The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03002

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Idfewlslb Flor idliao
159 Number 33
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, August 15,1986
FwtfMocftat By Man $' >S
Price 50 Cents
ugust 17-20
Hadassah National Convention On Miami Beach
ssah, the Women's Zionist Organization of America,
' 72nd annual convention at the Fontainebleau Hilton
. Miami Beach starting Sunday, Aug. 17 through
iay, Aug. 20, bringing close to 3,000 delegates to South
for four days of working seminars and education ses-
Hadassah programs in Jewish Instruction, Youth Ac-
|and Zionist and American Affairs.
the theme, "We Came To The Land To Build And To
Jt" from a song of the early Zionist pioneers the
will explore the vital role of the Jewish woman in
Zionism and in American Jewry's historic partnership
people of Israel.
resenting more than 385,000 members in 1,700 chapters
throughout the United States and Puerto Rico, this
invention will focus on American Jewish Women and
,'s role in leadership and education," according to Ruth
rin, national president of Hadassah.
fonal and international speakers will highlight the pro-
ving the four days the organization is meeting.
[convention is also the occasion for the annual presenta-
le Henrietta Szold Award, given to a man or woman who
the highest principles of humanitarianism and
iged expertise in a professional field. The award is
>r Hadassah's founder, who established the organization
th Florida chapters of Hadassah will take an active role
ling and operating the national convention.
Shamir Agree That Plight Of
loviet Jews Must Be A Top
Ida Item At Israeli-Soviet Talks

Hadassah National President Ruth W.
Popkin (center) reviews final plans for
Hadassah's 72nd National Convention in
Miami Beach with Blanche W. Shukow (left),
i:W
Convention Chairman, and Co-chairman
Thelma C. Wolf. The women's Zionist
organization will unveil plans for its 75th an-
niversary next year at the Convention.
Hadassah Convention Highlights Pages 7A-10A
On Taba
Inner Cabinet Reviews Draft Accord
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Inner Cabinet has the
responsibility for reviewing
the draft arbitration agree-
ment signed by Israel and
Egypt regarding the
disputed Sinai beachfront of
Taba.
This will follow months of
negotiations, the latest round
mediated in Cairo by U.S. Assis-
r GIL SEDAN
HUGH ORGEL
JSALEM (JTA) -
Shimon Peres and
Premier Yitzhak
told the Cabinet
Israeli delegates to
sinki talks with the
Inion would place at
' the agenda the de-
jat Soviet Jews who
emigrate should be
to do so.
tions for the Helsinki
been preoccupying
iers since the announce-
imade
tement, Peres sated:
Dt getting overly ex-
cited B this is another kind of
tep^ _in | the direction of the
the reservations about
ith Israel, in the direc-
elopment, of stability,
inly appreciate this.
ant cultural ties,
ties, commercial ties,
ns also want to par-
an international con-
ich will open if negotia-
een us and the Arabs
way."
NOT oppose their (the
icipation in the open-
e condition that they
1 diplomatic relations
d with the hope that
stop taking one-sided
the Middle East."
iternational conference
try to determine the
our people and of the
nnot bring peace,"
Id Jewish students the
e leaders of Egypt and
ed a joint statement in
favoring an interna-
tional conference.
SHAMIR STRESSED that he
opposed an international con-
ference whether or not it was at-
tended by the USSR. "Israel can-
not agree to any attempt to im-
pose solutions from the outside on
the parties to the conflict," he
said. "The solutions must come
from within the region, and by
Continued on Page 6-A
More Shin Bet Officials Seek Pardons
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Seven more Shin Bet officials
have asked President Chaim Her-
zog to pardon them for their in-
volvement in the April 1984 inci-
dent in which two Palestinian bus-
hijackers were beaten to death
while in Israeli custody.
The appeals were the first legal
development since the Supreme
Court ruled Herzog had the
authority to pardon four other
Shin Bet officials who never were
formally charged, including agen-
cy head Avraham Shalom.
IT WAS assumed here that
Herzog would find it difficult not
to grant the pardons, but the head
of the President's office stressed
that Herzog would decide each
case on its own merit. The names
of the appellants and their posi-
tions within Shin Bet were not
released for publication.
In a related development,
Israeli police here reportedly
began the overall investigation in-
to the affair.
unit Secretary of State Richard
Murphy, on deciding who will
possess the 25 acres on the Gulf of
Aqaba.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir told the Knesset Security
and Foreign Affairs Committee
that other problems with Israeli-
Egyptian relations also require
discussion.
HE ECHOED the initial reac-
tion of Foreign Ministry officials.
Sources there said that it was too
early to celebrate because no
agreement has been reached on
normalizing relations between the
two countries.
Israel's Cabinet stipulated on
Jan. 13 that it would agree to set-
tle the Taba dispute through bin-
ding arbitration as long as there
was concurrent progress in
building normal, neighborly rela-
tions between the two countries.
The most important conditions
were the return of the Egyptian
Ambassador to Israel, following
his 1982 recall during Israel's
Continued on Page 6-A
Senate Defeats Measure On Wearing
Of Yarmulkes By Military
The Egyptian and Israeli delegations to the
Taba talks, touring the area. (Photo by Scoop 80)
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Senate narrowly
defeated an amendment
that would have allowed
Jewish members of the
military to wear yarmulkes
if it did not interfere with
the performance of their
military duty. The vote was
51-49 to table the amend-
ment to the 1987 Depart-
ment of Defense Authoriza-
tion Bill introduced by Sen.
Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.)
Lautenberg told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that by
voting to table his amendment,
Senators were able to reject the
amendment without actually
voting against it. He said he would
urge the Senate-House conference
Continued on Page 2-A
Preston Tisch
New Postmaster
Preston Robert Tisch, New
York Jewish philanthropist and
president of the Loew's Corpora-
tion, was selected by the U.S.
Postal Service Board of Gover-
nors as the new Postmaster. The
60-year-old Postmaster-designate
and his family have been major
contributors to the United Jewish
Appeal and other causes for many
years.


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15,1986
Yarmulkes By ^Military
Left to right are Anatoly (Natan) Sharansky,
guest artist Yves Montand, Prime Minister
Shimon Peres and WZO Chairman Arye
Dulzin at Israel's Artist Salute the Jews of
Soviet Russia. The event marked the closing of
Solidarity with Soviet Jewry Month and took
place in Jerusalem's Sultan's Pool.
Behind the Headlines
Jews and Non-Jews In Spain
By MILTON JACOBY
MADRID (JTA) The
PLO has asked the Spanish
government to accord it full
diplomatic status. It has
made this request ever since
Israel was granted recogni-
tion by Spain early last year.
Although the terrorist
organization has a three-
story building in the heart of
Madrid, and has been
operating almost as any
Embassy, it has never en-
joyed complete status. It ap-
pears unlikely, however,
that such "compensation"
will take place.
Spanish authorities, deeply con-
cerned with Basque terrorists of
their own, have also been revolted
by the activities of the imported
variety. Following an investiga-
tion, the Libyan Ambassador in
Madrid, who was charged with
having provided support to Li-
byan terrorists trying to operate
in Spain, quietly left the country.
ACCORDING TO Mordechai
Amichai, the capable charge d'af-
faires of the new Israel Embassy,
relations between Jews and non-
Jews in Spain are the best they've
ever been a direct result of cur-
rent close ties between the labor
governments of Israel and Spain,
and the official establishment of
relations.
Spanish press and TV. stated
Amichai, were remarkably en-
thusiastic in hailing the new ac-
cord. Both El Pais and ABC. the
leading dailies, reported in un-
precedented detail facts about
Israel and the Spanish Jewish
past. National TV, the day after
Israel's recognition, began its
broadcast day, not with the
customary Buenos dias," but with
Shalom Israel Sepharad in huge
letters across the screen.
A major function of the fledgl-
ing Embassy is to bring the art
and culture of Israel to the atten-
tion of the Spanish public, less
than one percent of whom are
Jewish. But, as in other countries,
what Jews lack in numbers, they
more than make up for in spirit
and organized activity. Out of a
population of 40 million, there are
12,000 or 13,000 Jews, and more
than half reside in Madrid and
Barcelona.
SYNAGOGUES, community
centers, and schools are well-
maintained. A third of the
students in the Madrid schools are
non-Jews. Tourism to Israel and
Spain has increased to the extent
that flights between Barcelona
and Tel Aviv have just been in-
augurated, in addition to service
from Madrid.
Fifty miles from Barcelona and
deep in the heart of Catalonia is
one of the medieval splendors of
Spain, and of its ancient Jewish
people, the delightful city of
Gerona. For 600 years, from 890
to 1492, the Jews of Gerona ex-
erted a profound religious and
cultural influence, and, indeed in
the 12th and 13th Centuries, with
its school of the Cabala and its
great master, Nachmanides, it
came to be known as the Golden
Age of Spanish Jewry.
The lanes, houses, courtyards
and gardens of the ancient Jewish
quarter, or Call, are a vivid and
fascinating reminder of the glory
that once was Jewish Gerona. The
mayor of this unique city, Joaquim
Nadal-Farreras, has resolved to
upgrade the Call and improve its
current Jewish Center with its re-
mains of a 13th Century
synagogue. Nadal, himself a noted
historian, has pledged the finan-
cial and administrative resources
of his city to make Gerona a mecca
for Jews.
U.S. Group Provides Grant
To Sugar Cane Workers
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish World Service,
the Boston-based international
development organization, has
provided a grant of $5,000 to a
group representing sugar cane
workers in the Philippines.
The grant was given to the Na-
tional Federation of Sugar
Workers, a non-governmental
group formed several years ago in
an effort to raise the standard of
living of sugar cane workers, ac-
cording to Laurence Simon,
A.rWS president.
SIMON RETURNED recently
irom a visit to the Philippines. He
was accompanied by AJWS ex-
ecutive committee members
Herbert Weiss, a Boston at-
torney, and Warren Eisenberg,
director of the International
Council of B'nai B'rith.
The grant to the Federation,
based on the island of Negros,
some 350 miles south of Manila, is
to aid in a farm lot program
designed to diversify crops in
Negros.
According to Simon, sugar cane
workers and their families suffer
from poverty and malnutrition,
and the farm lot program seeks to
provide proper guidance for rice
and corn crops to be developed
during the months when sugar
cane is not grown in Negros.
Simon and the delegation also
met with Philippine President
Corazon Aquino, who welcomed
AJWS involvement in self-help
rural programs that will assist

Continued from Page 1-A
on the defense authorization bill
to include the amendment which is
contained in the House bill. He
said if this fails he and others
would offer new legislation later.
Lautenberg and Sen. Alfonse
D'Amato (R., N.Y.) introduced
the amendment after the U.S.
Supreme Court voted 5-4 last
March that the military had the
power to ban the wearing of aj)
headgear indoors.
The case involved Simcha
Goldman, an Orthodox Jew. who
as an Air Force captain working
as a psychologist in 1981 was
reprimanded for wearing his yar-
mulke on duty.
HADASSAH
cordially invites you to be part of its
72nd National Convention
Join
AMBASSADOR
BENJAMIN
NETANYAHU
Israel's Permanent
Representative
to the United Nations
as he "MEETS THE PRESS" in a
free question-and-answer session with
SANDER VANOCUR
ABC News Senior Washington Correspondent
WOLF BLITZER
Washington Bureau Chief. The Jerusalem Post
MICHAEL PUTNEY
Commentator, WTVJ Miami
8:30 PM. TUESDAY AUGUST 19. 1986
GRAND BALLROOM
FONTAINEBLEAU HILTON HOTEL MIAMI BEACH
Presented as a FREE public service to the people of South Florida by
HADASSAH the Women s Zionist Organization ot America Inc.
farmers with seeds, tools and
technical assistance to grow food
to sustain their families and sell in
the marketplace.
SIMON TOLD the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that, during
the 10-day visit to the Philippines,
the three-person group also met
with members of the Philippine
Jewish community at a reception
hosted by Israeli Ambassador Uri
Gordan. There are an estimated
350 Philippine Jews.
In addition, Simon said one host
of the AJWS trip to the Philip-
pines was Minister of Agrarian
Reform, Sonny Alvarez, a
member of the Cabinet of the
Aquino government. "We are fin- f
ding great levels of cooperation
from the government," Simon
said.
But Simon pointed out that the
food lot program is merely a
short-term solution to the pro-
blems facing sugar cane workers
in Negros. He said there are
substantial quantities of land
thousands of acres that are now
being foreclosed on by banks and
ready for redistribution by the
government.
Some of the land was left by
owners who fled the country dur-
ing the downfall of the former
government of President Ferdi-
nand Marcos. AJWS hopes to pro-
vide additional funds and
agricultural assistance to persons
with the newly acquired land
Simon said AJWS has been in con-
tact with Israel agricultural ex-
perts in an effort to have them
Srovide assistance to the people of
iegros.
O'U.tlxs&.te xowers
Hotels & Apartments
'Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
2 & 3 Yr. Leases Available
Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
Pool & Shuffleboard
Restaurant It
Lounge
FURN. & UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises
R
*
miDD
Commitment, it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're heside you
when you need us
most. After all, Our
Real Involvement is
with the Living.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel
Dade Broward Pakn Beai
Alfred Golden. Presidenl
Leo Heck. Exec VP
W*amF Saulson VP
Douglas Lazarus. VP. F D
AllanG Bnwtm.FD
GUARDIAN PLAN -
Tradition. Its what makes us Jews.
t
M-MMS M-MB-M M-8-1MS ll-frlMS M-8-.W* M-g-lMS


Against Israel
Are The Media Really Biased?
By ANTONY LEHMAN
London Chronicle Syndicate
Some of the most bitter
complaints against the
media come from partisans
in the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Arabs and their supporters
in the West argue that the
Palestinian case went
deliberately unreported for
decades because in the eyes
of the media Israel could do
no wrong.
Jews and Jewish organizations
say that media bias against Israel
increased dramatically after the
1973 Yom Kippur War as pro-
Palestinian reporting filled col-
umn inches and airtime. This led
directly to the consistently ex-
treme vilification of Israel and the
distortion of its case which, it is
said, characterized media
coverage of the 1982 Lebanon
War.
AS AN explanation for the
deterioration of Israel's image in
the world, the theory of the hostile
media is comforting and conve-
nient. But is it correct? What
evidence is there that the media
consistently distort Israel's case
and generally misreport the Mid-
dle East? And if there is bias,
whom does it affect?
Any discussion about the media
eventually comes back to two
issues: bias and the effect the
media have on their audiences.
These are closely related, because
the detection of consistent bias
has significance only if media con-
sumers are deemed to be affected
by it.
Coverage of the massacres at
the Palestinian refugee camps of
Sabra and Shatila in September,
1982 is often quoted as a classic
example of media bias. Many Jews
felt that the media in Europe and
the U.S.A. tended to ignore the
role of the Christian Phalangists,
who actually carried out the kill-
ings, and concentrated instead on
laying all the blame on the
Israelis.
SABRA AND Shatila drew
worldwide condemnation of un-
precedented coverage, but the far
worse massacre of 20,000 people
at Hama in Syria in 1982 went
unreported for months. The ex-
planation for the excessive
coverage, for the willingness to
accuse Israel of all manner of evil,
, and for the grotesque language
, and cartoons used to describe
A Israel's behavior, can only be at-
H tributed to extreme and consis-
tent bias, or so the argument
runs.
Powerful as this explanation
may have been, and possibly still
is for some, does it bear any rela-
tion to what the media actually
did? Important research con-
ducted at Stanford University in
the U.S.A. tells an altogether dif-
ferent story.
Pro-Israeli and pro-Arab univer-
sity students viewed television
coverage of the Beirut massacres.
They did this in small mixed
groups which included students
who were non-partisan.
The researchers found that the
"partisans evaluated the fairness
*>f the media's sample of facts and
*j*gument8 differently, in light of
|beir divergent views about the
jfcture of unbiased coverage."
But, most significantly, "each
oup reported more negative
eference to their side than
>sitive ones, and each predicted
tt coverage would sway non-
/tisans in a hostile direction."
'as, it seems, is very much in the
n of the beholder.
THIS TENDENCY to see only
hat you expect to see or to read
Wily what you find objectionable
"as almost, certainly at work
roughout the Lebanon War. Ar-
ticles about media bias written in
the heat of the moment were com-
prehensively scathing. But some
who allowed a longer period of
time to pass before looking at the
coverage have come to more
balanced conclusions.
Writing in "Survey of Jewish
Affairs 1985" about the quality
and popular press in Britain dur-
ing the Lebanon War, Philip
Kleinman concluded that the
"complaints of bias from many
Jews justified in some cases,
need to be viewed, however, with
care.
"The attitudes of British
reporters and commentators were
more varied, and the overall pic-
ture they presented less one-sided
than the more bitter complaints
admit The impression of a
uniformly hostile press received
by some Jewish readers does not
survive detailed scrutiny."
ACCUSATIONS of bias are
often based on misperceptions of
what the media are and what they
do. Media critics tend to assume
that readers believe the press to
be neutral, impartial, objective,
fair, balanced and driven by a
desire to seek the truth. But the
fact is that journalists and editors,
particularly those dealing with the
Middle East, very rarely claim to
be neutral or impartial, and there
is no evidence to suggest that
most readers assume otherwise.
On the contrary, a recent survey
in Britain shows that newspaper
readers are a pretty skeptical lot
who don't trust television that
much either. Of a random sample
of 1,146 people, 40 percent named
a television channel as the most
accurate and detailed source of in-
formation about public issues,
whereas only 20 percent mention-
ed the press.
The reader, then, is not a
"passive dope" who needs to be
told that the media are not impar-
tial. Most readers are well aware
of the shortcomings of
newspapers and the broadcasting
media from the discussions which
figure prominently in the widely
read letters pages and in broad-
casting feedback programs. And
do they really expect truth, cor-
rectness and objectivity?
THIS FLIES in the face of the
daily printed evidence. Even in
the quality press, such considera-
tions as whether a story grabs the
attention, raises eyebrows,
arouses indignation or holds in-
terest play a very important role
in what gets reported and how.
And what about the effect of the
media? Do they, as many critics
tend to believe, sway opinion and
have considerable influence over
their audiences? On this vexed
question, sociologists of the media
do not agree. Prof. Kurt Lang, of
the University of Washington, one
of the leading experts in this field,
says that there simply are no good
studies, and it is therefore dif-
ficult to generalize. The evidence
from research is inconclusive. The
case is not proven.
But it would be wrong to
assume that, because the ex-
istence of consistent deliberate
bias against Israel cannot be
substantiated, the media are
thereby exonerated. On the con-
trary, this clears away issues
which produce only fruitless and
circular discussion and allows
greater concentration on the
specific mistakes of the media and
other factors which affect the way
the media operate.
TAKING THE Lebanon War
aga^n as. an. wwmpk.. Dr.. Yosef
Olmert of Tel Aviv University's
Dayan Institute, an Israeli expert
on Lebanon, convincingly argues
that the mistakes of 1982 can be
traced back to 1975, the beginning
of the civil war. That period was
just a more public demonstration
of already well-established false
media perceptions.
Olmert identifies the mistakes
Continued on Page 15-A
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Jewish Jewish National Fund
Pano1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
i
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF
PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
i
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Tree!
18Trees-Chai
25 Trees-Cluster
36 Trees-Double Chai
50 Trees-Jubilee
75 TreesArbor
100 Trees-Garden
300 Trees-Orchard
1000 Trees-Grove*
Dedication Ceremony in Israel and a
Special Plaque in the Forest is Included
D Holiday Greetings
. Birthdays
? Anniversary
D Bar/Bat Mltzvah
D Wedding
a Graduation
D In Honor
D In Memory
D Get Well
D Good Wishes
D New Baby
D New Year
D Special Occasion
D In Gratitude
?____
Morris L. Levinson, a leading
figure in the Jewish communi-
ty, has been named an
associate chairman of the
Fund for Religious Liberty of
the American Jewish Congress,
it was announced by
AJCongress president
Theodore R. Mann.
Kslablishan Annuity with the JNF
Remember the JNF in your Will
Link your Name Kternal


with
the Land of Israel
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 353. Miami Beach. FL 33139
Phone 538-G464
A GREAT WAY TO START
YOUR NEW CAR.
A FULL FIVE (5) YEAR LOAN
AT OUR LOWEST
NEW CAR RATE.
JEFFERSON
NATIONAL BANKS
OUR STRENGTH IS TOUR SECURITY
MIAMI BEACH with Trust Department. 301/300 Arthur Godfrey Road and 975 Arthur Godtrey Road
532-6451 NOBMANDT ISLE 948 Normandy Drive 532-6451 IET BISCAYNE 600 Crandon Boulevard
361-6451 NOBTHDADE 290Sunny Isles Boulevard and 18190Colhns Avenue 949 2121
Subsidiaries ol Jetlerson Bancorp lnc Members FDIC and Federal Reserve System



Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
Hadassah
Hadassah's annual convention takes place
on Miami Beach starting this weekend.
Founded in 1912 by Henrietta Szold,
Hadassah today is the largest Jewish
women's organization in the United States
and is expected to attract about 3,000
delegates representing Hadassah's 385,000
members in 1,700 chapters and groups
throughout the United States and Puerto
Rico. Florida's membership alone has ap-
proached 27,000.
With the general theme "We Came to the
Land to Build and Be Rebuilt," the Conven-
tion will explore a range of issues impacting
on the life of the contemporary American
Jewish woman from her evolving role in
her family, work and community to her ac-
tive involvement in American Zionist affairs
and American Jewry's historic partnership
with the people of Israel.
Convention plenaries, workshops and
special study sessions will cover such topics
as volunteerism, leadership development,
Jewish life and observance and religious
pluralism, as well as Hadassah's health care,
education and youth welfare programs in
Israel and U.S.-Israel relations.
In Israel, Hadassah maintains a network
of human services and enrichment programs
spanning medical care including the
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical
Center and Hadassah University Hospital in
Jerusalem educational and vocational
training and counselling, youth welfare and
land reclamation and development.
In the United States, Hadassah's
volunteer network provides a range of ser-
vices for American Jewish women, including
special programming for career and profes-
sional women, Jewish education, American
and Zionist Affairs, leadership training and
fund raising.
Hadassah will celebrate its 75th anniver-
sary in 1987. We welcome Hadassah's an-
nual convention once again to our city with
all good wishes for success.
Case of Lavi
Is Remarkable
The case of Israel's Lavi jet-fighter is a
remarkable one. It is remarkable in the
sense that it demonstrates the breathtaking
high calibre of Israeli engineering an
achievement that comes from so small a
nation.
It is also remarkable because it has raised
so much debate in the Reagan Administra-
tion, some of whose spokesmen argue that
production of the Lavi should be abandoned
because the cost per unit to manufacture the
Lavi is, according to them, much higher
unacceptably higher than Israel claims.
Indeed, the Reaganites are insisting that
Israel abandon production of the Lavi for
this reason. The United States presumably
has the right to speak its mind because the
Lavi incorporates some American-made
parts, notably the Lavi's jet engine itself.
Israelis Are Skeptical
The Israelis are skeptical because, they in-
sist, the Administration's own estimate of
the cost per unit is incredibly high. More to
the point, say the Israelis, what the
Reaganites fear is competition in foreign
markets from Israeli Aircraft Industries for
American warplane producers.
'Jewish Florxdian
MPUST |N ?. SUiW Mian Fb UIJ2 Pin. 173 am
____ f') Boa0l73 Mitmi Ftonwutoi
3Z11BBE YSSaSii* SUIANNESHOCHET
TM nmm*, D IW 0........T. n~.
"*"' i "in r til c'U"ini
rM.MI .1, fin FnM, MM ,tr> M TW Jmt FWW.n
> hm Mn-i rw i
S0??0?^!^ **Ti* *0>*"t (LOCl A/Ml On* YMf-tiaOO Twq VM/ft-lMpO TIVM
***"-***-'l''"l"M iiu Hoc* MM ml from OOC" MB (10 s_,
Joxo-U SO Out i co.nl., ^ooomkvi
Friday, August 1C-, 1986
Volume 59
10 AB 5746
Number 33
This has certainly been true in the past,
when Israeli sales of the Kfir fighter and
even the original Mirage fighter, modified
and producedby the Israelis, were vetoed by
the United States on the basis that they, too,
have U.S.-produced jet engines and that
their sale abroad is thus subject to U.S.
approval.
In these recent cases, the rationale for
American vetoes was always rooted in the
humanitarian fears of proliferation of
regional wars that could easily escalate but
were shown in fact to mask the more essen-
tial issue: Israeli competition.
In the case of the Lavi, where budgetary
considerations are raised on the basis that
the U.S. gave Israel the right to use some
American foreign aid in its research and
development, the threat of a U.S. veto is
designed to seem even more "reasonable,"
since the Administration has pegged conti-
nuing U.S. foreign aid to Israel at its pre-
sent levels on the assurance that Israel
would first get a handle on the escalation of
its staggering inflation rate through 1985.
Second Test Set
Israel has been doing just that with in-
credible efficiency. At the same time, the
Israelis argue, their ability to research and
develop so superb a machine as the Lavi
augurs well for them into the 21st Century
so far as fiscal stability is concerned given
the opportunity to sell the plane abroad.
But consider the final reason why the Lavi
case is so remarkable. Reaching out to touch
Israel with its ultimate veto ofTove, the U.S.
is now reported to have asked the Israelis
for technological information about the
highly-sophisticated engineering aboard the
Lavi now that it will presumably no longer
be produced.
Whether or not the report is accurate, of
one thing there is little doubt. Israel has an-
nounced the testing of yet another Lavi pro-
totype in September.
Nomination Regrettable
The Senate's confirmation of the Ad-
ministration's nomination of Daniel Manion
to the U.S. Court of Appeals is regrettable.
The 49-49 vote, a tie which Vice President
Bush broke in Manion's favor, demonstrates
just how low is the esteem for the nominee
and his appointment expressed in particular
by the American Bar, which has listed its
grievances against him in no uncertain
terms.
The American Jewish Congress has ex-
pressed its disappointment in the Senate's
confirmation of Mr. Manion based on a lack
of confidence in his professionalism and
experience.
The AJCongress was on target when it
observed that a mistake in appointments to
the judiciary, unlike errors in appointments
to other branches of the government, are
likely to resonate in our public life for many
years to come.
The AJCongress added: 'We can only hope
that future appointments will reflect a more
scrupulous concern for the quality and ex-
perience of the nominee rather than his con-
formity to some narrow political ideology."
We hope President Reagan heeds this sort
of advice, not only from a Jewish civil liber-
tarian organization, but from many other
people and organizations of a great variety
of persuasions across the land who are also
disappointed.
Syrian's Anti-Semitic .
Book Proves the Point
Syria's intentions for the State of Israel
are obvious. If President Assad's military
capabilities, for all the support he receives
from the Soviet Union, were a match for his
intentions, there would have been a new
bynan-inspired war against Israel a lorur
time aeo. *
When King Hassan invited Prime Minister
Peres to Morocco the other week, it was
Syria among the Arab nations that im-
mediately severed diplomatic relations with
Morocco and urged other Arab leaders to
follow suit. And it was Assad who threaten-
ed members of the 21-nation Arab League
lest any of them should find merit in
Hassan's invitation.
Now comes further evidence of Syria's in-
tentions. Furthermore, this evidence puts
the lie to those Arab power-brokers who in-
sist that it is "only" Zionism that they hate;
it is not Jews.
At the core of it all is Syria Defense
Minister Mustafa Tlas and his book, "Mat-
zah of Zion." It is a virulently anti-Semitic
volume which confirms that Syrian enmity
toward Israel is only matched by its hatred
of the Jewish people.
In effect, Tlas revives the old blood libel
forgery against the Jewish people and calls
the religious beliefs of the Jews "black
hatred to all humanity and all religions."
When informed of Tlas* book, Secretary of
State George Shultz declared that "I can
assure you I share your deep sense of
outrage that individuals continue to write
such works which clearly serve only to fur-
ther hatred and anti-Semitism against the
Jewish people." And the Reagan Ad-
ministration has ordered the United States
Embassy in Damascus to look into the
matter.
This last peace of information is contained
in a letter from Secretary Schultz on July 3
to Rabbi Marvin Hier of the Los Angeles
based Simon Wiesenthal Center. In his own
letter to Shultz, the Rabbi observed:
V
"The fact that such a high-ranking
Cabinet officer of the government of Syria
could direct such a campaign of hatred and
anti-Semitism against the Jewish people is
an indication that the Golan Heights dispute
is only a smokescreen for the real intentions
of the current Syrian regime who would ob-
viously like to rid themselves of any Jewish
presence in the Middle East."
We find it interesting to note that Rabbi
Hier wrote about Tlas and his book to
government leaders in Canada, France, Ita-
ly, Great Britain, West Germany, the
Vatican and the UN Human Rights Commis-
sion as well, and that none has bothered to
reply except the United States.
It is of paramount importance that other
governments take up this issue on the
highest diplomatic level. The publication of
this anti-Semitic work by Tlas, a
distinguished" Syrian government official,
RS a Cluar imer to ^ safety of the
t>,uoo-member Syrian Jewish community -
and to Jews in other Arab countries, who
live in the shadow of ruthless and murderous
regimes.
I


Triday^ugU8H5^986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
:';'KfiK
1
I

:: ::: ,:K:i::,l
^mnMMNnMIMMM
HNMnlMwwlMw
Moods of Meir Kahane
They Pander to Sensationalism of Israel's Extremists
By DAVID ROSEN
Because extremist
elements tend to be noisy
and sensationalist, they thus
acquire attention totally
disproportionate to their
real numbers. This is par-
ticularly so in Israel today.
Such elements are to be found
amongst anti-Zionist medieval-
orthodox groups like Neturei Kar-
ta. Another such group is that of
Meir Kahane. However, whereas
the former have a serious (albeit
quixotic) ideology. Kahane ex-
presses little more than an
unscrupulous mixture of racism,
selective fundamentalism and
false reasoning.
HIS PROPAGANDA claims
that he asks uncomfortable ques-
tions to which none of his op-
ponents have any answers. This,
of course, is as dishonest as his so-
called "arguments" themselves.
It is. in fact, an embarrassment
for serious Jewish scholars and
leaders to have to lower
themselves to respond to
Kahane's distortions.
The result is that Kahane's
nonsense is not adequately expos-
ed as the insulting perversion of
traditional Jewish teaching and a
"hillul Hashem." a desecration of
the Divine Name, that it is.
Most spurious is Kahane's claim
that Zionism and democracy are
mutually exclusive. Most Western
democracies have a dominant na-
Rabbi David Rosen, director
of Interreligious Affairs in the
Jerusalem, office of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B 'rith, heads the Saphir Center
for Jewish Heritage in the Old
City of Jerusalem and is the
former Chief Rabbi of Ireland.
tional identity, culture and
language. The real question, of
course, is not whether a country
may maintain a particular domi-
nant identity, but rather what
methods it uses in pursing this
goal.
THERE IS. for example,
nothing wrong quite the con-
trary with the desire of the
Afrikaners in South Africa to
maintain their culture, language
and faith, which they feel to be a
part of the land on which they live.
There is, however, something ter-
ribly wrong with the way they go
about doing so. depriving others
(in this case, the overwhelming
majority) of their human rights
and dignity.
At the foundation of Judaism is
the root of democracy, namely
respect for every human in-
dividual's life and dignity and it is
on this basis that the modern
Zionist State is established.
In Judaism, the right of any
human being to place his or her
life before that of another only ap-
plies when the latter directly
threatens one's physical ex-
istence. Kahane claims that this
principle applies in Israel today to
all Arabs. The falsehood is obvious
and has been pointed out by
Israel's chief rabbis.
While the aforementioned prin-
ciple does, of course, apply in war
and preventing acts of terror,
almost all Arabs, whether anti-
Israel or not. are not physically
assaulting anyone nor
premeditating such. Justifying
the denial of their civil liberties on
such grounds is both a wanton
perversion of Jewish law and
denial of its moral foundations.
IN ONE of his latest leaflets,
Kahane excoriates the President
of Israel, Haim Herzog. who has
denounced him, while at the same
time recalling the memory of the
President's late father, the first
Chief Rabbi of Israel. Rabbi Yitz-
President Herzog
denounced Kahane
chak Halevi Herzog, with
reverence.
Yet, it was Chief Rabbi Herzog
who 40 years ago not only wrote
that Judaism demands that Israel
must be established upon the prin-
ciples that "you shall have one
statute both for the stranger and
the homeborn of the land," but
that the Jewish presence in the
land of Israel "is, in fact, a part-
nership between Jews and non-
Jews in the land, which
guarantees one partner a par-
ticular advantage."
Such a partnership he justifies,
in terms of Jewish law, as one
which obliges us to respect the
civil and religious liberties of non-
Jews in the country.
ANOTHER object of Kahane's
Continued on Page 12-A
Jaffa's Flea Market Sells a World Of
Antique Treasures And Just Plain Junk
The Jaffa Flea Market, a bargain-hunter's paradise.
By DIANE GREENBERG
Curiosities, antiques, ar-
tifacts, bric-a-brac and junk.
Call it what you will it's
all available and up for sale
every day at the Flea
Market in Jaffa. If you want
and old 78 rpm of Caruso
singing "0 Sole Mio," a pair
of left-handed boxing gloves
or a framed portrait of
Golda Meir, this is the place
to come.
People are selling every im-
aginable item on the premise that
if one person has no further use
for it there must be someone else
who will value and treasure it.
This philosophy encourages the
display of some dubious
"treasures" nails and screws,
taps and lengths of piping which
might equip an adventure
playground but would have a hard
job not springing leaks if used for
their original functions.
Old clothes are spread on the
pavement on top of old
newspapers. There are battered
and tired toys, an old man sitting
in front of a wall of old shoes,
tailors' dummies, gold and silver
arms and legs which once
displayed couture dresses, tran-
sistor radios, black and white
televisions and watches without
straps.
THE STALL selling stamps
and coins attracts its own kind of
clientele. Old World collectors
happily engage in close examina-
tion, inspecting possible new addi-
tions to their collections. No
money seems to change hands
here; exchanges are made in kind.
The Flea Market is perhaps
most famous for its vast stores of
second-hand furniture. There are
half a dozen cavernous
warehouses with room after room
piled high and overflowing with
desks and bookcases, coffee
tables, dining tables and occa-
sional tables. Chairs are
everywhere armchairs, stiff-
backed chairs and luxurious leg
padded chaise lounges. There are
sideboards with immense carved
feet and heavy ornamental
fluting, once a housemaid's
day growth of beard in no way
deters his customers.
People stop and show each other
their purchases. Young girls
wander down the two narrow ar-
cades which sell cheap fashions
and jewelry. Long-suffering
husbands stand around resignedly
while their wives rummage
feverishly for genuine antiques
and bargains.
Copper pots of every con-
Even in the age of the digital watch,
there's a big demand for grandfather
clocks.
nightmare to keep dusted and
polished.
If you're looking for a real anti-
que, there's a fair chance you'll
find it. You'll have to pay a good
price, however, as the salesmen
are canny, and it's rare for them
not to have recognized a genuine
piece and priced it accordingly.
EVEN IN the age of the digital
watch, there's a flourishing
market for grandfather clocks.
These elegant timepieces, with
their fine precision mechanisms,
are very much sought after. Ap-
parently people will buy them
even if they're not working, just
as an adornment to their living
room or in memory of a by-gone
age.
The market is full of unlikely
characters buying and selling. The
somewhat disreputable fellow sell-
ing after-shave lotions and per-
fumes does a roaring trade. He of-
fers liberal samples of his wares,
and the fact that he sports a three-
ceivable size and shape are
available. If you're after a
samovar, a finjan (coffee pot), a
pair of brass candlesticks, an iron
bedstead or a chandelier, you can
choose from hundreds here. There
are coal skuttles complete with
pokers and tongs, relics of the pre-
central heating era. One stall,
really just a hole in the wall, sells
faded pink wall lights that once
must have lit the bedroom of a Tel
Aviv hotel.
THE MIDDLE EASTERN art
of bargaining is very much the ac-
cepted form of trading. The first
thing to do is let the salesman
know that you do not want to buy
his beautifully burnished copper
pot. Walk away appalled at the
price he wants for it, and he of
course will entice you back with a
slightly lower price. Then negotia-
tions can really begin. Before the
deal will be completed, you'll have
discovered that his grandmother
Continued on Pge 12-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
On Taba
Inner Cabinet Reviews Draft Accord
Continued from Page 1-A
Lebanon war; and progress
toward improving trade, tourism
and cultural relations.
But Avraham Tamir, Director
General of the Prime Minister's
Office and one of the three Israeli
negotiators on Taba, said that he
would recommend that the
Cabinet sign the document. "As
far as I am concerned, this stage is
no longer of interest," he said. "I
am now working on the Peres-
Mubarak summit."
THE MEETING between
Israel's Prime Minister and
Egypt's President is expected to
take place next month, after the
two sides sign the arbitration
document. But Shamir said that
the summit would occur even if
the document is not signed.
Assessments of the document
differed. Most press reports in-
dicated that two points in the
document remained unclarified
the identity of the three interna-
Peres, Shamir Agree That Plight Of
Soviet Jews Must Be A Top Agenda
Item At Israeli-Soviet Talks
Continued from Page 1-A
direct negotiations.
"However," Shamir added, "a
superpower such as the Soviet
Union can influence developments
in the Mideast by acting in a
responsible manner, by publicly
supporting the peace process and
by refraining from providing sup-
port to aggressive regimes and
terrorist organizations.
"We will conduct our contacts
with the Soviet representatives
with an open mind in the hope that
the real improvement in relations
will come about. A real improve-
ment will come about only if the
Soviet government will change its
attitude toward the Jewish people
in the Soviet Union and will
change its negative attitude
towards the State of Israel in the
Mideast."
But Shamir appeared to have
softened his lute toward the
Soviet Union in an Israel Radio in-
terview. In his latest statement,
he said the Helsinki talks were a
hesitant, modest step toward im-
proved relations between the two
countries. At this point, Shamir
said, the Soviets want to discuss
"some important issues, such as
their property here, but we will of
course raise the issue which is
most important to us Soviet
Jewry."
SHAMIR DESCRIBED the
absence of diplomatic relations
between Israel and the USSR as
abnormanl. He said that Israel,
for its part, wants a resumption of
relations because of the vital role
the Soviet Union plays in the
Mideast and because of the in-
tolerable situation in which the
two million Soviet Jews live.
"Progress in these talks must
therefore be shown simultaneous-
ly in both these aspects of the pro-
blem," Shamir said.
While the Cabinet was in ses-
sion Sunday discussing the up-
coming talks, a group of former
allva activists, among them Natan
(Anatoly) Sharansky,
demonstrated outside the Prime
Minister's office. They demanded
that Israel make the emigration of
Soviet Jews a condition for any
talks with the USSR. The
demonstrators argued against the
euphoria which has characterized
many Israelis in the wake of the
reports of the upcoming talks.
tional arbitrators and the map of
the area that will be attached to
the arbitration document. Egypt
still insists that the pre-1967
borders, when Egypt controlled
Sinai, be shown, while Israel sug-
gests that each party submit a
map.
BUT TAMIR told Israel Radio
that the arbitration document, or
compromise, had resolved both
those issues.
"There is no argument over the
map," he said. We stayed for two
additional days because of this
map, and it was also agreed upon.
Thus all that remains to be done
now is not in the realm of dif-
ference of opinion.
"Everything has been agreed
upon, including the way in which
we will finish up the things that
must be finished up and that are
not related to the Inner Cabinet,
and can by all means be ac-
complished between the Inner
Cabinet's decision and the signing
of the compromise."
HE SAID about the three ar-
bitrators that "there are lists,
there is a method. As long as
there is no target date, it's clear
that each side will have additional,
better ideas, which to a great ex-
tent determines who the ar-
bitrators will be.
"At the moment it's clear that it
must be finished by a certain date,
(officials) will sit and finish it. This
is not the thing that will hold
anything up."
Tamir also said that the
negotiating team would bring
before the Inner Cabinet
"agreements and understanding
related to all the points, in accor-
.HOREI
MOTH 1 UACM UUi
TIM
Mi
K0SHER ON THE OCEAN
WEEK-END & MID WEEK PACKAGES
including Complete Breoktost. Dinner & Luncheon Snacks
Sabboth & Holidays 3 Full meals Daily
ALL DIETS CATERED TO .[?
Color TV in All Rooms Movies Entertainment kosher
e Private Beach Olympic Pool Free Parking
Masfigloch & Synagogue on premises Plus
Warm & Friendly Atmosphere tor your Pleasure
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS and SUCCOTH
Succah on Premises
Phone: 538-7811
ON THE OCEAN I to ST.. MIAMI IE ACM
[ft*-
MMOMMtf HOTEL
Mtoml Beech. FVW*o
UManrtow ffttn
F^AJrCondNton^
Soc^Proyy^W
Pool rre Cneiees
MMMci' Sup*"***"
HIGH HOLY DAYS $349
OCT.3-OCT.14 poep^on
12 DAYSI11 HIGHTS -
^K*ls-SHeos.HOL.os.
^ EWC JACOBS. Own.t-*9"
dance with what the Cabinet has
established that everything is
one entirety.
"WE PRESENT all this to the
Inner Cabinet with our recom-
mendation to accept it as s star-
ting position, as the Inner Cabinet
determined, for the improvement
of the relations with Egypt."
He said the discussions hadn't
dealt with the Mubarak-Peres
summit conference. "My aD.
proach from the beginning has
been that the summit is unrelated
to what we called the package deal
of all the things we handled," he
said. "The summit is an issue bet-
ween the Egyptian President and
the Israeli Prime Minister ..."
Israel And The Soviet Bloc
Moscow, according to Israeli ex-
By GIL SEDAN perts on Poland. That green light
JERUSALEM (JTA) was given which, the experts
Ts r p 1 will resume not1dl exPlams the delay in the
!, f L Z itolj implementation of the agreement
diplomatic ties with Poland in principie which was reached
and Hungary before such
ties are formed with the
Soviet Union, according to
political sources here. The
sources noted that ties with
Poland at the lowest
diplomatic level of "interest
sections" in Warsaw and
Tel Aviv are expected to
be established this month
followed by similar relations
with Hungary.
Poland's resumption of
diplomatic contacts with Israel
was initiated by Warsaw,
although this move apparently
received the green light from
in principle which was reached
several months ago in talks bet-
ween Israeli and Polish diplomats
in Bonn.
THE TALKS in Bonn followed
those between Shamir and the
Polish Foreign Minister at the
United Nations General Assembly
in New York last autumn. Official-
ly, Holland will continue to repre-
sent the diplomatic interests of
both countries.
As for relations between
Hungary and Israel, the two coun-
tries have had relatively
developed contacts for some time.
Hungary, for example, has for the
past three summers been a
popular destination for Israeli
tourists.
4 Days/3 Nites
Weekend- T$199
bh until 10il
<">' m 174 ran
MS
Also Available: 5 DAYS/4 Nites
.^ IMMM 3 meats daily Nutrttiontet L
Spas tor men I women Weight loss plans Sauna & MM
Swimming pools Free tennis Qort (avail.) Cocktail parties
a SoctJ ecttvroee Dinner dancing Alt-Star net shows
Information A Reservations
1-800-SPA-SLIM
7900 HARBOR ISLAND NORTH BAY VILLAGE FL 33141
I I

I
THE
PRINTS OF
AUTUMN
ttSSSSSSV
"BLUEPRINT TO WINNING"
It's our Dot-to-Dot Super Contest! Connect the dots and you just
might be the winner of a luxury 7-day cruise aboard Home Lines
Cruises brand new M/V 'Homeric," courtesy of Hollywood Travel
Pick up an entry blank at participating stores, and deposit at
Information Booth, Center Mall now thru September 1st.
"BLUEPRINT FOR GOOD HEALTH"
Shopping for Wellness, community awareness
for health maintenance sponsored by the South Florida
Hospital Association. Lectures, slide shows, free health
services, health screening and nutritional counseling throughout the
common area of the Mall. August 22nd and 23rd
The
Burdinea, Jordan Marah, Grandstand Food Court A._i j
n-j_____ v-ourt. >-Uc*el Atrium and over 150 Specialty Shop*


27,000 Fla. Members
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A



72nd Annual Meeting To Draw 3,000 Women
Ruth W. Popkin, National
President of Hadassah, an-
nounced that 3,000 delegates
representing 385,000
members in 1,700 chapters and
groups throughout the United
States and Puerto Rico will at-
tend the Hadassah National
Convention in Miami Beach at
the Fontainebleau Hilton
Hotel this weekend.
The four-day event will in-
Ruth Popkin 18th National
President Of Hadassah
Ruth Popkin is the 18th Na-
tional President of Hadassah. the
Women's Zionist Organization of
America, Inc., which is the largest
women's volunteer organization
in the United States. With its
385,000 members, Hadassah is
also the largest Jewish organiza-
tion in the country and the world's
largest Zionist organization out-
side of Israel.
Mrs. Popkin is immediate past
national vice-president and coor-
dinator of the Fundraising Divi-
sion. She has also served as chair-
man of Purchasing and Supplies
and of the National Youth Ac-
tivities Departments. She is still
remembered as an innovative
chairman of the Hadassah Zionist
Youth Commission and as chair-
man of the annual Salute to Israel
Parade that attracts thousands of
people to Fifth Avenue in New
York City.
She has held many important
posts in her ascent at Hadassah
including the presidencies of the
Judith Group in Brooklyn, the

f
*
Ruth Willion Popkin
Great Neck Chapter and the
Nassau-Suffolk Region.
Mrs. Popkin is a member of the
Continued on Page 9-A
Lauterbur To Be Honored
With The 1986
Henrietta Szold Award
Dr. Paul C. Lauterbur,
developer of magnetic resonance
imaging as a tool for medical
diagnosis and research, will be
honored with the 1986 Henrietta
Szold Award by Hadassah, Frieda
S. Lewis, National chairman of
the Henrietta Szold Award Com-
mittee announced.
Dr. Lauterbur, Director of
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Research and a Professor in the
College of Medicine of the Univer-
sity of Illinois, pioneered the
utilization of radio waves and
powerful magnetic fields to
generate clearer and more detail-
ed images of the human body than
ever before possible. The techni-
que has widespread applications
for the diagnosis and treatment of
illness and for enhancing
understanding of the chemical and
biological processes within human
cells, tissues and organs.
"Dr. Lauterbur's enormous con-
itribution to our greater
understanding of the human body
and the mysteries of how it works
reflects the dedication of Henriet-
ta Szold Hadassah's founder -
to humanity's quest for triumph
over illness," Lewis said in an-
[ nouncing the award.
"In advancing the frontiers of
medical knowledge and opening
I new vistas of ever more effective
| prevention and treatment of
disease, Dr. Lauterbur is carrying
forward the highest humanitarian
values of Henrietta Szold and the
organization she founded," Lewis
I added.
Dr. Lauterbur's work has been
I widely praised for greatly expan-
ding the diagnostic tools of
iniodern medicine. Magnetic
IKesonance Imaging is considered
* be risk free unlike other
hniques depending upon X-
l^8' ""^oactivity or invasive pro-
cedures and capable of reveal-
"1 disorders that cannot be auffi-
Dr. Paul C. Lauterbur
ciently examined by other current
methods.
In addition, it is believed that
the three-dimensional images
generated by the technique may
greatly expand knowledge of the
chemical, physiological and
biological processes that go on in
organs and tissues, leading to
earlier detection of disease and
more accurate monitoring of its
treatment.
The Award will be presented to
Dr. Lauterbur during a special
session.
The Henrietta Szold Award is
presented annually to individuals
whose lives and work reflect the
humanitarian values of
Hadassah's founder. Previous
recipients include writer Elie
Wiesel, United Nations Am-
bassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick,
Soviet "refusenik" and exile Ida
Nudel, former Israel President
Yitzhak Navon, President Harry
S Truman and Israel Prime
Ministers David Ben Gurion and
Golda Meir.
elude sessions on Hadassah
programs in Jewish Educa-
tion, Youth Activities and
Zionist and American Affairs
in the United States. "We
have planned an exciting con-
vention," Mrs. Popkin stated,
"concentrating on giving
women in leadership in the
American Jewish community
the means to understand, and
to convey to others, informa-
tion relating to Jewish and
Zionist values."
Mrs. Popkin also announced
that Blanche Shukow of Hun-
tington Station, N.Y.,
Hadassah's Coordinator of the
Fund-Raising Division, will
serve as Chairman of the Con-
vention. Her Co-Chairman will
again be Thelma C. Wolf, of
Lawrence, N.Y., National
American Affairs Chairman.
Mrs. Shukow said the agen-
da for the Convention which
will be preceded by a meeting
of the full National Board -
encompasses a full range of
issues of major concern to
American Jews as well as
Hadassah's medical, educa-
tional, vocational, youth and
land relcamation programs in
Israel.
The Convention also is the
occasion for the annual presen-
tation of the Henrietta Szold
Award, named for Hadassah's
Founder, and given to a man
or woman who exemplifies the
highest principles of
humanitarianism and recogniz-
ed expertise in a profession.
This year's recipient will be
Dr. Paul C. Lauterbur.
Five Florida Regions To Greet Delegates
Jean Temkin, president of the
Miami Beach Region of Hadassah
announced that the five Florida
Regions, Florida Atlantic, Florida
Central, Florida Midcoast, Miami
and Miami Beach will be on hand
to extend warm Hadassah
hospitality to the delegates to the
72nd Annual National Convention
to convene on Sunday, Aug. 17-20
at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
in Miami Beach, centering around
the Zionist pioneering theme
"We Came to the Land to Build
and to be Rebuilt."
Mrs. Temkin named the
delegates to attend the Conven-
tion including: Harriette Cohen,
Ricki Igra, Annette Kahn, Lillian
Martel. Sybil Scheid, Sylvia Wein-
traub, Anne Yarrow, Faye Yar-
row. Tillie Yates, Julia Weiss,
Jean Temkin
Esther Boyarin, Helen Adams,
Sophie Kane, Louella Shapiro,
National Board Member, Jean
Feinberg, Betty Kestenbaum.
Also the presidents from the 28
'Miami Beach Chapters: Mary
Krystle, Frieda Rephun,, Ann
Goodfriend, Jean Jacobson,
Geraldine Ramme, Pauline
I.essem, Evelyn Brown,
Ernestine Levinson, Sadie Her-
man, Regina Frischman, Margot
Backer, Florence Goldsmith,
Jackie Hachter, Julia Goldfarb,
Sylvia Meyers, Helen Cohen, Lil
Schwartz, Rose Marcus, Rose
Goldberg, Jane Glass, Sylvia Nex-
er, Rose Silverman, Clara Landy,
Augusta Hoffman, Shirley
Rosenberg, Alice Gold, Judith
Sirota, Florence Greenberg, Bea
Creinin, Henrietta Berman, Jen-
nie Fishman, Florence Gordon.
Israel's Ambassador To UN Special Guest
At Convention Public Affairs Session
Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel's
Permanent Representative to the
United Nations, will face ques-
tions from a panel of top newsmen
during a special public affairs ses-
sion of the 72nd National Conven-
tion of Hadassah, on Tuesday
evening in the grand ballroom,
open to the public.
Netanyahu, an expert on ter-
rorism, will be questioned by
Sander Vanocur, ABC News
Senior Correspondent in
Washington, Wolf Blitzer,
Washington Bureau Chief of The
Jerusalem Post, and Michael
Putney, reporter and correspon-
dent for WTVJ in Miami, at the
session scheduled for 8:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Aug. 19, in the Grand
Ballroom of the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel.
Netanyahu, former Deputy
Benjamin Netanyahu
Chief of Mission at the Israeli Em-
bassy in Washington, is author of
the best-seller, "Terrorism: How
the West Can Win" published this
year. A former officer in the
Israel Defense Forces and
businessman, he also was editor of
"International Terrorism:
Challenge and Response," and his
articles on Middle East affairs
have been widely published.
The Israeli diplomat also is a
founder and a member of the
Board of Directors of the
Jonathan Institute in Jerusalem, a
foundation for research on ter-
rorism named for his late brother
who was killed during the Israeli
rescue mission to Entebbe to ob-
tain the release of Israeli
passengers of an Air France plane
Continued on Page 8-A
Ambassador Schifter, Representative
Wilson To Address Convention
Richard Schifter, Assistant
Secretary of State for Human
Rights and Humanitarian Affairs,
and Rep. Charles Wilson of Texas
(D), a member of the House Ap-
propriations Committee, will ad-
dress the Convention Sunday
evening at the banquet in the
grand ballroom.
Ambassador Schifter, the State
Department's senior official for
human rights policy and a former
United States Representative to
the United Nations, will discuss
U.S. policy on human rights at the
Convention's opening banquet on
Sunday evening. The program
also features Israeli Ambassador
to the United States Meir
Rosenne and Hadassah National
President Ruth W. Popkin.
Wilson, a member of the
Defense and Foreign Operations
Subcommittees of the House Ap-
propriations Committee, will ad-
dress the Convention's closing
luncheon on Wednesday.
Three concurrent American Af-
fairs Forums on Wednesday mor-
ning will touch on issues of con-
cern to the American Jewish com-
munity. Judith Goldsmith, former
president of the National
Organization for Women, will
speak on "The Women's Agen-
da." Will Maslow, General
Continued on Page 8-A
Ambassador Rosenne has been
in government service since
1952. He was Consul of Israel
in New York (1961-1967), Coor-
dinator of the Israeli Atomic
Energy Commission
(1969-1971), Representative of
Israel on the Human Rights
Commission, the Third Com-
mittee of the UN General
Assembly.


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
Israel's Ambassador To UN Special
Guest At Hadassah Convention
Continued from Page 7-A
held hostage by terrorists in
Uganda.
The public affairs session is one
of more than 50 plenaries,
workshops and special presenta-
tions scheduled during the three-
day meeting that will focus on the
evolving role of American Jewish
women in American Zionism and
American Jewry's ongoing rela-
tionship with the people of Israel,
Shukow said.
Several sessions will focus on
issues of current concern in the
American Jewish community, in-
cluding plenaries on religious
pluralism with Dr. Emanuel
Rackman, Chancellor of Israel's
Bar-Han University, and Rabbis
Steven Greenberg and Shira
Milgrom of CLAL the National
Center for Leadership and Learn-
ing, and on Arab influence in the
United States with Will Maalow,
general counsel of the American
Jewish Congress.
Convention participants also
will discuss Hadassah's programs
for medical care, education and
youth services in Israel with
speakers such as Dr. Samuel Pen-
chas. Director General of the
Hadassah Medical Organization;
Eli Amir, Director General, and
Dr. Emanuel Chigier, Director of
Medical and Psycho-Social Ser-
vices, both of Youth Aliyah;
Moshe Shoshani, Director for
North America of the Israel
Israel's Commissioner for
Tourism for North America,
Moshe Shoshani, has served in
his current position since 198S.
As the Commissioner, he is
responsible for tourism from
the United States, Canada and
Mexico.
Dr. Shmuel Penchas is
director-general, Hadassah
Medical Organization, and im-
migrated to Israel in 1940.
Government Tourist Department,
and Ora Sela, chairman of the
Hadassah Council in Israel.
The Convention agenda also
reflects Hadassah's growing con-
cern with a broad range of con-
temporary issues affecting
women. Judith Goldsmith, former
president of the National
Organization for Women, will
discuss "The Women's Agenda"
and Elaine Silverstein, Executive
Vice President of Beber Silvers-
tein and Partners Advertising,
will speak at a "brown bag" din-
ner session for career women.
The National Convention will
formally open with a banquet at 7
p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 17, in the
Fontainebleau's Grand Ballroom
with an address by Hadassah Na-
tional President Ruth W. Popkin
and greetings from Israeli Am-
bassador to the United States
Meir Rosenne.
Sander Vanocur Wolf Blitzer Michael Putney
Since January, 1986,
Sander Vanocur has been cover-
ing the national political scene and
concentrated especially on the
1984 Democratic presidential
race. This fall he will anchor a new
weekly, half-hour business show
on the ABC network.
Formerly, he was ABC News'
Chief Diplomatic Correspondent,
assigned to the Department of
State in January, 1981. From
there, he provided analysis of in-
ternational developments and the
domestic impact foreign events
have upon U.S. national security.
In 1982, he was ABC's Senior
Correspondent in Buenos Aires
covering the Falkland Islands war
between Great Britain and
Argentina.
In addition to his regular repor-
ting on ABC's "World News
Tonight," Vanocur has con-
tributed to its "Special Assign-
ment" series. In February, 1981,
he reported a five-part series on
American and Soviet relations,
"The U.S. and the USSR A
Question of War or Peace?"
Schifter And Wilson
To Speak Sunday
Counsel of the American Jewish
Congress, will discuss anti-
Semitism in the U.S. and Marvin
E. Frankel, Co-chairman of the
Congress's Commission on Law
and Social Action, will speak on
the Constitution and the Supreme
Court.
Other sessions of special in-
terest include plenaries on
religious pluralism with Dr.
Emanuel Rackman, Chancellor of
Israel's Bar-Ilan University, and
Rabbis Steven Greenberg and
Shira Milgrom of the National
Center for Leadership and
Learning.
Wolf Blitzer is the Washington
correspondent of The Jerusalem
Post, Israel's English-language
daily newspaper and a regular
contributor to the Hadassah
magazine.
He has been covering the
Washington foreign policy scene
since the 1973 Yom Kippur War.
Since then, he has met personally
with top American, Israeli and
Arab political leaders and has
written hundreds of articles on
the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Mr. Blitzer has been a frequent
commentator on national and
local television and radio news
programs.
Michael Putney brings a solid
background of both print and
broadcast journalism experience
to the WTVJ-TV Channel 4,
Miami, news department.
A versatile reporter, Putney,
who has been nominated for three
Emmy Awards, excels in covering;
politics, court proceedings,
cultural events and spot news. He
also fills in as occasional co-anchor
for News 4 at 6 and 11 p.m., hosts
Channel 4's weekly public forum
program, "Newswatch," and is a
regular columnist for "Montage,'
Channel 4's popular public affairs
show.
Hadassah's Young Judaean Study
Program Honored In Israel For
Outstanding Volunteer Work
The government of Israel
honored Hadassah's young
Judaean Study Year Course for
outstanding volunteer service to
the nation in ceremonies in
Jerusalem.
Minister of Labor and Social
Welfare Moshe Katsav presented
a "Scroll of Honor" to Laura
Sokol, a representative of the pro-
gram and daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Stewart Sokol of New York
City, citing students in the pro-
gram for their "caring and iden-
tification with the communities of
Israel."
The ceremonies were attended
by Hadassah National President
Ruth W. Popkin and Members of
the Hadassah National Board, in-
cluding National Youth Activities
Chairman Rosalie Schechter. The
Young Judaeans were among 15
individuals and groups honored
for volunteer service to the nation
of Israel.
Each year, more than 100
American youths between the
ages of 17 and 19 spend a year in
Israel studying Hebrew, Judaism
and the nation's history,
geography and archeology. They
also work as volunteers on Israel's
kibbutzim, moshavim and develop-
ment towns.
This year, 110 young people
from throughout the United
States participated in the pro-
gram, which was begun 30 years
ago. The Year Study Course pro-
vides young Americans with the
opportunity to learn more about
the people and the land of Israel
and the challenges and oppor-
tunities of settling there. About
one-fourth of participants in the
program make aliyah to Israel.
The citation presented to the
Young; Judaea Year Study Course
said the youngsters' volunteer ac-
tivities "have become important
links in a chain connecting the
'student-tourist' with potential as
an immigrant to the people and
land of Israel."
"The students of the year
course have proved to be outstan
ding volunteers, exceptionally
devoted to the tasks assigned to
them," the citation reads. "They
have shown a feeling of caring and
identification with the com-
munities of Israel."
This year's participants in the
program spent two months in
Jerusalem at the Hadassah Youth
Center on Mount Scopus pursuing
academic studies accredited by
universities in the United Stater-
Mrs. Ora Sela was born in
Jerusalem. She completed her
studies for an MA degree in
Communications at the
Hebrew University. In recent
years she has been active in
various Hadasssah projects
and chairman of the Hadassah
council in Israel.
Founded by Henrietta Szold in 1912,
Hadassah built and maintains the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical Center in
Jerusalem the largest medical complex in
the Middle East. Hadassah also operates the
Hadassah Community College, the
SeligsberglBrandeis Comprehensive High
School and the Vocational Guidance Institute
m Jerusalem. It provides support for Youth
Aliyah, Israel's renowned child rescue and
rehabilitation movement, and is the largest
single contributor to the Jewish National
Fund for its land reclamation and develop-
ment programs.
National Leaders To Address WKAT Audience
OrSzTSn'of t? Pre3!?ent f Hada*h. the Women's Zionist
KiSffiwS'SB^^HadaMah membere Sunday-Aug
A**!* "* *.<** Wpmkm will be the guests of Oded
eT'^e Je^S^?h.n WKA? h8tS his """P"*" *
on Sundays tnri 5? P/0*""*. which airs from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
co^^df?tXa5roforma1tenCan "* ^^ ^^ *** ""


Elaine Silverstein To Speak At
'Brown Bag' Dinner Session
Elaine Silverstein, Executive
Vice President of Beber Silvers-
tein and Partners Advertising,
Miami, speaks at a "brown bag"
dinner session for career women
in the Fontaine Ballroom, on
Tuesday at 6 p.m.
Elaine Silverstein is the co-
founder and one of the two prin-
cipals in Beber Silverstein and
Partners, Advertising, Inc., a
14-year-old agency with offices in
New York, Washington, D.C., and
Miami.
Ms. Silverstein and her partner
are the major stockholders in the
agency which is the largest
privately held advertising agency
in the nation whose principals are
women.
A native of Daytona Beach, Ms.
Silverstein is an alumna of the
University of Michigan, where she
received a bachelor's degree in
language arts and master's
degree in English literature
criticism.
After working for several years
as a marketing executive in New
York, she returned to her home
state and joined the faculty of
Miami-Dade Junior College,
where for five years, she taught
courses in Marketing, Modern
Elaine Silverstein
Literature, The Novel and Ex-
pository Writing.
In 1972, she left the halls of
academia to team up with Joyce
Beber to establish an agency
whose assets were two telephones
and $7,000. Today, Beber Silvers-
tein is a $65-million advertising
agency.
Ms. Silverstein heads the
agency's marketing strategy
board and is its final authority in
that key functional area. She is
also responsible for the financial
management of the company.
Recognized for her marketing
expertise, she believes creative
advertising is the result of inten-
sive study of a product or service
and the careful development of its
strategic positioning.
Over the years, she has
spearheaded her marketing
team's efforts on new product in-
troduction for: Grandin Sparkling
Wine for Bacardi Imports, Ron-
son Shavers, National Organiza-
tion for Women, Helmsley Hotels
of New York, Coty Perfumes,
Squirt and Diet Squirt, State of
Florida and FloridaGold Orange
Juice.
Ruth Popkin 18th National
President Of Hadassah
Continued from Page 7-A
Board of Trustees of the
American Zionist Youth Founda-
tion, a member of the Executive
Board of the American Zionist
Federation, and of the Executive
Board of the Jewish National
Fund. She is an elected member of
the Va'ad Ha Poal (The Actions
Committee of the Jewish Agency)
and a three-time delegate to the
World Zionist Congress.
Mrs. Popkin is a former member
of the Board of Trustees of Tem-
ple Israel, the Board of the United
Jewish Appeal and the Board of
the Women's Division of Israel
Bonds in Great Neck, N.Y., where
she lived until she recently moved
into New York City to be closer to
her desk at Hadassah.
Mrs. Popkin visits Israel fre-
quently and has led several groups
of Hadassah leaders on special
missions, as well as National
Founders Missions in 1980 and
1982. She was a member of the
Study Missions which visited the
Soviet Union in 1966 and China in
1979. In 1966, 1972, 1978 and
1984, she was a Hadassah
delegate to the World Zionist Con-
gress in Jerusalem.
Mrs. Popkin was the co-
chairman of the 1977 national con-
vention in New York City and of
the 1978 national Hadassah con-
vention in Israel, which was the
first convention for the full
delegate body that Hadassah held
I in Israel. It was called the
["Convention without Walls", and
over 3,000 delegates and guests
Iwere transported in 65 buses to
[meetings and special events that
[were held in different parts of the
[country.
A dedicated, dynamic woman
I'vho presented the cause of
Monism in an enthusiastic,
mergetic and convincing manner,
I she is a favorite Hadassah speaker
[throughout the country; and in the
years of service on the National
soard there are few chapters in
ladassah's 1,700 chapters and
roups where she has not spoken.
^Mi-s. Popkin and the late Mr.
opkin are three-time Founders
the Hadassah-Hebrew Univer-
v Medical Center at Kiryat
Udassah, at Mount Scopus and at
J>e Institute of Oncology. Mrs.
r?u'nZecently became a member
">e Golden Wreath Society of
Major Donors in memory of her
husband, Morris. Her latest gift in
her husband's memory is a terrac-
ed stone-paved mall on the cam-
pus of the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center in Ein
Karem.
Judy Goldsmith, immediate
past president of the National
Organization for Women, serv-
ed in that capacity from 1982 to
1985. Her active involvement
with the organization spanned
12 years, seven of which were
served in national office.
Blanche Shukow
Convention Chairman
Blanche Shukow
Blanche Shukow (Mrs. Gerald).
Huntington Station, N.Y., con-
vention chairman, is a member of
the Executive Committee of
Hadassah. She is currently the
coordinator of the Fund Raising
Division. This division is compris-
ed of the following departments:
Major Gifts, HMO Fund Raising,
Youth Aliyah Fund Raising, HIES
Fund Raising, Youth Activities
Fund Raising, JNF Annuity
Trusts, Foundations, Grants and
Endowments, Wills and Bequests,
Associates, Project Quotas and
Welfare Funds. Mrs. Shukow
chairs the Division Committee and
coordinates the work of the
departments. She was Convention
Chairman in 1985 and continues
in that role for 1986.
Mrs. Shukow has been active in
Hadassah since 1948 when she
enrolled in the Huntington
Chapter, later to become its Presi-
dent. She then served on the Long
Island Region and the Nassau-
Continued on Page 10-A
Thelma Wolfe
Convention Co-Chairman
Thelma Wolfe
Thelma C. Wolfe, convention co-
chairman, is a member of the Na-
tional Board and the Executive
Committee of Hadassah. She
presently holds the chair for the
National American Affairs
Department.
Thelma Wolf was Hadassah's
liaison to the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC); Hadassah's
Alternate Non-Governmental
Organizations Representative to
the United Nations and to the
United States Mission at the UN.
She is Hadassah's representative
to the Board of Directors and Ad-
ministrative Board of the Jewish
Continued on Page 10-A
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Special Events
Convention events of special interest open to the public, all to
be held in the Grand Ballroom of the Fontainebleau Hilton unless
indicated otherwise, include:
SUNDAY, AUGUST 17
7 P.M.
Ambassador Richard Schifter, Assistant Secretary of State
for Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs, Israeli Am-
bassador to the U.S. Meir Rosenne and Hadassah National
President Ruth W. Popkin address the Convention's opening
banquet.
MONDAY, AUGUST 18
8:45 P.M.
Dr. Paul C. Lauterbur, developer of magnetic resonance im-
aging as a tool in medical diagnosis, receives the 1986
Henrietta Szold Award; Dr. Samuel Penchas, Director
General of the Hadassah Medical Organization, addresses
delegates.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 19
9 A.M.
Dr. Emanuel Rackman, Chancellor of Israel's Bar-Ilan
University, discusses world Jewry today.
6 P.M.
Elaine Silverstein, Executive Vice President of Beber Silvers-
tein and Partners Advertising, Miami, speaks at a "brown
bag" dinner session for career women in the Fontaine
Ballroom.
8:30 P.M.
Ambassador Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel's Permanent
Representative to the United Nations, is questioned by ABC
Senior Washington Correspondent Sander Vanocur,
Jerusalem Post Washington Bureau Chief Wolf Blitzer,
WTVJ-Miami commentator Michael Putney and a panel of
Hadassah members.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20
9:45 A.M.
Three concurrent sessions on Amerian Affairs featuring:
Will Maslow, General Counsel, American Jewish Congress.
Fontaine Ballroom.
Judy Goldsmith, immediate past president of the National
Organization for Women. La Ronde Showroom.
Marvin E. Frankel, Co-Chairman of the Commission on Law
and Social Action, American Jewish CongTess. Versailles
Gallery.
12:30 P.M.
Representative Charles Wilson, Member of the House Ap-
propriations Subcommittees on Foreign Operations and
Defense, addresses the Convention's closing luncheon.
Hadassah Community
College Offers Intensive
Electro-Optics Program
Hadassah Community College
in Jerusalem has established an
Electro-Optics Department to
provide career training in the new
technology which has a wide
range of applications in science,
medicine, industry and the
military.
Classes will begin this Fall in
the intensive program which en-
compasses 40 hours of classroom
and laboratory study weekly for a
Charlotte Wolpe is Florida
coordinator for the Hadassah
National Convention.
period of two years. Admission
standards are rigorous, and only
24 students have been accepted
into the program. They will
undergo a month-long
preparatory course in September.
The program is headed by Dr.
Naftali Eisenberg, a former chief
scientist at LUZ, an Israeli solar
energy firm, and a recognized ex-
pert in electro-optics who is a fre-
quent lecturer on the topic.
Graduates of the program are
expected to be in demand in a
number of fields in which the
technology already is in use and
employment opportunities are ex-
pected to expand as new applica-
tions for electro-optics are
developed.
The technology is an important
element in the CAT scanner a
medical diagnostic device
developed in Israel surgical
lasers, industrial robots and
range-finders and night vision and
guidance systems in missiles and
aircraft.
Electro-optics also has applica-
tions in printing such as the
high-speed color printing system
manufactured in Israel by Scitex
communications and nuclear
energy.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August IS, 1986
. :; -.,,. r.- .' '- '''" '
Israeli Researchers Seek Ways
To Close Culture Gap For
Ethiopian Immigrants
Two Hadassah-funded studies
underway in Jerusalem are seek-
ing ways to speed the absorption
into Israeli society of 8,000 Ethio-
pian Jews about 2,000 of them
children who were rescued
from the Sudan last year.
The research is being carried
out by Youth Aliyah, Israel's child
rescue and rehabilitation agency,
and Hadassah's Vocational
Guidance Institute. Both are sear-
ching for ways to bridge the vast
cultural differences that are
frustrating efforts to provide the
immigrants with work and social
skills essential to their adjustment
to their new environment.
Dr. Chaim Rosen, an American-
born anthropologist and former
Peace Corps volunteer in
Ethiopia, and Dr. Emanuel
Chigier, a pediatrician and Direc-
tor of Youth Aliyah's Medical and
Psycho-Social Services, are fin-
ding that the most difficult pro-
blems arise less because of the
contrasts in technological ad-
vancement between the Israeli
and Ethiopian cultures
although they are enormous but
rather because of the differences
in the ways that individuals from
both cultures view themselves and
the world around them.
Dr. Rosen is working with the
Vocational Guidance Institute,
which tests learning and voca-
tional skills and advises on career
choices, to adapt existing
psychometric tests to the unique
culture and life experiences of the
Ethiopian immigrants. Although
Ethiopians are known to be highly
intelligent and quicker-than-
average learners, existing tests
are so skewed culturally they can-
not adequately measure the im-
migrant's educational and career
potential.
Dr. Chigier, who is responsible
for a range of Youth Aliyah pro-
grams in medical care and health
education, is working with adoles-
cent Ethiopian girls for whom the
transition to a new life in Israel is
proving especially difficult.
In her native culture the young
Ethiopian girl "had no
adolescence in the Western
sense," Dr. Chigier says, "no op-
portunity to make decisions and
no education towards decision-
making. To use psychological ter-
minology, she has no internal
locus of control."
Dr. Chigier explains that as
children, Ethiopian girls are in-
structed by their elders and do as
they are told. Marriages are ar-
ranged when girls reach puberty,
and their husbands and their in-
laws make all decisions for them
for the rest of their lives.
In Israel's egalitarian society,
however, these young women sud-
denly are overwhelmed by the
choices they must make and the
freedom they have to make them,
Dr. Chigier says.
His research team is experimen-
ting with the use of stories il-
lustrated with photographic slides
to help Ethiopian girls understand
the kinds of choices they must
make, the process involved in
making them and their conse-
quences. The stories range in con-
tent from situations based on
Ethiopian folklore to contem-
porary sexual behavior.
A Youth Aliyah psychologist
discusses each story in detail with
the girls and, over time, helps
them understand how personal
decisions are made and how to live
with and rectify bad ones all
Zionist Congress held in Israel
February, 1978 and in 1982.
Mrs. Wolf has held many
Hadassah portfolios in the Queens
Region where she was president
from 1974 to 1977. Active in
within the context of Israeli social
values. It is a process that can re-
quire a substantial amount of
time, but has shown positive
results.
"The stories are designed to
help the girls to cross the bridge
from Ethiopia to Israel," Dr.
Chigier says. "We're after evolu-
tion, not revolution."
Dr. Chigier and his staff also are
currently engaged in a project to
educate Ethiopian youngsters in
modern medicine and personal
health and hygiene. With funds
from Hadassah, teams of doctors,
nurses, technicians and teachers
travel to Youth Aliyah villages in
a specially-equipped van called a
"Healthmobile" to bring the
Ethiopian youngsters practical
demonstrations in dealing with
medical practitioners and facts
about curing illness and staying
healthy.
Dr. Rosen, who also serves as a
consultant to human services pro-
fessionals working with im-
migrants, says that the sources of
misunderstanding between Ethio-
pians and Israelis are often as sur-
prising as the friction they can
create like the issue of names.
"Most Ethiopians have several
names," he notes, "a religious
name, the name given to them by
parents and other names bestow-
ed over the years by family
members and others that are used
to express various aspects of their
personalities."
When they arrived in Israel, Dr.
Rosen points out, the immigrants
were given yet another name
which delighted them but were
told they had to use it alone for
identification. "They felt they
were being asked to give up facets
of themselves which they valued."
Names also play a role in conflic-
ting standards of social etiquette,
Dr. Rosen has found, which is
highly structured and formal in
Ethiopia and much less so in
Israel. Israelis, eager to get on a
first-name basis with the
Blanche Shukow
Continued from Page 9-A
Mount Scopus Dedication Tour,
HMO/Major Gifts Mission, led the
1983 Founders Mission.
Mrs. Shukow attended the
United States National Women's
Conference in Houston, 1977, and
the World Conference of the
United Nations Decade for
Women in Copenhagen July
14-30, 1980 as a Hadassah
observer.
Mr. and Mrs. Shukow are
Founders at the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical
Center at Kiryat Hadassah and
Mt. Scopus, and at the Moshe
Sharett Institute of Oncology.
Thelma Wolfe
Continued from Page 9-A
Hadassah since her youth, she had
been president of the Hillcrest
Junior Hadassah Group.
After graduation from Queens
College, she attended Brooklyn
Law School where she received
her LLB. Mrs. Wolf is a member
of the Queens Bar Association and
member of the Family Law Com-
mittee. She is also a member of
the Queens County Women's Bar
Association where she served as
president from 1975 through
1977. She is also a past chairman
of the Queens County Women's
Bar Association Legal Assistance
Panel and member of the
Brandeis Lawyer's Association.
r
Dr. Chaim Rosen, an anthropologist, talks
with two Ethiopian students in the dental
hygienists course at the Hebrew University-
Hadassah School of Dental Medicine founded
by the Alpha Omega Fraternity. Dr. Rosen it
one of two Hadassah-funded researchers seek-
ing ways to bridge the cultural differences bet-
ween Ethiopian immigrants and Israelis.
newcomers, were surprised and
felt rejected, when Ethiopians
were appalled by such a social
faux pas.
Most problems, however, are
more substantial and have more
serious consequences for the
Ethiopians' adaptation to Israel.
But Dr. Rosen suggests that pa-
tience and a willingness on both
sides to work things out can over-
come most obstacles.
"What the problems come down
to is that it is not our tools that
make us different, but our
understanding of who and where
we are.
"Of course, we also have a lot
going for us." Dr. Rosen con-
cludes. "After all, we're both
Jewish."
HADASSAH AT 67 REAFFIRMS ROLE OF VOLUNTEER LEADERS
Henrietta Szold
1912-21;1923-26
Alice Seligsberg
1921-1923
Irma Lindheim
1926-1928
Zip Szold
1928-1930
Rose Jacobs
1930-32;1934-37
Rose L. Halprin
1932-34; 1947-52
Judith Epstein
1937-39; 1943-47
Tamar de Sola Pool
1939-1943
Etta Rosensohn
1952-53
Rebecca Schulman
1953-1956
Miriam Freund
1956-1960
Lola Kramarsky
1960-1964
Charlotte Jacobson
1964-1968
Faye I. Schenk
1968-1972
Founded on Purim, 1912, Hadassah is the
largest women s volunteer organization in the
United States Its presidents have given
distinguished leadership to the Zionist move-
ment and to the American-Jewish community.
Rose L. Matzkin
1972-1976
Bernice S. Tannenbaum
1976-
Hadassah s professional volunteers are train-
ed to carry on founder Henrietta Sxold's
philosophy of translating ideals into practical
programs.


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11/
Memorial
Center For Special Studies
An Open Secret
By HELEN HILL
The shadows, falling
across the names etched in
the soft sandstone walls, are
suitably symbolic, evoking
the mysterious lives of the
Israeli spies listed there
without hint of rank or af-
filiation. The walls, part of a
maze, are the focal point of
the first memorial center
for members of Israel's in-
telligenee agencies who
operated in circumstances
so secret that even today
they cannot be fully
revealed.
Some were hanged publicly in
Baghdad or Damascus, some were
the victims of double agents, and
others were buried in Arab coun-
tries under false names. Of the
360 names listed, many are being
revealed as spies for the first
time, while the memorial center's
directors, themselves former in-
telligence agents, refuse to com-
ment on the others. In addition,
376 names are still classified and
cannot be listed at all.
OPENED A year ago just north
of Tel Aviv, the Center for Special
Studies in Memory of the Fallen
of Israel's Intelligence Communi-
ty honors the one branch of
Israel's security forces that, for
security reasons, never had a
memorial. "Our way of life is not
to tell," explained Shaike Daliot,
director of the Center, and
himself a former senior in-
telligence officer, "but the
families of fallen intelligence
agents came to us and said, 'look,
they had to live and work
anonymously. Why must they be
anonymous now they're dead? Let
their children, friends and
neighbors know what they did for
their country.' "
A group of volunteers, each
with a distinguished record in in-
telligence work for Israel, col-
lected $2 million from Jews
worldwide to finance the Center,
which honors the fallen members
of all three intelligence agencies:
the Mossad, the institution
responsible for intelligence
gathering and activities abroad;
the Shabak, or General Security
Service, commonly known as Shin
Bet, which is responsible for inter-
nal security; and Military In-
telligence. Meir Amit, a former
head of both the Mossad and
Military Intelligence, was ap-
pointed chairman of the Center.
In the center of the complex,
surrounded by eucalyptus trees, is
the maze. Comprised of huge
angular sandstone blocks divided
into five alcoves, each alcove
represents a period in the history
of Israel and its intelligence
operations. The names of agents
who died in each period are listed
simply, as on a tombstone. "The
idea of a labyrinth is to give the
impression of endless search, of
changing direction, of the com-
plexity of intelligence work," ex-
plains Daliot.
A GUIDED walk through the
maze is like a tour through con-
temporary Israeli history. In the
second alcove, covering the
crucial years 1949-1957, one
name, Jacob Bokai, recalls the
first agent to die after the birth of
the State. Daliot tells how Syrian-
born Bokai was assigned the task
of entering Jordan with a stream
of Palestinian refugees. He
adopted the identity of Najib
Ibraham Hamuda and spent time
in a refugee camp and an Israeli
prison, completely concealing his
mission from everyone. However,
on May 4, 1949, as he passed
through Jerusalem's Mandelbaum
Gate, the only crossing from
Israel to Jordan at this time, with
the other refugees, he was
arrested.
In spite of interrogation and tor-
ture, he never admitted his true
identity, and the Jordanians ex-
ecuted him as a Palestinian spy.
The failure of the Jordanian inter-
rogators to extract information
from Bokai was revealed in letters
he had written shortly before his
execution, that were smuggled to
the Israeli authorities.
Havakook Cohen, who was a
victim of a doublecross, is listed in
the same section, as are two
Israeli agents, Shalom Shalom
and Joseph Basri, who were
caught and hanged in Baghdad's
central square.
In the alcove for the period 1957
to 1968, one name stands out: Eli
Cohen. "Many agents did similar
valuable work," says Daliot, "but
Eli Cohen became the most
famous for the way he infiltrated
into the highest echelons of Syrian
society and was even considered a
possible candidate for defense
minister."
COHEN WAS eventually
caught when the Syrian secret
service used sophisticated Soviet
equipment to intercept his daily
transmissions to the Mossad.
Despite appeals from all over the
world, he was hanged in May,
1965 in Damascus' central square.
Cohen's information helped Israel
3 STRICTLY
KOSHER
MEALS DAILY
Kashruth Under Strict Supervision Synagogue on Premises A/C
Rooms Private Bath Daily Maid Service Refrigerator in every Room
Jewish Shows Bingo Movies TV
SEASON SPECIAL
No.2May3
26 Weak Minimum Stay
$1CC SHARE RM
IDD PER WEEK
$OOC PRIVATE RM
PER WEEK
RESERVE NOW
FOR
HIGH HOLIDAYS
OPEN TO PUBLIC
DWNERSA7
5 00 ?* DAILY $7 00
WEEKLY MONTHLY YEARLY RATES AVAILABLE
1050 Washington Avenue Miami Beach, FL 33139
c, a.,.. (305) 531-6621
Nwrrun Scrwatti Own* Atlhui Ml Mgr RjbD. J Kjuimin Miingiii.^
Alcove in memory of Israel's intelligence
agents who fell between 196S and 197% is one of
five alcoves in the maze at the recently-opened
Center for Special Studies in Memory of the
Fallen of Israel's Intelligence Community.
Each alcove represents a period in the history
of Israel and its intelligence operations.
capture the Golan Heights in the
Six-Day War in 1967.
However, not everyone died in
the field. Shalom Dani, who died
in May, 1963, was a master forger
for Israeli intelligence and was
responsible for all the forged
documents used to bring about the
capture of Adolf Eichmann in
Argentina in 1960.
Ze'ev Bar Levi died of cancer
after a distinguished career as an
expert on Jordan. Nicknamed
"Biber," he was known as "The
Jordanian." "They used to say
that Biber knew what King Hus-
sein was thinking before the King
knew himself," says Daliot. "He
may even have saved the king's
life when he advised against bom-
bing a group of senior Jordanian
officers near the border, guessing
that the king might be there too."
THE LABYRINTH also has a
blank section for those whose
names cannot be recorded.
Ya'acov Bar-Simantov, the Israeli
diplomat shot to death outside his
Paris home in 1982 and Jonathan
Netanyahu, commander of the
Entebbe rescue in 1976, are also
listed. "They were ours," com-
ments Daliot.
In its first year of operation, the
Center has had a constant stream
of visitors. "We reckon 99 percent
of the families of intelligence com-
munity members have come for
what is often an emotional visit,"
said Yehuda Friedman, manager
of the complex. "There have also
been lectures discussions, exhibi-
tions fh the auditorium, con-
ference rooms and amphitheater
that make up the Center." We
hope to build the library and a Hall
of Fame when funds permit," he
added.
'We are very proud of the way
in which this place is used, com-
mented Daliot, "and the way in
which volunteers come to help
maintain the gardens. Our aim is
to fill the place with life and activi-
ty. That's the best possible
memorial for those intelligence
agents who gave their lives for
their country."
Weekly ^
Not Just Now and Then!
You Can't Be Fully Informed With Less
s500 Publix
Gift
With Each New Subscription
1 Year
52 Issues
$
18
00
-*
A Check
Must Accompany Oder
As A New Subscriber To The Jewish Floridian,
I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
Please Start My Subscription Now!

Name
Address^
City ___
.State
Apt.#_
Zip_
NEW SUBSCRIBER -t .
DADE COUNTY ONLY An ^6e^eeks
OFFER EXTENDED UNTIL AUGUST 25,1986
Mail To:
Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101



Lawmakers Urge The U.S. To
Boycott Chess Olympics In Dubai
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHIGTON (JTA) -
Forty members of Congress
have urged the United
States Chess Federation to
boycott the annual Olympics
of the International Chess
Federation in Dubai, United
Arab Emirates, this fall
because the Chess Federa-
tion of Israel was barred
from attending.
The bipartisan group of Con-
gressmen sent a telegram, in-
itiated by Reps. Tom Lantos (D.,
Cal.) and Jack Kemp (R., N.Y.) to
E. Stephen Davis, president of the
U.S. Chess Federation, at the
group's annual meeting in
Somerset, N.J.
"IT IS our view that this action
in blatantly discriminatory and is
diametrically opposed to the prin-
ciples upon which our nation is
based," the telegram said. Lantos
noted that if the American
Federation participates in the
Dubai meeting, "it tells the world
that Americans do not care"
about discrimination and bigotry.
"If we fail to stand up to our prin-
ciples this time, another country
may be excluded next year," Lan-
tos said.
The U.S. Chess Federation
decided to offer a resolution at the
Dubai meeting to remove the
regulation from the internatonal
group which allows any country to
bar another country with which it
is at war. The U.S. group also said
if its resolution is rejected it will
withdraw from playing in the
tournament held in conjunction
with the meetings of the Federa-
tion Internationale des Echecs
that will take place in November.
Kahane's Many Moods Cater
To Israel's Noisy Extremists
Continued from Page 5-A
confusion is Israel's Law of
Return. He acclaims it in his latest
propaganda as racist legislation.
However, what the Law of Return
is, in fact, saying is that by virtue
of the unbroken historical rela-
tionship between the Jewish peo-
ple and its national homeland (in
which Jews always lived and
emigrated to in every generation),
every Jew is automatically eligible
for citizenship of the country.
Certainly, the extent to which
this principle is taken is unique,
just as Jewish history is unique.
But it is not based whatsoever
upon any racist principle that
seeks to deny non-Jews human
rights or liberties in Israel today.
Another issue that Kahane
raises is that of intermarriage.
Facilities exist for marriage in
Israel within the framework of
recognized religious traditions;
thus there is, in practice, no legal
facility in Israel for intermar-
riage. However. Kahane's propos-
ed law that would punish people
for cohabitating across religious
or ethnic lines (as was the case in
South Africa), would be a
deplorable invasion of the in-
idividual's privacy.
This proposal was thrown out by
the Knesset, not only by secular
members, but also by its religious
legislators on various grounds of
Jewish law, including Darkei
Shalom (the requisite for a con-
structive, peaceful relationship
between Jews and Gentiles) and
Mishum Eyvah (the prohibition
against incitement).
Flea Market
Treasure Trove
Continued from Page 5-A
came from the same village in
Lithuania as your grandfather,
and as third cousins he'll give you
nothing less than a bargain.
The languages of the market are
Hebrew, Arabic and Yiddish,
though all traders have a key
word vocabulary in English,
French and half a dozen other
European tongues. But regardless
of the language in which you con-
duct your business, and whether
you end up buying what you
wanted or fall for something wild-
ly extravagant, the Flea Market
will have bitten you. And chances
are you'll find all manner of ex-
cuses to leave sophisticated Tel
Aviv, jump on a bus to Jaffa and
visit it again.
ABOVE ALL, it is Kahane's
simplistic and Draconian "solu-
tion" to the demographic
challenge to Israel's survival,
namely to expel all the Arabs from
as large an area as possible, that
denies fundamental Jewish
teaching. What, in effect, he pro-
claims is: "Preserve the Jewish
State by desecrating Jewish
values!" Aside from the very ab-
surdity. Judaism teaches that to
deny human dignity is both to
deny God and inevitably to be self-
destructive.
Kahane's policies would only
succeed in raising hatred and an-
tipathy to untold heights, com-
pletely isolating Israel, causing
unparaileled civil strife and under-
mining Israel's very foundations.
The demographic question,
however, should be considered
seriously. How best can Israel's
Jewish character be preserved
both externally and internally.
The message of Judaism is "deny
human dignity and you deprive
yourself of your own future." It is
also the message of the folk
wisdom in the Talmudic saying,
"Try to hold too much and you will
not hold anything."
Israel today has the opportunity
to learn from the mistakes of
others. She certainly must not fall
into the pit of the bigoted and
shortsighted in which apartheid
and Kahane are to be found in
blind embrace.
Terrorist Bases
Hit Again
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
For the second time in 24
hours, Israeli Air Force jets
hit terrorist bases in south
Lebanon. The sites attacked
were near the town of
Ba'albek in the Bekaa
Valley. An attack Sunday
was carried out south of
Sidon. Monday's attack was
the seventh since the begin-
ning of the year.
The Israel Defense Force
spokesman reported that all
planes in Monday's attack return-
ed safely and the pilots said they
had scored direct hits on the
bases. The targets were described
by the IDF as the headquarters of
Fatah terrorists loyal to PLO
chief Yasir Arafat and of
breakaway rebels backed by Syria
and led by Saed Musa.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida
liRKK
BRECK'
SHAMPOO-IN HAIR
COLOR
All Colors
s2.19
r i BRECK
** roMnmrNF r
"4#
CONDITIONtR
All
Types
16oz.
M.99
BRECK'
SHAMPOO
All Types
s1.99
s2-39
15oz.
,21^
SO
Jm
Anti-Perspirant
Deodorant
CREAM 2oz. s1.59
ROLL-ON 2oz. s1.59
STICK
DEODORANT
All Types
2.5 oz. 1.79
3.76 s2.69
MISS
BRECK
AEROSOL
HAIR SPRAY
All
Types
7oz.
1.39
'iChoioL,
C'WtSfa SOLID
Anti-
Perspirant
Deodorant
All Types
2oz.
jJiaLjJ s1.99
By
0/rr
ANTI-PERSPIRANT. DEODORANT
CM(ty*
2oz.
2.19
iue
CONDITIONING
AFTER SHAVE
4'/ OZ.
Or j
&$*
>ice*
Shave
Cream
11 oz.
1.99
NIVEA
Maximal
Sun
Protection
#8
4 oz.
s4.29
Aerosol
Deodorant
3oz.
5oz.
1.99
2.99
MS/fiar
After
Shave
Lotion
4.25 oz.
$3.49
NIVEA
Ultra
Sun
Protection
i^ #15
Suave
A'
Skin
Lotions
Suave
SKIN
LOTIONS
All
Types
15oz.
s1.79
4 oz.
$4.49
NIVEA
Moisturizing
After
Sun
Lotion
6.75 oz.
s4.49
I
.
- -:'..
.



Taking Shape
The Great Dictionary of
The Yiddish Language
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Scholars and computer
scientists at Columbia
University and at Hebrew
University in Jerusalem are
working together to help
the Great Dictionary of the
Yiddish Language take
shape. It will be the first
comprehensive, scholarly
dictionary of the language
spoke by millions of
Ashkenazic Jews for nearly
1,000 years.
Four volumes of a proposed 12
have been published; volumes five
and six are nearing completion.
"It is an all-embracing work,
the Yiddish parallel to the Oxford
English Dictionary," says Marvin
Herzog, Atran Professor of Yid-
dish at Columbia and editor in
chief of the dictionary. "It is a
kind of national memory, contain-
ing the totality of the language
through history and from region
to region."
Herzog described the dictionary
as a "tool of scholarship. Because
Yiddish is a fusion of several
languages, the dictionary will be a
resource for scholars of Yiddish
and other languages as well
German, for instance, and the
Slavic languages."
THE FIRST four volumes,
published independently and now
distributed by the Magnes Press
of Jerusalem, are entirely in Yid-
dish. Beginning with the fifth
volume, the dictionary's entries
will have, in addition, English and
Hebrew glosses and Latin-letter
transcriptions of every Yiddish
entry word.
Most entries will include not on-
ly Yiddish definitions, but the
various meanings of each word
through the years as reflected in
citations from Yiddish literature
and speech.
The idea for the dictionary goes
back at least to the turn of the
century, when Alfred Landau, a
Viennese philologost, set to work
on a comprehensive Yiddish dic-
tionary. But Landau's scholarly
standards were so exacting and
his resources so meager that when
he died in 1935 his work was in-
complete. A parallel project was
begun by a team of Soviet scholars
in the 1920's, but both the
scholars and their work fell victim
to Hitler and Stalin.
IN THE early 1950's, the
renowned Yiddish linguist Yudel
Mark was commissioned to begin
work on a comprehensive scholar-
ly dictionary by the YIVO In-
stitute of Jewish Research.
The institute, founded in Vilna
in Poland, had been the
respository of Landau's painstak-
ingly compiled resources and
notes, most of which were lost
before YIVO was relocated in
New York during World War II.
The Institute for Yiddish Lex-
icology at the City University of
New York was created to support
the project and Prof. Nathan
Susskind of CUNY was appointed
its director.
The pace of the work was
agonizingly but necessarily slow.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me. Esther. 635-6554
and let me quote you
fates Also local moving &
lon9 distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
0verseas.
AB. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
As with the Oxford English Dic-
tionary, which took 40 years to
finish, the Great Dictionary of the
Yiddish Language was built by
the patient labor of dozens of
volunteer readers, who copied out
millions of citation slips by hand.
MARK DIED in 1975 and Her-
zog became the project's editor in
chief. The editorial work is now
centered at Columbia and at
Hebrew University in Jerusalem,
with scholars from both institu-
tions and from other universities
serving on the editorial board.
The worlchas been made easier
and faster recently by computers
at Columbia and in Jerusalem.
The computers not only speed up
the lexigraphical work, but also
make it possible for the two teams
to communicate with each other
efficiently as they work. Satellite
communication allows discussions
of policy to flow back and forth
between Israeli and American
computers within hours. Textual
material is also sent by satellite.
The project has been supported
by grants from the National En-
dowment for the Humanities
(NEH) and individual donors since
1967. The National Endowment
has awarded three grants to Col-
umbia since 1981, when the dic-
tionary became formally based at
the university. Its most recent
grants, for July, 1985 through
June, 1987, include $250,000
outright and $290,000 in dollar-
for-dollar matching funds, bring-
ing the total possible NEH fun-
ding for the period to $540,000,
the largest award in the nation in
its funding category.
WITH THE addition of the
$290,000 in matching private gifts
to be raised, the total funding for
the dictionary for the two-year
period would rise to $830,000.
Scholars at other institutions in
the United States and Europe also
contribute their talent and time.
At the University of Trier in West
Germany, scholars have provided
both materials and expertise in
the Yiddish of the 13th through
the 16th Centuries, and the
Jewish Historical Institute in
Warsaw has provided
etymological material.
The editorial board includes
scholars from City and Brooklyn
Colleges, Hebrew Union College
in Cincinnati, the University of
Texas and Yale University.
China To Send Leading Scholar To
The U.S. To Study Jewish History
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The People's Republic of
China has agreed to send
one of their prominent
scholars on Christianity and
Judaism to the United
States early next year to
study modern Jewish
history.
Rabbi Arthur Schneier, presi-
dent of the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, an interfaith group,
who just returned from a visit to
China, told a press conference at
the Overseas Press Club that the
Chinese Academy of Social
Sciences has accepted an invita-
tion by the Foundation to send
Prof. Gao Wangzhi to undertake
this task. The professor is China's
leading authority on Christianity
and Judaism, Schneier said.
Schneier, who led an interfaith
delegation to China which includ-
ed the Rev. Vincent O'Keefe,
former president of Fordham
University, and Dr. David Ran-
dolph, senior minister of Christ
Church United Methodist in
Manhattan, also reported that the
Institute of History of the
Academy of Social Sciences in
Shanghai has agreed to undertake
a research study into the history
of the 25,000 European Jews who
found refuge in Shanghai from
Nazi persecution during World
War II.
Schneier, who is also the
spiritual leader of Park East
Synagogue in Manhattan, said
that the Chinese Academy of
Sciences will be sent books on the
history and philosophy of major
religious denominations in the
U.S., and also on the Nazi
Holocaust.
"A dramatic and positive shift"
in the Beijing government's at-
titude toward organized religion is
under way, Schneier asserted. He
said that the American delegation
met with Chinese Foreign
Minister Wu Xueqian in Beijing as
well as other officials.
According to Schneier, there
are no Jews in today's China nor
any "functioning synagogues."
Turning A Dumb Bomb Into A 'Smart* One
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Elbit Computer Co. in Haifa says
that it has field-tested a
sophisticated kit which turns an
ordinary bomb into a "smart
bomt," one that accurately pin-
points a target.
Kit project director Avi Getzler
told The Jerusalem Post that the
kit uses an infra-red device to
guide the bomb by sensing heat.
The kit costs $35,000, about
one-fifth the price of a "smart
bomb." In field tests held in June,
the dumb bomb fitted with the kit,
called "Ofer," scored direct hits
on a tank and a simulated tank.
Elbit claims the kit will allow or-
dinary bombs to make direct hits
during battles against tanks, ar-
mored vehicles, naval craft and
anti-aircraft missile sites. Getzler
says that Elbit has launched an
aggressive worldwide marketing
drive.
OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT]
j%>T%m 11**1.1]
DIVISION OF SCMREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOLSCHREIBER. PRESIDENT
FRED ( HEKANOW. V.P. LEN MORRISON. V.P.
Ottice Supplies furniture / Equipment / Printing
.1661 N.W. 74th St.. Miami
Dade: 69.J-.J661 ^^_^__
Broward: 463-9680
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Bookcase
'Forever Flowing'
By MORTON I. TEICHER to visit her
Forever Flowing. By Vasily
Grossman. New York: Harper
and Row, 1986. 249 pp. $6.95
(paper back)
The warm and glowing recep
tion which recently greeted the
Russian epic novel, Lxfe and Fate,
by Vasily Grossman sparked in-
terest in his other writings. One
result is this new paper back edi-
tion of Forever Flowing, a novel
which first appeared in 1970 when
it was published in Germany in the
Russian language.
This book is much shorter than
Life and Fate and, basically, has
only one plot as contrasted with
the numerous sub-plots in Life
and Fate. Both books are similar
in expressing Grossman's harsh
censure of the Soviet regime.
The author was a Russian
Jewish scientist who turned to
writing in 1934 at the age of 29.
He was moderately successful un-
til he fell afoul of Russian anti-
Semitism and to his own disen-
chantment with life in the Soviet
Union. He began writing Forever
Flowing in 1955 and completed it
in 1963, one year before he died.
The book tells the story of Ivan
Grigoryevich, a former high-
ranking Soviet official who was
denounced by a "friend" and who
then spent 30 years in Siberia. As
the story opens, he has just been
released from the prison camp and
he returns to Moscow to visit a
cousin. This proves to be a bitter
disappointment as Ivan discovers
that his cousin has sold out to the
Communist authorities. He moves
on to Leningrad where he had
been a university student and
where his former sweetheart
lives. He thought that she had
died 10 years earlier when he
stopped receiving letters from her
but his cousin had told him that
she was married and living in Len-
ingrad. Ivan approaches the
apartment house in which she
lives but he cannot bring himself
He wanders around Leningrad
for three days and the only person
he comes across from his old days
is the very man who denounced
him, although Ivan was not then
and is not now aware of his
"friend's" duplicity. The meeting
ends quickly when the "friend" of-
fers Ivan some money. The chance
encounter gives Grossman a
chance to express his thoughts
about informers.
Ivan finally settles in an unnam-
ed Russian city where he works as
a lathe operator in a cooperative
for handicapped people. He has a
brief affair with his landlady who
soon dies of cancer. The story
essentially ends there except for
describing a brief visit that Ivan
makes to his native town where he
finds nothing left from his
childhood days.
A considerable portion of the
book is given over to Grossman's
indictment of "urifreedom" in
Soviet society. He attributes his
ruminations to Ivan and his
landlady but they are simply
transparent vehicles for carrying
ideas which are clearly those of
the author. He devotes a lengthy
section to the massacre of the
kulaks, the Russian peasants, who
were "liquidated" in 1930 and to
the terrible famine which ensued.
Prison camps are described in har-
rowing details and grim por-
trayals of Lenin and Stalin are
presented.
Grossman's thesis is that the
Russians have never known
freedom, thus paving the way for
Stalin and Lenin to rule as dic-
tators. He saves his choicest
epithets for the despotism of these
two men and he claims that, while
their cruel system survived them,
nevertheless, freedom will even-
tually win out. The beauty of
freedom and his optimism about
its eventual triumph are
Grossman's final legacy in this
last book of his.
WATER YOU CAN
BUY IS
3500 YEARS OLD.
The Mountain Valley Water being bottled
today fell as rain over Hot Springs. Arkan-
sas. 3500 years ago. when there were no
pollutants, no urban wastes, no additives
It flows from the earth today pure and
enriched with a complement of good miner-
als, including calcium and magnesium
MOUNTAIN VALLEY WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS ARK
Purely for drinking.
DADE
696-1333
BROWARD
563-6114
A R BON AT i
"3- \
Mountain
Valley
"Water
HOI IPNINES. ARM
MUOI


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
New Light On The French Collaborators
By ARNOLD AGES
Herbert Lottman, a Paris-
based journalist and writer
for Publisher's Weekly,
records in a new book the
fact that more than 100,000
Frenchmen were in-
vestigated from 1944 on as
collaborators of the Nazi
occupiers.
Writing in "The Purge: The
Purification of French Col-
laborators After World War II"
(Morrow), author Lottman in-
dicates that not all suspects came
to trial but that more than 50,000
did appear before different
tribunals in the days and months
after France was liberated by the
Allies.
Executions of collaborationists
began even before the Nazis left
France. Resistance movements
exacted harsh justice on the bat-
tlefield while German troops were
evacuating the country. Summary
court martials were held frequent-
ly, especially in the south of the
country. Lottman's reconstruc-
tion of these purges required him
to stitch together a tremendous
amount of fragmentary informa-
tion because the purge courts did
not keep copious records.
In all, and depending on the
statistical source, France is said
to have executed almost 3,000
Frenchmen who were involved in
collaboration with the Nazis. In
the provinces, sentences were car-
ried out immediately death by
firing squad. Thousands of other
Frenchmen were given sentences
ranging from life to as little as one
year. A small number were
acquitted.
THE LOTTMAN survey shows
that collaborators belonged to vir-
tually every segment of French
society and included people like
Robert Brassilach, a noted
literary critic, Sacha Guitry, a
well-known actor and film per-
sonality, Charles Maurras, a right-
wing anti-Semitic activist, and
even Louis Renault, of automobile
fame.
A kind of poetic justice occurred
in 1944, says Lottman, when
thousands of suspected col-
laborators were rounded up by the
Free French authorities and sent
to the Velodrome d'Hiver, a
suburban sports stadium where
thousands of Jews had been se-
questered before being sent to
their deaths in concentration
camps.
Lottman notes that in some of
the memoirs left by the col-
laborators, complaints are found
about the ill treatment they as
Frenchmen received worse
even than that received by Jews!
Many of the collaborators who
received death sentences were in-
volved with the hated Militia, the
French equivalent of the Gestapo
which was involved in rounding up
Jews. One couple that was ex-
ecuted had received a per capita
fee for each Jew identified.
TWO OF THE Jewish victims
were young children who had been
playing on a street. One group of
Militia soldiers was sentenced to
death for its complicity in the
murder of Georges Mandel, a
Jewish Minister in the Popular
Front government.
Among the most sordid events
recorded by Lottman are the
trials of a number of collabora-
tionist newspaper people,
novelists and writers. In the Paris
tribunals where they were tried,
their anti-Semitic venom, their
Fascist proclivities and anti-
democratic values doomed them
once their articles and essays
were read into the court record.
Many of the defendants in this
professional category were tried
in absentia and received harsh
sentences. Celine, the brilliant but
misguided anti-Semite, belonged
to this group.
The purge of Frenchmen had its
embarrassing aspects. Under de
Gaulle's tutelage, France after
1944 wanted to settle accounts
with the Vichy regime. The prin-
cipal actors in that collabora-
tionist government, Laval, Petain
and a host of other civil servants,
military personnel and hangera-on
were brought to trial.
The most important among
these people received death
sentences. Some of the defen-
dants, such as Louis Darquier de
Pellepoix, the commissioner-
general for Jewish affairs, fled
France, and spent his remaining
years in Spain untouched by
French justice.
IN AN IMPORTANT epilogue
to his book, Lottman compares
the treatment meted out to
French collaborators with that
meted out to Belgian, Danish and
other collaborators, and finds
that, on a relative scale, France's
record of pursuit was not ex-
emplary. This is due in part to the
perception which leaders like de
Gaulle had that the past had to be
buried and a new life for the na-
tion begun. De Gaulle himself was
involved in the pardoning of hun-
dreds, if not thousands, of
collaborators.
The wounds inflicted on the
French body politic between 1944
and 1946 were very deep, as the
evidence of massive collaboration
with the Nazis surfaced. By 1947,
a kind of national compact had
been effected in which this sordid
aspect of French history was to be
submerged. Its diainterment with
the Barbie capture has ignited
many of the passions which have
lain dormant for more than 40
(JTA Features)
the ORIGINAL
Wolfie's 21
THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DELI-RESTAURANT
'WHERE THE ELITE MEET TO EAT!"
Collins Avenue & 21st Street on Miami Beach
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS!
In the heart of Miami Beach's Historic Art Deco District'
^ SPECIALS
WOtf* S FAMOUS MMMUME
MMSN I ROUS, CKAM QtXSE,
Una, COffEE OR TEA ......._..
OR
Z-CGGS, ANT STfll. GRTIS
Ot POTATOES. (MAM C1B
WTO*. HOUS. C0FE > | "
0 TEA___________________
SPECIALS
CHOOSE FROM 12 ENTREES!
$495
mm
ENJOY
WOLFIE'S
SPECIAL
MIDNIGHT SNACKS
MENU"
11 PM TO 4 AM
it
^_ TRADITIONAL X_A FRIDAY NIGHT DINNER Special Menu Includes: Choice of Two Appetizers; Choice of Soup; Choice of Entree; Choice of 6 Desserts. Plus: Choice of Potatoes; Tzimmess; Vegett or Apple Sauce. Rolls & Butt Coffee, Tea or Fountain Beverage. Our famous table relishes! ENTREES: Roast Brisket of Beef Broiled Filet of Sole ble er. 9.95 7.95 7.95 7.95 8.95 Vine
Stuffed Cabbage Roast Vt Chicken Chicken in the Pot
Complimentary Glass of V
Owned and operated by WOLFIE'S RESTAURANT, INC., Joseph Nevel, Chairman; David H. Nevel, President


>,<"
Against Israel
Are The Media Really Biased?
Continued from Page 3-A
but is sanguine as to their effects.
If the mistakes are important, it is
certainly not because of their im-
pact. They had no real or lasting
effect on government decisions
taken by the U.S. and Israel, and
none either on Lebanon. The
media, he argues, are simply not
that important.
Joshua Muravchik, a Fellow at
the Washington Institute for Near
East Policy, comes to similar con-
clusions. He says that the media
made mistakes, but many sup-
porters of Israel have erred in
their understanding of what went
on.
There was no anti-Semitism and
no widespread bias against Israel.
What we witnessed were the con-
sequences of the view, held
generally by journalists, that
Israel's policies had been wrong,
and the Israelis and Palestinians
should sit down and talk.
MEDIA COVERAGE of the
Middle East also demonstrates
other weaknesses of a more far-
reaching nature. Wars and violent
conflicts suck in "firemen" and
dominate news broadcasts and
news pages.
In the Middle East, such events
often have worldwide implica-
tions, but the media's approach to
them is informed too much by
stereotypical images of the past.
Shots of Israelis going in as if they
are liberating Paris may make
good visual copy, but they betray
the media's obsession with always
fighting the last war.
Focusing on war in isolation,
and with saturation coverage.
Often without conveying an
understanding of its historical
background, tends to turn all
history into military history. More
fundamental issues are obscured
and their continuity ignored. One
might almost say that the media
are "biased against peace."
We live in an age of monopoly
media. Our sources of information
for the Middle East are very
limited. This imposes an extra
responsibility on the journalist
who is no longer only one among
many suppliers of different ver-
sions of events drawn from dif-
ferent sources.
The products of the media
therefore assume an increasingly
important role as information.
And in this fast-moving world
that information rapidly becomes
history.
The media pursue their own
agenda. An issue like the Arab
boycott and its scandalous hold on
certain Western countries does
not make television: there are no
pictures, the issues are complex,
the arguments legalistic.
But when the former Conser-
vative Canadian government was
considering fulfilling its election
pledge to move its embassy to
Jerusalem, it made good copy;
there were controversy, conflict,
clearly definable "sides," and
plenty of visual material. What
you see on the "box" can
therefore be determined accor-
ding to criteria which refer only to
the world of the media and not to
the world the rest of us inhabit.
THESE ARE factors which
need airing, not to damn,
media, but to make journal
broadcasters more awar^b
processes which influence their
work. Some are skeptical, but
others, like the head of Carleton
University's School of Journalism,
Prof. Stuart Adam, realize that
the production of news is a com-
plex matter, bound by time and
therefore subject to inevitable
shortcomings.
Journalism, printed or broad-
cast, is about the present; it is "an
exercise in the present tense."
Journalists represent anarchy.
They are the poets of the acciden-
tal, the discrete event.
The Middle East poses special
problems which aggravate the
transience of much media
coverage. Nowhere is the long
view more necessary, yet nowhere
is it more often absent.
The gap between the critical
empathy required and the instant
assessment which is so often
given is what generates much of
the antagonism towards the
media expressed by partisans in
the Arab-Israeli conflict.
PERHAPS if we were less
quick to rush to judgment, less
ready to credit the media with im-
portance and influence, and more
willing to understand both the
weaknesses and the strenghts of
the media's interpretations of the
world, the relationship between
Jews and the media would be less
unhealthy.
The process of understanding
and discussion does not begin and
end in broadcast and printed jour-
nalism. It begins where jour-
nalism ends.
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
West Point Jewish Chapel
Receives Defense Dept. Award
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The West Point Jewish
Chapel has received a
significant honor, the
United States Department
of Defense's "1986 Award
for Design Excellence."
The Chapel's architect, Max
Abramowitz, internationally ac-
claimed for such buildings as the
United Nations and Lincoln
Center, accepted the award from
William Howard Taft IV, the
Assistant Secretary of Defense.
Also accepting the award was
Rabbi Marc Abramowitz, rabbi of
the Chapel, the first Jewish
military chaplain ever assigned to
West Point, and Stanley Fafinski,
chief, engineering division of the
New York District, U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers.
A panel of architects from the
American Institute of Architects,
engineers from the American
Consulting Engineers Council and
landscape architects from the
American Society of Landscape
Architects selected the $7.5
million Chapel for this highly
distinguished honor.
The Chapel is faced with rough-
hewn granite, providing power-
ful, monumental presence, while
also in keeping with the tradi-
tional military Gothic architecture
of West Point.
The building also provides a
clear religious presence. The
Tablets, made of bronze and etch-
ed with the symbols of the Twelve
Tribes, adorn the facade of the
towering sanctuary. With more
than three million visitors to West
Point annually, the Jewish Chapel
is becoming one of the nation's
highest attended Jewish sites.
The 15,000-square-foot Chapel
was designed to serve a multiple
of functions. Foremost, the
250-seat sanctuary provides a
place of worship for the Jewish
cadets, officers and other
members of the West Point
community.
The Chapel also contains a
gallery-museum which is presen-
ting an ongoing series of exhibi-
tions employing both art and ar-
tifacts that portray Jewish par-
ticipation and contributions to
America.
The Chapel's library and
classrooms, kitchen, hall and ad-
ministrative offices are also incor-
porated into one functional, in-
spired building. Today, an enor-
mous number of activities are held
in the building that were previous-
ly unfeasible and thus unavailable.
The construction of the Chapel
was financed by private contribu-
tions from thousands of in-
dividuals of all faiths throughout
the nation.
$125,000 For Elderly
ST. LOUIS (JTA) The
Southwestern Bell Foundation
has donated $125,000 to programs
for the elderly at the Jewish
Hospital at Washington Universi-
ty Medical Center. The funds will
be used to develop a series of
educational pamphlets on subjects
relating to the health of the elder-
ly, including exercise, nutrition,
and home hazards.
Master of Arts in Jewish Studies
The Jewish Studies Program at Barry University announces their Fall Schedule: September 3-December 19.
Biblical Judaism < RJS 601) Jewish Philosophy (RJS 633)
An analysis of significant aspects of the religious ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ An analysis ot the thought of such ancient and
views expressed In the Hebrew Bible such as '""'"''' *''&m&mlmmn&K.-- Wm medieval Jewish philosophers as Phllo. ludah
creation, the relationship of Cod to humankind, ^ Halevl, and others. 3 credits.
covenant, etc. 3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Jeremiah Unterman -*^bw *\ m m'm ^B Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir
Zionism and Israel (RJS 622)
Studies In the development of the Zionist move-
ments and the establishment of the state of
Israel. 3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
Hebrew Studies (RJS 401)
Introduction to Hebrew as a written language;
practice in class in understanding and using the
written language; reading and writing with
emphasis on progressive gramma tic explana-
tions, vocabulary and syntax. 3 credits.
Instructor: Dr. Rachel Abramowitz
At Barry University, the only graduate program In Jewish Studies hi Florida gives you the answers to many of your questions
about Jewish law and literature, ethics and philosophy, customs and ceremonies. Come and take a course with us!
What is the ethical basis for Jewish dietary laws?
Why does the Talmud say it is good that God gave humans the evil inclination?
How and why did secular love poetry get into the Bible?
Why does Hanukah last 8 days? (NOT because of a cruse of oil!)
Generous financial aid available for qualified students! 50% discount to auditors.
F0fc FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext. 524. OR SEND
IN THE ATTACHED COUPON. __ ^ __ ___ ___ ___ __ ___ _
Barry University, Department of Jewish Studies, 11300 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, FL 33161
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
ZIP
HOME PHONE
OFFICE PHONE


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
-I





Jewish Floridian.
Miami, Florida Friday, August 15,1986
Section B
Airs August 14th
'A World Of Difference'
Reducing Prejudice And
Intergroup Understanding Goal
Popular country singer Johnny Cash (right center) displays the
Jewish National Fund's prestigious Shalom Peace Award,
presented to him by Dr. Samuel I. Cohen (left center), JNF ex-
ecutive vice president. The presentation took place at a recent
j black-tie testimonial dinner and roast in Cash's honor at the
Peabody Hotel in Memphis. To the extreme left is Senator Albert
Gore, Jr., of Tennessee, who spoke at the event, and to the extreme
right is country star Kris Kristofferson. Cash received the award
because of his contributions to the music industry and his
humanitarian efforts. Proceeds from the affair will go toward
JNF projects in Israel in his honor. JNF is the organization
responsible for afforestation and land reclamation in the Jewish
I state.
Federation To Hold
I First In Volunteer
Training Series
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will hold the first in a
I series of special training pro-
grams for campaign volunteers on
I Wednesday evening, Sept. 3, from
6-10 p.m. at the Federation
building, announced Donald E.
Lefton, general campaign
I chairman.
The Sept. 3 seminar is designed
for members of the Federation's
Campaign Executive Committee
and the Summit and Vanguard
Divisions. Committee members
hold key leadership positions in
the Federation's 1987 Combined
Jewish Appeal Campaign and
I represent a variety of interests in-
Icluding trades, professions,
[hotels, high-rises, organizations
land others.
Leading the program will be
Iryeh Nesher of the United
Jewish Appeal National Training
Center. The seminar is aimed at
Introducing participants to face-
to-face solicitation as the most ef-
fective means for motivating,
iucating and soliciting prospec-
tive contributors; raising the par-
jcipants' level of Jewish con-
ciousness in order to build
Stronger ties with the Jewish com-
munity and with Israel; and help-
ng participants understand the
ehavior, motivation and needs of
ie donor in the face-to-face
olicitation process.
Nesher will engage the par-
iicipants in group discussions as
veil as in question and answer in-
fraction. In addition, he will lead
Razing of 600-Year-Old Synagogue
Causes Great Concern
Donald Lefton
the group in role-playing in order
to directly assist participants in
the practice of effective
solicitation.
Mikki Futernick, past Federa-
tion Women's Division president,
Federation board member and
chairman of the Federation South
Dade Division, now active with
UJA national training programs,
will conduct a portion of the train-
ing seminar.
Prior to the training session,
from 3-5 p.m., Campaign Ex-
ecutive Committee members will
formulate and finalize plans for
the Federation's 1987 CJA
Campaign.
Id. Ant'-Defamation League of
B nai B'rith said that the raring of
Ithe 600-year-old historic Sephar
Idic synagogue in Bucharest has
caused "great consternation and
concern" not only among Ruma-
nian Jews but in the American
Jewish community.
I tKIno letter to Nicol*e Gavrilescu,
I jne Rumanian ambassador to the
I ah?''. Abraham H. Foxman,
aijl s associate national director
and head of its International Af-
fairs Division, said "as recently as
three weeks ago, we were given
assurances and led to believe that
the synagogue would be saved."
Pointing out that American
Jewish groups, including ADL,
played a key role in securing most
favored nation trade status for
Rumania and in supporting
renewal of the status, Foxman
said, "in light of the destruction of
the synagogue, we feel that we
can no longer continue such active
support."
Reducing prejudice and improving in-
tergroup understanding are the ambitious
goals of a year-long project called "A World
of Difference."
Over $1 million in television time has been
committed and specially produced materials
for school classrooms in Dade, Broward and
Monroe counties have been developed for the
project, which is a cooperative effort of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith,
WPLG/Channel 10, Greater Miami United
and CenTrust Savings.
Arthur Teitelbaum, Southern Area Direc-
tor for the ADL, said the "A World of Dif-
ference" campaign involves "a serious and
sustained application of time and resources, a
blending of media and education, in the fight
against bigotry, and for harmony. We know
this effort is needed in our area and we are
certain the project will make important con-
tributions towards the goal of positive in-
tergroup relations."
Teitelbaum said the project is being
brought to South Florida by the ADL, after a
very successful experience with the concept
in the Boston area.
A key element of the project is a major com-
mitment of resources by WPLG/Channel 10
valued at $1.2 million for the on-air time
alone, exclusive of production costs for the
creation of programs, features and spot an-
nouncements intended to counter prejudice
and to profile the area's various racial, ethnic
and religious groups. The project's general
theme is, "a little understanding can make a
world of difference."
Television viewers will see initial evidence
of the project on Thursday, Aug. 14, with the
broadcast of the first of some 80 different
30-second public service spots featuring
messages on fighting prejudice and ad-
vocating intergroup harmony.
On Aug. 20, Channel 10 will broadcast a
major prime-time, hour-and-a-half (7:30-9
p.m.), live special titled "Check Your At-
titude." The program will feature pre-taped
vignettes depicting common situations involv-
ing prejudice and discrimination. Both the
studio and television audience will get a
chance to react to the vignettes, the Tatter
through a three-county telephone hookup.
The media campaign for "A World of Dif-
ference" will be coupled with the extensive
distribution in the three-county area of
specially prepared resource materials for
schools, and workshops for teachers, keyed to
the dual aims of the project, prejudice reduc-
tion and intergroup understanding. The
Arthur Teitelbaum
school-based portion of the campaign is being
underwritten by a $150,000 grant from Cen-
Trust Savings.
Under the guidance of Greater Miami
United a special writing team produced a
"South Florida unit" for the 350-page
Teacher Study Guide, a key item in the educa-
tional materials related to the project. The
Study Guide will focus on teaching about
cultural diversity and democratic values,
relating the general issues to the specific pro-
blems of South Florida.
Training conferences have been scheduled
in Dade, Broward and Monroe counties to in-
struct teachers on the effective use of the
Study Guide, which contains an extensive ar-
ray of lesson plans, suggestions for classroom
activities, readings and vocabularies.
The public awareness objectives of the pro-
ject will get a boost from $50,000 in billboard
space donated by Ackerley Communications.
The teacher's union in Dade County, United
Teachers of Dade (UTD), will devote its an-
nual county-wide poster contest to "A World
of Difference." Along with prizes to the win-
ner and runners-up, the winning poster will
be featured on one of the billboards being
donated to the project.
Washington artist Phillip Ratner displays his
original bronze sculptures of Ellis Island im-
migrants, which he has donated to JNF's
American Independence Park, outside
Jerusalem. While JNF has received the
original models, Ratner has also cast eight
life-size figures which permanently grace the
lobby of the Statue of Liberty.


Page2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
-
Special Interview:
Bush In Israel
By JUDITH KOHN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
This month's Middle East
tour by Vice President
George Bush campaign
motives and lack of
diplomatic initiatives aside
was significant both as a
symbol of the current warm
relations between the U.S.
and Israel and as an oppor-
tunity to cement a warm
personal relationship that
had already been forged
with Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres.
This was the conclusion of
Jacob Stein, one of eight Jewish
Republicans who were invited to
accompany Buah on the Israel
part of his three-leg tour.
"ON THE first day of his visit,
the press didn't seem to know
what to make of it whether it
was a photo opportunity, a
political exercise, a goodwill trip,
or what; but that soon
dissipated," said Stein, a New
York realtor who was President
Reagan's first liaison to the
Jewish community.
Stein and the other Jews invited
on the Vice President's plane are
officials of the National Jewish
Coalition a relatively new
Republican organization formed
out of what had been a Jewish
campaign group for the Reagan-
Bush White House ticket. Stein
said the invitations to the group of
eight, who were asked to join as
independent advisers and who
paid their own way, were
"unprecedented."
The other seven members of the
group were Gordon Zacks, na-
tional cochairperson of the Coali-
tion and a close friend of Bush;
Ivan Novick, a former president
of the Zionist Organization of
America; Paul Borman, of
Detroit; Joseph Gildenhorn, of
Washington, D.C.; Barbara Gold,
of Chicago; Richard Goldman, of
San Francisco; and Jay Kislak, of
Miami.
THE VISIT, said Stein, in an
interview following his return to
New York, was significant in
three respects. First, he said,
"there was the clear statement to
the Soviet Union about what is ex-
pected of it as a necessary condi-
tion of improved political rela-
tions." This was brought out, he
maintained, in the considerable
time and attention devoted in his
itinerary to meetings with former
refuseniks.
They included a session with
human rights activist Anatoly
(Natan) Sharansky, a visit with a
former refusenik couple in a
Jerusalem absorption center, and
a meeting in the office of Knesset
Speaker Shlomo Hillel with
members of Mothers of Freedom,
a group of women with refusenik
family members left behind in the
Soviet Union.
"I think one of the messages
that Vice President Bush was try-
ing to send was that we remain
deeply concerned about the issue
of Soviet Jewry, and if you want
to take a step in improving rela-
tions with our country, you should
deal with that issue," Stein said.
He said that in a private
meeting between Sharansky and
the group of eight, the recently-
freed Prisoner of Conscience urg-
ed them to "support a massive
demonstration of concerned Jews
in Washington" during the still
unscheduled summit between
President Reagan and Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
THE BUSH visit, said Stein,
was also important for the Vice
President's "restatement of the
American position that it will not
impose a peace, but will serve only
as a friendly supporter" in seek-
ing a settlement of the Arab-
Israeli conflict.
Finally, there was an important
message of concern from Bush to
the Israeli government about the
need for the Jewish State to "pay
attention to keeping its economic
house in order," said Stein, who
has been active in Operation In-
dependence, a project initiated by
Detroit businessman Max Fisher
to reduce Israel's dependence on
U.S. aid by stimulating its
economy through private
investment.
In the eyes of many observers,
however, the Bush visit was, more
than anything else, a public rela-
tions tour conducted with an eye
to the upcoming Presidential elec-
tions. Following Bush around the
Jewish State was a camera crew
paid for by a political action com-
mittee raising funds for the still
unannounced Bush campaign.
One already widely publicized
Continued on Page 7-B
Mayor Teddy KoUek is shoum visiting the
David Yellin Teachers College in Jerusalem
as guest of American educator and dean. Dr.
Norman Schanin, where he met with members
of the college faculty, as well as with Jewish
and Arab students. His tour included the col-
lege, s Early Childhood Demonstration School
Education Workshops, the Preparatory Pro-
gram for New Immigrants and the Computer
Center. The college was founded in IBIS. There
is a student body of 900 from Jerusalem and
all over Israel.
Lupus Foundation
Names Weinstein
Vice President
The Lupus Foundation of
America (LFA) announced at the
national convention in Cleveland
that it has elected Alan Weinstein
of Plantation, Florida executive
vice president.
"The Lupus Foundation is most
fortunate to have such a dedicated
and distinguished professional
working on its behalf," said Dr.
Evie Dennis, president of the
Lupus Foundation. "We believe
Mr. Weinstein's valuable con-
tributions will help substantially
in furthering the goals of the
Foundation."
Weinstein, his wife Rhoda, who
is a vice president of the
Dade/Broward chapter and their
daughter Michelle reside in
Plantation.
Local Student
Receives Honors
Michael Farbowitz, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Leonard and Rosilyn
Farbowitz of North Miami Beach,
a freshman majoring in Biology
made the Dean's List at Johns
Hopkins University for the Spring
1986 semester.
*****
Israel All Inclusive Special
October 15 to October 29,1986 mm * Miami
Departure
lyOO P.P. Double Occupancy" 375
DELUXE FEA TURES INCLUDE:
Sgl. Additional
rVTrip Air via El Al from Miami and Return
13 Nights 5-Star Hotel Accomm. in Israel
Includes 2 Ngts. Eliat
Full Israeli Breakfast Daily and
and Dinner Daily
8 Days Sightseeing A/C Buses
2 Night Club Shows
Dinner Cruise on the Sea of Galilee
Kabbalat Shabbat at Western Wall
U.S. Departure Tax
Baggage Handling, Transfers, Entrance
Fees, Taxes, Tips and Service
SHSS*Eno'l'hSpeakingGuides
Flight Bags, Luggage Tags,
Passport Case
0PTESttl i#Ni9hts London P*Q w/English Breakfast Daily and Full
Day Sightseeing Return via British Airways to Miami.
s211
00
Addt'l
DON'T WAIT VISIT ISRAEL THE LAND OF OUR DREAMS
NOW... NOW... NOW... Call Fred, lor Your Reservations...
Sandel Travel, Inc. Boc Raton 3685505
7035 Beracasa Way, Suite 103 Lauderdale 428-4 Miami __ Qdd.QiAR
TOLL FREE WATTS OUTSIDE FLORIDA 1-800.327 ni jo
* NEW YORK DEPARTURE $100.00 LESS 800-327-0142
Lehrman Day School Open House
Temple Emanu-El's Lehrman
Day School will host an open
house on Tuesday, from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. at the school. Parents and
students are invited to tour the
educational facility on Miami
Beach.
"The faculty and administration
of the Lehrman Day School take a
total approach to education by of-
fering activities seven davs a
week," said Dr. Amir Baron
Director of Education.
FUNDRAISER
SR. FUNDRAISER
We seek an experienced fundraising director to coordinate develop-
ment activities in the Florida office of a major university. The
successful applicant must be able to work independently and will
be responsible for organizing and planning productive functions
and work with lay leaders and professional staff.
Related fundraising experience, knowledge of Southeast region's
Jewish community and the ability to travel required. Compre-
hensive salary and benefits offered
For confidential consideration, send resume with salary history
and requirements to:
Vice President for Development
P.O. Box 8161. F.D.R. Station
New York, New York 10022
Equal Opportunity Employer
Experience A Learn-In
OPEN HOUSE -
LEHRMAN DAY SCHOOL
Tuesday, August 19th
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Early Childhood Elementary and Jr. High
* I?!!.R tne "ewest educational facility
on Miami Beach
* f^RN300^ the exceptional Hebrew
Day School program
* J-EARN about creative and innovative
programs
* DISCOVER why Lehrman Day School
's important for your child
* E2f5!ttft enthusiastic, licensed faculty
and administration
EDUCATION for the Future
Call 866-2771
for information
i

0
I
b
e
d
e<
C
d
d
ft
B
n
G
H
tl


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
B'nai B'rith International
Appoints Jerrold Posner
Veteran fund raiser Jerrold
Posner of Miami has been ap-
Linted by B'nai B'rith Interna-
pnal as assistant national diree-
of development. He will be
in Miami.
Daniel Thursz, executive
l president, who announced the
jointment, said Posner's
risibilities include all aspects
ind raising in Florida for the
B'rith Foundation of the
lited States, whose
ueficiaries are the B'nai B'rith
nth Services: the Hillel Foun-
fcions, which provide educa-
nal. religious, civic and social
rices to Jewish students on
than 400 college campuses;
B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
which offers similar pro-
is to teen-agers; and the
er and Counseling Service,
Ich tests and advises both
ig people and adults.
Tosner will have additional
snsibility for fund raising in
sr parts of the country when
upon.
frior to his appointment,
ner had been serving as direc-
of Southeast Area American
dates of Israel's Ben Gurion
fversity. Earlier, he held top
raising positions in Florida
Jerrold G. Posner
for the American Technion
Society-Israel Institute of
Technology, the Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation and the American
Friends of Hebrew University in
Jerusalem.
Hebrew Classes At
Beijing University
ly THEODOR SCHUCHAT
JEIJING, China (JTA)
The Department of
Rental Languagues of Bei-
University, China's
mier institution here at
national capital, offers
pane se, Korean,
rmese, Thai, Mongolian,
ibic and now, Modem
bbrew.
hen the Ministry of Culture
Ided that Ivrit would be
Jied, some of the Chinese
hers of Arabic were expected
each Hebrew also. They had
Spiled a Chinese-English-
ew dictionary by cutting
the columns of Reuben
Way's Hebrew-English dic-
lary, adding a column of
Oese characters, and photo-
pcating a dozen copies which
then bound in black cloth.
)R SOME reason, though, an
erican was employed to in-
rate Hebrew-language in-
ction in the People's Republic
of China. Michael Mann, a recent
graduate of Princeton University
where he majored in chemistry,
had signed up to teach English for
a year at Beijing University.
When university officials learn-
ed that he was a graduate of the
SAR Hebrew day school in The
Bronx, New York, and the Ramaz
Hebrew High School in Manhat-
tan, they decided he would teach
their first class in Ivrit.
When they told him, only two
weeks before he was due to leave
for China, Mann stuffed some
World Zionist Organization
teaching materials into his flight
bag. He had never taught
Hebrew, or anything else, until he
went to China.
At Beijing University, Kita
Alef, the beginners' class, started
with 10 students. Although most
were assigned to Kita Alef, a few
asked to study Ivrit. One young
woman came to Kita Alef knowing
some Biblical Hebrew. She told
Mann she had been taught by an
Continued on Page 16-B
Rosen Elected To Board
Of Governors Of HUC
ni Beach business, civic and
dus leader Arnold F. Rosen
ae of four new members
1 to the Board of Governors
[ebrew Union College-Jewish
ute of Religion. It trains rab-
I cantors, religious school
kators, Jewish communal
kers and doctoral and post
oral scholars at its four cam-
Is in Cincinnati, New York,
Angeles and Jerusalem,
en, founder and former ex-
|ve vice president of Lennar
[> ration, the Miami-based
iopment firm, is past presi-
| of Temple Israel of Greater
L He has served on the
of Overseers of the Cincin-
[School of HUC-JIR for the
[11 years and is a former
member of the Greater
i Jewish Federation.
en is a Founder of the
ew University of Jerusalem,
Arnold Rosen
Hospital for the Aged, the Univer-
sity of Miami and Appalachian
Modern Day Politico
Commissioner Barry Schreiber
By MARCIA RAFFEL LEVIN
Feature Writer
For the past 10 years County Commissioner
Barry D. Schreiber has successfully blended his
background as a traditional orthodox Jew with his
role as a modern-day politico dedicated to serving
the diverse needs of all of the people of Dade
County.
"My personal religious lifestyle hasn't caused
me any overt problems on the County Commission.
I just don't attend functions on the Sabbath," he
says. "There have been no problems at this level of
public service," he adds, recalling when he was
asked to introduce then Vice President Walter
Mondale at a Friday evening political fund raiser.
"It would have been a great honor," he says,
"but I had to turn it down."
Currently involved in a three-way race for the
Commission seat he's held since 1976, Schreiber is
spending these weeks before the Sept. 2 election
date drumming up support throughout the County.
He says being on the ballot with a woman (Betty
Ferguson) and a Hispanic (Raymond Barrios) gives
him a chance to see what his accomplishments and
record can do. "I am running an especially strong
campaign and am putting my full efforts into being
re-elected." He looks at the campaign as "a vote of
confidence" on his record.
Schreiber sees his role as that of a conduit bet-
ween the 285,000 Jews in Dade and the County
Commission.
For example, he takes credit for participating in
much of Dude's synagogue growth and expansion,
the creation of an Eruv (allowing carrying on
Shabbat) for North Dade, and for arranging funds
for a variety of charities.
Schreiber is also the Commission member
residents would go to to air problems regarding
vandalism or anti-Semitism. He works closely with
Anti-Defamation League director Arthur
Teitelbaum and Bill Gralnick of American Jewish
Committee.
Consider also that Schreiber serves as a wat-
chdog to prohibit County funding to projects
scheduled for Dade clubs that discriminate against
Jews.
Schreiber is Florida chairman for Yeshiva
University's centennial celebration. He is a
graduate of the prestigious New York school, the
oldest and largest university under Jewish
auspices in the U.S. Yeshiva encompasses such
famed institutions as the Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law,
Barry Schreiber
Wurzweiler School of Social Work, and Stern Col-
lege for Women where Schreiber's 18-year-old
daughter will begin studies next month.
Centennial plans are still being formulated, but
Schreiber's is focusing all his energy these days on
his bid for re-election.
Raising money is only one gauge of campaign-
ing, Schreiber says. He claims the support from all
segments and ethnic groups in Dade has been
outstanding and that many Hispanic leaders are
supporting him.
He began taking private Spanish lessons last
January. This is the first time he's campaigning in
Spanish and recently spoke in Spanish on a local
radio station.
Schreiber points to a recent article about him in
"Replica," the Spanish-language magazine. An ar-
ticle quotes the Commissioner.
"Hispanics have been pioneers in Dade, helping
to change it into one community not one of three
parts: Anglos, Hispanos and blacks." And, the
magazine article continues, Barry Schreiber plays
an integral part in achieving that cohesion.
"What
other coffee
would I
choose?
="j university of Jerusalem, sity oi Miami in A||wum.in>
Miami Jewish. Home and -State .University in Boone. N.C>
It lets you
be your best.
(CMlMIIb.
I
A


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
South Africa: The Moral Dilemma
i
By SUE SURKES
London Chronicle Syndicate
Late last year, concerned
South African Jews from all
walks of life gathered in a
Johannesburg synagogue to
launch Jews for Social
Justice (JSJ). Now, with a
manifesto opposing racist
legislation, police brutality
and use of military in the
townships, JSJ is planning
debates with a range of
cultural and political
groups, Jewish and
otherwise.
It is not tied to any political
mast, but has already had a
message of support from the
United Democratic Front (UDF),
an umbrella organization
representing some 650 South
African trades union, community
and other groups.
At a time when Johannesburg's
Jews, like those elsewhere in
South Africa, are having to decide
whether to stay put, get stuck in
or get out, Jews for Social Justice
represents a small breakthrough.
It is a clarion call to conscience
that says Jews, as a body, must
stand up and be counted in the
"struggle for a just and
democratic South Africa."
AS ONE member saw it: "We
want to teach the Jewish com-
munity about what is going on in
the townships, and we want to
restore the respect of blacks lost
by the community's involvement
with the state and Israel's links
with South Africa."
Many younger Jews are seeing
exodus as the only way out of in-
stability. While figures probably
do not vastly outweigh those for
the whites in general, they have
been trickling out to Israel (where
there are said to be 15,000),
Canada, Australia and the U.S.
since the Sharpeville crisis of 1960
and the 1976 Soweto uprising.
But while back-packing talk is
common, the community is unlike-
ly to follow its Zimbabwean
counterpart, which dropped from
8,000 souls to 1,400 in just five
years, unless things get a lot
worse.
Most Johannesburg Jews are
doing nicely. In the affluent
suburbs, it is easy to go through
life without seeing the turmoil of
the townships. "Have you seen
any violence yet?" people ask.
"The foreign press have got it
wrong."
THE CITY'S Jewish population
of 80,000, out of a South African
total of around 115,000, is
undeniably visible. Jews are pro-
minent in commerce and industry,
medicine and the law. The so-
called Kugels and Bagels
Jewish Yuppies are a con-
spicuous fixture on the social
scene.
Predominantly of Lithuanian,
Orthodox origins and often fierce-
ly Zionist, the Jews are culturally
homogeneous and impressively
organized with a network of
synagogues, Jewish day schools
and care agencies for the poor.
The South African Zionist Federa-
tion and Board of Deputies play a
central, unifying role, covering
the entire spectrum of educa-
tional, cultural and welfare
organizations.
But such strengths contrast
against widespread political
apathy and confusion. A growing
voice says that it is both morally
unacceptable and politically short-
sighted to continue "looking the
other way."
If the present is anything to go
by, the future will see increasing
friction between an establishment
trying to walk an increasingly
slippery tightrope and a disen-
chanted minority for whom the
Jewish community, even Judaism
itself, holds no answers.
COUNTLESS individuals have
hit the headlines: businessman
Tony Bloom, chairman of the
Premier conglomerate, who was
part of a delegation to visit the
banned African National Con-
gress (ANC) in Lusaka last year;
lawyer Arthur Chaskalson, who
has been leading the defense in
the Delmas treason trial.
But mindful of white, right-wing
anti-Semitism and black anti-
Zionism, and never encouraged to
mix with other groups, the
establishment has tied its fate,
economically at least, to that of
the whites.
There is certainly concern about
the direction of any post-
apartheid government, yet
dialogue with black leaders is
limited. One notable exception
concerns Zulu Chief Gatsha
Buthelezi, an ardent fan of Israel,
but anathema to many radical
political activists.
Lay leaders say that attempts to
meet Bishop Desmond Tutu and
UDF members have come a crop-
per over Zionism. Blacks would
deny that their dislike of Israel
was anti-Semitism and would say
the Jews had shown little will-
ingness to talk.
THE BOARD of Deputies,
which manages "domestic" af-
fairs, has traditionally shied away
from any communal political
stand, trying not to alienate sec-
tors of opinion. Then last year
came a breakthrough of sorts, a
Congress resolution condemning
apartheid. Critics point out that
this followed the government's
own rejection of "racial
discrimination" and was tanta-
mount to government support.
But the Board had accepted that
apartheid was a moral, if not
political, issue.
The Board's chairman, Prof.
Michael Katz, said, "On purely
political matters, we do not have
any viewpoint. But where there is
a matter that has a moral or
humanitarian dimension, we have
felt the right and obligation to
take a stand."
Parrying claims that the Board
remains silent on the daily
shootings and detentions, he reels
out protests against the dismantl-
ing of the Crossroads squatter
camp and submissions to Parlia-
ment on the now-abolished laws
prohibiting inter-racial sex.
The rabbinate, compared to the
bishopric, has also been cautious.
On Yom Kippur, Chief Rabbi Ber-
nard Casper welcomed govern-
ment moves to dismantle legisla-
tion which "entrenches
discrimination and exploitation."
But, he says, "The Jewish com-
munity has not played a major
role in trying to change the
system of life. They have been
more concerned with maintaining
their own Jewish life. They have
tended to look inwards."
Individual rabbis, Reform and
Orthodox, have been more
prepared to stick their necks out.
Rabbi Ady Assabi, spiritual leader
of the Reform Temple Shalom
congregation, said, "Individual
Jews have threatened to get me
out because of my outspokenness.
But I say that Jews either go or
fight the struggle. They can't af-
ford to sit on the fence."
RABBI Ben Isaacson of Johan-
nesburg's Independent Har'El
community, went further.
Religious leaders who tolerated
the shooting of children in silence
had blood on their hands, he said.
Lay leaders were guiding Jews to
disaster.
"It is a blatant lie that Jews
have supported the cause of
blacks. One day they will have to
answer. Racism is seen as kosher
so long as it does not apply to
Jews."
Jewish involvement in
mainstream national politics re-
mains patchy and oppositions!,
largely because of history.
Although Jews have been in South
Africa almost as long as the
whites, the colony was not opened
up to all religions until the British
occupation of 1806.
Anti-Semitic fascism marked
the edges of the now ruling Na-
tional Party (NP) during Hitler's
rise. Many future leaders were in-
terned as Nazi sympathizers. And
Jews were banned from member-
ship of the Transvaal and Orange
Free State branches until
post-1948. (Anti-Semitic out-
bursts in general now seem
isolated and uncoordinated.)
WHILE THERE are only four
Jewish members of Parliament
all Progressive Federal Party
(PFP) Jews have assumed a
high profile in local politics, filling
16 of the 23 PFP seats on Johan-
nesburg City Council, along with
the post of mayor. But despite
traditional liberalism, there is a
tendency now to adopt the Na-
tional Party as the agent of
gradual reform.
The recent municipal by election
in the 35 percent Jewish Belle
Vue/Judith's Paarl pitted two
Jewish candidates against each
other, with the PFP's Tony Leon
winning by only 39 votes. Emo-
tions ran high. Many religious
voters were seen at National Par-
ty tables, while unknown elements
defaced NP posters with
Holocaust slogans.
Outside institutional politics,
countless individuals are active
throughout the trade unions, the
UDF and such groups as Black
Sash and the End Conscription
Campaign.
The release of Rivonia trialist
Dennis Goldberg jogged memories
of past Jewish activism. Joe
Slovo, chief of staff of the ANC's
military wing, has just been tipped
as the next chairman of the bann-
ed South African Communist
Party.
But radical Jews are often
harder to identify and thus do lit-
tle to enhance the community's
image in the eyes of blacks. Many
activists have shrugged off their
Jewishness, not so much because
of Jewish self-hatred as through
disgust at the establishment's at-
titude to apartheid.
For them, it seems morally
twisted to debate the issues of a
country thousands of miles away
while keeping silent about in-
justice on the doorstep.
THE COMMUNITY has often
reacted by disowning those involv-
ed in radical opposition and refus-
ing to accept that they have failed
to demonstrate the relevance of
Judaism to questions which some
say matter most.
Lorraine Bernstein, chairman
of the broad-based South African
Union of Jewish Students, is
aware of the friction which dual
loyalties can cause. "We try to
show that being a Jew in South
Africa is not being a hermit," she
said, adding that students were
criticized for demanding the
release of jailed ANC leader
Nelson Mandela during a Sharan-
sky rally.
Sensitivity extends to the
Jewish press. Editor Suzanne
Belling has tried to open the pages
of the family-orientated indepen-
dent Jewish Times" to debate
about the JeW8' rote in g^
Africa. "I have been critic
taking a stand on issues and have
been asked to apologize for let-
ters," she said. "But I have put
my foot down."
APARTHEID apart, the
Jewish community is trying to
adapt to changes within. Chief
Rabbi Casper is leaving for Israel
this year, and synagogue leaders
fear South Africa's international
image could deter good potential
replacements abroad.
The Orthodox have closed ranks
with the amalagamation in March
of the Johannesburg-based
Federation of Synagogues and its
Cape counterpart. While a long-
held desire for more uniform stan-
dards has been important, leaders
realize they cannot afford
fragmentation in the face of an
aging, declining population.
The Reform movement, which
accounts for less than one-fifth 0f
South Africa's Jews, is confronted '
with financial problems and dif
ferences of approach among rab-
bis. Decentralization of ad
ministrative and religious struc-
tures is being discussed.
THERE ARE signs that Or.
thodoxy and Reform could ever.
bury the hatchet. Segregate
signs have been symbolically
removed from Johannesburg's
West Park cemetery.
That the Jews can maintiiii
their faith and culture in Johan-
nesburg does not seem in doubt.
Whether they are strong enough
to help guide the political winds of
change is something Jews for
Social Justice will be trying onlv
too hard to work out.
Upgrading Israel's
Navy Urged
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Navy, the smallest and probably
least publicized branch of the
Israel Defense Force, is due for
major expansion and greater at-
tention if its commander, Rear
Admiral Avraham Ben-Shushan's
plans are implemented.
They call, among other things,
for the construction of four more
Saar Class missile boats and three
new submarines at a cost of about
$1 billion. Ben-Shush an expressed
grave concern over the growing
naval strength of enemy Arab
states and the increased frequen-
cy and sophistication of terrorist
attempts attacking Israel by sea.
Israel needs new missile boats
and submarines to meet the threat
posed by the enlarged Syrian and
Libyan navies and increased ter-
rorist activity on the high seas,
Ben-Shushan said. He disclosed
that 31 terrorists were killed or
captured in encouters with the
Israel Navy at sea during the past
year.
But the Admiral stressed that
the Navy's main problem is not
the terrorists but how to cope
with enemy navies. Both Syria
and Libya are in the process of
upgrading their navies, Ben
Shushan said. "We are watching
the Syrian threat very carefully
They have more missile boats and
modified missiles. They are much
improved over 1973," the year of
the Yom Kippur War, he said.
Libya, at the same time, is ac-
quiring naval craft from both the
Eastern and Western powers
which means Israel has to adopt
counter-measures against both, he
said. He noted that the Syrian and
Libyan navies held numerous joint
exercises last year and are
cooperating more closely. He also
observed that there are more
Soviet naval units in the eastern
Mediterranean than ever before,
visiting ports in the region and
cruising the high seas. He stress-
ed that the Navy has very good
relations with the U.S. Sixth
Fleet.
The terrorists, too, are seeking
better and faster boats and are
beginning to train their people in
more conventional ways, though
their attempted attacks on Israel
so far have been foiled.
3t/*/ie*wng6
Adam L Berman. son of Les M Berman and Joyce Berman.
both of Miami, has been promoted in the U.S. Army to the rank
of private first class Berman is a parachute rigger with the 82nd
Airborne Division at Fort Bragg
Maj Judith M Schwartz, daughter of Sheila Wallman. North
Miami Beach, and Leonard Schwartz of Miami, has participated
in Global Shield 86. an exercise involving U.S Air Force, Navy
and Marine Corps units, and elements of the Canadian forces
Army Private Scott J Benson, son of Iris L Lkhtman and
Seymour Benson, has graduated as a reconnaissance scout at the
U.S. Army Armor School. Fort Knox
Contested Judicial Candidates for Dade County office have been
invited to the Wednesday luncheon of the Coral Gables Bar
Association at 12 noon at the University of Miami Faculty Club
Cedars Medical Center will be conducting rhythm strip tests for
shoppers at Dadeland Mall Friday and Saturday. Aug 22 and 23
from 10 am to 9 p.m., during the annual Shopping for WeUness
event. ^^


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
The Din Of Ideas
David K. Shipler, domestic correspondent of the New
York Times Washington Bureau, was keynote speaker at a
recent one-day conference on "Campus Media and
Minorities: Press Freedom and Press Responsibility" at
Columbia University in New York. The session was spon-
sored by the New York Regional Office of the Anti-
Defamation League, the City University of New York and
the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. Mr. Shipler's
talk, "Journalism in a Pluralistic Society: Freedom and
Tolerance," is excerpted in the accompanying article.
By DAVID K. SHIPLER
I am not objective about
tthnocentrism, racism and
ltolerance. I am prejudiced
linst the prejudiced, iti-
nerant of the intolerant. I
rew up in an all-white,
pretty much all-Christian
iwn in New Jersey called
'hatham, where the local
kstablishment still manages,
Reagan era.
The most precious attribute one
can have as a journalist or as a
citizen is the capacity to see that
your truth is not the only truth,
that your faith is not higher than
your neighbor's and that your
sense of yourself need not be
enriched by denigrating others
who are different from you.
THESE ELEMENTARY prin-
ciples of human tolerance do not
far as I can tell, to keep """I? tnis world. There is hardly a
>ut anyone darker than a
This so appalled me that I made
; the subject of a college disserta-
Dn in sociology ... a project that
ought me into abrupt contact
|ith an ugly reality lurking
fneath the pristine affluence of
Jy community. I interviewed a
mge of residents including a real
ttate agent, who criticized his
[>llegues in the house-selling
ismess, saying they've been "so
by keeping the damn Niggers
at they let the damn Catholics
beak in." This was my home
Iwn.
[MY FAMILY was different,
hey constructed another en-
ronment entirely. My grand-
bother, a Maryland farm girl with
formal education, was the
ost educable person I have
Sown. She came from the South
kt recognizing her own pre
lices, but even when she was in
70s she was able to grow and
inge as America grew and
inged. I remember when Sen.
Beph McCarthy (R., Wise.) was
road on the land whipping up
M". pointing to imaginary Com-
inists in every nook and cranny
government. The Army-
cCarthy hearings were on
evision, and my_ grandmother
ktched in the darkened living
m. steely with indignation at
Senator with the sliding eyes
the demented smile smearing
Oocents. She was a tough anti-
bmmunist herself, but she knew
it from wrong.
ie had her prejudices about
cks, but as the civil rights
vement gathered momentum,
I the twisted faces of the whites
side Alabama school houses
tied across television screens
Id the front pages of
"spapers, she was repulsed
ng with all good people,
fie revised every impulse that
been bred in her. And when
| mother and I went down to the
ch on Washington, my grand-
tier wanted to go, too, but she
just too old. Too old to
nonstrate but not too old to
IMAGINE if you will, growing
*> in that America, emerging
im a childhood infested with the
' Sd and evil dichotomy of
Cold War, coming of age dur-
the civil rights movement,
ivmg into adulthood at the
of the war in Vietman,
covering the grinding complex-
society in the year 1986 that is not
undergoing a powerful movement
into separateness and exclusivity
along the lines of race, religion,
nationality and ethnicity.
What this means is that huge
masses of the world's population
are pulling inward, retreating
from the cross-cultural identifica-
tions that have bound diverse
groups into nations and interna-
tional communities. They are
withdrawing into ethnocentrism,
chauvinism, religious fundamen-
talism. They are emphasizing not
their commonality with the rest of
mankind, but their differences.
They are finding refuge and
security in their distinctiveness.
They are exalting their own
groups at the expense of others.
And while there is nothing in-
herently wrong in being proud of
your own heritage or in embrac-
ing your own religion in devout
and literal forms, our unfortunate
expthema to many radical political
activists.
Lay leaders say that attempts to
meet Bishop Desmond Tutu and
UDF members have come a crop-
per over Zionism. Blacks would
deny that their dislike of Israel
was anti-Semitism and would say
the Jews had shown little will-
ingness to talk.
THE BOARD of Deputies,
which manages "domestic" af-
fairs, has traditionally shied away
from any communal political
stand, trying not to alienate sec-
tors of opinion. Then last year
came a breakthrough of sorts, a
Congress resolution condemning
apartheid. Critics point out that
this followed the government's
own rejection of "racial
discrimination" and was tanta-
mount to government support.
But the Board had accepted that
apartheid was a moral, if not
political, issue.
The Board's chairman. Prof.
Michael Katz, said, "On purely
political matters, we do not have
any viewpoint. But where there is
a matter that has a moral or
humanitarian dimension, we have
felt the right and obligation to
take a stand."
Parrying claims that the Board
remains silent on the daily
shootings and detentions, he reels
out protests against the dismantl-
ing of the Crossroads squatter
camp and submissions to Parlia-
ment on the now-abolished laws
prohibiting inter-racial sex.
The rabbinate, compared to the
oi poverty, seeing the values of bishopric, has also been cautious,
toward On Yom Kippur, Chief Rabbi Ber-
nard Casper welcomed Govern-
ment moves to dismantle legisla-
tion which "entrenches
discrimination and exploitation."
But, he says, "The Jewish com-
munity has not played a major
form, then corrupted in brutali-
! and defeat.
fmagine leaving that America to
elsewhere for 11 years, first
Vietnam, then the Soviet
then in Israel, and imagine
'"* bek -to- America in the' role in trying to' change the
system of life. They have been
more concerned with maintaining
their own Jewish life. They have
tended to look inwards."
Individual rabbis. Reform and
Orthodox, have been more
prepared to stick their necks out.
Rabbi Ady Assabi, spiritual leader
of the Reform Temple Shalom
congregation, said, "Individual
Jews have threatened to get me
out because of my outspokenness.
But I say that Jews either go or
fight the struggle. They can't af-
ford to sit on the fence."
RABBI Ben Isaacson of Johan-
nesburg's Independent Har'El
community, went further.
Religious leaders who tolerated
the shooting of children^ silence
had blood on their hands.lie said.
Lay leaders were guiding Jews to
disaster.
"It is a blatant lie that Jews
have supported the cause of
blacks. One day they will have to
answer. Racism is seen as kosher
so long as it does not apply to
Jews."
Jewish involvement in
mainstream national politics re-
mains patchy and oppositional,
largely because of history.
Although Jews have been in South
Africa almost as long as the
whites, the colony was not opened
up to all religions until the British
occupation of 1806.
Anti-Semitic fascism marked
the edges of the now ruling Na-
tional Party (NP) during Hitler's
rise. Many future leaders were in-
terned as Nazi sympathizers. And
Jews were banned from member-
ship of the Transvaal and Orange
Free State branches until
post-1948. (Anti-Semitic out-
bursts in general now seem
isolated and uncoordinated.)
WHILE THERE are only four
Jewish members of Parliament
all Progressive Federal Party
(PFP) Jews have assumed a
high profile in local politics, filling
16 of the 23 PFP seats on Johan-
nesburg City Council, along with
the post of mayor. But despite
traditional liberalism, there is a
tendency now to adopt the Na-
tional Party as the agent of
gradual reform.
The recent municipal byelection
in the 35 percent Jewish Belle
Vue/Judith's Paarl pitted two
Jewish candidates against each
other, with the PFP's Tony Leon
winning by only 39 votes. Emo-
tions ran high. Many religious
voters were seen at National Par-
ty tables, while unknown elements
defaced NP posters with
Holocaust slogans.
Outside institutional politics,
countless individuals are active
throughout the trade unions, the
UDF and such groups as Black
Sash and the End Conscription
Campaign.
The release of Rivonia trialist
Dennis Goldberg jogged memories
of past Jewish activism. Joe
Slovo, chief of staff of the ANC's
military wing, has just been tipped
as the next chairman of the bann-
ed South African Communist
Party.
But radical Jews are often
harder to identify and thus do lit-
tle to enhance the community's
image in the eyes of blacks. Many
activists have shrugged off their
Jewishness, not so much because
of Jewish self-hatred as through
disgust at the establishment's at-
titude to apartheid.
For them, it seems morally
twisted to debate the issues of a
country thousands of miles away
while keeping silent about in-
justice on the doorstep.
THE COMMUNITY has often
reacted by disowning those involv-
ed in radical opposition and refus-
ing to accept that they have failed
to demonstrate the relevance of
Judaism to questions which some
say matter most.
Lorraine Bernstein, chairman
of the broad-based South African
Union of Jewish Students, is
aware of the friction which dual
loyalties can cause. "We try to
show that being a Jew in South
Africa is not being a hermit," she
said, adding that students were
criticized for demanding the
release of jailed ANC leader
Nelson Mandela during a Sharan-
sky rally.
Sensitivity extends to the
Jewish press. Editor Suzanne
Belling has tried to open the pages
of the family-orientated indepen-
dent Jewish Times" to debate
about the Jews' role in South
Africa. "I have been criticized for
taking a stand on issues and have
been asked to apologize for let-
ters," she said. "But I have put
my foot down."
APARTHEID apart, the
Jewish community is trying to
adapt to changes within. Chief
Rabbi Casper is leaving for Israel
this year, and synagogue leaders
fear South Africa's international
image could deter good potential
replacements abroad.
The Orthodox have closed ranks
with the amalagamation in March
of the Johannesburg-based
Federation of Synagogues and its
Cape counterpart. While a long-
held desire for more uniform stan-
dards has been important, leaders
realize they cannot afford
fragmentation in the face of an
aging, declining population.
The Reform movement, which
accounts for less than one-fifth of
South Africa's Jews, is confronted
with financial problems and dif-
ferences of approach among rab-
bis. Decentralization of ad-
ministrative and religious
strucutres is being discussed.
THERE ARE signs that Or-
thodoxy and Reform could even
bury the hatchet. Segregation
signs have been symbolically
removed from Johannesburg's
West Park cemetery.
That the Jews can maintain
their faith and culture in Johan-
nesburg does not seem in doubt.
Whether they are strong enough
to help guide the political winds of
change is something Jews for
Social Justice will be trying only
too hard to work out.
A demonstration recently outside the Knesset in Jerusalem for
tolerance and understanding among Jews. The demonstration
followed the recent spate of Orthodox-secular tensions involving
the destruction of telephone booths in the city where advertising
posters featuring women in bathing suits were vandalized, as well
as attacks upon synagogues in Tel Aviv. The banner across the
stage reads 'Together, we will march for mutual tolerance.'
T*S&
eeV
\l*fr
i*^S^*r*
$**
*>*%>*"
0*
0
on
#*

SOW
p***
^*r

&!
10-
*6
t^
*9
f*cos

ffi

H0*
w&
,mM
/isit
Ve Welcome Your*',
: and Registration Inquiry *
9 A.M. to 3 P.M. daiy at the '
Lehrman Day School: 866-2771 and from
9 A.M. to 5 P.M. at the Temple Office: 538-2503


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
A Fascist Remains Free
By MILTON JACOBY
MADRID (JTA) Last
month a judge of the Civil
Court of Madrid dismissed a
suit of special significance to
every Jewish survivor of the
Holocaust. The suit was in-
stituted by Violeta Fried-
man, a grimly determined
survivor of Auschwitz who
now lives in Madrid, against
one of the world's most
notorious Nazis, Leon
Degrelle, who also resides
here.
He has a luxurious penthouse in
the city and several villas on the
fashionable Costa del Sol. He con-
tinues to bask in Hitler's reputed
tribute to him "If I had a son, I
would wish he were like you."
A Belgian, he was condemned to
death after World War II by the
Belgian government for war
crimes as a Nazi collaborator and
as the founder of the notorious
Rexist movement. But Degrelle,
unlike Vidkun Quisling in Norway
and Pierre Laval in France, was
lucky. Fleeing from Norway,
Degrelle crash-landed in Spain,
where his admirer Generalissimo
Francisco Franco granted him
citizenship.
THE ACTION 40 years later in
Madrid Civil Court resulted from
Degrelle's appearance on July 11,
1985 on national television, when
he boasted about his fascist past
and declared his undying love for
Hitler, whom he compared to
Napoleon.
On July 29, 1985 in an interview
published by the weekly Tiempo
he amplified his TV comments to
include a sweeping denial of the
existence of the Holocaust and the
gas chambers. The Nazi Party
might be dead, he said, but its
ideology lived on.
It was at that point that Fried-
man could no longer keep silent.
She had been taken at 14, with her
family, to Auschwitz from Tran-
sylvania. Her family was exter-
minated, but somehow she manag-
ed to survive despite a severe
spinal injury, until her liberation
by the Russians in 1945. She had
observed, with mounting frustra-
tion, the futile attempts by the
Belgians through the years to
have Degrelle extradited, and the
criminal's superb success in con-
founding his accusers.
SHE BEGAN with a letter to El
Paw, the leading daily, one of a
series of letters over the following
several weeks. Degrelle respond-
ed with an invitation, also through
El Pais, for her to visit him so
that he could convince her of the
justness of his views. Friedman
declined, unless their conversa-
tion could be covered by reporters
and a TV crew.
Some months ago, she managed
to find a lawyer who would initiate
legal action to prevent Degrelle
from continuing to flood the coun-
try with his lies, and this un-
precedented trial was set for June
11. In his preliminary deposition
to a judge, Degrelle repeated his
allegations (another of which was
that Josef Mengele was a gentle
soul who had been much malign-
ed). But he refused to appear at
the trial on the grounds that he
feared Jews would kidnap him.
Friedman insisted to this
reporter that all she wanted was
for the court's opinion to be car-
ried widely by press and TV, and
that he be asked for a financial in-
demnity to the Spanish survivors
of Mauthausen. Once again, with
the dismissal of the action on June
11, the Nazi warlord had escaped
justice.
THE VALIANT Violeta Fried-
man is determined to continue her
lonely battle, and she has launch-
ed an appeal. She has little or no
support from her Jewish com-
munity or from the Israel Em-
bassy. People seem uneasy in her
presence. It appears to be a case
of "let sleeping dogs lie" or
possibly a fear of retaliation by
the militant rightwing organiza-
tions in Spain which support
Degrelle.
Blind Teenagers Learn
CPR Techniques
Magen David Adorn in Israel
sponsored a life-saving course on
Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation
(CPR) techniques for 20 blind
teenagers from the Jerusalem In-
stitute for the Blind in the Kiryat
Moshe neighborhood. The purpose
of the course is to equip them with
the knowledge of how to handle
emergency situations concerning
heart failure, its treatment and
prevention. The classes have been
specially adapted so that the
sightless may detect signs of
distress by feeling and hearing.
MDA hopes in the future to in-
clude more blind people in such
classes.
A year ago deaf people from the
Helen Keller House in Tel Aviv
took part in a similar MDA course
that was suited to their handicap.
Magen David Adorn provides
classes in CPR training at MDA
Emergency Medical Care Centers
throughout Israel. Physicians and
MDA Paramedics agree in
crediting the quick thinking and
immediate administration of CPR
as a prime factor in a heart attack
MDA first-aid instructor
teaches blind teenagers techni-
ques in resuscitation and heart
massage on "Rescue Annie"
mannequin.
victim's recovery.
MDA's goal is to have one per-
son in every home trained in CPR
techniques.
Agudath Israel To Mark 35th Anniversary
AJCongress
Prayers At Public School Graduation Anumbeu-ofeffortoweremade
,.*, kjvuuui VTiaUUdXlUIl to discuss this matter with Israeli
Exercises Violate Supreme Court Ban
----------------------------- baa 1UIUV1I
Ambassador Shmuel Hadass, but
he was unavailable for comment.
Saturday, August 16, termen
for Jewry world-over as
"Shabbat-Nahamu," the Sabbath
of Comfort Ye, marks the 35th an-
niversary since Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute, on Miami
Beach, was founded.
Agudath Israel initially opened
its extensive program of religious
services and social activities,
under the founding leadership of
the author and scholar, Rabbi Dr.
Isaac Hirsh Ever, ZTL, on August
17, 1951.
Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever, who
was graduated from the Hebron
Rabbinical College of Jerusalem,
Israel at age 18 as an Ordained
Rabbi succeeded his father as
spiritual leader.
Rabbi Ever will deliver his ser-
mon on "The Voice of Comfort
and Prospects for Brighter
Times" at services on Saturday
morning. A gala reception and
buffet-style kiddush will be
served.
Aven though graduation exer-
cises at a public high school take
place only once a year, a religious
invocation or benediction at such
ceremonies violates the United
States Supreme Court's ban on
public school prayer, says the
American Jewish Congress.
An amicus, or friend-of-the-
court, brief filed by the Jewish
organization in the United States
Court of Appeals for the Sixth
Circuit asserts that by permitting
prayers at yearly commencement
exercises, school districts for the
Michigan towns of Plainwell and
Portage contravened the constitu-
tional prohibition against govern-
ment establishment of religion.
The brief, released by Alvin L.
Gray, National Vice-President of
AJCongress, asked the federal ap-
peals court to reverse a ruling by
the United States District Court
for the Western District of
Michigan which upheld the school
boards.
"It is the very significance of
graduation which, when prayers
become part of the program,
creates a difficult choice for some
students," the brief said, noting
that such students are forced
either to listen to prayers or forgo
the chance to attend a major
school function. Such a choice, by
having a coercive effect on a stu-
dent who wishes to be part of the
mainstream, serves to advance
one group's religious beliefs over
another's, it contended.
The case originated as a suit
brought in the federal district
court by residents of Plainwell
and Portage who objected to in-
clusion of an invocation and
benediction on the grounds that
these constituted religious
prayers and therefore violated the
Establishment Clause of the
Constitution.
The district court upheld the
school boards, claiming that
graduation ceremonies are purely
voluntary and are ceremonial
rather than a part of the formal,
day-to-day routine of the schooi
curriculum for which attendance
is compulsory.
The court also compared
prayers at graduation exercises to
prayers delivered by a chaplain at
the opening of legislative sessions
each day pointing out that
legislative prayers were permit-
ted by the framers of the First
Amendment to the Constitution.
However, the AJCongress brief
challenged the lower court's
reasoning on both the compulsory
attendance issue and the com-
parison with legislative prayers. It
noted that the Supreme Court has
ruled that whether attendance at
a public school function is com-
pulsory or voluntary has no bear-
ing on whether officially sanction-
ed prayer at such an event does,
or does not, violate the
Constitution.
The Supreme Court, according
to the amicus brief, has declared
that even prayers that are
"denominationally neutral" or are
voluntary, are subject to "the
limitations of the Establishment
Clause" of the Constitution.
The AJCongress brief also re-
jected the lower court's view that
prayers at a graduation ceremony
are analogous to legislative
prayers. Such an argument runs
counter to the ruling of the
Supreme Court which "explicitly
distinguished" between the two
on the grounds that "a legislative
prayer addressed a very different
audience from a prayer delivered
in a school context," it said.
The brief said that the district
court contention that the gradua-
tion ceremony prayers were "so
fleeting" and non-repetitive that
they could not be viewed as serv-
ing a teaching function is not sup-
ported in case law. The Supreme
Court, it declared, has rejected
the notion that "relatively minor
encroachments on the First
Amendment" are not a real threat
and therefore constitute a defense
against charges of constitutional
violation.
Weekly
Issues
Not Just Now and Then! -
You Can't Be Fully Informed With Less
<
<
$500 Publix
,.-- a. G' Certificate
With Each New Subscription
18
A Check
Mutt Accompany Order
Name
Address.
City ___
I Accept Your Introductory Offer
Ple.se Start My Subscription Now!
-Apt. #.
-----------------------------------------_ State __
NEW SUBSCRIBER -
DADE COUNTY ONLY Allow 4 to 6 weeks
I .OFFER EXTENDED UNTIL AUGUST 25,1986 d,""*ry
Zip
Mail To:
Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101


Friday, Augast 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
1
Synopsis of the Weekly Torch Portion
. Hear, 0 Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is One"
(Deuteronomy 6.4).
VAETHANAN
VAETHANAN The portion begins with Moses' plea to God for
permission to enter the Promised Land, and God's refusal The
law-giver warns the children of Israel against practising idolatry
in Canaan, calling their attention to their special history and mis-
sion. "Did ever a people hear the voice of God speaking out of the
midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live? Or hath God
assayed to go and take Him a nation from the midst of another na-
tion, by trials, by signs, and by wonders, and by war and by a
mighty hand, and by an outstretched arm, and by great terrors
according to all that the Lord your God did for you in Ejrypt
before thine eyes?" (Deuteronomy 4.S5-3J,). Moses sets aside three
cities of refuge on the east side of the Jordan. He repeats the Ten
Commandments, with slight variations for the purpose of clarity
The first section of the Shema beginning "Thou shalt love the
Lord thy God with all thy heart" and ending "And thou shalt
write them upon the door-posts of thy house, and upon thy gates"
is in this portion. (Deuteronomy 6.4-9). Moses urges the Israelites
to show no mercy to the seven Canaanite nations. "And when the
Lord thy God shall deliver them up before thee, and thou shalt
smite them; then thou shalt utterly destroy them; thou shalt make
no covenant with them, nor show mercy unto them; neither shalt
thou make marriages with them; thy daughter shalt not give unto
his son, nor his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son For thou
art a holy people unto the Lord thy God; the Lord thy God hath
chosen thee to be His own treasure, out of all peoples that are
upon the face of the earth" (Deuteronomy 7.2-6). Finally Moses
stresses the need for strict observance of the various ritual
commandments.
(The recounting of the Weakly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. WoHman.
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Bush In Israel
Continued from Page 2-B
photo that caused a few mild
squirms among some American
Jews, captured the Vice President
reverently kissing the Western
Wall in Jerusalem.
"HE WAS with (Minister of
Religious Affairs) Yosef Burg,
when Burg walked up to the Wall
and kissed it," Stein said, appear-
ing mildly embarrassed for Bush,
though amused. "So he followed
Burg and put his head to the Wall
and kissed it, too."
A more embarrassing incident
was the cancellation of an invita-
tion to Jerusalem Post correspon-
dent Wolf Blitzer to join the press
team accompanying Bush to
Israel. Jordan and Egypt. Blitzer,
who had a visa signed by the Jor-
danian Ambassador in
Washington, was bumped from
the plane at the last minute, after
it became clear that the Jorda-
nians had decided that the
American Jewish journalist would
not be welcome in Amman.
On balance, though, the Vice
President's trip should be seen
neither as a successful get-start in
the campaign for the Jewish
American vote nor a public rela-
tions fiasco, said Stein, who said
he plans to support a Bush can-
didacy for the Republican
Presidential nomination. Instead,
he stressed, it should be viewed as
another important step in the con-
tinuous deepening of American-
Israeli relations.
Joint Planning Starts
For Israel Observance
The American Zionist Federa-
tion of South Florida will coor-
dinate areawide observances of
two of the major events in the
history of the modern State of
Israel, according to president
Gerald Schwartz.
Schwartz, who also is national
vice president of the AZF, said the
Zionist Federation will sponsor
celebrations of the 20th anniver-
sary of the reunification of
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel
May 26-27, 1987, and the 40th an-
niversary of the independence of
the Jewish state, scheduled in
May, 1988.
"Because of the significance of
these two anniversaries, we are
beginning the planning now so
that as many Jewish and non-
Jewish organizations and agencies
as possible can participate,"
Schwartz said.
"Although fund raising for the
educational, cultural, medical and
welfare needs of Israel is a vital
concern to the Zionist Movement
and the overall Jewish communi-
ty, we are determined that these
two birthdays will be utilized for
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Florida 33101.
The Kendall Area Singles, ages 35 will sponsor a
'Last Rose of Summer" dance on Thursday, August 21
beginning at 8:00 P.M. at the Kendalitown Clubhouse,
10333 S.W. 76th Street. Refreshments, dancing.
Quests, $5.00. Members, $3.00. For more information,
call 595-9243.
Jerome B. Homer, a well-
known marketing specialist,
has been named National
Chairman of Development of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. His appointment
was announced by Burton S.
Levinson, ADL 's National
Chairman, who declared that
Homer will head the volunteers
who coordinate all fundraising
activities in support of the
League's multi-faceted human
relations programs throughout
the United States, Europe and
the Middle East.
Martha Aft Assumes
Duties At Bet Breira
Religious School
Congregation Bet Breira an-
nounces the arrival of Martha Aft,
Educational Director, who has
assumed responsibility for the
religious school and general
educational programs. Aft is a
widely respected educator who
has been in the forefront of in-
novative Jewish educational pro-
grams in the Reform Movement
for the past 15 years. She has
published widely in her field and is
a member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the National Association of
Temple Educators. Prior to arriv-
ing in Miami, Aft was in Israel for
an NATE conference where she
was a key participant.
She will oversee the educational
programs which include the
religious school, Hebrew school,
teen-age programs, adult educa-
tion, and inter-faith study
seminars. While taking respon-
sibility for the administrative
tasks and the organizational needs
of programs, Aft will continue to
emphasize the qualitative
programs.
Aft earned her MA in Contem-
porary Jewish Studies from
Brandeis University. For the past
five years she served as Educator
at Temple Sinai in Sharon, Mass.
Miami Beach Civic
League Schedules
Debates
The Civic League of Miami
Beach has scheduled three
debates on major issues to be
decided by the city's electorate in
this fall's elections the proposed
repeal of the Falk Amendment, a
charter change to provide for
staggered, four-year terms for the
city's six commissioners, and a
projected, $3 million bond issue to
improve Ocean Drive.
They're being billed as the
debates of the decade, and they're
open to the public on Monday, at
the Embers-By-The-Ocean
restaurant, Miami Beach.
Dinner is scheduled at 6:30 p.m.
with the program starting at 7:30
according to outgoing Civic
League president Billie Kern.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:38 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
T emple Beth Shmml
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi fSti
Moth* Buryn, Cantor '\ W),
Sergio Grobler. President ^
Sholem Epelbaum President
Religious CommittM
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avanua fWi,
Miami Beach \%>
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bergar
Yehuda Shitman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
AOATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-143S
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpom Conservative
SH. 8:30 a.m. 4 8:30 p.m
Dally ..rvici 7:30 a.m. 48:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5080 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 897-8887
Or. Herbert Baumgard
Sank* Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
M. 4:15 p,m. Or. William Slim
will apaak on
"Tha Do It Youraori Jaw "
HEBREW ACAOEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avanua 854-3911
Jack Rtemer, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Mlnchah Sat 7:40 p.m.
Fit avo aanlcaa 7:30 p.m.
SaLO a.m. aamca.
Dally aarvtoaa:
Sun.8a.rn. 4 5:30p.m.
Hon. A Thura. 7:30 a.m. i 5:30 p.m.
Tuaa.. Wad., Frl. 7:45 a.m. 4 530 p.m.
Opan Houaa Sunday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
AJam/'a Ptonaar 8aform Conoragabon
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskail Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emerttua:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
FrLSpjn.
Downtown: Rabbi Ran D. Paitoiatoi, "An You
Uatonmg. iMa^UamMSlSI Kaufman,
KandaM: MM HaakaM M Sak -EtNoa and
Omar UabNWaa... Jawtah Tradition Confront.
-tiaat
A Cynical
: Cantor R
RicrnHF.NHion.
TEMPLE JUDCA
5600 Granada Btvd
Coral QaWee 667 56*7
Michael B. Beenetat, Rabbi
Friday aarvtoa 6 p.m.
BETH KODESH
Coneervatfve
1101S.W.12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Joaaph Krtaaei
Roee Berlin: Executive Secretary
Sat. aarvtoa 448 a.m.
(*l
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Sarvloaa Frl. 7:30 p-m.
Sat. 30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33181
811S808 Conservative
Dr. laraal Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joaaph A QorfInkel.
Rabbi Emerttua
Moehe Frledler, Cantor
Frl. 7:44 p.m. Daily 7:20 a.m. 4 5 p.m.
Sal. 1:45 a.m.* 8:30 p.m
Sun. 4:30 a.m. 4 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
154S Jetlereon Ave.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr Jahuda Meiber
Cantor Niaeim Benyemim
Dally aarvloaa a.m. and 7 p.m.
fat fell am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowlti ,-,
Cantor Murray Yawneh \ 1
Sat a.m. Sabbath aarvtoa.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday S a.m and a p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 8 15 p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMIO
7902 Cartyte Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz
Cantor Edward Klein
^'ySarvtaaa* a.m. and 5:30 p.m. ,(
at 0:48 a.m 11
Frl lata aarvtoa 8 p m V
Conaanat.va
i
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7600 S.W. 120th Street
238-2801 /
Rabbi DavM H. Auerbach [
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Friday aarvtoa 1p.m.
Saturday aarvtoa 930 a.m.
Temple beth sholom 536/231
Chaae Ave. 8 41 at St. ,.,.,
DR. LEON KRONI4H. r-a-nc.no. Santo. RabtX
GARY A OLICKSTIIN, Rat*
HARRY JOLT, AyxMary RaMM
PAULO. CAPL AN. Aaalatant Rabbi
CANTON DAVID CONVtSER
Frl. ova. aarvtoa 4:16 p.m.
Sal. morning aarvtoa 10:46 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Dr Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvay L Brown. Exac Director
DallySanricaa.Uon.-Frl. 7:30 a.m. JB>*<
4 5:30 p.m. vV
Saturday 426 a.m. 4 7:30 p.m. **
Sun. I a.m. 4 5:SO p.m
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
362 0698
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Moaem oinodoj
Sal. 9:30 a.m. aarvlca al Tampla Samu-Ei.
93S3 SW 152 AM S ol N Kandall Or
TEMPLE SINAI 16601 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Frl. evanlng aarvicat p.m.
Sat. 10:30 a.m
Sunday a.m.
Mlnyan 8 45 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 ^
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi X)
Benjamin Adler Cantor 'X
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday 6 Thuraday.
Sunday 9 a.m., Frl., 115pm
Sabbath jarv will ba conducted by lamplat
canlara. "Mlnyanairaa" Sal 9 a.m. Sabbath
San. Taitl.r Chapal


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15^ 1986
Marcy Hacker Lippman of Miami and
Michelle Jaffe of Hollywood were among 7*
students from across the United States,
Canada, and Israel to receive a Master of
Social Work degree at Commencement Exer-
cises for the Block Education Plan of Yeshiva
University's Wurzweiler School of Social
Work. For her Wurzweiler field placement,
Ms. Jaffe participated in a unique plan
created three years ago by Wurzweiler and the
UJA-Federation Campaign of New York to
educate social workers in community develop-
ment, planning, and fund-raising. For her
field placement, Ms. Lippman worked at the
United Campus Ministry of Florida Interna-
tional University in Miami. Pictured at the
Commencement are (from left): Herbert H.
Schiff, chairman of the Board of Wurzweiler;
Ms. Lippman; Ms. Jaffe; Henry Voremberg,
treasurer of the Wurzweiler Board; and Dr.
Samuel Goldstein, dean of Wurzweiler.
Young Israel of Cornell, a full service institu-
tion providing kosher food, regular prayer
services, educational and social programs for
Jewish students on the Cornell University
campus and members of the surrounding com-
munity, has been rededicated in memory of
Morris Sole, the late Queens, N.Y. financial
secretary of the National Council of Young
Israel. At the dedication ceremony were (left to
right) Alan A Mond, director of community
and public affairs of the National Council of
Young Israel; David Love, vice president;
Mrs. Rita Sole, widow of Morris Sole; Rabbi
Mendal Kaufman, spiritual leader of the
Young Israel of Briarwood, where Mr. Sole
was a lay leader; David Loshin, president of
the Young Israel of Cornell; and Joel Baskin,
immediate past president of the Young Israel
of Cornell.
Mount Sinai Appoints Deborah Pollans
Deborah Pollans has been ap-
pointed by Mount Sinai Medical
Center of Greater Miami as Foun-
dation Representative responsible
for the Young Presidents Club. In
that capacity, she will coordinate
and direct all of the Young
Presidents fundraising endeavors,
social functions and special
events.
Most recently, Pollans was Ex-
ecutive Director of the Women's
Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation where she was
employed for five years. Former-
ly, Pollans worked at Bascom
Palmer Eye Institute as the Assis-
tant Director of Development and
at Mount Sinai in the Blood Bank.
Pollans has a BBA in Manage-
ment from the University of
Miami and has credits towards a
master's degree in hospital
administration.
Deborah PoIIaas
ROSH HASHANA
YOM KIPPUR
SUKKOT
4 Day/3 Nights from S1 49 per per.
OTHER HOLIDAY PLANS AVAILABLE
FROM2to 24 DAYS
With or Without Meals
Kitchen in Every Room / Shul on Premises
CADILLAC HOTEL 532-4541
Oceanfront Block at 39th St., M.B.
The Hassan-Israeli
Connection
Harry Milkman is the Mid-
dle East research analyst in
the International Relations
Department of the American
Jewish Committee.
By HARRY MILKMAN
King Hassan II of Moroc-
co ascended the throne on
March 3,1961, following the
death of his father during
routine surgery. He had
been educated in France,
received a law degree in
Bordeaux, and is considered
thoroughly Westernized,
although, like his fellow
Moroccans, he desires to
assert an authentic Arab
identity.
Like his predecessors of the
Alawi dynasty, he has always ac-
corded his nation's Jewish minori-
ty the fullest measure of tolerance
and equality. In 1985. Jo Ohanna.
a Jew from Meknes, a city that
has no Jewish community, was
elected to the Moroccan parlia-
ment. Shimon Levy of Casablanca
has been repeatedly reelected as a
member of the city council. And
David Amar, president of the
Moroccan Jewish community
since 1956, is a close confidant of
the King.
UPON ASSUMING power,
Hassan legalized the emigration
of Moroccan Jews to Israel. The
organizational requirements of
Jewish emigration created a
framework of contacts between
Moroccan and Israeli authorities,
as well as a climate of trust con-
ducive to cooperation in other
fields of central importance to
Morocco.
The King has periodically called
for a fusion of "Jewish genius and
Arab might" in order to ac-
celerate the development of North
Africa. In addition, since 1975
Morocco has received unpubliciz-
ed Israeli aid in fighting the
Algerian-supported Polisario
guerrillas in the western Sahara.
Libyan-backed terrorists at-
tempted to assassinate Hassan in
July. 1971 and again in August,
1972. In the summer of 1977,
Israeli intelligence services
discovered a Libyan plot to
assassinate Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat. King Hassan ar-
ranged a meeting in Casablanca
between the Israeli and Egyptian
intelligence chiefs in which the
plot by Libyan leader Moammar
Khadafy was revealed.
SADAT'S REACTION was
two-fold: he launched a retaliatory
strike against Libya, and he
agreed to send his Deputy Prime
Minister, Hassan Tohamey, to
Rabat to meet with Israeli
Foreign Minister Moshe Day an.
The Tohamey-Dayan talks became
the first step in the road that led
to Camp David and the Egyptian-
Israeli peace treaty of 1979.
In "Breakthrough: A Personal
Account of the Egyptian-Israeli
Peace Negotiations," the then
Israeli Foreign Minister Day an re-
counted that King Hassan told
him in 1977 that he believed the
Palestinian problem to be basical-
ly an Arab problem, and should
therefore be considered and solv-
ed by the Arab countries, and not
by Israel or the United States.
He believed that "the Arab
states should assume collective
responsibility over the Palesti
nians, maintain supervision over
them, and devise security
measures which would satisf;,
Israel." (A Jordanian-Palestinian
federation would constitute a
threat to Jordan, according \,
Hassan.)
THE KING acknowledged that
the territories occupied by Israel
were its ultimate guarantee of
security, and the relinquishment
of that guarantee would
necessitate its replacement by
mutual security agreements bet
ween Israel and the Arab states.
He believed that even Syrian
President Hafez Assad would
ultimately be persuaded to join
the pursuit of peace in exchange
for his lost territories.
This belief also provided the
justification for Hassan's deploy-
ment of a Moroccan brigade to
fight alongside the Syrians in the
Colan Heights in 1973.
By geographic necessity it is
further west than all of Europe -
Morocco is less directly involved
in Middle East affairs than the
eastern Arab states. Although he
belongs to the Arab League
King Hassan, in fact, is its chair
man Morocco's foreign policy is
based primarily on regional
(North African) considerations
rather than on Arab nationalis*
ideology.
HASSAN INTERPRETS the
1982 Fez Arab summit resolutions
as an implicit recognition of
Israel. He reluctantly accepted
the chairmanship of the Jerusalem
Committee of the Islamic Con-
ference on the grounds that he is a
descendant of the Prophet
Mohammed and de jure head of
Islam in Morocco rather than out
of any compelling persona!
conviction.
Hassan is obviously more con
cerned with Algerian and Libyan
sponsored insurgence against
Morocco and Tunisia than he is
with the lack of a formal peace
treaty between Israel and its Arab
neighbors. Nevertheless, the King
genuinely desires peace between
the Arab states and Israel, and is
apparently willing, as Sadat was.
to risk his stature in the Aral)
world for what he considers to be
a greater good.
JTA Services
SWIMMING POOL
CLEANING
Excellent Service
Reasonable and
Dependable
CC No. 16853 821-1399
ARE YOU A PEOPLE PERSON?
National Women's Zionist Organization needs
a creative self-starter to work with existing
chapters and develop new ones.
Part-time flexible hours car necessary.
1-800-221-3117


Names in the News
Klutznick Elected To Second Term
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B

Philip M. Klutznick, of
Chicago, was elected to his second
full term as president of the
Memorial Foundation for Jewish
Culture at the last of a series of
Board of Trustees meetings at the
Hotel Daniel in Herzlia, Israel.
Klutznick served as interna-
tional president of B'nai B'rith
and as president of the World
Jewish Congress. As a real estate
developer, he played a key part in
planning the development and
construction of the industrial
center and deep water port of
Ashdod in Israel. Klutznick was a
major leader in supporting Presi-
dent Carter's initiatives that led
to the peace treaty between Israel
and Egypt.
One of the most prominent
Jewish personalities in public ser-
vice, Klutznick served in various
government positions under seven
U.S. Presidents and was
Secretary of Commerce in the
Carter Administration.
Congressman William
Lehman (D., Fla.), chairman of
the Transportation Appropria-
tions Sub-Committee, has once
again come to the aid of Florida
Memorial College with an addi-
tional $2 million in funding for the
college's Aviation Sciences pro-
gram. If approved, the appropria-
tions bill would provide $2 million
for fiscal year 1987, and would br-
ing total funds allocated to
Florida Memorial by the
Transportation Sub-Committee to
S5.8 million.
In the past two years. Con-
gressman Lehman has been
credited with allocating and winn-
ing approval for $3.8 million in
federal funding for the college to
construct a new aviation sciences
facility. The three-story complex
will include the acquisition of in-
structional materials and equip-
ment in conjunction with the avia-
tion sciences curriculum and
technology, and will come com-
plete with an air traffic control
tower which will operate in
cooperation with the Opa-Locka
Airport neighboring the college.
The American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee is inviting
applications for the Ralph I.
'"I dm an Fellowship in Interna-
tional Jewish Communal Service
for 1987. The award will be
presented to a candidate with
demonstrated talent in the prac-
tice and study of Jewish com-
munal service, who shows a
strong interest in international
Jewish communal work. It will
provide the selected applicant
with a year of work-study in the
New York headquarters of the
AJDC, or in the Paris or
Jerusalem field offices. Only one
fellowship will be awarded
annually.
The scholarship was established
by the JDC in honor of Ralph I.
Goldman, executive vice president
Emeritus of the AJDC, whose
career in Jewish communal ser-
vice in the United States and
Israel spans more than 40 years.
Peace in the Middle East would
bring enormous economic benefits
to all nations of the region. This
was the consensus of opinion at
"e opening session of the Ar-
nd Hammer Conference on
Economic Cooperation in the Mid-
ale East, sponsored by the Ar-
mand Hammer Fund, and held
recently at Tel Aviv University.
Speaking at the session, Israeli
President Chain, Herzog said
F>at the Arab world now accepts
r8"*'.8 Presence in the Middle
-ast. Peace is possible," he said,
and if we are to give content to
at peace, economic cooperation
essential."
Philip Klutznick
Citing a study conducted by the
Hammer Fund, he said that within
two years of signing a peace
agreement between Israel and
three of its neighbors Egypt,
Lebanon and Jordan trade
among them would grow to a
value of $1 billion.
A foundation has been establish-
ed to benefit Brown University
and selected other charitable in-
stitutions, according to Rabbi
Baruch Korff of Providence.
The Baruch Korff Foundation
will support the Rabbi Baruch
Korff Endowed Scholarship at
Brown, the Rabbi Baruch Korff
Archives at Brown and possibly
endow a Baruch Korff Holocaust
Chair at the university. It will also
support the New England
Academy of Torah, Inc.
Goal of the Foundation is to
raise $1,225,000 in its first two
years. "We're delighted to hear of
this support for the university,"
said Samuel Babbitt, vice presi-
dent for development.
B'nai B'rith International's
Israel District has called upon
religious and secular extremists to
desist from both physical and ver-
bal violence and establish a
mutual understanding of their
differences.
In a statement issued in
Jerusalem, B'nai B'rith District
14 President Pnina Bor said that
the Jewish service organization
offers to conduct public meetings
with representatives of all
streams of society to work out
solutions.
Israel must eliminate all
violence that might result in ruin-
ing the nation's values and en-
dangering the people's existence,
Mrs. Bor declared.
History was made at a Board
meeting last week of Dropsie Col-
lege in Merion, Pa., when trustees
voted to rename the institution
the Annenberg Research Institute
for Judaic and Near Eastern
Studies.
Dropsie College was founded in
1907 as the country's first non-
theological and non-
denominational graduate school
for the study of the literature,
language and culture of Judaism.
Walter Annenberg, chairman
of the Dropsie post-doctoral
research institute, has been
primarily responsible for the rapid
movement toward realization of
the Institute concept and for the
development of its new home near
Independence Hall in
Philadelphia.
Bernard Lewis, an
internationally-recognized scholar
of Islamic and Judeo-Islamic
studies, has recently left the
Princeton Institute and the
University of Princeton to serve
as director of the new Annenberg
Research Institute.
Emunah Women of America
will dedicate the Florence and
Joseph Appleman School for
Technical/Arts Education in
Baka, Jerusalem, on July 23.
Hundreds of Emunah members,
their husbands and families will
travel to Israel to participate in
what the city of Jerusalem has
proclaimed as "Emunah Dedica-
tion Week." Led by United States
Ambassador to Israel Thomas R.
Pickering, Emunah supporters
will celebrate the realization of
the organization's most ambitious
project to date.
The Community College com-
plex established by Emunah
prepares Israeli women for
careers in early childhood educa-
tion, geriatric care and dental
technology. The new building will
house schools of computer science
and business administration as
well as the expansion of the
already existing graphics school
which includes a modern
photography laboratory.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee has praised a decision of the
United States Supreme Court
upholding affirmative action goals
and timetables in a case of
flagrant employment discrimina-
tion against blacks and Hispanics.
The case. Local 28 of the Sheet
Metal Workers International
Association v. Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission, arose
out of findings by lower courts
that the local had engaged in
"determined resistance ... to all
efforts to integrate its member-
ship," and was guilty of
"egregious noncompliance" with
judicial rulings.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee joined the NAACP Legal
Defense and Education Fund and
several other organizations in a
brief arniotsseeking to end such
discrimination. Samuel
RabinoveAJC's legal director, ex-
pressed particular satisfaction at
the manner in which the Commit-
tee and other civil rights organiza-
tions had been able to find com-
mon ground in their approaches to
the issues involved.
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher
visited the ORT School of Engineering in
Jerusalem during the recent ORT Week
celebrations where she met with ORT students
and educators. 'The ORT system of educa-
tion, she said, 'is a highly effective role model,
entirely worthy of emulation in Great Britain
or the United States or, indeed, in all coun-
tries where technology is receiving increasing
emphasis.' Hosting Mrs. Thatcher on her visit
was Israel Goralnik, director general, ORT
Israel (center).
You've
b [ h !


+ 1 + !
Got What
It
Takes...
(And You May Not Even Know It)
Help Those In Need... Hospital for the Aged. For free
And Help Yourself To A Pjck-up of your donations
Tax Deduction At The
Same Time.
The Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops can use your
gifts of resaleable furniture,
appliances, and household
goods. Items YOU may no
longer need will buy life-
giving medicines and
medical supplies for the
indigent residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
D
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
Two convenient locations:
5713 N W 27th Ave Miami
5829 Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Hallandale
A division of lira Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital lor the Aged at Douglas hardens


x age iiru tue jewmu nunuian/r naay, August lt>, 1W6
Liver Transplant A Year Away
TEL AVIV (JTA) Liver
transplant operations in Israel are
at least a year away, as the Health
Ministry has said that none of the
three hospitals vying for the
necessary license to perform such
operations is capable of doing so.
The three medical centers
Ram bam in Haifa, Beilinson in
Petah Tikva and Hadassah in
Jerusalem are contesting this
ruling, and each is putting for-
ward its own virtues to indicate it
is ready to start operating im-
mediately on the some 20 Israelis
now in urgent need of liver
transplants and now trying to
raise the hundreds of thousands of
dollars needed for the life-saving
operation abroad. The hospitals
say that a specially-appointed
committee has erred in its assess-
Egyptian
Tourism
Minister
In Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Egyptian Minister of Tourism, Dr.
Fouad Sultan, began an official
visit to Israel with a brief visit to
the Yad Vashem Holocaust
Memorial. The Ministry is leading
a 19-member delegation, which in-
cludes 12 travel agents and two
journalists.
His program takes him to
tourist sites around the country,
including Eilat and the Dead Sea.
He will also hold talks with his op-
posite number, Avraham Sharir,
and call on Premier Shimon Peres
and President Chaim Herzog.
In his arrival statement, the
Egyptian Minister conceded that
tourism between the two coun-
tries was low, but contended that
energetic promotion could im-
prove that situation.
ment of their capabilities.
Rambam Hospital said it should
be allowed to begin operations
because its Dr. Yigal Kam is wide-
ly recognized as Israel's preemi-
nent expert in liver transplanta-
tion, having trained at Pitt-
sburgh's University Presbyterian
Hospital, where he carried out a
number of transplants.
The Histadrut's Beilinson
Hospital points to its great ex-
perience in carrying out kidney
transplants and to its central loca-
tion in the middle of the country.
Hadassah's Ein Kerem is con-
sidered to have the best facilities
and was chosen by the Health
Ministry last month as the sole
Israeli hospital for heart
transplants.

: e ; ; t t
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
funeral director
Pt President Jewun Funeral
D"eciO's ot America
'20 SEVENTY-FIRST STREET
865-2353
Funeral Director
Miami BEACH FlCRiDA33<4>
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-20U9
Browdrd County
532-2099
Ki-presrnlt< New York: U\2) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th K.I.. Fonat Hills. N.Y.
BORNSTEIN
Ann. 66. of Mimmi. passed away August 10.
Mrs. Bomatein had made her home here for
the past 30 years coming from New York.
She ia survived by her husband. Stanley
Bomatein; her son. Jerry Edelstein;
daughters, Merryl Edelatein, Eve Williams:
her brothers, Abraham Brurkenstein,
Joseph Barkan and granddaughter. Caitlin
Rose. Services were held with interment at
Mt Nebo Cemetery.
man
Sylvia, 72, of Pompano Beach, passed away
August 6. She is survived by her husband.
Cantor Jacob J. Renter; children. Alan. Irv-
ing and David Renter and Barbara Horwitz;
brothers, Isidore and Moses Ehrenreich;
sisters, Lottie Lash and Erna Ferziger. Ser-
vices were held.
ROTHFELD
Lena, 76, of Miami Beach, passed away
August 6. Wife of the late Samuel Rothfeld.
mother of Warren and David Rothfeld;
grandmother of five; great-grandmother of
lour, sister of Rebecca Greenspan and the
late Sophie SchwarU Mrs. Rothfeld was a
long-time employee of Riverside Memorial
Chapel. Service* were held. The Riverside
GOULD. Eugene B 63, of North Miami
Beach, August 6. Services were held.
JACOBSON. Irving, of North Miami
Rubin-Zilbert.
SALTZMAN, Harry S., 70, of Miami Beach,
August 6. Services were held.
SCHNEIDER. Sadie, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
MANDELL, Arthur E.. of Miami Beach.
August 7. The Riverside.
SNOW, Bessie Schneikraut. 82. of Miami.
August 7. The Riverside.
BINDER, Dorothy, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
DIXON. Danny Lee. 42. of Coral Gables.
August 8. Menorah Chapels.
ErNLEGER. Dorothy, of North Miami
Beach. August 8. Levitt-Weinstein.
STREHAN/Ruth. of Miami. August 9. The
Riverside.
STONER, Dr. Adrian, of North Miami
Beach. Services and interment in New
York.
TINSKY. Anna, 73. August 5. Services
were held.
COLB, Dr Jacob. Menorah Chapels.
FAINBLATT. Leon. Services held in New
York.
Obituaries
ABRAMOWITZ
Ruth, 78, of Miami Beach, passed away
Aug. 12. Mrs. Abramowitz was a resident of
Miami Beach for over 30 years, coming from
the Bronx, N.Y. She was the widow of the
late Herman Abramowitc, a long time
member of the National Council of Jewish
Women, volunteer at Mt. Sinai Medical
Center for over 27 years and an officer of
the Junior Auxiliary of Douglas Gardens
(Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged). Services were held. TTie Riverside in
charge of arrangements.
BIALECK. Rebecca, 93. of Miami Beach,
Aug. 11. Levitt-Weinstein.
BLOOM, Saul (Sonny). The Riverside.
SACHS
Hebert, of North Miami Beach, husband of
Deborah H.; father of Susan Gross and Jay
Sachs; grandfather of Rachelle and Traci.
brother of Arthur Sachs, Theodore J.
Sakowitx, Syd Quinn and Ruth E. Babel.
Graveside services were held.
WILLIAMS. Herman David. July 31. Ser-
vices held in Brookline, Mass.
JAFP. Gustave, of Bay Harbor Island. Ser
vices held in New York. The Riverside.
KRAYSLER, Rose, of Bay Harbor Islands,
July 30. Services held in New York. The
Riverside.
FISHMAN, Clara (Shelansky), July 27. Ser
vices held in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.
GENTRY. Lillian. 89. of North Miami
Beach, July 31. The Riverside.
POCKER, Bessie. 96. July 26. Services
were held. ''
JARML'LOFF, Mrs. /..la. of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
ANDRESS, Leon, 73. of Coral Gables.
August 1. The Riverside.
LELAND, Ann. of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
KING, Sophia of Miami Beach, August 3.
Blasberg Chapel.
SOLOMON, Mordecai Leon, of Plantation.
formerly of North Miami Beach for the
past 30 years passed away August 3. The
Riverside. ,
SILVERSTEIN. Isador Meyer. 80. of
Miami Beach. Services held in Union, New
Jersey. Menorah Chapels.
LEWIS. Arthur, 87. of Miami Reach.
August 2. The Riverside.
AUERBACH
Sylvia, 74, of Miami. She is survived h k
husband Charles; daughter She,la tZ "
two grandchildren Adam and Rnrh.7'
Halpern and three sister,, Man Hew
Billie Goldstein and Ann Blauste.n" s member of Temple Zion. The Riverside '
o*>rAt\e*


RUBIN
ZILBERT
CHAPEL
M0NUMINTCO
CIMITIRY COUNSELING
10 CHAPELS SERVING
DADE
BROWARD
PALM BEACH j
RUBIN-ZILBERT
DADE
S38-6371
BROWARD
920-6660
ZILBERT-RUBIN
Levitt-Weinstein
presents the New
Beth David Memorial Gardens
and what it means to
South Florida.
Now Levitt-Weinstein offers the con-
venience of a complete funeral chapel
and interment service at one location.
Now- Star of David of Hollywood
becomes Beth David Memorial
Gardens... the only Jewish family-
owned-and operated cemetery and
chapel facility in Dade and Broward
Counties.
Beth David Memorial Gardens offer
a choice of above ground mausoleum
entombment or ground burial... mon-
ument sections... strict adherence to
Jewish burial and funeral laws... Jew-
ish funeral directors on call 24 hours
... and pre-arrangement plans provid-
ing comfort, security and cost savings.
<
... because the griefs enough to handle.
Memorial Chapels
North Miami Beach, 949-6315 Hollywood, 921-7200
West Palm Beach, 689.8700 Boca/Deerfield Beach, 427-6500
? Bl IHI)\\|[)
A MIMOKIM (.\KOf\s
3201N. 72nd Avenue Hollywood, FL. 963-2400
_


Paul Novack Appointed
To Law Committee
Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Miami Beach Attorney Paul
Novack has been appointed to the
American Bar Association Health
Law Committee's 1986-1987 Sub-
committee which will govern this
year's national student writing
competition.
The Subcommittee will be com-
posed of several ABA members
from various parts of the nation.
The Subcommittee will coordinate
the competition and will judge the
entries. Students from all law
schools in the country will be in-
vited to enter written works deal-
ing with issues relating to law and
the health care field.
Novack is associated with at-
torney Harold Rosen, a former
Mayor of Miami Beach and Judge
for the City of North Miami
Beach. Novack is a graduate of
Nova Law School and the Univer-
sity of Miami School of Business
Administration. In law school he
served as Chief Justice of the
Honor Court and as an Editor of
Law Review. Novack currently
serves on the Dade County
Paul Novack
Economic Development Commit-
tee which advises the Dade Coun-
ty Commission.
Flagler Federal Promotes
Rick Tuckerman
Rick Tuckerman
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association announces the
promotion of Rick Tuckerman,
Marketing Director, to Assistant
Vice President.
Mr. Tuckerman has been work-
ing for Flagler, for the past IVt
years. Before coming to Flagler,
he was an account executive with
Hume, Sindelar and Associates.
Rick has Bachelor of Business
Administration from Temple
University, Philadelphia, Pa.
He is member of the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce and
also sits on the Marketing Com-
mittee of the Florida League of
Financial Institutions.
Lois C. Waldman and Marc D.
Stern, two long-time members
of the American Jewish Con-
gress' legal staff, have been
named as co-directors of its
Commission on Law and
Social Action, the organiza-
tion's legal arm, it was an-
nounced by Henry Siegman, ex-
ecutive director of AJCongress.
Business
Notes
Arnold Geier, West Kendall in-
surance executive and author, has
had two books published
simultaneously. The first is titled:
"Before You Sing on the Dotted
Line" a consumer's guide to quali-
ty disability protection. The se-
cond, a training course for agents,
is titled: "Mastering Non-Can
Disability Insurance" achieving
excellence through
understanding.
Ed Blum, CPA has been admit-
ted to the firm of Caplan, Mor-
rison, Brown and Company, Cer-
tified Public Accountants. He is a
graduate of the University and
Florida Institute of CPAs.
Lauren Levy Miller, Assistant
City Attorney for the City of
North Miami Beach, was recently
appointed to the Executive Com-
mittee of the Dade County Bar
Association. Miller was also
recently appointed to the Mid-
Year Meeting Committee of the
Florida Bar scheduled to be held
in Miami in January. Miller is also
a member of the Board of Direc-
tors of Dade County Chapter of
the Florida Association for
Women Lawyers.
Circuit Court Judge Edmund Newbold (standing left), seeking re-
election in Group 6, looks on as Campaign Committee leaders,
Judith Kreeger, former Judge Irving Cypen and Harris
Buchbinder finalize plans for a cocktail-reception the Newbold
Campaign Committee is hosting, Monday, 5 to 7 p.m. at the
Bankers Club.
Reelection
Breakfast Set
On Sunday, Aug. 17, Miami
Beach Mayor, Alex Daoud and Ci-
ty Commissioners Stanley Arkin,
Ben Grenald, Abe Resnick,
William Shockett and Bruce
Singer are hosting a reelection
breakfast at the Shelborne Hotel
at 10 a. m. for Circuit Court Judge
Edmund Newbold.
Mark D. Cohen Joins
Kirkpatrick & Lockhart
Mark D. Cohen has joined the
Miami office of Kirkpatrick &
Lockhart as an associate.
Kirkpatrick & Lockhart is a na-
tional law firm with offices in
Washington, Boston and Pitt-
sburgh, as well as Miami. Cohen is
a graduate of Miami Beach Senior
High School and Southern Texas
University in Houston.
News Briefs
CINCINNATI (JTA) The
American Automobile Associa-
tion, in a 1986 tourbook, listed the
Hillel Jewish Student Center at
the University of Cincinnati as
one of the tourist attractions in
that city. It is the first Hillel to be
included in AAA tourbooks, accor-
ding to its Hillel Rabbi Abie
Ingber.
ATHENS (JTA) Margarita
Papandreou, wife of Greek Prime
Minister Andreas Papandreou,
has accepted an invitation to visit
Israel extended by Knesset
member Shulamit Aloni who
visited Greece last week. She said
she would go to Israel late this
year or early in 1987 in her capaci-
ty as president of a women's
organization affiliated with her
husband's Socialist Party.
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-15769
SEC. 13
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
LANNY B. BROWN, et ml.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and beat bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September, 1986,
the following described property:
Lot 5, m Block 124, of LESLIE
ESTATES SECTION THIR-
TEEN, according to the Plat
thereof, a* recorded in Plat Book
US, at Page 10. of the Public
Record* of Dade Coantr.
Florida. '
DATED the 12th day of Angast.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
B*rry Yarehin
Roaenthal and Yarehin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami, Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-18777
SEC. 19
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN ft COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
BARRANETT FARQUHAR-
SON. et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September. 1986,
the following described property:
Lot 76. in Block 108, of LESLIE
ESTATES. SECTION SEVEN,
~^H-g to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 97. at
Page 28. of the PaMie Records of
Dade Coaaty. Florida.
DATED the 12th day of Angast.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V.Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarehin
Rosen thai and Yarehin
3050 Biscsyne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-12436
SEC.27
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN COMPANY, s Florid.
corporation,
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
MILTON L. WILLARD and
l.AN'A M. WILLARD. his wife.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September. 1986,
the following described property:
Lot 43. leas the North 5 feet
thereof, of ACADIA. according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded
in PUt Book 3, at Page 216. of
the Public Records of Dade
Coanty, Florida.
DATED the 12th day of August,
1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarehin
Roaenthal and Yarehin
3050 Biscsyne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-11492
SEC. 04
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff(s)
vs.
JOYCE A. WELCH, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THntD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September. 1986,
the following described property:
Lot 1. in Block 5. of AVOCADO
VILLAS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
97. at Page 15. of the Public
Records of Dade Coaaty,
Florida.
DATED the 12th day of Angast.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarehin
Roaenthal and Yarehin
3050 Biscsyne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami, Fl 33137
I\iblished 8/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-7636
SEC. 26
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN ft COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff's)
vs.
DENNIS McCORMICK.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 6th day of September. 1986,
the following described property:
Lot 3. ia Block 1. of ALFIE
MANOR, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded ia Plat Book
106. at Page 29. of the Public
Records of Dade Coaaty.
Florida.
DATED the 12th day of Aagust.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarehin
Roaenthal and Yarehin
3050 Biscayae Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
Compensation Offered To Slave Laborers
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Finance Ministry announced here
that concentration camp inmates
who were used as slave laborers
by the Dynamit-Nobel munitions
factory or the Verwertchemie
plant during World War II may
now apply for special compensa-
tion from the successors to those
firms.
The Conference of Jewish
Material Claims Against Germany
has just obtained payment of 5
million Marks from Dynamit-
Nobel in West Germany, in fullfill-
ment of an understanding reached
20 years ago. Claims Conference
president Israel Miller said ap-
plicants for compensation should
file their claims with Compensa-
tion Treuhand, Gruneburgweg
119, 6000 Frankfurt, West Ger-
many. The deadline is December
31, 1986.
The Finance Ministry said ap-
plications should contain factual
information such as the date, loca-
tion and circumstances surroun-
ding forced labor for Dynamit-
Nobel and Verwertchemie.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-47156
SEC. 12
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florid,
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
LAZARA MARTINEZ. AN-
TONIO CASAMAYOR and
FELIPA CASAMAYOR. and the
unknown dooms, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 5th day of September. 1986.
the following described property:
Lot 28, in Block 49. of VISTA
VERDE TOWNHOUSES SEC-
TION "E". according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
94. at Page 69. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 12th day of August.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Roaenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscavne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, m AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-14472
SEC. 17
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United State, corporatioa .
Plain tints)
vs.
JAVIER ODIO and GEORGINA
ODIO, his wife, et al,
Defendant*.*)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September, 1986.
the following described property:
Uah Number 17-2, Phase Two, of
THE CROSSINGS VILLAGE
HOMES, a condominium, accor-
ding to the Declaration thereof.
as recorded ia Official Record.
Book 10457, at Page 1847, ami as
assdad by Amendment filed on
September 6, 1979, ia Official
Records Book 10506. at Page
387, of the Public Records of
Dade Count?. Florida.
DATED the 12th day of August.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V.Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3060 Biscavne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-14469
SEC. 06
STOCKTON., WHATLEY.
DAVIN ft COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
ANTONIO DEPOMBO and the
unknown spouse, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case
now pending in said Court, the
style of which is indicated above. I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash on the TWENTY
THIRD FLOOR of the Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse in Miami, Dade
County, Florida at 11:00 o'clock
A.M., on the 5th day of
September. 1986, the following
described property:
Lot 1. in Block 2. of CAROL CI-
TY PALMETTO PARK
ESTATES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
68, at Page 46, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
DATED the 12th dav of August,
1986.
I RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Roaenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscavne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3645
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT S. RIFKIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALFRED S. RIFKIN, deceas-
ed. File Number 86-3645, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 15, 1986.
CURATOR
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washigton Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Curator
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
GALBUT. GALBUT ft MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
Florida Bar No. 210889
11031 August 15. 22. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3155
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WALTER LAND MUNDEN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of WALTER LAND MUNDEN,
deceased. File Number 86-3155. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street. Miami. FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 15. 1986.
Personal Representative:
DORIS MUNDEN
13130 SW 10 Street
Miami. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Lamchick. Glucksman & Johnston
P.A.
BRUCE LAMCHICK, ESQ.
10725 SW 104 Street
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-6333
11032 August 15.22. 1986
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-9274
SEC. 21
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MOR-
TGAGE CORPORATION. a
United States corporatioa,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
LUIS JOSE ('A STANK DA and
MARIA M. CASTANEDA. his
wife, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September. 1986,
the following described property:
Lot 3, ia Block 73. of DEVON-
AIRE VILLAS. SECTION
EIGHT, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded ia Plat Book
111. at Page 8, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 12th day of Aagaat,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V.Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Roaenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
Congressman Wiliian Lehman greets Harvey Friedman, Chair-
man of the Florida Congressional Committee and board member
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and Evelyn Rubin, om
of the directors of the Congressional Committee and a Federation
member, during their recent visit to Washington.
Hospital Service Exposition
Set At Area Malls
"Shopping for Wellness." the
largest hospital service exposition
ever undertaken in the United
States, is set for August 22-23, at
five South Florida shopping malls.
Forty-three hospitals and seven
related organizations will provide
free health screenings, child
fingerprinting, displays,
demonstrations and safety lec-
tures all aimed at improving
and maintaining good health
practices.
Eye, blood pressure, cancer,
diabetic and hypertension screen-
ings, as well as CPR and aerobic
instruction, will be available.
Medical experts will be on hand to
discuss substance abuse pro-
grams, nutrition counseling, back
and head aches, sports injuries
and many other topics.
Dade Malls participating are the
Mall at 163rd Street and
Dadeland. Mall sites in Broward
County include the Broward Mall.
Coral Square Mall and Pompano
Square. The Friday and Saturday
expo is open from 10 a.m. to 9
p.m. each day.
The event is free to the public
and is being sponsored by the
South Florida Hospital Associa-
tion and WSVN-TV, NewsCenter
7. Miami.
"Last year we had 33 hospitals
participating with more that
75,000 people taking part." said
Steve Moldaver. vice presiden
the Miami-based South Florida
Hospital Association. "With the
increased size of the '86 expo. I'm
very excited about the potentia:
number of people we'll be able to
reach."
It's expected that more than
125.000 people will attend the
August 22-23 "Shopping for
Wellness" hospital exposition.
"The two-day event is our gift
to the community and provides
something for everyone," said
Moldaver. "It's useful, free and
the mall locations make it easy for
the entire family to get involved."
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-13422
SEC. 23
CITY FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK, f/k/a CITY FEDERAL
SAVING8 LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION, a United State. Savings A
Loan Association,
Plaintiffs)
vs.
RALPH SANDOVAL. a aiagle
Call 373-4605
For Legal Forms
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 5th day of September. 1986
the following described property '
LOT 1. BLOCK 1, LIME
GROVE ESTATES SECTION
TWO. ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF. AS RECORD-
ED IN plat book m pA(JE
85 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
DATED the 12th day of Augnst,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.: Suite 800
Miami. Fl 33137
Published 8/15-22
Sharon: Problem
Is People 'Not
Wanting To Work'
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry Ariel Sharon maintains
that there is no "hard" unemploy
ment in Israel at present, "just
pockets here and there." He also
claimed there is "a problem of
people not wanting to work."
Sharon, a Herut hardliner,
angrily denied claims that money
invested in West Bank set
tlements was money denied to
development towns inside Israel.
Such claims have been made by
Labor Party and other politicians
against the background of rising
unemployment and economic
stagnation in some development
towns.
But Sharon, addressing workers
at Migdal HaEmek, said that in
1985, only $15 million was in-
vested in industry in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip compared to
$180 million in development town
industries.
He said another $111 million
went to kibbutz-owned industries
and a further $161 million to
Histadrut-owned industries. "I do
not begrudge any industry ... It
was wrong though to argue that
these various industries competed
to the exclusion of each other for
investment funds," Sharon said.


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-31918-10
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(02*238)
IN RE: The Marriage of
NATHAN VOGEL,
Petitioner,
and
MILLY VOGEL.
Respondent.
TO: MILLY VOGEL
1750 South Federal
Denver, Colorado 80219
YOU, MILLY VOGEL. are
hereby notified that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and you art
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage on the
Petitioner's Attorney. FRANK,
STRELKOW & GAY, 502 Capital
Bank Building, 1666 Kennedy
| Causeway, North Bay Village.
Florida 33141, and file the original
Answer or Pleading in the Office
I of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on
[ or before the 29th day of August
1986. If you fail to do so, Judgment
or Default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
DATED this 28th day of July.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
(FRANK, STRELKOW & GAY
I Attorneys for Petitioner
502 Capital Bank Building
I 1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village, FL 33141
110989 August 1,8, 15,22,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31572 FC 03
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
PHILLIP JONES
Petitioner
and
HORTENSE MILLER JONES
Respondent
TO:HORTENSE MILLER
JONES
Residence: UNKNOWN
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 51473
New Orleans, La. 70151-1473
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 29,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25th day of July 1986.
RICHARD J. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
it Court Seal)
ttorney for Petitioner:
SHER BRYN, ESQ.
20 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
"ami Beach, Florida 33139
elephone: (305) 532-1156
August 1,8, 15.22,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-32700-30
[IN RE: The Marriage of:
[ANIOLA JAMES,
Petitioner,
and
I SYLVESTER BENJAMIN
I JAMES,
Respondent.
i: SYLVESTER BENJAMIN
JAMES, Residence unknown, you
I shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
MTa,r,r,'^.ge uPn GEORGE
JNICHOLAS, Attorney, 612
Northwest 12th Ave., Miami,
Honda 33136. and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
- At ,T ., b 1986- *>
^default will be entered.
Dated July 29, 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
io991 I CASAMAY0R
105,91 August 1,8, 16.22. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3695
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SELMA BRA USE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Selma Brause, deceased, File
Number 86-3695 (01), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33131. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 8, 1986.
Personal Representative:
CHEMICAL TRUST COMPANY
OF FLORIDA. N.A.
By: Lawrence A. Greenberg
251 Royal Palm Way.
Palm Beach FL 33480
Personal Representative:
STEPHEN FRANK
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Edwin M. Ginsburg, Esq.
Weil. Gotshal & Manges
800 Bricked Avenue, Penthouse
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 579-9529
11005 August 8, 15. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-32588
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE RAMON ARNAIZ. et at.,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RAMON ARNAIZ and
LUIS AGUILERA
LAFFAYA, Residence
unknown, if alive, and if
dead, to all parties claiming
interest by. through, under
or against the said JOSE
RAMON ARNAIZ and LUIS
AGUILERA LAFFAYA.
and all other parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Parcel
LANAI-2, in ARLEN KING
COLE CONDOMINIUM,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
recorded January 16, 1974, in
Official Records Book 8565,
at Page 940, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida; as amended,
together with all
appurtenances thereto,
including an undivided
interest in the common
elements of said
Condominium as set forth in
the Declaration, together
with the parking space
assigned to said unit
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison.
Plaintili's attorneys, whose
address is HI N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
September 5. 1986. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 29th day of
July, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
10992 August 1.8, 15,22, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-32588
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAV-
INGS AND LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION OF MIAMI, a United
States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANTONIO JOSE GARCIA GIL,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: ANTONIO JOSE GARCIA
GIL and MERCEDES
ELENA GARCIA GIL,
Residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by,
through, under or against
the said ANTONIO JOSE
GARCIA GIL and
MERCEDES ELENA GAR-
CIA GIL, and all other par-
ties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No.
10710-9, Building 10710
N.W. 7th Street, of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as record-
ed in Official Records Book
9009, at Page 1608, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida, as amended;
together with all im-
provements, appliances, and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
September 5, 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 29th day of Ju-
ly, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
10993 August 1.8, 15. 22.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4411
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERNARD PARNES
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BERNARD PARNES, deceas
ed. File Number 86-4411, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 15, 1986.
Personal Representative:
MARIA MELIDA PARNES
622 86th Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
FANNIE PARNES
713 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARK R. RUBIN
Suite 600C
Office in The Grove
2699 South Bayshore Drive
Miami, Florida 33133
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
Florida Bar No. 210889
11020 August 15,22,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4483
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEXANDER AVRIN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of ALEXANDER
AVRIN, deceased, File Number
86-4483 is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler, Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Fannie Avrin, whose address is
5255 Collins Avenue, Apt. 8A,
Miami Beach, Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If toe claim is not yet due,
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 15, 1986.
Fannie Avrin
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
ALEXANDER AVRIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Kroop (128023)
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg,
PA.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-7575
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Ludlam-Dixie Animal
Clinic at 8271 South Dixie
Highway, Miami. Fla. 33143 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Thomas W. Householder, D.V.M.
11018 August 15,22, 29;
September 5,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GD/EN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TEJERA ENTER
PRISE at 9340 SW 77 St. Miami
33173 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Diego Vicente Tejera
9340 SW 77 St.
Miami FL 33173
11030 August 15. 22,29;
September 5.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Stork Service at 6601
SW 116 Ct. Suite 107, Miami Fla
33173 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Ellen Karsh
11010 August 8, 15. 22, 29, 1986
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-31737
Florida Bar No. 349275
IN THE MATTER OF:
a minor
NOTICE OF ADOPTION
PROCEEDINGS
TO: RUBY MARIA
PALOMINO-PALOMINO
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the above named
Petitioners: MARIA CLAUDIA
PIZARRO and NELSON
PIZARRO, have filed a Petition in
the above styled court, with the
consent of the child's parent.
NESTOR AUGUSTO HER-
NANDEZ SABOGAL, for the
adoption of the minor child named
therein, and you are hereby re-
quired to show cause why the same
should not be granted by serving a
copy of your written defenses, if
any upon Mariano Sole, Attorney
at Law, P.A., 4343 West Flagler
Street, Suite 404, Miami, Florida,
attorney for the Petitioner, by the
filing of an original thereof with
the Clerk of the said Court on or
before the 29 day of August, 1986.
In the event you fail to comply with
the contents of this Notice, a
Default Judgment may be entered
against you, granting the said
adoption.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
the said Court in Miami, Dade
County, Florida, this 23 day of Ju-
ly, 1986.
As Clerk of the Circuit Court
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
CLERK
By B.J. FOY
Deputy Clerk
10969 July 25;
August 1,8, 15. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2276
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FLORA B WAGMASTER, a/k/a
FLORA WAGMISTER,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
(Florida Bar No. 048326)
The administration of the estate
of FLORA B. WAGMASTER,
a/k/a FLORA WAGMISTER.
deceased, File Number 86-2276
Div 01, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WTTHnN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 15. 1986.
Personal Representative:
MARIAN N. ELLIAS
77 East 12th Street
Apartment 15F
New York, NY. 10003
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ALAN R. LORBER, P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road, Suite 680
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-1401
11026 August 15, 22. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-34710 (28)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SEJOURNE RENELUS.
Petitioner,
and
MARY RENELUS,
Respondent.
TO: MARY RENELUS.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 612
Northwest 12th Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
September 12, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated: August 11. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: E. SEIDL
11027 August 15,22. 29;
September5,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-34696 (13)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIA CECILIA MANRIQUE,
Wife
and
XAVIER V. MANRIQUE.
Husband
TO: Xavier V. Manrique
9 de Octubre No. 429
Chimbarazo, El Morro
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
MANUEL ZAIAC, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 610,
Miami, Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 12, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 1 lth day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Manuel Zaiac
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue. Suite 610
Miami. Florida 33131
Attorney for Petitioner
11028 August 15.22, 29;
Septembers, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3828
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SIDNEY ZEKIND
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Sidney Zekind, deceased, File
Number 86-3828. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 15, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Jacqueline Renick
26 Bow Road
Newton Center, Massachusetts
02159
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Abraham M. Mora, Esquire
Blank, Rome, Comisky &
McCauley
1401 Forum Way, 7th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Fla. Bar No. 336157
Telephone: (305) 686-8100
11029 August 15, 22.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
FURNITURE at 5717 S.W. 40 St.,
Miami, Fla 33145 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Luis Padron
United Office Supplies, Inc.
5717 S.W. 40th Street
Miami. Florida 33155
Hector Abelairas, Esq.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies. Inc.
10955 July 26;
August 1.8. 15.1986


tage 14
W
The Jewish KloridianA
Friday,
August 15, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-31306
NOTICE OF ACTION
RICHARD O. BEECHAM.
SYLVIA L. BEECHAM.
Petitioners,
and
JOSEPH V. AUDITORE AND
ANNE L. AUDITORE.
Respondents.
TO: Respondents JOSEPH V.
AUDITORE & ANNE L.
AUDITORE
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to cancel a mortgage on the
following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lots 3 & 4, in Block 13 of
HIGH PINES, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 10. at Page 18,
of the Public records of Dade
County. Florida; also known
as the South 100 feet of the
North 200 feet of the East 'i
of Tract 13. of REVISED
PLAT OF 2ND AMENDED
PLAT OF HIGH PINES.
according to the Plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 31,
at Page 57, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you. and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB.
Petitioners" attorney, whose
address is 9995 Sunset Drive,
Suite 108, Miami, FL 33173. on or
before August 22. 1986. and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioners' attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 21st day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
10971 August 1,8, 15, 22, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Kile Nuber 86-4422
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
THERESA F. SCHDJE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of THERESA F. SCHINE,
deceased, File Number 86-4422, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 8, 1986.
Personal Representative:
IRVING CYPEN
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Wayne A. Cypen
CYPEN, CYPEN A DRIBIN
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
11017 Augusts, 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name HARDEE'S OF
HIALEAH at 1195 West 49th
Street, Miami, FL intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Palm Springs Mile Restaurant
Associates, Ltd.
H. ALLAN SHORE. ESQ.
Attorney for: Palm Springs Mile
Restaurant Associates, Ltd.
11006 August 8. 15.22.29, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31886
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SAMUEL RAWLINS,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ROSE MARIE RAWLINS,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Rose Marie Rawlins
Residence Unknown
Last Known Address
19621 N.W. 41 Ave.
Carol City, FL 33055
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
Samuel S. Sorota, Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 N.E. 167th Street.
Suite 308, North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 5.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 23 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Samuel S. Sorota, Esq.
801 N.E. 167th Street, Suite 308
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
10975 August 1,8,15. 22. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-34131 (11)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN SHIELDS, husband
and
MARIE SHIELDS, wife
TO: Ms. Marie Shields
504 Bay Blvd.
Bayville, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. 801 N.E. 167 Street,
Miami, Fla. 33162
attorney for Petitioner, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 12, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6 day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11013 August 8, 15,22.29, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of A A PROPER-
TIES at number 1570 Madruga,
Suite 214, in the City of Coral
Gables, Florida, intend to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Coral Gables, Florida,
this 18 day of July. 1986.
SHEPPARD FABER
ALAYNE D. FABER
Sheppard Faber. Esquire
Attorney for Applicant
1570 Madruga Avenue, Suite 214
Coral Gables. Florida 33146
16972 August 1.8,15,22, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name OSCAR'S intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
ZECAY CORP.
11022 August 15,22,29;
September 5. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-34132 (18)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DEBRA CLARK, wife
and
TONY CLARK, husband
TO: Mr. Tony Clark
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
N.E. 167 Street, Miami, Florida
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 12. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6th day of August. 1986.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
11016 August 8. 15.22,29, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-33883 (22)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
GLORIA NELSON
FAIRCLOUGH.
Petitioner,
and
RALSTON FAIRCLOUGH,
Respondent.
TO: RALSTON FAIRCLOUGH
25V. Penood Road
Kingston II, Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Samuel S.
Sorota, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 N.E. 167th
Street, Suite 308, No. Miami Bch..
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 12.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 5 day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Samuel S. Sorota, Esquire
801 N.E. 167th Street
Suite 308
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
11014 August 8, 15. 22. 29. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
SYSTEMS at 5717 S.W. 40 St.,
Miami, Florida 33145 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Luis Padron
United Office Supplies, Inc.
5717 S.W. 40 St.
Miami, Florida 33155
HECTOR ABELAIRAS, ESQ.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies, Inc.
10956 July 25;
August 1,8, 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LAW OFFICES OF
MARK B. SLAVIN at 1500 N.E.
162nd Street, North Miami Beach,
Florida, 33162 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
MARK B. SLAVIN. PA.
10952 July 25;
August 1,8. 15. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-33698 FC 23
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
Sergio Fernandez
and
Hilda Noya Fernandez
TO: Hilda Noya Fernandez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Mark Friedman, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 350
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach,
Florida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 12, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 5th day of August, 1986.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
Mark Friedman
350 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida
Attorney for Petitioner
11015 August 8. 15. 22. 29, 1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-25570 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
MAGNET BANK. FSB.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE A. MAGANA.
et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE A. MAGANA and
MARIE G. MAGANA. his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JOSE A.
MAGANA and MARIE G.
MAGANA, his wife, and all
parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
Unit 2-5, VIEW WEST CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11164, at Page 171, and
amendment thereto filed
November 3, 1981, in Official
Records Book 11259, at Page
2277, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 12, 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 7 day of August
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
WM August 15, 22, 29;
September 5,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name TRI ME
ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKS
at 2121 NW 139 ST BAY 1 OPA
LOCKA, FL 33054, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
SELVIN ALLEN
11025 August 15. 22, 29;
September 5, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-30758-15
JOSEPH S. MOSS and
OLA MAE MOSS, his wife.
Plaintiff
vs.
CHARLES E. CURRY, a
bondsman. ANDREW JAMES
ALLEN; SOUTHEAST BANK.
N.A. f/k/a SOUTHEAST FIRST
NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI,
f/k/a THE FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF MIAMI, a United
States corporation; GEORGE
PALMER MORRELL and
MARTHA N. MORRELL;
GENERAL FINANCE
CORPORATION OF FLORIDA,
a Florida corporation; and THE
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, and any and all
unknown parties who may claim
by, through, against or under any
or all of the named Defendants in
this action,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
No. 036819
TO: ANDREW JAMES ALLEN
(Residence Unknown)
GEORGE PALMER MORRELL
(Residence Unknown)
MARTHA N. MORRELL
(Residence Unknown)
and any other person or persons
who may claim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, legatees, or
otherwise by, through, under or
against the above named Defen-
dants, who are not known to be
dead or alive.
YOU AND EACH OF YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Complaint for Adjudication that
Quit-Claim Deed was a Mortgage
under F.S. 697.01 and/or Adjudica
tion for Reformation of Instru-
ment and Quieting Title in Plain-
tiffs with regard to the following
described property, to-wit:
Lot 144. in PALMHURST. ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 7, at
Page 22, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida;
has been filed against you. and you
are hereby required to serve a copy
of your Answer or pleading upon
the Plaintiffs' attorneys.
HOLLANDER & SCHIFFRIN.
1200 Republic National Bank
Building, 150 S.E. 2nd Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33131. and file the
original Answer or pleading in the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 22 day of
August, 1986. If you fail to do so.
Default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
DATED at Miami, Florida this
16 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
10953 July 25;
August 1,8. 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lee's of Florida at
440 East Drive. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
TROPICAL JANITORIAL INC.
JOSEPHINE BOREW, Pres.
BEN BOREW, Sec. Treasurer
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
Attorney for Tropical Janitorial
and Borews
P.O. Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
10961 July 25;
August 1,8, 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Blue Lagoon Exxon
at 700 N.W. 57 Avenue, Miami!
Florida, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Blue Lagoon Car Center, Inc.
a Florida corporation
By: Nelson Escala. President
Attorney for Blue Lagoon Car
Center, Inc.
Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esq.
Rossano, Torrent & Leyte-Vidal,
* .A.
701 S.W. 27th Avenue
Suite 625
Miami, FL 33135
Telephone: (305) 541-2266
>95 August 1.8, 16,22. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVirp
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31888
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GLORIA WRIGHT.
Petitioner,
and
MERTON WRIGHT,
Respondent
TO: MERTON WRIGHT
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN-
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
273 Sigel St.
Westburg L.I., New York 11590
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
Samuel S. Sorota, Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 N.E. 167th Street
Suite 308. North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 3,
1986; otherwise a default will he
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the Ma]
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Samuel S. Sorota, Esq.
801 N.E. 167th Street, Suite 808
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
10974 August 1.8. 15.22. 1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 84-12574 CA-16
NOTICE OF ACTION 002481
THE KISSELL COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA. et al.
Defendants.
TO: CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA
580 N.E. 127th Street. No. 21
Miami, Florida 33181
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
has been filed against you ami
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
August 22. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediate!)
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 17 day of July.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
10959 July 25.
August 1,8, 15.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fio
titious name CHINESE
VILLAGE RESTAURANT at
8427 SW 40 St. Miami. FL 33155
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LEE VILLAGE. INC.
10967 j^ 25.
August 1,8, 15,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the He-
titious name HARDEE'S OK
MIAMI 3 at 9046 S.W. 107th
Avenue, Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Kendall-107 Restaurant
Associates, Ltd.
H. ALLAN SHORE. ESQUIRE
Attorney for: Kendall-10"
Restaurant Associates. Ltd.
11009 August 8. 16.22, 29. 1986


Friday, August 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
[in the circuit court for
eleventh judicial
circuit, dade county,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3478
Division 03
|n RE: ESTATE OF
SDITH PORCO,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
LAIMS OR DEMANDS
[GAINST THE ABOVE
STATE AND ALL OTHER
5RSONS INTERESTED IN
IE ESTATE:
/OU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
CED that the administration of
estate of EDITH PORCO,
ceased. File Number 86-3478
?-03 is pending in the Circuit
art for 11th Judicial Court, In
For Dade County, Florida,
Bbate Division, the address of
!ich is 73 West Flagler Street,
tmi, Florida 33130. The
onal representative of the
ite is DAN PORCO. JR.. whose
jress is 1050 Fifth Avenue 7D,
few York. NY. 10028. The name
Id address of the personal
presentative's attorney are set
i below.
persons having claims or
femands against the estate are
Iquired, WITHIN THREE
)NTHS FROM THE DATE OF
IE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
hlS NOTICE, to file with the
rk of the above court a written
itement of any claim or demand
y may have. Each claim must be
writing and must indicate the
I Bis for the claim, the name and
I dress of the creditor or his agent
attorney, and the amount
limed. If the claim is not yet due.
( ? date when it will become due
1 all be stated. If the claim is
|J ntingent or unliquidated, the
ture of the uncertainty shall be
kted. If the claim is secured the
curity shall be described. The
Aumant shall deliver sufficient
pies of the claim to the clerk to
able the clerk to mail one copy to
Ach personal representative.
All persons interested in the
State to whom a copy of this
jfctice of Administration has been
t&iiled are required. WITHIN
WREE MONTHS FROM THE
TE OF THE FIRST
BLICATION OF THIS
riCE, to file any objections
ky may have that challenge the
tl idity of the decedent's will, the
llifications of the personal
resentative, or the venue or
ft sdiction of the court.
I LI. CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
A D OBJECTIONS NOT SO
1 .ED WILL BE FOREVER
B KKKIi
J ate of the first publication of
i Notice of Administration:
A fust 8, 1986.
DAN PORCO
I Personal Representative of
the Estate of
EDITH PORCO
Deceased
IX)RNEY FOR PERSONAL
IPRESENTATIVE:
4SLEE R. FERDIE. ESQ.
|RDIE & GOUZ
(t* 215. 717 Ponce De Leon
Gables. Florida 33134
TBephnm- (305) 445-3557
I 04 August 8. 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
IOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
I t the undersigned, desiring to
4 ;age in business under the fic-
)us name Elasmobranch Con-
I tante. at 9300 SW 99 St.,
1 imi, Florida 33176, intends to
fj ister said name with the Clerk
he Circuit Court of Dade Coun
(Florida.
Dr. Samuel H. Gruber
I Elasmobranch Consultants
9300 SW 99 St.
Miami, Florida 33176 USA
94 August 1,8,15,22,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
ie undersigned, desiring to
in business under the Re-
names HARDEE'S OF
^RGATE, HARDEE S OF
UII2. HARDEES OF MIAMI
"DEE,SOFMIAMi6at420
Dixie Highway, Coral
lies, FL intends to register said
ne with the Clerk o'. the Circuit
urt of Dade County, Florida.
Wtaurant Corporation of South
Florida
[ALLAN SHORE, Esquire
omey for: Restaurant Corpora-
1 of South Florida
August 8. 15,22,29, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-31435 11
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
BRIAN D. BRADLEY,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: LAURA F. BRADLEY
818 West 30- Street
Erie, Pennsylvania 16509
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 6, Block 3, of SUNNY
GARDENS ESTATES 1
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 120, at Page 7,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, and Amend-
ment thereto,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
August 22, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand ami the seal of
this Court this 21 day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
by JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
10965 July 25;
August 1.8. 15. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8982
Division 02
Kim. Bar No. 058319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SONIA EPSTEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SONIA EPSTEIN, deceased,
File Number 85-8982. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 8. 1986.
Personal Representative:
HAROLD EPSTEIN
75 East End Avenue
New York, NY. 10028
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FELDMAN, P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-5716
11001 Augusts. 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TROPICAL
MAINTENANCE at 440 East
Drive, North Miami Beach. Florida
33162 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
TROPICAL JANITORIAL INC.
JOSEPHINE BOREW, Pres.
BEN BOREW. Sec. Treasurer
Myron B. Berman. Esq.
Attorney for Tropical Janitorial
Inc. And Borews
P.O. Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
10960 July 25;
August, 1,8, 15,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-33076
NOTICE OF ACTION
CORAL GABLES FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff,
vs.
BLANCA MARGARITA
ARTILES. et al..
Defendants.
TO: BLANCA MARGARITA
ARTILES
Calle Rio Paragua CC.
La Piramide Local
Prados Lei Este (Miranda)
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit 210. of NAUTICO BAY
CLUB CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium, according to
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, dated
November 19. 1980, filed for
record November 21, 1980.
under Clerk's File No.
80R-315219. in Official
Records Book 10938. at Page
48. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and
amendments thereto,
together with all im-
provements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keitch. Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
September 5. 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 30 dav of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
10998 August 8. 15. 22, 29. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JESUS PAINT &
BODY SHOP at 4699 E. 11th
Avenue. Hialeah. Florida 33013 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
VILMA PAINT
& BODY SHOP, INC.
By: Vilma Cespedes. President
MARGARITA PEREZ
Attorney for Vilma Paint & Body
Shop, Inc.
362 Minorca Avenue. Suite 101
Coral Gables. Fla. 33134
10999 August 8, 15. 22, 29. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
SUPPLIES at 5751 S.W. 40th
Street, Miami. Florida 33155 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Luis Padron
United Supplies. Inc.
5751 S.W. 40 St.
Miami. Florida 33155
Hector Abelairas. Esq.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies, Inc.
10958 July 25;
August 1.8. 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Del Rios Retail Co. at
211 Lincoln Mall Miami Beach FL
33139 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Attorney for Dairo Rios
11011 August 8, 15,22,29, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Stork Service at 6601
SW 116 Ct. Suite 107, Miami Fla
33173 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Ellen Karsh
11010 August 8. 15,22,29, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31348 28
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUZ CHRISTIAN,
Petitioner/Wife
and
OSCAR CHRISTIAN,
Respondent/Husband
TO: OSCAR CHRISTIAN
2695 SW 18th Street
Apt No. 303 Miami, FL 33145
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of you writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on ANA
MARTIN-LAVIELLE, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
1800 S.W. First Street, Miami,
Florida 33135 Suite 324. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 22, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ANA MARTIN-LAVIELLE
1800 S.W. First Street
Suite 324
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
(305) 649-5486
10964 July 25;
August 1,8, 15, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO.: 86-30619(11)
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROSALINDA MANSUETO
HEITKAMP
PETITIONER/WIFE
vs.
NORBERT WILHELM
HEITKAMP
RESPONDENT.
TO: NORBERT WILHILM
HEITKAMP
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on WALTER L.
LEBOWITZ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Ar-
thur Godfrey Road. Second Floor,
Miami Beach. FL 33140, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 22, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
WALTER B. LEBOWITZ.
Esquire
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Second Floor
Miami Beach. FL 33140
(305) 532-0000
10954 July 25;
August 1, 8, 15.19865
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-33770 (01)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARGARITA ZAPATA, a/k/a
MARGARITA ORTEGA,
and
RAFAEL DARIO ZAPATA,
TO: Rafael Dario Zapata
Calle 46 D-Sur
No. 39B25
Medellin, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-1
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
wirtten defenses, if any, to it on
EMILIO C. PASTOR, PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is PHI 155 South Miami
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33130,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before September 5, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 4th day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C. PASTOR, P.A.
PHI 155 South Miami Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Tel: (305) 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
11002 August 8. 15,22, 29, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-31458-22
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIE FERELIE F.
PRUD'HOMME.
Petitioner,
and
CHENIER PRUD'HOMME,
Respondent.
TO:CHENIER
PRUD'HOMME, Residence
unknown, you shall serve copy of
your Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attorney,
612 Northwest 12th Ave., Miami,
Florida 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
August 29, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated July 22, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
10968 July 25;
August 1.8,15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business :r the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
PRODUCTS at 5717 S.W. 40
Street, Miami. Fla 33144 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Luis Padron
United Office Supplies, Inc.
5717 S.W. 40th Street
Miami. Florida 33155
Hector Abelairas. Esq.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies, Inc.
10957 July 25;
August 1.8, 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name U.S. AUTO PARTS
inc. d/b/a Manhattan Imports at
3570 N.W. 135 Street. Opa Locka
Florida 33054 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Pablo Davila
10973 August 1.8.15,22, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3566
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERMAN CAPLAN a/k/a
HERMAN I. CAPLAN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HERMAN CAPLAN a/k/a
HERMAN I. CAPLAN, deceased.
File Number 86-3566. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 8, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Helene R. Weinstein
107 Grymes Hill Road
SUten Island, NY 10301
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Abraham M. Mora. Esquire
Blank, Rome, Comisky &
McCauley
1401 Forum Way, 7th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (305) 686-8100
11003 August 8. 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name AZUSA ROOFING,
INC.. at 610 S.W. 47 Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33134. PH:
448-3020, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
James Kirkland
President
Coral Gables Roofing, Inc.
Accountant for
Azusa Roofing, Inc.
Teresita C. Miglio
11000 August 8,15,22,29, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-30140 FC 15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
GALINA GOROKHOVSKY
a/k/a GALINA GUZMAN
and
WILSON GUZMAN
TO: WILSON GUZMAN
Present address and
residence unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Bruce J. Scheinberg, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 420
Lincoln Road, Suite 512, Miami
Beach, Florida 33139, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August
29, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 28th dav of July 1986.
RICHARD J BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce J Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
10988 August 1,8. 15, 22.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name HARDEE'S OF
MIAMI 6 at 550 Brickell Avenue.
Miami, FL intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Brickell Bridge Restaurant Corp.
H. ALLAN SHORE. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Brickell Bridge
Restaurant Corp.
11007 August 8, 15, 22. 29. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CLARI PAL at 2555
Collins Ave. C-8 Miami Beach FL
33139 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Attorney for
CLARA PINEIRO
11012 Augusts. 15.22. 29. 1986


Hebrew Classes At
Beijing University
- ..~*3QIO -
Continued from Page 3-B
old Chinese gentleman who
himself had learned Hebrew from
a Christian missionary in Xi'an
many years before.
ONE MAN in the Chinese
Ministry of Culture is known to
"have" some Hebrew, learned
many years ago. no one knows
how or where. Except for a few
faculty members at Beijing and
perhaps elsewhere, the Hebrew
language is unknown among the
Chinese, who number one billion,
a fourth of the human race.
None of the students in Kita
Alef comes from Kaifeng. tradi-
tional center of the long-vanished
community of Chinese Jews. They
knew little or nothing about Jews,
Judaism or the State of Israel
when they started studying Ivrit.
Whatever these students may
have learned earlier in school or
from the Chinese media, for ex-
ample was presented from the
Arab and Third World viewpoint,
in accordance with current PRC
foreign policy directives.
The Beijing students were
assigned to major in Hebrew.
Their class in Ivrit meets from
eight to ten o'clock every morn-
ing, six days a week. In addition to
12 hours of Hebrew language in-
struction, they attend other
classes for a total of 20 hours each
week.
THEY ARE enrolled in a five-
year university program. After
they master Hebrew, they will
study Jewish history, modern
Hebrew literature, Judaism and
related matters for 12 hours a
week, plus eight hours of other
subjects.
Kita Alef uses BeAl Pe, a stan-
dard Hebrew teaching text and
workbook. Each student has
taken a Hebrew name Chana.
Dan. Dinah. Gershom. Moshe.
Shula. Tsiporah. Uzi. Yitzhak and
Yosef.
They recite reading aloud or
practicing the dialogue of their
textbook shyly, giggling at
their mistakes. Mann translates
new vocabulary into English,
which some of his students
studied for as many as eight years
before entering the university.
In class, however, he speaks
mainly in Hebrew, using the Ivrit
beivrit method widely employed in
Israel and elsewhere. Mann
knows only a little Chinese.
Words he cannot explain are look-
ed up in the makeshift Chinese-
English-Hebrew dictionary.
The Hebrew class meets in a
small, bare room lacking the maps
of Israel, posters and alphabet
charts that typically adorn
Hebrew classrooms elsewhere.
WHEN I VISITED. Kita Alef
was learning about Israeli
pastimes kadoor regel. kadoor
basis, hakolnoa. hateatron. foot-
ball, baseball, the cinema, the
theater. Musica was discussed in-
tensively, each student telling in
Hebrew what he or she prefers to
hear "pop, classic, symphonit."
Then Kita Alef turned to the
geography of Israel. They learned
that Tel Aviv al yod kayam. Tel
Aviv is beside the sea, haNegev
darom shel Yisrael. the Negev is
in Israel's South, and that
haXtgn- kamxdbar sW Yitratl.
the Negev is Israel's desert
Mann praised every utterance,
frequently exclaiming naehon.
correct, and tor mtod. very good.
Considerable "positive reinforce-
ment" of this kind is a hallmark of
Israeli ulpan teaching.
Four years from now, the
graduates of Kita Alef will be
assigned jobs by the Chinese
government. The students have
no idea where they will be sent or
what work they will be told to do.
If any of them dream of visiting
Israel someday, they did not men-
tion it to me or their teacher.
Michael Mann is returning to the
United States to enter medical
school, but Hebrew classes will be
continued at Beijing University.
Why?
THE PEOPLE'S Republic of
China has no diplomatic relations
with the State of Israel. When
telecommunications links between
the two countries were establish-
ed recently, the Chinese Foreign
Ministry specifically announced
that this did not presage any
change in China's non-recognition
of Israel.
At least 15 million Moslems are
believed to live in China, twice as
many as when the Communists
came to power 40 years ago, but
statistics are not firm. Some
estimates run as high as 50 million
Chinese Moslems, which would
equal the population of France.
One poster (right) shows a young man falling
to the ground, blood splattered behind him on
a wall and on a brick he was hit with. The
headline, in Hebrew, says: 'Extremism can
destroy the State.' The other (left) shows a vase
containing pretty flowers in a tranquil ar-
rangement. 'Tolerance.' the headline says.
'can save the State.' The two color posters havt
been distributed in Israel by the Antx-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith to help
stem the tide of intolerance and fanaticism
between religious and secular Jews. Tht
materials were produced in cooperation uith'
the Israel Forum by ADL which has an offut
in Jerusalem.
where shopping is o pleasure 7 days a week
Publix
Pubhx Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Summertime Party Special!
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
(Serves 25 People) Made with Three Quarts of Any Flavor, Publix Premium or Dairi-Fresh
Ice Cream, Decorated with Whipped Cream (Toys or Drawings are Extra)
Quarter Sheet
Ice Cream Cake and
50 Puff Pastry Hors d'Oeuvres
(Hors d'Oeuvres are Baked or Frozen)
$1Q95
only ^J

\ r
AveMeMe at Pub*x Store* with
Freeh DenMi Bekeries Only.
WMittw Pwchsee of a S-Tler or
Largor Wodd*ng Cake During
The Month* ol Jury and Auguat
Wedding Cake
Ornament
FREE!
(VahMdUpTotlSjOO)
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
For the Health Conscious
lOOo/o Whole
Wheat Bread
,79
\ r
Available at aM Pubflx Stores
Coffee Cake
$179

Available at Pubflx stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
A DeRcloue New item

Prices Effective m Dadc, Brpward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian
Rh~ 5S ONLY. *Sg^5ES&* Au^


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EJVP3NZMP_OCK8V9 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-24T23:47:55Z PACKAGE AA00010090_03002
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 15, 1986
A Fascist Remains Free
By MILTON JACOBY
MADRID (JTA) Last
month a judge of the Civil
Court of Madrid dismissed a
suit of special significance to
every Jewish survivor of the
Holocaust. The suit was in-
stituted by Violeta Fried-
man, a grimly determined
survivor of Auschwitz who
now lives in Madrid, against
one of the world's most
notorious Nazis, Leon
Degrelle, who also resides
here.
He has a luxurious penthouse in
the city and several villas on the
fashionable Costa del Sol. He con-
tinues to bask in Hitler's reputed
tribute to him "If I had a son, I
would wish he were like you."
A Belgian, he was condemned to
death after World War II by the
Belgian government for war
crimes as a Nazi collaborator and
as the founder of the notorious
Rexist movement. But Degrelle,
unlike Vidkun Quisling in Norway
and Pierre Laval in France, was
lucky. Fleeing from Norway,
Degrelle crash-landed in Spain,
where his admirer Generalissimo
Francisco Franco granted him
citizenship.
THE ACTION 40 years later in
Madrid Civil Court resulted from
Degrelle's appearance on July 11,
1985 on national television, when
he boasted about his fascist past
and declared his undying love for
Hitler, whom he compared to
Napoleon.
On July 29, 1985 in an interview
published by the weekly Tiempo
he amplified his TV comments to
include a sweeping denial of the
existence of the Holocaust and the
gas chambers. The Nazi Party
might be dead, he said, but its
ideology lived on.
It was at that point that Fried-
man could no longer keep silent.
She had been taken at 14, with her
family, to Auschwitz from Tran-
sylvania. Her family was exter-
minated, but somehow she manag-
ed to survive despite a severe
spinal injury, until her liberation
by the Russians in 1945. She had
observed, with mounting frustra-
tion, the futile attempts by the
Belgians through the years to
have Degrelle extradited, and the
criminal's superb success in con-
founding his accusers.
SHE BEGAN with a letter to El
Pars, the leading daily, one of a
series of letters over the following
several weeks. Degrelle respond-
ed with an invitation, also through
El Pais, for her to visit him so
that he could convince her of the
AJCongress
Prayers At Public School Graduation
Exercises Violate Supreme Court Ban
justness of his views. Friedman
declined, unless their conversa-
tion could be covered by reporters
and a TV crew.
Some months ago, she managed
to find a lawyer who would initiate
legal action to prevent Degrelle
from continuing to flood the coun-
try with his lies, and this un-
precedented trial was set for June
11. In his preliminary deposition
to a judge, Degrelle repeated his
allegations (another of which was
that Josef Mengele was a gentle
soul who had been much malign-
ed). But he refused to appear at
the trial on the grounds that he
feared Jews would kidnap him.
Friedman insisted to this
reporter that all she wanted was
for the court's opinion to be car-
ried widely by press and TV, and
that he be asked for a financial in-
demnity to the Spanish survivors
of Mauthausen. Once again, with
the dismissal of the action on June
11, the Nazi warlord had escaped
justice.
THE VALIANT Violeta Fried-
man is determined to continue her
lonely battle, and she has launch-
ed an appeal. She has little or no
support from her Jewish com-
munity or from the Israel Em-
bassy. People seem uneasy in her
presence. It appears to be a case
of "let sleeping dogs lie" or
possibly a fear of retaliation by
the militant rightwing organiza-
tions in Spain which support
Degrelle.
A number of efforts were made
to discuss this matter with Israeli
Ambassador Shmuel Hadass, but
he was unavailable for comment.
Blind Teenagers Learn
CPR Techniques
iiven though graduation exer-
cises at a public high school take
place only once a year, a religious
invocation or benediction at such
ceremonies violates the United
States Supreme Court's ban on
public school prayer, says the
American Jewish Congress.
An amicus, or friend-of-the-
court, brief filed by the Jewish
organization in the United States
Court of Appeals for the Sixth
Circuit asserts that by permitting
prayers at yearly commencement
exercises, school districts for the
Michigan towns of Plainwell and
Portage contravened the constitu-
tional prohibition against govern-
ment establishment of religion.
The brief, released by Alvin L.
Gray, National Vice-President of
AJCongress, asked the federal ap-
peals court to reverse a ruling by
the United States District Court
tor the Western District of
Michigan which upheld the school
boards.
"It is the very significance of
graduation which, when prayers
become part of the program,
creates a difficult choice for some
students," the brief said, noting
that such students are forced
either to listen to prayers or forgo
the chance to attend a major
school function. Such a choice, by
having a coercive effect on a stu-
dent who wishes to be part of the
mainstream, serves to advance
one group's religious beliefs over
another'8, it contended.
The case originated as a suit
brought in the federal district
court by residents of Plainwell
and Portage who objected to in-
clusion of an invocation and
benediction on the grounds that
these constituted religious
prayers and therefore violated the
Establishment Clause of the
Constitution.
The district court upheld the
school boards, claiming that
graduation ceremonies are purely
voluntary and are ceremonial
rather than a part of the formal
day-to-day routine of the school
curriculum for which attendance
is compulsory.
The court also compared
prayers at graduation exercises to
prayers delivered by a chaplain at
the opening of legislative sessions
each day pointing out that
legislative prayers were permit-
ted by the framers of the First
Amendment to the Constitution.
However, the AJCongress brief
challenged the lower court's
reasoning on both the compulsory
attendance issue and the com-
parison with legislative prayers It
noted that the Supreme Court has
ruled that whether attendance at
a public school function is com-
pulsory or voluntary has no bear-
ing on whether officially sanction-
ed prayer at such an event does,
or does not, violate the
Constitution.
The Supreme Court, according
to the amicus brief, has declared
that even prayers that are
'denominationally neutral" or are
voluntary, are subject to "the
limitations of the Establishment
Clause" of the Constitution.
The AJCongress brief also re-
jected the lower court's view that
prayers at a graduation ceremony
are analogous to legislative
prayers. Such an argument runs
counter to the ruling of the
Supreme Court which "explicitly
distinguished" between the two
on the grounds that "a legislative
prayer addressed a very different
audience from a prayer delivered
in a school context," it said.
The brief said that the district
court contention that the gradua-
tion ceremony prayers were "so
fleeting' and non-repetitive that
they could not be viewed as serv-
ing a teaching function is not sup-
ported m case law. The Supreme
Court, it declared, has rejected
the notion that "relatively minor
encroachments on the First
Amendment" are not a real threat
and therefore constitute a defense
against charges of constitutional
violation.
Magen David Adorn in Israel
sponsored a life-saving course on
Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation
(CPR) techniques for 20 blind
teenagers from the Jerusalem In-
stitute for the Blind in the Kiryat
M<>she neighborhood. The purpose
of the course is to equip them with
the knowledge of how to handle
emergency situations concerning
heart failure, its treatment and
prevention. The classes have been
specially adapted so that the
sightless may detect signs of
distress by feeling and hearing.
MDA hopes in the future to in-
clude more blind people in such
classes.
A year ago deaf people from the
Helen Keller House in Tel Aviv
took part in a similar MDA course
that was suited to their handicap.
Magen David Adorn provides
classes in CPR training at MDA
Emergency Medical Care Centers
throughout Israel. Physicians and
MDA Paramedics agree in
crediting the quick thinking and
immediate administration of CPR
as a prime factor in a heart attack
MDA first-aid instructor
teaches blind teenagers techm
ques in resuscitation and hear,
massage on "Rescue Annv'
mannequin.
victim's recovery.
MDA's goal is to have one per
son in every home trained in CPR
techniques.
Agudath Israel To Mark 35th Anniversary
Saturday, August lb, termeo
for Jewry world-over as
"Shabbat-Nahamu," the Sabbath
of Comfort Ye, marks the 35th an-
niversary since Agudath Israel
Hebrew Institute, on Miami
Beach, was founded.
Agudath Israel initially opened
its extensive program of religious
services and social activities,
under the founding leadership of
the author and scholar. Rabbi Dr.
Isaac Hirsh Ever. ZTL, on August
17, 1951.
Rabbi Sheldon N. Ever, who
was graduated from the Hebroc
Rabbinical College of Jerusalem
Israel at age 18 as an Ordainw
Rabbi succeeded his father is
spiritual leader.
Rabbi Ever will deliver his ser
mon on "The Voice of Comfort
and Prospects for Brighter
Times" at services on Saturday
morning. A gala reception and
buffet-style kiddush will be
served.
Weekly
Issues
Not Just Now and Then!
YouCan't Be Fully Informed With Less
$500 Publix
unu L Gift Certificate
with Each New Subscription
52 Issues $1 Q00
18
A Check
Mutt Accompany Order
Name
pCZm&ZX '"troductory Offer.
a8 SUrt My Subscription Now!
NEW SUBSCRIBER -
DADE COUNTY ONLY Aft* 4 to 6 weeKs
Mail To:
Jewish Floridiart
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
L


Friday, Augast 15, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Pagl-B
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Hear, 0 Israel: the Lord our God, the Lord is One"
VAETHANAN
(Deuteronomy 6.4).
VAETHANAN The portion begins with Moses' plea to God for
permission to enter the Promised Land, and God's refusal. The
law-giver warns the children of Israel against practising idolatry
in Canaan, calling their attention to their special history and mis-
sion. "Did ever a people hear the voice of God speaking out of the
midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live? Or hath God
assayed to go and take Him a nation from the midst of another na-
tion, by trials, by signs, and by wonders, and by war, and by a
mighty hand, and by an outstretched arm, and by great terrors
according to all that the Lord your God did for you in Egypt
before thine eyes?" (Deuteronomy 4.35-34). Moses sets aside three
cities of refuge on the east side of the Jordan. He repeats the Ten
Commandments, with slight variations for the purpose of clarity.
The first section of the Shema beginning "Thou shalt love the
Lord thy God with all thy heart" and ending "And thou shalt
write them upon the door-posts of thy house, and upon thy gates"
is in this portion. (Deuteronomy 6.4-9). Moses urges the Israelites
to show no mercy to the seven Canaanite nations. "And when the
Lord thy God shall deliver them up before thee, and thou shalt
smite them; then thou shalt utterly destroy them; thou shalt make
no covenant with them, nor show mercy unto them; neither shalt
thou make marriages with them; thy daughter shalt not give unto
his son, nor his daughter shalt thou take unto thy son For thou
art a holy people unto the Lord thy God; the Lord thy God hath
chosen thee to be His own treasure, out of all peoples that are
upon the face of the earth" (Deuteronomy 7.2-6). Finally, Moses
stresses the need for strict observance of the various ritual
commandments.
(The recounting of the Weakly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Woliman-
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York. N.Y. 10038 Joseph Schlang is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Bush In Israel
Continued from Page 2-B
[ photo that caused a few mild
I squirms among some American
[ Jews, captured the Vice President
reverently kissing the Western
I Wall in Jerusalem.
"HE WAS with (Minister of
Religious Affairs) Yosef Burg,
when Burg walked up to the Wall
and kissed it," Stein said, appear-
ing mildly embarrassed for Bush,
though amused. "So he followed
Burg and put his head to the Wall
|and kissed it, too."
A more embarrassing incident
was the cancellation of an invita-
Ition to Jerusalem Post correspon-
[dent Wolf Blitzer to join the press
[team accompanying Bush to
[Israel. Jordan and Egypt. Blitzer,
who had a visa signed by the Jor-
danian Ambassador in
Washington, was bumped from
the plane at the last minute, after
it became clear that the Jorda-
nians had decided that the
American Jewish journalist would
not be welcome in Amman.
On balance, though, the Vice
President's trip should be seen
neither as a successful get-start in
the campaign for the Jewish
American vote nor a public rela-
tions fiasco, said Stein, who said
he plans to support a Bush can-
didacy for the Republican
Presidential nomination. Instead,
he stressed, it should be viewed as
another important step in the con-
tinuous deepening of American-
Israeli relations.
Joint Planning Starts
For Israel Observance
The American Zionist Federa-
tion of South Florida will coor-
dinate areawide observances of
io of the major events in the
history of the modern State of
Israel, according to president
erald Schwartz.
Schwartz, who also is national
rice president of the AZF, said the
Sionist Federation will sponsor
elebrations of the 20th anniver-
sary of the reunification of
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel
May 26-27, 1987, and the 40th an-
iiversary of the independence of
he Jewish state, scheduled in
May. 1988.
"Because of the significance of
these two anniversaries, we are
beginning the planning now so
that as many Jewish and non-
Jewish organizations and agencies
as possible can participate."
Schwartz said.
"Although fund raising for the
educational, cultural, medical and
welfare needs of Israel is a vital
concern to the Zionist Movement
and the overall Jewish communi-
ty, we are determined that these
two birthdays will be utilized for
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
S 10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian.
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Florida 33101.
The Kendall Area Singles, ages 35 will sponsor a
"Last Rose of Summer" dance on Thursday, August 21
beginning at 8:00 P.M. at the Kendalltown Clubhouse,
10333 S.W. 76th Street. Refreshments, dancing.
Quests, $5.00. Members, $3.00. For more information,
call 595-9243.
Jerome B. Homer, a well-
known marketing specialist,
has been named National
Chairman of Development of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. His appointment
was announced by Burton S.
Levinson, ADL 's National
Chairman, who declared that
Homer will head the volunteers
who coordinate all fundraising
activities in support of the
League's multi-faceted human
relations programs throughout
the United States, Europe and
the Middle East.
Martha Aft Assumes
Duties At Bet Breira
Religious School
Congregation Bet Breira an-
nounces the arrival of Martha Aft,
Educational Director, who has
assumed responsibility for the
religious school and general
educational programs. Aft is a
widely respected educator who
has been in the forefront of in-
novative Jewish educational pro-
grams in the Reform Movement
for the past 15 years. She has
published widely in her field and is
a member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the National Association of
Temple Educators. Prior to arriv-
ing in Miami, Aft was in Israel for
an NATE conference where she
was a key participant.
She will oversee the educational
programs which include the
religious school, Hebrew school,
teen-age programs, adult educa-
tion, and inter-faith study
seminars. While taking respon-
sibility for the administrative
tasks and the organizational needs
of programs, Aft will continue to
emphasize the qualitative
programs.
Aft earned her MA in Contem-
porary Jewish Studies from
Brandeis University. For the past
five years she served as Educator
at Temple Sinai in Sharon, Mass.
Miami Beach Civic
League Schedules
Debates
The Civic League of Miami
Beach has scheduled three
debates on major issues to be
decided by the city's electorate in
this fall's elections the proposed
repeal of the Falk Amendment, a
charter change to provide for
staggered, four-year terms for the
city's six commissioners, and a
projected, $3 million bond issue to
improve Ocean Drive.
They're being billed as the
debates of the decade, and they're
open to the public on Monday, at
the Embers-By-The-Ocean
restaurant, Miami Beach.
Dinner is scheduled at 6:30 p.m.
with the program starting at 7:30
according to outgoing Civic
League president Billie Kern.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:38 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Baach
534-7213- 534-7214
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi fgN
Moehe Buryn. Cantor J W)
Sergio Groblar. President ^"
Sholam Epelbaum. President
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue f
Miami Beach >
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Garden. Drive
North Miami Baach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian AJpem Conservative
/
S.I 8 .30 a.m 4 6:30 p.m.
Dally .ervlc.i 7:30 a.m. a 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5BS0 N. Kendall Dr.
S Miami 6I7-BM7
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Dr. William Silver
will apeak on
"The Do It YoureeM Jew."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854 3911
Jack Rlemar, Rabbi
Robert Albert,
Cantor
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Mlnchah Sat 7.40 p.m.
Frl. eve aervtCM 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. sendee.
Dally aervteee:
Sun. S a.m. 4 5:30 p.m.
Hon. Thura. 7:30 a.m. I 5:30 p.m
Tuea.. Wed.. 4 Frl 7:45 a.m. 4 5:30 p.m
Open Houee Sunday 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnetree Drive. Miami Beach
5324421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon ScMff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mijm/I Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 NE. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Cantor Emeritus:
Jacob G. Bomstein
Director ol Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
FflSpjn.
Downtown: WaaW Wen 0. Portmoler, "Are You
Li.ianing. Israel" Liturgy- Heney Keutmen,
Caniortai Sotoiei
Kendall: Rabbi HaakaM M. Bemat. "Ethsee and
Oeier I labiKln... Jaartah TredWon Confronta
-L2SOL
* Cynical Wortd.
Cantor Aa.
RachaaaF.Nilion.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Brvd
Coral QaMee M7-5B57
Michael B. Deans tat. Rabbi
Frtday aarviee p-m
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W 12 Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krl.ee!
Roae Berlin Executive Secretary
858-6334
Sat service 8:45 am
m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33191
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A Gorfinkel.
Rabbi Emeritus
Moahe Frledler, Cantor
Frl. 7:46 p.m. Dally 7:20 a.m. 4 5 p.m.
Sat. i:45 a.m. 4 6:30 p.m
Sun. 6:30 a.m. 4 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ava.. MB, FL 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mather
Cantor Niasim Benyamini
Dally aorvtcea 6a.m. and 7 p.m
Set. 8:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 f
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Frtday aervtoo 8 p.m
Saturday aarvloa KM a.m.
538 7231
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chese Ave. A 41 at St. ,...
DP. LEON KRONrSH. Founding Senior Rebbi
OART A. OLrCKSTEIM, T
HARRY JOLT, AuilUery Rabbi
PAUL 0 CAPLAN, Aaefalant Rabbi
CANTOR DAVIO CONVISCM
Frl. eve. service US p.m.
Sat morning service 10:46 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Beech Blvd
Or Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Asst Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L Brown. Exec Director
Dally Sentoea: Mon. Frl. 7:10 ..I
4 5:30 p.m
v.ev u.m.
Saturday 6:26 a.m. 4 7:30 p.m.
Sun. 6 a.m. 4 5:30 pm.
(D
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9778
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
Frl 7:30 p.m
Set. 30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St.. Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz A
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat 0 a.m. Sabbath aen-lce.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday 8 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. and 6 15 p m
649833
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyie Ave..
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Servlcea a.m. and 5:30 p.m. {x
Set. 8:48 a.m. '\W/I
Frl. lal. Hnk 8 p.m
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0896
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Mode onnodo.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. service al Temple Samu-FI.
9353 SW 152 Ave S. ol N. Kendall Dr
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kmgsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay, Administrator
Frl. evening service* 6 p.m.
Set. 10:30 a m
Sat.1
Sunday a.m.
Minyan 8:45 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr Conservative
2712311 ^j-.
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi P)
Benjamin Adler Cantor N-J>
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 a.m. Monday A Thursday.
Sunday 8 a.m.. Frl.. 6:15 p.m.
Sabbath serv will be conducted by temples
center*. "Mlnyaneires" Set. 8 a.m. Sabbath
Serv. Teltler Chapel