The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02988

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"eJewish Floridliajni
Volume 59Number 19
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, May 9,1986
FfdShochtl .:,- Price 50 Cents
()n Israel's 38th Anniversary
[The ties binding the State of Israel to the Jewish People are not
{motivated by immediate needs or tangible gains but out of a sense
{ofcommon purpose and destiny.' David Ben-Gurion (1886-1973).
No Dreamer
m.
Ben-Gurion Nursed
The State Into Being
By SHIMON BEN NOACH
The simplicity of David Ben-
Kurion's grave belies the impact
lof his life on the affairs of
Imatikind. More than any other
single person, it was Ben-Gurion
[who brought the Jewish people
out of the wilderness of exile into
its ancestral homeland. Yet, at his
request, the tombstone at Kibbutz
Sde Boker in his beloved Negev
desert hears one brief epitaph:
alah nrtzah 1906 ("emigrated to
fsrael in 1906").
Though he was Israel's first
prime minister and his nation's
nost influential politician for
everal decades, the act of aliyah
Nmained in his own eyes the most
important deed of his life.
Thus it was in 1906 that David
Grien, with only a small knapsack
on his back, left his native Plonsk
in Russian-ruled Poland. He was
20 years old at the time and the
sixth child of Sheindle and
Avigdor Grien'. His father was a
lawyer; his mother had died in his
infancy. As a teenager, the young
David became obsessed by the
dream of Zionism and determined
to settle in Eretz Yisrael.
HIS FIRST experience in the
land of his dreams was the dusty
port of Jaffa. Ben-Gurion did not
like its squalor, and he continued
on foot across the swamps and
sand dunes that today have
become the metropolis of Tel
Continued on Page 15-A
Charge Soviets With
Violating Helsinki
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A leading expert on
Soviet policy accused the
Soviet government of
"systematically violating"
the humanitarian provisions
of the Helsinki Accords.
Testifying recently before the
U.S. Commission on Security and
Cooperation in Europe. Dr.
William Korey, director of inter-
national research for B'nai B'rith,
said the Helsinki pact obligates its
signatories including the Soviet
Union to "expedite in a positive
and humanitarian manner the
handling of applications for reu-
nion of families."
Korey testified that the Gor-
bachev regime's apparent public
acceptance of the baisc thesis of
the Helsinki Accords the
linkage between human rights and
security matters differs
markedly and alarmingly from
Soviet government actions.
HE POINTED out that Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev told the
recent Communist Party congress
that "resolution in a humane and
positive spirit of questions related
to the reuniting of families, mar-
riage and the promotion of con-
tracts between people and
organizations is a fundamental
principle of an all-embracing
system of international security."
Nonetheless, Korey said the
Soviet government has con-
sistently harassed, imprisoned,
and abused Soviet Jews wishing
to leave the country to be reunited
with family abroad. According to
Korey:
"By 1984, the number of Soviet
Jews permitted to leave was less
than 1,000. Contrast this amount
with the 51,000 who emigrated in
1979. Soviet authorities contend
the bulk of Jewry who had wished
to leave have done so. The facts
are otherwise. More than 380,000
Soviet Jews have applied for
emigration visas. At least 11,000
other Soviet Jews have been
refused permission to leave."
KOREY TESTIFIED that the
plight of the refusenik is par-
ticularly excruciating. "Someone
who wishes to leave is often faced
with a loss of his job, deprivation
Dr. William Korey
of academic standing, vilification
and social ostracism, imprison-
ment, and physical attack.
"This harassment," said Korey,
Moscow has harassed,
imprisoned, and abused
Jews wishing to leave.
"stand in stark and glaring con-
trast to obligations under the
Helsinki Accords assumed by the
signatories. The Soviet govern-
ment seems to have ignored a
crucial provision of the accords
which specifies that the rights of
applicants for exit visas are not to
be modified."
Nuke Disaster
Sparks Debate Over
Power Future in Israel
New Nuke Plants Need Questioned Page 4-A
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A debate is shaping up in
the government over the
issue of nuclear power
plants in Israel. Officials in-
sist the decision should be
made on the basis of the
future energy needs and
economic factors rather
than the concerns raised by
the nuclear accident in
Chernobyl, the Ukraine,
recently.
The Cabinet is divided. Gad
Yaacobi, Minister for Economic
Planning, and Gideon Patt,
Minister of Science and
Technology, advise against the
purchase of nuclear reactors. But
Energy Minister Moshe Shahal
said it must not be ruled out under
pressure of the disaster in the
Soviet Union.
YAACOBI NOTED at Sunday's
Cabinet meeting that oil prices
are expected to stabilize at a low
level and stay there for some time.
"To say the least, it is much less
urgent to take decisions concern-
ing this matter (nuclear reactors)
now than it was two years ago,"
he said.
Patt pointed out that a reactor
would have to be located
somewhere in the northern Negev
for safety reasons. But such a site
would add 50 percent to the
nominal price of a reactor because
of the high cost of providing water
a coolant. On top of this, he said,
there was the cost of defense and
security measures owing to'the
proximity of the reactor to the
Egyptian border.
Shahal insisted that Israel
should continue to gather infor-
Continued on Page 9-A
New Florida Bill
Aims At Social Club Discrimination
Sen. Roberta Fox
TALLAHASSEE The
Senate Commerce Commit-
tee of the Florida State
Legislature voted Monday
to force private clubs to
open their membership to
all social groups without
discrimination. Clubs failing
to do so will have to choose
between two penalties: give
up their liquor licenses or
their business tax
deductions.
Under Bill SB-I, private clubs
would have to decide whether
they are "social" or "business"
clubs and then register their
choice with the Florida Division of
Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco.
Business clubs would then have to
pledge not to discriminate against
certain ethnic, racial and religious
groups or lose their liquor
license if the state found
otherwise.
CLUBS CHOOSING "social"
status, meaning that they are free
to discriminate, would result in
their members' losing tax write-
offs for business lunches, cor-
porate memberships and other
perks at the club.
The bill emerged as a com-
promise between Dade Senators
Jack Gordon (D., Miami Beach)
and Roberta Fox (D., South
Dade). Gordon's original proposal,
which failed in the Legislature
last year, was that discriminatory
clubs should lose their liquor
Continued on Page 7-A
Sen. Jack Gordon


*^T
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Judge To Ponder Evidence
In Case Against War Criminal
CINCINNATI (JTA) -
The two-week deportation
hearing against a 62-year-
old construction worker ac-
cused of persecuting in-
mates at a Nazi labor camp
during the Holocaust
recently concluded here,
leaving the fate of Leonid
Petkiewytsch in the hands
of Judge 0. John Brahos.
He is not expected to render
a decision until early
September.
Petkiewytsch, a resident of the
suburban community of Fin-
neytown, is accused by the
government of having concealed
his past war-time activities when
he applied for entry into the coun-
try in 1955, and having par-
ticipated as a guard at the Kiel-
Hassee camp in the "persecution
of persons because of their race,
religion, national origin and
political opinion under the direc-
tion of the Nazi government of
Germany."
TESTIFYING in his own
defense, Petkiewytsch admitted
having served as a guard at the
labor camp in Germany, but claim-
ed, according to a report in The
American Israelite here, that he
never persecuted prisoners. In ad-
dition, he denied that he concealed
information from American
authorities when he applied for a
visa to enter the U.S.
The Kiel-Hassee labor camp,
one of the lesser-known camps
run by the Nazi war machine, had
an average population of some
1,800 persons. There are
estimates that 550 died there; 150
by execution. The Jewish popula-
tion there was relatively small,
with most arriving in the last
months of the war. About 160
Jewish prisoners were liberated
from the camp in April, 1945.
Petkiewytsch is not a U.S.
citizen, and it was his attempt in
1982 to become a naturalized
citizen that alerted an immigra-
tion official to his past activities.
He apparently indicated on the
1982 application that he had been
a labor camp guard. The official
alerted the Justice Department's
Office Of Special Investigations in
Washington.
PETKIEWYTSCH, whose twin
brother Goerge Perke of Western
Hills also provided testimony, told
the immigration hearing that he
and his parents fled Poland, fear-
72 Emigrated
NEW YORK (JTA) The
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported that 72 Jews
emigrated from the Soviet Union
in April, 25 more than were allow-
ed to emigrate in March. Of the 72
April emigrants, 18 went to
Israel. From October, 1968 to
April, 1986, 265,939 persons left
the USSR with Israeli visas, and
some 163,620 of them went to
Israel.
ing the Russian forces. His father
had been serving as a mayor of a
town under Nazi occupation, the
Israelite said in its extensive
coverage of the hearing.
He and his brother were later
assigned jobs by the Germans at
the Kiel-Hassee camp, they said.
They told the court that they were
given little choice in the matter:
either go as guards or as
prisoners.
Issued carbines and uniforms,
the brothers testified that they
escorted prisoners back and forth
from Keil for daily work details,
patrolled the perimeter of the
camp, and did other chores. They
asserted they never beat
prisoners or participated in any
executions.
While the brothers said the
camp was like an ordinary jail, six
Jewish survivors of Kiel-Hassee
provided testimony about the
brutal conditions of the labor
camp.
BOTH BROTHERS denied
concealing the fact that they fail-
ed to alert U.S. authorities in 1955
that they had been arrested and
imprisoned by the British for
three years for possible war
crimes. Judge Brahos informed
Petke before his testimony that
information he provided could be
used against him by the govern-
ment at a later date.
The U.S. official whom the
brothers say they presented the
British imprisonment documents
to is Marvin Hick man, who was
vice consul in Germany in 1955.
He testified at the hearing that,
according to documentation on
the visa application, Petkiewytsch
did not present the British
documentation. Hickman said he
would not have approved the visa
application had he known of
Petkiewytsch's past activities.
Brahos estimated that it will
take four to five months before he
reaches a decision. This time will
include post-trial presentations by
both sides. Afterwards, appeals
can be expected, which could go to
the Supreme Court.
IF PETKIEWYTSCH is found
guilty of persecuting persons
because of their race, religion and
political opinion under the direc-
tion of the Nazis, there can be no
"discretionary relief on the part
of the judge, according to U.S.
law.
However, if the judge were to
find Petkiewytsch not guilty on
that account and guilty of having
concealed information about his
past wartime activities when he
applied for entry into the U.S., he
can apply "discretionary relief
and suspend deportation, the
Israelite explained.
American Israelite editor
Phyllis Singer, who attended and
reported on the hearing, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
public reaction from both the
Jewish and general communities
was mixed. "Most of all, there was
disinterest," she said.
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IN ISRAEL.
Surrounded by a photo exhibit of Soviet Jews
in the rotunda of one of the U.S. House of
Representatives' office buildings, Con-
gressman Dante Fascell (D., Flo.) reads a list
of some 80 names of Rejuseniks, ending with
the words, 'Next Year in Jerusalem.' The
South Florida Representative, who is chair-
man of the House Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, participated in a pre-Passover program
sponsored by the National Conference
Soviet Jewry xn conjunction with the CoruZ.
sional Wives for Soviet Jews, of which Mn
Fascell is a member. A former chairman 5
Commission on Security and Cooperatm
Europe, Fascell has been honored for hit J2
nutng efforts in behalf of Soviet Jewry. Ht wt
with a number of Soviet rejuseniks dmru,
visit to the USSR last month.
Holtzman Urges
U.S. Open Secret Files on Nazis
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman called
on the United Nations Mon-
day to open to the public its
more than 40,000 secret
files on Nazi war criminals.
Holtzman's call, made during a
rally across the street from the
UN headquarters, followed a
similar official request last week
by Israel's UN Ambassador
Binyamin Netanyahu in a letter to
Secretary General Javier Perez de
Cuellar.
"Sadly, the spirit of Bitburg is
still alive today," Holtzman
declared at the rally, referring to
President Reagan's visit last year
to the military cemetery in Bit-
burg, West Germany, where
members of the Waffen SS are
buried. The President's visit
created an outcry in Jewish and
non-Jewish communities in this
country and abroad.
"The Kurt Waldheim affair -
the indifference, and even sup-
port, of world leaders over his
Nazi past and his 40 year cover-up
of it shows that the spirit of Bit-
burg lives on," Holtzman
declared.
SHE SAID the fact that
Waldheim finished first in
Austria's Presidential elections
Sunday shows that "Austrians
have given a wanted Nazi war
criminal the opportunity to be
elected to lead their country." She
added: "Even more appalling has
been the reaction of many world
leaders. West German Chancellor
(Helmut) Kohl, the architect of
Bitburg, has spoken in
Waldheim's defense, calling those
who criticized Waldheim's war-
time service arrogant."
Menachem Rosensaft, founding
chairman of the International
Network of Children of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors, also de-
nounced Kohl for publicly defen-
ding Waldheim as "a great
patriot."
"One year after Kohl and Presi-
dent Reagan honored the memory
of dead Nazi soldiers at Bitburg,"
Rosensaft declared, "Kohl is pay-
ing public tribute to a living
former Nazi officer who has been
exposed as a proven liar and an ac-
Helmut Kohl called
criticism arrogant.'
cused war criminal."
"Today," Rosensaft said, "w|
demand that Waldheim be bura1
from entering the U.S. regardla
of whether or not he is elected I
President of Austria."
AY ALL SCH ANZER, the Ui I
chairman of the North America
Jewish Students' Network,
nounced that his organization i
undertaking an international at j
paign to divert Waldheiii|
$100,000 annual UN pensooi
several groups of Jewish and M
Jewish survivors of Nazi bruOfl
in Greece and Yugoslavia, wta
the former Secretary Genea
served during World War II.
Meanwhile. Israeli and BU
ficials said that a reply to Isnrf
request that the IN "take
mediate stops necessary toinsn 1
free access of the general pubbc"
to the secret files on Nazi nr i
criminals, might take 's*
time" because a decision invdw
more than 18 membe
governments of the now-dena*
UN War Crimes Commissa
which compiled the files on *
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\U.S. Jews Vexed
By AIPAC Decision Not To Lobby Against Saudis
Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By JUDITH KOHN
ASHINGTON (JTA)
When the American-
li Public Affairs Com-
(AIPAC) decided last
ch not to lobby against a
posed missile sale to
.di Arabia, the un-
ited relief it brought the
(ministration was match-
by vexation from some in
Jewish community.
ailure to oppose an arms sale
country that bankrolls the
and Syria and refuses to en-
Israel-Arab peace negotia-
sends a wrong signal both to
Administration and to the
world, the critics say.
..ere have agreed with the
AC reasoning that expending
on a battle against arms
y in the Saudi arsenal and
h Israel itself has not con-
ed sufficiently threatening to
ant a bitter campaign against
sale, would unnecessarily
; tension with the Ad-
istration just when
-Israeli relations are at an un-
dented high.
STEAD, they say, attention
Bt be focused on the important
|e ahead protecting aid to
| si for fiscal year 1987 from
unpredictable swings of the
Bgressional deficit-cutting
let.
one Jewish organization
:c ipied with U.S. and Israeli
ise, the AIPAC move was a
in its direction. The Jewish
ute for National Security Af-
(JINSA), a conservative
M> that advocates a strong
man defense, has long main-
d that some battles against
to Arab countries are better
B" : 'Hi_'ht.
main argument for selling
^<>ns to the Saudis has often
the need to show U.S.
^ihandedness" in the Middle
in order to lure Arab coun-
into the peace process,
As newsletter, Security Af-
"hserved in a recent issue,
t added that to really pur-
Saudi loyalty would take "a
re (weapons) than we have
\KRTHELESS, the
riai maintained, "There are
more realistic reasons to
|ome weapons at some times:
>t want to see the fall of
the Saudi royal family; we do not
want the oil fields in radical
hands; we do want the Saudis (and
others) to defend themselves in
the event of an Iranian attack; we
don't want to use U.S. troops ex-
cept as a last resort."
"Our overall position on arms
sales is that you can't say they're
all bad," Shoshana Bryen,
JINSA's executive director, said
in an interview.
On the other hand, she stressed,
there should be pressure for the
adoption of measures ensuring
that those weapons remain in the
right hands.
Take the shoulder-fired Stinger
missiles included in the current
Saudi package. "I would go one
step beyond AIPAC and I would
be looking for that guy who would
put a rider on the sale," said
Bryen.
The possession of Stinger
missiles in Saudi Arabia, she
stressed, does not hold out the
danger to Israel that the same
weapons pose in Jordanian hands.
The problem with Stingers, she
said, is that "the Saudis have a
tendency of losing things."
TO ENSURE that arms destin-
ed for the Saudis do not end up
elsewhere, as they have in the
past, a rider on the Saudi package,
said Bryen, might include the con-
ditions under which the arms
would be stored in Saudi Arabia
and who can have access to them.
Perhaps it would involve keeping
the Stingers under the guard of
U.S. military personnel.
The strategy of challenging
every Arab arms sale in its entire-
ty, maintained Bryen, resulted in
the 1981 sale to the Saudis of
racks and refueling tankers for
Saudi F-15 fighter jets part of
the controversial AWACS
package tlat represent a far
greater threat to Israel's security
than the AWACS planes.
"We said the mistake in the
AWACS was in the Jewish com-
munity," Bryen said. "It was our
opinion then and still is that there
was no way ever to have defeated
that sale."
RATHER THAN fight the un-
winnable battle which lost to
the Administration by just a few
votes after months of bitter cam-
paigning AIPAC and Jewish
organizations here would have
done better to support a move by
the late Sen. Henry Jackson (D.,
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Wash.) to limit the sale to
AWACS alone, Bryen maintain-
ed. The Carter Administration
prevented the defeat of its propos-
ed sale of F-15s to Saudi Arabia in
1978 only by promising that they
would carry solely defensive
equipment.
The bomb racks and fuel
tankers have already been
delivered to the Saudis, while the
AWACS are scheduled to be sent
following submission to Congress
of the President's certification
that the Saudis have provided
"substantial assistance" to the
United States in promoting peace
in the region.
The condition was adopted by
Congress in 1985 on the basis of
Presidential commitments. Sen.
Alan Cranston (D., Calif.), who is
leading the Senate fight against
the Saudi arms sale, had said he
will oppose delivery of the
AWACS as well.
JINSA'S differences with
AIPAC on strategy notwithstan-
ding, the organization, which just
celebrated its tenth anniversary,
in many ways reflects the growing
emphasis in both the Jewish com-
munity here and among U.S.
policy-makers on mutual defense
interests in the Middle East as the
basis for a strong U.S.-Israel rela-
tionship a shift helped along by
a Republican Administration that
views its interests in
predominantly East-West terms.
JINSA's officers include its vice
president Morris Amitay, a
former director of AIPAC, and its
secretary, Stephen Rosen,
AIPAC's director of research and
information.
The seeds of JINSA were sown
with the Yom Kippur War of
1973, which led a group of conser-
vative American Jews to conclude
there was a dual need for a
defense-minded Jewish organiza-
tion: to persuade the Jewish com-
munity of the necessity of a strong
U.S. defense, and to press the
case for Israel as a U.S. strategic
asset inside the American defense
establishment.
THIS WAS a time when resent-
ment is said to have been fester-
ing in the military over a perceiv-
ed hostility by many Jewish
legislators toward the budgetary
needs of the Pentagon at a time
when massive quantities of
American weapons were being
shipped off to the Jewish State.
"It developed that so many of
our Jewish compatriots, whose
hearts had bled, as ours had, at
the slender thread by which the
fate of Israel was decided in those
crucial days and weeks (of Oc-
tober, 1973) those very same
people, all too many of them
had not been as supportive as they
should have been of the
strengthening process of the
United States military forces in
the many years preceding 1973,
and many of them had a kind of
mindset which was very difficult
to change," said Herbert Fierst,
JINSA's chairman of the board, at
a recent 10th anniversary dinner.
The dinner featured the presen-
tation of JINSA's fourth Henry
Jackson Distinguished Service
Award, named after the late
Democratic Senator from
Washington who is remembered
as a major spokesman for national
defense issues and a strong sup-
porter of Israel.
THE AWARD, whose three
previous recipients were Jackson,
former U.S. Ambassador to the
United Nations Jeane
Kirkpatrick, and Rep. Jack Kemp
(R., N.Y.), was presented this
year to Sen. Rudy Boschwitz (R.,
Minn.), a member of JINSA's
Board of Advisors.
Also honored at the dinner was
JINSA's first president and cur-
rent U.S. Assistant Secretary of
State for Human Rights, Richard
Schifter.
"The fact is that whereas
around ten years ago the word
defense caused people to look at
you askance, that isn't the case
any more, and there's increased
recognition in the Jewish com-
munity of the United States of the
need for a strong American
defense," Schifter observed.
Without a doubt, JINSA has
established itself in Washington.
With a membership of some
15,000 and a network of valuable
contacts in the Pentagon, it will
soon be represented in the Con-
Continued on Page 14-A
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Page 4-A TTieJewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Israel's 38th
Anniversary May 14
Israel will celebrate its 38th anniversary
of independence next Wednesday, May 14.
Israelis, and Jews around the world, will join
ranks in marking this notable occasion.
This year's Independence Day is little dif-
ferent from other more recent celebrations
in the sense that Israel continues to face pro-
found political, social and economic pro-
blems at home, no less than military and
diplomatic complexities abroad.
The Unity Government is scheduled to
rotate in October, but the frank schisms of
opinion between the currently-ruling Labor
Party and the expectant Likud in the form
of Yitzhak Shamir as he waits in the wings
to return to power are broad enough as to
raise speculation whether rotation will lead
to a ruling impasse in the coalition and a call
for new elections.
These schisms of opinion exist not only at
home over questions of the economy
Likud continues to lick its wounds as Labor
takes the credit for bringing inflation under
some semblance of control but they ex-
tend into politices governing the territories
and therefore foreign policy, as well.
World leaders concerned with Middle
Eastern matters are frankly concerned
about the October rotation. From President
Reagan to Egypt's President Mubarak,
there is a fear of lame duck aura about Israel
until then.
Many Growing Strengths
On the other hand, Israel's 38th anniver-
sary celebration next week can point to very
positive achievements in the recent past
that make this celebration more festive than
others that came before it.
In the wake of the war in Lebanon,
Israel's international image and its
diplomatic status abroad were never lower.
Little more than two years later, the com-
plete opposite is true. The link of friendship
between the United States and Israel is
firmer than at any previous time in Israel's
modern history. Increasingly in the U.S. it is
rooted more in the valuable fabric of cultural
affinity, intellectual exchange and strategic
purpose than in the older patterns of
"special relationship" tinged with frank
feelings of "guilt" and "burden."
Such a state of affairs is not only healthier,
but it has been obviously far more produc-
tive of worthwhile Israeli diplomatic
achievement elsewhere. From Spain's re-
cent recognition of Israel and an exchange
of ambassadors between the two countries
to the Vatican's current consideration of
diplomatic relations with Israel by sometime
next year, the number of new friendships
abroad Israel is making appears to be
unprecedented.
Achievements may or may not be balanced
out by continuing problems and yet newer
ones on the horizon. But Israel continues,
on its 38th anniversary of independence,
again to show that it is a free, kinetic, pro-
ductive society whose aims may be stymied
but are never stalled by its enemies.
That lame duck aura is more likely, in fact,
just that aura.
Austria's Dilemma
It is not entirely surprising that Kurt
Waldheim nearly made it the first time
around in his run for the presidency of
Austria. What is somewhat surprising is
Jewish Florida an
that the recent revelations about his Nazi
past helped spur his candidacy.
This says something about Austria itself
that it should have been galvanized into
voting for Waldheim in greater numbers
precisely because he had a Nazi past. Never
mind that he lied. Never mind that he is still
lying about his World War II experiences as
he recounted them in an autobiographical
volume he wrote. The Austrian electorate
has circled the wagons and rallies to
Waldheim's defense.
It is bad enough that none of these recent
revelations were around when Waldheim
was elected Secretary General of the United
Nations. But that they continue to make no
difference to his countrymen even now stag-
gers the imagination.
No wonder some responsible nations are
already reexamining the future of their
diplomatic relations with Austria should
Waldheim win out in his runoff effort in
June. Not to put this nation of confection on
notice that it will be a diplomatic pariah in
the event of a Waldheim victory would be to
endorse Waldheim himself. And those
Austrians for whom Waldheim's Nazi past
makes a laudable difference.
Bill Against Bigotry
We are not yet quite willing to shout hur-
rah now that the Florida Senate Commerce
Committee has approved Bill SB-I to limit
the rights of social clubs that practice
membership discrimination against certain
ethnic, racial and religious groups. The full
Senate has yet to vote on it.
The Committee endorsed the bill almost
unanimously, except for Sen. Richard
Langley (R., Clermont), who blusteringly
called it socialism and, in a non sequitur, of
the day that lawyers will be forced to accept
homosexuals as clients. But this was not the
only fervently bigoted plea in the cause of a
club's right to practice discriminatory
policies.
William Bostwick, a member of Jackson-
ville's super-elitist University Club, angrily
responded to the bill by declaring that peo-
ple "who grew up eating with a knife, fork
and spoon don't like to argue about whether
to use chopsticks."
We chopsticks-users were in fact painfully
reminded by Bostwick that Patrick Henry
had declared: "Give me liberty." He had not
begged for "anti-discrimination laws."
The bill was a frank compromise between
After Meltdown
ON A OCAR m YOU CAN $...
the original version last year of Sen. Jack
Gordon (D., Miami Beach) and Sen. Roberta
Fox (D., South Dade). Gordon had demand-
ed that clubs that continue to discriminate
be stripped of their liquor licenses. Fox has
more recently pressed for penalizing
members belonging to elitist social clubs so
that they would lose tax write-offs for
business lunches, corporate memberships
and other such club perks.
As the compromise now stands should the
bill pass, clubs will in future have to choose
between whether they are "social" or
"business" in nature. It is the "social" clubs
that would lose their tax write-offs; the
"business" clubs would have their liquor
licenses yanked.
We applaud the Committee's approval of
the bill. But the backwater, rural sentiment
that was so loud in the debate may yet roll
over the bill's best intentions. Sen. Langley
is not alone as Jacksonville's University
Club member Bostwick demonstrated out
there in the elitist electorate. Or as Quincy's
Sen. Pat Thomas' negativism showed when
he bitterly surmised that "nobody wants to
go on the damm (italics ours) record as being
for discrimination."
It certainly deserves to be passed. Sen.
Fox made a splendid case for the bill when
she observed that "People have a right to go
off and form their own ratty yacht club."
But, argued Fox, "What they don't have a
right to do is make me subsidize their three- .
martini lunches while they discriminate."
Bravo.
Concern Triggered for Relatives, Future
Friday, May 9, 1986
Volume 59
30 NISAN 5746
Number 19
By HUGH ORGEL
The nuclear disaster in the
Soviet Union has triggered
concern among Russian im-
migrants in Israel for the
safety of relatives in Kiev,
only 60 miles south of Cher-
nobyl, site of the nuclear
power plant where an ap-
parent meltdown occurred
It has also raised questions by
Knesset members about the
wisdom of building nuclear power
plants in Israel. Nuclear physicists
and engineers have gone on radio
and television here to explain the
uses and possible effects of a
reactor breakdown. Meanwhile,
- the atmosphere is being checked
for radioactive fall-out from the
accident in the Ukraine.
LEVELS ARE normal and ex-
perts have assured the public that
even if the high altitude winds
were to reverse direction an
unlikely prospect and blow
toward the Middle East, the levels
of radioactivity would be harmless
by the time the contaminated
winds reached here.
The Soviet immigrant communi-
ty, however, is far more alarmed
over the health and safety of their
relatives in Kiev, the third largest
city in the Soviet Union, and sur-
rounding areas. Their fears have
been heightened by the secrecy of
Soviet officialdom which has
released scant details of the
disaster and whose low casualty
figures are considered implausible
by Western experts.
Russian Jews here trying to
reach Kiev by telephone have
been told by operators that their
parties were not available or that
all lines were busy. One woman
who managed to reach relatives in
Kiev by phone said the people she
spoke to were surprised by her
anxiety and insisted that condi-
tions in Kiev were completely nor-
mal. They said there was no ex-
citement in the city or its en-
virons, she reported.
KIEV HAS a Jewish population
of between 300,000-400,000 out of
a total population of some two
million people. The calm there
may be the result of Soviet
secrecy toward their own people.
According to Western sources,
the Russian population has been
given few details of the disaster
by the official media and has
learned of its magnitude only
gradually by listening to broad-
casts from the U.S. and Western
Only one Israeli
radio operator
heard a report of
many casualties.
Europe which are normally
jammed.
Israeli ham radio operators who
have contacted amateur radio
operators in Kiev received
assurances that all was well. Only
one Israeli operator heard a
report of many casualties. Ap-
parently, Kiev residents learned
only five days later of the accident
that occurred and from what the
Israelis could ascertain, no special
precautions had been taken in
Yair Tsaban. a Mapam Knesset
member, and others are deman-
ding a debate on the dangers of
nuclear power plants in Israel in
light of the Soviet disaster. Israel
has one such plant, located near
Dimona in the Negev. On his visit
to France last month, Premier
Shimon Peres is reported to have
discussed the purchase of another
French nuclear reactor to
generate electric power in Israel.


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
17,000 Have Paid With Lives for Israel's Independence
Israel celebrates its 88th an-
niversary of independence on
May U- _________________
:::::*:*. uMtHl'.'J MM. MM. i^'Wi
By LILI EYLON
A children's playground
deep in the Jerusalem
Forest. A symposium on the
subject of cotton-growing. A
Torah scroll in a southern
synagogue. An annual prize
for fostering Arab-Jewish
relations. The common
denominator of these
diverse items and hundreds
of others is their dedication
to a fallen soldier of Israel:
each bears the name of a
son. brother, husband or
father who died while defen-
ding his country.
It is safe to say that r.o nation
honors and commemorates its
dead as do the people of Israel. A
people with a traditional respect
for human life ("he who saves one
soul is as if he saves a whole
world"), whose annals are filled
by exile, pogrom and the
Holocaust, is bound to be par-
ticularly sensitive to life, suffering
and death. And in a country
which, since its inception, has
known several wars and no real
peace, there has been ample op-
portunity to demonstrate this
sensitivity.
SINCE November, 1947, some
17.000 of the nation's sons and
daughters have paid with their
lives in official" wars, isolated
incidents or terrorist attacks. The
respect rendered them and the
finesse of feeling toward the
bereaved first become evident by
the manner in which their death is
communicated to their families.
There is no impersonal telegram
or letter.
A specially-trained army
representative, usually a member
of the peer group of the deceased,
plus two or thre civilian
volunteers, one of whom is often a
bereaved person himself, first
check the medical status of the
parents or widow and question
neighbors about any special pro-
blems which may exist within the
family. Only after all the relevant
facts become known to them, do
the bearers of the sad tidings ap-
proach the survivors.
Israel honors its sons in a varie-
ty of ways. The Commemoration
Unit of the Department of
Rehabilitation at the Ministry of
The details of the battle are not apparent, but the
message is clear. This unique torch is a symbol of
remembrance for Israel's fallen soldiers.
Defense has been publishing two
series of books: "Yizkor," with
systematic biographies of all who
have fallen, and "Scrolls of Fire,"
containing the prose and poetry,
scientific writings, paintings,
photographs and other creative
works of the boys whose lives
were cut short.
"When I peruse these books,"
said Prof. Urbach, a bereaved
father, who is president of the
Israel Academy of Science and
Humanities, "I see what the peo-
ple of Israel has lost."
CURRENTLY Rama Flint,
deputy department director, is
working on a literary memorial
called "On Behalf Of and On the
Way to the State." The book deals
with the pre-state fallen during
the years 1860-1947: those who
fell in active service with the
Jewish Brigade, Hashomer, Nili
Etzel and the like, and those who
lost their lives in incidents such as
the explosion on Ben Yehuda
Street and those who perished on
the way to Israel from Yemen,
Syria and Europe.
More than 700 group and in-
dividual monuments stand as
silent witnesses to a nation's long
memory. Numerous settlements
bear the names of defenders.
Mishmar Hashiva commemorates
the seven who fell in 1947 accom-
panying a food convoy to besieged
Jerusalem. Halamed Hay
remembers the 35 defenders of
Gush Etzion. Public parks, books
on various subjects, buses to
transport handicapped children, a
high school club of radio hams:
each brings home the message
that a young person, strong, and
often wise beyond his years, lived
in the community, attended the
local school, read, played and
died before his time.
Through the years, family and
friends have published a total of
some 3,200 memorial books of
writings by and about their dear
ones. Kibbutznik Yehuda Ben
Horin who, during the Six-Day
War lost both of his sons on the
same day, recently presented the
Tel Aviv University with a gift of
a 1,700-volume library he
gathered on the subject of grief.
In Israel's close-knit society,
every soldier is considered kin. It
is thus fitting that one of the most
important and joyful holidays, In-
dependence Day, is immediately
preceded by Remembrance Day.
THE VERY dear price for
Israel's existence is marked in of-
ficial commemorative ceremonies
Continued on Pag 12-A
Amal Nasr-El-Din
Israeli Druze, in Likud Party, Unique Among Members of Knesset
By SIMON GRIYER
Amal Nasr-El-Din is a
man of unusual political opi-
nions. Indeed, he is unique
among Knesset Members in
so far as he is the only non-
Jewish deputy in the Likud,
representing the Herat fac-
tion, which is associated
with strident and militant
Jewish nationalism.
But Nasr-El-Din sees no con-
tradictions in being a Druze and a
member of the Herut movement.
"The Druze living in Eretz Yisrael
signed a covenant with the Jews
even before the state was
established in 1948," he says.
"Therefore, the aims of Israeli
Druze and Jews are the same. We
share common hopes and fears.
And so it is no problem for me to
identify with all aspects of Herut
ideology and all of the move-
ment's policies."
INDEED, Nasr El-Din's views
on virtually every topic concur
with the more moderate wing of
the Herut leadership. He believes
in the Jewish right to settle in all
parts of Judea, Samaria and Gaza
and does not want to see Jorda-
nian sovereignty over any part of
the West Bank. He does not ad-
vocate outright annexation of the
administered territories but
wants to see the introduction of
autonomy as outlined in the Camp
David accords signed with Egypt.
The Golan Heights is a subject
close to his heart because the
15,000 Druze who live there are
popularly seen in Israel as a
disgruntled group who support
Syria. "This is not the case," he
stresses. "Ask them off the record
whether they prefer Israeli or
Syrian rule, and. I can guarantee
each person will tell you that they
prefer Israel. But they are scared
to speak out publicly because they
fear that one day Israel will give
back the Golan as they gave back
Sinai. We must reassure them
that the Golan Heights will always
be a part of Israel."
Nasr-El-Din himself comes from
Daliyat el-Carmel, a village near
Haifa which is the largest Druze
settlement in Israel. Born in 1928,
he is a lifelong member of the
Herut movement, having served
as chairman of the local Druze and
Arab branch of the Herut party
and one of their representatives
on the local workers' council,
before he entered the Knesset in
1977. He is chairman of the local
Association of Families of Fallen
Soldiers and is particularly proud
of the prowess of Druze soldiers in
the IDF.
THE MK regrets that Israel's
Arab minority is unable to serve
in the IDF, but feels that under
the circumstances this is not
possible. "Israeli Arabs see
themselves as part of the Arab
world," he states, "and unfor-
tunately many Israeli Arabs iden-
tify with the PLO. Clearly it
would not be appropriate for them
to serve in the Israeli army."
Nevertheless, Nasr-El-Din
asserts that Israeli Arabs, Druze
and other minorities are equal
citizens of Israel as written in the
Proclamation of Independence.
"We minorities are equal," he ex-
plains, "except for the Law of
Return which allows only Jews to
emigrate here. But then, the Jews
are entitled to their state in their
ancestral homeland. That is only
fair."
Nasr-El-Din agrees that Arab
and Druze municipalities and
Continued on Page 8-A


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Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
The Moshe and Madeline Baumel Judaic
Faculty Incentive Award at Yeshiva universi-
ty has been won by Rabbi Shalom Carmy (left).
Shown with Rabbi Carmy are Mr. and Mrs.
Baumel and Dr. Norman Lamm (right),
president of the University. Dr. Lamm is a
nephew of the Baumels. The Baumel Award is
given annually to a member of the Univer-
sity's Judaic studies faculty. Rabbi Carmy is
an instructor in Bible, Jewish history, and
philosophy.
Terrorists Who Shot Tourist Arrested
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Security
sources announce the arrest of the
terrorists who fatally shot British
tourist Paul Appelby in the Old Ci-
ty of Jerusalem and who may be
responsible for at least one other
murder and two attempted
murders of tourists there during
the past two months.
The suspects were said to
belong to the Abu Moussa faction
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization, which broke away
from the mainstream PLO headed
by Yasir Arafat and is reportedly
backed by Syria. A Jerusalem
magistrates court banned the
release of further details.
Appelby, 28, was killed by a .22
caliber bullet fired into the base of
his skull as he was about to enter
the Garden Tomb, the burial place
of Jesus according to Protestant
tradition. The same caliber bullet
murdered an Israeli
businesswoman, Zehavia Ben-
Ovadia, in her office near the
Damascus Gate on Apr. 13.
The suspects are also believed to
have wounded an American
Jewish tourist, David Blumenfeld,
in the Old City last Mar. 7, and a
German woman tourist on Apr.
16. Blumenfeld, a Conservative
rabbi from Long Island, is ex-
ecutive director of the New York
City Holocaust Memorial Commis-
sion. He was shot in the head. The
German woman sustained a slight
shoulder wound as she and her
husband were entering a Chris-
tian shrine in the Old City.
New Florida Bill Takes Aim
Against Discriminatory Clubs
Continued from Page 1-A
licenses. But Fox argued that
such a prohibition might trample
on the constitutional right to free
association. Her proposal offered
the choice between the liquor
license and business tax
deductions.
"People have a right to go off
and form their own ratty yacht
club," said Fox. "What they don't
have a right to do is to make me
subsidize their three-martini lun-
ches while they discriminate."
Gordon earlier took the position
that if private social clubs insisted
on their right to discriminate, the
State of Florida was not obliged to
reward them for it with a license
to serve liquor to fellow-bigots.
THE SESSION was marked by
uproar, coupled with laughter.
Supporters called the bill a "tough
stand" against discrimination, but
most were sorry for the com-
promise, declaring that they
preferred Gordon's original
version.
Many executives of Florida's
top private clubs appeared and
begged the senators to let them
choose their own social environ-
ment. William Bostwick, a
member of Jacksonville's Univer-
sity Club, told the snickering
senatorial body that people "who
grew up eating with a knife, fork
and spoon don't like to argue
about whether to use chopsticks."
He reminded the senators that
Patrick Henry had called for
''liberty,'' not "anti-
discrimination laws."
Responding to the compromise
version, Gordon declared that
"It'll force any club that wants to
continue to discriminate to say so.
Otherwise, why would they want
to call themselves social clubs and
deny their members the tax
benefits?"
THE COMMERCE Commit
tee's lone no-vote, Sen. Richard
Langley (R., Clermont) declared
that the bill "may be popular, but,
folks, it's socialism and it's not
right." He debated briefly with
Arthur Teitelbaum, southern area
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, who said
the bill would "cause a lot of soul-
searching and put the issue of
discrimination on the table of
every private club in the state."
According to Sen. Pat Thomas
(D., Quincy), the bill would
"probably pass" the Senate
because "nobody wants to go on
the damn record as being for
discrimination." But Fox had
some reservations about its final
success. She argued that some
senators may not go along "if they
understand how far-reaching this
(bill) is."
Menten Told
He's 'Unwanted'
BRUSSELS (WNS) Pieter
Menten, the Dutch Nazi war
criminal responsible for the killing
of 120 Jews in Podhoroce, Poland,
during World War II, has been
declared an unwanted person by
the Belgian authorities, official
sources said here. Menten, who is
86 years old, has tried over the
past few weeks to settle in a
residential section north of Ant-
werp, near the Dutch border, but
the mayor and a large number of
inhabitants have protested
against Menten's presence in
their midst.
JEWISH
rwnofw.
RID
(KEREN KAYEMETH
I 1 ISRAEL) INC.
vfConotfnu
Distinguished Guest Speaker
Spiritual Leader of Temple Emanu-El
Chairman, Jewish National Fund Foundation
Cocktails 6:30 P.M.
Dinner 7:30 P.M.
Chairpersons: Sol and Goldie Goldstein
WEDNESDA Y, JUNE 4,1986
KONOVER HOTEL
5445 Collins A venue
Miami Beach
Entertainment
Dancing / Ted Martin and His Orchestra
For Information and Reservations:
TEMPLE EMANU-EL, 1701 WASHINGTON AVE., MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA 33139 538-2503


Israeli Druze Amal Nasr-El-Din ofDaliyat eWarmel is the only
non-Jewish representative of the Likud Party in the Knesset.
Israeli Druze, in Likud, Unique
Among Members of Knesset
Continued from Page 5-A
villages receive less funds than
their Jewish counterparts.
However, he claims that this is
because Arab and Druze mayors
and leaders are not entirely com-
petent in administering those
funds. "The gap is closing quick-
ly," he says. "Today, Arab
villages receive perhaps 20 per-
cent less than Jewish villages.
And we are educating the Arab
leadership all the time. In five
years time there will be budgetary
parity."
Nasr-El-Din says he has never
felt any anti-Arab discrimination
from within Herut and claims that
that movement's reputation for
chauvinism is a myth. "On the
contrary," he stresses, "Herut is
the party that is most generous
towards the Arabs. That's a well-
known fact. Herut gives the
Arabs ten times the money that
the Labor party does for projects
like schools and community
centers, because we know how im-
portant these facilities are."
NASR-EL-DIN has a penchant
for statistics that are convenient
multiples of ten. For example, in
recalling the Lebanon War in
1982, he justifies the govern-
ment's decision to advance to
Beirut but is critical of the fact
that a pact was not signed with
the right-wing Druse Arsalani
clan.
"Jumblatt represents only 10
percent of the Lebanese Druze,"
claims Nasr-El-Din. "Yet he has
90 percent of the weapons.
Jumblatt is Syria's man. But
Israel could have armed the Ar-
salanis, and together with the
Jemayals they could have kept
control of Lebanon."
This is the lone criticism that
Nasr-El-Din will make of Herat's
deeds and policies. To many of his
fellow Arabs and Druze he is an
exception, although he claims that
many Arabs and most Druze sym-
pathize with his stand a claim
that is unfortunately impossible to
verify with statistics.
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Shamir Says
Israel Wants Renewed Autonomy Talks
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israel is interested in
renewing its talks with
Egypt on autonomy for the
Palestinians in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip and to
bring other participants into
the negotiations, Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
said here Saturday at a
special press briefing for
Israeli correspondents.
He said the other participants
could include Jordan and Palesti-
nian representatives who are not
associated with the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Shamir made a brief stopover in
New York enroute to Central
America for a four-day visit. "I
believe that the most realistic ap-
proach to advance peace in the
Middle East is by resuming
negotiations in the framework of
the Camp David accords," Shamir
said in reply to a question by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
HE ADDED, "Camp David is
the only tangible achievement for
peace so far in the Middle East."
He noted that Israel has invited
Jordan to negotiate for peace
without pre-conditions. "As far as
we understand Jordan, she is
reluctant to join in negotiations on
her own. She seeks partners for
those negotiations. Unfortunate-
ly, we can't provide partners,"
Shamir said.
He said, nevertheless, that he
thinks the peace process is still
alive in the Middle East because
talks between Israel and Egypt
are still taking place and there
are, as well, "contacts with
Jordan."
Shamir said in reply to ques-
tions that there will definitely be
"a problem" if former United Na-
tions Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim is elected in Sunday's
Presidential elections in Austria.
Yitzhak Shamir
Waldheim is accused of participa-
tion in atrocities as a Wehrmacht
officer in the Balkans during
World War II.
SHAMIR SAID there would be
a problem with Israel's relations
with Austria should Waldheim
become that country's President.
"We don't like to interfere in
other countries' elections but
when it comes to the Nazi pro-
blem, we as a Jewish State cannot
be indifferent," he said. "It is
clear that there will be a problem
if Waldheim is elected but I don't
want to say now what we will ^
When the results are in* ^
JOtS!* de!cribf1 the Nation-
shp between Israel and the U S as
one of "trust and understandine
and friendship." The lit,5
leader, who 3 replace ShfiJ
Peres as Premier under the rota
tion of power agreement next 0c
tober 14, said he did not anticipate
any 'meaningful changes" in
Israel s foreign policy when he
becomes Prime Minister.
He noted in that connection that
he is bound by the coalition agree
ment and the basic guidelines of
the unity government. He said he
expects that the rotation of power
will take place as planned.
rS^IR,SFIRSTst0Pr,his
central America tour was in Hon-
duras where he opened the Israeli
Embassy in Tegucigalpa. Unitl
now, Israel was represented by a
non-resident Ambassador. The
new Embassy represents an
upgrading of diplomatic relations
between Israel and Honduras.
He also met there with Presi-
dent Jose Ascona Hoyo. Shamir
then visited Guatemala for a
discussion of economic coopera-
tion with President Vinicio Cerezo
Arevalo and other officials. His
final stop was in Costa Rica, to at-
tend the inauguration of Presi-
dent Oscar Arias Sanchez Israel
has always had close relations
with Costa Rica which is one of
the few countries that moved its
Embassy from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem.
Israel, Uruguay Issue Statement
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Presidents of Israel and Uruguay
issued a joint statement here Sun-
day affirming the warm friend-
ship between their countries, their
support for the Middle East peace
process and support of the Con-
tadora process to end conflicts in
Central America.
The statement was released as
President Julio Maria Sanguinetti
of Uruguay ended his five-day of-
ficial visit here, hosted by Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog. It referred to
the problems of Third World and
developing nations and agreed
that both Israel and Uruguay
should assist those countries.
Spring Break
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..... ;
Vatican in Ties With Israel Next Year?
Rabbi Tanenbaum
POPE JOHN PAUL II visited
the main synagogue in Rome on
Apr. 13, the first Papal visit to a
Jewish house of worship in
WASHINGTON (JTA)
_ The Vatican has decided
I to establish diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel and this
|could happen within a year,
I according to Rabbi Marc
ITanenbaum, director of in-
Iternational relations of the
fAmerican Jewish Commit-
tee who has maintained
I close contacts with Catholic
I leaders since he attended
Vatican Council II as an
I observer 20 years ago.
Tanenbaum based his forecast
on recent conversations he had
I with cardinals and other church
I officials in the U.S., Europe and
I South America. "The question is
I not whether it will happen. The
I question is when and how it will
Ihsppen," he says.
I in the past few weeks, at least
I two cardinals told him that "the
decision has been made by the
I Pope and the Vatican Secretariat
[of State" to formally recognize
I the Jewish State, Tanenbaum
[reported. He did not identify the
I cardinals.
Bombs Net
No Casualties
JERUSALEM (JTA) Two
bombs exploded here Sunday, but
there were no casualties. The ex-
I plosions marred an otherwise
peaceful Passover aftermath.
I Jerusalem police called on the
I public to be on the alert for other
[possible bombings. At the same
I time, police increased their own
I search in places where terrorists
I might seek to place bombs.
The first bomb Sunday exploded
I at approximately 6:30 a.m. at the
IKiryat Moshe neighborhood in
I Jerusalem Two parked cars were
[slightly damaged. Several
[suspects were detained and
[released after being questioned.
The second bomb exploded at
[Cihon Street in the Abu-Tor
I neighborhood. No arrests were
[immediately made. Police are in-
vestigating whether both bombs
lere planted by the same
|terrorists.
Debate Over
Nuke Plants
Continued from Page 1-A
[nation and weigh the situation
["without unnecessary public
[statements." He said the pro-
INems of security and the price of
| oil were considerations.
YUVAL NE'E MAN. the leader
|of the Tehiya Party and a nuclear
scientist, said in a radio interview
|>ver the weekend that the use of
nuclear power to generate elec-
Pwty is not urgent at the mo-
Pient because of the low price of
l" c<>al. Ne'eman, a former
Minister of Science and
[technology, suggested that any
Ijuclear reactor in Israel should be
Jocated underground for security
wc Know yuu ic urn uiuuuug
H* also thought Israel should about IRAs at this time of the
'ncentrate on building its own yeiT but if you think about
actor rather than purchase one i.i..i... L...i..,..r. ...... a,,t,.
oroad. Israel is said to have been
Pegotiating for the purchase of a
puclear power plant from France.
Put the deal was stalled by pro-
P'ems of financing and credit.
history. Although he made no
statement on the issue of
diplomatic ties with Israel on that
occasion, the visit raised specula-
tion that such a move by the
Vatican is imminent.
According to Tanenbaum, one
possible step would be to appoint
an apostolic delegate to Israel.
Currently there is what Catholic
and Jewish leaders regard as "de
facto" Vatican recognition of
Israel whose diplomatic represen-
tatives in Italy have full access to
Vatican officials. Formal recogni-
tion would involve an exchange of
Ambassadors.
Tanenbaum explained why the
Vatican has refrained from
recognizing Israel since its
establishment in 1948. There are
unresolved disputes over Israel's
boundaries, the rights of Palesti-
Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Hasidic Jewry
Dance
nians in the Israel-administered
territories and the Vatican's long-
standing view that Jerusalem
must be an international city, not
the capital of a Jewish State.
THERE IS ALSO, Tanenbaum
noted, the "genuine fear" of
reprisals against Christians in
Moslem-dominated Arab states
should the Vatican recognize
Israel. Citing such concerns,
Tanenbaum advised Jewish
groups to be patient while the
Vatican works out the problem.
The fear of reprisals against
Christians is "not an abstrac-
tion," Tanenbaum said. But he
predicted Vatican ties with Israel
within a year, "provided the boat
is not rocked by extremists on any
side."
Meanwhile, a Catholic member
of Congress, Rep. Edward
Feighan (I)., Ohio), has introduced
a House resolution calling on the
Vatican to establish full
diplomatic relations with Israel.
PHOENIX (JTA) Arizona
State University Master's degree
candidate Diane Wawrejko
recently presented an original
dance composition she
choreographed based on her
research on Hasidic Jewry and its
culture. The composition, titled
"Of Sand and Stars," is divided
into three parts: Shabbos, Strife,
and Birth of the State of Israel.
Wawrejko, a non-Jew, told the
Greater Phoenix Jewish News she
was motivated to choreograph
"Of Sand and Stars" because she
was "distressed by anti-Semitism
and wanted to do a piece that was
pro-Jewish and pro-Israel." It was
performed at ASU's Temple cam-
pus by eight dancers.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
London Pressure
Wants U.S. To Tackle Mideast 'Roots'
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Strongly criticized for sup-
porting the U.S. air strike
against Libya, the British
government is trying to
restore its credibility by
urging Washington to boost
efforts to tackle the roots of
the Middle East conflict.
This has emerged in official
press briefings recently as mass
demonstrations took place both in
Britain and on the continent over
the Libyan affair.
It served notice that Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher
would raise the Middle East situa-
tion with President Reagan when
the two leaders met at the Tokyo
economic summit over the
weekend. While supporting the at-
tack on Libya, Britain is
simultaneously critical over what
it sees as America's lack of urgen-
cy towards continued peace
efforts.
THIS ATTITUDE may also be
displayed during Thatcher's visit
to Israel in the second hflf of May.
The British Foreign Office is
believed to be anxious lest Britain
appears to have thrown in its lot
entirely with the Americans or,
even worse, with the Israelis.
This, it is suggested, com-
promises not only Britain's own
international standing but also
that of the European Economic
Community, which for years has
aspired to a separate posture on
the Arab-Israeli issue.
Although the Israelis are likely
to applaud Thatcher's stout sup-
port of the Americans, during her
visit, she is therefore likely to
repay them with emphatic
statements on the need for
Palestinian self-determination
and with calls to evacuate the bulk
of the West Bank and Gaza Strip
in exchange for peace.
IN THE last few days, Britain
took the lead in urging her 11
EEC partners to take steps
Hussein Furious Over Peres'
'Secret Contacts' Statements
JERUSALEM (JTA) King Hussein of Jordan is
furious over a statement by Premier Shimon Peres that
"secret contacts between Israel and Jordan" have taken
Ci in the context of quiet diplomacy, Voice of Israel
o reported.
IT SAID THE Jordanians lost no time in registering
their anger with the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem.
Hussein was especially unhappy with the publication of
Peres' remarks on the eve of an Arab summit meeting
scheduled to be held in Fez, Morocco over the weekend. He
emphatically denied any contacts with Israel.
Peres cautioned that whatever progress was made with
Jordan was characterized by mutual understanding rather
than any agreement. Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, the
Likud leader, seemed to confirm that contacts had been
made when he asserted that they had failed to produce any
tangible results.
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,J*EN
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SUV
NANA
Julv L'ri
against Libya, such as closing her
People's Bureaus (Embassies) and
restricting the movements of Li-
byan nationals.
This achieved a measure of suc-
cess when EEC Ministers,
meeting in Luxembourg, agreed
on a package of anti-Libyan
measures, despite hesitations by
Greece, the EEC's most pro-Arab
country.
Britain announced that it was
curtailing the studies of more than
300 Libyan airplane, engineering
and maintenance students and a
number of airline pilot trainees.
The annoucement warned that the
students would be deported if they
do not leave voluntarily.
Other European nations took
similar anti-Libyan steps. In
Paris, the Defense Ministry said it
would reinforce anti-aircraft
missile defenses on the Mediterra-
nean coast to guard against possi-
ble Libyan attacks. The French
government also announced that
it would reduce the number of Li-
byan diplomats in the country.
IN MADRID, the government
ordered the expulsion of three Li-
byan diplomats and eight Libyan
teachers and students. It said that
eight other Libyans were being
expelled for security reasons. In
addition, West Germany, Den-
mark, Luxembourg, Belgium and
The Netherlands have announced
plans to expel Libyan nationals.
Britain's most persuasive argu-
ment was the threat that lack of
EEC action against Libya would
increase the likelihood of further
American military action, a pro-
spect which some EEC states
seem to regard with almost as
much horror as further terrorist
outrages on their own soil.
Here in Britain, the doubts
about the American air strike on
Libya are not limited either to op-
position parties or to large sec-
tions of public opinion. They are
also prevalent among sections of
Thatcher's own party and senior
members of her Cabinet.
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San Francisco's Mayor Dianne Feinstein recently visited Israel
for the first time as guest of 'sister city' Haifa Mayor Aryeh
Gurel (left), meeting with Technion President Josef Sinqer
(center) to discuss scientific and academic exchange and Israel's
high-tech research and industry, and touring Technion's campus
and the Coler-California Visitors Center.
Diva Sills Gets Top Award
NEW YORK (JTA) Bever-
ly Sills, genera] director of the
New York City Opera, received
the American Society for Tech-
nion Women's Division's Medical
Lngineenng Program Award >|
presented at its annual luncheon
in New York.
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Peres Says He Wants
Legal Info on Waldheim
Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres said
Sunday he has instructed
the Justice Ministry to col-
lect all information pertain-
ing to the allegations con-
cerning Austrian Presiden-
tial candidate Kurt
Waldheim's war-time ac-
tivities as a Wehrmacht of-
ficer and to conduct a
thorough legal analysis of
the charges against the
former UN Secretary
General.
Play Will Be
Shown To
'Closed' Viewers
by DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Rainer
Werner Fassbinder's play, "Gar-
bage, the City and Death," which
was taken off the boards in
November after protests by the
Jewish community and others that
it was anti-Semitic, will be shown
shortly for "closed audiences."
This was announced by Guen-
ther Ruehle, the artistic manager
of Frankfurt's municipally-
supported Kammerspiel (litle
theatre), where it was originally
scheduled to premier October 31.
Jewish protesters occupied the
stage and prevented the perfor-
mance, and a heated dialogue en-
sued between them and members
of the audience.
The protesters' contention that
the play is anti-Semitic is rooted
primarily in the fact that the main
protagonist is a heartless and
nameless real estate speculator
referred to only as "the rich Jew."
Ruehle. under pressure from the
Jewish community and various
political figures abandoned plans
in November to show the play.
Now he has announced that a
study of legal implications
demonstrates that performing it
for "closed" audiences the term
was not defined by him would
be in accordance with the laws of
the Hesse Federal State.
Frankfurt municipal authorities,
however, still hold to the belief
that such performances of the
play are illegal.
Observers in Frankfurt express-
ed the view that the showing of
the play has become almost an
obsession for Ruehle. Said one
theater critic, "He is prepared to
do anything to show this garbage
to the public."
"We are not a newspaper, we
are not an institution," Peres
declared in an address to students
from development towns meeting
at the Hebrew University. "We
are a government. We must give
an answer both serious and
substantiated. And if indeed the
legal material which we collect
and analyze proves that Kurt
Waldheim served in the Nazi army
and acted against partisans or
Jews, we shall draw from this all
the appropriate conclusions."
WALDHEIM. whose Presiden-
tial campaign has been dogged by
allegations that he participated in
Nazi war crimes, missed victory in
the election Sunday and will face a
run-off election on June 8.
Waldheim, the candidate of the
conservative People's Party,
received 49.66 percent of the vote
against 43.66 percent for his
Socialist rival, Kurt Steyrer. A
vote of 50 percent or more is re-
quired to avoid a run-off.
Israel has remained cautious in
the Waldheim matter, although it
did request and received last
month a file on Waldheim from
the archives of the UN War
Crimes Commission. Waldheim
has denied participation in
atrocities against Yugoslav par-
tisans, although he conceded
knowledge of such actions by the
Nazis. He died knowledge of the
deportation of Greek Jews from
Salonika and elsewhere while he
was an intelligence officer in the
Balkans.
Israel Defense Force radio
reported Monday that if
Waldheim is elected President of
Austria, the Foreign Ministry will
delay the dispatch, of a new Am-
bassador to replace Michael Elit-
zur, the present Ambassador in
Vienna, who is due to end his term
of service there this summer.
This, the radio report said, would
be done to avoid the presentation
of Israeli credentials of a new Am-
bassador to a head of state with a
past linked to the Nazis.
MEANWHILE, several hun-
dred youths demonstrated outside
the Austrian Embassy in Tel Aviv
Monday, pointing out that they
were protesting on the eve of Yom
Hashoah against the election to
the Austrian Presidency of a man
with an alleged Nazi past. They
presented a petition to Austrian
Ambassador Otto Kleinhardt, ask-
ing how it was possible to elect a
man said to have been associated
with the Nazis and asking how he
expected Israel to react to such a
development.
The Ambassador said he could
not answer the questions or any
questions concerning the elec-
tions, but promised to transmit
the petition to the Austrian
Foreign Ministry.
Proceedings Dropped Against
Mayor Who Had Unique Plan
BONN (JTA) The State Prosecutor in Dusseldorf
has dropped legal proceedings against Count Wilderich von
Spee, former Mayor of Korschenbroich, who remarked to
the town council s financial committee last year that the
way to balance the municipal budget was to "kill a few rich
Jews."
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY concurred in the deci-
sion to end the proceedings after von Spee was fined 90,000
Marks (about $41,000) which he donated to a children's
cancer hospital. The Dusseldorf Jewish community had fil-
ed charges against him for incitement to racial hatred. But
the prosecution concluded that the anti-Semitic remark
was an insult to Jews for which von Spee was fined but
not incitement.
Von Spee was forced to resign as mayor when he lost
the support of his political party, the ruling Christian
democratic Union (CDU), which initially had defended him.
His remark was the subject of a special debate in the
Bundestag on, resurgent anti-Semitism in the Federal
Republic of Germany.
Judge Moshe Bejski (right) in discussion with
Prof. David Lioai (center), chairman of the
Knesset Control Committee. On the table is the
Bejski report on the 1983 bank shares crisis.
The Bejski Commission has called for the
resignation of people who it felt should take the
responsibility for the crisis. Among those
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
whose resignation was called for were the
governor of the Bank of Israel and the manag-
ing directors of a number of Israel's banks.
Left is State Comptroller Yitzhak Tunik,
whose report led to the establishment of the
commission.
Canadian Arabs
Urge Parliament To Recognize PLO
By RON CSILLAG
TORONTO (JTA) -
Canada should recognize
the PLO as "the sole
legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people," the
Canadian Arab Federation
(CAF) has suggested to a
parliamentary committee on
Canada's international
relations.
Canada should recognize the
PLO because "the overwhelming
majority of Palestinians, inside
and outside Israeli occupied ter-
ritories, do so recognize it," and
because the United Nations and
120 individual nations accord it of-
ficial status, Sami Hadawi and
Rashad Saleh told the Special
Joint Committee on Canada's In-
ternational Relations.
SET UP by External Affairs
Minister Joe Clark, the commit-
tee, composed of Members of
Parliament and Senators, is
holding public hearings across the
country on Canada's foreign rela-
tions. Its report to Parliament is
due May 31.
Canada does not currently
recognize the PLO. Its policy is
not to do so until the PLO re-
nounces the use of terrorism and
recognizes Israel's right to exist.
However, Canada does permit its
lower level diplomats around the
world to have dealings with
representatives of the PLO.
Because Canada was a leader in
bringing an end to the 1956 Suez
crisis, it should "take up the
challenge" of recognizing the
PLO under Yasir Arafat, Hadawi
told the committee.
Other recommendations the
CAF made at the special commit-
tee includes calling on Canada to:
Follow "an independent
policy" in the Middle East, free
from international and especially
U.S. influence;
Divest itself of the influences
"of party politics and internal
pressure groups" in its Mideast
policy;
Respect "the will of the ma-
jority" at the United Nations;
Recognize all UN resolutions
relating to "the inalienable rights
of the Palestinian people to self
determination" and all UN resolu-
tions dealing with repatriation of
refugees and financial compensa-
tion for damages sustained and
property seized in 1948;
Use its position in the area to
increase trade with Arab
countries.
HADAWI TOLD the
lawmakers that "if Canada would
recognize the PLO and find out
exactly what it wants, that would
start the ball rolling. I feel certain
Canada would support the PLO."
Toronto MP Reg Stackhouse
wanted to know what message the
PLO would give Canada if talks
between the two ever opened.
$500 Publix
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
No Nation Honors Its Dead
As People of Israel Do
Continued from Page 5-A
in every city, town, kibbutz and
moshav, with state observances in
the 39 military cemeteries
throughout the country. At sites
of some of the memorial
monuments, school youngsters
gather to pause and remember,
listening to the story of what hap-
pened on the spot, reciting poems,
singing songs and each devoting
thoughts to all who fell, one of
whom could well be a member of
his own family in a nation where
almost every family has been
stricken.
On Remembrance Day, flags are
flown at half-mast, and all places
of entertainment are closed. This
is a day when, at 11 a.m., the
heartbeat of the nation stops for
one long minute as the sirens wail
the general mourning. Drivers
brake and step out of their cars,
housewives quit their work and
bow their heads, workers cease
their labor and all stand as one,
recalling those who are no more.
On Remembrance Day. the
Minister of Defense sends a per-
sonal letter to the bereaved
families usually delivered by a
school youngster with a
message of personal participation
and encouragement. The letters
are accompanied by a special gift,
usually a book dealing with the
history, geography, or flora and
fauna of Israel.
DR. IRWIN SMALHEISER, a
newly-arrived immigrant from
Midwestern America, has been
collecting these letters and com-
memorative envelopes, and has
recently published them, because,
as he says, "Jews everywhere owe
Israel's fallen the same debt." In
his publication, Dr. Smalheiser
recalls that the practice of lamen-
ting the deaths of warrior heroes
goes back to biblical times when
David grieved over the deaths of
Saul and Jonathan.
"And they wailed and wept and
fasted until even, / for Saul and
Jonathan and his son, and for the
people / of the Lord and for the
House of Israel / because they
were fallen by the sword."
Smalheiser traces the develop-
ment of the themes in the com-
memorative covers, which range
from the acceptance of death to
the proud celebration of military
victories to the expression of a
hunger for peace a reflection,
he believes, of a similar develop-
ment in the popular mood in
Israel.
Thus, the Remembrance letter
written in 1975 by Shimon Peres,
then Minister of Defense, states:
"It is our hope that the exemplary
courage of our sons, and the
memory of their sacrifice, will for-
tify the ramparts of Israel and will
open within them a gate to
peace."
'Holocaust Didn't Happen,'
Why Remembering Is Important
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Gail Rigler, a member of the
Board of Directors of the Second
Generation of Holocaust Sur-
vivors, was helping to set up an
exhibit on the Holocaust in the
Rotunda of the Cannon House Of-
fice Building when she was ap-
proached by a woman.
"Why are you all doing this ex-
hibit?" Rigler quoted the woman
as saying. "We all know the
Holocaust never happened."
"And that's exactly the reason
why we are all here today," Rigler
said at a ceremony marking the
opening of the exhibit which runs
through Friday, "to explain not
only that it did happen but that it
needs to get remembered."
The need to remember was also
stressed by the other participants
in the ceremony, Carol Lister,
New York regional director of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, and Rep. Charles Schumer
(D., N.Y.), who sponsored the
exhibit
"If the Holocaust is
remembered, if the Holocaust is
never forgotten, it will not happen
again," Schumer said. He noted
that this was the first time a
Holocaust exhibit had been
displayed at the Capitol and it
opened just one week before Yom
Hashoah was observed on
Tuesday.
The exhibit includes posters
depicting pictures and other
documents from the entire Nazi
period, 1933-1945 provided by the
ADL.
It also includes pictures taken
by American soldiers who
liberated the camps at Dachau,
Flossenburg, Buchenwald,
Ohrdruf and Mauthausen, which
are part of the archives of the
Center for Holocaust studies in
Brooklyn, N.Y. Tuesday (Apr. 29)
was the 41st anniversary of the
liberation of the Dachau concen-
tration camp by American forces.
Rigler, who represented the
Center, said the pictures were
taken by "individual soldiers who
felt the need to document what
they had seen, to prove that the
atrocities indeed did take place."
Schumer said that it is hoped that
long after the exhibit, its memory
"stays with members of Con-
gress" as well as visitors to the
Cannon Building.

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Bookcase
Two Works That Deal With
Jews' Return To Religion
Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A

By MORTON I. TEICHER
Return to Judaism: Religious
Renewal in Israel. By Janet
Aviad. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1985. 194 pp.
$8.95 (paper back).
Journey to Tradition: The
Odyssey of a Born-Again
Jew. By Michael Graubert
Levin. Hoboken, N.J.: Ktav
Publishing House, 1986. 129
pp. $14.95
These two books both deal with
baalei teshuvah, Jews who have
returned to the religion of their
ancestors.
Aviad approaches the subject as
a sociologist who brings the skills
of a social scientist to her research
on this phenomenon. Levin, by
contrast, tells his own story of
becoming an Orthodox Jew. The
two books complement each other
nicely. Aviad writes generally and
abstractly about the movement of
a group of Jews toward their
roots. Levin describes his in-
dividual experiences, using humor
and personal revelation to relate
what happened to a single secular
Jew who spent five years
discovering himself as an Or-
thodox Jew.
AVIAD concentrates on the
conversion by Jews to Judaism as
it occurs in Jerusalem where she
identifies three types of baalei
tethuvah: American Jews who
come either from a secular or an
Orthodox background; Israelis
who have a Western secular
background; and, finally, Israelis
from a Sephardic background.
What happens to these groups
as they encounter the yeshivoth
which try to convert them to
Judaism is told in narrative form.
There is a minimum of social
science jargon and a lively presen-
tation of the differences between
modern Orthodoxy and ultra-
Orthodoxy. A lucid explanation is
provided of the varying attitudes
toward Zionism among Orthodox
Jews.
Almost without warning, Aviad
sinks into sociologese as she
describes the motives for becom-
ing a baal teshuvah and for enter-
ing a yeshiva. Up to this point, she
has been writing in English. Sud-
denly, she starts to use terms such
K "smallest space analysis,"
"selected variables," "inter-
pretable correspondences,"
'geometric contiguity" and
"personal-expressive mode."
FORTUNATELY, this is only a
temporary lapse, and Aviad
returns to the narrative style, of-
fering only a few statistics now
d then which break up the flow
m only a minor way.
A chapter entitled "Return to
e New" describes seeking and
Homecoming as the dominant
totifs among baalei teshuvah,
Jne Americans tend to be
Uftf*"" ^ten- tneu" discovery
Orthodox Judaism follows their
nutation with other efforts to find
wmselves through drugs and
"stern religions. For the Israeli
JW teshuvah, it is more com-
*" to find an awakening to the
""I of being Jewish and a
mae of returning home.
Finally, Aviad concludes with a
'"Pter called "Relation to the
Honorary Member
GENEVA (JTA) Zvi
"er?ch Drukman, a well-known
*ish journalist and a former
"eya correspondent of the
2* Telegraphic Agency, was
j e *" honorary member of the
"""ulistic Association which is
^"edited to the United Nations
"* At the age of 80, Drukman is
J? "* dyen of the Association.
ne Rumanian-born journalist
g*" fr Jewish publications in
^wiUerland, France. Germany
M Israel.
Old" in which she analyzes the
connection between baalei
teshuvah and the rest of Israeli
society. Although the majority of
baatei teshuvah do not see major
changes among Jews being
brought about by political action,
nevertheless, they are among
those who stone Sabbath
motorists, who disrupt ar-
chaeological digs in the City of
David and who lead the fight to
settle Judea and Samaria
permanently.
These ultra-Orthodox Jews are
determined to return all secular
Jews to Judaism, hoping that
more and more will become baalei
teshuvah. In some measure, they
are benefitting from the failure of
secular, socialist Zionism to cap-
ture the hearts and minds of
Sephardic Jews.
MORE GENERALLY, the
baalei teshuvah, although few in
number, reflect the effort to
reverse the tide of history toward
secularization in favor of a return
to tradition through personal
renewal.
Aviad leaves open the question
of whether or not the baalei
teshuvah are indeed riding the tide
of history. Do they represent the
beginning flow of Jews toward
religious return? The reader can
infer Aviad's bias toward
secularization, but she has done a
fine job of retaining scientific ob-
jectivity and has presented an in-
formative picture of a significant
development in Jewish life today.
Levin traces similar ground,
raises similar questions and pro-
vides special insights as seen
through the eyes of one man. Dur-
ing the summer between his
junior and senior years at
Amherst, he spent 12 days in a
Jerusalem yeshiva. A deep im-
pression was made upon him, and
he came away determined to
become an Orthodox Jew. This
was symbolized by his wearing a
yarmulke as he returned to the
United States and went back to
complete his studies at Amherst.
HE BECAME involved with a
Lubavitcher couple who ran a
Chabad House, and this led to
several visits to Lubavitch head-
quarters in Crown Heights. On
graduation, Levin worked in New
York for two years, maintaining
Orthodox practices. Still uncer-
tain and still searching, he return-
ed to Israel where he entered a
yeshiva in which he spent about a
year, interrupted by a brief trip to
the United States and by vaca-
tions in Israel. His studies enabled
him to understand the concepts of
Judaism and to make his own in-
terpretations. Feeling that he
could stand on his own, he went
back to New York and entered
law school.
Gradually, he became somewhat
leas observant, giving up the
wearing of the yarmulke as the
first symbol of his new orienta-
tion. Levin attributes his moving
away from strict observance of
Orthodox practices to an attitude
of non-acceptance which he found
among Orthdox Jews. He is sharp-
ly critical of the Orthodox com-
munity for its ambivalence
towards the baalei tethuvah.
What he encountered was a point
of view which held that you had to
be born Orthodox to be truly
Orthodox.
Thus, he was caught between
Jews who found it hard to unders-
tand his embracing of Orthodoxy
and those Orthodox Jews who
were essentially suspicious of the
baalei tethuvah. Levin points out
that the baalei tethuvah move-
ment is only a generation old, but
he warns that its growth will be
nipped in the bud unless there is
more receptivity among Orthodox
Jews for those Jews who are
"bom again."
Rachel Dayan, widow ofMoshe Dayan, at the
opening of the Dayan Collection at the Israel
Museum, Jerusalem. The collection was
recently purchased from Mrs. Dayan by the
Israel Museum for $1,000,000. The money was
donated by Laurence Tisch.
Rotation on Schedule
But Unity Gov't. May Fall Anyway
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Secretary General of
Israel's Labor Party, Uzi
Baram, said he believes that
the rotation agreement bet-
ween Labor and Likud, will
take place as planned on
Oct. 14. But he did not rule
out the possibility that the
unity government could fall
after Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir replaces Prime
Minister Shimon Peres.
"Look, there is a rotation
agreement between Labor and
Likud, and the agreement must
take place," Baram said in a
special interview. "Am I sorry
about it? Yes, I am," Baram said,
adding, "In fact, almost all the
people of Israel are sorry."
BARAM, who has just conclud-
ed a 10-day visit to the U.S., noted
that the unity government, which
was established 19 months ago,
"is like any other government.
This government is not immune to
crises in the future."
He said that in case of
disagreements between Labor
and Likud in the future, "Labor
may walk out of the government."
Baram stressed that the unity
government and the rotation
agreement are based on basic
guidelines agreed to by Labor and
Likud. "If these guidelines are not
adhered to after Shamir becomes
Premier, Labor can act as it
deems," he said.
Baram said that it became
clearer than ever that the Likud is
not fit to govern Israel, after the
recent Likud convention ended in
chaos. "Shamir does not even en-
joy the support of the majority of
his own party," Baram said.
"A FUTURE Premier who
leaves his own party convention
under police protection cannot ef-
fectively govern the nation,"
Baram claimed. "In my opinion,
the logical solution is to call for
general elections, and the sooner
the better."
Baram praised highly Peres'
leadership and his performance as
Premier. "Peres has almost
reached the position of a national
leader," Baram said, claiming
that Peres not only guided the na-
tion toward economic recovery
but also created a "new climate
regarding Israel's international
position. Peres created a
moderate image of the country in
the eyes of the world, despite the
hawkish elements in the unity
government."
Baram, who also serves as
chairman of the Golda Meir
Association in Israel, an organiza-
tion devoted to combatting ex-
tremism and racism in Israeli
society, expressed concern over
the growth of intolerance and ex-
tremism in the country, a
phenomenon, he observed, which
is manifested in the suppport
among a growing number of
young Israelis for groups such as
Rabbi Meir Kahane's Kach Party.
Baram said he is concerned that
in the 1988 general elections in
Israel, ultra-nationalist groups
that advocate the expulsion of the
Arabs will gain more votes from
young Israelis. He called for the
support of American Jews to help
fight the phenomenon of ex-
tremism and racism in Israel.
ooooooo
",
Craatm Land From Sand*


DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW...
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $___
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420 Lincoln Rod Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florid* 33139 Phone: 538-6464


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Sharansky Due in N. Y.
He'll Appear At Soviet Jewry Rally This Sunday
ed an invitation
New York.
to him to
visit
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Anatoly Sharansky's par-
ticipation in the annual
Soviet Jewry rally here this
month is evidence of the ef-
fectiveness of both public
and private initiatives to aid
the plight of Jews in the
Soviet Union.
"That he is a free man
dramatizes and gives strong
credence to our belief that persis-
tent public action coupled with
private diplomatic initiatives can
produce substantive results,"
Alan Pesky, chairman of the
Coalition to Free Soviet Jews,
told reporters at a news con-
ference at Dag Hammarskjold
Plaza across from the United
Nations.
THE COALITION, the um-
brella agency and resource center
for 85 metropolitan area organiza-
tions, held the news conference in
order to announce plans for the
15th annual Solidarity Sunday for
Soviet Jewry. The march and rally
traditionally draws tens of
thousands of persons and is con-
sidered one of the largest annual
human rights demonstrations in
the world.
Sharansky, who has served as a
leading symbol of the struggle for
freedom of Soviet Jews at rallies
in past years, will address the
huge throng of demonstrators at
the May 11 rally. The appearance
will mark Sharansky's first visit
to the United States, which is to
Anatoly Sharansky
include a scheduled meeting in
Washington with President
Reagan.
The long-term Soviet Prisoner
of Conscience, jailed for nearly 10
years in the Soviet Union, was
recently released in an elaborate
East-West exchange of prisoners.
He was accused by the Soviets of
treason and anti-Soviet activities.
A founding member of the
Moscow Helsinki Watch group, he
first applied to immigrate to
Israel in 1973.
SHARANSKY'S release, and
that of other well-known Soviet
Jewish refuseniks in the past mon-
ths does not, however, appear to
indicate an easing of the plight of
Soviet Jews. According to the
Coalition, more than 400,000
Jews have begun the emigration
process and of this group, 20,000
have repeatedly been refused the
right to emigrate.
"We intend to keep the issue of
freedom for Soviet Jews in the
spotlight of world opinion," Pesky
said. "Our task will not be com-
plete until all are able to enjoy the
fruits of freedom." Only 47 Jews
were permitted to leave the Soviet
Union in March.
The annual rally, according to
New York City Deputy Mayor
Robert Esnard, "is really about
the freedom of all people in the
world, whatever their race or
ethnic background, that they be
able to live in peace and practice
their religion, whatever it is."
ESNARD ALSO told reporters
that "Sharansky is the greatest
example of that, living as he did
under terrible oppression." He
called the former Soviet Jewish
refusenik "a symbol, actually a
symbol that we all have some joy
in, the fact that... he will be with
us here on May 11."
Esnard noted that Mayor Ed-
ward Koch spoke with Sharansky
in Israel by telephone on Feb. 16,
just after his release, and extend-
Joining Sharansky at the rally
on the speaker's podium will l*
New York's two Senators, Daniel
Moynihan (D.) and Alfonse
D'Amato (R.), John Cardinal
O'Connor, and Israel's UN Am-
bassador, Binyamin Netanyahu.
The Coalition sponsors the annual
rally.
Arms Deal Vexes U.S. Jews
Continued from Page 3-A
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations.
ITS BIG events are the annual
"fly-ins" of members for assorted
defense-related tours and brief-
ings with military officials, and an
annual trip to Israel for American
admirals and generals.
In a general sense, the group is
a like-minded complement to the
less-focused National Jewish
Coalition, a recently-formed
Jewish organization that grew out
of a group of Republican Jews
who were active in the Reagan
campaigns. On most foreign af-
fairs issues, JINSA and the cur-
rent Administration are more or
less of one mind.
But Bryen, whose husband,
Steven Bryen, is currently
Undersecretary of Defense for
Trade and Security Policy, stress-
ed that the organization has main-
tained its independence and that
the Administration has never
sought to use the group as its own
"lobby" in the Jewish community
on issues such as aid to the Con-
tras in Central America, the
movement for a nuclear arms
freeze or the Strategic Defense
Initiative Star Wars.
On military sales to the Middle
East, she said, "We're approach-
ed probably as often as they ap-
proach AIPAC. But we don't get
phone calls saying what are you
going to do for us on this or that
issue."
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No Dreamer
Ben-Gurion Nursed Israel into Being
Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Continued from Page 1-A
Aviv. He eventually arrived in the
small village of Petach Tikvah,
where he found housing in a
workers' hostel and hired himself
out as a field worker.
After several years of work in
the Lower Galilee and Zichron
Ya'acov, Ben-Gurion came to
Jerusalem, joining the editorial
staff of the Labor newspaper
Ahdut. The following year, he
went to Turkey for university
studies, hoping to influence the
Turkish establishment into sup-
porting the Zionist cause. But, in
1917, the Turkish rule of Palestine
was defeated by the British, and
the subsequent Balfour Declara-
tion made Jewish statehood seem
viable.
In that same yer, Ben-Gurion
married Paula Munweis, a New
York nurse, while on a fundrais-
ing visit to America. After a spell
in the British office of the Poalei
Zion labor organization, Ben-
Gurion returned to Eretz Yisrael
Paramilitary Ban
LINCOLN, Neb. (JTA) -
Governor Robert Kerrey has sign-
ed into law a bill which seeks to
outlaw paramilitary organizations
from training in the state. The
governor's action on the bill, bas-
ed upon model legislation drafted
by the A nti- Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, makes Nebraska the
12th state to enact such legisla-
tion. The action is in response to
reported increases in the activities
of anti-Semitic and racist groups
in the region, ADL officials said.
to be elected secretary general of
the newly formed Histadrut Trade
union Movement in 1921. He held
this post for 14 years, as the
Histadrut became the political
force that was to mold Israel's
economy, and then served as
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Executive from 1935 to 1948.
WHEN THE UN voted to parti-
tion Palestine, it was Ben-
Gurion's initiative that led to the
decision to declare independence
on the day of partition. The
following year saw elections to the
first Knesset with Ben-Gurion of-
ficially becoming Prime Minister.
He also held the post of Minister
of Defence and thus helped nur-
ture the Israel Defence Forces in-
to the formidable fighting force
that it was to become.
Ben-Gurion remained Prime
Minister until December, 1963,
when he retired to settle in the
desert at Sde Boker. In 1955, he
was recalled to government,
resuming the role of Prime
Minister in November. He remain-
ed in office until 1963, when he
once again resigned.
In retirement, Ben-Gurion re-
mained involved in the controver-
sies of the Mapai party he was in-
strumental in founding. He broke
with his party in 1965, forming his
own Rafi party along with Moshe
Dayan, Shimon Peres, Yitzhak
Navon and Teddy Kollek.
Although living in Sde Boker, he
retained his Knesset seat and re-
mained active until his death in
1973.
Perhaps Ben-Gurion's most bit-
ter disappointment was that so
few Jews emigrated to Israel, par-
ticularly from the United States.
At first adamantly opposed to the
notion that the Diaspora had a
future after Israeli independence,
he grudgingly accepted the status
quo, whereby Diaspora Jewry saw
its principal role as lending Israel
financial, political and moral
support.
IN RETROSPECT, Ben
Gurion is often censored for not
having respected the culture of
the Oriental Jews. This stems
from the fact that he frequently
referred to the hundreds of
thousands of immigrants who
poured into Israel as "dust." This
seemingly derogatory term was
meant in a poetic sense, alluding
to winds blowing the exiles back
to their homeland.
"Most important, Israel is not
just an Eastern nation or a
Western one," he once said. "It is
both. In itself, it invites the two
great streams of the Jewish peo-
ple: the Ashkenazim, whose tradi-
tions are Western, and the
Sephardim whose cultural links
are with the East. Here is another
task of Israel: to marry the East
with the West and thus again to
serve as an example of unity and
brotherhood to all mankind."
Ben-Gurion envisaged the idyllic
with apocalyptic overtones,
although he was not a religious
man. But clearly he was no idle
dreamer. If Theodor Herzl con-
ceived Israel, it was Ben-Gurion,
the leader of the Labor move-
ment, who nursed the state into
being with painstaking devotion.
No other single individual has
more influence in the formation of
the State of Israel.
Sephardi Chief Rabbi Mordechai Eliahu and Yosef Shapira, the
Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi, signing the 'chametz' sale note in the
presence of the new Finance Minister Moshe Nissum on the eve of
Passover.
Released Terrorists Renew Activity
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Many of
the terrorists who were released
in the POW deal last year
among the 1,150 terrorists freed
in exchange for three IDF soldiers
have returned to terrorist ac-
tivities and have been involved in
serious acts of sabotage, accor-
ding to a security source quoted
by Davar Sunday.
The source noted that some 600
of these terrorists reside in East
Jerusalem and Judaea-Samaria.
They organized while they were
still in prison.
The source was critical of the
deal by which they were released,
saying that anyone who thinks it's
possible to keep tabs on 600
released terrorists is deceiving
the public, since such terrorist ac-
tivity can't be detected in ad-
vance. However, the source said,
the security forces know about
this activity and are dealing with
it.
Some of the released terrorists
have been arrested for taking part
in terrorist activity and a few
have been deported. The security
source said that the involvement
of the released terrorists had been
discussed at the highest political
echelons.
%
Abraham Grunhut
Pres.JNFGr. Miami
Zav W. Kogan
Pres. JNF Southern Region.
M
JEWISH
rwnoiw

(KEREN KAYEMETH
IEISRAEL) INC.
DISTINGUISHED GUEST SPEAKER
Exec. Vice Pres., JNF of Am erica
0ub 3&nobevb, dedicate*/ 3!e4t*JeM>, and &&mo4A
GIVE HONOR UNTO WHOM HONOR IS DUE
!f'n'< v, 4986 42:OOjVoon
CfC&nciwl tinted ( >//> /<, h-nle*tun*ne*il
M48 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Florida "
For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139 Tel. 538-6464


p
Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
t/ll uuv %

Thatcher Scheduled To Visit
Israel At End of the Month
Absorption Minister Ya 'aJcov Tsur meets with
Isai (left) and Gregory (center) Goldstein at a
reception in their honor shortly after their ar-
rival in Israel from Russia. The brothers
struggled for more than 15 years to be allowed
to emigrate to Israel. Isai was accompanied by
his wife, Elisabeta, and his 12-year-old son.
Avi.
Senate Resolution
Urges U.S. Bar Waldheim Here
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Prime Minister Marw
Thatcher of Britain is tentatively scheduled to visit SS
May 24-27. It will be the first visit ever by a British KZ
Minister to Israel. Thatcher will hold talks with Pre?
Shimon Peres and other officials. mt
PERES MEANWHILE received the Presidents
Uruguay, Dr. Julio Maria Sanguinetti, who arrived \Z
from Cairo last Thursday accompanied by his wife and a
large party of Uruguayan Cabinet ministers and members
of parliament. Mrs. Sanguinetti heads the Uruguay-Israel
Friendship Society. m
The South American leader, here on a five-day State
visit, conferred with Peres on Friday. He and his wife were
guests at a dinner given in their honor by President Chaim
Herzog Thursday night. Sanguinetti observed on that occa-
sion that there is no prospect for peace in the Middle East
as long as the parties directly involved deny Israel's right
to exist and its right to secure, recognized borders.
China Lowers Strident Tones
Of Criticism Against Israel
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Senate passed a resolution last
Thursday calling on the Justice
Department to consider barring
Austrian Presidential candidate
Kurt Waldheim from the United
States. The resolution, introduced
last March by Sen. Pete Wilson
(R., Calif.) after the World Jewish
Congress publicized findings
about Waldheim's activities as a
Wehrmacht officer in World War
II, was passed by a voice vote
Thursday night.
Its passage coincided with the
disclosure of new findings related
to Waldheim's war-time activities.
A war record written by
Waldheim for his army unit in nor-
thwest Greece from July 19 to
August 21, 1943, included an
order by Hitler to kill captured
partisans in Greece and send
suspected resistance fighters to
labor camps. The diary was main-
taned while Waldheim was assign-
ed to the German general staff
liaison attached to the Italian 11th
Army. The documents were
discovered in Washington's Na-
tional Archives by Robert Herz-
tein, professor of history at the
University of South Carolina.
Waldheim has conceded that he
was aware of atrocities against
partisans but has consistently
maintained that he had no part in
them, and that he knew nothing
about deportations of Jews from
Salonika.
The Senate resolution called on
the Justice Department to
"carefully and expeditiously
review the documents brought
forward by the World Jewish Con-
gress concerning former United
Nations Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim, to ascertain his role, if
any, in Nazi war crimes, and treat
appropriately."
Speaking on the resolution he
had introducted, Wilson said it
was time "to respond" to the "ap-
parent deception" by Waldheim
about his war-time activities,
which he had earlier indicated
came to an end in 1941, after he
was wounded on the Eastern
front.
"It is my intention to ensure
that the American justice system
is upheld with full and deliberate
speed. It is imperative that the At-
torney General act promptly on
the question of barring Mr.
Waldheim on the basis of the
documented evidence which the
(Justice Department's) Office of
Special Investigations has already
examined."
Passage of the resolution follow-
ed the disclosure a week earlier
that Neal Sher, director of the Of-
fice of Special Investigations, had
recommended that Waldheim be
barred from the country under a
1978 law forbidding entry to
aliens who took part in Nazi war
crimes.
In a news conference last Mon-
day, Attorney General Edwin
Meese said it was unlikely that
any decision on Waldheim's status
would be reached before the
Austrian Presidential elections on
May 4.
Justice Department spokesman
Patrick Korten told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency on Friday
that the issue had not yet reached
the level of Assistant Attorney
General and that he had no idea
when it would.
"We are always interested in
what members of Congress have
to say about something that may
be in our area of responsiblity,"
Korten said
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
There has been a dramatic
decrease in the criticism of Israel
by the People's Republic of China,
and there are even unofficial rela-
tions between China and Israel,
but there has been no change at
the official level regarding possi-
ble establishment by China of for-
mal diplomatic relations with
Israel.
The assessment was presented
by Dr. Yitzhak Shichor of the
Hebrew University's Department
of East Asian Studies at an inter-
national workshop on China and
Japan held at the university's
Harry S. Truman Institute for the
Advancement of Peace.
THE CHINESE press is now
reporting about events in Israel
more objectively and with less
hostility than previously, he said.
There has also been a change in
what they say about Israel's right
to exist, he noted.
This was never denied in the
past, but now Chinese officials are
supporting this right openlv ami
even talking about a just. i|
round solution to Middle East pro
blems. which will also take Israel
into consideration, said Shichor.
Shichor also tinted that Chin
has recently become the greatest
supplier of weapons and mihtan
spare parts in the Middle East
and one of the reasons for China's
lack of interest in diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel is that it does not
want to harm the military and
strategic relations which have
been so carefully cultivated with a
number of countries in the Middle
East.
DR. BEN-AMI Shillony of the
Hebrew University's Department
of History surveyed Japan's at-
titude toward Israel and the Mid-
dle East. Not having any great
power ambitions. Japan is in-
fluenced by three main factors
with regard to the Middle East its
dependence on Middle Eastern oil,
its pro-Western orientation, and
its view of the Soviet Union as its
main potential enemy.
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S The birth of Israel which was a joyous event
every Jew in the world is much more so for U.
| pioneers and builders of the Israel Histadruti
Foundation.
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<> Day at the
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Sunday, May 18,1986 at 11:30 A.M.
Chaired by the Hon. Herbert S. Shapiro
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Tel: 531-8702 (Dade) Convert Mort Goldberg j
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"Jewish Floridian
Miami, Florida Friday, May 9,1986
Section B
Thousands Commemorate
The Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
I Several thousand persons
gathered here Sunday in
solemn remembrance of the
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising 43
years ago, and to reaffirm
the commitment to never
forget the martyrdom of the
six million Jews who perish-
led in the Holocaust.
"The first appeal of the dead to
I the living is remembrance," Abba
lEban told the gathering at
I Madison Square Garden's Felt
[Forum. "Commemorate,
[transmit, explain, recount, por-
Itray; for if man has any hope of
Iredemption, it lies in the will and
implacable understanding of
Ihimself."
But at the same time, there was
Iclearly an undercurrent of con-
Icern expressed by various
(speakers at the annual com-
Imemorative event sponsored by
the Warsaw Ghetto Resistance
[Organization (WAGRO) of recent
Idevelopments in Austria regar-
Iding Presidential candidate Kurt
|Waldheim, who has been accused
of concealing his war-time ac-
tivities as an officer in the
IVehrmacht.
IN ADDITION, Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Nations,
Binyamin Netanyahu, told the
athering that Israel will seek
lusticc for the victims of the
Holocaust. He said Israel will con-
tinue to seek broad access to all
documents contained in the UN
1ft'a r Crimes Commission
prchives.
"There are 25,500 files listed of
iccused war criminals that
pobody has ever heard of,"
S'etanyahu declared. "No one has
ouched those files for 40 years."
He said also that he has been ask-
ed why Israel wants the files. "We
have six million reasons why we
want those files," he said.
Benjamin Meed, president of
WAGRO and of the American
Gathering and Federation of
Jewish Holocaust Survivors,
released the text of a letter he
sent to Attorney General Edwin
Meese, asking that Waldheim be
barred from the United States
because of his past war-time
activities.
"For forty years, Kurt
Waldheim deceived the world
about his three years of military
service as a Nazi officer of a
special unit in the Balkans known
for its brutality," Meed said.
"Therefore, we request that the
name of Kurt Waldheim be placed
on the 'watch list' to deny him en-
try to the United States pursuant
to the Holtzman Amendment
which prevents former Nazis or
those who aided Nazis from enter-
ing the United States."
THE CEREMONY Sunday in
eluded the lighting of six symbolic
candles in memory of the six
million Jews killed by the Nazis.
Each candle was lit by a Holocaust
survivor who was accompanied by
a member of the Second Genera-
tion. Misha Raitzin, a concentra-
tion camp survivor and member of
the Metropolitan Opera Company,
chanted the traditional prayer for
the dead, El Mole Rachamim.
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the
United States Holocaust
Memorial Council, spoke movingly
of the Holocaust and the need to
remember. "Were so many
memories to be forgotten, it
would be the killers ultimate vic-
tory," he declared. "Remember
that every killer kills twice the
Continued on Page 10-B
A six-foot deep, four-acre artificial lake has been
created within the 17,500-acre Timna Desert Park
north ofEilat. The lake, equipped with leisure-time
facilities, is surrounded by breathtaking scenery.
Reform Leader Says
Some Orthodox Jews In Israel Are Trying
To 'Emasculate' The Law Of Return
By RON CSILLAG
TORONTO (JTA) -
There are certain elements
in Orthodox Jewry in Israel
that are flouting halacha
and trying to "emasculate"
the Law of Return, one of
the world's leading Reform
Zionists told delegates to
the recent World Union for
Progressive Judaism Con-
vention here.
Rabbi Roland Gittelsohn, the
founding president of ARZA
the Association of Reform
Zionists of America unleashed a
stinging attack on certain Or-
thodox branches for trying to
"disenfranchise" Reform Judaism
in Israel and around the world.
GITTELSOHN, now rabbi
emeritus of his Boston congrega-
tion, told delegates at a session
Rabbi Roland Gittelsohn
set aside for Reform Zionists that
the Law of Return, which
automatically makes Jews citizens
when they immigrate to Israel, is
being "flagrantly violated day by
day" by much of Orthodoxy in
Israel.
"Twice a year, virtually without
exception, a bill is introduced in
the Knesset to redefine who is a
Jew. They have been introduced
and defeated" with the help of
non-Orthodox groups, Gittelsohn
said.
In February, the Knesset
defeated such a bill, introduced by
religious parties, by a 61 to 47
vote. The bill sought to redefine
Jewish identity to exclude anyone
converted by a non-Orthodox
rabbi.
GITTELSOHN CITED one ex-
ample of how the Law of Return is
Continued on Page 16-B
11 Its Annual Meeting
Mount Sinai Medical Center Installs Officers

*

U Kovens
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami installed officers of the
Board of Trustees at its annual meeting. The Board is the Medical
Center's policy-making body and it is comprised of civic-minded people
in the community who give their time and expertise to help guide Mount
Sinai.
Cal Kovens was installed for his second consecutive term as Chairman
of the Board. Kovens' Chairmanship marks 13 years of leadership both
on the Board of Trustees and in the Mount Sinai Foundation, the
hospital's umbrella organization for all of its fundraising activities.
Kovens served as President of the Board for three years prior to being
elected Chairman, and was also President of the Founders Club, made
up of major donors to Mount Sinai.
Gary Gerson, a Certified Public Accountant, was installed as Vice
Chairman of the Board of Trustees. He has been active with Mount
Sinai for more than a decade, both as a Trustee and a leader in the
hospital's fundraising organizations. Most recently, he was President of
the Board and has been President of the Foundation as well as the
Founders Club.
At the annual meeting, Fred D. Hirt, Chief Executive Officer for
Mount Sinai, was named President of the Medical Center, Hut is
renowned for his significant contributions to the field of geriatric care.
Installed as Honorary Chairmen of the Board were Leonard L. Abess,
Lila G. Heatter, Arthur Pearlman and Edward Shapiro.
Arthur Sheppard was installed as a Vice President, joining current
Vice Presidents Samuel I. Adler, Louis Harris, Sidney Olson, and W.
James Orovitz. Installed as new Assistant Secretary was H. Jerome
Joseph.
Newly elected to the Board of Trustees were Jeff Barash, who is a
Young President, a Mount Sinai Founder and f finer member of the
Board of Mount Sinai's Foundation; Sidney Rudolph, Chairman of the
Board is a Mount Sinai Young President as well as a Founder; and
Samuel May, a Mount Sinai Founder and President of the Harry
Greenberg Foundation for medical research.
X
Fred D. Hirt


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Dr. Lehrman Featured Speaker
At Cantors Assembly
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El, will be the
featured speaker Sunday during
the 39th annual convention of the
Cantors Assembly in Kiamesha
Lake.
Cantors from all over the world
will gather together to dedicate
the evening in honor of Rabbi
Israel Goldfarb, author of 10
volumes of best known hymns
sung in synagogues across the
globe and often called the "Father
of Congregational Singing."
Dr. Lehrman will share his per-
sonal experience and close rela-
tionship with the late Rabbi, who
was the father of his wife, Belle,
and who played an important role
in Lehrman's family and religious
life. Two other daughters of Rabbi
Goldfarb are members of the Tem-
ple Emanu-El congregation,
Thelma Rubinow and Hannah
Michelman.
Rabbi Goldfarb (1880-1967),
who came to this country at the
age of 12 from his native Poland,
was for nearly 55 years the
spiritual leader of Congregation
Baith Israel Anshei Ernes,
Brooklyn's "Mother Synagogue"
founded in 1855. He became Rabbi
emeritus in 1959.
He served as professor of
Jewish liturgical music at the
Seminary from 1920 to 1942, was
a founder of the School of Sacred
Music at the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion and was a president of
the prestigious New York Board
of Rabbis.
Many of Rabbi Goldfarb's songs
were published in the Army and
Navy Hymnal and his collections
for schools and synagogues are
among the most popular in the
United States.
One of the best-known melodies
is "Shalom Aleichem," so widely
known throughout the world it is
often thought to be an ancient
traditional Sabbath hymn.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Hebrew Academy Students In
National Bible Contest Finals
At a celebration party held at the Grand Bau ///,/ t
ttfipante in the Greater Miami Jewish Federation 'r!^
Day, Federation Board member and past pre7de\tmHl
Day, t ederation Board member and past president w 'if
(Hap) Levy is seen at left after presenTingSlr^
chairmen Charlotte Held and Harvey Frid2n,JkP ?f
animals. The animals were chosen aTgiftTfy^M ^
man in keevina with the. man in keeping with the day's theme', "Raiders',
Cards The event, in which pairs ofFederaJnrXt^
solicitation visits to campaign contributors. raiHdKLM
the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel EZo
Campaign.
rgency Fund
Robin Bienenfeld and Eliezer
Silberstein, students at the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami will
represent the Miami community
in the finals of the National Bible
Contest to be held on Sunday,
May 18 in New York City.
The contest under the sponsor-
ship of the Department of Educa-
tion and Culture of the World
Zionist Organization, and coor-
dinated locally by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, in-
volves students from day and
synagogue schools throughout the
country in both Hebrew and
English Divisions.
The participation of the
students in the national finals has
been subsidized by the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami and
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Rabbi Brett Goldstein, Rab-
binical Association president
noted that the "Rabbinical
Association is most pleased to
recognize the achievements of the
two winning students and to en-
courage the intensive study of Bi-
ble throughout the community."
Instructor for the students at
the Hebrew Academy was Rabbi
Na'amat USA
Rae Home, donor chairman and
vice president of membership for
the Kinneret Chapter of Na'amat
USA, will be honored at the
chapter's gala luncheon Sunday,
May 18 at noon at the Casablanca
Hotel.
Chapter president Rita Adoff
said Home is one of the leading
fundraisers, a life member of
Na'amat USA, and dues and
bulletin chairman of the Kinneret
chapter.
The luncheon will also feature
Rabbi Jehuda Melber of Temple
Beth Raphael, who will discuss his
recent trip to Israel.
Sophie Kemper will be the
featured entertainer at the Golda
Meir chapter meeting of Na'amat
USA Thursday, May 15 at noon in
the lower level of the 100 Lincoln
Road Building, Miami Beach.
Chapter President Katherine
Lippman said that Kemper, who is
the chapter's vice president and
program chairman, will entertain
chapter members by singing Yid-
dish songs.
David Shapiro, who has developed
regional winners during the past
five years.
Other schools participating in
the regional finals were Jewish
High School of South Florida,
Beth Torah Congregation and
South Dade Hebrew Academy.
Norman Lipoff of Miami.
James B. Boer of Boca Raton.
Heinz Eppler and H. Irwin
Levy of Palm Beach were
elected Members of United
Israel Appeal s Board of Direc-
tors at the organization's re-
cent 60th Anniversary Annual
Meeting in New York.
Judge Carney To Be Honored
Dade Circuit Court Judge
Thomas Carney will be honored
Wednesday at a cocktail reception
from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Bankers
Club for his "dedicated and
distinguished service to the
judiciary." Judge Carney is a can-
didate in the September election,
countywide and non-partisan, to
retain the seat to which he was
elevated early this year by Gover-
nor Bob Graham after selection br
the Judicial Nominating
Commission.
Attorneys Gilbert A. Haddai
Harris J. Buchhinder and Edward
Blumberg are co-chairmen of the
reception, which is free and open
to all members of the Florida Bar.
always...
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1984 Kraft mc


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Dr. Margaretten To Raise Funds New Officers To Be Installed At Temple Judea
^or School Of Optometry In Israel
It is widely known that in
bsrael there is no university-
related School of Optometry.
Jut some 450 persons in Israel
provide vision care (excluding
hphthalmologists) despite the
bsence of an optometric law.
A hundred are American,
British, or Canadian-trained,
knd a hundred are European-
trained, but 250 of those persons
providing vision-care have no
formal training.
'IT WAS in light of these
Ifacts that the American Friends
of Israel Optometry approached
Tel Aviv University to request
khat they undertake the joint
venture of establishing Israel's
Birst university-related School of
lOptometry," stated Dr. Milton
lEger, a retired optometrist liv-
|ing in Deerfield Beach.
Eger is vice president of
lAmerican Friends of Israel Op-
Itometry and former editor of the
Journal of the American Op-
Itometric Association.
Dr. Irwin Borish, Benedict
IProfessor of Optometry at the
University of Houston, and Dr.
Iwilliam Baldwin, Dean of the
lOptometry School at the same
[university, joined Eger in
[presenting Optometry's case in
llsrael.
THEY WERE pleased when
[Tel Aviv University made a com-
Imitment to establish a four-year
[diploma program leading to a
[Master's degree if American op-
I tome try could endow the pro-
[grani. Before the first students
Ere enrolled, $500,000 in cash
[must lie raised, $2 million being
I raised liefore the first students
(graduate.
American Friends of Israel
lOptometry have joined forces
[with the American Friends of
ITel Aviv University to develop
Ian international fund-raising
[campaign among worldwide op-
[tometry and the optical
[industry.
Dr. Eger announced the ap-
Ipointment of local optometrists
wh<> have agreed to spearhead
the fund-raising efforts in South
I Florida.
Dr Michael Margaretten will
I chair the local campaign. Dr.
[Margaretten practices op-
tometry in Dade County in
[association with Dr. Harvey F.
[Mazer and specializes in
developmental vision, vision
therapy and pediatric
I optometry.
MARGARETTEN is a
graduate of the University of
[Rochester and the Pennsylvania
College of Optometry, as well as
Yale University's Gesell In-
stitute of Child Development. He
was president of the Dade Coun-
|'V "ptometric Association from
11981 to 1982 and is on the Board
of Trustees of the Florida Op-
[tometric Association.
"It is my hope that the local
[community of Jewish op-
tometrists will recognize the op-
[tometric needs in Israel and
[come forth with their support.
(,f course, the School would
welcome contributions from
an),me." says Dr. Margaretten.
"Ue have the opportunity to
[guarantee proper vision care for
|all of Israel's future
[generations."
ON' MAY 18, Israel In-
Workmen's Circle
To Install Officers
Workmen's Circle, Miami
Beach Branch 1059, will meet on
^ednesday, at noon, at Surfside
\ "mmunity Center. The program
'Mil include installation of officers
"' Leonard Zilbert, president of
< Hebrew Home For Aged, who
'H speak on "The Golden Years
Are They Really?"
New Officers and Members of
the Board of Directors of Coral
Gables' Temple Judea will be in-
stalled May 23, according to Rabbi
Michael Eisenstat.
New Officers include Executive
Committee Members Stanley
Bulbin, president; Harvey Jacob-
son, David Magidson, Eric
Meyers, and Gail Newman, vice
presidents; Sanford Dernis,
secretary; Sandee Burger,
treasurer; Harlan Chiron, finan-
cial secretary and Russell Silver-
man, past president.
Newly nominated members of
the Board of Trustees include
Richard Forster, Bernard Her-
skowitz, Adah Jaffer, Hardy Katz,
David Moed, Sara Mullens,
Stephanie Rakofsky, Laurel
Shapiro, Gary Simon and Cynthia
Moshe Arens Guest Speaker
Dr. Irvin Borish
dependence Sunday, Dr. Paul
Klein and his wife, Regina, will
host a reception for Dr. Irvin
Borish, world-renowned pioneer
in optometric education. Guests
will hear first-hand of the
establishment of the School of
Optometry at Tel Aviv
University.
Moshe Arens, Minister of the
Israeli Cabinet, former Am-
bassador of the State of Israel to
the United States, and former
Minister of Defense of Israel, will
be the guest speaker at the Se-
cond Annual Dinner Dance of the
association Friends of the IDF.
Guest of honor will be Alex
Daoud, Mayor of Miami Beach.
The dinner will be held on Sun-
day, May 18, at 7 p.m., at the
Konover Hotel. Joey Bishop will
entertain for the event and the
music will be provided by Jaime
Bronsztein and the Klezmer band.
The proceeds will benefit the ac-
tivities of the association. Friends
of the IDF for the well-being of
the Israeli soldiers.
Varat.
Other trustees include Bernard
Applebaum, William Gorden,
Joseph Greenberg, Fred
Havenick, Barry Hesser, Lester
Langer, Harvey Miller, Ethel
Murray, Richard Waldorf and An-
drew Weinstein.
Completing the Board will be
Susan Feingold, Sisterhood Presi-
dent and the Men's Club Presi-
dent and Youth Group President.
The installation will be part of
the regular Sabbath service
scheduled at 8:15 p.m. at the
temple.
THERE S MORE TO CELEBRATING JEWISH LIFE THAN
mra BALL SOUP
Join ut tor Sabbath Services
Friday Night 8:00 P.M. Saturday Morning 930 A.M.
Sisterhood & Brotherhood
Doily ft Sabbath Service*
Religious School
forty Childhood Education
Solomon Schechtei Day School
Youth Program
o
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Nnated <"ii* 'r* UMMI Svnogoou* or AmNM
The Healthiest Traditions
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
MJHHA Appoints Goodman
Associate Exec. Director
October '86
Ben Gurion Centennial Launched
The Directorate of the Miami
Jewish Home has announced the
appointment of Terry Goodman as
Associate Executive Director in
charge of Operations as of April 9.
Goodman has assumed the posi-
tion previously occupied by new
Executive Director, Marc
Lichtman.
Goodman comes to the Home
with many years of diversified
management experience in the
hospital and nursing home in-
dustries. Most recently, he has
served as Administrator and
Chief Executive Officer of the
Swanholm Nursing and
Rehabilitative Center in St.
Petersburg and as Executive
Director and Chief Executive Of-
ficer of the Jewish Home of Cen-
tral New York.
Goodman holds both a
Bachelor's and a Master's degree
from Syracuse University, New
York and is a member of many
prestigious professional organiza-
tions in the health care field, in-
cluding the American College of
Health Care Executives, the
American Hospital Association
and the Florida Association of
Homes for the Aging.
He is a former member of the
Board of Directors of the New
York Association of homes for the
Aging, as well. Goodman is licens-
ed as a Nursing Home Ad-
ministrator in both New York and
Florida.
"I have every confidence that
Terry Goodman
Terry Goodman's proven exper-
tise will be a great asset to the
Miami Jewish Home, particularly
during this period of un-
precedented growth and capital
expansion," noted Executive
Director Marc Lichtman. "We are
delighted to have an ad-
ministrator of his caliber join our
staff."
Lawrence M. Schantz Assumes
Presidency Of Temple Emanu-El
Lawrence M. Schantz, South
NEW YORK (JTA) Three
Jewish organizations have an-
nounced activities in conjunction
with the year-long celebration of
the centennial of the birth of
David Ben-Gurion. Israel's first
Premier.
They are the Centennial Com-
mittee of the U.S., the American
Zionist Federation (AZF) in col-
laboration with the World Zionist
Organization-American Section,
and State of Israel Bonds.
The newly-formed Centennial
Committee of the U.S., with
President Reagan as its honorary
chairman, will hold educational
and cultural activities throughout
the U.S. from October, 1986 the
anniversary of Ben-Gurion's birth
- through May 4, 1987, the 40th
anniversary of Israel's
independence.
THE COMMITTEE is chaired
by Jack Spitzer, honorary presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith International,
and co-chaired by Israeli Am-
bassador to the U.S. Meir
Rosenne.
The AZF and WZO-American
Section will launch its celebration
of the B-G Centennial at a special
event May 8, where the 1986
Israel Achievement Awards will
be presented to folk-singer
Theodore Bikel and sculptor
George Segal, and Israel's 38th
anniversary celebrated. Former
Israeli President Yitzhak Navon,
who is now Minister of Education
and Culture, will deliver a major
address at the event, to be held at
the New York Hilton Hotel. There
will also be a special tribute to
American Jewish leader Max
Fisher of Detroit.
State of Israel Bonds plans a
gala international dinner June 1
at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in
New York to inaugurate the
organization's commemoration of
the B-G Centennial. The dinner
will also mark the 35th anniver-
sary of B-G's first visit to the U.S.
as Premier of Israel to launch the
Israel Bond program.
Israel Prime Minister Shimon
Peres will be the principal speaker
at the dinner. Mayor Teddy Kollek
of Jerusalem will be a special
guest of honor at the occasion.
Peres will present the Ben-
Gurion Centennial Medal, minted
specially for the occasion, to some
of the most prominent Jewish
leaders in the U.S., Canada,
France, Great Britain, and Mexico
in recognition of their "exemplary
service to Israel, the Jewish peo-
ple and the community at large."
THE U.S. honorees, who repre-
sent cities visited by B-G on his
1951 visit here, include Am-
bassador Walter Annenberg of
Philadelphia, Arthur Belfer of
New York. William Belzberg of
Los Angeles, Lester Crown of
Chicago, Fisher. Morton Mandel
of Cleveland, and u
Meyerhoff of Baltimore. >
Also Donald Robinson of h,
sburgh, Robert SmiVi
Washington, Henry TaS,/'
Jersey, and Jack Weiler *3
York. Also to be honored kS
Rothberg of New York i?
fonal chairman of
and chairman of the Benr
Centennial Dinner, and nS!
Bronfman of Canada **
In Houston. Israe|i arti
Yaacov Agam presented S
special limited edition centeruS
album of 10 silk screens anT
multigraph celebrating the life of
Ben-Gurion. at a recent receptio,
hosted by the Judaica Museum rf
Houston, the America
Associates of Ben Gurion Unive?.
sity of the Negev. and Sandra ud
Leon Weiner.
Ambassador Asher Ben Nata
director of Yad Ben-Gurion in
Israel, was a special guest at the
reception, held at the museum
located in Congregation Beth
Yeshurun. This was the first OJ
showing of the Agam album.
Israeli Implicated In Arms Deals
Appeals To Israel For Aid, Support
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
Eisenberg, one of the six Israelis
presently detained in Bermuda in
connection with plans to sell U.S.
arms to Iran, is quoted in Sun-
day's Maariv as appealing to the
Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem
via his lawyer. Reuven Rivlin
for Israeli government aid and
support.
"We are loyal citizens of the
State, we have committed no
crime and we have done no wrong.
All we are guilty of is entering
Bermuda without a permit," he is
quoted as saying. "We have done
nothing in violation of Israeli law
or the country's interests. Please,
do not abandon us in time of trou-
ble and do not let us be extradited
to the United States."
Florida attorney, is the new presi-
dent of Temple Emanu-El.
The new president, a senior
partner in the law firm of Britton,
Schantz and Schatzman, has for
many years played a leading role
in local, state and national Jewish
affairs, particularly in the educa-
tional area.
Schantz served as president of
the Southern region of the
American Jewish Congress from
1983 to 1985 and has been actively
involved in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, B'nai B'rith,
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and was a founding
supporter of the Jewish High
School in South Florida.
During many years in Temple
Emanu-El he has served as vice
president and director, chairman
of the board of education, a chair-
man of the Scholarship Ball for
the Lehrman Day School and as a
chairman of the Temple's Forum
series.
A graduate of the University of
Wisconsin, he received his law
degree from Rutgers School of
Law.
Lawrence M. Schantz
IF YOU'RE EATING A
HIGH FIBER BRAN FLAKE
THAT'S
in
IF IT'S HIGHEST IN FIBER
AND BEST TASTING.
THAT'S POST.
You ve got the nght idea You re eating a high fiber cereal because
you know how beneficial a high fiber diet can be.
But do you know there's a bran flake that's highest in fiber, best
tasting and absolutely Kosher?
Its Post* Natural Bran Flakes.
Post* has more fiber than the other leading bran flake And Post*
isoven toasted So every flake iscrispy. golden and delicious.
im n^fl3^0"vedec,dedtohaveahighfiberbranflake,makesure
flake ra'Bfan Flak6S The best ,ast,ng' h*ghest ,iber tXan
Oi9S6GnaK>r> -m^
Where keeping Kosher is a delicious tradition.


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
FPL Directors Elect Hudiburg,
Chairman; Tallon, President
Florida Power and Light Company directors elected John J.
Hudiburg chairman of the board and chief executive officer, and
Robert E. Tallon president of the utility. Tallon also was elected a
director of FPL. Previously, Hudiburg was president of the com-
pany and Tallon was executive vice president.
A Georgia Tech graduate and 35-year veteran of the company,
Hudiburg began as a student engineer and held various engineer-
ing and operating positions on his way to becoming president in
1979 and chief executive officer in 1983.
Tallon joined FPL in 1973 following nearly 20 years with Union
Oil Company of California. A graduate of Fullerton College and
holder of an LLB degree from Southwestern University School of
Law, he was elected executive vice president in 1981. Previously,
he served as vice president of divisions and group vice presdient.
Tallon is a director of the Florida State Chamber of Commerce
and chairman of the Chamber Foundation, a trustee of the
Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce and a member of the board
of advisors of the Salvation Army, both for Dade County and
statewide.
Minister of Health Mordechai Gur (left). Prof.
Shlomo Mashiah, head of the Gynecology
Department at Tel Hashomer's Sheba hospital
(right), and a member of the medical team
holding Israel's first 'frozen embryo' baby.
When Nili Arev gave birth to a girl on Mar.
28, she made Israel the third country to pro-
duce such a baby. The embryo, created by the
test tube fertilization of an ovum from 80-year-
old Nili by her husband Zvi 's sperm, was kept
frozen at minus 196 centigrade before being
implanted in Nili's womb.
Names in the News
ictions On Human Rights Differ From Helsinki Accords
A leading expert on Soviet
policy has accused the Soviet
government of "systematically
violating" the humanitarian provi-
sions of the Helsinki Accords.
Testifying before the U.S. Com-
mission on Security and Coopera-
tion in Europe, Dr. William
Korey, director of international
research for B'nai B'rith, said the
Helsinki Pact obligates its
signatories including the Soviet
Union to "expedite in a positive
and humanitarian manner the
handling of applications for reu-
nion of families."
Korey testified that the Gor-
bachev regime's apparent public
acceptance of the basic thesis of
the Helsinki Accords the
linkage between human rights and
security matters differs
markedly and alarmingly from
Soviet government actions.
Dr. Abram L. Sschar, founding
president of Brandeis University
and a noted historian, has been
named recipient of the American
Jewish Historical Society's Emma
Lazarus Statue of Liberty Award.
The award is presented by the
Society "to an individual who
made major contributions to the
understanding of the immigrant's
role in American life," according
to Morris Soble, president.
Sachar, the son of immigrants,
will receive the award at the Em-
ma Lazarus Statue of Liberty
Award Dinner in Boston on June
9- Secretary of the Interior
Donald P. Hodel will be keynote
speaker at the event.
A spokesman for the American
Jewish Committee charges that
right-wing extremist groups have
stepped up their campaign to
organize farmers in the Midwest,
and he urges that the major farm
organizations go on record and
condemn such groups.
, Speaking at a seminar at North
j Dakota State University, Rabbi
A. James Rudin, who directs the
AJC's Interreligious Affairs
Department, which has been
monitoring the problem, said:
"The radical right is making
significant inroads in the Middle
West. Prairiefire, an Iowa-based
[coalition of concerned farmers,
jhas reported a sharp increase in
the number of people who have
recently attended radical-right
meetings."
Rabbi Rudin warned that "The
LaRouche forces, which won
significant victories in the Illinois
Democratic Primary, have ag-
gressively tried to link the plight
of farmers with international
banking and other conspiratorial
movements."
The Synagogue Council of
America, representing the con-
gregational and rabbinic branches
of Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform Judaism, has launched ex-
ploratory talks with national
Catholic and Protestant bodies for
a four faith consultation on
terrorism.
Rabbi Henry D. Michelman,
executive vice president of the
Synagogue Council of America,
announced at the opening of a
two-day conference on terrorism
in New York that the SCA has
asked the National Council of
Churches and the Catholic
Bishops Conference to consider
the convening of a consultation on
terrorism with Jewish, Catholic,
Protestant and Muslim
representatives.
He indicated that initial discus-
sions with his Christian counter-
parts were favorable and that ad-
ditional conversations will be held
during the next few weeks.
Rabbis of the 100-year-old Con-
servative Judaism in America will
seek new avenues to reach unaf-
filiated Jews, increase Jewish
education and deal with the pro-
blem of the intermarried as part
of the 86th annual convention of
the Rabbinical Assembly, May
18-20, at the Concord Hotel,
Kiamesha Lake, N.Y.
"As we mark a century of
flourishing in North America as
the largest branch of Judaism,
serving 1.5 million congregational
members, we must prepare to face
the new challenges of the coming
decade," stressed the RA presi-
dent, Rabbi Alexander M.
Shapiro, South Orange, N.J.
A major issue before the
1 200-memher international rab-
binic association will be a resolu-
tion calling for sanctions against
any member of the organization
who participates in ceremonies
which recognize the Jewish
lineage of both the father and
mother.
Princeton University will
establish a Center for Jewish Life
with the help of a gift of $750,000
from the Ivan F. and Seema
Boesky Family Fund.
The new center, which is ex-
pected to cost a total of $1.3
million, will house the Princeton
Hillel Foundation. It will include a
University-run kosher kitchen and
dining hall, as well as facilities for
a variety of extra-curricular
Jewish activities, including lec-
tures and seminars, social events
and religious services.
The Boesky family has also
made a gift of $750,000 toward
the construction of a new building
complex to house the University's
Center of International Studies
Continued on Page 7-B
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Islands, Toronto, Ottawa, Washington, D.C.,
& many others. *
Special Diets Accommodated.
Call: 1-800-3-KOSHER Or 1-718-377-7794-5
44 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's Mustard
Vegetable Fritters
Vi cup butler or margarine.
melted; or as needed
i cup finely chopped fucchim
Vi cup fiaely chopped
mushrooms
CHARUE GULDEN
Vi cup shredded carrots
11 cup chopped omon
Vt cup dairy sour cream
3 tablespoons Guldens Spicy
Brown Mustard
2 beaten eggs
3 tablespoons cornstarch
Saale wgetaMes in I tablespoon butter; remow Irom heat. Mu
sour cream, mustard and eggs Gradually beat in comsUrcn
Stir in wtetables. Me* I tablespoon butler in skillet. Spoon
2 tablespoons Irilter baiter in skillet Ughlly brown on both
sides Add butter to skillet as needed Makes 110 fntlers
Note: Any combination of wgelaWes
can be substituted. ______
-GULDENS
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!99
Spinach-Stuffed Mushrooms
I pound Iresh spinach (or I package
|M oo.l Iroien chopped spinach,
thawed, well drained)
I pound Iresh mushrooms (about is
medium sued)
3 tablespoons butter, meked
I cup ncolta cheese
4 teaspoons Guldens Spicy Brown Mustard
Pinch crushed oregano
Wash, clean spinach; steam in covered
skiHel five minutes. Remow. drain and
chop. Remow mushroom stems and finely
chop Saule stems and spinach in one
tablespoon buller Combine spinach
mature with remaining ingredients
Spoon into caps Place on cookie 'heel
brush with remaining bulter Bake at 3S0*V
IS mmules or until heated through Makes
about 16.
Ol/LDtN) MUSTAROf
It tiHOrM
f I MUSTABDt
Memories are made with Gulden's.
Kosher Parw


Page6-B ITie^ewishJ^oridian/Frid^ May 9, 1986
fieth David
Announces pa|
Preschool Progtd
of an extensive prwd3
at its Coral Wf">
children aged l'J^k
grated .curriculu^*!!
boft Judaic and secultfteja
Beth I)av,,is pre-schooUib
directed l.y Alida Bunder 1\
current^ director of tJ{
Beach. She has had 19 yearsT
penencem her field, includmeW
position as supervisor of v
centers of family daycare in Ma
Adumim. Israel.
Mrs. Bunder has a BSdwr-i
education from TempleImverstt
and a post-graduate degree infe
At Hadassah Confab Women's League Branch Confe<* =ttfS5;
Members o/ the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Summit
Division recently participated in a cruise aboard the TSS Car-
nivale. The cruise was graciously hosted by Summit Division
members Lm and Ted Arison. The 35 community leaders (pic-
tured above) who were attending the first formal event of the Sum-
mit Division discussed their roles in regard to the important
work of Federation, u-hich through its annual Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign, allocates monies to SO local beneficiary agencies, to the
United Jewish Appeal to assist the people of Israel, and to meet
the needs of Jews living in 33 other foreign nations. Donald E.
Lefton serves as chairman of Federation's Summit Division.
Rev. Bergstrom To Speak Local Sisterhoods To Attend
Are America's basic freedoms
being undermined by rightwing
organizations and clerics? The
movement toward mixing church
and state in this country will be
discussed Sunday. May 18 at the
Miami Region of Hadassah's An-
nual Conference by the Rev.
Charles Bergstrom, executive
director for governmental affairs
at the Lutheran Council in the
USA.
Bergstrom. a founding co-chair
of People for the American Way,
an organization formed by TV
producer Norman Lear to counter
the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Moral
Majority, will address the con-
ference's American Affairs
Plenary at the Biscayne Bay Mar-
riott Hotel. The session, which
begins at 8 p.m., is free and open
to the public.
A strong opponent of the inter-
mingling of religious and state
matters, Bergstrom says, "The
fundamentalists try to tell you
that the Bible should decide how a
nation is run. I say that the Con-
stitution, not the Bible, should
govern a nation."
Among the topics Bergstrom
Rev. Charles Bergstrom
will discuss are prayer in public
schools, the strong fundamen-
talist lobby and how to counter it.
The plenary session, chaired
this year by Dorothy Handshu and
Pam Brown, is a noted highlight
of Miami's three-day conference
(May 18-20). Hundreds of women
from the region's 29 chapters at
tend the conclave, which is design-
ed as both a culiminating event for
the year's achievements and a
training ground for Hadassah
leaders taking office.
The Sisterhoods of Rodeph
Sholom and Kol Ami, led by their
presidents will be represented at
Spring Conference of the Florida
Branch of Women's League for
Conservative Judaism to be held
at the Hyatt Hotel in West Palm
Beach on May 18-20.
Linda Blum, outgoing president
of the Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood,
will be installed as Corresponding
Secretary for Florida Branch;
Diana Siegel. current Jewish
Family Living Chairman of
Florida Branch and past president
of the Rodeph Sholom Sisterh.....i.
will be installed as Vice President
for Torah Fund for Florida
Branch. Claire Levin will be in-
stalled on the Board of Directors
at this Conference. Installation
will take place on Sunday evening
May 18.
The annual Women's League
Conference briefs leadership of af-
filiated Conservative Synagogue
Sisterhoods on issues and pro-
grams for the year ahead.
Topics to be explored at this
year's Conference include the
Jewish woman today, Jewish
education and youth. American
and world affairs, the family to-
day, creative programming, and
Synagogue life.
Evelyn Seelig. a National Vice
President and National Member-
ship Chairman, from Jericho.
N.V.. a national leader of
Women's League, will serve as
Consultant at the Conference.
Arthritis Class Offered
The Florida Chapter of the Ar-
thritis Foundation. Parkway
Regional -Medical Center and the
Michael Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center arc sponsoring a
Self-Management Course design-
ed to help deal effectively with
their arthritis. The Course will
begin on Friday. May 23 at 10
a.m. at the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in
North Miami Beach. It will con-
tinue to meet weekly for six
weeks, two hours each week.
Katz Elected To
BB Hillel
Exec. Committee
Ellie Katz has been elected it
the executive committee of the In-
ternational R'nai B'rith Hilla
Commission. Kate will sen-em
the executive committee as i
member at large.
"Ellie Kate brings to the ei-
ecutive committee a deep commit-
ment and significant knowledges
the field of Jewish education."
Edwin SI r CommiuiN
chairman, said. Kate has scrnda
vice pres li :' the Jewish
Federation of South Biward.
president of the Jewish Higk
School of > ith Florida, and vice
president i if Temple Beth-Shalom
in Hollyw.....i. She is a board
meml>er of the Jewish Education
Service of North America and i
life member of B'nai B'rith
Women.
Golden Elected To International
BB Hillel Executive Committee
Alfred Golden has been elected
to the executive committee of the
International B'nai B'rith Hillel
Commission, Edwin Shapiro, com-
mission chairman announced.
Golden will serve on the executive
committee as a vice-chair and
chairman of the personnel
committee.
"I am delighted by Al Golden's
election to the executive commit-
tee," Shapiro said. "Al has a deep
commitment to Jewish communal
life and the Hillel movement. As a
leader in B'nai B'rith and the
Federations, he will be of major
value to the executive
committee."
In addition to his work with the
international commission, Golden
has served on the boards of the
local and regional B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations. He is a com-
missioner of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, and a life
member of the board of governors
of B'nai B'rith District Five, a
region ranging from Maryland to
Florida. Golden also served on the
boards of the Miami, Hollywood,
and Fort Lauderdale Federations
and is vice-chairman of the Large
Cities Budgeting Committee of
the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Golden recently attended the
first meeting of the committee,
which was held at the head-
quarters of B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional in Washington. The com-
mission executive committee
reviewed the 1986-87 foundation
budget request, discussed the
establishment of a national en-
dowment fund for B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations, reviewed
salary policy and procedures for
Hillel field staff, and recommend-
ed the establishment of a national
student membership structure for
Hillel. Currently, membership is
only offered on a local level. The
commission also approved provi-
sional status for the creation of a
Hillel Foundation at the Universi-
ty of Hartford.
So. Dade JCC To
Show Kreloffs Works
The South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center presents a showing
of Marty Kreloffs work at the
Barbara Gillman Gallery, on
Saturday, May 17, from 7 to 9
p.m., proceeds to benefit the
South Dade JCC. The evening in-
cludes a patron's reception to
meet the artist, complimentary
wine and cheese.
$500 publix
~ Gift Certificate
With Each New Subscription
ACheck t*m
Must Accompany 0r'
Name
Address.
City ___
As A New Subscriber To The Jewish Floridian,
I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
Please Start My Subscription Now!
Apt.#
-------------------------------------State _
NEW SUBSCRIBER-
DADE COUNTY ONLY Allow 4 to 6 weeks
OFFER EXTENDED UNTIL MAY 30,1986 'r d6,'verY
___Zip
Mail To:
JEWISH Florida"
P.O. Box 0129
Miami. Fla. 33101


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Names in the News
Continued from Page 5-B
d Department of Economics
n announcing the gift,
.nceton President William G.
Jwen said, "We are extremely
fateful to the Boesky family for
B exceptionally generous
mmitment."
gome 100 Jewish deaf and hear-
C youngsters from across the
ited States and Canada will
rticipate in the "Our Way" Na-
mal Conference of Synagogue
>uth national convention, accor-
bg to Rabbi Eliezer Leder-
ind. director of "Our
Bay" NCSY. The convention will
held in Brooklyn on May 15-18
pder the direction of Shimon
tz, regional representative of
w York City.
Theme of the convention is
Holocaust: Tragedy and
umph." Program highlights in-
line a Sabbath experience, tour
New York City, a visit to the
nter of Holocaust Studies, and
Bsions from deaf and hearing
rvivors of concentration camps.
Culmination of the convention
ill be an awards banquet.
wards will be bestowed on
wish deaf individuals who have
rsonally strengthened their
mmitment to Torah observance
d to those who have succeeded
raising the Jewish conscience of
hers in the Jewish deaf
mmunity.
[Judith S. Siegel has been
lected executive director of the
lational Ladies Auxiliary, Jewish
Var Veterans of the U.S.A., and
assumed the position in this
apacity at the national office in
Washington.
I The election took place at the
lational Executive Committee
peeting in Philadelphia and was
pintly announced by national
resident, Sharlee F. Friend of
|fexas, and national personnel
hairman, Florence Goldberg of
lew Jersey.
Siegel comes to JWVA from the
Washington Opera, John F. Ken-
nedy Center, where she was direc-
tor of special events for the past
three years.
The National Council of Jewish
Women's Center for the Child has
begun a new research project to
study the rapidly changing needs
of families in which mothers work.
The project will be the largest
study of its type ever conducted,
said James T. Bond, director of
the NCJW Center for the Child.
In discussing the need for the
project, "Mothers in the
Workplace," Bond noted that "In
1950, only 12 percent of women
with children under six years of
age were in the paid labor force.
Today, that proportion is more
than 50 percent and still growing.
This trend, coupled with the
dramatic growth in the number of
single-parent families, has pro-
foundly altered family life and
childrearing patterns in the
United States."
"Mothers in the Workplace" is
being conducted by NCJW
volunteers across the country.
Max Fisher of Detroit will be
honored by the World Zionist
Organization-American Section in
a special tribute to him as "the
preeminent leader of the
American Jewish community."
Mrs. Bernice Tannenbaum,
chairman of the WZO-American
Section, said, "We have chosen
our Yom Ha'atzmaut celebration
as the fitting occasion to do
homage to Mr. Fisher whose
achievements in behalf of the
Jewish people not only in the
United States, but worldwide, and
especially in Israel, have earned
our accolade."
The special tribute to Fisher is
for his "superb contributions to
the Jewish people as the founding
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors."
Bet Class Of Beth Torah To Host
Friday Night Family Service
followed by an Oneg Shabbat
sponsored by the Mollie Kahaner
Beth Torah Sisterhood.
[On May 9, the Bet classes of
leth Torah Congregation's
Jarnld Wolk Religious School,
be hosting the third Friday
light Family Service of the school
ear.
| The service will be conducted by
\ Max A. Lipschitz, rabbi, and
tbbi Randall Konigsburg, the
iritual leaders of the
ongregation.
| The special prayer service which
rill lie starting at 7:30 p.m. will be
The 19 students of the Bet class who will
l>e participating in the special evening under
the direction of their teachers. Mrs. Helen
Radin, Mrs. Fayanne Schwarzherg and Mrs.
Pearl Tucker are: David Citron. Ron Cohen.
Joshua Even. Richard Froom. Steven
(Hildman. Allan Haspel, Zvi Hirsch.
And Ian Hochman. Andrew Kronstadt,
Leon Maratchi. Tracy Orr, Beth Papir.
Sherman Reid.
And Rebecca Rosen. Beth Rosengaus.
Laura Ross. Leonard Siegel. Michael Ten-
drich and March Wertheimer.
3ti/ifi*Min


Horizons Chapter of B'nai B nth Women will meet Thursday
May H in the Clubhouse of the Horizons Condo. Kendall
The Courage to Care." a documentary about the rescuers of
-lews during the Holocaust will be shown on WPBT/Channel 2,
on Sunday at 11 p.m.
The next meeting of the South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry will be on Tuesday at 730 p.m., at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Yo-Yo Ma. the cellist who astounded audiences as a child pro-
digy and continues to perform to critical acclaim, will conclude the
1985-86 Prestige Series with a Sunday. 8:15 p.m. concert at the
bade County Auditorium.
Sisterhood of Temple Bnai Zion will hold their Annual Installa
non of Officers in the Auditorium on Tuesday at noon A lun-
cheon will be served.
Sholom Lodge No. 1024 of B'nai B rith will celebrate its 60
years of service in Dade County by a dinner dance at the Konover
Hotel, Saturday.
AMIT
WOMEN
Galil Chapter regular mon-
thly meeting will take place on
Monday, at noon at the Young
Israel Synagogue, North Miami
Beach.
Shalom Chapter Mother's Day
luncheon will be held on Tuesday,
at 11:30 a.m. at 100 Lincoln Road,
Club Room. Jeanette Goldberg,
chapter president will be honored
as "Mother of the Year." Lunch
will be served with Mayor Alex
Daoud as guest speaker,
candlelighting by Rose Shapiro
and entertainment by Tony
Simone.
Hadar Chapter final season's
meeting will take place on Thurs-
day, May 15 at Byron Hall.
Hatikvah/Miami Beach special
"Mother's Day" luncheon will be
held on Thursday, May 15 at noon
at the Kneseth Israel Social Hall.
The Chai Chapter of AMIT
Women will be holding their An-
nual Auction for the Children of
Israel on Sunday, May 18, at Tem-
ple Or Olom. The Auction will
begin at 7:30 p.m. Early bird sale
of smaller merchandise and
preview of auction merchandise
will start at 4 p.m.
Proceeds from this auction are
earmarked for scholarships,
Youth Aliyah and Social Services
that AMIT Women provide.
Auction chairpersons are
Jeanne Finkelstein, Ann Slotsky,
Sadie Kane. Serving on the Com-
mittee are Isabel Alexander, Mol-
ly Beckerman, Bess Sokol, Edith
Sirull, Susan Feldman, Bernice
Epstein, Bee and Stevie Harris,
Mildered Gomez, Ruth Sakowitz
and Mollie Stein.
HADASSAH
EVENTS
Natanya Chapter of
Hadassah of Winston Towers, will
celebrate its award luncheon at
the Eden Roc Hotel on Monday at
noon.
The Annual Installation will
take place in Tower 300 on
Wednesday, May 28 at noon.
Masada Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its Donor Luncheon on
Tuesday, at Beth Torah. Donor
Chairperson Harriet Barasch will
present Region representative
Eddyse Kessler as guest speaker.
The I.R. Goodman Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Sunday, at 1
p.m. at the Hadassah Region of-
fice, Miami Beach. A Mother's
Day program will be presented in-
cluding a candlelighting
ceremony.
Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah installation of officers
will be held May 12 at 12:30 p.m.
at the Auditorium.
Southgate Chapter of Hadassah
regular monthly meeting will be
held on Monday at 1 p.m. at the
Terrace Room. The Installation
will be conducted by Mayor Alex
Daoud.
Southgate Chapter of Hadassah
annual donor luncheon will take
place on Thursday, May 15 at
noon at Temple Emanu-El. A
musical program by Tony St.
Thomas and Sabrina will be
presented.
The Henrietta Szold Chapter of
Hadassah, Miami Beach, will hold
their regular meeting on Monday,
11 a.m. at the Shelborne Hotel.
The Donor Luncheon will follow
on Wednesday.
Hyatt Orlando To Open
Kosher Restaurant
Hyatt Orlando will open complete kosher restaurant and con-
vention facilities May 4, it was announced recently by General
Manager Rod Young.
The full service kosher capability will be the first of its kind in
the Central Florida area. Hyatt Orlando will also have the distinc-
tion of being authorized for Rabbinical supervision by the Or-
thodox Union (U), a New York based organization that grants its
name only to those facilities which strictly adhere to kosher
culinary guidelines.
Hyatt Orlando's kosher facilities will be operated in association
with Steve Greenseid Catering, Inc. Greenseid has done kosher
catering in the New York area and is currently involved in kosher
catering in Palm Beach under local kosher supervision.
Three forms of kosher facilities will be available: local catering,
such as bar mitzvahs or weddings; a kosher restaurant; and the
ability to host groups and meetings. Capabilities will range from
weekends for individual guests to national conventions.
The Hyatt Orlando has completely renovated a section of the
kitchen for exclusive kosher purposes to comply with Orthodox
Union specifications. The kitchen will be a "meat" kitchen, with a
wide variety of kosher food available both a la carte and banquet
styles.
The 946-room Hyatt Orlando, located just five minutes from
Walt Disney World, recently completed a multi-million dollar
renovation. Facilities include four swimming pools, whirlpools,
children's playgrounds and pools, and a jogging trail on 56 acres
of landscaped grounds. The adjacent Convention Center offers
40,000 square feet of meeting space, along with full service ban-
quet and convention service capabilities.
Temple Executive Director
Major Dade County Congregation seeks
dynamic, experienced Executive Director.
Qualifications must include strong fiscal and
business management skills; fund raising
skills; and membership solicitation and
development skills.
To apply send resume and salary history in
confidence to: Box TED c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
##
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Sat., May 10 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 11 7:30 p.m.
Mark I. Siller, M.D.
Ophthalmologist
Board Certified Eye Physician & Surgeon
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ON STAFF AT:
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute,
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17971 Biscayne Blvd.
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Tei 932-3901
MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED



Miami Jewish Home Celebrates
(Left to right) Harry and Lucille Chernxn. H. Jerome Joseph. Louis Stein
(standing), and Thelma Joseph.
Pioneers of thA
Polly deHirsch Meyer receiving Pioneer Award from Irving Frank?! (left) rm
Judge Irving Cypen. Judge Irving Cypen.
(Left to right) Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield, Mrs. Hannah Meyer, and Mr.
and Mrs. Hyman Small.
Jimmie Kopelowitz (left) showing his Pionem- Award
to Louis Fischer.
(Left to right) B.B. and Grace Goldstein and Burton and Rose Kahn.
Muriel Rudolph receiving recognition as Coordinator of the event from President
Harold Beck.
(Left to right) Nathan and Sophie Gumenick, Arthur (Left to right) Stanley Friedman, Bunny Adler, Glen- (Left to right) Judge Imng Cypen. Lours Stem, and
and Vwustte Kahn, and Rose and Burton Kahn. da Friedman, and Sam Adler. Sidney Rudolph.
% *4^ *
(Left to right) Stanley Kossuff, Scott Davis, and Sidney
an*/ Muriel Rudolph.
\
W aving goodbye at the end of a wonderful evening KM n
(left to right) May Meyer. Ruth Zimmerman. Fram: .-
Makovsky. ami M* Hie Sih'erman.
keft to right, Fnd andSuzarine#**


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
;h Year With Anniversary Bash
bme Honored
Pioneer Award from Mollie Silverman receiving Pioneer Award from
Judge Irving Cypen.
Frances Makovsky receiving Pioneer award from
Judge Irving Cypen.
(Left to right) Judge Philip Bloom, Rep. Elaine Bloom, Judge Herbert Shapiro
and Mrs. Ruth Shapiro.________________________
(Left to right) Rose Banner, Pearl Solovei, May Cowan, Dorothy Drexler, Jean
Tesser and Monya Resnick.
Jacqueline Traurig receiving recognition for her role as Chairperson of the
iOth Anniversary Journal from President Harold Beck.
Enjoying the evening are the Cypen family: (seated) Hazel and Judge Irving
Cypen, (standing, left to right) Stephen and Arlyn Cypen, Wayne and Nicole
Cypen, and Bonnie and Dr. Marc Epstein. ___________


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Soviet Jewry
Local Activist Works To Free Soviet Refusenik
By LLOYD RESNICK
When Sandra Goldberg was
called to the Torah for her Bat
Mitzvah in November, 1985, she
was celebrating her 50th birthday.
Having been raised in an Or-
thodox household. Sandra did not
have the opportunity to com-
memorate that important
religious rite of passage when she
was 13.
Yet there was something else
very special about this ceremony.
"I had decided that the Bat
Mitzvah would be more mean-
ingful if I did it on behalf of a
Soviet refusenik, preferably twin-
ning with a woman my age,"
recalled Mrs. Goldberg, who said a
special prayer for Cherna Goldort
of Novosibirsk and had a special
twinning certificate prepared for
the former Soviet physicist-
engineer, who first applied to
emigrate to Israel in 1975.
"I PRESENTED the cer-
tificate to Cherna's daughter,
Gelina, who lives in Jerusalem,
when I visited Israel with my hus-
band after the Bat Mitzvah," said
Mrs. Goldberg. "Her daughter
will give it to Cherna when she is
allowed to leave and join her fami-
ly in Israel."
Since that time, Sandra
Goldberg has embarked on a per-
sistent campaign to have her
Soviet "sister" released. As
former chairman of the North
Shore (Mass.) Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee, and a member of the
Soviet Jewry Task Force of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, Goldberg is familiar with
the plan of action in these cases.
She has written eloquent letters
to Senators Edward Kennedy and
Paula Hawkins, to President
Reagan and to Soviet Ambassador
Anatoly Dobrynin enlisting their
support for the 53-year-old
refusenik who, for various unsup-
portable reasons, has been
repeatedly refused permission to
emigrate.
"THE FIRST time Cherna ap-
plied, she was refused because of
'regime considerations,' Mrs.
Goldberg said. According to a
report on Goldort from the Israel
Public Council for Soviet Jewry,
Cherna did in fact have a second
degree security clearance when
she worked as a clerk at a
research plant in Bisk, but so did
everyone at the plant, including
the cleaning staff.
In 1971, Cherna moved to
Novosibirsk with her family and
worked in a factory involving no
secret work. She was dismissed
from her job in 1980 due to ill-
health and spent a large part of
the next year confined to bed.
Meanwhile, Cherna's husband
had died, and her daughters,
Galina and Irina. had both been
granted exit visas and were living
in Israel.
WHEN CHERNA applied for
an exit visa again in 1980, she was
told that she had to wait until
1990, despite Soviet claims of con-
cern for "family reunification." In
1982, after being told by her
former boss in Bisk that as far as
he was concerned her period of
"secrecy" had ended, Cherna ap-
plied again and was told that she
may have to wait a lifetime.
"Why are the Soviets keeping a
50-year-old, depressed, sick
woman who is not working and
whose entire family is in Israel, in-
cluding three grandchildren she's
never seen?" Sandra Goldberg
asked, emphasizing the inhumani-
ty and lack of reason in this case.
"Her daughters want to take
care of her," Goldberg continued.
"The Soviet authorities have
fabricated arbitrary reasons for
refusing her applications."
Nevertheless, Sandra Goldbei^
remains optimistic about Cherna's
situation.
"There is activity on behalf of
Cherna," Goldberg said. "People
in Canada, England and Miami
write to her, as do I, but I'm not
sure my letters get to her. I have a
gut feeling about this, though. I
think she will get out. The ques-
tion is when."
DISPLAYING press clippings
from a Canadian newspaper which
reported that Cherna had con-
tacted Canadian journalists dur-
ing a visit by a Canadian commis-
sion led by Joe Clark, External
Affairs Minister, Mrs. Goldberg
said, "The journalists who spoke
to Cherna became more in-
terested in her plight than in the
official gongs-on. The KGB
threatened to take passports
away from anyone who tried to
communicate with her."
Goldberg's activities on behalf
of Soviet Jewry took shape in
1969 when she visited the Soviet
Union with her husband as part of
a medical delegation.
Despite warnings she received
from her rabbi and others not to
visit or abet any refuseniks, she
brought yarmulkes, tallit and
prayerbooks into the country and
delivered the gifts to a Moscow
synagogue.
"The next day, three KGB
agents joined our group and hung
around for a few days," Mrs.
Goldberg recalled. "But I just had
to do it."
Mrs. Goldberg also sympathizes
with the torment experienced dai-
ly by Cherna's two daughters in
Israel, who in 1985 petitioned
Ronald and Nancy Reagan for
help. "My mother's struggle to
emigrate has destroyed her,
weakened her health, left her
without hope," Galina and Irina
wrote to the President and First
Lady.
WHEN SANDRA Goldberg
met Galina in Israel, they
rendevoused at the Hecht
Synagogue on Mt. Scopus to pray.
"I hope to meet Cherna in the
same place, some day." said Mrs.
Goldberg. "Many people are
working so that she can spend
next year in Jerusalem. Only cons-
tant and consistent public
pressure will force the Soviet
Union to change its treatment of
Soviet Jews."
Hoping to see Cherna's status
raised among the more than
400,000 Soviet Jews wanting to
emigrate, Mrs. Goldberg added
that "time is of the essence. A
concerted statement of Jewish
solidarity needs to be made now,
before President Reagan and
Mikhail Gorbachev meet again."
Mrs. Goldberg suggested that
letters be written to Con-
gressmen, Senators (especially
Kennedy, who has personally in-
tervened on behalf of Soviet Jews
with some positive results). Presi-
dent and Mrs. Reagan and Anato-
ly Dobrynin at the Soviet Em-
bassy, 1 Andrei Sakharov Plaza,
N.W., Washington.D.C. 20036.
SHE ALSO said that letters of
support may be written to
Cherna's daughters, Galina
Nabati and Irina Tzeitin (c/o Irina
Tzeitin, Minz Street 28/17, Beer
Sheva, Israel) and, of course, to
Cherna herself (Ulitza Votutina
33, Apartment 32, Novosibirsk
64, USSR).
Noting that the recent Passover
holiday reminded Jews
everywhere of the despair of bon-
dage and the joys of freedom, San-
dra Goldberg said, "We set a
'place' for Cherna at our Seder
table. We cannot be complacent
about our freedom while
refuseniks like Cherna languish in
the Soviet Union."
Cherna Goldort in 1979 (left) and in June of
1985. Six years of despair and loneliness
have obviously taken their toll.
Warsaw Ghetto
Uprising
Continued from Page IB
second time by erasing his crimes.
We could not save the victims
from their first death. But we can
save them from being killed
again. This is our responsibility."
Messages of greetings were also
received from President Reagan,
who is in Tokyo at the economic
summit, and from Israeli Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog. Reagan said
the "purpose of remembrance is
very constructive indeed: to keep
the torch of vigilance burning
bright. In the brightness of that
light, let us pray, no such dark evil
will ever take place again."
HERZOG, in his telegram read
to those gathered here, said, "I
express for myself and for Israel's
people our sense of participation
in your commemorative assembly
and our determination that
remembrance will be ensured and
new life continue to be built on the
ruins of the old."
Mayor Edward Koch read a pro-
clamation declaring Sunday War-
saw Ghetto Commemoration Day
in New York City, and urging all
residents to remember the events
surrounding the Uprising. Some
50,000 persons died in the Upris-
ing of April 19-May 16, 1943.
BBYO To Recognize
Volunteer Advisors
The North Dade-Broward-Palm
Beach BBYO Board of Directors
will be holding its Annual Ad-
visors' Recognition Night on Mon-
day, at 7:30 p.m. at the Howard
Johnson's Hollywood Beach
Resort to honor the volunteer Ad-
visors to the 20 BBYO Chapters in
the North Dade-Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
Temple Zion Israelite Center Sisterhood
Chair Women's League Branch Confab
Myrna Kagan and Honey
Cohen, past presidents of Temple
Zion Israelite Center's
Sisterhood, have been elected co-
chairladies of the annual spring
conference of the Florida branch
of Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism to be held May
18-20 at the Hyatt-Palm Beaches.
The conference theme will be:
"The Contemporary Jewish
Woman: Profile and Potential!"
The message will brief conser-
vative Jewish leadership on
topical issues confronting the
synagogue and Jewish family.
Evelyn Seelig of New York, na-
tional vice-president of Women's
League for Conservative Judaism.
will serve as 'consultant in
residence" at the conference.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Professional Jewish male, 41, seeks nonsmoking
female 3540. If you enjoy the outdoors, movies, tneatre,
fine dining and townhouse living in the Aventura-1 urn-
berry area, we could be a perfect match. BoxFDc,o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
If you are a happy, successful, cultured 9en,'em?"
(non-smoker), 65 + let's get together for friendship.
love, beach, theater I'm an attractive, slender, happy.
brunette with a zest for life. Box BXZ c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Pretty Widow, young 60s, 5'3", intelligent, with zest for
life, happy personality, seeks lively, compatible gemw
man, 60's or 70's, attractive, for dinner, dates anu
traveling. Box KLX c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 0129/*
Miami, Fla. 33101.


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
... Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment, in meteyard, in
right, or in measure. Just balances, just weights shall ye
have"
(Leviticus 19.35-36).
KEDOSHIM
KEDOSHIM "Ye shall be holy; for I the Lord your God am ho-
ly. Ye shall fear every man his mother, and his father, and ye shall
keep My sabbaths Turn ye not unto the idols And when ye
reap the harvest of your land, thou shalt now wholly reap the cor-
ner of thy field neither shalt thou gather the fallen fruit of thy
vineyard; thou shalt leve them for the poor and the stranger .
Ye shall not steal; neither shall ye deal falsely, nor lie one to
another. And ye shall not sear by My name falsely Thou shalt
not oppress thy neighbor, nor rob him; the wages of a hired ser-
vant shall not abide with thee all night until morning. Thou shalt
not curse the deal, nor put a stumbling-block before the blind .
Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment. Thou shalt not go
up and down as a talebearer neither shalt but thou stand idly
by the blood of thy neighbor Thou shalt love thy neighbor as
thyself (Leviticus 19.2-18). "Ye shall be holy unto Me; for I the
Lord am holy, and have set you apart from the peoples, that ye
should be Mine" (Leviticus 20.26).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ot the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society
distributing the volume.)
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Ner Tamid To Install Officers
Temple Ner Tamid will hold
their annual installation of of-
ficers on Sunday, at 10 a.m.
Paul Novak has been re-elected
as president of the Congregation,
Goldie Cohen, reelected as presi-
dent of the Sisterhood, and David
S. Meyer as president of the Mens
Club.
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz and
Cantor Edward Klein will present
a musical cantata in the main
sanctuary, followed by brunch in
the Sklar Auditorium.
Lea Rabin, wife of Israeli Defense Minister and former Prime
Monster Yitzhak Rabin, visited with members of the South Dade
New Leadership Division of the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization while she was in Miami recently. Among the many
Israel Bond leaders she met during her two-day stay were, from
left to right: M. Ronald Krongold, national vice chairman-at-
large of the Israel Bond Organization and former National
Chairman of the New Leadership Division; his wife, Glenda; and
David Abramowitz, co-chairman of the South Dade New Leader-
ship Dit>ision and a member of the division's National board.

m f
flfti
^v~^4Ll
The Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization honored Louis
Rones, center, during a luncheon at the Coral Creek Country Club
sponsored by the California Country Club and the Lake Carmel
Lodge B'nai B'rith. Rones was recognized for his contributions to
Israel through the Israel Bond program and to other philan-
thropic and community organizations. Presenting the Gates of
Jerusalem Award is Howard Klein, executive director of the local
Israel Bond Office. Ateo involved at the presentation is guest
speaker Ruth Gruber, an authority on the Middle East.
Jason .lames
CHAIM LEE
Chaim Joshua Lee, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Lee (Monica),
will be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at 10:30 at
Temple Emanu-El.
Josh is a seventh grade student
at Lehrman Day School where he
has been on the Rabbi's Honor
Roll and Derech Eretz many
times. He has also won awards
from the Dade County Youth Fair
for his art and poetry. He is an
avid sports enthusiast, a stamp
collector and model airplane
builder/collector. Someday Josh
aspires to become an aeronautical
engineer and a jet fighter pilot
graduating from a service
academy.
Many friends and relatives will
be coming from home and out-of-
town to help celebrate this happy
occasion.
JASON JAMES
Jason Seth James, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Geoffrey James, will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
on Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at Bet
Shira Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in the
Bet Shira Zayin Class and is ac-
tive in Kadima. He attends
Palmetto Junior High School
where he is in the 7th grade.
Dr. and Mrs. Geoffrey James
will host the Kiddush following
the services in honor of the
occasion.
ELIZABETH HOWARD
NATALIE BRAMSON
At Shabbat Services on Satur-
day, Elizabeth Howard, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Howard
and Natalie Bramson, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bramson, will
be called to the Torah as B'nai
Mitzvah at Temple Beth Sholom,
4144 Chase Avenue, Miami
Beach. Rabbis Leon Kronish.
Gary Glickstein, Harry Jolt and
Paul Caplan will officiate.
Elizabeth and Natalie are
students of the Confirmation
Class of 5748.
Adults To Celebrate
Their Bar Mitzvahs
Five adult members of the Tem-
ple Judea Congregation will
celebrate their Bat Mitzvah on
Friday at the synagogue in Coral
Gables.
Those to be Bat Mitzvah include
Florence Adler, Ellen Baum,
Mary Corenblum, Helene Her-
skowitz and Cynthia Varat.
According to Rabbi Michael
Eisenstadt, "thsi is the 10th year
that we have encouraged our
adult members to become Bar or
Bat Mitzvah and it has become a
particularly meaningful part of
our programming.'
"This type of religious par-
ticipation is perfect for adults who
perhaps did not have a religious
upbringing or for women who
were not offered the option of a
Bat Mitzvah when they were
growing up."
"We feel it's never too late!"
the Rabbi added.
The Bat Mitzvahs will be part of
the regularly scheduled 8:15 p.m.
Sabbath service and will be open
to the public.
TEMPLE SECRETARY
Major centrally located temple
needs secretary with strong
typing, phone and general ottice
skills, word processing useful.
Send resume In confidence to:
Box TSN c/o Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. FL 33101.
X
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:36 p.m.
AOATMYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Daily Mlnyan 7:30 a.m.. 6:30 p.m.
Fri. 8 p.m. Shabbat
Sat. 8:30 a.m. 1 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
SSS0 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 867-4667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon. Asaoclate Rabbi
Fit. 8 15pm Family Sarvlca. Rabbi Simon
will apeak on thama: "Increasing Spousal
Abuse What Can We Do About It."
Sat. 9:18 a.m. Bat Mltzvsh Cherle Johnson.
11:15 a.m. Bar Mltnah Jon Qubernlck
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3911
Jack Riemer, Rabbi
Dr. Sol Landau,
Rabbi Emeritus
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor

Frl. 7:30 a.m.. 5.30 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. Mlnchah 7:45 p.m.
Sun. 8 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.
Mon Thurs. 7:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m
Tuaa., Wed.. Frl. 7:45 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J Konovitch. Rabbi fSj?'.
Moshe Buryn Cantor \ ff./'
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
6p.m. Fri. Service.
Sat. 9 a.m. Dr. Lehrman will preach on
the weekly portion ot the Torah.
Cantor Yehuda Shifman will chant.
Junior choir will participate.
Bar Mitzvah. Adam Elegant.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schlff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer Rtotm Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskeii Bemaf
Aasistant Rabbi Rex 0. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomstein
Associate Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. GoMIn
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks]
Downtown: Rabbi Hasksll M. Bemat. "The
Tongue la a Powerlul thing." Liturgy: Cantor
Rachelle F. Nelson
Kendall: Rabbi Rei D. Perimeter. "An Eternal
Light." Liturgy: Cantor Jacob Q. Bomatein.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Elaenstat, Rabbi
Fri 8:15pm
BETH KOOESH
Conservative)
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krlaael
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
856-6334
(
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi ,___
Dr. Joseph A. Gorf inkel. (
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Frledler, Cantor
Frl. 7:45 p.m.
Sat. 10:45 a.m. "Melt Down At Chernobyl."
)
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. MB. FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Me+be*
Cantor Nlssim Benyemini
Dally services 8 a.m. S 6 p.m.
Sat. 8 15 a m
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul Melsali
Frl. Family services 8p.m. Bet Claaa
Religious School Set. 9:30 a.m Bet Mltzveh.
\>
Jason Sth J*m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 538 7231
Chase Ave 8.41st St. Ube..i
ON LEON KRONISH, Founding Senior RebM
UARYA.GLICKSTEIN.T
MARRY JOLT. Aulllerv RebbJ
PAUL D. CAPLAN, Aaaletant Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Frl 8:15 p.m Rabbi Glickstein "Holy Terror and
the Profane." Sat. 10:45 a.m. B'nai Mitzvah
Elizabeth Howard 4 Natalie Bramson
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beech Blvd
Or. Max A. Ltpschitz. Rsbbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L Brown, Exec Director
Daily Services Mon Fn. 7:30 am -Sic.
S 5:30 p.m.: Frl. Leto Service '351V
8 pm: Set 8 25 a m t 6.30 pm '>"" I
Sun 8am 4 5 30 p.m.. Fri
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Services Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abremowltz /~~~
Cantor Murray Yavneh \
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath service.
Dally Mlnchah Sunday-Friday 8 a.m. end 6 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 6:15 p.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-6345
7902Cartyt*)Avt).. 666-9933
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz cwucvim
Cantor Edward Klein /
lially Services 8 e.m. end 5:30 p.m. ,(
Sat. 6:45 a.m. '\
Fri. late service 8 p.m.
V)
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ot North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382 0898
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem onhodoa
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fri. 6:15 p.m. RebM Kingsley sermon "Jews
and Baptists: Are We More Than Casual
Acquaintances."
Sat. 10:30 a.m. Bar Mitzvah:
Paul Amarent.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 , Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi '))
Benjamin Adler, Cantor v-?>
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan Mon. a Thura. 7 a.m.
Sunday 9 a.m.
Fri. Adult Shabbat 9:15 p.m
I
X


Page 12-B The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Lewis P. Rut8tein has been
elected to the board of gover-
nors of South Shore Hospital
and Medical Center, affiliated
with the University of Miami
School of Medicine.
Flora S. Armnaon
Flora Aranson Named
Branch Manager By
Flagler Federal
Flora S. Aranson has been nam-
ed Branch Manager of the Flagler
Federal Savings and Loan
Association North Miami Beach
Branch, located at 16601 North
East 15th Avenue.
Ms. Aranson comes to Flagler
Federal with more than 14 years
experience in the industry, having
worked as Vice President, Com-
munity Affairs, for Chase
Federal, and most recently as
Vice President, Branch Manager
for Lincoln Savings.
She has extensive community
background with the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, Young
Presidents and Sustaining Board
of Fellows of Mt. Sinai Medical
Center.
Foreclosure Sales
Byron S. Cherkas, Managing
Director of the firm of Cherkas,
Stein, Sherrin and Co., Cer-
tified Public Accountants, has
been elected Chairman of the
Overall Economic Program
Committee, a 19-member of-
ficial body that advises the
Dade County Commission on
priorities and projects for
economic development, with
special emphasis on targeted
development areas.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-51884
SEC 18
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
f/k/a FLORIDA NATIONAL
BANK OF MIAMI, as tnutcc for
the Dade County Honiing
Finance Authority, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintifffs)
vs.
ROSALINA ORTIZ.
Defendant**)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Fina]
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami. Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M.. on
the 30th day of May, 1986, the
following described property:
Lot 14. lens the West 45 feet, and
all of I.oi 15. and the Weat 10
feet of Lot 16. in Block 6. of
SUNKIST GROVE, according to
the Plat thereof, aa recorded in
PUt Book 8. at Page 49, of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida.
DATED the 29th day of April.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
30350 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, FL 33137
Published 5/9-16
Gables Bar Association
"Management and Economics
of the Small Law Office," spon-
sored by the Coral Gables Bar
Association, will feature Samuel
E. Smith as speaker on Tuesday
at 6 p.m. at the Coral Gables
Board of Realtors Building:.
Ronald Lane has been ap-
pointed Senior Vice President,
General Merchandise Manager for
Jordan Marsh, it was announced
by William D. Frederick, Presi-
dent and Chief Executive Officer.
Lane will also be a member of the
Executive Committee.
A graduate of the University of
Miami, Lane began his retailing
career as an Executive Trainee
with Filene's, Boston. He held
merchandising positions with
Ivey's and Macy's and senior
management positions with Allied
Stores' Cain-Sloan in Tennessee
and Joske's in Texas. His latest
position prior to joining Jordan
Marsh was Senior Merchant at
Joske's, Texas.
Sam Seitlin, chairman of the
board, and Steve Jackman, presi-
dent of Seitlin and Company, In-
surance, announce that Edward
W. Gillman, has joined the firm as
a commercial insurance agent.
Gillman represents the thin!
generation of the Seitlin family
working with the company.
Gillman is a native Miamiam,
receiving his Bachelor's from the
University of Virginia in govern-
ment, and graduated from the
College of Insurance in New York
with a diploma in Risk and
Insurance.
Gillman lives in South Miami
with his wife Rebecca. He is a vice
president of the Young
Democrats, and a member of
Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity and of
Temple Judea. He is the son of
County Court Judge Marvin
Gillman and Barbara Gillman of
the Gillman Galleries.
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-5464
SEC. 08
FEDERAL NATIONAL MOR-
TGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiffs)
vs.
ALBERT E. FRANCIS, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 30th day of May, 1986, the
following described property:
Lot 8. in Block 118. of LESLIE
ESTATES SECTION 12. accor-
ding to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 106. at
Page 100 of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida.
DATED the 29th day of April,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, FL 33137
Published 5/9-16
NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-41768
SEC. 14
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN a COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
I'laiTitiffls)
vs.
EVERETT GUM and DOROTHY
GUM. hi. wife, at al.
Defendant^)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County,
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 30th day of May, 1986, the
following described property:
Lot 7. in Block 7, of PINE LAKE
SECTION TWO, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 111, at Page 51, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 29th day of May.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Yarchin and Rosenthal
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 5/9-16
__ NOTICE OF SALE
1U52l!ANTTO CHAPTER 45
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT M
THE ELEVENTH JUDlu
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DAM
COUNTY. FLORIDA E
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION "H-HON
CASE NO. 85-50084
SEC. 01
STOCKTON. WHATLEY
DAVIN A COMPANY.. Florid,
corporation,
Plaintifffs)
vs.
EVERETT GUM and DOROTHY
GUM, liia wife, et al.
Defendants)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order or Final
Judgment entered in this case now
pending in said Court, the style of
which is indicated above. I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash on the TWENTY THIRD
FLOOR of the Dade County Cour-
thouse in Miami, Dade County
Florida at 11:00 o'clock A.M., on
the 30th day of May. 1986. the
following described property:
Lot 5, in Block 7, of PINE LAKE
SECTION TWO, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 111. at Page 51, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
DATED the 2th day of April
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
by V. Clark
Depaty Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff
Barry S. Yarchin
Rosenthal and Yarchin
Suite 800
3050 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
Published 5/9-16
buiillliiri broil af C4UM af CROVEGATE BANK______________________________________________________________
of MIAMI. HOKIDA___________________ ^ faralfa aa. Doaaatlc M,MMilii. at IM cloaca of kvialaaaa
MARCH 31,
.>
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May 9.196


Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
\
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-MM9 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
torporation
Plaintiff,
J^NTONIO DEPOMBO, and the
laknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
psntees. creditors, or other
mrties claiming by. through,
under or against him.
Defendant.
TO: Antonio Depombo, whose
residence is unknown, and
the unknown parties who
may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees.
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or agaisnt said
Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lotl. in Block 2. of CAROL
CITY PALMETTO PARK
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 68. at Page 46. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
ire required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A..
Attorneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3950 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before June 6.
1986. and to file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on April 29th, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
Deputy Clerk
19771 May 2. 9. 16. 23, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-17400
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
W RE: The Marriage of
S0RMA ALAMO.
Petitioner,
and
MIDDUNIO ALAMO.
Respondent.
TO: MIDDONIO ALAMO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
Md you are required to serve a
fopy of your written defenses, if
y. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 825
South Bayshore Drive. Suite 543.
Miami. FL 33131. and file the
mginal with the clerk of the above
yled court on or before May 30.
1986: otherwise a default will be
altered against you for the relief
Prayed for in the complaint or
Petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
said court at Miami, Florida on
* 25th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19758 May 2.9. 16.23, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
* the undersigned, desiring to
gp in business under the
nnitious name Tropical Signs of
Miami at 760 W. 27 St., Hialeah
f L 33010 intends to register said
nme with the Clerk of the Circuit
Lurt of Dade County, Florida.
Tropical Signs Corp.
Francisco Blanco
197,, President
19753 April 25;
May 2.9. 16.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-15472-13
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
PALMIRA PEREZ
Petitioner/Wife
and
CARLOS R. MOLINA
Respondent/Husband
TO: CARLOS R. MOLINA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
ROSA M. VEGA, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 362
Minorca Avenue, Suite 101, Coral
Gables, Florida 33134 (Fla. Bar
No. 464759). and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 16, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROSA M. VEGA. ESQ.
362 Minorca Avenue, No. 101
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-0192
Attorney for Petitioner
00000 April 18,25;
May 2, 9.1986
D* THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 86-15322(03 (-FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
HARKLAND FULLER
Petitioner
and
YVONNE J. FULLER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: IVONNE J. FULLER. 315 E.
6 St.. Jacksonville, Fl. 32206
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before May 16, 1986 and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
April 11, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19740 April 18. 25;
May 2.9. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-14338
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JIM SMITH, husband
and
RACHEL SMITH, wife.
TO: Rachel Smith
2070 Lincoln Ave.. Apt. No. 8
Opa Locka, Florida 33054
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Arthur H. Lipaon,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 801 Northeast 167
Street. Miami, Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 23, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of April 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19747 April 25;
May 2, 9, 16, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-13716 (2C)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NOTICE
OF PUBLICATION
EDWARD COOPER,
husband,
and
LISA M. COOPER.
wife.
TO: Ms. LISA M. COOPER
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on ARTHUR H. LIPSON, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 NE 167 St., Miami,
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 9, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2nd day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19716 April 11.18.25;
May 2.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2386
Division 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
MINNIE MALINSKY
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MINNIE MALINSKY,
deceased. File Number 86-2386, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 9, 1986.
Personal Representative:
NORMA ROSS
18900 N.E. 14th Avenue (No. 104;
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33179
Attorney for Personal Repre
sentative:
JOSHUA S. GALITZER. P.A.
633 N.E. 167th Street (Suite 619)
Telephone: (305) 653-3535
19778 May 9, 16, 1986
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
ANNUAL REPORT
The annual report of the private
foundation of The Allan H. Apples-
tein Foundation Trust, required to
be filed under section 5060 of the
Internal Revenue Code, ia
available for public inspection at its
office, 7600 Red Road. South
Miami, Florida 33143 on business
days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. by any
citizen, upon request, within 180
days after this publication.
Aaron Applestein,
Managing Director
Allan H. Applestein, Esq.
7600 Red Road
South Miami. Florida 33143
Telephone: 666-5957
19773 May 9, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name LIBRERIA LA
EDAD DE ORO at 5370 Palm
Ave., Suite 3. Hialeah, Florida
33012, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Nelson Grille
19772 May 2,9. 16. 23, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-16154
m
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SONIA M. CROOKS
and
HUGH A. CROOKS
TO: Hugh A. Crooks
Cambridge Post Office
St. James, Jamaica
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
Ave., Miami, Florida 33162. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above court on or before May
23. 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
Dated in Miami on April 17,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19750 April 25,
May 2,9.16.1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 86-2164
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CARLOS BENTTO
FERNANDEZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CARLOS BENITO FER-
NANDEZ, deceased, File Number
86-2164, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, FL 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 9, 1986.
Personal Representative:
MARYLOU FERNANDEZ
7650 SW 128 Street
Miami. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
BRUCE LAMCHICK, Esq.
Lamchick, Glucksman & Johnston,
P.A.
10725 SW 104 Street
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-6333
19782 May 9, 16, 1986
|. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2212
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN R. KANE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of John R. Kane, deceased, File
Number 86-2212 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33131. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 2. 1986.
Personal Representative:
ETHAN F. COHEN
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MIAMI DRY
GOODS, at 337 N.W. 25th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127, intend to
register such name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida,
STUART T. SHAPIRO
ANNA I. SHAPIRO
PAUL EDLOW
a Partnership
19738 April 18, 25;
May 2.9. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-16032-14
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LAMERCIE BROWNLEE.
Petitioner,
and
LEON BROWNLEE,
Respondent.
TO: LEON BROWNLEE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Courth Clerk on
or before May 23, 1986. otherwise
a default will be entered.
April 17. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
19751 April 25;
May 2.9,16.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2436
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
SYLVIA S. HOLLAND
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
!TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
SYLVIA S. HOLLAND, deceased,
File Number 86-2436. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida.
The personal representative of the
estate is Barry Meiselman, whose
address is 9850 E. Broadview
Drive, Bay Harbor Island, Florida.
The name and address of the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
I' statement of any claim or demand
Repre-1{ "V '"'y hve- Each claim must be
It in writing and must indicate the
WASSERMAN basis for the claim, the name and
I address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due,
I the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
j nature of the uncertainty shall be
j stated. If the claim is secured, the
Attorney for Personal
sentative:
MARTIN W
ESQUIRE
(251143)
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19768 May 2.9.1986
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-1058 SP 24
LINDA RAMOS.
Plaintiff
IN THE COUNTY COURT FOR I"?"** *, described The
Iclaimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
BARBARO ESPINDULA and
FLORIDA INSURANCE
GUARANTY ASSOCIATION
Defendants
NOTICE
OF PUBLICATION
To: Defendant BARBARO
ESPINDULA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a complaint for
damages and to determine
ownership of $1,041.26 now held
by defendant Florida Insurance
Guaranty Association has been
filed in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
William O'Neil. attorney for
plaintiff whose address is 1111
Lincoln Rd No. 505. Miami Beach,
Fl, 33139 and file the original with
the clerk of this court on or before
June 3, 1986, or appear at 2:00
p.m. on that date at this court, 100
Meridian Ave, Miami Branch. Fl.
Otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint. This notice
shall be published once each week
for 4 consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court at Miami Beach, Florida
this 25th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of Court
(Seal)
Attorney for Plaintiff:
William O'Neil III
1111 Lincoln Rd No. 505
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Tel. (305) 532-1761
19776 May 9,16.23.30.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name European Body
Shop, at 1040 West 23rd Street,
Hialeah. Florida 33010, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Luis Gonzalez
Julia A. Delgado
Partners
19761 May 2.9.16.23. 1986
(enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
testate to whom a copy of this
| Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: May
9, 1986.
Barry Meiselman
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
Sylvia S. Holland
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
(REPRESENTATIVE:
'Richard I. Kroop
Kwitney, Kroop & Scheinberg.
P.A.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-7576
19777 May 9, 16, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Media Optical
Services, at 180 NE 123 Street,
North Miami. Florida 33161
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Mr. Frank D. Loos
19764 Mav 2, 9. 16. 23. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name R.L. Contractor at
351 E 13th St. Hialeah, Florida
33010, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Rene Ledeama
351 E 13th St.
Hialeah, Florida 33010
19755 April 25;
May 2.9,16.1986
i
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name LA-DBS at Post
Office Box 144728, Coral Gables,
Florida 33114-4728 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Latin American Direct
Broadcasting Services, Inc.
19763 May 2. 9, 16, 23. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Southern Exposure
at 412 NE 125 Street. North
Miami. Florida 33181, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Howard Prine
19767 May 2,9.16. a. 1986


Page 14-B___The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 9, 1986
Public Notices/
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-16702 FC18
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
CLAUDETTE BANTON
DAILEY
Petitioner,
and
BRUCE DAILEY
Respondent.
TO: BRUCE DAILEY
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is Suite
309 420 Lincoln Road Miami
Beach. FL 33149, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 30,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28th day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
Suite 309 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1156
19765 May 2,9,16, 23,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT'
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA ,
CASE NO: 86-16032-14
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LAMERCIE BROWNLEE. |
Petitioner,
and
LEON BROWNLEE,
Respondent.
TO: LEON BROWNLEE,
Residence unknown, you shall'
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136, and
file original with Courth Clerk on
or before May 23. 1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
April 17, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
19751 April 25;
May 2,9, 16, 1986
i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-742
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOE COOPER.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOE COOPER, deceased, File
Number 86-742, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. 3rd Floor. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 9, 1986.
Personal Representative:
ARNOLD COOPER
12001 Trail Ridge Drive
Potomac. Maryland 20854
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
H. ALLAN SHORE, ESQUIRE
FL Bar No. 139084
Fromberg, Fromberg. Gross &
Shore, P.A.
420 S. Dixie Highway, 3rd Floor
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-6622
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-13928 FC 01
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LAUREN RAUCH CABRAL,
Petitioner
and
ERONALDO MEDEIROS
CABRAL,
Respondent.
TO: Eronaldo Medeiros Cabral
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 309, Miami Beach.
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 16. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
19735 April 18, 25;
May 2.9, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of THE WAVE at
110 Fourth Terrace, San Marino
Island, Miami Beach. Florida
33139. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
THE WAVE PUBLISHING
GROUP. INC.
MICHAEL A. FRANK
Attorney for THE WAVE
PUBLISHING GROUP, INC.
19775 May 9, 16,23,30.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-17710-03
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA LEON.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
NELSON LEON.
Respondent/Husband
TO: NELSON LEON
Respondent/Husband
115 41st
Union City, New Jersey 07087
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
IRVING J. WHITMAN.
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 10661
N. Kendall Drive, Suite 200.
Miami. Florida 33176, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 30.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
IRVING J. WHITMAN
WHITMAN. WOLFE. GROSS &
SCHAFFEL, P.A.
10651 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 200
Miami, Florida 33176
Attorney for Petitioner
19766 May 2, 9, 16,23, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-17485 (13)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANIXUS LOUISSAINT
Petitioner,
and
BETTY Y. LOUISSAINT
Respondent.
TO: BETTY Y. LOUISSAINT.j
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612
Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami,
Florida, 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before May
30, 1986. otherwise a default will
be entered.
DATED: April 25, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
BY: E. SEIDL
19756 May 2, 9. 16, 23. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 86-17409 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EPIFANIO D. GARCIA
Petitioner,
and
OLGA GARCIA
Respondent.
TO: OLGA GARCIA
46 North Sherry Street Ap
B-4
Wallingford. Conn. 06492
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this Court
and you are required to serve a a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on CARLOS M.
MENDEZ. ESQUIRE. Attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
200 West 49th Street. Hialeah.
Florida 33012. and file the original
with the Clerk of the styled Court
on or before May 30, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami, Florida on
this 25th day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
197R9 Mav2,9. 16. 23, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-18413
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Florida Bar No. 180299)
JAMES A. CRIBBS and DALE L.
CRIBBS,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
RHIENGOLD HOLDINGS. LTD..
a Grand Cayman corporation,
Defendant.
TO: RHIENGOLD HOLDINGS
LTD.
P.O. Box 887
Grand Cayman.
British West Indies
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortage
on the following described
property:
The South of the SW V4 of
the NW '/., less the North 90
feet of the South 240 feet,
less road comprising 2.04
acres, more or less, lying and
being in Section 22,
Township 56 South, Range
39 East. Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Ronald Fieldstone, Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is
Suite 202, 1570 Madruga Avenue.
Coral Gables. Florida 33146, on or
before June 6th, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 5th day of May
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: BARBARA RODRIGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
9783 May 9. 16,23,30. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2163
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LUCILLE KNIGHT.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of LUCILLE KNIGHT,
deceased, File Number 86-2163, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Room 307.
Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Rena M. Wilson White,
whose address is 1011 N.W. 65
Street, Miami, Florida 33150. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: May
2, 1986.
Rena M. Wilson White
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
Lucille Knight
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
DANIEL SEPLER. P.A.
999 Brickell Ave.. No. 400
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 577-0600
19769 May 2, 9, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1142
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERMAN LLOYD
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HERMAN LLOYD, deceased.
File Number 86-1142, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 2, 1986.
Personal Representative:
HARRY LLOYD
3261 Brace Canyon Road
Burbank. CA 91504
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19770 May 2, 9. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-17348-01
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI, as Trustee for the
Housing Finance Authority of
Dade County, Florida under a
Trust Indenture as of December 1
1981.
Plaintiff
IN THE CIRCTIT COURT t(ln
DADE COUNTY. FL rile Number 86-2219
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of tne M,,
of BESSIE R. HOFFefe
deceased .File Number 86-2219^
Pending in the Circuit ColmV
Dade County, Florida Zl'
ghSrSSS
representative and the pers^
representative's attorney 'areT
forth below. *'
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTH^F
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1, all el
against the estate and (2) mv
objection by an interested person
J? ,whom, *ia notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications 'of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OR
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice hat
begun on May 2, 1986
Personal Representative'
MURRAY HOFFEN'BERG
6039 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HERBERT J. LERNER
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 673-3000
19760 May 2.9,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SUN CASUALS OF
FLORIDA, at 337 N.W. 25th
Street, Miami, Florida 33127, in-
tend to register such name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
STUART T. SHAPIRO
ANNA I SHAPIRO
PAUL EDLOW
a Partnership
19737 April 18. 25;
May 2, 9, 198
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 86-15213
IN RE: The Marriage of
BENJAMIN DESRAVINES.
Petitioner/Husband,
vs.
NORILIA T. DESRA VINES.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: NORILIA T. DESRA VINES
c/o MARC LAURISTON PLACE
DU MARCHE St. Louis Du Nord.
Haiti shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 16, 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered.
April 11, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By JOHN C. BRANDA
19741 April 18, 25;
May 2. 9.1986
HAN QUANG NGUYEN, et ux..
et al.,
Defendants.
TO: HAN QUANG NGUYEN and
NGOCDUNG T. TRAN. his
wife
1612 Worcester Road
Framingham. MA 01701
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 1-3. LAKESIDE XI
CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium according to
the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11619, at Page 1469,
of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146. on or before
May 30. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 24th day of April,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
19757 May 2, 9. 16,23, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 86-14339(08)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIACE OF
SHARON M. ADAMS wife.
and
ALVAN N. ADAMS, husband.
TO: MR. ALVAN N. ADAMS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Arthur H. Lipson. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 167 Street. Miami.
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 9. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: T Casamayr
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seaii
19742 April 18.25;
May 2,9.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Rio International
Associates at 3789 NW 46 Street
Hialeah Fla. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Rio Food Corporation of
America Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Jorge Grunglasse, President
19739 April 18. 25;
May 2. 9. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of ABSOI.I TE
PEST CONTROL at 100 E 42
Street., Hialeah. Florida 88013.
intends to register >aid name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
Francisco .1. Jimenez
100 E. 42 Street
Hialeah. Florida 38018
19781 May 9,16.23,30.1996
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 86-13008
IN RE: The Marriage of:
HECTOR QUESADA.
Petitioner/Husband.
vs.
ROSALBA OCA.MP0
QUESADA,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: ROSALBA OTA.MP0
QUESADA No. 35 2775 Cali Col
ombia shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 N.J
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida.
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 23, 1986.
otherwise a default will be entered.
April 15. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKEi:
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19743 April
liny 2.9.1


Macy Nulman:
Friday, May 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Obituaries
Synagogue Music Losing Its Direction
Synagogue music is losing
its direction and must be
"reevaluated and con-
sidered as to the purpose for
which it is being used,"
writes a leading authority
on Jewish liturgy in his new
book, "Concepts of Jewish
Music and Prayer."
According to Macy Nulman, a
North Miami Beach resident and
former director of the Philip and
Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music
at the Yeshiva University-
affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary in New
York City, there is "a definite
decline in the musical service of
the synagogue" because "misin-
formation, lack of knowledge and
indifference reign in the musical
service."
"Secular tunes, Israeli folk
song, and the swinging Hassidic
.song patterns do not belong in the
synagogue service," writes
Nulman. "Their place is at a sim-
rha (festive occasion), a farbreng
(joyous gathering), or at a con-
gregational gathering."
ACCORDING to Nulman, "the
tendency to adapt trite, sentimen-
tal, exhibitionist and cheap
melodies into the Nusah
Hatefillah (prayer modes of the
service), has no place in a
synagogue service."
He calls for the preservation of
time-honored Nushaot (prayer
modes) in their purest sense. "All
must learn and re-learn our an-
cient melos," he writes.
Although Nulman stresses that
the traditional and ancient
melodies of the synagogue must
be maintained, he discusses the
role the cantor should play in in-
troducing new, creative chants to
the service.
"It is his duty to familiarize
himself with the forms, styles and
motives, and vast amount of
literature of older synagogue
music," writes Nulman, "and then
perhaps fuse it with the modern
idiom."
USING AN analytical and
disciplined approach, he offers
viewpoints and perspectives of the
Nushaot and synagogue practices
as reflected in the rabbinic
tradition.
"What makes this book so uni-
que," said Cantor Bernard Beer,
director of the Belz School, "is
that no one before has ever ex-
plored the connection of prayer
chants to Halacha (Jewish Law)
and rabbinic responsa."
Other subjects dealt with in the
book include: "Jewish Women and
Jewish Music: Preserving a
Wealth of History," "Ideas for
Musical Practices for the
Synagogue, Community, and
Home," "The Sabbath and the
Holidays," and "Hazzanut
What Direction to Take?"
The 187-page hardcover edition
is published by the Cantorial
Council of America (CCA), a pro-
fessional organization of practic-
ing cantors who are leaders in the
field of Jewish music. The Council,
which Nulman co-founded in 1960,
is under the sponsorship of the
Max Stern Division of Communal
Services of RIETS.
THE BOOK is dedicated to Max
Heimowitz, a philanthropist and
communal leader in North Miami
Beach, who is a member of the
Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University.
Originally from Brooklyn and
now a resident of North Miami
Beach, Nulman retired from the
Belz School in 1984 after 33 years
of service.
He currently edits the Cantorial
Council's publication, "The Jour-
nal of Jewish Music and Liturgy."
He served as secretary of the
Council, and in 1962 was honored
by that organization for his
achievements.
An authority in his field, he was
asked to write a definitive article
on Jewish music for the "Interna-
tional Encyclopedia of Music and
Musicians." In 1975, his "Concise
Encyclopedia of Jewish Music"
was published by McGraw Hill.
POC Faces Serious Medical Problem
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
panel of Israeli doctors says
that if Prisoner of Zion Yuli
Edelstein does not receive
adequate and immediate
medical treatment, he will
be crippled for life from
serious injuries sustained in
a Soviet prison at the begin-
ning of this year.
The physicians told a press con-
ference called here Sunday by the
Committee of 35 the organiza-
tion formed by 35 British women
to oversee the treatment of
Prisoners of Conscience in the
Soviet I'nion that Edelstein's
injuries could have resulted either
from his being run over by a
motor vehicle or from a fall.
EDELSTEIN, 27, was injured
in a Soviet prison camp on the
Mongolian border on Jan. 29. The
prisun authorities claimed that he
had been hurt in a work accident,
l)ut it is known that the refusenik
had l>een singled out for harass-
ment in prison and had been
severely beaten and hurt.
Details of his injuries, medical
reports and even an X-ray were
sent to Israel by Edelstein's wife,
Tanya. On the basis of these
reports, local medical experts
reached a diagnosis which was
presented at the press conference
'>' 1'rof. Amnon Fried, a Beilinson
Hospital orthopedic surgeon;
j"rof. Ciro Servadio, head of
Beilinson's urology department;
Dr. Ram Yishai, head of the Israel
Medical Association; and Prof.
Arye Harel, head of the Magen
David Adorn first aid society.
According to the doctors, Edels-
'in has a severe pelvic fracture,
and a fracture of the upper femur
with multiple splinters and
dislocation. He also had a torn
urethra. The speakers noted that
Soviet law stipulates that a
prisoner disabled while serving his
sentence must be freed.
THE ISRAEL Public Council
'or Soviet Jewry has, meanwhile,
Published an appeal by Soviet In-
ternational Chess Grand Master
Boris Gulko and his wife, Interna-
tional Master Ann
Akhsharumova, addressed to the
International Chess Federation
and the international chess com-
munity, complaining of their
treatment by the Soviet
authorities.
They say they have been refused
exit visas to travel abroad or to go
to Israel since 1979, and have not
been allowed to take part in chess
tournaments, or when they do so,
chess rules are not applied to
them.
In 1983, the Chess Masters said,
the USSR sports committee
ordered the annual championshp
arbiter to ignore the rules in the
case of Akhsharumova. "They ac-
tually robbed Akhsharumova of
her gold medal," they complained.

~i^^k ^V "*


B I '-^Li-'St:"
11 I&J5! ^f I W^M^'
The Dade County Chapter of the Florida Association for Women
Lawyers raised $32,000 at its Third Annual Gala Dinner and
Scholarship Auction of April 17, at the Hotel Inter-Continental
Miami. Pictured are left to right: Linda Dakis, Co-chairperson of
the Auction; Elizabeth DuFresne, Co-Auctioneer; Cindy S. Leder-
man, Co-chairperson of the Auction; and Lauren L. Miller, Co-
chairperson of the Auction.
Ernest I. Japhet, Chairman of the Board of Bank Leumi, Israel's
leading financial group, was one of the four recipients of the
Rebecca Sieff Award given by World WIZO at its conference in
Israel.
ISENBERG
Michael M., 78, of Miami Springs, passed
away April 29. Mr. Isenberg came here in
1946 from Chicago after serving in the U.S.
Army in WWII. A graduate of Nor-
thwestern University. A practicing attorney
for 55 years. A member of Temple Israel.
Dade and Florida Bar Assn.. James Carnell
Lodge No. 223, Scottish Rite. Mahi Shrine
Temple. Miami Springs O.E.S.. past patron
and Benevolent Order of Elks. Survived by
wife. Louise, two daughters. Jaclin Mills
and Linda Keenan: one granddaughter.
Natlie Holt; four sisters and two brothers.
Services were held.
KOPPEL. Ethel (nee Jond) of North Miami
Beach. Services held in Hackensack. New
Jersey.
KARP, Jennie. 80 of North Miami Beach.
Levitt-Weinstein.
JEFFRIES, Benjamin. 99 of Miami. May 5.
The Riverside.
GERBER, Edward. Services held in New
York. The Riverside.
GROSSMAN, Lillian, 83 of North Miami
Beach, April 30. LevittWeinstein.
HOROWITZ, Benjamin J. of Miami Beach,
April 30. Services were held.
KAPLAN, Beatrice. 68 of North Miami
Beach, April 30. LevittWeinstein.
CLICK, Harry, 86 of Miami, April 30. Ser
vices were held.
OKA, Lillian. 86, April 29. Graveside ser-
vices were held at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
LANG, Joseph. 89, of Bay Harbor Islands.
April 29. Services were held.
WOLFE, Bessie, April 22. Services were
held in Philadelphia.
PEPLER, Leon, 88 of Miami Beach. May 3.
The Riverside.
ROTH. Mitchell Gordon. 29 of Miami. The
Riverside.
GOLDFARB, Bernard. 96. Services were
held.
GUTHMANN, Helen S. of Bal Harbour May
2. Blasberg Chapel.
KOMMEL, Aaron Frederick. 90, of Miami
Beach, May 2. Services were held.
PETLER, Leon, 88, of Miami Beach, May 3.
The Riverside.
SORKIN. Dr. Samuel S., 80. April 27.
WALTER, Alice L., May 2. Schwartz Bros.
Forest Hills New York.
CHECKMAN, Ida, 78 of Miami Beach, May
1. The Riverside.
HARRIS, Bernard. 96. Services were held.
ROSENBAUM. Ruth, 75, April 26. Services
were held.
BABOK. Beth, 35 of North Miami Beach,
April 27. Levitt-Weinstein.
KALTER, Eva of North Miami Beach. Ser
vices held in New York.
DORFMAN, Ella K... 88. of Miami Beach
Services held in Ridgewood, New Jersey.
The Riverside.
SCHOR, Helen L.. of Miami Beach, April
26. The Riverside.
WINDERMAN. Isadore. 75. of Bay Harbor
Island. The Riverside.
NEUMANN. Milton. 86, of Miami Beach.
April 24. Levitt-Weinstein.
RESNEK. Abraham, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
LIEBERMAN, Albert. 73, of North Miami
Beach. April 23. The Riverside.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
AMonument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phona 759-1669
V6
6 t t I 4 t 6
^i
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Through years ol dedicated service.
wt- have become ih' largest Jewish
! .imilv owm-il and operated
Kuneral Chapel in Klorida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
' (IN* MA| IllMt r.IOR
',, lent i.-*.sfi \ urn-fa
. Am#*rii ,,
,\ 4\U\ i iMSI SIHl \ I
8652353
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
Dade County
Broward County
5.12-2WW
Itiprtsinli-ii In KniTsiili'Vli'iiinriiil ( ha|M'l. Ini
New York: Rtlitt263 7600 Qutn-ns Klvil & 7ith K.I KoraU Hills. N V


Tk- % s r*
H 16-B Tb Jewish Flondian/Friday, May 9, 1966
Women's Division Retreat To
Feature Story Of Hannah Senesh
Orthodox Jews In Israel
A presentation of "Blessed is
the Heart, the Story of Hannah
Senesh." a blend of dance, song,
poetry and prose, will hifrhli^ht
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Women's Division 11th An-
nual Retreat and Installation to be
held Wednesday. May 21 and
Thursday. May 22 at the Sonesta
Reach Hotel
The one-woman show, perform-
ed by Dafna Soltes of the
UBANYU Theatre Dance Com
pany. portrays the life of Hannah
Senesh. a member of the Jewish
underground who helped rescue
European Jews from the Nazis.
Working as an officer of an elite
military corps, Senesh led a mis
sion of Palestinian Jews to save
Hungarian Jeary from Nazi
annihilation.
Soltes' performance of "Han
nah Senesh" on the second day of
the retreat will be followed by a
question and answer period. In ad-
dition to her performance. Soltes
will lead a Holocaust workshop on
the first evening of the retreat.
The first day of the retreat. May
21. is designated as a "playday."
offering participants the oppor-
tunity to spend the afternoon tak-
ing advantage of the hotel's ac-
commodations. That evening, a
poolside barbeque will include the
installation of 1986-S7 Business
and Professional Women officers.
On the second day. the
Women's Division will install its
19**-*T officers at a luncheon.
Martin Fine, local attorney, will
be keynote speaker. Fine has serv-
ed on the Board of Directors of
the Miami Housing Authority and
is currently chairman of the
Greater Miami Chamber of Com-
merce, and a member of the Board
of Trustees of Miami-Dade Com-
munity College.
Helen Berne and Renata Rloom
serve as co-chairwomen of the
retreat.
Federation Mercantile Event
Rescheduled For May 21
Continued from Page 1-B
being abused: He recalled the case
of Shoshanna Miller, a Colorado
woman who was converted by a
Reform rabbi. The process took
many years and when she finish-
ed. Miller became a part-time
teacher at the synagogue as well
as a part-time cantor.
But when she made aliya, her
application was turned down by
Yitzhak Peretx. Israel's Interior
Minister and leader of the ultra-
Orthodox Shas Party, because her
conversion was not recognized as
valid. Funds from the treasury of
the WUPJ are being used to fight
the case. Gittelsohn said.
"These (ultra-Orthodox) are
fanatics who insist even- aspect of
Kfe in Israel be governed entirely
by religious law. but they never
stop flagrantly flouting civil law
for their own purposes." he
declared. "We shall continue to
protest the emasculation of the
Law of Return."
GITTELSOHN SAID the
plight of Ethiopian Jews is
another example. When
thousands of Ethiopians arrived
Israel last winter after being
aiHifted. Israel's Chief Rabbis
said they weren't halachic Jews
because they had been isolated
from Judaism for thousands of
years. The Orthodox community
had insisted on their
"conversion."
Gittelsohn said Reform Jews
have three objectives, the first be-
ing the fight for recognition as
authentic Jews "not only in Israel
but everywhere. If Orthodoxy suc-
ceeds in delegitimizing us in
Israel, they will succeed
everywhere else. We shall assert
our credentials as non-fww j
religious Jews." SeSftS*"
Jews want to "protect tk0""
of traditional jJdS Y **
heard right". 85\ff
"There are times Si*4
purer interpreters of hXt 5"
the Orth^ox KSftM
thodox don't alwavs Zi *'
halacha." understand
Visiting Britain?
S.M.K. TOUrS Are Tailor-Made For You!
* Friendly Personal Service Guides you to the
sights you want to see in London or
elsewhere in Britain
* Choose your own itinerary Details in our
Brochure.
* Historic Jewish London is just one of our
special interest tours.
Write for Brochures to:
SMK TOURS
10 Greystone Gardens
Kenton, Harrow
Middx HA30EG. England, U.K.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Mercantile Pinsaor.
Cocktail Reception honoring
Miami philanthropist Harold
Reck, oryinalhr scheduled for
May K, has been rescheduled for
Wednesday. May .1 at the Omni
lntemaaonai Hotel The recep-
tion, to be heM m behalf of the
Federation's l^t- Combined
Jewwfc Appeal Israei Emergency
FuodFro^fct RenewaRV Akira
Campaign- begws at run.
Beck, a former Federatx*
Swd member and president of
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, wifl receive
the cc-vettd HaraW B. Boswortr
Award at the reeepcxwL
twtaated m 1*4 Boswecth s
aaeaaorv the award is presented
each year to aa arirndaal -?. the
v>eater Miaav !<
ty who exeatftatW Rosworc? I
principles, beliefs aid
evawepes by em
| x- the betaeraaens of the
Graaatr Mmbh Jew ah Federaacc
aad the ccaaaaaaty ai geoera.
There no charge fc anhnt
the Mercancie IVrsaca Cv*ta-
Keoeyooa, whack wii be S.tsec t>
dtvearc spvascrs. |wi ?nr-
are respired a? make a
C*. .* 880 v the I**
QMaf cataaaaja.
arc :sxv semes as daz-
anw rf the MercaaChr IVrsoce.
Lana aad F\au
Jtvuuia, fcwwtt Fa**.
Gary Bakanaa
rii Shhwaut sent as
ti a* rvpartaaat aad
Keen* Ssvire* Grose '*~~~~'
aaani ManrvooB
;c the ^pawi
whefe shopping rs o pleasue 7do^s c *eek
Publix
Mother's Day
Heart Cake
Heart Cake
J825
Stores with
DaaWi Bakeries Only,
from a
Assortment
Lemon Cheese
Coffee Cake...
Bran Muffins
nacaM69
6 a, M
at PuMu Stores with Fresh
Fresh Baked
English Muffin Bread
MM Heart Cake..........
79*
MiniDonuts
*<*.
S-|09
Farawa-.n* Grif
Jot Barwt. 'FHhas
Jt Sana. Jr. BanUi Seek. Tm
Oaken and few ScnKa ftm
!"hm ihinai ti 9* Jrvavy
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Heart Cake..........
Hamburger or
Hot Dog Rots......
Pricts Effective
May 8 tkr. 14. 1986
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50% OFF
>cve vcv_- vrpe r^r. ^ex \xx. cog
Vf?
Wlirri *af~^.x- : a ^-cr- *u* a f
4A___*_


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