The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02992

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
reater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert
Tewi]fo Flor idiamt
lume 59 Number 23
Three Section*
Miami, Florida Friday, June 6,1986
*Miiin b.m- ?
Price 50 Cents
ew Shultz Visit to Mideast On Tap
Recent Denials Suddenly
Become Strong Possibility
\riday, June 6, is Jerusalem Day. The obser-
tnce celebrates the 19th anniversary of the
unification of Jerusalem, which occurred
tring the Six-Day War in June, 1967. Above,
a youth pauses reverently at the Western Wall
to offer a prayer of thanksgiving. (For related
stories, see Page 5-A.)
aw Prof Takes Over
Zamir Resigns 'With Relief/
News Crackdown on Shin Bet Case
JERUSALEM Israel's
)rney General Yitzhak
r, who has been deman-
w an inquiry into allega-
is that Israel's Shin Bet
lef Avraham Shalom
shed investigative ef-
ts of Israel Defense
rces personnel who beat
Palestinians to death,
resigned. The Cabinet
^epted Zamir's resigna-
Sunday.
imir expressed relief when he
was informed that his resignation
was accepted. He has been replac-
ed by Tel Aviv District Court
Judge Yosef Harish, who was
nominated by Justice Minister
Yitzhak Modai. Harish took office
Wednesday.
Harish said over Israeli televi-
sion Sunday night that the scandal
"should have stayed behind closed
doors." He declared that the
publicity surrounding the case will
make "the daughters of the
Philistines rejoice."
HARISH ADDED: "The fear is
not only that some 'daughters of
the Philistines' will start dancing,
but that (public revelations) about
background elements pertaining
to security are liable to serve as an
argument for those seeking evil to
abuse our soldiers."
Harish teaches law at Tel Aviv
University. He was appointed to
the Tel Aviv court in 1969. He has
served on special government
panels investigating safety
measures in outdoor hikes arrang-
ed for tourists and has been on the
army's Internal Court of Appeals
for 10 years.
Zamir had been under attack by
Israeli conservatives for his
demanding of a new investigation
Continued on Page 2-A
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Is Secretary of State
George Shultz setting out
for a new round of
peacemaking efforts in the
Middle East? If observers
here are wondering, they
appear to be in the good
company of the White
House and Pentagon, as
well as the State Depart-
ment and the Secretary
himself.
After maintaining for the past
week or two that Shultz had no in-
tention of traveling to the region
any time soon, the White House
said last Thursday that "there are
plans for a possible visit."
Although no time frame has been
established yet, said White House
spokesman Edward Djerejian,
"it's in the planning stage."
THE COMMENT comes just a
day after Shultz told reporters on
his flight to Canada that despite
American willingness "to push
the peace process along," it is
useless to try and "force events
that aren't there." "We'd like to
push but we have got to have
something to push with," Shultz
said. Speaking on NBC televi-
sion's "Today Show," last Thurs-
day, Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger was dragged into the
guessing game as well.
"I don't know whether that's
Secretary Shultz
been settled or whether it's
anything more at this point than a
story," the Secretary said. "There
has certainly been talk of it and
there have been some countries
who have been interested in hav-
ing him come."
Most recently, Israel has been
pushing for renewed high-level
U.S. involvement in the peace pro
Continued on Page 15-A
On War With Syria
Things Are No Different Than Before
Drug Abuse Up
15,000 in Israel Today,
And Habit Seen Rising
By MARLENE GOLDMAN its drug problem, Israel is
NEW YORK (JTA) fighting a similar war
Twenty years after America against an escalating
first realized the extent of number of drug abusers.
There are an estimated
15,000 drug addicts in Israel
today, an accumulation of
about 10 years of drug use
there.
Moshe Arens
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Minister-Without-Portfolio
Moshe Arens said that it is
an "optical illusion" to view
the situation between Israel
and Syria in the last few
weeks as something dif-
ferent that did not exist in
the past.
"In fact, the danger of war bet-
ween Israel and Syria had been in
existence a year ago and two
years ago, and will continue to ex-
ist next year as well," Arens, the
former Defense Minister of Israel,
contended in an interview.
"The Syrian ruler, President
Hafez Assad, is hostile to Israel.
He has a large army. At the mo-
ment that he will conclude that
war with Israel will advance his
interests, he will start a war,"
Arens said. "Israel is in principle
against war. We know that we can
win a war with Syria, and we are
willing to pay the price but we
want to avoid paying the price. If
it is up to Israel there will be no
war with Syria."
ARENS, a leader of Herut and
a close associate of Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, who is
scheduled to replace Shimon
Peres as Premier next October,
said that it is unclear what indeed
can force Assad to launch a war
against Israel. "None of us can
say whether a worsening in the
economic situation of Syria or
growing terrorist acts inside that
Continued on Page 12-A
That statistic is based only on
accounts of hospital treatment
reported by the Israeli Magen
David Adorn, and according to
Andre Marcus, of the Interna
tional Anti-Drug Abuse Founda-
tion, "that figure can be doubled
without exaggerating."
About 40 percent of the drug
abusers in Israel are between the
ages of 13 and 18, according to
Diane Marcus, also of the Founda-
tion. Another 40 percent are 22
and over, while the figure drops to
20 percent for those 18 to 22.
"THE DROP comes when peo-
Continued on Page 8-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
Senior Official9 Case
Gov't. Defeats No-Confidence Moves
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The government easily
defeated four non-
confidence motions in the
Knesset last Thursday aris-
ing from the growing scan-
dal over a "senior official"
Attorney General Yitzhak
Zamir wants to prosecute
for obstruction of justice.
But the acrimonious five-hour
debate that preceded the show of
hands voting, cast no light on the
affair which has been described by
Zamir and other legal authorities
as a confrontation between the
rule of law and those who would
bend the law out of consideration
for national security.
The "senior official" in question
has not been identified publicly
and no name was mentioned in the
Zamir Resigns 'With Relief,'
News Crackdown Is Reported
Continued from Page 1-A
into the allegation that Shalom
tried to cover up the Shin Bet role
in 1984 after four Palestinians hi-
jacked a bus with 35 passengers
aboard and ordered it to the
Egyptian border.
TWO OF the hijackers were
killed when Israeli commandos
stormed the bus, but two others
were captured alive and reported-
ly beaten to death as they were be-
ing interrogated at the back of the
bus outside as to whether they had
bobby-trapped the bus with
explosives.
One ranking army officer and
five agents were later cleared of
serious wrongdoing when
disciplinary panels conducted an
investigation of their own into the
beating deaths. But Shalom is
alleged to have coerced witnesses
who appeared before the panels
and to have withheld evidence.
Some Israeli newspapers have
been carrying unconfirmed
Zamir's expression of "a sense
of relief at leaving his post as At-
torney General appeared to be ex-
plained by the fact that he had
tendered his resignation back in
February and that, finally, it was
accepted.
Justice Minister Modai mean-
while told reporters after the
Cabinet meeting that he had pro-
mised the Cabinet a long time ago
that he would be nominating
Zamir's replacement soon
which turned out to be Sunday.
Meanwhile, a Cabinet source
said that minister had agreed that
only Prime Minister Shimon Peres
or someone designated by him
would be making public
statements on the growing scan-
dal. Sixteen ministers were said to
have voted for the news
clampdown.
The source said Peres expressed
his appreciation to Zamir for his
reports that Shalom ordered;the.; "eoucage an.d_for.his activity in ac-
Palestinians killed and that Depu.: cordance.wih"hi^conscience","
ty Minister Yitzhak Shamir, who
was then Prime Minister, had
ordered Shalom to execute the
hijackers.
Peres is known to oppose an in-
vestigation into Shalom and the
Shin Bet because it could damage
Israel's security.
Hadassah Hospital Given Okay
To Perform Heart Transplants

By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Health Ministry has announced
that the government has given
permission to the Hadassah
Medical Center here to perform
heart transplant surgery. Accor-
ding to unofficial sources, permis-
sion will also be given to the Ram-
bam Hospital in Haifa which con-
siders itself fully equipped to per-
form the operation.
But, Dr. Sami Penhas, director
of the Hadassah Medical Center
said last Wednesday that halachic
problems surrounding heart
transplants are still unresolved.
He said he would meet shortly
with the two Chief Rabbis and
hopes to reach an agreement bas-
ed on the principle of "pikuah
nefesh" saving of life.
The Health Ministry said it ex-
pects Hadassah Hospital to per-
form about a dozen heart
transplants a year. The head of
the hospital's cardiothoracic
department, Dr. Yosef Borman,
believes 100 lives could be saved
annually in Israel by transplant
surgery.
It has been banned until now
because of the Rabbinate's objec-
tions. The halachic definition of
death differs from the medical
definition. The medical definition
is cessation of cerebral activity.
Many rabbis refuse to
acknowledge death until the heart
has ceased beating. Medical
science requires the donor heart
to still be beating when it is
removed for transplant.
The ban has forced patients re-
quiring heart transplants to seek
them abroad. Newspapers carry
advertisements from ad hoc aid
committees set up to raise funds
for Israelis to have the operation
abroad where the costs can exceed
$200,000.
The Hadassah and Rambam
hospitals are also working toward
the capacity to perform the more
complex liver transplant surgery.
An experimental liver transplant
performed on a dog at Rambam
Hospital recently was witnessed
by Health Minister Mordechai
Gur.
course of the debate. But
knowledgeable sources here have
confirmed overseas press reports
that he is Avraham Shalom, head
of Shabak or Shin Bet, Israel's in-
ternal security service.
IT IS ALSO generally
acknowledged that Zamir wants
the police to investigate evidence
that Shalom blocked an investiga-
tion into the unexplained deaths
of two Arab bus hijackers after
they were captured alive by the
Israel Defense Force in the Gaza
Strip in 1984.
Premier Shimon Peres conven-
ed his 10-man Inner Cabinet (five
Labor and five Likud Ministers)
last Tuesday to discuss the mat-
ter. The Inner Cabinet reportedly
was almost unanimous in rejec-
ting a probe of the "senior of-
ficial" on grounds of overriding
security considerations.
The only dissenter from that
position strongly supported by
Premier Shimon Peres and
Foreign Minister Yizthak Shamir,
was Ezer Weizman, Minister-
Without-Portfolio. He reportedly
backed Zamir's desire to
prosecute.
WITH THE affair shrouded in
official secrecy, the media are
raising questions and demanding
answers. One question is whether
Shamir, who was Prime Minister
at the time of the bus hijack, had
knowledge of actions by Avraham
Shalom and his senior aides at the
time, and if not, why, inasmuch as
the Prime Minister has direct
responsibility for Shin Bet. If he
did know, why did he take no ac-
tion at the time, the press is
asking.
It also asks whether Peres had
information when he took office
nearly two years ago and, "if fcfc^
did, why he did not order tarn-"
vestigation. It has been
speculated that the captured ter-
rorists were beaten to death by
Israeli security men before they
could be transferred to jail.
The IDF testified at a hearing
that it handed the two over alive
to the border police and the latter
say they were alive when turned
over to Shabak operatives for in-
terrogation. Shabak claims it
received two corpses.
Another question raised is
whether pressure was put on
Zamir by the government to drop
his probe. Zamir says it was.
Peres denies it. Justice Minister
Yitzhak Zamir observed that
there is only a "very thin line"
between "active persuasion" and
the "pressure" of which the At-
torney General complains.
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By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The city of
Darmstadt has made available
100,000 Marks toward the plann-
ing and construction of a
synagogue and Jewish community
center in the heart of the town, a
multi-million Mark project to be
financed jointly by the municipali-
ty, the State government of Hesse
and private donors.
The synagogue is scheduled to
open on November 9. 1988, the
50th anniversary of the infamous
Kristialbiackt (night of broken
"giass) "when mobs destroyed
Jewish shops, homes and
synagogues in the first major
pogrom of the Nazi regime.
Although only 150 Jews live in
Darmstadt today, the synagogue
and community center will serve
other Jewish communities in
Hesse.
The project was enthusiastically
welcomed by all factions at a
meeting of the City Council last
week. A member of the Free
Democratic Party called it a con-
tribution to peaceful co-existence.
A Social Democratic Party
member said the synagogue would
be part of Darmstadt's history. A
representative of the Green Party
urged the budget committee to
display generosity.
Local citizens have already rais-
ed 20,000 Marks and have called
on the general public to folio*
suit.
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Point-by-Point Study
Way Cleared for Mormon Center
Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
IA ranking legal authority's
point-by-point refection of
objections raised by the Or-
thodox religious establish-
ment and letters to the 120
members of the Knesset
from 150 U.S. Con-
gressmen, including some of
Israel's staunchest sup-
porters, appears to clear the
way for the controversial
[Mormon University Center
[under construction on Mt.
| Scopus.
Orthodox Jews in Israel and
labroad have been waging a
Irelentless campaign against the
project on grounds that it will Be a
center for missionary activities.
The Mormon Center is sponsored
by Brigham Young University
|[BYU) of Provo, Utah, affiliated
with the Mormon Church. It was
ipproved by the former Likud-led
jovernment and by the Jerusalem
municipality. But the Orthodox
have been demanding that the
building license and all other per
nits be revoked.
DEPUTY ATTORNEY General
iforam Bar-Sela was asked by a
bpecial ministerial committee to
Review the project. His findings,
published over the weekend ap-
eared to demolish the arguments
To Be Built
by religious Jews who have cited
the Mormon faith's long record of
proselytizing as grounds for their
fears. While the Church admits its
members are enjoined to seek con-
verts, it maintains that such ac-
tivities are not undertaken in
countries like Israel where they
are prohibited.
But Knesset members, under
severe pressure from their Or-
thodox colleagues and the Chief
Rabbinate as well as from Or-
thodox groups in the U.S., had
become nervous. The letters from
the U.S. legislators a form of
counter pressure may have put
their doubts to rest.
The signatories included Reps.
Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.), chairman
of the House Foreign Affairs
Committee's Subcommittee on
Europe and the Middle East; Tom
Lantos (D., Calif.), a member of
the Foreign Affairs Committee;
Morris Udall (D., Ariz.); and Jack
Kemp (R., N.Y.)
THEY ACKNOWLEDGED
that they are "aware of the sen-
sitivity which many Jews feel
regarding proselytizing," but add-
ed: "It is our understanding that
the officials of BYU have signed
an undertaking in which (BYU)
pledges that the center will not be
used for missionary activities."
BYU representatives in
Austria's Foreign Minister Wants
'o Know Shamir's Role in Imbroglio
Jerusalem hired a prominent
public relations firm to help their
appeal to local opinion. They took
out double page advertisements in
the leading dailies over the
weekend, reprinting the Con-
gressmen's letter with all 150
signatures attached.
Bar-Sela's opinion took care of
the legal objections. It stated, in
part: "The grant of the site to the
BYU accords with the terms of its
expropriation from its original
owners. The original owners
reconciled themselves with the ex-
propriation (for which compensa-
tion was paid) and with the use to
which the land is to be put. The
valuation made at the time of the
expropriation by government
evaluators was fair and
reasonable. The earthworks and
foundation-laying was done under
due statutory supervision by ar-
chaeologists. No ancient graves or
other valuable ruins were found.
There is no confusion about the
size of the original parcel of land."
ALL OF THOSE points had
been contested by Orthodox ac-
tivists as reasons why the govern-
ment should revoke its permit.
Bar-Sela stated that the universi-
ty campus itself adjacent to the
Hebrew University campus is
of no cause for concern, given the
repeated written and solemn
assurances by BYU and Mormon
leaders that it will not serve for
any missionary activities.
Bar-Sela found the Visitors'
Center adjacent to the campus
more questionable. But he inclin-
ed to the view that adequate
assurances from BYU can be in-
cluded in the land-lease contract
with the Israel Lands Authority.
VIENNA (JTA) -
foreign Minister Leopold
Iratz has instructed
Austria's Ambassador to
Israel to ascertain from the
government in Jerusalem
whether Foreign Minister
'itzhak Shamir spoke as its
representative or simply as
politician in his attacks on
Austrian Presidential can-
iidate Kurt Waldheim.
Iratz, whose Socialist Party
Candidate Kurt Steyrer is oppos-
ng Waldheim in the June 8 run-
)ff elections, nevertheless
ieplored Shamir's exhortations to
pefeat Waldheim as unseemly
neddling in Austria's internal af-
fairs. He added that he considered
Shamir's remarks "impertinent."
THERE HAS BEEN a long-
jnning verbal battle between
Austrian politicians and some pro-
ninent Israelis since the World
Jewish Congress last winter pro-
luced documents indicating that
Taldheim was fully aware of and
ossibly implicated in atrocities
gainst Yugoslavian partisans and
he deportation of Greek Jews
ehen he served as a Wehrmacht
ntelligence officer in the Balkans
World War II.
Waldheim, a former United Na-
jions Secretary General, was forc-
i to admit to his military service
fter 1941 a matter he falsified
his memoirs and managed to
anceal for 40 years. But he
ehemently denies personal in-
ttlvement in war crimes.
[Socialists deplore the attacks on
Faldheim because they divert
Bblic attention from the issues in
le Presidential campaign. The
bnservative People's Party,
tiose candidate Waldheim is, has
fco expressed outrage over
namir's attacks.
[Its chairman, Alois Mock, said
st Tuesday that Shamir was an
kult to Israel's President Chaim
lerzog who, while disturbed by
le allegations against Waldheim.
cautioned Israelis not to pass
dement until all the evidence is
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Since Unification,
Jerusalem Has Changed Dramatically
Jerusalem Day, in Hebrew Yom
Yerushalayim, will be marked worldwide on
Friday, June 6. On that day, in 1967, Israeli
forces broke into East Jerusalem, occupied
by Jordan since the 1948 War of In-
dependence, and unified the Old City with
the New, thus fulfilling a 2,000-year-long
dream. That day, one of the most indelible
achievements in the Six-Day War, hencefor-
ward gave meaning to Jews throughout the
world as they murmured in their prayers:
Next year in Jerusalem.
Since that historic day, Jerusalem has
changed dramatically. New parks, gardens,
newly-uncovered archaeological and
historical sites, and a proliferation of social,
cultural, educational, sports and health
facilities have all benefitted from this
achievement.
New Beauty, Enrichment
And there are other such new
developments on tap: for instance, the new
Henry Crown Symphony Hall and the
Rebecca Crown Auditorium adjoining the
Jerusalem Sherover Theater. And for the
sports enthusiast, there is the Goldberg
Sports Hall at Manachat in Jerusalem, a
multi-functional sports facility, the largest
of its kind, seating 2,000 and inaugurated in
1983.
All of these changes, which beautify and
enrich unified Jerusalem in the various
facets of its life, somehow make easier to
bear the ongoing problems of that noblest of
cities, the diadem of Judaism.
For example, the flap over the construc-
tion of a Brigham Young Unversity Mormon
establishment on the Mount of Olives, an ill-
conceived project in the first place; no less
than the ongoing struggle with the city's
Moslem citizens and, indeed, Moslems
throughout the world, over the Al Aqsa
Dome of the Rock on the holiest of holy
Mount Mori ah.
The celebration of Jerusalem Day 1986
somehow accents the shining beauty of the
unified city and gives us pause to rest from
its woes.
Pollard Scandal Again
The warm relationship that exists bet-
ween Israel and the United States today is
unique. There is not a previous presidential
administration since the establishment of
Israel that has not been officially friendly
and shown this friendship in very tangible
ways. But few observers will argue that the
present relationship is warmer and closer
than any other before it.
The scandal surrounding the Jonathan
Pollard spy case therefore came at a par-
ticularly embarrassing time. When Pollard
was arrested late last year for selling Israel
what FBI agents later described as "stacks
of classified reports" on the military
strength of the United States and other na-
tions, the firm denials by Prime Minister
Shimon Peres that the Israel government
knew anything about it took on an unusually
believable tone precisely because of the
warm, if at that moment shocked, feeling
between the two countries.
When Mr. Peres vowed to investigate
Israel's role in the affair "to the last detail,
no matter where the trail may lead," the
United States seemed anxious to bury
Jewish Floridiari
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Number 23
Israel's attachment to the case as a
nightmare that had embarrassed both
parties.
May U.S. Be Right
Now comes the latest allegation in the con-
tinuing Washington investigation of former
U.S. Navy analyst Pollard. According to the
Los Angeles Times. Pollard may well have
been but one link in an intricate Israeli spy
network operating in the United States. The
focus is on an as yet unnamed Israeli Air
Force official. Should all this prove to be
true, the burial of the Pollard case corpse
may turn out to be untimely.
With the latest scandal rocking Israel this
week over the 1984 beating to death of two
Palestinian hijackers by Israeli commando
forces and the role the Shin Bet allegedly
played in covering it up a scandal that has
produced the resignation of Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir following his deter-
mination to pursue an investigation of the
cover-up allegations the resurrection of
the Pollard case could well prove to be a
disaster.
WAmN^F0R(iORpAo^
lvrTA.
That is, providing that the highest
authorities in Israel, including Mr. Peres
did not tell the truth in the first place.
According to the Los Angeles Times, the
Sate Department continues to believe that
the Prime Minister knew no more about the
espionage activity than he said he knew
when Pollard was first arrested last Nov. 21
May the State Department be right.
Federation Annual Meeting To Eye Half-Century
The single, most important business
meeting of the year will occur for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation next
Wednesday evening when the Federation
holds its 48th annual meeting at the Omni
Hotel.
The event will celebrate the special part-
nership between the Federation and its
many beneficiary agencies 30 Dade Coun-
ty social and human service organizations in
all.
But the Federation will also honor three of
the community's leaders: Sam I. Adler, who
will be completing two years as president of
Federation; Norman Braman, the 1985 cam-
paign chairman; and Aaron Podhurst, chair-
man of the 1986 campaign and incoming
Federation president.
The two campaign chairmen being
Differing Fates
On Artukovic and Waldheim
honored have between them helped Federa-
tion raise almost $50 million for Israel and
local services.
Next Wednesday's meeting will serve as
an outstanding opportunity to celebrate the
Jewish community's accomplishments in the
company of Federation's family of agencies.
As Donald Lefton, chairman of the annual
meeting, notes, Federation is now entering
its 49th year. The 48th annual meeting will
provide those who attend next Wednesday
with an opportunity to reflect on past
achievement and to look toward the 1987
campaign and the celebration of "Federa-
tion 50."
That's a half-century 50 golden years of
the rendering of service to Jews locally, na-
tionally and in Israel. No nobler purpose can
be imagined for our community.
Friday, June 6,1986
Volume 59
By ROBERT SEGAL
Strange how the fate of
men involved in the bloody
Nazi venture of the 1930s
and 1940s differs. Here's
Kurt Waldheim, cheered on
by thousands of fellow-
Austrians while seeking his
nation's presidency, nearly
succeeding in denying his
Nazi past, and pictured gai-
ly waltzing with his frau in
Vienna.
And here's Andrija Artukovic,
long a United States resident but
found to have been a functionary
for Croatia, a Nazi puppet state,
sentenced to death at 86 in
Zagreb, Yugoslavia.
Artukovic was extradited from
California Feb. 12, a frail man,
legally blind, mentally confused,
and suffering from a heart
condition.
THERE APPEARS little
possibility that any real dents will
pierce the armor of righteousness
which sympathetic Austrians and
the former Secretary General of
the United Nations himself have
now wrapped around Waldheim.
Each passing day brings new,
damaging evidence, dredged from
old World War II official archives,
indicating heavy Waldheim in-
volvement in the Nazi program of
dispatching Jews to Auschwitz.
Following these startling
revelations, one learns that the
deceitful Austrian, so fawned
upon now by his countrymen, was
aware of the massacres of
Yugoslav partisans carried out by
the Waldheim Wehrmacht unit in
the Balkans. This was not long
after Hitler (April 16,1941) rejoic-
ed as his lieutenants set up shop in
Croatia, the Nazi-inspired spin-off
from Yugoslavia.
Quickly the anti-Jewish law
created in Berlin came to full
bloom in Croatia. Three years
later, when Waldheim must have
been well aware of the Nazis'
murderous games in Croatia, all
Croatian Jews except a few
honorary Aryans and those of
mixed marriages had suffered
Hitler's final solution.
IF WALDHEIM is cognizant of
Artukovic's fate, he may also
know that Artukovic, while serv-
ing as the interior minister of
Croatia, was accused of complicity
in the deaths of thousands of
Jews.
Meanwhile, we have Chancellor
Helmut Kohl of West Germany
brazenly defending Waldheim and
branding as arrogant those now
critical of the Austrian politician
with a Nazi past. And in
Washington, despite strong
recommendations from the
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations that the
U.S. bar Waldheim from ever
entering this nation, no decision
has been reached.
Forgetting the excuses made by
an for Nazis is not uncommon.
Albert Speer, Hitler's minister for
economic mobilization, was
sentenced in 1946 to 20 years in
prison by the International
Military Tribunal. Some
historians rate his Third Reich
position as second in importance
to Hitler's. Released in 1966.he
got rich by writing "Inside The
Third Reich" and convinced some
people he had plotted to
assassinate Hitler.
He insisted after the war that he
took no part in persecution o
Jews; but the wartime log
Speer's office offered evidence
that this organization evicteo
75.000 Jews from their Berlin
homes to provide housing w
Aryans. His correspondence wiin
Heinrich Himmler punctures
myth Speer floated that he was ig-
norant of the murder of six million
Jews. But the world forgets.
HOW WE nod also over_ the
triumphs of the Krupp dynasty.
you read in May of the death ot
Continued on Page 10-A


Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Flag
By HERB KEINON
For those born after the
creation of the Jewish
State, it is hard to imagine a
world without Israel. And
for those who came to Israel
after 1967, it is equally dif-
ficult to imagine Israel's
Jerusalem without the Old
City.
The Old City conjures up
i-ountless images: seven gates,
narrow lanes, laden donkeys,
tranquil churches, pious Jews,
golden domes, ancient ruins. To-
day, Jews can walk freely to and
from the Old City, but 19 years
ago this was forbidden. Today,
.lews can live freely in the Old Ci-
ty; 19 years ago they couldn't.
About 600 Jewish families, and
many minyans of yeshiva
students, have returned to the
Jewish Quarter after a 19-year en-
forced absence. Situated on the
eastern flank of Mount Zion,
overlooking the Temple Mount,
this site was given top priority for
, reconstruction soon after the blue
and white Israeli flag was raised
I over the area on June 7, 1967.
BUT ON that day the flag was
raised over a heap of rubble, not a
liveable quarter. The Jordanians
Ihad destroyed the Jewish
Quarter, turning homes into goat
pens, and synagogues into gar-
bage dumps. The Jewish Quarter,
which intermittently housed Jews
since the 7th Century BCE was
I flattened.
More galling was the Jorda-
i nians' shamelessly irreverent
(treatment of the quarter's
synagogues, many of them hun-
dreds of years old. When the Jor-
danians wrested control of the
quarter on May 28, 1948, there
[were some 60 synagogues and
[yeshivot in the area. When the
[Israelis returned in 1967, all that
[remained were the desecreted
I shells of a handful of buildings.
IThe Jewish Quarter was a lost
Jordan was shameless in its irreverent treat-
ment of the Jewish Quarter's 60 synagogues shells of a handful of buildings. Left is the
when it wrested control of the quarter on May Yochanan Ben Zakkai Synagogue, part of the
28, 19j8. When the Israelis returned and Four Sephardi Synagogues complex in the
unified Jerusalem in the Six-Day War of Jewish Quarter in 1967. Right is the
1967, all that remained were the desecrated renovated synagogue in full use today.
skyline.
Soon after the Six-Day War,
old-timers who lived in the Jewish
Quarter prior to 1948 scampered
over the ruins to identify places
where once a synagogue stood,
where once a yeshiva was housed.
In this manner, and with the aid of
a large-scale Jordanian map of the
Old City, the Army Engineers
Corps located the ruins of prac-
tically every Jewish holy place or
institution. Restoration of a
number of them, including the
Ramban Synagogue and the Four
Sephardi Synagogues, began
immediately.
THE RAMBAN Synagogue,
named for the brilliant Torah
scholar and philosopher, was for
three centuries Jerusalem's only
synagogue. Rabbi Moses ben
Nachman, commonly referred to
as the Ramban, established it at
its present site in 1267. Four
years earlier, the famed rabbi was
forced to flee his native Spain
because he bested a Dominican
priest in a public religious debate.
Leaving his home and his family,
the Ramban, at the age of 72,
started on his hazardous trek to
Jerusalem.
Arriving in Jerusalem, the Ram-
ban found only two other Jews
there. Twenty-three years prior to
his arrival, the Tartars had sacked
the city, leaving it desolate and
Jerusalem Day
1986 is being
celebrated Friday,
June 6.
almost entirely without Jewish in-
habitants. But the Ramban was
not deterred. Despite his age, he
set about rejuvenating Jewish life
in the city, calling upon Jews to
return to Jerusalem and rebuild
the Holy City.
From a letter to his son, we
learn that the Ramban transform-
ed into a synagogue a partially
destroyed building "with marble
pillars and a fine dome." Although
the dome has long since been
destroyed, parts of the four pillars
have been excavated and remain
the focus of the restored
synagogue.
Toward the end of the 16th Cen-
tury, the Jewish owner of the
synagogue site got into an argu-
ment with his co-religionists and
converted to Islam. His property
was turned over to the Moslem
authorities, and the synagogue
was turned into a cheese factory.
On one corner of the property,
looming over the old synagogue, a
mosque was built, and there it still
stands today.
THE SYNAGOGUE was
forgotten until the 1930's when a
Jewish architect, using the Ram-
ban's written description of the
synagogue, rediscovered it. Work
to renovate the site could not
begin, however, until the Israelis
Continued on Page 14-A
Dramatic High Point
Jerusalem Is in Our Hands'
>>,


v
m***^
Classic image shows awe of
IDF at liberated 'Kotel/
By ZEV GOLAN
All Israelis agree that the
dramatic high point of the
Six-Day War in June, 1967
the symbol of the
reunification of Jerusalem
was Gen. Mordecai Gur's
ecstatic exclamation, "Har
Habayit Beyadenu" "the
Temple Mount is in our
hands." Today, dovish
Labor MK Mordecai Gur
says "The situation on the
Temple Mount is
insufferable."
Gur's Labor Party colleague
Amnon Lynn says that, "Whoever
thinks we have sovereignty over
the Mount is kidding himself,"
while fellow Laborite Jacques
Amir refers to Arab "pogroms"
against Jews on the Mount. The
general consensus that all is not
well on the Temple Mount does
not, however, imply any agree-
ment on a remedy for the ills.
LIKUD Knesseteer Dov Shilan-
sky claims he will not rest until an
Israeli flag flies over the Mount.
Sephardi Chief Rabbi Mordecai
Eliahu was recently quoted as
favoring construction of a "big
and beautiful synagogue" on the
spot.
In stark contrast, MK Shulamit
Aloni has warned a probable
Moslem jihad if the nationalists
who are pushing for Jewish rights
on the Mount are not held back.
The Moslem Mufti of Jerusalem
has issued a warning of his own:
the result of any attempt by
Jewish politicians to explore the
usually off-limits areas of the
Mount will be bloodshed.
No site in Israel better
epitomizes the internal tensions of
the Jewish State, as well as the
larger regional conflict. The Tem-
ple Mount, the Biblical Mount
Moriah, is a 35-acre trapezoid
located at the southeatern corner
of Jerusalem's Old City. It has
been the focus of Jewish religious
and national sentiment for
thousands of years, since
Abraham prepared to sacrifice his
son, Isaac, on the stone that today
lies under the famous dome. For
nearly one-thousand years, the
First and later the Second Jewish
Temple stood on the Mount; with
the Destruction of the Temple,
Hebrew independence in effect
ended as well.
WHEN THE Moslems con-
quered Jerusalem in the Seventh
Century, they erected the
decorative dome over the Founda-
tion Stone at the Mount's center
and the silver-domed al-Aksa Mos-
que on the Mount's southern ex-
tremity. Moslem legend relates
that Mohammed journeyed to
Jerusalem in a dream and ascend-
ed to the seven heavens from the
Stone his footprint is still visi-
ble, they say before returning
to Mecca.
Though evidence suggests that
a synagogue existed alongside the
Moslem dome in the 11th Century,
this harmonious juxtaposition is
Continued on Page 12-A
:
*
$
1 J TlI- ^t T** p-

m -*
F^^*T9 f$ $&?T12R
Aerial view of the Western Wall in Jerusalem shows the proximi-
ty of the Wall, which was built as a retainer for the Temple
Mount, to the Dome of the Rock.


Pago 6-A The Jewish rTorktian/Friday, June 6, 1966
Israel Considering
Joint Rule With Egyptians Over Gaza Strip
P**j 763 k"ibes. each of which
wfllrecerve $8,000 fron> EgySJ
TeJ Suhan. near Rafa w. "
II ha. spent $1 2 Sg
preparing road and sewers eleo
trxnty and water systems.' Fur!
Israel for schools and
By JANE MOONMAN
Lomdtm CkromeU SynaScoU
Shimon Peres. Israel's Prime
Minister, appears to have moved
plans for the future of the Gaza
Strip higher up his government's
agenda. He is said to have discuss-
ed the idea of joint Israeli-
Egyptian rule with the U.S.
Secretary of State George Shultz
in his recent visit to Washington,
and be again canvassed the "Gaza
First" concept of self-rule for the
Palestinian Arabs of the Strip at a
recent Cabinet meeting.
There is no question that Gaza
presents the Israeli Government
with a number of urgent pro-
blems. The head of the civil ad-
ministration in the Strip. Brig.
Gen. "Shikey" Erez. is the first to
enumerate them, and though he
shoulders the responsibility for
them all. the most intractable are
not of Israel's making.
I MET him during a tour of
Gaza last month. An honest and
forthright man. he made no at-
tempt to disguise his anxiety for
the future of an area in which the
population is growing so fast the
present 00.000 will have become
almost a million by the year 2000.
Gaza covers only 360 square
kilometers. This means it has
3,500 people to the square mile. It
is one of the most densely-
populated areas in the world, and
50 per cent of its people have
refugee status.
There are eight refugee camps
in Gaza. One of them, Jabalia with
37-40,000 people is the biggest in
all the administered territories. In
fact, Gaza holds a number of
records, all of them representing a
problem. Gaza itself is the largest
city in the territories, and Al-
Azhar University or the Islamic
Institute as it is variously known,
is the biggest academic institution
with 4.700 students.
There are too many students in
Gaza, too many unemployed
graduates, too many children
just too many people. And it is go-
ing to get much worse. No at-
tempt is made to control the
population nor can there be while
fundamentalist Islam is the
predominant religion. I visited a
brand new maternity wing at
Shifa Hospital in Gaza. Seventeen
babies had been born by mid-
morning; 900 are born each month
in that one maternity unit alone. I
saw no evidence of maternal joy
only weary resignation.
THIS over-population is at the
root of all Gaza's problems. The
solution is obvious, but the Israelis
are impotent to do anything about
it. All they can do is grapple with
the worst of its effects.
The first of these was identified
by Brig. Gen. Erez as the supply
of water. The water source for
Gaza is an aquafer in the north
formed by rain water. It is a com-
pletely separate source from that
which feeds the rest of Israel.
However, because of the massive
population and the needs of
agriculture in the district, there is
always a shortage of water which
has to be metered and controlled.
This control applies to
everybody living in the area. in-
cluding the administration and
Israeli settlers. It' seems in-
evitable that the fresh water will
eventually become contaminated
with sea water from the ocean as a
result of over-pumping. There are
four possible solutions:
Water can be brought from
the Nile. This is the simplest and
cheapest solution, but the Egyp-
tians are not interested in
cooperating on it;
A massive program of
desalinization of sea water could
be introduced, but this is very
the north of the Strip to the south,
but this will exhaust the total
water supply to Gaza very quickly,
Water can be brought from
Israel. This seems to be the only
feasible solution, but there is a
drought in Israel where water is
also a very scarce commodity.
AT THE END of the day.
however, it is the solution most
likely to be effected. Any sugges-
tion that the Israelis are careless
of Gaza's water problems or that
they apply rationing only to the
Arab population are made in ig-
norance of the facts.
The other major difficulty is
employment. There are three
main sources of employment for
workers from Gaza;
The Arab countries, where
some 25.000 Gazans presently
work. But this source is drying up
as oil revenues decrease, and
there is less work available, par-
ticularly in places of traditonal
employment such as Saudi Arabia,
so Gazans are being dispatched
home by Arab countries which no
longer have a use for their labor.
43.000 people work in Gaza
itself, although many of these also
do some work for or in Israel;
42.000 Gazans go to Israel
each day to work. If in some
political solution the Strip were to
be cut off from Israel, these peo-
ple would not be able to get work
at all.
THE EMPLOYMENT situa
tion for educated people is
another severe problem.
Graduates of the university in
Gaza are not welcome in Arab
countries, and the status of their
qualifications is not regarded as
university equivalent by other
countries. Therefore, university
graduates frequently have to per-
form menial tasks within Gaza
itself, a potentially explosive
situation.
There are some 6.300 personnel
involved in the administration of
Gaza covering all the major func-
tions of government. Only one in
30 is an Israeli, the remainder are
from the local Arab population.
All the services in the area are
financed by municipal taxes and
money from the Israeli Govern-
ment and from international relief
agencies. The refugee camps are
administered and serviced by
UNRWA (United Nations Relief
and Works Agency)- Little or
nothing comes from the rest of the
Arab world.
The Israeli Administration has
tried hard to improve matters,
and great strides have been made
in some areas. Nevertheless, they
concede at the outset that any ad-
ministration carried out by an ar-
my, however well-intentioned and
humane, starts with the severe
disadvantage that there will
always be resistance.
THE DISTANCE between the
Strip and the West Bank is only
40 kilometers presenting the ad-
ministration with a considerable
security problem. The most im-
portant political influence in Gaza
is Al Fatah, the Arafat branch of
the PLO. This has the most money
and has been responsible for many
acts of terrorism in the district.
Egyptian political influence
diminishes year by year, but pro-
bably the second most important
strand of political life in Gaza is a
growth in fundamentalism. Its
supporters favor a solution to the
problems of Gaza which involves
expelling all the Jews from the
areas as well as from the whole of
Israel. Meanwhile, they concen-
trate on persuading the local
population to become more obser-
vant and to pursue Moslem unity.
During the 1970s, the Israeli
Government committed itself to
finding a solution to the problems
of Gaza through rehabilitation
schemes for the refugees. A deci-
sion had already been reached in
1967 to abolish any differential is
status between a refugee and any
other Gazan. The next step was to
recognize that for the Palestinian
Arabs the worst deprivation was
to have no land and no house of
their own.
ISRAEL Government funds
were used to purchase State land
in Gaza and to build homes which
were and continue to be sold at
low prices to inhabitants of the
refugee camps. This policy is be-
ing carried out both for
humanitarian reasons and in
order to provide a permanent
solution to the refugee problem.
When the scheme was first
started, the PLO was vehemently
opposed to it and the refugees
were intimidated from coming
forward. Gradually the opposition
has diminished so that now the
rehabilitation programs are suc-
ceeding. There are eight interna-
tional organizations, including
UNRWA and UNDP, involved
with Israel in various parts of this
rehabilitation scheme.
The head of the branch of the
Administration, which is responsi-
ble for refugee rehabilitation, is a
man called Rafi Sadeh. He came
as a refugee himself from Libya
and is an apt illustration of the dif-
ference between the fate of the
Jewish refugees who are
rehabilitated by Israel and the
Arab refuges whom no Arab coun-
try wants to absorb. I went with
him to visit the Shatti or Beach
refugee camp whose setting on
the beautiful Gaza beach contrasts
starkly with the untidy, makeshift
dwellings of the camp bristling
with TV antennae while open
sewers run in the streets. UNR-
WA is responsible for the
sewerage system in the camps.
Israel for the treatment plants
outside.
IN SHATTI camp, there are
6.000 families in a space that
should house only 1.000. Many of
the refugees do get out. They are
highly motivated to work hard.
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usually in Israel, and to save. In
the average family, there will be
two wage-earners who will
receive good salaries in Israel and
at the same time have no rent to
pay. have free health service, free
education and financial assistance
from UNRWA as refugees.
When they have saved the
roughly $25,000 needed to pur-
chase one of the bouses offered by
the administration, they will pro-
bably move to Sheik Radwan. a
suburb where 3.000 families from
Shatti have already been
rehabilitated.
Some came out of Shatti five
years ago and are already building
extensions on the homes they
bought then. Altogether 10.000
families have been rehoused by
Israel from the refugee camps in-
to suburbs in Gaza. In Sheik Rad-
wan. there are four new schools
buDt by Israel. (There are 160.000
schoolchildren in Gaza. 75.000 of
whom are educated in schools
built by Israel.)
Rafa camp is in the south of the
Strip on the Egyptian border. It
was home to about 7,000 families
to begin with, but in the last five
to seven years its inhabitants have
been rehoused on a systematic
basis and are in the process of be-
ing rehabilitated. So far. 2.500
families have been moved to new
homes with schools and other
facilities in their immediate
neighborhood.
INCLUDED in the Rafa
rehabilitation scheme is the
Canada Project for the rehousing
of refugees from the Canada
refugee camp on the Egyptian
side of the border with Israel.
After the Camp David Accords
were implemented, they found
themselves just inside Egypt,
which, however, was reluctant to
accept responsiblity for them.
Israel eventually agreed to do so
as part of the normalization pro-
cess between the two countries.
The move will involve 4.300 peo-
for the
medical
resettlement
faculties
scheme.
Whatever politica: lotatWB
eventually found for :he Gaza
Strip, whether it is a form of local
autonomy with additional powers
going to the Gazar. leaders or an
Egyptian-Israeli condominium"
responsible for policing and
defense. Israel's genera] response
to the problem of the refigees has
been that the camps must be
dismantled and the digr.::-. of pro-
per housing be given to their
inhabitants.
The rehousing scr.err.es have
been bitterly opposed by Arab
leaders and other; ..-. international
forums on the grounds that Israel
has no right to find a permanent
solution, and refuge*; must re-
main refugees onta they have an
independent Palestintan state.
You do not have I -:---. mucn
time in Gaza to a* nder wl k side
thev are on.
Jane Moonman it
tke Brtfish Israel
fairs Committee.
tor of
Pubii.c Af-
Klinghoffer
Forest
ROME -(JTA)- Members of
Parliament re;
all politica; faction have signed a
petition to plant a :' res: r. Israel
in memory of Leon Klinghoffer
and all rictam :' international
terrorism."
Klinghoffer was v.e elderly
American Jews Bordered by
Palestinian terror.-:.- -- seized
the Italian cruise -.-..: Achille
Lauro in Egyptian waters last Oc-
tober. The petition was s-.gned by
MPs of the Caraaavi Democratic
Party, the CoaaaaaaM Party, the
Liberals. Radical Republicans.
Socialist and S>>:-^ Democratic
Parties.
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Israeli Air Force Official
Said To Be Involved in Spy Ring
WASHINGTON -
Serious doubts are being
cast on Israel's claim that
the government was ig-
norant of the activities of
former U.S. Navy analyst
Jonathan Jay Pollard,
whose arrest in November
on charges of spying for
Israel was dismissed by the
Israelis as an isolated
embarrassment.
Now, according to the Los
Angeles Times, it is believed that
Pollard was just one link in an
organized and well-financed
Israeli espionage ring operating in
the United States. It is expected
that a continuing U.S. investiga-
tion of Israeli spying will probably
produce at least one additional
arrest.
THE INVESTIGATION, it is
claimed, has brought both
American and Israeli citizens
under suspicion. The suspects in
the case include an unnamed
Israeli Air Force official who has
been a frequent visitor to the
United States for "educational
purposes."
The unnamed Israeli is believed
to have been the "master case of-
ficer" for U.S. intelligence
operations.
Jonathan Pollard
One U.S. official is quoted as
declaring that "The Israelis lied to
us. This was no small-time rogue
operation; it was much more
systematic than that. This was a
very expensive operation that
they ran. There's no embassy
slush fund big enough to cover
that sort of thing."
In the days following Pollard's
arrest in November, Israeli of-
ficials expressed "shock and con-
sternation," saying that his es-
pionage accusations were a com-
plete surprise. Prime Minister
Shimon Peres later pledged to
unravel Israel's role in the affair
"to the last detail, no matter
where the trail may lead."
WITH THE latest information
in the Pollard case, some U.S. of-
ficials now believe that Peres
knew about the espionage net-
work from the beginning despite
the assurances Israel gave the
United States last December that
any spying was conducted
"without authority" from
Jerusalem.
Thus far, the U.S. State Depart-
ment is unconvinced that Peres
knew more about the Pollard case.
"There continues to be some ques-
tion of how far up the knowledge
of the American-targeted es-
pionage extended," one official
said.
A civilian intelligence analyst,
Pollard was arrested Nov. 21,
1985 as he tried to crash his car
through the gates of the Israeli
Embassy in Washington. The FBI
later told a federal magistrate
that Pollard had sold Israel
"stacks" of classified reports on
the military strength of the
United States and other nations,
including Israel's dominant Arab
enemies in the Middle East.
Tip of Iceberg'
Sorry Episode Casts Bad Light
By JOSEPH ALPHER
The recent Pollard affair,
the FBI alleges, may be just
the "tip of the iceberg."
How right they are but
for the wrong reasons. The
Pollard affair should indeed
be a source of concern to us
all, but not because this
country is running a
wholesale spy business in
the Unites States.
Rather, the entire sorry episode
reflects something genuinely
wrong in Israel's conception of its
relationship with the U.S. and
with American Jewry. To il-
lustrate the point, a few of the key
(usually apologetic) phrases ban-
died about in the Israeli press
regarding the affair form a conve-
nient context:
The affair pales when contrasted
with Israel's innate strategic
value to the U.S.
It may comfort a few Israelis
and friends of the country to
count the billions of dollars we are
purportedly "worth" to the U.S.
in "strategic value" in terms of
captured Soviet weaponry,
military know-how, and steady
friendship in a troubled region.
But the real reason the U.S.
values Israel is that it shares
democratic values and provides a
homeland for the Jews. The
Pollard case virtually presents us
as traitors to these very ideals in
the sense that we have been
caught both exploiting the warm
welcome of American democracy
and using American Jewry.
Friend* always spy on one
another, and they will undoubted-
ly continue to do so.
True, but recruiting an
American Jewish national,
himself a member of the most
friendly arm of the U.S. defense
intelligence community, is not the
same as getting a helpful tip here
and there, or even obtaining high
technology items forbidden for ex-
port. The chutzpah of it nay, the
hubris of it virtually cancels out

The read reason
the U.S. values
Israel is that it
shares democratic
values not
strategic worth.
Israel's contention, correct and
important in itself, that it sought
to do no harm to American in-
terests and therefore should not
be judged by the same standards
as are America's enemies who spy
in that country.
The Pollard affair was an
isolated event Jonathan Pollard
was a misguided American Jew to
whom it was hard to say no.
Israel, in willingly abusing the
uncertain motives of an unstable
American Jew in a sensitive U.S.
national security job, violated its
unique relationship with
American Jewry. Whether
Israelis like it or not, they must
recognize and accept that
American Jewry, with all its pride
in, and identification with, the
Jewish stated, resolutely insists
on remaining first American, then
Jewish. It views Israel essentially
as a country it helped establish
philanthropically and politically,
which would serve as a refugee for
Jews in times of crisis.
Israeli diplomats were brought
home in a hurry, without the
Israeli ambassador being
informed.
Israel's neutralization of its em-
bassy in Washington could prove
to be one of the most dangerous
by-products of this era of broad
coalition government in
Jerusalem. It is no secret that
Prime Minister Shimon Peres will
not work through the Likud ap-
pointees running the Washington
embassy, yet cannot replace them.
The resultant ethic of Byzantine
shadow diplomacy is highly
damaging to our relations with
Washington.
Accidents will happen; the
senior political leadership cannot
possibly know everything that is
going on.
True, a busy, democratic state
cannot centralize all its
defense/intelligence decisions.
The natural conclusion is that the
country must educate its
defense/intelligence decision
makers regarding the complex
issues of Israel-Diaspora and
Israel-U.S. relations. They must
be able to make the right decisions
on their own: to smell a "Pollard"
a mile away, and sound an alarm,
to know when to consult their
superiors at the political level, and
to appreciate intuitively when to
prefer broad national interess
over narrow, short-term ones.
As a rule, Israel's intelligence
community has been blessed with
such leaders. Rafael Eitan (not to
be confused with the Tehiya MK
and ex-chief of staff of the same
name), the man who, according to
press reports, "ran" Pollard, was
an exception. Indeed, it was no ac-
cident that Eitan was eased out of
the mainline defense/intelligence
establishment some 15 years ago,
before reaching its most senior
echelon. But he returned through
a back door, and his lack of sound
judgment will be remembered
long after we have forgotten his
professional excellence. Nor was
it a coincidence that his political
benefactor and mentor, Minister
of Trade and Industry Ariel
Sharon, also led the country to a
similar disaster in 1982.
On the professional
defense/intelligence level, we may
hope that these are the exceptions
that will, indeed, prove the rule.
As for the country's appreciation
of the demands placed upon it by
its relationship with the U.S. and
with American Jewry, it is less
certain that the lessons have been i
learned.
Israel Scene
The Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, in association with
Paramount Home Video, will be the exclusive distributor of the
video cassette release of 'Shoah.' Left to right are Tim Clott,
senior vice president and general manager of Paramount Home
Video; 'Shoah' writer, producer and director, Claude Lanzmann;
and Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, at
a screening of the video cassette before some 1,000 persons of the
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles.
Israel's Lavi Plane Cost Estimate
Difference Worries U.S.
TEL AVTV (WNS) U.S.
Ambassador to Israel Thomas
Pickering has told Israel Televi-
sion interviewers that the U.S. is
deeply concerned about the big
differences between it and Israel
on the estimates of the eventual
cost of the Lavi Israeli-designed
and built warplane.
He said that the U.S. believes
it's probably not a wise idea to
move ahead from the research and
development phase of the Lavi
project to the production phase
until these differences can be iron-
ed out.
Pickering, in his first extensive
Israel television appearance since
taking up his post nearly a year
ago, stressed that the U.S. saw no
technical impediment to the pro-
duction of the Lavi, and the deci-
sion to go ahead was an Israeli
one. But he added that there were
ongoing amicable discussions bet-
ween the two nations on the even-
tual cost of the Lavi, for which the
U.S. has already provided $1
billion.
According to Israel Aircraft In-
dustries (IA1), the manufacturers
of the Lavi, the prototype of
which is due to take to the air on
its maiden test flight in
September, each aircraft will cost
between $13.6 million and $15
million. The American cost
estimates are up to 50 percent
higher.
LAI President Moshe Keret said
recently that there was no doubt
that "our figures are correct, and
we will try to persuade the
Americans that this is so." He
said the LAI figures had recently
been checked and confirmed by an
authoritative, independent U.S.
body, which he declined to name.
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J^aBBf1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
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Sfctr o-r*
IUC JC.
Drug Abuse Up
15,000 in Israel And Rising
Thatcher Clarified Mideast Views
In Her 3-Day Trip to Israel
Clamed fro- Pag. i.A
pie go mto the Army. Dune Mar-
cos aid. Thoe found to be on
sod fo to jail. That creates a pro-
blem became if 70a don't finish
three jean in the Army too can't
do anything afterwards, she told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Drags exist aU over IsraeL An-
dre Marcos said, espeoa&y around
the borders where the drags are
coming in. "Historically.
Americans brought the first drugs
to kfebataan," he said, "but now
the main source is southern
Lebanon, the Bekaa VaOey."
Consequently, drags such as
used moat often m the
drdea. and heroin, pro-
minent in the over-22 group, are
available and cheap. "Since the
drugs are not travelling too far.
it's much cheaper than in
America." noted Diane Marcus.
ISRAEL IS just beginning to
realise the extent 0/ its drug pro-
blem, which Uf st became evident
after the Y'otr. Kjppur War in
1973. Diane Marcus explained
that since Israelis hare not
irmsstd the potentially harmful
effects 0/ drug use. as Americans
have, it is more difficult to pre-
vent it there Israehs are also not
yet equipped to deal with drag
sbusers.
"The probiem 3 that there a no
center to cure these people on s
long-tern: basis." said Diane Mar-
cus. The only thing that exists
are day chmcs." There are two
types of walk-in youth rhnirsr one
.ises methadooe to Teat addicts
and the other does not use any
drug replacement- The latter in-
volves soaai workers, doctors and
psychologists who counsel and
treat young drug abusers
anonymously
"The kids on drugs are in such a
circle that they cannot relate
anymore to their parents and they
cannot talk to friends who are not
on drugs because their behavior
will not be accepted." Diane Mar-
cos explained.
Those who realise they are on
a bad track and want to get out
would rather go to somebody out-
side their carle." she added
"Usually what happens s you end
up knowing more about them and
find out what led them way back
to the process of taking drugs.
Tins year's ball, held two weeks
ago at the Vista International
Hotel of New York City, was at-
tended by some 280 supporters
who were entertained by Sammy
Davis Jr.. and raised about
$150,000
ONE PROBLEM with the
Israeli ehnics is that they are
Mated to Denting drug sbusers
18 years and juunger According
to Diane Marcos, tha age group is
I in order to detoxify them
they're stm young. Many
drug users and drug pushers go to
jam. Andre Marcos said, for bet-
ween one to three years, since
there is no place else for them to
be treated.
"They are treated like common
criminals.'' explained Diane Mar-
cus, "ind there is no attempt to
rehabilitate them."
The Foundation plans to
caprtahse on the knowledge other
nations more experienced with
handling drug abuse have ac-
quired and share that with Israel
to prevent the problem from
spreading. Teachers are now be-
ing educated about the effects of
drug abuse and oass the message
to their students. Another goal of
the Foundation is to open a
therapeutic center for in-patient
treannent in Israel to complement
the existing youth ehnics
SO FAS. Israel has been
spared the worst of the drug pro-
blem, but it's coming," warned
former Ambassador to Israei
Samuel Lewis in a speech at the
ban.
"The problem is growing in the
wake of the Lebanon war." Lewis
said. But he expressed hope that
since the drug probiem came 10
vears later than in America.
"Israelis have a better chance to
profit from lessons we have
learned."
Lewis related to the bsssss* a
newscast he had been watching
earner that night about users of
"crack." a potent form of cocaine
that is rhmhar^ to ^pd**"?** pro-
portions in New York City.
"There is one crack-related
murder every 24 hours." Lewis
said. "It's a cause that had we
Americans been able to attack as
early as Israehs can attack it. we
wouldn't be watching scenes we
saw on our television sets
tonight."
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher made dear her
views on the Middle East
conflict at a press con-
ference here last week
shortly before ending her
three-day visit to Israei.
She endorsed Palestinian
demands for "self-determination"
but not an independent Palesti-
nian state. She maintained fh*r
the best approach, "moat nkery to
achieve success." was s federa-
tion of the Palestinians with
Jordan.
Thatcher was unequivocal m her
opposition to terrorists. She m-
dieated that the Palestinians moat
find an alternative to the
Palestine Liberation Organixation
if the PLOperstsom its refusal tc
accept United Nations Security
Council Resolution 242 and to
recognise Israel.
SHE RECALLED her own un-
successful efforts last October to
persuade the PLO to accept those
two conditions. She had gone so
far as to invite to London two pro-
minent PLO leaders. Bishop Eons
Khoury and Mohamed Muhem.
former Mayor of tee AW t^
Arab town of Hair^ fa* ullg
with her Forage Seer*-.*.-.
The tajcs ix^tf. oeca..^ _-,_ -Al
Palestnnana refusec v. aceet the
mere wouh be no more high level
meetings between B--ih
diplomats and PLO repreem.
tatrres unless the eonAtx^ *erp
fsaffled.
She stressed that tha position
stands despite the meeting in
Tomssa 'mat week Between Dutch
Foreign Minister Hans Van Den
Broek and PLO chief Yasir
Arafat. Van Dee Broek j :urrent-
hj chairman of the European
Economic Commonly EEC)
Council of MsBssters. Britain takes
over the chairmanship
Rabbi Stroh Chosen
TORONTO (JTA. Rabbi
Mkhad Stroh has beer r,-,*r.
1 awn on of Anenu. the World
Union of Reform Ziocusu at a
conference of the Worid Uruoc for
PiugnsaJM Judaism field in
Toronto. Stroh needs tee Cana-
fae Counts of Reform Zionists.
THE FIRST youth dmic was in-
augurated by Ehxabeth Moynihan
hi Apr_ 1978 on oehalf of the
Foundation and under the
auspices :' .*_-Sam. so Israeli
government-sponsored agency to
f.ght -irugs. Smee thee, funds
raised by the Foundation, which
was created m 1976 by A viva Na-
jor. wie of Israeli Amhaaranor
Amiei Najor. at the request of the
Israec Ministry of Health, have
helped to pen 11 youth '!'*

'
The Israeli goMranwnr sub-
sidizes some :4 the coats, depen-
ding on the state of the economy,
but much rf the money comes
from private fund-raising Every
two years die Foundation stages a
fund-raising jala bafi with pro-
ceeds going to the dhuca. Each
dank coats aboot SS0.000 anruai-
ty to operate, and aba to tram
Israeli personnel m America.
Blood Tests Slated
TEL AVTV (WNS) Every
amt of blood donated m Israel wffl
be tlisted for the presence of the
Ann HTLV-3 bodies, the virus
caoamg AIDS, by Magen David
Adorn Israel's
Semce In mating 1
the State of Israei
d the stinggte against the fatal
AIDS
It Costs So Little
And It Means So Much.
Southern Be* Long Distance s a great
way to stay m touch with friends and
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A 1W*NUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO"
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._


Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Israel Offers Experience in Arid Zone Agriculture to African Nations

By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
Israel offered to share its exper-
tise in agriculture and arid zone
research with the nations of
Africa and to cooperate with them
in innovative research and
development.
David Kimche, director general
of Israel's Ministry of Foreign Af-
fairs, made the proposal last
Wednesday, in an address to the
special session of the General
Assembly on the "Critical
Economic Situation in Africa."
"Israel wishes to share the
fruits of its experience with the
peoples of Africa," Kimche
declared. "We are not a large
country, nor do we have large
budgets at our disposal. We do,
however, have a great deal of ex-
perience in rural development and
agriculture under difficult
conditions.
"Also as a people with an un-
paralleled history of being victims
of racial persecution, we maintain
a large reservoir of goodwill and
sympathy for the people of Africa.
We are earnestly seeking ways in
which we can transfer the rele-
vant aspects of our experience
and know-how to Africa."
Noting that Israel has trained in
the last three decades tens of
thousands of persons from over
110 countries, the Israeli official
stated: "Israel is willing to work
with African countries and the in-
ternational community in
assisting to relieve one of the
most critical constraints to
African economic development:
that of know-how transfer."
Israel presently holds
diplomatic ties only with six
African nations: Zaire, Swaziland,
Malawi, Liberia, Lesotho and the
Ivory Coast. Most of the African
states cut diplomatic ties with the
Jewish state after the 1973 Yom
Kippur War.
Kimche's offer to the African
nations to put at their disposal
Israeli know-how and agricultural
expertise, was seen by diplomats
and observers here as part of
Israel's continued efforts to
restore its diplomatic relations
with as many as possible countries
in Africa.
In a briefing with Israeli
reporters last Thursday, Kimche
disclosed that he has been holding
talks with many African
delegates, including represen-
tatives of countries who do not
have diplomatic ties with Israel.
He declined to mention the coun-
tries. He said that many African
diplomats requested further infor-
mation following his statement at
the General Assembly.
The most distinguished award
for excellence among t
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m


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
Appeal for Reward Money
To Help Solve Rabbi's Murder Case
By RON CSILLAG
TORONTO (JTA) Of-
ficials in Pittsburgh have
appealed to Toronto to help
raise more reward money
for the arrest and conviction
of those responsible for the
April murder in Pittsburgh
of Toronto Rabbi Neil
Rosenblum.
Officials in the U.S. city have
turned to Toronto's Jewish com-
munity for help in raising an addi-
tional $19,000 U.S. (about $26,000
Canadian) to bring the total
reward in the case to $60,000 U.S.
On May 8, an anonymous caller
telephoned a Pittsburgh crime tip
servie and said he would reveal in-
formation about the April 17
shooting death of 24-year-old
Rosenblum if the reward was rais-
ed from $30,000 to $50,000.
Police are treating the call
seriously as the strongest lead in
the case the color of the car the
killer or killers were riding, a dark
colored Corvette has all but
dried up.
TONY HOVANEC, chief of
police in the Borough of Beaver,
20 miles west of Pittsburgh and
head of the area's Crime Solvers
Hotline program said he is
treating the call seriously and
hopes the tipster will call back if
the reward money is raised.
"If it gets the murderers of the
streets and shows the
(Rosenblum) family they're not
alone, I think it's worth it,"
Hovanec said, but admitted he
doesn't like the idea of someone
wanting a specific amount of
money to talk about a cold-
blooded killing.
He said the service has received
"about 60" calls, all of which are
being followed up. However,
Hovanec said he "will not go
higher than $50,000. I treat all
calls seriously. I'd hate to say, 'I
had the opportunity to catch the
guy and I let him slip away!
(Rosenblum) was here with his
wife and his child. That child will
never get to know her father.
That's what stinks."
ROSENBLUM, a graduate of
Ner Israel Yeshiva in Toronto,
was visiting his in-laws in Pitt-
sburgh with his wife and month-
old daughter to celebrate
Passover. He was returning from
late synagogue services in the
predominantly Jewish district of
Squirrel Hill when a car pulled up
at a street corner and one of two
men asked for directions. For no
apparent reason, Rosenblum was
shot six times at close range in the
abdomen, wrist and chest. He died
in the hospital the following
PhD Dissertation at French
Univ. Under Investigation
PARIS (JTA) The govern-
ment has ordered a full-scale in-
vestigation into the granting of a
doctoral degree by Nantes
University to a candidate whose
thesis claimed that the gas
chambers were a figment of
"Jewish imagination" and the
Holocaust in fact did not occur.
Alain Devaquet, Minister of
Higher Education and Scientific
Research, demanded an ad-
ministrative and university in-
vestigation of the procedures
which allowed the thesis to b* ac-
cepted and gave it top grades. The
author is Henri Roques, a retired
65-year-old agricultural engineer
and amateur historian. He submit-
ted his thesis to the Paris Sor-
bonne and several other major
universities, all of which rejected
Arrogance
Of Austria
Continued from Page 4-A
Arndt von Bohlen and Halbach,
last heir of the Krupp industrial
fortune, did you recall that Alfred
Krupp, key Nazi munitions maker,
was sentenced to 12 years in
prison for looting and employing
slave labor? Did you know that
John McCloy, U.S. High Commis-
sioner in Germany, ordered
Krupp released and most of his
property restored?
Although a condition of Krupp's
release was that his huge coal and
steel holdings were to be disposed
of by 1959, even so he had $500
million worth of holdings to pass !
on to his heirs when he died in i
1967.
You surely know how the
Krupps acquired their slave labor.
Dare we forget, as we are urged
to forget Waldheim's swastika-
emblazoned past, the identity of
most of those slave laborers?
Many were worked to death; but
the last of Krupp's heirs boasted a
hunting range in Herr
Waldheim's Austria, a home in
Munich, and a villa in Palm Beach.
WNS Syndicate
it
But Nantes University ap-
pointed an academic jury which
examined the 371-page work, pro-
nounced it excellent and granted
Roques an academic degree.
Devaquet told a Parliamentary
commission that the government
was "deeply disturbed by the
allegations tending to deny the ex-
istence of gas chambers and of the
Nazi Holocaust policies."
The episode was brought to the
Ministry's attention by 60 Nantes
University faculty members who
protested acceptance of the
thesis.
morning.
Before lapsing into un-
consciousness, he described the
car to a passerby as a dark blue or
black Corvette.
Lieut. Leo O'Neill, assistant to
the chief of police of Pittsburgh,
said there are "no new
developments" in the case.
O'Neill Mid police are checking
over 3,000 Corvettes of all colors
because they are not discounting
the possibility the car in question
may have been painted.
He said police can't deny the
crime service caller could offer
new leads, "but I can't really see a
solid lead in that." All 18 officers
on the city's homicide team are
working on the case, he added.
ROSENBLUM was dressed in
Orthodox garb and wore a beard.
Police have still not discounted
the possibility of a racially
motivated attack, although
Hovanec suspects the murder was
not because Rosenblum was
Jewish "He was just in the
wrong place at the wrong time."
The conventional wisdom is that
the shooting was a random thrill
killing.
Pittsburgh police "are still do-
ing everything they can,"
Hovanec added.
Gregory Deacon, director of
Toronto and Regional Crime Stop-
pers, a local crime tip hotline, said
all contributions to the Rosenblum
reward fund are welcome. So far,
Deacon said, $1,120 has been rais-
ed and about 40 callers have
pledged funds and support.
Deacon explained that funds col-
lected for the reward are held in
trust and check cashed only upon
arrest of a suspect. If there is no
conviction of the suspect, money
would be returned. If there is a
conviction, a tax receipt will be
available.
SHORTLY AFTER the
murder, Pittsburgh Mayor
Richard Calijuri posted a $10,000
reward for information leading to
an arrest and conviction.
An anonymous donor or donors,
believed to be from a Pittsburgh
Jewish organization, soon added
another $20,000 and Hovanec ad-
ded $1,000 from his Crime Solvers
program.
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NEW YORK (JTA) -
Retired Israel Defense
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along with three other
Israelis and an American
lawyer alleged to be involv-
ed in an illegal plan to sell $2
billion worth of American
combat aircraft and other
weapons to Iran.
The four men had been in Ber-
muda since Apr. 21 where, accor-
ding to U.S. authorities, they
went to finalize the arms deal.
They were held in custody at U.S.
request and deported from the
British colony last Wednesday
(May 28).
THEY WERE scheduled to ap-
pear last Thursday before a
federal magistrate in Manhattan.
In addition to Bar-Am, a 52-year-
old veteran of 30 years in the IDF,
the suspects are William Nor-
throp, who holds dual U.S. and
Israeli citizenship, Israel
and SamuelIX^ff"!*.
lawyer alleged to fi^S?
minded the deal "*
who were arresJoTSt;
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-eralfore.gncountHesaw^
WHEN THE case broke the
Israeli government categorically
denied any involvement or
taowledge of the alleged plot and
U.S. authorities affirmed that
Israel was not involved. But Bar
Am has claimed that he had Israeli
permission to broker the arm^
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Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Three Young Judaeans leaders from Gainesville devote a year of service
to Israel as participants in Hadassah s Young Judaea Year Course Pro-
p-am for high school graduates. Left to right and Shari Brook, Ross
Goldstein and Becky Smith seen relaxing after a hard day's work on the
kibbutz in the gardens of Kibbutz Neve Ur on the banks of the Jordan
River. They are working as volunteers on the kibbutz with a group of
Young Judaeans on the year course with them.
Indictment Published of
4 Israel's Policies in Gaza Strip
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A scathing indictment of
Israel's policies in the Gaza
Strip was published recently
by the West Bank-Gaza
Data Base Project here. The
director of the project,
Meron Benvenisti, said Gaza
Arabs are far worse off than
those in the West Bank and
warned that unless massive
development programs are
instituted, the Gaza Strip
would turn into the "Soweto
of the Mideast."
The report, prepared by Har-
vard University researcher Sara
Roi, accused the Israeli
authorities of neglect and stated
that "if something is not done
soon," conditions will get worse.
Sources at the Defense Ministry
which is responsible for the Gaza
Strip said they had not seen the
report and could not comment on
it.
THE REPORT called the Gaza
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Strip one of the most densely
populated areas on earth. It noted
that some 525,000 Palestinians
live in 96 square miles. One-third
of the territory, 46 square miles,
has been reserved exclusively for
Jewish settlements which have a
population of only 2,200.
Infant mortality in the Gaza
Strip is four times that in Israel,
and hospitals are woefully
understaffed and undersupplied,
the report said. It noted that the
Shifa Hospital, the largest in
Gaza, lacks basic medical equip-
ment such as X-ray machines, and
its sanitary conditions are "at
best abhorrent."
The report spoke of mice and
roaches found in filthy rooms with
broken windows where patients
lay two to a bed on torn, blood-
stained sheets.
BENVENISTI SAID
budgetary constraints are no ex-
cuse for the authorities not to
grant the Gaza inhabitants proper
services. He said Israel's income
from the Gaza Strip was greater
than its expenditures there. He
noted that 45,000 Gaza laborers
work in Israel, pay local taxes as
well as income tax and national in-
surance in Israel which amounts
to "an occupation tax" of $35
million a year.
He said the report documents
conditions "beyond disgrace." It
is no longer a political problem but
a long neglected moral imperative
which cannot be ignored. Accor-
ding to the report, the population
of the Gaza Strip is doubling every
generation and could reach
900,000 by the turn of the
century.
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Dutch Minister
Pessimistic About Mideast Peace
AMSTERDAM (JTA)
Foreign Minister Hans
Van Den Broek has return-
ed from a one-day visit to
Tunisia openly pessimistic
about peace prospects in the
Middle East, especially
after an hour-long meeting
in Tunis with Palestine
Liberation Organization
chief Yasir Arafat.
He met with Arafat in his
capacity as chairman of the Euro-
pean Economic Community's
(EEC) Council of Ministers. He
told reporters on his return here
that his talk with the PLO leader
convinced him that the Middle
East problem remains at an
impasse.
No early solution is likely, and a
standstill is no improvement, the
Dutch diplomat said. He spoke
with Arafat and the PLO's foreign
affairs spokesman, Farouk Khad-
doumi, after recent meetings with
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres,
King Hussein of Jordan, Presi-
dent Hafez Assad of Syria and
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt.
In Tunisia, he also met with
Chedli Klibi, Secretary General of
the Arab League. They discussed
fighting international terrorism.
Klibi observed, Van Den Broek
said, that the underlying cause of
Palestinian terrorism was the
hopelessness and despair of the
Palestinians which must be
alleviated.
Van Den Broek said that his
overall impression from his talks
with Arab leaders is that they see
Israel's existence as an irreversi-
ble reality but don't want to admit
this officially. He said he told
Arafat that no permanent peace is
possible without Arab recognition
of Israel.
On the other hand, the Foreign
Minister said, Israel must
recognize the legitimate rights of
the Palestinians. He said he
agreed with British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher that
the present position of the Palesti-
nians in the Israel-occupied ter-
ritories can be only temporary.
Klutznik Honored
CHICAGO (JTA) The City
Club honored Ambassador Philip
Klutznik, a former UJA national
chairman, as its "Citizen of the
Year."
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
On War With Syria,
Things Now Different

Continued from Page 1-A .
country could trigger a war. The
answer is not clear-cut," he said.
Arens, who described Syria as
'Israel's major enemy today,"
ruled out the possibility of a ter-
roritorial compromise on the
Golan Heights as a way of
reaching a comprehensive settle-
ment with Syria.
Referring to a statement Assad
recently made, in which the
Syrian President declared that
Syria wants the Golan Heights to
be "in the middle of Syria," Arens
said that in his view the equation
of territories for peace is not ap-
plicable to Syria. "We don't hear
them knocking on our door to
start negotiations." he quipped.
TURNING TO the issue of
Israel's relations with Egypt,
Arens said that "there is not even
one single person in Israel who
would tell you that the relations
between the two countries meet
his expectations." He contended
that Egypt is in clear violation of
its peace treaty with Israel by con-
tinuing to refuse to send its Am-
bassador back to Israel after he
was recalled at the start of the
Lebanon war in June, 1982.
Arens was also skeptical that
the resolution of the Taba dispute
would bring "real peace" between
Israel and Egypt, noting that
Egypt insists on complete Israeli
withdrawal from Lebanon and
resolution of the Palestinian ques-
tion before any meaningful im-
provement in relations with Israel
takes peace.
"The Egyptians are taking a
position which is against the letter
and the spirit of the peace treaty.
The peace treaty was not condi-
tioned on the Palestinian problem.
They agreed to keep an Am-
bassador in Israel and they do
not do it. They agreed for true and
stable peaceful relations and
they don't fulfill it," he charged.
THE FORMER Israeli Am-
bassador to Washington said that
"relations between Israel and the
United States today are better
than ever." He said that the good
ties between Washington and
Jerusalem are getting even "bet-
ter and stronger" every day.
He said that the strong relations
between the two countries are
built "on the mutuality of values
and ideals of the two countries
which are expressed in shared
strategic interests." He claimed
that Washington has recognized
the shared strategic interests
"and the ability of Israel to con-
tribute to these shared interests."
Asked about the Administra-
tion's proposal for a large missile
weapons package to Saudi Arabia
despite the "shared strategic in-
terests" between Israel and the
U.S., Arens admitted that Israel
and the U.S. do not agree on the
issue.
He said Israel does not agree
with Washington on arms for
"moderate" Arab countries such
as Saudi Arabia. "It is hard for us
to agree (with the U.S.) that Saudi
Arabia is moderate while she is
still in an official state of war with
us," Arens said. He added: "Our
policy has not changed; we are
against any sale of arms to coun-
tries that are in a state of war
with us."
IN REPLY to a question
whether the "rotation," which
will elevate Shamir to be Israel's
Premier next October, will indeed
take place, Arens said: "This is a
very popular question and people,
naturally, are very curious about
it. But there is an agreement bet-
ween Labor and Likud, and
everybody in Israel, including
Peres, says that agreements must
be honored. We know that the
Israeli public wants to see the na-
tional unity government
continuing."
As for the possibility that Labor
will decide to leave the govern-
ment after the rotation, Arens
said: "Theoretically it is possible,
but this will be in violation of the
agreement," since the agreement
stipulates that the unity govern-
ment must serve a full four-year
term.
Arens said that Shamir, whose
leadership of Herut was challeng-
ed during a chaotic convention of
the party in March, has the sup-
port of the "majority of Herut" to
serve as Premier. He said that
whoever claims that Shamir is not
fit to serve as Premier "says in ef-
fect that Herut has to abrogate
the rotation agreement" which
provides that Shamir, and none
other, will replace Peres as
Premier.
High Point of Six-Day War:
Unification of Jerusalem
Continued from Page 5-A
gained complete sovereignty over
the area. Finally, in the euphoric
summer of 1967, the rear half of
the synagogue was rededicated,
exactly 700 years after the Ram-
ban founded it. There it stands,
beautifully restored, once again
the focal point of religous life in
the Jewish Quarter.
Not far from the Ramban
Synagogue, through a courtyard
and down a winding lane, is a
synagogue complex called the
Four Sephardi Synagogues. Like
the Ramban Synagogue, this com-
plex is also a past-and present
focal point of Jewish Quarter
religious life.
The first of the four synagogues
built, the Yohanan Ben Zakkai,
was finished in 1520. During the
next century, as the Jewish com-
munity in Jerusalem grew, three
other synagogues the Elianu
Hanavi, the Central and the
Istambuli were added on. For
over four centuries this
synagogue complex was the
center of Jewish life in Jerusalem.
Many a Jew was circumcised,
married and eulogized in one of
these four interconnected
synagogues. Here, too, the
Sephardi Chief Rabbi, who
represented the Jews before the
Turkish governor of Palestine,
was coronated in an elaborate
ceremony. But in May, 1948 this
all came to an ignominious end.
IN THE final days before the
Old City fell into Jordanian hands,
the remaining Jewish residents of
the Jewish Quarter gathered into
the Four Sephardi Synagogues
for physical shelter, not spiritual
refuge. Due to a Moslem edict
declaring that all synagogues be
built lower than mosques, this
complex was built below street
level. When the fighting turned
fierce during the War of In-
dependence, this underground
building, provided security from
the incessant shelling. When the
Jews finally surrendered, and the
Jordanians moved into the
quarter, it was not long before
these synagogues were burned
and looted.
The entire complex has since
been painstakingly restored. Two
of the synagogues the Yohanan
Ben Zakkai and the Eliahu
Hanavi, which was turned into an
Ashkenazi synagogue are in
regular use. These synagogues
have once again become an in-
tegral part of religious life in the
Old City's reconstructed Jewish
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Bookcase
Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Memoirs of Israel Goldstein
By MORTON I. TEICHER
My World As Jew: The
Memoirs of Israel Goldstein.
By Israel Goldstein. New York:
Cornwall Books, 1984. 2
volumes. 766 pp. $45 the set.
This remarkable autobiography
was written by a remarkable man
who died a few weeks ago in
Jerusalem. On June 18. he would
have celebrated his 90th birthday.
Born in Philadelphia. Goldstein
was literally raised in the
synagogue since his father was
the shammash of a small shul and
received living quarters in the
shul building as part of his salary.
Goldstein was educated in the
Jewish ghetto of South
Philadelphia. As a public high
school student, he also attended
Gratz College which trained
Jewish teachers.
When he was 15, he completed
his studies at both schools and
entered the University of Penn-
sylvania. Although he worked as a
Hebrew teacher throughout his
attendance at the University of
Pennsylvania, he completed the
four-year course in three years
and earned membership in Phi
Beta Kappa.
IN 1914, Goldstein enrolled at
the Jewish Theological Seminary
where he was particularly im-
pressed by Mordecai Kaplan. In
1918, when Goldstein finished his
studies at the Jewish Theological
Seminary, he was ordained, he
was married and he accepted a
position as rabbi for B'nai
Jeshurun, the oldest Conservative
congregation in the United States
and the second oldest synagogue
in New York.
It had just moved to new
quarters on the Upper West Side
where, after a probationary
period of six months, Goldstein
was engaged as the permanent
rabbi.
He remained at B'nai Jeshurun
for 42 years and, even after he left
in 1960 to make aliyah, he return-
ed regularly for many years to
help conduct High Holiday ser-
vices. It is a tribute to Goldstein's
outstanding abilities that he held
this prestigious pulpit for so long,
especially since the congregation
had a number of strong-minded
officers, some of whom disapprov-
ed of Goldstein's non-synagogue
activities.
GOLDSTEIN WAS involved in
American politics as a founding
member and officer of the Liberal
Party and as an active participant
in political campaigns. He was
largely responsible for the foun-
ding of Brandeis University.
One of the many interesting
anecdotes which fill the two
volumes has to do with his falling
out with Albert Einstein who was
also interested initially in
Brandeis University. This led to
Goldstein's withdrawal from the
effort to get Brandeis started. Od-
dly enough, Einstein also
withdrew shortly thereafter.
In any event, Goldstein was
acknowledged by Abram Sachar,
the first president of Brandeis, as
its "father," although the citation
Israel Goldstein
for the honorary degree that
Goldstein received from Brandeis
in 1958 referred to him merely as
"a forerunner in the development
of Brandeis University."
Goldstein was active in the
establishment of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews and in its international
counterpart. After settling in
Israel, he gave leadership to
similar interfaith activities.
WITHIN THE Jewish com-
munity, although Goldstein served
as president of the New York
Board of Rabbis and the
Synagogue Council of America,
his primary focus was on Zionist
affairs. He led a number of fund-
raising and other Zionist organiza-
tions, holding one presidency and
chairmanship after another. In
much of the work that led to the
recreation of Israel in 1948, Golds-
tein was an active and important
participant.
During Israel's first year, he
took leave from his congregation
to serve as the treasurer of the
Jewish Agency in Jerusalem. He
maintained his Zionist in-
volvements on his return to New
York, making speeches, raising
money and being enmeshed in
Zionist politics.
In 1960, Goldstein and his wife
settled in Jerusalem where he
became head of Keren Hayesod,
the equivalent of the United
Jewish Appeal in all countries out-
side of the United States. This job
entailed considerable travel,
maintaining a pattern which
Goldstein and his wife had follow-
ed from the beginning of their
marriage. By 1970, Goldstein was
74 years old, and he decided to
give up his presidency of Keren
Hayesod but he continued to be
active in it and in many other
organizations.
THE STORY of Goldstein's life
is well-written and holds the
reader's interest. It constitutes a
living history of Jewry in
America, in Israel and throughout
the world for much of the 20th
century. Goldstein interacted with
almost every Jewish dignitary,
and he tells many fascinating
stories about them. He devotes a
chapter to intriguing "pen por-
Rabbi Better After Heart Attack
TEL AVTV (JTA) Rabbi Alexander Schindler is
reported improving at Soroka Hospital in Beersheba,
where he was taken last week after suffering a heart attack
while touring Masada.
SCHINDLER, a leader of Reform Judaism in the U.S.,
is president of the Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions and a former chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations.
Schindler, 61, spent the critical first 24 hours after his
heart attack in the intensive care unit at Soroka Hospital.
His wife, Rhea Schindler, was at his bedside. Schindler suf-
fered a heart attack 12 years ago.
traits" of 17 of these people.
It is surprising to find so many
careless and irritating errors in
the memoirs. Twice, Goldstein
refers to Adlai Stevenson as
"Vice President" Stevenson,
almost as though he didn't know
that Lyndon Johnson was John
Kennedy's vice president.
He calls the New York Federa-
tion of Jewish Philanthropies the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropic Societies." Project
Renewal comes out as "Urban
Renewal." Wrong dates are given
for the independence of several
African states, and he says that
the Mau Mau rebellion killed
"many whites" when, in fact, the
primary victims were Black
Africans.
WHILE THESE mistakes
detract from the autobiography,
they should certainly not deter
one from reading it. Goldstein's
memoirs are a valuable chronicle
and most adult Jews will find
some specific connection to
places, people or events he writes
about.
The most delightful of these
associations for me is based on the
privilege which my wife and I had
to hear Goldstein speak in
Jerusalem on September 17, 1975
when he opened a lecture series at
Brandeis University's Hiatt
Institute.
He discusses this occasion at
some length in the autobiography,
evoking many fond memories of
an experience which we recall
with affection. I suspect that
other readers will also find warm
nostalgia in the pages of these two
volumes. They richly deserve the
widest possible readership.
Gov. Mario Cuomo of New York (right) engaged in a wide-ranging
discussion on foreign policy and domestic affairs with Rabbi
David B. Kahane, spiritual leader of the Sutton Place Synagogue,
in the opening session of the synagogue's annual Jewish Town
Hall Series. Before an audience of more than 8,000 gathered in
the synagogue's main sanctuary and watching on closed-circuit
television, Gov. Cuomo expressed his opposition to the sale of
Stinger anti-aircraft missiles to Saudi Arabia, derided the effec-
tiveness of the United Nations and supported the use of force to
combat international terrorism.
Yiddish Theater Actor Ellin
Dead in New York at 61
NEW YORK (JTA) David
Ellin, a popular actor in the Yid-
dish Theater who also appeared
on Broadway, died last Tuesday at
Leon Lenox Hill Hospital after
suffering a heart attack. He was
61 years old and lived in
Manhattan.
Ellin came to New York from
his native Montreal to study at the
American Academy of Arts. He
made his Broadway debut in 1946
as the juvenile lead in the Ben
Hecht-Charles MacArthur play
"Swan Song," and later toured in
road companies of "The Man Who
Came to Dinner," "Death of a
Salesman," and "West Side
Story."
During his career, Ellin and his
wife Ruth Vool Ellin, coordinated
and performed in Yiddish and
English productions at Jewish-
oriented summer camps in upstate
New York. Ellin also toured as a
one-man show for Jewish centers
and organizations, presenting
original and standard songs and
amusing anecdotes.
On the Yiddish stage, Ellin ap-
peared in "The Jewish Gypsy,"
"The Rumanian Wedding,"
'Light, Lively and Yiddish,"
"The Shepherd King," "Wish Me
Mazel-Tov" and other plays.
i52
issues
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Page 14-a i ne jewisn t iondiap/Pnday, June 6,1986
Old Jerusalem
Flag Was Raised Over a Heap of Rubble, Not a Liveable Quarter
Continued from Page 5-A'
unlikely today: The Moslems on
the Mount find Jewish prayer so
near their mosque offensive, and
most rabbis have ruled that owing
to the holiness of the site, no one
is even allowed to enter.
This surreal "alliance" between
the Moslem and Jewish religious
authorities has been, in large part,
responsible for the relative quiet
on the Mount since 1967, as only a
few rabbis and religiously obser-
vant Jews have been willing to
enter the Mount to force a con-
frontation. The Rabbinate's
stance against entering may not
be as firm as thought however.
In the recent renewal of its ban,
the Rabbinate included a new
clause asking rabbis all over the
world to investigate the religious
issues involved and forward their
findings for further study. This re-
quest, coupled with Chief Rabbi
Eliahu's statements about a "big,
beautiful synagogue," have led
many to wonder whether the ban
is absolute.
GEN. GUR says that in 1967 he
ordered the Israeli flag raised
over the dome, and Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan ordered it
taken down. Dayan demonstrated
Israel's goodwill toward the
defeated Arabs by returning the
keys to the Mount to the Moslem
WaJtf or Religious Council. Many
Moslems feel that Jewish at-
tempts to pray on the Mount are
only a prelude to the extension of
Israel's sovereignty, if not the
rebuilding of the Temple.
Israeli courts have ruled the
government has the right to limit
access and prayer to preserve
public order. Agitating for change
is a Jewish group called the Tem-
ple Mount Faithful, which
engages in political lobbying and
acts of civil disobedience and il-
legal prayer on the Mount.
The seeds of conflict have been
abudantly sown: A Jew who prays
for the rebuilding of the Temple
must necessarily hope for the
disappearance of the dome built
over the Temple's Holy of Holies;
A surreal 'alliance' between Moslems and
Jews has been responsible for quiet on
the Mount.
nationalistic Jews are enraged
that they do not have free access
to this site. Moslems fear Jews
want to rebuild the Temple on
what is now the third-holiest spot
in Islam, after Mecca and Medina,
and some rabbis have declared the
Mount forbidden ground while
others advocate prayer there.
WHEN A delegation of Knesset
members entered the Mount
recently to look into charges of
hidden arms caches and illegal
construction, thousands of Arabs
gathered within minutes to pro-
tect what they saw as an assault
on the mosque. The quickly-
evacuated legislators returned a
week later, with hundreds of
police and military personnel on
hand to help them complete the
tour, but the Arabs again rose to
defend their mosque, and the
delegation left rather than force
their way through, an event which
most certainly would have been
the signal for bloody riots all over
the Middle East.
Most Israeli politicians, from
left to right, realize that no matter
what Utopian forms of Jewish-
Arab coexistence may have been
attainable immediately after the
Six-Day War, the almost two
decades since have formed a reali-
ty of their own. Israelis must con-
stantly consider the reactions of
the Arab world, as well as the
possible reactions of Arabs living
within Israel's borders who are
much less docile than they were in
Of course, ^ese constraints ap-
ply only to those who genuindy
seek some form of coexistence
The youth wing of the Temple
Mount Faithful recently plastered
Jerusalem with posters urging the
government to "Remove the
foreigners from the Mount"
While the immediate goal of the
raitMul is the guarantee of
Jewish access and prayer, they
openly list among long-range aims
the transfer to the Mount to
Israel's top political, legal and
religious authorities the
Knesset, Supreme Court and
Chief Rabbinate.
"I'M INTERESTED in coex
istence," declares Gen. Gur
"while the Temple Mount Faithfui
is interested in single-existence."
Gur says that although the cur-
rent situation is not ideal, the
methods of groups such as the
Faithful can only worsen matters
by inflaming Arab fears and emo-
tions. Until legislative efforts can
effect gradual and mutually accep-
table change, Gur believes the
status quo should be preserved.
This may not placate the ex-
tremists on either side, but it is,
he feels, most likely the path of
least bloodshed.
Isaiah prophesied that "many
nations will come and say: "Let us
go up to the Mount of the Lord, to
the House of the God of Jacob,
that He may instruct us in His
ways and that we may walk in His
paths' and they shall beat
their swords into plowshares and
their spears into pruning hooks;
nation shall not lift up sword
against nation and they shall
know war no more."
Ironically, the prophecy remains
as yet only half-fulfilled. Many na-
tions do indeed seek to go up to
the Mount, but their purpose is
not yet to walk peacefully
together in the service of one God.
Demjanjuk Remanded
For Additional 30 Days
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Supreme Court entered
the Demjanjuk case for the first time Friday (May 23),
ordering Ukrainian-born John Demjanjuk, alleged
Treblinka concentration camp guard, remanded in custody
for an additional 30 days while the state prosecutor and
police continue gathering evidence for his trial.
DEMJANJUK, a former U.S. citizen who is the first
suspected war criminal extradited to Israel, has been in
detention at Ayalon prison for over 90 days, the limit under
the law which provides that remands in custody must be
renewed every 15 days. This had been done up to Friday
(May 23) by Jerusalem Chief Magistrate Aharon Simcha.
Attorney General Yitzhak Zamir accordingly appealed
to the Supreme Court for an order to hold the prisoner an
additional 90 days.
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New Shultz Visit to Mideast?
Continued from Page l-A
cess, but more particularly, in ef-
forts to resolve the lingering
dispute between Egypt and Israel
over Taba, the small strip of land
on Israel's southern border which
both countries claim. Israel has re-
mained in effective control over
the territory since it withdrew
\ from the Sinai in April, 1982.
STATE DEPARTMENT legal
adviser Abraham Sofaer has been
in Egypt in an effort to mediate
an agreement on terms of
reference for arbitration. A State
Department spokesman said that
progress was made" in the talks
on Taba that took place in
Herzliya.
Back at the State Department
the nuance reading exercise
was straining the minds of
observers to the breaking point
after spokesman Charles Redman
explained the status of the aa-yet
unscheduled Mideast trip by say-
ing that the Secretary "has made
no decision" regarding travels to
the region. This replaced the stan-
dard State Department response
of late, according to which the
Secretary "has no plans" at pre-
sent to go to the Middle East.
Nonetheless, officials at the
State Department maintain that
contrary to the imagination of the
State Department lingo inter-
preters, the Secretary has authen-
tically not made up his mind. One
official even said that "If I had to
bet I would bet that Shultz would
not make a trip."
Thatcher Thanked
U.S. Surgeon
Who Went
To Chernobyl
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Dr.
Yair Reisner, the Weizmann In-
stitute biophysicist who flew to
Moscow to help Soviet doctors
treat victims of the Chernobyl
nuclear accident last month,
received personal and apparently
impromptu thanks from visiting
British Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher for alerting the West to
the kinds of medical preparations
needed to cope with similar
disasters in the future.
Reisner, an expert on tissue-
typing and bone marrow
transplants, said on his return
from the USSR that not only the
Soviets but the Western nations
lacked the necessary facilities and
techniques. He expounded in
detail on the lessons he learned
from his Moscow experience at a
luncheon at the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science in Rehovot
where Thatcher was guest of
honor last week.
IN HER AFTER dinner
remarks, the British Prime
Minister thanked him. She said his
report would help her "to see if
we (in Britain) have all the con-
tingency plans on the medical
side."
Reisner, in his report to the
Israel authorities, and at the lun-
cheon, stressed that people who
work in nuclear power stations or
t other facilities with a high risk
of radiation exposure, should have
their tissue group recorded and
filed in case of accident. He said
potential donors of bone marrow
f that same tissue group should
he located and listed, so that if an
accident occurs, transplant opera-
tions can be performed without
delay.
Reisner told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency later that he
-elieved these precautions were
not any more adequately taken in
pe U.S. and other countries than
in the Soviet Union.
THE ADMINISTRATION,
and Shultz in particular, has been
somewhat hesitant to renew any
high level role in the Middle East
without a near guarantee of the
efforts yielding fruit. The caution
goes back to the secretary's bitter
experience of having put himself
on the line in 1982 to work out an
agreement between Israel and
Lebanon, only to see it dissolve in
the face of Syrian opposition.
After the failure of Jordan's
King Hussein to win the endorse-
ment of Palestine Liberation
Organization leader Yasir Arafat
for proposed peace efforts, the
U.S. has been in what it has called
a period of "reflection" about
what precisely its role should be in
seeking a settlement of the Arab-
Israel dispute.
In the meantime, according to
the State Department official,
Shultz might agree to limit the ob-
jective of a visit to finalizing an
agreement on how the Taba
dispute should be resolved. The of-
ficial said that this would depend
on whether Sofaer is unable to
mediate an agreement.
Vice President George Bush has
tentatively scheduled a trip to the
Middle East in mid-July which will
include visits to Israel, Egypt and
Jordan.
Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Trees Grow Out of Thin Air;
Structure of Roots Observed
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Trees growing out of thin air in-
stead of the ground enable
botanists at the newly-opened
Sarah Racine Laboratory in Tel
Aviv University's Botanical
Garden to observe the structure
and development of roots.
According to Yoav Waisel,
director of the Garden, this is im-
portant because root physiology is
a neglected field. It is neglected
apparently because it is hard to
study roots without up-ending the
tree.
The two-story lab, which
resembles an ordinary
greenhouse, has a variety of trees
olive, avocado, palms, cotton-
wood and some vegetable
plants growing out of holes in the
floor. Their roots hang freely in-
side an aeroponic chamber. They
are sprayed for 10 seconds each
minute with water and nutrients.
The chamber is dark but has two
observation windows for public
viewing. The laboratory was
donated by Emmanuel and Sarah
Racine.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
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Week-Long Blitz To Close
Federation 1986 Campaign
Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, June 6,1986
Section B
Aaron Podhurst, general chair-
man of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign, has announced that
many community leaders will par-
ticipate in a series of phonathons
and personal solicitations to help
close the Federation campaign.
"The time has come for those in-
dividuals who have yet to make
their pledges to step forward and
be counted in our effort to assist
Jewish needs in Miami, in Israel
and worldwide," Podhurst stated.
He continued, "We're on the
verge of staging the most suc-
cessful campaign in Federation
history. Every Jew who is in a
position to give must act respon-
sibly to help ensure that we can
meet a full range of urgent
needs."
Podhurst indicated that the
push for pledges is particularly
crucial at this time because
Federation is about to make its
allocations to its beneficiary agen-
cies within the next two weeks.
"Our contributors help support 30
local beneficiary agencies which
provide a full range of human and
social services. In light of the cuts
mandated by Gramm-Rudman and
with cutbacks at the state level,
philanthropic giving is the only
alternative to ensure that we can
continue to offer these vital ser-
vices," Podhurst added.
The centerpiece of the Federa-
tion's effort to close the Federa-
tion fund-raising drive is "Cam-
paign Countdown" chaired by
Amy Dean. Dean said, "Between
Friday, June 6 and Federation's
Annual Meeting on June 11, we
expect to contact all our 1985 con-
tributors who have not yet made
1986 commitments. I'm certain
that when we outline the 1986
campaign case for them, we'll
secure a great many pledges."
On Sunday, June 8 all members
of the Jewish community are in-
vited to participate in a day-long
phonathon at the Federation
building between 9 a.m. and 4
p.m. The day will conclude with a
celebration barbeque at Federa-
tion beginning at 5 p.m. The event
will include a recognition
ceremony for Federation
volunteers who have worked in
the 1986 campaign.
"In past years, our contributors
have always responded to our call
to preserve Jewish life. I fully ex-
pect this year to be no exception,
and that by the time of Federa-
tion's annual meeting on June 11,
our community will be celebrating
its most successful campaign
ever," Podhurst concluded.
H (D.. Fla.) escorts freed Soviet dissident Natan (Anatoly) Sharan-
sky to a luncheon in his honor hosted by the committee. Sharansky
recently visited the U.S. Capitol, where special ceremonies were
held in his tumor. He was released in February after spending
eight years in a Soviet prison for urging Soi'iet compliance with
the Helsinki Accords and for being a leading spokesman for
Soviet Jews. Fascell, who also served as chairman of the Commis-
sion on Security and Cooperation in Europe from 1976-1985, was
instrumental in drawing world attention to Sharansky's phght.
which ultimately led to his release. Accompanying Fascell and
Sharansky is Foreign Affairs Committee chief Counsel Spencer
Oliver.
Message of Shavuot Tells Us
Freedom Needs Tie to Moral Law
Shavuot begins Thursday eve,
June 12, and continues Friday
and Saturday, June IS and U.
By DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
Temple Emanu-El
Prof. Mordecai Kaplan in his
book. "Judaism As a Civilization."
emphasizes the principle of
A Moveable Feast jjjpjjjy membersaosf a faith, we
are a people with a common
history and a common destiny.
This idea has not always been
completely accepted.
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) -
"There's enough food left
over from Jewish organiza-
tional functions in this city
I am sure many of you recall the
American Council for Judaism (I
tional functions in tnis city American Council tor juaaism \i
to feed every hungry Jew in aiways referred to it as the
the community, said American Council Against
for 30 years as assistant na- JJJjj .^.^ that Judaism is no
tional director of the Ann- different fr0m Christianity in the
Defamation League of B'nai ,, that they are both religions.
Bnth' L Ha members stood vehemently
In those years he had watched ^ concept of Jewish
hundreds of pounds of food re- ^r^od and nationhood. As
main untouched after an organiza- P* F anti.zionist8, they fierce-
tional dinner and wondered if it "" the estaDlishment of a
was recycled or simply thrown J^Jf state.
Continued on Page 2-B
ANNUAL MEETING
Miami Federation to hold 48th Annual Meeting
on June 11 at the Omni International HOW,
beginning at 6 p.m., announced Annual Meet-
ing Chairman Donald E. Lefton. (See Federa-
tion Supplement, Page 3.)
THEY WERE not the first to
espouse this ideology. In 1897, Dr.
Theodor Herzl called together the
first Zionist Congress in Basle,
Switzerland. Basle, however, was
not his initial choice. Originally,
he had selected Munich, Germany,
but the leaders of the Jewish com-
munity there, the members of the
Kultus Gemeinde, feared that
identification with the Zionist
cause would reflect negatively on
their loyalty to Germany.
They insisted that as Jews they
were not members of a people or a
nation; they were Germans of the
Mosaic persuasion. They
therefore refused to host the Con-
gress, and Herzl was forced to
move it to Basle.
The irony of history is that when
Adolf Hitler began his attack on
the Jewish community, his first
target was Munich. And the irony
of ironies is that today, the
children and granchildren of those
members of the Kultus Gemeinde
are now living in Israel, blessing
the name of Theodor Herzl.
Yes, Mordecai Kaplan main-
tains that we are more than a
religion. We are a people bound
together like a family, and to be a
Jew is to be identified with Jews
in all parts of the world, whether
in Israel, the Soviet Union, South
America or even Ethiopia.
BUT DR. KAPLAN goes even
further. He insists that even
though we are a people, the heart
of our peoplehood is our Toran.
Continued on Page 2-B
Senate Vote Due Thursday
To Override Reagan Veto
By JTA News Services
WASHINGTON The Senate was scheduled to vote on Thurs-
day afternoon on whether to override or sustain President
Reagan's veto of the Congressional resolution rejecting his pro-
posed sale of missiles to Saudi Arabia.
The vote was to come after four hours of debate. Prior to veto-
ing the resolution, Reagan removed plans to sell the Saudis the
Stinger shoulder-fired missile from the arms package.
UN File Brands Waldheim Class 'A' Criminal
NEW YORK The United Nations War Crimes Commission
said in 1948 that Austrian Presidential candidate Kurt Waldheim
should stand trial for "murder" and "putting hostages to death"
according to the secret file on the former United Nations
Secretary-General housed in the UN archives and released here.
The file, part of some 40,000 sealed files on accused war
criminals, witnesses and others contained in the archives, was
publicly released last Friday for the first time by the World
Jewish Congress.
On the basis of that examination, the UN Commission assigned
Waldheim an "A" classification, meaning the evidence clearly
justified his prosecution as a war criminal. The UN file states that
from April 1944 to May 1945, Waldheim, as a German intelligence
officer, was "responsible for the retaliation actions carried out by
the Wehrmacht units in Yugoslavia."
Harish To Continue 'Senior Official' Probe
JERUSALEM The newly-appointd Attorney General, Yosef
Harish. is not expected to drop the impending investigation of a
"senior official" accused of obstructing justice. Justice Minister
Yitzhak Modai indicated Monday.
But the probe probably will be conducted, in secrecy, by a
special judicial commission instead of by the police as originally
instructed by outgoing Attorney General Yitzhak Zamir.
Zamir, who held the office for nearly eight years, announced
several months ago that he planned to resign but agreed to stay
on until a replacement was found. He said Monday that he would
cooperate fully with his successor to ease the transition.
'Kahanism' Denounced at CJCongress Meet
TORONTO The Canadian Jewish Congress took strong
stands on issues of Jewish and general concern at its 21st plenary
session here last week. The 950 delegates from all over Canada
voted to oppose moves to restore the death penalty, to condemn
"Kahanism" as a perversion of Judaism and Zionism and to con-
demn apartheid in South Africa.
The resolution denouncing the ideology of Rabbi Meir Kahane,
leader of the extremist Kach Party in Israel, declared that
"Kahanism and other forms of extremist political activity
challenge the historic Zionist mission of a Jewish State based on
justice and democracy for all."
Pope Meets Rumanian Chief Rabbi
PARIS Pope John Paul II conveyed his "best wishes" to
Europe's Chief Rabbis during a 30-minute meeting in Rome last
FridaV with Rumanian Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen. Rosen attends
[his week a meeting of European Chief Rabbis in the Swiss moun-
tain village of Grindelwald.
Vatican sources said the Pontiff, who V^%init?tiv%ftV^n
meeting questioned Rosen on latest Jewish developments in
SSt and Eastern Europe and expressed his "friendly interest
in all matters concerning Catholic-Jewish relations.
Rabbi Rosen thanked him for his visit to the Rome synagogue
which, he said, marked a milestone in relations between the two
faiths. ... ,
Court Acts Against Alleged Nazi
WASHINGTON Justice Department officials are expected
SSiaaasssBSBasg
U.S. in 1949.
the Nazis.
French, Israel Nuke Talks Interrupted
PARIS Talks between French and Israeli experts on the sale
of two nuclear reactors to Israel have been interrupted, according
to sdentific sources in Paris. The talks had been going on for dose
to ^ear and had dealt with the sale of two French-made reactors
Estimated at two billion French Francs or close to $300 million.
French sources said Paris broke off the talks for a variety of
reran wmch went from Israel's apparent inability to pay even
naTof the cost of the two reactors, to Arab threats to break of
Ke relations with France should the sale go through. Israel,
sources were not prepared to comment on this report.
The two reactors, which were to have been used for energ>
creating pulses, were to have been erected ,n the Negev I
French and Israeli technicians.


Page2B___The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
Yeshiva College students Avi Litwin (left) and
Max and Steven Brody join Mrs. Pearl
aietner m making music at a party that
culminated a year of work in Project SAGES
which links generations in the Washington
Heights section of New York City
Yeshiva College Students Help
Span Generations In Special Project
Two South Florida residents,
who are students at Yeshiva
University in New York, have
been involved in the Project
SAGES, which links generations
in the Washington Heights sec-
tion of the city.
The two students are Avi Lit-
win, son of Harold and Joan Lit-
win of Miami Beach, and Steven
Brody, son of Dr. Martin and
Geraldine Brody of North Miami
Beach.
In Project SAGES, students at
Yeshiva, its affiliated Rabbi Isaac
Elchanan Theological Seminary
and the Marsha Stern Talmudica
Academy visit regularly with
elderly residents of the
neighborhood around the Univer-
sity's Main Center.
At a recent party that
culminated a year of work in the
project, both Litwin and Brody
made music as part of the party's
program.
Litwin graduated at the univer-
sity's 55th annual commencement
on Tuesday. He majored in
psychology at Yeshiva College
and took Jewish studies courses at
the Isaac Breuer College of
Hebraic Studies. He has also
taken cantorial music classes at
the Philip and Sarah Belz School
of Jewish Music and has worked
as a cantor on the High Holy
Days.
Brody will be a senior in the
next academic year at Yeshiva. A
political science and speech major,
he takes studies courses at the
Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic
Studies. He is also a member of
the basketball and tennis teams.
SAGES stands for Strengthen-
ing Another Generation Through
Education and Service.
A Moveable Feast
Continued from Page 1-B
out. When he became executive
director of the Metropolitan New
York Coordinating Council on
Jewish Poverty last summer and
learned that there are thousands
of Jews who are not getting
enough to eat in the city and who
need kosher food, Kohler talked
with former colleague Nathan
Perlmutter, ADL's national
director.
Out of this discussion emerged
ADL's commitment to turn over
left-over food from its dinners to
the poor Jews and non-Jews.
KOHLER THEN approached
City Harvest, asking for its help in
dealing with the growing need for
emergency kosher food in the
Jewish community. City Harvest
is a non-profit telephone-and-
transportation network created
over three years ago by Helen
VerDuin Palit to pick up food
from restaurants, caterers,
organizations "anyone with
good food" and deliver it in its
vans within a few hours to
facilities that feed people.
Every day, City Harvest picks
up and delivers enough food to
235 soup kitchens and food pan-
tries for 4,500 meals. Its trucks
are equipped with thermal boxes
and refrigeration to preserve
prepared food.
Over 1,400 food companies
donate food to City Harvest,
which has duplicated its program
in Halifax, Minneapolis-St. Paul,
Montreal, New Haven where
Palit ran a soup kitchen and
similar operation Paterson,
N.J., Philadelphia and Winnipeg.
KOHLER AND Palit together
developed City Harvest's new
Project Masbiah (from the
Hebrew word for eating to
satisfaction), which will collect
prepared and uncooked kosher
food from Jewish organizations
and food companies and deliver it
to various Jewish agencies which
feed people and, as well, to non-
kosher shelters, soup kitchens.
and food pantries throughout the
city.
The Project will use one van for
kosher food only. It is currently
being prepared for this purpose
according to traditional kashrut
standards under the guidance of
the Orthodox rabbinical staff of
the Metropolitan Council.
The Council will also ensure that
all contributed food is strictly
kosher, and provide City Harvest
with a list of agencies to receive it
Together with the ADL and the
American Jewish Congress, it will
approach Jewish organizations
and food companies for contribu-
tions of food.
Project Masbiah is currently be-
ing finalized and is expected to be
operational by the fall. One pro-
blem Kohler is working on in
volves developing food storage
facilities at potential recipient
Jewish agencies, most of which
don't have them.
THE ADL has already turned
over food left over from all its spr-
ing functions to City Harvest, ac-
cording to Christina Velasquez,
associate director of its meetings
and conferences department. She
and department director Deena
Lee know, by 7 p.m., when the
smorgasbord is over, how much
food remains and how many pe<>
pie will not be showing up for
dinner.
The caterer wraps up the food
which averages between 70 and
100 pounds for City Harvest.
"What gets picked up at ADL at
8," Palit told JTA, "is eaten
within two hours at a shelter."
SUCCESSFUL ISRAELI
PRODUCER
Seeking InvMtorfs) to underwrite
extraordinary rail Ufa melodrama
depicting Israel's unmatched
dedication to Its youth.
L. GOLDBERG. P.O.B. 391005
MIAMI BEACH 33139
Message
Of Shavuot
GO STIR CRAZY
Continued from Page 1-B
with its moral law and religious
values.
Our great teacher Moses
understood this. Just a short time
ago, we celebrated the Festival of
Passover when we rejoiced over
the exodus of the ancient
Israelites from Egypt. By break-
ing the shackles of bondage, our
people became a new, free nation.
But Moses wanted more than
physical freedom, so he led this
young nation through the
wilderness to Mt. Sinai where
they accepted the Ten Command-
ments and the moral law, thus em-
bracing a new destiny in accor-
dance with God's proclamation,
"You shall be unto Me a kingdom
of priests and a holy nation."
AT LAST they were whole.
They were now liberated both
physically and spiritually and
this is the message of the Festival
of Shavuot.
The renowned French existen-
tialist, Jean Paul Sartre, wrote
"The Anti-Semite and the Jew" in
which he accentuates the distinc-
tion between the authentic and
the inauthentic Jew. It is only to
the extent that we accept our
responsibilities of dedication and
commitment to both our people
and our faith that we can fulfill
ourselves as authentic Jews.
fMrtnFr9ihMixtut
u^ooB,ed PeppersBambooSlioc^
K Kosher
Make a deltoous oriental stir fried dish in a snap All it takes is one of the
onental-style vegetables from BIRDS EYE* and our quick and easy
recipe Its an absolutely Kosher way to en)oy the flavor ot the East
STIRFR>
SHANGHAI BEEF
GENERAL
TOOOS
ITZ touEr ',ableSP0n SOy Sauce and 'mmced aa'"c Cove in a bowl Slice
* pound flank steak into thin strips, toss with soy sauce mixture Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a
SSISSSlSPSSunJ"S22b,own Remove*"-* EBBS!
Suce heat SfSi c X Y25**! a"y *** Add ve9e,ables ,0 sk.llet Stir,
reduce heat Cover and simmer 3 minutes, stirring once Sprinkle contents ot seasonina
gJJg!.ft!*l *a.er and I teaspoon coms.arch pounntcS?
S |Ides'red ^ ""'" ,h'Ckened MakeS aDOU' 3 cups or 3 **5 Serve with
I9B5 Gwii Fooa> Corporator


Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Named Volunteer of the Year of South Shore
Hospital and Medical Center was Bertha
Towers, second from right, who received the
award from Dr. William Zubkojf and Mar-
shall Berkson, far right. Sharing her excite-
ment is Sarah Rutstein, left, honorary life
chairman of volunteers and past president of
the Auxiliary and chair of the luncheon held
last week at the Marriott on-the-Bay. Zubkojf
is executive director of the hospital and
Berkson is president and chairman of the
board. Achiever of the Year award went to
Steven Kern of Miami Beach. The hospital is
affiliated with the University of Miami School
of Medicine and is located on Miami Beach.
Governor To Give Oath To Judge Moreno, Cardonne
Governor Bob Graham will ad-
minister the oath to Dade
County's two newest judges at
separate investiture ceremonies
Tuesday at the Dade County
Courthouse.
In ceremonies beginning at 8:30
a.m., he will swear in Judge Fred
Moreno, who was selected by the
Judicial Nominating Commission
and appointed by the governor.
At 11:30 a.m., Governor
Graham will give the oath to
Judge Gisela Cardonne, who was
re-appointed to the bench after
selection by the Judicial
Nominating Commission. She has
been serving as deputy city at-
torney of the City of Miami.
Bob Josefsberg, former special
counsel to the governor, will
speak at the Judge Moreno in-
vestiture along with former Judge
Terrorist
Violence
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
60-year-old man suffered a slight
leg wound when an explosive
device detonated near a bus stop
in the center of Kfar Saba.
Another device exploded near an
apartment building several hun-
dred meters away but caused no
casualties or damage. Police de-
tained 100 Arabs in the vicinity
for questioning.
An explosive charge detonated
near a soldiers' hitch-hiking sta-
tion outside Ashkelon causing
neither injuries nor damage.
Israel Defense Force units,
meanwhile, searched the panhan-
dle of Upper Galilee for the impact
crater of Katyusha rockets after
explosives were heard in the
region. But no signs had been
found of a rocket attack in Upper
Galilee or in the south Lebanon
security zone.
Violence erupted in the security
zone where four terrorists were
killed in a clash with units of the
Israel-backed South Lebanon Ar-
my (SLA). One SLA man was kill-
ed, and another was wounded.
Several of the terrorists who
escaped may have been wounded.
William A. Meadows, Miami
Mayor Xavier Suarez and Judith
Korchin, president-elect of the
Dade County Bar Association.
Burton Young, past president of
the Florida Bar. will talk at the
Judge Cardonne investiture,
along with Joe N. Unger, past
president of the Dade County Bar
Association and Jose Villalobos,
past president of the Cuban-
American Bar Association.
3ti/i/ie4tvn Dr. Kurt Friedman. Miami oral and maxillofacial surgeon, has
been chosen one of ten dentists in the United States and Canada
to spend one week with Dr. Per-Ingvar Branemark. in Texas, stu-
dying severe and deformed jaws, bone grafting and difficult cases
Dr Branemark developed the osseointegration technique for den-
tal implants. --------
Mayor Alex Daoud. Members of the Miami Beach City Com-
mission and the Miami Beach Community Concert Association,
announce the dedication of the Annual Outstanding Citizen of the
Year Award Friday. June 6. at 4:30 p.m. at Theater of the Per-
forming Arts
Dade Score Chapter No. 29 will conduct a workshop on
Wednesday at the Holiday Inn. 1 1190 Biscayne Blvd.. starting at
8.30 am
Jerry Zelman. MD. director of Same Day Surgical Services
and a Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, will
speak at the sixth annual meeting of the Outpatient Ophthalmic
Surgery Society at San Diego in July. Dr. Zelman will present a
paper about his work in photo-phaco fragmentation, or laser-
assisted cataract surgery.
Barbara Gillman Gallery I will present Cesery's work in a
"Salute to the Statue of Liberty" exhibit running from Friday.
June 13, with an opening reception to meet the artist from 7 p.m.
to 9:30 p.m.
The Jewish Peace Corps, associated with the volunteers for
Israel and service programs, will hold a Kum-Zits on Saturday at
10 p.m. at the Haulover Beach Park celebrating "Jerusalem
Liberation Day."
The JWV Department of Florida annual convention will take
place June 6. 7. 8 at the Sheraton Bal Harbour Hotel.
The next meeting of the South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry will be on Tuesday, at 7:30 p.m.. at the Federation
Building.
As always...
Half the calories
of butler
& twice as good
Most people are surprised to find out that
Philadelphia Brand cream cheese has always
had half the calories of butter or margarine. But
fortunately they've always known That Philly
cream cheese tastes twice as good.
The good news is, now that they know Philly
cream cheeseeither soft or regularhas half
the calories of butter, they can enjoy twice as
much Philadelphia Brand cream cheeseor
twice as often.
Whether you use our super-spreadable soft
package, or the regular Philly cream cheese,
your whole family will enjoy a tenific spread.
What a mechayeh for your bagel, malzoh. bially
or toast!
So, pick up a package of Philly cream cheese,
because naif the calories means a great deal.

1984 Kralt Inc


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
Interfaith Caregivers Conference Starts Monday
The First Interfaith Caregivers
Conference will be held on Mon-
day at Temple Beth Torah
Tamarac Jewish Center, starting
at 8 a.m.
Sponsored by the Southeast
Region, United Synagogue of
America, the Interreligous
Liaison Office, American Associa-
tion of Retired Persons, Jewish
Federation of Fort Lauderdale,
and the National Interfaith Coali-
tion on Aging. The sessions will
include participants from Z
Jewish, Catholic. Orthodox Z
Protestant congregations i
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties. "
Israel Minister-Without-Portfolio Moshe Arens (left to right)
greeting Sam B. Topfand Eve Topf of Miami at a private recep-
tion Arens hosted at the Knesset, Israel's Parliament, welcoming
the American Society for Technion Inaugural Founders Mission.
The mission raised $2 million in support of Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology in Haifa, Israel's only technological univer-
sity and premiere resource for scientific brainpower. During the
mission, the Topfs announced the creation of the Eve and Sam B.
Topf Miami Student Hostel and Computer Center at Technion.
Mr. Topf is National Missions Chairman and Chairman of the
ATS Southern Region.
Shevin Elected President Of
Beth Shira Congregation
Jerome Shevin has been elected
president of the 420-member Bet
Shira Congregation synagogue in
South Dade.
A native Miamian, Shevin also is
active in other civic and profes-
sional organizations. He is a
member of the Metro-Dade Com-
mission's Community Relations
Board, a 30-member advisory
group which works to foster har-
mony among the county's diver-
sified ethnic and religious groups.
In addition, he serves as his firm's
liaison to the Public Interest Law
Bank, and is a member of the Ex-
ecutive Committee of the Florida
Regional Board of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Shevin, a practicing lawyer, also
serves as chairman of the Judicial
Nominating Commission for the
Eleventh Judicial Circuit, which
encompasses all of Dade County.
Two sumptuous
places to start
your Sunday.
Even Sunday. Marriott brings \<>u two
sumptuous brunch buffets (>nc .it The
Veranda (Miami Aiq*irt Marriott K the other
at Bsn View (Biscayne Ba) Marriott)
Feast to \ our delight tin steamship
round ofbecf, tempting m.u1mhJ
selections, fresh fruits and crisp salads
Plus a wonderful arra\ of breads and
pastries And more
Sunda\'s brunch buffet is available at
The Veranda from io 3<> a.m. to 2:50 p.m..
and at Ba\ View from 10a.m. to A p m
Either way. there's no better wax to start
your Sunday.
Marriott People know how.
BISCAYNE BAY
^Marriott
HtlTKI a \t\RIN\
MIAMI
AIRPORT
Harriott
|hM\.thHj.Jt I Jill N I .i...n< H...J M..m. H.d. VII Jr, KH ->
Jerome Shevin
IF YOU'RE EATING A
HIGH FIBER BRAN FLAKE
THAT'S G
11
Adath Yeshurun
Confirmation Set
Confirmation exercises will
take place at Adath Yeshurun on
the second day of Shavuot, June
14.
The students of the
confirmation class will participate
in a cantata entitled "A Time to
Dance," depicting the history of
the world as seven days,
culminating on the Sabbath at the
confirmation.
Certificates to Confirmands will
be presented by Rabbi Simcha
Freedman and Ed Graff,
Chairman of the Board of
Education.
Those being confirmed are
Stuart Abcug, Leonard Cohen,
Adam Ehrlich, Danny Gendler,
Dara Ladis, Suzanne Lechner,
Seth Mandelbaum, Brian
Plewinski, Eddie Reichelson,
David Venture, Billy Wigutow
and Scott Zucker.
IF IT'S HIGHEST IN FIBER
ANDBESTTAST1NG.
THATSPOST
natural
FIAKES
'brrfprl-r.illh
h *'l^,-

KOSHER
' **~"
You've got the right idea. You're eating a high fiber cereal because
you know how beneficial a high fiber diet can be
But do you know there's a bran flake thats highest in fiber, best
tasting and absolutory Kosher?
Its Post* Natural Bran Flakes.
Post* has more fiber than the other leading bran flake And Post-
IS?naS,ed Soeveryflake.scnspy,goldenanddeliclous.
rtc^^M^^dec,^,ohaveah,gh,iberDranflake.rnakesure
flak Natural Bran Flakes. The best tas'ing. h^hest fiber bran
C1966 Omm Foo<* CorpocKion
fj(ffi
Where keeping Kosher is a delicious tradition.


xnuajf, uunc \j, i^ouiiuc ttcwisii i iui iukui 1 age O-li
Community Leadership Mission
To Israel Departs Sept. 21
Sid Shneider, chairman of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Missions Committee, has
announced that David and Marvis
Schaecter will lead a Miami
delegation on the Community
Leadership Mission to Israel,
Sept. 21-Oct. 1.
"This particular mission is cer-
tain to be a highlight of Federa-
tion's 1987 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign," Shneider said. "We'll
be joining forces with other
American Jewish communities,
making our mission some 1,500
strong. It will be a perfect tribute
to the mission's theme which is a
commemoration of the 100th an-
niversary of David Ben-Gurion's
birth."
The itinerary, which calls for
departure on El Al Airline from
New York on Sept. 21, includes a
tour of the Old City in Jerusalem
and a "hands-on" archaeological
seminar and dig. The mission will
then proceed to visit Project
Renewal sites around Jerusalem
and the first day will culminate
with a fabulous opening celebra-
tion at Sultan's Pool.
The second and third days of the
mission include a meeting with
Prime Minister Shimon Peres and
Jerusalem mayor Teddy Kolleck
at the Western Wall, visits to
Kthiopian absorption centers and
Kabbalat Shabbat at the Western
Wall.
Other mission highlights include
visits to Mt. Herzl Military
Cemetery and Yad Vashem, walk-
JFS Schedules
Three Workshops
A series of workshop sessions
by the Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami is starts next
week.
Sandwich Generation, a four-
week workshop for adults with
obligations to both their children
and their aging parents will begin
Monday, 7-8:30 p.m. at the Coral
(iables Office.
Step Parenting, a learning
course of proven methods for
"blending" the remarried family
at a four-week workshop will start
Tuesday, 7-8:30 p.m., also at the
Coral Gables Office.
Tame Your Stress, a four-week
workshop to help learn how to
relax will begin Monday, 1-2:30
p.m. at the Miami Beach Office.
Fees will be charged for the
courses.
St. Francis Hospital
Schedules Blood Drive
St. Francis Hospital will con-
duct its semi-annual blood drive
on Thursday, June 12 from 7:30
a.m.-5:30 p.m. in the hospital's
Weigand Auditorium.
To encourage both employees of
the hospital and the community to
donate blood, an impressive array
of gifts has been assembled. Those
individuals who give blood
automatically qualify for a draw-
ing of the outs tar ding prizes. In-
dividuals who are medically
unable to give blood can qualify
for a prize by bringing someone to
donate in their place.
Noel King, Director of Com-
munity Relations and Develop-
ment at St. Francis Hospital, is in
charge.
ing tours of Tiberias, Safed and
Tel Aviv, a spectacular air show at
Sde Boker Air Force Base and a
visit to Miami's Project Renewal
city, Or Akiva.
"This is a particularly crucial
time for our community to ex-
press its solidarity with the people
of Israel," Shneider stated. "Mis-
sions to Israel are the best expres-
sion of our love and commitment
to our Jewish homeland. Travel to
Israel, particularly on El Al, is
quite safe, and security within
Israel provides mission par-
ticipants with an opportunity to
see this extraordinary nation
without worry."
Participants on the 1986 Com-
munity Leadership Mission to
Israel are expected to make a
minimum family gift of $1,500 to
the 1987 Federation campaign. A
number of parlor meetings are be-
ing planned for potential mission
participants to learn more about
this exclusive opportunity to visit
Israel with our nation's Jewish
leadership.
Individuals should contact
Federation's Mission Department
for additional information.
Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev awarded Dr. Abram
Sachar, founding president
and chancellor emeritus of
Brandeis University, with an
honorary doctorate degree 'in
recognition of his dedication to
Jewish learning and Jewish
ideals.' University President
Dr. Chaim Elata presented the
degree to Dr. Sachar at a
Board of Governors meeting in
Beersheba last week.
Fischer Named Associate Director
Of Development At MJHHA
The Directorate of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens has an-
nounced that Louis C. Fischer has
been promoted to Assistant Direc-
tor of Development.
Fischer, a legacy and endow-
ment specialist, has been with the
Miami Jewish Home for two years
as a Development Associate. Prior
to that, he served as Associate
Director of the B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation of the United States for
eight years. He was also recently
elected President of the B'nai
B'rith Hillcrest Lodge.
"I'm very proud to be affiliated
with an institution as innovative
as the Miami Jewish Home," com-
mented Fischer. "I hope to con-
tinue to work with our experienc-
ed cadre of tax specialists, at-
torneys and accountants on
developing means of giving that
make a big difference in the quali-
ty of life for our elderly, while
allowing donors the best possible
tax advantages."
Fisher is a graduate of the
Georgia Technical Institute.
Louis C. Fischer
CANTOR
(Retired) Conservative,
excellent tenor voice,
seeks position for High
Holidays.
305-967-4574
For Shevuoth
Take a Holiday From Cholesterol With
Fleischmann's Margarine and Egg Beaters:
33M
-5S-Q *
Fleischmann's
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rgarine
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noes i'"_. iew""'%,|, sides '"
Its always a good lime to
start a tradition ot sensible eating with
Fleischmann s Margarine and Fleischmann s Egg
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Fleischmann s Margarine is made trom t00- corn oil and Egg
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Fleischmann's Gives
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SAVE 15C
When you buy any package of
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7* agMMifl
KIMfH One coupon pet pw'tfutt 0> prOOUCI
fiOKJIfd *^T WtW WW COMMuK^ Ii*j0 COB
tunv in pjy uirMu VW ii cooM timWM
prohMM UMOiiMncM GooO on"I U S
ttr lOTtftnt you tn nw i*f ** Pfc; At
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thus mm
7900
-
t
.'. b/U


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 6, 1986
Rabbinical Association Elects Rabbi Klein President TemP,e Emanu-El Events To
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami has elected Rabbi
Carl Klein of the Hallandale
Jewish Center as its President for
1986-87. Also elected were Rabbi
Haskell M. Bernat of Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, Vice
President; Rabbi Menachem Raab
of Central Agency for Jewish
Education, Secretary, and Rabbi
David B. Saltzman of Aventura
Jewish Center as Treasurer.
Rabbi Klein succeeds Rabbi
Brett Goldstein of Temple Shu-
Ami, who served as President
during the past year. Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, Director of
Chaplaincy of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, serves as the
Executive Vice President.
Rabbi Klein has been spiritual
leader of the Hallandale Jewish
Center for the past nine years. He
came from Mexico City where he
served for 16 years as the spiritual
leader of Congregation Beth El.
He was ordained at the Rabbinical
School of Frankfurt Au Main;
7-hD from University of
Frankfurt; Doctor of Divinity
from the Jewish Theological
Seminary; former President of
the Rabbinical Council of South
Broward; President of Jewish
National Fund of Hallandale;
member of the Rabbinic Cabinet
of the United Jewish Appeal;
member of the Rabbinic Cabinet
of Bonds for Israel; member of the
American Board of Overseers of
Bar I Ian University in Israel;
former Assistant to the President
of Bar-Ilan University; and
recently awarded at Bar-Dan
University a Chair on Rabbinic
Judaism.
Rabbi Klein's publications
include: "The Credo of
Rabbi Carl Klein
Maimonides," published in 1958
by the Philosophical Library of
New York; "Anatomy of
Judaism," published in Mexico in
Spanish in 1971; "The Eternal
Book," in two volumes, published
in Mexico in 1975; "Friday
Evening Prayer Book," published
in Mexico in 1969.
Upon his election, Rabbi Klein
stated "On assuming the
Presidency of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami,
may I first say that I am proud of
the honor of heading this
Association of 110 Rabbis. Having
been a member for almost ten
years, I have participated in its
activities and served for the past
Hfflel To Graduate Largest 9th Grade
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School, North Miami
Beach will graduate 37 students.
Tuesday evening, 7:30 p.m. in the
school's Friedman-Uhlar
Auditorium.
This year's ninth grade class is
the largest graduating class, ac-
cording to Rabbi Wallace Greene,
Principal.
A musical and dramatic cantata
will be presented by the
graduates, under the direction of
Mrs. Marlena Tuchinsky, Music
teacher.
The graduates are Dino
Bagdadi, Izac Ben-Shmuel,
Abraham Cohen, Eitan Dagan,
David Eisen, Jack Fintz, Pnina
Flemembaum, Arieh Flemen-
baum, Adrian Gabor, Shana
Gerard, Uri Goldflam, Jennifer
Harel, Amir Harpaz, Ktalya
Israel, Matthew Karch, Harold
Klein, Ann Korros, Matthew
Krinzman,
Also Vanessa Kronenfeld,
Heather Lipson, David Magle,
Steven Maleh, Kenneth
McLaughlin, Morris Menasche,
Eric Mermelstein, Lori Nizel,
Phillip Olstein, Evelyn Rok,
James Saada, Lea Salama, Karina
Serber, Moshe Sondik, Talia Tep-
per, Assaf Tzur, Inna Vekshteyn,
Daniel Weisman, and Boris
Zelkin.
Valedictorians of this class are
Tali Tepper in General Studies
and Ann Korros in Judaic Studies.
Salutorian is Lea Salama.
Diplomas will be presented by
Rabbi Greene, Dr. Jerome Levy,
Vice Principal and Rabbi Jay
Neufeld, Assistant Principal. The
graduates and guests will be
welcomed by Michael Scheck,
President. Awards will be
presented during the evening.
Holocaust Survivors Local Reunion
Keeping with the "Freedom"
theme, a group of Holocaust Sur-
vivors from the small Hungarian
town of Nyirmada gathered at the
home of Andor and Lenore Klein
in North Miami Beach this past
week, renewing friendships and
reminiscing.

i

A
After All, Your Father Deserves A Good Dinner
And A Belly Dancing Show.
Join Us FATHER'S DAY!
Come to the
Restaurant
For Festive Food From the Mid East.
Authentic Belly Dancing
Reservations Required 662-1692
0$ 9553 SOUTH DIXIE HWY.
(X Pedelend H OWN

two years as its Treasurer."
"My objectives and aims: I
intend to develop a program to
forge the membership into a
strong bond of common interest in
our communal goals. I will stress
Rabbinic input into communal
affairs such as UJA, Bonds for
Israel, Jewish education, and
attempt to stimulate the interest
of the unaffiliated in joining
synagogues and temples."
"I will create programs and hold
joint meetings between the
Jewish community and its
counterpart, our non-Jewish
neighbors, to promote better
understanding and cooperation in
civic affairs and inter-religious
communication.''
"As we are not a political
organization, we shall try to be
independent and stand above
political struggles, but supportive
of the moral imperative and
political texture of American
life."
"I see the State of Israel as the
fulfillment of Jewish hopes and
prayers, the support of which will
receive my deepest concern in
lending full-hearted attention to
its struggle for economic vitality
and political security, as we raise
our voices against those forces
who by terror and violence design
to destroy the peace and security
of Israel."
"Like my predecessors, I shall
join with my colleagues against
the forces of ill will, the cults who
prey on the young and old in their
missionary endeavors, and shall
promote an educational program
to make both the Jewish and
Christian communities aware of
the harm they do to the
established religious
denominations," Rabbi Klein
concluded.
Fete Young Families
Three events will celebrate the
younger set of Temple Emanu-El
this week.
New officers of the Young
Family League were installed
Thursday. Rabbi Dr. Irving
Lehrman will officiate as outgoing
co-presidents, Jay and Hedy
Horowitz, welcome incoming co-
presidents, Jimmy and Lydia
Resnick, in the Resnick home. The
Young Family League, open to all
young families of the Temple,
sponsors social and educational
gatherings as well as major fund-
raising events each year for the
benefit of the Lehrman Day
School.
Closing exercises of the Early
Childhood Department of the
Lehrman Day School will be Fri-
day at 10:30 a.m. in the Friedland
Ballroom, with a reception follow-
ing. Rabbi Lehrman will officiate
assisted by Philippa Feldman'
principal of the Early Childhood
Department, and Dr. Amir Baron
Director of Education, in presen-
ting certificates to the young
graduates.
Rabbi and Mrs. Lehrman will
host members of the confirmation
class in their home at 4 p.m.
Saturday for an Oneg Shabbat.
Mark Baranek, teacher of the con-
firmation classes as well as assis-
tant director of the Lehrman Day
School, has been leading the
young people of the Temple in
their religious studies for the past
year. Essay winners will be an-
nounced at this annual event, a
prelude to the formal confirma-
tion ceremony on June 13 on the
Festival of Shavuot.
Holocaust Memorial Center
Schedules Annual Meeting
Dr. Abraham S. Fischler, presi-
dent of the Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center, an-
nounces that the center's sixth an-
nual meeting will be held Monday,
June 16, at 1:30 p.m. on the North
Miami Bay Vista Campus of
Florida International University
in the Student Center Building,
Room 320.
Guest speaker will be Neal M.
Sher, director of the United
States Deartment of Justice, Of-
fice of Special Investigations.
Sher, a Cum Laude graduate of
the New York University Law
School and Cornell University, is
the recipient of numerous honors.
The subject of his address will be
"Alleged Nazi War Criminals Liv-
ing in the United States."
All members and the
community-at-large are invited.
Graduate certificates will also be
presented to those volunteers who
have completed the center's
60-hour interviewer training
course. A special certificate of ap-
preciation will be presented to
each survivor, liberator and pro-
tector who has given testimony to
the center in the last year.
For deliciouily Haw refreshment. pout on the
Sato* Brood DecofTemoted
Coffee
Ploce on* rounded tea-
spoon Sareja Instant or
Freeze-Dried Decoffeinated
Coffee in o tall glass. Shr in one cup cold water. Add
ke and serve with create, and sugar, if you wont. Or
ask for it at your favorite restaurant. Ifou'tl hove a de-
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canein-free. And Kosher, too. Santo*
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Amit Women Luncheon Honored Many Members
Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Florida Council of Amit Women
held a Donor Luncheon at the
Konover Hotel. This annual lun-
cheon honors the many members
for their hard work and dedication
to the cause, which raises funds to
maintain 20 projects in Israel
which house and educate over
18,000 orphaned and needy
children in Israel. Members from
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties partake in this event.
Guests speaker for the after-
noon was Commissioner Barry
Schreiber who gave a most inspir-
ing speech, and presented awards
for meritorious service to
Jeanette Goldberg, president of
Shalom Chapter and Laura Vogel
and Ann Lechowitz, presidium of
Hatikvah/Miami Beach chapter.
A fashion show was modeled by
members of Amit Women.
Saundra Rothenberg,
Presidium member of the Florida
Council was chairman of the
Donor Luncheon.
Galil Chapter will hold its
meeting on Monday, noon. A mini
brunch will be served and Cer-
tificates of Merit will be
distributed. A program will be
presented with Southern Bell
Telephone Company arranging a
consumer scoreboard quiz, and
prizes and souvenirs will be made
available. The meeting will take
place at the Young Israel
Synagogue, North Miami Beach.
The Shalom Chapter will hold a
gala luncheon and card party on
Tuesday, at 100 Lincoln Road,
Club Room. Refreshments will be
served; family and friends are
invited.
Miamian Graduates
From Brandeis U.
Mark Bruce Leider, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Bert Leider of Miami,
has graduated from Brandeis
University.
Leider, an American Studies
and Education major, plans to
work in the law field and attend
law school in fall 1987.
Community Corner
B'nai B'rith Women Horizon's Chapter No. 1696 is
meeting in Horizon's Clubhouse, Thursday, June 12.
The 41st Annual Banquet of Beth Kodesh Congrega-
tion will take place on Sunday at the Casablanca Hotel
at 6 p.m. An installation of the officers and board
members will precede the dinner.
Cuban Hebrew Congregation, together with former
students and friends, are honoring Frida Zyss Seleski
for her 50 years of continuous dedication to teaching
and cultural community activities, at a celebration din-
ner Thursday, June 12, at 7 p.m. at the Olemberg
Ballroom.
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Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lyda
KOGAN-LYDA
Debra Lynn Kogan, daughter of Judge and Mrs.
Gerald Kogan of Miami, became the bride of Larry
Lyda, son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lyda of Orlando
Florida on May 25.
The bride's grandparents are long-time Miami
Beach residents Mr. and Mrs. Morris Kogan and
the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Vulgan. Judge Kogan
is a Circuit Court Judge and the Administrative
Judge of the Criminal Division.
Matron of Honor was Diana Kogan, sister-in-law
of the bride, of Phoenix, Arizona. Maid of Honor
was Karen Kogan, sister of the bride. Attending
the bride as bridesmaids were Susan Epstein, Mar-
cy Green, Debbie Seigal, sorority sisters of Sigma
Delta Tau from Atlanta, Ga., and Jodi Lucas of
Miami. Joy Lyda of Mobile, Alabama served as
flower girl.
Chris Lyda. brother of the groom, of Orlando,
served as best man. Ushers were Robert Kogan,
brother of the bride, of Phoenix, Jeff Pollard of
Baton Rouge, La., Steve Lyda of Waynesboro,
Miss., Larry Carlson of Atlanta, Frank Frana of
Orlando, and Mark Feinberg of Orlando.
The bride wore a designer creation in ivory silk
satin enhanced with a Queen Anne neckline,
sleeves and bodice accented with exquisite em-
broidered Milano lace, pearls and sequins. She
wore an heirloom pearl necklace worn by her
fraternal grandmother at her wedding 54 years
ago.
The bride is a graduate of the University of
Alabama with a Bachelor of Science degree.
The groom attended the University of Alabama
and is an independent manufacturers' represen-
tative for industrial corporations in the southern
United States.
Following a honeymoon in San Francisco and
Hawaii, the couple plan to reside in Baton Rouge.
Complete Guide To Jewish Travel In U.S.
LODI, N.J. Wandering You
Press announces the publication
of an accurate and up-to-date
guide for Jewish travel in the
United States, "Traveling Jewish
in America: The Complete Guide
for 1986 for Business and
Pleasure," is compiled by Brynna
C. Bloomfield and Jane
Moskowitz.
"Traveling Jewish in America"
is a handbook for Jewish families,
business people, students and
other travelers. The compilers
have contacted sources in every
community listed to provide the
up-to-date information for the
Guide, which was designed for
easy reading and reference for the
traveler on the go.
Make June
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Perk up any meal this June with the
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GOLDEN BRAND BUNTZES are rude the
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leaves are stuffed with the goodness of cheese,
potato, or the freshness of real bluebeny, sweet
cheny or cinnamony apple raisin. Golden Brand
Blintxes are fresh frown, heat quickly and a snap to
serve. And they art tow in calories.
GOLDEN BRAND PIEROGIES are tender
noodle pillows filled with our special blend of choice
potato, onion, spices and even real cheddar cheese in
our Potato Cheese Pierogies. Tney are truly the best,
never any artificial flavor or color.
GOLDEN BRAND POTATO PANCAKES are
patties of freshly ground potatoes, mitzoh meal and
onions. They're an all natural treat. Ready to heat and
eat. Your family will love the taste.
For a mealtime change of pace, serve Golden
Brand Products. They're convenient and versatile and
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Mount Sinai Medical Center's
Auxiliary Installs New Officers
Left to right Lila Heatter, Past President of Board of Trustees and
President of Founders with newly elected Auxiliary President,
Murray Sarlin.
It's a man ... for the first time in its history, the Mount Sinai
Medical Center Auxiliary has a man at its helm. Murray Sarlin, a
Mount Sinai volunteer for the past seven years and a food chemist
by profession, was recently installed as President of the Medical
Center's volunteer organization for the 1986-87 term.
Murray Sarlin is dedicated to Mount Sinai and its volunteers
and will be an asset to our program," said Adele Freund, Director
of Volunteer Services.
Working beside Sarlin will be five Vice Presidents, Shirley
Kaufmann, and Norma Steele back for another term. Joining
them are Dr. Judy Holland, William Leitner and Lynn Nagel.
Other elected officials installed by Rhoda Kern, Auxiliary Past
President, include Naomi Sarlin, Recording Secretary; Selma
Hammer, Corresponding Secretary; Rena Kriegel, Assistant Cor-
responding Secretary; Ceil Ross Block, Financial Secretary;
Beatrice Katz, Assistant Financial Secretary; Edith Eichenhon,
Executive Treasurer; Isle Simonhoff, Treasurer; and Norman
Holland, Nominating Committee Chairman.
The 2,000 member Auxiliary provides volunteers and communi-
ty support for Mount Sinai, raises funds for Osteoarthritis and
Osteoporosis research and maintains the Medical Center's Gift
Shop and Resell-A-Bration thrift shop. This year the Auxiliary-
presented Mount Sinai with a check for $25,000.
Teena Ellen Weiss retired from a three-year term as President.
She was responsible for starting a physicians VIP Auxiliary
Membership that underwrites the patients Diversional Activities
Program and TV Games; initiating the Resell-A-Bration thrift
shop at the Medical Center and spearheading improvement in the
Gift Shop including a payroll deduction plan for employees.
IBIBlBBBBrVL- ** amSiJmmmm
Outgoing President Teena Ellen Weiss presenting Sid Goldin.
**2*btnat Associate Director, with a check for $25,000 from the
Assistant Executive Director
BK *" tl>"h^ JSHMl burial society In large
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Administration, Labor Management Halations, Jewish
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Salary and benefits open. Submit resume In confidence
by June 25 to:
BOX SC c/O JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. Box 012973 Miami, Fla. 33101
20*
Teaching Is Tops
Challenging teaching positions at excellent
salaries in an exciting progressive Jewish
environment. Openings for Fall/86 in Sunday
and Hebrew Schools; Day School and Early
Childhood programs; specialists; and Youth
Advisor. Call: RABBI COOK at Temple Sinai
of North Dade.
932-9010



Report: The U.S. Will Oppose
Top UN Post To An
Alleged Former Nazi
rriuay, juiie o, igoo/me jewian riuriuiai) rage -o
GENEVA (JTA) The
dean of the California-based
Simon Wiesenthal Center
reports that the United
.Stateshas said it will active-
ly oppose the appointment
of Hermann Klenner of
East Germany to a top UN
post because of allegations
that he was a member of the
Nazi Party.
Rabbi Marvin Hier, attending a
conference on security and
cooperation dealing with human
rights issues in Bern, said the
Center was informed of the U.S.
policy decision in a letter dated
May 16 it received from Alan
Keyes, the U.S. Undersecretary
of State for International
Organizational Affairs.
THE LETTER was in response
to an earlier letter the Center sent
to Keyes urging that he intervene
in the Klenner case. Klenner was
appointed one of three vice
presidents of the United Nations
Commission on Human Rights,
which meets here once a year for
six weeks. Under a system of
diplomatic rotation, Klenner will
automatically gain the right to
become commission chairman
next year.
Klenner has been accused by the
Israeli delegate to the UN Human
Rights Conference, Ephraim
Dubek, of having been an active
Nazi, and the number of his card
as Party member was produced.
The card number allegedly held by
Klenner is 97-56-141. He is
reported to have joined the party
on April 20, 1944.
Klenner has never denied his
Nazi membership and has refused
to discuss it. In April, Israel's
.United Nations Ambassador,
Binyamin Netanyahu, received ac-
Icess to two files in the UN War
Crimes Commission archives, in-
cluding one marked "Klenner."
The other file was on Alois Brun-
ner, said to now be living in Syria.
KEYES, in the letter to Hier,
Isaid, "I share your anger at the
recent appointment of an East
German diplomat, Hermann Klen-
ner, as vice president of the UN
Commission on Human Rights.
We must do whatever we can to
ensure that such situations do not
occur again.
"The State Department is now
Hospital Association
Names Board
Of Directors
Eight administrators of area
ospitals have been named to the
rd of directors of the South
lorida Hospital Association
>FHA) for the 1986-87 year.
The new officers are chairman
dward J. Maas, vice
hairrnan/chairman-elect Charles
*eat, and secretary/treasurer
y Weinstein.
New members of the board are
fed Cowell, Brian E. Keeley. Ed-
*WJ. Rosasco, Jr., Frank Sacco
i Fred Hirt.
Remaining members of the
rt are Terry M. Carson. Mer-
W. Crews, Larry E. Hanan,
*n P. Lauri, Richard Stull, II,
J l*orge R. Berch.
News Briefs
NEW YORK (WNS) Air
*** remains safe considering
"e number of passengers flown
nd the comparatively small
amber of terrorist incidents, ac-
, P1 a conference on Terrorism and
'fansportation sponsored by the
jnti-Defamation League of B'nai
K h held in Washington.
actively engaged in diplomatic ef-
forts to prevent Mr. Klenner's
nomination as the East European
candidate for chairmanship of the
Commission in 1987. Please be
assured of the great moral
repugnance I feel toward the
Klenner appointment and the
commitment of our government to
opposing such travesties."
Meanwhile, Wiesenthal Center
officials made public last Monday
a 99-page study, "Portrait of In-
famy," which deals with alleged
Soviet anti-Semitic caricatures
which the Center said have their
roots in the Nazi ideology. Copies
of the report were presented to
the Ambassadors and delegates
from numerous countries. The
Soviet Union requested the report
and received it via the U.S.
delegation.
Rabbi Abraham Cooper,
associate dean of the Center in
Los Angeles, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
study clearly refutes the assertion
by Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev who continues to deny the
existence of an official Soviet
policy of anti-Semitism.
Fourteen 6th grade students will graduate
from Temple Sinai Academy, at the school's
first graduation ceremony on Sunday, at S
p.m. First Row: Jan Goldmann, Assistant to
the Director of Education, Jeffrey Lefkowitz,
Daria Lidsky, Jay Natkow, Vikki Kris-
tiansson, Julie Fass, Jean Gordon, Teacher.
Second Row: Lisbeth Klau, Jennifer Smith,
Jennifer Michael, Danny Brause. Third Row:
Paul Azaroff, Teacher; Kim Segall, Nicole
Gorin, Cheryl Roth, Sharon Lerner, Miles
Zalkin, Rabbi Cook, Director of Education.
^ where shopping is o pleasure 7 days a week
Publlx
DANISH
BAKERY
Publix Bakeries open at 8 OO A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
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with the purchase of a 3-tier
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Available at all PubMx Stores
and Danish Bakeries
each
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Individual
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for
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?
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\t.

Publix



Cindy S. Lederman
Edith G. Osman
,..r--- ...
Artist's rendering: Pool area at Northpark in Hollywood by Levitt Retirement Communities, Inc.
Women Lawyers Announce
New Officers For '86-*87
The choice of a near 20-acre
land area in the center of heavily-
urbanized Hollywood was a key
decision of Levitt Retirement
Communities, Inc., prior to
development of Northpark.
One of the developing firm's
major objectives in determining a
suitable location was to provide a
community setting in the familiar
surroundings where most of its
potential residents already live.
Now open with construction
well underway for the first two
100-unit residential apartment
buildings and adjoining Communi-
ty Center, Northpark is designed
to answer requirements of retiree-
aged residents of South Florida,
many of them living in the coastal
areas from North Miami Beach
through southeastern Broward
County.
Northpark, providing new ren-
tal apartments with both conve-
nience facilities (a Market Place
convenience store, barber
shop/beauty salon, Wellness
Center) and specialized services
Opti-Mrs. Club
Of Miami Beach
To Install
New Officers
Mrs. Barbara Miller will be in-
stalled as President of the Opti-
Mrs. Club of Miami Beach for a
third term. The annual installa-
tion luncheon will be held at the
Konover Hotel on Saturday, June
14 at 11:30 a.m., starring Peppy
Fields, a singer and entertainer
who sings in the most delightful
manner.
Mrs. Bea Hirsch and Mrs. Jeff
Olkin, past presidents, are
chairpersons for the afternoon.
The theme is "Everything Is Com-
ing Up Roses" a blooming start
for a wonderful loving year.
Mrs. Miller's son, Jerry will be
her installing officer.
Mrs. Muriel Weston, past presi-
dent, will install the remaining of-
ficers and board of directors.
Other officers elected are Vice
Presidents, Ida Mae Glickstein
and Estelle Renkoff; Co-
Treasurers, Betty Gottlieb and
Beverly Hornreich; Recording
Secretary, Rose Roth man; Cor-
responding Secretary, Norma
Kur; Social Secretaries, Edith
Leibowitz and Dorothy Miller.
The Board of Directors are
Dorothy Carmel, Chrlotte
Chester, Evette Fiur, Bea Hirsch,
Helene Jackson, Edith Katz,
Carol Levenson, Jeff Olkin, Geri
Peters, Irene Pilzer, Anne Pines,
Helen Segal, Mimi Sperling,
Esther Steiner, Mitzie Webster,
Muriel Weston, and Lucille
Brande.
(transportation, light housekeep-
ing, multiple activities and recrea-
tion), is a unique approach to
assist the high incidence of 65 plus
citizens who live in a variety of
housing in the same area.
The size of the site was another
key factor: it guaranteed suffi-
cient land area to build a self-
contained community, buffered by
parks and lakes from nearby ur-
ban thoroughfares yet still easily
convenient to shopping/com-
merical districts in the
southeastern Broward County
area.
Approximately two-third's of
the Northpark land area (off
Sheridan St., between North Park
Road and N. 35th Ave.) will be
preserved with lakes, parks,
greenscapes and buffer-type ber-
ming around all outside
parameters of the residential
apartment buildings and Com-
munity Center, effectively pro-
viding privacy through extensive
environmental screening.
The Dade County Chapter of
the Florida Association for
Women Lawyers announced the
election of new officers for the
1986-87 year.
Newly elected officers are Cin-
dy S. Lederman, President; Edith
Osman, Vice President; Sonia
Yahr, Secretary and Newsletter
Editor; and Adrienne Promoff,
Treasurer.
The annual installation of of-
ficers will be held on June 13 at
the Biscayne Bay Marriott. There
will be an outdoor cocktail recep-
tion from 5:30 with musical enter-
tainment and dinner at 6:30.
The newly elected directors are
AT? 22 May Cain- Linda
Dakis, Shelley J. Kravitz, Sheryl
J. Lowenthal and Lauren Levy
Miller. J
Hadassah Events
The I.R. Goodman Chapter of
Hadassah will hold the first
meeting of the new Hadassah
fiscal year on Sunday, at 1 p.m. at
the Hadassah Region office,
Miami Beach.
Installation of Officers and
Board Project Chairpersons will
be given by Faye Yarrow, Region
Secretary.
tl
t>
t
i;
E
a
si
i
a i
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Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Thatcher Visibly Shaken During Tour of Yad Vashem
By GIL SEDAN
\ JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher was visibly shaken
she toured the Yad
Vashem Holocaust
Memorial Museum here last
Jweek in the first full day of
Tthe first visit of an incum-
bent British Prime Minister
to Israel.
Pausing at the photograph of a
German soldier shooting a Jewish
mother and her child, she exclaim-
ed, "It is so terrible. Everyone
should come and see it so that
they never forget." She added, "I
am not quite sure whether the
new generation really knows what
we are fighting against."
Noting that Jews were being
slaughtered at the rate of 120,000
a day while the Holocaust was in
progress, Thatcher observed that
had the war lasted another year,
the death toll would have been 11
million instead of six million Jews.
She placed a wreath at the
memorial to the Six Million.
THE IMAGES of the
'
Holocaust, she said, told her the
horrors of the Holocaust "more
than all the stories I have heard."
Thatcher arrived in Israel ac-
companied by her husband, Denis
Thatcher. She was greeted at
Ben-Gurion Airport by Premier
Shimon Peres, Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, Knesset Speaker
Shlomo Hillel and other
dignitaries. In remarks to
reporters after she stepped down
from a Royal Air Force plane, the
British leader expressed concern
that the peace process "appears
to have lost momentum in recent
months."
"I don't believe that is your
wish or that of the moderate, far-
sighted Arab leaders with whom I
have talked in recent months,"
she said, adding that she hoped
her visit would help get the stalled
peace process moving again.
Thatcher lunched with Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog who praised
her anti-terrorist policies and said
the Israeli people stood beside her
in this.
Thatcher began her official talks
at meetings with Peres and
Shamir Sunday afternoon (May
25). Earlier she breakfasted with
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek,
who expressed regret that Britain
did not recognize Israel's
sovereignty over united
Jerusalem.
Bar Mitzvah
GEOFFREY HARRIS
Geoffrey Harris, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Edward Harris (Gail) will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El.
Geoffrey is a seventh grader at
Nautilus Junior High School
where he is in honors classes. His
interests are golf, skateboarding,
ping pong.
Many friends and relatives will
come from out-of-town and from
home to help celebrate this
occasion.
Legal Notices
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. "A good way of shall they pitch round about the tent of
meeting"
(Numbers t.t).
BAMIDBAR
BAMIDBAR "And the Lord spoke unto Moses in the
wilderness of Sinai, in the tent of meeting, on the first day of the
second month, in the second year after they were come out of the
land of Egypt, saying: 'Take ye the sum of all the congregation of
the children of Israel, by their families, by their fathers' houses,
according to the number of names, every male, by their polls;
from twenty years old and upward, all that are able to go forth to
war in Israel; ye shall number them by their hosts, even thou and
Aaron' (Numbers 1.1-3). Exclusive of the Levites, who were not
numbered, the total sum of men of military age was 603,555.
There follows a description of the Israelites' encampments during
their journeys through the desert: there were four major camps,
each of three tribes; one under the flag of Judah, one under the
flag of Reuben, one under the flag of Ephraim, and one under the
flag of Dan, The Levites camped separately near the sanctuary,
among the Levites, each clan had a particular service to render in
regard to the sanctuary.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion ol the Law Is extracted and based
upon The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,'' edited by P Wollman-
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York, NY. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get reeponse! Cost Is
$10.00 (or up to 30 words. To piece your specie! singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewleh'"<*'"'
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Attrectlve, blonde widow, 67, 5'6 140> Ibe. ***
witty, warm, very personable, fInancla y secure, seeke
gentlemen In the 70's with seme qualities wrw naeas
someone to enjoy life with. Box es c/o Jewleh Flortdlen,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
"SPECIALIZED CARE"-^
FORTHEHOMEBOUND
24 Hour Nursing Service
SERVING BROWARD & DADE COUNTIES SINCE 1972
R.N.'s, L.P.N.'s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
We Specialize in Live-Ins & Post Hospital Care
All Employees Bonded & Insured
For Competitive Rates Call
ALL DADE HOME CARE
Miami 5760383 Hwd. 963-1417 Ft. Laud. 566-650 i
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COUBT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CLAUDETTE PIERRE
Petitioner,
and
YVES PIERRE
Respondent.
TO: YVES PIERRE
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida,
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before July 7. 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered.
May 29, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
19833 June 6, 13, 20,27.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DONA AREPA
RESTAURANT at 9529 Sunset
Drive, Miami, Florida 33173. in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Toys and Party Supply by
Jeanette, Inc.
19840 June 6, 13.20.27. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
< ivil Action No. 86-23262
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
FRANK SHAIRA,
Petitioner,
and
HILDA SHAIRA,
Respondent
TO: HILDA SHAIRA
18 Spring Street -
Apt. 36
Wallington, N.J. 07067
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on USHER
BRYN, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309, Miami
Beach, FL 33139, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Jury 11,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
jnce each week for four con-
,ecutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 3 day of June, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(305) 532-1155
19844 June 6, 13.20,27. 198fi
T
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellghting Time
7:51 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tern pie Bath Shmuei
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
53*7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovltch. Rabbi
Moshe Buryn, Cantor
Sergio GroWer. President
Sholem Epalbaum. President
Religions Committee
ADATH YESMURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Baach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmcha Fraadman
Cantor Ian Alpam Conservative
'/
Sat. S:M a.m. Ultrytyn Herman Ginsberg.
Tnur. (June 12) 7:Ju p.m. Yom Yerusheleylm
Celebration. Frt. (June 1% 1 p.m. Hal
Clau graduation.
Sal. :*> a.m. S IX p.m.
Dally aecrtcee 7:S0 a.m. a 0: JO p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5060 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 867-0667
Dr. Herbert Baumga rd
Senkx Rabbi
James L. Simon. Aaaoclate Rabbi
Fit. 7:J0 p.m. Family Servlee, Rabbi Baumgard
ThoFavomoChlld"
Sal. 9:15 am Bel Mitzvah, Rachel Stem
let 11:1 5 a.m. Bar Mitzvah.
Daniel Stuzln and David Minor.
Sermon. "The Ancient Infatuation with
the "First Bom Bon.'"
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue (
Miami Baach
Or. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shtfman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat p.m.
Sat. a.m. Ov. Irnno LaMman win preach.
Cantor Yehuda Intlman will chant.
Bar Mitzvah Qeottrey Harrta.
Bat. Junior Cong. Sabbath Sarvtce, 10:JO a.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Baach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Sehiti
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avanua 854-3011
Jack Rlemer, Rabbi
Or. Sol Landau,
Rabbi Emeritus
Rav. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
Sat. 0 a.m.
Sun. 0 a.m.. 5:JO p.m.
Mon a Thura. 7: JO a.m., 5:J0p.m.
Tuea., Wad.. Fit. 7:48 a.m.. KM p.m.
Mlnchah7:S6p.m.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W 12 Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krlssei
Rose Berlin Executive Secretary
8586334
Sat. service 0:46 a.m.
Shavoua Thura. ( p.m. aervlce
(f)
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
861 5506 Conservative
Or. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. GorfInkel. (
Rabbi Emeritus v
Moshe Friedler. Cantor
Sat 10:10 a.m. RaoM Jacob*,
"Mkaea m the Dwert"
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
M'i aiamar Rotorm CamrsgitiBR____
137 N.E. 10th St.. Miami. 573-5000
9900 N. Kendall Dr.. 505-5055
Senior Rabbi Haekeil BernaI
Aaaistant Rabbi Re 0. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G Bornstein
fieaortati CQWMf Hi *"" c '"
executive Director Philip S. Ootdin
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Spartti
p.m Sorvtco.
Downtown: Rabbi Haakatl M. Bemat. "untieUs
In Leva." Sisterhood Shebbeth. Liturgy: Canto.
Jacob B. Bernstein.
Kendall. Rabbi Ren D. Fertmeter. "Waiting For
Torah."
Liturgy: Cantor Reehelle F. Melaon.
TEMPLE JUDEA ____
5600 Granada Bhrd. J*25
Coral Gabies 867 5657
Michael B. Elsenatat. Rabbi
Friday aervlce 0 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534.0776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab. Cantor
Services Frt ? JO pm
Sat ( 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abremowttz /SJv
Cantor Murray Yavneh %
Sat. 0 a.m. Sabbath wic*
Dally Mlnchah Sunday Friday 8 a.m. and S p.m.
Sat. 0 a.m. and 0:15 p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID BOS 134.5
7002 Carlyle Ave 066-9633
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene LabOVltl Coneervobw*
Cantor Edward Klein /?&
Oally Servtcee a m and 5: JO p m Sj|\ i
Sal. 0:S a.m. ^S,'/
Frt. late aervlce 0 p.m.
V>
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jettaraon Ave., MB. FL 33130
Tat 530-4112
Rabbi Dr. Janoda Masbar
Cantor Nlaaim Benyamini
Dallyeervtcee0am and7p.m
Sat.fcHa-m
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 SW. 120th Street
230-2001 /
Rabbi David H. Auarbach
Cantor Howard Bander
Cantor Saul Meieels
Friday aervlce p.m
SHAARAY TEFILLAM
ol North Miami Baach
071 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENOALL
382-0896
Rabbi Warren Kasitl Modem ortnodo.
Sat. 0: JO a.m. aervlce at Temple Samu-EI.
SJSJ SW 152 Ave S. at N. Kern
Itondall Dr.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 530 7231
Chase Ave. 8 41 t St u*ora<
D*. LtOH KRONISH, Founding Senior Rabbi
GARY A. QLICKSTEIN. Rabbi
HARRY JOLT, Au.Hlary Rabbi
PAUL 0 CARL AN, Aeeteiant Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID CONVIStR
Frlda aervlce I p.m.
Sat 10: 5 am Service
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L Brown, Exec Director
Dally Sorvlcoa: Mon.Fn 7 JO am
4 5 JO p.m., Frt Lata Service
8 p.m.: Sal 0 2S am 8 JO p m .
Sun ti m AS SO p.m.. Frt.
Shavuoth June 12. 7:45 p.m
[ft)
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dada's Reform Congreoatior
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frt. 7:JO p-m. Hebrew School tudanta
will receive Certrttcatee Ot Completion
CMMnan with btrthda ys In June and July
will be honored
Sat. a.m. Bar Mitzvah. Ryan PhHIlpa
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millet Or Conservative
2712311 >?*
Or Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi wPf
Benjamin Adler. Cantor
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan 7 am. Monday A Thuteday.
Sunday 9 a.m., Frt., 8:15p.m.
Sabbath earn will be conducted by temples
centers. "Minyanaires". Sat 9 a m Sabbath
Sen Teitler Chapel


Foreclosure Sales Public Notices
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-6174
SEC. M
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE CORPORATION,
United State* corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
EDDIE E. ANGULO and MARY
ANGULO, hn wife, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY-THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
F.lrida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 27th day of Jane. 1986. the
following described property:
Lot 19. in Block 56, of NOR-
WOOD FOURTH ADDITION,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 57. at
Page 93. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 3rd day of Jane.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.; Suit* 800
Miami. FL 33137
Published 6/6-13
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
Di THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-40(54
SEC 18
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
FELIX RODRIGUEZ, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of j
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY-THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on.
the 27th day of June, 1986. the
following described property:
Lot 4, in Block 3. of FAIRWAY
LAKE SOUTH SECTION ONE.
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 71, at
Paga 64, of the Public Record, of
Dad* County, Florida.
Pursuant to 28 U.S.C.S. 2410(e).
the Defendant, United States of
America, shall nave a right of
redemption for a period of 120
days from the date of sale.
DATED the 3rd day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin. P.A.
3050 Biacayne Blvd.. Suite 800
Miami, FL 33137
Published 6/6-13
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33392
SEC. 18
BUCKEYE FEDERAL SAV-
INGS LOAN ASSOCIATION,
an Ohio corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
JOSE M. LEDON and TANIA M.
LEDON. his wife.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY-THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 27th day of June, 1986, the
following described property:
Lot 24. in Block 32, of COUN-
TRY LAKE MANORS, SEC-
TION THREE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 119. at Page 50. of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 3rd day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. FL 33137
Published 6/6-13
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of The Parcel Place at
number 14121 SW 66th Street No.
' ;-4, in the City of Miami. Florida,
intends to register the said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
Dates at Miami, Florida, this 6
day of May of 1986.
AL MART OF MIAMI. INC.
By: Alan Febeah, Vice President
19786 May 16,23. 30;
June 6. 1986
NOTICE
SERVICES TO PERSONS
UNABLE TO PAY THEREFOR
SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL
AND MEDICAL CENTER
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
The Bureau of Community Medical
Facilities, Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services, State
of Florida, has established the sum
of $18,110.00 as the level of un-
compensated services to be made
available by South Shore Hospital
and Medical Center in the period of
June 1, 1986 to May 31. 1987.
This determination has been made
pursuant to the requirements of
the regulations of the Public
Health Service, U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare
(42 CFR, 53.111) and the ap-
plicable provisions of Florida
Medical Facilities Construction
Plan.
"Uncompensated services" means
services available in the facility
which are made available to per-
sons unable to pay therefor
without charge or at a charge
which is less than the reasonable
cost of such services. The level of
such services is measured by the
difference between the amount
paid by such persons for the ser-
vices and the reasonable cost
thereof.
The level set out above meets the
presumptive compliance guidelines
of the federal regulations and is 10
percent of all federal assistance
provided the facility under the
Hospital and Medical Facilities
Construction Act.
South Shore Hospital and Medical
Center has the right to determine
how, when, and to whom hospital
services will be provided.
There are no guidelines which
positively identify a person or
family as eligible to receive full or
partial uncompensated services.
Each case must be evaluated on its
own merits.
19842 June 6,1986
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-53370
SEC. 12
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
EDMUNDO ARGUELLO and
DORAMALIA ARGUELLO. his
wife, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 27th day of June. 1986. the
following described property:
Lot 7. in Block 11. of LAKES OF
THE MEADOW. SECTION
ONE, as recorded in Plat Book
118. at Page 7. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
DATED the 3rd day of June,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.: Suite 800
Miami. FL 33137
Published 6/6-13

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DANCEWORKS OF
MIAMI at 9290 SW. 150 Avenue.
No. 401. Miami. Florida 33196 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dude County, Florida.
Lana Brown
1 May 23.30;
June 6,13,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2486
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JULIA MOUCKEREZI
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Julia Mouckerezi, deceased, File
Number 86-2486 (01), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 6, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Charles Mack
1900 North 42nd Avenue
Hollywood, FL 33021
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Judith A. Frankel
960 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Suite 116
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 674-1313
19839 June 6. 13, 1986
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-32974
SEC. 18
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
RICHARD WARREN
CALLAHAN, and the unknown
spouse, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County.
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 27th day of June, 1986. the
following described property:
Lot 27. in Block 11. of RICH-
MOND TOWNHOUSE, accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 97, at
Page 26. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 3rd day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.: Suite 800
Miami. FL 33137
Published 6/6-13
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-36681
SEC. 09
STOCKTON. WHATLEY,
DAVIN COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
BEVERLY C. DIXON and
WINSTON DIXON. her husband.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY-THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 27th day of June. 1986. the
following described property:
Lot 2. in Block 1. of VISTA
VERDE CLUSTERS UNIT ONE.
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 106. at
Page 19. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 3rd day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A.
3050 Biscayne Blvd.: Suite 800
Miami FL 33137
Published 6/6-13

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-8750 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
OS
' '
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name MARITIME FOOD
SERVICES at 3300 N.W. 67th
Street, Miami, Florida 33147 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
CARRIAGE HOUSE
DISTRIBUTORS, INC., a Florida
corporation
MYERS, KENIN, LEVINSON A
RICHARDS
Attorneys for CARRIAGE
HOUSE DISTRIBUTORS. INC.
1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33181
19819 May 23, 30,
June 6. 13, 1986
.....
PATRICIA VALENCIANO. and
the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by,
through, under or against her.
Defendants.
TO: Patricia Valenciano, whose
residence is unknown, and
the unknown parties who
may be spouses, heirs.
devisees, grantees.
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said
Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive.
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 90. in Block 2, of
BARBELLA
SUBDIVISION. FIRST
ADDITION, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 91. at Page 34. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire of
Rosenthal & Yarchin. PA.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff. Suite 80o[
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami
Florida 33137, on or before July 7,
1986, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on May 28. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
19831 June 6. 13, 20, 27, 1986
'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-23753 (14)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MICHAEL A. FLEISCHER.
husband,
and
YUTAKA SEITO FLEISCHER,
wife.
TO: Yutaka Seito Fleischer
Residende Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Arthur H. Lipson.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 801 Northeast 167
Street, Miami, Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
July 11, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 4th day of June, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By JENNIS L. RUSSELL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19846 June 6. 13, 20, 27, 1986
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAI
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADF
COUNTY. FLORIDA 4
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-11493
SEC. 16
STOCKTON, WHATLEY
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florid,
corporation,
Plaintiffls)
vs.
MARVIN MALNICK and
MURIEL MALNICK. his wife, et
al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on THE TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour
thouse in Miami, Dade Countv
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 27th day of June, 1986. the
following described property
Lot 20. in Block 20. of' NOR-
WOOD FIRST ADDITION, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, n _t
recorded in Plat Book 53. at
Page 56. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 3rd dav of June
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
3050 Biscayne Blvd.; Suite 800
Miami. FL 33137
Published 6/6-13

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name VALDES IN-
TERIORS Company at 1350 NW
32 Ct.. Miami. Fla. 33125 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
19835 June 6, 13.20.27. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Al CLEAN CAR
RENTAL at 9815 NW 27th
Avenue, Miami, FL 33147, intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
A.J.O.
IMPORT 4 EXPORT, INC.
A Florida corporation
19818 May 23, 30;
June 6,13,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1332
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVE HART
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Dave Hart, deceased. File
Number 86-1332. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 Witt
Flagler Street. Miami, FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representatives and the
personal representatives' attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and. (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representatives, venue.
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 6, 1986.
Personal Representatives:
Ruth Hart Gold
9 Island Avenue, No. 1108
Miami Beach. FL 33139
AND
Ira Bigman
7800 Red Road. Suite 206
South Miami, FL 33143
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
Abraham M. Mora. Esquire
1401 Forum Way, 7th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (305) 686-8100
19847
June 6. 13. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name THOMAS QUAR
TIANO DBA. "TQ ENTER
PRISES" at 718 N.E. 82 Terrace,
Miami. Fla. 33138 intends to
register said names with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
THOMAS QUARTIAN0
May 30;
June 6,13,20.1986

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Friday, June 6, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
iblic Notices
/the circuit court of
r.lF ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
VlRCUT OF FLORIDA IN
VnP FOR DADE COUNTY
,\ NEKAL JURISDICTION
Gfc DIVISION 17
CASE NO. 86-19299
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
.gYERHAEUSER
I0RTGAGE
OMPANY.
plaintiff
ms LOPEZ /k/ LUIS
S,'AK LOPEZ, etal..
Defendants.
,) LUIS LOPEZa/k/a
AS OSCAR LOPEZ
g08 Blurt Lane
hur Springs, MD
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
Don for Foreclosure of Mortgage
(he following described
Sffiiber 2101, in VISTA DEL
XflO CONDOMINIUM. PHASE
"a Condominium according to the
Itclsration of Condominium
gnof U recorded in Official
l^is Book 11089, at Page 910,
| :h< Public Records of Dade
\iiintv Florida, and amendments
hereto, together with an undivid-
,j interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto, all
M set out in said Declaration of
Condominium.
Iias been filed against you and you
,re required to serve a copy of
tour written defenses, if any, to it,
gp Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
13 June, 1986 and file the original
ith the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
igainst you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand the seal of thjs
Court this 7 day of May. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
19790 May 16. 23. 30;
June 6, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 86-22651
IN RE; The Marriage of
METHELUS ARICE.
Petitioner/
is.
alSLENE ARICE,
Respendent/
TO; GISLENE ARICE
Delmas 19
Rue Makandal, Haiti
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before July 7. 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered.
May 28, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By E. Seidl
19834 June 6. 13.20, 27, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artie* No. 86-23651
Family Division 06
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARJORIE BARNABY,
Petitioner.
and
B0NZY BARNABY.
Respondent,
TO: BONZY BARNABY
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
gainst you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on MELVIN
iJ ASHER, ESQ.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 825
South Bayshore Drive. Suite 543.
Miami. FL 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July 11,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
Wition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Jennis L. Russell
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
!843 June 6, 13,20.27, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
BADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PC CASE NO. 86-20645
W RE: The Marriage of
r LUCIE QIIESTA JEAN-
PIERRE
Petitioner/Wife,
vs
PHILOME JEAN-PIERRE,
Respondent/Husband.
T0: PHI LOME JEAN-
^'ERRE, Residence unknown,
**U serve copy of your Answer to
* Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 N. W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida
1, and file original with Court
' uerk on or before June 20, 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered.
Uated May 15. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By CLARINDA BROWN
*05 May 23.30;
June 6. 13, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-21270 FC20
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ERIC MC COY.
Petitioner
and
PATRICIA MC COY,
Respondent
TO: PATRICIA MC COY
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN, ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 309 420 Lincoln
Road Miami Beach. Florida 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before June 27, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23 day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
Suite 309 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
19826 May 30;
June 6,13,20, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-50383 FC 14
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FRANCOIS NMN
ALEXANDRE.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MARIE CHARLESTINE
ALEXANDRE,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Respondent/Wife
MARIE CHARLESTINE
ALEXANDRE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
defenses, if any, to it on Jack
Druckman, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is Suite
315. 633 N.E. 167th Street. North
Miami Beach, Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
June 13th, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
IEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
if said court at Miami. Florida on
this 9th day of May. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Jack Druckman
Suite 315
633 N.E. 167th Street
North Miami Beach. Florida 33162
Telephone. (305) 652-0538
19792 May 16. 23. 30;
June 6, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-20425 05
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROBERT FISHER.
Petitioner/Husband
ind
FREDA ELIZABETH FISHER.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Freda Elisabeth Fisher
18447 Kennedy Street
Salinas, California 93906
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
JACK J. TAFFER. ESQUIRE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 3301 N. E. 2nd Avenue,
Miami. Florida 33137, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
20th, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16th day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By John Branda
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JACK J. TAFFER. ESQ.
3301 N. E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33137
(305) 576-6300
Attorney for Petitioner
19803 May 23.30;
June 6.13,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-19943
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
CLODOALDO NAVARRO. et
ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: AMERICAN SAVINGS ANL
LOAN ASSOCIATION
343 E. Main Street
Stockton. CA 95202
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 28, Block 2, of LAKE
LAURENCE ESTATES.
FIRST ADDITION,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 68.
at Page 59. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or about
June 13th. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of his Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 12th day of May,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
19797 May 16. 23, 30;
June 6,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Audio Visual
Language, Inc. d/b/a West Finance
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Audio Visual Language. Inc.
19798 May 16. 23, 30;
June 6,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-19470
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
BARBARA JOANNE BUTLER
Petitioner,
and
DALLAS ELTON BUTLER,
Respondent.
TO: DALLAS ELTON BUTLER
Woltogenstr. 17
1000 Berlin 37
GERMANY (49-30-801-3247)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
SUPPORTAND
MAINTENANCE NOT CON
NECTED WITH DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on IRVING J. WHITMAN, ES-
QUIRE, of the Law Firm of
WHITMAN, WOLFE. GROSS 4
SCHAFFE1. PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 10651
North Kendall Drive, Suite 200
Miami, Florida U.S.A. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before 13 June,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 8 day of May. 1986.
RICHAR P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
IRVING J WHITMAN
10661 North Kendall Drive.
Suite. 200
Miami. Florida 33176 U.S.A.
(Phone) (305) 279-7000
19789 "tu/ysi
June 6, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2948
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUDITH CHARLOTTE BRODY,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JUDTIH CHARLOTTE
BRODY. deceased. File Number
86-2948, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 30, 1986.
Personal Representative:
NICHOLAS VERT
230 Pelham Road
New Rochelle, N.Y. 10805
E. PETER GOLDRING
4560 Prairie Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
AGNES VERT
230 Pelham Road
New Rochelle, New York 10805
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 305-672-3100
19825 May 30; June 6, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-22153 FC01
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLORIA J. SOLOMON,
Petitioner,
and
ALONZO K. SOLOMON
Respondent.
TO: ALONZO K. SOLOMON
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN, ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road Suite
309 Miami Beach, FL 33139 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
July 11, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 3 day of June. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Syuite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1156
19845 June 6,13,20. 27, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-20644
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE GINETTE DUCLAIR.
Petitioner,
and
PIERRE L. DUCLAIR.
Respondent.
TO: PIERRE L. DUCLAIR,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 N. W.
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before June 20, 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered.
Dated May 15, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: CLARINDA BROWN
19806 May 23. 30;
June 6, 13. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-13519 (01)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
j KARYN SHIRLEY FINN,
Petitioner
and
WILLIE JAMES FINN.
Respondent.
TO: WILLIE JAMES FINN
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 309 420 Lincoln
Road Miami Beach. FL 33139 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
June 20. 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
Suite 309 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
19810 May 23, 30;
June 6,13, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-25*0
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
DOROTHY GREENE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DOROTHY GREENE,
deceased, File Number 86-2950, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interests person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 6, 1986.
Personal Representative:
SHARON GOLDBERG
421 E. DiLido Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
NELSON & FELDMAN. PA.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-5716
19K3X June 6, 13, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-20643
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROMAIN CYRIAQUE,
Petitioner,
and
JUDY CYRIAQUE
Respondent.
TO:JUDY CYRIAQUE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 N. W.
12th Avenue, Miami, Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before June 20. 1986.
otherwise a default will be entered.
Dated May 15. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: CLARINDA BROWN
19807 May 23, 30;
June 6.13. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-15475 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
KISSONDATH MAHARAJ, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: KISSONDATH MAHARAJ
41 Ruf Blenac
97200 Fort de France
Martinique
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Condominium Parcel No.
301. located in BUILDING
8887 of PINESIDE
CONDOMINIUM NO. 2.
together with an undivided
interest as Tenant in
Common in the Common
Elements and the Limited
Common Elements
appurtenant thereto
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof as
recorded in Official Records
Book 9132, at Page 1821, and
in Condominium Plan Book
47. at Page 2. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
! Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
;June 20th, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 19th day of May,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
19814 May 23. 30;
June 6, 13. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name "MISS COLOMBIA
U.S.A." at 5206 S.W. 139 Avenue
Road, Miami, Florida 33175, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Esther Castro. President
Ludis Castro. Treasurer
19820 May 30;
June 6. 13, 20, 1986


** *\**j viuic u, i^mi
Public Notices)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 86-9274 CA 21
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL HOME LOAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a
United States corporation. ,
Plaintiff
vs. j
LUIS JOSE CASTANEDA and !
MARIA M CASTANEDA. his
wife, and the unknown heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by,
through, under or against them.
Defendants.
TO: Luis Jose Castaneda and
Maria M. Castaneda, his
wife, whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be heirs,
devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
t. title, or interest in the
property herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 3. m Block 73, of
DEVON-AIRE VILLAS,
SECTION EIGHT, according
to the Plat thereof, aa
recorded in Plat Book 111, at
Page 8, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin, P.A.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3060 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33187, on or before June
20th, 1986, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on May 19th. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
19813 May 23, 30;
June 6, 13, 1986

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-22606 06
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GERTRUDE BETHEA.
Petitioner,
and
WILLIAM BETHEA.
Respondent.
TO: WILLIAM BETHEA
267 Martense Street
Brooklyn, New York 11226
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been I
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
KENNETH C. BRONCHICK,
ESQ., LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A., 3000 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 315, Miami,
Florida 33137, Attorney for
Petitioner, and file the original
with the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before July 11, 1986.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint or
Petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said court at Miami, Florida, this
28th day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Lisamarie Marcano
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
KENNETH C. BRONCHICK,
ESQ.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT. P.A.
3000 Biscayne Blvd.. Suite 315
Miami. Florida 33137
19832 June 6. 13.20.27,19861
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-14898 (All
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GMAC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION OF PA, f/k/a
COLONIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICE COMPANY OF
CALIFORNIA.
Plaintiff
vs.
N.E.B.A. CORPORATION, et al..
Defendants.
TO: N.E.B.A. CORPORATION
c/o Empire Corporate Kit
Company
328 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 3. Block 9. of ORCHARD
VILLA EXTENSION,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 17,
at Page 55, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
June 20, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 19th day of May,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19812 May 23,30;
June 6, 13,1986
IN THE COUNTY COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-1068 SP 24
LINDA RAMOS,
Plaintiff
-v-
BARBARO ESPINDULA and
FLORIDA INSURANCE
GUARANTY ASSOCIATION
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Defendant
BARBARO ESPrNDULA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a complaint for damages and
to determine ownership of $1,041.
26 now held by defendant Florida
Insurance Guaranty Association
has been filed in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on William O'Neil, attorney for
plaintiff whose address is 1111
Lincoln Rd No. 505. Miami Beach,
FI. 33139 and file the original with
the clerk of this court on or before
June 17, 1986, or appear at 2:00
P.M. on that date at this court, 100
Meridian Ave.. Miami Beach. Fl.
Otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint. This notice
shall be published once each week
for 4 consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court at Miami Beach, Florida
this 25th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of Court
By Alina Vallenilla
as Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
William O'Neil III
1111 Lincoln Rd No. 505
Miami Beach, Fl, 33139
19793 May 16,23, 30
June 6,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Best Battery Service,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Luis Ferrates
19828 May 30;
June 6, 13,20, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TV. Classified at 728
NE 72 Street, Miami, Florida
33138. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Big Wilson
19830 June 6,13, 20,27, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2860
Division (01)
Florida Bar No. 357510
IN RE:ESTATE OF
ROSE AVRICH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ROSE
AVRICH, deceased. File Number
86-2860 Division 01, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Dr. Paul H. Avrich, whose ad-
dress is 425 Riverside Drive Apt.
15-K, New York. New York 10025.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: May
30, 1986.
Dr. Paul H. Avrich
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Rose Avrich
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Law Offices of Joseph W. Malek
Steven A. Greenspan, Esquire
350 Lincoln Road Suite 501
Miami Beach Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4431
19824 May 30. June 6. 1986
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Phone (305) 532-1155
19804 May 23,30;
June 6, 13,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-19982 FC 15
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
BEVERLY WHITE
LAWRENCE,
Petitioner
and
NKRUMAH LAWRENCE.
Respondent.
TO: NKRUMAH LAWRENCE
2935 Holland Avenue
Apt. 4D
Bronx. New York 10467
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
ny, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln Road
- Suite 309, Miami Beach, FL
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 20th, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15th day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 86-13625 CA 21
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSE I. GONZALEZ; LUZ M.
MALDONADO a/k/a LUZ M.
GONZALEZ, and the unknown
spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against her;
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA; ACCREDITED
SURETY AND CASUALTY
COMPANY, INC.. a Florida
corporation; CHRISTINA
PALACIOS; KEMPER
INSURANCE COS., a foreign
corporation; CAPITAL
ASSOCIATES, INC., a Florida
corporation; DELTA
LABORATORIES, INC.. a
Florida corporation THE PUBLIC
HEALTH TRUST OF DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, an agency
and instrumentality of Dade
County, Florida, which operates
JACKSON MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL; STATE OF
FLORIDA. DEPARTMENT OF
REVENUE; HOUSEHOLD
FINANCE CORPORATION, an
Illinois corporation; KARL
KNIGHT; and FEDERATED
DEPARTMENT STORES. INC.
d/b/a/ BURDINES. an Ohio
corporation.
Defendants.
TO: Lux M. Maldonado a/k/a Lux
M. Gonzalez, whose residence
it unknown, and the
unknown parties who may he
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
said Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 18, in Block 20, of
KINGS GARDENS
SECTION THREE.
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 95,
at Page 30, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A..
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before July 7,
1986, and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on May 27, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
19827 May 30;
June 6, 13. 20, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1514
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSA BEGACH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ROSA BEGACH deceased.
File Number 86-1514 (01), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. 3rd floor. Miami, Florida
33130. The name and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 23. 1986.
Personal Representative:
CARLOS ARETZ
32-04 208th Street
Bayside, New York
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: 374-3116
19799 May 23. 30. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
THE KISSELL COMPANY,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN M. ZAKSZEWSKA. et
ux et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JOHN M. ZAKSZEWSKA
and JEANNINE C.
ZAKSZEWSKA. his wife
Rt 4 Box 304
Northwood, N.H. 03261
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 6, in Block 28. of
ROYALE GREEN
TOWNHOUSE SECTION
SEVEN, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 94, at Page 90, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146, on cr before
June 13th. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of his Court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 12th day of May.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
197% May 16.23. 30;
June 6, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nubaer 86-2724
Division 03
IN RE. ESTATE OF
EVA MICHAELIS
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate
of EVA MICHAELIS. deceased.
File Number 86-2724. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 30, 1986.
Personal Representative:
KATE JOSEPH
34 Shawnee Trail
Sparta. New Jersey 07871
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HENRY NORTON
1201 Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
19829 May 30;
June 6. 1986
r
u
%
'e

NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNT)
Civil Action No. 86-20466 FC 04
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LAZARO A HEVIA,
Petitioner
and
ROXANNE M. HEVIA.
Respondent
TO: ROXANNE M. HEVIA
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED Jiat a petition fr
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses if
any. to it on USHER BRYN, ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 309 420 Lincoln
Road Miami Beach, FL 33139 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
June 27. 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal \j
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ. j
Suite 309 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Phone) (306) 632-1165
19821 May 30;
June 6.13.20, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-20465 FC 29
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
VTVTAN OKERE.
Petitioner
and
CHIKA OKERE,
Respondent
TO: CHIKA OKERE
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on USHER
BRYN. ESQ. attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 420 Lin-
coln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach.
FL 33139 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 27, 1986; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21 day of May. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 5321155
19823 May 30;
June 6, 13,20,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Cut No. -FC- 86-21979-25
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
MARIE M. THEODORE
Petitioner
and
FRITZ THEODORE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FRITZ THEODORE,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I J
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 YE
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162. on
or before June 27 1986 and file tnr
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will I*' .'ntcre..
against you.
19822 May-Jo.
June 6.13.20. 1966


Friday, June 6, 1986/Trw Jewish Flondan Pf I

Lev Bronshtein Dead At 51
m
-*
ilichael Guld (left) and his father, Howard Guld, who head a firm
at helps Jewish families who are relocating find the right pro-
>rtu and make the right contacts to ease their transition to a new
ewish community. There is no charge to the families for the ser-
ice offered by Guld and Associates, Inc., headquartered in
jleigh. North Carolina.
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
KILE NUMBER: 86-3077
DIVISION 04
Florida Bar No. 212229
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MIGUEL RUIZ.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSON9*'HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
VOL' ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MIGUEL
RI'IZ. deceased, File Number
86-3077, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Pi Lte Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33133. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is AMELIA RUIZ whose address
is 15033 S.W. 302nd Terrace,
Leisure City, Florida 33033. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
iemands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
KIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
fflaj have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dreai of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
Rated If the claim is contingent or
.nli(|unlated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
lain) is secured, the security shall
ri!>ed. The claimant shall
ieiiver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
'ierk tii mail one copy to each per-
'epresentative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
I'ATE OF THE FIRST
1'1'BLICATION OF THIS
N"TICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AM) OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
T>ated of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
June 6, 1986.
Amelia Ruiz
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Miguel Ruiz
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ROSS ROSENBERG, P.A.
ne Datran Center-Suite 910
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33156
(305)667-1000
19*41 June 6, 13. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 86-19220 Div. 06
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 014496
IN RE:
CORDELLA MARTIN and
MONIQUE MARTIN;
MERCHELLE MARTIN; DAVID
MARTIN; and HAROLD
MARTIN, minors through their
mother and legal guardian,
CORDELLA MARTIN.
YOU, DAVID MARTIN,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for change of name with the Clerk
of the above Court and serve a
copy thereof upon the petitioner's
attorneys, Law Office of Herman
Cohen & Martin Cohen, 622 S. W.
1st Street. Miami, Florida, 33130.
on or before July 7, 1986, or else
petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this May 30, 1986.
Richard P. Brinker,
Clerk, Circuit Court
By DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19837 June 6, 13. 20,27. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-22916
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MILLICENT M. CLARKE
BAXTER,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JAMES P. BAXTER.
Respondent/ H usband.
TO: JAMES P. BAXTER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
DAVID S. BERGER, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is No.
1707, New World Tower, 100
North Biscayne Blvd., Miami.
Florida 33132, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before July 7th. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 30th day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
LAW OFFICES OF
BERNSTEIN & BERGER
100 North Biscayne Blvd.
New World Tower No. 1707
Miami, Florida 33132
Telephone: (305) 371-4555
19836 June 6, 13.20.27, 1986
NEW YORK (JTA) Lev
Bronshtein, a prominent activist
from Leningrad, died recently at
the age of 51, it was reported here
by the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry. He applied for an
exit visa 10 years ago but was
refused permission to emigrate.
An engineer, he was demoted
from his position following his ap-
BLOOM. Ferdinand S.. of Bay Harbor
Island, June 2. The Riverside.
FEIGENBAUM, Nathan of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
ORNSTEIN. Ethel of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
GERKOWIN, Selma, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
LESNICK, lsak Rubin Zilbert.
SILOW, Joseph, May 27. Services were
held.
SOCKOWITZ, Sam, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
STECKER. Moms (Moe) of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
WILD, Jeffrey Scott, 26, of North Miami
Beach. The Riverside.
JACOB, Dov. of Miami Beach, May 28.
Blasberg Chapel.
FRIEDMAN. Harry M.. of Miami Beach.
June 1. Blasberg Chapel.
KAPLAN, Solomon, 75, Cmdr. C.E.C., U.S.
Naval Reserve Ret., May 31. Services
were held in Virginia with interment at
Arlington National Cemetery.
ROBBINS, Mae. 72. of Miami. June 1. Ser-
vices were held.
SCHWARTZ, Jennie Cohen. 90. Services
held in North Carolina.
BERNNER, Harry. 89, of Coral Gables,
May. 29. Services were held.
RESNIK. Lena L.. 80, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
HALBRICH. Louis Sidney. Services were
held.

t e c a 6
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
plication for an exit visa Bronsh-
tein instructed many other
refuseniks on their legal right-
regarding emigration. He als<>
gave seminars to more than 50
people and wrote some articU-
about his field of expertise He
suffered from high blood pressure
and was bed-ridden for several
weeks in the spring of 1984.
BRENNER. Nathan, 83. of Miami Brarh
May 26 The Riverside
COHEN. Mildred Rubin Zilbert
FRIEDMAN. Esther, of Miami Bearh
Rubin Zilbert.
GROH. Leonard. 71. of Miami. May 11 The
Riverside.
SCHM1ER. Rose. 75, of Kendall. Mat II
Services were held.
SHEPPERD, Lewis A MI). 7u. of Bay
Harbor Island, May 25 The Riverside
SOMMER, Fanny, of Miami Beach, May 27
The Riverside.
SZAJNZYCHT, Miriam, of Miami Beach
Rubin Zilbert
RICE. Caroline R (Lindy). 81 The
Riverside.
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GROSSMAN Frank, at of
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Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
532-2099
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CHAPEL #
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Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
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Pre-Arrangements
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feg?16"?___The Jewish Floridian/Fridav. June 6, 1986
Grand Opening
A Place
to Love Life.

New beginnings start here. Ele^ant d,nine
- Wellness Center.
Activity friendship, service and luxury. These
are the beginnings awaiting you at Northpark, a
beautiful new adult rental community where
every detail has been planned for your comfort
and peace of mind, including:
Luxurious One and Two-Bedroom apartments.
bocial/recreational activities.
Extensive indoor and outdoor recreational and
physical fitness facilities.
NOHTlfflVlK Levitt Retirement Communities, Inc
3490 Sheridan Street
Hollywood, FL 33021
fes, 1 am interested in learning more about Northpark
rne prestigious adult rental community in Hollywood.
Name -c
Address________
City _____,
" Slarffe,ured hid,lW limousine service.
Weekly housekeeping and laundry service.
Shopping service and delivery.
Beauty and Barber shop.
The Market Place for snacks and sundries
Complete Security System with emetgency
medical response units.
Prime Hollywood location.
No entry or endowment fee.
A<
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Rent from $1450.
These are just a few of the features that make life
carefree at Northpark. By Levitt Retirement
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, lanSSW? rental office ,s Pen dai|V JO to 5
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A prestigious adult rental cormmnity.
Levitt Retirement Communities, Inc.


June is Federation
Volunteer Appreciation Month
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Gratefully presents this
to
^itL Our (gynitlbutbr* ami (gampaLjn l&lurtteers
For dedication and acheivement
On behalf of the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency FUnd/
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign
Samuel I. Adk-r
llVSilleni
(ireiiurMi.imi Jewish Rder.iiion
Aaron Rjdhurst
(ieneral campaign chairman
KNMiCJA-IEF
Myioriu. r^rpaie
Exeeutive Viee JTesideni
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
See story, page 2


Federation salutes campaign volunteers
The 1986 Federation campaign is quickly drawing to a close, and on Sunday,
June 8 "Campaign Countdown" will conclude with a day long phonathon and
Worker Recognition Barbecue at the Federation building.
Amy Dean, "Campaign Countdown" chairman, noted that "Our volunteers
are the backbone of the Federation campaign. On June 8 we'll pay tribute to their
achievements by honoring them at this very special event."
Between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. a phonathon will be held in an effort to close
outstanding gifts. The phonathon will be followed by the Worker Recognition
Barbecue at 5 p.m. The evening gala will include klezmer music by the Jaime
Bronsztein Orchestra. There will also be dancing, award presentations and prize
drawings for volunteers who participated in the "Campaign Countdown" coupon
game. Dietary laws will be observed and children are welcome to attend.
Members of the "Campaign Countdown" Committee include: Arnold Altman
George Berliner, Pat Feldman, Howard Glass, Doug Miller, Gail Jaffe Newman'
Judge Robert H. Newman, Milton Samuels, Maxine E. Schwartz and Jaek
Werksman.
Individuals wishing to participate in the phonathon or who are planning to at
tend the recognition party should contact Miriam Zatinsky at 576-4000, exten-
sion 299.
Federation volunteers who will honored on June 8 include:
Lester Abrahamer
Eva Abrahamer
Mildred Abramowitz
David Abramowitz
Isadore Abrams
Harry Achter
Mrs. Harry Achter
Anne Ackerman
Elsie Ackerstein
Martin Adler
Michael M. Adler
Arnold Altman
Max Anker
Albert Anker
L. Jules Arkin
Alan Aronson
Barbara Aronson
Etta Aronson
James Asher
James Astor
Mickey Balsam
Stanley Bamett
Jim Baroe
Bernardo Batievskv
Lang Baumgarten
T.R. Beer
Saby Behar
Yoshua Sal Behar
Sandy Belkind
Joseph Berenhaut
Isaac Berezdivin
Mae Berezin
Helene Berkowitz
Paul Berkowitz
Richard Berkowitz
Sheva Berland
Jerome Berliner
Robert Berrin
Irving Bicofsky
.lj.ii Billig
Jacobo Biniakonsky
Stephen Bittel
Barbara Black
Jeanette Blumenthal
Tom Bonn
Benjamin Botwinick
Michael Browarnik
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Karen Brown
Jack Burstein
Herbert Canarick
Hazel Canarick
Sol Center
Pauline Charal
Jack Chester
Mario Chyzyk
Charles Citrin
Sam Cohen
Sidney Cooperman
Molly Cummings
Nathan Cutler
Ben Cutler
Irving Cypers
Felix Danziger
Morris Davidson
Amy Dean
Betty SueDekro
Dorian Denburg
Betty Dreier
Terry Drucker
Sam Dubbin
Bea Durchslag
Dr. Enrique Eiber
Lenore Elias
Milt Engelman
David Estrin
ScJFarber
Herman Farer
MyraFarr
Harry Fein
William Feinberg
Evelyn Feinberg
Dr. George Feldenkreis
Pat Feldman
Menashe Feldstein
Florence Fink
Hyman Finkelson
Michael Fischer
Ike Fisher
John Fleeman
Diana Fleeman
Sylvia Farber Freedman
Dr. Sydney Freilich
Herman Fried
Mark Friedland
Lou Friedman
Harvey Friedman
John Paul Fuller
Bernard Fuller
Morris Futernick
Sam Gale
Rabbi Nesim Gambach
SabetoGarazi
JackGeUman
Peria GUinaki
Perlita GUinaki
Ben Glass
Howard Glass
Max Gleiberman
Morton Gluckman
Barton Goldberg
Al Golden
Pauline Goldfine
Marvin Goldman
Seymour Goldstein
Martin Goodman
Dr. Morton Gooze
Dr. Elliot Gordon
Moises Gorin
Dr. Harry Graff
Max Greenberg
William Grodnick
Martin Grossman
Alex Halberstein
Joseph Handler
Joe Harmelin
Lou Harris
Sam Harte
Phyllis Harte
William Heiberger
Charlotte Held
Jonathan Heller
Jose Hern* -
Ruth Herscher
Fred Hirsch
Micki Hochberg
Joseph Hofrichter
Howard Hollander
Gary Holtzman
GuU E. Huppert
Zena Inden
Al Isaacson
Marvin Jacobson
David Jacobson
Milton Jacobson
Frank Kamen
David Kamer
Robert Kaplan
Gail Karl
Dr. Robert Karl
Mickey Karzen
Martin Kasper
Barbara Kasper
Fred Katz
Richard Katz
Herman Katz
Ezra Katz
NateKatzen
Marcos Kerbel
Ida Kesaelman
Jon Kislak
Henry Klein
Susan Kleinberg
Alan Kluger
Mrs. Eva Kokiel
Benjamin Koplovsky
Dr. Oscar Kraines
Rafael Kravac
Steven Kravitz
Sol Krevans
Bernard Landers
Dr. Paul Lane
Mrs. Paul Lane
Mollie Lantz
Norman Lawrence
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Donald E. Lefton
Edith Legum
Elizabeth Leigh
IliaLeKach
Moises Levin
Rita Levin
Dr. Arthur H. Levine
Jack H. Levine
Meyer Levinson
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Ruth Lewitter
Ken Lewitter
Norman Lieberman
Elissa Lieberman
Nancy Lipoff
Norman H. Lipoff
Freida Lipp
Liz Litowitz
Mollye Lovinger
Yacob Lubin
Peter Luria
Jose Lurie
George Malm
Annie Malka
Fay Malkin
Ellen Mandler
Abraham S. Mannes
Ben Marks
Juan Matalon
Harold Medow
Neal J. Menachen
Steve Messing
Isaac Mildenberg
Dr. Bernice Miller
Douglas Miller
Al Morrows
Stanley C. Myers
Gail Myers
Meyer Myers
Oscar Nadel
Rabbi Sadi Nahmias
Joseph Nahoum
Mort Neuman
Irwin Newman
Judge Robert H. Newman
Gail Newman
Steven Nobil
Ruth Norton
Jerry Olin
Michael Olin
Sidney Olson
Nedra Oren
Leo Pam
Harry Payton
Manuel Pearl
Herbert Pechman
Steven Peretz
Evelyn Perlman
Dorothy Podhurst
Herb Polow
Rubin I'nissin
Mrs. Rubin Prussin
Forrest Raffel
Adria Raaken
Morris Raymond
Joseph Reisel
Sy Reisman
Ruth Resnick
Dr. Elton Resnick
Dr. Felix Reyler
Elaine Richmond
Hank Rodstein
Ellen Rose
Harry Rosen
Rabbi Dow Rosencwaig
Sam Kosenfield
Elaine Ross
Mrs. Seymour Roth
Seymour Roth
Nauru Rozen
Eric Salm
Jaime Salti
Sand i Samole
David Samson
Dorothy Sandlofer
William Saulson
Howard R. Scharlin
Gloria Scharlin
Mrs. Syd Schechter
David Schemer
Joseph Schoenman
Leon Schuster
Judy Schwartz
Dr. Allen Schwartz
Morris S. Schwartz
Gerald K. Schwartz
Maxine E. Schwartz
Morns L. Schwartz
Eve Semmel
Marc Shectman
Nat Sheray
Marc Sheridan
Edward Shohat
Norman Sholk
David Shore
David Shubow
Meyer Siegel
Eileen Silberman
Susan Sirotta
David Smith
Sam Solotkin
Aaron Soroker
Guillermo Sostchin
Maurice Speigel
Mrs. Maurice Speigel
Lee Spiegel man
Leon Srago
SaulSrebnick
Ben Stein
Irving Stessel
Mrs. Shara Stock
Hoisie Stoleru
Frank Strauss
Brian Strelitz
John Sumberg
Max Sussman
Charles Treister
Belle Tuch
Mark Vogel
Salo Wagenberg
Isail Wagenberg
Salomon Wainberg
Philip Warren
Rabbi Phineas Weberman
Murray Weil. Sr.
Norman Weiner
Dr. Joseph Weinreb
Yale Weinstein
Manny Weiss
Jack Werksman
Ida Whitelaw
Stanley Whitelaw
I.eonard Wien, Jr.
Charles Wilder
Bert Winfield
Ted Wolff
Ray Ellen Yarkin
Alan Yarkin
Pola Yarmus
Leon Yarmus
Charles Yavers
Theodore Yecies
Nathan ZeUer
CONTENTS
Federation salutes its contributors and workers on June 8
ANNUAL MEETING
Leadership to be honored, new board installed on June 11
ALLIANCE DIVISION
A message from Alliance Division Chairman Herbert Canarick
Irving Stessel is Alliance phonathon champion
Photo highlights from Alliance Division events
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Marcia Sue Needle appointed new WD Director
SW Dade board to hold year end thank you brunch
Highlights from WD Annual Retreat and Installation
WD Hold the Date
Federation searches for leaders in other communities
FEDERATION SOUTH DADE BRANCH
New board announced for 1986-87
SD Relationship Committee moves ahead
South Dade happenings
2nd Annual Marilyn K. Smith Forum to feature noted rabbi
Rabbi Carl Klein elected president of Rabbinical Association
RABBI ALEXANDER S. GROSS
HEBREW ACADEMY SPECIAL INSERT
CRC/PROJECT RENEWAL
Community Relations Committee update
So. Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry presents monodrama
Miami Project Renewal delegation maps the future in Or Akiva
AGENCIES
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for Aged opens Chernin Building
Annual meeting of Holocaust Memorial Center set for June 16
Jewish Vocational Service receives award
Jewish High School of South Florida blends Judaism and hi-tech
FOUNDATION
Foundation welcomes new committee members
Women's Committee to hold thank you event at Flagler Race Track
May 7 Planning Seminar offered sound tax advice
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION
"In Quest," a teen quiz show premieres on JFTV
Look for new episodes of "Check Up/Mount Sinai"
Cablegrams
June program guide
CALENDAR/AGENCIES
Community Calendar
!??.* Sinai Medical Center researches Alzheimer's Disease
iQ^EQ7P^den!NaxTRich likes what she sees at Jewish d*y schools
1986-87 Federation Newsmagazine deadlines and publication dates
YLC/MISSIONS
Ellen Rose to be installed as YLC Chairman at June 29 event
YLC announces dates for Summer Singles Mission
Pacesetter Mission to Israel departs in September
2
3
4
6
7-10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Federation gratefully acknowledges Studio Graphics, Inc., 701 South 21st Avenue,
Suite S, Hollywood, Florida, 920-7108, for its donation of the standing heads and
banner which are a part of our new look.
2 Federation, June 1986
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
June 6, 1986 by the
?oatr Miami Jew>sh Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Fo^eSaRagTmUniCati0nS Cmmittee
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark Freedman
Assistant Editor
Ruth Korenvaes


Adler, Braman and Podhurst
to be honored June 11
Aaron Podhurst *~
to assume
presidency
"Our 48th Annual Meeting and
Dinner is bound to be a memorable
event," notes Meeting Chairman
Donald E. Lefton. "We will pay
tribute to three outstanding
leaders and have the opportunity
to install new leadership on this
occasion."
The Annual Meeting, scheduled
for Wednesday evening, June 11
at the Omni International Hotel
beginning at 6 p.m., is the single
most important business meeting
on the Federation calendar. "In
addition to conducting our
business, the Annual Meeting will
provide our Jewish community
with an opportunity to celebrate
its proud achievements of the past
year and help set the tone for the
coming year," Lefton added.
Outgoing Federation President
Samuel I. Adler will be honored,
as will the past two general
chairmen of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency
rund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaigns, Aaron Podhurst and
Norman Braman. Podhurst has
been nominated to succeed Adler
as Federation president.
The evening will also be
highlighted by the presentation of
the Stanley C. Myers Presidents
Leadership Awards. Federation
Board Member Saby Behar and
Women's Division Miami Beach
Chairwoman Adria Rasken will be
the 1986 recipients.
It's not too late to make reserva-
tions for the Annual Meeting and
Dinner. All members of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
are invited to this important
gathering, which has a couvert of
$50 person. Please contact Beth
Rubin at 576-4000, extension 269,
for reservations and information.
Aaron Podhurst, President
Samuel I. Adler, Immediate Past
President
Norman Braman, Vice President
Steven J. Kravitz, Vice
President
Donald E. Lefton, Vice
President
Nancy Lipoff,
President
Vice
Forrest Raffel,
President
Vice
Howard R. Scharlin,
Vice President
Maxine E.
Secretary
Schwartz,
Herbert Canarick,
Associate Secretary
Michael M.
Treasurer
Alder,
Alex Halberstein,
Associate Treasurer
Myron J. Brodie, Ex-
ecutive Vice President
Elected Board Members
aby Behar
lelene Berger
effrey L. Berkowitz
Ivin Lloyd Brown
ack Burstein
my Dean
fry Drucker
Ivin Entin
vra Farr
rris Futernick
ary Gerson
oldie R. Goldstein
Ifred Golden
seph Handleman
harlotte Held
elvin L. Kartzmer
zra Katz
Shepard King
Jeffrey Lefcourt
William Lehman, Jr.
Frances B. Levey
Jack H. Levine
Joel Levy
Norman Lieberman
Ellen Mandler
Gerald Olin
Sidney Olson
Michael Scheck
Gerald K. Schwartz
Norman Sholk
Elaine Silverstein
Robert Traurig
Eric Turetsky
Philip T. Warren
Appointed by the President
Jack Bellock
Richard Berkowitz
Tom Borin
Ben Botwinick
Sidney Cooperman
Pat P. Fine
Mark Friedland
Martin Goodman
Dr. George S. Wise
Past Presidents Serving
on the Board
As Required in Bylaws
Samuel Harte
Gail Newman
Michael Olin
Rowland Schaefer
David Schaecter
Sid Shneider
John Sumberg
Norman Weiner
L. Jules Arkin
David B. Fleeman
Sidney Lefcourt
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Norman H. Lipoff
Stanley C. Myers
Harry B. Smith
Trustees
Leonard L. Abess, Sr.
Theodore Baumritter
Shepard Broad
Howard Kane
Aaron M. Kanner
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Ralph Levitz
Irving Norry
Muriel Russell
Mendell M. Selig
William D. Singer
Fay Stein
Carl Weinkle
Administrative Committee Chairman
Building Operations Committee Chairman
Bylaws and Governance Committee Chairman
Campaign Steering Committee Chairman
Communications Committee Chairman
Community Relations Committee Chairman
Federation Agency Relationships Committee
Chairman
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Chairman
GMJF South Dade Branch Chairman
Human Resources Development Committee
Chairman
Long Range Campaign Planning Chairman
Multiple Appeals Committee Chairman
Nominating Committee Chairman
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami
Vice President
Planning and Budget Committee Chairman
Treasurers Committee Chairman
Women's Division President
Young Leadership Council Chairman
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
President
Central Agency for Jewish Education
President
College Student Representative
Hillel Jewish Student Center President
Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami
President
Jewish Family Service President
Jewish Vocational Service President
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
President
Mt. Sinai Medical Center Chairman of the Board
Norman Braman
Ralph Chemin
FredK. Shochet
Donald E. Lefton
Forrest Raffel
Jeffrey L. Berkowitz
Irving Cypen
Martin Kalb
Norman Lieberman
Arthur Horowitz
Philip T. Warren
Eli Timoner
Norman H. Lipoff
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Jonathan Kislak
Harvey Friedman
Dorothy Podhurst
Ellen Rose
Judge Ronald Friedman
Nan Rich
Robin Prever
Barry S. Yarchin
Neal J. Menachem
Jeffrey Newman
Shirley Spear
Harold Beck
Cal Kovens
Federation, June 1986 3


Chairman evaluates Alliance Division's first year

By Herb Caaarick
As Alliance Division Chairman. I'd
like to share with you some reflec-
tions on the Division's first year of
progress. When I think about why we
formed the Division and the goals we
set forth for its first year. I can say
with great satisfaction that we have
succeeded most admirably. This first
year has been an outstanding one in
terms of both funds raised for the
Federation campaign and in terms of
the outstanding community leaders
who have emerged as a result of
Alliance Division activities.
Prior to the Division's inception
last year. Federation concentrated its
campaign efforts in selected areas,
with each townhouse. hi-rise and con-
dominium staging its own
UJ A/Federation campaign. More
than half of the hi-rise communities in
Greater Miami didn't even have
organized structures in which to
stage campaigns. We felt that this
situation made our Greater Miami
Jewish community seem disjointed
rather than as a single, unified entity.
Therefore, the Alliance Division's
major goals for 1985-86 were to bring
together these individual con-
dominiums within a structure that
reflected a much needed sense of
overall Jewish community, and to
bring the Federation message and
campaign to previously unaffiliated
buildings. In both of these goals, we.
as a Division and as caring
individuals, have achieved great
success.
I cannot begin to describe to you
the special feelings of ruaeh and
brotherhood I shared time and time
again with members of new Alliances
who joined together for the first time
for the common goal of aiding their
fellow Jews through the Federation
campaign.
Our first Alliance, which brought
together residents of Admiral's Port
and Commodore Plaza under the
newly organized structure of the
Division, holds a special place in my
heart. Leaders from both of these
buildings were committed to making
the Alliance work, even though
nothing of the sort had ever before
been attempted. We took a risk in
making this change from the old
campaign structure, and it paid off.
The Alliance was so successful that it
sparked all of the other Alliances
which followed.
Since that first Admiral's
Port'Commodore Plaza Alliance
event early this year, the Division has
held 22 major events for its
constituent Alliances. Prime
examples of this new spirit of
cooperation and community are the
Alliance North Premier Event and
the "Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance
Event. Each of these brought
together residents of 10
condominiums for the purpose of
making a massive and unified
statement of solidarity on behalf of
the Federation and our fellow Jews.
In addition to holding campaign
events, the Alliance Division brought
together many people for other types
of special events. Highlighting the
past year were a "mini mission" in
which we visited several of the
Federation's local beneficiary
agencies to see our community's
campaign dollars at work, a special
t'JA mission to Washington. D.C..
and a series of educational
workshops.
Each of these successes attest, in
no small way. to the community's
acceptance "of the concept and
philosophy of the Alliance Division. I
hope and expect that during the
Division's second year I will be able to
announce many more such joint
ventures. This forming of joint
campaigns not only indicates
acceptance of the Alliance Division
philosophy, but also reinforces the
Federation's 1986 campaign theme.
"One People. One Destiny."
My goal for the future of the
Alliance Division is. through our
campaign, to "practice what we
preach." We. as Jews no matter
how diverse our backgrounds, beliefs
and lifestyles are truly one people
with one destiny. We are one family,
and like any family, we belong
together and are responsible for one
another.
One of the most rewarding
experiences for me during the
evolution of the Division has been
seeing a number of people who were
previously uninvolved in the
Federation emerge, through the
Division, as outstanding community
leaders. The list of dedicated and
caring individuals such as these
would be too cumbersome in this
format. But these very special people
know who they are.
I think they also know that their
help and support has been the very
thing which guided the Alliance
Division successfully through its first
This year, the Alliance Division adopted the theme "Fund Raising Can
Be Fun." These candid photos from some of the Division's 1986 campaign
events prove that the theme is true.
year. Their efforts have helped fulfill
the human service needs of countless
numbers of our fellow Jews in Miami
in Israel and throughout the world
On behalf of the Federation and its
Alliance Division. I extend mv
heartfelt thanks to each and even-
one of them. In addition. I want to
say a special "thank you" to the
Alliance Division staff which, under
the directorship of Susan Marx, built
and developed the Alliance o incept
from the ground up. With the help
and support of both the lay leaders
and staff. I have no doubt that the
future of the Alliance Division will be
even brighter than its but
rewarding past.
Stessel is Alliance phone
solicitation champ
Irving Stessel.
Alliance Division
Campaign co-
chairman for
Eldorado,
recently won a
Division
phonathon com-
petition held as
part of Federa-
tions's "Campaign Countdown" Pro-
gram, having secured 38 gifts, more
than any other Alliance Division
phonathon participant.
And what inspires Stessel to solicit
on behalf of the Federation's CJA-
IEF* "It's my obligation." he says.
"Everyone of us has to pay our dues
on behalf of our fellow Jew"? And it's
a beautiful gift when you give
because it helps in so many ways."
Stessel is president of the Simcha
Aventura B'nai B'rith Lodge, direc-
tor of the Israel Bond Drive at Aven-
tura and is a chairman of the Jewish
Vocational Service's "Kosher Meals
On Wheels" program.
One
Destiny
i$u


BBW
WD gets new executive director
Marcia Sue Needle
Federation Executive Vice Presi-
dent Myron J. Brodie is pleased to an-
nounce that Marcia Sue Needle has
been selected to serve as the new
Women's Division executive director.
Needle replaces Deborah Pollans,
who has accepted a position as an ex-
ecutive in the Mount Sinai Medical
Center Foundation Department.
Needle comes to her new position
with the Women's Division after a
year as community development
associate for the Federation South
Dade Branch. Prior to employment
with the Federation, Needle held a
position with the South County
Jewish Federation in Boca Raton,
there, she served several functions
working for the campaign in leader-
ship development and in organizing
missions to Israel.
She has also worked at the Jewish
Federation in Las Vegas, Nevada,
and as director of student activities at
the B nai B'rith Hillel Jewish Student
Center at the University of Wisconsin
in Madison.
Needle, born and reared in New
York, earned her bachelor's degree in
history and Jewish studies at
Washington University in St. Louis
Missouri, and her master's degree in
Jewish communal service from
Brandos University in Waltham,
Massachusetts.
SW Dade Board holds
thank-you brunch
The Women's Division Southwest
Dade Constituent Board will hold its
final meeting of the year on Friday
June 6, beginning at 9:30 a.m. At the
meeting and brunch, the board will
say a special thank you to outgoing
officers and will welcome new ones.
Judy Adler is chairwoman of the
Southwest Dade Women's Division;
and Liz Litowitz is Campaign vice
chairwoman. Stella Haas serves as
Community Education vice chair-
woman; Fran Benin and Heidi
Fnedland are Leadership Develop-
ment vice chairwomen; Vivian
Brownstein is secretary; and Sandi
Miot is Nominating Committee
chairwoman.
For more information about the
WD Southwest Dade board meeting
and brunch, please call the Women's
Division at 576-4000.
-WDHold the Date
Thursday, June 12
Campaign Steering Committee
Meeting
Thursday, September 11
Executive Committee and Campaign
Steering Committee
Photo highlights of WD retreat and installation
'5 ^**A
The Women's Division Annual Retreat and Installation, held at the Sonesta
/ ach Hotel, featured special guest Dafna Soltes (seen at bottom) performing the
Story of Hannah Senesh. Shown above with Soltes, from left, WD President
Dorothy Podhurst, Retreat Co-Chairwomen Renata Bloom and Helen Berne, and
WD Vice President for Leadership Development Terry Drucker.
* W 1JI1B
Women's Division Executive Officers installed at the Annual Retreat pose for the
photographer. Shown above, from left, Amy Dean, vice president campaign
designate; Marine E. Schwartz, Nominating Committee Chairman; Sue
Graubert, parliamentarian; Elaine Ross, secretary; Terry Drucker, vice presi-
dent for Community Education; and Robbie Herskowitz, vice president for
Leadership Development. Not pictured is Gail Newman, vice president for
Campaign.
The Business and Professional Women also installed new executive officers at the
retreat. Shown above, from left, Diana Fleeman, Susan Neshick, Ileane Rayman
Kaufman, vice chairs for Leadership Development; Karen Brown, vice chair for
Campaign; Dorothy Podhurst, WD president; Maryanne Within, BPW chair-
woman; Lisa Leuchter Treister, secretary; and Adrienne Messing, vice chair of
' ''immunity Education. Not pictured are Ray Ellen Yarkin, vice chair for Cam-
paign; and Nancy Berkowitz, vice chair for Community Education.
Members of the Women's Division take time out at the Annual Retreat and In-
stallation to pose for a family photo.
call police*
HIGHWAY
EMERGENCY
BANNER
Eiaw Trouble?
Out of Gee?
n Hal Tire?
Help Federation locate leaders
Did you know that there are more than
200 Jewish Federations across the United
States and Canada? Together they form a
network which involves literally hundreds
of thousands of individuals working to
achieve a broad range of Jewish com-
munity objectives.
Each Federation is sustained by a
legion of volunteers who spend signifi-
cant amounts of time participating in
campaign, community relations and
leadership development activities. And
that's where you fit into the picture.
Perhaps you have children or other
relatives living outside of Miami who
might wish to know more about the
Federation in their area. If so, we'd love
to know where they are so we can have
the local Federation contact them.
Please take the time to complete the
coupon below, and help us extend the net-
work of Federation volunteers. For addi-
tional information, please contact Milton
Heller, director of Federation's Human
Resources Development Department, at
576-4000, extension 279.
Please have the local Federation contact my relatives living in the cities I have listed below.
Name
Relationship
Lock Your Car and Walt for Police Hdpl
Don't Risk Disaster
Stay out o< fata weather
Don't waft moe.
Don't depend on slranfrs
Don't dm chadrcn unat tended
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NCJW IANNEIS
4X0litm Mud.
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---------------------------------------*C en eaeaeae>-
Dur >.
HA rettdemt add i% Selei Te> -
toulendoMd -
Address.
City___
State.
.Zip.
Phone
Your Name
Phone
(please list additional contacts on a separate piece of paper)
Return this coupon to:
MILTON HELLER. Director
Human Resources Development Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137_________
Federation, June 1986____5


SD announces new officers and board
Norman Lieberman, South
Dade Branch Chairman
The Federation South Dade
Branch announced its complete slate
of 1986-87 officers and board of direc-
tors at a final board meeting and
barbeque held at the home of incom-
ing Chairman Norman Lieberman
and Jean Lieberman.
Norman Lieberman, after a term as
vice chairman for campaign, will
serve as South Dade Branch Chair-
man. Serving with him are Robert
Benin, vice chairman for Human
Resource Outreach; Samuel Harte,
vice chairman for Community Ser-
vices and Planning; Nedra Oren, vice
chairman for Campaign; and Larry
Metsch, vice chairman for Communi-
ty Education.
Selected for a two-year term as
board members are: Arnold Altman,
Rabbi David Auerbach, Paul
Berkowitz, Robert Brin, Shelly
Brodie, Alvin Lloyd Brown, Paul
Kade, Martin Kalb, Marilyn Kohn,
Robert Berrin, Vice Chair- Samuel Harte,
man, Human Resource Community
Outreach Planning
Abe Koss, Robert B. Kramer, Dr.
Gail Kwal, Rita Levin, Cindy Lewin,
Dr. Robert Marlin, Susan Metsch,
Judge Robert H. Newman, Joel
Robrish, Myron Samole and Dror
Zadok.
Serving during 1986-87 toward the
completion of two-year terms are:
Thomas Borin, Mel Brazer, Carol
Cantor, Howard Cherna, Mikki
Futernick, Jay Gamberg, Debby
Grodnick, Phyllis Harte, Dr. Robert
H. Karl, Nelson Keshen, Richard
Kwal, Ellen Mandler, Sandi Miot,
Sanford Miot, Sydney Newmark, Dr.
Stanley Rosenberg, Sandi Samole,
William F. Saulson, Norman Sholk,
Dr. Alan Swartz, Barry White and
Daniel Zelonker.
Judy Adler and Micki Hochberg,
representatives of the South Dade
and Southwest Dade Women's Divi-
sion constituent boards, will serve ex-
officio on .the South Dade Branch
Board.
Vice Chairman,
Services and
Lawrence Metsch, Vice Chair-
man, Community Education
Nedra Oren, Vice Chalrmn
Campaign
South Dade happenings
SD holds "Campaign Count-
down" Phonathon
As part of Federation's Campaign
Countdown" program, the South
Dade Branch held a phonathon at the
offices of Caplan, Morrison and
Brown, P.A., in which participants
called South Dade residents who had
not made their commitments to the
1986 campaign.
Leadership Development
Groups Graduate
The South Dade Branch's Leader-
ship Development Groups I and II
both held "graduation" ceremonies
last month. During their final ses-
sions, Federation Director of Human
Resources Development Milton
Heller led experiential programs and
discussed specific community leader-
ship positions which individual
graduates may wish to fill.
Both groups held mock graduation
exercises in which participants
received certificates of completion.
The graduates then celebrated with
wine and cheese receptions.
New Leadership Development
Group in Formation
A new Leadership Development
group is now forming in the South
Dade area. To participate or for more
information, please call Jerry Nei-
mand at 251-9334.
Seen at a recent program of the Federation South Dade Branch Medical Outreach
Group were, from left standing, Audrey Rice; Dr. Jerry and Barbara Rosen-
baum; Drs. Robert and Nilza Karl, chairmen; Rabbi Mark Kram, guest speaker-
and Dr. Thomas Rice. Seated are Drs. Carolyn and Andre Abitbol and Shelley
and Dr. Curtis Hamburg.
SD Relationship Committee
meets with agency reps
Members of the South Dade
Federation/Synagogue Relationship
Committee, under the chairmanship
of Sandi Samole, met April 29 with
representatives of South Dade area
Federation beneficiary agencies.
Representatives of the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami South Dade Center, Jewish
Family Service, Jewish Vocational
Service and the Central Agency for
Jewish Education were briefed on the
goals and objectives of the
Federation and its South Dade
Branch. The agency representatives
were also told of the purpose
and progress of the Federa-
tion/Synagogue Relationship Com-
mittee and each agreed to have a
representative sit on the Committee.
Those present also discussed the
feasibility of forming a Jewish
Community Council in the area to
serve as a forum for cooperation and
support among South Dade Jewish
community synagogues, agencies and
organizations.
In a elated program. South Dade's
Community Services and Planning
Committee, under the chairmanship
of Roslyn K. Berrin, will begin in
August to meet with South Dade
organizations which are no!
Federation beneficiary agencies.
Berrin and the committee will begin
to liaise with these organizations.
such as Hadassah and B'nai B'rith.
for the purpose of discussing their
desire for, and participation in. such a
Jewish Community Council.
For more information about the
South Dade Community Services and
Planning Committee, the
Federation/Synagogue Relationships
Committee or the proposed
formation of a Jewish Community
Council, please call Jerry Neimandat
251-9334.
Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum in November
Federation President Samuel I.
Adler has announced that the second
annual Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum will be held
November 3-5, 1986. Rabbi Harold M.
Schulweis, spiritual leader of Valley
Beth Shalom in Encino, California,
will be the scholar-in-residence for
the three-day program.
The Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum is sponsored by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and is underwritten by the Marilyn K.
Smith Philanthropic Fund which was
established in memory of this
dedicated community leader who
served as Federation vice president
president of the Women's Division
and as chairman of the Planning and
Budgeting Committee.
"This lecture series honors her
memory and continues to perpetuate
her vibrant spirit and lifelong concern
for the learning and sharing of
Jewish ideals," Adler noted. Rabbi
Schulweis is a renowned figure in the
national and international Jewish
communities. He is an outstanding
speaker, and is noted for his exten-
sive, scholarship on Jewish issues.
Rabbi Schulweis is a contribuWl
editor to Sh'ma. a journal of Jewish
responsibility and to Momnt
Magazine.
The trustees of the Marilyn I
Smith Philanthropic Fund are Harn
B. Smith. Joseph A. Smith. David ft
Smith, Lou Ann Smith, Samuel i-
Adler, Federation Executivei VW
President Myron J. Brodie and cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education
President Nan Rich.
For more information regarjj
the second annual Marilyn ft*
Leadership Enrichment torn
please contact Milton Heiier
576-4000, extension 279.
Rabbi Carl Klein named head
of Rabbinical Association
:v. PfetoNtM^faWMft-*-
;w;v:-

The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami has elected Rabbi Carl
Klein of the Hallandale Jewish
Renter as its president for 1986-87
Also elected were Rabbi Haskell M.
Bernat of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami as vice president; Rabbi
Menachem Raab of the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education, as
secretary; and Rabbi David B
Salman of the Aventura Jewish
___________________- ''.tiwHwlKiKi
Center, as treasurer.
Rabbi Klein succeeds Rabbi
Goldstein of Temple Shir Abu.
served as president dOTjJjg
year and who was commendw^
outstanding service. Ra,b?1 ,. nf the
Schiff, director of Chaplains* -,
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
executive vice president. .
Rabbi Klein has been *P'rf I
leader of the
Srr
Hallandale
"Rabbi Kl"* '


RABBI ALEXANDER S. GROSSl
Did you know...
The Hebrew Academy is fully accredited by the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools,
the most prestigious and demanding accrediting
agency in the region.
Did you know...
The Hebrew Academy Elementary School is one
of four national finalists in the Elementary Private
School Recognition Program, sponsored by the
Council for American Private Education, and a
Didyouknow...
The 85 faculty members of the
Hebrew Academy are fully cer-
tified by the State of Florida
Department of Education; all
Judaic Studies teachers are
licensed by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and more
than 70 percent of the faculty
have earned or are working to-
ward a masters or doctoral de-
gree.
Didyouknow...
The Hebrew Academy has a
highly qualified Guidance Depart
ment including a full-time re-
mediation director; two part-
time guidance counselors; two
college guidance counselors and
one educational psychologist who
serves as Director of Student
Special Services.
Didyouknow...
The average combined SAT
scores of Hebrew Academy
seniors in 1985 and 1986 were
1214 and 1193, compared to na-
tional averages of 897 and 850.
Did you know...
The Hebrew Academy has pro-
duced nine National Merit Schol-
ars in the past three years, an
extraordinary achievement for a
school of its size.
Did you know...
More than 99 percent of all Heb-
rew Academy graduates have
continued on to college during
the past three years, and 20 per-
cent were admitted to Ivy League
schools this year. Harvard, Yale,
Brandeis, Columbia, Princeton,
Barnard and the University of
Pennsylvania are among the
schools recent graduates are
now attending.
Did you know...
According to statistics compiled
by the World Zionist Organiza-
tion, the Hebrew Academy has
the highest percentage in the
country of students who pursue
post-high school education in
Israel.
The Rabbi Alexanders. Qross Hebrew Academy
ofQreater Miami has attained a reputation
since Us founding in 1947 as one of the finest
Jewish day schools in the nation. However, there
are many facts about the Hebrew Academy
that go fa beyond its wide renown.
finalist in the President's Exemplary School
Program.
Didyouknow...
The Hebrew Academy was one of only 84
schools selected in the entire na-
tion by the Educational Testing
Service to receive a fully equip-
ped computer laboratory from
IBM. Students receive 40 hours
of instruction per semester in this
nationally acclaimed computer
education program.
Didyouknow...
The school's overall student-to-
facutty ratio is 14:1; the average
elementary class size is 20 stu-
dents and the average secondary
dass size is 17 students.
Did you know...
Hebrew Academy students come
from throughout Dade County
and from as far north as Holly-
wood, and that bus transporta-
tion to the school is available.
Didyouknow...
Fifty percent of the Hebrew
Academy students come from
an Orthodox background with
the balance coming from Conser-
vative, Reform and unaffiliated
backgrounds.
Didyouknow...
The Hebrew Academy offers
many forms of scholarship and
financial assistance programs to
help defray the costs of tuition
and educational expenses.
Now you should know...
The Hebrew Academy has an
outstanding elementary educa-
tion program, and its secondary
program is one of South Florida's
finest college prepratory schools.
awA-sapi--*" ^M
^^I^^^^^I^^^^^^H


^*** *-*
*- *
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
PROGRAM-FOCUS ON THE CHILD
Rabbi Harvey Silberstein will complete his first year
as principal of the Hebrew Academy elementary
school with the end of the current academic year.
What he's found in his year of service is a school
environment which is rich and rewarding for 360
children attending nursery through the sixth grade.
"Mxing children in our society are full of questions
and they are constantly making new discoveries. We
try to stimulate this questioning process and help
children to discover the answers. The focus in our
elementary program is squarely on the child and
their needs. We want to keep their natural enthusiasm
for learning alive, therefore we concentrate on the
child." said Rabbi Silberstein.
"We hope that by the time the child
enters junior high school that these
critically important developmental years in
grades K-6 will have had an impact. The
emphasis on individual needs is a tremend-
ous responsibility for our teachers. In many
respects the child spends more waking
hours here than they do at home. We
believe that the Hebrew Academy is really
a nice place for our youngsters to be".
Rabbi Silberstein added.
The Real Wyrld Curriculum
The elementary program at the Hebrew
Academy maintains a strong emphasis on
"hands on" activities. Students visit
hospitals, nursing homes, places of work,
museums and many more. Rabbi Silber-
stein subscribes to the philosophy that it is
important that the school serve as a
gateway to the real world.
He noted, "Our students should be a
part of whatever goes on in the world We
don't know what the world will be like
when they reach adulthood. Our students
need to have the skills to ask questions
and choose the best solutions to the
problems which will confront them. They
participate in the process of studying
various topics, gathering information from
different sources, selecting what is appro-
priate and then assembling and presenting
it in the best format. That's the essence of
life in this society. We attempt to get them
ready to lead complete Jewish lives in the
21 st century and we emphasize the
development within each child. When a
child leaves the Hebrew Academy, they
have confidence in themselves and in their
abilities."
In all respects, school life for the Hebrew
Academy youngster does make it "a nice
place to be." Class sizes are small, with an
average student-to-teacher ratio of 20:1.
The teachers attempt to get dose to the
students, to know each and every student,
to better understand their needs. "That's
what makes the Hebrew Academy
unique," stated Silberstein. "Even with
small dass sizes, we like to think of ourse-
lves as one big school rather than serf -con-
tained individual classes. The walls of our
classrooms don't inhibit the strong commu-
nity spirit we find school-wide."
Fundamentals and Tradition
In the first through third grades the emphasis is
on reading as a means of communication. "Reading
is the realization that someone, somewhere has a
message to share with you," says Rabbi Silberstein.
He adds, "In our curriculum we focus on the basic
skills of communication. I think that's critical because
all academic subjects and life in the future beyond
schooling have communication as the foundation.
Besides the standard "readers," students are ex-
posed to literature. They are taught research skills at
any earty age and are required, even in the first
grade, to write book reports and papers.
In the area of mathematics the emphasis is again
on real life skills. Math skills are developed to be
Rabbi Alexander S. Qross
Hebrew Academy
The Elementary Programr-
"A Nice Place To Be"
A History of Excellence
The entire history of the Hebrew Academy has been charac-
terized by a common thread: a commitment to excellence in all its
educational endeavors. Founded in 1947 with four students, in
dassroom space rented from the local YMHA, the Hebrew
Academy soon became the leading force in the Greater Miami
Jewish day school movement.
Today, with 660 students from nursery to twelfth grade, a full
range of physical facilities, and a curriculum unparalleled in the
community, each student still receives the type of individualized
attention as did our first four students.
There are many measures of a school's success, but our greatest
pride is in our graduates. They have gone on to the nation's finest
universities and colleges. They have become physicians, lawyers,
judges, accountants, teachers and business executives Many have
become leaders of our Jewish community, as well as the overall
Miami community And we now teach the children of many of
our past graduates.
The quality of your child's education does make a tremendous
difference in his or her ability to succeed in an increasingly complex
world. It is also true that the quality of his or her Jewish education
will, in large part, determine their level of Jewish practice and
commitment in the years to come.
We invite you to visit our school; see our classes and students We
are sure you will agree that the Hebrew Academy offers an educa-
tional opportunity for your child that is second to none in Miami
but as active participants. Considerable amounts of
time are also spent on the teaching of Hebrew
language, which of course, is a central focus of the
Judaic curriculum. The teaching and learning of
Hebrew begins in kindergarten and continues
throughout the elementary program.
"We teach Hebrew to encompass all the learning
experiences a child encounters." Reflecting on the
full Judaic program of study at the elementary level,
Rabbi Silberstein says, "We're part of a wonderful
and noble history. The children should realize this
and know they're a part of this proud tradition. They
come to learn they have a history, a mission and a
purpose as Jews."
Israel and its people also are an integrafpart of the
Judaic curriculum. "Our special relationship with
Israel is stressed throughout the school
, year. Students do feel an attachment to
the 'land of our ancestors,' and see the
modem State of Israel as the fulfillment of
the Jewish dream to return to this special
land. Many of our students have had the
opportunity to visit Israel and they share
their experiences with classmates when
they return," Rabbi Silberstein indicated
Integrotive Curriculum
Enriches Student Learning
The elementary program is an mtegra-
tive one encompassing all subject areas In
music class students are exposed to secular
and Jewish music The music teacher
works with the dassroom teachers at-
tempting to merge folk music into its
proper context in history and literature
lessons
In art dass, students work and study
many art forms, and in the media center
youngsters learn, at an earty age, to use
the library as a valued research tool
Children work with computers throughout
the elementary school years, and in fact,
pre-kmdergartners sit down at the
keyboard at the tender age of four. Chil-
dren have physical education dass every-
day, and they can participate in numerous
extra-curricular activities A sampling of
these mdude drama, community service,
choir, spelling and Bible bees, arid science
fairs.
The Hebrew Academy elementary
school attends to the special needs of its
students by providing instruction for the
gifted, and remedial help for students with
mild learning disabilities
Rabbi Silberstein also welcomes parenta'
involvement. "We're always open to
suggestions from parents as well as their
partiopation in school activities. We want
to be partners with them because when
we work together, we can do the best job
possible with their children."
Rabbi Silberstein is proud of the fact
that many of the present leaders of the
Miami community attended the Hebrew
Academy "Now we see their children
here, second and even third generation
that's our greatest success story of all"
The Hebrew Academy has always
maintained that standards have to be high
comprehensible and practical. "Critical thinking,
problem solving and the ability to analyze and
reason are stressed in our mathematics programs,"
Rabbi Silberstein said
Of course, the elementary program has a strong
emphasis on the religious roots of Judaism The
Judaic curriculum concentrates on knowlege and
attitudes "A child should be as knowledgeable
about their Jewish background as they are with
secular topics," said Rabbi Silberstein
Students study the Bible and attempt to make it
relevant to their daily lives And when they study the
Talmud the children are made to feel that they are
studying with the great Raoois not as an audience.


for children to excel. "We expect the very best^a
child who is comfortable with him or herself and
teachers who will go out of their way to provide the
best instruction and climate for learning," Rabbi
Silberstein stresses.
"I am convinced that we have the optimum
environment for academic enrichment. There is a
warm personalized approach to the child's educa-
tion. As I said before, the Hebrew Academy is a nice
place to be," he conduded.
JUNIOR AND SENIOR
HIQH SCHOOL PROQRAMS
"The concept of the total Jew is what makes this
school special," notes junior and senior high school
principal Rabbi Yossi Heber, underscoring
the guiding educational philosophy of the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy.
A school with modest beginnings, the
Hebrew Academy was founded in 1947
with four students, in dassroom space
rented from the local YMHA. Today the
school's enrollment exceeds 600 students
housed in two buildings on Pine Tree Drive
in Miami Beach. Although the institution is
an orthodox day school, about half of its
students do not come from orthodox
households.
Rabbi Heber, a veteran of ten years at
the Hebrew Academy, elaborates on the
school's overall mission. "We endeavor to
provide students with the tools to under-
stand that Judaism approaches life with a
total world-view. Every aspect of a stu-
dent's life can and should be interpreted
with Jewish thought."
Of equal importance is the school's
approach to integrating a traditional
Jewish education with secular studies.
"First and foremost," Rabbi Heber indi-
cates, "we want students to take what
they've studied in Judaism and apply it to
be a better human being. We strive to
prepare our students for the many oppor-
tunities that life can offer, grounded in
I a maximum understanding and apprecia-
tion of Judaism."
We believe," continued Rabbi Heber, "that by
| bringing Judaism alive in every vein, we fulfill our
objective of making better Jews. In the process our
students are then capable of performing better in
every area of academic study."
Program of Studies
The extensive scope of the junior and high school
I curriculum reinforces the spedal nature of the
I school, ft begins with the Hebrew Academy faculty
I which, taken as a whole, possesses excellent schol-
arly credentials. At the secondary level, every Judaic
JStudies teacher is licensed by the Central Agency for
[Jewish Education (CAJE) and only one secular
[teacher out of 38 has less than a masters degree,
"iree members of the Hebrew Academy faculty
iold doctoral degrees in their particular areas of
expertise.
The curriculum itself follows two tracks. The first,
iich focuses on Judaic and Yeshiva studies has an
?mphasis on the Torah, the Talmud and Jewish law.
The second track concentrates on culture and
bnguage The two-track system exposes the Hebrew
Academy student to the full range of Judaic study.
The unique aspect of the educational program is
the successful integration of Judaic and secular
approaches. For instance, Rabbi Heber teaches a
course entitled "Psychology and Judaism "|
attempt to show that being a Jew is a whole process
in the way the student thinks, it illustrates to them '
how being a total Jew allows them to act effectively
m the world," Rabbi Heber said.
"Judaism is not a ceremonial religion, it deals with
the arts and the sciences," continued Rabbi Heber
He also indicated that the Torah deals with issues
well beyond the ritual, and that by recognizing this
fact students can approach their subjects with the
Rabbi Alexanders. Qross
Hebrew Academy
Junior and Senior High School:
Commitment To Learning And Excellence
MI
'XffPf-.;-
values grounded in the Torah to enhance their
understanding of the secular world we all live in. This
applies to other course offerings such as American
History, Political Science and Literature.
"A fine example is in the teaching of biology,"
Rabbi Heber began. "In this course we deal with the
issue of evolution versus creationism. This fusion of
competing theories is critical to providing the student
with the opportunity to evaluate material and
allowing them to draw their own conclusions. When
you come right down to it, I am hard-pressed to find
where Judaic values and American values come into
conflict. Students are quick to grasp this realization,
and the net result is a better educated Jew," he
added.
The academic program, in keeping with Jewish
tradition, is rigorous. "We cover the full gamut of all
Jewish studies. Hebrew language is very much
emphasized with classes held both before and after
school. Yeshiva track classes start at 7:30 a.m. It's
really a simple premise we hold to, you're a better
Jew if you know more, and this school strives to
expose children to everything," Rabbi Heber noted.
Hebrew Academy students are also exposed to
the ever increasing importance of the "computer
age." The Hebrew Academy has a computer labora-
tory which is equipped with 15 IBM personal com-
puters that were given to the school. It was one of
84 schools across the nation selected by the Educa-
tional Testing Service to receive the computers as a
gift from IBM
Students are taught the history of computers,
computer literacy, programming in Basic and Pascal
languages and use software for instruction in various
courses. "Every student receives a minimum of 40
hours of computer instruction; we firmly believe that
every student should be computer literate," Rabbi
Heber said.
Programs have been written for Hebrew instruc-
tion and software is used for all areas of instruction
in the school s curriculum. "Keeping our students on
the cutting-edge of high technology is important
and our emphasis on computers gives our students
the competitive advantage they'll need when they
move on to more advanced studies and to the work
place, Heber added.
Extracurricular and
Cultural Activities
The Hebrew Academy's secondary program is
replete with a wide selection of electives and
extracurricular activities. In-school dubs indude: art,
chess, physical education, debate, computers, home
economics, music, science, math, drama, photo-
graphy, student coundl, yearbook, Spanish,
newspaper, Israeli dance, audio-visual, Ben
Torah and Bas Yisrael. In-school clubs are
open to all students in 10-12 grade
Students who opt for the newspaper club
are required to attend an after school
Journalism course for which they receive
college level credit.
The Hebrew Academy also maintains a
close relationship with the Bass Museum
attending many of the museum's fine
exhibits, and they make regular trips to the
Shakespeare Festival which is held at
Vizcaya. Additionally, all seniors are required
to take a course in the humanities which
exposes them to the full spectrum of the
fine arts.
The Academy also produces and
presents their own plays. Last year it staged
the Renaissance Fayre which received wide
media attention. From a parody of
"Hamlet", to a seventh grade production
of "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Hebrew
Academy students transformed the school
into a 14th century Renaissance village.
Reflecting on the event Rabbi Heber noted,
"Text books aren'talways enough. It all fits
in with our belief that passive learning is
not good enough. You must let children be
a part of the process. They must be active."
Rabbi Heber also believes that commu-
nity service is an integral part of the learning
During Passover, students raised funds for
and delivered approximately 500 Pesach packages to
the elderly and poor living on Miami Beach.
"The students did this because we don't think
morality and ethics can be taught through academics
alone, it has to be practiced. All of our students must
fulfill 20 hours of community service each year,"
Rabbi Heber said.
finally the school maintains an excellent athletics
program which encompasses many sports for boys
and girls. There is a varsity basketball team, and a
wide range of physical education and physical fitness
activities.
Summing it all up, Rabbi Heber firmly believes that
the Hebrew Academy secondary program has much
to offer. "I think we rank among the finest pnvate
school's in the Southeast United States. The parents
and students who choose the Hebrew Academy can
be assured of an education which will allow the child
to be prepared for all of lifes challenges, as a Jew
and as a human being."


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9HI *J
Making the Educated Choice:
Parents of Hebrew Academy
Students Offer Their Impressions
of the Rabbi Alexander S. Qross
Hebrew Academy
Qila Rosenhaus and I lair n Wiener
(Real Estate Developer)
"We have three children at the Hebrew Academy in
grades 6,8 and 10. We're both Israeli and since we
don't live in Israel, we wanted to give our children a
strong Jewish education. It's a very good school with
a strong curriculum which is respected by the very
best of colleges and universities. No other school
here offers a comparable Jewish education. The
Hebrew Academy is doing a marvelous job in the
community."
David Cann (Airline Pilot)
"My two boys attend, in grades 5 and 10. Prior to
attending the Hebrew Academy, they attended
other Jewish day schools. I wanted a school where I
could keep both of them in dose proximity. The
school adjusted the curriculum for my older son's
education. He's taking all advanced courses in
physics, mathematics and psychology. I feel that
Rabbi Heber goes out of his way to keep the lines of
communication open at the school. The teachers
take a sincere interest in the welfare of all the students."
Vik invite you to visit the Hebrew Academy and
experience the educational opportunity available
to your child.
Name of Child
Age
Candidate will enter Grade.
Name of Parents________
Home Address.
City/State/Zip _
Residence Phone-
Business Phone_
? We request an application be sent to our
home for review.
? We would like a Hebrew Academy represen-
tative to visit our home.
? We would like a Hebrew Academy represen-
tative to call us with more information.
? We would like to arrange a personal visit to
the Hebrew Academy.
? We would like information about charitable
donations.
? Other comments.
Call for further information: Michael Fischer,
Executive Vice President, 532-6421.
Complete and return to:
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy
2400 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33140
David Qalbiit (Heart Surgeon)
"The Hebrew Academy is very committed to an
excellent secular education coupled with a traditional
Jewish education. No other school for boys and girfs
offers this in the community. I'm a graduate of the
1963 dass. The quality of secular education offered is
equal to a school like Ransom-Everglades."
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy is a
beneficiary agency of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.. Partners in a canng community
We gratefully acknowledge the donation of this space by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation so that the story of
the Hebrew Academy can be told.
Dr. David Reinhard, M.D., President
Jack Bursten, Chairman of the Board
Michael D. Fischer, Executive vice President
Rabbi Harvey Silberstein, Elementary School Principal
Rabbi Josef Heber, Junior/Senior High School Principal
Marlene Kaplan
(Single Parent, Attorney)
"As an alumnus of the Hebrew Academy, I felt my
education was superior and I was well prepared fa
university life. Obviously this affected my decision as
a parent. New my two children attend in grades 3
and 5. The Academy is a particularly warm school
which as a mother I find very entidng. The Hebrew
and English instruction are excellent Overall I'm very
satisfied with my children's education there The
school also really reaches out to single parents,
something other pnvate schools are just becoming
sensitive to, the special needs of single parents."
Rick Turetsky (Businessman)
"I have three children attending, in second grade, a
kmdergartner and a pre-kindergartner I feel it's
particularly important today for Jewish children to
get a day school education. It's important m under-
standing what it means to be a Jew The Hebrew
Academy has long been recognized as a leader in
Jewish day school education. I'm delighted with the
quality education my children are receiving there"



Community Relations Committee
Jeffrey L. Berkouritz
The Community Relations Commit-
tee (CRC) plays a unique role as the
trouble shooting and public affairs ad-
vocacy arm of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Through its com-
mittee and sub-committees, the CRC
works in the areas of promoting
understanding and support for the
State of Israel, supporting the rights
of Jews in troubled lands throughout
the world, securing the rights of
Soviet Jews to emigrate, and further-
ing interethnic understanding. The
CRC also has an advocacy role on
behalf of a broad range of domestic
issues, and resists the destructive
practices of cults and fraudulent mis-
sionary groups.
Over the year, the CRC sponsored
community forums, educational
seminars and monthly meetings
which explored local, national and in-
ternational issues that confront us as
Americans and as Jews. The Commit-
tee is chaired by attorney and
developer Jeffrey Berkowitz, with
Nan Rich serving as Domestic Con-
cerns chairwoman; Tim Cohen and
Eric Turetsky as Middle East co-
chairmen; Helene Cohen as chairman
of the Committee on Cults and Mis-
s,onaJ7. Grups; and Hinda Cantor
and Shirley Pollak as co-chairmen of
the South Florida Conference on
ooviet Jewry.
"It is the CRC's role to be at the
cutting edge of a broad range of
issues as we relate to national and
local Jewish agencies that work with
us and to a number of groups in the
general community," said CRC
Chairman Berkowitz. He listed these
Jewish agencies as the American
Jewish Committee, American Jewish
Congress, Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith, Jewish Labor Com-
mittee, Jewish War Veterans,
Hadassah, National Council of Jewish
Women, Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, United
Synagogue of America and Women's
American ORT.
The following are some of the ac-
tivities the CRC conducted during
this past program year:
U.S. Congressman Dante Fascell
was the featured speaker at the open-
ing meeting of the CRC. In his posi-
tion as chairman of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee, Fascell
presented his hard-hitting perspec-
tive on the Middle East situation in-
cluding U.S.-Israel relations, pro-
spects for peace and the outlook for
the future in that troubled region of
the world.
The following months brought such
outstanding personalities as Norman
Lear, founding chairman of People
for the American Way; Hirsh Good-
man, chief defense correspondent of
reports on a year of progress
the Jerusalem Post; Tom Dine ex-
ecutive director of the American
s.r?e' P^lic Affairs Committee
u a '' Congressman Lee
Hamilton of Indiana, staunch sup-
porter of Israel and ranking member
of the House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee; and Yosef Mendelevich
former Soviet Jewish Refusenik and
"Prisoner of Conscience" now living
in Israel, one of the famous Len-
ingrad "hijackers" and now known as
the voice of the Refuseniks in Israel.
Mendelevich reached well over 1,000
people in his several encounters in
Miami.
Other important guests were Max
Green of the White House; Arthur
Waskow, nuclear weapons opponent;
and Asher Nairn of Israel's Embassy
in Washington.
The CRC issued to public school ad-
ministrators, school board members
and Jewish leaders throughout the
community the newly revised edition
of its annual "Guidelines on Religion
in the Public Schools," which were
received enthusiastically by school of-
ficials and distributed through the
Dade County public school system.
The CRC also brought together com-
munity and agency leaders for an in-
depth briefing on the negative impact
upon the state of Gramm-Rudman
budget cuts. The briefing was
presented by Senator Roberta Fox
and Representative Elaine Gordon,
two of Florida's most powerful
lawmakers.
The committee spoke out strongly
through action alerts, news releases
and public statements on a number of
areas of deep concern, among them
opposition to proposed arms sales to
Jordan and Saudi Arabia, opposition
to the school prayer amendment and
other measures that would have
breached the wall of separation bet-
ween church and state.
The CRC, through its Committee
on Cults and Missionary Groups
presented Rabbi Stephen Robbins,'
nationally recognized authority on
destructive cults and fraudulent mis-
sionary activity, who spoke in
separate settings to Jewish profes-
sionals and lay leaders, to interfaith
clergy leadership and to an open
public forum, in addition to making
radio and television appearances. The
CRC, through its South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, focused
public opinion on the Reagan-
Gorbachev summit meeting through
massive and widespread letter
writing and media campaigns and
again used the media to focus public
attention on the plight of Soviet
Jewry keyed to the release of Anatoly
Shcharansky from the Soviet Union
in February.
In looking back over the year's ac-
tivities, Berkowitz commented with
satisfaction on the Community Rela-
tions Committee's work. "It has been
a good year," he said. "We've put out
some fires. We have brought our con-
cerns to a widening list of public of-
ficials. We have increased our contact
capability in the broader community.
I look forward to continued and
greater accomplishment in the next
program year.
For more information about the ac-
tivities of the Community Relations
Committee, please call 576-4000.
Project Renewal delegation eyes the future in Or Akiva
Ralph Chernin, left, with arm around
a recent Ethiopian immigrant, is seen
in Or Akiva at the dedication of Cher-
nin Plaza in Robert Russell Memorial
Park. Mayor Sholom Shabtai is
presenting Chernin with a plaque ex-
pressing the municipality's
appreciation.
"Work harder for Project Renewal
because it is the fulfillment of a moral
obligation. If together we succeed in
meeting the goals of Project Renewal,
future generations will know us as a
people of great vision and courage."
Robert Russell (1917-1983)
Past Federation President
and the first National Chairman
of Project Renewal
Last March, Miami's Project
Renewal delegation visited Or Akiva
to assess the progress which has been
made in the past year and to
prioritize renewal programs for
1986-87. The delegation consisted of
Ralph Chernin, Mickey and Mort
Teicher, and Hillel Levy of the
Federation staff. Stanley C. Myers,
chairman of Federation's Project
Renewal Committee, was unable to
attend this year.
While in Or Akiva, the delegation
met with the staff of the Project
Renewal Department of the Jewish
Agency for Israel, met with the
citizens of Or Akiva, and elected and
appointed officials. Primary among
the topics of these meetings were the
town's dental clinic, the educational
system of Or Akiva, economic
development, future physical projects
and citizen involvement in the
planning process.
The delegation was pleased to note
that Or Akiva residents have access
to a wider variety of facilities and
programs which have been developed
and supported by the Miami Jewish
community's participation in the Pro-
ject Renewal Campaign. These in-
clude the operation of day care
centers, youth activities, sports,
music, cultural programs, vocational
training and a variety of other related
social activities. Delegation member
Ralph Chernin noted that "All of
these social programs have con-
tributed to a marked improvement in
the quality of life in Or Akiva. The
people there recognize the vital role
that Miamians have played in the
Project Renewal process. From my
vantage point, I feel we've developed
a strong partnership which has yield-
ed only positive results."
Since Miami's initial involvement
with Project Renewal and Or Akiva,
the delegation has been concerned
that the level of educational achieve-
ment of the students from Or Akiva
has been far below the Israeli na-
tional average. Mort Teicher noted
that "The need for improved educa-
tion to insure that the next genera-
tion of Or Akiva residents has access
to economic opportunities in Israeli
society is the highest of priorities in
this neighborhood's revitalization."
The delegation met with a team of
educators from Haifa University who
proposed a comprehensive approach
to upgrading the school system,
primarily by providing the teachers in
Or Akiva with state-of-the-art
teaching methods and curricular
materials, and by improving the
resources and facilities available to
the students. Miami delegation
members believe that the interven-
tion of Haifa University represents
See "Or Akiva," page 16
SFCSJpresents monodrama
'Shadows9
. .
Rosina Fernhoff
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, an arm of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee, in con-
junction with Congregation Bet
Breira, will present the monodrama
"Shadows," the story of Soviet
dancer Nadia Arkadina's defection to
the United States. The play will be
performed Friday evening, June 13,
at the 7:30 Shabbat service at Con-
gregation Bet Breira, 9400 S.W. 87
Avenue.
Nadia Arkadina, in the United
States with her dance company,
stood alone on a bare stage and made
an urgent plea for asylum from
Soviet oppression. Arkadina gave
voice to her saga of war and years of
hiding, political purges and tyranny,
her grandmother's mystical
teachings and the suppression of her
Jewishness both as an individual and
as a creative spirit. Thus begins
Arkadina's plea:
"I was sent to your country to talk
about my dance company, but this is
not why I'm here I'm here to ask
for political asylum Don't let
them force me to board a plane and
fly back to Russia ... If your
authorities do not lead me to safety, I
will not be free."
"Shadows," written by Av In lender
and performed by Obie Award win-
ner Rosina Fernhoff, is a moving por-
trayal of the history of the Soviet
Jews' struggle for freedom. Eager to
see the play once again, South Flori-
dians familiar with "Shadows" en-
couraged its production in Miami,
saying it is a "must see."
For more information, please call
Matty Bloom at 576-4000, extension
358.

-


Jewish High School
mixing Judaism and hi-tech
(Reprinted with permission of the Jewish
Federation of Sooth Browmrd)
When David graduated from the
Jewish High School of South Florida,
college lay before him. With diploma
in tow, he went off to a big Midwest
university prepared for college life.
But officials at David's college
believed that freshmen of different
ethnic and religious backgrounds
should live together. And this is how
David came to live with two fun-
damentalist Christian students.
Thus, David would come home to
find posters of "JC" on the walls in
his apartment and tracts from the
New Testament on his desk.
Then the roommates began the
religious inquisition.
"Why don't you believe in the Lord.
JC?" they would ask David.
David unlike many of his Jewish
peers who enter college without a
solid knowledge of their roots
responded. "He was able to answer
their questions and, with the ones he
could not answer, he went to the
Hillel rabbi who helped him," David's
father said. "And he began asking his
roommates questions which dumb-
founded them.
"My son didn't care to re-fight the
Crusades," the father said. "But his
education at the Jewish High School
gave him the ammunition he needed.
It gave him a base from which to
work.
"We are trying to stem assimilation
and at the same time we are offerine
high-quality secular education," said
Rabbi Louis Herring, principal of the
Jewish High School.
The Jewish High School opened its
doors in 1981 after the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education (CAJE)
studied the need for a Jewish com-
munity high school and in 1980
recommended that the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation establish
one. The Jewish Federations of South
Broward and Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, American ORT Federation and
Women's American ORT agreed, and
joined the effort to start the Jewish
High School of South Florida.
Ellie Katz, president of the Jewish
High School, said Jewish community
leaders in 1980 realized "that our
children couldn't just have an elemen-
tary day school education" and be
prepared for college life as a Jew.
"You have to give the students a
strong self-image at the high school
level which will carry them through
college," she said.
Judaica, however, is just one aspect
of the Jewish High School. Students
here are exposed to a two-tier cur-
riculum Judaica and secular
studies.
Katz said the emphasis is on a col-
lege preparatory curriculum.
Katz is quick to emphasize that the
school is not a yeshiva. Fifty percent
of the students attending the Jewish
High School come from day school
backgrounds while the remaining fif-
ty percent come from public schools,
with varying degrees of Judaic
education.
"Our graduation requirements are
consistently above the requirements
of the state," Rabbi Herring said.
For more information about the
Jewish High School of South Florida,
please call 935-5620.
The Jewish High School of South
Florida is a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
cy Fund. Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the Jewish High
School Partners in a caring
community.
Holocaust Center holds
annual meeting
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center will hold
its Sixth Annual Meeting on Monday,
June 16 at 1:30 p.m. at the Bay Vista
Campus of Florida International
University, Student Center Building,
room 320, announced Dr. Abraham S.
Fischler, president of the Center.
Guest speaker at the Center's An-
nual Meeting will be Neal M. Scher,
director of the United States Depart-
ment of Justice, Office of Special In-
vestigations. Scher, recipient of
numerous honors, will speak on
"Alleged Nazi War Criminals Living
in the United States."
All members of the Center and the
community at large are invited to at-
tend the Annual Meeting. At the
event, graduation certificates will be
awarded to those who have com-
pleted the Center's 60-hour inter-
viewer training course. A special cer-
tificate of appreciation will be
presented to each survivor, liberator
and protector who has given
testimony to the Center during the
past year.
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center ac-
cumulates audio and video
12 Federation, June 1986 ----------
testimonies of survivors of the Nazi
Holocaust, their liberators and pro-
tectors. These testimonies, along
with an award-winning tape entitled
"In Their Words," are used as
teaching aids in private and public
schools for the study of the
Holocaust. In addition, the Center
also hosts a group for children of
Holocaust survivors and provides
seminars, lectures and workshops
both locally and nationally to instill
Holocaust awareness and sensitivity.
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center, a non-
profit organization, has acquired a
unique and dedicated corps of
volunteers. However, with the con-
tinual expansion of its programs, the
Center urgently needs new
volunteers to help implement its goal
of "a living memorial through
education."
For more information, please call
the Center at 940-5690.
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. The
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and the Holocaust Memorial Center
. Partners in a caring community.
Chernin Building opens at MJHHA
to
New Chernin Building residents Hortense and Dr. Herbert Uris (center) with
MJHHA staff and volunteers.
The new Harry Chernin Skilled
Nursing Building, Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged's
state-of-the art skilled nursing facili-
ty, is now open for new admissions.
This brings the total number of skill-
ed nursing beds on the Douglas
Gardens campus to more than 500.
Designed to serve 192 residents
who need varying levels of care, the
five-story Harry Chernin Skilled Nur-
sing Building features beautifully
decorated private and semi-private
rooms, individual dining rooms, in-
door garden areas and outside lanai
terraces on each floor, as well as a
family lounge and recreational room
for each wing. Every bed has a win-
dow view and each semi-private room
has a partition dividing the area to
enhance the privacy of the residents.
The Miriam and Sidney Olson
Hospital, located on the second floor,
has 32 beds in private and semi-
private rooms, the latest in medical
equipment and fully equipped
physical and occupational therapy
suites.
For the first time, 40 beds on the
third floor of the Chernin Building
known as the Harold and Patricia
Toppel Rehabilitation Center will
be used for short-term rehabilitation.
This service is now being offered by
the Miami Jewish Home thanks to
special funding from the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. People
recovering from strokes, serious frac-
tures or similar illnesses or accidents
will receive the most comprehensive
post-hospital rehabilitative care
available in this community at the
Harold and Patricia Toppel
Rehabilitation Center.
"I love the new building," said new
Chernin resident Beatrice Fine. "It is
spacious, beautifully furnished and
the view from my window overlooks
the Gardens. I'm going to love living
here."
Mrs. Fine is one of a number of
residents from the Ablin and Meyer
Nursing Buildings who have
relocated to the new Chernin
Building so that renovations to these
older buildings can begin. All
residents of the Pavilions were also
relocated. Built in the 1950's. the
Pavilions are scheduled to be
demolished this summer. On the site
now occupied by the Pavilions will he
built the Louis and Bess Stein Com
mons Building and Rowland and
Sylvia Schaefer Hall.
"Now that we have relocated those
residents already living on the
Douglas Gardens campus, we have
begun admitting people living in the
community who are in need of skilled
nursing care at our long-term care
facility," noted MJHHA Executive
Director Marc Lichtman. "Soon we
can begin admitting residents to our
short-term rehabilitation unit and
transferring others into Olson
Hospital."
One of the primary goals for the
Harry Chernin Skilled Nursinjr
Building was to retain the greatest
degree of privacy and most home-like
environment possible. The result is
one of the most progressive and in-
novative architectural designs for a
long-term care facility ever attemp
ted in this country one that will be
a model for similar facilities for many
years to come.
Those interested in applying for ad-
mission to the Miami Jewish Home
should contact Ted Deady, Admis
sions Social Worker, at 751-8626.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
MJHHA Partners in a caring
community.
JVS receives citation
The Jewish Vocational Service
(JVS) Nutritional Project has been
recognized by the National Economic
Commission for its outstanding
record of employing older workers.
This distinguished "Citation of Ap-
preciation" is a salute to JVS for its
strong commitment toward hiring
older workers for its various pro-
grams. Currently, more than 75
dedicated seniors are employed by
the congregate and homebound meals
programs. These seniors are a vital
part of the Nutritional Project; and
this citation, too, is in appreciation of
their productive work on behalf ot
JVS.
The Citation of Appreciation.
awarded to Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice during "National Employ the
Older Worker Week" by the Florida
American Legion Department in
Orlando, is now on display at the J\ 3
Nutritional Project, 920 Alton Road.
Miami Beach.
JVS is a beneficiary of the Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and JVS Partners in a car-
ing community.
tS'a^jiSfisJJ
SbhSES En


-
iSsI^^
Alan L. Sherr
The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies is pleased to announce the
addition of several distinguished com-
munity members to its various
committees.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
GLENN SPEAR is a partner with
the accounting firm of Spear, Safer,
Harmon & Company. He has been a
member of the Foundation's Profes-
sional Advisory Committee and
chairs the Foundation's 1986 Annual
Tax Seminar. Spear is an expert on
the tax aspects of charitable giving
and is a member of a family with long
ties to the Jewish community and
philanthropic giving.
CECILE WEISS has lived in the
Miami community for many years
and has been involved with a number
of charitable activities and organiza-
tions. Her late husband, Milton, was
one of the founding partners of the
prominent Miami Beach law firm of
Meyer, Weiss, Rose and Arkin (now
Therrel, Baisden and Meyer, Weiss)
and president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation from 1969 to 1971.
CeeCee, as she likes to be called, is a
board member of Financial Federal
Savings and Loan and serves on
several of its important committees.
SOL TAPLIN, prominent local
business leader and former owner of
the Harbour House, is a new member
f the Board of Trustees. Taplin cur-
rently serves as vice president of
Jewish Federation Housing and is an
active supporter of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged and
Mount Sinai Medical Center.
Melvin Jacobowitz
PROFESSIONAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Given Margolis
Louis Stein
ALAN WEISBERG holds a
master's degree and a law degree in
taxation. In 1977 he was appointed by
Griffin B. Bell (former U.S. Attorney
General) as an assistant U.S. at-
torney for the Southern District of
Florida. Weisberg returned to
private practice in 1981 and is cur-
rently secretary of the Greater Miami
Tax Institute. He works in criminal
tax practice in Miami.
MONTE JACKEL, an attorney
with the law firm of Broad and
Cassel, holds an L.L.M. in taxation
from New York University. Jackel is
a member of many organizations, in-
cluding the Estate Planning Council
of Greater Miami and the Greater
Miami Tax Institute. He has spoken
before numerous groups and his
works have been published widely.
ALAN L. SHERR, C.P.A., is a tax
partner with the firm of Eisner and
Lubin. Sherr has lectured and writ-
ten extensively on tax matters and is
a member of the Foundation's
Publications Subcommittee. Sherr
recently moved to the Miami com-
munity from Minneapolis.
MELVIN JACOBOWITZ, an at-
torney with the law firm of Broad and
Cassel, has an extensive background
in the areas of taxation and estate
planning. Jacobowitz participates in a
host of tax institutes and organiza-
tions, has authored related articles in
various professional publications and
has been a respected member of the
local Bar Association for many years.
INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
STATE SENATOR GWEN
MARGOLIS served in the Florida
House of Representatives for four
years. Following her first term, she
was overwhelming re-elected in 1980.
Senator Margolis, who has been a
realtor and appraiser for more than
20 years, currently serves on the
board of directors of the North Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce. She is
listed in "Who's Who of Finance and
Industry" and brings to the Commit-
tee a wealth of experience and
knowledge in real estate matters.
LOUIS STEIN brings not only
business acumen but an extraor-
dinary degree of commitment to
humanitarian causes and organiza-
tions. Stein retired in 1971 as chair-
man of the board of Food Fair Stores
and practiced law for more than 30
years. He is former chairman of the
Mount Sinai Medical Center
Florence Hecht
Founders and currently serves in a
similar capacity for the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged. A
nationally known philanthropist,
Stein recently endowed the Stein
Gerontological Center at the Miami
Jewish Home.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
The Women's Committee
welcomes FLORENCE HECHT, a
woman long committed to Miami's
civic, religious, and cultural organiza-
tions. Hecht, a general partner in
West Flagler Associates, Ltd.
(Flagler Greyhound Track), has
graciously offered her private terrace
at the track for an upcoming
Women's Committee event.
We salute the many ac-
complishments of Hecht and those of
all of the other new committee
members, and extend our warmest
welcome and expression of apprecia-
tion to each.
Tax seminar a great success
The Women's Committee is
On May 7, the Foundation's Profes-
sional Advisory Committee held its
First Annual Estate Planning
Seminar geared to the non-
professional member of the communi-
ty. Committee chairman Martin Kalb
explained that "We feel strongly that
there is a substantial and growing
number of individuals who are non-
professionals and who are interested
in estate planning. So this year the
Professional Advisory Committee
decided to take on an additional
seminar directed primarily toward
this second audience that we have
never attempted to reach before."
More than 100 people turned out at
the Biscayne Bay Marriott to hear
three noted local professionals on the
subject.
Featured were Sydney S. Traum,
tax partner with Myers, Kenin,
Levinson and Richards, who
presented an overview on estate and
gift taxes; Ivan Faggen, tax partner
with Arthur Andersen and Company,
who discussed how to control estate
and tax liabilities; and Norman H.
Lipoff, partner in the firm of
Greenberg, Traurig, Askew, Hoff-
man, Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel and
former Federation president, who
spoke on tax aspects of charitable
giving.
'Going to the dogs9

()n June 19, the Foundation
"omen's Committee will sponsor a
cocktail party at the Flagler
greyhound Race Track, located at
-W. 37th Avenue and 7th Street, to
Honor and thank all of the women
who have made commitments to pro-
vide for the future of our Jewish com-
munity. The hors d'oeuvres and
pcktail party will be held on the
firack Managers' Private Terrace
oni 6 to 7:30 p.m. The event, which
J o chaired by Gertrude Kartzmer
n Gloria Raffel, will include a talk
by noted investment advisor Arnold
Ganz, who will discuss investment
strategies for 1986. The Flagler
management has been kind enough to
offer free valet parking for everyone
who attends this exciting event. We
hope to see all women who have made
a commitment to the future of the
Jewish Community and philanthropic
giving.
For additional information, please
call Wendy Sobel at 576-4000, exten-
sion 352.
The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies new Zero Coupon Bond Pro-
gram is aimed at increasing the
Jewish Community's future asset
base. As pioneer members of the
"David Ben-Gurion Million Dollar
Society," the highest level of par-
ticipation in the program, Joseph
Handleman (second from left) and
Elinor and Arnold Ganz (third and
fourth from left) are seen being
presented with awards. Presenting
the awards, signed photographs of
Jerusalem by internationally renown-
ed photographer Robert Cumins, are
Melvin L. Kartzmer (left), and Leroy
Raffel (right), co-chairmen of the Zero
Coupon Bond Program.
Fe


Teen quiz show on JFTV
"In Quest," an exciting new teen
quiz show produced by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education (CAJE)
in cooperation with JFTV, will air
this month on JFTV.
The show, made possible through a
grant from the Harry Kramer
Memorial Fund, is a series of six pro-
grams in which two teams of four
panelists compete for points awarded
for correct answers to questions pos-
ed to them. Questions include topics
such as American Jewish history.
Genesis, early Prophets, Israel, the
five Megillot, Jewish life cycle, the
Holocaust, Mideast politics and
Jewish trivia.
The panelists, in junior and senior
high school divisions, were selected
locally by means of a series of qualify-
ing exams. The last two shows in the
"In Quest" series are the champion-
ship rounds in each of the age
divisions.
Look for "In Quest" on JFTV
Tuesdays and Fridays at 6 p.m.
JFTV airs all new 'Check Up'
JFTV
I
Cablegrams
Throughout the summer, watch
JFTV as children learn about their
Jewishness on "Torah Treasures."
Upcoming topics include Shabbos;
rituals of birth, circumcision and bar
mitzvah; kashrut; Jewish marriage;
Jewish death and mourning customs;
mezzuzot; tallit; the synagogue and
more. See program schedule for
times.
Watch JFTV this month as Eenie
cooks up rice salad and fish mold on
"Eenie's Kitchen."
watch JFTV on:
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29
Storer (South Dade I Channel 14
Harte-Hanks Channel 2.
Dynamic Cable vision Channel 43'
Miami Cablevision Channel 8
Americable Channel 28-A
See the touching reunion between
Anatoly Shcharansky and his wife,
A vital, as they meet in Jerusalem
upon his release from the Soviet
Union in "Shcharansky: The Struggle
Continues." To air on JFTV
throughout June on Wednesdays and
Saturdays at 6:30 p.m.
As Federation will cease publica-
tion until October, you may wish to
have JFTV's program schedule sent
to you by mail. If so, call the station
at 576-4000, extension 305.
WATCH MOUNT SINAI'S ALL
NEW "CHECK UP" THIS
MONTH ON JFTV
Week of June 2:
Dr. Delores Morgan on substance
abuse
Week of June 16:
Dr. Steven Kleinman on urology
Week of July 23:
Dr. Howard Engle on pediatrics
Week of June 30:
Dr. Marco Nanes on neurosurgery
"Check Up," Mount Sinai Medical
Center's health-oriented cable televi-
sion program now in its third year,
will launch all new episodes on JFTV
beginning this month.
Hosted by Lila G. Heatter, past
president of Mount Sinai's Board of
Trustees and honorary chairman of
the Board, "Check Up" boasts a
brand new format. The exciting
series is comprised of 26 new and in-
novative programs which will air dur-
ing the coming months. The show is
intended to create medical awareness
while educating and entertaining the
South Florida community.
In addition to Heatter's infor-
mative interviews with Mount Sinai
physicians and health care profes-
sionals, each show will feature a
"Health Update." During this seg-
ment, a physician representing
Mount Sinai will explore a new
discovery, explain a new procedure or
provide viewers with a health tip.
Other innovations in the series in-
clude a "medical dictionary" and
video footage of the subject under
discussion. Also included in Heatter's
interviews will be questions sent in by
viewers.
Topics to be featured on upcoming
programs include the gastric bubble,
a new device used for the morbidly
obese; magnetic resonance imaging, a
new way to see into the body without
the use of radiation; ambulatory
surgery, which allows the patient to
have same-day surgery and return
home instead of staying overnight in
the hospital; rehabilitation of stroke
victims; sports medicine; breast
disease; and substance abuse.
"Check Up," produced by the
Mount Sinai Medical Center in
cooperation with JFTV, airs on JFTV
on Mondays and Thursdays at 5:30
p.m., and on Saturdays at 6 p.m.
ttClbbl I\.lIfl Continued from page
Center for the past 9lh years. He
came from Mexico City where he
served for 16 years as the spiritual
leader of Congregation Beth El. He
was ordained at the Rabbinical School
of Frankfurt Au Main. Rabbi Klein
received his Ph.D. from the Universi-
ty of Frankfurt, and his Doctor of
Divinity degree from the Jewish
Theological Seminary. He is former
president of the Rabbinical Council of
South Broward, president of the
Jewish National Fund of Hallandale
and a member of the Rabbinic
Cabinet of the United Jewish Appeal.
Rabbi Klein also is a member of the
Rabbinic Cabinet of Bonds for Israel,
a member of the American Board of
Overseers of Bar-Ilan University in
Israel, former assistant to the Presi-
dent of Bar-Ilan University, and was
recently awarded a Chair on Rabbinic
Judaism at Bar-Ilan University.
Rabbi Klein's publications include:
"The Credo of Maimonides," publish-
ed in 1958 by the Philosophical
Library of New York; "Anatomy of
Judaism," published in Mexico in
Spanish in 1971; "The Eternal
Book," in two volumes, published in
Mexico in 1975; and "Friday Evening
Prayer Book," published in Mexico in
1969.
Dr. Klein has been married to
Helen Klein for the past 44 years.
They have two children and five
grandchildren.
Upon his election, Rabbi Klein
stated that "On assuming the
presidency of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami, may I first say
that I am proud of the honor of
heading this Association." Having
been a member of the 110-member
association for almost 10 years. Rabbi
Klein has participated in its activities
and served for the past two years as
its treasurer.
-JSSjJJi Programming Schedule ^jSVo^liib* Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc. | *?5eW Can%e JUNE 1986
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5.30 p.m. Eenie's Kitcnen Aieph Eenie s Kitchen Aieph Bet Din: The Jewish Peoples Court Hello Jerusalem JCCA Special Place
5:50-6 p.m. Checkup/ Mount Slnal 6/10*6/24 Jewish TV Nat I Magazine 6 316 17 Him Special Hello Jerusalem Checkup/ Mount Sinai Film Special Eenies Kitchen
JFTV Bulletin Board
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust ln-Ouest Eenies Kitchen ln-Ouest Checkup/ Mount Sinai we Remember The Holocaust
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. Still Small voice or viewpoint JCCA special Place Scharansky Film special Teen scene Film Special Scharansky Film Special Teen Scene
7-7:30 p.m. Bet Din: The Jewish Peoples court Torah Treasure Chest Film Special Still Small voice or viewpoint Hello Jerusalem Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Torah Treasure Chest
7:30-8 p.m. PlllOW Talk Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Film Special Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky 6 1416 28 Jewish tv Nat i Magazine 6 716 21 Film special Pillow Talk
JFTV Bulletin Board
I 'Subject to chanae i


Community calendar

TUESDAY, JUNE 10
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
("enter Singles Department, 18900 N.E.
25 Avenue, will celebrate summer with its
Second Annual Ice-Cream Smorgasbord.
Join in for a cool, refreshing evening of
swimming, great conversation and
delicious ice cream beginning at 7:30 p.m.
at the pool area. Cost is $2 for JCC
members, $4 for non-members. Call
932-4200 for more information.
TUESDAY, JUNE 10 AND
THURSDAY, JUNE 12
A driving course for people over the age
of 55 will be offered from 9 a.m.-l p.m.
Taught in two separate four-hour ses-
sions, participants will receive a cer-
tificate of completion plus a premium dis-
count. Pre-registration for this course is
required. Register in the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Greater Miami,
Michael-Ann Russell Center Senior Adult
Department, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue or
call 932-4200.
TUESDAY, JUNE 17
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue, holds a
Singles Support Group on Tuesdays. The
group, which meets at 7:30 p.m.. serves
as a vehicle for discussion on such topics
as relationships, loneliness, self-esteem
and other related topics. The cost is $1
members, $3 for non-members. Call
932-4200 for more information.
TUESDAY, JUNE 17
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center Senior Adult Department, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, will hold a trip to Miami
Jai Alai. The bus leaves the Center at
10:45 a.m. Lunch is on your own at Mor-
risons. The fee is $3.50 for JCC members,
(4.60 for non-members. The cost includes
.admission, preferred seat and program.
(all 932-4200 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center
presents its monthly Drop-by and Kibbitz
night on the third Wednesday of every
month. June brings back, by popular de-
mand, Late Night Bowling at the West
Dixie Bowling Alley. 15950 West Dixie
Highway, at 9:30 p.m. The cost is $1.75
per game (including shoe rental). Call
251-1394 for more information.
FRIDAY, JUNE 20
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center Senior Adult Department, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, in conjunction with
Mount Sinai Medical Center/Project Sinai
offers a free pulmonary function screen-
ing from 9:30 a.m.-12 noon. The Mount
Sinai Mobile Van will be in front of the
Main Building of the Center. By
mechanically measuring the air you
breathe, this test will determine how well
your lungs are functioning.
SUNDAY, JUNE 24
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center and South Dade Center Singles
D.ePartm,ents, present "A Summer
Night s Cafe." Partying under the stars,
a long cool drink, fresh fruit and ice cold
pasta round off this seductive evening
which takes place at the Airport Hilton-
Poolside, 5101 Blue Lagoon Drive, begin-
ning at 7:30 p.m. The cost is $10 for JCC
members, $12 for non-members. Call
932-4200 for more information.
JUNE 24, 25, 26
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue is offer-
ing a package cruise. Two nights at the
Newport, dinner at the Pub Restaurant
with showtime after dinner and a full day
aboard the Sea Escape, which includes
three buffet meals, gambling, shipboard
activities, entertainment and a visit to
Freeport. Call the Center at 932-4200,
ext. 213, for information about fees for
this program.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center Singles Department, 18900 N.E.
25 Avenue, will hold a mini-workshop
presented by Sharon Silver on the topic of
how dateable you are. The social hour is
from 7:30 p.m.-8 p.m. with the workshop
from 8-9 pm. The cost is $3 for JCC
members. $5 for non-members. Call
932-4200 for more information.
THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER
AUGUST 20-SEPTEMBER 2
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami presents Senior Adult
Camp two fun-filled weeks in the
Pocono Mountains. The cost is $690,
which includes round-trip air-fare, double
occupancy room with private bath, three
kosher meals per day, tips, activities. En-
joy the 70-acre lake for boating and
fishing, shuffle board, miniature golf,
heated swimming pool, Jacuzzi, dancing,
lectures, art, pottery making and more.
For more information contact Gail
Weisberg, 576-1660 or Myra Spolter,
932-4200, ext. 212.
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 5-
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 10 (6 sessions)
The Senior Adult Department of the
Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell, 18900 N.E.
25 Avenue, the Florida Chapter of the Ar-
thritis Foundation and Parkway Regional
Medical Center are sponsoring a Self
Management Course designed to help
people deal effectively with their ar-
thritis. Enrollment is limited and pre-
registration is required. To obtain an ap-
plication form or for further information,
call 932-4200, extension 209. This pro-
gram is free and open to the community.
Memory disorder clinic opens
at Mount Sinai
As a result of special funding from
the State Legislature, a Memory
Disorder Clinic is now open at Mount
Sinai Medical Center. The University
f Miami School of Medicine and
Mount Sinai are two of the four
facilities studying Alzheimer's
Disease in Florida.
Mount Sinai is in its fourth year
working on research with positron
emission tomography (PET). This
modality enables doctors to study
brain function while other physicians
are using imaging to study the brain's
structure. "The structure of the brain
loesn't alter much during the very
'arly stages of the disease, conse-
quently Alzheimer's is not easily
etectable with imaging modalities.
he disease, however, does cause ab-
normalities of function in its early
tages and these abnormalities can be
etected with PET," according to Dr.
anjan Duara, Chief, Section of
ositron Emission Tomography,
La
Department of Radiology, Mount
Sinai Medical Center, and a member
of the State Alzheimer's Advisory
Committee.
Dr. Duara is conducting studies
with persons who have presumptive
Alzheimer's Disease in its early
stages. PET is being used in conjunc-
tion with magnetic resonance imag-
ing to try and define how a diagnosis
of Alzheimer's can be made. Follow-
up studies are being conducted every
six months to one year to determine
whether the disease is progressing in-
to Alzheimer's.
Alzheimer's Disease, described as
"the disease of the century," is the
fourth leading cause of death in the
United States today.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and Mount Sinai Partners in a
caring community.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar Items
(Please Print or Type)
Deadline for October events is September 10
Organization
Event _____
Place______
Day ______
_ Date
Time___
(a.m.
p.m.
Your name
Title ____
MAIL TO:
Phone No.
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33137
Federation Newsmagazine deadlines
This issue of the Federation Newsmagazine is the last that will be published
as an insert to the Jewish Floridian until October 1986. The deadlines for sub-
mission of news releases, calendar items, etc. for the 1986-87 editions of Federa-
tion are as follows:
ISSUE
October 1986
November 1986
December 1986
January 1987
February 1987
March 1987
April 1987
May 1987
June 1987
DEADLINE
September 10
October 15
November 12
December 10
January 14
February 11
March 11
April 8
May 13
PUBLICATION DATE
October 3
November 7
December 5
January 2
February 6
March 6
April 3
May 1
June 5
All items should be submitted to:
Mark Freedman, Editor
Federation Newsmagazine
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
CAJE president and education
director continue school visits
Nan Rich, president of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
(CAJE). and Rabbi Menachem Raab,
Director of CAJE's Day School
Department, continued their ongoing
visits to day schools in our
community.
Rich said of a visit to the Lehrman
Day School, "What a pleasure it was
to visit the school in its newly
renovated facility. The building is the
ultimate in physical plant, but even
more impressive is the obvious feel-
ing of spirit and enthusiasm being
passed from teachers to students." In
observing classes, Rich and Rabbi
Raab noticed the emphasis on in-
tegrating Judaic and general studies
curricula. At the suggestion of Dr.
Amir Baron, principal, they were
treated to an impromptu choral
presentation by an enthusiastic group
of first-graders.
Rich and Rabbi Raab were also im-
pressed by the school's science pro-
gram. "Standing in the center of the
well-equipped science lab, and being
given a complete review of the ex-
citing curriculum, we could well
understand the enthusiasm students
feel toward their science lessons,"
Rich commented.
Entering the grounds of the
Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School, Rich stated that one can-
not help but to be impressed by the
size, layout and campus of South
Florida's largest Jewish day school.
Hillel serves children from early
childhood through 9th grade.
There is a strong continuity bet-
ween the early childhood and primary
grade curriculum programs which
results in the overwhelming percen-
tage of children continuing their
studies in the elementary school. The
educational program in both Judaic
and secular studies is quite intensive.
Students take nine academic periods
a day to fulfill their requirements.
Rabbi Wallace Green, principal, ex-
pressed his pride in the many suppor-
tive programs which offer in-
dividualized instruction to students in
subjects such as reading and math. In
addition, an honors track is offered in
Hebrew, math and science for junior
high students. The 9th grade cur-
riculum is structured on a high school
level, offering such courses as
biology, computer lab, world history
and honors English which meet the
state's high school graduation re-
quirements. In recognition of this
fact, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will be funding Hillel's
9th grade on the level which it funds
other high schools in the community.
Rich noted that the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School is for-
tunate to have extremely dedicated
lay leaders who contribute
significantly to the success of the
school.
Toras Ernes, an Orthodox day
school located on Miami Beach,
serves the needs of a growing Or-
thodox population which requires
separate educational facilities for
boys and girls. Beginning with the
5th grade, this philosophy is im-
plemented and results in small
classes with individualized attention.
CAJE, the Lehrman Day School,
the Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School and Toras Ernes
Academy are beneficiaries of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund. Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, CAJE and day
schools Partners in a caring
community.
Federation, June 1986


r "'

J
t
Ellen Rose named YLC chairman YLC summer singles mission
Ellen Rose
The Young Leadership Council will
proudly celebrate its first anniver-
sary on Sunday, June 29, with a
champagne brunch to be held from 11
a.m.-2 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel, 400 S.E. 2 Avenue. The
featured program will include the in-
stallation of new YLC Board
members.
The installing officer, L. Jules
Arkin, a past Federation president,
said that it will "give me great
pleasure to thank the outstanding
young members of our Jewish com-
munity who have worked with all
their hearts and souls during this, the
inaugural year of the Young Leader-
ship Council. They have not only had
a successful first year They have
been singled out as a model nation-
wide. It will be my honor and
privilege to recognize and install the
new officers and members-at-large
who will endeavor to continue the
work of last year's board and make
the Young Leadership Council even
more successful in the year to come."
Jack H. Levine, outgoing chairman
of the Young Leadership Council,
said, "I am very proud to have been
the first chairman of YLC. Together
with my officers and board, we have
led an organization which boasts a
membership of more than 3,000
young Jewish leaders from the
business and professional communi-
ty. Our programs this year have been
a showcase for the Jewish communi-
ty. Our members contributed more
than $1 million to the 1985-1986 cam-
paign and have shown commitment
and a sense of responsibility that in-
sures the perpetuation of our com-
munity, our people and Israel."
Ellen Rose, newly elected chairman
of the Young Leadership Council,
said. "I am honored to have been
nominated for this position. There
are so many outstanding people in
YLC who would like the opportunity
to serve on this prestigious board.
Unfortunately, there are only 40 posi-
tions available. Our new board is be-
ing filled by many new people. They
are all outstanding leaders and I look
forward to working with each and
every one. We have a most exciting
and challenging year ahead of us."
Rose, an attorney and partner in
the firm of Therrel, Baisden &
Meyer, Weiss, is a member of the
UJA Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet, was the 1985-86 vice Chair-
man of the Young Leadership Council
and is a legal counsel to Federation.
She served as co-chairman of Super
Sunday 1986.
Serving with Rose as YLC vice
chairman is Michael H. Novak, who
served as vice chairman of the
1985-86 YLC Singles Committee.
Novak is a C.P.A with the firm of
Rachlin and Cohen, and has served on
the Federation's Planning and
Budgeting Committee.
The new board members are: Susan
Sirotta, Campaign Committee chair-
man; Robert Kaplan, vice chairman;
Steven J. Brodie, Community and
Political Involvement Committee
chairman; Robert C. Gilbert, vice
chairman; Maureen and Paul
Berkowitz, Couples Committee
chairmen; Felicia and Richard
Schwartz, vice chairmen; Lyn J.
Pont, Missions to Israel Committee
chairman; Barbara Black, vice chair-
man; Zena Inden, Program and
Education Committee chairman;
Isaac K. Fisher, vice chairman; San-
dor Lenner, Public Relations Com-
mittee chairman; Fredric Epstein,
vice chairman; Sanford A. Freedman.
Singles Committee chairman; Arden
Magoon, vice chairman; and
Members-at-Large David
Abramowitz, Frank Adams, Anita
Altman, James G. Asher, Jeffrey S.
Bercow, Richard A. Berkowitz, Ra-
quel Bild, Fern Blum, Samuel J. Dub-
bin, Larry Elbrand. Ina Felsher.
David H. Gray, Barbara Kipnis.
Jeremy S. Larkin, Michelle D. Merlin.
Steven M. Silvers, Joseph A. Smith.
Lorraine Solomon, Karen Brown.
Lawrence Suchman and Charles
Treister.
All members of the Young Leader-
ship Council are invited to join us in
this celebration. An invitation will be
forthcoming. The cost is $21 per per-
son, and dietary laws will be observ-
ed. For more information, call Mar-
sha Kolman at 576-4000, extension
290. We look forward to seeing you
there.
At a party held to celebrate the end of the Federation beneficiary agency CJA-IEF cam-
paign. Federation presented awards to those agencies which achieved 100 percent board
participation.
Shown are, from left. Rabbi Louis Herring. Jewish High School of South Florida;
Federation Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie. who presented the awards; Naomi
Olstsr, Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami (JCC) South Dade Center; Douglas
Miller. JCC Miami Beach Center; William Lehman, Jr.. JCC Michael-Ann Russell Center;
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, JCC Executive Board; Barry Yarchin, Hillel Jewish Student
Centers of Greater Miami; Alfred Golden, Central Agency for Jewish Education; Carol
Romer. B'nai B'rith Youth Organization; Nelson Keshen. Alexander Muss High School in
Israel; Harvey Weinberg. Jewish Vocational Service; and Nancy Lipoff, chairman of the
beneficiary agency campaign.
Not pictured are representatives of the Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy, the Jewish
Family Service, the Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School and the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged, which also attained 100 percent board participation.
From July 13-23, the Federation s
Young Leadership Council, m
cooperation with the United Jewish
Appeal, will sponsor a Summer
Singles Mission to Israel. Miami Mis-
sion leaders include Barbara Black,
Sandy Freedman, Dr. Raymond
Nahmad and Dr. Steven Silvers. The
Mission offers an extraordinary op-
portunity for Miami men and women,
25 to 40 years of age, to visit Israel
with other young business and pro-
fessional people from across the na-
tion. It also offers an opportunity for
young Jews to stand up and be
counted among those who will not let
Muammar Khadafy determine their
travel plans.
By joining the hundreds of young
Jews who will visit Israel this sum-
mer on El Al Airlines, the safest
airline in the world as part of the
National Singles Mission, you and
countless other young Jewish Mia-
mians will be saying that nothing
keep us from showing our 5tf h
wttour brother, lj^
Because this program is so pop^
especially this year, single Jg*
urged to make their reservation
mediately. The cost of the ZL
just $2,100 per person fromZ
all-inclusive. An interest-fitej
merit plan is available from h
Federation to make the SJA
more affordable. A
minimum gift
$365 to the Federation's 1987^Sj
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel EmerJJ
cy Fund Campaign is required.
Instead of playing into the hands J
those who want to stop all travel A
Israel, join the thousands who ril
visit Israel this year because thj
know the country- is tranquil and 21
For additional information, p!e|
call Marsha Kolman at 576-4000a1
tension 290.
President's Mission to Israel
"A Celebration of Ben Gurion's 100th Birthday" is the theme of theGn.
Miami Jewish Federation's 1987 President's Mission to Israel, which willbefc
September 21-26. Herbert and Hazel Canarick will lead this mission, which be]
clusively for members of Federation's Pacesetter Division. Herbert Canarickir
chairman of Federation's Alliance Division, and Hazel is campaign chairmui
the Aventura community.
Highlights of the mission include a reception at the home of Israeli I
Chaim Herzog; a special meeting with Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek; and^
march along the route taken by Israeli paratroopers when they liben
Jerusalem in 1967, culminating at the Western Wall where participants wffl I
received by Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres and Jerusalem Mayor T
Kollek.
Other highlights include an air show at an Israeli Air Force base and ai
media extravaganza show at Sultan's Pool. Mission participants will anofl
private briefings on such topics as the current state of the Israeli economy,|
rorism and religion and state. Visits will be made to Miami's Project Ret
sister city Or Akiva, children's facilities such as day-care centers and nu
schools, Youth AH yah and Ethiopian absorption centers, military bases, andtlnj
Holocaust memorial at Yad Vashem.
The mission is free to those who make a minimum gift of $10,000 to i
Federation's 1987 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency FundProje
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign.
In addition, the Federation will offer, for the first time, an optional thr
extension mini-mission for those who have never before visited the country. Dm
ingthe mini-mission, visits will be made to many of Israel's tourist sites of Jewis|
interest.
For additional information about the 1987 Pacesetter Mission tolsndj
please contact Missions Coordinator Gil Elan at 576-4000, i < i n 215.
Or Akiva .... ,.
Iron pngr 11
perhaps the best opportunity to make
meaningful advances in Or Akiva's
educational system.
The Miami delegation also met with
representatives of the Israeli Dental
Association and the Jewish Agency to
reach a final agreement that would
permit full-time professional opera-
tion of Or Akiva's dental clinic. Ac-
cording to Mort Teicher. "the delega-
tion believes that the need for dental
care and a heightened awareness of
the importance of dental hygiene will
be realized by the clinic's operation."
While the central thrust of the den-
tal clinic is to provide essential care
for children, the delegation requested
that any profits generated by the
clinic be used toward the care of in-
digent patients. Miami will be receiv-
ing, on a monthly basis, reports on
the finances of the clinic as well as
service data for review by the Project
Kenewal Committee.
to considering the long-term
stability and economic development
of Or Akiva. the delegation has
recommended the establishment of a
subcommittee which will be charged
with the responsibility of reviewing
economic development proposals for
warded from Israel. "In our continu-
ng relationship with Or Akiva, the
time has come for us to locate poten-
tial investors f int ventures"*!
Or Akiva. spec ill> the idennl
tion of pro,... eh couM *j
manufactured e,TecI' LJ
Israel and ex| "\ *
StamVvC. M\. -A->Hb*J
Akiva'to expan tt ,;!"mlt'T
and enhance Iocs ploymeat^
tunities." he ad
At Federa. ^jl
Directors meeting. Project Kern1"
Committee Chairman >taiW_.
Myers and Mortie,cherpre*fH
report of their visit and made
allocation request tor the i- I
fiscal year for Or Akiva. hichl
approved by the board.
'I think that our Federationg
recognizes the ^! S^
have been made in Or W^M
continuing support of urn rf
vital today as it was st the o
our partnership. There are Krtunities for giving: *"*&
oiect Renewal/Or Akivs tfJJ
by designated giving, sue" ^
nLie by Ralph Cherron and
ly for the development ^
Plaza in Or Akiva: ana ^
economic investment, au ^
tant, and will ensure that" ^
reaches its full DO****"tfJ
Project Renewal communit)
concluded.
16 Federation, June 1986


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