The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03005

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T "dfewlslb Floridlia-mi
Volume 59 Number 36
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, September 5,1986
FnlSlMKhrt m.m.i. Si "
Price 50 Cents
Better Than in U.S.
Demjanjuk's Family Praises His Treatment
John Demjanjuk
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The family of John Demjan-
juk, the Ukrainian-born
autoworker accused of sen-
ding thousands of Jews to
their deaths at the Nazis'
Treblinka death camp, has
praised the treatment he is
receiving from Israeli
authorities.
According to the World Jewish
Congress, the Ukrainian-
American press is giving exten-
sive coverage to the recently com-
pleted visit by Demjanjuk's family
to Ramla prison, where Demjan-
juk has been held since his extradi-
tion from the United States on
Feb. 28.
THE CURRENT issue of The
Ukrainian Weekly, for example
reports that Demjanjuk's son-in-
law, Edward Nishnic, told the
newspaper that Demjanjuk "is
treated well," adding that he
"looked tanned and fit" and "is
well, both physically and
psychologically." Demjanjuk's
daughter Irene agreed that her
father looked "robust."
According to Nishnic, Demjan-
juk is actually receiving better
treatment in Israel than he did in
the United States. He cited the
fact that Demjanjuk, who has
been identified by survivors and
by a former SS man as Treblinka's
infamous "Ivan the Terrible," is
allowed into the prison courtyard
for an hour each day.
At the federal penitentiary in
Springfield, Mo., Demjanjuk had
been held for a full year without
being allowed outside, Nishnic
said.
During their visit to Israel,
Demjanjuk's family held what
they characterized as "amiable"
meetings with Israeli officials.
Israeli prison regulations ordinari-
ly allow families a 30-minute visit
with prisoners once a week.
However, in light of what a prison
spokesman called "the special cir-
cumstances" of Demjanjuk's case,
his family was granted two-hour
visits, twice a week.
Europe Awaits Palestinian Influx
By HENRIETTE BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA)
Hundreds of thousands of
Palestinians may soon pour
into Western Europe re-
questing asylum like the
current wave of Sri Lankan
Tamils, according to former
Dutch parliamentarian Jan
Nico Scholten.
Scholten's comments are con-
tained in a report on the absorp-
tion of refugees he presented in
his capacity as chairman of the
Netherlands Society for Refugees
(WN).
In the report, the former
parliamentarian said that coun-
tries which have taken in Palesti-
nians in the Middle East are now
increasingly less prepared to ac-
commodate them.
FOR SAUDI ARABIA, the
drop in oil prices has prompted
authorities to refuse permanent
residence to Palestinians and
other foreigners who had been
fortunate enough to find employ-
ment there. Lebanon is no longer
prepared to admit Palestinian
refugees and Syria, too. has
become increasingly unattractive.
Scholten said the only possibili-
ty remaining open to the Palesti-
nians is Western Europe. So far,
Continued on Page 2-A
Armand
Hammer:
Only Quiet Diplomacy
Will Work With Soviets
Waldheim Affair
Behind the Souring
Of Israel, Austria
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
VIENNA (JTA) Un-
til the fierce controversy
[engendered by Kurt
I Waldheim's wartime record
j broke into print, Israel and
j Austria had been quietly im-
| proving their relationship.
Under the leadership of former
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky,
[Austria adopted an activist Middle
East policy, championing the
[rights of the Palestinians and
[becoming the first Western Euro-
pean country to recognize the
LO.
During this turbulent period,
Austria was critical of a whole
range of Israeli policies, and
Kreisky a Jew by birth but a
Socialist and an atheist by convic-
tion was often in the vanguard
of lambasting the administration
of Menachem Begin, a man he also
scorned on a personal level.
AFTER KREISKYS retire
ment three years ago, and his suc-
cession by Fred Sinowatz, whose
interest in the Middle East was
minimal compared to that of his
predecessor, the climate in Israeli-
Austrian relations improved.
Continued on Page 11-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
American oil magnate Ar-
mand Hammer said here
that he was convinced that
only quiet diplomacy would
open the doors of the Soviet
Union to Russian Jewry
emigration.
Hammer, who was to meet
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
in Moscow this week, was speak-
ing to reporters after receiving an
honorary degree from Tel Aviv
University.
He said he intended speaking to
Gorbachev about permitting
direct flights from Moscow to Tel
Aviv to bring Soviet Jewish im-
migrants directly to Israel. "We
want to stem the dropping out, so
that Soviet Jews wall see how
Israel prospers before they make
irrevocable decisions about settl-
ing elsewhere," he said.
HAMMER, 88, has been deal-
ing with every Soviet leader since
Lenin. He noted that the Soviets
had permitted over 51,000 Jews to
leave in one year 1979 when
the Carter Administration was
pursuing its detente policy.
He said that Hungarian leaders
had recently mentioned the
feasibility of flights for Soviet
Jews via Budapest to Israel. He
said he had also heard Bucharest
mentioned as a possible transit
point.
Hammer said he was not taking
any message from Prime Minister
Shimon Peres to Gorbachev, but
said he would tell the Soviet
leader of Israel's strong desire for
peace.
Hammer said his business af-
fairs in Israel would now concen-
trate on oil exploration. "If
there's oil here and my
geologists say there is my com-
pany will find it," he said. Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, who spoke at the
University ceremony, made what
was regarded as one of his most
conciliatory statements to date
about the Soviet Union, praising
its role in fighting Nazism during
World War II, and stressing that
the recent meeting between
Soviet and Israeli officials in
Continued on Page 2-A
In Brazil
Jews Await Elections in November
Kurt Waldheim
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
SAO PAULO (JTA) -
As Brazil approaches its
first elections in the context
of "re-democratization,"
after more than 20 con-
secutive years of rule by
military dictatorship, Sao
Paulo's small but vibrant
Jewish community is reflec-
ting on its past involvement
and future role in social
justice and human rights
issues.
Because candidates elected to
the federal legislature on Nov. 15
will also be the drafters of Brazil's
new Constitution, this year's elec-
tions are of special significance.
Brazil's Jewish community of
about 150,000 could be considered
insignificant in a country of 130
million. But most of the members
of the Jewish community are part
of Brazil's economic elite, which is
only five percent of the
population.
EIGHTY PERCENT of the
people in Brazil are completely
left out of the country's economic
development. Thus, the impact of
the Jewish community is
somewhat greater than its small
Continued on Page 6-A
Yitzhak Shamir
Shamir
Says
Troops Must
Stay In
S. Lebanon
TEL AVTV (JTA) Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir said that Premier
Shimon Peres' visit to Cameroon
was a "landmark of progress of
renewed ties with Africa.''
He also said, during a tour of
the security zone in south
Lebanon where he met with
Israeli soldiers serving there,
"The value of the (Peres) trip is in
increasing Israel's presence on
the African continent. I strongly
hope that additional steps will
follow the present one, and that
our ties with Africa will grow, as
they did until now I only hope
the pace will accelerate. Addi-
tional progress is expected. The
visit is one of the landmarks."
On another matter, Shamir told
the Israeli soldiers that the Syrian
threat was a permanent
phenomenon against which Israel
must always be prepared. But he
added that the Israel Defense
Force would not remain in the
Continued on Page 8-A



Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
After 13 Years
Cameroon Resumes Ties With Israel
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
President Paul Biya of
Cameroon announced Tues-
day (Aug. 26) that his coun-
try was resuming diplomatic
relations with Israel 13
years after it had severed
ties after the Yom Kippur
War. The announcement
capped the two-day visit by
Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres, the first Israeli
Premier to visit Cameroon
since 1966.
Peres and Biya held several
rounds of talks on bilateral mat-
ters last Monday, and on Tuesday
they announced that cooperative
agreements had been reached on
trade, industry, agriculture,
tourism and security. There was
no immediate indication that
agreement had been reached on
Israeli military aid to Cameroon,
although this issue was an ex-
pected topic on the Peres-Biya
agenda.
AT A MEETING with
reporters, Biya said that
Cameroon's decision to restore
ties with Israel was the result of
ongoing relations between the
two countries during the past few
years. According to Israeli of-
Only Hebrew Teacher
In Cuba Has 10 Students
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Moises Asis is the only
teacher of Hebrew and
Judaism in Cuba today.
Late last year he organized
a course of Jewish studies,
and 10 children currently
meet with him every
Sunday.
To encourage Sis voluntary
educational work wiyi Havana's
T
Palestinians
Eye Europe
Continued froa Page 1-A
only a handful jfiave come to
Holland because^fhe country has
an image qf/being friendly to
Israel. But jff the situation for the
Palestinians worsened, they could
come hejfe in greater numbers.
Scfc^iten said that the sole
Wfeans of avoiding such an influx
would be for Holland to renew ef-
fort* to finding a political solution
to the Palestinian problem.
SCHOLTEN SERVED as an
MP for many years, first for the
Christian Democrats and then for
Labor and finally for a group con-
sisting only of himself and one
other parliamentarian. He failed
to secure backing from any party
for last May's parliamentary elec-
tions. The former MP is widely
viewed here as an advocate of the
Palestinian cause.
Asylum applications here have
risen steeply from 400 in 1975 to
6,500 last year. Recently, only a
small percentage of the applica-
tions have been granted, but ap-
plicants have the right to stay in
Holland until their application has
been dealt with.
Quiet
Diplomacy
Continued from Page 1-A
Helsinki had been sought by
Moscow.
SHAMIR NOTED that Ham-
mer was unique in that he was the
only person who enjoyed friend-
ship with both Vladimir Lenin and
Menachem Begin.
Hammer said that while in the
Soviet Union he would try to ob-
tain data and evidence requested
by Israel about suspected war
criminal John Demjanjuk, believ-
ed to be the notorious "Ivan the
Terrible" guard at the Treblinka
death camp.
Hammer met before the univer-
sity ceremony with Peres and
reportedly discussed with him the
laying of a gas pipeline between
Egypt and Israel, a project in
which the American oil tycoon
said he intends to invest.
Jewish youth, the Conference on
Alternatives in Jewish Education
invited Asis to its recent meeting
at University of Maryland. The
trip was arranged by a network of
American Jewish friends, who had
met Asis while on trips to Cuba,
beginning in 1978.
RANGING IN age from 4 to 11.
Asis" students learn Hebrew, the
meaning of holidays, Jewish
history and symbolism. Most of
the children in his class had no
previous involvement with the
Jewish community, Asis told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency dur-
ing his visit to New York. His
youngest student is his own
daughter.
Asis. who says his knowledge of
Judaism is generally self-taught,
learned Hebrew at the Zionist
Union of Cuba, which existed until
1978. He continues his studies at
the library of the Casa de la Com-
unidad Hebrea de Cuba, a Havana
communal organization which also
houses a synagogue and meeting
rooms. The Cuban Jewish com-
munity of about 1000 has four
other synagogues, all in Havana.
Asis credits the Lubavitch
movement with convincing local
Jewish parents to have their
children study Judaism. In the
past one-and-a-half years there
have been three visits to Havana
by a Chabad Lubavitch rabbi, he
said. Other rabbis from the United
States, Mexico and Canada have
also visited the community, which
does not have its own rabbi.
AT THE CAJE convention,
Asis obtained materials on in-
novative teaching methods, and
was able to share ideas with col-
leagues. He also led a workshop
on Jewish life in Cuba.
Asis says he would like to be
able to devote more time to
teaching Jewish youth. Currently
an information scientist with the
Ministry of Agriculture, he has
free time only on Sundays.
The son of a member of the
Communist Party, Asis, 33, says
he had no religious training at
home. His interest in Judaism
began with an intellectual interest
in his roots, he said. His grand
parenta were Sephardic Jews who
came to Cuba from Turkey at the
beginning of this century.
Big Summer Ulpan
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's largest summer ulpan has
opened at the Roth berg School for
Overseas Students of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, with an
enrollment of over 800 students
from all over the world. The
students come from North and
South America, Western Europe,
Africa and Australia, and from
Thailand and other countries in
the Far East.
ficials. the two countries have had
secret trade relations since 1981.
When Biya took power in 1983.
Israel was allowed to establish an
interest section in Yaounde, the
capital of Cameroon. Since then,
Cameroon re-evaluated the situa-
tion of Israeli-black African rela-
tions Biya said.
He noted that African nations
broke relations with Israel
because of its occupation of the
Sinai Peninsula. However, now
that Egypt and Israel have signed
a peace treaty and Sinai has been
returned, there is no reason for
African nations not to resume
relations with Israel, Biya said.
CAMEROON IS the fourth
black African nation after Ivory
Coast, Liberia and Zaire to
resume relations with Israel.
Twenty-nine African countries
severed ties with Israel under
Arab pressure in the wake of the
1973 Yom Kippur War. Only
Lesotho, Malawi and Swaziland
continued relations.
Israel also has "semi-
diplomatic" relations, at the in-
terest section level, with the
states of Gabon, Ghana. Kenya
and Togo. Gabon and Togo are
regarded in Israel as the most
likely to resume full relations
soon.
At a joint conference last Tues-
day, at the end of Peres' visit
shortly before his departure for
Israel, a nine-hour flight, Biya an
the Israeli Premier both condemn-
ed the apartheid policy of the
government of South Africa, and
expressed concern over events in
that country.
Biya announced that he had ac-
cepted an invitation by Peres to
visit Israel. He thanked Israel for
the speedy medical relief it ex-
tended to his country following
the volcanic gas explosion near
Lake Nios, about 240 miles nor-
theast of Yaounde, which killed an
estimated 1,500 people, according
to unofficial reports.
PERES' VISIT to Cameroon
was marked by a lavish reception
tendered by Biya and by extensive
greetings by thousands of
Cameroonians who were at the
Yaounde airport when Peres ar-
rived. Some of them, who had
studied in Israel previously,
greeted Peres with shalom. A
special issue of the Cameroon
Tribune was published with Peres'
picture on the front page and a
headline in Hebrew saying, "Mr.
Peres, Welcome to Cameroon."
The Hebrew letters, however,
were printed upside down.
On his return to Israel, Peres
sought to stop in Kenya for a
public meeting with President
Daniel Arap-Moi, but the Kenyan
leader refused to do so, according
to a report in Haaretz.
ADL Prods
Red Cross
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti -Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has called on the Interna-
tional Red Cross to rescind its
policy of non-recognition of
Magen David Adorn, the Israeli
equivalent of the Red Cross,
because it uses a red Star of David
as its symbol instead of a cross. In
a letter to the DtC, ADL's na-
tional chairman, Burton S. Levin-
son, said that the 25th Quadren-
nial International Red Cross Con-
ference in Geneva in October "will
be an opportunity to redress this
festering injustice and accord the
Magen David Adorn its rightful
place among the other represen-
tatives of the International
League of Red Cross Societies."
The West Point Jewish chapel has received the '1987 Award for
Design Excellence.' An exterior view of the chapel's towering
sanctuary shows that it is faced with rough hewn granite, pro-
viding a powerful monumental presence in keeping with the
traditional military Gothic architecture of West Point.
Israel Not Imposing Prior
Conditions on Soviets Peres
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Prime Minister Shimon
Peres indicated this week
that Israel was not imposing
conditions on the Soviet re-
quest to send a consular
mission to Jerusalem.
Speaking to reporters during a
tour of Afula, Peres said Israel is
negotiating out of a sense of
mutuality, which he called an ac-
cepted principle in diplomacy.
Asked if Israel made an Israeli
consular mission to Moscow and
freedom of emigration for Soviet
Jews conditions for granting the
Soviet consular request, Peres
replied: "I don't think one should
approach every negotiation with
an ultimatum in his hand. It is not
necessary it is mutuality, not
conditional."
PERES SAID Soviet
negotiators "asked for some
points" during their meeting Aug.
18 with Israeli negotiatorss "and
we are also asking for some
points. This is the normal way to
negotiate."
Peres and his colleagues were
criticized last week by Natan
Sharansky and members of the
Tehiya Party, following uncon-
firmed press reports that Israel
was not demanding an Israeli con-
sular mission to Moscow as a con-
dition for receiving a Soviet mis-
sion in Israel.
On another matter, the Premier
said that when he meets Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak in Alex-
andria, he would take "three
no's" with him. He was referring
to the Arab League's "three no's"
at the Khartoum Conference of
some years ago: no recognition of
Israel, no negotiation with Israel
and no peace with Israel. But
Peres said his no's would be "no
war, no terrorism and no refusal
to negotiate."
ACCEPTING honorary citizen-
ship of Afula, Peres attacked
government bureaucracy for
wasting millions of dollars, and
said people should be paid a fair
rate for their work, rather than
having to speculate on the stock
market.
He praised the residents of
Afula for trying to maintain good
relations with their Arab
neighbors, despite frequent
murderous terrorist attacks on
residents during the past year or
so.
Terrorism Down
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Palestinian terrorism in Israel
decreased significantly since Jor-
dan closed the PLO offices in Jor-
dan, Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin declared Aug. 19 during a
tour of the Jordan Valley.
Commitment, it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're beside you
when you need us
most. After all, Our
Real Involvement is
uith the Living.
Riverside
Memorial Chap^
DMe B*oward Palm BwC
AMred Golden. President
Leo Hack EnecVP
WkamF Sauteon VP
Douglas Lazarus VP FD
AllanG Brestm.P.O.
GUARDIAN PLAN
Tradition. It's what makes us Jews.
<'<
11-9-5*6 M-9-5*6 11-9-5*6 11-9-5*6 11-9-5*6 4-
9-5-86


Ebullient Peres
Back from Trip to Cameroon
Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
O
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) An
ebullient Premier Shimon
Peres returned home
Wednesday (Aug. 27) from
his 36-hour visit to
Cameroon, impressed by his
meeting with President
Paul Biya, moved by his
welcome by thousands of
Cameroonians, some of
whom greeted him in
Hebrew, optimistic about
future economic, political
and trade relations with the
black African nation, and
looking forward to the
renewal of relations shortly
with several other African
nations.
Speaking to reporters at Ben
Gurion Airport, Peres said the
Cameroon Embassy would be
opened in Israel within three mon-
ths, but its location has not yet
been established. Biya has an-
nounced that his country was
resuming diplomatic relations
with Israel, 13 years after it broke
ties after the Yom Kippur War.
THE PREMIER, who visited
Cameroon at the invitation of
Biya and who is the first Israeli
Premier to visit black Africa since
Premier Levi Eshkol was there 20
years ago, said that "from our
point of view, it was an excep-
tional visit according to the
warmth of the reception, the par-
ticipation of hundreds of
thousands of people who
I demonstrated their deep friend-
ship and warm feeling for the
State of Israel."
He said he was "deeply impress-
ed both by the country and its
leader, a country which is on the
road to development, with a
balanced budget, a growth rate of
six percent this year and a
| relatively high standard of
| living."
Peres characterized Biya "as
f one of the most important leaders
on the African continent. He is a
man of deep knowledge, great
restraint, much experience, and
I has a very special feeling of
; friendship toward Israel."
PERES SAID he and Biya had
three meetings, and that 12 work-
ing groups six consisting of
Israelis who had accompanied the
Premier and six consisting of
Cameroon government represen-
tatives selected by Biya met
Tuesday (Aug. 26) to mutually
1 work out bilateral agreements in
i the fields of agriculture, industry,
tourism, security and military.
The Israeli leaders said that in
I his talks with Biya, "we reached a
meeting of minds on the burning
issues in the Middle East and in
Africa. We agreed to enlarge and
deepen the relations between the
State of Israel and Cameroon. I
am looking forward to the
strengthening of relations with
Cameroon and maybe to the ex-
tension of the renewal of
diplomatic relations with other
countries in Africa."
Regarding South Africa's policy
of apartheid, Peres said he found
Biya's approach "uncompromis-
Hng in principle, but very well
measured in practice. That is to
say, he is not swept along by no-
tions of throwing the whites into
jthe sea. Neither does he think a
solution can be found overnight."
PERES SAID that Biya also
was not enthusiastic "about the
two-faced policy conducted by
pome countries in the world
toward South Africa). However,
me believes that there is no room
or compromise on apartheid and
hat a solution must be reached
fcradually. He believes that this is
wssible."
| Regarding Israel's attitude.
Peres said "there is do need for
any commitment, since Israel's
position on the issue of apartheid
is unequivocal. I don't think that
Israel is or shoud be a leading
country in formulating a policy
toward South Africa." This state-
ment was similar to the one he
made to reporters in Yaounde, the
capital of Cameroon.
He said there: "We don't feel it
is for us to be making policy vis-a-
vis South Africa. We are a party
to world policy. We shall follow
the resolutions, but I don't think
we have to take the lead in for-
mulating a policy toward South
Africa. That does not mean that
we are indifferent. A Jewish per-
son could never support
apartheid."
PERES SAID that in the joint
statement he made with Biya on
this issue, both sides condemned
apartheid and the Israeli leader
said that "both sides had agreed
to do everything to dismantle this
odious system" but that "did not
meant that Israel might be mov-
ing closer to any sanctions against
South Africa. The traditional posi-
tion of Israel is never to com-
promise with apartheid. But
Israel has no ambition to be the
leading country in cementing a
policy toward South Africa. I
think we have to remain true to
our size, meaning that we are not
a superpower."
Biya did not express dissatisfac-
tion with Israel's position on
South Africa, Peres said. "Not at
all. He just asked me one question
about the visit (earlier last month)
of our economic delegation and I
explained to him the purpose of
the visit."
Peres said he and Biya discuss-
ed Arab reactions to Peres' visit
to Cameroon and the decision by
Biya to resume diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel.
BIYA CONCEDED that some
Arab countries were not happy
with this development, "but Presi-
dent Biya feels he represents a
sovereign country and he doesn't
need the approval or permission
of anyone else. I think that the
President was very favorably im-
pressed by the meeting in Moroc-
co betweek King Hassan and
myself."
At a meeting with reporters
Monday (Aug. 25), Biya said that
Cameroon's decision to restore
ties with Israel was the result of
ongoing relations between the
two countries during the past few
years. According to Israeli of-
ficials, the two countries have had
secret trade relations since 1981.
When Biya took power in 1983,
Israel was allowed to establish an
interest section in Yaounde, the
capital of Cameroon. Since then,
Cameroon re-evaluated the situa-
tion of Israeli-black African rela-
tions, Biya said.
He noted that African nations
broke relations with Israel
because of its occupation of the
Sinai Peninsula. However, now
that Egypt and Israel have signed
a peace treaty and Sinai has been
returned, there is no reason for
African nations not to resume
relations with Israel, Biya said.
CAMEROON IS the fourth
black African nation after Ivory
Coast, Liberia and Zaire to
resume relations. Twenty-nine
African countries severed ties
with Israel under Arab pressure
in the wake of the 1973 Yom Kip-
pur War. Only Lesotho, Malawi
and Swaziland continued
relations.
Israel also has "semi-
diplomatic" relations, at the in-
terest section level, with the
states of Gabon, Ghana, Kenya
and Togo. Gabon and Togo are
regarded in Israel as the most
likely to resume full relations
soon.
Peres said Biya had told him
that other African countries were
ready to renew relations with
Israel. "He even told me about
several Presidents who said,
'Come, let us do this together.' "
But Peres would not identify the
countries or the Presidents.
Peres said that Biya was very
moved by Israel's medical aid to
the victims of the volcanic gas
catastrophe near Lake Nios,
about 240 miles northeast of
Yaounde, in which an estimated
1,500 persons were killed. "He
(Biya) went on television to say so
that without any request and as
a matter of fact, Israel was the
first not only to suggest but to
supply aid immediately to this
very unfortunate event," Peres
said.
THE PREMIER explained that
he had learned about the disaster
"just a day before we took off for
Cameroon. We didn't know exact-
ly the size of it, but from the early
information we understood that
this was a very serious matter.
"So on the plane that took us to
Cameroon, the Israel Army
Medical Corps arranged to send a
medical team and equipment. We
Continued on Page 10-A
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 5. 1986
Will Surprises
Never End?
The international-everything, Armand
Hammer, has been presented with an
honorary degree by Tel Aviv University.
What is more, Mr. Hammer was there to ac-
cept it.
Will surprises never end?
Israel has been in existence since 1948.
The struggle for Jewish statehood has been
in existence since long before that. Mr.
Hammer, age 88, has also been in existence
since long before that, and we hardly
remember an occasion when Mr. Hammer
was mentioned as ever being involved in
either historic development in the past.
Nevertheless, better late than never. Dur-
ing Mr. Hammer's visit in Israel last week,
he had occasion to make two significant
observations. Virtually on his way to
Moscow to meet with Mikhail Gorbachev, he
suggested that the Israelis keep a low profile
and enter into quieter diplomacy with the
Soviets on the matter of Soviet Jewry than
they have been conducting heretofore.
Undoubtedly, that was an excellent piece
of advice particularly in light of the fact
that he has been dealing with the Soviets
since the days of the fabled Lenin, and doors
in the Kremlin open up for him as if by
magic.
Hammer's 'Certainty'
Perhaps just as important, from a
longrange point of view, was his observation
that his geologist Mr. Hammer is Oc-
cidental Petroleum are convinced that
there is oil in Israel and that, if there is any,
"they will find it."
Since the return of the Sinai Peninsula to
Egypt for what, so far, appears to be a hand-
ful of delusions about normal relations with
that country, there has been a growing
sense of loss focused on the oil wells that
Israel drilled there and then turned over to
the Egyptians as part of the Camp David
package. At the same time, the Israelis have
frequently drilled for oil on their own lands
and come up dry.
If Mr. Hammer is right and can prove it
and there are few other men in this world
who ought to be taken seriously on the sub-
ject of oil he may well prove a boon to the
economic security of Israel henceforward. In
that case, the breaking of his long silence
may well have been worth waiting for.
Germany's Anthem
West Germany appears to be intent on go-
ing back to the old chorus in their national
anthem that trumpets Deutschland ueber
AUes "Germany above everything" and
ends with in der Welt "in the world."
The history of 20th Century Germany is
pod enough reason to cause people to
become somewhat edgy about that. The Nazi
era, in our view, doubles the ante.
While West Germany remains laudably
vigilant about neo-Nazi elements in that
country, there is increasing evidence of a
growing sense of irritation on the part of its
people with enforced recollection of the
past. West Germany's President Richard
von Weiszaecker has done a sterling job in
his repeated reference to the need that Ger-
mans must feel never to forget the Nazi era
and the horrors that it conceived.
Von Weiszaecker has spoken both with
Jewish Floridian
ol M.IA1SESMOCHFT
passion and scholarly adroitness on this sub-
ject, and both his manner and the content of
his presentations have demonstrated a sense
of conviction in him that goes far beyond any
political consideration. Wonder of wonders,
then, that in the presidential office he oc-
cupies, which has up until now been largely
ceremonial, Von Weiszaecker is today one of
West Germany's most popular political
leaders and, apparently, a shining leader-
ship personality- on its not-too-distant
horizon.
On the other hand, the more recent
statements of Chancellor Helmut Kohl,
coupled with the role he played in the unhap-
py Bitburg affair last year, reflect the very
irritation with West Germany's past that its
citizens appear to be feeling these days and
that will surely be assuaged with the return
of Deutschland ueber AUes in der Welt to
their national anthem.
Conflicting Views
Beyond understanding the issue in broad
sociological terms, the important thing for
us, as Jews, to wonder is whether the Kohl
view or the Von Weiszaecker view of the
German need as Von Weiszaecker sees it
will prevail in the future and, therefore,
what that view holds for the 20th Century
world that twice was precipitated into war
by that country.
We do not believe that the Germans must
be made to feel that they must do penance
forevermore. But we do believe, with their
President, that they must not forget the
Hitler era and what that era wrought as the
best way to avoid its ever happening again.
Deutschland ueber AUes will hardly fill the
bill in this.
Success in Cameroon
The Peres-Biya announcement last week
made Cameroon the fourth Black African
state to restore relations with Israel since all
but three broke them off in the wake of the
1973 Yom Kippur War. With the growing
willingness in the Arab world itself to public-
ly deal with Israel Egypt and Morocco are
clear examples the snowball effect that
Israel has hoped for may well come about.
One by one, the nations of Africa are reaf-
firming their independence by restoring for-
mal ties with Israel. In the process, they are
reaffirming the legitimacy of Israel as an
equal member of the community of nations.
The development is a happy one, both for
Africa and the Jewish State. In the late
-*m\
1950s and 1960s, Israel dealt with its isola-
tion in the region partly by reaching beyond
its regional boundaries into Africa. There
was a natural affinity between the young,
struggling Jewish state that was making its
desert bloom and the newly-independent
countries of the African continent.
In the case of Cameroon, before Yaounde
joined most Black African capitals in cutting
off ties with the Jewish state 13 years ago,
Israeli experts had helped establish two
agricultural training centers in Cameroon
and managed them until native personnel
could replace them. A permanent team of
Israeli volunteers founded and ran rural set-
tlements at Obala and Garoura, where
adolescents were trained in scouting,
agricultural skills and civics. In the towns,
they set up youth centers, which provided
vital supplementary vacational education.
And this is only a sampling.
It was as though Israel had never left in
spirit when Prime Minister Peres summon-
ed, on a moment's notice, a team of doctors
and medical supplies to travel with him on
his state visit to Cameroon. As Peres and
Cameroon President Paul Biya announced
the restoration of relations last week, the
Israeli medical team was aiding in relief ef-
forts for surivors of the horrible geological
disaster that had just taken place.
Rather than submitting to Arab pressure
where diplomatic relations with Israel are
concerned, the African nations increasingly
see where humanity and friendship truly lie
that they are not in the political posturing
and threats of the Arabs, but in the acts of
one country ready to help others where and
when it can.
Soviet Jewry's Humor
Laughter In A Hostile Environment
lUMCMFTlO* HATES A4**ftca lm -, rw. *. >
rfw-ll Ou)o>hM"
Friday. September 5. 1986
Volume 59
1 ELUL5746
Number 36
Soviet Jews
have turned to humor to deflate
the extraordinary tensions in
their daily lives.
So says David A. Harris, deputy
director of the International Rela-
tions Department of the American
Jewish Committee, who, together
with Israel Rabinovich, Professor
of Russian Language at the
Monterey Institute of Foreign
Languages, has just published
"On a Lighter Note? Soviet
Jewish Humor."
Some samples from the 10-page
compilation:
Q: Why are there no Jewish
cosmonauts?
A: The Soviet authorities are
afraid they would never return.
"Khaim, what would you do if
the borders were opened
tomorrow?"
"I'd jump into the nearest
tree."
"But why"
"So as not to be run over by the
stampede."
Q: Do you know Khaim. the
fellow who lives across from the
prison?
A: Yes, but now he lives across
from his house.
"My Khaim is such an anecdote
teller," boasted Sarah. "A few
years ago, he was sentenced to
three years for just one anecdote.
And last night he told an anecdote
that was worth at least eight
years!"
Q: What is the longest street in
Odessa?
A: Bebelya.
Q: Why?
A: Because Abramovich went
down it five years ago to KGB
headquarters but still hasn't
returned.
Q: What's the definition of a
Soviet string quartet?
A: A Soviet symphony or-
chestra that has just returned
from a tour of the West.
Abram telephoned the KGB.
"Hello. Is that the KGB there? I
wonder if by any chant.e a parrot
has come to your office?"
"No."
"If he should come, I just want
to let you know in advance that I
don't share his political views."
Shortly after Abram left Kiev
for a business trip to Eastern
Europe, his friend back home
received a telegram from Poland:
Greetings from free Warsaw.
Abram. A few days later a second
telegram, this one from
Czechoslovakia, arrived:
Greetings from free Prague,
Abram. Several days passed
before a third telegram from
Hungary, came: Greetings from
free Budapest, Abram. Then
followed a long period of silence
before the friend in Kiev received
a telegram from Israel: Greetings
from Jerusalem, free Abram.
And so on .
Adds Harris: "Few Americans
realize how vital a role political
humor plays as a commentary on
society, and an emotional outlet
for people behind the Iron Cur
tain. Deprived of opportunities for
Continued oa Page 6-A
4
*


Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Egypt's Failure To Solve Murders Scares West
i
By JOSEPH FIMILESTONE
London Chronicle Syndicate
"Fear has gripped not on-
ly Western embassies in
Cairo, but diplomats from
all over the world. The
Egyptian Government's
failure to find the terrorists
who killed two Israelis in
Cairo and injured others has
caused widespread conster-
nation. We tear that any
day the gunmen will turn
their weapons on us. We
could provide easy targets;
we have little protection
from the unknown
assassins."
This is an experienced Western
diplomat's description of current
feelings among the diplomatic
community in Egypt's capital.
Anxiety is mixed with surprise.
The Egyptian security service is
one of the most formidable in the
world, with a reported staff of of-
ficials and informers of more than
500,000.
IT HAS skilfully broken up
many extremist and terror
groups, including those of Libya's
Khadafy. Yet, despite finding im-
portant clues about the Israelis'
murderers, including the car
which they used at the Cairo book
fair, the Egyptian police have fail-
ed to trace them.
Western diplomats believe that
the assassins are native Egyp-
tians belonging to the same
Moslem fundamentalist group
which murdered President Anwar
Sadat. But experienced anti-
terrorist experts (including
Israelis) assume that the killers
are Palestinians or Libyans,
possibly directed from Damascus
by Abu Nidal, the terror chief who
organized the assassination at-
tempt on Shlomo Argov, Israel's
former Ambassador to London, in
June, 1982.
Being an Israeli diplomat in
Cairo is thus a harrowing ex-
perience. It imposes strains on
even the toughest men and
women, who have seen their col-
leagues gunned down without the
perpetrators being brought to
justice.
THE ISRAELI EMBASSY; in
the fashionable Giza district, is a
fortress: heavily armed troops
<
guard the approaches and the at-
mosphere is clouded in tension as
if an attack were expected any
moment.
Yet once within the embassy,
having passed all the intricate
security checks, one finds smiling,
hard-working staff at work. The
Ambassador, Moshe Sasson, and
his colleagues believe they have an
important task to perform both
for their country and for Israeli-
Egyptian relations and they carry
it out efficiently and
courageously.
The Ambassador has won the
admiration of the diplomatic
corps.
For him and his Arabic-
speaking staff, the anxieties of liv-
ing in Cairo are compounded by
the drastic deterioration in
Israeli-Egyptian relations.
The great hopes which followed
Sadat's visit to Jerusalem in 1977
have faded. At that time Cairo
taxi-drivers offered me free rides
when I mentioned I had come
from Israel. Today, any mention
of Israel is likely to provoke a
Mubarak (left) has far less luck than
Anwar Sadat did in solving problems.
sullen, suspicious glance and
could even be dangerous.
Egyptians had naively hoped
that peace would bring them pro-
sperity. But their enormous
economic problems have, in fact,
multiplied as tremendous popula-
tion increases every year there
are a million more mouths to feed,
pushing Egypt's population to
close on 50 million negating the
brave efforts of the planners.
President Mubarak is faced with a
colossal task which he cannot
master unless the world communi-
ty comes to his rescue.
"NASSER LEFT Egypt in
ruins," a Western diplomat
remarked. "Sadat struggled to
improve the situation and had
some luck. But Mubarak, a very
able man, has far greater pro-
blems and far less luck.
"The collapse of the oil market
has hit Egypt hard. The decline in
remittances from Egyptians in
Arab countries is a major blow.
Mubarak cannot hope to obtain
any substantial aid from moderate
Arab States such as Saudi Arabia.
Egypt owes huge amounts for
arms obtained in the Soviet Union
and the U.S.A., and the country is
literally on the verge of collapse."
Aid from the United States, se-
cond only in quantity to Israel,
amounts to over $2 billion, but is
Continued on Page 9-A
Jewish Agency Center of Drama
It Never Intended To Unfold

By STANLEY A. RINGLER
The recent Assembly of
the Jewish Agency for
Israel had more than its
share of drama. The players
were not on the plenary
stage but in the corridors
and lobby of Jerusalem's
Ram ad a Renaissance Hotel,
where the annual meeting
was held.
Just days before the start of the
Assembly, as hundreds of
Stanley Ringler is a former
member of the national staff of
the B 'nai B 'rith Hillel Founda-
tion who served as Hillel direc-
tor at the University of Miami.
members of the Board were
especially incensed because the
articles not only held them in-
directly culpable for many of the
alleged shortcomings of the World
Zionist Organization and Jewish
Agency, but because the series
was illustrated with a number of
caricatures described by some as
Maariv' Writer Views the Struggle Page 2-B
Anti-Semitic* drawing at root of the
burgeoning controversy.
delegates from around the world
converged in Jerusalem, emotions
began to build up to what ap-
peared to be a near decisive con-
frontation between Diaspora and
Israel leadership circles. The
Jewish Agency Board of Gover-
nors was about to conduct this
regularly scheduled pre-Assembly
meetings, but as the members of
the Board of Governors arrived at
the meeting room, they found
waiting for them copies of a
booklet containing reprints of a
Jerusalem journalist's series of in-
vestigative reports on the struc-
ture and work of the Jewish Agen-
cy and the World Zionist
Organization.
THE UNEXPECTED ap-
pearance of journalist Charles
Hoffman's probing series of ar-
ticles created a furor. The WZO
anti-Zionist and even anti-Semitic.
In fact the drawings, which for
many served to discredit the en-
tire booklet, were produced by the
two Jewish newspapers in
Baltimore and Detroit which had
originally commissioned Hoff-
man's series. Subsequently a
slightly abridged version of his ar-
ticles ran in The Jerusalem Post in
the late spring. Hoffman unwit-
tingly created a firestorm of pro-
test over his highly critical
analysis of what he described as
the politicized and sometimes inef-
ficient organizational structure
and program of the Agency and
WZO.
THE PRESENT chairman of
the Board of Governors of the
Jewish Agency, Jerrold Hoff-
berger of Baltimore, thought the
substance of the criticism to be so
important that he arranged to
have copies of it reproduced in a
booklet and distributed in
Jerusalem among members of the
Board of Governors. Hoffberger
did not, however, anticipate the
reaction the booklet's appearance
provoked.
Even some of his supporters
were disturbed by what they saw
as a number of clearly offensive
caricatures. The public condemna-
tion of the booklet's illustrations
tended to discredit the entire ef-
fort. The Israeli media
characteristically portrayed the
story on its front pages as a volley
of charges and counter charges
between the principal players in
the show: Hoffberger and
members of the WZO Executive.
Hoffberger at first insisted that
the booklet be distributed, read
and discussed by the entire Board.
However, Arye Dulzin, chairman
of the Executive of both the
Jewish Agency and the World
Zionist Organization, categorical-
ly refused to allow either its
distribution or discussion. Heated
accusations of yellow journalism
and anti-Semitism were heard
throughout the course of the
assmbly, with some demanding
Hoffberger's resignation.
EVENTUALLY, Hoffberger
proposed that a new version of the
booklet be prepared, sans illustra-
tions. But by this point, in view of
Continued on Page 8-A


Page6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
In Brazil
Jews Await Election in November
Cob tinned from Page 1-A
numbers seem to indicate. Sao
Paulo has the largest Jewish
population, about 70,000.
Rabbi Henry Sobel of the
Liberal Congregacao Israelita
Paulista in Sao Paulo (the largest
synagogue in Latin America, with
2,000 families), the acknowledged
human rights spokesperson for
the Jewish community, told the
JTA:
"The issue today is in the con-
text of the new Constitution. I tell
the Jewish community that the
issue is not the Constitution itself.
What is important for Brazil is the
ideology, the moral and ethical
credentials of the people who will
be responsible for drawing up the
Constitution. This is why elections
are so important for the Jewish
community and for Brazil in
general. Those elected will be both
writing and implementing the
new Constitution."
SOBEL DESCRIBED as a
"new phenomenon" the fact that
this year candidates are courting
the Jewish community. In
pancular. individual Jews who are
prominent in the community have
been asked to host and organize
fund-raising cocktail parties. Can-
didates are also going to the
Jewish federations and to
synagogues, asking for support,
Sobel noted.
"Perhaps they feel there is a
'Jewish vote,' be said. But both
he and Benno Milnitzky. a Sao
Paulo attorney who is president of
the Confederacao Israelita do
Brasil. deny there is such a thing
as a "Jewish vote" in Brazil.
Milnitzky said: "The Jewish
community is not a political party.
The candidates are seeking out
Jews for money and influence,
because they believe we are
stronger than we are. There is,
however, a Jewish stake in the
Constitution. We are studying all
proposals.
"PERSONALLY, I do not
believe the new Constitution is go-
ing to be the Magna Carta of the
Brazilian people, because the Con-
gress will both write and vote on
the Constitution. As Jews, what
concerns us most are the problems
related to prejudice in color, race,
religion. It is important for us that
basic principles (of social justice)
are incorporated into the im-
plementation of the law."
Milnitzky seemed to have reser-
vations with regard to the Jewish
community, redemocratization.
and the new Constitution. He
said: "The problem Jews face is
how to adapt to this period of
liberalization. Just as I have the
liberty to manifest myself as a
Jew, so do anti-Semites have the
liberty to manifest themselves as
anti-Semites. Jews are simply not
prepared to encounter contem-
porary anti-Semitism here.
"We do not have traditional
anti-Semitism here. Despite the
fact that Brazil has undergone a
revolutionary change and
economic crisis, with the excep-
tion of the PLO, no one has ever
accused Jews of having anything
to do with the country's
problems."
DURING THE years of the
military regime, the Jewish com-
munity kept a low profile and pro-
spered. There were no specific
problems for Jews, as Jews, ex-
cpet Brazil's infamous affirmative
vote in 1975 in the UNited Na-
tions General Assembly on the
Zionism equals racism resolution,
Milnitzky said. Today there is a
"chaotic state of affairs," in the
reformation of the country.
Dr. Isaac Schifnagel. who
founded the Brazilian Institute of
Human Rights in 1965 and has
worked with the Confederation on
the issue since 1972, said of the
dictatorship from 1964 to 1985
that on the issue of human rights,
"the Jewish community was on
the fence. During the dictator-
ship, it was possible to speak on a
personal level with Ministers, if
there was a problem."
Milnitzky concurred, saying:
"Speaking personally, and not in
my capacity as president of the
Confederacao I am a democrat
with socialist tendencies. I hate
Dublin Priest Among Scholars
Who Have Translated Targums
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
Father Martin McNamara. a
Dublin priest whose aides include
Rabbi Samson Levey of the
Hebrew Union College here, has
arranged for the first English
translation in 16 volumes of all the
Targums comprising the Aramaic
Bible (Old Testament). Aramaic
was the common language of the
Jewish people in Palestine from
the Second Century before the
birth of Jesus.
McNamara, editorial director of
the translation project, is a
scholar-teacher with the Society
of the Missionaries of the Sacred
Heart in Dublin. He has been on a
sabbatical this summer doing
research at the Claremont Calif.,
Ancient Biblical Manuscript
Center.
Levey is one of the three
American Jews among leading
Hostility
And Humor
Continued froa Page 4-A
self-expression through the ballot
box, the press, assembly or
cultural forms, political humor
becomes a treasured, if private
means of conveying anger,
frustration or criticism in an often
hostile environment.'
Targumk scholars in the English-
speaking world who have written
books for the project. His book
covers Ezekiel. on which he spent
four years.
The scholars said their project is
important because, unlike the
Greek account, it is more than a
mere literal translation of the
Hebrew Bible. "In the Aramaic
text, you find a lot of additional
material because the scholars of
that period, in their oral transla-
tions of the Hebrew into Aramaic,
would add many interpretations
and paraphrases." they said.
authoritarian regimes. I believe
authoritarian regimes drown
Jewish potential to express
ourselves freely. At the same
time, such a regime creates a con-
venience. All you need is a contact
with an authority to alleviate anti-
Semitism. This is bad, because it
leaves the Jewish community with
the erroneous impression we are
more protected by
authoritarianism than by
liberalism. This is a myth."
JEWISH COMMUNAL leaders
such as Milnitzky, Sobel and Schif-
nagel are concerned about what
this unknown future of
"democracy" and a new Constitu-
tion will mear to the community.
Sobel said:
"Now there is an aperture.
Within that context, the Jewish
community is responding as are
others. There is democratization,
although it is still not con-
solidated. It is a process. The Jews
have a special vested interest in
the political and social mobility of
our country. I was taught in
school that Jews fare well in an
open and free society.
When the masses are oppressed
they need an outlet, and history
proves that more often than not,
they throw the blame on the
Jews."
Speaking of the history of
Jewish involvement with human
rights and social justice in Brazil
in the 20th Century, Dr. Nachman
Falbel. a professor of medieval
and Jewish history at University
of Sao Paulo, observed that the
Jewish immigrants in the decades
of the 1920's and 1930's "were in-
terested in ideology. They
centered their lives on political
studies. This was a reflection of
their lives in Europe. They
brought their ideologies here and
continued to struggle with them
until the 1950's. Ideology today is
not so attractive to Jewish youth,
nor to Brazilian youth in general.
We do not live in an age of
ideology.
"THE CAPITALISTIC
development of Brazil after World
War II, the economic boom, had
the effect of a maelstrom," Falbel
continued. "People strove to be
rich, and in a good socio-economic
position. This happened to the
Jewish community. Old ideals had
influence on Jewish youth until
World War II, perhaps until the
1950's. After that, capitalistic
economic development caused a
weakening of ideals. People
wanted to be rich; this is the sim-
ple economic truth."
Rolf Herzberg. who heads the
House of Israeli Culture, agreed
that the Jewish community has
not been active on the human
rights question. "They came to
start a new life and take advan-
tage of the economic oppor-
tunities the country offers," he
said. "They also worry about the
education of their children. These
are the two issues that absorb
them."
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Hussein Grants Citizenship
To Former Mayor of Gaza
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) King Hussein of Jordan has
granted Jordanian citizenship to the former Mayor of Gaza,
Rashad A-Shawa, and six members of his family.
Residents of Gaza have no citizenship and travel on
special refugee papers. Shawa received his citizenship in
appreciation for his support of Hussein's policies, accordid-
ng to a statement issued in Amman, Jordan.
SHAWA SUPPORTED Hussein's February, 1986
split with the Palestine Liberation Organization and said
the silent majority of Palestinians backed Hussein's
demands that the PLO change its position on the peace
process.
As a result, Shawa was several times the victim of
sabotage attempts. Three weeks ago, Israeli security forces
safely detonated an explosive charge placed outside a car
inspection center he owned.
The former mayor met recently with Premier Shimon
Peres, discussing ideas for a settlement. He spent several
weeks in Amman, where he made pro-Jordanian and anti-
PLO statements. Shawa complained that the policy of the
PLO had led the Palestinian people nowhere, and it was
time to examine "other options.
Kollek Says Jerusalem
Schools Snubbed by Gov't.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mayor Teddy Kollek charged
Tuesday (Aug. 26) that the
government was allocating more
funds for education in the Jewish
settlments in Judaea and Samaria
than it was willing to give schools
in Jerusalem.
He told a press conference that
there was a shortage of
classrooms throughout the new
neighborhoods of Jerusalem,
"which are also located in
Samaria."
"A new settlement in Judaea
and Samaria immediately gets a
school, a kindergarten, a
synagogue. But for the 85,000
Jews living in the new
neighborhoods of Jerusalem, we
have to fight for every school and
every public garden. This is unfair
discrimination.''
Some 107,000 Jewish children
will go to school this year, an in-
crease of four percent. Kollek
noted that the education system in
Jerusalem was especially com-
plicated because of the large
number of new neighborhoods
with heterogeneous populations
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Study Shows
Catholic Academics Learn Judaism
Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Sabbath Flea Market Opens
Can of Worms for Knesset

NEW YORK (JTA) -
Faculty and students at
Roman Catholic educational
institutions have developed
"a deep appreciation of
Jews and Judaism" in the 20
years since the Second
Vatican Council's Nostra
Aetate declaration, accor-
ding to a study published
here.
Entitled "Jews, Judaism and
Catholic Education," it is based
on a survey of several hundred
Catholic educational institutions
in the United States conducted by
Sister Rose Thering of the
Department of Education at
Seton Hall University in South
Orange, N.J. It was published by
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, the American Jewish
Committee, and Seton Hall.
SISTER THERING also found
broad awareness of the
" 'teaching of contempt' that was
partially responsible for the
Holocaust." She attributed this
awareness to the fact that
Catholic educational institutions
are teaching about Jews and
Judaism in a positive way, reflec-
ting recognition that Christianity
is rooted in Judaism.
German
Anthem
Revised
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has called upon officials of
the West German state of Baden-
Wurttemberg to reconsider their
"ill-advised decision" to revive
the long-banned first verse of the
national anthem which contains
the words Deutschland uber alles.
In a cable to Baden
Wurttemberg's President Lothar
Spaeth, Abraham Foxman, ADL's
associate national director and
head of its International Affairs
Division, pointed out that the
words Deutschland uber alles.
"like the swastika, symbolize to
the world the brutality of Nazism.
Giving legitimacy to such a highly
identifiable symbol of the Nazi
regime can only weaken the effort
to educate the public of Nazism's
evil and can raise questions about
the German commitment to reject
that past."
A copy of the ADL cable was
also sent to Gunther van Well,
West Germany's Ambassador to
the United States.
The survey further disclosed
that Holocaust studies have
become required in most high
schools, some elementary schools
and almost all Catholic colleges
and universities and that many
Catholic institutions observe Yom
Hashoah Holocaust Remem-
brance Day with special ser-
vices to recall the genocide com-
mitted against the Jews durine
World War II.
In a preface of the study, Rabbi
Leon Klenicki, director of ADL's
Interfaith Affairs Department,
and Rabbi A. James Rudin, AJC's
National Interreligious Affairs
director, called the findings "both
promising and encouraging."
THEY ADDED, however, that
while "Jews and Judaism are no
longer esoteric studies in Catholic
schools, and there is growing in-
terest in Judaism on the part of
both students and faculty, much
still remains to be done. Crucial
issues remain."
Noting that "these issues are
being faced and addressed by a
growing number of Catholic
educators and institutions," they
commended Thering "and others
who have committed themselves
to building a new and constructive
relationship between Catholics
and Jews a relationship of
mutual respect and
understanding."
The survey expands on Ther-
ing's 1970 study which sought to
determine how Catholic institu-
tions had implemented the
Vatican Council II Statement on
the Jews and Judaism made five
years earlier.
The current study surveys im-
plementation of not only the 1965
Statement but also includes the
1974 Roman Catholic Guidelines
and Suggestions for implementa-
tion of the Vatican II document
and the 1975 National Catholic
Conference of Bishops' statement
on Catholic-Jewish relations.
AMONG THE findings of the
new study, based on answers by
respondents, were:
5 percent of the Catholic col-
leges and universities offer
courses in Judaism, either
separate or part of other com-
parative religion courses.
27 percent after a special
course on the Holocaust;
6 percent offer a separate
course on the State of Israel, 38
percent offer courses on the Mid-
dle East;
10 percent of the seminaries
have a special course on the
Holocaust with others covering it
as part of other courses:

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33 percent of the seminaries
have courses in Judaism;
25 percent of the seminaries
offer a course in Jewish history
after the emergence of
Christianity;
53 percent of the Ar-
chdiocesan/Diocesan ecumenical
commissions said they direct at-
tention to Catholic-Jewish
concerns;
62 percent of the high schools
have courses on the Holocaust and
its lessons;
30 percent of high schools
have a course on the State of
Israel and its meaning.
Sister Thering said the survey
found significant improvement
within Roman Catholic educa-
tional institutions but also in-
dicated a need for improvement in
such areas as presentation of the
Pharisaic movement, an aspect of
the Judaism of Jesus' time, which
the 1975 Vatican Guidelines
specifically cited as requiring cor-
rection in Christian teaching and
preaching.
"POPULAR PREACHING
and teaching including Passion
Plays have often used Catholic
devotion to Christ crucified as an
occasion for anti-Jewish
statements," Thering said,
despite "the Conciliar Statement
on the Jews that this is clearly not
in harmony with either the truth
or the spirit of the Gospel."
Thering also recommended that
in accordance with the 1974
Guidelines and Suggestions for
carrying out the VAtican II Coun-
cil statement, Christians "must
come to an understanding of
Torah, People, and Land, three
very important components of
Judaism." ("Land" refers to the
Land of Israel.)
Of the 209 questionnaires sent
to Catholic colleges and univer-
sities, 128 or 61.2 percent
responded. Of the 123 question-
naires sent to seminaries, there
were 40 responses or 32.5 per-
cent. Of 300 high schools which
received the instrument, 114 or 38
percent responded.
OF 180 questionnaires sent to
offices of superintendents, 43 or
23.9 percent responded. Of 213
questionnaires sent to Ar-
chdiocesan/Diocesan ecumenical
commissions, 75 responded or
35.2 percent.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The issue of a flea market
operating on the Sabbath
has opened a can of worms
in the Knesset. Twenty
MKs, led by Labor MK Rab-
bi Menachem Hacohen, have
demanded that the Knesset
meet for a special session
this week to discuss the flea
market operated by Kibbutz
Nir Eliahu, northeast of Tel
Aviv.
The two minor religious parties
in the Knesset, Agudat Yisrael
and Shas, threatened that they
would not hesitate to create a
coalition crisis around this issue.
Agudat sources expressed anger
that Premier Shimon Peres and
Deputy Premier Yitzhak Shamir
did not try to stop the kibbutz
from holding its flea market and
prevent "a massive desecration of
the Sabbath."
PERES ACTUALLY did ask
the United Kibbutz Movement to
refrain from its activity. But the
Kibbutz Movement secretariat
rebuffed him, explaining that Kib-
butz Nir Eliahu is facing an
economic crisis due to a drop in
agricultural sales and that a major
source of income now is the flea
market.
Meanwhile, other Knesset par-
ties are abuzz about the special
session Wednesday which some
MKs saw as turning into a con-
frontation between leftwing and
rightwing law makers. MK Chaika
Grossman, chairperson of the
Mapam Knesset caucus, warned
that the session would turn into a
farce.
"A flea market becomes a cen-
tral issue, whereas nobody
discusses vital national issues."
She said she would use the oppor-
tunity to discuss the economic
crisis of the moshavim.
Knesset members from other
parties said they would utilize the
session to discuss the crisis of the
moshavim.
Ex-Mayor Dies
TEL AVIV WNS) Haim
Levanon, former mayor of Tel
Aviv, d>ed Aug. 21, at the age of
86. Funeral services were held in
the old and original cemetery of
Tel Aviv, in the center of the city,
which he headed for a number of
years.
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.4


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
Foreign Ministry Says No Soviet
Visit Without Reciprocal Invite
Another of the drawings intended to show the
workings of the structure of the Jewish Agency
and the World Zionist Organization pits the
interests of secular Jews against the Orthodox
in Israel. The balance suggests just who ap-
pears to be favored.
Jewish Agency
Center of Unintended Storm
Continued from Page 5-A
the escalating passions of all par-
ties involved, it was thought best
to shelve the matter for the time
being. Overlooked in all the con-
troversy, however, were the
substantive issues which jour-
nalist Hoffman had tried to
address.
Only after the bulk of the Jewish
Agency Assembly metings had
concluded did several substantive
rebuttals to Hoffman's series ap-
pear in the press. One such article
IDF Must
Remain
Continued from Page 1-A
security zone forever.
HE SAID THE Syrian threat is
manifested by that country's
"intentions, conceptions, the
build-up of its military forces and
political alliances. Ail Syrian ac-
tivity today is directed toward a
military confrontation and we
don't know when it might come.
It's not a question of today,
tomorrow, or the day after tomor-
row but we must be prepared
for any possibility."
Asked by one of the soldiers
how long the IDF would have to
remain in the zone, the Deputy
Premier said: "There is, of course
no intention or plan to remain
here forever. However, as long as
this is necessary, we have to be
here.
"Anyone looking at what has
been going on in the field recently,
in the last year or two, knows that
a great deal is being done here, a
great deal is being contributed to
Israel's security. Everyone here
should know that he is making a
considerable contribution to quiet
and security, and to the fact that
we do not have to conduct any
large-scale military operations."
deal with the criticism placed at
the door of the Youth Aliya
Department, whose programs
Hoffman had claimed were too ex-
pensive and politicized.
The Department director
general gave a lengthy and
thoughtful response. Similarly,
the Jewish Agency's treasurer
and former secretary general, in
separate articles, defended the
decision-making process and
modus operandi of the Agency
with an explanation of how the
Diaspora leadership plays an in-
fluential role in its work.
The issues of accountability and
operational efficiency were ad-
dressed as well. Still, many
readers of both the booklet and
the responses claim that there re-
main many important questions
that deserve to be answered. Cer-
tainly within Diaspora circles
there seems to be a determined in-
terest in pursuing them.
IT IS ALSO quite likely that the
charges of politicization of the
WZO and Jewish Agency program
and structure will continue to
generate a serious exchange of
views between Diaspora and
Israel leadership circles. Indeed,
one of Hoffman's revelations
about the allocation of substantial
funds to anti-Zionist yeshivot has
already resulted in an un-
precedented Assembly policy
recommendation to deny the
allocation of funds to all institu-
tions and organizations which
neither recognize nor support the
State of Israel. Interestingly
enough, this decision not only
satisfied the critics from the
Diaspora who were particularly
disturbed because of the relatively
small portion of the program sub-
sidy that goes to Reform and Con-
servative institutions, but is also
met with the overwhelming ap-
proval of the Zionist leadership.
Clearly the flap over the series
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had an impact. Time will tell if all
parties concerned will allow
themselves the opportunity to
undertake a dispassionate ex-
change over the fundamental
questions raised by both critics
and advocates of the present
organizational and program
structure.
Israel Scene
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Foreign Ministry has
denied press reports that,
contrary to stated Israeli
policy, a Soviet consular
delegation would visit Israel
soon without a reciprocal
Israeli visit to the USSR.
Despite the denial, Soviet
emigres reacted sharply, most
vocal among them the
internationally-known Natan
Sharansky.
According to a Foreign Ministry
spokesman, Premier Shimon
Peres made a point of discussing
the issue with Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, stressing that
there was no change in Israeli
policy.
THE FOREIGN Ministry said
that the position of Israel con-
tinued to be the reciprocity outlin-
ed by Israeli delegates to their
Soviet counterparts at their
meeting in Helsinki on Aug. 18.
Since then, the Ministry said,
there had been no contacts with
the Soviets.
In a separate statement,
Minister-Without-Portfolio Moshe
Arens said no government forum
had given the green light to a
Soviet delegation. He contended
that any Soviet demand should be
met with a minimum demand by
Israel to release all Jews im-
prisoned for Zionist activities.
"No Soviet request should be met
without a similar response to
Israel's requests regarding Soviet
Jews," said Arens.
Speaking at a press conference
beside his mother Ida Milgroni
and his brother, Leonid, Natan
Sharansky urged a public cam-
paign against the USSR which
would convince it that "public opi-
nion of the West will simply never
permit their government to
sacrifice the interests of Soviet
Jewry." In a word, Sharansky
said, he condoned all "non-
violent" action to achieve the goal
of freeing Soviet Jewry.
ON THE reported proposal by
Peres that a Soviet delegation be
allowed to visit Israel, Sharansky
said adamantly: "We can never
compromise because it is reallv
very dangerous, and if (the report)
is correct, it's a serious mistake
which can bear very grave conse-
quences for all who struggle for
Soviet Jewry."
Sharansky thanked all those
who helped bring the family
together. His mother, brother and
his family arrived in Israel recent-
ly from the Soviet Union.
Meanwhile, American oil
magnate Armand Hammer arriv-
ed in Israel last Wednesday (Aug.
27) and had a meeting scheduled
with Peres. The 88-year-old Ham
mer has been an unofficial
mediator between the West and
the USSR since the 1920's.
He said he would try to use his
close contacts with the Soviet
leadership to advance Israeli-
Soviet ties. He was scheduled to
fly to the USSR at the end of
August.
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Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Bookcase: Israeli Does
Hatchet Job on Gen. Sharon
Roadblocks in the refugee camp of Deheishe
near Bethlehem come down. They had been
erected by the Israel Defense Forces some
years ago to hinder terrorist activities unthin
the camp.
Mubarak's Failures
Add Up to Questions About Egypt
Continued from Page 5-A
proving insufficient. Large
amounts of foreign currency are
being wastefully spent on sub-
sidizing staple foods; Mubarak is
anxious to cut the subsidies, which
are ruining Egypt and preventing
any recovery, but he fears that
any drastic action and any in-
crease in food prices would lead to
riots and looting, as happened in
the past.
The normally meek Cairo
crowds are quickly roused to fury,
burning and vandalizing when
they suspect a cut in their food
supplies, especially bread.
MUBARAK IS reliable
reported to have asked Shimon
Peres, Israel's Prime Minister, to
explain how Israel managed to cut
its 500 percent inflation rate
within a year. Peres sent back a
detailed account of the policy,
I pointing out that the "Israeli
[ miracle" was achieved by cutting
wages, reducing the state budget
I and withdrawing subsidies.
Shortly afterwards came a reply
from President Mubarak. He ex-
pressed admiration for the Israeli
'achievement but felt, alas, that
I the Israeli plan could not be ap-
I plied to Egypt: the Egyptian
1 masses would not appreciate the
need for such drastic reductions in
[ wages and subsidies.
Mubarak knows that his
enemies are looking for an oppor-
tunity to inflame the Cairo
masses, to attack the government
and to destroy the peace with
Israel. The Moslem fundamen-
talists have, indeed, made major
gains. Walking in the streets of
Cairo one sees many young girls
dressed in the strict Moslem garb.
Compared to the situation in
November, 1984, when I last
visited Cairo, the change in the
religious atmosphere is striking.
During Sadat's lifetime it was
rare to see a young girl in Moslem
attire; now many shops in the
main Cairo streets sell nothing
else.
One experienced observer
remarked: "Moslem fundamen-
talism is definitely a threat. So
far, the movement has no
charismatic leader, no Khomeini.
But if such a man were to emerge,
the government would face a
serious problem."
EGYPTIAN LEADERS are
watching developments warily.
One of them said: "We do not ob-
ject to people becoming strictly
religious. But we are concerned
when religious fanaticism is used
for political purposes. We will
strike at anyone misusing
religion."
It is among the groups opposing
Mubarak that the most vicious at-
tacks on Israel and Jews are
made. The anti-Semitic articles in
the fundamentalist and Com-
Saudi Pop Singer Starts
Storm in Geneva Hotel
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) A
oncert here by a popular
>audi Arabian singer,
escheduled because of a
dw over the fact it was to
te place at a Jewish-
f)wned hotel, degenerated
Tito a drunken brawl among
ie young Arab spectators.
The concert by Mohamed Ab-
ou, with seats priced at $500,
'as to have been held at the Noga
Wton Hotel.
The event was the brainchild of
i Egyptian impresario who view-
I it as an opportunity to attract
p many wealthy tourists from
audi Arabia and other Persian
ulf states spending the summer
i *jeneva.
[When members of the Saudi
yal family staying here learned
that the hotel to be used for the
concert was owned by Jewish
businessman Nissim Gaon, they
raised objections and the event
was transferred to the Intercon-
tinental Hotel.
Intercontinental officials were
only too pleased at the prospect of
a fresh source of income to make
up for the shortfall of American
tourists this year and Arabs who
chose to stay home because of fall-
ing oil prices.
Their satisfaction was shortliv-
ed. Young Kuwaitis attending the
concert after downing a few
drinks started a brawl with a
group from Saudi Arabia. The
concert was quickly transformed
into a donnybrook, with tables,
chairs and glasses flying in all
directions. Bodyguards, quickly
overwhelmed by the fray, called in
police and order was restored at
the hotel.
munist press are ugly and crude
and remind one of the worst ex-
cesses of the Czarist police.
The Talmud is alleged to contain
a plan for the Jews to conquer the
world. The Jews are said to use
freemasonry to gather in all the
earthly wealth. Israel is described
as "the evil spirit of the world."
Nor are the fabrications confin-
ed to the opposition press, as some
officials claim. They occasionally
appear in such respected national
newspapers as Al Ghomouria and
AI Ahram and Israeli officials see
them as alarm signals.
THEY FEAR that the Egyp-
tian government is warning Isrel
that relations will not improve
unless the Israelis make substan-
tial concessions in regard to the
Taba dispute and to the demands
of the Palestinians.
One Israeli official told me of a
boycott of Israel in the Cairo
press. Cairo editors had in-
structed their staff not to write
favorably about Israel or to have
any contacts with Israeli
journalists.
Egyptian writers, who are badly
paid, receive large amounts for ar-
ticles they place in the oil-rich
Arab countries: they know that
any suspicion of contacts with
Israel would destroy this lucrative
market. Similar considerations af-
fect the conduct of Cairo doctors
and lawyers.
"I have not seen an Israeli
tourist for weeks," said an Israeli
diplomat. In 1984, despite the cool
relations between Israel and
Egypt, more than 60,000 Israelis
visited Egypt. A similar flow con-
tinued until last October.
THEN CAME the horrifying in-
cident at Ras Burka in Sinai, when
a demented Egyptian soldier shot
dead several Israeli tourists, in-
cluding children. The horror
which swept Israel and the in-
dignation at the Egyptian govern-
ment's initial indifference has put
an almost total stop to Israeli
tourism.
The Egyptian aircraft which
took me from Tel Aviv to Cairo
was only a quarter full and would
have been emptier still had not a
group of Jerusalem Chasidim
decided to visit the grave of a
txaddik near Cairo. The El Al
plane on the return journey ap-
peared to have fewer than half a
dozen Israelis.
But there are signs of hope.
Both the Israeli and Egyptian
governments realize that they
have made mistakes and that it is
essential to warm up relations
before their pact dissolves. They
recognize that the alternative is
upheaval and tragedy.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Sharon: An Israeli Caesar. By
Uzi Benziman. New York:
Adama Books, 1985. 276 pp.
$17.95.
The sub-title of this book, "An
Israeli Caesar," is a dead
giveaway to the author's inten-
tions. Uzi Benziman, an Israeli
journalist, set out to do a hatchet
job on Arik Sharon and has
achieved his goal in no uncertain
terms.
There are occasionally some
grudging expressions of respect
for Sharon's talents as a military
man and for his patriotism but, by
and large, the book is an unreliev-
ed assault on the character and
the ruling passions of a man who
Benziman fears may one day win
Israel's top political position.
THE AUTHOR'S clear purpose
in bringing all of Sharon's defects
and dictatorial propensities to
public view is to sound a cry of
alarm concerning the possibility
that this "paranoid" may yet
realize his overweening ambition
to become the Prime Minister of
Israel.
The harsh critique begins with
the 1948 War of Independence
when the 20-year-old Sharon
fought as a brave infantryman
who "behaved strangely with odd
quirks and changing moods." As a
platoon commander, he was
wounded and suffered defeat in
the battle for the Latrun police
station.
He blamed the repulse on poor
planning by his superior officers,
and this began a life-long vendetta
against most military leaders
whom he saw as grossly lacking in
his own genius as a man at arms.
The story proceeds with detail-
ed accounts of Sharon's career in
the army, emphasizing his pro-
blem in obeying orders and his
calculated manipulation of them in
order to gain latitude for his own
way.
WHAT COMES through over
and over again is Sharon's con-
tempt for his colleagues and for
those who held higher rank than
he. He also treated his junior of-
ficers with disdain and, at one
point, was accused by Moshe
Dayan. then Chief of Staff, of
showing insufficient concern for
the lives of his own soldiers.
Despite the many difficulties
which Benziman fully recounts in
a most uncomplimentary fashion,
Sharon managed to work his way
up to become a lieutenant general.
He showed "originality and
courage," but he was "egotistical
and a chronic liar." After the Yom
Kippur War of 1973, Sharon left
the army and went into politics.
He soon became bored as an op-
position member of the Knesset
and his "brutish style" offended
other politicians, including those
in his own party. He tried to form
a new party, but he ran it "as a
guru ruling a cult." The party was
dismantled when Sharon joined
forces with Menachem Begin,
even though "he had often attack-
ed Begin as an old-fashioned
demagogue, a prattling fool ."
When Begin became Prime
Minister in 1977, Sharon was ap-
pointed Minister of Agriculture.
According to Benziman, Sharon
used his cabinet position dirup-
tively to extend Israeli set-
tlements on the West Bank while
paying little attention to his
responsibilities for agriculture. In
1981, when the Likud won reelec-
tion, Sharon became Minister of
Defense and, in this post, he
engineered the Lebanese War.
BENZIMANS most severe
condemnation of Sharon is reserv-
ed for the Lebanese War when he
was "deceitful, crafty, uncouth,
egotistic and paranoid." He is ac-
cused of having a "sick personali-
ty" and of scorning democratic
procedures.
There is no question but that
Benziman has succeeded in aler-
ting his readers to the dangers of
Sharon's possible ascendancy to
the position of Israeli Prime
Minister. However, the book is a
demonstration of unbalanced
overkill. Maybe it is true that Arik
Sharon has few redeeming
features, but a greater effort to
bring them to light might make
Benziman's negative bombard-
ment more persuasive.
Submersible Robotic Vehicle
Will Be Pressed Into Search for
Sub Lost on Trip from England
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A submersible robotic
vehicle that was used
recently to film the wreck of
the ocean liner Titanic will
be deployed in Egyptian
waters in the Mediterra-
nean Sea in an effort to find
the Israeli submarine,
Dakar, sunk in January,
1968, according to the
Department of Defense.
A Pentagon spokesman told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the search will begin in late
September in a cooperative effort
between the U.S., Israel and
Egypt. If the search by the U.S.
Navy is successful, efforts will
then be made to salvage the sub-
marine and recover the remains of
the 69 members of her crew.
There has never been any ex-
planation why the diesel-driven
Dakar sank on her maiden voyage
from England to Israel. The sub-
marine was a modernized British
World War II vessel.
Israel, helped by several other
nations, searched unsuccessfully
for the Dakar after it was lost.
There have also been three sear-
ches in cooperation with Egypt. A
marker buoy from the Dakar
washed ashore about 90 miles
south of Tel Aviv about a year
after the submarine sank. This
and other clues have given the
Israelis a general idea of where
the search should be conducted.
When Israeli Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin visited Washington
last year he asked Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger to
use the robotic equipment to
search for the Dakar, according to
the Pentagon spokesman. The ef-
fort was to have begun earlier this
year, but the equipment and
salvage material was needed by
the Navy after the space shuttle
Challenger exploded, the
spokesman said.
The equipment was then used
this summer to explore the
wreckage of the Titanic. It con-
sists of a small submarine, which
carries three persons and can des-
cend to a depth of 6,000-13,120
feet, and then go along the sea
floor and pick up objects with an
arm and claw.
It also can extend a robot ex-
plorer, the Jason Jr., which is at-
tached by a 250 foot tether and
can go in and around objects. This
was what was used to film the
Titanic wreckage.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
Catholic Endorsement
Auschwitz Convent Postponement
NEW YORK John Car-
dinal Krol, Archbishop of
Philadelphia, has informed
the American Jewish Com-
mittee that he "endorses
the recommendations" of
the AJC to postpone the
establishment of a
Carmelite convent at the
side of the Auschwitz con-
centration camp.
The Polish-born prelate also
supported the AJC proposal for
co-sponsoring with the Polish
Catholic church seminars in
Poland "that would help clarify
our differing understandings of
the meaning of Auschwitz to
Catholics and Jews, and to the
Polish people and the Jewish
people."
Cardinal Krol expressed his
views in a letter to Rabbi Marc H.
Tanenbaum, AJC's director of in-
ternational relations, who discuss-
ed the issue of the Carmelite con-
vent with the cardinal in New
York on July 25.
RABBI TANENBAUM and
David M. Gordis, AJC executive
vice-president, also expressed
their concerns about the convent
in a conversation with Zdziskaw
Ludwiczak, charge d'affaires at
the Polish Embassy in
Washington, on Aug. 7. In a long
and forthright exchange, Ludwic-
zak stated that the issue of the
disposition of the convent rests
within the jurisdiction of the
Polish Catholic Church, and he ex-
pressed the hope that a satisfac-
tory solution could be worked out
between the Church and the
Jewish community.
AJC's International Relations
Department has maintained
regular contact with Jewish
leaders in Belgium, France, and
Italy, who met on July 23 with
Franciszek Cardinal Macharski,
Archbishop of Krakow, in Geneva.
As a result of that conversation,
Cardinal Macharski has reported-
ly agreed to postpone any further
construction work on the convent
Peres
Ebullient
Continued from Page 3-A
had with us six physicians, ten
medics, and four tons of equip-
ment. We landed in Douala, which
is the major port of Cameroon,
and the doctors and medics took
off immediately to the stricken
area."
Peres said he and his entourage
had not heard from the doctors by
the time they left Cameroon Tues-
day (Aug. 26) for their 900-mile
flight back to Israel. According to
reports from Cameroon, the
Israeli medical team had taken a
long and difficult route to the
stricken area and had not yet ar-
rived there by nightfall Tuesday.
[:]ROWARD
IJAPER &
[JACKAGING
in Auschwitz, pending further
dialogue with Jewish leaders.
Cardinal Krol recently announc-
ed plans to visit Poland and meet
with Cardinal Macharski. In an-
ticipation of that visit, Rabbi
Tanenbaum sent Cardinal Krol a
letter outlining the views of the
Jewish community and asked that
these be shared with the Polish
Catholic church authorities.
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 800 432 3708
0ROWARD
SJAPER a
iJACKAGING
IN HIS response, Cardinal Krol
worte, "I have made a copy of
your letter and enclosures and in-
tend to submit it to Cardinal
Macarski of Krakow, and endorse
the recommendations which you
make with reference to the pro-
posed erection of a convent at
Auschwitz."
Rabbi Tanenbaum made the
following observations in his let-
ter to Cardinal Krol, whom he has
known since Vatican Council II:
The Jewish people are very
conscious that more than a million
Polish Catholic people were killed
by the Nazis at Auschwitz, and
that it is altogether appropriate to
memorialize their deaths. A
Carmelite convent at Dachau has
exactly that spiritual purpose.
The Belgian Cathlic group
called "Aid to the Church in
Distress" precipitated the present
debate over the proposed
Carmelite convent at Auschwitz
by seeming insensitivity to what
Auschwitz means to the Jewish
people. The group's fund-raising
literature ignored that nearly
three million were murdered by
the Nazis in Auschwitz-Birkenua,
adding "insult to injury" by mak-
ing statements as "the convent
. (is) a witness to the victorious
power of the cross of Jesus" and
"a spiritual fortress and
guarantee of the conversion of our
strayed brothers." Most Jews
have taken that as "a callous
spiritual affront to their dignity as
Jews."
Auschwitz has become "the
unique, transcendant symbol of
the Nazis' murderous attempt of
'the final solution,' the calculated
effort to bring about the exter-
mination of the entire Jewish peo-
ple." It is both morally and in-
tellectually "not allowable" that
the Belgian Catholic group can
transform Auschwitz into a
Catholic shrine
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Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Film-Maker, Sculptor Will Be
Honored by Survivors Group
Boys Town Jerusalem alumni, serving in the
Israel Defense Forces, light a memorial candle
for their 62 fellow-alumni who fell during
military service.
Waldheim Affair
The Souring of Israel, Austria
Continued from Page 1-A
Austria, whose foreign policy is
based on strict neutrality between
East and West, changed the style,
but not the substance, of its Mid-
dle East policy, lowering the
harsh rhetoric but maintaining its
principles intact.
With the accession of Waldheim
to the Austrain Presidency in Ju-
ly, Israel's relationship with
Austria has been thrown off-
balance again, although Austria's
new Chancellor, Franc Vranitzky,
is known to have warm feelings
for Israel.
To highlight its displeasure with
the then-President-elect's military
record as an intelligence officer in
the German army, Israel recalled
its Ambassador, Michael Elizur,
to Jerusalem. Elizur, in an inter-
view with this reporter as he
prepared to leave Vienna, said he
expected to return to Austria
some time in the future a view
echoed by officials in the Austrian
Foreign Ministry.
ISRAEL'S RELATIONS with
Austria began to sour on May 2,
when Yitzhak Shamir, the
Foreign Minister said that the
election of Waldheim would be "a
real tragedy from all points of
view political, diplomatic, and
human."
The Austrian response was
equally sharp. Leopold Gratz, the
then-Foreign Minister,
characterized Shamir's remarks
as an "unequivocable interference
in Austria's internal affairs."
Gratz, however, did not send
Israel an official protest note,
signifying his desire not to roil the
waters any further.
Observers on both sides agree
that the Waldheim affair has set
back Israeli-Austrian relations.
Before his recall to Israel, Elizur
acknowledged that an 'irritant"
had been injected into the rela-
tionship. In a reference to the
revulsion occasioned in Israel by
Waldheim's alleged involvement
in atrocities against Yugoslavian
partisans and civilians, as well as
Greek Jews, Elizur noted: "Many
Austrians haven't appreciated the
depth of feelings that move
Jewish Israelis."
WALTER SCHWIMMER, the
president of the Austrian-Israel
Friendship Society, and a conser-
vative member of Parliament who
recently visited Israel, said that,
at present, "uncertainty" was the
operative word to describe
Austria's relations with Israel. He
declined to say they had been
damaged.
A member of Waldheim's Peo-
ple's Party, Schwimmer defended
Waldheim, whom he knows well.
He said the former United Na-
France May Pull Soldiers
Out of UNIFIL, Chirac Warns
By RON POPESKI
PARIS (JTA) Prime
linister Jacques Chirac has
sued a new warning that France
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will pull its soldiers out of the
United Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL) unless new
guarantees for their safety are
given by the United Nations.
Chirac, speaking to a youth
group of his conservative Rally for
the Republic Party (RPR), urged
the UN to "redefine the objective
of its forces in the Middle East.
Should this not be done, it would
be absurd to maintain troops
there under current conditions,
whatever their nationality,^ par-
ticularly those from France."
The Prime Minister's comments
echoed a similar statement by
Foreign Minister Jean-Bernard
Raimond. Government concern
over the participation of more
than 1,000 French troops in
UNIFIL stem from attacks on
their positions by Shiite militia
that have left some two dozen
French soldiers injured in recent
weeks.
Chirac praised the courage of
the French soldiers, but said the
UN was "not up to the respon-
sibilities it claims to assume. If
things continue in this way, they
will wind up as hostages," he told
his youthful audience.
tions Secretary General had not
been a member of the Nazi Party,
opposed Nazi ideology and hailed
from an anti-Nazi family.
Waldheim, he went on to say, was
not anti-Semitic. "He'll fight anti-
Semitism in Austria, and he's in-
terested in good relations bet-
ween Austria and Israel."
Austrian electors, he added,
would have rejected Waldheim
had he really been a Nazi.
"Austrians voted for him because
he's a good statesman, because
they wanted a political change and
perhaps out of a feeling that he
had been unfairly maligned."
Schwimmer, whose
predecessor, Heinz Nittel, was
killed by Arab terrorists five years
ago, said he realized that "we
Austrians don't sufficiently
understand Jewish sensibilities
with regard to the Holocaust."
What was now necesary, he
pointed out, was "real dialogue."
NEW YORK Film maker
Claude Lanzmann and the
sculptor Natan Rapoport will be
honored as "guardians of remem-
brance" by the American Gather-
ing and Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors at a "Liberty
Reunion" dinner in the Waldorf-
Astoria Sunday.
Lanzmann's award-winning
film "Shoah" featured interviews
with Holocaust survivors. Among
Rapoport's acclaimed works is
"Liberation," a 15-foot sculpture
of an American soldier carrying a
Holocaust survivor. It is situated
in Liberty Park on the New Jersey
shore facing the Statue of
Liberty.
THE TWO MEN will receive
scrolls at the dinner, which is ex-
pected to be attended by 1,200
people and will be addressed by
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the
United States Holocaust
Memorial Council.
The dinner will celebrate "40
years of a new life," according to
Benjamin Meed, president of the
American Gathering, which
represents 55,000 Jewish
Holocaust survivors in the U.S. It
marks the 40th anniversary of the
arrival in the U.S. of the first
Jewish Holocaust survivors, who
entered the country under the
Truman Act of 1946.
Earlier in the day, several thou-
sand Jewish survivors of the
Holocaust and their families from
across the country will gather at
the Statue of Liberty "to thank
America for providing them with
a home and haven," Meed said.
The Liberty Island ceremonies
will commence at 11:30 a.m.
THE SEPT. 7 "Liberty Reu-
nion," the first to be held in New
York, is being co-sponsored by
HI AS, the worldwide immigration
agency, which was instrumental
in helping many of the Holocaust
survivors to begin new lives in the
U.S. in freedom and dignity.
Claude Lanzmann
Robert L. Israeloff, president of
HIAS, said the reunion and dinner
would "pay homage to the ex-
traordinary dynamism of the four
decades during which the sur-
vivors have given so much to this
country." He added:
"The survivors and their ac-
complishments in every field must
surely serve as shining examples
to all those who have found hope
and new life in these United
States. It is a story in which the
survivors and HIAS participated
together. And it is one that
demonstrates the invincible spirit
of the survivors and honors their
courage and tenacity."
THE FLAGS of 11 American
Army units that liberated the Nazi
death camps will be displayed dur-
ing the Statue of Liberty pro-
gram, which will include perfor-
mances of patriotic American
compositions and Yiddish music
by the 100-member U.S. Army
Band and Choir, Meed said. A
high-ranking Administration of-
ficial is expected to address the
gathering, he added.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986

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By JAY I. KISLAK
Six weeks ago, the morn-
ing mail brought a personal
invitation from Vice Presi-
dent George Bush to join
him as an official guest on a
five-day State visit to Israel,
the first leg of a ten-day
tour that would also take
the Vice President, his wife,
Barbara, and the official
party to Jordan and Egypt.
The letter asked me to be one of
a party of eight to act as informal
advisers to Bush in a country that
we, as supporters of the
American-Israel alliance, had
visited before.
THE OPPORTUNITY to travel
as a guest on Air Force Two, to
participate in a five-day whirlwind
calendar of official visits and in-
formal conversations with, among
others, Prime Minister Peres,
members of his cabinet and the
IDF, Natan and Avital Sharan-
sky, Jerusalem Mayor Teddy
Kollek and President Herzog, was
an exciting personal prospect.
But it was more than that. For
me it was, first of all, a chance to
observe first-hand a visit bound to
strengthen the links between the
U.S. and Israel. In addition, it was
an opportunity to participate in
the orientation of someone who
may be our next President into
the complexities of the Middle
East peace puzzle and the central
strategic role Israel plays in that
part of the world.
Bush's visit to the Western
Wall, his tour of Yad Vashem and
his speech to members of the
Knesset were all important. Yes,
they probably do provide the best
so-called "photo opportunities"
Jay I. Kislak is a longtime
Jewish community and civic
leader in Greater Miami.
demonstrating our government's
strong commitment to the Jewish
state.
BUT THE segments of the
Bush trip that I thought had the
greatest value flowed from three
or four lower key events which
gave the Vice President the
chance to establish direct personal
contacts with current and future
leaders of Israel as well as some of
Israel's young people.
The time he spent with Prime
Minister Peres was particularly
useful. I recall the warm meeting
between the two men and their
wives in the living room of Israel's
first Prime Minister, David Ben-
Gurion, at the Sde Boker kibbutz
in the Negev.
It reminded me of a dinner I at-
tended at the Bush residence in
Washington last Spring when
Peres was a guest, along with
Secretary of State Shultz and
other members of the administra-
tion. Bush and Peres were friend-
ly then. Their get-together in Ben
Gurion's living room was a further
demonstration of their close rela-
tionship and, to me, was one of the
highlights of the entire trip.
ANOTHER valuable gathering
was in Jerusalem when Bush met
with a group of young Israeli
leaders including represen-
tatives from the government, the
media, business and the arts. It
was a good mix of the many
strains of opinion that exist in
Israeli society and gave Bush an
unusual chance to experience the
Continued on Page 9-B
Runoff Sept. 30th
Primary '86 Results
Voters went to the polls Tues-
day to decide numerous races
state and county wide. The results
of this primary will be several run-
offs to be held Sept. 30.
Facing a run-off election will be
for Governor on the Democratic
ticket: Steve Pajcic will face Jim
Smith; Lou Frey Jr. and Bob Mar-
tinez will face each other on the
Republican ticket. In the Senate
race Bob Graham (D) will face
Paula Hawkins (R) in the
November general election.
The office of Attorney General
will have Robert Butterworth (D)
land Ed Dunn (D) in a run-off with
the winner facing Jim Watt (R) in
the general election. Commis-
sioner of Insurance/Treasurer Bill
Gunter (D) will be up against Van
B. Poole (R) in the general elec-
tion. Ron Howard (R) and Stan
Marshall (R) will be in a run-off for
I Commissioner of Education, with
I the winner facing Betty Castor
[(D) in November.
On the local scene, run-offs will
[ be held for the following districts:
;District 117, Democrat, Susan
Guber and Mike Simonhoff;
District 118, Democrat, Nathaniel
Edmond and Tim Murphy;
District 119, Democrat, John F.
Cosgrove and Carolyn Hawkins;
District 120, Democrat,
Wilhelmina Harvey and Ron
Saunders;
In the Circuit Court Joseph A.
Nadler will face a run-off with
Leah A. Simms for Group 13.
County Court races will be Ber-
nard S. Shapiro and David L.
Tobin, Group 5; Roy T. Gelber and
[Lucrecia Granda, Group 13.
Board of County Commis-
sioners, District 1 will see Betty
FT Ferguson and Barry D.
ISchreiber in the run-off; District 2
will be Jorge Valdes vs. John B.
Weaver.
Elected in the primary were:
School Board District 1, Democrat
Robert Renick; Circuit Court
Group 6, Edmund W. Newbold;
County Court Group 1, Thomas G.
O'Connell; Group 6, Eli Breger;
Group 22, Steve Levine. Board of
County Commissioners, District
3, Barbara M. Carey.
Three issues were decided in the
primary. The Dade Fire Board
was passed, Miami Question 1 was
defeated and Miami Question 2
was narrowly defeated.
Vice President and Mrs. Bush with Jay I.
Kislak, who was one of eight informal advisers
invited to join the Vice President as a guest on
a five-day State visit to Israel.
Attorney General Meese And D.C Banker
Robert Pincus To Be Honored By JNF
NEW
torney
YORK U.S. At-
General Edwin
Meese and Sovran/D.C. Na-
tional Bank President
Robert Pincus will be
honored by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund at a dinner on
Oct. 15 in the Washington
Hilton, Washington, D.C.
Meese will receive JNF's
Distinguished Community Service
Award, and Pincus will be
presented with the Tree of Life
Award. Co-chairmen of the event
are Delano E. Lewis, vice presi-
dent, C and P Telephone; and
Leonard S. Melrod, senior part-
ner, Melrod, Redman, Gartlan.
Meese has served as Attorney
General since February, 1985 and
has been one of America's
outspoken supporters for the
State of Israel, as well as a leading
advocate for a strong policy in
response to world terrorism. He
recently toured Israel and, while
there, planted a tree in a JNF
grove in memory of his son, Scott.
PINCUS is president and chief
executive officer of the newly-
merged Sovran/D.C. National
Bank. In addition to being one of
Washington's business leaders,
Pincus has been heavily involved
in community service. He has
served as chairman of the March
of Dimes Telethon and was involv-
ed in the Sovran/D.C., National
Continued on Page 8-B
U.S. Attorney General
Edwin Meese
Israel's Finance Minister To Address
Bonds National Leadership Confab
Israel's new Finance Minister,
Moshe Nissim, will deliver the
principal address at the Israel
Bond campaign's 1986 National
Leadership Conference in
Baltimore on Sept. 11-14, it has
been announced by Philip T. War-
ren, General Campaign Chairman
of the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization.
In addition to Warren, other
South Floridians attending the
conference will be M. Ronald
Krongold, Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, Larry Gotlieb, Fay
Frankel and Howard Klein, ex-
ecutive director of the Miami
Israel Bond office.
U.S. Senator Joseph R. Biden of
Delaware will also speak at one of
the conference sessions.
Nissim's visit to the United
States to address Israel Bond con-
ference participants will mark his
first public appearance in this
country since he assumed his key
post in Israel's Cabinet in April.
He will meet with U.S. Govern-
ment officials in Washington dur-
ing his visit.
"With economic issues in the
forefront of Israel's concerns, our
conference will give friends of
Israel their first opportunity to
hear a first-hand report on
Israel's progress from its highest
economic official," noted Warren.
je wislh Flor idia im
Miami, Florida Friday, September 5,1986 Section B
Federation
Proclaims 'Synagogue
Mobilization Month'
In a community-wide effort
to increase membership in
area synagogues, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has
proclaimed the month of Elul
(the last month of the Jewish
calendar year) as "Synagogue
Mobilization Month" beginn-
ing Friday, Sept. 5 and ending
with the ushering in of Rosh
Hashana on Friday evening,
Oct. 3. The announcement was
made by Federation President
Aaron Podhurst.
Aaron Podhurst
Podhurst noted, "Synagogues have always been the
traditional center of continuity in Jewish life in every com-
munity. It is the house of assembly and learning as well as
the house of prayer."
"During 'Synagogue Mobilization Month' our Federation
urges all people who are not presently affiliated with a
synagogue to participate actively in the richness and beau-
ty that synagogues can offer," Podhurst continued.
Podhurst noted that individuals and families who are in-
terested in obtaining synagogue membership information
can contact the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami.
The Rabbinical Association, which has offices in the
Federation building, will offer information on Orthodox,
Conservative, Reform and Reconstructionist synagogues
throughout the community to help guide residents.


Page 2-B The Jewish FToridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
Are Israelis 'Shnorrers'?
Jewish Agency Booklet Says So
By SHMUEL SHMTZER
American Jewry con-
tributes $400 million for
Israeli needs annually. Their
generosity entitles them to
have a say in the allocation
of this money to participate
in the management of the
Jewish Agency and the
World Zionist Organiza-
tions, which deckled upon
the distribution of Diaspora
Jewry's contributions.
If they are certain that these
two organizations are not fuction-
ing as they should, and that the
party-based distribution of
authority in the Jewish Agency
and the WZO is the roots of all
evils, then they have every right
to demand changes in the
organizational structure and
infrastructure.
IF THEY as certain, however,
that a pamphlet detailing their
complaints and proposals can be
"embellished" with illustrations
showing Israeli Jews and not
necessarily Jewish Agency of-
ficials running down a hill on
which the Zionist flag is firmly
planted, to a valley where there is
a flag in the shape of a dollar bill;
if they are certain that Israeli
Jews can be portrayed as long-
nosed thnorrert standing aside a
cannon and jet fighter extending a
long, long hand t the Jewish
benefactor in America; if they feel
it necessary to portray the rela-
tion of Diaspora Jewry to Israel in
the form of an upside-down
menorah with an unidentifiable
hand stuffing dollars into its base
and Israeli Jews standing below,
eagerly grabbing the dollars
which are spewing forth from
each of the seven branches of the
menorah; when they portray the
American contributors bearing
the Zionist burden, while the
Israelis are fighting among
themselves then they expect to
buy much more than the right to
an opinion, to which every con-
tributor is, naturally, entitled.
The pamphlet is called "Where
Do Our Dollars Go*" Its illustra-
tions have been called anti-
Semitic, or at beat, in very poor
taste. Whoever published it, and
whoever distributed it among the
delegates to the Jewish Agency
Assembly which convened in
Jerusalem recently, is neither
prepared to divulge his identity
nor to voice his accusations in the
open.
IF THE purpose of the pam-
phlet is to initiate a debate on the
management of the Jewish Agen-
cy and the WZO, and the manner
in which they allocate the
resources which Diaspora Jewry
has made available to them, then
it has failed. Such a debate cannot
begin with one side showing con-
tempt for the other and letting it
know that it is no better than a
miserable shnorrer who solicits
funds under false pretenses and
them misuses them. Israeli Jews
need financial aid perhaps no less
than Diaspora Jews need a com-
mon cause for which to rally
And yet, Israel does not need
the aid so badly as to agree to any
way in which it is extended, in-
cluding insults and contempt. At
any rate, the question of who real-
ly bears the burden of the State
and its existence deserves greater
consideration.
World Jewry so the pamphlet
informs us has contributed
more than $8 billion to the Jewish
Agency since the establishment of
the State of Israel. A very im-
pressive figure! A bit less im
preawve alongside Israel's current
budget of morew than $20 billion.
Even if we deduct $3 billion in
American aid, it is still more than
double the contributions of world
This article first appeared in
'Maariv' on June 27.
Jewry during the last W years.
This is not said to belittle the
role of Diaspora Jewry. It is, by all
means, respectable and conssv
tent. Over the years, the value of
the dollar has decreased con-
siderably, while the average in-
come of the Jewish family in
America has risen considerably.
Jewish campaign funds have,
more or leas, remained the same:
about $400 million annually, or 2.5
percent of what Israelis will pay in
taxes, customs and excise this
year, to insure the continued ex-
istence and development of then-
state.
ISRAEL'S JEWS are great
debaters. They discuss and debate
101 issues: hawks v. doves,
religious extremists v. militant
secularists, socialists v. social con-
servatives, Ethiopian olim v. the
Rabbinate, coalition partners
fighting among themselves,
workers fighting for employment
and increased wages, develop-
ment town residents arguing
against settlers in Judea and
Samaria, various interest groups
competing for a share of the na-
tional budget, proponents of law
and order take their stand against
lawbreakers.
There is no end to the
hullabaloo, no limit to the con-
troversy. Yet. amidst all this
tumult, everyone bears his part of
the financial burden, which is
among the heaviest in the world
and is only a small part of the
overall burden we have to bear.
There is also the security
burden to which Diaspora Jewry
contributes no more than admira-
tion and pride. When Khadafy or
Arafat threaten to increase ter-
ror, we don't cancel our trips to
the Middle East until the fury dies
down. We live in terror. When a
war doesn't progress as we ex-
pected, we debate extensively
from uitkin. not from without.
The Jews living in America? A
small group of community
workers which represents itself?
A lone Israeli vored graphic artist
who not long ago lived among us,
but has exchanged the blue and
white flag for one made of dollars,
and has found Jews in America
willing to pay for his efforts to pin
the blame on us?
THE DEBATE between
Zionists in Israel and America
seems not only legitimate, but also
necessary especially regarding
issues discussed in the sponsorless
pamphlet. Both parties to the
debate must recognize the great
difference between one who is in-
volved body and soul in Zionist
fulfillment and one who wants to
wield control from afar.
The first undoubtedly makes
more mistakes but also bears the
risks and pays for his mistakes.
Therefore he will always demand
the final say. And the one who
contributes a small part of his
wealth to the partnership without
becoming too personally involved
will have to come to terms with
the distribution of authority.
On this basis, it is definitely
possible to examine the com-
plaints and accusations in the
pamphlet. For example, the
charge that Zionist money should
not be used to encourage anti-
Zionist education in ultra-
Orthodox institutions or the
charge that shliehim (emissaries)
be chosen according to the posi-
tion, and sent to places where
they will be best utilized.
UNDERSTANDABLY, there
is reason to whitewash the ques-
tion of how much of Jewish cam-
paign funds allocated to Israel
should be rechanneled to the
Diaspora in the form of ihlxchxm.
teachers, or institutions which
non-Orthodox bodies seek to set
up in Israel not as centers for
their members who plan to make
aliya. but as a substitute to auya.
and youth education centers with
short-term programs aimed at in-
culcating the youth with Jewish
heritage before they return to
America.
This demand entails the implied
threat that if the Conservative
and Reform movements are not
allocated the funds they demand,
they will re-examine then- commit-
ment to the United Jewish Ap-
peal. This style of debate is
nothing new. It is consistent with
the tone of the entire pamphlet,
that the money contributed by
Diaspora Jewry does not become
the property of the Zionist Move-
ment of the State of Israel, but re-
mains "our" dollars.
These threats are two-sided. Or-
thodox contributors can also
threaten to re-examine their com-
mitment to the UJA if they feel
they are financing what they see
as "harmful" institutions. It is
very simple to reach a division of
financial contributions of
Diaspora Jewry into a large
number of campaigns, with each
one allocating funds as it wishes.
Whoever sees fit to discredit the
political divisions in Israel and the
political considerations which
guide the Jewish Agency and the
WZO. must consider whether
changing the inter-political divi-
sions for inter-stream divisions
will actually be an improvement.
With all due respect and
-ecognition of the rights of
American Jewish contributors. I
feel there are many things they
have yet to learn. Public debate,
its style, and argumentation are
not least among them.
And hundreds of reserve soldiers
return from military service
straight to demonstrations
without even changing clothes.
At the HadassahHebrew University Medical Center in
Jerusalem, Dr. Dan R. Lewis, of Miami, attends an annual
meeting on Admnces in Ophthalmology and lectures on some of-
fice and surgical procedures. Dr. Lewis is seen with Professor
Chanan Zauberman (right), head of the Eye Department in the
Hadassah Hospital, who organized the meeting.
IT IS TRUE that many aspects
of our lives in Israel run along par-
ty lines the government, jobs,
honors, and certainly, budget
allocations. This system, un-
doubtedly, leaves much to be
desired. Yet. it is far better and
far more democratic than other
systems: that of American Jewry
where leadership is determined
according to financial means and
not according to elections (which
are never held) or the relative
distribution of forces.
In Israel, with our distorded
democracy, at least we know who
authorized whom, and who is
speaking for whom. In America,
the depoliticization has brought
about a situation in which it is im-
possible to clarify whether an opi-
nion represents the entire Jewish
community, certain sectors, or
merely one Jewish millionaire or
another.
One thing is certain. Our system
is far from perfect, but before we
change it for the apolitical system
of Jewish organizations in
America, we would like to know
who referred to us in the language
of anti-Semitic caricatures and the
question, "Where Do Our Dollars
Go?"
When you're not quite ready
to go home ...we can help.
The Miami Jewish Home &
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens now offers the finest
short-term rehabilitation available
featuring:
the latest in rehabilitative and
diagnostic equipment and
individual therapy;
kosher meals and the full
spectrum of social and medical
services of the Miami Jewish
Home;
professional, skilled care in our
new, separate 40-bed
rehabilitation center.
full courtesy privileges for private
physicians
At the Harold and Patricia Toppel
Rehabilitation Center...
We can help you come home.
2!fFL 33l37V1"0n CartX3 "* AOm*''n9 ",ce a ,305) 75'-8626 exl 211 or wr,le 151 NE 52rxJ Street


Mid-Life Crisis
Is Subject Of
Dr. Sol Landau's New Book
Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
"Burnout" is a popular
phrase today for those in the
35-to-55 age bracket who
have achieved success but
are at a point where life has
lost much of its spark and
vitality.
Symptoms of burnout are
numerous: chronic fatigue, high
absenteeism, cynicism, low
motivation, increased irritability,
inability to concentrate or make
decisions, increased blood
pressure, higher accident rate,
heavier drinking and smoking.
DR. SOL LANDAU, former
spiritual leader of Miami's oldest
temple, Beth David Congregation,
and whose career as a rabbi has
spanned 35 years, explores the
burnout syndrome and the painful
realities of midlife crises in his
new book. "Turning Points: Self-
Renewal at Midlife." recently
published by New Horizon Press.
Dr. Landau's inspirational and
evocative study basically a
"why-to" and "how-to-do-it" book
offers practical advice and
methods for coping with mid-life
rises so that the crises
themselves can be turned around
for positive self-examination to
revive spirits and open new doors.
Utilizing case histories, life
check lists, the latest research in
the field and nearly four decades
of personal counseling, Dr. Lan-
dau set as his goal the renewal of
oneself through self-knowledge
and self-development.
DR. LANDAU is president and
executive director of the Miami-
based Mid/Life Services Founda-
tion organized in 1981. The Foun-
AJV dation was formed to assist
business and industry in mid/life
problems and career change for
executives and employees. The
Foundation also engages in
research, conducts workshops and
seminars, and provides individual
and group counseling.
"Middle age is a time of intense
crisis, a time of great turbulence
for many individuals," says Dr.
Landau. In his book. Dr. Landau
explores the painful realities of
mid-life crises which, in varying
degrees, can consist of burnout as
well as divorce, impotency, sud-
den unemployment, widowhood,
responsibility for infirm parents
and chronic illness.
^ Currently there are more than
45 million Americans in "midlife"
j ages 45 to 65. Some social
scientist* place midlife between
[the ages of 40 and 60; others 35
mi 54. But it is around age 40
it most of the manifestations of
he middle years begin to present
themselves.
FOR MANY, the years of
85-to-55 are the best and the
worst of times, writes Dr. Lan-
dau. On the one hand, the mid-
Fer is in the "command genera-
on," often at the peak of earning
power, with an established family
and goals achieved.
On the other hand, indicates Dr.
Landau, there is an increasing
Sensation that life is passing by as
mortality becomes internalized.
he value of one's work becomes
nore elusive, and the glories of
youth fade but are constantly
auted by society.
"Industry," notes Dr. Landau,
['is becoming increasingly aware
f the need to deal with the pro-
blems of mid-life. Lower morale,
lecreased productivity, high
senteeism and employee bur-
nout have a deleterious impact on
usiness." Dr. Landau estimates
fiat the monetary loss to U.S.
ftusiness is $15 billion a year on
turnout alone.
Dr. Landau reached one of his
wn "turning points" in life in
Dr. Sol Landau
1981 when he took an early retire-
ment from the pulpit at Beth
David. He finished his PhD degree
in adult education from Florida
State University. He earlier earn-
ed degrees from Brooklyn College
and New York University. In ad-
dition to serving as president of
Mid/Life Services, he was adjunct
full professor of psychology at the
University of Miami.
THE SON and grandson of rab-
bis in Berlin. Sol Landau and his
family came to the U.S. in 1940
via London. Two years later,
young Sol, now a U.S. citizen, was
back in Europe, this time serving
in the U.S. Army.
Before coming to Miami, Dr.
Landau led congregations in Ohio
and Illinois. He has served on such
Boards as the Florida Council on
Aging and the Mental Health
Association of Dade County. His
writings have been published in
both religious and secular
magazines.
Dr. Landau and his wife,
Gabriela, a vice president of
Prudential-Bache Investments in
Coral Gables, have been married
for 35 years and live at Grove Isle.
The Landaus have a son. Ezra,
and a daughter. Tamara.
Hillel Provides
High Holy
Day Services
South Dade Hillel, which serves
both FIU and Miami Dade South,
will be sponsoring Rush Hashana
and Yom Kippur Services this
year for all members of the FIU
and MDCC communities and their
families. Services will be located
at the FIU-Tamiami Campus.
Tickets for college students with a
valid ID are free of charge.
Tickets for faculty and staff with a
valid ID are also free of charge
(includes spouses and children
under age 18).
Community members will be
charged and tickets must be ob-
tained in advance from the
Hillel/Campus Ministry office at
FIU-Tamiami in Trailer MO-1.
CANTOR OR
BALTEFILAH
For High Holy Days
Phone 858-6334
For Appointment
Fundraiser
National Jewish membership
organization seeks experienced
F/R to direct Florida campaign.
Salary commensurate w/experl-
snee. Send resume to:
SYMARQOLIS
National Campaign Director
American ORT Federation
817 Broadway
New York. N.Y. 10003 ____
MJHHA
Gets Endowment For Alzheimer's Program
One family's tragedy will have
provided the impetus for a new
program that will benefit many
for whom Alzheimer's Disease is a
devastating blow. Miami-based
philanthropist and civic activist
Nathan Rood, whose wife is af-
flicted with Alzheimer's Disease,
has announced an endowment for
the establishment and continua-
tion of a new Alzheimer's pro-
gram at the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged.
The Roddy C. Rood Foundation
will provide an initial 1250,000 in
1986 and additional funds each
year thereafter to go toward
assessment, care and
maintenance of Alzheimer's pa-
tients, as well as the training of
professional and care staff who
deal with these special patients.
To this end, a 28-bed
Alzheimer's Unit will be set up as
a pilot program at the Miami
Jewish Home specifically for
residents afflicted with
Alzheimer's Disease. The pro-
gram will be the first of its kind in
Florida to fund a combination of
Alzheimer's clinical care and staff
training in a long-term care
facility.
"Slowly, Alzheimer's Disease
cripples the mind and the spirit
while we can do very little to ar-
New Edition Of
Rosh Hashana
Home Reader
It was announced that a new
edition of the Rosh Hashana
Home Reader is now ready for
free distribution by Congregation
Kol Yisroel Chaverim, according
to Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, spiritual
leader of the Congregation. The
new publication contains explana-
tions about the traditional
customs and ceremonies concern-
ing the High Holyday observance,
as well as selected prayers in
Hebrew and English which are
recited during the observance. A
special section of the leaflet is
devoted to several modern poetry
renditions which highlight the
deep significance of the holiday.
Roddy and Nathan Rood (right) are congratulated by Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged Director of Development
Steve Rose on the launching of their new Alzheimer's Program.
rest its progress," explained
Rood. "This new unit will not only
care for those afflicted with
Alzheimer's Disease, it will pro-
vide the best training for those
who will be working directly with
Alzheimer's patients. I think the
Miami Jewish Home is best
qualified to do this because they
are closest to the problem and
have had the most experience
with it."
The Roddy C. Rood Founda-
tion's endowment is also unique in
that it is the first ongoing grant to
the Miami Jewish Home to be
specifically used for direct care
and training. The program is
scheduled to go into effect early in
September, 1986.
Nathan Rood, a retired U.S. Ar-
my Colonel and real estate
developer, is the former president
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee and is a former officer and
member of the Board of Trustees
of Temple Israel. He and his wife
Roddy are Humanitarian
Founders of the Miami Jewish
Home.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 5. 1986
How I Learned To
Stop Worrying About My Kippah And Love New Kippon
NEW YORK What do a Artp-
pah and nuclear engineering have
in common? "They're both involv-
ed with the head," says Dr. Lev
Neymotin, a mechanical engineer
with Brookhaven National
Laboratory and the inventor of
Kippon, a new device to keep a
yarmulke on the head without
bobby pins or clips.
The Russian emigre, recently
naturalized as a U.S. citizen, hit
on a special type of V'elcro those
strips with tiny nylon heads that
fasten together which could be
taped inside a yarmulke to grip
the hair for easy hold. Now named
and packaged. Kippon is being
test-marketed mostly in the Now
York metropolitan area.
THE JINGLE on the Kippon
package proclaims: "No more bob-
by pins, no more clips! Say good-
bye to anxiety trips! Fits all sizes
adult or child. Fits all hair
types, straight or wild."
Instructions show how the Kip-
pon strips attach to the yarmulke
and how to agitate the yarmulke
on the head, pressing down until
the Kippon meshes with the hair.
The meshing process is a comfor-
table one, with no pull felt on the
hair, since the Kippon rounded
"heads" are tiny and catch the
hair easily.
To remove the yarmulke, simply
pull it gently away. For shorter
hair. Dr. Neymotin recommends
agitating the yarmulke with Kip-
pon slightly more on the head than
for the long hair, exerting
pressure.
To be doubly sure that the Kip-
pon strips stick to the yarmulke.
Dr. Neymotin suggests ironing
the glue side of the Kippon strips
before removing the protective
paper. Using a warm iron makes
the glue stickier, and it will
penetrate faster into the yar-
mulke when pressed in.
HOW DID Kippon come about?
The idea of an invisible, conve-
nient device to keep a yarmulke in
place was the brainchild of Rabbi
Sholom Ber Schapiro. While
teaching a class in Chassidus on
Long Island, he noticed that a
young man, interested in becom-
ing religious, and who usually
wore a yarmulke, was
bareheaded.
Concerned, Rabbi Schapiro ask-
ed him why. The answer was that
the young man had lost the critical
bobby pin. Worried that the man
was going to stop wearing the
yarmulke altogether. Rabbi
Schapiro wondered if there was a
superior solution to the bobby pin.
His focus on the subject carried
News Brief
TEL AVIV (WNS) Textile
exports rose during the first seven
months of 1986 from $203 million
last year to $257 million this year,
according to Yochanan Levy,
director of the Ministry of In-
dustry and Trade's Textile and
Light Industries division.
him as far away as Israel, where
he made contact with Prof. Her-
man Branover, who specializes in
magneto-hydrodynamics. Rabbi
Schapiro thought thay maybe
there was some kind of chemical
solution or very sophisticated
magnetism that would provide the
answer.
BRANOVER REFERRED
Rabbi Schapiro to Dr. Lev
Nemotin, living in the U.S. on
Long Island, and whom Branover
had known back in Russia.
Neymotin. rather than explor-
ing scientific means, seized upon
the idea of Velcro. After market
research, and trial and error, Dr.
Neymotin selected the width and
density of Velcro that worked best
in terms of attaching to hair. Most
ordinary Velcro did not do the job.
Said Rabbi Schapiro of his part-
nership with Dr. Neymotin: "I
thought about the problem for a
whole year. When I found Lev, he
pushed the idea, and within two
weeks we had a product."
Rabbi Schapiro, who is handling
Kippon's distribution, advises that
the product is available at select
Judaica and gift shops throughout
the New York metropolitan area.
i
Nuclear Engineer Lei- S'eymotin (left) congratulates his partner.
Rabbi Sholom Ber Schapiro of Nassau County, L.I.. on the launch
of their new product, Kippon. designed to keep a yarmulk> \n
place all day. ini'isibly and comfortably, without bobby mi
clips.
;
I
Reach Out And Teach Someone To Read
Beth David Congregation Installs
Kicking off literacy month.
Women's American ORT. Dade
South Region, in conjunction with
the Miami-Dade Public Library
System's Project Lead, will be
manning literacy information
booths and recruiting tutors from
Sept. 4 through 7 at the Cutler
Ridge. Dadeland and Miami Inter-
national Malls. The campaign
theme is "Reach Out and Teach
Someone."
Women's American ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
through Training) are national
supporters of PLUS. Project
Literacy U.S. PLUS is a major
Officers At Shabbat Service Adath Yeshurun Open House Sunday
Beth David Congregation an-
nounces the installation of the Of-
ficers of the Congregation for the
ensuing year to take place at
Shabbat Service on Saturday at 9
a.m. Officers for the Sisterhood
will be installed at the same time.
The Congregation officers for
1986-87 are Barbara Waas, presi-
dent; Albert Beer, executive vice
president; Norman Lawrence,
Isaac Serure and Stanley Zakarin,
vice presidents; David Swartz,
treasurer; Sydney S. Traum,
assistant treasurer; Myron
Stayman, financial secretary; and
Robert Merlin, corresponding
secretary.
The Sisterhood Officers for
1986-87 are Reva Green and Carol
Simon, co-presidents; Olga
Issenberg, Shara Waas, Lillian
Beer, Glenda Simon and Sharon
Maddon. vice presidents; Rose
Grossman, treasurer; Shirlee
Segal 1, corresponding secretary;
Fritzi Scherr, recording
secretary; Marilyn Simon,
membership secretary; Millie
Braverman, parliamentarian.
Barbara Waas
Rabbi Jack Riemer and Cantor
Robert Albert will conduct this
special Service. A Kiddush will
follow in Spector Hall.
Adath Yeshurun, North Miami
Beach, will hold an "Open House"
on Sunday, between 10 a.m. and
noon.
At that time prospective new
members will be able to meet with
Caryn Montague, Membership
Chairperson and members of her
committee. Synagogue officers
will be present to answer ques-
tions as will the president of the
Congregation, Alan Danis.
The principals of the Religious
School and Nursery Schools,
Rochelle Baltuch and Joan
Bergman will field queries about
the educational programs. Mrs.
Bergman will also respond to
questions about the synagogue's
Day Care program and Mommy
and Me classes. Craig Ezring. Ac-
tivities Director, will talk about
the new youth programming
under the aegis of United
Synagogue Youth and the efforts
of Young Judaea movement.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and
Cantor Alpern will be present U)
speak about Bar and Bat Mitzvah
training, choir and Adult Educa
tion classes and the Adath
Yeshurun volunteer choir. Ques-
tions of the synagogue's
philosophy and its growth and
development will be discussed.
media/public outreach pn.
the subject of adult Qutcrai j i
the United States. Memt
Women's American ORT wl m
be working at the malls are I.aurei
Shapiro. West Kendall. Joan
Cohen. Coconut Grove. Robin
Cashvan. Ann Kravitz. .-Vinenne
Tabin. Mildred Mirowitz. Kendall
I>akes; Ann Ross. South I>ade:
Sandy Margolius, Southwest
Dade; Dorie Frankel. Row Lewis,
Kendall; Ann Aibel. South Miami.
Joan Kobrin, Marry Haller. West
Kendall; Cheryl Epstein. Tern
Hershberg. Diane Table? Kast
Kendall; and Bonnie Rothschild
who is the coordinator of Protect
LEAD for the Miami-Dad.' I'uhlic
Library.
Talks On Taba Continuing
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
director-general of the Foreign
Ministry, David Kimche, and the
Ministry's Legal Adviser, Robbi
Sabel, left for Cairo Wednesday
(Aug. 27) for a meeting with Ismet
Abdul Meguid, Egypt's Foreign
Minister.
The purpose of the visit is to
"complete the preparations
toward signing the Taba com-
promise," according to political
sources in Jerusalem. An agree-
ment on procedures for submit-
ting the boundary dispute over
Taba to a panel of international
arbitrators was concluded three
weeks ago by Israel and Egypt.
But the two countries have not yet
agreed on who will be the
arbitrators.
The Egyptian weekly al-
Musawwar, known to be close to
President Hosni Mubarak,
reported that the summit between
Mubarak and Premier Shimon
Peres would take place Sept. 10 to
11 in Alexandria. The two leaders
are expected to meet for several
working sessions.
The weekly added that Egypt
continued to believe that some
progress was needed on the
Palestinian issue. "Peres would
commit a mistake if he came to
Alexandria, holding the same
views he presented at the summit
with King Hassan of Morocco,"
the paper said. After his historic
meeting with Peres in July, the
Moroccan monarch stated that
Israel's Premier had brought no
new ideas on resolving the Palesti-
nian problem.
Political sources in Jerusalem
expressed concern that Egyptian
foot-dragging in selecting the
three international arbitrators on
the Taba dispute might delay the
signing ceremony on the com-
promise and perhaps even the
summit.
Florida Power and Light Com-
pany President Robert E.
Taium has been named presi-
dent of the International
Association of Quality Circles
(IAQC), a non-profit organiza-
tion dedicated to expanding the
use of the quality circle concept
in business, industry and
government.
Not since the matzo ball has
something so tiny made It so big.
A

1 s Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They ve been making it big in Jewish homes lor years Tetley knows that |ust as liny lamb cnops and liny peas are the most flavorful the same thing .s true tor lea leaves So lor rich retreshing flavor take time out for tetley tea Because tmy is tastier'
J;IUi,TKTLKV^
48 TM ^t ^ff*~ ** ""W^T^^*,*^M
Bags ^*l48Tea ^-^ TEA ier"
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1 BBS C K Certified Kosher rw...ii.r TETLEY. "TiMff i tant


Glorious Past, A
Questionable Future
Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
VIENNA (JTA) The
ghosts of the Jewish past
haunt Vienna, a stately city
now nearly bereft of Jews.
There was a time, not that
long ago, when Vienna was
one of the most important
capitals in the diaspora.
Before the onslaught of
Nazism, Vienna was a place
where the flower of Jewish
crativity in every con-
ceivable field of human
endeavor bloomed.
Today, more than 40 years
after the Nazis carried out their
last deportation of Jews from
Vienna, there "are relatively few
signs reminding a visitor of what
used to be. The glory that was pre-
war Jewish Vienna is kept alive in
old buildings, plaques, street
markers and in the minds of peo-
ple with long memories.
By the early 1930's, when the
threat of German National
Socialism seemed imminently real
to some and far off to others. Jews
comprised about eight percent of
Vienna's population.
DESPITE BEING a minority.
Jews played a dominant role in
practically all aspects of life in
Vienna. It is probably fair to say
that the influence they exercised
here was far more pervasive than
Jews exercise in the U.S. today.
Jews were granted full civic
equality in 1848, but it was not un-
til 1867 that Jewish emancipation
was made permanent by law. Now
able to let their energy, talent and
imagination run free, Jews took
advantage of the relatively liberal
political and social climate in
Austria and, in unprecedented
numbers, entered professions like
law and medicine.
Hans Kelsen. a professor of con-
stitutional law at the University of
Vienna, wrote Austria's post-1918
constitution, the tenets of which
were incorporated into its
present-day constitution.
ROBERT BAR ANY won the
Nobel Prize in physiology, and
another Nobel Prize laureate,
Karl Landsteiner. discovered the
four main human blood types. Si^
mund Freud opened up new
horizons in psychiatry.
They were prominent in every
facet of the economic system.
They published newspapers; they
ran hanks; they owned facories.
Arguably, they made their
greatest mark in the arts. There
were writers like Arthur
Schnitzler, Franz Werfel and
Stefan Zweig. There were stage
directors and actors like Max
Reinhardt and Elizabeth Bergner.
And there were musicians like Ar-
nold Schoenberg, Gustav Mahler,
Carl Goldmark. Artur Schnabel
and Bruno Walter.
Vienna was a center of modern
Zionism. Theodor Herzl, the
author of "The Jewish State," liv-
ed and worked in Vienna. As a
correspondent in Paris for the
Neue Freie Prease, he was con-
verted to Zionism by the notorious
Dreyfus Affair. Vienna, for a
while, became the headquarters of
the Zionist Executive.
PERTZ SMOLENSKIN. one of
the founders of the Zionist
reawakening, resided in Vienna.
And Nathan Birnbaum founded
the first Jewish nationalist stu-
dent association, Kadimah, here.
At the height of the Jewish
renaissance, Vienna was home to
approximately 170,000 Jews. The
less successful ones lived in the
first district, now a prime shopp-
"ig area, and the better-off ones
were concentrated in the ninth
district, the site of the venerable
University of Vienna.
The 1938 Anschluss, the annex-
ation of Austria into Germany,
spelled finis to the Jewish com-
munity. Nazi Germany, having
devastated German Jewry, pro-
ceded to humiliate and disenfran-
chise the Jews of Austria.
Jews lost their livelihood, their
synagoues were burned on
Crystal Night, and they were forc-
ed out of the country. Many
emigrated, but 65,000 would not
or could not leave, and by 1945
they had been killed.
Today. 41 years after the
downfall of the Third Reich. Vien-
na is like a Jewish mausoleum. In
Juden Platz. once a choice address
for wealthier Jewish families,
there are non-sectarian
restaurants and shops, as well as
masses of parked cars. The
Judengasse. formerly the center
of Jewish commercial activity, is
just like any other street in con-
temporary Vienna: the Jewish
names are gone.
IN A LITTLE park near the
Judengasse. a plaque com-
memorates the Jewish victims of
the Holocaust. This was where the
luxurious Hotel Metropol. the
headquarters of the Gestapo,
stood. During the war. Allied
bombers destroyed it.
Up the street, one can find the
magnificent Seitenstettengasse
Synagogue. An impressive struc-
ture with a starry blue dome, it
was built in 1826. concealed
behind an apartment house on a
narrow, cobblestone street.
The Nazis, in their maniacal ef-
fort to eradicate all traces of
Jewish culture, tired to burn it to
the gound. The arsonists damaged
the interior considerably, dousing
the fire only because they feared it
would spread to the rest of the
neighborhood.
In 1963, the synagogue the
site of a 1981 Palestinian terrorist
attack which resulted in three
deaths was renovated. The area
around it has become a
fashionable, somewhat bohemian
nightspot.
THERE IS a kosher restaurant,
the Arche Noah, but it has fallen
on hard times because few Jewish
tourists are visiting Vienna in the
wake of the Kurt Waldheim affair.
And there is an Israeli restaurant,
Mapitome. a non-kosher facility
which attracts a young, beautiful
clientele.
Compared to Vienna's other
synagogues, the Seitenstet-
tengasse Synagogue suffered a
rather mild fate. The so-called
Polish synagogue, constructed in
a Moorish-Byzantine style, was
firebombed. A featureless housing
estate stands on its site.
There is a vacant lot on Grosse
Schiffgasse. and a glimpse
through the fence reveals rotting
car chassis, fruit trees growing
wild and a rusting crane. This is
where the Schiffschule, a
synagogue of Vienna's Hugarian
Jews, stood.
The Turkischer Tempel, where
Vienna's Sephardic Jews worship-
ped, is now nothing more than a
weed-choked lot behind a wall of
billboards. The Grosser Tempel,
designed by one of Vienna's
foremost architects, Ludwig
Frankl, is occuppied by a car park.
SIGMUND FREUD'S house,
on 19 Berggasae, has not met such
a sorrowful fate. Now a museum,
in the ninth district, it chronicles
his life and career through the
media of photographs, letters and
documents. Freud, who emigrated
from Vienna to London a year
before he died, lived in this apart-
ment building from 1891 until
1938.
There is a framed photo of
Freud posing with his children,
and one of the great man obvious-
ly enjoying himself in the German
Alpine resort of Berchtesgaden,
which Hitler favored.
When Freud was 70, he was
honored by B'nai B'rith. Freud, in
a letter, recalled the event by com-
menting on his Jewishness:
"What tied me to Judaism was
I have to admit it not the faith,
not even the national pride, for I
was always an unbeliever But
there remained enough to make
the attraction of Judaism and the
Jews irresistible."
The saddest picture is of
Freud's aged mother and her
daughters in an Austrian resort,
circa 1925, on the occasion of her
90th birthday. The faces are
neither sad nor happy, and they
look down at you from the im-
mense distance of another era.
Most of the people in the
photograph were murdered in
Auschwitz and Theresienstadt.
THE FREUD musuem rein-
forces the belief that Jewish Vien-
na, or what is left of it, cannot be
seen outside the context of the
Holocaust. Leon Zelman is one
man who firmly believes this.
Zelman, a Polish survivor who lost
his whole family in the war, runs
the state-subsidized Jewish
Welcome Service, which en-
courages Jews and non-Jews alike
to explore Vienna's Jewish legacy.
"Austria wants to forget the
Holocaust," he says, "but Austria
does not want to forget the con-
tribution of Jews to this country.
Hitler killed the Jews of Austria,
but we will not allow him to kill off
the spiritual Jewish life of
Vienna."
In that optimistic spirit, the
Jewish Welcome Service
publishes an annual book on
various facets of Jewish Vienna
and organizes occasional
exhibitions.
Last year, Zelman, in conjunc-
tion with London's Institute of
Jewish Affairs, mounted Vienna's
biggest postwar Jewish festival.
Entitled "The Lost World," it
revolved around the photos of
Roman Vishniac, the Polish
Jewish photographer who cap-
tured the essence of East Euro-
pean Jewry before the Nazi
calamity.
THE MAYOR of Vienna,
Helmut Zilk. tendered a kosher
reception in the city's gothic city
hall, and the speech he delivered
best sums up the wonderful, but
erratic, symbiotic relationship
that arose between the Jews and
Vienna in the 19th and the early
20th centuries.
"No history of Vienna," he said,
"would be complete if it did not in-
clude an account of the city's
Jewish community, which has
perhaps done more than any other
group ... to mold its cultural and
intellectual life. Vienna owes a
profound debt, of gratitude to its
Jewish residents."
LaRouche Supporter Fined For
Disorderly Conduct In A Synagogue
SKOKIE, III. (JTA) Janice
Hart, the Lyndon LaRouche sup-
porter who won the Democratic
nomination for Illinois Secretary
of State, was found guilty here of
disorderly conduct for her actions
in a Chicago suburban synagogue
following her attempt to change
the trial venue because the
presiding judge was Jewish.
Judge Morris Topol denied her
motion. After two hours of
deliberation, a jury found her guil-
ty, and she was fined $500, the
maximum for such a conviction.
According to the World Jewish
Congress Unit on the Documenta-
tion of International Anti-
Semitism, Hart disrupted an ad-
dress by Milwaukee Archbishop
Rembert Weakland before the
North Shore Congregation Israel
Temple in Glencoe last year.
At her trial, congregation
members testified that on May 7,
1985 Hart approached the Ar-
chbishop with a cardboard box
and pulled out a piece of raw liver
and shoved it at Weakland.
Hart claimed she was protesting
his support for the International
Monetary Fund which she said
backs South Africa's policy of
apartheid. Prosecutors said that
another LaRouche supporter was
in the temple shouting pro-
LaRouche slogans during the
incident.
68
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
Wedding
On August U, Senator Roberta Fox presented
State of Florida s check for $800,000 to
Coconut Grove Playhouse Producing Artistic
Director Arnold Mittelman and CGP Board
Chairman Alvin Davis; at the Coconut Grove
Playhouse, Miami. Shown from left to right:
Representative Ron Silver, Senator Roberta
Fox, Mittelman, Alvin Davis, and former
board chairman Marshall Taylor.
3t/i/ie*ti "Open House" at Temple Beth Moshe. North Miami, will take
place Sunday from 10 a.m. to noon in the Clara and Seymour
SmoOer Ballroom for family or single memberships.
The next regular meeting of Sholem Lodge 1024 will take place
in the Auditorium of the Hillel House on the University of Miami
Campus. Coral Gables on Sunday. Sept. 14 at 10 am Speaker
of the day will be Marshall Rubin. Executive Director of
Fellowship House.
The Association for Advancement of the Mentally Handicapped
(AAMH) announces its annual general meeting on Wednesday, at
8 p.m. at Palmetto General Hospital. Room 2. A forum discussion
will take pake.
Joyce Siemon and Eva Barretto were elected to the board of the
Forum of North Dade. according to President Burton Young
A support group for the parents of potential, current or past
runaway children will meet each Tuesday night from 7 30 to 9
p.m.. beginning Wednesday, at Ponce de Leon Junior High
School. Coral Gables
Temple Ner Tamid will sponsor a reunion dance and get-
together Sunday. Sept 14. from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Sklar
Auditorium. Miami Beach
Air Force Senior Airman Anna M.P Stern, daughter of Mar-
tina P Stern of Coral Gables, and sister of David P Stern of
Phoenix, has arrived for duty with the 1835th Electronic Installa-
tions Squadron. Norton Air Force Base. Calif Stern is an air traf-
fic control radar specialist
Beth Torah Congregation. Benny Rok Campus will hold it In-
stallation of Officers and Board of Directors on Saturday. Sept
13 at 8:25 in the Main Sanctuary Kiddush will follow the
services
Congregation Magen David at the Sephardic Jewish Center.
North Miami Beach will hold a luncheon on Sunday. Sept 14 at 2
p.m. in honor of 6 Stained Glass Windows, an "Original." made
and donated by Sam Barrocas The windows were a three-year
project designed especially for the congregation
NCJW Chapter Meetings
National Council of Jewish
Women Greater Miami Section
will hold its' first Section Board
Meeting of the 1986-87 calendar
year. The guest speaker will be
Mara Guilianti, NCJW National
Board Member and Mayor of
Hollywood.
The meeting will be held on
Wednesday, at 10 a.m. in the
Board Room of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Coffee will be
served.
Kendall Evening Branch, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
Greater Miami Section will hold
their opening meeting on Wednes-
day, at 7:46 p.m.
"Maximizing Your Child's
Potential" will be the featured
topic, with Scott Roseman,
counseling psychologist, as the
speaker. He will talk about in-
dividual differences in children
and how to listen to what your
child is saying.
Lakes Branch, National Council
of Jewish Women Greater Miami
Section will have a luncheon,
game and card party at the
Bayswater Cafe, Hallandale, on
Wednesday, Sept. 17, at noon.
Amit Women
Events
Hadar Chapter Amit Women
opening meeting of season will
take place on Thursday, Sept. 4 at
noon at Byron Hall. A book
review will be presented by Mar-
tha Rosenfeldt.
The first meeting of the season
of Shalom Chapter will be held on
Tuesday, at 11:30 a.m. in the Club
Room of the 100 Lincoln Road
Building. Miami Beach Mayor
Alex Daoud will be the special
guest and will show a slide film
presentation of his recent trip to
Israel. A luncheon will be served.
The first meeting of the fiscal
year of Hatikvah/Miami Beach
will take place on Thursday, Sept.
11 in the Kneseth Israel Social
Hall at noon. A program entitled
"Every Woman A Mother-In-
Israel" will be presented.
Rabbi Freedman
Returns From Visit
To Washington
Rabbi Simcha Freedman has
just returned from an invitation
from Representative Dante B.
Fascell, chairman of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee and
former chairman of the U.S.
Helsinki Commission, Represen-
tative Steny H. Hoyer, co-
chairman of the Helsinki Commis
sion and Ambassador Warren
Zimmerman, co-chairman, where
he appeared before members of
the U.S. delegation on the Con-
ference on Security and Coopera-
tion in Europe to express his
views on the issue of Soviet Jewry
and its relationship currently to
the Helsinki Accords.
Beth Am's New
Rabbi To Address
Breakfast Forum
Rabbi Leonard A. Schoolman,
recently inducted as the new
Associate Rabbi of Temple Beth
Am. will address the Brotherhood
Breakfast Forum on Sunday mor
ning, Sept. 14 at 9:30 s.m. in the
Temple Youth Lounge.
Rabbi Schoolman was formerly
a national director of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
For this occasion, admission to the
Breakfast Forum will be free of
charge.
BASKINGORDON
Florence Goustin Raskin of Coral Gables and Rabbi Theodore
H. Gordon of suburban Philadelphia announced their marriage on
Aug. 24 at the Main Line Reform Temple in Wynnewood, Penn
sylvania. Rabbi Gordon is Rabbi Emeritus of Main Line Temple,
having served that congregation from 1953 to 1972.
Both Rabbi and Mrs. Gordon are natives of Minneapolis. Min
nesota. Mrs. Gordon has resided in Florida since 1946. She is a na
tional vice-president of the American Technion Society, Women's
Division, and recently retired as president of the Southern Region
of that organization! She has been active, also, in the National
Council of Jewish Women. Torah Hadassah and ORT, and was a
Board Member of the Jewish Vocational Service since its incep
tion. Mrs. Gordon is currently a participant in the Institute for
Retired Professionals at the University of Miami, and served as
president of Phi Lambda Pi at the University of Miami. She was ;i
founding member of Temple Judea of Coral Gables, and served
for many years in the Women's Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Rabbi Gordon served for 16 years as Director of Hillel Founda
tions on several college campuses prior to becoming the first Rah
bi of the Main Line Reform Temple in suburban Philadelphia. He
served his Hillel congregations and the Main Line Reform Temple
as both Rabbi and cantor for many years. He was vice-president
of the Philadelphia Fellowship Commission and also of the Jewish
Community Relations Council, and served as president of the
Board of Rabbis of Greater Philadelphia. He retired recently as
President of the Martins Run Corporation, a non-profit agency
that built and developed the nation's first and only Jewish
oriented life care retirement community.
The couple plan to divide their time between Philadelphia and
Coral Gables.
JDC To Honor
Herbert Katzki
NEW YORK Half a century
of uninterrupted service to the
Joint Distribution Committee by
Herbert Katzki, currently its
assistant secretary, was marked
at a reception in his honor at
JDC's world headquarters in New
York last week.
Katzki, who retired as assistant
executive vice president of the
JDC in 1979. but who continues as
a full-time volunteer, was hailed
by some 100 colleagues and
friends. To mark the golden an-
niversary. Ralph Goldman, ex-
ecutive vice president, presented
Katzki with a nickel, silver and
pyrex Chanukah menorah by the
noted artist Ludwig Wolpert.
Katzki first joined the JDC staff
in New York in 1936. He was
assigned to the organization's
European headquarters in Pans
in 1939 and was named secretary
of JDC's European Executive
Council in 1940.
One day before Nazi troops
entered Paris in June of that year.
Katzki closed JDC's headquarters
and moved the office to Lisbon,
Portugal. He later served as direc-
tor of JDC activities in unoccupied
France.
Katzki joined the U.S. Army in
January of 1944 and was put on
detached service with the U.S.
War Refugee Board, serving as
special attache to the American
embassy in Ankara, Turkey, and
then to the U.S. legation in Berne.
Switzerland. In both posts he
worked closely with JDC rescue
operations for Jewish victims of
Nazi persecution.
Temple Emanu
To Excellence
Temle Emanu-El a leader in the
field of Jewish education em-
phasizing the importance of fine
education in both religious and
secular disciplines is under the
guidance of Dr. Irving Lehrman.
spiritual leader and Mrs. Rochelle
Malek, chairman of the Board of
Education, Lawrence Schantz is
president of the temple. Beginn
ing in the Early Childhood
Department at age two and conti-
nuing through grade eight each
child is offered an individualized
curriculum.
"Dr. Lehrman, created the new-
ly renovated Lehrman Day School
in response to the needs of Temple
Emanu-El and the Jewish com-
munity for a day school which pro-
Herbert Katzki
After World War II. Katzk:
directed JDC operations in Ger
many and held a succession of <
ecutive posts at the organizatu > -
overseas headquarters. *
general supervisory responsibilr
for JDC programs through".;'
Europe and the Moslem world. He
was reassigned to JDC's New
York office in December, 1967
JDC, the major American ager
cy aiding needy Jews abroaii.
receives the bulk of its funds for
its relief, resettlement an.i
rehabilitation programs from
campaigns of the United Jew
Appeal.
El Committed
In Education
vides a state-of-the-art quality
education in both general and
Jewish studies, preaparing the
child for life in the modem
world," Mrs. Malek said.
Leukemia Society
To Hold
Charity Luncheon
The Leukemia Society will
hold their 1986 Celebrity Waiters
Charity Luncheon on Friday, at
noon, at the Konover Hotel.
Chair and Honorary Maitre d'
will be honorable former mayor of
Miami Beach Dr. Leonard Haber
Master of Ceremonies will be Bob
Levy.
'


Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Revival Of Yiddish As
Viable Language
Dismissed By Linguist
By BEN GALLOB
A professor of Yiddish
studies warns that the
Rowing American interest
in Yiddish language and
culture should not be
'misinterpreted as
language recovery." David
Gold, co-editor of Jewish
Language Review, makes
his observations in a recent
issue of Sh'ma, citing two
lengthy articles about Yid-
dish in The New York
Times.
He contends that progressively
fewer Jews use Yiddish as their
everyday language, except for
Hasidim and other ultra-Orthodox
Jews; that less and less culture "is
being created in Yiddish; and ever
more of the old (Yiddish) culture is
finding a haven only in archives
and libraries and on researchers'
desks."
"Yiddish was once the native,
primary and habitual language of
all of Ashkenazic Jewry," he
writes. But, in the late 18th Cen-
tury, Yiddish began to be used
less by Ashkenazim in central
Europe, and, starting in the 19th
Century, also less frequently in
Kastern Europe.
THE HOLOCAUST dealt a
savage blow to Yiddish, he ex-
plains. Repression in the Soviet
Union, "Hebraitation" and
discouragement in Israel, and a
shift to other languages almost
everywhere in the 20th Century,
also "have taken their toll."
Gold asserts that the so-called
revival of Yiddish "limited
mostly to North America" is
simply "the kindling of a small
flame of curiosity about the
language and its culture, rather
than a significant increase in its
use."
He suggested that lovers of Yid-
dish not permit themselves to be
deluded "into thinking that a
language can maintain itself in
this artificial fashion."
If Yiddish were healthy, he con-
tends, it would not be necessary to
collect hundreds of thousands of
Yiddish books in order to save
them from extinction by indif-
ference or ignorance.
GOLD CITES the National Yid-
dish Book Center of Amherst.
Mass.. for rescuing about 350.000
Yiddish books "but it has succeed-
ed in selling only about 5.000 and
most of these have gone to
libraries at colleges and univer-
sities rather than into people's
homes."
He agrees that the Yiddish
theater "continues to make itself
felt" but the season "grows
shorter over the years."
Moreover, he declares that this
theater "is shunned by ultra-
Orthodox Ashkenazim among
whom the language has the only
chance of survival and pro-
ducers must now resort to more
and more translations or to Yid-
dish interspread with English
because they are playing" to au-
diences "who understand little or
nothing for the language."
Gold reports that since the early
1950s, nearly every Israeli college
has introduced Yiddish studies.
He directs that program at the
University of Haifa. But relatively
few students take these courses
and virtually "no Israeli-born
students hsve become researchers
of Yiddish language, literature or
culture, let alone Yiddish
speakers."
IN NORTH AMERICA, he
declares, Yiddish has become a
steadily more popular subject of
study at colleges, "so much so
that we Israeli teachers, to tell the
truth, look enviously on what is
happening on American and Cana-
dian campuses today."
Why? Gold explains that "most
Ashkenazi students in North
America are the grandchildren, if
not the great-grandchildren of
Yiddish-speaking immigrants
hence their interest in Yiddish is
largely nostalgic or antiquarian;
whereas most Ashkenazi students
in Israel today are the children of
immigrants hence it is too ear-
ly" in Israel "for nostalgia or
antiquarianism."
Gold contends that to be sus-
tained now. Yiddish must either
be withdrawn from the modern
world or "become the official
language of a political entity."
which Gold called a "chimeric
expectation."
JTA Services
Hadassah Events
Hatikvah Hadassah will be
having their administrative fun-
draiser with ice skating at Miami
Keach Youth Center's Ice Skating
Rink, on Saturday. Sept. 13. at 9
p.m.
Kinneret Hadassah of Kendale
Lakes will hold its first regular
meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 16 at
noon at the El Conquistor
Clubhouse. A fashion show with
members will entertain.
Morto* Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Monday, at
12:30 p.m. at the Morton Towers
Auditorium.
The Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their first
meeting at noon, Tuesday, at the
Hadassah Region office, Lincoln
Road.
Southgate Chapter of Hadassah
will hold the first regular meeting
of the season on Monday, at 1 p.m.
at Southgate Terrace Room.
Mr. and Mrs. Max Wonsch.
largest contributors of Blue Boxes
on Miami Beach will be honored.
The Henrietta Szold Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their regular
meeting on Monday, at noon, at
the Hadassah Office Building.
Miami Beach.
There will be a Box Luncheon,
and a report on the Convention.
There will also be a report on the
75th Jubilee Year.
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its first fall meeting Mon
day, Sept. 15, 12:30 p.m. at Tern
pie Zamora, in Coral Gables.
Refreshments of coffee and cake
will be served.
ORT New Wave
Chapter To
Present A Debate
The New Wave Chapter of
Women's American ORT will pre-
sent for members and guests a
debate with Andrew Rubin
representing "Citizens for County
Choice" and Howard Kaufman
representing "No Casinos Inc."
on Wednesday evening Sept. 10 at
7:30 p.m. at the Tiffany. Bal Har
bour, Card Room.
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridiaa(FJTd^r^Sep^berj^l986
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"ThoushaU. set him king over thee, whom ck( Lord thy God
shall choose; one from among thy brethren"
(Deuteronomy 17.1-5)
SHOFETIM
SHOFETIM "Judges and officers shalt thou make thee in all
thy gates, which the Lord thy God giveth thee, tribe by tnbe^and
they shall judge the people with righteous judgment Thou
shaft not plant thee an Asherah of any kind of tree beside the altar
of the Lord thy God. which thou shalt make thee. Neither shalt
thou set thee up a pillar, which the Lord thy God hateth
(Deuteronomy 16.18-tt). "At the mouth of two witnesses, or three
witnesses, shall he that is to die be put to death; at the mouth of
one witness he shall not be put to death" (Deuteronomy 17.6). If
there arise a matter too hard for thee in judgment thou shalt
arise, and get thee up unto the place which the Lord thy God shall
choose And thou shalt do according to the tenor of the
sentence which they shall declare unto thee from that place
which the Lord shall choose" (Deuteronomy 17.8-9). If. like the
other nations, the children of Israel in Canaan should desire a
king "Thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee, whom the
Lord thy God shall choose; one from among thy brethren shalt
thou set king over thee; thou mayest not put a foreigner over
thee, who is not thy brother. Only he shall not multiply horses to
himself. Neither shall he multiply wives to himself Neither
shall he greatly multiply to himself silver and gold ... He shall
write a copy of this law in a book, out of that which is before the
priests the Levites. And it shall be with him. and he shall read
therein all the days of his life; that he may learn to fear the Lord
his God" (Deuteronomy 17.15-19). The children of Israel may ex-
Cct prophets to rise in the Promised Land, men of God like
oses himself. "And it shall come to pass, that whosoever will not
hearken unto My words which he shall speak in My name. I will
require it of him" (Deuteronomy 18.19). How may the Israelites
distinguish a true prophet from a false one? "When a prophet
speaketh in the name of the Lord, if the thing follow not, nor
come to pass, that is the thing which the Lord hath not spoken;
the prophet hath spoken it presumptuously, thou shalt not be
afraid of him" (Deuteronomy 18.St) The portion also treats of the
cities of refuge. It cites the speech that the priest and officers are
to make to troops before battle, and states the laws of warfare
that apply to any city not of the seven Canaanite nations. The por-
tion ends with the regulations dealing with the heifer offered as
atonement when a slain person is found in the field and the identi-
ty of the murderer is not known.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted end based
upon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage, edited by P. VVollman-
Tsamlr, $15, published by Sbengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York. NY. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Judaic Head Teachers Appointed
At Goldstein Hebrew Academy
Bar Mitzvah
HENRY WILLEN
Henry Michael Willen, son of
Mr. Howard E. Willen and Ms.
Olga M. Willen will be called to
the Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at 8:30 a.m. at Temple
Adath Yeshunin.
The celebrant attends Highland
Oaks Junior High School and is in
the 8th grade.
He is a member of Bostom's Tae
Kwondo. Ives Estates Optimist
Club and is active in football,
baseball and soccer. Mr. Howard
Willen and Ms. Olga Willen will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion.
Laurie Farber and Ada Meltzer.
long-time Jewish educators in
South Dade. were recently ap-
pointed to head Judaic Studies at
the Arthur and Anna Goldstein
Hebrew Academy.
The private Jewish community
day school, built upon the 16-year
leacy of the former South Dade
Hebrew Academy, opened its
doors on Tuesday, with an enhanc-
ed Judaic Studies Program.
"One of the most important
things I can do with my life is to
pass on Judaism to kids," states
Laurie Farber of her appointment
to Judaic Studies Head Teacher
for Upper Grades at the Academy.
She is married to Rabbi Edwin
Farber of Temple Samu-El.
Also a dedicated educator, Ada
Meltzer will head Judaic Studies
in the Academy's early childhood
program and primary grades. The
goal for preschool through 3rd
grade Hebrew Academy students,
according to Meltzer, is for them
"to be happy in what they are
learning, know why they are
Jewish, be proud that they are
Jewish, and then practice their
Judaism in everyday life."
The Arthur and Anna Goldstein
Hebrew Academy is located on
the grounds of the South Dade
Jewish Community Center. Rabbi
Ralph Z. Glixman heads the
Academy.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian.
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Florida 33101.
Attractive, sensitive woman, divorced, no children,
wishes Torah man in his forties. Box HCC c/o Jewish
Floridian. P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Wanted: Jewish woman In Ists 50's or 60s, good
medics! health. To marry if compatible. Live in
Rockledge, Fla., 200 miles north. Send recent photo,
with nsme, address and phone. Box RF. c/o Jswish
Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, FIs. 33101.
T
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:16 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tempi* Beth BfcSMl
1700 MsMfSS A**., Miami Bp.ch
S34- 7213 -S34- 7214
Barry J. Konowteh. Rabbi /.
Mo*Ke Buryn. Cento. xW)
Sraio Grower. Prsaldsnt *"
Shewn Ep*4b*um. President
RoMgiOM CommillH
ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Garden* Ortvs
North Miami Beach 047 143*
Rabbi Slmcha Freedmen
Cantor Ian AJpern ConeervaiNe
Robert Pincus
JNF Dinner
Continued from Page 1-B
Bank Tennis Classic to help
underprivileged children.
Proceeds from the affair will be
used to plant trees in the
American Independence Park,
outside Jerusalem. The park con-
tains memorials to great
Americans and was established
during the nation's Bicentennial
as a testimonial to the friendship
and vision shared between the
United States and Israel.
JNF is the organization respon-
sible for afforestation and land
reclamation in Israel.
Nazi On Trial
BONN (JTA) A former SS
guard. Otto Reidemann. 74. went
on trial in West Berlin charged
with the beating deaths of at least
20 prisoners, many of them Jews,
at the Mauthausen-Gusen concen-
tration camp in Austria.
The trial is expected to last until
the end of this year. More than 15
witnesses are scheduled to give
testimony. Reidemann is denying
that he murdered prisoners under
his jurisdiction. However, in
preliminary questioning he admit-
ted being involved in arguments
which led him to beat inmates.
Florida Israel
Trade Association
Meeting Set
The Florida Israeli Trade
Association (FITA) will hold its
first meeting of the 1986-87
season on Tuesday, at 4 p.m. at
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion building. The meeting will in-
clude the election of association
officers and is open to all FITA
members and the general public.
David Litvak, Trade Commis-
sioner to the United States, of the
Government of Israel, will speak
on the Free Trade Area Agree-
ment, and the impact on
U.S.-Israel trade relations.
FITA was organized in 1985 by
Hollywood businessman David
Rush and Israeli Consul General
Yehoshua Trigor "to encourage
foster and stimulate commerce,
trade and business information"
between the State of Israel and
Florida.
(
V
Sat I 10 a.m. 4 30 p m
? ally WH 7: JO If fcJO PM
arMitrrahSai 4am
TEMPLE BETH AM
9B80 N. Kendall Or.
$. Miemi 0*7 S*t7
Or. Herbert Beumeerd
Senior Rebbi
Rebbi Leonard Schoolman
FA 7: JO p.m. Fa*Jry Sanded.
mew Laonard achoommv Aaaoc Paoot
on
i And Waapa
TEMPLE EMANU-EL ^_
1701 Weahington Avenue j h\
Miami Beech ^X.
Or. Irving Lehrmen. Rebbi
Auxiliary Rebbi Maiweil Berger
Yehuda Shifmen. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
at lp m
Sal.aanr. am NaviMarnbar
laaburv r> irvwa tea
MftaaoH
Cantat Ydhuea WMtmmn wta chant
Junk* Chat, an* panic ipa la
}
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pineiro* Drive. Miami Beach
S32-B421
Cantor. Rebbi Solomon Schifl
tTmTlTSrTeT
Of Greater Miami
ihgawMo
tD
BETH DAVIO CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 964-3*11
Jack Rlemer. Rebbi
Robert Albert.
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman.
Ritual Director
MtncAahtat 7 40 am
Frt wMntew'JSp*
Sal I a m aanrtca
Pel aanaoaa
Sunlam44Mpm
Man A Ttajra 7:10 a.av a !.JO p m
Tua... Wad.. 4 Fn MB W 4 am
K
Mian Sunday 10 B-av 1pm.
art, chNdhood can la.
BETMKODESH
ConaTvattv*
1101 S.W 12Ave
Rebbi Max Shapiro
SA-S334
137 N.E. 1*th St., Ml*ml, 573-5900
9000 N. Kendall Dr.. 505-5055
Senior Rabbi Haakeil Bernat
Aaiistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor RacneMe f. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G Bomstein
Director ol Education
And Programming: Jack L. Spar*,s
Frt 0a.m. Daannaaw BaaaM Waa 0
-
f HTlflttir Vlaiont o<
Manay Kauiman
> 44 pm Call hwmanaWana
TEMPLE JUDEA
Corel
9*75*57
Frtdayaonncalpm
Cantor Joseph Krieaei
Roes Berlin Executive Secretary
G>
Sat aantc* 4.44 a.m
TEMPLE BETH MOSME
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33191
S915509 Conservative
Or laraei Jacob*. Rebbi ^
Dr JoaepnA Gortlnkel /MK",
Rabbi Emeritus -%'
Moshe Frtedler. Cantor
Frt. 7:48 p.m. Daily a_m 4 S p m
Sat 448 am 4 4:10 pm
Sun 410 am 4 410 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Sanrtcaa Frt 7 10pm
Sal JO am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
154SJeWersonAvs.MB.FL 33i:
Tsi S3S-4112
Rebbi Dr. Jehuda MiBur
Cantsi Niaaim Benyamini
DaMy aaxrtcaa 4 a-m. and 7 p m
Sat 4 IS am
TEMPLE MENORAH
20- 75th St.. Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Meyor Abr arnowiu /
Cantor Murray Yemen \
Sat 4am Sabbath ttrnct
Daily Mlnchah Sunday Friday
4am andlpm
Sat la m and 4 14 pm
w
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Certyie Ave .
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene Leboviti
Cantor Edward Kletn
Dally Sanrtcaa 4 am and 4 JO p
Sat ii"
Frt lata aarvtca I p m
i-t*33
Canaanai.m
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ot Nortti Miami Beech
971 Norttteest 172nd SI
North Miemi Beech
961 15*2
Yeekov Sprung Rabbi

- >
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120ttl Street
224-2*01 f
Rebbi Da vld H. Auerbech \
C*nt I)
Friday aarvtca I p m
Saturday aarrtca a.m
Bat U ru* ah Nadtna Faya SoarU
Sat SarvtcaPJOam
Daily wK< Sun PJ0 a m Wad 7 JO p m
Men.. Tuaa 4 Thy/a M0 am
TEMPLE BETH SHOIOM 53* >i
Chsss Avs. B 41 at St. ......
0* llO**Cmu*H Faa*m* San*, ftaa*
OANv a ancmTim. pbm
HARMV JOLT, aiOianj PaaaSI
ui 0 CAP1AN. aal.....****
CANTON DAVIO CONVtSta
Frt. *pa aerate* 4 14 pj*.
Sat mamm*aarrtea10.4am
Sun 1012
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7529
1051 N Miami Beech Blvd
Or Mai A Lipechiti. R*bbi
Randall Konigsburg. Aasl Rabbi
2vse Aroni. Cent or
HarvsyL Brown. Ease Director
Daay
___Frt 7 JO a I*
4H0p.m
SalunJay 24 a m 7 10 p m
Sun lam a4J0pm
*)
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KEN0ALL
3*2 0*9*
Rabbi Hershei Becker *. 0*000
Sal 410 a m aanrtc. i
Tatrait* B**ae
JMJW1UM
S ot N KandaM 0.
TEMPLE SINAI 19S01NE22Av*
North Dads Rotonw Cenoreaatwri
Ralph P Kingaiey Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook A*ociat* Rabbi
Irving Snulkss. Cantor
Barbara S Rsmsey. Adm*ni*lelor
Frl I p.m Famtty Santca
ChNdran tam m Aa-ual 4apt
trSli.......|iilliaSSay
b4aaama> Sal ifc-J* a m aanfea
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
9000 Miller Dr Conssrvaliv*
2712311 ,;.
Dr Nor men N Shap.ro Rabbi jf)
Benjamin Adtet Cantor *"
Da.id Rossnthel. Auxiliary Cantor
Mtnyan 7 a m Monday 4
Sunday *a.m.. Frt. : 14
Sal a m taaaath larnea
TaNaar Chapat


The Value Of The Bush
Trip To The Middle East
Continued from Page 1-B
amazing diversity of expression
and thought in Israel. Israel is tru-
ly democracy in action. I can only
imagine the contrast between that
meeting and later visits by Bush
to Jordan and Egypt.
Finally, there was the visit with
the children, which coincidentally
took place immediately before a
rather impressive demonstration
<>f Israel's military might at
Hatzerim Air Base in the Negev.
This meeting, held sitting on a
great lawn at a kibbutz with
Prime Minister Feres, helped
Bush understand the determina-
tion of Israelis to hang onto their
tiny piece of real estate,
regardless of their disagreements
over timing and methods.
In addition, through his conver
sations with us during the tour, I
think the Vice President came to
letter understand the affinity
that Jews throughout the world
feel toward Israel. Israel's ex-
istence is very much like an in-
surance policy whose value, when
measured against events in the
20th Century, just can't be
questioned.
SO WHAT then is the real
meaning of the Bush trip to
Israel? I think three items men-
tioned by Bush in his Knesset
speech deserve repetition here.
First, the visit confirms this
country's solidarity with the
Jewish state. It couldn't have
!k-'fi clearer when, speaking on
behalf of our government, he said,
"Our friendship is deep and it is
permanent. No wedge can ever be
driven between us."
Second. Bush confirmed that
the U.S. will continue its pressure
on the Soviets to open its doors
for Jewish emigres. "The oppres-
sion of Soviet Jews is a permanent
item on the U.S.-Soviet agenda."
he said.
Third, the U.S. will remain
Israel's closest friend in the
United Nations. "If Israel is ever
voted out of the United Nations,
the United States will go out with
it," he said.
Those who were expecting some
dramatic progress to result from
the visit may be disappointed.
WE OURSELVES had hoped
that a solution to the Taba dispute
with Egypt could have been an-
nounced and there was an expec-
tation that the Bush trip would be
extended to include a stop in
Morocco, the scene of the recent
talks between Peres and King
Hassan. Neither took place, prov-
ing once again that progress is
painfully slow in the Middle East.
From another perspective,
however, the very absence of ma-
jor news is a positive sign. It
demonstrates that the American-
Israeli partnership is alive and
well. That in itself may be the best
news of all for the eventual solu-
tion of the Middle East peace
nuzzle.
Jewish Community Aids Victims
Of Cameroon Volcanic Gas Leak
NEW YORK (JTA) Lester
Pollack, president of the Jewish
Community Relations Council of
Greater New York, presented a
check for $5,000 to Tommo Mon-
the, charge d'affaires at the
Cameroon Mission to the United
Nations, to help the surviving vic-
tims of the volcanic gas leak in
that country which killed an
estimated 1,500 people.
Pollack, speaking on behalf of
the JCRC's 61 member organiza-
tions in the metropolitan area,
carried a message of compassion
on behalf of the New York Jewish
community. "The Jewish people
worldwide." Pollack told Monthe,
"identify with your grief during
these trying times and we in New
York are prepared to offer
whatever assistance we can
render."
Pollack pointed out that the
Council was spearheading a fund-
raising drive in the Jewish and the
general community for relief
funds to purchase desperately
needed supplies and medicines to
aid those remaining in the
stricken area.
While presenting the initial
donation to the relief effort.
Pollack said that he hoped that
"this humanitarian gesture would
serve as a catalyst for additional
charitable acts designed to help
the Cameroon people" during this
period of crisis.
At the 30-minute meeting.
Pollack, who was joined by JCRC
executive director Malcolm
Hoenlein and Assistant Executive
Director Michael Miller, also
praised Cameroon President Paul
Biya for restoring diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel. "The historic
visit of Israeli Prime Minister
Peres to Yaounde marks a turning
point in relations between Israel
and black Africa." Pollack stated.
"We are confident that the
Judeo-Christian tradition shared
by these two nations will serve as
the foundation for the beginning
of a long-term relationship and a
commitment to sharing mutual
cares and concerns." Pollack
pointed to Israeli doctors and field
hospitals at the disaster site as
reflecting the common interests
and relationship of Cameroon and
Israel.
LIPINSKY. Isidore D.. 67. of Hollywood
August 31 The Riverside.
SCHREIBER. Isidore of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert.
SPORKIN. Miriam, formerly of Miami
Beach. Services were held.
GRONER. Lillian K August 27 Services
were held, interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
KAY. Sophie. 74. of North Miami Beach
August 21 The Riverside
Beach. Services were held
(IARRET. Bettye The Riverside
KISTEL. Benjamin, 87. of Miami. August
26 The Riverside.
EELD. Stella of Miami. August 27. The
Riverside.
Rl'TKIN, Samuel, 70 ,.f Miami, August 26.
Services were held
DINER, Kisel of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert
SWERDLOFF, Jack, of North Miami
Beth, August 28. The Riversi.l.
NATHANSON. Man. August 29 Blasberg
Chapel
FRIED. Tillie Kotch. August 30. Swvtol
held in Rockville. Md
SCHENKER. Anna. 93 of Miami Beach.
August 31 The Riverside
I'i'MERANTZ. Harold. August 31. The
Riverside
I'ATRAKA. Bryant If., 54, August 29
I,evitt-Weinstein
SIDEL, Sarah of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
KI.STER. Max. 86 of North Miami Beach,
August 30. Levitt-Weinstein.
ADL Urges West German State Not to
Revive First Verse of National Anthem
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has called upon officials of
the West German state of Baden
Wurttemberg to reconsider their
"ill-advised decision" to revive
the long-banned first verse of the
national anthem which contains
the words Deutsckiand vber alien.
In a cable to Baden
Wurttemberg's President Lothar
Spaeth, Abraham Foxman, ADL's
associate national director and
head of its International Affairs
Division, pointed out that the
words Deutsekland uber (dies,
"like the swastika, symbolize to
the world the brutality of Nazism.
Giving legitimacy to such a highly
identifiable symbol of the Nazi
regime can only weaken the effort
to educate the public of Nazism's
evil and can raise questions about
the German commitment to reject
that past."
A copy of the ADL cable was
also sent to Gunther van Well,
West Germany's Ambassador to
the United States.
Israeli Scientist
Visiting China
JERUSALEM (JTA) Prof.
Yosef Singer, chairman of Israel
Air Industries and president of
the Haifa Technion, is visiting the
People's Republic of China.
Haarttz reported. Singer, who
considered a senior scientist in the
field of aeronautics, is in China on
what was described as a "profes-
sional" visit.
He and his wife reportedly
entered China on their Israeli
passports.
Friday. September 5. 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Obituaries
ASHER. Harvey, 64. of Bay Harbour
Island. Aug 26 Levitt Weinstein
KAY. Sophie, 74, of North Miami Beach.
Aug. 27 The Riverside.
GOLDMAN. Abraham of Miami Beach
Member of Jewish National Fund. Rubin
Zilbert.
BEREK. David Member of Cuban Hebrew
Congregation Rubin-Zilbert.
FISHER. Sally E of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert
GOLDBERG. Esther. 85. of Miami Beach,
Aug. 28. Services were held at Mt Nebo
Cemeterv
BERMAN. Hyman (.'.. 86 of Miami Beach.
August 24. The Riverside
EWEN, Emanuel. 84 of North Miami
Beach. August 24 Services were held.
Berner. Jonathan T 19 of North Miami
Baech. August 24.
HAMIN. Stephany Iris. 37, of Ft. Lauder
dale. Aug 31. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
KATKIN. Roslind. of Miami. Sept. 1.
Levitt-Weinstein
NASS. Dorothy. 80. of Miami Beach, Sept.
1. The Riverside Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery
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Now Levitt-Weinstein offers the con-
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COUBT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nukr 86-423
DivUio(02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
c'KI.IA SHUMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of CELIA
SHUMAN, deceased. File Number
86-4623, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagier Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The per-
sonal representative of the estate
are MOISES SPIL and JAIME
GOLDBERG whose addresses are:
Mourn Spil 1711 S.W. 87th Ave.,
Miami. Fl. and Jaime Goldberg;
4211 S.W. 97th PI.. Miami. Fl. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with hte clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his sgent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the chum is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
chum is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
dans to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail once copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FTL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 29, 1986.
MOISES SPIL
and JAIME GOLDBERG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
< "elia Shuman
Deceased
SILVER A SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 374-4888
By: MAX R SILVER
11019 August 29;
______________September 5,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name of CourTrust
Associates at number 2701 S.
Bayahore Drive, in the City of
Coconut Grove, Florida intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Coconut Grove, Florida,
this 4th day of August. 1986.
HMG CAPITAL CORPORATION
By: Lawrene I. Rothstein
COURTELIS CAPITAL
CORPORATION
By: William Hearon
Richard Schwartz. Individually
11068
September 5.12,19.26,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name TRI ME
ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS,
at 2121 NW 139 ST BAY 1 OPA
LOCKA. FL 33054. intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
SELVIN ALLEN
11026 August 15, 22, 29;
September5, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Or FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 84-37248
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MORRIS R. ANDERSON. JR..
Petitioner
and
GWENDOLYN ANDERSON
Respondent
TO GWENDOLYN ANDERSON
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on USHER BRYN. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road Suite
309. Miami Beach, FL 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 3rd, 1986; otherwise s
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 532 1156
11066
September 5. 12. 19. 26. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* Ne. 86-37*44-10
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PATRICE DARISME. wife
and
PIERRE W. DARISME, husband
TO Mr. Pierre W. Dariame
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve s copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LTPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami. Fl. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 3. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29 day of August. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
11064 September 5.
12.19.26,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-29563 (18)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DALE EMLINE MORENCY
Petitioner,
and
VALEUS MORENCY
Respondent
TO: VALEUS MORENCY,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612
Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami,
Florida 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
October 3, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated: August 27. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY: L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
11060
September 5, 12. 19. 26. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name TEJERA ENTER
PRISE at 9340 SW 77 St. Miami
33173 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Diego Vicente Tejera
9340 SW 77 St.
Miami FL 33173
11030 August 15. 22. 29;
September5, 1986
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nassber 86 4909
Divi.ios 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRIETTA KELLER a/k/a
HENRIETTA KELLER
SCHLACKMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of HENRIETTA
KELLER a/k/a HENRIETTA
KELLER SCHLACKMAN.
deceased, File Number 86 4909. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida. The personal represen-
tative of the estate is Beverly
Chester. 16 Lindburgh Blvd..
Teaneck. N.J. 07666 whose ad-
dress is Elsine Geller, 5
Kingswood Nor walk. Conn. 06851.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the churn is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
September 5. 1986.
BEVERLY CHESLER
ELAINE GELLER
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
HENRIETTA KELLER a/k/a
HENRIETTA KELLER
SCHLACKMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I Kroop
Kwitney, Kroop A Scheinberg.
r.A.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
11063 Septembers. 12. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT W AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION 04
FILE NO. 86-2672
FLORIDA BAR NO. 029668
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Rose Mahler
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of Rose Mahler,
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida. File Number 86-2672 is
pending in the Circuit Court in and
for Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
3rd Floor. Dade County Cour-
thouse, 73 West Flagier Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The per
sonal representative of this estate
is Lawrence Aldnch, whose ad-
dress is 71 NW 76 St., Apt. 18.
Miami, Fla 33150. The name and
address of the attorney for the per-
sonal representative are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against this estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk of the above sty]
ed court to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom s copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
valkhty of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 2 day of September. 1986
LAWRENCE ALDR1CH
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Rose Mahler
Deceased
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 5 day of
September. 1986.
MAX A GOLDFARB
19 West Flagier St.. Room 403
Miami. Fla. 33130
Telephone 371 2538
Attorney For Personal
Representative
11069 Septembers. 12. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nassber 86-4608
Divuioa 92
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRED LENNARD.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FRED LENNARD. deceased.
File Number 86-4608 (02). is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 29. 1986
Personal Representative
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street. Suite
1201
Miami, Honda 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HENRY NORTON. ESQUIRE
19 West Flagier Street. Suite
1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone (305) 374-3116
11056 August 29;
Septembers, 1986
DJ THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case Ne. 86-37015-24
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 36801*
In re the marriage of
SHARON JOYCE ALVAREZ
Petitioner
and
JOSEPH J ALVAREZ
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JOSEPH L ALVAREZ.
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St N.M.B Florida 33162. on
or before October 3, 1986, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise s default will be
entered agmnt you.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
11" August 29;
Septembers. 12. 19, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
enK*ge in business under the
fictitious name Oscar's Restaurant
Supplies A Equipment, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
ZECAY CORP
11022 August 15, 22, 29;
Septembers. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-34710 (28)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SEJOURNE RENELl'S.
Petitioner,
and
MARY RENELl'S
Respondent
TO: MARY RENELl'S,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy .>f your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 North wa*l |gth
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33136.
and file original with Court Clerk
on or bailors September 12 I9M
otherwise default will be entered
Dated August 11 i; RICHARD [ BRINKER
Bj K SEIDL
""-7 August 16.22,29,
September 6
IN THE CIRCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-37393 26
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GMAC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION OF PA /k/a
COLONIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICE COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
JAMES D PLATNER, et ux.. et
a).
Defendants
TO: JAMES D PLATNER and
BRENDA I. PLATNER.
his wife
1324 S. Plaza
Springfield. MO 66804
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of
Mortgage on the following
described property
Lot 3. in Block 3, of
REVISED PLAT OF A
PORTION OF BLOCK 3 OF
FAIRWAY PLAZA,
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 86. at Page 23. of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff*, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146. on or before
October 3, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default wiil
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 28th day of
August. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
11062
September5, 12. 19. 26, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
""Cage in business under the
fictitious names (1) Computer
Corner. (2) Computer Outlet (3)
Compucorner (4) Security Corner,
st 7958 SW 106 Place. Miami,
Florida 33173. intends to register
said names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
David Rafky
11033 August 22. 29:
Septembers, 12, 1HH6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAI
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO.: 86-1485(03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN ALPERT.
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO All persons having claims or
demands against the above estate
Within three months from the
time of the first publication of thi
Notice, you are required to file
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse 73 w
Flagier Street. Miami, Flondi
33130. a written and verified state
ment of any claim or demand you
may have against the estate of
Helen Alpert. deceased.
Each claim m st be in writing
and must indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or attornev
and the amount claimed If the
claim is not yet due. the date when
it will become due shall be stated
If the claim is contingent or unli
outdated, the nature of the uncer
tainty shall be stated If the claim
is secured, the security shall he
described The claimant shali
deliver a copy of the claim to the
Clerk who shall furnish the copy u>
the personal representative
The total cash value of the esuv
is approximately $26,000.00 V
Order of Summary Administrate i
was entered by the Dade Count)
Circuit Court. Honorable Franc
J Christie, assigning the property
of the estate to Brett Bern- .
Pinto. P.O. Box 1402. Quouue
New York 11969 and Huan
Mindlin. c/o P.O. Box 012941
Miami. Florida 33101.
All claims and demands not ~
filed will be forever barred
DATED August 14. 1986
BRETT BERNSTEIN PINTo
HILARY MINDLIN
First Published On:
September 1986
MICHAEL D. LOZOFF. BSQ
9400 S Dadeland Blv.i
Suite 102
Miami. Florida 33166
Telephone: (306) 662-1936
BY Starry F Soloff. Esq
11070 September5, 12. ISM
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-37283 (26)
IN RE The Marriage of
CLEANA OUBRICE.
Petitioner.
and
MONTES OUBRICE.
Respondent
TO: MONTES OLIBRICK
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney 612
Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami
Florida 33136. and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
October 3. 19M. otherwise I
default will be entered.
Dated: August 27. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY E SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
11061
September 5. 12. 19.26 -
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 66-2*696-30
IN RE The Marriage of
JOSEPH D CLAIRSAINT.
Petitioner,
and
JACQUELINE D CLAIRSAINT
Respondent.
TO: JACQUELINE D
CLAIRSAINT
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mr
riagc upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 NW. 12th Ave,
Miami. Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before October 10. 1986. other* -
a default will be entered
August 29. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: DC. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
11067
September 5. 12. 19.26,19*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring ti
engage in business under the fie
titious name 72nd Street I : '
Book and Video intend to rags*
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit of Dade County Fl
72nd Street Book and VTA
11037 August %
September Si:-' "'


Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-34694 (13)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIA CECILIA MANRIQUE.
Wife
and
XAVIER V. MANRIQUE.
Husband
TO Xavier V. Manrique
9 de Octubre No 429
Chimbaraio. El Morro
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
HKII that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
Tiled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it. on
MANUEL ZAIAC. attorney for
I'clitmner, whose address is 150
S E 2nd Avenue. Suite 610.
Miami. Florida 33131. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 12. 1986. otherwise a
i.'fult will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
!' said court at Miami. Florida on
this 11th day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
Manuel Zaiac
150 S E 2nd Avenue. Suite 610
Miami. Florida SS1S1
Attorney for Petitioner
11088 August 16, 88.88;
September V 1*K;
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cilvil Action No. 84-24544-17
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIA ISABEL HEREDIA DE
SCHWIERTZ NESBIT
Petitioner/Wife
nd
KARL E SCHWIERTZ NESBIT
Kespondent/H usband
! ii KARL SCHWIERTZ
NESBIT
The Tannery. Hollingbourne
Kent. ME 171 TP
United Kingdom
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, rfany, to it on ROSA M
VEGA. ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 362
Minorca Avenue. Suite 101. Coral
Gables. Florida 33134. and file the
i >nginal with the cJerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 19S6; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
nee each week for four
onsecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
' said court at Miami, Florida on
I this 21st day of August. 1966
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
I Attorney for Petitioner
ROSA M VEGA. ESQ.
1362 Minorca Avenue. Suite 101
|<'oral Gables, Florida 33134
(Telephone: (305) 4450192
I110*7 August 29.
Septembers. 12.19, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
I that the undersigned, desiring to
'"gage in business under the fie
IJitious name of Guggenheim
1 "tilery at 5701 Sunset Drive,
Suite 407. S Miami. Florida 33143
I intends to register said name with
';'" I lerk of the Circuit Court of
I lade County, Florida.
I John C. Guggenheim
I Ronald K Fieldstone
I Attorney for Guggenheim Gallery
I'"" Madruga Avenue. Suite 202
I* ".*h!,s. FL 33146
I"0" August 29.
September5. 12. 19. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-29944 CA 25
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP..
Plaintiff
vs.
MADELEINE DIAZ, et ux..
Defendants.
TO: MADELEINE DIAZ and
VICTOR DIAZ, wife and
husband
12255 S.W. 210 Street
Miami. Florida 33177
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 19. Block 18. of OAK
PARK, SECTION FIVE,
according to the Plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 122.
at Page 63. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146 on or before
September 26. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 22nd day of
August. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
11068 August 89;
Baptamber 5 18, 19. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actioa No. 86-35750
IN RE:
Petition of
Jeffery David Schauss
and Rita B. Epstein-Schauss
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
TO: Billie Owens
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Adoption has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
MAX A GOLDFARB attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 19
West Flagier St. Suite 403.
Miami. Florida and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before Sept 26. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in Jewish
Flondian
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 19 day of August. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By B.J. Foy
As Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Petitioner:
MAX A GOLDFARB
19 West Flagier St.
Suite 403. Miami. Florida
(Phone) 371-2538
110S9A August 22. 29;
September5. 12. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86 36248 26
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JESULA ST JEAN.
Petitioner,
and
FRANCOEUR ST JEAN,
Respondent
TO: FRANCOEUR ST JEAN.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before September 26. 1986; other
wise a default will be entered
August 80. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: E SEIDL
11041 SAugust 22. 29.
September 5. 12. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-36462-15
Florida Bar No. 349275
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN RE; THE MARRIAGE OF:
M AN FRANCISCO PLATA.
Petitioner.
VI
CARMEN MIRANDA.
Respondent.
TO CARMEN MIRANDA
Resilience Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve written defenses,
if any, to it on MARIANO SOLE.
ATTORNBY AT LAW. PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 2655 Le Jeune Road.
Penthouse II. Coral Gables.
Florida 33134. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 26.
1986. otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
21ft day of August. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By il' COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE, ESQ.
i i.ihles International Plaza
..'..">."> Le .leune Road
Penthouse II
Coral Gables. Florida 38134
Telephone (305) 441-8666
11048 August 29;
September6, \\l. 19. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4735
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FAYE CHERRY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FAYE CHERRY, deceased.
File Number 86-4735, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. FL 33130 The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 29. 1966.
Personal Representative:
MINERVA GRABEL
Apt. 1825. 100 Bayview Drive
No. Miami Beach. FL 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, PA.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
11059 August 29;
September5. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Ludlam-Dixie Animal
Clinic at 8271 South Dixie
Highway, Miami. Fla. 33143 in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Thomas W. Householder. D.V.M.
11018 August 15. 22, 29;
September5. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DANNY'S PIANOS
& ORGANS intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Daniel (Jeoghegan
11051 August 29;
Septembers. 12. 19, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-25570 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
MAGNET BANK. FSB.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE A. MAGANA,
et ux.. etal..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE A. MAGANA and
MARIE G MAGANA, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, ell parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against JOSE A.
MAGANA and MARIE G.
MAGANA. his wife, and all
parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Unit 2-5. VIEW WEST CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11164. at Page 171. and
amendment thereto filed
November 3. 1981, in Official
Records Book 11259. at Page
2277, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
September 12. 1986. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 7 day of August,
1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
11019 August 15. 22,29;
September 5. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-32822 FC 11
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EDWARDO GARCIA, husband
and
JENNY SANCHEZ GARCIA,
wife
TO: Ms. Jenny Sanchez Garcia
1346 N. Boshwell Street
Chicago, Illinois
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and your are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 N.E.
167 Street Miami. Fla. 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 3. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 26 day of August. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: DIANA CAMPBELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11058 August 29;
September 5. 12. 19. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-36245 83
IN RE. The Marriage of:
LOUIS JOSEPH.
Petitioner,
and
SHIRE A JOSEPH.
Respondent.
TO: SHIRE A JOSEPH,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
nage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before September 26. 1986; other
wise a default will be entered.
August 20. 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: E SEIDL
U042 August 22. 29;
Septembers, 12. 1386
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File N ilmber 86-4813
Division 03
IN RE; ESTATE OF
EDWIN E. BLOOM, a/k/a
EDWIN BLOOM, a/k/a EDWIN
ERVIN BLOOM, a/k/a E. E.
BLOOM,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EDWIN E BLOOM, a/k/a
EDWIN BLOOM, a/k/a EDWIN
ERVIN BLOOM, a/k/a E. E
BLOOM, deceased. File Number
86-4813, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagier Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 29. 1986.
Personal Representative:
RUTH BLOOM
5255 Collins Ave.. Apt. I0D
Miami Beach. FL 88140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SHAPIRO AND WEIL
BY: HERBERT S SHAPIRO
1666-79th St. Causeway. Suite
608
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone (305) 8644868
11054 August 29;
Septembers, 1866
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4489
Division (02)
IN RE ESTATE OF
FLORENCE F. HEILPERN.
DaoMMd
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FLORENCE F HEILPERN.
deceased. File Number 86-4489
(02). is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice hat
begun on August 29, 1986
Personal Representative:
ADELE P PODKAMINER
777 S Federal Highway. Apt
B-204
Pompano Beach. Florida 33062
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
BARBARA NORTH BURTON,
PA
9999 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Suite 103
Miami Shores. Florida 33138
Telephone: (305) 754 2211
11050 August 29;
September5. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names HARDEE'S OF
MARGATE. HARDEE'S OF
MIAMI 2. HARDEESOF MIAMI
4. HARDEE'S OF Ml AM. 5 at 420
South Dixie Highway, Coral
Gables. FL intends to n gister said
name with the Clerk o' the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Restaurant Corporation of South
Florida
H ALLAN SHORE. Esquire
Attorney for: Restaurant Corpora
tion of South Florida
11008 August 8. 15.22.29, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3170
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DIANE B. RABIN.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DIANE B. RABIN, deceased,
File Number 86-3170, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 29. 1986.
Personal Representative:
LOUIS M. RABIN
8510 Southwest 102nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33173
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
PETER H LEAVY of KING,
LEAVY & RABIN
6301 Sunset Drive, Suite 203
South Miami. Florida 33143
Telephone: (305) 666-6000
11046 August 29;
September 5, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-18574 CA-16
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
THE KISSELL COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA.
etal..
Defendants
TO: CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA
580 N.E 127th Street,
No. 21
Miami. Florida 33181
YOU ARE NOTD7IED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 23. less the West 25 feet
thereof, and Lot 24, in Block
6. of MOFFATVILLE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 10. at
Page 36, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1670 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 10, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 29 day of August,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
11065
September 5. 12,19. 26.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "ON CALL" Answer-
ing Service at 2070 N.W. 7 St..
Miami. Florida intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Telequick Corporation,
a Florida Corporation
By: Victoriano Alvarez,
President
Attorneys for Telequick
('orporation
Antonio Torrent. Jr., Esq.
Rossano. Torrent & Leyte-Vidal.
PA
701 S.W. 27th Avenue. Suite 625
Miami, il. 33135
(305)541 2266
11052 August 29.
September5, 12. 19. 1986


*
r age u-p ine jewisn r tonaian/r riday, September 5^1^86
Rev. Pat Robertson
Presidential Candidate
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
I first met the Rev. Pat Robertson several
years ago at his impressive Christian Broad-
casting Network in Virginia Beach. He in-
vited me to be his guest on his popular talk-
show, the 700 Club, and we talked at length
about church-state relations.
This telegenic Baptist preacher is warm,
friendly and folksy. On a personal level, he is
a likeable man. As a candidate for the
Presidency of the United States, frankly he
frightens me.
During our lively 700 Club interview, Pat
Robertson said that America is in moral
decline, and the only way to save our nation
was to restore it as a Christian nation. I tried
to persuade him that he was distorting
American history and that he is betraying
everything Thomas Jefferson. James
Madison and Benjamin Franklin struggled to
achieve in a pluralistic American democracy.
Pat remained impervious to any historic
evidence that did not conform to his myth of a
Christian America.
In a current cover story in New York
magazine, Michael Kramer cites further data
about Robertson's views which threaten
democracy. The preacher-politician describes
non-Christians as "termites" who are
destroying America and unbelievably calls for
their "godly fumigation."
Early in August, the Rev. Pat Robertson
ran in the Michigan Republican primary for
convention delegates. Apparently, he came in
second after George Bush. Whatever his
Presidential future and he has every right
to run for President his vision of America is
a threat to America as we know it, and the
debate with him must bne fully joined.
WNSSeven Arts
Luxembourg's Foreign Minister Urges
Self-Determination For Palestinians r
Ethiopian Jews In Israel Star In
Israel-American Little League
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Baseball may be America's
national pasttime, but it cer-
tainly is getting a lot of at-
tention in Israel these days
especially from some
young Ethiopians who play
for a team called the
American Association for
Ethiopian Jews (AAEJ) All-
Stars.
Even though these children had
never seen a baseball or bat in
their lives, they have shown an
amazing aptitude for hitting and
throwing. Their secret? Besides
enthusiasm, they played a
homemade stick and ball game in
their grass hut villages in
Ethiopia. And, they're all masters
of the slingshot the weapon us-
ed against marauders at home.
The AAEJ All-Stars Team is
part of the Little League network
being set up in Israel by Randy
Kahn. a Little League baseball
coach from Houston who visited
his sister in Israel in 1985 and
became determined to bring the
sport to the enthusiastic children
here. While Softball is played in
Israel, baseball is a new sport in
the country.
WHEN KAHN returned to
Houston, he collected used
baseball equipment from
synagogues, churches and recra-
tion departments and then
brought the gear back to Israel,
where he began teaching the
youngsters the rudiments of the
game.
Meanwhile, Kahn s father, at-
torney Leonard Kahn, also of
Houston, created the Israel-
American Baseball Corporation, a
non-profit organization that rais-
ed money for the League in Israel.
The games are played on soccer
pitches and open grass fields
where diamonds are marked out
for the 10 teams in the league. In
one game this summer, the AAEJ
All-Stars faced a mixed squad call-
ed the All-Stars from Ramat
Hakovesh and Tira, a team con-
sisting of Jews from Kibbutz
Ramat Hakovesh and Arabs from
Tira. It proved to be an upset vic-
tory for the Ethiopian team, 5-2,
and one that was captured by an
NBC-TV crew filming the Opera-
tion Moses story.
INCLUDED ON the AAEJ All
Stars are immigrants from
Ethiopia who live at the Be
Yehuda Absorption Center in
Netanya, an immigrant from the
USSR and several kibbutz
youngsters.
Rabbi Yosef Miller, coordinator
of the AAEJ's office in Israel, is
excited about Israel-American
baseball because of the
brotherhood it fosters.
"Not only do you have in-
teresting ethnic combinations on
the teams themselves, but the
healthy, honest competition bet-
ween the teams helps to
strengthen ties than can be hard
for some of these kids to form
after the hardships they've been
through with immigration and
separation from their families left
behind in Ethiopia." Miller said.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Jacques Poo* of
Luxembourg, who was here on a
three-day visit, called on Israel to
recognize the right of Palestinians
to self-determination. In addition,
he said that any Middle East
peace talks must include the
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Poos met with 15 Palestinians
from the West Bank, most of
them prominent PLO supporters.
According to participants at the
meeting, he said he supported the
1980 Venice Declaration of the
European Economic Community
(EEC) that supported Palestinian
self-determination and the inclu-
sion of the PLO in Mideast peace
talks.
During his visit to Israel. Poos
also met with Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
who told him that terrorism would
have to be eliminated before other
Mideast problems could be resolv-
ed. Poos reportedly agreed with
Shamir's assessment that there
would be a continuation of the
talks between Israel and the
Soviet Union which began m
Helsinki recently.
In addition. Poos promised to
help Israel in speeding up the
negotiations on its agricultural ex
ports to the EEC. The talks have
been bogged down because of
Spanish objections to the propos-
ed tariff-free quotas for Israel
Luxembourg will raise the issue at
the meeting of EEC Fore
Ministers this month.
reign
Dade County JWY
Auxiliary Meeting Set
Phyllis Shaw, president of U*
Dade Council Jewish War
Veterans advises that the second
quarterly meeting will be Sundw
morning at the Abe Borrowfa
Post and Ladies Aui
building. North Miami Reach
Breakfast is being served b) Vox
iliary No. 682 at 9 a.m.. and th
meeting will begin at 9:3c
Commander of the Dade ( ouoti
Council, Norman T. Levinc .'.'
scheduled to give a brief i
at this meeting.
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,


Full Text
Mid-Life Crisis
Is Subject Of
>r. Sol Landau's New Book
"Burnout" is a popular
ihrase today for those in the
5-to-55 age bracket who
,ve achieved success but
_ at a point where life has
lost much of its spark and
itality.
Symptoms of burnout are
lumerous: chrome fatigue, high
bsenteeism, cynicism, low
lotivation, increased irritability,
lility to concentrate or make
ecisions, increased blood
fcressure, higher accident rate,
Jjeavier drinking and smoking.
|DR. SOL LANDAU, former
Spiritual leader of Miami's oldest
"Memple, Beth David Congregation,
And whose career as a rabbi has
panned 35 years, explores the
fcurnout syndrome and the painful
Realities of midlife crises in his
lew book, "Turning Points: Self-
Henewal at Midlife,'' recently
aAublished by New Horizon Press.
I Dr. Landau's inspirational and
^vocative study basically a
why-to" and "how-to-do-it" book
B- offers practical advice and
Biethods for coping with mid-life
rises so that the crises
themselves can t>e turned around
|or positive self-examination to
evive spirits and open new doors.
iUtilizing case histories, life
eck lists, the latest research in
the field and nearly four decades
Of personal counseling, Dr. Lan-
dau set as his goal the renewal of
oneself through self-knowledge
tnd self-development.
I DR. LANDAU is president and
executive director of the Miami-
based Mid/Life Services Founda-
1fc>n organized in 1981. The Foun-
-S-dation was formed to assist
business and industry in mid/life
iblems and career change for
;ecutives and employees. The
foundation also engages in
h, conducts workshops and
iminars, and provides individual
id group counseling.
"Middle age is a time of intense
isis, a time of great turbulence
many individuals," says Dr.
idau. In his book, Dr. Landau
lores the painful realities of
id-life crises which, in varying
ees, can consist of burnout as
Well as divorce, impotency, sud-
Jpn unemployment, widowhood,
sponsibility for infirm parents
arid chronic illness.
j, Currently there are more than
C 45 million Americans in "midlife"
.# ages 45 to 65. Some social
cientists place midlife between
the ages of 40 and 60; others 35
and 54. But it is around age 40
that most of the manifestations of
the middle years begin to present
themselves.
FOR MANY, the years of
Jfc-to-55 are the best and the
rst of times, writes Dr. Lan-
i. On the one hand, the mid-
sr is in the "command genera-
>n," often at the peak of earning
Wer, with an established family
' goals achieved.
[On the other hand, indicates Dr.
indau, there is an increasing
ensation that life is passing by as
mortality becomes internalized,
.^the value of one's work becomes
ore elusive, and the glories of
outh fade but are constantly
luted by society.
"Industry," notes Dr. Landau,
8 becoming increasingly aware
the need to deal with the pro-
fms of mid-life. Lower morale,
(creased productivity, high
?senteeism and employee bur-
>ut have a deleterious impact on
siness." Dr. Landau estimates
it the monetary loss to U.S.
Jiness is $15 billion a year on
nout alone.
p>r. Landau reached one of his
"turning points" in life in
MJHHA
Friday, September 5, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Dr. Sol Landau
1981 when he took an early retire-
ment from the pulpit at Beth
David. He finished his PhD degree
in adult education from Florida
State University. He earlier earn-
ed degrees from Brooklyn College
and New York University. In ad-
dition to serving as president of
Mid/Life Services, he was adjunct
full professor of psychology at the
University of Miami.
THE SON and grandson of rab-
bis in Berlin, Sol Landau and his
family came to the U.S. in 1940
via London. Two years later,
young Sol, now a U.S. citizen, was
back in Europe, this time serving
in the U.S. Army.
Before coming to Miami, Dr.
Landau led congregations in Ohio
and Illinois. He has served on such
Boards as the Florida Council on
Aging and the Mental Health
Association of Dade County. His
writings have been published in
both religious and secular
magazines.
Dr. Landau and his wife,
Gabriela, a vice president of
Prudential-Bache Investments in
Coral Gables, have been married
for 35 years and live at Grove Isle.
The Landaus have a son, Ezra,
and a daughter, Tamara.
Hillel Provides
High Holy
Day Services
South Dade Hillel, which serves
both FIU and Miami Dade South,
will be sponsoring Rosh Hashana
and Yom Kippur Services this
year for all members of the FIU
and MDCC communities and their
families. Services will be located
at the FIU-Tamiami Campus.
Tickets for college students with a
valid ID are free of charge.
Tickets for faculty and staff with a
valid ID are also free of charge
(includes spouses and children
under age 18).
Community members will be
charged and tickets must be ob-
tained in advance from the
Hillel/Campus Ministry office at
FIU-Tamiami in Trailer MO-1.
CANTOR OR
BALTEFILAH
For High Holy Days
Phone 858-6334
For Appointment
Fundraiser
; National Jawlah memberahlp
organization aaaks xperlenced
F/R to direct Florida campaign.
Salary commanaurata w/axparl-
I anca. Sand raauma to:
SY MARGOLIS
National Campaign Director
Amarlcan ORT Federation
817 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10003
Gets Endowment For Alzheimer's Program
One family's tragedy will have
provided the impetus for a new
program that will benefit many
for whom Alzheimer's Disease is a
devastating blow. Miami-based
philanthropist and civic activist
Nathan Rood, whose wife is af-
flicted with Alzheimer's Disease,
has announced an endowment for
the establishment and continua-
tion of a new Alzheimer's pro-
gram at the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged.
The Roddy C. Rood Foundation
will provide an initial $250,000 in
1986 and additional funds each
year thereafter to go toward
assessment, care and
maintenance of Alzheimer's pa-
tients, as well as the training of
professional and care staff who
deal with these special patients.
To this end, a 28-bed
Alzheimer's Unit will be set up as
a pilot program at the Miami
Jewish Home specifically for
residents afflicted with
Alzheimer's Disease. The pro-
gram will be the first of its kind in
Florida to fund a combination of
Alzheimer's clinical care and staff
training in a long-term care
facility.
"Slowly, Alzheimer's Disease
cripples the mind and the spirit
while we can do very little to ar-
New Edition Of
Rosh Hashana
Home Reader
It was announced that a new
edition of the Rosh Hashana
Home Reader is now ready for
free distribution by Congregation
Kol Yisroel Chaverim, according
to Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, spiritual
leader of the Congregation. The
new publication contains explana-
tions about the traditional
customs and ceremonies concern-
ing the High Holyday observance,
as well as selected prayers in
Hebrew and English which are
recited during the observance. A
special section of the leaflet is
devoted to several modern poetry
renditions which highlight the
deep significance of the holiday.
Roddy and Nathan Rood (right) are congratulated by Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged Director of Development
Steve Rose on the launching of their new Alzheimer's Program.
rest its progress,'' explained
Rood. "This new unit will not only
care for those afflicted with
Alzheimer's Disease, it will pro-
vide the best training for those
who will be working directly with
Alzheimer's patients. I think the
Miami Jewish Home is best
qualified to do this because they
are closest to the problem and
have had the most experience
with it."
The Roddy C. Rood Founda-
tion's endowment is also unique in
that it is the first ongoing grant to
the Miami Jewish Home to be
specifically used for direct care
and training. The program is
scheduled to go into effect early in
September, 1986.
Nathan Rood, a retired U.S. Ar-
my Colonel and real estate
developer, is the former president
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee and is a former officer and
member of the Board of Trustees
of Temple Israel. He and his wife
Roddy are Humanitarian
Founders of the Miami Jewish
Home.
SPECIALIZED CARE'
FORTHEHOMEBOUND
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Serving All Dade & Broward Counties
R.N.'s, L.P.N.'s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
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Join A Synagogue Today!
WHEN YOU JOIN A SYNAGOGUE YOU SHARE ALL THE ASPECTS
OF JUDAISM WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY.
THE SYNAGOGUE IS THE ADDRESS OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION (C)
7500 S.W. 120 Street. Miami
238-2601
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974^650
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505-1500
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687-6887
R RaWOOfi. C Contsrvfttrv*)
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538-7231
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1701 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach 5382503
TEMPLE ISRAEL
OF GREATER MIAMI (R)
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573-5900
TEMPLE JUDEA(R)
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667-5857
TEMPLE SAMUEL OR OLOM (C)
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TEMPLE SINAI
OF NORTH DADE (R)
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932-9010
TEMPLE SOLEL(R)**
5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood
989-0205
TEMPLE ZION
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271-2311
OUR DOORS ARE OPEN REGARDLESS OF ABILITY TO PAY
VISIT ANY OF THESE SYNAGOGUES
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Sponsored By FASTA Florida Association Of Synagogue & Temple Administrators


















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FILES


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 5. 1986
Are Israelis 'Shnorrers 7
Jewish Agency Booklet Says So
By SHMUEL SHNITZER
American Jewry con-
tributes $400 million for
Israeli needs annually. Their
generosity entitles them to
have a say in the allocation
of this money to participate
in the management of the
Jewish Agency and the
World Zionist Organiza-
tions, which decided upon
the distribution of Diaspora
Jewry's contributions.
If they are certain that these
two organizations are not fuction-
ing as they should, and that the
party-based distribution of
authority in the Jewish Agency
and the WZO is the roots of all
evils, then they have every right
to demand changes in the
organisational structure and
infrastructure.
IF THEY as certain, however,
that a pamphlet detailing their
complaints and proposals can be
"embellished" with illustrations
showing Israeli Jews and not
necessarily Jewish Agency of-
ficials running down a hill on
which the Zionist flag is firmly
planted, to a valley where there is
a flag in the shape of a dollar bill;
if they are certain that Israeli
Jews can be portrayed as long-
nosed shnorrers standing aside a
cannon and jet fighter extending a
long, long hand t the Jewish
benefactor in America; if they feel
it necessary to portray the rela-
tion of Diaspora Jewry to Israel in
the form of an upside-down
menorah with an unidentifiable
hand stuffing dollars into its base
and Israeli Jews standing below,
eagerly grabbing the dollars
which are spewing forth from
each of the seven branches of the
menorah; when they portray the
American contributors bearing
the Zionist burden, while the
Israelis are fighting among
themselves then they expect to
buy much more than the right to
an opinion, to which every con-
tributor is, naturally, entiUed.
The pamphlet is called "Where
Do Our Dollars Go?" Its illustra-
tions have been called anti-
Semitic, or at best, in very poor
taste. Whoever published it, and
whoever distributed it among the
delegates to the Jewish Agency
Assembly which convened in
Jerusalem recently, is neither
prepared to divulge his identity
nor to voice his accusations in the
open.
IF THE purpose of the pam-
phlet is to initiate a debate on the
management of the Jewish Agen-
cy and the WZO, and the manner
in which they allocate the
resources which Diaspora Jewry
has made available to them, then
it has failed. Such a debate cannot
begin with one side showing con-
tempt for the other and letting it
know that it is no better than a
miserable shnorrer who solicits
funds under false pretenses and
them misuses them. Israeli Jews
need financial aid perhaps no less
than Diaspora Jews need a com
mon cause for which to rally.
And yet, Israel does not need
the aid so badly as to agree to any
way in which it is extended, in
eluding insults and contempt. At
any rate, the question of who real-
ly bears the burden of the State
and its existence deserves greater
consideration.
World Jewry so the pamphlet
informs us has contributed
more than $8 billion to the Jewish
Agency since the establishment of
the State of Israel. A very im
pressive figure! A bit less im-
pressive alongside Israel's current
budget of morew than $20 billion
Even if we deduct $3 billion in
American aid, it is still more than
double the contributions of world
This article first appeared in
'Maariv' on June 97.
Jewry during the last U0 years.
This is not said to belittle the
role of Diaspora Jewry. It is, by all
means, respectable and conssi-
tent. Over the years, the value of
the dollar has decreased con-
siderably, while the average in-
come of the Jewish family in
America has risen considerably.
Jewish campaign funds have,
more or less, remained the same:
about $400 million annually, or 2.5
percent of what Israelis will pay in
taxes, customs and excise this
year, to insure the continued ex-
istence and development of their
state.
ISRAEL'S JEWS are great
debaters. They discuss and debate
101 issues: hawks v. doves,
religious extremists v. militant
secularists, socialists v. social con-
servatives, Ethiopian olim v. the
Rabbinate, coalition partners
fighting among themselves,
workers fighting for employment
and increased wages, develop-
ment town residents arguing
against settlers in Judea and
Samaria, various interest groups
competing for a share of the na-
tional budget, proponents of law
and order take their stand against
lawbreakers.
There is no end to the
hullabaloo, no limit to the con-
troversy. Yet, amidst all this
tumult, everyone bears his part of
the financial burden, which is
among the heaviest in the world
and is only a small part of the
overall burden we have to bear.
There is also the security
burden to which Diaspora Jewry
contributes no more than admira-
tion and pride. When Khadafy or
Arafat threaten to increase ter-
ror, we don't cancel our trips to
the Middle East until the fury dies
down. We live in terror. When a
war doesn't progress as we ex-
pected, we debate extensively
from within, not from without.
The Jews living in America? A
small group of community
workers which represents itself?
A lone Israeli yored graphic artist
who not long ago lived among us.
but has exchanged the blue and
white flag for one made of dollars,
and has found Jews in America
willing to pay for his efforts to pin
the blame on us?
THE DEBATE between
Zionists in Israel and America
seems not only legitimate, but also
necessary especially regarding
issues discussed in the sponsorless
pamphlet. Both parties to the
debate must recognize the great
difference between one who is in-
volved body and soul in Zionist
fulfillment and one who wants to
wield control from afar.
The first undoubtedly makes
more mistakes but also bears the
risks and pays for his mistakes.
Therefore he will always demand
the final say. And the one who
contributes a small part of his
wealth to the partnership without
becoming too personally involved
will have to come to terms with
the distribution of authority.
On this basis, it is definitely
possible to examine the com-
plaints and accusations in the
pamphlet. For example, the
charge that Zionist money should
not be used to encourage anti-
Zionist education in ultra-
Orthodox institutions or the
charge that shlichim (emissaries)
be chosen according to the posi-
tion, and sent to places where
they will be best utilized.
UNDERSTANDABLY, there
is reason to whitewash the ques-
tion of how much of Jewish cam-
paign funds allocated to Israel
should be rechanneled to the
Diaspora in the form of shlichim.
teachers, or institutions which
non-Orthodox bodies seek to set
up in Israel not as centers for
their members who plan to make
aliya, but as a substitute to aliya.
and youth education centers with
short-term programs aimed at in-
culcating the youth with Jewish
heritage before they return to
America.
This demand entails the implied
threat that if the Conservative
and Reform movements are not
allocated the funds they demand,
they will re-examine their commit-
ment to the United Jewish Ap-
peal. This style of debate is
nothing new. It is consistent with
the tone of the entire pamphlet,
that the money contributed by
Diaspora Jewry does not become
the property of the Zionist Move-
ment of the State of Israel, but re-
mains "our" dollars.
These threats are two-sided. Or-
thodox contributors can also
threaten to re-examine their com-
mitment to the UJA if they feel
they are financing what they see
as "harmful" institutions. It is
very simple to reach a division of
financial contributions of
Diaspora Jewry into a large
number of campaigns, with each
one allocating funds as it wishes.
Whoever sees fit to discredit the
political divisions in Israel and the
political considerations which
guide the Jewish Agency and the
WZO. must consider whether
changing the inter-political divi-
sions for inter-stream divisions
will actually be an improvement
With all due respect and
recognition of the rights of
American Jewish contributors. I
feel there are many things they
have yet to learn. Public debate,
its style, and argumentation are
not least among them.
And hundreds of reserve soldiers
return from military service
straight to demonstrations
without even changing clothes.
7
At the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center .
Jerusalem. Dr. Dan R. Lewis, of Miami, attends an innunl
meeting on Advances in Ophthalmology and lectures on torn of
fice and surgical procedures. Dr. Lewis is seen with Profi
Chanan Zauberman (right), head of the Eye Departmrv'
Hadassah Hospital, who organized the meeting.
IT IS TRUE that many aspects
of our lives in Israel run along par
ty lines the government, jobs,
honors, and certainly, budget
allocations. This system, un-
doubtedly, leaves much to be
desired. Yet. it is far better and
far more democratic than other
systems: that of American Jewry
where leadership is determined
according to financial means and
not according to elections (which
are never held) or the relative
distribution of forces.
In Israel, with our distorted
democracy, at least we know who
authorized whom, and who is
speaking for whom In America.
the depoliucization ha.-, browfe
about a situation in which it is mv
possible to clarify whether an opi-
nion represents the entir. lev -
community, certain sec; .-- -
merely one Jewish nillionaire or
another
One thing is certain Our
is far from perfect, but before m
change it for the apolitical -. ttm
of Jewish organizatioi
America, we would like t.. know
who referred to us in the languag*
of anti-Semitic cancature> and tne
question. "Where Do Our I)..liars
Go?"
When you're not quite ready
to so home ...we can helh.
The Miami Jewish Home &.
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardcns now offers the finest
short-term rehabilitation available
featuring:
the latest in rehabilitative and
diagnostic equipment and
individual therapy.
kosher meals and the full
spectrum of social and medical
services of the Miami Jewish
Home;
professional, skilled care in our
new, separate 40-bcd
rehabilitation center.
full courtesy privileges for private
physicians
At the Harold and Patricia Toppel
Rehabilitation Center...
V\
^ can help you come home.
C!