The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02987

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement .. Special Insert
Volume 59Number 18
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, May 2,1986
PHt tUtll By Maul'
Price 50 Cents
\natnly (Natan) Sharansky is a free man, but human rights for
Mrs he left behind in the Soviet Union must be vigorously
tmud. "Scharansky: The Struggle Continues" is a 12-minute
tape showing the ongoing struggle that Sharansky
^presents. It was produced by and is available from National
mited Jewish Appeal, 99 Park Avenue. New York 10016.
Israel Denies Involvement
In U.S. Arms Sale to Iran
Bv HUGH ORGEL
| TEL AVIV (JTA) -
fficials of the Foreign
ry and the defense
iblishment categorically
y that Israel was in any
ay involved in a conspiracy
sell $2 billion worth of
nerican arms to Iran,
llowing the arrest by U.S.
priorities last week of a
tired Israel Defense Force
leral alleged to be one of
plotters.
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Avraham
Baram. 52, an IDF veteran of 30
years' service, was one of 17 men
of six nationalities who were plac-
ed under arrest or had warrants
issued against them in New York
and Bermuda. Baram and four of
the men were arrested in Ber-
muda where they allegedly flew to
make final arrangements for the
arms deal.
ALSO NAMED in the plot were
two other Israelis. Guri
Eisenberg, 31. and Israel
Continued on Page 9-A
Rabbis Get Involved
In Sanctuary Drive
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
"I am the son of an un-
documented alien,"
declared Rabbi Joseph
Weizenbaum to a small
group of reporters and sanc-
tuary movement activists
during a recent visit to the
Stephen Wise Free
Synagogue.
The Tucson. Ariz., rabbi,
sometimes referred to warmly as
the "mother of the movement."
repeats his oft-told story of how
his father arrived in the United
States from Europe in 1913 as a
stowaway and was nearly
deported.
"The slaves who fled north in
our country and the Jews who at-
tempted to flee Nazi Germany
found no refuge," he continued.
"We believe that communities of
faith are now being called again to
obey God by providing sanctuary
to the refugees among us."
WITH THE much-publicized
federal trial of the two Roman
Catholic priests, a nun, a
Presbyterian minister and church
lay workers accused of smuggling
aliens into the U.S. beginning to
wind down in Tucson, Weizen-
baum has begun to travel
throughout the East Coast as part
of a national tour of rabbis active
in the sanctuary movement.
The tour is sponsored by the
New Jewish Agenda. It includes
Rabbis Charles Feinberg of
Madison, Wisconsin and Judea
Miller of Rochester, New York.
Participating at the recent
meeting in New York were such
prominent New York rabbis as
Marshall Meyer of Congregation
B'nai Jeshurun, and Balfour
Brickner, the spiritual head of the
Stephen Wise Synagogue.
Supporters of providing sanc-
tuary for Central American
refugees are going directly
against Reagan Administration
policy, as interpreted through the
1980 Refugee Act. It provides
U.S. asylum to anyone with a
"well-founded fear of persecution
on account of race, religion, na-
tionality, membership in a par-
ticular social group or political
opinion" if returned to their
homeland.
The Reagan Administration
maintains that the vast majority
of refugees who are entering the
country illegally from Central
America are not fleeing war or op-
pression but are seeking a better
life here and may be competing
with U.S. citizens for jobs.
Precise figures of the number of
Central American refugees in the
United States illegally are not
available, but experts place the
number at 500,000 to 600,000,
most of them Salvadorans and
Guatemalans.
ACCORDING to the New
Jewish Agenda (NJA), less than
three percent of the Salvadorans
who have applied have been
granted asylum. By contrast, the
NJA contends that the figure for
refugees from Communist coun-

ill
Albert Vorspan
tries is 80 percent.
Sanctuary supporters are ask-
Continued on Page 9-A
Panic Studied
Financial Institutions
Flinch At Critical Eye
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM-(JTA) -
Israel's financial establish-
ment is reeling from the im-
pact of a report released by
the special commission set
up to investigate the col-
lapse of bank shares and
other stocks that touched
off a financial panic three
years ago.
The commission, headed by
Supreme Court Justice Chaim
Beisky, was scathing in its
criticism of the country's leading
commercial banks and their senior
officers, the Stock Exchange and
the entire banking system.
IT RECOMMENDED, among
other things, that the Governor of
the Bank of Israel and the heads
of the five largest banks be forced
to resign within 30 days, and that
few, if any. of them should be en-
trusted in the future with posts of
responsibility in their banks or
any other financial institutions, at
home or abroad.
The immediate response from
the banks and bankers ranged
from defensive to "no comment."
The prevailing reaction was that
the report, a 550-page document
representing 13 months of labor
by the commission, deals with
past events and the public must
now be reassured that the banking
system is safe.
The Knesset State Control
Committee adopted the recom-
mendations of the Beisky commis-
sion and requested the govern-
ment, the Tel Aviv Stock Ex-
Continued on Page 15-A
om Hashoa
Communitywide Observance To Be Held Here Tuesday
communitywide Yom
loah commemoration is
leduled for Tuesday, May
I at Temple Emanu-El on
fami Beach.
Ernest W. Michel, a sur-
who initiated and was
urman of the World
fthering of the Jewish
>locaust Survivors in
iel in June, 1981, will be
lote speaker.
* Tuesday event is part of
Holocaust Awareness Week being
observed here and nationally May
4-11. On Tuesday morning, at 9
a.m., a special presentation mark-
ing Holocaust Awareness Week
will be made before the Dade
County Commission.
TUESDAY WILL be the
seventh annual Holocaust
Memorial Day since President
Carter established the President's
Commission on the Holocaust.
The evening event at Temple
Emanu-El will begin at 7:30 p.m.,
with a candlelight ceremony per-
formed by survivors, their
children and grandchildren.
The communitywide com-
memoration will also serve as an
occasion for paying tribute to the
43rd anniversary of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising. Co-sponsoring
the event are the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, Community
Relations Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami and the
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Continued on Page 11-A


^-^^t^^MB-S^H
mmm**mimm
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986
I
I
i
s
Expect A Storm
If You Dare Criticize Lyndon LaRouche
By ROBERT SEGAL
If you dare criticize Lyn-
don H. LaRouche, the er-
ratic far-right politician, you
had better expect a storm of
harassment, accusations,
and threats.
Two years ago, after a careful
study of LaRouche propaganda,
both in print and on the air, I
wrote a column setting forth
logical conclusions about the
LaRouche political establishment.
Vitriolic wrath pounded against
my ears from members of the
LaRouche telephone squad. Then
followed a curious, accusatory,
angry letter from a press
representative of the LaRouche
campaign. The writer's hero was
at that time running for
President.
"I HAVE always had a very
strong sense of justice, which I
think comes from my Jewish
education," the writer informed
me. She went on to level a charge
of mistreating poor Lyndon
LaRouche, "perhaps for money, a
favor to someone, cowardice, or
stupidity."
Tarred thus with LaRouche
brand of Faustian mud, I felt
honored.
The letter writer, I must repeat,
mentioned her Jewish education.
Is one a money-grubber, coward, a
stupid fellow, then for expressing
amazement that this Mr.
LaRouche's Jewish press aide
would defend an extremist who
reportedly dismisses the
Holocaust as a Jewish myth,
equates Zionism with racism,
blames Jews for the Roman
crucifixion of Jesus, and finds
truth in the infamous Protocols of
the Elders of Zion which was long
ago pronounced an anti-Semitic
forgery by reputable historians?
Hampshire officials, including
Hugh Gallen, then governor of the
Granite State. Hugh Gallen's
name reportedly was on a list of
New Hampshire public servants
to be targeted for abuse during
the LaRouche campaign for Presi-
dent that year. According to the
Associated Press, the list was
found in a Concord, N.H., YMCA
room rented to a LaRouche cam-
paigner. Instructions were:
The*e are the criminals to burn
- we want calls coming in to
these fellows day and night USP
your networks to best
advantage."
Judging by the experience of
Thomas Roth, then Attorney
General of New Hampshire, the
LaRouche workers seem to have
obeyed orders. "I got about 50
phone calls on Sunday at home "
Roth reported.
It seems reasonable to conclude
that Gov. Gallen, who died in 1982
at the age of 58, received similar
treatment. Reared in poverty
Hugh Gallen was one of New
Hampshire's most caring, effec
tive, and beloved governors, sure
ly not "a criminal to burn."
WYS-Sm* Aru
Reagan Accepts Chair
Of Ben Gurion Centennial
SEN. DANIEL PATRICK MOYNIHAN
No one has sounded the warning
against LaRoucheism more effec-
tively than New York Sen. Pat
Moynihan. Scolding the top
Democratic Party stewards for
weak effort to alert the faithful to
the strange tactics of various
LaRouche fronts, he branded
LaRouche a fascist and an anti-
Semite, a leader of a cadre that
could destroy a major. American
political party.
MOYNIHAN cited a tactic he
claimed to have been used by
Melvin Klenetsky, a LaRouche
faithful who tried but failed to
wrest the New York senatorial
nomination from him in 1981. Ac-
cording to Moynihan, Klenetsky
depicted Averell Harriman as a
tool of Adolf Hitler.
Harassment?
Go back to 1980 and examine
the painful experience of top New
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan has accepted
the invitation of Israel President
Chaim Herzog to act as honorary
chairman of the David Ben Gurion
Centennial Committee of the
United States, it was announced
here by the Centennial Commit-
tee. Reagan's participation in the
year-long celebration of the birth
of Israel's first Premier
acknowledges the special relation-
ship between the United States
and Israel, the Committee said.
"The Ben Gurion Centennial
represents a unique event for
Americans," said Israel's Am-
bassador Meir Rosenne, who is
also the Committee's co-
chairman. "It is one of those rare
moments when Americans can
celebrate the birth of a foreign
hero a statesman of the 20th
century whose impact on
American and world history ranks
with that of Churchill and
Gandhi."
The Centennial Committee will
coordinate educational and
cultural activities throughout the
United States, from October,
1986. the anniversary of Ben
Gurion's birth, until May 4, 1987.
the 40th anniversary of Israel's in-
dependence, culminating with a
gala celebration at the Kennedy
Center in Washington in May
1987.
The Committee is represented
worldwide by Herzog. In the U.S.,
it is chaired by Jack Spitzer,
honorary president of B'nai B'rith
International, and co-chaired by
Rosenne. Dr. Benjamin Hirsch, an
educator, clergyman and ad-
ministrator, is the Committee's
executive director.
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Havurot Angered
Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Synagogue Council Shuns Ties
Bj YITZHAK RABI
MEW YORK (JTA) -
The Federation of
Reconstructionist Con-
gregations and Havurot
(FRCH) sharply denounced
the Synagogue Council of
America (SCA) following
the Council's decision to
deny it membership.
Warning that the denial can
harm "Jewish unity," Lillian
Kaplan, president of the FRCH,
charged in a statement issued
here that this rejection "negates
the very essence of its mandate."
The application of thwe FRCH
for membership in the SCA was
rejected on Mar. 11 after the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations exercised a unilateral
veto by voting against the
admission.
THE OTHER members of the
SCA which was founded in 1926
by the three major synagogue
movements of American Judaism
(Reform. Conservative and Or-
thodox) and their rabbinical af-
filiates supported the admission
of the Reconstructionists. The
SCA by-laws include the rule that
a nay vote by any of its six
members can veto any proposition
put before its Board.
The six members of the SCA
are: the Central Conference of
American Rabbis and Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
(Reform); the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations and the
Rabbinical Council of America
(Orthodox); and the United
Synagogue of America and the
Rabbinical Assembly (Conser-
vative). The FRCH claims to be
the fourth major movement in
American Judaism.
Noting that the SCA claims to
be "the umbrella for Jewish
religious life in America," Kaplan
said that the rejection "does not
weaken our movement, but it does
demean the Council's credentials
in terms of religious leadership."
FRCH EXECUTIVE director
Rabbi David Teutsch told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that,
following the veto, his organiza-
tion held discussions with leaders
of the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations in an effort to
change their opposition to the
Reconstructionists' membership
in the SCA, but to no avail. It was
after these efforts failed that the
FRCH issued a statement denoun-
cing the rejection.
Asked to explain the reasons for
voting against the admission of
the FRCH to the SCA, Rabbi Pin-
chas Stolper. executive vice presi-
dent of the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations said in a
telephone interview with the JTA:
"In our view there were and are
three major divisions of the
American synagogue community
the Reform, Conservative and
Orthodox. We feel that by admit-
ting additional groups we open a
Pandora's Box which would
needlessly confuse the already
confused landscape. Our opposi-
tion to admitting the Reconstruc-
tionists is not directed at the
Reconstructionists per se, but to
the realization that there are
many sub-groups of the three divi-
sions and by tolerating the crea-
tion of further division we will on-
ly render a disservice."
ACCORDING TO Teutsch, the
FRCH last applied for member-
ship in the SCA more than 10
years ago and was rejected. "We
did not ask all these years to be
admitted because we knew we are
going to be rejected," Teutsch
told the JTA.
Teutsch said that the FRCH has
about 75,000 members with over
56 congregations around the
country. "Our congregations are
located in most of the largest
Jewish population centers of the
country and our members are
leaders in local Federations, bran-
ches of UJA, and other areas of
Jewish communal life out of all
proportion to their numbers,"
Teutsch said, adding:
"The Council's decision
demonstrates woefully insuffi-
cient commitment to pluralism on
the part of the Orthodox in the
American Jewish community."
The Jewish Reconstructionist
movement was founded 60 years
ago by Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan. Its
guiding principle is that Judaism
is an evolving religious civilization
a culture and a way of life as
well as a religious faith.
Refusenik Gets One Year
NEW YORK (JTA) Soviet
Jewish refusenik Bezvalel
Shalolashvili was sentenced last
Tuesday to a one-year prison term
for "draft evasion" after a two-
day trial, the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry (SSSJ) reported
here.
The 22-year old Tbilisi student,
arrested in March, asserted that
he had never received his draft
notice. The SSSJ said that the
KGB has told Shalolashvili's
brother, Yitzhak, that "the charge
was in retaliation for the tatter's
efforts to prevent the official
destruction of the Ashkenazic
synagogue in Tbilisi."
The U.S. Congress was inform-
ed last February of reported plans
by the Soviet authorities to
bulldoze one of the few remaining
synagogues in the Soviet Union in
order to build a public square in its
place. The Tbilisi Jewish com-
munity is estimated at 20,000.
Shalolashvili and his family first
applied to emigrate in April, 1985,
and their application was refused
last August without any
explanation.
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(And You May Not Even Know It)
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986
Waldheim Operetta
Spurs Anti-Semitism
Former United Nations Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim is running for the
presidency of Austria. Recently-revealed
files at the United Nations and elsewhere
suggest that Waldheim played an active role
as a Nazi soldier in the shipment of East
European Jews to concentration camps.
Rudolf Kirchschlaeger, the current presi-
dent of Austria and a reputedly decent man,
has declared that he finds no connection bet-
ween Waldheim and the deportation of
Greek Jews from Salonika during the Nazi
occupation.
What the imbroglio in Austria has done is
to galvanize typically anti-Semitic opinion
there behind Waldheim's candidacy that is
in itself an explanation of how easily the
Waldheims of the Hitler era were able to
embrace the Fuehrer and all his genocidal
principles.
In an off-hand comment about the current
anti-Semitic outburst in Austria, Kir-
chschlaeger has declared that "Anti-Jewish
sentiments never did any good in our
history. And, besides that, they are deeply
inhumane."
Holocaust Awareness
Behind this Viennese operetta emerging
from Austria's worst self-deluding
theatrical fantasy stalks the shadow of the
Holocaust. If for no other, it is a good reason
to participate in next Tuesday's (May 6)
community-wide commemoration of Yom
Hashoa, one of the crowning events of
Holocaust Awareness Week May 4-11.
It will never be possible for us, as Jews, to
forget the six-million of our brothers and
sisters who were murdered by the Nazis
during the Hitler era. Nor will it be possible
for us to lose memory of the way in which
the so-called civilized nations of the world
failed to respond to the Nazi beast and, by
their indifference, contributed to the six-
million's demise.
But it is completely possible for others to
forget them. Indeed, they have been doing
so for a long time now spurred on, among
others, by historical revisionists who, in
their bigotry, seek to infect the world with
theories that the Holocaust in fact never
occurred.
It is for these revisionists, it is for those
who listen to them and for others who simp-
ly don't care, that we must never cease to
remind ourselves and others of this
most tragic event in the history of mankind.
By participating in Holocaust Awareness
Week events, we can make sure that we
strengthen the remembering process.
templating the unhappiness that comes from
unfulfillment.
In her inspired move to meet this need, in
her establishment and leadership of the
Temple Beth Sholom Great Artists Series,
she has for years brought the greatest sym-
phony orchestras, the finest conductors and
the most outstanding performing artists to
appear on a regular basis before us.
In addition to her position as cultural
director of Temple Beth Sholom, president
of the Concert Association of Greater Miami
and guiding hand behind the Great Artist
Series, in 1982 she inaugurated the Concert
Association of Greater Miami's Prestige
Series and has promoted dance perfor-
mances in our community as well.
The University of Miami School of Music's
Distinguished Alumna Award to her is une-
quivocally deserved.
WILL THE CHEMISTRY WORK?
,
History Deserves More Accurate Attention to Facts
"Just the facts, M'am," Sgt. Joe Friday
used to say to distraught victims of various
criminal offenses they suffered in that old
television series. And Sgt. Friday's quiet at-
tempt to brush away emotional translation
of facts into personal and often prejudiced
perspective would appear to be precisely
what is needed in history as well.
There ought to be no argument that
history is a recording of events. Trouble is,
there are too many nations and too many
leaders that come along later to "adjust" the
recording by recreating the events. Our cur-
rent problems with world terrorism are a
case in point.
Columnist James McCartney, writing
from Washington, recounts the unhappy
history of U.S. efforts in Lebanon to contain
the internescine struggles there and the
camps for terrorism which, in 1983, forced
us to withdraw.
Apologizing for our humbling, McCartney
argues that "The Israelis couldn't manage
either. Terrorism and guerrilla warfare,
which is a kind of terrorism, drove the
Israeli army out in the months that follow-
ed," he opines.
Then, recalls McCartney, "In the days
after the tragedy (the explosion killing 241
American servicemen in our peacekeeping
force headquarters in Beirut), American of-
ficials came to the conclusion that terrorists
trained in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, which is
under Syrian control, were probably
'Highest Priority'
responsible."
This is about as selective a piece of
recollection of history as can be mustered to
illustrate the principle of revisionist history
and how it gets started.
Why is it that Israel couldn't "manage" in
Lebanon, as McCartney writes? How is it
that Syria today controls the Bekaa Valley?
The answer is simple.
After the Israeli destruction of the
Palestine Liberation Organization structure
in Lebanon, the United States, joined by
other of our European "allies," notably the
French, insisted that PL0 Chief Yasir
Arafat be permitted to leave Beirut "with
honor and dignity" rather than to be submit-
ted to the humiliation of defeat. From there,
Arafat went to Tripoli under the outstretch-
ed arm of the Quai d'Orsay, and from there
to Tunis where he is today.
After Israel's destruction of Syria's air
force and dismemberment of Syria's ground
forces, the United States, again joined by its
European "allies," insisted that President
Assad's army be permitted, under protec-
tive escort, to "save face" and march proud-
ly back to Damascus.
On the way, Syria turned south, ensconced
itself in the Bekaa Valley and has never left
since.
These are the facts, M'am. Just the facts.
No poetic license as a columnist always
manages to take for himself.
Our Reaching Out to Other Jews
Drucker Deserves Award
The University of Miami has selected im-
presaria Judy Drucker as the recipient of
the 1985-36 Distinguished Alumna Award of
the UM School of Music.
All must agree that Drucker deserves the
award hands down.
It is a sad but incontrovertible fact that
South Florida has never been able to sustain
a major symphony orchestra of its own. So
large a population in so busy a community
not to be able to meet this important cultural
need is a sad thing.
But Drucker was never one for con-
JewisH Florxdiain
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Friday, May 2. 1986
Volume 59
23 NISAN 5746
Number 18
By BOCHELLE SAIDEL
TORONTO
"The highest priority for
Jews must be to reach out to
Jews of different beliefs,"
Rabbi Henry Sobel of Sao
Paulo, Brazil, told delegates
at the World Union for Pro-
gressive Judaism Interna-
tional conference in Toronto
recently.
Calling for a dialogue with the
"moderate Orthodox," Sobel ad-
mitted there are "non-negotiable"
differences. "But that should not
prevent us from looking for areas
of cooperation and trust," he said.
"Support of Israel is one example.
The struggle for Soviet Jewry is
another."
Our position as Progressive
Jews must strike a good balance,
manifesting strong opposition to
the Orthodox establishment's use
of political power to suppress Pro-
gressive Judaism, while at the
same time calling for dialogue
with the Orthodox moderates,"
Sobel said. "There is a need for an
ongoing dialogue between Liberal
and Orthodox Jews on every level.
not only among rabbis and lay
leaders, but especially among am-
cha, the people," he said.
WITH BEGABD to the Reform
movement in Israel, Sobel said,
"We must continue our unrelen-
ting struggle for the recognition
of Progressive Judaism." Poin-
ting out that a December 1985 poll
showed that 66.8 percent of
Israelis interviewed felt that the
Reform and Conservative
movements should be recognized
and should receive the same rights
now held by the Orthodox, he
asked:
"If we have popular support in a
democratic society, why must we
subject ourselves to Orthodox
domination?" He suggested that
encouraging aliya of non-
Orthodox Jews would be an im-
portant step in "legitimizing" the
Reform movement in Israel.
Sobel's Sao Paulo synagogue,
Cognrecagao Israelite Paulista.
has a membership of 2,000
families and is the largest in Latin
America. Some 250,000 Jews live
in Brazil today, 90,000 in Sao
Paulo and 35,000 in Rio. Sao
Paulo, ihe fifth largest city in the
world, is the seat of the Con-
federacao Israelite do Brasil. the
umbrella organization of the
Jewish community (affiliated with
the World Jewish Congress).
ALTHOUGH THE Jewish com
munity is only a small fraction of
Brazil's population of 130 million.
95 percent of whom are Catholic,
Sobel told the JTA that the
Liberal Jewish leadership plays an
important role in the country. The
Jewish community is part of the
small economic and social elite in
Brazil, the five percent of the
population that owns most of the
big business and land.
In the 1970's the Liberal Jewish
movement made an alliance on na-
tional social action concerns with
the National Conference of
Brazilian Bishops, Sobel said.
Describing Brazil's Roman
Catholic Bishops as the most
liberal in the world, Sobel said
they consider it their mission to
build a just society in Brazil.
(Brazil has the largest Catholic
population in the world, with one
tenth of the world's bishops.)
The Roman Catholic Church in
Latin America has been increa.-
Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Prof. Only Rarely Fails To Evoke His Listener's Passion
By HERB KEINON
Hailed by some as the "closest
thing Israel has to an Old Testa-
ment prophet." and denounced by
others as a "traitor in need of a
mental examination," Prof.
Veshayahu Leibowitz only rarely
fails to evoke his listener's pas-
sion The world according to
Leibowitz has God "completely
transcendent," Golda Meir an
"old, very wicked woman," Ben-
Gurion a "hater of Jewish
history," Jerusalem's Western
Wall a "religious disco," and Gush
Emunim a movement propagating
"false messianism"
For these and similar sen-
timents, the eighty-three year old
former Hebrew University pro-
fessor has variously been called a
"heretic," "gadfly," "penetrating
mind." "enfant terrible," and
"the most devout Jew in the coun-
try today."
One thing for certain, and on
this even the Professor agrees,
Yeshayahu Leibowitz is an
iconoclast: a breaker of idols, an
attacker of cherished beliefs and
institutions.
IF, AS Will Durant maintains,
"philosophy begins when one
learns to doubt, particularly to
doubt one's cherished beliefs,
dogmas and axioms," then
Yeshayahu Leibowitz is a
philosopher par excellence. With a
PhD in both bio-chemistry and
medicine, and extremely well
versed in Judaism, physics,
genetics and philosophy,
Leibowitz claims to be interested
only in fact, not opinion or
ideology. Nothing, no mater how
sacred, escapes the Professor's
critical mind.
The Western Wall, Zionism,
Divine Providence, the Holocaust,
Jerusalem: all this must, in
Leibowitz's socratic fashion, be
defined free of the preconceived
notions which often blur our vi-
sion. In books and at personal ap-
pearances, on the radio and
through numerous newspaper and
magazine articles, Prof. Leibowitz
has annoyed and entertained,
fascinated and antagonized a
never bored Israeli audience. For
over two decades he has con-
tinuously challenged consensus
opinion which many Israelis felt
somehow fell outside the pale of
public debate.
Characterized by a can-
tankerous, arrogant and often
supercilious presentation, Prof.
Leibowitz has nothing but scorn
for those who would believe that
modem Jewish history proves
that God is watching over His peo-
ple Israel. For, in Leibowitz's
view, the Holocaust has no
theological meaning, Israel's War
of Independence was not a
modern Parting of the Red Sea,
and the Six-Day War does not pro-
ve that God actively intervenes in
the affairs of man.
God, in each of these three
historical events, was where He
always is in relation to man: com-
pletely transcendent. "Anyone
who sees the hand of Divine Pro-
vidence in history," Leibowitz
declares, "is a blasphemer."
YET DESPITE a belief that
God is absent from history,
Leibowitz continues to observe
Kashrut, keep Shabbat and pray.
His reason is simple: "We are so
commanded." In Leibowitz's
unemotional theology, Judaism is
solely concerned with serving
God. It is not, as many believe,
concerned with morals, ethics,
philosophy, folklore, literature or
political and social organization.
Leibowitz contends that a Jew can
only serve God through the
scrupulous performance of His
commandments as elaborated by
man in Halachan (Jewish law). It
is Halachan, therefore, which
becomes the only truly unique
Jewish value or contribution.
The Professor's unconventional
views are not confined to the
theological realm. He is as much a
political as he is a religious
maverick. In the euphoric wake of
the Six-Day War, to those who
claimed that Israel's victory
would provide a magic cure for all
the nation's ills, Yeshayahu
Leibowitz called for an im-
mediate, unilateral and complete
withdrawal from all the ter-
ritories, including East Jerusalem
and the Golan Heights.
Again, his reasoning was sim-
ple: the demographic and

^^r^^^v^^^
logistical problems involved in
"occupation" would severely tar-
nish the moral and Jewish color of
the state. In January, 1968, while
many Israelis had already taken it
for granted that more territory
means grater security, Leibowitz
declared: "Israel should forthwith
return every inch of territory
taken in the Six-Day War. The
demographic problems involved in
incorporating over one million
Arabs in the territories will, in a
short while, turn Israel into a
Levantine country, shot through
with corruption and without
either Jewish farmers or workers.
Even those Israelis agreeing to
territorial compromise were
aghast, however, at the prospect
of returning East Jerusalem and
her holy sites. The Professor's
blunt reply: "There is no such
thing as a holy place ... A kibbutz
which raises pigs on its farm is as
much the Lord's heritage as
Jerusalem and Rachel's tomb."
LEIBOWITZ HAS become
even more convinced, in the in-
tervening 19 years, that such a
withdrawal is in Israel's best in-
terest. By no means naive, the
Professor realizes that such a
move will not ensure peace.
However, in the cut-and dry world
which characterizes his thought,
such a step is the only alternative
to a "war until the death with the
whole Moslem world." Besides,
Leibowitz maintains, territory
does not necessarily guarantee
security. Security can only be en-
sured by the superiority of Israel's
armed forces which in turn, is
dependent upon the moral
superiority of Israeli society and
the backing of other nations: both
of which have seriously been erod-
ed due to Israel's continued
"occupation."
"What kind of Jewish State is it
when on Arab holidays Jewish fac-
tories are closed for lack of
laborers, Jewish restaurants are
closed for lack of kitchen workers,
and even the operating theaters at
Hadassah are unable to function
because Arab cleaning personnel
do not show up? Leave the ter-
ritories," Leibowitz thunders, "so
we can return to being a nation of
Jews."
Yeshayahu Leibowitz,
throughout his public life, has at
one time or another managed to
alienate nearly everybody. The
religious detest his idea of an im-
personal God. the secular don't
like his stand on Halachah, the
"Right" can't stomach his posi-
tion on the territories and though
he is the darling of the Left," it is
the results of his pragmatism
rather than his overall views they
Eighty-three year old
Yeshayahu Leibowitz, hailed
by some as the closest thing
Israel has to an Old
Testament prophet' and
denounced by others as an
iconoclast and political
maverick.
espouse.
MOST CONCEDE, however,
that without Prof. Leibowitz,
Israel would be a much poorer
place from an intellectual,
spiritual and political point of
view alike. All the sacred cows in
Israel are subject to his
penetrating and piercing treat-
ment. Conformists of all hues and
colors rightly see Prof. Yeshayahu
Leibowitz as a challenge which
they cannot afford to overlook.
Those who have tried to take him
lightly in public debate would be
the first to agree that whether one
accepts or rejects him, he is a
thinker of unusual stature.
Welcome News
Meeting Spain's Rich Jewish Heritage
'n Cordoba stands a statue to its native
son Maimonides, Talmudic scholar.
Philosopher, physician.
The establishment of
diplomatic relations bet-
ween Israel and Spain is
welcome news. With the ex-
change of ambassadors bet-
ween Jerusalem and
Madrid, travelers will be
more inclined to explore
Spain's rich Jewish heritage
and to make contact with
the vibrant communities
which have been restored,
almost five centuries after
the expulsion of 1492.
For the present, the speedier
links between the United States,
Spain, and Israel are by air. The
stopover in Madrid, the Spanish
capital, is the first stage of a
rewarding journey through
Jewish history on the Iberian
peninsula.
THE CITY'S 3,000 Jews are,
for the most part, Sephardim
whose families had settled in
Morocco in 1492 and who
themselves elected to leave that
country when it won in-
dependence in 1956. Some even
brought with them the keys to the
houses their ancestors had sur-
rendered at the time of their forc-
ed departure.
Community life is centered in
the Beth Yaakov synagogue at
Calle Balmes 3 (Metro station, Ig-
lesia). It is a handsome, modern
structure, built in 1968 as the first
Jewish house of worship erected
in Madrid since the 15th Century.
Kosher meals are available at the
synagogue, but only upon
reservation.
Less than an hour from Madrid
is Toledo, once the very Jerusalem
of Spanish Jewry. The medieval
walled town is perched on a hill
above the Tagus River, looking
just like the famous cityscape by
Toledo's great painter-in-
residence, El Greco a case, as it
were, of nature imitating art.
LIKE AN earlier flowering in
Moslem Cordoba, Jewish culture
achieved a high level under the
Christian kings of Toledo. In a
community of 12,000, then the
largest and most prosperous in
Spain, there were poets like Judah
Halevi and a galaxy of rabbi-
scholars holding forth in a dozen
synagogues.
Two synagogues remain,
magnificent, unused and now
designated as national
monuments: El Transito, with its
adjoining museum, considered the
gem of medieval synagogue ar-
chitecture; and a few hundred
yards away, on the same Calle de
Samuel Levi, Santa Maria La
Blanca, dedicated a century
earlier and reflecting the graceful
Continued on Page 8-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986
Related Story 1-A
Bank Governor Resigns Post
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Moshe Mandelbaum, Gover-
nor of the Bank of Israel,
resigned last Monday in the
wake of a scathing indict-
ment of Israel's banking
system by a commission set
up to investigate the col-
lapse of bank shares in 1983.
The commission, headed by
Supreme Court Justice Chaim
Beisky, released its report last
Sunday night. It recommended,
among other things, that the
Governor of the Bank of Israel
and the heads of the five largest
commercial banks be made to
resign within 30 days.
Mandelbaum had planned to leave
office shortly as head of Israel's
central bank, which plays a
regulatory role similar in some
ways to the Federal Reserve Bank
in the U.S.
HIS EARLY departure set off a
search for a replacement and
several names were mentioned
Tuesday as likely candidates.
Finance Minister Moshe Nissim,
who took over the Treasury two
weeks ago, said he has his own
choice but would not name him
before consulting with Premier
Shimon Peres and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, leader
of Likud, which is Nissim's party.
Among the possible
replacements for Mandelbaum are
Deputy Finance Minister Adi
Rabin Criticizes Reaganites
For Urging 'No Mideast Trips'
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin is being sharply
critical of the Reagan Ad-
ministration for cautioning
traveling U.S. Congressmen
to avoid the Middle East.
At the same time, however, he
has praised the U.S. initiatives
against international terrorism,
including the recent naval action
in the Gulf of Sidra against Libya.
Rabin, addressing a luncheon
meeting of the Foreign Press
Association here, faulted the
State Department advisory to
members of Congress to
"reassess" whether planned trips
to the Middle East were necessary
at this time in view of threats by
Libyan leader Muammar Khadafy
that he would launch a wave a ter-
rorism against Americans in the
region.
SUCH ADVICE was giving into
terrorism, Rabin said. It should
not be part of the policy of a coun-
try which seeks to be the
spearhead in the fight against ter-
rorism. At least two Senators,
Gary Hart (D.. Colo.) and Bennett
Johnston (D., La.), cancelled visits
to the Middle East which were to
include stopovers in Israel.
Rabin emphasized in his
remarks that Israel was freer
from serious terrorist acts than
many other countries. No Israeli
Prime Minister has been
assassinated, as was the Swedish
Prime Minister, Olof Palme, last
month.
There has been no major attack
in the main streets of Tel Aviv, as
has happened in Paris in the past
few weeks. And no hotel or
building housing a political con-
vention in Israel has been bombed
by terrorists, as happened with
the Conservative Party in
England, Rabin said.
NEVERTHELESS, he conced-
ed, Israel has a problem with ter-
rorists. He said the number of in-
cidents in Israel and the ad-
ministered territories increased in
recent months but the number of
casualties has fallen.
He said much of the blame for
terrorist activities from inside
Lebanon could be laid to the com-
petition between various guerrilla
groups there and the growth of
Islamic fundamentalism inspired
by *he Ayatollah Khomeini of
Irr "\ hbluu has succeeded in
e ). ting his brand of fundamen-
talism to Lebanon alone. He failed
to do so elsewhere in the Arab
world where Shiite Moslems live,
Rabin said.
Rabin said Israel continues to
hope for peace in the region. The
two major issues are how to
stengthen the peace with Egypt
and how to lay the groundwork
for peace with Jordan.
IN THE first instance the top
priority was to advance the nor-
malization of relations with Cairo.
He said a good start has been
made in finding a compromise
solution to the Taba border
dispute.
On the eastern front, however,
tricks and gimmicks by the U.S.
or Israel itself would not bring
about a dialogue with Jordan and
the moderate Palestinians with
whom Israel is ready to negotiate.
He saw little chance of any peace
talks with Syria. There is a poten-
tial threat of war from Damascus,
he said, but this can be averted by
awareness and preparedness.
Syria alone, he stressed, is no
military match for Israel.
Rabin had little patience with
countries which criticize Israel's
policies in the administered ter-
ritories. What Israel is trying to
do in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, he said, is to improve the
quality of life for their inhabitants
and encourage them to run their
own local affairs.
He wondered aloud why coun-
tries that have been critical of the
quality of life in the territories did
not contribute more to help raise
living standards in the refugee
camps supported by the United
Nations and by investing in the
recently established West Bank
Industrial Committee.
Amorai; Michael Bruno, a pro-
fessor of economics; Emanuel
Sharon, Director General of the
Finance Ministry; and Moshe Zan-
bar, who was Mandelbaum's
predecessor at the Bank of Israel.
The Bank Hapoalim is also look-
ing for a replacement for its board
chairman, Giora Gazit, who
resigned last Monday. Its direc-
torate and the directors of the
Bank Leumi met last Tuesday to
consider the Beisky commission
report and possible replacements
for other senior banking officials
who may resign in the coming
weeks. The Bank Hapoalim also
released its annual report, which
showed profits up by 85 percent in
1985 compared to 1984.
THE TEL AVIV Stock Ex-
change, whose management was
blasted by the Beisky commission
for failure to heed warnings of the
market collapse three years ago,
appeared to be unaffected by the
report. Since it was released the
prices of most shares rose by an
average of about one percent and
advances far outnumbered
declines.
Meanwhile, the Knesset is em-
broiled in a heated debate over
whether to pass legislation that
would protect the banks from
lawsuits by customers who, in
light of the Beisky commission's
findings, could claim they were
defrauded. The government is in-
clined to enact such laws to
preserve the stability of the bank-
ing system.
Tehiya Wants
Refugee Transfer
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
right-wing opposition Tehiya Par-
ty has called for the transfer of
500,000 Palestinian refugees from
Israel-held territories to Arab
countries as a precondition for
peace negotiations.
According to Tehiya leader
Yuval Neeman, this would be a
"humane solution." He spoke at
the opening of the party's conven-
tion here. The convention moved
to Kiryat Arba, the Orthodox
township adjacent to Hebron in
the West Bank, long a scene of
tension between Jews and Arabs.
The convention opening was at-
tended by President Chaim Her-
zog.
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Faces, both questioning and hopeful, catch the mood of Moscow
refusenik children today as their families await the second
Reagan-Gorbachev summit, in a photo obtained by the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry. Although Western pressure has forced
the release of several weU-knoum Russian Jews recently, emigra-
tion rates have plummeted, and these youngsters could be denied
the chance to live in freedom for years to come.
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Murphy Defends
Saudi Criticism of Libyan Raids
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
_ Assistant Secretary of
State Richard Murphy has
found himself defending
Saudi Arabia's criticism of
the United States air raid
against Libya. But Murphy,
who heads the State Depart-
ment's Near Eastern and
South Asian Bureau, said he
did not "excuse" the Saudi
position.
His remarks came as he was
questioned by Rep. Tom Lantos
(D.. Cal.) about the Saudi position
as he testified before the House
Foreign Affairs subcommittee on
Europe and the Middle East in
support of the Reagan Ad-
ministration's proposal to seal
Saudi Arabia $354 million in
sophisticated missiles.
THE SAUDI statement after
the U.S. raid expressed support
and sympathy for the Libyan peo-
ple, Murphy noted. "You do not
find words of support for Col.
(Moammar) Khadafy or the Li-
byan government," he added.
Murphy said the Saudis are
members of the Arab League's
joint defense treaty. "They have
said probably the minimum they
could say as being a member of
the joint Arab defense treaty," he
said.
But Lantos rejected this argu-
ment. "If in every single incident
we ourselves rationalize the anti-
American attitude and actions
and public statements of countries
that we are supporting there will
be no incentive for them to line up
(with us)," he said.
Murphy noted that "I don't
Richard Murphy
think that we have reason to be
satisfied with the support we have
gotten around the world" on U.S.
action against Libya. "We've had
very direct talks with our friends
and allies around the world about
the lack of support for us," he
said.
MEANWHILE, Rep. Mel
Levine (D., Cal.) said he has 221
co-sponsors to the resolution he
introduced to prohibit the arms
sale. A similar resolution in the
Senate, introduced by Sen. Alan
Cranston (D., Cal.) has been sign-
ed by 63 senators.
Both Houses of Congress must
pass the resolution by May 8 to
prevent the sale from going
through. But Murphy reiterated
that if Congress does adopt a
resolution of disapproval Presi-
dent Reagan will veto it.
The threat of the veto was not
mentioned in a letter Rep. Lee
Hamilton (D., Ind.), the subcom-
mittee's chairman, released dur-
ing the hearing from Secretary of
State George Shultz.
Stressing the necessity for a
"balanced policy in the Middle
East," Shultz said "efforts to
block all arms sales to moderate
Arab states, simply because they
have not been perceived as totally
supportive of our efforts in the
peace process, can make that
balanced policy impossible and the
attainment of peace all the more
difficult."
"THIS IS neither in our in-
terest, nor, I would submit, that of
Israel," he continued. "Par-
ticularly at a time when Khadafy
and Khomeini are trying to
radicalize the Arab and Muslim
world, our moderate friends in the
area need our support, not our
rejection."
The lack of Saudi support for
the peace process has been one of
the major objections of members
of Congress to the Saudi sale, as it
was to the sale of arms to Jordan,
which was withdrawn earlier this
year. Whatever the outcome of
the missile sale, the issue will
come up again when the Ad-
ministration will bring before
Congress the certification for the
delivery of the five AW ACS sold
in 1981. Murphy said this would
occur in June or shortly
afterwards.
Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page
Israel Wants Access to More Files
*
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
Israel requested here last
Wednesday access to the files of
hundreds of Nazi war criminals in
the UN archives, an Israeli
spokesman said.
According to the spokesman,
Israel wants to examine the files
of the hundreds of war criminals
who are already on the list of
wanted war criminals as compiled
by Israel's police.
The UN archives contain some
40,000 documents on suspected
Nazi war criminals compiled by
the now-defunct United Nations
War Crimes Commission. The UN
archives are located in a building
at 345 Park Avenue South in
Manhattan.
Israel has already requested
and was given access to the
files of former Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim; Alois Brunner, a
major Nazi war criminal who has
been living in Syria since the end
of World War II; and Hermann
Klenner, vice chairman of the UN
Human Rights Commission in
Geneva and head of the East Ger-
man delegation.
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Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
GIVE HONOR UNTO WHOM HONOR IS DUE
Vum/ay, //<' *. 4986 J2:COjVoon

5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Florida
( 44/ f44114/4 >i 4/ f n/< i/ For Information and Reservations
Jewish National Fund 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353, Miami Beach, Fl. 33139 Tel. 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. May 2, 1986
.


y
UN Chief
Urged To Expel Libya and PLO
New Exploration
Spain's Recognition of Israel
Revives Jewry's Glorious Past
NEW YORK Leaders
of three national Jewish
organizations have called on
UN Secretary-General
Javier Perez de Cuellar to
"expel Libya and the PLO
terrorist group from the
United Nations."
At a news conference on the
steps of the Libyan Mission of the
UN representatives of the Herut
Zionists of America, the Betar
Zionist Youth Movement, and the
Tagar Student Zionist Activist
Organization urged Perez de
Cuellar to follow the recent U.S.
military action against Libya by
mobilizing the "nations of the
world in a united effort to punish
the sponsors of international
terrorism."
IN A LETTER to the
Secretary-General, Hart Hasten,
national president of the Herut
Zionists of America, wrote that
"these continued atrocities
threaten free men, women and
children on every continent." He
joined with leaders of the other
Jewish organizations in asking the
Secretary-General to give his "full
and immediate attention" to "en
Tagar Student Zionist Organization leader Glenn Mones speaks
with reporters on the steps of the Libyan Mission in New York at
a news conference co-sponsored with the Herut Zionists of
America and the Betar Zionists Youth Movement. The Jewish
leaders called upon the United Nations to expel Libya, the PLO
and other sponsors of terrorism.
sure that this cancerous growth
be removed from our globe."
The Jewish leaders jointly prais-
ed the American military action
against Libya as "courageous, im-
portant and bold." But they in-
sisted that to effectively stop in-
ternational terrorism, world
leaders would have to "actively"
cooperate in a united campaign.
'Roll Call'
Seeks Jewish Emigration from Russia
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- More than 100
legislators, as well as Con-
gressional spouses and
leaders of religious, labor
and human rights organiza-
tions, took part in an all-day
"roll call" last week of Jews
seeking to emigrate from
the Soviet Union.
The rotunda of the Cannon
House Office Building here was
bedecked with a photographic ex-
hibit of refuseniks and their
families, as well as some of the
very few remaining synagogues in
the Soviet Union, providing a
poignant backdrop for the
ceremony which was launched by
House Speaker Thomas (Tip)
O'Neill (D., Mass.).
"Tomorrow night, (Wednesday,
Apr. 23), Jews throughout the
world will gather to recite the
traditional phrase 'Next Year in
Jerusalem' as they celebrate
Passover, the Festival of
freedom," O'Neill said in a state-
ment introducing the
10,000-name roll call.
"For Jewish refuseniks in the
Soviet Union these words take on
a significant meaning. As we call
out the names of the 10,000
refuseniks and the number of
years they have waited to
emigrate, we hope to express our
solidarity with those struggling to
be free."
The ceremony was sponsored by
Congressional Wives for Soviet
Jews and supported by the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ) and the Congressional
Coalition for Soviet Jews. The
NCSJ has recently launched a
stepped-up campaign to bring the
Soviet Jewry issue to public atten-
tion in advance of the still
unscheduled second Summit
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
Meanwhile, plans for an official
Congressional ceremony to honor
Anatoly Sharansky were laid
down Monday by O'Neill and
Senate Majority leader Robert
Dole (R., Kans). The two
legislators agreed to co-sponsor a
joint resolution authorizing a
House-Senate ceremony
generally reserved for heads of
state to be held when Sharan-
sky visits here this month from
Israel Sharansky is expected to
meet with President Reagan dur-
ing his visit to the Capitol.
Continued from Page 5-A
style of the Moors who had
formerly reigned in Toledo.
Southward 200 miles is Cor-
doba, famed as the birthplace of
Maimonides and venue of what
has been called the Golden Age of
Spanish Judaism. The city is reso-
nant of that era of Jewish physi-
cians, poets and philosophers
almost 1,000 years ago.
TWO-STORY white houses,
their stucco walls laced with vines
and the tendrils of rose bushes,
line the narrow alleys of what was
once the Juderia, the 11th Cen-
tury Jewish quarter. A contem-
porary sculpture of Maimonides
dominates the little square known
as the Plazuela de Maimonides.
Around the corner, on the Calle de
los Judios, is the tiny synagoga.
the only one of the many in Cor-
doba still extant. It is also a na-
tional monument.
In 1935, the municipal govern-
ment observed the 800th anniver-
sary of Maimonides' birth. In
1985, Cordoba once more marked
a Maimonides anniversary, this
time the 850th. Scholars from
Spain, Israel and the United
States joined in a series of events
which, by their scope and intensi-
ty, signaled the ultimate tribute to
Maimonides which has followed
only a few months later
recognition of the Jewish State.
Still further south, on the Costa
del Sol, is Malaga, metropolis of
the region. There are no longer
any artifacts of the Jewish
presence in the city, but one
native son the medieval poet,
Solomon ibn Gabirol is
memorialized by a bronze statue
in the small park near the central
police station. The work is by an
American, Reed Armstrong, who
is currently living in Spain.
THERE IS a kosher butcher in
Malaga but no kosher restaurant.
by
"seph
are
Sabbath services are let
Moroccan-born Rabbi J,,._
Cohen in the small sanctuary U*
community maintains i'n a
downtown office building near
the waterfront, at Calle Duquesa
de Parcent 4.
Spain's third, and largest, major
community is an hour's plane
flight to the north, in Barcelona,
capital of the province of
Cataluna. Two congregations -
the larger, Sephardic; the smaller,
Ashkenazic harmoniously share
a modern, five-story building
(erected in 1954) at Calle Porvenir
24, near the Plaza de Gala Placidia
(Metro Station, Gracia). By far the
larger group, the Sephardim have
their sanctuary on the street-level
floor; the Ashkenazim
usptairs on the third floor.
There is a kosher butcher on
Calle Porvenir, close to the
synagogue, but no kosher
restaurant. There is a vegetarian
restaurant at Calle Canud 41
(Metro Station, Cataluna).
Barcelona was the seat of one of
the oldest Jewish communities in
Spain. There are only scattered
remnants: to the west of the city is
Montjuich (Catalan for the
"Mountain of the Jews"), the site
of Jewish-owned land and
cemeteries dating from the 10th
Century; in the Gothic Quarter,
around the main cathedral, is the
cluster of narrow, cobblestoned
streets of the old Jewish quarter.
ONE IS designated "Carrer de
Call" Catalan for "Street of the
Kehillah." In the same area of the
city is its municipal museum, in-
cluding a permanent exhibit of an-
cient tombstones from Montjuich.
Little else remains.
As elsewhere in Spain, the ex-
pulsion of 1492 aborted Jewish
history. Recent events, and most
especially recognition of Israel,
augur well for a sustained
resumption.



CELEBRATE




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Day at the |
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| Sunday, May 18,1986 at 11:30 A.M. |















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Lots of Food Fun Entertainment
Door Prizes Will Be Awarded
Make checks payable to: ISRAEL HISTADRUT FOUNDATION
420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Suite 389
Tel: 531-8702 (Dade)
462-5740 (Broward)
Couvert Mort Goldberg
$10.00 per person Executive Director
#









Role Denied
Israel Played No Part in Arms Sale
Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Tunis Raid Encouraged U.S.
Continued from Page 1-A
Eisenberg. 55, and a man who
mav be Israeli, identified only as
Hebroni. Others seized or wanted
on charges by Federal Prosecutor
Rudolph Giuliani are of U.S.,
British. French, West German
and Greek nationality.
Giuliani, the Chief U.S. Pro-
secutor for New York, said,
however, that there is "no sugges-
tion of involvement by the Israeli
government" in the aborted arms
deal which he described as mind-
boggling in scope."
The U.S. State Department had
no immediate comment. But a
spokesman for the Israel Embassy
in Washington stated flatly that
"the government of Israel has no
connection or involvement with
this matter.' He described Baram
as long retired from the IDF.
MENAHEM MERON. director
general of the Defense Ministry,
called in the U.S. Charge d'Af-
faires after what he called an in-
tensive investigation. He inform-
ed the American official that no
link, direct or indirect, could be
found suggesting that Israel was
involved in the alleged plot.
According to Giuliani and U.S.
Customs officials, the accused
men conspired to sell Iran several
hundred F-4 and F-5 jet fighters,
15,000 TOW air-to-air missiles
and scores of tanks as well as
helicopters, long-range artillery
and C-130 military transport
planes. They said the weapons
were to be delivered in Greek
ships and were presently stored in
Israel and several other countries.
The implication that the plot in-
volved the sale by Israel of combat
aircraft and other weapons it ac-
quired from the U.S. was describ-
ed as "ludicrous" by well inform-
ed sources here. The sources
noted that the U.S. knows exactly
how many American-built aircraft
are in Israel's possession and
about any that might be removed
from the Israel Air Force order of
battle. Moreover, Israel does not
sell F-4s, has no F-5s and does not
sell TOW missiles.
EVEN IF Israel had sought to
sell weapons to Iran, a country it
regards as one of its most
fanatical foes, it would hardly do
so in the U.S., through an IDF
reserves general, the sources said.
Israel has admitted selling Iran
spare parts prior to the overthrow
of the Shah in 1979, and did so ap-
parently with the knowledge and
approval of the U.S.
Israel Radio described Gen.
Baram as a twice-decorated of-
ficer cited for bravery. But he
retired under a cloud for allegedly
giving unauthorized weapons to
civilians.
Last year, Baram received per-
mission from the Defense
Ministry to act as a private consul-
tant on military supplies and
know-how. But he was precluded
from dealing in arms or even
negotiating arms deals without
special permission.
Baram's arrest focused atten-
tion on the problem of senior IDF
officers who have become arms
dealers after retiring from active
service. There is no legal way for
Israel to control their activities
abroad even if they sully the coun-
U.S. Rabbis Get Involved
In 'Refugee' Sanctuary Movement
Continued from Page 1-A
ing that Central American
refugees be granted "extended
voluntary departure" status,
which would give them the right
to live and work in the United
States until it is safe to return to
their homelands. The NJA noted
that similar status has been ex-
tended to refugees from many
countries, including Poland and
Afghanistan.
Until recently, the sanctuary
movement had been primarily bas-
ed in the Catholic Church and
among Protestant denominations,
out the organized .lewish com-
munity has become more involved
with th<' issue.
. THi: PRINCIPLE of sanctuary
|"r Central American refugees
endorsed bj the 'nionof
American Hebrew Congregations
(Reform), the Rabbinical
Assembly of America (Conser-
Wive). the Reconstructionist
wbbinical Assoration. and the
'entral Conference of American
Kabbis (Reform).
All together, about 270 Jewish,
>testant and Catholic congrega-
tions around the country offer
sanctuary to Central Americans,
a" m defiance of U.S. government
N'cy. Temple Emanu-EI, Rabbi
w.eizenbaum's synagogue, is one
> more than 20 Jewish congrega-
tions and organizations to offer
sanctuary and pledge support to
entral American refugees.
Albert Vorspan, senior vice
President of the Union of
(l"Iu^an Hebrew Congregations
W AHC) and director of its social
a<-tion committee, also addressed
refugees was overwhelmingly en-
dorsed by some 3,000 delegates
from across the country and
Canada at the UAHC's biennial
general assembly last November
in Los Angeles. "The people are
behind us and ready to take ac-
tion," he said.
The UAHC resolution called on
its 791 synagogues to furnish
material and financial aid to Cen-
tral American refugees and to join
legal efforts to overturn the Ad-
ministration's policy of deporting
them. The resolution urged its
member synagogues to do this
despite ''serious legal
implications."
The 58-year-old Weizenbaum
was asked how he responds to
people who ask about the illegal
nature of the sanctuary move-
ment, risking arrest and possible
jail sentences for their activities.
lie said he would ask those people
to pretend it is 1942 and it is a
Christian family seeking to (rive
sanctuary to a Jewish family dur-
ing the Holocaust.
"If you as a Jew can look me in
the eye and tell me you would ad-
vise the Christian family to not
give sanctuary to a Jewish family
during the war because it was il-
legal," he said, then he could not
argue with that person. But, he
added. "It is. an ethical decision."
ie sanctuary issue at the Stephen
th
u- j <* uv wax. wwinrou
isc Synagogue. He emphasized
;nat the Jewish community is
nenind us" in support of the
"aictuacy movement.
, fOW>ING TO Vorspan, the
Aitt resolution in support of
nctuarj to Central American
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try's reputation.
THE NUMBER of officers
engaged in these activities has in-
creased of late because they have
had difficulty finding suitable
civilian jobs. If they are unable to
obtain licenses in Israel to deal in
weapons, they become middlemen
abroad, sources here said.
If Baram and the others ar-
rested are found guilty of the
charges, each faces a maximum
prison term of five years and a
fine of $250,000. The U.S. has em-
bargoed arms sales to Iran since
the seizure of hostages at the
American Embassy in Tehran in
November, 1979. Even if no em-
bargo exists, the State Depart-
ment must approve arms sales to
a foreign country.
Iran, engaged for nearly six
years in a war with Iraq, is known
to be paying premium prices in
cash for weapons of all types.
Sources in the U.S. speculated
that the alleged conspirators may
have been playing a confidence
game with Iran to obtain cash for
weapons they did not possess and
could not deliver.
IvlROWARD
Qaper &
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TEL AVIV -(JTA)-Thel S
air strike against Libya on Apr. 14
was influenced by the success of
the Israel Air Force long-range
bombing attack last year on
Palestine Liberation Organization
headquarters in Tunisia, accor-
ding to Air Force commander
Maj. Gen. Amos Lapidot.
In an interview in the Israel Air
Force Journal, published recently,
Lapidot stressed that terrorism
will escalate as long as sovereign
nations do not take matters into
their own hands and act much
more vigorously against terrorist
organizations.
"As long as passive action is us-
ed against them security
checks, searches of passengers'
luggage at airports the ter-
rorists are risking very little, the
failure of only one operation,"
Lapidot said. In his opinion, such
measures are not sufficient to
deter them.
The Air Force Journal noted
that the Israel Air Force has been
taking a more active role against
terrorism of late. It disclosed for
the first time that Cobra attack
helicopters were used to silence a
terrorist position that had fired on
an Israel Defense Force unit trap-
ped in a wadi near Safira village in
south Lebanon. As a result, eight
terrorists were killed and the IDF
men were extricated.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986
Abba Eban (right), former Foreign Minister of Israel, will speak
at a memorial service honoring the memory of the six million
Jews who perished in Nazi hands to be held in New York's Felt
Forum Sunday, May. 4. Harry Walker (left) is chairman of the
program advisory committee for the event. Benjamin Meed, presi-
dent of the Warsaw Ghetto Resistance Organization, says that
other speakers include Benjamin Netanyahu, permanent
representative of Israel to the UN.
Kirchschlaeger Says Waldheim
Not Linked to Deportations
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) -
President Rudolf Kir-
chschlaeger said last week
that while Kurt Waldheim
must have been aware of the
German campaign against
Yugoslav partisans during
World War II, he found no
connection between
Waldheim and the deporta-
tion of Greek Jews from
Salonika.
The Austrian President, in a
20-minute speech to the nation
broadcast over national television,
said that his review of documents
from the United Nations archives
and the World Jewish Congress
on Waldheim's war-time activities
led him to the conclusion that "If I
Habash Gang
Fingered
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Members of a terrorist gang con-
nected to George Habash's
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine (PFLP) were respon-
sible for the kidnap murder of an
Israeli soldier, Moshe Tamam,
who has been missing since
August, 1984, Israeli Defense
Force sources announced.
The round-up of the gang in re-
cent days apparently solved the
two-year-old mystery, the IDF
said, though the investigation is
continuing.
would act as a public prosecutor, I
would not dare to lay down an in-
dictment on those documents."
Kirchschlaeger, at the same
time, also expressed his concern
about an unleashing of a wave of
anti-Semitism in Austria. Saying
that the tension caused by the
media's reportage of the allega-
tions against Waldheim had led
Austrians to interpret the
coverage as a meddling in
Austrian affairs, he appealed to
all Austrians and especially to
those holding political office to
calm such sentiments.
"Anti-Jewish sentiments never
did any good in our history," he
declared. "And besides that, they
are deeply inhumane."
Waldheim, the conservative
Peoples Party candidate in next
week's presidential election, said
that now the campaign against
him had finally collapsed. He said
that with the President's
statements, "all accusations
against me have collapsed, and I
hope that now, in the last phase of
the election campaign, we can
concentrate constructively on the
real problems."
Kirchschlaeger said the charges
against Waldheim were full of
questions and that the key witness
against him in the Yugoslav
documents prove his own position
charging other German soldiers."
In addition, the President said a
notable question involved why the
Yugoslav authorities, neither in
the past nor today, tried to pro-
secute Waldheim, die former UN
Secretary General, or demand his
extradition from Austria.
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U.S. Won't Seek Arafat Arrest
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Justice Department
has notified Congress that it
will not seek the prosecution
of PLO chief Yasir Arafat
for being implicated in the
murders of two American
diplomats in Sudan in 1973.
Maintaining that laws enacted
over the last decade for pro-
secuting suspects in the murders
of Americans abroad could not be
applied retroactively, Assistant
Attorney General John Bolton in-
formed Congress that no arrest
warrant would be issued.
A LETTER signed by 44
Senators last February called on
Attorney General Edwin Meese to
investigate allegations that
Arafat directed the killings of
U.S. Ambassador in Khartoum
Cleo Noel and Charge d'Affaires
Curtis Moore on May 2, 1973.
Sens. Frank Lautenberg (D.,
N.J.) and Charles Grassley (R.,
Iowa), the two who initiated the
letter, subsequently sent Meese a
declassified 1975 study conducted
for the Defense Advanced
Research Projects Agency, which
asserts that the murders were
"approved by Yasir Arafat."
Also pressing for an investiga-
tion into the alleged role of Arafat
have been the Heritage Founda-
tion, a conservative think-tank,
and the National Jewish Coalition.
In the Justice Deparment's let-
ter to Congress, Assistant At-
torney General John Bolton main-
tained that the U.S. lacked legal
jurisdiction and sufficient
evidence to seek Arafat's prosecu-
tion for the two murders. He said
that retroactively applying a 1976
law on prosecuting suspects in
terrorist kilings overseas would
violate the Constitution.
IN VIEW of the lack of jurisdic-
tion, Bolton said, "undertaking an
exhaustive global search for addi-
tional detailed evidence of
Arafat's complicity in the 1973
murders would divert precious in-
vestigative resources which we
must devote to locating and ap-
prehending those responsible for
terrorist attacks in cases where
we do have jurisdiction."
Among the cases he noted were
the hijacking of TWA airliner 847
in June 1985, in which an
American Navy diver was killed,
and last October's hijacking of the
Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro,
in which an elderly American Jew,
Leon Klinghoffer, was murdered.
Saying he was "extremely disap-
pointed" at the decision not to
seek prosecution, Lautenberg
maintained in a statement that "a
strong argument could be made
that the department had jurisdic-
tion to go after Arafat if it had the
political will." He called the
Justice Department's failure to
conduct an exhaustive investiea
tion "inexcusable."
A staff member in Lautenberg'^
office said the Senator would pur-
sue other legal avenues for
Arafat's prosecution, possibly in-
cluding the application of a
broadly-written racketeering law-
enacted in 1970 and recently used
to prosecute members in
Washigton State, for an array of
violent crimes, including the
murder of a Jewish radio an-
nouncer, Alan Berg, in Denver.
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Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Likud Refugees Form Party
Yom Hashoa
Community Observance Here Tuesday
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Liberal Center, a new political
party concerned with the pro-
blems of middle class Israelis and
supportive of compromise for
peace, was officially launched by
disaffected former members of
the Liberal Party wing of Likud.
The Liberal Center is headed by
Tel Aviv Mayor Shlomo Lehat;
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives; Yit-
zhak Berman, a former Cabinet
Minister and Knesset Speaker;
and Yehezkel Harmelech. They
outlined their political credo at a
press conference here. Dulzin said
the new party would demand its
share of Liberal Party funds and
property and would go to court if
necessary to obtain them.
THE NEW party was formed,
its founders said, because of the
Liberal Party's drift toward
merger with the rightwing Herat,
its Likud partner. Lehat said it
would speak for a constituency
made up of middle class wage-
earners and private en-
trepreneurs. Its domestic pro-
gram will call for reductions in the
size and budgets of the national
and local governments, and lower
taxes, particularly income tax.
On foreign policy, Lehat said,
"We are a party which believes in
compromises and we are ready to
negotiate to try to achieve peace."
The party also supports religious
pluralism. "We believe that all the
different lines and streams in
Judaism are equal," he said. "We
believe that for the future benefit
of Israel we should have an
(American-style) Presidential
government," Lehat added. Ask-
ed which way the new party would
go if it held the balance of power
between Labor and Likud, Lehat
replied, "Today, in the present
political reality, I believe the
Labor Alignment."
Continued from Page 1-A
Memorial Center.
Keynote speaker Michel is ex-
ecutive vice president and cam-
paign director of the United
Jewish Appeal/Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies in New
York City. He was honored with
an invitation to attend the historic
signing of the Egyptian-Israeli
peace treaty in 1979.
Michel also serves on the Ad-
visory Committee of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council.
AS PART of Holocaust
Awareness Week, the Southeast
Memorial Center is sponsoring a
two-day symposium. The sym-
posium will take place at the
Florida International University
Bay Vista Campus in the Trade
Center Building, Rooms 333A and
333B, on Wednesday and Thurs-
day, May 7 and 8.
On May 7, students throughout
Dade County in 10th, 11th and
12th grades will gather to learn
more about the Holocaust and
then explore the issue of prejudice
in the world today.
An adult symposium on Thurs-
day will feature speakers, in-
cluding Dade County Commis-
sioner Barry Schreiber; Arthur
Teitelbaum, Florida director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith; and Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, executive director of the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami.
Rositta Kenigsberg, executive
vice president of the Children of
Holocaust Survivors, said that
"Our goal is to educate all people,
Memorial to Nazis Draws Ire
VIENNA (JTA) A
memorial tablet and a street name
honoring Austrian Nazis has
drawn the ire of the Yugoslavian
government and triggered a
dispute in the city of Linz. The
two altercations are unrelated
but, according to one Vienna
newspaper, they show a lack of
sensitivity in dealing with the
past.
The memorial tablet, at the
Austrian Military Academy in
Wiener Neustadt, honors Maj.
Gen. Alexander Loehr, recognized
as the founder of the Austrian Air
Force in 1935. In 1941, he gave
orders to bomb Belgrade,
resulting in the deaths of
thousands of civilians. He was ex-
ecuted as a war criminal in
Yugoslavia in 1947.
DEFENSE MINISTER
Friedhelm Frischenschlager has
refused orders to have the tablet
removed. He claims it honors
Loehr as the father of the
Austrian Air Force, not his war-
time activities, and was, in any
event, donated by a private
organization.
young and old, to the atrocities of
the Holocaust so that our future
generations will not suffer as they
did."
ALSO SCHEDULED locally is
a Holocaust Day Memorial Ser-
vice and program on Monday,
May 5, 7:15 p.m., at Temple
Samu-El. The event is co-
sponsored by Temple Samu-El,
Congregation Bet Breira and
South Dade Midrasha.
Guest speaker will be John Lof-
tus, author of "The Belarus
Secret," who will discuss the pro-
tection provided by the United
States State Department to Nazis
after World War II.
In 1977, Loftus was invited to
join the Justice Department as a
member of the Attorney General's
Honors Program and for two
years worked on cases in the
Federal Appellate courts and in
the Supreme Court of the United
States.
After President Carter created
the Office of Special Investiga-
tions in 1979, Loftus coordinated
a top secret inquiry into Nazi
recruitment by U.S. intelligence
agencies.
(Wmnf(F$m
TERRY DRUCKER
Working toward a caring community.
Terry Drucker knows that our Jewish com-
munity is growing because she cares
enough to ask others to give to the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
salutes Terry for her dedication and her
commitment to the fact that we are:
One People with One Destiny.
O
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami. FL 33137 576-4000
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MOSHE DAYAN: art attracted flak.
Israel Museum Buys
Dayan's Art Collection
By London Chronicle Syndicate
The Israel Museum has purchased the archaeological col-
lection of the late Moshe Day an from his widow, Rachel, for
$1 million and has put on display 600 of the 1,000 artifacts.
Dayan's action in collecting these treasures was a subject of great
criticism during his lifetime. His opponents alleged that he was break-
ing the Antiquities Law, which forbids private excavations, although it
may be permissible to retain small objects found on the surface of the
ground.
A COMPLAINT against Dayan was lodged by one of his critics, but
the state attorney of the day declined to prosecute. To add to his pro-
blems, Dayan suffered a severe back injury when there was a landslide
at a site he was excavating.
Most of the objects in the collection are from the earlier ar-
chaeological periods, which were Dayan's main interests the Bronze
(Canaanite) and Iron (Israelite) Ages.
But the collection also includes a 9,000-year-old Neolithic mask carv-
ed from limestone found near Hebron; a menorah relief from a Jewish
tomb of the late Roman period; Byzantine gravestones: funerary ob-
jects; clay vessels and figurines.
CONTROVERSY about Israel's great soldier-statesman and his finds
did not end with his death. His daughter, Yael, launched a savage attack
on his widow Rachel in a recent book, because, she alleged, Rachel had
"persuaded" her husband to disinherit her and her two brothers.
Mrs. Dayan replied that her late husband had made the gift of the an-
tiquities to her during his lifetime in a notarized deed.
The Israel Museum stresses that the $1 million was contributed by a
New York donor and four Israelis, and did not come from its normal
funds.
Zionists Pledge Aliya
In Specified Time
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Magshimim (Zionist Fulfillment),
a world-wide movement of
Zionists who commit themselves
to aliya within a specific time,
recently concluded its first con-
ference here and, according to its
founder, Leon Dulzin, it should
double and even triple the flow of
aliya over the next few years.
Dulzin, who is chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that he sees Magshimim as part of
the "Herzliya process" which
perceives Zionism not only as a
national liberation movement but
as one whose mission is to
preserve the national existence of
the Jewish people. According to
Magshimim's ideology, that can
only be done in Israel.
Dulzin said the movement's
platform will be presented at the
Zionist General Council meeting
here in June and he will propose
that Magshimim be made an in-
tegral part of the WZO. "I hope
this will inject into the Zionist
movement a dynamic and active
element of fulfillment," Dulzin
said. He noted that the number of
olim from the free world has not
exceeded 10,000 a year in recent
years and he hopes that number
will at least double.
The Magshimim platform states
that Aliya is the supreme expres-
sion of Jewish identification; the
fulfillment of Jewish identity is
expressed through aliya as the
persona] commitment of every
Zionist to come on aliya to Israel;
Jewish existence is guaranteed,
both spiritually and physically, on-
ly in the State of Israel and only
there is Jewish creativity renew-
ed; the ingathering of the Jewish
people in its now land and the con-
sequent fulfillment of Judaism's
values is a central goal in formal
and informal Jewish education;
the essence of Zionist fulfillment
is aliya to Eretz Israel and
devoting oneself to the needs of
society and State.
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Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Reaching Out to Other Jews
Called 'Highest Priority'
Hershel D. Rephun, a resident of Miami
Beach, and a student at Yeshiva University in
New York City plays the composer, Mozart, in
the Yeshiva College Dramatics Society produc-
tion of Amadeus.' Yeshiva College is the
men's undergraduate, liberal arts and
sciences division of the university. Rephun,
son of Josh and Claire Rephun, is a junior
majoring in speech and drama at the college.
He also takes Jewish studies courses at the
university's Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic
Studies, one of three Jewish studies divisions
of men at the university.
Bookcase
Autobiography of An Art Collector
By MORTON I. TEICHER
In Many Worlds. By Jacob M.
Alkow. New York: Shengold
Publishers, 1985. 240 pp.
$13.95.
The author of this interesting
autobiography is a remarkable,
83-year-old man who now lives in
a lovely house in Herzlia, Israel,
surrounded by his magnificent col-
lection of paintings, sculpture and
Judaica.
Starting in Lithuania, Alkow
has indeed lived "in many
worlds." Not only has he worked
in different countries, but his
"worlds" include a variety of
careers, ranging from the rab-
binate to films, to television to
business and to finance. He im-
migrated to New York as a
youngster and, although he calls it
a "jungle," he found great
stimulation in the public library
and the Metropolitan Museum of
Art.
ALKOW STUDIED at the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
where he was greatly influenced
by Mordecai Kaplan. Before com-
pleting work for his degree and
ordination, he became ill with
what his parents feared was
tuberculosis. He was sent to his
brother and sister in Los Angeles
where he recovered his health and
completed his studies.
He then spent three years as
head of a Hebrew school and com-
munity center in the Boyle
Heights section of Los Angeles.
This was followed by a year's
work with Cecil B. DeMille as
historical advisor in connection
with the production of King of
Kings. Alkow tells fascinating
stories about the Jews involved in
making this film, including
himself, who were later roundly
criticized for having participated
m producing a film which was con-
sidered unfriendly to the Jews.
jt is not clear whether it was
us criticism or the Holy Land
setting of the film which reminded
Alkow of his Zionist interests but,
in any event, when the film was
one, he decided to go to
Palestine.
ALKOW ARRIVED in
^alestine in 1929, and almost im-
mediately was plunged into
"aganah activities. His adven-
wes ended when he learned of
"ie stock market crash in 1929
whwh left him with just about
[nough money to return to the
1 n'tPd States.
!" the United States, Alkow
e, on a speaking tour for the
Zionist Organization and then had
a series of odd jobs before he final-
ly became the rabbi of a temple in
San Bernardino, Calif. During his
period there, he married and was
active in a variety of community
affairs. In 1936, he made an ex-
tensive trip to Europe, Egypt and
Palestine, at the end of which he
decided to leave his work as a con-
gregational rabbi.
He accepted a position that en-
tailed responsibility for develop-
ing a market for oranges in the
Orient with Shanghai as his head-
quarters. He lived through the
Japanese bombing and occupation
of Shanghai, remaining there until
early 1941. While in the Orient,
Alkow collected Chinese, Korean
and Japanese art. He established
associations with dealers that
enabled him to open a gallery for
the sale of Oriental art when he
returned to California.
HOWEVER, with the bombing
of Pearl Harbor, supplies dried
up, and the business came to an
end. Alkow went back to work for
the community center in Boyle
Heights which broadened its con-
cerns to include services for
military personnel. Alkow held
this job for most of World War II.
In February, 1945, he became the
director of the American Zionist
Emergency Council. This meant
moving to New York where
Alkow worked with Stephen Wise
and other dignitaries in Jewish
life.
In 1946, Alkow returned to Los
Angeles to become a television
film producer. His successful pro-
ductions included programs with
Jackie Gleason and Groucho
Marx. During the ensuing seven
years while Alkow was apparently
earning a good deal of money, he
kept up his interest in Zionism and
in collecting art.
His attachment to Israel led him
to accept a position in 1953 as the
director of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America House in Tel
Aviv. He ran this program for
three years and then moved to
New York where he joined a Wall
Street investment firm. Before
long, the firm became Alkow and
Co., and for eight years, he suc-
ceeded in making a financial suc-
cess. This period came to an end
when his wife became ill and
Alkow decided to move to Los
Angeles in order to provide a bet-
ter climate for her. After a year,
she died. Alkow remarried and
made up his mind to start life
anew in Israel. He produced a film
in Israel which was a financial
failure but which eventually
received artistic recognition.
ALKOW'S investments both in
the United States and Israel
enable him to live very comfor-
tably. He is a gracious and engag-
ing host with the manner of a
sophisticated individual who has
benefitted from his varied ex-
periences but who has never lost
sight of his Jewish identity and
Zionist commitment. He main-
tains his deep appreciation of the
Hebrew language, literature and
fine arts. Alkow has a special con-
nection to Miami through his
nephew, Dr. Jeremiah Unter-
mann, who is the head of the
Jewish Studies Program at Barry
University.
The book is written in a simple,
straightforward style. It is easy to
read and provides a useful record
of one man's journey from
Lithuania to Israel with many ex-
citing and interesting detours that
have placed the author "in many
worlds."
Continued from Page 4-A
ingly assuming a role in pointing
out injustices in society, not unlike
the ancient Hebrew prophets," he
said.
UNDER THE sponsorship of
the National Confernce of
Brazilian Bishops, Sobel coor-
dinates a National Commission of
Jews and Catholics, comprised of
four Liberal rabbis, one Liberal
lay leader, one Bishop, three
Catholic spokesmen for social
reform, and one Catholic
specialist on Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions. Meeting on a monthly basis,
the group takes positions on
issues of national and interna-
tional concern. The Confederacao
Israelite do Brasil is consulted on
an informal basis.
The Catholic-Jewish group this
month published a 150-page
guidebook entitled "Israel: Peo-
ple, Land and Faith," which will
be distributed in all of the coun-
try's Catholic schools. Sobel said
that most Catholic children attend
parochial schools, and that the six
Jewish schools in Sao Paulo and
two in Rio serve moat of the
Jewish students in the country. At
least a third of Brazil's population
is at a bare subsistence level, and
has been left out of the country's
"development."
In November, 1985, Sao Paulo
was the site of the first Pan-
American Conference on Catholic-
Jewish Relations. Sobel said that
the Orthodox Jewish community
tried to "sabotage" the con-
ference, because Cardinal Jean-
Marie Lustiger, Archbishop of
Paris and a former Jew, was
keynote speaker.
THE CONFERENCE was,
nevertheless, a success, Sobel
said. One significant result was
the marking of the 10th anniver-
sary of the infamous United Na-
tions "Zionism is racism" resolu-
tion with an official resolution
signed by all of Brazil's bishops
stating that "Zionism is not
racism."
Asked about anti-Semitism in
Brazil, Sobel said that "overt
manifestations are only sporadic,
and the few that occur are fed by a
'pragmatic' anti-Israel govern-
ment policy." One reason for this
policy is Brazil's mounting inter-
national debt of $110 billion, and
the country's need for Arab oil
and petrodollars, Sobel said. But
he emphasized that "our most
urgent task in Latin America to-
day is not to obliterate anti-
Semitic trends, but to rediscover
and redefine what it means to be a
Jew."
Sobel's congregation was found-
ed by German immigrants in 1936
and still follows the German
Liberal traditions of separate
seating for men and women, with
an organ and mixed choir. Sobel
has headed the congregation since
his ordination from Hebrew Union
College 17 years ago.
In a sense, Sobel's decision to
live in Brazil is a return to his
"roots." The son of Belgian Jews
who fled the Nazis in 1939, Sobel
was born in Lisbon, Portugal in
1944. Portuguese could thus be
considered his "native" tongue.
But his family immigrated to the
United States from Lisbon when
he was yet too young to talk.
AIDS Fears
Spur Tests
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
Magen David Adorn, Israel's
equivalent of the Red Cross, will
test every unit of blood donated in
Israel for the AIDS (Acquired Im-
mune Deficiency Syndrome) anti-
bodies to determine if the donor
has the AIDS virus, the MDA an-
nounced last Tuesday.
Dr. Shulamit Bar Shany, direc-
tor of the MDA's Blood Bank in
Jaffa, said there are roughly the
same percentage of AIDS victims
in Israel as in Western European
countries, but substantially fewer
than in the U.S.
According to the MDA, the new
testing program brings Israel in
line with most other Western
countries in the struggle against
the fatal disease. It will be under-
taken by the MDA's Blood Ser-
vices, which collects more than 80
percent of the blood donated in
Israel. This amounts to some
180,000 pints per year, which are
supplied to all hospitals and to the
Israel Defense Force.
The testing instrumentation has
been acquired in the U.S. by the
American Red Magen David for
Israel. The MDA Blood Services
here, meanwhile, has assembled a
skilled laboratory staff.
oooooooa
Create Land From Sand


DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!


Specter of Appeasement
Raised by European Failure To Face Terrorism
NEW YORK Mayor
Edward I. Koch of New
York City fears that the
failure 01 many European
nations to assume a firm
stand against terrorists
raises the specters of ap-
peasement that these same
nations practiced prior to
the rise of Adolf Hitler.
Koch told a meeting of the In-
ternational Association of Jewish
Lawyers and Jurists and the
Synagogue Council of America
that he firmly supported the
Reagan action against Libya, and
when he asked the lawyers and
synagogue leaders to show their
support for or against the bomb-
ing attack, 150 said yes and 5 no.
KOCH SAID that European na-
tions should take a lesson from the
State of Israel which has for years
taken a strong stand against ter-
rorists. "Think of what would hap-
pen if Israel would not strike back
against an act of terrorism. Those
who tried have learned a lesson
that you can't hide from the
Israelis; no matter where you are,
they'll find you." He added, "This
is not an eye-for-an-eye retribu-
tion, but action which serves as a
deterrent."
Koch
session
terrori
Jewish
leaders
thodox
During
many
addressed the luncheon
of a two-day meeting on
sm bringing together
lawyers, rabbis and lay
from Conservative, Or-
and Reform synagogues,
the meetings, experts in
fields covered various
Mayor Edward Koch
aspects on the problem of
terrorism.
Prof. Yonah Alexander, direc-
tor of the Institute for Studies on
International Terrorism for the
State University of New york, im-
plored those present to raise the
consciousness of the American
people and others in Western na-
tions to the evils of terrorism
today.
OTHERWISE, Dr. Alexander
said, "we will remain in the hands
of these blackmailers for many
years to come." He offered 10
areas that should be considered to
combat terrorism:
Governments must make
fighting terrorism a priority;
Increase their prevention
mechanisms;
Legal cases against terrorists
must be stepped up, such as ac-
tions against Yasir Arafat and the
PLO for the assassination of the
U.S. Ambassador in the Sudan;
Intelligence-gathering units
should be strengthened;
Domestic and international
law enforcement agencies should
receive increased budgets and
support from the public;
Political communications
among nations should be
increased;
The U.S. and other Western
nations should consider refusing
study permits to young people of
those countries such as Libya who
are the direct perpetrators of
terrorism;
Economic sanctions among
nations that support terrorism
should be considered;
Military units against ter-
rorism should be kept on a cons-
tant alert;
The media should help to
make the general public aware of
the problems concerning
terrorism.
ANOTHER SPEAKER.
Thomas Sheer, deputy assistant
director of the FBI in New York,
said that his agency had expanded
their anti-terrorist forces tremen-
dously in the last several years, in-
cluding the maintenance at the
present time of a 50 agent hostage
rescue team that has been special-
ly trained for this task.
Sheer acknowledged that Israel
and some other Western
democracies were helping to pro-
vide important information to
united States law enforcement
agencies that assist in combatting
terrorist activities. He said that
the most important thing that
could be done was to create "an
awareness of the problem among
the average citizen as to what
represents terrorist activities."
Yoram Dinstein, professor of
International Law and Human
Rights at Tel Aviv University, ex-
pressed the hope that the United
Nations General Assembly might
finally be ready to produce inter-
national treaties that could help to
stamp out terrorism.
DR. DINSTEIN said that the
resolution adopted by the UN this
year, stating "that terrorist acts
are criminal" represented a
watershed for the international
body. He stated that at the pre-
sent time international laws exist
covering hijacking, sabotage, the
taking of hostages, torture, at-
tacks against heads of states or
diplomats, and the unlawful
seizure of nuclear materials.
As an example, he cited the case
of Abu Abas who was able to
escape through four different
countries without the United
States having the possibility of br-
inging him to the U.S. for trial for
the murder of Leon Klinghoffer.
In a far reaching discussion on
Jewish law and terrorism, Dr.
David Novak, associate professor
of Philosophy at Baruch College,
and Dr. Sol Roth, professor of
Philosophy at Yeshiva University
indicated that Jewish law on self
defense and the rights of in.
dmduate and nations to protect
themselves can certainly be ao-
plied to acts of terrorism. As a
matter of fact, in many cases
both scholars indicated, preemp-
tive strikes are permissible when
such actions would prevent ter-
rorist attack.
In addition to the International
Association of Jewish Lawyers
and Jurists and the Synagogue
Council of America, other spon-
sors of the Conference were the
Leon and Marilyn Klinghoffer
Foundation, the American Judges
Association (New York Section)
Brandeis Association and Cardozo
School of Law.
Arab Names
Released
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Haifa magistrates court has decid-
ed to release the identities of 10
Israeli Arabs suspected of com,
phcity in the kidnap murder of an
Israeli soldier. Moshe Tamam. a
year ago. The information had
been classified.
Four of the suspects believed to
have been directly involved in the
crime are residents of Baka Al-
Gharbiya, a large Arab village
near Hadera. They are allegedly
members of George Habash's
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine, recruited in Cyprus
by the terrorist organization and
trained in Syria.
Officials here stressed that the
case is exceptional and does not
reflect on the loyalty of the large
majority of Israeli Arabs. Accor-
ding to these officials, there have
been relatively few cases of ter-
rorism involving Israel's Arab
citizens.
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Panic Studied
Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Flondian Page 15-A
Financial Institutions Flinch At Critical Eye
Continued from Page 1-A
change management and the
securities authority to implement
them. The committee warned
arainst rushing to adopt legisla-
tion that would give the banks im-
munity to legal action.
PREMIER Shimon Peres is
known to have consulted with
financial and legal authorities,
after seeing the commission
report, on the need for special
regulations to prevent a flood of
private lawsuits against the banks
bv customers who may claim, on
the hasis of the report, that they
were defrauded.
But State Comptroller Yitzhak
Tunik recommended strongly
against immunity for the banks.
He told the Knesset committee
that it would be improper to
revoke the basic right of citizens
to go to court. Tunik was respon-
ding to a proposal by Energy
Minister Moshe Shahal to enact
protective legislation to preserve
the stability of the banking
intern.
Finance Minsiter Moshe Nissim,
who took over the Treasury in a
Cabinet portfolio switch with Yit-
zhak Modai, said that the banking
system was not in danger as a
result of the Beisky commission
report. He said he would appoint a
team of experts from the Finance
and Justice Ministries to study the
report and draw practical conclu-
sions. Nissim had been Justice
Minister until two weeks ago,
when he replaced Modai as
Finance Minister.
MINISTER of Economy Gad
Yaacobi said that confidence in
the stability of the banks should be
maintained. He noted that the
commission's report referred to
events that occurred in 1983.
Justice Beisky said that the full
record of the commission's hear-
ing comprising thousands of pages
of testimony would be made
available to the Attorney General
to institute criminal proceedings
against individuals if he deems it
necessary.
Pope Paul Says Visit To Synagogue
Was 'Deep' Experience
ROME (JTA) Pope John Paul II described his visit
to Rome's main synagogue on April 13 as a "very deep" ex-
perience, "especially from a religious point of view."
IN A TELEVISION interview, the Pontiff, the first
Pope in history to enter a Jewish house of worship, said, "It
was a deep emotional experience to enter that place which
at least ideally, bring us back to the times of St. Peter and
the first Christians."
He said the visit "was made possible by the Second
Vatican Council" more than 20 years ago and by its famous
declaration, "Nostra Aetate" (Our Times), in which the
Catholic Church repudiated Jewish guilt for the death of
Jesus.
The commission's report severe-
ly criticized two former Finance
Ministers Yoram Aridor and
Yigael Horowitz both of whom
held the office in the Likud-led
government before the crash.
According to the report, they
knew the banks were grossly in-
flating the value of their shares
sold on the Stock Exchange but
did nothing to halt the practice.
The leaders of the Stock Ex-
change were also taken to task for
failing to heed warnings of an im-
minent collapse.
Among the banks cited in the
report, Bank Hapoalim has pro-
mised "cooperation." The chair-
man of its Board, Giora Gazit,
resigned and asked that he not be
named to any other office at the
bank.
AHARON MEIR. managing
director of the Bank Hamizrachi,
critiziced the harsh nature of the
report and denied its accusations
against him. He stressed he was
speaking for himself, not his bank.
Ernest Japhet, board chairman
of Bank Leumi, declined comment
as did the heads of the Israel Dis-
count Bank, Bank of Israel Gover-
nor Moshe Mandelbaum and
former Finance Minister Aridor
who was in New York.
But Uri Slonim, a legal adviser
to the Bank Leumi, thought the
report was too hard on the heads
of banks and too easy on the
former Finance Ministers because
the latter no longer hold office.
David Shoham, director general of
the Bank Klali, likened the com-
mission to "the Romans throwing
people to the lions."
Bank shares were the most
popular form of personal savings
until 1983 when deteriorating
economic conditions and periodic
devaluations of the Shekel
precipitated a rush to sell them off
in order to buy Dollars and other
hard currency.
THE BANKS which issued the
shares were shoring up their value
while keeping the public in the
dark. That practice had been go-
ing on since the early 1970's when
the Labor Party was in power. It
reached serious proportions after
the Likud took office in 1977, the
report said.
That drew an angry response
from Minister-Without-Portfolio
Moshe Arens, a Herut hardliner,
who claimed the report reflected a
situation created not by Likud but
by the "leftist parties." He charg-
ed, "This is a Bolshevik economy
in which people cannot work but
everything is run by an army of
officials."
Ran Cohen of the Civil Rights
Movement maintained that if the
Beisky report had been publicized
during the Likud regime, the
government would have toppled.
He said the report shows the ir-
responsible manner in which
Likud ran the country,
economically as well as politically.
Qlfm^^hiu
JUDGE ROBERT NEWMAN
Working toward a caring community.
Judge Robert Newman knows that our
Jewish community is growing because
he cares enough to ask others to give to
the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-Or
Akiva Campaign.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
salutes Judge Newman for his dedication
and his commitment to the fact that we are:
One People with One Destiny.
O
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137 576-4000
IT


Chase Federal Savings
and Loan Association
Extends
Passover Greetings
To All

CHASE FEDERAL >
Savings and Loan Association SHS


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986

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Share the spirit
Share the refreshment


Drucker Named University of Miami
School of Music 'Distinguished Alumna9
Impresaria Judy Drucker
has been selected for the
1985-86 Distinguished
Alumna Award by the
University of Miami School
of Music.
Drucker was cited by the
university as "a major force in
assuring that Miamians have ac-
cess to musical presentations of
the highest artistic quality"
through the development of the
Temple Beth Sholom "Great Ar-
tists Series" and the Concert
Association of Greater Miami.
"It's very touching," Drucker
said. "1 am especially appreciative
of an honor like this because the
University of Miami has always
been very close to my heart."
THE DISTINGUISHED
Judy Drucker
Alumni Award was established by
Music Dean William Hipp "as a
vehicle for recognizing outstan-
Federation Women's
Division Campaign
Tops $4 Million
The Creater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division
1986 < ombined Jewish Appeal-
lsra paign has topped the $4 million
mark, exceeding the Division's
goal and breaking all records for
past i-ampaigns, announced
Dorothy Podhurst, WD president.
Gail -laffe Newman, who serves
as WD 1986 campaign chair-
woman and has been elected to re-
tain that position for 1987. said
"Obviously, I am extremely pleas-
ed at this year's WD campaign
figures. Women's Division
members have worked very hard
to reach this point, and we still
haw time before the official end
of the 1986 Campaign," she said.
"Our .uvomplishments thus far
will certainly encourage us to
reach an even higher goal for the
end of the 1986 CJA-IEF, and
more so for next year's
campaign."
In addition to the overall suc-
cess of its campaign, the Division
gained a record number of new
members in the "Lion of Judah"
Trustee category during the 1986
Campaign.
In order to become Women's
Division Trustees, women make
minimum personal gifts of $5,000
Gail Jaffe Newman
to the CJA-IEF Campaign in addi-
tion to any gifts made in their
husbands' or family's name. New
WD Trustees are presented with
gold pines in the shape of the
"Lion of Judah."
The "Lion of Judah" pin was in-
augurated 14 years ago by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division and has since
been instituted in many other
Jewish communities throughout
the United States.
ding achievements and contribu-
tions to the musical arts by alumni
of the School of Music," he said.
The recipient is named by a com-
mittee of faculty and alumni of the
School of Music.
"They've come a long way since
the days when I gave my first
recital at the School of Music that
is now the Charade Restaurant,"
Drucker remembered.
While still a student at Miami
Beach Senior High School, she
took classes for college credit at
the U of M. "To audition for Music
Dean Joseph Tarpley, I took two
buses from Miami Beach High to
play a Beethoven sonata."
She was awarded a scholarship
to study piano, but discovered
singing to be her passion. Drucker
studied voice with Dr. Arturo Di
Filippi. Throughout her college
career, Drucker concertized all
over Florida, sang at the Latin
Quarter on Palm Island, perform-
ed in dramatic roles at the Ring
Theater on campus, "and still
managed to graduate," she
laughed.
IN FACT, she was named
outstanding singer of her
graduating class of the School of
Music and became soloist with the
university's symphony orchestra,
also appearing with the Opera
Guild of Miami.
Today. Drucker holds the titles
of cultural director of Temple
Beth Sholom and president of the
Concert Association of Greater
Miami. For the Temple, she
created the Great Artists Series,
now a Miami institution. Among
the performers presented by the
series are Isaac Stern, Itzhak
Perlman. Luciano Pavarotti and
Joan Sutherland.
Along with her full schedule for
the Temple. Drucker inaugurated
the Concert Association of
Greater Miami in 1982, with the
Prestige Series of concerts in
Miami, presenting an equally
esteemed roster of musical
artists.
Drucker has promoted dance in
the area as well, presenting the
American Ballet Theater, Sadler's
Wells Royal Ballet, the Paul
Taylor Dance Company, and the
Dance Theatre of Harlem.
The award will be presented
Thursday, May 8, during the
School of Music Graduation
Recognition Ceremonies at the
University of Miami Gusman Con-
cert Hall.
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropiesof
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation has in-
augurated a Zero Coupon Bond Program to
ase its present and future assets. As new
"ambers of the "David Ben Gurion Million
DoUar Society," the highest level ofparticipa-
'""' in the Zero Coupon Bond Program.
"h Handleman (uamd from left' and
" and Arnold. Gam (thirdfrom
from left) are seen being presented with
awards. Presenting the awards, signed
photographs of Jerusalem by intemationallr
renowned photographer Robert Cumina. ar,
Melvin L. Kartzmer (left), chairman of '
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Leroy Raffel (right), co-chairman of Ih- ,.
Coupon Hnml Pro(p-nm
News Briefs
Eastern Airlines To Drop
Third World Magazine
By JTA Services
NEW YORK Eastern Airlines says it will no longer make the
magazine, South, available to its passengers as part of its in-flight
library. A complaint lodged with the airline by the American
Jewish Congress charged the Arab-owned publication with being
"devoted almost exclusively to maligning Israel and the United
States."
A letter of reply from Donald Lohr, an Eastern Airlines official,
said that the complaints from AJCongress and others "have con-
vinced us to discontinue boarding this publication."
South, which calls itself 'the Third World magazine," recently
described PLO chief Yasir Arafat as "one of the great freedom
fighters of our time," according to AJCongress, which charged
that Arafat personally had ordered the assassination of the U.S.
Ambassador to Sudan in 1973 as well as other terrorist acts.
Massive Manhunt Seeks Slayer of Briton
JERUSALEM Israeli security forces are engaged in a
massive manhunt for a lone killer who fatally shot a British
tourist in the Old City last Sunday. The murder was the fourth at-
tack on foreign visitors and Israelis in the Old City in the past two
months and the second to result in death. It has contributed to a
sharp decline of tourism that has the industry worried.
Security sources are convinced that Paul Appelby, 28. from
Bristol, was the victim of an assailant who approaches his targets
closely and fires an 0.22 caliber pistol point blank into their heads.
Appelby was killed by a bullet fired into the base of his skull as he
was about to enter the Garden Tomb, the burial place of Jesus ac-
cording to Protestant tradition.
Peres Hints of Quiet Diplomacy With Jordan
TEL AVIV Premier Shimon Peres said Sunday that a path
toward developing quiet diplomatic contacts with Jordan has
developed, though he warned that the breakthrough is
characterized by mutual understanding more than agreement.
Peres declined to amplify on his remarks, but his optimism was
immediately dampened by Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
Foreign Ministry officials who insisted that recent contacts bet-
ween Israel and Jordan had so far failed to yield any tangible
breakthrough.
Shamir told reporters, "I don't think we're very near a peace
treaty or any similar development.
Conservative Woman Rabbi To Be Ordained
NEW YORK In a development similar to one which enabled
Amy Eilberg to be ordained in May, 1985 as the first Conser-
vative woman rabbi, another woman rabbinical candidate will be
ordained in graduation exercises at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America (JTS) on May 11 as the second Conservative
woman rabbi.
The second woman to become a Conservative rabbi is Nina
Bierber Feinstein of Dallas, Tex., a member of the incoming class
of September, 1984.
Like Eilberg, Feinstein qualified for graduation and ordination
through transfer credits and credits earned in the JTS rabbinical
school since September 1984, according to a JTS spokesperson.
Poland Said To Plan New Mission in Israel
JERUSALEM Foreign Ministry sources said Monday that
an announcement is expected from the Polish government that it
will open a mission in Israel, but no date has been set for further
diplomatic contacts between the two countries.
The sources were responding to a report Sunday by an Israeli
television correspondent in Bonn, Yisrael Segal, that Israel and
Poland would resume diplomatic relations within a month.
According to Segal, steps toward an agreement in principle
were discussed between the two countries last week when the
Israel Embassy in Bonn hosted a high-level diplomatic delegation
from Poland, headed by the Polish Ambassador to West
Germany.
Proxmire Honored for Battle to Pass Treaty
WASHINGTON Sen. William Proxmire (D., Wise.) stressed
Monday that although the Senate ratified the Genocide Treaty in
February after a 37-year battle, the implementing legislation still
needs to be passed by Congress. In addition, Proxmire said that
for the treaty to be "effective," the Senate must eventually res-
cind the amendment introduced by Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.)
and adopted, prohibiting the United States from being taken
before the World Court. Despite the amendment, Helms was one
of 11 Senators who voted against ratification.
The U.S. will never be taken before the World Court on a
charge of genocide, Proxmire told the some 60 persons attending
the annual policy meeting of the Commission on Social Action of
Reform Judaism, a joint body of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC) and the Central Conference of American
Rabbis (CCAR).__________________
"eJewisln Flojridliaiini
Miami, Honda Friday, May 2.1986
'


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986

I
H
Florida Comptroller Gerald Lewis Looking For
Owners Of $8 Million In Property
Florida Comptroller Gerald
Lewis wants to give back a $2,000
diamond ring to Mrs. Gertrude
Dotson of Miami. He is also look-
ing for the owners of 49 other dia-
mond rings which are worth over
$40,000.
The rings are a portion of more
than $8 million worth of abandon-
ed property now being held by the
Comptroller's Office. Lewis said
there are 21,000 individuals and
associations in Florida who are en-
titled to some of the unclaimed
property and cash.
"In the past month, we have
returned $150,000 to 88 Florida
residents," Lewis said. "Please
remember to search your
memories for forgotten safety
deposit boxes, check your files for
old refund notices, and call the
Comptroller's Office to claim your
property. Help me give back your
money."
Gerald Lewis
S&i/t/iettvngA
Miami Beach Commissioner William E. Shocketi recently
donated three pieces of exercise equipment, called neck machines,
to the Miami Beach Senior High School. The $600 machines will
be used by all of the sport teams, male and female, along with six
physical education classes.
Dade County Judge Stanley Goldstein will serve as master of
ceremonies and present special awards at a dinner Tuesday at the
Singapore Hotel, as the North Shore Optimist Club honors the
Officers of the Year and Chiefs of Police of Bay Harbor Islands.
Miami Beach. Bal Harbour. Surf side. North Miami Beach and
Metro Dade Police Station No. 6 (Sunny Isles).
The Rotary Club of Miami West will formally receive its
Charter on Friday evening. May 16. during the District 699
Assembly on Miami Beach.
Miami Heart Institute Auxiliary recently elected its officers for
1986. They are: Peggy Brickman. president: Miriam Sabin. first
vice president: Bernie Weiner. second vice president: Jean
Teaser, third vice president: Amy Chanin. fourth vice president:
Lillian Yasinow. treasurer: Martha Ipp. recording secretary;
Alberta Tirschwell. corresponding secretary; and Ruth Mills.
parliamentarian.
The Southern Florida Chapter of Leukemia Society of America
function Saturday at Omni International Hotel. Ballroom level, at
11:30 a.m. will benefit the Research and Local Patient Aid Pro-
grams of the Southern Florida Chapter.
"The Second Annual Women's Health Seminar: A Prescrip-
tion For Wdlness." on Wednesday, at Mount Sinai Medical
Center, beginning at 9 a.m.
Ms. Rosalind Gettis
Happy Passover
Mr. and Mrs. David H. Zoberg
Mariana, Bonnie, Steven, Elian and Stuart
Wish Their Family and Friends
A Very Happy Passover


PRINCIPAL
Nursery through 12th Traditional Hebrew Day School in
suburban community south of Los Angeles seeks
General Studies Principal to oversee entire secular
educational program.
Must have experience in college guidance, admissions
counseling, curriculum development and educational
supervision. Four years administrative experience and
masters degree required.
Call (714) 895-7195 or wr Willow Lane, Westminster, CA. 92683, Attention:
Rabbi Newman.
Most of the millions of dollars of
abandoned property held by the
Comptroller's Office represents
money left in savings and check-
ing accounts, safe deposit box
items, stocks and bonds,
dividends, and unclaimed wages.
Lewis said there is no statute of
limitations for the recovery of
abandoned property.
Florida law directs the Com-
ptroller's Office to try to locate
rightful owners or heirs after in-
stitutions have held unclaimed
funds for 10 years and safe
deposit boxes and trust depart-
ment items for seven years.
If no owners or heirs are found,
the unclaimed balance becomes
part of the State School Fund, a
trust designed to benefit Florida's
school children.
Floridians who want to find out
if their name or that of a relative
is on the abandoned property list
should contact one of the area of-
fices of the Comptroller's Office
or write to Gerald Lewis, State
Comptroller, Attention: Abandon-
ed Property Section, 202 Blount
Street, Third Floor, Tallahassee.
Florida, 32301. phone (904)
487-0570.
Phone numbers for the area of-
fices are: Miami, (305) 377-5213;
West Palm Beach, (305) 837-5054;
Tampa, (813) 272-2565; Orlando,
(305) 423-6115; Jacksonville, (904)
354-6085; Pensacola. (904)
435-8520.
Northpark, Forerunner Levitt
Retirement Community,
Northpark, a prestigious Hollywood adult rental com
planned in a private environmental setting, is being AnSHf^
Levitt Retirement Communities, a wholly-owned suhi^Pe<"'
Levitt Corporation. "oisidiarj. of
Northpark will provide visitors with plans of its one nH
bedroom rental apartments and complete information i
Community Center, activities and services that will he Z*\?
Northpark concept. w Part of t}
"We are breaking new ground in Levitt's long histnn,
building residential communities that create secure comf i?
and active lifestyles," commented Harvey P. Rafofskv
vice president of marketing and sales for Levitt. *"'*
Located on the south side of Sheridan Street at the co
ill
tropically-landscaped site with extensive lakes' andI park an
North Park Avenue, just west of 1-95, Northpark will i*
three residential buildings with a total of 340 apartments set
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost it
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special tingle
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridim,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101'
Loveable widow, early 70's, with a zest for life, wtrJ
hearted, nice personality, seeks a compatible smM
man over 65 for dinner, dates and traveling. Write Ba!
JJK c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973 Mini
Ha. 33101.
American Heart
Summer Scholars
Announced
Each year the American Heart
Association of Greater Miami
gives 15 Dade County high school
students the chance to become
researchers through the Summer
Scholarship Program.
Two of this year's scholars are
David Brafman, Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami and
Daren Grosman, Jewish High
School of South Florida.
"The purpose of providing sum-
mer scholarships is to stimulate
interest and knowledge about the
careers available in research,"
said Dr. Arthur Pickoff, chairman
of the Scientific Careers
Committee.
Brafman is particularly in-
terested in applying computer
science to research. He holds
youth services at Temple Beth
Israel on Miami Beach and enjoys
photography, music computers,
boating and fishing.
Grosman would like to do
research in either genetics or
cancer this summer. He enjoys a
wide range of hobbies including
tennis, photography, computers,
poetry, chess and weightlifting.
Bet Breira To Hold
Special Friday
Night Service
Bet Breira will present a
creative service, The Rededica-
tion of The Stable of Liberty at
this week's Friday night service.
The "multi-media" presentation
will provide a nostalgic look back
in time, when the Jewish people fl-
ed the Czar and followed their
dream to America.
Bet Breira congregants will
relive memories of their heritage,
with readings, poems, music, and
humor, all under the protective
light of a 12 foot replica of the
Statue of Liberty, courtesy of Jor-
MallftMMte/:
i?&?d&^^
Come to the
Restaurant
For Festive Food From the Mid East
Enjoy Suzanne and her Jerusalem Band
Singing International Music of the Holylani
EvsryWi
RMn-atlonRwind
662 1682
<#::
9563 SOUTH DIXIE HWY.
Man Cantor)
< V
RATED mimmi Maws A*
MKrni MaraM

\ mmkwmkWHkWkWMBBBBSBm
ALVIN LLOYD BROWN
Working toward a caring community.
AJvin Lloyd Brown knows that our Jewish
community is growing because he cares
enough to ask others to give to the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
salutes Alvin for his dedication and his
commitment to the fact that we are
One People with One Destiny.
O
'Greater Miami Jewish Radiation '
, 4200 Ai-.::,- .vd.. M.am.. FL 33137 576-4KW
ak


Immunity Forum At Temple Israel Saulson To Speak
Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
American Jewish Congress and
*he Mini College of Temple Israel
If Greater Miami announce a
tommunity Forum on "The
Eshing Bill of Rights' The
forum is open to the public, and
Li be held at Temple Israel of
treater Miami, downtown, on
lunday. at 10 a.m.
1 Moderator for the program will
L Linda Ehrlich, Chairwoman of
L Commission on Law and
cial Action. Marc Pearl, the
American Jewish Congress
Representative of Washington
till present a political, judicial
U legislative overview of "The
Vanishing Bill of Rights."
The program will consist of
enelists from the Commission on
JlM and Social Action speaking
|n lawsuits in which American
Jewish Congress has filed amicus
briefs.
Presentations will be made by:
Myrna Bricker speaking on Ohio
Civil Rights Commission v.
Dayton Christian Schools in the
U.S. Supreme Court.
Richard Wolfson will be speak-
ing on an amicus brief in
Capistrano Parents Comm. v.
Capristrano Unified School
District in California Superior
Court.
Mitchell Horwich will be speak-
ing on an amicus brief in May v.
Evansville-Vanderburgh School
District, U.S. Court of Appeals.
7th Circuit.
Richard Burton will be speaking
on a joint amicus brief on behalf of
AJCongress and Synagogue
Council in U.S. Supreme Court in
Goldman v. Weinberger.
Mayor Daoud To Participate On
A Survey Mission To Israel
1 Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud
Lill leave Wednesday on a two-
leek survey mission to Israel dur-
g which he will participate in the
eventh Jerusalem Conference of
ayors and meet with Israeli
rime Minister Shimon Peres,
..esident Chaim Herzog and
Lrmer Israeli Premier Menachem
gin.
JCommissioner Abe Resnick and
ike Schneider, a member of the
|ty of Miami Beach Tourist and
bnvention Center Expansion
uthority, will accompany Daoud
. his first visit to the Jewish
ate. Resnick, chairman of the
[inference of American Jewish
nrvivors of the Holocaust for the
tutheastern United States and
|e president of Ohr Chaim
nagogue in Miami Beach, is a
quent visitor to Israel.
The visit to Israel is under the
abined auspices of the State of
ael, United States Conference
f Mayors, American Jewish Con-
ess, American Zionist Federa-
bn and Na'amat USA.
Topic of the mayors' conference
1 be "Municipal Government in
Period of Austerity." Jerusalem
ayor Teddy Kollek will host the
Jnfcrence. and meet several
nes with Daoud and other city
iders.
The Miami Beach delegation
take part in Israel's May 14
|ebration of Yom Haatzmaut,
dependence Day, marking the
Jth anniversary of the founding
(the Jewish state.
Daoud, Resnick and Schneider
11 take part in a wreath-laying
remony at the Yad Vashem
jflocaust Memorial, which they
study in conjunction with the
locaust Memorial which is be-
ing built adjacent to the Miami
Beach Garden Center under the
chairmanship of Resnick.
Daoud is an active member of
the American Zionist Federation,
and serves as legal counsel for the
South Florida Council of Na'amat
USA.
"Israel Upbeat" is the subject
for discussion sparked by guest
speaker William F. Saulson for
the Sunday meeting of
Miamonides Lodge of B'nai
B'rith. Mr. Saulson is a vice presi-
dent of Riverside Memorial
Chapel in the capacity of family
consultant and serves as the presi-
dent of the Hillel Jewish Student
Centers and on the board of direc-
tors of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Maimonides Lodge meets at 9
a.m. in the Auditorium of the Star
Lakes condominium.
Yiddish Culture
Winkle To
Celebrate Ha'Atzmaut
Yiddish Culture Winkle will
hold their final gathering of the
season, celebrating Yom Ha'Atz-
maut, Israel's Independence Day
on Thursday, May 8 at 10:30 a.m.
at Temple Ner Tamid.
Dr. Sol Stein, founder and ar-
chitect of the Histadrut Founda-
tion, will be the guest speaker;
Rose Luski, will recite poems;
Cantor Moshe Buryon will sing;
Maestro Shmuel Freshko, pianist,
will accompany Cantor Buryon
and play original compositions.
Menasha Feldstein, president,
will chair the meeting.
Foundation To Sponsor Tax
And Estate Planning Seminar
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation will sponsor its first seminar on
estate planning and charitable giving designed especially
for those who are non-professionals in the field, announced
Melvin L. Kartzmer, chairman of the Foundation.
Speaking on behalf of the Foundation's Professional Ad-
visory Committee, which sponsors the seminar, Advisory
Committee Chairman Martin Kalb noted that "The Com-
mittee is pleased to augment the educational opportunities
now provided by the Foundation for professionals with this
new annual program geared to the lay person. We continue
to feel that practical advice on estate planning will benefit
not only the donor and his or her loved ones, but the com-
munity as well."
The Wednesday seminar, entitled "Saving Taxes: Estate
Planning and Charitable Giving A Practical Guide," will
be held from 5-7 p.m. at the Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel in
downtown Miami.
As part of the seminar, Sydney S. Traum, attorney, CPA
and tax partner in the firm of Myers, Kenin, Levinson,
Frank and Richards, P.A., will provide an overview on
estate and gift taxes. Ivan Faggen, CPA and tax partner
with the firm of Arthur Anderson and Co., will discuss
"Controlling Your Estate and Gift Tax Liabilities." Nor-
man H. Lipoff, partner in the law firm of Greenberg,
Traurig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel,
P.A., will speak on the tax aspects of charitable giving.
where shopping is o pleasure 7 days o week
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Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
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NCJW Holds prjCes Effective May 1 thru 7,19
..ch*249
1986
Installation
Of Officers
Jational Council of Jewish
pmen, Greater Miami Section
hold its Installation of Of-
ers on Wednesday, in the Boar-
K>m of the Greater Miami
vish Federation from 10 a.m. to
to.
fhe Myra Farr Volunteer Ser-
Award will be presented to
idys Green and Virginia
leans. It was established in
p0 to honor Myra Farr for her
ny years of local service and
|tiring devotion to the Greater
imi Section and our National
uiization.
Jean Soman will be the featured
aker. She is the author of
four True Marcus" a Civil War
fry about Mrs. Soman's great,
pat grandfather, Col. Marcus
eigel, uncle of Hannah G.
omon, founder of NCJW.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2, 1986
Sholem Lodge Celebrates 60th
B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge No.
1024 will celebrate its 60 years of
service in Dade County by a din-
ner dance at the Konover Hotel,
on May 10.
At one time the largest lodge in
the area, Sholem 1024 was very
instrumental in forming other
Lodges.
Past presidents included Milton
Friedman, Sam Silver. Sidney
Aronovitz, William Pallot, and
Edward S. Klein. E. Albert Pallot,
Robert J. Lewison, Richard C.
Schulman, Ronald A. Shapo,
Jerry Chait, Marx Faber, Dr.
Reuben Sorkin. Andrew Tibor
Edward S. Roth, and AJ
I^andskroner.
Rudy Kamp is serving his se-
cond term as president.
The lodge originate,! the
Outstanding Citizens Award"
Luncheon in which an outstanding
man and woman are
volunteer charitable
Dade County. This will b
luncheon.
In the last IV lwanj
program has been plani i
South Dade Conn'!: of 'B'nai
B'rith. nai
The Florida Friends of Albert Einstein Col-
lege of Medicine of Yeshiva University
presented Governor Bob Graham, with their
Distinguished Public Sennce Award in
Miami Beach. From left: Gov. Graham. Dr.
and Mrs. Lawrence B. Rabbins and their
daughter. Jessica; Mr. and Mrs. Alan C.
Kaplus of North Miami, co-chairs for the
award dinner. Dr. Robbins recehvd the
Distinguished Achievement Award from th<
Florida Friends of the Albert Einstein College
of Medicine.
QfLnti^m
Women's American ORT To
n^ Hold Honor Roll Luncheon
The Southeastern Florida
Region of Women's American
ORT will be holding their annual
honor roll luncheon and installa-
tion Sunday at the Marriott Hotel
in Miami. Consul General of
Israel, Yehoshua Trigor will be an
honored guest.
Mary Ellen Peyton, District VI
vice-president will install. Presi-
dent, Ruthe Naftal; Chairman of
the Executive Committee,
Marilyn Selevan; Vice Presidents,
Lois Entin, Mildred Feld, Hilda
Katz, Sonnie Waters and Syd
Sablosky; Financial Secretary,
Charlotte Schwartz and
Treasurer, Bea Shultz. Yehoshua Trigor
Technion Women
Honor Diane Seherer
The Miami Beach Chapter.
Women's Division. American
Technion Society, will held it
luncheon meeting, honoring Diane
Seherer, on Thursday. May 8.
noon, at the Shelborne Hotel,
followed by entertainment. Jean
Zaber and Diane Seherer are in
charge of the event.
Horizons Chapter
BB Women Meet
Horizons Chapter of B'nai
B'rith women will meet Thursday.
May 8 in the Clubhouse of the
Horizons Condo in Kendall at 8
p.m.
WILLIAM SAULSON
Working toward a caring community.
William Saulson knows that our Jewish
community is growing because he cares
enough to ask others to give to the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
salutes William for his dedication and his
commitment to the fact that we are:
One People with One Destiny.
O
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200Biscayne Blvd.. Miami. FL33137 576-4000
Master of Arts
in Jewish Studies
"Fix A Time For The Study Of Torah"
Shammai (Ethics Of The Fathers 1:15)
The Jewish Studies Program at Barry University announces the following summer schedule:
Summer Session I: May 13-June 20
Hebrew Literature (RJS 613) An analysis of selected
portions of Hebrew literature in the original. Prerequisite:
one year of college Hebrew or the equivalent. The class
will meet Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00-9:30
p.m. Instructor: Dr. Rachel Abramowitz. Room Andreas 104.
Talmudic Literature (RJS 642) Studies in selected por-
tions of the Talmud and Midrash. The class will meet
Monday and Wednesday evenings from 6:00-9:30 p.m. in
Andreas 103. Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIP AID IS AVAIULABLE
FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS. AUDITORS WILL BE
GRANTED A 50% DISCOUNT.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext. 524.
OR SEND IN THE ATTACHED COUPON.
Summer Session II: June 23-August 1
Modern Jewish History (RJS 611) Studies in Jewish
history from the Enlightenment. The class will meet on
Monday and Wednesday mornings from 9:00-12:30 in
Andreas 109. Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
Jewish Mysticism (RJS 632) Studies in the development
and concerns of Jewish mysticism, with emphasis on
such texts as the Zohar. The class will meet on Tuesday
and Thursday evenings from 6:00-9:30 p.m. in Andreas 108.
The instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
"" Mail Coupon Today'
JF5 2
! Name
Addreaa
at,
State
I
Phone
Zip
Jewish Studies. Barrv University. 11300 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami Shores. FL 33161
a_____________________________.______________________________________'
BARRY UNIVERSITY
11300 Northeast Second Avenue Miami Shores, Florida 33161


n recognition of SU years of dedicated service to the Miami
Jewish Home, Chairman of the Board Irving Cypen (left) received
a special award from President Harold Beck at Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged's 40th Anniversary Celebration.
Rosenberg Named To Jewish
Theological Seminary Post
Stanley G. Rosenberg, has been
named the new Executive Direc-
tor of The Jewish Theological
Seminary of America's Southeast
Region. According to Judith
Frede Love, Seminary Vice Presi-
dent for Development.
The Seminary's Southeast
Region office is located in Bay
Harbour Island.
As Executive Director, Mr.
Rosenberg will oversee the
Seminary's fund-raising campaign
in the southeast. In honor of its
100 years of academic excellence
and spiritual leadership, the
Seminary is committed to raising
$50 million by June 1987. It has
raised more than half so far.
With almost 30 years of fund-
raising experience, Mr.
Rosenberg spent 11 of those with
American Friends of Hebrew
University earning the title of
Southeast Regional Director.
Among his many ac-
complishments there, he increas-
ed the cash campaign more than
seven-fold, originated new pro-
grams and opened up two bran-
ches in south Florida.
He was most recently National
Director of Development for B'nai
B'rith, and before that was the
Southeast Regional Director of
American Friends of Haifa
University. He has also worked
for the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith in New York and
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies in Greater New York.
L & L Video Library
4018 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach 672-0262
Wishes All Their Friends & Customers
A Very Happy Passover
Spectors & Sons Realty
575 SW 22nd Ave
Miami 642-3153
Happy Passover
Camp Shalom
9340 SW 103 St.
Miami 279-0401
Happy Passover
Food Spot Stores
7901 SW 67 St.
Miami -666-0642
Happy Passover
The Beverly Hills Cafe
17850 W. Dixie Hwy.
7321 Miami Lakes Dr.
12019 SW 152 St.
We Wish Everyone A Very Happy Passover
Arlequin Foto Studio
1425 NE 163rd St.
No. Miami Beach 944-5606
Happy Passover To All
Morris Schwartz
Bonds To Honor
Morris Schwartz
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Morris
Schwartz of North Miami Beach
during ceremonies at the Arlen
House Auditorium, on Tuesday.
The festivities will begin at 7:30
p.m.
Schwartz, who will receive the
Israel Award of Honor, is being
recognized for his contributions to
Israel through the Israel Bond
program and to philanthropic and
community organizations. He is a
member of the Sunny Isles Lodge
B'nai B'rith and is a Century Club
member of the organization. He
also serves as secretary of the
Arlen House Condominium
Association.
Guest speaker at the Salute to
Israel event will be Jerome
Gleekel, a Mid-East expert.
The evening's festivities is be-
ing sponsored by the Arlen House
Israel Bonds Committee. Serving
as chairmen are Irving Cypers
and Theodore Yecies.
Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
American Friends Of Hebrew U.
To Hold Luncheon Meeting
Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion, American Friends of the
Hebrew University, will hold their
season's final luncheon meeting
on Thursday, May 8, at 11:45 a.m.
at the Sans Souci Hotel.
Betty Schaffer, chairman of the
afternoon session, announced the
guest Speaker will be Dan Leven-
son, a Founder and benefactor of
the American Friends of the
Hebrew University. Levenson, is
a philanthropist and leader in the
Hollywood community. His sub-
ject will be "Building For The
Future Benefitting Your Own Im-
mediate Family As Well As
American Friends of the Hebrew
University." A report will be
given on the testimonial Florence
D. Feldman Scholarship Fund
luncheon.
Members of the committee in-
clude Viola Charcowsky, Ruth
Platt, Irene Kaczkowski and
Stella Topol and is being coor-
dinated by Florence D. Feldman,
director of the Greater Miami
Women's Division.
^mm^^m
MYRA FARR
Working toward a caring community.
Myra Farr knows that our Jewish com -
munity is growing because she cares
enough to ask others to give to the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
salutes Myra for her dedication and her
commitment to the fact that we are:
One People with One Destiny.
O
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, FL 33137 576-4000
Jerome C. Berlin, chairman of
the Florida Regional Board of
the Anti-Defamation League;
Jerome B. Homer, chairman of
the Florida Society of Fellows;
Jack H. Levine, dinner chair-
man, announce that comedian
Marty BrM will entertain at
the ADL Network Young
Leadership Award Dinner on
May 22, at the Hotel Inter-
Continental.
Happy Passover
PALMETTO GENERAL HOSPITAL
An American Medical International, Inc. Health Care Center
2001 West 68th Street. Hialeah, Florida 33016
823-5000
New Policy New Policy New Policy
Musicals Revues Star Personalities-And Mod. More
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OPPOSITE THE DIPLOMAT MALL

.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. May 2, 1986


Miami Jewish Home Celebrates
Pioneers of fk
(Left, to right) Harry and Lucille Chernin, H. Jerome Joseph, Louis Stein
(standing), and Thelma Joseph.
(Left to right) Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield, Mrs. Hannah Meyer, and Mr.
and Mrs. Hyman Small.
Polly deHirsch Meyer receiving Pioneer Award from Irving Franke! deft)
Judge Irving Cypen. Judge Irving ^ypen.
Jimmie Kopelowitz (left) showing his Pioneer Award
to Louis Fischer.
(Left to right) B.B. and Grace Goldstein and Burton and Rose Kahn.
Muriel Rudolph receiving recognition as Coordinator of the event from Presided
Harold Beck.
(Left to right) Nathan and Sophie Gumenick, Arthur (Left to right) Stanley Friedman, Bunny Adler, Glen- (Left to right) Judge Irving Cypen, Louis Stein, ad
and Violette Kahn, and Rose and Burton Kahn. da Friedman, and Sam Adler. Sidney Rudolph.
(Left to right) Stanley Kossoff. Scott Davis, and Sidney
and Muriel Rudolph.
Waving goodbye at the end of a wonderful evening were
(left to right) Mm. Meyer, Ruth Zimmernmn. Frm
Makovsky, and Mollie Sih
(Left t<. right) Fred and

Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
h Year With Anniversary Bash
me Honored
ioneer A ward from Mollie Silverman receiving Pioneer Award from
Judge Irving Cypen.
(Left to right) Judge Philip Bloom, Rep. Elaine Bloom, Judge Herbert Shapiro
and Mrs. Ruth Shapiro. ____
Frances Makovsky receiving Pioneer award from
Judge Irving Cypen.
(Left to right) Rose Banner, Pearl Solovei, May Cowan, Dorothy Drexler, Jean
Tesser and Monya Resnick.
line Traurig receiving recognition for her role as Chairperson of the
i Anniversary Journal from President Harold Beck.
1 to right) Sidney Schreer and Harold Beck.
Enjoying the evening are the Cypen family: (seated) Hazel and Judge Irving
Cypen, (standing, left to right) Stephen and Arlyn Cypen, Wayne and NieoU
Cypen, and Bonnie and Dr. Marc Epstein.
Bruce Blaise and Helen Rechtschaffer.
(Left to right) Muriel Rudolph, Carolyn and Leonard
Miller.
i
i
-**.
'/

Alberto Barrocai (left) and Jack ( Hester
(Seated, left to rigid) t ana 4an '
Gitler and(xtaru


*>>
wnfi ij
Bar Mitzvah
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
'And Aaron tkaR nut [/At* upon the two goal*, one l/A for the
L*mi. and tkt other U* for Azazei"
Lmtxm* '.:
AHARE
AHARE After the death of Aaron s two sons God said to
Moses Sf*aic unto Aaron thy brother, that he come not at ai:
times into the holy place within the veil, before the ark-cover
which is upon the ark. that he die not; for I appear in the cloud
upon the ark-cover" (Lenturtu 16.1/. Only on the Day of Atone-
ment, "the tenth day of the seventh month" may Aaron enter the
Holy of Holies, entirely alone, to "make atonement for the holy
place, because of the uncleannesses of the children of Israel."
Aaron ways to bring a bullock as a sin-offering and a ram as a
ourat-offering. He was to accept from the children of Israel two
he-goats for a sin-offering and a ram for a burnt-offering. One of
the goats was to be chosen by lot as a sin-offering to God; the
other was to be dispatched to the desert, (to Azazel). a scapegoat
carrying the sins of the children of Israel. The portion enumerates
the laws prohibiting the consuming of blood. It concludes with
regulations pertaining to sexual morality.
Community Corner
Temple Menorah Sisterhood will hold its installation
on Wednesday at noon at 7435 Carlyle Ave. A luncheon
will be served.
Temple Beth Raphael will hold a special memorial
service for the victims of the Holocaust, on Sunday, at
2 p.m. A candlelighting program has been arranged.
Gala At The Grove
The Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami Michael-Ann
Russell Center presents "The
Gala At The Grove," Saturday at
8:30 p.m. at the Grove Isle Yacht
and Tennis Club. The Gala will
feature a buffet reception, art auc
tioo and show, music, tour of
sculpture garden and an oppor-
tunity to win a valuable piece of
art, announced Cultural Arts
Committee President Gary Y.
Hortzman and Marcia Engebnan,
Cultural Arts Director.
The cultural arts committee is
comprised of: Michael Turtletaub,
Chairman; Goldie Andron; Kay
Boorstein; Ray Boorstein; Bar-
bara Price; Sondie Reiff; Ingrid
Roakin; Rhoda Sigman; Michele
Sihrerberg; Dorothy Sponder; and
Donald Yaffie.
Golden Shores ORT Install Officers
The Golden Shores Chapter of
Women's American ORT will in-
stall their newly elected officers at
a dinner at the Biscayne Bay Mar-
riott, Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. Serving
on the executive board of the new
chapter of professional and
Legal Notices
IN THE CIHCUTT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NuWr S4-1142
DiriiioB 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
HERMAN LLOYD
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HERMAN LLOYD, deceased.
File Number 86-1142, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flakier Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all chums
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication ot this Notice has
begun on May 2, 1986. /
Personal Representative/
HARRY LLOYD I (
3261 Brace Canyon Roa*
Burbank. CA 91504 '
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HYMAN P GALBUT. ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19770 May 2, 9, 1986
business women are President,
Marsha Umlas; Membership Vice
President, Myra Sonshine; Com-
munications and Program Vice
President, Myrna Gust; Vice
President (ORT Overseas Fun-
draising) Miriam Zadanoff; Vice
President (ORT Domestic Fun-
draising) Millie Collins; Financial
Secretary, Shirley Stracher;
Recording and Corresponding
Secretary, Joan Pressman;
Treasurer, Audrey Solomon.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN TUB CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
Civil Actisa No. 84-1371* (2C)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NOTICE
OF PUBLICATION
EDWARD COOPER.
husband,
and
USA M. COOPER.
wife.
TO: Ms. LISA M. COOPER
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on ARTHUR H. LIPSON. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 NE 167 St.. Miami.
Florida 33162, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 9, 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2nd day of April. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dsde County, Florida
By E. 8EIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19716 April 11,18, 25;
May 2, 1986
ADAM ELEGANT
Adam Elegant, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Ira Elegant (Sharon) will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El.
Adam is a 7th Grade student at
Ransom-Everglades School where
he is on the honor roll. He is a
member of the Middle School soc-
cer team and participates in all
sports and has an extensive
baseball card collection.
He has attended the Temple
Emanu-El afternoon religious
school for the past three years.
Many friends and relatives will
be here to help celebrate this hap-
py occasion.
Hadassah
Events
The Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their installa-
tion luncheon meeting at noon,
Tuesday, at the Shelborne Hotel.
Nine Chapters of the Miami
Region of Hadassah are par-
ticipating in the South End
Hadassah Donor Reward Lun-
cheon on Sunday, at Signature
Gardens, at 11:30 a.m.
Entertainment of the day will
be comedian, George Hopkins.
The South End Donor Chairper-
son is Pearl Noble.
The nine chapters included in
the South End are Aliyah, Aviva,
Chai, Eilat, Hatikvah, Kinneret,
Menorah, Naomi and Torah.
The Hatikvah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its annual In-
stallation and Awards Night
Thursday, May 8, beginning at
7:30 p.m. at the Studio
Restaurant.
The evening will include the an-
nouncement of the winners of this
year's chapter awards, special
year-end presentations, and the
official installation ceremony
which will be conducted by
honored guest Bess Lieblich, in-
coming organization vice presi-
dent of the Miami Region of
Hadassah.
To be installed as officers of
Hatikvah for the 1986-1987 year
are: Amy Mittelberg, president;
Diane Taub, administrative vice
president; Susan Nevel, education
vice president; Caroline Fletcher
and Susan Kaplan, fundraising
vice presidents; Penny Pawliger,
membership vice president; and
Donna Jay, programming vice
president. Taking the office of
treasurer is Alecia Sachs, and Kel-
ly Schreer will assume the duties
of financial secretary.
Filling the other secretary posi-
tions are Debbie Hurwitz,
membership dues secretary;
Karen Gostel, corresponding
secretary; and Susan Penn, recor-
ding secretary.
Brandeis U. Women's
Committee Luncheon
Brandeis University, National
Women's Committee-Miami
Beach Chapter will hold its Spring
Luncheon and Installation at noon
Thursday, May 8 at the Seaview
Hotel.
T
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:33 p.m.
Eft**" *eseM *'
""jwn Conwntrtse
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NC Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1405
Rabc* Simctia Freedman
Censor Ian AJpem Conoorvalise
TEMPLE EMANU EL
Or Irving Lehrman Rat)0(
Au**efy Rabbt Ms,*, _
Yehuda Shrtman. Cantor *
Gerald Taub. Executive o,ricl0r
lu Fn
SM.*am5TL
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or ii /as ml S3
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SiiUi-
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1 V* Torih.
""wltchim
samesjsis
HEBREWACADEM-
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
MWPbujbee orhe. Miam, Beach
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitf
TEMPLE BE7M AM
5*50 N. Kendall Or.
S Miami-667
Or. Herbert
FfLTdSl
. tint!
.
BETH DA VID CONG REG ATIO N
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenos 854-3911
Dr. Sol Landau,
Rabbl Emeritus
Jack Rlemar. Rabbi
Re. M4Hon Freeman,
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tamber. Cantor

TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot Oreebw Miam.
137 mi imm^m&Zsnm
M. KendaM Of, 5*5 5055
- Hasheil Bernat
Rabbi Res D Psrtmttw
G. BomekMn
acbataF NdH
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ot Education
sapaswsniiaj Jack L. Sparks|
'**_*i'" uawa* homisir
lawprfaassf "<
TEMPLE JUOEA
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Rabbi
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CTHKOOESM
Con *)*"., try*
1101S.W. 12Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Kriaa*
arts* Executive Secretary
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
10 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
OR. DAVI0 RAAB, Rabbi
i Raab. Cantor
k4Sim
TEMPLE MENORAH
Sav-TSBi St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mays* Abra mow Hi f
Cantor Murray Yavneh

TEMPLE BETH MOSME
5 NE 121 St, N. Miami. FL 331S1
i-SSOS CoooorvBlhe
O Iarasii Jacobs. Rabbi
Or. Joseph A GortInksi.
Rabbl Emeritus
Moahe FrietBar, Cantor
Fn 7:48 p.m.
SM.ia4taja.-Asa>
TasNiBaWn.
Sat. ta.m ajjMjsa) aantca.
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Sat m sndSISpm
TEMPLE NEB TAMID MM34S
702 Carlyie Are MMM3
MUml Bach 33141
Rabbi Euoone Laboriti cit
Cantor Edward Kls^n
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Lli'
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1546 JeHarson Ae.. M.B., FL 3313
Tai.53a.4i 12
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Meaber
Cantor Nissim Benyamini
Oaay
wsss i mm, a t am
SataitajK.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W.120MI Street
23B2B01 ,
Rabbi OavW H. Au*rbech \
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Metteas
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
ChassAvs a 41st St.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
71 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
B51-1SB2
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0696
Rabbi Warren Kasxtl Moat.n o*
53 7231
" '"""".-|LIILll.._l, I ILIM
OAWY A. QLICKSTtlN, %E* ^^
HANRV JOLT, AasBjar. RaM
*Ul 0 CAFUKlJMUM
CAMToaMviDconvwaa
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 647 7526
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd
Or. Mai A. Lipschiu. Rabbi
Randall Konigaburg. Assl. Rabbi
Zee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown. Exec Director
0JantSSC Man. Fit 7.30 a.m _.
5 30 p m Fn Laia SarWca fWKt
fl p m
Sat !2Sam St 30pm.
Son. t a.m. I 8:30 p m.: Frt.
TEMPLE SINAI 16901 NE 22 Ar
North Dads s Retorm Cora/sosjion
Ralph P. Kinosley. Rabbi 932-6010
Julian I Cook. Associata Rsbbi
kvtng Shulkea. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Adminitlraw
&*mVLUaXSB8m%*
^a-^Itst^SV-*'
sat NaMaaTsS o*""*
TEMPLE i*ION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Or ConstnttW*
271 2311 ,. Ml
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi ^f
Benjamin Adler. Cantor
DatrM Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
BbseaJsta>6Tbas. Taat.
M aswt m*mtt*&*eSP
Rhoda t SM Mabar. vo^n'*, ln IW
isttaja-ssiiiM


Friday, May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
ablic Notices
bciRCU'TC0URTF0R
.InF COUNTY. FLORIDA
IApROBATK DIVISION
, Vile Number 86-2015
|FioidB.r No. 357510
1 r KSTATK Or
THA l.IKSHITZ.
Lr ^MINISTRATION
LALL PERSONS HAVING
R.gi OR DEMANDS
H'.HST THE ABOVE
KiS VND ALL OTHER
goN'S INTERESTED IN
lOl^ARE HEREBY NOTl-
Vn that the administration of
f Bertha Lifshitz,
unber 88-2016, is
|Lw ui the Circuit Court for
fc four' Florida. Probate
Ito,theaddreMofwliiehto71J
L Flagler Street, Miami,
frida 38180. The personal
-tentative of the estate is
[ot* Lifshitz. whose address It
M Jam.- Avenue. Apt. 4-A.
;nB,. Florida 88189. The
neand : he personal
Imetntf attornaji are set
I
.-hums or
i the estab
I! IN THREE
MTHS FROM THE HATE OF
E firsi PI BLH A'! ION OF
[IS NOTICE, to file with the
.-' a written
. i demand
laim must l*
indicate the
urn. the name and
.,lit..r or his agent
attrne>. and the amount
li-i,. I date when it will become due
ill be stated If the claim is
tingent or unliquidated, the
tore of the uncertainty shall be
ted. If the claim is secured, the
urity shall be described. The
imant shall deliver sufficient
lies of the claim to the clerk to
able the clerk to mail one copy to
ch personal representative.
Ill persons interested in the
ate to whom a copy of this
bee of Administration has been
iled are required, WITHIN
;ree months from the
me of the first
blication of this
rflCE, to file any objections
j may have that challenges the
idity of the decedent's will, the
ilifications of the personal
iresentativc. or the venue or
isdiction of the court.
ILL CLAIMS DEMANDS AND
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
LL BE FOREVER BARRED.
ate of the first publication of
s Notice of Administration:
ril 25. 1986.
JACOBO LIFSHITZ
h Personal Representative of
the Estate of
BERTHA LIFSHITZ
I )*<* p use' 11
IrrORNEY FOR PERSONAL
:presentative:
Office.- of Joseph W. Malek
even A (Greenspan, Esquire
0 Lincdn Road. Suite 501
ami Beach, Florida 33139
lephone: (805) 538-4431
"52 April 25,
May 2,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-15472-13
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
PALMIRA PEREZ
Petitioner/Wife
and
CARLOS R MOLINA
Responden V H usband
TO: CARLOS.R. MOLINA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
ROSA M. VEGA, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 362
Minorca Avenue, Suite 101, Coral
Gables, Florida 33134 (Fla. Bar
No. 464759), and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 16. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14th day of April. 1986
RICHARD P. BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROSA M. VEGA, ESQ.
362 Minorca Avenue, No. 101
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-0192
Attorney for Petitioner
00000 April 18, 25;
May 2,9,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-14338
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
W SMITH, husband
nd
ACHEL SMITH, wife.
W Rachel Smith
2070 Lincoln Ave.. Apt. No. 8
Opa Locka, Florida 33054
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
JED that a petition for
^solution of Marriage has been
W and commenced in this court
you are required to serve a
W of your written defenses, if
y. o it on Arthur H. Lipson,
Womey for Petitioner, whose
J**88 is 801 Northeast 167
pj. Miami, Florida 33162, and
* the original with the clerk of
* above styled court on or before
ty 23, 1986; otherwise a default
^1 be entered against you for the
w prayed for in the complaint
' Petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
s court at Miami, Florida on
"s 6th .lay of April 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
> D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
Aprils.
May 2, 9. 16, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT DN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 86-15322<0J>-FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
HARKLAND FULLER
Petitioner
and
YVONNE J. FULLER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: IVONNE J. FULLER, 315 E.
6 St., Jacksonville. Fl. 32206
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before May 16, 1986 and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
April 11, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19740 April 18. 25;
_________________May 2.9.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name WAR Fashions Divi-
sion of Marwal Industries Inc. at
6950 NW 37 Ct. Miami 33147 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Marcel Walder
19722 April 11,18.25;
May 2, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46361 FC 24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SEFINALDOREID.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ELIZABETH JUDY RF.ID.
Respondent/Wife.
Hi: ELIZABETH JUDY REID
1798 Nostrand Avenue
Apt 2R
Brooklyn, New York 11226
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
LAWRENCE SHOOT, ESQ..
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, PA., 3000 Biscayne
Boulevard. Suite 315, Miami,
Florida 33137. Attorney for Peti-
tioner, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above-styled court
on or before May 9, 1986, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint or Petition.
I! ii notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida, on
this 7 day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAWRENCE SHOOT, ESQ.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT. P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
3000 Biscayne Blvd. Suite 315
Miami, Florida 33137
19730 April 11.18.25;
May 2.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-14343-06
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AMELIA H. WALLACE, wife,
and
AVONSDALE R. WALLACE,
husband.
TO: AVONSDALE R. WALLACE
3315 FIELDGATE DRIVE
MISSISSAUGA. ONTARIO
L4X2J3
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on ARTHUR H. LIP-
SON, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 Northeast
167 Street Miami, Florida 33162
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before May 9, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19727 April 11, 18.25;
May 2.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-14471
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
WEYERHAEUSER
MORTGAGE
COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
RODOLFO GUERRERO, et ux.,
.t al ,
Defendants.
TO: RODOLFO GUERRERO and
B I B I A N A I D E
GUERRERO, his wife
OFC 42. Av Cuatriccntenaria
Torre Delta-Tachina
San Cristobal, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 6, Block 16, KINGS
COURT WEST, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 113, at Page 7.
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Fiber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
May 16. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before lerviCC on Plaintiff's
attorney of immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 8th day of April,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19733 April 11.18. 25;
May 2.1986
kia
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Southern Exposure
at 412 NE 125 Street. North
Miami, Florida 33181, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Howard Prine
19767 May 2,9,16, 23, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
mmi in business under the
fictitious name VAGABOND
LOUNGE intends to register said
,.th the Clerk of the Circuit
I Dade County, Florida.
i Ml. C. RICHARDS
April 11.18. ii"
Mav 2. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name LA-DBS at Post
Office Box 144728, Coral Gables.
Florida 33114-4728 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Latin American Direct
Broadcasting Services. Inc.
19763 May 2. 9. 16, 23. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name LIBRERIA LA
EDAD DE ORO at 5370 Palm
Ave., Suite 3, Hialeah, Florida
13012, intends to register said
the Clerk of the Circuit
i lade County, Florida.
.Nelson Grille
May J.'.'. 16,28, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-17400
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
NORMA ALAMO,
Petitioner,
and
MIDDONIO ALAMO,
Respondent.
TO: MIDDONIO ALAMO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER,
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 825
South Bayshore Drive, Suite 543.
Miami. FL 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before May 30,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25th day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19758 May 2,9,16,23.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name European Body
Shop, at 1040 West 23rd Street.
Hialeah, Florida 33010, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Luis Gonzalez
Julia A. Delgado
Partners
19761 May 2.9,16,23, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name R.L. Contractor at
351 E 13th St. Hialeah, Florida
33010, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Rene Ledesma
351 E 13th St.
Hialeah. Fl
19766 26:
v j 9 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 86-2047
DIVISION 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUANITA H. JONES,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Juanita H.
Jones, deceased, File Number, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Room 307.
Miami, Florida 33131. The per-
1 sonal representative of the estate
is Karen J. Wilson whose address
is 16275 NW. 45 Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33131. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dreai of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 25. 1986.
Karen J. Wilson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Juanita H. Jones
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Daniel Sepler. PA.
999 Brickell Ave., No. 400
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 577-0600
19748 April 25, May 2, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MIAMI DRY
GOODS, at 337 NW. 25th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127, intend to
register such name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
STUART T. SHAPIRO
ANNA I. SHAPIRO
PAUL EDLOW
a Partnership
119738 April 18.25;
May 2.9,1986
"in the circuit court for
dade county. florida
probate division
file number 86-2061
division (04)
in re: estate of
shirley rivlin.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE A B o V E
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HERE B Y
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of SHIRLEY
RIVLIN, deceased, Kile Number
86-2061, is pending in.the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The per
sonal representative of the estate
is Emanuel Smith, whose address
is 3100 South Miami Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33129. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney arc set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
.-( court a written state-
ment of any clam I they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must md' v.. ""basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
drees Of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be#
stated. If the claim is contingent er
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable^the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that chaWnge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 25. 1986.
Emanuel Smith
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SHIRLEY RIVLIN
Deceased
SILVER & SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
By: MAX R. SILVER
19749 April 25; May 2,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-16032-14
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LAMERCIE BROWNLEE,
Petitioner,
and
LEON BROWNLEE,
Respondent.
TO: LEON BROWNLEE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Courth Clerk on
or before May 23, 1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
April 17, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
19751 April 26;
May 2,9, 16, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NELSON D
CARDENAS Y SU ORQUESTA
DELUXE at 500 East 47th Street,
Hialeah, Florida 33013 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
NELSON ESTRADA
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN, ESQ.
Attorney for NELSON D'
CARDENAS Y SU ORQUESTA
DELUXE
19725 April 11.18.25;
May 2, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SUN CASUALS OF
FLORIDA, at 337 NW. 25th
Street. Miami. Florida 33127. in-
tend to register such name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
STUART T. SHAPIRO
ANNA1. SHAPIRO
PAUL El
a Partm i
19787


PC 10-B Th* ien/k riiii Public Xoticesf\
**/TKl Of ACTION
OJMI BLITHE VRi
r> the ctbcitt oocrr or
tse EiXTcrrv irvkOAL
aacvrr or tumwa. r>
and for dads coorrr
OB Mia Mo. U PCI*
sorter it pvbucatios
Of BZ TWIknafiW
CLAl'DITTE BASTON
DAILET
CE DATLEY
TO BRUCE DAILCY
i tun VSKHUWS
YOU All HEREBY SOT!
PIED that
n>n in w
petitiaa fcr
vaa arc raond to au a a
of year wnetea aeteaees rf
n to t USHER BEYS
ESQUIRE, atteraey for
Pifiiii. wheat ladnas a Sot*
** 4 Laaxaa Roas
Bcaex. EL :i and Se
ongaaai wsth the 4trk oft
atjrlarf oaart a r before May 30.
la** odamt a defaa* was be
yon far the retell
far b the cocas
WTnfESB hand and to* seel
at* 2*tt 4a, ej Apra i*
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Chart Ceresat Coort
Dade Coast?. Flonda
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Oer*
?Croat Coart Seaii
Dm BRYN ESQ
Sate 309 420 Lincoln Read
Mam Beach. PL 33139
Telephone O06) 532-1156
MM i;2'):ea;
V/TV7E UNDER
FbCTTTIOC* SAME LAaT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GTVEN
taac a
i a mi BASK
FORECLOSURE SERVICES a:
44* Eaat Dnae i at Crj rf
Sertk Maaa Fbarata 33142
UBa list Saw I
TROPICAL JASTTORLAL D*C
Br XMFHTNE BORE*
BES
Sat
Ceraurat* Seat
inaaaai far
MjtwB Bii a Eat,
PjO Box 1113
Mora Mae* Beaca. FL 331*
Teasahaar OKi 9B2-7222
1972 April! 1*. 25
Majt UBJ
soncE
BEBVICE8 TO PEBSONS
USABLE TO PAT THEBEFOB
M>CTH SHORE HOSPITAL
AND MEDICAL CENTER
MIAMI BEACH. PLOBIDA
The Bureau of Community
Medical Paeaaties. DepartaaaDt of
Health end Rehabilitative
State of Florida, haa
the HUT. of tl7.044.00
aa the level of uneompenaeted
to be made anaaUi by
Shore Hospital and Medical
m the penod of June 1.
IBM to May 31. 1986
Thai determmetion haa beep
made pursuant to the
requirements of the HBaaaaaal of
the Pubac Health Seme*. U.S.
Department of Health. Education
and Welfare. (42 CPR. 53 111) and
the applicable provunona of Florida
Medical Facilities Construction
Plan.
"Uncompensated services"
means services available in the
facility which are made available Id
unable to pay therefor
charge or at a charge
wroeh is leas than the reasonable
coat of such services The level of
such services is measured by the
difference between the amount
paid by such persons for the
services and the reasonable coat
thereof
The level set out above meets the
presumptive compliance guidelines
of the federal regulations and is 10
percent of all federal assistance
provided the facility under the
Hospital and Medical Facilities
Construction Act.
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center has the right to
determine how, when, and to
whom hospital services will be
provided.
There are no guidelines which
positively identify a person or
family aa eligible to receive full or
partial uncompensated services.
Each case must be evaluated on its
own merits.
19762 May 2.1986
ELEVENTH CIBCUTT COURT
DADE COUNTY. PLOBIDA
CABS NO. M-174M (13)
IN RE The Marriage of:
ANILU8 LOU1SSAINT
Petitioner,
and
BETTY Y. LOUISSATNT
Respondent
TO: BETTY Y. LOUI88AINT.t
Basidwrs unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marrisge upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612
Northwest 12th Av.. Miami.
Florida. 88136. and file original
with Court Clark on or before May
BO. 19B6. otharwias a default wl
be entered
DATED April 26, 1986
RICHARD P BRISKER
BY: E. 8EIDL
10766 |fa.B,B.lC,Bi.lBBf'
notice or Acnos
CONSTRUCTIVE SEBYKE
BJ THE CTBCtTT COCBT OT
THE ELXTESTH JUDICIAL
CTBCtTT OP FLOBIDA. Di
AND FOE DADE COUNTY
CM Actaaa N*. 00-I303S PC 01
SOnCE BY PUBUCATIOS
IS RE The Mamage of
LAUREN RAUCH CABRAL
Petitioner
aad
EROSALDO MEDEIROS
CABRAL.
Hiaj riit r ~
TO Erocaidr, Meoesros Cabral
isaa-nn UNKNOWN
YOU' ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Daaaaaaoc of Mamage haa beer.
Sad aad commenced as das court
aad you are maured to serve a
copy of your wnttec defenaea. if
aay. to a on USHER BRYS
ESQ attorney for Petrooner
whoae iJJrias a 420 Lmeotr.
Road, Suite 309 hair. Beacr.
Florida 33139. and file the orapnai
with the clerk of the above styied
eoart on or before May 16. 1986
otherwaw s default wfll be entered
agamst you far the rebel prayed
far in the complaint or petroor.
WTTNESS my hand and the seal
of saad court at Miami. Florida on
that 10th day of Apri. 1986.
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk Crrcurt Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal;
Attorney for Petitioner
USHER BRYS. ESQ
420 Uneoin Road. Suite 309
Miami Beach. FV.rvU 33139
Telephone (305) 532-1155
19735 April 18. 25:
May 2. 9. 1986
NOTICE USDCB
PKTfTKK.' SAME LAW
VTTCE B BXiXBV 1"TS
'rrjTjam -a-- sl-^i -.'--.-3.
Serncca at IW SE 123 Street
Svrta Msaaa. Plena* 3314:
he CJera af the Croat Coon of
DaaeCoaarr Fionas.
Mr PraakD Loo*
SJSM Mar2 : 23 :
.NOTICE OF ACTION
COS8TBUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. S6-17400 (12)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Mamage of
EPIFANIO D GARCIA
Petitioner,
and
OLGA GARCDV
Respondent.
Tt> OLGA GARCU
46 North Sherry Street Ap
B-4
Waihngford. Conn. 06492
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this Court
and you are required to serve a a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on CARLOS M.
MENDEZ. ESQUIRE. Attorney
for Petitioner, whoae address is
200 West 49th Street. Hialeah.
Florida 33012, and file the original
with the Clerk of the styled Court
on or before May 30. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
That notice shall be published
once each week, for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WTTNESS my hand and the seal
of aaid Court at Miami. Florida on
this 28th day of April, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ. Esq.
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attorney tor Petitioner
17M May 2.. 16.28.1986
IQOTtCE OP ACTION
CUNilBLCTTTE SESYKE
(NO PBOPEBTT,
Di TIB CTBCtTT COCBT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CTBCtTT OT FLORIDA. TS
AXB FOB DADE COUNTY
Ova- Artaaa No. B-17Ti0-3
action fob dissolution
ot mabbiage
IS RE TStMamswaaf
MARIA LEON"
Petxxsaerir^e
NELSON LEON
sfiaprrrttT-.Haataay!
TO NELSON LEON
ReapceaaBavHaabaad
115 -41st
Umoe Cary Sew Jersey 07087
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED test aa action for
Daaaaaaor. of Mamage aaa oeee
Sed agazaz i-jt ic^ ;.-... .-
leuuaed to serve a a copy of yoar
wnttec vfni. if any. to a on
IRVING 1 WHITMAN
ESQUIRE attorney for
Peaboner whose address a 10661
S Keneau. I>rrve. State 200.
Maun Florida 33176. and fac the
mayuai wxa the derk of toe above
styled court on or before May 30
1986-. otherwise s default wi be
entered agamst you for the rebef
demanded m the compsasot or
prtroon.
Tha noQee shall be puhaaaad
once each week for four
consecutive weeks :n THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WTTNESS my band and the seal
of aud court at Mauaa. Florida on
tha 28th day of Aprfl. 1986
BJCHARDP BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dad* County. Florida
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Oerk
(Co-curt Court Seal i
IRVING J WHITMAN
WHITMAN. WOLFE. GROSS A
SCHAFFELP_A.
10661 N. Kendall Drive Suit* 200
Miami. Florida 33176
Attorney for Petitioner
19766 Mav 2. 9. 16. 23. 1986
TN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OP THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. Di
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
PAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-11701 PC-22
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAGE
IN RE The Mamage of
MARC BAPTISTE
Petitioner.
and
JANET BAPTISTE.
Respondent
TO JANET BAPTISTE
41 Wellington Street
Spanish Town. JAMAICA
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for J
Dissolution of Mamage haa been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
LAWRENCE SHOOT, ESQ..
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT. PA., 3000 Biscayne
Boulevard. Suit* 315. Miami,
Florida 33137, Attorney for Peti-
tioner, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above-styled court
on or before May 9, 1986. other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the Complaint or Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WTTNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida, on
this 7 day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAWRENCE SHOOT. ESQ.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT. P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
3000 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 315
Miami. Florida 33187
19729 Aprfl 11.18.26;
May 2.1986
D" THE CTBCtTT COUBT FOB
DADC COUNTY. PLOBIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FTLE SUMBEB M-la
DnrsBosos
RE ESTATE OF
JERRY 5. 5SMAN
soncEor
ADMTNISTRATIOS
4 JERBY fVSSMAN
Pa* Saaabr 86-lBat
Coart far Dade Caaaty
set f'jrv besow
_ -^r^*L
asarari to Se
WTTHTN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FTRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE (I. al chasm
t&e estate sec -'-: sarr ot-
2* T "*'-
aBaaaaer-u^rt*
taoa ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TTON'S SOT SO FTLED WTLL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Pabhtataa. of tha Notsc* bai
aaaaj rx. Aprs 2 1986
Peraooa. Rcpreaentaove
E5THER SUSSMAS
1576 Dertoea Road
Ma.-- Beacr. Florida 33141
GESE K GLASSER ESQ_
No. 160354
Attorney for Personal
Bipnaii nun
ABRAMS AMTOX ROBBTSS
RESSICK. SCHNEIDER
* MAGER PA
2021 Tyler Street. P 0 Box 660
Hoarywood Florida 33022
Tesephone (305)940-8440
19754 Apri 26. Mav 2 1986
Di THE CIBCUTT COt aH OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CTBCtTT OP PLOBIDA Di
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-11766 CA-13
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
82481
GUILD LOAN" A
DIVESTMENT COMPANY.
Plaar.uff
va.
JOHNJ MACALUSO.
etal..
Defendants
TO: JOHN T MACALUSO
220 Nice Lane. No. 114
Newport Beach. CA 92663
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that ar.
actxm for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property.
Lot 14. Block 43 HEFLER
HOMES SUNSET PARK
SECTION 3. Plat Book 75
Page 68. Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gabies. Florida, 33146 on or before
May 9. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 7 day of April.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19728 April 11. 18.25.
May 2,1986
ELEVENTH CIBCUTT COUBT
DADE COUNTY. PLOBIDA
PC CASE NO. 86-11213
IN RE: The Marriage of
BENJAMTN DESRAVTNES.
Petitioner/Husband.
TB.
NORILIA T. DESRAVTNES.
Respondent/Wife
TO: NORILLA T. DESRAVTNES
c/o MARC LAURISTON PLACE
DU MARCHE St Louis Da Nord,
Haiti shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Diasoru-
uor, of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 N.W.
12th Avenue, Miami. Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 16. 1986.
otherwise s default will be entered.
Aprfl 11. 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
By JOHN C. BRANDA
19741 April 18.26;
May 2.9,1986
NOTICE OT ACTION
CONSTBUCTTVE SEBVKE
Di THE CIBCITT COUBT OT
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
(TBCtTT OT FLORIDA. tS
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
Ova" Aetaaa No. K-134*2 PC 14
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IS RE TVMarrssgeef
5ANDOR BABOCSAJ
LAURA BABOCSAl
TO LAURA BABOCSAl
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a bcodob far
aad pea are raoaaraa to serve a
?opv of yoar wnttec desaaaea. i
aay to K on USHER BRYS ESQ
artuiuij far Petaaoner whoae ao-
drsas a 420 Lmeaae Road State
309 Maast Beach. Florida 33139
and Se the orapeai was the tiers
of the above styied eoart on or
befare May 9 1986 otherwaw a
defasat wfll be entered agamst yoa
for the rebef prayed for x the eoca-
paaaa or prisiaai
be suTiBbt, i 1
far four eoa-
seeaove weeks m THE JEWISH
FLORJDIAS
WTTNESS my head aad the seal
of said coart at Mbudl Florida on
thai 3 day of Apri. 1986
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk Circuit Coart
Dade County Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clers
(Csremt Coart Seal)
Attoraer for Petrboner
D8HBB BRYTi. ESQ.
420 Lmcote Road Sort* 309
Maun Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (306) 532-1155
19721 Aprfl 11. 18. 25.
May 2.1986
Di THE CIBCUTT COl aTT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CTBCtTT OP FLORIDA Di
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-17348-tl
NOTICE OP ACTION
882481
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI, as Trustee for the
Houamg Finance Authority of
Dade County. Florida under a
Trust Indenture as of December 1.
1981.
Plaintiff
va.
HAN QUASG NGUYEN, et ux..
etal..
Defendants
TO: HAS QUASG NGUYEN and
NGOCDUNG T TRAN. ha
wife
1612 Worcester Road
Framingham. MA 01701
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property
Unit 13. LAKESIDE XI
CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium according to
the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11619. at Page 1469.
of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146. on or before
May 30. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WTTNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 24th day of April.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy derk
19757 May 2.9.16.23.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Rio International
Assoeiatea at 3789 NW 46 Street
Hialeah Fla intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Rio Food Corporation of
America Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Jorge Grungtasse, President
19739 April 18.26;
May 2, 9. 1986
Di THE CIRCUIT f OtTrr s.i
**%?* "*?'
PROBATt DIMsion
a-S^" *-a
rv-ac r-^T?**'1
HOI
^OPADMIN-JTPaTlOX
of BESOT^'n^l
*7 r*k, rrdZ
-*% snJa
aal Jawaaawai Baraaaj M
"^ ^* tins cam.
wmrrs three novrHsor
TMnBtTPl-BLICATI0\w
THIS NOTICE til in daa,
y* ** "d (21a,
*TOe-by at 'tortsted pm,,
*"**mtha v.ace was nuiW
", aaieags -.-< \-ibdm- 0f ^
8L the onaefieaaons 'of ta
perwoal NBaaaaaadvB, vejiot, a |
aaaahuiuc of tbe court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS MOT SO FILEDl
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Parjbca->r. :'. Dai Notwha!
kaaaa] 'jc May 2 I8M
Persona! Representative
MURRAY H0FFE.VBERG
6039 Colhrj Avenue
Maun: Beacr. FV-nda 33140
Attorney for Pervr.il Repte
HERBERTJ LERXER
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Has. Beach F.rKa 33140
Telephone l^061 673-3000
:*~* Miv2.9.l
Di THE CIRCUIT COIRT0F
THE ELE>TNTH JUDICIAL
CTRCTTT OF FLORIDA. Di
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Cm] Actiee
No. 86-1433* IM|
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
SHARON M ADAMS atfe
aad
ALVAN N .ADAMS, husband.
TO MR ALVAN N ADAMS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that i petition for Dissolu-
Don of Mamage his been filed ind
commenced in this court and you
are required to sen* i copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Arthur H Lipson. ittomey for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 16T Street. Miami.
Florida 33162. and file the original
with the derk of the above styled
court on or before Miy 9. 1986;
otherwise s default will be entered
against you f r the relief prayed
for m the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court a: Miami. Florida on
this T das of Apr.; 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Count) Florida
By T Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Coon
19742 April 18. & J
Mav 2.9.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name DA Auto Paint
and Body Shop at 2111 N.W. 139
Street. Bav No. 19. Opa-Locki
Florida 33054. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Count)'.
Florida.
Msunce D Duncan. Sr.
19731 April 11.18.
Miy2,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COUBT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PC CASE NO.: 86-13008
DJ RE: The Mamage of:
HECTOR QUESADA.
Petitioner/Husband.
ROSALBA 0 CAMPO |
QUESADA.
rleapondent/Wife. ,/,,UD(,
TO: ROSALBA 0'CAMPO
QUESADA No. 35 2775 Can Col-
ombia shall serve copy I**
Answer to the Petition for Dija*;
tion of Marrisge upon GfcOKW
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 61Z l*J
12th Avenue, Miami. FlorKB.
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before Msy 23, 1
otherwise a default will be entered.
April 15, 1966
RICHARD BRINKER
By: DC BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19743 Apnl01;^;
May 2,9,19*


"
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
lha( the undersigned, desiring to
Zpp in business under the
Stiou. name Trop.cal Sips of
M,ami a. 760 W. 27 St.. Hialeah
FL 331 >ntends to *,st*r s*"1
Lme with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Tropical Signs Corp.
Francisco Blmnco
President
19753 April 25;
May 2.9, 16,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2212
Divinion 02
|N RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN R. KANE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of John R. Kane, deceased. File
Number 86-2212 (02), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33131 The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 2, 1986.
Personal Representative:
ETHAN F. COHEN
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
MARTIN W. WASSERMAN,
ESQUIRE
(251143)
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19768 May 2.9.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 86-14669 06
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation
Plaintiff.
Business Note
Lina Macki has been elected
vice president in charge of install-
ment lending of Jefferson Na-
tional Bank. Her promotion was
announced by Barton S. Goldberg,
president of Jefferson National
Bank.
Friday. May 2, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
17,
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-16154
(16)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SONIA M. CROOKS
and
HUGH A. CROOKS
TO: Hugh A. Crooks
Cambridge Post Office
St. James, Jamaica
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
Ave., Miami. Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk ol
the above court on or before May
23, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
Dated in Miami on April
1186
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By E. SEIDL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19750 April 25;
May 2,9,16.1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-2163
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LUCILLE KNIGHT.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration of
the estate of LUCILLE KNIGHT,
deceased. File Number 86-2163. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Room 307,
Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Rena M. Wilson White,
whose address is 1011 N.W. 65
Street, Miami, Florida 33150. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each daim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the daim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
daimed. If the daim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the daim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the daim to the derk to
enable the derk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: May
2, 1986.
Rena M. Wilson White
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
Lucille Knight
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
DANIEL SEPLER. PA.
999 Brickell Ave.. No. 400
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 577-0600 .
l.)769 Mav2.9. 1986
Obituaries
GARDNER
Carl, of Miami Beach, died Monday at the
age of 85. He was a resident of Miami Beach
for over 50 years. He and a partner opened
Tropic Textile and Furniture Company on
South Beach in 1935.
Carl was very active in a number of
organizations in Miami Beach. He was foun-
ding member of the Civic League of Miami
Beach and its only three-time president. He
was further honored by the organization by
being made an honorary lifetime president,
the only member to be so honored. During
WWII he became active in the 52 Associa-
tion, a group that visited returning wound-
ed servicemen at the local VA Hospital in
Coral Gables. He was also an early member
of the Footlighters and served on its board
of directors for many years. He was very ac-
tive in Miami Beach politics. He served as a
boxing commissioner and a boxing judge for
many years on Miami Beach. He was also ac-
tive in the Miami Beach Elks and was a
Mason and a Shriner.
He is survived by his wife, Shirley; son,
Joe and daughter-in-law Frances and four
grandchildren. Glen, Carl, Robert and
Susan.
Services held today at Rubin-Zilbert
Memorial Chapel, Alton Road.
DORFMAN, Ella K.. 88, of Miami Beach.
Services held in Ridgewood, New Jersey.
The Riverside.
SCHOR, Helen L., of Miami Beach, April
26. The Riverside.
WINDERMAN, Isadore, 75, of Bay Harbor
Island. The Riverside.
NEUMANN, Milton. 86. of Miami Beach.
April 24. Levitt-Weinstein.
RESNEK, Abraham, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
LIEBERMAN, Albert, 73, of North Miami
Beach. April 23. The Riverside.
FELDMAN. Hyman, April 22. The
Riverside.
KLEIN. Beatrice, 63, of North Miami, April
23. The Riverside.
SIEGEL, Harry S.. 84, of Miami Beach.
April 23. The Riverside.

l&4>
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
SMITH, Lillian, 79. of Bal Harbour. April
23. The Riverside.
STAHL. Jared Todd. 17. of Miami, April 22.
The Riverside.
ZIKIND. Sidney. 85, of North Miami Beach.
April 23. The Riverside.
BAKER. Joe. 73. of North Miami Beach.
April 26. Levitt Weinstein.
BUCHBINDER. Joseph (Jerry), 90. of Bay
Harbor Isle. April 26. Services were held
in Perth Amboy. New Jersey.
FEDER, Elsie G., of North Miami Beach.
April 26. Menorah Chapels.
GAUER, Stanley, 78, of Miami Beach, April
28. Blasberg Chapel.
RASKIN. Sigo, 71 of Kendall. April 23. Ser-
vices were held.
SIMONS. Marshall D.. 62. of Saraaota.
Florida and formerly of Miami. April 30.
Services were held. Interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
HELLER. Sol, 72 of North Miami Beach,
April 11. Services were held in Fairlawn,
New Jersey.
K. Reuben
(Bob). Services were
SHAREK,
held.
BECK. Jeanne of Miami Beach. April 10.
Menorah Chapels.
LEVINSON, Dorothy, 79 of Kendall, April
11. Services were held.
BUSHMAN. David. 59 of North Miami
Beach, April 8. Services were held.
BRODY, Simon of Bay Harbor Island, April
18. The Riverside.
RAFKIN, Yetta W., 87 of Miami. The
Riverside.
STEINHARDT, Arthur, 68 of Miami. Ser
vices were held.
26640 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park. Michigan 4X2:17


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Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 2. 1986
Grand Opening
A Place
to Love Life.

New beginnings start here.
Activity, friendship, service and luxury. These
are the beginnings awaiting you at Northpark, a
beautiful new adult rental community where
every detail has been planned for your comfort
and peace of mind, including:
Luxurious One and Two-Bedroom apartments.
Social/recreational activities.
Extensive indoor and outdoor recreational and
physical fitness facilities.
Elegant dining.
Wellness Center.
Chauffeured scheduled limousine service.
vifeekry housekeeping and laundry service.
Shopping service and delivery.
Beauty and Barber shop.
The Market Place for snacks and sundries.
Complete Security System with
emergency medical response units.
Prime Hollywood location.
No entry or endowment fee.
These are just a few of the features that make lite
carefree at Northpark. By Levin Retirement
Communities, Inc., a subsidiary of Levin
Corporation, one of Americas oldest and best
known names in community development.
Northpark rental office is open daily 10 to 5
at 3490 Sheridan Street in Hollywood. Take 1-95
to Sheridan Street, then west to Northpark.
(305) 963-0200. Toll-free 1-800-346-0326
$&NorthPark
^X^ A prestigious adult rental community.
Levitt Retirement Communities, Inc.


4
Samuel I Adtef
President
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation
1984-1986
Norman Braman
General Campaign
Chairman
1985 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
greater
I liami
Jewish V
^O Annual
1 leeting
ederation
D
and
inner
Aaron Podhurst
General Campaign
Choirman
1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund
Honoring
Samuel I. Adler
Norman Braman
Aaron Podhurst
June 11,1986


r*T
*.........v- .-
mm
mum*:
SAVING TAXB8: ESTATE PLANNING AND CHARITABLE GIVING
"A Practicl Gui4"
A FREE SERVICE SPONSORED BY THE
fev^SH^pHILANrHRpPtS
of I A. Ormmlmr MiimmU Jtwimk F.dratUn
Wednesday. May 7th
5-7 pra
BISCAYNE BAY MARRIOTT HUTU
IM1 North bafihurt Diiv*
lion D'ocuvm
RSVP RrHuirrd
( J< lUr
No Satbt KMNjn ol I uftdt
CALL 576-4000 ezt. 352 for more information
Notice to all our friends
Lower oil prices have helped to
reinforce lower inflationary expecta-
tions in the minds of many investors.
This has led to a collapse in long term
interest rates as investors have
scrambled to lock up double digit
yields. Subsequently, both the stock
and long term bond markets have
soared to levels unprecedented dur-
ing this decade. This has created a
marvelous opportunity for investors
to shelter part of their gains through
a gift to the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Gifts such as these
have the effect of reducing your cur-
rent tax liability for 1986 while
generating significant benefits for
the Jewish community. Contact the
Foundation at 576-4000 for additional
information.
ANNUAL MEETING/CAMPAIGN ,
Federation Annual Meeting tribute to outstanding leaders
"Campaign Countdown" program in full swing
Saby Behar chosen UJA Young Leadership Cabinet Miami Area Chairman
CAMPAIGN/ALLIANCE DIVISION 4
Harold Beck to be honored at Mercantile Division reception May 22
Alliance Division photo highlights
WOMEN'S DIVISION 5
Dorothy Podhurst urges involvement in WD
11th Annual Retreat and Installation to feature sun, fun and
official business
WD announces new officers for 1986-87
Hold the Date
FEDERATION SOUTH DADE BRANCH 6
SD 1986-87 officers announced
Drs. Robert and Nilza Karl help Medical Outreach Group succeed
Sandi Samole chosen to head SD Synagogue/Federation Relationships
Committee
Photo highlights of SD "Israel 38" March
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH PHILANTHROPIES
SPECIAL INSERT 7-10
WOMEN'S DIVISION/AGENCIES n
WD 1985-86 Area boards to hold final meetings in May
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center opens at Mount Sinai
Hillel Jewish Student Centers to hold Annual Installation Dinner
Miami Jewish Home holds senior Olympics
"ISRAEL 38" PHOTO HIGHLIGHTS 12
AGENCIES 13
Seniors Walk "for the health of it"
Jewish Family Service provides aid to seniors forced to evacuate
Ex-Floridians talk about their new lives in Israel
Jewish Vocational Service provides additional programming during
"Older Americans Month"
National Council of Jewish Women to install officers May 7
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION 14
Viewers can now become JFTV members
"Torah Treasure Chest" teaches Jewish tradition
Singles' concerns are explored on "Pillow Talk"
May program guide
CALENDAR 15
Federation community calendar serves as "communal date book'"
YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL/AGENCIES 16
YLC "takes to the seas" on a three-hour cruise
YLC missions bring singles to Israel
YLC hold the date
Community Shaliach reflects on Israel's commemoration of Yom Hazikaron
Community commemorates Yom Hashoah Holocaust Remembrance -
with week of events
<
This material was prepared for The Jewish Floridian Supplement May 2,1986 by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation 4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33187
President Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee Forrest Raff el Newsmagazine Editor Mark Freedman
Director of Communications Nicholas Simmonds Associate Editor Ruth Korenvaes
Federation gratefully acknowledges Studio Graphics, Inc., 701 Sou* J^JJ"Jj
Suite 3. Hollywood. Florida. 9*0-7108, for its donation of the standing heaas
banner which are a part of our new look.


48th Annual Meeting June 11
Dtmald E. Lefton, chairman of the
1,8th Annual Meeting
Election of new leader-
ship and a tribute to three
outstanding current
leaders will highlight the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 48th Annual
Meeting and Dinner on
Wednesday, June 11 at 6
p.m. at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel, 1601 Biscayne
Boulevard.
A full slate of Officers, Trustees
and Board of Directors members will
be voted upon by meeting delegates.
Aaron Podhurst, general campaign
chairman and a Federation vice presi-
dent, has been nominated to serve as
Federation president.
Other nominees for officers' posi-
tions are: Samuel I. Adler as im-
mediate past president; Norman
Braman, Steven J. Kravitz, Donald
E. Lefton, Nancy Lipoff, Forrest
Raffel and Howard R. Scharlin as
vice presidents; Maxine E. Schwartz
as secretary; Herbert Canarick as
associate secretary; Michael M. Adler
as treasurer, and Alex Halberstein as
associate treasurer.
Annual meeting delegates will pay
tribute to Samuel I. Adler, outgoing
Federation president; Aaron
Podhurst, general chairman of the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign; and Norman
Braman, 1985 CJA-IEF general cam-
paign chairman.
Adler will complete a two-year
tenure as Federation president in
June. Under his leadership, Federa-
tion has allocated funds to provide an
ever increasing variety of vital
human services to people in Greater
Miami, Israel and Jewish com-
munities around the world. Prior to
becoming Federation president,
Adler served as a Federation vice
president between 1975 and 1982, as
the general campaign chairman in
1978-79, and was president of Jewish
Federation Housing, Inc. In that post
he was instrumental in the develop-
ment of Federation Gardens and
Federation Towers, both of which
provide low-cost housing for qualified
senior citizens.
Aaron Podhurst, who also served
as general chairman of the 1983 CJA-
IEF campaign, has chaired Federa-
tion's Vanguard and Pacesetter Divi-
sions and the Community Relations
Committee. Under his leadership this
year, the Federation is headed
toward its most successful regular
campaign ever.
The evening's other honoree is Nor-
man Braman, who served as general
chairman of the 1981 and 1985
Federation campaigns. Braman head-
ed up the first Miami Federation
peacetime campaign to surpass the
$20 million level in 1981. In addition
to his service to the Federation,
Braman serves on the Holocaust
Memorial Council, and on the boards
of numerous charitable and philan-
thropic organizations.
The 48th Annual Meeting will also
occasion the presentation of the 1986
Stanley C. Myers Presidents Leader-
ship Award.
Donald E. Lefton will chair the an-
nual meeting. Organizing Committee
members include: Amy Dean, Terry
Drucker, Alex Halberstein, Jon
Kislak, Jack H. Levine, David a Levy,
Norman Lieberman, Gail Newman,
Dr. Felix Reyler, Gloria Scharlin,
Maxine E. Schwartz and Rick
Turetsky.
All members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation are invited to this
important gathering. The Annual
Meeting and Dinner will have a
couvert of $50 per person, with
dietary laws strictly observed.
Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., followed by
dinner at 7.
For further information and reser-
vations, please call 576-4000, exten-
sion 261.
'Campaign Countdown'
counting on YOU
"Campaign Countdown" is in high gear! And there's still
time for you to join in this communitywide effort to assist our
fellow Jews.
Amy Dean, chairman of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's "Campaign
Countdown" Committee has announced dates and times for the series of
phonathons which will be held at the Federation Building, 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard, during the next month.
Many local Jewish organizations and Federation campaign divisions have
agreed to sponsor the phonathons which will help to close the 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign. The eight-week program will
conclude on June 8 with a day-long phone effort followed by a gala celebration
and worker recognition party.
Dean indicated that as an added incentive to volunteers, a "Campaign Count-
down Coupon Game" will be in progress throughout May and early June.
Volunteers will be eligible to win prizes by participating in phone programs or by
closing gifts through personal appointments with potential contributors.
Other members serving on the "Campaign Countdown" Committee with
Dean include: Arnold Altman, George Berliner, Pat Feldman, Howard Glass,
Doug Miller, Gail Jaffe Newman, Judge Robert H. Newman, Milton Samuels,
Maxine E. Schwartz and Jack Werksman.
Members of the community who wish to join the "Campaign Countdown" ef-
fort may participate in any of the sessions listed below by contacting Miriam
Zatinsky, "Campaign Countdown" coordinator, at 576-4000, extension 299.
Scheduled sessions include:
Tuesday, May 6 Special Gifts Division (GMJF) 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; GMJF Beneficiary
Agencies 5:30-8:30 p.m.; GMJF Board of Directors 5-7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 7 Special Gifts Division (GMJF) 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; All Volunteers
Open Session 5-9 p.m.
Thursday, May 8 Alliance Division 9-11 a.m.
Friday, May 9 GMJF Staff 9 a.m-4 p.m.
Monday, May 12 B'nai B'rith Youth Organization 5-8 p.m.
Tuesday, May 13 Special Gifts Division (GMJF) 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Thursday, May 15 Special Gifts Division (GMJF) 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; JCCs of Greater
Miami 5-9 p.m.
Monday, May 19 All Volunteers Open Session 5-9 p.m.
Tuesday, May 20 Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy 9-11 a.m.; Young
Leadership Council 6-10 p.m.
Wednesday, May 21 B'nai B'rith Youth Organization 4-8 p.m.; Young Leader-
ship Council 6-10 p.m.
Thursday, May 22 Young Leadership Council 6-10 p.m.
Friday, May 23 GMJF Staff 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Tuesday, June 3 Attorneys Division 1-3 p.m.; All Volunteers Open Session 5-8
p.m.
Wednesday, June 4 Attorney's Division 8:30-11 a.m.
Thursday, June 5 Attorneys Division 1-3 p.m.
Friday, June 6 GMJF Staff 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
SUNDAY, JUNE 8
CAMPAIGN COUNTDOWN FINALE PHONATHON 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
GALA PARTY AND WORKER RECOGNITION 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Saby Behar discusses his new leadership role
Saby Behar
The United Jewish Appeal's
n>ung Leadership Cabinet is one of
the most effective vehicles that we
have for developing new community
leaders," says Saby Behar, who is
about to become the Cabinet's Miami
area chairman. "The group is a very
exciting one to be involved in, both in
terms of the type of person who is a
member and also the programming
and new approaches."
Miamians play a major role in the
Young Leadership Cabinet, starting
with Michael M. Adler who is the
Cabinet's National Chairman,
Richard Berkowitz who serves as
chairman of Region V (Miami), and
now Saby Behar.
"When we recruit people for the
Cabinet, we are looking for quality,"
Behar says. "There are only 300
members nationwide and the re-
quirements we impose are quite
strict." These requirements include
mandatory attendance at the annual
Cabinet Retreat for new members
(this year the Retreat will take place
August 13-17); participation in one
mission to Israel in the first year; a
minimum of five face-to-face solicita-
tions resulting in two new gifts per
year; a leadership position in the
Federation annual campaign; and the
maintenance of a responsible giving
level.
The Cabinet uses an innovative
technique for soliciting its members.
Called "full disclosure giving," it in-
volves a candid disclosure of an in-
dividual's financial situation to a
small group of fellow Cabinet
members, followed by a group discus-
sion on what would be an appropriate
gift for that individual to make.
"Having participated in full
disclosure solicitation on a number of
occasions," says Behar, "I can
honestly say that you emerge from
the process with a marvelous feeling
of personal satisfaction and fulfill-
ment and with tremendous respect
for, and affinity with, fellow Cabinet
members."
In combining educational and
motivational techniques within an in-
timate group setting, the Cabinet at-
tempts to create an infrastructure of
relationships that forms the basis of a
national young leadership network.
These relationships are maintained as
individual Cabinet members assume
leadership responsibilities within Na-
tional UJA and within their own com-
munities. "In the final analysis
everyone benefits," says Behar. "The
individual member is better equipped
to take on leadership roles, the com-
munity has a resource of dedicated
and educated individuals and the
campaign benefits because Cabinet
members give up to their maximum
ability."
The following individuals are
members of the Miami area Young
Leadership Cabinet: Michael M.
Adler, Saby Behar, Jeffrey
Berkowitz, Richard Berkowitz, Brian
Bilzin, Tim Cohen, Alvin Entin, Mark
Friedland, Ignacio Goldemberg,
Roberto Kassin, Ezra Katz, Michael
Katz, Alan Kluger, Ronald Kohn,
Jack H. Levine, Robert Maland,
Robert Merlin, Steve Messing, Isaac
Mildenberg, Jeff Newman, David
Perkins, Ed Sheridan, Mark
Sheridan, Ed Shohat, John Sumberg,
Eric Turetsky, Allan Yarkin and
Richard Zinn.
For further information, contact
Ken Bierman at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, 576-4000, ext.
228.
Federation, May 1986 3


Merc event to honor Harold Beck
Harold Beck
Harold Beck, noted Miami philan-
thropist, will be the recipient of the
coveted Harold B. Bosworth Award
to be presented at the Mercantile
Division Cocktail Reception on Thurs-
day, May 22 at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel. 1601 Biscayne
Boulevard.
The reception is being held on
behalf of the 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Pro-
ject Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign.
Howard Socol serves as chairman of
the Mercantile Division, Leonard
Luna and Peter Luria are division co-
chairmen.
Beck, a former Federation board
member and president of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged, will receive the award named
in memory of Harold B. Bosworth.
Initiated in 1964. the award is
presented each year to an individual
in the Greater Miami business com-
munity who exemplifies the prin-
ciples, beliefs and humanitarian con-
cepts of Harold Bosworth. and who
has contributed to the betterment of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and the community in general.
There is no couvert to attend the
Mercantile Division Cocktail Recep-
tion which is hosted by division spon-
sors. Participants are required to
make a minimum gift of $50 to the
1986 CJA-IEF campaign.
Jeffrey Bayer. Robert Fisch.
Robert Goldstein. Gary Holtzman and
David Schiener serve as chairmen of
the Department and Retail Stores
Group; Larry Mizrach and Howard
Margoluis are chairmen of the Ap-
parel Group.
Home Furnishing Group chairmen
include Jim Baros. William J. Baros.
Jr., Harold Beck, Tim Cohen and
Brian Strelitz. David Shore is chair-
man of the Jewelry Group.
For more information and reserva-
tions for the Mercantile Division
Cocktail Reception, please contact
Daniel Lepow at Federation.
576-4000. extension 250.
Hnnsy Friedman and Charlotte Held led a legion of Fed* rat
in all. 'luring Buddy-l'p Day 1V86. The special event, th. .
''Raider* oftht Last Cards, raised SilO.OOOon behalf of tin < JA-IEF rampant
Residents of Park Gardens Condominium in Miami Bearh held a meetingn
behalf of the Federation 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel E >-"jeney Funi
The guest speaker was Rabbi Yehuda Melber. spiritual leader fnesHa
Beth Raphael. Seen at "ent were members of the Special Comm i for 'htim.
They are, from lift, Mike Cohein; Sol Sherman: Sam Leifer. B- r> ard WingitU.
chairman of the drive; Rabbi Yehuda Melber. guest speaker; A ri S til :.f\Mn-
cial secretary: ami Sender \f. Kaplan, representative of the Fed
Photo highlights of Alliance Division events
Members of the Federation's Bal Harbour
101/Balmoral Alliance set a precedent for the Bal
Harbour community with a first-time. $2,500
minimum leadership gifts event on behalf of the
Federation campaign. Many of those who attended
the dinner made gifts at that level for the first time.
In addition, there were three new gifts at the
Vanguard level and 10 new Women's Division
Trustees.
Seen at the event were, standing from left. Murry
Puterman; guest speaker Zelig Chenitz. director oj
Israel's Operation Independence program; Sam
Rosenfield. chairman of the Bal Harbour
101/Balmoral Alliance; Jack Millstexn; Jules Gerson;
Irv Kovens; Ed Shapiro; and Louis Handler. Seated,
from left, are Howard Mescon; Edith Legum. recep-
tion chairman; Leon Cohen; and Walter Levin.
More than 300 residents of the Aventura Community
attended a $100 minimum gift brunch on behalf of the
Federations 1986 CJA-IEF campaign. Seen at the
event were member a of the Federation Aventura Ex-
ecutive Committee. Seated, from left, are Micky
Karzen, Dorothy Sandlofer, guest speaker Yaacov
Morris, Aventura General Chairman Hazel Canarick
and Irving Stessel. Standing, from left, are Seymour
Goldstein, Stanley Whitelaw, Manny Weiss, Dr. Mor-
ton. Goose, Dr. Sydney Freilieh, Harry Rosen, Fred
Hirsch. Bill Heiberger and Max Sussman.
S.....it the Point East Advai eedC
held ftht Fed*
from left. Ken ana Rut!
chairmen; Ernie Sammeis, Max S
Kepes, event hosts, and Molly* L
Executive Committee member. Seat-
Don Rath, event guest tptaker. I ''"*
Irene Ken
At the 2nd Annual Turnberry Isle Ambassador Ball
Federatum presented Ball Chairman Harry Gampel
above unth an award for his outstanding service to the
Jewish community.
Federation recently held a brunch for *fftl
Winston Towers on behalf of the 1986 CJA***-fr
at the event were, from left. Event Coordinating
mittee members Morton Gluckman. Hoist sw
Joseph Hofrichter and Joseph Reuel; "tsl
speaker Israel Amitai, Israeli journalist em
sion producer; and Event Coordinating J^jaJj
members Manuel Pearl, Jerome Berliner ana em
Farber.
4 Federation, May 1986


\A message from the
Women's Division president
Dorothy Podhurst
Moshe Dayan once said "All we ask
[is that you feel Jewish because
I then you will do what one Jew does
when another Jew is in trouble
[anywhere. You will help."
think it is important to note that
I Dayan was not only speaking in
[terms of fund raising. He was speak-
ing in the broader sense, underscor-
ing an important principle which has
Iguided Jewish communal participa-
tion for generations.
Feeling Jewish is what Federations
lare all about. Participating in the ac-
tivities of the Women's Division is the
Ibest expression of commitment to the
welfare of our community, whether it
me for the purpose of raising funds or
[raising consciousness.
As we look to the year ahead, it
Iwould be useful to take stock of the
numan assets you possess, and how
phey tan best be put to work to
enhance our own Jewish identities
and the community's. First, I'd like to
[talk about a very basic need. Your
lime. Realistically, what better use
pmld you make of your time than
Volunteering for Federation? Speak-
ing from a purely objective point of
hew. I can't think of any.
The late Marilyn Smith, who gave
0 much to the Miami community
perhaps stated it best. Writing in Mo-
ent Magazine on the "Pride of the
Professional Volunteer," she said
[There are a vast number of other
pings I'd love to do; but for me; right
bow, the action is here as a volunteer
. Where else can one find the
potential for such outstanding per-
sonal enhancement; the superb op-
portunity to risk, to learn and grow;
ihe possibility of sharing unique
events with such special human be-
ings; the occasion to participate in
raising funds and rendering decisions
that impact Jewish life here in Israel
and in the world at large? Where else
can one feel so congruent, working in
a professional capacity with no
monetary compensation for
something so positive and important
as the perpetuation of the dreams and
values of our people?
Marilyn's words need no embellish-
ment, but allow me to add just a few
thoughts. Jewish life is replete with
trying moments and proud times. For
those of you who can, remember how
it felt to be a Jew in 1948 on the day
of independence? Remember how it
felt to be a Jew during the Six Day
War, or in the wake of the Entebbe
rescue mission? And most recently,
how it felt to be a Jew just last year as
we rescued 20,000 Ethiopian Jews?
Our traditions and proud history
are alive because our people have
always cared enough to give the time
required to better our lives and make
them more secure. Your activities on
behalf of the Women's Division are
extremely relevant to carrying on
this tradition. Every time you
transmit the important message of
Federation to a previously unaf-
filiated Jewish woman, you add a
critical link to the chain of Jewish life.
I ask you to join me in making this
year a turning point. Let me be
specific. On the campaign side, this
community has the potential to in-
crease its campaign achievement
significantly in the coming year. Our
Women's Division is absolutely
critical in achieving this goal. And
just as important, let's turn-on more
women in our community to this
Federation. The old axiom "if one
friend tells one friend, who tells
another, who tells another ." can
work for us. All you need to do is find
the time to do the telling.
I look forward to working closely
with all the members of our Women's
Division, and I'm confident that if we
establish some attainable goals, our
potential for achievement is limitless.
I'd characterize myself as a great op-
timist, and I'm asking you to share
this spirit of optimism as we move
ahead. Let's remember while it is im-
portant to think Jewish, we must also
feel and act Jewish to reach our full
potential.
Dorothy Podhurst
President
Women's Division
WD Hold the Date
Monday, May 5
South Dade Board Meeting
Burdines Dadeland
10 a.m.
Tuesday, May 6
Miami Beach Board Meeting
Neiman Marcus Bal Harbour
9:30 a.m.
North Dade Board Meeting
Home of Sue Graubert
10 a.m.
Wednesday, May 7
1 Business and Professional Women's Net-
working Program
Sheraton River House
5:45 p.m.
Thursday, May 8
(ampaign Steering Committee Evalua-
tion Meeting
Federation Building
! 10 a.m.
Tuesday, May 13
New York Mission Reunion
Home of Betty Cooper
12 noon
Thursday, May 15
Executive Committee Evaluation
Home of Dorothy Podhurst
9:30 am
Wednesday, May 21-
Thursday, May 22
Retreat/Installation
Sonesta Beach Hotel
Thursday, May 29
Executive Committee Department
Planning Meetings
Federation Building
10 a.m.
Week of June 9
Constituent Board
Selection Meetings
Representatives
WD Retreat/Installation
May 21-22
Every member of the Federation
Women's Division is invited to join in
the combination of sun. fun and of-
ficial business at the Women's Divi-
sion 11th Annual Retreat and In-
stallation, announced Terry Drucker.
WD vice president for Leadership
Development. The event is scheduled
for May 21-22 at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel on Key Biscayne.
The first day of the Retreat, May 21, is
designated as a "playday," offering par-
ticipants the opportunity to enjoy the
pool, tennis courts, private beach,
aerobics classes and other hotel facilities.
Toward the evening, things will become a
bit more serious with cocktails in the
Retreat chairwomen's room, followed by
a poolside barbeque including the installa-
tion of 1986-87 Business and Professional
Women officers.
Following the BPW installation,
featured guest Dafna Soltes will present a
special workshop on the Holocaust. Using
dramatics, movement and creative
writing, Soltes' workshop is guaranteed
to personalize and deepen each partici-
pant's perception of the Holocaust
experience.
A "midnight brownie bakeoff" will
liven up the nightime happenings on the
21st. All Retreat participants are en-
couraged to bring their own baked
delights and join in this chocoholics
dream.
The following morning. Dafna Soltes
will perform "Blessed is the Heart: The
Story of Hannah Senesh," a blend of
dance, song, poetry and prose. The one-
woman show portrays the life of Hannah
Senesh, a member of the Jewish
underground who helped rescue Euro-
pean Jews from the Nazis and was even-
tually captured and killed at the age of 23.
Dafna Soltes
See "Retreat." Paje 11
WD announces 1986-87 officers
President.................................................................................................. Dorothy Podhurst
Vice President, Campaign................................................................................. Gail Newman
Vice President, Campaign Designate........................................................................Amy Dean
Vice President, Community Education...............................................................Terry Drucker
Vice President, Leadership Development.....................................................Robbie Herskowitz
Secretary...............................................................................................................Elaine Ross
Parliamentarian..................................................................................................Sue Graubert
Nominating Committee Chairwoman.............................................................Maxine Schwartz
Business and Professional Women Constituent Board
Chairwoman............................................................................................... Maryanne Witkin
Vice Chairwomen. Campaign............................................................................ Karen Brown
.................................................................................................................' Ray Ellen Yarkin
Vice Chairwomen, Community Education....................................................* Nancy Berkowitz
....................................................................................................................Adrienne Messing
Vice Chairwomen, Leadership Development/Networking...................................Diana Fleeman
..........................................................................................................Ileane Ray man-Kaufman
.........................................................................................................................Susan Neshick
Secretary..............................................................................................Lisa Leuchter-Treister
Nominating Committee Members..........................................................................Anne Bloom
....................................................................................................................Cornelia Philipson
Miami Beach Constituent Board
Chairwoman......................................................................................................Meryle Loring
Vice Chairwomen, Campaign.....................................................................* Helene Berkowitz
..............................................................................................................................SaraRaiffe
Vice Chairwoman, Community Education........................................................Candace Ruskin
Vice Chairwoman, Leadership Development.......................................................PamTuretsky
Secretary........................................................................................................Eliane Rackman
Nominating Committee Chairwoman...................................................................AdriaRasken
Nominating Committee Members...................................................................Barbara Aronson
...............................................................................................................................Vicki Land
North Dade Constituent Board
Chairwoman................................................................................................ Debbie Edelman
Vice Chairwomen, Campaign...........................................................................* Sandy Belkind
.......................................................................................................................Monica Gur land
Vice Chairwomen, Community Education.......................................................Shirley Bergman
........................................................................................................................Phyllis Henann
Vice Chairwoman, Leadership Development.......................................................Ellen Elbrand
Secretary......................................................................................................Stephanie Hirsch
Nominating Committee Chairwoman....................................................................Lenore Elias
Nominating Committee Members..............................................................................JudiBillig
..............................................................................................................................LoisEntin
South Dade Constituent Board
Chairwoman....................................................................................................Micki Hochberg
Vice Chairwomen, Campaign........................................................................* Barbara Kasper
.............................................................................................................................Gail Meyers
Vice Chairwomen, Community Education......................................................Selma Rappaport
Vice Chairwoman, Leadership Development.........................................................Estelle Segal
Secretary...............................................................................................................Joan Hayet
Nominating Committee Chairwoman........................................................................Elly Wolff
Nominating Committee Members..........................................................................Linda James
........................................................................................................................Phyllis Salzman
Southwest Dade Executive Officers
Chairwoman........................................................................................................* Judy Adler
Vice Chairwoman, Campaign.......................................................~........................Fran Benin
Vice Chairwomen, Community Education........................................................Vivi Brownstein
.........................................................................................................................Susan Nullman
Vice Chairwomen, Leadership Development.................................................. Heidi Friedland
........................................................................................................................Judi Levenshon
Secretary..................................................................................................................TatiKa'
Nominating Committee Chairwoman......................................................................Stella Haas
Nominating Committee Members...............................................................................Pat Levy
...............................................................................................................................Susan Zinn
incumbent
L
More WD news see page 11
Federation, May 1986 5


-SO announces 1986-87 officers
The Selection
Committee of
the Federation
South Dade
Branch has ap-
r>inted new of-
i c e r s for
1986-87, it was
announced at
the Branch's
April Board of
Directors
meeting by
Ellen Mandler,
chairman of the Selection Committee.
Norman Lieberman
Norman Lieberman, who served as
1985-86 South Dade Branch vice
chairman for Campaign, will serve as
the new Chairman of the Board.
Lieberman is a member of the
Federation Board of Directors, and
has served as chairman of the
Federation Stockbrokers Committee.
He has been an active member of the
South Dade Branch for many years,
and serves on its Community Ser-
vices and Planning Committee.
Larry Metsch will serve a second
term as the South Dade Branch vice
chairman for Community Education.
He has been a campaign worker in
the Federation Attorneys Division
and serves as chairman of the South
Dade Branch's Community Educa-
tion Committee. Metsch also served
as co-chairman of the "Israel 37"
Yom Ha'atzmaut March in South
Dade last year.
Newly selected as officers on the
Board are Robert Benin, as vice
chairman for Human Resource
Outreach; Samuel Harte, as vice
chairman for Community Services
and Planning; and Nedra Oren, as
vice chairman for Campaign.
A member of the South Dade
Branch's 1985-86 Board, Robert Ber-
lin comes to his new position after
having served as co-chairman of the
very successful South Dade
Branch/YLC "Blast from the Past"
event held recently. Benin serves as
co-chairman of the Federation's YLC
Couples Committee, and has been an
active campaign volunteer in the
Federation Attorneys Division.
Samuel Harte, Federation Board
member and president of Jewish
Federation Cable Television (JFTV),
served on the South Dade
Branch's 1985-86 Board. He has also
served on the South Dade Branch's
Community Services and Planning
Committee and the Human Resource
Outreach Committee.
Nedra Oren comes to her new posi-
tion as the South Dade Branch's vice
chairman for Campaign after having
served several terms on the South
Dade Board and on its Campaign and
Community Services and Planning
Committees. Oren serves on Federa-
tion's Campaign Steering Commit-
tee, and for two years chaired the
South Dade Branch's "Bigger and
Better Event."
The Federation South Dade Branch recently sponsored a presentation of-Trial
and Error," a play based on transcripts from the trial of Soviet refusenik Yuli
Edelstein. Seen at the event were, from left, South Dade Branch Chairman Alvin
Lloyd Brown; Sharon Azoulay, chairman of the Branch's Community Education
Committee; University of Miami Student Wayne Firestone, author/producer of
the play; and Larry Metsch, South Dade Branch vice chairman for Community
Education.
Medical Outreach Group
moves ahead
Paul Berkowitz, Federation South Dade Branch vice chairman for Human
Resource Outreach, is pleased to announce that the new South Dade Medical
Outreach Group held its first participatory program last month, and the program
was outstandingly successful. The program, which is designed to educate par-
ticipants and help enhance their sense of Jewish commitment, is chaired by Dr.
Robert Karl.
According to Berkowitz, "We tried for a long time to establish such a group
in this area. Yet it wasn't until Robert Karl and his wife. Dr Niiza Karl, stepped
in that we were able to succeed. Not only do the Karls have a deep commitment
which drives them to want to share that commitment with others, but they also
have the leadership skills necessary to get others active in the program."
In the first program of the Medical Outreach Group, held in the Karls home.
Rabbi Edwin Farber, spiritual leader at Temple Samu-El, led a participatory
study of the book of Esther in conjunction with the holiday of Purim. Rabbi
Farber related the story to our Jewish community and the Diaspora today.
Future programs of the group will be held monthly, with the next meeting
scheduled for May 15.
For more information about the South Dade Medical Outreach Group, call
Marcia Sue Needle at 251-9334.
Sandi Samole named chair of Relationships Committee
Roz Benin, chairman of the South
Dade Branch's Community Services
and Planning Committee, is pleased
to announce that Sandi Samole has
been appointed chairman of the new
South Dade Synagogue/Federation
Relationships Committee. Samole is a
member of the South Dade Branch
Board of Directors and served as cc-
chairman of the Branch's
"Pathfinder" event.
Samole's appointment comes as the
result of her outstanding participa-
tion in the activities of a Community
Services and Planning Committee
fact-finding effort which began last
summer to determine the feasibility
of establishing a permanent Relation-
ships Commiteee. It was decided in
January by the South Dade Branch
Board of Directors that, in light of
the fact-finding committee's recom-
mendations, the establishment of a
permanent Synagogue/Federation
Relationships Committee was
desirable.
The purpose of the new Committee,
which is still in formation, is to serve
as a liaison between Federation and
synagogues and Federation
beneficiary agencies in South Dade.
The Committee hopes to encourage a
greater sense of cooperation among
organizations in the South Dade area,
and to help the various groups work
* According to Samole, the fact-
*inding effort laid the groundwork for
much of the work the Relationships
Committee will do in the future.
"Between June 1985 and January
1986," she said, "we met with
representatives of several area
synagogues to discuss whether the
permanent Committee was necessary
and to talk about ways in which we
can improve the existing
relationships.
"Through these meetings, we
decided that once the Committee was
formed, we should extend its scope to
deal with agency relationships as
well. So, the Relationships Commit-
tee will soon begin this process,"
Samole continued. "In addition,
within the coming months, the Com-
mittee will meet with agency and
synagogue representatives to decide
whether we would like to establish a
formal Jewish community council in
the area."
The next meeting of the South
Dade Synagogue/Federation Rela-
tionships Committee will be held
Tuesday, May 6. For more informa-
tion, please call Marcia Sue Needle at
251-9334.
'Israel 38'March
highlights
The "Israel 38" Yom Ha'atzmaut March Ml Sou*
Dade, coordinated by the Federation South Uaae
Branch in cooperation with the Jewish Comwunuy
Centers of Greater Miami, attracted more than l.uw
participants. The March benefited the fffg^Si
Above, at left, the Miami Coral Park High Scto*
Band is seen marching behind Torah-bearers, vho&
the March. At left, Federation South Dade Bra**
Chairman Alvin Lloyd Brown waves as he **%*
beside members of the KiUian High School Band.
Above, march chairman Susan Metsch leads flMrw
in singing "The Star Spangled Banner ana
"HatiJcvah."
6 Federation, May 1986


Vol.1, No. 1
A publication of the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
May 1986
Profiles in Generosity: Melvin L. Kartzmer
For Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration Board Member Melvin L.
Kartzmer, community service is a
life long commitment. Despite the
demands of his pension planning
business, he has found time to par-
ticipate in dozens of worthwhile
causes which benefit the commu-
nity. He currently serves as chair-
man of the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies.
Kartzmer sees the Foundation
as a logical extension of charitable
giving above and beyond the Fed-
eration's annual Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. In this interview, he
discusses his views on the impor-
tance of the Foundation and the
building of the Jewish Community
Trust Fund.
Q: Lefs start with a basic point.
What is the difference between Feder-
ation's annual campaign and giving
opportunities with the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies?
A: The difference is that the
annual campaign seeks to meet the
current needs of the Jewish com-
munity through its local agencies
and programs as well as for the
people of Israel and Jews through-
out the world. At the end of the
year there are no funds left in re-
serve because we have allocated all
the money raised in the annual
campaign. On the other hand, the
Foundation acts as a community
reserve, providing necessary funds
for emergencies at home and
abroad. It represents, in some
ways, the long term stability of the
Miami Jewish community. In es-
sence, the campaign is the basic
'ife-blood, providing for the cur-
rent needs of our beneficiary
agencies. The Foundation is here
for the unforeseen and to make
change and creativity possible.
Q: As someone who has been ac-
tive in our community for many
years, can you tell me why you see the
need for the Foundation?
A: Well again, it builds stabil-
ity, it provides us with the flexibil-
ity to meet the ever increasing
needs of our community. It creates
a comfort zone which allows the
community to handle unexpected
reverses or emergency situations.
For example, in the last several
years the unrestricted funds of the
Foundation have been used to pro-
vide additional resources to Feder-
ation's Planning and Budgeting
Committee to meet increasing lo-
cal needs. Moreover, the Founda-
tion can help to meet the extraor-
dinary needs for capital which
weren't provided for in annual
budgets. Funding is also available
to provide seed money for projects
and programs which haven't been
tried before, and which we feel
there is a need for in the commu-
nity. In short, the Foundation's re-
serves are the funds that are put
aside in advance, in anticipation of
future needs. These reserves are
terribly important to us.
Qj Do you feel that giving to the
Foundation is limited to the wealthy
members of our community?
A: Absolutely not. Everyone
in the community can contribute
in some manner to help us build
and strengthen the future of our
people. After all, it is not just
wealthy people who have children
and grandchildren who will be
growing up in the Miami commu-
nity. All of us have an obligation to
make this a better place for our
children and grandchildren to live.
That's part of Jewish life and al-
ways has been.
Q: You're an astute business-
man. Tell us what you see as some of
the business and tax advantages of
giving to the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies.
A: Let's assume that an indi-
vidual has an asset which has ap-
preciated in value. This asset
might take the form of real estate
or common stock. Were this per-
son to sell this asset today, a capital
gains tax would have to be paid on
the profit above the initial cost. If
our contributor would consider
gifting this asset to the Foundation,
prior to sale, the tax would be
avoided. Under present law, the
Federal government allows a con-
tributor to take a full income tax
deduction in the year the gift is
made for the fair market value of
any asset that is contributed to us.
So several things happen.
First, the contributor saves a
potential long term capital gains
tax that he or she would have had
to pay by selling the asset, and, sec-
ond, the contributor receives the
full income tax deduction for the
value of the asset. Third, the con-
tributor maintains the right to
make recommendations to the
Foundation Board as to distribu-
tions of income and principal of
the fund which further the con-
tributor's own philanthropic de-
sires. Finally, the asset which has
been given away is no longer a part
of the donor's estate, thereby sav-
ing taxes which would have been
imposed by the government at a
future point. I think we are indeed
fortunate to live in a country where
philanthropic giving is rewarded.
These advantages certainly cannot
be found in other countries!
The Reward
of a#
Personalized
Philanthropic
Fund
Deeplv hidden in most peo-
ple's psyche there's a secret desire.
It's not something most people talk
about, nor is it a desire most of us
ever realize. But there's little ques-
tion that almost everyone would
like to leave their mark on history
to be remembered for having
improved our community and our
world.
Now, there's a great way for
many people to accomplish that
difficult goal. Through the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies,
you can establish a personalized
Philanthropic Fund that will bear
your nameand carry your good
works into the future.
Setting up a Philanthropic
Fund is easy and convenient.
Here's how it works:
The donor makes an irrevoca-
ble lifetime gift to the Federation
of money or appreciated property.
There is no minimum gift.
The donor and/or his or her
designee has the privilege of mak-
ing recommendations for the dis-
tribution of principal and/or in-
come from the fund to more than
318 eligible organizations on the
Foundation's ever-expanding list.
If those recommendations
are approved by the Foundation
Board, the gift is sent either in
the name of the donor or anony-
mously, depending on the donor's
wishes.
The Foundation's professional
staff handles all the paperwork.
The donor is granted the
maximum tax deduction for chari-
table contributions. Capital gains
taxes are not realized on the trans-
fer of appreciated property.
Additions can be made to the
Fund with the same tax and chari-
table benefits that were provided
at its inception. All interest accrues
to the Fund.
All funds are strictly confi-
dential. Overall Foundation opera-
tions are monitored by the Foun-
dation's Board of Trustees.
In short, a Personalized Phi-
lanthropic Fund offers an out-
standing way to make an enduring
gift and obtain a range of great tax
benefitswhile truly making an
important mark on history.


^^^
Jay and Ton Kislak
are building a stronger
Jewish community by
investing in Miami's future
FOUNDATION
PHILANTHROPIC
FUNDS:
GIVING
OPPORTUNITIES
TO PRESERVE
JEWISH
UFE
For internationally known
mortgage bankers Jay and Jon
Kislak, philanthropy and good
business go hand in hand. |a\
Kislak is a builder and an investor
in dreams for a bright Jewish fu-
ture, a dream shared by his son.
Jon. Together they represent the
continuity which has helped the
Jewish people to survive and nour-
ish for nearly four thousand years.
The Kislaks have transformed the
Miami skyline while dedicating
equal amounts of time and energy
to building this Jewish community
and working for the securitv of the
Jewish homeland. Israel.
By establishing philanthropic
funds with the Greater Miami |ew-
ish Federation's Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies, the Kislaks
have It hiii continuing their tradition of diver-
sified charitable giving hInk max-
imizing their lax benefits. This is
an example of the business at u-
men which characterizes the
Kislaks' careers.
Jay Kislak explains whv hees-
tabhshed a philanthropic fund. "Ii
was the perfect investment instru-
ment lor me. It allows me to make
recommendations as to w hit h in-
stitutions should receive Mip|*>rt.
and it gives me a great deal "I
freedom to create mv own pro-
gram of philanthropy, and ii bene-
fits not onlv this community but
Israel as well*
Jon Kislak adds. ~Bv establish-
ing a philanthropic fund w know
that there will Ik* resoun es to han-
dle future emergencies and to
meet new needs as thev aris< in the
Jewish communitv and st* u as a
whole. I've always taken great
pride in participating in nun erous
t haritabie activities on behall ol
|ewish organizations and the com- ,
tnunitv at Luge, Hie philanthrope
fund which niv wife, I ina and I
have created, is. in essence, an in-
surance policy which will guaran-
tee that the traditions and the insO-
tuuons which we cherish will thrive
for generations to come."
Creating a
legacy/or
the 21 st
ctntwy.


}
ph Handleman
iows the Jewish f u
e hands of those \
pable of building
THE
ZERO COUPON
BOND
PROGRAM:
FOUNDATION'S
INVESTMENT
IN
TOMORROW
Joseph Handleman is a pio-
neer. He sensed the wave of the fu-
ture in the early 1950s, pioneering
the mass merchandising of high
fidelity and later stereophonic-
records in retail stores across the
United States. A board member of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, Joe continues to apply his as-
tute pioneering spirit, becoming
one of the first participants in the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthro-
pies Zero Coupon Bond Program.
Joe, a management and finan-
cial consultant, has continued to
build upon the Jewish tradition
long after others would have felt
they'd done enough. "I'm eighty
years old now," noted Handleman.
"so I tend to think of goals for the
short-term."
But that is only partially true.
As a charter member of the "David
Ben Gurion Million Dollar Society."
Joseph Handleman is investing in
the future, expressing his desire
that Jewish life will flourish here,
and in Israel, well into the 21st
century.
"I believe," Handleman said,
"that if properly harnessed, we
have limitless opportunities to
make Miami a great metropolitan
center. We must present out youth
with the blessed opportunity to
move through the cycles of life,
which for me. were born in the
pioneer spirit. I'm very content
with the adventure I've had, now
my choice is to share my good for-
tune with the next generation."
Joseph Handleman possesses
the wisdom to adapt to a chang-
ing society. He applied his acumen
to the Handleman Company, a
highly successful mass merchan-
dising enterprise, and these same
attributes now are working for the
Miami |ewish community.
"I made a $"><),<)<><). live year
investment in the Zero program
because I believe in the compound-
ing effect of money and the conti-
nuity of community services
funded through Federation's an-
nual campaign and the Founda-
tion's Jewish Community Trust
Fund. This program will reap
great benefits for the good that it
does to the agencies which render
vitally needed services. It provides
us the chance to leave a message
that lives on after us."
The message is clear to Joe
Handleman.
Creating a
legacy for
the 21st
century.


*w

Building
Tradition
Charitable giving can take
many forms and offer significant
tax advantages to potential donors.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion established the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies in 1972. pro-
viding contributors with a vehicle
for preserving the future of the
Jewish community while at the
same time enabling them to re-
ceive a wide range of tax benefits
today.
In this interview. Foundation
Executive Director Joseph Imber-
man discusses how a well con-
ceived program of philanthropic
giving makes good business sense.
Q: Why have a Foundation at all?
A: We have a diverse city with
a set of very unique problems. The
needs of our elderly and our
young are of critical concern to the
Miami Jewish community. Educa-
tion is an area where we have com-
mitted substantial resources in or-
der to provide our youth with the
type of Jewish education which will
orient them to their history and
traditions. Of equal concern is the
need to address the major health
care problems of our elderly popu-
lation.
To meet these and other
community needs, an organized
endowment program was es-
tablished. Since its inception, the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthro-
pies of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation has built an asset base
of $37.5 million of which $5.5 mil-
lion is in "true" endowment funds
which are at the discretion of the
community.
A major objective of the Foun-
dation is to create the resources
which will allow us to meet the
growing needs of the Jewish com-
munity at home and abroad. Addi-
tionally, we must be "prepared to
meet the emergencies which con-
front our community from time to
time. These challenges can be met
by the creation of a substantial en-
dowment fund which provides a
second source of revenue to sup-
plement the annual Combined
Jewish AppealIsrael Emergency
Fund campaign.
Q: Is there a difference in the
nature of assets given to the Cam-
paign as opposed to the Foundation?
A: No major difference. All of
our Fund donors support the an-
nual Campaign, mostly from in-
come generated by philanthropic-
funds created with the Founda-
tion. Contributions to the Founda-
tion come in the form of assets like
real estate, stocks, bonds, insur-
ance, even cash... in the case of an
unexpected windfall.
Qf Does that mean substantial
tax savings?
A: Quite often, yes. 'Fake a re-
cent case, call him Dr. Green, a tax-
paver in the 50 percent bracket.
Fen years ago. Dr. Green
bought 20 acres of undeveloped
land for $1,000 per acre. Recently
he found the value had increased
to $20,000 per acre and wished to
sell. His attorney suggested that he
consider an additional investment
by creating a Green Philanthropic-
Fund as part of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
When he sold the land, he re-
ceived a total of approximately
$340,000 and the Federation re-
ceived a total of $60,000.
First, he got a charitable de-
duction of $30,000 from his in-
come tax. And second, he paid no
capital gains tax on the funds
given to the Federation, because it
is a public chanty.
Qj Are there other benefits?
A: Yes. You do not have to
be wealthy to benefit. In addition,
the Foundation allows the donor to
offer recommendations to our
Board of Trustees as to the use of
the fund or its earnings to organi-
zations whose purposes are consis-
tent with the Federation's guide-
lines. The list of those organiza-
tions is now about 318 strong, and
still growing.
But that's not really the most
important benefit.
Qj What is?
A: The reward of giving a gift
that will mean so much to the com-
munity, that will benefit people in
need. In short, the benefit of giv-
ing a gift that will endure the test
of time.
YES! I'DMKF TO KNOW MOREABOUI THE
FOUNDATION OFJEWISH PHILANTHROPIES.
Please send me more information about:
______Philanthropic or restricted funds that let me establish a "foundation" at the
Federation.
______How to designate the Greater Miami Jewish Federation in mv will.
______Pooled Income Funds thai let me give to charity and earn money at the same time.
i_____Zero (Coupon Bond Program.
. Other endowment fund programs and gift-giving opportunities.
Name
Address
City
Zip
TelephoneDay
Evening

Clip and mail to: Joseph C. Imberman, Director. Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami. Florida 33137. Phone (305) 576-4000.
Builders of
Tradition
When an individual or
company makes an enduring
contribution to the community it's
worth special attention. Below are
dojiors whose gifts to the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies
earn them the title of "Builders
of Tradition."
Lester & Eva Abrahamer
Adler Philanthropic Fund
Adler Associates
Neal 8c Isabelle Amdur
L.Jules Arkin
Sandra Arkin
Theodore R. 8c Ellen Bayer
Jack Bellock
Benjamin 8c Bessie Botwinick
Norman 8c Irma Braman
Morris N. Broad
Shepard Broad Familv
Herbert Buchwald
Norman & Evelyn Cohan
Irving tt Hazel Cypen
|ulius & Rose Dank)
Maxwell & RevaDauei
Moii ft Eleanor Deckeibaum
Mm 11 Diamond
Kiscnger Familv
Steven & Eva Feig
George & Dora Heldcnkreis
David I In in,hi
Jerome Fleeman
Foor Familv
Irving 8c Ann Frankel
Harvev 8c Gloria Friedman
Belvin 8c Lucille Friedson
David Friedson
Herman & Dora (iaba
Gables Waterwav
(.,m/ Family
Charles B. Ganz
Milton 8c 1-enore Gaynor
Leo Oelvan
Leo 8c Rosemary Gelvan
Emil J.Gould
Ella Gelvan Greenberg
Melvin 8c Elsa Greenberg
Greenberg, Traurig. Askew, Hoffman.
Lipoff. Rosen 8c Quentel. PA.
Charles 8c Charlotte Held
Larry Hoffman
Joseph Kanter
Melvin 8c Gertrude Kartzmer
Ezra Katz
Herbert 8c Eleanor Katz
Herman M. Katz
Jay I. Kislak
Jon & Tina Kislak
Sidnev Lefcourt
J.L. Lester, M.D.
Jack H. Levine
Morris 8c Rhoda Levitt
Joel Levy
Jerome E. Libbin
Norman 8c Nancy Lipoff
Bob Lining
Bernard & Ellen Mandler
Morton 8c Bluma Marcus
Owen Margolis
Charles Merwitzer
Norman Nierenberg
Louis Nieweg
Patricia Papper
Forrest B. Raffel Family
Leroy 8c Shirlev Raffel
Roblis
Simon Rothenberg
Lee Ruwitch
Marian Grossman Scheer
Mendell Selig
Fred 8c Suzanne Shochet
George 8c Marilyn Simon
Harry & Marilyn Smith
Samuel & Susan Smith
Ixniis & Bessie Stein
Morris Spiegel
Ira & Marsha Sussman
Joel & Deborah Sussman
Sol Taplin
Timoner Family
Robert & Jacqueline Traurig
Carl, Esther & Julien Weinkle
Alan & Bonnie Weisberg Family
Sherwood Weiser
Cecile Weiss
I Linn Wiener
Norma Kipnis Wilson
Fredric & Marilyn Wise
George Wise
Harold 8c Fay /.inn
Carl Zwerner
Numerous Anonymous Funds
w -
Gr
for Today
LVUlff
rTo&j
When a community joins to-
gether to build a future, it's some-
thing very special. Here are a few
of the recent programs supported
by the Foundation's Jewish Com-
munity Trust Fund during the past
fiscal year.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
GardensShort Term Rehabili-
tation Unit. This program, which
received a Foundation allocation
of $98,600, enabled the Home to
establish a new 40-bed. skilled
nursing facility for short term re-
habilitation. Housed in the new
Chernin Building, this facility is
the only one of its kind in the Dade
County Jewish community. It ad-
dresses a long standing and 11 iucal
need for those individual* re-
quiring further rehabilitation fol-
lowinga hospital stay and prior to
returning to independent living
situations.
Jewish Vocational Service
"Teen Between"a program of
the Jewish Vocational Service for
the learning disabled high school
student. New Foundation funding
in the amount of $14,908 enabled
the Jewish Vocational Service to es-
tablish an innovative program pro-
viding individualized vocational
counseling and career planning
for Dade County Jewish youth
who are learning disabled. This
model program recendy garnered
the award as "Counseling Program
of the Year" presented by the Na-
tional Association of Jewish Voca-
tional Services.
Miami Beach Jewish Com-
munity CentersLatch Key Af-
ter School Program. $8400 of new
Foundation funding has allowed
the JCC to greatly expand its after
school programs for the children
of single and traditional parent
families. The program is designed
to help all children develop an ap-
preciation and awareness of Jewish-
values and enhance their Jewish
identity through a wide variety of
organized activities held each day
after school.
Central Agency for Jewish
EducationTeacher Training
Program and the Jewish Special
Education Program. Total fund-
ing in the amount of $50,060 has
allowed for the ongoing training of
Jewish educators, and. has pro-
vided consultation services to syna-
gogues and day schools for learn-
ing disabled students. The Central
Agency for Jewish Education pro-
vides inservice education to 250
Jewish day school teachers and
over 350 early childhood teachers.
Additionally, the Agency sponsors
the only program in Greater
Miami which makes formal Jewish
education available to students
with special needs.
Jewish Family Service of
Greater MiamiFamily Service
and Older Adults Departments--
Funding in the amount of $125,085
has enabled the Jewish Familv Ser-
vice to continue to provide essential
clinical social work services for
neariy 450 individuals and families.



Retreat/installation WD 1985-86 Constituent Boards
(Continued from Page 5)
A noon luncheon on the 22nd will in-
clude installation of the Women's Divi-
sion 1986-87 officers and a presentation
by keynote speaker Martin Fine. Fine, an
attorney with the firm of Fine, Jacobson,
Schwartz, Nash, Block & England, P.A.,
is chairman of the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce. He is a member
of the Board of Trustees of Miami-Dade
Community College and has served on the
board of the Miami Housing Authority.
Women's Division members may par-
ticipate in any or all programs of the 11th
Annual Retreat and Installation. For
reservations or more information, please
contact the Women's Division at
576-4000.
to hold final meetings
The South Dade, North Dade and
Miami Beach constituent boards of the
Federation Women's Division will hold
final meetings in early May for their
1985-86 boards of directors.
On Monday, May 5, the South Dade
Area Board will meet for a 10 a.m.
breakfast in the Burdines Special Events
Center in the Dadeland Mall. The follow-
ing day, on May 6, members of the Miami
Beach Area Board will enjoy a 9:30 a.m.
breakfast and makeup consultation with
Renell of Estee Lauder at Neiman Mar-
cus in The Shops of Bal Harbour.
Also on Tuesday, May 6, the North
Dade Board will participate in a meeting
to be held in the home of Sue Graubert,
beginning at 10 a.m. Special guest
speaker for the meeting will be Phyllis
Ehrlich, Ph.D., of the Jewish Family Ser-
vice, who will present a program on "The
Sandwich Generation." The program will
focus on women who are "caught in be-
tween," with obligations to aging parents
and to their families of growing children.
At each of the area board meetings,
members will recognize the outgoing of-
ficers, the members will be thanked for
their efforts and new board members will
be introduced. In addition, each area
board will evaluate its progress over the
past year.
All outgoing and incoming board
members and officers are encouraged to
attend the final meeting of their respec-
tive constituent board. For reservations
or more information, please call the
Women's Division at 576-4000.
Mount Sinai dedicates MRI Center
James L. Knight (second from right)
dedicated Mount Sinai's Mary Ann and
James L. Knight Magnetic Resonance Im-
aging Center with a symbolic "magnetic
pulling" ceremony.
Joining Mr. Knight (from left to right)
were Cal Kovens, chairman of Mount
Sinai's Board of Trustees; Beverly Olsen,
the Knight's daughter; and Manuel
Viamonte, chairman, Department of
Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center.
The Mary Ann and James L. Knight
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Center
houses the most powerful magnets in the
state of Florida. They are 50,000 times
stronger than the earth's magnetic field.
In addition, the facility is the only free-
standing MRI building built on a hospital
premises in South Florida.
The MRI Center was made possible
through a generous gift from Mr. Knight
and his late wife, Mary Ann.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and Mount
Sinai Medical Center Partners in a
caring community.
Celebrating their victories in the MJHHA Senior Olympics were, from left, front,
Myrte Cohen, Ann Cohen and Howard Cohen; and, rear, Bernard hanger.
..g>wnrnv>uaaTf3|B2!LV3*
Let Us Remember..
Join Us In Paying Tribute To
The Six Million Jewish Martyrs
43rd ANNIVERSARY
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Let us say Kaddish together on our
Collective Remembrance Day
Tuesday, May 6th, 1986 7:30 P.M.
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Hillel Annual Dinner June 3
The Hillel Jewish Student Centers of
Greater Miami will hold its Annual In-
stallation Dinner June 3 at the Hillel
building on the University of Miami Cam-
pus, announced Hillel President William
F. Saulson. Larry Moses, international
director of B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tions, will be guest speaker.
At the dinner, Hillel will honor Max
Mickelson for his devoted service as a
Hillel volunteer. A member of both the
local and state Hillel boards, Mickelson
has served Hillel for decades in various
capacities. His involvement with Hillel
comes as a result of his commitment to
B'nai B'rith. He is chairman of the Hillel
Committee of B'nai B'rith of Florida and
is immediate past president of the B'nai
B'rith Advisory Board of South Florida.
Previously, Mickelson served as president
of his lodge, and as vice president of the
South Florida Council of B'nai B'rith
Lodges.
In addition, Mickelson has served on
the board of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization and is an active member of
Congregation Beth Torah, where he was
selected Men's Club "Man of the Year"
and is an honorary Trustee.
Larry Moses, keynote speaker at the
Installation Dinner, is now in his second
year as international director of Hillel.
His address will deal with the latest
developments in the restructuring of the
Hillel organization on the national level,
and with the changing relationship bet-
ween B'nai B'rith Hillel and the in-
dividual organized Jewish communities it
serves.
For more information or reservations,
please call the Hillel Area office at
661-8549.
Hillel Foundations of Florida and Hillel
Jewish Student Centers of Greater Miami
are beneficiaries of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and Hillel .
Partners in a caring community.
MJHHA seniors 'go for the gold9
How old must we become before we
stop caring about "winning," or cease to
take pride in our accomplishments?
"Never!," said 93-year-old Ethel Peltz.
"You don't sit around wondering what's
going to become of you. You just go right
on living, right on achieving ... or else
you die."
Mrs. Peltz, who won a gold medal in the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged's Senior Olympics on April 5th, is a
participant in the Home's Senior Adult
Day Center. She was one of more than
200 frail elderly residents of the Miami
Jewish Home, its two community adult
day centers, and Irving Cypen Tower, the
Home's adult congregate living facility,
who "went for the gold" in such competi-
tions as wheelchair relays, walking races,
distance throwing, and more.
The Miami Jewish Home's Annual
Senior Olympics is the only event of its
kind specifically for the impaired elderly.
While no records for speed, stamina, or
strength were broken, the courage and
determination of these "senior athletes"
is the very essence of the Olympic spirit.
"As far as I'm concerned, each of you is
a winner," noted MJHHA Chairman of
the Board Judge Irving Cypen as he
presented gold, silver, and bronze medals
to the winners. "You were winners the
first time you said i don't know if I can
do it, but I'm willing to try.' Your courage
and enthusiasm serve as examples to all
of us."
Mrs. Peltz added that "Growing old is
not what it used to be. Today, growing old
can mean being independent, active ..
and having the time of your life."
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged is a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and MJHHA Partners in a caring
community.
Barry University announces
Jewish Studies summer courses
The Jewish Studies Program at Barry
University is pleased to offer the follow-
ing courses for summer 1986:
Summer Session I: (May 13-June 20)
Hebrew Literature (RJS 613) An
analysis of selected portions of Hebrew
literature in the original. Prerequisite:
one year of college Hebrew or the
equivalent. The class will meet Tuesday
and Thursday evenings from 6-9:30 p.m.
in the Andreas building. Instructor: Dr.
Rachel Abramowitz.
Talmudic Literature (RJS 642) Studies
in selected portions of the Talmud and
Midrash. The class will meet Monday and
Wednesday evenings from 6-9:30 p.m. in
Andreas 103. Instructor: Dr. Yehuda
Shamir.
Summer Session II: (June 23-August 1)
Modern Jewish History (RJS 611) -
Studies in Jewish history from the
Enlightenment The class will meet on
Monday and Wednesdays from 9
a.m.-12:30 p.m. in Andreas 109. Instruc-
tor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
Jewish Mysticism (RJS 632) Studies in
the development and concerns of Jewish
mysticism, with emphasis on such texts as
the Zohar. The class will meet on Tuesday
and Thusrday evenings from 6-9:30 p.m.
in Andreas 108. Instructor: Dr. Yehuda
Shamir.
Generous scholarship aid is available
for qualified students.
Auditors will be granted a 50 percent
discount.
For further information please contact
the Jewish Studies Program at 758-3392,
extension 524.
The Barry University Jewish Studies
Program is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
Barry University Jewish Studies Pro-
gram Partners in a caring
community.
Federation, May 1986 11


IsRaeL
"Israel 38" ... One People, One Destiny
Sunday, April 13, 1986 marked our comunity's commemoration of the
founding of the Jewish homeland.
L Yom Ha'atzmaut, Israel Independence Day, was celebrated in South Florida
by more than 10,000 people at the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami.
Michael-Ann Russell Center, Miami Beach Center and South Dade Center with
celebrations and "Marches of Freedom" to show solidarity with Soviet Jewry.
The day was declared "Israel Independence Day" in the State of Florida by
Governor Bob Graham, who was one of the many dignitaries to walk in the
parade.
Below are photos highlighting the day's events, which were coordinated by
the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
JGC
Jswtsh
Community CjpUn
of Greater Miami
* .
Governor Bob Graham (second from left), walks
in the Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center's "Parade
of Freedom," accompanied by Fern Canter (se-
cond from right), chairperson of "Israel 88" in
North Dade, and Elton J. Kerness (right), ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish Community
Centers of Greater Miami. The 2,000 parade par-
ticipants marched from the Sky lake State Bank
to the Michael-Ann Russell Center where Gover-
nor Graham presented the JCC with a proclama-
tion, stating that Sunday, April IS, was "Israel
Independence Day" in the State of Florida.
(Senator Paula Hawkins was invited to attend
the parade and celebration but was unable due to
her hospitalization.)
Samuel I. Adler (left), president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, and Congressman
William Lehman riding in North Dade parade.
From left. Federation Board Member Philip T.
Warren, Commissioner Barry Schreiber and
South Dade Branch Board Chairman Alvin
Lloyd Brown enjoying "Israel 88" festivities.
"March of Freedom" in South Dade showing
solidarity with Soviet Jewry and raising funds
for the CJA-IEF Campaign.
Parade Co-Chairmen in North Dade, from left,
Marshall Baltuch and Harvey Brown.
*mt%i*z
Miami Coral Park High School Marching Band
leads off South Dade's "March of Freedom."
I
Jfe
A young celebrant holds balloons for a 8 p.m.
blast-off in which balloons were released at all
three celebration sites, showing solidarity for
Soviet Jewry in a symbolic gesture of freedom.
Leaders of the "Israel 88" march in South Dade
with shofars and a Torah.
Metro-Dade Commissioner Barry Schreiber.
Federation Board Member Eric Turetsky and
Miami Beach "Israel 88" Celebration Co-
Chairman Doug Miller at Miami Beach
celebration.
Each of the celebrations featured a Shouk (It
Market place). At the Miami Bench Center on
Pine Tree Drive, jewelry, religious art
ceremonial puces and art were sold.
Alan Mendelson from Channel 4 Htm presents
essay contest awards to children at the Miami
Beach Center during the "Israel 38" opening
ceremonies.
International music band "Shajar" performed
at the South Dade and Michael-Ann Rw*eu
celebrations.
12 Federation, May 1986


Mount Sinai and Mall at 163rd
Street open indoor walking club
Several hundred senior citizens
descended upon The Mall at 163rd Street
when Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami and the Mall officially
opened South Florida's first indoor "Mall
Walkers Club" on March 17.
It's not too late to join the newly-
formed Mall Walking Club and member-
ship is FREE. The Club is an ongoing pro-
gram that was developed to provide
senior citizens with a controlled and safe
environment in which to walk. Upon join-
ing, all members receive a membership
card giving them early access to the Mall,
Monday through Friday at 9 a.m., an hour
before the stores open. Special half-mile
and quarter-mile courses have been
printed on the cards to designate the
areas in the mall that comprise these
walking courses. This will enable the
elderly to monitor the distance they have
walked.
Those senior citizens who joined the
Mall Walking Club on opening day
received a specially designed t-shirt that
reads, "I Walk The Mall at 163rd Street."
During the opening festivities. Dr. Chris-
tian Zauner, Director of the Sports
Medicine Institute at Mount Sinai, gave a
talk on safe and healthy walking. Follow-
ing the talk, walking enthusiasts asked
specific questions. Dr. Zauner will be
making frequent appearances a,t the mall
to coach the elderly. In addition, Mount
Sinai will be offering free health screen-
ing programs throughout the year.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and Mount
Sinai Medical Center Partners in a
caring community.
Emigrants love new life in Israel
The Aliyah Council of South Florida
fromotex and develops community
......Hid understanding of the con-
tpl o) aliyah (moving to Israel), and pro-
nrngement and support to in-
mduals who plan to emigrate to Israel.
I representative of the Aliyah Council
"' with several former arm
oho wen visiting Miami from
.....home in Isnnl. The following
' '" rpts "/their conversations.
"We love everything about the country.
"the place where every Jew should
according to Alfred and Lili Stone.
*o moved to Israel last year. The Stones
W visiting friends and relatives in the
mteil Slates, but "can't wait to get back
Israel."
Ijv and Eve Krugel. formerly of
UUywood, Florida, are also enthusiastic
tout their new lifestyle in the Jewish
"ate. The Krugels. like the Stones, are
nw retired but manage to keep very
"s.v. "We go to Ulpan classes to learn
wveraational Hebrew, we do volunteer
ork, we're involved with the synagogue.
*ve met so many new people. It's a
fc*inating country and more people
nould at least come to see it," said Eve
^J- Irv added that "Young people
ally have to be dedicated because of the
wnomic situation there. But retirees can
e it on Social Security alone if
cessary. If there were more mortgage
"ey available, that would be a big help
especially for the younger people."
*emice Wolf and her late husband,
"nuel, made aliyah in 1984 from
jami Beach. Bernice is now living on the
Bkirts of Jerusalem and, even though
is retired, manages to live a very full
rL, attends Ulpan classes and does
'unteer work in an eye and dental clinic
also at an ORT school for under-
7f ^"dren. She attends social
"Political meetings sponsored by the
ration for Americans and Canadians
H rael a"d still finds time for concerts
tan" y?' "LLfe 8eemS to haVe m0re
?"* her and there is much less of a
feeling of materialism," Wolf says.
"Even though I have lived in Israel for
only two years. I feel more at home there
than I did in Miami Beach. People in
Israel have more important values," she
concluded.
Rabbi Ralph Carmi and his wife.
Rosalie, left Miami Beach to follow their
three daughters who live in Israel.
We're here in Miami on a visit now and
can't wait to get back," Rabbi Carmi said.
"In Israel there is such a positive outlook.
People are full of spirit. I could never
again live in Miami Beach."
Sidney Schuchman, his wife, Lesley,
and their two sons moved to Israel in
1984. and have also found life there a
rewarding experience. They lived in an
absorption center for one year and are
now renting an apartment in Jerusalem,
where Sidney works as an accountant.
"Life in Israel is very difficult, but I
would make the same choice if I had the
opportunity to do so again. The children
have adjusted very well and are speaking
Hebrew. I feel that every Jew has a con-
tribution to make to the State of Israel."
Leo Osheroff was a resident of Miami
Beach who made aliyah in 1950. Leo set-
tled on a kibbutz in the Negev, where he
met and married Tamar. They have three
children and the entire family is involved
in the operation of their very successful
business which specializes in engineering
and commercial arts supplies. Leo is
visiting the United States as an emissary
for the Association of Americans and
Canadians in Israel. According to Leo,
"Americans can contribute their skills
and their way of life to Israel. There are
now approximately 60,000 Americans liv-
ing in Israel and Israel needs 250,000
more."
The Aliyah Council of South Florida is a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the Aliyah
Council Partners in a caring
community.
JFS responds to hotel evacuation
When a Miami Beach retirement
hotel was closed by the state fire mar-
shal recently, the scene was one of
mass confusion. More than 100 elderly
residents needed to be relocated in a
hurry; but many didn't even know
what was happening.
Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami, a Federation beneficiary agen-
cy, quickly recognized the need for
help and promptly responded. Dr.
Phyllis Ehrlich, director of the JFS
Department of Older Adult Service,
and Marilyn Berkowitz, coordinator of
the governor's Long-term Care Om-
budsman Council, calmed residents,
directed workers and organized the
move to other hotels, nursing homes
and hospitals.
JFS social workers and volunteers
readily pitched in. They knocked on
doors, packed up belongings, patiently
provided explanations and gave emo-
tional support to those in distress.
Later that day they were joined by
staff members from the Miami Beach
HRS office.
"It was a very emotional experience
for these residents," says Ehrlich.
"Most did not expect to be uprooted
this way and many were in tears."
By 7 p.m. the hotel was empty. The
job was nearly complete, but not over.
A few JFS workers stayed on to clean
up, arrange final details and offer
reassurance by phone to several
tenants as they adjusted to their new
homes. It wasn't a typical day for the
staff of Jewish Family Service, but it
was one that exemplifies the agency's
dedication and commitment to serving
the needs of the Jewish community.
The Jewish Family Service is a
Inmeficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and JFS Partners in a caring
comunity.
CAJE announces new publications
In keeping with its policy of publishing
the newest and most exciting educational
materials and books, the Central Agency
for Jewish Education (CAJE) is pleased
to announce the upcoming premiere of
two new publications. One book, edited by
Lillian Ross, is entitled "A Guide to
Jewish Miami." The other, entitled
"Tastes and Tales," is a cookbook with
recipes and tales of Jewish tradition
which has been written by Malvina Lieb-
man especially for young people.
CAJE continues to meet a most en-
couraging demand for more resource
materials for teachers, schools, communi-
ty centers and camps, as well as for lay
teachers throughout the country. With
more than 40 titles in its Publications
Catalog, CAJE has processed more than
2,000 orders from schools and organiza-
tions across the United States, Canada
and around the world.
Some new titles currently available in-
clude CAJE's third annual journal, entitl-
ed "The Teacher and the Teaching Pro-
cess," edited by Jerome L. Hershon;
"The Day School Manual," compiled by
CAJE's Day School Department and Rab-
bi Menachem Raab; "Torah Out of Zion,"
by Dr. Joseph Diamond; and "From
Generation to Generation" by Dorothy
Herman. A current update of the
"Materials Resource Guide," which was
developed by the Jewish Education Ser-
vice of North America, has also recently
been published by CAJE.
These publications or a catalog can be
obtained by writing to CAJE Publica-
tions, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, or by calling 576-4030 in
Dade or 462-1710 in Broward.
CAJE is a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
CAJE Partners in a caring
community.
JVS holds programs for
'Older Americans Month'
May is "Older Americans Month" and
the Jewish Vocational Service (JVS)
Nutritional Project, in cooperation with
other community agencies, has scheduled
a variety of health related programs. In
keeping with the overall theme "Plan on
Living the Rest of Your Life," and the
slogan "Have your Health and Have
Everything," the JVS has several ac-
tivities planned for its regular par-
ticipants as part of its ongoing supportive
services to the elderly.
Blood pressure screenings will be held
weekly at four JVS meal sites on Miami
Beach and in North Miami Beach. The
Mount Sinai Medical Center will supply
two registered nurses who will ad-
minister the procedures and provide
health counseling and lectures on related
topics for JVS Nutritional Project
participants.
A weekly exercise class is scheduled at
two meal sites, and is taught by Beverly
Kaspar, an exercise fitness specialist who
tailors her classes to the special needs of
the elderly.
The JVS's staff nutritionist, Bertha G.
Makovsky, conducts an ongoing monthly
series of nutrition education seminars at
each meal site. Her topics include
shopping and cooking for one,
understanding food labels and buying the
best products, and how to prepare and
store foods. She also helps to keep
participants informed on the latest diets,
fads and nutritional information.
In conjunction with Older Americans
Month and National Hospital Week, the
.IVS Nutritional Project and Mount Sinai
Medical Center have scheduled the
Hospital's Mobile Health Van to be at the
Nutritional Project office. 920 Alton
Road on Miami Beach. From 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. on May 14, blood pressure and vision
screenings will be available.
During Older Americans Month, as
always, the Jewish Vocational Service
continues to provide quality meals and
services to the elderly, so that seniors can
"Have their Health and Have
Everything."
The JVS is a beneficiary of the Combin-
ed Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and JVS Partners in a caring
community.
NCJW installation May 7
The National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Miami Section, will hold its
annual Installation of Officers May 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon in the Federation
Board Room.
The Myra Fair Volunteer Service Award will be presented to the volunteer
who most epitomizes Fair's lifetime of untiring devotion to the NCJW.
In addition a talk will be presented by Jean Soman, author of "Your True
Marcus," a Civil War story about Soman's great great-grandfather, Col. Marcus
Spiegel, uncle of Hannah G. Solomon, founder of the NCJW.
Coffee and danish will be served. For reservations or more information, call
the NCJW at 576-4747.

Federation, May 1986 13


JFTV memberships available
Viewers can now help support
JFTV by becoming members of the
station, announced Samuel Harte,
president of JFTV.
"Because JFTV is a cable station
which doesn't accept regular adver-
tising," Harte said, "it relies heavily
on the support of individuals and on
having businesses underwrite specific
shows. We developed the new JFTV
membership program in hopes that
those who enjoy watching the station
will help show their appreciation by
becoming members."
JFTV began airing in November
1983 to provide programming of a
Jewish nature to the Greater Miami
community. The station features a
diverse blend of Jewish educational,
cultural and entertainment programs
on Israel, current events and human
services.
In addition to airing several
popular shows produced in com-
munities throughout the United
States and Israel, JFTV produces
several shows locally. The station
produces, among others,
"Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky,"
a television magazine; "We
Remember the Holocaust," in which
survivors and liberators discuss the
past, produced in conjunction with
the Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center; and "Teen Scene,"
a panel discussion show produced in
conjunction with the Jewish Youth
Directors' Council of Greater Miami.
JFTV memberships can be obtain-
ed at various levels. Please call the
station at 576-4000 for more
information.
'Pillow Talk9 explores
singles issues
Several new editions of "Pillow
Talk," an open discussion show
featuring issues of concern to Jewish
singles, will air this month on JFTV.
The show, hosted by JFTV's
Suzanne Lasky, director of broadcast
operations, and produced by
volunteer Susan Zalesky, features a
local expert on the day's topic and
four panelists who are referred to
the snow by the Federation Young
Leadership Council and the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami. "Pillow Talk" airs every Sun-
day and Monday at 7:30 p.m.
The topic for the upcoming show to
air May 4 and 5 is "Singles and the
Fear of Disease" with Brent Aumen,
president of "Help Miami." Rabbi
Edwin Farber, spiritual leader of
Temple Samu-El, will join panelists in
exploring the issues of "Intermar-
riage and Interdating" in a show to
air May 11 and 12.
Another new segment of "Pillow
Talk" featuring Karen Kaye,
psychotherapist and singles director
of the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Center,
will focus on "Fear of Commitment,"
and will air May 18 and 19. The
fourth in the series of new shows,
which will air May 25 and 26, focuses
on "Pressure to Accel" and features
Dr. Paula Levine, clinical
psychologist.
New show teaches
Jewish traditions, rituals
A child's inherent curiosity will be
used as a tool for teaching both
children and adults about the customs
and rituals of Judaism in a new show
entitled "Torah Treasure Chest,"
which will make its debut on JFTV
this month.
Each half-hour segment of the
show, produced by David Gray and
Federation Board member Rick
Turetsky, will have groups of
children who reach into a treasure
chest filled with Jewish ritual items.
The children will then ask the hosts
about the cultural and religious
significance of the "treasures,"
which will include such items as mez-
znzot, prayer shawls, yarmulkes,
Stars of David and items associated
with Jewish holidays.
Hosting "Torah Treasure Chest"
will be Gray, Turetsky and Rabbi
Avrohom Chaim Feuer, spiritual
leader of Congregation Or Chaim in
Miami Beach and advisor to the show.
According to Turetsky, the show is
a wonderful way to introduce Jewish
customs and rituals to both children
and adults. "Many Jewish people
have reached adulthood without ever
having had the opportunity to learn
the basics about their own religion
and culture," he said. "But by that
time, many are too embarrassed to
admit their limited knowledge and
don't ask so they never learn.
Through the show, we hope to
educate these adults and help to en-
sure that children don't reach
important
JFTV
4 -
adulthood without this
knowledge."
Look for "Torah Treasure Chest"
everyTuesday and Sunday at 7 p.m.
watch jftv on:
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29
Storer (South Dade) Channel 14
Harte-Hanks Channel 2
Dynamic Cablevision Channel 43
Miami Cablevision Channel 8
Americable Channel 28-A
Radio shows
feature
Jewish music
We now can listen on Sunday
mornings to the Jewish music sound
on two radio stations.
"The Jewish Sound" from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. on WKAT, 1360 AM, is
hosted by Oded Salpeter, an Israeli
who comes to Miami from the Tampa
area and has previously conducted a
Jewish radio program from the West
coast.
"Tradition Time" is presented
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on WVCG,
1080 AM.
On both shows, Jewish music, in-
cluding Israeli, Yiddish, cantorial and
Hassicuc is presented, along with
community news, news from Israel
and timely guest speakers.

Programming Schedule Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc. 1 MAY 1986*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenles Kitchen Aleph Eenles Kitchen Aleph Bet Din: The Jewish Peoples Court Hello Jerusalem JCC:A Special Place
5:50-6 p.m. Checkup/ Mount Slnal 5 1315 22 Jewish TV Nat I Mag 5 6&5 20 Film Special Hello Jerusalem Check up/ Mount Slnal Film Special Eenies Kitchen
JFTV Bulletin Board
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust Film Special Eenles Kitchen Film special Checkup/ Mount Sinai we Remember The Holocaust
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. Still Small voice or viewpoint JCC:A Special Place Film Special Teen Scene Film Special Passover special Teen Scene
7-7:30 P.m. Bet Din: The Jewish peoples court Torah Treasure Chest Film special Still Small voice or Viewpoint Hello Jerusalem Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky rorah Treasure Chest
7:30-8 p.m. I Pillow Talk Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Film special Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky 5/10*5 31 Jewish TV Nat l Mag. 5/3.17. 24 Film special Pillow Talk
JFTV Bulletin Board
y




FRIDAY. MAY 2-SUNDAY. MAY 4
Young Judaea will hold a convention for the
youngest age group, Ofarim, grades 3-6 at
rmo Owaissa Bauer in Homestead. For more
information, ple.se oil 947-0637.
SATURDAY. MAY 3
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. South Dade Center. 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue, presents "All That Jazz" featuring
Jeff Zavac and Company. The evening begins
at 8:30 p.m. at the home of Roz and Ray Ber-
rin The cost for this Cultural Arts program is
$7.50. Call the Center at 251-1394 for reserva-
tions and address.
SUNDAY. MAY 4
The Latin Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged, will hold a luncheon
at 11 i.in in the Ruby Auditorium at Douglas
Gardens. For more information, please call
Steffi Cohen at 761-8626.
SUNDAY. MAY 4
The South End Miami Region of Hadassah will
hold a donor luncheon at 11:30 a.m at
Snature Gardens, 12810 SW 122 Avenue.
For more information, please call 385-4452.
SUNDAY. MAY 4
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue. Senior Adult Department will hold a
potluck dinner and games night. Bring a
favorite dairy dish to share with others. Enjoy
an evening of casual conversation followed by
cards. Rummy-Q, Scrabble, etc. This program
is sponsored by the South Dade Center's Bon
Vivant group, for people 55 years of age and
older The program begins at 5:30 p.m. Call
Minna for reservations at 279-7482.
MONDAY. MAY 5
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree
Drive will show the movie "The Diary of Anne
Frank." The movie is based on the diary of a
young girl and her experience and feelings
about the Holocaust. Parental permission will
be required for children. The movie is being
shown in commemoration of Yom Hashoa,
Holocaust Memorial Day. There is no charge
for the program which begins at 4 p.m.
MONDAY. MAY 5
The Miami-Coral Gables-Kendall Chapter.
American Technion Society. Women's Divi-
sion, will hold an installation meeting at 12:30
p.m at Temple Judea in Coral Gables. For
more information, please call Mildred
Schwartz at 443-5369.
TUESDAY, MAY 6
Women's American ORT. South Seas Chapter
will hold an auction at 1:30 p.m. at Temple
Adath Yeshurn, 10th Avenue at Miami
Gardens Drive. For more information, please
call Shirley Steier at 653-0109.
TUESDAY. MAY 6
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree
Drive, will offer a Holocaust Memorial Day
program for children. The children will hear
songs and poetry and view art work of children
from the concentration camps. The program
begins at 4 p.m. This program is free. Parental
permission is required. Call 534-3206 for more
information.
TUESDAYS. MAY 6 AND 20
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900 NE
25 Avenue, will hold a Singles Support Group
which acts as a vehicle for discussion on such
topics as relationships, loneliness, self-esteem
nd other related topics. The group meets on a
bi-monthly basis. Meetings begin promptly at
'30 p.m. No one will be admitted after that
ume Cost is $1 for JCC Members, S3 for non-
members.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 7
'emple Menorah Sisterhood will hold its in-
stallation luncheon at noon in the Social Hall,
donation is $4 for members. $5 for non-
JJiembers. The public is welcome. For more in-
formation, please call RhodaGeist at 861-7205.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 7
'ne Jewish Community Centers of Greater
N'mi. South Dade Center. 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue. Social Seniors Club will gather for a
'uneh of hot dogs (with all the fixings) at 11:30
!* cost is $2 for JCC Members and $2.50
W non-members. Call the Center at 2511394
'or more information.
THURSDAY. MAY 8
Technion's North Dade Chapter of the
Women's Division will hold its final event, a
luncheon at noon today at the Harbor House.
The cost per person is $15. For more informa
tion, please call Miriam Lankay at 948-6518.
THURSDAY. MAY 8
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, will present a workshop on
"Learning to Flirt" beginning at 7:30 p.m. at
the Center. The cost is $3 for JCC members, $5
for non-members. Call 932-4200 for more
information.
THURSDAY. MAY 8
Brandeis University NWC Miami Beach
Chapter will hold a spring installation and lun-
cheon at noon at the Seaview Hotel, 9909 Col-
lins Avenue. For more information, please call
861-4388.
TUESDAY. MAY 13
The Jewish Vocational Service Employment
Counselor and the Counselor for the Learning
Disabled will present a workshop entitled
"Bucking the System: Careers Without Col-
lege." Admission is free and will be held at 7:30
p.m. at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center, 18900 NE 25th Avenue.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 14
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, will present a workshop for
singles on "Intimacy in Relationships." The
workshop will be held from 8-9 p.m. with a
social'hour following. The cost is $4 for JCC
Members, and $6 for non-members. Call the
Center at 932-4200 for more information.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 14
In celebration of "Older Americans Month"
and National Hospital Week," the Jewish
Vocational Service, in conjunction with Mt.
Sinai Hospital, will offer seniors two health
care screenings, blood pressure and vision
checks at the JVS Nutritional Project, 920
Alton Road from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 14
The Founders of the Miami Jewish Home and
Aged will hold its monthly dinner meeting in
the Ruby Auditorium at Douglas Gardens. For
more information, please call Steve Rose at
751-8626.
SUNDAY. MAY 18
The Temple Beth Am Concert Series will hold
an afternoon of music with Richard Goode at 4
p.m. at the Temple, 5950 North Kendall Drive.
For more information, please call Doreen Marx
at 667-6667.
TUESDAY. MAY 20
The Junior Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged will hold an
installation luncheon at noon in the Ruby
Auditorium at Douglas Gardens. For more in-
formation, please call Steffil Cohen at
751-8626.
TUESDAY. MAY 20
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center. 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue, Bon Vivant Seniors Group presents a
program entitled "The Attack of the New
Right of Church, State and Abortion Issues,"
beginning at 8 p.m. The program is presented
by Ron Cohn, Southeast Regional Director of
the American Jewish Congress. The program
is free to JCC members, with a $2 charge to
non-members.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 21
The Rabi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy Women will hold a paid up member-
ship luncheon at the home of Dahlia Lipner,
1515 Cleveland Road, Miami Beach, at noon.
For more information, please call 532-6421.
THURSDAY, MAY 22
The South Florida Council Na'amat USA will
hold an awards day luncheon at the Seville
Hotel on Miami Beach. For more information,
please call 5384213.
FRIDAY. MAY 23-MONDAY. MAY 26
Young Judaea will hold a Bognm convention at
the Hollywood Beach Hilton Hotel. For more
information, please call 947-0637.
SUNDAY. MAY 2S
The 1986 Regional Young Judaea Banquet will
be held in the Grand Ballroom of the
Hollywood Beach Hilton today. All young
Judaeans, Hadassah members, and families are
invited. The cost is $20 per person. For more
information or reservations, please call
947-0637.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 28
The Association for Jewish Special Education
will hold a spring general meeting and elec-
tions at 7:30 p.m. at the Federation building.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. For more informa-
tion, please call Charlotte Klieman at 279-8150.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 28
The Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
will hold its installation breakfast at 10:30 a.m.
in the Ruby Audi to rim at Douglas Gardens.
For more information, please call Steffi Cohen
at 751-8626.
THURSDAY. MAY 29
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue, Senior Adult Department presents a
free program featuring Nachiko Maekane, a
marimbist. This native of Japan will present an
informa] performance and discussion program.
She is the first percussionist ever to win the
prestigious Gaudeamus Interpreters Competi-
tion in Rotterdam, Holland. The evening is
brought to the JCC by PACE Concerts. The
program begins at 1 p.m. Call the Center at
251-1394 for more information.
ONGOING PROGRAMS
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center. 4221 Pine Tree
Drive, offers a two-year-old playgroup that
meets on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
from 9:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m Arts and crafts,
music, dancing, outside play, singing, snacks
and Judaic programs will be stressed. The
classes continue until the end of May. The fee
for members is $350, non-members $450.
There is an additional $10 registration fee. For
more information, please contact the Center at
534-3206.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center, offers a "Mommy
and Me" group that meets on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The pro-
gram provides toddlers and parents with initial
learning sharing and growing experiences.
Arts and crafts, singing, dancing, outdoor play
and Judaic programs are stressed. The fee for
JCC members is $150 and $250 for non-
members. There is an additional $10 registra-
tion fee. Call the Center at- 534-3206 for more
information.
SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, has a Counselor in Training
Program. The skills it takes to be a good
counselor are taught through on-the-job ex-
perience. Only students entering 10th grade in
the fall.are eligible for this program. Contact
Marcia Engelman at 932-4200, ext. 219 for
more information.
SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree
Drive, in cooperation with the Hebrew
Academy, offers a summer camp program for
children ages '.'.' to 12. Judaic programs, arts
and crafts, outdoor sports, field trips. Red
Cross instructional swimming, drama and
music are just some of the great activities of-
fered. A fully trained and experienced staff
will make sure that your child will have the
safest and best summer ever. For more infor-
mation call Iris at 534-3206.
LEADERSHIP SUMMER PROGRAM
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree
Drive, in cooperation with the Hebrew
Academy, offers a Leadership Apprentice Pro-
gram for those students entering 10th grade.
Participants will undertake various sessions on
the philosophy of camp operation, supervised
work experiences with various age groups and
group work with children. For further informa-
tion call the Center at 534-3206.
AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center. 4221 Pine Tree
Drive offers an After School Program for
children in nursery school through 6th grade.
The professionally planned and supervised pro-
gram is held Monday through Thursday from 2
p.m. to 6 p.m. and on Fridays from 2 p.m. to 6
p.m. Transportation is provided from area
schools. Daily snack is provided, arts and
crafts, drama, music, karate, ceramics and
sports. For registration information call Fran
Cartine at 534-3206.
reoplei
Destiny

Community
Calendar
service available
Did you know that the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation keeps a computeriz-
ed community calendar for all organiza-
tions and individuals within our com-
munity? This important service affords
the opportunity for all groups in our com-
munity to list any and all upcoming
events. By listing a meeting or event in
the calendar, many potential conflicts can
be avoided. You can also use the com-
munity calendar to check possible
meeting dates before scheduling an
event. We urge you to use this service as
often as possible by calling Amalia Gon-
zalez at Federation, 576-4000. She will
check dates for you in addition to listing
your event on the community calendar.
The community calendar service is pro-
vided free of charge to all organizations.
The community calendar is not a
published listing, but rather a computeriz-
ed "community appointment book" in-
tended to avoid conflicts in scheduling.
The community calendar should not be
confused with the calendar published in
this newsmagazine, which is also provid-
ed as a free community service.
Listing for Newsmagazine Calendar Items
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for events of June through September is May 15.
Organization __________________________________________________
Event
Place
Day
Date.
.Time.
.( (a.m. ( )p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No.
MAILTO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
Federation, May 19S6 15



I
YLC cruises aboard
'Spirit of Miami9
YLC singles missions to Israe;
All young adults arc invited to join the
Federation's Young Leadership Council
on a cruise along the moonlit Intracoastal
Waterway in a special "Moon Over
Miami" campaign event to be held Sun-
day, June 1, announced John Fuller,
chairman of the event
The three-hour cruise aboard the
"Spirit of Miami" will depart at 7:30 p.m.
from the dock of the Dupont Plaza Hotel.
Participants are encouraged to board at 7
p.m. Highlights of the cruise include live
entertainment and dancing to the sounds
of two bands. An elaborate array of
mouth-watering desserts, French
pastries, ice cream sundae bars and other
snacks will be offered along with a cash
bar.
More than 500 people are expected to
participate in the "Moon Over Miami"
cruise, and passage will be booked on a
first come, first served basis. Couvert for
this exciting event is $24 per person, and
a minimum gift of $100 for individuals or
$150 for married tuples it required for
attendance.
All are urged to join the YLC for this
evening of fun and friends in a picture
postcard setting of serene waters against
the backdrop of the moon and stars and
the beautiful Miami skyline. Put yourself
in the picture by calling 576-4000, exten-
sion 278 for reservations or more
information.
YLC Hold the Date
Thursday. May 8:
Mission to Tallahassee
7 a.m.-8 p.m.
May 11-20:
Young Leadership Ruach Mission to
Israel
Wednesday. May 21:
YLC Singles Committee Meeting
6 p.m.
Federation Building
/LC Board Meeting
7:30 p.m.
Federation Building
Sunday, June 1:
YLC "Moon Over Miami" Event
7 p.m. boarding-7:30 departure
Aboard the "Spirit of Miami"
Dupont Plaza Marina
Community Commemorates
Yom Hashoah
Holocaust Awareness Week will be com-
memorated during the week of May 4-11.
This week is set aside to memorialize
those who perished in the Holocaust.
Since President Jimmy Carter establish-
ed the President's Commission on the
Holocaust, these "Days of Remem-
brance" have been observed in the state
of Florida, as well as throughout the
United States.
In Miami, plans for many special com-
munity events are underway (See
schedule
Friday, May 2 and Saturday, May 3
Shabbat of Remembrance Synagogues
will hold special services for Holocaust
victims in accordance with the Proclama-
tion of the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami.
Sunday, May 4 and 11
Churches will include Holocaust Remem-
brance in their Sunday Services.
Sunday, May 4
2 p.m.: Radomer Relief Club of Greater
Miami Yom Hashoah commemoration
at Orangebrook Country Club, 400 En-
trada Street, Hollywood.
Monday, May 5
7:30 p.m.: Holocaust Survivors of the
Palm Beaches Yom Hashoah com-
memoration at Jewish Community Day
School, 5801 Parker Avenue. West Palm
Beach.
8 p.m.: John Loftus, author of "The
Belarus Secret," a history of Nazi smug-
gling programs in America, will speak at
Temple Samu-El, 9353 S.W. 152 Avenue,
Miami.
Tuesday, May 6
9 a.m.: Presentation before the Dade
County Commission, in the Commission
Chambers, 2nd floor. Metro-Dade Center,
111 N.W. 1 Street, Miami.
12 noon: The United States Holocaust
Memorial Council commemoration in the
Rotunda, Washington, D.C.
5 p.m.: Holocaust Survivors of South
Florida, Inc. Yom Hashoah Com-
memoration with guest speaker George
Katzman, liberator and adjunct professor
in international relations. Florida Inter-
national University, at Temple Beth-Am.
7205 Royal Palm Boulevard. Margate.
7 p.m.: Community Commemoration
With guest speaker Ernest W. Michel.
Survivor and initiator and chairman of
World Gathering of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors in Israel. 1981. Program in-
cludes Yiddish readings, candle-
lighting ceremony and children's choir.
At Temple Emanu-El. 1701 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach.
8 p.m.: "Revolt of Job" This film, set in
pre-war Hungary, centers on Job and
Rosa, a childless elderly couple who
challenge extinction in the Holocaust by
adopting a Christian child to carry on
their line. At Congregation Bet Breira.
9400 S.W. 87 Avenue. Miami.
In addition to the above listings. Yom
Hashoah will be commemorated by "Stu-
dent Day" programs for 10th-12th
graders, sponsored by the Southeastern
Florida Holocaust Memorial Center. To
be held Wednesday, May 7 from 9 a.m. to
3 p.m. at the Student Center Building,
room 320, Florida International Universi-
ty, Bay Vist Campus, N.E. 151 Street and
Biscayne Boulevard.
The Holocaust Memorial Center will
also present "Adult Day" Yom Hashoah
Commemoration programs on Thursday,
May 8 from 8-9:30 p.m. at the Student
Center Building of FIU. For more infor-
mation on "Student Day" and "Adult
Day" programs, call Rositta at 940-5690.
Ernest W. Michel. Holocaust Sur-
vivor and initiator of the 1981 World
Gathering of Jewish Holocaust Sur-
vivors, will be keynote speaker at the
community commemoration of Yom
Hashoah on May 6 at Temple Emanu-
El on Miami Beach.
This summer, instead of taking an or-
dinary trip, have an extraordinary ex-
perience on a Summer Singles Mission to
Israel, sponsored by the Federation's
Young Leadership Council in cooperation
with the Young Leadership Cabinet of the
United Jewish Appeal.
Two missions are scheduled for summer
1986: one from July 13 to July 23; the
other from August 17 to August 27. On
either of the missions, travel with single
business and professional men and
women, between the ages of 25 and 40,
who share your values and lifestyle, your
commitments to the Jewish people, and
your desire to share an incredible ex-
perience with people, many of whom will
become your lifelong friends.
Each of the missions is limited to 200
people from communities throughout the
United States, so be sure to get your
reservations in early. The cost for each
mission is just $2,100 per person in-
cluding round-trip air fare from Miam
five-star hotel accommodations, most
meals, ground transportation and tour
guides To make the mission even more
affordable, an interest-free payment plan
is available through the Federation A
minimum gift of $365 to the 1987 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign is required for
participants.
During Passover last week, we said
"next year in Jerusalem." You can make
this promise a reality. But don't delay
Many people were turned away from last
year's Summer Singles Mission because
of insufficient space to accommodate the
overwhelming demand. Don't let this hap-
pen to you. Call Marsha Kolman or Milton
Heller at 576-4000 for more information
Shaliach remembers
Yom Hazikaron in Israel
By Raffi Miller
Community Shaliach
A few months before leaving Israel for
my mission in Miami, I started to say
farewell to my country. I knew that I was
leaving for two years, a long separation
from home. I looked at many sites, places
and people, knowing I would not see them
again for a long time. I tried to store in
my memory many details of things 1 love
in order to carry the memories with me. I
looked everywhere for things that tie me
to my country Israe).
It was very hard to explain the long
departure from Israel to my children. A
few months before we left. I began to
show Daphna and Jonathan the things
they would miss in the two years we
would be away. It was hard for them to
understand the meaning of a long separa-
tion from their home, school and friends.
I wanted to help them understand what
Israel means to them and what Israel
means to me. I knew that eventually
America would attract them, and they
might love life in America. I wanted them
to know that in spite of all the glittering
sites. Israel is their home. I wanted to
show them their roots.
Last Yom Hazikaron Israel's day of
remembrance for its fallen soldiers I
decided to take Daphna and Jonathan to
the military cemetery in our town. It was
not an easy decision to make as a parent
to take my children to such a place
but I thought it was important. I thought
it was important because it's no use
hiding death and grief from them as it had
already become a part of their lives. They
watched the news every day, and knew
children who had lost their fathers in
wars.
So my wife Hannah, and my two
children and I went to the military
cemetery. It was the eve of Yom
Hazikaron and some young soldiers and
volunteers were making the final
preparations for the big ceremony which
would take place the next day.
Yom Hazikaron is commemorated in
Israel by special ceremonies all over the
country: at the National Cemetery on
Mount Herzl in Jerusalem, in small cities.
in settlements, kibbutzim and in all of the
schools. At 10 a.m. a siren sounds
throughout Israel for two minutes. For
those two minutes all of Israel stands
still, commemorating those who
sacrificed their lives for the State. In
those two minutes businesses stop and
traffic comes to a halt. Standing outside
in the sunshine with a soft wind Mowing, 1
realized how precious these few minutes
are to me. It is not only the time you
remember your dear friends who had
fought and had been killed next to you.
but it is the time that you feel proud; you
feel strong: you feel that you oelong to
this place and to this people. If I had a
way to bring all the Jews in the United
States to Israel for only minutes, I would
bring them for this, and then they would
finally understand what it means "to be
free in your country Erttz Zxon -
Yerushalayim.''
So I stood in the cemetery with my
family and I showed them where my
friends are resting. I showed them the
graves of thousands of soldiers, from 11
to 60. Sons, brothers, fathers, friends.
generals and simple soldiers. They all lie
together, they all laughed and loved
together, they all died proud to keep the
promise. All of them are my beloved ones.
There in the quiet dignity of the
cemetery, as we walked among the
graves, I felt that we had all gained new
awareness about our country and about
ourselves.
Zfe
Btain
nx ^tnt
YOM HAZIKARON
ISRAEL
MEMORIAL DAY
a.a Ihalr llv.a far I Ha 1TATI OF ISMAIL
MONDAY. MAY 12. I986. 7:30 P.M.
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
1051 N. MIAMI BEACH BLVD.
(NE I63 ST.)
Ylsker
Yahoahua Trlf or, Conauf Ointril of Israel
Vom Hailkaron Ramambr anc a IN word A "
i


Full Text
[oseph Handleman
tows the Jewish f u
e hands of those \
pable of building
THE
ZERO COUPON
BOND
PROGRAM:
FOUNDATION'S
INVESTMENT
IN
TOMORROW
' S
\tlit It IIIIHl
MADMi-
A

-
"^
Joseph Handleman is a pio-
neer. He sensed the wave of" the fu-
ture in the early 1950s, pioneering
the mass merchandising of high
fidelity and later stereophonic
records in retail stores across the
United States. A board member of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, Joe continues to apply his as-
tute pioneering spirit, becoming
one of the first participants in the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthro-
pies Zero Coupon Bond Program.
Joe, a management and finan-
cial consultant, has continued to
build upon the Jewish tradition
long after others would have felt
they'd done enough. "I'm eighty
years old now," noted Handleman,
"so I tend to think of goals for the
short-term."
But that is only partially true.
As a charter member of the "David
Ben Gurion Million Dollar Society."
Joseph Handleman is investing in
the future, expressing bis desire
that Jewish life will flourish here,
and in Israel, well into the 21st
century.
"I believe." Handleman said,
"that if properly harnessed, we
have limitless opportunities to
make Miami a great metropolitan
center. We must present our youth
with the blessed opportunity to
move through the cycles of life,
which for me. were born in the
pioneer spirit I'm very content
with the adventure I've had. now
my choice is to share my good for-
tune with the next generation."
Joseph Handleman possesses
the wisdom to adapt to a chang-
ing society. He applied his acumen
to the Handleman Company, a
highlv successful mass merchan-
dising enterprise, and these same
attributes now are working for the
Miami Jewish community.
"1 made a $50.000. five year
investment in the Zero program
because I believe in the compound-
ing effect of money and the conti-
nuity of community services
funded through Federation's an-
nual campaign and the Founda-
tion's Jewish Community Trust
Fund. This program will reap
great benefits for the good that it
does to the agencies which render
vitally needed services. It provides
us the chance to leave a message
that lives on after us."
The message is clear to Joe
Handleman.
Creating a
legacy for
the 21st
century.
**


Jay and Jon Kislak
are building a stronger
Jewish community by
investing in Miami's future



r
FOUNDATION
PHILANTHROPIC
FUNDS:
GIVING
OPPORTUNITIES
TO PRESERVE
JEWISH
UFE
For internacionaJh known
mortgage bankers Jar* and Jon
krslak. philanthrope and good
business go hand m hand Ja-.
Kislak ts a builder and an m*ev
in dreams for a bright Jewish
cure, a dream shared b% he son.
Jon Together the* represent the
cootiniJE\ which has helped the
Jewish people to sur*r*e and flour-
tsh for nearr* four thousand pears.
The kslaks have transformed the
Miami skvhne while dedica i
equal amounts of time and en.
to building the Jewh coounur
and working for the securit* -a the
Jewtsh homeland. IsraeL
B* estatbkshmg phSamhropn
funds widi the Greater Mtaxr.i
tsh FederattKfi F>undat*:<
Jewish Philanthropies- the *
ha*e found the perfect *ehicie :
continuing then* tradition of d:
Mtied chanuble gntng while v.
inuzing their tax benefits. I fa
an example of the hus-r.-1
men which characier-
kisiaks'careers.
Ja* Rtsiak etptiirt* id
tabhshed a phJanthr oc
was the perfect imestinen-
ment for me. It alfc*
recommendations as *
soruooro should reiertc-
anc. .-eatdea
freedom to create
eram of phikamhropv and
fits rxx onh this ommunr
Israel as weft*
\tm kisliicada> *B* esci-- -
| phiianthniptL tur-
.here will be resources :
die future emergent*-^
meet new net -
Jew tsh coaimurao and soar
whole l'*eahI
pnde m participating m nun
charitable MU inn on beha
lew tsh organizations and thi
munic* at Large. The phiia:
fund which m* wile. Ti:
ha*e created, ts. in essence
surancepoho-which wilc-
tee that the traditions and ::
tuaons wtuch we chertsh w-i!
for generations to cvtne *

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