The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03011

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Full Text
T "dfewislfo Floi-idi-ami
Volume 59 Number 42
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, October 17,1986
Frtd SMoclMI
Price $3.00

Elderly man at the Western Wall holding the four species.
On Sukkoth
'You Shall Live In
Booths Seven Days'
By DVORA WAYSMAN
The long Israeli summer
draws to a close. The crops
are gathered, the fruit
ripens and is harvested. It is
the Hebrew month of Tishri
and the 15th day is the
Festival of the Ingathering.
It is also known as the
Festival of Booths: "You
shall live in booths seven
days; all that are Israelite
born shall dwell in booths;
that your generations may
know that I made the
children of Israel to dwell in
booths, when I brought
them out of the land of
Egypt..." (Lev. 23:42-43).
The sukkah, or booth, com-
memorates the journey from
Egypt to the Promised Land,
when the Israelites were wander-
ing in the wilderness. The month
of Tishn was the season when
almost all the pasturage in the
Sinai desert had disappeared, and
the water pools were dry, so they
would gather the flocks and move
to a desert oasis of date palms,
where water abounded. Even to-
day Israel's nomads, the Bedouin,
gather at oases at this time of the
year. The dates which have red-
Continued on Page 11-A
Not At AllReagan
Iceland Aftermath:
Dashed Peace Hopes
Human Rights 2-A
Jewish Leaders 10-A
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Reagan told the nation
Monday night, just 24 hours
after returning home from
Reykjavik for two-day
meeting with the Soviet
Union's Mikhail Gorbachev,
that "we made progress in
Iceland."
In addition, he said over nation-
wide television that he was
prepared to "pick up where we
left off,** and that he remained op-
timistic about reaching an arms
agreement with the Soviets.
Nevertheless, the meeting in
Reykjavik ended with both
Reagan and Gorbachev standing
glumly before departing from
their collapsed talks during which,
ostensibly, the two leaders came
hreathtakingly close to agreement
on a variety of arms control pro-
posals. It was clear that Mr.
Reagan never anticipated this as
he repeated several times to aides
during breathers. "This wasn't
supposed to be a negotiation
session."
COLLAPSED WITH the talks,
at least for the moment, were
hopes voiced by American Jewish
community leaders in the cause of
advancing a more salutary Soviet
position on human rights.
In his address to the nation, Mr.
Reagan declared that "I also
made it plain, once again, that an
improvement of the human condi-
tion within the Soviet Union is in-
dispensable for an improvement
in bilateral relations .
"We Americans place far less
weight upon the words that are
spoken than upon the deeds
that follow. When it comes to
human rights and judging Soviet
intentions, we are all from
Missouri: You have got to show
us."
THE STICKING point between
the two teams was the President's
commitment to his Strategic
Defense Initiative, or Star Wars,
as it is popularly known. Despite
what appeared to be far-reaching
Continued on Page 8-A
Mikhail Gorbachev
President Reagan
Jews
For Judaism
They Fear Increasing
Mission Work in Israel
By LAWRENCE LEVEY
JERUSALEM Due to what is
decribed as "an intensified pat-
tern of missionary activity within
the Jewish State," Jews for
Judaism has announced that it is
opening a branch office in
Jerusalem.
Jews for Judaism, a countemis-
sionary and Jewish outreach
organization which worked to
monitor and combat deceptive
Christian missionary efforts, cur-
rently has offices in Baltimore,
Los Angeles and Harrisburg, Pa.
THE JERUSALEM facility,
scheduled to open in November,
will be headed by Rabbi Motty
Berger, a graduate of Ner Israel
Rabbinical College and an interna-
tionally renowned expert on mis-
sionary and cult movements.
"Despite official Israeli Govern-
ment denials, our intelligence
sources reveal that a large variety
of fundamentalist missionary
groups are expanding their decep-
tive conversionary efforts
throughout Israel," asserted Rab-
bi Berger. In support of this claim,
Rabbi Berger cited the following:
An attempt by Oral Roberts
University to infiltrate 38 Israeli
Kibbutzim with 180 carefully
trained missionaries (code named
"Project Kibbutz") was recently
halted following public disclosure
of group's internal training
documents.
The American Board of Mis-
sions to the Jews is presently
training Israel-born operatives in
New York for missionary work in
Israel.
Netiv Ya, a Jerusalem based
"Messianic Yeshiva" run by
Jewish apostate Joseph
Schulman, is attended by about
Continued on Page 9-A
His Last Hurrah?
French Wine and Dine Peres in Renewed Warmth
President Mitterrand
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres end-
ed a 36-hour visit to Paris
last Thursday night, his last
overseas trip as the leader
of Israel's government.
He was given what was describ-
ed as a royal send-off* at the air-
port, reflecting the new warmth
in Franco-Israeli relations and a
nostalgic reminder of the two
countries' collaboration in the
Suez Campaign 30 years ago.
PERES CAME here to in-
augurate the Ben-Gurion Centen-
nial Year celebrations in France,
which he did at a Versailles Palace
celebration before his departure.
But the focus of his visit was inter-
national terrorism and how to
fight it. He discussed the matter
with President Francois
Mitterrand.
The subject dominated his
90-minute talk with Premier Jac-
ques Chirac last Wednesday night
(Oct. 8). It followed a special ses-
sion of the French Parliament on
terrorism at which most speakers
urged France to emulate Israel's
methods of combatting terrorists.
Nine people have been killed and
200 wounded in a series of ter-
Continued on Page 11-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Collapsed Iceland Talks
Mean Human Rights
Put on Back Burner
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State
George Shultz stressed last
Wednesday (Oct. 8) that the
Soviet Union would be told
in Iceland over the weekend
that there can be improve-
ment in relations with the
United States only if the
USSR improves its human
rights conditions, including
increasing emigration for
Soviet Jews.
'They need to know there can
be no lasting improvement in our
relations as long as Soviet citizens
are deprived of the right to speak
freely, freedom of worship and to
live where they please." Shultz
told some 400 Jewish leaders at-
tending a National Leadership
Assembly for Soviet Jewry.
THE DAY-LONG assembly was
sponsored by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions and the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC). Also
cooperating in the event were the
Coalition to Free Soviet Jews, the
Council of Jewish Federations and
the Synagogue Council of
America.
AFTER THE speech by Shultz
at the State Department, the
Jewish leaders went to Capitol
Hill for another meeting attended
by members of Congress and then
participated in a prayer vigil in
Lafayette Park, across from the
White House.
Shultz said that when President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev met in Reykjavik.
Iceland, the Soviets must be made
to understand that progress in the
issues discussed, including arms
control, are tied to human rights.
The Secretary said that when
Reagan has an issue that is impor-
tant to him like human rights, "he
looks you in the eye and tells you
what he thinks, and I'm sure he's
going to do that" in Iceland.
Shultz added that Gorbachev and
nil ffdlagim would hear about
human rights, including the
Soviet Jewry issue, from "the
President and me and others."
HOWEVER, Shultz said on an
ABC television interview last
Wednesday that the U.S. would
not refuse to sign an arms control
agreement with the Soviets if
there were no progress on human
rights. "We're not making any
firm and formal linkage" between
arms control and human rights
improvement, "but these various
areas of our relationship are inter-
related." Shultz said in response
to questions.
He added. "It is essential if
we're going to have a really de-
cent and constructive relationship
with the Soviet Union that we
make progress in this area"
(human rights), but "that doesn't
mean telling them they have to
change their system. They aren't
going to do that, and we have no
right to do that."
On the eve of their departure
for Reykjavik, both Reagan and
Shultz stressed the importance of
human rights for the meeting in
Iceland, as well as the official
summit in the United States that
is expected to follow.
REAGAN STRONGLY stress-
ed this point when he wecomed
Yuri Orlov. the Soviet human
rights leader, to the White House
last Tuesday. "I will make it amp-
ly dear to Mr. Gorbachev that
unless there is real Soviet move-
ment on human rights, we will not
have the kind of political at-
mosphere necessary to make
lasting progress in other issues."
Reagan said.
Morris Abram. chairman of both
the NCSJ and the Presidents Con-
ference, in introducing Shultz.
said that the Secretary told a
group of Jewish leaders recently
that while he always has the issue
of Soviet Jewry in his mind, he
wants Jewish groups to keep giv-
ing "me the needle."
Shultz said that while he
believes in private diplomacy, the
pressure of the organized Jewish
community and others "is
something I can point to" in talks
with the Soviets.
"Your presence is a demonstra-
tion that we not only hold and care
about our values, but that we are
willing to extend ourselves, go out
of our way and work ... to do
everything we can to do
something about it." Shultz said.
He said the issue of Soviet Jewry
and human rights in general, is
m>t just "bipartisan." but
"universal."
SHULTZ SAID that despite all
the efforts, the situation is "grim
with emigration for the first nine
months totaling only 631 Jews. He
said if this continues only 1.000
Jews would have left the USSR in
1986.
When he met with Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze at the State
Department in September. Shultz
said he showed him a chart
prepared by the NCSJ which gave
a breakdown month-by-month of
the emigration figures, which did
not have to be translated into
Russian.
Shultz said that when Shevard-
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(JTA/W7.N NcwsPtx* ,
Some 1,500 representatu'es of the United
Jewish Appeal march to Jerusalem's Western communities in the U.S. They were midrmed
Wail, together with residents of Project by Prime Minister Shimon Peres. The mar-
Renewal neighborhoods that are twinned with chers' slogan is 'One people, one destiny
nadze replied that the Jews who
wanted to leave had left, he
presented him with documents
from the NCSJ showing that some
400.000 had applied for exit visas.
Shultz said the NCSJ was supply-
ing another chart for the Iceland
meeting.
Abram said Shultz was also
given a list of all the Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience in the
Soviet Union, and National
Security Adviser John Poindexter
was given a list of 18.000
refuseniks.
SHULTZ STRESSED that the
human rights issue is not an inter-
nal issue but a matter of the
Soviet Union living up to the in-
ternational obligations it agreed
to when it signed the Helsinki
Final Act and other international
agreements. "They signed them.'
he said.
He said the Soviet Union ha>
made some "high-profile
gestures." but this is not enough.
They must be shown they pay ;i
"high price" for not improving
human rights conditions, he
stressed. "We need to keep show
ing that we care, that we rea
care," Shultz declared.
2 Jews Detained
Raise Family Separation Issue
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Inessa and Victor Flerov
were detained for two hours
by the KGB in Moscow last
Wednesday (Oct. 8) as they
demonstrated in front of the
Communist Party Central
Committee headquarters, it
was reported by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
At the time, they were
holding up a sign that read
"FarniLes Should Not Be
Separated."
Victor Flerov has been on a
hunger strike for two weeks pro-
testing Soviet officials' refusal to
allow him to leave for Israel with
his wife and two daughters. Soviet
officials refuse to allow him to
leave because they claim that he
has not received a waiver of finan
cial obligation from his father.
with whom he has not been in con-
tact for a long time.
INESSA FLEROV A has been
waiting since February for per-
mission to go to Israel to try to
donate bone marrow to her grave-
ly ill brother Michael Shirman.
whose myeloid leukemia can
possibly be treated by a bone mar-
row transplant from near kin. His
mother, Evgenia, who im-
migrated with him to Israel six
years ago, tested incompatible as
a marrow donor.
Flerova finally received an exit
visa in August, along with her
daughters, after herself going on
a hunger strike and with the in-
tervention of several American of-
ficials and doctors.
Meanwhile. Shirman and 14
other Israelis left last Wednesday
night for Reykjavik. Iceland, and
arrived there last Thursday after-
noon to participate along with a
group of American Soviet Jewry
activists in a demonstration on the
eve of the summit meeting bet
ween President Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
The Israeli group's trip was spon-
sored hj the Soviet Jewry Public
Information Center in Jerusalem
ONE-QE the members of the
Israeii group was a doctor to at-
tend to Shirman s possible needs.
Myeloid leukemia leaves its vic-
tims ambulatory until the very
end of the disease
Others reportedly in the group
are liana Fridman. sister of
refusenik Ida Nudel: Vladimir
Brodsky. recently released former
refusenik; Rabbi Benjamin
Leyman; Zaloyga Glossnii
former refusenik persecuted for
promoting Hebrew-language
education in the USSR, ani
Chaim Margoles. a relative i : ;i
refusenik
/?
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Elie Wiesel
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Wins 1986 Nobel Peace Prize
OSLO, Norway The
1986 Nobel Peace Prize has
gone to Elie Wiesel, a sur-
vivor of the Nazi Holocaust
and a pioneer in human
rights efforts, the Nobel
committee announced
Monday.
In making the announce-
ment, the committee
declared that "Wiesel is a
messenger to mankind; his
message is one of peace,
atonement and human
dignity. His belief that the
forces fighting evil in the
world can be victorious is a
hard-won belief.
His message is based on his
own personal experience of total
Elie Wiesel
Two Jewish Researchers Given
'86 Nobel Prize for Medicine
STOCKHOLM, Sweden -
Two Jewish researchers,
one an American and the
other Italian, won the Nobel
Prize in medicine here
Monday.
Dr. Stanley Cohen, 63, of
the Vanderbilt University
Medical Center, and Dr.
Rita Levi-Montalcini, 77, of
the Institute of Cell Biology
in Rome, were named co-
winners of a $290,000 prize.
The Nobel Assembly of
Stockholm's Karolinaka Institute
said their research dates back to
the 1950s, and that it "may in-
crease our understanding of many
disease states," including
Alzheimer's disease and cancer.
The research of the two scien-
tists centers on growth factors,
which has increased understan-
ding of how individual cells
develop into complex organ
systems.
Levi-Montalcini carried out ex-
periments in her bedroom while
hiding from the Nazis during
World War II. Previously, she had
been forced to quit her university
post in Turin, where she grew up.
Cohen suffered from polio as a
child, and he still walks with a
limp today.
It was at Washington Universi-
ty in St. Louis that Levi-
Montalcini first met Cohen, and
the two worked together for
seven years after that in the
1950s. In the beginning, their
research in cell development was
greeted skeptically.
But during the 1970s, the role of
growth factors became increas-
ingly accepted and led to better
understanding of the basis for
cancer and degenerative diseases
of the brain.
Kerstin Hall, a member of the
Nobel committee, declared that
the reason for honoring the two
scientists so many years after
their discoveries is that "only in
the last 10 years or so has the
meaning of their results been
investigated."
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humiliation and of the utter con-
tempt for humanity shown in
Hitler's death camps. The
message is in the form of a
testimony, repeated and deepened
through the works of a great
author."
THE NOBEL citation con-
tinues: "Wiesel's commitment,
which originated in the sufferings
of the Jewish people, has been
widened to embrace all repressed
peoples and races."
The Nobel Prise to Wiesel car-
ries a cash award worth $290,000.
Wiesel had been proposed several
times for the peace priie by
previous winners and numerous
groups of national legislators, in-
cluding one from the West Ger-
man Bundestag.
Wiesel, now 58, has written ex-
tensively about his concentration
camp experiences during World
War II. His subject matter has
also turned to themes involving
the plight of the Jews in the
Soviet Union, as well as other
human rights issues.
A RESIDENT of New York Ci-
ty, he holds a professorship at
Boston University. Among his
numerous literary and human
rights awards is the U.S. Congres-
sional Gold Medal of Achievement
for Wiesel's work as chairman of
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council.
Wiesel was bom in Sighet in
what is now Rumania. In 1944,
the Nazis ordered the deportation
of the city's 15.000 Jews and the
(JTA/WZN Newi Photo)
Outgoing Interior Minister YosefBurg talk* to reporters shortly
after announcing his retirement as of Oct. 6. Burg Joined the
cabinet in 1951 as Minister of Health, and toas the present
cabinet's oldest and longest serving member.
Wiesel family was shipped to
Auschwitz concentration camp in
Poland, where his mother and
youngest sister were killed.
It was not until after the war
that he learned that two of his
older sisters had survived. By
then, Wiesel himself had also sur-
vived his father, with whom he
was sent to Buchenwald in 1945.
a concentration camp in Germany,
where his father died shortly
thereafter.
After Buchenwald was liberated
on April 11, 1945, he refused to
return to Eastern Europe and set-
tled in France instead, where he
studied at the Sorbonne. In 1948,
he traveled to Israel as a jour-
nalist to cover the establishment
of the State of Israel for a French
newspaper. Four years later, he
became Paris correspondent for
Yediot Achronot. He applied for
U.S. citizenship in 1956.
First Exec Named
ALBANY, N.Y. (JTA) -
Norman Schimelman has become
the first executive director of the
United Jewish Federation of Nor-
theastern New York. This federa-
tion is the consolidation of the
former individual federations of
Albany and Schenectady, N.Y.
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lag* 4 A The Jewish Fforidiaii/rriday. October 17. 1*86
Negotiations Weren't
On Reagan's Agenda
As Americans, we are sad that the two
days of talks in Reykjavik between Presi-
dent Reagan and the Soviet Union's Mikhail
Gorbachev ended in coUapae without seem-
ing progress. As American Jews, we are sad
that the President's statements to Mr. Gor-
bachev on human rights violations in his
country and elsewhere in the world must for
the moment languish with the rest of the
near-achievements at Reykjavik despite the
President's promise to the nation Monday
lugh t that aD is not lost
In fact. Mr. Reagan told us. everything
that occurred in Iceland is merely on hold
for the moment And there is s general
sense that perhaps he feels this is a good
thing, too. After all. he had complained to
aides in Iceland. Mr. Gorbachev's pressure
there was producing what seemed like alar-
ming progress at an alarmingly rapid rate.
Nothing in the Gorbachev arsenal had a ge-
nuine sense of reality about it
Said the President s Miami Herald
Washington Bureau reports. "This wasn't
supposed to be a negotiation session"
anyway
Soviet Words Say Little
Indeed, that b what the President had
been saying all along on the eve of this two-
day, much advertised venture. He had been
saying it in order to dampen what he saw as
unfounded hopes of possible piogiess there.
He had, from the beginning, cautioned that
Reykjavik would merely be a "base camp''
for a future summit
But Mr Gorbachev was busily teihng the
other part of the work! just the opposite, and
it not beyond the realm of possibility that
the President sensed something off balance
I the compelling haste of the Gorbachev
stance.
It a precisely the compelling haste in the
Sonet leader that frustrated him sharply
as the Preaadeot time and again refused to
set aside he Strategic EVfense Initiative no
Mfln how tugh the Soviet ante dnnbed-
Whether it that the Russnns already have
an SDI system of their own and want no
conapeacaon, or whether it b that Mr Gor-
bachev recognises that bis country b not m
any position now to match the vast
American ouaays for SIM research the
fact b that SDI faI the socksng pome on
wbaca the Gorbachev issarrrsar^ect pro-
posals, brveuhcacngiy >unj, on their
race, foundered.
We are not prepared to say. as others have
d* done, that Mr Reagan wanted rt aiL
at ai. at Reyijari. and that he
s&ouki have heeded tSr sew Soviet scewc;
of cooperaacc. We are syrrfacheac wher.
the Presaieat charges that the Soviets say
zk stoat thaars. dksarsasec; rvrjied.
bat they aasaage after the taik >x tc act.
arc *. *; shoe*: -Jv xxiapsec taxs r->ar-
poirt .s asyway*
Rethinking SDI
the Russians. He seems to carry the ball on
their court better than most of his
predecessors. In this sense, at Reykjavik, he
said of the Gorbachev proposals, laudable
though they seemed. Let's not rush here.
What about human rights first? And what
about our need to be certain that this time
you're not kidding that you intend to
mean what you propose?
Perhaps in retrospect we may discover
that this was not such a bad postponement
As for SDI, although Mr. Reagan is adamant
on the issue, we might just as well echo Mr.
Gorbachev's advice to the President and to
the American people when he saw with
dismay the collapse of the Iceland talks:
Hunk about it some more.
Three Nobel Jews
Jews are known as the People of the
Book. During this High Holy Day period, we
are constanuv reminded of the presence of
our scriptural heritage at the core of our
prayers.
It was all the more apt therefore, to
observe with a special sort of pleasure the
announcements of the Nobel Prise commit-
tees in Stockholm and Oslo Monday that
three distinguished Jews had been chosen
for these prestigious awards.
Two of them. Dr. Stanley Cohen of the
Yanderbilt University Medical Center and
Dr. Rita Levi-Montaloni of the Institute of
Cell Biology in Rome, were named to share
the 1966 Nobel Prise for their medical
research in the 1960s.
The third. Ebe Wiesel found his life in the
cause of remembering the Holocaust and in
pursuing^ human rights for Jews in the
Soviet I nion and elsewhere crowned by the
award to him of the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize.
This trio, from wider/flung parts of the
world, pursued and still pursue the
Word, knowledge and sensibility, perhaps
differently from those sacred Scriptures
Arab Agenda
which have bound us together as a people for
all these millenia. But theirs is nevertheless
a Word in the cause of human betterment
and in the cause of good works for the eleva-
tion of us all, whether expressed in terms of
science or of literature. That is, after all,
what the People of the Book have always
pursued. Drs. Cohen and Levi-Montalcini in
their medical research and Ebe Wiesel in the
mystical poetry of his imagination speak for
an improved mankind in an imperfect world
that would discourage lesser minds than
theirs.
It is the vision of prophesy that fires this
trio the same vision that fed the pas-
sionate utterances of our biblical forebears.
In recognizing the vision and the flame in
them, tae Nobel committee also recognize
the unique Jewish spirit that will not die no
matter what those who seek to torment us
may say or do. No matter what those who
tormented Wiesel in the concentration
camps and Levi-Montalcini in her bedroom
hideaway from the Nazis in Turin. Italy did
to them.
It Hasn't Changed from the Beginning
B> STEPHEN SILBXaTjULB
Recent commentaries and
new? reports wood have as
believe that Palestinian
frustraaoe wrr* Israei: v
cupaaoc s the ca^se ::'
Paescrjan terrorssE. We
have heard the "root casae"
of Arab terroracr. a Israei 5
rerssai a? reccgr^se trie
PLO and accept ar. -.rjdepec-
ier: Paiescr-a,- scale .t ts
borders. Bat iet's joo* a: the
facts.
TV* Mf ai oaj exaoeaev x
JTHI 5 HI V.TC XCIUaX
a sic uml itC&vy: ir
r-a aad aaa*w 5-*r .
a ana) jool
4
The ano-Israel
sentHnent thai stoked
the flames of Arab
hatred poor to 1967
sol rages although
both tempered and
fanned by Egypt's lone
and uncertain foray
The frontal assault has.
for the twne being
pro\en meffectne
Terrorism has replaced
taas Arab
lsra*c .-vc^ *" ta*
,Scx-:al7
of a*
IrocucauT ta*
ttroafiy
Ai-f'2."
tka: -
this 5V
and ik rhi mwhn aac
.-aiae furthered aoc been
by acts ot terror
ISRAEL'S vmbair*-:
I wrd: very bttie room for error.
I'stake :3 foe*. Israe-. .-.-- -e
a batue rsor afford perpecu*. oar
The bottom Jar. Israei r.us:
B--t .be f**t -a*d by aarr rat
d k::-?.r.*:* attathi afl '-'
dereaweleae nitaaie not
to -tin(> ta* reeato c< -
twy War or i i|H a ars
peace If that *er* ta* case '-*>'
wid take aawaf Sadat j
c af \--ae aer-vr-at aesi
a* eaboa; rf C "juia mrrac *
'. ~* Ma iqaeBajr. amr i'.
2*1 V 5.
- v*
--?-
THE A.VTV4SBJULL =-"*[
ntaM ta* ftiaa* al Arab
prior ae :T "V*
^o^9 MS iiaMiiit a: :*=^
I *? K^y^c s now aoc xx*^-^-
fjraj TV r^sooaa T sa -
_, p*v*n **&*
e- f ar.--" J
-iwe'-"y
d VMS :C
at .-Afc flip


On His Centennial
Ben-Gurwn's Hole in Creation of Israel
Left Him Disappointed With U.S. Jewry
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Fa^e 5-A
: MVl
By SIMON GRIVER
David Ben-Gurion did not
naively believe that the
establishment of the Jewish
state would bring world
Jewry rushing to live in
Israel. He was, however,
disappointed by the small
fraction, particularly of
American Jewry, that did
make its home in Israel,
though he remained eternal-
ly optimistic that Israel
could develop into a nation
capable of attracting large
numbers of Jews from the
free world.
Most of all he feared the
cleavage that could divide Israel
from the Jewish people in the
Diaspora. Whenever he met
Jewish parents from overseas, he
would ask them to ensure that
their children learn Hebrew,
study the Bible and Jewish history
and become acquainted with
Hebrew literature. Ben-Gurion
felt that common heritage and
consciousness could help to
preserve Jewish unity.
AS THIS extract from his essay
entitled "Israel and the Diaspora"
shows, he believed that the fate of
Israel and the Diaspora were inex-
tricably linked. The one could not
survive without the other. "The
fate of the state," he wrote, "is in-
extricably linked with the fate of
world Jewry and vice-versa. The
State of Israel is only the beginn-
ing of the redemption; its survival
and the fulfillment of its mission
cannot be assured without the
continuation of the ingathering of
the exiles. Jewry in the Diaspora.
and above all in the two great
centers (U.S.A. and USSR), is
already far gone in the process of
assimilation, although its Jewish
consciousness has not yet
disappeared.
Without strong mutual bonds
between Israel and the Diaspora
communities it is doubtful
whether Israel will survive, and
whether the Diaspora will not
perish by euthanasia or suffoca-
tion. Apart from the prophetic
heritage, there are also
geopolitical reasons for the fact
that Israel is not and cannot be
like other states. The House of
Israel is not like other nations
for there is not a religious and
ethical dogma, but a historical im-
perative, the decree of fate."
Ben-Gurion tolerated the con-
tinuation of the Diaspora, though
he perceived its future existence
in terms of strengthening Israel
and providing a reservoir of
potential immigrants. He did not
approve of people who called
themselves Zionists but did not
come on aliya themselves and
often playfully teased American
Zionists.
HE WOULD ask them what
was the difference between
themselves and Jews who were
non-Zionists: "You support Israel,
and they support Israel," he
would argue. "You send money,
and they send money. You love
Israel, and they love Israel. You
lobby the politicians on behalf of
Israel, and so do they. You don't
make your homes in Israel, and
neither do they. So where is the
difference?"
In the following extract from his
essay "Israel and the Diaspora,"
Ben-Gurion addressed the pro-
blem. "The principal Jewish
Diaspora center of our days does
not admit that it is living in exile.
America is its homeland, and it
has no intention of leaving it; but
American Zionists are offended
when they are placed on the same
level as all other Jews who seek
the welfare of the state, and in-
sist, with an obstinacy which
arouses respect (and perhaps also
surprises), on their special rights
as "Zionists." although they do
not conceal the fact that they have
no intention or desire to return to
Zion, for they consider themselves
an integral part of the American
people. There is no point in quar-
relling about names.
"If there is anyone who.
although he has no attachment to
the ideological and practical con-
tent of the term 'Zionism.' as we
knew it before the rise of the
state, nevertheless feels a
spiritual need to use this name,
who can stop him calling himself a
Zionist? And there is no sense or
advantage in quarrelling about
names and terms."
Ben-Gurion eagerly supported
fund-raising drives among
Diaspora and especially American
Jewry. He realized the vital need
for such funds to build up the nas-
cent Jewish state. But he also lik-
ed to stress that in return for
those funds Israel gave to the
Diaspora something that is much
more valuable than money.
"THE STATE of Israel," he
wrote, "has straightened the back
of every Jew wherever he lives. In
the course of a few years, it has
redeemed hundreds of thousands
of Jews from poverty and
degeneration in exile, and
transformed them into proud,
creative Jews, the builders and
Ben-Gurion only tolerated Diaspora as
well for Israel's future.
defenders of their country. It has
poured a new hope into the hearts
of the helpless and muzzled Jews
of the Soviet Union. It has reveal-
ed the extraordinary capacity of
the Jew for accomplishment in all
spheres of human creative work
and revived Jewish heroism.
"It has assured every Diaspora
Jew who enjoys freedom of move-
Continued on Page 8-A
Devout Catholic
He Saved the Lives of 10,000 Jews
Th Pillar of Heroism at Yad Vashem. English text: 'Now and
forever, in memory of those who rebelled in the camps and ghettos,
Jought in the woods, in the underground and with the allied
forces, who braved their way to Eretz Israel and those who died
sanctifying the name of God.'
By DAVID SHAPIRO
The story of Aristides
Sousa Mendes, though little
known, is perhaps the most
amazing instance of an in-
dividual's help to Jews dur-
ing the Holocaust. This
single man, a devout
Catholic, saved the lives of
over 10,000 Jewish
refugees.
When France fell to the Nazis in
1940, French Jews and Jewish
refugees from all parts of Europe
who had fled to France found
themselves trapped. British war-
ships patrolled the Mediterra-
nean, preventing Jewish migra-
tion to Palestine. The French
borders on the east to Switzerland
and Italy were sealed, as was the
port of Marseilles. The Germans
had entered Paris, and it was
clear that they would soon occupy
the entire country.
THE FRENCH moved their
government south to Bordeaux,
and around 30,000 refugees, a
third of them Jewish, fled there in
desperation. Only one escape
route presented itself: over the
Pyrenees to Spain, and from there
to Portugal. The refugees in the
city besieged the Portuguese Con-
sulate for visas, but the Por-
tuguese government had une-
quivocally ordered its consuls to
turn down any and all requests for
visas from Jews. Spain, in concert
with Portugal, closed its borders
to the unfortunate refugees.
Aristedes Sousa Mendes,
however, the Portuguese consul
general to France and a devout
Catholic of Marrano extraction,
greeted a delegation of the
refugees in the outer hall of the
consulate. His eyes were circled
with fatigue and, amid the moun-
ting tension, his hair had recently
turned white.
"My government has denied all
applications for visas to any
refugee," he declared. "But I can-
not stand by while people lose
their lives. Our Constitution
states that the religion, color and
politics of a foreigner shall not be
used to deny him refuge in Por-
tugal. I have decided to follow this
principle. I am going to issue a
visa to anyone who asks for it
regardless of whether or not he
can pay."
MENDES TURNED to his
wife, standing beside him. "I
know that Mrs. Mendes wholly
concurs with my view. Even if I
am discharged from my duties as
a consequence, I can only act as a
Christian and as my conscience
dictates."
The announcement electrified
the onlookers, who responded
with an outburst of cheers.
Mendes entered his chancellery,
hunched over a low coffee table,
and began to write out visas for
the throng which had lined up and
begun to stream through.
Assisted by two of his sons. Dr.
Pedro Nuno and Jose Antonio
Mendes, he worked there for
three days, stopping only briefly
to eat and sleep. On the third day,
he collapsed, exhausted and sick.
Word of his activities reached
Lisbon, and two emissaries were
dispatched to bring Mendes back
to the capital for having violated
orders. They escorted him to their
car. and while passing through
Bayonne on their way to Spain,
encountered a scene similar to the
one recently witnessed in
Bordeaux. Thousands of refugees
had flocked around the Por-
tuguese consulate, pleading for
visas. Mendes strode into the vice
consul's office and, as his
superior, ordered him to grant
visas to all the applicants. Not
even the two officials from Lisbon
could prevail upon Mendes to
desist, as the consul himself began
issuing make-shift visas with the
following inscription: "The Por-
tuguese government requests the
Spanish government the courtesy
of allowing the bearer to pass
freely through Spain. He is a
refugee from the European con-
flict and en route to Portugal."
The next day, after all the
refugees had been accommodated,
Mendes and the two officials
resumed their journey. When they
reached Hendaye, on the Spanish
border, they found a huge throng
of refugees many of whom had
been granted visas by Mendes
himself being prevented from
crossing the border. Spain was
complying with Portugal's wishes
and prohibiting passage through
its territory.
MENDES, however, correctly
surmised that the orders to seal
the border had gotten no further
than Hendaye, and he led (he
crowd to the next border entry.
Presenting his credentials, he suc-
ceeded in getting the refugees
through to safety.
Upon reaching Lisbon, Mendes
was hauled before an inquiry com-
mittee and was fired from the
Portuguese foreign service for
disobeying orders. In 1954,
neglected and poverty-stricken,
he died. Mendes never regretted
his actions, although he once said
that if thousands of Jews had to
suffer because of one Catholic
(Hitler nominally belonged to the
Catholic Church), then it was
perfectly all right for one Catholic
to suffer for thousands of Jews.
In 1961, the Government of
Israel planted 20 trees in the Mar-
tyr's Forest in honor of Aristides
Sousa Mendes.
When Mendes' activity was
discovered, he was brought home.


Page 6-A The Jewish rIoridian/Fridaj; OctoberJ7, 1986
Rotation This Week
Despite All Fears To Contrary
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Two years ago the pundits
here and abroad were
predicting, almost to a man.
that the government of na-
tional unity was a non-
starter, a lame duck, bound
to collapse no sooner than it
set out on its 50-month
course.
The differences between major
parties were considered too big.
the instability of the coalition too
built-in, to brook any longevity.
The capacity for crises was seen
as endemic and any crisis was
thought likely to be fatal.
NOW. half-way through the
term, and with the Prime
Ministerial rotation implented
Tuesday with remarkably little
friction, those same pundits
having eaten their earlier words
as gracefully as possible are
now predicting with renewed self
""jiMf*- that the government
will last its full statutory term.
"Its lairit is its strength."
is one of the now-popular theories.
Each side's inability to cobble
together an alternative, narrow
bnssd coalition is cited as the
reason why the myriad crises of
the past two years ended in com
prosniat and resolution and why
the inevitable crises of the future
' be weathered.
The real laon. however, of
these past two years might well be
not that the pundits were wrong
them, nor that they are right now.
but that Israeli politics are in an
inherently anprirhrtahlr phase
following the inconchisave results
of the 1961 and the 1984 Knesset
"A WBEE." said former
British Premier Harold Wilson.
'is a long time in politics." Two
whole years in Israel's unity coali-
tion, with the two main partners
straining to be rid of each other
and of their shotgun marriage, are
that criterion a veritable aeon
mystery and unpredictabtliu
Even if Shimon Peres and Yit-
zhak Shamir had plighted to each
other their solemn troth to stick
together come what may which
they patently have not external
IOOOOSBOOOBOOOOC
3
circumstances, beyond their con-
trol or influence, could evolve in
the months ahead to pull them
apart.
In the peace process, a signifi-
cant shift by Jordan would in-
stantly put Labor and Likud into s
confrontational posture. Premier
Peres, in his valedictory address
to the Knesset last Tuesday, said
that while he had not managed to
lead Israel to the negotiating
table, the door to the negotiating
room had been opened.
HE ADDED that Israel and
Jordan, through the United
States, were discussing the
modalities of an international
forum that would ultimately
facilitate direct negotiations.
What Peres end not say. in so
many words, was that so far King
Hussein of Jordan had disap-
pointed both him and the U.S.
Secretary of State George Shultz
in his failure to follow through on
his rift with the PLO by entering
unequivocally into a peace process
with Israel
But Hussein's equivocation may
suddenly end especially if Peres
is able to continue building for the
hesitant Hashemite monarch a
supportive bastion of moderate
Arab opinion.
In this context, Peres' recent
visits to Morocco and to Egypt,
and the warm public en-
dorsements he elicited from both
King Hassan and President Hosni
Mubarak, may be encouraging
harbingers of an Arab consensus.
Peres, moreover, has made it
abundantly dear that be will not
permit himself to be stymied by
Premier Shamir in his pursuit of
these diplomatic overtures, which
he launched late in his own term
as Premier.
SIMILARLY, if the idea of an
international forum or conference
takes on more concrete and prac-
tical form at the moment it is
still the subject of controversy or
suspicion in many world
chanceries this could quickly
end the Labor-Likud policy-
ceasefire which is at the basis of
this unity government.
For after all. the government
has maintained its existence until
now because the two major part-
ners have not been required to ad-
dress the essentials of the Palesti-
nian issue the issue on which
they are irretrievably divided.
Preparations for an interna-
tional conference would inevitably
bring those differences to the
fore, in the form of the question of
Palestinian representation.
Peres, at his summit meeting
with Mubarak in Alexandria,
declared that the Palestinians
were s people like any other peo-
ple. He has said repeatedly that he
would accept "authentic Palesti-
nian representatives" as
negotiating partners
THIS IS not a position which
the Likud could support if it were
removed from the realm of
rhetoric and placed squarely in the
center of an international
diplomatic confabulation.
Shamir has been at pains to
pour cold water on the notion of
an mteraaoonal conference and
seems to have won over at least
some in the Reagan Administra-
tion to this viewpoint. These
American policymakers are less
exercised by the Palestinian
aspect than by the prospect of the
Soviets returning to center-stage
in Middle East diplomacy
On the domestic front, relations
between Labor and Likud could
quickly deteriorate to breaking
point if Labor begins to feel that
the Likud, holding both the
Premiership and the key Ministry
Finance, is loosening the reins of
austerity and hiwwg out pre-
election largess, as it did in
1963-4
Peres has made it dear be did
so with diplomatic understate-
ment in his Knesset speech Tues-
day that he and his party take
moat of the credit for restoring
the country to economic stability
after inheriting the roller-coaster
hyper-inflation of the Likud years.
In the pre-rotation wrangling.
Labor has sought with scant
success, it seems some
modicum of power in the economic
sphere. The Likud has been
understandably reluctant to cede
any. Finance Minister Moshe
Nissun (Likud-Liberal) has pledg-
ed full cooperation and argued
that this need not be formalised.
Nissun. unlike his predecessor.
Yitzhak Modal has built for
(OOOOOOOOOO
"Crtaf Land From Sand*
Dr. ArnaU Patz (left) of the John* Hopkins Medical Institution in
Baltimore. M from Mr. David Ben-Ezra, an eye specialist at the Hadassak-
University Hospital and co-chairman of a recent symposium on
eye disorders in Jerusalem
himself a calm, solid, dependable
image. Peres himself admits
privately that Nissim has been a
pleasant surprise and that the
Treasury, therefore, is in good
hands.
Still. Labor finds it hard to face
the future denied any real say in
economic policy-making. This
frustration may grow ominously
ss the Shamir Premiership wears
on and the next elections loom
closer.
In the administered territories,
the right flank of the Likud and
the parties of the farther right are
openly anticipating a new wave of
Jewish settlements. And the
Labor Defense Minister. Yitzhak
Rabin, is stating plainly that there
is no money for it nor does the
carefully crafted unity govern-
ment policy-platform require it
SHAMIR, always canny and pa
uent. has let his ideologues have
their say. But he has made it clear
that he is aware of the constric-
tions and limitations imposed on
him both by economic exigencies
and by the nature of unity govern-
ment politics.
As long ss Shamir can hold off
the incessant challenge to himself
from Ariel Sharon, his
pragmatism should ensure that.
on this issue at least, the unity
government can continue to hold
together.
Israel To Buy
China's Coal
JERUSALEM (JTAi -
Energy Minister Moshe Shahal
said last Wednesday night that
the Peoples Republic of China
may soon sell coal to Israel. If the
deal goes through, it would be the
first publicly-acknowledged trade
between the two countries.
Shahal spoke on his return from
a visit to France, where he had
two meetings with China's Depu-
ty Minister for Coal. Both men
were attending the International
Energy Congress in Cannes.
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Author Under Fire
For Attack on Deschenes Body
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish FloridJM Page 7-A

By ARNOLD AGES
TORONTO The author
of a highly praised book on
the forced repatriation of
Soviet soldiers after World
War II. "The Minister and
the Massacre," has strongly
criticized Canada's Commis-
sion of Inquiry on War
Criminals.
The attack against the creation
of the Deschenes Commission
might under normal cir-
cumstances be summarily re-
jected, but in this case the high
reputation of Nikolai Tolstoy re-
quires that his theses be given a
respectful hearing.
Tolstoy's view on what he
perceives as the illegitimacy of the
commission are contained in a
recently-published booklet called
'Trial and Error" (Justinian
Press). While it is written in fine
English and comes complete with
quotations from "Alice in
Wonderland" and even a former
Zionist spokesman, the essay is
marred in several ways.
First, it makes an ungracious ad
kominfm attack against Sol Litt-
man of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center.
TOLSTOY IS under the er-
roneous impression that Littman
is the person solely responsible for
the government's decision to
create the Deschenes Commis-
sion While Littman is undoubted-
ly flattered by this distinction, he
does not claim it
In fact, the commission has a
lengthy paternity going back at
least two decades and to the per-
sistent attempts on the part of the
Canadian Jewish Congress and
other interested Jewish organiza-
tions to persuade the government
of the importance of investigating
the presence in Canada of
suspected Nazi war criminals.
Tolstoy's careless assertion
ahout the origins of the Deschenes
Commission are not the only ques-
tionable aspect of his brief. His
suggestion that there is im-
propriety in investigating only
Ukrainians or Baltic peoples
without also investigating Rus-
sians who collaborated with (Jer
many until 1941 is entirely
'US.
The commission, first of all, is
not investigating Ukrainians. Lat-
vians, Estonians or any other
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group. It is investigating Cana-
dians who through the alchemy of
history belong to one or more of
the groups described. Their
membership in those communities
is accidental and not relevant to
the investigation.
TOLSTOY'S LINE of argu
ment, and one that is really un-
worthy of him, is to employ the old
avoidance by expansion
stratagem, which deflects atten-
tion from the object under
scrutiny by proposing extraneous
considerations.
The strongest part of the
Tolstoy polemic concerns the
unreliability of any witnesses
from the Soviet Union. This is an
argument of some cogency, given
the cynicism which passes for
justice in that country. The
lengths to which the Soviets go to
frame Jewish and non-Jewish
dissidents and refuseniks leaves
little doubt about the official
Soviet bureaucracy in matters of
justice.
According to Tolstoy, the ex-
port of any Soviet witness and the
willingness of Soviet authorities
to cooperate in war crimes trials
outside the Soviet Union are
merely avenues which permit the
Soviet government to enhance its
own reputation.
That, of course, is Tolstoy's
view. It rests, however, on the
assumption that the Soviets are
anxious to assist Western in-
vestigators. That is a totally false
assumption, according to people
who actually have dealt with
them.
ON THE matter of the probity
of witnesses, it must be noted that
this is a concern in all trials, even
those involving Canadian courts
trying Canadian defendants
where Canadian witnesses are
Continued on Page 10-A
V

Henry Siegman (left), executive director of the American Jewish
Congress, congratulates Philip H. Cohen (center) and Richard D.
Isserman (right), recipients of AJCongress' 1986 Accountants,
Bankers and Factors Award for exemplary service to the business
community. Cohen is senior executive in a financial enterprise.
Isserman is in charge of real estate practice in a New York ac-
counting firm.

iAt7 Cfiebett CfCf&u&melA
fi'pnp

You Are Cordially Invited To Attend
The Jose Marti Forest Park Inaugural Ball
Dedicated To The Establishment of
The 430,000 Tree Jose Marti Forest Park
In The Judean Hills, Jerusalem
Wo*4ti ffe- yoAfJutnuin ,t\4"U h fifty* >*ne/A Pe4 SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1986
Grand Ballroom of the Omni Hotel
1601 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
tjHtt^ot ^t/9He-t Shio/iew
(Giett4>*i/ Wnmitonmn
MAYOR STEPHEN P. CLARK
MAYOR ISIDORO CUEVAS
MAYOR ALEX DAOUD
MAYOR RAUL MARTINEZ
MAYOR PEDRO REBOREDO
MAYOR DOROTHY THOMSON
Cocktails 6:30 P.M.
Dinner 8:00 P.M.
'^ff^tif^^it^ ($fitnnu'//f>4>
&tt fifotntftftfrn
DR. AND MRS. HORACIO AGUIRRE
DR. AND MRS. LUIS BOTIFOL
MR. AND MRS. ZEV BUFMAN
MR. AND MRS. GEORGE FELDENKREIS
MR. AND MRS. ABEL HOLTZ
MR. AND MRS. JORGE MAS CANOSA
MR. AND MRS. ISAAC MILDENBERG
MR. AND MRS. ISAAC OLEMBERG
MR. AND MRS. RALPH SANCHEZ
MR. AND MRS. ANDRES VARGAS GOMEZ
$f&* tA44ttU ^Kedmei wttnmjtidim tfn. .'* Jose M Alonso
Rabbi Amram Amselem
Ramiro Campms
Xiomara Casado
Consul David Cohen
Flora Cornide
Jose Credi
Sol Credi
EmilioCalleia
Dr. Samuel I. Cohen
Executive Vlce-Prea.
JNF of America
Jorge Cunlll
Guarione Diaz
Cary De Leon
Diego Del Pino
Richard Druks
Moises Eshkenazi
Angel Fernandez Varela
Rolando Fernandez Padron
Fernando Figueredo
Martha Franchi de Diaz
Salomon Garazl
Luisa GarciaToledo
Rafael Garcia Toledo
Juan Garcia
Silvia Garcia Frutos
Virginia Godoy
Fernandez Gomez Pina
Wiltredo Gort
Sergio Grobler
Jose Heres
Rabbi Barry J. Konovich
Isaac Maya
Ana Maria Montes Flores
Juan Matalon
Nancy Perez Crespo
JoseJ Poza
Comm Abe Resnick
Norma Reboredo
Rosie Rivas
Lula Rodriguez
Julio Schniadoski
Rela Schniadoski
Gloria Sotolongo
Leon Schuster
Evita L Suarez
Rita Suarez
ZevW. Kogan
President
JNF Southern Region
Nily Falic
Director
KKL Latin Division
Mordechai Dayan
World Co-Chairman
KKL Jerusalem
For Information and Reservations:
JNF Karen Kayemeth LeisraelLatin Division, 420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 349, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 532-8706, 538 6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Ben-Gurion Was Disappointed
By U.S. Jewry's Non-Support
Continued from Page 5-A
ment in his present country of the
opportunity to live in his indepen-
dent homeland if he chooses to do
so, thus ensuring potentially, if
not yet in practice, a life of
sovereign independence for the
entire Jewish people."
In effect, Ben-Gurion agreed to
disagree with the Diaspora. He
was prepared to continue the
dialogue with world Jewry, but he
insisted th' aliya was the duty of
every Jew. He asserted that life in
an independent Jewish state was
preferable to life in the Diaspora
whether the United States or
the Soviet Union or elsewhere.
"ALL JEWISH communities in
the Diaspora," he wrote, "have
certain things in common which
apply equally to the rich, free,
democratic communities and to
the impoverished, oppressed
Jewries of the totalitarian coun-
tries. These common features find
expression in four basic facts, by
which Jewish life in the Diaspora
is differentiated from Jewish life
in Israel. By virtue of these facts,
all Diaspora communities, without
exception, are in a condition of ex-
ile, whether the Jews concerned
realize it or not.
"A) The fact is that the Jews
are a minority, subordinate to and
dependent on the will of the ma-
jority. The majority may treat the
Jewish minority as having equal
rights, or it may restrict its rights,
but the Jewish community is
helpless to make its own decisions
in the matter. The status of the
Jewish minority is not decided by
itself, and does not depend on its
will and capacity alone.
"B)The economic and social
structure of the Jewish com-
munities in the Diaspora is dif-
ferent from that of the peoples
among whom they live. The ma-
jority of every people consists of
farmers and workers. The status
of the workers and farmers is dif-
ferent in every nation; in some
they are poor and downtrodden,
and in others the opposite is the
case; but in every nation they are
the majority and the main founda-
tion on which the entire people
rests. In the wealthy countries,
Jewish cultural and material stan-
ding is above that of the majority
they are thus removed from the
primal sources of the vitality of
every people, and this deprives
them of firm and solid ground.
"C) Those Diaspora Jews who
wish to preserve their Jewishness
find themselves living in two con-
tending spheres of influence. As a
citizen the Jew derives his
sustenance, in both his material
and his cultural life, from the
foreign people among whom he
lives. Every day, wherever he
goes, he is surrounded by a non-
Jewish atmosphere attractive,
all-embracing and sometimes even
hostile but always non Jewish
The non-Jewish environment is
extremely powerful. It controls
the government, the economy, the
law, politics and the dominant
language and culture. The Jew is
influenced by it whether he
realizes it or not.
*'D) ONLY IN sovereign Israel
does the full opportunity arise for
molding the life of the Jewish peo-
ple according to its own needs and
values, in loyalty to its own
character and spirit, to its
historical heritage and its vision
for the future. In Israel the bar-
rier between the Jew and the man
is destroyed; the state has assured
its people of their integrity and
completeness as Jews and men.
The- sovereign Jewish sphere en-
compasses ail needs, deeds and
desires."
Reagan Says Reykjavik
Still Holds Hope for Peace
Coatinmed from Page 1-A
proposals by Gorbachev amoun-
ting to concessions on cutting
ballistic missiles, reducing
medium-range missiles and agree-
ing to negotiating seriously on
nuclear testing, the President's
determination to pursue his SDI
program and refusal to confine
the testing to the laboratory for a
10-year period, another Gor-
bachev proposal, was what proved
to be the last straw.
In Gorbachev's view, SDI
research is intended to develop a
space-based weapon that could
give the United Staes a strategic
advantage this, despite Mr
Reagan's oft-repeated position
that the project is intended to be
"a non-nuclear defense" that
would spur efforts both in the
United States and the Soviet
Union to eliminate nuclear
weapons entirely.
Despite this apparent impasse,
which also included a rejection of
the Gorbachev proposal from a 50
percent reduction in long-range
ballistic missiles on each side,
elimination of all intermediate
missiles in Europe, and a limit of
100 medium-range war heads per
side in Asia this last, a stagger-
ing surprise, since the Soviets had
previously stonewalled all discus-
sion of their 513 warheads in Asia
Mr. Reagan told the nation
Monday night:
"... we continue to believe ad-
ditional metings would be useful
. But whatever the immediate
prospects, I can tell your that I am
ultimately hopeful about the pro-
spects for progress at the summit
and for world peace and
freedom."
NO MATTER what the out-
come of the talks in Reykjavik, the
President assured the country
that "The implications of these
talks (in Iceland) are enormous
. We proposed the most sweep-
ing and generous arms control
proposal in history. We offered
the complete elimination of all
ballistic missiles Soviet and
American from the face of the
earth by 1996 ... We are closer
than ever before to agreements
that could lead to a safer world
without nuclear weapons."
In his explanations as to why he
trumped this glowing view of a
safer world future with his SDI
program, the President declared:
"SDI is America's insurance
policy that the Soviet Union would
keep the commitments made ..
SDI is the key to a world without
nuclear weapons."
On the issue of regional con-
flicts, the President said nothing
so far as Israel and the Middle
East generally are concerned, but
he observed that "Summit
meetings cannot make the
American people forget what
Soviet actions have meant for the
peoples of Afghanistan, Central
America, Africa and Southeast
Asia.
"Until Soviet policies change,
we will make sure that our friends
in these areas those who fight
for freedom and independence
will have the support they
need ."
Arbus Elected Prexy
NEW YORK (JTA) Isak
Arbus has been elected president
of the Holocaust Survivors
Association U.S.A. He succeeds
John Ranz, who will become ex-
ecutive secretary.
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;


Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Jews for Judaism Fears
Growing Missionizing in Israel
Dr. Abdel Majid a-Zir, the newly-appointed
58-year-old Mayor of Hebron, is congratulated
by well-wishers. Col. David Shahaf, Governor
of Hebron, looks on the left.
High Court To Decide
Are Jews Protected By Civil Rights?
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The U.S. Supreme Court
has agreed to decide
whether Jews are protected
by the U.S. civil rights laws.
No date has been set yet for
arguments on the case.
Opening its new term last week
(Oct. 6), the Supreme Court
agreed to hear the appeal of
Shaare Tefila Congregation, a
Conservative synagogue in the
Washington suburb of Silver Spr-
ing, Md that was defaced in
November, 1984 with anti-Semitic
epithets and Nazi symbols.
Eight men were charged in
criminal court, one of whom was
convicted of destroying property.
But the 500-members congrega-
tion filed for damages under two
federal ci%-il rights laws passed
after the Civil War to protect
blacks.
HOWEVER, last March the
Fcurth District Court of Appeals
in Richmond, Virginia, upheld a
ruling by a federal district court in
Maryland that the statutes did not
apply to Jews because they are
not members of a separate race.
The Supreme Court also agreed
to hear the case of an Iraqi-born
U.S. citizen who sued St. Francis
College in Loretto, Pa., charging
that he was denied tenure because
he is an Arab.
Irvin Shaped, president of the
Jewish Advocacy Center, said
Shaare Tefila originally brought
the suit "to send the clear and em-
phatic message that anti-Semitic
violence will not be tolerated and
that Jews will fight back to the
fullest extent of the law."
THE JEWISH Advocacy
Center, a nonprofit legal service
organization which represents
without charge victims of anti-
Semitic violence in civil damages
lawsuits, and the Washington law
firm of Hogan and Hartson are
representing the congregation in
the suit.
"Although the congregation
does not claim that Jews are a
separate race, it does argue that
Jews are entitled to protection if
acts of hate violence against them
IDF May Soon Face Crisis
With Career Military Personnel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Gen. Natan Vilnai, chief of
the Israel Defense Force
Manpower Division, has
warned that the IDF will
soon face a crisis with
respect to career military
personnel. In the past two
years, more regular soldiers
left the army for civilian life
than had been anticipated,
he said.
nff5i was one of several senior
'L>r officers who spoke at a con-
ference of the Kibbutz Altai
aelense group last week. Kibbutz
Artzi is affiliated with Mapam and
's encouraging its members to
consider enlisting in the armed
iTwt teth M a n*tional duty and
Kibbutz movement mission.
VILNAI SAID the IDF had
noped for a controlled drop-out"
rate after the withdrawal from
r*anon. "But in the end we lost
wntrol over who left and where.
* have lost the in-between
generation those aged 24-32 -
"* future Chiefs of Staff and the
wmmanders of tomorrow." he
He said that in many instances
order to keep military unita up
strength "we reconcile
ourselves to the fact that they are
commanded by less able persons."
He lauded the kibbutz movement
for its past efforts, adding that it
was "inconceivable that the kib-
butz movement would now say it
has problems of its own and
dissociates itself" from any
military service responsibility.
One kibbutz member suggested
that the movement must
recognize that "career-soldier" is
not a dirty word. The audience
also heard from Chief of Staff
Gen. Moahe Levy, who said the
two main problem facing the IDF
are military budget cuts and the
need to keep pace with rapidly ad-
vancing high technology, both of
which could affect IDF opera-
tional capabilities on a future bat-
tlefield. He said an increase in the
IDF's budget was unavoidable.
WITH RESPECT to the Lavi,
Israel's controversial second-
generation jet combat plane, Levy
said it would be the outstanding
aircraft of the Israel Air Force.
He said the nation was coping
with its design, development and
production. The Lavi, which is
financed largely with U.S. aid
funds, has run into difficulties
with the Pentagon over excessive
production costs.
Responding to questions. Levy
said reports of religious coercion
in the armed forces were grossly
exaggerated by the media.
are racially motivated," Shapell
said. "Courts should not decide
whether someone is entitled to
protection based on their racial
makeup, but rather based on the
nature of the attack against
them," he said.
"Many people and groups suffer
'racial' attacks even though they
are not considered a 'race.' Those
people and groups are entitled to
the same protection under federal
law given to others," Shapell
stated.
Continued from Page 1-A
100 "Hebrew Christians."
Midnight call Ministries,
which operates in Israel under the
name "Beth Shalom," is currently
building a hospital in Israel (the
Aliaa Begin Memorial Clinic), this
as part of its self-described mis-
sion of "winning precious souls
and leading them to Jesus
Christ."
"Hebrew Christian" mis-
sionary leader Morris Cerullo
boasts of having distributed
25,000 Hebrew copies of the New
Testament in Israel. Cerullo
recently led a 500-person mission
to Israel to announce that the end
of the world is near and that there
is little time left to accept Jesus.
Evangelist Jimmy Swaggart,
supported by First Assemblies of
God Church, has recently
established a full-time missionary
center in Jerusalem.
The International Christian
Embassy of Jerusalem, though
publicly disclaiming any mis-
sionary intent, serves as an um-
brella group for a number of overt
missionary groups in Israel, in-
cluding Bob Lindsay's Jerusalem
Baptist Church and the Voice of
Hope Radio.
From its base in West
Jerusalem, Bob Lindsay's
Jerusalem Baptist Church daily
peddles large numbers of Hebrew
language missionary materials,
sponsors a congregation which in-
cludes dozens of "Hebrew Chris-
tians" (including teens), and hosts
a local "Jews for Jesus" group.
In Lindsay's own words, "after
I succeed in getting through to all
these obtuse Jews, give me
another thousand years and I'll
make them missionaries to the
world."
COMMENTING ON these
items, Lawrence Levey, an at-
torney and director of Jews for
Judaism's East Coast branch, con-
cluded: "In its refusal to recognize
the seriousness of the missionary
threat, the Israeli Government is
failing to take the missionaries at
their own word.
"In published documents as ear-
ly as 1979, the United Christian
Council in Israel (an alliance of 20
Protestant groups) called for 'new
and meaningful efforts to reach all
Jews in Israel' with the New
Testament message and termed
these efforts a 'top priority' item.
As the Mormon situation has
made clear, the time is long over-
due for a concerted response."
Solender on Job
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Stephen Solender has begun work
as executive vice president of the
United Jewish Appeal-Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies of New
York. From 1970-81, his father,
Sanford, was executive vice presi-
dent of the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies of New York.
"In a single month our new hot water system
saves enough money to pay
for three months of outdoor lighting.
But it was FPL who told us about it"
And for good reason. FPL is encouraging everybody
to manage their energy efficiently because lowering
peak energy demand delays the need for new power
plants an expense everyone must share.
A heat-recovery water heating system takes
exhausted heat from your central air conditioning
system or heat pump and uses it to heat your water.
And it can cut your water heating costs up to 50%.
The best time to have it installed is when you get
a new air-conditioning system or when you service
your existing one.
lb encourage you to make this energy-saving
improvement, we'll even pay part of the cost. But first,
we'll send an energy specialist to your home to see if
a heat-recovery unit is right for you.
To find out how to qualify for a cash incentive
and to get more information on energy management,
call our 24-hour toll free number. 1-800-821-7700.

HOftO* POWVER 1>GM' COMP*Nv


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Jewish Leaders
Briefed in Capital by Shultz
Book Criticizes Deschenes Body,
Author Comes Under Fire
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State
George Shultz had stressed
on the eve of his departure
that human rights "would
get an important share of
attention during the
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev in Reyk-
javik, Iceland, last weekend.
The differences between the
United States mod the Soviet
Union are reflected "in our at-
titudes toward individual human
beings," Shultz said at a White
House briefing on the meeting. He
noted that some progress has
been made on the issue of divided
families.
"But there is a crying need for
more observance of freedom of
religion, more readiness to accept
the fact that people can be critical
without having to be thrown in
jail, and more readiness, if people
want to leave the country, to let
them leave," Shultz said.
WHILE SHULTZ did not
specifically mention the issue of
Soviet Jewry, he was expected to
discuss it in detail when he met
with the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ) at the State
Department last Wednesday,
(Oct. 8). Shultz also said that
regional issues would get a good
deal of attention, while bilateral
issues would only play a small
part. However, arms control, in
all its elements, would get a
"great deal of attention," he said.
President Reagan also stressed,
in a speech to business leaders last
Monday, (Oct. 6) that he would
press Gorbachev on human rights
violations and military interven-
tion in regional conflicts. Reagan
noted that Yuri Orlov, who arriv-
ed in the U.S. last Sunday (Oct. 5)
after being freed from exile in
Siberia, "was persecuted simply
because he led an effort to get the
Soviet government to live up to
the human rights agreements it
signed in Helsinki in 1975.
"When the Soviet state's
ideology makes it a crime to ad-
vocate living up to international
commitments, the rest of the
world has to take notice. And this
point, as well as the entire range
of Soviet human rights abuses,
must be addressed at future
summits."
THE REAGAN Administration
stressed that the meeting in
Iceland was not a summit but a
preliminary to Summit II in the
U.S. which Reagan and Gor-
bachev agreed upon at the first
summit in Geneva last year.
Shultz said that it is the Soviets
who have held up scheduling the
summit.
In discussing regional issues.
Shultz did not mention the Arab-
Israel conflict. The U.S. has ruled
out Soviet participation. But the
Secretary did mention
Afghanistan and the Iran-Iraq
2 Israeli Seamen
Elude Drug Charge
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israeli seamen arrested in Alexan-
dria eight months ago on drug
charges were acquitted and
released and elected to spend the
Rosh Haahanah holiday with local
Jewish families before returning
home to Haifa
Shlomo Peretz and Amram
Shlush, from Zim Lines' cargo
ship Camelia, were apprehended
after they allegedly purchased
hashish from an undercover agent
in an Alexandria bazaar. They ad-
mitted they were approached but
denied buying the drug.
war. On Afghanistan, the
Secretary said there have been
reports that the Soviets may move
troops out before the conference
in Iceland, but added he did not
think this would mean much, since
new other troops would be moved
in.
Shultz said the U.S. would like
the Soviets to join the U.S. effort
to end the Iran-Iraq war so that
there are no winners or losers.
The U.S. sees Iran as the
"recalcitrant party" and is trying
to stop the flow of arms to that
country, Shultz said.
"AN AWFUL lot of arms
comes from states with whom the
Soviet Union has, we think, great
influence," Shultz said. "So we
would like to see them use that in-
fluence" to curtail the sale of arms
to Iran.
Meanwhile, Reagan met with
Orlov at the White House last
Tuesday afternoon. This was
followed by a meeting of the
President with representatives of
human rights and religious rights
organizations.
Jewish representaives atten-
ding were Morris Abram, NCSJ
president and chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations;
Malcolm Hoenlein, executive
director of the Presidents Con-
ference; Jerry Goodman, the
NCSJ's executive director;
Shoahana Cardin, president of the
Council of Jewish Federations;
and Robert Blut, past president of
the United Jewish Appeal.
BLUT AND CARDIN are also
co-chairpersons of Campaign to
Summit II, the organized Jewish
community'8 effort to arouse
public awareness to the need to
stress the human rights issue at
the summit.
As part of this, a leadership
Assembly for Soviet Jewry was
held last Wednesday starting with
the meeting with Shultz at the
State Department. This was
followed by another meeting on
Capitol Hill and a prayer vigil at
Lafayette Park across from the
White House. The vigil was led by
a group of rabbis from across the
nation. Rabbi Milton Polin, presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Council of
America, led the vigil.
Continued from Page 7-A
testifying. To dismiss all Soviet
citizens as agents of the KGB is
not only a calumny against Rus-
sians in general but a veiled insult
to the Canadian courts.
Tolstoy assumes that Canadian
courts will automatically be duped
by the manufactured testimony
that will be offered by witnesses
to war crimes.
His lack of confidence in the
Canadian criminal justice system
betrays an ignorance of its sobrie-
ty and concern fo due process.
Defendants in any projected trials
would have ample opportunity
through their attorneys to
demonstrate the falseness of a
specific testimony.
The most offensive part of
Tolstoy's pamphlet is the author's
suggestion that people who are
the victims of evil sometimes in-
herit part of the evil. In this in-
stance, manifestations of the evil
many be seen in the attempt to
prosecute willy nilly suspected
war criminals without sound
evidence.
Tolstoy should be advised that
the six million Jews who perished
under Hitler and his collaborators
did not have an opportunity to in-
herit any evil from their execu-
tioners. It is the survivors who
cannot rest while those who
perpetrated odious crimes remain
free. They will not be deflected by
Tolstoy's elegant sophistries.
JTASermces
Anti-Crime
Laws Extended
MONTREAL (JTA) The
Genera] Assembly of the Interns
tional Civil Aviation Organization
(ICAO) approved by acclamation
last Thursday a Canadian pro-
posal to extend existing criminal
provisions against airplane hijack-
ing to acts of violence against air-
ports and air terminals.
The Canadian proposal is almost
identical to one formulated by
Israel and was strongly supported
by the Israeli delegation and many
other countries. It gives top
priority to preparation of a draft
instrument to apply criminal
penalties to airport attackers.
The ICAO's Legal Committee is
expected to have that draft ready
for approval before the Assembly
adjourns Friday.
FIFTEEN YEARS OF SUCCESS
AND LOOK WHAT WE'VE GOT
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At Highland Park Hospital, we have the finest medical
directors available anywhere, and we're proud of that.
From left to right, we would like to introduce you to
them: Dr. Barry Miller. Clinical Director of the Adult
Program; Dr. Ed Georgia, Medical Director of the
hospital; and Dr. Stephen Kahn, Clinical Director of
the Geriatric Program and the Recovery Center.
Highland Park Hospital is in the center of Miami's
medical community, located in the
heart of the Civic Center. Our
hospital has been serving the
South Florida area for over fifteen
years, successfully. We are a full
service psychiatric hospital serving
adolescents, adults, seniors and
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Highland Park Hospital is
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These highly acclaimed doctors as well as the
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1660 N.W 7th Court. Miami. FL 33156
324-8111


On Sukkoth
'You Shall Live in Booths 7 Days'
)

Continued from Pajre 1-A
dened and ripened are harvested
ind spread in the sun to dry. and
date honey is made by squeezing
out the thick, sweet juice.
WE ARE TOLD in the Book of
Seheniiah (8:14-17) that the
Biblical booths or tabernacles
were made from the branches of
wild olive, myrtle and palm. To-
day, e construct sukkot from a
variety <>f materials, but they
must be no taller or lower than 20
cubits (30 feet) to convey the
lesson that we should be neither
too proud nor too humble. The
roof must be covered with palm
fronds or some kind of greenery
through which it is possible to
glimpse the sky.
Sukkoth perpetuates the
precept that God is One forever.
and Judaism imparts this message
bj symbolism and ritual. In addi-
tion to dwelling in booths. Suk-
koth is one of the three Pilgrim
Festivals when we are command-
ed to come up to Jerusalem. We
are also commanded to rejoice
after the solemn days of awe in
fact, it is repeated three times:
"You shall rejoice before the Lord
\our When we attend the synagogue,
we lake with us the lulav and
etrog, the myrtle and the willow
- the four species. The palm
frond reminds us of our history,
when the Jews wandered in the
lesert. Willows grow close to the
River Jordan, which flows into the
Sea
When the Israelites crossed the
Jordan, under Joshuas leader-
ship, they were instructed to set
up 12 large stones from the Jor-
i memorial. It is likely that
\ere also told to select
a branches and to weave
them into the four species for the
Sukkoth festival.
French Wine,
Dine Peres
Continued from Page 1-A
roriat l>omb attacks in Paris dur-
ing the past month.
Peres and Chirac also discussed
bilateral relations and Middle
East problems. Chirac informed
Perea that he had raised the ques-
tion of Soviet Jews at his meeting
with Soviet Foreign Minister
Eduard Shevardnadze at the
I'nited Nations in New York
earlier this month. He promised to
continue pressing that issue "until
the Soviet Union's gates open"
for all Jews who want to leave.
BOTH MITTERRAND and
Chirac assured the Israeli leader
that France would never bow to
terrorist pressure and would
"punish" those who plant bombs
"and those who manipulate
them." They did not specify who
they suspect of supporting the ter-
rorists. Peres said Israel has
reliable information linking Syria.
Libya and Iran to the terrorist
gangs.
At a reception for him at the Na-
tional Assembly last Wednesday
night. Peres declared that to give
" to terrorist demands
"threatens not only France but
the entirecivilized world."
Peres submitted his resignation
to President Chaim Herzog in
Jerusalem last Friday morning
under terms of the Labor-Likud
rotation of power agreement.
Likud leader Yitzhak Shamir was
to take office as Prime Minister on
*t 14. the day after Yom
Kippur.
Lehat Stays On
TEL AVIV (JTA) Tel Aviv
ayor Shlomo Lehat resigned
"om leadership of the newly
founded Liberal Center Party but
"as not quit the party, though he
j*d it was a "disappointment" to
''
Erev Sukkoth it Friday even-
ing. First and second days of
the holiday are Saturday and
Sunday. Oct. 18 and 19.
THE MYRTLE has a delightful
fragrance and grows wild in the
woodlands of Galilee, and Jews
sanctify it as a symbol of peace
and brotherhood. The etrog, a
citrus fruit, symbolizes the beauty
of the fruit harvest and can be
picked at Sukkoth. Thus the four
species teach us about the terrain
of Israel and how the natural
elements form the basis of im-
agery in the bible and in ritual.
They connect the People of Israel
to the Land of Israel.
The Festival of Sukkoth ends
with Simhat Torah, the Rejoicing
of the Law. It is a joyous festival
whose agricultural nature is more
than ever relevant today when
Jews have returned to inhabit
Eretz Israel to sow and reap the
grain and fruit of the Land.
mm fiiiiiiiggati
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
More Nazi Records Found
WARSAW (JTA) Nearly 800 books from 54
registries of the former German district of Swidnica in
southwest Poland, containing records on the deaths of
prisoners murdered in the former Nazi Gross Rosen death
camp in the locality of Rogoznica, have been discovered,
the World Jewish Congress reported here.
THE RECORDS were believed to have been destroyed
by the Nazis during their retreat from the camp but were
recently found in the attic of a house in Swidnica currently
being converted to serve as a health center.
Specialists have begun examining the newly-discovered
Nazi documents. The analysts say the records are in-
complete, and the regional militia office in Swidnica has ap-
pealed to local inhabitants asking them to turn in any
documents in their possession.

*
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Same great taste
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A Lulav By Any Other Name Jewish Floridian
Would Smell As Sweet
Miami, Florida Friday, October 17,1986
Section B
By NORBERT WEINBERG
What do the phrase, "A
land flowing with milk and
honey," the Judge,
Deborah, and the Festival of
Sukkoth have in common?
The answer the date
palm. By ancient tradition,
the honey of the Bible is the
sweet, sticky juice of the
date; the Judge, Deborah,
sat under a date palm as
she presided over the affairs
of the people of Israel; and
during Sukkoth, the
Festival of Tabernacles, the
tender shoot of the date
tree, the lulav, is a major
feature in the religious
celebration.
"You shall take the fruit of the
goodly tree, fronds of the date
palm, the branch of the thick
DOUgh and the brook willow, and
you shall rejoice before the Lord.
your God. for seven days," is the
presentation (riven in the Biblical
tome o( Leviticus. Rabbinic tradi-
i<>n interpreted these words to in-
hcate that the worshipper was to
take together the citron fruit,
etrog, the heart of the date palm.
lulav, the myrtle branch, hadas.
and the brook willow, aravah.
During the daily services of the
festival, the worshipper is to hold
the four species, arba minim, and
wave them in all directions to in-
dicate the omnipresence of God
and also march in triumphal pro-
cession about the synagogue.
ALL FOUR of these plants are
cultivated at Neot Kedumim, the
Biblical Landscape Reserve in
Israel, which grows all the plant
life native to ancient Israel and
mentioned in the Bible. The
history of the usage of these
plants in religious celebration is
made clear in the section
designated as "Ascent of the Four
Species of Sukkoth."
Helen Frenkley, associate direc-
tor of Neot Kedumim, has been in-
volved with the reserve for the
past 17 years. She described the
horticultural aspect of the lulav:
"It is the heart of the date palm,
the embryonic frond. There are up
to three or four of these on a tree,
and each one eventually opens up
in the shape of the palm of a hand.
From this comes the plant's name
in English and its connotation in
Hebrew, kaf tamar. the palm of
the date.
The palm is a highly versatile
plant, yielding benefits in a great
variety of ways. From its leaves,
stems, and trunk crating and
packing materials are made, as
well as baskets, furniture and
rope fiber. Its fruit is a source of
syrup, alcohol, vinegar and liquor.
For the diet-conscious the sweet
date itaelf is one-half sugar. As for
the lulav, it too has a culinary
function as the tender heart of
palm used in salads and even in
pizza toppings.
CLASSIC JEWISH lore used
the date palm and its heart, the
lulav, as vehicles for conveying
values and thought. There are
moral, mystical and even roman-
tic lessons to be derived from this
plant.
The plant is reminiscent of the
human form. The Song of Songs
describes the ideal woman in
graphic terms as tall and well-
formed as the date palm (7:8-9); in
Psalms, the well-being of the
righteous man is compared to the
flourishing palm (92:13). The
tree's fronds recall the human
head, and thus Isaiah uses the
term kippah, derived from the
word for the frond, kaf in the
sense of a head, not a hat (9:13).
The lulav symbolizes the human
backbone, straight and upright
yet at the same time flexible; this
teaches that one should be upright
in behavior yet humble in spirit.
There is a Zionist aspect to the
palm tree. When the Hasmoneans
defeated the Seleucid tyrant, An-
tiochus, they struck their own
Continued on Page 6-B
Lulav s growing at Neot Kedumim, the Biblical Landscape
Reserve m Israel.
Arab League To Seek Suspension
Of Israel From Current UN Assembly
By YITZHAK RABI
L'NITED NATIONS (JTA) The Arab League will
request the suspension of Israel from the current 41st ses-
sion of the General Assembly when Israel's credentials
come up for approval in about one week.
DIPLOMATIC SOURCES here disclosed last Tuesday
that the Arab League has informed the UN Credentials
11 "mmittee that it will "oppose" Israel's credentials.
Israel's credentials were challenged by the Arabs repeated-
ly in recent years but without success.
In fact, diplomats here pointed out, Arab moves to sus-
pend Israel are losing ground steadily, with more and more
countries voting against the Arabs.
THREE ARAB countries Morocco, Oman and a
third unnamed one voted against the Arab League's
decision to press for Israel's suspension, sources here said.
Western and Israeli diplomats expressed confidence
that the Arab move to suspend Israel will be "defeated"
again, as in previous years.
Miami Beach
Arab Caller Foils Plans To Terrorize Synagogues
An anonymous Arab caller may have
helped frustrate plans by young Arab
students at an unidentified Miami university
to terrorize several Miami Beach synagogues
during their Yom Kippur services Sunday
evening and Monday.
The caller told police that the synagogues
were chosen because they would provide the
attackers with quick escape routes. He iden-
tified himself to the police as a "non-violent
Arab student" who said he overhead several
other Arab students plotting their attack.
MIAMI BEACH police spokesman Howard
Zeifman said that the anonymous caller
declared the attack would be a terrorist
assault without bombs, but nevertheless
designed to "harm people" inside the
temples.
Some 20 Miami Beach police officers were
instantly dispatched to stand 24-hour guard
at Beth Israel Congregation, 770 40th St.,
Temple Beth Sholom, 4144 Chase Ave.; and
Ohev Shalom Congregation, 7055 Bonita Dr.
The police wore bullet-proof vests and bran-
dished machine guns.
"I just feel the world has caught up with us,
and I'm not happy about it," declared Rabbi
Phineas Weberman of Ohel Shalom. He
reported that two Miami Beach officers had
come to him about 5:30 p.m., Sunday, and
told him about the threat and that from then
on until the end of Yom Kippur Monday there
would be heavy police patrols in the areas. He
was also told that S.W.A.T. team members
were also expected to join the guard duty.
"THEY WERE there at every entrance
with their machine guns pointing outward
and everything," said Rabbi Weberman.
"Some people were questioning why they
were carrying machine guns, and I told them
it was just extra precaution, and they felt bet-
ter about that."
At Temple Beth Sholom spiritual leader
Rabbi Gary Glickstein said that his congrega-
tion usually hires off-duty policemen for
security during the High Holy Days, but that
Beth Sholom would therefore hire several
more than usual.
Both the Rabbi and Zeifman explained that
police had decided to protect Beth Sholom
because of its proximity to the other two con-
gregations. Zeifman added that there were no
suspects in the case, and no local Arab
students had been questioned.
Arthur Teitelbaum, southern area director
of the Florida Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, said that Dade County
ragogues had received similar threats over
years, and although "there is no reason to
press the panic button," Jewish leaders must
take all threats seriously.
"These kinds of threats are not uncommon.
They are easy to make," according to
Teitelbaum. "This is testimony to the fact
that even where terrorism does not occur, the
threat of terrorism can have its own serious
consequences, and we are grateful to the
Miami Beach police for the way they handled
this incident.'
Demonstration Held In Support Of
Pardons For Jewish Underground Members
2a (left) and Lisa Klinghoffer pay a recent visit to the Leon and
Marilyn Klinghoffer Memorial Forest established near
Jerusalem in memory of their parents by the Jewish National
J und.The 10,OOO-tree forest serves as a tribute to Leon Klinghof-
aI -Tr08* orutai ***rder by terrorists aboard the cruise ship
Achiiu Lauro catapulted him to international attention, as well
t0 courageously fighting terrorism. The forest is located in the
American Independence Park, dedicated durinq the U.S.
K centennial
by JNF.
reclamation in Israel.
during
responsible for affbrmtaHo*
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
estimated 6,000 Gush Emunim
members and supporters marched
through Jerusalem streets last
week to demonstrate outside
Chief Rabbinate headquarters
demanding Presidential pardons
for Jewish underground members
currently serving p'oon
sentences for violent mes
against Arabs in the W<- | .ink.
'an" ilemonstration. organized
by the Gush Emunim, was sup-
ported by Rabbi Meir Kahane's
extremist anti-Arab Kach Party
and members of the rightwing
Tehiya Party. Virtually all of the
demonstrators wore skull caps
signifying membership in or sym-
pathy with the Orthodox Gush
Emunim.
Spokespersons said the con-
victed men were not terrorists but
had acted in self-defense, an argil
rtient that carried little weight at
their trials. President Chaim Her-
zog was reported in the media
recently to have suspended con-
sideration of amnesty for the con-
victed terrorists.
A spokesperson for the Presi-
dent refused to confirm or deny
the reports. He noted, however,
that Herzog has made it clear on
many occasions that he would not
deal with amnesty request.- under
pressure from ai.. luarter


Page 2-B Tte Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Remembering the Hungry
On Yom Kippur
Temple Samu-El/Or Olbm Adult
Education Program Begins
LOS ANGELES (JTA)
Last August, Theodore
Mann of Philadelphia and
Leonard Fein of Boston
sent a letter to 5,000 rabbis
all over the United States
Reform, Reconstructionist,
Conservative and Orthodox
urging them on Yom Kip-
pur, to remind their con-
gregants of the one billion
people all over the world
"whose every day is a day of
hunger."
They hoped that the day of
fasting, the holiest day on the
Jewish calendar, would be used as
the occasion to launch Mazon, "a
Jewish response to hunger," in
synagogues around the country.
Mann, who is president of the
American Jewish Congress, and
Fein, editor of Moment, are the
chairman and founding board
member, respectively, of Mazon. a
Los Angeles-based group less
than a year old.
ITS SOLE purpose is to put in-
to concrete action an age-old
Jewish tradition of succoring the
hungry. Its approach is modern.
Mazon asks American Jews to put
a voluntary surcharge of three
percent on celebrations such as
weddings. Bar and Bat Mitzvahs,
birthdays and anniversaries and
give the money to the hungry,
through Mazon, to non-sectarian
programs that feed poor people or
work toward eliminating hunger.
According to Irving Cramer, ex-
ecutive director of Mazon, this
program gives contemporary
meaning to Isaiah, 58:10 "If
you offer your compassion to the
hungry and satisfy the famished
creature/Then shall your light
shine in darkness/And your gloom
shall be like noonday."
"The whole proposition is about
Jewish tradition," Cramer said.
"It's Jewish tradition that you
don't have a simcha of any kind
without having the poor. We
begin the Passover Seder by say-
ing, 'Let all who are hungry enter
and eat.' Today we do that behind
locked doors."
MANN AND FEIN urged the
rabbis to remind their con-
gregants on the Day of Atone-
ment that "There are two fasts
happening on this Yom Kippur
Day. There is our fast of cleansing
and repentance, our fast of
return. At day's end, our fast will
end, and we will resume our daily
affairs, our work and our play, our
eating and drinking, our loving
and laughing.
"And there is another fast, a
fast that did not begin last night
and will not end with tonight's
setting of the sun. It is the in-
voluntary fast of a billion one
billion people across this God's
earth, a billion men and women,
and God help us all. children,
whose every day is a day of
hunger."
According to Cramer. "The rab-
bi plays a significant role in
Mazon, acting as a middleman,
both encouraging the congrega-
tion as a whole to participate and
then advising and reminding
families during the planning of a
celebration."
RABBI Harold Schulweis of
Los Angeles, another founding
board member of Mazon, noted.
"When you live in a middle and
upper-middle class society and
don't see the poor, you begin to
think they don't exist. That's a
sad part of economic segregation.
It's why a synagogue has to have a
window. You're supposed to look
outside the sanctuary and see how
people are living so you can pray
and realize what those prayers
signify."
Mazon made its first grants last
June, small ones ranging from
$1,250 to $10,000 to secular
Jewish and Christian programs all
over the country They were little
more than "symbolic," Cramer
said, because there was little time
to solicit. He hoped that next
time, there will be more money for
the purpose.
Fein and Cramer stressed that
it is not the intent of Mazon to in-
still guilt among the fortunate.
They say they are speaking of a
tradition which sees wealth as a
blessing that ought to be shared.
And they think three percent will
be shared.
"Three percent is large enough
to be meaningful, but small
enough not to intrude." Fein said.
"If you talk of more you've got a
selling job. Three percent sells
itself and many donors have sent
more, he said.
THE FOUNDERS of Mazon
have calculated that Jews in
North America spend a minimum
of $500 million a year on simchas.
three percent of which is $15
million. But they think their goal
of $4- $6 million a year for the
hungry is a realistic amount that
would "help a lot of people." Fein
said.
The Fall session of The Adult
Education Program of Temple
Samu-El/Or Olom begins Tues-
day. The six-week program will be
offered both on Tuesday evenings
and Thursday mornings. Thurs-
day classes will run from 7:45 p.m.
to 8:45 and from 8:45 to 9:45.
Thursday morning sessions are
Bible Study
Group Begins Year Of Study
The Hug Tanach. the intensive
Bible study group of Miami Beach,
will begin its new year on Mon-
day, Oct. 27, with the prophetical
book of Hose* as the subject mat-
ter for its fall semester.
Meeting weekly at Temple Beth
Raphael. Miami Beach, from
9:30-11 a.m., the group, which
conducts its sessions in Hebrew,
probes the profound meanings
and insights of the Biblical text.
Leader of the class is Rabbi
Jehuda Melber. spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Raphael and Biblical
scholar. Rabbi Melber received his
PhD from Yeahiva Univeraity, has
authored two books on Jewish
philosophy, and received the Ben
Gurion Award for outstanding
service to the State of Israel.
The Hug Tanach. which has
been in existence for more than
three decades, is cooperatively
sponsored by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and the
Moadon Ivri, the Hebrew speak-
ing club of the community..
BB Chapter 645 To
Hold Book Review
The next meeting of the North
Shore Chapter No. 645 of the
B'nai B'rith will be at 1 p.m. Mon-
day at the Surfside Community
Center. Lillian Golden is in
charge.
Mary Brand of the Riverside
Speakers Bureau will give the
review of Herman Wouk's novel,
"Inside, Outside." Ms. Brand is a
librarian, and critic.
Dr. Jehuda Melber
Its
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The class offerings, open to the
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TEMPLE SHIR AMI
Celebrates
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Rabbi Biett S. Goldstein
Hoshana Rabbah services
Friday evening, October 24th
at 8 P.M.
9200 S.W. 107th Avenue
Completion date for new building: JANUARY, 1967


Unholy Gathering
At A Holy Site
Hershel Shanks is editor of
Biblical Archaeology Review in
Washington, D.C.
By HERSHEL SHANKS
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Although it is already old news in
the Arab papers, it has not receiv-
ed coverage in the Jewish press.
This year the four-day Moslem
observance of Eid-al-Adha fell on
Aug. 16-19, marking the end of
Ramadan, the 30-day period when
the Moslem faithful fast from
sunrise to sunset.
The festival of Eid-al-Adha is
the time of the haj, the pilgrimage
to Mecca which every Moslem is
enjoined to make at least once in
his lifetime, circumstances
permitting
ACCORDING TO the Saudi
Gazette, 856,718 Moslem pilgrims
from 119 countries converged for
the haj on Mecca, the holiest of ho-
ly sites, and the proceedings went
without a hitch.
The most important ritual of the
haj is the supplication of the
faithful on the Plain of Arafat,
where the Prophet himself
delivered his last sermon.
Temperatures reached 113
degrees Fahrenheit; ambulances
roamed the area to care for
sunstroke victims.
The pilgrims' descent to the
Plain of Arafat from the height of
Mina was supervised by King
Fahd himself. In the words of the
Saudi Gazette, this was to "ensure
that everything is running the
perfect way."
The principal sermon of the
festival was delivered by Sheikh
Abdul Aziz Bin Abdallah Al-
Sheikh from the Al-Nimrah Mos-
que in the Plain of Arafat. The
proceedings were broadcast live
in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman
and elsewhere. They were also
translated into English, French,
Urdu, Persian, Indonesian,
Somali, Turkish and other
languages.
THE SHEIKH urged the
devout, who, according to the
Saudi Gazette listened with "rapt
attention," to adhere to the Koran
and to fear God. "The fear of God
by man will have positive effects
during his lifetime and
hereafter."
"Enemies rose up against the
Prophet's (Mohammed's) call, but
God made him triumph," the
Sheikh's sermon continued.
The Jews are the "enemies" of
Moslem unity, the faithful were
told. The Jews "always attempt to
divide the Muslim people and their
united world, so that they can
dominate them."
"The animosity of the Jews
against this religion and its
followers will continue till the
Doomsday." according to the
Sheikh. But, he added, there is a
purpose to the struggle: "The
Almighty created the conflict bet-
ween the right and wrong to
purify the faith of the believer."
Calif. Mandates Retailers Of Kosher
Meat To Keep Records
By TAMAR KAUFMAN
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) -
Gov. (ieorge Deukmejian last
month signed a bill designed to
protect consumers from possible
kosher food fraud.
Sponsored by state Sen.
Herschel Rosenthal (D.. Los
Angeles), the bill requires anyone
selling kosher meat or poultry in
the counties of Alameda, Orange.
Santa Clara, San Diego and San
Francisco to keep records through
July 1. 1988.
The law extends a pilot program
that was initiated by state
Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D.,
L.A.) for Los Angeles County.
The records will enable inspec-
tors to substantiate sellers'
kashrut claims by proving where
products originated and what
became of them.
The bill also appropriates
$100,000 for the California
Department of Food and
: r hon
islerl l Edna
'' "
NOW OPEN
Agriculture to carry out the pro-
gram, primarily, according to an
aide in Rosenthal's Sacramento
office, by providing for inspectors
in the affected counties.
Michael J. Scharfwill be guest
of honor at Boys Town
Jerusalem's International
Dinner of Tribute on Nov. 4 at
the New York Hilton Hotel.
Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg will
be keynote speaker, and
Israel's Ambassador to the
United States Meir Rosenne
will be special guest.
Israel Histadrut
Campaign Appoints
Executive Director
The Israel Histadrut campaign
of South Florida announces the
appointment of Elliott H.
Engelbaum as executive director.
Engelbaum has had extensive
background in fundraising,
marketing and public relations.
Engelbaum comes to the Israel
Histadrut campaign from the
American Friends of Hebrew
University's office in New York
where he served as assistant na-
tional director of campaign ser-
vices for six years.
The Israel Histadrut campaign
is launching its 1986-87 campaign
with a luncheon on Nov. 9, at the
Konover Hotel in memory of its
former director, Irving Gordon.
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Israel Bonds Names Krongold
Miami Campaign Chairman
M. Ronald Krongold has been
named general campaign chair-
man of the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization for the
1986-87 drive by Brig. Gen. (Res.)
Yehudah Halevy, president and
chief executive officer of the State
of Israel Bonds national office. A
partner in the law firm of
Krongold and Bass, Krongold has
long been associated with Israel
Bonds, both locally and nationally.
Krongold replaces Philip T.
Warren, who served as general
campaign chairman for the past
two years.
A resident of Miami, Krongold
has served in many capacities for
the Israel Bonds Organization, in-
cluding New Leadership Division
chairman, national campaign vice
chairman and associate chairman
of the Miami campaign.
In his capacity as national New
Leadership chairman, he was
responsible for expanding the
division's campaign into 22 new
communities throughout the
United States and Canada. The
New Leadership Division is com-
prised of young professionals who
have pledged support for Israel's
development and economic
growth through the purchase of
Israel Bonds.
Among the various civic awards
Krongold has received are the
prestigious Israel Peace Medal,
the David Ben-Gurion Award and
the City of Peace Award.
In his capacity as general chair-
man, Krongold has pledged to in-
crease the sale of Israel Bonds so
that the funds committed may be
used to improve the economic
development of Isrel in the fields
of manufacturing, agriculture and
high-tech industries. "Israel's
strength and qualitative edge is a
necessary condition for maintain-
ing stability and encouraging an
environment for peace in the
Ron Krongold
region," Krongold said.
In addition to his association
with Israel Bonds, Krongold has
been active in numerous other
organizations, including Ben-
Gurion University, Florida Con-
gressional Committee, Long
Range Planning Committee of
Jewish Federation, board of direc-
tors for South Dade Federation
B'nai B'rith, the South Dade
Jewish Community Center, the
Israel Chamber of Commerce, the
Israel Young Commerce Division
and on the board of directors of
Capital for Israel.
A member of the Florida Bar,
he is a past member of the Con-
struction Law Committee and has
been a lecturer for the Miami
Board of Realtors and for the
University of Miami in Real Pro-
perty Law.
GO STIR CRAZY
Edna
Gallery
I
The art ol Edna Mibel
lor a lifetime o/ beauty'
311 Roy
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Hours 10 AM
-
Make a dekoous oriental shr fried dish in a snap AH it takes is one of the
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GSc^
SHANGHAI BEEF
Combine W teaspoon ginger 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 minced garlic dove in a bowl Slice
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skillet or wok add beet and saute until lightly brown Remove seasoning pouch from 1 pack
age (10 oz I BIRDS EYE- Stir-Fry Vegetables' any variety Add vegetables to skillet Stir
reduce heat Cover and simmer 3 minutes stirring once Sprinkle contents ot seasoning
pouch over vegetables Combine cup water and i teaspoon comstarch pour into skillet
Cook and stir about 1 minute until thickened Makes about 3 cups or 3 servings Serve with
nee it desired
to use BIRDS fvf "farm fresh Mulures CauMiowei BaDy Whole Carrol-, jnc ms or
Bioccoli RedPeppers Bamboo Shoots and Slia* Mushrooms Prepare 'coped'. fltrei \rC. II
nq packet using pactaqe i? cupsi eqelat)i MMigOyMUCHO2UMespoons
I9S Goti foods Cootxtucr


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridiart/Fnday, October 17, 1986
Jewish Voters Urged
To Consider Not
Only Israel Issue


By BEN GALLOB
American Jews, while maintain-
ing their vigorous support for
Israel in judging political can-
didates, should ascertain the
views of the candidates on a wide
range of general issues that
should concern them as Jews and
as Americans.
That advice was contained in an
editorial in the Reconstructionist,
the official organ of the
Reconstructionist movement. The
editorial's premise was that
because American Jews live in an
environment "in which there is no
shortage of politicians who are
responsive to Israel's needs," it
should be axiomatic that "Jewish
interest could be better served if
we were to highlight the priority
of other issues that affect our
future."
The editorial posed two ques-
tions for American Jews as par-
ticipants in the American political
process, particularly as voters:
"How wise is it to expend our
political influence on the single
issue of support for Israel? Are
there no other causes that deserve
our support as Jews?"
THE EDITORIAL declared
there was nothing mysterious
"boot why so much Jewish
energy and money is devoted to
political action committees
(PACS) that contribute to cam-
paigns solely on the basis of can-
didates' records on Israel."
"All studies show that support
for and identification with Israel
constitutes the central core of
Jewish identity," the editorial
explained.
But the editorial warned "there
are dangers" in Jews supporting
candidates on the basis of "Israel-
related issues alone." Much
money is apparently going "to
support candidates with good
records on Israel but whose agen-
das on such issues as church-state
separation, disarmament and
social welfare are distant from the
views of most American Jews."
These incumbents are sup-
ported by Jewish voters even if
the challengers have equally good
credentials regarding Israel and
are closer on other issues to Jews'
domestic interests. This happens,
the editorial declared, "because
only Israel is considered."
THE EDITORIAL scoffed at
any implication that the
Reconstructionist movement, in
this context, was suggesting that
Jews should ignore a candidate's
record on Israel, and give their
support to a candidate "who votes
against Israel aid packages but
has s good record on other
issues."
However, the editorial added.
Jews do not want "to be identified
exclusively with Israel, as was evi-
dent in our discomfort in June
when President Reagan called
Jews in to ask for their support
for the Saudi arms sale."
The editorial reported that the
Shalom Center, housed at the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
Seminary, has made plans for s
project seeking to get 1986 can-
didates to address the "critical
issue" of arms control. The
editorial reported also that the
United Synagogue of America,
the central agency for Conser-
vative congregations, has planned
a national day of education about
all nuclear
Pops, Sunday
"South Points Pops" will br-
ing music fans popular musk at
South Point* Park in Miami Beach
on Sunday, Oct 19 at 7 p.m. Jill
Zalis is volunteer organiser of the
Asserting that "arms control is
a Jewish issue related to other
Jewish issues," the editorial warn-
ed Jews "not to be misled by those
who claim that we would oppose
arms control until Moscow
allows" much greater emigration
by Soviet Jews.
"As Jews, we should be con-
cerned not only about the survival
of our people, but of our species as
well," the editorial added.
"Moreover, we should not forget
that it was in the days of detente
that the Soviet Jewish exodus
occurred."
The editorial declared that,
similarly, "we are concerned
about the growing influence of the
Christian right. No matter how
supportive that may be of Israel,
we ignore at our own peril their
positions on abortion rights,
school prayer, birth control
counseling, the Christianization of
American values, nuclear arms
and a host of other issues."
JTA Services
Welcoming Israel Finance Minister Afoshe
Nissim and his wife. Ruth, (center) to south
Florida for their first visit were South Dade
New Leadership Division members, from left
to right: Fay Frankel, Ina Felsher and Gail
and Marshall Burack. South Dade New
Leadership is a division of the Greater Miami
Israel Bonds Organization comprised of
young professionals who have pledged support
for Israel s development and economic growth
throgh the purchase of Israel bonds.

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Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
I
Irene and Norman Sholk
Florida Couple To Receive
JTS Service Award
Irene and Norman Sholk of
Miami will receive the Jewish
Theological Seminary's National
('(immunity Service Award on
Nov. 9 at the Seminary's Florida
Convocation and Awards
Ceremony at Temple Emanu-El in
Miami Beach. The event is being
held in celebration of the
Seminary's Centennial year.
The National Community Ser-
vice Award is presented by the
Seminary on special occasions to
outstanding individuals. The reci-
pients range widely in the fields of
their interests and the scope of
their activities. Their single com-
mon denominator is devotion to
Judaism and commitment to
widening its influence for the
good of all mankind.
OTHER FLORIDIANS being
honored by the Seminary on Nov.
9 will be Louis Stein, Doctor of
Laws, honoris cauaa; Con-
gressman Dante B. Faacell, the
Herbert H. Lehman Ethica Medal;
Judge Herbert S. Shapiro, the Na-
tional Community Service Award;
and Phyllis Harte, the New
Generations Award.
Irene Sholk is a past president
of Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism. Florida Branch.
She is former chairman of
Florida's Torah Fund -
Residence Halls Campaign and
former president of Beth David
Sisterhood.
She is a member of the Board of
Directors of Bet Shira Congrega-
tion and Sisterhood, on the Na-
tional Cabinet of Torah Fund
Residence Halls Campaign, and is
a member of the National
Women's Patron's Society.
Norman Sholk is a past presi-
dent of Beth David Synagogue
and its Men's Club. Currently, he
is director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the Jewish
Home for the Aged, and the South
Dade Jewish Federation. He is
regional chairman of the Jewish
Theological Seminary's
Chancellor's Council and
secretary of the Hillel Foundation
of Florida.
The Jewish Theological
Seminary of America was founded
in New York City in 1886 to train
rabbinical students in the United
States and is today the academic
and spiritual center of Conser-
vative Judaism throughout the
world.
It maintains five schools of
academic study at both
undergraduate and graduate
levels on campuses in New York
City, Los Angeles and Jerusalem,
training leading scholars in
Jewish studies, educating
teachers and others who serve in
communal agencies, and prepar-
ing Conservative rabbis and
cantors.
No Sign Of Sunken Sub
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel and the U.S. announced
'hat a month-long search for the
missing Israeli submarine Dakar
in Egyptian coastal waters failed
to find any trace of the undersea
craft and has been called off.
The search was financed by
Israel from U.S. aid funds and
was approved by Egypt after
lengthy negotiations. It began on
*ept 4 and was abandoned on
[Jet. 4. Although the Egyptians
had allowed 70 days for the under-
ling, the U.S. Navy, with
Israel's concurrence, decided
there was no point to continue.
The Dakar, a British-build sub
fnarine of World War II vintage,
was purchased by the Israel Navy
in 1967 and was on her delivery
voyage to Haifa with an Israeli
crew of 69 when she disappeared
somewhere in the eastern
Mediterranean. The vessel was
last heard from on January 25,
1968.
Shlomo Erell, who commanded
the Israel Navy at the time, said
that the search was a mistake
which needlessly raised the hopes
of families of the crew members
that bodies could be recovered if
the Dakar was found.
In fact, a team of Israeli
chaplains stood by during the
search to be available in such an
event. Erell also expressed doubt
that the submarine was lost in the
search area.
Na'amat
Women
A musicale and a discussion of
Sukkot will be on tap at the Mon-
day, noon meeting of the Kinneret
Chapter of Na'amat USA to be
held in the social hall of Temple
Ner Tamid.
Leah Benson, former national
board member and current vice
president of membership will talk
about the joyous holiday of Suk-
kot, of which the American holi-
day of Thanksgiving is patterned.
She will say that Sukkot is the oc-
casion for the consecration of the
Temple built by Solomon. Benson
will include in her remarks the im-
portance of being a member of
Na'amat.
Rose Gordon, well-known
singer, will be accompanied by
pianist Helen Skolnik during the
musical portion of the program.
Rita Adoff. president, said
refreshments will be served and
the public is invited.
Rabbis Congratulate Wiesel
The Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has issued a state-
ment congratulating Dr. Elie Wiesel upon being chosen to be the
recipient of the Nobel Peace Prise. The statement was issued in
the name of the Association by its President, Rabbi Carl Klein of
the Hallandale Jewish Center and its Executive Vice President,
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director of Chaplaincy, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The statement reads:
"The Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami congratulates
Dr. Elie Wiesel for the outstanding honor of being selected to be
the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prise. This prominent award
recognizes the outstanding work of Dr. Wiesel in a wide area of
efforts focusing on human values. Among such efforts include re-
counting the horrors of the Holocaust, the fight for the rights of
Soviet Jewry and for all manner of human right*.
"Dr. Wiesel has been serving as a fearless champion in pro-
dding the conscience of society to the evils of intolerance and
bigotry. He has been sounding a clear clarion call reminding
mankind of the evils that contributed to the Holocaust the most
bestial crime committed in mankind's history.
This high honor will give a more global platform to Dr. Wiesel's
efforts and, hopefully, will inspire a universal condemnation of
this kind of crime and a resolution to learn to live in mutual
respect and harmony."

Young Leadership Conference Of Na'amat USA
Council To
Build Sukkah
A "Sukkah raising" will be
held at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation by members of its
Young Leadership Council (YLC)
- on Thursday. Oct. 16.
This celebration of the holiday
of Sukkot is being sponsored by
the Program and Education Com-
mittee of the YLCV It is part of
their "Holiday Leam-ins" series.
The program. "Sukkot, The Feast
of the Tabernacles," will feature
guest speaker. Rabbi Edwin
Farber. The evening will include,
6:30-7:30 p.m. Sukkah decorating,
after which the rabbi will conduct
the "Learn-in" concerning the
holiday.
To Be Held At Konover
Third Biennial Conference of
the Southeast Area of Na'amat
USA will be held Oct. 29 and 30 at
the Konover Hotel in Miami
Beach, area coordinator Gert
Aaron of Hallandale announced.
Lillian Elkin of New York City,
national vice president of pro-
gram and education, will serve as
"scholar-in residence" for the
two-day conference. Also taking
part will be Harriet Green of
Miami Beach and Coral Gables,
national vice president of capital
funds and development.
A new Na'amat motion picture,
"The Future Is Now," will be
premiered at the session which
will bring together leaders of the
Women's Labor Zionist Organiza-
tion of America from throughout
the Southeastern United States.
A Na'amat fashion show,
featuring clothes designed and
made by students at Na'amat
vocational training high schools in
Israel, also will be presented.
Participants in the conference
will include Israel Consul General
Yehoshua Trigor, who will be
honored by Na'amat USA on the
eve of his departure for Israel
after more than four years of ser-
vice in Florida. Others who will
take part in panel discussions and
special presentations include
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud.
reporting on his own missions to
Israel earlier this year and next
spring, and Gerald Schwartz, na-
tional vice president of the
American Zionist Federation.
When you're not quite ready
to go home... we can help.
The Miami Jewish Home &
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens now offers the finest
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featuring:
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individual therapy;
kosher meals and the full
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Page 6-B The Jewish noricuan/Friday, October 17, 1986
A Lulav By Any Other Name
Would Smell As Sweet
Ceatiaaed fro* Page 1-B
coinage with tne palm tree on the
face. On the other hand, several
centuries later, when the Romans
destroyed the Second Com
monwealth, they minted their own
commemorative coin emblasoned
with the image of a weeping
woman under a palm tree and the
motto Jadea Capta. Two millennia
later, the Jewish people are once
again free to cultivate their own
palms and wave the lulav branch
in the spirit of freedom and
independence.
THE MORAL lessons to be
derived from the plant are varied.
Why did Jewish law define the
words "fronds of the date palm"
to mean specifically the closed.
young shoot and not the fully
opened branch? The sage Abaya
explained, "Her ways are ways of
pleasantness and all her paths are
peace." The fully developed palm
branch is bulky and sharp and in
the hands of a crowd of worship-
pers it can be a cause of injury
The teachings of Judaism are for
the purpose of pleasantness and
peace and for that reason the
softer, less cumbersome young
shoot is used. (Talmud Sukkah
32a).
A rehgious command can be car-
ried out only if free from any taint
of crime against one's fellow
Thus in Jewish law a stolen lulav
is unfit for use; otherwise, it
would consist of doing evil in
order to do good. Judaism as a
civiliranon enhances life rather
than reveres death. Therefore a
dried out lulav is unit for use.
because, as the Psalmist exclaims,
"The dead can not praise God."
(115:18).
From the perspective of Jewish
mysticism, every object in this
material world is a reflection of a
higher, purer form in the realm of
the spirit. Every human action is
echoed in the heavenly spheres.
The great mystic code, the Zohar.
interprets the lulav in light of this
cosmic interplay.
EACH OF the four species used
during Sukkoth is associated with
one of the Seftroth. the emana-
tions of the Divine. The lulav is a
reflection of the emanation of
Yesod, the Foundation, the male
aspect of the Divinity which in-
teracts with the feminine aspect.
Shekkinak, to bring life and vitali-
Zionist Youths Protest
Budget Cuts
ty into the material world. When
the mystic worshipper waves the
lulav in the course of his obser-
vance, the very universe waves
with him.
There is even a romantic aspect
to the lulav. According to Rab-
binic lore, palm trees are very
emotional and loving plants. A
tale is told of a lonely and forlorn
female palm tree in Tiberias which
pined for a male rooted in Jericho.
She was distrught because of the
great distance between the two of
them and refused to bear fruit un-
til the pollen of her lover in
Jericho was brought to her. (Gen.
R. 41:1).
There is a moral for all in the
use of the four species of Sukkoth.
generically tabled lulav in
tradition.
Each of the four plants typifies
a human quality. The etrog is both
edible and fragant, like the learn-
ed Jew who has content and who
carries out good deeds to benefit
all. The lulav is edible but not
fragrant, like the Jew who is
learned but does nothing with his
knowledge for anyone else's
beneift. The myrtle has fragrance
but no taste, like the ignoramus
who tries, nevertheless, to do
well. The willow possesses neither
fragrance nor smell, like the Jew
who knows ho good and does no
good.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud adds his name to the massive
facsimile petition at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation to
show his support for the kick-off of the petition drive which asks
President Reagan to make the issue of human rights for Soviet
Jews a high priority item. The petition drive is being coordinated
by the South Florida Conferece on Soviet Jewry, an arm of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Community Relations
Committee.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Young
Zionists involved in aliya activities
in the United States are pro-
testing what they claim are sharp
budget cuts by the World Zionist
Organization in Israel for their
programs. The young Zionists
contend that these cuts directly
affect the activities of their youth
movements and the future of
aliya.
They made this point by holding
a demonstration here in the lobby
of the Jewish Agency/WZO-
American Section headquarters.
About 25 youths representing
Hashomer Hatzair. Habonim-
Dror. Netzer (Reform Zionist
Youth). Hashachar (Young
Judea). Massada. B'nai Akiva and
Betar participated in the
demonstration.
ACCORDING to Mark Raider,
secretary-general of Habonim-
Dror. who was one of the
organizers of the protest, "During
the past year, the youth
movements have absorbed budget
cuts of up to 40 percent," He said
that as a result of the cuts. "The
Va'adah L'idud Garinei Aliya
(committee to sponsor settlement
groups going on aliya) was
eradicated."
Raider said that as a result of
the austerity measures, the youth
movements also face "direct com-
petition for their leadership train-
ing programs from a WZO-funded
year program for youth in Israel."
He charged that the budget
reductions "instituted without the
previous knowledge of the
movements involved, took effect
retroactively, leaving the groups
without funding promised to them
and already allocated. Without
this money, the movements can-
not run educational seminars and
other activities for youth, or sub-
sidize summer camps to make
them affordable for all Jewish
children."
CONTINUING. Raider said: if
the WZO cannot support the
Zionist movements that have been
the vanguard of aliya since the
State's establishment, then it has
lost its legitimacy as an institu-
tion." He said that the annual
budget normally allocated to the
youth movements is "negligible."
amounting to about $100,000.
Bernice Tannenbaum. chairper-
son of the WZO-American Sec-
tion, said that she is for restoring
the original budget for the Zionist
youth movements.
She said she had cabled Leon
Dulzin. chairperson of the WZO
Executive, to draw his attention
t< the fact that "the state of the
Zionist youth movements is
precarious." She said she told
Dulzin that the budget cuts "put
in jeopardy the viability of the
youth movements" and that,
therefore, their budget must be
restored "immediately."
Tannenbaum added: "The
American Section of the WZO is
deeply concerned because it
regards our Zionist youth
movements and their programs
for aliya. the hightest form of
Zionist activity."
Free Screenings Highlight
Cancer Awareness Day
A Cancer Awareness Day is be-
ing afjj by Cedars Medical
Center a* part of its 25th anniver-
sary utilities for the community.
Scheduled for Saturday. Oct.
25. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. in the
new Radiation Oncology Depart
ment. Cancer Awareness Day will
feature free screenings for oral,
skin, testjcular and breast cancer.
Cancer Awareness Day will
serve as the grand opening of the
; segment of Cedars' cancer
(Med Keren PaSSeS The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and the American Committee of the Weiz-
mann Institute of Science held a tax seminar entitled. "The 1986
Tax Law: Investment Strategies for Individuals. The seminar.
held at the Biscayne Bay Marriott was attended by over 200 peo-
ple. Pictured (left to rxght) are Barry Nelson, Charles Goat,
Robert Farrell and Martin Kalb. chairman of the Foundation for
Jewish Philanthropies.
Oded Keren, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Israel Keren, was killed in
sn accident last Thursday
evening.
Mr. Israel Keren is regional
manager of El Al Israel Airlines.
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is trie Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo Lush landscaping.
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism This tradition is continued in the Gardens.
Mount Nebo s latest expansion.
the $3.5 million Radia
oon Oncology Department. TTus
15.000-square-foot area now pro-
vides the space and technology to
treat up to 100 patients a day.
Cedars was the first hospital in
Dade County to he designated a
community cancer center by the
American College of Surgeons
Commission on Cancer. The
cancer program was established
in 1980 to meet the growing needs
of cancer patients in South
Florida.
SPECIAL PRE-OPENINC PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT:
281-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 nw 3rd street. Miami. FL 33126


Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B

COMMUNITY CQRNFR Israeli Troops Detain Dozens Of Gazans

Temple Samu-EI/Or Olom is holding a Toy and Book
Fair for young people from 4 to 12 years old. It will take
place Nov. 16 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The public is
invited.
Girt Bossak's "Sounds of Yiddish: The Jewish Con-
nection" class enters its seventh year. Sessions take
place every Tuesday, 1:30 to 2:30 pm. at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center. For Beginner and In-
termediate students, vocabulary, folk-ways and beliefs
Jewish culture, folk songs and personal experiences'
in Yiddish and English, are all taught and practiced. Ac-
cording to Susan Lepow, South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center Senior Adult director.
Temple Samu-EI-Or Olom will hold a Torah Thon and
Sukkot celebration on Sunday at 6 p.m. Join the special
march of the Sifray Torah from Or Olom to their new
home in Temple Samu-EI-Or Olom. A march from the
Hammocks Junior High School to the sanctuary with
the Torahs ... special service as they bring them to the
Ark .. singing and dancing ... refreshments in the
Sukkah. March will start at Hammocks Junior High
located at 9889 Hammocks Blvd.
The Forward
Hangs On
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
Two generations ago, The For-
ward was the major daily source
of news and advice to the Yiddish-
speaking Jewish immigrants to
the United States, as well as a
welcome link to the culture they
left behind.
Now the newspaper's circula-
tion has slipped from a high of
220.000 to 25.000; its five floors of
offices have been reduced to two
rooms here in New York; and the
paper is no longer published solely
in Yiddish or even daily, as the
English section comprises half of
the new weekly Forward.
Despite these changes, the small
and aging staff fills the cramped
newspaper offices with dedication
and optimism. "The atmosphere is
what you make it," said Simon
Weber, the 75-year-old editor.
from behind a desk cluttered with
letters and articles written in Yid-
dish. His shelves overflow with
Jewish-related books, many of
which he plans to donate to
libraries, and the floor holds
stacks waiting for display.
WEBER JOINED The For
ward staff 54 years ago as a cor-
respondent in Detroit. He moved
to New York from 1936-37. and
briefly to Philadelphia, where he
edited The Jewish World
newspaper.
Weber vividly recalls the hey-
day of The Forward, when a staff
of more than 50 occupied a base-
ment pressroom, a ground floor
office for business administration,
a manager's office on the third
floor, a ninth floor editorial
department, and a tenth floor
composing room.
The Forward was founded on
April 22. 1897 as a socialist paper,
appealing to a liberal, democratic
audience. According to Weber,
who has been editor for 16 years,
readership began to diminish as
early as 1924. when immigration
quotas imposed by the United
Mates discriminated against East
European Jews, and the number
of Yiddish-speaking Jews began
to decline.
"Germany and Great Britain
were given the strictest quotas,"
Weber explained. "Jews didn't
emigrate, and the Yiddish-
speaking generation died. There
was no increase in circulation and
no active readership." The paper
has struggled to hang on for
|decades.
Recently, several key changes
m format were instituted, all
lender the direction of Harold
ustroff, general manager of the
Per for 10 years. A weekly
-Wish section was added five
years ago. when the paper was
still a daily. The next year. The
Forward switched to weekly fre-
quency and tabloid size.
Despite this new audience,
financial report for The Forwa
is bleak. "It costs SI million-ana
a-half a year to publish The For-
ward," Ostroff said, and the an-
nual deficit hovers at around
$250.000-$300,000. The paper is
nourished financially primarily
through fund-raising. Some
groups supporting the Labor-
oriented paper are the Workmen's
Circle, the Labor Zionist Alliance,
and Jewish federations. Some in-
come is derived from ownership of
Radio Station WEVD in New
York.
YET DON'T expect any other
major changes. "The Forward will
always be primarily a Yiddish
paper." Ostroff insisted, because
he believes "the Yiddish language
will never be on its last legs.
There will always be a recurrent,
returning of interest in Yiddish."
He noted a revival of Yiddish in
America and Israel.
Weber shares Ostroffs op-
timism for the paper and the
language. In fact, he has stayed at
the paper because he feels an
obligation both to The Forward
and himself to "not retire and sit
down to wait for death."
His resilience is carried over in-
to the newspaper. "Nothing dies
among Jews," he said. "The paper
will survive me."
He subscribes to author Isaac
Bashevis Singer's appraisal of
Yiddish. According to Weber,
Singer said, "Yiddish is sick. Jews
are accustomed to sickness.
Sickness is not always fateful."
THE ENGLISH and Yiddish
sections are physically separate,
but similar. Editorials, written by
Weber, are translated into
English, and there is some cross-
translation of other articles.
According to Ostroff, 63, who
came to The Forward from his job
in cooperative housing, the
English section has been well-
received. "Readers can share the
paper with their children," he
said. Readership, he noted, is a
mixed bag. "There are some in the
older group reading the Yiddish
and an increasingly new reader-
ship because of the regular
English," he explained.
Over Recent Fatal Stabbing
By HUGH ORGEL
And GIL SEDAN
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israeli soldiers, combing
Gaza for clues to the knife
murder of Ashkelon taxi
driver Yisrael Kitaro, have
detained dozens of suspects
for questioning. Three men
were found in possession of
knives of the type that may
have been used in the slay-
ing, security sources report.
The sources said pressure on
Gaza residents will continue.
Sources see a link between the
stabbing of Kitaro in a Gaza
garage and the fatal stabbing on
Sept. 27 of another Israeli from
Ashkelon. Haim Azran. who was
assaulted in the Gaza fruit market
not far from where Kitaro was
attacked.
INVESTIGATORS now believe
several persons may have been in-
volved rather than a lone killer.
But they think the attacks were a
local initiative, not connected to
outside terrorist gangs. Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who
visited the scene of the crime,
noted that the attackers wielded
knives, not the more sophisticated
weapons often used by terrorists.
Nine Israelis have been attack-
ed with knives in the streets of
Gaza over the past 18 months.
Most were in town for shopping or
to have their cars serviced at
prices much lower than in Israel.
But except for the ever-present
soldiers. Israelis were notable by
their absence in Gaza.
A senior Army officer said it
was the declared policy to en-
courage Israelis to visit the city.
However, he added, they should
visit "using their head." His ad-
vice was not to walk around alone,
to be armed and to avoid any
situations in which an attack could
take place.
ONE BORED shopkeeper in
the marketplace told a reporter:
"This murder hasn't done us any
good. It's not good for commerce,
it's not good for the people who
work here, it doesn't do our cause
any service." But another local
merchant said: "Don't worry.
They (the Israelis) will be back in a
day or two. Nothing beats the dai-
ly routine."
Mahmoud Jaber, an Israeli Arab
from Abu Gush village on the out-
skirts of Jerusalem, said he did
not fear driving around Gaza in a
truck with Israeli licence plates
and would continue to come as
usual.
Only a few months ago, an Arab
neighbor was taken for an Israeli
Jew and stabbed to death in Gaza.
But Jaber is a fatalist. "When you
are destined to die, you will die
wherever you are," he said.
MEANWHILE. Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, addressing a
memorial meeting for the 1,200
Israeli paratroopers who died in
Israel's wars, denounced "the
cowardly terrorist knife-wielders
who attack their victims from am-
bush or with a stab in the back, on-
ly because they are Jews."
He said "Their beastly and
brutal actions are doomed to
failure. The hand of Arab ter-
rorism has always been broken
against our steadfastness."

Diabetes Research Institute President Henry Keller, Jr. holds a
check for $80,000 presented by the Suburban League to the
Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami School of
Medicine. The presentation was made by League President Bar-
bra Berman at the group s New Member Luncheon.
Video Professionals Unlimited!
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REASONABLE PRICES 674-1515
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National Officr: 2<* (ommonwcillh Avtnuc Suite I0I Boston. MMMChUMttl <>2I li (6I7) 267-nnM>
ATTENTION FEDERAL EMPLOYEES
Because of a 'Catch-22' in the regulations governing the COMBINED FEDERAL
CAMPAIGN, you may not see the American Jewish World Service listed In the literature of your
local campaign Though we are fully certified by the Office of Personnel Management to
participate in this year's campaign, some CFCs have elected to use only the names of agencies
receiving contributions in last year's campaign AJWS was founded only one and one-half years
ago and therefore did not participate last year
In these campaigns, you must write-in our name to contribute to our international
programs.
Other local campaigns have elected to use the current listing of all charities certified for this
year Our name will appear on their list and you need only designate funds to us.
We are the only Jewish organization certified by OPM In the international service section of
the campaign AJWS was established in May of 1986 by leaders of the American Jewish
community to be an international relief and development organization benefiting people in
Africa. Asia and Latin America regardless of race, religion, or color Our community self help
development projects concentrate on small scale agriculture and primary health care in such
countries as the Philippines. Sri Lanka and Mozambique Disaster relief and recovery programs
in Mexico and Colombia help families rebuild their bves and communities
Israeb technical assistance in semi-and zone agriculture has become a major offering of
AJWS programs in the developing countries
Your assistance is greatly needed to support our projects and to assure that we are fully
listed in next year's campaign IF WE DO NOT APPEAR ON YOUR CFC LIST, PLEASE LIST US AS
YOUR WRITE-IN CHOICE IF WE DO APPEAR. PLEASE DESIGNATE FUNDS TO US.
All contributions are tax deductible Literature on our programs may be requested from
our national office
Shalom.
for the Board of Trustees
Hy man Bookbinder
American Jewish Committee
Warren Blaenberg
B'nai B'nth
label Joseph B. Olaser
Central Conference of
American Rabbis
Babbl Wolfe Kelmaa
The Rabbinical Assembly
OratnMUona :iuad for toanuhctlion only
Philip M. Klutmlck
President Emeritus
World Jewish Congress
Kabbl Benjamin S. Kreltman
United Synagogue of America
Hat nan Perlmntter
A nti Defamation League of
B'nai B'nth
Lawrence 8. Phillips
Philhps-Van Heusen
Corporation
Henry Blefnan
American Jewish Congress
Babbl Marc Tananbann
American Jewish Committee
Albert Vorapan
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations


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Celebrate 55th Anniversary
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Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
You've got what It takes.
Share the spirit. Share the refreshment


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Rep. Lawrence Smith Chairs Congregation's
Cocktail Party For ARMDI
Cong. Lawrence J. Smith,
Democrat, 16th District, is chair-
man of the Cocktail Buffet plann-
ed by The American Mag-en David
for Israel, Southeast Region, for a
select group of community
leaders. Cong. Dante B. Fascell,
featured guest speaker, will
discuss Magen David Adorn.
Israel's Red Cross.
The buffet will take place at
Hamilton on the Bay, Miami, on
Thursday, Oct. 30 at 6 p.m. Cong.
Smith announced his committee
will include, Lawrence J. Aber-
man, Joseph Alon, Hon. Elaine
Bloom Seymour Brief, Jack Burs-
tein, Sidney Cooperman, Jerry
Kamine, Murray Kaye and Mila
Levy.
Also, Hon. Gwen Margolis, Hon.
Claude Pepper. Elaine Pittel. Dr.
Robert Pittel, Michael Reinhard.
Hon. E. Clay Shaw, Pepe Sueiras,
Shari Sueiras, Dr. Joel M. Wilentz
and Lawrence D. Winson.
Cong. Smith, having served as
Florida State Representative
since 1982, currently serves on
the Foreign Affairs and Judiciary
committees, and is Vice President
of the Southeast Region of
ARMDI.
"This cocktail party," com-
ments ARMDI Regional Presi-
dent Murray Kaye. "represents a
new departure for the Southeast
Region. Since we have officially
become a region in July, this
cocktail party is our way of
acknowledging our community
leaders' assistance with gratitude
and appreciation."
Federation Women's Division
Community Education Day Set
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division
will hold its annual community
education day on Thursday, Oct.
30 from 9:30 am. to 2:30 p.m. at
the Fontainebleau-Hilton in
Miami Beach.
Federation's Women's Day will
be highlighted by a keynote ad-
dress by Ms. Magazine editor Let-
ty Cottin Pogebrin. and presenta-
tions by attorney and author John
Loftus, and author and lecturer on
Judaism and contemporary socie-
ty, Dennis Prager.
For 10 years. Pogrebin wrote a
regular column entitled "The
Working Woman" for the Ladies
Home Journal. She is con-
tributing author to numerous an-
thologies, including the Emmy
Award-winning television pro-
gram Free to Be, You and Me.
John Loftus, a Boston attorney,
is author of The Belarus Secret, a
history of the Nazi smuggling pro-
gram in America. After the book
was declassified by the CIA, "60
Minutes" televised .a half-hour
special segment on the Nazi con-
nection based on The Belarus
Secret. The book eventually
became a television movie.
Loftus coordinated a top secret
investigation into Nazi recruit-
ment by United States in-
telligence agencies while working
for the United States Office of
Special Investigations.
Dennis Prager is internationally
noted for his writings and lectures
on contemporary society and on
Judaism. A social and political
commentator, Prager has his own
daily radio program, "Religion on
the Line," on KABC Radio in Los
Angeles. He is author of two ma-
jor books, The Nine Questions
People Ask About Judaism, and
Why the Jews' The Reason for
Antisemitism.
Helen Berne and Lenore Elias
are co-chairwomen of Federation
Women's Day; Terry Drucker is
Women's Division vice president
for Community Education; and
Dorothy Podhurst is Women's
Division president.
PERSONALS
ARE YOU SINGLE? Per-
sonal Ads get response!
Cost is $10.00 for up to 30
words. To place your spe-
cial singles ad send $10.00
and copy of ad to: The
Jewish Floridian. Singles
Column, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Florida 33101.
I WANT TO meet a woman
in the 70's. I am 36 years
on the Beach. I have a nice
con. apartment. I am 5 feet
4 inches. Phone 538-0709.
DJW FEMALE, AGE 42,
5'4", Very attractive,
caring, sharing and
thoughtful blonde, blue-
eyed Streisand lookalike.
Wishes to share rest of
life with one wonderful
man. Loves travel and
local events. Box BLS c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, miami, Fla. 33101.
A NEW ARMDI chapter
needs members who are
single and would like to
meet different people. The
ARMDI Singles Chapter, a
vibrant exciting group of
singles in their 40's and
50 s interested in the
welfare of Israel and in
humanitarian causes is
planning a variety of pro-
grams, activities and
events. A festive sukoh
party at the Harbour House
South, Tuesday, October
21, 8 p.m., with dancing
and light refreshments. A
Travelogue to Israel with
slides, plus a surprise
speaker on November 19.
A weekend cruise to
Nassau and a private
Island. The M/S Sunward.
December 12-15 (Friday
through Monday). A latke
party with music and
dancing on December 28.
Please call Sidney
Gerstein at 932-7679 for
additional information
and/or reservations.
HAPPENINGS IS HAVING
a HORROR-I-FIC HALLOW-
EEN PARTY on FRIDAY.
OCTOBER 31, 1986 from
5:30 p.m. on, at the Hyatt
Regency Miami (Currents
Lounge), 400 S.E. 2nd Ave.,
Miami, Florida. This party
is FREE and Everyone Is
Welcome. There will be a
Live Dance Band, Compli-
mentary Hors D'oeuvres,
Halloween Games and
Costume Contests, Trick
Or Treat Bags. Special
Prizes and Surprises. For
more information call
Sharon Silver 385-1255.
Survival
In Doubt
By MAURITS KOPUIT
London Chronicle Syndicate
AMSTERDAM There
are doubts whether the
Sephardi community in
Holland, together with the
historic Portuguese
Synagogue in Amsterdam
which dates from 1675, can
survive as a separate entity.
A number of factors have
contributed to this situation.
First in 1981, Rabbi Barend
Drukarch resigned; then his suc-
cessor. Rabbi Shimon Haliwa.
returned to Gibraltar after a quar-
rel; the Rev. S. Nunes Nabarro.
the reader, went on sick leave and
retired; Mr. G. Lange, the
secretary, went on sick leave; and
the caretaker of the Beth Haim
cemetery also retired.
Now. with the recent departure
of Salo Vaz Diaz, the shammas,
for Israel, it is left to volunteers to
conduct services in the synagogue
and conduct funerals. About six
men are experts in Sephardi
ritual.
FRIDAY NIGHT services were
discontinued some time ago
because of a lack of interet, and
the congregation on Sabbath mor-
nings is mostly made up of
tourists.
There are some 4.000 Sephar-
dim and Jews of Oriental origin in
Holland. Many of them came to
Holland from Israel, but they are
not attracted to the long-
established Portuguese Jewish
congregation.
One reason is the annual tax
return on which they are required
to state their income. This was not
usual in Morocco, Iraq and the
other countries from which the
vast majority originated.
The Portuguese Jewish con-
gregation musters only 400
members, many of whom are
Ashkenazim married to Sephardi
partners. They contribute about
$50,000 a year in taxes, but the
expenditure is much bigger, with
a large proportion spent on
security.
Some years ago, the manage-
ment decided to shut the
synagogue because the govern-
ment refused to contribute to the
security costs. With the resump-
tion of Sabbath morning services,
policemen in a patrol car keep
watch in the road outside the
front door of the synagogue dur-
ing the service.
THE SYNAGOGUE manage
ment had been hoping to appoint a
reader-teacher to revive religious
activities, but apparently no one is
available in Holland and, after a
one-year search, no one has been
found abroad either for the post.
The Portuguese congregation is
the oldest Jewish community in
Holland, dating from the end of
the 16th Century with the settle-
ment of Marranos in the country.
Menasseh Ben Israel, who peti-
tioned Oliver Cromwell in 1665 to
allow the resettlement of Jews in
England, came later.
Workmen's Circle
692 Celebrates
60th Anniversary
The Workmen's Circle an-
nounces the 60th Anniversary of
Branch 692 of Miami Beach.
Branch 692 was the original
branch of Workmen's Circle in
South Florida. Together with its
affiliate, Branch 28, the members
and friends of Branch 692 will
celebrate at a luncheon at the
Seville Hotel, Miami Beach at
noon, Oct. 26. Harry Schuldiner is
in charge. I
Synagogue
Listing
Candlel ighting Time
6:32 p.m.
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Cantons Drive
North Miami Beach 9471435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedmen
Cantor Ian AJpwn Conservative
Sal INinitlXpm
Daily earrieee 7 30 am 4 30 p m
Fre Succoth F.l 30 p m
TEMPLE BETH AM
9B60 N. Kendall Or.
S Miami 9*7 eM7
Or. Herbert atoumgerd
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
F'l HI HSpm
M. Beumaard will epoat an
andOleeewr The
l.iofl Bat.
Security am
ff Brian
N...O-
Barry J. Konovttch. Rabbi /?.,
Moehe Buryn. Cantor [ V/
Sergio Qrobter. President "*
Sholem Epeebaum. President.
Religious Committee
t
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving Lehrman Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Ma.well Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Otrector
. *f*oirrta8at.*J0B.m.
J *""I,J" **9 a>nnan
mm preach both momlnga Canto Yehuda
SMIman will chant.
Choi M.moao Succot Monday Friday. Oet J4
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
S32-B421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiti
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911
Jack Rtonter, Rabbi
Robert Albert. ("M*.
Cantor *JeV
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
mmchah Set i p m
Suaaot Sal. timll p.m
Sun Bam a I 15 p m
Daily aerv.. Sunlial S 30p m
Man. a Thure 1 30 am 4 5 30 p m
Tuee.. Wad. | Fri Ml a.m. a S 30 pm
BCTH KODCSH ,-2-N
Conservative {&)
m,*s. .sbS*
it Joseph Krtoool
arbn: Executive Secretary
rEMPLE BETH MOSME
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 331B1
Bfl1-SS08 Coneervatrve
Or. leraol Jeoobe. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A Qorflnkel. /*
Rabbi Emerttua
Moehe Frtodtor. Cantor
(D
Swccoth Fri. ( p.m. Sal. I s a.m. 4 p.m
Sunday 4:46 am 4 p m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
15*5 Jefferson Ave MB FL 3313*
Tel. S3B-4112
Rabbi Or tohuda MqBjoi
CaMei Niaaim Bonvamini
Detty aervteee 4 a-m. and 7 pm
let Sett am
BET SMIRA CONGREGATION
75O0S.W 120th Street
23*2*01 ,J.
RabM DevM H. Auerbech \W)
Cantor Stephen Freedman "*
Suaaot lerWoee Fit 4 M> Sat. 9*9 aje.
Bar Mtavah Landan MNoa Niger Sun. ft at aja.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 53*7231
ChaeeAve 41etSt
DM LION KMONISM, Fpeaaamg Sa
oanv a aucKSTfjM. .
MAAP.Y JOLT, BUr. Kami
FAUIO CAPLAN AaeieloM
CANTOR DAVID CONVtSIB
Suaaot UK Family amreMp Fri. 7 30 a.m
fiLfiS *S ***** "**"! Jueamm
Studanta mm participate m Hobday e~
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or Mai A Lipschiti. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dotty Servtoee: Man Fn r.30 a.m. S&'<
4530pm *yr.
SuhkotFrtajOpm
Sal 4 Sun (Mam
TEMPLE ISRAEL-----------------------------
01 Greater Miami
ABaaw'a moneei Rttorm Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex 0. Perimeter
Cantor. Racheite F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Director ol Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
4 p.m
Downtown: Rabbi Bemet "Shebbel Succot
liturgy Canloi Noiaon
xandali Rabbi Penmowi Shebbel Succol
liturgy Heney Kaulman Children aia
encouraged to bring canned gooda 4 boie* et
dry geada tor ttkt naady Ktoduah arili ba
__________hew in tha Succah
TEMPLE JUDEA
SftOOGVened
Coral Qabaea 997 5*57
B. EManatet.Rabbi
Ere? Sueaet p m SukkM j., ,0 ,
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534 9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoahanah Raab. Cantor
Servtcee Fn 30 p m
Sat. ftje am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Ati Frldkls. Aaaoc. Rabbi i
Cantor Murray Yavnoh \
Sat 4 am. Sabbath eervtce
Daily MlwaKah Sunday Fnda,
am and4pm
Sal *am and 5 IS p.m
s>
TEMPLE NERTAMIO
7902 Certyte Ave
33141
MUMS
Canearniiw
Cantor
Eugwne LaboviU
r Edward
aerdKieen
:f)
Dotty larvteaa 4 am and MS p-m
Sal li- Fri. wteaon4ce*pn
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
oi North Miami Beech
971 Northoest 172nd St
North Miami Beech
661 15*2
Yeaaov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
392-0*399
RabM Herahel Becker Moawn oihoao.
Sat KM a.m. aeratce ai
T ample Samu-tl
a^aulwIUAea..
S ol N Kendall 0.
TEMPLE SINAI 19*01 NE 22 Ave
North Oede'S Rotorm Congregat-an
Ralph P K.ngatey Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabb>
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Adminiat'*to<
Sukkot Fri 4 p m Sal 10 30 m
Ser MtU.etl Juaiin Ban*.
Sat Mnave* Braeft Ban*
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTEH
9000 Miller Or Conservative
2712311 ,^-
Or NormenN Shapiro. Rabbi ^ )
Benjamin Adler Cantor "**
David Roaenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
nca
7 am Monday 4 Thuredey
___day 4 a.m.. Fri. fttS p.m
Sat 4a.m. laMatti Sarvtoa
Teltwr Chaeei.


Lebanon War Film
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Admired By Critics As Well As Israeli Military Personnel
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
TORONTO In the spr-
ing of 1985, while the Israeli
army was pulling out of
Lebanon after an arduous
three-year occupation, Eli
Cohen was making a move
that eventually would cause
a sensation in israel.
Cohen, an experienced film-
maker with a solid reputation, was
producing a picture for the army
that would be used to stimulate
discussion on the behavior of
soldiers under constant stress.
The resulting movie, Ricochets,
has played to packed houses in
Israel, drawn raves at the Cannes
film festival and was screened at
the recent Festival of Festivals
here.
There was good reason for the
army to finance such a film. In
southern Lebanon, Israel was
engaged in a defensive war of at-
trition, an increasingly vicious
guerrilla war against Shiite and
Palestinian fighters, an unpopular
war in which Israel took daily
casualties.
COHEN, who had done a
number of straight documentaries
on Lebanon for the army's film
unit, wasn't thinking of making
yet another documentary that
would only focus on the military
dimensions of the conflict, but a
feature that would treat its human
aspects.
"It would have been very hard
to do that in a conventional
documentary," explained Cohen
in an interview.
Cohen's idea fascinated the ar-
my, and he was given permission
to conduct research. He and a
psycholgist friend spent a week
with an infantry unit in southern
Lebanon, gathering material
about soldiers' experiences.
Cohen returned to his home in Tel
Aviv with a bulging notebook,
satisfied he had a workable idea.
After presenting the army with
an outline, Cohen began to
develop a script. It took the IDF
about two months to approve the
project. "I thought they'd give me
conditional approval," Cohen
said.
COHEN AND his crew shot
Ricochets in 24 days in the spring
of 1985, some four miles from the
Israeli border, on a $100,000
budget. Cohen. 45. used profes-
sional and amateur Jewish and
Arab actors. He had no real trou-
ble finding Jews to fill the roles,
simply using actors doing their an-
nual reserve duty. But recruiting
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Young Leadership
Council held its Fall Gala at the Sonesta Beach Hotel. Over 700
young Jewish business and professional men and women from
throughout the community attended, each pledging a minimum
gift of St 5 to the 1986 UJA Campaign. Pictured here (from left to
right) are Ian Kaplan, Fall Gala Event Co-Chairman; Arden
Magoon, YLC Singles Committee Vice Chairman; Sanford Freed-
man, YLC Singles Committee Chairman; and Tracey Dubin,
Fall Gala Event Co-Chairman.
Three Soviet Jews,
Seeking Treatment For
Cancer In The West
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Three Soviet Jews seeking treat-
ment for cancer in the West have
received or will receive exit visas
for the purpose, it was reported at
a meeting of the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews at the Westin
Hotel here Monday.
The information came from
Jewish sources in the USSR and
has not been confirmed by the
U.S. Administration or in any
other quarters. Also unconfirmed
is speculation that the visas may
be part of a deal between the U.S.
and Soviet Union which resulted
in the release of Nicholas Daniloff,
the Moscow correspondent of U.S.
News and World Report who was
arrested last month on charges of
spying for the U.S. Daniloff flew
to Frankfurt, West Germany,
Monday.
The persons seeking visas are
two couples, Benjamin and Tanye
Bogomolny and Naum and Inna
Meiman. and Benjamin Charney
Lhamey, Tanye Bogomotoy and
inna Meiman have been diagnoeed
to have cancer. Benjamin
Bogomolny and Naum Meiman
would accompany their spouses.
Sources at the Soviet Jewry
meeting here said there was no
:lear relationship between the
jromised visas and the Daniloff
;ase. The visas may have been
granted in response to appeals by
Western physicians on behalf of
.he cancer victims, according to
Glenn Richter, national coor-
dinator of the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry, who is attending
the meeting.
It was learned, meanwhile, that
another Soviet Jew, Semyon
Borozinsky of Leningrad, has
been sentenced to five months'
forced labor for refusing to testify
at the trial earlier this year of
Jewish activist Vladimir Lifshitz
who was sentenced to three years
at a labor camp.
Director Named
LONG BEACH, Canf. (JTA)
Sandi Goldstein has become ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Long
Beach and West Orange County.
Arabs was no easy task. Some
believed that Cohen was making
an Israeli propaganda film and
refused to take part. Those who
harbored no such suspicions pro-
bably participated out of curiosity,
Cohen thinks.
A veteran of several wars,
Cohen said his crew was never in
danger during shooting. But, he
added, they worked under a
"heavy, menacing" atmosphere.
As he puts it: "There were two
sorts of fear. One, fear for our
lives. Next, for the production .
We were an attractive target for
attack. We had to take all the
necessary precautions, and we
worked as a military unit for all in-
tents and purposes."
According to Cohen, shooting
took place under the tremendous
time pressure, as the IDF was
preparing for its final withdrawal
as Ricochets was filmed.
RICOCHETS WAS shown to
groups of soldiers, enlisted men
and officers, who were uniformly
impressed by its authenticity.
Cohen reported that, "The
soldiers said: "The film is true to
life. That's just the way it was out
there. None of the problems are
glossed over. We would like our
parents and friends to see the
film. All those who weren't in
Lebanon should see the picture
and then they'll understand just
what we experienced there.' "
Ricochets, whose cumbersome
Hebrew title was Shtay Etzbaot
mTzidon (Two Fingers from
Sidon), deals with the grind of war
by focusing on the men in one
company. There are no Rambo-
like heroes here, only simple,
frightened, tense, tender, funny
humans who want to leave
Lebanon with their lives and their
limbs intact.
In the autumn of 1985, Cohen
showed Ricochets to Chief of Staff
Gen. Moshe Levy and a group of
senior officers. After the last
credit flashed across the screen,
Levy sat in the theater quietly for
a couple of minutes, and Cohen
wondered what Levy was think-
ing. Finally, Levy spoke: "For the
army, yes. For outside distribu-
tion, I have to think about it."
In the weeks that followed,
members of the general staff saw
Ricochets and, in general, liked it.
A few grumbled, but Levy gave
Cohen permission to take
Ricochets to Cannes, where it was
acclaimed as a serious, non-
propagandistic film.
COHEN, who personally oppos-
ed Israel's 1982 invasion of
Lebanon, said Ricochets gives the
IDF a "very positive image."
Shimon Peres, the former Prime
Minister, raved about it. "Peres
pronounced it the best Israeli film
he had ever seen," Cohen
reported.
Cohen acknowledged that
Ricochets would have "stirred up
a lot of criticism" had it been
released two or three years ago,
at the height of Israel's military
involvement in Lebanon. "Today,
even members of the Likud admit
that mistakes were made in
Lebanon."
Nevertheless, Ricochets has
come under criticism from the ex-
treme right and left. Rightists
claim the film maligns the IDF,
while leftists say it fails to address
the underlying causes of the war.
It was never Cohen's intention
to deal with the political problems
raised by Israel's invasion and oc-
cupation. There is a scene, toward
the end, when an Israeli armored
personnel carrier gets stuck in the
mud. Some observers have singled
it out as a metaphor of Israel's
misguided invasion, but Cohen
begs to differ. "It was a factual,
dramatic scene, but also a reflec-
tion of the soldiers' desire to get
out of Lebanon."
COHEN, the son of Russian
Jews who arrived in Palestine in
the 1920s, does not stand to earn a
penny from Ricochets. "The com-
mercial benefits will go to the
distributor and the army," he
said.
But Cohen, whose previous
documentaries have been on the
Jewish communities of Ethiopia,
France and Argentina, is hardly
sorry. Immensely pleased with its
success, Cohen said that
Ricochets has burnished his
reputation and made it
theoretically possible for him to go
on to bigger and greater things.
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Paov Ift-R TV*. .leoHK v\,^Aii\?.t.... r.
Page 12-B The Jewish FloridiM/Friday, October 17, 1986
Ethel Bernstein, Mother
Of Rep. Elaine Bloom
Ethel Bernstein, a 12 year Surf-
aide resident active in Jewish af-
fairs and the mother of State Rep.
Elaine Bloom, died Saturday after
complications from a stroke.
Bernstein, 80, and her late hus-
band Julius, came to Miami in
1962 from New York, where she
waa active in the United Jewish
Appeal, the Conservative
Synagogue of Riverdale, the
League of Women Voters and the
Brandeia group of Hadaaaah.
In Miami she served with the
National Council of Jewish
Women, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and Beth
Torah Congregation.
In addition to Bloom and her
husband, Dade Circuit Court
Judge Phihp Bloom, Mrs. Berns-
tein is survived by her son and
daughter-in-law, Hirshel and
Gloria Bernstein, of Bellmore,
New York; four grandchildren.
Anne and David Bloom, and Mar
na and Neil Bernstein, and several
nieces and nephews.
Obituaries
Ethel Bernstein
Services were held at the
Blasberg Funeral Chapel. Miami
Beach.

)&&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5605 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
%
Weekly &8ues
-NotJwtNowwdThM!--
SCHUHAM ,
Dsyid. 91, hnw 80-year r^^ent of Coral
Gables, Fla. and member of Temple Betn
Am. Bora in Chieeeo. m. October 5, 1&.
Mr. Schuham apent hi. boyhood in Douglas.
Mica. where he iii hi. Wjm***%
with th Dutcher Masonic Looe No 193, of
Douglas He was m*m***fFZ
|3E of Grmnd Rapid. Briored father of
daughter. lri end eon-in-law. Atunij A.
Budd CuUar, with whom he reeided. and
Michell. EtaHotnn, of Tucson, Am.; loving
rr.ndf.ther of Beta* (Dr. Carl 8.)
Schreiber. Gten Core. NY, Attorney. ><
frey H. Cutter, of Coconut Grore, Jo. S.
Hokin, Miami. Jeanne (Jam-) Dutton, Tue-
aon. Jama. (Heddi) EtaHokin. OYergeard.
Am.. Jody (Jaaa.) Otreer. BOtajham
Waah. and devoted greatgrandfather of
eight Survivor, alao inchida hia dear eister
laabaUa Stawibarr Doottaa, Mich, wd
brother., Sidney fcretenen) and Kenneth
(Pamela) Schuham. of Dougia. and Chicago
aa wall a. numerous beloved niece, and
nephew. Mr. Schuha paaaad away
jjaaaMb in 'P hom* m K*?T
onlu. 91t birthday Throufhout hu bfe he
did hia beat to help others and with hia wife.
Ella, participated in many charitable cause.
Foremen waa the Adopt A Refugee Child
Program, aponaored by Women > American
ORT. which reaettled children orphaned by
WW II from Europe to Palestine and under
wrote their rehabilitation and training
Together with hu brother.. Mr Schuham
founded Schuham Hardware of Chicago
Later, a. Eastern Dutrict Manager for the
Garcy Corp. of Chicago and while baaed in
NY., he worked doaely with major ar
chitectt and designer.. >uch aa Elenore
LeMaire and Raymond Lowy The first
floureacent lamp in the IS was made
under Mr Schuhams direct supervision and
leadership and installed for demon.tr.Oon
at the NY. World'. Fair of 1939 Mr
Schuham aw active service in the I S
Navy during WW I. aboard the CSS Mar*
He pereued Mt advocacy for veteran. right*
and benefit, to active parbcipaUon on the
board, of Amencan. Legion Poet* both in
Verona. N.J. and Miami, where he con
Unued to repreaent the Garcy Corp for
many year.. Not only did he enjoy having
been member of John Philip Souia'. Mar
dung Band, where he played the coronet, at
the Great Lakes Naval Training Station and
during his lifetime he was enthusiastic aboyt
hia coDection of antique lock, and hardware
which wa. displayed at the Coral Gable.
Public Library in 1966 Graveside service*
here held Tuesday. Oct 7. at Star of David
Memorial Park In lieu of flowers the family
suggests contributions to the chanty of your
hoice The Riverside
COLE. Herbert M., 60 of Los Angeles
Cab!., October 4 Memorial stmce. were
bald at Temple Emanu-EI. Miami Beach
GREENBERG. Max, 86. of Miami Beach.
October 10 The Riverside
M1CHELSON. Lawrence M 92. of Bay
Harbor I.lands. October 10 The
Riverside. ,
OPPENHEIM. Herman Keller, of Surfside.
October 8. Service, were private
SHERMAN. Herman. 80. of Miami. October
10 Graveside service, and interment
were held at Mt Nebo Cemetery
WEINSTEIN. Benjamin. Service, were
held in Rockvule Centre. New York.
TUCKER. Sidney M 60. of Sebnng Fla
formerly of North Miami Beach October
10 The Riverside
SEIDENMAN. Elsie (nee Doline). October
10. Service, held in Baltimore. Md.
SPECTOR, Joseph, of Miami Beach Ser
vices were held.
FREEMAN. Walter, 81. of Miami Beach.
October 11 Service, were bald in New
York. The Riverside.
ROSENBLUM. Lee Lempert. of Miami
Beach. Service* ware held
FITTERMAN. Valerie of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert
BERNSTEIN
Ethel, mother of State **"***
Elaine BJoom and Cwwnt Court Judge
Philip BJoom, died Saturday of atroke-
riud compbeattone Mr. Bernatam. 80^
rwadad in w*Vae5-esse. 174 togather with
her late huaband Julius Prior to coming to
Greater Miami from New York, in 1972.
Mr. Bernstein wa. a vary ^J^J?
orgsniasuone each aa The Umted Jewiah
SS The Conaanrsbve Sy~yt J
RfvVrdala. League of Womeei Voters and
waa preekiant of the Brandeia Group of
Haiti" (Btobji Chapter) for many years.
In taswj aha wa. active in The National
Couwil of Jewiah Women, Creator Maun,
jrwiah Fadarstjon Woaaan'. DrrmsOB and
Beth Torah Conejeauooo An advoeate far
Iarwai's development and saeunty and far
.mprovtag the quality of Jewiah Main
America. Survived by her W Hirshel
(Gloria) of Bellmore. New York; her
dsughter Elaine Bloom (Phibp) frsnd-
duldren Anne Rachel Bloom, Ikvid Naiaon
Bloom, Mara. EUen Bernetoin afJJ.jaal
Stuart Baraatain Servieaa were netd at
Blaaberg Chapel
ENGERS. Loui*. of North Miami Rubin-
Zubert
BRIT'EL, Juliu.. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
BERNSTEIN. Erther Senncee were held
RITJO. ladore. 9S, of Miami Beach, Oc-
tober 12. Service, were held
KAPLAN. Mrs Ruth, of North Miami
LANDEBMAN
Bruce Herahel.
0. a lifelong renden, ,
with Uukenua A
Academy of Miam

KyW Landed
Er MaasMa
by hia parento F
He W-AatMaA tflL'lM
and Mrs Mom. Landeaman Serv.elV.LL
held al the Rhramd. Alton Road qK
with internment at Mt Nebo CemeUi,
AMERMrsl^ofMaunil^^
JUBBLMR, Morley L October 13. To,
LANDMaAN. Bruce Herwhel. o #
Miaaai Beach. October 12 The Rivwwo.
CMBLER. Mr* Bertha, of Miami>BsM.
GELB
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North Miami Baa*'*5"


Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
-------------------------. .t i i----------1-------------.i------------------------------
A Desperate Plea By Mothers
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of mothers in Israel
whose children remain
behind in the Soviet Union
and whom they have not
seen for at least eight years
are sad, angry, lonely, and
desperate. They are also
frustrated because they are
unable to present their case
for family reunion to Soviet
officials.
To get their message out both
to the Soviet officialdom and to
the world at large, four of these
mothers were in New York and
Washington with a poignant plea
to the Soviets: Let our children
go-
The group, which represents
about 85 Soviet emigres in Israel,
calls itself "Mothers For
Freedom." This is only a small
part of at least 200 Soviet mothers
living in Israel who have not seen
their children for up to 20 years
but who hesitate to join the
Mothers For Freedom for fear of
reprisals against their families.
THE FOUR mothers, who were
in the United States recently, all
emphasized that the children who
remain in the Soviet Union may
never see their parents again.
Many of the mothers in Israel are
sick and bedridden, according to
the group, and they say other
mothers about 15 have
already died. In fact, some of the
refuseniks have already lost both
parents.
For the children waiting in the
Soviet Union to emigrate to Israel
for family reunification, the
chance may never come unless it
happens soon; there may be no
one to invite them to Israel.
The four mothers brought this
imperative message to the U.S.
hoping that American officials
and representatives of Western
nations who are now attending
the I'N General Assembly in New
York might listen to their plea and
intercede in their behalf.
These women related their in-
dividual stories in an interview
I with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency at the offices of the Coali-
tion to Free Soviet Jews, which
sponsored their visit to this
[country.
KTZIYA RATNER is 81 years
Iold. wizened and in failing health.
I Despite her intense worries, she
displays an indomitable spirit,
[helping handicapped or ill persons
Imore aged than herself in her
iRehovot community, and writing
Ipoems in Yiddish. Ratner compos
led a poem at the interview table
|about her love for her "own land,
Israel."
Ratner has not seen her
daughter. Judith Bialy of Moscow,
p 13 years.
Ratner and her husband,
fehuda, emigrated to Israel in
1973. They first applied for exit
isas in 1971, at which time
Jialy's husband, Leonid, an elec-
ronics engineer by profession,
na fired from his job as a result
the Ratners' application to
pnigrate.
In 1973, when the Ratners made
liya, Bialy, a metallurgist, was
' from her job at the Soviet
kcademy of Sciences. Although
was later reinstated at the
Metallurgical institute of the
Academy, it was a technician at
ne-fourth of a scientist's salary,
*tner said. Bialy lost that job in
P77 when she and her husband
id children applied to emigrate.
. B'ALY *S practically im-
ponilired ^nc* *n automobile ac-
cent in 1979 which killed her
Jnt, who was en route to Israel,
disability pension she received
w the accident was suddenly
erminated two years ago.
Ratner and her husband had
^itten many times to the Soviet
authorities asking that the family
be permitted to be reunited in
Israel, but to no avail. Meanwhile,
Yehuda Ratner died in 1978!
Leonid Bialy has suffered four
heart attacks in the last six years,
the last one severe. His mother
died last year.
"As you can see, I am a very old
woman. My time is running out."
Ratner said. She said she worries
not so much for herself as for her
daughter and daughter's family.
"If I die." she said, "then my
daughter will not be able to leave.
I had a sister in Tel Aviv, but she
died four months ago. Now I am
alone. I truly don't know what to
do."
ASYA PLOSHCHANSKAYA.
65, of Jerusalem, recalled a life of
adversities. Her father, a high-
ranking army officer, was ex-
ecuted in 1938 for being "an
enemy of the people," and her
mother was confined to a labor
camp for nine years for her rela-
tion to him. Mother and daughter
were not allowed to see each other
and had to meet covertly.
Ploshchanskaya, forced to live
alone, could not find work because
of her membership in this
"enemy" family. She married a
man who gave her work as a book-
keeper, and they had a daughter,
Natalia. Shortly afterward, he left
them.
Ploshchanskaya has not seen
her daughter, Natalia, in nine
years. Natalia Rosenshtein, 46,
and her husband, Grigory, and
family are dauntless aliya activists
in Moscow, openly observant
Jews, and constantly harassed by
the KGB. Natalia, a landscape ar
chitect, and Grigory, a
cyberneticist, left their jobs in
1971 and 1972, respectively, in
preparation for applying for exit
visas, which they did in 1973.
They were refused in 1974 on
grounds of "state secrecy."
Ploshchanskaya, working as a
teacher, did not apply for a visa
with them, but because their ap-
plications would eventually affect
her. she quietly left her job and
lived on her small pension. When
she applied for a visa, she received
it almost immediately. She has
been in Israel since 1977. The
Rosenshteins, who were granted
Israeli citizenship in 1974. have
been denied visas repeatedly.
DR. VANDA OSNIS, 59. of
Kfar Saba, has not seen her son in
14 years. She. her husband Yit-
zhak, also a physician, and their
only child Marat, who lived in
Chernovitz, applied to emigrate in
1972. and the two doctors im-
mediately lost their jobs. Marat's
wife, Klaudia, was expelled from
the university where she was stu-
dying economics. Marat had left
his job as a computer engineer in
1971 to avoid being fired. Since
that time, he has not worked in his
profession.
Marat and his family have been
refused a visa every six months on
grounds of alleged access to
secret information at his work
place. Although he was once told
he would be allowed to leave 10
years after he had left his work,
he was refused again in 1981 and
in 1985.
In March of this year, Marat's
father Yitzhak Osnis, underwent a
serious operation in Israel. Marat
submitted medical documents on
his father's illness to the Soviet
authorities, pleading to be allowed
to see his father, but he was refus-
ed once more. Vanda Osnis'
mother and brother died recently.
FRIDA LEMBERG, 63, of Tel
Aviv, formerly of Riga, lost her
entire family, including her
parents, during World War II
when the Germans occupied Lat-
via. Returning to "normal" life,
she studied musk and voice and
became a conductor of a philhar-
monic orchestra, a position she
had to leave when the family ap-
plied for exit visas in 1972.
Their sons, Theodor and
Philly Police Seek
Man Suspected Of
Vandalizing Statue
By STEVE FELDMAN
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) -
Police are still looking for a
25-year-old man about 5 feet. 10
inches tall who allegedly vandaliz-
ed a statue on the grounds of the
National Museum of American
Jewish History on Thursday. Oct.
2.
The statue, completed in 1876,
was broken in several places and
covered with a yellow-red
substance believed to be molasses.
Barry Morrison, regional direc-
tor of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith here, said
the damage wasn't necessarily
anti-Semitic. But, he noted
because of the location of the
statue and the fact that it was
commissioned by B'nai B'rith,
"it's hard not to conclude that
anti-Semitism was the rationale
for the act." The vandalism he
said, is another indication of the
need to promote religious and
racial harmony.
Sallie Gross, acting director of
the museum, said that 10 days
earlier a swastika had been spray
painted on the museum wall fac-
ing the statue.
She speculated that the vandal
used materials from a nearby con-
struction project to climb above
the statue and damage it. She said
the broken pieces were not
salvageable.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Pile Naaber &6-570J
Diriaioa 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELENE EHRLICH
DatssHd
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
Th administration of the estate
of HELENE EHRLICH.
deceased. File Number 86-5703. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorneys are set
forth below.
All interested persons sre
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representatives, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 17, 1986.
Personal Representatives:
Manufacturers Hanover Trust
Company of Florida
100 Chopin Plata. Suite 702
Miami. Florida 33131
Herbert S. Shapiro
1666 79th Street Causeway. No.
608
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Herbert C. Zemel
3660 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida SS1S7
Attorneys for Personal
Representatives:
Herbert S. Shapiro
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
1666 79th Street Causeway
Suite 608
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone (306) 864 2369
Herbert C. Zemel
3600 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone (306) 573-1811
12309 October 17. 24. 1986
Solomon, received their visas
separately after initial refusals, so
that by 1978 all but their youngest
son, Grigory, were living in Israel.
Grigory's army service, between
1965-67, was the pretext given all
along to the family for the
repeated visa refusals. Grigory
has been refused every six mon-
ths. He married in 1981, and had a
daughter, whom the Lembergs
have never seen.
Lemberg acted as informal
spokesperson for the group of
mothers, describing the myriad
hardships that befall families as
one member or all apply for exit
visas. The plea for the remaining
parents is overwhelmingly impor-
tant now, said Lemberg, because
"time is flying."
Ktziya Ratner perhaps summed
up the feeling of all the mothers
by saying: "I have gone to
everyone I could. What more can
be done soon so that I can see my
daughter and her family again, so
that they can come here this year?
Next year is not good enough. It
must be this year."
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DANIEL'S at 5859
S.W. 73rd Street. South Miami.
Florida intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
BAB Restaurants, Inc.
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQUIRE
Attorney for
BAB RESTAURANTS. INC.
U298 October 17.24. 31;
November 7,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 84-44644-18
IN RE: The Marriage of:
FREDE DESIR,
Petitioner,
and
FRANCOISE DESIR.
Respondent.
TO: FRANCOISE DESIR
Rue du Centre No. 242 A
L'interieur
Coridor Prison
Port-au-Prince. Haiti. W.I.
Shall serve copy of your Answer
to the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 N.W
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before November 21.
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered.
Dated: October 15. 1986.
RICHARD P BRJNKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
12307 October 17,24.31;
November 7,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Arties Na. 84-44414-18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ORTELIO VIERA,
Petitioner,
and
JOAQUINA VIERA,
Respondent
TO: JOAQUTNA VIERA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whoae address is 825 South
Bayshore Drive. Suite 543. Miami.
Florida 33131, and file the original
with the derk of the above styled
court on or before November 21,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15th day of October, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Om October 17. 24. 31;
November 7.1986
Business Notes
Steven L. Cantor, a Miami at-
torney specializing in the
representation of foreign in-
vestors in real estate, business
and tax matters, was recently ap-
pointed President of the Florida
Chapter of FIABCI-USA, an in-
ternational real estate federation
founded in 1949 with members in
more than 43 countries. Cantor
currently serves as a permanent
national faculty member for Inter-
national Property Specialist
Designation courses for FIABCI-
USA and the National Association
of Realtors, lecturing throughout
the country on the legal and tax
consequences of foreign invest-
ment in real property.
The North Dade Bar Associa-
tion is pleased to announce that its
October meeting will be a judicial
reception held on Thursday, Oct.
16, from 5 to 7 p.m. at G. Wizz
Restaurant, North Miami Beach.
"How to be a Perfect Young
Trial Lawyer" will be the topic at
a luncheon meeting of the Young
Lawyers Section of the Dade
County Bar Association spon-
sored by its education committee
Thursday, October 16. at 11:30
a.m. at the Dade County
Courthouse.
The Lunch Time Seminar ses-
sion in the former county commis-
sion chambers on the second floor
will feature Circuit Court Judges
Richard Yale Feder, Fredricka G.
Smith and Jon I. Gordon.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, tlosaiiias. to
engage in business under the fie
titious name FOODCRAFTERS
DISTRIBUTING CO. at 3400
N.W. 67th Street. Miami. Florida.
33147 intends to register said
name with the Clark of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
FOODCRAFTERS
DISTRIBUTING CO.
BY: IRVING FIEN.
PRESIDENT
Lynn W. Fromberg, Esq.
Attorney for Foodcrafters
Distributing Co.
12305 October 17. 24. 31;
November 7, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(Ne Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Artie. Ne. 8-44sM (64)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar Ne. 221141
BILL LEE MATHEWS.
Petitioner /Husband.
vs.
JANET E MATHEWS,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: JANET E. MATHEWS
5606 N.E. 7th Street
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an Action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Silver A Silver, attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is 160
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326.
Miami. Florida 33131. and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before
November 21, 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my baud and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of October. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
Ira S Siver
Attorney or Petitioner
160 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 83131
Telephone: (306) 374-4888
12908 October 17.24.31;
November 7. 1986


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 17, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. D*
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CM! Artie* Ne. M-41137 PC If
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALPHONSINE GUILLAUME
also known aa ALPHONSINE i
WILLIAMS
Petitioner/Wife
and
HAROLD WILLIAMS.
Respondent/Husband
TO: Mr Harold Williams
Residence Unknown
Last Known Address (Street
Number Unknown)
Bay Street
Nassau. Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Mamage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Bruce J.
Scheinberg, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whoa* address is 420 Lin-
coln Road. Suite 512. Miami
Beach. Florida 33139 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 7. 1906: otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weak for four con
secubve weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 1st day of October. 1966.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce J Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-7575
Attorney for Petitioner
11278 October 10.17, 24. 31.1986
FLORIDA PROBAYE
DIVISION
File Namber 82-5533
DrrameaM
IN RE: Guardianship of
ROSALIE MARCUS.
Incompetent
NOTICE OF CHANGE
OF DOMICILE
To WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
JAMES R. SLOTO. Guardian
Ad Litem of ROSALIE MARCUS
hereby gives notice of his intention
to terminate the guardianship as a
result of change of domicile of the
ward. All persons having an in-
terest in these proceedings are
notified that the Guardian has filed
her final accounting and a Petition
for Discharge and that any objec-
tions thereto should be filed within
thirty (30) days from the date of
the first publication of this notice
and that an application for
discharge will be made immediate-
ly following the expiration of said
thirty (30) day period. Jurisdiction
of the ward will thereafter be
transferred to the state of foreign
jurisdiction.
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION: October 17, 1986
JAMES R. SLOTO
JAMES R SLOTO.
Guardian Ad Litem
MISHAN. SLOTO AND
HOFFMAN
300 Bmeayne Boulevard Way
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 379-1792
11299 October 17. 24.1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
The undersigned, under oath,
says It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
bumnea* enterprise under the fie
titious name of RICHARD
MARKOWTTZ A ASSOCIATES
located at 19 West Flagier Street
in the city of Miami. Dade County
Florida.
Those interested in said enter
prise, and the extent at the in
tercet of each, is as follows
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West Flagier Street
Miami. Dade County. Florida
MONEY A EGO. INC
100 percent Stockholder
11274
Octobers. 10. 17.24. 1986
IN THE CIRCUrT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caee No. 84-440*7 (*)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 5*407*
BELMAR CONDOMINIUM
ASSOCIATION. INC.. a Florida
not for profit corporation.
Plaintiff.
CESAR A. AVILES and
GLADYS M. AVILES.
Defendants,
TO: CESAR A. AVILES
GLADYS M. AVILES
YOU. CESAR A. AVILES and
GLADYS M. AVILES. residences
unknown, are required to file your
answer to the complaint to
foreclose condominium lien with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
plaintiffs attorneys. COHEN.
COHEN A COHEN. 622 S W. 1st.
Street. Miami. Fla. 33130. on or
before November 14. 1986. or else
petition will be confessed
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this October 10, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
By E Seidl
Deputy Clerk
11297 October 17. 24.31;
November 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUrT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 84-4CM
DiTMieaOl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM COOPER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ABRAHAM
COOPER, deceased. File Number
86-4696 (01). is pending in the Car-
cuit Court for DADE County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 3rd Floor. Dade
County Courthouse. 73 W. Flagier
Street. Miami. FL. 33130 The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is STANLEY COOPER, whose ad
dress is 840 Montgomery Avenue.
Bryn Mawr. Pennsylvania 19010.
The name and address of the per
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
punsdirtion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
chis Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 17. 1986
STANLEY COOPER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ABRAHAM COOPER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LYNN W FROMBERG. ESQ
FROMBERG. FROMBERG.
gross SHORE LEWIS
ROGEL A KERN. PA
420 S Dixie Highway. 3rd Floor
Coral Gables. FL 33146
Telephone (306) 6644622
11291 October 17.24. 1986
W THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 84-6177
DiriaioB 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELENE LANDE BH'MKIN
YINNON.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
The administration of the estate
of HELENE LANDE BLUMKIN
YINNON, deceased. File Number
86-5177 CP02. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami. Florida, 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons are required to file
with the clerk of this court.
WITHIN THREE CALENDAR
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE all claims against the
estate in the form and manner
prescribed by Section 733.703 of
the Florida Statutes and Rule
5.490 of The Florida Rules of Pro-
bate and Guardianship Procedure
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 17. 1986.
Personal Representative:
LESUE RACHLINE
Co-Per. Rep.
8100 Southwest 136th Street
Miami. Florida 33156
DAVID ORLOWSKY.
Co-Per. Rep.
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 12-1.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LAW OFFICES OF NORMAN
K. SCHWARZ. PA.
NORMAN K. SCHWARZ
407 Lincoln Road. Suite 10- A
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672 1222
11296 October 17. 24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
DV THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artioa No. 86-42825 05
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar Ne. 239415
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
FATMI M MASRI.
and
REDWEAN KHAZMA MASRI.
TO: REDWEAN KHAZMA
MASRI
8120 S.W. 15th Street
Miami. Florida 33144
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
RAFAEL E PADIERNE. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 1800 S.W First Street.
Suite 324. Miami. Florida 33135.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 14. 1986; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAFAEL E PADIERNE. ESQ
1800 S.W. First Street. Suite 324
Miami. Florida 33135
(306)649-5486
Attorney for Petitioner
11296 October 17.24.31;
November 7.1986
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the iimkw signed, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name 3770 West Flagier
Medical Center at 3770 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Fla. 33134
intends to regsrtsr said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Ernesto A Sivula. M.D PA
Harold J Cohen
Attorney for 3770 West Flagier
Medical Center
11267 September 26.
Octobers. 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. N*. 84-43173 (27)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
W RE: The Marriage of
GREGORIO HERRERA
Petitioner
and
DEN1SE ANNE HERRERA
Respondent
TO: DENISE ANNE HERRERA
112 Saltcreek Road Lot 21
Savannah. GA 31406
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
thia court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on USHER
BRYN. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach.
Florida SS1S9 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 14.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 8 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. ESQ
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 3S139
(Phone) (306)532-1156
11292 October 17.24.31;
November 7. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Ne.: 84-4M10
Florida Bar Ne.: 349275
NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GUILLERMO PANIAGUA.
Petitioner.
vs.
MIRIAM VAQUERANO.
Respondent
TO: MIRIAM VAQUERANO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve written defenses, if
any. to it on MARIANO SOLE.
ATTORNEY AT LAW. PA. at
tomey for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2655 Le Jeune Road. Pen
thouse II. Coral Gables. Florida
33134. and file the ongnal with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 14. 1986.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the petition
Thia notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
9 day of October. 1986. -
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ
Gables International Plasa
2655 Le Jeune Road
Penthouse II
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
(306)441-2655
11293 October 17. 24.31;
November 7.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name GENESIS at 2725
S.W. 3rd Avenue. Miami. Florida
33129 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
GENESIS DEVELOPMENT
GROUP. INC
11260 September 26;
Octobers. 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie. No. 84-43437 FCS1
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MERANCIER JOSEPH.
Petitioner
and
NELLY DIEUDONNEE
JOSEPH.
Respondent
TO: NELLY DIEUDONNEE
JOSEPH
173 Street Reunion
Port Au Prince. HAITI
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on USHER
BRYN. ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach.
Florida 33139 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 21.
1984; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 8 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. ESQ
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (306) 532-1156
11295 October 17. 24.31.
NovciTmbeT i. 19o6
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss:
The undersigned, under oath,
says. It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fie
titious name of CAPLAN PRO
CESS SERVERS located at 19
West Flagier Street in the am) "f
Miami. Dade County. Florida
Those interested in said enter
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West Flagier Street
Miami. Dade County. Florida
MONEY A EGO. INC
100 percent Stockholder
11276
October 3. 10. 17.24. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Umt the undemgned. desinngJ
engage m business under the fir
titious name ARCHITECTURai
HOMES at 387 Palermo Avenue
Coral Gable.. Florida ifflj
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
ALEMAR DIVESTMENTS
CORP
HOMES BY FONT, INC
By: Miguel Font
VEGA AND PEREZ
Attorneys for Alemar Investment.
eorp. and Homes by Font Inc
362 Minorca Avenue
Suite 101
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
11289 October 17.24.3!
November:. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrmous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name 183rd Street Auto
Specialist at 18200 N.W 27 Ave ,
Miami. Fla. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
W. DAVID CURRY. Owner
11262 September 26.
Octobers. 10.17, 198*
XS THE CIRCUIT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-4534
Ihvisioa 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY KRAM.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BETTY KRAM. deceased. File
Number 84-5634 (02). is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and sddnesea of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with thm court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom thia notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdie
uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of thia Notice has
begun on October 17. 1986
Personal Representative
HENRY KRAM
5430 Alton Road
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative
NELSON A FELDMAN. PA
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone 865-5716
11290 October 17. 24. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTlTIOl S NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ARNOLD'S HOT
DOGS at 1200 West Avenue. So
521. Miami Beach. Florida 3S139
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ARNALDO DEL PINO
EDNA DEL PINO
ALBOl'M and FURLONG
Attorney for
ARNALDO DEL PINO
333 Arthur Godfrey Road So 104
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone No. (306) 538-6741
11288 October 17 24.31
November 7.1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 84-43107
IN RE: The Mamage of
JOSEPH SERAPHIN
ANGERV1LLE
Petitioner,
and
SOPHIA L. ANGERY1LLE
Respondent
TO: SOPHIAL
ANGERVILLE. Residence
unknown, you shall serve cop;
your Answer to the Petition (or
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attomrj
612 Northwest 12th Aw Mann
Florida 33136. and Bk ongiaa.
with Court Clerk on or before*
November 21. 1986, Mharwktl
default will be entered
Dated: October 14. l^
RICHARD P BRINKER
By: DIANA CAMl'BELL
12303 October 17.24.31
Novemt*r 7,1986
attorney
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY I
IN THE CIRCUIT C0UIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COURT!
Civil Arties, Ne. 84-4417* Itli
IN RE The Mamagr i
JOSE JOACHIM MEC A VACOS
and
ISABEL M. CANSCO MARTINS
TO: ISABEL M CAN1C0
MARTINS
Patio 2 Barranca Prim*
Pieo
Nasare 2450. Portugal
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has bw
filed against you and you w
required to serve a copy of root
written defenses, if any. to it *
RAFAEL E PAI'IERNE
for Petitioner who*
i 1800 S.W FW Strwt
Suite 324. Miami. rVram SSIfc.
and file the orsrinal with the ekn
of the above styled court osor
before November 21, '^
otherwise s default will b* sMJJ
against you for the rwj
demanded in the complaint or
P*trt,on -*
This nonce shall be r**0**
once each week for foil'
consecutive weeks m '
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand the the"
of amd court at Mmmi Hen**
thia 14th day of October 1
RICHARD P. BRINk-E"
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Fk>nd*
By JENNIS L RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) ..
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE. ESQ
1800 S.W. First Street V>
Miami. Florida 33135
Telephone: (306) 449-541*
Attorney for Petitioner
|RfM October 1-
Novemtr

324
24. a
7.19*


tri-
i i
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, October 17, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(ml Action No. 86-39068 F< 09
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The iwni|( of:
HILDA LUGO.
Petitioner
and
LUIS LUGO
Respondent
TO: LUIS LUGO
5388Zoua5
Panama City. PANAMA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
opv of your written defenses, if
any', to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Riiad. Suite 309. Miami Beach,
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24th.
1986: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
l*-tition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17th Day of September. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
I SHERBRYN. ESQ.
120 Lincoln Road. Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone: (305)532-1155
11110 September 26;
October 3. 10. 17. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4858
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
:Ml kirk WEISMAN.
I used
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
administration of the estate
f ISIDORE WEISMAN.
ised Kile Number 86-4858. is
ig in the Circuit Court for
Dadi County. Flonda. Probate
Division, the address of which is T.'i
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
S3130 The names and addresses
i the personal representative and
he personal representative's
rney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
'equired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
'iijection by an interested person
"n whom this notice was served
'hat challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
IECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 10, 1986.
Personal Representative:
JEFFREY A LINN
7 Crescent Road
Wynoote. PA 19095
SHARON LINN
130 East 18th Street. No. 4G
NY, NY 10003
ROBERT GROVER
01-41st Street. 5th Floor
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBIN
Post Office Box 402099
828 Arthur Godfrey Road
Telephone: '306) 532-3200
11279 October 10. 17. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaber 86-5515
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSE RAMON FAJARDO
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSE RAMON FAJARDO
deceased. File Number 86-5615. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 78
W. Flagler Street. Miami. Flonda
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representatives
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE (1) all claims
gainst the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 10. 1986
Personal Representative:
NOHEL1A FAJARDO
11441 S.W 7th Terrace
Sweetwater. FL 33144
Attorney for Personal
Representative-
BRUCE LAMCHICK. Esq
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN &
JOHNSTON
10725 S.W. 104th Street
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-6333
11277 October 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE I? HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Royal Palm Cleaners
at 4016 Royal Palm Ave.. Miami
Beach. Fl. 33140 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida
Elisa Jones. President
4016 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
SOLOMON WEISS, Esq
Attorney for
SHARON & ELISA. Inc.
11270 October 3. 10. 17.24. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deainng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names United Pool In
dustnes. Inc a/k/a Sally Dysart
Inc.; Dyiart's Pool & Patio World
Dysart Pools; Dysart. the Swimm
ing Pool People; Fiberglass Pool of
America. Inc at 16160 Biscayne
Boulevard. No Miami Beach
Flonda 33160 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Flonda.
United Pool Industries. Inc.
Ruth Gans. President
11286 October 10. 17.24.31,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name NEW LOOK
JEWELRY INC a Florida cor
poration at 58 N.E. 167th Street.
Suite 34. North Miami Beach. Fla
33162 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Flonda
GLYN THOMAS
49 percent
CAMERON BACCHUS
51 percent
Myron B Herman Esq.
Attorney for New Look Jewelry
Inc
P.O. Box 1113
N.B.B. Fla 33160
"257 September 26.
October 3. 10. 17.1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
MCTITIOUS NAME STATUE
MATE OF FLORIDA
BOUNTY OF DADE
Th' undersigned, under oath.
W It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fie
nt.ous name of CAPLAN/
4?,W,TZ PROCESS
-R\ERS located at 19 West
Hagler Street in the city of Miami.
I >ade County. Flonda.
Those interested m said enter
and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
MONEY & EGO. INC 100%
"'I'K-kholder
STEPHEN CAPLAN
President
19 West Flager Street
Miami, Dade Countv. Florida
'1^83 October 10. 17.24.31.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. Irt MM
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
RAMONA QUINTAL
Petitioner/Wife,
and
FITZROY TAYLOR
Reaponden t/H uaband.
TO: Fltaroy Taylor
660 Ocean Avenue
Apartment El 5th Floor
Brooklyn. New York 11226
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT. ES
QUIRE, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 11. 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed ir. the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ABRAHAM A GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Flonda 33139
Telephone (305) 672-3100
Attorney for
Florida Bar No 210889
11284 October 10. 17, 24, 31. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-5630
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ISAAC FRAGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
.YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of ISAAC
FRAGER, deceased, File Number
86-5630, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Flonda.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Marilyn Bier
uck. 2141 Cayuga Dr.. Merrick.
NY'.. Shelby Petrarca. 440 Lisa
Drive. West Miffin. Henna The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each daim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the daim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
daim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 10. 1986
Marilyn Biersuck.
Shelby Petrarca
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ISAAC FRAGER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I Kroop (128023)
Kwitney. Kroop & Scheinberg.
PA
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Flonda 33139
Telephone: (306) 538 7575
11287 October 10. 17. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-5600
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MEYER SITZ.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary Administration
has been entered in the estate of
MEYER SUTZ. deceased. File
Number 86-5600. by the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Flonda.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. that the
total cash value of the estate is
$16,150.00, and that the names
and addresses of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order is:
Julia Suu. 1334 Drexel Avenue.
Miami Beach Flonda 33139
All persons are required to file
with the clerk of said court
WITHIN 3 CALENDAR
MONTHS FROM TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE all claims against the
estate in the form and manner
prescribed by Section 733.703 of
the Florida Statutes and Rule
5 490 of the Florida Rules of
Probate and Guardianship
Procedure
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 10. 1986
Attorney
Herbert J Lerner
H01 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 673-3000
11280 October 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31472
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
LUIS DULAC.
and
ERNESTINA DULAC.
TO: Ernestina Duiar
Present-Unknown
Last Known
9920 N.W. 6th Lane
Miami, Florida 33172
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 155 South Miami Avenue.
Penthouse I. Miami. Florida
33130, and file the original with
the derk of the above styled court
on or before October 31. 1986;
otherwise s default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaing or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
ecutjve weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24 day of September, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C PASTOR. PA.
PH I 155 South Miami Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
11269 October 3, 10. 17.24.1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-43104
IN RE: The Marriage of:
FELIX ALONSO.
Petitioner,
and
ROSA MARINA GOODMAN
ALONSO
Respondent.
TO ROSA MARINA GOODMAN
ALONSO. Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 612 Nor
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida.
HIM, and file onginal with Court
Clerk on or before November 7.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered
October 6. I'M
RICHARD BRINKER
BY CLARINDA BROWN
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-33399-09
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE:
SHELDON HEIGHTS
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY,
an Illinois corporation
Plaintiff,
vs.
YUAN-YUAN KUO.
Defendant
TO: Mr. Yuan-Yuan Kuo
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED thst a petition for Rental
Arrearage And Termination Of
Lease has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Leonard Selkowitz, J.D
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 19 West Flagler Street
Suite 810, Biscayne Building.
Miami. Flonda 33130, and file the
original witii the derk of the above
styled court on or before October
24, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida this
19th day of September. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Leonard Selkowitz, J.D.
Suite 810 Biscayne Building
ly West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Phone (305) 358-2900
'1256 September 26;
October 3. 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie*
No .86-41020 FC 28
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
BENIGNO AYALA
Petitioner
and
TERESA AYALA
Respondent
TO: TERESA AYALA
11160 Herrera Avenue
No. 7
Colon. PANAMA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on USHER BRYN. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road Suite
309, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
and file the original with the derk
of the above styled court on or
before October 31st. 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of Mid court at Miami, Florida on
this 23rd day of September, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road -
Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone (305) 532-1155
11266 September 26;
Octobers. 10. 17.1986
PUBLIC NOTICE
The annual return of the Obduiia
S. De Von Bernard Charitable
Foundation Trust is available at
the address noted below for inspec-
tion during regular business hours,
by any dtizen who so requests
within 180 days after publication
of this notice of its availability
The Obduiia S. De Von Bernard
Charitable Foundation Trus'
lllOBrickell Avenue
Suite 700
Miami. Florida. 33131
The Foundation Manager is
I. Stanley Levine. Trustee
Publication of this Notice on the
tenth day of October. 1986
1281 October 10. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40155 08
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
RAMON GONZALEZ.
Petitioner Husband
and
CARMEN GONZALEZ,
Respondent/Wife
TO. Carmen Gonzalez,
address unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Alan H.
Miller. Esq.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd.. Suite 317. Miami.
Flonda 33189. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24th.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 day of September. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H Miller Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd..
Suite 317
Miami. Flonda 33189
(305)238-1080
Attorney for Petitioner
HI" September 26.
October 3. 10. 17. 1986
11282 October 10, 17. 24. 31. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Norman's Tavern at
6770 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
FL 33141 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Miami Moon Cafe, Inc.
A Flonda Corp.
Paul Kwitney
Kwitney. Kroop & Scheinberg,
PA
420 Lincoln Road Suite 512
Miami Beach. Fiji 33139
Attorneys for Miami Moon Cafe.
Inc.
110% September 19, 26;
October 3. 10, 1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTmOU8
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA)
as:
COUNTY OF DADE)
The undersigned, under oath.
ays; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of 36th Street Auto
Sales. Melrose Auto Sales. Real
Auto Sales, and World Wide Auto
Sales located at 3660 N.W. 36th
Street in the city of Miami. Dade
County. Florida.
Those interested in said enter
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
ANTONIO CARBONELL.
President
Real Enterprises. Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Sworn and subscribed to before
me. st Miami, this 19 day of
September. 1986
Nancy Laugiio
Notary Public.
State of Florida at Large
Proof of publication of this inten-
tion to register, is filed herewith,
pursuant to the provisions of
Chapter 20953. Laws of 1941.
(865.09 FSA)
11258 September 26;
Octobers. 10. 17,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage a business under the fie
titious name ROSINA MALTA at
3390 Mary Street. Kl. Coconut
Grove. FL 33133 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Flonda.
Armando Gutierrez. Esquire
Attorney for Tejus Import A.
Export. Inc
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400.
Miami. FL 33145
11268 October 3. 10, 17, 24. 1986


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 17, 1986
A Place
to Love Life
V

New beginnings start here.
Activity, friendship, service and luxury. These
are the beginnings awaiting you at Northpark, a
beautiful new adult rental community where
every detail has been planned for your comfort
and peace of mind, including:
Luxurious One and Two- Bedroom apartments.
Social/recreational activities. ,
Extensive indoor and outdoor recreational and
physical fitness facilities.
Elegant dining.
Wellness Center.
Chauffeured scheduled limousine service.
Weekly housekeeping and laundry service.
Shopping service and delivery.
Beauty and Barber shop.
The Market Place tor snacks and sundries.
Complete Security System with emergency
medical response units.
Prime Hollywood kx;ation.
Nk> entry or endowment tee.
Rent from $1450.
These are just a tew of the features that make life
carefree at Northpark. By Levitt Retirement
I .'ommunities. Inc.. a subsidiary of Levitt
C 'orporation, one of Americas oldest and best
known names in community devek>pment.
>sk>rthpark rental office is open daily 10 CD 5
at MX> Sheridan Street in Hollywood Take 1-95
to Sheridan Street, then west to Northpark
(JOS) *>}-0200.Toll-free 1-800- M6-0326
NORTtff^VW Levin Retirement Communities, Inc.
M90 Sheridan Street
Hollywood. FL J3021
Yes, I am interested in learning more about Northpark,
the presngious adult rental community in Hollywood.
X
Name__
Address
L
City----------:-------
Phone No. i___L
State
Zip
NorthPark
Apiestigiou^acMtienkaiaxTyriunity.
Levitt Retirement Communities, Inc.


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