The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03010

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"Jewish Floi* idliaii
Volume 59 Number 41
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, October 10,1986
FrOCMf
Price $3.00
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The French govern-
ment has ordered elaborate security
measures to protect the hundreds of
synagogues and Jewish community
centers all over France during the High
Holidays which began last Friday night.
A government spokesman said 2,000 provincial
police have been brought to Paris to bolster the
local gendarmerie. Paris has been hit by terrorist
attacks six times in the past month, leaving nine
dead and nearly 200 injured by bombs. The extra
police will remain on duty through Yom Kippur on
Monday. Oct. 13.
THE JEWISH community is taking its own
precautions. Members of youth organizations will
stand guard at various synagogues. Worshippers
will be searched before they enter, and any bags or
parcels will be examined. The Chief Rabbinate has
Paris Police Guard Synagogues Against Holy Days Terrorist Attack
issued a booklet explaining measures to be taken in
case of emergency.
Chief Rabbi Rene Sirat has called on French
Jews "not to give in to terrorist threats and
blackmail." He urged them to attend services in
greater numbers than in past years in response to
such threats. Theo Klein, president of the
Representative Council of French Jews (CRIF),
also urged the community to attend the holiday
services in great numbers.
At Reykjavik
Reagan Urged
To Press For
Human Rights
Yom Kippur
Kol Nidre Launches Holiest of Days
Kol Nidre services will launch the
observance of Yom Kippur in synagogues
throughout South Florida this Sunday
i ening (Oct. 12).
The holiday continues through Monday
as a time of fasting and prayer for repen-
tance. Yizkor, a memorial prayer for the
departed, will be recited during Yom Kip-
pur services Monday (Oct. 13).
Yom Kippur continues the High Holy
Day season, which began with Rosh
Hashanah last weekend. Shabbat
Teshuvah, the Sabbath of Repentance,
falls between Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur, and will be observed at Sabbath
services this weekend (Oct. 11).
Next in the High Holy Day observances
will be Sukkoth, or the Feast of Taber-
nacles, which opens the eve of Friday
(Oct. 17) and continues through Saturday
and Sunday (Oct. 18 and 19).
Choi Hamoed Sukkoth begins on Mon-
day (Oct. 20).
'Acrimonious Discord9
Jewish Extended Family Threatened
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Nineteen lay leaders
representing a spectrum of
U.S. Jewish religious
denominations have urged
the establishment of pro-
grams to promote intra-
Jewish understanding and
unity.
In a joint statement last week,
the leaders expressed concern
that the Jewish "extended fami-
ly" in the U.S. is threatened by "a
mood of acrimonious discord,"
caused to a great extent by "dif-
ferences over Jewish conversion
and divorce procedures."
THE LEADERS, who had met
semi-monthly since last November
in a task force organised by the
American Jewish Committee, pro-
posed seven strategies to build
unity:
"A return to civil discourse
Continued on Page 10-A
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The American Jewish com-
munity is mobilizing rapidly
to urge President Reagan to
fulfill his pledge to raise the
issues of human rights and
Soviet Jewry when he meets
with Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev at their
preparatory summit in
Reykjavik, Iceland Saturday
and Sunday.
Morris Abram. chairman of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, said 100,000 telegrams
will flood the White House this
week, wishing the President suc-
cess in his efforts to achieve peace
and to strengthen the cause of
human rights, including free
emigration for Soviet Jews,
guaranteed by the USSR as a
signatory to the Helsinki Accords.
THE SAME call was issued
from thousands of pulpits at Rosh
Hashanah services all over the
U.S. this past weekend, Abram
said. He also told a news con-
ference that there would be a
Jewish presence in Reykjavik dur-
ing the summit, which coincides
partly with Yom Kippur. There is
no official Jewish community in
Iceland.
Abram, who is chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
said representatives of more than
100 Jewish communities across
the country would meet in
Washington Wednesday for a
"national leadership assembly."
They were to be briefed at the
President Reagan
State Department and meet with
the chairmen of key Senate and
House committees to promote a
million-signature petition cam-
paign on behalf of Soviet Jewry.
Abram was joined at his news
conference by Alexander
Goldfarb, whose seriously ill
father. Dr. David Goldfarb, has
been waiting for a Soviet exit visa
mnce 1961.
THE ELDER Goldfarb, a scien-
tist, is a personal friend of
Nicholas Daniloff, the American
correspondent arrested in
Moscow last month for alleged
spying and released last week in
exchange for a Soviet spy held by
Continued on Page 6-A
U.S. Cites Shield for Israel
SDI Can Also Protect Against Short-Range Missiles
H*bbi Greenberg
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The technology being
developed through the
Strategic Defense Initiative
(SDI) will not only provide a
defense against intercon-
tinental ballistic missiles
(ICBM), but also against
short-range missiles such as
threaten Israel, two Pen-
tagon officials stress.
Frank Gaffney, Jr., Deputy
Assistant Secretary of Defense
for Nuclear Forces and Arms Con-
trol Policy, and Air Force Lt. Gen.
James Abrahamson, director of
SDI, discussed SDI. popularly
known as "Star Wars." and Israel
before a group of Jews from
across the country at the Old Ex-
ecutive Office Building, next to
the White House last week.
GAFFNEY SAID that Israel
wants a defense against tactical
ballistic missiles that now
threaten it from the air, land or
sea. The Soviet Union has provid-
Continned on Pace 9-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10, 1986
Summit Agenda
Reagan, Gorbachev Meet Saturday
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Reagan will
meet Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev in Reykjavik,
Iceland, Saturday and Sun-
day to prepare for a summit
conference in Washington.
Secretary of State George
Shultx, who appeared with
Reagan for the White House an-
nouncement of the meeting last
week, said that, as in all meetings
with the Soviet Union, human
rights will be discussed along with
arms control, bilateral problems
and regional issues. "You can be
sure we are going to keep the sub-
ject of human rights on the agen-
da," Shultz said.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT came
as Nicholas Daniloff, the U.S.
Newt and World Report cor-
respondent arrested in Moscow on
charges of spying Aug. 30, was en
route to Washington after being
allowed to leave the USSR.
The White House statement
also was made shortly after Gen-
nadi Zakharov, a Soviet employee
of the United Nations, pleaded no
contest to three charges of spying
in the U.S. District Court in
Brooklyn, N.Y. Shultz had said
that Zakharov would leave the
United States for the Soviet
Union Tuesday (Sept. 30).
He also announced that Yuri
Orlov, the 62-year-old founder of
the Moscow Helsinki Watch whom
he called "a giant of the Soviet
human rights movement," would
be allowed to depart the Soviet
Union for the U.S. with his wife.
Irina, scheduled for Tuesday (Oct.
7). Orlov, a physicist, had been a
close associate of Anatoly Sharan-
sky until his arrest for "anti-
Soviet activities" in October,
1977.
U.S. OFFICIALS had charged
that Daniloff s arrest a week after
Zakharov's was a "frameup" aim-
ed at taking a hostage to obtain
Zakharov's release. But Reagan
denied this, saying there was "no
connection between the two
releases." However, he noted that
"the release of Daniloff made the
meeting (in Iceland) possible. I
could not have accepted that
meeting if he was still being
held."
Shultz said that Gorbachev re-
quested the meeting in a letter
delivered by Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevardnadze at
the White House Sept. 19.
Shevardnadze held a press con-
ference in New York last Tuesday
(Sept. 30) at the same time as
Reagan and Shultz were meeting
with reporters in Washington.
There had been speculation that
along with Orlov the Soviets
would allow two Soviet Jewish
refuseniks to leave, Vladimir
Slepak, who has been seeking to
Shamir To Take Helm from Peres
When Rotation Completed Tuesday
TEL AVTV (JTA) Premier Shimon Peres said last
week that he will submit his resignation to President Chaim
Herzog on Friday so that Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
can take office as Prime Minister on Oct. 14, the date set by
the Labor-Likud rotation of power agreement.
PERES EXPLAINED to high school students in
Hadera that Oct. 10 is the latest he can resign because the
11th is a Sabbath, the 12th is Kol Nidre night and the 13th
is Yom Kippur. Therefore he will call on Herzog a week Fri-
day so that the President can ask Shamir to form a govern-
ment immediately after the holidays.
According to Israeli practice, the entire Cabinet
resigns with the Prime Minister. Peres said discussions
would be held this week on the allocation of portfolios in the
new national unity government.
FEW CHANGES are expected apart from the ex-
change of jobs between Peres and Shamir.
Peres will make his last trip abroad as Prime Minister
this week when he goes to Paris to meet with President
Francois Mitterrand during ceremonies marking the open-
ing of the Ben-Gurion centennial year.
Japanese Say They Would
Welcome Imports from Israel
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Shinichi Yanai, the Deputy
Foreign Minister of Japan, said
here last Wednesday (Oct. 1) that
his country would welcome in-
creased and diversified imports
from Israel. He spoke at a
meeting with Israeli Deputy
Foreign Minister Ronni Milo, who
said his guest's remarks were a
positive development in trade
relations between the two
countries.
Japan, which exports
everything from cars to
microchips all over the world has
kept a low profile with respect to
trade with Israel. It is heavily
dependent on Middle East oil.
Yanai said, however, that Japan
looks with favor on the efforts of
some of its large trading com-
panies to help Israeli companies
find local partners for joint in-
dustrial ventures. ___
He also spoke favorably of the
increasing number of Japanese
tourists visiting Israel but did not
respond to Milo's suggestion of
direct flights between Tel Aviv
and Tokyo. Yanai told reporters
after his meeting with Milo that
his country believes in free trade
which depends only on the in-
itiative of the merchants.
emigrate since 1970, and David
Goldfarb, a refusenik since 1979
whose exit visa was taken away
after he refused to help frame
Daniloff.
Other speculation had centered
on three Jewish refuseniks suffer-
ing from advanced cancer. They
are Inna Meiman and her hus-
band, Naum; Tanye Bogomolny
and her husband Benjamin, and
Benjamin Charney.
NEITHER REAGAN nor
Shultz would comment about the
possibility of others being allowed
to emigrate. "We have a continu-
ing dialogue with the Soviet
Union about a large number of
dissidents, about divided families,
about emigration generally,"
Shultz said. "So there is an ongo-
ing urging of them to take action
in those areas. So we'll continue
that now,"
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry welcomed Orlov's
release, calling him "a long-time
advocate of human rights," who
"has suffered greatly in prison,
labor camps and Siberian exile."
"We are greatly disappointed,
however, that the Soviet Union
has refused to make any signifi-
cant gestures to ease the plight of
Soviet Jews." an NCSJ
spokesman said. "Hundreds of
refuseniks continue to live in lim-
bo while others unjustifiably suf-
fer in labor camps.
"We hope, therefore, that pro-
gress toward a real summit will be
made during the pre-summit
meeting in Iceland and that all the
brush will be cleared away. We
have confidence that the Ad-
ministration is proceeding on its
promise to press the issue of
Jewish rights and emigration at
the summit and to help secure the
immediate transit of those hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews who
wish to be repatriated to Israel
and to join their families."
THE UNION of Councils for
Soviet Jewry (UCSJ), whose
board was meeting in Washington
last Tuesday, sent a telegram to
Reagan, urging him to seek a full
settlement of the Soviet Jewry
problem when he meets with
Gorbachev.
"We have confidence in Presi-
dent Reagan's concern for Soviet
Jewry and we trust that this issue
will be on the table at the sum-
mit," said Pamela Cohen, of
Chicago, the UCSJ's newly-
elected president.
The telegram expressed ap-
preciation for the Administra-
tion's efforts to obtain exit visas
for specific Jewish families. "Now
is the time to negotiate full
freedom of emigration for all who
wish to leave in accordance with
the Helsinki Final Act which was
signed by the Soviet Union," the
UCSJ stressed.
The site of the meeting in the
capital of Iceland may make it
more difficult for Jewish and
other groups to be on hand to
publicize their issues ss they did
when Reagan and Gorbachev held
their first summit in Geneva in
November, 1985. In addition, the
first day of the meeting is a Satur-
day, and the second is the eve of
Yom Kippur.
OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMEN
SOI s( HKKIHKK. PRESIDENT
KREIM HKKANOtt. V P I.EN MORRISON. I P
Office Suppi>s furniture aJ'P>nt Printing
Mttl NW 74th St.. Miami
Hade: 099-3861 H rmard 4b"l-9tiMi
IW.V
Fighting for Friend's Freedom
Alexander Baiter holds a poster of his close friend. Prisoner of
Conscience Zachar Zunshein, in the Tel Aviv offices of the Israel
Public Council for Soviet Jewry. In March. 1981,, Baiter and Zu n-
shein, both of Riga, demonstrated in central Moscow far
visas. Baiter was eventually released, but Zunshein was sentenced
to three brutal years in the Gulag.
Bomb Explodes in Athens
ATHENS (JTA) A bomb exploded in a building
housing the Central Jewish Board of Greece here early
Wednesday morning (Oct. 7) but police believe it was in-
tended for the Athens Workers Union which has offices in
the same building. The blast, at 3 a.m. local time, cau
minor damage. No one was hurt.
THE POLICE THEORY is based on the fact that two
other bombs exploded at about the same time at the offices
of the General Federation of Greek Workers and another
office of the Athens Workers Union. No group has claimed
responsibility for the bombings.
-
=v\
Commitment, miDD
makes us Jews. That's
why we're beside you
when you need us
most. After all. Our
Real fmokjcmem is
uith the Living.
OUAMDMNPIAN
Riverside
Memorial Chapel
Dade Bro*an* -PannBo'
Kn.tth J Lmn Mgr
LeoMac* Cc V>'
W*a>n F Sauison v P
Uougms La/arus VPFC
AtartG Bresi" FD
FOW.-VO Dotn FD
M-10 10-B6 M-lunuMi M-tO-liUS M-KHO-86 N-10-10-M M-iain.*.


Secret Archives
May Reveal French Collaborators
Friday, October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Ten
tons of top secret archives
describing in detail the ac-
tivities of French col-
laborators with the Nazis
during the German occupa-
tion of France will be
analyzed by French
historians and members of
the State prosecution. The
archives, which consist of
several million documents,
are believed to be the
largest such collection not
yet classified by any
authority.
The former head of the French
Secret Service, Alexandre de
We're Watching
PLO in D.C.,
Meese Says
NEW YORK (JTA) At-
torney General Edwin Meese told
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions that the Justice Department
was "looking very carefully" into
the activities of the PLO office in
Washington and hinted that the
office might be closed down.
Responding to a question
following an address to the Con-
ference, Meese said the Depart
Edwin Meese
ment was "taking certain steps to
see if there was any violation of
law" in the PLO's activities in
Washington. He added: "We will
not allow that office to aid ter-
rorists or to be a source of support
for terrorists anywhere."
THE ATTORNEY General said
there were "sensitive aspects" to
the situation that he said "may af-
fect actions we may take." The
PLO was permitted to open a so-
called information office in
Washington during the Carter
Administration.
On other issues, the Attorney
General said an early decision was
expected on whether to bar Preai
dent Kurt Waldheim of Austria
from the United States as a
former Nazi. The Presidents Con-
ference and other groups have
called on the Administration to
refuse entry to Waldheim under
the "watch list" provision of the
immigration law.
Meese said that he deplored re-
cent "leaks" emanating from his
department that charged various
Israeli officials with wrongdoing.
i i.8*1*'' your remor* SI these
leaks, which are a matter of great
distress to me personally and to
this Administration," he said.
He declined to comment on the
case of confessed spy Jonathan
Pollard, noting only that sentenc
ing would take place in November.
I hope that other problems"
elated to the case "will conclude
rapidly," he added.
Marenches, revealed in a recently-
published autobiography that
upon his appointment as head of
intelligence in 1970, he discovered
to his amazement that 10 tons of
documents were stored without
ever having been examined.
He said he did not have the
means or the staff to undertake a
thorough analysis but ordered
that a few documents picked at
random be examined to ascertain
their authenticity.
HE SAID the random selection
showed the documents were not
only authentic but threw a new
and tragic light on the Nazi oc-
cupation. According to Marenches
they showed that many people,
honored as war and resistance
heroes, had actually collaborated
with the Nazis and even were paid
for their services. Marenches, who
resigned in 1981, said the col-
laborators included "famous
names" among the so-called war
heroes.
The President of the National
Assembly, Jacques Chaban-
Delmas, himself a former
resistance fighter, called for an
immediate thorough examination
of these records. Chaban-Delmas
said that leaving them in secret
storage as they now are would br-
ing discredit to all former
resistance fighters.
Defense Minister Andre Giraud
said that the archives will be hand-
ed over to the historical depart-
ment of his Ministry to be examin-
ed by its researchers and by the
staff of the State Attorney.
Giraud said the National
Resistance Commission, a con-
sultative body accredited to the
Defense Ministry, will also be
authorized to examine the
documents.
IN CASE of legal proceedings
both sides, the State and the
Defense, will be given free access
to the pertinent papers. Giraud
did not sav whether the
documents will be made available
to independent and foreign
researchers.
But even if incriminating
evidence is found it will not be ad-
missible in French courts because
all war crimes, except genocide,
are covered by the statute of
limitations. The release or publica-
tion of the evidence could,
however, affect the reputations of
countless people including, accor-
ding to Marenches, prominent na-
tional figures.
American ORT Federation President Alvin L. Gray (right) con-
gratulate* Prof. Efkraim Katxir, farmer President of the State of
Israel, on his election as president of the World ORT Union at the
recent WOU Congress in Jerusalem. Katxir extended his own con-
gratulations to Gray on his election as World Union secretary.
Some U50 delegates from 27 countries, including more than tOO
delegates from the American ORT Federation, participated in
the Congress.
Kollek Due for Top Award
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) -
Mayor Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem
will receive the second Raymond
and Miriam Klein Foundation An-
nual Award for "distinguished
contribution to the advancement
of Jewish life and thought." He'll
be presented the sward, which in-
cludes a 1100,000 grant, early
next year.
>jV&f(e4&n Cfaiy&melA SSed&uie/Statin Q)iv&i&n '
You Are Cordially Invited To Attend _
The Jose Marti Forest Park Inaugural Ball
Dedicated To The Establishment of
The 430,000 Tree Jose Marti Forest Park
In The Judean Hills, Jerusalem
Participate In This Gala Event
Sunday, November 16, 1986
Grand Ballroom of the Omni Hotel
1601 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
Cocktails 6:00 P.M.

tAiauat SlCa^Ue/i Sfmmtmjt
Co-Chairmen
MAYOR ALEX DAOUD
MAYOR ISIDORO CUEVAS
MAYOR RAUL MARTINEZ
MAYOR PEDRO REBOREDO
MAYOR DOROTHY THOMSON
Dinner 7:30 p.m.
^Audi-man
DR. AND MRS. HORACIO AGUIRRE
DR. AND MRS. LUIS BOTIFOL
MR. AND MRS. ZEV BUFMAN
MR. AND MRS. GEORGE FELDENKREIS
MR. AND MRS. ABEL HOLTZ
MR. AND MRS. JORGE MAS CANOSA
MR. AND MRS. RALPH SANCHEZ
MR. AND MRS. ANDRES VARGAS GOMEZ
M*6* iAl**i &Kcjecl ^omnuMee &ft /fattnnfton
Jose M. Alonso
Rabbi Amram Amselem
Ramiro Campins
Consul David Cohen
Flora Cornide
Jose Credl
Sol Credl
Cary De Leon
Dr. Ssmusl I. Cohen
Executive VTce-Pres.
JNFot America
Diego Del Pino
Richard Druks
Moises Eshkenazl
Angel Fernandez Varela
Rolando Fernandez Padron
Fernando Flgueredo
Martha Franchls de Diaz
Salomon Qarszl
ZsvW. Kogan
ProsMoftt
JNF Southern Region
Lulsa Garcia Toledo
Rafael Garcia Toledo
Juan Garcia
Silvia Garcia Frutos
Fernando Gomez Plna
Wilf redo Gorl
Sergio Grobler
Jose Heres
Rabbi Barry J. Konovitch
Isaac Maya
Ana Maria Monies Clares
Juan Matalon
Nancy Perez Crespo
Jose J. Poza
Comm Abe Resnlck
Norms Reboredo
Rosie Rlvas
Lula Rodriguez
Gloria Sotolongo
Rela Schmadoski
Julio Schmadoski
Leon Schuster
Evita L. Suarez

Nily Falic
Director
KKL Latin Division
Mordechal Dayan
Wortd Co-Chslrman
KKL Jerusalem
For Information and Reservations:
JNF Karon Kayamath Leisrael Latin Division, 420 Lincoln Rd., Sulta 349, Miami Baach, FL 33139
Phono 532-9706, 539-6464
lOOOQOOOOOOQQOOOOQOOOOOOQ


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10, 1986
Kol Nidre To Launch
Yom Kippur Sunday Eve
The awesome musical sound of the Kol
Nidre prayer will launch Yom Kippur ser-
vices this Sunday evening. More like an
operatic statement of agonizing self-
confrontation than in the tradition of the
trop, or of the later incorporation of Middle
Eastern musical petterns into the liturgy,
Kol Nidre is a devastating religious
experience.
The prayer denudes us of all pretense, of
all common occasions during the outgoing
year when we voiced vows signifying our
very human impulses toward omniscience
and omnipotence. Instead, in this prayer, we
bow before the inevitable. Man is not God,
for Whom all power and all-knowing are
reserved exclusively. For man to have made
such vows during the year on those common
occasions is both arrogant and errant.
The Mishnah devotes eight chapters to
Yom Kippur which is called in that work
Yom HorKippurim. Of these eight chapters,
only the last deals with the laws pertaining
to the Fast The first seven describe in far
more dramatic detail the order of its
performance.
From this, it seems clear that the codifiers
of the Mishnah seemed far more concerned
and therefore placed far more emphasis on
the haiachot of the service on the Day of
Atonement than on the Fast itself.
Installing Ancient 'New'
In the Kol Nidre, we are cleansed of our
common human impulses and stand before
the inevitability of God's extraordinary
judgment. In this way, we sweep away the
old. We install the ancient "new' of Jewish
imperatives governing all human interrela-
tionships, and we strive toward the max-
imum of our Jewish spiritual ideals.
It is not the Fast that ordains the holiness
of Yom Kippur. It is the order of the Fast
and, indeed, of the Yom Kippur service
generally, that supercedes the Fast itself. In
the end, the order of the service makes the
why of Yom Kippur stand paramount rather
than the what. The melody of Kol Nidre
rapidly rivets us to that emotional and
spiritual mood and places the accent of the
holiday squarely where it belongs.
As the New Year begins, we wish you a
"good closing." May you be inscribed into
the Book of Life.
Wishing Reagan Well
We wish President Reagan well at Reyk-
javik. It will be a difficult moment for him.
Too often, there is the feeling that we are as
babes in the woods in our dealings with the
Soviet Union. This feeling runs especially
deeply for those of us who saw the Allies
bowing before the Russian onslaught after
World War II that gobbled up Poland,
Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Czechoslovakia,
Hungary, Rumania, Yugoslavia. Not to men-
tion East Germany. Who saw this
"inevitability" of Leninism as newspaper
headlines, not as pages in a history book
already rewritten many times over.
One strength of Mr. Reagan is that he is
the first of many Presidents who has been
able to put the Soviets off-balance. The cost
to our economy and on our social structure
has been near-devastating, but he is en-
thusiastic about his purpose, regardless of
price.
This should serve Mr. Reagan well at
Jewish Florid iam
orrirEatfPUirT iaiw> n rw win ni'iw
po BaaOIIVTJ "i- '-*
r[>* IHOTHrT 11.. Ml SIM IS sl/ssrsM.M>I
, Cnr, '<.. ;ITl>.*.n.*>
rrM-io n. unirua

Reykjavik. Already, the Soviet Union's
Mikhail Gorbachev has attempted to up the
ante at Reykjavik by announcing that he
would bring his wife along, thus introducing
an extraneous element 01 what might be in-
terpreted as social camaraderie between the
two First Families that, happily, Mr.
Reagan has refused to emulate. First Lady
Nacy will not be there.
Even so small a maneuver on the Presi-
dent's part demonstrates that he is deter-
mined to focus on the business matters at
hand to stress substance as a prelude to a
future summit in the United States, to set a
tough agenda and to avoid the softer trapp-
ings that might encourage him to grasp at
these trappings when the negotiating takes
a hard turn against his own agenda of more
serious considerations.
One of these considerations is human
rights. Mr. Reagan this week vowed that he
intends to press the issue with Mr. Gor-
bachev and to accent the fate of Soviet
Jewry. We commend him for his determina-
tion in this.
If a summit is what the President believes
is necessary between the two leaders, then
his view of Reykjavik as a "base camp" on
the road to a summit is excellent. And that,
too, deserves our applause.
Dim Light on Dimona
Once again, Israel is being hurled into the
international headlines this time involving
Dimona and what goes on there. Around the
world, the message is clear. Deep in the in-
nards the reactor at Dimona are 200 nuclear
warheads.
It would be idle to speculate about
Dimona. It would be just as idle to continue
the speculation about whether the number
W KflOW NOTHING ABOurTHtS -
6UTBKA*0!
TUt tAXN/U* IN l*TWUl.
mm
of nuclear warheads allegedly stored there is
accurate. Or whether, indeed, Israel has any
nuclear warheads at all.
A nuclear reactor does not continue to
function year after year without something
going on there. And: given Israel's extraor-
dinarily large number of capable nuclear
scientists and technologists, it should not be
surprising that nuclear warheads are in its
arsenal. As Abba Eban has put it: why
shouldn't Jews have nuclear weapons?
Didn't they pioneer the field in the first
place?
The international outcry is hypocritical. It
is the rest of the world and its commitment
to the general Arab determination to
destroy Israel in short, the geopolitical
pressures of the region that forced Israel
into nuclear weapons research as a
necessary condition to its survival.
Six Senators Withdraw
Records Eyed of Possible Winners
SVHCWIOII M'll < iMCW Oo. -> '< '*- IM0O "~
inn I Mil imu* ilacai '> -* c- i If
m<4 UW Owl*" uimhi, yon iimmi
Friday, October 10,1986
Volume 59
7 TISHRI 5747
Number 41
By MORRIS AMITAY
WASHINGTON Six
U.S. Senators have decided
not to run for reelection this
November. Of these, two
are considering presidential
bids, one has been mention-
ed as a possible guber-
natorial candidate, and
three are retiring from
public life, apparently for
good.
An analysis of the views and
records of their probable suc-
cessors indicates that support for
Israel in the Senate will be
strengthened in the 100th Con-
gress convening next year. In-
creasingly, elections in both the
House and Senate are being won
by candidates who support
stronger U.S.-Israel ties.
THIS POSITIVE development
may be explained by increased
awareness among this new
generation of politicians that sup-
port for legislation maintaining
Israel's security is beneficial both
from a political standpoint and a
national interest standpoint.
SENATOR Thomas Eagieton.
Democrat of Missouri, who is
stepping down after three six-
year terms, has compiled a voting
record on the whole supportive of
Israel. Although he occasionally
voted against foreign aid bills and
did support the sale of advanced
U.S. F-15 fighters to Saudi Arabia
in 1978, Eagieton has always been
sympathetic to Israel's concern,
and has opposed the more recent
proposals to arm Jordan and
Saudi Arabia.
He will be replaced by either ex-
Republican Gov. "Kit" Bond or
current Missouri Lt. Gov. Harriet
Woods, a relative of Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum. Both have made
good statements and are expected
to be supportive of closer
U.S. Israel ties.
SEN. HART of Colorado is
relinquishing the Senate seat he
has held for two terms in order ac-
tively to pursue the Democratic
nomination for President in 1988.
Hart has compiled a perfect
voting record on Israel-related
issues in the Senate. Unfortunate-
ly, his failure to clarify his position
on the transfer of the U.S. Em-
bassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem
during the 1984 New York state
primary cost him some Jewish
support.
Although Hart's consistent sup-
port will be missed, it will pro-
bably be duplicated to a great ex-
tent by either of the two House
members vying for his seat
Republican Ken Kramer and
Democrat Tim Wirth. Kramer has
had a more consistent record over
the last two years, but Wirth has a
better overall record.
Paul Laxalt of Nevada, a close
confidante of President Reagan,
and an engaging personality, has
been accessible to the Jewish com-
munity, with whom he has tried to
forge some ties on a national level.
But Laxalt, an Administration
loyalist, has consistently sup-
ported all the controversial arms
sales to Arab foes of Israel. Also,
he usually voted against final
paaaage of foreign aid bills con-
taining military and economic
assistance for Israel.
Laxalt, currently testing the
waters for a presidential bid, will
be replaced by either Republican
Jim Santini, an ex-Democratic
Representative, or by current
Democratic Representative Harry
Reid.
REID, a two-termer who serves
on the Middle East Subcommittee
of the Foreign Affairs Committee,
has been excellent on Israel-
related issues, while Santini's
record in the House was mixed.
Reid is ahead at this point in a
close race, and he would be the
preferable candidate.
all of the six
running to replace
definitely be more
from a pro-Israel
As for the three remaining
retirees, Republicans Goldwater
of Arizona and Mathias of
Maryland, and Democrat Long of
Louisiana
possibilities
them will
favorable
standpoint.
Goldwater, while alluding to his
own Jewish heritage (a Jewish
grandfather), amassed one of the
most negative records in the
Senate. He has been particularly
acerbic in his verbal comments
about Israel's leadership and
American supporters of Israel.
Mathias, a moderate Republican
who voted for foreign aid, has
decried the influence of American
Jews on Middle East policies and
has supported all Arab arms sales
As a member of the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee, he has been able
to play a mischief-making role
EXPECTED Jewish support
for any potential opponent was
undoubtedly a factor in Mathias'
decision to call it quits after three
terms and either Democratic Rep.
Barbara Mikulski or Linda Chavez
will undoubtedly be much more
favorable.
The colorful and almost legen-
dary Russell Long is ending 36
years of service amid rumors he
may run for Governor of Loui-
siana. Long's largely negative
record, with just a few recent
bright spots, is based more on in
difference to the issues rather
than any malice. It is anticipated
that either Rep. Henson Moore or
Rep. John Breaux will show more
attention to Israel-related
subjects.
It is gratifying to be able to look
forward to the certainty that the
half-dozen new Senators filling
open seats will be sttuned u>
Israel's value as an ally to our own
country, and more involved with
their Jewish constituents.


Labor Party Fears
Likud Return As
'Unfit' At Helm
Friday, October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By YA'ACOV BAR-SATAN
Don't talk to me about
the rotation. I'm not
prepared to say what will
happen even one minute
after it, because I don't
think there should be a rota-
tion. I don't think we should
hand over power to them
(the Likud) because I don't
think they're capable of
governing. '
That is the opinion of Minister
of Health. Mordechai Gur. Like
several other Alignment
ministers, he regards next Tues-
day's rotation with a mixture of
gloom and apprehension. He and
Yaacov Tzur, the minister of im-
migration and absorption, have
made no secret of their hope that
a cabinet crisis would cause the
break-up of the national unity
government and trigger early
elections.
THERE HAS been no shortage
of such crises during Prime
Minister Shimon Peres'
precarious two-year reign. But
the latest, and most certainly the
last, of these was resolved about
two months ago when Peres
demanded and received the
resignation of Justice Minister
Yitzhak Modai who, only a few
months earlier, had been forced to
resign his post at the finance
ministry. On both occasions,
Modai's vitriolic attacks against
Peres sparked the demand for his
resignation.
The Likud gave in to the de-
mand, preferring to endure one
more humiliation rather than
jeopardize the transition of power.
In the wake of that capitulation,
the rotation would now seem to be
a virtual certainty.
In his two years as Prime
Minister, Peres has changed from
the most maligned politician in the
arena to the most popular Prime
Minister in the country's history.
The opinion polls show him far
ahead of Shamir and. contrary to
predictions, he has maintained
this popularity throughout his
term.
HOWEVER, it is by no means
certain that Peres can retain this
popularity as Vice Premier when
he loses the aura of authority that
goes with the Prime Minister's of-
fice Moreover, Peres' image-
builders have not had the same
success in revamping the image
the Labor Party, which is still
regarded with suspicion by large
sectors of the public.
Even militant Labor politicians
admit that if elections were held
now, the results would not differ
greatly from the last elections.
Some say the trend to the right-
wing of the political spectrum has
been stemmed. Some even say
that it has been halted, but few
Labor politicians are ready to ven-
ture that it has been reversed
which is why even the strongest
opponents of the rotation, the
Gurs and Tzurs of Labor, are
unlikely to make a move to bring
down the government after
Shamir assumes power.
"Anyone who hopes the Shamir
government will be short-lived
may be in for a disappointment."
warns Labor's Minister of
Economic Development Gad
Yaacobi.
AS PRIME MINISTER. Peres
could have brought down the
government simply by handing in
his resignation to the President.
With Shamir as Prime Minister,
Peres will have to obtain a vote of
no-confidence in the Knesset.
Since the religious parties are
largely opposed to the break-up of
the national unity government, or
the holding of early elections,
Peres has no chance for the
foreseeable future of obtaining
the necessary majority.
Labor's small coalition partner,
the three-man Shinui Party, has
not yet decided whether to remain
in the government. But whatever
its members decide, its numbers
are too small to make a dent in the
political map.
That does not mean to say the
next two years will be smooth sail
ing in the Knesset. Many
observers in both Labor and the
Likud anticipate more violations
of coalition discipline which will
make the second half of the na-
tional unity government's
50-month term even stormier
than the first. But the overall im-
pression is that the rotation will
bring more continuity than
change.
FOR PERES, the move to the
Foreign Ministry will be a major
setback After determining the
national agenda and coordinating
international contacts with heads
of-state. culminating in the
meeting with King Hassan of
Morocco and Egypt's President
Mubarak, Peres will see his power
to initiate major foreign policy
developments reduced to a
modest level. In fact, one com-
mentator predicts that dealing

Shamir (left) has studiously avoided
precipitating conflict with Peres.
with Israel's relations with Japan
and Holland, rather than with the
peace process, "will drive Peres
crazy."
This is perhaps exaggerated.
Peres will retain a major influence
on government policy in his
capacity as Vice Premier, par-
ticularly in the economic sphere.
But there is no question that the
role of initiating major foreign
policy overtures will now fall to
Shamir.
Continued on Page 8-A
Precarious Balance
Religious Parties' Decisive Role
By YA'ACOV BAR-NATAN
That the precariously
balanced national unity
government has survived in-
tact until now is largely due
to the decisive role played
by the religious parties. The
National Religious Party
(NRP), Agudat Israel, Shas
and Morasha all stressed the
national unity ideal in their
election campaigns, presen-
ting themselves to the
public as a bridge between
the Labor Alignment and
the Likud. Indeed, the ultra-
Orthodox parties.
Shas and Agudat Israel, which
are non-Zionist, even anti-Zionist
in ideology, played a key role in
the negotiations between Labor
and the Likud that led to the for-
mation of the national unity
government.
IN ONE SENSE the religious
parties kept their promise to the
electorate. They could theoretical-
ly have obtained much more in
terms of religious legislation and
government funds for religious
education had they sold
themselves to the highest bidder
either Labor or the Likud. In a
narrow-based government the rul-
ing party would have been much
more indebted to its religious
supporters.
But the religious power-brokers
insisted on forming and maintain-
ing a broad-based coalition, rejec-
ting the not-infrequent overtures
from some Labor cabinet
ministers to break up the national
unity government and form a nar-
row coalition under Shimon
Peres.
As the rotation enters its second
phase, the survival of the Shamir-
led national unity government
depends no less on the continued
support of the religious parties
than did the Peres-led coalition.
IN RECENT MONTHS.
however, there have been signs
that some of the religious parties
are having second thoughts about
backing a national unity govern-
ment. The first to defect from the
coalition was Rabbi Avraham
Werdiger of Montana. Recently,
Continued on Page 10-A
Shamir Seen As Reticent,
Secretive, Patient
By YA'ACOV BAR-NATAN
Yitzhak Shamir is one of
the most reticent, even
secretive, men ever to hold
office in Israel. Like all
politicians he appreciates
the value of publicity, but
unlike his colleagues, he
does not relish being cast in
the limelight and has, on oc-
casion, been known to wince
visibly at the sight of a
reporter.
His home telephone number is
unlisted, and one sure way to pro-
voke his ire is for a journalist to
get hold of that number. It has
been changed several times.
Some say it is just his character.
Others say it is due to half a
lifetime spent in clandestine ac-
tivity of one kind or another. Dur-
ing the British Mandate he was a
leader of Lehi, the most extremist
of the Jewish underground
groups.
UNLIKE Menachem Begin's
Irgun Zva'i Leumi (Etzel), Lehi
did not stop its attacks on the
British even during the Second
World War. It is an open secret
that Lehi was responsible for the
Continued on Page 11 A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10. 1986

Joseph Lamport (right), who graduated from Yeshiva Univer-
sity's Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Lav: last June, is the first
alumnus in the school's 10-year history to be appointed to its
faculty. Lamport, shown speaking with Dr. Norman Lamm,
president of Yeshiva University, is serving this fall as a full-time
visiting assistant professor.
Burg Leaves Gov't. After
38 Years of Service
JERUSALEM (JTA) Yosef Burg, who served in
virtually every Israeli government since 1948, received a
warm, emotional farewell from his colleagues at Sunday's
Cabinet meeting. Burg, 77, submitted his resignation to
Premier Shimon Peres last Friday and it became effective
48 hours later, according to the law.
HIS LAST portfolio was Religious Affairs Minister.
His successor, former Education Minister Zevulun Ham-
mer, selected by the National Religious Party, was ex-
pected to be approved by the Knesset Tuesday.
Hammer, leader of the NRP's "young guard" faction,
was elected party leader last summer at the NRP's conven-
tion. Burg has been a Minister almost without interruption
for 35 years and a member of the Knesset for 38 years. He
will retain his Knesset seat.
Wiesenthal Center Gives
Aussies Info on Nazis
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Marvin Hier, dean of the Simon
Wieaenthal Center in Lob
Angeles, announced last Wednes-
day (Oct. 1) that the Center has
given the Australian government
a list of 40 names of Nazi war
criminals suspected to be living in
Australia. Hier said the Center
will turn over an additional 150
names of suspected Nazi war
criminals to the Australian
government within a few weeks.
Hier, who made the announce-
ment at a press conference, said
the Center's recent discovery of a
new source of information on
Nazis who fled Europe after
World War II and settled in
various countries around the
world marked "the beginning of a
Push Human
Rights, Reagan
Urged
Continued from Page 1-A
U.S. authorities and for promi-
nent Soviet dissident Yuri Orlov.
Alexander Goldfarb said:
"While we are gratified that Yuri
Oriov. a great human rights ac-
tivist, was released by the Soviets
following the release of Nicholas
Daniloff, and while we hope for
the release of my father and many
other long time refuseniks, I want
to make this clear: We are not
fighting for individual tokens of
goodwill but for the intrinsic
rights of human beings to live in
the country of their choice.
"When the free world accepts
tokens of goodwill instead of
demanding the fundamental
human right to live where one
chooses, it condones a modem
form of the slave trade and that is
profoundly disappointing and
distasteful to us."
new age in the search for Nazi war
criminals."
Although Hier would not be
specific about how or where the
Center gained access to the data,
he did say that based on the new
information, the Center will be
able to turn over lists of 3,000 to
5,000 names of Nazi war criminals
who are living in various countries
to the governments within the
next six months.
The Australian government has
informed the Wiesenthal Center
that it will investigate the lists,
Hier said.
The initial list of 40 names, ac-
cording to Hier, identifies
primarily Latvian and Lithuanian
collaborators who had not chang-
ed their identities after leaving
Eastern Europe. He said the war
criminals from this region retain-
ed their names because the Berlin
Documentation Center, an exten-
sive archive on Nazi war criminals
and collaborators, lacks records of
Latvian and Lithuanian
collaborators.
Study Shows
Military Balance in Jeopardy
TEL AVIV The overall
Arab-Israeli military
balance has deteriorated
somewhat from Israel's
point of view, according to
the Middle East Military
Balance 1985, an annual
publication of Tel Aviv
University's Jaffee Center
for Strategic Studies.
Presenting the major findings
of the study at a recent press con-
ference. Maj. Gen. (res.) Aharon
Yariv, director of the Jaffee
Center, noted the continued
growth of Arab armies, further
diversification of their sources of
supply, and the improved quality
of Arab weapons.
THERE IS almost no weapons
system possessed by the Israel
Defense Forces that the Arabs do
not have as well, he said. Further,
the buildup of the Arab armies has
come at a time when economic cir-
cumstances have dictated major
cutbacks in Israel's defense
budget.
The most significant military
expansion has occurred in Iraq,
which since the outbreak of its
war with Iran has increased its
ground forces from 12 to 33 divi-
sions and has acquired huge
numbers of tanks, planes, and
helicopters.
But the only real threat to Israel
at present comes from Syria, Gen.
Yariv said. Since 1982. the Syrian
army has increased by 50 percent
and now consists of half a million
regular troops and 250,000
reserves. Syrian capacity for a
surprise attack has been
strengthened by the acquisition of
sophisticated missile systems and
the possibility of concentrating
troops between Damascus and the
Golan Heights.
SINCE ISRAEL has a relative
ly small standing army and is
dependent on its reserve forces,
which take time to mobilize, it
must remain in a state of high
alert against the possibility of a
surprise attack by Syria, Gen.
Yariv warned. However, he said
he did not view such an attack as
imminent, and added that Syria
has not yet reached its goal of
"strategic parity" with Israel.
S. Africa Israelis
Seen Returning
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
About 200 Israelis living in South
Africa returned to Israel over the
past few months, and a larger
number is expected to return in
the near future, the Absorption
Ministry reports. About 15,000
Israelis live in South Africa, and
the Ministry has sent represen-
tatives to Cape Town and Johan-
nesburg to encourage them to
return. Ministry officials said the
yordim are motivated by the in-
creasing violence in South Africa
and better employment oppor-
tunities in Israel.
BEACH S
glatt
K0SMEP
l_l
WORE CLUB
Bf AO
OPEN ALL YEAP
Make The
SNORE CLUB HOTEL
YOUR YEAR ROUND HOME
doty plus lunch e Private
Otympic Pool, right on me
Rooms w*n COLOR TV *
tnrerfotnmefn bynogogut
Mashgwch on Premises Free
PofMng e Personal Attention
Hoes wm Benovrw unmwno rommm
538-7811
FREE!!
JUICE TEA
and SNACKS
SERVED TO
YOUR ROOM
THROUGHOUT
THE NIGHT
BY REQUEST
On the positive side. Gen. Yariv
noted that the Arab world is divid-
ed at present and that Egypt has
remained faithful to its peace
treaty with Israel. It was unlikely,
he added, that the Arab armies
could maintain their present
growth rates, since they were
dependent on the now steadily
shrinking supply of petrodollars.
Dr. Mark A. Heller, deputy
director of the Jaffee Center and
editor of the Balance, said that the
most important development in
the region this year had been the
decline in "strategic ner-
vousness." Israel's withdrawal
from Lebanon had removed the
most immediate source of conflict
between Israel and Syria, while
Iraq's military buildup had led to a
more even balance of power with
Iran.
GIVEN THE decline in super
power interest and involvement ii
the area, the Middle East is more
stable today than it has been dur-
ing the previous three years It-
Heller concluded.
The Middle East Militar
Balance is written by Dr. Heller.
Aharon Levran and Zeev Eytan
It has been published annualK
since 1983. The survey includes a
review of the major strategic
developments in the region during
1984 and 1985. an inventory of
armed forces in the area, and an
analysis of various local military
balances.
Director Named
LONG BEACH, Calif. (JTA,
Sandi Goldstein has become ex
ecutive director of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Long
Beach and West Orange Count;
Now bouncing
a check at
Ftogler Federal
is like dribbling
a ball without
air.
It jut anil be done
Because now Flaglcr Federal gives you two new ways to avoid
Check-bouncing, Simply get a Flaglcr Federal Master* jrd and your
(Impressor Supcr< huprcM Account can become bounce-proof
()rcombine a Flaglcr Federal Money Market, High Performance iir
Passbook Savings Account with a Flaglcr Federal checking account
and your checking account can become houncc-proot It's that can
With this new service, we'll automatically transfer available funds
from your MasterCard or savings Account to cover any overdrafts on
your checking account. So you'll never have to worry about bouncing
a check again
Plus, you II have the security of knowing that it's like having a
credit line built into your checking account So you can write a check
whenever you want to without the tear of overdrafts
So come into any of the *() convenient Flagler Federal office--
today or call 1-800 -FIAGLER and ask about our bounce-proof check
ingserviccs VhiII find that they re more than a lot of hot air
FbgleriyHl
Federal fit
// lufera /*m*>utt/anf*- *> undtruai*! Ihr Hint la himtetmn


Beverly Sills, general director of the New York
I'xty Opera, and Dr. Isadore Rosen/eld.
Clinical Professor of Medicine at Cornell
Medical College, are honored by the American
Society for Technion Women s Division at its
annual Medical Engineering Program Lun-
cheon held at Maxim's in Manhattan.
Women's Division Co-President Ramie J.
Stlbert chaired the event which raised over
$125,000 for Technion's Gerontological
Research Center. Shown here are left to right
Dr. Rosenfeld. Beverly Sills. Ramie J. Stlbert.
Technion President Dr. Josef Singer, and
ATS Women's Division Director Florence
Cohen.
Netanyahu Says
Arabs 'Fuel' S. Africa Economy
NEW YORK Benjamin
Netanyahu. Israel's Ambassador
to the United Nations, last week
charged Arab countries with
"fueling" South Africa's economy
by clandestinely supplying South
Africa with virtually all of its oil
needs.
Speaking at an American
Jewish Congress luncheon at the
Pierre Hotel here, he reported
that Arab oil exports to South
Africa totaled almost $8 billion in
the last six years. This year an
estimated $2 billion in oil from the
Persian Gulf alone will be shipped
secretly to South Africa.
ISRAEL'S TRADE with South
Africa annually constitutes about
$100 million, less than half of one
percent of South Africa's total
trade and about three-fourths of
one percent of Israel's total
exports.
Netanyahu suggested that the
Arabs have been engaged in a
cover-up of their illegal oil
shipments by launching a pro-
paganda campaign against Israel.
Inlnrmation uncovered in the
Shipping Research Bureau of
Amsterdam and Lloyd's Voyage
R* rda showed that approx-
imately 27 million metric tons of
crude oi] shipped to South Africa
from 1980 through the first
quarter of 1986 originated in the
Arab states and Iran.
CITING THE Arab campaign
of "slander against Israel," in
which they accused Israel of sup-
porting apartheid. Ambassador
Netanyahu said that "Israel can-
not merely resist the lies, it must
expose the liars because what the
Arabs are doing is accusing Israel
of the very practices they
themselves are guilty of."
During his discussion, Am-
bassador Netanyahu revealed that
contacts between Israel and black
African countries allegedly hostile
to Israel are taking place. He at-
tributed the change on the part of
Black Africa to the "decline of
Arab oil power which has created
the opportunity for many African
countries to identify the value to
them of renewed contacts with
Israel." He noted that a Black
African diplomat whom he did not
identify had told him: "We are no
longer afraid of (the Arabs), and
we no longer believe their
promises."
Two weeks ago, Israel's
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
met with several representatives
of African nations while visiting
the U.S.. and public announce-
ment of renewed relations with
Israel is imminent. Ambassador
Netanyahu said.
"It is not enough to merely
break down the wall that extreme
radical enemies of Israel are try-
ing to put around us; you have to
build a wall around them," he
said.
AS AN EXAMPLE of this type
of offensive movement,
Netanyahu cited the recent case
of the President of the Congo
whose visit with President
Reagan was cancelled after the
Foreign Minister of the Congo
stood up in the UN and equated
Israel and South Africa with Nazi
Germany.
Subsequently, the President of
the Popular Republic of the Congo
apologized for this remark. "This
is the first time I can remember in
the history of the campaign
against Israel," Ambassador
Netanyahu remarked, "that one
of the vilifiers actually made a
public retraction and paid a price
for vilifying Israel."
Friday. October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
London Times Says Israel
Has 200 Nukes At Dimona
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
repeated Monday its long-
standing request that Israel
accept international
safeguards and inspection
for its nuclear facilities.
"W believe that regional
security will be enhanced if all
states in the region would adhere
to the nuclear non-proliferation
treaty," State Department deputy
spokesman Charles Redman said.
"We are concerned about the ex-
istence of unsafeguarded nuclear
facilities in Israel and made our
concern known to the government
"f Israel."
REDMAN'S comments came
after he was asked about a report
in the London Sunday Times that
Israel has 200 nuclear warheads.
He would not comment on
whether the U.S. believes Israel
has any such warheads.
"Israel has stated that it will not
be the first state to introduce
nuclear weapons in the region,"
Redman said.
Premier Shimon Peres declared
at Sunday's Cabinet meeting that
Israel adheres to its long-standing
policy on nuclear weapons: "We
will not be the first to introduce
nuclear weapons into the area."
The Foreign Ministry issued an
identical statement.
Peres spoke in response to the
Sunday Times of London story
that Israel has produced up to 200
nuclear weapons at a secret
underground plant in the Negev.
Peres told the Cabinet that
Israel has frequently been faced
with sensational reports in the
world media relating to the
nuclear reactor at Dimona in the
Negev. There were no comments
from any of the Ministers and no
further discussion of the matter.
ACCORDING TO the Sunday
Times' report, which was headlin-
ed around the world. Israel's
nuclear weapons arsenal was
disclosed by Mordechai V'anunu. a
31-year-old nuclear technician
who worked at Dimona for 10
years before he was laid off with
180 Dimona workers last
November. Vanuir.i presently
lives in Australia.
If the Times' report were true.
Israel would rank sixth among the
world's nuclear powers.
Israel's Tennis
Team Beats
Swiss Stars
NEW YORK (JTA) Israel's
national tennis team defeated
host Switzerland 4-1 in the Davis
Cup European Zone B final last
week, moving Israel for the first
time into the 16-nation final round
of competition for the following
year's cup.
Most of the matches in the sur-
prise victory were lengthy and
hard-fought.
jtetjjggr)
PALMETTO GENERAL HOSPITAL
An American Medical International, Inc. Health Care Center
2001 West 68th Street. Hialeah. Florida 33016
823-5000
'Croat* Land From Sand"
3 STRICTLY
KOSHER
MEALS DAILY
Kashruth Under Strict Supervision Synagogue on Premises A/C
"owns Private Bath Deity Maid Service Refrigerator m every Room
Jewish Shows Bingo Movies TV
SEASON SPECIAL
NOV. 2-May 3 26 Week Minimum Stay
$166
SHARE RM
I PER WEEK
PRIVATE RM
PER WEEK
WEEKLY MONTHLY YEARLY RATES AVAILABLE
TvT 1044 Washington Avenue Miami Beach. FL 33139
en.* (305) 531-6621
NomiMi Scftnrtr Ownt.. Arthur Ft* Mgr FUDOi J Kjutirun Mishgucf
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $____________
Name.
.Phone.
Address
Apt No
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach. Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Florklian/Friday, October 10, 1986
Will Rotation By-Ways
Drive Peres 'Crazy'?
Continued from Page 5-A
It is no secret that Shamir has
not been enthusiastic about many
of Peres' initiatives in the last two
years. In his search for "authentic
Palestinian representatives,"
Peres was prepared to overlook
the fact that virtually all promi-
nent Palestinians in the territories
declare that the PLO is their
legitimate representative. As long
as the individual was not known to
be engaged in terrorist activity or
hold an official position in the
PLO hierarchy, Peres was
prepared to talk with him.
Shamir's criteria are far less
liberal.
WHILE PERES attempted to
promote negotiations with Jor-
dan, Shamir is unlikely to pursue
this aim with the same vigor since
he is not prepared to offer Jordan
anything at least, not in terms
of territory. The two leaders also
disagree on the degree of interna-
tional participation in any future
negotiations.
Despite these differences in
outlook, neither party leader an-
ticipates any major change in
foreign policy. When asked, both
Peres and Likud Minister Moshe
Arens said that the ground rules
which govern the coalition agree-
ment do not allow for any sweep-
ing changes in polky which are
not agreeable to both parties. This
would rule out returning any part
of the territoriea, or at the other
extreme, annexing them.
If the religious parties expect
that Shamir's leadership will
spark a major revival in settle-
ment in the territories they are
probably in for a disappointment.
Under the coalition agreement,
six new settlements were to be
established each year. This
schedule has not been adhered to
because of lack of funds. The
financial situation is going to get
worse, not better, according to
Labor's Economic Development
Minister Gad Ya'acobi. Oil prices
will not remain low for long and
the U.S. emergency economic aid,
which has been maintaining
Israel's foreign currency
reserves, is coming to an end.
Under these circumstances, it is
doubtful that Likud's finance
minister will authorise increased
expenditure on settlement.
"IN ANY CASE we are in a
position to block any major new
settlement drive or any move
towards annexing the territories,
just as they have been in a position
to block any major peace initiative
by Peres over the past two
years," says Yaacobi, adding
cynically that it is not the rotation
that will cause a paralysis in the
peace process, but that paralysis
set in during the first two years of
the national unity government
it is built into the agreement.
A less jaded view, voiced by
Soviets Ask
For Wiesel
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Soviet Union has invited Elie
Wiesel. chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council, to
visit the USSR from Oct. 20
through Nov. 2 to meet with Rus-
sian scholars and archivists on the
fate of millions of non-Jewish
Serbs, Ukrainians, Poles, Czechs,
Russian soldiers and others killed
in Nazi concentration camps dur-
ing World War II.
The meetings in Moscow are to
prepare for a conference spon-
sored by the Memorial Council at
the State Department on
February 20. 1987, on non-Jewish
victims of the Nazis. Wiesel will
also gather information for the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
being built in Washington.
arens. is that Shamir will more or
less continue where Peres left off
and that any changes will be ones
of style and not substance.
In addition to the exchange of
posts between Peres and Shamir,
there may be a reshuffling of
ministers, but it will not affect the
balance of power between the par-
ties. The coalition agreement
stipulates that all portfolios must
remain in the same party hands,
although the individual heading
the ministry may change. So, for
instance, in the economic port-
folios, the Likud will continue to
head the Treasury, while Labor
will have control of the Economic
Development Ministry. But
Economic Development Minister
Yaacobi could theoretically be
replaced by another Labor
minister, just as current Treasury
head Moshe Nissim could see his
post filled by another Likud
member, possibly Modai again.
THIS, in fact, is the only in-
dividual appointment likely to pro-
voke any major controversy.
Peres, who forced Modai's
resignation first from the Finance
Ministry, and then, the Justice
Ministry, would consider it a viola-
tion of the agreement were
Shamir to return him to any
cabinet post. But the highly am-
bitious leader of the Liberal Party
is not likely to settle for a back
seat in the government, nor is
Shamir likely to give in on this
when he holds the reigns of
power.
The only post specifically
guaranteed to an individual, and
not a party, is the Defense
Ministry, which will stay with
Labor's Yitzhak Rabin.
One appointment that may
result in a significant policy shift
is that of Deputy Foreign Minister
Ronnie Milo, who is likely to
replace Ezer Weizman as deputy
minister in the P.M.'s office
responsible for Israeli Arabs. This
report was received with dismay
by prominent Israeli Arabs. Milo
is a hawk who frequently criticizes
Weizman for being too con-
ciliatory towards the Arabs.
WHEN WEIZMAN recently
proposed that the army's con-
troversial "training area number
9" in the Galilee be broken up, and
those parts belonging to Arab
farmers be restored to them, an
angry Milo quipped that Weizman
had assumed the role of
"redeemer of Arab land."
Moreover, Milo proposes to
reestablish the office of Prime
Minister's adviser on Arab affairs
which was abolished under
Weizman.
Most Israeli Arabs had welcom-
ed the abolition of the post which
in their eyes was symbolic of the
patronizing attitude the Israeli
establishment holds towards the
Arab citizen.
Other changes in deputy
ministers are not expected to trig-
ger any major changes.
As for the main swap, the Prime
Minister's post, a source close to
Peres says his most outstanding
achievement in the past two years
has been to act as a healer. "He in-
herited a divided society, an
economy in ruins, an army bogged
down in a pointless and demoraliz-
ing war in Lebanon. The peace
process was in total deadlock, and
the international standing of
Israel was problematical, to put it
mildly. He stabilized the economy,
got the army out of Lebanon,
opened the door to peace and im-
proved Israel's international stan-
ding. This government is popular
because the public wants
stability."
The irony is that the very same
desire for stability is what is likely
to keep Shamir in power for the
next two years.
IaratlScen*
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
TAMPAX
TAMPONS
TAMPAX
Original
Super
TAMPAX
10's
1.29
YARDLEY
MUSK
Cologne
4oz.s6.99
Stick
2.75 oz. S1.99
BENADRYL
Benodryl
Allergy
Medication
24 Tablets
$2.19
BENADRYL
Decongestant
Gillette
Trac II
Razor
$3.99
GILLETTE
DAISY
Disposable
Shavers
For
Women
4 Shavers
Plus One FREE
5'
.s.99
YARDLEY
BRILLIANTINE
2oz.
1.59
Gillette
Atra
Plus
Razor
3.99
GILLETTE
ATRA PLUS
SUPUCAL-D
So0wv
SUPLICAL + "D"
a
-*> *oi *; st*j**f ^
30
CALCIUM
SUPPLEMENT
30 Tablets S2.99
60 Tablets S4.99
^ LiquiSlim
LIQUISLIM
Dietary Fiber
Beverage Mix
12's
24s
s3.19
s6.29
J

e.....- ^i
TROMEGA
heart health
supplement from the tea
Promega
Natural Fish Oil
Concentrate
30 Capsules S5.19
60 Capsules S9.59
Gillette-Atra* or Tracings
YOUR
CHOICE
$4.99
A
SHAMPOO
3?
A
coHcmc

WELLA
BALSAM
Shampoo & Conditioner
Normal
Dry
Oily
Extra Body
24 oz.
1.99
GILLETTE
JUST WHISTLE
Ap
Mm fk V

Razor
For Women
M.29


Friday, October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
N
U.S. Says SDI Can Also Defend
Against Small Missiles

Symbolic papers are passed as the West Point accepts the gift from Herbert M. Ames, presi-
Jewish Chapel is formally transferred to the dent of the West Point Jewish Chapel Fund.
U.S. Government in ceremonies on the The $7.5 million Jewish Chapel was presented
Chapel's grounds at the nation's military free and clear of any debt, but the Fund is still
academy. Lt. Gen. Dave R. Palmer, obligated for less than $l-million. It expects to
superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy, raise these funds by year-end.
West Point
Takes Over New Jewish Chapel
WEST POINT, N.Y. -
The United States Govern-
ment received a special gift,
a synagogue, as ownership
of the West Point Jewish
Chapel was formally
transferred as a gift from
the private, non-profit
group that funded construc-
tion of the temple.
A colorful military ceremony
was held to mark the occasion in
which the U.S. Military
Academy's Cadet Honor Guard
and U.S. Military Academy Band
participated. Cadets, faculty and
staff filled the audience for the
festivities held on the premises of
the Jewish Chapel.
Lt. Gen. Dave R. Palmer,
superintendent of the Military
Academy, accepted the gift on
behalf of the Secretary of the Ar-
my, John 0. Marsh, Jr.
THE JEWISH Chapel, taking
its place alongside the Protestant
and Catholic Chapels, emphasizes,
for the world to witness, the
source of strength and greatness
of our democracy, Herbert M.
Ames, president of the West
Point Jewish Chapel Fund, stated.
The gift of the temple to the
U.S. government is the culmina-
tion of a nearly 20-year-long ef-
fort. The Chapel was first opened
for baccalaureate graduation ser-
vices in the spring of 1985. Addi-
tional details of the building, in-
cluding the Sanctuary's "Ten
Commandment Windows" and
the Ark Curtain, have recently
been completed and installed.
Speaker at the ceremonies was
Marty Silverman, an officer of the
West Point Jewish Chapel Fund,
who is president and founder of
North American Corporation, a
private, New York-based
computer-leasing organization.
THE WEST POINT Jewish
Chapel Fund presented the
Chapel to the government free
and clear of any debts. The Fund,
however, is still obligated for less
than $1 million of the $7.5-million
cost to build and furnish the
Chapel. It will continue its fund-
raising efforts, which it expects to
complete this year.
"To the Jewish community at
West Point, the Chapel serves a
wide number of religious and com-
munity functions. To new Jewish
Cadets, it serves as an inviting
welcome, and it serves to
enlighten the wider public as to
the role Jewish Americans have
played and continue to play in this
great country's defense and
statesmanship." Ames told the
audience.
Continued from Page 1-A
ed Syria with the highly-accurate
SS-21 missile which can hit
Israel's population centers, as
well as military targets.
Abrahamaon said that Israel
must stop a missile "not in the last
few seconds when it goes off over
that tiny country.. The best
place to stop it is as soon as possi-
ble right after it's launched. '
There is a popular misconcep-
tion that SDI is aimed at pro-
viding the United States with an
"umbrella" gainst ICBMs,
Abrahamson said. But he said the
program is aimed to find "an ef-
fective defense against ballistic
missiles of all ranges" to protect
the U.S. and its allies, including
Israel.
He stressed that the overall aim
is to "incorporate a defensive
strategy into our overall strategy
in such a way as to prevent a
nuclear war on a worldwide
scale." Both Abrahamson and
Gaffney said that the Soviet
Union has been working on an
SDI for years and now has the on-
ly operational anti-ballistic missile
system.
ABRAHAMSON noted that a
satellite warning system would
not only alert the U.S. to attack-
ing ICBMs but also West Europe
and Israel to short-range missiles.
He noted it will be easier to res-
pond against short-range missiles
because of the lesser distance
although there will be less time
than against ICBMs.
The U.S. invited 18 countries to
participate in the SDI research,
and on May 16 Israeli Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and U.S.
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger signed at the Pen-
tagon a memorandum of
understanding on Israel's
participation.
The memorandum gives Israel
the right to compete with the
other participating countries and
the U.S. for SDI research con-
tracts. Abrahamson said two con-
tracts have been signed with
Israel and three more are ex-
pected to be signed soon for a
total of about $10 million.
NOTING THAT he has had
years of personal experience deal-
ing with Israel, Abrahamson had
high praise for its scientific know-
how. "There are more technically
qualified people, scientists and
engineers in Israel per 1,000 peo-
ple in the population than
anywhere on earth," he said.
He added that the Israelis are
not only creative, but have the
"capability to respond quickly,"
something which he said the U.S.
must learn.
Smuklers Cited
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) -
Constance and Joseph Smukler,
founders of the Soviet Jewry
Council of the Jewish Community
Relations Council of Greater
Philadelphia, have received the
Mellon Bank Good Neighbor
Award.

Israel Air Force Jets Raid
Terrorist Bases in Lebanon
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israel Air Force jets raided ter-
rorist bases northeast of Tripoli in northern Lebanon Mon-
day morning. A military spokesman said hits were scored
on the targets and all aircraft returned safely to their
bases.
THE TARGETS were further north than any hit by
Israeli air raids in the past, in an area of Lebanon about 10
miles from the Syrian border known to be effectively under
Syrian control.
The main target was described as headquarters serving
two dissident groups of the Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion opposed to Yasir Arafat. The raid was described as a
routine operation to disrupt terrorist plans.
BEIRUT RADIO reported Monday that eight Israeli
aircraft attacked buildings used by the Syrian National
Socialist Party in three villages in the Akka region of nor-
thern Lebanon.
The targets were said to be protected by Syrian-based
SAM-2 and SAM-6 missiles, but none was fired at the at-
tackers. The Syrian national Socialist Party specializes in
car bombings and suicide attacks in south Lebanon and in
the south Lebanon security zone, according to Israeli
sources.
"Covering my windows with
reflective film more than covers the cost
of running my microwave and food processor.
So why did FPL help me do ft?r
FPL is encouraging everybody to manage their energy
efficiently because lowering peak demand delays
the need far new power plants an expense everyone
must share.
When you cover your windows and glass doors wrtn
solar film, solar screens or qualifying awnings and shut-
ters, youll get less sun. And less sun means youll use
less energy cooling your home. (Vxill also protect your
furniture from fading. I lb encourage you to take this
energy-saving step, well even pay part of the cost.
lb find out how to qualify for this incentive and
to get more information on energy management
in general, call our 24-hour toll free number.
1-800-821-7700.
FLORIDA POWER I LIGHT COMPANY


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10. 1986
Jewish Extended Family Seen
Threatened by 'Acrimony'
Continued from Page 1-A
among Jews .. We must work to
lower the decibel level of our in-
ternal squabbles .
". Renew a commitment to
joint action on a common Jewish
agenda, including solidarity with
Israel, support and rescue of op-
pressed Jews strengthening
Jewish education and seeking
a more just American society."
". .. the educational pro-
grams of each movement should
stress the factors that unite all
Jews and promote mutual
respect"
". .. encouraging and foster-
ing those who promote understan-
ding and cooperation among
Jews."
". serious consideration for
a national beta din (Jewish
religious court) with local
branches ."
"As a general rule, before a
Jewish movement or organisation
decides on a position or a policy
statement, it ssould consider the
effect on fellow Jews and on the
unity of the Jewish people."
The convening of local
dialogue groups, both lay and
rabbinic.
Israel, Greece
Eye Tourism
By JEAN COHEN
ATHENS (JTA) Greece
and Israel have agreed on a joint
program to promote American
tourism to both countries, Kostas
Kyriaxis, president of the Greek
National Tourist Office EOT. an-
nounced here after a visit to
Israel.
He said it would include Greek
Israeli package tours utilising the
two countries' national airlines.
Olympic Airways and El Al, and a
joint publicity campaign to be
launched next year. The expenses
will be shared equally by the two
countries.
Kyriaxis said the agreement was
reached in talks he had with the
heads of the Israel Tourist
Organisation (TTO) in Israel. He
said the Israel government show-
ed great interest in the planned
program. Details will be announc-
ed at a press conference in New
York at the end of the month by
representatives of the EOT and
ITO. Kyriaxis said tour operators
would have time to prepare their
tour packages by the end of the
year.
LOCAL AJC chapters nation-
wide reportedly are organixing
task forces similar to the one that
produced the statement
Jewish leaders have traded
criticism over the past few years
over questions of Jewish identity.
Traditionally, that identity is
transmitted through the mother
or conversion.
However, the Reform move
ment believes that either parent
can transmit Jewish identity.
Moreover, conversions performed
by Reform and Conservative rab-
bis aren't accepted by some Or-
thodox rabbis. And the Reform
movement accepts a civil decree
of divorce as sufficient, while Or-
thodox and Conservative Jews re-
quire also a gtt (Jewish divorce).
These disagreement* all con-
tribute to an increasing number of
children considered Jewish by
some Jews, but not by others.
Some leaders believe this could
cause a rupture of the Jewish
people.
ONE OF them, Rabbi Irving
Greenberg, last month announced
a program of dialogue and educa-
tion sponsored by his National
Jewish Center for Learning and
Leadership to attempt to settle
these same disputes.
The 19 AJCommittee
signatories were members of na-
tional organisations and educa-
tional institutions of Conser-
vative, Orthodox, Reconstruc-
tionist and Reform Judaism ss
well as Jewish umbrella
organizations.
Among them were Stuart
Eixenstst, a former assistant to
President Carter and member of
the board of United Synagogue of
America; Jacob Stein, former
special assistant to President
Reagan and past chair of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organisations;
and Alfred Moses, an AJCommit-
tee national vice president and s
former special adviser to Carter.
Their statement stemmed from
their belief that Jews have "a
common history and a common
destiny ... And we share the
knowledge that the anti-Semites
do not distinguish one kind of
Jews from another."
AJCommittee staff member
Larry Grossman said lay leaders
were invited rather than rabbis
because the latter "tend to reflect
institutional interests" while "we
felt that lay people might have s
more objective way of looking at
these issues, more down to
earth."
Temerson Foundation of Birmingham make*
a St5,000 grant to the University of Alabama
Press in support of its Judaic Studies sepes.
Harry Asman (second from left) of the Foun-
dation Committee is shown presenting the
check to UA President Dr. Joab Thomas.
Shown also are Dr. Leon J. Weinberger (se-
cond from right), general editor of the series,
and Malcolm McDonald, director ofUA Press
The nationally-acclaimed series in Judaic
Studies will issue its 18th volume later in the
fall on 'Nahum Goldman, His Mission to the
Gentiles,' by Raphael Patai.
Reagan Aide
Calls Demjanjuk Justice 'Victim'
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Patrick Buchanan, White
House director of com-
munications and a long-
standing critic of the Justice
Department's Office of
Special Investigations
(OSI), has published a col-
umn contending that John
Demjanjuk is "a victim
himself of a miscarriage of
justice," and his case may
be "the American Dreyfus
case."
Demjanjuk. 66, was indicted in
Jerusalem last Monday (Sept. 29)
on four counts of war crimes and
is accused of being "Ivan the Ter-
rible," a sadistic guard at the
Treblinka concentration camp
where some 900,000 Jews were
killed.
Buchanan, in his column, wrote
that after a thorough review of
the facts of the Demjanjuk case,
be believes the accused man is s
victim of mistaken identity.
BUCHANAN'S column ap-
peared in the Washington Post
and carried a footnote saying the
article expressed his personal
views and not those of the Ad-
ministration. He detailed the
history of the Demjanjuk case and
cited what he claimed were
numerous testimonies of
Treblinka survivors who all gave
identical accounts of a revolt in
Treblinka in which a prisoner
fatally stabbed a man identified as
"Ivan" in 1943.
In an unprecedented case, the
U.S. extradited Demjanjuk to
Israel in February to stand trial
for Naxi war crimes and stripped
him of his U.S. citixenship. Dem-
janjuk was a retired auto
mechanic for the Ford Motor Co.,
in Cleveland. Ohio.
Demjanjuk has claimed since
the outset of the proceedings
against him that he is innocent
and served as a Ukrainian con-
script in the Red Army who was
later captured by the Germans.
After spending time in POW labor
camps, Demjanjuk said he served
in the "VTasow Army" in a Ukrai-
nian, anti-Soviet unit which
defended Prague during a Russian
advance.
BUT THOSE who prosecuted
Demjanjuk in the United States,
namely the former head of the
OSI. Alan Ryan, Jr., alleged that
Demjanjuk never went to a P0W
camp but instead defected to the
Naxi side and became s guard out-
side the Treblinka gas chamber
who bludgeoned men with a six-
foot metal pipe and mutilated
women and children on their way
to the gas chambers.
The prosecution's case in Israel
hinges on the positive identifica-
tion by Treblinka survivors of i
photograph of Demjanjuk from a
document provided by the Soviet
government during the pro-
ceedings in the U.S. Buchanan
said the Soviets fabricated the
document, an old identity card.
Meanwhile the Cleveland Plain
Dealer reprinted Buchanan s col_
umn after a Ukrainian church
group mounted a support cam-
paign for Demjanjuk in that city.
Religious Parties
Playing for New Power Roles?
PageS-A
the larger Agudet Israel announc-
ed its intention of leaving the
coalition, but baa so tar failed to
carry oat that threat. The two.
both ultra-Orthodox, have accused
the main coabtion parties of lack
of sympathy and understanding
far the feehngs of the rehgious
pubhc.
In tact, the entire rehgions lob-
by in the Knissit charges that
pubhc violations of the Sabbath
have become more widespread of
late Msmhsn ate Haifa's cable
ear and movie house*, the Hekhal
Petah TSkva. and
i of entertainment
in Tel Aviv, all of which
dunag the Sabbath The
lobby is also iJaayp rants rl over the
of the Rj! i ssi t to pass the
"Who is a Jew"
; to taw Law of Retara.
of
religious legislation.
In the secular parties there is a
deep-rooted skepticism about
threats from the religious part-
ners to leave the coalition There
have been so many. However.
even if there are more defections
during the two years of Shamir's
premiership, this will not
nsnirilj mean the faD of the
THIS CAN happen only if the
rebgious parties defect en bloc, in
collaboration with the Labor
Augment Anything is poasabte
in Israeh pofatoc*. but so far the
fragmented rehgwus camp has
never shown that degree of unity.
Moreover, in order to muster a
bare tmjminj. a narrow coalition
would have to include the left
wing opposition paitiss Mapam
and the CitJasna Bights Move-
waieh
oppose any more concessions on
the religious front.
For the religious bloc the Likud
is a much more congenial partner
than the left-wing- Much of the
religious camp reflects Likud's
more hawkish views on foreign af-
fairs, defense and the future of
the West Bank and Gasa Strip.
As for the two ultra-Orthodox
parties. Shas and Agudat Israel,
they will leave the coalition if they
are ordered to do so by their
leapoliu spiritual mentors, the
Council of Torah Wise Men and
the Council of Torah Sages. Until
now these two bodies have shown
a great deal of political sagacity.
In spite of their ihstisfsitiini,
they may well decide that the beat
course for the rehgions camp in
the next two years is to remain in
the national unity
Isrmd Scene
ENTIRE UVES WITHOUT
TASTING WATER.
Some people have never tasted waser
thai s fresh and pure as a sprng Wale'
wNhout sorjum. poeutants or carbonabori
Water wMh notang added, nothng taken
away Some people have never tasted
dean, dear Mountain vasev Water from a
natural spnng in Hot Springs Arkansas
II you're one of those people, ty
Mountan vasey Water Ybul be tasang
water for tie very first sme
MOUNTAIN VAIIfY *ATtt
SPOS4G WMTER FAOU HOT SPeuNGS AHK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114


Reticent
Friday. October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
If Shamir Is Secretive, He's Also Patient
Continued from Page 5-A
assassination of United Nations
observer, the Swedish Count
Folke Bernadotte, who had come
to the Middle East in 1948 to im-
plement a plan for the interna-
tionalization of Jerusalem. In fact,
it has often been rumored that
Shamir himself was directly in-
volved in the incident.
After Israel gained its in-
dependence Shamir went into
private business. In 1956 he was
recruited by Isser Harel, head of
the Mossad. Israel's main in-
telligence agency. Harel ap-
preciated Shamir's toughness, ab-
solute discretion and solid
experience.
In 1969. Shamir joined
Menachem Begin's Herut Party
and was elected to the Knesset. In
a way the wheel had come full cir-
cle because the Lehi underground
was a splinter group which broke
away from Begin's Irgun Zva'i
I^umi. When Begin retired as
Prime Minister in 1983. Shamir
replaced him, serving until the
1984 elections when the national
unity government was set up.
The years have not mellowed
Shamir's hardline attitude to the
Middle East conflict. When the
Camp David Accord was submit-
ted to the Knesset for approval,
Shamir abstained, despite the fact
that it was his own leader. Begin,
who had negotiated the agree
ment Shamir did not join the
Likud rebels who broke away and
firmed the far-right Tehiya Par-
ty, but he certainly shared their
:.. (remise that Begin had er-
red in giving up Sinai to Egypt.
IN THE LAST two years, as
Vice Premier in the national unity
government. Shamir has tended
to frown upon many of Shimon
Pins' diplomatic initiatives. In
Shamir's view, Peres' agreement
to "some kind of international ac-
companiment" to negotiations
between Israel and its Arab
neighbors smacks of the Arab and
Soviet demand for an interna-
tional conference, which Israel
has officially rejected.
Nor was Shamir enthusiastic
when Peres mooted the idea of
"unilateral autonomy," which was
later modified as "the delegation
of more responsibility" to Palesti-
nians in Judea and Samaria.
Similarly, talk of "Gaza first" -
the idea of granting autonomy to
the Gaza Strip in the hope that
West Bank Arabs would soon
follow garnered no support
from the Vice Premier.
In practice, very little came of
these proposals because the West
Bankers were unwilling or simply
afraid to cooperate with the
Orchestra's
50th Year
i TE,L VIV <"*> The
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra
|inj) opened its 50th jubilee
season here and in Jerusalem last
*eek under the baton of the
American conductor and
Poser Leonard Beroatein.
IPO
late
*as created
in
com
The
1936 by the
virtuoso violiniat Bronislav
Huberman. Iu musicians were
refugees and exiles from Nazi
*rrnany and performed under
the baton of Arturo Toscanini.
The IPO returned to Israel two
*eeks ago from what was describ-
^asa highly-auccesaful tour of
turope and the U.S. Iu opening
Jub,1f* Performance featured the
Jubilee Games Suite composed by
istei-
<*asion.
H,
rnstein
especially for the
Bernstein spent a week in Israel
** a documentary film com
"*"*''?* by the IPO."-.
Israeli government or any
moderate Palestinians and insist
that the PLO is their sole
legitimate representative. Never-
theless, Shamir's only offer to the
Palestinians autonomy accor-
ding to the Likud's interpretation
of the Camp David Agreements
is scoffed at by even moderate
Palestinians.
If, as some say, the Peres years
were marked by initiatives which
achieved little concrete gain but
created a positive image for
Israel, the Shamir years may lack
even that. Unless Shamir deviates
from his declared policies. Israel
may lose much of the favorable
image she has gained in the inter-
national arena, and come to be
branded, once again, as
"intransigent."
IT IS AN open question
whether King Hassan of Morocco
would have invited the Israeli
Prime Minister to Ifrane had
Shamir been in office instead of
Peres. There are fears in the
Labor Party that efforts to "un-
freeze" relations with Egypt will
fizzle out once Shamir assumes
power. In Shamir's view, the ac-
tions of Arab leaders are deter-
mined by the situation within the
Arab world.
He believes that Egypt's rela-
tions with Israel are cool, despite
the Peres-Mubarak summit in
Alexandria several weeks ago, not
because of the Taba dispute or the
stalemate over the Palestinian
issue, but because Egypt is trying
to rebuid its bridges with Arab
countries and reestablish its posi-
tion as leader of the Arab world.
Therefore, in his view, further
Israeli concessions on any issue
will not produce the normalization
of relations that Israel is seeking.
Given such conditions, Shamir
believes Israel can do little but
wait for a change in inter-Arab
relations. Shamir is very good at
waiting. He is renowned for his
patience as he is for his reticence.
Israel Scene
the ORIGINAL
Wolfie's 21
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DELI-RESTAURANT
"WHERE THE ELITE MEET TO EAT!"
Collins Avenue & 21st Street on Miami Beach
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS!
In the heart of Miami Beach's Historic Art Deco District
^ SPECIALS
WOtflE S FAMOUS MMUtUfff
DANISH a ROILS. CREAM CHEESE.
UTTER. COFFEE OR TEA _............
OR
2-EGGS. AMY STYLE. (MIS
OR POTATOES. CREAM CHEESE
UTTER. ROLLS. COFFEE
OR TEA........_______....._____
SPECIALS
CHOOSE FROM 6 DELICIOUS
ENTREES!
$095
FROM
2
tp> BM1 iL
SPECIAL
MIDNIGHT SNACKS
MENU"
11 PMT0 4 AM
0
TRADITIONAL
FRIDAY NIGHT
DINNER
$
Special Menu
Includes: Choice of Two
Appetizers; Choice of Soup;
Choice of Entree; Choice of
6 Desserts. Plus: Choice of
Potatoes; Tzimmess; Vegetable
or Apple Sauce. Rolls & Butter.
Coffee, Tea or Fountain
Beverage. Our famous table
relishes!
ENTREES:
Roast Brisket of Beef___
Broiled Filet of Sole
Stuffed Cabbage___
Roast .Chicken
Chicken in the Pot
9.95
7.95
7.95
7.95
8.95
Complimentary Glass of Wine
Owned and operated by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT. INC.. Joseph Nevet. Chairman: David H. Nevel. President
i
1
1
'
i
l
1
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10. 1986
WHAT CAN
YOU BUY
t r
$
10
IN ISRAEL THESE DAYS?
6 days/5 nights in a superior hotel.
Hertz car rental for 5 days.*
Discounts on a treasure trove of shops,
restaurants and museums.
*

WITH EL AL'S MILK AND HONEY
TOURS YOU GET A RICH PACKAGE.
AT A VERY SWEET PRICE.
For just $10 over the $915 airfare from Miami
you'll get one honey of a flight with our
SUNSATIONAL ISRAEL package. Plus a creme de
la creme vacation in Jerusalem or Tel Aviv. Free car
rental includes discount coupons. Add-ons are
available to Eilat and Cairo.
More time to spend? Then consider:
DISCOVER ISRAEL 12 days/10 nights. A chance to
explore our sights and sites from $379 plus airfare
ISRAEL PLUS 15 days/13 nights. Our exclusive two
week vacation package from $479 plus airfare
ISRAEL AT LEISURE 22 days/20 nights to see it all
and enjoy it all including 12 nights in Jerusalem
from $629 plus airfare.
For more information see your travel agent
or call EL AL at 1-800-EL AL SUN
(1-800-352-5786)
Does not include gas. mileage or insurance
Effective November 1986 through March 1987
SUNSATIONAL not available Dec 13-jan 6 Prices/fares subject to
change and certain restrictions apply.
For a free, detailed color
brochure, write El Al Israel
Airlines. Milk and Honey
vacations. 850 Third Ave.
New MDrk. NY 10022.
'
Nd--
Address
City
SMM
Zip
EL7J/ML7//.
The Airline of Israel
The airline people believe in.
COME TO ISRAEL COME STAY WITH FRIENDS.
jf io-iO
-


( ongresaman Duitc Fascell
Dante Fascell To Be Guest
Speaker At Temple Israel's
Yom Kippur Service
Honorable Dante B. Fascell,
Democrat, 19th District, Florida,
has been invited to speak at Tem-
ple Israel's Yom Kippur service to
I* held on Monday. Oct. 13, at the
Dade County Auditorium. Rep.
Fascell will address the congrega-
tion on the topic of "The Two
'ireat Arenas, the Middle East -
and the Soviet Bloc."
Dante Fascell has a long history
in Congress, having served as
Florida State Representative
from 1950-54. and having been
elected to the 84th Congress of
the United States in 1954 and to
each Congress thereafter. He also
has an extensive diplomatic
background having served as
member of the U.S. Delegation to
the 24th General Assembly of the
United Nations; as Vice-Chairman
of the U.S. Delegation to the
CSCE conference in Belgrade,
1977-78; and to the CSCE con-
ference in Madrid, 1980-83. In ad-
dition, Rep. Fascell was the of-
ficial congressional observer to
the Arms Control talks in Geneva.
A panel of special guests from
the graduate School of Advanced
International Studies of the
University of Miami, will respond
to the Congressman's remarks.
The panelists include, Prof. Julian
Weinkle, Associate Dean; Prof.
Chaim Snaked, Middle Eastern
Studies; and Prof. Jin Valenta.
Eastern European Studies.
Congressman Fascell will begin
speaking at 1:30 p.m.
Israel And Egypt Agree
On Arbitration Panel
GENEVA (JTA) Israel and Egypt have agreed on
the third member of the arbitration panel which wiH be ask-
ed to resolve their dispute over Taba. The agreement was
reached last Monday (Sept. 29) in less than three hours of
what was expected to be a three-day meeting between
Israeli and Egyptian delegations.
THE NAME OF the third arbitrator, a European, will
be announced only after the nominee is officially informed
and agrees to serve. The delegations met in closed session
at the Geneva City Hall. The two arbitrators already
chosen attended. They are Dietrich Schindler of
Switzerland and Pierre Bellet of France.
The full arbitration panel will hold its first meeting here
n 9ecem':)er- The process is expected to last a year. Israel
and Egypt will jointly bear the expenses. The president ol
the panel will receive $300,000 for his work, and the othei
members $100,000 each.
Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, October 10,1986 Section B
Federation Scores A Touchdown
For The 1986 Campaign
The 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal (CJA) Cam-
paign of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation is
not winding down; it is gearing up for a final
"year-end blitz" to include new givers. On Sunday.
Nov. 9, the Federation will hold a "mini-Super
Sunday," to reach out to the Jewish community for
assistance with the 1986 Campaign.
Kenneth J. Schwartz has been named as chair-
man of the "year-end blitz" by Federation Presi-
dent Aaron Podhurst.
"Research has shown us that many members of
Greater Miami's Jewish community do not make
gifts to the Federation's CJA Campaign simply
because they were never asked to," said Schwartz.
"Through a series of new programs, we hope to ex-
pand our prospect base so that in the future we can
feel secure in knowing that most of the Jews in this
community have at least been asked to
participate."
Included in the programs for the 1986 campaign
"cleanup" is a Sunday, Nov. 9. telephone blitz
which will have volunteers calling past campaign
contributors who have not made their 1986 com-
mitments. "A mini-Super Sunday," as Schwartz
calls it.
"The plan is to really motivate our callers, so
that the enthusiasm is carried through to those
receiving the solicitation. Since it's football
season, we're using that as our motif, with com-
peting 'teams' making calls." said Schwartz.
"We're in the fourth quarter, it's the fourth down
and there are only minutes left on the clock to
score a touchdown for the 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal Campaign. That's the feeling we have," he
added.
The phonathon is only one of many events
scheduled for the remainder of the year. Other ac-
tivities will include a "President's Council," which
will call on past Federation presidents and cam-
Kenneth J. Schwartz
paign chairmen to conduct face-to-face solicita-
tions of those who have made significant gifts to
past CJA efforts but have not yet made their 1986
commitments; rabbis and local synagogues will be
asked to host cocktail parties for their congrega
tions on behalf of the CJA at which they will be
educated as to the purpose and goals of Federation
and will be encouraged to make campaign gifts.
Women's Rise Within Jewish
Leadership Has Slowed
By SELMA WEINTRAUB
The advancement of women in
professional, business and in
Jewish life has, since the feminist
revolution, slowed. Despite some
recent bright spots, the increased
influence of women in a man's
world will still take a long time
before the word "equal" can be
applied.
Women in the leadership roles
of national Jewish organizations
have made marked advances as
lay presidents of the Council of
Jewish Federations, the World
Zionist Organization, Canadian
Jewish Congress, American Sec-
tion of the World Jewish Con-
gress. Many are presidents of
their synagogues and scores serve
on organizational and congrega-
tional boards.
Despite this bright note, when
one turns to the Jewish profes-
sional world, a much darker pic-
ture appears. Very few women
hold top executive positions in na-
tional Jewish or communal agen-
cies, and national Jewish fund-
raising organizations such as
United Jewish Appeal and Israel
Bonds do not have a woman in any
high executive post. Even in
Israel, where the beloved Golda
once headed the government, not
a single woman holds a Cabinet
post, and women members of the
Knesset are few indeed.
DURING THE last five years in
the Conservative movement, a
groundswell developed for the or-
dination of women, and rightfully
so. Yet, those beating down the
doors as entering female rabbinic
students at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America are not as
great in number as had been
predicted.
Now that the victory of admis-
sion has been won, are women
reflecting on the problems of
those women entering our tradi-
tional, yet modern fi of
religious expression? Perhap> the
answer lies in the stark fart.- that
14 years after the ordination of
Selma Weintraub is president
of the Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism.
the first woman rabbi in Reform
Judaism, Sally Preiaand, very few
women serve as the senior rabbi in
a major pulpit anywhere in the
world.
I do not know how many con-
gregations are willing to accept
women as rabbis. (The female
synagogue president is a growing
phenomenon.) I also do not think
that we have a sufficient number
of women in key leadership roles.
It will take time to eliminate the
stereotypes, the inborn resistance
against accepting women rabbis.
Perhaps in the next generation we
will be able to accommodate this
more readily.
WOMEN FACE an additional
challenge as they aspire to leader-
ship roles, whether this be in
federations, the community or
even the synagogue, due to the
conventionalized roles they had
possessed for many years.
Because of the traditional accep-
tance of men, women are ex-
pected to perform at a much
higher level. For example, when a
man stumbles during the recita-
tion of Torah blessings, very little
is made of it. However, let a
woman do the same, and there is
not doubt that she would be im-
mediately subjected to criticism
and unfavorable comments.
I recently watched a television
program in which three Harvard
Business School graduates now
10-to-15 years in the business
world were interviewed. They ad-
mitted paying a high price for
achieving their status. They con-
ceded that they were only ac-
cepted up to a point and that re-
maining on the corporate rise is a
giant struggle.
These women said the sacrifice
that they had to make juggling
th-ir careers and families was not
wcrth it. When a woman is on the
she must still go home to be con-
cerned with dinner, no matter
how responsibilities divided bet-
ween husband and wife. What will
happen with a woman congrega-
tional rabbi? Do you hesitate to
call her male counterpart at 8 a.m.
or 11 p.m.? But how about a
woman rabbi who has young
children or a baby? Would you call
her very early or very late?
I RESPECT and encourage
women who aspire to leadership
roles in Jewish life, believing
everyone should have an equal op-
portunity. I am just completing
four years in the most challenging
task as the lay head of the
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism, representing
200,000 women. Given the oppor-
tunity, women can be a key in-
fluence in the upgrading of Jewish
education, strengthening family
life and making an impact on
world questions such as nuclear
disarmament and world peace.
Women are considerably more
sensitive to family life than men.
and this includes Jewish educa-
tion. The men who run our con-
gregations are too often preoc-
cupied with budgeting, always
looking how to "cut back." Yet.
when religious school teachers'
salaries suffer, so do our children.
Paradoxically, the men will not
"blink an eye" at spending $25 or
more per hour for their child's
music lesson.
I believe, too, that women will
more quickly respond to the in-
fluence of their young adult
children than will men. My
generation grew up with gran-
diose synagogue edifices. Today's
parents of young children want
the synagogue to be serviceable
and practical, but do not see the
need for large, luxurious buildings
that often place high financial con-
straints on the synagogue budget,
thereby causing continuous in-
crease in dues.
JTA


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Fridmy, October 10, 1986
Behar Named Chairman Barry U. To Offer ** 0ur Turn... To Make A Video
Of Super Sunday 1987
JCS Course
Saby Behar. the 1986 recipient
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Stanley C. Myers
Presidents' Leadership Award,
has been named overall chairman
of Super Sunday 1987, announced
1987 Combined Jewish Appeal
General Campaign Chairman
Donald E. Lefton. Paul
Berkowitz, Richard Berkowitz,
Judi Billig and Ellen Rose have
been appointed vice-chairmen.
Plans are already underway for
Super Sunday '87. to be held next
March 22, at Temple Israel.
"This is the first time that the
Miami Federation will join with
the four other South Florida
Federations and participate in a
regional effort," said Saby Behar.
"Each Federation will hold its
own event in its own community,
and will cooperate on several dif-
ferent advertising and promo-
tional efforts. By combining
forces I believe we will be able to
save a significant amount of
money, while at the same time, be
in Miami
a Jewish
Saby Behar
part of the biggest and best Super
Sunday this community has ever
seen," Behar said.
Petition Drive For Human
Rights Of Soviet Jews
Tuesday marked the beginning
of a petition drive among Jewish
communities throughout the
United States, asking President
Reagan to make the issue of
human rights for Soviet Jews a
high priority item on his Summit
agenda with Soviet Leader
Gorbachev.
The program was put together
by the South Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry, an arm of the
Community Relations Committee
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Yacov Gorodetaky, a prominent
Leningrad Jewish activist, who
made a substantial contribution to
the Jewish National Movement in
the Soviet Union during his year?
as a "Refusnik," was the featured
speaker at the gathering at th<
Greater Miami Jewish Federa
tion. Yacov, who now makes his
home in Israel, spoke about Xht
current conditions for Jews in th<
USSR.
rts
Yacov Gorodetaky
Barry University
Shores will offer
Chautauqua Society (JCS) spon-
sored course during the 1986-87
academic year under the direction
of Hollywood Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
now an Adjunct Associate
Professor.
JCS, in addition to endowing
courses, assigns rabbinic lecturers
to campuses and secondary
schools. Jaffe, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth El since 1958. will
teach "Jewish Beliefs and Prac-
tice" for the 10th consecutive
year.
The course will be given in
honor of Shepard Broad.
Jaffe is Chairman of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis'
Retirement Committee, Board
member of the Henderson Mental
Health Center. Biscayne Humana
Hospital, and the Southeast
Florida Holocaust Memorial
Center.
Letty Cottin Pogrebin
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal Campaign will have the advantage of both a new theme
song and a new "music video" according to 1987 campaign chair-
man Donald E. Lefton.
"We were looking for a way
to fire up our volunteers and
give them a feeling of con-
fidence and a sense of fami-
ly," said Lefton. The song
and its accompanying video
will be performed by Federa-
tion volunteers, staff and
their families, in addition to
members of Federation's
beneficiary agencies. The
video will be screened for the
first time at Federation's
Campaign Opening Dinner on
Jan. 15.
"We know that our
volunteers work harder when
they are properly
motivated," added Lefton
"This will be a novel and very
enjoyable way of instilling enthusiasm. I am looking forward to
demonstrating my vocal abilities," he said.
Donald E. Lefton
To Speak
Letty Cottin Pogrebin, editor of
'Ms. Magazine." will be the
keynote speaker at the third an-
nual Community Education
Night, sponsored by the Business
and Professional Women of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. The event will be held on
Wednesday. Oct. 29 at 6:30 p.m.
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton.
Barbara Black and Susana
Garazi are co-chairwomen of
BPW Community Education
Night; Nancy Berkowitz and
Adrienne Messing are PBW vice-
chairwomen for Community
Education; and Maryanne Witkin
serves as BPW chairwoman.
Language Lessons: Brush Up Your Hebrew;
Start Learning It Now
Arts Films. Inc.. 2130 Broadway, New York (212) 362 8535.
has produced "Basic Hebrew," a two-hour 21-minute
videocassette course it bills as "the first instructional Hebrew
cassette." It was designed by Rachel Sarna. coordinator of
Hebrew Language studies at New York University, and Ahamr.
Komen of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel
The cassette covers 1.000 basic Hebrew words and phrase-
such areas as holidays, clothing, the human body, transportation
and days of the week Its 15 lessons are taught on a multi imajre
screen, showing new words. English translation, phonetic
transcription, a close-up of a narrator's pronunciation an.i a- ir
tist's illustration. A lesson guide and glossary are included
"People remember more when they have the combinav.
audio and visual." says Sarna. who has used the tape in her
university courses The cassettes are available at Beth Bre
Dr. Jack L. Sparks. Director of Education of Tempi* Israel of
Greater Miami, announced a special program of High Holiday
services targeted towards the congregation's children. Pictured
r Rabbi Haskell St Bernat and Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson with
hmel+xldrem fauWfiU^o sound the Shofar.
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo Lush landscaping.
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism This tradition is continued in the Gardens.
Mount Nebo s latest expansion.
SPECIAL PRE-OPENING PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT:
261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo Cemetery 5505 N.w. 3rd Street. Miami. FL 33126
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------\..............,*..


Friday, October lfr 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Michael Rassler
Yiaroel Cohen
Cohen And Rassler Appointed To
Federation Planning And Budgeting
Myron J. Brodie. executive vice
president, of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation announced the
appointments of Yisroel Cohen
and Michael Rassler to the
Federation Planning and
Budgeting Department. Cohen,
assumes the position of assistant
director of planning and
budgeting and Rassler, the posi-
tion of planning and budgeting
associate.
Cohen, who most recently serv-
ed as director of planning, alloca-
tions and community relations at
the Jewish Federation of
Worcester, Massachusetts holds a
masters degree in Social Work
from Columbia University's
School of Social Work and a
masters degree in Jewish Studies
from the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America. He will be
responsible for staffing the
Federation Subcommittees
relating to Jewish Education and
Group Work Services.
Rassler comes to Federation
from Baltimore where he recently
graduated with masters degrees
from the University of Maryland
School of Social Work and the
Baltimore Hebrew College. He
also earned a masters degree in
business administration from
Miami University in Ohio. He will
be responsible for the Federation
Subcommitte on Individual and
Health Services, the Agency Ad-
ministrative Practices Commit-
tee, as well as Project Renewal.
Both Cohen and Rassler are
recipients of the Federation Ex-
ecutive Recruitment and Educa-
tion Program Scholarship from
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, a program initiated to draw
candidates into the Federation
field who have the potential to
become Federation executives on
an accelerated basis.
Friends Of Bass Museum Appoint
Director Of Development
The Friends of the Bass
Museum of Art announces the ap
pointment of Roger E. Wyman II
Director of Development
Wyman's extensive backgrounc
includes fund raising, marketing
external relations and administra
tion of not-for-profit
organizations.
Wyman comes to the Bass
Museum of Art from the Universi
ty of Miami where he served at
Director of Foundation and Cor
porate Relations for three years
Before moving to Miami he was
Associate Director of the Commit
tee on Institutional Cooperation,
the consortium of the Big Ten
universities and the University ol
Chicago in Evanston, Illinois. He
also acted as a consultant to the
Committee and the McKnight
Foundation.
Friends of the Bass Museum
president Joseph Nevel stated:
"We are delighted to have Roger
Wyman join the staff of the
Friends of the Bass Museum. He
is bringing strong experience in
fund-raising in South Florida and
thorough knowledge of the cor-
porate community. The creation
of a professional development
staff is another significant
milestone in our effort to enhance
the stature of the Bass Museum."
Dr. Kushner To Speak
Dr. David Kushner, coordinator
of musicological studies at the
University of Florida, will speak
on "The Jewish Works of Ernest
Bloch" Sunday, Oct. 12 at 11 a.m.
at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in
Miami.
Dr. Kushner, who wrote the ar-
ticles on Bloch in The New Grove
Dictionary of Music and Musicians
and who has lectured widely on
the Swiss-American composer in
Temples, will be speaking on this
occasion at the National Conven-
tion of the College Music Society.
Dr. Kushner is president of the
CMS Southern Chapter. Dr.
Kushner, who has been affiliated
with the University of Florida
since 1969, is listed in the Interna-
tional Who's Who In Music, Who's
Who In the World, Who's Who In
America, and in The International
Directory of Distinguished
Leadership.
HELLO BABY, .nc
Unique gift packages for the
new baby, delivered to homes,
hospitals, showers, etc.
'LENE RECHTMAN 651 -8866
L'ShanaTova
Israeli Finance Minister Has
Concerns Other Than Money
By SIMEON BAKER
Israel's Minister of Finance is
one of those rare politicians who
quotes excerpts from the weekly
Torah portion and tells stories of
learned rabbis that are relevant to
contemporary issues.
Moshe Nissim, 51, comes by this
naturally. He is the son of the late
Rabbi Isaac Niaaim, a former
Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel.
Niaaim studied at a yeahiva and
law school.
His religious convictions were
apparent during an interview in
the midst of his first trip to the
United States last month. "I have
come to the United States to alert
American Jews to the danger they
are facing aa a result of assimila-
tion and mixed marriages," he
explained.
"This threat is particularly
acute after we lost six million
Jews in the Holocaust. The only
way to insure Jewish survival in
the Diaspora is aliyah. But prior to
that every Jewish child must
receive a Jewish education and
American Jews should visit Israel
once a year."
NISSIM HADNT even left
Israel since joining the Cabinet
nine years ago as a minister
without portfolio. He was then a
leader of the Liberal Party. Subse-
quently he became Minister of
Justice, and six months ago he
took on his present post. As such,
he met in Washington with
Secretary of State George Shultz
and Secretary of the Treasury
James Baker.
He said that the economic
reforms introduced by the unity
coalition will continue after the
rotation of Oct. 14, when Prune
Minister Shimon Peres and Vice
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir will switch jobs.
"The policy of restraint and plans
of economic growth will be pur-
sued after the rotation as well,"
Nissim asserted.
He favors reducing taxes in
order to enable the Israeli popula-
tion to spend more money and, he
believes, to enhance the capital
market. Another important issue
to him is the reduction of the
government budget and the
enlargement of the private
economic sector, which he
believes would create more oppor-
tunities for its growth and
development.
"We are trying very hard to
maintain the stabilization of our
economy," he stressed.
HE SAID he had "a very mean-
ingful exchange of views" with
Shultz and Baker. "I did not bring
with me a shopping list. My main
purpose was to have with them a
dialogue on economic matters per-
taining to both countries," he
said.
He pointed out that the Reagan
Administration shows a great in-
terest in the Israeli economy.
"Shultz, for example, is a great
friend of the Jewish state. He is a
man of experience and handles
matters in good taste and a very
logical manner," Niaaim amid. "I
do not see any dictate in his (re-
cent) letter to us concerning our
economic reforms. To the con-
trary, I interpret it as a sign of
true friendship."
Dwelling upon aspects of
Israel's foreign policy, Nissim em
Continued on Page 9-B
COUNTY COMMISSIONER
Barry Schreiber
and Family
say
"Thank you very much";
and
we wish you a
Happy, Healthy
and Prosperous
New Year.
pa poi a<*


Federation
CRC Supports Override Of Presidential Veto
e-Aaaraa '** =-i*
pNfem
r-VTTj -"*-
U. of Miami
Dedicates First
Residential College
tf at fn:
n xl
1 a*

IFVOlTREEAnNCA
MGH FBER BRAN FLAKE,
THATSG
in
F FTS HIGHEST IN FBER
ANDBESTTASTOG
THATSPOSl
In
fiS-GT


Friday, October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Lnd Berkson Honorary Chairpe]
Of 18th Annual Grand Ball
Dorothy Ash of Bal Harbour
and Lyla Berkson of Miami Beach
have been named honorary
chairpersons of the 18th annual
Grand Ball of South Shore
Hospital and Medical Center,
which will be held Saturday night,
at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Cocktails at 7 p.m. will precede
the 8 p.m. dinner, a black-tie
occasion.
Felice Schwartz Named National
Seminarist Of Na'amat USA
Israel Finance Minister Moshe Nissim, left, presents the Prime
Ministers Award to Philip T. Warren, center, for his staunch
support of the State of Israel Bonds Organization. Warren receiv-
ed the award during a recent reception sponsored by the Greater
Miami Israel Bonds Organization in honor of the Finance
Minister's first visit to the United States and South Florida.
Warren served for two years as the general campaign chairman
at' the Greater Miami Israel Bonds office. Participating in the
presentation is Howard Klein, executive director of the Miami
Israel Bonds office.
COMMUNITY CORNER
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Mount Sinai Chaplain and
Director of Chaplaincy for the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will conduct Yom Kippur Services for
Jewish employees and patients at Mount Sinai Medical
Center on Friday, October 10 at 3 p.m. in the Skylight
Cafe.
The Southeast Region of American Jewish Congress
will sponsor the David Brown Forum on Sunday, Nov. 9
at Temple Israel of Greater Miami, beginning at 10 a.m.
The topic of the forum is "America at Risk: The Con-
stitutional Convention, Threat to our Civil Liberties "
Dvorah Chapter Amit Women meeting will take place
Wednesday, October 15 at 1 p.m. at the Roney Plaza.
Sandwich Generation," a four-week workshop for
adults with obligations both to their children and their
aging parents will begin Monday, October 20 at 7 p.m.
at the North Dade Office of Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami.
A program on Mall Order Frauds will be presented by
Ms. Ruth Gross, of the Jewish Family Service, at the
next regular meeting of the Temple Zamora Sisterhood
at the temple, on Wednesday at 12:30 p.m.
On October 10 the Coconut Grove Playhouse will
celebrate its 30th anniversary with a special evening of
activities. The entertainment will begin with a perfor-
mance of the Broadway hit, "On the 20th Century,"
followed by a "1930's Fantasy Party" at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton. The celebration will be dedicated to
a number of individuals who have helped the growth
and success of the Playhouse.
Menorah/B'nai B'rith Seniors
Classic At Inverrary
The sixth annual Menorah/B'nai B'rith Seniors Golf Classic is
scheduled for Monday, Oct 27 at Inverrary Country Club.
Open to men and women golfers aged 55 and older, the tourna-
ment will benefit B'nai B'rith Youth Services, as it has since
Menorah Gardens and Funeral Chapels and the B'nai B'rith
foundation of the U.S. began sponsoring the event in 1981.
About $25,000 has been raised in past tournaments to help sup-
Port B nai B'rith Youth Organizations, Hillel and Career and
Counseling activities.
7uLC1*M'c com*8 to Inverrary for the first time this fall, and
will be played on the renowned east course, where the prestigious
inverrary Golf Classic was played for many years. "It s a superb
course, with a location convenient for many of the golfers who
nave joined us year after year for the competition," noted Oscar
^oldstein, tournament director and public relations director for
Menorah Gardens and Funeral Chapels.
A $25 entry fee will cover greens fees, cart rental, cold drinks,
pnzes and souvenirs including three Titleist golf balls per player.
Kegistration for the tournament is open, with information
available at any of the Menorah facilities in North Miami Beach,
sunrise, Margate, Deerfield or West Palm Beach, or from any
B nai B'rith office.
Felice P. Schwartz of Miami
Beach, vice president of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat USA.
has been named a national
seminarist of the organization,
also known as the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America.
Mrs. Schwartz will attend a
16-day program in Israel which
will bring together leaders of
Na'amat USA for an intensive,
on-site tour of the nationwide net-
work of educational, medical,
cultural and welfare facilities in
the Jewish State operated by
Na'amat.
The program, which includes
Mrs. Schwartz as the only Dade
County representative, also will
include extensive visits with Israel
Government and Labor Party
leaders, touring and educational
sessions. She is one of 19 women
selected from the country.
Harriet Green, national vice
president of Na'amat USA and
president of the South Florida
Council, announced the selection
of Mrs. Schwartz. Mrs. Green is a
former national seminarist.
Mrs. Schwartz is a past presi-
dent of a Miami chapter of
Hadassah. former vice president
of the Omaha Zionist Council, and
was a member of the Inter-
collegiate Zionist Federation of
America while a student at the
University of Miami. She is ex-
Dewey Knight
Guest Speaker
At NCJW
The National Council of Jewish
Women, Greater Miami Section,
will host a Membership Meeting at
Temple Israel, Downtown, Oct.
22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch
will be served.
Dewey W. Knight, Jr., Dade
Deputy County Manager, will
speak on community needs.
The meeting will present audio-
visual entertainment, question
and answer period and "Quiz."
I
Felice P. Schwartz
ecutive vice president of the
Gerald Schwartz Agency, a Miami
Beach-based public relations and
marketing agency.
Congressman Claude Pepper
will present the Claude Pepper
Community Service award to
developer Gerry Sanchez, presi-
dent of Polonia Restoration South
Company, "for his dedicated ser-
vice and distinguished leadership
in the revitalization of Miami
Beach, particularly in the South
Shore Art Deco District."
Rabbi Gary Glickstein, spiritual
leader of Miami Beach's Temple
Beth Sholom, will offer the in-
vocation. Announcement of the
Grand Ball program and par-
ticipants was made by Marshall H.
Berkson, president and chairman
of the board of South Shore,
which is affiliated with the
University of Miami School of
Medicine.
Ruth Roney and Helene Owen,
both of Miami Beach, presidents
of the South Shore Auxiliary,
were named chairpersons of the
Grand Ball, which will feature the
Libert Theme in commemoration
of the 100th anniversary of the
dedication of the Statue of
Liberty.
Other members of the Ball Com-
mittee include Betty Brandy,
Esther Bright, Beatrice Brodie,
Claire Brotman, Ingrid Fine,
Beatrice Goodman, Monica
'leftler, Vicki Land, Tobie Levin-
son, Barbara McCallion, Mollie
Peal, Sara Rutstein and Felice
Schwartz.
Dr. William Zubkoff is executive
director of South Shore.
Baskets For
All Occasions
Balloons
Gifts
Stuffed Animals
Candy-
Special Wrapping
Party Favors
WE DELTVEK
GRINS
The Real lba 12766 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY NORTH MIAMI FLORIDA 33161
(305) 895-6467
Motgioch
on
Promloos.
Cortitlod
Panto or
Dairy.
Full lino
of Froah
Bakad
Cakes and
Pastries.
THE KNISH EVERYONE'S
TALKING ABOUT !!
^loo& fat u& ch cpcei local &ufien man6et&
o* fUeA ccfi Ch out Stone..... 'pne^A
midc daily.......

e@
\

POTATO SlVEET POTATO
KASHA CHEESE
uROCCOi & CHEESE CHEESE HI PINE APPLE
SPINACH CHEESE W BLUEBERRY
MUSHROOM & POTATO CHEESE M/CHERRY
18125 BISCAYNE BLVD.. N.M.B.
(BISCAYNF HARBOUR SHOPS)
937-0949
MONDAY thru FRIDAY
9 AM. to S P.M.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10, 1986
CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS WITH VEGETABLES
6 chicken drumsticks (about 1W lb.)
v* Tsp ah
Dash of pepper
1 Tbap. oil
*caa> water
% Tsp. grated lemon rind
1 to 2 Tap* tenon juke
1 package (10 os.) Birds Eye Bavarian style recipe
green beans with spaetxle with a seasoned sauce
Sprinkle chicken with salt and pepper, brown on all sides in oil
in large skillet. Add water cover and simmer about 20 minutes or
until tender. Move chicken to side of pan; stir in lemon rind and
juice. Add vegetable*. Bring to a full boil over medium beat.
separating vegetables with a fork and stirring frequently. Reduce
beat; cover and simmer 3 minutes. Makes 3 servings.
GLAZED COFFEE CAKE
* asp Post Grape-Nuts brand cereal or Post Grape-Nuts flakes
W cup sugar
2 Tap* cinnamon
2 Tspa. Maxwell House or Yuban instant coffee or Sanka
brand 97% caffein fee instant coffee (optional)
1% asps all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
1 Tsp. baking soda
V Tip. Calumet baking powder
W Tsp salt
1 asp 0* pC) sour cream
Vh cup butter or margarine, softened
2 eggs
V* Tap. vanilla
Easy Coffee Oase
Mix cereal with '- cup sugar, the cinnamon and instant coffee;
set aside Mix flour with 1 cup sugar, the baking soda, baking
powder and salt in large mixer bowl. Add sour cream, butter.
eggs, and vanilla Blend at low speed of electric mixer then beat 1
minute at medium speed. Spread one third of the batter in a
greased 8- inch square pan; sprinkle with half of the cereal mix-
ture. Repeat layers and top with remaining batter. Bake at 350
degrees for 45 to 50 minute*, or until cake tester inserted in
Center comes out dean. Cool in pan; then spread with Easy Cof-
fee Glase
EASY COFEE GLAZE
2 Tbap* cooled brewed Maxwell House coffee
m cups sifted confectioners sugar
Gradually blend coffee into sugar and spread on cake. Makes
about Vt cup
'Jewish Students Of America*
In Protest Against Waldheim
Students from Florida joined 50
rtadwrts from 10 states m a
uakswd Vsjpl at* Conscience m
front of the US. Justice Depart
meet in Washington, imploring
Attorney General Edwin Maeae
HI to peace Kurt Wakfceun on the
Watch Lest, barring him from en-
try to the United State*
After a Snahbat of
history of the case, and the urgent
need to not take the Holocaust
hghtitjr. the atmjsiafi held Sbebot
i at 1 la m front of the
Rebecca Umschweis and Gabi
Gabor of Florida International
University. Michelle Markovitx.
Jody Da via. and Andrea Klem of
University of Florida, Shira
Friedman of Buchhols High
School in Gainesville and Randy
Kntchman of Miami all par
bapsted in the Round the-Cloek
Vigil which went over 48 hours
from Sunday morning to Tuesday
afternoon when Attorney General
Meese was speaking in New York
for the Conference of Presidents
of Major Jewish Organisation*
Amit Women Youth Village Develops
Technique To Continue Growing Vegetables
NEW YORK This coming
year is a Shmitah year in Israel,
and according to the Biblical com-
mand* mem. "The seventh year
shall be a Sabbath of solemn rest
for the land." (Lev. 25:4). hence
the land must lie fallow for the
year. Nevertheless, at Amit
"Youth Village Petach Tikvah.
studentis will continue growing
vegetables.
Vegetables grown in Amit
Youth Village Petach Tikvah
hothouses are carefully grown ac-
cording to the "separate plat-
form'* method. This method has
the plants in pots rather than
directly in the ground, and they
receive their water through
special pipes. By this method, the
plants technically do not grow
directly from the ground, thus
enabling Amit Petach Tikvah
students to continue their
agricultural studies and labors
during the coming year in full ac-
cordance with Jewish law.
WHAT THE students do is
carry out experiments upon
carefully-selected plants and
follow up on their projects with
consistent observations and
photography, recording progress
throughout the plant's develop-
ment. Students themselves
operate the computerized system
which monitors growth conditions
of hothouse plants, determines
precise quantities needed of water
and nutrients, and regulates the
amount of sunlight each plant
should receive for optimal
development
The basic structures of these
newly-modernixed hothouses were
built last summer by the teachers
and students of the Agriculture
and Carpentry Departments at
Amit Youth Village Petach
Tikvah. By this "do-it-yourself'
method of construction, much
money was saved, and the con-
struction activity on the part of
the youth village faculty and stu-
dent body certainly encouraged
and reinforced the Administra-
tion's decision to invest in this
project.
Agriculture instructor Zvi Segal
says that the decision to construct
new hothouses came almost of its
own accord. "Amit Youth Village
Petach Tikvah has had hothouses
for the past decade, but
technological advance* in the field
have grown so rapidly in recent
years, that reconstruction of the
facility was essential." he
explained.
The Agricultural Department of
Amit Youth Village Petach
Tikvah is affiliated with the Life
Sciences Department of Bar Dan
University. Final projects as well
as research performed by Amit
Petach Tikvah pupils take place
under the guidance of the Univer-
sity's faculty and advanced
students.
Amit Women s youth village develop* technique to continue grow-
ing vegetables during the Shmitah Year.
Southeast Region Of Bnai Zion
Elects Klein President
Arthur Y. Klein, a Florida resi-
dent since 1981. has been elected
President of the Southeast
Region, it was announced in New
York by Ernest Zelig. National
President of Bnai Zion.
He has also served as Chairman
of the Israel Bond Drive in the
Manhattan Region, and as Na-
tional Chairman of the Cultural
Program Committee of Bnai Zion.
Born in Czechoslovakia. Klein
was sent to a Nazi labor camp dur-
ing the Holocaust. After escaping.
he made his way to Palestine.
where he joined the Haganah and
participated in the war of
Independence.
Mr. Klein succeeds Seymour
Rubin, who will assume the posi-
tion of Trustee. "Bnai Z
delighted that Arthur Kleir. who
during his years in New York
founded the Israeli Chapter No
72. has assumed the preaider.oy of
the Southeast Region.'' Zahf
in announcing the election
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
DELUXE 1&2 BEDROOM
GREAT LOCATION
Walk to 163 St Mall
Across From PuMU
and Z yra Shopping
Transportation
Pool t Sauna
"Game*" 4 Social Director
Synagogue on Premises
Kosher Shopping
WINDSOR TOWERS
1S51 NE167SI
945-8174
Open 7 Days
An Adult Community
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth they'll never say
'Feh' to your flanken!
for a mor n*c*ul an**n "*>
*G tuaaninamri t ao tow*-
Sttsorang ant trot* you
x rv oatar ana *oaMes
r* maat G WaWnciw s Se
somng mfl Brosi mort man i
*voraraancv tsieomptetr
tauonwa. Tlw taaoa msm o*
VrtM ane specs **ws yow
tanas* )iton aysfianont
And ooes Bonders tor yc*.
stock toc'**tiG Matnmo
ion $ tha> nemr say n* -
!*e m> "tore'
Women s League for Israel S'a-
twnal Heritage'Club Chair-
man. Anna Sexdxtz. will give
an eyemtnes* report of events
ta Israel at the luncheon OcL
U xn Dania
T
s
FUME!

3
iWsjawtttsakaa wafer 3
1 aacasts fc wasaaastaa s 2
ftca treat* Sai***i*| aM trait 2
UaM> broa* snort nfts r sftonrnns Snjr ASd
ss> Ca*e anc coo lor 2 no*-s w o* ?* ora*aJM*<
Sswitax* srasorassouo Sac* mama* Senas f lot
eaiert


Friday, October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
HAPPENINGS

Hisa Rosal and ManoUte, who appeared Mon-
day at Miami-Dade Community College
Wolfson Campus in a flamenco dance pro-
gran, with guitarist Felipe Maya and singer
Ramon el Portugues in celebration of the
Hispanic Heritage Festival of the Lively Arts
Series at M-DCC.
Concert Celebrates
Hispanic Heritage Festival
A concert Sunday at Gusman
Hal! was part of Miami-Dade
Community College's celebration
of the Hispanic Heritage Festival.
Aside from presenting three of
the leading gypsy flamenco artists
in Spain today, it was a collabora-
tion between a gypsy artist and a
Jewish artist who met and found
certain qualities their cultures
share and they, as dancers, felt
their work expressed.
Dancer Lori Ilise Rosen grew up
in Miami Beach and chose Miami
for the debut of this tour with
Manolete.
Manolete is considered one of
the finest flamenco dancers in
Spain today, with a unique ability
to remain true to the traditions of
flamenco, and at the same time
create original works that are on
the most sophisticated levels of
dance. Guitarist Felipe Maya is
also one of the most pure and
creative musicians presently ac-
companying flamenco dance. And
singer Ramon el Portugues has a
power and authenticity in his
voice that is breath-taking.
When he sings, it is clear that
roots of flamenco have a great
deal of Semitic influence. Few
singers of flamenco today have
m ability to encompass modern
musical sophistication while re-
pining traditional ethnic
lualities.
MANOLETE and Rosen, who
lances under the name Ilisa
al. met in Granada four years
when she was traveling
Irugh Andalucia to see various
ummer flamenco festivals,
lanolete asked Rosal to teach in
"s school because he felt that her
"ekground in ballet technique
, ? eLthnic dance forms would be
aluable to his students.
'We talked at great length
M dance forms and their
kgrounds." Rosal recalls, "and
discovered he was very in-
r<(stedI in Judaism and Jews, just
s 1 and many other Jews have
Jn drawn to flamenco and the
ypsy culture many people
^m all over the world study
*"ienco in Spain, and a surpris-
Percentage are Jewish.
''Basically. I think that the emo-
expressed in flamenco are
is? .&jew8-" **>*** *
itk l ^J8e Mn two cultures
a history of persecution, liv-
W m countries that are not their
own for centuries and trying to
preserve their identity.
"They are both resolved to keep
their traditions and are very
afraid of assimilation. More than
anything, though. I think that
flamenco expresses human suffer-
ing and response to suffering. We
as Jews relate to the suffering of
the gypsies and to their struggle
for survival."
HISTORICALLY, the Jews liv-
ed in the same sections of An-
dalucia as the gypsies, and the in-
fluence they had in the develop-
ment to flamenco is evident.
There is one flamenco song, "La
Petenera," which describes the
plight of a Jewish girl who was
said to have poisoned a well in a
town in the province of Sevilla.
The melodies in the oldest flamen-
co songs such as the "cana" and
"seguiriyas" sound like davening
with their repetition to the lamen-
ting "ay, ay. ay."
Says Rosal. "I used to study
Israeli folk dance and other ethnic
dance forms, and I always tried to
connect my dancing with my
Jewishness. I performed modern
dances on the holidays at our
synagogue and tried to express
Jewish themes in performances I
did for B'nai B'rith and other
organizations. I went to Israel
three times and tried to find some
dance there with which I could
relate all of the aspects of the arts
and culture I wanted to express.
"I met a woman named
Hadassah who had grown up in
Jerusalem with her family and
who had never left the land and
had been religious scholars for
generations. She had set out to
rediscover the ancient dance
referred to in the Torah, which no
longer exists. It wasn't a folk
dance or a social dance; it was a
religious dance.
"Her studies finally took her to
India, where she decided was the
only remaining dance form with
the history, age. and quality that
our own dance might have had if it
had been developed and retained
as part of our culture."
GYPSIES are originally from
India, and the basic roots of
flamenco are in this Indian
religious dance. Once the gypsies
left India, they were influenced by
the cultures of the countries in
which they lived. Their language,
"calo," their music, dance, and
food differ in varying parts of
Europe, as with Ashkenazim and
Sephardim.
They are a people who left their
homeland with a strict set of laws
and traditions, who traveled the
world, persecuted wherever they
went because they were different,
and they have developed an art
Continued on Page 9-B
HADASSAH
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their chapter meeting
Thursday, Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m. at
Harmony School. The program
for the evening will feature Rabbi
Warren Kasztl speaking on the
topic, "Sexual Roles in the Jewish
Family."
The chapter will be having, "A
Sigh of Relief Baby Safety Class,"
at Baptist Hospital, Thursday,
Oct. 16, from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
The class will teach CPR training,
poison control and other impor-
tant issues on life saving
information.
Representatives from No
Casinos and Citizens for County
Choice on Casinos will speak when
Ko'ach Chapter of Miami Beach
Hadassah meets Tuesday evening
at 8 p.m. in the Cadillac Hotel,
President Jackie Hechter an-
nounced. The public is welcome,
added Program Vice President
Paula Sernaker.
Michelle Rapchik, Regional
Director of the Hadassah Zionist
Youth Commission, will be guest
speaker when the Brandeis-
Cantor Chapter of Hadassah con-
venes for its meeting on Thurs-
day, Oct. 16. at the Ocean
Pavillion Restaurant, Miami
Beach. Luncheon will be served at
11:45 a.m. with Ms. Rapchik
scheduled to speak at 1 p.m.
"History Repeats Itself," will
be the subject discussed by Rail
Miller, emissary from Israel, at
the next general meeting of the
Naomi Chapter of Hadassah.
The meeting will be held on
Monday, Oct. 20, at the Tamarind
Apartments Clubhouse, North
Kendall Drive, at 8 p.m.
Tropical Cancer League of Miami Beach will have its season's
first luncheon meeting at 12 o'clock Friday. Oct. 17. at the Ocean
Pavillion Sadie Brodsky will give a book review
"Does Florida Need Casino Gambling?" will be the topic of
discussion sponsored by the Brotherhood Breakfast Forum of
Temple Beth Am. on Sunday morning. Oct 19. at 9:30 a.m. in
the Temple Youth Lounge Participants are Ronald Buschbom.
Andrew Rubin and Gerald Richman.
Wilma Morrison. Director of Public Relations for the Central
Agency for Jewish Education will air an original interview with
the late Prime Minister David Ben Gurion on Tradition Time
WVCG 1080 AM on the dial. Sunday. Oct 12 The interview
was done in March. 1967. |ust two months before the Six Day
War on Prime Minister Ben Gurion s last official visit to the
United States
At their Oct 27 meeting, at 12.50 p.m at the Social Hall.
Roney Plaza B'nai B'rith Women, will have as their guest
speaker a Medicare Representative.
The Miami Chapter of the American Jewish Committee an-
nounces its participation in the 17th Annual Academicians
Seminar in Israel As part of its involvement, the human relations
agency will be selecting and partially subsidizing the expenses of a
local resident The program is designed to enable Jewish scholars,
to more deeply inquire into their heritage as well as to experience
firsthand the life and problems of Israel.
The Florida Lions Eye Bank 25th Anniversary will be
celebrated Saturday. Oct 18. at the Diplomat Hotel, beginning at
630 p.m.
Eliot Berg. MD. General Surgery, has been recently promoted
to Clinical Professor of Surgery at the University of Miami School
of Medicine, according to Edward Tudanger. AMI Palmetto
General Hospital Chief Executive Officer. Dr. Berg, founding
physician and Board Chairman of AMI Palmetto General
Hospital. Hialeah. has served as an Associate Professor of
Surgery at the University since 1970 and a member board of
overseers. University of Miami, since 1985
Two world premieres and two works by the late George Balan-
chine will highlight the inaugural programs danced by the nation's
newest major ballet company when the Miami City Ballet, headed
by its artistic director. Edward Vifleil*. bows in a gala debut on
Friday. Oct. 17 at 8 p.m. at downtown Miami's Gusman Center
for the Performing Arts. The program will be repeated on Satur-
day, at 8 p.m. and on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Maestro Ottavio De Rosa
will conduct the Philharmonic Orchestra of Florida.
Air Force Staff Sgt Randy L Miller, son of Sadie M Miller
has arrived for duty with the 4th Civil Engineering Squadron.
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. N.C.
Miami Beach's Acorns Civic Theatre will hold auditions for
"South Pacific'' on Saturday. Oct. 11 and 18 from 2 to 5 p.m.. at
the 21st Street Community Center's Little Stage
Dave Shafran of Miami Beach is among 59 Florida Atlantic
University students who have received scholarships from the
Department of Musk to study vocal and instrumental music for the
1986-87 academic year
The Gloria Luria Gallerv announces the opening of "Still
Life/Landscape New Approaches To Old Traditions curaied by
Manuel E Gonzalez opening on Friday evening, from 7 50 to
9:50 p.m. and continues through Saturday. Nov. 1.
The New World School of the Arts will hold a public forum on
Friday, Oct 1 7. from 4 to 6 p.m at the Intercontinental Hotel in
downtown Miami The forum is designed to establish a dialogue
between the professional arts community and the School's new
Provost. Richard Klein
The American Cancer Society is offering a new program.
"New Beginnings A Workshop in Pain Management and Stress
Control It is an eight-week series beginning October 20 from 1
p.m. to 5 p.m.. conducted at Cedars Medical Center
North Miami Beach resident
Diane Weiss, daughter of
Gaston and Ita Weiss, has
begun her first year of inten-
sive study at Yeshiva Univer-
sity's Stern College for Women
in New York. A native of Peru,
Ms. Weiss, 18, is a biology ma-
jor. She has lived with her
family in North Miami Beach
for the last three years.


Page 8-B The Jewish Flondian/Fnday, October 10, 1966
Yaakov Mesh Is Free ...
And He's Coming To Miami
Yaakov Mesh, a former Soviet "refusenik" will
join Congregation Bet Breira during Yom Kippur
services, Sunday. Oct 12, at Bet Breira, South
Dade
Together with his wife and parents. Mesh will
usher in the holiest day of the Jewish New Year by
kindling the Holy Day Lights.
For more than eight years, the Congregation in
the forefront in the Soviet Jewjy movement, has
fought for the release of Mesh. This past January,
after extraordinary efforts by Bet Breira con-
gregant Dr. Joel Levin. Mesh was freed.
But Mesh's freedom did not come easily. In
1977, Mesh and some 20 family members received
permission to leave the Soviet Union. As they were
boarding the plane. Mesh and his wife were pulled
off supposedly because of a misspelling of Mesh's
name on some official document. Soviet
authorities assured Mesh's parents that Yaakov
would follow on the next flight.
But he did not follow.
For eight years. Mesh tried to leave the Soviet
Union but was denied permission. He was con-
stantly harassed by Soviet police and on various
occasions was jailed, accused of "subversive"
activities.
Through all this. Dr. Levin fought, literally and
figuratively, to bring public pressure on Soviet of-
ficials to free Mesh.
Levin, a plastic surgeon, arranged an exhibition
bout with world lightweight boxing champion Hec-
tor "Macho" Camacho to dramatize the plight of
Mesh, a one time leading amateur boxer in Russia.
This unusual "bout" gained international atten-
tion for Mesh's cause and was the subject of a
special report on Howard Cosell's "Sports Beat"
program on ABC television.
In addition to his more dramatic efforts, Levin
also took the political route, contacting Senators,
Congressmen and finally the White House in his
efforts to free Mesh.
Last year, Mesh's mother addressed the Con-
gregation at New Year services, pleading for help
to free her son. then in a Russian prison. The Con-
gregation responded by sending 400 telegrams
from the 400 Bet Breira families.
The telegrams, political and public pressure
worked. The Soviets soon released Mesh from
prison and granted him his exit visa.
An now Mesh can celebrate his first High Holy
Day. in freedom, united with his family.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. "Give ear. ye heavens, and I u-iU speak: And let the earth hear
the u\*rds of my mouth"
(Deuteronomy St.lt.
HAAZINU
HAAZ1NU Moses' song beginning "Give ear, ye heavens and I
will speak" contains the principal elements in the unique relation-
ship between God and his people Israel. Moses opens with a call to
heaven and earth to witness his declaration. From the beginning
of time. Moses asserts, the Lord had chosen Israel for a special
place among the nations of the world. He had first singled out
Israel in the desert, whence he lovingly led them into the land of
Canaan. But Israel. Moses prophesies, would abandon their God
for foreign idols. Then God would send a cruel nation to enslave
and torment the children of Israel. Eventually however, God
would have compassion on His beloved people and wreak
vengeance on Israel's tormentors. All the nations would then
behold how the Lord had avenged the blood of His servants and
had made expiation for the land of His people. At God's command.
Moses prepares to ascend mount Nebo. in the land of Moab. From
there at a distance he is to glimpse the Promised Land and die; as
Aaron had died at mount Hor. "Because ye trespassed against Me
in the midst of the children of Israel at the waters of
Meribathkadesh, in the wilderness of Zin: because ye sanctified
Me not :n the midst of the children of Israel" (Deuteronomy
St.Sl).
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and msm
upon "The Graph* History ol the Jewish Heritage, edited by P WoHmarv
Tsanvr I'' published by ShengoM The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. Near York. N V 10036 Joeeph Schiano. is president of the society
distnbutmo the volume.)
PERSONALS
ARE YOU SINGLE? Per
sonal Ads get response!
Cost is $10.00 for up to 30
words. To place your spe-
cial singles ad send $10.00
and copy of ad to: The
Jewish FlorkHan. Slnoies
Column. P.O. Box 01973.
Miami. Florida 33101.
DWJ ONE WOMAN
mensch needs to snare life
with a warm lovable,
unpretentious partner for
intimate communication,
stress-tree togetherness,
love, happiness, exercise,
fun. laughs even tears. Am
clean, own teeth, casual
dresser, considerate,
understanding, unencum-
bered, no alimony pay-
ments, no dependents,
miserable dancer, not rich
but no debts Not perfect
but not one nighter. not
smoker, gambler, drinker,
drug user 5 11. 59. exer-
cise, nutrition minded
vegetarian. If you want to
be loved (genuinely), want
appreciation, respect, are
45 to 50. affectionate,
attractive 5'3" to 57",
healih exercise conscious
115 to 135 lbs., please mail
recent photo, letter to
informal living New Yorker
currently visiting, wants to
move to southern Florida;;
TO. Reznik. P.O.B. 1631.
islamorada Key. Florida
^3036
HAPPENINGS IS HAVING
a HORROR-I-FIC HALLOW-
EEN PARTY on FRIDAY.
OCTOBER 31. 1986 from
530 p.m. on. at the Hyatt
Regency Miami (Currents
Lounge). 400 S.E. 2nd Ave..
Miami. Florida This party
is FREE and Everyone Is
Welcome. There will be a
Live Dance Band. Compli-
mentary Hors Doeuvres.
Halloween Games and
Costume Contests. Trick
Or Treat Bags. Special
Prizes and Surprises. For
more information call
Sharon Silver 385-1255
Bar Mitzvah
Adam Haft
ADAM HAFT
At Shabbat Services on Satur-
day, Adam Haft, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Haft, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Sholom. Miami
Beach. Rabbis Leon Kronish.
Gary Glickstein and Harry Jolt
will officiate.
Adam is a student of the Confir-
mation Class of 5749.
Israel And Poland
Moving Toward
Diplomatic
Relations
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israel
and Poland are moving slowly
toward the resumption of
diplomatic relations broken off by
Poland after the 1967 Six-Day
War. Each country will be open-
ing an interest section in the other
over the next few weeks and
Israeli and Polish technical teams
have gone to Warsaw and Tel
Aviv, respectively, to make the
necessary arrangements.
Mordechai Bar-Zur, who holds
the personal rank of Ambassador,
will go to Warsaw in about a
month to head the Israel interest
section, but with the official rank
of only a Second Secretary. His
No. 2 man. Alex Ben-Zvi. arrived
in the Polish capital last week
with his family
The Israeli technical team in
Warsaw is preparing the old
Israel Embassy building for reoc-
cupation. It has been vacant for 19
years but kept clean and in good
repair under special ar-
rangements with the Polish
government.
The Polish Bank on Allenby
Road in Tel Aviv will house
Poland's interest section, to be
headed by a diplomat, as yet un-
named, of equivalent rank to Bar-
Zur. He is expected in Tel Aviv at
the same tune Bar-Zur goes to
Warsaw. The Polish technical
team, meanwhile, is readying the
bank bmlding for its diplomatic
role The bank was kept open over
the last two decades but has done
Mel
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:38 p.m.
AOATM YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Ortva
North Miami Beach 947 1436
Rabbi Slmcha F roadmen
Cantor Ian Alparn Conservative
Ct>
StllUimllUpm
OaMy aarricoa '30 a m UHpn
KolNlcvaSun SrJOp.n.
Yam Meavr Man. I m
Tatlah Oadela Man 7:40 p m
TEMPLE BETH AM
SBS0 N. Kendall Or.
S Miami Bf7-aSS7
Dr. Herbert Bauwsperd
Sank* Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
M. a 15 am
Sat. 11 1Sa.ni *oX laumgard Wl
on 'Ttm Imponanca a* Si In a Thantha'
Sat SMttvah aai Stana.
Bi Mitrrah Michafta Duem
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
MM S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911
Jack Riemer. Rabbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
m
UinchahSai SaSpm
Kel Naare Sao. tM a."
Ton.Hippw.iaor l.m
ChMdran ho 10 10 a m
DaHy aar. Sun m 4 4 JO p m
aton SThun 7 joam 5 JOpm
Tim *M I > ? UMp
pm
BETHKOOESH
1101 SW 12 Ave.
Rabbi Man Shapiro
CsSOlOf- JOeMOft t\rt+tfataM
Kiln Executive

TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami FL 331*1
BtVSSOO Conaarvatlw
Or. i are* Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Oorfsnfcol, I
Rlbbl Emarttui
Moahe FrtedM*. Cantor
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tempi. Beth Shmuel eu*TK}*
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
53*7213- 534 7714
Barry J. Konovttch. Rabbi /.
Moshe Buryn. Cantor \W)
Sergio Orobter. President "*
Shoaem Epeibsum President
Religious Committee

TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Weoh.ngton Avenue
Miami-Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrmen. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Ma.well Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Sat. am SKaebei Shurah
Or tntxelahnitananN preach
Cantor Vasxaea Onllaaan mil chant
Oar MHnah Oaniol a** z
Sarrtcaa Hi Thaatar ol Porlorming Am
Kol NWra. Sunday T JO p m
Yam Wpear Man. S JO m
Y1akarlaon.12noon
. Timpu Sanctuary.
roH sweat and
notary aen.
rood. Mai
Cantor Jacob Tambor
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
6329421
C-einto* RefDOv SOoOef^oo Sen* 11
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot Greater Miami
bkam Himn Sawn hi Conoraeat ion
137 N E 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9900 N. Kendall Dr.. 596-5055
Senior Rabbi Haekeil Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor. RechoHo F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus
Jacob 0. Bornstein
Director ol Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
al Shuah
Kaaaman. Kandea nato laraat
Cantor SachMM
un.. aton -
. nakor 1 p n
a Kandaa2p"
Harvey Kant
teat St- a*.- USarey
vomKipeu-Sun It
iCbm, lull III
TEMPLE JUDEA
56001
Coral
(Wfom
997 5967
Friday aantea S p m
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 634-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Snoshanah Raab. Cantor
Santcoa Frl 7 JO p m
Sat ? JCa m
TEMPLE MENORAH
920-TSth St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowttz
Art Fridkis. Aaaoc. Rabbi
Cantor Murray Yavneh
SetOamSHSilaannca
0ay aMrtcfeah Sunday rnoa.
t
r
>
Fn rNpaMhlintltx
SaiadSamSaiOpm
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Javaaraooi Are.. MB. Fl 33139
Te. 539-4112
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Misiir
CowlS' Niaaim lanysmim
Dee,i
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7S00S.W. 120th Street
299 2901 '?>,
Rabbi Davtd H. Auerbach \W)
Canter ----------------
TaaalUaawajHL
TEMPLE BETH lHO10M5U>23i
Chose Ave A4lol St ,?.,
oe ^OW'aCdagSw^r^.aa w *m.
aaavaau
'uto caeuu). *
iBaeat
caanoe oawo ccaivtaia
Vaaa a^ajar San. a 15 a SMS vm I
aJK. Cheavant pan 1 iSpnt i
ae bjh. ataOa* aara. I mm. eat
iKIS
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7529
1061 N MiarvM Beach Btvd
Or Maa A LapachrU Rabbi
Randall Konagsburg Asot Rebt>
2* Arorw. Cantor
Harvey L Brown E>ec OVector
.ernr)C.. S
aaaoam S
rfcJS.n. ar p
> I5Mp
Sam andSpm
Sat Sam andHSp-Ht
TEMP1E NER TAAN0
7902 Cartyie Ave
33141
999 MU
Cantor
Klein
(f)
Dee.IanMilSa-aa.andS.SSp.Hi
Set kel ajav PtL kata aanaaa S p m
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
el North Mtemi Baach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
911-1692
Yaakov Sprung Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
3924999
Rabbi Herahei Becker -W- "^i
Set SJ0 a-a*. aarvaaa at
TaaaeaaSeHav-Ci
osuawmava.
SaaStKniiOOr
TEMPLE SINAI II
North Dade s Relonvi Congreoaiw
Ralph P Kangaley. Rabbi 932 901
Julian I Cook Associate Rebb<
srvang ShuMiee. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay Adminisfator
TEMPLE ZtOH ISMAELITE CENTE
9000 Miller Or Conservs'
2712311 ..
Or Norman N Shap.ro RiDt) jj
Benieman Adlor Canto* ~"
David Rosenthal Auxiliary Cantor
.


Friday, October 10, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Larry Gottlieb, center, accepts a Campaign Achievement Award
on behalf of the Greater Miami Israel Bonos office for the best
New Life campaign in 1985. The presentation was made to Got-
tlieb, who resides in South Florida, at the closing session of the
Israel Bonds Organization's 1986 National Leadership Con-
ference. Presentingthe award is Israel Bonds International Cam-
paign Chairman David Hermelin, left, while Gad Ariel, Israel
Finance Ministry's Chief Fiscal Officer for the Western
Hemisphere, looks on.
Hispanic Heritage Festival
Continued from Page 7-B
form as a response to their
experience
It was their one way of finding a
place to be, a means of livelihood,
and a reason to hold their heads
up. It gained them a certain
begrudged respect because it was
one thing they could do better that
everyone else "much as Jews
are known for certain talents and
resented for them even as they
are sought after," explains Rosal.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
AMonument. Inc.
?60 Northeast 2^t3 A.enue
Phona 7591669
OF COURSE, there are many
differences between these two
cultures, but they have too much
in common to ignore. It is not
coincidence that so many Jews
love flamenco so much that
they leave their homes and com-
fortable lifestyles to work and
study in Spain as foreigners.
"It is not a coincidence that
Manolete reads every book he can
find about Jews and Israel and the
Holocaust, and that he can't stop
talking to me about my
background and knowledge of my
people," says Rosal, with whom
Manolete finally decided to col-
laborate to create flamenco
dances expressing those qualities
the two share as artists, as a gyp-
sy and as Jew.
Following the Sunday concert,
Rosal remains in Miami teaching
at her school, the Academia de
Baile La Rosa, where her Middle
Eastern dance classes are taught
by Myriam Eli.
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN
lARRie S. BLASBERQ MICHAEL C BLASBERG
'UNEB.AI DIRECTOR
' B,eiOent Jewish Fune'll
0"*CIO>1 ol America
SEvENtY -FIRST STREET
'J 0CtO'
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Oade County
Broward County
KS2-209H
!< (>i.s.-nut! t.v Wiwrmdr Memorial< hapel liw
Mew York: (2I2)M3 7no (jue*nn Blvd A Mill Kd Kara* H
QBITMARIE?
Wolfie Cohen,
Restaurateur,
Passes
Wolfie Cohen, the restaurateur
who built the Rascal House,
Wolfie'8 and Pumpernik's, died
Sunday at the age of 74.
Survivors include one son,
Lewis; one daughter, Robin; a
brother, Albert; and a sister, Ruth
Stamler.
Services were held at the River-
side Alton Road Chapel.
SEGAL. Irvine R., 76 of Sorth Miami
Beach, October 4. Service* held in
Newark, New Jersey. The Riverside.
GORALSKY. Mr*. Either of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert.
UPTON, Eleanor. 58 of Miami. October 5
Service* held at Temple Israel.
GITTLEMAN. Jennie G., 89 formerly of
Forte Towers, October 4. Services were
held.
GOLDSMITH. Justin J.. of North Miami
Beach. October 3. The Riverside.
WEINBERG. Isidore. Service h-ld in Ner
York City.
ROAM AN, Mortimer, 86 of Miami Beach.
October 3 The Riverside
KUSHEL. Julia. 79. October 4 Services
were held.
I.EVE NTH AL. Samuel of Miami Beach. Oc
tober 3. Service* held in Va. The
Riverside.
Concerns Other
Than Money
Continued from Page 3-B
phasized that there can be no
negotiations regarding the
establishment of a Palestinian
state in Judaea, Samaria and
Gaza. Nor will Israel negotiate
with the PIX). "We are ready to
talk about autonomy, applying the
Camp David accords as precedent.
But any solution with territorial
compromises is a myth," he said.
Nissim does not believe in
criticizing the Israeli government
while a coalition partner. "It is
neither healthy nor constitu-
tional," he said.
JTA Services
Legal Notices
Statement of Ownership, Management and
Circulation (required by 39 USC No. 8*86):
1 Title of publication Jewish Floridian
(Miami) Publication No. 275820. 2 Date
of filing: Sept. 30. 1986, 3 Frequency of
issue: Weekly. A No of issues published
annually 52. B Annual subscription price:
$18.00. 4 Location of known office of
publication: 120 N.E. 6 Street, Miami. Els
33132. 6 Location of headquarters of
publishers: 120 N.E 6 Street. Miami. Fla.
33132. 6 Publisher, editor, managing
editor Fred K. Shochet, 120 N.E. 6 Street,
Miami, Fla. 33132. 7 Owner, Fred K.
Shochet. 120 N.E 6 Street, Miami. Fla.
33132. 8 Known bondholders, mor
tfafese or other security holders holding or
owning 0 percent or more of total amount of
bonds, mortgages and other securities, if
any: None. 9 for completion by non-profit
organization: None. 10 Extent and nature
of circulation, given in this order Average
no. copies each issue during preceding 12
months followed by actual no. copies single
issue published nearest to filing date: A)
total no. copies printed (net press run):
29,363, 61.000; B) paid circulation 1 sale*
through deal en and earners, street vendors
and counter sales. 26, 31; 2 mail subscrip-
tions: 26.753, 58.363; C) total paid circula-
tion; 26,778, 58,394; D) free distribution by
mail, carrier, or other means, samples, com-
plimentary and other free copies, 1,417,
1.471; E) total distribution 28,196. 59,865,
F) copies not distributed: 1) office us*, left
over, unaccounted for. spoiled sfter prin-
ting. 1.168, 1,136; 2) returns from news
gents- 0. 0; G) Total: 29,963. 61.000. I cer-
tify that statements made by me above are
correct and complete.
s. Fred K. Shochet, publisher
SCHI'HAM
David, 91, former 30 year resident of Corsl
Gables, and member of Temple Beth Am.
Bom in Chicago, III Mr Schuham spent his
boyhood in Douglas, Mich., where he began
his 69 year affiliation with the Dutcher
Masonic Lodge No. 19S He was a graduate
of the Ferris Institute of Grand Rapids
Father of daughter, Iris and son-in-law. At
torney A. Budd Cutler, with whom he reaid
ed snd Michelle EuHokin of Tucson, Arts
Grandfather of Betsy (Dr. Carl 8.]
Schreiber, Glen Cove. NY; Attorney, Jef
frey H. Cutler of Coconut Grove; Joe S
Hokin. Miami; Jeanne (James) Dutton, Tue
son; James (Heddi) EUHokin. Overgaard
Am-; Jody (Jeaae) Oliver, Billingham. WA.
and great-grandfather of 8. The Riverside.
MILLER
Samuel. 96 of North Miami Beach, formerly
of Chicago, passed sway October 1. Surviv-
ed by sons, Leroy (Eileen), North Miami
Beach. Clifford (Birdie). Calif.; daughter
Maxine (George) Silverman. North Miami
Beach; nine grandchildren; 11 great grand
children. Levitt-Wniatein
BACHRACH. Robert Allan of Miami.
Rubin Zilbert
GALLUB. Fannie, formerly of Bad Harbour,
September 24. Services held in New York.
LIFE. Betta of Miami Beach. Rubin Zilbert
MANDEL. Sara (Shirley), September 26.
Services held in New York City.
GOLDMAN, Ruth of North Miami Beach,
October 1. The Riverside.
RENKOFF, Arnold CLU, 60, a 42-year resi-
dent of Miami Beach psssed sway October
1. The Riverside
CIMBLER, Mrs Bertha of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert
FRANKEL. Rebecca, 86 of Miami, October
5. Services were held.
FUCHS. Mark. 54, of Miami, October 4. The
Riverside.
FUTTERMAN. Valerie of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert
Eleanor 'Elly'
Lipton Passes
Eleanor "Elly" Lipton, a civil
rights activist in the 1960s and
former acting director of the
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee, died
Sunday. She was 58.
Survivors include her brother
William Lott; three daughters,
Leslie Lipton, Lauren Morse and
Lisa Wilson; and two grandsons.
Services were held at Temple
Israel.
JAJUCEI
Eva, 82, of North Miami Beach, pasted
away October 2. Survived by loving aim,
Lao, of North Miami Beach and 6 grand-
children. Service* ware bald October 8.
Levitt Wetnstein North Miami Beach with
interment at Lakeside Manorial Park.
STEIN. Murray G, 77. of Miami Beach. Oc-
tober 7. The Riverside
SUCHOUCKI. Solomon. 80. of Coral
Gables. October 6. Services were held.
GOLDSMITH. Justin J.. 66. of Miami. Oc
tober 3 The Riverside.
PIMSTEIN, Harry. 80. of Bal Harbour, Oc-
tober 2. Services private.
FURMAN, Gssrul of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
LOWE, Harry of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
MAGRAM. Bella, 94 of Miami. October 4
The Riverside.
PARMACEK. Sophia of Miami Beach. Ser
vices held in Skokie, II
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compare
pre-arrangement plans. Then come to Menorah last. With five
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens in Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah Is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing. And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop "them" first. Then come
to Menorah where your last choice Is your best choice.
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6000
Margate: 975-0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627 2277
Crmrlcnrs Funeral Crniprh M.iiisok-uni I"it Need Planning
,

r RUBIN 1 ZILBERT 1 CHAPEL MONUMINT CO CIMITIRY COUNtlLINQ 10CHAPELS SERVING DADE BROWARD V PALM BEACH J RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE ^y ^BT BHOWABD 538-6371 A A 920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN



Page 10 3 The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 10, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
in THi circuit court of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND rOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actiee Ne. II WH FC 08
NOTICE BY PUBUCATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
GILDA LUGO.
PttrtMCMT
and
LUIS LUGO
Respondent
TO: LUIS LUGO
5388Zoue5
Panama City, PANAMA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for
DkeoJution of Mamage haa been
f9ad and commenced in this court
and you art required to serve a
copy of your written ilefanaaa, if
any, to it on USHER BBYN,
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner
shoot address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 909, Miami Beach,
Florida BUM, and fBa the original
with the dark of the abort atyled
court on or before October 24th,
1986, otherwise a default will bo
entered againat you for the rebef
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the teal
of aaid court at Miami. Florida on
thk 17th Day of September. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A> Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone: (306) 532-1166
11110 September 26.
Octobers. 10.17.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TB ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT W AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Ne. 86-81788 FC II
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBUCATION
Bar Ne. 146741
IN RE: The marriage of:
MIRIAM BARBOSA.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
PABLO R BARBOSA.
Reapondent/Huaband.
TO PABLO B. BARBOSA
Rasadennr Unknown
YOU. Pablo R. Barbosa.
reaidence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for diaaohibon of marriage with
the Clark of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner'! attorneys. Law Office
of HERMAN COHEN A MARTIN
COHEN. 622 S. W. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. on or before
October 17. 1986. or else petition
wul be luufoesod.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this September 10. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Deputy Clerk
11091 September 19. 26;
Octobers. 10,1986
NOTICE UNDER
riCTTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, daring to
engage a rssnnass under the fic-
titious name ROSINA MALTA at
3390 Mary Street. Kl, Coconut
Grove. FL S3133 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Armando Guuerres, Esquire
Attorney for Tejus Import A
Export, Inc.
2163 Coral Way. Suite 400.
Miami. FL 33146
11268 Octobers. 10.17,24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. DM
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-S88M
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of:
CLARISTA GEORGIA.
Petitioner /Wife.
and
LEROY GEORGIA.
Respondent/Husband
TO: LEROY GEORGIA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for
Diaeohition of Marriage haa been
filed againat you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
lack P. Draekman. Eaq.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
6SS NE. 167th Street. Suite S15.
North Miami Beach. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the derix of the above styled court
on or before October 17. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
againat you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida, on
this 12th day of September. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Jack P. Druekman. Eaq.
633 N.E. 167th Street
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
Telephone: (306) 662-0638
Attorney for Petitioner
11093 September 19. 26;
Octobers. 10. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
EN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVI1 ACTION NO. 88-30798
FC 16
NOTICE BY PUBUCATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
SADIE R. BENNETT BARNES.
Petitioner
and
WILLARD L. BARNES.
Respondent
TO: WILLARD L BARNES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road
- Suite 909. Miami Beach. Florida
33139, and file the original with
the dark of the above styled court
on or before October 17. 1986;
otherwise s default will be entered
againat you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the aeal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
thk 10th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P BRENKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (905) 532 1156
11090 September 19.26;
Octobers, 10. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
that the lajiitiejfid, dearag to
engage in ti unarm- under the
fictitious Basse FEDCO
DISTRIBUTION CENTER. INC .
at S646 NW 112 St.. in the City of
Maun. Florida, intends to register
said aaana with the dark of the
Ca-oat Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami Beach. Florida,
that 10th day of flialiwtiar. 1986
FEDCO. WC.
Br Lioyd L Ruakin
V.
Lloyd L.
Attorney tor
629-71etSt-
Miaant Beach. FL 1*141
11088 Sayl.srtirl9.10.
Octobers. 10, 1986
NOTICE UNDEB
FICTTTrOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, deasrmg to
engage m busmeas under the fie
ubous name LEMON AND COLA
CORPORATION at 819 NW 26th
St. Mnuni. Fk. 33127 intends to
lagtatar said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida.
LEMON AND COLA
CORPORATION
819 NW. 26th St
Maum. Fk. 33127
ROSA M VEGA
Attorney for Lemon and Cola
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Royal Palm Cleaners
at 4016 Royal Palm Ave.. Miami
Beach. Fl. SS140 intends to
register aaid name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Eliaa Jones, President
4016 Royal Palm Ave
Miami Beach, Fl. 88140
SOLOMON WEISS. Eaq.
Attorney for
SHARON EUSA. Inc.
11270 Octobers. 10.17.24.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
i inMhaeigiisit, jseaaai to
ubous name 8770 West Flegier
Madieal Cantor at 8770 West
FlegJar Street. Miami. Fla. 88134
intends to register aaid name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Ernesto A. Sivilla, M.D. PA
Harold J Cohen
Attorney for 8770 West Flagier
Medical Center
11267 September 26;
Octobers. 10.17.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name WILSON'S
RETIREMENT CENTER at 2233
NW. 56th Ave.. Lauderhill,
Florida SSSIS. intends to register
amid name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
WILSON BENJAMIN
SUSAMMA W BENJAMIN
11098 September 19. 26;
Octobers. 10.1986
NOTICE UNDEB
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name ALAN
SAKOWITZ, at 9200 South
DedeUnd Boulevard. Suite 208.
Miami. Florida 88156. intends to
register aaid name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
ALAN SAKOWITZ. PA.
11096 September 19. 26;
Octobers. 10. 1986
i Avenue. Surte 101
Coral Gables, Fla. 88184
11097 fl |t ll 19.18;
October S. 10, 196*
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
LN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
Civil Artioa Ne. 86-41137 FC 10
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ALPHONSINE GUIL1AUME.
also known as ALPHONSINE
GUILLAUME.
Petitioner/Wife
and
HAROLD WILLIAMS.
Respondent/Husband
TO Mr Harold Williams
Residence Unknown
Last Known Address (Street
Number Unknown)
Bay Street
Nassau. Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for
Diaeohition of Marriage has been
filed againat you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Bruce J. Scheinberg. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address ia 420
Lincoln Road. Suite 512. Miami
Baach. Florida 88139. and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before
November 7. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered againat you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 1st day of October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce J. Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 612
Maum Beach. Florida 38189
Telephone (806) 688-7676
Attorney for Petitioner
11178 October 10.17.24. 31.1986
IN THE CIBCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-MU
Divieiea 01
IS RE: ESTATE OF
JOSE RAMON FAJARDO.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSE RAMON FAJARDO,
deceased. File Number 86-6616, ia
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Divanon, the address of which ia 73
W. Flagier Street, Miami, Florida
33190. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative i
attorney are net forth below
All interested persons are
required to file with that court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBUCATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) aD claims
against the estate and (1) any
objection by an inter sated person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WUL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of thk Notice has
begun on October 10, 1986.
Personal Representative:
NOHELIA FAJARDO
11441 S.W. 7th Terrace
Sweetwater. FL SS144
Attorney for Personal
Representative
BRUCE LAMCHICK, Eaq.
LAMCHICK GLUCKSMAN A
JOHNSTON
10726 S.W. 104th Street
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (306) 596-6333
11277 October 10.17.1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 66-4868
Diviaioa 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ISIDORE WEISMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
Tie administration of the estate
of ISIDORE WEISMAN.
deceased. File Number 86-4858. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with thk court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom thk notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of thk Notice has
i on October 10. 1986
Personal Representative:
JEFFREY A. UNN
7 Crescent Road
Wyneote. PA 19096
SHARON UNN
130 East 18th Street. No 4G
NY. NY 10003
ROBERT GROVER
801-41* Street, 6th Floor
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHAEL A DRIBIN
Post Office Box 402099
826 Arthur Godfrey Road
Telephone (306) 532-32C0
11279 October 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the laMhaejgiiail. ilson kyj to
engage in business under the fie
titjous names United Pool In-
dustries. Inc. a/k/a Sally Dyaart,
Inc.; Dysart't Pool A Patio World:
Dyaart Pook. Dyaart, the Swimm
kg Pool People; Fiberglass Pool of
America, Inc at 16180 Bkeayne
Boulevard. No Miami Beach,
Florida 88100 intends to isgkti
aaid naaae with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
United Pool Industries, Inc
Ruth Gana. President
11286 October 10.17. 24. SI, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-6400
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MEYER SUTZ,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Seuaaaary Adsaiaktratiea)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an
Order of Summary Administration
haa been entered in the estate of
MEYER SUTZ, deceased. File
Number 886800, by the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which k 78 W. Flagier Street,
Miami. Florida 33130, that the
total cash value of the estate k
$16,160.00. and that the names
and sddrissri of those to whom it
haa boon assigned by such order k:
Julia Sutx, 18S4 Drexel Avenue,
Miami Beach. Florida 88189.
AD persona are required to file
with the derk of aaid court,
WITHIN 8 CALENDAR
MONTHS FROM TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBUCATION OF THIS
NOTICE all claims againat the
estate in the form and manner
prescribed by Section 733.703 of
the Florida Statutes and Rule
5.490 of the Florida Rules of
Probate and Guardianship
Procedure
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of thk Notice has
begun on October 10, 1986
Attorney:
Herbert J. Leroer
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (306) 673-3000
11280 October 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUiT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
(iril Arties No 84-43325
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
RAMONA QUINTAL
Petitioner/Wife,
and
FTTZROY TAYLOR
Resporident/Huaband.
TO: Frtaroy Taylor
660 Ocean Avenue
Apartment El 5th Floor
Brooklyn. New York 11226
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed againat you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
ABRAHAM A GALBUT. ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petitioner.
whose address k 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the derk of the above atyled court
on or before November 11, 1986.
otherwise a default will be entered
againat you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
Thai notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
thk 7 day of October. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
Aa Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33189
Telephone: (306) 672 3100
Attorney for
Florida Bar No. 210889
11284 October 10. 17. 24. 31. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 84-43104
IN RE: The Marriage or
FELIX ALONSO,
Petitioner
and
ROSA MARINA GOODMAN
ALONSO
Respondent.
TO: ROSA MARINA GOODMAN
ALONSO. Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dkeoki-
bon of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 Nor
thwert 12th Are.. Miami. Florida.
33136. and file original with Court
Clark on or before November 7.
1986; otherwise a default will he
enterosd
October 6. 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: CLARINDA BROWN
11282 October 10. 17. 24, 31, 1986
PUHUC NOTICE
The annual return of the Obduha
S. De Von Bernard Chanubi,.
Foundation Trust k available at
the address noted below for inspec
bdn during regular business hours
by any dtken who so request*
within 180 days after publication
of thk notice of its availability
The Obduha 8. De Von Bernard
Charitable Foundation Trust
1110 BrickeD Avenue
Suite 700
Miami. Florida, 331S1
The Foundation Manager u
I. Stanley Levine, Trustee
Publication of thk Notice on the
tenth day of October. 1986
11181 October 10.1906
AFFIDAVIT UNDEB~
FICTITIOUS NAME BTATUl
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
The undersigned, under oath
says; It k the intention of the
undersigned to engage in
busmeas enterprise under the fie
titious name of CAPLAN/
MARKOWITZ PROCESS
SERVERS located at 19 West
Flagier Street in the city of Miami
Dade County, Florida.
Those interested in said enter
prke, and the extent of the in
tereat of each, k as follows
MONEY A EGO, INC ion
Stockholder
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West FUger Street
Miami, Dade County, Florida
11283 October 10. 17.24,31,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File N amber 06-4430
Divieiea 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ISAAC FRAGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IS
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admimstri
boo of the estate of ISAAC
FRAGER. deceased. File Number
86-5630, k pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade Count). Fiords,
Probate Divanon, the address of
which k 78 West Flagier Street.
Miami. The personal repre**
tative of the estate k Marilyn Bi
suck, 2141 Cayuga Dr Memc
N.Y.. Shelby Petrarca. MO List |
Drive, West Miffin. IVr.ru. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
AD persons having claims or
demands againat the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE RON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICAnON OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the derk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any daim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the ban
for tee claim, the name and so-
dreaa of the creditor or his sgent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the daim k not yet due. the date
when it wul become due shall be
MfSjeJ If the daim k contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of tk
uncertainty shall be stated If tk
claim k secured the security ski
be described The claimant sbat
deliver sufficient conks of tk
daim to the dark to enable tk
derk to mai one copy to each per
aortal lepieeiiuafira.
AH parsons interested in the
estate to whoso a copy of thii
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to ffle any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
ispiitativa, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT 80 Fffl>
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED .
Date of the first publication ol
thk Notice of Administration:
tober 10. 1986.
Marilyn Biersuck.
SheAry Petrarca
Aa Personal Repreaen tatrn
of the Estate of
ISAAC FRAGER
Dstessai
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Krocp (128023)
Kwitney. Kroop A Scheinbsr.
PA.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 5 U
Miami Beach. Florida S3K
Telephone: (806) 688-7675
11187 Ortoherl0.17.1
?1


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
Friday, October 10, 1986/The JewshJHoridianPage 11-B
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File N.ssber 86-6444
Division 02
IN RE. ESTATE OF
SIEGFRIED E. HAMBURGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SIEGFRIED E HAM
BURGER, deceased. File Number
M '464 (02). is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
qui.ed to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
l>egun on October 3. 1986.
Personal Representative
ERIC WFIL
2301 South Ocean Drive.
Apt 1705
Hollywood. FL 33019
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSONi FELDMAN. PA
1! 36 Kane Concourse.
Ba) Harbor
Mands. FL 33154
Telephone K6So716
\'.2T.i OctobtrS, 10 1961
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE 1)1 VISION
File Naaber 86-6016
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSA GRUNZEUG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ROSA GRUNZEUG, deceased.
File Number 86-5016 (02). is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W.
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130 (3rd floor). The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 3, 1986
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street. Suite 1201
Miami. Flonda 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON, ESQUIRE
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Honda SSIM
Telephone (806) 37441 16
11271 October3, 10 1966
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss:
The undersigned, under oath,
says: It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fie
titious name of RICHARD
MARKOWITZ & ASSOCIATES
located at 19 West Flagler Street
in the city of Miami. Dade County
Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Dade County. Florida
MONEY & EGO, INC
100 percent Stockholder
11274
October 3. 10.17.24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 80-31472
\( TION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
LUIS DULAC,
u !
VESTD4A DULAC.
T1' Krnestina Dulac
Present Unknown
' Known
N W 6th Lane
Miami. Florida 33172
VOIJ ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defense*, if any. to it on at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is 155 South Miami Avenue.
Penthouse I, Miami. Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 31. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaing or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24 day of September. 1986.
RICHARD P BRJNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
A* Deputy Clerk
" ircuit Court Seal)
F.MILIO C. PASTOR, PA.
PH I 156 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
"269 October 3.10.17.24. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
tht the undersigned, desiring to
nirage in business under the fie
titious name NEW LOOK
Ir-WELRY INC a Florida cor
porauon at 58 N.E. 167th Street,
Suite 34. North Miami Beach. Fla
33162 intends to register said
""me with the Clerk of the Circuit
1 "urt of Dade County. Florida.
GLYN THOMAS
49 percent
CAMERON BACCHUS
51 percent
K Herman. Esq.
Attorney for New Look Jewelrv
Inc.
' Box 1113
N B.B.. Fla 33160
11L"'7 September 26,
October 3. 10. 17. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-5468
Division 02
IN RE ESTATE OF
ROCCOJ MARTUCCI,
Decease.!
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of ROCCOJ MARTUCCI, deeeas
ed. File Number 86-5468. is pen
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Flonda
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 3. 1986.
Personal Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER. PA.
By: Alan R. Lorber
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
11272 October 3. 10. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Antiques Plus at
1660 NE 123 St Miami. Flonds
33181, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Edgar Belliveau
11089 September 19. 26;
October 3. 10. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-38799 FC 14
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marnage of
RUBIELA QUINTANA WRAY.
Petitioner
and
JERRY WAYNE WRAY.
Respondent
TO: JERRY WAYNE WRAY
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marnage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your wntten defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN.
ESy attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139. and file the onginal
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24.
ISM otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 16th day of September. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Phone:(305)532-1155
11102 September 19. 26;
October 3. 10.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name 183rd Street Auto
Specialist at 18200 N.W 27 Ave..
Miami. Fla intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Flonda.
W DAVID CURRY. Owner
11262 September 26.
October 3. 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40236-27
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JACK ROBERT WILSON,
and
BELINDA WILSON,
TO: Belinda Wilson
1426 East Ralston Avenue
San Bernadino. California 92404
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Irving
J Whitman, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10651
North Kendall Drive, Suite 200,
Miami, Flonda 33176, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
24, 1986. otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 17 day of September, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dodo County, Flonda
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy ( 'lerk
(Circuit Court Seall
Irving I Whitman Eaq
10461 N Kendall Dr St.- BOO
Miami, Florida SS176
Phona (806) 879 7000
Attorney for Petitioner
11107 September I
October 8, 10, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40244
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AIDA MAGDALENA COLE, wife
and
JIM COLE, husband
TO: Mr Jim Cole
1791 N.W 114 Street
Carol City. Fla. 33055
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on ARTHUR H. LIPSON. at
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is 801 N.E. 167 Street,
Miami, Fla 33162, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
24. 1986: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Flonda
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11108 September 19. 26;
October 3. 10. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40243
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
JAMES DARREI. STEWART
husband
and
SONIA STEWART, wife
TO SONIA STEWART
66MEI.MA< ST
BELIZE CITY
BRITISH HONDURAS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marnage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your wntten
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
II LIPSON attonwj for Peti
turner, whose address is 801 Nor
theast 167 Street. Miami. Flonda
33162. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 24, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed in
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of September. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11109 September 19. 26;
_____________October 3, 10. 1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA)
ss:
COUNTY OF DADE)
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of 36th Street Auto
Sales. Melrose Auto Sales. Real
Auto Sales, and World Wide Auto
Sales located at 3560 N.W. 36th
Street in the city of Miami. Dade
County. Florida.
Those interested in said enter
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
ANTONIO CARBONELL.
President
Real Enterprises, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Sworn and subscribed to before
me. at Miami, this 19 day of
September. 1986
Nancy Lauglio
Notary Public,
State of Florida at Large
Proof of publication of this inten-
tion to register, is filed herewith,
pursuant to the provisions of
Chapter 20953, Laws of 1941.
(866.09 FSA)
11258 September 26,
October 3. 10. 17. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-37701
FB 226096
ACTION FOB PETITION FOR
ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTERS OF
THE ADOPTION OF:
a minor
and
TO: Jose Luis Burgueno
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Petition/Adoption has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Armando
Gutierrez, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2153 Coral Way.
Suite 400, Miami. Florida 33145,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 24, 1986; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B J FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARMANDO GITIERREZ,
Esquire
2153 Coral Way, Suite 400
Miami. Flonda 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
11103 September 19. 26;
October 3, 10. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 86-41020 FC 28
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marnage of
BENIGNO AYALA
Petitioner
and
TERESA AYALA
Respondent
TO TERESA AYALA
11150 Herrera Avenue
No. 7
Colon. PANAMA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marnage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your wntten defenses, if any, to it
on USHER BRYN. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road Suite
309. Miami Beach. Florida 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 31st. 1986; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23rd day of September. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road -
Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1166
11266 September 26;
Octobers. 10. 17. 1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name GENESIS at 2725
S W 3rd Avenue, Miami. Flonda
.'13129 intends 10 register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
GENESIS DEVELOPMENT
GROUP, INC.
11260 September 26,
October 3. 10, 17. 1986
The undersigned, under oath,
says: It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterpnse under the fie
titious name of CAPLAN PRO
CESS SERVERS located at 19
West F'lagler Street in the city of
Miami. Dade County. Flonda
Those interested in said enter
pnse. and the extent of the in
terest of each, is as follows
Inter. -
STEPHEN CAPLAN
President
1!' West Flagler Street
Miami. Dade County. Florida
MONEY \ EGO !\>
loo percent Stockholder
1 U.'76
1 k-tober.U 10, 17.24. IHK6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-33399-09
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE:
SHELDON HEIGHTS
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY,
an Illinois corporation
Plaintiff,
vs.
YUAN-YUAN KUO.
Defendant.
TO: Mr Yuan-Yuan Kuo
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Rental
Arrearage And Termination Of
Lease has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Leonard Selkowitz. J.D.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 19 West Flagler Street,
Suite 810, Biscayne Building.
Miami. Florida 33130. and file the
onginal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
24. 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida this
19th day of September, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Flonda
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Leonard Selkowitz. J.D
Suite 810 Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Flonda 33130
Phone (305) 358-2900
118*4 September 26
October 3 10. 17, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40155 08
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
RAMON GONZALEZ.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
CARMEN GONZALEZ.
Respondent Wife
TO: Carmen Gonzalez,
address unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Alan H.
Miller. Esq.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317, Miami.
Flonda 33189, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24th.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of amid court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 day of September. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H Miller. Esq
10700 Caribbean Blvd..
Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
(305)238 1080
Attorney for Petitioner
11111 September 26.
October 3. 10, 17, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Norman's Tavern at
6770 Collins Ave Miami Beach.
FL 33141 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Flonda
Miami Moon Cafe, Inc
A Flonda Corp
Paul Kwitney
Kwitnoy, Kmop A Scheinberg
1 A
420 Lincoln Road Suit. Ml'
Miami Beach. Fl.a 88139
Attorneys for Miami Moon Cafe
Inc.
11096 September 19. 26.
Octobers. 10. 1986


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Fnday, October 10, 1986
Yom Kippur
Playoff Games Leave Some Jewish Fans Angry
By ANDREW MITHIN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
This Yom Kippur, some
Jews may be contemplating
not only their own
misdeeds, but also one they
consider to have been com-
mitted by the Commissioner
of baseball.
The beloved New York Mets is
scheduled to play one and maybe
two National League playoff
games here in the world's largest
community of Jews on the holiest
day of the Jewish calendar.
THE METS will play the fourth
of a best-of-seven-game series
with the Houston Astros at 8:20
p.m. Sunday at Shea Stadium
here. The fifth game, if necessary,
would take place at 3:10 p.m.,
Monday.
Although the decisions in years
past by Hall of Famers Hank
Greenberg and Sandy Koufax not
to play important baseball games
on Yom Kippur won universal
respect, some Jewish Mets fans no
doubt are feeling a bit torn, if not
angry.
Yet, the Jewish agencies have
decided not to go to bat for them,
although their leaders, some of
whom are baseball fans, were
displeased with the scheduling of
the games.
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
urged Jewish baseball fans to
follow the example of Greenberg
and place the sanctity of Yom Kip-
pur above that of baseball.
"THE SCHEDULING this
year is unfortunate, but as Jews
we have no right to impose our
religious calendar on the rest of
the country," he said. "Doing
without the Mets for one day," he
added, "might even have the ef-
fect of reminding Jewish fans of
their religious obligations."
Nathan Perunutter, national
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, said Jews
can't demand rescheduling
because the Mets are "a private
enterprise." He told the JTA that
Jewish baseball fans "will know
what to do" about this dilemma
"I'm a baseball fan. This poses ab-
solutely no problem." He said
ADL has made no contact with
the Commissioner of baseball,
Peter Ueberroth, over the
schedule and doesn't plan to.
The same goes for the American
Jewish Committee. The agency's
executive vice president, Dr.
David Gordis. last month urged in
response to a reporter's question
that the games be rescheduled.
But he said he doubted that
AJCommittee would deal with the
issue any further, explaining that
Michael Scharfhas been elected
to the Board of Trustees of
Yeshiva University. Scharf
who has homes in Ponte Vedra,
Flo., and in New York City, is
a native of Waterloo, I A.
it wasn't important enough and
that the scheduling was only an in-
convenience that likely was
unintentional.
THE AMERICAN Jewish Con-
gress has had no comment pro or
con. "We felt really that it was
not of such a major concern," ex-
plained Israel Levine. director of
communications.
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of New York also
has taken no position, contending
"that baseball is separated from
religious life," according to
Michael Miller, executive director.
However, Miller said that after
the playoffs he "would probably
be shooting off a letter" asking
that Ueberroth take into con-
sideration important dates of all
religions when scheduling games.
That would "allow all religious
baseball fans to enjoy without
guilt," he said.
Miller added that he was en-
couraged by the Jewish organiza-
tions' public statements. "Take a
look from where we've come," he
said, when Jews used to express
Times sports columnist George
Vecsey predicts a Divine solution
torrential rain throughout Yom
Kippur. preventing any baseball
game.
no outrage at such scheduling.
That feeling was echoed by Rab-
bi Wolfe Kelman, president of the
Rabbinical Assembly. But he cau-
tioned that "this is not one of the
great issues of our time."
THE SO-CALLED offensive
playoff schedule is the creation of
Ueberroth's office, according to a
spokesman, Richard Levin. "Un-
fortunately this year Yom Kippur
came in the middle" of the
playoffs, he said. "We really
regret it." In the American
League playoffs, only the fifth
game, if necessary, would be
played on Yom Kippur at 3 p.m.
Oct. 13 in Anaheim, Calif.
Once the Commissioner's office
realized the National League con-
flict, it unsuccessfully tried to
alter the schedule, Levin said.
However, the playoffs couldn't
begin earlier because only one day
off separated them from the
regular season. Neither could they
begin later, because the World
Series, the culminating event of
the season, runs into late October,
which presents risks of inclement
weather.
Why then wasn't the Sunday
night game moved to the after-
noon and the Monday afternoon
game to the evening, so they
wouldn't fall of Yom Kippur?
Levin said the Commissioner's of-
fice suggested those changes dur-
ing late July and August to the
televiser of the games, ABC-TV,
which refused.
AN ABC programmer, Karen
Dyton, denied that Ueberroth's
office tried for six weeks to
change the schedule. "They did
not once suggest changing the
schedule until about a month
ago." she said.
By then, it was too late to make
a change because of contractual
obligations to other concenrs. ac-
cording to Dyton. Besides, she
said, ABC all along was "merely
following the schedule that major
league baseball gave us ...
Whenever they schedule the
games, we put them on."
Jews, of course, have the iden-
tical relationship to their worship
on Yom Kippur. Thus, New York
Its
"Schach"
Time Again!
The Finest
Palms for
YourSuccah.
Call
Steve Schiff
531-4631
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Pubhx Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
\
AvaiaMa at PmMx Store* with
Fraah Danish Baksrtss Only.
Oftd FaaNonad (8-Inch)
it si 11
Cream Pie
$-|49
AvaiaMa at Pub* x Storas with
Fraah Danish Bakarlaa Only.
An Italian Traat, Mini
Sfogliatelll
4~M
AvaiaMa at PubHx Storaa with
Fraah Danish Bakarlaa Only.
Bsksd Fraah Dally
Pumpernickel
8ran Kaieer Rofts.......6 *** oQ*
Coffee Cake.................~i.*1
atAJI
Pound Cake............
Gourmet Brownies
GoManLoaf
.. a*a$139

Quantity
Rights Reserved
Prices Effective
Oct. 9 thru 15.1986.
Rr^^'-v.* rim ..


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EVOK809XF_93S43L INGEST_TIME 2013-06-24T20:21:47Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03010
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES