The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:03000

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dfewislla FloridHami
Volume 59 Number 31
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, August 1,1986
Price 50 Cents
Deny Report U.S. Seeks Lavi Info
The Lavi jet-fighter makes its debut at the
Israel Aircraft Industries complex near Ben-
Gurion Airport last week (July 21). Two-
thousand inrrited guests sat in stands in front
of the Lam hangar, while the gleaming white
aircraft was rolled out by a small yellow trac-
tor to music by the Israel Air Force Band.
Behind Jet's Debut
U.S. Hopes It Will Fade Away
*
By HUGH ORGEL
* TEL AVIV-- (JTA) A
prototype of the Lavi, Israel's
. second generation jet fighter
plane, was rolled out of a
hangar at Ben Gurion Airport
lest week to make its official
debut before 2,000 invited
guests, including a delegation
of U.S. Congressmen.
But the array of colored lights
that bathed the pencil-thin, white-
painted aircraft did not dispel the
shadows that hang over its future.
The Lavi project, which cost over
$1.2 billion for research, develop-
ment and construction, most of it
supplied by the U.S., has become
the object of bitter controversy
both in Washington and Israel.
The Pentagon believes the cost
of producing the plane is excessive
- a view shared by some senior
Israel Defense Force officers, and
there has been less than subtle
pressure by the Reagan Ad-
ministration of late for Israel to
abandon the project.
NEVERTHELESS, the unveil-
ing was a gala occasion. President
Chaim Herzog cut a blue-and-
white ribbon across the huge
hangar doors and a tractor slowly
pulled the plane on to the tarmac
to be admired by the throng of
dignitaries and other VI Ps invited
for the occasion.
But one of the Lavi's most im-
portant boosters was absent.
Premier Shimon Peres flew to
Morocco the same night (July 21)
for meetings with King Hassan.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
officiated instead. But there was
no mention by the television and
radio reporters covering the Lavi
that the Prime Minister was not at
hand.
Live coverage was reduced to a
few minutes because of the
Cabinet crisis in the wake of
Justice Minister Yitzhak Modai's
resignation earlier in the day.
Peres' trip to Morocco was
unannounced. Israelis who are us-
ed to surprises may have guessed
that something was afoot when
Peres attended what was billed as
a dress rehearsal in the morning.
It was a private unofficial roll-out
of the plane for the benefit of
Israel Aviation Industries (IAI)
workers who designed and built it.
THE PREMIER, in his
remarks, acknowledged that the
Lavi was a "big risk" in many
ways. But, he noted, "those who
want to take small risks will re-
main small. Those who want to
succeed in a big way must be dar-
ing in a big way. That is the
reason for the Lavi."
Rabin, in his official remarks,
said the Lavi has already passed a
major hurdle. He stressed,
however, that much more effort
and sacrifice would be required
before it went into production. He
thanked the American Congres-
sional delegation that attended
the Lavi roll-out. The American
contribution was crucial to the
success of the project, Rabin
declared.
One of the Congressmen, Rep.
Continued on Page 7-A
Defense Ministry Says
Request Would Be 'Cheek'
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Defense Ministry flatly
denied Wednesday (July 23) that any request has been
received from the U.S. for technical information about the
Lavi, Israel's second generation jet fighter plane.
The Ministry reacted to a report by Israel Radio's
Washington correspondent, Shimon Shiffer, that a senior
Pentagon official had expressed hope that Israel would
cooperate fully with the Reagan Administration to produce
an American-built substitute for the Lavi that would incor-
porate the sophisticated equipment designed by Israeli
engineers. Such a request would be "cheek," the Ministry
statement said.
ALTHOUGH the Lavi is largely financed by the U.S.,
and about half of its components are American-made, the
Continued on Page 6-A
Bush in Israel
Camera Crews Follow
Him Wherever He Goes
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice President George Bush
began his three-nation tour
of the Middle East Sunday
affirming the Reagan Ad-
ministration's commitment
to pursue an end to the
Arab-Israel conflict.
Referring to last week's
meeting between King Hassan of
Morocco and Premier Shimon
Peres, Bush said, "I can't think of
any better time to come here .
We in America will do all we can
to help bring true peace to the
Middle East."
Bush's comments were made in
a colorful welcoming ceremony at
the Rose Garden near the Knesset
and the government's office com-
plex in Jerusalem. Bush had flown
into Israel Sunday morning.
ISRAEL DEFENSE Force
soldiers fired a salute as Peres and
other Israeli leaders, both political
and spiritual, shook hands with
the visiting American guest while
dozens of cameras recorded the
event.
Records Back to '38
Waldheim's Application, Photo to SS
*
President Waldheim
NEW YORK Kurt
Waldheim is identified as a
member of Hitler's
"Brownshirt" storm-
troopers in a 1940 court
document published by a
neo-Nazi newspaper in West
Germany this year.
The document is the first show-
ing Waldheim's Nazi affiliations
that bears his photograph.
Waldheim's passport-size picture
Revealed by WJCongress
appears in the right-hand corner
of the document which bears his
name at the top.
The document Waldheim's
"personal questionnaire" from his
1940 application for a court posi-
tion was published on Apr. 4 of
this year in Munich by the neo-
Nazi National Zeitung newspaper.
WALDHEIM has repeatedly
denied membership in Nazi
organizations. He wrote WJC
President Edgar M. Bronfman on
March 7, "I was not a member of
the SA (stormtroopers) or any
organization of the Nazi regime."
Continued on Page 11-A
Vice President Bush
Israeli media reports have noted
that Bush's political action com-
mittee, the Fund for America's
Future, sent a film crew with
Bush to record the visit here for
possible use during his expected
Presidential campaign.
Bush then proceeded to visit
Yad Vashem, Israel's museum to
the victims and martyrs of the
Holocaust, and later to the
Western Wall, guided by Minister
for Religious Affairs, Yosef Burg.
Bush met briefly Sunday even-
ing with Peres and later in a
separate meeting with Vice
Continued on Page 3-A
Inside
Morocco: Frank Exchange
Cohen Charges 'Sell-Out'
2-A
6-A
King Hassan's Record 11-A
U.S. downplays Talks ... 11-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Two Surprises
Talks Were the First Surprise
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres' sur-
prise two-day visit to Moroc-
co which ended early last
Thursday morning (July 24)
apparently amounted to lit-
tle more than a frank ex-
change of views on the Mid-
dle East between the Israeli
leader and his host, King
Hassan II.
But there was another surpris-
ing development following the
meeting between the two leaders.
On Sunday, King Hassan an-
nounced that he has resigned as
chairman of the Arab summit con-
ference because of the meeting
with Peres.
Hassan said in a letter to Chedli
Klibi, secretary general of the
Arab League, that he hoped his
resignation would clear the way
for a meeting of Arab leaders
"with as little delay as possible."
DESPITE THE second sur-
prise, the two-day meeting bet-
ween Peres and Hassan is being
regarded by many observers as an
accomplishment, as was the joint
communique published
simultaneously in Jerusalem and
Rabat Thursday which made
clear, politely, that the two
leaders could reach no agreement.
But the possibility was held out
for further contacts in the future.
"I don't think anyone expected
that in one meeting we would
reach agreement on all subjects,"
Peres told reporters after his pre-
dawn arrival at Ben Gurion Air-
port Thursday. He added, "It cer-
tainly contributes to speeding up
the peace process."
The joint communique described
the meeting as "of a purely ex-
ploratory nature, aiming at no mo-
ment at engaging in negotia-
tions." It outlined in general
terms the positions of Hassan and
Peres.
THE MOROCCAN ruler urged
Middle East peace on the basis of
the resolutions adopted at the
Arab League summit conference
of September, 1982 at Fez, Moroc-
co, which called for Israel's total
withdrawal from the occupied
Arab territories, negotiations
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization and the creation of a
Palestinian state.
Peres informed the monarch
that those terms are unacceptable
to Israel. According to the com-
munique, "Peres clarified his
Rosenne
Recovering
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Meir Rosenne. Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States,
was expected to be released from
the hospital Tuesday after
undergoing single bypass heart
surgery last week. The 55-year-
old Ambassador is "feeling very
good," Israel Embassy
spokesman Yosef Gal said Mon-
day. According to Gal, Rosenne
underwent surgery at
Georgetown University Hospital
July 22.
Vice President George Bush,
who was this week in Israel,
visited Rosenne last Friday. He
reportedly brought with him
President Reagan's wishes to
Rosenne for a speedy recovery.
The Ambassador's surgery was
kept "a secret" in order not to
cause undue worry to his daughter
in Israel.
observations on the Fez plan, put-
ting forth propositions pertaining
to conditions he deems necessary
for the installation of peace." The
communique did not elaborate.
Moroccan officials said Hassan
is determined to go ahead with his
search for better Israeli-Arab
understanding. In a televised ad-
dress Wednesday night, Hassan
said Peres had refused to accept
what he termed the "path to
peace." He said he had explained
the meaning of the Fez statement,
and Peres replied that Israel could
not withdraw from the territories
and could not hold discussions
with the PLO.
PERES, who said he hadn't
heard Hassan's television ad-
dress, told reporters at the air-
port, "I wasn't surprised by the
position the King took. I just
remembered that when (Egyp-
tian) President Anwar Sadat
came to Jerusalem, in the Knesset
itself, he delivered practically the
same positions."
He said he responded to
Hassan's presentation of the Fez
plan by offering Israel's plan for a
Middle East settlement which is
basically direct talks without prior
conditions, where every party can
suggest its own plan of approach,
"and when direct talks take place
between the Arab side and our
side, I wouldn't be surprised that
the Arabs propose their position
which is different from our own."
He added, "It is because we
don't have an agreement that we
have 10 look for an agreement."
Peres noted further that "The
King was very careful to speak on
behalf of himself, so the positions
he has represented are the posi-
tions, as he describes it, of the 22
Arab countries. He says that the
Fez plan represents the widest
possible Arab consensus."
Peres acknowledged that "the
gap is still wide and demanding."
But he said he believed "The King
and myself found there is much
more than a common
denominator, if not for anything
else at least for the mere fact that
we could have met face-to-face
and tried to look where there are
opportunities and not only where
do the problems reside."
PERES STRESSED that "The
talks ended with two things an
agreement that there would be a
continuation, and secondly, with a
joint statement, despite the fact
that in the joint statement there
are separate points of view."
He observed that "One must
also remember that he (Hassan) is
formally the head of the Arab
League, and for this reason he
naturally did not speak only for
Morocco, but for what he assesses
to be a consensus of the Arab
states." In that connection Peres
said, "I want to express my ap-
preciation for his courage. I
believe that he is indeed a man
who is seriously, honestly and
deeply looking for peace."
Hassan, in his television ad-
dress, chastized other Arab states
for remaining "passive"
throughout the long Arab-Israeli
conflict. He called the Arab coun-
tries "lazy." The King had ob-
viously taken a risk in talking to
Peres. He was blasted by Syria
and Libya for "treason." Syria
broke off diplomatic relations with
Morocco last Tuesday (July 22).
EGYPTIAN REACTION to the
Peres-Hassan meeting was
strongly positive. President Hosni
Mubarak welcomed it as a "good
initiative" that must be supported
by all who favor peace in the
region. The Egyptian Charge
d'Affaires in Tel Aviv, Mohamm-
ed Bassiouny. speaking at a recep-
tion, said Egypt supported the
Peres-Hassan meeting. He
described it as a positive step
toward direct talks between Israel
and moderate Arab leaders and a
movement toward peace in the
Middle East.
Peres said he considered his trip
to Morocco "an historic visit" in
the context of the Middle East
peace process because it is in no
way comparable to other visits in
Israel or by Israelis in other
places, and also not comparable to
the contacts that were held
previously with King Hassan.
"We know that former Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin was there
(in Morocco), the late Moshe
Dayan was there, but the fact that
he (Hassan) gave it public status
this is essentially another call to
the Arab world" as if to say,
" 'Sirs, the time has come to meet
and talk in daylight, to speak
about the topic which interests us
all, and endangers us all.' '
NEVERTHELESS. Peres
would not call his talks a
breakthrough. He said he prefer-
red to think that another step and
status was added to the peace pro-
cess. "It certainly contributed to
speeding up the peace process,''
he said, referring in that context
to Israel's relationship with Egypt
which he hoped would be improv-
ed once the Taba border dispute is
on the way to resolution.
Peres said that King Hussein of
Jordan had not been in the pic-
ture. "King Hassan told me that
he wanted this meeting to be a
Moroccan initiative not a Rus-
sian, American or European one,
or that of any other Arab state.
This was his initiative. He did not
want it described as a response to,
or being carried out under an in-
itiative by another country, and
for this reason King Hassan and
myself did not inform any other
nation in the Middle East about
the existence of the meeting."
Peres said the establishment of
diplomatic relations between
Israel and Morocco was not
discussed. "We had enough other
topics to discuss," he said.
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Minister of Labor and Social Welfare Moshe Katsav con-
gratulates Laura Sokol of New York, a representative of
Hadassah's Year Study Course, which was recently honored by
the government for outstanding volunteer work in Israel.
Jerusalem Book Fair Next Apr. 6

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center from April 6 to 12, 1987.
Mayor Teddy Kollek has announc-
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been constantly growing, and the
number and variety of par-
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the nearly 1,000 publishers from
40 nations who attended
Jerusalem's most recent biennial
book fair in 1985.
Since the first Jerusalem Book
fair 23 years ago, the Book Fair
has evolved two special themes:
international publishing and the
involvement of the younger
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Bush in Israel
Cameras Follow Him Everywhere
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Continued from Page 1-A
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, who will
in October take over the Premier-
ship from Peres under terms of
the power-sharing agreement
reached at the outset of the for-
mation of the unity government.
OFFICIALS HERE said the
meetings with Peres and Shamir
were courtesy calls and that full
working sessions were scheduled
for Wednesday. Bush is to visit
Egypt and Jordan, but not Moroc-
co during his Mideast tour. No in-
vitation to Bush from Morocco
was forthcoming.
Israeli sources said Sunday
night that the negotiations over
Taba with Egypt had suddenly
undergone a dramatic accelera-
tion, and they held out the pro-
spect of a ceremony marking an
agreement on the compromise or
arbitration document during
Bush's visit to the region. There
was also the possibility raised of a
summit meeting between Peres
and Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak.
Peres is understood to have sent
a message to Mubarak last
weekend concerning his trip to
Morocco, and he was expected to
meet with Egyptian journalists
and Presidential confidant Anis
Mansour Monday to receive a
message from the Egyptian
leader.
After the meeting with Peres,
at the Premier's residence, Bush
and Peres, accompanied by their
wives, rode together to the
Knesset where Peres and Knesset
speaker Shlomo Hillel and his wife
gave a dinner in honor of Bush.
AT THE arrival ceremony in
Jerusalem, Bush noted the
especially felicitious timing of his
visit just after Peres' visit to
Morocco. Peres, welcoming Bush,
said, in part:
"The people of Israel welcome
you with open arms, deep feelings
and sincere friendship. We
welcome you as an outstanding
leader of your nation. We
welcome you as a representative
of a nation whose friendship we
cherish and for whom our friend-
ship is unqualified.
"We welcome you as the senior
emissary of the Reagan Ad-
ministration, that has gone a long
way in enabling us to defend
ourselves and in lending a firm,
supportive hand to the search for
peace recognizing that the two
efforts complement each other.
"We welcome you, Mr. Vice
President, as a true friend a
friend of our people who has
played a critical role in bringing
home sons from afar, in the strug-
gle against international ter-
rorism, in strengthening
U.S.-Israel relations, and in the
search for peace. Thus, your com-
ing is very timely."
BUSH, in response, said: ". .
there is so much that underpins
the friendship between Israel and
the United States: we are both
committed to democracy. We are
both committed to advancing the
rights of all mankind, we are both
peace-loving people. And we both
find our ethics in the common
body of teaching derived from the
scriptures. And, so, because of
these many intangible, and in a
sense spiritual, ties, a multitude of
wordly bonds have developed bet-
ween us.
"Particularly in the last five
years there has been a blossoming
of the relationship between our
countries. In commerce, we've
recently signed a free trade agree-
ment. In defense, we have for
three years engaged in strategic
cooperation and will be joining
together in strategic defense
research. And our countries and
our peoples have cooperated in
education, in medicine and in
almost every area of human
endeavor.. .
"And we want to see Israel's
neighbors accept Israel's right to
exist, and make peace with Israel.
And just this last week, in your
mission to Morocco, you have
shown again your dedication to
peace. And that mission captured
the imagination of everybody in
my country. I can't think of any
better time to have come here to
say once again that we in America
will do all we can to help bring the
peace to the Middle East."
Itinerary
Veep Does Typical Tourist Things
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice President George Bush
spent the second day of his
visit to Israel Monday tour-
ing the Old City of
Jerusalem in the company
of Mayor Teddy Kollek, and
later had lunch with a recent
Jewish emigrant from the
Soviet Union.
Bush, who arrived on the first
part of a three-nation, 10-day tour
of the Middle East, visited the im-
migrant center at Mevasseret
Zion near Jerusalem. He was also
scheduled to meet with former
Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Cons-
cience Natan Sharansky.
ON MEETING with olim from
such countries as the Soviet
Miami's Jay Kislak Among
Prominent Jews With Bush
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Eight prominent
American Jews including
Jay Kislak of Miami, accom-
panied Vice President
George Bush to Israel, the
Vice President's office here
confirmed Monday. All were
people Bush consulted in
planning his trip to the
Jewish State, according to
Gayle Fisher, an assistant
press secretary to the Vice
President.
She said that all eight paid their
own way for a one-way trip to
Israel. They will not accompany
Bush to Jordan and Egypt but will
return to the United States on
their own.
The eight are all members of the
National Jewish Coalition and in-
cluded Gordon Zacks, national
cochairperson of the Coalition,
and Jacob Stein, President
Reagan's first liaison to the
Jewish community. However,
they were not accompanying Bush
as Coalition members but as in-
dependent advisers.
OBSERVERS HERE believe
that Bush is using his visit to
Israel to help him in his forthcom-
ing campaign for the Republican
nomination for the Presidency.
Although he has frequently
represented the Reagan Ad-
ministration before national
Jewish organizations, Bush does
not have such close ties to the
Jewish community as do two of his
potential rivals. Rep. Jack Kemp
(R., N.Y.) and Senate Majority
leader Robert Dole (R., Kan si,
who are known for their strong
support of Israel.
The Bush party was accom-
panied by a television crew from a
political action committee set up
to raise funds for Bush. It will not
be surprising to see pictures of
Bush at the Western Wall and
Yad Vashem appear during
primaries in states with large
Jewish populations.
ZACKS, of Columbus, Ohio, is
considered one of the persons
closest to Bush in the Jewish com-
munity and has frequently in-
troduced the Vice President to
Jewish audiences. The other Jews
who accompanied Bush are believ-
ed to be supporting him, accor-
ding to sources.
In addition to Zacks and Stein,
Fisher identified those accompa-
nying Bush as: Ivan Novick, Pitt-
sburgh, former president of the
Zionist Organization of America;
Paul Borman, of Detroit; Joseph
Gildenhorn, of Washington, D.C.;
Barbara Gold, of Chicago; Richard
Goldman, of San Francisco; and
Kislak.
Union, Rumania and the U.S. dur-
ing their Hebrew studies at the
Center's Ulpan Hebrew class for
adult immigrants, Bush com-
mented, "It is very moving for me
to meet people who are free to
come to the land of their choice, to
the land that means so much to
them."
Ulpan director Shmuel Segal
told Israel Radio that Rumanian
immigrants in particular found it
difficult to understand the Vice
President's visit, saying that in
their home country such
dignitaries are never seen by the
ordinary public.
Bush then had lunch at the
Ulpan Center with Marc and
Natasha Drajinsky, who came to
Israel from the Soviet Union a
year ago. Center residents urged
Bush to increase pressure on
Moscow to open the gates and
allow increased Jewish
emigration.
EARLIER, Bush became the
most senior United States
political personality to visit the
Old City. Surrounded by scores of
security personnel, Bush visited
the restored Citadel at King
David's Tower, the Church of the
Holy Sepulchre, the Cardo, the
renovated Jewish Quarter of the
City and the Mosques on the Tem-
ple Mount.
Kollek presented his American
guest with an antique map of
Jerusalem, and to Barbara Bush,
the Vice President's wife, he gave
a pendant in the shape of a "Ham
sa" (hand) charm. According to
Kollek, the purpose of the tour
was "to show that Jerusalem is
one city and not a divided city."
It was only a few years ago that
visiting American political figures
agreed to tour across the pre-196 7
borders in the company of an
Israeli official. Secretary of State
George Shultz made a similar
tour.
Bush was warmly welcomed to
Israel in a Rose Garden ceremony
in Jerusalem attended by Israeli
dignitaries, and religious and
political officials, including
Premier Shimon Peres.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
For Moment: Agreeing To Disagree
If nothing else, Prime Minister Shimon
Peres' surprise trip to Morocco last week for
talks with King Hassan II demonstrates that
an Israeli and an Arab leader who still con-
siders that he is technically at war with
Israel can nevertheless sit down face-to-face
and consider possibilities for Middle Eastern
peace.
That is exactly what happened. Peres said
that Israel would be happy to talk to Arab
leaders anywhere, any time but without
preconditions. Hassan said that some sort of
peace process could begin, but only if Israel
returned to its pre-1967 borders and
acknowledged the right of the Palestinian
people to a new and independent homeland.
On this unresolved note, they parted. In ef-
fect the two agreed to continue to disagree.
But this is no cause for discouragement. It
is apparent that neither one expected
anything substantive to emerge from their
astonishing meeting anyway except,
perhaps, that the meeting took place. In this
alone, there is hope that it may happen
again. More astonishing things have occur-
red in that area of the world before, among
others, the meeting of Egypt's late Presi-
dent Sadat and Prime Minister Menachem
Begin in Jerusalem in 1977.
Syria's Lead Snubbed
That meeting, incidentally, was at a time
when Arab leaders were flush with the sort
of power that can only come from the
billions in oil revenue to which they then
seemed natural heir. The events of 1986,
with these oil revenues plummeting and ob-
vious tensions dividing the Arab nations and
their governments, are a far cry from that
austere period when Sadat and Begin began
the meetings that culminated two years
later in the Camp David Accord.
In these terms, it is therefore not surpris-
ing that Prime Minister Peres returned to
Jerusalem in the upbeat belief that the first
of his talks with King Hassan was hardly his
last. Even in light of Syria's break of
diplomatic relations with Morocco over the
invitation to Peres, there is some cause for
optimism.
Hassan, president of the 21-nation Arab
League, wUl not apparently suffer the fate
of President Sadat who was instantly
isolated by the League when he flew to
Jerusalem. Other members of the League
did not follow Syria's lead this time. Nor did
they identify with President Assad's
bellicose or threatening talks to discourage
more moderate reaction in the Arab world.
A Courageous Beginning
It is true that King Hassan has since
resigned as chairman of the Arab summit
conference in order to appease some of the
more radical members who threatened to
prevent a new summit because of Hassan's
overture to Prime Minister Peres. But this
was a small blast compared to the mighty
explosion that would have erupted in the
Arab heyday of the '70's.
Whether all this is further evidence of to-
day s Arab "weakness" is beside the point
In the end, it only strengthens the hope for
peace talk possibilities, since it is likely that
King Hassan will continue the quest for
peace he has now so courageously begun
chairman of latter-day Arab summitry or
not.
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The Tarmulke Case'
New York State Human Rights Commis-
sioner Douglas White has sent a letter to the
two New York senators and the 33 members
of the House of Representatives. In his let-
ter, he urges them to take the lead in seek-
ing legislation to prevent the military from
the kind of action that forced Rabbi Simcha
Goldman to remove his skullcap during the
performance of his duties as a clinical
psychologist at Pease Air Force Base in
California.
The action against Rabbi Goldman, com-
monly called the "yarmulke case," was rein-
forced last March 25 when the United States
Supreme Court ruled that the Air Force
acted within its authority in imposing their
right to enforce dress codes.
In his letter to the congressmen, Commis-
sioner White argues that legislation is need-
ed to restore "the First Amendment right of
free exercise of religion to members of the
Armed Forces." White further says that the
yarmulke ban may "seriously undermine"
the provisions of the New York human
rights law and "open the door to religious
discrimination in any job where a uniform is
required."
Offering to testify in support of such
legislation at Congressional hearings, White
said flat out that "we cannot permit such
erosion of a basic human rights, especially
where the religious observance cannot
possibly interfere with the performance of
one's duties."
We agree with Commissioner White. His
suggestion that "we can envision uniformed
services from police departments to private
security guards imposing similar rules on
their employees on the strength of the
(Supreme Court) decision" raises the
possibility of future difficulty in recruitment
not only in these fields but in the Armed
Forces themselves.
But more strictly to the point, the var-
mulke ban and the court's affirmation of the
ban pose a threat to the religious rights of
minorities who would like to serve.
For Jack Kemp
Really Means What He Says Abmt Israel
Friday. August 1, 1986
Volume 59
25 TAMUZ 5746
Number 31
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
WASHINGTON The
very same evening Israeli
Prime Minister Peres was
winging his way to Morocco,
another event of potentially
great significance to Israel's
future took place. On July
21 at Ben Gurion airport,
Israel unveiled its brand
new Israeli designed ultra-
modern attack aircraft, the
Lavi.
The significance of a relatively
tiny nation being able to produce a
state of the art fighter lies not on-
ly in maintaining the balance of
power in the Middle East into the
21st Century, but in establishing
the foundation for Israel becom-
ing a high-technology power.
The boost to Israel's scientific
and engineering base should have
far reaching consequences for its
future economic well-being.
IT WAS particularly ap-
propriate that the sole American
speaker at the "roll-out"
ceremony was Rep. Jack Kemp of
New York. Kemp, a presidential
hopeful, was the original
Republican sponsor of the legisla-
tion which permitted Israel to use
some of its Foreign Military Sales
funds from the United States for
development of the Lavi.
Unlike some recent high-level
visitors to Israel who feel con-
strained to display even-
handedness in discussing aspects
of the Arab-Israel conflict, Kemp
was and has always been
unabashedly pro-Israel.
Given his long record of
outspoken support, no one could
accuse Kemp of pandering to his
audience, when he declared that
"Israel's security depends on
Israel's superiority."
AT A TIME when there has
been increasing criticism of the
Lavi program from the Pentagon,
supporters of the Lavi were
gratified to hear Kemp not only
Rep. Jack Kemp
praise the Lavi for its technical
performance, but make clear that
any decision whether to go ahead
with full-scale production should
be strictly an Israeli one.
Kemp, a former star profes-
sional quarterback who was
elected to Congress in 1970, is
now ranking Republican on the
vital Foreign Operations Ap-
propriations Committee which
sets the terms and levels of U.S.
assistance to Israel.
He made the point that this aid
to Israel is "not extending chari-
ty," but that "we are investing
our faith and precious resources in
a key ally; we are contributing to a
vital defense outpost for the
West, just as surely as our own
defense budget is vital to our
freedom."
The substance of Kemp's
remarks, and the fact that they
would have been exactly the same
to a non-Israeli or non-Jewish au-
dience, certainly mark him as one
of Israel's staunchest supporters
in the Congress and on the na-
tional political scene.
ALSO LENDING weight to
this occasion were five other key
members of Congress whose sup-
port had been instrumental in the
development of the Lavi: Mel
Levine of California, Charles
Unlike some recent
high-level visitors to
Israel who feel
constrained to
display even-
handedness in
discussing aspects of
the Arab-Israel
conflict. Kemp was
and has always been
unabashedly pro-
Israel.
Wilson of Texas, Bob Torricelli of
New Jersey, Gary Ackerman of
New York, and Larry Smith of
Florida.
It is unfortunate that Israel's
major technological achievement
had to be the creation of such a
lethal weapon of war. But this is a
role which Israel's Arab foes and
the Soviet Union which arms them
have forced upon her. European
reluctance to sell arms to Israel,
the occasional U.S. suspension of
arms shipments, and denial of the
latest technology have made
Israel look more to its own
resources.
However, future peace in the
Middle East will ultimately de-
pend not on new weapons but on a
change in the fundamental Arab
hostility toward Israel. The Peres
visit to Morocco coinciding with
the Lavi roll-out made Kemp's
concluding remarks even more
meaningful as he expressed his
"deepest wish that this magnifi-
cent aircraft will never have to be
used in combat." To that, we can
all say amen.


Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
f
,
Stokely's Back Pushing Best Zionist Is 'Dead Zionist''
.*
i*

By DAVID EVANIER
During the campus unrest
of the 1960s, Stokely Car-
michael was a national
figure as a leader of the Stu-
dent Non-Violent Coor-
dinating Committee
(SNCC). He was a hero to
many in the early days of
the civil rights movement.
But then he began to attract
widespread attention with
his violent and extreme
statements.
Today, Carmichael is a black
revolutionary who has taken the
name of Kwame Toure. He is once
again appearing on American
campuses his message one of
anti-Zionism and racism.
FOR INSTANCE, speaking at
Columbia University in New York
last March, Toure told his au-
dience of 200 students:
"The best Zionist is a dead
Zionist. There is no such thing as
the Jewish people. Zionism must
be struggled against without mer-
cy and without pity Zionists
ain't gonna get Israel. Palesti-
nians are gonna get Israel."
Toure travels to the United
States once a year from Guinea,
West Africa, where he now lives,
to do organizing work for his
Washington-based All-African
People's Revolutionary Party. His
periodic forays onto the nation's
college campuses have led to ex-
pressions of anti-Semitism against
Jewish students and tension bet-
ween blacks and Jews.
Uproars have occurred at some
of the numerous campus ap-
pearances Toure has made during
the past year, including speeches
at the University of Maryland and
the State University of New York
at Binghamton.
FOLLOWING HIS Maryland
speech, Jewish students were
threatened and their dormitories
and student organization offices
defaced with swastikas.
After Toure was applauded at
Columbia University, a Jewish
student told the Spectator, the
university newspaper: "It sort of
hits you in the stomach when so-
meone ... in your class applauds
your own destruction."
While speaking at the Black
Student Union at the University
of Maryland, Toure said, "If your
people are exploited, and you
don't help, we have every right to
kill you."
Jewish students who asked
questions were jeered, threatened
if they refused to leave the room
and harassed after the meeting.
David Evanier is a member
of the Research and Evaluation
Department of the Anti-
Defamation League's Civil
Rights Division.
Threatening phone calls even
warned of death.
THE WASHINGTON Jewish
Week reported that the Jewish
student community at the Univer-
sity of Maryland "was in turmoil
. following a string of anti-
Semitic incidents" after Toure's
appearance. The article noted
that, "Verbal assaults, physical
harassment and swastika graffiti
have marred this usually peaceful
campus ..." The article reported
that someone wrote "Hitler-God"
below the mailbox of the Mitzpeh,
the campus Jewish monthly
publication.
Toure told 600 students in
Binghamton last November that
"Zionists sent others to their
death in Germany to justify taking
land from the Palestinians." He
also announced his "100 percent"
support of Louis Farrakhan, the
anti-Semitic Black Muslim leader.
While a leader of the Student
Non-Violent Coordinating Com-
mittee in the 1960s, Carmichael.
became increasingly critical of the
group's alliance with white peo-
ple. He helped popularize the con-
cept of "Black Power" and subse-
quently became Prime Minister of
the Black Panthers.
HIS RAPID descent into anti-
Semitism and racism began at
that time. According to the Anti-
Defamation League's 1974 book,
"The New Anti-Semitism," as
chairman of SNCC in 1966, Car-
michael called for racist guerrilla
warfare by blacks in the United
States. SNCC began to attack
Israel and Zionism on a regular
basis. In September, 1967, Car-
michael visited several Arab coun-
tries in an apparent show of
solidarity with the Arabs against
Israel.
After a three-day visit to Syria,
he declared, "Our support to
Arabs and their legitimate rights
in Palestine is complete and
absolute."
He left the United States in
1969 to live in Guinea where he
became a naturalized citizen and
espoused a policy called Pan-
Africanism. He called on blacks as
"one cohesive force, to wage an
unrelenting armed struggle
against the white Western empire
for the liberation of our people."
He served as personal secretary
to Kwame Nkrumah, a former
president of Ghana, for two years,
and then studied under President
Sekou Toure of Guinea until Presi-
New name and big mouth
explode on U.S. campuses.
dent Toure's death in 1984. It was
in the early 1980s that Carmichael
adopted the name Kwame Toure,
honoring his two mentors.
Last year, Toure appeared at
Madison Square Garden in New
York as the opening speaker in-
troducing Louis Farrakhan. Julius
Lester reported in the New
Republic that Toure said, "Our
people don't need talk, they need
guns!" Lester wrote that "the
most thunderous standing ova-
tions were reserved for Toure's
attacks on Israel, Zionism and
Judaism." Toure has also attend-
ed the Palestine Liberation
Organization's Palestine National
Council meetings in Damascus in
recent years.
THE ALL-AFRICAN People's
Revolutionary Party he leads is
the most outspokenly anti-Semitic
radical group on the left now func-
tioning in the United States. It
has distributed a brochure entitled
"Israel Commits Mass Murder of
Palestinian And African Peoples:
Zionism Is Racism ... It Must Be
Destroyed." Another pamphlet is
called "Smash Zionism."
Other AAPRP leaflets accuse
the international Zionist move-
ment of controlling all banks and
businesses in black America and
accuse Jewish butchers and mer-
chants of selling bad meat and
"dry rotted clothes" to blacks.
They also charged that "Jewish
capital" financed slavery. One
leaflet calls Zionism "a well-
organized and financed, interna-
tional conspiracy which controls
the economic and political life of
the United States and Europe, us-
ing this stranglehold to steal and
colonize the land of the Palesti-
nian people."
The AAPRP describes itself as a
small party, based in Africa, a
"permanent, mass, independent,
socialist, revolutionary, Pan-
African political party" that
fights for the "destruction of
capitalism, imperialism .
Continued on Page 12-A
Orthodox Tradition Yields Rich
Array of Decorative Head Coverings
By LEAH ABRAMOWITZ
What you wear on your
head, and even when, is a
better sociological gauge in
Israel than your political in-
clination or philosophical
viewpoint. For those who
know, the size or color of a
skullcap (kipah) or the turn
of a hat band can indicate
which rabbi you follow or
the degree of your
observance.
In Orthodox circles, all males
and married women cover their
heads at all times. In some Orien-
tal communities, even unmarried
girls over eight or nine cover their
heads with kerchiefs. The excep-
tion in recent generations were
the Jews of Germany and
members of some North African
communities who, although strict-
ly observant, were wont to walk
about bareheaded, putting on a
yarmulke or hat only to pray or
say a blessing.
NO STATED reason for the
necessity of men to cover their
heads is given in the Torah, but
the traditional explanation, glean-
ed from the Talmud (Tractate
A Baedeker's guide to the major
styles displayed by members of
different communities, sects and
schools of thought in Israel today
takes us through exotic and tradi-
tional origins, some stemming
from the stetU of 18th Century
Poland, some influenced by the
Middle East or New World fads.
The tour is both highly interesting
and a faithful social indicator.
ACCORDING TO a Jerusalem
SS::; ::S

Exotic origins traced to shtetls' of 18th
Century Poland.
_
A variety of wigs, kippot and hats worn at a recent religious wedding in Jerusalem.
Shabbat), is that a headcovering
perceptualizes for the individual a
Godly presence overhead at all
times. That is why B'nei Brak
mothers will fasten a miniature
kipah on a tot of 18 months to in-
still in him Yirat Shamayim (the
Awe of Heaven) from his earliest
days. Regardless of the historic
development, it is now accepted
that a Jewish male does not walk
four paces without something a
hat, a skullcap or even a knotted
handkerchief on his head.
For a woman, uncovered hair is
considered ervah (lack of modes-
ty), and the requirement to shield
any show of hair from male eyes,
other than her husband's, stems
from the laws of a sotah, an un-
faithful wife, in the book of
Bamidbar (Numbers). One Beit
Yaakov teacher explained the
underlying principle to her high
school class this way: "A girl's
hair is her pride and crowning
glory. Just look how much time we
all spend primping and fixing our
hair in front of a mirror every
time we go out. By reserving our
most cherished external feature
for the man we marry, exclusive-
ly, we show our dedication and
devotion to the only one we now
have to please."
journalist who has made a study of
the subject, "A rule of thumb for
the uninitiated may be that the
less that is covered the more
modern the wearer's perspective
and the less strict his observance
. Black, in hat or scarf, is also a
sign of strictness." And indeed
the Haredi (ultra-Orthodox)
population of Mea Shearim, B'nei
Brak and elsewhere will favor
black head coverings.
On Weekdays, the men of most
Ashkenazi congregations,
whether Hassidim or Mitnagdim,
wear black felt hats. Jews
originating from Lithuania and
the Lubavitcher Hassidim favor
the usual-sized fedora, while other
Hassidim will wear wide-brimmed
hats, either with high, rounded
crowns, as the European style, or
low wide-brimmed velvet hats.
Vishnitz Hassidim are the only
Hassidim whose hatband ties on
the right side. In their vicinity in
Eastern Europe, I was informed,
the priests used to sport hats with
bands that tied on the left.
Of course at home or at work,
Hassidim will remove their black
hats for mroe comfortable
skullcaps of black or knitted white
Continued on Page 8-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
MK Cohen Charges
Peres 'Selling Out' to Hassan
A n D A :K JCAYJJ08PICE
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres was
in Morocco for talks with
King Hassan II last week in
what many observers see as
the first major Middle East
peace initiative since Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat of Egypt
went to Jerusalem nine
years ago. Peres' trip was
unannounced, but reaction
in Israel was broadly
positive.
Peres arrived in Morocco Mon-
day night (July 21) in an Israel Air
Force executive jet. He was ex-
pected to remain there 48 hours as
Hassan's guest at the King's sum-
mer residence at Ifrana, about 160
miles southeast of the capital,
Rabat.
Political experts and diplomats
here, and abroad believe the talks
concentrated on ways and means
to break the deadlocked Middle
East situation. Some diplomats in
Rabat were said to believe Hassan
may try to arrange an official
summit meeting between Peres
and King Hussein of Jordan.
IT WAS recalled that Hassan
acted as an intermediary in help-
ing arrange Sadat's visit to
Jerusalem in November, 1977.
Details were worked out by the
late Moshe Dayan who was
Foreign Minister at the time, and
several of Sadat's senior aides
who met with him secretly in
Morocco.
Peres and Hassan held their
first round of talks shortly after
the Israeli leader's arrival, accor-
ding to reports from Paris Tues-
day (July 22). Peres was accom-
panied by Rafi Edri, chairman of
the Labor Party's Knesset fac-
tion, his media aide, L'ri Savir,
and broadcast crews from Israel
television and radio. Edri, who is
Moroccan-bom, visited the coun-
try recently and met with Hassan,
possibly in connection with Peres'
visit.
In an immediate reaction to
Peres' visit, Syria broke
diplomatic relations with Morocco
Tuesday (July 22) and Damascus
radio accused Hassan of "a long
history of treason against the
Arabs."
PRESIDENT Hosni Mubarak
of Egypt welcomed the meeting
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Have your roof repaired now.
you will save on a new roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
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as "a good initiative" that must be
supported by all who favor peace
in the region. He told reporters in
Cairo, "I appreciate the
meeting," but he refused to
speculate as to whether it might
bring Hussein into the peace pro-
cess. The visit made front-page
headlines in the Egyptian press.
Jordan's state-controlled media
did not mention the visit until late
last Tuesday morning, long after
it was headlined all over the
world. It stressed that Jordan had
no advance knowledge.
Most Israelis wished Peres
"Godspeed" on his mission. There
was less favorable reaction on the
left of the political spectrum and
bitter criticism on the far right.
MK Geula Cohen of the Tehiya
Party declared, "Shimon Peres
must be stopped before it is too
late. Morocco is where they sold
out all of Sinai What are they
going to sell out now?
Likud circles greeted the sur-
prise trip with some cynical com-
ment and reservations. "I hope
this is not a stunt designed to
torpedo the rotation," Likud
Knesset faction Chairman Sara
Doron said, referring to the rota-
tion of power agreement by which
Likud leader Yitzhak Shamir will
take over the office of Prime
Minister from Peres next October.
ANOTHER LIKUD Liberal
MK, Pinhas Goldstein, also ex-
pressed hope that "this is not a
public relations gimmick." Labor
MK Ora Namir termed the visit "a
vitally important development."
And Binyamin Ben-Eliezer of the
Labor-allied Yahad Party sug-
gested that there "must be more
to it than just the visit itself and
meeting with Hassan." He
speculated that Peres might meet
with other Arab leaders in Moroc-
co as well.
But Cabinet Secretary Yossi
Beilin, one of Peres' closest
associates, cautioned against ex-
pectations of immediate substan-
tive results. He said in a radio in-
terview that the meeting was not
intended "for negotiations" but
for a thorough exchange of views.
Nevertheless, Beilin noted that
the very fact it was taking place
publicly was "unprecedented .
completely different from secret
meetings ..." He spoke hopefully
of the possible evolution of a bloc
of moderate Arab states, in-
cluding Egypt, Morocco, Saudi
Arabia and Jordan, which was
moving toward the "legitimiza-
tion" of Israel's presence in the
Middle East.
EGYPT ALONE among the
Arab states has a peace treaty
with Israel, dating back to 1979.
But relations between Cairo and
Jerusalem have been strained
since Israel's invasion of Lebanon
in 1982. Minister-Without-
Portfolio Ezer Weizman of the
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Yahad Party suggested that
Peres' meeting with Hassan could
help improve the Israeli-Egyptian
relationship.
Weizman also observed that
Hassan would not have invited the
Israeli Premier for a public
meeting "unless he had some
ideas to put forward .
Something to contribute about the
Middle East peace process."
There were complaints from
Meir Wilner, veteran leader of the
Hadash Communist Part}-, that
Peres' move "deliberately avoided
the main issue" which according
to Wilner was the need to talk to
the Palestinians through their
legitimate representative.
YOSSI SARID of the Citizens
Rights Movement (CRM) also
stressed the need to address the
Palestinian problem rather than
peripheral issues. But his CRM
colleague, Mordechai Baram, said
the party welcomed every contact
with Arab leaders and wished
Peres well.
Eliezer Granot of Mapam said
he hoped the visit would advance
peace prospects but noted that
past experience with Morocco had
produced very mixed results.
Mordechai Wirshubsky of the left-
of-center Shinui Party called
Peres' trip a valuable develop-
ment even if it did not result in im-
mediate progress for the peace
process.
7na and Jack Kay of Washington, D.C. join National President
Ruth W. Popkin (right) for the dedication of the Ina and Jack Kay
Hospice for the terminally ill on the Mount Scopus campus of the
Hadassah University Hospital. Ceremonies took place recently.
Defense Ministry Denies U.S.
Wants Lavi Jet's Details
Continued from Page 1 -A
Pentagon has recently urged Israel to abandon the project
on grounds of excessive costs. A prototype of the Lavi was
officially unveiled at Ben Gurin Airport last week. Another
trototype is scheduled for its first test flight late in
eptember.
Defense Ministry officials told Israel Radio that no re-
quests for information on any Israeli innovations have been
received from Washington. Sources at Israel Aircraft In-
dustries, manufacturer of the Lavi, disclosed meanwhile
that they have tightened security around the plane, its con-
struction facilities and its design team to prevent industrial
espionage.
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Three U.S. Marines
Booted for Neo-Nazi Activity
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
NEW YORK Three
United States Marines at
Camp Leieune have been
discharged for participating
l*ln paramilitary exercises
jand rallies in North Carolina
Staged by a violence-prone,
neo-Nazi group, it was
disclosed here by the Anti-
Dafamation League of B'nai
It'tith.
Hie action followed a letter of
tr qfriry to U.S. Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger by ADL na-
| onal director, Nathan
perlmutter.
I THE LEAGUE said it had been
Informed by the Defense
cretary that the three have
en dismissed from the Corps
allowing initial reports that they
rere "involved in activities of the
lute Patriot Party," formerly
mown as the Confederate
fits of the Ku Klux Klan.
An investigation into "allega-
tions of misconduct" is still conti-
nuing, Weinberger told the
League. The Defense Department
is seeking to determine whether
other Marines were involved in
White Patriot activities in North
Carolina and if they had any con-
nection with the Party's
paramilitary activities.
Perlmutter, himself a former
Marine, commended the Defense
Department for "its swift and
decisive action to prevent the
Marine Corps' mission to defend
the freedom of all Americans from
being tarnished."
IN HIS LETTER to the
League, Weinberger declared
that the Defense Department
"deplores the violence and bigotry
of the Ku Klux Klan and organiza-
tions like it."
He added: "The Department of
Defense is committed to the
equality of treatment to all per-
sonnel, regardless of race, sex, na-
tional origin or religion. In our
view, prejudice and intolerance
are incompatible with accomplish-
Newsman Blitzer Dropped
From Journalists in Bush Party
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"he Jerusalem Post's
Washington correspondent,
./olf Blitzer, was dropped
It the last moment from
.S. Vice President George
Jush's party visiting the
diddle East this week,
although Blitzer is an
American citizen and an ac-
credited White House
Jtorrespondent.
Bush arrived in Jerusalem Sun-
ay \t the start of a four-day visit
) IsmeJ after which he will be go-
ng on to Jordan, Egypt and
ossibly toiirocco.
Blitzer, wl*> also writes for
everal other newspapers, was
aid that he couk* not accompany
tie Vice President ws he would not
welcome in Jordai.
THE REPORTER, who had
iginally been invited b^ .Rush to
in his entourage, had received a
isa to Jordan personally signed
ty the Jordanian Ambassador to
Washington, who had given
Blitzer his "strong assurances" of
welcome in Amman.
feOnly a few hours before the trip,
litzer was informed by Stephen
art. Assistant Press Secretary
t) the Vice President, that Hart
ad been told during his
reparatory trip to Amman that
litzer would not be welcome
Because he would be writing about
ie trip for an Israeli paper, the
Jerusalem Post.
I Blitzer, however, says that he
id personally clarified this point
ith the Jordanian Ambassador
the U.S., Mohammed Kamal.
10 himself had cleared the pro-
em with Jordan's Foreign
inister Taher El Masri.
Will Lavi
Fa H p Away?
Continued from Page 1-A
Jack Kemp (R., N.Y.), told the
fathering that the aircraft could
sve both lie Star of David and
tars and Stripes for its insignia.
But he stressed that the decision
to go ahead with production is
olely an Israeli one. The new
ghter aircraft is the most expen-
sive item on Israel's tightened
^efense budget. Originally pro-
jected to cost $4 billion, some
critics say it will cost as much as
$6 billion. Pentagon experts have
stimated the cost of each unit at
$22 million.
BLITZER HAD accepted a Jor-
danian suggestion that he should
present himself as a syndicated
columnist although, according to
Kamal, "everyone in Jordan"
knew that he was the Post's
Washington correspondent and
that his articles would appear in
that paper.
After Hush's rejection of
Blitzer, the Ambassador received
an assurance from the press
spokesman at the Royal Palace in
Amman that the reporter "would
indeed be welcome." However, in
a subsequent conversation with
Hart, Blitzer was told that the
U.S. Embassy in Jordan had also
informed the Vice President that
Blitzer would not be welcome, and
that his rejection from the travel
party was final.
ment of our military mission."
Perlmutter said the League had
been told by the Defense Depart-
ment that, under its current
policy, military personnel can be
discharged for participating in the
following activities of extremist
groups: marching in a parade,
making public speeches in support
of racial discrimination, becoming
involved in their management or
organization or helping to recruit
membership.
An official of the legal office of
the Assistant Secretary of
Defense for Force, Management
and Personnel told the League the
Defense Department is reviewing
policy to determine whether cur-
rent regulations regarding par-
ticipation in hate group activities
are "complete and adequate."
IN HIS inquiry to the Defense
Department, Perlmutter pointed
out that the leader of the White
Patriot Party, F. Glenn MUler,
had publicly threatened armed
revolution against American
elected officials.
"Particularly troublesome," the
ADL official wrote, "is the
possibility that U.S. Marines could
be providing this gang with
weapons or explosives to which
they have access."
The League in recent years has
called to the attention of the
Defense Department attempts by
the KKK and neo-Nazi groups to
recruit members of the armed
services.
Perlmutter said the ADL had
learned that former California
Klan leader Tom Metzger recently
had written to San Diego-based
U.S. military commanders in-
viting them to join the "The White
American Political Association."
THE COMMANDING officer of
the San Diego naval base inform-
ed the League that those military
commanders solicited by Metzger
have been directed not to respond
to him.
The Navy in 1979, the ADL of-
ficial noted, took steps to prevent
the Klan from recruiting sailors in
the Norfolk, Va. area.
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water for the very first time.
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In what the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry termed 'a victory
for Western pressure,' it^year-old Tbilisi refiisenik student Bet-
zalel Shalolashvili's one-year sentence was 'draft evasion' has
been suspended by an appeals court. The KGB had told Betzalel's
brother, Yitzchak, that a reason for his sibling's arrest was
retaliatunn for the latter's efforts to prevent the government's
destruction of the city's Ashkenazi synagogue.
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D Holiday Greetings
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A


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Orthodox Tradition Features
Rich Array of Head-Coverings
Continued from Page 5-A
beanies. The latter are worn by
the anti-State sect of Neturei Kar-
ta (also called Reb Arele's
Hassidim at the Toldot Aaron
congregation).
The women of Toldot Aaron
wear black head-coverings too,
often over shaven heads. It is the
custom at Neturei Karta wed-
dings (where the segregation bet-
ween men and women is so strict
that they celebrate in different
rooms), for the bride and her
closest female relatives to weep
profusely before the chuppa. One
explanation is her sadness over
the loss of her maidenly hair, now
to be shaven off completely.
ON SHABBAT, many
Hassidim sport elaborate fur hats
in winter and summer alike. The
wide streimel, favored by Jews
originating from Galicia or
Rumania (for example, th Satmar
Erloy, Sanz, Belz, Vishnitz,
Klozenberg, Hassidim), consists of
24 or more fur tails of sable, mink
or fox which are still sometimes
imported from Russia. Hassidim
originating from Poland, such as
the Gur and Amshenov sects,
wear the high fur spodik with a
plush base which makes use of the
whole animal, not just the tails.
These fur hats cost between
$500-$ 1,000 and are bought and
carefully looked after by the
bridegrooms. They are worn also
on holidays and special occasions
PLO Members
Invade
W. Germany
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Hundreds of
members of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and other
Palestinian groups linked to ter-
rorist activities are among the
refugees who have come to West
Berlin in the past few months, ac-
cording to Interior Ministry of-
ficials and police officers here.
The sources, who spoke private-
ly, said that West Germany can do
nothing to stop the influx of
members of extremist organiza-
tions among refugees who ask for
political asylum in this country.
"We have seen a dramatic in-
crease in the number of Arabs
coming here, both in numbers and
in terms of their share of the
overall influx of refugees, which
had become unmanageable," an
official said. "The Arabs have
become the single largest group,
and we know that many of them
are extremists who intend to pur-
sue their political activities here."
West Germany has been com-
plaining for some time that East
Germany was "planting" the
refugees in its territory by
guiding them to seek asylum in
West Berlin. From there, many of
them are sent to other parts of
West Germany under a plan to
share the burden of intergrating
the newcomers.
such as weddings or other family
simchas. Some Hassidim also have
beautiful white streimels for the
High Holidays.
Ultra-Orthodox women are less
eclectic and colorful in their
headstyles. Most wear scarfs
which completely cover their hair.
The Satmar women sometimes
still wear turbans, as did German
immigrant women 20-30 years
ago. The Vishnitz Hassidot often
have half-wigs under their ker-
chiefs, and many of the younger,
more elegantly-clad Haredi
women prefer full, stylish wigs.
THE SUBJECT of wigs as
suitable hair coverings has been
hotly debated throughout the
generations. The sheiteU, which
clearly make women more attrac-
tive, were thought to defeat the
purpose of modesty, but the rab-
bis have in most cases ruled that a
peiyah (wig) which adequately
does the job, that is, covers the
woman's natural hair, is
permissible.
The Oriental communities had
distinctive head coverings of their
own. The Egyptian-type fez was
sported by the leaders of the
Yishuv (even Ben Gurion had one)
at the beginning of the century in
imitation of the style favored by
young Arab nationalists of the
period. The Buchanan and Per-
sian men displayed beautifully-
embroidered cloth skullcaps, and
the Yemenite and North Africans
wore tarbooshes or cloth turbans
when they immigrated to Israel.
The older Sephardi women, on
the other hand, still wear their
scarfs as in the old country, either
tied around their heads in the
Moroccan style, or in the back as
worn in Syria, Lebanon and
Yemen.
The more modern, pro-Zionist
elements, popularly called the
"knitted kipah society,"
demonstrate differences in
outlook by the dimensions of their
skullcap. Those who wear soup-
plate sized kipot are usually
associated with Mercaz HaRav,
the late Rabbi Kook's yeshiva.
Wearing slightly smaller kipot,
which still cover most of the man's
head, are the Hesder Yeshiva
students or graduates, who com-
bine secular and religious studies
with army service.
THE WIVES of the knitted
skullcap society show more in-
dividuality in their style of head-
dress. Every few years some
other fad captures the market:
silk, one-color scarfs over foam
strips for elevation; scarfs that tie
on the side of the head or are
braided; two scarfs worn together
for contrasting colors and this
year, kerchiefs with silver or gold
stitching. Among these women
wigs are also making inroads.
The survey does not or cannot
end here. There are too many ex-
ceptions and original trend setters
who fit into no category. The vast
number of Baalei Teskuva (Repen-
tants) for example, now returning
to their roots, both from the
Diaspora and within Israel, are
good examples of how any head-
covering from ancient Bucharian
skullcaps to Spanish-style man-
tillas are being reinstated im-
aginatively.
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Bookcase
Novel Traces Soviet Jewry's Struggle

Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
etween Darkness and Dawn.
By Abraham T'homi. New
York: Bloch Publishing Co.,
1986. 261 pp. $19.95.
An essential message of this ap-
ealing autobiography is the
nverbalized assertion that con-
kmporary difficulties experienc-
1 by Jews who want to leave the
|>viet Union have their counter
. if not their origin, in the
ys following the Russian revolu-
bn of 1917.
he author is an Odessa Jew
ho was born in 1903. He
rribes his childhood with par
Jar emphasis on the anti-
litism and the hardships which
endured during World War I
" in the aftermath of the Rus-
revolution. In 1918, already
nng become attracted to
>nism, T'homi met Joseph
ampeldor, a former Russian ar-
officer who had organized a
lion of Jewish volunteers to
it against Turkey and who
inded the Zionist pioneer move-
ment called Hehalutz. Of course,
Trumpeldor went on to enter the
pantheon of Israeli heroes.
T'HOMI WAS inspired by
Trumpeldor to join his movement
and to help organize the illegal
emigration of Halutzim from
Russia to Palestine. Just as is the
case today, it was practically im-
possible to obtain exit visas from
the Soviet Union, but the problem
in those days was aggravated by
the refusal of the British to permit
Jews to enter Palestine."
Most of the book is devoted to
the saga of clandestine activities
carried out by T'homi and his com-
rades as they established and
operated an underground railroad
to carry Jews to Poland, Rumania
and Turkey before they eventually
managed to make their way into
Palestine. T'homi himself finally
arrived in Palestine in 1922, and
the book ends as he goes to
Jerusalem to join the Haganah.
According to the publisher,
there are two more volumes to
follow which will tell about
T'homi's life in Palestine and
Israel. These should prove as in-
teresting as the first book in the
trilogy, since T'homi helped to
organize the Irgun and was active
in the secret operation that
brought Jews from Poland to
Palestine. During World War II,
he directed a Jewish intelligence
network in Palestine, Turkey and
Lebanon.
T;HOMI WRITES in a
straightforward, unadorned style.
The book is easy to read, and
young people, as well as adults,
can readily follow its account of an
exciting era in Jewish history
which is not nearly as well known
as it should be.
It also introduces readers to an
heroic Israeli who deserves
greater recognition than he has
received up to now. Both the ob-
jective of filling in some blank
pages in Jewish history and of
familiarizing us with the author's
notable achievements are well
met by this first-rate piece of
writing.
Amnesty Int'l/s Worry
War Criminal Won't Get Fair Trial
KE
By KEVIN FREEMAN
:W YORK (JTA) -
Concerns about the fairness
of a Soviet court trial of an
accused war criminal pro-
mpted Amnesty Interna-
tional to ask Attorney
General Edwin Meese to
prevent the deportation of
Xarl Linnas unless Linnas
,bau be guaranteed a fair
Sugarmann, a spokesper-
for Amnesty International,
the Nobel Prize-winning human
rights group based in London,
confirmed that its executive direc-
tor, John Healy, sent a letter to
Meese expressing the organiza-
tion's "grave doubts" about the
fairness of a Soviet trial. The text
of the letter dated June 27 was
not made public.
LINNAS, 66, of Greenlawn,
L.I., is being held in a federal
prison in Manhattan and is facing
a death sentence from the Soviet
Union for war crimes committed
while a concentration camp com-
mander in his native Estonia.
Ben-Gurion Centennial Fete Planned
ptUSALEM (JTA) -
cities marking the centennial
^vid Ben-Gurion's birth will
snce in Israel at the opening
United Jewish Appeal's
campaign, scheduled for
lenlfclem Sept. 23.
The UJ A plans a sound and light
ihowat the Sultan's Pool, an open
-henter beneath the Old City
valla. Four I'JA missions, totall-
ing more than 1,500 participants,
will take part in the celebrations,
along with hundreds of Israelis,
among them representatives of
development towns and Project
Renewal neighborhoods.
Also planned is a solidarity
march from the town center to the
Western Wall where Premier
Shimon Peres will greet the mis-
sion members.
[iami School Teacher
MiaAi school teacher Miriam Kassenoff (left) chats with two
Isadtrs of the American Gathering and Federation of Holocaust
Svr^fors Roman Kent and Vladka Meed at an orientation
at New York 8 JFK Airport prior to flying to Israel to
rt in a three-week seminar on teaching the Holocaust. Mrs.
>ff, who teaches at Homestead Senior High School, is
a Holocaust survivor, having fled Hungary as afive-year-
h her parents. Mrs. Kassenoffs father. Rabbi Maurice
is ritual director of Temple Emanu-El, Miami Bench.
' teachers from 12 states are taking part in the seminar,
p left New York July IS and returns Aug. 6.
Linnas was stripped of his U.S.
citizenship in 1981 by U.S.
District Court Judge Jacob
Mishler, who found him guilty in
participating in the death of Jews
and Communists at the concentra-
tion camp. He was ordered
deported in 1984 and lost his ap-
peal in May before a three
member panel of the U.S. Court of
Appeals.
Sugarmann said Amnesty Inter-
national became aware of infor-
mation which suggests that Lin-
nas was not given a fair trail in
1962 when he was sentenced to
death in absentia for his war
crimes.
ACCORDING TO Sugarmann,
an account of the court order sug-
gests that Linnas was sentenced
before his actual trial took place.
Linnas was sentenced on
December 7, 1961, but he was ac-
tually tried in January, 1962,
Sugarmann said.
This information came to light
from an article written about the
sentencing by correspondent G.
Grigoryev in Socialist Legality,
the official organ of the USSR
Procuracy. The article appeared
on December 7, 1961, and accor-
ding to Sugarmann, it was obtain-
ed through the U.S. Library of
Congress in Washington.
"To our knowledge, it is authen-
tic," said Sugarmann in an inter-
view with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. In addition, he said the
Amnesty International has learn-
ed that since 1979, 40 persons
have been sentenced to death
after being convicted of crimes
during World War II. He said
eight have been executed, while
the status of the remaining 32 per-
sons remains uncertain.
"AMNESTY International has
grave doubts about the fairness of
these trials," he said. "We believe
that for individuals who used tor-
ture there should be no safe
haven. But everyone charged with
political crimes should be given a
fair trial."
Sugarmann added that Amnes-
ty International is requiring that
Meese not. consider granting the
Soviet request for Linnas until the
following criteria are met: that he
be tried in public in view of the in-
ternational media and that his
family be allowed to attend; that
he be allowed to select his own
defense attorney and that
witnesses be allowed to testify on
his behalf; that he be granted the
right of appeal; and that he not be
sentenced to death.
Justice Minister Yitzhak Modai is shown announcing his
resignation at a press conference in Jerusalem, July 21. His
resignation was a result of Prime Minister Shimon Peres' an-
nouncement that he intended dismissing the Justice Minister as a
result of Modai's 'disparaging' statements about Peres at a recent
public meeting.
Tourism Minister Sharir
Replaces Resigned Modai
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Avraham Sharir (Likud
Liberal), the Minister of Tourism, was Sunday appointed
Minister of Justice, too, in place of his party colleague, Yit-
zhak Modai. Sharir's appointment was announced by the
Cabinet and is expected to be ratified by the Knesset
without difficulty.
MODAI WAS FORCED to resign last week, under
threat of being fired by Premier Shimon Peres, whom he
had publicly insulted. The Likud says Modai will return to
the Cabinet, and to the Justice Ministry, following the rota-
tion of the Premiership in October. But Labor has said it
will oppose his return.
Sharir said Sunday that while he would be holding the
portfolio temporarily (pending Modai's return), he would
work "as though it is permanent." He vowed that the
Tourism Ministry and tourism industry "which I love and
believe in" would not suffer.
The Cabinet Sunday also approved the appointment of
Moshe Nissim, the Finance Minister (Likud Liberal), as a
member of the ten-member Inner Cabinet in place of
Modai.
Our Readers Write: Reform
Not Only Rabbis Who Suffer
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Wendy Elliman's article, "U.S.
Rabbis No Legal Validity,"
which appeared in the July 11
issue, raises some interesting
questions.
The article did portray the
policy of the Israeli Orthodox
establishment toward the non-
Orthodox in Israel and around the
world accurately. But by presen-
ting the views of only one Reform
rabbi and his narration of what
the Reform movement stands for
and what it has done to try to
change the situation in Israel,
Elliman has made it seem that the
conflict involves only Orthodox
and Reform and that only the
Reform movement is involved
with the struggle for
"Democratization" of religion in
Israel.
In fact, the Conservative move-
ment is no more highly regarded
by the Orthodox rabbinate in
Israel; their divorces and conver-
sions are also not considered
valid. The Masorati movement has
been actively lobbying for change
in Israel has started schools and
been involved with curriculum
revision, has begun a seminary for
8abra8, and has at least one kib-
butz to its credit.
Among its most stalwart cham-
pions is Rabbi Victor Hoffman.
formerly rabbi of Tikvat Shalom
Synagogue in New Orleans.
Distortion in news reporting is
frequently occasioned as much by
omission as by misstatements of
fact. I take nothing away from the
efforts of the Reform movement
to liberalize the religious scene in
Israel. It would be nice, however,
for your readers to get the whole
picture.
BARRYIVKER
New Orleans, La.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Israel's New Stiff Travel Tax
May Thwart U.S. Agreement
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's stiff travel tax, a
subject of heated debate
among Israelis, may thwart
a U.S.-Israel tourism agree-
ment signed when Vice
President Geroge Bush
visited here this week.
Tourism Minister Avraham
Sharir confirmed in an interview
that Washington is pressing Israel
to repeal the tax on grounds that
it undermined the reciprocity in-
herent in the agreement. Sharir
has called the tax "idiotic" and
counter-productive. But Finance
Minister Moshe Nissim says he
would be prepared to raise it if the
Knesset Finance Committee call-
ed for an increase.
THE TRAVEL tax, a feature of
the austerity economic program,
was instituted more than a year
ago to raise revenue and help
preserve Israel's dwindling
foreign currency reserves. At pre-
sent it amounts to $120 per capita
for Israelis traveling abroad, plus
a 20 percent surcharge on their
airline tickets.
Last summer, the tax was set at
$300 in the peak travel months
and an estimated 250,000 Israelis
were deterred from vacationing
abroad. Sharir denounced the tax,
maintaining that the revenue rais-
ed was more than offset by the
reduction of tourism to Israel.
That was because airlines, which
"want their planes full in both
directions," cut service to Israel,
he explained.
The Finance Ministry, on the
other hand, thinks the tax should
be increased because many Israeli
travelers avoid paying the 20 per-
cent surcharge. They do so by hav-
ing their airline tickets purchased
for them abroad. The Ministry
believes the surcharge should be
abolished and the tax, which is
unavoidable, raised.
Demjanjuk
Gets Visitors
TEL AVIV (JTA) John
Demjanjuk, held in the Ramie
prison awaiting trial on charges of
war crimes as the suspected
notorious Ivan the Terrible
sadistic camp guard at Treblinka,
Thursday (July 24) met his family
for the first time since his extradi-
tion from the U.S. last February.
His wife, Vera, 60, their
26-year-old daughter, Irene, ac-
companied by her husband, Ed-
ward Nishnik and their seven-
month-old baby Edward Jr., had
arrived in Israel last Wednesday
and were reportedly angered that
they were not allowed to visit him
immediately upon their arrival.
They were told that the
necessary permission would be
granted last Wednesday and that
they would henceforth be allowed
to spend two hours with him twice
a week, instead of the regulation
30-minute visit to prisoners once a
week.
Prison authorities said the
special arrangements have been
made in view of the special cir-
cumstances the distance the
family has come, and the fact that
Demjanjuk, who is 66, knows
nobody else in Israel.
The Demjanjuk file is now in the
hands of the state prosecutors
who are preparing charges
against the suspected war
criminal, who denies that he is
Ivan the Terrible and was not at
Treblinka at the time of the
crimes with which he is to be
charged. He claims that his deten-
tion and extradition are a result of
mistaken identity.
SHARIR STRESSED the im
portance of a tourism accord with
the U.S. and wants nothing to
stand in its way. He cited the 40
percent drop in American tourism
to Israel so far this year becasue
of the terrorist scare. He said
there are signs of a possible im-
provement later in the year.
Another agreement that Bush
hoped to wrap up during his visit
concerns the Israeli-Egyptian
border dispute over Taba.
The two countries have been
deadlocked over the terms of
reference for the arbitration panel
which is to resolve the issue and
have been unable to agree on the
third member of the panel who
will be from outside the region.
Israel has accused the Egyp-
tians of foot-dragging over the
procedures that have to be com-
pleted before an arbitration docu-
ment is signed. U.S. State Depart-
ment lawyers and cartographers
have arrived in the area to join a
measuring and map-making ex-
pedition to the disputed site on the
Red Sea near Eilat. But Egypt
has not yet indicated it is ready
for that procedure.
BUT IN the most violent reac-
tion to the talks, the Moroccan
Embassy in Beirut was ransacked
last Friday (July 25) by
demonstrators. They smashed a
portrait of Hassan, tore down the
Moroccan flag and replaced it
with that of the pro-Iranian Shiite
Moslem Hezbollah. The Embassy
had been virtually deserted for
about a year, only guarded by a
handful of Lebanese security
personnel.
Meanwhile, Arab League
secretary general Cheldi Kiibi
urged the 21 member-nations and
the PLO to hold an urgent summit
as a result of the Peres-Hassan
talks. Though he did not directly
criticize Hassan, Klibi said in a
statement issued from Tunis that
the meeting of Hassan and Peres
has "shown Israel's true face .
and revealed spectacularly his
(Peres) rejection of any peaceful
solution" to the Arab-Israel
dispute.
"The first concrete action (of
the Arabs) should be an urgent
summit of Arab leaders, the
elimination of everything liable to
compromise the solidarity of our
states and the reinforcement of a
joint Arab action," the statement
said.
Hassan's reaction to Klibi's call
for an Arab League meeting was
to announce Sunday that he was
resigning his post as Arab League
summit chairman. This action was
announced in a letter to Klibi
published in the official Moroccan
news agency, MAP.
ACCORDING TO Hassan, he
was stepping down from the sum-
mit chairman position because of
the "upheavals" caused in some
Arab states by his meeting with
Peres, and so Morocco would not
stand in the way of an Arab sum-
mit. The last full Arab summit
was held in 1982 in Fez. All at-
tempts to have a full Arab summit
meeting since then have resulted
in cancellation.
Hassan did host a summit in
Casablanca last August, but it was
boycotted by five Arab states
Lebanon, Syria, Algeria, South
Yemen and Libya. Hassan also
sought to arrange an Arab sum-
mit meeting in Morocco after the
U.S. air strikes on Libya last
April. His efforts failed, as Arab
League members failed to agree
on a venue or agenda for the
meeting.
Despite internal Arab dissen-
sion on the meeting, Moroccan of-
ficials attempted to interpret the
Hassan-Peres meeting as purely
"preparatory," called to give both
sides an opportunity to present
their views. Future meetings, ac-
(M
d
The Israel Museum in Jerusalem has an-
nounced the most important and moving
revelation in Biblical archaeology since the
discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls some J,0
years go, and on July 1, the museum opened
the exhibition of the Jerusalem Silver Scrolls
excavated in a First Temple Period burial
cave repository at Ketef Hinnom. These con-
tain the oldest Biblical inscription ever found
three sentences from the Torah, the Birkat
Cohanim (Priestly Blessing in Numbers
6:24-26), incised on small silver strips in an-
cient Hebrew script in the Seventh Century
BCE. Here. Israel's Chief Rabbis Mordechm
Eliahu (left) and Avraham Shapiro (center)
are shown the Jerusalem Silver Scrolls by
Meir Meyer, vice chairman of the Israel
Museum.
cording to Foreign Minister
Sillali. would depend on whether
Peres presents "positive sugges-
tions" to Morocco.
HE MAINTAINED in the in-
terview published Sunday that if
Israel wants to achieve peace, it
should be "less intransigent," ad-
ding that "no peace is possible if
all sides stick to their opening
positions."
Moroccan Minister of State
Allawi was more upbeat about the
two days of talks, referring to it as
an historic turning point. He
spoke of the "warmth radiating
from the meeting" and that he felt
"a kind of electric current flowing
between the King and Mr. Peres.*'
He also stressed that "Peres
cannot return to Morocco if he
does so only to tell us the same
thing." But he did see as an im-
mediate result of the meeting "a
substantive and psychological
change in relations between Israel
and the Arab states."

:
For your child's safety, make sure there is
nothing metallic on the kite, make sure that
the string for the kite has no wire or metal in it,
and don't let kids fly kites near power lines.
Ordinarily, power lines are quite harmless. But
when a kite gets caught in a power line, it could become electrified
Tell your kids to let go of the string and leave the kite alone
Otherwise, the result could be deadly.
Always look up. Whether you're picking fruit or pruning trees,
installing antennas or doing any activity that puts you in possible
contact with overhead lines.
Don't be a victim of your own carelessness.
FIOBIOA POWER ft UGH' COMPANY
I



Records Back to '38
Waldheim's Application, Photo to SS
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Reaganites Downplay Talks
Between Hassan, Peres
Continued from Page 1-A
He explicitly stated he was not a
member of the SA or the Nazi stu-
dent union in his formal defense
memorandum to the U.S. Justice
Department of Apr. 12.
He told the Associated Press on
Apr. 9: "I was anti-Nazi. All this is
lies. I was never in the SA nor in
the student union."
The 1940 document lists
: Waldheim as a member of the SA
I and the Nazi student union.
In the box on membership in
Jazi affiliated organizations,
/aldheim is identified on the
form as an SA-Mann (SA man)
wing joined on November 18,
1938. He is listed as belonging to
tie NSStudentenbund (Nazi stu-
jent union) as of April 1, 1938.
WALDHEIM's membership in
lie stormtroopers came less than
week following the infamous
'(ristallnacht (Night of Broken
jlass) the reign of terror
inst Austrian and German
Jews spearheaded by the SA.
[Under Nazi Party rules,
Waldheim must have applied in
May of 1938 to be accepted in the
! SA and submitted an "Aryan"
[ certificate along with a certificate
[of "good conduct."
Coinciding with the release of
tie document, the WJC again call-
on Attorney General Edwin
leese "to enforce the law and
place Waldheim on the 'watch list'
f aliens excludable from the
Jnited States."
MIiiiiii> tm W--1>
i 9ml to ~
iiIhmiii|IIMi to
>
Sr,Curt (aldbtla Blpl.eoc';Jk*.
?1.1.1H S. liiM.M,l.ni
3>, ra.k4th.
irkichulln- tor 1.?..
k.in T.nOj.o

U.ftalttntk.idart* 5/o s..-Knn nil 13.ll.19ja
iS.Stutmi.Duna mt l..l-38
In April, the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investiga-
tions concluded that under
American law, Waldheim should
be excluded as a "Nazi
persecutor."
Hassan's Record
Had Contacts With Israelis Before
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ling Hassan of Morocco has
long record of high level
lontacts with Israelis,
Ithough Premier Shimon
feres' surprise visit to that
puntry last week as the
King's guest was the first
piblicly acknowledged
unit-level dialogue bet-
sen the two countries.
Peres is known to have visited
^pssan at least twice during the
Eod 1977-1984 when he was
er of the Labor opposition.
Hassan played host to Yit-
thak Rabin when he was Prime
Minister of Israel in the mid-70s,
though Rabin's trip to Rabat was
>dertaken in strictest secrecy.
PASSAN'S QUEST for Middle
Bt peace accelerated after
kud came to power in Israel
Jer Premier Menachem Begin
11977. He hosted two crucial
ret negotiating sessions with
Foreign Minister Moshe
Iran and Hassan Tohamey. a
por aide to Egyptian President
var Sadat.
hose sessions are said to have
Ce jsalem on November 19, 1977,
Camp David meetings bet-
Bn Sadat and Begin a year later
the subsequent peace treaty
yeen Egypt and Israel.
lassan invited Begin to Moroc-
But the latter, according to
eli sources, insisted that a
be open and official and
Bsan demurred. Last year the
roccan ruler publicly invited
res to meet with him, "but only
comes with a real peace
larter-Million Gift
IARTFORD (JTA) A gift
1250,000 has been made to the
rtford University Maurice
enberg Center for Jewish
lidies by Simon Konover, a
Bt Hartford realtor.
plan."
SHORTLY afterwards, Hassan
appealed to the Arab world to
select one of its leaders to meet
with Peres for an exchange of
views on peace. In March, 1986,
he said he himself would accept
the assignment. But there was no
response from other Arab heads
of state.
Some analysts here attribute
the timing of Hassan's latest in-
vitation, which Peres accepted, to
Morocco's desire to improve its
relations with the U.S.
Washington has been concerned
of late by a Moroccan flirtation
with Libyan leader Moammar
Khadafy. The analysts suggest
that Morocco may feel that a rap-
prochement with Israel would
boost its standing with the
Americans.
Hassan had been scheduled to
visit Washington last week but
postponed his trip for "health
reasons." He is believed to be hop-
ing for increased U.S. military
and economic aid. Morocco's
ongoing war with the Polisario
rebels in the Sahara has been
draining its resources.
MOROCCO HAS always main
tamed warm ties with Israelis of
Moroccan origin. They are allow-
ed to pay visits to their native
country without undue
bureaucratic difficulties. Members
of the small Jewish community
still living in Morocco about
18,000, mainly in Fez are per-
mitted to visit Israel, and many do
so quite openly.
This attitude is unique in the
Arab world and has earned
Hassan special affection in Israel.
Many Israelis from Morocco speak
fondly of their former home and
stress the atmosphere of
tolerance and cordiality which
generally prevails between Jews
and their Moslem neighbors in
Morocco.
"Relations were generally good,
even when disturbing events such
as wars were taking place out-
side," Labor MK Yaacov Amir,
who was born in Morocco said. He
attributed this to King Hassan
and the King's late father.
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Against the background
of the surprise visit to
Morocco by Israeli Prime
Minister Shimon Peres last
week, the Reagan Ad-
ministration is playing down
the significance of a
previously-planned trip to
the region by Vice President
George Bush.
Bush, who will visit Israel, Jor-
dan and Egypt beginning this
week, will be the first senior U.S.
official to travel to those countries
since Secretary of State George
Shultz visited there last year. But
a senior Administration official
cautioned Tuesday against expec-
tations of "dramatic initiatives."
"I THINK we're emphasizing
here the depth of the continuity of
American interests in the region,"
the official said at a briefing. He
stressed that while extensive
discussions were expected on the
outcome of the talks between
Peres and Moroccan King Hassan
II, the Administration was view-
ing the first public visit by an
Israeli leader to an Arab country
other than Egypt as significant
less for its liue!y results than for
the fact that it took place."
Having asserted a high profile
in past Middle East peace efforts
that ended in impasse or failure,
the Administration appears to be
distancing itself from the most re-
cent development, as it waits to
assess the outcome.
White House and State Depart-
ment officials, while praising the
Peres-Hassan talks, have main-
tained that the initiative had come
entirely from the two leaders
themselves. The Administration
official on Tuesday said the U.S.
was informed of the meeting just
"a few days" before it took place.
THE OFFICIAL said, in
response to a question, that the
Vice President's visit in Israel
the first leg of his week-long Mid-
dle East tour beginning July 27
will also include discussion of
allegations about Israeli spying in
this country and the current in-
vestigation into alleged illegal ac-
quisition by Israel of American
technology for the production of
cluster bombs.
He indicated there was also a
possibility that Bush's visit would
coincide with the initialing of a
compromise between Egypt and
Israel or. the procedure for ar-
bitration of the boundary dispute
over Taba, the small strip of ter-
ritory whose status was left
unresolved when Israel withdrew
from the Sinai in April, 1982.
State Department Legal Adviser
Abraham Sofaer is currently in
Israel, where he is attempting to
mediate an agreement on the
terms of reference for arbitration.
Talks in all three countries, the
official said, would also focus on
the problem of international ter-
rorism and on economic issues.
Jackson
Praises
Meetings
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Rev. Jesse Jackson praised the
meetings in Morocco between
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres and
King Hassan II as well as Egyp-
tian President Hosni Mubarak's
support for the talks.
This occurred last week during
a celebration of the 34th anniver-
sary of the Egyptian revolution at
the Egyptian Embassy, according
to Hyman Bookbinder of the
American Jewish Committee. He
was one of six Jewish represen-
tatives among the 140 persons at-
tending the ceremony.
WE'RE
MAKING
OUR MOVE
Make Yours for the Best Deals in Town.
Douslas Gardens Thrift Shop is moving to a new location,
two miles west of its present site on Hallandale Beach
Boulevard. Between now and the opening of our new store
on August 4th, everything in stock is on sale. Be it furniture,
appliances, clothing or antiques, you will find the best deals
in town at the Douglas Gardens Thrift Shop, 3149 West
Hallandale Beach Boulevard.
Proceeds from the sales of all merchandise help support
indigent residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens.
Also, plan to join us on
August 4th for the Grand
opening at our new location:
5829 W Hallandale Beach
Boulevard, two blocks east of
State Road 7
D
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
For free pick-up of donations
simply call:
Dadc: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
All donations are tax deductible
A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens


Pag* 12 A Ik*
Friday.
fOTernment was i
Stokely's Hot Again
He's Back Pushing 'Dead Zionist' As 'Best'
. or>o a maU DeraosaJ
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sntaii personal following of
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ariftdy to wm ha* aany bating
followen. Tbeae are a fe*
?xa-Tvptes:
Or. Afghamatan: "The Sonet
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Drucker Appointed Regional
Chairmen Of UJA
Women's Division Fall Mission
Terry Drucker, representing
i Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
jn, was appointed among six
omen who will serve as regional
airmen for the United Jewish
jpeal Women's Division Fall
iership Mission to Israel.
| Drucker currently serves as vice
esident of Community Educa-
n of the Greater Miami Jewish
[deration Women's Division
)) and is a member of the
leration Board of Directors
|ld its Treasurer's Committee,
he served last year as the WD
ce president of Leadership
velopment, and served as
irerall WD campaign chair-
man in 1983-84.
As the Florida regional chair-
man for the UJA Fall Leadership
lission, Drucker will be responsi-
ve primarily for recruiting par-
pipants for the mission.
iThe mission, scheduled for
^ptember 17-26, will focus on
ograms funded by UJA/Federa-
>n campaigns conducted
roughout the United States and
nada. Participants will visit
jnagers in Youth Aliyah
lages, settlements in Judea and
laria, Project Renewal com-
lities and Ethiopian Jews and
er residents in absorption
liters.
The mission is a major compo-
nt of "Celebration '87," which
launch the 1987 UJA/Federa-
m Campaign and help
nonstrate the partnership bet-
n American Jewish com-
lities and Israel. During the
part of the mission, par-
jipants will join with four other
ional UJA Missions the
esident's Mission. Chazak Corn-
Terry Drucker
munity Leadership Mission,
Business and Professional
Women's Leadership Mission and
the Communal Service Workers
Mission.
More than 1,000 participants
will gather at the Western Wall
where Prime Minister Shimon
Peres will commemorate the
centennial of David Ben-Gurion's
birth, and mark the 20th anniver-
sary of Jerusalem's reunification.
On an optional pre-mission,
which will also take place in Israel
September 14-18, participants will
have a special chance to meet with
artists in the studios and galleries
of Ein Hod, an artists' colony; ex-
plore Israel's diamond and fashion
exports; attend a recital by noted
pianist Yitzhak Tavior; and visit
the historical cities of Acco and
Safed.
[Ten Arabs Arrested On Suspicion
Kidnap-Murder Of Israeli Soldier
JRUSALEM (JTA) Ten
as have been arrested on
sicion of kidnapping and
rdering Akiva Shaltiel. a
^ear-old Israeli soldier, in
il, 1985.
be 10 men, from the village of
Kassem in the Galilee and
/illages near Nablus, are also
ected of shooting at a bus on
trans-Samaria highway last
ember and of throwing a
de at another bus in Nablus
in August of last year.
Shaltiel was kidnapped as he
was hitch-hiking home to the
largely Yemenite town of Rosh
Ha'Ayin from his post in
Lebanon. His body was found
some days later near Bet Arieh in
Samaria by an Arab shepherd.
The 10 detainees are said to
belong to the Palestine Liberation
Organization. Military sources
said that further arrests are ex-
pected shortly.
Arab-Israeli Conflict
Nearing End Says Former
Military Intelligence Director
The Arab-Israeli conflict
is almost over, said Maj.
Gen. (Res.) Shlomo Gazit,
Israel's former director of
military intelligence, in an
address to participants in
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Community
Leadership Mission schedul-
ed for Sept. 21-Oct. 1.
According to Gazit, now direc-
tor general of the Jewish Agency,
the conflict which has continued
for some 75 years is in its final
phases. "This is not to say that
there won't be further wars," he
explained. "But one can begin to
see the light at the end of the tun-
nel. It will not be immediate or
sudden, but we can be optimistic
over the long term."
Gazit says that among three
items which are at the forefront of
Israel's agenda today, security
and the ongoing war between
Israel and the Arabs ranks first.
The recent open talks between
King Hassan of Morocco and
Prime Minister Shimon Peres can
be seen in the context of a distinc-
tive change in the attitude of the
Arab countries toward Israel, he
said.
The 1973 Yom Kippur war prov-
ed to the Arab nations that Israel
is a permanent fixture in the Mid-
dle East and that any future at-
tempts to dislodge or destroy
Israel would be both futile and
costly, Gazit says. The Yom Kip-
pur War pushed Egypt back 10
years in economic development,
welfare and national
advancement.
GAZIT SAYS that "Sadat
hated the notion of the existence
of an Israeli nation in the Middle
East from the earliest point in his
career," and died without chang-
ing that opinion.
It took the Arab countries seven
years to build up and prepare for a
war which they lost, causing
Sadat "to face the realization that
another war with Israel would
destroy Egypt's chances of
development for generations."
Also high on Israel's agenda,
Gazit said, is the country's
economy. "Israel has performed a
miracle in the last 12 months that
no economist thought possible,"
"*..
-W.
F
rr^e
r

ressman William Lehman poses with
et Jewish immigrants Boris Goldfarb and
sister, Julia, on the steps of the U.S.
vapitol in Washington. They hold a sign sett-
ing greetings to Boris' wife, Elena, and th/*ir
daughter. Lisa, who were not granted permis-
sion to leave the Soviet Union. Lehman h
pressed Soviet officials to allow the family to
reunite.
Shlomo Gazit
he said.
Only one year ago, inflation in
Israel was rampant at over 400
percent a year. Today, as the
result of a combination of strict
government measures and the full
cooperation of the Israeli people,
inflation is now holding at less
than 30 percent a year.
GAZIT SAID that although this
battle is also long from over, "the
spirit of the Israelis will allow
them to overcome this problem,
and Israel will begin a surefooted
track on the road to economic
stability and independence."
During a question and answer
period following Gazit's talk, he
noted that "Israel has benefited
from its ability to adapt military
technology for civilian purposes."
"The spin-offs of that industry in
the fields of high technology,
computer-related sciences,
robotics, aviation and electronics
form a solid basis for Israel's
future economic stability."
Another priority item on
Israel's agenda is the absorption
of new immigrants, according to
Gazit. In the first 10 years of its
existence, Israel more than tripled
its population. The concentration
of so many different cultures,
languages, traditions and political
backgrounds would be under
any circumstances a surefire
recipe for total social and ethnic
chaos, he said.
"And yet, despite this un-
precedented 'pressure pot' situa-
tion, Israel has fused into a
strong, dedicated and highly
technically advanced nation."
He explained that "the occa-
sional incidents of religious in-
tolerance or demonstrations along
ethnic lines should be seen in the
context of the whole. When com-
pared with situations in other
countries, these incidents are
isolated, minimal and tolerably
normal in a country where
freedom of speech is of supreme
value."
U.S. Calls Peres-Hassan Talks
'An Historic Opportunity'
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion last Tuesday (July 22)
called the talks under way in
Morocco between King
Hassan II and Israeli Prime
Minister Shimon Peres "an
historic opportunity" and
urged "all governments" to
support the new dialogue.
"We applaud this courageous
initiative by these two leaders
one which the U.S. strongly sup-
ports," said a statement read by
State Department spokesman
Pete Martinez. "Our consistent
position has been that direct
dialogue holds out the best pro-
spects toward a just and lasting
peace in the Middle East."
AT THE SAME time, the
White House criticized the reac-
tion of Syria, which has broken off
its diplomatic relations with
Morocco, as "a negative step
which flies in the face of the
changing political environment in
the Middle East."
But Administration spokesmen
maintained that while the U.S.
had been told of the talks in ad-
vance there was no direct
American role in preparing the
groundwork for the first publiciz-
ed meeting between Israel and an
Arab head of state since the late
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
visited Jerusalem in November,
1977.
"The U.S. was aware of this
meeting, but we regard it as a
Moroccan-Israeli initiative which
we strongly wecome," White
House spokesman Larry Speakes
said in a statement. He said the
Peres-Hassan meeting "sym-
bolizes the change that has occur-
red in the Middle East and creates
a context which can enhance the
peace process."
THE MOROCCO talks come in
the wake of a recent Jordanian
move to expel officials of the
Continued on Page 2-B
jjcwigh TFloridiara
Miami, Florida Friday, August 1,1986 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Dr. Ronald Kronish
Named Executive Director
Dr. Ronald Kronish has been
named executive director for the
Office of the Chairman of the
Board of Governors of the Jewish
Agency for Israel. Kronish, of
Jerusalem, replaces Howard
Weisband, who will be moving to
Jerusalem next month to assume
the post of secretary-general of
the Jewish Agency.
Dr. Kronish has been the direc-
tor of Staff Development for
MELITZ, the Center for Jewish
Zionist Education, as well as a
Lecturer in Education at Tel Aviv
University since he moved to
Israel seven years ago.
Educated in the United States,
Dr. Kronish received his
undergraduate training at
Brandeis University, his Master's
degree in Hebrew Literature and
Rabbinical Ordination from the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in New York,
and his Doctorate in Education
from Harvard University.
In addition to being an
educator, lecturer, and ad-
ministrator, he has written widely
in American Jewish journals on
topics related to education,
Judaism, Zionism, Israel and
Israel-Diaspora Relations.
Dr. Kronish is the son of Rabbi
and Mrs. Leon Kronish of Miami
Beach.
Dr. Ronald Kronish
Office of the chairman of the
Board of Governors of the Jewish
Agency coordinates the work of
the chairman with the major
Jewish leaders and communal in-
stitutions in the Diaspora as well
as with the Jewish Agency head-
quarters in Jerusalem. Jerold Hof-
fberger has been serving as chair-
man of the Board of Governors
since 1983, when he was elected to
succeed Max Fisher of Detroit.
Oren Teicher Running For
U.S. House Of Representatives
Oren J. Teicher, a former Con-
gressional aide, is running in
White Plains, N.Y. to win a seat in
the U.S. House of Represen-
tatives. Incumbent Joseph J.
DioGuardi, a Republican, defeated
Teicher by 4,000 votes for the
Westchester County seat in 1984.
Teicher is a management con-
sultant. In the past, he has served
as director of Corporate Com-
munications for the March of
Dimes, twice as chief of staff and
campaign manager for U.S. Rep.
Richard L. Ottinger, and as staff
associate for numerous other na-
tional and statewide political
campaigns.
Teicher holds a Bachelor of Arts
degree in public affairs from
George Washington University in
Washington, DC.
Teicher. 36, faces possible op-
position for the Democratic
nomination in the 20th District
from former Rep. Bella Abzug. He
has criticized incumbent DioGuar-
di on tax reform, the Gramm-
Rudman amendment on enforced
balancing of the budget, the
Republican candidate's opposition
to the proposed equal rights
amendment, and failure to oppose
Orea J. Teicher
trucking of nuclear waste through
Westchester.
He is married to the former
Alison Eden Greene, an attorney,
and the couple have three
children.
He is the son of Dr. and Mrs.
Morton Teicher, of Miami Beach.
Dr. Teicher is a book-reviewer for
The Jewish Floridian.
U.S. Calls Peres-Hassan Talks
'An Historic Opportunity'
Continued from Page IB
Palestine Liberation Organization
loyal to Yasir Arafat a move
that has been viewed as a possible
prelude to a major new peace in-
itiative by Jordan's King Hussein.
Administration spokesmen
would not say how far in advance
they were aware that the talks
would take place or whether this
week's meeting was behind the
King's cancellation of a visit to
the U.S. that had been scheduled
to begin Tuesday. However, State
Department officials reportedly
acknowledged that this was the
reason given when Hassan backed
out of the trip two weeks ago.
But the State Department con-
tinued to characterize discussions
held recently in Amman by
American Ambassador to Israel
Thomas Pickering as "personal
consultations," unrelated to the
current talks in Morocco. Mean-
while, the White House said Vice
President George Bush had not
changed the itinerary for his trip
to the Middle East where he arriv-
ed on Sunday. Bush was schedul-
ed to visit Egypt, Israel and
Jordan.
CANTOR
Wall known, young beautiful
volco and Nuaach Hatfllah
cnlncldantally available. Writ.
P.O. Box LAB c/o Jewish
Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami
33101.
- ',
UIA Delegates Undeterred
By Terrorist Threats
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Undeterred by threats of
terrorism, some 267 leaders
of American Jewry,
representing 46 Jewish
Federations and various
Zionist organizations
throughout the U.S., at-
tended the recently-held
Jewish Agency Assembly in
Jerusalem as members of
the United Israel Appeal
delegation.
As active participants in the
Assembly's deliberations, UIA
delegates were responsible for the
passage of more resolutions than
have ever before been passed in
Jewish Agency Assembly history,
according to Henry Taub, UIA's
chairman.
TAUB SAID that, as opposed to
the "resolutions brought to the
floor during last year's Jewish
Agency Assembly, 36 were receiv-
ed by the Assembly Resolutions
Committee this year, and 21 were
passed. He said that the "future
of UIA's involvement in the
Jewish Agency could be measured
by the vigorous resolution activity
of UIA delegates" and he praised
the "interest and staying power"
of members of the UIA
delegation.
Taub said the resolutions which
received "the most attention"
was the one which called for a
cessation of assistance, directly or
indirectly, to anti-Zionist, anti-
Israel organizations.
Taub stated that some of the
other key resolutions of the 1986
Jewish Agency Assembly passed
were:
A resolution accepting the
$414 million Jewish Agency
budget for the current fiscal year.
In addition, the Assembly approv-
ed $48 million for Project
Renewal, dependent on cash flow
in that amount.
A resolution encouraging the
Jewish Agency settlement
Department to move swiftly to
save Israeli agricultural units in
serious difficulty and to make the
necessary expenditures to assure
their economic independence.
A resolution mandating that
the term "non-Zionist" no longer
be used in reference to any
member of the Jewish Agency
Assembly.
-i
A resolution that the Agency
"develop equitable guidelines for
appropriate, maximum involve-
ment with all branches (of
Judaism)." UIA delegates were
insistent that Agency depart-
ments carry out their mandates to
assist individuals in need of sup-
port and not organizations, per se.
A resolution which insisted
that programs and schools receiv-
ing Jewish Agency aid admit all
olim, including Ethiopians.
A resolution urging the Pro-
ject Renewal Department to com-
plete its work on behalf of cur-
rently twinned neighborhoods and
to assure fulfillment of respon-
sibilities to those neighborhoods
RABBI ordained. University
degree, versed in all sections
belonging to the synagogue, Is
interested In a psrttimeVtulltime
challenging pulpit. Write to: Box
J.R., c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 01-2973. Miami, Florida 33101
Small Hotel Miami Beach,
Bal Musaf, Blow Shofar,
High Holidays Room and
Board and $500.00.
531-1191
FUND RAISING
ASSISTANT REGIONAL
DIRECTOR
(ENTRY-LEVEL)
Career opportunity for
aggressive individual seek-
ing a challenging future in
fund raising, in annual
campaign & special gifts.
Miami based. Min. 2 years
experience desired. Send
resume including salary
history to:
Aaalatant Regional Director
B'nai B'rith
Foundation
1440 Kennedy Causeway
Suite 301
North Bay Village, Fl. 33141
Equal Opportunity Employef M/ Ff
already within the program.
A resolution calling for the ex-
tension of appropriate absorption
services to the Ethiopian Jews
rescued by "Operation Moses."
A resolution responding to
Prime Minister Shimon Peres' call
for solving the problems of the
Negev.
Several resolutions calling for
"excellence" in Jewish Agency
services.
A resolution urging that "all
members (of the Assembly) should
contribute to their community
Campaigns and be encouraged to
become members of the Zionist
organizations of their choice."
Israel's 'Pioneer Kibbutz'
Brings Fish To Desert
By GIL SEDAN
EILAT (JTA) Israel is
seeking markets in Europe for the
gilt head sea bream, a fish it used
to breed in the Bardawil Lake in
northern Sinai and is now
breeding for commercial use in
the waters of the Red Sea near
Eilat. About 20 tons already have
been exported, mainly to Rome.
Ministry of Agriculture experts
have been doing market studies in
Europe funded by the Jewish
Agency and initial findings are
favorable, especially in Italy and
Greece.
The fish are bred by the Na-
tional Center for Maritime
Agriculture, which has dispatched
13 scientists to the Red Sea to ex-
plore the commercial potential of
the sea waters. The bream is the
first practical result of their ef-
forts, which have been financed in
part by the Jewish Agency's set-
tlement department.
Kibbutz Elifaz in the Arava
region began in 1984 to breed the
sea bream in floating cages in the
Red Sea. A pollution problem
arose because every 1,000 tons of
fish raised requires 2.500 tons of
fish food. 60 percent of which is
returned as waste. The Maritime
Agricultural Center subsequently
built inland sea water ponds to
solve the problem. The Center is
also breeding shrimp for export
According to Dr. Hillel Gordir..
director of the Maritin.e
Agricultural Center, "In our vi-
sion we see the entire area from
Eilat northward covered with fish
ponds. We have only started
scratching the potential. Even-
tually, it is a question of financial
resources."
Gordin noted that "Japan in
vests in maritime agriculture.
research some $750 million; Nor
way invests some $20 million an-
nually. Israel settles for the time
being on an annual investment if
only $1 million."
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Our Film Folk
Danny Kaye Honored
In Paris Recently
By HERBERT G. LUFT
HOLLYWOOD Danny Kaye,
recently honored in Paris with
Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur,
I was presented with the same
iecoration in a special ceremony
lat the home of Bernard Miyet,
'onsul General of France, at a
[Beverly Hills reception attended
by this columnist. I had watched
Danny some 40 years ago when,
it the Samuel Goldwyn Studios,
he started in "The Kid from
irooklyn," "The Secret Life of
Valter Mitty," and later as "Hans
Christian Anderson."
Danny was honored for his
lifetime commitment to
^humanitarian works, as well as for
is artistry as an actor. The
French government has recogniz-
ed his 33 years as UNICEF's
ambassador-at-large during which
jhe toured the world to bring a
sense of hope and a moment of
laughter to children. Over a
period of 23 years, he has raised
. close to $8 million for musician's
- pension funds by conducting sym-
/ phonic orchestras, though he
i never learned to read music.
BORN Daniel Kaminsky in New
*York City on January 18, 1913,
the son of an immigrant Russian
Jewish tailor, he adapted his name
from the label Danny K. his
friends gave him in his youth. He
*ot his start in show business by
fummeling at summer resorts in
the Catskill mountains. He was
%]owning about the premises for
he enjoyment of the guests at all
Sours of the day and night. He
Mirst came to the attention of
^theatergoers in the Kurt Weill-
mAoss Hart musical "Lady in the
Dark," when he upstaged Ger-
trude Lawrence with his
"Tchaikovsky" rendition, rattling
off the names of more than 50
Russian composers in 38 seconds.
Much of his earlier material was
^written for him by Sylvia Fine,
daughter of a Brooklyn dentist for
-hom Kaye had worked briefly as
n errand boy. Sylvia married him
in 1941 and continued to write his
Special material for many years.
From the show-stopper in "Lady
in the Dark," Kaye jumped into
jktardom on Broadway with "Lets
yace It," a musical revue which
was made into a film with Bob
Mope.
But his stage appearance had
fibeen caught by the late Samuel
JGoldwyn who brought him to
^Hollywood in 1943 for his first mo-
tion picture, "Up in Arms," with
youthful Dinah Shore at his side.
He proved himself a completely
novel kind of song and dance man,
-with an inventiveness Hollywood
[had not seen since Eddie Cantor,
'or Goldwyn, Kaye appeared in a
lumber of musicals, later made
films on a more serious note, most
lotably "Me and the Colonel" and
f'The Madwoman of Chaillot" for
)ther production companies.
HE WENT into television in
1956, appearing on Edward R.
lurrow's "See It Now," after he
Aad an even dozen starring films
Behind him. Four years later, he
Aiade his debut in TV entertain-
yent with three specials, "An
Kvening with Danny Kaye," one
Bf them co-starring Lucille Ball.
n the same period, he made his
rst Las Vegas night club ap-
pearance, toured the Orient and
performed as guest conductor in
Boston, Detroit, Los Angeles and
V'ashington and visited Russia at
he behest of the State
department.
"The Danny Kaye Show," star-
ing on CBS-TV in September,
f963, had a four-year run, bring-
ig him four Emmy awards for
imself and his collaborators. His
elevision performances since
ave ranged from "Pinocchio,"
Peter Pan," The "Ringling Bros,
arnum and Bailey Circus,"
Danny Kaye
"Disneyland," to guest ap-
pearances on the "Twilight
Zone." They also include an
Emmy-winning "Look at the
Met" from the stage of the
Metropolitan Opera House. But
his most significant dramatic per-
formance was the one in
"Skokie," where he appeared as a
grim survivor from a Nazi concen-
tration camp.
In June, 1967, during the Six-
Day War, he flew to Israel to visit
hospitalized Israeli soldiers. He
performed or conducted or-
chestras to let the Israelis know
that there were people out in the
world who cared for them.
Visiting children's day camps and
kibbutzim, he also spent time with
the military, political and civilian
segments of the population, re-
maining friends with them to this
day.
ON OUR VISIT to Israel earlier
still, in 1961, we heard that Kaye
had inaugurated the golf course in
Caesaria (the only one in the coun-
try at that time). After the Six-
Day War, he toured three con-
tinents, conducting the Israel
Youth Symphony. For his devo-
tion to the young democracy in
the Middle East, he received vir-
tually every honor awarded by
that nation, including in 1982 the
Lifetime Achievement Award
from Ben-Gurion University.
He has seen as many battlefields
as most Americans in uniform,
over a period of some 33 years,
entertaining troops in World War
II, the Korean War, Vietnam, as
well as the Middle East. In 1984,
he was the recipient of the Ken-
nedy Honors, presented before
President Reagan at a special
awards performance in
Washington.
Some years ago, he was Noah in
the Biblical play, "Two by Two,"
in which he reiterated the dream
of a better society, a dream he
helped to facilitate in many ways.
The impoverished offspring of im-
migrant parents, product of the
streets of New York, he became
ambassador of laughter to an en-
tire world and Pied Piper to its
children.
JTA Services
Naomi Hadassah
Dinner-Social
Scheduled
"Jewish Trivia" games will be
featured at Pumperniks, 112th St.
and South Dixie Hwy., according
to Rose Wolf, Program Vice
President of the Naomi Chapter of
Hadassah.
The combined dinner-social and
meeting will be held on Monday,
August 11, starting at 6:30 p.m.,
and a short general meeting at 8
o'clock.
Coralie Guberman will be the
Mistress of Ceremonies for the
evening's program.
fF&nzm
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Temple Shir Ami celebrated groundbreaking
for its new facility to be constructed at the in-
tersection of Sunset Drive and S. W. 125th
Avenue in Kendall. Completion date for the
8,800-square-foot building is scheduled for
January. Participating in the ceremony, left
to right, are Harold Zeeman, founding
Honors And
Appointments
member; Roberta Fox, state senator; Susan
Rader, temple president; Rabbi Brett Golds-
tein; Barry Schreiber, county commissioner;
Metro Mayor Steve Clark; Art Simon, state
representative; and Walter Dartland, con-
sumer advocate.
SPRING GLEN, N.Y. (JTA)
Arie Silverman of Fort Lee,
N.J. has been elected president of
North American Aliya Movement,
succeeding Susan Becker of New
York City.
NEW YORK (JTA) Actor
Jack Lemmon has been named
honorary president of the world's
first International Peace Park, ac-
cording to Alan Freidberg, ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of Greater New York,
sponsor of the project. The Peace
Park will be situated on the
Israeli-Egyptian border area of
Ezuz.
JCCs to conduct study
During the next week, the Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will conduct a telephone survey to gather
information to help plan a new Center in South Dade.
The questions will take about two minutes and the
interviewer will not ask for your name or address.
The study is being directed by Dr. Ira M. Sheskin,
associate professor of geography at the University of
Miami.
If you are contacted, we would sincerely appreciate
your cooperation.
Wk|y Sues
Not Just Now and Then!
You Can't Be Fully Informed With Less
s500 Publix
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With Each New Subscription
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Names In News
New Israel Fund Approved Grants

The Board of Directors of the
New Israel Fund, at their bi-
annual meeting in Jerusalem, has
approved grants for 25 organiza-
tions involved in improving social
change in Israel, including the
establishment of the country's
first Legal Defense Center, it is
announced in New York by
Jonathan Jacob?. NIF executive
director.
"The 25 organizations chosen to
receive more than $250,000 bring-
ing our total 1986 distribution of
funds to nearly $1 million,
represents our commitment to the
future of Israel." Jacoby said.
The Israel Legal Defense
Center, which will operate under
the auspices of the Israel Associa-
tion for Civil Rights, is a ground-
breaking step towards
establishing respect for litigation
as a nonpartisan tool for pro-
moting civil rights.
A growing obstacle to political
discourse in Israel is the tendency
of the secular and Orthodox
religious camps to view each other
as extremist, even though only a
small fraction on either side
represents extremist views, says
an Israeli professor.
Dr. Gerald Cro^er of Bar I Ian
University told participants in
Jerusalem for the 22nd annual
America-Israel Dialogue spon-
sored by the American Jewish
Congress that it has become in-
creasingly difficult in Israel to
identify those on the extreme
right or left because of the tenden-
cy to "group" people and
ideologies into single categories.
Citing the Jewish underground
as an example, he noted that in-
stead of portraying them as ex-
tremists within their own rightw-
ing ranks, the Israeli left sees
them "as an example of what the
rightwing is all about."
Following instructions of the
L.A. Mayer Memorial Foundation
in Jerusalem. Christie's in Lon-
don have dispersed works of art
and books collected by Sir David
Salomons (1851-1925) during
assorted sales over the last three
weeks. The collection, which was
dominated by a library of il-
lustrated French books, included
European pictures and old master
prints and realized a total of
$2,160,821.
Sir David Salomons, nephew of
the first Jewish MP in England,
was eminent as a pioneer and in-
ventor and was the first person, in
1874, to design and install a
system of electric power for
lighting and propelling machinery
at his home in England. During
his one term as mayor of Tun-
bridge Wells in Kent in 1894. he
was largely responsible for the
first motor exhibition to be held in
England.
The library that he amassed
consisted of over 5,000 volumes
for which he compiled a
bibliographical catalogue.
Despite claims to the contrary,
Israel's trade with South Africa is
minute, and Jewish opposition to
apartheid is significant, an up-
dated study by the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation indicates.
The revised edition of the
popular monograph entitled
"Jews, Zionism and South Africa"
includes expanded information on
the response of the South African
Jewish Community to apartheid.
There is also a new chapter on the
infiltration and exploitation of the
anti-apartheid movement by anti-
Israel forces.
The study was made by Yosef
Abraaowitx. a member of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel National Stu-
Martin KeUner of Los Angeles
was elected vice-chairman of
the International Board of
Governors of Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology at its
annual meeting in Haifa on
June 18. Dr. KeUner is now
serving his third term as na-
tional president of the
American Society for
Technion.
Hebrew University from
throughout the world will gather
for five days. Sept. 17-21. in Los
Angeles for their biennial
conference.
'The International Conference
will be a rare blending of stars and
savants." said Harvey L. Silbert
of Beverly Hills, United States
chairman for the meeting.
Barbra Streiaaad is honorary
chairman. Isaac Becker of Mex-
ico. Gerald Halbert of Canada,
and William Weinberg of Bever-
ly Hills and Honolulu are Silbert's
co-chairmen.
3&M/t/uwn dent Secretariat and a student at
Boston University who, as a major
in international relations and an
intern at the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC), has done a great deal of
research on these issues.
The study was edited by Rabbi
Stanley Ringler, formerly the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
director of community affairs and
development B'nai B'rith Hillel is
a sponsor of this report.
Rabbi David Rosen, former
chief rabbi of Ireland, has been
named director of Interreligious
Affairs of the Jerusalem office of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
ADL national director Nathan
Perlmutter said Rabbi Rosen will
serve as ADL's official liaison
with the religious communities in
Israel, both Jewish and Christian,
and will be responsible for
developing interreligious pro-
gramming in Israel.
Rabbi Rosen, who is dean of the
Sapir Center for Jewish Heritage
in the old city of Jerusalem, was
senior rabbi of the Green and Sea
Point Hebrew Congregation, the
largest Jewish congregation in
South Africa. Prior to that he
served as chaplain for the Israel
Defense Forces in the Western
Sinai and Suez Canal regions.
A leading Jewish activist has
charged that certain elements,
under the guise of religion, are
seeking to create conflict between
the black and Jewish com-
munities, and that active religious
leadership is needed if positive
progress is to be made in relations
between the two groups.
Speaking on "Religion and
Racism in America" at a panel
discussion at the National Urban
League Conference in San Fran-
cisco, Gary E. Rabin, program
director for the American Jewish
Committee, stated:
"Forces within both our com-
munities, including some in
religious positions, would want to
divide us. Those with genuine
religious principles, however, who
truly seek a better life for our
communities and our country, will
redouble our efforts to work
together for a more just and equal
society."
Some 500 Friends of the
The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, representing
more than 800 Reform
synagogues in the United States
and Canada, has called on Presi-
dent Reagan to protest the
"degrading treatment" by
Austrian police of Sister Rose
Thering, an American nun who
was strip-searched at the Vienna
airport after taking part in a
demonstration protesting the in-
auguration of Kart Waldheia as
president of Austria.
Albert Vorspan. senior vice
president of UAHC, said the
organization had also called on
Waldheim "to repudiate this ac-
tion, lest your election be regard-
ed as a signal for the resurgence
af Nazi-like brutality."
Shamir Knew
Peres Was
Morocco-Bound
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir said
Monday (July 21) he knew in ad-
vance of Premier Shimon Peres'
trip to Morocco for talks with
King Hassan believed related to
the Middle East peace process but
declined to say whether he gave
Peres his blessings. But President
Chaim Herzog did.
The Likud leader said on a radio
interview that if the trip resulted
in anything acceptable to the
Cabinet and Inner Cabinet, he
would continue that policy after
he takes office as Prime Minister
next October under the Labor-
Likud rotation of power
agreement.
However, Shamir stressed that
he would oppose any territorial
concessions in the West Bank in
exchange for an agreement with
Jordan, if that was the outcome of
Peres' talks with Hassan. He in-
dicated that the Cabinet as a
whole had not been informed in
advance of Peres' trip, adding
that it was up to the Premier to
decide which senior ministers to
inform.
Herzog welcomed Peres' mis-
sion. He said it indicated the ex-
tent to which the Arab states now
accept the fact of direct talks with
Israel as the way to achieve peace
in the Middle East. He too knew in
advance of Peres' plans.
"On the eve of his visit, the
Prime Minister reported to me
that all the arrangements had
been concluded, and I gave him
my blessing and best wishes for
the trip," Herzog said. "I regard
his open and publicized visit as of
first-rate importance."
The Abe Horrowitz Post of the Jewish War Veterans meets on
Sunday at 930 am at N.E. 160 Street and 19 Place
Erasmus Hall High School, the oldest secondary school in New
York and the second oldest in the country. wiD be celebrating its
200th birthday in September. Parties interested in attending the
celebration should contact the school, located in Brooklyn
The American Jewish Committee-Greater Miami Chapter will
hold its annual award dinner October 21 at the Grand Bay Hotel
The honoree for this year's dinner is Ah/in Cassel of Broad and
CmmL
Dade County Bar Association President Henry H Harnage has
announced the appointment of a special commission to hear com-
plaints about judicial campaigns. Serving will be Frank A
Howard. Jr.. chairman. Jose 1 Astigarrage. Ellen Freidin. Phyllis
Shampanier and Eugene Shy. Jr
The Miami Beach Chess Club is sponsoring the first "Dave
Wiliams Seven Minute Speed Chess Tournament." with $150
cash prize fund guaranteed, on Sunday. 12 15p.m.. at the Miami
Beach Chess Ckib Pavilbon. 21st Street Community Center
Miami Beach. The tournament a opened to all chess players,
members and non-members, rated and unrated Players must br-
ing their own chess sets and chess clocks
Attorney-CPA Sydney S Traum. of Miami, attended the Mid
Year Meeting of the American Association of Attorney-Certified
Public Accountants in Boston Traum is a vice president of the
1200-member association, composed of persons qualified both as
Attorneys-at-Law and as Certified Public Accountants.
The Goldstein Hebrew Academy of South Dade is now taking
registrations for the 1986/87 school year The school, located on
the campus of the South Dade Jewish Community Center, serves
students m nursery through the sixth grade
The Miami Bech Business and Professional Women's Club
plans the next organizational meeting for Tuesday at the Holiday
Inn Oceanside. in Miami Beach at 6 p.m for cocktails followed by
dinner.
Airman Mark Mitiuck. son of Jules S and Bertha Mitmck
Miami, has graduated from the U.S. Air Force security police
specialist course at Lackland Air Force Base. Texas.
You heard us right: Menorah wants you to shop and compart"
pre-arrangement plans Then come to Menorah last With live
convenient locations, the finest options to custom-tailor your
plan, memorial gardens In Palm Beach and Broward. and
expert, counselors. Menorah Is the plan more Jewish families
are choosing And our plans are available at the lowest prices
quoted by anyone. So go ahead shop 'them" first Then come
to Menorah where your last choice is your best choice
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
North Miami Beach: 935-3939 Sunrise: 742-6O00
Margate: 975-0011 Deerfield Beach: 427-4700
West Palm Beach: 627-2277
( cmcirnr> Funeral C haprts Mjusolcum I'n- Need Htannlnft


Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. "And Moses gave unto Gad Reuben and unto the half-
tribe ofManas8eh the kingdom ofSihon"
(Numbers 32.33).
MATTOT
MATTOT Moses informed the tribal heads regarding the laws
concerning vows. He sent 12,000 armed men (1,000 from each
tribe) to war with the Midianites. The expedition was successful.
Among those killed was Balaam. The tribes of Reuben and Gad,
who had large herds of cattle, asked to be allowed to settle on
grazing land in Transjordan. Moses agreed, on condition that
these tribes lead the other tribes accross the Jordan, and not
return to Transjordan until all their brother tribes had been pro-
vided for. Part of the tribe of Manasseh conquered half of Gilead,
and were granted it for their territory.
2 of 2 Torahs
. "Three cities beyond the Jordan, and three cities in .
Canaan; they shall be cities of refuge"
(Numbers 35.14).
MASE
MASE The portion begins with a detailed account of the
various stations on the Israelites' route to the Promised Land,
from the time they left Egypt until they reached the plains of
Moab, by the Jordan at Jericho. Instructions concerning the ap-
portionment of the land followed. "And ye shall inherit the land
by lot according to your families to the more ye shall give the
more inheritance, and to the fewer thou shalt give the less in-
heritance; wheresover the lot falleth to any man, that shall be his"
(Numbers 33.54). It was necessary that all the Canaanites be ex-
pelled. "But if ye will not drive out the inhabitants of the land
from before you, then shall those that ye let remain of them be as
thorns in your eyes, and as pricks in your sides, and they shall
harass you in the land wherein ye dwell" (Numbers 33.55). The
portion gives specific instructions concerning the boundary lines
and lists the names of the persons who should divide the land. The
Israelites are commanded to set aside 48 cities and surrounding
lands for the Levites, who have not been given territory as the
other tribes were. Reference is made to the cities of refuge where
the accidental murderer might fled for safety. The portion, and
book of Numbers, ends with an injunction prohibiting the transfer
of inherited land from one tribe to another through inter-tribal
marriage.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Woliman-
Tsamlr, S15. published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, NY. 10038 Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Bankruptcy Forces 40 Families To
Abandon A Jordan Valley Settlement
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vered Yericho (Rose of
Jericho), a hilltop settle-
ment overlooking the Jor-
dan Valley, has been aban-
doned by the 40 families
whose home it was for the
past six years. The reason:
bankruptcy.
Financial woes piled one atop
the other until the moshav was
unable to function. "It is the end
of Zionism," one settler said. "We
have been broken by petty-minded
clerks," declared moshav
secretary Arik Shaul. Another
member wept openly as he
lowered the Israeli flag for the
last time.
THE MOSHAV blames an
unfeeling bureaucracy for its
demise and lashed out at the "set-
tlement institutions." But
Matityahu Drobless, chairman of
the World Zionist Organization's
Settlement Department, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency in
Jerusalem that the moshav
brought its problems on itself.
Ten months ago it received a $1
million mortgage to build perma-
nent homes. The money was im-
mediately deposited with a thrift
institution which paid high in-
terest. It was supposed to do the
purchasing for the moshav. But a
few months later the institution
collapsed because of its own finan-
cial difficulties and took the
moshav's money with it.
The settlers also lost the
$150,000 they had deposited to
pay the water bills. The bills were
never paid and the Mekorot water
company cut off the water which
was used to irrigate the moshav's
vineyards.
ACCORDING TO Drobless, he
warned the settlers not to deposit
their money with the failing finan-
cial institution but they didn't
heed his advice. Nevertheless, he
said, the WZO continued to assist
the settlement even though it was
not entitled to assistance. "One
could not ignore their troubles,"
he said.
The assistance was too little and
too late. This week the settlers
turned in their personal weapons
to the local military authorities.
The 40 families got into their cars
and drove in a long motorcade to
Jerusalem. It was like a funeral
procession, one observer said.
They spent the night at a hostel
and were to demonstrate the next
day outside the Prime Minister's
Office. They will not end their
campaign for help, the settlers
said. Vered Yericho is not the only
moshav in trouble. Moshav
Kochav Michael in the Lachish
region also closed its gates
because of a financial crisis.
Political
Briefs
Dr. Ann Ruben, an educator, is
running for Dade County School
Board education self-esteem
projects.
Dade County Court Judge Leah
Simms says she's about ready to
get back on the campaign trail,
after giving birth to a son two
weeks ago.
Susan Guber is a candidate for
State Representative in District
117, having served in the
legislative field.
Rep. Betty Metcalf of Coral
Gables, a clinical psychologist, is a
candidate for the Dade
Legislature. Rep. Metcalf offered
an amendment during the 1986
Legislative Session to mandate a
year-long follow-up study of pa-
tients released from the state's
mental institutions.
Lucrecia Granda kicked off her
campaign for Dade County Court
Judge on Friday at the Omni
Hotel. Granda has been active in a
number of civic causes, including
the YWCA (as former president).
Eli Breger, a candidate for the
office of Dade County Court
Judge, has named his 29 year old
son Richard, an attorney, as his
campaign manager.
World
News Briefs
JERUSALEM (WNS) An
ancient Biblical text was un-
covered in an archaeological dig in
Jerusalem, it was announced here.
The text includes the priestly
benediction in full. The text was
found in two copies, engraved on
petit silver plates, near the
Jerusalem Station, by a team of
archaeologists headed by Gaby
Barkai of Tel Aviv University.
NEW YORK (WNS) An
American interfaith delegation of
Catholic, Jewish and Protestant
religious leaders conferred with
Foreign Minister Wu Xueqian of
the Peoples Republic of China in
Beijing on July 1, it was reported
here. The delegation is headed by
Rabbi Arthur Schneier, president
of the Appeal of Conscience Foun-
dation, which sponsored the visit
to China.
PARIS (WNS) Boris
Goulko, the former Soviet Grand
Master, will represent Israel this
month at the Mediterranean
Chess festival in Marseilles. It will
be the first time Goulko, a former
Soviet champion, will be playing
abroad since he left the Soviet
Union last May for Israel. Goulko,
his wife Anna Aksharumova, also
a chess champion, and their seven-
year-old son David, left the Soviet
Union on May 29 after a seven-
year wait for their exit visas.
Israel Discount Bank Of
New York Publishes Statement
Israel Discount Bank of New
York published its Balance Sheets
as of June 30. Total assets reach-
ed $3.7 billion, total deposits were
$3.4 billion and total capital funds
$222 million. Based on its year
end 1985 deposits, the bank was
ranked as the 14th largest com-
mercial bank in New York State
and the 73rd largest in the United
States by the American Banker.
Israel Discount Bank of New
York is an American bank
chartered by New York State and
a member of the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corporation.
The Bank has steadily increased
its client base, both within the
U.S. and abroad by consistently
emphasizing a high degree of pro-
fessionalism and personal service.
During the last five years the
Bank's assets, deposits and
capital have more than doubled.
T
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:44 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tempi* Beth Shmutl
1700 Michigan Ava.. Miami Baach
S34-7213 534-7214
Barry J Konovltch. Rabbi fSN
Mosha Buryn, Cantor fr/
Sergio Groblar. President ^
Shotem Epalbaum. President
Religious Committaa
W
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Baach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
S.I. 8:30 a.m. 6 8:30 p.m.
Dally aarvlcai 7:30 a.m. 4 6:30 p.m.
;
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avanu* '
Miami Baach
Or. Irving Lahrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bargar
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klain. Ritual D.raclor
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
TEMPLE BETH AM
5080 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 697 6667
Or. HatlMft Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Rabbi Leonard Schoolman
Frl. fell p.m. Sarvica Rabbi
Laonard Schoolman will load
"Aak Tha Rabbi" Ion
BETH DAVID CONG REG ATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avanu. 854-3911
Jack Rlamar. Rabbi
Dr. Sol Landau,
Rabbi Emerttua
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Mlnchah Sat. 7:56 p.m.
Frl. aarvlca 5 30 p.m
Sat. 9 a.m. aarvlca
Baby namlno ol Martina Wlaotaky
DoHy Sotvlcoa:
Sun. 6 a.m. 6 5:30 p.m.
Mon. 6 Thuri 7:30 a.m. 4 5:30 p.m.
Turn.. Wad.. A Frl. 7:46 a.m. 6 5:30 p.m.
Early Childhood Cantar raglatrallon
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pkvatree Drive. Miami Beech
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitf
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
MujaWI ntmm nvtorrn Conorooatton
137 N.E. 18th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior RabtX Haskell Bemat
Aaalatant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Rachetle F. Nelson
Cantor Emerttua:
Jacob Q. Bomatain
Director of Education
And Programming: Jack L. Sparks
Frl. p.m Downtown: Rabbi Ran P. Porimottar
"Walahlng Our Wordi Tha Soaclar ol
:anaorsNp" Liturgy: Cantor Rachollo F. Nalaon
Kandall: Rabbi HaskeU M. Bamat Ethic and
Omar UaMHtlee. -. Jewteh Tradition Confront*
a Cynical World" Lltunw: Hanoy Kaufman.
CanlorlalSotolit.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Ofanada Btvd Reform
Coral Qab+ae 867 5867
Mlohaal B. Daanatat, Rabbi
Friday aarrtoa 8 p.m.
BETHKODESH
Conearvetrve
1101 S.W. 12 Are.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joaeph Krlseel
Rose BerMn: Executive Secretary
858-6334
f
Sat aarvtoa 8:45 a.m.
m
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal 534-9776
Rabbi Marvin Roaa
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
SantOM Frl 7:30 aon.
Sat 8:SO a.m
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75fh St., Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramovrrte /f"
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat a.m. Sabbath aorvtc*.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday t a.m. and 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 6:15 p.m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33191
915509 Corteervattve
Or. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Or. Joaeph A. Qorflnkal.
Rabbi Emerttua
Mosha Frledler. Cantor
Frl 7:45 p.m. DaMy 7:30 a.m. 6 6 p.m
Sal 8:46 am 4 8:30 p.m
Sun. 6:30 a.m. 4 6:30 p.m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S4S Jefferaon Are.. M.B., FL 33139
Tei 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Matbar
Cantor Nlaaim Benyamini
Dally aarvlcaa 6 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Sat. 6 15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7800 S.W. 120th Street
239-2901 f
Rabbi David H. Auarbech \
Cantor Stephen Freedman
Fridayaamtca 6p.m.
16:30 a.m.
Saturday aarvlca I
538 7231
Temple bT>iSh6lom
ChaaeAve. *41atSt. llb.
OR leon kronish, Faundmo Senior Rabbi
GARY A QllCKSTEIN.r
MARRY JOLT, Au.Hlary Rabb
pAUL D C APL AN. Aaalatant Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Frl. ava aarvtoa 8:15 p.m
Sat. morning aarvlca 10:46 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N Miami Baach Blvd
Or Max A. Lipachitz. Rabbi
Randall Konigaburg, Assl Rabbi
Zvee Arom. Cantor
Harvay L Brown. Exec Oiractor
DaMy Senfeee: Mon.Frt. 7:30 a.m.
4 5:3D p.m.
Saturday 8:25 a.m. 4 7:30 p.m
Sun. 6 a.m. 4 5:30 p.m
m
TEMPLE NER TAMIO
7902 C arty mi Ava..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovtu
Cantor Edward Klein
Jalry Sanncoa 6 a.m. and 630 p.m.
Sat 8:45 a.m.
Frl. lata aarvlca 6 p.m

SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
661 1582
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0898
Rabbi Warran Kasztl Mooam othodo>
Sal 9:30 am. aarvlca at Tampla Samu-El.
8353 SW 152 Ava.. S. ol N Kandall Dr.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava
North Dade s Reform Congrega
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook Associate Rabbi
Irving Shu Ikes Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Frl. avanlng aarvlcaa 6 p.m
Sal 10 30am
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Or Conservative
2712311 ..r-.
Or Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi 'W))
Benjamin Adler Cantor x^>
David Rosanthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan 7 a.m. Monday 4 Thursday
Sunday 8 a.m.. Frl., 6:15p.m.
Sabbath aarv. will ba conducted by lampliv-
centera. "Mlnyanakaa". Sat. 6 a.m. Sabbat!
San. Tattler ChapeL


Page 6-B The Jewish FVjodaivTndaj. August 1. 1986
Behind The Headlines
A Nightmare Continues In Argentina
By AVIV A CANTOR
Argentina's night of ter-
ror and carnage is over at
last but the nightmare
goes on. The dawn of
democracy has brought no
end to the agony of the
relatives of the
desaparecxdos. the 9.300
(documented) to 30.000
(estimated) individuals,
mainly youths, devoured by
the Moloch of the junta dur-
ing its 1976-53 reign of
terror.
These "disappeared persons.'"
Argentina's cocarfccaoc to the
20th Century's dumber of hor-
rors, were pulled from their beds
at gunpomt is the dead of night.
inafraarl off the sOeets into un-
marked ears, banted off from then-
office*. Never heard from again.
they have no graves, not even un-
marked ones. Their bodies were
thrown into the sea from
hehcopter*. borned to ashes in
i nulna sad case mutilated
and Jaauemfacred. mto time pits.
snd sD the local emissaries of
Hashomer Hatxair. the Socialist
WmM faaA
peared. Most at
and almost the entire yoath move-
aseat in Cordoba disappeared-
Since the reign of terror began
tflf*. a group of women has
oeen marching every Thursday m
front of the PresuWina: Palace in
Buenos Aires to demand an ac-
counting on the i*ze of their disap-
peared children. They are known
ss the "Madres. the Mothers of
the Plaza de Mayo.
JEWISH community,
by the resgn of ter-
cke die majority
of ArgenGnans. to pot the past
behind ft. fcansc tnat ojsmtemng
the human rights itiuurki mage:
endanger the fragile democratic
tegime of Prescient Raui Aifoc-
aa The amm,miL; however, is
st rent by ottter rrmme* over
what it did and fid not do for the
victims of the terror, m particular.
the Jewish oesapareados.
While these charges and
counter-charges have come mto
the open x Argentina since the
remsctution of democracy m that
country the mformasoc the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency has
learned regarding the heroic
rescue of Jews dozing the resgn of
terror via an '"underground
rafiroad' organised by Israehs
asfnewii at Argentma has net
seen made pecoc.
An estimated 10 peneat of the
deaspareados were Jews a pro-
portion higher than the Jews' one-
aad-a-quarter percent in the
stioa.
THET INCLUDED what the
jaata called "ideological
eraaaass." peopie m psychology.
the sods, soences. journalism.
teadang and over 100 children of
Entire chapters
Renee EpeJbsum. a widow in
her 60s. is one of their leaders.
Her three children are among the
desapareados: none have ever
been heard from or about since
their abduction. Lms, who had
beenamedkai student concerned
about his country's poor, was kid-
capped in August. 1977 at the age
of 25.
THE YOUNGEB ehfldren -
Gaucbo (then 23X a poet and musi-
cian who was studying law to be
able to defend prisoners of cons-
cience, and Lfla (then 25) were
fc-4~PP-* three months later
from Uruguay. Their mother had
sent them there to try to ensure
their safety
She is oz of six mothers and
one grandn-jCher appearing in a
lauesiUj hi leased documentary on
"Las Madres: the Mothers of the
Plaza de Mayo." which premiered
at the F2m Forum here. The San
was produced and directed by
Susans Munoa. an Argectine-borc
Jew who was active in a Zionist
youth movement, and cved x.
Israel from 1972-79. and Lourdes
Portiao.
EpeJbaam. m an interview with
the JTA during her recent visit to
Sew York m connection with the
film, said that Jewish
rWsaparnrViw "were not kidnap-
ped as Jews, but it helped. The
pobce were more snapsaoos of
Jews. For them, every Jew mast
be a Communist."
The junta, she continued, was
"deeply anQ-Semroc." Jews m
prison recerved three or four
times the i" of torture as
non-Jews. This has been substan-
tiated by Amnesty InternaaonaL
former prisoner Jacobo Timer-
man, and. most recently, by Nobel
Peace Prixe wmner Adoifo Peres
Esqcvei. whe was hrmsetf aa-
praoned and tortured for 14
BaBBl
EPELBAUM told the JTA that
the DAIA. the representative
body of Argentine Jewry, was not
active in intervening with the
authorities on behalf of
iesapareados iwho beeac
persons) and prisoners (whose hv
carceraoon was on record) a
charge the DAL*, enphaocaily
denied m its 1984 document on
the subject.
Rabbi Marshall Meyer, who
served until recently as spiritual
leader of Congregation Beth-El of
Buenos Aires, was a founding
member of the Permanent
Assembly for Human Rights, and
visited piiauuers m jaiL In a re-
cent interview with the JTA in
Sew York, where he now serves
as rabbi of Congregation B'nai
Jeahurun. he criticised the DAIA
for not speakiag oat forcefaBy oa
human rights atrocities in
general.
Both EpeJbaum and Meyer told
JTA that the DAIA urged Jewish
communities outside the country
to keep silent about the horrors.
EpeJbaum said she was told that
World Jewish Congress affiliates
cad so because of the WJC pohey
that they cannot intervene when a
laaj fRK** m this ease the
DAIA. opposes it. WJC secretary
general Israel Smger toad the JTA
that the WJC spoke out anyway.
MEYEE ALSO revealed the
scope of the unofficial rescue work
the Isrehs were doing in Argen-
tina during the reign of terror
running a latter-day
"underground railroad" to get
Jews at risk out of the country
Israel's .\mbassador unt I960,
the iate Ram Sh-gad. and ha staff
worked unkaaji night and day.
and saved hundreds of Jew's." he
said
"He was inToJved with every
case. Meyer deserved the opera-
tion: when a Jew was ^*"pp*^
the next thing the securitj forces
would do was get ahold of his or
her address book and seae all her
or his friends and acquaintances.
Shgad and his peopie. therefore.
quickly compiled a hat of names of
as the friends and coiieagues of t
disappeared person, who were at
grave risk.
We went from door to door.
from house to bouse." he con-
tinued, perwrahag parents to let
thee Jakiten go with us. They
had to leave at once." Meyer
would not disclose the route out of
Members of the World Jewish Congress at a press conference at
the Jerusalem Hilton introduce new evidence against newly,
elected Austrian President Kurt Waldheim concerning kit alien.
ed .Van past. Left to right are Dr. Israel Singer, WJC secretary-
general- Edgar M. Bronfman, WJC president; and Elan
Steinberg. WJC executive director.
Argentina or the immediate coun-
try of destination. DovSchmorak.
who took over Sirgad's job until
1965. told the JTA last year that
he and the DAIA made secret ar-
rangements with the government
and seuaitj forces who would let
certain priaoueis go if the Israelis
would get them out.
The Israelis often went in the
middle of the night to the prisons.
took the released Jews to the air-
port, and got them out of the
country. "They rescued seven]
hundred Jewish prisoners this
way." the JTA was told.
JTA Syndicate
Rabin: Despite Lebanon War, Israel
Still Faces Problem Of Terrorism
By HUGH OBGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's long, costly invasion
of Lebanon did not diminish
terrorism, and "unfor-
tunately, we are faced with
problems of terrorism which
are not less than those
before the war began in
Lebanon.'' Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin said last
Wednesday (July 16). But
Gahlee is more secure, he
said.
Rabin spoke during a visit to
Israeh soldiers wounded recently
m rrashur with terrorists in the
south Lebanon security zone. He
said the Israel Defense Force is
fightaig terrorists in accordance
with government decisions. "At
this stage. I beheve we are achiev-
ing the mam goal security in the
Gahjee." he said.
THE PBOOF h that during a
period of more than 12 months,
not one Israeli dtisen has been
killed due to terrorist activity in
Lebanon, although several have
been wounded." Rabi said. He ad-
ded however that "this cost the
IDF a painful price, but far less
than during the three preceding
years."
He denied reports of recent
Katyusha rocket attacks on Israel.
"no Katyusha shelling has hit
Israeli territory in the last 24
hours. In the past there has been
shelling, and we do indeed live
with a certain reality." he added.
Asked if an attempted terrorist
landing in Israel by sea signif ed an
escalation. Rabin said. "Firs: of
all. there have been attempts in
the past, whether by land or sea."
He praised the IDF and the Navy
"The commanders on the spot
shoeed resonsabthty. initiative.
danng. courage and understan-
ding that their goal was to pre-
vent any attempts by terrorists to
penetrate and carry out their
murderous intentions." Rabi said
Oaan /atu sfnaaf tffutmli mmd smrunu Afiaaa
Uhtsmtti/orbmehtn the msidle^theOmm Hotel
Hstd m+rml mnmwrr Chris Morrison hosts the
NOT
gkwtt kvthrr kit-
emUsd Chef*
to the Omni
Waiter PaLemni*.
xsruyn "hr du Weumtmm Institute of Science.
GrsmfrMin Jewish F>
**vwt *t*.
Wther gOTMOT, aVsetor of catering; Bemie Bendheim. assistant director.
-""2^r-D?WO" >sof>; Ltt MiUman, executive director. American Commit-
MJ^^?*Z??,IluMai*:**0*<*> Ckn* Momson. general manager.
KaM*K*pk>WOT** kitchen supervisor. Ron Sasapwro. ft*
erer^r TV ( te*BsOTW \ >-nr*iu* n>peraton or the Bflss '
'rher: Ken Hamko. director Food and Beverage
Emxlv. G*rruio.


Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B.
*
\
L..J
Miami Beach resident Geoffrey Gelblum, M.D., left, has
chosen as Mount Sinai Medical Center's "Intern of the
ir." The award, initiated in 1975, recognizes outstanding per-
ince by a medical intern. "Dr. Gelblum, a graduate of
diversity of Maryland, impressed his colleagues at Mount Sinai
I his wealth of knowledge in the health care field, his sensitivi-
| in patient care, and his interest in teaching," said Kenneth
in, M.D., Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases.
It. Sinai Names Robbyn Sakrais
Foundation Representative
fount Sinai Medical Center of
ter Miami has named Robbyn
Sakrais as Foundation
>resentative.
is one of the staff profes-
knals, she will assist in the fund-
jsing and the coordination of
events for the Woman's
incer League of Miami Beach.
n addition, Sakrais is the Foun-
S^ons liaison to the Mount Sinai
iliary.
P'or many years, Sakrais has
6n President of her own In-
jior Design Firm. During much
hat time, she was actively in-
fed with local civic and
ritable organizations in which
i worked on event planning, art
ction and fund-raising. Robbyn B. Sakrais
Municipal Building At Former
Synagogue Site Evokes Protest
iONN (JTA) Plans by the
y of Frankfurt to erect a
inicipal building at the
erneplatz, site of a former
lie in the center of the old
i ghetto, was protested Sun-
by scores of artists, intellec-
1s, and local politicians.
le group, led by writer Eva
tmski, has launched a major
ipaign to lobby the city of-
Js against any changes that
>uld forever obliterate the
fish character of the area. Of-
ficials responsible for the project
said they would go ahead with the
plans.
The local Jewish community has
expressed displeasure but stopped
short of open opposition. A
spokesman, Michel Friedman,
said there would have been no
controversy if the Jewish com-
munity had been given an oppor-
tunity to regain the site. Demski
said it was in the interest of all
Frankfurt residents, not only
Jews, to preserve the historical
character of the Boerneplatz.
JNF ISRAEL TOUR
Space la (till available for tha Jewish National Fund'* Adventure
Israel tour, Aug. 13-24, for sing lei and young marrtedt, Including
meetings with Israeli military and political leaders, a night cruise on
the Klnneret, a kibbutz experience and visits to Tel Aviv, Masada and
Old Jerueelem. For more Information, contact your local JNF office,
53*^484, or call (212) 879-9300, SXt 262.________________
SOUTHERN FIELD REPRESENTATIVE
FOR OFFICE OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS,
HEBREW UNIVERSITY
College degree required. Past participant in H.U.
program preferred. Position entails travelling and
contacts with students and academics.
Send resume to: Director, Office of Acadecmj?
Affairs, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 11 East 69th
Street, New York, N.Y. 10021.
ZADANOFF-GODEL
Dana Zadanoff, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Zadanoff of North Miami
Beach, has become engaged
to Jacques Godel, son of
Maurice Godel of Bole,
Switzerland.
A March wedding is
planned.
Na'amat Groups Install Officers
Cabinet Gratified
With Morocco
Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet expressed its
"gratification" Sunday over
Premier Shimon Peres' visit
to Morocco last week for
two days of talks with King
Hassan, according to an of-
ficial communique issued
here.
The Cabinet statement said
Peres had reported at length on
the talks, stressing that he believ-
ed Hassan genuinely sought peace
and that peace benefitted from his
mission to Efrane, the site of
Hassan's summer palace some
160 miles from the Moroccan
capital of Rabat.
Peres expressed hope that the
dialogue with Hassan would have
a "favorable impact" on Israel's
relations with Egypt and on
Israel's ability to engage in discus-
sion with the Arab world.
Informed sources here have
disclosed, meanwhile, that Peres,
in a working paper he presented
to Hassan for distribution to other
Arab leaders, undertook to meet
with "authentic representatives
of the Palestinian people" in the
near future in order to explore
with them possible avenues of pro-
gress. The Camp David accords
spoke of elected representatives.
In the working paper, Peres
said Israel would negotiate with
such authentic representatives
who eschewed violence. He also
pledged that Israel would not im-
pose its sovereignty upon the oc-
cupied territories pending the con-
clusion of negotiations, and that
sovereignty would be resolved in
the course of such negotiations.
Other points said to be outlined
in the working paper include a call
for a "year of peace negotia-
tions," the renunciation of
violence by parties to the talks,
and a general development plan
for the region. It also called for an
international framework for
direct Arab-Israeli talks.
Earlier, Vice Premier and Likud
leader Yitzhak Shamir said public-
ly that Peres had stayed within
the policy guidelines of the unity
government during his talks with
Hassan. Shamir made the com-
ment after a briefing on the talks
from Peres last Friday.
The oldest Miami chapter and
the new Latin chapter of Na'amat
USA announced its officers for
the 1986-87 organizational year at
a luncheon of the South Florida
Council of Na'amat.
The Kadimah chapter's officers
include Charlotte Mittler of West
Kendall, president; Ida Meltzer of
Brickell Avenue, vice president
and treasurer; Pauline Levick of
West Kendall, vice president;
Dora Hill, vice president and Tess
Landsman, recording secretary.
Mittler's late mother, Tillie
Sandier, had served as president
of Kadimah for many years.
Raquel Rub of North Miami
Beach is the new president of the
Or Chapter of Na'amat USA and
will be serving with Ligia Lut-
zgarten, vice president; Berta
Feldman, secretary and Matilde
Behar of North Miami, treasurer.
Rub's mother is president of the
organization in Peru.
Harbor Island SPA Has New
Toil-Free Reservations Lines
South Florida's Harbor Island Spa has announced new toll-free
reservations numbers to make booking spa vacations more conve-
nient for the upcoming fall/winter season. Following a six-week
closing after Labor Day, Harbor Island reopens Oct. 22. Reserva-
tions may be made toll-free from anywhere in the U.S. by calling
1-800-SPA-SLIM (772-7546). The spa's main number in Florida
remains the same, (305) 751-7561.
Harbor Island Spa, which is completing a multi-million dollar
renovation this summer, has been owned and operated by the
Paakow family for more than 30 years.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
The Single Jewish Professionals invite Singles of all
ages to a Mid-Summers' Nights Dream, The Singles
Dance ol the Summer, at The Mutiny, 2951 South
Bayshore Dr., Coconut Grove, on Sunday, Aug. 3, at 8
p.m. Donation of $6 includes a deluxe buffet. For
additional information call 538-2884 or 932-4031.
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian.
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973. Miami, Florida 33101.
OCEMIFMHT
BOARDWALK HOTEL
25th Str^*^""*^
AURoomitlH^wwh
------- KRSKSh-
KSKKS"
HIGH HOLY DAYS $349
OCT. 3-OCT. 1* p.rp.ro
12 DAYSI11 NIGHTS -
L ^fLl rates for longer stays
* SKftSSSSSS CALL COLLECT
305-538-5721^^ ,
:


Page 8-B The Jewiafa Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nubtr 86-4180
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SELMA GERLOW1N
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of SELMA
GERLOWIN. deceased. File
Number 86-4180, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 78 West Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida The per
sonal representative of the estate
is Paul Kwitney. whose address is
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512.
Miami Beach. Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth beJow
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If the
claim is secured the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
daun to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WTTHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
unsdjcoor. of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 1. 1986.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Selma Geriowm
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Richard I Kroop (128023)
420 Lincoln Road. Suoe 512
Miami Beach. Flonda 33139
Telephone. (306) 53$-7575
10987 August 1.8.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the uudfgned dassnag to
under the fie-
nn immn Con-
st 9800 SW 98 St.
FVnda 33176. intends to
with the CJerk
at the Cirea* Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Dr Seaauai H Gruber
Eleawjobranch Consultants
MOO SW 99 St.
Mum i. Florida 33176 USA
19884 August 1 e. 15. 22. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-31306
NOTICE OF ACTION
RICHARD 0. BEECHAM.
SYLVIA L. BEECHAM.
Petitioners,
and
JOSEPH V. AUDITORE AND
ANNE L. AUDITORE.
Respondents.
TO: Respondents JOSEPH V.
AUDITORE 4 ANNE L.
AUDITORE
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to cancel a mortgage on the
following property in Dade
County. Florida;
Lots 3 4 4. in Block 13 of
HIGH PINES, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 10. at Page 18.
of the Public records of Dade
County. Florida; also known
as the South 100 feet of the
North 200 feet of the East W
of Tract 18. of REVISED
PLAT OF 2ND AMENDED
PLAT OF HIGH PINES.
according to the Plat thereof.
as recorded in Plat Book 31.
at Page 57. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you. and you
are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any. to it
on HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB.
Petitioners' attorney, whose
address is 9995 Sunset Drive.
Suite 108. Miami. FL 33173. on or
before August 22. 1986. and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioners' attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
DATED this 21st day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARJNDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
10971 August 1.8. 15.22.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31886
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SAMUEL RAWLINS.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ROSE MARIE RAWLINS.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Rose Marie Rawlins
Residence Unknown
Last Known Address
19621 N.W. 41 Ave.
Carol City. FL 33055
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
Samuel S. Sorota. Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress is 801 N.E. 167th Street.
Suite 308. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 5.
1986: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 23 day of July. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Samuel S. Sorota. Esq.
801 N.E. 167th Street. Suite 308
North Miami Beach. FL 33162
10975 August 1.8. 15.22.1986
NOTICE UNDER
ncrmooB name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undaragned dammar to
niiii under the fic-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2894
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
RICHARD HITCHCOCK
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs-at-Law
Living or dead, their respective
heirs and all persons claiming by.
through and under and or may be
infants, incompetents or otherwise
sui juris.
Residence unkown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Establishment and
Probate of Lost or Destroyed Will
has been filed in this court. You are
required to serve written defenses
to the petition not later than
September 1. 1986. on petitioners
attorney, whose name and address
are
ABRAHAM A GALBUT
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Mauni Beach. Florida 33139
and to file the original of the writ-
ten 6a8M8M with the derk of that
court either before service or jn-
TnedaUehr thereafter Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the rehef demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of thai court on Jutv 30. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Charlotte W Guard
As Deputy Clerk
First puhheanoe or posting on
August 1. 1986
Pttbhahed m The Jewve Florwhac
10996 August 1 8, 1966
'. ST A
Flonda. pinna to
name wah the Clark of the Oreo*
Court of Dads County Flonda.
Baa* Lagoon Car Center bat.
a Fauna*, corporaoua
By- Nelson Eacakv Priidaw
Atsnraev for Btae Lagoon Car
bat.
Leyts-VaW. Esq.
Torrent 4 Leyte-Vaha.
P-A.
701 S.W 2Tth Aveoae
FL 33136
541,
1. 8. 15. 22.11
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3710
Diiiaiea04
IN RE ESTATE OF
TENA WILKINS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN-
SAID ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Tena Wilkins.
deceased, late of Dade County.
Flonda. File Number 86-3719-04 is
pending in the Circuit Court in and
for Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of wbjch is
3rd Floor. Dade County Cour-
thouse. 73 West Flagier Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The name
and address of the personal
representative of this estate is
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WTTHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1> all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom thjs notice was served that
challenges the vabdity of the will,
the laahfirsfajoa of the personal
representative, venue, or juriadK
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TKMB NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Personal Representative
Shawn L Caolev
15399 SE 6 At. No A108
Miami. FL 33161
First puhheaoon of that notice of
sikniiasti ilmi on the 1 of August.
1966
I JEROME GRAFF ESQ
633 N E 167st St.. Suite 1015
N Miami Beach. Fav 33162
Telephone: (3061 651-3343
Attorney for Personal
NOTICE INDCR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the andenagaed. laumiius, tc
rkUUius same aaanaa*. Restaurant
fiaaynnut 4 Supply a: 58~? W
21 Court, ffialsah Flonda 33016.
intends to i igatn ssad name with
the Clark of the Ca-east Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Jury 16. 25.
1.8.198*
August 1. 8. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
nCTTTMXS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the nadersigned, iiwg to
buameas under the
Baa* L 1 N SALES
CO at 2988 N.W 79th. Avenue.
Flonda 33122. intends tc
d name with the Clerk
of the Orvutt Court of Dade
County Flonda.
BERNARDO LLERENA
M Jury 18.25;
August 1. 8. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOB DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-31918-10
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
(026238)
IN RE: The Mamage of
NATHAN VOGEL.
Petitioner,
and
MILLY VOGEL.
Respondent.
TO: MILLY VOGEL
1750 South Federal
Denver. Colorado 80219
YOU. MILLY VOGEL, are
hereby notified that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has beer
filed against you. and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage on the
Petitioner's Attorney. FRANK.
STRELKOW 4 GAY, 502 Capital
Bank Building. 1666 Kennedy
Causeway. North Bay Village.
Florida 33141. and file the original
Answer or Pleading in the Office
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 29th day of August
1986. If you fail to do so. Judgment
or Default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded in the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
DATED this 28th day of July.
1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
FRANK. STRELKOW 4 GAY
Attorneys for Petitioner
502 Capital Bank Building
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village. FL 33141
10989 August 1.8. 15.22. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 86-31172 FC 03
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Mamage of
PHILLIP JONES
Petitioner
and
HORTENSE MILLER JONES
Respondent
TOHORTENSE MILLER
JONES
Residence UNKNOWN
Mailing Address:
P 0 Box 51473
New Orleans. La 70151-1473
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve s
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 309. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the derk of the above styled
court on or before August 29.
1986: otherwise s default will be
entered against you for the rehef
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 25th dav of Jury 1986.
RICHARD J BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Flonda
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
iCircuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER' BRYN. ESQ
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (3061 532-1155
10990 August 1.8. 15 22. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-32788-38
IN RE The Mamage of.
ANIOLA JAMF -
Petitioner,
ind
SYLVESTER BENJAMIN
TAMES,
Respondent.
TO- SYLVESTER BENJAMIN
.'AMES. BieVart unknown, you
shal servo copy of your .Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage apon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612
Northwest 12th Ave Miami
Flonda 33136. and Se ongmaj
with Court Clerk on or baton
cayiiiln 5 1986. otherwae a
defaa* wal be auteroa.
Dated July 29 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
BY T CASAMAYOR
10081 August 1.8. IS. 22.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Crril Actioa No. 86-30140 FC 15
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
GALINA GOROKHOVSKY
a/k/a GALINA GUZMAN
and
WILSON GUZMAN
TO: WILSON GUZMAN
Present address and
residence unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Bruce J. Scheinberg, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 420
Lincoln Road. Suite 512. Miami
Beach. Flonda 33139. and file the
original with the derk of the above
styled court on or before August
29. 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 28th day of July 1986.
RICHARD J. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Flonda
By D.C BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce J Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
10988 August 1.8. 15. 22, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-32588
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE RAMON ARNAIZ. et at..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RAMON ARNAIZ and
LUIS A G U I L E R A
LAFFAYA. Residence
unknown, if alive, and if
dead, to all parties claiming
interest by. through, under
or against the said JOSE
RAMON ARNAIZ and LUIS
AGL'ILERA LAFFAYA.
and all other parties having
or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein desenbed
YOU ARE' NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following desenbed property in
Dade Count). Florida
Condominium Parcel
LAN AI -2. in ARLEN KING
COLE CONDOMINIUM,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof,
recorded January 16. 1974. in
Official Records Book 8565.
at Page 940. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida, as amended,
together with all
appurtenances thereto,
including an undivided
interest in the common
elements of said
Condominium as set forth in
the Declaration, together
with the parking space
assigned to said unit
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
jo Keith. Mack. Lewis 4 Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose
ddress is 111 N.E 1st Street.
Miami. Flonda 33132. on or before
September 5. 1986. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
amoehateh thereafter, otherwise,
a default wul be entered against
you for the relief demanded m the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of das Court on the 29th dav of
Jury. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JENN1S L RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
10992 August 1, 8. 15. 22. 1986
Fl
th
Ri
dc
P
Di
Di
W
3
re
A
ad
P.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME La*
NOTICE IS HEREBY qL
that the undersigned. JpW
engage in business under tk/fcl
titious name BLOOM nV?
FEOLA at 25 SE 2nd Ave ^J
1225. Miami, Florida 331'jN
tends to register said nam. 3
the Clerk of the Circuit cJL?]
Dade County, Florida
Sam Bloom. P.A.
Thomas P. Feola P a
10920 July 11, ig J
A"put 1, m]
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Ms
DADE COUNTY. FLORID,,
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-8488
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
SQUIRE WELLS.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the esu>
of SQUIRE WELLS date*
File Number 84-8488, is pendm,
the Circuit Court for DADE Ce"
ty. Florida. Probate Division, a
address of which is 73 Ws,J
Flagier Street Miami. Fiona j
33130. The names ar..i add**, ,S
of the personal representation J .
the personal representative'! S
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons an >
quired to file with this cor
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
THE FIRST PUBLICATION m.'
THIS NOTICE: (II all da J
against the estate and l2l uis^H
jecOon by an interested perxi:^B
whom this notice was served ai-H
challenges the validity of the H^|
the qualifications of the peru^H
representative, venue, orjunnl
tion of the court. 01
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILLtt W
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice is -M
begun on August 1. 1986. in
Personal Representative at
VERONICA BLUE n
729 N.W. 55th St d
Miami. Flonda .13167
Attorney for Persona.
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Flonda 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
10976 August. 1.8 SB

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICU1
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA P
AND FOB DADE C0UNTT
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-24144 CA4I
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GMAC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION OF PA.
tVa COLONIAL
MORTGAGE SERVICE
COMPANY
Plaintiff
vs.
TRAVIS K WADE,
et ux et al .
Defendants
TO: POSTAL FINANCE
COMPANY'
Not known whether it is a daw, 1
ed or existing, foreign ^r domes j
corporation.
All parties claiming interest I!
through, under or against I
organisation which operated of j
business under a name indieatinji |
corporation and all parties lav*
or -taiming to have an> nght. ~>
or interest in the property l*r*
described.
You are hereby notified that*
action to foreclose a mortgsp j
the following property in DAB
County. Flonda. .
Lot 12, Block 6, WIND*-*
ESTATES SECTION ONE, a*
ding to the Plat thereof, as reefl
ed m Plat Book 65, Page 141'
the Pubbc Records of Dade G* 1
ty. FVanda-
has been filed against you and
are required to serve ff J
your written defenses, if any. l
on Sheppard Faber. AnonaV*!
Plaintiff, whose address is **1
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. *.
Gables. Flonda. 33146 or. or hH
August 8th, 1986. and file *
original with the derk of this *
either before service on Pto^
attorney or "mmedl*'jJ
thereafter, otherwise a detsult I
be entered against you WJl
rehef demanded in the ^""P** I
WITNESS my hand and thel
of thai court this 2nd day 0' J*|
taMaal
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Barbara Rodngi**
As Deputy Clerk
10924 Jui-vllTie*,
August 1.1
ni


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
l_
KaDE COUNTY. FLORIDA
[ PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3634
Division 01
I RE: ESTATE OF
than J. RATNER
A/K A NAT RATNER
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Deceased
3
Al
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSONS HAVING
AIMS OR DEMANDS
AINST THE ABOVE
ATE AND ALL OTHER
SONS INTERESTED IN
ESTATE:
U ARE HEREBY NOTI-
that the administration of
estate of NATHAN J.
ER, A/K/A NAT RATNER.
. File Number 86-3634. is
in the Circuit Court for
County, Florida, Probate
ion. the address of which is 73
Flagler, Miami, Florida
30. The personal
ntative of the estate is
RT B. RATNER, whose
is c/o Kathleen Mar key,
Myers, Kenin, Levinson &
Is, 1428 BrickeU Ave., Suite
Miami, Florida 33131. The
and address of the personal
ntative's attorney are set
below.
persons having claims or
^Kands against the estate are
Huired. WITHIN THREE
NTHS FROM THE DATE OF
K: FIRST PUBLICATION OF'
S NOTICE, to file with the
^t of the above court a written
sHement of any claim or demand
may have. Each claim must be
iting and must indicate the
for the claim, the name and
of the creditor or his agent
attorney, and the amount
L If the claim is not yet due,
te when it will become due
be stated. If the claim is
ingent or unliquidated, the
a^ftre of the uncertainty shall be
iBed If the claim is secured the
tBrity shall be described The
d^Lriant shall deliver sufficient
es of the claim to the clerk to
I^Ke the clerk to mail one copy to
> personal representative.
3il persons interested in the
^Kte to whom a copy of this
^Kke of Administration has been
Bed are required. WITHIN
ptEE MONTHS FROM THE
TE OF THE FIRST
BLICATION OF THIS
ICE. to file any objections
A may have that challenge the
tssBilty of the decedent's will, the
^Bifications of the personal
l^fcesentative, or the venue or
J^Bda-tion of the court.
M.I. CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
Ml OBJECTIONS NOT SO
iJMED WILL BE FOREVER
tREI)
^fct- of the first publication of
^H Notice of Administration:
Anjust 1, 1986.
I ALBERT B. RATNER
^B Personal Representative of
the Estate of
I NATHAN J. RATNER
A/K/A NAT RATNER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
KATHI.KKN MARKEY, P.A.
^Brs. Kenin, Levinson &
Efchanis
K BrickeU Avenue Suite 700
Kin. Florida 33131
Kphone (3(15) 371-9041
B2 August 1.8, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
'ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
3TICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
B the undersigned, desiring to
Age in business under the fie
Aus name UNITED OFFICE
BTEMS at 5717 S.W. 40 St.,
li, Florida 33145 intends to
;r said name with the Clerk
Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
lorida.
Luis Padron
Jnited Office Supplies, Inc.
5717 S.W. 40 St.
Miami, Florida SS155
IR ABELAIRAS, ESQ.
mey for United Office
lies, Inc.
July 25;
August 1,8, 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
[FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
it the undersigned, desiring to
in business under the fic-
name LAW OFFICES OF
UtK B, SLAVIN at 1500 N.E.
2nd Street, North Miami Beach.
t>rida, 33162 intends to register
name with the Clerk of the
rcuit Court of Dade County,
nrida.
MARK B. SLAVIN, P.A.
July 25;
August 1.8. 15. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-30758-15
JOSEPH S. MOSS and
OLA MAE MOSS, his wife.
Plaintiff
vs.
CHARLES E. CURRY, a
bondsman; ANDREW JAMES
ALLEN; SOUTHEAST BANK,
N.A. f/k/a SOUTHEAST FIRST
NATIONAL BANK OF MIAMI,
f/k/a THE FIRST NATIONAL
BANK OF MIAMI, a United
States corporation; GEORGE
PALMER MORRELL and
MARTHA N. MORRELL;
GENERAL FINANCE
CORPORATION OF FLORIDA,
a Florida corporation; and THE
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, and any and all
unknown parties who may claim
by, through, against or under any
or all of the named Defendants in
this action,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SUIT
No. 036819
TO: ANDREW JAMES ALLEN
(Residence Unknown)
GEORGE PALMER MORRELL
(Residence Unknown)
MARTHA N. MORRELL
(Residence Unknown)
and any other person or persons
who may claim as heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, legatees, or
otherwise by, through, under or
against the above named Defen-
dants, who are not known to be
dead or alive.
YOU AND EACH OF YOU
ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
Complaint for Adjudication that
Quit-Claim Deed was a Mortgage
under F.S. 697.01 and/or Adjudica-
tion for Reformation of Instru-
ment and Quieting Title in Plain-
tiffs with regard to the following
described property, to-wit:
Lot 144. in PALMHURST, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 7, at
Page 22. of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida;
has been filed against you, and you
are hereby required to serve a copy
of your Answer or pleading upon
the Plaintiffs' attorneys,
HOLLANDER A SCHIFFRIN.
1200 Republic National Bank
Building. 150 S.E. 2nd Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33131, and file the
original Answer or pleading in the
Office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court on or before the 22 day of
August, 1986. If you fail to do so.
Default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
DATED at Miami. Florida this
16 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
10953 July 25;
August 1,8. 15. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
FURNITURE at 5717 S.W. 40 St..
Miami, Fla 33145 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Luis Padron
United Office Supplies, Inc.
6717 S.W. 40th Street
Miami, Florida 33155
Hector Abelairas, Esq.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies, Inc.
10965 July 25;
_____________August 1.8.16. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrrnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name LANES, THE
STORE FOR MEN at number
5700 Sunset Drive, in the City of
South Miami, Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LANES CLOTHING STORE,
INC.
By: Edward Boas. President
By: Anita Boas, Secretary
Attorney for Applicant:
SYDNEY S. TRAUM. P.A.
Myers Kenin Levinson &
Richards
1428 BrickeU Avenue, Suite 700
Miami. FL 33131
10929 July 11. 18, 25;
August 1, 1986
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, DJ
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
Civil Action No. 86-24974 (30)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
FLORENCE STEWART
NORRIS,
Petitioner
and
JERRY NORRIS, JR.
Respondent.
TO: JERRY NORRIS, JR.
Residence Unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it. on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 15,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this court, at Miami, Florida, on
this 8 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone: (305) 532-1166
10931 Jury 11, 18,26;
August 1,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
REAL PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-19626 03
BENJAMIN BOREW. and
JOSEPHINE BOREW his wife,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
MACKEY WIGGINS, d/b/a/ Alpha
and Omega Roofing Co.
Defendant.
TO: MACKEY WIGGINS
d/b/a Alpha and
Omega Roofing Co.
6873 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33150
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Discharge of Lien, Real Property
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Myron B. Berman, Esq., At-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is P.O. Box 1113, N.M.B..
Fla. 33160 932-7222, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August
22. 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
Real property described as: Lot
34, Block 15. HIGH MANOR SUB-
DIVISION located at 440 East
Drive, North Miami, Florida
33162.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
P.O.Box 1113
N.M.B.. Fla. 33160
Telephone: 932-7222
Attorney for Petitioner
10949 July 18, 25;
August 1,8. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CHINESE
VILLAGE RESTAURANT at
8427 SW 40 St. Miami, FL 33155
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LEE VILLAGE. INC.
10967 July 25;
August 1.8,15. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-29403 FC 17
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
CAROLYN KAYE WALKER
Petitioner
and
LAWRENCE EDWARD
WALKER
Respondent
TO: Lawrence Edward Walker
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 16th,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14th day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
46 July 18, 25;
August 1,8.1986
Ui THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-12674 CA-16
NOTICE OF ACTION 002481
THE KISSELL COMPANY,
Plaintiff
vs.
CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA, et al.
Defendants.
TO. CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA
580 N.E. 127th Street, No. 21
Miami, Florida 33181
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
August 22, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 17 day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
10959 July 25;
August 1.8, 15. 1986
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 86-11613-FC-02
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
IN RE: The marriage of
MICHAEL W. WHITE
Petitioner
and
TAMMY D. WHITE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Tammy D. White
29 Regatta Ct.,
Columbus, GA 31903
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 633
N.E. 167 St.. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, on or before August
15, 1986, and file the original with
the clerk of this court, otherwise a
default will be entered against you.
Dated: July 11. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the court
By. L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
10944 July 18, 25;
August 1.8,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-2*722 (19)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK, FSB, f/k/a
COMMUNITY FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
EMILIO VALDES. et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: STANDARD FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION
481 North Frederick Avenue
Gaithersburg, Maryland
20877
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lots 9 and 10, Block 222,
REVISED PLAT OF CORAL
GABLES RIVIERA SECTION
PART 13, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 28, Page 30, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
August 18th, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 10th day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
10935 July 18, 25;
August 1,8, 1986
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3268
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SYLVIA POMERANTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SYLVIA POMERANTZ.
deceased, File Number 86-3268, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler St., Miami, Florida,
33160. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 1. 1986.
Personal Representative:
SOLOMON H. BASCH
8 Crestwood Drive
West Orange, New Jersey
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
10986 August 1.8, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31888
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GLORIA WRIGHT,
Petitioner,
and
MERTON WRIGHT,
Respondent
TO: MERTON WRIGHT
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS
273 Sigel St.
Westburg L.I., New York 11590
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
Samuel S. Sorota, Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 N.E. 167th Street,
Suite 308. North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 5,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By S. BOBES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Samuel S. Sorota, Esq.
801 N.E. 167th Street, Suite 308
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Attorney for Petitioner
10974 August 1,8,15,22. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-4197
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABE BIRENBAUM,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ABE BIRENBAUM, deceased,
File Number 86-4197, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 1, 1986.
Personal Representative:
ROBERT BIRENBAUM
8940 S.W. 67th Avenue
Miami, Flroida 33166
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
RICHARD E. RECKSON, ESQ.
Blank, Rome, Comisky A
McCauley
4770 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (306) 573-5509
10985 August 1,8, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICnTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of A A PROPER-
TIES at number 1570 Madruga.
Suite 214. in the City of Coral
Gables, Florida, intend to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Coral Gables, Florida,
this 18 day of July. 1986.
SHEPPARD FABER
ALAYNE D. FABER
Sheppard Faber, Esquire
Attorney for Applicant
1570 Madruga Avenue, Suite 214
Coral Gables. Florida 33146
16972 August 1,8.15, 22. 1986 '
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Aeroeeas Brokers
Infl., Inc.. at 1242 W. 44 Place.
Hialeah. Florida 33012, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Michael Sayres
10315 N.W. 9th St. Circle, Apt.
206
Miami. Florida 33172
Manuel Muniz
4520 S.W. 89 Ave.
Miami. Florida 33166
10936 July 18,25:
August 1.8, 1986


rage wa ine Jewish e londian/h "nday, August 1, 1986
Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86 3652
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA BRIGHTMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ANNA
BRIGHTMAN. deceased. File
Number 86-3662 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Abraham Brightman, whose ad-
dress is 9600 N. Hollybrook Lake
Dr.. Pembroke, FL 33025. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Adminaitration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: July
26. 1986.
Abraham Brightman
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Anna Brightman
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard I. Kroop (128023)
Kwitney. Kroop & Scheinberg,
P.A.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7575
10966July 25, August 1, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-290*9 26 -FT
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re marriage of
INEZ E. HARNEY
Petitioner
and
LLOYD HARNEY
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Lloyd Hamey,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 38162 on
or before August 8, 1986, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
DATED: July 3, 1986.
Clerk of the Court
RICHARD P. BRINKER
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
10922 July 11, 18,25,
August 1.1986
Call 373*4605
For Legal Forms
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lee's of Florida at
440 East Drive, North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
TROPICAL JANITORIAL INC.
JOSEPHDNE BOREW, Pres.
BEN BOREW, Sec. Treasurer
Myron B. Herman. Esq.
Attorney for Tropical Janitorial
and Borews
P.O. Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
10961 July 26;
August 1,8. 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
SUPPLIES at 5751 S.W. 40th
Street, Miami, Florida 33156 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Luis Padron
United Supplies, Inc.
5751 S.W. 40 St.
Miami, Florida 33155
Hector Abelairas, Esq.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies, Inc.
10968 July 25;
August 1,8. 15,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TROPICAL
MAINTENANCE at 440 East
Drive. North Miami Beach. Florida
33162 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
TROPICAL JANITORIAL INC.
JOSEPHINE BOREW. Pres.
BEN BOREW, Sec. Treasurer
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
Attorney for Tropical Janitorial
Inc. And Borews
P.O. Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
10960 July 25;
August. 1.8,15. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO.: 86-30619(11)
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROSALINDA MANSUETO
HEITKAMP
PETITIONER/WIFE
vs.
NORBERT WILHELM
HEITKAMP
RESPONDENT.
TO: NORBERT WILHILM
HEITKAMP
Residence and Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in this
court and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on WALTER L.
LEBOWITZ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Ar-
thur Godfrey Road, Second Floor,
Miami Beach, FL 33140, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 22, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
WALTER B. LEBOWITZ,
Esquire
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Second Floor
Miami Beach, FL 33140
(305) 532-0000
10954 July 26;
August 1,8.15, 19866
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IS THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 86-28972 FC 02
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIZABETH MANASCO.
Petitioner
and
JAMES E. MANASCO
Respondent
TO: JAMES E. MANASCO
Residence
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on USHER BRYN, ESQ. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309.
Miami Beach, Florida 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 8th, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
10923 July 11, 18.26;
August 1. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, Ui
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-31348 28
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUZ CHRISTIAN,
Petitioner/Wife
and
OSCAR CHRISTIAN.
Respondent/Husband
TO: OSCAR CHRISTIAN
2695 SW 18th Street
Apt No. 303 Miami, FL 33145
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has. been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of you writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on ANA
MARTIN-LAVIELLE. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
1800 S.W. First Street, Miami,
Florida 33136 Suite 324, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 22, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ANA MARTIN-LAVIELLE
1800 S.W. First Street
Suite 324
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
(306) 649-6486
10964 July 25;
August 1,8, 15. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-29398 (21)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ELIZABETH SWEETING,
Petitioner,
and
FREDDY SWEETING.
Respondent
TO: FREDDY SWEETING
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before August 15,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered.
July 8, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk
BY: E. Seidl
10930 July 11. 18,26;
August 1,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-31435 11
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
BRIAN D. BRADLEY,
etal..
Defendants.
TO: LAURA F. BRADLEY
818 West 30- Street
Erie, Pennsylvania 16509
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 6, Block 3, of SUNNY
GARDENS ESTATES 1
SUBDIVISION, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 120, at Page 7.
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, and Amend-
ment thereto,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
August 22. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 21 day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
by JOHN BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
10966 July 25;
August 1.8. 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name UNITED OFFICE
PRODUCTS at 5717 S.W. 40
Street, Miami, Fla 33144 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Luis Padron
United Office Supplies. Inc.
5717 S.W. 40th Street
Miami, Florida 33155
Hector Abelairas, Esq.
Attorney for United Office
Supplies, Inc.
10957 July 25;
August 1,8. 15. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-31458-22
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIE FERELIE F
PRUD'HOMME.
Petitioner,
and
CHENIER PRUD'HOMME.
Respondent,
TO:CHENIER
PRUD'HOMME. Residence
unknown, you shall serve copy of
your Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attorney
612 Northwest 12th Ave Miami
Florida 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
August 29. 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered.
Dated July 22, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY. T. CASAMAYOR
10968 July 25;
August 1,8. 15, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name South Florida
Actors Studio at 2517 Andros
Ave., Coconut Grove. Florida
33133, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Jonathan Nichols
10926 July 11, 18, 25;
August 1, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name U.S. AUTO PARTS
inc. d/b/a Manhattan Imports at
3670 N.W. 135 Street, OpV Locks
Florida 33054 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida. ''
Pablo Davila
August 1,8,15,22. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-3800
PI i Mm
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO BUDA
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of LEO BUDA,
deceased. File Number 86-3800, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida. Probate-
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, Third Floor,
Miami. Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is NOMI BUDA DWORKIN.
whose address is 2123 W. Hoyt
Avenue, St. Paul. Minnesota
56108. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: July
25. 1986.
NOMI BUDA DWORKIN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LEO BUDA
Deceased
LYNN W. FROMBERG. Esq.
(No. 206940)
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
FROMBERG. FROMBERG,
C.ROSS. SHORE. LEWIS,
ROGEL & KERN. P.A.
No. 800. 2500 E. Hallandale Beach
Blvd
Hallandale. Florida 33009
Telephone: (305) 940-0709
16963 July 25. August 1.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT Ctt.
OFTHEUTHJUdiS
CIRCUIT IN AND FnDl
DADE COUNTY.Rfi
FAMILY Dli-fffi"*
CASE NO. 5S
Florida Bar No 34,,-,
IN THE MATTER or 75
a minor
NOTICE OF ADOPTiov
_ PROCEEDINGS
TO: RUBY MARIA
PALOMINO-PALOMINO
YOU ARE HERr,
NOTIFIED that the J^
Petitioners: MARIA CU^T
PIZARRO and NElS
PIZARRO. have filed a PeS
the above styled court, ffi
consent of the child', ^Z
NESTOR AUGLSTO^
NANDEZ SABOGAL. fo?

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 86-29245
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 564079
IN RE: The marriage of:
MOISE PIERRE.
PeUtioner/husband,
and
SHEILA PIERRE.
Respondent/wife,
TO: SHEILA PIERRE
Residence Unknown
YOU. SHEILA PIERRE,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
adoption of the minor child n,
therein and you are hereby^
quired to show cause why theaaro.
should not be granted bv servT!
copy of your written defense. J
any upon Mariano Sole, Atton*
at Law. PA.. 4343 W fW
Street, Suite 404. M,am,, FloiS,
attorney for the Petitioner by ft.
filing of an original thereof,
the Clerk of the said Court on.
before the 29 day of August, m
In the event you fail to comply wm
the contents of this Notice 1
Default Judgment may he tnunc
against you. granting the
adoption.
WITNESS my hand and so. *
the said Court in Miami. Dm
County, Florida, this 28 day of J
ly. 1986.
As Clerk of the Circuit Court
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
By BJ F0Y
Deputy Clerk
10969 Julys
August 1.8.15,1*
*:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOI
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaber 86 J5J4
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEATRICE BERGER
IlectasK
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Saauaary Adminntratioti
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that 1:
Order of Summary Admimstratw 1
has been entered in the estate :
BEATRICE BERCER. decease:
File Number 86-3594. by the Cr
cuit Court for Dade Count;
Florida, Probate Division, the
dress of which is 73 West Flape
Street. Miami. Florida 33130 lbs
the total cash value of the estate 1
Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000*
and that the names and addresse
of those to whom it has been isfr-
ed by such order are
David M. Berger
8040 Noremac Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
All persons are required to St
with the clerk of said W-
WITHIN 3 CALENDAR IN
THS FROM TIME 0T THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OFTHI;
NOTICE all claims against a
estate in the form and macaf
prescribed by Section 733 703 :<
the Florida Statutes and R-
5.490 of the Florida Rules I ft
bate and Guardianship Procedm
ALL CLAIMS AND DEN!
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARREI'
Publication of this Notice !
begun on July 25. 1986
Spieler, Weiner A Spieler I' A
4700 Biscayne Boulevard. Su
200
Miami. Florida 33137
10970 July 25. August 1.19*
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATITE
STATE OF FLORIDA 1
)>
COUNTY OF DADE )
The undersigned, under ostk
says: It is the intention of *
. undersigned to engage in
the Clerk of the above Court and business enterprise under the Of
serve a copy thereof upon the titiouo mine of S A S TRADLM.
petitioner's attorneys. Law Office COMPANY located at 1801 I
Treasure Dr. Suite 123 N y
Village in the City of Miami 33141
Dade County, Florida.
Those interested in said eat**1
prise, and the extent of the
of Herman Cohen A Robert S.
Cohen, 622 S. W. 1st. Street,
Miami. Fla. 33130. on or before
August 8. 1986, or else petition
will be confessed
WITNESS my hand and seal of terest of each, is as follow
10973
this Court, at Miami. Dade County,
Florida, this July 7, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By JENNIS L RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
10927 July 11. 18.26;
August 1.1966
Interest
SAAD MURAD
1801 South Treasure I>nve
Suite 123
N. Bay Village.
Miami. Fla. 33141
10933 Julyll.l
August 1.1**


gal Notices
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
IE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
RCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
SNERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-32588
NOTICE OF ACTION
\GLER FEDERAL SAV-
3S AND LOAN ASSOCIA-
DN OF MIAMI, a United
ktes Corporation,
plaintiff,
)NIO JOSE GARCIA GIL,
efendants.
^ ANTONIO JOSE GARCIA
GIL and MERCEDES
ELENA GARCIA GIL.
Residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by,
through, under or against
the said ANTONIO JOSE
GARCIA GIL and
MERCEDES ELENA GAR-
CIA GIL, and all other par-
ties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property herein
described.
)U ARE NOTIFIED, that an
to foreclose a mortgage on
following described property in
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No.
10710-9, Building 10710
I.W. 7th Street, of
lAGUNA CLUB CON
)MINIUM. according to
He Declaration of Con-
ominium thereof, as record-
in Official Records Book
9, at Page 1608, of the
ablic Records of Dade Coun-
Florida, as amended;
jgether with all im-
ovements, appliances, and
Ktures located thereon
en filed against you and you
[required to serve a copy of
written defenses, if any, to it
Keith. Mack. Lewis & Allison,
ntiffs attorneys, whose ad-
is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
ni. Florida 33132. on or before
ember 5. 1986. and file the
final with the Clerk of this
either before service on
ntiffs attorneys or immediate-
hereafter; otherwise, a default
| be entered against you for the
pf demanded in the complaint.
TTNESS my hand and the seal
his Court on the 29th day of Ju-
1986.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
^y: JENNIS L. RUSSELL
Deputy Clerk
August 1.8, 15.22, 1986
Obituaries
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Dena Z. Goldman Passes
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
: ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
ICIRCUIT IN AND FOR
M>E COUNTY, FLORIDA
ae No. H6-29069 26 -F( -
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
[marriage of
EZ E. HARNEY
litioner
)YD HARNEY
ondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
ftUoyd Harney,
nidence unknown
ARE NOTIFIED that an
for dissolution of marriage
en filed against you and you
quired to serve a copy of
[written defenses upon: I. J.
TF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
r, whose address is 633 N.E.
ft. N.M.B. Florida 33162 on
|fore August 8, 1986. and file
riginal with the clerk of this
otherwise a default will be
I against you.
CD July 3, 1986.
Clerk of the Court
K'HARD P. BRINKER
By: John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
July 11, 18,26;
August 1, 1986
KOVLER
Meyer. 90, passed away July 27. A resident
of Miami Beach since 1969. Mr. Kovler was
a WWI veteran, a Pensionier for the NYC
Newspaper Mail Deliverers Union; a
member of the American Legion and Tem-
ple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach. He is surviv-
ed by his son, Burton (Rowena) Kovler and
daughter, Ruth (Stanley) Gross; grand
children. Andrew (Kerri), Brian and Amy
Kovler, Elizabeth and Robin Gross and Jen-
nifer (Marquis) Hodes. Services were held.
with Blasberg Chapel in charge of
arrangements.
MILLER
E. Dorothy. 84, a Florida resident since
1941, formerly of Boston, passed away July
24. Mrs. Miller is survived by her son Selig
(Dolores) and grandchildren Robin, Laurie,
Richard, Lisa and Susan. Mrs. Miller
devoted her efforts to the Hope School, hav-
ing started and developed the Hope Bouti-
que Shops. Arrangements were handled by
Levitt- Weinstein.
EMANUEL, Sydell. of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices were held.
SCHWARTZMAN, Henry N., 93. of Bay
Harbor Islands. July 29. The Riverside.
SHAPIRO, Benjamin L., 80, of Miami
Beach, July 28. The Riverside.
BARTH, William, of North Miami. Services
were held.
GOLDMAN. Herbert I., of Miami Beach, Ju-
ly 22.
KORENBI.IT, Lillian S.. 82. The Riverside.
WEINGARDEN, Leo Joseph, 88, July 22.
Levitt-Weinstein.
BROOKMIRE. Essie, of North Miami
Beach, July 23. Menorah Chapels.
BURT. Emanuel, 66, of Miami, July 24. Ser-
vices were held.
MILLER, Edward A.. July 24. The
Riverside.
i AMINi;, Helen S.. of Miami Beach. Ser-
vice* were held.
ZA1DNER, Yeck. 70. of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
AARONSON. Sarah, 84. of Miami, July 14.
Riverside.
BASKES. Harry, of North Miami Beach.
July 15. Levitt-Weinstein.
ROBBINS, Diane, 74. of Miami, July 16.
Riverside.
SHER. Pauline B of North Miami. July 15.
Riverside.
BIRENBAUM. Abe of Miami Beach. July
10. Blasberg Chapel.
FIERSTAT, Theodore (Teddy) 51, of Ken
dall. July 18.
COHEN. Albert. The Riverside.
SELTZER. BENN K.. of Miami. Julyl8.
The Riverside.
BERMAN. Dr. Milton B.. 88. of Miami. July
11. The Riverside.
GREEN, David M 85. July 10. The
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GOLDSTEIN. Lilly, July 26. The Riverside.
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ROSENTHAL, Dorothy, of North Miami
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SIEGEL. Abraham, of Miami Beach. Ser-
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ABRAMS, Lillian, of Kings Point, July 25.
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LEWIS, Gertrude. 89, of North Miami
Beach, July 26. The Riverside.
GARDNER, Alex, of North Bay Village
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GRUNDMAN. E. Jack, 36. of North Miami
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ABOLAFIA, Alice, of Miami Beach. July
27. Menorah Chapels.
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Page 12-B The Jewish FToridun/Friday. August 1, 1986
Background Report:
The Jews Of Morocco

about 15,000 Moroccan Jews live
in the United States. Montreal,
with 30,000 Moroccan-born Jews,
has the largest Moroccan Jw>
community in North America. The
JDC reported that Jewish emigra-
tion, which
establishment
began ^
of the Suu*
Israd. continuee at a rate ofi
one percent a year. **
JTA Senvej
By KEVIN FREEMAN
The nearly 15,000 Jews in
Morocco, scene of last
week's dramatic talks bet-
ween King Hassan and
Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres, enjoy religious
freedom as well as the right
to emigrate to Israel, a step
taken over the years by
some 350.000 Jews who
have left for Israel since
1948.
Beyond these freedoms,
unusual inasmuch that Morocco is
a Moslem nation and technically
at a state of war with Israel, the
Jewish community also runs a
vast support network of Jewish
welfare and educational institu-
tions, operated with government
approval and support and with
funds from the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee.
NEVERTHELESS, while rela-
tions between the Moroccan
Jewish community and the King
remain cordial, it was reportedly
King Hassan who in 1984
prevented entry to an interna-
tional conference in Marrakesh of
an Israeli writer and philosopher.
Aharon Amir. He was invited to
the World Conference on Poetry
by its chairman, former
Senegalese President Leopold
Senghor.
This was ironic since just
several months earlier, a
35-member Israeli delegation
went to Rabat to attend the First
National Confernce of Moroccan
Jewish Communities. They were
invited with the consent of King
Hassan. The delegation consisted
of Knesset members, academics,
mayors, and Israeli journalists.
Crown Prince Sidi Mohammed,
Hassan's son. addressed the con-
ference's closing session.
Similar expressions of support
between the Jewish community
and Hassan occurred when nearly
the entire Moroccan Jewish com-
munity turned out en masse to
celebrate in March. 1984 the 23rd
anniversay of their King's ascen-
sion to the throne.
IN EACH of the major cities, in-
cluding Casablanca. Tangiers.
Fez. Marrakesh and Rabat, the
Jewish community renewed its
pledge of loyalty and support for
the King at huge parties and din-
ners, wrote Jewish Telegraphic
Agency correspondent Milton
Jacoby from Casablanca.
Jacoby quoted an unidentified
Moslem leader who was president
of the Municipal Council of Mar-
rakesh as saying. "There's never
been any real difference in Moroc-
co between the Mussulman and
Jew. Let us inspire in our children
and grandchildren the same spirit
of amity that bring us here
tonight."
David A mar. head of the Moroc-
can Jewry since 1956. said in an
interview that the Jews of Moroc-
co consider themselves "Moroc-
cans first and foremost." He said
the "response of Jewry on March
3 was to confirm our allegiance to
our King."
MANY OF the Jews in Morocco
live in Casablanca. Five com-
munities Marrakesh. Rabat.
Meknes. Fez and Tangiers
range in size from about 800 to
about 1,000; three range from
about 100 to about 5.000 and the
rest have 100 or less members, ac-
cording to the World Jewish
Congress.
Each remaining Jewish com-
munity has a communal organiza-
tion, the Committee, and all these
are united in a coordinating body.
The Council of the Jewish Com-
munities of Morocco, a member
organization of the World Jewish
Congress. The Council is the
representative organ of the
Jewish community in matters
the institutions of
according to the
relating to
government.
WJC.
The schools were established by
the Alliance Israelite Universelle
in 1862. Curriculum and staff
have changed, however, to accom-
modate the increasing number of
Arab students in the schools. The
Moroccan government con-
tributes financial assistance.
ORT. Oxar Hatorah and the
Lubavitch movement also operate
schools that have government
support, according to the WJC.
AN EXAMPLE of JDC ac-
tivities in Morocco was the ship-
ment to the Jewish community
there from New York in 1984 of
more than 10.000 Hebrew books,
including 8.000 prayer texts for
Sephardi rites and 2.000 school
texts. The shipment was describ-
ed as the largest at the time of
religious texts in the history of the
JDC relationship with Morocco,
which dates from 1946.
The JDC budget for aid to
Moroccan Jewry was more than
$2.2 million in 1985. according to
a JDC spokesperson. The JDC
maintains an office in Casablanca
where the bulk of the Jewish com-
munity resides.
About half of Morocco's Jewish
community receive some sort of
assistance from JDC operations.
About 1.200 aged or handicapped
Moroccan Jews receive cash
grants while 1.500 to 1.800
receive monthly food packages.
The JDC provides other programs
and forms of assistance as well.
IN OCTOBER. 1985 some 150
delegates representing "50.000
Moroccan-born Jews around the
world gathered in Montreal for
the first World Assembly of
Moroccan Jewry and pledged to
help promote a just and lasting
peace in the Middle East.
Morocco's Ambassador to
Canada. Ahmed Mamoud. told the
delegates that their action will
"help preserve the identity of
your community and guarantee
the preservation of the links bet-
ween the Moslem and Jewish com-
munities of Morocco, ties which
contributed greatly to our com-
mon national heritage."
The Assembly reported that
The End Of An Ordeal
For 3-Year-01d Boy
TEL
By HIGH ORGEL
. AVIV (JTA) Meir
Zoreah. age three, returned home
to Israel last week fully recovered
from a liver transplant operation
performed at a hospital in Pitt-
sburgh. Pa. nearly a year ago. It
was a long and terrible ordeal for
the child and his parents. Mr. and
Mrs. Yitzhak Zoreah of Migdal
HaEmek. who thought their son
would surely die.
Liver transplants were not per-
formed in Israel when Meir
became ill. His journey to the U.S.
was made possible by public con-
tributions. They poured in after
Yitzhak Zoreah appeared on
television to tell the country his
son was "dying before our eyes"
for lack of funds to send him
abroad."
The youngster, accompanied by
his father and a physician, left for
the L'.S. last year in a plane equip-
ped as an intensive areunit,tk.l
ing the flight he developed 1
plications and was t'.-.-edingjjzl
nally. On the advice :" the dcZ
the plane landed ir. I. ndon^Z I
Meir was hospitahz.-,: for \
weeks.
When he finally arrived infc
sburgh. the donor whose liver*
to be transplanted was no low,
available. Surgery was posta*,
for several weeks When fittf
performed, the operation 'tut
seven hours. While Meir n
recovering, his father and mofc
took turns being with him. TV
were helped by the Pittsbw
Jewish community ami by frie
in Israel who looked after a*
three other children
Father and son returned i
Israel. Meir was h'lcged by
mother at the airport. "He ai
new boy," she explained. "At'-
we are all together again."
whefe shopping is o pleasure 7 days a wee*
r^
DANISH
BAKERY
Publix
Publix Bakeries open at 800 A.M.
Summertime Party Special!
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
(Serves 25 People) Made with Three Quarts of Any Flavor. Publix Premium or Dairi-Fresh
Ice Cream, Decorated with Whipped Cream (Toys or Drawings are Extra)
Quarter Sheet
Ice Cream Cake and
50 Puff Pastry Hors d'Oeuvres
(Hors d'Oeuvres are Baked or Frozen)
$1Q95
only ^J
Available at all Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
For the Dial Conscious
Bran Muffins
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pfcg. *
09
Avertable at Publix Stores with
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With the Purchase of a 3-Tier or
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The Month* of Jury and August
Wedding Cake
Ornament
FREE!
(VaejsdUpTo$l5.O0)
Available at all Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake
M79

Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Apple Fritters
2 49*
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpernickel or
Rye Bread
69*
Wb.
loaf
Available at Publix Stores with
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Flan
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Quantity Rights Reserved


Full Text
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FILES


Records Back to '38
Waldheim's Application, Photo to SS
Friday, August 1, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11 A
Reaganites Downplay Talks
Between Hassan, Peres
Continued from Page 1-A
He explicitly stated he was not a
member of the SA or the Nazi stu-
dent union in his formal defense
memorandum to the U.S. Justice
Department of Apr. 12.
He told the Associated Press on
Apr. 9: "I was anti-Nazi. All this is
lies. I was never in the SA nor in
the student union."
The 1940 document lists
| Waldheim as a member of the SA
| and the Nazi student union.
In the box on membership in
Jazi affiliated organizations,
/aldheim is identified on the
form as an SA-Mann (SA man)
lying joined on November 18,
1938. He is listed as belonging to
tie NSStudentenbund (Nazi stu-
ent union) as of April 1, 1938.
WALDHEIM'a membership in
le stormtroopers came less than
week following the infamous
(ristallnacht (Night of Broken
jlass) the reign of terror
inst Austrian and German
Jews spearheaded by the SA.
Tnder Nazi Party rules,
Waldheim must have applied in
May of 1938 to be accepted in the
ASA and submitted an "Aryan"
! certificate along with a certificate
[of "good conduct."
Coinciding with the release of
le document, the WJC again call-
on Attorney General Edwin
leese "to enforce the law and
place Waldheim on the 'watch list'
f aliens excludable from the
Jnited States."
"-
L >llll*ht > -:
*
>. *ml tm febn
* fc^W i. ** y>*M(M
ii ii urn.
r.Iiut tsltfhaia Mpl.con";*.
?i.i? iQin. j.nrch hntnprf
nn.k.th.
**clrksachullna:iktor i.2.
kala lin<|n
By JUDITH KOHN Vice President's visit in Israel -
WASHINGTON (JTA) the first leg of his week-long Mid-
- Against the background dl^1Eaft tour fining July 27 -
.V* W u/ill alert inclnHo /Jn-,vii,-,.;,,r f
ol the surpnse visit to

**.Stltintk.-idart* 5/?0 s.'.-lUnn rait 13.ll.193e
iS.StuCnt.j.buna aalt !..!-
In April, the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investiga-
tions concluded that under
American law, Waldheim should
be excluded as a "Nazi
persecutor."
Hassan's Record
Had Contacts With Israelis Before
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
ling Hassan of Morocco has
long record of high level
lontacts with Israelis,
Ithough Premier Shimon
feres' surprise visit to that
)untry last week as the
ing's guest was the first
iblicly acknowledged
Ummit-level dialogue bet-
Ween the two countries.
Peres is known to have visited
Hassan at least twice during the
period 1977-1984 when he was
leader of the Labor opposition.
And Hassan played host to Yit-
thak Rabin when he was Prime
Minister of Israel in the mid-70s,
though Rabin's trip to Rabat was
ndertaken in strictest secrecy.
HASSAN'S QUEST for Middle
list peace accelerated after
LaVuii came to power in Israel
and in 1977. He hosted two crucial
eret negotiating sessions with
then Foreign Minister Moshe
Day a n and Hassan Tohamey, a
aanior aide to Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat.
Whose sessions are said to have
fed the way for Sadat's visit to
jsalem on November 19, 1977,
Camp David meetings bet-
5n Sadat and Begin a year later
the subsequent peace treaty
teen Egypt and Israel.
^lassan invited Begin to Moroc-
But the latter, according to
eli sources, insisted that a
be open and official and
demurred. Last year the
ccan ruler publicly invited
es to meet with him, "but only
le comes with a real peace
larter-Million Gift
ARTFORD (JTA) A gift
J250.000 has been made to the
Brtford University Maurice
Beenberg Center for Jewish
Bodies by Simon Konover, a
tst Hartford realtor.
plan."
SHORTLY afterwards, Hassan
appealed to the Arab world to
select one of its leaders to meet
with Peres for an exchange of
views on peace. In March, 1986,
he said he himself would accept
the assignment. But there was no
response from other Arab heads
of state.
Some analysts here attribute
the timing of Hassan's latest in-
vitation, which Peres accepted, to
Morocco's desire to improve its
relations with the U.S.
Washington has been concerned
of late by a Moroccan flirtation
with Libyan leader Moammar
Khadafy. The analysts suggest
that Morocco may feel that a rap-
prochement with Israel would
boost its standing with the
Americans.
Hassan had been scheduled to
visit Washington last week but
postponed his trip for "health
reasons." He is believed to be hop-
ing for increased U.S. military
and economic aid. Morocco's
ongoing war with the Polisario
rebels in the Sahara has been
draining its resources.
MOROCCO HAS always main-
tained warm ties with Israelis of
Moroccan origin. They are allow-
ed to pay visits to their native
country without undue
bureaucratic difficulties. Members
of the small Jewish community
still living in Morocco about
18,000, mainly in Fez are per-
mitted to visit Israel, and many do
so quite openly.
This attitude is unique in the
Arab world and has earned
Hassan special affection in Israel.
Many Israelis from Morocco speak
fondly of their former home and
stress the atmosphere of
tolerance and cordiality which
generally prevails between Jews
and their Moslem neighbors in
Morocco.
"Relations were generally good,
even when disturbing events such
as wars were taking place out-
side," Labor MK Yaacov Amir,
who was born in Morocco said. He
attributed this to King Hassan
and the King's late father.
Morocco by Israeli Prime
Minister Shimon Peres last
week, the Reagan Ad-
ministration is playing down
the significance of a
previously-planned trip to
the region by Vice President
George Bush.
Bush, who will visit Israel, Jor-
dan and Egypt beginning this
week, will be the first senior U.S.
official to travel to those countries
since Secretary of State George
Shultz visited there last year. But
a senior Administration official
cautioned Tuesday against expec-
tations of "dramatic initiatives."
"I THINK we're emphasizing
here the depth of the continuity of
American interests in the region,"
the official said at a briefing. He
stressed that while extensive
discussions were expected on the
outcome of the talks between
Peres and Moroccan King Hassan
II, the Administration was view-
ing the first public visit by an
Israeli leader to an Arab country
other than Egypt as significant
less for its HVely results than for
the fact that it took place."
Having asserted a high profile
in past Middle East peace efforts
that ended in impasse or failure,
the Administration appears to be
distancing itself from the most re-
cent development, as it waits to
assess the outcome.
White House and State Depart-
ment officials, while praising the
Peres-Hassan talks, have main-
tained that the initiative had come
entirely from the two leaders
themselves. The Administration
official on Tuesday said the U.S.
was informed of the meeting just
"a few days" before it took place.
THE OFFICIAL said, in
response to a question, that the
will also include discussion of
allegations about Israeli spying in
this country and the current in-
vestigation into alleged illegal ac-
quisition by Israel of American
technology for the production of
cluster bombs.
He indicated there was also a
possibility that Bush's visit would
coincide with the initialing of a
compromise between Egypt and
Israel on the procedure for ar-
bitration of the boundary dispute
over Taba, the small strip of ter-
ritory whose status was left
unresolved when Israel withdrew
from the Sinai in April, 1982.
State Department Legal Adviser
Abraham Sofaer is currently in
Israel, where he is attempting to
mediate an agreement on the
terms of reference for arbitration.
Talks in all three countries, the
official said, would also focus on
the problem of international ter-
rorism and on economic issues.
Jackson
Praises
Meetings
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Rev. Jesse Jackson praised the
meetings in Morocco between
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres and
King Hassan II as well as Egyp-
tian President Hosni Mubarak's
support for the talks.
This occurred last week during
a celebration of the 34th anniver-
sary of the Egyptian revolution at
the Egyptian Embassy, according
to Hyman Bookbinder of the
American Jewish Committee. He
was one of six Jewish represen-
tatives among the 140 persons at-
tending the ceremony.
WE'RE
MAKING
OUR MOVE
Make Yours for the Best Deals in Town.
Douslas Gardens Thrift Shop is movins to a new location,
two miles west of its present site on Hallandale Beach
Boulevard. Between now and the openms of our new store
on August 4th, everything in stock is on sale. Be it furniture,
appliances, clothing or antiques, you will find the best deals
in town at the Douglas Gardens Thrift Shop, 3149 West
Hallandale Beach Boulevard.
Proceeds from the sales of all merchandise help support
indigent residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens.
Also, plan to join us on
August 4th for the Grand
opening at our new location:
5829W Hallandale Beach
Boulevard, two blocks east of
State Road 7
D
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
For free pick-up of donations
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
All donations are tax deductible
A division of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 1, 1986
Israel's New Stiff Travel Tax
May Thwart U.S. Agreement
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's stiff travel tax, a
subject of heated debate
among Israelis, may thwart
a U.S.-Israel tourism agree-
ment signed when Vice
President Geroge Bush
visited here this week.
Tourism Minister Avraham
Sharir confirmed in an interview
that Washington is pressing Israel
to repeal the tax on grounds that
it undermined the reciprocity in-
herent in the agreement. Sharir
has called the tax "idiotic" and
counter-productive. But Finance
Minister Moshe Nissim says he
would be prepared to raise it if the
Knesset Finance Committee call-
ed for an increase.
THE TRAVEL tax, a feature of
the austerity economic program,
was instituted more than a year
ago to raise revenue and help
preserve Israel's dwindling
foreign currency reserves. At pre-
sent it amounts to $120 per capita
for Israelis traveling abroad, plus
a 20 percent surcharge on their
airline tickets.
Last summer, the tax was set at
$300 in the peak travel months
and an estimated 250,000 Israelis
were deterred from vacationing
abroad. Sharir denounced the tax,
maintaining that the revenue rais-
ed was more than offset by the
reduction of tourism to Israel.
That was because airlines, which
"want their planes full in both
directions," cut service to Israel,
he explained.
The Finance Ministry, on the
other hand, thinks the tax should
be increased because many Israeli
travelers avoid paying the 20 per-
cent surcharge. They do so by hav-
ing their airline tickets purchased
for them abroad. The Ministry
believes the surcharge should be
abolished and the tax, which is
unavoidable, raised.
Demjanjuk
Gets Visitors
TEL AVIV (JTA) John
Demjanjuk, held in the Ramie
prison awaiting trial on charges of
war crimes as the suspected
notorious Ivan the Terrible
sadistic camp guard at Treblinka,
Thursday (July 24) met his family
for the first time since his extradi-
tion from the U.S. last February.
His wife, Vera, 60, their
26-year-old daughter, Irene, ac-
companied by her husband, Ed-
ward Nishnik and their seven-
month-old baby Edward Jr., had
arrived in Israel last Wednesday
and were reportedly angered that
they were not allowed to visit him
immediately upon their arrival.
They were told that the
necessary permission would be
granted last Wednesday and that
they would henceforth be allowed
to spend two hours with him twice
a week, instead of the regulation
30-minute visit to prisoners once a
week.
Prison authorities said the
special arrangements have been
made in view of the special cir-
cumstances the distance the
family has come, and the fact that
Demjanjuk, who is 66, knows
nobody else in Israel.
The Demjanjuk file is now in the
hands of the state prosecutors
who are preparing charges
against the suspected war
criminal, who denies that he is
Ivan the Terrible and was not at
Treblinka at the time of the
crimes with which he is to be
charged. He claims that his deten-
tion and extradition are a result of
mistaken identity.
SHARIR STRESSED the im
portance of a tourism accord with
the U.S. and wants nothing to
stand in its way. He cited the 40
percent drop in American tourism
to Israel so far this year becasue
of the terrorist scare. He said
there are signs of a possible im-
provement later in the year.
Another agreement that Bush
hoped to wrap up during his visit
concerns the Israeli-Egyptian
border dispute over Taba.
The two countries have been
deadlocked over the terms of
reference for the arbitration panel
which is to resolve the issue and
have been unable to agree on the
third member of the panel who
will be from outside the region.
Israel has accused the Egyp-
tians of foot-dragging over the
procedures that have to be com-
pleted before an arbitration docu-
ment is signed. U.S. State Depart-
ment lawyers and cartographers
have arrived in the area to join a
measuring and map-making ex-
pedition to the disputed site on the
Red Sea near Eilat. But Egypt
has not yet indicated it is ready
for that procedure.
BUT IN the most violent reac-
tion to the talks, the Moroccan
Embassy in Beirut was ransacked
last Friday (July 25) by
demonstrators. They smashed a
portrait of Hassan, tore down the
Moroccan flag and replaced it
with that of the pro-Iranian Shiite
Moslem Hezbollah. The Embassy
had been virtually deserted for
about a year, only guarded by a
handful of Lebanese security
personnel.
Meanwhile, Arab League
secretary general Cheldi Klibi
urged the 21 member-nations and
the PLO to hold an urgent summit
as a result of the Peres-Hassan
talks. Though he did not directly
criticize Hassan, Klibi said in a
statement issued from Tunis that
the meeting of Hassan and Peres
has "shown Israel's true face .
and revealed spectacularly his
(Peres) rejection of any peaceful
solution" to the Arab-Israel
dispute.
"The first concrete action (of
the Arabs) should be an urgent
summit of Arab leaders, the
elimination of everything liable to
compromise the solidarity of our
states and the reinforcement of a
joint Arab action," the statement
said.
Hassan's reaction to Klibi's call
for an Arab League meeting was
to announce Sunday that he was
resigning his post as Arab League
summit chairman. This action was
announced in a letter to Klibi
published in the official Moroccan
news agency, MAP.
ACCORDING TO Hassan, he
was stepping down from the sum-
mit chairman position because of
the "upheavals" caused in some
Arab states by his meeting with
Peres, and so Morocco would not
stand in the way of an Arab sum-
mit. The last full Arab summit
was held in 1982 in Fez. All at-
tempts to have a full Arab summit
meeting since then have resulted
in cancellation.
Hassan did host a summit in
Casablanca last August, but it was
boycotted by five Arab states
Lebanon, Syria, Algeria, South
Yemen and Libya. Hassan also
sought to arrange an Arab sum-
mit meeting in Morocco after the
U.S. air strikes on Libya last
April. His efforts failed, as Arab
League members failed to agree
on a venue or agenda for the
meeting.
Despite internal Arab dissen-
sion on the meeting, Moroccan of-
ficials attempted to interpret the
Hassan-Peres meeting as purely
"preparatory," called to give both
sides an opportunity to present
their views. Future meetings, ac-
The Israel Museum in Jerusalem has an-
nounced the most important and moving
revelation in Biblical archaeology since the
discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls some 40
years go, and on July 1, the museum opened
the exhibition of the Jerusalem Silver Scrolls
excavated in a First Temple Period burial
cave repository at Ketef Hinnom. These con-
tain the oldest Biblical inscription ever found
three sentences from the Tor ah, the Birkat
Cohanim (Priestly Blessing in Number*
6:24-26), incised on small silver strips in an-
cient Hebrew script in the Seventh Century
BCE. Here, Israel's Chief Rabbis Mordechai
Eliah u (left.) and Avraham Shapiro (center)
are shown the Jerusalem Silver Scrolls by
Meir Meyer, vice chairman of the Israel
Museum.
s.
cording to Foreign Minister
Sillali, would depend on whether
Peres presents "positive sugges-
tions" to Morocco.
HE MAINTAINED in the in-
terview published Sunday that if
Israel wants to achieve peace, it
should be "less intransigent," ad-
ding that "no peace is possible if
all sides stick to their opening
positions."
Moroccan Minister of State
Allawi was more upbeat about the
two days of talks, referring to it as
an historic turning point. He
spoke of the "warmth radiating
from the meeting" and that he felt
"a kind of electric current flowing
between the King and Mr. Peres."
He also stressed that "Peres
cannot return to Morocco if he
does so only to tell us the same
thing." But he did see as an im-
mediate result of the meeting "a
substantive and psychological
change in relations between Israel
and the Arab states."
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