The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03012

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T "dfewislb Floridliaini
Volume 59 Number 43
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, October 24,1986
? Fn4t*oclt fl.Md $ '
Price 50 Cents

Glenn's Amendment Would Have Prevented Role for Israel in SDI
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) An amend-
ment that could have prevented Israel's
participation in some research for the
Reagan Administration's Strategic
Defense Initiative (SDI) has been deleted
from the Defense Department's ap-
propriation bill for 1987.
The amendment proposed by Sen. John
Glenn (D., Ohio) was removed during the
Senate-House conference on the ap-
propriations bill, largely through the ef-
forts of Rep. Jim Courter (R., N.J.), accor-
ding to Howard Kohr, deputy director of
the National Jewish Coalition.
THE GLENN AMENDMENT was not
aimed specifically at Israel, but at all
Continued on PafC 14-A
Koka mm pray with lulav at the Western Wail during the festival
Sukkoth in Jerusalem. It was near this spot that a grenade at-
tack on Israeli soldiers and their families carried out by a mili-
tant wing of the Palestine Liberation Organization killed one per-
ton and wounded 69 last week (Oct. 15).
And
Other Faiths
Pope Invites Jews,
Christians to Prayer Day
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) Pope
John Paul II has issued in-
vitations to Jews, Christians
and representatives of other
faiths to convene at Assisi
I Oct. 27 for an international
day of prayer for peace.
I Through diplomatic channels,
I all nations are being asked to lay
I down their arms for the entire
day, reporters were told at a
Vatican press conference. The ap-
peal has gone out not only to na-
tions in a state of war or formal
belligerence but also "to those
who seek to achieve their aims
through terrorism or other forms
of violence," Msgr. Achille
Silveatrini, the Vatican Secretary
of State, declared.
"Of course we realize that peace
Continued on Page 15-A
Shultz Says
Shamir: No Int'l.
Talks, No Arab State
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir's
25-member Cabinet won
Knesset approval Monday
by a vote of 82-17 with three
abstentions. In a 40-minute
address preceding the vote
of confidence, Shamir said
his government would focus
mainly on economic affairs
during the final two years of
its tenure but would also
vigorously pursue the peace
process.
He stressed the "unity of the
nation," said that U.S.-Israel rela-
tions were at an "unprecedented
peak" and expressed hope that
the Eastern European bloc, "first
and foremost" the Soviet Union,
would change their attitude
toward Israel.
SHAMIR EMPHASIZED that
"Like its predecessor, this
government will be a government
of national unity ... It will refrain
from divisiveness and extremism,
will strive for mutual respect and
consideration for others, and will
seek to augment the love of Israel
within us."
He said that both Likud and the
Labor Party shared the aim of a
strong and economically sound
Israel living at peace with its Arab
neighbors. He said the differences
between the main coalition part-
ners were not over aims but over
the tactics needed to achieve
those aims.
"National unity is not just a
matter of parliamentary conve-
nience," Shamir said. 'Those who
conceived the idea of the unity
government hoped and desired
that by virtue of its very forma-
tion and existence, that govern-
ment would project a message of
unity, of drawing closer together,
of love of Israel, and of true
cooperation among the country's
political leadership and between
all the strata of the population in
the country.
"These goals have already been
achieved to a certain extent, and
the government I head will indeed
make the unity of the nation its
Continued on Page 3-A
PRIME MINISTER YITZHAK SHAMIR
New
Conspiracy?
Is Veep Bush Behind
Arms Sales to Iran?
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Attorneys for some of 17
defendants, including four
Israelis charged here with
conspiracy to illegally sell
American weapons to Iran,
have made motions to
dismiss the charges on
grounds of entrapment, lack
or jurisdiction for the case in
New York and prejudicial
pretrial publicity.
A hearing on the motion before
a federal judge in the Manhattan
U.S. District Court was scheduled
to begin late Monday. After hear-
ing from the defense and prosecu-
tion, the court will decide whether
to dismiss the charges.
AN AFFIDAVIT filed late last
month in support of this motion by
Continued on Pace 2-A
There Was No Refusenik Understanding at Reykjavik
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
I- Secretary of State
T*wge Shultz said Sunday
Fhat the exit visas given two
Soviet Jewish families last
week did not come about
because of any "precise
agreement" during the
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev in Reyk-
javik, Iceland Oct. 11-
"We didn't have any
1-12.
any precise
agreement, although many names
of individuals were talked about,"
Shultz said on the NBC-TV "Meet
the Press" program. He added
that Reagan and Gorbachev also
discussed the "hundreds of
thousands who would love to
emigrate. So all of that was
discussed, but there was no
precise agreement on either of
those cases."
Continued on Page 2-A
Vice President Bush


Page 2-A The Jewish Ftoridiap/Friday, October 24. 1966
New Conspiracy
Is Bush Behind Arms to Iran?
Coatiaaed
P**l-A
Paul Grand, one of the attorneys
representing Sam Evans who a
the aflsged middleman in the con-
spiracy, contends that high-
ranking Administration. State
Department and Pentagon of-
ficials considered and eventually
approved covert arms sales of
American military hardware to
Iran, using some of the defen-
dants as agents
Grand also alleges that U.S.
Customs agents and a govern-
ment informant in the case
pressured the defendants to use il-
legal meajtt to obtain the weapons
for Iran, whiie the defendants in-
anted on using legal means.
Grand's affidavit, based on
some 200 tapes the government
recorded with the help of the in-
formant and numerous interviews
with defendants in the case,
claims that Vice President George
Bush. Secretary of Defense
Caspar Weinberger, Marine
Corps commandant Gen. P.X
Kelley and unnamed State
Pspai tint nt and Pentagon of-
ficials were in contact directly
with several of the defendants and
were involved in an active debate
over changing U.S. government
policy to begin covert arms sales
to Iran en a quiet level.
GRAND AND other defense at
torneys received access to copies
of the government tapes as part of
the discovery process in criminal
cases. In his affidavit. Grand
quotes from taped conversations
between the defendants and the
government informant in which
the defendants say they met with
Bush's aides in West Germany to
discuss an arms deal with the Ira-
nians and that Bush had given
"the green light."
The affidavit also cites press
reports in which an unnamed
White House official acknowledg-
ed "a secret tilt toward Iran after
six years of mutual hostility"
within the Reagan
Administration.
This official reportedly stated
the U.S. hopes to solidify relations
with "reasonable" leaden in
Tehran and "regularize" the arms
flow from the U.S. directly to Iran
instead of going through mid-
dlemen, one of which was iden-
tified as Israel.
THE WEAPONS allegedly
under negotiation included F-4
and F-5 fighter jets. C-130
transport planes, thousands of
TOW missiles. Hawk missiles.
Sidwinders. Sparrow guided
missiles and Skyhawk aircraft
According to the indictment,
the weapons were already in the
possession of Israel and three un-
named countries, and the defen-
dants were conspiring to resell the
arms without obtaining the proper
licenses for resale from the State
Department. The State Depart-
ment is the ultimate authority for
approving foreign military aid.
Under the U.S. ban imposed on
selling American arms to Iran.
No Refusenik Understanding
At Reykjavik, Says Shultz
Csatiaaed from Page 1-A
THE TWO CASES he referred
to were those of David Goldfarb. a
long-time refusenik. who was
flown to the U.S. by Armand
Hammer last Thursday with his
wife. Cecilia, and Viktor and In-
essa Flerov who were told Friday
they could leave for Israel. Inessa
Flerova has a brother in Israel.
Michael Shirman. who suffers
from acute leukemia. She will
donate bone marrow for a
transplant that may save his life.
In an address to the National
Press Club Friday. Shultz said
there was "sustained discussion"
on human rights issues in Iceland.
He said the National Conference
for Soviet Jewry and other human
Demjanjuk
Files Appeal
JERUSALEM (JTA) Nan
war crane suspect John Demjan-
juk appealed to the Hn Court of
Jusbce hat Friday against the
derision by a lower court to hold
ban in custody until the end of
legal proceedings against him
The Jiruaalwit District Court
ruled that Demjanjuk would re-
main m detention after the state
charged him with murdering
thousands of Jews at the
Trebbnka death camp in Poland
daring World War II.
Demjanjuk. 66, was extradited
from the U.S. last February. He
has continuously argued that he
was not the Nan criminal known
as "Ivan the Terrible." and that
he had never been to Treblinka
In the petition filed at the High
Court, his lawyer, Mark O'Con-
nor, said be could not present the
fuO arguments against his client's
continued detention because he
was not presented with all the
evidence against Demjanjuk. The
will probably be heard this
rights groups "helped us to make
a powerful presentation "
Asked on "Meet the Press"
about criticism that the U.S. was
making concessions to the Soviets
in return for the release of in-
dividuals. Shultz replied, "trading
in human beings is inherently a
repulsive matter." He added.
however, that the Soviet "system
is as it is. When we can get people
out we're glad to have them out."
HE STRESSED that it was not
only important to gam the emigra-
tion of people whose names are
well known, but also the "great
mass of people" who want to
leave. The number of refuseniks in
the Soviet Union is estimated at
400.000.
Asked if Gorbachev knows that
if be were to come to the U.S. for
a summit meeting he would face
large demonstrations. Shultz said
the Soviet leader has been told
"he will be treated with the
respect and dignity that he
iam But there won't be the
kind of warmth out there in the
American public because of
the human rights problem."
On other matters. Shultz said
the situation along Israel's nor-
thern border was "tense,'' but he
did not expect a war to break out
"We certainly don't want that to
happen," he and. He added. "We
do have a situation where Israel in
its northern border is concerned,
and understandably so. about at-
tacks that come from southern
Lebanon"
SHULTZ DENIED an Israeli
report that be sent a letter to in-
coming Premier Yitzhak Shamir
not to establish more Jewish set-
tlements in the West Bank.
However, he said be was opposed
to the expansion of such set-
tlements Shultz said he had a
"long session" with Shamir when
he was here as Foreign Minister in
September to attend the United
Nations General Assembly, and
spoke as well with other Israelis.
those licenses called end-user cer-
tificates could not be obtained
legally. Both the Israeli defen-
dants and their attorneys claim
the Israeli government was aware
of the alleged negotiations.
Since 1979, a number of reports
of Israeli sales of Amencan-made
spare parts and weapons have sur-
faced in the press. Israel has
steadfastly denied the allegations
and press reports.
American government officials
responded to the allegations in the
affidavit with consistently firm
denials of any involvement of U.S.
officials or government agencies
in approving the covert sale of
American weapons to Iran.
THE INDICTMENT issued in
April charged 17 defendants with
51 counts of conspiracy to resell
some S2.5 billion of American
weapons earmarked for Israel and
three other unspecified countries
to Iran. Other charges included
mail and wire fraud.
Three Israelis and one
American resident of Israel are
among the 17 defendants charged
in the conspiracy. The four are out
on bond awaiting their trial
scheduled for late November in
U.S. District Court in Manhattan
The case broke with the arrest
of Evans, an American, and the
four Israelis upon their arrival in
Bermuda on Apr. 29. They believ-
ed they were going to sign the
contracts for the arms deal.
But in cooperation with the US
government, the Bermudian
government had placed the five on
a Stop List, and upon their arrival
they were arrested for illegal en-
try. One month later, the Bermu-
dian government extradited the
five to the U.S.
THE U.S. Customs Department
and the U.S. Attorney's Office of
the Justice Department built their
case on what Grand's affidavit
claims was an elaborate sting
operation conducted with the
cooperation of a former Iranian
arms procurement agent. Cyrus
Hashemi, who was indicted in the
U.S. in 1984 for selling Amencan-
made weapons to Iran.
Hashemi, who posed as an arms
buyer for the Iranian government.
agreed to record various meetings
and phone conversations with the
defendants as part of a coopera-
tion agreement made with the
government in which he would not
stand trial immediately for 1984
indictment.
Hashemi, the government's key
witness, died of acute leukemia in
a London hospital in July. After
an official investigation into the
cause of death, the U.S. At-
torney's office in Manhattan con-
cluded that Hashemi died of "ap-
parently natural circumstances."
indirs ting that there were no
suspicious circumstances surroun-
ding Ins death between the indict-
ment and the trial.
THE GOVERNMENTS case
now relies almost entirely on some
200 tapes of phone conversations
and muting! between Hashemi
and the defendants
Grand used excerpts from the
tapes in his affidavit to show that
Hashemi attempted at every step
of the negotiations to encourage
tbe defendants to obtain
American arms illegally The ex-
cerpts show that the defendants
insisted on exhausting all the legal
channels for obtaining the arms
with legitimate American ap-
proval. The excerpts also show
that the defendants were convinc-
ed that U.S. officials were going
to give that approval.
In the tapes, Hashemi also turn-
ed down several of the defen-
dants offers to sell Iran non-
Amencan weaponry, including
French Mirage jets.
Tamar Kollek. wife of Jerusalem Mayor Teddy KolUk. pauses to
chat with a young patient and his older brother during a receni
visit to the Hadassak-Hebrew University Medical Center
Yizkor Saturday
Holiday Season Ends
With Simchat Torah
Hoshana Rabba on Friday ends this week's observance of Choi
Hamoed. Yizkor memorial prayers for the departed will be said
Saturday as part of the Feast of Conclusion and Shetnmi
Atzereth services.
SUNDAY'S HAPPY Simchat Torah celebration will conclude
the Sukkoth festival and the High Holy Day period which begin
with Rosh Hashanah on Friday eve. Oct. 3.
JDC Gifts on Way to El Salvador
NEW YORK (JTA The
American Jewish Joint Distribu
be* Committee, in response to the
earthquake in El Salvador, is
opening its mailbox for receipt of
contributions to help the more
than 8.000 injured and the more
than 1.000 families of those who
were killed.
JDC President Heinz Eppieran
nounced that the JDC is making a
contribution of $10,000 of itl owe
funds towards emergency relief
for the victims of the disaster
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Shamir Vows There'll
Be No Int'l. Talks,
No New Arab State
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Continued from Page 1-A
chief concern," Shamir said.
SHAMIR TERMED the
government's economic program
a "Zionist economy." Its goals, he
said, are "reducing inflation to ac-
ceptable levels in order to attract
immigration and ensure economic
growth with work available for all
newcomers, and the settlement of
the entire Eretz Israel the
Biblical land of Israel or
Palestine."
According to Shamir, "The uni-
ty government which has just con-
cluded the first half of its term of
office, has already registered
some not inconsiderable
achievements in the economy,
in labor relations, in foreign
policy, in the war against Arab
terrorism, and in fortifying
Israel's security."
He expressed his "thanks and
appreciation to the outgoing
Prime Minister, Mr. Shimon
Peres, for the understanding and
cooperation he accorded me dur-
ing the two years (of Peres'
tenure), and to wish him the best
in his next position" as Foreign
Minister.
SHAMIR presented an essen-
tially conservative economic pro-
gram. "We have to adopt the rule
of refraining as far as possible
from any government interven-
tion in the economic sector, unless
the need to do so has been pro-
ven," he said.
"In any other case, there is no
place for subsidies, for incentives,
for grants, or for providing free
services to everyone which con-
stitute the reason for heavy taxa-
tion." He said however that en-
couragement should be given
"any manifestation of initiative,
action, originality and the
assumption of personal
responsibility."
He pledged that "Every work-
ing citizen will be able to earn a
living with dignity and the State
will be able to look forward to
economic growth and augmented
aliya, the Zionist goal for whose
sake the State of Israel was
established and exists."
He conceded that reviving
economic growth will be difficult.
"Yet this is the true challenge.
Economic growth does not mean
only a growth in the national pro-
duct that enables a higher stan-
dard of living and reduced
dependence on foreign aid.
Economic growth signifies, first
of all, creating the conditions that
will allow us to fulfill the country's
Zionist goals and above all,
aliya
"THIS MEANS that we must
concentrate on those changes that

President Ckaim Herzog receives a formal let-
ter of resignation from Prime Minister
Skimon Peres at Beit Hanassi. The Knesset
Monday formally approved the rotation of the
Unity Government with Yitzhak Shamir as
Prime Minister.
will permit new immigrants to live
and earn a living in this country.
We will have to struggle to cut
back on every non-essential
government expenditure.
We must place the emphasis on
a concrete effort to reduce the
burden of taxation a taxation
which hinders the emergence of
new places of employment for our
young people, for demobilized
soldiers, and for new
immigrants."
Shamir added that it was no
"exaggeration to term the
economic system which the
government will seek to forge a
'Zionist economy' an economy
that will not be based only on solid
economic principles but also on
the Zionist values which must be
our guide, and among them the
supreme value of settlement
throughout Eretz Yisrael. We will
not discriminate between one part
of the country and the other ."
HE SAID. "We want to assure
the Arab residents of Judaea,
Samaria (West Bank) and the
Continued on Page 6-A
He's never ducked a challenge...in fact Dante
Fascell thrives on tackling the tough prob-
lems and finding fresh and dynamic ways to
resolve them.
That's why he's earned the respect and
admiration of his fellow Congressmen...and
become a force always to be reckoned with
on Capitol Hill.
The 19th Congressional District of Florida
is an area undergoing constant change...
New people, New ideas...Dante Fascell is a
Congressman who welcomes the opportunity
to provide leadership for the constructive
changes that will improve the quality of life for
all of the people he serves...and to make cer-
tain that future generations will inherit the
best that he can achieve for them.
"South Florida-and our country-could
not ask for a more dedicated public servant."
Richard G. Capen Jr., Publisher,
Miami Herald 12/2/84
Send Florida^ strongest
asset in Washington back to
Washington.
Re-Elect Dante Fascell, 19th
Congressional Dist., Democrat.
pd tor by Dante Fascell Campaign Committee George Korge Treas


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
Israel and Sale
Of Arms to Iran
For years now, Israel has insisted it is not
selling arms to Iran in its war against Iraq.
Now it appears that Israel's determined
repudiation of reports to the contrary may
be wrong and even dishonest after all, and
that the powers that be both in Jerusalem
and in Tel Aviv are stonewalling a very com-
plex conspiracy.
To complicate matters worse, Vice Presi-
dent George Bush may be involved. Four
Israelis are included among 17 defendants
awaiting their trial scheduled for late
November in U.S. District Court in
Manhattan.
According to Paul Grand, who represents
middleman Sam Evans in the alleged con-
spiracy, Vice President Bush is involved
with some of the 17 defendants in active
debate over changing U.S. policy to begin
covert arms sales to Iran.
Grand says he has the taperecorded evidence to
show that Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger
and Marine Corps commandment Gen. P.X. Kelley,
among others, are also involved.
Wondering About Motives
It would be inconceivable that such highly-placed
government leaders, including as yet unnamed State
Department and Pentagon officials, would be able to
carry out this kind of an undercover operation
without the approval of President Reagan himself.
Nevertheless, it is charged by Grand that Vice
President Bush's aides met with the defendants in
West Germany to discuss an arms deal with the Ira-
nians. Grand further charges that Bush gave them
"the green light" there.
To complicate matters for Israel, it is Israel which is
mentioned as a major middleman whose role is to
"regularise" the arms flow from the U.S. to Iran.
We wonder why in the world either the United
States or Israel would each have it in its interest in-
dividually and in their mutual interest collectively to
favor Iran over Iraq. Of all of the Middle Eastern na-
tions, Iran is the most intractable, with its Islamic
fundamentalism turning that country back into a
medieval bastion of militant hatred for Western
civilization, including the religions and civilizations of
Judaism and Christianity as a whole.
U.S. Covering Tracks
This is not to be construed as a suggestion that
"modern" Iraq makes that nation any more
"moderate" so far as the dominant value systems of
the Western world are concerned. After all. Iraq is a
Soviet client state.
So far as the United States is concerned. Grand in-
sists that his taped evidence names a thusfar uniden-
tified White House official who has declared that
there is "a secret tilt toward Iran after six years of
mutual hostility" within the Reagan Administration
about what this nation's policy toward the Iraq-Iran
war should be.
Who the White House official is, we have yet to
learn. What this explains about the reasons for our
nation's "tilt" is harder to imagine. But Israel's role
remains even more inexplicable. And possibly
therefore more damnable once the defense attorney's
evidence becomes part of the District Court's public
record.
Rotation on Road
Once again, Yitzhak Shamir is Prime
Minister of Israel. It happened almost as
easily as we suggested in these columns two
weeks ago it would happen. A virtually
predictable hitch a struggle over Cabinet
positions and outgoing Prime Minister
Shimon Peres' adamance about one of them
kept what was the certainty of rotation
for the Unity Government on tenter hooks
but a few days longer.
In his address to the Knesset on Monday,
Prime Minister Shamir insisted that there
'Jewish Florida*ri
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Mf*S\rH Ml T
would be little change in his rule from what
had occurred during Mr. Peres tenure.
After all, why should there be? Mr. Peres
made monumental strides toward economic
stability and even some more modest ones
toward peace in the Middle East. What is
more, Mr. Peres achieved a level of world
leadership respect and even friendship tor
him personally that Mr. Shamir may find dif-
ficult to emulate.
Tough Act To Follow
Part of this difficulty may stem from the
fact that Mr. Peres will be a difficult act tor
anyone to foUow. For Mr. Shamir this will be
especially true. He may anticipate little
change, but how otherwise is one to judge
his statement to the Knesset that "No inter-
national forum can serve as a substitute for
direct negotiations" between Israel and its
adversary Arab nations?
After all, Mr. Peres had several times
reiterated his readiness to accept such a
forum under the right circumstances. These,
of course, would include the Soviet return of
normal diplomatic relations to both nations
as a prerequisite to its role as an arbiter in
the Middle East peace process.
Does this mean that Mr. Shamir would
refuse even if the Soviets were to comply?
Then how could he, in the same address, ex-
press the hope that there must be "a change
of heart on the part of the Eastern bloc
countries" toward Israel, "first and
foremost the USSR"? Given the "change of
heart," would Mr. Shamir still say no after
Mr. Peres had already said yes?
Shamir's Hard Job
We must concede that Mr. Peres' two-
year tenure and his successes rest partly on
the cooperative spirit of the Likud Party and
Mr. Shamir in avoiding confrontations with
French Rightist
the outgoing Prime Minister's policies.
Without this forthcoming spirit, there would
have been a rupture in the Unity Govern
ment, a Peres resignation and new national
elections, which Mr. Peres would most cer-
tainly have won hands down.
What there is now to hope for is that, once
again in the driver's seat, Mr. Shamir will
want the very same cooperation extended
toward him. In the end, this must mean a
Prime Minister's peace policy that the Labor
Party and Mr. Peres can accommodate
themselves to. In this sense. Mr Shamir
surely meant in his address Monday that
there would be little change that his Unity
Government partners would find hard to ac-
cept without complaint.
But that would necessarily mean Likud ac-
ceptance of an international peace forum, in-
cluding the Soviet Union under the right
conditions. Otherwise, what we have once
again is a Likud Party and a Likud Prime
Minister whom other world leaders consider
intractable from the start.
LePen's Impressive Gains This Year
Jaw 1K CM *o
Friday. October 24. 1986
Volume 59
21 T1SHR1 5747
Number 43
By ALISON B. CARB
Jean-Marie Le Pen and his
National Front made im-
pressive gains in the French
elections earlier this year,
riding a wave of xenophobia
inspired by such slogans as
"France for the French"
and "Two million im-
migrants equals two million
unemployed."
For the first time since its foun-
ding in Paris in 1972. the National
Front, which used to fight its bat
ties as a fringe group in the
streets, has become an important
political force in France. By winn-
ing 10 percent of the popular vote
in France's legislative elections in
March and a resulting 35 seats in
the 577-seat National Assembly,
over-all the party emerged with
more support in key cities than
polls had predicted.
WHY IS the National Front
becoming popular? Mainly
because it has objected to the
presence in France of large
numbers of immigrants many
from Algeria, Morocco and other
parts of North Africa who, it
contends, cause unemployment,
taking away jobs from the French.
But there is another more wor-
risome side to the National Front.
Its opponents, with good reason,
have called the party racist,
fascist and anti-Semitic. Party
publications have expressed racist
and anti-SemiUc viewpoints and
some National Front leaders have
Nazi or neo-Nazi connections
Since its establishment in 1981.
the National Front's daily
newspaper, Present, edited by
Francois Brigneau and Bernard
Antony (a.k.a. Romain Marie), has
become a major organ in France
Alison B. Carb is a member
of the Research and Evaluation
Department of the Anti-
Defamation League Civil
Rights [>ii"ution.
for publishing anti-Semitic
attacks.
For example. Present contends
that too many Jews hold key posts
in government and administra-
tion, not only in France but in the
world. Romain Mane. Le Pen's
right-hand man and one of 10
members of the National Front
elected to the European Parlia-
ment, has claimed that the leader
ship of the Russian Revolution
was an "international (sic) of
assassins that was composed
essentially of Jews."
HE ARGUES that there are
powers in France" for which
"the interests of Judaism are
more important than those of
French society."
Present also criticized France's
Mitterrand government, singling
out Jewish ministers such as
Minister of Justice Robert
Badinter.
In 1983, Present editor Francois
Brigneau denounced Badinter'8
alleged laxity toward criminals
and charged that he supported
"the nomad against the settler,
the cosmopolitan against the in-
digenous ... the outcast against a
society which has for so long done
without Badinter and his tribe
(emphasis added), the murderer
against the murdered."
He added: The only thing
French about such men is where
they live. When we stop and con
sider how far they have taken con
trol of th' country then it is in
deed time for us to be afraid."
IN lt7S. Simone Veil, a sir
vivor of Auschwitz, who, at
Health Minister under the Guard
administration introduced a lw in
parliament legalizing abortion.
was attacked in the Niboni!
Front-connected publications. U
Satumal and Militant Since
then. Le Pen has o.r.inuedhisat-
tacks on Veil.
It is noteworthv that Mark
Frederiksen. a National Front
candidate in the 1978 election*.
headed the French n.- Nan group
which in 1980 claimed rap*
sibility for the Rue Coperw
synagogue bombing in P*"*;(
which four persons were blM
and a dozen injured
A number of those who profess
to deny the Holocaust haw
been linked to the National Front
For example. Enc Delcroix. iMj
tional Front candidate in the IPj
elections, who was the lawyer
Robert Faurisson. the French pffr
fessor convicted of libel and pr>
moting racism because of his to*
denying the facts ot m
Holocaust. Delcro.x has om
published in the Journal
Historical Review, the PJ*^
of the Institute of ffigj
Review, the leading Holocu*
denial propaganda group n
U.S. The pseudo-academic in-
stitute was founded by dlis
to. who heads the extremist Ur
ty Lobby.
ALTHOUGH Le Pen has *
tempted to make himself W*
respectable during the |*"
years while campaigning tore
tion. he has continued U> m*
comments viewed at "" .
least as insensitive by the je
community.
appearance
During an
Continued on Page
13-A


Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Is Bonn Making Royalties on Nazi Films?

By ROD LURIE
It all boils down to this:
The West German govern-
ment is making royalties
off of Nazi films and some
American film makers are
mad as hell. Josh Waletzky
and Aviva Kempner, the
director and producer of
"Partisans of Vilna," the
first American film soley
devoted to documenting
Jewish heroism during the
Holocaust, want to put
their ire on record.
"The Germans made us pay
them money," Kempner ex-
plains, "and it simply disgusted
me. Imagine. I actually had to
pay a fee to use footage of the
Nazis to the same country
responsible for these
murderers."
INITIALLY, the claim seems
almost unbelievable. Several
critics would question the
morality of the German govern-
ment making any sort of profit
off the darkest period in their
history. In any case, documen-
tary film producers have rarely
had to pay any fees for footage
they obtain from archives. The
National Archives in
Washington, D.C., for example,
has a no-charge policy. Ap-
parently, though, Miss Kemp-
ner's assertion is correct.
Correspondence between
Kempner and Transit Films, a
German-based company that
describes itself as "acting in the
name of the German state," con-
firms a licence fee of DM 20
($10) was charged for every
meter of film incorporated into
the documentary.
"Partisans of Vilna," which
was created with a $600,000
budget, has only two minutes
and seven seconds of crucial
Third Reich documentary
footage. Kempner and Waletzky
were financially unable to in-
clude more than that.
WHAT MAKES all this even
more interesting is that the
Scene from 'Partisans of Vilna' was created
with a $600,000 budget and has only two
minutes and seven seconds of crucial Third
Reich documentary footage. That is all the
producers were able to afford.
German-based firm says 'we naturally'
will charge fees for footage.
Rod Lurie is senior film critic
and analyst for Editors Press
Service in New York City.
footage used did not actually
come from Germany. The film
makers found their material in
the National Archives the
same institution with a no
charge policy.
Here is why Nazi films are an
exception to the rule: During the
Second World War, the United
States army confiscated several
reels of Nazi films and stored
them in the Archives. In the
1960s, when the United States
allied with West Germany, the
American government was
divested by law of retaining the
films. Because of the historical
significance of what had been
captured on film, a request was
made to the West German
Government that copies of the
film be kept in the National
Archives.
Transit Films, which attained
copyrigth authority over all
documentaries and newsreels of
the Nazi era until May 8, 1945,
agreed. Their condition,
however, was that all film
makers using the Archive
footage would pay a royalty or
"licence fee" to Transit Films.
The funds, according to a Tran-
sit spoke man, would go to
"promoting films in Germany."
The office of the German Con-
sulate General flatly denies that
Transit Films is a "government
institution" or a "branch of the
government." Bernd Moranz,
press secretary for the Con-
sulate General, would not go as
far as denying that Transit Film
was a "representative" of the
German government. That, he
claims, is open to interpretation.
IN RESPONDING to Kemp-
ner's written protest over the
German Government's using
Nazi films as a money
generating device "for the
state," a Transit spokesperson
wrote, "I cannot say that I
disagree, but I hope you will
understand that it is the order of
the company to control the pur-
pose and do the exploitation
herefore. We do not like it that
anybody can use the material,
perhaps in order to create pro-
paganda. Besides, we have the
possibility to charge fees with it,
which we naturally will do."
Despite it all, Kempner and
Waletzky seemed satisfied with
their final product, which took
them five years to piece
together. If the international
critics have any credibility, than
they ought to well be proud.
They drew absolute raves from
Europe, even in Berlin where
the film was screened at that
city's annual film festival. So, if
the film "makes" it in the United
States, will the two be ready to
put their troubles behind them?
"Well," Waletzky says, "there
was that situation with the
Russians."
"What situation is that?" I
asked.
KEMPNER BEGAN to ex-
plain, "We went to the Soviet
embassy so that we could film
within Vilna, where this entire
history takes place. We told
them that we wanted to make a
film about the Jewish partisans
who battled the Germans. They
looked at us and said, "It is only
about Jews?" When we confirm-
ed that, they told us that our film
was too narrow-minded and
refused us permission to film
within Vilna."
How then, did they get
modern footage of Vilna?
Kempner answers very matter
of factly, "Oh, we had some of
the old Partisans visit Vilna, and
they sneaked 8-millimeter
cameras into their jackets and
photographed the town for us."
But that is another story.
Decision To Bring War Criminals
To Trial Was Not Unanimous
To some extent, the trials were
a spectacle.' Telford Taylor
The Nuremberg trials were
part of a larger effort to
assure a lasting peace
following World War II, ac-
cording to Telford Taylor,
Herman George and Kate
Kaiser Professor of Con-
stitutional Law at Yeshiva
University's Benjamin N.
Cardozo School of Law.
Forty years later, Prof. Taylor,
who was chief U.S. prosecutor at
Nuremberg, feels that "the in-
fluence of Nuremberg as a peace-
keeping effort has been good
rather than bad."
TAYLOR POINTED out that
the same San Francisco con-
ference which established the
United Nations also established
the International Tribune for the
Trial of War Criminals.
"It was hoped," said Taylor,
"that (the Nuremberg trials),
along with the United Nations,
would be engines for keeping of
peace in the future."
Indeed, the charges leveled at
the trials included not only
atrocities against civilian popula-
tions, but also the newly-defined
international crime of "waging
aggressive war."
THE DECISION to bring Ger
man war criminals to trial was by
no means unanimous among the
Allies, Taylor said. The British,
according to Prof. Taylor, favored
drawign up a list of Germans to be
summarily executed without trial.
The problems with such an ap-
proach, he said, was not only its
repugnance to Western legal
tradition but the difficulty of
deciding whom to name.
The decision to conduct trials
"was the only rational choice," ac-
cording to Taylor. Such an ap-
proach allowed for investigation
of the facts and examination of
the evidence. Decisions concern-
ing which individuals to prosecute
could be left to the prosecutors,
who enjoyed the same pro-
secutorial discretion as "any U.S.
Attorney," he explained.
WITH THE total military
defeat of Germany, and the
disintegration of the German
government, a great many
records and documents were cap-
It was hoped that
Nuremberg would
help keep the
peace.
tured. The trials, said Taylor,
"brought home to the public the
content of those documents in a
way that could never have been
done with history books."
Taylor stressed that the use of
this documentary evidence at the
trials afforded the defendants the
opportunity for explanation and
rebuttal. And the very existence
of this documentation belies the
arguments of those who deny the
reality or the magnitude of the
Holocaust.
"To some extent," he noted,
"the trials were a spectacle." But
they were a spectacle needed to
make the public aware of the
crimes that had taken palce and
they "got the message across.''
JTA Service

V


Pag 6-A The Jewiih Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
Shamir Vows
No Int'l. Talks, No Arab State
Coatinaed froai Page 3-A
Gaza district a life of dignity and a
life of peaceful co-existence with
their Jewish neighbors. It is our
aspiration that these Arab
residents will be able to run their
affairs by themselves. But the
necessary condition for this is ab-
solute severance from the various
terrorist organizations. The PLO
with its various branches poses
the danger to their future and
well-being and it is the obstacle to
a settlement and to peace."
He invited the Arabs of the ad-
ministered territories who reject
terrorism to enter into dialogue
with Israelis. He also promised
"to ensure Israeli Arabs their
rights and the advancement of
their living conditions." He ap-
pealed to Arab "public figures and
educators" in Israel "to exert
their influence in order to deepen
the affinity and loyalty of Israeli
Arabs toward the State" and to
serve as "a bridge between Israel
and its Arab neighbors (to) ex-
pedite understanding and peace in
the region."
Shamir pledged that "The
government will continue in-
defatigably to create conditions
that will enable Israel and Jordan
to live in peace alongside each
other. But we will not be able to
attain this without free, direct,
face-to-face discussion. No inter-
national forum can serve as a
substitute for direct negotiations.
"IT IS ALSO perfectly dear
that peace and the terrorist
organizations cannot coexist, and
therefore we are following with
interest Jordan's trend to free
itself of any relationship with the
PLO," Shamir said. He expressed
regret that "despite efforts of the
government, with the assistance
of representatives of the United
States government, Jordan has
not yet responded to our call to
come to the negotiation table."
"The State of Israel has more
than once proved its sincere
desire for peace through the dif-
ficult and painful sacrifices made,
both in life and property, within
the framework of the various
agreements with its neighbors, up
to and including the peace treaty
with Egypt," Shamir said.
He said that although there are
disputes within the government
over tactics, "not over essence
and goals," there is "no point or
purpose in fanning the dispute
amongst ourselves so long as the
Arab side has not presented a pro-
posal that is acceptable to even
part of the government."
BUT SHAMIR stressed that
"We shall not sit idly by. The
government will continue to in-
itiate and seek ways to peace and
we shall not let the initiative fall
from our hands."
He said the government will
continue to adhere to the basic
guidelines continuing the peace
process, as agreed to at Camp
25-Member Cabinet Changed
Little With Unity Rotation
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The 25-member Cabinet
presented to the Knesset
Monday by incoming
Premier Yitzhak Shamir dif-
fers only slightly from the
outgoing national unity
Cabinet headed by Shimon
Peres. It consists of 10
Likud Ministers, including
the Premier, and nine Labor
Ministers. The remaining
six Ministers represent the
minor parties in the
coalition.
The new Cabinet is as follows:
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
(Likud-Herut).
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres (Labor).
Deputy Premier and Minister of
Housing and Construction
David Levy (Likud-Herut).
Deputy Premier and Education
Minister Yitzhak Navon
(Labor).
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin (Labor).
Finance Minister Moahe
Nisaim (Likud-Liberal).
Minister of Trade and Industry
- Ariel Sharon (Likud-Herut).
Maaafrr of Economic Coordina-
tion-Gad Yaacobi (Labor).
Agriculture Minister Aryeh
Nshamkin (Labor).
Minister of Justice and Minister
of Tourism Avraham Sharir
(Likud-Liberal).
Minister of Transport Haim
Corfu (Likud-Herut).
Minister of Energy and In-
frastructure Moshe Shahal
(Labor).
Minister of Communications
Amnon Rubinstein (Shinui).
Minister of Interior Yitzhak
Peretz (Shash).
Minister of Public Security
Haim Barlev (Labor).
Minister of Health Shoshana
Arbeli Almoslino (Labor).
Minister of Immigration and
Absorption Yaacov Tsur
(Labor).
Minister of Labor and Social Af-
fairs Moshe Katzav (Likud-
Herut).
Minister of Science and
Technology Gideon Part (Likud-
Liberal).
Minister of Religious Affairs
Zevulun Hammer (National
Religious Party)
Ministers-Without-Portfolio:
Moshe Arens (Likud-Herut);
Yigael Hurwitz (Ometz); Yoaef
Shapira (Moraaha): Ezer Weizman
i Yahad): Yitzhak Modai (Likud-
Liberal).
/
David. But within those
guidelines, "Israel will oppose the
establishment of an additional
Palestinian state in the Gaza
district and between Israel and
Jordan and will not negotiate with
the PLO."
Shamir hailed Israels relations
with the U.S. which, he said,
reached an 'unprecedented peak"
after President Reagan's 1983 en-
dorsement of strategic coopera- __________ ______
tion between the two countries. ^^^^j- ^
"President Reagan thus laid the ^^^*^^^^"*
foundation for a very close j^ AUda Gomales Fackinello ofArgentina is one of 11 docton.
framework of cooperation which nurset and paramedical personnel currently enrolled in the %%
has increasingly developed since." (emotional Masters degree program of the School of Publv
Shamir said. Health and Community Medicine at the Hadassah-Htbriv
"In the past two years, we con University Medical Center in Jerusalem. More than too medwsl
tinued to consolidate and foster professionals from kO nations have participated in the program
these important relations. Today ^^ Us founding.
we have reached a situation when
Israel and the U.S. are allies in (.. ,
Red Cross Says 'No' Again
many spheres, and formal expres-
sion should be given to this net-
work of relations. The govern-
ment will persist in developing
special relations with the 1
-
Jewish Film Festival Resumes
PARIS (JTA) The Jewish Film Festival was in-
augurated Wednesday (Oct. 22) by Cultural Affairs
Minister Francois Leotard. The festival was cancelled last
month by the owner of the cinema where it was to be held,
at the height of the terrorist wave which struck Paris.
FESTIVAL ORGANIZER Emile Weiss protested at
the time, saying that it was "giving in to terrorist threats"
and promising that the festival would be held as planned.
Weiss told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency Monday that
the month-long festival during which 65 films will be shown
will be held at the Paris Jewish Community Center. He said
that some 10,000 people are expected to attend.
TEL AVIV (JTA) A top-level delegation of
Israel's Magen David Adorn will go to Geneva this week for
our great friend, and will give this the 25th quadrennial conference of the International Com-
mittee for the Red Cross (ICRC). But their status will be
only as observers.
THE ICRC HAS REFUSED, for political reasons, to
recognize the MDA, which is Israel's equivalent of the Red
Cross. Israel has repeatedly sought full membership in the
ICRC. which recognized the Moslem Red Crescent shortly
after the Red Cross was established in 1907.
Israel's first application was submitted in 1949.
topic high priority."
SHAMIR EXPRESSED hope
that there will be "a change of
heart on the part of the Eastern
bloc countries" toward Israel,
"first and foremost the USSR."
"Nonetheless," he said, "it is
our duty as a Jewish State to de-
mand of the Soviet government to
change its attitude toward our
people living in its territory and to
allow them to live as Jews, to
unite with their people and to im-
migrate to their homeland."
In his peroration. Shamir
declared: "From Jerusalem must
go forth a call to our people in all
parts of the diaspora: Come back
home, for EreU Yisrael is your
place. We will receive you with
open arms in order to continue
marching together toward the
great and glorious chapter in the
history of our people: The chapter
of perfect redemption of the
Jewish people in its land."
Gaucher's Disease Week Slated
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Congress has adopted a joint
resolution declaring this week Na-
tional Gaucher's Disease
Awareness Week. The resolution
was sponsored by Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum (D.. Ohio) and Rep.
Lawrence Smith (D.. Fla.) to help
bring public attention to the little
known, but devastating genetic
disorder.
Gaucher's Disease afflicts ap-
proximately 20.000 persons in the
United States and is most
prevalent among Jews of East
European ongin. according to
Michael Epstein, president of the
National Gaucher Foundation
The Washington hast-i founda-
tion was founded in 1984 to in-
itiate research programs aimed V.
development of a cure and treat
ment for the disease which is even
more prevalent amontf Jews than
the better-known Tay Sachs
Disease
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Just Glatt Kosher.
he Omni International Hotel
proudly announces our new.
complete glatt kosher kitchen, the
only one of its kind in downtown
Miami. So now, along with Miami's
largest ballroom and a variety or
versatile banquet and meeting rooms.
the Omni has the finest glatt kother
catering facilities. For bar mitrvahs,
weddings, parties and special
occasions. Whether your affair is
small or a cast of thousands. L'chaim!


Elegant Scientist
Her Father Was 'Free-Thinker'
By USA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) Dr.
I Rita Levi-Montalcini, who
last week shared the Nobel
IPrize in Medicine and
(Physiology with American
biochemist Stanley Cohen,
[comes from a family of
lltalian Jewish intellectuals
lin Turin.
Now. at 77. this small, elegant,
aright-eyed woman recalls first
hearing the expression "free-
thinker" from her father. Prof.
Giussepe Levi, at the age of three.
That and deeply ingrained
feminism her idol, she says, was
Simone de Beauvoir defined her
life and work. But her distinguish
d career was also shaped by the
t-ople and events that marked the
fate of the Jewish people in this
century.
HER FAMILY left Italy to
tscape the stultifying and
repressive atmosphere of
lussolini's fascism. They lived in
Belgium for a time, but when the
ana invaded in 1940, they fled
ack to Italy. Because she was
Jewish, she was denied employ-
Itroessner Orders
]nd To Outbursts
NEW YORK (JTA) -
'araguay's strongman,
" ?n. Alfredo Stroessner,
las ordered an end to a
vave of anti-Semitic out-
)ursts which had swept his
country in recent weeks, the
"Vorld Jeiwsh Congress
reported.
"There is not, nor will there be
lit; Semitism in Paraguay," the
?neral stated in a letter to WJC
resident Edgar Bronfman.
5troessner's letter was in reply to
cable from Bronfman on Sept.
I:; which asked the General to in-
ervene and put a halt to the anti-
emitic wave which had left the
lewish community of Paraguay
[living in a state of alarm."
On Sept. 10, posters appeared
iroughout Asuncion, capital of
Paraguay, calling on the popula-
tion not to patronize shops owned
ly Jews because "they rob the
auntry and send the money to Tel
iviv and Moscow." The posters
steti 20 shops with the names of
heir Jewish owners.
ANOTHER POSTER said.
Wanted: Jews. Dead or alive for
lling Christ, for establishing the
>mmunist Party, for causing
world wars, for bombing Li-
yan and killing children, for plan-
ng three world wars."
In his cable, Bronfman asked
t Stroessner act to "ensure the
wish community of Paraguay of
t safety they so direly need in
w of "the general manifests
n of terrorism" against Jews
d particularly "in the aftermath
the anti-Jewish terrorist attack
Turkey."
Stroessner, in his reply to
>nfman, stated he was the
rst to condemn" the ap-
ce of anti-Jewish posters.
*fore receiving your message I
already given instructions to
competent national
thonties to intervene with
Jery energy in defense to the
wish community, as a means of
oiding any misconduct on the
n of people interested in harm-
K the prestige of our country.
Tin my fatherland, all persons
respected, whatever their na-
nalities. This is why we will not
ow irresponsible people to
ow a shadow over the well-
rved prestige of my country."
Jhere are some 1,000 Jews who
* m Paraguay out of a general
>ulation of nearly 3.5 million.
ment and research facilities,
though she already held a
doctorate.
Because of the family's opposi-
tion to fascism, they were forced
to live clandestinely in Florence
under the assumed name of
Lovisato, from "southern Italy,"
a disguise belied by their northern
Italian accent.
In a makeshift laboratory, set
up in her bedroom. Levi-
Montalcini conducted ex-
periments secretly during the war
years. She begged for eggs "for
needy children" from farmers and
extracted the embryos for her
work. The results of her ex-
periments went unpublished in
fascist Italy because "she belong-
ed to the Jewish race."
RECOGNITION came in post
war Italy and in the U.S.. where
she went in 1947 to accept a
teaching and research post with
Prof. Viktor Hamburger at
Washington University in St.
Louis. Mo.
Levi-Montalcini was the first
woman admitted to the Pontifical
Academy of Science and, in 1968.
the sixth woman to gain admit-
tance to the American Academy
of Science. Long before getting
the Nobel Prize, she won two ma-
jor international prizes, the
Medicineltrinelli in 1969 and the
St. Vincent in 1970.
Her Nobel Prize stemmed from
work completed in the U.S. in
1951: discovery of NGF. a protein
growth factor that stimulates
nerve cell development. It was the
result, she says, of an intuition
best described in a Latin proberb
which states that there is
physiological connection between
a sound mind and a sound body.
THE DISCOVERY, and
parallel work by Cohen, hold out
promise that cures can be found
for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's
diseases, which attack the human
nervous system. It has also led to
further research on the relation
between nerver cells and the im-
munological defense system.
Friday, October 24, 19&6/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Pickering Says U.S.-Israel
Relations Better Than Ever
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Thomas Pickering, the
United States Ambassador
to Israel declared last
Wednesday night (Oct. 15)
that Israeli-American rela-
tionships have "never been
better.
Addressing more than 500 peo-
ple attending the annual dinner of
the American Friends of Haifa
University at the Pierre Hotel
here, the American envoy said
that "despite some tough tests
over the past year, it's (American-
Israeli relations) as good as it has
ever been. We have a thriving
security relationship, and we are
partners in strategic cooperation.
We are working together on a
peace process. Israel's economy is
recovering."
PICKERING NOTED.
however, that there are also
"challenges" in American-Israeli
relations and "we need to con-
tinue to work together to deal
with problems that arise between
us."
One of the challenges, the Am-
bassador said, is the need for
Israel to become independent
economically and to reduce its
dependence on U.S. economic
assistance.
"Obviously, I am not suggesting
that Israel's future security needs
in the absence of peace can be met
without U.S. help. But on the
economic side, there should be
ways to reduce the dependence
and thus increase the harmony
and mutual respect which both na-
tions feel for each other," he said.
Pickering praised the
"remarkable economic perfor-
mance of Israel over the last 15
months." But now, he observed,
Israel should take the next step
"which is no less crucial. This is
the challenge of economic
growth."
^c/fflrjt#fi .Ktn/e.-iwe.Mi Steivuie/ < 4dp i-m
You Are Cordially Invited To Attend
The Jose Marti Forest Park Inaugural Ball
Dedicated To The Establishment of
The 430,000 Tree Jose Marti Forest Park
In The Judean Hills, Jerusalem
vfvewt. f .Mti'uleefi-ftt ijtauan
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1986
Grand Ballroom of the Omni Hotel
1601 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
tjt/latyGt SfowJeb SPutMteg
MAYOR STEPHEN P. CLARK
MAYOR ISIDORO CUEVAS
MAYOR ALEX DAOUD
MAYOR RAUL MARTINEZ
MAYOR PEDRO REBOREDO
MAYOR DOROTHY THOMSON
Cocktails 6:30 P.M.
Dinner 8:00 P.M.
DR. AND MRS. HORACIO AGUIRRE
DR. AND MRS. LUIS BOTIFOL
MR. AND MRS. ZEV BUFMAN
MR. AND MRS. GEORGE FELDENKREIS
MR. AND MRS. ABEL HOLTZ
MR. AND MRS. JORGE MAS CANOSA
MR. AND MRS. ISAAC MILDENBERG
MR. AND MRS. ISAAC OLEMBERG
MR. AND MRS. RALPH SANCHEZ
MR. AND MRS. ANDRES VARGAS GOMEZ
$<&& < l( Jose M Alonso
Rabbi Amram Amselem
Ramiro Campins
Xiomara Casado
Consul David Cohen
Flora Cornlde
JoseCredi
SolCredi
EmilioCalleia
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen
Executive Vlce-Pree.
JNF of America
Jorge Cunill
Guarlone Diaz
Cary Oe Leon
Diego Del Pino
Richard Druks
Moises Eshkenazi
Angel Fernandez Varela
Rolando Fernandez Padron
Fernando Figueredo
Martha Franchi de Diaz
Salomon Garazl
Luisa Garcia Toledo
Rafael Garcia-Toledo
Juan Garcia
Silvia Garcia Frutos
Virginia Godoy
Fernandez Gomez Plna
WllfredoGort
Sergio Grobler
Jose Heres
Rabbi Barry J. Konovich
Isaac Maya
Ana Maria Montes Flores
Juan Matalon
Nancy Perez Crespo
JoseJ Poza
Comm. Abe Resnick
Norma Reboredo
Rosie Rrvas
Lula Rodriguez
Julio Schniadoski
Rela Schniadoski
Gloria Sotolongo
Leon Schuster
Evlta L. Suarez
RitaSuarez
ZevW. Kogan
PrMktont
JNF Southern Region
Nlly Falic
Director
KKL Latin Division
Mordechai Dayan
World Co Chairman
KKL Jerusalem
For Information and Reservations:
JNF Keren Kayemeth Leisrael-Latin Division, 420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 349, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 532-8706, 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986

Rabbi Arthur Schneier (center), president of
the Appeal of Conscience Foundation,
presents a crystal star to the U.S. Ambassador
to the United Nations Vernon Walters (second
from left) far 'strengthening international
understanding among many nations' at the
Foundation'8 annual dinner in New York.
Carroll and Milton Petrie (right), noted
philanthropists, were honored for 'strengthen-
ing human dignity, social justice and the
quality of life.' Left is Archbishop Iakovos.
Primate of the Greek Orthodox Diocese of
North and South America, who pronounced
the benediction concluding the dinner.
Soviet Religious Leader
m On Twelve-Day U.S. Visit
NEW YORK (JTA) -
For the first time in the
history of the Soviet Union,
the chairman of the Council
of Religious Affairs of the
USSR a post equivalent
to that of Minister of
Religion is visiting the
United States, it was an-
nounced here.
The announcement was made
by Rabbi Arthur Schneier, presi-
dent of the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, at a dinner in the
Pierre Hotel honoring Milton and
Carroll Petrie and Vernon
Walters. Ambassador of the
United States to the United
Nations.
SCHNEIER SAID the Soviet
official Constantine Karchev
was to arrive in the United States
on Sunday for a 12-day stay as the
guest of the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, an ecumenical coali-
tion of laymen and religious
leaders concerned with religious
freedom around the world.
At the dinner, Schneier
presented awards in the form of
Steuben crystal stars to Milton
and Carroll Petrie he is a noted
philanthropist and chairman of
the Petrie Stores Corporation
"for strengthening human digni-
House Passes Anti-Vandalism Bill
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
bill that would impose criminal
penalties on anyone who damages
religious property or injures per-
sons in their free exercise of
religious belief was adopted by the
House by a voice vote. The bill, in-
troduced by Rep. Dan Glickman
(D., Kans.), sets penalties up to
life imprisonment in cases where
death results, and fines up to
$600,000.
Sen. Arien Specter (R., Pa.) has
introduced a similar bill in the
Senate. But because of Reagan
Administration opposition, there
is little chance it will be adopted
before Congress adjourns for the
election campaigns, according to a
spokesperson for the Senate.
The spokesperon said the Ad-
ministration believes these crimes
should be dealt with by state and
local governments and not the
federal government.
Glickman said the bill is aimed
at deterring a small minority in
this country "who see fit to van-
dalize and destroy religious pro-
perty and in turn to jeopardize the
freedoms of others to safely prac-
tice their religious beliefs.'
He said while the majority of
these acts have been motivated by
anti-Semitism, "this problem is by
no means limited to the Jewish
faith. The entire range of faiths,
including Baptists, Catholics and
Episcopal, have been the targets
of such attacks." Glickman added
that an effort must be made to
"eliminate both the root of the
problem and the symptoms."
Panel Probing War Criminals
Given Six-Week Extension

TORONTO (JTA) The
Deschenes commission in-
vestigating Nazi war criminals liv-
ing in Canada has lecenred a six-
week extension. Commission co-
counsel Yves Fortier said its
"report is 96 percent finished."
The extension was granted to
allow suspected war criminals
named in the report time to ex-
amine the evidence against them.
This is required by the Inquiries
Act under which the one-man
commission, headed by Quebec
Superior Court Judge Jules
Deschenes was crested in
February, 1966.
The commission was mandated
to determine whether Nazi war
criminals are in Canada, how they
got here, how many of them are
there and what can be done to br-
ing them to justice. The deadline
for its report, originally
December, 31, 1986, has been
periodically extended during the
past year.
ty, social justice and the quality of
life." Walters was cited as a
military officer and diplomat
"who has served his country with
distinction and strengthened in-
ternational understanding among
many nations."
In announcing the visit of Kar
chev, Schneier stated that the
Soviet official will meet with
representatives of Catholic, Greek
Orthodox, Jewish and Protestant
lay and religious leaders. "He will
observe at first-hand the diversity
of American religious life."'
SCHNEIER SAID Karchev s
itinerary in the United States will
include visits to Atlanta.
Washington and New York
Schneier, who is also the spiritual
leader of the Park East
Synagogue, told the 600 guests,
"We are hopeful that Mr. Kar-
chev's visit to our country will
lead to an expansion of contacts
between religious communities in
the United States and the Soviet
Union."
Schneier reported that the Ap
peal of Conscience Foundation
had established "close and friend
ly relations" with the Academy of
Social Sciences of the People's
Republic of China and that a
series of exchanges had already
taken place, with additional visits
expected. In 1986 two Chinese
scholars spent a year at American
universities and theological
seminaries under the Founda-
tion's auspices to study American
religious life and thought.
"So positive were these ex-
periences that further religious
exchange agreements were reach
ed," Schneier said, noting: "The
Chinese Academy of Social
Sciences has accepted our invita-
tion to Prof. Gao Wangzhi,
China's leading authority on
Christianity and Judaism, to study
in the United States beginning
early next year."
IN ADDITION. Chinese
authorities have agreed to par-
ticipate in a conference of Chinese
and American scholars on religion
and society to be convened by the
Appeal of Conscience in New
York next year. Books and
periodicals will be exchanged by
the Foundation and the Academy
as well."
Survey: The Placement
Of Women Rabbis
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Five of the 20 women or-
dained as Conservative,
Reform and Reconstruc-
tionist rabbis last May and
June have been placed as
assistant rabbis, and four
have been named as solo
rabbis, according to the an-
nual Jewish Telegraphic
Agency survey of such
placements.
Solo rabbis is a term indicating
that a synagogue is too small to
either need or be able to afford
more than one rabbi.
The 20 brings to 130 the number
of women ordained as rabbis since
the practice of ordination of
women began in 1972.
The JTA was also informed that
two of the new women rabbis have
returned to study to earn advanc-
ed degrees and that several hsve
taken administrative posts in both
Jewish and general agencies.
THE ONLY woman to have
received ordination as a Conser-
vative rabbi last June. Nina Feins
tein. has returned to her native ci-
ty, Dallas, apparently without
seeking placement. A spokesper-
son told the JTA that the plans of
Feinstein were not known. Feins
tein is the second woman to be or-
dained as a Conservative rabbi.
Seven women were graduated
as Reconstructionist rabbis.
Among them is Avis Miller of
Pawtucket, R.I., named assistant
rabbi of Adath Israel Congrega-
tion, a Conservative congregation
in Washington. She was described
as the first woman to serve in that
post.
Sheils Weinberg of New York
has been named rabbi of Beth Am
Shalom, a Conservative congrega-
tion in Penn Valley. Pa. She is the
first woman to serve that con-
gregation. She is a solo rabbi.
Sue Levy of Abington. Pa. has
been named rabbi of Beth Shalom,
a Conservative synagogue in
Dover, Del. This also is a solo
pulpit Judy Gary of Richmond,
Va. is engaged in full time study
for a doctorate in Jewish
philosophy at Temple University.
LAUREN LEVY of Plainsboro.
N.J. has been named program
director at the Hillel of RutgeR
University. Joan Sacks has
returned to Philadelphia to be
with her husband while she pUn?
her next steps as a rabbi Gai]
Glicksman of Yaedon, Pa. has
been appointed to a position in the
health professions division of th<
University of Pennsylvania
Five of the Reform women rab-
bis were named to posts as aacu.
tant rabbis. They are Shirs
Milgrom of Berkeley. Jewish Community Center a
White Plains. NY. Judith CoW
Rosenberg of Brooklyn, at B'nth
Kodesh Temple in Rochester.
N.Y.; Ellen Greenspann of
Scarsdale, N.Y.. at Congregation
Rodeph Shalom in Philadelphia.'
Pauls Winnig of Milwaukee, at
Temple Sinai of Roslyn in Rosin
Heights, N.Y.; and Sue LeV
Elwell of Buffalo. N Y at Leo
Baeck Temple in Los Angeles
Margaret Holub of Tusun. Cal.
has been named an advocate in
the Legal Aid Foundation of Loi
Angeles.
MARGARET MEYER of Cin-
cinnati has been named rabbi of
Temple Beth Sholom of Mid
dletown, Ohio. Linda Motzlrin of
Los Angeles has been named co-
rabbi with her husband. Jonathan
Rubenstein, at Temple Sinai in
Saratoga, NY.
Julie Schwartz of Cincinnati has
received an appointment as a IS
Navy chaplain, with the rank of
lieutenant, junior grade, in San
Francisco. Eve Ben-Ora, of Min-
neapolis, has been named director
of education and programming at
Temple Emanuel in Denver
Ruth Langer of Pittsburgh did
not accept a pulpit appointment
because she married Dr. Jonathan
Sarna, a member of the faculty of
the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion (Hl'C-JIRl.
where she had been ordained a
Reform rafibi Sarna is on a sab-
batical in Israel langer is study
ing for a doctorate in rabbinic
literature at the Jerusalem cam-
pus of the HUC-JIR
Nina Mizrachi ha> i>een named
assistant director of the Depart-
ment of Outreach of the I'mon of
American Hebrew I ^-regatwns
the central Rations agssej ot
Reform congregat.
Ephraim Katzir Elected
President Of ORT Union
JERUSALEM Prof.
Ephraim Katzir. former President
of the State of Israel and chair
man of Israels Region 2000 hi-
tech development project, was
elected president of the World
ORT Union Sept. 22 at the World
ORT Union Congress in
Jerusalem
Delegates from ORT organiza-
tions in 27 countries attended the
Congress, held once every six
years to determine future direc-
tions for the high technology
training and Jewish education at
ORT schools and training centers
throughout the ORT globsl
network.
In his acceptance speech. Katzir
noted: "Brainpower is, and
always has been, the most plen-
tiful natural resource of the
Jewish people. The aim of ORT.
throughout its 106-year history,
has been to nurture this resource!
snd train people to meet the
challenge of the working world
"By providing Jews with the
means to learn technical slaUs wd
upgrade their own lives. ORT en-
sures the continuity and viaWt)
of the Jewish people As pres
dent, I will work to continue this
fine tradition which was begun
over a century ago."
Katsir's first official vwt wtht
United States on behalf of W*
will be as guest speaker at m
American ORT Federaoon N*
tional Conference banquet
won. Jsn. 24 in New York City
In addition to Katzir. other
speakers at the Congress ind**
Chshn Herzog, Prewdent of Ur*
snd immediate past president
the World ORT Union. W*
Prime Minister Shimon t
Yitzhak Nsvon, Deputy rwj
Minister of Israel and Minister
Education snd Culture; and lea
dy Kollek. Mayor of Jerusalem


Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
West Germany Presents
Holocaust Memorial
Book To Israel
Leaders of the Union of American Hebrew
I'migregation's Henry S. Jacobs Camp for
I.iring Judaism in Utica, Miss., hold Torah
trrolls from congregations in once-populous
Southern Jewish communities. A new
/
museum-synagogue at the camp will house
these Torahs and other artifacts from
synagogues that have fallen into disuse as
their members move to larger cities.
\Plough Foundation Grant
To Preserve History of Early Jewish Pioneers
To meet the needs of small
Jewish communities in the
Deep South and to preserve
the history of early Jewish
pioneers in the region, the
Plough Foundation of Mem-
I phis. Term, has made a
grant of $540,000 for a
synagogue-museum com-
plex at the Union of
American Hebrew Con-
gregation's Henry S. Jacobs
Camp for Living Judaism in
[Utica, Miss., it was an-
nounced recently by Rabbi
Alexander M. Schindler,
|UAHC president.
Camp Jacobs is a cultural and
[religious center that serves
I families from 42 Reform con-
Igretfations in Mississippi, Arkan-
sas. Louisiana and Western Ten-
Jnessee. Year-round programs in-
Iclude camping for persons of all
|am-s, weekend retreats, college
>uth activities, adult seminar
enes and congregational outings.
The facilities of Camp Jacobs have
liso been frequently placed at the
>|K'sal of neighboring church
Hi civic groups for their own pro-
rams. It was founded in 1970.
OF THE 42 synagogues served
ky the camp, 28 have fewer than
K"1 families and 24 have no full-
rabbi. "For the 28 congrega-
i<>riN Camp Jacobs is a major
ter of Jewish life, filling the
created by declining con-
relations and assisting
m' agogues that do not have full
me rabbis,'" according to Macy
I Hart, camp director.
lie explained that some of the
mailer synagogues in the region
ire disappearing as their
Jiembers move to the larger cities
the region where Reform
(rnagogues are growing or to
etropolitan centers in other
of the country.
["In recent years," Hart said,
the camp has become a
ository for many beautiful
_gious artifacts. Our museum
pi chronicle the development
*d contribution of the Southern
wish experience and will serve
I an enduring legacy of a proud
I committed Jewish population.
TBy housing the artifacts of
"lagogues that no longer exist as
^result of shifting population
ends," he added, "the museum
pi preserve the rich history of
*se once populous Southern
vish communities."
IN A STATEMENT hailing the
retribution, Rabbi Schindler
dared: "The Plough Founda-
?n gift will permit the construc-
1 of a synagogue-sanctuary
that seats 330 persons and a
library-museum complex to
display the artifacts, documents
and exhibits depicting the life of
early Jewish communities of the
Deep South.
"The museum will keep alive
the memory of once-flourishing
Jewish communities of the Deep
South, part of the little-known
history of the pioneering days of
American Jewry, thanks to the
generosity of the Plough
Foundation.
"In addition," he noted, "the
new synagogue that will be built
at Camp Jacobs will enhance the
camp's role in revitalizing Jewish
life in the region."
Vicki Reikes Fox, formerly of
Hattiesburg, Miss., will serve as
museum consultant to Camp
Jacobs. Fox is the former curator
at the gallery of arts and artifacts
of the Hebrew Union College cam-
pus in Cincinnati and former
curator of education for the Dan
forth Museum of Art.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-
A Memorial Book recording
the names of more than
128,000 German Jews killed
by the Nazis was presented
by the West German
government to Israel
recently in ceremonies at
the Yad Vashem Holocaust
center here.
Prof. Hans Booms, head of the
Federal Republic's Archives at
Koblenz, where the 1,700-page
book was compiled over the past
25 years, told the 300 guests at
the presentation ceremony that
there can be no rapprochement
between Germany and Israel if
Germany does not acknowledge
the stark realities of its past.
THE BOOK has an introduction
by West German President
Richard Von Weizsaecker, who
wrote: "Not only are we responsi-
ble for the consequences of what
happened, but our history would
come to an end if we attempted to
erase the years of terror from our
own consciousness."
The book contains the name,
date and place of birth, and date
and place of death of each of the
victims, where such information
was available. It is far from com-
plete, however.
Yad Vashem estimates that bet-
ween 170,000 and 200,000 Ger-
man Jews perished in the
Holocaust. The Memorial Book
does not contain the names of
Jewish victims from what is now
the East German Democratic
Republic, which refused to
cooperate in compiling the list. It
does, however, include the names
of Jews from East Berlin.
THE DATA were culled from
German municipal archives and
Red Cross lists. But many records
were destroyed in air raids. The
compilers also had problems with
spelling and had to weed out
duplications. The dates of death of
some 80,000 victims could not be
ascertained.
Other countries have under-
taken similar projects. Yad
Vashem already houses memorial
books from The Netherlands,
Belgium and France.
Solender on Job
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Stephen Solender has begun work
as executive vice president of the
United Jewish Appeal-Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies of New
York. From 1970-81.
Weekly ^,
Not Just Now and Then!
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 24, 1986
Grenade Attack
Bloodiest in Jerusalem Since '84
!Oi
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A grenade attack on Israeli
soldiers and their families in
the Old City Wednesday
evening (Oct. 15) killed one
person and wounded 69 in
the bloodiest terrorist foray
in Jerusalem in more than
two years.
The fatality. Dov Pont, 46. was
buried in Holon Thursday (Oct.
16). He was one of hundreds of
parents and relatives who had just
attended the swearing-in of 300
Israel Defense Force recruits of
the elite Givau Brigade at the
Western Wall, a short distance
from the scene of the carnage.
As of last Thursday noon. 34 of
the wounded were still hospitaliz-
ed. One was described in serious
condition, and seven others were
reported to have suffered
"medium" wounds.
POLICE AND border pohce de-
tained 18 Arab suspects for ques-
tioning and a curfew was clamped
on the Old City. But the search for
the terrorists spread to the West
Bank where the Jordan River
bridges were closed to block a
possible escape route for the
killers. Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe
Levy ordered an immediate in-
quiry into the circumstances of
the attack.
It occurred at 8:20 p.m. local
time, as the young IDF soldiers,
having just taken their oath and
been presented with rifles and
Bibles, were strolling with their
families to a parking lot at the
Dung Gate to board buses and
private cars for home.
According to police, three
Soviet-made F-l grenades were
huries at them from ambush by
two men who escaped in a car
driven by a third. Within moments
the place was "a bloody hell." one
eyewitness said. Dozens of wound-
ed lay on the pavement crving for
help.
WITHIN HOURS? the
Palestine Liberation Organization
claimed responsibility for the
assault in an announcement from
its office in Cairo. But two other
terrorist gangs also boasted of
responsibility for attacking armed
IDF soldiers. They are the Marx-
ist Democratic Front for the
Liberation of Palestine headed by
Naif Hawatmeh and a hitherto
unknown group calling itself the
Islamic Jihad Legion.
Police Say They've Arrested Three
'Terrorist Squad9 Members
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Police announced Sunday
the arrests of three
members of a "terrorist
squad" responsible for the
grenade attack on Israeli
soldiers and their families in
the Old City last Wednesday
in which one man was killed
and 69 soldiers and civilians
were wounded.
The suspects were described as
members of an extremist group
known as the Islamic Jihad (Holy
War), all in their 20's. Further
identification was withheld by
court order. Two of them,
residents of SU wan village on the
outskirts of Jerusalem, were ap-
prehended last Thursday, within
24 hours of the attack. The third.
who lives in the nearby village of
Abu Tor. was taken into custody
last Friday morning. They were
arraigned in magistrates court
Friday and remanded in custody
for seven days.
POLICE SOURCES said the
investigation is continuing, and
other arrests are possible. Accor-
ding to a police statement, the
suspects were recruited in Jordan
in 1985 by agents of El Fatah, the
terrorist arm of the Palestine
Liberation Organization. The
sources said they had planned for
nearly two years to carry out a
major assault in Jerusalem.
The soldiers and their families,
attacked following a swearing-in
ceremony for Israel Defense
Force recruits at the Western
Wall, were a target of opportuni-
ty, security sources said.
ADL Condemns Malaysia
For New Anti-Semitism
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has condemned
Malaysia for the latest inci-
dent of its "state sponsored
anti-Semitism" the expul-
sion of two reporters for the
Asian Wall Street Journal
and the banning of the
newspaper.
Malaysian Prime Minister
Umt^tUi* Mohamad, who is cur
rentry in New York for the United
Nations General Assembly
meeting, charged the newspaper
is "controlled by Jews" and is in-
volved in a "Zionist plot" to top-
ple his government.
Abraham H. Foxman. ADL's
-* national director and
head of its international Affairs
Dmaton. called on the interna-
tional community, "psrtjeularry
those nations with dose political
or economic ties with Malaysia, to
oat
IN A STATEMENT issued
here. Foxman cited a pattern of
Malaysian anti-Semitism. He
pointed out that last spring Malay-
sian authorities responded to
press critjeism of corruption in the
country by blaming "international
Jewish media."
In late 1964. he went on. the
New York Philharmonic Or-
chestra rs nee led a visit after
Malaysian officials banned the
performance of a work by the
composer Ernest Bloch
In addition. Foxman said.
Malaysia's voting record in the
United Nations has been con-
sistently anti- American as well as
anti-Israel and in 1964 Malaysia
enthusiastically welcomed
Palestine Liberation Organization
chief Yasir Arafat. He pointed out
that the nation's caital. Kuala
Lumpur, is host to officials of Iran
and Libya, as well as the PLO
These factors, be said, "mark
Malaysia as one of the most
hostile nations to Jews and
Israel"
Such claims from different
quarters are commonplace after
terrorist and are seen as attempts
to enhance the status of com-
peting terrorist organizations and
to confuse the authorities. In this
case there is some confusion over
the nature of the attack.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, who was on the scene last
Wednesday night, said he doubted
the attackers were aiming
specifically at the soldiers "PLO
terrorists try to hit us anywhere,
at any time, and any target will
do." he said.
GEN. (RES.) Rehavam Zeevi. a
former adviser on terrorism to the
Prime Minister, said on a radio in-
terview last Thursday that if
Rabin's assessment is based on in-
formation, he had nothing to add
But if the Defense Minister was
merely speculating, "one should
take into account the worst
possibility, that is that the ter-
rorists deliberately selected a
military target. If so. they showed
a greater degree of chutzpah (ef-
frontery) and courage" than in the
past. Zeevi said.
The inquiry ordered by the
Chief of Staff will try to deter-
mine whether the swearing-in
ceremony for the recruits, con-
ducted under brilliant spotlights
at the Western Wall, had been
adequately protected and if pro-
per security measures were taken,
inasmuch as many civilians were
at the ceremonies.
Zeevi called for a more intensive
war on terrorists. He said it
should be continuous, employing
whatever measures are necessary
and should not ebb and flow along
with the incidence of terrorist
acts. He urged capital punishment
for convicted terrorists.
The grenade attack also had
repercussions on Israel's relations
with Egypt, which have warmed
considerably of late since Egypt
returned its Ambassador to Tel
Aviv. The fact that the PLO an-
nouncement claiming responsibili-
ty emanated from Cairo triggered
angry reactions among Israelis.
THE EGYPTIAN envoy.
Mohammad Bassiouny. was sum-
moned to the Foreign Ministry
last Thursday and handed a for-
mal letter of protest to his govern-
ment. It said the Cairo announce-
ment was contrary to "the new
spirit" in relations between the
two countries. One Knesset
member. Haim Druckman of the
National Religious Party, urged
Israel to demand that the Egyp-
tians close down the PLO office in
their capital.
The tragedy was personalized in
the exprerience of one recruit.
Omer Porat, 18, whose father was
fatally wounded. His mother.
Naomi, 43, and his sister. Liat, 21,
were also among the casualties.
Hit by grenade fragments, they
fell bleeding at his feet.
The young soldier, also wound-
ed, administered first aid to his
mother and sister and then went
in search of his father, who had
disappeared in the confusion. He
found him at the entrace of the
parking lot, bleeding profusely
while an officer attempted to
revive him.
"HE (his father) was losing a lot
of blood from his chest." Omer
told reporters at his hospital bed.
"He was breathing heavily."
After bandaging his father's
wound he accompanied him in an
ambulance to the hospital. There
doctors tried to save his life, but in
vain. "He died in my arms." Omer
said.
The previous worst terrorist at-
tack in Jerusalem occurred in
April. 1984 when a Palestinian
gunned down 48 persons in a
downtown street, killing one and
wounding the rest.
Dot- Roll. 18, a patient in the Orthopedics Department at the
Hadassah-Hebreu' University Medical Center in Jerusalem, and
S'urse Rachal Shalit shou- one of the 'get-well' cards created by
kindergarten children in the religious school at the Santa Monica
Synagogue in California.
Was Nelson Glueck
A Spy for OSS?
WASHINGTON Indiana
Jones aside, the world of ar-
chaeology has always been a
rather stodgy one scholars pa-
tiently poking into arcane and
obscure corners.
Now documents recently releas-
ed under the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act reveal that one of the
20th Century's greatest ar-
chaeologists. Nelson Glueck. was
a spy for the U.S. Office of
Strategic Services (OSS) during
World War II
WRITING IN the
September/October. 1986 issue of
"Biblical Archaeology Review."
Floyd Fierman reveals that
Glueck. a rabbi and director of the
American School of Oriental
Research (1936-1940). using an ar-
chaeological survey as a cover,
helped the Allied forces map the
Palestinian desert region in the
early days of the war.
The mapping especially noted
sources of water in the arid region
and areas of special strategic in-
terest to the Allies.
Fierman believes that Glueck
communicated with his OSS
superiors through brief "newslet-
ters" to archaeological colleagues
in the United States and
elsewhere.
The clandestine mapping was
part of a contingency plan in the
event the Allies should lose the
battle of El Alamein in North
Africa and have to retreat to the
east into British Mandate
Palestine.
EVEN AFTER the Allied vic-
tory at El Alamein (Oct. 23-Nov.
5. 1942), Glueck. dressed in an
Arab kefiyeh in order to blend in
with the population, remained in
Palestine, most likely, says Fier
man, to organize Arab guerrilla
bands in the area in the event the
Nazis might overrun the British
forces and occupy the Middle
East.
Glueck resigned from the OSS
on August 15. 1945. his work
done, and returned to his
distinguished archaeological in-
vestigations into the ancient
history of Israel and surrounding
lands.
The September/October issue of
"Biblical Archaeology Review"
contains both Rabbi Nelson
Glueck An Archaeologist's
Secret Life in the Service of the
OSS." by Fierman. as well a
revaluation of Glueck's excava-
tions at Tel El-Kheleifeh a site
he thought was Solomon's port ci-
ty of Ezion Geber, mentioned in
the books of Kings and Chronicles
by scholar Gary Pratico.
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Damage to Religious
Property Bill Hailed
By Jewish Leaders
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
NEW YORK The
[American Jewish Commit-
tee has hailed the passage
by the U.S. House of
Representatives of legisla-
tion that would impose
criminal penalties for willful
damage to religious proper-
ty or injury to persons in the
free exercise of their
| religious beliefs.
At the same time the human
I relations agency urged that the
ll'.S. Senate enact the parallel bill,
[which was recently introduced by
Senators Arlen Specter (R., Pa.)
land Howard Metzenbaum (D.,
Ohio), and it commended Rep.
|Dan Glickman (D., Kans.). who in-
troduced the House bill.
The AJC also urged that such
I'hate crimes" legislation should
linclude deliberate acts of violence
73 Headstones
Vandalized
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
[Seventy-three headstones were
knocked over by vandals at a
Jewish cemetery in East Los
\ngeles two days before the Rosh
lashanah holiday, the World
Jewish Congress reported here.
According to the WJC unit on
Ihe documentation of interna-
tional anti-Semitism, the vandals
struck Wednesday night, Oct. 1 at
khe Home of Peace Memorial
Park Although the tombstones
Were knocked from their moun-
tings, none was broken, and there
pu no graffiti, so the cost of
pepainng the damage will not be
Teat.
It is not clear whether the van-
dalism was timed to coincide with
he Rosh Hashanah holiday, as
kimilar acts of vandalism have oc-
curred during the last four weeks
ri two non-Jewish cemeteries in
he East Los Angeles area, the
h'lC reported.
The vandals apparently broke
nto the cemetery, entering it
Iter its gates had been locked for
he night.
|Zionist Honored
TORONTO (JTA) Neri J.
Hloomfield, president of the ('ana
lian Zionist Federation, has
ceived an honorary doctor of
law degree from St. Francis
Xavier University of Antigoniah,
''ova Scotia, and was invested as
officer into the Venerable
ler of Saint John of Jerusalem.
to religious articles such as Torah
scrolls.
RICHARD FOLTIN, AJCs
Associate Legal Director, stated
on learning of the House action:
"The House, by enacting this bill
by a unanimous voice-vote, has
sent a clear message not only that
'hate-crimes' are condemned, but
also that society will take effective
steps toward their eradication.
We urge the Senate to follow
suit."
While acknowledging the
primary and essential role of local
law enforcement agencies in deal-
ing with "hate crimes," the AJC
has asserted that the Federal
government has a role to play in
dealing with those crimes. In
testimony before the House
Judiciary Committee's Subcom-
mittee on Criminal Justice in
1985, Mr. Foltin called for
passage of a "hate crimes" bill,
stating that because "organized
hate groups are national or
regional in scope, the help of the
Federal government may be re-
quired in certain instances effec-
tively to deal with the problem."
In addition, he stated at that
time, "enactment of such legisla-
tion will carry to offenders, to vic-
tims and to society at large the im-
portant message that the nation is
committed to battling the violent
manifestations of bigotry and
racism."
AT THE hearing before the
Subcommittee, the AJCs legal
division was requested by Con-
gressman John Conyers, chair-
man of the Criminal Justice Sub-
committee, to prepare a
memorandum discussing constitu-
tional objections to the bill that
had been raised by the Depart-
ment of Justice. The legal division
concluded in its memorandum
that, whatever question might ex-
ist concerning Congress' authori-
ty generally to penalize criminal
acts motivated by religious
animus, there would be little ques-
tion of such authority if the bill
were amended so as to apply only
to acts that involved inter-state
activity.
In addition, the AJCs legal divi-
sion proposed certain changes in
the bill's language that would
eliminate any ambiguity that
might suggest the bill penalized
speech activities protected under
First Amendment. The "hate
crimes" bill, as enacted by the
House, substantially incorporated
those AJC comments. Moreover,
the House Judiciary Committee's
report on the bill cited with ap-
proval the AJC memorandum's
conclusions as to the constitu-
tionality of the bill.
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Left to right are Italian film director Franco
Zeferelli, Prime Minister Shimon Peres,
opera star Placido Domingo and Mayor Ted-
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
dy KolleJc at the recent premiere of 'Otello' in
Jerusalem.
On Yom Kippur
Austrian Bigwigs Visit Services
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) -
Austrian political and
church leaders made signifi-
cant gestures toward the
Jewish community over
Yom Kippur to counteract
the upsurge of anti-
Semitism which accom-
panied last summer's
Presidential election
campaign.
For the first time in Austrian
history, dignitaries of the Catholic
and Lutheran churches met with
Austrian Chief Rabbi Chaim
Eisenberg and leading members
of the Jewish community for a
"joint hour of meditation" on
Yom Kippur eve. Later,
Chancellor Franz Vranitzky
visited the Vienna Synagogue for
a prayer service.
THE HOUR of meditation was
initiated by Catholic Action and
the Laymen's Council. It was held
in the main hall of the Austrian
National Library, a building
erected by Emperor Franz Josef
II who granted Jews civil rights in
Austria in the latter half of the
18th Century.
The historic symbolism of the
site was not coincidental.
Observers noted that Austria's
small Jewish community is in need
of reassurance because of the anti-
Semitism that greeted the ex-
posure of President Kurt
Waldheim's Nazi past by Jewish
organizations before and since the
July 8 elections.
The new Bishop of Vienna,
Hans Hermann Groer, and the
senior Pastor of the Lutheran
Church, Alfred Jahn, attended
along with Chief Rabbi Eisenberg,
Ivan Hacker, president of the
Jewish community and others.
PAUL SCHULMEISTER.
president of Catholic Action, said,
"This joint meeting cannot be
taken for granted, but is indeed
very necessary. The immediate
cause of this meeting was the
disturbing upswing of anti-
Semitic tendencies during the
Austrian Presidential elections."
He added, "We do not want to
forget. We do not want to cover
with a cloak of silence what was
brought to the surface last sum-
mer in the matter of anti-Semitic
ideology, whether deliberate or
unintentional."
Vranitzky said at the
synagogue, "I want to declare in
my name and in the name of the
Austrian government, that we
want to do everything in the
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
OOOQOBOQOQOOI
future to avoid any doubts from
your side that our homeland is
also yours. Together we have
rebuilt Austria from the ruins,
and together we want to accept
the demands of the future. So I
want to ask you to join in coping
with those demands."
Mulroney
Chairs Fete
MONTREAL (JTA) Prime
Minister Brian Mulroney has an-
nounced that he will serve as
honorary chairman of the Ben-
Gurion Centennial Year in
Canada, marking the 100th an-
niversary of the birth of David
Ben-Gurion, the first Prime
Minister of Israel. The event is be-
ing celebrated in many countries
in addition to Israel.
The proceedings will be opened
in Montreal on Oct. 30 by Yitzhak
Navon, Israeli Minister of Educa-
tion and a former President of
Israel, who was a close associate
of Ben-Gurion.
The Canadian Parliament in Ot-
tawa will officially proclaim the
start of the centennial year at a
special session on Oct. 29
rQOOOBBBBOl
'Create Land From Sand"

HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $____________
Name
Address
Ptione
Apt No
'
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach. Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464


Pag* 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 24. 1986
Austria's 'Significant' Step
Toward Jews Hailed in U.S.
NEW YORK The Presi-
dent of the American
Jewish Committee.
Theodore Ellenoff. this
week welcomed as "a
significant and constructive
step forward** the issuance
of m polio- declaration by the
Austrian People's Party re-
jecting ''unambiguously .
(the use) of anti-Semitism by
anyone, in any form and
under any circumstances."
The Austrian People's Partv
iO*ttrrr%fk nek* \'olk*p*rteii
issued its statement through its
secretarr general. Dr Michael
Graff erf Vienna. Referring to the
iast Austrian Presaiental ejec-
tion*, daring wtuce anc-SeuuU&ui
surfaced- the People's Party
declaration stated.
"In bght of the cortrorersjes
created during the past presiden-
t2&. cKgoona. the Austrian Peo-
ple's Party wishes to underscore
esp- c- ui rejec-
tion of ano-Seaatoaw. against our
fieflow Jewish citistui by aayone.
in any form, under any
A CONCERN over the
manifestations o/ anb-Sesutasm
daring that campaign, which
resulted m the election of Dr.
Kurt Waidheun as PresxieEt. was
commumcated by a laaJsjaMl
mawaon of the American Jewafe
Committee m Aaguat m meecngs
with the top pohcy-maken as the
Austrian People's Party and the
Austrian Sooahst Party
Similar sJbjbji were expressed to
Chancellor Franz Vranitsky and
Dr Peter Jankowitaen. Foreign
lanawter. durmg recent meetings
Vienna and New York-
Leo Nevas chairman of the
AJC's Board of Governors, head-
ed the AJC mission to Austria
Aug. 24-28. which included Ed-
ward Ebon of Atlanta, chairman
of AJC's Board of Trustees; Miles
Jaffe of Detroit, chairman of
AJC's International Relations
Commission: Dr. David Gortfas.
AJC executive vice president;
Wilbam Trosten. AJC associate
director, and Rabbi Mark H.
Tanenbaum. AJC director of in-
ternational relations
Trosten and Rabbi Tanenbaum
visited Vienna on a follow-up mis-
sion recently to advance a number
of programs witfc several Austrian
research and academic
iknsctutions
IN HIS welcoming statement.
E'.'.enoff also acknowledged as
bh important the assurance
that the Austrian People's Party
has giver, to the small Austrian
Jewish community, our respected
Jewish citiens.' that it is 'absolute-
:etermined not to tolerate any
kmd of anb-SerrutJsm and to figfe:
against ar.y remnants of this vile
prejudice which must become
anathema to Austria and the
avijaed world.' '
That statement, the AJC presi-
dent added, a "undoubtedly the
most forthright repudiation of
anti-Semitism made by any
pohtjcai partv m Austria since the
end of World War II. and we
sincerely welcome it."
Elienoff also pointed out that
the affirmation by the People's
Party of its "commitments to .
democratic and anti-Nan tradi-
tions and that it is 'genuinely
ii iisig. to barn from the past' is
helpful in supporting our
cooperative program with a
""wh of key educarjonai and
cultural centers in Austna for ex-
sjnwawji the pace present, and
future relations of Austria and the
Jewish people."
Austrian Raps Israel's
Diplomatic Maneuver
VIENNA JTA. Akas
Mock, chairman of Presaden: Kurt
Wajdbam's conacrvatrre Pennies
Party, sharper artacs.ee Israei
Sunday for its decision to
downgrade its diplomatic
-rprtatntatka, m Austria.
According il a report m the da.-
v .New K~vm**xettn9. Mock, a
for the office of Prone
told a press conference
in Canntha, ptuume that Israel's
atstude was octrageous and that
he would iiajgat to Wilitum
that Austna recall :U Am-
hawaador to Israei.
HE WM spencng of the an-
aoancesBent by Israel's then
Foreign wTslii Yitihac Tn
WakaWsm's taacoon nc
repiace as Amsawnanar m
Michae-. Ehzur when the
irter recres shortly
A new envoy would have to pre-
at his credentials to Waidbeur..
Nan past was *rpined dur-
ing the election campaign- The
Vienna embassy therefore would
be left in the hands of a Charge
d' Affaires. Shamir said
According to .V a
K~:%<%z*\:%%g Mock said
SharrT statement and IsBaswl
reflected the views of a few
fanatics in Israel. "Austria must
not accept any recipes from
Israei. from a country that has
tkea~> Mock was quoted as
saying He also expressed anger
the World Jewish Congress
agajst Watdheim.
Saudi Arabia Gives
$28.5 Million to PLO
LONDON (JTA) Saudi Arabia gave the PLO
$28.5 mifiioc earber this month, the World Jewish Con-
gress reported. Announcement at the transfer of the funds
was made in a statement from the Saudi Press Agency in
Riyadh, monitored here by WJC sources.
RAFIQ AI-NATSHAH. the PLO representative in
Riyadh, saw that the sum represents Saudi Arabia's annual
cuBUimuoc to the PLO and was ir. accordance with the
resolution of the F-c*"4*'* A**0 summit held in 1979.
More than any other state Saudi Arabia
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.4 short play enacted by recent immigrants
from the USSR to Israel of the summit
meeting between President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev takes place opposite
the American Embassy in Jerusalem. In the
play 'Reagan' hands 'Gorbachev' a petition
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
regarding Soviet Prisoners of Zion, which
'Gorbachev' proceeds to burn. The 'prisoner'
was played by Zvi Patios, a professional mime
and brother of Prisoner of Zion Igor
Guberman.
No:
Iceland Weakens Rights Hopes
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The failure of President
eagan and Soviet leader
likhail Gorbachev to reach
agreement on arms con-
trol during their meetings in
Iceland may also diminish
>ossibilities for im-
provements in Soviet
human rights practices, in-
cluding Jewish emigration
from the USSR.
Both Reagan and Secretary of
State George Shultz in their
reports on the Iceland talks
stressed that human rights were
discussed, and Shultz hinted that
a statement in the issue was in the
French Rightist LePen Made
Impressive Gains This Year
Continued from Page 4-A
rench television in February,
984, Le Pen stated: "I am accus-
of fascism, of anti-Semitism.
*h>s is a disinformation maneuver
9 the Communist press.'* Le Pen
lleged that charges of his anti-
lemitism stemmed from "intellec-
:ual terrorism." To prove that he
vas not an anti-Semite, he
rted, did not mean he had "to
ve the Veil law, the paintings of
hagall and the politics of
lendes-France." (The late Pierre
lendes-France, a Jew, was a
rench Prime Minister.)
Le Pen said that Mendes
ranee inspired in him a
patriotic and almost physical
pulsion." Perhaps realizing the
icist ring to this, he quickly ex-
lained that his objections to the
loted French politician were
aesthetic."
Le Pen has waged war against
s accusers. During his recent
mpaign. ^ie successfully sued
ore than 20 journalists and
olitical opponents for asserting
Without sufficient legal proof that
was racist, fascist or anti
emitic.
LE PEN'S views have been
Wished in anti-Semitic public*
Pns in the U.S. He was inter-
red late in 1984. in The
p>thght. Liberty Lobby's weekly
ewspaper. A profile of him sp-
eared in a September, 1984 issue
[Supplies from Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mrael has ruahed medical and
ner supplies to help the
"estimated 100.000 people affected
Ry the earthquake in San
Salvador, capital of El Salvador.
ine supplies went to the Central
l".^ country by a special El
w night via New York. President
Pse Napoleon Duarte of El
alvador reported 876 dead. 8,176
ijured and 30.988 families
Pomeless as a result of the quake.
of the anti-Semitic publication. In
stauration, alluding to Le Pen as
"a new, younger Petain who
will again seek to hold France
together in a time of troubles ..."
Ironically, the National Front's
official line seems to be one of un-
conditional support for Israel,
which is viewed as a bulwark of
the West against the Soviet-
supported Arab countries who
promote terrorism and economic
crisis.
Still, Le Pen's behavior has the
French Jewish community wor-
ried, and almost all official Jewish
organizations and community
leaders in France and Belgium
have taken forthright positions
against him and the National
Front. Some have raised ques-
tions as to the wisdom of granting
large-scale publicity to him in the
Jewish press. AH agree that
priority must be given to monitor-
ing National Front activities
without exaggerating the
dangers.
A STUDY released in October,
1984. published by the Institute of
Jewish Affairs, in association with
the World Jewish Congress, and
prepared by the Paris-based
Center for Study and Research in-
to Contemporary Anti-Semitism
states that the National Front
poses a threat because of its
"potential political acceptability
and its penetration of democratic
ranks in a seemingly inoffensive
way."
Recent articles in the press in-
dicate that dissent has developed
within the National Front. Two
candidates elected on Le Pen's
ticket have quit the party, follow-
ing reports of acrimonious inter-
nal disputes. This reduces the Na-
tional Front number in the Na-
tional Assembly to 33. bringing it
close to the limit of 30 deputies
necessary to maintain a separate
parliamentary group. Whatever
the outcome, the actions of the
National Front and its leader bear
close watching.
offing.
BUT REAGAN emphasized in
his nationally-televised speech
from his White House office Mon-
day night (Oct. 13) that he had
told Gorbachev, as he had when
the two first met in Geneva last
year, that the United States will
judge Soviet action on human
rights not just words.
"I made it plain that the United
States would not seek to exploit
improvement in these matters for
purposes of propaganda," Reagan
said in his Oval Office television
address.
"But I also made it plain, once
again, that an improvement of the
human condition within the Soviet
Union is indispensable for an im-
provement in bilateral relations
with the United States."
Reagan said he told Gorbachev,
"again in Reykjavik as I had in
Geneva, we Americans place far
less weight upon the words that
are spoken at meetings such as
these than upon the deeds that
follow. When it comes to human
rights and judging Soviet inten-
tions, we are all from Missouri:
you have got to show us."
WHILE REAGAN did not
specifically mention Soviet Jewry,
Shultz did in response to a ques-
tion on human rights at his brief-
ing in Reykjavik after the Reagan-
Gorbachev talks ended.
"The issue of human rights was
brought up on a number of occa-
sions and some very significant
material was passed to the Soviet
Union, which they accepted,"
Shultz said. He said this material
"stated not only our views, but in
detail things about Jewish emigra-
tion, the number of people who
have signified their desire to
leave, lists of people and things of
that kind."
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry had provided Shultz
with charts on Jewish emigration,
which totaled only 126 in
September and 667 for the first
nine months of 1986, as well as a
list of Jewish Prisners of Cons-
cience and the names of 11,000 of
the estimated 400.000 refuseniks.
SHULTZ SUGGESTED there
might have been a statement on
human rights if the arms agree-
ment had not collapsed at the last
minute. "And in what might have
been a statement coming out of
the meeting dealing with this
issue, the subject is explicitly
referred to," he said.
"Perhaps at some point there is
a prospect of setting up some kind
of systematic basis for discussing
it. But of course that remains to
be seen."
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
YES: Iceland Boosted
Hopes for Jewish
Emigration from USSR
By EDWIN EYTAN
REYKJAVIK (JTA) -
Jewish activists and families
of refuseniks from a half
dozen countries pleaded the
cause of Soviet Jewry at the
summit meeting here bet-
ween President Reagan and
Soviet Leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev, Oct. 11-12.
They prayerd in public and
demonstrated peacefully, joined
by Icelandic sympathizers and
others. Some activists erected a
symbolic cage outside the Hofti
House where the two leaders held
their final meeting Sunday (Oct.
12).
THE SOVIETS, for their part,
seemed to offer a slight ray of
hope that restrictions on Jewish
emigration from the USSR might
possibly be eased in the future.
One Soviet spokesman told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
"things are changing" and hinted
that the authorities may be more
accommodating in the future.
A member of the Soviet delega-
tion, Samuel Zivs, who came here
to deal with "the Jewish issue,"
met several refusenik families
whom he asked for details of their
relatives' cases and promised to
facilitate their departure.
The line taken by official Soviet
spokesmen was that while the
USSR refuses to let "foreign
countries meddle in its internal af-
fairs," it is now prepared to study
some of the issues raised by Soviet
Jews on a case-by-case basis "out
of humanitarian considerations."
THE SOVIETS said that
message was also relayed to the
American delegation with which
they met in an ad hoc commission
dealing with humanitarian issues,
regional conflicts and bilateral
affairs.
But these hints were vague and
hopes for any substantive change
for the better for Soviet Jews
diminished after the summit end-
ed Sunday night without agree-
ment on the major issue of arms
control, and the U.S. and USSR
each blamed the other for the
failure.
In private conversations before
leaving Reykjavik, Soviet officials
claimed that had the talks suc-
ceeded, a compromise solution on
humanitarian issues would have
been reached. "All this is a pity,"
one Soviet spokesman said of the
summit's failure.
BUT THE Jewish leaders and
others who had converged on the
Icelandic capital days before the
start of the summit meetings,
achieved their objective of bring-
ing the plight of Soviet Jewry to
the attention of the super power
leaders while international atten-
tion was focused on them.
American Jews were
represented here by delegations
from the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ), headed by
its chairman, Morris Abram, and
the Union of Councils for Soviet
Jewry. David Wakes berg of San
Francisco, a UCSJ vice president,
summarized their purpose when
he said, "We will be presenting
cases to the media and delegations
and try to insist that Soviet Jews
are not forgotten."
Two Knesset members, Nava
Arad of Labor and Uzi Landau of
Likud, were part of an Israeli
delegation that included relatives
of prominent refuseniks. They
met with the President of the
Icelandic Parliament, Thorvakdur
Gardar Kristjansson, who ex-
pressed support for the cause of
Soviet Jewry.
ARAD ALSO met with women
members of Parliament whom she
asked to take up the cause of "the
mothers of the prisoners" in the
USSR and to intercede on their
behalf.
Especially poignant was the
case of Michael Shirman, an im-
migrant to Israel from the Soviet
Union who is suffering from bone
cancer and needs a marrow
transplant which only his sister,
Inessa Flerova, can supply.
Flerova has been unable to leave
for Israel because an exit visa has
been denied her husband, Victor
Flerov, to accompany her.
Shirman camped outside the
summit meeting hall for two days,
sometimes in heavy rain, carrying
a poster "to remind President
Reagan that he is meeting the
man (Gorbachev) who is murder-
ing me."
(The Flerovs have since been
granted a visa to go to Israel so
that she may give her brother
bone marrow cells for transplant.
The operation is scheduled for
Hadassah Hebrew University
Hospital in Jerusalem. See story,
Page 14-A.-Ed.)
ON FRIDAY night (Oct. 10),
two Jewish students from Britain
spent the entire night outside the
Saga Hotel which housed the
Soviet delegation, intoning
prayers and reciting the names of
11,000 refuseniks. Other
demonstrators held up
photographs of long-time
refuseniks. They attended Soviet
press briefings with posters urg-
ing the Kremlin leadershp to
"prove it has changed by allowing
Jews to emigrate."
Jewish prayer servics were led
by Yosef Mendelevich who im-
migrated to Israel from the Soviet
Union in 1981. He was joined by
an Israeli rabbi, Benjamin
Lehman, who noted that custom
dictated that in times of crisis,
Jews pray in public.
Police refused to permit the ser-
vice outside the hotel. The group
gathered outside the press center,
about 150 yards away. Icelandic
sympathizers sang with them,
"Pray for the peace of
Jerusalem." The Jews sang
Hatikva. Israel's national anthem.
AN ICELANDIC Foreign
Ministry spokesman told the JTA,
''Everybody is free to
demonstrate in our country. The
only thing we demand is that the
summit meeting should be able to
go along undisturbed as planned."
Jews weren't the only
demonstrators. Two young men
unfurled a banner outside the
Saga Hotel accusing the Soviets
of oppressing the Hare Krishna
sect. The Greenpeace movement
brought its ship. Sinus, to anchor
at the Reykjavik harbor ap-
proaches.
Nazi Period
Exhibit in Bonn
BONN (WNS) An exhibit
on the expulsion of Jews from
Germany during the Nazi period
opened here Oct. 7. "The Jewish
Emigration from Germany,
1933-1941" documents the
persecution of the Jews from the
first discriminatory measures to
the "final solution" in the death
camps.
The exhibit's photographs,
books, documents, newspaper ar-
ticles and letters, collected by the
German Library in Frankfurt
with additional contributions from
the Leo Baeck Institute in New
York, will be on display until
April.


Page 14-A The Jewish rTondiap/Fnday. October 24, 1996
Glenn's Amendment Would Have Prevented Role for Israel in SDI
Page 1 A
foreign countries that would compete
with American firms in bids for SDI
research.
This was noted by Lt. Gen. James
Abrahamson. director of the Department
of Defense's SDI Office, during a recent
address to a group of Jewish leaders. He
said it would not have affected research
on tactical weapons but could have
prevented other research such as on
lasers that Israel is now doing under the
SDI program.
Israel and several West European allies
have accepted the Reagan Administra-
tion's invitation to participate in the SDI
program, popular!v known as "Star
Wars."
Israel is particularly interested in
defending itself against short-range tac-
tical ballistic missiles such as the SS-21
which the Soviet Union has supplied
Syria. But Israel is also interested in the
jobs SDI research and development will
bring to Israel as as well as other benefits
to the Israeli economy. Initial contracts
now total about $10 million, but are ex-
pected to expand greatly.
Soviets Let 2 Jewish
Families Leave Country
By SUSAN BIRNBAl M
NEW YORK (JTA) -
In two surprise moves last
week. Soviet authorities
allowed a prominent Jewish
scientist and his wife and
the family of a cancer victim
who is now tiving in Israel to
leave the Soviet Union.
Dand
Ceaha,
Goldfarb and ha wife.
* Wednesday (Oct. 15V
Two days a*sr. the satire fenary
of Vaktor and Imw Fkrov were
booM that they could leave. For
the FWrov faaaty. iiiassa r, to
D4KSSA PUBOVA-S brother.
Michael Shirman. 31. :s a
hving in Israel
of suMnal
oc a poeasbie bone-marrow
; from hat aster, hit only
who bvea m Moscow The
about the Ftarov
, confirmed by the L .S.
StateDepartment.
Ineaaa FWrova and her two
daughters. Danja. 7. and
Mariana. 5. ware tranced exit
Tott at the end of August, bat
Soviet MwMMi would not allow
them to ieave with Viktor, citing
his father's nftaai to frant him a
wan-er of fmanoai obligation.
Shirman had told Flerovanot to
leave without her husband.
thereby separating the family on
has an'W* Victor FWrov and his
father had had tittle contact, if
any. m years.
FWrova first apphed for a tem-
porary tub last February, and
was uplainly grven eonfheeng
advice about emigration nsas by
Sonet ofta-aia Both Ineaaa and
Viktor went on hunger Hi ska to
protest against the official
SHIRMAN CAME to the
United States last week for two
days luaowaa, a visit to keJand
during the summit meeting bet-
ween President Reagan and
Sonet leader Mikhail Gorbachev,
where he pleaded bis case with
American and Sonet offViah
Last Thursday, he told a press
conference on Capitol Hill that he
has bean given about a month to
lire unless he receives the
transplant-
In a dramatjc development im-
mediately preceding a press con-
ference in the Lincoln Square
Synagogue in New York. Shirman
mmSm a phone caD from the
wife of Dr. Kenneth Prager. a
fillIV- 1 afl -"- Hospital
-i ft"**>*>y phyakian. who
is r"*"g to both Shirman and
Goldfarb. telling Shirman that his
wife. Anka. had called from Israel
with news that FWrova had called
her from Moscow.
Shirman immediately called
Anka. and she said she understood
that the entire FWror family had
received permission to emigrate
to Israel
SHULMAN SAID ha wife was
heartant to confirm the conversa-
tion license she doesn't speak
Russian and that the language
piubiem may have created a
misunderstanding. But after
answering a senea of questions
from the press. Shmnan called his
sister in Moscow and confirmed
the
VJA Sationoi Chairman Martin Stem iltji,
accompanied by VJA Sationoi Viet Ckutr-
man Alan Aim (center) and his u~v't. Ruth
tnght). a member of the VJA Women $ Divi-
sion Sational Board, recently vxtited
Prisoners ofZion in the Soviet Union who are
denied the right to emigrate. They art shown
Were with Anya Lifshitx (secondfrom lefti and
her daughter. Masha (second from right), in
Leningrad. When Ada presented some col-
ored markers to the young girl, she drew a
map of Israel and wrote m Hebrtv.-. Sat
Year in Jerusalem Kith mother, father and
brother.'
If aQ went wefl. the FWrovs
would be airborne some tune this
week, he saad But some news
reports from Moscow noted that it
might take up to two weeks for
there to leave. Lynn Singer, direc-
tor of the Long Island Committee
for Soviet Jewry and former
president of the Union of Councils
for Sonet Jews (UCSJ1 sponsors
of Shirman s trip to the U.S.. said
Shirman would receive
chemotherapy while he is stanng
m Sew York for the Sukkoth hob-
day and would then be placed
aboard the first plane poamble for
ImVat
Shirman told reporters that if
the FWrovs do meet him in Israel,
the next step is to "start my own
normal' problem." He was referr-
inf to the bone-marrow
transplant, which first must be
okayed by testing has sister's
blood comparibdrty
SHIRMAN STRESSED the
Minimal of the operation and
the inisnlriliTT of failure and the
long period of time he would be
watched for sagas of rejection
Shirman said the operation would
take peace at Hadaasah Hospital x
grateful by the deoswn (to let the
F.erov family emigrate \. the
members and Board of the UCSJ
remain profoundly disturbed by
the Soviet Union's continued
refusal to aQow emigration for the
estimated 400.000 Sonet Jews
who wish to do to. We see do
reason why the Soviet govern-
ment continues to delay .r. rim
matters, and we urg* Soviet
authorities to expedite 'wMgfwJB
procedures for all Sov.e: Jew*
atoens who wish to go

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But he underlined that his
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told reporters that he might have
had a better chance of recovery if
the Soviets had not procrastinated
about allowing the entire FWrov
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ss green only a SO percent chance
of survival now even wrth the
lusw manna transplant. He has
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and cheaaothera
by Dr. Prager. durmg has stay
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ARM AND HAMMER, the
dusthahst who payed
the release of Goidfart
he was also inmeved
FWrov case. He told the
graphic Agency- Tha
part of the same goodwal
in oy the Soviets with
the Goldfarb rel'iase I brought a
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David Goldfarb
~, : -a. :-'-> :- ). *' '-
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
In Stable Condition, His N.Y. Doctors Report
By YITZHAK RABI
And SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A spokesperson for the
Columbia-Presbyterian
Hospital in Manhattan said
that ailing former Soviet
refusenik David Goldfarb is
in stable condition and is
undergoing tests to evaluate
| his health.
Goldfarb and his wife Cecilia,
who were unexpectedly given per-
mission to leave the USSR
Wednesday (Oct. 15), arrived in
I New York last Thursday night
I with American industrialist, Ar-
I mand Hammer, aboard his private
Ijet. He was met at Newark Air-
Iport by his son, Alexander
[Goldfarb, and his friend, jour-
Inalist Nicholas Daniloff.
THE HOSPITAL'S spokesper-
lon told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency last Friday that Goldfarb
is being evaluated for diabetes,
Cardiac status and peripheral
Pope Invites
Jews, Others
To Pray
Continued from Page 1-A
cannot be achieved by prayer
I alone, however essential it be.
Prayer must go together with a
conversion of the heart and an ac-
tive commitment to justice,"
ISilvestrini said.
THE PAPAL invitations were
divided between "Christians" and
|"non-Christians." but Jews were
lincluded on the Christians list
because, Silvestrini explained, of
|the "special bond" Christians feel
Ithey have with Jews and because
lof historical reasons dating back
lt<> the 1965 Second Ecumenical
[Council (Vatican II) when the Of-
|fice for Religious Relations with
Jews was incorporated into the
[Secretariat for Promoting Chris-
|tian Unity.
The non-Christian faiths invited
[include Hindu, Buddhist, Islam.
|Shint>, Zoroastrianism and the
"traditional religions" of
Vmerican Indians and Africans.
Jut Islam is to be represented
olely by nations not at war, such
Pakistan, Turkey. Egypt,
torocco, Bangladesh and Ivory
St.
Moslem nations such as Iran
id Iraq, which are at war with
f<-h other, Libya, Syria and Saudi
Arabia, technically in a state of
w with Israel, were not invited
ftecause "their simultaneous
presence would create divisions at
Usisi and not serve the cause of
ce," Silvestrini said.
PAPAL INVITATIONS were
Extended to the Rome Jewish
ummunity. the Union of Italian
Jewish Communities and the In
"national Jewish Committee for
fnterreligious Consultation
JJCIC) which is the Holy See's of-
ficial Jewish partner in dialogue.
UCIC comprises the
imerican Jewish Committee,
synagogue Council of America,
Mrael Interfaith Committee,
world Jewish Congress and B'nai
1 nth International.
To date, the only definite Jewish
"Ticipant is the delegation to be
by Rome's Chief Rabbi Elio
Toaff. He has assured his
presence with nine other Jewish
nales to constitute a minyan for
grayer.
PR Prizes Due
. NEW YORK (JTA) The
-ouncil of Jewish Federations will
resent 71 public relations prizes
> Jewish federations at its annual
eneral Assembly next month.
vascular disease. There has been
no update on his condition since
Friday because the family has re-
quested that no further informa-
tion be made available, the
spokesperson told the JTA
Sunday.
The 67-year-old molecular
biologist and geneticist has been
suffering from severe diabetes,
whose complications include a
heart ailment, ulcers, some blind-
ness and loss of part of his foot.
He lost a leg during World War II,
in the battle of Stalingrad.
The fitting of a prosthesis is
possible, according to Dr. Ken-
neth Prager of Bergen County,
NJ who is a cardiopulmonary
physician at Columbia-
Presbyterian Hospital.
PRAGER BOARDED the
plane to check David Goldfarb
after the family had been
reunited. Prager explained that
the elder Goldfarb had never
received a prosthesis because the
Soviets are not advanced in the
field.
Awaiting the arrival of Ham-
mer's plane Thursday evening,
Alexander Goldfarb told reporters
he was grateful to Hammer.
At the airport, Daniloff greeted
the elder Goldfarb, calling him one
of the most "splendid" people he
has ever known. As a U.S. News
and World Report journalist in
Moscow, Daniloff had befriended
the elder Goldfarb after meeting
his son, Alexander Goldfarb,
earlier in New York. On that occa-
sion, Alexander Goldfarb asked
Daniloff to "look up my father"
when he got to Moscow.
That is when the Daniloff-elder
Goldfarb friendship began. Short-
ly thereafter, the KGB approach-
ed David Goldfarb and urged him
to help frame Daniloff as a U.S.
spy. Goldfarb refused, whereupon
official consideration of
Goldfarb's request for a visa to
leave the Soviet Union was
withdrawn and his emigration dif-
ficulties began.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24. 1986
Israel Says
No Info Available on Downed Pilot in Lebanon
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Sources here said that
Isarel has no definite infor-
mation that one of the
airmen who bailed out when
their Israel Air Force Phan-
tom iet was shot down over
South Lebanon Thursday
(Oct. 16) is in the hands of
Amal, the Shiite Moslem
Militia.
Amal claimed Friday to be
holding the flyer. They said he
sustained a broken arm but was
otherwise unharmed. The sources
here said Lebanon media reports
were studied over the weekend
but offered no confirmation of
Amal's claim. Amal failed to pro-
duce the pilot for foreign
reporters.
THE PILOT was literally
scooped off the ground in a danng
helicopter rescue Thursday, 90
minutes after he parachuted safe-
ly in an area east of the port city
of Sidon controlled by terrorist
groups. Outgoing Premier
Shimon Peres said at Sunday's
Cabinet meeting that the rescue
wss the most brilliant and
courageous act possible in the cir-
cumstances. He said it proved the
resourcefulness of the Israel
Defense Force and the Air Force.
Jews Safe In
El Salvador
Earthquake
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Members of the small Jewish com-
munity of El Salvador escaped in-
jury in the massive earthquake
and even managed to hold Yom
Kippur services, according to in-
formation received by Rabbi Mor-
ton Rosenthal, Latin American
Affairs director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
He said, however, that ADL
was advised by Jean-Claude Kahn,
president of the Jewish communi-
ty of El Salvador, that many of
them suffered damages to their
homes and businesses. Rosenthal
said Kahn urged that the
American Jewish community
assist in the general earthquake
relief effort
The American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee announcd
that it was opening its mailbox for
receipt of contributions to aid the
earthquake victims.
Kahn, who owns a textile fac-
tory in San Salvador, is working
with other local businessmen to
manage the flow of international
aid into the country. The program
is being coordinated by the
private sector, working with the
United States Agency for Interna-
tional Development.
Librarian's
Chair Funded
NEW YORK (WHS) A
Chair for the Chief Librarian of
the Jewish Division of The New
York Public Library has been
created through a $1 million en-
dowment gift from the Dorot
Foundation. The endowed chair
represents the largest gift ever
made to the Jewish Division, one
of the greatest collections of
Judaica in the world and the most
accessible. It will help secure the
continued growth of the Division
under the leadership of its chief,
Leonard Gold.
The American-built jet fighter
was the first Israel Air Force
plane shot down over Lebanon
since 1983. It was taking part in a
bombing raid on an El Fatah base
near the Lebanese coast south of
Tyre. It is believed to have been
hit by a Soviet-made SA-7 rocket.
Details of the pilot rescue were
released after nearly 10 hours ot
official silence. According to the
account, the pilot managed for
minutes to evade terrorists in Uie
area. He was detected by a radio
transmitter device activated when
he bailed out of his plane.
A SEARCH helicopter braving
gunfire at treetop level swooped
to the ground long enough to
allow the pilot to grab the skids
and whisked him to safety. The
pilot, not immediately identified,
was released from Rambam
Hospital in Haifa after a physical
checkup.
The search for the second down-
ed fyler proved fruitless.
Although Israel remains skeptical
of Amal's claim thst he is their
captive, the govern*, i
d,nau,r for
Lubram warned thtlS
Sunday that i, ^
responsible for thTV,,
welfare ..f th. rS*J
Amal leader N,bA jo-
over the w,.,.Kend of
major prisoner exch**
i"?,' h"* doubt a
would agree to anytW
scale of the 1985 i\%
1.150 convict* 2LL1
Palestinian terrorist!*-?
ed in exchange fortW,
soldiers held m Lebanon
ed Jibnl's h,Pui ^
Liberation of p^.
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av pei cigrme 6> FTC nmhod


Lsn riondian
ii, Florida Friday, October 24,1986
Section B
Conservative Movement
Warns Of Global
Nuclear Destruction
liamian Franklin D.
(utzer, international
lident of the two-million
iber United Synagogue
America, has issued a call
a "Sabbath of
reness" of the clanger
Inuclear holocaust and
iction.
ie 850 Conservative
agues in North America will
ve this coming Saturday as
\Atzeret Le'chayyim, a day of
Ving for life. This Sabbath
|ides with the last day of the
of Sukkoth and is known
ie Hebrew calendar as
)tn Atzeret, the eighth day of
ring.
lin D. Kreutxer
The observance will be worked
as a day of synagogue attendance
and prayer devoted to preserving
life and reaffirming the dignity of
the individual human being.
"The Conservative Jewish
religious community has been con-
cerned with the growing danger
of universal nuclear holocaust and
in view of the latest developments
in Iceland is stressing the need to
examine alternatives." said
Kreutzer.
"This Conservative concept
.omes at the culmination of the
Holy Days and holidays of the
Jewish New Year which celebrate
ind symbolize the worth of human
life and human dignity."
Kreutzer added: "It is the
responsibility of every religious
community to sensitize its con-
gregants to the awesome threat of
nuclear destruction. Religion, and
particularly Conservative
Judaism, is esentially a celebra-
tion of life and this Atzeret
Le 'chayyim is part of our Conser-
vative religious imperative, a
means of protesting the disregard
of human life and worth."
Kreutzer recognized"the deep
split in the worldwide community
of the political overtones of this
issue." but said "that the religious
community must come forward
and take a stand in favor of life
and its preservations from poten-
tially total destruction by a
nuclear holocaust, whether by ac-
cident or design."
larles Wolfe Named Executive
Director Of Mount Sinai
Medical Center Foundation
rles S. Wolfe has been nam-
Executive Director of the
It Sinai Medical Center Foun-
. In that capacity, he will
the fundraising efforts of
it Sinai's Foundation, a not-
sfit corporation which raises
mds necessary to support
ealth care facilities, state-of-
technology, innovative
ch and to provide indigent
le comes to Mount Sinai
[the Jewish Home for the Ag-
Detroit where he was Ex-
re Vice President for the
II years and held other ad-
iitive positions for five
[prior. During his tenure, he
ited a multi-million dollar
iaing drive, which enabled
me to grow from 300 to 400
buck Wolfe's appointment
the continued success
>unt Sinai's Foundation,"
D. Hirt, President and
I Executive Officer of Mount
(Medical Center. "His leader-
enhance the fundraising
our hospital which is vital
growth as a medical
has served in numerous
sin a wide variety of local,
id national task forces and
itions. Currently, be is
nt of the North American
ttion of Jewish Homes and
for the Aged and serves
ice President of the
wr's Disease and Related
"ders Association of
. litan Detroit. He is a
er of the American Associa-
of Homes for Aging, the
Jean College of Health Care
nistrators; the American
|
Charles S. Wolfe
Gerontologies] Society.
Wolfe has taught courses at
several universities and is cur-
rently Assistant Adjunct Pro-
fessor in the Medical School at
Wayne State University and the
School of Osteopathk Medicine of
Michigan State University. He
has authored several professional
articles, consulted for s variety of
organisations, and traveled exten-
sively throughout the world.
"We are delighted to welcome
Chuck Wolfe," said Foundation
President, Arthur Pearlman. "His
professionalism will sdd much to
the work of the Foundation. His
experience with obtaining grants
from such prestigious organisa-
tions ss the Kellog and Kresge
Foundation will aid him in his fun-
draising endeavors."
Wolfe received his Bschelors,
Masters and Specialist degrees
from Eastern Michigan Universi-
ty and his Certificate in Geron-
tology from Wayne State
University.
Hadassah National President Ruth W. The traditional booth, decorated with seasonal
Popkin (right) welcomes Sue Mizrahi (left), na- fruits, vegetables and colorful plants, recalls
tional Hadassah Jewish Education chairman, the Jews' journey through the desert after the
and Carmela Kalmanson, national Zionist Exodus from Egypt and also commemorates
Affairs chairman, to the organization's Sule- the festival of Sukkoth, the final gathering of
kah surrounded by skyscrapers on the terrace the harvest,
of Hadassah House in midtown Manhattan.
Na'amat USA
Biennial Conference of Southeast Area Opens Wednesday
Israel Minister Plenipotentiary
Yehoshua Trigor will bring
greetings from new Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and from
new Foreign Minister Shimon
I'eres Wednesday, to the opening
session of the biennial conference
of the Southeast Area of Na'amat
USA.
Delegates from councils and
chapters of the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America
will convene at the Konover Hotel
in Miami Beach, at 11:30 a.m. to
honor Trigor, who will conclude
more than four years of service as
Consul General of Israel in
Florida next month. More than
100 delegates from Palm Beach,
Broward and Dade Counties will
include presidents and Zionist Af-
fairs committee chairpersons
from every unit in South Florida.
Other delegates from the
Southeastern United States will
take part in all-day sessions
Wednesday and Thursday at the
Konover.
Mildred Weiss of Deerfield
Beach, s member of the national
board, will lesd s group dynamic
session on "Now Is the Future"
following the brunch which kicks
off the two-day conference. A new
motion picture on Israel and
Na'amat. "The Future Is Now,"
will share the spotlight with
Minister Trigor st the brunch.
Vocalist Nina Diamond will lead
the singing of the national an-
thems of Israel and the United
States.
Highlight of Wednesday's pro-
gram will be a 6:30 p.m. dinner
saluting the late David Ben
Gurion, Israel's first prime
minister and the founder of
Israel's Labor Party with which
Na'amat USA is affiliated. The
dinner will be chaired by Lillian
Hoffman of Sunny Isles, program
and education chairman for the
Southeast Area. Scott Evans and
his troupe head the entertain-
ment The centennial of Ben-
Gurion's birth will be marked st
the dinner. Lillian Elkin of New
York City, national vice president
of Na'amat USA for program and
education, and "schola .-
residence" for the conference, will
be the keynote speaker.
Lillian Elkin
Thursday will be highlighted by
an 8:80 a.m. breakfast chaired by
Shulamith Saltxman of Margate,
Southeast chairman for American
and Zionist Affairs. Principal
speaker will be Harriet Green of
Miami Beach and Coral Gables,
national vice president for capital
funds and development.
A noon luncheon, chaired by
Sylvia Snyder of Delray Beach,
Southeast Area fund raising
chairperson, will feature a panel
discussion on "Israel Today."
Participants will include Lillian
Elkin and Gerald Schwartz of
Miami Beach, national vice presi-
dent of the American Zionist
Federation.
Scholar-in-residence Lillian
Elkin of New York City is a well-
known author, poet and professor
and currently serves ss national
vice president of program and
education of Na'amat USA and is
on the editorial board of the
organisation's magazine,
"Na'amat Woman." She is also
literary editor of the Jewish Fron-
tier magazine.
Jose Marti Project Will Be
A Symbol Of Liberty
Throughout Latin America
The Jose Marti Project, spon-
sored by JNF Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael, will honor the memory of
Cuba's Apostle of Independence,
as "a symbol of liberty throughout
Latin America."
The project consists in the
establishment of the Jose Marti
Forest Park in the surrounding
hills of Jerusalem and will encom-
pass 430,000 trees (10,000 for
each year of Marti's life), an
educational amphitheater, recrea-
tional facilities, nature trails, pic-
nic areas, and s dedicatory wall at
the plaza. According to the
organizers, this will be the largest
community project ever in Miami.
The local organizing committee
includes mayors Steve Clark,
Isidore Cuevas, Alex Daoud. Raul
Martinez, Pedro Reboredo,
Xavier L. Suares, and Dorothy
Thomson.
JNF Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
is s not-for-profit agrarian foun-
dation that has specialized in
reforesting lands for the past 85
years. The foundation has already
established forest parks for other
Latin American heroes, such as
O'Higgins, Ssn Martin, and
Bolivar.
According to the organizers, the
project has been very warmly
received already in Union City,
New York City, Puerto Rico, and
other countries with large Cuban-
exile communities. The local com-
mittee meets every Wednesday
noon at the Miami City Hall


Page 2B The Jewiah noridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
Brandeis University
Divests Some Of Its
South African Holdings
WALTHAM, Mass. -
(JTA) Brandeis Universi-
ty has sold its stock in three
U.S. companies that were
found not to be in com-
pliance with university
policies governing in-
vestments in firms doing
business in South Africa,
Brandeis President Evelyn
E. Handler has announced.
Hie three companies whose
stocks were sold sre Reynolds and
Reynolds Company,
Schlumberger Ltd., and Union
Camp Corp. The total value of the
stocks is approximately $200,000,
about 6.5 percent of the univer-
sity's holdingi in companies doing
business in South Africa.
THE ACTION is the result of a
new policy on South Africa-
related stocks adopted by the
university's Board of Trustees
this summer. The policy requires
that companies in the Brandeis
portfolio with South Africa opera-
tions subscribe to the expanded
Sullivan Principles, which call for
activities beyond the workplace in
ameliorating the plight of South
African blacks.
The Board also voted to con-
sider full divestment in May, 1987
if significant reform of South
Africa's apartheid policies has not
occurred.
The Board's measures also pro-
hibit new investments in com-
panies not currently in the univer-
rity's endowment portfolio that
?nter South Africa after Januay 1,
1987. They also continue the
ward's policy of selling stock in
ompenies that do not earn the
highest performance ratings
under the Sullivan Principles, to
which Brandeis has subscribed
since 1977 in governing its South
Africa-related investments.
FOLLOWING THE Board's ac-
tion this summer. Handler sent
letters to all South Africa-related
companies in the university's
portfolio, asking for "substantive
details of the ecompany's active
involvement, future plans and
commitment to ending the system
of apartheid in South Africa."
"Most firms are in compliance
with our policies," said Handler.
"Those that appeared not to be
were subject to further investiga-
tion. In the case of two of those
companies whose stock had been
purchased earlier this year, we
could not verify to our satisfaction
that they had signed the Sullivan
Principles. In the ease of the third
firm, the university treasurer ask-
ed our investment manager to
double-check its compliance with
our policies and new information
led to the sale of its stock."
The investment in
Schlumberger was reversed as
soon as the university officials
became aware of the holding,
Handler said. The Reynolds and
Reynolds stock was sold because
the university was unable to
verify that the company had sign-
ed the Sullivan Principles even
though the company indicated
that it had applied to become s
Sullivan signatory.
THE INVESTMENT managers
who purchased Union Camp stock
were unaware of the fact that the
company was doing business in
South Africa, she said. Brandeis'
new procedures governing South
Africa-related investments caused
the management firm to recheck
the company's holdings.
New Appointments Made
For Young Judaea
Sylvia Herman and Linda
Minkss, Co-Chairpersons of the
Florida Hadassah Zionist Youth
Comnusoc, announce the ap-
pointments of Michelle Rapchik as
Regional Director of Young
Judaea and Rebecca Kaplan as
Assistant Regional Director.
In addition to formal Judaic
schooling, Michelle was an active
member and leader of USY for
eight years and went on Israel
Pilgrimage Michelle has recently
graduated from the University of
Miami with degrees in Psychology
and Judaic Studies This is her
fifth year working for Young
Rebecca, the new Assistant
Director, grew UD in Puerto Rico
where she was an active member
of Young Judaea. She has attend-
ed Young Judaea's Year Course in
Israel program as well as atten-
ding Hebrew University of
Jerusalem for one year.
Other appointments made are
Walter Synalovaki as Senior Ad-
viser, Randy Gorod as North Ares
Coordinator, and Keith Berman
as City Coordinator.
Walter is also from Puerto Rico
where he grew op in Young
Judaea where he has held many
leadership positions. Randy also
grew up in Young Judaea in
Florida. Keith was an active
member of Young Judaea who has
had various leadership positions.
Fall Workshops Educate,
Enrich Jewish Families
Stress, aging, parenting and
single life are among the topics o*
in*r offered by Jewish Family Ser-
vice of Greater Miami (JFS) in its
Fall Series of Family Life Educa
tion Workshops.
On the topic of aging, JFS will
offer "Sandwich Generation" for
adult children who are "caught-in
between" obligations to aging
parents and their own famines,
continuing on Thursday, Oct. 28,7
p.m. at the JFS Coral Gabies Of-
fice. "Giving Care," a workshop
for persons responsible for the
well being of an aging, infirm
spouse or sibling, will begin Mon-
day. Nov. 17, 1.30 p.m. at the JFS
Miami Beach Office.
For parents. JFS will offer
Single Parenting" st the North
iJade Office and "Positive Paren
ting" at the South Dade Office
Both begin Wednesday. Oct. 29 at
7 p.m. The latter is designed for
parents of children ages three to
11.
Singles can choose from
"Interpersonal Dialogue." begin-
ning Wednesday. Nov. 6 at 7 p.m.,
and "Surviving Separa-
tion/Divorce." beginning Thurs-
day. Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. Both will
meet at the Coral Gables Office.
Couples who wish to enrich
their relationships will be in-
terested in "Creative communica-
tion," beginning Monday, Nov.
10, 7 p.m. at the South Dade
Office.
Relaxation techniques will be
discussed in "Tame Your Stress,"
beginning Tuesday, Nov. 18, 7
p.m. at the Coral Gables Office.
In addition, "Create-A-
Workshop" is available for clubs,
groups and schools interested in
other family life enrichment
topics. These workshops may be
presented at the location of the
sponsoring organization.
Congressman Dante Fascell
will be the guest speaker at a
cocktail buffet planned on
Thursday, Oct. SO at 6 p.m. on
Hamilton on the Bay in Miami
for a select group of community
leaders by the American Red
Magen David for Israel, accor-
ding to Regional President,
Murray Kaye.
Bruce Singer
Chosen Beach
Vice Mayor
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Bruce M. Singer was
selected by his colleagues to serve
as Vice Mayor beginning Nov. 1.
"I am honored to be chosen for
this post and look forward to serv-
ing our community in this
respect," said the Commissioner.
Joining the City Commission in
1981. this is Singer's third term in
office. He has served as Vice
Mayor once before. As a City
Commissioner he's been known
fcr his strong stands on the need
to spur redevelopment, en-
vironmental issues, youth-
oriented projects and problems, as
well as historic preservation.
Singer, age 36, is a Beach
native. Prior to running for City
Commission he worked as a Miami
Beach Assistant City Attorney,
joining the city following a stint as
Assistant Attorney General. A
graduate of the University of
Florida College of Law, he is now
a practicing attorney.
He's a former president of the
Miami Beach Jaycees and was
voted as one of the five outstan-
ding young men in the state by the
Florida Jaycees in 1981.
Mercury Morris
To Speak
Temple Shir Ami will host
Eugene "Mercury" Morris in s
discussion of teenage drug addic-
tion at Friday evening Sabbath
services on Oct. SI at 8 p.m. "It is
no longer any secret that drugs
are all pervasive in today's socie-
ty," explains the temple's Rabbi
Brett S. Goldstein. "We feel that
the legendary Morris possesses
the unique ability because of his
background to reach out to our
young people and encourage them
to remain straight"
Score Seeking More
Women Members
The Service Corps of Retired
Executives (SCORE) is looking
for more women members, accor-
ding to Myrtle Levinson,
SCORE'S Women's Business
Ownership Representative for the
Southeast Region and member of
Dade County SCORE Chapter
No. 29 "The rapid growth in the
number f women entrepreneurs
has created a need for additional
women SCORE counselors." said
Levinson.
Hebrew Academy To Hold
Reunion For The 50's And 60s
Former students and graduates
of the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Greater Miami Hebrew Academy
and their spouses will converge
upon Miami Beach for the first
Alumni reunion of those who at-
tended the school during the
1950s and 60s. The Saturday
evening Jan. 3 grand event will
take place at the Shelborne Hotel
and will be hosted by the Galbut
family, former Academy students,
Robert. David, Abraham. Russel
and Ronalee Eisenberg Galbut.
The Hebrew Academy, the first
Day School established in the
southeastern region of the United
States, was founded by the late
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross in 1947
and opened its doors in the old
YMHA building with seven
students. The school later moved
to larger quarters on Sixth Street
and Jefferson Avenue where it
continued to function until 1961
when the Academy moved into its
present site on Pinetree Drive and
24th Street. Today the school
counts an enrollment of 670
students.
Almost 100 Hebrew Academy
Alumni live in Israel, many of
them in Kibbutzim while other,
are practicing their various *
and professions in cities and
villages throughout the country
E. Jay Mirmelli and Bam
Bogin. Alumni living fa, Mlart;
Beach and presently parentTTf
Academy students, are coor-
dinating the program.
Na'amat USA
A new film on Israel and the
projects of Na'amat and a
musicale will highlight the Mon
day. Nov. 3. 1 p.m. meeting of the
Eilat Chapter to take place in the
civic auditorium of Financial Sav
ings and Loan Association, 755
Washington Ave.
Ids Kovalsky. cultural chair-
f^an, has prepared an original
eading relating to the High Holi
day season which she will recite
Program chair is Fneda Levitan
Book reviewer Sophie
Weissman will be the guest
reviewer at a paid up membership
luncheon of the liana Chapter on
Tuesday. Nov. 4 at 11:30 am at
the Winston Tower 100
auditorium.
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth they won't be frugal
with your kugel!
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twmt
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Combine ai ingredients mn *ei Place greased "? guai Da> -5 : s-
Bake m 350" F oven lor 1 hour or until D'oi Serve hot Serves 6 t
' 1 cat potato flsar
4 taetstaoom mtltts butter
3 tablespoons grates onion
H teaspoon baking powfle'
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Phyllis Harte To Receive JTS
New Generation Award
Phyllis Harte, a Miami attorney,
Iwill be honored with The Jewish
[Theological Seminary of
(America's New Generations
IXward on Nov. 9, at the
ISeminary's Convocation and
Awards Ceremony at Temple
Knianu-El. The Convocation and
Awards Ceremony is being held in
Icelebration of the Seminary's
Centennial Year.
The New Generations Award is
presented by the Seminary in
nvognition of inspiring commit-
Inient as a dynamic young leader in
wide-ranging endeavors that
enhance the growth and progress
lof Jewish life.
Other Floridians also being
honored by the Seminary on Nov.
lit are Louis Stein, who will receive
Ithe degree of Doctor of Laws,
[honoris causa; Congressman
Tante B. Fascell, who will receive
the Herbert H. Lehman Ethics
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Israel Bonds Sales Increase
During High Holy Days Appeal
4
Phyllis Harte
Campaign For Holocaust Museum
I Gets Lift From Wiesel's Nobel Prize
Florida civic, business and
Ireligious leaders here who have
[been working with Nobel Peace
Laureate Elie Wiesel to create the
ll'. S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
lin Washington, D.C. are predic-
ting that the prize will hasten the
[completion of their shared dream.
The Museum is being con-
structed entirely with private
funds on land provided by Con-
[gress near the Washington Monu-
Inient in the nation's capital.
"Wiesel, a survivor of Nazi death
ramps, is chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council, an
Independent federal entity charg-
led with creating the $100 million
[facility. President Reagan serves
la- honorary chairman of the Cam-
|paign to Remember.
Brzezinski To
Lecture At
U. of Miami
Z higniew Brzezinski,
lstinguished Sovietologist and
>rmer national security adviser
9 the President of the United
?tates, will give a public lecture at
the Cniversity of Miami on Thurs-
day. Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. His topic
be the subject of his newly
published book. Game Plan: How
Conduct the U.S.Soviet
'mteat.
Mr. Brzezinski's lecture is the
official opening event of the UM's
piew Institute for Soviet and East
[European Studies in the Graduate
(School of International Studies.
Marvin Rauzin
To Be Honored
The Trustees and Directors oi
[Transition will hold a Testimonial
[Dinner honoring Marvin J.
IRauzin, Founder and Chairman,
Ion Thursday, October 30 at 6:30
|p m. at Radisson Mart Plaza.
Rauzin will be honored for the
115 years of volunteer service and
[support as a Major Benefactor.
Rauzin is vice president. Grand
Jury Association of Florida; past
president, Bayshore Service Club;
past president. Better Govern-
ment Association; past president,
Miami Beach Optimists Club and
past president of Sholem Lodge,
B'nai B'rith.
The Museum will memorialize
the six-million Jews and millions
of others murdered by the Nazis.
The American Museum is planned
to dramatize to future generations
the value of the freedom we enjoy
as our national heritage, and the
tragedies that occur when
freedom is not defended. It will
bean education center from
which, as Wiesel has promised,
"no visitor will leave unchanged."
Florida leaders of the Musuem
Campaign include Gov. Bob
Graham, U.S. Sen. 'Paula
Hawkins, and State Campaign
Chairman Norman Braman, who
is a member of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council
Medal; and Irene and Norman
Sholk, and the Honorable Judge
Herbert S. Shapiro, who will
receive The National Community
Service Award.
Phyllis Harte is active in Na-
tional UJA as a member of the
Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet and with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation as past
Chairman of the Business and
Professional Women's Group of
the Women's Division.
She is a past Campaign Vice
Chairman of the Business
Women's Group and is a member
of the Women's Division Ex-
ecutive and Campaign Steering
Committees. She currently serves
as a member of the Board of the
GMJF South Dade Branch. In
1984 she was a nominee for the
B'nai B'rith Outstanding Citizen's
Award.
Mrs. Harte serves on the Next
Generation Board of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens and is
also Campaign Vice President of
the South Dade Friends of
Douglas Gardens. She is a
member of the Board and Ex-
ecutive Committee of the
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Center. She is also an officer of
JACPAC and a member of the
Board of the Bet Shira Solomon
Schechter Day School.
With her husband, Samuel, she
is active in many community
organizations, including the
Center for the Fine Arts, Subur-
ban League for Diabetes
Research, and The Society of One
Thousand of the National Founda-
tion for Advancement in the Arts.
Phyllis resides with her husband
and two children in Miami.
The Jewish community of the
Greater Miami area once again
came to the aid of Israel and her
people by making commitments to
purchase Israel Bonds during the
recent High Holy Day Appeal held
at several local synagogues, an-
nounced M. Ronald Krongold,
general campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization.
Krongold noted that this year's
Bond Appeal saw a significant in-
crease in sales of Israel Bonds in-
struments over the High Holy Day
campaign in 1985. He credited the
rabbis and the congregants of the
synagogues which took part in the
High Holy Day Appeal for this
year's success. "Their efforts and
support prove once again how
American Jewrv can work
together to accomplish a goal .
a goal to aid the Government and
people of Israel gain economic
stability and, eventually,
economic independence."
The synagogues in the Greater
Miami area which participated in
the Israel Bonds High Holy Days
Appeal were Temple Adath
Yeshurun, the Aventura Jewish
Center and Beth Torah in the
North Dade area; Temple Bet
Breira, Temple Beth Am and
Temple Judea in South Dade;
Temple Israel in Miami; and Beth
Israel, Beth Moshe, Beth Raphael,
Beth Sholom, Temple Emanu-El,
Hebrew Academy, Temple
Menorah, Temple Moses, Ner
Tamid and Ocean Pavilion in
Miami Beach.
Penny Stocks
An Opportunity of the 80's
FOR YOUR FREE REPORT CALL:
RAY MILES
1-800-443-3390
the STUART JAMES co.
Incorporated
InvMtmont Bankers
MEM sen HMD k StPC
THE RABBI ALEXANDER S. GROSS
GREATER MIAMI HEBREW ACADEMY
We're looking for former students of our school for
Alumni records. If you attended the Academy or know
the whereabouts of those who were students at the
Academy please call:
(305) 532-6421 ex. 244
or write
Mrs. Shirley Gross
2400 Pinetree Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Bagels and Lox and
Maxwell House* Coffee.
Itcouldntbe
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morning.
BOCA RATON/
CENTURY VILLAGE
Female roommate to share
2 B.R. apt., 3-4 months, $550
per month. Call Sophie:
482-6614
Manvd
At last there's time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhurried conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
rich, delicious Maxwell House* Coffee. It
couldn't be anything but Sunday morning
K KOSHER cG,ii io.
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE!
Ss WB?

GENERAL
rooos


Page4-B The
FVjnrfaaTrJday. October 24. 1986
i \
^4/icf 7%e Jews
As The Arab Press Sees Israel
By CAKL ALPEBT
HAIFA There are jcZ
nobie lpuTS*. even among Jews.
w&o beheve 2a: the onry obstacle
v. > wrtB tne Arana a lsraei s
If Jn iuni were but to
greater spjnt of enadbataon and
aVpHaaaal m haw v. t_scia..
goodwill, aad extend the
-' iVieTrtsc^, i :rje \zs.
peace could be aajerrtcL
TV picture a as idytbe one z-
deed. bat it is completely
tjrr^r-x: _f r '.:< i -.-. Ban
earefauy at the mood and apart
that are bang fostered m the
ands of Islam What the pubhc
being toad m the press of Egypt
and Jordan. Syns and 5ea-
Arabi (not to speak of Iran) about
Jews and Zaomsta* What kmd of
education are the youth bang
given the next generation of
Arabs to whom we are a^Baaaa
to *xt^*d oar hand of friendship?
A quick and random renew of re-
cent press items presents a
1 lii laifagmg ptctore
THE EGYPTIAN paper. Air
3Ba\ presents its nathui with a
tetter to the editor which pro-
claims that the Zionist Jew who
acts amjtdinf to ha Torah.
Talmud and the Protocols of the
Eiders of Zaon regards it as s basic
doty to spread corruption m the
world. In the US they bead the
gangs who (hstribate alcohol, and
m France they ran the brothels
and night dubs.
AL-Sur, also of Egypt, is not
quite so extreme when it ram an
r.ternew with Ai-Shetkh Mahmnd
AW-AMTthab Fayed, who teDa
the readers that the Israel Em-
bassy m Cairo a secretly trying to
undermine Egyptian hfe. How*
By spreading the Bahai rebgtoc.
which is ano-lsiam, and by en-
couraging Rotary and similar
dobs which are part of an Israeli
plot. The Jewi have not lived up to
the peace agreement, but thia is
only to be expected of the Jew.
whose word ia never to be trusted.
Readers in Jordan aregiven an
inside picture of what Israel;
education ia like. In Israel, a
writer in Al-Dustur says, the
children are taught thai the Araoe.
are slaves, who were bom in the
country only to serve the "chosen
people." Arabs have the status of
animals there.
THE HOLOCAUST ia a
favorite theme. The whole thing is
aimply a Zionist fabrication,
writes the Saudi journal. Al-Ukaz
The story is repeated so often that
even the Arabs are beginning to
s. the paper says A.-
Gnmkri}rs. as offica. gorem-
Lsraei aes itt notocass: v. exv.r-.
favors from the word powers.
Mach of ae story that a toad s
written by "sarvrrors" who bare
been compelled to produce
Hoioeaast'^era=re whether rea,
or fk.Ltii.iws
Al-Lxwz A.Iuamx. a Ca^r
recgyxs paper saes the device of
ar-rwer3g aa anqasry from a
> report that the sa-agg:*
Jews and Araos a of ac-
I: a a straggle bet-
ween jusace and evr. and was
first proclaimed oy die prophet
Mohammed after be had ascer-
tained hem treaeheroas and qcar-
retaotne the Jews were. Jews are
the enemies of Islam and
mankind There a hope that A-ae
win soon open the eyes of at
oond. who will become aware of
Jewish mingles agairat r-asaz:-
ry. and then the entire worid wZ
fight against them.
Arab |i nagamlati know we
how to rouse rehgious passaons.
The Saudi paper. AWartrt. drops
s spark into a munitions dump
when it "reveak" that Israel's
rabbia plan to erect a synagogue
on the Tempie Mount m pkace of
the hory Ai-Aqsa mosque
Lake the Arabs of other states
the mhaortants of Yemen, too. are
being psychologically prepared for
peace by then* paper. Ai-Irtkaa.
The editor writes that those try-
ing to make peace in the Middle
East think the Jews are a nation
like all other nations, but they are
different You extend your hand
to them m peace, and they seize
the opportunity to a nark, to ptar.
your annihilation, to wipe you off
the face of the earth V
you have satisfied them, but they
can chop off the hand you exteM
to them. Only when they cease to
exist wiD we be spared their evils
IT WAS left for the Synar.
Minister of Defense. Gen.
Mustapha Tka*, la reach new dep-
ths of anu-Serr.:tic hatred H
new book, entitled The Mitzr.
Zv/k. revives the old iibe. Mast
Jews use biood to bake their Baw
za On the c -- a gniesome
drawing of two bearded Jews fien-
dishly slitting the throat of an m
fidel and draining his blood into a
bowl.
Gen. TTas writes of the Jewish
hatred for the rest of mankind,
and draws a direct line between
the use of biood for religious pur-
poses, and what the Jews are
allegedly doing to the Arabs to-
day. The ridiculousness of his
charges may be gauged from his
claim that in the famous
On his recent trip to Israel, Dr. Alfred Gottschalk (left), president
of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, was among
distinguished guests invited to a formal dinner hosted by Vice
President George Bush in Jerusalem (center). The Vice President
was m the Mideast on a fact-finding mission and to confer with
the principal governments. He was accompanied by his wife, Mrs.
Bush (right).
0*.-a*c-^ B,:r.'. 1* :f 1M-: r*
Jews sought to aae the biood of a
r*\m/*r'm snook to bake -am for
tawir Y jc hjppor
At .east one European paper,
the Austrian week.j news
magaz-ne P~>?u\ has already
quoted aoeraty from the TTas
book, tnrwadmg sack joky saw!
r.ewsworthy passages as.
Mothers warr. thee rhflitren not
v. go vx far from home iest the
Jew grab you. part you z a sag ar.:
c_ ; -. that be ran _** --
biood tc bake has ssatxa.
IN AN -jcmtr* wr t* Para
Le M was -"T-y to haTe ria 000k
translated into all major
ianguages.
A. :ftn 3G>: are fresh, from pnbfaeataons of re-
Tecz weesa and ssnwrhs They pro-
Mi an a*rm-ng picture of the at-
mosphere bemg created x the
.Arab world even aa utoptara
Israel Consul General Yehoshua Tngor. eMfcr v^mti
Presidents Awards to Gary Gerson, led. and Ju.iv '^mT^
on behalf of the Greater Miami Israel Bonds OrjanuatuiLGl
son, former general cAutrmaa of the Miami Jarad Bondt em
paign. and Cypen were honored for their staunrh ^p^- d
Israel through the Israel Bonds program. Purrha^s or/rJ
among as urge that lsraei show Bonds u a major source of development capital for I *~ > iiWrnv
greater ffexiahty and greater t finance industrial and agricultural projects. 0 'rnttrvtvL
trfT"" to ecenpromise and ,f highways and harbors, the expansion of eommunvatwu ast
make xrcesaoc* to the Arabs, transport, the building of new towns and 'the awwt c-n^w vZ
No further comment seems sources of ~
eneroy
I o< servmg tne same o thng tfus Sriaobos wtry rxjt try Romon' pasta'
tanwy mi oe aesgnteO as they spn thew fcxKs and soak up the* sauce wtn an> one 0
our 70 shapes and vanenes Ai made to our exacting stanoards *th i00"c durum
wheat semoana tor unsurpassed taste and texture
Ronzom' rs not onry good tor Shaooos its good tor you Made of oompteteh *
ngrecients our pasta has no cholesterol and no added salt whatsoever And o CC
its absotutery Kosher and Parve
So start a new tradrtion tras Shaboos with Roruor* f^o pasta shapes up bette<
@
Kosher
Parve
VEGETABLE LASAGNE
1 pacfcagell6o7)nON20NI' cup mnosc onwn
Curly Edge Lasagne 1 v toaapoons Oneo Oav
a cups (32 oz i ncofta cheese i teaapooon garfcc
1 package (8 oz i cream powder
cheese soheneo H teaspoon dneo
v.cupm* oregano
2 cups broccou florets
1 cup shredded carrots
1 cup shced mushrooms
4 cups (16 oz ) shredded o*
moisture mozzarea cheese
*< cup grated Parmesan cheese
Combine ncotta cheese cream cheese, m*. oraon. basil garsc fXMtOet ana oregano ana
wend until smooth Add vegetables Meanwhile cook pasta as directed on package dram and
lay flat m sing*, layer until needed Spread cup vegetable mixture mio 9xi2x2-nch b
dah to cover boflom Add a layer o noodles one-tourih remaining vegetable mixture arc
sprinkle wrth some o the mozzareiia and Parmesan cheese Repeat layers ending wtr-
cheese Bake at 375 tor 50 rtwiutes or until hot and bubbly Let stand 10 minutes oetore
serwig Makes 8 sennngs
RonzoHi Sobo Buoni.
Gwam foo Corpcf


Mount Sinai Medical Center hosted a cocktail reception for
members of the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce in the Lobby
of the Mary Ann and James L. Knight Magnetic Resonance Imag-
ing Center. It afforded members the opportunity to take a guided
tour of the MRIfacillity, featuring its state-of-the-art diagnostic
equipment. Among those present were Col Kovens, chairman of
the Board of Trustees; William 0. CuUum, President Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce; Fred D. Hirt, President and CEO;
Harry Chernin; Dr. Manuel Viamote, Jr., Director, Dept. of
Radiology Services; and Mrs. Harry Chernin.
Combatting Culture Shock
JERUSALEM When
someone makes Aliyah,
they're in for a real shock.
We're speaking about
(culture shock, and if you
think that this is just a
meaningless terms or the
clever title of a new book,
| you're wrong.
Culture shock is a verifiable
[emotional condition. It has been
studied in depth, and its various
stages categorized by social scien-
tists. It was really "discovered,"
not in Israel with its tens of
thousands of immigrants from all
over the world, but, oddly enough.
in Washington, D.C. where it was
I first defined and studied.
AN ALERT sociologist noticed
| that many members of the
diplomatic community in
Washington exhibited signs of
disorientation and depression
after arriving in the American
capital. She defined the malady as
"culture shock," which occurs
when one is removed from his
familiar cultural milieu and thrust
I into an entirely different cultural
| setting.
Nomi Rosenberg is an expert on
[culture shock. Not only does she
I treat people experiencing culture
shock, she does so from first-hand
knowledge. "I went through
culture shock at least twice,"
notes the vivacious 35-year-old
mother of two: "once when I
made Aliyah in 1969, and again
when I returned to the United
States as an Aliyah emissary for
| three years in 1983."
Nomi's personal experiences led
I her to develop the unique sevice of
Culture Shock Counseling now be-
ing offered by the Association of
Americans and Canadians in
Israel(AACI). Given Nomi's
background and the AACI's long
loistorv of service to North
American olim, it's not surprising
that the two have joined forces on
this project.
NOMI ROSENBERG grew up
in various communities in the
United States as her fater. a rab-
bi, moved to different pulpits
around the country. She finished
high school in Greenville. Miss.,
and made Aliyah in 1969. In 1974,
she graduated from the Baerwald
School of Social Work at Hebrew
University. From 1976 through
1983. she was in charge of a
Jerusalem-based project aimed at
rehabilitating released convicts.
From 1983 until 1986. she served
as the Aliyah emissary in the
Greater Washington, D.C. area.
The AACI is the largest and
most active of the immigrant
associations in Israel. Founded in
1951, its over 18.000 members col-
lectively represent most of the
60,000 North Americans living in
Israel. The main goal of the AACI
is smoothing the absorption of
new immigrants into the
mainstream of Israeli society.
Towards this end, it offers ex-
tensive counseling services on
such important topics as educa-
tion, housing, taxes and employ-
ment. Its five regional offices also
sponsor a variety of social ac-
tivities, ranging from picnics to
support groups for single parents
and seniors.
REFLECTING on her personal
experiences and drawing on her
professional background, Nomi
has developed the idea of Culture
Shock Counseling. She feels that
the concept of Aliyah, literally
"going up," often serves to raise
the expectations of new im-
migrants to an unrealistic level
and exaggerates the effects of
culture shock. The counseling,
which takes place on an individual
or family level, serves to help the
immigrant pass quickly through
the depression phase and into the
lvnM Book Month will be celebrated Nov. 27-Dec. 27. A newly-
iy* Poster heralds the forthcoming observance. Designed
\Jr felted by the Israeli artist, Giora Carmi, it is a whimsical
E?"*< of the phrase, 'One who increases books increases
K?"i* The Poster shows a man reading one book whiU his hair
"** the spines of additional books perched atop his head.
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Fascell Reports
On Trip
To USSR
A special presentation by Con-
gressman Dante B. Fascell on
"U.S.-Soviet Relations: Reflec-
tions on a Recent Trip to the
USSR" with a public discussion to
follow will take place Monday at 8
p.m. at the Graduate School of In-
ternational Studies Conference
Room, University of Miami
Campus.
Ambassador Ambler H. Moss,
Jr., Dean, Graduate School of In-
ternational Studies, will preside.
Prof. Jiri Valenta, Director, In-
stitute for Soviet and East Euro-
pean Studies, will moderate.
The program is sponsored by
the Institute for Soviet and East
European Studies, the Communi-
ty Relations Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and its South Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry, and the Univer-
sity of Miami Lecture Series
Committee.
Nomi Rosenberg during a counseling session at the office of the
Association of Americans and Canadians in Israel (AACI).
coping phase ot culture shock.
"Most Olim who return to
America do so during the depres-
sion stage," explains Nomi. "This
is when they are the most
vulnerable and feel the worst. We
help them to understand that their
feelings are normal and will pass
with time. I really believe that as
this type of counseling becomes
more widespread we'll begin to
see a drop in the rate of returning
AJCongress
Membership
Drive
Neil Alter, Citicorp Vice Presi-
dent, has been chosen to lead a
multi-faceted membership cam-
paign on behalf of AJC's Miami
Chapter. It will be the first com-
prehensive chapter membership
drive in almost a decade.
In explaining the impetus
behind the drive. Alter said that
the chapter has developed an ex-
citing program, and linked with
the illustrious 80-year history of
the AJC, it should be on the agen-
da of many more Miamians than it
is.
The campaign activities will be
chaired by Barbara Udell, Robin
Davidson, Susan Lichtman, David
Mesnekoff, and Robert Waxman.
Also participating are Ron
Levitt and Steve Silber.
The Miami Chapter was found-
ed in 1953. Roger Bernstein, a
local attorney, is its President.
Olim."
Both Nomi and the professional
staff of the AACI view this new
program as an important advance
in the services that are offered to
North American immigrants liv-
ing in Israel. "This is really a
revolutionary approach in dealing
with Olim," states Nomi. "We are
relating to the new immigrant on
a personal/emotional level, and
not just as a statistic in a
bureaucratic system."
Herbert H. Mabry, president of
the Georgia State AFL-CIO,
will receive the American ORT
Federation Community
Achievement Award at a
testimonial dinner in his
honor at the Hyatt Regency
Atlanta on Oct. 28. Mabry will
receive the ORT award 'in
recognition of his outstanding
leadership and his ac-
complishments on behalf of the
people of Georgia.'
ANN
BARRON
Stands for
New Energy New Ideas
Responsible Leadership
Accountability
Your friends and neighbors are supporting
Ann Barron
Mayor Steve Clark
Comm. Sherman Winn
Comm. George Valdes
Comm. Clara Oesterle
Mayor Paul Vogel
Mayor Irving Peskoe
Vice Mayor Jules Littman
Vice Mayor Eli Lurie
JEWISH LADY, speaks English,
Spanish, Hebrew, with experi-
ence In taking can* of aWerty and
babies. From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. or
11 p.m. to 9 a.m. Call 534-4781
ext. 208 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.
These organizations are supporting
Ann Barron
Concerned Citizens of
NE Oade
Owners & Residents of
Sunny Isles
United Teachers of Dade
Dade County AFL-CIO
Building Trades Council
of Miami
Mechanics and Aero-
space Workers
Hotel and Restaurant
Workers
Police Benevolent
Association
Dade County Firefighters
November 4 we ask YOU to please VOTE
for
ANN BARRON
for
FIRE COMMISSIONER
PUNCH #113 *.,***


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986

.'
Construction on a new addition to the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens (MJHHA) was officially
begun when ground was broken for Rowland
and Sylvia Sekaefer Hall Pictured
are
MJHHA Executive Director Marc Lichtman,
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, MJHHA President
Harold Beck, Sylvia and Rowland Schaefer
and MJHHA Chairman of the Board Judge
Irving Cypen.
Fourth Annual Founders amit women
Gala Of MJHHA Nov. 1
The glamour, glitz and high
style of New York in the 40's will
live again when the Founders of
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens present "Take Me Back
to Manhattan." This Fourth An-
nual Founders Gala will be held in
the Versailles Room of the Hotel
Intercontinental on Nov. 1.
The event will be chaired by
Founders President Louis Stein
and his wife, Bess. Over 300
Founders and their guests are ex-
pected to attend this largest
Founders Gala to date.
"From the moment our guests
'check their hats,' they will be
transformed into the magic of a
New York night club in the 40's,"
explained Stein. "It will be a great
party and a tribute to an era
that defined a great party."
Ted Martin and his 10-piece or-
chestra will provide the entertain-
ment, conjuring up the spirits of
Cole Porter, Rogers and Harte
and Noel Coward.
Founders is a concerned group
of benefactors, each of whom has
pledged at least $50,000 toward
the capital expansion of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged.
Northpark Community Names
Rechtschaffer Administrator
Simcha Chapter luncheon and
program at their meeting on Mon-
day, at noon at the Winston
Towers.
Shoshana Chapter will meet on
Tuesday, at noon in the State
Room of Seacoast Towers South.
Chai Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, at noon at Temple
Beth Tov.
Galil Chapter will hold their an-
nual Fresh Air Luncheon on
Wednesday, at noon at the Young
Israel Social Hall.
Rishona Chapter is planning a
weekend, from Friday, Oct. 31 to
Monday, Nov. 2 at the Tarleton
Hotel.
An expert in the field of retire-
ment and aging, Hope "Candy"
Rechtschaffer, has been named
Administrator of Northpark, an
adult rental community developed
by Levitt Retirement Com-
munities, a wholly-owned sub-
sidiary of Levitt Corporation, a
major U.S. community develop-
ment company.
Ms. Rechtschaffer for the past
eight years has been associated
with the Broward County Area
Agency on Aging, the last five
years as its Executive Director,
having previously served as assis-
tant director.
Northpark, now under construc-
tion for late 1986 occupancies, is
planned as a community of 340
rental apartments in three
residential buildings, each directly
connected to the Community
Center which will provide recrea-
tion, activity and a wide range of
services.
Ms. Rechtschaffer will super
vise the total operation of Nor-
thpark including budgeting, staff-
ing, care, quality services and
maintenance, as well as represen-
ting the facility in community and
civic associations.
Ms. Rechtschaffer has an
18-year background in the field of
aging in Broward County and was
responsible for an $8.5 million
budget at the Broward Area
Agency on Aging, including
transportation, nutrition, recrea-
Hope Rechtschaffer
tion, counseling, in-home care and
repair, employment, outreach,
legal services, senior centers and
adult day care centers.
She received her Master's
Degree in Social Work Ad-
ministration from Barry College
Graduate School of Social Work
and has additional course work in
Administration, Gerontology,
Health Care, Planning, Public
Relations and Government Rela-
tions. Her BA degree in Sociology
was awarded by Florida Atlantic
Univeraitv.
Natalie Lyons and Shirley
Grossman, co-cordinators of
Big Gifts for Miami Region of
Hadassah, announce Fund
Raising Seminars to be held
Tuesday and Wednesday. Ruth
Koslove, (above) National
Hadassah Chairperson will
conduct the seminars.
Birth Announcement
Dr. and Mrs. Meir Ihah of
Feasterville, Pa. are happy to an-
nounce the birth of their son
Jonathan Michael on Sept. 25. The
proud grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Melvin L. Kartamer of North
Miami Beach and Mr. and Mrs.
Nairn Mazala of Israel.
Fascell Honored For Efforts
To End World Hunger
Congressman Dante Fascell (D., Fla.), chairman of the Hous*
Foreign Affairs Committee, received a Presidential award for to
efforts to end world hunger in special ceremonies held h!
Washington
Fascell received the Presidential End Hunger Award for hi
"extensive, extraordinary efforts" and "leadership in motivating
others" to solve the problem of hunger throughout the world
"During hia years in Congress, Chairman Fascell has provided in
fluential leadership in furthering measures to help the people in
developing countries grow more of their own food and to ensure
that food assistance helps feed hungry people," the award states
Fascell, a member of Congress since 1965 and committee chair
man since 1984, will be cited for:
Supporting over the years legislation to encourage construe
tive U.S. assistance to developing countries with the help going tc
the poorest people in those nations.
As s member of the Commission on Security and Economic
Assistance, insisting on balanced foreign aid programs which in
elude humanitarian and development aid as important national
priorities.
Creation of the Inter-American Social Development Institute
now known as the Inter-American Foundation, which established
a new style of assistance programs for Latin Americans, making
a positive impact on their daily lives; this led to development of
the "New Directions" legislation which encouraged support of
small, innovative enterprises.
As principal author of legislation creating Appropriate
Technology International, helped organizations serve as brokers
for the sale and promotion of small-scale technology to feed the
hungry.
Recently introducing legislation to reorganize development
assistance programs for the nations of sub-Saharan Africa to pro-
vide more effective aid in reducing poverty and hunger in that
part of the world.
The report concludes: "As a thoughtful, creative legislator.
Dante Fascell has made many important contributions to the style
and shaping of U.S. assistance to the nations of the Third World.
He deserves to be recognized for his many contributions to solv-
ing the problem of hunger in the world."
U. of Miami Presents American
Jewish Literature In Cinema
Herman Wouk's "Marjorie Mor-
ningstar," Phillip Roth's "Good-
bye Columbus," Irwin Shaw's
"The Young Lions," and Edward
Louis Wallant's "The
Pawnbroker," are featured in the
University of Miami's Third An-
nual International Jewish Film
Festival, sponsored jointly by the
UM Judaic Studies Program and
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Four Jewish American authors,
whose books have been adapted
for the screen, have been selected
for the film series, entitled
"American Jewish Literature in
Cinema."
"Each movie speaks to a par-
ticular theme, and collectively,
touch the major issues of concern
of the Jew today: Holocaust,
assimilation, the family, Israel,"
said Dr. Henry Green, Director of
the UM Judaic Studies Program.
"American Jewish iiterature
has contributed significantly to
American culture, and the adapta
tion of novels to the screen is a
true measure of its popularity,"
Dr. Green said. "This adaptation
allows us the opportunity to
visualize and reinterpret the
literary traditions as they move
from one medium to another."
"The Pawnbroker," on Oct. 28,
stars Rod Steiger. "Marjorie Mor
ningstar," on Nov. 11, stars
Natalie Wood and Cene Kelly
"Goodbye Columbus," on Nov. 25,
stars Richard Benjamin, Ali
MacGraw, and Jack Klugmin.
"The Young Lions." on Dec. 9,
stars Marlon Brando and Mon
tgomery Gift.
All films will be shown at 7:30
p.m. in the University of Miami's
Beaumont Cinema.
Last Call For Artists
The last call for artists planning
to enter the Thirteenth Annual
Miami Beach Festival of the Arts
next February is Nov. 1. The Fine
Arts Board, organizers of the
event, has received close to 3,600
requests for applications so far,
with 130 new applicants to date,
way over last year's count and
more than in any other year. Ar-
tists who have not participated
previously in the festival and are
interested in receiving applica-
tions may do so by writing to the
Fine Arts Board. Miami Beach
Though the Festival is not until
February, 1987, the deadline to
enter the show is Nov. 1. "fte
have to get the applications in
ahead of time so that our pre-
screening judges can decide which
artists will qualify for the show.
said Fine Arts Board Chairperson
Susan Gottlieb.
Yeshiva University To Meet
With Prospective Students
Dr. Samuel M. Goldstein, dean
of Yeshiva University's Wurz-
weiler School of Social Work and
Director of the Block Education
Plan at that School, will be in the
Miami area, Monday, Nov. 3
through Friday, Nov. 7, for
meetings with students, field in-
structors, and agency officials at
local communal agencies and for
student recruitment.
On Tuesday, he will *j
Michael Ann Russell JCC and the
Greater Miami Jewish temn
tion. On Wednesday morning, u-
Goldstein will be at the HilM A*
Office in Coral Gables and, fro*
5-7 p.m.. at the Miami federation
to see prospective students"
terested in MSW Programs
Wurzweiler


Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Missions Return To Miami: A Success
Participants from the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation took part in two national UJA missions
to Israel. The President's Mission and the Chazak
Community Leadership Mission, in which gifts to
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation 1987 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Campaign increased by over
$132,000.
The President's Mission, included 21 people
from Miami whose contingent was led by Syd
Snyder. "It was a highly successful mission,"
Snvder reported. "Seven new gifts were pledged
w the Campain," he added. Those gifts in 1986
represented $176,000. During the mission, they
were increased to $271,000 for the 1987 CJA Cam-
paign and $32,000 of the pledges are earmarked
for Project Renewal.
j2J*m2! ^Ponent of the Community Leader-
ZZ lii! V,8ltors to Jewiah homeland
wasled by Manns and David Schacter. The gifts
raised during the mission provided an 88.9 percent
S&l ft m7CP"Z" over the ESS
t9Q, r^? t,^.6 mi88,on in 198- for total of
SSffaSLS9-000 of *"amount *to
Nationally the President's Mission achieved a
l^r increase in gifts to the United Jewish
Appeal Campaign and the Community Leadership
?.mEimeV,rLa 6? P61"06"1 increase- A ^tal of
51,635 433 will be targeted for Project Renewal
redevelopment in 1987.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation 1987 CJA Campaign Chair-
man, Donald E. Lefton with former Commander-in-Chief of the
Israel Defense Forces, General Mordechai Gur during the Prime
Minister s Mission.
CHERNIN PLAZA
Pictured at Chernin Plaza in Or Akiva dur-
ing the recent President's Mission are (from
left to right) 1987 CJA Campaign Chairman
Donald E. Lefton. Jan Schneider. President i
Boeaie Reitcr
Mission Chairman Sid Schneider, Ralph
Chernin, Marilyn Chernin and Associate Ex-
ecutive Vice President of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, Elton J. Kerness.
Gail Newman, Greater Miami Jewish Federaton, Women's Divi-
sion Campaign Chairperson and Judge Robert Newman plant a
young sapling at a new Galilee settlement during a Community
Leadership Mission to Israel.
Mark Friedman
Beth Rabin
Federation Announces Appointments
To Communications Department
Myron J Brodie, executive vice
ESSL* Greatr M-n"
Z2 Feder*tion. announced the
Wwntments 0f Bonnie Reiter
J Mrk Friedman to the
^ration Communications
^ftment. headed by Nicholas
22*. Reiter aamime. the
wuon of associate director of
J^cations and Friedman,
ZJE*P of communications
J** In addition. Beth Rubin
wen named communications
i""j*ct manager.
*, who most recently aerv-
ttfeK*. of communications
122* "* cer-
St2 S ,*W advertising
pS SS? of degree E
from pi ^ n" communications
RLTfit AtUntic University
iSSu? "^' member of
SeS kReUtion Society of
^-She will be responsible
"^ting ,n the coordination of
the public relations and media
relations program for the Federa-
tion and several of its agencies, in-
cluding the Jewiah Community
Centers.
Friedman also comes to the
Federation from the Jewiah Com-
munity Centers of Greater Miami
where he recently held the posi-
tion of assistant director of com-
munications. He holds a bachelor
of science degree in advertising
communications from Florida In-
ternational University and is an
active member of the Advertising
Federation of Greater Miami.
Friedman will be responsible for
producing the Federation's mon-
thly Newsmagazine as well as
media relations and advertising.
Rubin, who has been with the
Federation communications
department for five years, has
been named to the position of pro-
ject manager. She holds a
bachelors of science degree in
journalism from the University of
Florida and will be responsible for
organizing the production/traffic
of the department and events
coordination.
Chaim Weizman
343 To Meet
Chaim Weizman Farband
Branch 343 will hold their
meeting on Monday at 12 noon at
the American Savings, 1200 Lin-
coln and Alton Roads.
Morris Becker will speak about
David Ben-Gurion, the architect
of Zionism and first Premier of
Israel. Rose Luski will render
several recitations. Regina Bailen
will sing accompanied by Helen
Skolnick.
Roz Berrin and Marvis Schaecter visit with a young resident at
Miami's Project Renewal sister city of Or Akiva during Com-
munity Leadership Mission to Israel.
Michael Adler, 1987 Summit
Division Chairman, plants a
tree at Karkoum, a new settle-
ment in the Galilee during
UJA Prime Minister's
Mission.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
\ .
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Sum-
mit Division held a reception aboard a yacht
in Bxscayne Bay. The reception was hosted by
David Paul, Chairman of the Board and Chief
Executive Officer ofCenTrusL Guests includ-
ed Richard Newberg, Davica Levy, Dale
Newberg, Howard Sharlin, Women's Division
President Dorothy Podhurst, Federation
President Aaron Podhurst and Federation
Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie.
Young Leadership Council (YLC) members,
Phil Plotka and Nancy Krau, who met at a
past YLC "Learn-in" and are presently
engaged to be married, help decorate the YLC
Sukkah at the Program and Education Com-
mittee's "Sukkot Learn-in" held at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. The event
was chaired by Anita Altman.
Federation Takes The Gold At National
CJF Public Relations Competition
One Gold, three Silver and an
Honorable Mention award will be
presented to the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Communica-
tions Department for excellence
in Public Relations at the 1986
Council of Jewish Federations
(CJF), General Assembly to be
held in Chicago, Nov. 12-16.
The Miami Federation took the
gold for its "Insider's Report," a
publication which gives the latest
campaign information to its
contributors.
Silver awards were presented to
the Miami Federation in the
categories of "Newspapers
Without Ads" for Federation's
monthly supplement to "The
Jewish Floridian." The 1986 CJA
campaign brochure and an invita-
tion. An honorable mention was
received in the category of
"Newspaper Advertising." All in
all, Miami's five awards ranked it
in first place (shared with the
Baltimore Federation) in terms of
number of wards won.
"It's nice to know that Miami's
long tradition of excellence ;n the
field is being maintained," said
Forrest Raffel, Chairman of the
Federation's Communications
Committee.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is a national association of
250 Jewish Federations serving
nearly 800 communities and em-
bracing a Jewish population of
more than 5.7 million in the
United States and Canada.
Miami Beach Civic League
Schedules Political Debates
Debates by candidates in the
forthcoming election will
highlight the annual election din-
ner meeting of the Civic League
of Miami Beach Monday evening,
Oct. 27, at 6:30 p.m. at the new
Embers Restaurant, 5005 Collins
Ave.
In addition to the debates, Civic
League members will take part in
discussions of the three City of
Miami Beach issues to be decided
by voters in the Nov. 4 general
election. The issues call for a $3
million bond issue to improve
Ocean Drive and Lummus Park,
the repeal of the Falk Amendment
and a charter change to provide
for elections every two years for
city commissioners running for
staggered, four-year terms.
Civic League members also will
vote on approving a recommenda-
tion from the board of directors
that the organization go on record
in favor of the state lottery and
the county choice option for casino
gambling. Gerald Schwartz, Presi
dent of the Civic League, said.
Shirley Aron. Director of Switchboard of Miami, has been
elected President of the Florida Network of Youth and Familv
Services for the upcoming year. The Network is a private non
profit association of 17 agencies throughout the state which serve
the needs of runaway and troubled teenagers and their families
The Dade County Medical Association Auxiliary will host its an-
nual luncheon Tuesday, at 11 am to aid in the fight against child
abuse The luncheon at the Inter-Continental Hotel will be follow-
ed by a fashion show
Discussions of two of the maior issues which Miami Beach
voters will decide in the Nov. 4 election will highlight the monthly
breakfast meeting of the Beach Chamber of Commerce Thursday
Oct 30. at 8 am at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel Former
Mayor Malcolm H Fromberg and City Commissioner William E
Shockett. past Chamber president, will give updates on the
campaigns
Jeremy Menuhin. Pianist will appear at the Theatre of the Per-
forming Arts in Miami Beach on Thursday. Oct 23 at 8 p m
This is the first of six concerts presented by Community Concert
Association, celebrating its 30th year.
The Oct 26 edition of WPBTs Viewpoint will feature
South Florida clergymen discussing AIDS and the rote of people
with AIDS in their ministries Joining "Viewpoint" host Rodney
Ward for exploration of this sensitive issue will be Reverend
Luther Jones. Rabbi Carl Klein and Father James Fetscher
Miami Dade Community College s Lunchtime Lively Arts
Series opens its 15th season with a performance by ODC/San
Francisco at noon. Wednesday Inaugurating Miami s new
cukural season, representatives of the aty's performing am
organizations will greet the noon audience in Gusman's lobby
from 11 am to noon
Dr Thomas Terry Thompson, authority on X-ray equipment
techniques and department design, has been appointed chief of
Radiology at South Shore Hospital and Medical Center, affiliated
with the University of Miami School of Methane His appointment
was announced by Marshal H Berkson. president and chairman
of the board of South Shore Hospital and by Dr Wilham
Zubkoff. executive director of the medical center
The Center for the Fine Arts presents Close Encounters with
Musk", a special series of five concerts under the artistic direction
of Ceflat Yehuda Hanani at 1 and 8 p.m on Saturdays This con-
cert series is made possible by Patricia and Emanuel Papper The
first presentation will take place Nov. 1.
The Greater Miami Society of Plastic and Reconstructive
Surgery' has elected its new officers for 1986-87 year They are
Barry M Schwartz MD. President Jay Fine. MD. FACS \ ice
President, and Gary Zahler. MD. PA. Secretary-Treasurer
Harmony Lodge of B nai B'nth will hold its meeting on Monda>
at 7 p.m at Pythian Hall. North Miami Beach Fred Lesuie
Associate Director Florida Regional Office Anti-Defamation
League, will speak
Miami Children s Hospital is celebrating the opening of their
new hospital on Saturday. October 25. and announced a whole
day of fun for all the children of the community starting at 1 >
a.m..
An independent in athletic competition. Jewish High School of
South Florida is arranging matches with other area schools such
as Hebrew Academy. Lear and Miami Country Day According to
Fred Wolven. Athletic Director and Bowling Coach Jewish
High's new bowling program allows a larger number of students
to participate in sports in a relaxed atmosphere
Joel L. Roskind. MD. of Miami has been invited to join the
faculty of the l.jpolysis Society of North America for its annual
Advance Workshop and Annual Meeting to be conducted in Los
Angeles Oct 25-26. just prior to the annual meeting of the
American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons
Classes In The Arts
At The Jewish High School
In its 6th year the Jewish High
School of South Florida is
creating a more comprehensive
curriculum by instituting classes
in the Arts. "We are addressing
the need to provide a well-rounded
education as well as trying to
satisfy our less science oriented
students." says Principal. Rabbi
Louis Herring.
Heading the Art program is
Llena Jacobs, a graduate of New
York's Hunter College and a
former student of the I'mversiu
of Miami. "I want to get students
involved in what art is about,
says Ms. Jacobs. Projects for tne
Art Club include thematic decora
tion. a school mural, masks for
Purim and excursions to museums
and exhibitions.
The stage has also been set for a
drama program under the direc-
tion of Rosally Saltsman. who has
studied and performed music ana
drama in Israel. London and Mon-
treal, teaches drama to a group oi
students.


Ha Bima To Present
'Dreyfus In Rehearsal'
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
I Ha Bima Miami. Miami s only
Cmoanv producing plays about
IK history- problems and in-
VZL ^ EnPlishl WI" ptTae^t
ISWdway h" ;'Dreyfu8 In
f!^,'at tne Colony Theatre
Kvember. The production is
llrt of the Outreach Program of
IS* University of Miami s Judaic
Studies Program.
I H Bima Miami, founded and
lirected bv Bill Kimmel. a UM
Iriduatt student in the English
|Srtment. is entering its se-
EdlMT- Last year they produc-
K classic "The Dybbuck."
lino Trial and Error." an original
E jbout the Russian refuaenik
E Edelstein This year's first
Imductior. I'reyfus in Rehear-
I* is by Garson Kanin. which
\ials with anti Semitism through
the vehicle of a Polish acting com-
pany in rehearsal, where fantasy
quickly becomes reality, and
humor becomes tragedy.
Ha Bima Miami, an all-
professional, non-equity group,
performs throughout Dade Coun-
ty, as well as at the Colony.
"This is one of our most impor-
tant outreach programs," said Dr.
Henry Green, Director of UM's
Judaic Studies Program.
"Through Ha Bima Miami we try
to preserve the reservoir of
Jewish theater, and to build a
bridge between the ethnic groups
in this community by exposing
them to different cultural
experiences."
"Dreyfus in Rehearsal" will run
Nov. 7. 8, 9 and 14, 15. 16 at the
Colony Theatre in Miami Beach.
PERSONALS
ARE YOU SINGLE? Per-
sonal Ads get response!
Cost is $10.00 for up to 30
words. To place your spe-
cial singles ad send $10.00
and copy of ad to: The
iewish Floridian, Singles
Column, P.O. Box 012973.
Miami. Florida 33101.
HAPPENINGS IS HAVING
aH0RROR-I-FIC HALLOW-
EEN PARTY on FRIDAY.
OCTOBER 31. 1986 from
5:30 p.m. on. at the Hyatt
Regency Miami (Currents
Lounge). 400 S.E. 2nd Ave.,
Miami, Florida. This party
is FREE and Everyone Is
Welcome. There will be a
Live Dance Band. Compli-
mentary Hors D'oeuvres,
Halloween Games and
Costume Contests, Trick
Or Treat Bags. Special
Prizes and Surprises. For
more information call
Sharon Silver 385-1255.
BETH TORAH Congrega
tion. Benny Rok Campus,
1051 North Miami Beach
Boulevard. North Miami
Beach. Florida is proud to
announce the formation of
The Old Fashioned Way".
aconfidential Jewish Intro-
duction Concept available
I 'or the entire Jewish Com-
munity. This program is
open to Jewish singles
Between the ages of 25 and
J years old. Under the
direction of Stephanie
tngelberg and David Brook
Tne Old Fashioned Way"
ill strive to bring together
s,ngle Jewish men and
*omen in South Florida.
0ur nope is that we can
introduce Jewish Singles
one another. South
"Mda is full of Jewish
Mflle men and women
""o have little or no outlet
o meet other Jewish men
w women. We hope to
We that. -The Old
JNonjd Way" is charg-
g no fee for its service.
2'and evening appoint-
S a? avai|able. For
Eft '"formation please
I ?na -5hanje En0elberg
"David Brook at 947-7528
EJ! SUVIVE The
Eft* ^ne. A Singles
E2eneM Training (tm)
PS* Saturday. Nov
K ke" R Holiday
ISta rane,ls,s- 10 Ses
i sL?umiet Luncheon
USSR ft?hlon Show
[^Myer call 27*6745.
h'S HANDSOME, dynanv
SftST. 0rthdox New
heived l6man' a,wavs
I ra;Lkrev,ews- a
_seeks pretty
young lady aged 19-29, who
is lively, sincere, affection-
ate, humorous, honest, and
with a great zest for life
for role of leading lady. Box
STL c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami
33101.
I WANT TO meet a woman
in the 70s for marriage. I
am 36 years on the Beach. I
have a nice con. apart-
ment. I am 5 feet 4 inches.
Phone 538-0709
THE JEWISH SINGLE Net
work and the Adult Depart-
ment of the South Dade
JCC are proud to present
Dr. Bernard Schecterman,
Professor and Former
Chairperson of the Depart-
ment of Politics and Public
Affairs Graduate School of
International Studies at the
University of Miami. Dr.
Schecterman is a United
States government con-
sultant and lecturer. Plan
to attend this thought-
provoking evening.
Refreshments to follow.
For further info contact
Marsha Botkin at 251-1394.
October 29, 1986 at 7:30
p.m. at the SDJCC, 12401
SW 102 Ave. Free for
members. $2.00 for
non-members.
ATTRACTIVE, sophisticat
ed, well educated New
Yorker who spends lots of
time in Miami, and has a
great deal of style and
elan, seeks a very success-
ful, energetic, sharing and
caring man with a sense of
humor, over 38 who knows
how to be a friend, and a
lover. Bio/Photo/Phone ...
please. Box ASW c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973. Miami. Fla. 33101.
SINGLE JEWISH MALE.
54, living In the Boston
area would like to meet, in
Florida, a single Jewish
Female financially well
off. Box SJM, c/o Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101.
I AM A RETIRED, healthy
blind man living in Miami
Beach. I need a middle-
aged or older person with
car to assist me afternoons
with daily chores. Salary.
865-1892.
THE NEXT MEETING of the
SDJCC Singles Havurah
will be held on October 27.
1986 at 8:00 p.m. at the
Goldstein Academy
Library, located at the
SDJCC campus. 12401 SW
102 Ave. For further
information, contact Jodye
Friedman at 251 1394.
HADASSAH
NEWS
The Miami Beach Region
Hadassah Supporters of Israel
Bonds Luncheon will be held
Thursday, Nov. 6, at Temple
Emanu-El. The luncheon will
begin at 11:30 a.m. Guest speaker
will be Alon Ben-Gurion, grand-
son of David Ben-Gurion, Israel's
first Prime Minister and founder
of the State of Israel Bonds
Organization.
Albert Einstein Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a paid-up
membership luncheon on Monday
at noon at Temple Adath
Yeshurun. Luncheon will precede
entertainment.
Next meeting of Stephen S.
Wise Hadassah will be held on
Monday. Nov. 3, at the Ocean
Pavilion at 11:30 a.m. "The World
of Saga Holidays" will be
presented.
Hatikvah Hadassah will be hav-
ing their Thursday, Oct. 23 Board
Meeting at Sandy Silver's home at
7:30 p.m.
Loehmann's Fashion Center
will sponsor a fashion show at the
Annual Fall Membership Brunch
of the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah
on Sunday. Nov. 2, at 11:30 a.m.
at 8901 SW 95th Ave.
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its paid-up membership
luncheon Monday, at 12:30 p.m. at
Temple Zamora, Coral Gables.
President is Vera Fiedler and
Chairman of the Day is Libby
Lieberman. The program
presents Marilyn Delee, singer.
Marilyn Dele*
Annual and Life Members of
Albert Einstein Chapter of
Hadassah are invited to attend a
paid-up membership luncheon on
Monday at Temple Adath
Yeshurun.
Zohara Aventura and Eastern
Shore* Chapter membership lun-
cheon will take place on Oct 31 at
Eldorado Tours at noon. On the
reservations committee are Helen
Spitz. Rose Pinaky. Rose Wieder,
Esther Gordon. Alice Lazarus and
Cele Dabular
Dade County Council
JWV/VA Celebrate
Birthdays
Dade County Council Com-
mander Norman T. Levine and
President Phyllis Shaw, advise
the County will celebrate their
joint birthday, October 25. at their
Night Club Night, in the
Singapore Hotel.
The men will be celebrating
their tenth year, and the women
their fifth All the past com
manders and presidents will be
honored.
Greeting new members of the Next Generation, newest support
group of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, at
their cocktail reception from left: Sarah Zimmerman, A. Jeffrey
Barash, Charles Gam, Martin Gelb and President Nancy Rauch.
AJCommittee
Miamian Judith Rood Traum
Chosen For German Exchange
Judith Rood Traum has been
chosen by The American Jewish
Committee to represent Miami in
its Konrad Adenauer Exchange
Program. Established six years
ago. the program brings young
German leaders to America for an
intensive study of American
democracy and the pluralistic
nature of our society. It sends
young American Jewish leaders
for an intensive look at post-
World War II German democracy.
The joint program recognizes
the crucial nature of the Ger-
man/American alliance and the
need for deep understanding bet-
ween the future leaders of the two
nations.
The trip will take the par-
ticipants across the length and
breadth of the Federal Republic.
They will meet with civic,
military, religious and govern-
mental leaders. While in Berlin
they will cross into the East
meeting with East German of-
ficials and the U.S. Ambassador.
Issues as anti-Semitism. Israel.
Soviet Jewry, and the repatriation
of Germans from behind the Iron
Curtain, will be discussed. Two
years ago at such a meeting a
breakthrough was reached allow-
ing AJC to provide a Rabbi to
East German Jewry for the High
Holy Days.
Mrs. Traum, the ninth Miamian
to participate in the exchange is a
product of Miami schools and a
magna cum laude graduate of
Radcliffe College. She has a Juris
Doctor degree from the Universi-
ty of Miami School of Law. A
practicing attorney, she is active
in a host of civic activities in-
cluding the WLRN reading ser-
vice, recording for the blind, and
several music and theatre associa-
tions. She is a Vice President of
AJC Miami and chairs its
Domestic Affairs Commission
Miami Chapter of the American
Jewish Committee was founded in
1953. Roger Bernstein, a local at-
torney, is President.
ELECT 1* KEN
FRIEDMAN
FIRE COMMISSIONER
KEN FRIEDMAN...
A VOICE FOR STABILITY
Public Service is a part of
Ken Friedman's proud
tradition of personal and
family involvement in public
life His father i Judge
Milton Friedman and his
brother is Judge Ronald
Friedman.
PRESIDENT OP:
Florida State Aaaodatioa of
BaaiBrith
Greater Miami Jayreca
(JCIS*aatorl
South Miami Toaatmaatera
Saylaka-H%*laad Lakaa
Howowmt'i Aaoodatkw
Switchboard of Miami
I pledge to continue my lifetime of community
leadership by being a voice for stability, one
that will help guide the foundation of our new
New Fire Commission. / -r-"', i
ELECT
KEN FRIEDMAN
FIRE COMMISSIONER
ENDORSED BY COUNTY COMMISSIONERS & THE FIRE FIGHTERS
& CONCERNED CITIZENS NE DADE
& OWNERS & RESIDENTS SUNNY ISLES
Don't b- i on I ii\< il
Vote lor the Bet O.NE
on November 4"*
Pl'lSC.H #145
fa aov


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. "These shall ye not eat of them the camel the rock-
badger the hare the swine they are unclean unto you"
(Leviticus 1U-8).
SHEMINI
SHE MINI n the eight day of their consecration, Aaron and his
sons offered sacrifices for themselves and the people at Moses'
command. Then Moses and Aaron came out of the tent of
meeting, blessing the people. The glory of God appeared; a fire
from Heaven consumed the burnt-offering on the altar. At the
sight, the people cried out and fell on their faces. Nadab and
Abihu, Aaron's sons, offered "strange fire" on the altar, a fire
issued forth and devoured them. Aaron held his peace. The priests
are commanded not to drink wine or strong drink when entering
the tent of meeting "that ye may put difference between the holy
and the common, and between the unclean and the clean"
Leviticus 10.10). The portion details the laws describing
cleanliness and uncleanliness in regard to the eating of animals,
fowls, and fish.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P Wollman-
Tsamir $15. published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
iX&Jfi" Yorkl NY 10038 JOPn Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.) '
Michael Weston To Head New
STEMS Program At MJHHA
Michael Weston has been
engaged by the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
at Douglas Gardens to head up a
new program, the Short-Term
Emergency Management
Systems (STEMS). In the next
three years, STEMS will be pro-
viding at-home emergency care to
900 elderly in North Dade and in
Hialeah thanks to a grant of over
$300,000 from the Arthur Vining
Davis Foundations.
Weston comes to the Miami
Jewish Home with a long history
of designing and administering
services to the elderly. Most
recently, he worked for the Health
Council of South Florida, Inc.,
where he served as a health plan-
ner. He has also served as a
private social work consultant.
Coordinator of Psychiatric
Outreach Services at the Stanley
C. Meyers Community Health
Center of Miami Beach and Direc-
tor of Guardianship, Outreach and
Emergency Intervention Services
with the Broward Gerontology
Program. Weston holds a
Bachelor of Arts degree from the
University of South Florida and a
Masters degree in Human Ser-
vices from Nova University.
"Emergency service is one of
the most sadly neglected areas of
elderly care," noted Weston.
"Too often, the elderly person in
need of emergency services is con-
fronted with a bureaucracy that
boggles the mind. STEMS will cut
through the red tape associated
with health and human service
assistance and provide the ser-
vices where and when they are
Michsel We.ton
needed most. In this way, we hope
to prevent bad situations from
becoming worse and avoid un-
necessary institutionalnation "
The STEMS program is
scheduled to go into effect in
February, 1987, and will provide
at-home help for periods of up to
three weeks to elderly persons in
health or family crisis situations.
Fees for these services will be
determined according to ability to
pay and eligibility will be deter-
mined according to need.
Egyptian F.M. Says PLO Should
Play Equal Role In Mideast Peace
By MARGIE OLSTER
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
Egyptian Foreign Minister Ahm-
ed Esmat Abdel-Meguid told the
General Assembly in his address
Monday that Egypt supports an
international conference on peace
in the Middle East which would in-
clude an equal role for the
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Meguid, who was scheduled to
meet Israeli Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir Monday evening said
the summit meeting in Alexandria
last month between Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres and Egyp-
tian President Hosni Mubarak
represented "a serious endeavor
to revive the peace process."
Meguid characterized the
meeting as "a step towards in-
creased flexibility, a deeper
awareness of the centrality of the
Palestinian question and a key to
comprehensive tackling of the
Arab-Israeli conflict."
Meguid supported "dialogue
and negotiation" as the best
means of achieving peace, but
stressed that the Palestinian ques-
tion remains "the crux of the con-
flict." He said Egypt is "best
equipped" to represent the
Palestinians as "a direct party to
this dispute."
The essentials of a settlement
with the Palestinians, Meguid
said, include the restoration of
"their occupied territories in the
West Bank, including Arab
Jerusalem, Gaza, and the Syrian
Golan Heights," as well as the
right to self-determination and
the establishment of a Palestinian
state in cooperation with Jordan.
The Rev. Dr. James J. McCart-
ney, Director of the Bioethics
Institute of St. Francis
Hospital, and former
Academic Vice President of St.
Thomas University, has been
elected Chairman for 19886-87
of the Clergy Dialogue of the
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews.
Sandi SamoU. an Academy
parent will head the 29th An-
nual Scholarship Journal of
the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy to be publish-
ed in conjunction with the
school's annual dinner schedul-
ed for Dec. 7 at the Biscayne
Marriott Hotel.
Author Amos Oz will speak
Sunday, Nov. 2, leading off the
1986-87 Omnibus Lecture
STr)f* f TemPie B** Sholom
of Greater Miami, announced
tepb cultural director Judy
DruekeT- T** morning lecture
will address the topic "Israel-
Peace and War," at 10:00 a.m
at the Temple.
Free Health
Screenings
In honor of its 26th Anniver-
sary, Cedars Medical Center will
offer free health screenings.
Called Health Worka, the vita
course will be available from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30,
in the Cedars Seminar Center.
Featured will be testa for car-
diac abnormalities, blood
pressure, diabetes, hearing
posture and other important
aspects of health.
V
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellghtlng Time
6:25 p.m.
9kmrw%* 1 **-------- _
Banyj. Kenovftcn. Rat*,
^^.fHId*,,
ShoUn F^mT' """'"I
^?TT EP*,b*"Tt. President
k>ua Committee
AOATH YESHURUN
1028 NE Miami Gartens Drive
North Miami Beach 8471438
Rabbi Samche Froedman
Cantor Ian Aepetn Conearvath*
f
t>
Sat 130am IIMpiK
OeHy eenteea 7*0 am a tx> p.m
Fit be* Bhaaaid auiea a: so p.m
talaiaoiaa Set feSO m
Sat If thenhat Tereh M0 tun
Sun. Wimftal Tereh fcjo a m a few p m
TEMPLE BETH AM
5880 N Kendall Or
S. Miami 887-8887
Dr.HsttMrll
Rabbi Leon.ro Schoolman
fh aisp.m
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue raft
Miam. Beach* WU* {)
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rat*,
AiwMiary Rabbi Maxwell Bern.,
Vahuda Shifman. Cantor^"
Maurice Klein. Ritual Directo,
OacaMTaub.E.ecutiveDi,^
Moehanah Kabbah Fri a m
Shomim Atxarat Frt.x Z
Set 0a.m.Vl*or 10:30 am "_.
Torah H.k.totSat 7:30 p.m ffff.
Cantor Yehuda Shltman will chant
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH EL CONGREGATION
gOWnslme Drive Miami Beach
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Sch.it
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2825 S.W 3rd Avenue 64-3911
Ritual Director
n.
Mmcheti Sal I p m
ShaaMM Atxeret Sat m a a pm
ShMohat Torah San. lama IMpm
Dewy ton Sun am a 5. JO a.m.
Man t Thura. 7: SO am a S p m
Tuee.. Wad. a Frt. 7:*> a.m. a 5 JO p m
Sat Ba.m.ahr baton auneet
-
faaPLE^RAEL------------'--------
Of Off-tox Miami
mrt none)*)' Ar*o/m Ccvgrex)jf.or,
137 N.E 18th St., Miami. 573-5900
8890 N. Kendall Dr.. 585-5055
Senior Rabbi Hat kail Bern at
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus
Jacob Q. Bomstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
.Kendall Cloaed: p.m. Downtown RaoMi
Bemat and Fertwani win conduct aamcai
Llturyy Cantor rUehetta F Nalaon In oMaprt
tton ol Slmchat Torah now chiioian ol
"Wotoua School will ba comaoitad
TEMPLE JUDCA
5800 Grenada
Coral Qabtee
E
M7-M67
Ere* Slmchat Torah I p m Frt.
Smchaltorah Manorial San 111Ja.ni Sat.
BETHKODEBH
OaWaMfM ttVO
1101 SW 12 Are
Rabbi Max Shsparo
Cantar Joaaph Krtaaat
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
88-8.184
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2?Ki121 *'N ,""*,nt- FL mibi
*1M0> Conservative
Or Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joeeph A GortlnkeJ.
Rabbi Emorttwe
Moshe Frted+er, Cantor
Frtioje.
Set. feat a.m
*U*ar Sat Stmehal Tor.n
t p.m. Sam. feat am

4-
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
Or
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rosa
Shoahenah Raab. Cantor
Servtcea Fri 7:30 pm
Sat 1-30 am
aft
TEMPLE MEN0RAH
820-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowiu
Art FrWkls. Assoc Rabbi f
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. a.m Sabbath aanlea
Dally Mtnchah Sunday Friday
I am and t p m
Sat t a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
d
Ti^
PLE NER TAMIO
7902 Cartyte A*e..
Miami Boach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Laboviu
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Sarrlcaa I am and i. JO p m
Sat fees a.m. Frt. lata aanrica I p r,
ISiy'^CONOREQATrON
7^"Bw-1tras4
238-2901 ,s>.
RabW Dartd H. Auerbsch [W)
Cantor Stapn>n Fraedman ^
Frt. a
JJBpTI IFTM IMOLoM *U 'Hi*
CheeeAire 8 41st St
OAhYA ORrCK
F^yTni.>yrA.w.
***- *>"' (.na| rejjjji
HAMHY XKT, Auaator* aa>
?*Ul 0 CAatAK MitigT
cAinoaoAviodoimaa
TnrahrFaaaai Mat
SHAARAV TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172rK)St
North Miami Beach
881 1882
Vaakov Sprung. Rao*.
a-.
SMAARE TEFILLAH OF KENOAll
389-0998
Rabbi Hersnel Becker aw-o*-'
hi rxi mtiicii
raaaata Saatu-O
OMSlWIUAva..
S o< N Ra~J.li Or
r!ESL> CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 Ti2m
081 N Mi.m.B^hBlvd
D Max A Lipschiti RabO>
f^eAronl, Cantor
Henrey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dam/ Sarvtcoa Men Fri 7:301
Hahana haabah Mtocha Fri.
feltaja,.
ahnchal Torah Hakatot Sat.
7:X p m
ahahartt Sun 25 am
rSi
TEMPLE SINAI 1S801NEM*"*
North Dade s Reform Corajreottwn
Ralph P Kingstey. Rabb. WW
Julian I Cook. Associate RaOb.
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramaay. Administ'HO'
Frt be* SJmchet TorahitP*
Sat Slmchat Torah rfejt a.m.
Bar Mltrrah Joattn Ban*
Bat atittvah Brooa an>
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
9000 Miller Or Consertl>
2712311 ,.
Dr Norman N Shapiro Rabb' yf)
Benjamin Adler Cantor ~"
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Ctnic
ainyan 7 am
Sunday*!
Sat. t am
van 7 a.m. Monday ThurwMr
lay*a.m.. FrtfclSe.ni.
1a.m. Sabbath Sarnca
Taitlar Chapat.


Pvtured at the Flamingo Career League's
Dxnner Dance at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob Gutt are from left Maria Behar, Lucy
Kalusin, Jack
Miriam Gutt.
Gutt, Gota Huppert and
Flamingo Cancer League Annual Dinner Honors Holtz
Abel Holtz was honored for his
gift to the AMC Cancer Research
Center at the Flamingo Cancer
League's annual by-invitation-
only dinner dance held at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Gutt.
The event was organized by Mrs.
Guta Huppert and Mrs. Maria
Behar.
Abel Holtz's gift is for the pur-
chase of an ELISHA Microplate
Reader for AMC. The ELISHA
Reader, to be used in the Cell
Biology Laboratory at AMC, is us-
ed to assist in the development
and testing of antibodies that seek
out breast cancer cells in the body.
The Flamingo Cancer League
was honored at the last national
convention in 1985 as the number
one fund raising chapter for AMC
out of 74 chapters nationwide.
The AMC Cancer Research
League Center, housed in Denver,
is an international leader in the
fight against cancer, Miami.
Focus on Issues:
Pope's Prayer Meeting In Assisi
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum,
director of international rela-
tions of the A merican Jewish
Committee, was the only rabbi
present at Vatican II.
By RABBI
MARC TANENBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
On the face of it, the
meeting of representatives
from the world's major
religions to pray for peace
on Monday, Oct. 27, in
Assisi, Italy, is a positive
oevelopment.
Called by Pope John Paul II,
JgW of Catholics, Protestants,
ffft Hindus. Jews. Moslems,
Buddhists, Shintoists and
will meet in St. Francis
oi Assui's birthplace for prayer,
J ton will assemble the next
y to ducuas ideas for the promo-
oon of peace.
While clearly Judaism's leaders
w deeply committed to the idea
snalom." the organization of
Pfayer demonstration has not
Jjjthout problems for Jewish
FIRST IS the problem of calen-
. The prayer day is scheduled
8JT.fr on morning after
ffiSToah, the final day of
I JjWh. In practical terms, this
?2 that no Jewish religious
*ouki vwiate yom tot- by traveling
&to Assisi on the SundaP
Sl^^'talyiB expected to
1ES M a Jewi8h religious
JJJ only a short distance from
Jjjr. an official
'JJdbeen extended
ecai Waxman, chairman of
5 ST ES,Jewiah <**
-which relates to the Vatican
* World Council of Chur-
coordinating body for the
American Jewish Committee,
B'nai B*rith International, the
Synagogue Council, the World
Jewish Congress, and the Israel
Interfaith Committee. Because of
the conflict with Simchat Torah.
Waxman will not attend.
Some individual rabbis and
Jewish organizational people
reportedly will come to Assisi, but
they have not received official
invitations.
BEYOND THE calendar pro-
blem, there are some
"theological" difficulties which
are being discussed in Jewish and
other non-Cathonc circles. When
the idea of a world peace meeting
was first discussed in Rome
several years ago, the conception
that some of us set forth was that
the foremost recognized leaders
of the major Western and Oriental
religions would join together in in-
viting representatives of their
respective communities to join in
appropriate prayers and discus-
sion for world peace.
Such "ecumenical" invitations
would have precluded any
possibilities of religious "one-
upmanahip" or triumphal ism As
it turns out. this meeting is now
being perceived essentially as a
"Papal" or "Vatican" meeting to
which other religions are being in-
vited to take part.
One consequence, whether in-
tended or not, might be to
establish the Pope as "the moral
conscience of mankind" to which
these world's religious represen-
tatives not necessarily the
elected leaders of the major
religions woud seem to attest
by their presence.
THAT IMAGERY of a
predominantly Catholic initiative
with interreligious participation
rather than a genuine pan-
religious event will be
underscored by the fact that the
climactic prayer event will take
place in the Basilica of St. Francis
instead of some more neutral
assembly place.
In any case, the threat of
nuclear catastrophe is so great
and the cause of world peace so
compelling that religious leaders
appear to be ready to put aside
ecumenical protocol for the time
being in order to make a strong
public demonstration for the
cause of world peace.
Demjanjuk Trial Expected
To Begin Early In 1987
invitation
to Rabbi
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
trial of John Demjanjuk, the alleg-
ed Treblinka death camp guard
known to inmates as "Ivan the
Terrible," is expected to begin
early in 1987, Justice -Ministry
sources said.
They said the charge sheet
against the Ukrainian-born
former resident of Cleveland,
Ohio, is presently under study by
State Attorney Yona Blatman,
and a final draft should be ready
to be presented in court before the
end of the month. Demianjuk, who
was stripped of his U.S. citizen-
ship, is the only suspected Nazi
war criminal extradited to Israel
to stand trial.
He was brought here last Feb.
28 and has been confined to a
maximum security prison near
Ramie without being formally
charged. Justice Ministry sources
denied speculation that the State
prosecutors were finding it dif-
ficult to put together an air tight
case against the 65-year-old
former automobile worker. The
sources said the relatively long
delay in filing charges is due to the
"masses of evidence" which had
to be processed.
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
COMMUNITY CORNER
B'nai B'rith Women's Horizon's Chapter will have a
party at the Horizon Clubhouse on Saturday night, Nov.
1. A dairy dinner will be served along with music and
prizes.
A card and games party of the Temple Menorah
Sisterhood is scheduled for Wednesday at noon at
7435 Carlyle Ave., Miami Beach.
South Dade Chapter, Women's American ORT open
orientation membership tea for new and prospective
members will be held Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at North
Kendall Acres Clubhouse. Sylvia Feidman will brief the
members on ORT.
Temple Beth Sholom Sisterhood political forum on
gambling and lottery will take place Tuesday evening
at 7:30. Speakers will be Commissioner Howard For-
man, Andy Rubin and Ms. Janet Reno.
Brandeis University National Women's Committee,
Miami Beach Chapter holds its open meeting 10 a.m.,
lunch at noon, "Study Group Showcase" Program at 1
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30 at Harbour House South.
Miami Herald film critic, Bill Cosford will review and
preview new films for the Winter/Holiday season on
Nov. 2 at 7:30 p.m. at the South Dade JCC.
Bnai Zlon Miami Beach Chapter No. 186 will hold a
Social and Card Party on Sunday, Nov. 2 at noon at the
Hollywood Beach Hilton.
Shaare Zedek HospitalTSouTh Florida Women's Com-
mittee will meet Wednesday, at noon at the Shelborne
Hotel. Kosher lunch will be served and movies of Israel
will be shown. ______
The Women's International Zionist Organization will
hold Its Fifth Annual Fashion Show Luncheon
presented by the Exit Shops honoring Mrs. Frieda
Arber, Thursday, Nov. 20 at the Fontalnebleau Hilton,
Miami Beach. For information call Mercedes Ivcher or
Rosita Retelny at 937-1306.
B'nal B'rith Women Sinai Chapter No. 1615 will
feature a brunch at their next meeting on Tuesday, Nov.
4 at 11:30 a.m. In Morton Towers.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
DELUXE 1&2 BEDROOM
GREAT LOCATION
Walk to 163 St. Mali
Across From Pubtlx
nd Zayre Shopping
i Transportation
Pool Sauna
Games" 4 Social Director
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Kosher Shopplr
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Page 12-B
Thn^^^orSjFnS^oS^^U^m
Phillip Schiff Passes
Phillip Schiff, a resident of
Miami for 42 years passed away
this week.
Mr. Schiff was a World War II
veteran, Army Major, Bronze
Star and Purple Heart. He was a
partner with son Jim in the Schiff
Law firm, chartered member of
Florida, Kentucky and Ohio Bar.
Pioneer and past president of
Beth David Congregation, past
president and youth commission
chairman of S.E. Region of
United Synagogue of American
and member of Mahi Shrine.
He is survived by his daughter
Judi (Richard) Pauliger, Atlanta
and son Jim (Laurie) Schiff of
Miami.
Graveside services were held at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery. The
Riverside.
Phillip Schiff
Israel To Seek Having The
Red Magen David Adorn
Recognized By The ICRC
WASHINGTON (JTA)
When the International
Committee of the Red Cross
holds its 25th quadrennial
conference in Geneva Oct.
23, Israel will once again
seek to have its Magen
David Adorn admitted into
the International Red
Cross.
Since the establishment of the
Jewish State, the ICRC has refus-
ed to accept the Red Star of David
as an international symbol along
with the Red Cross, the Red Cres-
cent and Iran's Lion and Sun.
THE ICRC has been "held in
blackmail" out of fear that if it ac-
cepted the Jewish symbol, the
Arab countries would leave the
organiation, it was charged last
Thursday (Oct. 2) by Rabbi Rubin
Dobin, of Miami Beach, interna-
tional chairman of Operation
Recognition. The volunteer
organization has sought for the
last nine years to have Magen
David Adorn recognized by the
ICRC.
Dobin spoke at an informal
hearing in s Senate hearing room,
sponsored by Sens. Paula
Hawkins (R., Fla.) and
Christopher Dodd (D., Conn.),
who along with Dobin, sre na-
tional co-chairmen of Operation
Recognition. Dobin said there sre
similar committees in 50 other
Lester A. Macktez of Boynton
Beach and Providence, R.I.,
has been appointed chairman
ofB'nai B'rtth International's
Tours Committee by Seymour
D. Reich, the Jewish service
organization's new president.
He headed the committee
previously from 197U to 1980.
He is a professional travel
consultant.
countries.
The Senate unanimously
adopted a resolution, introduced
by Hawkins and Dodd, as it did in
1982, calling on the ICRC to
recognize the Israeli group. "This
has gone on so long," Hawkins
said. Both Hawkins and Dodd
noted the excellent work Msgen
David Adorn does in Israel and in
international rescue work.
SEN. ARLEN SPECTER (R..
Pa.) said it is "just s tragedy" that
Israel has been excluded. He
noted that Israel needs the inter-
national guarantee that the
Msgen David Adom symbol will be
a awn of protection in case of s
conflict. A similar point was made
by Steve Shaw, executive director
of the Jewish War Veterans.
"It is s terrible shame that what
can only be called anti-Semitism in
some parts of the world has
deprived the Jewish people of the
right to use their religious symbol,
the Star of David, in the same way
as others use their own religious
symbols," Rep. Benjamin Gilman
(R., N.Y.) said. Dobin stressed
that the American Red Cross has
since 1949 led the effort to have
Magen David Adom recognized.
Sherman Cohen, a professor of
international law at the
Georgetown University Law
Center .and president of the
American Section of the Interna-
tional Society of Jewish Lawyers
and Jurors, said the issue was not
legal, as ICRC officials claim, but
political.
COHEN SAID that the ICRC in
1907 adopted a convention with a
single symbol, the Red Cross. But
when Turkey joined and later Iran
and Egypt, they agreed to the
convention with the reservation
that they would not use the cross
since it is s Christian symbol.
There were no objections,
Cohen noted. Later the ICRC ap-
proved the Red Crescent and
Iran's Lion and Sun as official
symbols. After the Shah was over-
thrown, Iran adopted the Red
Crescent.
But Cohen said when Israel ap-
plied for membership in 1949 it
made the exact reservation as had
the Moslem countries. However,
the ICRC "refused to do exactly
what they did do in exactly the
same circumstances for Turkey,
Egypt and Iran." he said. Cohen
stressed that the ICRC set a
"precedent" for the three Moslem
countries which should now be
followed for Israel.
Lewis Serbin, Garment Manufacturer
Lewis I. Serbin, the founder of
one of Florida's largest women's
apparel makers died Saturday at
Miami Heart Institute. He wss 79.
Mr. Serbin wss chosen
Manufacturer of the Year in 1959
by members of the National
Association of Women's and
Children's Apparel Salesmen. He
was an active board member of
Temple Israel.
Mr. Serbin is survived by his
wife Janeth, Daughters Marianne
Friedman and Kathy Berman; a
sister, Rose Nathan and five
grandchildren. Services were held
at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami. Riverside in charge of
arrangements.
Alexander Youngerman, Developer
Alexander Youngerman, a
developer and real estate broker
died Sunday at his Bay Harbor
Island Home. Mr. Youngerman,
87, had been ill for several
months.
Mr. Youngerman was active in
the Urban League and the Jewish
Federation. He was also a past
president of the Dartmouth Col-
SCHIFF
Phillip, resident of Miami 42 year*. Devoted
husband of Mary. Beloved father of Judi and
Richard Pauliger (Atlanta). Laurie and Jim
Schiff Loving Brother of Betty Bear and
Manan Goldberg. Cincinnati. Ohio Dearest
Zayde of Erin and Noah Pawuger. Erica
and Mania Schiff. W.W. II Veteran. Army
Major, Bronze Star and Purple Heart Part
ner with ton Jim in the Schiff Law Firm.
Chartered member of Florida, Kentucky
and Ohio Bar. Respected and dedicated to
the community. Pioneer and Past President
of Beth David Congregation. Past President
and Youth Commission Chairman of S.E
Region United Synagogue of America
Member of Mahi Shrine and Founder and
Trustee of Mid-Life Seivicea Foundation.
Man of integrity, will be missed by family,
friends, profession and community.
Graveside Services were held at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery
DR08NE8
Sylvia, 84, of Miami Beach passed sway Oc-
tober 16. Mrs. Drosnea had bssn s resident
bare for the past 54 years coming from
Eage!wood, N.J She was a community
leader in the Israel Bond Drive. ORT and
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. She
is sunined by bar daughter Sue Grosansr.
grandchildren, Lauren. Joshua David and
Dana Lyn Services ware held at Riverside
Alton Road Chapel with interment at Mt
Nebo Cemetery
NEAR, Raina T., S3, of North Miami. Oc-
tober 18. The Riverside, Interment st Mt
Nebo
ROBAN. Aba of North Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 18. Menorab Chanel*
GOODMAN. Karen. 48. of New York.
formerly of Kendall. October 10. Service.
PAWLIGER, Mack. 76, of Miami. October
IS Service* bald at Temple Zion Israelite
WEINER, Edward, of North Miami Beach.
October 17. Sanies* ware bald.
FRIEDMAN. Lila I. (nee Sandier) of
Chicago Levitt Weineteui Interment at
Mt Nebo Cemetery.
KOEN1G. Gladys of Surfaide. October 14.
Service, were held
BERNER, Leo, 78, of Miami, October 14.
LASKOWTTZ, S-tria Ysdkn. of
Beach, October 14. TV* Riverside
NEDBLMAN. Esther K 68. of Miami. Oc-
tober 16. The Rr-eraide.
WAS8ERMAN. Samuel of Miami Beach.
Services and interment in New York.
Rubin Zikert in charge of arrangement*.
ADLEB, Frances (nee Bloch) Services
APPEL, Tubs, 77, of North Miami Beach,
October 16. Levitt-Wemsteui
GER8TENFELD. Olga, 76. of Coral
Gabies. October 12 Services were held.
LUBIN, Boris of Miami. RubnvZilbert
MANHOFT, Jack P.. 72, of Tampa, former
ly of Miami, October 16. "
GOODRICH. Isabel (Lama-area). October
17. Services were heal
COLE, Herbert M.. 60 of Lot Angel at,
Catif.. October 4. Memorial services were
held at Tempts Emanu-El, Miami Beach.
GBEENBEBC, Max. 86. of Miami Beach.
October 10. The Riverside
MICHELSON, Lawrence M.. 92. of Bay
Harbor Island. October 10. The
Riverside
lege South Florida Alumni
Association.
He is survived by his wife
Reyna; two daughters Judith Gin-
dy Benjamin of Coral Gables and
Marianna Green James of Ken-
dall; five grandchildren and one
great-grandson.
Services were held at Riverside
Alton Road Chapel.
ACHTER. Harry, of Miami Beach. October
16 The Riverside
LEVITT. Rae. 83. of Miami. October 17,
Services were held.
WEINTRAfB. Beatrice Merlin. 65 of
Miami. October 17 Services were held
WEINER, William, of North Miami Beech.
October 16 Service, were held
ZIMMERMAN. Molly Sheinfeld. 72. of
Miami Beach. October 20 The Riverside
LEHRMAN. Ruth of North Miami Beach
October 18 Blaaberg Chapel
1.1 PPM AN. David M Menorah Chapel*
NATHAN. Harry. 76. October 17 Services
l ML
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261 7612
Through years ol dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
Fun.'*' 0"ec*o*
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
"< President Jeaisti Funer.i
Directors ol America
'20 SEVENTY- FIRST STREET
865-2353
MIAMI BE AC" Fl'fuOaJ
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532*2008
Broward County
RUBIN
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CHAPEL
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10 CHAPELS SERVING
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BROWARD
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l<> |innil <<| n> Riverside Memorial Chapel. Ini
New York: Gtl2)2SS-7fl00 Lhjwns Blvd. & 76th Kd Fores! Hill- N \
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
538-6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN


Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
War Criminals In Canada
I Joachim Schoenfeld is the
I aihor of Holocaust Memoirs,'
I ; in the Lwow Ghetto' and
ty Janowski Concentration
j, JOACHIM SCHOENFELD
. TORONTO For 40
Lgrs, the government has
shown no concern in in-
vestigating and bringing to
justice the suspected war
criminals living in Canada.
Moreover, a tendency of noj.
being involved prevailed. In
the early 1960s, the Cana-
dian Cabinet was advised
aot to prosecute Nazi war
criminals. It would appear
to be pandering to Jewish
group intent of revenge. It
smacked of witchhunt. Bet-
ter let the sleeping dogs lie.
Simon Wiesenthal. the Nao-
tonter. submitted during these
Ml to the Canadian govern-
wnt many lists of Nan war
criminals living in Canada, re-
questing an investigation. But,
whenever the question of bringing
these subjects to justice was
brought up, it became a political
hot potato, and no action was
I taken.
IF ONE, <>r another war
criminal was recognized and de-
nounced to the proper authorities,
nothing was done. Legal
irguments were used as a
lomekescreen to cover up inac-
tion, and the criminals were allow
d to escape punishment. The
RCMP was told not to launch any
investigation without orders from
Ottawa
j A Canadian justice minister
(Chretien) told the Commons
Justice Committee that he didn't
intend to introduce legislation in
Canada for cnmes committed 35
jars ago in other countries.
There was a common policy
followed by the Canadian govern-
ment and by the I nited States not
prosecut,- war criminals.
However, in 1H7S legislation mak-
ag deportation of war criminals
possible was introduced in the
^t*d Sut->. and an Office for
special Investigations was in-
"tuted at the Justice Depart-
ment of the I'nited States.
W CANADA during all these
! only one war criminal
'"ucai was extradited to the Ger-
m Federal Republic. And. in
b"jary. 1958 a commission, the
fscnenes Commission, was
im to determine how many
**r criminals are in Canada, how
wy got here and what could be
*** to brinn them to justice.
JSf^ Commission was
"w* for war criminals with no
Z to**r ethnic origin, and
2 this question concerned
* the guilt or innocence of the
^'duals involved and had
*Jln Jo do with the eventual
fit of the nation to which he or
J* may have belonged, a can of
5 sprr n- 5^ Cana
J" Baltic Lithuanian and Ukrai-
JJ1 Committees felt offended.
" extreme passions were ig-
Ettad 55*21 .miUKm"of do,lars
elhnLe'La^e dvertisements
Efe* '" bier newspapers
"gAj country, and a process
iKfX "*"ibers of parha
fffSiSS wa transformed
political issue. Also, well
bowri J3u 188U M">- we"
Mind the HeRedTvar
AeT^ for Vete8
I rJI! ret P1*4* of the Ukrai-
tS^^Ann^gotcreden-
aomenri Commission. This
"^nclature was an alias for the
SS-Division Galizien formed ex-
clusively from Ukrainian
volunteers. It was an integral part
of the SS-Waffen used mostly in
iotion of the Einsatzgruppen
which committed mass murders of
lews. The SS-Waffen was the
military arm of the SS (Schutz-
staffel) an organization outlawed
by the Nuerenberg Tribunal and
declared a criminal organization.
When in 1944 the Germans
were retreating before the pursu-
ing Soviet armies, the SS-Division
Galizien, fighting shoulder-to-
shoulder with the Nazi armies,
formed their rear-guard. With
them went also the Nazi helpers,
such as the murderous guards in
the concentration camps and all
other Nazi collaborators.
When they reached German ter-
ritory, which was already under
Allied occupation, they shed their
German uniforms, presented
themselves as DPs and, playing
the role of innocent lambs,
declared that they were brought
forcibly to Germany as slave
laborers, or that they had just
been freed from a concentration
camp.
AFTER A SHORT time, the
DPs applied for immigration
visas, among others to Canada. In
the 1940s. Canada had a not too
restrictive immigration policy,
and masses of DPs applied for en-
try. The RCMP. under great
pressure, was unable to
meticulously scrutinize the visa
applicants in the prescribed time
of 14 days, the more so because no
applicant was able to present valid
documents.
Back in Europe, the consular
representatives dealt in most
cases on their own. Not having
received reports from the RCMP
in time, they did not ask many
questions, and the mere assertion
that one was not a Communist
was enough to obtain a visa.
Once in Canada, the new im-
migrant enjoyed a free life im-
mune from punishment. After a
few years, they were granted
Canadian citizenship, and some
became very prosperous.
The Deschenes Commission did
its homework and compiled a list
of a few hundred Nazi war
criminals living in Canada. But
there were also some surprises
like the one concerning immigra-
tion files from which it could have
been learned if one gained entry
to Canada on false pretenses. It
turned out that thousands of im-
migrant files had been destroyed.
THEN ANOTHER question
came up. Since the crimes were
committed in different European
countries, the Commission decid-
ed to travel to the countries in-
volved, among them to the Soviet
Union, in order to look for
evidence at the source.
However, the various ethnic
groups, especially the Ukrainian
Committee, fiercely opposed a
trip to the Soviet Union. It
asserted that there the Commis-
sion would be served fake
documents, and brainwashed
witnesses would be presented to
them and, in short, that in no
way could the Soviet judicial
system, which is a corrupt one, be
trusted.
The Commission nevertheless
decided to undertake the fact-
finding trip to the Soviet Union
because nowhere else could there
be found the pertinent documen-
tation and witnesses. To be sure
that there would be no corruption
of the procedures to be conducted
there, the Commission requested
of the Soviet Union that the in-
vestigation be conducted in accor-
dance with the rules of Canadian
court procedures and Canadian
law without any interference from
the Soviets.
NEGOTIATIONS to get Soviet
agreement to the conditions put
forward by the Commission took a
long time, during which the East-
European ethnic groups were
holding their breath in expecta-
tion of a refusal.
Last June 10, to the great sur-
prise of those who expected a
Soviet refusal of Canada's condi-
tions, and the expected deletion of
important evidence which could
eventually lead to the conviction
of some suspects in Canada,
Moscow accepted all conditions
without reservations. The
obstacles had been removed, and a
green light was given to the
Deschenes Commission to go to
the Soviet Union.
But on the next day, a still big-
ger surprise for which nobody was
ready was announced. The Com-
mission decided not to go to the
Soviet Union, apparently for lack
of time, since its report had to be
ready for the September 30, 1986
deadline.
CANCELING the fact-finding
trip to the Soviet Union offends
all decent Canadians and the
motivation of the cancelation
doesn't hold water. The deadline
for presenting the Commission's
report had been extended twice,
first from December 31. 1985 to
June 30, 1986, and then to
September 30, 1986.
In November, 1985, the Com-
mission urged the Soviet Union to
respond and accept the Commis-
sion's conditions, so that it could
visit the Soviet Union, collect the
evidence available there and be
able to prepare the report in time
for the Dec. 31 deadline, which
was then six weeks away. Then
again in May, 1986, with the same
six weeks from the June 30
deadline, a similar request was ad-
dressed to the Soviets.
But now, when the Soviets final-
ly agreed to all particulars put for-
ward by the Commission, there
was supposedly not enough time
to make the trip and prepare the
report for last Sept. 30. This
would have given the Commission
14 weeks to do the job. What could
Business Notes
Jeff Jeruss announces the open-
ing of his optometry practice,
located in the Dadeland North
Shopping Center.
Kim Marie Maugeri has been
elected assistant vice president of
Jefferson National Bank at Sunny
Isles. Her election was announced
by Norman S. Giller, president,
who said she would continue as
branch manager of the 18170 Col-
lins Avenue office of Jefferson
National Bank at Sunny Isles.
Savings of America will
celebrate the ribbon-cutting
ceremony of its new Miami Beach
office at 555 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
on Oct. 31 at 11 a.m.
Mayor Alex Daoud will perform
the ribbon-cutting, and other city
officials will be on hand to par-
ticipate in the event.
have been done previously in six
weeks could not be done now in 14
weeks.
If this is really so, why couldn't
the government grant another ex-
tension of the deadline? These
deadlines are not governed by any
binding law. Moreover, there is no
statute of limitations for murder
in Canada.
And so it is up to all Canadian
citizens to draw their own conclu-
sions about whether justice was
bent by politics.
Bank Hapoalim BM, one of
Israel a largest banking groups
and one of the world's 100
largest, has appointed Uzi
Vardy-Zer President, Regional
Management No rth
America. The appointment
was announced by Amiram
Si ran, Chairman of the Board
of Management. The bank has
offices in Miami.
Weekly j52
w w vviwj issues
Not Just Now and Then!
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Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Ptsnssti)
IN THE CBCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CWil Artie. Ne. 84-44S90 (04)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 221351
BILL LEE MA THEWS.
Petitioner/Husband.
vs.
JANET E. MATHEWS.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: JANET E. MATHEWS
5606 N.E. 7th Street
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an Action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Silver Silver, attorney for
Plaintiff, whoa* addreaa ia 150
SE. 2nd Avenue. Suite 1326,
Miami. Florida 33181. and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before
November 21, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice ahall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS nr/hand and the seal
of aaid court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of October. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Honda
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
Ira 8. Shrer
Attorney or MM
160 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Sort* 1826
Miami. Florida 88181
Telephone: (806) 874-4888
12808 October 17. 24, 81.
November 7, 1986
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TO CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. W
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CM ActiM Ne. 8*41472
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE:
LUIS DULAC,
and
ERNESTTNA DULAC.
TO: Erneatina Dulse
Present-Unknown
Last Known
9920 N.W 6th Lane
Miami, Florida 33172
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action foi
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 166 South Miami Avenue.
Penthouse I, Miami, Florida
88180, and file the original with
the derk of the above styled court
on or before October 81, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the rebef demand-
ed in the complaing or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of September, 1886.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dads County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMTLIO C. PASTOR, PJL
PH I 156 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida S3 ISO
Telephone: (806) 872-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
11289 October 8,10.17.24.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the underssgned, deeinnc to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FOODCRAFTERS
DISTRIBUTING CO. at 8400
N.W. 67th Street. Miami, Florida.
88147 intends to register said
name with the Clark of the Circuit
Court of Dads County, Florida.
FOODCRAFTERS
DISTRIBUTING CO.
BY: IRVING FIEN.
PRESIDENT
Lynn W. Fromberg, Esq.
Attorney for Foodcrafters
Distributing Co
12306 October 17, 24.81;
November 7. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actiea Ne. 8*48826
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
RAMONA QUINTAL
Petitioner/Wife,
and
FITZROY TAYLOR
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Fitxroy Taylor
660 Ocean Avenue
Apartment El 5th Floor
Brooklyn. New York 11226
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT, ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
SS1S9, and file the original with
the derk of the above styled court
on or before November 11, 1988;
otherwise a default wul be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the romplamt or petition.
This notice shall be published
ones each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of October, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
A* Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 88189
Telephone: (806) 672-8100
Attorney for
Florida Bar No. 210889
11284 October 10,17.24.31.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasser R-tt34
DtvieieeH
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY KRAM.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Ciiate
of BETTY KRAM. deceased. File
Number 86-6634 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 78 West FUgier
Street, Miami. Florida 33130 The
names and iddrasses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHLN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TION8 NOT SO FTLED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED:
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 17, 1986.
Personal Representative:
HENRY KRAM
5630 Alton Road
Miami Beach. FL 83140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON A FELDMAN, PA.
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 88164
Telephone: 8668716
11290 October 17. 24,1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME STATUE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fir
titious name of CAPLAN/
MARKOWITZ PROCESS
SERVERS located at 19 West
Flagier Street in the city of Miami,
Dade County, Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
MONEY A EGO. INC 100%
Stockholder
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West Flager Street
Miami. Dade County. Florida
11283 October 10, 17, 24.31. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
Oi THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. DO
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Arties Ne. 86-44414-18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ORTELIO VIERA.
Petitioner,
and
JOAQULNA VIERA.
Respondent
TO: JOAQl'INA VIERA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED thst s petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve s
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whoee address is 826 South
Bsyshore Drive, Suite 648, Miami.
Florida 33131. and file the original
with the derk of the above styled
court on or before November 21,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the rebef
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of October, 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12806 October 17, 24.81;
November 7,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
fB8 NsnsAer 88-88H
Prrerlsa-68
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT COHEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALBERT COHEN, deceased.
File Number 86-6866. is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 78 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are aet forth below.
All interested persons sre re-
quired to file with this court,
WTTHLN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 24. 1986.
Personal Representatives:
FLORA PORTNOY
14699 N.E. 18 Ave.
N. Miami, Florida 33181
ALAN H PINKWASSER
2146 N.E. 204 Street
N. Miami Beach, Florida 33179
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
ALAN H. PINKWASSER
2146 N.E. 204 Street
N. Miami Beach. Florida 33179
Florida Bar No. 1
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
Galbut, Galbut A Menin
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
Florida Bar No. 210889
12317 October 24.31.1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 88-48107
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSEPH 8ERAPHTN
ANGERVILLE
Petitioner,
and
SOPHIA L. ANGERVILLE
Respondent.
TO: SOPHIA L.
ANGERVILLE. Residence
unknown, you shall serve copy of
your Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attorney.
612 Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami.
Florida 88186. and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
November 21. 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated: October 14, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
12303 October 17.24.31.
November 7. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Pile Nusaber 86-6767
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ROSE C. LEIBOWITZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ROSE C. LEIBOWITZ. deceas-
ed. File Number 86-5767. is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 24. 1986.
Personal Representatives:
HERMAN LEIBOWITZ.
6161 Collins Avenue
Miami Bench. FL
BARBARA BROOKE GOMPERS,
4400 Hillcrwrt Drive.
Hollywood. FL
SHELDON WALLERSTEIN.
909 Orlando Drive,
Forked River, NJ
Attorney for Personal
Representatives
SYDNEY S. TRAUM 098892
Myers. Kenin. Levinson A
Richards
1428 Bnckell Avenue
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (306) 371-9041
12315 October 24. 31. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FBs Nasawsr 8f 1881
DMbAm84
IN RE: ESTATE OP
LEOPOLD MESSINGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Fieri* Bar Ne. 848886)
Trie administration ot the estate
of LEOPOLD MESSINGER.
deceased. File Number 86-6696. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida 38130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen
Utive and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons sre re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 24. 1986.
Personal Representative
BERTHA MESSINGER
2871 Colons Avenue
Apartment BS88
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
ALAN R. LORBER, P. A.
Attorney for Personal
Representative
By: ALAN R. LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach. Florida 83139
Telephone: (306) 688-1401
12313 October 24.31,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fir
titious names United Pool In-
dustries. Inc. a/k/a Sally Dysart,
Inc.; Dyavt's Pool A Patio World!
Dysart Pools; Dysart. the Swimm-
ing Pool People; Fiberglass Pool of
America, Inc.; at 16160 Biscayne
Boulevard, No. Miami Beach,
Florida 33160 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
United Pool Industries. Inc.
Ruth Cans. President
11286 October 10.17,24,31,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-43104
IN RE: The Marriage of:
FELIX ALONSO.
Petitioner,
and
ROSA MARINA GOODMAN
ALONSO
Respondent.
TO: ROSA MARINA GOODMAN
ALONSO, Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida.
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before November 7.
1986; otherwise s default will be
entered.
October 6. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: CLARJNDA BROWN
11282 October 10. 17. 24.31. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
PICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of The Miami Mink
Co. at number 20710 Highland
Lakes Blvd.. in the City of Miami.
Florida, intend to register the said
name with the Clark of the Circuit
Court of Dads County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 13
day of October. 1986.
Linda Gef en
Roberta Gotlieb
Robert M. Schwartz
Attorney for Applicant
2020 N.E 163rd St
Suite 800
North Miami Beach. FL 88162
12810 October 24.81;
November 7.14.1986
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name INTERAMERICAN
SECURITY SERVICES OSS) at
810 NE 199th St. No. C-206,
North Miami Beach. Florida 33179
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida-
David Frank
FRANK. STRELKOW A GAY
Attorneys for Interamerican
Security Services (ISS)
12312 October 24. 31.
November 7, 14. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
PICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Royal Palm Cleaners
at 4016 Royal Palm Ave.. Miami
Beach. Fl. 33140 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Eliaa Jones, President
4016 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
SOLOMON WEISS. Esq.
Attorney for
SHARON A ELISA. Inc.
11270 October 3. 10. 17. 24. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTrnOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
thst the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Fabian Realty at
439 Arthur Godfrey Road. Miami
Beach. Florida 33139. intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Howard Fabian
Licensed Real Estate Broker
12311 October 24. 31,
November 7.14,1986
SZJ?Tl?*n"i d"Kii
engage in business under
fictitious name Eon nt
FINANCIAL GROUP ,l
D/B/A EMSI CORP 2StS
Hall.ndale Beach r^J
HallarKiale.FkirKi.^^
to register said name mST
C^rkoftheCircui^n?,
County. Florida.
,.. G*0"*'Shamns
_________ November 7. U, 19
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undemgned. dearil"
engage in business under tin
fictitious name SOUTBlAM
PRINTING SERVICES po1
Box 164986, Miami. Flonds 331161
intends to register said name ad
|i^ of the Circuit^S
Dade County. Florida
JSJKW-J. S-ce,,J
Attorney for Southeast Printed
Services. Inc. "I
19 October 24.311
November 7. U, \m\
NOTICE UNDER
PICTmoU8 NAME LAW ,
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinrg J
engage in business under the I
fictitious name PHOENIX LINEN-
SUPPLY, at 1609 Shensndoah St *
Hollywood. Florida 38020. uitemk I
to register amid name with the |
Clark of the Circuit Court of Dale
County, Flonds
PHOENIX LAUNDRY CORP
Michael A Frank
Attorney for PHOENIX
LAUNDRY CORP
12820 October 24,31;
November 7,14.1986
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
REPORT
The Annual report of the print*
foundation. The Selms Schechter
Foundation, Inc.. required to be fil-
ed under Section 6056. Internal
Revenue Code, is available for
public inspection at its principal of
fice. 2000 So. Dixie Hwv; Suite
103. Miami. Fla. 3133. for inspec-
tion on business days between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m. by any alien upon
request within 18(1 days after the
date of this publication.
J. Jerry Schechter
Principal Manager
12314 October 24.1986
HEREBY
in action for
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name MENA SIGNS at
4613 SW 74 Ave Miami FL 33166
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
REIMUNDO MENA
4618 SW 74 AVE
MIAMI FL 83166
12316 October 24. 31;
November 7.14,1986
Call
373-4605
For
Legal Forms
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIECUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. Ci
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Arties Nol 84-46637-24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLORIDA BAB NO. MM75
IN RE. The Marriage of
JAVIER MAQUEDA.
Petitioner/Husband.
and
MAX! ROMERO.
Respondent/Wife
TO: Maxi Romero
Catte Bejar No 43
Barcelona, Spain
YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that
Diasoiution of Mamsge has been
filed against you and you sre re-
quired to serve s copy of your wnt
ten JafRssn* if am to it on Ana
Martin LevieUe. Esq.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address if 1*
S.W. 1st Street, Suite 324, Miami.
Florida 88186. and file the orginal
with the derk of the above MM
court on or before Nov 28, 196*.
otherwise s default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petio-
This notice shall be pubiuhed
once each week for ttm
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and BMW
of aaid court at Miami. Florida on
this 22 day of October, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Oark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Flonds
By T CASAMAY0R
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ANA MARTTNLAVIELLE.
ESQ
Law Offices of Rafael E. ?***"
P. A.
1800 S.W. 1st Street. Suite 324
Miami. Florida 33136
(806) 649-6486
Attorney for Petitioner
12321 O^/4,*.
November 7. 14.19*


Hday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
>sure Sales Public Notices
^rtOF ACTION
ffil-CTlVE SERVICE
^PROPERTY)
.CIR-T COURT OF
SITleventh judicial
RfiTT OF FLORIDA. IN
^N, 86-41137 FC 10
flONTOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Lr ft* Marriage of
JJUssALPHONSINE
jilAMS-
pii^wif*
WLD WILLIAMS.
p__ot/Husband
jjjJ"iurold Williams
Ikadence Unknown
llH Known Address: (Street
ujafer Unknown)
giy Street
u^ui Bahamas
5b hereby noti-
) that an action for Dissolu
,of Marriage has been filed
t you and you are required
\mn s copy <>f your written
, if any, to it on Bruce J.
attorney for Peti
r who* address is 420 Lin
'mad, Suit* a 12. Miami
, Florida 33139. and file the
il with the clerk of the above
Ifltd court on or before
__ 7, 1986. otherwise a
_jt ail be entered against you
fit relief demanded in the corn-
tor petition
j notice shall or publiahed
i eadi week for four con-
tn weeks in THE JEWISH
_ UDIAN
jsTTXESS my hand and the seal
laid court at Miami. Florida on
lit dsv of October. 1986.
RICHARD P BRISKER
A! Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy i left
J Court Seaii
eJ Scheinberj:
)Lincoln Road. Suite 512
t Besrr. Florida
i 13051 H8 7576
ry for Petitioner
October lo. IT 24. 31. 1986
|loRI 0 A PROBATE
DIVISION
File Niaber A2-5533
Division 04
I RE Guardiansmp of
ROSALIE MARCUS,
Incompetent
NOTICE OF CHANGE
OF DOMICILE
IIBOM IT MAY CONCERN.
IJAMES R SLOTO. Guardian
pLitesi of ROSALIE MARCUS
y gives notice of his intention
Iterminste the (fuardumahip as a
* of change of domicile of the
" All persons having an jn
' n these proceedings are
d that the Guardian has filed
I**counting and a Petition
?**'* and that any objec
S*to should be filed within
Wm days from the date of
PJ Publication of this notice
*t in application for
sJ>"* be made immediate-
ly'"* the expiration of said
* (30) day period. Jurisdiction
BJT thereafter be
1 to the gute of foreign
t OF FIRST PUBUCA-
'October 17, 1986
JAMES R. SLOTO
W SLOTO.
'AdLitem
SLOTO AND
PjPf Boulevard Way
^widaSSlSl
'(806)379-1792
O"***-17.24.1986
^AVTT UNDER
TCTTTIOU8
SJH 8TATUTE
S FLORIDA
^ OF DADE
iW'eSPii under **.
eli mt*nt" of the
.-. to ****** n a
"iterpnse under the fic-
0WrV5e.of R'CHARD
!JSL* ASSOCIATES
^of Miami. Dade County,
.Jftwrth M*Mr
*tn iS M fo||OW8.
^PHFACAPLAN.
> ,. Pr^ident
eW/1*8'" S^t
Jftisrv C2.unly- Flonda
IrVl EG<). INC.
^Pwwnt Stockholder
Ctob*r3. 10, 17,24. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 8S-44097 1041
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 564079
BELMAR CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION. INC., a Florida
not-for profit corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
CESAR A AVILES and
GLADYS M. AVILES.
Defendants.
TO: CESAR A. AVILES
GLADYS M. AVILES
YOU. CESAR A AVILES and
GLADYS M. AVILES. residences
unknown, are required to file your
answer to the complaint to
foreclose condominium lien with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
plaintiffs attorneys. COHEN.
COHEN A COHEN. 622 S. W. 1st.
Street. Miami. Fla. 33180. on or
before November 14, 1966, or dse
petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade County.
Florida, this October 10. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By E Seidl
Deputy Clerk
11297 October 17. 24.31;
_______________November 7,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nmsaber H4-4CK
Diviaiea 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM COOPER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the edministra
tion of the estate of ABRAHAM
COOPER, deceased. File Number
86 4696 (01), is pending in the Cir
out Court for DADE County
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 3rd Floor. Dade
County Courthouse. 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. FL. 33130 The per
sonal representative of the estate
is STANLEY COOPER, whose ad
dress is 840 Montgomery Avenue.
Bryn Mawr. Pennsylvania 19010
The name and address of the per
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dreas of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the daim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured, the security shall
be described The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the dark to enable the
dark to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persona interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has bean
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
lurisdk-tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 17. 1986.
STANLEY COOPER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ABRAHAM COOPER
Deceaseil
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LYNN W FROMBERG. ESQ
FROMBERG. FROMBERG.
GROSS. SHORE. LEWIS.
ROGEL A KERN. PA.
420 S. Dixie Highway. 3rd Floor.
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-6622
11291 October 17, 24, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-6177
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELENE LANDE BLUMKIN
YINNON.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
The administration of the estate
of HELENE LANDE BLUMKIN
YINNON. deceased. File Number
86-6177 CP02. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida, 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All persons are required to file
with the clerk of this court,
WITHIN THREE CALENDAR
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE all daims against the
estate in the form and manner
prescribed by Section 733.708 of
the Florida Statutes and Rule
5.490 of The Florida Rules of Pro-
bate and Guardianship Procedure.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 17. 1986
Personal Representative:
LESLIE RACHLINE
Co-Per Rep.
8100 Southwest 136th Street
Miami. Florida 33156
DAVID ORLOWSKY.
Co-Per Rep
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 12-L
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LAW OFFICES OF NORMAN
K SCHWARZ. PA
NORMAN K SCHWARZ
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10-A
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-1222
11296 October 17. 24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actiea Ne. 84-42825 06
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar Ne. 229415
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FATMI M MASRI.
and
REDWEAN KHAZMA MASRI,
TO: REDWEAN KHAZMA
MASRI
8120 S.W. 15th Street
Miami. Florida 33144
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten dafanssa, if any, to ft on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE. at-
torney for Petitions, whose ad-
dress is 1800 S.W. First Street.
Suite 824, Miami, Florida 38185.
and file the original with the deric
of the above styled court on or
before November 14. 1986; other-
win a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
can each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 10 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE. ESQ.
1800 S.W. First Street. Suite 824
Miami. Florida 88185
(306)649-5486
Attorney for Petitioner
11296 October 17. 24. 81;
November 7. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage a business under the fic-
titious name ROSINA MALTA at
3390 Mary' Street. Kl. Coconut
Grove. FL 33133 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
Armando Gutierrez. Esquire
Attorney for Tejus Import A
Export, Inc.
2153 Coral Way, Suite 400.
Miami. FL 33145
11268 October 3. 10. 17. 24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCU IT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actiea No. 84-43173 (27)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
GREGORIO HERRERA
Petitioner
and
DENISE ANNE HERRERA
Respondent
TO: DENISE ANNE HERRERA
112 Saftcreek Road Lot 21
Savannah, GA 31405
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on USHER
BRYN. ESQ. attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach
Florida 88189 and file the original
with the dark of the above styled
court on or before November 14,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 8 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (306) 582-1156
11292 October 17. 24.31.
November 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
('as* Ne.. 84-43910
FlerMa Bar Ne.: 84*275
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
GUILLERMO PANIAGUA.
Petitioner,
vs.
MIRIAM VAQUERANO,
Respondent.
TO: MIRIAM VAQUERANO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve written defenses, if
any. to ft on MARIANO SOLE.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. PA., at
tomey for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress ia 2666 Le Jeune Road. Pen-
thouse II. Coral Gables. Florida
SS1S4. and file the original with
the derk of the above styled court
on or before November 14. 1986.
utbeiwiae a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition.
This notice shall be published
one* each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
9 day of October. ISM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
CLARTNDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ.
fiahles Inttrm*Mwsl Pleas
2656 Le Jeune Road
Penthouse II
Coral Gabies. Florida 83134
(106) 441 2656
11298 October 17, 24.31.
NovcctsOcr 7, lvoo
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
as:
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It ia the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of CAPLAN PRO
CESS SERVERS located at 19
West Flagler Street in the city of
Miami Dade County. Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Dade County. Florida
MONEY A EGO. INC
100 percent Stockholder
11276
October 3. 10.17.24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa Ne. 84-43437 FC01
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MERANCIER JOSEPH.
Petitioner
and
NELLY DIEUDONNEE
JOSEPH.
Respondent
TO: NELLY DIEUDONNEE
JOSEPH
173 Street Reunion
Port Au Prince. HAITI
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to ft on USHER
BRYN. ESQ.. attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address ia 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach,
Florida SS1S9 and file the original
with the derk of the above styled
court on or before November 21,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the rebef
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 8 day of October, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 809
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (306) 532-1156
11295 October 17, 24. 31;
November 7. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nnasber 84-6793
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELENE EHRLICH
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HELENE EHRLICH.
deceased. File Number 86-5703. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorneys are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all daims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal represantatrius, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTION8 NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Pubbcation of this Notice has
begun on October 17. 1986.
aa* eawei 1 ffc ^ ^ M -----* -
rersonai Representatives
Maiaifsttuma Hanover Trust
Company of Florida
100 Chopin Plesa, Suite 702
Miami. Florida 33131
Herbert 8. Shapiro
1666 79th Street Causeway, No.
608
Miami Beach. Florida 38141
Herbert C. Zemel
8660 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 88187
Attorneys for Personal
Representatives:
Herbert S. Shapiro
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666 79th Street Causeway
Suite 608
Miami Beach, Florida 38141
Telephone: (806) 864-2369
Herbert C Zemel
8600 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida SS1S7
Telephone: (806) 573-1811
12309 October 17, 24,1966
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ARCHITECTURAL
HOMES at 337 Palermo Avenue.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134 in
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ALEMAR INVESTMENTS
CORP
HOMES BY FONT. INC
By Miguel Font
VEGA AND PEREZ
Attorneys for Alemar Investments
corp. and Homes by Font, Inc.
362 Minorca Avenue
Suite 101
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
11289 October 17. 24,31;
November 7.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DANIELS at 5859
S W. 73rd Street. South Miami.
Florida intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
BAR Restaurant-'- Inc.
H ALLAN SHORE, ESQUIRE
Attorney for
BAB RESTAURANTS, INC.
11298 October 17, 24, 31;
November 7. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ARNOLD'S HOT
DOGS at 1200 West Avenue. No.
521. Miami Beach. Florida 88189
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ARNALDO DEL PINO
EDNA DEL PINO
ALBOUM and FURLONG
Attorney for
ARNALDO DEL PINO
338 Arthur Godfrey Road. No. 104
Miami Beach. FL 88140
Telephone No. (306) 588-6741
11288 October 17, 24.31;
November 7,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
< IRCITT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actiea Ne. 84.4417* (93)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSE JOACHIM MECA VAGOS.
and
ISABEL M. CANECO MARTINS
TO ISABEL M. CANECO
MARTINS
Patio 2 Barrancos Primer
Pise
Nasare 2450, Portugal
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to ft on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1800 S.W. First Street.
Suite 324. Miami. Florida 38185.
and file the anginal with the derk
of the above styled court on or
before November 21. 1986;
otherwise a default wul be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand the the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
thus 14th day of October, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad* County. Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE. ESQ.
1800 8.W. First Street No. 824
Miami. Florida 33136
Telephone (906)649-6486
Attorney for Petitiuusi
12804 October 17. 24. 31;
November 7. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DAM COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 84-44*44-1A
IN RE The Marriage of
FREDE DESIR.
Petitioner,
and
FRANCOD3E DESIR.
Respondent
TO: FRANCOISE DESIR
Rue du Centre No. 242 A
I.'inteneur
Coridor Prison
Port-au-Prince. Haiti. W.I.
Shall serve copy of your Answer
to the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before November 21.
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered.
Dated: October 15. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
By T CASAMAYOR
12307 October 17. 24,31;
November 7.1986


m*m*mmi

' r
Convert To Judaism
Enters Yeshiva University
NEW YORK When Adiv
Burgin goes to a synagogue he has
never visited before, people often
stare at the young, dark-skinned
man in the yarmulke. Then they
come up and ask if he is from
Ethiopia.
"No," he always answers
sometimes to their apparent
disappointment, "I'm from
Buffalo."
But the 24-year-old Burgin is
Jewish for he converted more
than a year ago and he attends
Yeshiva University in New York
City, America's oldest and largest
university under Jewish auspices.
BURGIN, who earned
Bachelor's and Master's degrees
from Rensselaer Polytechnic In-
stitute in Troy, N.Y., is enrolled in
the James Striar School of
General Jewish studies, one of
three undergraduate Jewish
studies divisions for men at the
University. That division is for
men with limited backgrounds in
Jewish studies.
Burgin's background is limited,
but he has been studying Jewish
texts on his own for nearly five
years, and he has taught himself
to read and write Hebrew.
He has changed his given name,
Darrel, to Adiv, which is Hebrew
for "pleasant" or "polite."
His first exposure to Judaism
came during his sophomore year
at RPI, when his roommate
who was Jewish invited him to a
Passover dinner sponsored by the
campus Hillel.
"My roommate thought it would
be a great joke it I walked into the
meal," Burgin said, "and I went
along with it."
BUT BURGIN was intrigued by
what he learned about Judaism
that evening. With his curiosity
piqued, he began reading books on
Judaism and eventually started
attending Firday night services at
the Hillel.
"My roommate said, 'Listen,
the joke is over,' Burgin recall-
ed. 'You don't have to come any
more.' Then I told him I was
thinking of coverting."
What attracted Burgin to
Judaism?
"I think it is the Jewish em-
phasis on the real world, the world
we live in, not just the world to
come. And it was the concept of
the Jewish community. No matter
where you live in the world, if you
are a Jew, you are part of that
community.
Burgin already feels like part of
that community, he said. "I've
made a lot of friends at Yeshiva
University, even more friends
than I had at RPI."
HIS MOTHER, Ms. Bobby
Woods, has accepted her son's
new identity.
"She has been very suppor-
tive," Burgin said. "In fact, she
bought extra utensils and an extra
tablecloth so that I could keep
kosher when I visit her. A lot of
non-observant Jewish parents
don't do that for their children."
Burgin got to know some
Yeshiva University students when
he became active in the National
Council of Synagogue Youth, and
he first visited the University's
campus for a seminar organised
by the Kuriv program.
"I sat in on a couple of classes
and met some students," Burgin
said, "and I was impressed by
what I saw."
Kiruv (Hebrew for "bringing
near") is a national project to in-
crease Jewish identity on universi-
ty and college campuses and is
sponsored by the University.
BURGIN 18 now in the in-
novative Shanah program
which allows students at other in-
stitutions and college graduates to
come to the University for a year
of concentrated Jewish studies.
With his Bachelor of Science
degree in physics and his Master
of Science degree in technical
communication, Burgin wants to
make a career as a technical
writer. But he is already thinking
of staying at Yeshiva University
for more than one year.
"The classes are challenging
and very interesting," he said,
"and I know that I won't be able
to get all the basics in one year."
Even though he feels at home in
the Jewish community and at
Yeshiva University, Burgin says
he feels he faces a special
challenge.
"As a convert, I want to prove
myself," Burgin said. "I want to
demonstrate to everyone that I
can learn and that I am complete-
ly dedicated to Judaism."
Addressing the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organizations in
New York, Attorney General Edwin Meese III
(left) said that the Justice Department was
'looking very carefully' into the activities of
the PLO office in Washington and hinted that
the office might be closed down. Meese also an-
nounced that an early decision was expected
on whether to bar President Kurt Waldhem o'\
Austria from the U.S. as a former Nazi
Seated are Morris B. Abram (center>, chair-
man of the Presidents Conference, and Edgar
M. Bronfman, chairman of the World Jewish
Congress.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Available at PubMx Store s
And Danish Bakeries
Decorated for Haftowean


Full Text
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I V

Page 2-B The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, October 24, 1986
Brandeis University
Divests Some Of Its
South African Holdings
WALTHAM, Mass. -
(JTA) Brandeis Universi-
ty has sold its stock in three
U.S. companies that were
found not to be in com-
pliance with university
policies governing in-
vestments in firms doing
business in South Africa,
Brandeis President Evelyn
E. Handler has announced.
1Te three companies whose
stocks were sold are Reynolds and
Reynolds Company,
Schlumberger Ltd., and Union
Camp Corp. The total value of the
stocks is approximately $200,000,
about 6.5 percent of die univer-
sity's holdings in companies doing
business in South Africa.
THE ACTION is the result of a
new policy on South Africa-
related stocks adopted by the
university's Board of Trustees
this summer. The policy requires
that companies in the Brandeis
portfolio with South Africa opera-
tions subscribe to the expanded
Sullivan Principles, which call for
activities beyond the workplace in
ameliorating the plight of South
African blacks.
The Board also voted to con-
sider full divestment in May, 1987
if significant reform of South
Africa's apartheid policies has not
Dccurred.
The Board's measures also pro-
hibit new investments in com-
panies not currently in the univer-
sity's endowment portfolio that
snter South Africa after Januay 1,
1987. They also continue the
xmlkTs policy of selling stock in
zompanies that do not earn the
highest performance ratings
under the Sullivan Principles, to
which Brandeis has subscribed
since 1977 in governing its South
Africa-related investments.
FOLLOWING THE Board's ac
tion this summer, Handler sent
letters to all South Africa-related
companies in the university's
portfolio, asking for "substantive
details of the ecompany's active
involvement, future plans and
commitment to ending the system
of apartheid in South Africa."
"Most firms are in compliance
with our policies," said Handler.
"Those that appeared not to be
were subject to further investiga-
tion. In the case of two of those
companies whose stock had been
purchased earlier this year, we
could not verify to our satisfaction
that they had signed the Sullivan
Principles. In the case of the third
firm, the university treasurer ask-
ed our investment manager to
double-check its compliance with
our policies and new information
led to the sale of its stock."
The investment in
Schlumberger was reversed as
soon as the university officials
became aware of the holding,
Handler said. The Reynolds and
Reynolds stock was sold because
the university was unable to
verify that the company had sign-
ed the Sullivan Principles even
though the company indicated
that it had applied to become a
Sullivan signatory.
THE INVESTMENT managers
who purchased Union Camp stock
were unaware of the fact that the
company was doing business in
South Africa, she said. Brandeis'
new procedures governing South
Africa-related investments caused
the management firm to recheck
the company's holdings.
New Appointments Made
For Young Judaea
Sylvia Herman and Linda
Minkss, Co-Chairpersons of the
Florida Hadassah Zionist Youth
Commission, announce the ap-
pointments of Michelle Rapchik as
Regional Director of Young
Judaea and Rebecca Kaplan as
Assistant Regional Director.
In addition to formal Judaic
schooling, Michelle was an active
member and leader of USY for
eight years and want on Israel
Pilgrimage. Michelle has recently
graduated from the University of
Miami with degrees in Psychology
and Judaic Studies. This is her
fifth year working for Young
Judaea.
Rebecca, the new Assistant
Director, grew uo in Puerto Rico
where she was an active member
of Young Judaea. She has attend-
ed Young Judaea's Year Course in
Israel program as well as atten-
ding Hebrew University of
Jerusalem for one year.
Other appointments made are
Walter Synalovatri as Senior Ad-
viser, Randy Gored as North Area
Coordinator, and Keith Berman
as City Coordinator.
Walter is also from Puerto Rico
where he grew up in Young
Judaea where be has held many
leadership positions. Randy also
grew up in Young Judaea in
Florida. Keith was an active
member of Young Judaea who has
had various leadership positions.
Fall Workshops Educate,
Enrich Jewish Families
Stress, aging, parenting and
single life are among the topics be-
ing offered by Jewish Family Ser-
vice of Greater Miami (JFS) in its
Fall Series of Family Life Educa-
tion Workshops.
On the topic of aging, JFS will
offer "Sandwich Generation" for
adult children who are "caught in
between" obligations to aging
parents and their own families,
continuing on Thursday, Oct. 23,7
p.m. st the JFS Coral Gables Of-
fice. "Giving Care," a workshop
for persons responsible for the
well being of an aging, infirm
spouse or sibling, will begin Mon-
day, Nov. 17, 1:30 p.m. at the JFS
Miami Beach Office.
For parents, JFS will offer
Single Parenting" at the North
Dade Office and "Positive Paren-
ting" at the South Dade Office.
Both begin Wednesday, Oct. 29 at
7 p.m. The latter is designed for
parents of children ages three to
11.
Singles can choose from
"Interpersonal Dialogue," begin-
ning Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m.,
and "Surviving Separa-
tion/Divorce," beginning Thurs-
day, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. Both will
meet at the Coral Gables Office.
Couples who wish to enrich
their relationships will be in-
terested in "Creative communica-
tion," beginning Monday, Nov.
10, 7 p.m. at the South Dade
Office.
Relaxation techniques will be
discussed in "Tame Your Stress,"
beginning Tuesday, Nov. 18, 7
p.m. at the Coral Gables Office.
In addition, "Create-A-
Workshop" is available for clubs,
groups and schools interested in
other family life enrichment
topics. These workshops may be
presented at the location of the
sponsoring organization.
Congressman Dante Fascell
will be the guest speaker at a
cocktail buffet planned on
Thursday, Oct. SO at 6 p.m. on
Hamilton on the Bay in Miami
for a select group of community
leaders by the American Red
Magen David for Israel, accor-
ding to Regional President,
Murray Kaye.
Bruce Singer
Chosen Beach
Vice Mayor
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Bruce M. Singer was
selected by his colleagues to serve
as Vice Mayor beginning Nov. 1.
"I am honored to be chosen for
this post and look forward to serv-
ing our community in this
respect," said the Commissioner.
Joining the City Commission in
1981, this is Singer's third term in
office. He has served as Vice
Mayor once before. As a City
Commissioner he's been known
fcr his strong stands on the need
to spur redevelopment, en-
vironmental issues, youth-
oriented projects and problems, as
well as historic preservation.
Singer, age 36, is a Beach
native. Prior to running for City
Commission he worked as a Miami
Beach Assistant City Attorney,
joining the city following a stint as
Assistant Attorney General. A
graduate of the University of
Florida College of Law, he is now
a practicing attorney.
He's a former president of the
Miami Beach Jaycees and was
voted as one of the five outstan-
ding young men in the state by the
Florida Jaycees in 1981.
Mercury Morris
To Speak
Temple Shir Ami will host
Eugene "Mercury" Morris in s
discussion of teenage drug addic-
tion at Friday evening Sabbath
services on Oct. 31 at 8 p.m. "It is
no longer any secret that drugs
are all pervasive in today's socie-
ty," explains the temple's Rabbi
Brett S. Goldstein. "We feel that
the legendary Morris possesses
the unique ability because of his
background to reach out to our
young people and encourage them
to remain straight."
Score Seeking More
Women Members
The Service Corps of Retired
Executives (SCORE) is looking
for more women members, accor-
JJjJIL t0 Myrtle Levinson.
SCORE'S Women's Business
Ownership Representative for the
Southeast Region and member of
Dade County SCORE Chapter
No. 29. "The rapid growth in the
number of women entrepreneurs
has created a need for additional
women SCORE counselors." said
Levinson.
Hebrew Academy To Hold
Reunion For The 50's And 60's
Former students and graduates
of the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Greater Miami Hebrew Academy
and their spouses will converge
upon Miami Beach for the first
Alumni reunion of those who at-
tended the school during the
1950's and 60's. The Saturday
evening Jan. 3 grand event will
take place at the Shelborne Hotel
and will be hosted by the Galbut
family, former Academy students,
Robert, David, Abraham, Russel
and Ronalee Eisenberg Galbut.
The Hebrew Academy, the tirst
Day School established in the
southeastern region of the United
States, was founded by the late
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross in 1947
and opened its doors in the old
YMHA building with seven
students. The school later moved
to larger quarters on Sixth Street
and Jefferson Avenue where it
continued to function until 1961
when the Academy moved into its
present site on Pinetree Drive and
24th Street. Today the school
counts an enrollment of 670
students.
Almost 100 Hebrew Academy
Alumni live in Israel, many of
them in Kibbutzim while mk.
are practicing their vanousS
and professions in 32 "S
villages throughout the !*
E. Jay Mirmelli and R,
Bogin, Alumni living in Sj
Beach and presently" p^
Academy students; aT Lf
dinating the program.
Na'amat USA
A new film on Israel and It,
projects of Na'amat and
musicale will highlight the Mo*
day. Nov. 3. lp.m. meeting of
Eilat Chapter to take placf \S
civic auditorium of Financial Siv
ings and Loan Association, 755
Washington Ave.
Ida Kovalsky. cultural chair-
man, has prepared an original
I eading relating to the High Holi-
day season which she will recite
Program chair is Frieda Levitan.
Book reviewer Sophie
Weissman will be the guest
reviewer at a paid up membership
luncheon of the liana Chapter on
Tuesday. Nov. 4 at 11:30 a.m. at
the Winston Tower 100
auditorium.
With G.Washington's*Seasoning
and Broth they won't be frugal
with your kugel!
G. WASHINGTON'S
GOLDEN POTATO KUGEL
II no one s clamoring tot you'
kugel it s time you B'ougri! it tc
trie attention ot G Washington s
Gofoen Seasoning ana B'ot"
G Washington sis more Tan a
flavor enhancer I! s a complete
seasoning its special Bienc:'
herbs and spices flavors row
kugel m more ways thai
Just mm in G Wasrvg'nr <,
Seasoning and Broti bet
baking and you IIhave II
tokveii over'
Cafflhta Kaskcr am) Pirve
3 cups grated potatoes.
drained
3 eggs, well beaten
2 packets G Washington s
Golden Seasoning and Broth
Combine an ingredients mix well Place greased iI ? guan Da- -g as"
Bake in 350 f oven lor I hour or until brown Serve hot Serves 610 P
' i cup potato (lour
4 tablespoons melted butler
3 tablespoons grated onion
Ik teaspoon baking powder
'iteaspoon pepper
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DADE COUNTY DESERVES THE
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The best NEWSPAPER endorsements:
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Phyllis Harte To Receive JTS
New Generation Award
Phyllis Harte, a Miami attorney,
Iwill be honored with The Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America's New Generations
'u-ard on Nov. 9, at the
luminary's Convocation and
lAwards 'Ceremony at Temple
lEmanu-El. The Convocation and
wards Ceremony is being held in
.elebration of the Seminary's
[entennial Year.
The New Generations Award is
presented by the Seminary in
ecognition of inspiring commit-
nent as a dynamic young leader in
tide-ranging endeavors that
nee the growth and progress
of Jewish life.
Other Floridians also being
.onored by the Seminary on Nov.
jare Louis Stein, who will receive
degree of Doctor of Laws,
honoris causa; Congressman
nte B. Fascell, who will receive
Herbert H. Lehman Ethics
Friday, October 24, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Israel Bonds Sales Increase
During High Holy Days Appeal
i
PhyllU Harte
Campaign For Holocaust Museum
Medal; and Irene and Norman
Sholk, and the Honorable Judge
Herbert S. Shapiro, who will
receive The National Community
Service Award.
Phyllis Harte is active in Na-
tional UJA as a member of the
Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet and with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation as past
Chairman of the Business and
Professional Women's Group of
the Women's Division.
She is a past Campaign Vice
Chairman of the Business
Women's Group and is a member
of the Women's Division Ex-
ecutive and Campaign Steering
Committees. She currently serves
as a member of the Board of the
GMJF South Dade Branch. In
1984 she was a nominee for the
B'nai B'rith Outstanding Citizen's
Award.
Mrs. Harte serves on the Next
Generation Board of the Miami
The Jewish community of the
Greater Miami area once again
came to the aid of Israel and her
people by making commitments to
purchase Israel Bonds during the
recent High Holy Day Appeal held
at several local synagogues, an-
nounced M. Ronald Krongold,
general campaign chairman of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds
Organization.
Krongold noted that this year's
Bond Appeal saw a significant in-
crease in sales of Israel Bonds in-
struments over the High Holy Day
campaign in 1985. He credited the
rabbis and the congregants of the
synagogues which took part in the
High Holy Day Appeal for this
year's success. "Their efforts and
support prove once again how
American Jewrv can work
together to accomplish a goal .
a goal to aid the Government and
people of Israel gain economic
stability and, eventually,
economic independence."
The synagogues in the Greater
Miami area which participated in
the Israel Bonds High Holy Days
Appeal were Temple Adath
Yeshurun, the Aventura Jewish
Center and Beth Torah in the
North Dade area; Temple Bet
Breira, Temple Beth Am and
Temple Judea in South Dade;
Temple Israel in Miami; and Beth
Israel, Beth Moshe, Beth Raphael,
Beth Sholom, Temple Emanu-El,
Hebrew Academy, Temple
Menorah, Temple Moses, Ner
Tamid and Ocean Pavilion in
Miami Beach.
i_ T .,, .-, TM7 l* xt i t Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Gets Lift From Wiesel s Nobel Prize *&* D*ta Gardens and *
Florida civic, busineas and
eligious leaders here who have
en working with Nobel Peace
ate Elie Wiesel to create the
I'.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
Washington, D.C. are predic-
j that the prize will hasten the
ompletion of their shared dream.
The Museum is being con-
ucted entirely with private
nds on land provided by Con-
ess near the Washington Monu-
ment in the nation's capital.
Wiesel. a survivor of Nazi death
nps. is chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council, an
ndependent federal entity charg-
1 with creating the $100 million
cility. President Reagan serves
s honorary chairman of the Cam-
i to Remember.
Brzezinski To
Lecture At
U. of Miami
Zbigniew Brzezinski,
tstinguished Sovietologist and
ormer national security adviser
the President of the United
gtates, will jjiv a public lecture at
lie University of Miami on Thurs-
ay, Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. His topic
be the subject of his newly
Wished book. Game Plan: How
[o Conduct the U.S.-Soviet
ymtegt.
Mr. Brzezinski's lecture is the
ficial opening event of the UM's
ew Institute for Soviet and East
[uropean Studies in the Graduate
hool of International Studies.
Marvin Rauzin
To Be Honored
Jhe Trustees and Directors oi
rition will hold a Testimonial
P'nner honoring Marvin J.
an, Founder and Chairman,
I Thursday, October 30 at 6:30
IB. at Radisson Mart Plaza.
Rauzin will be honored for the
H years of volunteer service and
^PPort as a Major Benefactor.
Rauzin is vice president, Grand
FT Association of Florida; past
Resident, Bayshore Service Club;
P* president. Better Govern-
m Association; past president,
ami Beach Optimists Club and
^President of Sholem Lodge,
N B'rith. ^^
The Museum will memorialize
the six-million Jews and millions
of others murdered by the Nazis.
The American Museum is planned
to dramatize to future generations
the value of the freedom we enjoy
as our national heritage, and the
tragedies that occur when
freedom is not defended. It will
bean education center from
which, as Wiesel has promised,
"no visitor will leave unchanged."
Florida leaders of the Musuem
Campaign include Gov. Bob
Graham, U.S. Sen. -Paula
Hawkins, and State Campaign
Chairman Norman Braman, who
is a member of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council
also Campaign Vice President of
the South Dade Friends of
Douglas Gardens. She is a
member of the Board and Ex-
ecutive Committee of the
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Center. She is also an officer of
JACPAC and a member of the
Board of the Bet Shira Solomon
Schechter Day School.
With her husband, Samuel, she
is active in many community
organizations, including the
Center for the Fine Arts, Subur-
ban League for Diabetes
Research, and The Society of One
Thousand of the National Founda-
tion for Advancement in the Arts.
Phyllis resides with her husband
and two children in Miami.
Penny Stocks
An Opportunity of the 80s
FOR YOUR FREE REPORT CALL:
RAY MILES
1-800-443-3390
the STUART JAMES co.
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MCMURNASOAMPC
THE RABBI ALEXANDER S. GROSS
GREATER MIAMI HEBREW ACADEMY
We're looking for former students of our school for
Alumni records. If you attended the Academy or know
the whereabouts of those who were students at the
Academy please call:
(305) 532-6421 ex. 244
or write
Mrs. Shirley Gross
2400 Pinetree Drive
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
BOCA RATON/
CENTURY VILLAGE
hoa room'nate to share
PWl apt, 3-4 months, $550
IP" month. Call Sophie:
482-6614
At last there's time for a leisurely breakfast,
unhurried conversation and the chance
to enjoy a second (or even a third) cup of
rich, delicious Maxwell House* Coffee. It
couldn't be anything but Sunday morning
Maxuvd u^
2s m
GENERAL
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K KOSHER "86 Gsn*"> foo* Caoatha-
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE: