The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03009

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement.. Special Insert
"Jewish Flojfidiami
Volume 59 Number 40
Five Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, October 3,1986
fnd snocft .i
Price $3.00
986 ^osli 'xQaskanak Q/teettngs 5747




Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1B6_
.?

In the Jewish month of Tishri,
approximately 3800 years ago, an
event took place that had a profound
affect on the conscience of humanity.
It established the principle that
Man alone is responsible for preserving
the gift of freedom granted to him by
God at the Creation.
The experience of the patriarch
Abraham, the father of the Jewish
people, launched a new era of human
understanding. For Abraham's will-
ingness to sacrifice his most cherished
possession, his son Isaac, on behalf of
his faith and ideals, gave man a new

direction and purpose for life.
The Biblical story of Abraham's
triumph, therefore, is not merely an
account of the teat of the strength of
one man's convictions and prepared-
ness to act on behalf of what he
believed. It is a test all humanity must
be ready to face. For freedom to live,
develop and worship as one chooses is a
gift not easily acquired, and once
obtained,often requires sacrifice to
maintain.
If humanity is unprepared to meet
its obligations to preserve freedom, it
may ultimately lose it
Rosh Hashana, the solemn Jewish
New Year, reaffirms the principle
established nearly 4000 years ago, that
Man's destiny to be free lies in his
own hands.
As the Shof ar is sounded on Rosh
Hashana, it summons humanity to
unite in the cause of freedom and jus-
tice. It bids mankind to heed the pleas
of all who suffer from oppression and
slavery. It rekindles the spirit of hope
and peace for humanity.
It evokes the day in which Man met
his soul.
It's what makes us Jews.
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MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St (Douglas Road'
NORTH MIAMI BEACH 16480 NE 19th Ave
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HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood Blvd
TAMARAC: 6701 W. Commercial Blvd
BROWARD COUNTY PHONE: 523-5801
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714 Okeechobee Blvd
PALM BEACH COUNTY PHONE 683-8676
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Report Wonders:
French Make Deals With Terrorists?
Friday. October 3, 1986/The .Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Msgr.
Hillarion Capucci, the
former Greek Catholic
Bishop of Jerusalem who
was sentenced to 12 years'
imprisonment in Israel for
smuggling arms into the
country, has been allowed to
meet Georges Ibrahim Ab-
dullah, the terrorist leader
suspected of having staged
the murder of American
military attache Lt. Col.
Charles Ray and Israeli
diplomat Yaakov Barsiman-
tov in 1982.
It is generally believed that the
French authorities allowed the
visit to try to stop the recent wave
of terrorist attacks which killed
nine people and wounded more
than 160 last month alone.
CAPUCCI, who was sentenced
in 1974, met with Abdullah in
Paris' top security prison, La
Sante, where the terrorist is being
held incommunicado. Even his
lawyers have not been allowed to
see him since his recent transfer
to Paris.
Capucci, who lives in Rome and
travels with a Vatican diplomatic
passport, has played an active role
in various secret negotiations and
is known for his close personal
relations with Syrian President
Hafez Assad and Iran's Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini.
The French radio quoted Arab
sources as saying that Capucci
came to Paris at the invitation of
the French authorities. He also
met on several occasions with the
Minister for Security and Police
Robert Pandraud.
Premier Jacques Chirac has
twice pledged that he will "not
yield to terrorist blackmail." He
also said there will be no negotia-
tions with the terrorists and that
"those guilty (of the terrorist at-
tacks) and those who manipulate
them will be crushed wherever
they may be."
CAPUCCI'S meeting with Ab-
dullah is generally seen, however,
as an attempt to reach an agre-
meent with the terrorist gang
which has killed nine people and
wounded more than 160 since
September 4, when it launched its
latest series of bomb attacks in
Paris.
The French press has revealed
that the former Socialist Ad-
ministration of Premier Laurent
Fabius had also tried to strike a
deal with the terrorists. The
government of Jacques Chirac
was prepared, according to these
reports, to go ahead with the
plans and release Abdullah.
The plan was foiled last July
when the U.S. government and
the family of Ray became civil
plaintiffs in the case, a procedure
preventing the dismissal of the
case and Abdullah's summary
liberation.
Court Rules
Nazis Can't Copy ADL Name
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A group which calls itself
the "German American
Anti-Defamation League"
ard has anti-Senitic ties
will change its name at the
urging of the Anti-
Dwamation Leagu<> of B'nai
B'-ith.
Michael 12. Schultz, c hairman of
AEL's Civil Rights Committee,
said the group's decision was
taken after being informed that it
was infringing upon the exclusive
right of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith to use of
the name Anti-Defamation
League, which it has registered
with the United States Patent and
Trademark Office.
THE LEAGUE'S request
followed a series of "educational
advertisements" in the
Washington Post and Washington
Times last July and August signed
Israel Downgrades Vienna Office
VIENNA (JTA) Israel reportedly has decided not
to replace its Amba ssador in Vienna when the current en-
voy, Michael Elizur, retires shortly. Instead, it will leave its
Embassy in the hands of a Charge d'Affaires, a significant
downgrading of Israeli diplomatic representation in
Austria.
JERUSALEM'S DECISION is clearly a sign of its
deep displeasure over the election of Kurt Waldheim to the
Austrian Presidency last July after a bitter campaign dur-
ing which massive evidence of Waldheim's Nazi past was
uncovered. A new Ambassador would have to present his
credentials to Waldheim, a diplomatic ceremony unaccep-
table to Israel under current circumstances.
outhgate JLowers
Hotels & Apartments
"Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
2 & 3 Yr. Leases Available
Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
Pool & Shuffleboard
Restaurant 6
Lounge
e..F,URN- UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises
by the "German American Anti-
Defamation League" and pro-
viding a Washington, D.C. post of-
fice box number to write to for
further information.
The ads complained of "the con-
stant bombardment of propagan-
da against the German people,"
suggested that critics of Kurt
Waldheim apply "the same
judicial standards" to the career
of former Israeli Premier
Menachem Begin and solicited
contributions for the group's bat-
tle for truth and justice."
ADL investigation disclosed
that the ads were taken out by
Stan Rittenhouse of Burke, Va.,
who from 1974 to 1982 was a
legislative aide to Willis Carto, the
head of the anti-Semitic Liberty
Lobby. Rittenhouse is also a con-
tributor to Christian Defense
League Report, published by a
Christian Identity movement
paramilitary group.
According to ADL, Rittenhouse
is the author of an anti-Semitic
book, "For Fear of the Jews," and
is the founder of the Vienna,
Virginia-based Exhorters Foun-
dation, which has promoted such
anti-Semitic publications as Henry
Ford's "The International Jew"
and "The Protocols of the Learn-
ed Elders of Zion."
THE ADS by the German
American group listed the same
post office box number as that of
the German American National
Political Action Committee (GAN-
PAC), a registered PAC headed
by Hans Schmidt, a naturalized
American who served in the
Hitler Youth and Waffen SS in
Germany.
Schultz said ADL has been in-
formed by attorneys for the "Ger-
man American Anti-Defamation
League" that its new name will be
the German American Informa-
tion and Education Association.
The attorneys contacted ADL
after it had sent three letters to
the German American group, the
last of which said legal action
would be taken.
The ADL letters, signed by Jef-
frey P. Sinensky, director of the
agency's Legal Affairs Depart-
ment, told the group that courts
which have had occasion to con-
sider the question have all ruled
that die coined term "Anti-
Defamation" originated with the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, has since become in- i
separably associated with the j
organization and that use of the !|
term by other groups would lead
to public confusion.


Frwnds of the Israel Defense Forces traditionally give a gift, for
the New Year to oM soldiers on active duty. Packages are also
given for Purxm, Chanukah and other holidays, letting the
soldiers know how much friends in Israel and around the world
care about them. Pictured here is 8-year-old Chana, presenting a
\kJt5 ^ New Year 5U7 to ^Idiers outside the Friends of the
IDF Soldiers Home in Jerusalem.


Happy New Year
Alfred Golden, President
Kenneth J. Lassman, General Manager
Leo Hack, Exec. V.P.
William Saulson, V.P.
Douglas Lazarus, V.P., F.D.
Edward Dobin, Manager, F.D.
Allan Brestin, F.D.
William Settles
Barney Selby
Fred Snyder
Abraham J. Daoud, F.D.
Carol Hymson
Riverside Memorial Chapels
miDB
Commitment, it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're heside you
when you need us
most. After all, Our
Real Involvement is
with the Living.
Riverside
Memorial ChapBl
Dade Broward Palm Beach
Alfred Golden. President
Leo Hack. Exec VP
William F Saulson.VP
Douglas Lazarus. V.P. F.D
Allan G Brestin. FD
GUARDIAN PLAN
Tradition. Its what makes us Jews.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 3. 1986
High Holy Days:
Drama and Urgency
The High Holy Day services are suffused
with a sense of drama and urgency. It is this
drama and this urgency that will engulf us in
our prayer on Rosh Hashanah this weekend.
According to Jewish tradition, each Jew in-
dividually and all of humanity collectively
are judged by the Almighty on Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur. The basis for
judgment rests upon our deeds of the past
year.
The Ten Days of Penitence, beginning
with Rosh Hashanah and culminating with
Yom Kippur, are the last opportunity afford-
ed us to truly repent our transgressions. The
prayers of the High Holy Days are of para-
mount importance to all Jews. It is an impor-
tance emphasized in the dramatic pleading
on Rosh Hashanah of the Cantor's Hineni,
as he kneels upon the altar and begs God's
mercy in behalf of the entire congregation.
On Rosh Hashanah, the dramatic call of
the shofar stirs every Jewish soul with both
hope and fear. And when Jews wonder,
"How many will pass away? Who will
live, who die?", the passion of the moment
underscores the Jewish life principle the
need to survive in order to accomplish in a
new year one's own, as well as God's work.
Standing Before Almighty
Both on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur,
in contast with other Jewish holidays, the
emphasis is upon the extended synagogue
service with special prayers, as opposed to
home observances at other times during the
year. In the synagogue, each Jew stands
before the Almighty to plead for his or her
life, and for the lives of their loved ones.
Yom Kippur, which this year falls on Oct.
13, with its Fast and other physical priva-
tions, is the emotional and spiritual climax of
the High Holy Day season. Its classical
prayers begins with the haunting melody
of Kol Nidre (Sunday eve, Oct. 12) and the
tearful nostalgia of the Yizkor memorial
prayer for the dead the next day. The obser-
vance concludes with the dramatic Neilah
service, symbolizing the closing of the
heavenly gates before the final shofar blast
and judgment.
Rotation Should Cause
No Anxiety
The rotation of Yitzhak Shamir back into
the Prime Minister's Office this month
should be no real cause for concern in the
hearts of those who have followed the two-
vear tenure of Shimon Peres as Prime
Minister, which ends this month.
In many ways, Mrs. Peres' is an enviable
record. Not the least of the accomplishments
under his governance was coming to suc-
cessful grips with Israel's staggering triple-
digit inflation. More than that, a greater
sense of urgency to achieve peace has set
upon the land as opposed to the sense of
urgency involved in worrying about the
possibility of war that pervaded Israel prior
to the establishment of Unity Government
rule two years ago.
This is not to say that, as Prime Minister
in a Likud coalition, Shamir wanted war and
that the arrival of Peres and the Labor Par-
ty on the scene put all fears about war to
rest. That would be simplistic; furthermore,
it would erase what can not be erased: the
Jewish Florxdian
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threat of war is an ongoing thing in Israeli
life. It existed as much during outgoing
Prime Minister Peres' tenure just as well.
But there is no doubt that what separates
Peres from Shamir is more than political
ideology. What separates the two leaders is
more a matter of style than substance. And
of accent.
What Peres has achieved is to pour balm
on troubled waters at the same time that he
scored many solid achievements. There is lit-
tle reason to doubt that Shamir has not
changed dramatically during the past two
years, and so he is not likely to have or even
want much of a supply of balm of his own.
In this sense, the style will change. The ac-
cent. But what is hardly likely to change
with it will be content. Peres may have been
more flexible, and Shamir will surely be
more intractable, especially in the matter of
the West Bank and Gaza. But neither man
would sell out Israel's historic and security
interests there.
When Peres, in the name of his more sen-
sitive diplomacy, appeared more likely to
give something away to Palestinian
demands, to Egypt's Mubarak or to Jordan's
China Cautious
King Hussein, Likud accused him of sur-
render and treason.
Similarly, we may expect that as Shamir
clangs shut some of the doors of communica-
tion between Israel and the Arabs that
Peres has opened, or he seems less capable
of manipulation by the Reagan Administra-
tion and thus arouses the ire of Washington,
Peres' Labor faction will, in its own cooler
way, pressure Shamir to understand that
Israeli government policy must be a continu-
ing thing.
It can not be one thing under one ad-
ministration and, inevitable in the
democratic process of change, become
something else. -Should Shamir want to
carry his admittedly irritating style to the
limit of his power, then there will stand
Peres as an ultimate threat to dumping the
Unity Government coalition and moving for
new national elections.
A poll this week reveals that, given a
Likud-Labor election today, Labor would
trounce Likud by something like 2-1. Peres
knows what he has achieved in bringing
back a great sense of stability to Israel on
every level. So does Shamir, who must sure-
ly now feel impelled to achieve no less.
Israelis To Sign Special Agreement
Friday, October
Volume 59
_ H Qi
.986
29 ELUL 5746
Number 40
Israeli delegation headed by a
senior government official will go
to China shortly to sign an agree-
ment for cooperation in
agriculture and energy between
Israel and the People's Republic
of China, Israel Television
reported.
It would be the first official ac-
cord between the two countries,
although agreements already ex-
ist between Israeli and Chinese
companies. Israel Radio reported
that Avraham Tamir, director
general of the Prime Minister's
Office, is presently in Paris for
talks with unidentified Chinese
officials.
CHINESE SCHOLARS and
scientists are interested in
developing technical and scientific
cooperation with Israel, according
to Prof Josef Singer, president of
the Haifa Technion, who returned
from an 11-day visit to China last
week at the invitation of the
Chinese authorities.
Singer, who is president of the
Intern onal Council of
Aeronautical Science (ICAS), said
that Chinese academicians and
engineers will attend the next
ICAS convention to be held in
Israel in August, 1988.
But according to Singer, while
China wants to develop ties with
Israel in various technical fields,
the Beijing government is not
prepared to establish formal
diplomatic relations with Israel at
this time.
Beijing is moving cautiously
even with respect to non-official
contacts.


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Catholic Church 'Rewriting' History of the Holocaust?

JERUSALEM Yad
Vashem, the Holocaust Mar-
tyrs' and Heroes' Remem-
brance Authority at Har
Hazikaron here, is writing
English-language Jewish
newspapers in the United
States to remind them of an
anguish-laden development.
Yad Vashem's latest let-
ter declares:
"A Carmelite nun's convent
was recently established in one of
the buildings at Auschwitz. This
fact alters the very essence of the
camp, as well as its nature.
Auschwitz, more than any other
place in the world, symbolizes the
Holocaust of the Jewish people.
We see in the establishment of
this monastery an attempt to
distort the nature of Auschwitz.
"THE ESTABLISHMENT of
this monastery at Auschwitz is
not the end. There exists a real
danger that it will expand and
grow and turn into a dominant
feature at Auschwitz, which will
distort its very essence. This may
. and al>et those who claim that
\ ischwitz was not at all a death
camp, and everything that exists
there was built after the war.'
"Furthermore, we have recent-
. received information, that over
and above the establishment of
the convent at Auschwitz, there
now also exists a Capella-
Mausoleum of the Capuchine
Order in Sobibor. As opposed to
Auschwitz, where together with
the vast majority of Jewish vic-
tims, people of other nations were
also murdered, in Sobibor, all the
victims were Jewish. Again, the
Mausoleum at Sobibor will be the
central building at the site, and
will distort the true nature of that
place.
"There exists the very real
danger that after Auschwitz and
Sobibor, similar buildings will be
erected in other places, such as
Treblinka. Chelmno, Belzec, Ma-
jdanek and others.
"AS SOON as we learned about
these events, we registered our
protest to the Government of
Poland. Furthermore, when Car-
Exterior view of a new church built on the site of
the Sobibor extermination camp in Poland.
dinal Macharsky, the Archbishop
of Cracow, in who's jurisdiction
Auschwitz falls, visited Yad
Vashem on July 17, we raised
these two issues with him. but
received no binding promise.
"In our opinion, the problem is
not only one of prients and/or nuns
praying at the sites of the death
imps at Auschvi::; and Sobibor,
I: it that with tht pi sage of time.
Auschwitz and sobibor may
become better known for the con-
vents located there than for the
f.tct that they are the places in
which millions of Jevs were put to
eeath.
"Thus, we are convinced, that
no one should alter I hose camps in
any way or form, and that no con-
struction of buildings should be
added to those which existed in
the past. These sites should re-
main as they were for all genera-
tions to come, as everlasting
testimony to the crimes commit-
ted against the Jewish people.
"We have received numerous
calls from survivors of these death
camps who complained and asked,
'Where were these churches when
we truly needed them in those
tragic days? Today they make
their appearance at the death
camps!' These are opinions of
which account must definitely be
taken.
"Yad Vashem will continue its
efforts to restore the sites to the
way they were prior to the making
of these changes at Auschwitz and
Sobibor, and also in order to pre-
vent any expansion of such
Continued on Page 12-A
Puppets Appeal to Children of All Ages
As Festival in Jerusalem Shows
perforZ^n TFgPeteer8fr< the Im Wind Figurentheater' in a
swnnww ^i/ }jerman,' the story of an introspective old man, a
"^ J the Holocaust.
By JILL TWERSKY
Most people think of pup-
pets as ideal entertainment
for children, but the Third
International Festival of
Puppet Theater, held
recently in Jerusalem, prov-
ed that puppets can appeal
to audiences of all ages.
Sponsored by the Train Theater
and the Jerusalem Convention
Center, in cooperation with
several government ministries,
the Festival brought together 22
puppet troupes from as far away
as Mexico, Portugal, France, Italy
and West Germany and puppet
lovers from all over Israel.
SHOWS WERE held in
theaters in and around
Jerusalem's Liberty Bell Park and
just about anyone who went for a
stroll in the gardens during the
Festival might have done a
double-take as giant puppets
danced around the park under the
watchful eye of a gigantic helium-
filled bird which hovered above
the park. The bird was a creation
of Italian artist Emmanuel Luzat-
ti, who was honored at the puppet
festival for his work in puppetry.
According to festival manager
Mario Kotliar, this year's festival
was the biggest ever. "Despite the
recent threats of worldwide ter-
rorism, none of the performers
cancelled," he said. "This is
because our festival has an ex-
cellent name and everyone wants
to participate."
Organizers of the festival
broadened their definition of
"puppet theater" this year, allow-
While the majority of the program did
cater to children, almost 40 percent of
the performances were geared for adult
audiences. For example, 'Hermann,' a
German production, used puppets to tell
the story of an introspective old
Holocaust survivor.
ing performers to break away
from the traditional use of pup-
pets. By combining puppets,
masks, shadows, live actors,
music and dance, the performers
added new dimensions to their
stories.
Jacques Templeraud of the
Theater Manarf of France
brought clay objects to life in his
production entitled "Paris Bon-
jour et Persil." Templeraud used
limited props and practically no
words to tell a 3tory that he seem-
ed to make up as he went along.
IN THE Israeli production
"Because of the Holes in the
Cheese," actors and puppets
shared the stage as they told the
story of a little boy entering an en-
chanted forest to meet the giants
and dwarfs who live there. In
"Way," created by Israeli Pablo
Ariel, an actor combined puppets
and objects ,.ortray dreams and
memories in a striking wordless
performance. Yet another
highlight was the colorful puppet
rendition of "Sleeping Beauty."
While the majority of the pro-
gram did cater to children, almost
40 percent of the performances
were geared for adult audiences.
For example, "Hermann," a Ger-
man production, used puppets to
tell the story of an introspective
old Holocaust survivor. Israel's
Acco Theater Center used pup-
pets and other materials in a
theatrical fabrication of the life
and death of Franz Kafka. Of
course, since no puppet festival
would be complete without the
traditional marionette and hand
puppet show, these puppets per-
formed in classic stories from the
Brothers Grimm and Hans Chris-
tian Andersen.
While nine days of puppetry
seemed like pure pleasure to the
audiences, manager Kotliar said
putting such a program together
is not easy. "We get applications
from puppet troupes throughout
the world," he explained, "and
send scouts to the various coun-
tries to audition each group. Not
everyone was accepted. Because
of the size of our theater, we look
for small groups and of course
the very best groups."



Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Officially Charged
Demjanjuk Trial Due in February
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Suspected Nazi war
criminal John Demjanjuk
was officially charged with
four counts of war crimes in
Jerusalem District Court
Monday.
A 25-page charge sheet, drafted
by State Attorney Yona Blattman
and her associates, was presented
along with a request that Demjan-
juk be held in prison pending trial
which is expected to start next
January and last several months.
THE CASE against the
Ukrainian-born former U.S.
citizen from Cleveland, Ohio, will
hinge on positive identification of
him as the Treblinka death camp
guard, known to inmates as "Ivan
the Terrible" because of his
brutality.
Some 900,000 Jews died in the
Treblinka gas chambers during
World War II. The guard known
as "Ivan" is said to have operated
the crematoria.
Demjanjuk is the first Nazi war
crimes suspect ever extradited to
John Demjanjuk
D'ajvi inn*
a
a
n
K&pR
kt;
nictf
ssociation
of greater miaml
The Dade County members of the Association, comprised
of Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstruc-
tionist Rabbis extend warm wishes for a Shanah Tovah
to the entire community.
The Association encourages Jewish education and
philanthropy and fosters civic betterment and interfaith
communications.
May the New Year, 5747, usher in an era of peace for
Israel and all mankind.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
Rabbi Yehuda L. Benhamu
Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat
Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz
Rabbi Julian I. Cook
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
Rabbi Edwin Farber
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Rabbi Ari Fridkis
Rabbi Gary A. Glickstein
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
Rabbi Rachel Hertzman
Rabbi Israel Jacobs
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley
Rabbi Mark Kram
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Rabbi Norman S. Lipson
Rabbi Meir Matzliah
Melamed
Rabbi Jehuda Melber
Rabbi Sadi Nahmias
Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Rabbi Menachem Raab
Rabbi Jack Riemer
Rabbi Samuel Rudy
Rabbi David B. Saltzman
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro
Rabbi Rami Shapiro
Rabbi Bernard A. Silver
Rabbi Frank N. Sundheim
Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Rabbi Jordan I. Taxon
Rabbi Nathan Zwitman
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone 576-4000
3 Rabbi Carl Klein
President
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Israel for trial. He was brought to
Israel last February and confined
in isolation at a maximum security
prison near Ramie.
He was charged in court with
crimes against die Jewish people,
crimes against humanity, crimes
against persecuted people, and
war crimes.
EACH OFFENSE carries the
death penalty and is unique in-
asmuch as Israel's statutes do not
provide capital punishment. The
only war criminal executed by
Israel was Adolf Eichmann who
was hanged 25 years ago.
The prosecution is intent on
establishing an airtight case
against the 66-year-old retired
automobile plant worker who was
stripped of hiB U.S. citizenship
several years ago. During the
evidence-gathering process, Dem-
janjuk was periodically remanded
and re-remanded in custody. His
detention was extended in August
until Oct. 1
The State reportedly plans to
call some 50 witnesses, 15 of them
Treblinka survivors living in
Israel or overseas. It will take
testimony abroad from an
80-year-old former SS guard who
served at Treblinka. Because of
the importance of positive iden-
tification, witnesses asked to iden-
tify the prisoner will be limited to
persons who knew "Ivan the Ter-
rible" for at least eight months.
THE CHARGE sheet lacks
some vital evidence. Still missing
from the file is a certificate
reportedly issued to Demjanjuk at
an SS training camp. It is believed
to be in the possession of the
Soviet authorities.
Happy
&1
bwlfear
fiffm Delta
(JJtiJnes.
Delta Air Lines extends best wishes to our Jewish friends for
the holiday season and for the year to come. May the new year
bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity for everyone.
FOR THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
STATE OF ISRAEL IVRI BONDS
GOOD FORYOU
AND GOOD FOR ISRAEL!
On the eve of our community's annual Israel Bonds appeals in our
synagogues in support of Israel's economic development every
friend of Israel is urged to consider investing in an IVRI (Individual
variable Rate Issue) Bond.
LV51 Sivel.y u an attractive interest rate a minimum of 6% plus
Jfnmrfo feren? t0_ XY)f prime rate- Minimum subscription is
Vf^'QiSSF^SS** IVRI Bond wnich isavailable in denomina-
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own,VR,iBND IS 8 ,inanclal instrument that stands on its
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HnivnTv^n IS!d dWn the tab on your pled9e card durin9 the High
your IRA V svna9ogue, invest in an IVRI Bond, or an IVRI for
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PHONE: 531-6731




1
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Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Dr. Joyce Warshawsky (right/, pediatrician at the University of
Minnesota Hospital and Clinic in Minneapolis, and Edna Pin-
hover, a kindergarten teacher in the Pediatrics Department of
the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center at Ein Karem,
display art work by young Israeli patients created as part of an
exchange program with youngsters in Minneapolis. The
pediatrics departments of the two hospitals have been 'twinned'
as part of a joint celebration of the 75th anniversary of both the
Minneapolis institution and Hadassah, the Women's Zionist
Organization of America. Dr. Warshawsky is Hadassah's Upper
Midwest Region travel chairman.
SEND US
YOUR MOM AND DAD!
If your parents are
65 years of age of older,
they should spend
the next 100 years
with us.
THE
"BETTER LIFE PROGRAM"
AT THE
SHELBORNE BEACH HOTEL
Kahane 's Pals
Smash Windows At Ceremony Site
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Official
ceremonies naming a square in
Ashkelon in honor of the late King
Mohammed of Morocco were cut
short Sunday when Rabbi Meir
Kahane and followers of his ex-
tremist Kach Party invaded the
municipality offices, smashed win-
dows, overturned furniture and
threatened the clerks.
Premier Shimon Peres, the
principal speaker, had difficulty
making himself heard over the
shouts of hecklers. Most were sup-
porters of the right-wing opposi-
tion Tehiya Party who had a per-
mit to demonstrate and did so
noisily but peacefully. The
violence came from Kach.
The town on Israel's coast south
of Tel Aviv is in ferment over the
fatal stabbing of one of its
residents, Haim Azran, in the
Gaza marketplace Saturday. His
funeral, scheduled for Sunday,
Sept. 28, was postponed at the re-
quest of local police who feared
clashes.
MOHAMMED WAS the father
of King Hassan, the present ruler
of Morocco, with whom Peres met
last July. Peres reminded the
crowd that the late monarch had
befriended Jews during World
War II and at other times. But a
historian of the Moroccan Jewish
community claims Mohammed
signed Nazi racist laws at Hitler's
order when his country was ad-
ministered by the collaborationist
Vichy regime.
Peres referred to Azran's
murder, noting that it followed a
recent attempt on the life of
Hassan by Palestinian terrorists.
"We shall not allow PLO people in
Gaza or PLO people in Morocco to
kill the peace process," Peres
said. He told the hecklers, "Peace
is built on love of country, not
hatred of Arabs. It (the square)
can serve as a center for perma-
nent dialogue between the dif-
ferent peoples."
Tehiya MK Gershon Shafat told
reporters his party objected to
honoring King Mohammed
because 'To this day I have not
heard of naming a square in
Morocco in honor of Ben-Gurion
or any other Zionist leader." He
said such "gestures" to the West
would bring no benefits.
Mekorot Water Co. Shuts Pipeline
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Mekorot water company shut
down its main pipeline to central
Israel and the Negev Sunday
because the water level in the Sea
of Galilee is at a near record low.
It is the first time the pipeline was
closed since its completion more
than 30 years ago.
The Sea of Galilee, Israel's main
reservoir, is short about a half
billion cubic meters of water due
to several years of sub-normal
rainfall, the national water com-
pany said. The surface level is
more than 10 feet lower than
average and large stretches of
lake bed are visible.
Makorot said it hoped to resume
pumping after the winter rainy
season. Meanwhile, it will provide
minimum water supplies to
farmers and drinking water from
local wells.
To Celebrate.
Israel Discount Bank takes this holiday occasion to extend
greetings and warmest good wishes for a healthy and
happy New War to our friends and depositors.
Israel Discount Bank provides the local business community
with a full range of trade financing and international banking services
through its subsidiaries, branch offices and representatives on the
North American Continent and around the world.
We strive to excel at everything we do.
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FOR INFORMATION CALL
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ASK FOR MR. COLON
The Shelborne Beach Hotel
1801 COLLINS AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
"Craata Land From Sand"
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3. 1986
OUR STRENGTH IS YOUR SECURITY
Ida MUgrom (center), recently permitted to
leave the Soviet Union and join her noted son,
Anatoly now Natan Sharansky in Israel,
gets a hug from her daughter-in-law, Avital,
who is expecting, after being given a check-up
by Dr. Mervyn Gotsman, head of Cardiology
Department of the Hadassah-Hebrew Univer-
sity Medical Center at Ein Karem. Dr.
Gotsman said the mother of the former Soviet
dissident is in 'satisfactory' condition.
Military Report
South Lebanon Tense But Quiet
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Military sources report that
south Lebanon remains
tense but relatively quiet.
The sources said there was
no large-scale movement by
the Israel Defense Force in
the border security zone.
Reports in the overseas
media earlier said Israel was
massing troops and equip-
ment there.
The sources said that whatever
movement there was, was of a tac-
tical nature and involved small
quantities of equipment. Never-
theless, Israel is bolstering the
South Lebanon Army (SLA)
which operates in the security
tone. Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has vowed that Israel would
protect the SLA and thwart any
attacks on it in the security rone.
"WE WILL increase our back-
ing of the SLA whenever terrorist
activities increase and we will
reduce our activities when the ac-
tivities of the terrorist groups are
reduced," Rabin told a convention
of disabled war veterans in Kib-
butz Geva. "I believe that the
essence of our policy at present is
to create conditions that will give
support to the SLA,'* he said.
Punishment
Proposed
MONTREAL (JTA) Israel
has proposed that terrorist acts
against airports and aircraft be
treated as an international crime
and that the perpetrators,
wherever they are. be punished
according to international law.
The proposal was contained in
an eight-page document
presented by the Israeli delega-
tion at the opening of the 26th
Assembly of the International
Civil Aviation Organization
(ICAO) here. "The most impor-
tant precondition for the suc-
cessful combat against terrorism
is the determination of states to
flight against terrorism and those
who support it," the document
said.
It urged cooperation among
states in the area of intelligence
and the creation of "well-trained
anti-terrorist units which should
be capable to act whenever and
wherever they are needed. The
terrorists must never be allowed
to feel safe anywhere in the
world," the Israeli document said.
"If its (SLA) positions are at-
tacked again, we shall do the ut-
most to bring about the total and
painful failure of those who attack
them or to anyone who tries to
carry out any attack on the securi-
ty zone or targets in Israel," the
Defense Minister added.
The SLA is a largely Christian
Lebanese force commanded by
Gen. Antoine Lehad which Israel
has supported since the
withdrawal of IDF troops from
south Lebanon a year ago. It has
been the target of attack at dif-
ferent times by the Shiite Moslem
mainstream militia, Amal, by
Shiite extremist groups and
Palestinian terrorists.
Rabin said on a television inter-
view Sunday night tint Israel
would like to see a strong, viable
SLA capable of fulfilling its
assigned role in the security zone
as part of Israel's comprehensive
security strategy. He said it must
be made clear that any attacks on
the SLA would result in severe
punishment for the attackers.
MEANWHILE, it is the French
contingent of the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) which has borne the
brunt of attacks in south Lebanon.
It has suffered four killed and 33
wounded over the past six weeks..
Last Tuesday morning, four
Katyusha rockets hit French
headquarters at Ma'areke, 10
kilometers east of Tyre. There
were no casualties.
Asked on last Sunday to com-
ment on charges that Israel's
refusal to allow UNIFIL to extend
its area of operations southward
to the international border was
responsible for the attacks on the
French, Rabin replied that there
is neither proof nor any basis for
that claim.
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five
year
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Behind Rotation
Cabinet Will Remain Intact
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The rotation
of power this month affects only Premier
Shimon Peres and Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir, who are scheduled to ex-
change jobs. The rest of the Labor-Likud
Cabinet will remain intact with each
Minister retaining his present portfolio,
unless some Ministers balk.
The rotation is part of the Labor-Likud
unity coalition agreement reached in
1984. It will be carried out according to
law which requires the entire Cabinet to
resign along with the Prime Minister. The
basic formalities will be observed.
PERES WILL submit his resignation.
President Chaim Herzog will go through
the statutory consultations with all coali-
tion parties. The latter will ritually recom-
mend that Shamir become Prime Minister
and Herzog will ask him formally to take
office.
Shamir will appoint a government iden-
tical to the existing one, apart from his
exchange with Peres. Some changes are
possible. Health Minister Mordechai Gur
and Gad Yaacobi Minister of Economics
and Planning, both Laborites, have in-
timated they would not serve under
Shamir.
Should they leave the Cabinet, Shamir,
in consultation with Peres, would propose
successors.
On the Likud side, some Ministers want
Yitzhak Modai to be reappointed Finance
Minister, a portfolio he was forced to give
up earlier this year in an altercation with
Peres. Labor objects to this. Modai is
presently Minister of Justice, having ex-
changed portfolios with Moshe Nissim.
Soviet Bureaucracy
Stymies Woman from Helping Brother
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A Soviet Jewish woman,
whose brother is gravely ill
in Tel Aviv, has been caught
up in a bureaucratic cat-and-
mouse game in which she
faces a tragic dilemma of
having to choose between
her brother and her
husband.
Inessa Flerova, 37, of Moscow,
is the only person who might be
capable of donating bone marrow
to her brother, Michael Shirman,
31, who is stricken with myeloid
leukemia, a bone marrow
malginancy that is fatal in young
adults. His sole chance for sur-
vival of the disease rests in the
successful transplant of bone mar-
row from a close relative.
FLEROVA, after staging a
hunger strike in August that at-
tracted international publicity and
prompted the intervention of
American Congressmen, was
granted a visa to immigrate to
Israel with her two daughters.
But, in a nightmare of Kafkaesque
proportions. Soviet authorities
refused to allow her husband, Vic-
tor Flerov, to accompany his
family.
Flerovs visa is being held back
on grounds that his father has
allegedly withheld the necessary
written statement absolving his
38-year-old son of financial obliga-
tions. Flerov has not seen his
father since he was very young,
according to family accounts.
Word came from Tel Aviv that
Flerov has begun a hunger strike
to protest the Soviet authorities'
refusal to allow him to join his
Claims Confab
Reminder
NEW YORK (JTA) The
cEn?"? n Jewi8h M*^*!
isS Agam8t y has
ET\J vminder to Jewi8h vic-
worlcJ NM P^^ution who
Ver!Lu Dyn"nit-Nobl or
uwJT*"*"1 of claims is
"ecember 31, 1986.
CUim8aretobefiledwithCom
Grun?Ktl0n Treuhand,
Fr^n&^eg; 119, 6000
.OT^. West Germany. They
382?6 factual information
labor SC6n8Urroundinforced
^erSe^/^^-Nobel or
family in going to Israel.
Initially. Flerova did not re-
quest permission to emigrate, on-
ly a temporary visa that would
allow her to go to Israel for
testing for compatibility and,
possible bone marrow transplant.
HER APPLICATION for that
permission was beset by a series
of obstacles, according to Shirman
himself, in letters he has written
to an American doctor, Kenneth
Prager, and to Prager's New
Jersey Congressman, Robert Tor-
ricelli, both of whom have in-
tervened through written peti-
tions to Soviet officials, to
American government officials in
the highest echelons, and to the
doctors who attended to the vic-
tims of the Chernobyl nuclear
disaster.
Shirman says his sister's re-
quest to OVIR, the Soviet emigra-
tion office, for a temporary visa to
go to Israel unaccompanied was
rejected on two separate occa-
sions; that her personal request to
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
went unanswered; that the
authorities pressed her for her en-
tire family to apply for visas; and
that the family was pressed to ap-
ply to emigrate, ostensibly a
longer process and a complicated
one, taking up precious time that
was so necessary for Shirman's
life.
Shirman says that he Flerovs'
application for a visa has rendered
the family "enemies of the peo-
ple" and has affected their lives
terribly. Flerova's request for
"character reference" from work
(she is an economist) was rejected
and has caused her to be "brutally
persecuted" at her job by "senior
functionaries waging a
shameful campaign of humiliation
and slander against her," Shir-
man said.
SHIRMAN, in letters to Prager
and Torricelli, wrote that "I am
not at peace with myself' because
he feels that he is "the cause of
sorrows being visited upon her
(Flerova) and her family." Shir-
man had telephoned his sister in
Moscow and asked that the family
not be separated for his sake.
Prager, a cardio-pulmonary
specialist at Columbia-
Presbyterian Medical Center in
New York, became familiar with
the Flerova-Shirman case while in
Moscow in March and April.
Prager stressed the desperate
nature of Shirman's case. At this
point, time is absolutely of the
essence, he said. With each pass-
ing day, Shirman's chances of sur-
vival grow slimmer and slimmer.
What was diagnosed in February
as a 70 percent chance of survival
if the transplant was done then
has dwindled to about 30 percent,
according to medical evaluations.
Friday, October 3, 19867The^Jewish Florjdian_ Page 9-A
Egypt's New Envoy to Israel
Presents Credentials to Herzog
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Mohammed Bassiouny,
Egypt's new Ambassador to Israel, presented his creden-
tials to President Chaim Herzog Tuesday (Sept. 24). The
ceremonies at the Presidential residence marked the
restoration of top-level Egyptian diplomatic representation
in Israel for the first time since Cairo recalled its former
Ambassador, Saad Mortada, during Israel's invasion of
Lebanon in 1982.
BASSIOUNY REMAINED in Tel Aviv at that time
and for the next four years as Charge d'Affaires. His ap-
pointment as Ambassador was announced at the summit
meeting between Premier Shimon Peres and President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt in Alexandria last month.
The new envoy arrived at the Presidential residence in
a car provided by Herzog. As he alighted, the Egyptian flag
was raised and the Egyptian national anthem was played.
Bassiouny reviewed a military police guard of honor. He
was accompanied by members of the Egyptian Embassy
staff in Tel Aviv.
THEY WERE GREETED By Herzog, Deputy
Foreign Minister Ronni Milo and David Kimche, director
feneral of the Foreign Ministry. Foreign Minister Yitzhak
hamir was in New York. Bassiouny brought a message
from President Mubarak.
In his brief remarks, he expressed hope that the im-
provement in relations between Egypt and Israel would
continue and that a just peace settlement would be found in
the Middle East.
Celebrating Our 30th Anniversary
New Directions for the 80's
Hebrew Home For The Aged
of Miami Beach
and
The Corinne & Samuel Kraver Institute
(North Dade-Geriatric Satellite)
hV f AthCR
f*Z.
LEONARD ZILBERT
President
SIDNEY SIEGEL
Executive Vice Pres.
Your contributions
and support will
help the ELDERLY
to live their lives
in comfort and
peace.
to* Vhy&e+i
.Wa/i/ty and
In consideration ol the pledges of others. I hereby pledge to
The Hebrew Home For The Aged. Miami Beach and The Corinne A
Samuel J. Kraver Institute 320 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach
Florida 33139 the sum ol
Payment shall be In
the last payment due on
Instalments,
Date
Address.
Signature------------------------------------------------------------------
All gifts to The Hebrew Home For The Aged, Miami Beach
and The Corinne a Samuel J. Kraver Institute are deductible
lor federal and state income purposes. Gifts of appreciated
assets will result in greater benefit to the donor at the
least coat.
FOR ADMISSION INFORMATION PHONE OR VISIT THE MIAMI BEACH OFFICE
MIAMI BEACH HEBREW HOME FOR THE AGED
320 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Fl. Telephone 672-6464
1800 N.E. 168th Street, North Miami Beach, Fl. Telephone 947-3445
Leonard Zilbert, President Sidney Slegel, Executive .Vice President


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Shamir Touches Bases With Diplomats at UNations
U.S. Secretary of Education Gets Degree
Dr. William J. Bennett (left), U.S. Secretary of Education,
receives an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Dr.
Norman Lamm, president ofYeshiva University, at the Univer-
sity's Centennial Convocation. Dr. Bennett was featured speaker
at the Convocation, which marked the University's 100th anniver-
sary. In his speech, the Secretary assailed 'anti-religious pre-
judice in the classroom' and called upon educators to strive
towards a synthesis of moral values and academic learning.
NEW YORK (JTA) Israeli
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
arrived here Tuesday (Sept. 23)
for a hectic round of talks with 30
Foreign Ministers and Secretary
of State George Shultz in addition
to an address before the UN
General Assembly Tuesday of this
week.
Shamir said the agenda for his
week-long visit includes meetings
with representatives of four
Soviet-bloc countries, among
them the Polish Foreign Minister,
to discuss renewed diplomatic ties
between Poland and Israel.
Poland and Israel are set to
establish interest sections and ex-
change representatives in mid-
October, Shamir said.
IN A MEETING scheduled
with the Egyptian Foreign
Minister, Shamir said he expects
to futher discuss the subjects
decided on at the summit meeting
in Alexandria between Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres and Egyp-
tian President Hosni Mubarak,
and the Taba question.
The Israeli Foreign Minister,
who will resume the Premiership
this month under the rotation
agreement of Israel's unity
government, said he would confer
with some African and Asian
countries which do not have
diplomatic relations with Israel.
Best Wishes for
Good Health and Happiness
Throughout the New Year
Congressman and Mrs. Lawrence J. Smith
Grant and Lauren
Paid for by Larry Smith for Coi*rt Campaign. Joatph A. Epatain. CPA. Traaanrar
J
Israel Says: No
Fight Between
Shiites, SLA
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel Air Force jets bomb-
ed a terrorist base in
Lebanon southeast of Sidon
last Thursday (Sept. 25). A
military spokesman said the
target was an encampment
of El Fatah, the mainstream
terrorist group of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization loyal to Yasir
Arafat.
The spokesman said the tented
camp was in a wooded area far
from civilian centers. It was heavi-
ly defended by anti-aircraft bat-
teries but none was fired at the
Israeli planes, he said. Beirut
Radio reported that three Israeli
planes carried out the bombing
while three others flew over at a
higher altitude.
THE ATTACK was the second
Israeli air raid on south Lebanon
in three days and the sixth in
September. Last Tuesday, Israeli
jets bombed the bases of the
Popular Front organization and
the dissident PLO faction headed
by Abu Musa, Arafat's rival.
Meanwhile, the Israel Defense
Force denied Beirut reports of
heavy exchanges of fire between
Shiite Moslem groups and the
Israel-backed South Lebanon Ar-
my (SLA) in a region north of the
security zone last Wednesday
night. The IDF reported the
security zone quiet.
A Nepalese soldier of the United
Nations Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) was wounded by an
unidentified assailant who shot
him at point-blank range after
asking for a water bottle. The
Nepalese unit replaced the French
UNIFIL contingent last week
east of Tyre. The French troops
were withdrawn after suffering
four dead and 33 wounded in re-
cent attacks by Shiite extremists.
Shapiro Elected
BALTIMORE (JTA) -
Milton Shapiro of Great Neck,
N.Y., was elected Sunday to a
two-year term as president of the
Zionist Organization of America,
suceeding Alleck Resnick.
May
the year
5747
_ bless
you with
health and
happiness.
American mm
SAVlNGSt^
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF HOSIDA ^^
Morris N. Broad
Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer
Shspsrd Broad
Chairman
Executive Committee
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 5711
)


At UNations
Resolve Ignored Israel's Security


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By MARGIE OLSTER
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The U.S. Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, Vernon Walters, said
> last Wednesday that he abs-
tained from voting on a
Security Council resolution
calling for Israel's
withdrawal from the south
Lebanon security zone
because the resolution made
no provisions for security
arrangements acceptable to
all parties.
The resolution approved Tues-
day evening (Sept. 23) by a 14-0
vote with one (U.S.) abstention,
called for "an end in south
Lebanon to any military presence
not accepted by the Lebanese
authorities" and deployment of
the United Nations Interim Force
in Lebanon (UNIFIL) southward
to the Israel-Lebanon border.
IT WAS promptly denounced
by Israeli Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir as "the height of ab-
surdity." and he made clear that
Israel is not about to comply. The
vote followed a Security Council
debate on the situation in south
Lebanon convened recently at the
request of France.
Walters, explaining his absten-
tion, said the resolution focused
exclusively on the redeployment
of UNIFIL while ignoring the
critical factor which was the
absence of agreement among the
parties concerned on security ar-
rangements that would respect all
interests.
He said that measures must be
agreed on by the parties concern-
ed, otherwise the level of suspi-
cion and mistrust would be
\ 'increased.
Walters added that he regretted
he could not vote on a resolution
raised by an ally as close as
France. Observers here, noting
that the U.S. in the past has
almost invariably voted against
and thereby vetoed Security
Council resolutions unacceptable
to Israel, suggested that the
American abstention in this in-
stance was a case of not wanting
to offend the French.
THE RESOLUTION gives UN
Secretary General Javier Perez de
Uellar 21 days in which to "make
necessary arrangements for a
deployment of the (UNIFIL) force
to the southern border of
Lebanon. It solemnly calls on all
'he parties concerned to
PLO Presence
Protested
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) The
Canadian Jewish Congress has
Protested to Prime Minister Brian
Muironey against the presence of
? Palestine Liberation
organization at the executive
meeting of the International Civil
wh!!kn 0rSan'zation (ICAO)
SIX%.ln Mntreal Tu~
CJC President Dorothy Reit-
^a" said in a telegram to
!?H Mnday 5* "^eir
alltipresence is unacceptable at
the Zi m?re P^cularly now in
*e wak of terror.8t
She^'J^^^f^ce."
ba T1 2* Prime Mu^ter to
W* uPL0 from Canada
C^Tpresence here en"
ners the Jews of Canada."
llCAO ^L is rePresented at the
*ho herkt"Vy H- Murad'
kthoufv^ StaiUS 0f ob8erver
Israel1 tmg n*nts- Canada **
iet^W exPected to present a
2E rePrt at the meeting on
neasures to combat terrorism.
cooperate in the achievement of
that objective."
Although the two-paragraph
resolution did not mention Israel
by name, it contained a clear
reference to Israel's control of a
security zone some six miles deep
north of Israel's border with
Lebanon. The rone was establish-
ed by Israel when it withdrew its
forces from Lebanon in June
1985.
The resolution was approved
after France asked the UN to
compel the evacuation of Israel
and the Israel-backed South
Lebanon Army (SLA) from the
zone and allow the deployment of
UNIFIL to the international
border.
The French contingent of
UNIFIL is the largest of the
multinational force, consisting of
1,391 troops out of a total of
5,827. It has suffered serious
casualties in recent weeks under
attack by Shiite Moslem ex-
tremists. Walters remarked in
that connection that "One thing is
quite clear. It is not Israel that is
killing and wounding the soldiers"
of UNIFIL.
A REPORT to the Security
Council held Israel responsible for
UNIFIL's vulnerability because it
refuses to allow UNIFIL to be
deployed along its border with
Lebanon.
In the Security Council debate
that followed, Israel's Am-
bassador to the UN, Binyamin
Netanyahu, strongly defended the
south Lebanon security zone and
declared that if it did not exist
"south Lebanon and northern
Israel would again face an in-
tolerable situation. A terrible
violence would again be
unleashed."
Shamir, who arrived here Tues-
day (Sept. 23) to attend the 41st
session of the General Assembly,
left no doubt that Israel will not
abandon the security zone. He
said the Security Council resolu-
tion is "the height of absurdity,"
because Israel and UNIFIL are in
effect "on the same side," both
fighting extremists in south
Lebanon such as the Iran-inspired
Hezbullah.
AT A BRIEFING for Israeli
journalists here, Shamir's press
spokesman, Avi Pazner, said
Shamir made the same point at
meetings with the Foreign
Ministers of Finland and Ireland,
two countries that provide troops
for UNIFIL. Pazner said Shamir
told Finnish Foreign Minister
Paavo Vayrynen that "We won't
pay the price for UNIFIL to stay


Three Yeshiva University leaders participate in a special
^-evumy marking the issuance of a U.S. postage stamp honoring
ur Bernard Revel, first president of the institution that later
became Yeshiva University. The leaders, all of whom were
presented with special Commemorative First Day Covers from
the U.S. PosUU Service, are (from left) Stanley E. Stern, vice
chairman of the University's Board of Trustees; Ludwig
Jesselson, Board treasurer; and Hermann Merkin, Board vice
chairman. The $1 stamp honoring Dr. Revel, who was born in
Kovno, Lithuania (now part of the Soviet Union), is the ninth
stamp issued in the 'Great American Series' in 1986 and the S5th
stamp in the series overall.

in Lebanon, and we will not allow
any redeployment of UNIFIL to
the south. We have to protect our
security interests, but Israel has
an interest in UNIFIL remaining
in its present positions."
Shamir also said he was angered
by the attacks on UNIFIL. He
stressed that Israel had not in-
vited it into Lebanon but woud not
want to see it leave. Shamir said
much the same thing to the Irish
Foreign Minister, Peter Barry,
Pazner said.
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and security
Transportation to doctors
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Personal laundry service
Special diets
Social worker
House doctor
Private and semi private
accommodations.
1900 N. Bayshore Dr.,
Miami, FL 33132
Telephone: (305) 371-3035


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Fridaj^ October 3^986
Violence Erupts in Ashkelon At Funeral of Resident Slain by Arab
. '1
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Tension erupted into in-
cidents of violence in
Ashkelon Monday where an
angry crowd of more than
2,000 attended the funeral
of Haim Azran, a 35-year-
old Ashekelon resident
fatally stabbed by an Arab
assailant in the Gaza market
Saturday.
Feelings were exacerbated by
the dedication of "Peace Square"
in Ashkelon Sunday in honor of
the late King Mohammed of
Morocco, which infuriated rightw-
ing elements. Azran's funeral had
been scheduled for Sunday, and
the townspeople were given to
believe that it was postponed on
government orders so as not to in-
terfere with the dedication
ceremonies, attended by Premier
Shimon Peres.
Eli Dayan, the Moroccan-born
Mayor of Ashkelon, tried to
mollify the crowd at the funeral,
explaining that it was delayed
because the police insisted on an
autopsy. But he was shouted down
by hecklers, as was Health
Minister Mordechai Gur who at-
tended on behalf of the
government.
POLICE REPORTED several
incidents of violence against
Arabs vusiting the town or pass-
ing through. Their cars were ston-
ed and, in two cases, set on fire.
Gur tried to assure the crowd that
the fight against terrorism would
continue.
Ariel Sharon, Minister of Com-
merce and Industry, an outspoken
Likud hawk, was on hand. He
refused urgings by the crowd to
speak. But he read a prepared
statement to reporters later de-
nouncing the honor to King
Mohammed, father of the present
ruler of Morocco, King Hassan.
He said if he had been consulted
he would have recommended that
the square be named instead in
memory of the 21 Jews killed in an
attack on the Neve Shalom
synagogue in Istanbul earlier this
month and that a street in
Ashkelon be named in honor of
Azran.
Meanwhile, the dispute over the
honor to King Mohammed con-
tinued along party lines.
Laborites are urging closer con-
tacts with Morocco while Likud
and other rightwing parties are
sharply critical of Peres' recent
moves in that direction.
PERES WAS the guest of King
Hassan in Morocco last July. He
stressed in dedicating the square
in honor of Hassan's father, that
the late king had befriended Jews
during World War II and at other
times.
That has been disputed by Prof.
Michael Abutbul of the Hebrew
University's Truman Institute. He
claims, in a book published several
months ago, that Mohammed col-
laborated with the Vichy regime
in World War II and never aided
his Jewish subjects.
But Labor MK Rafi Edri told a
television interviewer Monday
that Abutbul's claim was
disproven by other historians and
charged Abutbul with seeking
publicity for his book.
Edri said he had documentary
proof of Mohammed's help to
Jews during the Vichy and Nazi
periods, including statements by
Moroccan Jewish leaders. He said
there was also proof of a deathbed
request by Mohammed to his son
and successor instructing him to
continue caring for the welfare of
Moroccan Jews as his forefathers
had done for generations.
Edri was a member of Peres'
party when he visited Morocco.
He was there again last week and
had a private audience with
Hassan.
Murder Ringed by Violent
Arab Acts on West Bank
By HUGH ORGEL
And GIL SEDAN
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli from Ahskelon was
fatally stabbed while shopp-
ing in Gaza Saturday. The
victim, Haim Azran, 35, was
assaulted from behind in an
alley off the main street and
knifed twice in the throat
and once in the back.
He was aided by a friend,
Mordechai Mordi, who summoned
help from the local military head-
quarters. An ambulance rushed
Azran to Barzilai Hospital. He
was taken by helicopter from
there to Soroka Hospital in Beer-
History
Rewritten?
Continued from Page 5-A
activity.
"WE TURN to your readers to
raise your voice on this issue by
protesting personally, collectively
and organizationally to the
Government of Poland and its
representatives, the Pope and the
heads of the Catholic Church in
your country, and to exercise your
influence with anyone who might
help this effort.
"Only strong pressure from
worldwide public opinion may en-
sure that these wrongs be set
right, and can prevent similar oc-
currences at other death camps."
The writer is Rabbi Menahem
Fogel, a spokesman for Yad
Vashem here.
sheba where he died of his
wounds.
A curfew was clamped on Gaza
after the attack but was soon
lifted. A grape stall dealer told
police he saw the attacker whom
he described as young and strong.
But he could not identify him.
ISRAELI AUTHORITIES at-
tributed the stabbing and other
recent violence in the Gaza Strip
to the fatal shooting two weeks
ago of an Arab youth during a
stone-throwing melee in Rafah at
the southern end of the Gaza
Strip. That occurred on the fourth
anniversary of the Shatila and
Sabra refugee camps massacre in
Lebanon and triggered anti-
Israeli incidents in the gaza Strip
and West Bank. The authorities
are puzzled because they have not
yet abated.
Palestinian nationalists
demonstrated at a local school in
Rafah Thursday. An Israeli vehi-
cle was stoned and its windshield
smashed but the occupants were
unhurt. Police arrested two per-
sons on suspicion of organizing
the demonstration.
Two gazoline bombs were
thrown at an Israeli bus in Nablus
last Thursday. A window was
smashed but no one was hurt. The
bus was carrying Israeli school
children from Shavei Shomron
settlement to Elon Moreh. Securi-
ty forces searched the area.
The tension in Nablus appeared
related to the recent dismissal of
Dr. Munther Sallah, president of
A-Najah University there, on
suspicion he was involved in anti-
Israel demonstrations.
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES AFFILIATED WITH
cTnited Synagogue of corner ica
SOUTHEAST REGION-SOUTHERN COUNCIL
282 S. University Drive, Plantation, FL 33324
Broward (305) 474-4606 Dade (305) 947-6094
*
LOU MELTZER
Regional President
MARSHALL BALTUCH
Southern Council Vice President
MARLENELUSSKIN
Regional Vice President
FRANKLIN D. KREUTZER
International President
HAROLD WISHNA
Executive Director
BRUCE KLASNER
Youth Director
DR. ALAN MARCOVITZ
Treasurer
WISH ALL A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
AND INVITE YOU TO AFFILIATE WITH AND TO
WORSHIP IN ONE OFTHE FOLLOWING
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
tanan nstw nrob
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
BENNY ROK CAMPUS
1051 N. Miami Beach, FL 33162
947-7528
RABBI MAX D. LIPSCHITZ
CANTOR ZVEE ARONI
Robert Whilebrook. President
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. FL 33139
538-2503
RABBI DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN
Lawrence M. Schantz, Pre.
Gerald Taub. Exec. Director
ADATHYESHURUN
CONGREGATION
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
No. Miami Beach, FL 33179
9471435
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN
CANTOR IAN ALPERN
Alan Danls, President
Robert A. Kravltz, Exec. Director
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
TEMPLE BETH SHMUEL
1700 Michigan Ave.
Miami Beach. FL 33139
534-7213
RABBI BARRY KONOVITCH
CANTOR MOISES BURYN
Sergio Grobler, President
Aron Kelton. Exec. Director
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 N.E. 121st Street
No. Miami, FL 33181
891 5508
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER
Melvyn Tmte, President
Irving Jaret, Exec. Director
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. Third Ave
Miami, FL 33129
864-3911
RABBI JACK RIEMER
CANTOR ROBERT ALBERT
Barbara Waas, President
Albert J. Beer, Exec. V.P.
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Boulevard
No. Miami Beach, FL 33180
935-0866
RABBI DAVID B. SALTZMAN
CANTOR BERNARD KNEE
Jacob Cohen, President
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
7100 West Oakland Park Blvd.
Sunrise, FL 33313
742-4040
RABBI DR. HOWARD A. ADDISON
CANTOR MAURICE A. NEU
Dr. Clark D. Galln, President
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
Miami, FL 33156
236-2601
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR STEPHEN FREEDMAN
Jerome Shevin, President
Hlllel Levy, Exec. Director
TEMPLE BETH EL OF
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
7800 Hispanola Ave.
No. Bay Village. FL 33141
861-4005
RABBI JORY LANG
CANTOR DANNY TAOMORE
Eugene Rosenberg, Co-President
Irving Ceranka, Co-President
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th Street
Miami Beach, FL 33139
866-0221
RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ
ASSOC. RABBI ARI FRIDKIS
CANTOR MURRAY YAVNEH
Harvey Abramson. President
Marcia Levy. Exec. Director
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Road
Miami, FL 33155
271-2311
RABBI DR. NORMAN N. SHAPIRO
CANTOR BENJAMIN ADLER
Michael M. Exelbert, President
Norman Pollack, Exec. Director
TEMPLE SINAI OF HOLLYWOOD
1201 Johnson Street
Hollywood, FL 33021
9201577
RABBI RICHARD J. MARGOLIS
CANTOR MISHA ALEXANDROVICH
Fred Packer, President
Sheila Rigor, Administrator
SUNRISE JEWISH CENTER
TEMPLE SHA'ARAY TZEDEK
4099 Pine Island Road
Sunrise, FL 33321
741-0295
RABBI RANDALL J. KONIGSBURG
CANTOR JACK MARCHANT
Philip Nelson, President
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTF.R
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
9101-15 N.W. 57th Street
Tamarac, FL 33321
721-7660
RABBI KURT F. STONE
Seymour Wildman, President
Arthur Knopf machsr, Exec. Dlr.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM OF
BOCA RATON, INC.
P.O. Box 340015
Boca Raton, FL 33434
463-5557
RABBI DR. DONALD DAVID CRAIN
CANTOR JOSEPH M. POLLACK
Reuben Saltzman, President
TEMPLE EMANUEL
190 North County Road
Palm Beach. FL 33480
832-0804
RABBI JOEL CHAZIN
CANTOR DAVID FEUER
Richard A. Lynn, M.D., Pres.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
132 S.E. 11th Ave.
Pompano Beach, FL 33060
942-6410
RABBI SAMUEL APRIL
CANTOR RONALD GRANER
Dr. Philip Rubinstein, Pros.
Dr. Wilton Isaacson, Exec. V.P.
B'M \\ TORAH CONGREGATION
140I N.W. 4th Ave.
io:a Raton, FL 33432
i0: 8566
RA )BI THEODORE FELDMAN
CANTOR DONALD ROBERTS
Helen Waxier, President
Jeryl Beers. Administrator
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
4657 Hood Road
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33416
694-2350
RABBI WILLIAM MARDER
CANTOR EARL J. RACKOFF
Alan Gordon, President
TEMPLE SAMUEL OR OLOM
9353 S.W. 152nd Ave.
Miami, FL 33196
382-3668
RABBI ED FARBER
ASSOC. RABBI SAMUEL RUDY
CANTOR PAUL GOLDSTEIN
Leonard Alan Shubltz, Pres.
Murray H. Knopf, Exec. Director
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Cartyle Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 33141
866-6345
RABBI DR. EUGENE LABOVITZ
CANTOR EDWARD KLEIN
Paul Novak. President
TEMPLE BETH AHM
9730 Stirling Road
Holly wood. FL 33024
431-5100
RABBI AVRAHAM KAPNEK
CANTOR STUART KANAS
Andrew Medvln, President
Philip Sacks, Exec. V.P.
TEMPLE BETH AM
7205 Royal Palm Blvd.
Margate, FL 33063
974-8650
RABBI PAUL PLOTKIN
CANTOR IRVING GROSSMAN
Max Model I, President
Harry Hlrsch, Exec Director
Steven S. Greene, Administrator
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
200 Century Blvd.
Deertleld Beach, FL 33442
421-7080
RABBI JOSEPH LANGNER
CANTOR SHABTAIACKERMAN
Reverend Saul Kirschenbaum, Pres
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER
501 N.E. 26th Ave.
Boynton Beach, FL 33435
580-9428
RABBI LEON B. FINK
CANTOR ABRAHAM KOSTER
Leo Grossbard, Prealdent
TEMPLE BETH EL
2815 North Flagler Drive
Wast Palm Beach, FL 33407
8334)339
RABBI ALAN L.COHEN
CANTOR NORMAN F. BRODY
Gall Pariser. President
1


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Israel and Jordan
Collaborate on PLO
Leaders of 60 national Jewish religious and
secular organizations signed a 'Declaration of
Jewish Unity This Year in Jerusalem' dur-
ing the recent visit to New York of Prime
Minister Shimon Peres of Israel (left,). With
him are (left to right) Morris Abram, chair-
man of the Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations; Rabbi
Joseph Sternstein, chairman of the Presidents
Conference task force on tourism; and David
Hermelin, national chairman of Israel Bonds
and co-chairman of Project Independence,
which co-sponsored the meeting with the
Presidents Conference.
Waldheim Called
For Enemies To 'Kill the Jews'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Virulently anti-Semitic
tirades, culminating in a call
to "kill the Jews," appear in
a newly-discovered package
of Nazi propaganda leaflets,
a package initialed by Kurt
Waldheim when he served
as a senior German in-
telligence officer during
World Warl II, the World
Jewish Congress reports.
The leaflets, located by
WJCongress researchers at the
U.S. National Archives, bear such
titles as "The Jews prepared This
War" and "Onward to Berlin.
Jews Shriek." They have been
turned over to the U.S. Justice
Department.
the
for
DOCUMENTS show
leaflets were prepared
distribution by a German army
propaganda company and sent to
Waldheim at the High Command
Headquarters of his intelligence
section. At headquarters,
Waldheim received the leaflets
along with a title index and a
cover report dated November 28,
1944, both of which he initialed in
">e 03" box of the stamp of his
'?A(fnC' section the
WfJdbeim acknowledged his
03 intelligence status in his
memorandum to the United
^tatf Justice Department of
Apnl 6, 1986. The 03 "was the
deputy of the chief intelligence of-
ficer responsible for all opera-
tional intelligence and the control
of the intelligence staff," accor-
ding to the declassified study,
"German Military Intelligence,"
by the Military Intelligence Divi-
sion of the U.S. War Department
1946.
Sixty-five titles were listed on
the master index of the propagan-
da leaflets that Waldheim initialed
and dated. The cover report which
he also initialed states that 80,000
copies of the leaflets had been
printed and that "repeat printings
are planned."
ACCORDING TO the cover
report, thousands of copies of the
leaflets were to be dropped behind
enemy lines to Russian soldiers, in
an attempt to get them to defect
to the German side. The leaflets
include such outpourings of anti-
Semitic venom as the following:
"Cursed be the Jews who sit
over the necks of our relatives in
the rear and such their blood";
"Only the German people did
right when it freed itself from the
accursed Jews"; "All of us must
seriously consider going over to
the German people, to fight with it
against Jewish Bolshevism"; and
"The Jews prepared this war.
Jews got it onto our backs. Jews
do not want it to end."
One of the leaflets concludes:
"Who, wherever you move into
the Balkans, showed the greatest
enthusiasm? The Jews. Enough of
the Jewish war, kill the Jews,
come over."
Another captured Nazi war
document a secret organiza-
tional chart of the German High
Command in the Balkans shows
that "Waldheim's intelligence sec-
pro-
The
pro-
tion ("IC/AO") had major
paganda responsibilities,
document shows that the
paganda company that printed the
anti-Semitic leaflets reported
directly to the "IC/AO."
That same propaganda com-
pany was responsible for
publishing a front-page photo of
Waldheim with his commanding
General, Alexander Loehr, which
appeared in the German army
newspaper in the Balkans. Loehr
was hanged as a war criminal in
1947.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel and Jordan are col-
laborating unofficially in a
policy to eliminate PLO in-
fluence in the West Bank
which has already drastical-
ly reduced terrorist activity
in the territory, Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin
disclosed in an interview
published in Maariv
Monday.
He said the appointment of
local Arab leaders to serve as
mayors of three of the West
Bank's largest towns was part of
that policy and in fact was under-
taken at Jordan's initiative. It was
announced Sunday that Abdel Ma-
jid E-Zir, Halil Mussa Haul and
Hassan A-Tawil have been named
the mayors of Hebron, Ramallah
and El Bireh respectively, replac-
ing the Israel Defense Force of-
ficers who previously governed
the towns.
RABIN SAID the three ap-
pointees were tacitly approved by
Jordan and agreed to by Israel
after it was ascertained that they
were acceptable to the local
population and had no connections
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
This step is part of the ongoing
war against terrorism and
strengthening of moderate
elements, Rabin said. He reported
that King Hussein of Jordan has
encouraged moderate elements in
the territory and poured money
into circles favorable to his
Hashemite regime.
Rabin said that Israel was
prepared for an upsurge of ter-
rorism in 1984 when Hussein per-
mitted the opening of PLO offices
in Amman. But Jordan changed
its policy sharply after Hussein
broke with FLO chief Yasir
Arafat last February.
The PLO offices were closed
and PLO activists were detained
or expelled from Jordan. Rabin
said. The new attitude and policies
of both Jordan and Israel has
resulted in a significant reduction
of terrorist attacks.
SINCE FEBRUARY, terrorist
activity in the West Bank fell by
50 percent and there has been a 70
percent drop in the number of
casualties attributable to terrorist
acts, Rabin said, compared to the
same period last year.
Meanwhile, Gen. Ephraim
Sneh, head of the civil administra-
tion in the West Bank, stressed in
a radio interview Sunday night
that the appointment of Arab
mayors should not be construed as
a beginning of the unilateral im-
plementation of autonomy by
Israel.
"By no means, no. There is no
connection to any kind of
(autonomy) plan," Sneh said. "On
the other hand," he added, "this is
a continuation of the policy we
have followed for a long time: that
control of the local officers should
be returned to the local
residents."
Sneh ponted out that autonomy
was an overall regional concept,
not a local municipal one. "There
is a basic and substantive dif-
ference between the two things,"
he said.
Announcing the Opening of
THE GARDENS AT MOUNT NEBO
Miami's most beautiful exclusively Jewish Cemetery
Nowhere is the Jewish concept of life eternal expressed with more
dignity, love and beauty than in Mount Nebo. Lush landscaping,
combined with more than 50 years of devoted care, creates
at Mount Nebo a lasting tribute to loved ones in the highest
tradition of Judaism. This tradition is continued in the Gardens.
Mount Nebos latest expansion.
Our Readers Write: Does
Robertson Talk Double Speak?
EDITOR. The Jeunsh Floridian:
In a major speech of Sept. 17,
unanS" ViSi0n for America,"
" wp .iLRobert8on declared:
reservation ?** ouT8eIv without
BWjpSP'religious
teliTf^,^ 30- 19I
'ecast of his "700 Club," Rev.
'nsuS?!theUn,ted States, for
fr selfvl a marvelous document
f*Ple &Tment b* Christian
ll* docnm C m,nute vou turn
^cSan1^0, hands of
People thS, ^P'6 Md atheistic
theveVv f? T USe il to destroy
A n d t u "n.datlon of our society
Vpenng what'8 been
And on July 30 of this year in
Lansing, Mich., the TV evangelist
remarked that, "Christians feel
more strongly about love of coun-
try, love of God and support for
the traditional family than do non-
Christians."
The question is: Just which vi-
sion is it that this presidential
aspirant has for America? Has
Rev. Robertson really changed his
mind about non-Christians or
finding that blatanly bigoted
statements do him more harm
than good merely his strategy?
MAURY C. ABRAHAM
Associate Director
Americans for Religious
Liberty,
Washington, D.C.
SPECIAL PRE-OPENINC PRICE OFFERINGS
FOR A LIMITED TIME. VISIT OR CALL US AT:
261-7612
MOUNT NEBO
Mount Nebo cemetery 5505 n.w. 3rd Street. Miami, fl 33126
*_


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 3, 1986
I s,
Mohammed Abdel-Aziz Bassiouny presents
his letters of credence to President Chaim Her-
zog after being named Egypt's Ambassador to
Israel. Bassiouny was, until now, the Egyp-
tian Charge d'Affaires. (JTA/wzn News Photo)
Chirac Says
France Behind Int'L Peace Talks
By MARGIE OLSTER
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Prime Minister Jac-
aues Chirac of France told
tie General Assembly last
week that France approves
of the concept of an interna-
tional peace conference on
the Middle East and is ready
to play a role in such a
forum.
In his address to the Assembly
he also said France welcomed as
"favorable" signs that dialogue is
becoming an increasingly popular
method of resolving the Mideast
conflict.
Chirac said peace in the Middle
East requires "mutual recogni-
tion of the parties concerned" and
the recognition of both Israel's
right to exist and the right of
Palestinians to self-
determination.
DEALING WITH the problems
facing the UN Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL), he said the
continued attacks against it will
leave no alternative other than to
"retrench" to insure its own safe-
ty. He stated that France does not
intend to withdraw its troops
from UNIFIL but that it might
have to reduce its size. French
troops have been under heavy fire
from Shiite extremists.
Chirac refrained from placing
responsibility on Israel for these
attacks although France, in a
special Security Council debate
earlier last week on UNIFIL, con-
tended that UNIFIL was made
vulnerable because Israel refuses
to allow it to deploy southward to
the international border the
security zone in south Lebanon.
Recalling France's historically
intimate ties to Lebanon, Chirac
said, "Side by side with other na-
tional contingents of UNIFIL,
French soldiers have too often
paid for a peace mission with their
lives. But of late, the situation has
become intolerable.
[DROWARD
IJAPER &
IJACKAGING
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CHIRAC CONTINUED, "The
United Nations force is no longer
just being caught in the sporadic
clashes between the enemies it is
supposed to keep apart; it has
become the target of methodically
prepared attacks which soon will
leave it no alternative other than
to retrench in order to insure its
own safety."
Speaking to reporters at a press
conference later in the day, Chirac
reiterated that France has no in-
tention of withdrawing its con-
tingent from UNIFIL, the single
largest contingent with about one
quarter of UNIFIL's total 5,827
soldiers. Chirac said UNIFIL pro-
vides "an element of security for
Israel" and Israel has manifested
its approval for UNIFIL.
The attacks on Nepalese
soldiers Wednesday (Sept. 24)
who had replaced French soldiers
in the most volatile UNIFIL posi-
tions demonstrated that the at-
tacks on the French contingent
were not aimed specifically at the
French, Chirac said.
HE ALSO contended that there
is no link between the wave of
bombings in Paris recently and
the attacks on French UNIF'
soldiers.
Chirac devoted a large part of
his General Assembly address to
the problem of terrorism, which
has hit home in a series of bomb-
ing attacks in Paris last month.
He called for international
cooperation "in strengthening air
and maritime security" and in us-
ing all other international chan-
nels to eradicate terrorism.
Chirac also suggested striking
at the cause of terrorism and cited
"the complicity of states that are
willing to close their eyes to ter-
r o r i s t. organizations'
activities..."
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A.B VAN LINES INC.
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Police Raid Counterfeit Ring
TEL AVIV (JTA) Police raided a small printing
plant here Friday and confiscated $4.5 million in
counterfeit U.S. Dollars. A 37-year-old Ashdod resident,
alleged leader of the counterfied ring, was arrested with
two confederates at the plant. Police said they were caught
red-handed. Two other suspects were arrested at their
homes.
THE ARRESTS CAPPED a five-month investigation
and stake-out. Police said they watched ring members cart
hundred Dollar bills from the press to a rented car. They
said a search of the premises yielded good quality paper
sufficient for printing between 200 and 300 million phoney
Dollars, apparently for distribution in the U.S.
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AJCong
To Miami
. Says 'No'
Effort To Censor Film, Art Showing Here
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
The Southeast Region of the
American Jewish Congress has
issued a statement on the decision
if the Miami City Commission to
place a question on the Nov. 4
>al!ot asking voters whether they
would be for prospective laws to
govern obscenity in movies and
television "that degrade religious
oeiiefs."
The City Commission action
was spearheaded by the showing
of "Hail Mary,' the Swiss-born
filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard's ver-
sion of the Biblical tale of Mary
and Joseph. Protesters here, who
have picketed the showing of the
movie at the Grove Cinema, carry
rosaries and signs denouncing
pornography and call the film
blasphemous and obscene.
Linda J Ehrlich, chairperson of
Redman Tells
Why U.S.
Abstained
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA. The
State Department has stressed
hat the problems of security in
iOUth Lebanon cannot oe solved
>> extending the authority of the
i Nations Interim Force in
inon (UNIFIL) u> the Israeli
r ur by "any resolution pass-
. "he United Nati ma Securi-
y Council.
S .' Departme it leputy
I lhaiies Redman made
his point in explaining wny the
States abstained Tuesday
when the Security
Council adopted a resolution call
r te to with Iraw its trops
Leban m and allow
IL to move to tne Ixirder.
elieve that staoihty for
irthern norder can only
'ome through measures agreed on
the parties to the conflict."
an said. "The call for the 1m-
nediate deployment of UNIFIL
to the border in the absence of
HI solve none of the underlying
Drohiems of instability and lack of
central autnority which plagues
south Lebanon."
Redman added that UNIFIL
has "the potential to contribute
significantly" to the two major
goals supported by the U.S. -
the return of the effective
authority of the Lebanese govern-
ment to southern Lebanon and the
withdrawal of all foreign forces
from Lebanon." But he stressed
that these goals cannot be achiev-
ed by UNIFIL without an agree-
ment first by the parties involved.
Japanese
Study Hebrew
tinvERlUSALEM <"*> ~ The
J-L f aPanes* community of
un^ei\p'ew by -even'this
> when a group from Japan
SSL* S^dy Hebrew the
Rothberg School of Overseas
Wot if ",** Hebrew Universi-
Xh ijfift lt i8 believed that
JJ'was the first time a group
JW.Japan came to the university
^Heebrew:,fiCPUrp08e0f8tud^
Olfiift Student w 80 years
Thev .iT 25 youngest was 27.
learn Si!2 k was *** to
5252*2: *"* ** they en-
^sSLe8-newomanhad
W^ 8t"died some Hebrew in
her rt was not as difficult for
the AJCongress Commission on
Law and Social Action, stresses in
the statement that-
"The Southeast Region of the
American Jewish Congress is
deeply concerned that the Miami
City Commissioners have put this
question before the voters. First,
we are particularly disturbed at
the manner in which the question
was placed on the ballot. With lit-
tle or no debate, the commis-
P ** ** ** *r ** /r tr> as.*
sioners overrode a city ordinance
which prohibits them from placing
questions on the ballot less than
45 days before the election. Hav-
ing shortened the deadline to 30
days, what would now prevent
them from shortening the
deadline even further? Such a pro-
cedure denigrates the democratic
system and is a blatant misuse of
the ballot.
"Secondly, we are concerned
about the constitutional issues
raised by the question which will
appear on the ballot. The United
States Supreme Court in Joseph
Burstyn. Inc. vs Wilson ruled in
1952 that 'The state has no
legitimate interest in protecting
any or all religions from views
distasteful to them It is not
the business of government in our
nation to suppress reai or imagin-
ed attacks upon a particular
religious doctrine whether they
appear in publications, speeches
or motion pictures.'
"The American Jewish Con-
gress Believes that individuals and
groups which find movies with
religious themes offensive are en-
titled to their views However, the
City's action is a thinly-veiled at-
tempt at censorship; placing this
issue on the ballot is entirely inap-
propriate. The net result is that
the Miami City Commission has
acted spuriously to inject religious
issues wider the guise of obscenity
issues This is a dangerous path
for the Commission to take and
we urge them to reconsider their
actions."
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c
Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 3, 1986
Israel's Envoy Defends Security Zone
In Lebanon from Attack At UNations
By MARGIE OLSTER
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Binyamin
Netanyahu, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, has strongly defended
the south Lebanon security
zone at a meeting of the
Security Council. He said if
it did not exist, "south
Lebanon and northern
Israel would again face an
intolerable situation. A ter-
rible violence would once
again be unleashed."
The Security Council convened
at the request of France to debate
the future of the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) of which the French
contingent is the largest 1,391
men of a total of 5,827. Four
French UNIFIL soldiers have
Picture
Credits
Illustrations in The Jewish
Floridian New Year Edition on
Pages 1-A, IB, 12-C and ID
are from "Drawings by Saul
Raskin," published by Genesis
Publishing Corp., New York.
Reproduction of the drawing
on Page 2-C is from "The
Hasidim," paintings and draw-
ings by Ira Moskowitz, with
text by Isaac Bashevis Singer,
published by Crown
Publishers, New York.
been killed in recent attacks and
33 wounded.
NETANYAHU, in his speech,
rejected vigorously the contention
that UNIFIL was made
vulnerable because Israel refuses
to allow it to deploy southwards to
the international border mean-
ing in essence, abandonment of
the security zone.
The allegation was contained in
a report to the Security Council on
UNIFIL's problems, issued here.
Netanyahu said the report was
misguided in blaming Israel for
those problems. He maintained in
his speech that the attacks on
UNIFIL originate "overwhelm-
ingly" from "the Shiite terror
organization known as Hezbullah
.. (the) so-called 'Party of
God.'"
He charged that Hezbullah is
equipped, financed, inspired and
motivated by the Iranian regime
of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini,
and by Syria. "All of us remember
its barbaric attacks against the
multinational peacekeepers, as
the spearhead of the Syrian effort
to expel this force from Lebanon.
Iran, of course was an en-
thusiastic partner to this perfidy,"
the Israeli envoy declared.
HE SAID, "Hezbullah focuses
on UNIFIL as part of Khomeini's
policy to expel all Western forces
from Lebanon to facilitate its
becoming an Islamic republic." He
quoted from religious edicts of
Shiite extremists which called for
the "killing of Frenchmen at
every opportunity."
If the French decide to
withdraw their troops, the
UNIFIL force would fall apart,
Netanyahu said. He said France
was seriously considering this op-
tion. The French contingent has in
fact been redeployed to a safer
area in south Lebanon and its
positions taken over by Nepalese
troops.
Netanyahu told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency after the
debate that UNIFIL cannot
realistically deploy to the Israel-
Lebanon border because Israel is
the only power that can prevent
attacks by Shiite extremists and
Palestinian terrorists on Israel's
population.
Nevertheless, he said, Israel
does not want to see UNIFIL
evacuate the area or change posi-
tions. He said the U.S.
understands Israel's policy in
south Lebanon and also wants the
status quo to remain.
ACCORDING TO Netanyahu,
the underlying issue in the Securi-
ty Council debate lies in the in-
herent contradiction of having a
peacekeeping force in a region
where there is no peace to keep.
"UNIFIL is caught in the con-
tradiction," and Israel is not leav-
ing south Lebanon in the im-
mediate future, he told the JTA.
"will continue to do what is
necessary to protect the lives and
safety of our citizens. That is our
goal, our only goal, vis-a-vis
Lebanon. And we shall continue
to work with any party in
Lebanon genuinely interested in
securing peace in this area.''
He added: "UNIFIL has tried to
assist in this objective. It has suf-
fered painful casualties in the pro-
cess. Although we did not request
UNIFIL's establishment,
everyone in Israel shares the grief
of the bereaved families and their
governments. We cannot and
must not, however, expect
UNIFIL to defend Israel. This
was never and cannot be
UNIFIL's purpose."
In his Security Council speech,
Netanyahu declared that Israel
Price Plunge Yields Strange Results
emanating from Bonn. German
exports to the Arab countries
were down by 8.9 billion Marks or
24.9 percent during the first six
BONN (JTA) The plunge in
oil prices has resulted, paradox-
ically, in a drastic reduction in
trade between West Germany and
the 21 Arab countries of the Mid-
dle East, and a sharp toning down
of anti-Israel statements
months of this year and imports
from Arab countries declined by 5
billion marks or 48.9 percent.
\y the New Year
be one of Health, Happiness
and Prosperity for you and
your family
Mr. and Mrs. Fred K. Shochet
and Family
Joseph H. Kanter
Chairman of the Board
Bank of Florida
WISHING YOU and YOUH FAMILY
PEACE, HEALTH & HAPPINESS,
FOR THE
NEW YEAR
From the Board of D irectors. Officers and Staff of the
^f^ BANK Of FLORIDA

r.- tm> mm w***
FDIC
6101 Sunset Dr. South Miami Phone: (3 ):>6f 5-1106
&


eJewisk Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, October 3,1986
Section B
Premier Shimon Peres'
Rosh Hashanah Message
Premier Shimon Peres has
issued the following message to
Jewish communities on the occa-
sion of Rosh Hashanah 5747:
On the threshold of the New
year we greet you from Israel and
Jerusalem, in the spirit of
brotherhood and partnership, and
extend to you an open invitation
to continue to participate in
Israel's spiritual and material ad-
vancement and, to Jewish
youngsters in particular, to come
and settle in Israel.
Two years have elapsed since
the establishment of the National
Unity government, and, while we
have not yet solved all the pro-
blems confronting us, we certainly
have nothing of which to be
ashamed.
IN THE domains of internal af-
fairs, the economy and defense,
the fruits of our efforts are clearly
Perceptible. There has been a
substantial reduction in inter-
communal tensions. An improve-
ment may be noted in Jewish-
Arab relations within Israel.
Altogether, there has been a
change m the national style.
As for the economy, we have
brought about a veritable revolu-
tion. We took an inflation-ridden
economy and set it on its feet
with all the pain this has involved,
but also with all the positive
results. Inflation has been
drastically reduce. The Israel
Shekel has been rehabilitated. The
balance of payments has improv-
ed. Exports have increased.
In Israel's international stan-
ding, too, we are perceived as a
nation striving earnestly and
vigorously for peace.
Our relations with the United
States of America have been
enhanced with several new enter-
prises from the Free Trade
Zone Agreement to wide-ranging
political and strategic coopera-
tion. Our relations are marked by
an unprecedented degree of inten-
sity and understanding.
A MARKED improvement has
taken place in our standing in
Europe, Africa and Latin
America. Diplomatic relations
have been restored with a number
Continued on Page 3-A
Rosh Hashanah To Be
Observed At Synagogues,
Temples Friday Evening

will bring Jews to
synagogues and
Rosh Hashanah
prayer services in
temples throughout South Florida beginn-
ing at sundown Friday evening and conti-
nuing Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 4 and 5.
The intervening 10-day period between
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is
known asAseret Yimay Tschuvah, the ten
days of penitence that includes Shabbat
Tschuvah, the Sabbath of Repentance fall-
ing between the two holidays, scheduled
this year for Saturday, Oct. 11.
Yom Kippur, the most awesome of the
Jewish Holy Days, will be observed at Kol
Nidre services Sunday, Oct. 12, followed
by Yom Kippur prayer services and Fast
on Monday, Oct. 13.
THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON
The Jewish New Year begins with the High Holy Days,
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. These are days of judgment,
not by man, but by God. the one eternal God who revealed
Himself to the People of Israel. For Jews, these are the Days
of Awe, a time for reflection and repentance for rededica-
tion to the service of God and to His ethical code. This is
symbolized most dramatically by the sounding of the Shofar
which according to Maimonides says: "Awake, awake, O
sleepers from your sleep; O slumberers; arouse ye from your
slumbers; and examine your deeds, return in repentance and
remember your Creator."
While the Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur have special meaning
for Jews, they are not special days for Jews alone. At this
time of year, all of us should rejoice in the knowledge that
ours is a country which has always welcomed Jews and repudi-
ated anti-semitism. As George Washington wrote to the Jewish
congregation in Newport, Rhode Island in 1790, the American
government is one "which gives to bigotry no sanction, to
persecution no assistance."
All Americans can take pride in this, and in our unwavering
support for the state of Israel, which was born out of the
ashes of the Holocaust and which to this day is a refuge from
persecution and a beacon of hope for Jewish people throughout
the world. Our deep commitment to Israel's security is one
with our commitment to freedom of religion in our own country.
Underlying both are the unchanging moral and spiritual values
to which Jews and Judaism continue to make an incalculable
contribution.
It is therefore a great pleasure for Nancy and me to extend
our warmest greetings for the New Year of 5747 to Jews here
and throughout the world. May your names be written in the
Book of Life, and may the Lord bless you with health and
happiness from generation to generation.
Q
ff>\A4*s
fC*4ML^
Runoff Election Results
The Tuesday Runoff Election results at press time revealed the following victorious
candidates.
... ?5J choice between Democrat and Republican candidates, where there is opposition,
will be decided by the voters in the General Election to be held Nov. 4, as well as several
other issues.
Governor/Lt. Governor
Democrat:
Steve Pajcic/F rank Mann
republican:
Bob Martinez/Bobby Brantley
Commissioner of Education
Republican:
Ron Howard
State Houst
District 117, Democrat:
ousan Guber
District 118, Democrat:
Nat Edmond
District 119, Democrat:
John F. Cosgrove
District 120, Democrat:
Ron Saunders
Board of County
Commissioners
District 1:
Barry D. Schreiber
District 2:
Jorge Valdes
Miami Beach Bond Issue
No
Labor Would Have 2-1 Edge
Over Likud If Elections
Were Held Now
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Labor Party would lead
Likud by two to one and be able to form is own government
if elections were held now, according to a poll published in
Haaretz last Friday. The poll was taken by the Poli Public
Opinion Research Institute.
IT SHOWED THE Labor Party's popularity rating up
nine percent, since the last elections in 1984 and Likud's
down by 9.1 percent, less than a month before Likud leader
Yitzhak Shamir takes over as Prime Minister under the
coalition rotation of power agreement.
According to the poll, Labor is favored by 45.1 percent
of the electorate and Likud by 22.8 percent. Parties that
usually support Labor rose in popularity from 5.1 to 6.6
percent which would enable the Labor Party to form a
government of its own choosing with a 52.7 percent majori-
ty in the Knesset.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
New Year Offers Chance To Aid
Israel's Economic Recovery
By M RONALD KRONGOLD
General Cpaif Chairman
Greater Miami
Israel Bonda Organization
As the New Year 5747, begins.
it marks the 39th year of the State
of Israel, the 35th year of our
sharing in her development
through the purchase of Israel
Bonds, and the close of a trium-
phant year for Israel in her goal to
gain economic stability.
While the picture is brighter,
however, there is still much to be
done.
Inflation was slashed from more
than 400 to just over 25 percent.
The trade deficit was also reduc-
ed. As with other ac-
complishments, few other coun-
tries can claim such achievements
in so short a time. On the other
hand, a tremendous price was
paid for these gains as a direct
result of the measures that had to
be implemented under the na-
tional unity government's austeri-
ty program. Our brothers and
sisters made many sacrifices, as
their already modest wages were
cut by another one-third.
As part of the drastic reduction
in government expenditures, sub-
sidies on certain food items were
withdrawn, and unemployment
* went up to almost 10 percent
which is unprecedented for Israel.
The results have shown that the
right planning and implementa-
tion, coupled with determination,
could achieve a real economic tur-
naround. The surgery has been
performed. The healing process,
leading to economic growth, is
now taking place.
We are part of the healing pro-
cess, especially during the holiest
time of the year. Again, we will
find ourselves in synagogues with
small tab cards in our hands, by
which we will commit our
resources to show our support for
Israel.
By pressing down a square inch
of paper, we can reassure Israel of
research and development funds
for high technology, of start-up
funds for promising industries, of
the continuation of economic
recovery, of jobs and prosperity
for her citizens, who guard and
sustain the spiritual homeland for
all Jews
M Ronald Krongold
This year, worshippers will be
urged to purchase the new In-
dividual Variable Rate Issue
(TVRI) Bond and the special IVRI
Bond for Individual Retirement
Accounts, IRA, which stand on
their own merit. With their com-
petitive interest rate, they are
good for the purchaser and good
for Israel.
Bonds are a partnership with
Israel in the truest sense. They
represent an opportunity, an
obligation and the privilege to be
associated with the strength of
Israel. By buying Israel Bonds, we
strengthen Israel's economy, a
key to the nation's progress and
peace in the near future.
Temple Israel Hosts
Debate on Casino
Gambling
In its third year hosting the
downtown Business Breakfast
Forum, Temple Israel of Greater
Miami will present an informal
debate on the issue of casino
gambling, Thursday, Oct. 16,
7:45-9 a.m. at the synagogue's
Downtown main facility.
Representing the No Casinos,
Inc., Speakers Bureau, architect
Alfred Browning Parker will
argue against the issue. Attorney
Andrew Rubin, chairman of
Citizens for Jobs and Tourism will
support the concept of casinos.
3a/t/ig, jVeut- ^eaA
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
(KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)
Rabbi Irving Lehrman Zev W. Kogan
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn. Pres. JNF Southern Region
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn JNF Exec Board
Abraham Qrunhut
Pre*. JNF Or. Miami
Ernest Samuels
V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353
Miami Beach, Fla 33139
Phone 53*6464
THANK YOU
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
As we begin a New Year, we wish to thank our community for its support of our
Thrift Shops during the past year.
Your generous donations of resalable merchandise and your continued
patronage of our stores, have enabled us to provide quality health care and needed
social services to thousands of indigent elderly persons.
DOUGLAS GARDENS THRIFT SHOPS
A division of the Miami Jewish Home & Hospital for the Aged.
5713 N.W. 27 Ave.. Miami 5829 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board Harold Beck, President
Aaron Kravitz, Chm. Thrift Shop Comm. Marc Lichtman, Executive Director
Free pickup 751-3988 (Dade) 981-8245 (Broward)
Good Merchandise at a Good Price.
\JfeWish\bu
And \bur Family
A Healthy Happy
Prosperous New\ear
LShana Tova
Comprehensive American Care
CAC. Quality health care you can count on.
Corporate Offices. 2850 Douglas Rd., Coral Gables. FL 33134

You've
Got What
+ TTTTd


t 1 t 1 T
TSmBS ^f
(And You May Not Even Know It)
Help Those In Need...
And Help Yourself To A
Tax Deduction At The
Same Time.
The Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops can use your
gifts of resaleable furniture,
appliances, and household
goods. Items YOU may no
longer need will buy life-
giving medicines and
medical supplies for the
indigent residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. For free
pick-up of your donations
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
Gardens
VJ Thrift Shops
Two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Ave. Miami
5829HaNandaleBeach Brvd.. Hatand-'te
A Ihristo* at Km Miami jtvts* Harm aJ
Haaaital tm ttw Af* at Dwfias Garaam


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Premier Shimon Peres' Rosh Hashanah Message
Continued from Page 1-B
0f important countries from
Spain, in Europe, to Ivory Coast
and Cameroon, in Africa.
Let us not underestimate
though one should not exaggerate
either the importance of the
signs of change being manifested
in the Eastern bloc, including the
Soviet Union. On the Asian conti-
nent, too, we are getting signals
indicating positive movement,
whether openly expressed or still
latent.
A profound change has also
taken place in Israel's position in
the Middle East. Where previous-
ly all the countries of the region
either turned their back on us or
pointed an accusing finger, now,
this attitude has been replaced, at
least among some of these coun-
tries, by a certain readiness to
listen and more restrained
language.
WORTHY OF particular note,
among the events in the region,
have been the following: the end
of the war in Lebanon; the
resumption of dialogue with
Egypt; a change in our settlement
policy in Judaea and Samaria; a
reduction in the tension between
Israel and Jordan; Jordan's
readiness to look for a Palestinian
partner for peace talks while re-
jecting a Palestinian partner who
will prevent the advent of peace;
and the public meeting with the
King of Morocco, who is also the
head of the Islamic Conference
and a prominent Arab leader.
These are important steps on
the road to regional peace, and we
must seek out ways to continue
the march along that road. Prac-
tical Zionism never contented
itself with the role played, here in
the Land of Israel, by the Jews as
individuals, but aspired to carry
out tasks that can be carried out
only by full-fledged nations.
Practical Zionism also believed
that basic human needs create the
right to provide for these needs.
Thus we have always believed that
the Jews have an absolute right to
freedom from hunger, from ig-
norance, from insecurity and
injustice.
And we have always believed
that the Jews have the right to
reconstitute their ancient civiliza-
tion and their nationhood in their
ancestral homeland. Inspired and
guided by these beliefs, we have
acted and we have built. Inspired
and guided by these beliefs, we
shall continue to act and to build.
WE ARE faced by three prin-
cipal tasks: to renew aliya to
Israel; to promote peace in our
region; to generate growth in our
national economy.
The approach of a new Jewish
year is the time to remember our
brethren-in-distress in the Soviet
Union, in Syria and in Iran and
to pledge that we will not rest un-
til we shall have made it possible
for them to be rescued and
restored to the land of their
fathers.
To every corner of the Jewish
world, an earnest call goes out
Tom Jerusalem, our eternal
^P'tal: Come to Israel. Come join
118 m the historic venture of
reconstruction and nation-
ouilding going on here very day.
No. Miami Beach
n2&J brooms, 2 baths.
overlooking lake. Furnished or
^furnished. Walk to synagogue.
ccePKn,0n'nc#- BM< H#r
651-8882
The Talmudic University .1-^1
Of Florida
Alfred and Sadye Swire College
Of Judaic Studies
Invites The Entire Community To Its
DAYS OF AWE SERIES
To Be Held et the:
YOUNG ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI
990 Northeast 171 Street, North Miami Beach
On: THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 9,1986 -
7th of TISHREI, 5747 AT: 8:30 P.M.
SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER:
The Rosh Hayeshiva,
RABBI YOCHANAN ZWEIQ, SHLITA
Theme: Yom Kippun Infinity Neshama
Men & Women Cordially Invited To Attend
Limited Seating!
The Talmudic University of Florida
Wishes All
A Happy A Healthy New Year
raiu T\w*7
mnnni ujDJi


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Golden Blintzes are made with
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Maybe it's hard to believe that
something this good, could be so easy
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So to prove it, we'll tempt you
with a 20* off coupon on Golden's
cheese, blueberry, apple-raisin, cherry,
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Golden's delicious pierogies or potato
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Look for them in your grocer's
freezer along with the other Golden
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taste almost as good as Momma
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Rosh Hashanah Exhibit
Lithos, Photos, Sculpture at
Lowe-Levinson Gallery Highlights
'Forgotten World of the Shtetl'


A special Rosh Hashanah exhibition at the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery featuring Anatoli
Kaplan's lithographs of the world of Sholom
Aleichem, photographs by Bill Aron, and sculpture
by Armando Ortega Orozco will inaugurate Tem-
ple Beth Sholom's 1986-87 art calendar on Friday,
and the memorial exhibition of Kaplan's "The
Forgotten World of the Shtetl," on loan from the
Pucker-Safrai Gallery in Boston, includes works
depicting the familiar characters from "Fiddler on
the Roof including Tevye and Goldie, and Lazer-
Wolf the Butcher, as well scenes from other belov-
ed tales and shtetl life.
More than an illustrator, the late Soviet artist
Tanchum (Anatoli) Kaplan is a romantic. His
panoramic view of Jewish lore, family life and
Jewish dreams makes him spiritually the brother
of Marc Chagall. Like him, he poetically turns the
material poverty of the Jews into an inspired fan-
tasy, creating a monument to that lost world. He
transforms the pathos into expressions of great
human dignity.
Photographs of "Disappearing Jewish Com-
munities All Over the World" by Bill Aron, also
courtesy of the Pucker-Safrai Ggallery, will be in-
cluded in the show. From New York to Jerusalem
to Leningrad, Aron's sensitive observations are a
result of his infinite patience to capture the telling
moment. He has been praised by author Chaim
Potok for this ability: "He does not impose the mo-
ment upon the object to force the surface into a
stimulation of art ... He lets the object itself
unveil its own truth in its own good time."
Two metal sculptures by esteemed Mexican ar-
tist Armando Ortega Orozco also will be on view
courtesy of Bryna Galleries and Bryna Prensky.
Orozco's "Fallen Man" and "Fallen Woman" were
inspired by his readings on the struggles to
establish and maintain the State of Israel. The two
heads were exhibited for extended periods at Mex-
ico City's Museum of Modern Art soon after they
were completed.
The exhibition will run from Oct. 3 through Nov.
3, at the Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery of Temple
Beth Sholom, Miami Beach.
Non-Aligned Declaration Condemns Israel
HARARE, Zimbabwe (JTA)
The final declaration of the
eighth summit of the non-aligned
countries, which was held here
last month, included repeated con-
demnations of Israeli policies and
continued support for the "strug-
gle against Zionism," the World
Jewish Congress reported.
According to the WJC
spokesman here, the Harare
declaration included a four-part
final document in which the non-
aligned expressed itself on the
Middle East in explicit anti-Israel
terms. Included in this political
declaration were the following
points.
Demand for "the total and un-
conditional withdrawal of Israel
from all Palestinian and other
Arab territories it has occupied
since 1967, including Jerusalem.
Support for the PLO as the
"sole legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people" and their
right "to establish a sovereign in-
dependent state in Palestine."
Condemnation of "Israeli ag-
gression against Lebanon and the
continued Israeli occupation of
parts of the country," as well as
sharp condemnation of "the in-
human practices of the occupation
forces in Lebanon."
Deterioration of the Middle
East situation is "caused by
Israel's continued practice of ag-
gressive and expansionist policies
in the region, which pose a grave
threat to international peace and
security."
Israel's 1981 strike against
Iraq's nuclear reactor was sharply
denounced and the United Na-
tions Security Council was asked
"to take effective measures to en-
sure Israel refrains from strikes
or threats to nuclear installations
in Iraq or elsewhere."
The WJC said there was "little
new" in this declaration. "It is the
same sorry anti-Israel pro-
nouncements we have seen in the
declarations of previous years,"
the WJC spokesman added.
# t t t t t I
tOOOCM
WALL TO WALL NUTS
All Kosher under ORC Supervision
Candy, Handmade Chocolates, Nuts
Dried Fruit, Gift Baskets and Boxes
2009 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 944-6887
Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sun. 12 noon-5 p.m.
Closed Saturday
WE DELIVER AND SHIP MASTER CARD A VISA
13989 So. Dixie Hwy.
Miami 251-6887
Many Kosher Items
Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
New Year Greetings and Peace For All
Judge and Mrs. David L. Trask
Mrs. Paul (Sylvia) Lefkow and Family
Mr. and Mrs. David Phillips and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Robbin and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Seth Daniel Lefkow and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Smith and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Brooke Lefkow
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Turkish and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Brody and Family
The warmth of tradition
and Maxwell House" Coffee.
It couldn't be anything bat Shabbos

It's a special time of the week when families
gather, traditions are renewed and there's
plenty of time to relax and enjoy the rich,
delicious taste of Maxwell House* Coffee.
It couldn't be anything but Shabbos dinner
K KOSHER
'986 dene-* f i
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE.


HAPPENINGS
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Annette Kay. Florida Region President of Women's League
for Israel announces a Heritage Club Luncheon to take place on
Tuesday. Oct. 28 at the Sea Fair Ballroom in Dania. Estelle
Halpern. Florida Region Chairman of the Heritage Club is Chair-
man of the event, entertainment by Harry Frank.
Airman Ben J. Rosen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Rosen has
graduated from Air Force bask training at Lackland Air Force
Base.
Second Lt. Jeffrey N. Pollack, son of Dr Joel and Linda
Pollack. Miami, has graduated from U.S. Air Force pilot training,
and has received silver wings at Columbus Air Force Base. Miss.
A luncheon meeting of OPTI-Mrs. of Miami Beach will take
place Wednesday at noon at the Harbor House South. Bal
Harbour.
SOL and ELEANOR ROSENKRANZ
And Family
Wish All Their Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
Ha Bima Miami
... is Miami's only not-for-profit professional
theatre company producing plays showing
Jewish History, problems and interests,
including Yiddish theatre in translation.
We are planning three major productions in
86-87 at the Colony Theatre: the wonderful
musical about Noah. Two by Two; Patty
Cheesky s classic The 10th Man and the off-
Broadway hit Dreyfus in Rehearsal.
For advance tickets call
868-5085
i
Fcr ether information
Director at 665-4047.
call Bill Kimmel, Exec.
j
The Talmudic University -vw
Of Florida
Alfred and Sadye Swire College
Of Judaic Studies
Invites the Entire Community To Its Annual
Kinus Teshuva
Featuring as Guest Speaker:
Rabbi Joshua Fishman
Executive Vice President of Torah Umesorah
Who will address the community on the theme of:
YOM KIPPUR: PURITY AND PENITENCE
At the Yeshiva Raymond Rubin Building,
1910 Alton Road, Miami Beach
On: WEDNESDAY EVENING,
OCTOBER 8th, 1986
6th of Tlshrei, 5747
At 8:00 p.m.
Followed by Two Vital Workshops at 9:00p.m.
An Essential and Practical Review of
The Laws Of Taharas Hamishpocha
(Family Purity)
By:
Rabbi Avrohom Chaim Feuer,
Rav of Ohr Chaim For Men
Rebbetzin Luba Feuer For Women
All Are Cordially Invited To Attend
The Talmudic University of Florida
Wishes All
A Happy & Healthy New Year
lDJinrn ihjdji
Miami Herald, News Endorse Gelber
For Dade County Judge in Nov. 4 Race
Strong recommendations
from The Miami Herald, The
Miami News, The Miami Times
and The Home News coupled
with a commanding lead he piled
up in the first primary have
propelled attorney Roy T.
Gelber into the Nov. 4 judicial
runoff as a heavy favorite to win
election for the vacant County
Court judgeahip in Group 13.
Voting for the judicial poat
will be eountywide aad non-
partisan, with Democrat*.
Republican, and Independents
able to east ballots for Gelber,
an active member ef the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith
and of the American Zionist
Federation as well as of the
Urban League of Greater
Miami.
Roy T. Nelson, a Miami Lakes
attorney who finished third, just
behind Lucrecia Granda, in the
primary endorsed Gelber as "the
much more qualified lawyer in
this race."
In fact. Granda was voted un-
qualified by more than half of
the lawyers and judges in the
1986 Dade Bar Poll among those
responding in her case.
Gelber, meanwhile, was
rated highly qualified or
qualified by more than three-
fourths of the judges and
lawver* who rated him in the
same 1986 Dade Bar Poll.
Gelber also won the endorse-
ment of the Miami and Dade
units of the Fraternal Order of
Police for the runoff elections
against Granda.
Even more significant was
the announcement by the
politically powerful Concerned
Citizens of Northeast Dade
County that its Political Action
Committee has shifted its en-
dorsement from Granda. whom
it supported in the primary, to
Gelber. whom the Concerned
Citizens fully support in the
Nov. 4 general election.
Gelber narrowly missed winn-
ROYT. GELBER
ing outright election in the first
primary after the Dade Bar
Association's Judicial Campaign
Practices Commission
reprimanded Granda for three
major violations of the judicial
canons of ethics. The Judicial
Campaign Practices Commission
found that Granda falsely claim-
ed to have a law degree from the
University of Florida and a
master's degree in law from the
University of Miami, when in-
deed Granda received no degree
from either university. In addi-
tion, she admitted soliciting en-
dorsements from hundreds of at-
torneys, a practice expressly for-
bidden by the Judicial Canon of
Ethics.
Gelber thus achieved a
dramatic reversal from The
Miami Herald, which
withdrew its recommendation
from Granda in one edition,
and on the same day recom-
mended Gelber for election as
Dade County Court Judge.
Gelber was rated qualified by
more than three-fourths of all
Dade County judges and at-
torneys in the 1986 Bar Poll,
with opponent Lucrecia Granda
rated unqualified by more than
half of the lawyers and judges
responding.
The former top assistant Dade
State Attorney already has been
endorsed by Councilman Harry
Cohen and Jule Littman of
North Miami Beach, Mayor Mar
jorie MacDonald, condo leader
Anne Ackerman and former
State Attorney Richard E.
Gerstein.
Gelber, who is running for the
Dade County Court Judge post
left vacant by Leah Sinuns, was
a top assistant to Dade State At-
torney Richard Gerstein from
August 1976 through October,
1979. His opponent, Lucrecia
Granda, worked for Gelber dur-
ing her brief stay in the state at-
torney's office from June, 1978
until July, 1979.
Many former Dade Circuit
Court judges, including Judge
Robert L. Floyd, past presi-
dent of the Florida Bar and
former Mayor of Miami, and
David Goodhart. another top
assistant to Gerstein, joined in
endorsing Gelber. Former
Florida Bar president Burton
Young, former Florida
Secretary of State Jesse J. Mc-
Crary, Jr., Juan J. Jimenez,
Cynthia L. Greene, Herman J.
Russomanno, George F. Knox,
Jr., Stephen A. Glass and
Gerald Schwart added their
formal support for Gelber.
Gelber, a resident of Miami
Beach and South Dade for the
past 36 years, is the nephew of
Circuit Court Judge Seymour
Gelber.
He also won the endorsements
of the South Florida Council of
the AFL-CIO and the United
Teachers of Dade County,
T.I.G.E.R.-COPE.
Gelber serves as vice chair-
man of a Grievance committee
of the Florida Bar and is past
president of the Racquet Club
Condominium.
Gelber and his wife Anna Rose
live in Kendall Lakes. He is an
active member of the Miami
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith, the
Urban League of Greater Miami,
and the American Zionist
Federation.
Pa Adv
Gerald Schwartz
American Zionist Federation Elects
P.R. Executive So. Florida Leader
Gerald Schwartz, president of
a Miami Beach-based marketing
and public relations agency, has
been elected president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida. He succeeds
Dade County Commissioner
Barry Schreiber, a North Miami
Beach attorney of counsel to the
firm of Broad and Cassel.
Harriet Green of Miami
Beach and Coral Gables, na-
tional vice president of
Na'amat USA, has been re-
elected chairman of the board
of the AZF of South Florida.
The organization is an um-
brella agency for Hadassah.
Amit Women, Na'amat USA,
B'nai Zion, Herat Zionists, the
Zionist Organisation of
America, American Jewish
League for Israel, Zionist
Youth groups and all other
Zionist bodies in the area.
Schwartz is national vice presi-
dent of the American Zionist
Federation, which has more than
one million dues-paying
members in the United States.
Mrs. Green estimates that there
are nearly 100.000 Zionist
families in Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties which
together have some 10 percent
of the American Jewish
population.
GERALD SCHWARTZ
The American Zionist
Federation of South Florida is
the organization designated by
the Jewish Agency of Israel to
coordinate observances of such
holidays as Yom Haatzmaut
(Israel Independence Day) and
Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem
Day). It also promotes tourism
to Israel, aliyah (emigration to
Israel), support of Soviet
Jewry, investment in Israel
and contributions to Israeli
welfare, education, health and
cultural agencies.
Other officers elected include-
six vice presidents: Joseph
Morley of Herut Zionists am
Miami Beach; Josh Rephun of
the ZOA and Miami Beach;
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, past presi-
dent of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and Surfside;
Jean Temkin of North Miami
and Hadassah; Lillian Chabner
of Miami Beach and Amit
Women; and Wilheim Mundt of
Hollywood and B'nai Zion.
Secretary is Harriet Cohen of
Hadassah and Miami Beach, and
treasurer is Margot Bergthal of
Miami Beach and Na'amat USA.
Schwartz is associate na-
tional chairman of Friends of
Na'amat USA, past president
of the Zionist Council of South
Florida, former president of
the Presidents Council of ZOA
and former executive vice
president of Bar-Ilan Universi-
ty in Israel.
He is also former president of
the Miami Beach Lodge of B'nai
B'rith. past national chairman of
Israel Bonds for B'nai B'rith,
former regional director of
Hebrew University of
lerusalem, vice president of the
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce and president of the Civic
League of Miami Beach.
A frequent visitor to Israe
Schwartz is former
Southeastern director of the
Israel Government Tourist
Office.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, OctoberjLj.986^
To culminate Cedars Medical Center's year-
long Silver Anniversary celebration, Alberto
and Rosario Vadia, left, will chair the
"Variations on Vienna" Ball, an occasion
reminiscent of Vienna during the Hapsburg
Empire. The gala urill take place on Saturday,
Nov. 15 at the Doral Hotel. Joining the Vadias
as co-chairpersons are Donald and Debra
Rosenberg, center, and Dr. Staffan and Becky
Nordquist.
COMMUNITY CORNER
Jewish War Veterans, South Dade Post 778, and their
Ladies Auxiliary will hold a Joint meeting on Thursdav
evening, Oct. 9, at 8 p.m. at Temple Israel South.
Beth David's Early Childhood Center is sponsoring a
Tupperware Fundraiser at the Congregation on
Wednesday evening, Oct. 15, at 7:30 p.m.
The Bass Museum will be closed on Saturday and
Sunday. Regular museum hours wfll resume on Tues-
day, Oct. 7.
Adath Yeshurun's B'nai Raphael Early Education Pro-
gram now provides as part of its early childhood pro-
gram the addition of Hebrew and Spanish classes,
taught in a format of songs and games.
^tififiu $
S'SfVuvna. &vva
LILLIAN C.ALEINIKOFF
Wishes Everyone A Happy New Year
ZALMAN BACHEIKOV, D.D.S.
420Lincoln Rd., Suite344- Phone5326795
Wishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. BERNARDO BATIEVSKY
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Sincere Wishes For A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. DONALD BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. AL BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. AND MRS. ABE BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. and MRS. HAROLD BERKOWITZ
and Family
DR. and MRS. LEO BRAVERMAN
and Family
MR. WALTER MACKAUF and Family
MR. and MRS. MAX DEAKTER
and Family
Wish To All A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. GABRIEL DEUTSCH and Family
Wish Friends A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. G. ENERFELD
Wish Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MILDREDS. FALK
Wishes All The Good People Of Miami Beach
A Happy Holiday
DR. and MRS. JEFFERY FEINGOLD
and Family
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
JUDY and IRA BLITT
DIANE, STUART, JERILYN and PHILIP BOTWINIK
CYNTHIA, MICHAEL, WILLIAM
and ANDREW KORENVAES
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. R. BOTT
Wish All Friends and Family A Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. JACK BRENNER
Wishes Family, Friends and Patients
A Happy and Healthy New Year
i
LEWIS, BARBARA and LAURI COHEN
DIANNE and EDWARD SCHMIDT
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. MAXWELL DAUER
MR. and MRS. ROGER A. DAUER
DR. and MRS. EDWARD A. DAUER
Wish All Their Friends
A Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. GEORGE FELDENKREIS and FAMILY
Wish All Our Friends A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. AINSLEE FERDIE
And Their Children
Wish The Entire Jewish Community, Friends
and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
LAURA and RICHARD FINK
Wish Friends, Family and Clients
A Happy New Year
MRS. LOUIS GADON and FAMILY
Wish Friends and Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. PAUL GAIER
Wishes Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year


A-E
MOUNT SfNfll
!MM!GRRT10N
1 Li
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
t
Welcoming the Young Presidents Club of
Mount Sinai Medical Center to 'Serenade To
Liberty," at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Saul
(Dalia) Glottmann, were (left to right) Mr. and
Mrs. Leslie A. (Carol Ann/ Klein, Mrs.
s>
Richard (MarcetUi/ May, Mr and Mrs. Barton
S. (Sandra/ Goldberg ana Mr. and Mrs. Glott-
mann, Chairmen of "Miss Liberty Welcomes
the World," the group's annual costume ball
on Nov. 8.
Authors William Novak and Francine Klagsburn will be
featured at the Sixth Annual Book Fair by Jewish Community
Centers of Greater Miami, starting Tuesday, Nov. 18 through
Sunday at the South Bade Center.

Mei/i/iy, tAem ^ea*,
$
SB t/wana &cwi
MR. and MRS. GARY GERSON
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MS. ROSALIND GETTIS and
MR. LES WINSTON
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MRS. MYRIAM GINGOLD
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. BENJAMIN LEIGH
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. PETER LOPEZ
Wish All Clients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. BARTON S. GOLDBERG
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD GORDON
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. EDWARD LUSTIG
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL MATTER
Neveles Industries Sales
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. MARTIN MAYER
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
HARRIET and MILT GREEN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
RICHARD J. and SONYA HORWICH
FRANCINE and RONALD MITCHELL,
SHERRY and JENiNE
Wish Their Family and Friends
A Very Healthy and Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JERRY ISAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. JULES and LINDA MINKES
and FAMILY
With A Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. H. KORENVAES
Wish The Entire Jewish Community
And Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. JOSEPH LANDSMAN
With Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
COUNCILMAN and MRS. TED NELSON
Happy New Year To Everyone
DR. and MRS. SOL NUSSBAUM
Wish The Entire Jewish Community,
Friends, Patients and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. FRED OBER
and HEIDI LEE
With Their Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD PELZNER and FAMILY
With Friends A Happy New Year


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Making plans for the forthcoming Alzheimer's
Ball on Nov. 2, are from left, sponsors Alan
and Claudia Potamkin, Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged Chairman of the
Board Judge Irving Cypen, President Harold
Beck, and Executive Director Marc Lichtman.
WEDDING
KRINSKYFLEISCHER
Miami Beach Jaycee President Randy
Fleischer and long-time sweetheart Bonnie
Anne Krinsky were married by Rabbi Jory
Lang on Sunday, September 28 at Temple
Beth El in North Bay Village. After the
ceremony, Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud
presented the young couple with an official
Certificate of Marriage of the city of Miami
Beach.
Randy, 26, and Bonnie, 24, were both born
in New York. Randy is a graduate of New
York University, with a BA in Protocol
Science, and Bonnie graduated from Pace
University in Manhattan, with a BA in Com-
munications and Marketing.
After their honeymoon in the Bahamas, the
couple will return to Miami, where Randy is
currently a manager for Scandinavian Health
Club, and bonnie is in charge of local sales for
Commtron.
3tl/l/iM *Afe>& ^4X/l
$
^B'SPAtvnti ^Tcwa
DR. and MRS. PAUL RICHMAN and Family
Wish All Patients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. LESTER ROGERS
Wishes Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
BOB, GLORIA, RENEE SHARI,
and TODD ALAN ROSEN
of 9242 SW 78th Place
Pepperwood, Miami
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. MORTON ROSENBLUTH
Wishes Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD SCHARLIN
and Family
Wish The Entire Jewish Community,
Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. IRVIN STEINBERG
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH SURES
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. SANDFORD SUSMAN and Family
Wish All Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. EDWARD SWERDLIN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. RODNEY R. TEICHNER and Family
Wish All Friends and Patients
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. JULIEN and DR. SCHATZ
1680 Meridian Ave., M.B. 531-3476
IVe Wish All A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. LEONARD SCHWALB
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. REBEL SOLLOWAY
BENES and ALAN GLACKMAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year

CLARA and SEYMOUR SMOLLER
New Year's Greetings To All Our Friends
DR. and MRS. HUGH UNGER
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOEL VOGEL and Family
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
TOT WISHES
MR. and MRS. MORTON B. ZEMEL
JOE, PNINA, FRED
AUSA, BRUCE and AVIVA
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year
GREETINGS
From
ALBERT ZEMLOCK
"Z"



Shamir Meets With Ivory Coast Foreign Minister
Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Miami
Dr. Irving Lchrman
Rabbi
Lawrence M. Schantz
President
A Joyous New Year To All
The Sisterhood The Men s Club The P. T.A.
The Players The Forty-Niners The Family League
and all Affiliated Youth Groups
v t
Beth Iorah Qdncregahon
Bb*jy It* Campus
1051 North Miami Beach Boulevard
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
(305)947-7528
"A Conservative Synagogue That Cares"
Wishes The Entire Community and Members
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Or. Max A. Lipschltz. Rabbi
Zvm Aronl, Cantor, Rav. Mordechal Adlar, Ritual Director
Harvey L. Brown, Executive Director
Rhea Schartzberg, Religious School Director
Shulamlt Glttalaon, Early Childhood Director
David Brook, Youth Director
Stephanie Engelberg, Active Adulta Director
Robert Whrtebook, Preeident
Temple Israel
of Greater Miami
Mam/'i HI Rtlorm CottgngiUon
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Associate Cantor Emeritus Jacob G. Bornstein
Director of Education and Programming Jack L Sparks
Gerald K. Schwartz, President
Ted Weinreich, Executive Director
Wishing the Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) Israeli
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
met with Ivory Coast Foreign
Minister Simeon Ake on Wednes-
day (Sept. 24) and asked him to in-
tervene with other African coun-
tries to recognize Israel. It was
the first meeting between the two
Foreign Ministers since both
countries formally resumed
diplomatic ties when Ivory Coast
reopened its Embassy in
Jerusalem.
Shamir told Ake that Israel is
ready to increase aid to Ivory
Coast. To date, Israel has provid-
ed only agricultural and medical
assistance to that country. But
Shamir's spokeman, Avi Pazner,
indicated that Israel is not willing
to provide other types of
assistance, presumably military
aid.
IVORY COAST broke
diplomatic relations with Israel
after the Yom Kippur War in
1973. The two countries agreed to
resume diplomatic relations at a
meeting in Geneva last January
between Premier Shimon Peres
and President Felix Houphouet-
Boigny.
Shamir arrived here last week
(Sept. 23) for one week of talks
with Foreign Ministers and
diplomats, including officials from
Soviet bloc countries, and to ad-
dress the United Nations General
Assembly on Tuesday. His
meetings concentrated on the
debate in the General Assembly
on the UN Interim Force in
Lebanon and on terrorism.
The Israeli Foreign Minister
met with Foreign Minister Giulio
Andreotti of Italy last Wednes-
day. The meeting focused on the
issue of terrorism. Pazner said
Shamir welcomed Italy's tough
stance against terrorism and in-
vited Italy to cooperate with .
Israel in all aspects to fight
against this scourge. Andreotti
told Shamir that he feared the
wave of terrorism in France
would spread to Italy, Pazner
said.
ANDREOTTI, who is also the
President of the 21-member Coun-
cil of Europe and former two-time
Prime Minister of Italy, said he
believed his country took the cor-
rect steps to enforce strong
measures against terrorism,
Pazner said. The Italian Foreign
Minister also said the Italians had
taken a lesson from the Israelis on
how to deal with terrorists.
JOIN US
Miami's most dynamic Conservative Congregation
WHAT WE OFFER
Shabbat & Holiday Services Daily Minyan
Religious School Day School
Sisterhood Brotherhood Senior Assembly
Youth Activities Havurot Adult Education
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
at Palmetto Senior High School
MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES INVITED
For information Call 238-2601
7500 S.W. 120th Street
David H. Auerbach, Rabbi
238-2601
Stephen Freedman, Cantor
Affiliated with United Synagogue of America
Fria^Ctetoberj^ 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
SB 9rAa4%a T
>?.
Our warmest greetings to all our Friends
May the New Year bring peace
throughout the world
Officers and Staff of the
American Friends of
The Hebrew University
A Happy New Year To All
Temple Beth Moshe
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, Fla. 33181

Israel Jacobs
Rabbi
Melvyn Trute
President
Joseph A. Gorfinkel, Ph.D.
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler
Cantor
Irving Jaret
Executive Director
Temple Sinai
18801 N.E. 22nd Ave. North Miami Beach 33180
Phone 932-9010
Wishes Members and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
George J. Berlin, President
New Year Greetings From
Dep. of Florida Ladies Auxiliary
Jewish War Veterans of U.S.A.
Amit Women
(Formerly American Mizrachi Women)
633 NE 167th St., Suite 815
North Miami Beach 651-1444
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Hadassah
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MIAMI BEACH REGION
JEAN TEMKIN. Prssldsnt
MIAMI REGION
MILDRED RIESENBERQ. PrWll
Temple Beth Am
Harbart Baumgard Leonard Schoolman
Senior Rabbi Aeeoclata Rabbi
5850 N. Kendall Dr., Miami 667-6607
rV/shss ThtJawlsh Community A Haalthy Naw Yaar
YIDDISH CULTURE WINKLE
Happy New Year
Manasha Feldsteln, President
Sarah Kaufman, Honorary Vice President
Joaaph Bamhaut, Vice President
Sheva Borland, Financial Secretary
Rose Lusky, Recording Secretary
Beth Kodesh Congregation
Sisterhood and Men's Clnb
Extend New Year Greetings To All
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Sol Chaaln, Cantor, High Holy Days
1101 S.W. 12th Ave., Miami
L'ShanaTova
MIAMI CHAPTER
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
Rogar Brntein. Praaideot
WIlHu A Grmlaick. Si.lfci.il Risin.il Dirwtar
Jake Fl~... Mitchil Paha, Aaat Aim INracUn


Page 10-B The Jewish riondian/yriday, October 3, 1986
Rabbi Abraham Korf Regional Director of Chabad in Florida,
has announced the appointment of Morton Mayberg and Tvi
Ainsworth as Co-Chairmen of the Chabad Lubavitch Annual
Shabbos Shuva Melave Malka to be held on Shabbos Shuva, the
Sabbath between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Oct. 11, at 9
p.m., at Temple Moses m Miami Beach, honoring Mr. and Mrs.
Murray Stein.
PERSONALS
ARE YOU SINGLE? Per-
sonal Ads get response!
Cost is $10.00 for up to 30
words. To place your spe-
cial singles ad send $10.00
and copy of ad to: The
Jewish Floridian, Singles
Column, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Florida 33101.
GENTLEMAN, Handsome,
green eyes, black curly
hair, 5'9", 162 lbs. Late
30s, No smoking, No drink-
ing, seeks good and open-
minded gal, for healthy
relationship, possible to
have a child. Appreciate
photo. Guarantee return.
Confidential. Box GHG c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
Singles will offer two trips
to Israel, twelve-days each
for Jewish singles. The
first trip is for ages 22-35.
The second trip is for ages
35-60. Both trips depart
Dec. 24 and return Jan 4.
For information write:
United Synagogue Singles,
155 Fifth Avenue, New
Yoric, NY 10010 or call (212)
533-0800.
JEWISH MALE, PhD, 6'
tall, good looking seeks
to meet attractive Jewish
woman in her 30's with
cultural and travel inter-
ests. Photo exchange a
must (will return). Any
nationality alright. Box
JMP c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami,
Fla. 33101.
WANTED: JEWISH woman
in late 50's, good medical
health. To marry if compat-
ible. Live in Rockledge,
Fla., 200 miles north. Send
recent photo, with name,
address and phone. Box
RF, c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami,
Fla. 33101.
ATTRACTIVE, SENSITIVE
woman, divorced, no chil-
dren, wishes Torah man in
his forties. Box HCC c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
DOMINANT NORTH Miami
Jewish male, age 40, 57",
138 lbs., seeks a marriage
minded, affectionate, pas-
sive, Jewish female. Write
D.W., P.O. Box 611265,
No. Miami, Fla. 33261.
THIS HANDSOME, dynam-
ic, self-confident 29-year-
old modern Orthodox New
York gentleman, always
received rave reviews, a
mensch, seeks pretty
young lady aged 19-29, who
is lively, sincere, affection-
ate, humorous, honest, and
with a great zest for life
for role of leading lady. Box
STL c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami
33101.
REWARD!!! MULTI-
LINGUAL, well-traveled,
vivacious young Jewish
lady deserves and hopes to
meet her reward: a mar-
riage-minded, considerate,
healthy Jewish profession-
al male to age 44 with
cultural and athletic inter-
ests. Box CE c/o Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101.
DWJ ONE WOMAN
mensch needs to share life
with a warm lovable,
unpretentious partner for
intimate communication,
stress-free togetherness,
love, happiness, exercise,
fun, laughs even tears. Am
clean, own teeth, casual
dresser, considerate,
understanding, unencum-
bered, no alimony pay-
ments, no dependents,
miserable dancer, not rich
but no debts. Not perfect
but not one nighter, not
smoker, gambler, drinker,
drug user, 5'11", 59, exer-
cise, nutrition minded
vegetarian. If you want to
be loved (genuinely), want
appreciation, respect, are
45 to 50, affectionate,
attractive 5'3" to 5'7",
health exercise conscious
115 to 135 lbs., please mail
recent photo, letter to
informal living New Yorker
currently visiting, wants to
move to southern Florida;;
T.D. Reznik, P.O.B. 1631,
Islamorada Key, Florida
33036.
HELLO BABY, ,nc
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Lydia Goldring and Rabbi Solomon Schiff, stand by the
Shabbat elevator in the Blum Pavilion at Mount Sinai.
Observant members of the Jewish community can now
visit patients at Mount Sinai Medical Center during the
Sabbath by using the "Shabbat elevators."
The elevators, located in the Main Lobby and in the Blum
Pavilion, will stop automatically on each floor from Friday
at 6 p.m. until Saturday at 8 p.m., and during similar hours
during the Jewish holidays. Visitors may enter the complex
through the hand-held doors in front of the Blum Pavilion
or through the doors next to the Emergency Room leading
into the Greenspan Pavilion.
The concept of the "Shabbat elevators" allows the obser-
vant Jewish visitor to use the elevators without actually ac-
tivating the electrical circuits. "This service is an added
convenience for Jewish visitors of Mount Sinai," said Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, Director of Chaplaincy, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and Chaplain for Mount Sinai Medical
Center.
Dorwin's
1574 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 532-4061
Wish The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Baskets For
All Occasions
Balloons
Gifts
Stuffed Animals
Candy
Special Wrapping
Party Favors
WE DELIVER
GRINS
'he Real foadte\ca<$e
12766 WEST DIXIE HIGHWAY rfORTH MIAMI. FLORIDA 33161
(305) 895-6467
Epworth Village
ENJOY A LIFESTYLE ^^
THAT IS ACTIVE AND SECURE
More Abundant Living
Affordable Retirement
No Entry Fee
Private Apartments
All Meals Available
Activities & Religious
Services
Nursing Assistance
Available
24-Hour Security
& Switchboard
Housekeeping &
Maintenance
Transportation
Adjacent to Susanna Wesley Health Center
A 120-Bed Skleed Nursing Facility
(305) 556-3500
M tece" QUALITY CARING STAFF
00 W 16TH AVE HIALEAH. FL 33012 A NOT-FOR-PROFIT FACILITY
Na'amat
^^^^^^^^^^^BBBBBBHSM
Women
A talk on the life of David Ben-
Gurion, the late prime minister of
the State of Israel, will take place
at the first meeting of the fall
season of the Beba Idelson
Chapter of Na'amat USA on
Wednesday, at 11:30 a.m. The ses-
sion will be held in the club room
of the 100 Lincoln Road Building,
Miami Beach.
Leah Benson, vice president of
the South Florida Council of
Na'amat will be the speaker on
Ben-Gurion, discussing the man,
the leader and prophet of Zionism.
She will also give an update on the
latest project of the organization
in Israel and the need for increas-
ed membership and support.
Honorary president Sarah
Kaufman will conduct the installa-
tion of the new officers. Irene
Raczkowski is president.
HADASSAH
NEWS
Renanah Chapter will meet
Monday at the Carriage Club, the
Board meeting, starting at 11
a.m. is open to all members.
Southgate Chapter will hold a
regular meeting on Wednesday,
Oct. 15 at 1 p.m. at the Southgate
Terrace Room. The program will
feature a candleighting ceremony
and a talk on the High Holy Days.
Forte Towers Chapter will hold
their regular meeting on Wednes-
day, Oct 15 at 1200 West Ave.
Auditorium at 1 p.m.
Sunny Seniors
Celebrate
Anniversary
Sunny Seniors of Temple Israel
which meets at the Kendall facili-
ty, will celebrate its second an-
niversary on Monday, at noon.
Feature speaker at the meeting
will be Stephen T. Rice, GLU,
CHF, son of charter member
Sylvia Rice. Rice will present the
inside story of the Sunrise Com-
munity for the Retarded.
Nominating committee chair-
man Sylvia Adler will report on
the 1986-87 slate, and call for the
election of officers.
Mildred Brams, editor of the
club's newsletter, will also
distribute the first issue.
Whitney Receives
Civic Leaguer
of the Year
George Whitney, vice president
of the Civic League of Miami
Beach, received the organization's
1986 "Civic Leaguer of the Year"
award at Sunday afternoon's 50th
annual installation of the city's se-
cond oldest civic organization.
Murray Gold, past president of
the Civic League, made the
presentation at the Kono\er
Hotel. Mayor Alex Daoud, whv.
was the installing officer, award-
ed outgoing president Billie Kern
the city's official certificate of ap-
preciation for her service during
three terms as head of the Civic
League.
And incoming president Gerald
Schwartz, president of a Miami
Beach public relations and adver-
tising agency, was given the key
to the city by Mayor Daoud.
State Rep. Mike Friedman, a
former vice mayor, was principal
speaker. Also taking part in the
luncheon were Vice Mayor Ben Z.
Grenald, Commissioners Abe
Resnick and Sidney Weisburd and l
State Rep. Elaine Bloom.
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
T
(Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:46 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuil
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
S34-7213 534 7214
Barry J Konovttch. Rabbi /)BN\
Moth* Buryn, Cantor WJ)
Sergio Grobler. President -^
' Sholem Epelbaum, President.
Religious Committee
AOATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Garden. Drive
North Miami Beach 947 143$
Rabbi Slmcha F read man
Cantor Ian Alpem Coneervatlve
Sal. 8:30 a.m A 8:30 pm.
Daily services 7:30 a.m. 4 8 30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
ISSS0 N. Kendall Or.
| S Miami 997-9987
i Or. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. Ma, 6:30 p.m. It t p.m. Sr. Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard will speak on "Hoping."
Sal. 8:30 a.m. Rabbi Baumgard will apaak on
"Hijack A Response To Terrortam."
Adult family aan. In gym al 9:30 a.m. Rabbi
Schoolman will apaak on "Repenting
Sat. 1:30 p.m. Chlldren'e aarvlca.
3:30 p.m. Adult-family service
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert. M
Cantor IF
Rev. Milton Freeman, ^
Ritual Director
Mlnchah Sat. 0.30 p.m.
Frl. Roan H.ih.nah eve 7 p.m. Sal.
Roth Haahanah 1:1 S a.m. A 7 p.m. Sunday
Roah Haahanah Ml a.m. Spaclal children'a
aorvlca 10:30 a.m. conductad by iris Kalz,
Ed. Dlr. Ratraahmonta will ba served |
TEMPLE EMANU EL _,
1/01 Washington Avenue [tt\
Miami Beech \%p
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shilman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Roah Haahanah In tha Theater of tha
Performing Ana Frl. A Sat. eve. 7:30 p.m.
Spaclal family aan. Fri. eve. Sat. A Sun.
preliminary aan. 8 15 a.m. Morning aarv a a.m.
Of. Irving Lahrman will preach both morning.
I Cantor SMtman will chant. Auxiliary
aan at Temple conductad by Rabbi B.rger A
Cantor Tambor. Spec. Youth aan. 10 a.m.
I St. A Sun.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beech
5326421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
'TEMPLE ISRAEL----------------------------
Of Greater Miami
Mitmt't Piont Reform Cono'eg.lion
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor. Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Roah Haahanah aan. Oada County Auditorium
I S p.m. led by Rabbi H..k.ll M. Bern.l. R.bbl
Rai D. P.rlmeier and Cantor Rachelle F.
Nelson. Spaclal Chlldren'e aan. Sunday 9:30
I a.m. Kendall and 11.30 a.m. Downtown.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd
Coral GaMea M7-5667
Michael B. Eleenetat, RebW
Friday sentca p.m
m
m
BETHKOOESH
Conaervettve
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krieeei
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
5*4334
Frl. 6:30 p.m. lor the Ural lime 2 students
of tha Academy will chant tha Liturgy R.bbl
Shiftman will aan> aa Cantor, assisted by Ma
coualn Aaron "Otty" Shiftman. Rabbi Max
Shapiro will conduct sanlcea A discuss "Lll*
Can Ba A Tregady." A "A Captive People ''
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
891 -5506 Coneervatlve
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi _
Dr. Joseph A. GorfInkel. / JBKV
Rabbi Emeritus \MJ>
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Frl. 7:45 p.m. Dally a.m. A S p.m.
Sat. 8 45 a.m. A 6:30 p.m
Sun. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 539-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Meiber
Cantor Nissim Benyemint
Dally services a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat 8'15 a.m
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2901 -
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \ wl
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Erev Roah Haahanah: Frl. p.m.
Palmetto Sr. High School. Roah Haahanah:
Sat. A Sun. 9 a.m. Palmetto Sr. High School.
TaaMlch: Sunday 5:30 p.m. Tha L at
tact. A 120 St.
TEMPLE BETliSM6LOMSU 723.'
Cheee Ave. S 41 at St. 11*... i
DR LEON KROMISH, Founding Senior Rabbi
GARY A.OLICKSTEIN. T
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
I Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Servlcea Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Meyer Abremowltz _
Arl Frldkls, Assoc. Rabbi /".
Cantor Murray Yavneh \\%J
Sal. t a.m. Sabbath service ^~*^
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday
t a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sal. 9 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMIO
7902 Cerfyfe Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Lebovttz
Center Edward Klein
1 Coneervatlve
Dally Senlces
Sat 8 45 a.m
as t a.m it
-Fri.latl,
If
I 5:30 p.m.
Meal p m.
SHAARAYIE'ILLAH
of North Mi< n i Beech
971 Norther. 172nd St.
North Mien II each
661 1592
YaafcovSeruja.Rebbi
SHAARE TEFIi.i.Af OF KENDALL
382 0696
Rabbi Herehel Befxer ajooem onnodo.
S.I 9:30 l.m
Temp e S. mu-EI
3363 ItYf 2 Ave.
S.OINKa Jail Or
HARRY JOLT, Auxiliary Bab*
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. Aaelet.nt Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID COMVISCR
Frl eve service 8:15 p.m
Sat. morning aarvlca 10:45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or Max A. Lipschitz. Raobt
Randall Konigsburg. Asst Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L, Brown, Exec Director
'4SK*
Dally Services Mon Fri 7 30 a.m 5'
A 5:30 p.m. *.J5
Saturday 8:25 a.m. A 7:30 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m. A 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE SINA 18601 NE 22 Ave
North Dede's lief m Congregation
Ralph P Ktngsley Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook. As octate Rabbi
Irving Shulke* Ci ntor
Barbara S. R.imn y, Administrator
Era* Roah Ha hana Frl. 8 p.m.
Roah Haahana Sit Sun. 10:30 a
TEMPLE .'JON ISf AELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Dt Conservative
27123M ^.
Dr Norman N Sh ptro. Rabbi 'wl
Benjamin Adler. C antor -
David Rosenthal. tuxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Mr nday A Thursday
Sunday 9 a.m Fri. 8:15 p.m.
Sal 9 a.m. Si ibalh Service
Teitler Ihapel


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
U.S. Welcomes Appointment
By Israel Of Arab Mayors
OBITUARIES
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
welcomed Monday the ap-
pointment by Israel of Arab
mayors in three major West
Bank cities. "We welcome
the restoration of Arab
authority to West Bank
municipalities," State
Department deputy
spokesman Charles Redman
said. "We are hopeful that
means can be found to
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Evety DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
restore Arab control in
other towns in the occupied
territories."
Israel announced Sunday that
Dr. Abdel Majid E-Zir, a physi-
cian, was appointed mayor of
Hebron; Halil Mussa Halil, a
restaurant owner, was named
mayor of Ramallah; and Hassan
A-Tawil, a businessman, mayor of
ElBireh.
Redman said the general posi-
tion of the United States is that
"we support increased control
over their own affairs by the Arab
inhabitants throughout the oc-
cupied territories through
developments which have the sup-
port of the local population."
Secretary of State George
Shultz has long urged the need for
the improvement of the quality of
life of Palestinians on the West
Bank and Gaza.
BERNEY
Harold H.. husbsnd of LoretU Berney.
puaed sway on September 26. He is surviv-
ed by his children Wsrren and Marilyn
Berney. Fred and Ellen Berney; step-bthw
of Elisabeth Perwin, Jean and Joel Perwin,
Scott Perwin and Cynthia and Manfred
Helpern. He is also survived by his sisters
Eleanor (Sylvan) HerskowiU of Johnstown.
Pa. and Naomi (Philip) Kass of Toledo, Ohio.
Services war* held with interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery
ADELMAN. Isadora, 96, of North Miami
Beach. September 23. Levitt-Wemstein.
ALLAN. Mrs. Birdie, of North Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert.
GREENBERG. Anna, of Miami Beach.
September 22. Services held in Paramus,
New Jersey.
GUBIN, Mrs. Rith E. "Gubie." of Miami.
Rubin-Zilbert
BRESSLER. Estelle, 61, of Miami,
September 23. Services were held.
DuBOIS, Syd. 86, September 24. Levitt-
Weinstein. .
KRIEFF, Benjamin, of North Miami Beach,
September 22. Services private.
[2ti640<;reenfield Rd
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
1313) 543-1K22
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
I)iw;nii\ and Understanding
i nmplflr Shipping Service Knmi Kluridu \rej
Your F"St Call to Us will
Hj.-Jlp All Funeral Afrangt menu;
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SCHWITZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532 2099
Id presented l> Kiverside Memorial) hapel, I m
New York: (212) 263-7600 (Jjueena Blvd.*.- Tilth Kd Korea! Hills, NY
Sincere good wishes
for a healthy and happy New Year
from your friends at
rMeno&hW
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
Art Atlas Shirley Crayder Sylvia Cutler Scott Cuttler
Marion Dack AJ Danheiser Philip Dash Ruth Friede
Mark Ginsberg Gary Glass Rick Golden Norman Gold-
man Oscar Goldstein Stephen Gutterman Reuven Horo-
witz Michael Jacobson Judd Kallen Johnathan Kaplan
Ruby Kaplan Joel Kirschenbaum Seymour Kirschen-
baum Joan Kosky Lee Melamed Manny Mishkin Bruce
Moshman Isaac Nahmias Jack Polinsky Joe Roth
Jacob Salz Sy Schiffman Marty Siegel Claire Sieger
Julius Stein Robert Swerdlick Hershey Weinstein Joel A.
Weinstein Robert A Weinstein Jeffrey Weisberg Mark
Weissman Louis Wilson Betty Wynroth Alan Yaffe Al
Yellen Richard Zadanoff
North Miami Beach Sunrise Margate Dcerfield Beach Wesl Palm Beach
KAUFMAN
Anna C, a resident of Miami Beach since
the 1930's passed away September 30 in
Wayne, Pa. She was a secretary of the
Jewish Welfare Bureau; First President of
the Metropolitan B'nai B'rith Council and
an officer of the Conference of Jewish
Federation Women's Club. Services were
held.
HAAS, Elisabeth (Betty), September 80.
The Riverside.
WEINBERGER, Pearl, of South Miami,
September 30. Blasbeiw Chapel.
ROBERTS. Allen, September 30. Menorah
Chapels.
COrfN, Emory F., of Miami Beach. Rubin
atari
EISEMAN, Irwin. 88. Services were held.
EPSTEIN, Harry H. MD, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert
ARNOLD, Edward, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
PERTNORY, Irving A., 79, of Miami.
September 26. The Riverside.
FELLMAN. Claire, of North Miami Beach,
September 28. Menorah Chapels.
Beach,
BAUER, Herman S., of Miami
September 26. The Riverside
JACOBS, William (Bill). 74, of North Mam,
September 27. Levitt-Weinstein '
ABRAMSON. Bernard. 56, September 2*
Services were held. '
FETN^ltalka. of Wnu Beach. Rubir,
BLINDER, Sophie, of Manhattan New
York^and jfTrUrbour, SeoteXr^
SjrrKe. held in Wertwood, New jersey:
The Riverside in charge of arrangement.
COOK. Ceba, 77, of rforth MUmf JE*
September 28. Services were held
JERbLEM. Florence, 0f Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert. ^*
SCHWARTZ, Shari. 75, of Miami Beach
SmUmber 21. The Riverside. Intermem
at Mt Nebo Cemetery.
BLUMBERG. Raymond (Shep) 79 of Vent
nor City, N.J. and Miami Beach
September 22. Rubin-Zilbert
SNEIDER, Gussie. 98, of Miami Beach
September 23. The Riverside
3
HAVE
YOU BEEN
COMPARING
APPLES and ORANGES
AMONG PEE-AERANGEMENT PLANS?
II you've shopped lor funeral pre-arrangements
you ve lound there are some big differences among tl era
Some package plans look economical, but then you rea; the tir.e
print and discover the add-ons, surcharges, hidden costs they lorgot tcjj
mention. At Menorah, you'll lind the custom-designed pre-neea plan t<
your pocketbook with extra value, extra attention and no extra charf.
II you have a plan now, bring it in and we'll write a Menorah Pre-Need
tor less and give you a dozen oranges. Now isn't that a peach ol an ofi
fMenoiah g
.Gardens and Funeral Chapels
West Palm Beach 627-2277. DeerCeld Becich <1 ."-3700. Sunrise 742 nJOC-Margale 976-00 li- North Minmi Beach 931
Funeral Chapels Cemetenes Mausoleum Pre-Need Planning
Only Levitt-Weinstein
in South Florida
is Weinstein Brothers
of Chicagp.
Any other representation is purely fictitious.
Don't be confused. A Weinstein by any
other name is not a Weinstein one of
America's leading practitioners of tradi-
tional Jewish funeral services.
And in South Florida, Levitt-Weinstein
presents the same comprehensive, pro-
fessional, caring servicewith 5 memo-
rial chapels in Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties... Guaranteed Security
Plan pre-arrangement services and
Beth David Memorial Gardens, with
funeral and interment services at one
convenient location.
Make sure you talk with the real
thing. There's only one Weinstein in
Florida, and that's Levitt-Weinstein.
... because the grief is enough to handle.
Memorial Chapels
Nrto^ia^r?each ^"y0^ West Palm Beach Boca/Deerfield Beach
949-6315 921-7200 689-8700 427-6500
nc^S^SP SECURITY PLAN: 1-800-343-5400
BETH DAVID MEMORIAL GARDENS: 963-2400
3201N. 72nd Avenue, Hollywood


Business Note
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 18-B
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., a
publicly held bank holding com-
pany headquartered in Miami
Beach, announced that the Com-
ptroller of the Currency has
granted the Company preliminary
approval to establish a new Jeffer-
son National Bank in Boca Raton.
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-38837
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN ELIE LUNDY.
Petitioner,
and
CLARABELLE LUNDY.
Respondent.
TO: CLARABELLE LUNDY,
residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612
Northwest 12th Ave., Miami,
Florida 3313b, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
October 10, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated: September 8, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
BY: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
11078 September 12, 19, 26;
October 3, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 8*-MU 01
IN RE:
GLENIESE TOUT ANT
DOMINGUEZ,
Petitioner
and LUIS DOMINGUEZ.
Respondent.
TO: LUIS DOMINGUEZ
Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on ALAN
SCHNEIDER, Esq., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 2720
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 331S6, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 10,
1986: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
The notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 5 day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN SCHNEIDER, Esq.
2720 West Flagler St.
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
11075 September 12, 19, 26;
October 3,1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss:
The undersigned, under oath,
ys; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of CAPLAN PRO-
CESS SERVERS located at 19
West Flagler Street in the city of
Miami. Dade County, Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN.
President
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Dade County, Florida
MONEY & EGO, INC.
11276 percent Stockholder
Octobers, 10,17,24,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
"at the undersigned, desiring to
enKae m business under the
fictitious name ALAN
SAKOWITZ. at 9200 South
iiaaeland Boulevard, Suite 208.
Miami. Florida 33156. intends to
register said name with the Clerk
! the Circuit Court of Dade
bounty, Florida.
ALAN SAKOWITZ. P.A.
11095 September 19, 26;
October 3, 10, 1986
Arthur H. Courshon, chairman
of the board of the new Jefferson
National Bank and of Jefferson
Bancorp. Inc., said the Boca
Raton bank "is being opened to
provide our special Gold Account
type of banking to residents of
Palm Beach County and former
Alan J. Marcus
Opens Law Office
Alan J. Marcus, formerly a tax
associate at Smith and Mandler,
PA, has opened a law office at
1150 Kane Concourse, Bay Har-
bor Islands.
Marcus will specialize in taxa-
tion, along with estate planning,
probate, real estate, and business
planning.
A graduate of Miami Beach
Senior High School, Marcus
graduated with honors from the
University of Miami School of
Law in 1983. He also received a
masters of law degree in taxation
(LLM) in 1984 at the University of
Miami. Marcus was editor of the
Miami Hurricane, UM's student
newspaper.
residents of Miami Beach who
have moved to Palm Beach
County."
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss:
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of RICHARD
MARKOWTIZ & ASSOCIATES
located at 19 West Flagler Street
in the city of Miami, Dade County,
Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN,
President
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Dade County, Florida
MONEY & EGO, INC.
100 percent Stockholder
11274
Octobers. 10,17.24.1986
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-19*43 CA-12
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
CLODOALDO NAVARRO, et ux,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: WILFREDO NAVARRO and
MARIA C. NAVARRO, his
wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
WILFREDO NAVARRO
and MARIA C. NAVARRO,
his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in
the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Lot 28. Block 2. of LAKE
LAURENCE ESTATES,
FIRST ADDITION.
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 68,
at Page 59, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
October 10, 1986, and file the
original with the deric of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 3rd day of
September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
11071 September 12. 19. 26;
October 3. 1986
Robert M. Levy and Associates
has been engaged by the City of
Miami Shores to prepare a
marketing and membership pro-
motion campaign for the Miami
Shores Country Club.
Schwartz Named
President of Society
Barry M. Schwartz, MD, has
been elected as the 1986-87 presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Society
of Plastic and Reconstructive
Surgery. He is on the staff of
Palmetto General Hospital.
Dr. Schwartz, from Miami
Beach, completed his medical
degree at the University of Miami.
His intern residency in general
and plastic surgery training was
completed in 1977 at Boston
University Medical Center. He
served two years as a major in the
U.S. Army Medical Corps from
1971-73.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 8S-38826
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of:
CLARISTA GEORGIA.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
LEROY GEORGIA.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: LEROY GEORGIA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Jack P. Druckman, Esq., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167th Street. Suite 315,
North Miami Beach, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 17, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida, on
this 12th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Jack P. Druckman. Esq.
633 N.E. 167th Street
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Telephone: (305) 652-0538
Attorney for Petitioner
11093 September 19, 26;
October 3,10.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 86-38780
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 345741
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SOL ANGEL CRUZ.
Petitioner/wife
and
ANTONIO CRUZ,
Respondent/h usband
TO: ANTONIO CRUZ
Residence Unknown
YOU. ANTONIO CRUZ,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorneys, Law Office
of MARTIN COHEN. 622 S.W. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33130, on
or before October 10, 1986, or else
petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade County.
Florida, this September 8. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
BY: JOHN BRANDA
Deputy Clerk
11084 September 12, 19. 26;
October 3, 1986

Pictured at Women's American ORT, Southeastern Florida
Region, District Six Gala for Giving are: from left, Bea ShuUz,
Planned Giving chair; Ottlia KeUerman; Sarah Schwartz, con-
tributors. The gala was hosted and underwritten by Devra and
Peter Pollock, and coordinated by Gloria Chekanow, vice presi-
dent and Capital Funds Chairman, and Norma Heit, Golden
Circle chairman.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ROSINA MALTA at
3390 Merrick Street, Kl, Coconut
Grove, FL 33133 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Armando Gutierez, Esquire
Attorney for Tejus Import A Ex-
port, Inc.
2153 Coral Way, Suite 400,
Miami, FL 33145
11268
Octobers. 10,17.24,1986
notice under
fictitious name law
notice is hereby given
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name FEDCO
DISTRIBUTION CENTER, INC.,
at 8646 NW 112 St., in the City of
Miami, Florida, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida,
Dated at Miami Beach, Florida,
this 10th day of September, 1986.
fedco. roc.
By: Lloyd L. Ruskin
V. Chairman
Lloyd L. Ruskin. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
629-71st St
Miami Beach, FL 33141
11092 September 19,26;
Octobers, 10,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 8-3878
FC 18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
SADIE R. BENNETT BARNES.
Petitioner
and
WILLARD L. BARNES.
Respondent
TO: WILLARD L. BARNES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road
- Suite 309, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 17, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
11090 September 19,26;
October 3,10. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned. desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LEMON AND COLA
CORPORATION at 319 N.W. 25th
St., Miami, Fla S3127 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
LEMON AND COLA
CORPORATION
319 N.W. 26th St.
Miami, Fla. 88127
ROSA M. VEGA
Attorney for Lemon and Cola
Corporation
362 Minorca Avenue. Suite 101
Coral Gables, Fla. 331S4
11097 September 19,26;
October 3. 10, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Royal Palm Cleaners
at 4016 Royal Palm Ave., Miami
Beach, Fl. S8140 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Eliaa Jones, President
4016 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach. Fl. 33140
SOLOMON WEISS, Esq.
Attorney for
SHARON & ELISA. Inc.
11270 October 3,10.17.24, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name By All Means Travel
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
L. Nevins Enterprises, Inc.
11088 September 12,19, 26;
October 3,1986
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-35467-FC-23
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROSALIND L. HANNA
Petitioner
and
HARRISON HANNA
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: HARRISON HANNA.
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 633
N.E. 167 St., North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, on or before
October 10, 1986. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated September 8, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
11081 September 12, 19. 26;
October 3, 1986


rage 14-e ine jewisn rionaian/r naay, uctoDe
rrmr
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1664 (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEXANDER BLUESTINE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
ALEXANDER BLUESTINE,
deceased. File Number 86-1664 is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flakier Street, Miami,
Florida SS1S0. The personal
representative of the estate is
JEROME ROSENTHAL, whose
address is 5 Christopher Road,
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
AD persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due,
%the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have-that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications ot the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 26, 1986.
JEROME ROSENTHAL
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
ALEXANDER BLUESTINE
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
IRA S. SILVER, ESQ.
160 S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
11261 September 26;
October 3. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name KAMIO GALLERI at
2336 N.W. 107 Avenue, Unit M45,
Miami, Fl. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Kamio Traders and Distributers,
Inc.
Attorney Hays, Grundwerg &
Vann
By: Moses J. Grundwerg
28 West Flagier Street No. 800
Miami, Florida 33130
11077 September 12,19,26,
October 3,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Norman's Tavern at
6770 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach,
FL 33139 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Miami Moon Cafe, Inc.
A Florida Corp-
Attorneys for Paul Kwitney
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg
PA.
11096 September 19, 26;
October 3. 10, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. M-33Mt-M
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE:
SHELDON HEIGHTS
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY,
an Illinois corporation
Plaintiff,
YUAN-YUAN KUO,
Defendant
TO: Mr. Yuan-Yuan Kuo
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Rental
Arrearage And Termination Of
Lease has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Leonard Selkowits, J.D.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 19 West Flagier Street,
Suite 810, Biscayne Building,
Miami, Florida 38130, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
24, 1966; otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida this
19th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Leonard Selkowits, J.D.
Suite 810 Biscayne Building
19 West Flagier Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone (306) 368-2900
11266 September 26;
October 3,10,17,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nassber 864140
Division 02
DM RE: ESTATE OF
LILLIAN KRASNOW,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LILLIAN KRASNOW,
deceased. File Number 86-6140, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED,
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 26, 1986.
Persona] Representative:
STEPHANIE SCHAMESS
10 Ahwaga Avenue
Northampton, Mass. 01060
JUDITH K. GQfENEZ
11826 S.W. 169 Street
Miami, Florida 33167
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SYDNEY S. TRAUM
093392
Myers Kenin Levinson & Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue
Miami, Florida 3S181
Telephone: (306) 371-9041
11112 September 26;
Octobers, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business uncer the fic-
titious name Law Office of Cohen,
Cohen & Cohen at 622 S.W. 1
Street, Miami, FL 33130 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Herman Cohen
Martin Cohen
Robert Cohen
11076 September 12.19, 26;
October 3.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-6123
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTABROOK 0. PERKINS,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of ESTABROOK O. PERKINS,
deceased. File Number 86-6123. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 26, 1986.
Personal Representative:
DIANE ROMERO
2390 N.W. 133rd Street
Miami, Florida 33167
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER, P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road, Suite 680
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-1401
11266 September 26;
Octobers. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DH THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. 86-40166 08
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RAMON GONZALEZ.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
CARMEN GONZALEZ.
Respondent/Wife
TO: Carmen Gonzalez,
address unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Alan H.
Miller, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317, Miami,
Florida 33189, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24th,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: John Brands
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller, Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd.,
Suite 317
Miami, Florida 33189
(306) 238-1080
Attorney for Petitioner
Hill September 26;
Octobers, 10,17,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Norman's Tavern at
6770 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
FL 33141 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Miami Moon Cafe, Inc.
A Florida Corp.
Paul Kwitney
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg,
PA.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 512
Miami Beach, FLa. 33139
Attorneys for: Miami Moon Cafe,
Inc.
11096 September 19, 26;
October 3,10,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. 86-M068 FC 09
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
GILDA LUGO,
Petitioner
and
LUIS LUGO
Respondent
TO: LUIS LUGO
5388Zoua5
Panama City, PANAMA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve s
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24th,
1986; otherwise s default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17th Day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Phone: (306) 632-1166
11110 September 26;
October 3.10,17.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nmssber 86-6147
Division 01
FLA. BAR NO. 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL SHAPIRO,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SAMUEL SHAPIRO, deceased.
File Number 86-5147 (01), is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 26, 1986.
Personal Representative:
ETHEL SHAPIRO
17092 Collins Avenue
Vista View No. 407
North Miami Beach, FL 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33164
Telephone: (306) 866-5716
11269 September 26;
Octobers, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name 183rd Street Auto
Specialist at 18200 N.W. 27 Ave.,
Miami, Fla. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
W. DAVID CURRY, Owner
11262 September 26;
October 3,10,17,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-6323
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY MARMORSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of BETTY MAR
MORSTEIN, deceased, File
Number 86-6323, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Richard I. Kroop, whose address
is 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 612,
Miami Beach, Florida 88139. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his sgent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 26, 1986.
Richard Kroop
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
BETTY MARMORSTEIN
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Bruce J. Scheinberg. P.A.
(152577)
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg,
P.A.
420 Lincoln Rd. Suite 512
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
11264 September 26;
October 3, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NEW LOOK
JEWELRY INC. a Florida cor-
poration at 58 N.E. 167th Street,
Suite 34. North Miami Beach, Fla
33162 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
GLYN THOMAS
49 percent
CAMERON BACCHUS
51 percent
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
Attorney for New Look Jewelry
Inc.
P.O. Box 1113
N.B.B., Fla 33160
11257 September 26;
Octobers. 10 17 lftflfl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaber 86-5292
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
HARRY CLICK,
NOTICE OF DeCeMd
ADMINISTRATION
,^! J!^i8tr*tion of estate
of HARRY CLICK, deceased, File
Number 86-5292, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per
sons! representative and the per
sons! representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claim,
gainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Co-Personal Representatives-
LEONARD CLICK
10306 S.W. 117th Street
Miami, Florida 33176
IRVING J. WHITMAN. Esq.
17260 S.W. 83rd Court
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQUIRE
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross,
Shore, Lewis, Rogel & Kern, P.A.
420 S. Dixie Highway. 3rd Fl.
Coral Gabies, FL 33146
Telephone: (305) 666*622
11263 September 26;
October 3,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-37644-10
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PATRICE DARISME. wife
and
PIERRE W. DARISME. husband
TO: Mr. Pierre W. Darisme
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY,
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami. Fl. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 3. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29 day of August. 198tv
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11072 September 12,19.26;
October 3, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Antiques Plus at
1660 NE 123 St., Miami, Florida
33181, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Edgar Belliveau
11089 September 19, 26;
October 3, 10, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name WILSON'S
RETIREMENT CENTER at 2233
N.W. 56th Ave., Lauderhill,
Florida 33313, intends to register Florida" this'september 10. 1986
said name with the Clerk of the RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court of Dade County, Clerk Circuit Court
Florida. By DIANA CAMPBELL
WILSON BENJAMDW Deputy Clerk
SUSAMMA W. BENJAMIN 1109i September 19.2b;
11098 September 19. 26; October 3,10.1986
October 3,10, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 86-32786 FC 12
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bax No. 345741
IN RE: The marriage of:
MIRIAM BARBOSA,
Petitioner/Wife.
and
PABLO R. BARBOSA.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: PABLO R. BARBOSA
Residence Unknown
YOU. Pablo R. Barboss^
residence unknown, sre required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon _the
petitioner's attorneys, Law HWJ
of HERMAN COHEN MARTIN
COHEN, 622 S. W. 1st Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. on or before
October 17. 1986, or else petition
will be confessed. ,
WITNESS my hand and seal oi
this Court, at Miami, Dade County.


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-5464
Division 02
IN HE: ESTATE OF
'SIEGFRIED E. HAMBURGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
01 SIEGFRIED E. HAM
mjRGER, deceased, File Number
36-5464 02), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
."Ionia. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names ind addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
jonal representative's attorney are
.et forth below.
All interested persons are re-
cuired to file with this court.
VITH1N THREE MONTHS OF
''HE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
Dgainst 'he estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
liic qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
i^OREVER BARRED.
ublication of this Notice has
begun on October 3, 1986.
Personal Representative:
>:ric WEIL
230! South Ocean Drive,
Apt. 1705
Hollvwood. FL 33019
/.norney for Personal
'.iepresentative:
NELSON < FELDMAN, PA
1186 Kane Concourse,
' Iftands. PL 13154
Telephone: >65-571S
i.'"S October 3 10, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
ON8TRLCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TIE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31472
iCTION FOR DISSOLUTION
)F MARRIAGE
IN RE
.('ISDULAC.
tnd
ERNF.STINA DULAC
TO: Ernestina Dular
Present J-iKnown
Last )vnown
C920 N W. -ith Une
Miami, Florida 33172
Y 0 1 ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution )f Marriage has been
iled against you and you ire re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress :s <55 South Miami Avenue,
penthouse I, Miami. Florida
S3130. and file the original with
the clerk if the above styled court
on or before October 31. 1986;
otherwise I default will be entered
tgainst you for the relief demand
-d in the complaing or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
'I.0RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24 day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P BRHflCER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
gUUOC. PASTOR. P.A.
i 165 South Miami Avenue
*iami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
112W 0ctober3.10.17.24.1986
NOTICE UNDER
M "I*10"8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
,' the undersigned, desiring to
."P*8 ^nees under the fk
nPiDn",*"16 CARRIBEAN
W Street, Miami. FL 33176 in-
^Clerk of the Circuit Court of
** County. Florida.
r. .. Y*R. Inc.
"y: GEMINI INTERNATIONAL
Ru. TRADE CO.. INC.
Hy: ""^AL INTERNATIONAL
INP
3RUCE LAMCHICK, ESQ.
i(fc',for Y R- INC.
J2&W 104th Street
Sjj. FL 33176
J^Phone: (305) 595^133
Sept mbtr 12,19,26;
Oct*er3,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaber 86-5016
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSA GRUNZEUG,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the -stat<-
of ROSA GRUNZEUG, deceased,
File Number 86-5016 (02), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for
DADE County Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 W.
Flagier Street. Miami, Florida
33130 (3rd floor). The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: fl) all claims
against rhe estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 3. 1986.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON. ESQUIRE
19 West Flagier Street. Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: T305) 374-3116
11271 October.}. 10. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 46-5468
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROCCO J. MARTUCCI.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of ROCCO 3. MARTUCCI, deceas-
ed. File Number 46-5468, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami. Florida.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested ,erson8 are re-
quired 51e with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 3 1986.
Personal Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER. P.A.
By: Alan R. Lorber
1111 Lincoln Road. Suite 680
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
11272 Octobers, 10.1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-38838
m RE: The Marriage of:
ST. THOMAS ANTENOR.
Petitioner/Husband
vs.
ELIVETTE ANTENOR.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ELIVETTE ANTENOR
Rue 3F No. 4
Cap-Haitian. Haiti
Shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attorney.
612 Northwest 12th Ave., Miami,
Florida 331S6, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
October 10, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated: September 8. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
BY: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
11079 September 12.19, 26;
October 3, 1986
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
as:
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business interprise under the fic-
titious name of RICHARD
MARKOWITZ & ASSOCIATES
located at 19 West Flagier Street
in the t'lty of Miami. Dade County,
Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
STEPHEN CAPLAN,
President
19 West Flagier Street
Miami, Dade County. Florida
MONEY & EGO. INC.
100 percent Stockholder
11274
October 3. 10, 17, 24. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil \ction No. 86-38799 FC 14
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
RUBIELA QUINTANA WRAY.
Petitioner
and
JERRY WAYNE WRAY.
Respondent
TO: JERRY WAYNE WRAY
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE. HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and ommenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, :f
any, to it an USHER BRYN,
ESQ attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 24.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16th day of September. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 309
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone:(305)532-1155
11102 September 19. 26;
October 3,10.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40236-27
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JACK ROBERT WILSON,
and
BELINDA WILSON,
TO: Belinda Wilson
1426 East Ralston Avenue
San Bernadino, California 92404
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Irving
J. Whitman, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10651
North Kendall Drive, Suite 200,
Miami, Florida 33176, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
24, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Irving J. Whitman, Esq.
10651 N. Kendall Dr.. Ste 200
Miami, Florida 33176
Phone: (305) 279-7000
Attorney for Petitioner
11107 September 19.26;
October 3. 10, 1986
Friday,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. 86-40244
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AIDA MAGDALEN A COLE, wife
and
JIM COLE husband
TO: Mr Jim Cole
1791 N.W. 114 Street
Carol City, Fla. 33055
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an notion fo'
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
'ias been filed against you and von
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on ARTHUR H. LIPSON, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 N.E. 167 Street.
Miami. Fla. 33162, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
24, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11108 September 19,26,
October 3. 10,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40243
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JAMES DARREL STEWART
husband
and
SONIA STEWART, wife.
TO: SONIA STEWART
ti6 MELMAC ST.
BELIZE CITY
BRITISH HONDURAS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
?on >f Marriage has been filed
against you and you ire required
to si rvt a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 Street, Miami. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 24, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for .he relief prayed in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of September '986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11109 September 19,26;
Octobers. 10, 1986
October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA)
as:
COUNTY OF DADE)
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of 36th Street Auto
Sales, Melrose Auto Sales. Real
Auto Sales, and World Wide Auto
Sales located at 3660 N.W. 36th
Street in the city of Miami, Dade
County. Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise, and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
Interest
ANTONIO CARBONELL,
President
Real Enterprises, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Sworn and subscribed to before
me, at Miami, this 19 day of
September. 1986.
Nancy Lauglio
Notary Public.
State of Florida at Large
Proof of publication of this inten-
tion to register, is filed herewith,
pursuant to the provisions of
Chapter 20963, Laws of 1941.
(866.09 FSA)
11258 September 26;
Octobers. 10.17.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name GENESIS at 2725
S.W. 3rd Avenue. Miami. Florida
33129 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
GENESIS DEVELOPMENT
GROUP, mc.
11260 September 26;
Octobers, 10, 17, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-37701
FB -22SON
ACTION FOR PETITION FOR
ADOPTION
IN RE: THE MATTERS OF
THE ADOPTION OF-
a minor
and
TO: Jose Luis Burgueno
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Petition/Adoption has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Armando
Gutierrez, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address k 2153 Coral Way,
Suite 400, Miami, Florida 33145,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 24, 1986; otherwise
a default will he entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By B. J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ.
Esquire
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
11103 September 19. 26;
October 3, 10. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 86-38904 04
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 564079
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MYLENE BUBLICK.
Petitioner/wife
and
BERNARD BUBLICK.
Respondent/husband
TO: BERNARD BUBLICK.
Residence Unknown
YOU. BERNARD BUBLICK,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorney.. Law Office
of HERMAN COHEN & ROBERT
S. COHEN 322 S.W. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33130, on or before
Oct-.iber 10. 1986. or else petition
w^il be'confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this September 8, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
BY: JOHN BRANDA
Deputy Clerk
11080 September 12,19, 26;
October 3. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naatber 86-2894
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
RICHARD A. HITCHCOCK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RICHARD A. HITCHCOCK,
deceased. File Number 86-2894. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom thii notice was served that
challenge* the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 26. 1986.
Personal Representative:
Mil. ARTHUR RABIN
6340 Lakenshem Boulevard
:'m \ngeles, California 91606
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
:<266 September 26;
October 3, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. DN
AND FOE DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie.
No. 86-41020 FC 28
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
BENIGNO AYALA
Petitioner
and
TERESA AYALA
Respondent
TO: TERESA AYALA
11150 Herrera Avenue
No. 7
Colon, PANAMA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a oetition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on USHER BRYN. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road Suite
309, Miami Beach, Florida 33189
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before October 31st, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23rd day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Rodriguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road
Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1166
11266 September 26;
Octobers, 10.17.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 86-39089
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 014496
IN RE: The marriage of:
MARIA L. SANCHEZ,
Petitioner'wife
and
GERSON B. SANCHEZ.
tespondent/husoand
TO: GERSON B. SANCHEZ,
Residence Unknown
YOU GERSON B. SANCHEZ,
residence unknown, sre required
to file your answer to the petition
for disolution of marriage with the
Clerk of the above Court and serve
a copy thereof upon the peti-
tioner's attorneys, Law Office of
HERMAN COHEN & MARTIN
COHEN. 622 S. W. 1st. Street.
Miami. Fla. 33130. on or before Oc-
tober 17. 1986. or else petition will
be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this September 9. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By Clannda Brown
Deputy Clerk
11086 September 12.19.26
October 3.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name 3770 West Flagier
Medical Center at 8770 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Fla 33134
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Ernesto A. Sivilla, M.D. P.A.
Harold J. Cohen
Attorney for 8770 West Flagier
Medical Center
11267 September26;
Octobers, 10, 17, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name All Fabric Protection
Treatment at 1607 W 42 Place,
Hialeah. PL 33012 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Reinaldo Igiesias, Jr.
11085 September 12. 19,26;
Octobers, 1986


Page 16-B The Jewish Poridian/Friday, OctobCT 3^1986
Pictured here (from left) at a High Holiday
Seminar for members of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami held at Beth
Torah Congregation are Rabbi Menachem
Raab, Director, Day School Department, Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education and
Secretary of the Association; Rabbi Carl
Klein, Hallandale Jewish Center and Presi-
dent of the Association; Rabbi Haskel Looks-
tein, Scholar-in-Residence; Rabbi Haskell Ber-
nat of Temple Israel of Greater Miami and
Vice President of the Association; Rabbi Max
A. Lipschitz of Temple Beth Torah and Rabbi
Solomon Sch{ff, Executive Vice President of
the Association.
Women's Division Of American
Friends Of Hebrew U. Luncheon
Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion, American Friends of the
Hebrew University, will hold a
luncheon meeting on Thursday,
Oct. 16, at 11:45 a.m. at the
Mimosa Restaurant, according to
Florence D. Feldman, Director of
* the Division.
Betty Schaffer, chairman of the
afternoon, announced the session
will include a book review by
Sophie Primak.
A report will be given by Albert
G. Effrat, Director of the
Southeast region, American
Friends, on the International Con-
ference of Friends of the Hebrew
University, which was held at the
Century Plaza Hotel, Los
Angeles, California. Participants
at this Conference included: Pro-
fessor Don Patinkin, President of
Hebrew University of Jerusalem;
Ambassador Avraham Harman,
Chancellor, Harvey M. Krueger,
Chairman, Board of Governors;
Harvey L. Silbert, Conference
Chairman, United States; Isaac
Becker, President of the Mexican
Friends; Gerald Halbert, Presi-
dent of the Canadian Friends;
Fred S. Lafer, President of the
American Friends; and William
Weinberg, President, Western
States Friends, sponsored by the
American, Canadian and Mexican
Friends. Conference was held
Sept. 17 through Sept 21.
Members of the committee an-
nounced by Mrs. Betty Schaffer,
include Viola Charcowsky, Ruth
Platt, Stella Topol and Eva
A Purr-Feet
Ending
TEL AVIV (JTA) A cat
stuck at the top of a 30-foot tree in
the Defense Ministry compound in
Tel Aviv for 10 days was rescued
by rappeling amateurs after the
professionals including the ar-
my, the police, the fire brigade,
the local zoo, and nature and
animal lovers societies had fail-
ed to get the angry, frightened
and hungry feline down to safety.
The soldiers in nearby bases and
offices could not get to the top of
the tree. And neither could
policemen. The fire brigade failed
to move the cat by spraying
water. The SPCA called on ex-
perts from the Ramat Can Safari
Zoo. They fired tranquilizer darts
at the feline but missed the target.
The Nature Protection Society
finally suggested appealing to
young rappeling enthusiasts,
whose pastime is handling steep
drops down cliffs by the use of
ropes this time thrown over the
tree top.
The SPCA reported that the
cat, which had nothing to eat or
drink for 10 days, is recovering
from its ordeal.
Ricklin. The 11:45 session is being
coordinated by Florence D.
Feldman.
Retired man to sham apart-
ment at live-In companion-
helper to healthy elderly
blind man. Room, board,
salary. Call:
864-7581
NEW...
from Nestle* Toll House* Morsels
In a continuing effort to provide only the finest in quality
products, we at Nestle Foods Corporation, in cooperation
with Rabbi Dr. J. H. Ralbag, announce an improvement in
the shelf life and appearance of Nestle Toll House Semi-Sweet
Chocolate Morsels, Little Bits semi-sweet chocolate pieces,
and Mint Chocolate Morsels by the addition of l%milkfat.
This addition will in no way change the great taste of our
morsels or the recipes made with them the taste of Nestle
Toll House Chocolate is America's favorite. Although these
morsels will no longer be pareve, they will remain a strictly
Kosher product.
We trust that our valued consumers will continue to enjoy
these fine Nestle morsels products. For ease of identifi-
cation, the products will bear the A D insignia on the
packaging. Thank you for your continued loyalty to our fine
quality products. _
Nestle Foods Corporation
Rabbi Dr. J.rf. Ralbag
At
A
l JB
Nestle
Publlx
BAKERY
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
f Available at Publlx Stores wittA
Fraah Danish Bakeries Only.
For ttto Dlot Conscious,
Lightly Sprinkled with
Sesame Seeds or Ryo Flow
Three
r, r I
Bread
AvaWablo at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Choose Your Favorites From
Our Delicious Assortment
Available at Publlx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
A Flaky Fie Cruet Made with
AH Vegetable Shortening,
Freeh Northern Spy Apples
and No Preservatives.
Apple or Dutch (8-inch Size)
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Delicious Crunchy Crust
Chicago Hard Rolls...6 tor 75*
Chocolate Cake Filled
with Cherries, Topped with
Whipped Cream (7-inch)
Black Forest Cake....... $4"
Filled with Apples and Cinnamon
Apple Streudel Slices.. 3 $1
Made with Crunch Walnuts and Plump Raisins,
ThrGG Rood
Walnut Raisin Bread .... !$169

Quantity
Rights Reserved
Available at All Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Regular or Unsalted
Bran Muffins................. 52*119
Butter Streusel
Coffee Cake..................^h$169
Great for Dunking, Mini
Powdered
Sugar Donuts................2 ^l09
Prices Effective
Oct. 2 thru 8,1986.
/r
Pubhx wishes your family a Happy Rosh Hashonah. To help celebrate the
Jewish New Year, the Danish Bakery will have the following items available
for your eating enioyment: Round Challah Breads, Honey Cakes, Sponge
Cakes, Miniature Danish, Macaroons and Rogards.
r*:
Publix




"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, October 3,1986 Section C



ROSH HASHANAH AT THE KOTEL.
Rosh hashanah PRayeRs at the Western! Wall
By HERB KEINON
Rosh Hashanah morning, 8:30,
the second day. The white stone
courtyard that leads up to the
Kotel (Western Wall) is filling up.
Against a deep blue, cloudless
Jerusalem sky, the sun inches its
way over the Mount of Olives. The
raspy, distinctively Middle
Eastern sound of two nasal,
elongated Arab words are heard
from a nearby minaret: "Allah
Akbar, God is great.
A steady flow of Jewish wor-
shippers make their way to the
Kotel men to the left, women to
the right. A 4-year-old boy, knit-
nTJa1m,ulke hanging over the tip
of his left ear, grabs his father's
hand and parts from his mother
hand aftr them wavin& her
MEN FILE into the courtyard
vtlai?tand filled with cardboard
E"! fu fr the ""Prepared.
Beyond the stand the worshippers
LT^men ^"8 tolure
"W to their particular minyan.
S52 tthe service. or where he
Lund^teS il with operatic-
funding interludes. Pray where
Morni, accent Lithuanian,
BffBJ*twentieth "**
JJWL The accents are different;
"eprayers more or less the same.
DlarT"8 ?f 8ervice8 taking
P^J mu]taneously. Some havf
haveLn qUOrum of 1Q: others
o!e ^.^[WTheKaddishof
Mu\sffnr,C.blend* with the
K*.**5 of ^ther.
ne the Shema is recited, there
the shofar is blown. It is an
unorganized emporium of ser-
vices. While one minyan is taking
out the Torah, another minyan
puts it back. It is jumbled and con-
fused; it is fascinating to watch.
One of the minyans begins the
Haftorah reading. A young, clean-
shaven man in his early twenties,
wearing sandals, blue pants and a
tallit over his short-sleeved,
wrinkled white shirt, reads from
Jeremiah: "Behold, I will bring
them from the north country, and
gather them from the uttermost
parts of the earth."
HOW APPROPRIATE the
verse seems as one looks out upon
the vast collection of Jews
gathered in front of the Kotel. A
list of their native lands reads like
the index of a world atlas:
Afghanistan, Brazil, Canada,
Ethiopia, France The variety
of their native tongues seems a
partial catalogue of the world's
languages: Arabic, Belorussian,
Czech, Dutch, English ... Yet
they have made their way to
Israel, and their sons and
daughters speak Hebrew.
The reader of the Haftorah con-
tinues: "And there is hope for thy
future, saith the Lord; and thy
children shall return to their own
border."
A group of tourists speaking a
Scandinavian language lean upon
the iron chain that separates the
praying of the courtyard from the
socializing of the plaza area
behind it. Here friends meet, high
school students flirt, people watch
people. One of the tourists takes
out a pocket camera and points it
at the praying, swaying masses.
An elderly Sephardic guard, iden-
tified by a blue hat with a badge
attached, runs toward the tourist
yelling ferociously in heavily ac-
cented English: "No camera to-
day. No, No." The tourist, eyes
lowered, slips the camera back in-
to his pocket.
Indeed the sight would be a
photographer's delight. There are
worhshippers in green army
uniforms; American tourists in
coats and ties; hassidim wearing
black pants, black coats and fur
streimels. Children some with
suspenders and corkscrew
oarlocks, others with shorts and
sandals run, jump and slide
across the courtyard as their
fathers pray.
HERE A MAN sways wildly,
there a man stands dead still with
his arm upon the Kotel, his head
upon his arm. Some men have a
tallit draped over their heads,
others have it loosely around their
shoulders, still others just have fr-
inges jutting out from underneath
their shirts. Some wear fedoras
while others sport only
yarmulkes.
In the plaza area, a group of
four border patrolmen, iden-
tifiable by their green berets, sit
smoking and laughing, their
M-16s resting on their knees.
They sit and watch as the
variegat' Iewish world parades
before them.
On the women's side there are
no organized services; no minyan
groups. Rather, the women crowd
close to the wall and pray private-
ly. Some weep loudly, others raise
their hands imploringly toward
heaven. A few place their ears
close to the six-foot slatted metal
mehitza (partition), hoping to hear
some of the Toarh being read on
the other side. But the din is so
great it is doubtful anything can
be heard.
At the entrance to the women's
section, a guard hands shoulder
shawls to women he deems to be
immodestly dressed. Many are the
elegantly coiffured wigs, the black
scarfs and colorful kerchiefs and
hats worn by married, observant
women. Many, also, are the heads
left uncovered.
A YOUNG GIRL in pigtails and
black stockings hand in hand
with an identically dressed
playmate skips across the width
of the women's section. Her
mother passes her a disapproving
look. The girl stops in mid-stride,
picks up a prayer book and ap-
proaches the Kotel.
Referring to the Kotel, the late
Conservative Rabbi Abraham
Joshua Heschel wrote: "No com-
eliness to be acclaimed, no beauty
to be relished. But a heart and an
ear." On Rosh Hashanah many
are those who walk to the Kotel to
speak to this ear, derive comfort
from this heart. It seems a most
fitting way to start the new year.


Page 2-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986

high holy days
Challenge Us
to face Reality
By RABBI CHAIM PEARL
It is often said that, while all
other festivals have a strong na-
tional and historical significance,
the High Holy Days are personal,
since they challenge the individual
to face up to the realities of his
own life. There is much truth in
that assertion. Nevertheless, let
us look at a further national im-
plication in the choice of the Torah
reading for Roah Haahanah. First,
another legend.
THE RABBIS tell the following
story. When Abraham started out
on his journey to sacrifice his son
in accordance with God's com-
mand, Satan disguised himself as
an old man and met Abraham on
the road.
"Where are you going?" he ask-
ed the Patriarch
"I am going to pray." answered
Abraham.
"Then why on earth are you car-
rying the wood and the knife?"
"Well," answered Abraham,
"we might want to camp out for a
day or two. and then we will need
to cook and to bake."
"Old man." Satan said, "I was
present when God told you to
slaughter your son. and I think
you've gone out of your mind.
Here you are at the age of one
hundred. At last you have the son
you have been waiting and pray-
ing for. and now you are going to
kill him."
"Yes I am," said Abraham
quietly. "For that is what God
commanded me to do."
"And what if tomorrow God will
ask you to kill yourself, because
you killed your son?" persisted
Satan. "What will you do then?"
"I would still carry out His com-
mand," said Abraham.
SEEING THAT he was getting
nowhere with the father, Satan
then tried with Isaac. He changed
himself into a youngster and he
stood before Isaac.
"Where are you going?" he
asked.
"To study Torah," Isaac
answered.
"Before your death or after it?"
Satan taunted.
"Can anyone study Torah after
his death?" the boy asked.
"Alas. You poor kid. I can't bear
to think of your mother. How
many fasts she kept and how
many prayers she offered before
you were born. And now this fool
of an old man. your father, is go-
ing to slaughter you."
"Just the same." answered
Isaac. 'I won't rebel against the
will of God or against the decision
of my father."
When Satan saw that his efforts
had failed with both of them, he
tried a new tactic and changed
himself into a big river in order to
prevent them from proceeding on
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A rabbinic view warns us that zechut avot' is not forever
their journey.
ABRAHAM immediately walk-
ed into the water and. when it
reached his knees, he instructed
Isaac and his servants to follow
him. Abraham went on ahead; but
the water got deeper and deeper,
and when it reached his neck.
Abraham looked up to heaven and
prayed:
"Oh. God. You revealed
Yourself to me and said, i am the
One God. and you are the uniquely
faithful, and through you shall My
name be acknowledged
throughout the world.'
"When you commanded me to
sacrifice Isaac. I did not argue and
I am now on my way to carry out
Your command. But the waters of
this river are ready to take my
life. If I or my son Isaac is to
drown, then who will be left to
Garry out Your commands? By
whom will You be acknowledged
as the only One God?"
Immediately after Abraham's
prayer. God rebuked the river,
which then disappeared, leaving
Abraham and his company to con-
tinue their journey on dry ground.
When they finally arrived at the
place of the sacrifice. Abraham
got everything ready They built
the altar, and Abraham bound
Isaac on to it. Abraham's tears
flowed as he took the knife to
slaughter his son.
BUT EVEN at the last minute.
Satan was determined to
everything he could to
Abraham from proving his f
God. He pushed Abraham's!
and made the Patriarch dr
knife. Abraham stooped.
up the knife and made to perfai
the act of sacrifice.
But it was not lod'splini
Isaac should be sacrificed. I
now evident and it
always be clear i all men a
all time that Anraham hado
ed the test of faith in God.
So God immediately dispatc
the angel Michae,. whoprevef
Abraham from Killing his
After that. Abranam found ar
Continued on Page 15-C
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Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-C
Seventh yeaR a SaBBath of Solemn Rest Por the Un6

By DVORA WAYSMAN
Shmitta happens every seven
years, beginning on Rosh
Hashanah, and although for most
of world Jewry it is just a
theological concept with no prac-
tical application, for Israel's
observant Jews it has profound
significance. "The seventh year
shall be a Sabbath of solemn rest
for the land," we are commanded
(Lev. 25:4).
Exiled for the greater part of
their history, the Shmitta year
was largely forgotten by Jews
who were not obliged to observe
it. that is if they lived outside of
Eretz Israel. Even those who liv-
ed in Palestine and were
persecuted had reason to waive its
observance. But since the birth of
the State of Israel, it has become a
voluntary act of piety for obser-
vant Jews and is again a lively
I issue in the conscience of Iraelis.
DURING THE First Com
I monwealth, the settlement of Ca-
Inaan under Joshua, the Jewish
[people were lax in observing
IShmitta, and many lapsed into
[idolatry. Ezra ruefully observed in
Ithe epilogue to Chronicles: "And
Ithey burnt the house of God .
[and those that escaped from the
Isword did Nebuchadnezzar carry
into exile into Babylon until
|the kingdom of Persia came to the
government to fulfil the word of
Lord until the land has been
aid its (unobserved) Sabbaths; all
be days of its desolation it rested
ntil 70 years were completed."
Neglect of Shmitta brought ex-
ile, and for more than four of the
nine centuries of the First Com-
nonwealth, Shmitta was not
bserved properly. When the ex-
iles returned under Ezra and

An 18th Century Austrian prayer book binding in hammered and engraved silver, depicting Jacob's dream and the sacrifice
of Isaac.
Nehemia, they solemnly vowed to
keep it.
It required great self-sacrifice
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l to refrain from cultivating the
land when the Romans levied a
heavy annual crop tax. Yet even
with the fields lying fallow and
vineyards (intended, most Jews
managed somehow to satisfy the
Romans' demands. The Rabbis
dealt leniently with Jews who
Continued on Page 1S-C
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5747



Page 4-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Outgoing yeaa Was
Qovepnefc By Coming
Srwnm Rotation
By SIMON GRIVER
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
spent the past year caught bet-
ween the proverbial devil and the
deep blue sea. Some observers
believe he tried on several occa-
sions to rock Israel's political boat
in the hope of sinking his Likud
political partners in the National
Unity government but seemed to
pull back for fear that he might in-
advertently drown. As it happens,
there often seemed a greater
likelihood that Vice Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir would be
thrown overboard by colleagues
from within his own Herat Party.
Israeli politics were dominated
during 5746 by the rotation agree-
ment. This unique political accord,
signed in September, 1984, stated
that Peres would serve as Prime
Minister for 25 months upon
which he would be succeeded by
Shamir for the following 25 mon-
ths. It was an innovative agree-
ment, unheard of in the annals of
parliamentary democracy
anywhere in the world, between
two parliamentary blocs (Labor
and Likud) who are bitterly divid-
ed over many issues, but especial-
ly that of Israel's future borders.
THE AGREEMENT came
about because neither bloc could
form a government after the in-
conclusive elections of Jury, 1984.
Labor was in a marginally-
stronger position, and Peres
opted to take first strike as Prime
Minister. The rotation agreement
was not constitutionally binding.
Whoever, however, chose to annul
the agreement would have to ex-
plain the act to the electorate.
This has been at the heart of
Peres' dilemma. He has enjoyed
his stint as Prime Minister but
rotation has threatened him
despite his successes in stabilizing
the economy, withdrawing the
IDF from Lebanon and
strengthening the country's inter-
national profile and foreign rela-
tions. Furthermore, he has over-
come his own demonic image
within certain sectors of Israel's
oriental population. With this in-
creased stature in mind, many of
Peres' supporters have urged him
to call early elections, despite the
credibility risk involved in break-
ing the rotation agreement.
Few people, at the start of 5746,
saw any likelihood of rotation be-
ing implemented. The Likud was
cynical, seeing Peres as an
unreliable megalomaniac. "It
would be extremely naive to
believe that the Labor Alignment
will keep the arrangement," said
Likud MK Eliahu Ben Elissar last
October.
"The rotation agreement is in-
tolerable," declared MK Rafi
Edri, chairman of the Labor
Alignment Caucus in a speech last
October. "The Likud's hard line
on the possibility of peace talks is
paralyzing the government's
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Shimon Peres (left) and Yitzhak Shamir at
Mimouna celebrations earlier this year. The
two are due to rotate their leadership roles
this month.
foreign policy." Yet the rotation
agreement survived. There were
three distinct crises, though none
of them ever looked likely to pro-
vide Peres with a strong enough
reason for appealing to the
electorate.
"THE FIRST crisis came in
November when Peres fired In-
dustry and Commerce Minister
Ariel Sharon after he had been in-
sulted by him. He retreated from
the brink, however, by accepting a
lukewarm apology. The second
crisis came in March when then
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai
also strongly criticized Peres. A
conciliatory Likud, determined
not to scuttle the rotation agree-
ment, allowed Modai to change
positions with Justice Minister
Moahe Nissim.
By the third crisis, over whether
there should be an inquiry into the
conduct of the head of the Shin
Bet (General Security Service),
nobody believed that the rotation
agreement would be violated,
especially as Peres and Shamir ap-
peared to see eye-to-eye on the
issue.
This fatalistic attitude towards
rotation greatly angers many
Labor people, for they fear that
with the economy on the road to
recovery, the Likud will now take
the credit for Peres'
achievements.
Assuming that rotation is im-
plemented, Peres will have more
power as Deputy Prime Minister
and Foreign Minister than did
Shamir. Just as Shamir did not
want to rock the rotation boat
while Peres was in power lest he
lose his opportunity to become
Prime Minister, so he will have to
accede to Peres' maneuverings
after rotation, if he wants to re-
main in power. The results of the
1988 elections could depend on
whether Shamir or Peres proves
to be the shrewder politician.
BUT WHILE Peres leads a
Labor Party that seems relatively
united, Shamir faces a continuing
challenge to his leadership from
Housing Minister David Levy and
Industry Minister Ariel Sharon.
Indeed, during the Herut conven-
tion in February, there were at-
tempts to depose Shamir despite
the fact that the rotation agree-
ment is personal and is only valid
if Shamir remains at the helm of
his party.
The Herut convention which
was marked by rowdiness and
even fist fights, also saw the reap-
pearance of the name Begin, in
the form of Dr. Binyamin Zeev
Begin, a geologist, tyro politician
and son of die former Prime
Minister. Begin and Deputy
Foreign Minister Ronnie Milo
(Begin's nephew) put their full
support behind Shamir charging
that Sharon had not served in
Herut during its long years in op-
position. Eli Landau the Mayor of
Herzliya and a Sharon supporter,
says in an attempt to slight Begin
junior and Milo, "There should be
no princes in a democratic party."
If Shamir is successful as Prime
Minister he could quell attempts
to oust him. Otherwise, it is not
only Peres and the Labor Party
who are out to exploit any
weaknesses.
A FURTHER threat to the Na-
tional Unity government could
come from overseas. Labor has
always hoped to launch a peace in-
itiative, preferably trading land
for peace with Jordan. Such a deal
would be anathema to the Likud,
which adheres to the concept of an
Israel including Judea, Samaria
and Gaza even though the ter-
ritories contain 1.3 million Arabs.
King Hussein still seems reluctant
to embark on a Sadat-style peace
initiative
Should the rotation agreement
remain intact, it would undermine
the belief that Israel is a country
hopelessly polarized between left
and right. And with the pollsters
predicting that elections would
once again produce a stalemate
between Labor and Likud, rota-
tion could even create a precedent
for a further compromise in 1988.
Opinion polls, however, also show
that the majority of Israelis on
both left and right do not want
new elections before 1988.
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Among the Outgoing year's top events:
penes' meetings With hassan, muBauak
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-C
By WALTER EYTAN
The most dramatic event of
5746 was the meeting between
Prime Minister Shimon Peres and
King Hassan of Morocco, which
polarized attitudes in the Arab
world. It remains to be seen what
long-range effects it may have on
Israel's relations with its
neighbors: no modification of
policies is discernible yet on either
side. The year's achievements
have been mainly in other fields.
Israel concluded a free trade
agreement with the United States
whose implementation, as always
in such cases, will be spread over
several years. The agreement is
similar to that which was signed,
and is being implemented, with
the European Economic Com-
munity (EEC), a market as
populous as that of the United
States. These agreements provide
for the exchange of goods "free-
ly." that is, without tariff barriers
or customs dues. They are design-
ed to make Israel, in effect, an in-
tegral partner in the European
and American economies.
IN THE sphere of bilateral rela-
tions, diplomatic ties have, at last,
been established between Israel
and Spain. Apart from the anoma-
ly of Spain having been for years
the only West European country
to hold out against such ties, this
move had a special significance,
coming as it did within weeks of
Spain's admission to membership
of the EEC. At the same time the
Ivory Coast became, after Zaire
and Liberia, the third African
country to resume diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel after their
disruption in the wake of the Yom
Kippur War. In August,
Cameroon became the fourth. The
Prime Minister Thatcher
breach with Africa, which
resulted from Arab pressure and
the oil embargo of 1973, is
gradually being healed.
One of the year's outstanding
events was the official visit to
Israel of Margaret Thatcher, the
first ever by a Prime Minister of
Great Britain. It marked
something like an effective recon-
ciliation between the two coun-
tries, effacing the last bitter
memories of the Palestine Man-
date. Other noteworthy "firsts"
were the reception accorded to an
Israeli President in Ireland, when
Chaim Herzog returned on a state
visit to the land of his birth, and to
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zhak Shamir, in Japan.
While all this was going on,
Israel's relations with its Arab
neighbors remained, by and large,
at a standstill. The peace treaty
with Egypt was maintained, and
in some sectors attempts were
made on both sides to lend it more
practical content. The Taba issue,
however, blocked the develop-
ment of normal relations: a whole
year was spent (one can only hope,
not wasted) on seeking an agreed
formula for arbitration pro-
cedures to determine whether this
tiny strip of land near the head of
the Gulf of Eilat, was to belong to
Israel or to Egypt. It seems likely
this will now be achieved in the
very near future.
In mid-September, Prime
Minister Peres and President
Mubarak held a summit in Cairo.
THE SUPPOSED "peace pro
cess" between Israel and Jordan
hardly crawled forward an inch.
Jordan deemed it could make no
move except in partnership with
the PLO. King Hussein's repeated
efforts to pin down Yasser Arafat
ended in failure. As the year went
on, it became clear that the king
had despaired totally of the
Jordanian-Palestinian understan-
ding, which for him was the
precondition of negotiations with
Israel. In the end he took active
steps against the PLO, by closing
down their offices in his kingdom,
hoping perhaps to find alternative
partners among other Arab
notables in Judea and Samaria.
As things stand, the ball is in the
Arab court, but if ever King Hus-
sein agreed to nogotiate, pro-
blems would clearly arise on the
Israeli side. The present national
unity government can achieve no
consensus on what the terms of
seace with Jordan should be. In-
leed, the coalition agreement of
September, 1984 between Labor
ind Likud stated explicitly that if
Jordan accepted Israel's call to
legotiate, new Knesset elections
vould be held a virtual referen-
lum on whose policy, Likud's or
^abor's, the public decided to
ndorse.
A formal treaty of peace bet-
veen the two countries is unlikely
n any event. Such a treaty could
lot evade the problem of
Jerusalem, on which neither side
vill yield. The most, probably,
hat can be hoped for is a wide
anging, formalized modus viven-
li, based on that which in practice
-ules today. It would refelct the
rital interest of Israel and Jordan
n each other's independent ex-
istence and strength.
THE MENACE to both comes
from Syria, which is aiming to call
the shots in the Middle East as a
whole as it has been doing in
Lebanon. It has never abandoned
its dream of a Greater Syria to en-
compass not only Lebanon but the
whole of Jordan and what was
Palestine. King Hussein has been
trying to appease Syria's Presi-
dent Hafez al-Assad but with
his eyes wide open.
Syria, at this point, is the only
Arab state that threatens Israel
with war. For the past year, with
sustained supplies from the Soviet
Union, it has quite openly been
building up its military strength,
and not for defensive purposes
alone. The year has been marked,
too, by an intensification of ter-
rorist activity, one of whose main
sources is Syria. Side by side with
the Syrian government's own part
in this campaign, the leading Arab
terror groups all have their base
in Damascus. If terrorist activities
continue in 5747, it is clear where
the finger should be pointed.
U.S. Vice President George
Bush arrived in Israel, late in July
for a four-day visit, during which
he announced that the U.S. is
ready in principle to grant "most-
Prime Minister Shimon Peres vrith King Hassan of Morocco in
the king's palace at Ifrane, July 1986.
favored nation" status to Israel in
the field of security. The move will
allow Israel to purchase U.S.
weaponry under improved terms
and will facilitate Israel access to
U.S. research and development
programs.
Bush also signed a memoran-
dum of understanding between
the U.S. and Israel affirming the
importance of two-way traffic bet-
ween the two countries.
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Page6-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
.
Clear evidence points to
growing anti-Semitism in
Europe. While it is natural
to react with anguish and
anger to increasing anti-
Semitic acts which con-
stitute a sickness and an im-
mensely worrying
phenomenon, merely recor-
ding their occurrence is not
an effective strategy.
The Jewish community must in-
stead 1) make more vigorous use
of the EEC and, in particular, its
recent report on racism and anti-
Semitism; 2) record more in-
telligently the scale of anti-
Semitism in Europe; and 3) define
and encourage programs to
strengthen our own Jewish
commitment.
The EEC statement on anti-
Semitism has, not surprisingly,
been submerged beneath subse-
quent EEC reports. But its terms
of reference and recommenda-
tions signal opportunities for
Jewish leaders to mobilize their
communities.
THE RECOMMENDATIONS
require the Commission to report
on the growth and size of fascist,
racialist and related groups within
Europe; the relationship between
the growth of fascism and racism
and the worsening economic and
social conditions, for example,
poverty and unemployment; the
machinery member states'
governments already use to res-
pond to these organizations; and
ways of combating them.
The recommendations are ex-
tensive but not always detailed.
Countries have been asked to
ratify all conventions restricting
racism whether at the UN,
UNESCO, ILO or the Council of
Europe. They are also urged to
draw up legislation to combat
racism at home.
The Commission also urges a
these is Cleaa evidence
Of a QRowinq ti&e Of
Anti-Semitism in eupope
By ERIC MOONMAN
London Chronicle Syndicate
Eric Moorman is a vice
president of the British Board
of Deputies.
comparative law study of the
various legal instruments and
practices within the Community
to deal with racism and that the
European Parliament should en-
courage this project.
At the same time, organizations
should be set up in each country to
provide information on the best
means of legal protection against
discrimination. The Committee
further urges that national
governments and parliaments
study the proposals and act on
them. We in the Jewish communi-
ty should do the same.
REPORTS FROM political
bodies and parliaments suffer
from party compromises
necessary to produce an agree-
ment. But this EEC document
touches on ground that will not
particularly surprise Jewish com-
munity leaders and will certainly
encourage political leaders to act
through their national and the
European parliaments.
What can Jewish communities
Europe do? Each one should
in
W
'ski
and
isninr uou napmness
throughout
o
ha
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the
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vti&c/,
(G. Holmes Braddock)
fM
Federal Precious Metal
250 N.E. 17th Terrace
Miami 33132 Phone 379-5772
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T\ J
Louis Farrakhan
draw up strategies to demand
tougher legislative controls on
racism, involve trade unions and
worker organizations in fighting
racism and encourage ratification
of certain conventions. To grasp
expanding opportunities, I would
like to see working parties set up
in each country dealing specifical-
ly with such groups as trades
unions and professional bodies.
Why compare anti-Semitism in
different European countries?
Are we comparing like with like,
or is there not a case for a truly
comparative appraisal? The pat-
tern of anti-Semitism in Europe
varies enormously. Sweden has
had no reported instances of anti-
Semitism in this past year, while
for the first time in many years
Jewish tombstones in Austria
have reportedly been vandalized.
The Waldheim affair has un-
doubtedly brought latent anti-
Semitism to the surface.
IN OTHER West European
countries, our enemies have in-
creasingly used the terrorists'
bomb. In Denmark, the attack on
a synagogue and other institu-
tions has diverted the local Jewish
community's resources towards
stepped up security
arrangements.
Elsewhere, vandalism is rife:
the Jewish community in Belgium
reports that intruders inscribed
"death to the Jews" on the walls
of the Maimonides School in
Burssels. Similar desecration ap-
peared on the walls of the
synagogue in Madrid. In Italy, the
shouting of anti-Semitic slogans
now characterizes Italian football.
Police were recently called to the
Meazza football stadium in Milan
in response to anti-Jewish abuse
continuously shouted from a large
section of the crowd.
In the United Kingdom, efforts
must be made to head off anti-
Semitism between the black and
Jewish communities. A review is
taking place through the Board of
Deputies whose findings and con-
clusions will ultimately need a
sympathetic understanding of all
Jews.
THE AMERICAN black leader,
Louis Farrakhan, and his televi-
sion appearances in recent mon-
ths from Madison Square Garden
before 25,000 people have shock-
ed many British Jews. While the
Home Secretary prevented Far-
rakhan from visiting Britain, his
disciples play his tapes and ap-
plaud his speeches on campus, at
town halls and elsewhere and de-
mand that he be allowed to enter
this country.
AT THE South Polytechnic, a
major dispute over the playing of
the tapes led the college ad-
ministration to ban the African
Society (and the Jewish Society
for protesting) and officers of the
Board of Deputies to visit the
Secretary of State for Education.
On May 3, a pro-Farrakhan and
pro-Libyan rally at Lambeth
Town Hall heard on tape Far-
rakhan's address to the recent
"anti-imperialist" conference in
Libya at which anti-Semitic
speeches were made.
The involvement of both ex-
treme left and rightwing activists
is behind much of the agitation.
This problem is not uniquely
British. It will likely concern other
West European countries in the
next year or two.
In France, monitoring anti-
Semitism is confined to analyzing
the March general election, which
produced a narrow victory for the
rightwing parties, the RPR and
the UDF (they represent 42 per-
cent of the electorate). The ex-
treme right, which has not stood
in Parliament since 1956 when 52
Poujadists did, is now represented
Levinson Loans
22 NW 1 St.
Miami 371-6437
Happy New Year
w
Chancellor Kohl
by the Front National 35
deputies and 130 regional
councilors.
EVENTS immediately
preceding the March elections,
such as the condemnation of Jac-
ques Le Pen for anti-Semitism in a
civil court, hardly worked against
theFN.
In February, Chancellor Helmut
Kohl of West Germany put into
perspective, as he saw it, any anti-
Semitism which may still exist in
contemporary Germany.
Frau Hildegard Hamra-
Brucher, a backbench member of
the Free Democrats, the liberal
party which is part of Herr Kohls
Center Righ coalition, had taken
Continued on Page K

k
a
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n
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f*
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Our warmest greetings to all our Friends
May the New Year bring peace
throughout the world
Officers and Staff of the
American Friends of
The Hebrew University

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leRUsalem theater* Complex,
newly-6xpan6e6, hosts
many top pepf opmances
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-C

By HELENA FLUSFEDER
The 1986 Israel Festival, held in
Irusalem from May 24 through
[ine If) was a diverse medley of
da (u'ture offerings.
jhnghteei by performances that
Eebrateo renewed cultural ties
Ith Poland and Israel's recently
fcabiished diplomatic relations
Ith Spain
[The newly-expanded Jerusalem
leater complex decorated with
ream? of multi-colored flags and
inner;- was the Festival
owpiece. The new wing incor-
Irate.*- three auditoriums: a
10-seat symphony hall, a
ID-seal auditorium for ex-
nmentai theater and dance, and
150-seat "Little Theater" for
etry readings and smaller
Iformances, all of which were us-
extensively throughout the
tival.
he three-week Israel Festival,
|ich has been centered in
usalem since 1982, began with
hacaber play, "Replika," by the
lish playwright. Jozef Szajna,
formed by members of the
Habimah Theater Com-
|y. "Replika" is a chillingly
esque story about the debase-
Dt of man and was no doubt the
lit of Szajna's personal ex
Bences in Auschwitz. As Szajna
I it, there is no real plot just the
liction of "the agony of our
|rld and our immense
nism."
IER POLISH productions
uded "The End of Europe," by
|50 actors and musicians of the
er Nowy Poznan, and sevei-al
cheerful and inspiring per-
nances by the 100-strong
owsze State Song and Dance
kmble.
be festival also included per-
hances of three plays by
Dish playwright Federico Gar-
rca. which were chosen to
nemorate both the 50th an-
gary of his death and the new
[between Israel and Spain,
lese included the famous
Wedding," performed by
ITeatro de la Plaza company
v the direction of Jose Luis
, based on events which oc-
l in 1928 in Spain's Almerica
p. The strikingly dramatic
pna. performed by the Nuria
rt Company, tells the story of
Fren and unfulfilled woman,
fascinating aspect of the play
at "e set represents the
which in Yerma's case is
less.
vigorous and convincing
J especially on the part of
H lady Nuria Espert as Yer-
? and brilliant yet simple sets,
J% was a huge success.
N*neous translation through
Phones was available.
TO.HIGHLIGHTS includ-
Wni-festivalofplaysbyGer-
. dramatist Franz Xaver
a selection of vocal and
I j*- a P^uction of
Rite Cor* *
lTW perfor-
oi the two-act ballet
m>fr Orchestra,
Ba"et s rendition of Swan
S^10^ not to attend
{Et&" of ter>ri8t
K Krder not te bow to
itoatt:ndCO,npany *y
iveeVrk ba8ed P8t"
fnie Zane offered
somewhat more unusual fare
with exciting dance sequences and
an outstanding leading dancer
more than making up for its
discordant music and weak
storyline.
The long passageways and im-
posing stone walls of Davids
The Sadler s Wells company had
in fact decided not 10 attend the
festival, for fear of terrorist attack, but
in order not to bow to terrorism, the
company finally decided to attend
Tower in Jerusalem's Old City
provided a striking backdrop for
the New York Ensemble for Early
Music's effective rendition of the
12th Century liturgical drama
"Daniel and the Lions."
Using antique instruments, in-
cluding a lute and Renaissance
recorders, the company told the
biblical story (in medieval French)
of Daniel, who is thrown to the
lions for worshipping his own God.
With choral voices emerging from
hidden crevices, magnificent
lighting and richly-colored royal
costumes, it was an interesting,
enjoyable and unconventional
Members of the BriUA Sadler's WeUs Royal Ballet company performing Swan Lake dur-
ing the Israel Festival in Jerusalem.
production.
The budget for this year's
festival amounted to $770,000
(derived from the sale of tickets
and funding from the Jerusalem
Municipality, the Education,
Foreign and Tourism, Ministries,
the Jewish Agency and the
Jerusalem Foundation.) Addi-
tionally, impresarios brought in-
dividual artists and companies to
the Festival and took on the cost
productions
of several
themselves.
FOR THREE WEEKS, people
savored a multitude of cultural
events, while the area around the
Jerusalem Theater took on a car-
nival atmosphere. Audiences
came from all over the country;
festival organizers estimated that
40 percent of festival-goers came
from outside Jerusalem.
As for the more far-reaching ef-
fects of the festival, artistic direc-
tor Oded Kotler described it as a
"part of cultural life, a chance to
let people see what's happening in
human and artistic expression. It
has created a storm in the Israeli
artistic scene."
If the crowded performance
sites and appreciate audiences
were any indication, this year's
festival was an unmitigated
success.
The people of CenTrust sincerely wish
you and your family the happiest, healthiest
and most prosperous of New Years.
ALTON ROAD OFFICE: 1801 Alton Road.

41st STREET OFFICE: Sheridan Financial Center, 400 41st Street.
NORMANDY ISLE OFFICE: 1166 Normandy Drive.
SUNNY ISLES OFFICE: 16830 Collins Avenue.
SURFSIDE/BAL HARBOUR OFFICE: 9556 Harding Avenue.
CenTrust
Savings Bank
\bur future is our future"
1986 CenTrust


Page 8-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Oavifc Ben-QuRion: his Centennial CeleBRAtion Oct.
By RABBI
BERNARD K ASK AS
Oct. 16 marks the hundredth
anniversary of the birth of David
Ben-Gurion, one of the greaest
Jews of modern times. His con-
tributions to the Jewish people
and his impact on the world scene
are destined to be remembered for
as long as the human race will en-
dure. Most of us are aware of his
life, and it is hardly possible to do
justice to such a towering figure in
a brief article. Instead, it would be
more interesting to take his five
favorite biblical verses and use
them as some revealing insights
into his life.
The first verse is from Isaiah
(45:7): "I, the Lord, do all these
things."
As much as Ben-Gurion
disregarded ritual, he was a deep-
ly religous man. He believed in
God but felt that ritual was not
necessary because living in the
land of Israel provided the cement
to keep the Jewish people
together in modem times.
LET ME quote his own words:
"The essence of being a Jew, in
my opinion, is the idea of the Pro-
phets not the Torah, but the
Prophets. They have two ideas:
You must love one single God and
you must lead a normal life. That
is all that matters."
He had tremendous respect for
the natural forces of the universe.
He spent his time cultivating
roses in the Negev, walking the
terrain of Israel, and encouraging
people literally to work in the soil.
One of the loveliest pictures I
have ever seen shows him feeding
a bottle to a newborn lamb. It is
absolutely beautiful, and it really
shows his love and reverence for
DAVID BEN-GURION: "you shall love your neighbor."
the life of the universe.
THE SECOND verse is taken
from Leviticus 19:18 and 33: "You
shall love your neighbor as
yourself. When an alien settles
with you in your land you shall
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love him as yourself."
It is very interesting that
although Ben-Gurion was a very
strong figure, he never used other
than democratic means to press
for his policies. He was elected
Premier of Israel, and never once
did he silence his opposition even
though it was bitter and even
though he had the power to do so.
Although the Arabs were his
adversaries, he never spoke
disrespectfully of them or their
cultures.
It is rather remarkable that
even though he was devoted to the
Jewish people to an unbelievable
degree and worked so hard on
their behalf, he found time to
study other cultures. Consider the
fact that he was a keen student of
the Greek and Eastern
philosophies and used to stand on
his head in a yoga exercise.
In addition to his profound
knowledge of the Bible, he
mastered English. Russian.
Greek, Yiddish. Turkish. French,
Arabic, and at the time of his
death he was studying Spanish.
What an extraordinary human
being.
THE THIRD biblical verse that
he loved was Isaiah 42:6: "I, the
Lord, have called you with
righteous purpose ... I have
formed you and appointed you to
be a covenant to all peoples, a
beacon for the nations."
Ben-Gurion's dedication to the
Jewish people was absolute. It
was he who proclaimed the State
of Israel after two-thousand years
of exile. It was he who built up the
armed might of Israel, and one of
the symbols of this is the fact that
he changed his last name from
Green to Ben-Gurion, which
means "the son of a lion."
It was he who brought
Eichmann to trial to prove "Jews
are not sheep to be slaughtered,
but a people who can hit back."
But even more than this, he
showed himself to be an essential
Jew by his love of the Bible and his
constant study of the Prophets.
Ben-Gurion used to teach the
Bible.
Throughout his life, he focused
all his attention on the Prophets
until he became a prophet himself.
He was his people's revolutionary
and the visionary that gave birth
to their new homeland.
INTERESTINGLY enough,
the New York Times in an
editorial lauded Ben-Gurion,
above all else, for his love of
biblical scholarship. And so he was
committed to the concept of
leading an exemplary, righteous,
and just life. And because he felt
the Jew had a special destiny not
only in the active world but in the
world of learning, he is properly
designated the representative
Jew of modem times.
The fourth passage from the Bi-
ble is taken from the Book of
Micah (2:3): "... nation shall not
lift up sword against nation
He used to say. "I consider peace
more important than territories."
He truly loved all men.
The greatest paradox of Ben-
Gurion is that even though he had
to fight all his life he essentially
had the goal of peace. He became
a friend of the great political
figures of the world and always
and forever he pressed them for a
peaceful solution to Israel's pro-
blems. His love of peace was
shown when Israel had its 25th
anniversary parade. Because of
the political situation it had to be
an army event, but he showed up
in a farmer's hat.
ALTHOUGH he was involved in
all the wars of Israel, he never
wore a uniform or decoration. In
fact, so great was his disdain for
formality that he rarely wore a
tie. There was something about
him that was earthy, that was
real, that spoke of the common
man who only wanted to make a
living and live with his neighbors
in peace.
I think that is why in his later
years he returned to Sde Boker in
the Negev desert. He wanted no
honors and he wanted no power
His desk at his death was piled
with manuscripts, a Bible, a copy
of Plato's philosophy in Greek
and some Buddhist words.
In his last will and testament, he
indicated that he did not wish to
be buried in any national cemetery
but instead should rest next to his
beloved wife, Paula, in the Negev
It was as if to say: 1 want to be
next to the woman I have always
loved, in the soil I have loved, en
couraging young people to pioneer
in the land that I loved.
BEN-GURION had a fifth
biblical verse which he always car
ried in his pocket. And when he
took to his final illness, they found
this verse in Hebrew in his own
handwriting. It constitutes the
closing words of Amos:
"And I will turn the captivity of
my people Israel, and they shall
build the waste cities, and inhabit
them; and they shall plant
vineyards, and drink the wine
thereof: they shall also make
gardens, and eat the fruit of them.
And I will plant them upon their
land, and they shall no more be
plucked up out of their land which
I have given them, saith the Lord
thy God."
Through Ben-Gurion's extraor-
dinary life and work came the
fulfillment of that ancient
prophecy.
Ben-Gurion's first name was
David. And like his namesake,
King David of the Bible, he began
a whole new era in Jewish history.
And so, in time, they will say of
him something that they once said
of another great leader: "From
David unto David, there arose no
one like David."
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Friday^October 3^ 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-C

euRopean Anti-Semitism
Tnshlirh on a Tel Aviv beach.
OBseRvant Jews at tashlich:
Casting theiR Sins Into the Sea
By CAROL GREEN
Toward late afternoon on the
first day of the new year, Jews
customarily gather alongside the
banks of a river, ocean, stream or
other body of water to utter
praises to God and "cast all their
sins into the depths of the sea."
(Micah 7:19) This ceremony,
known as Taahlich, from the
Hebrew "to cast," is performed
by observant Jews all over the
world. Jews can be spotted
casting breadcrumbs, symbolic of
their sins, along the shores of the
Atlantic, Pacific and Mediterra-
nean seas, at the Sea of Galilee
and in landlocked Jerusalem at
the Shiloah or Silwan tunnel,
through which the Gihon spring
flows.
The origins of this symbolic
ritual, however, remain a
mystery. It is not mentioned in
either the Bible or the Talmud, or
by the early rabbinic authorities.
The earliest reference is found in
the writings of the 15th Century
German sage Rabbi Jacob Moellin
in the Sefer Maharvil, but though
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he acknowledges the existence of
the practice he doesn't explain
how and why it developed.
SEVERAL commentators link
the idea of going to a body of
water on the new year to a legend
about our father Abraham. Accor-
ding to the legend, after God
ordered Abraham to sacrifice
Isaac, Satan came to God claim-
ing, "this is too much. I can't
believe that your servant
Abraham will bring his only son
the son he has waited for his en-
tire life to the slaughter."
So confident was the Almighty
in Abraham that He made a bet
with Satan. The legend explains
that God allowed Satan to do
everything in his power to tempt
Abraham and divert him from his
path.
To frighten Abraham, Satan
disguised himself as a mighty
river. When the aged patriarch
and his son saw the river they
were puzzled. "I have passed this
place many times before and
never have I seen this river," said
Abraham. Determined to reach
his destination Mount Moriah,
the hill designated for the
sacrifice Abraham and his son
waded into the river. Soon the
water reached their necks.
Abraham called out to God asking
Him for the strength and clarity
to help him do His will. When
Satan saw this, he caused the
waters to recede, allowing
Abraham and Isaac to pass.
IN JEWISH tradition, the new
year is the time man takes stock
of himself and asks himself how
well he is serving God. By going to
the banks of a river or other body
of water, we recall the legend of
our father Abraham who stood
prepared to fight any obstacle, no
matter how great, that stood in
the way of his divine service. As
we ask God to forgive our sins and
grant us another year of life, we
pray that we too will be able to
overcome any obstacles.
In Jewish tradition Torah is call-
ed a "well of living waters." Our
sages teach that only by cleansing
ourselves in the living waters of
Torah can we overcome our
weaknesses and serve God proper-
ly. To illustrate this, at Taahlich,
Kurdish Jews literally jump into
the water to observe the
ceremony. In the Tashlich prayers
we say to God "arouse your mercy
that we may be cleansed from all
forms of impurity."
The Code of Jewish Law, or
Shulhan Arukh, states that
Tashlich should be recited
alongside a body of water contain-
Continued on Page 12-C
Continued from Page 6-C
the unusual step, supported by
Social Democrats and Greens, of
sponsoring a Bundestag debate on
"anti-Semitic tendencies" in the
Federal Republic.
The debate followed a public
furor over a series of anti-Semitic
remarks made by conservative
politicians who spoke out against
"rich and money-hungry Jews"
and "Israel's arrogance" in
holding democratic West Ger-
many responsible for the murder
of six-million Jews by the Nazis.
Chancellor Kohl, who has been
criticized for failing to dissociate
himself completely from such
remarks, unexpectedly intervened
to .-orrect what he said was a
distorted quotation from a con-
troversial speech he made in
Israel last year.
WESTERN Europe presents a
troubling scene with increased ac-
tivity by extremists both on an in-
tellectual level and in the streets.
The Community has clearly failed
to compare and contrast instances
of anti-Semitism. What one coun-
try may correctly regard as an
"incident," another may not. Our
information flow is neither as
defined nor as accurate as it
should be. Reversing this situation
must be a priority for the Euro-
pean branch of the World Jewish
Congress during the next 12
months.
A positive response to anti-
Semitism is the most effective
way to combat the situation
described here. We must start
with our own community before
we give advice to Christians on
how to behave towards us. The
education of our young people and
greater emphasis on Jewish com-
mitment within the home are
essential. The parent has the
critical role in education and nur-
turing the young in Judaism,
while the teacher, the rabbi, and
the youth worker provide support.
(It's not the other way round as
some parents mistakenly
imagine.)
We need to secure greater in-
volvement among young teen-
agers. Much attention has been
directed, quite rightly, to the cam-
pus and the need to help the Union
of Jewish Students in their fight
on campuses up and down the
country. But another constituency
of the same age-range (18-22) re-
quiring attention are young peo-
ple, in fact the majority, who
hypass university and go into jobs
straight from school. They could
well became a forgotten genera-
tion if we do not use their talents
within the community.
WE NEED to encourage the
young to stand up to the anti-
Zionism/anti-Semitism cam-
paigns. Here in Britain, the work
of the Association of Jewish Sith
Formers and the Union of Jewish
Students is exemplary. The
former helps to prepare
16-and-l7-year-olds before they
go to college, and the latter
strengthens their hand while they
are there.
There are some splendid and
committed Jewish academics who
are supportive and committed to
Jewish issues.
A further positive response to
anti-Semitism is to strike at its
source. Here, I would like to see
all Jewish organizations taking a
lead in encouraging non-
discrimination policies. More im-
portance should be given to civic
education throughout the cur-
riculum at Jewish day schools
with the aim of fostering support
for the principles and practice of
democracy and pluralism.
Best Wishes For A Happy New Year
IMPLOSION, 1966
Roy licMenslein. tifftofiaph
Gilt ol D> Nornun liebmjn
The Bass Museum of Art
accepts gifts of art and
contributions toward its
program, collection and
building funds. Your gifts
will be enjoyed by museum
visitors for generations
to come.
ErASSwav
>OF/V?Tg
Southgate Towers
Hotels & Apartments
"Waterfront Rental Apartments"
Wishes Friends, Clients & Family
A Happy & Healthy New Year
900 West Ave. on the Bay.
Miami Beach
672-2412
Charade Res tauran t
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables 448-6077
Happy New Year


Page 10-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 3, 1986
ShARansky, in ispael, takes the measupe of his WoRks
By WENDY ELL I MAN
"Being a Prisoner of Zion is
something I wouldn't wish, on
anyone," says Anatol\ Natan
Sharansky. "Yet in certain ways,
living through something like that
gives you a great deal When you
come on aliyah after such an ex-
perience, you truly know what it
means for a Jew to live in a Jewish
state."
On Feb. 11. after 3.255 day? fe
the Soviet Gulag 430 of them in
isolation in icy punishment cells
Sharansky, 5 feet 2 inches tal. and
38 years old, reached Israel One
of the Soviet Union s best-known
political prisoners, and a symbol
for Soviet Jews and human rights
dissidents everywhere, he was no
ordinary newcomer.
PRIME MINISTER Shimon
Peres embraced the oleh haaa&h
(new immigrant i as he stepped off
the plane. Cabinet ministers,
members of Knesset and both
Chief Rabbis were assembled on
the tarmac, ana tens of thousands
of wellwishers gathered outside
the airport to welcome him home.
"My first impressions of Israel
are stronger than anything I'd
thought in my dreams." said
Sharansky on his first morning in
Israel. "My wife. Avital. once
wrote to me in prison: 'You can't
even imagine what waits for you
in Israel!' Now I see she was right.
I'm still too tired to take it all in.
It will take many months."
Six months later, Sharansky
"enjoys every day of living in
Israel. Everyone I meet is a per-
sonality and that in itself is
wonderfully refreshing after liv-
ing within a system where being
different is against the law."
Intense public interest in
everything he does, and recupera-
^
NATAN SHARANSKY: finally, st hone.
tion from the years of imprison-
ment, are settling-in difficulties
unique to Sharansky. But in other
ways the absorption path has been
smoothed for him largely by his
wife, Avital.
Southeastern Public Service Co.
P.O. Box 41000 R
(Normandy Branch)
Miami Beach 866-7771
Happy New Year
Nature's Garden Bakery
800 Collins Ave. Miami Beach 534-1877
Salt & Sugar Free S Wheat Free i Hi-Fiber
Bread. Rolls & Cake
Seville Photographers
2935 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach 672-5363
Allen Malschick
Wishes Happy New Year To All Customers & Friends
Bergman & Kane, P.A.
3785 NW 82 Ave.. Suite 300
Miami 591-3631
Happy New Year
Fu-Manchu Restaurant
325 71st Street
Miami Beach 866-4303
Happy New Year

Sheldon, Ribotsky, Levine, P.A.
Extends A Happy New Year
To All Our Friends A Clients
"I CAME to a home in Israel, to
my wife and to many friends
some of whom I knew, and others
who only knew me," he says. "I
speak Hebrew, although not well
enough, and I was offered a con-
tract for a book almost immediate-
ly. And we're expecting a baby by
the end of the year. So although
my aliyah was very hard, my ab-
sorption is easier than for many
new immigrants."
During the time he has been in
Israel, Sharansky has broadened
and deepened his perception of his
new home. "For Avital, Israel is
one bright paradise," he says.
"She accepted it all immediately
and, for her, disputes and divi-
sions within Israel are non-
existent. For myself, I see the pro-
blems as well. But they are
healthy problems problems of
living."
Political divisions between
Israel's Left and Right, religious
conflicts between Orthodox and
secular, and social tensions bet-
ween Ashkenazi and Sephardi are,
for Sharansky, the vital signs of
democracy alive.
"Arguments like these aren't
dangerous." he says, "as long as
we all remember that our first and
shared mitzvah is to live in Israel
and build our country to defend
the rights of those who live here,
and those still struggling to
come."
His activist years in Moscow
prepared Sharansky well for the
conflicts of opinion he has en
countered in Israel. "Even those
of us united by the common goal
of wanting to leave the USSR for
Israel were often fiercely divided
among ourselves," he recalls.
"And, of course, in Moscow I
came in contact with a whole
range of Jews and Jewish
organizations from the free world
all of whom had different ideas
about how to campaign for the
release of Soviet Jews."
EVEN SO, the intensity of pas-
sions in Israel took Sharansky by
surprise. "I could never have im-
agined that whether or not I wear
a kipak (yarmulke) on my head
would become a national issue,
with journalists writing about
whether I had 'fallen into the
hands of Avital's extremist
friends'! The only ones who didn't
seem concerned were the so-called
extremists' themselves."
One of the first things he notic-
ed about Israel, says Sharansky, is
that "wherever you go. people
switch on the news every hour. In
the Soviet Union, there's no need
to listen more than once in three
days. But in Israel, there's always
something happening.'
The constant spotlight focused
on the Sharanskys themselves is
something they accept with
resignation. "All through the
years that Avital fought for my
freedom, she lived in the public
eye.' says Sharansky "And
although I didn't meet too many
people in prison. I was constantly
watched even in the punish-
ment cell. When I first reached
Israel, we thought: At last. We'll
lead private lives again. But we
haven't been able to do that yet.'
In early July, the couple ac-
cepted an invitation from a kib-
butz to take a short holiday there.
They had turned down similar in-
vitations in the past, in the belief
that kibbutz would prove more of
a goldfish bowl than the city. "But
this kibbutz promised us privacy,
and we decided to go," relates
Sharansky. "They were as good
as their word. We'd walk around,
and people would simply say,
'Shalom,' and move on. We
thought: 'What's happened! Is it
over?' But it turned out that the
kibbutz members had simply
disciplined themselves to leave us
alone, on condrion that I talk to
them on the last night."
SHARANSKY is in constant
demand as a speaker. He limits his
subject matter to the plight of
Jews still trapped in the Soviet
Union because: "I prefer to speak
of the future, and to concentrate
urgently on the struggle for
Soviet Jewry Time is against us
The Jews of Russia are in great
danger. None of us can bt-
satisfied with the fact of rm
release as a solution to the pro-
blems of Soviet Jews. I'm not
satisfied Why should you be?"
In the morning hours, he works
on his book, describing his prison
experiences. He writes in Rus
sian. but an American col-
laborator will shortly begin th
translation into English frorr
which other languages will be
prepared. In the afternoons ano
evenings, he meets with families
of Prisoners of Zion, with a steam
stream of journalists ano with
representatives of a range of in
ternat:ona! Soviet Jewrj
organizations, trying to develop
strategies that will force open the
locked gates of Soviet Russia
"The campaign to free Soviet
Jews has become the strongest
movement in Jewish life in man_\
years," he says. "We must think
how to turn a strong movement
into something stronger still
We're discussing how to reach
(Soviet leader Mikhail) Gorbachev
how to get the Jews out "
THE BOOK, the meetings and
the fight for those left behind in-
undate Sharansky's days. "These
are the urgent things to be done
this first year in Israel," he says.
"At the same time, I'm slowly
entering into the everyday life of
my country although with all
the English I speak, my Hebrew
has scarcely improved at all.
There'll be time to think about a
profession later whether to try
and catch up in mathematics and
Continued on Page 11-C
Happy New Year
Florida East Coast Properties
444 Brickell Ave.
Miami 358-7710
Dade P.B.A.
1200 NW 78th Ave., Suite 217 593-0044
Wish All Their Friends A Happy New Year
Florida Lace and Braid Inc.
575 NW 24 St.
Miami 573-8020
Happy New Year
Elsie Undergarment Co.
8295 W. 20th Ave. Hialeah 822-6981
Isaac it Elsie Sil verbarg and Family
Wish Friends and Family A Happy New Year
Lawrence Plumbing Supply
31 SW 57 Ave.
Miami 266-1571
Happy New Year
Abraham's Kosher
Bakery
7423 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 861-0291
We Wish You And Your Family
_______ A Happy New Year ^^^
I


peoeaation Opf iciaIs List aqen&a
Of ConceRns for the new yeaR
By AARON PODHURST
President
And MYRON J. BRODIE
Executive Vice President
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
As we enter the Days of Awe
and prepare to spend time in self-
contemplation, we should also
spare some thought for our in-
dividual roles in our community.
In doing this, we lend context and
an additional dimension to our
self-assessment.
The concept of "community"
or as we say in Hebrew kehilah
seems in recent years to have
been increasingly taken for
granted. We assume that our com-
munal institutions and the ser-
vices which they offer can stand
alone without our help. We
assume that they will always be
here to educate our young, feed
the hungry and provide care for
our Jewish elderly.
Similarly, in the context of our
place within world Jewry, we have
become too complacent about
Israel's future, too wrapped up in
our parochial concerns to realize
that although Israel's borders are
quiet now, this peace has been
purchased through the expen-
diture of massive resources
both human and material.
FROM THE perspective of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, which will soon be entering
its sixth decade as this Jewish
community's central address,
complacency is an extremely
dangerous phenomenon which
threatens the social and organiza-
tional fabric of our community.
Stated in its most negative con-
text, complacency signifies a lack
Aaron Podhurst
of caring. Without caring and per-
sonal commitment, this communi-
ty will suffer. The high standards
of service to which we have
become accustomed and the
trend-setting agencies and pro-
grams which have been developed
over the past two decades will not
be passed on to our children and
grandchildren.
As we enter the Year 5747, we
must give serious consideration to
rededicating ourselves to our com-
munity and, equally important, to
our fellow-Jews in Israel and
wherever they may need our help
throughout the world. Let us
breathe new life into the in-
disputable truth of Jewish ex-
istence that we are indeed one
people with one destiny, and
Dade Tire Co. Inc.
1501 N. Miami Ave.
Miami 33136
Happy New Year
Silver Plumbing & Sewer
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1071 NE79St. Miami, FL 33138
Phone-672-1744
Professional Arts Pharmacy
1150 NW 14 St.
Miami 324-0803
Happy New Year To Our Friends & Customers
Floridian Furniture
4795 SW 8th St., Miami, Fla.
448-2639
Happy New Year
Juvenile Centers Inc.
2031 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 947-1771
Happy New Year
Southern Wine & Spirits, Inc.
1600 NW 16? St.. Miami 625-4171
A Joyous New Year To All
Myron Brodie
therefore, we must share the
burden of responsibility for the
well-being of our fellow Jews.
IF WE take a moment to revisit
some of the events of the past
year, we can begin to see how the
threads of Jewish destiny are
intertwined.
Anatoly Sharansky was allowed
to leave the USSR. In his
freedom, we saw the hope of
thousands of our fellow Jews who
wish to practice their religion and
way of life in freedom.
When the State of Israel was
faced with the prospect of having
to slash social programs to over-
come massive inflation, our
United Jewish Appeal (UJA)
dollars helped to ease the burden,
so that the Jewish homeland could
continue to offer shelter and
sustenance to all of its citizens.
WITH AN eye to the future, we
see that throughout the United
States and Canada, Jewish com-
munities are joining together to
amass one million signatures so
that the issue of human rights for
Soviet Jews can be at the top of
the agenda of the impending
"superpower" summit between
President Reagan and Soviet
Leader Gorbachev.
Let us hope that through our
generosity and our commitment
to our people, 5747 can be a year
in which our Jewish community
becomes stronger through the in-
volvement of those of us who
have, to this point, been uninvolv-
ed, and through a general
rededication to the concept of
community building.
Shapansky
eyes his
Putupe WoRks
Continued from Page 10-C
computer technology, or to do
something else."
When Anatoly Sharansky arriv-
ed in Israel to a hero's welcome
last February an Israeli journalist
wrote: "The man emerged from
the myth .. unbroken and unem-
bittered ... By the time he left
the airport an hour later, he was
larger than the myth."
Unprepared by anything that
had gone before for his 13 year
struggle with the KGB, Anatoly
Sharansky drew strength and
dignity from his sense of belong-
ing to the Jewish people. Through
the years of imprisonment, illness
and isolation, he never lost sight
of the Zionist dream.
And when he realized that
dream, he reminded Jews
everywhere of the special mean-
ing of the Jewish State.
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11 -C
yom kippuR Relates
to man's tie to Qofc

t?
By DVORA WAYSMAN
"For on this day shall atone-
ment be made for you, to cleanse
you; from all your sins shall ye be
clean before the Lord." (Lev.
16:30).
Thus was instituted Yom Kip-
pur, the Day of Atonement, the
one Jewish festival, aside from
Rosh Hashanah, that does not
relate to any historical event or
agricultural concept. Most other
Jewish holidays have some kind of
national significance that even
secular Jews can relate to. Yom
Kippur, however, relates only to
man's relationship with God and
his fellow man, and involves ask-
ing forgiveness from God. The
days preceding the Day of Atone-
ment are for man to make restitu-
tion and ask pardon from those he
may have wronged during the
year.
In Hebrew there are about 20
different words denoting "sin,"
each with a different nuance. The
usual Rabbinic term is averah
from the root avar to pass over,
and interpreted as a rejection of
God's will. Jews believe sin is
caused by the evil inclination,
yetzer ha-ra, a force which drives
one to gratify instincts regardless
of the cost.
God said: "My children! I
created the evil inclination, but I
created Torah as its antidote: if
you occupy yourself with the
Torah you will not be delivered in-
to its hand." Rabbi Ishmael
taught: "My son, if this repulsive
wretch (yetzer ha-ra) attacks you,
lead him to the house of learning:
if he is stone, he will dissolve; if
iron, he will shiver into
fragments." (Kid.30b)
FREEDOM OF choice is a basic
Jewish doctrine from the first
story in Genesis where Adam and
Eve are given the option to accept
or reject God's commandment.
The great medieval Jewish
scholar, Maimonides, wrote:
"Every man has the possibility of
becoming as righteous as Moses
our teacher, or as wicked as
Jeroboam; wise or stupid; kind or
cruel; miserly or generous..."
(Yad, Teshuva 5). This contradicts
a popular Yiddish expression that
things are beshert or predestined.
We recite a prayer during the
High Holy Days, however, which
seems to contradict this: "On the
New Year it is written down, and
on the Day of Atonement it is seal-
ed .. who shall live and who shall
die, who at the measure of man's
days and who before it. ." Some
rabbis claim this is meditation
rather than prayer, designed to
help a Jew understand the impor-
tant conclusion: "But penitence,
prayer and charity avert the
severe decree." Even if our lives
warrant punishment, we can still
choose to repent even up to our
last hour on earth. This is a
wonderful and optimistic aspect of
Judaism.
There is a special dimension to
the solemnity of Yom Kippur in
Israel, especially in Jerusalem. No
cars are seen on the streets for the
entire 24 hours even the most
secular Jew would not publicly
profane this Holy Day. As
darkness descends and the long
day of fasting and prayer draws to
a close, the synagogues are crowd-
ed and thousands more walk to
the Western Wall, Judaism's,
holiest site, to hear the final blast
of the shofar the ram's horn.
As the piercing blast rends the
night, we in Israel are mindful of
Isaiah addressing the exiles: "And
it shall come to pass in that day,
that a great horn shall be blown;
and they shall come that were lost
in the land of Assyria." (Isaiah
27:13).
Merchandise Liquidators
250 No. Federal Hwy.
Hallandale 454-1657
Happy New Year
A1A Employment
1325 NE 1 Ave., Miami
379-8401
Happy New Year
Fine Distributing Co.
3485 NW 65 St., Miami 691-0231
Holiday Greetings To The Entire Jewish Community
Acme Industrial Sheet
Metal Inc.
555 West 18 St., Hialeah 885-4943
Happy New Year
Associated Photographer
19 SW 6th St., Miami
373-4774
Happy New Year
FEDCO
1605 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 531-5583
Happy New Year


Page 12-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
miami's Rabbis Queet Community
By RABBI CARL KLEIN
President
And RABBI
SOLOMON SCHIFF
Executive Vice President
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
It is our privilege, on behalf of
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, to extend
warmest wishes to our fellow
Jews for the year 5747. May the
new year bring Israel and
mankind closer to peace by "all
His children uniting in one
fellowship to do His will with a
perfect heart."
As spokesmen for the rabbinate,
the fourth largest Jewish com-
munity in the United States, we
are particularly sensitive to the
deep spiritual scars that need to
be healed on the body organism of
our society to make our hopes, our
aspirations and our prayers for
the New Year more than poetic
expressions.
ABOVE ALL, the Rabbinical
Association attempts to fulfill its
sacred task by serving as the
religious information and coor-
dination center of the Jewish com-
munity. In the closest relationship
with the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and the leadership of
the total community, the Associa-
tion analyzes and guides the total
development and growth of its
people.
Our rabbinic organization is
comprised of colleagues of all
branches of American Judaism
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform
and Reconstructionist and
meets on a monthly basis for a
discussion of current problems.
Rabbis represent the Association
in many community bodies, agen-
cies and institutions spanning the
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Happy Holiday
Lily an Cortez
6700 NE 77th Ct., Miami
Phones: 592-8000 or 592-8111
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We Are The Wall Covering Leader In The South
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Happy New Year
Lincoln Square, Suite 100
18441 NW 2nd Avenue
Post Office Box 694-730
Miami 33169
(306) 653-6610-Dade
Certified Poultry
& Egg Co.
763 West 18St., Hialeah 887-7591
Happy New Year
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NE 163 St., No. Miami Beach
949-0801
Happy New Year
Heres Gift Center
607 Lincoln Rd. Mall, Miami Beach 673-1706
Happy New Year To Our Friends d Customers
PHILIPPE
3403 Main Highway
448-2290
Coconut Grove
448-0942
Happy New Year
spectrum from Jewish education,
Israel, youth, chaplaincy, through
community relations. Thus, the
rabbis have their continuous input
into the shaping of our community
programs and, in turn, are kept
informed of the lay points of view
on all issues.
The Rabbinical Association also
sponsors educational programs
through the communication
media. Among those programs
are the "Still Small Voice" on
Channel 7; the "Jewish Worship
Hour" on Channel 10; "View-
point" on Channel 2, an interfaith
program; and special educational
material that appears regularly in
The Jewish Floridian. From time
to time, special programs are
prepared and presented by the
Association on other television
and radio stations.
THE COMMUNITY Chaplain
cy Service, sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
in association with the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami,
provides visitation and spiritual
counseling to unaffiliated Jews in
hospitals, nursing homes, homes
for retarded. Hospice, correc-
tional and other institutions.
This representative rabbinate
works with all major Jewish
organizations for important
causes. At the same time, it is in
close contact with the school
authorities from elementary to
university, providing them with
calendars of Jewish holidays so as
to avoid conflicting events.
The Rabbinical Association
works closely in the area of inter-
faith activities and many projects
in cooperation with the Catholic
Archdiocese of Miami and with
the Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches, the Ministerial Associa-
tion, the National Conference of
Christians and Jews, the Inter-
faith Commission, the Miami
Citizens Against Crime and other
appropriate organizations.
WE WORK closely with JFTV,
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation on the develop-
ment and operation of Cable
Television which is a new source
of education for our community.
We hope that in the New Year
we will be able to further extend
and deepen our activities for an
even more committed and more
dynamic Jewish life in our South
Florida community.
Casting Our
Sins Into
the Sea
Continued from Page 9-C
ing fish. This is because fish are
vulnerable. They are constantly
prey to hooks, nets and other
larger fish. So, too, is man
vulnerable, to his impulses and
destructive tendencies and must
constantly be aware of his feelings
and actions so as not to fall prey to
sin.
In the Tashlich service, we
recite the 13 attributes of divine
perfection, recalling that God is
compassionate, forgiving, slow to
anger, etc. Judaism teaches that
man must strive to imitate divine
perfection and incorporate these
attributes into his personality.
Abraham, more than any Jew in
history, succeeded in this.
The Torah also teaches that
man was created out of the dust of
the earth and that before man was
created the earth was covered
with water. Standing along the
waterside, on the first day of the
new year, we recall where we
came from, where we are going
and the great task we have ahead
of us. The Tashlich ceremony
reminds us both of how small we
are, and how great we can be.
S. & S. Air Conditioning
7320 NW 58th St., Miami 592-3412
Happy New Year
MILLER & SOLOMON
460 So. Dixie Hwy.
Miami 661-3403
A Happy New Year
To The Entire Jewish Community
Miami Rug Co.
Happy New Year To All
Hi-Grade Food Co.
240 NE 71 Street
Miami 758-0516
Happy New Year
Happy New Year To All
Arkin Construction Co.
1827 Purdy Ave., Miami Beach
538-8721
Monahan's Electric Company
4050 NW 29th St., Miami 871-3163
New Year Greetings
Carpet Mart
12645 South Dixie Hwy., Miami
232-2430
Happy New Year
American Mailing Service
5050 E. 11th Ave.. Hialeah 685-6401
Happy New Year To All


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-C
jews in U.S. apmefc foRces to OBseRve high holy days
SEW YORK Jews in the
US. armed forces stationed
throughout the continental U.S.
and around the world, their
families and patients in Veterans
Administration hospitals will be
able to observe the Jewish New
Year, Rosh Hashanah and the Day
of Atonement, Yom Kippur, with
the assistance of Jewish
chaplains, lay leaders and
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council.
The announcement was made by
Rabbi Barry H. Greene, chairman,
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council.
THIS YEAR Rosh Hashanah
begins at sundown on Friday, Oct.
3 and ends at dark on Sunday,
Oct. 5. Yom Kippur begins with
the chanting of Kol Nidre on the
evening of Sunday, Oct. 12 and
concludes at nightfall on Monday,
Oct. 13.
For High Holy Days, according
to Rabbi David Lapp, director,
JWB/Jewish Chaplains Council,
"U.S. Air Force Chaplains Joel R.
Schwartzman in Greece and
Selwyn Geller and Elliott Marmon
in England will provide all U.S.
Jewish Air Force personnel and
their families with High Holy Day
liturgical services.
"Senior Jewish Chaplain Philip
Silverstein in Heidelberg will
coordinate High Holy Day ser-
vices with U.S. Army Jewish
Chaplains Nosson Sachs, Richard
White, and Howard Schwartz
covering Nuremberg, Heidelberg,
Stuttgart, Frankfurt and Munich
and U.S. Army Chaplain Dennis
Beck-Berman who will conduct
services for military assigned to
all of Northern Italy.
"Chaplain Sanford H. Shudnow
of the Sixth Fleet will provide
Jewish Navy personnel with JWB
High Holy Day prayer books,
kipot (skull caps), taleisim (prayer
shawls) and other Jewish supplies
for those unable to attend shore
religious services but required to
be on duty at sea."
"SINCE THERE are only 48
full-time Jewish military chaplains
on active duty with American
forces and 13 more at Veterans
Administration hospitals," said
Rabbi Greene, "the JWB/Jewish
Chaplains Council will help
mobilize 136 part-time and 112
reserve chaplains as well as 138
lay leaders to conduct Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur ser-
vices at every base where Jews
serve."
"In Europe," he added, "High
Holy Day services will take place
in Spain and Turkey, as well as
Germany, Greece, Italy, and
England. In the Far East, there
will be services in Korea, Japan,
Guam, the Philippines and
Okinawa."
In its role as a full support
system of Jewish chaplains and
lay leaders, the JWB/Jewish
Chaplains Council will provide
JWB calendars 1986-87, inspira-
tional literature, Selichot (peniten-
tial prayers), cassettes, and, as
needed, ram's horns (shofrot),
prayer shawls (talitot) and skull
caps (kipot).
TRADITIONALLY, the first of
the services will occur on the
island of Guam in the South
Pacific, just east of the Interna-
tional Date Line. Since services
follow the sun, Pearl Harbor in
Hawaii will be the last base to
sound the shofar blast trumpeting
the end of the High Holy Days.
The full-time and part-time
Jewish chaplains covering the VA
hospitals have made plans to pro-
vide religious services for all
hospitalized veterans. Am-
bulatory patients will be provided
the opportunity to attend services
in the hospital chapels and bedrid-
den patients will receive special
coverage by the chaplains.
"Break-the-fast" suppers for
military personnel and VA pa-
tients arranged by the chaplains
will mark the conclusion of Yom
Kippur.
ALL OF the U.S. services en-
courage and foster liberal leave
and pass policies for Jewish per-
sonnel and in many instances, ser-
vice men and women who cannot
get home for the holidays are in-
vited to share the warm "home
hospitality" of Jewish families in
the locale where they are station-
ed. Frequently, single men and
women are guests of Jewish
military families on their bases.
Local Jewish communal
organizations cooperate fully in
holiday planning for service per-
sonnel with the Jewish chaplains,
the JWB Jewish/Chaplains Coun-
cil, the Armed Forces and
Veterans Services Committee,
and JWB's Women's Organiza-
tions' Services.
JWB is the association of 275
JCCs, YM-YWHAs and camps in
the U.S. and Canada with a consti-
tuency of more than one million
Jews, a major source of Jewish
educational and cultural program-
ming for North American Jewry,
and the U.S.-Government ac-
credited agency for serving
American Jewish military families
and hospitalized VA patients.
U.S. Still Aims to Amputate Israel's Boa&eps
By PETER E. GOLDMAN
We don't know if it is senior or
junior officials in the Administra-
tion who are seeking to damage
U.S.-Israel relations through their
high profile "leaks" to the media
about alleged irregularities in the
export of cluster bomb and can-
non barrel parts to Israel. Nor do
we know who was responsible for
the screaming headlines alleging
more extensive spying in connec-
tion with the Pollard spy affair.
So far, there has only been
smoke and no fire. No other spies
were revealed in the Pollard af-
fair, and there were no illegalities
in last year's cannon barrel affair.
We await more information about
Peter Goldman is executive
director of Americans for a
Safe Israel.
the cluster bomb parts, although
the Israelis insist they have
cluster bombs of their own design.
The only fact to emerge is that the
media still enjoy bashing Israel, as
do some officials in the
Administration.
Balogh Jewelers
Wishes Their Clients A Friends
A Happy <8 Healthy New Year
Home Lumber Industrial
Supply Corporation
1050 E. 25 St., Hialeah 691-8515
Happy New Year
Central Taxi
740 Alton Rd.. Miami Beach
538-1525
Happy New Year
Pyke Bros. & Son Body Shop
35 NE 29 St., Miami 573-6800
Happy New Year
Rothman's Shoe Salon
9700 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach 866-1172
Happy New Year
CYNTHIA APTS.
2115 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
Wish You A Good Year
IT IS disturbing that no effort
has been made by top officials to
put an end to this Israel-bashing.
These incidents are symp-
tomatic of a malaise that
underlines U.S.-Israel relations.
Basic U.S. policy towards the
Arab-Israel conflict has always
been dictated by Arabists in the
State Department, the CIA, the
Pentagon and elsewhere.
In spite of increased U.S.-Israel
strategic cooperation, increased
economic and military aid to
Israel, and the many warm words
of friendship between the two na-
tions, the basic pro-Arab "peace"
policy remains.
The Reagan Plan of September,
1982 for an Arab-Israel peace
calls for the "association of the
West Bank and Gaza with Jor-
dan," and the "status" of
Jerusalem to be "determined
through negotiations."
This plan remains operative to-
day, and is at the heart of Ad-
ministration efforts in the Arab-
Israel "peace process."
THUS, while calling Israel a
friend, ally and a strategic asset,
the Administration pursues a plan
which would in effect, reduce
Israel to a narrow 10-mile wide
strip in the center of the country,
effectively endangering the
security and existence of the
state.
This "peace" plan is not idle
chatter or mere rhetoric; the Ad-
ministration has been seeking to
implement the plan by every
means possible: efforts are made
to thwart congressional attempts
to move the U.S. Embassy from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem; money is
given by the State Department's
AID program to private voluntary
organizations (PVO's) to build up
the Arab infrastructure of Judea
and Samaria, while Jewish settle-
ment is declared "an obstacle to
peace."
Administration officials, in-
cluding the President, repeatedly
state that an Arab-Israel peace
must be based on Israel's giving
up more territory in Judea and
Samaria, although the Jewish
state is only 40 miles wide. Con-
tacts are maintained with the
PLO and Syria in spite of their
virulent anti-American words and
actions.
Syria is called "helpful" by the
State Department because of its
"assistance" in the release of
hostages. "The U.S. physically
saved the terrorist PLO three
times in Lebanon when the PLO
was on the verge of being
destroyed by Israel.
ISRAEL IS pressed to "better
the quality of life" for "West
Bank" Arabs, but Jordan is never
pressed to cease its many viola-
tions of human rights, including
its racist law of administering the
death penalty to an Arab who sells
land to a Jew. Nor, for that mat-
ter, is Egypt scored for its multi-
ple violations of the peace treaty
with Israel.
While the Arab military advan-
tage over Israel in manpower and
modern weapons has grown to a
ratio of 6-to-l, the United States
continues to pursue Israel's ter-
ritorial reduction.
To force Israel out of Judea,
Samaria, Gaza and Jerusalem and
thus "solve the Palestinian pro-
blem" remains a major preoccupa-
tion of this Administration. In the
Middle East, where peace treaties
are never kept and where every
inch of land that Israel gives up
encourages the hostile Arab world
to pursue its aim of eliminating
Israel, American policy is doomed
to total failure.
It has been widely acknowledg-
Continued on Pace 14-C
Gottex of Israel
777 NW 72 Ave., Miami
261-4700
Happy New Year
American Plumbing
And Electrical Supply
1735 Alton Road, Miami Bch. 532-3446
Happy New Year To Our Friends A Customers
Metro Gas
1234 NW 79 St., Miami 693-3921
Happy New Year
Food Spot Stores
7901 S.W. 67th Ave.. Miami 666-0642
Happy New Year
Animal Lovers West
8454 SW 24 Street
233-7141
Happy New Year To All
Creative Doors &
Window Corp.
7371 SW 8th St., Miami 264-6057
Happy New Year


Page 14-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986 ^
isRAel's move Back
to help thiRO WorIo
Win diqnity
By AVI PRIMOR
Even before the independence
of Israel, school children were
taught Theodor Herzl's idea that
once we Jews reached political in-
dependence, we should help the
nations of the Third World win
their dignity as well.
As soon as the first difficulties
after independence were over-
come, Israel began assisting Bur-
ma in 1954.
Then a relationship developed
with Africa, probably because
Africa is physically closer to
Israel, and its geographical and
climatic characteristics make it
more adaptable to the Israeli ex-
perience in development and
agriculture.
THAT RELATIONSHIP con-
tinued until the early 1970s when
the Africans severed them with
the excuse that they had to main-
tain solidarity with Egypt as
members of the Organization of
African Unity (OAU) because,
they said, Egypt's frontiers had
been violated and its territory lost
to Israel.
When they severed relations,
the Africans made it clear that our
bilateral relations were totally
satisfactory. This was quite an ex-
ception in international relations
one country telling another: "I
am very satisfied with my rela-
tions with you, I like you very
much. I am grateful for what you
have done but I sever relations
with you for reasons that have
nothing to do with our bilateral
relations."
Avi Primor is deputy direc-
tor general of the Israeli
Foreign Ministry, in charge of
Africa, Asia and Oceania.
This article is excerpted from
his talk before the Anti-
Defamation League's National
Commission.
Solidarity was not the real
reason. Those were the years that
the Arabs gained power and in-
fluence with their control of oil
production. If this had simply
been a matter of unity with Egypt
because of lost territory, then why
was the action in 1973 and not
1967 when Egypt lost the Sinai
Peninsula to Israel?
But now, Egypt has the Sinai
back, has made peace and has
diplomatic relations with Israel
while the Africans continue the
severance, with a few exceptions.
THE AFRICANS are simply
afraid. Some because they get
material help from the Arabs,
although much leas than they
hoped for. An African foreign
minister at the United Nations
General Assembly told me his
country receives $3 million a year
from the Arabs. He said, "Find
(us) $3 million and we will im-
mediately open relations with
Israel."
The Africans are even more
afraid of Arab threats. The presi-
dent of the Ivory Coast, (which
recently reestablished relations
with Israel) told us, "The Arabs
Fulton Pest Control
1981 NE 153 St., North Miami Beach
946-6525
Happy New Year To AU
The Palette
125 NE 26 St., Miami 573-0980
Happy New Year
Mandarin Garden Restaurant
3266 Grand Avenue
Coconut Grove 446-9996
Happy New Year
Fan Tours & Travel
2323 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
531-5327
Happy New Year
Meridian Apothecary Shop
1608 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach 538-0424
Happy New Year
'
Laura McCarthy Inc.
8601 Biscayne Blvd., Miami Shores 751-1641
Happy New Year
A stallholder in a Tel Aviv market sells fruit
and vegetables during a Shmitta year. The
sign reads: 'Shmitta Committee this shop.
which belongs to Yitzhak Cohen, it under the
supervision of the ultra-Orthodox hnredi court
in matters of Shmitta.'
have no credibility for money, for
cooperation, but you certainly
have to give them credit when
they talk terrorism."
There is no place in the world
where I feel as welcome as in
Africa. There is no place in the
world where Israel is so well liked.
Our people worked with the
peasants, our doctors went into
the villages where European doc-
tors would not go. Things like that
are not forgotten.
THE TECHNICAL assistance
we gave Africa in the past is not
sufficient any more. We would
like to cooperate with other
organizations which extend aid to
Africa, such as the U.S. Agency
for International Development
(AID). If AID would provide the
means, we would send the
U.S. Still Aims
to amputate
iSRael's Borocrs
Continued from Page 13-C
ed that Israel is the only force in
the Middle East capable of
resisting Soviet and radical ad-
vances and combating terrorism.
Yet, by ignoring the basis of the
Arab-Israel conflict the Arab
attempt to destroy Israel and
by substituting the red herring of
the "West Bank" or the "Palesti-
nian problem," American policy
makers are helping to undermine
Israel's ability to remain secure in
a hostile area.
IN SPITE OF the Administra-
tion's pro-Arab "peace" policies,
the Jewish community is being
told by its leaders that U.S.-Israel
relations are excellent at almost
all levels. This was the message
delivered by AIPAC's executive
director, Tom Dine, at the AIPAC
meeting in Washington in March.
While it is true that relations
have improved from the low point
following the war in Lebanon in
1982, the Arabist view of the basic
Arab-Israel conflict guides U.S.
policy. It is, therefore, a
dangerous myth to label
U.S.-Israel relations as "ex-
cellent." It breeds complacency
and saps the community's will to
fight for a better policy.
Without opposition, the Ad-
ministration will continue to press
for Israeli withdrawal to the
10-mile-wide 1949 Armistice lines.
A divided and weak Israeli
government, if given any en-
couragement by the Arabs (who
only need utter the words "peace"
or "242"), may bend. This could
lead to a catastrophe for the third
Jewish commonwealth.
technicians.
The Africans need real develop-
ment. They want Western in-
vestments and particularly
American involvement.
Africa is the world's greatest
reservoir of unexploited natural
resources. One example is
Botswana, a desert country, with
one million inhabitants, most of
them nomads. Everyone is in-
terested in Botswana, including
the Russians, and the Arabs.
Some of the greatest reservoirs of
minerals are in the Botswana
desert. The Russians and the
Arabs see that and look ahead.
The Western world, particularly
the United States, should look
ahead as well.
For Israel, work in the Third
World has technical, economic,
ideological and political meanings.
The Arabs have tried to prevent
Israel from establishing itself as
an entity on the international
scene. To a great extent, they
have succeeded. They ousted
Israel from Africa, they block it in
many Third World countries.
They persuaded Japan to respect
the Arab boycott. It is more dif-
ficult for Western friends to main-
tain normal relations with Israel
when it is considered by many to
be a pariah state.
ISRAEL IS constantly singled
out by Arab propaganda concern
ing its relations with South
Africa. In fact, Israel hu
repeatedly and forthrighuy a
demned apartheid.
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Miami Beach
538-8533
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy New Year
Sofas & Chairs
89 NE 27 St.
Miami 573-0760
Happy New Year
Flo & Ben Kram Print-Rite Co.
748 NE 79th St.. Miami 691-5452
Happy New Year To The Entire Jewish Community
Fox's Sherron Inn
6030 So. Dixie Hwy., Miami
666-2230
Happy New Year
Seybold Building
36 NE 1st St., Miami 374-7922
Happy New Year
Joe's Stone Crabs Restaurant
Holiday Magazine Award Since 1961
-, Open For Lanch Weekends _, ..
227 Biscayne St. at Washington Miami Beach 6734365
Happy New Year


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-C
holy 6ays Challenge Us to pace Reality of Our Lives
Continued from Page 2-C
caught oy its horns in a thicket
and he offered it as a sacrifice in-
stead of Isaac.
The shofar blown on Rosh
Hashanah is usually the horn of a
ram. making the symbolic connec-
tion between the festival and the
binding of Isaac, and we ask God
to remember" the Akeda for our
good. We call this zechut avot
the merit of our forbears and it
is a concept which has an
honorable place in Jewish
theology.
BUT IT IS relevant that the
idea of zechut avot is not like a
stockpile of "merit" earned
through the pious deeds of our
ancestors which we can draw on
whenever necessary, like one
iraws out the interest while the
capital sum remains in the bank
forever.
A rabbinic view warns that
zechut avot is not forever. Rather.
the notion of zechut avot has to
serve as a historical challenge to
the descendants of the Patriarchs.
It is not God so much who
should "remember" the virtues of
the Patriarchs, out rather we
mrselves who should remember
hem. For. by remembering the
past and all its sacrifices, subse-
quent generations are more likely
to oe influenced by its teaching.
By and large, the descendants
nave oeen faithful to the tradi-
tions of the past. The important
".hing is that they have lived with
loyalty But all too frequently they
were prepared even to die for
their loyalty.
The rabbis >ffered the observa-
tion that the experiences of the
Patriarchs are repeated in the
-ecord >f their descendants. View-
ed with this point in mind, the
Akeda is not only a story m the
lives of Abraham and Isaac; it has
been a constant theme in the
record of the Jews throughout
their history. "Take now thy son.
thine only son ." has been an
oft-repeated text. Perhaps no
other people has made similar
sacrifices for Torah, for cons-
cience, for human honor.
The Akeda story is also part of
the modern record. In a book call-
ed "Bizchutam," written in 1971.
Yitzchak Nimtsovitz describes the
scene in an Israeli synagogue in
Bat Yam where a Mr. and Mrs.
Kramer donated a Torah scroll in
memory of their son.
WHAT WAS SO special about
the Torah scroll donated by that
family? The author tells us. Dur-
ing the Nazi occupation of Poland,
Kramer built a bunker near their
home somewhere in the outskirts
of Vilna. At that time, Jews were
being shot on sight. Altogether 46
Jews hid in that bunker, including
Mr. and Mrs. Kramer and their
baby son, David.
As the Nazis continued their
search, they came close to the
bunker when the baby began to
cry Everyone was afraid that the
infant would give them away, and
all eyes turned to Kramer, the
father of the child. He hesitated
for a long, anguished moment; the
he suffocated his own son.
All 46 managed to escape, some
to fight with the partisans; some
of them ultimately reaching
Israel, where they and their
children now live. That was why
the scroll was donated. All the
survivors were present; and the
story was written down.
We can ask. "How could he do
it? Was he mad, that father who
killed his own son?" And, even
while we acknowledge the reason,
can we imagine the enormity of
that sacrifice?
NOW WE CAN perhaps see the
connection between the Akeda
and Yom Hazikaron. Throughout
the generations, satanic opposi-
tion to Jews might have broken
Jewish faith. In the Midrash of the
rabbis, the sages tell their story
with precisely that point in mind.
In modern times, Satan disguis-
ed himself as a Nazi: there is no
difference. But in spite of
everything Satan could do, Jewish
faith remained firm. It is really a
touch of genius which moved
those responsible for arranging
the order of the service for Rosh
Hashanah to bring the story of the
Akeda into our synagogues on
Yom Hazikaron. For Yom
Hazikaron is not only a day when
we ask God to remember. It is also
a day when the Jew remembers.
And remembrance of the past
should strengthen loyalty to the
present and the future.
A SaBBAth of Solemn Rest fop the Un6'
Continued from Page 3-C
could not observe Shmitta. In
fact, Rabbi Yannai ruled: "Go
forth and sow in the Seventh Year
on account of the Arnona (crop
tax).-' (Sanhednn 26a).
JEWISH FARMERS abroad
are not obliged to leave their
fields fallow, as the obligation
begins when ye come into
the Land which I give you ."
Lev 25:2).
For many generations, both
Jews and Gentiles saw the logic of
letting the land rest periodically
and voluntarily practiced crop
rotation. In Israel today, still
largely an agricultural land,
Shmitta brings with it a very
heavy economic burden. Learned
Rabbis, including the late Rabbi
Abraham Kook, agreed to a heter
Central Hardware Co.
545 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Miami Beach
531-0836
Happy New Year
Hearne Electric
14801 NE 20 Ave.. No. Miami Beach 944-7799
Happy New Year
Frame Factory and Gallery
Do It Yourself or Custom Framing
1405 West 49th St. 558-0412
Happy New Year
I. Brown Sales
4380 East 11th Ave., Hlaleah 685-7622
Wishes All Their Customers And Friends
A Happy New Year
Camp Shalom
and
Dave, Shelly Sokol and Family
Jan, Jerry, Heidi and Michael
Wish All A Happy New Year
Holland Machinery Co., Inc.
Happy New Year
405 E. 10th Ave., Hialeah 885-2575
(special dispensation) to sell the
land to non-Jews during the sab-
batical, to permit the land to be
worked. Other methods have also
been devised an early sowing of
vegetables before the New Year,
relying on the view of Rabbi Shi-
meon from Sens, and the growing
of crops by hydroponics or soil-
less systems as is practiced at the
Poalei Agudat Yisrael kibbutzim.
They are helped with government
subsidies and fund-raising: but the
full biblical observance of Shmitta
is impossible for the public as a
whole.
How does Shmitta affect the
religious community in Israel?
Throughout the year, lists of
shops appear in newspapers from
whom it is permissible to buy fruit
and vegetables. For many ultra-
Exiled for the greater part of their history the Shmitta year was
largely forgotten by Jews who were not obliged to observe it. that is if
they lived outside of Eretz Israel Even those who lived in Palestine and
were persecuted had reason to waive its observance But since the birth
of the State of Israel it has become a voluntary act of piety for obser-
vant Jews and is again a lively issue in the conscience of Israelis.
Orthodox Jews who do not accept
the heter of selling the land, there
are certain shops that market only
Arab or imported produce; and
the Arab markets in East
Jerusalem, Jericho and
Bethlehem are thronged
throughout the Shmitta year by
those Jews who will only buy pro-
duce not grown on Jewish soil.
We don't always understand the
reasons for the commandments,
but Shmitta teaches us that the
earth belongs to God. It also gives
man freedom just to study Torah,
for he is not preoccupied with
working the land. In the words of
Rabbi Kook. 'We today are charg-
ed with preserving the memory of
the commandment until the time
is npe for it to be carried out with
all its minutiae.
^
May you be inscribed in the book of life.


Government Securities
Corporation
442-4242
Gables Corporate Plaza, 2100 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, 12th Floor
Coral Gables, FL. Branch Offices: North Miami Beach. Plantation,
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Toll-tree 1-800-448-4242
A registered and licensed government securities broker/dealer.


Pagel6-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
in Loving memory
Harriet S. Jackman
uU/i. and ^W/i. Qdwatid QAiaMen QiCfman
Qufaid ^est ^A/tstas tToa
A ^nppq and -Ptospfctous ^Vieu- ^IJcoi zSc AM
^Ba/tba/ia QiShm
And CMdicn ?Uem\ Almt OatoPun Sue
and Andi\ T)aud extend best uistas fcw
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^Uft. and ^AA/is. Sam Seitfito
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and v^U/is. QtimfrM
And (%Cdvn ti* and Justin D.. vffd Qflal lUshrs
lot _4 ~Jjnppt) ond Ptospftous _W ^Jwit ^To ,4(1
oWa. (in^d jU/is. Stephen packman
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Seitlin and Company
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8125 N.W. 53rd Street, Suite 200, Miami, Fl. 33166
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our sinceRe
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W

/Msm*jj//AU\
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MSfptMmfMf
toNT


eJewisla Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, October 3,1986
Section D


Page 2-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Trumpeted By Washington Post
Special Relationship
Between U.S. And Israel
By MORRIS J. AM IT AY
At times during the past two
years, several Jewish leaders have
declared that the "special rela-
tionship" between the United
States and Israel has reached new
heights. This perception was
trumpeted by the Washington
Post in its latest exercise in anti-
Israel reporting, and to prove it
cited Congressional opposition to
the most recent Saudi arms sale (a
Presidential veto was almost over-
ridden even though there was no
organized lobbying against it by
American Jewish organizations).
While U.S.-Israel relations
could certainly be worse than they
are, there are still a number of
dark clouds threatening the rela-
tionship which should not be ig-
nored. It has become axiomatic
that Israel is the only stable
democracy in the Middle East and
represents a strategic asset to the
United States. But we cannot ig-
nore the built-in limits of this
"special relationship" or a
number of existing negative fac-
tors. The U.S. and Israel are
separate countries with unique in-
terests that do not always
coincide.
The current controversy over
the Israeli-produced Lavi fighter-
bomber illustrates how differently
the U.S. and Israel view Israel's
defense needs and military budget
priorities. Israel is determined to
produce its own attack aircraft on
the basis that militarily this woud
be most suitable for Israel, and a
boon to her economy and
technological base. Pentagon of-
ficials argue, however, that the
Lavi will cost more than Israel
estimates and they have en-
couraged Israel to scrap the pro-
gram and buy American-made
planes with Israeli avionics in-
stead. This dispute is not only
over cost projections but
highlights the antipathy felt for
Israel by certain Pentagon of-
ficials who have hindered closer
U.S.-Israeli military cooperation
every step of the way.
On the diplomatic front, the
Reagan Administration, eager to
court favor with so-called Arab
"moderates," continues to push
for arms sales to Arab countries
that will erode Israel's
technological advantage and force
her to allocate scarce resources to
keep the edge. During his recent
visit to the Middle East, Vice
President George Bush
underscored this policy with his
public remark (in Jordan) that
Congress had been wrong to op-
pose the latest U.S. arms sale to
Jordan.
The Administration has also not
retreated from the Reagan Plan
first put forth in 1982. This plan
for the future of the "West Bank"
was flawed then, and still is by
prejudging the outcome of any
direct negotiations between
Israel, Jordan and Palestinian
representatives.
Another political fact of life is
the absence in the White House of
any significant Jewish input on
issues of concern to our communi-
ty. The post of Jewish liaison has
been steadily downgraded to
where it has even less meaningful
input than at the time of the Bit-
burg incident.
The lessons to be learned from
an objective appraisal of the ac-
tual state of U.S.-Israel relations
is that there is reason not to be too
euphoric but certainly not to
despair. U.S. policy toward Israel
has always been and will continue
to be a tug-of-war with a number
of principal players the White
House, the Congress, the Jewish
community, the State Depart-
ment, the Pentagon and the
media.
If the American Jewish com-
munity is to play a constructive
role in the process, it must main-
tain its cohesion on Israel-related
matters, deal in reality rather
than wishful thinking, and
recognize that there are still a lot
of individuals and institutions that
do not share our belief that a
secure Israel is in the best in-
terests of the United States.
By endlessly repeating that
things are better than ever,
Jewish leadership might come to
believe it and convince enough ac-
tivists to be less involved. This will
only make inevitable disappoint-
ments harder to deal with
effectively.
Volunteers Who Fought in Spain
Gather for Jerusalem Congress
TEL AVTV (JTA) Surviv-
ing veterans of the International
Brigade, the army of volunteers
which fought on the side of the
Spanish Republic against the
Nazi-backed rebels under Gen.
Francisco Franco in the Spanish
Civil War of 1936-39, gathered in
Jerusalem Monday for their 50th
anniversary congress.
The veterans, from 15 coun-
tries, were joined by 60 Israelis
who were among the volunteers
from Palestine in the first effort
to stem the tide of fascism in
Europe a half century ago. Accor-
ding to Jerusalem-born Salman
Salzman, organiser of the con
ress, 300 volunteers from
fought in Spain, all of
them Jews except three Arabs
and two Armenians.
He said at a press conference
here that 20 percent of the 40,000
volunteers were Jewish, including
members of the American
Abraham Lincoln Brigade and the
Thaelman Brigade made up of
German anti-fascists.
The congress opened with an
address by President Chaim Her
zog of Israel. A grove of more
than 1,000 trees will be dedicated
near the Beth Shemesh-Jerusalem
highway in honor of the Spanish
war volunteers. Known as the
Peace and Brotherhood Grove, it
is financed by Salzman out of his
personal savings.
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Flink
I
At the Jewish National Fund's Laromme
Jerusalem Forest, Littlesun Bordeaux, the
13-year-old hereditary chief of the Teton Sioux
Indian nation in the State of Washington,
recently received a certificate for IS trees
planted in honor of his Bar Mitzvah. Lit-
tlesun, who divides his life between the Jewish
and Indian cultures, is the offspring of three
generations of Jewish women who married
Sioux Indians but raised their children as
Jews. Though he is shown wearing his tradi-
tional Indian dress, he switches over to a yar-
mulke and prayer shawl when attending ser
vices at Temple Beth Shalom in Spokane.
Wash., where he receives his Jewish educa-
tion. Presenting him with the certificate u
Yoram Gordon, general manager of Uu
Laromme Jerusalem. Hotel, which hosted Lit-
tlesun 's family and held a special Bar Mitzvah
party for him. JNF is the organization
responsible for afforestation and land
reclamation in Israel.
A Peak
Experience
TEL AVIV (JTA) The first
attempt to climb a Himalayan
mountain by a team of Israeli
mountain climbers is due to get
under way shortly, following the
receipt of permission from the
Nepal government in Katmandu.
An eight-member team led by
Doron Erel, 27, a geologist from
Givatayim near Tel Aviv, will try
the ascent of Mount Kangchutse,
also known as Makalu 11, about
23,000 feet high, in the northeast
of Nepal and only slightly lower
than Mount Everest.
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Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-D
Consensus Develops In Israel Against UN Resolution
Calling For Israel To Withdraw
From Lebanon Security Zone
y&&
Danny Blau, a medical electronics engineer at the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical Center, has been named 'Best Worker
in Israel' by Maariv, the nation's leading evening newspaper.
Blau, the father of five children who immigrated to Israel from
Yugoslavia in 19A9, is reponsible for the installation and
maintenance and, when necessary, the invention of the
Medical Center's highly sophisticated electronic equipment.
Among the instruments he developed are devices for controlling
drug dosage during inhalation therapy for asthma and for
measuring hydrogen levels in the brain.
Abraham J. Kremer, of Fair
Lawn, N.J., vice president oj
the New York-based PEF
Israel Endowment Funds, has
been elected president of the
JWB Jewish Book Council. The
announcement was made by
JWB President Leonard
Rochwarger, of Buffalo, N.Y.
Kremer succeeds Blu
Greenberg, who served as coun-
cil president since 198S.
Moshe Nativ, who retired from
the Israel Defense Forces with
the rank of Major General, has
succeeded Ambassador
Ayraham Avidar as executive
jce president of the Jewish
Agency and Treasury
Representative of the World
Zionist Organization.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A strong consensus has
developed in Israel against
the UN Security Council
resolution calling for
Israel's abandonment of the
south Lebanon security
zone and the deployment of
the United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL)
along the Israel-Lebanon
border.
The resolution was adopted
Tuesday evening (Sept. 23) by a
14-0 vote. The United States abs-
tained. Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir's swift condemnation of
the resolution at the UN was
echoed in statements here by
Premier Shimon Peres, Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Chief
of Staff Gen. Moshe Levy.
THE KNESSET'S Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee's
majority of Labor and Likud MK's
strongly supported the govern-
ment's policy of no change in the
status quo, defended by Rabin
who appeared before the commit-
tee last Wednesday. Hawks and
doves in opposition parties at op-
posite ends of the political spec-
trum favored changes reflecting
their particular views.
Peres, addressing the World
ORT Convention here, said he
hoped the Security Council would
"come to terms with reality" with
respect to UNIFIL. By reality he
meant Israel's determination not
to permit UNIFIL to deploy fur-
ther southward.
Peres noted, however, that the
Lebanese government wants
UNIFIL to remain, "and one can
clearly understand that ... If
UNIFIL leaves Lebanon, the
chaotic situation there would be
worsened."
RABIN TOLD the Knesset
committee that the security zone
has been relatively effective and
should remain as is, neither ex-
tended nor reduced. He rejected
the argument of former Chief of
Staff Rafael Eitan, a member of
the Tehiya Party, that the zone be
expanded northwards to the
Litani River.
Similarly, he spurned the warn-
ing by Mapan MK Eliezer Granot
that Israel was in danger of being
sucked back into the Lebanon
morass. Another leftist MK, Yossi
Sarid of the Citizens Rights Move-
ment (CRM), reasoned that if the
Shiite Moslem extremists, such as
the Hezbullah, want so desperate-
ly to get UNIFIL out of Lebanon,
that should be reason enough for
Israel to want it to stay.
All Israelis were angered by the
implication of the Security Coun-
cil's resolution that Israel's
refusal to allow UNIFIL to
operate along the international
border was somehow responsible
for recent attacks on it. The
French contingent suffered the
most casualties.
CHIEF OF Staff Levy said in
an interview that he detected a
link between the attacks on
French UNIFIL troops and the
recent spate of terrorist bombings
in Paris. They were premeditated
attacks on the French as were the
terrorist attacks in Paris and have
nothing whatever to do with
Israel, Levy said.

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Page 4-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
U.S.-Israeli Relations After Peres
London Chronicle Syndicate
WASHINGTON The re-
cent visits to Washington by
Prime Minister Shimon
Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin underlined
the generally strong state of
American-Israeli relations
on the eve of this month's
transfer of power in
Jerusalem. As far as the
United States is concerned,
Yitzhak Shamir is going to
have a tough act to follow.
U.S. and Israeli officials agreed
that the relationship right now
was excellent, virtually across the
board. There is certainly an era of
good feeling toward Israel in the
American capital in both the ex-
ecutive as well as legislative
branch of the government. Even
the major national news media
seem more supportive of Israel.
Americans like the generally
open and frank approach of the
Labor leadership, as compared to
the more shrill tones during the
Likud years in office, first under
Menachem Begin and then
Shamir. There are leas friction
and tension under the surface,
greater confidence and trust.
BOTH PERES and Rabin serv-
ed Israel's interests well during
their visits to Washington. In
short, American officials are
pleased by the policies coming
from Jerusalem nowadays.
Publicly, they maintain that this
will continue after Peres swaps
jobs with Shamir in October.
Privately, there are some serious
misgivings.
"We're hoping for the best, but
bracing for the worst," an
American specialist on the Middle
East said. Like other U.S. of-
ficials, he clearly appreciated
what he said was the "basically
flexible" style of Peres and Rabin
as opposed to "a certain rigidi-
ty" adopted by Shamir and his
Likud colleagues.
Even if there is not all that
much difference in substance on
key issues, diplomatic style the
way a policy is stated can make
all the difference in the world.
REAGAN Administration of-
ficials also continue to point out
that Peres and Rabin, while in the
Opposition, were basically open-
minded in reacting to President
Reagan's September 1, 1982
peace initiative, while Begin's
Likud-led coalition had instantly
rejected it out-of-hand.
Peres and Rabin are very sen-
sitive to Israel's image in
America, especially with the Ad-
ministration and Congress. They
tried during their public and
private statements to underscore
their willingness to accommodate,
as much as possible, America's
major concerns and interests in
the Middle East without sacrific-
ing Israel's.
How they phrased their posi-
tions, therefore, was very im-
pressive to the Americans. In-
stead of constantly declaring "no"
and rejecting all sorts of peace op-
tions, Peres and Rabin repeatedly
tried to say "yes," hoping to put
the burden for any diplomatic
stalemate and military tension on
the Arab side.
This was very apparent when
Peres addressed the Washington
Institute for Near East Policy on
Sept. 17 and when Rabin spoke
before the Heritage Foundation a
few days earlier. Both are influen-
tial Washington "think thanks."
There were many important
State Department, Pentagon and
White House officials, Congres-
sional staffers, journalists,
academicians and others in the au-
diences; most emerged with a
greater sense of understanding
for Israel's security predicament
and of confidence in Israel's
readiness to take chances for
peace.
THIS POSITIVE attitude
toward the top Labor leadership,
most especially toward Peres, was
repeatedly signalled during the
Prime Minister's two days of talks
in Washington. He won unusually
strong kudos from President
Reagan, Vice President Bush,
Secretary of State Shultz,
Secretary of Defense Weinberger,
and many others.
Israel'8 best friends in the
Senate and House of Represen-
tatives were clearly delighted by
Peres' performance during a joint
session of the Senate Foreign
Relations and House Foreign Af-
fairs Committees.
Reagan's carefully-prepared
remarks at a White House Rose
Garden farewell for Peres began
by noting that Peres was "a
valued friend, a statesman, and a
spokesman for peace, and a leader
of the Government of Israel, a
country with whom the United
States has deep and special ties."
In insisting that some im-
pressive progress has been achiev-
ed in recent weeks in the peace
process, Reagan added: "No one
has done more than Prime
Minister Peres to that end. His vi-
sion, his statesmanship, and his
tenacity are greatly appreciated
here."
THUS, the relationship bet-
ween Washington and Jerusalem
has clearly bounced back from the
tensions which erupted after the
Jonathan Jay Pollard spy scandal
last November. Indeed, neither
Peres nor Rabin was even asked
to discuss the Pollard case during
any of their numerous ap-
pearances before the U.S. news
media.
The only time it came up at all
was during the briefings the
Prime Minister and Defense
Minister had with the
Washington-baaed Israeli press
corps. Indeed, at one point, Rabin
even berated an Israeli journalist
for asking a question about
Pollard, pointing out that the sub-
ject was not raised during any of
his meetings in Washington.
Peres made the same point during
one of his question-and-answer
sessions with the Israeli press.
U.S. officials had a strategy in
heaping all of their praise on
Peres. They truly admire the
Prime Minister. They will miss his
style of operation. But they were
also hoping to put some subtle
pressure on Shamir.
By constantly referring to the
wonderful development of
American-Israeli relations these
past two years since Peres took
office they were serving notice
on Shamir that any deterioration
in the coming months would be
blamed on new policies coming
from Jerusalem. It was up to
Shamir to maintain this currently
very cordial state of ties by conti-
nuing the thrust of Israeli policy
as enunciated these past two
years under Peres.
THE AMERICANS did not
totally view Peres as a "lame
duck" leader. For one thing, they
suspect that he could once again
emerge as Prime Minister if the
National Unity Government
should collapse at some point
following the rotation. And he
will, after all, become Deputy
Prime Minister and Foreign
Minister not insignificant
portfolios.
Administration officials in
Washington are not exactly
holding their breath waiting for a
political crisis to burst out in
Jerusalem in the next few months.
Americans are aware of the basic
popularity of the coalition among
the Israeli public, largely because
of the remarkable economic tur-
naround these past two years. But
they know that the potential for a
political crisis is always there,
given the very serious differences
between Labor and Likud on the
future of the West Bank and
Gaza.
At the same time, the Ad-
ministration is very aware of the
benefits for Israel resulting from
the coalition agreement. No one is
more sensitive than Shultz, for ex-
ample, to the fact that a national
unity government can get away
Continued on Page 13
Jews Whose Families Came From Turkey Are Bitter
Over The Massacre
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jews in the metropolitan
area, whose families had im-
migrated to the United
States from Turkey, and
religious leaders spoke with
bitterness and sorrow over
the terrorist rampage
Saturday in Istanbul.
Rabbi Marc Angel, spiritual
leader of the Spanish-Portuguese
Synagogue in New York, Con-
gregation Shearith Israel, recall-
ed, in an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, that
his mother's family came from a
town outside Istanbul, Tekirdag,
and his grandmother from the
Island of Marmara, sites of
500-year-old Jewish communities
that had come to Turkey from
Spain and Portugal at the time of
the Inquisitions.
"THE JEWS of Turkey are
generally very mild-mannered,
low-key and they don't like to
draw attention to themselves,"
Angel said.
"They're ve-y patriotic, very
loyal to Turkey." The rabbi, who
was in Istanbul two summers ago,
has a cousin who currently serves
in the Turkish army.
Reflecting on the massacre of
the Sabbath worshippers, Angel
said: "If there can be an attack on
Jews and freedom-loving people,
who is safe? If you give terrorists
an opportunity to disrupt
freedom, then this is a challenge
to all of us.
"When things like this happen,
it tends to strengthen the Jewish
resolve and Israeli resolve. We've
had our sufferings, and this is
another chapter in the long litany
of martyrs, and what this does is
to strengthen the resolve of the
Jewish people. The Jewish people
will not bow to tyranny."
LEON LEVY, president of the
American Sephardi Federation,
whose family's roots are also in
the town of Tekirdag, said of the
massacre: "This points out that
Jews all over must band together
and care for one another ... if
even in a friendly country such as
turkey none of us is immune from
terrorist attacks ... It parallels
what happened in the Yom Kippur
War, using a holy day to carry out
an attack."
Lew's daughter, Janet, a New
York lawyer, visited Istanbul last
week, her second visit to Turkey,
where she sought her roots, and
was in the Neve Shalom
Synagogue on Wednesday, wat-
ching workers refurbishing the
synagogue for the Sabbath ser-
vice, the first which was to be held
in the newly-renovated surroun-
dings. Janet Levy remembered
them polishing the benches and
cleaning ceiling and pulpit.
She told the JTA that she feels
completely shocked by the attack.
Even though the synagogue is
situated in a vulnerable position,
on a busy avenue, she said she felt
absolutely no tension. She also
related visiting shops in Istanbul
where non-Jewish owners engag-
ed her in constant conversations,
interested in her origins and in-
quisitive about her Jewish
background, but always with
respect and no ulterior motives
other than friendliness.
RABBI MILTON POLAND.
president of the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America, said, "We anxious-
ly await the condemnation of this
barbaric act by the leaders of
other religious communities and
the punishment by the govern-
ment involved against those who
plotted and carried out this
dastardly act."
fope John Paul II condemned
the terrorist attacks on both the
Pan Am jumbo jet in Karachi and
the attack on the Istanbul
synagogue. Speaking from the
summit of a mountaintop in nor-
thwest Italy, where he was on a
mountain-climbing expedition, the
Pope said, "Faced with events so
horrendous and almost incredible,
the yearning for peace is
transformed into anguish." He ad-
ded that the two terrorist attacks
had wounded the conscience of
humanity.
"Blood of brothers in travel,
blood of brothers gathered in a
place of prayer" has been spilled,
the Pontiff said. "It is necessary
that without delay everything
possible must be done to put an
end to the unending spiral of hate
and terrorism." A Vatican
spokesperson said the Pope was
"extremely saddened" because of
the attack in a place of worship.
MEANWHILE, the Synagogue
Council of America, the umbrella
organization of the congrega-
tional and rabbinic bodies of the
Reform, Conservative and Or-
thodox movements in America,
have called an emergency meeting
for Monday afternoon to develop
outreach programs to the Jewish
community in Istanbul and to "of-
Continued on Page 13


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-D
Anti-Semites Of Far Right Threaten
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Federal and local law en-
forcement agencies in
Tidewater, Va,, have laun-
ched an investigation into a
series of bomb threats
against an exhibition of
Holocaust artifacts and
photographs at the
Tidewater Jewish
Federation.
At the same time, local police
have stepped up security at the
exhibit, "Auschwitz: A Crime
Agaisnt Humanity," which open-
ed Sept. 8 and is scheduled to run
a month. The exhibition has been
seen by at least 500-800 people
daily.
IN ADDITION to the bomb
threats, the exhibit was picketed a
week ago by a group said to be af-
filiated with a white supremacist,
anti-Semitic group, the Christian
Identity Movement. About a
dozen demonstrators distributed
blatantly anti-Semitic leaflets
with a cartoon deriding the
Holocaust as a lie and portraying
Jews in control of all forms of the
media. It was captioned "How
long can the Jews perpetrate the
Holocaust myth? Not much
longer!"
The leaflets bore two different
addresses, Kingdom News
Crusades for Truth, in
Chesapeake, Va., and Lord's
Covenant Church, America's Pro-
mise, Phoenix, Az.
Both are known headquarters
for an extreme, rightwing,
pseudo-Christian movement that
Holocaust Exhibit In Virginia
promotes belief in the "Israel
identity of the Saxon race" and
espouses paramilitary tactics
against Jews, Catholics, blacks
and the American government.
THE IDENTITY movement
also vilifies Christian Fundamen-
talist supporters of Israel, chiefly
the Rev. Jerry Falwell and Pat
Robertson, who are based in the
same Virginia area as the
Tidewater Federation.
According to A. Robert Gast,
executive director of the United
Jewish Federation of Tidewater,
the 15,000-member Jewish com-
munity has received much support
from the non-Jewish community
there. A rally was held last
Wednesday at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, site of the exhibit
and of the Federation and Jewish
Family Services.
The convocation, endorsed by
the local press, brought together
civic and religious leaders of the
Tidewater area. Father Thomas
Nee, of the Blessed Sacrament
Church, addressed the rally, say-
ing, "I wish to decry and deplore
the insanity and the cruelty of the
violence exhibited here" which
demonstrated "unAmerican,
woefully ignorant and thoroughly
unChristian behavior ... It is
frightening to realize that the
diabolically evil shadow of the
deeds and spirit of Nazi hatred so
poignantly recalled by the chilling
exhibit .. can reappear .. ."
GAST, in a telephone interview,
said that people are "concerned
but not frightened. Our ab-
solute horror in seeing this
demonstration in Norfolk, Va.,
reinforced our determination to
make the Auschwitz exhibit more
available to the community at
large." He said the Jewish
Federation would double its effort
to "get the good people of
Tidewater to come out and stand
up to the demonstrators."
The exhibit was first seen at the
United Nations last winter by
70,000. The UN showing was
organized by the Auschwitz State
Museum and the International
Auschwitz Committee. In April,
the United Jewish Appeal signed
an historic agreement with the
Polish government providing for a
two-year nationwide tour of the
death camp artifacts and related
documents.
J -i-iiizizi-i-i-izii^


atid/ cuhhI neaXUrv
>i. /Vatr ne* >S -uidtlack
Among the articles on display
are suitcases, human hair, oven
parts and 135 photographic
panels. Tidewater is the first of its
stops throughout the U.S. Gast
said attendance at the exhibit has
risen sharply since the demonstra-
tion and bomb threats, and that
people coming to see the exhibit
included groups from universities
and churches, including black
Pentecostalists.
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Pafgtj) The Jewish rToridian/Friday. October 3, 1966
B'nai B'rith Sends Representative
To Istanbul Funeral
Paul Skate, director of the
B'nai B'rith Worid Center xn
Jerusalem, attended the
funeral in Istanbul as a
rtprtstntntiit of B'nai B'rith
International.
By PAUL SHAW
London Ckrvmde Syndicate
One of the sights that
perplexed many of the
visitors and newsmen who
attended the funeral of the
Istanbul massacre victims
were the black kippot on the
heads of many of the
women.
The phenomenon was a pointer
to the unusual Jewtshness of this
tiny community (some 21.000 oat
of a total wnjewemsu of 51 milbon)
caught in a matrix of cir-
cumstances which together make
its internal viability precanous.
Discussing the kismet, some of
us present came to the conclusion
that they were bang worn out of
total ananuhanty with focal or
genera! custom in the bebef by the
s that that was the ee-
headgear for rehgious oe-
i for Jews, whether male or
INTKRKSTDrGLT. the un-
dnrer who took me to Istanbul
airport on my return journey
thought that my ctspa meant that
I was a Moslem dene. This said a
lot. not only about his knowledge
of Jews and Judaism, but also,
despite the fact that he was a
Moslem, about his knowledge of
Moslems and Islam.
Turkey a secular. Moslem
country' Under the soU Tery
actrrefT-revered national leader
and rerolutionary. Kama!
Atarurk. ox -nfhynce of the mos-
que was drastically cut back.
Turkey was secularised and
westernised.
Religious associations were for-
bidden. Only places of worship
were permitted, and their ac-
tivities were dosery controlled. As
s result, after decades of this pro-
cess. Istanbul is Moslem, in very
much the same way that Tel Arhr
is Jewish.
The Jewish community, too.
was affected by this westernizing,
secularizing process. The crowds
at the Jewish cemetery could, in
their dress and their ambience
hare equally been the Jewish com-
munity of. say. Stanmore or Sa-
vior in their coQectiTe grief.
DISPLAYING many of the
same patterns of behavior and at-
titude, the I^tp*"!1 community
shows signs of undergoing the
same assimuatory process as did
Western European Jewry in the
late 19th Century.
At the Neve Shalom synagogue.
while the musK ss definiteiy
Eastera. the rabbis more fairly
elaborate canonicals. Western
fashion. At the funeral, the only
person to display Turkish-styie
dothing was the Rtsfcoc Le-Zjoc
the Israeh Sephardi Chief Rabbi,
who wears splendid robes and a
tarbush of Ottoman provenance.
There was also great emphasis oc
procedure, ceremony and
decorum.
In conversation, the community
leaders stressed their individual
and corporate Turkish loyalty
They adopted, almost without dis-
sent, the view of the government
that the synagogue massacre be
considered an entirely internal
Turkish affair. There was no con-
nection to other events m Rome.
Paris or Antwerp let alone
Ma aloe
In a country which strongly
discourages all association with
overseas groups and demands
strong national loyalty from its
unaem. the Jewish community
does not base its response on a
sense of shared Jewish destiny
and purpose with the worldwide
Jewish community. "What hap-
pened was an attack on Turkey
not primarily, an attack on the
Jews."
THUS FAS. But
already signs of
stirring. Some voices within
community were advocating
throw iag off the traditional low
profile (the lower the healthier) of
the community and. for example.
advertising in the national
Turkish press for eoetrSsibons
from their feflow countrymen
towards the support fund for the
bereaved farifhes.
I heard one young go-! student.
wearing s very fashionable
trouser-stnt. being interviewed at
the cemetery by an overseas
television news team
After
p before
on donning a <\t~
egan. she saxL
to die interviewer's
question suggesting that the at-
tack would make the community
afraid to acknowledge its
Jewishness pubberr. "No. it has
made me question my roots and
made me want to learn more
about bemg Jewish." Both the ac-
tion and the sentzment were
If many bebeve as she does, and
as do those whose reaction tended
towards the treiacveiyi militant.
then the Turkish Jewish communi-
ty eoutd face an internal struggle
in the near future between tbe
old. conservative forces and those
who have fired with a more ac-
trrtst spirit. The j mnwiwnr w-I
certainly favor the former.
EVEN WITH the immensely
dignified leadership of Chief Rab-
bi David Asseo, who, only recently
bereaved by the loss of Ins wife,
rose bravely to the task of comfor-
ting an entire community, the
Istanbul community faces an
uncertain future. "We were in a
deep sleep. Suddenly we have
woken up," a leading community
leader said to me.
The Jewish resources of the
community have been drastically
depleted by abya and emigration.
Many of the more intensively
Jewish community members have
left
The film on Israeh TV' news of
the memorial service to the vic-
tims held in the Turkish
synagogue in Bat Yam showed a
very different community from
those who gathered in the
cemetery in Istanbul. It will take a
movement of real wfl] to make
that awakening last.
Put into the spotlight by appall
ing tragedy, the Turkish Jewish.
community is suddenly receiving
increased attention from many in-
ternational Jewish organmat:' I
It is. perhaps, part of a noticeable
concern in recent years by. par-
ticularly. American Jewry, in
isolated, small and dare one say
it? exotic Jewish communities
IT IS easy to build such a rela-
tionship in time of crisis there is
no doubt that the presence of
representatives from other com-
munities and of major Jewish
organizations was of great com-
fort and importance to the
Turkish community.
The challenge for us (and them |
is to maintain those contacts
structures and motivations when
the pressure is off.
'It Was Not The Work Of Turks'
By ROBERT SEGAL
Security officer* obtained
fingerprints of the twe terrorists
wb: cljec .1 1 Jews at worship ear-
Secc m the beauafuv Neve
Shaice symagc^rue m lra.-f By
passing tn*s* ;. jes mr.t^rr: 1-
terpci. vie .ntemacccal pcoce
aecw:rt Turkar :5--La_5 hcoe -:
iieccfy the terrorsts-
TSe fingerpnsss may be thane
3l men apcased by Abu NidaL
leader cc" the smaaaeis respoaav
bie for the recent pose igsVa>g
a Pakistan. Or they coutd be tsss>
ufied with the Hesbuoae 'Party ;:'
Godk eafancs the IMS TWA
Pight >4" Pemaw AM Areas
chief PLO tactacsan. provided the
scaer-.-ry rra.-* We as; wan v
Or we snsy never know sc
are today's
is the
IT WAS NOT the work
sf Turks.- Rafabz Rfa: Sccfcc
rorssts. pesrg as photographers.
:pened fire at *"!5 a.m_ Race*
Socfmc s cenam the death toil
wouki have been heavier bad the
coo? +-: mmutes .ater
here woc*d nave teen r>:o?
people at prayer in the desecrated
synagogue-
7-rest, autacnoes. stocked by
zzje massacre noted that several
ar.:-Israel terrorist groups
roasted of tne clings oc behalf of
Isssssk Holy War. and a pro-
Iraauac cadre called Islai-ic
Resscsnce. Whue ifcasmtg those
specfie chums, the Turfcsc securi-
ty force did ie-x-i* the death
team sssTsssss as Arabs.
WHEN JEWS ponder Turkey's
hsstnry. there ceases to nsnd the
of Theodor Here seekmg
I the Occca: Empire tc
to Palestine for Jews op-
by Poksk a*
pogroess.
Once the Asses had
m WorM War 1. the Taam.--*
Treaty of 1*25 provided the op-
Turkey tc estabesh a
at wsh the raw tc
power of Atatark Lesaal essae a
period far ssMssl
tke eesfiscatioa of many
Jews and
grocps Turkey
ct M:vem. mci-aie Ca^ic
..- rtr rssssf ] i r>.
Lxregrr; r tne urea: .-. i rr an
.!",- -*^rcn. reaete-; '_
j Hsw ^"-i.'.~ irjisacrs '- -
BBJPSBI :-: i rr-*T--r =ap-
;?rj i --
What. ^jer_ ::' :.:-:: r* Aj
eacn wees rr^ags wc-r: m:re
terrors: attacks, with Arar
fanaocs esssassf "credit' f:r ns-
bndied wanton deeds. Jews
more than all others earn
usuTf burden. We know, sad
-"-; many non-Jews are beginn-
ing to reabxe. that Arab terrorinta
tasssc not Israel alone, but have
deep hatred m their nearti far
Je*-s everrwhere.
Conservative Rabbis Set Agenda
To Join in Anti-Drug War
NEW YORK Conser-
vative rabfcts were urged to
actively participate in the
national eaznpajgr: against
drag dealers and users by
mobtliirag their coagrega-
oocs to corxfiat "ooe of the
grea^st potexxial dangers
to the future of oar society.' *
Races Abeseos. sssssssaall
* the :j:-m=ber
Assemciy the mtema-
body nf CssuiiLii raccts
lillisa memhers in 850
r=**"3ga tir^vghouc the D 5
Tazaca. sraaec tae -~Trm
: Preaoect aa: M-
faasssf the cssspsTg-
=Tgs ss a nsoieal hi
Ate :z j:-*fse:
-*--^ioos farces a
at" Rabbi
tsat tie
sd pssy a sen ramie roie
faZa "far-short of the actua.
need."
Whfle Rabbt Abeison commend-
ed President Reagan's proposals
for stronger penalties for drug
ieaiers. he challenged whether
this alone would reduce drug
usage. "The President has fail
ed_" he said, "to allocate adequate
funds for rehshaotation centers
and programs aimed at helping
the users."
The Conservative Jewish leader
stated that many ccogregaaoc-s
were already engaged m dealm
with the drug problem. Rare
Abeison noted that many
Wswsgnmm conduct forums or
the drug crisis, while rabbes
in private < nniwhng ano
in coosBMBSty pro-
grams. "AM of these efforts must
be xtnauVd." Rabbi AbeJcr.
asserted
HE OFFERED the foDowtng
sn csose -: per
AT TIE SAME tane. Raze*
Aaesscc Tfr.ennw: tea: the pro-
a=--r-jg laajawa


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-D
Shamir Meets With Foreign Ministers Of
Five Black African Countries
By MARGIE ULSTER
UNITED NATIONS -
iJTA) Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
held behind-the-scenes
neetings with Foreign
Ministers of five Black
.African countries since his
arrival here last week. None
i the countries have
diplomatic relations with
Israel.
Shamir reportedly urged the
Foreign Ministers, who were not
identified, to renew relations with
Israei and pointed out that there
B nothing to fear in a resumption
State, according to Shamir's
spokesman. Avi Pazner.
SHAMIR reminded the Foreign
Ministers that since 1981, four
African nations Zaire.
Cameroon, Liberia and Ivory
Coast have reestablished
diplomatic ties with Israel with
virtually no repercussions from
the Arab world.
Only three Black African na-
tions Lesotho, Malawi and
Swaziland retained relations
with Israel after Black African
countries severed diplomatic ties
with Israel following the 1973
Yom Kippur War.
Shamir met with Foreign
Minister Mandunju Bula Nyatiof
Zaire on Monday to discuss Israeli
aid programs and the possibility of
sending an Israeli delegation of
economic advisors to Zaire in the
near future. The Zairian officiaj
reportedly asked Shamir to speak
to American Administration of-
ficials regarding America's
lukewarm relations with Zaire,
Pazner said.
ACCORDING TO Nyati, the
U.S. Congress makes it difficult
for Zairt to get the foreign aid it
needs. Shamir promised to raise
this matter with secretary of state
George Shulz when the two men
met for talks late in the day Mon-
day followed by dinner on a yacht.
Foreign Minister loan Tout of
Rumania also asked Israel to in-
tervene on its behalf with the U.S.
when he met with Shamir Mon-
day. The Rumanian official and
Shamir discussed a number of
issues, including the possibility of
Israel taking up the matter of its
Most favored Nation status with
American offcials.
Rumania, which benefits from
the MFN status, has come under
critical scrutiny in light of
reported human rights violations
and a recent report that a Sephar-
dic synagogue in Bucharest was
razed despite repeated assurances
that the synagogue would be
spared in a massive urban renewal
Happy New Year
To Friends & Neighbors of
Harbour House
10275 Collins Avenue
Bal Harbour, Fla. 33154
The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
Happy
New
Year
arnett
anK
K4#fT>0#f ^OIC
Barnett Bank of
South Florida, N.A.
project in the Rumanian capital.
SHAMIR REPORTEDLY told
Foreign Minister Totu that Israel
was pleased with the ongoing
Jewish emigration from Rumania
and would say so in meetings with
American officials.
A representative of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
testified before the House of
Representatives in June, saying
progress had been made on the
human rights fronts and especial-
ly on the issue of Jewish emigra-
tion from Rumania. Over the past
six years, according to this
testimony, 25 percent of the
Jewish community was permitted
to emigrate.
In his meeting with Shamir.
Totu categorically denied that
Rumania provided military aid to
the PLO in Middle East peace
talks but opposes terrorism.
Shamir was also scheduled to
met Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ahmed Esmat Abdel-Meguid
Monday evening.
DR. THOMAS WEISS
OPHTHALMOLOGIST
Is pleased to announce the opening of
an additional office in Aventura for the
treatment of DISEASES AND MICRO
SURGERY OF THE EYE.
Best wishes for a happy and
healthy New Year!
2956 Aventura Blvd. 1680 Michigan Ave.
Suite 212 Suite 816
North Miami Beach, FL. 33180 Miami Beach, FL. 33139
673-4224
Medicare Accepted
Newman Insurance
Agency, Inc.
A Happy New Year To All
ROSE AND IR VING NE WMAN
JEFFREYM. NEWMAN
1558 NE 162 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida
Dade 940-7515 Broward 921-0616


Page 8-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
A Conversation with
Author/Activist
Marek Halter
Within weeks of publication, "The Book of
Abraham,' by Marek Halter, became a best-seller
in the United States, duplicating its earlier success
in Prance. The novel, soon to be a television mini-
series, fictionalizes 2,000 years of Jewish history
from the perspective of a single family. Halter,
who survived the Warsaw ghetto and eventually
settled in France, is a successful painter as well as
a political activist, devoting his prodigious
energies to the Middle East conflict, anti-
Semitism, hunger, Catholic-Jewish relations, the
Soviet dissident movement, racism and politica op-
pression in South America. He was recently inter-
viewed by Aron Hirt-Manheimer. editor of
'Reform Judaism,' published by the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Marek Holler (center), political activist and author of "The Book of Abraham," leads
demonstration at Bitburg.
To what do yoa attribute the
great interest hi roar aew
Mi
Jewish readers are curious
about their history. We know the
bible through the celebrations of
our festivals. We know the
Holocaust, if not through books,
through television. We know a lit-
tle about Jewish life in Poland
thanks to Isaac Baahevis Singer.
Bat the rest is a 2,000-year void.
What was the daily life of the Jew
like in North Africa or Prance in
the fifth or sixth century? I tried
to answer that
Why a Bevel? Why sot noa-
fietiea?
Because I am not a philosopher,
I'm a storyteller. Like the Hasjdic
rabbis. I believe it is easiest to
transmit knowledge through
stories. My role is to ssk
questions.
D roe coauddor yoearsslf first
a activist or a writer?
For some authors, the process
of writing is important. I belong
instead to the Jewish tradition of
scribes, of witnesses. Each human
experience can be useful to the
whole of humanity. Historically,
even very small Jewish com-
munities had a Jewish scribe who
preserved daily life. For them,
what was important was the
transmission of knowledge, not
the process of writing. This is the
difference between me and
clsssicsl writers. I will write as
long ss I have something to
transmit. If, one day, I find that I
have nothing more to say, I will
stop writing. My political and
literary motivations are the same:
remember, remember.
Do yon believe that Jews are
wdsjaed to play s special role in
history?
I don't believe that Jews are
better than other people, but we
have been entrusted with s great
treasure, the law, and its is our
task to preserve it. I spent two
years in the Warsaw ghetto.
Because I survived, I believe I
have a duty to help other suffering
people today. To my mind, that is
the essential idea behind Judaism.
We are obliged to remember
that we were slaves in Egypt, not
because we are still slaves, but
because other people are still
enslaved. We cannot be fully
liberated as long ss other people
are not free. We are the keepers
of the essential ethical treasure of
humanity. We are scribes,
witnesses. We hsve some
knowledge about evil. Our duty is
to transmit that knowledge.
What is the state of Preach
Jewry?
Among non-Jews in Prance
there is s growing interest in
Judaism. People are now return-
ing to moral values, to the Ten
Commandments, which leads to
an interest in Judaism. Last year
we organized a month-long
celebration of Judaism at the Sor-
bonne, and 32,000 people, in-
cluding leading politicians and
celebrities, attended. Thousands
of non-Jews paid to listen to
discussions about Jews and
Judaism.
Is French anti-Semitism
waning?
Racism and anti-Semitism will
be around forever, or at least until
the Messiah comes. Jews unders-
tand the permanency of evil, of
violence. It is the destiny of
human beings. So we are vigilant
in France, where 1 helped found
the movement called SOS Racism
that numbers two million
members, the majority of whom
are non-Jews.
When we organized a concert
against Russian anti-Semitism,
we had 400,000 people singing
and dancing, the majority non-
Jews. Yet at the same time, the
National Party of Jean-Marie Le
Pen obtained nine percent in re-
cent elections, 35 deputies in the
Parliament It is the first time
since the war that a fascistic, anti-
Semitic, racist party has been
elected. So we have reason to be
vigilant.
Can yon tell sac of your
eetinr with Yasir Arafat?
When we met, I told him he had
to declare his willingness to go to
Jerusalem, to recognize and live in
peace with Israel, to stop the ter-
ror. Israel is not ready to talk to
me, he said. I told him that Jewish
mothers, like Palestinian mothers,
don't want to see their children
killed in another war.
If you make such a statement of
reconciliation, I told him, I will
organize demonstrations in Israel,
asking the government to receive
you. But if I do this, he said, I will
be killed by Dr. Habash. If you are
afraid to be killed for the future of
your people. I told him, you will
never be head of a free Palestinian
nation.
Elie Wiesel has written sboat
how sarvivers. instead of seek-
ing revenge after the liberation,
formed into group* to call for s
new humanitarian order. How
do yen explain that?
Those who survived, who saw
the evil, have a duty to do what
they can to change the world.
When Afghanistan was occupied
by Soviet troops, I said to my
friends, we must do something.
Regardless of whether we like the
Afghan people or its leaders, it is
unacceptable for a superpower to
overrun s small country, as Hitler
did Czechoslovakia. We accepted
that then and look what happen-
ed. So a group of us made an ap-
peal in the newspapers and raised
funds to buy a radio station.
In 1982, we traveled to Pakistan
and walked 100 kilometers over
the border to deliver the station to
the rebels. When we met with the
leaders of the Afghan resistance,
one of them said, "Our main
enemies are the Soviet Union and
Israel." "Why Israel?" I asked.
"Because Israel is against Islam,"
he said. I then said. "First, Israel
is not your enemy, and second, I
am a Jew." So he asked, "Then
what are you doing here?" I said,
"I am here because of Jewish prin-
ciples." "Then," he said, "we are
brothers." Radio Free Kabul is
still on the air, telling the world of
the Soviet genocide there.
Do yoa believe that a siagle ia-
diTidual can make a differeace
in the world?
I believe that a human being can
change history. Jewish history
proves it again and again.
U.S. Warns That The Return Of PLO Terrorists To South Lebanon
Will Increase The Tension In The Area

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
warned Thursday (Sept. 25)
that the increasing return to
Lebanon of Palestine
Liberation Organization ter-
rorists will increase the ten
sion in the already volatile
south Lebanon.
The reason for' the recent
Israeli raids on terrorist bases in
Lebanon is believed to be based on
evidence that Palestinian ter-
rorists, driven out by Israel in
1982, are infiltrating back closer
to Beirut and the coastal highway
that links the city with southern
Lebanon. There have been reports
that there are ss many as 8,000
Palestinians in various parts of
Lebanon.
ASKED ABOUT this last
Thursday, State Department
deputy spokesman Charles Red-
man said, "There have been
reports over the past several
years that Palestinian fighters of
various factions, taking advan-
tage of continued civil strife, hsve
been drifting back to Lebanon.''
He said he could not confirm if the
8,000 estimate was correct.
"Obviously the return to
Lebanon of armed personnel, of
whatever faction, can only
damage the prospects for ending
the cycle of violence,''Redman ad-
ded. "It cannot help efforts to
restore Lebsnese unity,
sovereignty and independence
and to bring about national
reconciliation.
On a related issue, Redman ap-
peared ambiguous over whether
the United States supported
Israel Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir's charge that Syria and
Iran were behind much of the
violence in south Lebanon.
"Damascus and Teheran have
criticized the Israeli presence in
south Lebanon," he said. "Both
have expressed support for at-
tacks on Israeli forces and on the
South Lebanon Army."
AT THE same time, he noted
that Syria has "expressed its sup-
port" for the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL)
while Iran opposed UNIFIL
"Our position is dear," Redman
said. "Support for acts of violence
are harmful to efforts to achieve
stability in south Lebanon.
The U.S. position on south
Lebanon is that the parties to the
conflict must reach an agreement
that will ensure stability for south
Lebanon and security fr nor-
thern Israel. This position was
restated last Tuesday when the
U.S. abstained from a UN Securi-
ty Council vote calling on Israel to
withdraw all its forces from south
Lebanon and to allow UNIFIL to
extend its activities to the Israeli
border.
1


Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Flondian Pa#e 9-D
U.S. And Its West European Allies To Press Soviet Bloc
On Human Rights
While the plight of Soviet Jewry
was not specifically mentioned by
either Reagan or Redman, it has
been brought up by the U.S. and
other Western countries, with
specific names mentioned, at the
previous follow-up conferences in
Belgrade in 1977-78 and Madrid
1980-83.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The United States and its
West European allies will
press the Soviet bloc on
human rights in a con-
ference that opened in Vien-
na last Tuesday (Sept. 23),
the State Department said.
The U.S.. Canada and 33 Euro-
pean nations are meeting in Vien-
na for two weeks to prepare for a
follow-up to the 1975 Helsinki Ac-
cords in Vienna on Nov. 4. The
foUow-Up and a conference which
ended in Stockholm Monday
(Sept 22) were scheduled at the
end of the Helsinki review con-
ference in Madrid in 1983.
"THE U.S. and its allies will
seek improved compliance by the
East with all the principles of
Helsinki and Madrid." State
Department deputy spokesman
Charles Redman said.
He said at the meeting the West
will seek an agenda for the Nov. 4
meeting that will address the full
range of issues covered by the
Helsinki Final Act "which
represents a framework for seek-
ing to resolve the humanitarian,
economic and security issues that
divide Europe."
Redman said the Stockholm
conference was an integral part of
the broader process which
"recognizes the interrelationship
between peace and freedom in
Europe." At Stockholm an agree-
ment was reached for exchanges
of information about military ex-
ercises and for inspection of troop
movements between NATO and
Warsaw Pact countries.
But Redman stressed that dur-
ing the two-week gathering the
West will discuss "promises made
and promises kept." He said that
"in particular, concrete steps by
the East to resolve problems in
the areas of human rights and
humanitarian concerns are
needed."
PRESIDENT REAGAN, in his
speech to the United Nations
General Assembly last week,
noted that while Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev has recently
spoken of military, political and
economic issues, he has not
discussed human rights. Reagan
said human rights is "the first
obligation of government and the
source of its legitimacy" as well as
"the foundation stone in any
structure of world peace."
"Commitments were made
more than 10 years ago in
Helsinki concerning these rights
nd their recognition," Reagan
said. "We need only look to the
East today to see how sadly un-
fulfilled those commitments are.
The persecution of scientists,
religious leaders, peace activists,
political dissenters and other
prisoners of conscience continues
unabated behind the Iron
Curtain."


FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS
May you receive
the blessings of happiness,
the best of health and peace
throughout the New Yean
Senator Paula Hawkins
Paid for by the Committee to He-Elect Paula Hawkins Republican.


PgelO-D The Jewish Floridin/Fridy, October 3, 1986
Proposals To
Strengthen The
Status Of
Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
series of proposals to strengthen
the status of Jerusalem as Israel's
capital and further its economy
and development were approved
unanimously by a ministerial com-
mittee Sunday. The proposals
were made by a steering commit-
tee headed by Chaim Kubersky.
The ministerial committee
agreed that five senior Cabinet
Ministers would be in charge of
further implementing the basic
law which established Jerusalem
as the seat of government. They
are the Premier and Vice
Premier, the Interior Minister.
Finance Minister and Minister of
Economy and Planning
They will be authorized to
establish by-laws covering all
aspects of the basic law. By so do-
ing, the declarative status of the
basic law will be guaranteed and
given an executive character.
The ministerial committee also
decided that science-based in-
dustries would be given preferred
status in Jerusalem with respect
to land prices, tax abatements and
grant levels. In addition, a
development authority will be
established to coordinate the ac-
tivities of the government and
municipal companies operating in
Jerusalem.
It will be charged with prepar-
ing long-range plans for the
development of the city. A com-
pany, to be called "Jerusalem,"
will be created as an economic
lever to advance development in-
itiatives.
>
Deputy Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir and his wife meet with
members of the Gyor Ballet of Hungary following their recent per-
formance at the Jerusalem Theater. Mrs. Shamir has just return-
ed from a visit to Bulgaria, where she was guest of the Jewish
community in Sofia.
Vice President Bush And Prime Minister Peres
To Speak At CJF General Assembly
NEW YORK Vice President
George Bush and Israeli Prime
Minister Shimon Peres will be
featured speakers at the 55th
General Assembly of the Council
Zev Buf man
& Family
Happy New Year To All
of Jewish Federations Nov. 12-16
at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in
Chicago. Over 3,000 Jewish com-
munity leaders from throughout
North America are expected to
attend.
Rabbi Harold Schulweis will
serve as scholar-in-residence.
delivering a major address on the
theme "Klal Yisrael Challenges
Facing North American Jewry in
Balancing Unity and Diversity."
He will also give the summary
statement at the concluding
plenary.
In addition, Shoshana S. Cardin.
president of the Council of Jewish
Federations, will deliver the
Keynote Address on the Assembly
theme "Klal Yisrael: Federation's
Role in Building Community" dur-
ing the opening plenary. The pro-
gram will also feature a musical
performance, including chorales
singing in Hebrew, Yiddish and
Ladino to highlight the unity and
diversity of the Jewish people.
ONE FEATURE of this year's
General Assembly will be a live
satellite appearance from Israel
by Natan Sharansky, who is
unable to appear in person
because his wife, A vital, who ad-
dressed the Assembly on his
behalf last year, is about to give
birth.
As part of the campaign to Sum-
mit II, an outdoor rally will take
place in nearby Grant Park to pro-
test the continued refusal of the
Soviet Union to permit the vast
majority of the refuseniks to
emigrate. This will be the precur-
sor to a much larger demonstra-
tion now being mobilized to take
place in Washington. D.C.. at the
time of the projected Reagan
Gorbachev summit meeting.
Other activities dunng the
Assembly will include Jewish Ex
po '86 a repeat of the educa
tional drop-in center organized b\
the Jewish Educational Service of
North America that proved to be
so popular last year ano a
special commemoration of the
100th anniversary of the birth of
David Ben-Gunon. featuring his
grandson.
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Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-D
You No Longer Can Travel As Innocent
Robert Israel is editor of the
Rhode Island Jewish Herald.
AN INNOCENT ABROAD
By ROBERT ISRAEL
You no longer can travel
as an "innocent abroad."
Wander into the Temple
Mount, also known as the
Dome of the Rock, in
Jerusalem, and you'll see
what I mean the at-
mosphere changes instant-
ly. There are guards
everywhere. They check
your knapsack not once,
but twice. Wander around
the mosque, but avoid ven-
turing close to the Medina
Gate: there are more guards
there with guns.
They are there for good
reasons: Jewish terrorists have
tried t<> bomb the Temple Mount
several times. In one of the mos-
ques, a smaller one below the
golden domed mosque, one can
Me the charred remains of their
handiwork. Inside, scaffolding
rises to the dome, the walls black.
Outside, tourists doze under the
olive trees. Children play in the
garden. The cries <>f the street
vendors can he heard over the
wall.
Camus once wrote about the
Bense of ahandonement he felt
when gazing into the blue waters
of the Mediterranean Sea. That
same feeling can be kindled when
walking and swimming along Tel
Aviv's In'ach under a cloudless
sky.
CONSTRUCTION continues on
high rise luxury hotels that face
the beach, but the surrounding
streets of the Opera House
district are in desperate need of
repair. Like the yellow, crumbling
buildings in old Miami Beach. Tel
Aviv's opera House district dates
to another time before toruism
brought the hordes of Europeans
and Americans to the beaches.
Walking to Tel Aviv's hotel
front the old city of Jaffa.
- Inter everywhere. People
imp debris on the beach old
res, refrigerators, plastic ear-
pieces of old machinery.
Vfti r swimming, it is necessary to
scrub the feel to get rid of the tar
Meets there
Men and women, scantily clad in
itl ng suits that scarcely conceal
their figures, cavort on the beach
under a cloudless sky. while
Israeli helicopters, on patrol, fly-
up and down the coast every ten
minutes.
>n Allenby Street, prostitutes
patml the streets. Several weeks
go, the police closed down an
escort service on Allenby
LATER IN the evening, at a
dinner engagement in Bat Yam. a
town not far from Tel Aviv. I meet
Yitzchak. a Holocaust survivor,
and his wife. With them are
another couple and their
daughter, who is a Major in the
Israeli army. On the way to their
apartment, we get into an
automobile accident; a young man
on his way to work in Ashdod
smacks into us from behind when
we stop to let pedestrians cross.
While exchanging license plate
numbers, the children from the
beach stand around us with wide-
eyed wonderment.
At dinner, we discuss the Israeli
economy, which has been worsen-
ing, according to my hosts. Later,
we retire to the living room to
watch Jordanian television.
Reason: Israeli television is on
strike. So is the radio. The day
before, the post office went on
strike. Before that, there was a
strike at Ben-Gurion airport.
Reason: the government is pulling
back on all subsidies. This is the
reason why we paid one fare for
the bus, and the following day that
fare doubled. This is also the
reason why the cost of milk and
eggs has climbed sky high. There
is a move to lay off several thou-
sand government employees, but
Labor won't go for it.
My hosts are discouraged Yitz
chak and his wife are considering
moving to the United States
"I like my social life here." he
tells me. "but I can't stand what's
going on in the economy and I
won't invest my money here. I en-
dured the Holocaust, but at this
stage in my life, I'm tired of strug-
gling for survival."
FOR THE young woman in the
Israeli Army, the salary is poor,
but the night life is exciting. As a
single woman, she visits many of
the pubs she refers to them as
putnm. "You move from one to
another, and meet many people."
she says.
She is troubled about the in-
crease in crime in Israel.
"A week ago," she tells me, "a
rapist attacked many women in
North Tel Aviv. He even came in-
to my apartment house. He was
on the floor beneath mine. The
woman who lives there heard so-
meone come in. She was in the
bathroom. She called out her hus-
band's name, and the intruder
quit the building when he heard
her. But he could have come
upstairs to my apartment. I was
all alone."
Like many women in the I'nited
States, she carries a -mall con
tamer of mace and a police
whistle
At night, driving back to the
hotel in Tel Avi\. we pass through
the old city of Jaffa. The sea is
calm. The lights of the city glitter
in white phosphorescence.
IN RARE DESHER? on the
Sea of Galilee, the Benedictine
monks provide travelers with a
clean camping area that costs $3
U.S. for a mattress and the use of
the toilet and a communal kitchen.
The church bells ring at dawn,
and there is no point in trying to
sleep after that the bells wake
up the flies which are fond of lan-
ding on your eyelids.
At dawn, I wander down the
path to the shore where a medita-
tion center has been created a
bamboo thatched roof with a
trunk of a tree for a bench facing
Mr. & Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
and Family
the water and the sleeping city of
Tiberias a half dozen kilometers
away.
There is a sense of peacefulness
here. The mountains are pink in
the early light. Birds are about,
fish are jumping, a cool breeze
rustles the reeds and flowers.
Under this thatched roof. I can
see the hills of summer wheat and
the cultivated fields beyond. Soon,
the summer sun will bake the
earth, and the coolness will only
be a memory. The roar of farm
tractors can be heard and an occa-
sional car on the road. There is a
scent of flowers, of mint, and
close by, the green coolness of the
olive trees. A kingfisher hovers in
the air and then dives, catching a
fish.
Back at the monastery, across
from the sleeping area, is a
bunkhouse. Twenty orphan
children are staying there for the
month, from Bethlehem. They
sing Arabic songs, pounding on a
drum. One of the girls dances a
belly-dance. Late last night, I
heard them take a swim in the
stream that flows past the camp-
site into the Sea of Galilee, their
voices and the sound of the
cascading water converge in a
cacaphony of delight.
THE SUN has set on the Red
Sea. The mountains across from
me, in Jordan, are ablaze with a
fiery red glow.
Swimming is magnificent
there are multi-colored tropical
fish and coral reefs and one
rents snorkling gear, playing
peeping-Tom for awhile, until the
water proves too cold and one has
to retreat to the hot sun again and
the even hotter sands for a pause.
Elat is a boom town, an Israeli
Miami Beach. An airport runway
is located in the center of town.
There is quick cab service for
wealthy travelers to any number
of five star hotels.
In Taba, on the Egyptian
border, vacationers with an air of
somnambulism, order drinks
while their children frolic in
kayaks or ride camels. Out to sea
is an Israeli gun boat, anchored,
keeping close watch.
If you are a young person
visiting Elat, you can sleep on the
beach or in any one of the many
hotels that are in town. At night,
everyone, young and old, con-
gregates in the new tourist center
opposite the beach and the five-
star hotel area. In the park, young
people lie on the hot pavement,
many of them intoxicated or on
drugs. Other young people are
simply exhausted from over-
exposure to the sun.
While the new tourist center
can be admired for its multi-
leveled American-style myriad of
stores, the older section of town,
across from the central bus sta-
tion, offers a better opportunity
for the gourmet, particularly at a
French restaurant operated by a
young French Jewess whose fami-
ly made aliya in the late 1960's.
AFTER A delicious meal -
prepared masterfully with herbs
and wine she sat and told me
about her life in Israel.
"I am extremely unhappy about
the way the ultra-Orthodox Jews
are behaving," she said. "It seems
to me they have an unfair hold on
the government. Moving here, my
family and I made great
sacrifices, just like other im-
migrant families. I resent the fact
that the ultra-Orthodox do not
acknowledge the State of Israel. I
resent the fact that my brothers
have had to serve in the Army,
and the ultra-Orthodox men
refuse to serve. I resent the fact
that we work so hard, and they
hardly work at all, and they
receive government subsidies.
"I do not see my fellow ultra-
Orthodox Jews giving of
themselves in the same way. My
brother is now thinking of quitting
the country. I cannot do the same
because I have this business to
think about. I have a son to think
about. I would like to have more
children, but I cannot afford to
have them. I do other jobs in addi-
tion to running this restaurant,
and I have very little time to
spend with my son who is here
tonight, playing out in the cour-
tyard until I get off from work. If
I had an opportunity to quit this
country, I would, but it is not
possible."
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Page 12-D The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
Mainstream American Artists Infuse
Jewish Themes Into Their Work
By ANDREW MUCHIN
NEW YORK Jewish art
in the United States is not
exclusively the province of
crafters of religious objects.
Mainstream artists working
in many media lately find
themselves driven to create
personal statements of
Jewishness. These can take
many forms. In "Jewish
Themes: Contemporary
American Artist 11/ an ex-
hibit running through Nov.
16 at the Jewish Museum
here, the statements are
fresh, if sometimes naive,
and reflect a vibrant variety
of thinking by the 24 artists,
all but one of whom are
Jewish.
The exhibit is diverse a fan-
tastical steel sculpture bursts
from the floor nearby cartoon
panels of anthropomorphic mice
telling a Holocaust-like tale but
four major motifs can be seen:
depicting the evil of the Holocaust
and Nazism in general; the
reconstruction of the Jewish past.
% including the artist's own family,
to create a sense of rootedness in
the Jewish present; the powerful
attraction of the land of Israel;
and the inspiration provided by
biblical stories and Jewish ritual
and mysticism. In many works,
these themes intermingle.
THE ONLY apparent thematic
failure is Martin Silverman's
table-top sculpture "Eve," which
portrays the first woman prepar-
ing to plunge a knife into the ser-
pent that surrounds her. That, of
course, is not how the story goes.
Silverman, of New York, ex-
plains in the artist's comments
that accompany each work that he
has transformed in his imagina-
tion many biblical stories.
Another approach to these
stories is the emotive portrayal.
The acrylic paintings of New
Yorker Sue Miller, particularly
"Ararat," show a reverence for
biblical images as well as an ap-
preciation for desert colors.
Louise Fishman's layered strokes
form bold shapes in ardent
abstract paintings of biblical
themes. The strongest of the
Philadelphian's work here is the
solid and spiritually suggestive
"Tabernacle."
Indeed, it's instructive to ex-
amine how the diverse artists ap-
proach the same topic. The most
compelling works not surprisingly
are inspired by the Holocaust.
Paul Marcus' multi-media pain-
Israelis Will Get Commercial Radio
And TV, Cabinet Decides
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet approved a draft law Sun-
day to establish a second channel
on State-run television and radio
which would be open to private
commercial operators.
The Cabinet decided to compen-
sate daily newspapers for loss of
advertising revenue to commer-
cial broadcasters. The Israel
Broadcasting Authority will also
be compensated for loss of
revenue because of the expected
decrease of paid public service an-
nouncements on the first channel.
Communications Minister Am
non Rubinstein said he expected
that 10 private radio stations
could begin operations within six
months. The second television
channel will take longer to set up,
he said.
Premier Shimon Peres briefed
the Ministers Sunday on his visit
to the U.S. and Canada from
which he returned Tuesday. He
described his meetings with Presi-
dent Reagan, Secretary of State
George Shultz, Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger and other top
Administration officials.
He noted the determination of
the U.S. government to support a
strong Israel, oppose the
Palestine Liberation Organization
and to view the peace process as
part of peace itself.
ting "Reflections" puts resigned
horror on the faces and in the
postures of a man and his wife as
he is about to be beaten by Nazi
thugs with faces that resemble
skulls. This violent
"Kristallnacht" scene is inten-
sified by its ominous browns and
the perspective looking at the
scene from the inside of a shop
whose window is defaced by a
yellow Star of David. Marcus, of
New York, has covered the work
with a sheet of glass pierced by
what appears to be a bullet hole.
ANOTHER CHILLING
Holocaust-related piece is the
panel of photographs by the only
non-Jew in the show. "Auschwitz-
Birkenau (Gas Chamber)" by Bill
Thompson of New York and Paris
shows in stark colors a scene
wider than one's field of vision. It
is the interior of a gas chamber.
This view was no doubt shared by
the first members of any con-
demned group of Jews to enter
the chamber.
The creation of the world also
was multi-inspirational for this
show. New Yorker Ann Sperry's
"The Creation: Seven Days" is a
series of vertical, organic looking
pieces of welded and painted steel,
each depicting a day of creation
according to Genesis. These still
pieces seem to bend and wave and
pulsate, but to distinguish them, it
helps to have a scorecard.
Stephanie Weber of Berkeley,
Calif., uses similar organic swirls
and planes more convincingly in
her large and bright acrylic pain-
tings ''Genesis' and
"Beginnings."
The show also features con-
structions of all sizes, the largest
of which is the eight-cubic foot
"Mikva: The Place of Kissing
Waters," built on site by Mierle
Laderman Ukeles. With a tape of
water flowing, she represents
pure rain water mixing with city
water for the ritual bath. The
work has its abstract elements,
but she aspires for realism by ex-
tending a turquoise-color pipe
from the piece out the front door
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and up to the roof of the six-story
museum. Like all of the artists
here, Ukeles doesn't limit herself
to Jewish works, according to
museum chief curator Susan
Tumarkin Goodman. As artist-in
residence for the New York City
Department of Sanitation, Ukeles
created a ballet for mirrored gar-
bage trucks.
NEITHER ABE the four
Jewish motifs of the show the only
ones addressed now by American
artists. The museum's first Jewish
show, in 1982, contained, for ex-
ample, a piece expressing
gratitude for Soviet Jewish
emigration. And Tumarkin Good-
man said she encountered other
themes in the works of hundreds
of artists she viewed over the past
few years in putting together this
show.
The Jewish artists aren't alone
in their movement toward
religious expression, she in-
dicated. "There is a concern with
roots, with spirituality in
general," she explained. "Artists
are really feeling a need to
discover who thev are."
She elaborates in her introduc
tion to the exhibit catalogue that
"those who employ Jewish con-
tent frequently address the
spiritual, their work is more often J
the result of an emotional or *
ethical catharsis. They arrive at
their Jewish imagery through
routes that have for them a per
sonal resonance of an intensely
positive nature." In this, she in
dicates, they differ from the
alienation or strong ambivalence
expressed in avant-garde Chris
tian sacred imagery.
Although American Jewish ar-
tists have produced Jewish art for
60 years, Tumarkin Goodman sees
an increase in Jewish themes in
the past decade.
Moreover, this latest group of
artists was "thrilled," the curator
said, that a Jewish art show would
include their works.
Some of them had an additional.
nearly identical reaction,
Tumarkin Goodman said, that also
may be considered in keeping with
Jewish themes. They Slid, My A
parents will be so happy."
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Israeli Expert Proposes More Responsibility
For Palestinian Leadership In West Bank
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-D
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
researcher at one of Israel's
leading think-tanks propos-
ed a gradual expansion of
responsibility for Palesti-
nian leaders in the West
Bank, leading eventually to
autonomy for the territory.
But he warned against im-
plementing autonomy
unilaterally in the near
future.
Brig. Gn. (Res.) Arye Shalev, a
Senior Fellow at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity's Jaffee Center for Strategic
Studies, presented his views in a
35-page study on unilateral
autonomy for the West Bank.
published Thursday (Sept. 25).
HE SAID an international
peace conference on the Middle
East is unlikely to material ire now
and Israel therefore should work
to strengthen the authority of
Palestinians in the administered
territory and encourage Jorda-
nian influence there at the ex-
pense of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Negotiations between Israel
and any Arab partner are unlikely
at this stage and Israel therefore
should work behind the scenes,
with Jordanian cooperation, to
strengthen the power of local
Arab officials so as to pave the
way for an eventual political solu-
tion, Shalev said.
He suggested among Israel's
other options a policy of prodding
West Bank Arabs to take greater
responsibility for their own in-
stitutions. That, combined with
greater authority for local
leaders, would lessen friction bet-
ween Israeli officials and Arab
residents, he said.
BY STRENGTHENING Jor-
dan's position in the territory, an
alternative leadership to the PLO
could be created, he said, and the
j Jews From Turkey
Continued from Page 4
fer any and all assistance
possible."
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard,
president of the SCA, said "These
tragic criminal acts must once and
for all come to an end." He called
for a united front of governments
of goodwill regardless of political
persuasions to develop "strong ac-
tion efforts" to counteract such
terrorist offensives.
A memorial service for the vic-
tims of the synagogue attack is be-
ing coordinated by the Conference
of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations and the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York to be held
Tuesday at noon at the Spanish -
Portuguese Synagogue. Con-
gregation Shearith Israel. Rab-
binic and community leaders are
expected, as well as represen-
tatives of the Turkish and Iraeli
governments.
ACCORDING TO Malcolm
Hoenlein, executive director of
the Presidents Conference, "It is
our hope that this memorial ser-
vice is an expression of both our
outrage at this dastardly act as
well as our solidarity with the
Jewish community of Turkey.
This was an attack on the entire
Jewish people. It is regrettable
that it takes such tragedies to
galvanize us into action. We must
see to it that action is taken to put
an end to such terrorist attacks by
consistent pressure, and not simp-
ly by responding each time there
are more sacrifices."
U.S.-Israeli Relations
Continued from Page 4
with more painful economic
reforms and austerity measures
than a more modest Labor-led or
Likud-led government. By com-
bining forces, both parties are
forced to accept the blame for un-
popular decisions. One party can-
not overly swipe away at the
other.
THE FACT also remaina that
the Administration is expecting
Israel to follow through on the
economic front by promoting
policies which will lead to real
growth. The Americana are urg-
ing Israel to accept more budget
cuts and more far-reaching tax
reform which should stimulate the
economy. They want more
privatization" of the
government-owned industries.
There are investment oppor
tunities which could spark some
real capital formation.
"Prime Minister Peres and his
colleagues in Israel's National
unity Government have achieved
remarkable success in stabilizing
their economy," Reagan said.
ney re now turning their atten
tion to growth with our full en
couragement and support."
All of these economic issues
were scheduled to be discussed in
greater detail in late September
*nen Finance Minister Moahe
nwm was due in Washington for
*ks with Shultz and Treasury
^cretaiy James Baker. Niasim
*ould also be attending the an-
nual meetings of the World Bank
Jj the International Monetary
GIVEN THE basic goodwill
toward Israel right now, there is a
prevailing assessment in
Washington that the U.S. even-
tually will find a way to reduce the
interest rates on outstanding
Israeli loans from the United
States. Exactly how that will be
formulated remains unclear. But
there is confidence it will even-
tually happen.
But while there are obvious ad-
vantages in the economic sphere,
the Americans also know that
there are serious drawbacks in the
peace process, given the basic dif-
ferences between Labor and
Likud. In fact, this could paralyze
the peace process.
In this connection, the
Americans have two immediate
objectives: 1. to strengthen
Israeli-Egyptian relations; and 2.
to bring Jordan directly into the
negotiating process and to public-
ly challenge Israel's commitment
to resolve the Palestinian ques-
tion. U.S. officials are encouraged
by the Taba arbitration agree-
ment and the Peres summit with
President Hosni Mubarak.
But they are less upbeat in
assessing the prospects for King
Hussein's getting involved.
Still, the U.S. will continue to go
through the diplomatic motions
even if there is deep skepticism
regarding the results. In the
meantime, the Americans are
waiting to see what, if any,
changes come from Jerusalem
after Shamir and Peres trade
positions.
stage would be set for a political
solution between Israel, Jordan
and the Palestinians.
In the long term, Shalev said,
the Israeli civil administration
should be eliminated. But he cau-
tioned that premature implemen-
tation of autonomy would benefit
the PLO because its supporters
would promptly take over the
posts vacated by the Israelis.
Rabbis Join
Drug War
Continued from Page 6-B
support federal, state and
municipal governments in adop-
ting tough legislation against
drug dealers and increasing the
funds available for rehabilitation
efforts;
A special anti-drug committee
should be established in the con-
gregation to develop activities and
work in cooperation with com-
munity efforts;
The rabbi should preach on
this important problem;
Young members of the con-
gregation should be educated and
guided in developing their own
anti-drug program;
A similar committee of
parents should be formed.
Rabbi Abelaon pointed out that
one of Judaism's primary
teachings is u'themartem et naf-
shotekhem, the commandment to
care for one's health. "Drug usage
runs counter to this teaching," he
said, "as it is life-destructive
rather than life-affirming."

A grove of trees honoring the renowned Russian composer,
Dmitri Shostakovich, has been established in Jerusalem s Neveh
Ya'akov neighborhood by the Jewish National Fund, which is
responsible for afforestation and land reclamation in Israel. The
grove was sponsored by musicians of the Israel Philharmonic Or-
chestra and the Israel Information Center for Soviet Jewry in
recognition of Shostakovich's life-long compassion for the plight of
Soviet Jewry. Shostakovich's son, Maxim (above), a well-known
European conductor residing in the United States, was also pre-
sent at the dedication, which coincided with a series of concerts
that he was conducting in Israel devoted to his father's
compositions.
JORDAN MARSH
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Page 14-1) The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two years ago, American
Navajo Indians doubted the
promise of David Mazigh, an
Israeli agronomist who said
he could transform areas of
the barren Painted Desert
in Arizona into fertile stret-
ches of farmland.
But Mazigh allayed the Nava-
jos' disbelief by producing fields of
corn, potatoes, melons and other
fruits and vegetables on ex-
perimental farms across Navajo
reservations in Arizona. He earn-
ed their respect so much so that
they named him Nihikaoojeeh, a
Navajo word meaning "one who
comes to help us," and insisted on
honoring him at a farewell party
on a Navajo farm he founded 60
miles northeast of Flagstaff.
BETWEEN 75 and 100 Nava
jos and dignitaries joined the
celebration, including Peterson
Zah, chairman of the Navajo
Tribal Council, and Wilma
Man killer, principal chief of the
Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma.
The feast featured samples of
* Mazigh's hard labor onions,
tomatoes, melons, squash,
potatoes and corn and the
Navajos presented him with gifts.
"Mazigh was very special and
was not afraid to dig into the
earth with his hands," said Lois
Roisman, excutive director of the
Washington-based Jewish Fund
for Justice, a national Jewish
foundation which funds efforts
that promote social and economic
justice in the United States.
"He worked from dawn till
dusk, side by side with the Nava-
jos, and they treated him like a
brother," she added.
These impoverished American
Indians extended their gratitude
to Mazigh with turquoise Indian
jewelry and a Navajo blanket. But
the occasion was not completely
joyous, as it marked the close of
Mazigh's two-year stay.
WHILE MAZIGH returns to
his position in Israel as director of
the Avdat Experimental Farm on
the Sde Boker campus of Ben-
Gurion University of the Negev.
his replacement. Ron Scherzer. a
36-year-old expert in field crops
and fish pond culture, will move
his family from Kibbutz Sde
Boker to the Navajo Nation for
two years.
Mazigh, originally from Tunisia
and living in Israel some 30 years,
parted as a friend of the Navajos.
"Today I feel like an Indian," he
said. In the first year working on
the reservations, he was not ac-
cepted, and it was only after
testing the first zucchini that the
Navajos considered the project a
success.
When Mazigh first arrived in
early 1985, he said that the Nava-
jos didn't even know what Israel
is. They could not understand why
the Jewish people wanted to help
them. "I told them Jews believe
you love other people as you love
yourself. This is my religion," he
explained. "I think they
understood."
The Navajos, whose 170,000
members comprise the largest of
the 424 Native American tribes,
are among the poorest people in
the world. They were totally ig-
norant about the basics of farming
technique, according to Mazigh.
"They didn't know to give the
crops water every day," he said.
"We needed to teach them
slowly."
MAZIGH introduced to the
American Indians drip irrigation,
the method used by Israelis in the
Negev to utilize every scarce drop
of water. When the Indians first
An Israeli Helps Green The
Barren Painted Desert
saw the thin, plastic tubing, now
covering a total of 240,000 feet,
with holes every two feet from
which a mixture of water and fer-
tilizer is carried to the plant's
roots, they nicknamed it "zhini
baachee," meaning little black
intestines.
During the first year. October
1984-85, 12 acres were planted on
a pilot basis in three communities
Birdsprings, Leupp and Sand-
springs in the Little Colorado
River Valley in northeastern
Arizona. These communities had
sought help from the Seventh
Generation Fund, established in
1977 to assist tribal economic
development.
Mazigh tested some 120 dif-
ferent varieties of fruits,
vegetables and grains, including
14 varieties of watermelon,
pineapple, papaya, avovado, pep-
per, cabbage, almond and his per-
sonal favorite, pistachios. He is
known as the "pistachio king" in
Israel for his success with the
crop.
THIS YEAR'S project was ex-
panded to 40 acres in five com-
munities, working with 30
families. The crops have been nar-
rowed down to corn, potatoes,
squash and melons. "Our success
was very important for these peo-
ple who don't have much food,"
Mazigh said.
The idea of looking to Israel to
aid the Navajos was the brainchild
of Jacques Seronde, program
director of the Seventh Genera-
tion Fund. "I was inspired by the
book 'The Negev: Challenge of the
Desert,' by Michael Avenari,"
Seronde said. Seronde was im-
Polish Foreign Minister
Says Soviet Bloc Countries
Are Moving Toward
Diplomatic Ties With Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Poland's Foreign Minister
told Jewish leaders here
that in the aftermath of the
decision to resume Polish-
Israeli diplomatic links, he is
"convinced that other
Socialist countries are adop-
ting the same attitude,"
Kalman Sultanik, World
Jewish Congress vice presi-
dent, disclosed.
Sultanik also said that Foreign
Minister Marian Orzechowski
jledged to take up the growing
problem of Catholic Church in-
stitutions being built at the sites
of Nazi death camps in Poland
specifically the convent at
Auschwitz and the chapel at
Sobibor.
ORZECHOWSKI and senior
aides held three hours of discus-
sions "on matters of mutual con-
cern" with Jewish leaders at a
private luncheon recently at the
offices of WJCongress president
Edgar Bronfman, who was joined
by Morris Abram, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations.
The talks were "wide-ranging"
and served as a follow-up to
discussions held last December in
Warsaw with Polish leader Gen.
Wojciech Jaruzelski, WJC sources
On the subject of diplomatic
relations with Israel, Orzechowski
disclosed that Poland's diplomatic
representative will arrive in Israel
on Oct. 14 coincidentally, the
date of rotation of posts between
Premier Shimon Peres and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
HE NOTED that it would have
been "impossible" for Poland to
have taken this step two or three
years ago given the international
climate, but had done so now
because it is "in the interests of
Poland, the Jewish people, and
peaceful coexistence."
Although Orzechowski said he
expected other Communist states
to soon act similarly, he noted that
Poland had taken the lead because
of its historical legacy linking it to
special ties to the Jewish people.
"It is naive and wrong to try and
separate the Jewish people from
Israel," he said, explaining that
normalization of relations with
the Jewish people is linked to
recognition of Israel.
Orzechowski stressed support
for Israel's right to "secure
borders" and added that "the ex-
istence of the State of Israel is a
fact and any effort to disregard
this fact is doomed to failure."
TURNING TO the question of
Auschwitz and Sobibor, Sultanik
said there were indications that
church institutions were being
planned at other death camp sites
and noted that the chapel at
Sobibor where all the 200.000
victims were Jewish "will be
the central building at the site,
and will distort the true nature of
the place."
"Poland's role should be to
preserve the authentic historic
record and prevent these distor-
tions of history," Sultanik told
Orzechowski. In response,
Orzechowski pledged that
"Poland will be the guardian of
the historical record." The
government, he said, had regret-
ted what had happened.
He said he would take up the
matter of Sobibor on his return to
Warsaw, claiming he had not
previously been aware of it. "We
do not wish to do anything that
would irritate our relations with
the Jewish community inside or
outside of Poland," the Foreign
Minister stated.
On another issue, Orzechowski
pledged to continue full coopera-
tion with American authorities in
the pursuit and prosecution of
Nazi war criminals. He specifical-
ly said Poland would continue its
wholehearted assistance in the
case of John Demjanjuk who is
facing trial in Israel charged with
being the notorious "Ivan the Ter-
rible" at Treblinka.
pressed how the Israelis con-
quered the Negev by using runoff
water and envisioned success us-
ing similar methods in the arid
region inhabited by the Navajos.
Seronde, who is married to an
Indian woman and whose grand-
father was the late Christian
Herter, a former Secretary of
State in the Eisenhower Ad-
ministration, has lived and work-
ed with the Navajos since 1970.
He travelled to the Negev in 1981
to study drip irrigation at Ben
Gurion University's Blaustein In-
stitute for Desert Research,
where he met Mazigh. When
Seronde returned to Flagstaff, he
convinced tribal and community
officials to create the "Navajo Ex-
perimental Farm Program."
GRANTS were obtained from
the Jewish Fund for Justice and
the Ford Foundation, and Mazigh.
who was on sabbatical leave, was
recruited. "What he brought was
a big heart, a willingness to work
hard and a great deal of technical
and social knowledge," Seronde
said.
The farms started by Mazigh
are comparable to the Israeli
moshav, according to Seronde.
"It's a cooperative village where
families live independently and
each works a plot of ground, but
they cooperate for purchasing fer-
tilizer, ana tractors and m
marketing produce," he added
The success of the Israeli
modeled family agriculture has at
tracted the interest of Pueblo
Lakota. Shoshone, Hopi, and
other Native Americans. The
Seventh Generation Fund, Jewish
Fund for Justice and Ben-Gurion
University intend to expand the
program further in 1986-87.
During the winter, Seronde
hopes to be able to send Native
Americans to Israel because he
believes it is "important for peo
pie here to see what has been done
in Israel." He also plans to in
troduce Israeli expertise to
fisheries in the north and livestock
in the High Plains.
"THE SOCIAL and economic
conditions are disastrous on reser-
vations, and I feel there is a good
chance we can adapt the Israeli
model to meet Native American
needs," Seronde said.
He believes the Navajos and
other American Indians are now
willing to accept help from Jews
and Israeli because they have
presented a visible solution. So
far, Seronde has met his initial
goals with the project. "The
Israelis have added green to the
palate of the Painted Desert." he
said.
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Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-D
Preliminary Thoughts On The Peres-Hassan Meeting
Phil Raum ..< associate cr-
toutivt director, and Raphiui
Danziger is a policy analyst
for the American ,l>-wish
Congress
By PHIL BAl.M
And RAPHAEL DANZIGER
Although it is far too early
to assess the full
significance of the meeting
in Morocco between Israel s
Prime Minister Shimon
Peres and Morocco's King
Hassan, after consultation
with leading authorities, we
are prepared to venture the
following comments:
The BMMt striking aspect of
this initiative, thus far, is the
absence of vehement, concerted
Arab denunciation or threat of
reprisal President Mubarak of
Egypt has warmly praised
Hassan. King Hussein of Jordan
and other conservative Arab
rulers remain non-committal, and
\ ei>* for Syria's breakoff of
diplomatic tie* with Morocco, the
radical Arab states have Uius far
contented themselves with pro
forma denunciations despite
Syria's call to follow its example
It seems clear especially since
he was then tne presiding chair
man of the Arab League, that
Kin* Hassan would not have
undertaken this dramatic move
without first obtaining at least
tacit approval from key Arab
leaders in other states For one
thing, he could not risk the loss of
Arab support for Morocco's an-
nexation of Western Saharn
which lias been the centerpiece of
nis policy since die mid-1970s and
which is critically important to the
domestic stability of his regime.
If. as now seems possible.
Hassan uets away with this move
without major Arab retribution,
this fact, added u Hussein's re-
cent unchallenged expulsion and
repudiation of the PLO and the
surprising willingness of such
noted Palestinian figures as
Gaza's former Mayor A-Shawwa
publicly to endorse Hussein's
move, encourages the hope that
significant Arab and Palestinian
elements are becoming increas-
ingly emboldened.
It may De that the most impor-
tant inference to be drawn from
this whole Moroccan episode is
that the time is approaching when
these Arab factors will be able to
free themselves from the con-
straints and discipline imposed by
the PLO. It would \>e wrong to
make too much of these slender in-
dications: on the other nand. they
should not be summarily
dismissed.
Whereas Prime Minister
Peres' motives for going to
Morocco seem clear enough to
implement his oft repeated desire
to promote the peace process and.
incidentally, to repair the damage
done to his image by recent
domestic scandals Hassans
reasons for meeting with Peres at
this time are more obscure Surely
M irocco'a relations with the
I nited States, which have been
strained since its conclusion of a
union treaty with Khadafy's Libya
in 1984, were an important factor
in the King's decision.
President Reagan has requested
Congress to increase U.S. aid to
Morocco in 1987 to $154 million
from $138 million in 1986. and
Hassan must have been aware
that in these days of Gramm-
Rudman a positive gesture on nis
part was essential even to
preserve the current level of U.S.
aid, let alone induce Congress to
accede to the President's request
for an increase. Given the sad
shape of Morocco's economy and
its massive foreign debt of $14
billion, US aid has to be a major
consideration ;n Morocco's
foreign policy.
Still, at other times, this would
have seemed an extravagantly
risky maneuver to adopt, in the
mere hope that it would stimulate
enhanced American financial sup-
port. It would seem reasonable to
assume, therefore, that other con-
siderations must have been at
work as well. Thus, the timing of
the meeting, otherwise puzzling,
doubtless was related to the im
pending rotation of the prime
ministership in Israel, an event
which has caused consternation
among conservative Arab leaders
who view a Likud-led government
as far less amenable to an agree-
ment on the West Bank than is the
current Labor-led government.
And finally, ever since last
February s occupation of Iraq
southern tip by Iranian troops.
Arab leaders have come to view
Iranian fundamentalist expansion
into the Arab world as the gravest
threat to their survival, leading
some of them to the conclusion
that the Arab-Israeli conflict must
bo put aside, at least temporarily,
so that they will be able to focus
their attention and energies on
the Iranian threat King Hassan,
in particular, has been deeply-
frustrated by the collapse of the
Hussein initiative last February
and nas apparently felt a need to
oreak the deadlock. His failure to
convene an Arab summit to deal
with the issue seems to have led
him io the conclusion that he
would nave to go it alone.
The open question remains
whether Hassan s move is the
prelude to genuine progress in the
peace process between Israel and
Jordan It is improbable that
Hassan would have gone through
the trouble of a meeting with
Peres for the mere sake of a sym-
bolic move with no prospect of a
substantive follow-up. King Hus-
sein has not yet mustered suffi-
cient support in the West Bank to
risk a unilateral move toward
Israel which may account for his
circumspect response to the
Peres-Hassan meeting.
Nonetheless, since the meeting
is clearly to his advantage in that
it sets the precedent of an Arab
League member negotiating
directly with Israel with no PLO
participation, Hussein may well
have encouraged Hassan to em-
hark upon this initiative. Certain-
ly the meeting in Morocco has
made Hussein's life a lot easier
and probably a lot safer
No one believes that this
meeting will lead directly to a
West Bank iettiemen: and a
peace treaty between Israel and
Jordan But the very fact of an
open meeting between an Israeli
prime minister and a major Arab
leader (Hassan, as we have said,
was chairman of the Arab League,
and Morocco, with nearly 25
million inhabitants, is the most
populous Arab country after
Egypt) is an important milestone
in Israel's quest to break out of its
regional isolation.
A Glorious Past, A
Questionable Future
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
VIENNA (JTA) Vienna,
after World War II. was a
wasteland for Jews. Sixty-five-
thousand Austrian Jews had been
killed in the Holocaust, and
Jewish institutional life in Austria
had been eradicated by the Nazis
The great Viennese Jewish com
munity, which had produced
figures like Sigmund Freud. Ar-
thur Schnitzler, Arnpld
Schoenberg, Gustav Mahler.
Bruno Walter and Max Reinhardt
was no more than a memory in the
smoking ruins of the Austrian
capital.
FORTY-ONE years after the
collapse of the German Third
Reich, of which Austria was part,
Austria is home to a Jewish com-
munity that is infinitely much
smaller and far leas significant
than the one which existed before
World War II.
"It is a community of displaced
persons, completely unlike the
pre-war community," observed
Avrsham Hodik. the executive
director of the community's um-
hrella organization, the
Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde.
In the wake of Nazi Germany's
defeat. Vienna became an impor-
tant transit point for East Euro-
pean Jewish survivors of the
Holocaust on their way to Israel
and North America. By 1947,
there were about 45,000 Jewish
DPs in Austria, the majority from
Poland, Rumania and Hungary.
VIRTUALLY ALL of them left
the country, then administered by
the U.S., the Soviet Union.
France and Britain, and the few
thousand Jews who elected to stay-
had very little in common with the
2,000 or so Viennese Jewish
survivors.
In the past 10 to 15 years,
several thousand Russian Jews
who rejected Israel as a final
destination have also found a
refuge in Vienna, thereby
strengthening the East European
flavor of Austrian Jewry. No
more than 15 percent of the Jews
here are Austrian-born, making
this a relatively new, immigrant
community.
Until about a decade ago, most
.lews here lacked any genuine
desire to sink roots. There was no
real sense of permanency.
Everything seemed transitory.
"There was a subconscious
tendency on the part of Jews to sit
on their suitcases," says Hodik, a
native of Vienna. "We were
always told, when we were
children, that we'd be leaving
next year," explains Doron
Rabinovici, a 24-year-old medical
student who spent the first 2Vt
years of his life in Israel.
THAT ATTITUDE no longer
holds, Hodik believes. "People
have settled down and now con-
sider Austria their home."
Ivan Hacker-Lederer, the presi-
dent of the Israelitischen
Kultusgemeinde, and a survivor of
Auschwitz and Dachau, says this
change of heart is apparent in the
community's priorities. "In the
1950s. I was told we would need
a cemetery. Today, we have
Jewish schools with several hun-
dred pupils.
Austria's Jewish population,
numbering some 200,000 in 1938,
now consists of 6,000 registered
Jews who hold Israeli passports,
and some 2,000 unaffiliated Jews.
The number of people of partly
Jewish origin cannot be determin-
ed. But in 1942, when the Vien-
nese community was officially
dissolved by the Nazis, there were
about 7,000 Jews in mixed mar-
riages whom the Nazis did not
deport. Many of their descendants
have not identified themselves as
Jews.
AS IN THE pre-war period,
nearly all of Austria's Jews live in
Vienna, with a sprinkling in Linz
(Hitler's birthplace), Graz.
Salzburg and Innsbruck.
Today's community is geriatric,
with the average age being in the
mid-50's. "For every 25 deaths
per month, we have five births,"
said Hacker-Lederer, who is 78.
Despite the fact that two-thirds of
its members are over the age of
60, the community has been
revitalized by what appears to be
a committed post-war generation.
There are several Jewish day
schools and kindergartens, one
high school that was opened in
1984, two functioning synagogues
(one which was constructed on the
site of a synagogue destroyed by
the Nazis in 19S8), 15 prayer
rooms, two kosher butchers and a
baker and a restaurant that
observes the laws of kashrut
"Our community is small, but it
has everything it needs," says
Paul Eisenberg. the 36-year-old
Chief Rabbi who was born in Vien-
na and studied in Israel.
THE AUSTRIAN government,
together with the Vienna
municipality, has assisted in the
rebuilding of the community
center and two schools, and by
paying salaries to its teachers.
The community may be Lillipu-
tian, but the divisions within it are
not. Its governing board, compos-
ed of 24 members, is deeply split
along political and ideological
lines, pitting conservatives
against progressives, Zionists
against Bundists and religiously-
oriented Jews against secular
Jews. In the religious camp, there
are fissures as well.
The newest additions to the
community, the Russians, do not
constitute a monolithis group
either. The Sephardic Jews from
Georgia and Bokhara have little, if
anything, to do with the
Ashkenazim from the European
areas of the Soviet Union. And the
Russians, in turn, have resisted in-
tegration into the community at
large, says Dov Sperling, the
director of the Jewish Agency of-
fice here.
IN GENERAL, the Russians
have not enjoyed any recognizable
degree of economic success in
Austria. They do a variety of odd
jobs, and many of them can be
found in the vicinity of Mexico
Square, on the banks of the
Danube River, where Eastern
Bloc ships discharge their
passengers and cargoes. They
guide East European tourists
around, change currency and buy
and sell smuggled goods.


Page 16 p The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 3, 1986
South African Zulu Chief
Is Ardent Supporter Of Israel
By CHARLEY LEVINE
ULUNDI, Kwazulu, South
Africa (JTA) The man
who could well emerge as
South Africa's first black
President is an outspoken
supporter of Israel.
"Israel is indeed a land of
miracles," enthusiastically
declared Chief Mongosuthu Gat-
sha Buthelezi. who claims the sup-
port of South Africa's largest
ethnic group, the six million
Zulus, whose ancestors fought the
British in the 19th Century. "It is
miraculous to see what Israel has
achieved in 38 years in the face of
great adversities and hostilities."
Regarded by more radical
blacks as an apologist for apar
theid, by liberal whites as an
authentic voice for compromise,
and by the South African govern-
ment itself as a responsible, but
annoyingly independent champion
of black power and pride.
Buthelezi has led the proud Zulus
for 30 years. He is chief minister
of his tribe's important Buthelezi
clan, and head of Inkatha, a mili-
tant cultural-political organization
that boasts a paid-up membership
of a million.
INKATHA ACTIVISTS wear
military-style uniforms, attend
demonstrations armed with
spears, clubs and shields, and
have engaged in several, well
publicized bloody clashes with
followers of the outlawed African
National Congress (ANC). an
organization committed to the
violent overthrow of white rule in
South Africa.
In sharp contrast to Buthelezi's
Inkatha movement, the ANC,
which admits to Soviet backing,
has adopted a generallly anti-
Western and specifically anti-
Israeli line. South African officials
attribute the ANC's position on
Israel to support that the
underground group has reported-
ly received from the Palestine
Liberation Organization and
Libya.
According to both South
African and Israeli experts on in-
ternational terrorism, the PLO
and the Libyans have provided the
ANC and the smaller, perhaps
even more radical. Pan African
Congress with arms, money and
military training and logistical
support for over five years.
"I would say that Libya's Col-
onel Khadafy is today part of the
ANC," Buthelezi said during the
course of a lengthy interview con-
ducted at his ministerial head-
quarters in Ulundi, capital of
Kwazulu." The ANC describes
itself as anti-Zionist, not anti-
Semitic, like many African
groups. But anti-Zionism and anti-
Semitism are one and the same
thing, I have always found.
The "Anti-Zionism, equating
Zionism with racism all this is
really a cover for anti-Semitism.
It's an abhorrent, abominable
thing."
An articulate, urbane leader,
who advocates power sharing for
South African blacks instead of
revolution, and remains commit-
ted to non-violent change for
practical as well as moral reasons
Buthelezi makes no secret of his
admiration for Israel and his view
of the country as a model for other
developing nations.
"I am deeply inspired by what I
saw in Israel," he said, referring
to his visit there last year. "I
returned home with increased
hope and a realization that people
facing adversity can become in-
genious beyond all prediction. In
addition, visiting Israel for me,
my wife and those who accom-
panied us was a very special
spiritual experience for us as
Christians."
HE SAID that he was moved in
particular by his visit to Yad
Vashem, the Holocaust memorial
in Jerusalem, adding that as a
result of the visit and his reading
of the history of the Holocaust, he
is especially sensitive to the
newly-risen strength of the neo-
Nazi AWB. an Afrikaner ex-
tremist group that sports brown-
shirted uniforms and waves
swastika-like banners.
"They really cause my flesh to
crawl because I say, 'God help us
if we're going to have a repeat
performance of that kind of
racism which cost the world so
many lives," Buthelezi said.
Buthelezi is quick to take issue
with Anglican Bishop Desmond
Tutu, who recently likened apar-
theid to the Nazis' genocidal pro-
gram. "One can hardly say apar-
theid is the same as Nazism," the
Zulu chief said. "I mean, apar-
theid is based on a racist premise
and bad enough, but it's hardly
murderous."
He pointed out that while the
Nazis sought to exterminate the
Jews. South African policy seems
bent on preserving its black ma-
jority, but as second class, or
subservient, citizens.
"I BELIEVE as you do in the
God of Abraham," Buthelezi
declared, "and I believe that we
are all creatures of His creation.
The Jewish people may not be in a
position to know the extent to
which the black people identify
their situation in South Africa
with that of the Israelites in
biblical Egypt, the land of bon-
dage. We often hear blacks ask,
"When are we going to get out of
Egypt?"
Buthelezi's friendship for Israel
is music to the ears of many South
African Jewish leaders, who have
grown increasingly concerned
over the prospects of an ultimate
ANC victory and the establish-
ment of a pro-Soviet regime.
Zionist Federation chairman
Mocke Friedman has said that the
Zulu leader "illustrates
statesmanship, peaceful change,
conciliation, the rejection of
violence and discrimination."
"Buthelezi is a moderate with
millions of followers, and as such,
he holds one of the keys to a long-
term political solution of South
Africa's problems," says the
president of both the South
African Board of Jewish Deputies
and South African B'nai B'rith,
Dr. I. Abramowitz. "His problem
is that he's seen as sending signals
out to whites that he is prepared
for gradual change. That is not ac-
ceptable to many blacks in the
climate we face today."
BUTHELEZI'S pro-Israel,
stance seems rooted in his positive
impression of South African Jews
He explained that as a young man
he admired the Jews at Adams
College who belonged to the pro.
gressive Institute of Race Rela
tions. He was a guest in the home
of veteran civil rights crusader
and opposition parliamentarian
Helen Suzman. and later fre-
quented the home of Arnold
Zulman in nearby Durban.
"Zulman remains one of m\
closet friends even now
Buthelezi said. "His house
like my home because I could not
stay in a hotel, and he opened the
doors of his house to me I
remember that he received i
telephone threat from -
whites at that time, more that. In
years ago. threatening him
because he was my friend."
The Zulu leader recalled at ten
ding "shul in Durban many times
When I stayed with the Zulmani I
went to shul. and also attended
the Bar Mitzvahs of their f
children." When Buthelezi's
mother died last year. Zulman
took part in her funeral. Buthelezi
said it touched him deeply
TODAY. Buthelezi's closest
Jewish confidant is Rowley Arens-
tein, 68, who holds the distinction
of having been the first radical at-
torney banned by the Nationalist-
led government after it came to
power nearly four decades ago.
No longer a practicing lawyer.
Arenstein is a frequent visitor to
Buthelezi's Ulundi headquarters.
Haopy


Greater Miami Jewish Federation
1986 Annual Report. special pullout section pages 7-10


Q/teate/t Jikami <^ewtsli 9fedetoUon
CWomms crDtftsLon
HI1HI 111 If DfS
III 11411< S
H< HI N** I 4>

ctote SO, 1926
See Stofty page 4


9h 3de4fi tjUeiAe zTAe
*/nce
Volunteers.
One of the most valuable assets of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
The members of the Federation's Volunteer Service
Bureau want you to join in and help them continue
to make the difference.
Meet with us for an active day with our wonderful
group and nosh, kibbitz and feel good, knowing
you are helping Jews the world over.
The Federation raises and allocates funds for
human services in our local community. Israel and
throughout the world.
By helping us put together multi-page bulk mailings,
you make the difference by providing us with this
much needed service.
Help us to continue to make the difference.
Call Gert Schner today at 576-4000.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
One People, One Destiny
CAMPAIGN
Kenneth J. Schwartz to bend 1986 campaign deanup effort
Campaign Chairman announces the formation of Council of
Commerce and Professions
Rabbi Dr. Harold Schnhreis to be guest speaker for Marflyn K. Smith
Leader ship Enrichment Forum
1967 Campaign Opening Dinner scheduled for January
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Letty Cottin Pogrebin. John Loftus and Dennis Prager to be
featured speakers at Federation Women's Day
BPW explores "Our Jewish Bodies. Our Jewish Selves''
Newcomers and veterans pair up at WD welcome brunch
LETS 101" teaches women to be effective leaders
CSC 5
Miami mobihses to help Jews in Soviet Union
Women's Division bold the date
Federation Information and Referral Service offers telephone advice
YLC/PROJECT RENEWAL 6
Photo highlights of YLC participation in the L'JA Summer
Singles Mission to Israel
YLC plans campaign event on beautiful Fisher Island
Mothers become involved m their children's education in
Miami's Project Renewal sister dty
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
19S* ANNUAL REPORT SPECIAL INSERT 7-10
FOUNDATION AGENCIES 11
Foundation to present seminars on tax and estate planning
Tax advisory alert
Zero Coupon Bonds help provide for our community's future
B'nai B'nth Youth Organization gears up for fall programs
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION 12
JFTV shines in ratings
New programs highlight Federation and agency activities
Singles needed to appear on JFTVs "Pillow Talk"
October program guide
AGENCIES 13
Bob Russell Community Retreat Center is off to a shining start
Students from throughout South Florida attend Hillel Conference
Jewish Family Service offers classes for "caregivers"
Jewish Film Festival highlights American Jewish literature in cinema
AGENCIES 14
Early childhood Jewish education strong m Dade and growing stronger
Jewish Vocational Service elects new officers at annual meeting
Patricia and Harold Toppel Short-Term Rehabilitation Center
opens at Miami Jewish Home
University of Miami Judaic Studies Program and CAJE offer
courses for Jewish Studies teachers
Floridians in Israel gather for Aliyah Council reunion

CALENDAR
AGENCIES
Arthur and Anna Goldstein Hebrew Academy of South Dade is
the "new lad in town"
Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial Center to begin
interviewer training courses
15
16
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
October 3.1986 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscavne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Aaron Podhurst
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
2 Federation. October 1986



1986 campaign cleanup effort
to involve new givers
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Kenneth J. Schwartz has been named
to head a series of programs to clean up
Federation's 1986 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal campaign, announced Aaron
Podhurst, 1987 Federation president and
1986 CJA campaign chairman. According
to Podhurst, several events will take
place during the coming months to bring
j in 1986 gifts to the CJA from past con-
tributors and to give new prospects the
opportunity to participate in the
campaign.
Schwartz will call together a group of
past Federation presidents into the
"Presidents Council," which will be
| charged with conducting face-to-face
solicitations of those who have made
significant gifts to past CJA efforts but
have not yet made their 1986
I commitments.
"In addition to asking past givers to
give again," Schwartz explained, "We
have planned a number of programs
which will give current non-givers the op-
| portunity to participate in the campaign."
As part of Federation's effort to in-
volve current non-givers, rabbis from
local synagogues will be asked to host
cocktail parties for their congregations on
I behalf of the CJA. At the parties, con-
Igregants will be educated on the purpose
land goals of Federation and will be en-
couraged to make campaign gifts.
A similar program will be launched
among members of Jewish Community
Centers. In addition, the Federation's
Alliance Division will spread the CJA
campaign to two buildings which have not
previously held organized campaign ef-
forts on behalf of Federation. These cam-
paign expansion programs will begin on a
small scale for the 1986 campaign and, if
they prove successful, will expand to in-
clude more synagogues and beneficiary
agencies for future campaigns, Schwartz
explained.
"Research has shown us that many
members of Greater Miami's Jewish com-
munity don't make gifts to the Federa-
tion's CJA campaign simply because they
were never asked to," Schwartz says.
"Through these new programs, we hope
to expand our prospect base so that in the
future we can feel secure in knowing that
most of the Jews in this community have
at least been asked to participate."
For the 1986 campaign, more than
1,000 new prospective givers have been
added to the Federation's mailing list just
through the participation of three
synagogues and the Jewish Community
Centers.
"If we can continue to add names and
contact more people," Schwartz said,
"the possibility for the growth of future
campaigns is greatly increased."
Included in the programs for the 1986
campaign cleanup is a November 9
telephone blitz which will have volunteers
calling past campaign contributors who
have not made their 1986 commitments.
"A mini-Super Sunday," Schwartz says.
The final 1986 campaign cleanup effort
will take place during December.
Phonathons will be conducted at Federa-
tion on December 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 and 17.
During those six days, it is hoped that
volunteers will bring in $2.5 million to add
a final push to the 1986 campaign.
"Every one of these efforts is depen-
dent on the participation of hundreds of
volunteers. We already know that most
non-givers don't give because they
weren't asked. So just as much as we
need people to be givers, we need them to
be askers as well," Schwartz says. "For
every Jew in need in Miami, there is
another Jew who can help. But without
the final, crucial link the person who
brings these two together by asking one
to give to the other nothing can be
accomplished."
mJtiZui***** fthe United Jewish Appeal's National Training Center
ofthr U workr fining seminar designed for 1987 campaign volunteers
Sum ater Miami Jewish Federation's Campaign Executive Committee and
mi- Vanguard and Pacesetter Divisions. Group discussions, role playing
voluvfPS -an^ a auesii(m and answer session, all designed to enhance the
unteer s face-to-face solicitation skills, were included in the seminar.
Council of Commerce and
Professions unifies
campaign divisions
Donald E. Lefton, 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal general campaign
chairman, has announced that begin-
ning with the 1987 campaign, the
various Federation divisions dealing
with commerce and professions will
be unified under the new Council of
Commerce and Professions.
The Council, chaired by Martin
Fine and co-chaired by Arnold
Altman and Stephen Bittel, will serve
as a coordinating and networking
body for the following campaign divi-
sions: Builders, Real Estate, Finance
and Allied Trades; Mercantile; Food
and Allied Trades; Services; At-
torneys; Accountants; Manufacturing
and Transportation; Healing Arts;
and Advertising, Communications
and Entertainment. Chairpersons
from each division will be members of
the Council of Commerce and
Professions.
As in the past, each division will
have its own leadership and workers
and will organize its own non-
campaign events. The Council,
however, will take over the campaign
function of its constituent divisions,
and will organize a single, massive
fund raising event, scheduled for
April 1987. In addition, the Council
will organize worker training pro-
grams for division members and
officers.
In January, the Council will
organize a mission to Israel for
members of the Council and its con-
stituent divisions.
f
1987 Campaign Opening
Dinner January 15
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's annual Campaign Opening Dinner, which
will formally launch the 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal Campaign, will be held
Thursday evening, January 15 at Miami Beach's Fontainebleau Hilton. Harvey
Friedman will serve as chairman of the event, and the Hon. Elaine Bloom will be co-
chairman.
Nearly 2,000 people are expected to attend the $1,000 minimum gift Opening Din-
ner, and table captains are now needed. Please volunteer to fill a table with friends
I and relatives by calling Marty Barasch at 576-4000, extension 274.
:.
Look for more information about the 1987 Campaign Opening Dinner in next
month'8 edition of Federation.
Second Annual Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment Forum
NOVember 3m5 Smith Philanthropic Fund. The Forum
honors her memory and helps to
perpetuate her vibrant spirit and lifelong
concern for the learning and sharing of
Jewish ideals. It is intended to provide a
high-level Jewish cultural enrichment
program to enhance the Jewish identity
and commitment of Jewish community
leaders and to broaden understanding
about Jews and Judaism in the general
community.
Dr. Schulweis, rabbi of Valley Beth
Shalom Congregation in Encino, Califor-
nia, was ordained at The Jewish
Theological Seminary. He has a Master in
Hebrew Letters from The Jewish
Theological Seminary and Doctorate in
Theology from the Pacific School of
Religion at Berkeley. Dr. Schulweis holds
an Honorary Doctorate of Divinity from
The Seminary and an honorary Doctorate
of Humane Letters from the Hebrew
Union College.
Schulweis was an instructor of
philosophy at the City College of New
York and an adjunct professor of Jewish
contemporary civilization at the Universi-
ty of Judaism in Los Angeles.
Dr. Schulweis is author of Evil and the
Morality of God; and co-author of Ap-
proaches to the Philosophy of Religion. He
is contributing author to numerous books,
including Encyclopedia of Morals and
Ethics; Philosophical Library; American
Jewry; Judaism in America; Varieties of
Jewish Belief; and the Condition of
Jewish Belief.
He is contributing editor of The
Reconstructionist, Sh'ma, and Moment,
and his articles have appeared with
regularity in numerous other magazines.
Dr. Schulweis was the chairman and
(Continued on Page 6)
Marilyn K. Smith
Rabbi Dr. Harold Schulweis, founder of
the "Havurah" movement, will be
keynote speaker for the Second Annual
Marilyn K. Smith Leadership Enrichment
Forum, to be held November 3-5.
The Forum is named in honor of
Marilyn K. Smith, a "professional
volunteer" who dedicated her life to
enhancing the quality of Jewish life in our
community, in Israel and around the
world.
The Forum is sponsored by the Federa-
tion through a grant from the Marilyn K.
Federation, October 1986 3


I
Miami explodes with Federation Women's Day October 30
Letty Cottin Poqrebin
John Loftus
Dennis Prager
On Thursday, October 30, Miami will
explode with the excitement of Federa-
tion Women's Day, an annual day-long
program and luncheon featuring top-
quality guest speakers on topics of in-
terest to Jewish women. This day is spon-
sored by the Federation Women's
Division.
Highlighting the day's program will be
a keynote address by Ms Magazine
Editor Letty Cottin Pogrebin, and
presentations by attorney and author
John Loftus and Dennis Prager, world-
renowned author and lecturer on Judaism
and on contemporary society.
Pogrebin, editor of Mi Magazine since
1971, is listed in Who's Who in America
19U-S5, The World Wko'$ Who of Women,
Tke Who's Who of American Jewry and
others. She is author of numerous books,
including How to Make It in a Man's
World. Family Politic* and her latest,
Having Friend; Being Friend*. Her ar-
ticles on various topics have been publish-
ed in The New York Times and she has
authored a regular Times column called
"Hers."
For 10 years, Pogrebin wrote a regular
column entitled "The Working Woman"
for the Ladies Home Journal. She is con-
tributing author to numerous an-
thologies, including the Emmy Award-
winning television program Free to Be,
You and Me.
John Loftus, a Boston attorney, is
author of The Belarus Secret, a history of
the Nazi smuggling program in America.
After the book was declassified by the
CIA, "60 Minutes" televised a half-hour
special segment on the Nan connection
based on The Belarus Secret. The book
eventually became a television movie.
Loftus coordinated a top secret in-
vestigation into Nazi recruitment by
United States intelligence agencies while
working for the United States Office of
Special Investigations.
Dennis Prager was described in a
feature article in the Los Angeles Times
as an "amazingly gifted man and
charismatic moralist. whose mission in
life already has been crystallized ... to
get people obsessed with what's right and
wrong."
He is internationally noted for his
WD holds learn-in
The Business and Professional Women's Division (BPW) of the Federation Women's
Divisioni will sponsor a special three-part "Learn In" entitled "Our Jewish Bodies Our
Jewish Selves beginning this month, announced Sarah B. Sheridan and Lisa Leuchter
Treiater, Learn In co-chairwomen.
The series, led by Rabbi Norman Lipaon of the Central Agency for Jewish Education
wUi explore vitkhu aspects of Judaism and will give participants the chance to explore*
tneir Jewish identities. r
The first session in the series will be held Wednesday evening, October 22 and will
tocua on Jewish culture. Part two in the series, focusing on Jewish ethics, will be held
Wednesday evening, November 12. Jewish religious beliefs will be explored in the third
Learn In session on Thursday, December 2.
All sessions wiLbegin at 7 p.m. at the Federation building, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard
and an optional dinner wfll be served before each session, beginning at 6:30.
5761000 inform*tion lbout ** BPW Learn In-1*"** B Women's Division at
Seen at the Federation Women's Day table captains' kickoffbrunch were from
po^hlrTw^t' JS n^S'r^1- Comrrty **rK
m^s-D^JL^SJ^ HeUn Berne and Lenore *** Fed< -
writings and lectures on contemporary
society and on Judaism. A social and
political commentator, Prager has his
own daily radio program, "Religion on
the Line," on KABC Radio in Los
Angeles. He is author of two major books,
The Nine Questions People Ask About
Judaism, and Why the Jews? The Reason
for Antisemitism.
Prager first came to public attention at
the age of 21 when he and a handful of
others alerted the West to the plight of
Soviet Jewry. From 1976-83, Prager was
director of the Brandeis-Bardin Institute,
where he earned an international reputa-
tion for his ability to attract skeptical and
alienated Jews to Judaism. Also active in
interreligious affairs, Prager was invited
by the Vatican to meet Pope John Paul II
and to speak on Vatican Radio.
Federation Women's Day begins at 9
a.m. with registration and coffee at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel on Miami
Beach. The program and luncheon will be
held from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The cost
for Federation Women's Day is $40 and
all Jewish women are encouraged to at-
tend. Those registering prior to October 7
will receive a $4 discount on regi^
Helen Berne and Lenore Elia* ,
chairwomen of Federation Women'Tn!
Terry Drucker is Women's DivK
president for Community Educatw,Z
Dorothy Podhurst is Women's DiJ-
president. T
Letty Cottin Pogrebin will ,!
keynote speaker at the Bui*., L
Professional Women's Comu!
Edacatioa Night, to be held WZ
October 29 at 6:30 p.m 7l
Fontainebleau-Hilton. A light dinner ]
be served. Cost is $22 for those r
register prior to October 22 and ft
after that date.
Barbara Black and Susana Girui
co-chairwomen of BPW ConunL
Education Night; and Nancy Berkoto
and Adrienne Messing are BPW vi
chairwomen for Community Eduar
Maryanne Witkin serves as BPI
chairwoman.
For more information about BPWC
munity Education Night or Fedentn
Women's Day, or for reservations, j
the Federation Women's Division i
576-4000.
BPW holds welcome brunch
As part of its membership recruitment and retention efforts, the Federation Womi
Division South Dade and North Dade Divisions recently held welcoming coffees' fetal
ing programs led by Rabbi Norman Lipson of the Central Agency for Jewish Eduotul
Milcki Futernick, past Women's Division president, told participants at the South DmI
event about the history and purpose of Federation.
The South Dade program, held in the home of Elaine Ross, and the North Dade pi
gram, in the home of Ellen Elbrand, inaugurated the 1986 Women's Division "parawl
program." The program, which pairs newcomers with Women's Division "vetena'l
enables the veteran to teach the newcomer and encourage her involvement on a one* I
one basis.
The Federation and its Women's Division extend a warm welcome to all I
newcomers to division boards. The partners who participated in the welcome cab
were:
North Dade:
Barbara FeingoW and EUen Elbrand
Joanne Kane and Sandy Bellrind
Jill Kavolchyck and EUen Elbrand
Ally Kom and Lenore Elias
Regrna Klein and EUen Elbrand
Lori Miahkin and Lois Entin
Roaanne Miahan and Susan Jones
Barbara Rutter and EUen Elbrand
Judith Wartkvchi and Sandy Bellrind
StaDde:
Lee Berkow and Hdene Lanater
Pegy Brin and Barbara Kasper
Doris Gold and Doris Notanus
Dolly Harris and Selma Rappaport
Shaloma Leasner and Micki Hochberg
Suaan Ludwuj and Robbie Herskowiu
Diana Schoolman and EUy Wolff
Harriet Segal and Helen Lanster
Sue Serrina and Sandy Landy
Clara Snider and Gail Meyers
Elaine Ross is overall WD chairwoman for Recruitment and Retention; and M
Herskowitx is WD vice president for Leadership Development.
WD to begin Leadership
Effectiveness Training program
Home and Hospital for the Aged, IS
N.E. 52 Street.
The LETS 101 schedule for South Da*
and Southwest Dade women is as folk""
Monday, Oct. 20: The History j
Organization of the American lf>
Community
Monday, Oct. 27: OrganiM*
Techniques.
Monday. Nov. 3: Speaker Tmn
Parti
Monday, Nov. 10: Speaker TrW*
P*rtn
Monday, Nov. 17: Israel and TxedaW
Monday, Nov. 24: Tour. Luncheon"*
Graduation
All South Dade and Southwest!*
LETS 101 sessions will be held &"
a.m.-ll:30 a.m. at the South P"_^
Community Center, 12401 S.w.
Avenue.
The Federation Women's Division will
sponsor a Leadership Effectiveness
Training Seminar (LETS 101), beginning
this month, designed to help women
become more effective Jewish community
volunteers as well as to enhance their per-
sonal and professional lives. The schedule
for the six-session course is as follows:
For Miami Beach, North Dade and
ooutn Dade women:
Friday, Oct. 17: The History and
of *Americ- **w
Te^^ues Ct- 24: *"""
i Friday, Oct. 31: Speaker Training. Part
Friday, Nov. 7: Speaker Training, Part
Friday, Nov. 14: Israel and Tzedakah
gS&Nov- 24: Tour' Lunch">"
WaJia.lfT'iigg^ North ***** ">d
22JhlS,ira 101 """tan will be
CriL 9:3i am-12 n00n tS
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. 4200
B.scayne Boulevard, excep the
November 24 session, which will be held
m conjunction with the South Dade and
a.m. to 1.30 p.m. at the Miami Jewish
II
Phyllis Harte serves as Women's^
sion chairwoman for Leadership '
ing; and Robbie Herskowitt sen*
vice-president for Lead*"
Development.
For more information about_b& $
please call the Women's Di*31"
576-4000.
More WD news ... see next page
/ federation, October 1986


\h Federation
\nfo and Referral
dp is only
call away
Federation Information and Referral
vice, housed in the Greater Miami
wish Federation, serves more than 300
ents of all ages each month by giving out
nple information as well as assessing
pblem cases and referring clients to the
Lropriate community agency that can
Ip. Frequently, out-of-town families call
ring that their relative is alone in Miami
I in need of social services. The Federa-
|n Information and Referral Service
hponds by putting them in touch with
fencies that can help with case manage-
fcnt as well as specific needs. The Service
quently gets calls from people all over
country who are planning to relocate
I need information on the Miami Jewish
nmunity.
|n addition to providing local informa-
, the Service gets calls requesting ta-
xation on cities and resources out of
Ite. in which case clients are referred to
formation and referral services in various
les through a national network of Jewish
formation and Referral workers,
federation Information and Referral
J-vice is urgently in need of volunteers to
Ip with general office duties and to help
ke follow-up calls to clients ensuring
' they have received the service re-
ested. If you are a caring individual, peo-
oriented, and eager to do community
rk to help others in need, please call
ncy Zombek at 576-4000 extension 283
more information.
Community mobilizes on behalf of Soviet Jewry
omen s
division
fold the Date
lay. October 7
pthwest Dade Board Meeting
i Fifth Avenue, Dadeland
la.m.
v. October 9
ecutive Committee/Campaign Steering
nittee Caucus
pration Building
i.
ay. October 14
npaign Training
eration Building
|.m.-10 p.m.
ay. October 15
npaign Training
leration Building
|am.-2 p.m.
ay, October 21
Dade Board Meeting
lam.
ay October 21
' Dade Board Meeting
ay. October 22
m Beach Board Meeting
Lm.
. October 2f
Community Education Night
Hilton
'p.m.
*T. October 30
eration Women's Day
PUinebleau Hilton
p-2:30 p.m.
*y. NoTeabcr 6
*utive Committee/Campaign Steering
imittee Meeting
eration Building
urn.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
through the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, an arm of the Federation's
Community Relations Committee, is
building toward a massive community
"Mobilization for Freedom" in anticipa-
tion of a possible summit meeting bet-
ween President Ronald Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
"Summit II, which is expected to take
place before the end of the year, will pro-
vide this community indeed the nation
with the unique opportunity to
demonstrate to the world its deep con-
cern for the human rights of the more
than two million Jews in the USSR," said
Jeffrey Berkowitz, chairman of the Com-
munity Relations Committee. "Trapped
behind the Iron Curtain, our fellow Jews
endure religious oppression, cultural
persecution and ethnic discrimination,"
he continued.
Rerkowitz explained that this communi-
ty is undertaking a series of activities to
mobilize public opinion and to
demonstrate to the two world leaders,
particularly Gorbachev, that the plight of
Soviet Jews is a high priority item on the
community and national agendas.
"We have asked members of this com-
munity, both Jews and non-Jews, to par-
ticipate in a massive petition drive, aimed
at gathering a million signatures nation-
wide," Berkowitz said. "In addition, we
have established a coalition of concerned
individuals in this community, including
those of various religious and ethnic
backgrounds. Our goal is to show that all
segments of this community and all
segments of the nation are concerned
for the human rights of Soviet Jews and
support President Reagan's commitment
to make the freedom of Soviet Jews a key
issue at Summit II," Berkowitz
continued.
Hinda Cantor, co-chairman of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, add-
ed that "We have already begun to
mobilize for participation in a nationwide
rally in Washington, D.C. at the time of
Summit II, at which an anticipated
400,000 people will gather to
demonstrate to Gorbachev and the world
media that the plight of Soviet Jewry is of
utmost concern to the American public."
Berkowitz further explained that "the
collection of signatures on petitions urg-
ing that Soviet Jewry be a high-priority
item on the Summit II agenda is of vital
importance to helping ease the situation
of Jews in the Soviet Union. It is absolute-
ly crucial," he said.
A copy of the petition can be found on
this page. Please clip it, collect signatures
from your family, friends and co-workers,
and send it to the Federation.
"This petition drive is a very important
way for community members to do their
part," Cantor said. "Those who may not
have the time to help Soviet Jews in other
ways can help accomplish this important
humanitarian task by doing their part in
collecting signatures. If each reader
would collect just 10 or 15 signatures, the
nationwide effort will have no trouble at-
taining its one million signature goal."
For more information or additional
copies of the petition, please call the
Federation's Community Relations
Department at 576-4000.
A PETITION TO THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
President Ronald Reagan
The White House
Washington. D.C. 20500
Dear Mr. President:
We thank you and your Administration for your eontinued efforts to rescue the Jews in the Soviet
Unionthe world's third largest Jewish community.
As you plan your forthcoming meetings with General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev, we urge you
to continue to insist that human rights remains a key issue of East-West relations.
You can count on our support as you press for Jewish emigration and the protection of cultural and
religious rights in the Soviet Union.
Name
Address
City/State
Telephone
O
Greater
Miami
Jewish
Federation
Please return by November 5. 19X6. to:
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry
Community Relations Committee. Greater Miami Jewish Federation
42(X) Biseavne Boulevard. Miami. Florida 33137
Federation, October 1986 5




Mission co-leader Sanford Freedman
got hugs and smiles when he presented
a "Miami See it Like a Native"
t-shirt to this young resident of Or
Akiva, Miami's Project Renewal
sister city in Israel
Peggy Scharlin plants a tree.
YLC to hold event on elegant
Fisher Island
More than 500 of Miami's young Jewish
leaders are expected to turn out for an
elegant evening of dancing and dining
beneath the stars on beautiful Fisher
Island. The affair, sponsored by the Cam-
paign Committee of Federation's Young
Leadership Council, will be held on Satur-
day, December IS, on behalf of the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal.
According to Susan Sirotta, chairman
of the YLC Campaign Committee,
"Fisher Island provides a trip back in
time to the elegant Miami of long ago.
The island," she says, "is everything you
imagine when you read F. Scott Fit-
zgerald's The Great GaUby."
The event, which requries a minimum
gift of $100 per person, $150 per couple,
to the Federation's 1986 CJA campaign,
"will be very affordable, but will provide
an extravagant atmosphere," according
to Sirotta. "From the moment you step
off the dock behind the Hyatt Regency
Hotel to begin your trip back in time to
the island," she says, "you feel elegant. A
man in a white suit ushers you onto a
glass-enclosed, air-conditioned yacht.
And when you step onto Fisher Island,
you see the breathtakingly beautiful
Vanderbilt estate, which is being restored
to its original grandeur."
More information about this evening of
"old world elegance" will be provided as
event co-chairmen Raquel Bild-Libbin and
Robert J. Merlin work out the details.
Robert A. Kaplan is vice chairman of the
YLC Campaign Committee, and Ellen
Rose is chairman of the Young Leader-
ship Council.
For more information, call the YLC at
576^000.
Fisher Island
Marilyn K. Smith leadership
Enrichment Forum (continued from Page 3>
founder of the Institute for the Righteous
Acts, and was involved in the Documenta-
tion and Study Center on Rescuers of
Jews in the Nazi Era.
Under the auspices of the Marilyn K.
Smith Leadership Enrichment Forum,
Dr. Schulweis will present four lectures.
Attendance is by invitation. If you wish to
attend a lecture but do not receive an in-
vitation by mail, you may request an in-
vitation by calling the Federation.
The schedule for Dr. Schulweis' lec-
tures is as follows:
Monday, November 3: for Federation
leadership, beneficiary agency boards and
Women's Division at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, November 4: for general com-
munity leadership at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel at 12 noon.
Wednesday, November 5: for Jewish
communal professionals at Temple Israel
of Greater Miami at 8:30 a.m.
Wednesday, November 5: for the
Federation Young Leadership Council at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami at 7:30
p.m.
Members of the Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment Forum Commit-
tee are Harry B. Smith, David Smith,
Joey Smith, Lou Ann Smith, Federation
President Aaron Podhurst, Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education President Nan
Rich, Federation Executive Vice Presi-
dent Myron J. Brodie, Federation Assis-
tant Executive Vice President Arthur
Flink, Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion Executive Director Gene Greenz-
weig, Milton Heller, Federation director
Human Resource Development, Federa-
tion Director of Communications
Nicholas B. Simmonds, and Federation
Director of Planning and Budget Jacob
Solomon.
For more information concerning the
Second Annual Marilyn K. Smith Leader-
ship Enrichment Forum, please call
Milton Heller at 576-4000, extension 279.
Mission Co-Leader Barbara
takes in the sights.
Black Joel M. Levy arrives in Israel.
The ABCs of Or Akiva
Reprinted with permission, from a
UJA-Project Renewal special section to
Maaric.
Each week, representatives of Bar Ilan
University travel to Or Akiva to meet
with local mothers in an unusual program
that strives to raise students' grades and
strengthen the family.
The program, "ABC for a Brighter
Child," seeks to teach mothers how to in-
still in their children a sense of pride and
encouragement about school work. It's
been only two years since it was launched,
and the program is already beginning to
show positive results. Grades are higher
and the troubling dropout rate is slipping.
The idea for this Project Renewal pro-
gram was worked out by the Jewish com-
munity of Miami, Florida. They learned
that the residents of Or Akiva, a develop-
ment town near the ancient port of
Caesarea, were disappointed in their
children's school work. Miami Jewish
leaders met with education experts from
Bar Ilan to tackle the problem.
TEACHING PARENTS SKILLS
They already knew that top students
came from homes where children were
encouraged and tutored. The answer to
their problem wasn't just to make the
schools better, but to teach parents skills
that would help their children see the
value of a solid education. What was
needed was a partnership between parent
and child.
"A child has to be guided and offered
direction," said Miriam Alkali, who runs
the programs in Or Akiva. "The goal is to
prepare the child to study and develop the
ability to benefit from new situations."
Mothers were observed at home,
feeding, bathing and playing with their
children. Then with the help of Bar Ilan
graduate students, the mothers learned
techniques to foster pride in their
children. "These mothers are taught to
give the child a sense of accomplishment
. make him feel he is doing well and en-
courage him," Alkali said.
HOMEWORK IN THE AFTERNOON
Most of the families who benefit from
the program were in earlier years denied
the opportunity of a good education.
Tamar Sasi, a mother of five, says that
the parents of Or Akiva want their
children to succeed where their parents
failed. She says that many parents now
spend afternoons helping their children
complete homework assignments.
The program's success has gone beyond
just boosting grades. Program officials
say it has also brought families closer
together. Some mothers claim they have
even improved relationships with their
mothers-in-law.
EDUCATION FOR ALL
The emphasis of Project Renewal's
educational program is to leave no one
behind. Those who need a little extra help
will get it.
Sela-Netanya (Project Renewal sister
city to Louisville and Lexington, Ken-
tucky), Givat Olga-Hadera (Minnesota),
Kiryat Moshe-Rehovot (upstate New
York and Lowell, Massachusetts), Or
Yehuda (Milwaukee and Madison,
Wisconsin), and Yoseftal-Petach Tikva
(Houston, Texas, Ann Arbor and Grand
Rapids, Michigan) all have established
special tutorial programs to improve stu-
dent grades.
For more information about Or Akiva
and Project Renewal, call the Federation
Planning and Budget Department at
576-4000.
6 Federation, October 1986




In thia special section of Federation, you will find exeerpU
from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation'* 1986 Annual
Report which will be published later this month. Copies of the
full report can be obtained by calling the Federation at
576-4000.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation The community lifeline
The partnership between Federa-
tion and its family of service agencies
forms the lifeline of Greater Miami's
Jewish community. With your gift to
the Combined Jewish Appeal Cam-
paign. Federation's 30 local
beneficiaries provide a wide range of
individual and group services in our
community.
Your gift last year was used to pro-
vide thousands of nutritious meals
and clean, safe housing for Miami's
elderly and poor. It was used to help
ensure, through a solid base of
secular and religious education, the
continuity of our people. It provided
secure and healthy day care en-
vironments for children and frail
older adults.
Through the United Jewish Appeal,
your gift helped to rebuild downtrod-
den neighborhoods in Israel, helped
President's Message
Aaron Podhurst
There's an historical doctrine which
seeks to explain the rise and decline of
civilizations in terms of their responses to
significant challenges; the more vigorous
the civilization, the greater the likelihood
that it will respond effectively to
challenge. I believe that the same can be
said of our Jewish community.
While there can be absolutely no doubt
about our ability to mobilize and concen-
trate our communal resources in the face
of clear and present danger as we
demonstrated in 1967 and again in 1973
- there is always the possibility that in
the absence of an overt crisis, we may
V Secome too complacent. It is essential for
us to be able to identify, understand and
respond to challenges which, if not con-
fronted today, will become potential
crises in the future.
The Jewish community of Greater
Miami is a vibrant and complex entity
within which a myriad of educational,
health care and social Welfare needs must
be met. These needs have been escalating
at an unprecedented rate due to federal
government cutbacks and to inflation.
The annual Combined Jewish Appeal is
our single most important weapon
against want, and we must mobilize to
support it. This is the challenge which we
must face.
Only the CJA lifeline sustains such a
broad spectrum of agencies and institu-
tions schools, hospitals and geriatric
care facilities, counseling services and
recreational facilities, youth services and
vital programs which foster intergroup
relations.
Unless we can rediscover the volunteer
spirit and rededicate ourselves to the goal
of creating a caring Jewish community in
which our parents and our children can
feel proud and secure, then our
achievements over the past 50 years will
be diminished. There are no short cuts, no
panaceas, no simplistic solutions. The
challenge must be met with hard work
and unselfish commitment.
This renewal and rededication can only
be realized if it is anchored in a bedrock of
Jewish values and historical continuity.
The Jewish community of Greater Miami
is one small, vital link in the chain of
Jewish survival, a chain which begins and
ends in our spiritual and historical
in the absorption of Ethiopian Jews
and provided sorely-needed social
services for countless numbers of our
Israeli brethren. Your gift helped to
free Anatoly Shcharansky and others
from oppression in the Soviet Union.
It helped to ease the suffering of our
fellow Jews in 30 other nations
around the world.
And your gift did much, much
more. Your gift gave us the ability to
birthplace, Israel. Through our
partnership with the United Jewish
Appeal, we will ensure that the chain
remains unbroken.
The reality of Jewish historical
experience during the past 2,000 years is
that we have been engaged in a constant
struggle against forces that have tried to
obliterate us. In those instances, we
fought for physical survival. Fortunately,
today the struggle is different. But the
challenge must still be met.
extend our lifeline to countless
numbers of Jews everywhere who
were and are hanging on for
dear life.
As one who makes a gift to the CJA
campaign, you can help Federation
continue to provide aid to Jews in our
community and around the world.
You can help to ensure that the
lifeline remains unbroken.

I am confident that by working
together and by giving unselfishly, we
will record achievements of which we will
be justifiably proud.
-tiSLfivx
VcrO/LuA*^
Aaron Podhurst
President
1986-1987 Officers and
Board of Directors
Aaron Podhurst, President
Samuel I. Adler, Immediate Past President
Norman Braman, Vice President
Steven J. Kravitz, Vice President
Donald E. Lefton, Vice President
Nancy Lipoff. Vice President
Forrest Raff el. Vice President
Howard R. Scharlin, Vice President
Maxine E. Schwartz, Secretary
Herbert Canarick. Associate Secretary
Michael M. Adler, Treasurer
Alex Halberstein, Associate Treasurer
Myron J. Brodie, Executive Vice President
Executive Vice President's Message
Myron J. Brodie
During 1987-88, The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will enter its sixth
decade as the central address of the
Jewish community in Miami. The coming
years will be years of challenge, years of
opportunity, and years of achievement.
The past year has witnessed this com-
munity wrestling with some serious pro-
blems centering on our ability to sustain
adequate levels of funding to our local
agencies for the provision of vitally im-
portant human services, and at the same
time maintain our appropriate share of
responsibility to Israel and world Jewry
through the UJA.
The crux of the problem is not difficult
to identify: our fund raising efforts have
not been able to keep pace with
expanding needs and increasing costs,
many of which could not be anticipated.
This is not to say that our recent
campaign achievements are anything to
be ashamed of quite the contrary.
According to a report published by the
Council of Jewish Federations, between
1979 and 1984, our Combined Jewish
Appeal campaign achieved an overall
percentage increase that placed us first
among large city federations in North
America. However, we have reached a
plateau which we must transcend if this
community is to grow and prosper. The
alternative is stagnation, and, ultimately,
decline.
In the context of escalating costs and
their unwelcome impact on our
beneficiary agencies, one dramatic exam-
ple will serve to illustrate the seriousness
of the problem. The Senior Ride Pro-
gram, operated by the Jewish Community
Centers of Greater Miami, provides bus
transportation for the elderly, giving
them access to Jewish Community Center
(Continued on Page 10)
*L. Jules Arkin
Harold Beck
Saby Behar
Jack Bellock
Helene Berger
Jeffrey L. Berkowitz
Richard Berkowitz
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Thomas Bonn
Benjamin Botwinick
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Jack Burstein
Ralph Chernin
Sidney Cooperman
IrvingCypen
Amy Dean
Terry Drucker
Alvin Entin
Myra Fan-
Pat P. Fine
David B. Fleeman
Mark Friedland
Harvey Friedman
Judge Ronald Friedman
Morris Futernick
Gary Gerson
Alfred Golden
Goldie R. Goldstein
Martin Goodman
Joseph Handleman
Samuel Harte
Charlotte Held
Arthur Horowitz
Martin Kalb
Melvin L. Kartzmer
Ezra Katz
Shepard King
Jonathan Kislak
Cat Kovens
Jeffrey Lecourt
Sidney Lefcourt
William Lehman, Jr.
Frances B. Levey
Jack H. Levine
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Joel Levy
Norman Lieberman
Norman H. Lipoff
Ellen Mandler
Neal Menachem
Linda Minkes
Stanley C. Myers
Gail Newman
Jeffrey Newman
Gerald Olin
Michael Olin
Sidney Olson
Dorothy Podhurst
Robin Prever
Nan Rich
Ellen Rose
David Schaecter
Rowland Schaefer
Michael Scheck
Gerald K. Schwartz
Sid Shneider
Fred K. Shochet
Norman Sholk
Elaine Silverstein
Harry B. Smith
Shirley Spear
John Sumberg
Eli Timoner
Robert Traurig
EricTuretsky
Philip T. Warren
Norman Weiner
Dr. George S. Wise
Barry S. Yarchin
Past Presidents
i
Federation, October 1986 7


Local Agencies and Services
Youth and Group
Services
Including group
experiences
Jewish iden-
communal in-
to
gwmnmm to msmmmm personal
and group identification with
B'nai B'rith Youth
Judge Ronald Friedman, President
Steven M. Klein, Executive Regional
Director
An international agency serving Jewish
teens, ages 14-18. Members participate in
democratically functioning groups under
the guidance of volunteer advisors and
professional staff. Activities include
Jewish community service, athletic, social
and cultural programs. Also sponsors s
group for educable mentally retarded
Jewish youth in Dade County. (14411 S.
Dixie Hwy., Suite 208, Miami, FL 33176,
253-7400)
Hillel Foundations of Florida
Carole Romer, President
Richard K. Goldstein, State Director
A consortium of 15 Jewish Federations,
B'nai B'rith of Florida and college
students. Oversees the provision of ser-
vices at Hillel units at Florida colleges
and universities outside of Dade County.
Also oversees the budgeting of Hillel
units. Hillel units currently operate at the
University of Florida, Florida State
University, the University of South
Florida and in the Broward/Palm Beach
County region, with smaller units located
on seven other campuses. (Local Office:
1100 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables, FL
33146, 661-8549)
Hillel Jewish Student Centers
of Grantor Miami
Barry S. Yarchin, President
Richard K. Goldstein, Area Director
Hillel provide services to Jewish college
students in Dade County, including High
Holy Day services, Shabbat services and
dinners, personal counseling, Israel-
oriented programs, social action activities
and cultural, social and athletic pro-
grams. Hillel also conduct annual United
Jewish Appeal campaigns on behalf of
Federation within the university and col-
lege Jewish communities. Organised and
co-sponsored by B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional. Hillel is located on almost every
college and university campus in Dade
County. (Regional Office: 1100 Stanford
Drive, Coral Gables. FL 33146. 661-8549)
Irael Activities Department
Linda Minkes, Chairman
Uri Cohen, Israel Aliyah Shaliach
Raffi Miller, Community Shaliach
Formed this year to combine the Aliyah
Center, Aliyah Council of South Florida
and Federation's Israel Programs Office.
Provides advice, guidance and policy
direction regarding the promotion and
support of local participation in Aliyah,
Israel programs and local events relating
to Israel. Also provides support and
guidance to local tehliehim (Israeli em-
misaries) employed by the America
Zionist Youth Foundation and the
Department of Aliyah of the World
Zionist Organization and integrates pro-
grams and activities sponsored by
Federation committees and by Federa-
tion local beneficiary agencies. (3950 Bis
cayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137, 576-4000
or 573-2566)
Jewish Community Center* of
Greater Miami
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, Chairman of the
Board
Neal J. Menachem, President
Composed of four Centers Michael-
Ann Russell Center, South Dade Center,
Miami Beach Center and Miami Beach
Senior Center. Provides programs and
services for people of all ages, designed to
meet a wide variety of needs and in-
terests. Programs include day care for in-
fants and children; after school care; sum-
mer and "no school day" day camp; pro-
grams for singles; the JASSline, a
24-hour recorded listing of activities for
singles (573-JASS); educational and per-
sonal growth programs; cultural arts pro-
grams; athletics for all ages; and much
more.
Services for senior adults include
recreation; education; health
maintenance; assessment; homemaker;
friendly visitor; shopping; home health
aides and home delivered meals for
residents of South Miami Beach; and
Senior Ride, which provides transporta-
tion to doctors, clinics, hospitals and meal
sites in Miami Beach and North Dade for
seniors who are unable to use public
transportation.
Michael-Ann Russell Center: Sherman
Canter, President; Daniel L. Yoffee,
Center Director, 18900 N.E. 25. Ave.,
North Miami Beach, FL 33180, 932-4200.
South Dade Center Rosiyn K. Benin,
President; Edward Rosen, Center Direc-
tor, 12401 S.W. 102 Ave., Miami, FL
33137, 251-1394.
Miami Beach Center Ronald W. Shane,
M.D., President; Jerome Libbin, Center
Director Gail Weisberg, Director, Older
Adult Services; 4221 Pine Tree Drive,
Miami Beach, FL 33140. 534-3206.
Miami Beach Senior Center: 610
Espanola Way, Miami Beach, FL 33139,
673-6060.
Jewish Education,
Culture and Religion
Including day and religious
schools from preschool through
university levels, non-degree
courses and Jewish cultural and
religious programs.
Bet Shim Solomon Schechter
Day School
Jane Bialilew, Chairman
Dr. Michael H. Halzel, Headmaster
A Conservative day school offering
preschool for children ages 2-5 and
elementary school for children in grades
1-6. In addition to its highly regarded
reading program, Bet Shira offers an
enriched curriculum of general and
Judaic studies in grades 1-6, including
computer science courses and resources
for gifted and talented students.
Accredited by the American Associa-
tion of Colleges and Schools and the
Solomon Schechter Day School Associa-
tion. Affiliatd with the United Synagogue
of America. (7500 S.W. 120 St., Miami,
FL 33156, 238-2606)
Central Agency for Jewish
Education
Nan Rich, President
Gene Greenzweig, Executive Director
South Florida's major communal agen-
cy in the field of Jewish education.
Priorities include the continuation of
Jewish education beyond Bar and Bat
Mizvah age and the enrichment and licen-
sing of Hebrew and early childhood
teachers.
Offers courses and seminars for
teachers' professional enrichment; the
Educational Resource Center/Adler-
Shinensky Library, including a major
Jewish film collection and the Teacher
Resource Center at which teachers can
create new classroom materials; com-
munity services; publications, including
teacher resource pamphlets; and an adult
education program.
In the past few years CAJE has added
Day School, Jewish Special Education,
Synagogue Supplementary, Religious and
Hebrew School departments. This year
CAJE will coordinate the inaugural year
program of the Bob Russell Community
Retreat Center, a Federation project.
(4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137,
576-4030)
Arthur and Anna Goldstein
Hebrew Academy of South Dade
Ronald A. Kriss, President
Gayle G. Berger, Acting Principal
Dori Goldman, Executive Director
Formerly the South Dade Hebrew
Academy, the Goldstein Hebrew
Academy is a traditional Jewish day
school offering classes from nursery
school through 6th grade. Offers in-
dividualized instruction, including
reading and math laboratories, suited to
students' achievement levels in general
and Judaic studies. Aims at challenging
each student to achieve his or her fullest
potential academically in a nurturing en-
vironment, while enhancing students'
understanding of themselves as in-
dividuals, as Americans and as Jews
(12401 S.W. 102 Ave., Miami, FL 33176,
253-2300)
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami
Jack Burstein, Chairman
Michael D. Fischer, Executive Vice-
President
A day school offering general and
Judaic studies from nursery through 12th
grade. Offers comprehensive academic
extracurricular and cultural enrichment
programs; and science and computer
courses and laboratories. Committed
equally to academic excellence in Judaic
and general studies and to the character
development of each student through the
observance of traditional Jewish practice.
During 1986, the Academy's elemen-
tary school was named among only three
in Dade County as one of the best in the
United States. Accredited by the
Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. (2400 Pine Tree Drive, Miami
Beach, FL 33140, 532-6421)
Jewish High School of South
Florida
Eleanor Katz, President
Richard Levy, Chairman of the Board
Rabbi Louis Herring, Principal
Provides high quality courses in Judaic
and general studies for students in grades
9-12. Offers a special curriculum track for
students with little or no previous Jewish
education and an excellent general
studies curriculum designed by scholars
at the University of Miami. (19000 N.E.
25 Ave., North Miami Beach, FL 33180,
935-5620)
Jewish Studies Program, Barry
University
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman, Director
Offers graduate studies for individuals
seeking a master's degree in Jewish
studies. Courses offered on Bible, Rab-
binic literature, Jewish thought, Jewish
history and Hebrew. Also sponsors free
public lectures on topics of Jewish in-
terest Scholarship aid is available to
students intending to pursue careers in
Jewish education or Jewish communal
service. (11300 N.E. 2 Ave., Miami
Shores, FL 33161, 758-3392)
Lehrman Day School
Rochelle Malek, Chairman of the Board
Dr. Amir Baron, Director of Education
Rowena E. Kovler, Principal
A Conservative Hebrew day school for
students in nursery through 8th grade,
combining secular disciplines with the
study of Hebrew language and Jewish
tradition and culture. Facilities include a
computer center, science laboratories and
library. General studies curriculum
designed by scholars from the University
of Miami.
Fully accredited by the Solomon
Schechter Day School Association under
the auspices of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America. (727 77th St.,
Miami Beach, FL 33141. 866-2771)
8 Federation, October 1986


Local Agencies and Services
Alexander Muss High School in
Israel
Nelson C. Keshen, President
Rabbi Morris Kipper, International
Director
An eight-week intensive study program
for high school students designed to
thoroughly acquaint them with Israel and
to impart each with "a permanent Jewish
identity." Main campus located 15 miles
northeast of Tel Aviv, with a second cam-
pus adjacent to Netanya.
Students, recruited through local high
schools, receive credit at their regular
schools for participation. Program receiv-
ed the prestigious William J. Schroder
Award from the Council of Jewish
Federations in 1983, and in 1986 received
the State of Israel's Presidential Award
as "The outstanding international pro-
gram." Federation provides financial
assistance for 500 students each year.
(3950 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33137,
576-3286)
Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School
Michael Scheck, President
Marshall Baltuch, Executive Director
Largest Jewish day school in the
Southeastern United States, offering a
full curriculum of Judaic and general
studies for students in preschool through
9th grade. Emphasizes fundamental skills
and offers math and reading labs for in-
dividualized enrichment and remedial
academic work.
Accredited by the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools. Member of the
National Commission on Torah Education
and the Southern Association of Indepen-
dent Schools. (19000 N.E. 26 Ave., North
Miami Beach, FL 33180, Dade:
931-2831/Broward: 524-8688)
Synagogue Supplemental
School Scholarship Program
Rabbi Norman Lipson, Administrator
Administered by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and funded entirely
by the Federation. Provides scholarship
assistance to financially deserving
students in synagogue schools for Jewish
education through Bar and Bat Mitzvah
age. (4200 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL
33137, 476-4030)
Teacher Fringe Benefits
Program
Rabbi Shimon Azulay, Administrator
Administered by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and funded entirely
by the Federation. Designed to maintain
high quality licensed Hebrew, general
studies and early childhood educators in
Jewish schools by providing pension and
health insurance plans for teachers with
continuing or temporary licenses. (4200
Riscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137,
576-4030)
Torus Ernes Academy of Miami
William Gordon, President
Rabbi Bentzion Chait, Principal
An Orthodox day school serving Dade
and South Broward students in preschool
through 6th grade. Provides a meaningful
Torah education and a high quality com-
prehensive general studies curriculum.
(Nursery-Kindergarten: 195 N.W. 156
St., North Miami, FL 33161,
947-1959/Grades 1-6: 7902 Carlyle
Avenue, Miami Beach, FL 33141
868-1388)
University of Miami Judaic
Studies Program
Dr. Henry A. Green, Director
An interdisciplinary program offering a
bachelor's degree in Judaic Studies.
Designed to provide comprehension of
Jewish civilization and the creative
cultural experience of the Jewish people.
Offers classes, film festivals, a speaker
series and educational programs for the
University and for the community-at-
large; and an outreach program con-
ducted at local synagogues offering
University and Central Agency for
Jewish Education credits. Federation
funds are used to provide scholarship sup-
port, student stipends and special enrich-
ment programs and materials. (Universi-
ty of Miami, Ashe Building, Coral Gables,
FL 33124, 284-4375)
University of Miami Middle
East Studies Program
Dr. Haim Shaked, Director
Affiliated with the U of M Graduate
School of International Studies. With
Federation's support, the University
hosts an exchange professor from Israel
in the field of Middle East studies who
teaches at the University and serves as a
resource to the entire Miami community
in matters relating to Israel. (1531
Brescia Ave., Coral Gables, FL 33146,
284-4303)
Individual and Health
Services
Including health care,
counseling, vocational
rehabilitation and services to the
elderly.
Community Chaplaincy Service
Benjamin Botwinick, Chairman
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director
Provides visitation and religious ser-
vices to unaffiliated Jews in various in-
stitutions such as general hospitals, men-
tal institutions, correctional institutions,
homes for the retarded, nursing homes
and hospices. (4200 Biscayne Blvd.,
Miami, FL 33137. 576-4000)
Federation Information and
Referral Service
Nancy Zombek, Director
Provides a telephone resource for peo-
ple needing help in locating the ap-
propriate sources to fulfill their social ser-
vice needs or general intake about the
Jewish community. Operates Monday-
Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (4200 Bis-
cayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137, 576-4000,
extension 283)
Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami
Jeffrey E. Newman, President
David B. Saltman, LCSW, Executive
Director
Works to strengthen Jewish family life
and promote the emotional and social
well-being of people of all ages. Offers in-
take and referral; individual, group,
marital, family and parent-child counsel-
ing; play therapy; psychoaocial assess-
ment of the elderly; home visits; family
life education; community workshops;
public education; and school/agency
consultation.
Programs include "Family Lifeline,"
which helps dispersed families provide
care for elderly Miami family members,
and an eating disorders clinic. Also ad-
ministers the Refugee Resettlement Pro-
gram on behalf of the Federation. (Five
locations throughout Greater Miami.
Main office: 1790 S.W. 27 Ave., Miami,
FL 33145, 445-0555)
Jewish Vocational Service
Shirley Spear, President
Eugene Greenspan, Executive Director
Offers a wide variety of services in-
cluding vocational counseling and
rehabilitation; job placement and skills
training for the handicapped with a
special program for the deaf; student
loans; micrographics skills training;
microfilming services; "Training Oppor-
tunities Project," an on-the-job training
program for handicapped clients;
"Productive Older Workers Program"
for low-income elderly in need of employ-
ment assistance; and homemaker
referral.
The JVS Nutritional Project serves
about 1,850 hot kosher meals every week-
day to the elderly and needy at eight con-
gregate meal sites and through home
delivery. (Five locations throughout
Greater Miami. Main office: 318 N.W. 25
St., Miami, FL 33126, 576-3220)
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged
Irving Cypen, Chairman
Harold Beck, President
Marc Lichtman, Executive Director
A multi-faceted geriatric care center of-
fering a wide variety of services aimed at
enabling the elderly to lead active and
productive lives and maintain their in-
dependence to the fullest extent possible.
MJHHA facilities include the new
Harry Chernin Skilled Nursing Building,
which houses the Harry and Patricia Top-
pel Rehabilitation Center and the Miriam
and Sidney Olson Hospital. The
Rehabilitation Center uses Federation
funds to offer post-hospital care to people
recovering from strokes, serious frac-
tures or similar illnesses or accidents. The
Miriam and Sidney Olson Hospital is a
specialty geriatric unit featuring the most
modern medical equipment and physical
and occupational therapy facilities.
MJHHA also offers an Ambulatory
Health Center with primary medical care
facilities and specialty clinics; the Stein
Gerontological Institute, a research and
training center offering accredited
courses and seminars to health care pro-
fessionals; a mental health center offer-
ing a complete range of mental health ser-
vices to Miami Beach residents; Irving
Cypen Tower, a 102-unit congregate liv-
ing apartment complex for seniors who
can live independently while benefiting
from MJHHA services; two adult day
care centers to help keep the frail elderly
alert and independent for as long as possi-
ble; and two Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops, which take reaalable goods and
use the proceeds to buy medical supplies
for the indigent.
Among the special programs offered by
MJHHA are "Channeling," a full range
of community services for frail older
adults experiencing problems with daily
activities; "Project Independence," pro-
viding personalized assessment and case
management of at-home services tailored
to the individual's needs; and the Mount
Sinai/Miami Jewish Home-Home Health
Agency, designed to minimize the length
of hospital stays by having medical ser-
vices and equipment delivered to patients
in their homes. (Main facility: 151 N.E. 52
St., Miami, FL 33136, 751-8626)
Rescue and Migration Service
National Council of Jewish
Wc
Gladys Green, Chairwoman, Presidium;
Ruth Anne Lefcourt, Chairwoman,
Rescue and Migration
Charlotte Oliver. Director
A local cooperating agency of H1AS
(Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society). Pro-
vides immigration counseling and
technical assistance to Jewish residents
of Dade County and their relatives and
friends throughout the world. Offers legal
and social aid to clients before gaining
legal entry and after admittance to the
United States through the naturalization
process. (4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL
33137, 5764747 or 573-6971)
Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami
Cal Kovens, Chairman of the Board
Fred D. Hirt, President/Chief Executive
Officer
Mount Sinai is a 700-bed, acute-care
medical center providing quality patient
care for those requiring hospitalization,
outpatient or emergency services. With
its Gumenick Ambulatory Care Center,
the hospital leads the way in same-day
surgery and outpatient medical services.
A teaching hospital, Mount Sinai excels
in its educational facilities for physicians-
in-training, nurses, paramedical students
and employees. With research grants
totaling more than $2.1 million in 1985,
the hospital furthers future medical
knowledge. Mount Sinai is at the
forefront of diagnostic technology with
Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the Mary
Ann and James L. Knight MRI Center.
In the area of community service, the
hospital reaches out to the community
through Project Sinai by providing health
care for Miami residents at 13 hot meal
sites. Mount Sinai/North is a multi-
specialty physician's practice designed to
better serve residents of Northeast Dade
and South Broward. The hospital's
Mobile Health Center van brings educa-
tional programs and health screenings
out into the community. The Addiction
Treatment Program saves lives in jeopar-
dy by providing a new beginning. "Check-
up," a series of half-hour medical pro-
grams, educates the public about medical
care on Jewish Federation Cable Televi-
sion. (4300 Alton Road, Miami Beach, FL
33140, 674-2121)
Federation, October 1986 9


Local Agencies and Services
Special Projects
Government Affaire Committee
Florida Aeeociation of
Jewish Federations
L. Jules Arkin, Chairman
Edward Roaenthal, Director
Represents the Jewish Federations of
Florida in dealing with branches of state
government in various governmental
matters, including efforts to assure the
conservation of federal and state funds
flowing through state agencies to human
service programs of the Jewish communi-
ty. Works in close cooperation with such
bodies as the Florida Association of
United Ways, the United Protestant Ap-
peal, Florida IMPACT and others. (Com-
munity Relations Department, 4200 Bis
cayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33137, 576-4000)
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Cable Television,
Inc.
Samuel Harte, President
Suzanne Lasky, Director of Broadcast
Operations
Formed to provide Dade County with
Jewish cable television programming.
JFTV produces and airs evening pro-
grams on topics such as Jewish culture
and religion, entertainment, Israel, cur-
rent events and human services. (3950
Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137,
576-4000)
Jewish Federation Housing,
Inc.
David B. Fleeman, President
Nathan Skolnick, Administrator
Operates two low-cost apartment
buildings for the elderly: Federation
Towers, located on Miami Beach, has 114
residential units; and Federation Gardens
in South Dade has 110 one-bedroom
residential units. (757 West Avenue,
Miami Beach, FL 33139, 531-2388)
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, Inc.
Dr. Abraham S. Fischler, President
Donald E. Lefton, Chairman of the
Executive Committee
Goldie R. Goldstein, Executive Vice
President
Compiles oral and video histories of
Holocaust survivors, their liberators and
protectors, and offers these materials for
educational purposes. Also sponsors a
variety of community service programs
relating to the Holocaust, seminars and
lectures and a Children of Holocaust Sur-
vivors group. Coordinates major public
awareness programs, such as the annual
"Holocaust Awareness Week" series and
commemoration of "Yom Hashoah." the
day of Holocaust remembrance. (Florida
Internationa) University Bay Vista Cam-
pus, N.E. 151 St and Biscayne Blvd.,
Miami. FL 33181, 940-5690)
Executive Vice President's Message
(Continued frost Page 7)
programs, Jewish Vocational Service hot
meals sites and other locations that would
otherwise be inaccessible to them. Due to
escalating operating costs, the Senior
Ride Program may be in jeopardy unless
additional funds can be found. Without
this vital service, 400 elderly people could
literally become trapped in their homes,
suffering from the sort of isolation that
inevitably leads to premature institu-
tionaliiation. We cannot allow this to hap-
pen; the necessary funds must be
allocated to keep Senior Ride in business.
To do this and maintain our practice of
allocating an appropriate share of the
campaign to the UJA, we must raise in
excess of an additional million dollars for
this need alone. If the extra funds cannot
be provided, hundreds of our Jewish
elderly will suffer.
Objectively, there is no reason why we
should not be able to increase our cam-
paign by significant increments on a year
to year basis. There exist within this com-
munity all of the necessary human and
material resources. But do we have the
determination to succeed? Will the cam-
paign lifeline still be available to this com-
munity 50 years from now? I think that
both of these questions can be answered
in the affirmative. Winning is ingrained
in this community; we have always suc-
ceeded, no matter what the odds. We
have always had the good fortune to be
blessed with talented leaders who have
been ready to give unstintingly of
themselves to make things happen. We
need them again, but we need more than
just the "chiefs." There are too many
passive bystanders who see the campaign
as the responsibility of others. We must
involve more individuals as workers in the
campaign. Our current base of con-
tributors is too small in relation to our
population. It has to be expanded, and the
only way that is going to happen is by
those of us who are involved exercising
individual initiative in recruiting friends,
family and colleagues. I can assure you
that the entire professional staff of
Federation is working all out to ensure
that the campaign will regain its upward
momentum.
I only ask that you, the volunteer, join
us. You are the backbone of this com-
munity of any community. The time for
sitting on the fence is past; please give us
your commitment.
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Table of Allocations
1986-1987
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
Beth Shalom Day School (Hollywood)
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
Central Agency for Jewish Education
Community Chaplaincy Service
Federation Cable Television
Federation Information and Referral Service
Arthur & Anna Goldstein Hebrew Academy of South Dade
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Hillel Foundations of Florida
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of Greater Miami
Israel Programs Office
'Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami
Community Care for the Elderly
Michael-Ann Russell Title III
Senior Ride
South Beach Activities Center
'Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami
Guardianship Program
Jewish High School of South Florida
Jewish Studies ProgramBarry University
'Jewish Vocational Service
Nutrition Program
Lehrman Day School
'Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
Community Mental Health Center
Mount Sinai Medical Center
Alexander Muss High School in Israel (Miami Students)
Rescue and Migration Service NC JW
Refugee Resettlement Program
Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School
South Florida Aliyah Council
Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial Center
Synagogue Supplemental School Scholarships
Teacher Fringe Benefits Program
Toras Ernes Academy
University of Miami
Judaic Studies Program
Middle East Program
( $37,688)
( $7,030)
( $69,346)
($145,617)
( $12,640)
( $55,357)
( $38,500)
(
(
$12,000)
$25,000)^
39,160
3,000
53,131
1,005,040
105,935
153,891
42,036
58,533
471,134
76,428
299,941
72,466
1.290,518
1,000,863
147,346
25,000
339,824
42,946
1,099,544
231,000
177,954
44,396
50,955
309,449
6,150
59,385
41,230
179,925
52,615
37,000
TOTAL
Non-Local Agencies and Services
America Israel Cultural Foundations
American Academic Association for Peace in the
Middle East
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
Association of Jewish Family and Children's Services
B'nai B'rith National Youth Services Appeal
H.I.A.S
JWB
Jewish Education Service of North America
Jewish Labor Committee
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Jewish War Veterans
Joint Cultural Appeal
National Conference on Soviet Jewry
National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership
National Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council
North American Jewish Students Appeal
Project Interchange
Synagogue Council of America
TOTAL
United Jewish Appeal
Other Allocations
Audit Fees for Local Agencies
Community Relations Committee
Council of Jewish Federations and Large City
Budgeting Conference Dues
Florida Association of Jewish Federations
Greater Miami Jewish Federation (Year-round
Administration, Planning and Budgetting,
Leadership Development, Etc.)
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund-
Fund-Raising and Collections
Reserve for Gifts-in-Kind
Reserve for Losses on Collections
Retirement Plan Special Reserve
Total of all Allocations
$ 7.516,795
$ 4.000
1,500
49,500
22.675
49,500
1.000
2,500
37,500
42,000
44,850
3,500
7,000
2,000
21,000
7,500
1,515
36,500
6,000
4,000
3,000
$ 347,040
$10,800,000
$ 44,000
238,475
148,090
30,969
1,605,649
2,837,262
93,750
1,459,500
40,000
TOTAL $ 6,497,695
$25,161,530
Federation receives an annual allocation from the United Way of Dade County
in support of four beneficiary agencies: Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami, Jewish Vocational Service and
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged.
10 Federation, October 1986


Federation's Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies recently held a special "thank
you" event to honor the more than 150 women who have made commitments to pro-
vide for the future of our Jewish community. The cocktail reception was held at
Flagler Dog Track at the Track Manager's Private Terrace, thanks to the
generosity of Mrs. Florence Hecht, a longtime philanthropic fund donor. An infor-
mative talk was given by prominent investment advisor Arnold Gam, chairman
of the Foundation's Investment Commitee and Board of Trustees member.
Assisting Women's Committee Chair EUie Ganz were event co-chairs Gertrude
Kartzmer and Gloria Raffel. Seen at the event were, from left, Foundation Chair-
man Martin Kalb, Sharon Kalb, Irving Cypen and Florence Hecht.
Foundation sponsors tax and
estate planning Seminars
The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies will sponsor two special
seminars this fall in order to maximize in-
formation available to donors, profes-
sionals and investors in the community
about upcoming changes in the law and
their implications.
The first seminar, jointly sponsored
with the American Committee of the
Weizmann Institute of Science, entitled
"The 1986 Tax Law: Investment
Strategies for Individuals," will feature
nationally known investment advisor
Robert Farrell and a panel of local ex-
perts on tax aspects of charitable giving.
Farrell, senior vice president and chief
marketing analyst for Merrill Lynch
Pierce Fenner and Smith, has been a
panelist on the well known PBS program
"Wall Street Week" and a member of In-
stitutional Investor Magazine's "A
, Team." He will speak on some of the per-
sonal investment opportunities generated
by the impending legislation. Following
Farrell's presentation, Barry Nelson, at-
torney with Smith & Mandler, will speak
on estate planning under the new tax law.
Local panelists Martin Kalb, of
Greenberg, Traurig, Askew, Hoffman,
Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel; Mike Segal, of
Broad and Cassell; and Donald Tescher,
of Tescher and Milstein, will briefly cover
other aspects of the law.
The program will be held on October 8
at the Biscayne Bay Marriott from 3 to
5:00 p.m. with cocktails and hors
d'oeuvres to follow. Cost of the seminar
will be $15.
On November 6, the Foundation's 14th
Annual Tax Seminar and reception will be
held at the Hyatt Regency Miami from
3-6 p.m. The featured speaker will be na-
tionally known estate planner and at-
torney Edward Schlesinger. A native of
New York City, Schlesinger is an expert
on many estate and tax matters. His talk
will be oriented toward the professional
practitioner.
There will be no charge for the pro-
gram, as local legal and accounting firms
will again sponsor the afternoon. Conti-
nuing legal credit will be provided for at-
tendance at the tax seminar.
For information and reservations,
please call the Foundation office at
576-4000.
Tax advisory alert
CONGRESSIONAL JOINT COMMITTEE APPROVES NEW TAX BILL
With the sweeping changes it promises, 1986 will present a unique opportunity for
getting the most from your charitable dollar. Benefits available to donors to chanty,
under existing law, can be realized by taking action before year end.
Consider the creation of a PHILANTHROPIC FUND, if you do not already have one.
WHY?
* Tax savings from gifts made in 1986 are apt to be substantially higher Tax rates
on 1986 income are certain to be higher than in the future.
* Deduction of full fair market value of appreciated stocks and bonds IMPORTANT
in a year when the markets have risen substantially.
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies offers several vehicles to assist you in
custom tailoring your charitable gifts. Whether the creation of a Philanthropic Fund,
Charitable Trust, Life Insurance Policy, Zero Coupon Bond, or Estate Planning, we can
help you make decisions which will save you dollars NOW!
REMEMBER there are only 90 days to save dollars and help yourself, while giving
the Federation your valued support. Take advantage of this unique opportunity contact
your legal and tax professional, or call Joseph Imberman, Director, Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, at 576-4000.
Zero Coupon Bonds:
A wise investment
By Alan L. Sherr, CPA
Several years ago, the investment com-
munity became quite excited about a new
investment vehicle called the zero coupon
bond. At the time, interest rates were
high and the bonds were rapidly acquired
by institutions and individuals for a varie-
ty of uses. As the bonds do not pay cur-
rent interest, but accumulate until
maturity, this allows a nominal invest-
ment to grow substantially over its
lifetime.
'Zero coupon bond' is really only a new
title for a familiar concept. Those of us
who are old enough, remember how we
helped win World War II as school
children by purchasing 25 cent saving
stamps. The stamps were pasted into a
book, and when full, totalled $18.75. The
book was exchanged for a $25 bond. This
was, in fact, a zero coupon bond, as have
been all subsequent variations since
World War II.
A "Zero" is a bond whose terms require
that the face amount be paid at maturity,
but does not pay interest until redemp-
tion. Therefore, it can be sold at a dis-
count. The size of the discount is depen-
dent upon prevailing interest rates and
the period of time between acquisition
and maturity. The purchase price is really
the present value of a future amount at a
given interest rate. This price will vary
with changes in interest rates and the
length of time until maturity. An example
of this: A donor purchases a zero coupon
bond for $1,000. At an interest rate of 10
percent, the zero will yield $11,467.40 in
25 years.
ZERO COUPON BONDS AND
PHILANTHROPIC FUNDS
Charitable foundations and philan-
thropic funds have unfortunately been
perceived as vehicles of the affluent.
A philanthropic fund allows for a
charitable tax deduction in a current year
along with some limited direction as to
what organization's earnings of the
trust's assets shall be contributed during
the donor's lifetime. The grantor receives
recognition during his lifetime for the
gifts. Upon his demise, the fund continues
the grantor's altruistic intention through
posterity.
Zero coupon bonds provide a method
for those of us of more modest means to
"leave our mark" with future genera-
tions. The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies has embarked on a program to
recruit contributors to commit $10,000 a
year for the next five years. With a 10
percent interest rate, it is estimated that
the future value of this $50,000 will be
worth $1 million in less than 33 years.
Therefore, contributions of $5,000 or
$2,500 a year for a period of five years
will approximate future value of $500,000
and $250,000 respectively. Pension plans,
profit sharing trusts and individual retire-
ment accounts often find zero coupon
bonds an appropriate vehicle for their in-
vestment objectives. Because of the
"locked in" yield, one is able to predict
the value of this portion of the investment
at the desired future date. Like other pen-
sion and profit sharing plans and in-
dividual retirement accounts, the locked
in yield provides an excellent way for the
fund managers to guarantee a specific
amount if held to maturity.
While zero coupon bonds possess a
quality of liquidity with inherent risks of
die marketplace, the fluctuations over the
total period of the investment are
minimal, and, therefore, bonds represent
a prudent and secure investment to com-
plement the overall investment strategy
of a charitable foundation.
The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies now has a highly successful Zero
Coupon Bond program. Since its incep-
tion in the fall of 1985, the Foundation
has received 23 commitments represen-
ting a future value of nearly $14 million to
the Jewish Community Trust Fund. This
ensures that future generations will be
provided with the means to guarantee the
continuance of a strong and healthy
Jewish community.
For more information, call Joe Imber-
man, director of the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies, at 576-4000.
Foundation salutes new
Zero Coupon Bond participants
DAVID BEN-GURION
MILLION DOLLAR SOCIETY
Shepard Broad
Bessie and Louis Stein
Philip T. Warren
BENEFACTORS
Zack and Margarita Brammick
Herman Katz Trust
PATRONS
Herman and Dora Gaba
Melvin Kartzmer
Charles Ganz
Raffel Family
Norma and Allan Wilson
BBYO swings into
fall programming
Members of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO) have begun plan-
ning their fall program and are fired up
and ready to make this the best year ever.
It all started with BBYO's big recruit-
ment bash held on Sunday, September 14.
All BBYO chapters were there to meet
potential members and to spread the
word about BBYO. The bash was a big
success, and BBYO has many new
members eager to start their training and
become active members in BBYO.
The chapters have also been gearing up
for the athletic league which began this
past Sunday. The A.Z.A. boy's chapter
are running around on the football field
while the B.B.G. girl's chapters are hit-
ting the volleyball. We won't know the
outcome until the first of December, but
we will keep you posted.
BBYO's executive board has also been
swinging into action, planning council ac-
tivities and existing events. BBYO ex-
ecutive board presidents have been work-
ing hard to see that this gets done.
For all you teenagers who missed the
BBYO membership bash on the 14th, its
not too late to join a chapter. If you are
14-18 years of age and are ready to meet
new people and have fun, then call the
BBYO office at 253-7400. If you are over
age 21 and interested in becoming an ad-
visor for a chapter, then please give us a
call. We are expecting a great year, so
don't miss out.
BBYO is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal. Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and BBYO Partners in a
caring community.
Federation, October 1986 11


f
JFTV ranks high in ratings
Turner Broadcasting System, in a re-
cent study, reported that Jewish Federa-
tion Television (JFTV) had very high
ratings on both Hart* Hanks Cable
System in Miami Beach and Storer Cable
System in North Dade.
More than 16,000 surveys were mailed
to Harte Hanks and Storer customers in
November 1986. Forty-one percent (41%)
of the respondents indicated that they
watch JFTV in Miami Beach; Twenty-
eight percent (28%) in North Miami. The
results from other cable systems have yet
to be obtained.
"Surveys like this, show us that JFTV
is an effective tool in reaching a signifi-
cant segment of Dade County's Jewish
population," said Samuel Harte, presi-
dent of JFTV.
JFTV can be seen on Harte-Hanks
channel 2, Storer (North Dade) channel
P 29, Storer (South Dade) channel 14,
Dynamic-channel 38, Miami Cablevision
channel 4 and Americable channel 28A.
The new programs spotlight
Federation and its agencies
JFTV thanks its supporters
Jewish Federation Television (JFTV)
wishes to thank the following individuals,
families and corporations for their sup-
port of our programming. They are all
members of our
PRODUCER'S CLUB
Samuel and Bunny Adler
Michael and Judy Adler
Jeffrey and Elaine Berkowitz
Channel One
Irving and Hazel Cypen
Greenberg, Traurig, Askew, Hoffman,
Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel, P.A.
Samuel and Phyllis Harte
Hecht Family Foundation
Barry and Cynthia Hersh
Arthur and Bunny Horowitz
Barbara Kipnis
Jonathan and Tina Kislak
Krasnow Foundation
Cal and Roz Kovens
Marvin and Susan Kurzban
Harry "Hap" and Davida Levy
Irwin and Ruth Marmorstein
Sanford and Sandra Miot
Kenneth M. Myers
Nieweg Foundation
Podhurst, Orseck, Parks, Josefsberg,
Eaton, Meadow and Olin, P.A.
Stephen Rose, Ph.D.
Rowland Schaefer
Elaine Silverstein
T.I.F. Instruments, Inc.
Eli and Lisa Timoner
Philip and Renee Warren
Norma Kipnis-Wilson
Ellen and Louis Wolfson III
Richard and Susan Zinn
JFTV UNDERWRITERS
Signature Gardens (for 2 years)
Menorah chapels
Grimberg Medical and Dental Center
of North Beach
Port Sonata
Jordan Marsh
Call JFTV if you would like to become a
part of this growing group, 576-4000.
Jewish Federation Television (JFTV) is
now airing two new programs, "Presi-
dent's Corner," hosted by Samuel Harte,
President of JFTV and "Federation To-
day," hosted by Jack Levine, immediate
past chairman of the Young Leadership
Council.
The new programs provide up to date
information about the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's activities and pro-
grams and also highlight the work done
by Federation's family of benefiiary
agencies.
"They also serve to profile our Jewish
leadership, "says Samuel Harte, "The
line of questions are geared to explore our
leadership's commitment and goals for
the Federation. We want our viewers to
identify with the guests and get to know
them. This will serve as a way to bring
new friends into our Federation family,"
he added.
Interviewed on recent programs were
Jeffrey Berkowitz, Chairman of the Com-
munity Relations Committee, Ellen Rose,
Chairman of Young Leadership Council
and Sidney Schneider, Missions Chair-
man. "They were eloquent spokespersons
for Federation," said Harte.
The schedule for October is as follows:
October 6
President's Corner: Nelson C. Keshon,
President of the Alexander Muss High
School in Israel.
Federation Today: Douglas Miller, M.D.
member of the UJA Young Leadership
Cabinet, YLC liaison to the Campaign's
Physician's Division.
October 13
President's Corner: Martin Kalb, Chair-
man of Foundation of Jewish
Philantropies.
Federation Today: Robert Merlin, Co-
chairman of upcoming YLC $100
minimum gift event.
October 20
President's Corner: Nancy Lipoff,
Treasurer of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Federation Today: Susan Sirotta, YLC
Campaign Committee chairperson.
October 27
President's Corner: Ezra Katz, Co-
chairman of the Pacesetters Division,
member of the GMJF Board.
Federation Today: Richard Berkowitz.
YLC Board member. Vice-chairman of
1987 Super Sunday 1987.
The programs can be seen on JFTV on
Mondays from 7 to 7:30 p.m.,
Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8 p.m. and
Saturdays from 6:30 to 7 p.m.
Suggestions for guests are welcome.
Call JFTV at 576-4000.
Singles wanted for 'Pillow Talk9
Jewish Federation Television is produc-
ing the television program "Pillow Talk."
The program features single adults,
discussing issues of concern to their
peers.
If you would like to appear on the pro-
gram, contact JFTV at 576-4000.
Grove Isle Residents
JFTV can now be seen on cable channel
001, 003 or 004 (not on the automatic
selection) from 5 to 8 p.m. daily.
High Holidays
JFTV will not be broadcasting during
the High Holy Days, October 4, 5 and 13.
A
lt**S3i Programming Schedule .JSSs 2VS?8b* Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc. Ateen OCTOBER 1986*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenies Kitchen Aleph Eenies Kitchen Aleph Film Special Hello Jerusalem Signature Gardens Torah Treasure Chest
5:30-6 p.m. Check up/ Mount Sinai 10/14 A 28 Jewish TV Nat i. Magazine 10/7*21 Film Special Hello Jerusalem "Signature Gardens Checkup/ Mount Sinai Film Special Eenies Kitchen
JFTV Bulletin Board
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust Film Special in-Ouest Eenies Kitchen Checkup/ Mount Slnal we Remember The i Holocaust
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. still Small voice or viewpoint Film Special Film Special Teen Scene Film Special Presidents corner Teen Scene i
Federation Today
7-7:30 P.m. presidents comer Torah Treasure Chest Pillow Talk "Jordan Marsh Still Small voice or Viewpoint Hello Jerusalem "Signature Gardens Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky in-Ouest
Federation Today
7:30-8 p.m. Pillow Talk "Jordan Marsh Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Presidents Corner Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky 10/11*25 Jewish TV Nat i. Magazine 10/4*18 Film special Pillow Talk Jordan I uirch 1
Federation Today JFTV Bulletin Board
i 'Subject to change "Underwriter ..... i
12 Federation, October 1986


Community Retreat Center begins inaugural year program
^
Response to the inaugural year pro-
gram of the Bob Russell Community
Retreat Center has been very positive,
with eight Jewish community organiza-
tions already booked to use the facilities
over 10 weekends, announced Norman H.
Lipoff, chairman of the Federation's
Retreat Center Committee.
The inaugural year program of the
Retreat Center, a project of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, is being coor-
dinated by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education. The program, which begins
October 31, is intended to give Jewish
community organizations the opportunity
to conduct educational and experiential
Hillel holds annual
seminar for students
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of
Greater Miami and Hillel Foundations of
Florida held their fifth annual regional
seminar at the Colonnades Hotel on
Singer Island last month. College
students from Greater Miami, and
Broward and Palm Beach counties were
in attendance. The weekend included
workshops, discussions and informal
social activities.
This year's scholar-in-reaidenoe for the
seminar was Rabbi Norman Lipson of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education.
Using Biblical and Rabbinic literature,
Rabbi Lipson guided participants toward
an understanding of the historical pat-
terns of leadership in Jewish history and
how these patterns relate to modern
Jewish campus and community life.
The goals of the seminar were to
develop closer relations among the
students of the various campuses, to help
participants creatively discover
themselves and their heritage, and to
begin active participation in the planning
of campus programs for the coming year.
One of the weekend's most exciting
events was a special performance by
members of the Ruth Forman Theater.
Actors Fred Ornstein, Harriet Oser,
Shawn Cutler and Anthony Foreman per-
formed scenes from the Neil Simon play,
"Brighton Beach Memoirs." The play will
open for the public at the Ruth
Foreman Theater at Florida Interna-
tional University's Bay Vista Campus on
October 1 and will run through November
9.
Other activities included in the
weekend were Shabbat and Slichot ser-
vices led by Rabbi Mark Kram, Hillel
Director at the University of Miami; an
enjoyable Saturday night program; Hav-
dalah. services on the beach; and a tradi-
tional Friday night dinner.
Hillel is a microcosm of the entire
organized Jewish community. Through
weekends such as this, the students are
not only enriched both culturally and
socially, but begin preparing for their
roles as leaders in the Jewish community.
JFS helps those who help others
Caring for the needs of an aging, infirm
parent or spouse takes a special person
one dedicated to the welfare of an aging
loved one on a daily basis. This family
member reaps the rewards that come
with the caregiving responsibility, yet he
or she must also cope with the stresses of
being "on call" at any time. Family
caregivers sometimes find themselves in
need of relief.
Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami (JFS) offers that relief through a
variety of services designed especially for
r!!i.y care&ivers. These services
enlighten family members about the cop-
ing techniques helpful to overcome feel-
'ngs of anxiety, frustration, guilt and
helplessness.
Workshops and speakers are available
to educate and inform caregivers about
the mental and physical changes of aging
and the special needs of the elderly. A
family caregiving support group, as well
as individual and family counseling, offer
emotional support and assistance in plan-
n'ng for the future.
Three times a year, JFS offers two
4-session workshops for family
caregivers. "The Sandwich Generation"
is for adult children who find themselves
"sandwiched" between their obligations
to their own families and the needs of
their aging parents. "Spouse Caregiving"
is for men and women responsible for the
daily well-being of an infirm spouse. Both
workshops are offered at the JFS branch
offices in North Dade and Miami. They
are also available at off-site locations for
sponsoring clubs and organizations, with
a minimum registration of six.
Speakers on caregiving topics are
available free to civic, social and religious
organizations. Lecture titles include
"Growing Old Gracefully," "My Parents,
My Kids and Me How We Com-
municate," and "New Findings in Mental
Health for Older Adults."
Further information about workshops,
speakers and other family caregiving sup-
port may be obtained by calling 445-0555.
Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami
is a beneficiary of the United Way of
Dade County and the GMJF's Combined
Jewish Appeal. JFS and the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Partners
in a caring community.
programs in a focused environment con-
ducive to effective learning.
It was determined by the Federation's
Long Range Planning Subcommittee on
Jewish Education that retreat center pro-
gramming is one of the greatest vehicles
for the transmission of Jewish values and
identity enhancement. In addition,
research indicates that participation in an
experiential learning program carries
with it educational impact which far ex-
ceeds comparable hours spent in a formal
classroom environment.
Therefore, Lipoff explained, "the crea-
tion of a retreat center is considered to be
of integral importance to Federation's
mission of working to ensure, through
educational and experiential programs,
the creative and vital continuity of the
Jewish people."
The inaugural year program, funded
through a grant from the Robert Russell
Foundation, will use the facilities of the
Hawk's Cay Resort on Duck Key and the
Hyatt Palm Beach Convention Center in
West Palm Beach.
Lipoff explained that "The inaugural
year program will serve as a demonstra-
tion project and will lend impetus to the
search for a permanent retreat site. We
hope that such a retreat center will then
be more accessible and flexible to the
needs of our community."
Impetus for the retreat center came
from Federation's Long Range Planning
Process which took place in 1984. At that
time, the concept of a Federation spon-
sored retreat site was endorsed by the
Board of Directors as among the highest
of this community's priorities. A commit-
tee was then formed to develop a plan for
determining the feasibility of the retreat
center project, and ultimately, to oversee
the creation of a permanent retreat
center.
In consideration of the resources which
would be required for a permanent
retreat facility, the inaugural year
demonstration project was conceived as
an appropriate test of feasibility.
During the inaugural year, blocks of
rooms have been reserved for 24 dates at
the two locations. All Greater Miami as
well as South Florida regional organiza-
tions are invited to use the facilities for
programs during the available dates.
The role of CAJE in coordinating the
inaugural year program will be to oversee
all physical accommodations, from book-
ing dates for group retreats to the provi-
sion of kosher meals. In addition, CAJE
will provide programming assistance,
when requested, in areas such as Jewish
education, religious services, group ex-
periences and entertainment.
Lipoff said that "While CAJE is
preparing to offer participating groups
Judaic programming for individual
weekends, some organizations will use
the facility for their own purposes, such
as board retreats, leadership develop-
ment and youth group conventions."
The following Jewish community
organizations have already made reserva-
tions to participate in the inaugural year
program of the Bob Russell Community
Retreat Center: Bet Shira Congregation,
Temple Adath Yeshurun and Temple
Judea for congregational retreats; B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization, for a regional
convention of teen members; the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, for a state
conference and for a Board of Directors
retreat; the Council for Jewish Educa-
tion, for a national convention; the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, for a
Board of Directors Retreat; and the
Judaica High School, for two teen
conferences.
For more information about the in-
augural year program of the Bob Russell
Community Retreat Center, or to discuss
the advantages of your organization's
participation, please call Miles Bunder at
CAJE, 576-4030.
The Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal. Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and CAJE Partners in a
caring community.
UofM Judaic Studies Program
to sponsor Jewish film festival
The Annual Jewish Film Festival of the
University of Miami Judaic Studies Pro-
gram begins this month and will focus on
American Jewish literature in cinema.
The series will offer four films based on
novels by American Jewish authors.
The first film in the series, to be shown
Tuesday, October 28, is "The
Pawnbroker," starring Rod Steiger. The
film, based on Edward Lewis Wallants's
novel of the same name, was produced in
1965 and directed by Sidney Lumet. The
film focuses on Sol, an aging Jewish
businessman who owns a pawn shop in
Spanish Harlem. A Holocaust survivor,
Sol is tied to his past by both suffering
and guilt.
Sol's character derives from Biblical
sources and depicts the archetypal victim
the Jew as sufferer. Rod Steiger was
nominated for an Academy Award for his
moving portrayal of Sol.
The second film in the series, "Marjorie
Morning8tar," to be shown on Tuesday,
November 11, stars Natalie Wood, Claire
Trevor and Gene Kelley. This 1958 film,
based on the novel by Herman Wouk and
directed by Irving Rapper, is the first
work since the ghetto films of the 1920's
to focus entirely on Jewish family life.
The story, which takes place in New
York's Upper East Side, tells of the
"Jewish American Princess" and the
modern Jewish family. Critic Leslie
Fiedler sees the character of Marjorie
Morningstar as a mid-century detente
between the Jews and middle-class
America.
"Portnoy's Complaint," the third
movie in the series, to be shown on Tues-
day, November 22, stars Richard Ben-
jamin, Lee Grant and Karen Black. Based
on the novel of the same name by Philip
Roth, "Portnoy's Complaint" focuses on
the character of Alexander Portnoy, an
intellectual young urbanite whose sexual
problems and fantasies prevade his life.
Portnoy struggles to cast off the image of
his mother, who represents his Jewish
identity.
Because of its subject matter, "Port-
noy's Complaint" is not recommended for
young viewers.
"The Young Lions," based on Irwin
Shaw's novel and directed by Edward
Dmytryk, will be shown on Tuesday,
December 9. This early post-war movie
interweaves the lives of two Americans
and one German caught up in World War
II. The film focuses on the theme of anti-
Semitism and emphasizes the blackness
of the Third Reich and its false propagan-
da. The film stars Marlon Brando, Mon-
tgomery Clift, Dean Martin and Lee Van
Cleef.
All movies begin at 7:30 p.m. at the
University of Miami's Beaumont Cinema.
Cost is $3 per movie or $8 for the entire
MM,
For more information, please call Dr.
Henry Green, director of the University
of Miami Judaic Studies Program, at
284-4375.
The University of Miami Judaic Studies
Program is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
U ofM Judaic Studies Program Part-
ners in a caring community.
Federation, October 1986 T3


CAJE reports on early childhood education in Bade
Twenty-five early childhood programs,
serving over 2,300 children from six mon-
ths to five years; 260 teachers, aides and
specialists. These are the impressive
statistics that describe Jewish early
childhood education in Dade County. And
they are constantly growing!
Spurred by the increase in the number
of working mothers and births in the
"baby boomer generation," but most of
all by the realization of the crucial nature
of the early years in personality and iden-
tity development, growing registration in
Jewish early childhood programs in
synagogues, day schools and Jewish com-
munity centers reflects a national trend.
Throughout South Florida, there are 50
schools with a total of more than 4,000
students and over 400 teachers. These in-
clude seven programs of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Greater Miami (JCC)
12 day schools and 31 synagogue schools.
Among the exciting new developments
are Mommy and Me, Toddlers, Bright
Beginning*, Creeper* and Crawler* and
Daddy and Me, a variety of programs that
involve children between the ages of 6
months and 2 years attending school with
a parent one to five days a week.
Socialization of parents as well as
children is an integral part of the cur-
riculum, together with modeling by the
teacher of the ways in which parents can
stimulate the intellectual, emotional and
physical development of the child.
School days are longer as well, in-
cluding extended day programs, early
drop off hours, full day activities, and
Jewish day care programs extending
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The extended day
offers exceptional opportunities to pro-
vide an enriched Jewish environment,
together with the ongoing activities of an
early childhood program.
In addition to the wonderfully creative
activities conducted in the early childhood
education classroom, schools are now con-
centrating more than ever on involving
parents in the educational process. In ad-
dition to the Mommy and Me type of pro-
grams, almost every school conducts
parent education in a variety of
stimulating modes.
The teachers and directors of South
Florida schools are united in the Jewish
Council for Early Childhood Education
(JCECE), an affiliate of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, which en-
compasses over 400 members from Ken-
dall to North Palm Beach. Founded in
1954 with a charter personally granted by
the Secretary of the State of Florida, the
organization conducts two major all-day
professional growth institutes, a direc-
tors institute, ongoing workshops and
seminars, and strives to enhance the
status of Jewish early childhood
educators and Jewish early childhood
education in general.
Heading the organization for the com-
ing year is the "trisidium" of Alida
Bunder, early childhood education direc-
tor at Beth David; Anita Koppele, Temple
Beth Sholom, Miami Beach; and Arlene
Lasko, Temple Sinai of North Dade.
Previous presidents have included direc-
tors of JCC programs, synagogue schools
and day schools.
For three years the JCECE has spon-
sored an Israel Study Tour for its
members with seminars, workshops,
visits to early childhood programs and
meetings with early childhood education
leaders in Israel. Members of the JCECE
have also been active in the Jewish
Caucus of the National Association for
the Education of Young Children,
meeting as a special group at the national
JVS elects new officers
Pat P. Fine, immediate past president
of the Jewish Vocational Service, and her
husband Martin recently hosted the JVS
Annual Board of Directors Meeting and
Special Awards Presentation in their
home.
About 100 members of the JVS Board,
staff and guests were in attendance.
Honored guests included Myron J.
Brodie, executive vice-president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation; Sandy
Lindsey of United Way; Jose Fox of the
Area Agency on Aging; Dr. Arnold Cor-
tazzo of the Office of Vocational
Rehabilitation; and Elton J. Kerness, ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish Community
Centers of Greater Miami and associate
executive vice president of Federation.
Following the social and buffet hour,
guest speaker, Florida State Senator
Roberta Fox, spoke of the impact of fiscal
cutbacks on local social service programs.
She stressed the importance of the JVS's
commitment to providing quality services
and the agency's continued role as ad-
vocate for those in need. Fox commended
the Jewish Vocational Service for its
significant role in our community.
Awards were the order of the evening.
An award was presented to Mrs. Fine as
outgoing president for her outstanding
contributions and accomplishments dur-
ing her two year term of office. Herbert
Weiner of Ameri-Tire, Inc. received the
"Employer of the Year Award" for hiring
disabled JVS clients. Upon accepting the
award, Weiner commented that
"Everyone deserves a second chance,"
which truly reflects the JVS vocational
rehabilitation philosophy. It was announc-
ed that JVS received a State of Florida
Award for "Excellence in Programming"
and a national award for an outstanding
counseling program with the "Teen Bet-
ween" program.
The finale to this important meeting
was the election of the 1986-87 JVS slate
of officers and board of directors. The
following officers were elected:
President...........................Shirley Spear
President-Elect............Harvey Weinberg
Vice-Presidents................Stanley Gilbert
FredKatz
JeffStubins
Treasurer............................Barry White
Assistant Treasurer.........Sandor Lenner
Secretary........................Michelle Merlin
Assistant Secretary......William Grodnick
Courses offered for Judaic
studies teachers
The University of Miami Judaic Studies
Program, the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and the Jewish Community
Center of Fort Lauderdale will serve as
co-hosts for the Southern Jewish
Historical Society's annual meeting and
conference at the Inverrary Hotel
November 7-9.
All interested members of the Jewish
community are invited to attend the ses-
sions with participants from throughout
the United Sates. Seminars will be held
on Jews of the South, Jews of Dade Coun-
ty, the Holocaust and preserving old
photos and artifacts. A special "hands
on" session will be held on geneology for
the family.
Of particular interest to Miamiana will
be a session on the immigration and in-
tegration of Cuban Jews into Miami's
population. The film "Hotel Cuba" will be
shown during this session, which is led by
the film's author.
For more information, please call
Henry Green, director of the U of M
Judaic Studies Program, at 284-4375.
The U of M Judaic Studies Program and
the Central Agency for Jewish Education
are beneficiaries of the Combined Jewish
Appeal.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, U of
M Judaic Studies Program and
CAJE... Partners in a caring
community.
conventions. In addition, the JCECE has
a teacher incentive program of grants for
paticipation in early childhood education
professional growth.
As part of the process of enhancing the
qualifications of the early childhood
education teacher, CAJE's Board of
License instituted the Early Childhood
Teacher License, requiring extensive
background in Judaica and early
childhood education. Since that time, an
increasing number of teachers have
secured the license and are eligible for the
Teacher Fringe Benefits program, coor-
dinated by CAJE and funded by
Federation.
Shulamit Gittelson, former JCECE
president, noted that "The increasing em-
phasis nationally on the early years as
crucial in the personality formation of the
child mandates a qualified, certified
teacher with strong Judaica and educa-
tional credentials. The JCECE serves as
the professional group stimulating its
members to achieve the ECE license and
to constantly be involved in further
enhancement of instructional
competency."
In this respect, the recent JCECE Pro-
fessional Growth Institute held at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami attracted close to
300 teachers. Sessions included a
workshop conducted by the Kohl Teacher
Center, the most prominent in the entire
United States; seminars in music, move-
ment, crafts, story telling, dramatics and
motivation; exhibits and displays; and in-
stallation of new JCECE officers'.
There are many issues still to be resolv-
ed in Jewish early childhood education,
such as defining relative balance between
intellectual and social development, the
strengthening of Judaica and Hebrew in
the program, the development of Jewish
day care programs and others. Still, the
field of Jewish early childhood education
is probably the most dynamic in all of
Jewish education. For further informa-
tion about any of the programs, contact
Dr. Gittelson at 576-4030.
CAJE is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
CAJE Partner* in a caring
community.
.
MJHHA opens short-term care center
Since it opened its doors in 1945, the
name "Miami Jewish Home" has meant
the finest in long-term care. Now,
through an endowment by Miami philan-
thropists Patricia and Harold Toppel and
subsidies from the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the United Way of Dade
County, MJHHA is offering an additional
service to the community: short-term
rehabilitation.
"This is the first time that an extensive
rehabilitation center in South Florida is
catering to the special needs of our elder-
ly population," noted MJHHA Chairman
of the Board Judge Irving Cypen. "At the
Toppel Center, we have a comprehensive
team of specialists who have had exten-
sive experience with geriatric patients."
Elders recovering from strokes, frac-
tures, serious illnesses or accidents can
receive the best post-hospital care at the
Patricia and Harold Toppel Rehabilitation
Center. "Patients at the Toppel Center
will stay for a maximum period of 100
days," noted Assistant Director of Nurs-
ing Sharon Cohen. "These people will be
undergoing extensive therapy and train-
ing so that they will be able to live in-
dependently again. We teach patients
how to modify lifestyles and help them
and their families to understand the
nature of their illnesses."
The team approach is an important part
of the care at the Toppel Center. Masters
level social workers, nurses and nursing
assistants work closely with licensed
speech, physical and occupational
therapists toward one goal discharging
a patient who is able to reenter the
community.
"We've set up a simulated living en-
vironment in the Toppel Center, very
much like an elderly person's home," ex-
plained MJHHA Associate Executive
Director Terry Goodman. "Patients will
use this facility to relearn the skills they
will need to function in their own home
environments."
For example, when 81-year-old Abe
Scharlat was discharged from the
hospital on September 1, he was not quite
ready to go home. A mild stroke had af-
fected mobility on the left side of his body
and hemhorraging from previously
diagnosed bladder cancer had left him
weak and severely anemic. Although Mr.
Scharlat no longer needed to be in an
acute care hospital, he still needed skilled
nursing care and intensive rehabilitative
therapies before he would feel comfor-
table enough to live in his own home. Mr. y4
Scharlat chose to enter the Toppel
Rehabilitation Center.
Twice each day Mr. Scharlat works
with a physical therapist doing exercises
that will restore strength, control and
coordination to his left arm. He receives a
special therapeutic diet designed to
counter his anemia, and lab work is done
at least twice weekly to monitor Mr.
Scharlat's progress.
"The therapy is helping; I'm walking
with only a cane now," said Mr. Scharlat.
"I know that when I do go home next
week, I'll be able to do for myself again."
In order to ensure continuity of medical
care, Toppel patients' attending physi-
cians are encouraged to use the facilities.
Lovely surroundings, quality medical
care and delicious kosher cuisine create
an environment that is supremely con-
ducive to the healing process. The Toppel
Rehabilitation Center, located on the
third floor of the new Harry Chernin
Skilled Nursing Building, is a 40-bed unit.
Medicare and private-pay patients are
now being accepted for admission.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged is a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal.
Miami Jewish Home and the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Partners
in a Caring Community.
Aliyah Council holds reunion
for Floridians in Israel
The Aliyah Council of South Florida, in conjunction with the Association of Americans
and Canadians in Israel, sponsored a Reunion Picnic for Florida Olim (Floridians who
have moved to Israel). The event took place in Hayarkon Park in Tel Aviv on July 17.
More than 100 former Floridians attended the event and enjoyed an afternoon of socializ-
'"* refre8hmenta' dancin8 ""d games for the children. Prizes were awarded to the family
with most children, the Floridian who has lived in Israel for the longest time, the most re-
cent arrival and the person who travelled the longest distance to attend the picnic.
The Aliyah Council has sponsored four reunions in Israel in the past five years so that
Floridians now living in Israel can have the opportunity to get together, reminisce, com-
pare notes on their lives in Israel.
The Aliyah Council is a component part of the newly created Israel Activities Depart
ment of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
L
14
Federation, October 1986


MONDAY. OCTOBER 6
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
S E 25th Avenue, will hold a lecture for adults
entitled "Let's Get Organized." This lecture
will help you organize your drawers and closets
and better use the space you have. The pro-
p-am which begins at 7:30 p.m., is free and
open to the community. Call 982-4200 for more
information.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 7
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will go on a trip to the Parrot Jungle at 10a.m.
U> see a remarkable bird show in a tropical set-
ting. Pack a light lunch or eat in the Parrot
Jungle's cafeteria. The cost is $9.60 for JCC
members, $11.50 for non-members and in-
cludes admission and transportation. Call Vicki
at 932-4200, ext. 213 for reservations and
information.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 7
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged will hold its Junior Auxiliary Board
Meeting at the Bay Harbor City Hall beginning
at 10:00 a.m. Call 751-8626, for more
information.
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 8
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, 151 N.E. 52nd Street will hold a ground-
breaking ceremony for the Rowland and Sylvia
Schaefer Hall at 6:00 p.m. followed by the
Founders monthly meeting in the Ruby
Auditorium. For more information contact
Steve Rose at 751-8626.
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 8
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, will hold a lecture for adults
on the problem of missing children. This lec-
ture, which is free and open to the public,
begins at 7:30 p.m. Call 932-4200 for more
information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 9
The Hebrew Technical School for Girls Alum-
nae will hold a meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the
Flagler Federal Savings and Loan Association,
1050 Alton Road, Miami Beach. For more in-
formation please call 861-7206.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 9
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will hold another meeting of their popular
Yiddish for Fun" class with Bette Shalloway
from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Join us for an evening of
delightful entertainment, fun and laughter as
we share Yiddish stories, jokes and the love of
a vibrant language. The cost is free to JCC
members, $1 for non-members. Call 932-4200.
ext. 213 for more information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER I
American Jewish Congress Justine-Louise
Wise chapter will meet at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings and Loan association Bank
building at Alton and Lincoln Roads. For infor-
mation call 864-1355.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 9
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, North Miami Beach Auxiliary Board
Meeting will be held at Denny's Restaurant on
Miami Gardens Drive at noon. Call 751-8626
for more information.
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 10
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will hold a lecture on "Being Alone Dealing
with the holiday season" from 11 a.m. to noon.
This program is free and open to the public.
Call 932-4200. ext. 213 for more information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 1C
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 26th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will hold an intergenerational Sukkoth
Celebration at 11 a.m. with the Jewish High
School of South Florida. Students and seniors
will share in traditional food, prayers and
ceremonies. This program is free and open to
the public. Call 932-4200, ext. 213 for more
information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 16
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
"ceniUe' Children's Department will hold a
bukkah Raising" event. The event will be fun
qi., twho|e family, so come and decorate the
aukkah and join us for a 6 p.m. barbeque din-
"er Reservations required. The cost is $2.50.
Call 251-1394 for more information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 16
1 he Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, North Miami Beach Auxiliary will have
open meeting at the A venture Jewish
Center beginning at noon. Call 751-8626 for
more information.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue, in conjunction with the Kendall Even-
ing Division of the National Council of Jewish
Women is sponsoring a "Candidates Night."
This special evening will give the community
an opportunity to ask questions and discuss the
issues facing the local and national community
during the upcoming elections. This program is
free and open to the community. Call 251-1394
for more information.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1C
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 26th Avenue, will hold a mini-workshop
on "European Jewry, Before the Holocaust,
beginning at 7:30 p.m. This workshop will pre-
sent a potpourri of culture, history, and tradi-
tion prevalent during this fascinating era. The
cost is free to JCC members, $3 for non-
members. Call 932-4200 for more information.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, South Dade Friends Alpha-Quest will
begin at the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center, 12401
S.W. 102nd Avenue at 7:00 p.m. and end at the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged,
151 N.e. 52nd Street at 9:30 p.m. with dinner.
Contact Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for more
information.
MONDAY. OCTOBER 20
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will hold a general membership meeting of the
local chapter of the American Association of
Retired Persons beginning at 10:30 a.m. Call
the JCC at 932-4200, ext. 213 for more
information.
MONDAYS BEGINNING OCTOBER 20
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will hold a class in conjunction with Miami
Dade Community College, North Campus,
"International Relations Behind the
Headlines." This course is free and open to the
public. Call 932-4200 for more information.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 26th Avenue, Cultural Arts Department
will hold a workshop on "Antiques" beginning
at 8 p.m. The cost is free to JCC members, $3
for non-members. Call 932-4200 for more
information.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, Junior Auxiliary will hold an open
meeting at the Singapore Hotel on Miami
Beach beginning at noon. Call 751-8626 for
more information.
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 22
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, 161 N.E. 52nd Street, will hold a
meeting of the Planned Gifts Council Cocktail
Party in the Ruby Auditorium beginning at
4:00 p.m. Contact Lou Fischer at 751-8626 for
more information.
WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 22
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 26th Avenue will hold a lecture about Tay
Sachs. Testing will also be available. This pro-
gram, which begins at 7:30 p.m., is free and
open to the community. Call 932-4200 for more
information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 23
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged. 151 N.E. 52nd Street, Greater Miami
Women's Auxiliary Board Meeting will be held
at noon. Contact Steffi Cohen at 751-8626 for
more information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 23
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue will present a show, "The Funniest
Mind Reader in the World," beginning 7:30
p.m. Harold Collins performs a funny, mind-
boggling show featuring feats of ESP with
humor and wit. The coat for JCC Members is
$2; non-members, $4- for more information
call 2511394.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 26
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged will hold a Board of Directors Meeting in
the Ruby Auditorium beginning at 10:00 a.m.
MONDAY. OCTOBER 27
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center. 18900
N.E. 26th Avenue will hold a self-defense
workshop for adults. This seminar is both a lec-
ture and a demonstration, so please wear com-
fortable clothes. The cost is free to JCC
members, $3 for non-members. Contact the
Center at 932-4200 for more information. The
program begins at 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 28
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue, Children's Department, will present,
Dr. Michael Epstein, a prominent child
psychologist who will talk about discipline and
the general well being of children. A question
and answer session will follow the discussion.
RSVP required. The program is free and open
to the community. Call 251-1394 for more
information.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue, Jewish Singles Network and Adult
Department will hold a lecture on 'Terrorism
How Vulnerable are We?", beginning at 7:30
p.m. with Dr. Bernard Schecterman, professor
and former chairperson of the Department of
Politics and Public Affairs at the Graduate
School of International Studies at the Universi-
ty of Miami. Dr. Schecterman is a United
States government consultant and lecturer.
Free for .ICC members; non-members, $2.
Please call 261-1394 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will go to Gusman Theater to see the O.D.C.
San Francisco Dance Company. The bus
departs the Center at 10:45 a.m. Tickets must
be purchased by October 20. Call the JCC at
932-4200. Cost is $3.60 for JCC members,
$5.50 for non-members.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital For The
Aged, Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary New
Year's Project Luncheon will be held at the
Harbor House in Bal Harbour at noon. Call
751-8626 for more information.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
The Brandeis University National Woman's
Committee, Miami Beach Chapter will hold its
open meeting at 10 a.m., lunch at noon. Study
Group Showcase program at 1 p.m. at Harbour
House South, 10275 Collins Avenue in Bal Har-
bour. Call Sarah Schwartz at 865-5252 for
reservations.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue will hold a "Birthday Party
for Houdini." Children are welcome to this lec-
ture which will demonstrate what happens
behind the scenes of a magic show. The pro-
gram begins at 7:30 p.m. and is free to JCC
members, $3 for non-members. Call 932-4200
for more information.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 30
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
will go to see "Brighton Beach Memoirs," a
play by Neil Simon presented by the Ruth For-
man Theater. Tickets must be paid for no later
than October 17. Cost is $9.60 for JCC
members, $11.60 for non-members. Transpor-
tation available at an additional fee of $3. Call
the JCC at 932-4200. ext. 213 for more
information.
EVERY SUNDAY
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, will hold Israel Dancing
every Sunday evening from 7:30-10:30 p.m.
The first half hour offers beginners an oppor
tunity to learn. The cost is $2 for JCC
members. $3 for non-members. Call 932-4200
for more information.
MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department
holds Canasta Club meetings every Monday
and Thursday from 12:15 p.m. until 3 p.m.
Refreshments are served. Free the JCC
members, $1 for non-members. Call 932-4200,
ext. 213 for more information.
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS
The Sports Medicine Institute at Mount Sinai
Medical Center is conducting morning walks
and providing participants with professional
advice on walking properly, selecting the
rights shoes, doing warm-up exercises and
much more. Participants would meet at the en-
trance to the Miami Beach Boardwalk on 46th
Street and Collins Avenue at 7 a.m. For more
information call 674-2787.
EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue, Jewish Singles Network will meet at 9
p.m. at Don Carter Kendall Lanes for their
weekly "Network Bowling League." The
leagues are growing. For more information call
Jodye at 251-1394.
EVERY TUESDAY EVENING
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue, will present "Women In Touch,"
every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. This program is a
weekly discussion/support group for single,
divorced and newly divorced women of all
ages, and is a perfect opportunity for women to
develop friendships, discuss personal issues,
and offer support in a non-threatening environ-
ment. The program will be facilitated oy Elaine
Getzow, Ed. D Counseling Psychologist. Tne
cost for .ICC members is $2; non-members, $3.
Call 251-1394 for more information.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue, Senior Adult Department,
holds "Bagels and Bingo" every Wednesday
from noon until 2 p.m. This is a fun filled after-
noon to nibble and nosh, play Bingo and talk to
friends. The cost is $2.50 for JCC members,
$3.50 for non-members. Call 932-4200, ext. 213
for more information.
EVERY OTHER THURSDAY
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue holds "Jerusalem Club" meetings, a
social club providing our area's mentally han-
dicapped adults with a chance to meet new
fnends and socialize. It will provide an oppor-
tunity for Club members to chat, play games,
bowl, go out to the movies, learn more about
Jewish culture and holidays, and experience
the pleasure of being a Jewish adult in the com-
pany of other Jews. The club meets at 7 p.m.
The membership fee is $15. Call 261-1394 for
more information.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree
Drive will hold an Exer-Flex class for adults
every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from
9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The class features energetic
exercises choreographed to fast-paced music
and is designed to maintain flexibility, increase
muscle tone and improve cardiovascular en-
durance. The cost is $3 per class for JCC
members; $4 per class for non-members. For
those who cannot attend in the morning, there
is an alternate schedule. Tuesday and Thurs-
day evening from 7-8 p.m. The cost is the same.
Call 534-3206 for more information.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar Items
(Please Print or Type)
Deadline for November events is October 10.
Organization
Event
Place.
Day _
Date.
Time.
) a.m. ( ) p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No..
MAILTO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
Federation, October 1986 15


- .
Academy
Arthur Goldstein, center, with students of the Arthur and Anna Goldstein
Hebrew Academy of South Dads.
Holocaust Center
to begin
interviewer
training
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center is pleased to announce
that Josephine Knopp, Ph.D., has joined
its staff as director of Holocaust Educa-
tion. Dr. Knopp will plan educational pro-
grams for all levels of education and for
all types of institutions within our com-
munity. She will enhance the develop-
ment of the Resource Center and Ar-
chives, which contain Holocaust materials
and memorabilia.
Dr. Knopp most recently served as
senior educational outreach associate at
the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los
Angeles and as associate professor in the
Department of Philosophy at Claremont
McKenna College in Claremont, Califor-
nia. She was the director of education and
research at the National Institute on the
Holocaust from 1976-1980.
Dr. Knopp has published the following
books: The Trial of Judaism in Contem-
porary Jewish Writing; Mysticism,
Nihilism, Feminism; New Critical
Essays on the Theology of Simone Weil;
and a translation of In Memoriam: A
History of the Greek Jews ofSolonika. She
is currently working on two manuscripts:
Elie Wiesel, Literary Theologian and
Judaism and Christianity: Contem-
porary Religious Issues. She has also
written and published many articles.
Over the past 12 years, Dr. Knopp has
been invited to speak at conferences and
colleges throughout the United States.
She taught philosophy, comparative
literature, Holocaust and religion at the
University of Illinois, Temple University
and University of Wisconsin, and was in-
vited professor at Syracuse University
and Haverford College. She has been reci-
pient of national grants from Harvard
University, Tufts University and the
Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture.
Those interested in Holocaust educa-
tion programs should call the Center of-
fice at 940-5690.
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center is a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal. Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and the Holocaust
Memorial Center. Partners in a caring
community.
The newest kid on the block is only
"sorta' new as a beneficiary agency of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Established in July of this year, the Ar-
thur and Anna Goldstein Hebrew
Academy of South Dade opened its doors
to over 100 preschool through 6th grade
students in early September. The school,
which offers a traditional philosophy, car-
ries on the sixteen year legacy of its
predecessor, the South Dade Hebrew
Academy.
The immediate neighborhood is a
friendly and familiar one to the new
Goldstein Hebrew Academy. Sharing the
campus of the South Dade Jewish
Community Center and the South Dade
Branch of Federation, with its move to
12401 S.W. 102 Avenue last year, the
school's visibility and acessibility had
already been enhanced. Now, as the
Goldstein Hebrew Academy, President
Ron Kriss, "anticipates even greater
awareness and community involvement in
the continuing development of the school
in South Dade."
Kriss' cousin 90 year old nearly-blind
Arthur Goldstein, who never had children
of his own and resides in Brooklyn, N.Y.
is the benefactor of the school which is
now named for himself and his late wife
Anna. Attending a dedication dinner in
his honor early this past summer, Golds-
tein also had the opportunity to tow a,
school faohty and spend some time Jh
the students. Despite his frail healS
'"creasing years, Goldstein's enjowZ
of the children who benefit K2
gracious gift was in no way impeded.
students equally enjoyed Goldstein's via?
The school may be the newest kid on the
block but it already has made many new
friends. With these friends and a K
of making a whole lot more, the Goldstem
Academy will succeed in attaining 2
goals: helping each child to achieve his or
her highest academic achievement while
developing as individuals, committed
Jews, and proud and concerned
Americans.
Having the involvement of dedicated
parents and community leaders, the pro-
fessional direction of newly appointed Ex-
ecutive Director Dori Goldman and Ac-
ting Principal Gayle Berger, and the con-
tinuing guidance of Spiritual Leader Rab-
bi Ralph G. Glixman, the Goldstein
Hebrew Academy has become, in just a
few months, a permanent resident of the
South Dade Jewish community.
The Goldstein Hebrew Academy is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal. Goldstein Hebrew Academy and
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Partners in a caring community.
16 Federation, October 1986
When you pay your pledge
here's the change.
Not nickels and dimes. Or even shekels. But real change.
'to^^^^'1 f Ur *<** and brought
Change that turns a slum into a thriving neighborhood.
Change that helps an unemployed father learn a new skill.
Change that promises a future for the people of Israel.
So please. Pay your pledge. You'll feel good about the change.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Combined Jewish Appeal
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
(305) 576-4000
o
_________________One People, One Destiny
J


Full Text
Friday, October 3, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-D
U.S. And Its West European Allies To Press Soviet Bloc
On Human Rights
While the plight of Soviet Jewry
was not specifically mentioned by
either Reagan or Redman, it has
been brought up by the U.S. and
other Western countries, with
specific names mentioned, at the
previous follow-up conferences in
Belgrade in 1977-78 and Madrid
1980-83.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The United States and its
West European allies will
press the Soviet bloc on
human rights in a con-
ference that opened in Vien-
na last Tuesday (Sept. 23),
the State Department said.
The U.S., Canada and 33 Euro-
pean nations are meeting in Vien-
na for two weeks to prepare for a
follow-up to the 1975 Helsinki Ac-
cords in Vienna on Nov. 4. The
follow-up and a conference which
ended in Stockholm Monday
(Sept. 22) were scheduled at the
end of the Helsinki review con-
ference in Madrid in 1983.
"THE U.S. and its allies will
seek improved compliance by the
East with all the principles of
Helsinki and Madrid," State
Department deputy spokesman
Charles Redman said.
He said at the meeting the West
will seek an agenda for the Nov. 4
meeting that will address the full
range of issues covered by the
Helsinki Final Act "which
represents a framework for seek-
ing to resolve the humanitarian,
economic and security issues that
divide Europe."
Redman said the Stockholm
conference was an integral part of
the broader process which
"recognizes the interrelationship
between peace and freedom in
Europe." At Stockholm an agree-
ment was reached for exchanges
of information about military ex-
ercises and for inspection of troop
movements between NATO and
Warsaw Pact countries.
But Redman stressed that dur-
ing the two-week gathering the
West will discuss "promises made
and promises kept." He said that
"in particular, concrete steps by
the East to resolve problems in
the areas of human rights and
humanitarian concerns are
needed."
PRESIDENT REAGAN, in his
speech to the United Nations
General Assembly last week
noted that while Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev has recently
spoken of military, political and
economic issues, he has not
discussed human rights. Reagan
said human rights is "the first
obligation of government and the
source of its legitimacy" as well as
"the foundation stone in any
structure of world peace."
"Commitments were made
more than 10 years ago in
Helsinki concerning these rights
and their recognition," Reagan
said. "We need only look to the
East today to see how sadly un-
fulfilled those commitments are.
The persecution of scientists,
religious leaders, peace activists,
political dissenters and other
prisoners of conscience continues
unabated behind the Iron
Curtain."

FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS
May you receive
the blessings of happiness,
the best of health and peace
throughout the New Year.
Senator Paula Hawkins
Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Paula Hawkins. Republican.


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Page 8-D The Jewish Florkhan/Friday, October 3. 1986
A Conversation with
Author /Activist
-Marek Halter
Within weeks of publication. The Book of
Abraham.' by Marek Halter, became a best-seller
in the United States, duplicating its earber success
in Prance. The norel. soon to be a television mini-
series, fictionalises 2.000 years of Jewish history
from the perspective of a single family. Halter,
who survived the Warsaw ghetto and eventually
settled in France, is a successful painter as well as
a political activist, devoting his prodigious
energies to the Middle East conflict, anti-
Semitism, hunger. Cathobc-Jewish relations, the
Soviet dissident movement, racism and politics op-
pression in South America. He was recently inter-
viewed by Aron Hirt-Manheimer. editor of
'Reform Judaism.' published by the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
Marek Halter icenteri. political actimtt and author of "The Book of Abraham," leads
demonstration at Bitburg.
To
gnat
what da tn attribute the
Jewish readers are curious
about their history. We know the
bible through the celebrations of
oar festivals. We know the
Holocaust, if not through books,
through television- We know a lit-
tle about Jewish life in Poland
thanks to Isaac Basbevis Singer.
But the rest is a 2,000-year void.
What was the daily life of the Jew
like in North Africa or Prance in
the fifth or sixth century? I tried
to answer that.
Why not
Because I am not a philosopher,
I'm a storyteller. Like the Haacbc
rabbis. I believe it is sjsjjsjl to
transmit knowledge through
stories. My role is to ask
Why a
first
For some authors, the process
of writing is important. I belong
instead to the Jewish tradition of
scribes, of witnesses. Each human
experience can be useful to the
whole of humanity. Historically.
even very small Jewish com-
munities had a Jewish scribe who
preserved daily hfe. For them,
what was important was the
transmission of knowledge, not
the process of writing. This is the
difference between me and
rlassjrsl writers. I will write ss
long as I have something to
transmit. If. one day. I find that I
have nothing more to say. I will
stop writing. My political and
literary motivations are the same:
remember, remember.
Da yos fcaikvi that Jews are
I to play a special role ia
Is French aati-Sestitisi
s
I don't believe that Jews are
better than other people, but we
have been entrusted with a great
treasure, the law. and its is our
task to preserve H. I spent two
years in the Warsaw ghetto.
Because I survived, I bebeve I
have a duty to help other suffering
people today. To my mind, that is
the fHitial idea behind Judaism.
We are obliged to remember
that we were slaves in Egypt, not
because we are still slaves, but
because other people are still
enslaved. We cannot be fully
liberated as long as other people
are not free. We are the keepers
of the essential ethical treasure of
humanity. We are scribes,
witnesses. We have some
knowledge about evil. Our duty is
to transmit that knowledge.
What is the state of Preach
Jewry?
Among non-Jews in Prance
there is a growing interest in
Judaism. People sre now return-
ing to moral values, to the Ten
Commandments, which leads to
an interest in Judaism. Last year
we organized a month-long
celebration of Judaism at the Sor-
bonne. and 32,000 people, in-
cluding leading politicians and
celebrities, attended. Thousands
of non-Jews paid to listen to
discussions about Jews and
Judaism.
Racism and anti-Semitism wul
be around forever, or at least until
the Messiah comes. Jews unders-
tand the permanency of evil, of
violence. It is the destiny of
human beings. So we are vigilant
in Prance, where I helped found
the movement called SOS Racism
that numbers two million
members, the majority of whom
sre non-Jews.
When we organized a concert
against Russian anti-Semitism,
we had 400.000 people singing
and dancing, the majority non-
Jews. Yet at the same time, the
National Party of Jean-Marie Le
Pen obtained nine percent in re-
cent elections. 35 deputies in the
Parliament. It is the first time
since the war that a fascistic, anti-
Semitic, racist party has been
elected. So we have reason to be
vigilant.
Caa
mm tell
with Y
ie of
Arafat?
When we met, I told him be had
to declare his willingness to go to
Jerusalem, to recognize and live in
peace with Israel, to stop the ter-
ror. Israel is not ready to talk to
me, be said. I told him that Jewish
mothers, hke Palestinian mothers,
don't want to see their children
lolled in another war.
If you make such a statement of
reconciliation. I told him, I will
organize demonstrations in Israel,
asking the government to receive
you. But if I do this, be said. I will
be killed by Dr. Habash. If you are
afraid to be killed for the future of
your people. I told him, you will
never be head of a free Palestinian
nation.
Elie Wiesel has written aboat
how sarvivars, instead of seek-
iag revenge after the liberation.
fonaed into groans to call far a
new haxtaaitariaa order. How
do yoa explain that'
Those who survived, who saw
the evil. have a duty to do what
they can to change the world.
When Afghanistan was occupied
by Soviet troops, I said to my
friends, we must do something.
Regardless of whether we like the
Afghan people or its leaders, it is
unacceptable for a superpower to
overrun a small country, as Hitler
did Czechoslovakia. We accepted
that then and look what happen-
ed. So a group of us made an ap-
peal in the newspapers and raised
funds to buy a radio station.
In 1962. we traveled to Pakistan
and walked 100 kilometers over
the border to deliver the station to
the rebels. When we met with the
leaden of the Afghan resistance,
one of them said. "Our main
enemies are the Soviet Union and
Israel." "Why Israel?" I asked.
"Because Israel is against Islam."
be said. I then said. "First, Israel
is not your enemy, and second, I
am a Jew." So be asked. 'Then
what are you doing here?" I said.
"I am here because of Jewish prin-
ciples." "Then," he said, "we are
brothers." Radio Free Kabul is
still on the air. telling the world of
the Soviet genocide there.
Da you hebtve that a single in -
dividaal caa saake a difference
ia the world?
I bebeve that a human being can
change history. Jewish history'
proves it again and again.
UoS. Warns That The Return Of PLO Terrorists To South Lebanon
Will Increase The Tension In The Area
By DAVID FRIE DM AN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
warned Thursday (Sept. 25)
that the increasing return to
Lebanon of Palestine
Liberation Organization ter-
rorists will increase the ten-
sion in the already volatile
sooth Lebanon.
The reason for the
Israeli raids on terrorist bases in
Lebanon is behoved to be based an
evidence that Palestinian ter-
rorists, driven out by Israel m
1982. sre infiltrating back eJoaer
to Beirut and the coastal highway
that links the city with southern
Lebanon. There have been reports
that there are as many as 8.000
Palestinians in various parts of
ASKED ABOUT this last
Thursday. State Department
deputy pnfc Charles Red-
man said. "Tnere have been
reports over the past several
years that Palestinian fighters of
factions, tatting advan-
! of umlsaml cm) strife, have
been drifting back to Lebanon."
He said be could not confirm if the
8.000 estimate was correct.
'Obviously the return to
Lebanon of armed personnel, of
whatever faction can only
damage the prospects for ending
the cycle of violence." Redman ad-
ded. "It cannot help efforts to
restore Lebanese unity,
sovereignty and independence
and to bring about njajjsajsj
reronfiharton."
On a related issue, Redman ap-
peared ambiguous over whether
the United States supported
Israel Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir's charge that Syria and
Iran were behind much of the
violence in south Lebanon.
"Damascus and Teheran have
criticised the Israeli presence in
south Lebanon," be said. "Both
have expressed support for at-
tacks on Israeli forces and on the
^outh Lebanon Army."
AT THE same time, he noted
that Syria has "expressed its sup-
port" for the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL)
while Iran opposed UNIFTL.
"Our position is dear." Redman
said. "Support for acts of violence
are harmful to efforts to achieve
stability in south Lebanon.
The U.S. position on south
Lebanon is that the parties to the
conflict must reach an agreement
that wfll ensure stability for south
Lebanon and security for nor-
thern Israel. This position was
restated last Tuesday when the
U.S. abstained from a UN Securi-
ty Council vote calling on Israel to
withdraw all its forces from south
Lebanon and to allow UNIFIL to
extend its activities to the Israeli
border.