The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03016

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dfewislfo Flor idliaim
Volume 59 Number 47
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, November 21,1986
ff*
BvMa.iS' >4
Price 50 Cents
Religious Tiffs Need 'Civility'-Peres
Film star and producer Goldie Haum jokes with Prime Minister
} it :hak Shamir during a meeting at the Prime Minister's office
nisalem last week. Hawn was in Israel as a guest of Tel Aviv
(JTA/WZN N*w Photo)
Mayor Shlomo Lahat and the Tel Aviv Foundation to help raise
funds for the cinematheque complex now being built in Tel Aviv.
Not For Most Israelis
Toyota or Datsun from Japan in Your Future?
By KENNETH JACOBSON
And JESS HORDES
On November 20, 1985,
New York Mayor Edward I.
Koch spoke in Tokyo to the
Japanese Economic
Business Council, the
Keidenren. He spoke blunt-
ly, as is his way, about the
imbalance in U.S.-Japanese
trade and how Americans
feel about it. He noted the
growing protectionist senti-
ment in Congress and the
Japanese argument that
free trade is essential for
the economic health of the
world.
But he would not let pass the
Japanese claim to be free traders:
"We say that the argument of the
Japanese is flawed because they
don't engage in free trade. Look
Continued on Page 13-A
More Likely, A Ford
Speaks To
CJFWF
In Chicago
Related Stories 2-A. 6-A
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
CHICAGO (JTA) An
appeal to the Jewish people
to avoid a split within its
ranks over religious and
secular issues was issued
here by Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres. He
urged that "a civilized way
be found to deal with
religious differences" that
have become exacerbated in
Israel and the United
States.
Addressing more than 3,000
Jewish leaders from North
America and abroad at the 55th
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations here, Peres
said that Jewish life is marked by
variations, with different strains
and different beliefs between and
among the religious and secular
elements in Israel and the U.S.
THE VARIATIONS, he said,
do not worry him. But. he added,
"I am worried about our unity.
Let's be careful not to split. We
are too small a people to become
two or three people instead of
one."
Peres declared: "1 call upon
everybody, let's argue without
hate; let's decide our positions and
listen to one another, among your
synagogues and between the
religious and secular."
THE FOREIGN Ministers
remarks were in keeping with the
General Assembly theme of Klal
Yisrael. the pursuit of unity in the
Continued on Page 2-B
UN Chief Warns Against
Eventual War in Mideast
By YITZHAK RABI
I'NITED NATIONS-
(JTA) UN Secretary
J^neral Javier Perez de
tuellar warned here that
without a breakthrough for
peace in the Middle East -
including the Palestine
Liberation Organization" -
war can engulf the region
once again.
'The situation in the region con-
tinues to be highly volatile," de
Cuellar said in his annual report to
the General Assembly, issued last
Thursday (Nov. 13), on the situa-
tion in the Mideast. "There is a
grave danger that if the present
deadlock in the peace process is
allowed to persist, major
hostilities will break out again in
the area as has happened several
times in the past," the Secretary
General stated.
Continued on Page 9-A
Shimon Peres (center) meets with members of
AJCongress' 25 Club during his first visit to
the U.S. last week as Israel's Foreign
Minister. Bernard Schwartz (left) is chair-
man of the board and chief executive officer of
the Loral Corporation. Right is Theodore
Mann, president of the AJCongress. At the
meeting in New York. Peres assured the
gathering of leaders that 'There is no one with
the slightest doubt as to where the U.S. stands
on terrorism.'


2-A The Jewish Floridin/Friday. November 21. 1986
Bush Tells CJF
U.S., Israel in 'Long Alliance'
Bt MURRAY ZLCKOFF
CHICAGO (JTA) -
Vice President George Bush
declared here Saturday
night that the U.S. and
Israel 'are united in a long
alliance dedicated to insur-
ing not a beginning but a
continuation, not the crea-
tion of the State, but its sur-
vival." The "sheer bottom
line consideration," he said.
is that the U.S. needs Israel
and Israel needs the U.S.
"This mutual dependence is
good, not bad," Bush stated.
Addressing the closing plenary
session of the 55th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations. Bush told 3.000
Jewiah communal leaders from
North America and abroad that
this reaffirmabon of the mutual
bond needs to be repeated "as
long as Israel is surrounded by
those who could do her in."
ISRAEL'S FRIENDS "have a
moral responsibility to declare to
the world unambiguously and une-
quivocally: Israel is our friend and
ally." Bush said.
The Vice President was fre-
quently interrupted bv applause
as he talked about I".S.-Israel
relations, the need "to be tough in
the continued war on terrorism"
and the ongoing effort of the U.S.
to press the Soviet Union about
the rights of Soviet Jews. He em-
phasized that American support
for Israel is unswerving
As an example, he noted the
unremitting hostility against
Israel in the UN by those he term-
ed "racists and bullies." "You
would think that being the target
of such obvious hostility. Israel
would have been ejected from the
UN by now." Bush said. "But of
course, she hasn't, and the reason
reminds us of how important it is
for fnends to make their friend-
ship and their intentions
clear."
"Israel is still in the U.S..'' he
said in a slip of the tongue, which
was greeted by laughter, in-
cluding his own. "I mean the
UN." he said, "because America
has made it clear this Ad-
ministration has made it repeated-
ly, abundantly clear that if
Israel is thrown out of the UN.
America leaves too. If they're out.
Vice President Bash
we're out; if they get the boot, our
boots are made for wallrin'."
BUT EXPRESSING frankness
and candor, he said that "over the
past quarter century or so,
America's passion to defend
Israel has sometimes seemed to
manifest itself in a kind of col-
dness or rejection of all things
Arab. And they have sensed this.
and this has not been helpful, and
it has not been kind "
Bush affirmed that the U.S. is
no enemy, to the moderate states.
"We are a friend of Egypt, where
President (Hosni) Mubarak and
his people, with great courage and
sense, made it clear that they
need to preserve the peace with
Israel. King Hussein of Jordan
continues his tough and lonely
search for a way to start negotia-
tions and this is helpful, and
deserving of our praise And the
courage Shimon Peres showed
when he met with King Hassan of
Morocco is another cause far
hopi
In discussing terrorism. Bush
said that one element in the fight
against "this viciousness and
bloodlust" is to step up in-
telligence and analysis He said
that America's intelligence
system "is the best ever In the
past year alone, we were able to
stop 90 planned attacks against
U.S. citizens before they happen-
ed. But we can do better "
He did not give specific informa-
tion about the planned attacks,
and. unlike Israeli Foreign
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Beauty Parlor on Premises
Minister Peres, who address-
ed the GA Thursday night, did not
call for international coopera'
in confronting terrorism on a
global scale.
ON ANOTHER issue, the
separation of church and state,
which Bush referred to as "a
source of anxiety" to the Jewish
community and to others, he said:
"I would fiercely oppose the ob-
vious or subtle establishment of
any state religion. 1 would oppose
any merging of church and state. I
embrace, respect and support the
wall that separates them, and I
would never tear it down nor
allow it to erode."
But. he added, "the separation
of church and state does not. and
cannot, be allowed to apply a
hostility of the state toward
religion The church and the
state are neighbors." Bush said
that Americans must remember
not to judge each other "or to
speak disparagingly of each
other's belief. In a pluralistic
democracy, you've got to
remember to give each other a lit-
tle spiritual breathing room.
Religion isn't a problem in
America, but intolerance
sometimes is. And this is
something we all have to watch
out for."
On the issue of human rights.
Bush assured the assembled
Jewish leaders "that the U.S. has
been bringing up the problem of
Soviet Jewry with the Soviets in
Geneva" during the ongoing
talks He also stressed that P'
dent Reagan "pressed the Soviets
on this cause" when he met with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
in Iceland last month
BUSH ADDED. We will con
tinue to press The human rig
is now a permanent part of
thr U.S.-Soviet agenda. They
don't like that a lot, but that's the
way ;t's going t" be until the]
what's right
Continued on Page 6-A
Former Soviet dissident Satan Sharansky (left) greets godson
Ronnen S'ashpitz whose name means Jubilation' in Hrf>rru- _
and Ronnen's father. Dr. Mark Sashpitz (right), who spent nint
years in exile for refusing to testify against his friend, 'it Uu in-
fant's Brit Mila in the Chagall Synagogue at HadassahHebreu
Cmversity Medical Center. Sharansky's wife, A vital, gar. forth
to a daughter the same day.
Helicopters Protected By Jets
Attack Terror Targets in Sidon
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli helicopter gunships pro
tected by jet fighters attacked terrorist targets near Sidon
in south Lebanon Monday and returned safely to their
bases.
A military spokesman said the attack was a follow-up of
Sunday's air raid on the same area. The target was
reportedly a naval base where terrorists trained and em-
barked on sea-borne missions against Israel.
REPORTS FROM Sidon Monday said two ircrafl
an unspecified number of helicopters attacked a >' :
story building in the Ein Hilwe refugee camp oi out-
skirts -if Sidon There were no immediate re]
casualties but ambulances were rushed to the BCeri
Other report! said helicopters attacked I
Liberation Organization bases in the Mir Mia
Hilwe camps. They encountered anti-aircraft fire bul
tained no hits, according to the reports
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Burg Believes
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
'Ivan the Terrible' Will Go
Unity Gov't. Will Survive Tenure 0n Trial in Jeru8alem Jan-19
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Yosef Burg, the former
Israeli Minister of Religious
Affairs who retired last
month after serving in vir-
tually every government
since the State was founded,
believes the present Labor-
Likud unity coalition will
survive the final two years
of its tenure, despite
ideological differences bet-
ween the partners.
"I don't see any serious political
problems which will break up the
unity government," Burg said at a
press conference here. But the
77 year-old Burg, who can be
described as leader emeritus of
the National Religious Party, did
not come to New York to make
political prognostications.
HE IS HERE to rally support
for the religious Zionist move-
ment in the upcoming elections to
the next World Zionist Congress.
According to Burg, religious
Zionists are under siege by the
Reform movement, which is "try-
ing to muscle in on the Zionist
movement" through its consti-
tuent bodies such as the Jewish
Agency and the World Zionist
i impress.
Burg expressed fear that the
Reform movement, which is
rigorously seeking equal status in
Israel, may align itself with the
I-abor camp to try to oust the
religious factions from Zionist
organizations.
He warned of dangers, such as a
recent resolution adopted by the
Zionist Actions Committee, the
supreme body of the movement
between Congresses, which would
bar funding for non-Zionist or
anti-Zionist yeshivas in Israel.
Burp urged the religious Zionist
movement to organize itself for
the Congress elections to counter
encroachments by Reform
elements. He said the religious
tamp in Israel is under-
represented in the Zionist move-
ment and is apathetic about its
role in the movement.
HE CALLED on Reform Jews
to come to Israel on aliyah before
trying to gain influence in Zionist
bodies in proportion to their
FORMER RELIGION MINISTER YOSEF BURG.
strength in the United States. The
Zionist Congress is not for
everyone, just for Zionists. Burg
maintained.
Burg was questioned about
freedom of religion and worship in
Israel. "There is freedom of wor-
ship in Israel, every human being
can worship God in the way he
sees fit." the Orthodox leader
said.
With respect to the recent con-
frontation in the Baka suburb of
Jerusalem when ultra-Orthodox
Jews attempted by force to inter-
rupt Simchat Torah services at a
Reform congregation, Burg said
the incident was "unhappy." He
called it a "clash between per-
sonalities" who have since made
peace with each other.
THE REFORM congregation
dropped criminal charges against
the local Orthodox chief rabbi.
Eliahu Agergil. who gave a writ-
ten promise never again to in-
terfere with Reform services.
According to Burg. "The bone
of contention is not in the form of
worshipping, but the absolute
necessity of having the (religious)
law of Israel as one and only one
in order to preserve the character
of Israel."
TEL AVIV (JTA) The trial of John Demjanjuk,
alleged to have been the notorious Treblinka death camp
guard known as "Ivan the Terrible," will open in Jerusalem
on Jan. 19. The date was set Monday at a meeting between
the panel of judges who will hear the case, the prosecution
and the defense.
A REQUEST FOR a three-month postponement by
Demjanjuk's American attorney, Mark O'Connor, was re-
jected by Justice Don Levin, President of the court. An
Israeli lawyer will be appointed to assist O'Connor.
Ukrainian-born Demjanjuk, 66, is the first suspected
Nazi war criminal extradited to Israel for trial. The former
resident of Cleveland, Ohio, was brought to Israel earlier
this year.
Powerful Bomb Explodes Outside
Main Synagogue in Antwerp
PARIS (JTA) A powerful bomb exploded outside
the main synagogue in Antwerp late Monday night (Nov.
10) causing extensive damage but no casualties. The
building was unoccupied at the time.
A POLICE SPOKESMAN said the explosive was plac-
ed outside the main entrance. No messages were found and
as of late afternoon last Tuesday no group claimed respon-
sibility. Two caretakers who live behind the synagogue said
they heard no suspicious noises during the night.
The bomb destroyed the synagogue gate and shattered
its windows and those of neighboring buildngs. Antwerp
has a large Jewish community. Six years ago, terrorists at-
tacked a group of Jewish children waiting to board a bus for
a summer camp. One child was killed, and a dozen were
seriously injured.
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rage 4-A Th Jewiah Ftoncban/Fnday, November 21, 1986
Public Schools Guidelines Strike A Good Note
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation is
striking a fine note with its Guidelines on
Religion and the Public Schools which are in
the process of being distributed well before
the advent of the holiday season. The
celebration this year of Christmas in the
Christian community on Dec. 25 and of
Chanukah in the Jewish community on Dec.
26, just one day later, makes all the more
praiseworthy the Federation distribution of
its Guidelines at this time.
Object of the Guidelines is to remind
Public School administrators and faculty of
the First Amendment separation of church
and state principle as a guard against
government interference or encroachment
by specific religious denominations.
This is a particularly apt reminder when
Fundamentalist persuasions of every stripe
have felt themselves encouraged for the
first time in a long time to press for a
"Christian" America, to enter into the lists
against textbooks and creative literature
they consider offensive to them (including
some of the greatest works of literary art of
all time), to introduce prayers of a specifical-
ly sectarian nature into the schools, and to
oppose abortion on those very same sec-
tarian bases.
Neutrality Needed
What ought to be remembered at this time
of the year is that the Public Schools must be
religiously neutral, a principle lone
established in an equally long line of judicial
decisions. The Supreme Court has defined
"religiously neutral" as meaning that the
government may not promote any or all
religions, express opposition or hostility to
any or all religion or to no religion, or show
preference for one religion over another.
This hardly means that schools may not
teach about religion. Public Schools should
indeed take cognizance of religion and its
role in our society. Programs which teach
about religion and its role in the historical
development of civilization, as well as its
current role in society, ought to be
developed in the school curricula, providing
they do not violate the religious neutrality of
the school system.
Especially for the Jewish community it
must be emphasized that ioint celebrations
of Christmas and Chanukah are no more ac-
ceptable than individual observances. Such
observances only introduce more improper
religious participatory activity into the
Public Schools. They also tend to place
holidays in competition with one another
and typically distort each holiday as a
distinct religious experience in the minds of
children.
Vigilant Parents
Parents who may be assuaged in their
more sensible rejection of any religious
observance in the Public School classroom or
auditorium by the observance of any type of
Chanukah ceremony as well, are con-
tributing to a double assault one to the
separation of church and state principle and
also one upon the understanding of children,
both Jewish and Christian, who come to con-
fuse these separate and distinct holidays as
essentially the same thing.
In the end, because Public Schools are
responsible for teaching our children the
Jewish Florid it* in
armataMr-iam Man n. nm
raso* tHucHrt lcohimoum
uzanhc morHrr
principles of American democracy, it is par-
ticularly important that they observe the
principle of separation of church and state in
the First Amendment as an essential ele-
ment of our religious liberty.
Kahane's Divisiveness
In an address before the National Press
Club in Washington the other Wednesday.
Rabbi Meir Kahane. head of the extremist
Kach Party in Israel, predicted that the Uni-
ty Government there would not survive
another year because the Labor Party would
ultimately call in its chips and demand new
elections.
In this, Kahane expressed no regret, saw
no contradiction in the survival of the Unity
Government with Shimon Peres at the helm
for its two alloted years, and predicted that
his own Kach Party would be there on the
sidelines to pick up the pieces as Likud and
Labor ultimately went to war.
In the end, surely Rabbi Kahane had
heated visions at the National Press Club of
his own elevation to Prime Minister.
At just about the same time, former Prime
Minister Shimon Peres was speaking to
American Jewish Congress officials in New
York and, on Thursday (Nov. 13), before a
session in Chicago of the Conference of
Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds.
On both those occasions, Peres spoke not
about war but of peace. Dominantly on his
mind was the growing hostility between
American and Orthodox Israeli Jews over
questions of religion notably, Orthodoxy's
determined struggle to keep the U.S.
Reform Jewish movement from establishing
itseif on a broad basis in Israel without
violent confrontation.
Mr. Peres' note was one that accented
"civilization" the need for mutual respect
and. above all. unity among; Jewish
brethren. In this call for unity, th- former
Prime Minister has an enviable record of ex-
perience in the Unity Government's first
phase.
It is our hope that, in its second phase
under Yitzhak Shamir and Likud, the record
will be one of equal "civilization."' Much has
already been written about the remarkable
achievement of a coalition agreement which,
in 1984 when it was forged, gave little
reason for hope of success.
Much, all of us trust, will be written again
in 1988, when the Unity Government fulfills
its original mandate.
This is what needs to be emphasized. Mr.
Peres did just that in New York and
Chicago. In Washington, Rabbi Kahane
spouted only divisiveness and threats of war
among brothers.
Zionism-Racism Blunder
Bishop Urges UN To Reverse Itself
Friday, November 21.1966
Volume 59
19 HESHVAN 6747
Number 47
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
Bishop James Malone,
president of the U.S.
Catholic Conference, has
urged the United Nations
General Assembly to
reverse its "deplorable"
resolution equating Zionism
with racism.
This was the first time a U.S.
Catholic Conference president
had commented on the resolution
since it was labelled as "unjust"
by Joseph Cardinal Bernardin
shortly after the General
Assembly adopted the resolution
on November 10, 1975.
Malone's statement was issued
from the conference office here
prior to the opening ^last week of
the annual meeting of the Na-
tional Conference of Catholic
Bishops, which he also heads.
HE SAID he agrees with Ber
nardin's statement in 1975 that
the resolution "retards the
necessary struggle against racism
in the world and opens the door to
harassment, discrimination and
denial of basic human rights to
members of the Jewish communi-
ty throughout the world."
However, Malone added that he
also reaffirms "the principles of
peace in the Middle East as put
forth by the National Conference
of Catholic Bishops in 1973 and
again in 1978."
He outlined these as a "com-
prehensive peaceful solution"
with recognition by all of Israel's
right to exist; "recognition of the
rights of Palestinian Arabs to par-
ticipation" in negotiations for the
future; "recognition of the 'unique
religious significance of
Jerusalem' through an internal
guarantee of access to holy places
and preservation of its 'religiously
diverse citizenry'; and affirmation
of I'N Resolution 242 as a basis
for a just settlement."
"The years since the deplorable
UN vote on Zionism as racism and
since the issuance of our own
statements have served to in
crease the urgency of condemning
the former and working toward
realizing the principles enunciated
in the latter,'' Malone said.
MEANWHILE, the American
Section of the International
Association of Jewish Lawyers
and Jurists has created the Pro-
ject to Combat Anti-Semitism and
Anti-Zionism (Project CASAJ) to
actively oppose all manifestations
of the "Zionism is racism" resolu-
tion. The project is aimed at
educating both Jews and non-
Jews on the issue.
At a forum at George
Washington University, organiz-
ed by the American Section and
the George Washington Universi-
ty Hillel Foundation, Jeane
Kirkpatrick, former United States
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions, said that resolutions should
be introduced annually in the
Security Council and General
A.Me.mb'v to repeal the anti-
Zionist resolution.
Also participating in the forum
were Alan Keyes. Assistant
Secretary of State for Interna-
tional Organizational Affairs;
Allan Gerson. a Deputy Assistant
Attorney General; Tova Henl, a
Congressional liaison officer for
the Israel Embassy; and Yoram
Dinstein, s law professor st Tel
Aviv University, who is currently
a visiting professor st the New
York University School of Law.
PRESIDENT REAGAN sent a
message to the forum in which he
said he was proud that he and his
two predecessors, Presidents
Ford and Carter, had opposed the
UN resolution.
He said it was a nonparusan
issue. Americans "have been
united and will remain united in
our commitment to Israel, in our
conviction that Israel has a right
to exist and s right to exist in
peace." Reagan declared
Kirkpatrick said that since the
failure of the Arabs tt) defeat
Israel in 1967 and 1978. there has
been an effort to "undermine
Israel by political means inside the
United Nations." She called this*
"kind of war by other means '
Keyes said the effort to
deligitimize Israel was not aimed
just against Israel or Jews, but aH
those who support the Jewish
State, particularly the U S He
said beyond this it was aimed at
those like Israel who believe m
democratic principles
BUT KEYES warned that the
"Zionism is racism" resolution
also was simed st causing
domestic dissension within the
U.S.. particularly at creating
split between American Jews ana
American blacks.
An example of this was at the
University of Maryland. OOM"
Washington, recently, when
Jewish and black students clasnea
over the appearance by Kwame
Toure. formerly Stokely
Carmichael.
The Jewish students obj**"*1^
the black Student Union inviung
Toure. since in a talk it J
university last spring, he *,"
"only good Zionist ia
Zionist." During his
a dead
speech,
Toure was heckled by Je
students, and he called them
-Zionist pigs" and said "Zionism
is Satan in disguise."


Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewiah Floridian Page 5-A

Disinft
By London Chronicle Syndicate
WASHINGTON The
current controversy in
Washington over the
Reagan Administration's
alleged use of "disinforma-
tion" in the U.S. and foreign
news media against Libyan
leader Muammar Khadafy is
part of the bigger debate
over the use of military
force to combat terrorism.
Some of those political and
.try voices in the government
arguing against the use of military
an clearly attempting t>
mine the position of the bo-
hardliners." led by
State I" orge Shulti
Sal mal Securitj \ I
: tar
.- part r against
,.: on terrorism,' one
mmei
IIIKKK IS also a very direct
to [arael, according to
fficialS, since those
. maken favoring vary tough
onveottonaJ maaauras
Libya are almost always
pro Israeli in their orien-
tation. The other side is clearly
sympathetic
In the of t en-f rac t ious
fureaucratic politics of
Washington, U.S. officials said,
anything that weakens the anti
Khadafy hardliners is bound even-
tually to result in less overall U.S.
support for Israel. That helps to
explain why Israeli diplomats and
other pro-Israeli political activists
are so concerned over this latest
"disinformation" flap.
"' >ur l>est friends, especially
Poindeztar, are being hurt right
now." one pro-Israeli analyst said.
Among those resisting the
tugh U.S. posture against
Khadafy including last April's
Bernard Kalb (left) resigned, and
Secretary Shultz may follow.
bombing of Libyan targets, have
been officials in the Office of the
Defense Secretary. Caspar
Weinberger; the Joint Chiefs of
Staff; and the Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs Bureau at the
State Department. But their
hesitations have been rejected by
President Reagan, Shultz,
Poindexter and others.
ON OCT. 2. the Washington
Post reported that the Reagan
Administration had launched "a
secret and unusual campaign of
deception" designed to convince
Khadafy that he was about to be
attacked again by U.S. bombers
and perhaps be ousted in a coup.
The secret plan, adopted at a
White House meeting on Aug. 14,
was outlined in a three-page
memo by Poindexter.
The Post story, written by Bob
Woodward, caused a firestorm of
protest, especially in the U.S.
news media, which noted that one
of the key elements of Poindex-
ter's strategy was to combine
"real and illusory events
through a disinformation program
with the basic goal of making
Khadafy think (word underlined
in the original) that there is a high
degree of internal opposition to
him within Libya, that his key
trusted aides are disloyal, that the
U.S. is about to move against him
militarily."
After that memo was prepared,
several U.S. newspapers, starting
with the Wall Street Journal,
reported extensively on supposed
new plans in Washington to use
force against Libya and about the
increased internal opposition to
Khadafy. Woodward suggested in
this story that those reports were
not accurate, based in part on
false information released by the
Administration.
ADMINISTRATION
hardliners, including Poindexter
and Shultz, have been severely
embarrassed by the disclosure of
the secret memo to Woodward.
They suspect that the leak came
from a disgruntled official who
was opposed to the Administra-
tion's tough line against Libya, in-
cluding the use of military force.
The FBI is reportedly looking for
the leaker.
Shultz has denied that he had
ever participated in any meeting
where a plan to misinform the
U.S. madia was discussed. "There
isn't any intent to try to spread
around false information," he
said.
But he confirmed that the Ad-
ministration was still very anxious
to "confuse" Khadafy. When the
U.S. bombed Libya in April, he
continued, "it did disorient him,
and it did put terrorism down for
awhile. And we want to keep it
that way.
"There are various ways in
which we can do things that may
cause him concern. If we move the
fleet around in the Mediterra-
nean, that may cause him concern.
I don't see anything wrong with
that."
The Secretary said the U.S.
should not limit itself to
"economic sanctions and military
strikes as a means to try to
disorient him." But at the same
time, he insisted, the government
Continued on Page 8-A
Christian Advises Zionists
Not To Generalize
Avi (left) Instills Integrity Among Men
Who Were Unfavorably Discharged
By ROBERT A. CUMINS
Avi is a major in the Israeli Defense Forces.
His assignment is to instill dignity, self-
respect, and the will to belong in men who
have been unfit for military service. Once
they would have been unfavorably discharg-
ed, a devastating stigma in Israeli society.
Now, many are put into Avi's special pro-
JTram. The short-term goal is to make them
soldiers; the long-term goal is to make them
productive citizens.
MAJOR AVI explains: "Most of the men in
ur program did not finish elementary school.
Fifty percent of their parents did not finish
school. They have low self-image, little con-
fidence, trouble performing tasks. They are
not cooperative. They don't think they are
getting anything from our country, so they
don't understand why they should serve in
the army."
Each soldier gets put into a class with
6-to-12- others for a 7-week course. The for-
mal purpose is education. The actual purpose
is deeper a kind of spiritual rehabilitation.
Major Avi's method? The won! he uses is
"love."
By DR. EUGENE J. FISHER
When Zionists seek my ad-
vice on how they can pro-
mote their views among
Christians, I first stress that
the Christian community,
no less than the Jewish com-
munity, is pluralistic. This is
true not only among
denominations, but within
denominations. So no single
approach is apt to be
successful.
Having said that. I nevertheless
do have some friendly sugges-
tions. First, Christian individuals
or institutions sometimes are
alleged to have views that they do
not actually hold. For example,
people keep trying to tell me that
the Vatican advocates "interna-
tionalizing" the city of Jerusalem,
when it doesn't, or that the Pope
refuses to recognize the existence
of Israel, which he does.
I HAVE ALSO noticed that the
posture of Zionist organizations
and Jewish agencies in general
tends to be a lot less critical of
Israel in public than in their own
internal discussions. These public
expressions establish a climate
within which it becomes difficult
for some Christian friends of
Israel to disagree, say, on the
West Bank settlement policy,
even if they strongly support
Israel in broad terms.
To me, the more free-flowing
and open-ended the dialogue bet-
ween Christians and Jews the bet-
ter. I think Jews should openly ex-
Dr. Fisher is executive direc-
tor of the Secretariat for
Catholic-Jewish Relations of
the National Conference of
Catholic Bishops. This article
is adapted from a talk he gave
before the Jacob Goodman In-
stitute of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America.
press to Christians their own con-
cerns about Israeli policies and
in the context of clearly-stated
support encourage Christians
to do the same. We might find out
that we are not so far apart after
all, and that a certain amount of
the perceived disagreement bet-
Continned on Page 12-A

!
Dr. Eagene Fisher


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
Cardin Says
Pluralism Needed in Jewish Life
Bush Tells CJF U.S., Israel
United in 'Long Alliance'
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
CHICAGO (JTA) A
call for pluralism in Jewish
life in North America,
abroad and in Israel was
issued here last week by
Shoshana Cardin, president
of the Council of Jewish
Federations. She was mak-
ing her keynote address to
more than 3,000 Jewish
leaders from the United
States, Canada and
overseas attending the 55th
General Assembly of the
CJF.
The commitment to pluralism
"nurtures mutual respect among
specific ideological groupings and
seeks the pursuit of unity even in
the midst of serious differences."
Cardin declared in her address en-
titled "Klal Yisrael Federa-
tion's Role in Building Communi-
ty." This also was the theme of
the entire convention which ended
Sunday.
"WE BELIEVE that honest
differences can be a source of
creativity. We believe that the
agenda which unites us is far more
powerful and significantly more
compelling than the agenda which
divides us," she said. Further-
more, Cardin stated. "We are
committed to a civil, even if pas-
sionate discourse. We are opposed
to shrill and strident discourse.'
The CJF leader emphasized that
"the Federation environment
must not be used to leverage
specific religious or ideological
support at the expense of other
religious persuasions and
ideologies Respect for dif-
ferent ideological, religious or
political persuasions we accept.
Demanding that one ideology or
persuasion prevail to the exclu-
sion of others we decry."
Cardin"s address was a dramatic
reaffirmation that the CJF is a
collectivity of diversity in unity
and the unity of diverse elements
and views, all working to
"enhance the opportunities for ef-
fective community building" and
making it "a shared responsibili-
Israeli Woman
Wins Lottery
NEW YORK (JTA) An
Israeli woman who immigrated 20
years ago to the United States
won $12 million in the latest New
York State lottery. Last Monday
morning, Osnat Burdman arrived
at the lottery office with her hus-
band and her winning ticket, with
the number combination of 18, 31,
24, 86, 45 and 47. to claim her
share of the $24 million Lotto
jackpot. As of Thursday the
holder of the second winning
ticket has not come forward.
Mrs. Burdman, 55, who is mar-
ried to Dr. Mortimer Burdman,
69, said that she had purchased 60
tickets in a stationery store in
Minksssiil NY She said that she
has always played the cotnbina-
Uon of numbers that won her the
groat prise, adding the numbers
were a mixture of Hebrew letters,
her husband's birthday "and a few
numbers I threw in at random."
Mrs, Burdman, who has been
working so a saleaclerk at her
daughter's boutique in
Msnlissort lives with her surgeon
husband in Albertaon, NY She
has two daughters from a
Srevious marriage, while her
rooklyn-born husband has one
son. They have been married for
13 years. The couple said they
plan to retire soon. "Probably
tomorrow." Dr. Burdman said
with a smile.
Shoshana Cardin
ty." as she put it. All Jews, Cardin
declared, "should be participatory
Jews." She noted that "Judaism
is not a spectator ideology."
HER ADDRESS was in many
ways markedly different in scope
and substance than those CJF
presidents have delivered in
previous General Assemblies. It
was less concrete in terms of
organizational guidelines, but
more powerful in terms of a
philosophical guideline for "a vi-
sion of Klal Yisrael at home,
abroad and in Israel."
Without specifying, her urgent
appeal for pluralism in Jewish life
alluded to some of the discordant
and vexing religious, social and
economic issues extant in Jewish
life.
These ideas include: the ongoing
conflict over who is a Jew; the role
of the Orthodox establishment in
Israel; the nuclear weapons build-
up by the United States and
Soviet Union; the Reagan Ad-
ministration's economic and social
policies affecting the lower and
middle income segments of
American society; the Jewish
community as a single or multi-
issues-oriented community; and
attitudes toward abortion, the
sanctuary movement, and the
kind of leadership the Jewish com-
munity requires to assure its
vitality and viability.
CARDIN ALSO obliquely
criticized financially affluent
movers and shakers in the com-
munity who seek to use their in-
fluence to try to sway the Federa-
tion movement toward their
views, as well as the Reform
movement, which has indicated
that it would have to rethink its
financial contributions to Israel
unless it was allowed a greater
role in religious affairs.
"CJF and Federations must
maintain an open forum where all
can participate, where all can ex-
press themselves without feeling
threatened and without threaten-
ing others. We must be extremely
wary of tactics which may be coer-
cive or tactics which may seek to
threaten our ability to respond to
the needs of Klal Yisrael by
withholding money," she said.
"Money should not and cannot
be used as an instrument for the
pursuit of specific ideological or
religious primacy in the pursuit of
power or to redress grievances
... I call upon our co-workers in
all the ideological and political
movements of Jewish life to re-
main fervent and passionately
committed to their ideologies to
seek to persuade to seek to
engage one another through
creative, civil and effective
discourse.
"I MUST, however, be candid. I
fear that a significant segment of
our people can be alienated as a
result of the animosity and hostili-
ty that is being generated in our
communal framework. Some may
even choose a spectator role
because of this negativism.'
Cardin urged the assembled
leaders to "be prepared to take
risks and design new approaches
- test new ideas and experiment
with new modes in the art and
science of what the French call
engage' in order to build a more
just, more open and more
equitable larger society."
Cardin said the task of Federa
tions is to maintain an effective
and all-inclusive Jewish communi
ty by demonstrating "that our
doors are open to all who can
belong ... to all who may wish to
participate but don't know how
"JEWS IN OUR continental
community, affiliated or unaf
filiated. detached or even
alienated, must begin to feel
viscerally that the communal
enterprise the Jewish Federation
wants them, is ready to em-
brace them and make room for
them .
"We should not set precondi
tions. on the contrary". *e must
convey the message that our com
munal enterprise the Jewish
Federation extends itself and
invites every individual and every
discrete group into an interdepen-
dent relationship with community,
representing our belief that 'all
Jews are responsible to and for
one another.' "
Continued from Page 2-A
The most dramatic portion of
the closing GA session was the ap-
pearance of Natan Sharansky on
satellite television from
Jerusalem. This first satellite
telecast from Israel was brought
through the auspices and services
of the World Zionist Organization
Education Department.
Sharansky, smiling and at ease.
issued an impassioned plea for
continuing efforts to pressure the
Soviet Union to allow Jews to im-
migrate to Israel He warned the
audience not to be beguiled by the
release of a few prominent
refuseniks as signifying a more
liberal emigration policy It was
tokenism, he explained.
HE POINTED out that Gor-
bachev was engaging in clever
public relations in dealing with the
WaH and this, therefore, made
Gorbachev even more dangerous
than his predecessors. Sharansky
said the change in the outward ap~
nwarsnfS of responsiveness by the
USSR to human rights pressure
Dt the I' B was due to the Soviet
Union's need for more trade and
credits from the I'.S
Realistically, the situation of
Soviet Jews in worse than ever,"
he said "The number of Jews
allowed to emigrate today is the
lowest in 20 years. The number of
Prisoners of Zion in the camps and
the refuseniks in the cities is big-
ger than before. There are
400,000 Jews waiting to come to
Israel. That's why we must not be
deceived by the new image Gor-
bachev is presenting to the
West."
The former refusen.k also u^
Oiat more American Jews vi^S
Soviet Union to establish coo^J
with Jews there to obuinrnfoT
Uon about the situation andW
them know that they are not^
IN AN unscheduled dramibr
addendum to the session fc*
asked to be allowed to ifi
Sharansky directly ovtr &
satellite television The Vw*
President recalled hi> fnendib
with Sharansky and hi Wj
Avital and his visit.- to Israeli
declared that the I s *>,'' w
cease in its effort speak outce
behalf of Soviet Jem ^
privately and publicly.
"There il r n for qm
negotiation.- and
diplomacy." B isl laid But it
will speak out
opprsissioo of S
have no fear that aregoinjto
resort to sole's -.an I
wanted U) rat
your eloquent pk
you come in coi to I *ith thuit
will do both "
Medal for Miron
NEW YORK .JTA) -
Issachar Miron received a gold
medal for multi-image motm-
Uonal production for his Si
"Festival of Freedom"' it the2ftt
Annual Competition >f the Inter
national Film and TV Festmi
held Nov. 10 at Town Hall hen.
Miron may be best known for U
song. "Tzena, Tiena. Tiena.
KITES, KIDS _
AND POWER ULNES^
CAN BE A
DEADLY MIX.
* For your childs safety, make sure there is
nothing metallic on the kite, make sure that
the string for the kite has no wire or metal in it.
and don't let kids fly kites near power lines.
Ordinarily, power lines are quite harmless. But
when a kite gets caught in a power line, it could become electrified.
Tell your kids to let go of the string and leave the kite alone
Otherwise, the result could be deadly.
Always look up. Whether you re poking fruit or pruning trees,
installing antennas or doing any activity that puts you in possible
contact with overhead lines.
Don't be a victim of your own carelessness
aim
FiomoAPowtB4lKjMT Co** ...


la]
Sharansky:
'I Didn't Know They Were PLO'
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page_7-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Natan Sharansky issued a
public apology last Thurs-
day (Nov. 13) for meeting
with pro-PLO Palestinians
in East Jerusalem early last
week. "I learned that the
delegation that met with me
was identified with the PLO
only after our meeting. Had
I known this fact in ad-
vance, the meeting never
would have taken place,"
Sharansky said.
Orthodox
Circles
Attack
Sharansky
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Soviet Jewry activist, Natan
Sharansky came under at-
tack from Orthodox political
circles last Wednesday
(Nov. 12) for a meeting he
had early in the week with
Palestinian leaders in East
Jerusalem. Laborites and
leftists in the Knesset im-
mediately sprang to his
defense.
Sharansky, who came to Israel
last February after nine years in
Soviet prisons and labor camps,
was angrily denounced by Na-
tional Religious Party MK Haim
Druikman for "succoring Israel's
enemies." Labor MK Micha
Hansh said Druckman's attack
ttu reminiscent of the Soviet
Union.
SHARANSKY met discreetly
with Feisal Husseini. a prominent
pro-PLO Palestinian intellectual,
and reportedly with other Palesti-
nian activists in connection with
the deportation order against
Akhram Haniye, editor of the
East Jerusalem Arabic daily A-
Shaab. The meeting became
known generally only after
I'ruckman attacked Sharansky
for it.
Husseini. who heads the Palesti-
nian Research Center in East
Jerusalem, is a leading figure in a
puolic movement to block the
deportation. The movement con-
ti mainly of Palestinian
academicians and journalists, but
they have been joined by a grow-
ing number of Israeli liberals.
Many of the latter attended a pro-
test rally for Haniye at an East
Jerusalem theater.
Maniye's case will be considered
by the Supreme Court. His at-
torney, Felicia Langer, lodged an
appeal after a military review
hoard in Nab I us upheld the depor-
tation order at a hearing.
THE ISRAEL Defense Force
Central Command ordered the
editor expelled to Jordan on
| grounda that he has been involved
in PLO activity in the ad-
hered territories But the
|1DF acknowledged that Haniye is
not linked directly to anv terrorist
[act
MK Ram Cohen of the leftist
[< itizens Right* Movement (CRM)
Baid at the East Jerusalem rally
that the expulsion of Haniye
would hinder the peace process.
He said Israel should be ashamed
resort to "colonialist laws
I under which our own people
previously suffered." He was
referring to the British Mandate
(regulations under which Haniye
[was ordered deported.
Sharansky's statement, a fierce
attack on the PLO and avowal of
confidence in the government's
methods of fighting it. was issued
after the Soviet Jewry activist
came under fire from Orthodox
and rightwing circles for meeting
the Palestinians.
THE GROUP he met with is
seeking to block a deportation
order against East Jerusalem
editor Akhram Haniye, whom the
authorities accuse of PLO activity
in the administered territories,
though not of direct involvement
in terrorist acts.
The most prominent among
them is Feisal Husseini, a leading
East Jerusalem intellectual sym-
pathetic to the PLO. Husseini said
last Thursday that Sharansky
made his statement under heavy
pressure from right-wing Israelis.
Sharansky said. "The people of
Israel are waging a war of self-
defense against the PLO. a
Natan Sharansky
criminal terror organization
whose goal is the denial of the
legitimate rights of the Jewish
people to their homeland, and
ultimately the destruction of the
State of Israel. Both the aims and
the barbarous methods of this
organization of cut-throats violate
every human standard.
"THE PLO and those who sup-
port it place themselves beyond
the pale of civilized society. I
learned that the delegation that
met with me was identified with
the PLO only after our meeting.
Had I known this fact in advance,
the meeting would never have
taken place.
"... The blood of my brothers is
on their hands ... I have full con-
fidence that the government and
security forces of Israel are wag-
ing an unrelenting battle for our
protection The pursuit of this
goal in accordance with the laws
of the State of Israel and subject
to the judicial scrutiny of the
Israeli Supreme Court is in no
way a violation of human
rights. ."
Haniye has appealed to the
Supreme Court against his depor-
tation. The order will not be im-
plemented until the high court
rules on the appeal.
Soviet Mission
Protesters Freed
From Charges
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Charges have been dropped by
New York City Criminal Court
Justice Roger Hayes against all 55
rabbis and laypersons who were
arrested Oct. 12 at the Soviet UN
Mission here. Their demonstra-
tion coincided with the Reagan-
Gorbachev Iceland summit
meeting and Yom Kippur eve.
The protesters, who had been
charged with disorderly conduct,
were organized by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry and the
Long Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry as part of "Operation
Redemption." a series of peaceful
arrests at Soviet offices in the
New York area in which 415 per-
sons have been arrested since
January 1985, including 173 rab-
bis and 12 legislators.
^11'P HP
m '
fijVci' CtCeb&n CfCaye^nelA Set&uie/ Satin Q)ivb>n
ISAAC M. MIL DENBERG
National Chairman
JNF Karen Kayemath Lalsrael-Latln Division
STAe tfiAffi Cfi&tett Ctfwuent&tA Satin ^tsnibi&n
cvn /it's ahjt oJ'fAe tJ&lni&Gfyu TDtwnntiffl&e of? tne
JljVd' CtCeb&n CfCau&melA Sei^iae/ Satin fiii&ion.
if&ntl t&i&Aeb Awn mar A bacc&bb In i/4fmfabe end&awrtA.

P
**f
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen
Executive Vlce-Pree.
JNF ot America
Zev W. Kogan
President
JNF Southern Region
Nily Felic
National Director
KKL Latin Division

Mordechai Dayan
World Co-Chairman
KKL Jerusalem
JNF Keren Keyemeth Leisrael-Lstin Division, 420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 349, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 532-8706, 538-6464
tOOBOQOBOQI


*?
fge a-A me Jtwmi riondian/Fnday, November 21, 1986
Disinformation
Kalb Resigned, Shultz Not Far Behind
hardli
in*
Continued froa Page 5-A
"shouldn't get involved in any
operation where we try to mislead
our news media or our public in
any way, shape or manner. And as
far as I know, we haven't. And I
certainly wouldn't be part of
that."
BUT ONE immediate casualty
from the escalating "disinforma-
tion" controversy was State
Department spokesman Bernard
Kalb, who resigned in protest on
Oct. 8.
"In taking this action." he said,
"I want to emphasize that I am
not dissenting from Secretary
Shultz, a man of integrity, a man
of credibility. Rather I am dissen-
ting from the reported disinfor-
mation program."
Kalb, a former television news
reporter who served in the State
Department for nearly two years,
said he was concerned "about the
impact of any such program on
the credibility of the United
States. Faith in the word of
America is the pulse beat of our
democracy. Anything that hurts
America's credibility hurts
America."
Thus, Kalb said he personally
could not continue as spokesman
for the State Department. "I'm
familiar with the absolute require-
ment of credibility," he said.
Kalb'8 surprise resignation has
generated enormous shock waves
in Washington. Coming on the eve
of President Reagan's mini-
summit with Soviet General
Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev, the
resignation clearly embarrassed
and weakened the President.
It has opened up many ques-
tions involving the Administra-
tion's overall credibility. Kalb's
dissent has clearly tended to con-
firm that the Administration had
indeed sought to plant false
stories in the U.S. news media as
part of a disinformation campaign
aimed at confusing Khadafy. Ad-
ministration officials deny any
such plan.
BUT KALB, the 64-year-old
former correspondent, could not
passively go along with the
reported effort. "You have a
choice as an American, as a
spokesman, as a journalist
whether to allow oneself to be ab-
sorved in the ranks of silence,
whether to vanish into unopposed
acquiescence or to enter a modest
dissent," he told reporters during
an emotional news conference.
His voiced cracked and he was
near tears. He was applauded by
the journalists at the end of the
session.
Since the Washington Post first
disclosed the anti- Libya disinfor-
mation plot on Oct. 2, Kalb has
been deeply bothered. "It has pur-
sued me unshakably." he told the
New York Times.
"I have been agonizing about
this thing," he continued. "I knew
nothing about it. I was concerned.
I was concerned with the impact
of any such program on the
credibility of the United States
and the word of America and what
the word of America means .
And I was concerned about my
own integrity.
"MY OWN integrity means
something to me personally, but in
the grand scheme of things I'm a
simple asterisk. What I know is I
didn't want my own integrity to
get scooped up in this
controveray.'
At the White House, thert was
deep anger at Kalb, especially
because of the timing of his dis-
sent. Many of Reagan's closest
political associates had never
trusted Kalb very much to begin
with. His appointment nearly two
years ago was pushed through
personally by Shultz.
Disinformation target was Libya's
Muammar Khadafy.
Kalb, in his resignation state-
ment, went out of his way to
praise Shultz. But the two men
clearly differed in their assess-
ment of the disinformation pro-
gram, and its impact on U.S.
credibility.
Shultz, in earlier defending
anything that might confuse
Khadafy, had quoted Winston
Churchill who said during World
War II: "In time of war, the truth
is so precious, it must be attended
by a bodyguard of lies."
Later, when a journalist told
Shultz that the disinformation
story represented a serious
"charge" against the Administra-
tion, the Secretary replied: "Why
is that a charge?
"If I were a private citizen
reading about it, and I read that
my government was trying to con-
fuse somebody who was conduc-
ting terrorist acts and murdering
Americans. I would say, 'Gee. I
hope it is true." I don't see why
you think this is a charge."
BUT KALB obviously
disagreed. After agonizing for
several days. Kalb confronted
Shultz with his decision. The
Secretary did not try to change
his mind.
On Oct. 8. the Secretary issued
a terse statement: "I am sorry to
see Bernie Kalb go. I admire him
as a friend. Bernie has my thanks
for the job he has done, and I wish
him well."
White House Chief of Staff Don
Regan was irritated by Kalb's ac-
tion. But he also was defensive. "I
think a lot of this talk about our ly-
ing or dissimulation, or what have
you. has been overblown,
misunderstood," he said. "I don't
think the President has been
wounded at all."
Pressed on the CBS Morning
News to explain Kalb's reaigna
tion. Regan replied: "I'll leave
that up to you to ask Mr. Kalb.
He's an employee of the State
Department. He doesn't come
under me. And I've had no conver-
sation with him."
Regan went on to say that he
wanted to assure the American
public that "we have not lied to
anyone. Did we have a plan to deal
with Muammar Khadafy? Of
course we did. We'd be derelict in
our duty if we didn't."
Regan, in response to another
question, said that Poindexter's
Aug. 14 memo outlining a disin-
formation program against
Khadafy was simply designed to
keep the Libyan leader "off-
stride." He said the U.S. hoped to
"keep questions in his mind. Let
him think that something was
Koind to happen so as to keep him
off-stride. This man s a murderer
a terrorist. We have to deal, and
deal with him so that he is con-
stantly off-stride."
Kalb. in an interview on ABC's
"Nightline" television program,
noted that when he accepted the
State Department assignment he
had said that the guidelines in
eluded "no lies, no misleading, to
be as forthcoming as possible
within security constraints .
I've sought to abide by those
(fuidehnes "
Kalb also rejected the notion -
advanced bv some Administration
officials -that the U.S. should
plant false stones in the foreign,
as opposed to American, news
media. He warned that such
stories overseas are quickly
"echoed" back home, and are
dangerous
KALB CONFIDED only with
his wife. Phyllis, nd his younger
brother. Marvin Kalb of NBC
News, before making his an-
nouncement. "This was not an
easy thing for me to. but it's
something I had to do." he said.
"You know. 1 came here suddenly.
I was taken by surprise at the
Secretary's invitation, and I'm
leaving with as comparable sud-
denness. There seems to be an in-
evitability about it."
The son of Jewish immigrants
from Poland and Russia. Kalb
worked for the New York Times
from 1946 to 1961 He then joined
CBS News, serving in Hong Kong
and Indonesia for many years. In
1980. he joined NBC News, cover
ing the State Department with his
brother.
USA Today reported that the
Cable News Network is interested
in hiring Kalb. But he has not
commented on his future plans.
In the meantime, one of
Poindexter's top aides. Howard
Teicher. has come under some
sharp private criticism from those
officials opposed to the
policy against Libya.
Teicher, director of
poHtico/military jiffairs at the Na.
1 said to
officials
Journal
-hi-eaLs com-
ing from Libya. But he is said to
have the very strong support of
Poindexter.
tional Security Council.
have been among those
briefing The Wall Street
on the latest terror th
Labor Party
Making Up
With Jews
By MAURICE SAM I F.I.S0N
LONDON tJTAi The
British Labor Parn is mending
fences with Britain's
350.000-strong Jewish community
and is seeking to renew its tradi-
tional friendship with i.
Labor Party, strained ir. recent
years because of the emergence of
anti-Zionism in some I,abor circles
here. Labor Party leader Neil Kin-
nock spoke at a l^bor Zionist din-
ner marking the HOth anmversan
of the establishment of 1'i.ale Zion
in Eastern Europe and the 65th
anniversary of its British branch
affiliation with the British Labnr
Party. He shared the platform
with the Israel: Minister of
Economic Coordination Gad
Yaacobi
Yaacobi said the growing rap-
prochement between the labor
movements in both countries was
symbolised by their common
views on terrorism He praised
the British government for its
tough action against Syria, which
was involved in an attempt to
blow up an El Al airliner last
April.
Kinnock stressed the continued
need to deal with the causes of ter-
rorism, but he spelled out a su-
point plan to deal with its effects
They are: more effective coordina
tion between national security
agencies; tighter extradition laws.
better cooperation net ween police
forces; an international conven
tion to protect travellers from hi-
jacking and murder, exposure of
the support systems and state fun-
dings on which terr< msts rely: and
prevention of the abuse of
diplomatic immunity
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Uneasy Calm
3 Youths Arrested for Fatal Stabbing
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A large
police presence enforced an uneasy calm
in Jerusalem Monday after 24 hours of
anti-Arab violence by Jews enraged over
the fatal stabbing of a yeshiva student in
the Moslem quarter of the Old City Satur-
day. Three youths from Jenin, linked to a
terrorist organization, were taken into
custody almost immediately after the
crime.
THEY WERE remanded for 15 days by
a Jerusalem magistrate Monday. The
judge banned release of any further infor-
mation about the suspects who the Police
Ministry said Sunday were members of
George Habash's Damascus-based
Popular Front for the Liberation of
P;destine.
Although they are from a West Bank
town 17 miles from Jerusalem, local
Arabs were the targets of attacks by Jews
during and after the pre-dawn funeral
Sunday of the stabbing victim, Eliahu
Ambi, 22.
Arabs were stoned and beaten in the
Old City and other parts of East
Jerusalem and in the Sanhedria and
Shmuel Hanavi quarters of West
Jerusalem. Ambi lived in Shmuel Hanavi.
AT LEAST 10 Jews were arrested for
attacking Arabs. Three fire bombs were
hurled at Arab-occupied houses in the Old
City. The windshields of Arab-owned cars
were smashed and tires were slashed.
As police squads patrolled the narrow
alleys of the Old City Monday, some
residents of the Jewish quarter threaten-
ed more violence. They said the murder
"could not go unanswered." Police warn-
ed that any further disorders would be
dealt with firmly.
Stop
Police
Violence by Enraged Jews
Left is Sen. Rudy Boschwitz (R., Minn.) outside th* Capitol in
Washington. D.C., with Jack J. Spitzer, chairman of the David
Ben-Gurion Centennial Committee, after passage last month of a
congressional resolution commemorating the 100th birthday of
David Ben-Gurion, first Prime Minister of Israel. Resolution
was sponsored by Sen. Boschwitz and Congressman Sidney Yates
(D., III.) and was passed by both Houses of Congress before ad-
journment in October.
'Holy Man of Leningrad' Emigrates
Bv DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
'olice moved into the Old
Jity in force Sunday to quell
nounting violence by Jews
raged over the stabbing
lurder of a 22-year-old
reshiva student in the
Joslem quarter Saturday
fternoon.
The victim, Eliahu Ambi, at
ended the yeshiva Shuvu Banim.
school for penitents run by the
eslav Hasidim. He was set upon
three assailants on Hagai
ftreel near the yeshiva and fatal-
.stabUd jn a struggle during
Hiich he injured one of his at-
ckers. Police said Sunday that
three were in custody and had
Dnf.ssed to the crime.
IAMBI WAS buried in the
lount of Olives cemetery in a pre-
Iwn funeral Sunday. Mourners
the procession smashed the
(indshields of Arab-owned cars
clashed tires. One Arab was
and the police made several
violence erupted anew later in
the day when fire bombs were
thrown by Jews from the second
floor of the Shuvu Banim Yeshiva
at a nearby Arab house. One set
fire to the roof and the other fail-
ed to explode. The Jerusalem fire
brigade put out the blaze. A third
fire bomb was tossed Sunday
evening, but caused no damage.
Jews were also reported to be
stoning Arab passers-by in the Old
City and in the Shmuel Hanavi
quarter of West Jerusalem where
Ambi lived. A tourist bus was
stoned outside the Old City walls,
apparently by Arabs. No one was
hurt.
POLICE ARRESTED several
demonstrators who tried to block
the main road in Ramat Eshkol. a
suburb of Jerusalem. They came
under a hail of stones and souts of
"Death to the Arabs." A number
of people, including reporters,
were injured.
According to acting Police
Minister Yigael Hurwitz, the
three assailants were acting on
behalf of George Habash's
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine, a Damascus-based
terrorist group. Hurwitz, who is
filling in for Police Minister Haim
Barlev, told the Cabinet Sunday
that evidence points to the PFLP
despite a claim by El Fatah's
"Force 17" that it was responsible
for the murder.
Meanwhile, Israeli soldiers
fatally shot an Arab youth last
Friday inside an army camp near
Nablus. Military sources said the
youth and his brother were loiter-
ing outside the camp, apparently
planning to steal ammunition.
They were taken inside for ques-
tioning. One broke away and was
shot after failing to heed orders to
halt. The sources said the soldiers
acted correcUy firing into the air
before firing at the fleeing youth.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yitzhak
Kogan, a former electronics
engineer who became an Or-
thodox Jew during his 12-year
quest for permission to emigrate
from the Soviet Union, arrived in
Israel with his family Sunday.
Kogan, who won the name of
"Tzadik (holy man) of Len-
ingrad." was greeted at Ben-
Gurion Airport by an ecstatic
crowd of Habad Hasidim. He step-
ped from the plane garbed in a
black kaftan and wearing a long
beard.
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Without Breakthrough for Peace,
UN Chief Warns of Mideast War
| Continued from Page 1-A
CUELLAR recalled that
^<>m Kippur War between
fpt and Israel in 1973 almost
to direct confrontation bet-
n the United States and the
I'nion. He warned that a
war in the Mideast, "with the
'elopment of ever more
usticated and destructive
3ns." may be more difficult
ontrol and may indeed bring a
'Jear confrontation between
| superpowers.
' just and lasting peace (in the
east) can best be achieved
Nrh a comprehensive settle-
t covering all aspects of the
pet and involving all the par-
concerned, including the
Kine Liberation Organiza-
r de Cuellar said.
comprehensive Mideast set-
ent, he continued, must be
n "withdrawal of Israeli
from Arab territories oc-
,ed since June, 1967;
wledgement and respect for
[sovereignty, territorial in-
land Political independence
1 the states in the region and
nght to live in peace within
i and recognized boundaries;
and finally a satisfactory solution
of the Palestinian problem based
on the recognition of the
legitimate rights of the Palesti-
nian people, including self-
determination."
THE SECRETARY General
was critical of Israel's settlements
in the West Bank. "I am par-
ticularly concerned about the con-
sequences that would flow from
the establishment by Israel of ad-
ditional settlements in the oc-
cupied territories." de Cuellar
said, adding:
"This is a matter of deep con-
cern and, more than any other
single factor, contributes to
doubts in the minds of many about
Israel's readiness to negotiate a
peace settlement that would re-
quire its withdrawal from the
territories."
But the Secretary General also
was critical of violent incidents in
the region as a major obstacle to
peace. "Peace efforts would be
enhanced if there was a lessening
of violent incidents, which all too
frequently involve innocent lives
and of which there have been
some particularly terrible ex-
amples" in the last year, he
stated.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
Confession
May Have Prevented Sour Relations
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's unexpected an-
nouncement that it is indeed
holding atom-suspect
Mordechai Vanunu in
custody and that he is to
face trial may have come
just in time to prevent a
dangerous deterioration in
relations between London
and Jerusalem.
There can be little doubt that the
timing of the Cabinet Secretary's
statement Israel's first official
word on this seven-week-old saga
was linked to the growing wave
of media speculation in Britain
that Vanunu, the former Dimona
nuclear reactor technician, was
kidnapped from British soil by
Israeli agents.
WORSE STILL, the British
press early last week was sug-
gesting that Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher had actually
been apprised ahead of time, by
then-Premier Shimon Peres of
Israel's intention to abduct
Vanunu.
Vanunu, an extreme left-winger
who left Israel for Australia last
year, sold what purported to be
detailed plans of a nuclear-bomb-
manufacturing facility at Dimona
to the Sunday Times of London.
He presumably will be charged
with treason in what is likely to be
a closed-door trial.
The Israeli statement took pains
to insist that Vanunu had not been
snatched from British soil and
therefore no conversation about
such an abduction had taken place
between Thatcher and Peres.
According to reports from Lon-
don last week, the government
there is making a determined ef-
fort to make do with this terse
Israeli position and to have the
British media make do with it, too.
PLAINLY, had Israel con-
tinued to stay silent, the credibili-
ty of one of its major friends on
the world stage, Thatcher, would
have been seriously jeopardized as
the story continued to burgeon on
Fleet Street. The British Premier
could have been damagingly
embarrassed.
In addition. Israel's top
policymakers and their legal ad-
visers may have been prompted to
Golda Meir Award
Goes to Family
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) -
State of Israel Bonds presented
its Golda Meir Leadership Award
to a family for the first time. At
the Nov. 9 dinner here that laun-
ched the 1987 international bonds
campaign, Richard Dinner, Dee
and Melvin Swig, Roselyne
"Cissie" Swig and Richard Swig
were honored for their service to
Israel. Jewry and the community
at large.
act now and release a public state-
ment for fear of being forced to by
the High Court of Justice.
But beyond these tactical and
legal considerations. Premier Yit-
zhak Shamir, Foreign Minister
Peres and Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin may well have been
moved by a more fundamental ex-
amination of Israel's condition at
this most extremely delicate junc-
ture in its various foreign relation-
ships and especially relation-
ships connected with covert
activities.
THEY MAY have decided to
clean up. as best they could, the
messy aftermath of the Vanunu
affair before bracing themselves
to face possibly heavy fallout from
the arms-to-Iran affair.
The Israeli policymakers are keen-
ly aware of the still ominous build-
up of questioning and criticism
within the American political com-
munity over insistent reports that
the U.S. and Iran are engaged in
longtime negotiations and
tradeoffs involving arms for
hostages and that Israel is play-
ing the role of secret middleman,
and supplier of the arms to the
Khomeini regime.
At the moment, criticism and
opposition from at home and
abroad are focused at the Reagan
Administration. Critics charge
that dealing with Iran over
hostages' lives undermines the
very essence of America's pur-
ported policies on terrorism.
But Israel, which according to
some U.S. media reports initiated
the negotiation, is bound to take a
great deal of flak itself if this af-
fair continues to gather
momentum.
Politicians and pundits are
bound to point out that Israel is
always stridently advocating an
arms boycott of any state abetting
terror and yet here is evidence
that the same Israel is actively
participating in an ongoing arms-
supply relationship with the
quintessential terrorist state.
INDEED. Israel has called
forcefully on France to abandon
plans to sell arms to Syria,
because of Syria's close involve-
ment in terrorism as unmasked in
the Hindawi trial in London.
European Community Foreign
Ministers were due to discuss
their relationships with Syria at a
meeting in London last week
and Israel's position is one they
would naturally hear out. if not
necessarily adopt.
But that position must in-
evitably be weakened by the
steady stream of reports that
Israel is itself, on behalf of the
U.S.. selling weapons to Iran.
Compounding Israel's discom-
fort is a string of other damaging
intelligence-related episodes:
The Pollard affair, involving
U.S. Naval analyst Jonathan Jay
Pollard, who allegedly passed on
American secret assessments to
the Israelis, hit the headlines just
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8
one year ago and the scars it two Palestinian terrorists, is not
left are still unhealed. yet concluded. Police in-
The Shin Bet affair, involving vestigators are wrestling with the
the cover up of an illegal killing of conflict accounts of Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
then-Shin Bet head Avraham
Shalom regarding who author,^
the killings and the cover-up.
The security aspects of the
Vanunu affair must surely disturb
the Israeli intelligence commuiutv'
and its political mastery Accor
ding to foreign reports, one senior
Shin Bet official already has been
fired in the wake of what inZ
to have been a major
lapse.
security
<<>m%%^
The Israel Histadrut Foundation
cordially invites
Its Friends and Supporters
To hear its Founder and President
DR. SOL STEIN
n
19


<>
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Angry Controversy
Stirred by Broadcast of Diary
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The broadcast of excerpts
from a diary kept by
Mordechai Vanunu has
touched off an angry con-
troversy between civil liber-
tarians and Israel Television
over the right to privacy.
Vanunu is the former nuclear
technican who is in custody for
giving a British newspaper infor-
mation about Israel's alleged
nuclear weapons capability. His
lawyer, Amnon Zichroni. said that
he might press charges against
the Israel Broadcast Authority.
A TELEVISION reporter said
he f' Hind the diary in a suitcase in
a building where Vanunu once liv-
ed It covers the years from
18 and reveals the writer"s
attitudes toward women, family,
philosophy, religion and finances.
The excerpts read on television
Friday night described growing
sympathy with the Arab cause.
They depicted a troubled man who
had difficulty communicating with
others, who had a "strong urge to
prove himself and who feared he
was being "followed."
The Civil Rights Association
criticized the publication of the
diary as a "gross invasion of
privacy." According to the
Association, "A man's diary is one
of his most intimate writings and
cannot be publicized without his
consent." The Broadcast Authori-
ty was accused of violating a 1981
law for protection of privacy.
BIT THE Authority maintain-
ed that Vanunu stands accused of
serious offenses against the State
and has lost his right to privacy.
Uri Porat, Director General of the
Broadcast Authority, said pains
were taken not to publicize
anything about Vanunu that is not
already known and to resiBt "the
temptation to score a great many
journalistic scoops which were
contained in the diary."
The reporter who obtained it
claimed a relative of Vanunu
authorized its publication.
Zichroni, meanwhile, is on his
way to London to prepare for the
case. Vanunu was, last seen in
London on Sept. 30. The govern-
ment acknowledged only last
week that he was "under lawful
detention" in Israel and denied he
had been kidnapped by Israeli
agents. When and how he was
brought to Israel remains
unexplained.
Uncertain
Do British Want More Vanunu Info?
Bv GIL SEDAN
JKRISALEM -(JTA)-
Mordechai Vanunu, the
former technician at the
Dimona nuclear facility, will
be charged with either
treason or espionage for
allegedly revealing secret
information about Israel's
nuclear weapons
capabilities.
If convicted of espionage, the
31 year old Israeli who recently
converted to the Christian faith
would face life imprisonment.
Capital punishment applies for
treason.
The government has announced
that Vanunu is being held in Israel
"under lawful detention" and is
represented by counsel. The state-
ment, released after a Cabinet
meeting last week, was the first
official acknowledgement that
Vanunu. #ho was reported miss-
ing in I/ondon Oct. 1, is in Israel.
HE WAS remanded in custody
for 15 days by order of a senior
police officer, an indication of the
gravity of the charges which will
be brought against him. In cases
other than espionage or treason, a
suspect cannot be detained unless
brought before a judge within 48
hours of arrest.
The government statement said
that Vanunu was checked by a
medical doctor shortly after he
was brought to Israel. It em-
phatically denied charges that he
was kidnapped in London by
Israeli agents and brought here
against his will. But there was no
indication of how or when he ar-
rived in Israel.
Britain has formally asked
Israel to clarify this. The British
Ambassador, William Squires, has
contacted the Foreign Ministry's
political director general, Yossi
Beilin, to request further informa-
tion. Squires was acting on in-
structions from the Foreign Office
in London.
ISRAELI OFFICIALS are
uncertain whether the British are
genuinely seeking additional in-
formation or whether the inquiry
is to help the government of
Prime Minister Margaret That-
cher fend off demands for
"clarification" from opposition
members of Parliament and the
media.
The Thatcher government has
already denied media reports that
the Prime Minister was secretly
advised by Shimon Peres last
month that Israeli agents would
abduct Vanunu on British soil and
that she did not raise objections.
This allegedly occurred while
Peres was still Israeli Premier,
before the rotation of power.
Initial reaction in Jerusalem to
the British inquiry is that there is
no need for explanations beyond
the announcement that Vanunu
was in custody.
After the government's admis-
sion that Vanunu is in custody,
Amnon Zichroni, a lawyer well
known in leftist circles, revealed
that he had been appointed to
represent the suspect at his own
request. Zichroni told reporters
that he asked Premier Yitzhak
Shamir several days ago to an-
nounce publicly that Vanunu was
being held in Israel.
Herbert H. Mabry. left, president of the Georgia State AFL-CIO,
receives the American ORT Federation Community Achievement
Award at a recent tribute dinner held at the Hyatt Regency in
Atlanta. Dinner chairman Sidney Feldman presented the ORT
award to Mabry 'in recognition of his outstanding leadership and
his accomplishments on behalf of the people of Georgia. 'Nicholas
Bonanno, of the International Ladies Garment Workers' Union,
and Tom Cordy. of AMC Mechanical Contractors, were dinner
co-chairmen.
Israeli Leftists Who Met PLO
In Bucharest Were Detained
JERUSALEM (JTA) Four Israeli leftists who
headed a delegation that met in Bucharest recently with
representatives of the Palestine Liberation Organization
were detained by police for questioning to determine if they
violated a law barring Israelis from contact with members
of terrorist organizations.
The three-hour interrogation was conducted at the cen-
tral district police headquarters in Ramla. The four were
released on bail and were not summoned for further
questioning.
EACH OF THE SUSPECTS was questioned separate-
ly. One of them, Yael Lotan, told reporters afterwards that
"We had replies for all the questions asked." She said, "We
went to Rumania, accompanied by a lawyer, not to violate
the law, but in order to convey a message of peace."
Lotan noted that the dialogue was held under the
auspices of the Rumanian government in a public hall
where 29 Israelis sat on one side and the Palestinians on
the other.
Shamir Says Israel Didn't
Violate Laws in Britain
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
said here that Israel did not
violate British laws in con-
nection with Mordechai
v anunu's transfer from Bri-
tain to Israel, and has in-
formed the British govern-
ment accordingly. He also
insisted that "Israel is not
Belling arms to Iran."
Shamir, who spoke to reporters
mle touring the Yemenite Israeli
)wnship of Rosh Haayin, was
'erring to London's request for
"taw information in the case of
anunu, a former technician at
Dimona nuclear facility who is
Jwer detention in Israel for
lleKedly giving a British
le*spaper information about
r*el s nuclear weapons
ilities.
THE ISRAELI government
aowledged last Sunday (Nov.
.that Vanunu. who was reported
B m London on Oct. 1, is in
but did not say how and
he got here. The govern
wi emphatically denied reports
at he wa8 fcndapped by Israeli
ents on British soil.
I Shamir said there was "no baas
pr any crisis of confidence or split
Plween Britain and Israel," a*
some sources have speculated in
the Vanunu case. "After all, we
have informed Britain that we
have done nothing to contravene
the laws of Britain. Therefore
there is no reason for any com-
plaints against Israel," he said.
The question of Israeli arms
sales to Iran arose from American
media reports that Israel played
the "middleman" in a clandestine
operation by the National Securi-
ty Council to secure the release of
American hostages held by pro-
Iranian groups in Lebanon in
return for weapons.
ASKED IF Israel had been sell
ing arms to Iran earlier, Shamir
replied, "Israel does not deal with
supplying weapons to Iran."
Vanunu hopes for a public trial
and that the veil of secrecy around
him be dropped, according to his
lawyer, Amnon Zichroni.
Zichroni met with Vanunu in a
new cell, to which the suspect was
transferred at Zichroni's in-
sistence. There is still no word on
the location of the prison.
Vanunu reportedly is under con-
stant observation "for fear that
he might hurt himself." But
Zichroni told reporters that he
found Vanunu to be in good
spirits. He is reading a lot, keep-
ing to his vegetarian diet and has
begun a beard.
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Page 12-A The Jewish rioridian/FrfcUy, November 21, 1986
' -^
Christian Urges Jews To Avoid
Generalizing in Zionist Discussion
Coatiaoed froai Page 5-A
ween us is more artificaJ than real.
Criticism conducted within the
context of unequivocal support for
the existence and security of
Israel should include ongoing
discussion about resolving the
needs of Palestinian Arabs.
Responsible criticism also
demands careful consideration of
all the actors in the Middle East,
not just Israel.
IT IS MORE than a little
hypocritical, for example, for
Christians to continually criticize
Israeli policy on the West Bank as
"pushing out" Palestinians from
their homes and yet to ignore, as
we mostly have, the Judenrexn.
not to mention Christianrein. of-
ficial policy of our "moderate" al-
ly. Saudi Arabia. It is hypocritical
for Christians to condemn Israel*?
incursion into Lebanon and yet ac-
quiesce, by silence, in Syria's oc-
cupation of that tragic land.
One can. it seems, be anti
Zionist simply by the selectivity of
what one chooses to criticize. The
line between anti-Zionism and
anti-Semitism is a notoriously thin
one.
Two other points need to be
made more clear to Christians.
First, the emphasis in most
Jewish explanations of Israel to
Christians has naturally been on
the relationship between the
Holocaust and the moral justifica-
tion for the State, a point that is
becoming widely accepted.
BUT WHAT is lost in this em-
phasis is the fact that Israel is also
a refuge for Jews victimized by
Arab/Muslim intolerance. Hence
there is a susceptibility among
Christians to the anti-Zionist pro-
paganda line that Israel is a
Western "imposition" on Islam, a
solution to a Western problem
(anti-Semitism) forced on the
Muslim world.
The story of the Jews from
Yemen and other Arab lands forc-
ed to flee to Israel for survival
needs to be told. Israel can thus be
seen and supported as the proper
dwelling place, the heart of the
Jewish people whether
Western or Eastern.
The second point calls for
challenging the view, which I hear
more and more frequently among
Christians, that the Palestinians
are "the Jews of the Middle
East." An ideal response, of
course, would be a creative Zionist
solution to "the Palestinian pro-
blem." a phrase taken over from
the Jewish experience.
This would require the oar
ticipation of key Arab govern-
ments and the Palestinians
themselves. Whatever one thinks
of Palestinian peoplehood
historically, the fact remains that
the Palestinians now exist as a
people and must be dealt with as
such.
CHRISTIAN theologians need
to undertake the task of remin-
ding their co-religionists that the
Jews are Jews. For centuries,
with often tragic results, we
Christians have claimed to be "the
New Israel." a phrase nowhere
found in the New Testament.
To see Christian theologians
now declaring the Palestinians to
be "the true Israel" is frighten-
ingly reminiscent of certain
elements of the ancient teaching
of contempt. It needs to be
challenged theologically as well as
factually. Denying that Zionism is
racism, as most Christian
denominations have done, is only
the first step.
David Goldfarb's Daughter
In N.Y. for Week's Visit
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Olga Goldfarb, daughter of
the Soviet emigre David
Goldfarb, arrived in New
York Sunday for a one-week
visit with her father, who is
recuperating here from lung
cancer surgery. She was
granted a one-week tem-
porary visa by Soviet
emigration authorities last
week, a move considered
unusual for a refusenik
whose application to per-
manently emigrate from the
Soviet Union was concur-
rently pending.
David GoldfariVs seven-year
ordeal as a refusenik was abruptly
terminated Oct. 16 when in-
dustrialist Armand Hammer flew
him and his wife Cecilia to the
United States aboard his private
jet. The 67-year-old retired
geneticist was a patient in a
Moscow hospital, suffering from
complications of diabetes and
heart disease.
UPON HIS arrival in New
York, he was immediately admit-
ted to Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center where tests Oct.
29 revealed lung cancer. On Nov.
2, David Ooldfarb sent a letter to
Kramer Is Chancellor
TORONTO (JTA) Joe
Kramer of Montreal has been
elected supreme chancellor of the
Knights of Pythias. He is the first
highest office oflhe international
fraternal organization
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
asking that his daughter, who re-
mained behind in Moscow, be
allowed to emigrate to join him in
New York with her husband. Yuri
Lev. and two daughters. Katya.
10. and Nadia. 4.
In his letter. David Goldfarb
said of his daughter's family that
"They have been trying to obtain
exit visas together with me. and
there is no reason on earth why
they shouldn't be permitted to
follow me now The chances
that my daughter will make it
without high-level intervention
are small unless your overall
emigration policy changes."
Goldfarb also praised Gorbachev's
"recent reforms in other fields,"
which "make me believe that
change is possible."
Goldfarb was scheduled for
surgery Nov. 5, and Columbia-
Presbyterian was asked to pro-
vide that information to the
Soviets. Olga then applied for per-
mission for a temporary tourist
visa to visit her father in the
hospital, and was told on Nov. 11
to report to the OVIR emigration
office two days later to pick up her
passport, which contained a visa
good for one week's stay.
THE 34-YEAR-OLD pediatri-
cian was given permission only for
herself and was refused permis-
sion to bring along her older
daughter, as she had requested.
Olga told reporters at a news
conference at Kennedy Airport
that the granting of the emergen-
cy visa "happened so quickly. I
didn't think I would get it, but I
did. The Soviet Union is unpredic-
table." She also said her parents'
release "is considered a miracle in
Moscow." and that she believes
her visa is part of that miracle.
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y w r '
Friday, November 21. 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
At firt of the Los Angeles-based Simon
Wiesenthal Center's new research and
ltepptd-up efforts to track Nazi war
criminals. Center Dean Rabbi Marvin Hier
isecond from left) recently met in Miami with
Venezuelan Consul General Benjamin Ortega
iseond from right) to present his gm u-ith 'i list of suspected Nazi war criminals
Ining in Venezuela. Accompanying Rabbi
Hier was Robert L. Novak (left), recently-
appointed director of development for the
Center's new Southern regional office based in
Miami; and (right). Congressman William
Lehman. (D.. Fla.) one of the House of
Representatives' leading experts on South
America. Included on the Centers list were
the names, emigration data and alleged
en mes of the suspects and. in one case, a
current address.
Probably A Ford
Toyota, Datsun in Your Future?
Continued from Page 1-A
at the boycott they have of Israel.
They don't buy Israeli products in
uiy large amount, nor do they sell
am top-line technology to Israel
because of the Arab boycott.
That's unacceptable to
Americans who believe that you
may not. if you believe in free
trade, engage in anti-free trade
with a friendly country like Israel
with which you have diplomatic
relations."
NEW YORK'S mayor was rais-
ing a matter not well known to
Americans. Most of what we hear
on the subject of Japanese trade
focuses on the U.S. Japan trade
imbalance, high-level trade talks
to find solutions, and the growing
possibility of Congressional
legislation to protect American
industry.
Japan, proclaiming its commit-
ment to free trade, also maintains
that it should not have to pay a
mce for higher productivity and
fficiency. In order to get that
piessage across to the American
ublic and policymakers,
Japanese government agencies
M firms spent over $14 million
n 1984 on lobbying activities in
he United States.
Unfortunately, as Mayor Koch
oted, the Japanese do not come
" the matter with clean hands.
ney have violated the principle of
^ trade in one area, their sup-
rt of the Arab boycott of Israel
"lore openly than any other major
nutria] nation.
n doing so. they subvert the
U'stem of international trade that
Wiefite all nations and they put at
disadvantage those nations, like
t-nited States, who, by law,
use in any way to abet the Arab
oycott.
THE IMPACT of the Arab
oycott on Japanese-Israeli
mess relations is very strong,
"we between Israel and Japan
Jan $200 million per year in
^direction) is negligible in pro-
Won to the foreign trade of
** country.
*g*lmillMil towards the
oycott substantially differs from
: of other Western industrializ-
es Japanese business not
r gives in openly to Arab
2W to refrain from main-
'7 economic contacts with
" but frequently boycotts
voluntarily.
jj*government of Japan not
rLmr8'8tVn "'""ning from
^nnuj the boycott, but is un-
""* to do anything to prevent
Kenneth Jacobson is assis-
tant director of the Anti-
Defamation League's Interna-
tional Affairs Division and is
director of the Middle Eastern
Affairs Department. Jess
Hordes is associate director of
the Washington. DC. office of
the ADL.
its application in Japan or to
discourage Japanese business
from cooperating with it. One can-
not avoid the impression that
some Japanese companies decide
to boycott Israel after consulting
official Japanese authorities.
MOREOVER, no Japanese
economic mission has ever visited
Israel, nor indeed has any govern-
ment minister in all the years of
Israel's existence.
The boycott is exercised mainly
by the large Japanese con-
glomerates, most of which either
refuse to deal with Israel or are
willing to do so only indirectly,
through trading companies set up
for this purpose, dummy com-
panies or third countries. Smaller
companies, which do little
business with the Arab states, are
frequently more amenable to
trading with Israel.
There is a reluctance among
Japanese importers to purchase
Israeli-made consumer goods
which would receive wide public
exposure.
On the other hand, there is
greater willingness to buy Israeli
cut diamonds, chemicals, and elec-
tronic equipment, which are less
exposed to the public eye. But
even here, Israeli exporters fre-
quently come across difficulties.
For example, the Japanese
agricultural cooperatives associa-
tion, Zennoh, which for 26 years
imported potash from the Dead
Sea Works, suddenly stopped.
While there is no proof that Zen-
noh acted because of boycott
pressures, there is no apparent
commercial reason to explain the
decision.
THE BOYCOTT is even more
evident in Japan's exports to
Israel. Take the case of Toyota.
Despite several offers by Israeli
firms to act as Toyota
distributors, Toyota has declined.
While Toyota has claimed that it
was not participating in the
boycott of Israel, that its decisions
were purely economic, it has
never substantiated that claim.
And, in 1981, Toyota aborted a
joint venture with Ford Motors
after Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and
Iraq warned of retaliation if
Toyota conducted business with
Ford, which does business with
Israel and was on the Arab
boycott list until recently.
Another example is Nissan,
which has also never done
business with Israel. In a July 9,
1969, letter to Arditi, Ltd. of Tel
Aviv, a Nissan Motors official
stated:
"We are now exporting around
20,000 units a year to the Arabic
countries, and have already
penetrated the market. According
to the boycott resolution by the
Israel Boycott Committee, the
transaction with your country
(Israel) will surely create the total
ban of our export to the Arab
countries.
"Judging from the above-
mentioned, we would unfor-
tunately decline your proposal at
this moment."
IN MARCH. 1970. the
Jerusalem Post reported that
Nissan attempted to "allay Arab
fears" after it was announced that
Nissan and Ford would engage in
a co-production deal. The Post ar-
ticle noted that a Nissan
spokesman hoped that the com-
pany's assurances to the Arabs
would be "sufficient to dispel the
misunderstanding that Japanese
car makers were siding with
Israel."
Soon thereafter, when Nissan
denied that it had been par-
ticipating in the boycott. ADL
characterized its claim as being
"totally false and part of Nissan's
continuing pattern of double
talk." There have been no new
developments.
Other major Japanese com-
panies dealing in durables, such as
Sanyo, Sharp and National, trade
with Israel only indirectly. It is
not uncommon for Japanese firms
approached by potential Israeli
customers to inform them openly
that, due to the Arab boycott,
they are unable to supply the
desired items. For example, the
Japanese company Mochida refus-
ed to sell medical supplies to an
Israeli hospital and stated in
writing that the boycott was the
reason.
TRANSPORTATION and
finance services are affected as
well. A notable example is Japan
Airlines (JAL). Talks between El
Al and JAL about possible air
agreements began in 1967 but
went nowhere. In 1970, ADL in-
formed JAL that it considered the
airline to be taking part in the
Arab boycott.
And in February, 1973, ADL
stated publicly that JAL had "con-
sistently refused to establish
mutual landing rights with the
Israeli airline. El Al," and had
adopted a public relations pro-
gram "to mask its continuing par-
ticipation in the Arab economic
boycott of Israel." To this day,
JAL refrains from landing in
Israel.
Ships bearing the Israeli flag do
call on Japanese ports, but no
Japanese ships drop anchor in
Israel. Japanese banks generally
refuse to grant commercial credit
lines for over 180 days or long-
term financing for exports of
capital goods to Israel.
Japan's heavy dependence on
Arab oil and markets for invest-
ment is seen as the chief reason
for its submission to the boycott.
With the decline of OPEC in re-
cent years, hope grows that
Japanese policy will change. The
visits during the past two years by
Yitzhak Shamir as Israel's
Foreign Minister, Finance
OOOOOI
Edward Koch
Minister Yitzhak Modai and
Cabinet members Moshe Arens
and Amnon Rubinstein, the
highest Israeli officials to visit
Japan since the oil revolution of
1973, gave rise to further
expectations.
JAPANESE companies have
begun to show interest in Israeli
achievements in the field of
research and development and
high-tech industries. Seminars on
the Israeli economy have been
held in Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya,
with some 200 top executives of
Japanese industry participating.
And in November, 1985, Israel's
Minister of Economy and Plann-
ing, Gad Yaacobi, said that a
number of Japanese industrialists
had expressed interest in setting
up joint enterprises with Israel to
take advantage of Israel's
favorable trade terms with the
U.S. and the Common Market.
Still, barriers remain. Mayor
Koch, upon his return to the U.S.,
reported that in a private meeting
Prime Minister Nakasone had
reiterated Japan's intention to
continue to support the boycott.
Disturbingly, the Japanese
language press gave not even a
word of coverage to Mayor Koch's
public comments critical of
Japanese policy in this area.
And, when the Ford Motor
Company, which continues to do
business with Israel, was recently
removed from the Arab boycott
list, the chairman of Mazda Cor-
poration was reported to declare
his company would now deepen
ties to Ford. Although Mazda's
chairman denied to ADL any
boycott compliance motivation,
his company has consistently
turned down requests from
businessmen wishing to distribute
cars in Israel.
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'
Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
Only Slight Chance
For Leukemia Victim To Make It
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Doctors treating leukemia
victim Michael Shirman said
last Thursday that he has
only a 10-15 percent chance
of survival, even with a bone
marrow transplant from his
sister, Inessa Flerova,
because his condition has
deteriorated seriously in the
past 11 months.
They said that if Flerova had
been given permission to leave the
USSR last February, when she
first requested it, his chances
would have been as high as 50 per-
cent. Flerova arrived in Israel
with her family two weeks ago.
WITH SHIRMAN'S disease in
an advanced stage, the doctors
are uncertain whether to go ahead
with the transplant because of the
patient's weakened condition and
the poor outlook for success.
The prognosis was all the more
painful because tests showed that
Flerova's tissues are entirely com-
patible with her brother's. The
Rabin Confirms Israel
Supplied Arms to Iran
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin seemed to confirm
last Thursday (Nov. 13) that
Israel supplied arms to Iran
to help the U.S. obtain the
release of American
hostages held by pro-Iranian
groups in Lebanon.
Rabin told a luncheon meeting
of insurance agents here that "If a
country very friendly to Israel ap-
peals to us with certain requests
in order to help it free hostages,
we will help it, in ope way or
another." He added, "I don't
think it is my duty to go into fur-
ther details as long as another
country the country concerned
has not done so."
RABIN MOST probably was
alluding to U.S. President
Reagan, who went on national
television last Thursday night to
explain his reasons for supplying
arms to Iran, which has been at
war with Iraq for six years. (The
New York Times and Washington
Post reported last Thursday that
Reagan personally acknowledged
selling weapons to Iran at a
meeting with Congressional
leaders last Wednesday, after two
weeks of denials by the
Administration.)
According to media reports in
the U.S. and other countries,
Israel played the role of "mid-
dleman" in the clandestine opera-
tion by the White House's Na-
tional Security Council. When
questioned by reporters last week.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir stated
flatly that "Israel does not deal
with supplying weapons to Iran."
Rabin stressed at the luncheon
that "Israel has never sold
American arms, or arms which in-
clude American-made com-
ponents, without previously ob-
taining U.S. approval." He said
international media reports to the
contrary "are completely false."
HE SAID Israel's policy was to
do everything possible to effect
the release of hostages by any
means, including deals if military
intervention was impossible. He
cited as an exmample the freeing
as part of an East-West exchange
of Soviet Jewry activist Natan
(Anatoly) Sharansky last
February after nine years' im-
prisonment in the Soviet Union.

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test results were announced by
Dr. Haim Brautbar of Hadassah
Medical Center here, where the
tests were made. Shirman was
hospitalized several days ago at
Kaplan Hospital in Rehovot.
Flerova's initial request for exit
visas was denied by the Soviet
authorities. Later she was told she
could leave, but without her hus-
band and children.
AS AN international campaign
on behalf of Shirman was
mounted in the West, the
authorities relented to the extent
that she could take her young
children to Israel, however, her
husband, Viktor Flerov, would
have to remain behind on a legal
technicality.
Shirman urged his sister not to
divide her family. As the months
dragged on, the campaign inten-
sified. Shirman, attended by a
physician, flew to Reykjavik,
Iceland, to appeal personally to
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev,
who was there for the Oct. 11-12
summit meeting with President
Reagan.
Later he flew to Washington,
where he told a press conference
on Capitol Hill that doctors gave
him only three months to live
unless he had a bone marrow
transplant. His sister was the only
possible donor. The Soviet
authorities agreed three weeks
ago to allow Flerov to accompany
his wife.
Asher Nairn (left), a minister of the Israel Embassy m
Washington, with Jack J. Spitzer (center), chairman of the Daiid
Ben-Gurum Centennial Committee; and Congressman Sidney
Yates (D., IlL) after passage last month of a congressional resolu-
tion commemorating the 100th birthday of David Ben-Gurion.
first Prime Minister of Israel Resolution was sponsored by Rep.
Yates and Sen. Rudy Botehwitz (R., Minn.) and was passed by
both Houses of Congress before adjournment in October.
Red Army Vet Dead At 68
NEW YORK (JTA) Haim
Elbert, a 68-year-old Red Army
veteran who with his family had
been denied exit visas since they
first applied in 1976, died in Kiev
Nov. 8. the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry reported here.
His death came two days after
he learned that the latest visa ap-
plication for himself, his wife,
their sons and their families had
been rejected, the NCSJ reported.
Elbert suffered heart attacks and
a stroke in recent years.
Acording to the NCSJ, his son.
Lev Elbert, a former Prisoner of
Conscience, was summoned to
OVIR, the visa office, last week
expecting the application to be
granted. Instead, he was told it
was denied on grounds that he had
failed to disclose "a former mar-
riage" in a previous application.
The charge was false, the NCSJ
said.
Haim Elbert was a graduate of
the Stalingrad Military Academy
and served as a company com-
mander in the Caucusus dunng
World War II. He was captured in
1942 and escaped from a (ierman
prisoner of war camp after two
unsuccessful attempts He surviv-
ed in the POW camp by concealing
his identity as a Jew.
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FPL is encouraging everybody to manage their energy
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Reagan on Run
Reveals Economic Sanctions Against Syria
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Bv DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The Reagan Administra-
te ,n ended a week in which
jta commitment to its of-
ficial anti-terrorism policy
was questioned by announc-
ing economic sanctions
against Syria.
The announcement by the
White House on Friday came
after President Reagan's
nationally-televised speech Thurs-
day night on the Administration's
secret 18-month dealings with
Iran, which like Syria is on the
State Department's list of states
that sponsor terrorism.
REAGAN SAID one of the four
aims of the talks with Iranian of-
ficial- was to end Iran's sponsor-
ship f terrorism and subversion
of other countries.
"Since U.S. government con-
tact began with Iran, there's been
no evidence of Iranian govern-
ment complicity in acts of ter-
T'l.-ni against the United
States." the President said.
Hostages have come home and
we welcome the efforts that the
government of Iran has taken in
the past and is currently
undertaking."
White House spokesman Larry
Spetkei said the sanctions were
heing taken because "the convic-
tion of Nezar Hindawi in a British
court directly implicated the
Syrian nnvernment in the attemp-
'itung of the El Al plane.
M than 23< Americans and
-,M' passengers of other
iities were on board the
Hid would have died had the
r i s t operation been
. wssful."
STATE DEPARTMENT
kesman Charles Redman
Syria has been on the
t's terrorism iist since
.it until the El Al attempt
ISlbls denials" fur >
' ICt! linke-i to Damascus
auctions announced by
followed the U.S. recall
."ibassador from Damascus
' Britain*! break in relations
Syria m well as some sane
the European Economic
Community on Monday.
The S sanctions include: ex-
panding the current restrictions
' export! to Syria to include na-
tional security itemg such as com-
puters, technical data, airplanes
and parts for planes; a ban on sell-
ing of tickets in the U.S. for the
Syrian national ariline; and the
reduction in the already small
number of staff at the U.S. Em-
bassy m Damascus and the Syrian
Embassy in Washington.
In addition, the Administration
is asking U.S. oil companies to
discontinue operating in Syria.
Tnere also will be no high-level
(in between the U.S. and Syria.
REDMAN SAID the U.S. does
** expect the steps taken by the
L S. to have an immediate effect.
W waj sending a "signal" to
tyna.
"These measures are intended
convince the Syrian govern-
"*nt that state support of ter-
rorism will not be tolerated by the
forced world." Speakes said.
We will continue to closely
monitor the situation and take ad-
ditional steps as necessary."
, Redman said that steps for
yna to take are closing the Abu
*Wal group's office in Damascus
shutting down the terrorist
Poups operating from Syrian-
controlled territory in Lebanon.
Both Speakes and Redman
weMed that Syria cannot be ac-
.! M a "responsible power"
Mu IW* key role il has in *
Wdle Last as long as it con-
""ues to sponsor terrorism.
011 Sunday. Syrian President
Hafez Al-Assad accused the U.S.
and Great Britain of supporting
terorist activities and called for
the formation of an international
committee to determine the
definition of terrorism
REAGAN, in his speech last
Thursday night, said the U.S.
undertook the "secret diplomatic
initiative" with Iran not only to
convince it to end state-sponsored
terrorism, but to renew its rela-
tions with Iran to try to end the
Iran-Iraq war and to bring about
the safe return of American
hostages held in Lebanon
He denied that the U.S. sent
arms to Iran to get the release of
hostages. He said he authorized
"small amounts of defensive
weapons and spare parts" as "a
signal that the United States was
prepared to replace the animosity
between us with a new relation-
ship." He said the several
deliveries could all fit in a single
cargo plane.
Ragan said it was made clear to
the Iranians that they must
pose terrorism. "The most signifi
cant step which Iran would take,
we indicated, would be to use its
influence on Lebanon to secure
the release of all hostages held
there," the President said.
REAGAN DID not mention any
Israeli role in the dealings with
Iran. A senior Administration of-
ficial, briefing foreign reporters
Friday, said there was "no Israeli
role." But he said there were
many intermediaries during the
18 months both from within the
Middle East and without
However, there have been
reports that David Kimche was
one of the intermediary- hen he
was director genera! of he Israel
Foreign Ministry
Medal to Kweller
NEW YORK (JTA. The
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America has presented its
Solomon Schechter Medal to
Goldie Kweller of Queens. N.Y.

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Snake Ceatatas Carlo* Mononde


What Vleh' Can Expect Miamians Urged To Fight Red Cross
Less in the Line of Goods, Bias Against Magen David Adorn
More of Spirit
By TERRY SHAMMAY
"Even the weather is bet-
ter in Israel," exclaimed
David Breslaw, chairman of
the Senior Division of the
Association of Americans
and Canadians in Israel,
here in Miami as guest
speaker at NAAM's
"retiree day."
For those unfamiliar, NAAM
ttanda for the North American
Aliyah Movement, and the AACI
is its sister organization. NAAM
prepares the olek before his move.
and the AACI takes over upon ar
rival. Not only is the AACI con-
cerned with absorption of olim
from the United States and
Canada, it is dedicated to enhanc-
ing the quality of life in Israel for
all
BRESLAW. who spent Sunday
with local seniors who have
already expressed an interest in
moving to Israel for retirement,
tried to explain to them what it's
all about.
He described the role of AACI's
Senior Division, which was
established primarily to meet the
special needs of American and
Canadian seniors. "For us, a
senior is someone 60 and over and
we are 11,000 strong in Israel
with branches of our Senior Divi-
sion in 14 cities. The largest con-
centration of seniors is naturally
in Israel's central population
centers, with Netanya heading the
list. A second favorite spot for our
members is in the Tel Aviv coastal
plain area and then, of course,
Jerusalem."
Detailing the unique projects of
the AACI's Senior Division.
Breslaw enumerated the wide
range of activities and oppor-
tunities available in Israel for this
special group, geared to its
ethnicArultural and "advanced
Continued on Page 1 6-B
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Pacesetter Committee
meets to plan for upcoming Dinner Dance on Dec. S at the
Fmtainebleau-Hilton.
Miami Federation
Pacesetter Dinner Set
For December 3
More than 400 of the Jewish
community's top leaders are ex-
pected to turn out on Wednesday
evening. Dec. 3 to attend the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa
turn's "Pacesetter Dinner
Dance The theme for this year's
event is "A Journey Through Our
Heritage To our Homeland" and
*ill feature a wide array of food
and decor, representing various
Jewish communities throughout
">* world. The annual Pacesetter
Wla will be held at the Omni In-
ternational Hotel in Miami, and is
'pen to major contributors to the
federation's 1987 Combined
J*wiah Appeal Campaign the
s"We largest human service-
delated fund raising campaign in
s-uth Florida.
His Excellency Meir Rosenne.
'srael's Ambassador from the
;** of Israel to the United
jates, will be the guest speaker.
tK,St;nne has been in the service of
we Israel, government for more
an three decades. In the past, he
* served as Consul of Israel in
pew York; coordinator of the
waeli Atomic Energy Commis-
sion, representative on the
numan Rights Commission of the
\klli*J Ntions General
I,^mly: le*1 adv*o'- to the
lor to France. Rosenne is an
accomplished scholar, having
received a doctoral degree with
honors from the Sorbonne in the
field of international law. In
Israel, he was a senior lecturer on
international law at the Univer-
sities of Tel Aviv. Haifa and
Jerusalem.
Ambassador Rosenne has also
played a key role in the world of
international politics. He par-
ticipated in the 1973 Geneva
Talks, and was involved in all
negotiations leading to the Israel-
Egypt peace treaty in 1979.
Also scheduled to appear at the
dinner is the performing group,
"Orot Haschuna," translated
Lights of the Neighborhood."
The group is composed of young
adults, ages 17-22 from four Pro-
ject Renewal neighborhoods. Pro-
ject Renewal is a national pro-
gram designed to help Israeli
residents plan and implement the
revitalization of their own
underdeveloped communities, by-
twinning them with American
Jewish communities, known as
"sister cities." Four of the per-
formers are from Or Akiva,
Miami's sister city.
"Orot Haschuna" members
have been specially chosen from
their own neighborhood perform-
Continued on Page 11-B
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin is
reminding Miamians this
week that "the blatant
bigotry and discrimination
indicated by the action of
the recently-concluded In-
ternational Red Cross Con-
ference in refusing member-
ship to Israel's Red Magen
David Adorn" must be
overcome.
Dobin, who is chairman of
Operation Recognition, pointed to
the entry of national Hadassah
and of the American Section of
the World Zionist Organization in-
to the battle against International
Red Cross as further evidence
that Americans of every persua-
sion must let the International
Red Cross know that the "latest
affront to Israel is inexcusable."
IN HIS reminder here, Rabbi
Dobin pointed out that the
organization's change of name to
International Red Cross and Red
Crescent Movement "is an ar-
rogant" decision because it serves
notice that only adherents to
these two religious symbols, the
Christian and Moslem, will
henceforward be eligible for
membership.
This makes the Movement a
political arm of two religious
faiths, "neither of which is ger-
mane to the essential purpose of
the Red Cross," according to Rab-
bi Dobin. "And that is medical
assistance in times of disaster."
The Rabbi is urging letters of
protest be sent to Alexandre Hay,
This makes the Movement a political
arm of two religious faiths, "neither
of which is germane to the essential
purpose of the Red Cross," according
to Rabbi Dobin. "And that is medical
assistance in times of disaster."
W:*x*:W:*:*:W^
president of the International
Committee of the Red Cross,
CH-1211, Geneva, Switzerland;
Richard F. Schubert, president,
American National Red Cross
Society, National Headquarters,
Washington, D.C. 20006; and
Hans Hoegh, secretary general.
League of Red Cross and Red
Crescent Societies, CH-1211,
Geneva Switzerland.
IN THE Hadassah move to op-
pose the Red Cross and Red Cres-
cent Movement anti-Magen David
Adorn decision, Ruth Popkin, na-
tional president of Hadassah,
wrote to Alexandre Hay on Nov.
7: "The decision by the Interna-
tional Conference (of Red Cross
and Red Crescent Movement), like
the decision to suspend the
delegates of the government of
South Africa, points up the
dangerous erosion of the Move-
ment's neutrality and threatens
its effectiveness as a force of
human welfare Hadassah con-
demns apartheid, but the
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin Continued on Page 7-B
Miami Federation Announces
New Apartment Complex
Jewish Federation Housing,
Inc., a subsidiary of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, an-
nounced plans for the opening of a
new building in South Dade to
house the elderly.
The Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) Department
of the U.S. Government recently
approved a loan in the amount of
$2.3 milion, payable at 9V percent
over 40 years to Jewish Federa-
tion Housing, making possible the
construction of the new 50 apart-
ment facility.
The building will consist of four
floors, one third of which will be
efficiencies, featuring a large liv-
ing area with a separate kitchen
and bath, the ramainder to also in-
clude a separate bedroom area.
Each apartment will be approx-
imately 514 square feet in size.
The building will house a laundry
room and storage space on each
floor. As yet unnamed, the
building is expected to open in the
Fall of 1988.
Application for residency in the
building must follow certain
guidelines. To be eligible, the in-
dividual must be 62 years of age
or older, a resident of Dade Coun-
ty, have a low income, and be able
to live independently. Residents
pay no more than 30 percent of
their annual income as rent. The
balance is paid under a Section 8
rent subsidy from HUD.
The building is also available for
disabled persons of any age. A
number of apartments will be
especially designed to accom-
modate wheelchairs and tenants
with various physical handicaps.
These individuals must also be
able to live independently to
qualify for residency.
"Jewish Federation Housing is
not a convalescent home for the
elderly but a place where they can
reside at a low subsidized cost and
live their lives with dignity and
respect," said David B. Fleeman,
President of Jewish Federation
Housing.
The new facility will be located
near Federation Gardens, another
Jewish Federation Housing pro-
ject in South Dade. Gardens,
located at 10905 SW 112th Ave.
is the second of Jewish Federation
Housing's two current apartment
"These buildings
are self sustain-
ing and do not
receive funds
from the Greater
Miami Jewish
Federation or
any other agen-
cy, says Nathan
Skolnick, Ad-
ministrator of
Federation
Housing.
tt&imi&SaimttSIMttilMtSIIMIttlt
houses and opened in 1982
through a similar arrangement
with HUD. The building is on
seven acres, surrounded by an ex-
tensive wooded area and a lake.
Federation Gardens is a 110
apartment facility and it features
extensive public and activity
spaces with an enormous activity
room capable of accommodating
several hundred individuals and a
modern, well equipped
restaurant-sized kitchen. It also
contains a library, TV room,
crafts center and a lobby with a
large seating area. Gardens
received a $5.2 million. 40 year
loan from HUD in 1982.
Federation Gardens also owns a
48 passenger bus to take residents
. to their doctors, shopping malls,
cultural events, activities and ex-
cursions. The bus is also made
available to Federation Housing's
other facility on Miami Beach,
Federation Towers.
The first of Federation Hous-
ing's buildings. Federation
Towers was built in 1979. Located
at 757 West Avenue on South
Miami Beach, contains 114 units
for senior adults. The 11 floors are
made up of efficiencies and
bedroom apartments and has a
large central kitchen and dining
area for meetings and social
gatherings plus social halls and ac-
tivity rooms.
"The apartments near the top
have a view of Biscayne Bay and
the Atlantic Ocean," added
Fleeman.
Federation Towers was built as
the result of a loan of approx-
imately $3 million. A special addi-
tional sum was awarded Towers
to provide 30 of its frailest tenants
with two kosher meals per day,
seven days a week, plus
housekeeping and personal ser-
Continued on Page 6-B
cJe wish Floridian
Miami,Florida Friday, November 21.1986
Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Mondian/fnday, November 21. 1
sT
Peres Tells CJF
'Civility' Needed in Religious Tiffs
Continued froan Page 1-A
midst of diversity and the coex-
istence of diversity for the sake of
unity.
His remarks were also made
against a backdrop of discord and
disharmony between the Or-
thodox on the one side and the
Reform and Conservative
movements on the other over
numerous issues of halacha
(Jewish law), and the restriction
imposed on the Conservative and
Reform movements in Israel by
the Orthodox establishment.
Peres, whose remarks on the
imperative need for Jewish unity
were greeted by prolonged ap-
plause, said, "I think it is for you
and for us to mobilize goodwill, to
call upon the heads of each strain
to see the need for Klal, Yisrael,
not just the conviction of each
synagogue, important as it may
be, and to find the necessary
wisdom and patience and talent to
have our arguments in a way that
won't split us to pieces."
SPEAKING OF another kind of
unity, Peres focused on the rela-
tions between the United States
and Israel. He said the two coun-
tries are in "an era of cooperation
like never before and with nobody
else. We are not afraid of the
greatness of the United States
and the United States is not wor-
ried about the smallness of
Israel." He did not specify the
areas of cooperation nor did he
allude to reports about Israel's
cooperation with the U.S. in sen-
ding arms to Iran.
He said Israel was very proud of
the fact that the U.S. recently
recognized Israel "by a very
special name, and I shall pro-
nounce it very clearly a non-
NATO ally." But Peres explained
that Israel is esentially different
than America's European allies in
a number of ways.
"We do not ask the American
army to protect our land or our
skies," he asserted. "We shall do
that ourselves. We are allies
because we are not reluctant, we
are not shy or apologetic in our
relations with the U.S. American
equipment, up to a point. Israeli
risk, when necessary. Definitely, a
non-NATO situation."
ANOTHER KIND of unity
stressed by Peres was interna-
tional cooperation to fight ter-
rorism on a global scale. "The real
danger which innocent people and
nations of goodwill are facing is
not so much full-fledged wars run
by armies but the terrible criminal
violence of terror," he said. "I
think in many ways Israel was
forced to be the first to confront it
and the U.S. the second."
Terrorism, Peres said, must be
curbed if the peace process in the
Middle East is to continue. He
said that Israel and the U.S. can
help bring peace to the Mideast
for all the people. "Our enemies
are not Arabs, Moslems or
Christians.
Our enemies are hostility,
belligerency and war," Peres
declared.
He said that "an international
Shimon Peres
involvement is also necessary in
order to stop terrorism. The cost
of terror from the point of view of
its victims is high. But terror also
affects the Arab world itself.
Leaders are frightened to death
because of the continuous threat
to their lives, from the level of
mayors to the heads of state. They
cannot make the right choice.
"They cannot select the
necessary policies in order to save
themselves from the terrible ex-
pense of military preparedness
and the ongoing danger of a new
war. Unless terrorism is fought,
peace will not happen at all."
PERES URGED the nations of
Europe, especially West Germany
as well as Japan, whose gross na-
tional products have increased
steeply over the past few years
and whose economies are well
organized and viable, to help the
Arabs economically.
"The economic situation of
some of the Arab countries
became so dramatic that their
own governments, their own
systems are in real danger, and
unless real help is offered the
danger will be augmented and the
road to peace will be impeded," he
declared.
But, Peres emphasized, while
international cooperation is
necessary to combat terrorism
and to help stabilize the economies
of Arab countries, the interna-
tional community cannot impose
solutions on the Arabs and Israel.
"No imposed solution will be a
success. The road to peace is
through free negotiations bet-
ween Israel and her Arab
neighbors," he said.
ISRAEL IS intent on pursuing
peace, Peres said, and has proved
this in relation to Egypt and its
ongoing efforts with Jordan.
"Israel is strong enough to defend
itself and is strong enough to go
and negotiate peace with our
neighbors," be stated. "We have
won all the wars that have been
forced upon us. We have decided
this time to win a peace."
The world, Peres observed, "is
convinced that Israel is sincere in
trying to halt the dispute between
the Arabs and ourselves, peaceful-
ly, diplomatically." One of the
consequences of this, he noted, is
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GARDEN RAVIOLI
i The Jewish Homemakers Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Calls for Chef Boy-ai^dee Chew laviott. (^.,=-5^, i
2package*< earhifraien
chopped broccoa
2 tablespoons graced Parmesan
che*e
W cup finely chapp*** oomn
1 medium dove garhc. crushed
V* cup chopped redor green pepper*
1 tablespoon butter or nurgjnne
2 cis (15 ot. each) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Raw* m Sauce
Cook broccoli acconkng to package directions, drain well. Add
Parmesan cheese and mix well. Saute onion, garhc and peppers m
butter until lightly browned; combane with broccoh. Place Ravioli
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-JOJL To n-esent (Jovetel
Award To David Paul
that it "helps create a climate of
support for the peace process in
the United States among the peo-
ple and in Congress."
Israel, Peres continued, has
moved in the direction of bringing
peace to the Mideast without the
help of the United Nations. The
war with Lebanon has come to an
end, the dispute with Egypt over
Taba has been settled. Arab
mayors have been given increas
ing authority to run their own
municipalities in the West Bank,
and a Jordanian bank has been
allowed to open in the West Bank.
"Terror has subsided in the West
Bank," Peres observed. "There is
50 percent less terror this year
than the preceding year."
MEANWHILE Israel internal-
ly still faces some problems. Peres
said there is "no sense in covering
up the divisiveness in Israel bet
ween Sephardim and
Ashkenarim, between religious
and secular groups and between
religious groups themselves as
well and between the secular
groups as well, and the Arabs in
Israel who do not get a feeling of
equality."
But. he added. "I have a feeling
that the ethnic divisiveness is
diminishing. A great thing has
happened. Both the Ashkenazim
and Sephardim have begun to feel
Jewish. They have a greater feel-
ing of equality. We are correcting
some mistakes regarding the
Arab minority. We are implemen
ting the things we demanded
when we were minorities."
Peres also listed some other
achievements in Israel, including
a balanced budget, a halt to infla-
tion, increased foreign trade and a
decreased trade deficit, the ab-
sorption of 16.000 Ethiopian Jews
who came to Israel under Opera
tion Moses.
Amit Women Plan
Annual Child's
Day Campaign
The Florida Council of Amit
Women will hold its national
Child's Day Door-To-Door drive
starting Dec. 1. through Mar. 14.
Chairmen of the campaign are
Blanche Cantor and Laura Vogel.
Mrs. Vogel stated, "These cam-
paigns have been successful in the
past due to the dedication and
hard work of Amit volunteers,
and we hope that our 1986-87
drive will surpass all records."
Proceeds of the funds raised
during the drive will be used
directly for the child care pro-
grams and maintenance of Amit
Women's Social Service and
Educational Facilities in Israel.
Jerome C. Berlin, chairman of
the Florida Regional Board of the
Anti-Defamation League and
Jerome B. Homer, national chair-
man of Development are pleased
to announce that Martin Fine,
member of Fine. Jacobson.
Schwartz. Nash. Block and
England law firm. James K. Bat-
ten, president, Knight-Ridder.
Thelma V.A. Gibson and Sergio
Periera. Dade County Manager
will serve as dinner chairmen of
the 1986 Americanism Award
Dinner Dance The coveted award
will be presented to David L. Paul,
chairman of the Board of Centrust
Savings Bank at the League's
gala event to be held on Saturday,
Dec. 6. at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel.
"Mr. Paul became a real estate
contractor in the Northeast after
completing school in 1966. Among
his most successful real estate
projects are the American Ex-
press Building and Citicorp
Building in New York, and the
American Furniture Mart in
Chicago. His financial acumen,
imagination and motivation
transformed a marginal savings
bank into the highly successful
(entrust Savings Bank, now the
largest S and L in the Southeast,
(entrusts new 47-story head-
quarters, with a state-of-the-art
skyscraper illumination, has
become the signature building in
Miami's skyline," Berlin related.
"Though his responsibilities are
immense. David Paul remains in-
tensely concerned with the quality
of life in our community. With
enormous energy and without fan-
fare, he has devoted himself to a
score of civic causes and groups
He is a member of the Public
Health Trust of Dade County.
Jackson Memorial Hospital;
trustee of the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews,
Miami, trustee of the National
David I. Paul
Foundation for the .Vhancenwm
of the Arts; steering committw
member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and a memwr
of the Florida State Bar Assoca-
tion's Grievance ('-ommittce
"He serves as a trustee cm the
Boards of Mount Sinai Media,
Center. Mount Sinai Hospita..
Mount Sinai Medical Society, aa!
the Neustadter ConvaleMsal
Center for the Elderly in Sew
York. He is a memU-r if the poiicj
advisory board of the ("enter of
Real Estate and Urban
Economics at the University of
California at Berkeley and is a
governing memtier i >f the Lincoln
Center Repertory Theater
Berlin added
Through Paul, (entrust Savings
has provided a 1160.000 grant to
ADL's "A World of Ihfferenot
project for the developBMBt of
teacher-training pr igraoa and in
school materials on mulu-cultuni
relations. The gram support! the
largest education an paign of its kind in the historr of
South Florida
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Israel Bonds To Honor Miami Couple
The Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Wanization will pay tribute to
etty and Harry Farber with a
ireakfast held in their honor on
lunday. Dec. 7. at Temple Samu
_ Or Olom, Miami. The
reakfast is scheduled to begin at
>:30 a.m.
I The Farbers, who are parents of
bmple Samu-El Or Olom's
bbi Edwin Farber, will receive
he Israel Freedom Award for
^ir dedicated efforts on behalf
| the temple.
IA member of the Jewish War
feterans, Harry Farber has also
*n involved with the Knights of
hvthias, B'nai B'rith and various
Ebe at the temple.
JH:s wife. Betty, has been active
Bth Hadassah and the temple's
Isterhood. The Farbers were
nong the founders of the Dade
'iffhts Jewish Congregation in
... late 1950's. later known as
fnai Raphael in North Miami.
Guest speaker at the breakfast
he Howard Stone, writer and
Insultant to various Jewish
mizations. He has held various
Bitions with the United Jewish
peal.
Serving as chairmen of the Tem-
Samu-EI Or Olom Israel
bnds campaign are Joseph and
lomi Weisberg and Peter and
nda Hornik.
m
. '. < J


v V
**c *,.


Betty and Harry Farber
* '^
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Beach Chamber To
Honor Robert Blum
As Man Of The Year
Apartment developer Robert
Blum has been selected by the
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce as "Man Of The Year." The
award will be presented at the
Chamber's 65th annual installa-
tion dinner on Nov. 29 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton.
Developer Norman Frank will
be installed for a two-year term as
Chamber president, succeeding
architect Ira Ciller.
As operating general partner of
The Carnage House and Carriage
Club apartments, Blum introduc-
ed Miami Beach to thousands of
new residents by offering dis-
counts to upscale renters between
the ages of 25 and 50 and promis-
ing contemporary lifestyle
amenities.
Incoming Chamber president
Norman Frank is chief operating
officer of Professional Real
Estate Investments, Inc., Molko
Realty Enterprises and M and S
Management, Inc., developers of
newly opened Sheridan Financial
Center on 41st Street and the
restored art deco Thirties Pro-
menade on Washington Avenue;
and owners of the Sea Isle Hotel.
He is a member of the City of
Miami Beach Planning Board,
former chairman of the City's
Budget Advisory Committee and
a former member of the Zoning
Board of Adjustment. Frank also
serves as a member of the
Mayor's Economic Development
Council, the steering committee of
the Rediscover Miami Beach Com-
mittee a joint effort of the
Miami Beach and Greater Miami
chambers of commerce and the
board of directors of the 41st Mer-
chants Association.
Officers to be installed are
Malcolm Fromberg, Stuart
Blumberg, Harold Rosen, Gary
Allington, Beverly Aberbach and
Perry Fabian.
Elected members of the board
of governors to be installed in-
clude Robert Blum, Glenn
Johnston, Ira Ciller, Neisen
Kasdin, Harold Rosen, William
Shockett, Keith Kovens, Chris
Perks. Jan Pfeiffer, Scott E. Ross
and Gerald Schwartz.
Appointed to one year terms on
the board of governors are Bruce
Blaise, A. Anthony Noboa, Saul
Glottman, Sidney Goldin and Jack
Lubin.
Trustees to be installed are
Aaron Farr, Barton S. Goldberg,
Leon Manne, James McDonnell,
Joseph Nevel and Milton Sirkin.
4tnp HP
m '
UKIIOTHTIII
THE DEVELOPMENT OF KINNERET SHORES
& SURROUNDING AREA IN THE GALIL, ISRAEL

SVdtinuuiiAti fflm*At &%kmam%
S/jhecia/ tjfle/toi/ &+om &uie/

fixer, 1*re .1*\e4. //. \.*t^. Grand Ballroom Konover Hotel
5445 Collins A venue
Musical Program Dancing
Sunday, December21, 1986
12 Noon
Abraham (irunhut
Pre* JNF Or. Miami
Zev W. Ko^an
Pres .1NFSouthern Refiion
Habbi Ininn Lehrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Ernest Samuels
V.P.JNFGr. Miami
Habbi Mayer Abramou tic
Chrmn. .INF Fxei Hoard
For Information and Reservations:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139 Phone 538-6464


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
United Synagogues Of America
Southeast Region Biennial Confab
The Southeast Region of the
United Synagogue of America will
hold its Biennial Convention at
the Hyatt Regency in Tampa,
starting Friday through Monday.
Lou Meltzer, President of the
Southeast Region, has appointed
Richard P. Jaffee of Daytona
Beach, as Convention Chairman,
with Dr. Steven A. Field as Site
Chairman assisted by Site Co-
Chairmen, Louis Morris and Sam
Pincus.
The Biennial Convention will br-
ing together delegates from seven
Southeastern states and Puerto
Rico for four days of study, wor-
ship, workshops and social events
in keeping with the Convention
theme, "Legacy of the Past. Vi-
sion of the Future."
Among the nationally known
participants will be Dr. Neil
Gillman, of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, who will
serve as Scholar-In-Residence.
Dr. Morton K. Siegel, Education
Director of the United Synagogue
of America, will conduct an
Education Conference in conjunc-
tion with the convention.
The featured speakers from
United Synagogue of America are
Franklin D. Kreutzer, National
President; Rabbi Benjamin Z.
Kreitman, Executive Vice Presi-
dent; Rabbi Jerome M. Epstein,
Senior Vice President; and Harry
J. Silverman. Director of Regional
Activities. Dr. Abraham Git-
telson, of the Central Agency of
Jewish Education, will also speak
during the convention. Parallel
sessions will be held for Young
Leadership.
Participating in the sessions
from the local area will be Rabbi
Max LipschiU. Beth Torah Con
gregation; Michael Exelbert,
President, Temple Zion Israelite
Center; Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rab-
bi, Temple Emanu-El; and Rabbi
Edwin Farber, Temple Samu-EI
Or Olom.
Harold Wishna is Executive
Director of the Southeast Region.
Executive Director Of AIPAC In Miami
Thomas A. Dine, the leading
pro-Israel lobbyist and Executive
Director of AIPAC, returns to
Miami for the annual visit with the
pro-Israel community on Tuesday.
Dine. 46, joined AIPAC in 1980.
Under his direction, the organiza-
tion has evolved into "the most ef-
fective Foreign Policy lobbying
group in Washington," according
to the New York Times.
His name has appeared regular-
ly on lists of the most effective
political professionals in
Washington. Most recently, the
National Journal cited him in a
1986 article on Washington policy
elite.
AIPAC, headquartered in
Washington. D.C., is the
American organization which, for
over 30 years, has worked on
Capitol Hill to strengthen United
States-Israel relations and to fight
for Israel's security and well-
being.
For fiscal year 1986. AIPAC
lobbied successfully for an un-
precedented $4.5 billion in all-
grant regular and supplemental
aid to Israel. Through AIPAC's
efforts. Congress overwhelmingly
passed a bill authorizing the Presi-
dent to negotiate a Free Trade
Agreement with Israel. This land-
NASSAU GARDENS
163 St. Mall Area
Adult Community
1 bedrooms available.
1495 NE 167 St.
947-9163
mark legislation provides for a
duty-free trade zone between the
U.S. and Israel.
Before is entry' into the world of
AIPAC. Tom Dines' political and
academic experience ran the
gamut! His 10 years of Senate ex-
perience include work on the staff
of Senators Edward M. Kennedy,
Edmund Muskie and Frank
Church.
Previously, he held Fellowships
at Harvard University. Kennedy
Institute of Politics.
Dine also served as the personal
assistant of Chester Bowles. U.S.
Ambassador to India. In addition,
he held the position of Congres-
sional liaison to the U.S. Peace
Corps from 1962-64. and was a
Peace Corps volunteer in the
Philippines.
With these impressive creden
tials and his smooth and mtellec
tual manner. Dine now lead>
AIPAC in it,- work in the COT
ridors of Capitol Hill to
strengthen U.S. support for
Israel.
Tom Dine will carry hi; message
to the Miami community on Tuc.--
day. No?, li"). at the (irand Bay
Hotel at 5 p.m The general pul'hr
is invited.
Senator Lawton Chiles uiU be honored by thr Southeast Rm^
United Synagogue of America at its Biennial <' consistent support in Congress of a strong and securt Irvik
efforts on behalf of freer emigration ofSmiet Jeu-s, and kum
mitment to those m need of food, shelter, health am ^2
education.
Rabbi Rose To Lecture On
Biblical Figure Joseph
The life of the major Biblical
figure. Joseph, will be analyzed by
Rabbi Marvin Rose, spiritual
leader of Temple King Solomon.
Miami Beach, at the public free
lecture in the senes Spiritual
Giants of the Past, taking place on
Wednesday. Dec 3. at 10:30 a.m..
at the Miami Beach Public
Library
Rabbi Rose, teacher and lee
turer in the Miami Beach vicinity-
received his Rabbinical >rdination
from the Yeshiva I'nivensty He
is very active in the Jewish com
munity serving as Chaplain at St
Francis Hospital Southeastern
Medical Center. Villa Maria
through the auspices of the
"ireater Miami Jewish Federation
Chaplaincy Service He has writ
ten several books and received
many honors for his services to
the community
OUR
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KWrnEO WTTH W VTUMMS AND MMERAtS
c
I


Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
|jay and Renee Weiss Honorees
At Weizmann Dinner, Dec 11
-
fhf Weizmann Institute of
fence at its annual Dinner
kce in Miami on Dec. 11 will
low one of its highest honors
n Jay and Renee Weiss by
khlishing a Professorial Chair
Itheir names at the Institute
t.(i in Rehovot. Israel.
i>re than 500 guests will at-
the Dinner-Dance honoring
[\Veisses. The event, to be held
the Omni International Hotel,
[sponsored by the Florida
Bon <>f the American Commit-
the Weizmann Institute.
Special guest speakers will be
film actor. Kirk Douglas, a close
friend of the Weisses. and Prof.
Michael Sela, immediate past
president of the Weizmann In-
stitute and currently Deputy
Chairman of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Institute.
Chairman of the Institute's
Florida Region is Rowland
Schaefer, last year's honoree.
Dinner-Dance chairmen are Mel
Dick. Cye Mandel. and David L.
Paul.
Young Israel Of Sunny Isles
To Provide Scholarships
tVM announced that Young
lei of Sunny Isles in Miami
fcrh is arranging to provide
larship grants for high school
bra in Miami Beach and South
ftiia area who want to spend
in Israel to continue their
Ill's
Price. Young Israel Presi-
t .'\plained that the scholar
:ir< tfing granted with the
deration "f the National Coun-
Young Israel and the World
ust Organization Torah
Ication Department. The
Kfl ir. being offered for study
Machon Gold Institute for
H or the Bet Midrash Le-
Institute for men, both in
I m Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin.
ftuai leader of Young Israel of
v. I-its is serving as coor-
lorof the project High school
seniors who are interested in ap-
plying for the scholarships are
asked to send for applications to:
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin. Young
Israel Scholarships, at the temple.
All requests must be accopanied
by a self-addressed, stamped
envelope. The deadline for ap-
plications is Feb. 28.
Jay and Renee Weiss are active
supporters of numerous
charitable, civic and educational
organizations in Greater Miami.
Mr. Weiss, the Senior Vice Presi-
dent and Partner of Southern
Wine and Spirits. Inc., is
Honorary Chairman of the Weiz-
mann Institute's Florida Region
and also serves as a member of the
American Committee's national
Board of Directors.
Mr. Weiss is founder of the
Mary Beth Weiss Cancer
Research Fund and a member of
the Board of Trustees of the
Public Health Trust of the Univer-
sity of Miami/Jackson Memorial
Hospital. He also is a member of
the Boards of the Papanicolaou
Comprehensive Cancer Center in
Miami and the American Heart
Association of Greater Miami.
Renee Weiss is also active in
community fund-raising projects.
She served as Chairperson of last
year's Dinner-Dance at Barry
University where Mr. Weiss is
Honorary Trustee and a member
of the Founders and Planned Giv-
ing Committees.
Jay and Renee Weiss
Eat In Good Health
With Fleischmann's. Margarine
)

Fleischmann's
"!JOO*omol
_ 4

Sweet UNSALTED
^eischmanns
^-OOXcomod
hhi I.ehrman
Margarine
Jeanne
tbbi Lehrman
Speak At
iennial
inference
Irving Lehrman, spiritual
f Temple Emanu-El, will
Keynote Speaker at the
al Convention of the
east Region of the United
J"gue of America. The con
W will be held at the Hyatt
fey Hotel in Tampa starting
l through Monday on the
Legacy of the Past Vi-
the Future."
bi Lehrman will speak at the
"on on Sunday on "Survival
ival Plus."
Southeast Region of the
Synagogue of America in-
< "nservative congrega-
1 Florida, Georgia. North
outh Carolina, Tennessee.
B'Ppi, Alabama and Puerto
It's easy to eat healthful, low cholesterol food
when delicious Fleischmann's Margarine is
part of the meal. Fletschmanns is made from
100% com oil, has 0% cholesterol and is low in
saturated fat So. rf you want to enjoy good
eating and good health, one thing's for certain:
There's never been a better time for the great
taste of Fleischmann's.
I
I
Fleischmann'segives every meal a holiday flavor.
/mandel brootN
- cupHflSCHMANNS. 1 teaspoon grated lemon pen
Mjigjrmc SofTool ? cups all purpose Moui
t cup suqii 4 teaspoons Mkincj powdef
>. cup IGG MATf RS. i teaspoon s*n
Cholesterol 'ree 99% Re* Egg cup PLANTERS. Slncied
Product Almonds toasted inc crtopped
' teaspoon jUnonfl eiti*c1
m*gttoa- Dt* logroll (iSlMMJU* SM*'e*mt suoti (CGWATfKSCnoas
l new tiding poaOr 1*1 jnO PIANT(RS SmM m>on< un* MndM
0-vOt aougn i iujii ** nowto ntnn ittpf each pact ot OOufn ""to en e i 3
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Kan incfi wen
15; jMltllllJ
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When you buy any package ol
Fleiscrvnanns Margarine

I H**tH -* o^mr m tftftMt # <** MuW v.
. m *** -p.ifw.im *+m o*\ at *****
.*** movi mmoi w I
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A


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
Hadassah's Women Of
' The Year, Myrtle
Wreath Awards Dec lj
Miami Federation Gardens in South Dade.
Miami Federation Announces
New Apartment Complex
Coa tuned from Page IB
vice. "These people are still able
to get around, they just need a lit-
tle extra care than the average
person," Freeman observed.
Both Federation Gardens and
Federation Towers have exten-
sive arrangements for programm-
ing with the Dade County School
System and local Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Agencies as
the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Jewish Family
Service, Mount Sinai Medical
Center, Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice, Jewish Chaplaincy Service of
Federation and various local
synagogues.
Each building also has an ac-
tivities director on staff to plan
programs as well as senior aides
to encourage the residents to par-
ticipate in various activities.
"These buildings are self sus-
taining and do not receive funds
from the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation or any other agency,"
says Nathan Skolnick, Ad
ministrstor of Federstipn
Housing.
The buildings are also very
secure with emergency alarms in
each apartment's bedroom and
bathroom. The alarms are
The buildings are also very secure
with emergency alarms in each
apartment's bedroom and bathroom.
The alarms are monitored 2U hours
a day.
:-:-:-:v:-x-:v:w^
Mrs. Jean Temkin. President of
the Mismi Beach Region of
Hadassah, announced that "The
Women of the Year. Myrtle
Wreath Awards" will be held at
the Miami Beach Theater of the
Performing Arts, on Dec. 18, at 1
p.m.. in recognition of outstan
din* efforts and service to
Hadassah
The afternoons highlight will be
the drawing from the list of Life
Members of Hadassah. for a trip
to Israel during Hadassah's 75th
l>iamond Jubilee Mission to Israel
i in Mar. 8. Other prizes will also be
announced. A musical skit will be
presented by Rose Marcus and
Polly Fiedler.
Heading the committee is An
nette Kahn, Membership Vice
President; Helen Adams. Life
Membership Chairman; Betty
Miller. Task Force; Rose Naidorf.
Trsnser and Irene Cohen,
records
Receiving the Myrtle Wreath
Awards will be Irene Lippman,
Avila Chapter. Gilda Davis. Bay
Harbor Chapter. Sylvia Newman.
Ben Gunon Chapter; Florence
Waldman. Haim Yassky Chapter;
Esther Glazer, Brandeia-Cantor
Chapter; Sara Spatt King, Em
man Lazarus Chapter; Pauline
Lesaem. Forte Towers Chapter;
Esther Aronaon. Golda Meir
Chapter; Bess Lepow. I.R Good
man Chapter, Rebecca Murav-
chick. Hanna Senesch Chapter.
Ruth Berg. Henrietta Szold
Chapter; Malka Maiem.
Inter-Amencan Chapter &
G^ldatein.Kadimah.wT?
di Landfield, KoadTOaS
Sarah Gordon. Maison 2
Chapter; Syd wSSSi B
Towers Chapter. Edna K*
man. Mt. Scopus 1'haoier sZ.
Weintraur, NaunvTc^
Harriet Cohen, RerunahcEJ
Muriel Kovinow. SouZJ
$2*5 StetfS
Jie Chapter .it, Miriajns*
Treasure House I ihaptar,
The faction ii open to M
Chapter Life M.r-n*rs and fW
vP mhT N-" Mnbiai
New Life Mtr
Fashion Show
Preview Set
The National Parkinson F
dation, in conjunction wrj
Romanoff Boutiques, aj|
presenting a fashion ctnvaj
xa and luncheon on Dec. 4 a,
Hotel Inter Continental.
Proceeds from the went ri
support the newly esubiaM
Florence Hecht Research Fuaaa
the Foundation Hecht wi k
presented with the Jeanne Let
Humanitarian Award at the at
cheon. in appreciation of her
vTces to the community
Ilene Ewak at the Natm
Parkinaon Foundation u a
charge
monitored 24 hours a day.
"The staff and the tenants in
the buildings become surrogate
families for one another," added
Fleeman, "Their real families
generally live in distant states, so
they take care of each other and
look after each other. If a person
sees that her neighbor hasn't
shown up for an activity that she
usually attends, she will check in-
to it. If they find that the person
has become ill and is unable to
leave the apartment or answer the
telephone, it is reported to the
building manager and appropriate
steps are taken to deal with the
problem.
The tenants hold religious ac-
tivities that keep them in touch
with their faith, as High Holiday
services, seders for Passover, and
Chanukah, Purim, Shavuot and
Sukkot parties.
"The need still exists for more
of these accommodations for the
elderly. The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation is hoping that
it can construct a facility in North
Dade in the future." Fleeman
concluded.
KROSSKEYSAPTS.
1 BrJ1 Va Bath 2 Br./2 Bath
Pool, waterfront, security bldg..
under new Mgmt.
2903 NE 163 St. NMB
949-6861
ANDY STATMAN: ON RESPECTING YOUR HERITAGE AM) YOl'R BOM
Fifty Women Join The Ranks Of
IMMA Of The Hebrew Academy
Fifty women enrolled as
members of the Imma Corp
the Rabbi Alexander S. Or
Hebrew Academy Women at a
luncheon held this week at the
Shelborne Hotel.
Hostess of the event was Lillian
Silverman, who was assisted by
Bess Jacobs and Tillie Yates.
According to Dahlia Lipner,
president of the organization, the
Imma luncheon is an annual party
at which women who pledge to
become an Imma of the school are
recognized and honored. The
Hebrew word "Imma" means
mother, and by becoming an Im-
ma a woman nurtures the educa-
tional opportunities of a Hebrew
Academy student Immas play a
very vital role in the support
system of the school. A plaque
posted in the Academy's
auditorium bears the names of
those who have volunteered and
enrolled in the Imma project.
Imma pins and honors were
presented to the following Immas:
Sarm Benaon. Tola Bloch. Eather Borann,
Laune I)'Angel". Roae Dermer. June Dunn.
Irma Ehrenreich. Eitelle Furat. Judy Har
na Goldman. Shirley Groaa. Till* Halpern.
Marline Lou Harria. Bcsa Jacoba, Anna
Kain. Belle Kohn. Barbara Kudiah. Shirley
Kaufman, Othelia Kellerman, Shirley
KukofT. Conetanee Matter Laiamua, Dahlia
Lipner. Lillian Mandel. Jennie Pianin
Alao Eliane Rack man. Feiiaa Ranhard.
Hermia Retnhard. Shirley Retter. Ruth
KingcJ. Charlotte Roae. Sandi Samole. Bella
Sohiffman. Daniela Schimmel. Marietta
Schimmel. Prancea Schnur. Roae
Schonberfar. Sarah Senderoff Rita Shear.
Lillian Silverman. Jeanca Silverman. Betty
Slater. Gabnella Teaaer. Mr* Jaunie
Wainbarf. Fannie Werner. Gila Weiner.
Ann Yarrow. Faye Yarrow, Tube Yatea.
Sylvia Zemel
Rabbi Lehrman To Speak
At Goldstein Academy
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi of
Temple Emanu-EI. will be the
keynote speaker at the Founders
and Future Simcha Dinner of the
Goldstein Hebrew Academy of
South Dade, on Sunday. Nov. 23,
at Signature Gardens- Dr.
Lehrman'a mesaajre will stress the
importance of Jewish education to
the future of Judaism. The Golds-
tein Academy, formerly the South
Dade Hebrew Academy, will
honor its founders and builders at
the gala event which will begin at
6 p.m.
Oncol the questions I'oiarwayi
au.cdis "yarydoyewdaaoaeio
play Klc/mcr music '" The ansei
in simple Kk/mcr musiv i\ pan uf
my musical inheritance KU/mci
louche* deep jnd profound feeling
relating lo my heritage
< Hher Jewish pe.>ple ,, hcj,
cxpencrKc the same leelings It
i.KKhcs them in jvs no other await
docs Which is h> I play Kle/mer
musK lo serve ihc conimun.lv hs
ptayiai maK iiui bnap ttecthcr
fcwt lion, JitK rx-til h*k,;riHinds
.- Kic/nKi mm i -
u.His lhai s ,.iK ajaane h\ I Mb
caw .'i msseii v.| eacwiN
waSC* h,n I asl Bui :.ik
nivsell doesn I iiicjn
K. KOSMIH
aatasslssjo) Uaewflssjj
a^r/ldr-k Sanaa* ^Jj
leinjicds.rtlce I
liacecsfhswdoea. .ft-
\,H Myle, San*.. |-#
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haw H aaytaw I
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lM^llooka.1 H**
ls,e,lll..-m(.d rVKfc"
Ihawisisaecaitolrn^
Sank,' heir "^'|U'""


Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Healthy eating doesn't require total exclusion of "tempting in-
dulgences." Year-round availability of a wholesome variety of
nutritious ingredients allows a healthy diet that is anything but
boring or restrictive.
While our ideas about healthy eating have rapidly changed,
desserts have frequently continued to be viewed as usually
calorie-laden "sinful" indulgences. That image should change.
Nutritious ingredients can make desserts just as important in a
good diet as other foods.
Top on the list of "good" desserts? Fruit, of course. Thanks to
marvels of modern transportation, supermarket produce depart-
ments now carry the same abundance of fresh fruits during the
winter as during the summer dispelling the concept of what
>nce was called the "seasonal peaks."
Another fruit dessert possibility? Buckwheat. That's right:
hntanically. the edible seed of the buckwheat plant is actually a
fruit. Non-botanists usually classify buckwheat as a grain. Indeed.
when compared to other cereal grains, buckwheat is a very im-
pressive whole grain. It's the best source of high biological pro-
tein in the entire plant kingdom. Buckwheat also contains twice
as much vitamin B as wheat.
Buckwheat adds a hearty goodness u> many types of desserts.
Here are four recipes that exemplify the variety of buckwheat
products: buckwheat flour, buckwheat cereal "grits," and toasted
buckwheat kernels known as kasha.
Everyone realizes the nutritional benefits of a wholesome,
whole grain, hot cereal for breakfast. Orange Buckwheat Parfaits
transfer those same attributes into a dessert based upon
buckwheat cereal cooked in orange juice, then blended with less-
fattening whipped topping, and layered with fresh fruits. The par-
faits may remind you of a fruit tapioca pudding, but the similarity
ends there. Buckwheat is vastly superior nutritionally to tapioca
(which is only a refined starch).
Cranberry Apple Kasha Bars and Applesauce Kasha Cookies
are made for munching as snacks or desserts. With current in-
flated nut prices, it's nice to know that medium granulation kasha
adds a leas expensive crunchiness and nutlike flavor to many bak-
ed items
Poached Pear Tart is a company-special dessert that says
elegance. Fresh poached pears take a little effort but have flavor
unmatched by canned pears (which can be substituted when
neceaaary). Pears top an incredibly flaky pastry that surpassed
the recipe testers' expectations. Buckwheat flour was substituted
for some of the flour to add flavor. Besides adding flavor,
buckwheat flour also made the pastry so flaky and tender that it
can be reworked repeatedly and still stay flaky. You can also put
your rolling pin away. This pastry works great simply pressed in-
to the pan without any rolling.
ORANGE BUCKWHEAT PARFAITS
2"A cups orange juke
Vi cup Wolffs Buckwheat Grits
3 to 4 taps, sugar
1 carton (8 ox.) frozen whipped topping
Grange flavored liqueur (optional)
Fresh fruit of your choice
In large saucepan, bring orange juice to boil. Slowly stir in
buckwheat. Lightly boil for 10 to 12 minutes or until liquid is ab-
sorbed, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; stir in sugar.
Cool 30 minutes. Fold in whipped topping and orange liqueur (1-2
tbsp8.).
Alternate layers of "pudding" and fresh fruit in decorative
stemmed glassed. Garnish with fruit. Chill. Serves 6-8.
CRANBERRY APPLE KASHA BARS
3 tbsps. butter or margarine
1 cup sugar
2 l*rgeeggs
1 tbsp. fresh grated orange rind
1 cup medium uncooked kasha
l'A cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking soda
2 tsps. baking powder
Buckwheat And Fruit:
A Natural Combination
l1* cups peeled, grated apple (two medium)
1 cup whole cranberries
Orange Frosting:
1/3 cup soft butter or margarine
3 cups confectioners' sugar
2-3 tsps. orange juice
1 tsp. vanilla
Beat butter, sugar and eggs together in medium bowl until light
and fluffy. Stir in orange rind. Combine flour, kasha, soda and
baking powder. Stir into creamed mixture. Fold in apples and
cranberries. Spread into 9x13-inch oiled and floured baking pan.
Bake at 350 degrees F. for 25-30 minutes or until toothpick in-
serted in center "comes out clean." Cool on wire rack. Frost with
Orange Frosting. Cut into bars.
For frosting, combine butter and sugar. Stir in vanilla and
enough orange juice to make a spreadable consistency. Beat until
smooth.
APPLESAUCE-KASHA COOKIES
lVi cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking soda
6 tsp. baking powder
V* tsp. salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/8 tsp. nutmeg
V tsp. cloves
*/4 cup brown sugar
Vi cup butter or margarine
1 egg
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
lk cup raisins or currants
'i cup medium kasha, uncooked
Vt cup regular rolled oats
Stir or mix together flour, soda, baking powder, salt and spices;
set aside. In large mixing bowl, cream butter and brown sugar un-
til light and fluffy, then beat in egg and applesauce. Slowly stir in
flour mixture; mix well. Add oats, raisins and kasha. Drop mix-
ture by teaspoonsful onto greased baking sheets. Bake at 375
degress F. for 10 minutes, or until golden brown. Makes about 4
dozen.
PEAR TART IN BUCKWHEAT PASTRY
Pastry:
y cup buckwheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp. sugar
dash salt
V cup cold butter, shortening, or margarine
1 tbep. lemon juice
3 tbsps. milk
1 egg, separated
Combine flours, sugar, and salt. Cut in butter or shortening
with pastry blender until particles pea-size. Combine lemon juice,
milk and egg yolk. Sprinkle over flour mixture, toss with fork un-
til all flour is moistened and dough forms. Gather dough in ball.
Press (or roll) dough into 12-inch tart shell. (Pie pan or individual
tart shells can be substituted.) Prick bottom and sides of pastry
with fork. Chill slightly. Brush with lightly beaten egg white.
Bake at 475 degrees F. for 12-14 minutes or until lightly browned.
Cool before chilling.
Poached Pears and (ream Cheeae Filling:
4 pears
1 cup water
V cup sugar
1 tbsp. lemon juice
4 tsps. corns tare h
1 pkg. (8 oz.) cream cheese, softened
* cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
2 tsps. butter
In wide pan or skillet, bring water, sugar, and lemon juice to
boil. Peel, core, and halve pears. Place halves cut side down in
single layer in boiling liquid. Spoon liquid over pears, cover,
reduce heat, and simmer 5-8 minutes or until pears are poached
but firm. Remove pears; drain on paper towels. Combine cor-
nstarch with one tablespoon of water. Add to poaching liquid. Br-
ing to boil, cooking until thickened and clear, stirring constantly.
Cool.
Whip cream cheese and add thickened pear syrup. Spread on
bottom of baked tart shell. Arrange pears cut side down over fill-
ing. Melt chocolate and butter in small saucepan (or microwave)
stirring until smooth. Drizzle over pears. Chill. Serves 8.
The Florida Region of the
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science
and the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
recently sponsored a joint tax
seminar entitled "The 1986
Tax Law: Investment
Strategies for Individuals."
Shown are Harry B. Smith
(right), chairman of the Weiz-
mann Florida Region s Estate
Planning Committee, and
Barry A. Nelson, who spoke on
the new tax reform law.
Fight
Bias
Continued from Page 1-B
politicization of the International
Red Cross jeopardizes a vital
channel of aid and protection to
the people of South Africa. The
precedent set by the International
Conference bodes ill for the future
of the humanitarian movement."
Popkin told Hay that "in the
eyes of much of the world, the
crescent is as religious a symbol as
the Magen David the Star of
David and both carry political
significance as well. To grant
recognition to one while excluding
the other is to abandon the prin-
ciples of justice and human dignity
which are the foundation of
humanitarianism."
In a letter to the New York
Times on Nov. 13, Bernice S. Tan-
nenbaum, chairman of the
American Section of the World
Zionist Organization, declared
that:
"THE CHANG!: in the official
name of the International Red
Cross movement to the Interna-
tional Movement of the Red Cross
and Red Crescent is a deliberate
and blatantly hostile act of
discriminatory anti-Jewish and
anti-Israeli rejection. It excom-
municates the Red Star of David
(Magen David Adorn) as a
humanitarian peer group. The
record of the Magen David Adorn
eminently qualified it for member-
ship based on every Red Cross
criterion with the one exception
its six-pointed emblem, which is a
symbol of Jewish history, Jewish
suffering and Jewish caring.
"The purport of this action,
restricting International Red
Cross recognition to Christian and
Moslem emblems, is Israel's exclu-
sion from the international agen-
cies that synchronize and regulate
aid for victims of our natural
catastrophes and wars.
"This act prejudicially imposes
two religious emblems on a
universal movement while
flagrantly blackballing a third. It
is an unjustified, self-
contradictory act by an organiza-
tion that says it is dedicated to im-
partial global efforts to relieve
suffering and tragedy."
FOR RENT
Towers of Oceanside, sub-
lot, 1 bedroom. 1V. bath,
fully furnished, yearly or
season, 457-3873 leave
message.


a-o Aim jcwiaii riuiiuuuvf *tu*\y, iwicumci *., iju
Members of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Campaign Cabinet meet to set
goals for the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
Campaign. Pictured first row, left to right are
Adele Lurie, campaign staff, Myra Farr,
Federation Board member and former
chairperson of Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee, Dan Lepow. campaign staff.
Norman S. Rachlin. chairman of the accoun-
tants division, second row, left Co right Sender
Kaplan, campaign staff. Jerry Neimand,
director of Federation's South Dade branch.
Marc R. Schectman. chairman of stockbrokers
division, Mark Vogal, vice chairman of at-
torneys division.
Engagement
GOLDFISHER
Stanley and Carol Gold of Miami announce the engage-
ment of" their daughter, Harriet of Fort Lauderdale to
David Fisher, son of Albert and Liela Fisher of Fort
Lauderdale.
Harriet is the granddaughter of the late Mauric- and
Lena Gold and the late Fred and Tillie Sandier, long time
residents of Miami.
She is a graduate of the University of South Florid
is currently employed a* a sales representative for S. Ivania
Lighting Services.
David is a graduate of the State University of Nev York
at Buffalo, and is the oVner of Sun Fabrics of Fort
Lauderdale.
A June wedding is planned at Temple Samuel-Or ()|<.m in
Miami.
JCC To Host Chanukah Happening
Jewish Fund Raising MTV Style
One of Dade County s oldest
and generally more low-key
charitable institutions has decided
tbat what worked for USA for
Africa, the Chicago Bears and the
New York Mets. might help to get
its 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
fund raising campaign off to a fly-
ing start.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, which celebrates its
50th anniversary in 1988. is mak-
ing a music video using members
of its board of directors, their
families and Federation staff.
The video, which will be taped at
Criteria Studios in North Miami
on Nov. 23, is based on a song en-
titled "It's Our Turn to be the
Heroes" that was written for
Federation by local composer and
songwriter Art Weissman. It is
being produced as a joint effort
between Federation's Com-
munications Department and
Jewish Federation Television
(JFTV).
"Let's face it, getting volunteer
workers properly motivated
nowadays requires a lot of
creativity," said 1987 CJA Cam
paign Chairman Donald Lefton.
who is President of the Continen
tal Companies and also serves as
Chairman of the Greater Miami
Tourism Council. "Once we had
the song, we decided to go the
whole way and make a music
video after all, you can't have a
hit song today without one. It's
going to be quite an experience
seeing the board of directors
'boogying' on camera," he said.
The video, which will be screen-
ed before an audience of 2,000
people at the Federation Cam-
paign Opening Dinner at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel on Jan. 15. and
will be shown on Jewish Federa-
tion Cable TV in January, will be
directed by Israeli producer Raffi
Miller who adapted Sesame Street
for Israeli television. The song on
which the video is based will be
adapted for use in the Federa-
tion's television and radio cam-
paign promotions.
Among the individuals who have
so far signed up for the Nov. 23
shoot are Donald E. Lefton,
Aaron Podhurst. Norman Lipoff,
Eli Timoner. Judge Robert
Newman. Rabbi Haskell Bernat,
Jeffery Berkowitz and Bernard
Mandler.
Criterian Studios is located at
1755 NE 149 St., North Miami.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Combined Jewish
Appeal is the single largest human
services fund raising campaign in
Florida. It allocates funds to more
than 30 local health, education
Raffi Miller, Israeli television director, well-known for his adap-
tation of Sesame Street for Israeli television, will direct the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's MTV style music video, 'It's
Our Turn To Be The Heroes, "to be produced at Criteria Studios
on Sunday. Miller is pictured here rehearsing for the production
with assistant director Lee Rubin._______^________
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
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An Adult Community
945-8174
and social service agencies and.
through the United Jewish Ap-
peal, to similar agencies and ser-
vices in Israel and in 32 other
nations.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center is hosting a
Community wide Chanukah Hap-
pening on Sunday. Dec. 14, 1-4
p.m. at the Center, North Miami
There will be crafts for all ages.
Chanukah items for sale, and holi-
day foods. Entertainment will
feature an afternoon of Jewish
songs and dance by community
groups and Israeli Folk Dancinj'
Free Blood Pressure screening
will be provided by Mount Sin*
Medical Center/Project Sinai.
The South Florida Blood Ser
vice will hold a blood drive durtnj
the event
Admission is free.
Instead of serving the same oW thing this Shabbos why not try Ronzoni pasta9 You'
family will be delighted as they spin their forks and soak up their sauce with any one cf
our 70 shapes and varieties All made to our exacting standards with 100 c durum
wheat semolina tor unsurpassed taste and texture
Ronzoni" is not only good for Shabbos. its good for you Made of completefy Ml
ingredients our pasta has no cholesterol and no added salt whatsoever And. of course
its absolutely Kosher and Parve
So start a new tradition this Shabbos with Ronzoni No pasta shapes up better

Kosher
Parve

r
CHEESE STUFFED SHELLS FLORENTINE
1 package(12oz) RONZONI' Jumbo Shells
1 (ar (29 oz ) mannara sauce
' I teaspoon salt
Iteaspoon pepper
'? teaspoon oregano
1 package (10 oz) BIROS EYE*
Chopped Spinach
2 pounds ncotta cheese
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
P^ mannara MnHo saucepan, add salt, pepper and oregano Bong to bod and simme.
gentry tor 2 minutes Spoon i cup of sauce**) the bottom of i vefy large roasting pan ^Z?l!Z!l~<*X bak,n9 *5hM ""*" wnainKig sauce Cook spinach accordmg to
Pac*a*'e'ons dram Combine spinach ncotta cheese egg and Parmesan cheese m a
mm^T **fanwNle Pfapare shells according to package directions dram Usmg a lea
Ti^L.c6.*0^&hel,wrtt,che mixture Arrange shells m single layer in baking dish Bake at
350- tor 15 to 20 minutes Serve with heated sauce Makes about 8 servings
Ronzoni Sono Buopi.
tM Qmnrnm foal* Copo*or
rj


Rabbi Leon Kronish To Be
Honored By AJCongress
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Norma A. Orovitz, president of
utheast Region of the
(jnerkan Jewish Congress, has
inoiinced that Rabbi Leon
| will be honored st
LlCongreM1 annual Century Club
Cocktail Reception on Sunday.
l at the Doral Beach Hotel
epnr.inn at 4 p.m.
Theodora R. Mann, national
i.i of the American Jewish
fongreas, will be the guest
eaker and will present Rabbi
h with an award named in
honor. Rabbi Kronish was in-
trumental in the formation of the
louthfast Region of AJCongress,
vinj? served as the region's first
ident Through his leadership,
Jc'ongress played a vital role in
thieving numerous civil rights
nd civil liberties victories. Rabbi
ronish has served as a national
I president of AJCongress, and
currently a member of the
inization's Executive Commit-
II. also holds the title of
Miorary national vice president.
Mann, who was elected presi-
en' of AJCongress in 1984,
viously served as chairman of
le Conference of Presidents of
jajor Jewish Organizations. An
tnrney specializing in major con-
titutional. antitrust and
runiit's fraud litigation, Mann
written numerous articles on
>ubjects. international af-
irs. civil rights and liberties, and
future of the American
kwish community.
I Reflecting on Rabbi Kronish's
lecadea of community ser-
Orovitl noted, "In every
ea of Jewish life. Rabbi Kronish
l- left an indelible mark and an
luring legacy His contribu-
i I'ducation, culture, social
r i ind to the human spirit are
mony to a distinguished
jv. -
hThe Southeast Region of
m Jewish Congress and its
Jntury Club members feel it is
st fitting that we pay tribute to
bbi Kronish with an award
ned in his honor. He has set a
mg example of leadership
ich will set a standard to ail
use who follow in his footsteps,"
added.
Perving with Orovitz on the
fntury Club Cocktail Reception
ennj; Committee are: Dorothy
Louis Elkies. Linda J.
Irlu-h. Sylvia and Irving Kaplan,
ha Miller, Sylvia Rivchun and
|via and Charles Silvers.
[wish High School
Of So. Fla.
lonors Students
wish High School of
nth Florida inducted seven of
lent! into the National
|iior Society for the first time on
19, during the school's an-
Scholarship Event.
fhe honored students, all
>r- and seniors, are: Michael
nvs. Shaw Condiotti, Ronit
Rebecca Ghen, Philippa
enberg, Daren Grosman and
I'fer Guindi.
National Honor Society
iizes academic excellence,
trihip, citizenship and
ter in high school students.
like the Phi Beta Kappa of
school students," says Gary
IM. Dean of Students. "They
W*t just a bunch of smart
Theodore R. Mann fubbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Kronish was instrumental in
the formation of the Southeast
Region of AJCongress.
mnriff fifmnr ---""^" ------'----- .................iiinniHijinnniiniinnnnnfliiiiiiniiiiA
HAPPENINGS
Miami Dade Community College's Lunchtime Li\ely Arts
Series presents Thanks for Giving." a holiday program of
music, at noon. Wednesday, at the Wolf son Campus
"To Be Or Not To Be An Estrogen User" discussion lead by
Dr Judy Pardo on Thursday. Nov 20. from 7 p.m. to H M) p m
at North Shore Hospital and Medical Center's Women's
Department
To help religious leaders meet the special needs of church or
synagogue members who Are hospitalized. Baptist Hospital is of-
fering a daylong "Practical Medicine Seminar for Clergymen"
on Tuesday. Nov 25 The seminar, offered free to clergy of all
faiths, is from 8amio 330 p.m at the Hospital
The next meeting of Mount Sinai Medical Center's Alzheimer's
Disease support group is on Wednesday, at 1 p m in the
hospitals Chernin Auditorium
ABC-TV will present The Beate Klarsfeld Story with Farrah
Fawcett. Geraldine Page and Tom Conti on Sunday at 9 p.m.
Beate Klarsfeld has devoted her life to hunting down Nazi war
criminals
The Robyn Tubin Chapter of the City of Hope will hold their
next regular meeting on Thursday. Nov 20. at 2 p.m. at the
Gulf stream Restaurant in Jordan Marsh. 163rd St Mall
minimum GPA of 3.5 is re-
to be eligible for the award
faculty committee who
fcns the students also evaluate
[ on qualities such as strength
"^acter, extra curricuiar ac-
f and contributions to the
a"d community.
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Coconut Custard $ 1.99
Dutch Apple.......$1.99
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.


Page 10-P The Jewish Ftoridian/Friday, November 21. 1986
Simcha Dinitz To Speak
At Israel Bonds Dinner
Simch Dinitz. former Am-
bassado f the State of Israel to
the Uni i States, will speak at
the ann 1 Cuban Hebrew Israel
Dinner State on Saturday, on
behalf o Je State of Israel Bonds
campaign. The event, honoring
two Miami couples, will take place
at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Miami Beach. The dinner begins
at 7:30 p.m. with a cocktail
reception.
Being recognized at the dinner
are Alberto and Nelly Behar and
Aron and Lucia Kelton, two pro-
minent couples who have been in-
strumental in the Cuban Hebrew
community in Greater Miami, as
well as supporters of Israel
through the Israel Bonds pro-
gram. They will receive the
prestigious Gates of Jerusalem
Medallion.
Also on the program will be
singer Gina Kreiezmar and
Naguila, an Israeli dance group.
A distinguished career diplomat
and key administrator in the
highest echelons of Israel's
government for two decades. Am-
bassador Dinitz is widely recogniz-
ed as an outstanding authority
and an eloquent spokesman on
Israel's foreign and political af-
fairs. Presently, he serves as vice
president of Hebrew Univeristy in
Jerusalem and as a member of the
Knesset.
Two Miami couples to receive Gates
of Jerusalem Award.
A "Sabra" or native of Israel.
Dinitz. 57, was born in Tel Aviv,
where he received his primary and
secondary education before join-
ing Israel's Defense Forces in the
War of Independence in 1948. At
the end of the war. he came to the
United States to study Political
Science at the University of
Cincinnati.
In 1966, Dinitz was appointed
Minister Plenipotentiary to Rome,
and in 1968 he returned to
Washington as Minister of Infor-
mation at the Embassy of Israel.
The following year, he was call-
ed back to Israel and appointed
Political Adviser to Prime
Minister Golda Meir. Prior to
assuming his post as Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States,
Dinitz was Director-General of the
Prime Minister's Office.
Ambassdor Dinitz has written a
number of articles in the field of
political science and international
law, including "The Legal
Aspects of the Egyptian Blockade
of the Suez Canal," which was
published in 1956 in the
Israel Bonds To Hold
Breakfast At Star Lakes
Residents of the Star Lakes
condominium in North Miami will
be able to participate in a Salute
to Israel Breakfast on Sunday.
Dec. 7. in the Star Lakes
Auditorium. The event, which is
under the auspices of the Greater
Miami Israel Bonds Organization,
is being held in honor of Israel's
38th anniversary. The complimen-
tary breakfast is scheduled to
begin at 9:30 a.m
Making a special appearance at
the Salute to Israel Breakfast will
be Gil Elan. Southeast Regional
Manager of the American Jewish
Congress International Travel
::-::xx-:-:-:-:<-:->:-:-x-:vX-w-:->x-x-Xv
Joyce Goldberg has joined the
Medical Center Communica-
tions staff, Departmeent of
Marketing and Community
Relations, University of
Miami/Jackson Memorial
Medical Center, as medical
writer/editor. She is editor of
"Spectra," the I'M School of
Medicine's quarterly publica-
tion and on the News Bureau
staff.
Program and Spokesman on
Israeli Affairs.
Elan is a Paratroop Major in the
Israeli Defense Force Reserves,
who served as a Commanding Of-
ficer of its Spokesman Unit in
Beirut during the recent war in
Lebanon. Since then, and until his
arrival in Miami. Gil has been ser-
ving his reservist duty as a senior
press briefing and escort officer
for the Israeli Defense Forces.
Serving as chairman of the Star
Lakes Israel Bonds Committee is
Charles Silverberg. Acting as co-
chairman is Joan Kowler.
PERSONALS
HUNGARIAN BORN Jew
ish lady, very attractive and
an excellent cook, would
like to meet a fine gentle-
man, 62-70. who is looking
for love and understanding
Send to PO. Box 600713.
N. Miami Beach. FL 33160-
0713.
ATTRACTIVE, intelligent
professional New Yorker
seeks non-Orthodox
gentleman 39-50. over 5'8".
successful, yet sensitive,
a dreamer yet realistic
enough to know the score
Box SL, c/o Jewish
Ftoridian. P.O. Box 012973.
Miami. Fla. 33101.
THE SINGLES' HAVURAH
of the South Dade Jewish
Community Center will
host a Singles Shabbat
Dinner on Friday. Decem-
ber 5 at 800 p.m. at the
home of a member. There
is no charge, but each
participant will bring a part
of the dinner. Seating is
limited, for information,
reservations or directions,
call the JCC at 251-1394.
Simcha Dinitz
Georgetown University Law
Journal.
The Israel Bonds office is in
charge.
Rabbi Dr. Abraham J. Twerski
will speak on the subject of
Alcohol and Drugs in the
Jewish Community at the
Young Israel of Greater
Miami, on Monday evening,
Dec. 8, at 8 p.m. Rabbi Dr.
Twerski is a leading authority
in the field of chemical
dependency and is the Founder
and Medical Director of the
Gateway Rehabilitation Center
in Pittsburgh.
Book Review By
Rabbi Shapiro
The best selling book on living a
fulfilled life. "When Everything
You Ever Wanted Isn't Enough"
by Harold Kuahner. will be
reviewed by Rabbi Rami Shapiro,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Or, Miami. This will be presented
in a public book review to be held
on Thursday, Dec. 4. at 1:30 p.m.,
at the Miami Beach Public
Library.
Rabbi Shapiro is the spiritual
leader of Temple Beth Or. He
graduated from the University of
Massachusetts with a BA in Asian
religious studies, and received his
MA in Judaic Studies from
McMaster University in
Hamilton, Ontario. He was or-
dained from the Hebrew Union
College and also holds s MA in
Hebrew Literature.
Cedars Medical Center
Auxiliary Elects Officers
Sara Rutstein of North Miami
Beach has been elected president
of the 420-member Auxiliary of
Cedars Medical Center. Rutstein
served the Auxiliary' last year as
administration vice president.
Re-elected one of the auxiliary
services vice presidents was Bea
Rosenthal of Miami. Serving with
her will be Jean Spivack of Ken-
dall, who last year won an award
as a New Volunteer Achiever.
Belle Berlin of Miami Beach was
elected vice president, geriatric
services. She was membership
president last year.
New vice presidents for
membership are George Mildwoff
of Miami Beach and Carol Feibush
of North Miami Beach. Feibush
was the recipient of a New
Volunteer Achiever award last
Sara Rutatein
3
year.
Eve Zinner of Coral Gables, a
past president three times and a
25-year member of the Auxiliary,
was re-elected Cedar Chest vice
president. Mindy Lampert of Ken-
dall was re-elected ways and
means vice president.
Grace Tavss of Miami B*ach.
who served as auxiliary semes
vice president last year was
elected treasurer Dorothj
Sagman of Southwest Dade. &
25-year member, was re-elected
recording secretary.
Temple EmanuEl
PROUDLY PRESENTS
1986/87 Cultural Series
DR. JEANE J. KIRKPATRICK
WEDNESDAY,
DECEMBER 17,1986
AMBASSADOR
PHILIP HABIB
TUESDAY,
JANUARY 27,1987
AN EVENING WITH RENOWNED CANTORS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16,1987
Yehuda ShHman MeeheStem Ben Zton Miller Baruch NMN
MARK RUSSELL
WEDNESDAY,
MARCH 11,1987
WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY, JR.
WEDNESDAY,
APRIL 1,1987
Subscription Rates For The Series
All Five Attractions Begin at 8 P.M.
PATRON s175
LOGE s;
BALCONY s50
Ht-r-Otionlriciudec
Per P-
Per Person
TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW
tElPM0NE
Temple-Emaqu-EI Box Office 538-2503.e.i u
\n Ave Miami Beach. Fla 33139
Lawren '' ""' p'*i,de'11
1701 Washing*
'.it>0'


Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
, -As he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day; and he lifted
up hi* eyes and looked, and, lo. three men stood ever against him "
(Genesis 18.1-2).
VAYERA
VAYERA God appeared to Abraham as he sat at the door of
his tent in the heat of the day. Lifting up his eyes, Abraham
beheld three men (actually, angels in the form of men). Abraham
ran toward them, took them into his tent, and treated them
hospitably. One of the angels foretold that in a year Sarah would
bear a son. The other angels went on to Sodom to destroy the city
because of its wickedness; only Lot, Abraham's righteous
nephew, was to be saved. God revealed this plan to Abraham, who
pleaded that Sodom be saved for the sake of the righteous persons
living in it. But it turned out that Sodom could not be saved -
thire were not 10 righteous persons in the whole city. Lot was
saved, and lived in a cave. There his two daughters bore him two
s-.ns: Benammi. or Ammon. and Moab. In fulfillment of the
angel's prophecy, Sarah bore a son. who was named Isaac. When
the lad grew up. God tested Abraham's devotion by bidding him
offer Isaac as a sacrifice. Abraham prepared to carry out God's
t ..i.iinjr; at the last moment, an angel intervened, and Isaac was
saved Abraham had passed the hardest trial of all
The recounting of the Weakly Porl.on o( the Law is e.trected ana based
T*e Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage, edited by P Woliman
'samir $15. published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maider
L"e New York. NY 10038 Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Bar Mitzvah
Pacesetter Dinner
Continued from Page 1-B
ing groups and brought together
to perform at the General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations held earlier this
month in Chicago. "Orot
Haschuna's" Miami debut is part
of a performing tour that will take
the group all over the United
States.
"The Pacesetter Dinner is a
way in which we annually
recognize our major workers and
fivers to the Campaign said, Max-
ine E Schwartz, Pacesetter Divi-
sion Chairman. She added,
"Pacesetter-level contributors are
those who are truly committed to
the Jewish community, both local-
ly and worldwide."
The Pacesetter Dinner Dance
will begin with cocktails at 6:30
p.m. with dinner to follow.
Dietary laws will be observed.
Maxine E. Schwartz is Paceset-
ter Division Chairman, Ezra Katz
is Pacesetter Division Vice Chair-
man and Roberta Segal is serving
as Dinner Chairman.
Professor Of Hebraic Studies At Barry
The graduate program of
Jewish Studies, Barry University,
will present a guest lecture by
Prof Leon Feldman, Monday
evening, Dec. 1. in Wiegand Lec-
ture Hall. 7:30 p.m.
Professor of Hebraic Studies at
Rutgers University will speak on
"Diversity in Unity: Sefardim and
Ashkenazim The Lessons of
History."
Prof. Feldman received or-
thodox rabbinic ordination from
the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary of Yeahiva
University. He is the possessor of
three doctorates: a doctorate of
Hebrew letters from Yeshiva
University, a doctorate of
theology from the University of
Amsterdam, and a doctorate of
philosophy from Columbia
University
Prof. Feldman has been
honored with numerous awards
for his contributions to Jewish
scholarship, including the
prestigious Jerusalem prize for
literature and Jewish thought. His
eight books and many learned ar-
ticles have established him as one
of the premier Jewish historians
in the United States.
The lecture is open and free to
the public.
Jason Postelnek
JASON POSTELNEK
Jason Postelnek. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Marc Postelnek will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, November 22, at 10:45
a.m., at Temple Beth Sholom.
Miami Beach
Rabbi Gary Glickstein will of-
ficiate. Jason is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5749.
Jason will be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah not only for
himself but also for Eugeney
Levenshtein, a Soviet Refusenik
who has been denied the freedom
to live his life in the Jewish
tradition.
AVI KASHUB
Avi Kaahub, son of Rachel and
Morris Kaahub will be called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day. November 22, at Temple
Adath Yeshurun, 1025 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive, North
Miami Beach.
The celebrant is a student in the
Adath Yeshurun Judaica High
School. He attends JFK Junior
High School where he is in the 8th
grade. Avi received a scholarship
to the Judaica High School, and he
plays the organ beautifully.
Mr. and Mrs. Morris and Rachel
Kaahub will host the Kiddush
following the services in honor of
the occasion. Special guests will
include his sister Carol and her
husband. Bud Monsur from Israel;
Mr. and Mrs. Shulman from Israel
and Mr. and Mrs. Osher
("ham in sky
Stanford Begins
Jewish Studies Program
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) -
A Jewish studies program was
founded this autumn at Stanford
University, Palo Alto, Calif. A
centerpiece of the program is the
20.000-volume Judaica library
purchased from Prof. Salo Baron
of Columbia University.
J* Israel Histadrut Campaign of South
t.l'Pda held its annual ,'Chai" Luncheon
dedicated to the memory of Irving Gordon, the
^mediate former director of the Israel
Hittadrut Campaign of South Florida. A
5e7rtuc/ Memorial, "The Irving Gordon
laboratory for Optics" will be established at
the Ha'amit. "Amal" School in Rishon Le-
zion, Israel Left to right: Elliott Engelbaum,
Executive Director, Harold Bauman, Lun-
cheon Chairman, Sue Gordon, wife of former
director Irving Gordon, Joseph Walker, Ex-
ecutive Vice Chairman and David Silverbush,
Chairman.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:12 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Garden* Drive
North Miami Beach 947 14J5
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
'$?
Mlnyln 7 30m 4 5 15 pm
Sat Sun I a.m. 4 5 15 p m
Frt. I p.m wi Bat Mima**
Dmoi Sllvar Sal. 130 am
Bar Mltnan *l KttnuO
TEMPLE BETH AM
SBS0 N. Kendall Or.
S Miami BB7-BM7
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolmen
Frt. 8:1 i p.m Rabbi Baumgard will tpaat
on -Rrarrtiea Raahaad. Hare or HuHmrT'
Sai i s m Be Mitzvah Rom Kalo.i
Sat. 11:11 am Bar Mim.h Mart QoMatam
Sarmon topic: "Oed Win Provida
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
53*7213- 534 7214
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi ("ST".
Mosne Buryn. Cantor >.1f )
Sergio Grobier. President
Sholem Epeibaum. President.
Religious Committee
t
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Mav*li Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalal ShaBbal 5 pm.
Sal. 9 a.m Or Irving lanrman win praacri
Cantor Yahuda Shllman will chant
Bar Mltnan Laonard Scotl Feuer
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beech
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schif t
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue BS4-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert. (
Cantor v
Rev. Milton Freemen.
Ritual Director
w
Mlnchah S:15 p.m Sat
Sat t. m
DaHy aarv Sun. am t 5 JO p.m
Moo 4Thur 7 10 a.m 4 5 10pm
Tuaa.. Wad. B Frt. 7 44 a.m. a 510 p.m.
Sat. I am a '. h. before aunaat.
BETHKOOESH
Conearaethie
1101 S.W 12Ava
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joeeph Kriaaei
Roee Berlin E xi
85*6334
ecutlva Secretary
Sabbath Sarvtcaa 5 a.m
Shtoah Saudoa. Mlncha. Sat 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33111
881 5506 Conservative
Or. Israel Jecobe. Rabbi _.
Or Joseph A Qorilnkai (#>
Rabbi Emerltut -%'
Moshe Frtedler, Cantor
Fftapj*
Sal 5am
Bar Mitzvah: Cralg Mian
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave MB. FL 331:
'el 536-4112
Rabbi Or Jeftuda Metber
Cantor Nlssim Benyemtni
Daily aarvicaa S am. and 7pm
Sat 115am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2801 rh
Rabbi David H. Auerbach V '
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fn npjhi Family aarv p.m Gradat 5 4 8
Irom Solomon Schachtar Day School will
partlclpata Sat tXi.n aarv
TEMPLE b"Wsh6lOM MB '.Mi
Chase Ave. *41et St. Lew*!
OB If ON KROMISM, FaMtyHiB Sw Rabbi
GARY A QLICKSTCIN. Rabbi
MARRV JOLT. AuiHIary Rabbi
PAUL D C AFl AN. Aaalatani Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID COMVtSCR
Sabbath aarv Frt ft:IS p m Rabbi Gary
Giicfcatem wM apaak on "Seaino Arab* 4 Jaw*
WrthOpanEyat
Sal 10 45 a m Bai Mitrvan jor^P"itin_
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Dr Mai A Lipschitz Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
DaHy Sarvtcaa Mon.-Frt 7:10 a.m > >
4 5 >0pm V
Sat tai.ml411i.ai
Sun l.m asp-m
p.m
Lata
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami % Pionaar ^utofm CongrrgMlfOn
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Racheile F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
FrlJ pjw. Ouwnauwii: Rabbi HaaaaN Bamat
tmrrworatiori. What Wa Prorrwaad. Whara To
Draw tha Una'- Forum utunjy- Cantor
RiehiBi F. Mill nit. Kanda* Rabbi Raa 0.
Fartalar "Riuajaaalu Tanaa UbjRjr Marvay
Kaufman. CaMortal SokaM.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada
Coral Oahln BB7 M67
Michael 0. EJeenatat. Rabbi
Frt. Worehtp Sarvlca 30 p.m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
I Frt. 30 pm
Sat ISC. m
Onag Shabbat will follow
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Ari Fridkis. Assoc. Rabbi
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. lam Sabbath tarvtca
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
am and ft p.m
Sat lam and 5 15 pm
m
TEMPLE NER TAMIO
7*02 Cartyle Ave
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Ertward Klein
Daily Sarvtcaa Sam and 5 10 p.m
Sat ft 45 am Frt lata tarvtca ft p.r
WJ
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd SI
North Miami Beach
661 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
362 0696
Rabbi Harshel Becker wmdv-n o.mooo.
Sal 1 Ma m aarvica >i
Tampla Samu El
9353 SW 152 Ava .
SoiN Kandali Di
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ave
North Dedes Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay Administrator
Frt. p.m. Now mambar Sabbath
Sat. 10 a m aarv
Bat MlUvah Sujann* Hoaan
TEMPLE ZION IbMAtLUE CENTER
8000 Miller Or Conservative
2712311 /S.%
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi m>)
Benjamm Adler. Cantor v-^>
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7am Monday 4 Ttturaday
Sunday ft a.m Fn BiSp.m
Sat. I a.m. Sabbath Sarvlca
TaMMrChapal


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
. Former Israeli Vice Consul
Convicted Of Conspiracy
David Mordechai. a former
Israeli vice consul in charge of
security for El Al Airlines in
Miami, was convicted Monday of
conspiracy and of helping a con-
victed con man escape to Israel in
exchange for $125,000.
Mordechai. 29. was ordered by
U.S. District Judge Eugene P.
Spellman to be imprisoned after
the verdict. Judge Spellman said
that there was a "substantial
risk" that Mordechai might flee
otherwise. Sentencing is set for
Jan. 7.
Mordechai was acquitted of an
additional charge of helping con-
victed swindler Gurdon Wolfson
avoid sentencing in federal court
by arranging his flight to Israel.
Over a period of three days, the
jury deliberated the case.
Mordechai now faces up to five
years for the conspiracy charge
and a maximum of 87 years for ar-
ranging Wolfson's escape, which
caused Mordechai to become an
accessory to Wolfson's crimes
In February. 1986. Wolfson was
convicted of 34 counts of mail
fraud tor urging some 10,000 in-
vestors to give him an estimated
$56 million for fake gas and oil
leases.
On April 8. 1986. Wolfson failed
to appear for sentencing. Five
days earlier. Mordechai and
Wolfson took an El Al flight
bound for Tel Aviv. Wolfson. in
absentia, was sentenced Monday
to 20 years in federal prison. He
was arrested in Israel and ordered
extradited two weeks ago.
Wolfson appealed, pleading
illness.
Mordechai denied ever taking
$125,000 from Wolfson, whom he
described as "a very warm Jewish
person, an elderly Jewish man
who could be my grandfather."
He said he met Wolfson through
another man. James Baror. who
pleaded guilty to mail fraud in
Wolfson's case.
During the Mordechai trial.
Baror told the jury that he
delivered the $125,000 to
Mordechai and was to have receiv-
ed half, but Mordechai only gave
him $20,000.
Obituaries
BARASCH
Irene, 77. of North Miami, passed away
November 16 Survived by her aon. Jerome
and Marty (Elena), brother. Jack Baum.
pmndchiJdren. Michael. Stacy and Petuue
She was a lone tim* employee of the
Greater Miami Jewiah Federation. Service*
were held at Levitt-Weinatein. North Miami
Beach
JAFFE. Charles. Rubin Zilbert
LEVINE. Yetta of Coconut Creek.
November 15 Levitt Weinatein
NERENBl'RG. Sofia of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert.
RfBIN. Irvine T of North Miami Beach.
November 14. The Riverside
SWIMMER. Joseph Rubin Zilbert
ASHER. Ben C 76. of Bay Harbor Island*.
November 11. Service* in New York
LAZARUS. Rubin (Ruby). 64 of North
Miami Beach. November 12 The
Riverside
WASHKOWrrZ. Rose. 71. of Kendall.
November 12 Semcea were held
ENGLEMAN. Anatole Rubin Zilbert
GORFINKEL. Sonia Rubin Zilbert
SCHIMMEL. Samuel, of North Miami
Beach. November 12 The Riverside
SOBEL. Molly. 78. of Miami Beach.
November 12 The Riverside
SPIELMAN. Anna, of Miami The River
side Interment at Mt Nebo Cemetery
RRESLAR. Abraham. 83, of North Miami
Beach. November 17 Menorah Chapels
FRIED. Alex. 83. of North Miami.
November 18 The Riverside
GOLDBERG. Jules, 86. of Miami Beach
November 17 The Riverside
LICHT. Eiias. 77. of Miami Miami Beach
Levitt Weinatein
SILVERBERG. Theresa F 85. November
11 Services were held in New Haven.
Conn
Beatrice Stepkin, 73, Passes
Sanctions Against Syria Approved By
11 Of The 12 EEC Member-States
Beatrice Stepkin, a dedicated
Dade County elementary school
teacher for 37 years, died
November 13 of a stroke. She was
73.
Originally from West Blockton.
Ala.. Mrs. Stepkin arrived in
Miami with her father on
Thanksgiving Day in 1924. The
family settled in what is now
downtown Miami.
In 1930, Mrs. Stepkin
graduated from Miami High and
then in 1932 from the University
of Miami with a degree in educa-
tion. She taught first and second
graders at Highland Park. Buena
Vista. Coral Way and Coral Ga-
bles elementary schools.
During World War II. Mrs.
Stepkin volunteered to help
wounded soldiers being treated at
the Biltmore in Coral Gables and
assisted in draft registration. Sh-
received two honorary citations
for her work during the war from
Presidents Roosevelt and
Truman.
In 1985. the Dade County
School Board Centennial Commit-
tee chose Mrs. Stepkin as a
representative to contribute to
The Miami Herald's story- on 100
years of education in Dade County
for its 75th anniversary edition.
Mrs. Stepkin was a member of
the Dade County Retired
Teachers Association, the Order
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Eleven
of the 12 European
Economic Community
(EEC) member-states
agreed last Monday (Nov.
10) to sanctions against
Syria on the basis of Bri-
tain's charge that the
Damascus government was
involved with terrorist acts.
Only Greece refused to con-
demn Syria or vote for the four-
point sanctions program at the
EEC's Ministers Conference in
London, hooted by British
Foreign Secretary Sir Geoffrey
Howe. The sanctions themselves
are consideral ly less than Britain
demanded al an earlier EEC
Ministers OCM erence in Luxem-
bourg last month.
THEY CALL for a total ban on
arms sales to Syria: suspension of
high-level exchange visits bet-
ween Syria and EEC countries;
police survi' :lance of Syrian
diplomatic missions: and security
controls on the Syrian Arab
Airlines.
Britain broke diplomatic rela-
tions with Syna on Oct. 24. after
charging that the Syrian Am-
bassador in London and his staff
acted in collusion with Nezar Hin-
dawi. the Jordanian national con-
victed of attempting to smuggle
explosives aboard an El Al airliner
at Heathrow Airport last April 17.
At the Luxembourg meeting.
Howe had urged his EEC part-
ners to follow Britain's lead, or at
very least recall their Am-
bassadors from Damascus. In
London last Monday, he agreed to
accept watered-down sanctions in
order, reportedly, to overcome
the objections of Spain. Italy.
France and West Germany.
THE EEC Council of Ministers
will set up an ad hoc working com-
mittee to implement the sanc-
tions. But they are not considered
likely to do Syria much harm. The
ban on Western arms sales, the
strongest measure, will be more
than offset by the Soviet Union,
which has long been Syria's major
supplier of weapons and military
equipment.
France stopped arms shipments
' Syria last March, and Britain
has sold only $20 million worth of
equipment to Syria over a three-
year period, mainly communica-
tions equipment which Syria can
easily obtain elsewhere.
Prime Minister Jacques Chirac
of France and Chancellor Helmut
Kohl of West Germany agree to
back Britain while preserving
relations with Syria. France went
along despite an announcement by
a pro-Syrian group in Beirut that
it would release three French
hostages within 24 hours. Two of
the hostages were released last
Tuesday. Extremist Shiite groups
in Lebanon with close links to
Syria and Iran still hold eight
French nationals hostage.
Monday's decision to impose
sanctions on Syria took the form
of "the President's statement"
because Greece's refusal breached
the unanimity required of all EEC
joint decisions. Howe is the cur-
rent President of the Council of
Ministers.
Writer Yuri Suhl Dead At 78
NEW YORK (JTA) Yuri
Suhl. a novelist, poet and
biographer who was active in the
civil rights and peace movements
and the preservation of Yiddish
cutlure. died in Oak Bluffs. Mass..
on Nov 8 at the age of 78. He had
lived in New York City and Mar
tha's Vineyard.
Suhl authored four books of Yid-
dish verse. He was best known for
his English works, which included
"They Fought Back." a history of
Jewish resistance in Nazi-
occupied Europe during World
War II. published in 1967
He was the author of 10 books
for children, one of which. "Simon
Bloom Gives a Wedding." receiv-
ed the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award
in 1972. He also wrote a
biography of Ernestine Rose, the
Jewish woman pioneer in the suf-
fragette movement, and two
autobiographical novels. "One
Foot in America" and "Cowboy
on a Wooden Horse."
Suhl became controversial for
his efforts to prevent the execu-
tion of Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg, convicted for giving
atomic secrets to Soviet spies. He
became a trustee of the
Rosenberg Children's Trust Fund.
Suhl was also an outspoken critic
of the persecution of Jews in
Poland and the Soviet l/nion. He
identified himself politically as a
Socialist.

: :
S5':0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
of Eastern Star, the Women',
Shnners the Young Women's
Hebrew Association of Dade and
co-chairman of the Miami Hirf,
Reunion Committee.
She is survived by her daughter
Roberta Schulte; brother Judge
Sam Silver and two
grandchildren.
Services were held.
ASKOWITZ. Lewis. 82 of Mum:
November 16 Service* were rvt-i.:
MONCARZ. Sara. 84. of Miami M
November 17 The Riverside
STERN. Betty J of Miami. Hiiiaroliai n
The Riverside
FOX. Philip. 81. of Miami Beach November
14 The Riverside
CASH. Dorothy E. 90. of Miami Notaajbw
17 The Riverside
SCHIFF Anne, of Miami Bearh Rubin
Obart.
rUTEBNICK, Enka 6v of Mian
November 14 The Riverside
HAUSMAN. Bernard. 74 f Mum;
November 14 Services were held
Hl'BERMAN Mrs Marreila of Mha
Beach Rubtn-Zibert
MARCIS Irvine of North Miarr.. Heart.
Rubin Zilbert
SHECTMAN. Ada of Naranja Laki
vices were held
APPELMAN Stuart David. 43 at Miami
November IS Service* were '.e I
KELZ. Florence. 85. of Miarr. Reart
Rubin Zilbert
KLEIN. Eufene (Jack). 83. of Miami Bsadi
November 15 The Riverside
RINGER. Silvia. 88. of Kendall. November
12. Service* ware held
SANDLER. John. 77. of North Mum.
Beach November 12 The River;o>
RACHLIN Martin. 93. of Miami Bearh
November 13 The Riverside
Wll.l.IG Fannie Pearl of Nortt Bty
Village November 13 The RivrrxMe
we have become the largest Jewish
Family ownttt jnd operated
Funeral (hupel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
< jMBA. O'BK 'C "
oa* ai at I *
a*M *
.,s-
865-2353 w k ..
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SI1UIITZ BROTHUS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532'209B
Browjrd Count)
532-2099
M. |i'. -^ nti-ii '.\ Hah.hIi Mcimarisl< haprl lm
New York: i_!IS)MI 7wiurns Blwi & Mat K.i Per** Ha* N >


Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Organization News
Sovereigns Lodge of B'nai B'rith will
meet at 8 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 20 in the
Recreation Building at 6851 S.W. 147
Avenue. Special guest will be William F.
Saul son.
North Miami Chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women will meet at the North Miami Com-
munity Center, N.E. 16 Avenue at 123
Street, on Tuesday, at 1 p.m. William F.
Saulson will speak about ADL Today.
Saulson, family consultant and vice presi-
dent of Riverside Memorial Chapel, is direc-
tor of the Speakers Bureau, a community ser-
vice of Riverside.
I.R. Goodman Chapter of Hadassah Oneg
Shabat will be held on Saturday, Dec. 6 at 1
p.m. at the Hadassah Region Office. The
hostess will be Anna Kaplan.
Masada Chapter of Hadassah will have
many of its members attending the L'Chaim
Luncheon at the Radisson Mart Hotel, featur-
ing guest speaker. Deborah Kaplan, the Na-
tional Hadassah Treasurer, on Dec. 14, at 11
a.m. A minimum pledge of $350 is required.
Lil Klugerman is in charge.
Masada Chapter of Hadassah will hold its
monthly meeting on Monday, Dec. 22, at
Adath Veshurun. A candlelighting ceremony
will be held. A skit prepared by Rose Model,
program chairperson on "Dr. Naomi on Sex
and Hadassah, will be presented.
A viva Chapter of Hadassah is celebrating
Hadassah's 75th Anniversary with a Big Gifts
Dinner on Sunday, at the home of Ruth and
Irwin Marmorstein honoring the Founders:
Fredi and Ray Applebaum, Sandee and Alvin
Burger, Gloria and Harvey Friedman, Sylvia
and Morris Herman, Janet and Robert
Kramer, Pauline and Alfred Lewis, Linda and
.lules Minkes and Elayne and Moie Tendrich.
Proceeds from this event will benefit the
Hadassah Medical Organization.
The dinner is chaired by Elaine Selig and
Irene Sholk. Jean Vogel, President of A viva,
announces that Dr. Mordecai Globus will be
the guest speaker.
Albert Einstein Chapter of Hadassah
Thanksgiving weekend starts Thursday, Nov.
27 at the Shelbourne on the Beach.
Congressman Larry Smith will be honored
with the Women's League for Israel's
Humanitarian Award at the annual "Chain of
Life" luncheon on Dec. 8, at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour Hotel in Miami at 11:30 a.m.
A fashion show by Barbara Katz will be
presented.
Beth David Congregation Sisterhood will
hold its annual Winter Flea Market on Sun-
day, Dec. 7, from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., in the
parking lot, 2625 S.W. 3rd Ave.
A Chanukah Latka Party and Shopping
Bazaar at the Beth David Early Chile hood
Center, will start at 11:30 a.m. Children's
Singer and Dancing, Face Painting, and holi-
day shopping are on the program.
Amit Women Maaada Chapter has once
again arranged a Thanksgiving week-end at
the Saxony Hotel on Miami Beach from
Wednesday, through Sunday, Nov. 30. This
annual event is chaired by Ross Bassman.
Amit Women Migdal Chapter will have a
luncheon meeting on Wednesday, at 12:30 in
the auditorium of Forte Towers. Miami
Beach. Refreshments will be served with a
book review presented by Sophie Primak.
Amit Women Geula Chapter meets on
Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m. in the Jewish Com-
munity Center, Miami Beach.
Amit Women Shoahana Chapter will meet
on Tuesday, Nov. 25 at noon in the state room
of Seacoast Towers. A special Thanksgiving
luncheon will be served and a book review by
Sophie Primak.
Amit Women Simcha Chapter will meet in
Winston Towers on Monday, at noon. Enter-
tainment and refreshments.
South Dade Chapter of Women's
American ORT will meet Tuesday for lunch
at 10:30 a.m. at the Kendall Acres Clubhouse.
Holiday Bazaar, sponsored by the Golds-
tein Hebrew Academy, will be held on Sun-
day. Dec. 7 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 12401
S.W. 102 Avenue. Featuring games, rides,
food and entertainment, the bazaar will host
numerous vendors with holiday gift items,
crafts, plants and books.
The Institute of Human Relations of The
American Jewish Committee Award Dinner,
honoring WLTV Channel 23, is set for
Wednesday, Dec. 10 at the Biscayne Bay
Marriott Hotel with cocktails at 6:30 p.m.
General Manager Joaquin Blaya will accept
the award for WLTV Channel 23.
The Institute of Human Relations of the
American Jewish Committee conducts
research, education and training in the broad
area of urban and intergroup affairs, in-
cluding interreligious programs, group identi-
ty, housing and social welfare. Its staff is
comprised of specialists in community rela-
tions, education, law, social science, research,
social work, religion, communications and the
mass media.
Dinner coordinators are William A.
Gralnick, Julie Russin and Lawrence Cohen.
Shaare Zedek South Florida Women's
Committee kosher luncheon meeting
Wednesday at 11:45 a.m. at the Shelborne
Hotel. Installation of officers; a slide presen-
tation of Anne Frank's personal papers,
courtesy of American Savings.
Israel Histadrut Foundation will hold an
opening brunch on Sunday. Dec. 7 at 11:30
a.m. at the Seville Hotel.
This special event will mark the return of
Dr Sol Stein, founder and president, to the
Miami Beach area. Dr. Stein, who recently
returned from Israel, will lecture on the topic:
"Will Israel's Unity Government Survive
Rotation and Next Elections? and .
New Winds Over West Bank0"
Arts And
Entertainment
An intriguing look into the heart of South
Florida's widely-acclaimed Miami City Ballet will
bow on Saturday, at 8 p.m. when Artistic Director
Edward Villella introduces the provocative new
Colony Series at Lincoln Road's Colony Theatre.
The Colony Series is being funded in part by the
Miami Beach Visitor and Convention Authority
and Southern Bell. This funding makes it possible
to offer the programs for $5 each on a general ad
mission basis. Tickets are available at the Colony
Theatre Box Office or by calling Select-A-Seat.
University of Miami's 60th Anniversary will be
celebrated at a gala concert extravaganza, featur
ing six decades of music performed by student and
faculty musicians from the UM School of Music,
the University's founding school.
The concert will be held Tuesday. Dec. 2. at 8
p.m. in the main auditorium of the University of
Miami/James L. Knight International Conference
Center.
Temple
News
Young Israel of Greater Miami Lecture
Series will present Rabbi David Lehrfield on
the life of King Solomon on Tuesday evening
at 8 p.m. at the synagogue.
Temple King Solomon will begin Friday
night services this evening at 7:30 p.m. in-
troducing Rabbi Marvin Rose, new spiritual
leader. Cantor Shoshanah Raab will be
featured in cantorial melodies. An Oneg
Shabbat will follow.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Board member Norman
Weiner works hard on the "1986'/i" phonathon raising funds for
the Combined Jewish Appeal Campaign. The phonathon raised
approximately $85,000 for the 1986 Campaign.
Dr. Yecheskiel Cohen, Director of B'nai B'rith Womens
Children's Home in Israel and Irma Gertler, president of B'nai
B'rith Women will be aboard the S.S. Galileo, Port of Miami at
noon Friday in conjunction with a benefit for the BBW
Children's Home.
American Technion Soviety
Of Miami To Present A Gala
The American Technion Socie-
ty. Greater Miami Chapter
presents. "A Gala Nite of Fan-
tasies and Illusions." Saturday.
Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. at the
Fontainehleau-Hilton Hotel.
Miami Beach
A cocktail party and dinner will
l>e held in the Fontaine Room,
i-a Cage Aux Folles" will be
presented in the I.aRonde
Nightclub.
Al Isaacson is dinner chairman
for the event. Jay E. Leshaw is
president. The dinner committee
consists of: Robert Bakerman;
Stanley Barnett; Yehuda Ben
Horin; Marshall H. Berkson; Ben
Botwinick; Gary Dix. Dr George
Feldenkreis; Rabbi Simcha Freed
man; Rep. Michael Fiedman; Mur-
ray M. Friedman: Allan Fuller;
Martin Gelb: Gary Gerson; Jerrold
Goodman: Norman Gorson;
Abraham Grunhut; .lack Katz-
man; Morris Mirsh; .Ion Kislak;
Shirley Knox; Keith Kovens; Rab-
bi Irving Lehrman; S. Michael
Levin; Harry A. Levy. Hank
Luria; Bernard Marko; Stephen
Nagin; Peggy Nye; Arthur
Rosichan; Goodwin Salkoff; Dr.
Arthur Shapiro; Sol C. Shaye;
Larry Shoot; Lou Stein; Paul
Steinberg. Sam B. Topf; Harvey
W'eidenfeld; Frances Weinstein;
Hv Wiener and Walter Winshall.
'V Panamerican Maccabean Games'
Hebraica Miami Community
Center will be celebrating its "V
Panamerican Maccabean Games."
The opening ceremony of the
special event will be held at the
Miami Beach Convention Center,
on Saturday, at 7 p.m.
More than 700 participants will
compete in a variety of sport
events starting with the Conven-
tion Center parade, representing
South American countries.
America and the Jewish Com-
munity Center of North Miami
Beach.
Children In Distress
Luncheon December 6
Children In Distress, a volun-
tary support organization for the
Division of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry. University of Miami
School of Medicine, will sponsor a
Tropicana Holiday, Luncheon and
Fashion show, Saturday. Dec. 6 at
the Doral-On-The-Ocean Michele
Leblang, who is president of the
group, said the party will kickoff
with a cocktail reception at 11:30
a.m. Luncheon will follow.
Chairperson is Ann Schlossberg
and co-chairpersons are Martha
Crown, Renee Levy, Charlotte
Getz and Hildene Potashnick.
Honoree is Margie Feldman.
The folkloric Israeli dance group
"Naguila" and Haprachim of the
center will offer a special program
of dances.
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. M-48128
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE The marriage of:
FRANCOIS AUGUSTUS
Petitioner/husband
and
MARIELLE AUGl'STIN
Respondent/wife
TO: MARIELLE AUGUSTIN
Residence Unknown
YOU. MARIELLE AUGUSTIN,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the peti-
tioner's attorneys. Law Office of
HERMAN COHEN & ROBERT S
COHEN. 622 S.W. 1st Street,
Miami. Fla. 33130. on or before
December 12. 1986. or else petition
will be confessed.
Witness my hand and seal of this
Court, at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this November 6. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
dark. Circuit Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
12360 November 14. 21.28:
December 5. 1986


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PBOKBTY) '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* Ne. M-4MM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
SYLVIA LEVINE
and
HAROLD LEVINE
TO: HAROLD LEVINE
Raaadsncs Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to aerve a copy of your writ-
tan defenses, if any. to it on JOY
BARK AN. attorney for Petitioner.
whoae addreaa is 2020 N.E. 163rd
Street North Miami Beach.
Florida, and file the original with
the dark of the above styled court
on or before December 12. 1966:
i a default will be entered
: you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
Thia notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
thia 6 day of November. IMS.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12362 November 14. 21.28;
December 5.1986
in the cntcurr court for
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nsanber ew-4273
DtviaiaaM
IN RE ESTATE OF
WILLIAM POLAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The sdministraoori of the estate
of WILLIAM POLAN. deceased.
File Number 88-6273. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dreaa of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami Florida 33130. The
names and sddr.....of the per-
sonal ispiseantirivs and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with thia court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of thia Notice has
begun on November 14, 1986.
Personal Representative:
IRENE MARIE POLAN
6770 Indian Creek Dnve
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHAEL A DRIBIN. ESQ.
CYPEN. CYPEN A DRIBIN
P.O. Bos 402099
I Beach. FL 33140
(306) 532 3200
12351 November 14. 21. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deamng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Software Solutions at
8860 S.W 123rd Ct Apt. K 103
Miami. Florida 33186 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court at Dade Coun-
ty. Fkmde-
Software Solutions
Michael A Frank
Attorney for Software Solutions
12363 November 21. 28.
Decembers. 12 1986
NOTICE UNDEB
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deamng to
in business under the fie
name QUEEN OF MEATS
N.W 27 Avenue. Miami.
County. Florida. 33142 in
leads to register said name with
the Clerk at the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
FacundoP. Gnnralss
MM November 21. 28.
r 5. 12. 1986
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 88-438*1 (CA 27)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI.
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
AGUSTIN DOMINGUEZ and
CARMEN DOMINGUEZ. his
wife.
Defendants.
TO: AGUSTIN DOMINGUEZ and
CARMEN DOMINGUEZ. his wife
Residence unknown, if they are liv-
ing or if they are dead, to all par-
ties claiming interest by. through,
under or against the said
AGUSTIN DOMINGUEZ and
CARMEN DOMINGUEZ. and all
other parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property ir
Dade County. Florida:
Unit 4-4-A. of WEST
GABLES ESTATES CON
DOMINIUM NO. 4/4. accor
ding to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 9677. at Page 869. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith. Mack. Lewis and A
Allison. Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132. on
or before December 19. 1986. and
file the original with the Clerk of
thia Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
thia Court on die 14 day of
November. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clark of the Court
By Diana Campbell
Deputy Clark
12364 November 21. 28;
Decembers. 12. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 84-46449 FC26
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE The Mamage of
RICKY COLEY.
Petitioner
and
DE ETTA COLEY.
Respondent
TO DE ETTA COLEY
4037 N. Alaska
Portland. Oregon 97203
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenaaa. if any. to it on USHER
BRYN. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address 420 Lin
com Road Suite 309 Miami Beach.
FL 33139 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 19. 1986.
Otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 13 day of November 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN ESQ
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (309) 532-1156
12369 November 21, 28:
December. 5. 12.1986
NOTICE UNDEB
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in hiin as under the
fictitious name Jim Dooley Travel
at 7287 Bad Road. South Miami
Fla intends to register said name
with the Clark of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Travel Planners. Inc.
Marvin I Moss
Attorney for Travel Planners. Inc
12339 November 7 14.
21.28. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENEBAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 88-32889 CA 30
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI.
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
JOSE RAMON ARNAIZ. et al.
Defendants,
TO JOSE RAMON ARNAIZ and
LUIS AGUILERA LAFFAYA
Residence unknown, if they are liv-
ing or if they are dead, to all par-
ties claiming interest by, through,
under or against the said JOSE
RAMON ARNAIZ and LUIS
AGUILERA LAFFAYA and all
other parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Condominium Parcel
LANAI-2. in ARLEN KING
COLE CONDOMINIUM, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof,
recorded January 16. 1974. in
Official Records Book 8666.
at Page 940, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida; as amended,
together with all ap-
purtenances thereto, in-
cluding an undivided interest
in the common elements of
said Condominium as set
forth in the Declaration,
together with the parking
space assigned to said unit
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith. Mack. Lewis and A
Allison. Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132. on
or before December 19. 1986. and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise, s default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 13 day of
November. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By Dians Campbell
Deputy Clerk
12366 November 21. 28:
Decembers. 12. 1986
For Legal
Publication Forms
Call 373-4605
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FUe Nasaaer M 4604
Drrisisa 81
IN RE ESTATE OF
CEL1A FINKELSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CELIA FINKELSTEIN.
deceased. FUe Number 86-4604. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen
tative and the personal represen
tative'i attorney are set forth
below
All interested persons are re-
quired to fiat with thai court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom thai notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 21. 1986
Personal Representative:
SHIRLEY MARBLESTONE
180 Walnut Lane
Manhasset. New York 11030
Attorney for Personal
Representative
NELSON C KESHEN. ESQ
8906 Southwest 87th Avenue.
Suite 209
Miami. Florida 33176
Telephone (306) 596-1638
12372 November 21, 28. 1986
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaaer 88-2496
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FAY GINSBERG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FAY GINSBERG, deceased.
File Number 86-2496. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dreaa of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 21. 1986.
Personal Representative:
MICHAEL RICHARD BLUM
1966 Silver Bell Road
Eagen. MN 56122
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SAMUEL I. LEFF
LEFF PESETSKY A ZACK. P A
1367 N.E. 162 Street
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
Telephone: (306) 946-7601
'>i*i November 21, 28. 1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
Fue Nasaaer 84-4754
DrrawaaiM
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PHYLLIS NEUSTADTER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PHYLLIS NEUSTADTER,
deceased. File Number 88-4764. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dads County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
AD interested persons are re-
quired, to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice eras served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 14. 1986.
Personal Representative:
MURRAY NEUSTADTER
c/o Leff. Peseta*) A
Zaek. PA.
1367 N.E 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fla 33162
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Samuel I. Leff. Eaq.
c/o Leff. Peastaky A Zack. PA.
1367 N.E 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fla. 83162
Telephone: (306) 946-7601
12368 November 14. 21. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SEBVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 88-481 IS
FAMILY DIVISION 23
NOTICE FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CRISTINA C. ALVAREZ.
Petitioner
and
LUIS M. ACEITUNO
TO. LUIS M. ACEITUNO
Are. Principal San Luis
Qta. La Aecitunera
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
s copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MARC
POSTELNEK. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose addreaa is 407
Lincoln Road. Suite 10-B. Miami
Beach. FL 33139. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 29. 1986: otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida, on
this 18th day of Novennber. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clark
MARC POSTELNEK. ESQ.
407 Lincoln Road Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (306) 638-7210
Attorney for Petitioner
12370 November 21. 28;
December 5.12,1986
NOTICE UNDEB
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name AMPAC PROPER
TIES at 4906 SW 8th Street. Coral
Gables. FL 33134 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
PASTOR DE LA TEJERA
RENE MONTEAGUDO. JR
ERNESTO GUERRA
DAVID BLANCO
JORGE L BLANO
FRANK D CABEZA
MELVINJ ASHER
Attorney for Applicants
826 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 543
Miami. FL 33131
Tel 541 2686
IffM November 21. 28.
December5. 12, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 84-48949 07
IN RE The Mamage of:
JACQUELINE JORDAN
Petitioner,
and
LORENZO LEE JORDAN.
Respondent.
n> LORENZO LEE JORDAN.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before December 19, 1986. other
wide a default will be entered
November 13. 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
BY T CASAMAYOR
12360 November 21. 28.
Decembers. 12. 1986
IN THE CIBCUIT COUBT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FUe Nnaaber 88-4448
Dtviaisa 91
FB 973774
IN RE ESTATE OF
JULIET FRACKMAN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JULIET FRACKMAN.
deceased. File Number 88-6446. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagter Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative s attorney are sat
forth below
All interested persons are
required to file with thai court.
WITHIN THEE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested parson
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 21. 1986.
Personal Representative:
JULIAN E NEWBAUER
1800 N.E. 114th St. Apt. 1803
North Miami. Florida 33181
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HERBERT 8 SHAPIRO
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1886 79th St Cswy. No 608
Miami Beach. FL 38141
Telephone (306) 864 2369
12873 November 21, 28.198*
IN THE CIBCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaiaer 84-4247
DivisioaOJ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEWIS I SERBIN,
NOTICE OF ^***d
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS BAVMl
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL (rTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED k
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the adminatrv
bon of the estate of LEWIS I
SERBEN. deceased. File Number
86-6247(03), is pending in the Cir
cuit Court for Dade ( Florida, Probate Division, the id-
dress of which is 73 West Flajrler
Street. Miami. Florida 33131 The
personal representative of the
estate is JANETH SERBIN
whose address is to Kathleen
Markey. 1428 Bnekell Ave Suit*
700 Miami. FL 33131 The name
and addreaa of the ;-rsnr*
representative's attorney are let
forth below
AB persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION >,- THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state
ment of any claim or demand they
may have Each daim must be n
writing and must indicate the bass
for the chum, the name and ad-
dreaa of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the chum is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall bt
stated. If the daim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If the
daim is secured, the security ihiD
be described The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mad one copy to each per
sonal representative
AH parsons interested in the
estate to whom a copy >f this
Notice of Administration ksj beer
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OK THIS
NOTICE, to file any 'Ojeroow
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedents will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS
AND OBJECTION'S NOT SO F1L
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
November 21. 1986
JANETH SERBIN
As Personal Representative
af the Estate of
LEWIS I SERBIN
[leceasea
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Kathleen Markey
1428 Bnekell Avenue. Suite 700
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone (306) 371 9041
12371 November 21 19*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREB1 GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
tibous name FOODCRAFTERS
DISTRIBUTING CO FOOD-
CRAFTERS DISTRIBUTING
COMPANY at 3400 N W 67*
Street. Miami. FL 33147 intends
to register said name with *
Clark of the Circuit Court of Deov
County. Florida
FINE DISTRIrllTlN)'
CORPORATION
By IRVING FINE
PRESIDENT
LYNN W FROMBERC.
ESQUIRE
Attorney for FINE
DISTRIBUTING CORP) > RATIO
12325 uWobaTB
November 7. 14 -'1 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA
NOTICE IS HEREBY &TVW
that the undersignesi 1,s:"J*^
engage in business under the lie
tiuous name ELCHAVALatll"
S W 126 Place. Miami rlorw
33184 intends to register
iiame with the Clerk of the UK*
Court of Dade Count > noraw.
El fawlll In*'
Maria Julia Smith.
Treasurer
12367 November.!.*
December 5 IS. I*


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 16-B
rs THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
fflE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
(VriT OF FLOBIDA IN
;ND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-24452 CA-IS
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
10R1DA NATIONAL BANK.
^TRUSTEE FOR THE
OUSING FINANCE
1THORITY OF DADE
fcoNTV FLORIDA. UNDER A
1ST INDENTURE DATED
OF SEPTEMBER 1. 1983.
Plaintiff
et ml..
-
IGDALLA PEREZ.
lUGDALIA PEREZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against
UGDALIA PEREZ, and all
parties having or claiming to
have any right, title or
interest in the property
hereir. described.
ou are hereby notified that an
on to foreclose a mortgage on
Mowing property in DADE
rida:
trot 1 CONQUISTADOR
PARK CONDOMINIUM
PHASE I according to the
Declaratii r. of Condominium
thereof as recorded in
Official Records Book 11963,
Page 41* of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Tonda
been filed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
f written defenses, if any. to it
Sheppanl Faber. Attorney for
muff, whose address is Suite
I :>7" Madruga Avenue. Coral
. Florida 33146. on or before
remher 5 1986, and file the
nnal with the clerk of this court
ler before service on Plaintiffs
orney or immediately
rafter, otherwise s default will
ottered against you for the
? : lag .:: :he complaint
TTNESS ro) hand and the seal
'Jus court this 31st day of
|ooer, 1986
RICHARD 1" BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By VICTOR M BORRERO
A- I wputjl Clerk
W7 14.21,28. 1986
IlN THE CIRCUIT COURT
lOETHE 11TH JUDICIAL
I t'IRCMT. IN AND FOR
l\DECOUNTY. FLORIDA
lENERAI JURISDICTION
DIVISION
tiSE No S5-439S0 (CA 10)
|ri( E DE \CTIOS
jiILER FEDERAL SAVINGS
BLOAN ASSOCIATION
I
* ted Corporation,
I
I'STIN DOMINGUBZ and
PESI">MINGUEZ,
Ml
fondant*
> AGISTIN DOMINGUEZ
m CARMEN DOMINGUEZ.
wife Residence unknown, if
m) are living or if they are
af*". to parties claiming in-
rest by. through, under or
wnst the said AGUSTIN
WGUEZ and CARMEN
M.NGUEZ. and all other
"** having or claiming to
** any right, title or interest
senhed
l' Are NOTIFIED, that an
to foreclose a mortgage on
"owing described property in
County. Flonda:
I 4 B, of WEST
WBLES ESTATES CON
'MINIUM NO 4/4. actor
* o the Declaration of
["dominium thereof, as
f*,W '" Official Records
W*.W77. ,t p,^ gjg of
'Public Records of Dade
f"ty, Florida
*w filed against you and you
quired to ierve a copy of
"[""en defenses, if any. to it
" **<*. Lewis and Allison,
M"s attorneys, whose ad
I 111 NE 1st Street.
W- "orida 33132. on or before
Err 5. 1986. and file the
g*1 Kli the Clerk of this
m either before service on
Wr\lltorr*y or immediate
W"*Ur. otherwise, a default
Entered against you for the
^manded in the Complaint.
K->tss my hand and seal of
rjW on the 29 day of Oc-
"'HARD P BRINKER
Lt i2Sof cou"
WJOR M BORRERO
fVputy Clerk
November 7,14,21;
28, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-4*710-04
NOTICE OF 8UIT
MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE
Mfin
SOPHIE JACOBS
Plaintiff.
TS.
MOSHE LAHAV and JASON
MANAGEMENT. INC..
Defendants
YOU. MOSHE LAHAV.
residence unknown, are hereby
notified that a Complaint to
foreclose certain mortgages on the
following described property to
wit:
Unit No. 204. TALL TREES
CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium according to
the Declaration of
Condominium, as recorded in
Official Records Book 7933 at
Page 909 of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to the
Complaint on the Plaintiffs
attorney. BERNARD BOBER.
ESQUIRE. Leff Peaetaky A Zack.
PA.. 1367 NE 162nd Street.
North Miami Beach. Florida
33162. Telephone (305) 945-7501.
and file the original Answer or
Pleadings in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before
the 5th day of December, 1986. If
you fail to do so. judgment by
default will be taken against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint
THIS NOTICE shall be
published once each week for four
consecutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Florida, this 29th day of
October. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court. Dade County,
Florida
By C. P COPELAND
BERNARD BOBER. ESQUIRE
Leff Peaetsky A Zack. PA
Attorneys for Plaintiff
1367 NE 162nd Street
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
Telephone (306) 945-7501
12328 October 31.
November 7. 14. 21. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-48494-19
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE TDK MARRIAGE OF
CHOYCE 0 WIGGAN, wife.
and
IRVIN WIGGAN, husband
TO IRVING WIGGAN
1715 N Edgewood St
Philadelphia. PA 19151
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on ARTHUR H.
LIPSON. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 Northeast
167 Street, Miami. Florida 33162.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before December 29. 1986;
otherwise s default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 12th day of November. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12356 November 14. 21.28;
December 5. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name TROPICAL
PROCESS SERVERS at P.O. Box
145485. Coral Gables. Flonda
33114. intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
DENISE ABAD
ROBERT ABAD
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Applicants
825 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 543
Miami. Flonda 33131
Telephone: (305) 541 2585
12336 November 7. 14,21.28, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
File Number 84-31416
Division: 18
Florida Bar No. 210889
NOTICE OF ACTION-
DONALD N. APPLEBAUM,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GUENTHER J. SCHINAGL and
THOMAS J SCHINAGL.
Defendants.
TO: Guenther J. Schinagl and
Thomas J. Schinagl
A4690 36. Austria
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action to
Foreclose two Mortgages recorded
on June 14, 1983. in OR. Book
12641, Page 550, and at Page 553.
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Flonda. has been filed
against all known and unknown in-
terested parties. Said Mortgage
was recorded against the following
described real property, to wit:
Lot 6. Block 44. of Ocean
Beach Addition No. 3. accor-
ding tot he Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 2. Page
8. of the Public Records of
I>ade County. Florida.
As an interested party with some
claim in this action, you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
ABRAHAM A GALBUT. ES-
QUIRE. Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach. Flonda
33139. on or before December 5.
1986, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs Attorney of
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the circuit Court
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clerk
Dated this 27th day of October.
1986.
12827 October 31;
November 7. 14,21, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-42133 Sec.
20
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RF The Marnage of
LEROY GEORGE.
Petitioner Husband,
and
CLARA MAKIE GEORGE,
Respondent/Wife
TO Clara Mane George
10731 Scenic Highway
Baton Rouge. Louisiana
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marnage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Alan H Miller. Esq attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317. Miami,
Flonda 33189. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before December 5.
1986; otherwise s default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 30th day of October, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller, Esq
10700 Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
Telephone: (306) 238-1080
Attorney for Petitioner
12337November 7, 14. 21. 28. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under *' fic-
titious name HAPPY i^STA
PARTY PLANNING at 8550 W
Elagier Street, Suite 112B. Miami.
Florida 33144 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Euaebto Ribera
12345 November 7. 14. 21;
28.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE 8ERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-34187 CA 18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE:
OSCAR E THOMPSON.
Plaintiff,
vs.
POST LOAN CO. and
CHARLES E CURRY,
a Bondsman.
Defendants.
TO: POST LOAN CO
Last Known Address
5998 NW. 7th Avenue
Miami. FL.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Complaint to Quiet Title has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to served s copy of your
written defenses, if sny, to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK. at
torney for petitioner, whose ad
dress is 9400 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 300. Miami. FL
33156. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 12. 1986.
otherwise s default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4 day of November, 1966.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Victor M. Borrero
As Deputy Clerk -
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M NEWMARK.
ESQUIRE
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd.
Suite 300
Miami, FL 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305) 665-9775
12346 November 7. 14.21;
28. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT DV AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 84-44248 (26)
AMERICAN BRIESS CORPORA
TION AND CEREAL PRO
DUCTS CORPORATION.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
CERVECERIA REGIONAL,
C.A..
Defendant.
ACTION FOR DAMAGES AND
ATTACHMENT OF PROPERTY
WITHIN THE JURISDICTION
OF THE COURT
TO: CERVECERIA
REGIONAL. C.A..
Avenida 17
Nr. 112-113
Los Haticos
4001 Maricaibo.
Veneniela
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an Action for
Damages and Attachment of Pro-
perty within the Jurisdiction of the
Court to wit Three Hundred
Twenty One Thousand Six Hun-
dred Eighty Five and 28/100
($321,685.28) U.S. Dollars owned
by Cervecena C.A.. in an account
in the possession of Bankers Trust
International, 1 Biscayne Tower.
Suite 2300, Miami. Florida, has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if sny, to it on
Silver and Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326.
Miami. Florida 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 12. 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 4 day of November, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Victor M. Borrero
As Deputy Clerk
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Flonda 33131
Telephone: (306) 374-4888
12348
November 7, 14, 21. 28. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 84-48323 (23)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF
JACOB GOLDMAN
Husband/Petitioner
and
LUZ MARIA GOLDMAN
Wife/Respondent
TO: Lui Maria Goldman
621 NW 190 Street
Miami, Honda
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
MICHAEL P. CHASE, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
16924 NE. 19th Ave., North
Miami Beach, Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
December 12, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of November, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Flonda
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MICHAEL P CHASE
16924 NE. 19th Ave.
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
12355 November 14. 21.28;
December 5. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-46749
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SCOTT GRANT.
Peti tioner fH usband.
and
LISA MARIE GRANT.
Respondent/Wife
TO: LISA MARIE GRANT
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Irving
J. Whitman, Esquire, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 10651
North Kendall Drive, Suite 200,
Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 5, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29 day of October, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By JENNIS L RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Irving J. Whitman. Esquire
10651 North Kendall Dnve
Suite 200
Miami. Florida 33176
Attorney for Petitioner
12334 November 7. 14.21;
28. 1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
SS
COUNTY OF DADE
The undersigned, under oath,
says: It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterpnse under the
fictitious name of M.B.R.
Industries and M.B.R. located at
4600 NW 128th Street Road. Opa
Locks, FL 33054 in the City of
Miami, Dade County. Florida.
Those interested in said
enterprise, and the extent of the
interest of each, is as follows:
M.B.R. Industries. Inc..
100 percent
12364 November 14. 21. 28;
December 5. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-4842
Division 02
Fla. Bar No. 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEVERLY R. STIEFEL.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BEVERLY R. STIEFEL.
deceased, File Number 86-5842. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 14, 1986.
Personal Representative:
JAY STIEFEL, ESQ
1622 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON A FELDMAN, PA.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-5716
12353 November 14. 21, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-43208 ('A-08
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
AUGUSTO ROSADO. et ux et
al..
Defendants.
TO: AUGUSTO ROSADO and
MYRNA ROSADO, his wife
12944 S W. 48 Street
Miami. Flonda 33175
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 8, Block 11. ROY ALE
GREEN
TOWNHOUSE
SECTION FOUR,
according U> the Plat
thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 90. Page 38.
of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146. on or before
November 28. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 22nd day of
October, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
12323 October 31;
November 7.14.21.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PARKER PAGE
GROUP at 111 NW 183 St.. Suite
514, Miami, FL intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
By: Harry Harfenist.
Sole Owner
Attorney for Parker Page Group
Antonio Torrent. Jr.
Rossano, Torrent A Leyte-Vidal.
PA.
701 S.W. 27 Ave., Suite 625
Miami, FL 33135
Telephone: (306) 541-2266
12324 October 31;
November 7. 14.21.1984


torn 16-B The Jewish FToridian/Friday, November 21,1986
Hebrew Academy Dinner
Honors Fana Holtz
"Education was the most impor-
tant thing in our family," explains
Fana Holtz, who will be the
honored guest at tiie 39th Annual
Scholarship Dinner of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy on Dec. 7 at the Bis
cayne Marriott Hotel.
Growing up in her native
Havana. Cuba, with her two
brothers Oscar and Isaac, Fana
well remembers her parents'
stories of their fleeing the horrors
of Europe as youngsters. Coming
to Cuba in the 1930s. Salomon
and Rosa Sklar fell in love and set-
tled down to the business of
establishing a home, a new life in a
free society. They raised their
children in the tradition they had
brought with them. Fana and her
brothers grew up in a home where
education, learning and Jewish
living were valued above all.
"Our parents would talk to us
about how important it was to be
learned and educated. How proud
they were of our progress in
school; and our scholastic
achievements gave them the
greatest pleasure."
Fana and her brother Isaac
were students at the University of
Havana where Fana graduated
with a degree in Pharmacy and
Isaac as an architect. Upon
graduation, Abel Holtz. a young
and already successful attorney
came courting, and soon the
young couple were married.
Together they settled down to
what they dreamed would be a
beautiful, peaceful life.
But peace was not to be. All too
Holtz
soon there was talk of revolution
and the political climate became
very uneasy. Once again, Salomon
and Rosa Sklar and their family
would be forced to uproot
themselves to settle in another
land and start all over.
Nothing would deter this
unusual family. First, ar-
rangements were made for Oscar,
the youngest son, to continue on
with his education in the United
States at Pratt Institute in New
York, where he too was to
graduate as an architect.
Fana and Abel and their two
young sons, Daniel and Javier
just a babe in arms, arrived in
Miami in 1962. Young, energetic.
Less In The Line Of
Goods. More In Spirit
Coatiaaed from Page 1-B
stage of life" situation. In addition
to providing guidance and
counseling in the areas of health
care and bousing, there are
outings, seminars, newspapers,
and even summer camp for these
distinguished participants.
THESE SERVICES can be
taken advantage of by both
newcomers, and by those who
have been living in Israel for what
seems tike an eternity. Breslaw
added that there are now courses
offered in English on various sub-
jects ranging from history to
cooking in conjunction with local
universities' continuing education
programs.
Three special projects of the
Senior Division that Breslaw is
especially proud of have to do with
fundraising "There is the Jewish
National Fund Memorial Forest in
memory of those who fell in
Israel's wars or by terrorist at-
tacks," he said. Also: the Senior
Fund, set up for special activities
and needs of individuals who are
sick and homebound, and finally
the AACI Endowment Fund "All
branches raise money for local ac-
tivities, and the Senior Fund is
also empowered to give small
loans." Breslaw added.
Jobs are not readily available in
Israel for seniors, he conceded.
However, he noted thst "they are
at the stage of life where employ
rri'-nt is not a priority. Our seniors
a extremely active on a
vi unteer basis. According to
Breslaw, "seniors find a more
meaningful life in Israel even if
they have to do without a few
small the comforts.
THE APARTMENTS might
be smaller. Shopping as we do in
th. local shuk or market might be
man difficult than ordering by
telephone. There is usually no cen-
tral air-conditioning or central
heating, although room air-
conditioners snd heaters abound,
and our seniors msy experience s
kind of culture shock towards
their new surroundings."
But. said Breslaw, "That's
where the AACI comes in to
bridge the gap, to emphasize that
Zionism snd Jewish fulfillment,
where the Jewish people, you, are
the majority, can prevail and help
to overcome the trivial dilemmas
of dairy life."
Regarding hard, cold facts of
life, Breslaw explained that a
family of two can live on $650 a
month, not including rent or
clothing. Average rent can range
anywhere from $170 to $600 a
month, without electrical ap-
pliances. He added that most
seniors prefer to rent apartments
rather than to purchase.
Breslaw. a native of Jackson-
ville, Fla., is a graduate of the
Camdem Talmud Torah, the
Hebrew High School of
Philadelphia and Gratz College. In
addition, he studied at New York
University's School of Education
in Jewish Studies. Before im-
migrating to Israel in 1949,
Breslaw was principal of a
religious school amd executive
director of Habonim.
UPON ARRIVAL in Israel, he
took up the position of staff
academician at Katznelson In-
stitute in Kfar Sab* In 1953. he
was sent as an emissary to New
York to head up the Habonim mis-
sion and remained there for two
and half years.
Again in 1957. Breslaw spent
two years as executive vice presi-
dent of the Labor Zionist
Organization's American head-
quarters. Back in Israel he co-
authored a book entitled "Arise
and Build." the story of American
Habonim.
What is his message to
American Jewish Seniors? "Come
to Israel to live s full Jewish life
and participate in the great
challenge of restoring the Jewish
people to its old/new homeland."
intelligent, and vivacious, the
young couple were soon recogniz-
ed for their many talents. Abel
became associated with the
Carner Bank and after a rapid rise
through the ranks, he was soon
president of this own bank
Capital Bank, a position his son
Daniel holds today. Abel Holtz is
Chairman of the Board and Javier
a Vice President.
Having had a career in phar-
macy in Havana, Fana decided to
try a new direction in her profes-
sional life here in Miami and em-
barked upon a career in business.
Her many successes and
achievements are legendary and
are well recognized in the business
world by corporate and business
leaders.
The Holtz' are a very sharing
family. The merits of their suc-
cess, they feel, are not for
themselves only. They are promi-
nent members of Temple
Emanuel and their names appear
on the rosters of ever)- worthwhile
cause, not only in the Miami area,
but in national and international
organizations.
Recently, the Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross Hebrew Academy High
School Was dedicated as the Fana
Holtz High School. The dedication
and naming were the results of a
major gift to the Academy by Abel
in honor of Fana. It was the only
gift Fana had ever asked for.
Tradition and education play a
great part in Fana Holtz' outlook
on life. As she sees it, only an
education rooted in the traditions
of our past utilizing the
technologies of the future is a
worthwhile endeavor. This is what
the Hebrew Academy represents.
This is what the Academy was
recognized for when it was recent-
ly acclaimed ss a school which pro-
vides "Excellence in Education."
Fana Holtz, the excellent lady,
has formed s partnership with the
Hebrew Academy.
Historical Society Confab Theme:
Mosaic Jewish Life In Florida
"You don't have to be Southern
to belong to the Southern Jewish
Historical Society," says Janice
Blumberg, the society's im-
mediate past president. "You
don't have to be Jewish either! We
have a number of very active
members who are not," she adds.
"Your prerequisite for joinign us
is your love of history."
Mrs. Blumberg is referring to
several SJHS devotees among the
110 in attendance who come from
California, Pennsylvania or
Washington. They have been
regular participants. And this
year a new country was repr-
sented: the Woodrow De Castros
of Panama City, Panama. Mr.
Castro presented a paper about
the Portuguese Jewish communit
in his country and his wife and
daughter were present to take
pride in his presentation.
All 110 who came to the lit
Conference meeting of the SJHS
would heartily agree that they
were fascinated and enlightened
during the variety of workshops,
lectures and programs led by a
team of brilliant scholars and lay
people. It was all headquartered
at the Inverrary Hilton Con-
ference Center with services out
at two area temples, a tour and a
dinner-reception at the JCC, Nov.
9-11.
"The Southern Jewish Ex-
perience was a good one," says
Dr. Sam Proctor of Gainesville,
the newly-elected and installed
president of the society. "This
was the best meeting we ever
had."
The featured theme of the SJHS
Conference '86 was: "Mosaic:
Jewish Life in Florida: The
Southern Jewish Experience."
The exhibit at the Hilton had a
display of photos, documents,
newspaper clippings yellowed
with age and memorabilia dating
as far back as 1886. This
"Mosaic" is the initial collection of
precious artifacts relating to
South Florida's earliest Jewish
settlers. The committee, still col-
Malvina Lieberman. Wno
worked with her late husband
Seymour, to produce the book
"Jewish Frontiersmen." chats
with Dr. Abe Gittelman. Fort
Lauderdale's Director <->( QA-
JE during the Southern Jewish
Historical Conference.
lecting. hopes that many more
items of Jewish historical interest
relating to Jewish life in Florid*
will be forthcoming The
"Mosaic" is scheduled t* go on
tour and visit all the maj.>r cities
in Florida, beginning in 1988.
Members of the community are
requested to aid the committee in
their search. If you have a story to
tell relating to early Flonda
Jewish history or if you have
photos, documents, or any other
item of interest to lend to the ex
hibit please eontacl Laura
Hochman at the JCC Assuredly.
special care will be taker, of your
precious possessions
Renee Spector. the ar-
rangements chairperson of the
Conference '86, report.-- tnat her
experience before and during the
weekend was most heartwarming
and educational all due to the
excellent cooperation of the com-
mittee members of Federation't
CAJE; the Soref JCC. Ferlman
Campus; and the University of
Miami's Judaic Studies program
the three organizations who co-
hosted th Conference and who
are continuing to develop the
"Mosaic" with the expectation of
beginning to show it off in 1988.
5600 at $790 a month.
Weve put some
great numbers together
By any measure, 5600 Collins is one
of Miami Beach's premier residences. Yet
rentals sun at a modest $790 a month.
And look at the kind of lifestyle that $790
opens up to you.
You'll wake to beautiful vistas of the
Intracoastal and downtown Miami. Lunch
on your own private terrace or in our own
popular restaurant. Take your boat out tor
a little spin around the Bay And en>ov quiet
evenings in your elegant apartment or
head out for all the nearby excitement that
South Flonda offers in such abundance
It's all here. Or only minutes awav
At 5600 Collins Avenue. Stop bv our
rental office soon Or call 305-865-1088
5600 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida 33140, 305-865-1088
Ap>opa>tyo>
VMSH^rt,


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FILES


Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
|Jay and Renee Weiss Honorees
At Weizmann Dinner, Dec 11
fhe Weizmann Institute of
ence at its annual Dinner-
nce m Miami on Dec. 11 will
It.'* "fie of its highest honors
Jay and Renee Weiss by
Wishing a Professorial Chair
heir names at the Institute
ted in Rehovot, Israel.
|nre than 500 guests will at-
the Dinner-Dance honoring
j WYisses The event, to be held
(the Omni International Hotel.
(sponsored by the Florida
fan of the American Commit-
for the Weizmann Institute.
Special guest speakers will be
film actor. Kirk Douglas, a close
friend of the Weisses. and Prof.
Michael Sela. immediate past
president of the Weizmann In-
stitute and currently Deputy
Chairman of the Board of Gover
nors of the Institute.
Chairman of the Institute's
Florida Region is Rowland
Schaefer. last year's honoree.
Dinner-Dance chairmen are Mel
Dick. Cye Mandel. and David L.
Paul.
Young Israel Of Sunny Isles
To Provide Scholarships
mi announced that Young
el iif Sunny Isles in Miami
r. ia arranging to provide
Itrship grants for high school
>rs iii Miami Beach and South
iiia area who want to spend
:n Israel to continue their
lillel Price. Young Israel Presi-
|i explained that the scholar-
ire Ix'ing granted with the
i. n of the National Coun-
^f Young Israel and the World
list Organization Torah
(cation Department. The
are lieing offered for study
Ifachon Gold Institute for
r,er. or the Bet Midrash Le-
Iristitute for men. both in
iisaiem Ral>bi Rubin R. Dobin.
nier of Young Israel of
ay Isles is serving as coor-
tor nf the project. High school
seniors who are interested in ap-
plying for the scholarships are
asked to send for applications to:
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin. Young
Israel Scholarships, at the temple.
All requests must be accopanied
by a self-addressed, stamped
envelope. The deadline for ap-
plications is Feb. 28.
Jay and Renee Weiss are active
supporters of numerous
charitable, civic and educational
organizations in Greater Miami.
Mr. Weiss, the Senior Vice Presi-
dent and Partner of Southern
Wine and Spirits. Inc., is
Honorary Chairman of the Weiz-
mann Institute's Florida Region
and also serves as a member of the
American Committee's national
Board of Directors.
Mr. Weiss is founder of the
Mary Beth Weiss Cancer
Research Fund and a member of
the Board of Trustees of the
Public Health Trust of the Univer-
sity of Miami/Jackson Memorial
Hospital. He also is a member of
the Boards of the Papanicolaou
Comprehensive Cancer Center in
Miami and the American Heart
Association of Greater Miami.
Renee Weiss is also active in
community fund-raising projects.
She served as Chairperson of last
year's Dinner-Dance at Barry
University where Mr. Weiss is
Honorary Trustee and a member
of the Founders and Planned Giv-
ing Committees.


Jay and Renee Weiss
Eat In Good Health
With Fleischmann's. Margarine
ft
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Fleischmanns
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Sweet UNSALTED -
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ihbi I.eh
rman
tbbi Lehrman
Speak At
iennial
inference
Irving Lehrman, spiritual
ox Temple Emanu-El, will
Keynote Speaker at the
ial Convention of the
east Region of the United
jfKue of America. The con-
M will be held at the Hyatt
lev Hotel in Tampa starting
*Y through Monday on the
Legacy of the Past Vi-
f the Future."
*>i Lehrman will speak at the
teon on Sunday on 'Survival
vival Plus."
Southeast Region of the
Synagogue of America in-
Conservative congrega-
n Florida. Georgia. North
wth Carolina, Tennessee.
B'Ppi. Alabama and Puerto
Margarine
Nwgwine
U PVf
it's easy to eat healthful, low cholesterol food
when delicious Fleischmann's Margarine is
part of the meal. Fleischmanns is made from
100% com oH. has 0% cholesterol and is low in
saturated fat So, if you want to enjoy good
eating and good health, one thing's for certain
There's never been a better time tor the great
taste of Fleischmanns.
s
Fleischmann's.gives every meal a holiday flavor.
l\
MANDEL BRODT
- cup FLEISCHMANNS.
Margarine sotenw
i cup sugar
>. cup EGG BEATERS.
Cholesterol tree 99*. Real Egg
Product
I teaspoon WnooO eitract
"i teaspoon grated temon pcci
M cups an purpose Itoui
4 teaspoons baking powder
i teaspoon salt
1 cup PLANTERS. Sl.verw
Almonds toasted and chopped
m*gBow Mioec*r iHMHtMNNSMwpvint wt* IGGMAtlHSCnom
hvoi het 99S Ami tpg ftoduct awnono aiuart and <\ Horn baaing powder UK and PIANIIRS Sawed almonds unM Mended
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Fleischmanns Margarine
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Page4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 21, 1986
United Synagogues Of America
Southeast Region Biennial Confab
The Southeast Region of the
United Synagogue of America will
hold its Biennial Convention at
the Hyatt Regency in Tampa,
starting Friday through Monday.
Lou MelUer, President of the
Southeast Region, has appointed
Richard P. Jaffee of Daytona
Beach, as Convention Chairman,
with Dr. Steven A. Field as Site
Chairman assisted by Site Co-
Chairmen, Louis Morris and Sam
Pincus.
The Biennial Convention will br-
ing together delegates from seven
Southeastern states and Puerto
Rico for four days of study, wor-
ship, workshops and social events
in keeping with the Convention
theme, "Legacy of the Past, Vi-
sion of the Future."
Among the nationally known
participants will be Dr. Neil
Gillman, of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, who will
serve as Scholar-In-Residence
Dr. Morton K. Siegel, Education
Director of the United Synagogue
of America, will conduct an
Education Conference in conjunc-
tion with the convention.
The featured speakers from
United Synagogue of America are
Franklin D. Kreutzer, National
President; Rabbi Benjamin Z.
Kreitman, Executive Vice Presi-
dent; Rabbi Jerome M. Epstein,
Senior Vice President; and Harry
J. Silverman, Director of Regional
Activities. Dr. Abraham Git-
telson, of the Central Agencs of
Jewish Education, will also speak
during the convention. Parallel
sessions will be held for Young
Leadership.
Participating in the sessions
from the local area will be Rabbi
Max LipschiU. Beth Torah Con
gregation; Michael Exelbert,
President, Temple Zion Israelite
Center; Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rab-
bi, Temple Emanu-El; and Rabbi
Edwin Farber. Temple Samu-El
Or Olom.
Harold Wishna is Executive
Director of the Southeast Region.
Executive Director Of AIPAC In Miami
Thomas A. Dine, the leading
pro-Israel lobbyist and Executive
Director of AIPAC, returns to
Miami for the annual visit with the
pro-Israel community on Tuesday.
Dine, 46, joined AIPAC in 1980.
Under his direction, the organiza-
tion has evolved into "the most ef-
fective Foreign Policy lobbying
group in Washington," according
to the New York Times.
His name has appeared regular-
ly on lists of the most effective
political professionals in
Washington. Most recently, the
National Journal cited him in a
1986 article on Washington policy
elite.
AIPAC, headquartered in
Washington, D.C., is the
American organization which, for
over 30 years, has worked on
Capitol Hill to strengthen United
States-Israel relations and to fight
for Israel's security and well-
being.
For fiscal year 1986, AIPAC
lobbied successfully for an un-
precedented $4.5 billion in all
grant regular and supplemental
aid to Israel. Through AIPAC's
efforts. Congress overwhelmingly
passed a bill authorizing the Presi-
dent to negotiate a Free Trade
Agreement with Israel. This land-
NASSAU GARDENS
163 St. Mall Area
Adult Community
1 bedrooms available.
1495 NE 167 St.
947-9163
mark legislation provides for a
duty-free trade zone between the
U.S. and Israel.
Before is entry into the world of
AIPAC, Tom Dines' political and
academic experience ran the
gamut! His 10 years of Senate ex-
perience include work on the staff
of Senators Edward M. Kennedy.
Edmund Muskie and Frank
Church.
Previously, he held Fellowships
at Harvard University. Kennedy
Institute of Politics.
Dine also served as the personal
assistant of Chester Bowles. I S
Ambassador to India. In addition,
he held the position of Congres-
sional liaison to the I'.S. Peace
Corps from l%2-64. and was a
Peace Corps volunteer in th-
Philippines.
With these impressive creden
tials and his smooth and intellec-
tual manner. Dine now lea-is
AIPAC in it.- work in the C I
ridors of Capitol Hill to
strengthen I'.S. support for
Israel.
Tom Dine will earn, his message
to the Miami community on T .
day. Nov. 2:>. at the (Irand Ka\
Hotel at 5 p.m. The general public
is invited.
Senator Lawton Chile* unll be honored by thf Southeast Rmni
United Synagogue of America at its Biennial ''.mtrnrumjirlj
consistent support in Congress of a strong ami serurt limiU
efforts on behalf of freer emigration of Soviet Jews, and hum
mitment to those in need of food, shelter, health mn
education.
Rabbi Rose To Lecture On
Biblical Figure Joseph
The life of the major Biblical
figure. Joseph, will be analyzed by
Rabbi Marvin Rose, spiritual
leader of Temple King Solomon.
Miami Beach, at the public free
lecture in the series Spiritual
Giants of the Past, taking place on
Wednesday. Dec 3. at 10.30 a.m..
at the Miami Beach Public
Library
Rabbi Rose, teacher and lee
turer in the Miami Beach vicinity,
received his Rabbinical Ordination
from the Veshiva I'nivensty He
is very active in the Jewish com-
munity serving as Chaplain at St.
Francis Hospital. Southeastern
Medical Center. Villa Maria.
through the auspices of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Chaplaincy Service He has writ-
ten several books and received
many honors for his services to
the community.
Rabbi Martin Kom
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