV programming, and office
visits, representing service to a minimum
of 2,693 individuals and generating over
$20,000 in income.
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged
$19,720
To extend for two additional months
the funding previously approved by
Federation for the 40 bed Sk Nursing
Facility which occupies the tl i >or of
the new Chernin Buildintr
Refugee Resettlement Program
$4,399
To l
including costs related ment,
health, acculturation and othei
Svnagogue Supplemental Scholarship*
$4,730
To maintain the minimum level of finan-
cial assistance for 370 students from 12
synagogues in Dade County for pre-
BarlBat Mitzvah training.
Teacher Fringe Benefit Program
$21,003
To provide anticipated annual increase!
in Federation's contribution toward
teacher benefits, especially for pension
and health benefits.
Non Local Services
$10,375
To restore certain Community Rela
tions agencies to their current levels of
allocations, including maintenance fun-
ding for American Jewish Congress.
American Jewish Committee, and Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
WYO sports update "Beta Sig" and "322" triumph
I-he results are in. The winners of B'nai
nth Youth Organization's (BBYO) fall
nletic league have been decided in an
citing round of playoffs.
Jj playoffs were held in December at
th Miami High School. B'nai B'rith
ns (BBG) played volleyball, while AZA
Vs played football. After weeks of com-
^ltion it was time for the playoffs and
championship games.
JBG began with Beta Sig defeating
"I to advance to the volleyball cham-
pionship playoff. Wat Kt* defeated the
Debs by forfeit. This set up Beta Sig ver-
sus Wot 'Rith for the title. It was an ex-
citing action packed match. When the
results were in, it was the Beta Stg team
reigning triumphant.
The AZA football league was next. The
games commenced with the SMs
defeating Zum and the AZA Hurricanes
defeating Masada to advance to the
playoffs. This led to a rematch of an
earlier game that ended with 8M and
Hurricanes in a tie.
The football championship game began
at noon with a full crowd on hand to
witness the competition. When the dust
finally settled, Sit defeated the AZA
Hurricanes by a score of 25-13 to become
the AZA football champions.
Referees for the leagues were Teresa
Baker, Phil Patton and Dave Collopy who
did an outstanding job. They will all be
around on January 11, for the start of
BBYO's next athletic season.
Tony Smith, BBYO's athletic director,
also did a fine job. He will be coordinating
the games and organizing the leagues this
month.
If you, your son or daughter, are in-
terested in becoming involved in BBYO
and all of the exciting things that go along
with it, call the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization at 253-7400.
BBYO is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
BBYO Partners in a caring
community.
Federation, January 1987 13


South Dade JCC presents "Aladdin"
On a lovely morning in China, a spunky
lad named Aladdin begins an incredible
theatrical musical adventure with magi-
cians, giant genies and majestic
emperors. This musical adventure will be
brought to our community by the South
Dade Jewish Community Center on Fri-
day, January 30 at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at
the Miami Senior High School
Auditorium. 2450 S.W. 1st Street.
Aladdin is the second in the
"Kaleidoscope A Young Show-Goers
Series" presented by the JCC to area
youngsters.
The musical is performed by New
York's famed Prince Street Players. This
Em my-A ward winning group has been
presenting innovative adaptions of tradi-
tional literature for the past twenty
years.
Aladdin is a favorite among the collec-
tion of tales that comprise "A Thousand
and One Nights." These tales, as the
story goes, were told by a young woman
named Sheherazade to the Sultan
Haroun-al-Rashid in the city of Baghdad.
The sultan had threatened to kill her
unless she could entertain him. Because
the tales were told each night to appease
the difficult king, they were referred to as
"A Thousand and One Nights."
The collection of short stories, of which
Aladdin is a part, are of uncertain date
and authorship, but are believed to have'
been first told around 850 BCE. Although
the original written texts are in Arabic,
the stories are set in Central Asia, India,
and as in the case of Aladdin, in China.
They depicted the lives of sultans, viziers
and the like who were distinctly Arabic.
Each new culture to introduce the tales
added its own modifications and local
variations.
The Prince Street Players present their
own special version of the story. In it,
THE MUSICAL
idin is a "free spirit," who does little
to support himself or his widowed
mother. The criticisms of others did
nothing to affect his laziness. Instead, it is
his love for a beautiful princess that
stimulates his initiative and
resourcefulness.
Tickets for the performances are $5 for
children and adults and may be purchased
by contacting the South Dade Jewish
Community Center at 251-1394.
Interface between religion and medicine
JFS sponsors
care giver
support groups
Persons responsible for the care and
well-being of an aging spouse, sibling or
parent are invited to join support groups
now in progress under the sponsorship n_
Jewish Family Service of Greater Mian*
(JFS).
A "Sandwich Generation" support
group is open to adult children who feel
"caught in between" obligations to aging
parents and to their own familks A
"Care Givers" support group is geared
toward people who have some respon
sibility for the care of an aging, infirm
husband, wife, brother or sister.
These groups allow persons with
similar concerns to share their feelings
and benefit from the experiences of
others. "Group members are able to
receive emotional support, and help in
solving problems. This often makes it
easier for people to cope with the stresses
of care giving responsibilities," said
Suzon Gordon, MSW, a JFS staff social
worker.
For information about joining a JFS
support group call 445-0555. JFS is a non-
profit social service agency and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
JFS Partners in a caring community.
JVS is reaccredited for three more years
The fifth annual seminar on the Inter-
face Between Medicine And Religion took
place recently at the Mount Sinai Medical
Center. The title of the seminar was "The
Challenge In Substance Abuse -
Religious And Medical Points of View."
This annual series is sponsored by Mount
Sinai Medical Center, the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami and Com-
munity Chaplaincy Service of Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, in cooperation
with the local and state organizations
dealing with substance abuse.
The course was designed to provide
clergy and health care professionals with
the methods and approaches available in
dealing with the prevention and treat-
ment of the substance abuse patient and
family.
The following issues were examined:
The clergy and health care professional's
role in the stages of decision making; the
general principles of responding to and
supporting the substance abuse patient
and family from the religious, medical
and psychological points of view.
Standing left to right are Fr. Sean
O'Sullivan who is the director of the
substance abuse division, Catholic Com-
munity Service, Archdiocese of Miami;
Rabbi Gary Glickstein, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach; Rab-
bi Albert Schwartz, director of chaplain-
cy, Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale; Rabbi Carl Klein of the
Hallandale Jewish Center and president
of the Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami; Rabbi David Novak, guest lec-
turer from New York.
Seated left to right, Dr. Dolores
Morgan, director of addictionology ser-
vice. Mount Sinai Medical Center; Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, executive vice president.
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami i
director of chaplaincy, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and seminar chair-
man; and Dr. Brian Weiss, department of
psychiatry. Mount Sinai Medical Center.
The Jewish Vocational Service (JVS) of
Miami has been reaccredited for a three-
year period by the Commission on Ac-
creditation of Rehabilitation Facilities
(CARF), the nation's leading organization
for the certification of rehabilitation
facilities. JVS has maintained continuous
accreditation by CARF since 1978, when
it was one of the first agencies in South
Florida to be approved by the
Commission.
"This important achievement on the
part of Jewish Vocational Service is a fur-
ther indication of its dedication and com-
mitment to improve the quality of the
lives of people with disabilities," said
Alan Hi Toppel, executive director of
CARF. "Everyone involved in your
organization can rightfully be proud of
the unique distinction of beine
accredited."
Shirley Spear, president of the JVS
Board of Directors commented, "The
high level of service we have continued to
provide to the disabled of Dade County is
a reflection of the professionalism, quali-
ty of program development and dedica
tion of the entire rehabilitation staff.
"The board of directors of JVS continues
to take pride in all programs we provide
and hopes to maintain our consistent level
of outstanding service to the communi
ty," Spear added.
In a recent letter of congratulations to
JVS, U.S. Senator Lawton Chiles said.
"As I review your past accomplishments.
I am continually reminded of your impact
in providing quality services to in-
dividuals who are in need of rehabilita-
tion. I wish you continued success in your
endeavors to serve those residents with
special needs."
JVS is a beneficiary agency of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal. If you wish more in-
formation on the services offered by the
JVS Rehabilitation Department call
576-3220.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
JVS Partners in a caring community.
14 Federation, January 1987
^^M^ntfrtlitaMi


/ c
CAJE sponsors annual Day School Teachers
Institute
The annual Day School Teachers In-
stitute sponsored by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education in cooperation with
the Principals and Administrators Coun-
cil, will be held on Monday, Jan. 26, 1987
at the Lehrman Day School on Miami
Beach. Over 400 teachers from 11 Day
Schools in the Greater Miami area will
gather for a full day of learning and
sharing.
"There will be numerous workshops
and seminars throughout the morning
and afternoon sessions, dealing with both
general studies and Judaic topics," said
Rabbi Menachem Raab, director of the
day school department of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education. There will
also be lectures on classroom manage-
ment, conferencing skills for teachers,
teaching Judaic studies through music
and drama, the skill of asking questions,
and an introduction to the teaching of
values through discussions of moral
dilemmas.
Among the workshops and seminars
will be: "The Art and Skill of Asking
Questions" and "Classroom Manage-
ment" by Professor Edward Reichbach;
"Methods of Involving Students in the
Lessons Through Oral and Written Ac-
tivities" and "The Combined Global and
F'hoentic Methods of Teaching Reading in
1st and 2nd Grades" by Ruth Livne,
"Jewish Art Grades 4-9" by Marsha
Kolman; "Judaic Studies-Teacher Prayer
in an I'northodox Manner" and "An In-
troduction to Teaching Values through
Discussion of Moral Dilemmas" by
Miriam Barkai.
"Teaching Judaic Studies Through
Music and Drama Grades K-3" by.Leah
Abrams; "Science-Teacher Exchange
Jr. and Sr. High School" by Gail Grand;
"Guidance Counselors Teacher Ex-
change" by Nancy Bauerlin; "Reading-
Teacher Exchange Grades 1-6" by
Diane Wander; "Active Comprehension"
by Anita Abraham; "Teacher Expecta-
tions and Student Achievement
(T.E.S.A.) All Levels" by Dr. Michael
Halzel; "Math-Teacher Exchange
Grades 1-6" by Irma Levison; "Math-
Teacher Exchange Jr. and Sr. High
School" by Larry Kuczynski; "The
Talmud" by Rabbi Stuart Grant; "Social
Studies Teacher Exchange Grades 1-6"
by Irwin Marshall.
"Teaching of Israel Through General
Studies (Teacher Exchange Grades
9-12" by Stephanie King; "Computer-
Teacher Exchange Grades 1-9" by Tina
Freiman; "Sabbatical Year in Israel
Grades 9-12" by Rabbi Michael Schecter;
"Conferencing skills for Teachers How
To Handle Those Difficult Meetings with
Parents all Levels," by Dr. Jerome
Levy; "Ways of Teaching Midrash" Jr.
and Sr. High School, by Yair Barkai.
One of the highlights of the day will be a
unique opj>ortunity for teachers to sit
down and share ideas, practica, and new
innovations in their own teaching skills.
Judaic Studies Program to hold
''Winter Lecture Series"
"The Jews in Literature and Film." will
ie one of the topics discussed at the
I niversity of Miami's Judaic Studies Pro-
gram "Winter Lecture Series."
This first topic will be discussed by
Mordechai Richler on February 4, at 8:00
p.m. Richler is one of Canada's leading
authors today. He has been on the New
York Time* best seller list and has won
every major Canadian literary award.
Several of his books have been adapted as
movies, the most well known being, "The
Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitx" and
"Joshua, Then and Now.''
The second lecture in the series will be
held on March 19, and will feature Dr.
Morton Weinfeld, chairman of the
sociology department of McGill Universi-
ty and leading commentator on Canadian
Jewry. He will discuss the issue of "Cana-
dian Jewry: Culturalism and Survival."
The third and final lecture on April 9
will be conducted by Dr. Bill Fishman.
The topic will be "Britain and American
Jewry: An Anarchist View." Fishman is a
fellow of Baliol College at Oxford Univer-
sity and professor of history at Queen
Mary's College, University of London. He
is the foremost scholar on the immigra
tion of Jews into Britain at the turn of the
century.
If you would like more information
about this series, contact the Judaic
Studies office at the University of Miami
at 284-4375.
The University of Miami Judaic Studies
Program is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
the University of Miami. Partners in a
caring community.
There will also be numerous displays of
educational materials, exhibited by major
publishers and manufacturers of educa-
tional games, toys and books, including
general studies and Judaic topics.
Working closely with Dr. Raab and the
Principals and Administrators Council is
Ruth Weingarten, an experienced Jewish
educator who, instead of retiring, has
seen fit to volunteer her services in help-
ing the Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion coordinate many of the activities of
the Day School Department. Weingarten
is quick to add, "Another important part-
ner in the Day School Institute is the
Lehrman Day School which has so
graciously offered its facilities for our ac-
tivities. The Institute enables the
teachers to charge their batteries as they
enter the second half of the school year."
Thanks are also offered to Mrs. Wilma
Morrison, public relations director of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education, for
her assistance.
For more information about the Day
School Institute and about Day School
education, please contact Dr. Menachem
Raab at 576-4030 in Dade and 472-1710 in
Broward.
CAJE is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
CAJE Partners in a caring
community.
Jewish Film
Festival begins
in February
The University of Miami Judaic Studies
Program and the Central Agency for
Jewish Education (CAJE) are co-
sponsoring the annual Jewish Film
Festival.
Entitled, "The Immigrant in the New
World Part Two," it is a continuation
of last year's festival. When the series
dealt with first generation immigrants.
This year's series deals with second and
third generation immigrants.
77k* schedule is as follows:
February 3 The Apprenticeship of
Duddy Kravitz. Author Mordechai
Richler will speak.
February 17 The Chosen.
March 3 American Pop.
March 17 Private Benjamin.
All programs begin at 7:30 p.m. at the
Beaumont Cinema, University of Miami.
Tickets are $8 for the series, $3 per pro-
gram if purchased separately. Students
attend free.
More information can be obtained by
calling the Judaic Studies Office, Univer-
sity of Miami at 284-4375.
The University of Miami Judaic Studies
Program *"d the Central Agency for
Jewish Education are beneficiaries of the
Combined Jewish Appeal.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
University of Miami Judaic Studies Pro-
gram and the Central Agency for Jewish
Education Partners in a caring
community.
Jewish High School
offers unique
program
"A scholar is someone who is either a
specialist in his field or an exceptional
student," said Stephanie King, chairman
of the Jewish High School's Social
Studies department. Both of these types
of scholars are present at the Scholars'
Luncheon held monthly at the high
school.
"The idea is twofold," says King, who
originated the special program, "to ex-
pose students to leaders in a variety of
fields and activities and to give them con-
tact with people in more social settings,
stimulating intellectual conversation."
Each month 10 students are invited to
break bread with a specialist in various
fields as varied as the interests of the
students. Guests this year have included
Michael Hettich, on poetry; Stephen
Mander, a prominent immigration at-
torney; Barbara Billie. a Seminole Indian
speaking on the history of her tribe; Den-
nis Latimer speaking for the Peace
Corps, and William Lehman, United
States Congressman. Guests also includ-
ed Steven Crawford and Marilyn Mimms,
Chorus Master and soloist with the
Greater Miami Opera.
After the luncheon with Mimms
students with no previous interest in
opera requested a field trip to see a
performance.
"The students learn that these are real
people," says King. "They see achievers
are not so different from themselves and
therefore they can begin to see achieve-
ment as possible."
Future guests will include Rita Deutsch
of the University of Miami and Bob Carr
of the Historical Preservation Division.
Agency begins
serving clients
The Mt. Sinai Medical Center Miami
Jewish Home-Home Health A) y has
begun orving clients. After o\ i year
of con. lex negotiations and pla g, the
agenc was able to accept its fir :ents.
and is ready expanding to incl -iome
delive- of "high-tech" medic -juip-
ment id other specialized ser\
Mos elderly are eligible I home
health services. Medicare. Mea aid and
private-pay patients are accept*' i. as well
as select elders who are eligible for ser-
vices under a special Department of
Health and Human Service (HHS) grant
that subsidizes residents of Miami Beach
south of 87th Street.
One of the Home Health Agency's first
clients is an 84 year old woman with
chronic heart problems who was released
from Mt. Sinai Medical Center after a two
week stay there. "While the patient no
longer needs the around-the-clock care af-
forded her in a hospital, she does need
ongoing medical supervision and help
with her personal care," noted Barbara
Brodbar, Home Health Agency director.
"For her and others like her, home health
services mean much lower medical bills
without sacrificing the quality of care."
In addition to skilled nursing services,
the Home Health Agency also provides
home health aides to help with personal
care and housekeeping, as well as a wide
range of rehabilitative specialists and
medical equipment, all delivered to the
patient at home. This includes physical,
speech and occupational therapies,
medical social work, dietary consulta-
tions, medical supplies and adaptive
equipment. For additional information on
the Mt. Sinai Medical Center/Miami
Jewish Home-Home Health Agency, con-
tact Harriet Grant at 674-2111.


K
TUESDAY, JANUARY 6
The Junior Auxiliary Board of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged will meet at 10:00 a.m. at
the Bay Harbor City Hall. Contact
Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for more
information.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 6
The Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center Senior Activities Center, 610
Espanola Way, will hold its "Best of
Health Day" from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00
.m. Free health screenings for
eight, weight, blood pressure, vi-
sion, cholesterol, hearing and dental
problems will be offered. There will
also be free health counseling and
referrals, plus educational exhibits on
diabetes, heart, stroke, nutrition, ex-
ercise, cancer, Alzheimers, arthritis,
drugs, stress and more. Call 673-6060
for more information.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 6
The Forte Forum will feature Dr.
Robert Sandier discussing the topic,
"The race is on! Which will win:
Enlightened civilization or massive
human destruction?" Dr. Sandier is
currently a Professor of English at
the University of Miami, specializing
in American Literature and Contem-
porary American Culture. The
meeting will be held at 1:00 p.m. in
the auditorium of Forte Towers
North, 1200 West Avenue on Miami
Beach.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 6
"Jerusalem, Archeology and Jewish
History," will be the theme of a lec-
ture delivered by Efrat Afek,
representative of the Department of
Education and Culture for the World
Zionist Organization. This program
will be given at the auditorium of the
Miami Beach Public Library, 2100
Collins Avenue, beginning at 1:30
p.m. The program is co-sponsored by
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and Moadon Ivri-Hebrew
Cultural Forum. Admission is free
and open to the public.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 6
South Seas Chapter of Women's
American ORT will hold a member-
ship meeting featuring lunch and
entertainment at Temple Adath
Yeshurun, 10th Avenue and Miami
Gardens Drive beginning at 11:30
a.m. Call 653-0109 for more
information.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7
"Spiritual Giants of the Past" is a
discussion of various great Bible
figures. "Adam," will be the topic of
this evening's program whose discus-
sion leader will be Rabbi Barry
Konovitch of Temple Beth Shmuel -
Cuban Hebrew Congregation on
Miami Beach. The Central Agency
for Jewish Education sponsors the
program held at the Miami Beach
Public Library, 2100 Collins Avenue
beginning at 10:30 a.m. Admission is
free and open to the public.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 8
American Jewish Congress Justine
Louis Wise chapter, will hold a
regular meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings and Loan Associa-
tion bank building at Alton and Lin-
coln Roads. Guests are invited. Call
864-1355 for more information.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 8
"Yiddish for fun," with Bette
Shalloway will begin at 7:30 p.m. in
the Katz Auditorium of the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue,
North Miami Beach. This program is
an evening of entertainment and fun
as the group shares stories and jokes
in Yiddish. Call 932-4200 for more in-
formation. This program is free and
open to the public.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 8
The Central Agency I for Jewish
Education sponsors a bi-weekly book
review. The book, On Ecstasy, by Dov
Baer and Louis Jacobs will be review-
ed by Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz. Director
of Havurah of South Florida. The
group will meet at the Miami Beach
Public Library, 2100 Collins Avenue
beginning at 1:30 p.m. Admission is
free and open to the public.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 9
B'nai B'rith Women Miami Coun-
cil will hold the Children's Home in
Israel Luncheon at Signature
Gardens, 12725 S.W. 122nd Avenue
beginning at 11:30 a.m. Call 279-0659
for more information.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 9
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, 18900 N.E. 25th
Avenue, will present information on
home care alternative for chronic
health problems. The meeting will
begin at 11:00 a.m. and is free and
open to the public. Call 932-4200 for
more information. Refreshments will
be served.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 11
The Miami Beach Chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will feature
Professor John Bush Joens and
Claudia Novack-Jones at their lun-
cheon which begins at noon. The
meeting will be held at the Sea View
Hotel, 9909 Collins Avenue in Bal
Harbour. Professor Jones will discuss
"Sunday in the Park with Steve: The
musicals of Stephen Sondheim," with
musical selections by his wife Claudia
Novack-Jones. For reservations call
Sarah at 865-5252.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar items
(Please print or type)
Deadline for February events is January 9
Organization
Event _____
Place______
Day
Date.
Time
i )a.m.
p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No.
MAILTO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
16 Federation, January 1987
SUNDAY, JANUARY 11
International Youth Day sponsored
by the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion (BBYO) will be held at Miami
Dade Community College South
Campus, 11011 S.W. 104th Street
from 1:00-5:00 p.m. BBYO is inviting
youth groups from throughout the
community to join in this multi-ethnic
festival. The day will include speaker
Valerie Shalom from the Anti-
Defamation League speaking about
prejudice and the acceptance of
others, food, music, dancing and
volleyball. This program is free. Call
253-7400 for more information.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 11
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, 18900 N.E. 25th
Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will go on a trip to the Greater Miami
Opera dress rehearsal. The bus
departs the JCC at 1:00 p.m. for its
trip to the Dade County Auditorium.
The cost is $4 for JCC members. $6
for non-members (includes transpor-
tation). Call 932-4200 for more
information.
MONDAY, JANUARY 12
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Senior
Center, 610 Espanola Way will hold
their Chai Grief Support meeting at
1:00 p.m. Anyone experiencing a loss
is welcome to attend. Call 673-6060
for more information.
MONDAY, JANUARY 12
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah will
hold a meeting featuring guest
speaker William F. Saulson, discuss-
ing the topic of anti-semitism. The
meeting will be held at Temple
Zamora in Coral Gables beginning at
12:30 p.m. call 649-7134.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 13
The Forte Forum presents Dr.
Steven and Brenda Myerson discuss-
ing the subject. "The nuclear threat:
Prevention is the only cure." The
meeting will be held at 1:00 p.m. in
the auditorium of Forte Towers
North located at 1200 West Avenue
on Miami Beach.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged Founders' Din-
ner meeting will be held at 6:00 p.m.
in the Ruby Auditorium at Douglas
Gardens. Contact Steve Rose at
751-8626 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14
Morton Towers Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its Youth Aliyah Luncheon
at Temple Emanu-El. 17th Street and
Washington Avenue at Noon. Con-
tact 672-3264 for more information.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 15
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Campaign Opening Dinner at
the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel on
Miami Beach. Governor Bob Mar-
tinez will be the featured guest
speaker and the Federation music
video, "It's Our Turn To Be The
Heroes" will make its public debut.
The evening begins with cocktails at
6:30 p.m.. followed by dinner at 7:30
p.m. Couvert is $55 per person and
attendance at dinner requires a
minimum $1,000 gift the 1987 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 18
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hosptial for the Aged board of direc-
tors meeting and breakfast will be
held at 10:00 a.m. in the Ruby
Auditorium at Douglas Gardens, 151
Northeast 52 Street. For more infor-
mation contact the office of the ex-
ecutive director at 751-8626.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 20
The Forte Forum presents Dr. Philir,
Shepard discussing the topic- "Cerwh
tral America: Development or Distor
tion." beginning at 1:00 p.m. in the
auditorium of Forte Towers North
1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 20
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital jfor the Aged Junior Aux-
iliary Board Meeting will be held at
Bay Harfor City Hall at 10:00 a m
Contact Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for
more information.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21
"Rachel and Leah," will be the topic
of the Biblical discussion group led by
Martha Aft, Educational Director of
Bet Breira Congregation. The Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education
sponsors this program which begins
at 10:30 .m. at the Miami Beach
Public Library, 2100 Collins Avenue.
Admission is free and open to the
public.
sDir
THURSDAY. JANUARY 22
The NoHh Dade Chapter of the
Women's Division of Technion will
hold a cird party which will be
preceded ly a hot lunch. The cost is
$7.50 perlperson. The party will be
held at Tie Hemispheres in Hallan-
dale beginning at Noon. Call
651-8545 or 948-6518 for more
information.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 22
The bi-weekly book review group,
"Great Jewish Books Discussion
Group wil meet to discuss. 'The
Book of Abraham" by Marek Halter.
Rabbi David Saltzman, spiritual
leader of the Aventura Jewish Center
will lead the discussion. The meeting
is sponsoed by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and will be held
at the Miami Beach Public Library.
2100 Collins Avenue beginning at
1:30 p.m. Admission is free and open
to the public.
FRIDAY. JANUARY 23
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center. 18900 N.E. 25th
Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will hold screenings for Visual Acuity
in the Mount Sinai Health Van in
front of the main building. The tests
are free and open to the public. Call
932-4200 for more information.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27
THROUGH THURSDAY.
JANUARY 29
The Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center. Senior Activities Center. 610
Espanola Way, will hold a Disney
World Epcot Cener Trip. Call the
center at 673-6060 for more
information.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 29
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its
Leadership Workshops for Auxilians
from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the
Ruby Auditorium at Douglas
Gardens, 151 Northeast 52 Street.
Contact Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for
more information.
EVERY TUESDAY
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Senior
Center, 610 Espanola Way holds
meetings of its Elderly Hearing Im-
paired program at 11:15 a.m. Anyone
with a hearing problem is encouraged
to attend and join the support group,
share ideas, suggestions and new
developments in helping the hearing
impaired. Call 673-6060 for more
information.


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