The Jewish Floridian

forry and Rachel Nathanson
' the Temple's Twenty-Eighth
hiinttil Banquet on Sunday at
f<- Temple at 6 p.m. Morry
Vtihanson has served the Con-
rWtion as president and is
vesently honorary president,
fachel S'athanson has been an
pe member of the Congrega-
m and Sisterhood for many
jfars. They will be named as
fan and Woman of the Year
fith Rabbi Eugene Labowitz,
pintunl Leader of the Temple
taking the presentation in
wlj of the Congregation.
"hairman Named To
Board For
Capital For Israel
I Arthur Joseph of Teaneck. N.J.,
* nen named Chairman of the
P*M of Capital for Israel, an af-
Pe of the State of Israel Bond
fguuzation.
'this position, Joseph will lead
Ir''lal effort to increase sales of
I Organization's various
aei Government securities in
American business world.
' ke.v leader in the Bond
pwnization for many years,
fj* is also a director of the
veiopment Corporation for
a!id corPorate entity of
^ei Konds, and a member of its
Mcutive Committee.
Left to right. Circuit Court Judge Philip Bloom. Representative
holdiZ Bibk' S"prm* Court Jmtice Rosemary Barkett
Local FPL Employees
Share National Honor
Florida Power and Light Company's program of training and
motivating employees to voluntarily speak to community au-
diences has been recognized as one of 1985's ten best public infor-
mation programs in the United States and Canada by PR NEWS,
a leading journal in the field of public relations and public affairs.
According to FPL Miami Beach District General Manager Paul
Kalv. employees from every level of the company voluntarily par-
ticipate in the Community Information Program "to present
FPL's increasingly complex story to customers in an easy-to-
comprehend fashion." In Miami Beach. Jacqueline Moon and
William Rodriguez are among FPL's top speakers on energy-
related subjects.
Kalv said FPL employee presentations are as varied as FPL
customers. "Our programs on electrical safety are popular and ef-
fective among shool-age children. We also speak to senior citizens
about their special concerns and the programs we've developed to
meet their needs. In between, there's probably not a consumer
topic on energy we can't address for an audience," he noted.
Arrangements for an FPL employee speaker can be made by
calling (305) 674-4300, said Kalv.
Getyour
money in
anIRA
before the
IRS gets
your money
Wouldn't you much
rather see your money
working for you
ma Flagler Federal
Individual Retirement
Account than just
giving it away to
the government?
And while other entire program for you. your deposit must be
financial institutions Mail you the forms.
IRA-Term
18 Month CD
Minimum Deposit
$100
Interest
9%'
Additional deposits may be made at this rate, any time
prior to maturity.
Because with a
Flagler Federal IRA,
you not only lock in
your 1985 tax deduc-
tion, you secure your
financial future in an
account that earns a
high yield.
have you fill out tedi- You just sign and send
ous forms, we do most them back with your
of the work for you. initial deposit.
We don't even charge If you'd rather
administration fees, so make your deposit in
you end up with even person, just stop in to
one of our 40 conven-
ient locations. We'll
make sure all the
documents have been
completed beforehand,
so they're ready and
waiting for you.
At Flagler Federal,
we think it would be a
shame to give your
money away when you
can keep it yourself in
an IRA Remember that
made by April 15,1986.
There are no exten-
sions. So don't procras-
tinate any longer, tax
time is right around
the corner. Call us at
577-0060 in Dade.
463-0060 in Broward.
659-0060 in Palm Beach.
more money.
All you have to do
to open an account
with us is call our
exclusive IRA phone
number. We take down
all the pertinent infor-
mation. Set up the
SiMillT-X hull \.MH Lll.nl
// takes hometown l>eople
to ttntlersUituI the needs of
a hometown
^R


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
-
Community Corner
Harry Mildner. President of the Miami Beach Retirees Inc. an-
nounced that the next business meeting will be held Wednesday at
the American Savings Bank. Alton and Lincoln Road. Miami
Beach at 1 p.m. The agenda includes a short business meeting and
Travelogue, a film on traveling around the world.
Attorney Lawrence Feingold will be guest speaker at the next
general meeting of the Morton Towers Men's Club on Sunday at
10:30 a.m. according to entertainment chairman Sid Gersh
Dr. Sol Landau. President and Executive Director of the
Mid/Life Services Foundation, announces a seminar to be held on
Tuesday evening at the Holiday Inn at Brickell Point, at 7:30 p.m.
The Florida Association for Women Lawyers will hold their
Third Annual Gala Scholarship Auction and Dinner on Thursday.
April 17 at the Pavilion Hotel. Proceeds will go to their scholar-
ship fund which will benefit law students at the University of
Miami. St. Thomas University, and Nova University.
Pacemakers Club of Parkway Regional Medical Center will
meet on Monday at 10 a.m. at the center.
The South Dade Friends of Douglas Gardens is holding a
square dance at Rinky-Tink in Kendall on Saturday at 7:30 p.m..
coordinated by Eva and Fred Rawicz to benefit the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Dorita and George Feldenkreis will host a Cocktail Party honor-
ing Barry D. Schreiber. Dade County Commissioner, on Thurs-
day. April 10 at 6 p.m. at their home.
The next meeting of the South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry will be held on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.. at Federation
Building.
The Anti-Defamation League's Annual Florida Thousand
Cocktail Party will be held Thursday. April 10 at 530 p.m. at the
Mayfair House. Coconut Grove. Neal M. Sher. Director. Office of
Special Investigations. United States Justice Department and Ar-
thur N. Teitelbaum. Southern Area Director will speak.
ROKEACH
Wishes
You A
Happy
Holiday

Rabbi Auerbach Named Program
Chairman For Rabbinical Assembl
Dade County State Attorney
Janet Reno will be the guest of
honor at the State of Israel
Bond Organization
Testimonial Dinner on Sun-
day, April 13, at the Biscayne
Bay Marriott Hotel in Miami.
Reno, who has served in the
Eleventh Judicial Circuit since
1978, will be recognized by the
State of Israel Bond Profes-
sional Women's Cabinet for
her strong commitment to
human rights and the rule of
law, as well as her support of
Israel. The dinner will begin
with a cocktail rception at 6
p.m.
Rabbi David H. Auerbach of
Miami has been named as the na-
tional program chairman for the
86th annual meeting of The Rab-
binical Assembly, international
body representing 1200 Conser-
vative rabbis, May 18-22 at the
Concord Hotel.
The apointment was announced
by Rabbi Alexander M. Shapiro,
president of the RA. South
Orange, N.J.
Rabbi Auerbach and his commit-
tee will develop seminars,
academic sessions, workshops,
symposia on topical issues and
special sessions to provide a con-
vention reflecting general and
y
Jewish problems that concern th,
Conservative rabbis.
Rabbi Auerbach, a native of
Montreal, Canada, founded hk
present congregation, Bet Shirs
and previously served pulpits b!
Montreal, Atlanta and Miami.
As a past president of the Ri'i
Southwest region, he participate
m the decision-making process of
the 1.5 million member Conser
vative Judaism movement in the
U.S. and Canada. In Miami he u
active as a board member of the
South Dade Federation, with the
American Jewish Committee, and
has written extensively in various
secular and Jewish publications.
Teaching Is Tops
Challenging teaching positions at excellent
salaries in an exciting progressive Jewish
environment. Openings for Fall/86 in Sunday
and Hebrew Schools; Day School and Early
Childhood programs; specialists; and Youth
Advisor. Call: RABBI COOK at Temple Sinai
of North Dade.
932-9010
ROttAOL
?tr.l
Iff
BQKEAO
mv\
Fti
W^er we stoned m 1870 we
didn know we d become o '-od>
ion 6V we hove And now we
.....e' oo' high quolity change
Rokeoch For o complete Ime c'
troditiOffllly die prodoC'S
Kosher and endorsed
This Passover ser\e
ROKEACH
and be sued
Dr. Lawrence B. Robbins
Gov. Graham and
Dr. Robbins
To Be Honored
Dr. Lawrence B. Robbins,
Miami plastic and reconstructive
surgeon will be honored by the
Florida Friends of Albert Einstein
College of Medicine at its 1986
Distinguished Achievement
Award Dinner-Dance on Satur-
day, April 12 at the Konover
Hotel.
Governor Bob Graham will Ik>
the keynote speaker and recipient
of the Distinguished Public Ser-
vice Award.
Toastmaster for the evening is
Miami Dolphin's vice-president.
Joe Abrell.
Mr. and Mrs. Alan ('. Kaplus ar-
dinner chairmen.
Help Fight The Cults!
Donate your property,
boat, or car to
Chabad House.
Tax deductible.
932-2043
Shirt Sleeve IRAs
High Rates, High Yields
Guaranteed*
Unlike many Money Funds and Gmme Maes that don't guarantee your rate, yield or even your principal
investment, your Ensign Banker does give you guarantees Lock into one of our high rate CDs and be
guaranteed a high yield. And what's more, your IRA will be insured by the Federal Savings and Loan
Insurance Corporation Try to get that with a money fund
We are so sure that our IRA rates are some of the highest around that we want to help you compare our
rates with other institutions So roll up your shirt sleeves, get out a pencil and start comparing_____
"1
Bank
Term
Rate/Yield'
Ensign Bank
12-Month CD
18-Month CD
48 Month CD
7.50%/7.90%
7.70%/8.12%
8.30%/8.78%
Money Fund/Ginnie Maes
H
Centrust
12-Month CD
18-Month CD
48 Month CD
Amerifirst
12-Month CD
18-Month CD
48 Month CD
Other Banks
12-Month CD
18-Month CD
48-Month CD
JL
Rales ana yields are guaranteed at the time you open an account lor the term ol the account Rates subnet to change without "o-ice
Substantial penalties will be charged it the Bank permits an early withdrawal IRA rules may require substantial lai penalts to- -ha-a*s
beio-e age 59' | Yields assume lunds on deposit tor the lull term ot the account at the same rale with no .nterest withdrawals 0" >a"d <**1
lor personal accounts Deposits are insured by the FSLIC up lo $100 000 per depositor
YreWs on Money Funds (Ginnie Maes) are estimated based on the lunds past performance and do not represent protected KM **<
ISZZSZT^^ZV?**!!?* Chan9e acco'a,n9,0 m"> conditions Although pr.nc.pal and accrued interest are backed by U S
Government the rates and yields are not guaranteed
No surprise: Your Shirt Sleeve Banker ,s offering one of the highest IRA rates in town And to make
opening this year s IRA even easier, he s offering an IRA loan that makes starting one more affordable than
ever before Tax savings, high interest, retirement security: you can have them all with your Ensign Bank
guaranteed IRA And you can start your program by simply sending in the coupon below
*JS $500 and the maximum is $2,000 (rollovers may be higher) Higher rates, easy loans, simple deposits and
guaranteed returns-when you measure other IRA programs against your Shirt Sleeve Banker's there's
just no comparison --
Ensign Bank FSB. 801 H.aleah Drive. Miami. FL 33010 (305) 887-5511
Dear Shirt Sleeve Bankers.
SifoesUor'mera,6S ***** ""* "* "*,n,orma,,on' need o help me choose the Ens>n IRA plan
JFH
NAME,
ADDRESS-
ZIP-
PHONE-
ENSIGN BANK
*****
SOC SEC NO
FSB
M
THE SHIRT SLEEVE BANKERS.
J


\rcepling congratulations as a benefactor of the Auxiliary of
|}<>uM Shore Hospital and Medical Center is Felice P. Schwartz,
erf. shown with Helene Owen, co-president of the organization at
iieir lith annual Spring Gala, "South Seas Fantasy." Schwartz
L m the board of the auxiliary and executive vice president of the
terald Schwartz Agency.
Hadassah
Events
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a regular lun-
cheon meeting on Monday, at
11:30 a.m. at the Ocean Pavilion.
Officer Vincent Mulshine of the
Miami Beach Police Department
will show a film on Crime Watch.
The Henrietta Szold Chapter of
Hadassah. will hold their Board
Meeting on Tuesday, at noon, at
the Hadassah Office, Lincoln
Road.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Monday. April
14. at 12:30 p.m. at the Morton
Towers Auditorium, 1500 Bay
Road. Call Lil. 534-5754.
Workmen's Circle
Workmen's Circle, Miami Beach
Branch 1059 will meet on
Wednesday, at noon, at Surfside
Community Center, Rabbi Marvin
Rose, discussing the Holocaust,
and Willian Saulson, with an up-
date on Soviet Jewry.
Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Rabbi Kravitz To Speak
Rabbi Leonard Kravitz will
speak on behalf of the North Dade
Midrasha at Temple Sinai of
North Dade, on Tuesday, at 8 p.m.
His topic will be "Midrash As
Philosophy Philosophy As
Midrash."
Rabbi Kravitz is Professor of
Midrash and Homiletics at the
New York School of the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion. From 1957 to 1959 Rab-
bi Kravitz served as a chaplain in
the U.S. Army.

Come to the
Restaurant
For Festive Food From the Mid East.
Enjoy Suzanne and her Jerusalem Band
t Singing International Music of the Holyland. X
CB Every Wednesday Evening
Reservation Required jgy^
662-1692
<

4&*y
9553 SOUTH DIXIE HWY.
(In ttw DadaUnd PUu C.nt.n
RATED MltmlNtmi
Miami Hinld
*
**
.<**

in
Na'amat USA
[Rabbi Yehudah Melber will be
\e featured guest speaker at the
eeting of the Beba Idelson
hapter of Na'amat USA on
Wednesday, at 11:30 a.m. in the
lib room at 100 Lincoln Road.
[Chapter president Irene Rac-
lowski said Rabbi Melber, who
ently returned from Israel, will
ue a report on the situation
re.
|Entertainment will be provided
vice president Esther Weins-
ln. and Tillie Fraydman.
Passover poems and songs will
[featured at the meeting of the
at chapter of Na'amat USA
onday, at 1 p.m. in the
ditorium of American Savings
|d Loan Association, 890
hington Avenue.
-hapter President Faye
ucker said the meeting will be
flighted by Cultural Chairman
tin Kovalsky. and Frieda
?tan, program chairman.
Yiddish Culture
Winkle
iddish Culture Winkle will
their culture and musical
Bering of the season on Thurs-
[morninc April 10 at 10:30 in
piple Ner Tamid.
r. Morris Becker, pedagogue
lecturer, will talk on Yom
hoa, in tribute to the six
Jews who perished under
ose Lusky will render a pro-
of Yiddish and Hebrew
on Yudoff, singer, will pre-
songs. He will be accom-
ied by Oscar Shapiro.
f- Menasha Feldstein, presi-
. will chair the meeting.
,s Judaic Studies
[rrogram Ends
persity of Miami's Judaic
pes Program for the spring
*ster closes on Wednesday.
' Program will host a Jewish
Res Colloquium in the Presi-
[s Board Room from 2-5 p.m.
put Professors Bob Levine,
1 lemkin, William Fishman,
lenry (,reen wi|| speak on tne
of- 'The Immigrant and
Won."
J:3 p.m.. William Fishman,
Jewish History at the
Pfsny of London will speak
"i Fall of the East
>tto." in the Learning
^ where shopping is q pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Raisin
Pumpernickel
Bread
99*
lib.
loaf
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Flaky, Tender and Delicious
Croissants
0 I
J
Strawberry Cheese
Coffee Cake
$129
sen
(Buy one with each filled S&H
Stamp Price Special Certificate).,
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Golden Loaf
Pound Cake..................each $159
Bran Muffins................. K $119
Prices Effective
April 3 thru 9,1986.
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Der Waffelbakkers
8-ct.
Dutch Waffle Cakes..... S 99*
Topped with Creamy Chocolate
Eclairs...........................2 for $1
tf
imSX$fflffl Rights Reserved. iKjte.iJ^^-./ fcSW*111 ^
Publix


.Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Frid^y,, April 4, 1986
SPECIALLY-FOR
SINGLES
Edith Jacobson
Enjoying the monthly Meeting of the Founder of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged were new Founder (left to
right), Edward Levine, Executive Director Marc Lichtman,
Frieda Levine, Director of Social Services Marilyn Goldaber,
David Wexler, and Louis Stein, Founders president.
Are you Single? Pereonal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 3310V
3&t/t/l&tU*ip4
The Sunny Isles Chapter of ARMDI is planning a
Musical Extravaganza, "The Cavalcade of Stars" for
Monday evening at the Constitutuion Room of the
Newport Hotel, Miami Beach. Dinner and an optional
show, scheduled for 8 p.m. includes a nationally
renowned all-star cast of singers, comedians and
dance groups.
American Jewish Congress, Justine Louise Wise
Chapter will meet Thursday, April 10 at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings and Loan at Alton and Lincoln
Roads.
Menorah Sisterhood will hold a regular meeting on
Wednesday, at noon. Greta Fleissig will be guest
speaker.
A year of festivities marking the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged's 40th Anniversary will
culminate in a dinner-dance at the Pavilion Hotel on
April 19.
California Club Women's American ORT luncheon
meeting will take place Thursday, April 10, at noon with
an open forum at the Coral Creek Country Club, former-
ly the California Club, North Miami Beach.
Book Shelf
Established
Edith Jacobson has donated a
shelf for contemporary books on
Christian-Jewish though to the
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, 4200 Biscayne Blvd.
The books were given to CAJE's
Adler-Shinensky Library through
the Smulovitz Fund.
Jacobson established the
Smulovitz Memorial Trust at
Barry University in memory of
her parents. Purpose of the fund
is to promote Jewish-Christian
dialogue through a lecture series
held annually at the University.
Jacobson holds an AB degree in
philosophy from the University of
Miami and an MA degree in
religious studies from Barry
University. She is a graduate of
the Theological Seminary
Teachers Institute.
Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, presi-
dent of Barry University, in
acknowledging the importance of
the Smulovitz Fund in "encourag-
ing dialogue for better understan-
ding," sees Jacobson as "a
modern day bridge between
people."
Retired Jewish professional man seeks Jewish senior
citizen non-smoker lady to share my Miami Beach 2
bedroom 2 bath condo with pool 50-50. Box W7 c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Professional Jewish male, 41, seeks non-smoking
female 35-40. If you enjoy the outdoors, movies, theatre
fine dining and townhouse living in the Aventura-Turn-
berry area, we could be a perfect match. Box FD c/o
Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Attractive, sensitive sports-oriented, male, 30, MBA,
looking for attractive female 22-28, health-minded!
educated; for camping, theatre, active fun lifestyle.
Send recent photo, phone number, summary of interests,
to P.O. Box 40-2685, Miami Beach 33140.
HAPPENINGS SINGLES le ha-Hog an OUTSTANDING SINGLES PARTY
on FRIDAY, APRIL 4,1966 at 6*0 P.M., at the DIPLOMAT COUNTRY
CLUB, 501 DIPLOMAT PARKWAY, Hallandato, Florida. Thar* will b.
DANCING, UVE BAND, CONTINUOUS HORS D'OEUVRES, GIFT
DRAWINGS and SURPRISES. Admission la 66.00. For mors Inform*
tlon call Sharon Silver 366-1256.

I
MIT'S HERE!!
Our Annual
ABSOLUTE
DISPOSAL
SALE
pershing]
Auto Leasing Must Sell |
Our Pedigreed
"Off-Lease" Rental
Cars & Select Trade-Ins!
#p
Hii.iiiii.mn'iiJi:iiii:rrmn
COMETOMIMM BEACH THIS WEEK. SAVE HUNDREDS.
SAVE THOUSANDS!... open 7 days ... 9 am 6 pm.
Bank Financing On Tha Pramlaoal...
EXAMPLES:
77 AMC PACER.
78 MERCURY COUGAR_________
77 MERCURY COUGAR XR7_____
81 MERCURY WAGON 6 pa '81 CHEVY WAGON 6 DMsangsr____
83 FORD FAIRMONT____________
'83 AMC CONCORD DL___________
83 MERCURY ZEPHYR__________
'79 OLDS TORONADO___________
81 CHEVROLET CAPRICE_______
ISM
Parahlng'a 32-Year Reputation Unconditional Guarantee With Each "O
EXAMPLES:
'81 OLDS CUTLASS 4-DOOR .____________64.196
.61.496
.61.495
.61.695
_61,895
_S2.49S
.63.995
.63.995
.63,996
.63.995
.63,995
'84 AMC ALLIANCE.
83 NIS6AN 5ENTRA 4-DOOR_____
82 CHEVROLET IMPALA WAGON.
81 CADILLAC SEDAN DVILLE_
82 CHEV. CAPRICE CLASSIC_____
82 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE_______
83 BUICK REGAL COUPE.
83 PONTIAC FIREBIRD COUPE.
83 CHEV. CAPRICE CLASSIC___
.64.296
-64.296.
-64,395
-64,496
-64,566
.64,795
.66.296
.66.596
.66.996
EXAMPLES.
83 CHEVROLET CAMARO________
'84 CHEVROLET CAMARO________
'82 LINCOLN MARK VI, Loadadl___
'83 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER_____
'83 TOYOTA CONVERTIBLE______
83 CADILLAC SEDAN DsVILLE___
'84 CADILLAC COUPE DsVILLE___
'83 PEUGEOT 4 DOOR_____________
84 VOLVO G.L.E. 760_____________
___66.995
___66.795
___67.995
___67.495
___67,995
___69,395
_610,996
Whokult'
_Wholaslsl
I
I
I
Choose From
200 Additional Can
MUnbaatablaSatingall
ChovyB Olds
.Bulck8-Pon JC6
Fords Cadillac*)
Uny,MnyMore)M|
BuYATWHOLESALt
AUCTION PRICES
NO DEALER CAN MATCH'
WDRATHRSHL
saigas':
ALL CARS ALSO
AVAILABLE FOR
LEASE AT LOW
UNBELIEVABLE
south florida s most
rcSpectedLeasin
IMS
I
\
memer****
AS A DOWN PAYMEN i
AUTO LEASING
1545 ALTON ROAD, MIAMI BEACH
DADE:538-10O0BROW: 525-9300


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
The residents of Imperial House held a brunch
on behalf of the Greater Miami Jeunsh Federa-
tion's 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency FundJProject Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign. The brunch also paid tribute to the
late Esther Weinkle. Seen above, at the event
are (left to right): Sylvia Farber Freedman.
event co-chairman; guest speaker Jerome
Gleekel; Polly de Hirsch Meyer; Milton Jacob-
son, event co-chairman and Fay Stein,
honorary chairman.
Easter Seal Campaign
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion Names Co-Ambassadors
... "These shall ye not eat of them the camel the rock-
badger the hare the swine they are unclean unto you"
(Leviticus 11.4-8).
SHEMINI
SHEMINI On the eight day of their consecration, Aaron and
his sons offered sacrifices for themselves and the people at Moses'
command. Then Moses and Aaron came out of the tent of
meeting, blessing the people. The glory of God appeared; a fire
from Heaven consumed the burnt-offering on the altar. At the
sight, the people cried out and fell on their faces. Nadab and
Abihu, Aaron's sons, offered "strange fire" on the altar, a fire
issued forth and devoured them. Aaron held his peace. The priests
are commanded not to drink wine or strong drink when entering
the tent of meeting "that ye may put difference between the holy
and the common, and between the unclean and the
clean "Leviticus 10.10). The portion details the laws describing
cleanliness and uncleanliness in regard to the eating of animals,
fowls, and fish.
(The recounting of tht WMkly Portion of Mm Law Is extracted and betax.
upon "Tht Graphic History of the Jawlsh Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Ttamir, Si s, published by Shengold The volume Is available at 7$ Maiden
Line, New York, N.Y. 1003*. Joseph Sdilang Is president of the society dis-
tributing tht volume.)
Seymour Liebman To Be Honored
Seymour B. Liebman, author,
will be honored at a special lun-
cheon to be held by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, for
his years of work with the Miami
Beach Public Library, "Great
Book Series" on Wednesday.
His latest book, "Requiem Por
Los Olvidados" (Mass for the
Forgotten) is a translation of the
English edition, entitled: "New
World Jewry 1493-1825."
Regional Director
National Zionist Fraternal Organization seeking
REGIONAL DIRECTOR for South Florida.
Should have experience in communal affairs,
organizational ability and f undraising.
Send resume and salary requirements to: Box
BZS c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101.
Physician
Referral
Service
referral to over 300 doctors
868-2728
first appointment within 2 days
a community service
on Miami Beach
Ambassadors of the 1986
Easter Seal Campaign have been
announced by Bruce N. Reinert-
son, president of the board of the
Society in Dade County.
Bob Kuechenberg has been
named chairman of this year's
campaign activities. Kuechenberg
is a former Miami Dolphin football
star.
Easter Seal Child is Samantha
Faine, who will act as
Kuechenberg's co-ambassador.
She is in treatment at the
Society's Demonstration School.
CAJE Events
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education will present its Fifth
Annual Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Education Director's
Workshop on Thursday, April 10
from 9 a.m. until 6:30 p.m. at Beth
Torah Congregation.
"Supervision and Evaluation in
the Jewish Early Childhood
education Program," will be the
theme for the day, according to
co-chairmen Arlene Lasko and
Alida Bunder.
Libby Kaplan
Honored By
Technion Women
The Southern Region Women's
Division, American Technion
Society, will honor Libby Kaplan
of Boynton Beach at a luncheon to
be held at the David Williams
Hotel in Coral Gables, Wednesday
at 12:30 p.m. Mildred Magill, Na-
tional Vice President of the
Medical Engineering Program,
will be the guest speaker.
Rose Grossman is chairman of
the event
WPBT Specials
Examine Israeli/
i Palestinian Conflict
The land issue at the heart of
the Israeli/Palestinian conflict is
examined in three hours of special
programming airing Wednesday,
beginning at 8 p.m. on
WPBT/Channel 2.
Flashpoint: Israel and the
Palestinians portray the complex
and controversial issue through
the presentation of three in-
dependently produced films and
commentary by Profess.or
Rhashid Khalidi of Columbia
University and Ehud Olmert a
Likud Party member of Israel s
Knesset.
X
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:19 p.m.
ADATHYESHURUN
102S NE Miami Qardana Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Fraadman
Cantor Ian Aipem Conaarvativa
Dally Mlnyan 7:10 a.m., 8 30 p.m.
Frl. ntaM p.m riddle* Shebbet with
re). Benear and Mlndell* Waiemen.
Sat : a.m. Sat etkieha 5:30 p.m
p.m. Sun. 8:30 l.m.4 p.m
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmual
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534 7213-534 7214 _
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi t *)
Moehe Buren, Cantor > JJ'
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epelbaum. Prasklent,
Religious Comminae
TEMPLE EMANU El _
1701 Washington Avenue '_*>
Miami Beach \1T
Or. Irving Lahrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Max wall Beiger
Yahuda Shitman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Diractor
Gerald Taub. Executive Diractor
Frl. eve. p.m RebM Sergei will apeak
"Ol Care, Courage and Conlu.ion '
Cantor Yehuda Shitman win chant.
Sat. 8 a.m. Dr. Lahrman will praach on
the weekly portion ol the Bible
Cantor Shitman will chant, the Junior Choi'
will participate
TEMPLE BETH AM
5050 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl. eve Family Service Rabbi Simon will
apeak on (Jetting Reedy lor Paeeover.
Sat. 11:15 a.m. Bar Mltnahe:
Daniel Heubecnmann and Joey Krauae.
Sermon by Rabbi Simon
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue 854-3811
Dr. Sol Landau, -.,_-
Rabbi Emaritua 'V)
Rev. Milton Freeman, *
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
Fit. eve 5:30 p.m.
Sat a.m. Kldduah lolkmlng eervtce
Jlncheh 8:25 p.m. Wed SUtarhood
emoraeebord a upper 7 p.m
Dally eervlcee: Sun. I a.m. S 5:30 p.m.,
Men. Thure. 7:30 a.m., 5.30 p.m Tu...
Wed, Frl. 7:4* a.m., 5:30 p.m
BETH KOOESH
Conaervattvo
1101S.W.12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Canton Joeeph Krieael
Rosa Berlin: Executive Secratary
858-6334

o
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33161
88 V 5506 Conaarvativa
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi .
Dr. Joseph A. Qorf Inkel, B\
Rabbi Emeritus *X'
Moehe Frladler, Cantor
Frl. eve MeWe Out Shea*at. Sea. OeMend
Sat 1fremUS*lbUecooe.riiiepee.
The Tlene ol Your LHe."
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
IMS Jeffaraon Ave.. MB, FL 33136
Tai 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Johuda Mather
Cantor NiSSim Banyamim
OeHy eervtoea S a jn. e-m.
Sat. 8:15a.m
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Straat
236-2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Malaals
Shebbat Servloee Frt. S ejn. Set. *M a.m.
I>
TEMPLE BETH H8E8B 538 7231
Chase Ave. 441 at St. >.
OR. LEON KROHISH, Founding Senior
OAKY A. a LICK8T El*, Rebel
HARRY XHT, AwMety Rear
aulD CAPLAN.fcaaiataM
CANTOR DAVID COHVIS1R
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetrae Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami atoneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 10th St., Miami. 573-5900
9090 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob Q. Bomstain
Associate Cantor RachaMa F Netaon
Executive Director Philip S. Gotdin
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L Sparks
Downtown: Rabbi Haekell M. Bemat
"Romania, Romania, Romania, but the country
la no longer a aong." Ltturgy Cantor Racheue
F. Nalaon and Cantora Club.
KendeN: RaoM Re. D. Perl mate. "Faith S
Reaeon: A Limned Partnerehlp." Liturgy Cantor
Jeooba 0. Bometetn.______.
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Oablae 667-5657
Mtchasi B. Eteenstat. Rabbi
Friday eervtoea B:1S p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
610 Lincoln Rd. Tal 534-9776
OR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Stwehaneh Raab. Cantor
Service* Frl 7:30 p.m.
Sat. (:30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75M1 St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz ,;
Cantor Murray Yavneh IW
SatSam Sebbethaervtee.
Dally Mine hah Sunday Friday S a.m. and B p.m
Sal 9 am end 6:15 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 8664345
7902 Carlyla Ava., 866-9833
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene LabovtU coneer*au*e
Cantor Edward Klein
Daily Senricee 8a.m. and 5:M p.m.
Sal 8:45 a m
Frl. late eervlca 8 p.m.
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
362-0698
Rabbi Warren Kasztl aaooem omatm
Rebel Keeitt arlll temporarily conduct
eeparele aerrleee Sat *30 a.m. et Tempi*
^Semu-B. SSSS S. W. 1 fiAe..
eoulh of N. KendeN Drive.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava.
North Dados Reform Cortgragatton
Ralph P. Kingslay. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkas. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
FoSe
enabbet ejn. eerv. dedication ol
tno ahanaei a.m. eera. uoueuainai m
atdg. m honor ot m* Abe F*moom
Saaolal havohoon knmad.k-~
Famey worh*p Fn 7 30
V
V
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd
Or. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvaa Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown. Exec Diractor
Dally eervlcee Monday-Thuraday
7 M a.m. and 5 30 p.m. Friday
7:S9 e.m., 5:15 p.m. end 8 p.ei.;
Saturday 8:25 a.m. and 5 p.m..
Sundey8am and5:30p.m
w
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Consarvativa
271-2311 jfjfje.
Or. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi IBJ
Baniamin Adlar, Cantor -
Oavid Rosanthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Men'* Club Sebbeth. Serveoee
conducted by rnembei ol men* dub. 8 am
Set, eheebeth aervloee lotiepal


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
Anti-Defamation League's first annual
Woman of Achievement Award Luncheon was
presented to Adele Graham, wife of Florida
Governor Bob Graham. (Left to right), Arva
Parks. Luncheon Chairman; Adele Graham.
First Lady of Florida; Arthur Teitelbaum.
Southern Area Director for the Anti-
Defamation League; Myrna Shevin. Luncheon
Chairman.
Minnie Goldstein received the presitigious
Lion ofJudah Award at a special luncheon at
the Port Royale condominium in Miami
Beach. Goldstein was recognized for her active
involvement in various philanthropic and
community organizations, including her sup-
port of Israel through the Israel Bond pro-
gram. With Goldstein at the award presenta-
tion were, from left to right. Port Royale
Israel Bond Chairman Jack Finn; guest
speaker Mickey Freeman, a comedian, who
appeared on the Sgt. Bilko TV Series, and co-
chairman David Pretner.
Business Note
The Neighborhood, a consor-
tium of major hotel, apartment
houses, hospitals, condominiums,
hanks and merchants in Miami
Beach, from 41st through 63rd
streets, from the ocean to the bay,
has retained Gerald Schwartz
Public Notices
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-02268-21
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JACQUES MARIE
KERNESANT EVARISTE
Petitioner,
and
BURNESTINE EVARISTE
Respondent.
TO: BURNESTINE EVARISTE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612
Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami.
Florida. 33136. and file original
with Court Clerk on or before May
2. 1986. otherwise a default will be
entered.
Dated: March 25. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Court Clerk
BY: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19703 March 28:
April 4. II. 18. 1986
Agency for its year-round adver-
tising, public relations and
marketing activities.
Walter Henry has been named
assistant auditor of Jefferson
Bancorp, a publicly-held bank
holding company headquartered
in Miami Beach.
His promotion was announced
by Barton S. Goldberg, president
of Jefferson National Bank, which
is headquartered at 301 41st
Street with three other offices in
Miami Beach and Key Biscayne.
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-0226S
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NORMA FERNANDEZ,
Petitioner,
and
JUAN B. FERNANDEZ,
Respondent.
TO: JUAN B. FERNANDEZ
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
ticn of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 Nor-
thwest I2th Ave.. Miami. Florida.
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before May 9. 1986.
otherwise a default will be entered
April 1. 1986.
RirHARD BRINKER
BY: L.E.R. Sinclair
19711 April 4. 11 18. 25. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 8C 13*24-14
Family Division
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ENRIQUE PEREZ,
Petitioner,
and-
MARIA ELOISA PEREZ,
Respondent.
TO: MARIA ELOISA PEREZ
Chana 1980
Montevideo. Uruguay
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 825 South
Bayshore Drive. Suite 543. Miami
FL 33131, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 9, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 2nd day of April, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19714 April 4. 11. 18.25. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name Rainbow Lawn
Service at 3620 NW 30 Avenue
Lot E509 Miami. Florida 33142,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Pedro Alvarado
19657 March 14. 21. 28;
April 4, 1986
NOTICE OK ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 86-12685 FC12
IN RE: RHONDA DEBBIE
GONZALEZ, and
ANTHONY MICHAEL
GONZALEZ, her natural minor
child
Petitioners
TO: Mr Thomas Haywood Parker
5161 Rice Road
Nashville. Tennessee
Y () I' ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Change of Name for your minor
child has l>een filed and you arc re
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on Bruce
i Schemberg. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 4^(1 Lin-
coln Road. Suite 512, Miami
Beach Florida 33139 and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
May 9. 1986, otherwise a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
or Petition.
This notice shall he published
once a week for four weeks in The
Jewish Flondian
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
1st day of April. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce J. Scheinberg
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(305) 538-7575
Attorney for Petitioner
19712 April 4. 11,18.25. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ODYSSEY at 2029
NW. 22 Court, Miami, Fl. 33142
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Rafael Pardo President
Attorney for R.P. Fashions Inc.
19660 March 14. 21.28:
April 4. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-11881-01
NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
TERESA SUE HICKS, wife,
and
DANIEL G. HICKS, husband.
TO: DANIEL G. HICKS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on ARTHUR H.
LIPSON, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 NE 167 St..
Miami. Florida 33162. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April 25.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this twenty-first day of March.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19699 March 28:
April 4. 11. 18.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-1606
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REUBEN H. EPSTEIN
I >r< ;,M,j
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Reuben H. Epstein, deceased
File Number 82-1606, is p,.ndin '
the Circuit Court for Dade County
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 78 W Flakier
Street. Miami. FL 38180. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney arc
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this curt
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION' OF
THIS NOTICE: (1, all claims
against the estate and (21 an) ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILI BE
FOREVER BARRKI)
Publication of tl
begun on April 4 1986
Personal Representative:
Edwin A Easton
220 West Ritteniiou.-c Square
I'hiideiphia. PA 19103
Attorne] br Personal
Representative:
Abraham M Mor. I iquire
Blank, Rome. Ci miskj
McCaoJej
1401 Forum Way. 7th Floor
West Palm Beach Fl
Telephone: (305)386-8100
19713 ApnU. II 181
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-11612 FC-05
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
GEORGE TOOMKK
Petitioner
and
GLADYS B. TOOMER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GLADYS B. TOOMER
Rt. 3. Bx 139-B
Ft. Valley. Ga 31030
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.
JEROME GRAFF. ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167 St. North Miami
Beach. Florida 33162. on or before
April 25. 1986. and file the original
with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 20. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19695 March 28:
April 4. 11,18,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artioa No. 86-08215 (28)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CHRISTINE JACKSON,
wife,
and
DOUGLAS JACKSON,
husband.
TO: DOUGLAS JACKSON
13009 Chestnut
Ridge Road
North Ridgeville,
Ohio 33009
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor
theast 167 St.. Miami. FL 33162.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before April 4, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 26 day of February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Seidl
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19646 March 7, 14.21.28. l'-'W


I Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
Vi THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
nRCUITOFFLORIDDA^IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 8WI7
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
* OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR. NO. 151623
RUTH BADARANI
and
ZAID BADARANI
TO: ZAID BADARANI
Residence Unknown
fOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
te f Marriage has been filed
jgainst vou and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ALAN S.
KESSLER. attorney for Peti-
uoner. whose address is The
Ronev Plaza. 2801 Collins Ave..
Suite' M-8. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 11, 1986: other-
riK default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice e published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks ill THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this Tthdav.'f March. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN S. KESSLER. ESQ.
Attorney and Counselor at Law
The Ronev Plaza
2301 Collins Avenue
Mezzanine Suite M-8
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19668 March 14. 21,28;
April 4. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nubcr 86-558
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NOEMI GEORGE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of NOEMI GEORGE, deceased,
File Number 86-559. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 28, 1986.
Personal Representative
Ronald L. George
10705 SW 134th Court
Miami. FL 33186
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Abraham M Mora, Esquire
Blank, Rome, Comisky &
McCauley
1401 Forum Way. 7th Floor
West Palm Beach. FL 33401
Telephone. (305) 686-8100
19701 March 28;
April 4. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
enpufi ill business under the fic-
titious nan,, ALEXANDER AP
PUANCES at 30M N W 27
Avenue Miami. FL 88148 intends
to register said name with the
I Jerk of the Circuit Court 'if Dade
County Florida
Hurra] Spector
Harold A Turtietaub
Attorney for Murraj Spector
199 inset Drive Suite 108
Miami. FL 33173
March li 21.28;
April 4, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
nirage in business under the
I c I t i ii u s name
INTERNATIONAL
TYPOGRAPHY SERVICES at
' K 26 Street, in the City of
Wilton Manors. Florida, intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Dateii at Miami, Florida, this
-1st day of March, 1986.
SCG. INC.
By Nelson C Keshen, Secretary
NELSON C. KESHEN.
ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 209
8905 SW. 87th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-1538
W00 March 28;
_____ April 4.11,18, 1986
KERNE-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 86-11765 (13)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GUILD LOAN &
INVESTMENT COMPANY.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN .1. MACALUSO,
et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOHN T MACALUSO
240 Nice Lane. No 306
Newport Beach. CA 92663
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14. Block 43, HEFLER
HOMES SUNSET PARK
SECTION 8, Plat Book 75,
Page 88. Public Records of
Dade County. Florida
has been Tiled against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Cables. Florida 33146. on or before
April 25. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter! otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 21st day of
March, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19698 March 28;
April 4. 11. 18.1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 864)2268-21
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JACQUES MARIE
SANT EVARISTE
Petitioner,
and
BURNESTINE EVARISTE
Respondent.
T: BURNESTINE EVARISTE.
residence unknown, you shall
jerve copy of your Answer to the
">tiuon for Dissolution of Mar
"Wupon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
*"*-. Miami, Florida, 33136, and
e original with Court Clerk on or
fore April 25. 1986; otherwise a
will be entered.
March 18, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
196*8 : DC BRYANT
WMt March 21, 28;
April 4, 11, 1986 1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the tic
titious name Love Store at
1275-1277 West Flagier St. intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Marbetty Inc.
19672 March 14.21,28;
1% April 4. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under tne
fictitious name Asociacion Pnvada
en Defensa del Consumidor
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Angel Maldonado
and Nestor J. Barbosa
,4667 March 14.21.28;
li**' April 4. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-8739 Sect. 09
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VINCENT A. HAUGHTON.
husband,
and
GLORIA HAUGHTON, wife.
TO: GLORIA HAUGHTON
1582 Westwood Drive
Charleston, So. Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
NORTHEAST 167 STREET.
MIAMI, FL 33162, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April 18,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 12 dav of March, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19679 March 21. 28.
April 4, 11. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1427
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARION K. BOURCHIER
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED THAT the administration of
the estate of MARION K
BOURCHIER. deceased. File
Number 86-1427 (01). is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. 3rd Floor. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the ..-late :-
JOHN THOMAS BOURCHIER.
whose address is 10021 Martinique
Drive. Miami. Florida 33189 The
name and addresses of the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claim.- Of
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basil for the claim, the name and
addreM Of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall I* stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
slated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. .
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 4. 1986.
John Thomas Bourchier
As Personal Representative of
the Estate of
MARION K. BOURCHIER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SANFORD F. DERNIS
10700 Caribbean Blvd.. No. 314
Miami, Florida 33189
Telephone: (305) 233-3735
19709
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-43816 FC-01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
FLORETTE BEAUSIL,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ESTOFIL BEAUSIL,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr. Estofil Beausil
Residence unknown
Address:
16 Emory Street
Jersey City, New Jersey
07304
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Alan
H. Miller, Esq.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd.. Suite 317, Miami,
Florida 33189, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 18, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller, Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
Telephone: (305) 238-1080
Attorney for Petitioner
19687 March 21.28;
April 4. 11. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.8.1-48625 FC 21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE:
JOANNE MCKENZIE.
Petitioner
and
BURCHELL L. ARCHER.
Respondent
TO: Burchell T. Archer
226 Benziger Avenue
Staten Island, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
CUSTODY AND DETERMINA-
TION OF PATERNITY has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on ARTHUR H. LIPSON
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is'801 NE 167 St., Miami. Fl.
33162 and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before April 11, 1986; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6th day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade-County. Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19665 March 14.21.28;
April 4. 1986
April 4, 11, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
litious name Maritza Luna I) B A
Luna Services at 8250 S.W. 89
Ave. Miami Fla. 33173 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Maritza Luna
M76 March 14.21.28.
April 4,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
tilioiis name Coconut Grove Artist
Group intends to register nid
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida,
.lack Diftler
March 21,28;
April 4, 11. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(IVII. ACTION NO. 86-11337
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ZOILA ESPERANZA CORTEZ.
Petitioner,
and
JOSE DANIEL FIGUEROA.
Respondent.
TO: Jose Daniel Figueroa
Colonia Primero de Octubre
Zona "G" No. 3
Barrio San Antonio
Santa Ana. El Salvador. CA.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 825 South
Bayshore Drive, Suite 543. Miami.
FL 33131. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 25, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 19th day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Cort
Dade County, Florida
By: J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19692 March 21, 28;
April 4. 11.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name(s) (1) BUD SIMON &
ASSOCIATES (2) DAVA'S
PLACE at 777 NW 72nd Ave.,
Suite 3F8. Miami. Florida 33126,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
A.E SIMON
00000 April 4. 11.18,25, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-2000 CA 19
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
THE 125(1 WEST AVENUE
CORPORATION
Plaintiff
vs.
FELIX BURGUET, et al..
Defendants
TO: FELIX BI'RGUKT
2748 S V\ 14th Street
Miami. Florida 3314.1
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
,,,, the following described
property:
Unit 2-L it HAY GARDEN
MANOR CONDOMINIUM,
according to the Declaration
recorded in Official Records
Hook 10681 si Page 2486, of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
four written defenses, if any, to it.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No. 86-10338 07-FC
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
MARTA L. VASQUEZ
Petitioner
and
VICTOR M. RISSO
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: VICTOR M. RISSO, residence
unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti
tioner. whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162. on
or before April 25, 1986, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
March 12, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19683 March 21. 28;
April 4. 11, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-10341(25>-FC
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In the marriage of
ANGELA DIAZ
Petitioner
and
DANIEL DIAZ
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DANIEL DIAZ. 813 FAILE
ST., No. 5. BRONX, NY 10474
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162. on
or before 2.1 April 1986, and file
the original with the clerk of tins
ourl otherwise a default will '*
ntered against you
March 12. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHNC BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
1968-1 March 21, 28;
April 4. 11. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTS
Civil Action No 86-10632
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE. Th. Marriage of
BELMA ROMERO VFANADOR
Petitioner
and
JOSi a VFANADOR
Respondent
T(i .lose A. Afanador
Residence Unknown
Y0U A K E HERE H Y
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage lias been
filed and commenced in this
on Sheppard Falier. Attorney for an(1 vou ar(. required to serve a
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite I rl,pV 0f V(,ur written defense- if
214. 1.170 Madruga Avenue. Coral I ;lllv ,. MKI.VIN .1 ASHER.
Gables. Florida 33146. on or before I jrsy. attorney for Petitioner.
April 25, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal
of this Court this 18th day of
March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY: DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19691 March 21. 28;
April 4. 11, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS at 220 71 Street No.
205, Miami Beach, Florida 33141,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ATLAS HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS. INC.
Joshua D. Manaster, Esquire
Attorney for ATLAS HEALTH
CARE SYSTEMS, INC.
19694 March 28;
April 4. 11,18,1986
whose address is 82.1 South
Bayshore Drive. Suite 543. Miami.
FL 33131. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 25, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14th day of March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19686 March 21, 28;
April 4, 11. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Flagier & 13
Restaurant and Cafeteria at 1277
and 1281 West Flagier St. Miami
33135 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Caribetty Inc
19671 March 14, 21. 28;
April 4. 198,1


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
Public Notices1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
UN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-09816 FC 30
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
SIMONI D0BROW0LSKI.
Petitioner
and
MACAU DOBROWOLSKI,
Respondent
TO: MAGALI DOBROWOLSKI
423 St. Ann's Avenue Apt. 4B
New York. New York 10454 I
YOU ARE HEREBY'
NOTIFIED that a petition for'
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 420 Lincoln Road Suite
309 Miami Beach, FL 33139 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or oefore
April 18, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1166
19678 March 21, 28;
April 4,11.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Piergiorgio at
1660-52 N.W. 87th Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33172 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Tirabasso of Florida, Inc.
19708 April 4. 11, 18, 25, 1986
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-04961 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT
GAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
RUBY M. PALOMINO, et al.,
Defendants
TO: RUBY M. PALOMINO
740 S.W. 109th Avenue
No. 310
Miami, Florida 33174
YOU ARE NOTIFED that an ac-
tion for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
That certain Condominium
Parcel composed of Unit No.
310, of GROVE ESTATES
CONDOMINIUM, according
to the Declaration of Con
dominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11769, Page 3123, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
nas been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146. on or before
April 18, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 12th day of
March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19-580 March21.28;
April 4,11,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Fermograco Building
Associates at 826-830 Euclid Ave..
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Gabriel Fernandez
Jorge Moya
Antonio Gran*
Rigoberto M. Colom
19661 March 14. 21.28;
April 4. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 86-10942 (1C)
Florida Bar No. 349275
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NANCY IDARRAGA
Plaintiff/Petitioner
vs.
GUSTAVO A. IDARRAGA
Defendant/Respondent
TO: Gustavo A. Idarraga
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve written defenses,
if any, to it on MARIANO SOLE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW, PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 4343 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33134. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
April 25, 1986, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ.
4343 West Flagler Street
Suite 404
Miami, Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 443-4343
19702 Mar 2*
April 4, 11.18, 198
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-11085
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALFRED MOSS a/k/a/ ALFRED
I. MOSS, et a!..
Defendants.
TOALFRED MOSS a/k/a
ALFRED I. MOSS.
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by. through.
under or against the said
ALFRED MOSS a/k/a
ALFRED I. MOSS, and all
other parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Lots 21 and 22. in Block 9,
WASHINGTON PARK.
according to the plat thereof.
recorded in Plat Book 2. at
Page 95. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Keith. Mack. Lewis A Allison.
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 25, 1986, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18th day of
March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
19690 March 21,28;
April 4, 11. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
:'ngage in business under the fic-
titious name Coconut Grove Ar-
tists Group, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Jack Diftler
19685 March 21, 28;
April 4,11,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-12474
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
VILMA LOPEZ,
Petitioner,
and
RAUL LOPEZ,
Respondent.
TO: RAUL LOPEZ
Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
ALAN SCHNEIDER, ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 2720 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33135, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
May 2, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26th day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN SCHNEIDER. ESQ.
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
19706 March 28;
April 4, 11,18.1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-00327 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN
SAVTNGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
IVAN VILACHA L.,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: IVAN VILACHA L. and
MYRIAM GARCIA DE
VILACHA. his wife
Calle San Ant. Urban
San Ant. Sebana Grande
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
CONDOMINIUM NUMBER
9. BUUDING NUBMER 14,
OF INDIAN LAKE
VILLAGE II CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof and
Exhibits attached hereto as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10483, Page 2655, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to h,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146, on or before
April 11, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of March
1986.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19666 March 14.21,28;
April 4.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-09311
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
INELIA PROSPERE PIERRE
Petitioner
and
ROSEME PIERRE
Respondent
TO: ROSEME PIERRE
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 18, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 11 day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(Phone) (306) 682-1166
19677 March 14,21. 28;
April 4,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-08761 FC 27
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Adoption of:
Minor Children
TO: JERRY ABRAHAM
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Adoption has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
USHER BRYN, ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is Suite
309 420 Lincoln Road Miami
Beach, FL 33139 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April 18.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
Suite 309 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
19681 March 21,28;
April 4.11,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name MENDOZA STORE
CORP. D/B/A EL MUNDO DE
LAS CORTINAS at 770 SW 47th
AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA
33134, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MARCOS MENDOZA
PRESIDENT
770 SW 47th AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33134
19704 March 28;
April 4,11, 18, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN
that the undersigned, desirin, to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name OCEAN BLUES at
2029 N.W. 22 Court, Miami. Fl.
33142 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Rafael Pardo President
Attorney for R.P. Fashions Inc.
19669 March 14.21,28;
April 4.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-11613 FC-02
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
MICHAEL W. WHITE
Petitioner
and
TAMMY D. WHITE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: TAMMY D. WHITE
4100 Cusseta Rd No. 28A
Columbus. Ga. 31903
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.
JEROME GRAFF. ESQ., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167 St. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162. on or before
April 25, 1986. and file the original
with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 20, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19696 March 28;
April 4. 11, 18. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-2549 FC-10
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
BRENDA GAIL PRINCE
Petitioner
and
DAVID W. PRINCE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID W. PRINCE
5028 18 Ct.
Birmingham, Ala. 36203
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses to it on I.
JEROME GRAFF, ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167 St. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162, on or before
April 25, 1986. and file the original
with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 20. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
19697 March 28;
April 4,11.18, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-12574 (16)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
THE KISSELL COMPANY,
Plaintiff
vs.
CONSTANCE L. ZAMORA, et al..
Defendants
TO: AMERICAN SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION
131 Oyster Creek Drive
Lake Jackson. Texas 77566
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 23. Ie*3 the West 25 feet
thereof, and Lot 24, in
Block 6 of MOFFAT-
VILLE, according to
the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book
10, at Page 36. of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
May 2, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 26th day of
March. 1966.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19707 April 4.11,18,26,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORID?
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1776
Division 01
FLORIDA BAR No.: 030112
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTELLE KAPLOWITZ
NOTICE OF '^
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVINr
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administr*.
tion of the estate of Estelle
Kaplowitz, deceased, File Number
86-1776. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida, 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Herbert Kaplowitz, whose ad-
dress is 10380 S.W. 93rd Street
Miami, Florida 33176. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE M0N
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
April 4. 1986.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Estelle Kaplowitz
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MILTON C. GOODMAN
19 W. Flagler St., Suite 520
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 379 1885
19710 April 4, 11,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-09801
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Adoption of:
a minor
TO: ROBERT ELLIS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Adoption has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
USHER BRYN. ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 420
Lincoln Road Suite 309 Miami
Beach, Florida 33139 and file the
original l ith the clerk of the above
styled c<> -t on or before April 25.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered ,,-ainst you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition
WITr..SS my hand and the seal
of said., urt at Miami, Florida on
this 18. ..of March, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner.
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (806) 632-1166
19689 March 21,28;
Ai4.11.1M


Obituaries
Friday, April 4. 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
fglher .>f Gloria Donen Sosin (Mrs
'.*, of Whit* Plains and Joyce Donen
Chh..rn (Mrs Adrian) of Killingworth.
, former Ion* time resident of Rye
lw(j on Kehruan- 27 at the Sarah Neuman
\ursinK Home in Mamaroneck at the age of
u In 1968 he retired and sold his busines.-
ml after extensive travel in Europe and
ursel ne and Mr- Donen moved to Miami
Reach "here thev were both active in com
minitv and -levnah affairs He was a captain
,. the I luted Kund. president of the
Brandeis Chapter '<< the Zionist Orgmnita-
jon of America Vice President of the
RgHi Vouth ("ommission of Miami, active
,n Israel Bunds. Jewish War Veterans and
mnjatkmi Mrs Donen died in
im
LEONARD Marilyn 57 of North Miami.
March In Services were held
Rl'vKIND Annabel. S3, of North Miami
Beach March 30 Levitt-Weinstein
BEREZDIVIN. Dr Miguel. 61. of North
Miami Beach. March 28 Levitt
Weinstein
Cl'CH'C. Lipa. of Miami Beach. Kubin-
Zilbert
I'DOWITZ. Mrs Bessie, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilhert
KR0O. Emil of Miami Beach. Rubin-
/.ilbert
LONDON David, of North Miami Beach
Services were held
ROSENBERG. Abraham lAI). 7fi of Miami.
March li' Services were held
iA)LDBER<; I'elia. ->4 of Miami. March 29
Services were held
Prominent
LEVINE
Max Cantor of the Seacoasi Tower- Sib
hath (irnupdied Monday of heart failure He
was 77 Survivors include his wife I.ilia and
two daughters Bunai wili !* htM In
Charleston. S I
HECHTMA.N Gertrude March 2X Ser
vices held in Brooklyn. New York
LAVER. Helen G. 75. of Miami Beach
March 28. The Riverside
FINE. Rose Leah. 88, March 26 Sen-ices
were held
SHERESHEWSKY David, of Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert
(JREENGLA.SS. Edward. March 21 Ser
vices were neld
GL'STMAN Merry C, of Miami. March 2
The Riverside
KNOBEL. Murray 92. of Surfside. March
26. The Riverside
MARGOL1ES. Rebecca (Becky Kitmanl. 78.
Services were held in Pittsburgh. Pa
NADEL. Isidore N 71. of Miami, March
24 The Riverside.
ROTH. Mrs. Betty. 68. of Miami Beach. Ser
vices were held.
SHYKO. Sidney 77. of North Miami Beach.
March 25 Menorah Chapels
PELSEN Harold. 78 of Miami Beach. April
1 Rubin Zilbert
GARDNER. Reba. 74. of North Miami
Beach April i l,evitt-Weinstein
Editors
Continued from Page 1-B
loctorates bj Hamilton College
the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America.
Maynes an internationally -
syndicated columnist, was Assis-
Secrotary of State lor Inter-
national Organization Affairs
prior to being named editor of
F'irngii Pnhcy in 1980. He served
an officer with the U.S.
Foreign Service in Laos and
Moscow and later became a Con-
irressionai Fellow, serving with
both Republican and Democratic
iepslators.
A recipient of the U.S. State
Department's Mantorius Service
Award Maynes earned a
Bachelor's degree from Harvard
University magna cum laude and
a Matter's degree from Oxford
University in England. He is a
member if the National Academy
of Public Administration. Council
on Foreign Relations, and the
United Nations Association.
M64Q Greenfield Rd
Oak Park. Michigan 482:7
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
V'linplete Shipping; Service From Florida -\r\i
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements______
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service
D*de County
M2-21MW
Broward County
532-209U
K<|)r..s.nll tiyKitt-r-iili- Memorial I'hapel. !'
Ne* York: 1212)268 7wrtrQu-r*Klv.< & 7rtth K Over 50.000 attended services in New York for
Rabbi Moses Feinstein who passed away
March 13. Interment followed m Jerusalem.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL 0
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
The Only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arrangements
with
No. Miami Beach Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Levitt-Weinstein
presents the New
Beth David Memorial Gardens
and what it means to
South Florida.
Now Levitt-Weinstein offers the con-
venience of a complete funeral chapel
and interment service at one location.
Now Star of David of Hollywood
becomes Beth David Memorial
Gardens... the only Jewish family-
owned-and operated cemetery and
chapel facility in Dade and Broward
Beth David Memorial Gardens offer
a choice of above ground mausoleum
entombment or ground burial... mon-
ument sections... strict adherence to
Jewish burial and funeral laws... Jew-
ish funeral directors on call 24 hours
... and pre-arrangement plans provid-
ing comfort, security and cost savings.
Counties.
... because the griefs enough to handle.
Memorial Chapels
North Miami Beach, 949-6315 Hollywood, 921-7200
West Palm Beach, 689-8700 Boca/Deerfield Beach, 427-6500
? bi iHiWvin
}* MIMORIAl (,-\RI)[\S
3201N. 72nd Avenue Hollywood, FL. 963-2400


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
I-
Grand Opening
A Place
toLoveLife.
**
New beginnings start here.
Activity, friendship, service and luxury. These
are the beginnings awaiting you at Northpark, a
beautiful new adult rental community where
every detail has been planned for your comfort
and peace of mind, including:
Luxurious One and Two-Bedroom apartments.
Social/recreational activities.
Extensive indoor and outdoor recreational and
physical fitness facilities.
> Elegant dining.
' Wellness Center.
' Chauffeured scheduled limousine service.
' Weekly housekeeping and laundry service.
Shopping service and delivery.
Beauty and Barber shop.
The Market Place for snacks and sundries.
Complete Security System with
emergency medical response units.
Prime Hollywood location.
No entry or endowment fee.
These are just a few of the features that make life
carefree at Northpark. By Levitt Retirement
Communities, Inc., a subsidiary of Levitt
Corporation, one of America's oldest and best
known names in community development.
Northpark rental office is open dairy 10 to 5
at 3490 Sheridan Street in Hdrywood. Take 1-95
to Sheridan Street, then west to Northpark.
(305) 963-0200.
$ ,NORTriPARk
AptesHgiousadimienldconTitJTitv.
Levitt l^rementCommunltiesJna


April m
ISKdGL
ISRAEL 38
One People One Destiny
1
Celebrate
Sunday, April 13,1986
Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami
i o^tor South Dade Center Miami Beach Center
assassr .jssgar -aaaa*"
N. Miami Beach 251-1394 534-3206
932-4200 *&1 1,w



THANKS!
At its Annual Volunteer Luncheon March 19, the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion honored its volunteers who unselfishly donate their time to the Federation to
help prepare mailings. These volunteers save the Federation tens of thousands of
dollars each year, which because of their efforts, can be spent for vital human
services.
Seen at the luncheon, volunteers pose with a plaque which will be displayed in the
Volunteer Room in the Federation building to serve as a reminder that our
volunteers' services are appreciated. The inscription on the plaque reads:
"Presented in gratitude to our Dedicated Volunteers, whose many hours of
devoted service to the Federation and to the Jewish community represent the
highest ideals ot Tzedakah."

'1

i
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
April 4,1986 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark Freedman.
Assistant Editor
Ruth Korenvaes
CAMPAIGN
Buddy Up Day set for April 17
"Campaign Countdown" in progress
Photo highlights Attorneys and Builders Dinners
ALLIANCE DIVISION
Photo highlights from recent campaign events
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Gail Newman reflects on 1986/1987 campaigns
Hannah Senesh story to be presented at WD retreat
New officers for 1986-87 announced
BPW networking through "The Source" and special events
WD Hold the Date
FEDERATION SOUTH DADE BRANCH
Area newcomers receive warm welcome from Federation and agorae
"Tnaland Error" last in 1986 Federation Forum/Public Affairs Series
There s still time to join "Israel 38" March
SD Hold the Date
ISRAEL ;
Northern border town in Israel faces daily challenges
Project Renewal moves toward achievement of goals
ISRAEL 38 SPECIAL SECTION
AGENCIES
Central Agency president tours day school programs
Holocaust Center seeking survivors for portraits
NCJ VV plays key role in reuniting family in distress
Jewish family Service program for elderly garners award
ISRAEL
Special feature by the Consul General of Israel
High tech programs in Israel to benefit from computer education
FOUNDATION
f!LaLLeV?nt focus ,on charitable giving and tax savings
Important notice to all donors
YLC/CRC/CAMPAIGN
YLC HoKe JJaCUSSes recent UJA national conference
XmLf^K0.^^".8 to sPeak at Public forom on April 10
ThZJf Ph0t h^h,ihts ~ Blast from the Past
Thanks to our Federation volunteers
DERATION CABLE TELEVISION
JewiSUFSlHSUTr0bert Clary featu"*i in documentary
13 Ric r!t-n Mag^ne highlights Passover season
Aiireo fcisenstein and his music on JFTV airwaves in April
CALENDAR
Ml
U
Su^70CS%rkTvled^s Studi Graph-its. Inc., 701 South 21*1**4
r.'-J-


\Charlotte Held and Harvey CAMPAIGN
iedman to chair Buddy-Up Day COUNTDOWN!
APRIL 1-JUNE 8
The spirit of adventure will come to
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
tin Thursday, April 17 during Buddy
'p Day. The theme for this special
event is "Raiders of the Last Cards."
The event follows last year's highly
Successful effort, the Miami Federa-
tion's first ever Buddy Up Day.
Prizes will be awarded to the Buddy
Up Day team which obtains the
greatest number of pledges and to
the team which brings in the largest
dollar amount in pledges. Other
prizes will be awarded to Buddy Up
Day teams based on a recounting of
their "adventures" during the day.
It's easy to volunteer to become a
"Raider of the Last Cards." Simply
contact the Federation at 576-4000,
extension 272.
Aaron
Podhurst, 1986
general chair-
man of the
Combined
Jewish Appeal-
Israel
E merge ncy
Fund/Project
Renewal -Or
Akiva Cam-
paign, has an-
nounced that
the period bet-
Aaron Podhurst
Charlotte Held
Charlotte Held and Harvey Fried-
nan will serve as Buddy Up Day co-
chairmen, as they did last year. Ac-
cording to Held, Buddy Up Day is the
highlight of the spring campaign
Reason. "The premise is very sim-
ple," she explained. "We attempt to
risit contributors from whom we
haven't heard and ask for their gift.
^f we are going to close the campaign
at a record level, then Buddy Up Day
nust be a success."
Last year more than 90 campaign
?olunteers, working in teams of two,
Ssited prospects throughout Dade
bounty and secured more than
400,000 in pledges. "Beyond raising
ands for the campaign, last year's
Juddy Up Day was an excellent vehi-
for building community spirit.
lany volunteers worked together for
lie first time, the net result being the
reation of many new friendships. I
ully expect the same to happen this
lear," noted Friedman.
A Buddy Up Day Committee has
een formed in an effort to recruit ad-
Mional volunteers. Working with
MM and Friedman are Arnold
Mtman, Isaac Garazi, Marvin Jacob-
Pn and Dr. Elliot Gordon. Held and
[nedman anticipate that Buddy Up
^ay. will attract more than 100
wticipants.
"The day is going to be full of sur-
fjses, and with the theme we've
elected, I'll leave it to the imagina-
^n as to what exactly is going to
aPPen," Held added. Buddy Up Day
111 begin at 8:30 a.m. at the Federa-
n Building for breakfast, a brief
lentation and card selection. Buddy
IP Day teams will then set out to
pit prospects until late afternoon.
day will conclude with a celebra-
n at 4:30 p.m. at a secret location
nicn will only be made known to
Irticipants at the morning meeting.
Harvey Friedman
ween April 1 and June 8 will occasion
a "Campaign Countdown."
"In the next eight weeks, we must
make a concerted effort to reach each
and every individual who has yet to
make a gift to the 1986 campaign,"
noted Podhurst. He continued, "It's a
large undertaking, and we'll need lots
of volunteers working at the Federa-
tion building and in the community. If
we use our highly successful com-
munitywide events as a yardstick,
I'm certain we'll reach our goal dur-
ing 'Campaign Countdown.' '
Podhurst indicated that by June 8,
the campaign should stand at $20
million. "The $20 million target will
provide the impetus for closing the
campaign at a record level. There are
many gifts which we can add to the
$20 million which are made at the end
of the year," Podhurst said.
"Right now our greatest need is for
volunteers to make phone calls on a
regular basis. We've already invited
B'nai B'rith lodges and other Jewish
organizations to spend time at the
Federation Building. And we are cur-
rently mobilizing all our campaign
Campaign photo highlights
e Attorneys Dimsion cocktail reception and dinner on behalf ofthe 1986
Combined JeM Appeal-Israel Emergency FundJProject Renewal-Or Akiva
C^Za^^rTtfroTuft): Charles Citrin, event co-chairman; guest speaker
DanSthZZ; Am^Deak chairman of the Attorneys Division; and Gerald K.
Schwartz, event co-chairman.
Estate, Finance and Allied Trades Division recently staged its
?X*wto campaign event ever. Seen above are (from left): BuyersDivision
C^rlZETraKcUzTati Katz, and dinner fumoree Benjamin D. HoUoway.
divisions to join in this effort," in-
dicated Podhurst. Podhurst is work-
ing with other campaign leaders to
form a "Campaign Countdown"
Committee which will oversee the
spring blitz.
As an extra incentive to volunteers,
a "Campaign Countdown Coupon
Program" will be in effect.
Volunteers who participate in a
phonothon or complete face-to-face
solicitations will be eligible to enter a
drawing. As part of a "Campaign
Countdown" Celebration on Sunday,
June 8, prizes will be awarded from
the drawing. The more hours a
volunteer spends on the phone or in
face-to-face solicitations, the greater
his chances of winning a prize.
On June 8, a final phonathon will be
staged and in the evening an outdoor
barbeque and recognition celebration
will be held at Federation. During the
festive evening, each division will an-
nounce a "Campaign Worker of the
Year," and other volunteers will be
recognized for their efforts on behalf
of the campaign. The gala celebration
will include musical entertainment,
dancing and other special surprises.
"I want our entire Jewish com-
munity to feel as excited about 'Cam-
paign Countdown' as I do. I believe if
we all pitch in we'll reach our goal by
June 8. I look forward to working
with many campaign volunteers in
the next two months and joining
them at our celebration on June 8,"
Podhurst concluded.
To volunteer your time or that of
your group or organization for "Cam-
paign Countdown," please contact
Miriam Zatinsky at 576-4000, exten-
sion 299.
"A Blast From the Past," the
nostalgic event sponsored by the
Young Leadership Council and the
South Dade Branch of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, featured
Danny and the Juniors, the Dovells
and the ShireUes in a live concert at
the Hyatt Regency Hotel. More than
400 attendees, each making a
minimum gift of $365 to the 1986 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
cy Fund Campaign, decided to "Be
There or Be Square." Shown above,
standing from left. Young Leadership
Council Chairman Jack H. Levine,
Young Leadership Council Campaign
Chairman Richard A. Berkowitz, and
South Dade Branch Chairman Alvin
Lloyd Brown. Seated, from left, Event
Chairmen David Abramowitz and
Robert Berrin and South Dade Cam-
paign Chairman Norman Lieberman.
Federation, April 1986 3


Photo
highlights
from
Alliance
Division
events
.;;'- dinner Km /"-*vs-> N for tsxdenU
' and Tke T\_fany. funds raxsed for Federation t
lttt CJA-IEF campaign totaled tunce :hose ^axsed i
even: S**~ i wmtrwtn from bfl Kin
Prutmu. Dr Be*
nice Miller tmd Etiksk ami Smmv P. tk
lie AUxanre, Division North Premier Event brought
together residents of 10 high-rise, condominium and
townhouse communities for one massive erpre*tion of
solidarity on behalf of tke Federation > campaign. Seen at
'he February it event xcere. from left. Dorothy Podkurt'
president c-f tke Federation Women's Dmmkm
rpeake*- Joseph "Tommy LapuL senior en
neurtp-iper Ma'uric; neu Women'^ D
Trustee Anne Polo*: and Herb Polo*, receptv/n dka
for tke California Club Community.
Seen at tke Alliance Division \ortk Premier Event wer*
firm left. Dorotky Podhurst. neu Women's Dxvxsxon
Trustee Estker Raskkow. Jotepk Raskkou. and event guest
speaker Jotepk Tommy LapuL Alliance Division Chair-
man Herb Canarxck xs seen m tke background.
'.' ke Alliance Dxnsxon North Premier
E*nt. 98 percent of tke women m atten-
dance made gifts to tke 298-5 CJA-IEF \n
their own names, in addxtv/n to their
husbands' gifts Seen, from lef.. Dorothy
Podkurst awards a Lion ofJudah pin
to new Women's Division Trustee Toby
Salovsky as Joseph Tommy Lapxd
looks on.
Tke Cai iforn ui Club Com m u n 11y kt
annual dinn** Federa-
l's 1986 CJA-IEF campaign
February IS. Seen at the event vert,
from left. Jack Gellman. California Club
munxty campaign chairman; and
Herb Polow. reception ckairman
The "Fabulous Fifty* Alliance P-rrmxrr Event brought
tsjgether residents of 10 Collins Avenue hx-nses for a
brunch on behalf of the Federation campaign. Seen at the
February t3 event were, standing from left. Ben Bot-
wxniek. Crystal House ckairman; Lester'Abrakamer.
Seacoast East ckairman; Yale Wexnstein. Crystal House
Executive Comsnittee member; Leon Srago. Corxntkian Ex-
ecutive Committee member; Ida Kesselman, Seacoast South
ckaxrman; and Betty Drier, Seacoast South Executive
Committee member. Seated were, from left. Sidney Olson.
Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance ckairman; and Herb
Canariek, Alliance Division chairman.
At the California Club Con
nual dinner. Jerry Hy
for Ma many years of ded'
to the Federation and >
mumty. Pictured an Hyan
and Federation Cam}-: :
Kenneth B. Bierman.
Hyam.< uitk an award
Federation
Seen at the Fabulous Fiftys'' Alliance Premier E'.enr
were, from left, event guest speaker Jerome Gleekel. Middle
East expert; Florence Fink, new Federation Women's
Division Trustee; and Sidney Olson.
The Arlen HouseJCoastal Towers Alliance held a brrntA
March t to benefit the 1986 CJA-IEF and honoring Pauline
G. Ckaral for ker years of devoted service to the Jewish
community. Seen at tke brunch were, from left, Herb
Canariek. Alliance Division ckairman;' Ining Cypers.
Arlen HouseJCoastal Towers Alliance chairman; Pauline
G. Ckaral; and Abraham Mannes. Arlen House-Coastal
Towers Alliance chairman.
Tke Harbour HouseJCarlton Terrace Alliance held a
brunck February tS on behalf of the Federation campaign.
Seen at the event were, from lift. Harbour House/CarUon
Terrace Ckairman Ruth K. Herscker, event guest speaker
Ambassador Skaul Ramati, and Harbour HouseJCarUon
Terrace Chairmen Dr. Elton and Ruth Resnick.
The Admirals PorUCommodore Plaza Alliance held a
first-time cocktail party Marck t on behalf of the Federa-
tion campaign. Seen at tke reception were, from left, event
honoree Irving Jimmy- Bicofsky, Commodore Plaza
ckairman event konoree Dr. Artkur LeVine, Admirals
Portco-ckaxrman; Nate Katzen, ckairman of tke Admirals
PorUCommodore Plaza Alliance; event guest speaker
Israel Amxtox, Israeli television producer and journalist
Lea Pam Commodore Plaza co-ckairman; Milt Engelman
Admirals Port ckairman; Meyer Siegel, Commodore Plaza
cockaxrman; and Eric Salm, Admxrals Port co-ckaxrman
Tke Belle Isle Alliance, composed of six Belle Isle high-
rxses, keld a premier dinner Marck 1 on behalf of the 1986
CJA-IEF. Prior to tke formation of the Alliance, only Ivo
Belle Isle buildings held annual events on behalf o} the
Federation campaign. Seen at the event were, from left. A'
Isaacson, Belle Isle Alliance chairman; Bea DurehsH
reception chairman; event guest speaker Israel Amitai;
and Sy Reisman, Belle Isle Alliance co-chairman.
4 Federation, April 1986


A message from the campaign WD Retreat to feature
chairwoman
'Story of Hannah Senesh'
Gail Jaffe Newman
Nearly one year ago, I wrote my
first message on this page as the
incoming campaign chairwoman
of our Women's Division. At the
time. I discussed the importance
of our Division and the collective
responsibilities we share in insur-
ing the success of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign.
1 am happy to report that,
because each of you has responded
to my earlier appeal we are on the
verge of staging a record cam-
paign within our Women's Divi-
sion. To date, we have raised $3.6
million represented by more than
6,000 gifts. This is an achievement
of which we can be justifiably
proud, an indicator of our most
recent success, and more
importantly, it provides the base
from which we will launch our
1987 campaign with a new and
more ambitious goal.
The Women's Division cam-
paign offers us the opportunity to
share in the wonderful experience
of raising the necessary dollars
which are allocated to our
brethren in Israel, to thousands of
Jews in our local community, and
in 33 other nations worldwide. We
participate in the most extraor-
dinary fundraising effort on the
face of the globe. No other civic or
religious group can make that
claim. The lessons of history have
taught us that Jewish needs can
only be met by Jewish giving.
Each gift is a vote for Jewish sur-
vival, and every member our
Women's Division is an active par-
ticipant in this effort.
What can we expect in the year
ahead? I believe we must be
prepared to dedicate ourselves to
spending more time working on
behalf of the Federation campaign
in our Women's Division. There
are two elements which, more
than any others, will guarantee a
successful campaign.
The first element is you. The se-
cond is your time. The old axiom
that "people give to people" is the
framework for building a stronger
and more secure community, at
home and overseas. Our Division
is blessed with many volunteers
who are willing to spend signifi-
cant amounts of time bringing our
campaign message to con-
tributors. I deeply appreciate their
efforts and would be delighted to
have many more women join our
legion of "askers." It is easy to
become involved, and the rewards
of asking are certainly equal to
those of giving.
The requirements for becoming
a campaign worker are not com-
plex. The first is to be a Jewish
woman who cares; the second is to
be a Jewish woman who cares
enough to ask others to be con-
cerned about the future of our peo-
ple. In many respects, all of us
possess these attributes, and
therefore, are equal to the task.
Now it's up to you to make the
time.
Please join me in 1987, knowing
there is great satisfaction in the
realization that one person does
make a difference. You are the
difference.
Gail Newman
Vice President for Campaign
Women's Division
WD announces 1986-87 officers
The Federation Women's Division is pleased to announce its new slate of
officers for 1986-87.
Dorothy Podhurst will serve a second year as president of the Women's
Division; and Gail Jaffe Newman will serve a second term in her position as
WD vice president, portfolio of Campaign.
Amy Dean, who has just completed her term as 1985-86 chairwoman for
Campaign Training, will serve during the coming year in the newly-
mstituted position of vice president, portfolio of Campaign Designate.
Terry Drucker, 1985-86 vice president, portfolio of Leadership Develop-
ment, will serve as vice president, portfolio of Community Education. Rob-
bie Herskowitz, who served last year as vice president, portfolio of Com-
munity Education, will fill Drucker's previous position as vice president,
Portfolio of Leadership Development.
Elaine Ross, who has just completed two consecutive terms as chair-
woman of the South Dade Area Board, will serve as the Women s Division
1986-87 secretary. Sue Graubert, who served last year as chairwoman lor
Federation Tuesday," will hold the position of WD parliamentarian.
The new officers will be formally installed in their positions during the
WD 11th Annual Retreat and Installation, to be held May 21-22 at the
aonesta Beach Hotel.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation and its Women's Division salute
both the outgoing and incoming WD officers for their continued commit-
ment and outstanding efforts on behalf of Greater Miami s Jewish
community.
"You've Come A Long Way" will
be the theme of the Federation
Women's Division's 11th Annual
Retreat and Installation, to be held
Wednesday, May 21 and Thursday,
May 22. The retreat, which has an op-
tional overnight stay, will be held at
the Sonesta Beach Hotel, announced
Terry Drucker, WD vice president
for Leadership Development.
Highlighting the two-day event will
be a presentation of "Blessed is the
Heart, the Story of Hannah Senesh,"
a blend of dance, song, poetry and
prose. This one-woman show, per-
formed by Dafna Soltes of the
Libanyu Theatre Dance Company,
portrays Hannah Senesh as she goes
through her extraordinary transfor-
mation from a carefree adolescent in-
to a committed pioneer in Palestine
and finally into a relentless idealist
and secret agent during World War
II.
Soltes' performance of "Hannah
Senesh" on the second day of the
retreat will be followed by a question
and answer period. In addition to her
performance, Soltes will lead a
Holocaust workshop during the first
day of the retreat, followed by a
poolside barbeque at which the
Business and Professional Women's
Division will install its new officers
for 1986-87.
On the second day of the retreat,
the Women's Division will install its
1986-87 officers at a luncheon. Martin
Fine, attorney with the firm of Fine,
Jacobson, Schwartz, Nash, Block and
England, and prominent leader of
Greater Miami's Jewish community,
will be keynote speaker at the in-
stallation luncheon. Fine has served
on the Board of Directors of the
Miami Housing Authority and cur-
rently is chairman of the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce, and a
member of the Board of Trustees of
Miami-Dade Community College.
During the retreat, free time will be
allotted for participants to take ad-
vantage of the pool, sauna, tennis
courts, beauty salon and other hotel
facilities.
Helen Berne and Renata Bloom
serve as co-chairwomen of the 11th
Annual Retreat and Installation.
All members of the Federation's
Women's Division are invited to at-
tend the retreat. For more informa-
tion, please contact the Women's
Division at 576-4000.
BPW networking news
Seen at the first BPW "Networking" session, held March 5 at the Barbara
Gillman Gallery, were, from left, Diana Fleeman, BPW Networking Recruitment
chairwoman; Lisa Treister, BPW vice chairwoman, Leadership Development;
Barbara Gillman. BPW Networking Programming chairwoman; and Cornelia
Philipson, BPW Networking Arrangements chairwoman.
The new "Networking" Branch of
the Federation's Business and Pro-
fessional Women's (BPW) Division
held successful sessions in March and
April.
According to BPW Networking
Recruitment Chairwoman Diana
Fleeman, the first program, which
was held March 5 at the Barbara
Gillman Gallery, had a good turnout,
with several women in attendance
who had been previously uninvolved
in the Women's Division. "The idea
of a Jewish women's professional net-
work is new in this community and
seems to be catching on," she said.
"I think the program will snowball
as each woman brings a friend to a
session, and that friend brings
another friend to the next session.
This is a good way to introduce new
people to the Federation and its
Women's Division."
Fleeman served with Barbara
Gillman, BPW Networking Program-
ming chairwoman, as co-chair of the
April 2 session. That session, entitled
"What Is Success? ... The Suc-
cessful Woman," featured an open
panel discussion on the evening's
topic.
The next session in the BPW Net-
working series will be held May 7,
and will explore the theme "The
Superwoman Myth." Stella Grubair,
Ivy Lorber and Hilda Mitrani will
serve as co-chairwomen.
At the May 7 and subsequent ses-
sions, the BPW will offer, free of
charge, a networking directory entitl-
ed "The Source." The directory will
list, by business or professional
category, those women who have re-
quested that their names be listed
and who have made minimum $100
gifts to the 1986 CJA-IEF.
Lisa Triester serves as BPW vice
chairwoman for Leadership Develop-
ment; and Maryanne Witkin is chair-
woman of the BPW.
For more information about the
May 7 or subsequent sessions, please
call the Women's Division at
576-4000.
~Hold the Date ~
Thursday, April 10
Women's Division Phonothon
4:00-8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, April 22
Women's Division Executive Com-
mittee Meeting
10:00 a.m.
Dorothy Podhurst's home.
Monday-Wednesday, May 5, 6, 7
Area Constituent Board Meetings
Wednesday, May 7
BPW Networking Program
5:45 p.m.
Sheraton River House
Wednesday and Thursday, May
21-22
Women's Division
, Retreat/Installation
i Sonesta Beach Hotel
V
Federation. April 1986 5


SD sponsors presentation
of Trial and Error'
In America, You Have To Kill Someone To Get 12 Years
In Prison. In Russia, You May Just Have To Teach Hebrew
The final program of the Federa-
tion South Dade Branch's 1985-86
"Federation Forum/Public Affairs
Series" will take the form of a special
presentation of "Trial and Error," a
play about the trial of Soviet Jew Yuli
Edelstein, announced Sharon
Azoulay, chairman of the "Federa-
tion Forum" Committee.
The play, performed by HaBima
Miami, will be presented free of
charge on Thursday, April 10 at Con-
gregation Bet Breira, 9400 S.W. 87
Avenue.
"Trial and Error," written and pro-
duced by 21-year-old University of
Miami student Wayne Firestone, is
based on actual trial notes smuggled
out of the Soviet Union by an
American tourist, and printed in the
Jerusalem Post in early 1985.
Firestone learned of the case while an
exchange student at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity last year.
Yuli Edelstein, the defendant in the
trial upon which the play is based,
was sent to a Soviet labor camp for
three years for allegedly possessing
opium and marijuana. Edlestein was
an observant Jew and a teacher at an
underground Hebrew school prior to
his imprisonment.
The one-act play, directed by Bill
Kimmel, has been performed for au-
diences in both the United States and
Israel. It focuses on the "railroading"
of the defendant and on the shoddy
work done by the prosecution and the
judge. Musical accompaniment will be
provided by Leonid Rubanchik, a
former Soviet refusenik who
emigrated from the Soviet Union in
1977. Rubanchik is the former prin-
cipal cellist for the Symphonic Or-
chestra for Radio and Television in
Minsk. U.S.S.R.
Larry Metsch is the Federation
South Dade Branch's vice chairman
for Community Education. Serving
with Azoulay on the "Federation
Forum/Public Affairs" Committee
are: Bob Brin, Bert Brown, Dr.
Eugene Eisner, Debby Grodnick,
Fran Storper and Miriam Zadok.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, call Marcia Sue Needle at
251-9334.
SD holds newcomers9 reception
The South Dade Shalom Commit-
tee of the Federation's South Dade
Branch held a dessert reception
March 12 for newcomers to the area.
Shelly Brodie, South Dade Shalom
Committee chairman, explained that
the reception was held for several
reasons. "The dessert reception was
a new concept for the Shalom Com-
mittee. Within the past months,
members have called newcomers in
the area and visited their homes,
bringing welcome baskets with wine,
Israeli candy, Shabbat candles,
mezzuzot and an information booklet
explaining the services offered by
Federation and its beneficiary
agencies in the South Dade area.
Brodie continued, "Through the
reception, we gave the newcomers
the opportunity to meet other
newcomers and to meet those already
active in the community, in addition
to teaching them more about
available services."
Members of the South Dade Shalom
Committe prepared the desserts
served at the reception, which was
held in the home of Brodie and her
husband, Steve.
At the reception, representatives of
Federation's South Dade Branch and
Federation beneficiary agencies in
the area addressed the group, ex-
plaining the services which their
organizations provide. Alvin Lloyd
Brown, chairman of the South Dade
Branch, and Larry Metsch, the South
Dade Branch's vice chairman for
Community Education, spoke about
Federation's role in the community.
Susan Metsch, chairman of the
"Israel 38" March, told the group
about the upcoming event and en-
couraged participation.
Naomi Olster, president of the
South Dade Center of the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami (JCC), spoke about programs
and services of the JCC. Speaking on
behalf of the Jewish Family Service
(JFS), Bob Newman, district direc-
tor, explained the many benefits his
organization provides to the South
Dade Jewish community. Also pro-
viding informative presentations
were Barry White, a volunteer
representing the Jewish Vocational
Service (JVS), and Claire Savitt, a
JVS employment assistance
counselor.
According to Brodie, "The at-
mosphere at the reception was one of
great warmth and community. Com-
mittee members agree that the
newcomers truly appreciated the op-
portunity to meet us and other
newcomers and to learn about the
social services in this area. Some
have already called the South Dade
Branch to ask how they can become
involved." She concluded that "The
dessert reception was successful in
reaching its goals, and we will pro-
bably hold another one in the future."
South Dade Shalom Committee
members who worked with Brodie on
the dessert reception were Sharon
Azoulay, Sandy Halpern, Marcy
Levitt, Janet Polsky, Shelly
Rosenberg, Cindy Rosenfield, Ellen
Spiegel, Millicent Topel and Laurie
Turner.
SD Hold the Date
Taeaday, April 8:
SD Board of Directors Meeting and
I -\rning Institute
1 p.m.
,uth Dade Branch
Thursday. April 10:
"Trial and Error" Federation
Forum/Public Affairs
8:00 p.m.
Congregation Bet Breira
Sunday, April 13:
"ISRAEL 38"
Tuesday, April 15:
Leadership Development Group II
Program: "The Jewish Family: An
Endangered Species; Growing Old in
Miami'
7:45 p.m.
6 Federation, April 1986
"TRIAL
AND
ERROR
A Ha Bima Theatre production
A dramatic presentation based on actual courtroom notes
of Yuli Edelstein s trial on drug charges
Special Presentation -
Open To The Public
No Admission Charge
Thursday, April 10 8:00 p.m.
at Congregation Bet Breira, 9400 S.W. 87 Ave.
Presented by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
South Dade Branch
as part of
-Federation Forum/Public Attain"
Please R.S.V.P. by calling Marcia Sue Needle at 251-9334
JJ
SD gearing up for
'Israel 38'March
It's not too late to get involved in
the exciting "Israel 38" March, which
will be held Sunday, April 13 in
celebration of Yom Ha'atzmaut
(Israel Independence Day). The 1V^
mile march in South Dade, coor-
dinated by the Federation's South
Dade Branch in cooperation with the
South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, will serve as a tribute to
Soviet Jews who are unable to
celebrate this joyous occasion in their
own country.
Participants in the "Israel 38"
March will walk, hundreds strong,
carrying signs with the names and
faces of Soviet refuseniks. South
Dade synagogues and Jewish com-
munity agencies will march under the
banners of their respective organiza-
tions. Marching bands from local
schools will lead the March, which
will also include floats.
The "Israel 38" March will benefit
the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund through
sponsorships solicited by individual
participants. Those wishing to march
should call the Federation's South
Dade Branch at 251-9334 to receive
their sponsor packet. Once the packet
has been received, the marcher is ask-
ed to sign up as many sponsors as
possible prior to April 13.
Whenever possible, marchers are
asked to pre-register for the March
by returning their sponsor forms and
any monies collected to the South
Dade office. Those who are unable to
pre-register may do so on the day of
the March.
On the day of the March, April 13
participants will congregate at Ron
Ehmann Park, 10995 S W 97
Avenue, adjacent to Killian High
School, no later than 2:15 p.m. Open-
ing ceremonies, local performers and
refreshments will keep marchers
entertained until all participants have
completed late registration and
cneck-in procedures. The March will
4:00 at the campus of the Federation
bouth Dade Branch and Jewish Com-
m""\tyo ?&2 of Greater Miami
(JCC) South Dade Center, where the
"Israel 38" Celebration, coordinated
by the JCC, begins.
Those participating in the March
should remember to dress comfor-
tably on April 13, and should carry as
little as possible. THE MARCH
WILL BE HELD RAIN OR SHINE,
so bring rain gear if the weather
looks uncooperative.
All children under the age of 10
who wish to participate in the March
must be accompanied by an adult or
march in a group with a particular
organization. Each organization is
responsible for providing adult super-
vision for its group of marchers.
Volunteers are still needed to help
with late registration and in other
aspects of the March. If you would
like to help with this fun and impor-
tant event, or would like more infor-
mation, please call Marcia Sue Needle
at 251-9334.
Please see pages 8 and 9 for more
information about the "Israel 38"
March and Celebration.
New Leadership
Development
Group
in formation
The Federation's South Dade
Branch is in the process of forming a
new Leadership Development group-
This new group will be the third to
participate in a series designed to
enhance participants' sense of Jewish
identity and commitment, and en-
courage them to become active
members of Federation and its
beneficiary agencies.
If you are interested in becoming a
part of the new Leadership Develop-
ment group, or for more information,
p'ease call Marcia Sue Needle at
251-9334.


Metulla: 90 years on the front line
UJA looks ahead to successful
completion of $225 million
Project Renewal campaign
Lebanese workers approaching the -good fence" at the Israel-Lebanon border in
Metulla.
By JANET MENDELSOHN MOSHE
World Zionist Press Service
"These days, we are just happy to be
sleeping in our homes and not in
shelters," says Esther Levit, one of
the oldest and most colorful per-
sonalities in Metulla, Israel. Born in
Metulla 80 years ago, Levit has lived
through difficult times in this nor-
thern border outpost. Not one to com-
plain, however, Doda or "Aunt"
Esther has befriended thousands of
soldiers of the Israel Defense Forces,
entertaining them with her tales of
life in the old days and offering them
her warm apple strudel, always fresh
from the oven.
The village of Metulla was founded
some 90 years ago, far to the north of
any existing Jewish settlement in the
land of Israel. Today, third-
generation residents of the town
farm the same land that was purchas-
ed by Baron de Rothschild in 1893 to
help provide the backbone for Jewish
settlement in the Upper Galilee.
Pastoral Beauty
The visitor to this mountaintop
village of 1,200 people is impressed
by its pastoral beauty. The cool moun-
tain air obviously is ideal for the or-
chards that are the agricultural
mainstay of the town. Beautiful
modern homes and well-tended
gardens stand in contrast to the
town's first stone buildings, which
have been lovingly restored and
maintained.
Until recently, however, army
vehicles were as common a sight as
tractors for the 320 local families.
But today, with Israel's almost com-
plete pullback from Lebanon and a
new military road bypassing the
town, life has almost returned to nor-
mal in Metulla.
'Our neighbors in southern
Lebanon are our friends and have
wen for as long as I have been here,"
smiles Doda Esther. Long before an
international border affixed Metulla
as Israel's northernmost village and
tne neighboring Iyon Valley as part
oi southern Lebanon, good relations
and commerce knew no boundaries.
A Single Entity
Before World War I, Syria,
Lebanon and the Land of Israel were
considered a single entity. When the
ontish and French met to determine
e borders between the areas they
nf V1lrned' tney found the persistence
oi the Jewish settlers at the three
northern settlements of Tel-Hai,
^etuiia and Kfar Giladi convincing. It
was their determination and pioneer-
H 2"?t0 ho,d onto the |and that
rrf Jk ,decide the future boundaries
oer Po.L,and 0f Israel- PvinS the UP"
gjyffl "tsfinger-shaped northern
In 1920, Tel-Hai was attacked by
Arab marauders, and the Upper
Galilee settlements had to be aban-
doned. The settlers were evacuated
with the assistance of their Moslem
neighbors to the north. Doda Esther
recalls that her family stayed in
Nabatiye, in Southern Lebanon, for
more than a year. "Relations with
our neighbors were always good," ex-
plains Doda Esther, whose Arabic is
fluent. "When my father was ill, he
was treated by a doctor in Beirut and
hospitalized there." Many of
Metulla's families still own land in the
neighboring valley, which today lies
in Lebanese territory.
A Quiet Border
Despite Israel's War of In-
dependence and new international
boundaries on Metulla's back
doorstep, the border with Lebanon
remained quiet. In the early 1970s,
however, the Palestine Liberation
Organization was expelled from Jor-
dan, subsequently setting up terrorist
bases in Southern Lebanon. In addi-
tion to carrying out murderous opera-
tions in Israel, the PLO also made life
intolerable for local Lebanese
residents. In 1976, Israel opened its
"Good Fence," offering medical and
humanitarian assistance to the
Lebanese.
Living on the Front Line
"Over the years we got used to the
situation and even the katyushas
whizzing overhead," explains Gideon
Bez, a local farmer. "Living on the
front line, we have learned to deal
\/ith the problems here." After
Israel's three years of involvement in
Operation Peace for Galilee, Bez was
glad to see the soldiers return home.
"Now that our boys are on our side of
the border, we sleep easier at night,"
he says.
Today, the small hotel and intimate
guest houses of Metulla are not doing
the same business they did last year.
Journalists are no longer camped in
Metulla waiting for a scoop. The tour
buses still drive through town en
route to the "Good Fence," but
Metulla's name is out of the
headlines. The apples, cherries and
pecans are doing just fine, though.
Doda Esther was awarded the
Israel Prize in 1977 for her untiring
efforts on behalf of the Israel Defense
Forces, and she continues to provide
a warm environment for the new
recruits. Pointing to large cracks
which appeared between the wall and
ceiling of her kitchen during the
fighting in Lebanon, she smiles: If
old age hasn't pulled this house down
by now, then I suppose it will be
around for a few more years."
By Gerald S. Nagel,
UJA Watch Desk Editor
In the United States, Project
Renewal is a series of local fund-
raising efforts with help from the
United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In
Israel, it is a series of local problem-
solving programs in 56
neighborhoods. Because of local fac-
tors in Israel and the United States
results have varied, although the
project has, overall, been remarkably
successful.
At one end of the spectrum are 15
success stories, 15 Israeli
neighborhoods to be independent by
December of private overseas Jewish
philanthropy (12 by this spring)."
These neighborhoods across Israel
have job training, counseling and
placement; early childhood, remedial
and adult education; health services;
new buildings and supplies; and
childcare, parenting, counseling,
sports and cultural programs help
for everyone. They also have
residents whose former despair has
been changed to optimism, and who
have friendships with visitors or pen-
pals from the sponsoring Jewish com-
munity in the United States. They in-
clude neighborhoods such as
Hatikvah in Tel Aviv (aided by New
York City area Jews) and Ramat
Eliahu, five miles south (twinned with
Metro-West and North Jersey
Federations). And they all prove that
Project Renewal works.
In mid-spectrum are 23
neighborhoods such as Yahud, five
miles east of Tel Aviv (linked to
Atlanta's Jewish community), in
which some major needs have not yet
been met, but sufficient progress is
being made.
At the far end of the spectrum are
18 neighborhoods with substantial
gaps between aid and need. In some,
such as Ramat Amidar on Tel Aviv's
eastern perimeter (twinned to
smaller New Jersey communities),
the fund-raising challenge has been
simply too much. In others, such as
Ramla, eight miles southeast of Tel
Aviv (linked to Detroit), help has
come, but the problems have proven
unexpectedly pervasive. In still
others, help has been limited because
the paired United States Jewish com-
munity has had difficulty in awaken-
ing its constituents to the importance
of giving. Progress in all
neighborhoods has been hampered by
the Israeli economic crisis and
austerity measures to rebuild the na-
tional economy, which have hurt
every Renewal neighborhood family
and heightened the financial
challenge to American Jews.
Nowhere is the variance between
success and continuing need more
glaring than in Netanya, 45 minutes
up the coast from Tel Aviv. Famous
as a diamond center, Netanya had
two depressed sections, Dora and
Sela. Bergen County, N.J., Jews have
just about finished their role in Dora.
But Louisville and Lexington, KY.,
Jews are only a quarter of the way
toward their goal for nearby Sela.
To help struggling partnerships,
UJA recently voted to encourage
many American Jews to give to
Israeli communities beyond the
neighborhood to which their home
Jewish community is twinned. UJA
also is encouraging those who have
contributed to Renewal to give again.
And for those in communities not
twinned, to aid a Renewal
neighborhood. Major donors are be-
ing offered the chance to have a facili-
ty they help finance bear their name.
"We have $163.2 million in and we
are determined to reach our $225
million goal for these 56
neighborhoods," said Jane Sherman,
UJA national vice chairman and na-
tional Project Renewal chairman.
"The challenge is considerable. But
the track record shows that Renewal
works. We will help every community
meet its fund-raising goal for project
Renewal." She added that contribu-
tions may be made via local Jewish
Federations.
Further information on major giv-
ing is available from UJA in New
York (212) 818-9100.
Spain and Israel form
diplomatic ties
By YOEL COHEN
World Zionist Press Service
The establishment of diplomatic ties
between Spain and Israel is a major
achievement in Israeli foreign rela-
tions. Now Israel can claim to have
diplomatic ties with every member of
the Western democratic family of
nations.
Even five years ago, there was
limited support among Spain's
political parties for formal recogni-
tion of Israel. Only the small Popular
Party favored such a.public act. To-
day, recognition is certainly due in
part to the good personal relationship
between Socialist Prime Minister
Felipe Gonzalez and Prime Minister
Shimon Peres, who have known one
another for a long time through the
Socialist International. Others in the
Socialist Party, however, such as
former Foreign Minister Fernando
Moran, opposed such a step, fearing
it would threaten Spain's close ties
with the Arab world.
More important than personal ties
and popular approval, however, was
Spain's entry into the European
Economic Community (EEC) in
January. Spain would have been the
only EEC member without formal
diplomatic ties to Jerusalem.
Spain's entry into the EEC may be
costly to Israel; Spain's duty-free
fruits, notably oranges, present a
threat to Israeli agricultural exports
to EEC countries.
In bilateral terms, there is a grow-
ing trade relationship between the
two countries. In the first 11 months
of 1985, Spanish exports to Israel
amounted to $73 million a 100 per-
cent increase over 1977; and Israeli
exports to Spain amounted to $28
million.
These economic ties are minor,
however, when compared with the
close economic ties between Spain
and the Arab world. Up to 80 percent
of Spain's oil comes from Arab coun-
tries, and Spanish exports and
building contracts with Arab nations
amount to more than $2 billion a
year.
See 'Diplomatic tiei" page 11
Federation, April 1986 7


Israel38... One
Yom Ha'atzmaut. Isn
No matter how it is said, the meaning is the sai
with One Destiny, rejoicing in the fulfillmento|
Only 38 years of independence hi
reality of the dream always ft
Today, the wol
IsRoeL
Ci
Jl
t
:
!
Jewish
Comit unity Centers
of Greater Miami
Michael-Ann Russell Center
The North Dade Jewish community will show its bond with the State of
Israel and with Soviet Jewry during the Israel 38 Celebration on April 13
The day will begin with a "Parade of Freedom," with participants from
various organizations leading the parade which begins at Skylake Sum
Bank. 1550 Miami Gardens Drive and ends at the Michael-Ann Russell
Center, where there will be day-long festivities to celebrate Israel's 38th
anniversary.
Once at the Michael-Ann Russell Center. 18900 N.E. 25th A>enue.J
there will be continuous entertainment at the Showmobile and in the Gym as
well as various other locations throughout the 17-acre site.
l*t* a.m.
Parade from Skylake State Bank to the Michael-Ann Russell Center
Celebration 11:40 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
On the field: Professional Entertainment at the Showmobile. Keep the
Beat Moving for Soviet Jewry Event, Game Booths by Teens. Rides. Dun*
the Leader Booth (Funds for Or Akiva), Spoils Competition. Makea VMs"
at the Western Wall. Food Hot Dogs. Felafel. Haagen Dan. Totuiu.
Sephardic Specialties. Pickles. Pretzels, Cotton Candy and much more, ha
at "Dizengof Cafe, Craft Creations for Children, Clown Face Painting.
Balloons, Petting Zoo. Mt. Sinai Health Van Blood Pressure Testing-
K.I.D.S. Child Identification Booth, Adopted Soviet Family Pen Pal
(write letters). Archeological Dig, Israeli Dancing with Audience W
ticipation. Fern Canter is the chairperson foe the Center's Celebration
At the Outdoor Pool: Clown Diving Show, Swimming Competmon
In the Gym: Israeli Shouk (Marketplace). Expo Community
Information Center. Continuous Entertainment including: JCC Gymnast
Exhibition, Youth Choirs, Puppet Shows and much more.
A Sign Language interpreter for the deaf will be present at the opening
ceremonies.
Admission to all events is FREE and open to the public.
For more information, or if you wish to volunteer in North Dade.ca
Sylvia Ziffer at 932-4200.
Israel 38 is coordinated by the Jewish Community CenH
8 Federation. April 1986


yple, One Destiny
Independence Day.
The world celebrates as One People
me dream for a Jewish Homeland.
passed, but the Hatikvah, the hope of 5000 years, keeps the
imost in the minds of Jews everywhere.
)|j celebrates Israel's 38th year of independence.
Jewish community will join in the festivities on
April 13, uniting the entire county in a celebration
ill remember Soviet Jews who are unable to celebrate
Ijoyous day.
Soviet Jews know of Israel's existence. But for them,
ig the promised land is often still only a dream.
ael38... One People, One Destiny
brate "Israel 38" at all three locations of the
ish Community Centers of Greater Miami, Sunday, April 13.
South Dade Center
The South Dade Center will join in the celebration with a "March of
Freedom," which will tie together Israel Independence Day and Soviet
Jewry. The I1/* mile March begins at Ron Ehmann Park, 10995 S.W. 97th
Avenue at 3:00 p.m. and will raise money for the Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund Campaign. The March is being
coordinated by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation South Dade Branch
and is being chaired by Susan Metsch.
The March will include many bands from local high schools, including
Killian High School bringing 65 band members and Miami Coral Park
Senior High with 120 band members.
Once the marchers arrive at their destination, the South Dade Center,
12401 S.W. I02nd Avenue, there will be celebrations throughout the
afternoon and evening. The celebration is being chaired by Dror Zadok.
2:15 p.m-3:00 p.m.
Pre-March activities: registration, opening ceremonies and entertain-
ment at Ron Ehmann Park.
3:00 p.m.
l'/j mile "March of Freedom" begins.
4:00 p.m.
"March of Freedom" ends at the JCC grounds. 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue. Opening Ceremonies for the Celebration.
440 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
The Celebration begins, including: Expo Center. Rides. Game Booths,
Israeli Foods, Films, Displays, Petting Zoo, Shouk (Israeli Style Market),
Continuous Entertainment featuring International Music Band "Shajar,"
Dance Troupe "Nitzanim." Musical.Presentations by Area Day Schools,
Synagogues, and Youth Groups, Choral Groups.
740 p.m.
"Kumiiti": Israeli-style bonfire with entertainment, singing and
dancing, and a special fireworks display.
Parking is available at Leewood Elementary School, 10343 S.W. 124th
Street and Killian High School. 10655 S.W. 97th Avenue. Free shuttle buses
run between parking areas and Celebration.
There will be a Sign Language interpreter for the deaf at the opening
ceremonies of the Celebration.
Admission to all events is FREE and open to the entire community.
If you would like more information, or would like to volunteer to help in
the Celebration, call Gary Bomzer at 251-1394.
Greater Miami and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Miami Beach Center
Israel 38 festivities on Miami Beach will be a week-long celebration
beginning on Sunday. April 13. The weeks's activities include an "Israeli
Museum" located at the Center. 4221 Pine Tree Drive. The Museum will be
open from Sunday, April 13 Thursday. April 17. Museum hours are
Sunday. 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Monday-Thursday from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
The Museum depicts the 38 years of Israel's independence, with each room
representing a different period of history. Each historic period shown will be
constructed by a different Jewish organization or Synagogue.
During Israel 38, April 13. the events will begin with a "March of
Freedom" which will be a walk for Soviet Jewry, in an attempt to bring
attention to their plight. It will be a show of solidarity to stimulate the
community, bringing attention to the problems faced by our Soviet
counterparts.
Israel 38 Celebration April 13
9:15 a.m.
"March of Freedom" Meet at the Miami Beach Convention Center.
Parking Area. March will go to the Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive.
1140 a.m.
"Israel Museum" Opens Tours will be conducted throughout the day.
Non-stop entertainment begins on stage, including: Opening Cere-
monies. Candle Lighting Ceremony for Soviet Jewry. Miami Beach Senior
High School Band Rock Ensemble, Klezmer Band. Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Choir. Nitzanim Dance Troupe. Miami Beach Center's
"Swinging Seniors," St. Patrick's Choir, Lehrman Day School Youth
Chorale of Temple Emanu-El, Israeli Dancing with Yussi Yanich, Awards to
Essay Contest Winners.
Other activities scheduled in the new JCC Mini-Park throughout the
day: Handicraft Workshops for Children, Israeli Food Demonstrations,
Browsing Through an Israeli Shouk (Marketplace). Original Play by Martin
Holtz, "A Dream of Israel" will be performed by children throughout the
day.
A Sign Language interpreter will be provided during the Opening
Ceremonies at 1:00 p.m.
All events are FREE and open to the entire community.
For more information, or if you would like to volunteer to help in the
celebration on Miami Beach, call Jerry Libbin at 534-3206.

Federation, April


CAJE president visits day schools A chak md dagger sfory
Nan Rich
Nan Rich, president of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education (CA-
JE), has discovered the exciting
world of the day school.
In order to better understand the
goals and problems of Greater Miami
day schools, and to establish better
communication between CAJE and
the schools, Rich and Rabbi
Menachem Raab, director of CAJE's
Day School Department, visited each
of the schools.
The first school visitation was to
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter, a Con-
servative day school for students
from nursery through sixth grade.
This school is headed by Dr. Michael
Halzel, who came to Miami from San
Diego last year. After a lengthy
discussion about the role of CAJE in
the community, Rich and Rabbi Raab
toured the school, stopping in on the
computer room where students were
working at an Apple computer.
Another stop was at the school's new
teachers' lounge where educators
were taking a relaxation break. They
then visited a nursery class where
children were working on an art pro-
ject for "Parents' Night."
"There was a general spirit of ex-
citement and enthusiasm," Rich com-
mented. "The children were cutting
outlines of their bodies, and then col-
oring the socks and ribbons so their
parents could identify the silhouettes
as theirs."
At the South Dade Hebrew
Academy, a traditional school for
children from kindergarten through
sixth grade, Rich and Rabbi Raab met
with Headmaster Rabbi Ralph Glix-
man and Principal Marlene Mitchell.
Mitchell mentioned the need for in-
creased training for teachers, stating
that while one-day institutes were
good, she would like to see more
ongoing training and more full-day
workshops on secular topics as well
as Jewish ones.
At the Jewish High School of South
Florida, Principal Rabbi Louis Herr-
ing expressed his delight that Rich
had taken time out of her busy
schedule to meet with school officials.
Rich stated that "It was exciting to
be at the High School's new home on
the Hillel Campus. The psychological
effects were apparent. The attitude
of the teachers and students was very
upbeat," she said. "It is obvious that
there is a great deal of emotional in-
volvement on the part of the
teachers, as well as a great deal of
stability and commitment. One
teacher I met teaches classes, labs,
and coaches the volleyball team as
well. If that isn't commitment, what
is?"
The students, in turn, are en-
thusiastic about the Jewish High
School and about the education they
receive there. One student who
recently transferred from a private
school said that he had made more
friends in one month at the Jewish
High School than he had all year at
his previous school.
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the Bet Shira Solomon
Schechter Day School, the South
Dade Hebrew Academy and the
Jewish High School of South Florida
are members of Federation's family
of agencies and beneficiaries of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
leads to a joyful reunion
JVS 'Teen Between9 named
counseling program of year
"Teen Between," a program pro-
viding vocational and career counsel-
ing for learning disabled adolescents,
was awarded "Counseling Program
of the Year" at a conference of the
National Association of Jewish Voca-
tional Services (NAJVS). The NA-
JVS's 46th Annual Reception and
Awards Dinner was held in San
Diego, California, on February 10.
Among representatives of the Miami
Jewish Vocational Service (JVS)
were Eugene Greenspan, JVS ex-
ecutive director; Rachel E. Tannen-
baum, associate executive director;
Mrs. Pat P. Fine, JVS Board presi-
dent; J. William Baros, Jr., past
president of JVS and NAJVS; and
Irene Baros.
Upon accepting the distinguished
"Counseling Program of the Year"
award, Pat Fine commented that
"The problems of the older learning
disabled student are rapidly emerg-
ing as a national concern and I am
ftroud that the Miami JVS is taking a
eadership role in aiding these
students and their families in the
transition to employment, training or
higher educational programs. Ex-
perts now are recognizing that a very
high percentage of learning disabled
students do not "outgrow" their
learning problems and are in
desperate need of vocational
direction.
"Teen Between" helps these
students explore their vocational
values, interests and abilities in order
to recognize and use their strengths
in setting realistic educational and
career goals. In addition to vocational
counseling, "Teen Between" pro-
vides referral information for board-
ing schools, two- and four-year col-
leges with special services for the
learning disabled, independent living
facilities and an update of available
local services.
The Jewish Vocational Service is
the only accredited, nonprofit agency
providing career and vocational
counseling in Dade County. For more
information about the "Teen Be-
tween" program, call Arleen Rosen-
thai, "Teen Between" Coordinator,
at 576-3220.
JVS is a member of Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
It wasn't a magic carpet that
brought the "Paveed" family to
Miami on a recent Tuesday evening.
It was a 747 carrying a Jewish
Iranian family of five to join stateside
relatives. Waiting anxiously at the
airport for the family's arrival was a
woman who would finally see two of
her grandchildren for the first time;
and a brother and sister, both
doctors, anxious to do whatever they
could, but still trying to rebuild their
lives after their own escape from the
terror of the Ayatollah Khomeini and
his followers.
The immigrants' real names cannot
be used because they fear for family
members who remain in Iran.
The stage for the reunion was set a
year ago when "Hekkmat Paveed"
well known to the National Council of
Jewish Women (NCJW) through its
Rescue and Migration efforts in his
asylum appeal alerted us of his
brother "Behroz," who planned to
flee Iran with his wife and children.
As the local agency for the Hebrew
Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), the
NCJW alerted headquarters, sharing
available information on the plight of
the family and receiving instructions
to relate to the family through a pre-
arranged code.
Waiting was difficult for all. But
even more difficult was the
treacherous journey experienced by
"Behrooz" and his family, who cross-
ed mountains, hid from soldiers and
fled highway robbers before finally
arriving in Karachi, Pakistan, at the
meeting place with the HIAS agent.
During the weeks they were in
Karachi, visas were arranged for
their eventual trip to Vienna and for
State Department inverviews which
would take place there, ultimately
granting them refugee status.
At this end, the NCJW was for-
mulating a resettlement plan and
verifying family relationships. And
finally after a year of combined ef-
forts, myriads of paperwork,
counselling and innumerable phone
calls another Jewish family was
rescued from persecution. Another
Jewish family reunited. Another in-
credible, yet true, account of a real
life drama made possible through the
Rescue and Migration Service of the
National Council of Jewish Women,
Greater Miami Section.
The Rescue and Migration Service
of the NCJW is part of Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
Holocaust Center to take
portraits of survivors
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center will
undertake an important project in
which a professional photographer
from the University of Miami will
take portraits of Holocaust Sur-
vivors. The pictures will help provide
a clear picture of who these people
are today. Each portrait will become
part of the Survivor's oral history
record, if given, and may be used in a
book or photographic exhibition.
Any Survivor who would like to
take part in this significant project
should call Merle at 940-5690 to
schedule an appointment.
The portraits will be taken, by ap-
pointment only, on Monday, April 7,
at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, 18900 N.E. 25
Avenue in North Miami Beach.
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center is a
member of Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
JFS program wins
national recognition
"Family Lifeline," a program of the Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami (JFS), was awarded national recognition recently by the American Society
on Aging (ASA), announced David B. Saltman, JFS executive director.
The ASA spotlighted "Family Lifeline" in March during its 32nd Annual
Meeting in San Francisco. The program was honored in the ASA's Best Practice
Showcase, Families/Intergenerational category. Family Lifeline Coordinator
Tena Frank, LCSW, was on hand to present a paper about the program's
services.
A uniquely new idea, "Family Lifeline" was created by JFS in 1984 to help
out-of-town families keep in touch with the emotional and physical needs of their
elderly relatives who reside in Dade County. The vital social services JFS pro-
vides to these older adults include psychosocial evaluation, counseling and crisis
assistance. A JFS clinical social worker keeps the family apprised of the in-
dividual's condition and needs on an ongoing basis.
For more information about "Family Lifeline," call the Jewish Family Ser-
vice at 868-0888.
JFS is a member of Federation's family of agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
10 Federation, April 1986


Israel not target of most terrorism
says Consul General
Yehoshua Trigor
Reprinted with permission.
Yehoshua Trigor is the consul general
of Israel for Florida and Puerto Rico.
He wrote this article for The Miami
News.
Immediately following the Palesti-
nian terrorist attacks against the
Rome and Vienna airports, I was ask-
ed by a friend if I thought that the
news from Europe, as shocking as it
was, would have an effect on tourism
to Israel. "Why should it?" I replied.
The U.S. State Department agrees.
In the aftermath of the Rome and
Vienna massacres, no travel advisory
was issued regarding Israel, and
Americans contemplating visits to
Israel were not urged to alter their
plans in any way. Numerous articles
appeared in print calling El Al, the
national airline of Israel, the safest in
the skies, and praising security
measures at Israel's Ben-Gurion Air-
port as the most stringent and suc-
cessful in the world.
The spurious suggestions that
tourism in Israel might be affected by
the incidents in Rome and Vienna is
instructive, however, because it
reveals a serious misunderstanding
about Arab terrorism.
Both inside and outside of the Mid-
dle East, the vast majority of Arab
terrorist incidents are directed
against Arab targets, and have ab-
solutely nothing to do with Israel.
This is especially the case with Arab
terrorism against civilian air traffic.
In the year-and-a-half from January
1984 through June 1985, there were
24 airline hijackings, mostly into or
out of the Middle East none of
which had even the slightest connec-
tion to the Arab-Israel conflict.
The very first airline hijacking of
1985 is a case in point. A Cyprus Air-
jays plane was commandeered in
Beirut on Feb. 7 of that year. The ter-
rorists, members of the Shiite "Black
Brigade," demanded the release of
two Lebanese who were jailed in
typrus on June 23, 1983, for having
"(jacked a Libyan-chartered Roma-
nian jetliner in a vain attempt to force
Libya to tell what it knew about the
a>sappearance and presumed murder,
n Libya, of the Lebanese-Shiite
'eader Imam Musa Sadr. Such is the
Byzantine cobweb of inter-Arab
terror.
The Jordanian national airline,
Alia, has been one of the most consis-
tent targets. Last March 21, for ex-
ample, explosive devices were thrown
at Alia offices in Nicosia, Rome, and
Athens. A caller on behalf of "Black
September" claimed responsibility,
vowing to continue its attacks until
the Jordanian regime is overthrwon.
In 1984, Alia was victimized on two
occasions.
On April 4, a rocket was fired at
one of its airliners as it was taking off
from Athens. Thankfully, the
shoulder-launched rocket failed to ex-
plode and no one on board was hurt.
"Black September" once again claim-
ed credit, as it had for a rocket attack
against the Jordanian Embassy in
Rome that took place the day before.
And on June 11, an Alia aircraft
was hijacked from Beirut to Lamaca,
Cyprus, then on to Palermo, Sicily,
before being forced back to Beirut.
Responsibility for this act was claim-
ed by the Lebanese-Shiite "Musa
Sadr Brigades."
It will come as no surprise that the
Iranians have been involved up to
their necks in air piracy.
On July 31, 1984, an Air France jet
flying out of Frankfurt was hijacked
over Luxembourg and forced to land
in Tehran. The hijackers were Shiites
who belonged to a terrorist organiza-
tion that claimed responsibility for
the attempted assassination of
former Iranian Prime Minister
Shahpour Bakhtiar in Paris in July
1980. They demanded the release of
five of their comrades jailed in
France. Incidentally, the men ar-
rested for attempting to murder
Bakhtiar, while initially claiming to
belong to a hitherto unknown
organization called the "Guards of
Islam," later admitted that they were
acting under orders from the ubi-
quitous Yasser Arafat, the godfather
of international terrorism.
Arafat and his ilk, therefore, keep
themselves busy by plotting ter-
rorism against each other. Inter-Arab
terrorism has been part and parcel of
the Middle East landscape for cen-
turies upon centuries, and would be
there today even if Israel didn't exist.
Middle East terrorism, however,
does teach us two important lessons.
First, if Arabs find it so difficult to
live in peace with each other, it will be
even more difficult for them to learn
to live in peace with Israel the only
non-Arab, non-Moslem state in, the
region to achieve independence and
maintain it.
And second, despite the endemic
nature of terrorism in the Middle
East, Israel remains an oasis of stat-
bility and Western values in a desert
of conflict.
It will continue to be so, for the
sake of all its people, and all its
friends who come to visit with us in
peace.
diplomatic ties
Continued from page 7
DesP|te the satisfaction in Israel
ver official diplomatic ties, Spain's
jasic support for the Arab point of
Pi a ~ 'ncludineT the position that the
UK) should be involved in peace
I "egotiations-remains unchanged.
to thVer W'th the addition of SPain
the EEC which already hosts
several pro-Arab nations, any future
EEC policy statements regarding the
Arab-Israeli dispute can be expected
to shift further to the Arab point of
view. Prime Minister Peres has allud-
ed to the possibility that Spain's good
connections with the Arab world may
contribute toward establishing a
dialogue with Israel. However, given
Spain's limited involvement in inter-
national diplomacy, such assistance
at this point seems unlikely at best.
Israeli technology tapped for
computer education programs
By YITZCHAK DINUR
World Zionist Press Service
Will the development of a com-
prehensive system of computer-aided
education soon become a national
Israeli project? The Israeli govern-
ment is likely to decide in the near
future on a recommendation from the
Steering Committee on the Develop-
ment of Computer Communication
Technology that such a project should
be implemented.
This Committee, composed mainly
of businessmen, wants to exploit
Israel's expertise in education and
computer software, a niche of com-
puter technology development not
yet occupied by the economic giants
such as the United States and Japan.
Such a national computer project
would be Israel's contribution to
modernizing education and to the
present worldwide push in computer
development.
Well-Developed Industry
Israel's software industry is well
developed. In addition to university
computer departments and specializ-
ed departments in government
ministries, more than 150 Israeli soft-
ware companies are at present
creating computer programs of many
kinds. These achieve a healthy export
of programs and services reportedly
totalling $20 million annually.
The proposed national project in
computer aided instruction is ex-
pected to go beyond merely giving
pupils a basic knowledge of the com-
puter, which is what most parents ex-
pect of schools today. The Commit-
tee's concept sees the computer stan-
ding at the center of a new com-
prehensive teaching system and calls
for the establishment of a national
educational computer network, with
enormous data bases (in Hebrew)
which pupils would be able to use botb
for prescribed classroom studies and
for other interests. It would contain
provisions for all levels, from bright
children who gobble up all they can
learn to slow learners who need extra
time and help.
Logical Limitations
By no means does the plan call for
the computer to displace all other
educational means. Nature cannot be
adequately studied through a com-
puter, for example; nor can computer
stimulation completely replace ex-
perience with real chemical and
physical experiments or even draw-
ing with a pencil. The Committee's in-
tent is simply to provide educational
materials that will utilize computers
to the beneficial maximum.
The national project is foreseen as
producing varied benefits. Teaching
would improve; yet the cost per pupil
would be reduced. Israel's economy
would benefit from an enlargement of
research and development, and in-
come would be earned by export of
the teaching systems. Finally, such
an ambitious program should attract
scientists from abroad to come and
live in Israel.
Programs Underway
Numerous projects in computeriz-
ed instruction are already being sup-
ported by the Ministry of Education
in Israeli universities and in a variety
of other organizations. In order to en-
sure proper development of educa-
tional materials for use with com-
puters, the Ministry has established a
Department for Computer Aided In-
struction within its National Cur-
riculum Development Center. Along
with this, the Israeli Association for
Computers in Education has arisen.
An International Conference on
Courseware Design and Evaluation,
organized by the Association, will be
held in Tel Aviv April 8-13. Matters
under discussion will include
systematic instructional models, new
technologies, and design for specific
disciplines such as mathematics and
foreign languages.
Students Writing Programs
The Computer Aided Instruction
Department is about to begin an
adventurous Community Courseware
Service Project in Rehovot, south of
Tel Aviv. It has asked tenth-grade
high school pupils who participate in
a school-sponsored community ser-
vice project to help write, under the
guidance of experts, computer-
assisted instruction programs as
their community service. Eligible are
teenagers who have acquired suffi-
cient programming skills at home or
in high school computer classes.
Some people have doubts about the
project, but its initiators are confi-
dent that their "whiz kids" will come
through with good materials.
The broad-based program for com-
puter aided education will be expen-
sive, but if it is accepted as a national
project in high technology, and if the
financing for it can be found, it will
help to nurture Israel's one great
resource its human capital. One
can only imagine the ways in which
better-educated citizens could im-
prove their country. What more could
be asked of a national project?
Last month two Israeli teens visited Miami as 'Ambassadors of Good Will, tour-
inq local high schools to teach their American counterparts about life in their
native country The program, sponsored by the Israeli government, was im-
plemented in Greater Miami by the Central Agency for Jewish Education Seen
above, the teens, Tami Rachmilewitz and Eyal Petersiel, receive keys to the city
from John McDermott, administrative assistant to Metro-T)("* Mayor Stephen
Clark.___________________________________________________.__________
Federation, April 1986 11


I f
Saving Taxes: Estate Planning and Charitable Giving
Ivan Faggen
Norman H. Lipoff
Sydney S. Traum
How do I transfer assets held by
my business from generation to
generation?
What is the best way to provide
for my children and grandchildren?
Through a will? Through a Living
Trust? Through a direct gift?
These and other basic tax and
estate planning questions will be the
focus of a first annual seminar entitl-
ed "Saving Taxes: Estate Planning
and Charitable Giving A Practical
Guide." The seminar, sponsored by
the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, will be held Wednesday,
May 7 at the Biscayne Bay Marriott,
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Seminar and Professional Advisory
Committee Chairman Martin Kalb
noted that "The Professional Ad-
visory Committee is pleased to aug-
ment the educational opportunities
now provided by the Foundation to
WHATP5
WILL
THEY
REMEMBER?
What will my grandchildren remember about me?
Oh. there will be pictures around. My son will remind
them of the good times we spent together. But as the
years blend into one another and time ticks away,
what will they remember about ME?
I've lived a full life. I was honest in business and I
prospered. I've given money and time to my Jewish
community and over the years I've helped bring it to
the vibrant point it is today. I want my children and
grandchildren and, yes, G-d willing, great-
grandchildren to know not only that they are Jews,
but to take responsibility as a Jew in the community.
But I wont always be here to talk about these things
and to act as an example.
My children and grandchildren won't love me any
less if I give a portion of my estate to my Jewish
community's endowment fund to help insure the
quality of Jewish life that my dear departed wife and I
helped to build. A permanent fund may give me that
touch of immortality I desire. But more important,
when grants are made from my fund in future years
to supplement the charitable projects that need help,
that will be their example. That they will remember,
and they will remember ME.
If you want to unite your legacy with the future of
our Jewish community, seriously consider a commit-
ment by completing the "Letter of Intent" on this page
and returning it to the Foundation Office.
For more information please call 576-4000.
12 Federation, April 1986
A Practical Guide
the professionals in the community
with this new annual program geared
to the lay person. We continue to feel
that practical advice on estate plann-
ing will benefit not only the donor and
his or her loved ones, but the com-
munity as well."
Featured speakers will include such
noted local professionals as Sydney S.
Traum, tax partner in the firm of
Myers, Kenin, Levinson and
Richards, who will present an over-
view on estate and gift taxes; Ivan
Faggen, tax partner in the firm of Ar-
thur Anderson and Co., discussing
how to control estate and tax
liabilities; and Norman H Liooff
partner in the firm of GreenbW
Traung, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff'
Rosen and Quentel, who will speak on
tax aspects of charitable giving.
Hors d'oeuvres and cocktails will
follow a question and answer seg-
ment of the program.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please call the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies at 576-4000
NOTICE TO ALL DONORS
As noted in the March issue of Federation, the 1984 Tax Reform Act
imposed new filing and appraisal requirement* for non cash charitable
contributions. Individuals and certain corporations who now claim a
charitable deduction based on a gift of property (other than cash) ex-
ceeding $500 must complete and attach the new Form 8283 to their 1985
tax return. Additionally, where the claim exceeds $5,000 ($10,000 in the
case of closely held stock), donors most not only complete Form 8283.
bat must also attach s qualified appraisal for the donated property to
the 1985 tax return submitted to the IRS.
LETTER OF INTENT
It is the tradition of our Jewish faith to share our
blessings. Therefore I take deep satisfaction in declaring my
intent to provide for the needs of future generations in the
following manner:
D I have made provision
? I shall make provision during the next
__________months
to support the Greater Miami Jewish Federation or its agencies
through
?
?
A lifetime gift of securities, real estate, life
insurance or other property
- The establishment of a philanthropic fund
? The establishment of a charitable remainder
trust
? A bequest in my will
? A gift to the ______________
-,
(agency)
I understand that this declaration of intent is not a legal
obligation and may be changed at my discretion and that the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies will send me a copy of
this Letter of Intent for my personal records.
Date
Name
Signature
Address
? You may use my name if it will be helpful in
encouraging others to sign letters of intent.
'TbUNPATION OF fe>>lSl^pHILANT>lRpPieg
ofthe (firmer Miami Jewish 'federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
Melvin L. Kartzmer, Chairman Joseph C. Imberman, Director
'
....



Reflections on the UJA Young Leadership Conference
By Robert J. Merlin
Commitment and involvement.
That was the theme of the 5th Na-
tional UJA Young Leadership Con-
ference in Washington, D.C., attend-
ed by 2.500 young Jews from
throughout the country, including
120 from Miami. Those of us who at-
tended had a remarkable and
memorable experience.
Our own Michael M. Adler officially
welcomed us. Michael, the National
Chairman of the Young Leadership
Cabinet, was one of the founders of
the original Young Adult Division of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
We were fortunate to have Am-
bassador Meir Rosenne talk to us. He
implored us to continue our involve-
ment in the Jewish community. The
recent release of Anatoly Shcharan-
sky was wonderful but we cannot let
his release be the end of our struggle
for the release of the other 350,000
Russian Jews who want to emigrate.
Elie Wiesel challenged us to step
forward and lead the way. He told us
that it is our privilege, not a burden,
to be tomorrow's leaders. If for no
other reason, we should act out of self
respect. There is no difference bet-
ween the Refuseniks and the Jews
who wanted to leave Europe in the
1930's.
We then split into nine different
sessions to discuss various topics.
Many members of Congress, in-
cluding Representative Larry Smith
and Senators Chic Hecht and Howard
Metzenbaum, participated in the ses-
sions.
Perhaps the most important topic
covered during the Conference was
the plight of Soviet Jews. It was men-
tioned by almost every speaker. In
addition, we attended a rally in
Lafayette Park which you may have
read about in U.S.A. Today or the
Washington Post. Representatives
Jack Kemp and Tim Wirth emphasiz-
ed how critical is our individual par-
ticipation in this on-going struggle.
No matter how futile our efforts
seem, we must remember that loud
public outcry over many years was
responsible for the eventual release
of Shcharansky. We must continue
our fight for human rights and put
pressure on the Soviets to "let our
People go!"
Senators Gary Hart and Robert
^ole addressed us during our
^enatorial Dinner. They both have
been close friends of Israel for* many
years and received a very warm
response. We thanked them for their
recent stand against the proposed
arms sale to Jordan.
Tom Dine, the Executive Director
9,1 the American-Israel Public Affairs
Lomm'ttee, elaborated on a four
Pp'nt plan to use when lobbying our
congressmen. He asked us to urge
congress to support the full alloca-
tion of economic aid to Israel, to op-
pose the soon to the proposed arms
sale to Saudi Arabia, to support the
Camp-David Middle East peace in-
itiative and to renew efforts to gain
the freedom of Soviet Jews.
We again had small sessions on
various topics, including "Ter-
rorism," where we heard from
Senators Paul Simon and Rudy
Boschwitz. Although we came away
with no solutions, we received at lot
of background information, and were
frightened to learn how the fear of
terrorism affects all of us. We ex-
perienced the effects while in
Washington when we had to avoid ce-
ment barricades and pass through
metal detector searches when enter-
ing the Capitol.
We then converged upon the
Capitol to meet with our Con-
gressmen. We urged our Con-
gressmen to support financial aid to
Israel and to oppose the sale of arms
to Saudi Arabia and prayer in public
schools. Senators Paula Hawkins and
Lawton Chiles were given warm
receptions in response to continuing
support of Israel.
Monday night was filled with song
and dance and was highlighted by the
singing and activism of Mary
Travers, of Peter, Paul and Mary.
The evening was a wonderful oppor-
tunity to meet people from
throughout the country.
On Tuesday morning we were for-
tunate to be addressed by three of the
world's most influential leaders.
Senator Ted Kennedy spoke to us as
only he could. He told us that as long
as one Jew is oppressed and
prevented from freely practicing the
religion of his father, no one can
stand by and be uninvolved. So long
as Jews remain unfree, we shall
never give up or give in. Senator Ken-
nedy urged the Administration to
concentrate on UN Resolutions 242
and 338 instead of selling arms to
Israel's enemies and that the U.S.
needs a peace policy instead of an
arms policy.
Senator Joe Biden gave the most
rousing and inspiring address of the
conference. He told us that we were
fortunate to have something to
believe in and that we therefore have
an advantage over the rest of our
generation. "We must recognize that
Israel is our first and foremost ally in
the Middle East. We should treat it as
a true ally, recognize and support it
as the strategic ally it is, and never
apologize for the aid we give it," he
said
Finally, we were addressed by
Prime Minister Shimon Peres, who
gave us a State of the State address.
We were pleased to hear that Israel is
rapidly moving toward economic
recovery.
Overall, the Conference was a uni-
que learning experience. Where else
can 2,500 young Jews gather to make
their voices heard? Those of us who
attended came back to Miami with
renewed vigor and dedication to the
survival of Israel, American Jews and
Jews throughout the world. It is up to
us to lead the way. We will not allow
ourselves to be condemned to repeat
history. We will be involved, will ex-
ercise our constitutional rights and
will do our best to make life better for
our children. I urge you to join us as
we further that goal in the next few
months.
Noted expert to speak on
cult groups April 10
Rabbi Stephen Robbins, nationally
recognized expert on cults and mis-
sionary groups, will be the guest
speaker at a public forum entitled
"Constitutional Rights and Freedom
of Religion-Are They in Conflict?: An
Analysis of the Cults and Missionary
Movements in America" on Thurs-
day, April 10 at 7:30 p.m.
The event will be held at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. The forum
is free to the public and is sponsored
by the Committee on Cults and Mis-
sionary Groups, an arm of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Community Relations Committee.
The burgeoning phenomenon of
cults and missionary groups indicates
that American Jews are over-
represented in these groups relative
to their numbers in the general
population. Some cults attract and
hold members through deception and
coercion, in some cases doing signifi-
cant harm to individuals and families.
Evidence of fraud, child abuse, forced
marriages and other illegalities in
many cult groups can be challenged
on legal grounds.
Concerned individuals who monitor
cult group activities assert that they
YLC Hold the Date
Thursday, April 3
Tallahassee Mission Recruitment and
Orientation
7:00 p.m. at the Federation
Speaker: The Honorable Elaine
Bloom
Tuesday, April 8/Monday, April 14
YLC Learn In: "Womb to Tomb
(last two sessions)
7:30 p.m. at the Federation
Speaker: Gene Greenzweig
Wednesday, April 9
YLC Summer Singles Mission
Briefing
7:00 p.m. at Federation
Sunday, April 13
Israel Independence Day Celebration
JCC South, YLC Blood Mobile
All day ______
Tuesday, April 15
Sandra C. Goldstein Speaker Series
with Hirsh Goodman, senior military
correspondent, Jerusalem Post
7:30 p.m. at the Federation with wine
reception
Wednesday, April 16
YLC Singles Committee Meeting
6:00 p.m. at the Federation
YLC Board Meeting
7:30 p.m. at the Federation
Thursday, April 17
YLC Campaign Committee
6:30 p.m. at the Federation
Monday, April 21
YLC Summer Singles Mission
Briefing with Menachem Perlmutter
7:30 p.m. at Federation
Monday, April 28
Washington Conference Follow-Up
7:30 p.m. at the Federation
pose an increasing threat to
both American Jews and other
religious groups because they are
now attempting to enter the
mainstream of organized religion and
are amassing great wealth. The issue
is whether these groups can be
challenged. Though clear illegalities
can be legally challenged, challenging
cult groups which attempt to win
adherents through persuasion short
of force is a subject of great debate
because civil courts are prohibited
from determining the truth of
religious claims.
At the April 10 forum, Rabbi Rob-
bins will discuss the recent growth of
cult and missionary groups and the
meaning and impact of these groups
on questions of constitutional rights
and freedom of religion.
Rabbi Robbins is chairman of the
Commission on Cults of the Pacific
Association of Reform Rabbis; chair-
man of the Task Force on Cults and
Missionary Activities of the Jewish
Federation Council of Greater Los
Angeles; and co-chairman of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregation's National Committee on
Cults and Missionaries.
In addition to his extensive lectur-
ing and writing on the psychology of
religion and social philosophy, Rabbi
Robbins has discussed cults on "60
Minutes" and "Nightline." He cur-
rently serves as rabbi for Temple
Emanuel of Beverly Hills, California.
Helene Cohen serves as chair of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Committee on Cults and Missionary
Groups. For more information about
this event, please contact the Com-
munity Relations Department at
576-4000.
Campaign
photo highlight
The invitation read "Grab your main
squeeze and join the gang for a 'Blast
From the Past.' The dance floor was
filled to capacity for every number as
the gang grooved to the hip sounds and
stars of the 50's and 60's.
Federation. April 1986
1$


Robert Clary helps youth understand Holocaust
In "Robert Clary: A5714. A
Memoir of Liberation. a film presen-
tation to appear on JFTV this month.
a special attempt is made to help
viewers, and especially youth,
understand the Holocaust in terms of
its effect on the lives of real people.
The documentary, which received an
Emmy Award nomination, translates
the cold and abstract statistics sur-
rounding the Holocaust into the real
experience of a single individual.
Robert Clary, best known for his
role in the television series "Hogans
Heroes." is executive producer U the
film, which is based on Clary's own
story and the experience of those who
liberated the concentration camps in
the spring of 1945. The documentary
traces Clary's story from his
childhood in Paris, to the roundup of
Jews in July and August of liM2. his
deportation and that of his family to
Nazi concentration camps, the tor-
turous journey 10 Buchenwald (where
his name became the number A5714A
and finally, liberation.
A very special feature of the
documentary is a visit to Buchenwald
by Clary and the video crew. Buchen-
wald. near the German city of
Weimar, is in East Germany, behind
the Iron Curtain. This was the first
time a western film crew had been
permitted to work at the Buchenwald
site. Rare film footage, never seen
before, was made available for use in
the film by the U.S. Department af
State. In addition, there is Color film
shot by a young (J 5. Arm>
photographer who. after viewing Ma
own footage, could not bring himself
to make .i film ,x:: of :t. When he
heard about the production of
'Robert Clan-: A5714." he donated
the footage to the project.
The one-hour film will appear on
JFTV Wednesdays. April 9 and 30 at
6:30 p.m.
Jewish Television Magazine
celebrates Passover and spring
Passover is a favorite Jewish holi-
day, not onlv because it is a celebra-
tion of freedom, but because it coin-
cides with the arrival of spring. The
April edition of "Jewish Television
Magazine" celebrates both the holi-
day and its season.
The program begins by retracing
the steps of the Children of Israel as
they wandered, according to the ac-
count in Exodus, througn the Sinai
Desert for 40 years before arriving at
the Promised Land. To this day. as
the first segment of the program
shows, one can find in that rugged
terrain evidence of the kind oflife
those wanderers must have led.
One can also find modern factor.es
that make matzok, the flat unleaven-
ed bread which our ancestors, in their
rush to leave Egypt, were obliged to
eat. and which we still eat or.
Passover. The second segment of the
program takes viewers to see how
this ancient food is baked today.
Another segment af the program
highlights a seder enthusiastically
conducted in a modern kibbutz in the
desert not far from where the
Israelites are said to have wandered.
In deference to the spring season, a
time often thought peculiarly con-
ducive to falling in love, the longest
segment of the program focuses or
ways in which single Jewish people
are being introduced to one another
in Jewish settings in Miami.
Baltimore and Washington. D.C.
Part of the segment features Senator
Rudy Boschwitz of Minnesota, the so-
called "Cupid of Capitol Hill." who
brings single people together par-
ticularly to celebrate Jewish holidays
which they might otherwise have to
face alone.
The program also celebrates the
joyousness of the season and the holi-
day with musical selections by a
E>pular band called Selah. formerly
K>wn as the Diaspora Yeshiva Band.
The host of the series is film and
television actor Stephen Macht. cur-
rently best known to viewers for his
featured role on "Cagney and
Lacey."
This installment of "Jewish Televi-
sion Magazine" will air on JFTV on
Tuesdays. April S and 22 at 5:30 p.m.:
and on Saturdays. April 12 and 26 at
7:30 p.m.
watch jftv on*
Storer (North Dade)
Storer (South Dade)
Harte Hanks
Dynamic
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Channel P-29
Channel 14
Channel 2
Channel 43
Channel 84
Channel 28-A
JFTV features
evening with
Alfred Eisenstein
4
This month JFTV will air a special
cultural program featuring the
Broward Symphony Orchestra per-
forming the works of Alfred Eisens-
tein.
Eisenstein. an octagenarian resi-
dent of North Miami Beach, has been
heralded as one of the best classical
composers of modern times. His work
has been compared to that of
Tchaikovsky, who is Eisenstein's
favorite composer.
Eisenstein. who fled the Holocaust
and arrived in America penniless in
1939. earned his living as a civil
engineer until his retirerr.er.: in 1970.
Since then, he has devoted his life to
music. Fans from all over the world.
including fellow comp-osers and
classical music lovers, write I bin in
several languages to praist his work.
JFTV

:
I
H
I
I
'-CUPANDSAVfc
Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewisn Federation cable Television inc.
1!

i
S-5 SO p.m.
5 JWpm
$-.50 p.m.
Monctav
EeniS
Krtcnen
owe* up
Mount
Shu*
Tuesday
Wednesday
specia
we
me
Holocaust

* 1 -5S
EenS
He4K>
Jerusalem
Tnursoav
Passover
Special
Friday
jewisn
RoundtaOte
or
Aiepn
Saturday
cneckup
Mount
Sinai
Hello
Jerusalem
JFTV
Butteovi Board
Eemes
Krtcnei i
I 4.50-7 p rn.
7-7:50 PJR.
7:504 pJ*.
IF-
Bet Din
mill
Peoples
Court
XC A
Soeoa
* 344 SC
ias*y
to
voce
or
__ ^_ JFTV
TT**oward Bulletin Board
Svmprwrry ------------:----------
cneckup
Mount
Sinai
Fttm
Special
neao
. -usawm
usfcv
JFTV
| Be in Board
Sunday
JCCA
Special
Place
Eenies
Kitcnen
Remember
me
Holocaust
r Meidoscope
4 12*4 2C
4 514 19
Teen
Bet Din:
mjw>n
peoples
court
P K?V
Taft
-r^PAACsatf---------
14 F*
_*%^m t^ff^f


SATURDAY. APRIL 5
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Center
Teens, 7th-12th grade, will go to see a
LaserlightyRock Music Show at the
Museum of Science from 7:30 to 11 p.m.
The cost for JCC members is $6.50; non-
members $8. For more information,
please call Darcy at 534-3206.
TUESDAY. APRIL 8
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center,
12401 S.W. 102 Avenue, presents "The
Joys of Passover," a program designed
for adults, couples and singles to explore
the Passover holiday. Joan Schwartz will
lead a workshop on the history of
Passover foods, recipes old and new-
alternatives for meals and the rituals of
the Seder. Admission is free and open to
the community. For more information
and to RSVP, please call Marsha at
251-1394.
TUESDAY. APRIL 8
The Jewish Vocational Service Employ-
ment Counselor will present a special
workshop entitled "Am I Here Forever?:
Life Long Career Planning." The
workshop will focus on factors which af-
fect career choices during different
decades of ones life. Admission is free and
open to all adults. The workshop will be
held at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center. 18900 N.E. 25
Avenue. For information, please call
576-3220.
TUESDAY. APRIL 8
Dr. Leonard Kravits, professor of
Midrash and Homiletics at the New York
School of Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, will speak on
"Midrash as Philosophy Philosophy as
Midrash" at Temple Sinai of North Dade.
18801 N.E. 22 Avenue at 8 p.m. The lec-
ture is presented on behalf of the North
Dade Midrasha Lecture Series. Tickets
available at the door. For more informa-
tion, please call 576-4030.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 9
William Fishman, professor of Jewish
History. University of London, will give a
free public lecture on "The Rise and Fall
of the East London Ghetto." The lecture
describes the Jewish experience at the
turn of the century. Sponsored by the
Judaic Studies Program of the University
of Miami, the lecture will begin at 7:30
P.m. at the University's Learning Center,
Room 190. For more information, please
call 284-4375.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 9
The Yiddish Cultural Circle of Point East
will hold its Holocaust Memorial Com-
memoration at 1 p.m. in the Rose
Samuels Room of the Point East
Clubhouse. Anne Ackerman will be the
guest speaker. All are welcome. For more
information, please call 935-1915.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 9
The Judaic Studies Program of the
University of Miami is hosting a Jewish
studies Colloquium from 2-5 p.m. in the
President's Board Room, second floor,
Ashe Building. The topic is "The Im-
migrant and Integration." Panelists in-
clude Professors Bob Levine. Sefton
lemkin, William Fishman and Henry
I'reen. Attendance is free, but space is
limited. For more information, please call
284-4375.
THURSDAY. APRIL 10
>ie American Jewish Congress-Justine
Louise Wise Chapter will hold a regular
meeting at 12:30 p.m. at the American
Savings and Loan Association Bank
Building, Alton and Lincoln Roads.
Quests are invited. For more information,
Please call 864-1355.
THURSDAY. APRIL 10
Dr. Leonard Kravits, professor of
Midrash and Homiletics at the New York
School of Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, will speak on
"Midrash as Philosophy Philosophy as
Midrash" at Beth Breira Congregation,
9400 S.W. 87 Avenue at 8 p.m. The lec-
ture is presented on behalf of the South
Dade Midrasha Lecture Series. Tickets
available at the door. For more informa-
tion, please call 576-4030.
THURSDAY. APRIL 10
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Center, will
present the film "Ghostbusters" at a teen
movie night, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the
Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive. Popcorn
will be served. Admission is free and open
to the public. For more information,
please call 534-3206.
SUNDAY. APRIL 13
ISRAEL 38. See story on page 8 and 9 for
details.
MONDAY. APRIL 14
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah will hold
a meeting with guest speaker Rabbi
Akiva Brilliant at Temple Zamora in Cor-
al Gables at 12:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call Libby Lieberman at
649-7134.
MONDAY. APRIL 14
A Pacesetter Reception, honoring Dr.
George S. Wise on his 80th birthday, will
be held from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Federa-
tion Building. Hirsh Goodman, chief
military correspondent for the Jerusalem
Post, will be the guest speaker. There will
be no solicitation of funds. However, a
$10,000 minimum gift to the 1986 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund is required for attendance. Norman
H. Lipoff serves as chairman of the event.
For more information, please call Jeff
Klein at Federation. 576-4000.
MONDAY. APRIL 14
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami. Michael-Ann Russell
Center Children's Department, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, will begin a new
semester of children's after school
classes. Registration ends April 9th.
Costs for classes vary. Please call
932-4200 for a program guide.
TUESDAY. APRIL 15
"The Contemporary Jewish Community
in the 1980's" will be the theme of a lec-
ture delivered by Dr. Abraham J. Git-
telson, associate director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, at the
Miami Beach Public Library from 1-3
p.m. This program is co-sponsored by the
Central Agency fo&Jewish Education and
Moadon Ivri-The Hebrew Cultural
Forum. Admission is free and open to the
public. For more information, please call
576-4030.
TUESDAY. APRIL 15
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center,
12401 S.W. 102 Avenue, presents "The
Joys of Passover," a program designed
for adults, couples and singles to explore
the Passover holiday. Rabbi Norm Lip-
son, director of the Institute of Jewish
Studies of the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, will give an historic overview
on the cultural and political efforts on the
celebration of Passover throughout
history. Sponsored by the Tuesday Even-
ing Couples Club, admission is free and
open to the community. For more infor-
mation and to RSVP, please call Marsha
at 251-1394.
TUESDAY. APRIL 15
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue, will take
a group to the final show of the season of
"Evita" at the Ring Theater, located at
the University of Miami. The cost is
$10 50 for members and non-members,
plus an additional $5 for bus transporta-
tion (if you do not have transportation).
Please call Marcia at 932-4200 for more
information.
TUESDAY. APRIL 15
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center Singles Department, 18900 N.E.
25 Avenue, will hold a Singles Support
Group at 7:30 p.m. The group serves as a
vehicle for discussion on such topics as
relationships, loneliness, self-esteem and
other related topics. The group meets on
a bi-monthly basis. Cost is $1 for JCC
members, $3 for non-members. Please
call 932-4200 for more information.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 16
The Jewish High School will hold its an-
nual event to benefit the Scholarship
Fund at 7:30 p.m. at the San Souci Hotel.
Dennis Prager will be the guest speaker.
The cost is $25 per person. For more in-
formation, please call Barbara Eisenberg
at 935-5620.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 16
Dr. Jacob Milgrom will speak on "Ancient
Israel's 'Picture of Dorian Gray': Biblical
Ethics for Today," at 8 p.m. at Barry
University, Andres Building. The lecture
is presented on behalf of the North Dade
Midrasha Lecture Series. Tickets
available at the door. For more informa-
tion, please call 576-4030.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 16
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center Singles Department, presents a
"Drop By and Kibbitz" night from 8 to 9
p.m. The topic of discussion, led by
Augusta Zimmerman, LCSW, will be
"Feeling Good and Being Single." The
cost is $3 for JCC members, $5 for non-
members. For more information, please
call 932-4200. ext. 217.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 16
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami. Michael-Ann Russell
Center, will present a film and lecture on
Claes Oldenburg, the artist who made a
huge baseball bat for Chicago, a giant
clothespin for Philadelphia, an enormous
flashlight for Las Vegas and promises to
put Miami on the map as a center for
public sculpture. The lectures will be held
at the Center, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue,
from 10 a.m. to noon and 7 to 9 p.m. The
cost is $2 for members, $3 for non-
members. For more information, please
call 932-4200.
THURSDAY. APRIL 17
BUDDY UP DAY. See story on page 3
for details.
SUNDAY. APRIL 20
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue, will have
a "Fantastic Family Fishing Day."
Reservations are required by April 16th.
The cost which includes bait, tackle,
soft drinks and prizes for the largest,
smallest and ugliest fish is: JCC members
adults $15. children $10; non-
members, adults $18, children $15. Br-
ing your own lunch and Dramamine.
Space is limited. Please call 932-4200 to
register.
SUNDAY. APRIL 20
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Center
Teens, 7th-12th grade, will have an
"Atlantis Day" from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The cost for JCC members is $13, non-
members $15. For more information,
please call Darcy at 534-3206.
THURSDAY. APRIL 24
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center and South Dade Center Singles
Groups will hold their Singles Passover
Seder at 6 p.m. at the South Dade Center,
12401 S.W. 102 Avenue. The fully
catered kosher dinner will include a
Passover service led by Gideon Pelig. The
cost is $20 for members and non-
members, $7 for children. For more infor-
mation, please call Jodye at 251-1394 or
Marilyn at 932-4200.
SUNDAY. APRIL 27
The Temple Beth Am Concert Series, in
association with radio/station WTMI, will
present an afternoon of music for
children entitled "Meet the Instruments
of the Orchestra," with the Philarmonic
Orchestra of Florida Brass and Percus-
sion Ensembles. The one hour concert
begins at 4 p.m. in the Temple Sanctuary,
5950 North Kendall Drive. All seats are
$2.50. For more information, please call
667-6667.
SUNDAY. APRIL 27
Charles Silberman, author of "A Certain
People: American Jews and Their Lives
Today," will speak at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, 137 N.E. 19 Street at
10:45 a.m. as part of the North and South
Dade Midrashot. Tickets availa^' at the
door. For more information, pie. call
576-4030.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell
Center, has a new Judaic showcase in the
lobby. The Center needs family momen-
tos that members are willing to share and
have displayed. Such items as family por-
traits, passports, ketubas, religious
items, and Jewish memorabilia are need-
ed. For more information, please call
932-4200.
Yaacov Sassi leads Israeli dance classes
every Sunday night at the Michael-Ann-
Russell Center, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue.
The cost is $2 for members, $3 for non-
members. For more information, please
call 932-4200.
The Michael-Ann Russell Center is look-
ing for teens, entering the 10th grade in
September, to be Counselors in Training
(CIT) this summer. For applications and
an interview, please call 932-4200.
Beginning the week of April 14, the
Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Michael-Ann Russell Center, will
offer new adult classes in hand-building
ceramics, clay masks, art, and water color
painting. All classes are individually pric-
ed. Please call the Center at 932-4200 for
a complete program guide.
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach Center, will
hold a prep course for the May 3rd SAT
test on April 7, 9, 14, 16, 21 and 28. For
more information, please call Darcy at
534-3206.
"The Spirit of Place," a photography
exhibit by Barry Fellman, will be on
display at the Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery
of Temple Beth Sholom now through
April 23. The Gallery is located at 4144
Chase Avenue, Miami Beach. For more
information, please call 532-3491.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for May events is April 11
Organization
Event _____
Place__--------
Day-----------
Date.
. Time.
)a.m. ( >p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No.
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
.


-*-->- I H HWiMpiitHnagiMit ttoit.. Vjs-.
" J
N*p*^w^i^!"^"?*wppiwf"www^w^r
ISRAEL PROGRAMS OFFICE
Ihw nT33n*7 Tallin
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000
TYPE
OF
PROGRAM
I. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL AGE
Camp & Tours (Bar/Bat Mitzvah)
"II. HIGH SCHOOL AGE
Academic
Ulpan
Volunteer
Sports
Arts
Camp & Tour
Leadership Training
III. UNIVERSITY AGE & UP
Academic
Kibbutz/Academic
Kibbutz Moshav
Sports
Art
I Singles
volunteer
Educational Tour
Leadership Development
Professional Development
Ulpan
Aliya'Sefflement
IV. ADULTS
Tout & Civics Experience
Tour & Academic Experience
V. FA1HUES
Living Experiences
THIS YEAR IN JERUSAI FMI


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02983

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert
Jewislhi Floridiami
felume59Numbr14
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, April 4,1986
- Frtd SHOCK* H. Vh $ "
Price 50 Cents
M). The President said he would never sell arms to moderate 'Arab countries
aldheim's Signature Fingers Him
In U.S.
Lawmakers Demand
Israel's W. Bank Control
JEW YORK (JTA) -
Gael's permanent control
| the West Bank and Gaza
rip was urged by conser-
ve Congressmen of the
fpublican and Democratic
ties at the 1986 National
inference of Americans
a Safe Israel (AFSI)
pe. They stressed U.S.
rPport for Israel and
eace through strength" in
the Middle East.
Legislators who addressed the
gathering included Sen. Steve
Symms (R.. Idaho); Sen. .Jesse
Helms (R., N.C.); Rep. Tommy
Rohinson (D.. Ark.); and Sen. Chfe
Hecht (R.. Nev.). They also plugg-
ed for support of President
Reagan*s Strategic Defense In-
itiative (SDI) and his request for
$100 million in aid for the Contras
seeking to overthrow the San-
dinista government of Nicaragua.
Evidence Mounts He Had
Big Hand in Nazi Crimes
ting directly to the General
Staff of Army C, Group E
("Heeresgruppe E"), the oc-
cupying force in Yugoslavia
during World War II.
Sen. Jesse Helms
SYMMS TOLD the convention.
"I oppose any plan, whether pro-
posed by Svria. Jordan, the UN or
the State Department, that seeks
to remove the territories of
Judaea and Samaria from Israel s
control." The U.S.. he said "must
Continued on Page 9-A
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The World Jewish Congress
has provided what they
referred to as a "surprise
witness" in the Kurt
Waldheim affair
Waldheim. himself. The
WJC presented captured
Nazi documents obtained
from the National Archives
in Washington which
Waldheim himself had sign-
ed in the capacity of senior
intelligence officer repor-
It was headed by Gen. Alex-
ander Loehr who was extradited
to Yugoslavia after the war and
executed in 1947 for war crimes.
These disclosures appear to
refute Waldheim's claim he was
only an interpreter for the
Wehrmacht in Yugoslavia. The
evidence produced was discovered
Continued on Page 9-A
essure on Rise
Ban Sought on Military Move To Restrict Yarmulke
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
VASHINGTON (JTA)
Kep. Charles Schumer
, N.Y.) said last Wednes-
N he plans to introduce
islation prohibiting the
military from banning the
wearing of yarmulkas.
Schumer. a member of the
House Judiciary Committee, was
acting in response to a 5-4 deci-
sion by the Supreme Court
upholding the right of the Air
Force to prohibit an Orthodox
Jewish captain, Simcha Goldman,
from wearing a yarmulka. The rul-
ing climaxed close to five years of
litigation by Goldman and his at-
torney from the National Commis-
sion on Law and Public Affairs
(COLPA).
"I DO NOT believe that rigid
military regulations should be in-
terpreted to supersede basic con-
Continued on Page 7-A
Inside
Israel will 'consider
carefully' the political
future with Austria'...
Page 2 A
Kreisky calls charges
'monstrous meanness' ...
Page 13-A


E
I
I
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
New Evidence
Israel Will 'Consider Carefully'
Future Relations With Austria
By DAVID LANDAU
(Jerusalem)
And REINHARD ENGEL
(Vienna)
Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim said last Thursday
that mounting evidence that
former United Nations
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim has a Nazi past
will require Israel "to con-
sider carefully" whether it
is possible to have any rela-
tions with him in the future.
Waldheim is the conservative
Peoples Party candidate for the
Presidency of Austria in elections
to be held May 5. Austrian and
Yugoslavian newspapers and the
World Jewish Congress have
made public in recent weeks war-
time and post-war documents in-
dicating that Waldheim was in-
volved in the murder and torture
of partisan fighters while a lieute-
nant attached to the German
General Staff in the Balkans dur-
ing World War II.
HE ALSO may have been im-
plicated in the deportation of
Greek Jews from Salonika. Nissim
was the first ranking Israeli of-
ficial to comment on the
Waldheim affair. He said that
Israel would have to weigh its
position if, for example, the ques-
tion of Waldheim*s visiting Israel
arises in the future.
There have been no indications
from present or past officers of
the Israel foreign service as to
whether Israel knew of or
suspected Waldheim's alleged
Nazi activities during his two
terms as UN Secretary General
1972-81.
Waldheim denied any Nazi past
in an interview with Israel Radio
from Vienna. He said his wartime
service in the Balkans was limited
to acting as an interpreter for the
German High Command.
Two Yugoslavian newspapers
and the Austrian daily Kurier
published documents found in a
Belgrade archive which reveal
that Waldheim was wanted for
war crimes in 1947 in connection
with atrocities committed against
partisans and civilians during the
German occupation
WORLD JEWISH Congress in
New York has released a 1948
U.S. Army document showing
that after World War II both the
Army and the United Nations
War Crimes Commission listed
Waldheim as a suspected Nazi war
criminal. The document, from the
Army's "Combined Registry of
War Criminals and Security
Suspects" (CROWCASS), reports
that Waldheim's arrest was
sought by Yugoslavia on suspicion
of complicity in what the Registry
listed as "murder."
According to the documents
published in Belgrade and Vienna,
it was Waldheim who, despite his
junior rank, made proposals for
retaliation measures agaisnt local
populations after partisan attacks
and on the treatment of hostages.
His proposals were passed on to
his superiors.
Waldheim flatly rejected the
allegations as "lies, defamation
and devilish intrigue." He main-
tained that the documents lumped
all German officers together and
because no proof was ever found,
the charges were quietly dropped
by the Yugoslav authorities.
SIMON WIESENTHAL, who
heads the Nazi war crimes
documentation center in Vienna,
said last Thursday that the
Yugoslav authorities should check
into why the allegations against
Waldheim were not pursued after
1947. "There is a whole range of
possibilities, from pure laziness
and sloth to a feeling that the
suspicions were not justified," he
said.
Meanwhile. Alois Mock, chair-
man of the Peoples Party, accused
the WJC of "infamous meanness
and unwarranted interference
with Austrian political matters.
Mock called on the Socialist-lea
Austrian government to protect
Waldheim as a citizen from un-
justified attack.- comirii: from
abroad.
Another Peopies Pariv
spokesman, Robert Gral'. called on
President Rudolph Kir-
chschlaeger to call a special ses-
sion of Parliament to' reject
foreign intervention in Austrian
politics.
But Socialist Chancellor Fred
Sinowatz said no such session was
necessary. He said it was
Waldheim's duty to prove the
charges unfounded. He added that
the government would not in-
tervene against a private
organization in the U.S.. meaning
the WJC.
JTA Serricps
The experience I had in
Israel was the most meaningful
experience of my life."
Randall Lending. Vanderbili University 185 Partk'ipani
ISRAEL SUMMER PROGRAMS
for lx>th Brat-time visitors and returnees
STUDENTS
Explore the Land
O Jerusalem1
Holocaust Seminar
Experience Kibbutz
Hebrew Ulpan (in Kibbutz
Volunteer in a Development lown
SEMINAR FOR JEWISH
ACADEMICIANS
May 25-June II
June 15-July 3
July 20-August 11
July 2-July 31
July 2-July 31
July 2-August 14
)une 10-August H
July 2-August 7
)une 2 for an Information Brochure wruc or call
Bnai Brith tlillel roundauon
Israel Summer Program^
lO-H) RruxJc Island Avenue. NW
Wellington IK: 200}o
telephone 202-Bv-0552 or o5ol
<>r omtJct v.xir local Mlllcl ofhec
Zkt&i
Conservative and Reform leaders of the
American cantorate join hands at the second
annual joint seminar of the Cantors Assembly
and the American Conference of Cantors at
the Jewish Theological Seminary of America.
Left to right are Cantors Samuel Rosenbaum,
executive vice president, Cantors Assembly;
Raymond Smolover, executive director.
American Conference of Cantors; Jay
Frailich, president, American Conference of
Cantors; and Saul Z. Hammerman, president.
Cantors Assembly.
Part of Wider Network
Seven Arabs Arrested for Terrorism
Bv GIL SEDAN
KFAR KASSEM (JTA)
Seven residents of this
Arab town just east of
Petach Tikva have been ar-
rested for alleged terrorist
acts. The authorities believe
they are part of a wider net-
work of terrorist gangs af-
filiated with El Fatah.
They were taken into Custody
recently in a mas.-, crackdown on
terrorist- mainly in Last
Jerusalem and the administered
territories The Bweep was one of
the most successful by Israe.i
security forces in recent years.
The gang's are held responsible for
a long senes of bombings and
other acts of violence over a 2"
month period.
THE KFAR Kassem BUSOectS
are Israeli Arabs. Thej are charg-
ed, among other things, with plan-
ting a bomb in the Te! Aviv cen-
tral bus station it failed to ex-
plode and bombs in Bnei Brak
and Petach Tikva. The latter, con-
cealed among cooking gas con-
tainers, exploded causing damage
but no casualties. The gang also
tried to ambush a bus in the
Samaria district of the West
Bank.
Israel Television reported last
week that several of the suspects
were recruited in Europe and
trained in Lebanon. Security of-
ficers reportedly found arms and
explosives in their homes. They
are charged, among other things
writh membership in an illegal
organization, military training
without permission, and intent lo
sabotage and to kill.
Kfar Kassem is a town of about
9,500, just across thi "green line"
from the West Bank The arrests
were greeted with shock and
astonishment among the
residents. Many Arabs from Kfar
Kassem, work for Jewish
employers in nearby Petach Tikva
and they fear their jobs may be
jeopardize by the discovery of ter-
rorists in their midst.
ABDL'AL RAHLM ISSA.
Mayor of Kfar Kassem, warned
Wednesday against casting blame
on the entire population which
has always had good relations
with Jews. But then an bitter
memories in the to*
It was the scene of a
massacre in I '">'> whei
i >order policemen ihot t ith 4S<
civilians who unki
violate"! a curfew inn..
first day of the Sinai
the Israeli invasioi
cert with.an attai
Anglo-French tori
dei' Gamal Abdel Nass
tionalized the Suez < 'ai
PASSOVER10Kf3
HMVIUSAl k" *H( TIM KS IN'

DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
El Al Comes Up With Plan
To Recoup Part of Losses
TEL AVIV (JTA) El Al.
Israel's national airline, has come
up with a way to recoup part of
the severe losses it has sustained
since a ban on Sabbath flights was
imposed by the government
several years ago under intense
pressure from the Orthodox
religious establishment.
Rafi Har-Lev, president of El
Al. has proposed leasing its Boe-
ing 747s from sundown Fridays to
sundown Saturdays to charter
companies not affected by the
ban. Saturday is the favored day
of the week for many European
tourists to start their vacations.
The enforced idleness of the giant
aircraft means that traffic is lost
to El Al.
Har-Lev made the offer recent-
ly at a reception inaugurating
charter service between Israel
and Hamburg and Cologne in
West Germany. It is operated
jointly by Arkia, Israel's privately
owned domestic airline, and Sun
D'Or, the El Al-owned charter
company.
Har-Lev said his proposal would
help the two charter carriers by
increasing their capacity would
bring additional tourist revenue
into the Treasury and would pro-
vide income for El Al. The equip-
ment would have to be returned in
time for El Al's Sunday morning
flights. *
. An Israeli air cargo service, Cal
V-44-Wi l-4-4-86 M-4-4-86
already operates Boeings leased
from El Al to carry agricultural
and industrial products to Europe
on Saturdays.
Nt mi WMM I -.
I tlnffUJ iLiuhr- low" MM
% rV" H J / j
New tort v.-- .'1J--.S4.OtUh HOn-JJ'
I m lewtr Oprralor tot IMPIOMV
HOKUM
>ovit^.gSLte Towers
Hotels & Apartments
'Waterfront Rental Apartments"
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fla.
672-2412
2 & 3 Yr. Leases Available
Marine and Fishing Pier
Planned social activities
to fill your hours happily
Pool & Shulfleboard
Restaurant *
Lounge
Free Bus Service
FURN. & UNFURN. EFFICIENCY
FURN. & UNFURN. 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
Beauty Parlor on Premises


News in Brief
AIPAC Won't Lobby Against Arms Sale
Friday, April 4^1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By JTA Services
WASHINGTON The
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee, while opposed to
President Reagan's proposed
$354 million sale of missiles to
Saudi Arabia, will not actively lob-
by against the sale in Congress,
AIPAC sources said. The AIPAC
decision was officially disclosed
recently to Secretary of State
George Shultz by Thomas Dine,
AIPAC's executive director, ac-
cording to the sources.
This move follows the announce-
ment by the Israeli government in
March that it will not actively
campaign against the proposed
sale. But the Cabinet announce-
ment stressed that Israel con-
tinues to be opposed to the sale of
weapons to countries that are in a
state of war with it. Most
observers here see the decision by
Doth Israel and AIPAC as aimed
at no wanting to damage the pre-
sent good relations between Israel
and the United States over an
issue that is considered only
marginal to Israel's security.
W. German Tourist
Dies of Her Wounds
TEL AVIV A 20-year-old
West German woman, Miriam
Stucker, died in a Beersheba
hospital last Thursday, two weeks
after she was found comatose
with a buliet wound in her head in
a field near Kibbutz Revivim in
the Negev. She never regained
consciousness.
S.ucker, described as a tourist
who had worked as a volunteer at
r. kibbutz in Galilee before coming
to the Negev, was the second
woman shot in the Revivim area
since last summer. The earlier vic-
tim, a woman soldier, survived.
Police said Stucker was
discovered between 24-48 hours
after she was shot possibly by a
man who gave her a lift in his car.
A Bedouin detained as a suspect
was remanded in custody for 15
days by a Beersheba magistrate's
court last Wednesday while police
investigate the case. There was no
indication why the Bedouin is
under suspicion.
Soviets Plan to Razs
Synagogue in Tbilisi
WASHINGTON Soviet
authorities are planning to
bulldoze one of the few remaining
synagogues in the Soviet Union
and build a public square in its
place, the Simon Wiesenthal
Center was recently informed.
In a letter sent to members of
Congress last month, the Center
reported that the Ashkenazic
Synagogue in Tbilisi, the capital of
the Georgian Republic, was slated
or demolition. Closing the
building, the letter noted, would
have "obvious tragic impact" on
the Tbilisi Jewish community of
some 20,000.
The report of the planned
demolition came from Isai and
wgory Goldstein, two brothers
from Tbilisi who were recently
granted exit visas after seeking to
emigrate to Israel for 15 years, ac-
cording to Rabbi Abraham
hooper, associate dean of the
Wiesenthal Center, who sent the
letter to Congress.
Rocket Injures Four
At Kiryat Shemona
TEL AVIV A Katyusha
rocket exploded in a schoolyard in
K"7at Shemona last Thursday
morning, slightly injuring three
students and a teacher. Shortly
afterwards, Israel Air Force jets
wmbed two targets in Sidon,
south Lebanon, said to be installa-
tions of the Palestine Liberation
Organization. Beirut radio said six
Israeli planes carried out the raid,
which lasted 15 minutes and caus-
ed heavy casualties.
The 122 mm. rocket struck the
school yard at 9:30 a.m. local time.
Two of the injured were hit by fly-
ing glass and two others were
hurt in a stampede to air raid
shelters. Order was quickly
restored and within an hour after
the attack youngsters were kick-
ing a soccer over and around the
crater left by the rocket in the
schoolyard.
Although Thursday's casualties
were minor, they were the first
casualties in Kiryat Shemona
since Israel invaded Lebanon in
June, 1982 with Premier
Menachem Begin's assurance that
rockets will never again fall in
Galilee.
Supreme Court Dodges
Voluntary Prayer Issues
WASHINGTON Whether or
not the Constitution permits
voluntary student prayer groups
in public schools was left undecid-
ed by a Supreme Court decision.
The Court sidestepped the issue
when it ruled, by a 5-4 vote, that a
former member of the school
board in Williamsport, Pa. has no
legal right to challenge a federal
district court decision upholding
the right of a Christian student
group, called Petros, to hold
prayer meetings.
In the majority opinion on the
case known as Bender v.
Williamsport, Justice John Paul
Stevens said that "an individual
board member cannot invoke the
board's interest in the case to con-
fer standing upon himself." He
also said that John Youngman Jr.,
the former board member, could
not show that he or his school-age
son were harmed by the meetings.
Peres Sees Mounting
Austerity Budget Opposition
JERUSALEM Premier
Shimon Peres, lobbying hard for
the new austerity budget, has run
into opposition from some
members of his own Labor Party
faction. A meeting of the faction
executive ended with no binding
commitment of support despite
Peres' warning that coalition
defections could spell the end of
the unity government.
Some Labor MKs said they
would vote for the budget on the
understanding that Peres will per-
suade the Treasury to cancel
measures they find objectionable.
The latter include an education
tax and a tax on old age pensions
whose recipients have additional
sources of income. The Labor
dissenters propose that the
government levy a new tax on
large homes and increase the
taxes on senior business ex-
ecutives who drive company cars.
N.Y. Schools Will
Remain Open Passover
NEW YORK New York City
School Chancellor Nathan
Quinones said that all public
schools will remain open on
Passover and warned the six com-
munity school boards which voted
to close their schools Apr. 24-25,
the first two days of the holiday,
that they would be superseded or
face suspension if they defy this
order.
Five of the local school boards
are in Queens, and one is in
Manhattan. They decided to close
their district elementary and in-
termediate schools because many
teachers will be absent and the
children will be improperly
supervised.
Two Jewish Mayors
Elected in S. Africa
JOHANNESBURG Two
leading Jewish political figures
have been elected mayors of
Johannesburg and Sandton.
Prof. Harold Rudolph, 38, serv-
ed for 14 years on the Johan-
nesburg City Council before being
inducted as the city's mayor
earlier this month. Rudolph, who
is associate professor at the V/its
University School of Law, is an
active Rotarian, past chairperson
of the Emmarentia Hebrew Con-
gregation, and vice chairperson of
the Transvaal Council of the
Jewish Board of Deputies.
Hazel Egdes-Shochet, 52, has
been a Sandton town councillor
for almost nine years before tak-
ing on the duties of mayor last
month. She was the town's
Mayoress as the wife of the late
Morris Egdes, Sandton's mayor in
1973. She was also the first
woman to be elected to the town's
management committee.
New Liberal Center
Party Shaping Up
JERUSALEM Yosef Lapid,
a senior editor of the daily
Maariv, was named Secretary
General of the newly formed
Liberal Center Party last Thurs-
day. He was appointed by the
party's unofficial leadership
Mayor Shlomo Lehat of Tel Aviv,
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, and
Yitzhak Berman, a former
Speaker of the Knesset.
The Liberal Center Party was
founded several months ago by
disaffected members of the
Liberal Party wing of Likud. It
will hold internal elections soon.
Camp David Anniversary
Almost Goes Unnoticed
WASHINGTON It almost
went unnoticed that it was the
seventh anniversary of the
Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty.
But Israeli Ambassador Meir
Rosenne reminded guests at an
Israeli Embassy reception for
visiting Tourism Minister
Avraham Sharir that it was on
March 26, 1979 that the treaty
was signed in Washington by
then-Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin and Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat.
While the treaty has not
brought about the full normaliza-
tion of relations the Israelis ex-
pected in 1979, Rosenne stressed
that for the last seven years no
soldier has been killed on either
side of the Egyptian-Israeli line.
Anti-Racist Bill
Compromise Offered
JERUSALEM The Orthodox
lobby in the Knesset, opposed to a
pending bill against racism, has
come up with a compromise ver-
sion that would outlaw acts
against ethnic or religious
minorities without specifically us-
ing the term racism.
The religious parties oppose the
original bill on grounds that its
broad formulations could be used
to prosecute religious dogmas and
practices.
QROWARD
[JAPER &
[PACKAGING
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 800 432 3708
LGROWARD
IJAPER 4
PACKAGING
OUR STRENGTH IS YOUR SECURITY
-^
JEFFERSON
NATIONAL BANKS
MIAMI BEACH with Trust Department. 301-300
Arthur Godtrey Road and 975 Arthur Godtrey
Road 532-6451 NORTH SHORE 948 Normandy
Drive 532-6451 KEY BISCAYNE 600 Crandon
Boulevard 361-6451 NORTH DADE 290 Sunny
Isles Boulevard and 18170 Collins Avenue 949-2121
Subsidiaries ol Jellerson Bancorp Inc
Members FDIC and federal Reserve System
we
can't
our
new
loan
rate
any
lower
on
five
year
loans |


Despite Evidence, Austria Shows Its Less Attractive Face
Bruno Kreisky is Austria's former
Chancellor. He is a self-hating Jew. He does
not confuse us. Cutting through all of the
charges and counter-charges that have put
Austria into a sweat ever since the story
broke that Kurt Waldheim. running for the
presidency, was a willing participant in Nazi
era atrocities against the Jews, Kreisky is
denying everything and so vociferously, it
seems, that Waldheim need hardly come to
his own defense.
In effect, Kreisky is like Robert Graf,
spokesman for the Peoples Party. Graf
warns that unless the charges "from
abroad" are withdrawn forthwith, abroad
meaning the World Jewish Congress,
Austria will not be responsible for the
powerful feelings of anti-Semitism they are
likely to muster in response.
Sinowatz Is Different
On the other side of this quaint operetta is
Austria's current Chancellor Fred Sinowatz.
He does confuse us for an Austrian. He
has, for example, made some very friendly
overtures toward Israel. Unlike his
predecessor, one of whose bosom pals is
PLO Chairman Yasir Arafat, Sinowatz has
also made some pretty sharp statements
about the Arab terrorist machine.
In response to Waldheim's argument last
week that old war photographs showing him
riding horse with well-known Nazis could
not possibly incriminate him, Sinowatz in-
sited that, of course not, Waldheim was not
a member of the SS. Only his horse was.
And answering Grafs threat of "renew-
ed" Austrian anti-Semitism unless a special
session of the Parliament were called to re-
ject foreign intervention in Austrian
politics, Sinowatz replied that no such ses-
sion was necessary. After all, said Sinowatz,
it is up to Waldheim to prove the charges un-
founded and that the government would not
intervene.
Wiesenthal A Puzzler
The only clear-cut picture in this terrible
flap is the one presented by Simon Wiesen-
thal, head of the Nazi war crimes documen-
tation center in Vienna. When the World
Jewish Congress first announced its
evidence against Waldheim, Wiesenthal
came quickly to his defense and in no uncer-
tain terms.
But this week, Wiesenthal set his sights
instead on Yugoslavia, whose authorities, he
declared must be more vigorous in their
checking into why allegations against
Waldheim's Nazi past were not pursued as
early as 1947 when they were first made.
"Sloth" and "laziness" is how Wiesenthal
sees it now, still leaving himself an out that
"the suspicions were not justified" as an
ultimate possibility. But then, it was
Wiesenthal whose own pursuit of the
"Angel of Death," Dr. Josef Mengele, ended
on an operetta note all its own.
Apparently, with Chancellor Sinowatz at
the helm, Austria these days is in the kind of
good hands it has never appreciated and still
doesn't want. Not even the good Simon
Wiesenthal can brook charges against so
eminent an Austrian as Waldheim, who was
after all once Secretary General of the
United Nations.
Let alone the self-hating Jew, Bruno
Kreisky.
Jewish Florxdian
PfcoMr J7. 4M1S
OTFKTf .^^LANT IJONE x.W M- FU jjijj
PO talliri **. Hond. 13101
PREDK &HOCHKT IHiMIVIH.lv SUZANNE SHOTMH
Amotmw Kd-ur Euruliv* Kdiua
TtellnWlHllHh Hi Mil ir.....TXHWniH.
>
M"W W*l, Eran '"->>r IK7 b, TW knt Elllltn
HiMliCT Piiiib PadiwMiy Eta U3PSI7U30
'III....... 'mmiUnmlmnMUmHWpl
aUMCn'TION RATES In AO*ar> ILOcal AfMI Ovt VM,-S1A00 TWO Vm#*-S340O IhN
*! w00 Suppta"**"' '..# .Local A>aa E.rsi f'MSay aacn mom* ito ima topi
Juna 13 90 OutoHown Co,,' ', jpOAH
Friday, April 4. 1986
Volume 59
, ,
JWV's 90th Anniversary
The Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A.
celebrated its 90th anniversary as the na-
tion's oldest, active veterans organization
on Mar. 15. It was on that day, in 1896, that
a group of Jewish Civil War veterans first
met and pledged to give the lie to malicious,
anti-Semitic slanders that painted Jews as
unpatriotic parasites who didn't serve their
country.
Those Jewish veterans present at that
first meeting had, between them, not less
than 218 medals awarded for their part in
the Civil War and they represented less
than one third of one percent of the Jews
known to have served.
Jews have been involved in America's
military history from this country's pre-
Revolutionary War beginning and have
served this country faithfully and valiantly,
in every military conflict.
The Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A. is
dedicated to maintaining true allegiance to
the United States of America; upholding the
fair name of the Jew and fighting his battles
wherever unjustly assailed; encouraging the
doctrine of universal liberty, equal rights.
and full justice to all men and women; com-
bating bigotry wherever it originates and
whatever its target; supporting comrades
and their families; aiding fellow veterans
and preserving the memories and records of
patriotic service performed by men and
women of our faith.
We salute the JWV on its 90th anniver-
sary. As one of this nation's many patriotic
voices, the JWV deserves all our
congratulations.
Activists Protest
They Want To Hear Louis Farrakhan
24 2 ADAR 5746
Number 14
.. ,
By RICHARD GRUNBERGER
London Chronicle Syndicate
LONDON A pathetic
anniversary: 50 years after
the East End's victory over
racism in the Battle of Cable
Street, some black activists
in the East End protest at
the ban on Louis Farrakhan,
the American Black Muslim
leader, entering Britain.
The ban will prevent them
hearing tributes to Hitler's
greatness and denunciations of
"lying Judaism" from Far-
rakhan's own lips. They will also
miss his warning to the Jews
"You can't say 'Never Again' to
God. because when he puts you in
the ovens, it's forever!" which
drew applause from a large black
audience in the United States.
What is the background to the
Farrakhan phenomenon, the
latest manifestation of black
separatism? In its original form,
in Marcus Garvey's Back-to-
Africa movement of the 1920s, it
was avowedly pro-Zionist.
THEN, after the Second World
War. the Black Muslims harness-
ed burgeoning black con-
sciousness to Islam (incidentally,
in hlatant disregard of the cruciai
Arab involvement in the African
slave trade). The Muslims acted as
a conduct for the spread of anti-
Israel sentiment among U.S.
blacks.
The late 1960s saw "long hot
summers" of Harlem and Watts,
entailing attacks on Jewish pro-
perty in those areas. (Jews formed
the bulk of shopkeepers in U.S.
black ghettoes the way Indians do
in Handsworth, Birmingham.)
Black anti-Semitism was assum-
ed to have passed its climax with
the 1969 New York school strike
when a pupil's poem entitled
"Hey. Jewboy. I wish you were
dead." was broadcast by a local
radio station.
What motivates Farrakhan to
revive it? It cannot be ignorance
of the fact that the Jews have
done more for black emancipation
than any other segment of
American "white" society.
JEWS SUPPLIED two of the
six founder members of the Na-
Louis Farrakhan
tional Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People as
long ago as 1909. They were
disproportionately involved in the
Urban League, and such radical
groupings as CORE and the New
Left.
When, in the course of the 1960s
civil rights agitation, Mississippi
rednecks shot three members of
the Students Non-Violent Coor-
dinating Committee dead, two of
the victims bore the names
Schwirmer and Goodman.
Jewish martyrs for the black
cause were not only to be found in
the U.S.A. In South Africa, Ruth
First paid with her life for pro-
ANC activity, and Helen Joseph
endured ten years' house arrest.
When Nelson Mandela and
Walter Sisulu stood trial in 1963.
their co-defendants were D.
Goldberg. L. Bernstein, J. Kan-
tor, H. Wolpe and A. Goldreich.
From Torch Commando leader
Kane-Berman via Progressive MP
Helen Suzman to the novelist
Nadine Gordimer, Jews have been
in the forefront of opposition to
the apartheid regime since its
inception.
FRANCE SHOWS a similar
picture, with Leon Blume the first
Premier to appoint a black to a
colonial governorship (in the
1930s) and Andre Schwarzbart
prominent among writers
pleading the black cause.
Could it be the fact th;it .lews
have exerted themselves undulv
on their behalf that makes a
number of blacks espouse anti-
Semitism? Psychology has reveal
ed the structure of" the human
mind to be convoluted, not t. Bay
twisted.
Post-war history shows a coun-
try like France, that owed its
liberation and economic revival
largely to the U.S., displaying bla-
tant anti-Americanism (rememlier
de Gaulle?). The Awareness of a
debt of gratitude can be as much
of a burden as any other form of
debt.
Perhaps Farrakhan's sup-
porters have, by some strange
trick of logic, convince'!
themselves that Jewish defense of
their cause was just a more subtle
form of colonization, of white
liberal condescension. It is hard to
know.
Two things are certain.
however. Farrakhan is twingine
the anti-Semitic drum not becaua
Angela Davis and Stokely Car-
michael stood in slotu pupilaris
to Marcuse and Kahn. but because
Hitler-worship sends shock wave-
through the American ImhIv politic
and attracts huge publicity.
(There is, moreover, in the black
ghettoes, where Cadillacs arc
known as Jew canoes, a reservoir
of anti-Jewish feeling to be
tapped.)
THE SECOND point is this:
Farrakhan-8tyle anti-Semitism is
in danger of being imported into
this country. Its potential pro-
moters are the Hackney Black
People's Association (who both in-
vited the Black Fuehrer and pro-
tested at the Home Office ban on
him), ultra-Leftists beavering
away among British blacks on
behalf of the PLO, and such self
appointed tribunes of the people
as barrister Rudy Narayan.
In his book, "Black England''
(Doscarla Publishers, 1977).
Narayan wrote: "The Jews own
most of Britain Their control
over the media is absolute One
cannot help but believe that they
operate to a master plan for a
takeover of the world." We have
been warned.


i >


Rightwing Reagan
Bloc Pressures
Shultz Ouster
Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
London Chronicle Syndicate
WASHINGTON -
Secretary of State George
Shultz is facing mounting
criticism from rightwing
conservative supporters of
President Reagan. They
have waged an intense bat-
tle in recent months to try
to force him out of the Ad-
ministration. Simply put,
they believe that he is too
"moderate" on many
foreign policy issues,
especially in connection
with the Soviet Union.
For these conservatives who
are very loyal to Reagan, it is
politically much easier to complain
about Shultz than about the Presi-
dent, who has very consistently
supported the Secretary's stance
on most foreign policy issues. The
conservatives say they primarily
want Shultz out because of his
clearly impressive clout with
Reagan and other senior U.S.
policymakers, especially the
powerful White House Chief of
Staff. Donald Regan. Since suc-
ceeding Alexander Haig in June,
1982. Shultz has almost always
managed to get his way.
THE SECRETARY, while
understandably sensitive to
criticism from the rightwing of
the Republican Party, is showing
no signs of leaving the State
Department. That makes Israeli
officials and pro-Israeli sup-
porters in Congress and the
American Jewish community
quite happy. They are hoping that
he remains exactly where he is.
The Secretary has emerged in re-
cent years as a great friend of
Israel.
A decision by Shultz to resign,
they said, could be extremely
damaging to Israel right now,
especially because it would come
on the heels of Robert
McFarlane's departure as White
House National Security Adviser
in December. McFarlane, who
almost always sided with Israel's
point of view on key decisions in-
volving the Middle East, was
replaced by Admiral John
Poindexter, a career Naval officer
considerably less robust in his
sympathy for and attachment to
Israel.
Earlier last year, UN Am-
bassador Jeane Kirkpatrick,
another outstanding supporter of
Israel, resigned. Fortunately for
Israel, her replacement, Am-
bassador Vernon Walters, has
emerged as another strong friend
even if at a somewhat lower
profile.
That Shultz has become as such
a great champion of Israel is
somewhat surprising, given his
background with Bechtel, the San
Francisco-based engineering con-
sulting firm with huge contracts
in Saudi Arabia and other oil-rich
Arab states. After his appoint-
ment, there were real fears
among Israeli officials and their
supporters in Washington that the
new Secretary would move the
U.S. away from Israel.
BUT THAT has certainly not
occurred. Instead, Shultz has
demonstrated a keen sensitivity to
Israeli interests economic,
military and diplomatic.
Most recently, U.S. officials
said, it was Shultz who played the
decisive behind-the-scenes role in
trying quickly to repair the
damage in American-Israeli rela-
tions caused by the Jonathan Jay
Pollard spy scandal.
While the wounds have not yet
been entirely healed from that
sordid affair and the possibility
of revived friction is still real once
the secret Grand Jury meeting in
Washington files its formal indict-
ments against Pollard and his
wife, Anne Henderson-Pollard
the current climate in
Washington-Jerusalem relations
is almost back to normal. Israeli
officials are the first to credit
Shultz for this.
Coincidentally, Minister without
Portfolio Moshe Arens had been
in Washington when the Pollard
incident initially erupted. Arens, a
former Defense Minister and Am-
bassador to the United States, had
met Shultz that very first day.
TOGETHER, they set in mo-
tion the events which eventually
led to Israel's diplomatically un-
precedented decision to allow a
high-level delegation from the
State Department, the Justice
Department, the Federal Bureau
of Investigation and the U.S. At-
torney's Office in Washington to
visit Israel. There, they met the
key Israeli intelligence operatives
implicated in the affair. They also
received all of the stolen
documents from Israel.
Shultz, moreover, had been in
close personal contact with Prime
Minister Shimon Peres
throughout that ordeal. "We were
very lucky that he (Shultz) was in
charge," one Israeli official said.
"It could have turned out much
worse for us."
The Secretary has established a

Secretary of State George Shultz (right) in
talks with West Germany's Foreign Minister
Hans-Dietrich Genscher in Berlin last
December.
very good personal relationship
with Arens, Peres, Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Deputy
Prime Minister and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
other Israeli leaders. He likes
them, and they like him. These
personal ties have created a new
climate of trust between
Washington and Jerusalem. In-
deed, U.S. and Israeli officials in-
sist that American-Israeli rela-
tions are today still better than
ever before, despite Pollard.
Without Shultz in the equation,
however, the situation could very
easily suffer.
It is somewhat ironic that the
rightwing conservatives should
complain so actively about Shultz
since he has probably been the
most forceful advocate within the
Administration in getting tough
with terrorism against the United
States.
SHULTZ much more than
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger, Central Itelligence
Agency Director William Casey,
and even President Reagan
himself has repeatedly called
for a firm U.S. response in dealing
with the terrorists and their state
sponsors, including the use of
military measures. In the process,
he has sounded very much like
Israeli leaders defending their
own actions against Arab
terrorists.
"We must be prepared to com-
mit our political, economic and, if
necessary, military power when
the threat is still manageable and
when its prudent use can prevent
Continued on Page 12-A
Earl Warren Predicted It
Human Rights Bow to Military Rule
Capt. Goldman experienced no
opposition until he served as witness.
By JILL H. K AHN
Chief Justice Earl War-
ren, more than 20 years
ago, noted that "our citizens
in uniform may not be strip-
ped of basic rights simply
because they have doffed
their civilian clothes."
The observation was put to the
test last week and lost when the
Supreme Court decided in the
Goldman v. Weinberger case
whether the government can pro-
hibit a religiously observant Air
Force captain from wearing a yar-
mulke on duty.
The Anti-Defamation League
previously filed an amicus brief
supporting the right to wear a
yarmulke while in uniform. The
brief argued that the fundamental
right to freely exercise one's
religious beliefs guaranteed by the
First Amendment must, in this
case, take precedence over Air
Force dress regulations. The
Court did not agree.
CAPTAIN Simcha Goldman,
who brought the issue to the
Court's attention, is an Orthodox
rabbi and served for two years as
a Navy chaplain. In 1979, after
completing a PhD in psychology
under the Armed Forces Health
Professions Scholarship Program,
Captain Goldman entered the Air
Force as a clinical psychologist.
For the next three years, he
wore a yarmulke at all times while
on duty (mainly in the base
hospital). He received consistently
outstanding performance evalua-
tions, including specific ratings on
attitude, dress, cooperation and
bearing. No objection was raised
regarding his religious practice.
In 1981, however, when Captain
Jill L. Kahn is an assistant
director of the Legal Affairs
Department of ADL's Civil
Rights Division.
Goldman testified as a defense
witness at a court-martial pro-
ceeding, the hospital commandant
received a complaint alleging that
wearing a yarmulke while in
uniform violated Air Force dress
regulations.
The regulation, AFR 35-10, sets
necessary to ensure the re-
quirements of an effective and ef-
ficient fighting force: teamwork,
motivation, discipline, esprit de
corps and image. The military con-
tended that any departure from
the regulation would adversely af-
fect these goals.
Judge Robinson, however,
found that this argument was not
supported by evidence. The Cap-
tain's wearing of a yarmulke did
not adversely affect his perfor-
mance, or the operations of the
'amicus7 argued religious
freedom must take priority.
forth detailed provisions regar-
ding the wearing of headgear and
includes the following: "(2)
Headgear will not be worn: ...(f)
While indoors except by armed
security police in the performance
of their duties."
The commandant subsequently
ordered the captain to cease wear-
ing his yarmulke while in uniform
on the base, withdrew a positive
recommendation for his service
extension and threatened a court-
martial if he continued his
religious practice. Captain
Goldman filed suit in a federal
district court to enjoin the
military from applying AFR
35-10, as it "related to his wearing
a yarmulke for religious reasons."
AT THE trial, District Judge
Aubrey E. Robinson, Jr., analyzed
the competing and seemingly an-
tithetical claims of the Air Force
and Captain Goldman. Expert
witnesses for the military testified
that adherence to AFR 35-10 is
base hospital. In fact, Judge
Robinson declared, exceptions to
AFR 35-10 for legitimate reasons
"may enhance the effectiveness of
the Air Force by dissipating
hostility over minor matters and
thus contribute to a perception of
the Air Force as a less rigid, more
humane institution."
The district court granted Cap-
tain Goldman's request for an in-
junction against the military.
THE AIR FORCE appealed the
district court's decision and won a
reversal by the District of Colum-
bia Court of Appeals. While the
appellate court described the
regulations as "necessarily ar-
bitrary," it ruled that the "Air
Force's interest in uniformity
renders the strict enforcement of
its regulation permissible" even
against competing free exercise
rights.
The appellate court decision was
Continued on Page 14-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
Brazil's Jews Study Role As Parliamentary Elections Approach
By MANUEL TENENBAUM
SAO PAULO (JTA) -
Brazil's advancement on the road
to democracy and the forthcoming
Parliamentary elections have
sparked widespread debate within
the Jewish community as to its
stance regarding the elections and
vis-a-vis the democratic process in
general, the World Jewish Con-
gress reported here.
As a sign of the new democratic
era, elections for the Constituent
Assembly have become an issue
for heated polemics within the
Jewish community, particularly
among its institutional leaders.
"What should the community
do?" they are asking, "give its
support to individual candidates?
Promote Jewish candidates?"
THIS POLEMIC, which
reflects the changes that
democracy has brought to the
Jewish communities of South
America, is being waged entirely
in the open, and organs such as
Resfnka Judau-a. the Jewish com-
munal newspaper here, give it
publicity without inhibition.
Benno Milnitzky, president of
the Confederacao Israelita do
Brasil and president-elect of the
WJC Latin American branch,
stated:
"The community, since it is not
a political party and is integrated
into the civilian Brazilian society,
cannot have direct representation
in the Constituent Assembly.
What it can do is to participate in
the procedure, acting within the
Assembly, to ensure that the con-
stitution to be approved contains
safeguards considered indispen-
sable for the proper functioning of
the law."
Questioned by a reporter on
whether there are conditions for
the community's support of in-
dividual candidates, Milnitzky
replied in the negative. He added
that "The candidates represent
parties with varying, and even op-
posing, ideologies. It is the com-
munity's duty, however, to guide
the voters who belong to it with
regard to the various ideologies
and concerning candidates who, in
one way or another manner, are
hostile to the community."
JOSE KNOPLICH, president
of the Jewish Federation of Sao
Paulo, wrote in an article that
"The Federation will not remain
with- folded arms in these for-
thcoming elections, and intends to
mobilize the yishuv (Jewish com-
munity) so that Sao Paulo may
have a Jewish representation in
the Constituent Assembly."
Knoplich explained that the Sao
Paulo Federation will make sure
that the most important parties,
when appointing candidates of
Jewish origin, do so in contact
with the Federation "so as to
avoid harmful divisions."
Another well-known Jewish
leader. Marcos Arbaitman, feels
that community leadership should
capable of being elected, in order
to avoid the dispersal and waste of
Jewish votes. '
LEADERS OF the Sao Paui0
Hebraica, Bernardo Goldfarb i.
tervened in the debate to state
that "The Jewish Federate I
not qualified to indicate
anybody," adding, "We have to
defend our interests vis-a-vis the
entire Constituent Assembly, and
make the elected candidates
aware of the community's point of
view."
Since the establishment of the
civilian regime in Brazil a year
ago, there has been an avalanche
of appointments of Jewish public
officials in the State and
municipal administration Some
are linked to the Jewish communi-
ty, many are not.
She's one tough cookie.
So she gets more
extra Medicare
benefits today
She's not getting older. She's getting tougher.
The actors, the singers, the dancers can pitch
away but she's not going with any extra benefits
Medicare plan until she knows the facts. That's
why she's with CAC's Medicare Plus,' today.
Bottom line is Medicare Plus' offers more benefits
at no cost to you than any other plan:
NO COST- Unlimited hospital days.
NO COST- Medical and Dental check ups.
NO COST Emergency care. j
NO COST-Hearing aids.
NO COSTRoutine dental services.
NO COST- Routine Podiatry.
The list goes on and on. And, the cost to you
for the entire plan is absolutely nothing.
CAC is Florida's oldest HMO, and we have a
vast network of centers and physicians to serve
you. Our song and dance may not be as slick as
some of the others, but none have a better plan.
So call CAC today. And get together with the
best plan in the business. More benefits at no
cost to you.
In Dade: 444-5533
Outside Dade: 1-800-432-2026
Corporate Offices
2850 Douglas Rd., Coral Gables, FL 33134
Medicare
PlusS
Comprehensive American Care
More benefits
than any other plan
at no cost to you.


Christian
Schools Say
Teacher-Hiring
Protected
By Law
Bv AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Supreme Court has
heard arguments in-
cluding amicus (friend of
the court) briefs by the
American Jewish Congress,
American Jewish Commit-
tee, and the National Com-
mission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA) in a case
involving a religious
school's claim that its
policies on the employment
of teachers are protected by
the First Amendment.
The case involves the Dayton
Christian Schools (DCS), a consor-
tium <>f evangelical schools in
Ohio, and its refusing to rehire.
and then its firing, one of its
female elementary teachers. The
DCS justified both actions on
grounds that the teacher's
behavior was contrary to its
religious beliefs. The Ohio Civil
Rights Commission considered
both actions to be violations of the
state's anti-discrimination
statute.
THE SUPREME Court will
have to decide whether a religious
school's policy that its teachers
adhere to its religous beliefs as a
condition of employment can be
defended on First Amendment
grounds.
If it can. then this policy, as a
religious right, overrides anti-bias
laws. This would obviously have
implications for Jewish religious
schools' employment policies.
The case began in January,
1979. when born-again Christian
Linda Hoskinson was a teacher at
DCS' elementary school. After
she informed her principal that
she would have a baby in the fall,
he told her she would not be
rehired in September. His reason:
the school's religious beliefs in-
clude the tenet that mothers
should stay home with their young
children and therefore she would
not be an appropriate role model
as a teacher.
Hoskinson discussed this with
her attorney, who wrote the
school a letter threatening a
lawsuit. The school then fired
Hoskinson at once, for violating
another of its religious beliefs
breaking the "Biblical chain-of-
command" by seeking the advice
of an outside, secular, authority
in this case, her attorney.
IN MARCH, 1979, Hoskinson
filed a suit with the Ohio Civil
Rights Commission under the
state's anti-discrimination law,
charging that the DCS had engag-
ed in sex discrimination and illegal
retaliation. The Commission
found in her favor, and the federal
district court, which heard the
DCS' suit, upheld the
Commission.
The DCS took the case to the
Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals,
where it won on constitutional
grounds. The appellate tribunal
declared that state interference
with the DCS's selection of
religious role models, such as
teachers, constituted "a substan-
tial burden on religious freedom."
The Commission then took- the
case to the Supreme Court.
The briefs of the American
Jewish Committee and of COLPA
"Pheld the DCS position. The
American Jewish Committee brief
said that "the state may not com-
pel a private religious school and
the parents and students atten-
ding (it) to violate their sincerely
held religious beliefs by requiring
the school to continue to employ a
teacher who acts contrary to
those beliefs."
Dr. Joseph Schenker, head of the Department ofGynecology and
Obstetrics at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center,
visits Nina Calderon, mother of triplets conceived and brought to
term in Hadassah s Test-Tube Baby Program.
COLPA HELD that any
government proceeding into "the
selection, termination or assign-
ment of personnel who participate
in the religious mission of a
religious institution" violates the
First Amendment.
The American Jewish Congress
brief, however, supports the DCS
on constitutional grounds only on
its refusal to rehire Hoskinson.
and then, only by applying one of
the two clauses in the First
Amendment, the "free exercise"
clause.
Under the interpretation of this
clause which mandates people's
right to practice their religion
unimpeded by government a
religious institution may be ex-
empted from adhering to a law if
its action is "religiously
motivated" and if its exemption is
not outweighed by a "compelling
state interest."
The AJCongress argues, as
well, that this clause does not pro-
tect the DCS action on the firing
of Hoskinson. It regards the
state's interst in preventing
retaliation such as firing
against persons who file suits
under anti-discrimination laws as
sufficiently compelling to
outweight the school's religious
concerns.
Marburg Honors Jewish Theologian
BONN (JTA) The
municipal council of the university
town of Marburg, overriding ob-
jections by local residents, voted
unanimously to rename a street in
honor of Leopold Lucas, a Jewish
theologian who died in the There-
sientadt concentration camp in
1943.
Lucas was the founder in 1902
of an association for Jewish
studies in Marburg. Householders
on the street to be renamed for
him protested that they did not
want to be issociated with Lucas
or his fate. But Mayor Hanno
Drechsler of Marburg replied that
the street name will be a reminder
of the thousands of other Marburg
Jews who perished in the
Holocaust. Lucas' wife, Dorothea,
died in Auschwitz in 1944.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me. Esther, 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
cgceccicccig ORLANDO KOSHER FOOD
STAGECOACH RESORT INN ;
featuring \
ORLANDO S FIRST KOSHER RESTAURANT
ONLY 10 MINUTES TO
WALT DISNEY WORLD VACATION KINGDOM
FREE SHUTTLE BUS
rFULLAMERlCAN PLAN sp_clA
s49 s54 passov
[wmioni iis>mioi PACKAG
>ccupancy NOW
Includes Accommodations. AVMLAB
\ breakfast mrnirlunch and dinner
TOLL FREE RESERVATIONS:
1-800-327-9155 (U.S.) 1-800-432-9198 (FL.)
lit
or call your travel agenl
Snomer SnaBnos Eiuv
Cholov Y.sroei available Synagogue on proccly
STAGECOACH RESORT INN
4311 W. VINE ST.. KISSIMMEE. FL. 32741 (305) 3964213
Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Ban Sought on Military Move
To Restrict Yarmulke-Wearing
Continued from Page 1-A
stitutional rights, especially when
they need not conflict," Schumer
said. The Congressman, who
represents a Brooklyn district in
which a large number of Orthodox
Jews live, noted that a yarmulka
is essentially unobtrusive.
"If the military is concerned
about regulations and standard
uniforms, then let them design a
yarmulka that Jews who so desire
can wear." Schumer said. "All
that is required is a simple cover-
ing of the head." He added that
"wearing of the yarmulka while in
uniform certainly hasn't under-
mined the effectiveness of the
Israeli army."
In a related development, Den-
nis Rapps, executive director and
general counsel of COLPA, said
the organization would try to put
together a coalition of various
religious minorities to work
towards a legislative resolution of
the yarmulka issue.
CONGRESS, said Rapps.
should study whether it accepts
the military's position that "a
member of a religious minority
has to sacrifice a practice of his or
her faith because the military ar-
bitrarily (states) that it will under-
mine the individual's ability to
perform his or her military
mission."
Rapps stressed that he did not
hold that every religious practice
has to be accommodated. It would
have to be evaluated whether or
not it compromises the perfor-
mance of military duties. But if it
does not and in the case of the
yarmulka. not one of the courts
which had heard the case thought
it did "why should the military
have untrammeled discretion" to
veto it?
"How can we accept that?"
Rapps continued. "Why should so-
meone have to sacrifice religious
practices to participate fully in
American life? This runs counter
to our concept of a pluralistic
society."
M
JEWISH
rvvnoiw.
FUID
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer...
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
4. The JNF needs you but you need
the JNF much more
The JNF gives life to the desert
And strength to Israel
K*r*n
Dorot A*re*
m*"1
IEW6H
IWlOfW
nra>
lKe>n Kyemelh Leivael) Inc
Yes. I am
interested in
becoming a Keren
Dorot donor.
Name.___________
Address
City.State.Zip
Phone _______
a>3-^
_*Vv>7*>_t
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Rd., #353
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
538-6464
>__o<


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
'Conciliatory Tone9
Religious Groups Eye Jews in 2000
By B.Z. LEUCHTER
PRINCETON, N.J. -
(JTA) Leaders of four ma-
jor national groups Con-
servative, Reconstruc-
tionist, Reform and Or-
thodox were among the
featured speakers at a two-
day conference here on the
subject "Will There Be One
Jewish People by the Year
2000?" Each addressed the
issues of Jewish unity and
diversity.
Some observers termed the
conference "historic" not only
because of the stature of the par-
ticipants in a conference dealing
with Jewish pluralism, but
because of the conciliatory tone of
the speeches.
Featured speakers were Rabbi
Gerson Cohen, chancellor of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America (Conservative); Ira
Silver-man, president of the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical Col-
lege; Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
(Reform); and Rabbi Norman
Lamm, president of Yeshiva
University (Orthodox).
THE CONFERENCE was
sponsored by the National Center
for Learning and Leadership
(CLAL) in cooperation with the
UJA-Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York and the
United Jewish Federation of
Metro West, New Jersey.
Other speakers included Elie
Wiesel, chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council;
Charles Silberman, author of the
current best-selling book, "A Cer-
tain People: American Jews and
Their Lives Today;" and Rabbi Ir-
ving Greenberg, president of
CLAL. The gathering was chaired
by Sol Kimerling of Birmingham,
Alabama.
Stressing his acceptance of
"pluralism within halacha,"
Lamm declared that no Orthodox
Jew is true to the Jewish tradition
if he refuses to recognize non-
observant Jews as Jewish. He said
that it is an "egregious error,
fatuous and self-defeating" for
Orthodox Jews to seek to
delegitimize all other Jews.
ALTHOUGH a similar attempt
by Prof. Saul Lieoerman of the
Jewish Theological Seminary and
Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik failed
some 30 years ago, Lamm recom-
mended "new attempts to
establish a national Beit Din" to
rule on cases of gittin and
mamzerim (divorces and children
born from unions considered
"illegitimate" by halacha). He
said branches of the rabbinic
courts could be set up throughout
the country, and in his opinion
rabbis who observed halacha per-
sonally (even if non-Orthodox)
could serve on such courts.
Lamm asserted that Orthodox
leaders as well as Conservative
and Reform spokespersons ought
to become "more civil in their
rhetoric" and "eliminate striden-
cy" in their public
pronouncements.
Schindler voiced some self-
criticism. "In my volleys with Or-
thodoxy," he said, "I have in the
heat of response to what I saw as
attack more than once indulged in
the anger of the outcast, using
words and invoking images and
bitter analogies which I now
regret." And, apparently referr-
ing to the issue of patrilineal des-
cent, the Reform leader added:
"I CONFESS, too, that there
were times when I did not take in-
to account the halachic difficulties
that certain Reform innovations
present to Orthodox Jews. I have
responded in kind to the intran-
sigence and zeal of Orthodoxy's
most extreme spokespersons, us-
ing their scorn as an excuse for
not truly striving to lessen the
pain of others."
Schindler stressed, however,
that his self-criticism should not
be interpreted as a "retreat from
any of the steps taken by Reform
Judaism this past decade only
that these steps may have seemed
less precipitous and threatening
had we achieved a higher level of
dialogue in advance of public
pronouncement.''
He lashed out at what he termed
"religious triumphalism," which,
he said, "must be banished from
our table That Orthodoxy,
which I was taught to revere as a
young man, manifested a good
deal of modesty. It did not lay
claim to an all-exclusive authen-
ticity. It did not presume to know
with a certainty what the Holy
One, blessed be He, demanded,
and whom He deemed acceptable
in His eyes. It did not wear armor
in the name of righteousness or
wield the sword to trim the beards
of other Jews."
Schindler asked for the
"emergence and amplification of
more Orthodox voices such as
those of Yitz Greenberg and
Emanuel Rackman and Eliezer
Berkovits.. The genius of these
men," he said, "is in building
bridges, not citadels of
intolerance."
COHEN ASSERTED that
"behind the scenes, the religious
leadership of this Jewish com-
munity is bound by friendship."
and he voiced the need for a "joint
and long-standing committee to
meet behind closed doors." It
should include Orthodox, Reform,
Conservative, Reconstruction!sts
and secularists, he said, "but
don't expect the approval of the
Israeli religious establishment. It
will depend on the will of the
Jewish laity."
Silverman, president of the
Reconstructinist Rabbinical Col-
lege for the past five years, said:
"We have to overcome what
divides us," and he called for the
creation of "joint standards for
conversion and divorce."
In his keynote address to the
conference, Wiesel recalled the
"destructive mood that reigned in
Jerusalem before its destruction,"
and he asked: "Are we ap-
proaching an era of gratuitous
hate?"
Wiesel said that "fanaticism in-
spires fear" in him. "What we
Jews need most now," he said, is
"awareness and understanding"
of the positions of other Jews.
REITERATING his belief that
there is a "serious risk of a split in
the Jewish people by the year
2000," Greenberg said 90 percent
of the Jewish people don't want a
split. Unfortunately, he added,
"what they want is the next vic-
tory," and he described "the split-
ting forces" as getting stronger.
"We have the wrong priorities,"
he said, "We're spending $10
million a year on relations with
Christians and only a small frac-
tion of that amount on relations
among ourselves. We must spend
enough energy getting to know
other Jews."
Greenberg, the founder of
CLAL (previously known as the
National Jewish Resource
Center), claimed that the level on
intra-Jewish dialogue is less than
our dialogue with Christians 50
years ago. He said that "philan-
thropy has funded the growth of
the extreme right" in Jewish life.
"It should fund outreach among
ourselves," and he stressed "the
pressure of lay people" as having
"a crucial role to play in the
process."
Messages of encouragement
from Israel's President Chaim
Herzog and Prime Minister
Shimon Peres were read to con-
ference participants.
The goals of the conference, as
articulated by Klara Silverstein of
New York, one of the co-
chairpersons, were "to mobilize
Jewish leaders to take a stand
against polarization "

YOU CAN BUY IS 3500
YEARS 0U>.
The Mountain Valley Water being bottled today fell as
rain over Hot Springs. Arkansas. 3500 years ago. when
there were no pollutants, no urban wastes, no additives
It flows from the earth today pure and enriched with a
complement of good minerals, including calcium and
magnesium
MOUNTAIN VALUE Y WATER
SPRING WATER FROM HOT SPRINGS. ARK
Purely for drinking. _.*.
DADE BROWARD j^V
696-1333 563-6114 v
P
Actress Patricia Neal accepts the B'naiB'rith Women's Perlman
Award for Human Advancement for her work in rehabilitating
the handicapped. The award, the highest given by BBW, was
presented during the organization's Biennial Convention in Las
Vegas. From left are BBW Past President Anita Perlman. Presi-
dent Beverly Davis, Miss Neal, and newly-elected President Irmn
Gertler
The An Crrc.t'C-eC
Cftouin
MOTEL

GLATT
Directly on the Ocean
40th to 41st Sts
Miami Beach
APRIL/PASSOVER
Any5Days $125 Any4Days $95
& 4 Nights
papMM
douDteocc
March 9 to April 15 f March 9 to April 15
S. 3 Nights p*"*
Plus Tax & Tips INCLUDING MEALS
OftOUf* RAIIS AVAMABU
Reserve Now For The
PASSOVER HOLIDAYS
Sedurlm & Services Conducted by Cantor
SOLOMON SCHIFF
YOUf Host* TT> irfcOwWl 'omily ft Aji Smilow Anoc
Phone: 531-5771
BHfcJH
You've
I !r|
Got What
It
Takes...
(And You May Not Even Know It)
t I i I i
Help Those In Need...
And Help Yourself To A
Tax Deduction At The
Same Time. '
The Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops can use your
gifts of resaleable furniture,
appliances, and household
goods. Items YOU may no
longer need will buy life-
giving medicines and
medical supplies for the
indigent residents of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. For free
pick-up of your donations
simply call:
Dade: 751-3988
Broward: 981-8245
D
ouglas
Gardens
Thrift Shops
Two convenient locations:
5713 N.W. 27th Ave, Miami
3149 Hallandale Beach Blvd.. Hallandale
A division of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for me Aged at Douglas Gardens


Signature Does It
Waldheim Incriminates Himself
Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
U.S. Lawmakers Demand Israel
Have Control of West Bank
Continued from Page 1-A
and researched by Prof. Robert
Herzstein of the University of
South Carolina, who recently
served as an expert witness for
the U.S. Department of Justice.
THE PHOTOGRAPHIC
documents released show that
Waldheim was a senior in-
telligence officer. The tasks to
which he was assigned, according
to Herzstein, went beyond respon-
sibility for interrogating prisoners
of war and included capturing
civilians aged 14 and above from
whom information '.'was extracted
by the most brutal methods of
torture."
In the documents he signed,
Waldheim reports on what were
called "cleansing" (Snuberung)
operations in Bosnia, Yugoslavia,
in 1942, "cleansing" being the
Nazi term for mass murders. The
documents refer to the killing of
about 6,000 "partisans" with a
loss to the Germans of 71 dead.
Other captured secret Nazi
documents signed by Waldheim
refer to Vernehmung, a
euphemism for interrogation
under torture. They also indicate
Waldheim participated in one of
the worst atrocities of the Nazis in
the Balkans, the Kozara
massacres of 1942 in which 1,626
partisans were killed, nearly 9,000
captured, and 431 persons shot to
death as reprisals. Waldheim's
name appears on a list of 30
honoring Nazi troops for the "an-
nihilation of the enemy," a
reference to the Kozara
massacres.
HERZSTEIN AND Eli Rosen
baum, WJC legal counsel, com-
mented on the singularity of a
25-year-old lieutenant in charge of
such major operations.
The documents detail the
organizational structure for
Waldheim's command, including
his duties and responsibilities.
Waldheim was one of two, and
Arab Family Arrested on Charges
Implicating Them In Slaying
JERUSALEM (JTA) Six
members of an Arab family, in-
cluding a mother of five children,
were arrested recently in connec-
tion with the kidnap-slaying of an
Israeli soldier, Sgt. David Manos,
whose remains were found in a
cave in the West Bank on Mar. 14,
police sources disclosed last week.
They identified the suspects as
Lamia Abdallah and her husband,
Tawfik. from Dir Baloot village in
the Samaria district of the West
Bank; Tahseen and Najah Ab-
dallah. a related couple; Mustapha
Abdallah. a construction worker;
and Mohammad Abdallah, a
teacher. Lamia Abdallah, who
grew up in Brazil and holds
Brazilian citizenship, was arrested
a day after she gave birth to her
fifth child.
According to the police, the
suspects are not affiliated with
any known terrorist organization
but apparently decided to kidnap
1 loll/man Cited
KENT, Ohio (JTA) -
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman received the
National Association of Holocaust
Educators' 1986 Janus Korczak
Humanitarian Award at the fifth
Annual Holocaust Conference at
Kant State University.
an Israeli soldier at random.
Manos became their victim. He
was last seen alive on November
6, 1984, hitchhiking from Haifa to
his home in Petach Tikva. He
became the object of a coun-
trywide search which lasted for
months.
The case was broken, the police
said, when a resident of Deir
Baloot detained on suspicion of a
criminal act informed on the gang.
They were arrested and led police
to the cave where they hid Manos'
body 18 months ago after strangl-
ing him to death.
Meanwhile, hundreds of securi-
ty personnel are searching the
area between Shefaram and
Nazareth for two Arabs who at-
tempted to murder a hitchhiking
Israeli soldier last Sunday night.
The victim, Yosef Levy, a 46-year-
old reservist who is secretary of
Kibbutz Usha near Haifa, was
picked up by two men near the
Arab village of Kufer Manda.
Once in their car, he was stabbed
in the chest. He struggled with his
assailants, the car was forced off
the road and the two Arabs
escaped.
Levy said he waited 20 minutes,
bleeding, on the empty road until
an Arab driver picked him up and
took him to a hospital.
Passover Seders
Deduvilie
GIATT
KOSHER
ON THE OCEAN AT 67TH STREET
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
CONDUCTED BY
CANTOR
JACOB TAMBOR
1ST SEDER APRIL 23
2ND SEDER APRIL 24
$35
per person, per Seo*
including tax & gratuities
RESERVATONS AVAILABLE FOR
1ST SEDER, 2ND SEDER or BOTH SEDERS
subsequently sole, chief of the in-
telligence division within unit
"03," whose responsibility was
the direct briefing to the General
Staff of the Army group. The
documents indicate that
Waldheim was solely in charge of
"prisoner interrogation" of
Greek, Armenian, British. French
and Bulgarian nationals.
"In all my experience as a
federal prosecutor," said Rosen-
baum, "rarely, if ever, have I seen
documents of such devastating
nature as those made available to-
day." Elan Steinberg, executive
director of the WJC, said that
"the Waldheim affair ... is now
ready to be turned over to official
agencies responsible for the in-
vestigation of Nazi war
criminals."
THE WJC sent a letter to U.S.
Attorney General Edwin Meese
III asking that Waldheim's name
be placed as soon as possible on
the watch-list of the U.S. Im-
migration and Naturalization Ser-
vice. "We stand ready to make
available to the Justice Depart-
ment all our documents,"
Steinberg said.
Rosenbaum, asked by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency why
the Jewish communities of Greece
and Yugoslavia did not recognize
Waldheim's name as a Nazi
responsible for atrocities, said
that it was not possible that an
operative of such high stature
would be known to the general
populace.
Continued from Page 1-A
help Israel stand firm against
pressure to surrender her security
by ceding strategic territories to
Arab states."
Symms warned that Syria, with
its arsenal of Soviet-supplied
weapons, could easily cut Israel in
two if it returned to its pre-1967
borders. He also called for support
of a strong American defense
which he said is needed not only to
defend the U.S. but Israel as well.
Helms hailed Israel as
America's only reliable friend in
the Middle East and urged every
member of the Senate and House
to visit Israel so they could
"understand the importance of
Judaea and Samaria to Israel
from a geo-strategic and Biblical
point of view."
HE PRAISED Israeli settlers
who are "revitalizing and re-
juvenating Judaea and Samaria."
He said the eight days he spent in
Israel last summer were among
"the most meaningful" he could
remember.
Robinson, a member of the
House Armed Services Commit-
tee, declared that for strategic
reasons "Israel ought to recap-
ture some of the territory it gave
up." He did not specify which ter-
ritory. Robinson stressed the
strategic importance of Israel to
the U.S. He said it was "absolute-
ly ridiculous" that the State
Department wants Israel to "give
up territory needed to protect the
integrity and security of the State
of Israel."
The Arkansas lawmaker attack-
ed U.S. Middle East policy, which
he called "schizophrenic," and
suggested that the State Depart-
ment be re-named the "capitula-
tion department." He said he
would vote against the $300
million arms sale to Saudi Arabia
proposed by the Reagan Ad-
ministration, and urged moving
the U.S. Embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
ANOTHER SPEAKER. Lt.
Gen. Daniel Graham, chairman of
the Coalition for the Strategic
Defense Initiative, said that Israel
is faced with a ballistic missile
threat from the Soviet Union, in-
cluding germ and chemical
weapons, and is "aware that it
needs SDL" He said that
awareness led Israel to join the
U.S. in the project. According to
Graham, "With SDI, the USSR
would lose its status of
superpower."
Music Published
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
"Anthology of Hasidic Music," in-
corporating 104 melodies some of
which have never appeared in
print, has been published by the
Jewish Music Research Center of
the Hebrew University. The an-
thology, which is based on the
musical legacy of the late Ehmjo
Vinaver and edited by Dr. Eliahu
Schleifer, is meant to be used by
both scholars and performers.
Our new insulation supports my puttering
and then some. _
surprising thing is tha
Not surprising at all. FPL is encouraging everybody to
manage their energy efficiently because lowering peak
energy demand delays the need for new power plants -
an expense everyone must share.
By insulating your ceiling, or adding to your
existing insulation, you'll use less air conditioning.
And you'll lower your bills as you lower your demand
for electricity.
We'll send out an energy specialist to advise you
on how much insulation you need. We'll even pay for
part of the work.
lb find out how to qualify for this incentive and
to get more information on energy management,
call our 24-hour toll free number.
1-800-821-7700.

CALL
865-8511- 531-3446

FLORIDA POWER LIGHT COMPANY


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
Heinz Galinski
He Still 'Rules' Berlin Jewry
By DIETER STACKER
DeuUellf* Allgrmeinn Somtagtblatt
BERLIN The decision
to reestablish the Jewish
community in Berlin at the
end of 1945 was not taken
lightly. "There were grave
doubts whether there was
any future for Jews in Ger-
many after the Nazi
Holocaust," says Heinz
Galinski. "Many felt it was
out of the question."
Herr Galinski has been head of
the Jewish community in Berlin
since 1949. Many Jews, he recalls,
felt in those days they couldn't
possibly live amid a people who
had at least approved the persecu-
tion and annihilation of their
Jewish fellow-citizens.
JUST OVER 1,000 of the
150,000 Jews who lived in pre-war
Berlin survived the Nazi
machinery of destruction.
They included fashion designer
Ruth Thomas, who was hidden
away by the wife of an SS officer
of all people, and TV quizmaster
Hans Rosenthal, who spent the
last few months of the war in a
friend's allotment garden in
Lichtenberg, an East Berlin
suburb.
These two survivors are still
members of a community now
numbering 6,000, making it the
largest Jewish community in
Germany.
The life of the Jewish communi-
ty was reactivated from the mo-
ment the Red Army occupied the
city in April, 1945. "The fact
was," Galinski recalls, "that a
handful of Jews had survived in
Berlin. They needed to be
recharged with vital energy and
to be retained as members of the
Jewish community.
"WE FELT this point was
more important than all objec-
Heinz Galinski
tions to reestablish Jewish
communities."
Heinz Galinski, 73, is a key man
in the post-war history of the
Jewish community in Berlin,
which was reestablished on
December 20, 1945.
His mother and first wife were
killed in Auschwitz. He was im-
prisoned in Auschwitz, Buchen-
wald and Belsen. He returned to
Berlin as soon as the war was
over.
He first looked after the sur-
vivors of racial persecution on
behalf of the City Council. In
1949, he was elected board chair-
man of the Jewish community in
West Berlin and has regularly
been reelected by a large majority
ever since.
"Not even in times of direst
persecution did we lose hope of
democracy and humanitarianism
returning to Germany after the
end of Nazi dictatorship," he
wrote in 1980.
HE IS strongly in favor of mak-
ing the life of the Jewish com-
munity more accessible and
transparent. While opposing
assimilation, he espouses the
LivealktteT
Mature singles and adults gather at
The Granit every summer Tor the
time of their lives! There's every
sport, special entertainment,
wonderful dining and friendly
cocktail hours. There's also
hours of relaxing by the pool or
in the shade of our big willows.
Best of all. there's always
friends to share it with. And
everything happens in
the most beautiful ^^~ //
scenic setting.
It's the perfect
place to live
it up!
Wr
WEEKLY RATES FOR 2 AND 3 MEAL PLANS AVAILABLE
$330- $420 K'
DISCOUNTS FOR LONGER STAYS
18 hole Championship GoM Tennis Outdoor and Indoor Swimming Pool
Women's and Men's Health Clubs with Steam and Saunas Indoor
Miiialure GoH Basketball Night Clubs Cocktail Lounges 4 Bands
Bocci VoleybaU Shuffleboard Hiking Jacuzzi
THE
MOTEL AMD COUNTRY CLUB
Kcrhonkson. New York 12446
Contact Mrs. Irene Unterman (305) 735-6456
or Toll Free (800) 431-7681
cause of integration in a
pluralistic society.
"Making Judaism more
transparent," he says, "will
counteract the spread of anti-
Jewish prejudice."
The synagogue in
Fasanenstrasse was rebuilt in
1959 on the site of a synagogue
sacked in 1938. In the early 1960s
a Jewish night school was set up,
offering evening classes in
Hebrew and Yiddish to non-Jews.
It is the only facility of its kind
in Europe, and 80 percent of its
students are now Gentiles.
OPENING UP the Jewish com-
munity also means, as Galinski
sees it. speaking out when politi-
cians and authorities in the
Federal Republic of Germany op-
pose neo-Nazism and anti-
Semitism only half-heartedly.
When Bonn Interior Minister
Friedrich Zimmermann refused to
voice disapproval of a meeting of
former Waffen-SS men in
Nesselwang, Bavaria. Galinski
was most upset.
Zimmermann merely said it was
for the Bavarian authorities to
decide whether the meeting
should be held, the country being
run on federal lines.
"I FEEL it is totally inap-
propriate to want to explain to so-
meone directly affected and a
former concentration camp in-
mate the difference between Nazi
dictatorship and parliamentary
democracy," Galinski said.
He was equally forthright in
telling the Christian Democrats
how he felt about the painfully
slow progress of legislation to
make saying six million Jews
weren't murdered at Nazi concen-
tration camps an indictable
offense.
"I don't know whether those
responsible can possibly ap-
preciate how a survivor of
Auschwitz feels," he said, "about
having to file a suit himself to take
action against those who deny
that six million Jews were killed."
FORTY YEARS after it was
reestablished the Jewish com-
munity in Berlin is still influenced
by pre-war trends. There are two
wings, the Orthodox and the
Liberal.
But they joined forces after the
war because, as Heinz Galinski
puts it, "a Jewish community
decimated by the Nazi machinery
of persecution and destruction
could no longer afford the luxury
of rivalry between religious
groupings."
The community has an im-
pressive record of integration.
Early in 1946, many Polish Jews
arrived in Berlin.
Most went on to Palestine but
some stayed in the city and were
fully accepted by the Jewish com-
munity that was mainly German.
Hungarian. Rumanian and
Czech Jews followed, and in the
late 1970s, several thousand
Soviet Jews arrived in West
Berlin via Vienna or Israel.
About 2,500 of them have
stayed in the city.
THERE WAS heated debate
about these latecomers at the
time, but they are now largely in-
tegrated in a Jewish community of
which they make up nearly half
the membership.
The Jewish community in West
Berlin maintains ties with Jews on
the other side of the Wall.
On High Holy days the cantor of
the Liberal synagogue, Estrongo
Nachama, who was born in
Thessaioniki and is a survivor of
Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen,
holds services for the last 200
Jews in East Berlin.
Jewish National Fund leaders (from left) Dr. Samuel I. Cohen
executive vice president; Moshe Rivlin, world chairman
Jerusalem; and Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein, president, shown here
at JNF of America's New York headquarters were among prin-
cipal speakers at the organization's recent All-Day National Con-
ference at the Grand Hyatt Hotel. At the conference, attended bu
more than 800 delegates, two checks, one for $1 million and ihv
other for $500,000, were presented to Raiin to support major
JNF projects in Israel.
Space Shuttle Challenger Replica
To Stand At JNF Park Entrance
NEW YORK (JTA) A
replica of the Challenger space
shuttle will stand at the entrance
to the Jewish National Fund's
American Independence Park in
Israel, it was announced last
week. A seven-foot model of the
shuttle was presented to JNF as a
gift to the people of Israel at the
JNF's annual conference in New
York.
At the same meeting, a forest in
memory of Leon Klinghoffer.
slain by Arab terrorists on the
Achille Lauro. and his late wife
Marilyn was formally dedicated by
JNF.
The Challenger model, which
was built by the Brooklyn Union
Gas Company and displayed at
John Kennedy Airport until the
day the shuttle exploded, will be
given a permanent home in the
JNF's new Challenger Forest,
now being established by JNF out-
side Jerusalem. It was accepted
by Moshe Yegar, Israel's Consul-
General in New York.
A scroll marking the formal
dedication of the Klinghoffer
Forest was presented to the
daughters of the late couple. Lisa
and Ilsa, by Representative Ted
Weiss (I)., Manhattan).
Rabbi Block Cited
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Irving Block, spiritual leader of
the Brotherhood Synagogue.
received the Rabbi Israel and Lib-
by Mowshowitz Community Ser-
vice Award from the New York
Board of Rabbis.
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS
WORLD
WIDE
%SWixfPMCUr<^Vf*$DM.>2TRtO'l0bHSlUI Acapu/co
COPACABANA
POSADA DEL SOL
AMBASSADOR BEACH
St. Thomas
Virgin Is lands
VIRGIN ISLE HOTEL
California
RIVIERA HILTON
ft*" Sonny*.
HE NEWPORTER
Ne*fxy0aar"
Ftortdm
'ONTAINEBCEAU HILTON
NNISBROOK RESORT
SHE RATON BAL HARBOUR
SANSSOUCI
N.Y.Area
'AMIMEN TRE SOP'
HARBOR ISLAND S
LongAV*
Puerto Rico
PAiVASOt. '''
ATLAS AMBASSADOR KOSHER TOURS
a w. 43 Meet, arc Itm, I2ii) DHM 0HHH *.r. M r<* r *ro*x
r
The Pines
1
has everything!
Even the nearness of
your family.
Wticom* back to > tun you vt
*wayi MAi fum. Tata
annum wt Mm yw al Mm
tvttitt art adhntiM ysu "|oy
hi* yni'rt don waeh to yoor
tam4lyto.iivttthmtoi*rilT,i
$360 $430
0* *. dot oct
savoy a hpm 0a)i ktjta
Prus. stay 2 weeks & act a
winter weekend free I Extra
low rates for extended stays
IT'S ALL ON THE
PREMISES!
tossw ft Osawr MM 4 km aaX
PHs tatof of wit Mart*
Tun OK. Mm. 1 (Mnor *Mt Has* (
HMM (Jew .J aasnaet Mass Ml attoOa*
MeratosSMtog
L
'rjdrtcn* Steven Conducted
fc Bit MCOrWM'latt Can*'
AVRUM DUBOW
jnrj tut Aotafiam Mat* $fnpfrx Cw-1
OH TARV LAWS
OBSERVED
/r.r
c*i mi kn: (Mil 431-3184 I
mm om* t w MMM
aUJ


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Starting April 27th Pan Am Will Belaking Off Every Day ForTel Aviv.
Right now ^nA. can take .announceffinrtg*** ^-^J^*^
St%LA^^.r_t_UniLLWeek TrfZ"^ e27*Matngieven Agent or ftn Am a. 1-800-221 -111
i "
with convenient connections
through Paris. And we're happy
eet even better. Witn aauy service auu HMu-r> jKJLrpj.
starting April 27th. Making it even Agent or Pan Am at 1 -800-221 -1111
easier for this year to be the year
Rin AnCfoa Can't BeatThe Experience
Schedules subject to change without notice


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. April 4. 1986
- -'
.'. '
Rightwing
Wants To See Shultz Leave His Post
Continued from Page 5-A
the threat from growing," Shultz
said on Jan. 15.
Addressing a Pentagon con-
ference on low-intensity warfare,
the Secretary added: "There is
substantial legal authority for the
view that a state which supports
terrorists or its subversive attacks
against another state or which
supports or encourages terrorist
planning and other activities
within its own territory is respon-
sible for such attacks. Such con-
duct can amount to an ongoing
armed aggreession against the
other state under international
law."
THIS SAME argument, of
course, has often been used by
Israeli officials in defending their
own preemptive or retaliatory
strikes against terrorist targets in
Lebanon and elsewhere in the
region. This was Israel's basic
argument of "legitimate self-
defense" after its raid late last
year against PLO headquarters in
Tunisia.
Shultz has not always come
down on Israel's side. Like vir-
tually everyone else in the Reagan
Administration, he is very suppor-
tive of the proposed sale of ad-
vanced anti-aircraft missiles and
jet fighters to Jordan. Israel op-
poses that proposed transaction,
which is about to be considered
once again by Congress.
But the Secretry, even in urging
Israel and its friends to go along
with the sale, has put forward all
sorts of arguments that it is even
in Israel's own long-term best na-
tional interest to see the U.S. re-
main the major weapons supplier
to Jordan rather than Britain,
France and certainly the Soviet
Union. At least, the U.S., he and
other Administration spokesmen
have argued, will retain some con-
trol over the eventual use of that
weaponry.
And strengthening Jordan's
King Hussein militarily, they add,
will automatically encourage him
to enter into direct peace negotia-
tions with Israel. There will be
other positive political spinoffs for
the U.S. (and Israel) in the region
as well, according to the
Americans.
THUS SHULTZ is known to
feel very frustrated by Israel's
refusal to consider these
New One-Shekel Note Appears
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet, yielding to public
pressure, ordered the printing of a
new one-Shekel note as compa-
nion to the new one-Shekel coin
which has been disparaged by
Israelis because of its small size.
The Cabinet acted recently
because many people find it hard
to take the coin seriously as "real
money." It is referred to as "the
button" because it is so much
smaller than coins of less value.
The new Shekel, note or coin,
equals 1,000 old Shekels and has a
vlaue of 66 cents, American.
The new note, like the coin, will
bear a likeness of Maimonides
(Rambam), the 12th Century
Jewish philosopher and physician.
The Cabinet also approved the
printing of a 100 Shekel note
which will carry a portrait of the
late Yitzhak Ben Zvi, the second
President of Israel. It will be the
highest denomination banknote in
circulation. Until now the highest
is a 50 Shekel note.
arguments in easing its opposition
to the proposed sale.
But the Secretary understands
that no Israeli government can
easily be seen domestically as ac-
cepting U.S. weapons sales to
Arab countries still in a technical
state of war against Israel. The
political consequences could be
quite severe. Several senior
Israeli officials have quietly in-
formed Shultz that they do not
really fear the Jordan sale even if
they can't say so in public.
Certainly, a decision by Jordan
to enter into direct peace negotia-
tions with Israel would quickly
make it easier for Israel and its
supporters in Congress and the
Jewish community to go along
with the Administration's sale.
But such an immediate
breakthrough on the peace front
is not seen as very likely.
In the meantime, Israeli of-
ficials are spreading the word that
they want Shultz to remain in of-
fice. Other pro-Israel lobbyists
with good contacts among the
conservatives pressing for
Shultz's ouster have sought to
temper the anti-Shultz
momentum.
THE ARGUMENT of Israel's
friends to these conservatives is
that since strong U.S. support for
Israel is also on the conservative
agenda given Israel's
democratic and pro-American
orientation and its strategic role
in thwarting further Soviet
penetration of the Middle East
the rightwingers should stop call-
ing for the Secretary's resigna-
tion. The conservatives, however,
counter that any future secretary,
with a clear conservative
background, would also support
Israel maybe even more so.
But that argument does not ex-
actly ease Israeli fears. They
know Shultz; they also trust and
like him. They don't know who
would follow.
Spring Break
for Senior Citizens!
Our Price includes
port charges, three generous meals,
and roundtrip motorcoach from selected locations
in Broward, Dade and Palm Beach Counties.
The regular Senior's fare, 55 years and older
is $83.00. BUT FOR THE MONTHS OF
APRIL. MAY AND JUNE. WERE GIVING
SENIOR CITIZENS A SPRING BREAK BY
REDUCING THIS PRICE TO A LOW $63.00.
Every departure, seven days a week, subject
to space availability.
Depart Miami at 8:30 a.m.. spend the
afternoon in Freeport/Lucaya and return to
Miami at 11:00 p.m. All the magic of a
longer cruise in just one day. Dine and
Dance. Relax by the pool. Play bingo.
Take in the SeaEscape Revue. Big Band
every Monday. You can do as much or as little
as you like.
And when your club or homeowners
association books a group of 40 or more,
we'll take $4.00 more off each fare and
provide a special motorcoach to/from any
point of your choice in Broward. Dade or
Palm Beach Counties.
So don't miss our special Senior Citizen's
Spring Break. See your travel agent today
or call SeaEscape at 1-800-432-0900 or in
Dade County. 379-0000. Proof of age may
be requested. Cabins optional.
South Florida's o nly One Day Cruises to the Bahamas
Eti Yaffe, wife of an Israel Embassy employee in Cairo, on her
way to an operating theater at Israel's Tel Hashomer hospital.
Yaffe was wounded at the Cairo Trade Fair Mar. 19 when
gunmen opened fire on a car carrying her and three other Israelis
as they drove out of the fairground complex. The three wounded
Israelis were brought to Israel by a specially-chartered plane.
New Stamps Override Orthodox Pressure
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Despite opposition by Orthodox
elements, the Israel Philatelic
Service will issue next May three
new stamps, depicting the three
main trends in Judaism. One
stamp will depict Yeshiva Univer-
sity, the second will be dedicated
to the Rabbinical Beit Midrash of
the Conservative movement, the
third to the Hebrew Union Col-
lege of the Reform movement.
C1986 SeaEscape Ltd.
Ships Registry: Bahamas
THE B00DLIFE AT
BROWNS STARTS AT
THE AIRPORT
2-WEEKS *948 -1,190
3-WEEKS 1,308 -1,653
WEEKLY RATES 397- *509
ajaji I Woyl PHxn HhMI| Nghf
Tax a Tranaporttlon nol indudM
EVERYTHING INCLUDED! n
g Personated Service With Extra Care For Special Diets
y 3 Gourmet Meals Daily <7Cocktail Parties
y Great Entertainment V Dancing to 4 Orchestras
OraMMM not Mfcidad
Free Golf on Two 18 Hole Golf Courses. Tennis. Roller
Skating. Health Club, Indoor-Outdoor Pools. Outstanding
Social Programs & Speakers Bingo. Shuffleboard. Dance
& Aerobics and Arts A Crafts Classes-And Much More1
Inquire About Family Mm.
Our Supervised youth Programs for Children 01M Ages
"iT'"*-!
I rDIET 1 jCENTERj DM CanMr approved Ht avaHaW*. Official Counaator for conauftstton

M ToM Fret tor ^^ .._.
Information and Rtsarvations 800-431-38OO
, MY 0781
(M* 4M-Mfl mafic cndt can* honored
*


Shamir, Levy in First Meeting
After Chaotic Herut Conference
Yelena Homier, wife of Soviet dissident An- dissidents in general. Fascell is chairman of
dreiSakharov, meets with South Florida Con- the House Foreign Affairs Committee where
gnssman Dante Fascell (D., Fla.) during her he continues his fight for the rights of in-
recent visit to Washington. Mrs. Bonner ex- dividuals in all oppressed countries which he
pressed her thanks to Fascell for his efforts in led for more than eight years in his previous
her behalf and that of her husband, as well as post as chairman of the Commission on
his work for Soinet Jewry and Soviet Security and Cooperation in Europe.
Kreisky Says
Waldheim Charges Are 'Monstrous'
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Yit-
zhak Shamir and David Levy, bit-
ter rivals for leadership of Herut,
met in the Foreign Minister's of-
fice alone last week, their first
meeting since the Herut conven-
tion broke up in chaos Mar. 13. It
was at Shamir's initiative.
The meeting was unannounced
and Levy, who is Minister of
Housing, told reporters before
entering Shamir's office that it
was up to the two of them to find
ways to heal the rift in Herut. He
admitted, however, that he was
not bringing any formula of his
own. Aides to Levy said he was
prepared to listen to whatever
ideas Shamir might advance.
It was learned later that Shamir
extended an invitation to Levy
which the latter promptly ac-
cepted. Herut sources said earlier
that the rival camps remained at
odds over a proposal by Minister
of Commerce Ariel Sharon, also a
contender for Herut leadership.
Sharon has suggested a three-
way power-sharing arrangement
by which Shamir would be elected
chairman of Herut, Levy chair-
man of its Executive Committee
and Sharon chairman of the Cen-
tral Committee.
Shamir, denied endorsement at
the aborted convention, insists
that he hold both the party and
Executive Committee chairman-
ships, a tradition established by
former Premier Menachem Begin
who held both positions during his
many years as undisputed leader
of Herut.
Downed Pilots'
Guardian Angel
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Tadiron Electronics Co. has
unveiled a guardian angel for
downed pilots in the form of a
small two-way radio that guides
rescuers to a flyer who has bailed
out or made a crash landing.
The radio, known as the
PRC-434, switches on
automatically whether or not the
pilot is conscious. It responds to
signals sent by search planes and
gives the planes the exact location
of the downed aircraft. It carries a
small screen that lights up to in-
form the pilot that help is on the
way.
In addition, it provides for voice
communications between downed
pilots and rescuers so that the
former can identify themselves.
This helps rescue parties avoid
traps set by hostile forces.
Bv RF.INHARD ENGBL
VIENNA (JTA) The
heated controversy over
Kurt Waldheim's alleged
Nazi past reached a new
pitch here when former
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky
denounced as "monstrous
meanness" charges brought
against Waldheim by the
World Jewish Congress and
wider circles in the United
States.
WJC officials, meanwhile, vow-
ed to pursue their investigation of
Waldheim even after he becomes
President of Austria, assuming he
is elected.
KREISKY. who is Jewish and a
Socialist, came to the defense of
Waldheim. a Catholic conser-
vative, in an interview published
in Oh Presae. Waldheim, the
presidential candidate of the con-
servative People* Party, who
served two terms as Secretary
General of the United Nations,
has been accused of concealing for
M years alleged membership in
the Nazi SA (Brown Shirts) and a
Nazi student organization before
World War II. He is also accused
of possible complicity in the depor-
tation of Creek Jews while a
Beutenanl in the Wehrmacht dur-
inK tin Herman occupation of
Greece.
Kreisky warned of a backlash in
Austria against Jews abroad who
Ktten as trying to dictate who
ul be Austria's next President.
In that connection, he referred to
an interview in the Austrian
magazine Profit with Israel
wnger, secretary general of the
"< and Elan Steinberg, its ex-
ecutive director.
Singer was quoted as saying
that ,f Waldheim is elected,
Austria would have to bear the
consequences. "I can tell you that
"ie next six years with Waldheim
IDF Gives Notice
Of Mobilization
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
'srael Defense Force gave ad-
vance notice Tuesday of a prac-
tice mobilization for reserve
soldiers to take place in the next
,e* days. The IDF always gives
advance notice to avoid ap-
prehension at home and inform
neighboring Arab states that the
mobilization is only a practice
exercise.
(as President) will not be easy
years." Singer said.
Profit is the magazine which
first published documents in-
dicating that Waldheim joined the
SA and a Nazi student group
shortly after the Anschluss in
1938. Waldheim had denied these
charges.
BUT HE DID serve during the
war on the staff of Gen. Alex-
ander Loehr who was hanged in
1947 for war crimes. U.S. Army
documents released last week
listed Waldheim as a 'suspected"
war criminal at the time.
Steinberg told Profit that the
WJC would not end its inquiries if
Waldheim is elected. "We will
continue to research, together
with specialists in the U.S., in
Germany, in Yugoslavia, in the
Soviet Union and in Austria," he
said, adding, "until now this has
been a matter of Mr. Waldheim.
Then it will be an Austrian
problem."
Ivan Hacker, president of the
Austrian Jewish community,
warned that the election of
Waldheim would bestow
legitimacy on Brown Shirts and
anti-Semites. In an apparent
response to Kreisky. he said the
community condemned language
that disqualifies documented
evidence as defamation, criticizes
the researchers and makes Jews
scapegoats. He mentioned "cer-
tain Socialist politicians" who
play down any kind of documents.
MICHAEL GRAFF, a
spokesman for the Peoples Party,
warned against "emotions none of
us want to rise." So far, the
Freedom Party, a coalition part-
ner in the Socialist-led govern-
ment, with a strong right wing,
has refrained from comment on
the Waldheim affair. But one of
its members broke ranks to warn
of an anti-Jewish backlash.
Mario Ferrari-Brunnenfeld.
Secretary of State in the Health
Ministry, said the Jewish com-
munity should have remained
silent at least until a link between
Waldheim and the deportation of
Greek Jews is proven. If there
should be any anti-Semitic feel-
ings in Austria, it would be the
fault of the WJC. which has in-
terfered in Austria's internal
politics, he said.
Meanwhile, a straw poll taken
by the Peoples Party showed
Waldheim ahead of his Socialist
rival. Kurt Steyrer. by a 48-82
percent margin.
PERSONAL CARE FOR THE ELDERLY
An alternative lifestyle for independent seniors
who need assistance with life's daily chores.
And there's no admission fee.
THE MONTHLY RENTAL INCLUDES:
One bedroom apartments
Delicious, Kosher-style meals
Weekly maid service
Transportation to doctors and shopping
24-hour licensed nurse and security
Full time activities program
Emergency buzzers in each apartment
Personal aid and supervision of
medication available
C*H&e
ONTHCMV
1900 N. Bay shore Dr.
Miami, Florida
371-3035
A licensed A.C.LF
s500 Publix
Gift Certificate
With Each New Subscription
1 Year
52 Issues
$
18
00
A Check
Must Accompany Order
As A New Subscriber To The Jewish Floridian,
I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
Please Start My Subscription Now!
Name
Address^
City ___
State
Apt.#
Zip_
NEW SUBSCRIBER -
DADE COUNTY ONLY
OFFER EXTENDED UNTIL APRIL 15,1986
Allow 4 to 6 weeks
for delivery
Mail To:
JEWISH Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
i

I
A forest of 10,000 trees at American Independence P**"
Jerusalem, has been established by the Jewish NatumalFundin
memory of Leon and Marilyn Klinghoffer. Formal Ration of
the forest was marked by the presentation of a scroll by' Manhat-
tan C couple. Ilsa (second from left) and Lisa. Also P^P*^
ceremony was Rabbi Joseph P. Sternstein, JNF Pr^dent,who
hailed the 'unprecedented' outpouring of support for the forest
from persons throughout the country.
Basic Human Rights Give Way to
Power of Military Regulations

Continued from Page 5-A
disturbing, not only in its rejec-
tion of Captain Goldman's claims,
but also in its near-reflexive
deference to military expertise. In
its Supreme Court brief, ADL
argues that this deference is
misplaced: "In constitutional mat-
ters, the Court and not the the
military is the expert."
The brief asserts that while
ADL recognizes the particular
concerns of the military, its uni-
que role in national security, and
its expertise in creating and main-
taining combat forces, of concern
is that the appellate court's total
deferral to military judgment
would arbitrarily strip service per-
sonnel of First Amendment
rights.
Following the Court of Appeals
decision. Congress directed the
Secretary of Defense to conduct a
study on overall religious accom-
modation in the military, with a
view toward broadening current
policies. Testifying before the
Department of Defense joint
study group organized as a result.
ADL, in conjunction with the
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA), argued that,
despite the significant and par-
ticular concerns for discipline,
security and uniformity in the
military, greater accommodation
of religious practices (such as the
wearing of a yarmulke) could be
provided.
UNFORTUNATELY, the final
report and recommendations fell
substantially short of ADL hopes
and Congressional expectations.
While there was progress in a few
areas, the military remained rigid
on many other issues of concern.
The following are the final recom-
mendations which focused on
specific categories of religious
observance:
Ritual: Positive consequences
were found in accommodating
religious ritual but merely recom-
mended that regulations
acknowledge that Sabbath obser-
vance is not only a Sunday
jractice.
Diet: Religious dietary re-
quirements were also found to be
relatively easy to accommodate,
at least on the premises of
military bases. The group recom-
mended the continued use of
separate and supplemental
rations.
Medical: Focusing mainly on
immunization, blood transfusions
and surgery, the study group did
not find religion-based medical
needs problematic. The recom-
mendations, however, were not
expansive. The study group said
immunization waivers should con-
tinue to be allowed in peacetime
under garrison situations, but
were not feasible under wartime
conditions. Exemptions from
transfusions, surgery and other
conventional medical treatment
were found to be burdensome in
peacetime and "intolerably
stressful" in major conflict.
Dress and Appearance: This
was the category where ADL
hoped for the most improvement,
but saw the least. Apparently,
buoyed by the Court of Appeals
decision in Goldman, the study
group relied on the frequently
cited military concerns for unifor-
mity, esprit ie corps, discipline,
health and safety. The bottom line
recommendation was to suggest
that specific living spaces be
designated where yarmulkes
could be worn with a uniform
when there is a determination
that it will not have an adverse im-
pact on unit cohesion.
HOW DOES this translate into
practice for an individual such as
Captain Goldman? At the discre-
tion of his unit or base com-
mander, he might be allowed to
wear his yarmulke in certain
areas of his own living quarters.
The question is whether the
military study grup's recommen-
dations will satisfy Congress. If
not, legislation will surely be in-
troduced and debated which
reflects civilians' ideas on
religious accommodation in the
military service.
Before Congress acts, however,
the Supreme Court has already
had an opportunity to resolve at
least a portion of the dispute.
While the issue before the court in
Goldman v. Weinberger was fac-
tually limited to yarmulke accom-
modation, the decision may have .*
broader impact on other religious
practices in the military.
Seeking a favorable ruling in
the Goldman case, ADL argued
that under many Supreme Court
precedents, "the Air Force is re-
quired to make a reasoned deter-
mination of its ability to relax
dress regulations where necessary
to accommodate religious freedom
. and to permit the wearing
of a yarmulke."
Early last week, the Supreme
Court ruled, by a 5-4 vote that the
First Amendment's guarantees of
freedom of religion may carry
great weight in civilian life, but
not in the military.
Justice William Rehnquist.
writing for the majority, argued
that "When evaluating whether
military needs justify a particular
restriction on religiously
motivated conduct, courts must
give great deference to the profes-
sional judgment of military
authorities."
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue. Miami. Florida
ESOTERICA
medicated fade cream
Regular $4.49
Facial $4.49
Fortified, Scented
or Unscented s4.99
3oz.
Triaminic
COLO TABLETS
Triaminic
COLD TABLETS
Q:
Our** NOM $**v So*
24's
$2.19
Triaminic
COLD SYRUP
4oz.$2.69
8oz.s4.49
Triaminic-12 Tablets
12-Hour Belief
Triaminic-^
0
10
10 Tablets s2.19
20 Tablets s3.49
Triaminic-DM
COUGH
FORMULA
4oz.s2.49
8oz.$3.99
Triaminicin Tablets
1.49
2.39
3.99
iocs s7.39
12's
24's
48s
Dorcol
CHILDREN'S LIQUID
COLD FORMULA
40Z.
2.29
Acne-
Pimple
Medication
iSTC
49
NEUTTOGEN*
MOISTURE I
IL1L
eimcco*
NEUTROGENA'
MOISTURE
pure racial moisturizer
4oz.
5.99
The sate, yet effective
facial moisturizer for
even delicate complexions.
OXY
MED Acne-pim( C A T E -He medical onj. PADS 50' $1.89 *
' \ w "7"
CLEANSER 4oz. $1.99 SOAP 3.25 oz. $1.49 SCRUB 2.6 oz. $2.99
Oarol*
NteehEasp
3.49
Triaminic
EXPECTORANT
4oz.s2.99
8oz.$4.99
Dorcol
CHILDREN'S
COUGH SYRUP
4oz.s2.69
8oz.s4.49
Triaminicol
MULTI-SYMPTOM
COLD SYRUP
4oz.s2.99
8oz.s4.99
i
ORAFIX
Special
Denture Adhesive
2.4 oz.
s2.99
T/GEL
Therapeutic
HNMroyaT Shampoo
4.4 OZ.
'3.19
TUMS
TUNfe
3-Roll
^ 99$


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Climate ... Country ... Community
Leisure home ownership in the Catskills, for
the Florida "snowbird," is becoming increas-
ingly popular. Everybody's getting into the
act, including some of the leading hotels of
the area. VACATION VILLAGE is proud to of-
fer its luxury townhouses to the "snowbird"
of a slightly different feather. While others do
offer climate and country and some even
luxury we add to that a year-round,
modern orthodox community. Our uni-
queness doesn't end there. All our luxury
townhomes offer spectacular lake views, and
are not merely planted in the forest. There are
no charges to use the facilities either, as is the
case in all the hotel developments. In VACA-
TION VILLAGE you OWN all of our extensive
year-round facilities. These include: a magnifi-
cent heated indoor pool, with sauna and
health gym; a new, huge outdoor pool (mixed
swimming); 5 lit tennis courts; 4 concrete-
walled handball courts; an elaborate Nite Club
with two restaurants; a Young Israel
synagogue; a private scenic lake; an adjacent
18 hole golf course; and much more. Live with
us during the warm seasons, be close (but not
too close!) to your families, and enjoy the best
of both worlds!
Beautiful, custom built, 2 bedroom homes are
still priced in the S80's only if ordered be-
fore Memorial Day. Larger 3 or 4 bedroom
homes are also available. Fully detached
homes are also offered in our golf course sec-
tion. Be an "earlybird" and catch your choice
location. Phases 1 & 2 completely sold out and
occupied since 1984. Call Nachman or Heshey
for a convenient appointment to visit our
development at (914) 434-2600. If you like
what you see, and decide to join our com-
munity then your flight is on us. C'mon up!
VACATION
V I
LAG
LOCH SHELDRAKE, NEW YORK
Directions: Rt. 17 Exit 105B, left at blinker 9 miles
(through Hurleyville) on right side.
NOTE: 'A mile before end of road
(Intersection Rt. 52)
Offering by prospectus only H83020
New York Stale Residency Required

4*J


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
Frightening words.
Unlessyou'reajewin
Russia. It means you have
received "razeshenie." Per-
mission. Stamped on your
exit visa.
Ida and her daughter
Tania arnved in Israel in
December
Why they were some of
the few Jews allowed to leave
the Soviet Union in 1985, we
may never know.
But now that she is in her
religious homeland we can help
Ida, a widow, and young
Tania are living in an immi
grant absorption center. The
center provides room and hoard.
They are learning Hebrew. She
is taking courses at Hei
University in Jerusalem.
Her world has changed
forever. And freedom taste:
sweet. But the changes arc treat,
the adjustments difficult.
Ida and Tania join 2 mil-
lion Jews from 102 countries,
speaking 78 languages who
have been absorbed into
Israeli society since 1948.
Fortunately, a major part
of your pledge to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation goes
to help these new Israelis
in resettlement.
Share the hope Israel
offers the persecuted Share
the pride and the responsibility
of resettling Jews in Israel.
Support The Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund.
And pray more Soviet
Jews will be kicked out of their
country.
Give to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federanon's
1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergent
Fund/Project Renewal Or
Akiva Campaign. Phone in
your pledge today. 5764000.
PEOPLE
DESTINY
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137-0100


eres
Main Reason: World Jewish Cong. Meet, IjjjggMJfa Floridian
But Also Has Talks in Washington
Section B
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres left
on a four-day visit to the
U.S. Monday morning,
stressing before his depar-
ture that economic issues
I would look large on the
agenda of his talks with
American officials, but "I
am not going in order to ask
for money. (Peres arrived
in New York Monday after-
[noon and was in
|Washington Tuesday.)
He said Israel's role in the
iReagan Administration's
|Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI),
opularly known as Star Wars,
would "probably" come up. But
bis trip is not an official visit.
"Basically, the purpose of my
trip tn the U.S. is to attend the
lubilet' "f the W<>rld Jewish Con-
res?, an important organization
the lift of the Jewish people."
"But then, being in
r I l>elieve we shall try
i summarize what are the open-
ngs for the .'ontinuation of the
eace process on the one hand,
what are the necessary
heasures to be taken in order to
peet the growing danger of inter-
Torism."
ASKED IF he intended to pur-
issue of former United Na-
i faMheim's alleged Nazi past
issue vigorously being pressed
the World Jewish Congress
ere* replied, "No, that is not the
ipose of my visit."
e U J4' has been urging Israel
take an official position on
aWheim who is running for the
esideno of Austria in elections
eduii'ii for May 5. *
flurry of speculation was rais-
bj fact that the Premier
S to the U.S. in an Israel
feme Fi >rce Boeing jet instead
an Ei Al commercial flight.
ked if this was a security
1 in view of terrorist
eats. Defense Minister Yitzhak
in told foreign correspondents
it was routine.
We frequently take lifts on
military) planes. El Al is
Premier Shimon Peres
perfectly safe, but the IDF is fly-
ing so we use them as well."
Rabin said. He explained that the
IDF planes frequently fly to
Europe and the U.S.. transpor-
ting goods abroad for sale or
repair and bringing other goods
home. He did not specify the
nature of the goods.
in
Peres was unusually expansive
in his statements to Israeli and
foreign reporters before his take-
off from Ben Gurion Airport. "I
believe that the economic issue
will be the chief issue in the Mid-
dle East in the coming years and if
it's not dealt with, we can expect
very many jolts." he said.
"I AM not going (to the U.S.) in
order to ask for money. I am not
going in order to propose how to
spend money. But I think there
are ways to deal with improving
the economic situation through an
important international effort."
Peres said, adding, "I do not in-
tend to go into the details of the
plan at the moment."
He elaborated, however, on his
reasons for not seeking more
money in the U.S. at this time. "I
am aware of the Gramm-Rudman
(budget-balancing) Amendment,
which is not just a financial issue
but is a state of mind, and I shall
respect it," the Premier said.
"I think there is a lot to be done
there (the U.S. with respect to
helping Israel's economic
recovery). As you know, we have a
task force with the purpose of in-
creasing investment in Israel, of
enlarging the exports of Israel, of
building joint ventures between
American investors and Israeli
enterprise.
"THIS PLAN is much sup-
ported by the American Ad-
ministration by President
Reagan, by Secretary of State
(George) Shultz, and it has had a
fine start. We are going to enlarge
it, develop it.
"Then again, I shall be talking
with (American Jewry) about the
continuation of a plan which exists
already for seven years Project
Renewal to give it some new
life and new dimensions. And real-
ly, to see what are the best oppor-
tunities to go from a policy
development and growth. I think
we have some opportunities and I
do believe it is not recessarily
through grants or money."
Peres disclosed that, over the
last few months, the government
has sold off some of its companies
to private enterprise, one of them
a company for the development of
Ashdod and the other a chemical
plant in Haifa.
PERES SAID the U.S. has not
approached Israel on its problem
with Libya. But ways to combat
international terrorism would be
on his agenda in the U.S. "As you
know. Vice President (George)
Bush heads the U.S. Administra-
tion team that is dealing with the
subject of international ter-
rorism," Peres said.
Asked if Israel's role in Star
Wars would come up, the Premier
replied, "Probably yes. It's one of
the topics which is under discus-
sion between the U.S. govern-
ment and the Israeli government.
In effect, we are in full agree-
ment, but again we shall go a little
bit into depth in order to see what
is the right way to proceed."
Marilyn K. Smith Inducted To
Florida Women's Hall of Fame
The late Marilyn K. Smith has been inducted by
Vfpr Bb Graham to the Florida Women's
a I of Fame. Smith was among 13 women elected
the Hall which was created in 1980 under the
"thorny of the Florida Commission on the Status
.Women. Women are inducted every two years
""more than 100 candidates were nominated for
honor in 1986.
[Marilyn Smith, over a two decade period, held
ny leadership positions in the Miami Jewish
nmunity and the community at-large. She serv-
|as a vice-president of the Greater Miami Jewish
^aeration, was president of Federation's
omen s Division and chaired the Planning and
ogeting Committee. She also sat on the board of
Tctor* of the United Way of Dade County.
J's past October, the first Marilyn K. Smith
wership Enrichment Forum was held in Miami.
erwritten by the Marilyn K. Smith Philan
"Pic Fund, established in her memory, the
icnment Forum honors her vibrant spirit and
FnS concern for the learning and sharing of
P'sn ideals. World renowned philosopher and
"or. Dr. David Hartman was the scholar-in-
nce for the six-part lecture series.
!rrvn?mith *nd nis sofs. Joseph and David.
in Tallahassee for a reception at the Gover-
: Mansion where the induction ceremonies
Iff t The Smiths received a medallion and
' commemorating Marilyn's posthumous
"ion into the Hall of Fame.
Marilyn K. Smith
Four other Dade County women were also in-
ducted into the Florida Women's Hall of Fame in-
cluding Annie Ackerman, Rosemary Barkett, Mar-
jory Stoneman Douglas and Arva Parks. Th. -
State Representative Gwendolyn Cherry
ducted posthumously.
Miami, Florida Friday, April 4,1986
Miami Rabbis Declare High Court
Yarmulke Ruling Imperils Freedom
The Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami has
issued a statement regret-
ting the U.S. Supreme
Court ruling that the Air
Force may bar an Orthodox
Jewish officer from wearing
a religious skullcap on duty.
The statement was issued in the
name of the Association by its
president. Rabbi Brett S. Golds-
tein of Temple Shir Ami, and its
executive vice president, Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, director of
Chaplaincy for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The statement
reads:
"The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami regrets the ruling
of the U.S. Supreme Court that
the Air Force may bar an Or-
thodox Jewish officer from wear-
ing a religious skullcap on duty.
We lament the majority view
which in effect places a curb on in-
dividual religious freedom. We ap-
plaud and commend the minority
view as expressed by Justices
William Brennan, Thurgood Mar-
shall, Harry Blackmun and San-
dra Day O'Connor which attacked
the majority for yielding too easily
to the Armed Forces and giving
too lightly weight to constitu-
tional rights.
" 'If a branch of the military
declares one of its rules sufficient-
ly important to outweigh a service
person's constitutioal rights, it
seems that the court will accept
that conclusion no matter how ab-
surd or unsupported it may be,'
wrote Justice Brennan. He found
it unbelievable that if Orthodox
Jews are allowed to wear yar-
mulkes on duty 'our fighting
forces will slip down the
treacherous slope toward
unkempt appearance, anarchy
and, ultimately, defeat at the
hands of our enemies.'
"Justice O'Connor added, the
court should have considered the
special importance of defending
our nation without abandoning
completely the freedoms that
make it worth defending.' -
Rabbi Riemer New Spiritual
Leader Of Beth David Congregation
Rabbi Jack Riemer has been
engaged as the new spiritual
leader of Miami s first synagogue.
Beth David Congregation, its
president. Sam Badanes. an-
nounced. Rabbi Riemer will of-
ficially assume his position May I.
retiring Dr. Sol Landau, who
came out of rabbinical retirement
to temporarily lead the
''ngregation.
Rabbi Riemer. who comes to
Miami from La Jolla, California, is
one of the distinguished leaders of
the American rabbinate. Badanes
said. New Prayers for the High
Holidays, which he edited, is used
in hundreds of congregations
throughout the country, and his
prayers and readings appear in
Sabbath and High Holiday prayer
books of both the Conservative
and Reform movements.
His sermons ha"e often been
published in "The Best Jewish
Sermons of the Year."
Rabbi Riemer and his wife Sue
hope to arrive in Miami by mid-
April, and he is anxious to begin
his duties with the 487-family
synagogue.
"I'm thrilled to be joining Beth
David," Riemer said. "I'm very
excited and look at it as a
challenge to be part of a new Beth
David."
Rabbi Jack Riemer
Before taking the pulpit of Con-
gregation Beth El in La Jolla in
1980, Rabbi Riemer served for 14
years as the spiritual leader of the
Beth Abraham Synagogue in
Dayton, Ohio, where he helped
form the Hillel Academy and the
Society of Patrons, a cultural arts
association.
He is a member of the National
Rabbinic Cabinet for the United
Jewish Appeal
Two Prominent Editors Will Debate
UM Students on Reagan, Terrorism
Two prominent editors will ap-
pear at a "Face the Students"
debate at the University of Miami
on Wednesday, Apr. 9, from 6 to 8
p.m., in the UM Richter Library's
Brockway Hall.
Featured will be Norman
Podhoretz, editor in chief of Com-
mentary, and Charles William
Maynes, editor in chief of Foreign
Policy, in a dicussion of "Interna-
tional Terrorism and Reagan's
Response."
Jiri Valenta will be moderator.
Valenta is director of the Program
in Soviet, Stragetic, and East
European Studies at the UM
Graduate School of International
Studies.
Podhoretz has been editor in
chief of Commentary since 1960.
He is also the author of many
books, articles and reviews, in-
cluding "The Present Danger"
(1980) and "Why We Were In
Vietnam" (1982).
Podhoretz earned a Bachelor's
and Master's degree in English
Norman Podhoretz
from Cambridge Universe in
England, wh he w i
Fulbright Schola' i Kellett
Fellow. He was rary
Continued 'age .


Page2-B The Jewish Fioridian/Friday. April 4, 1986
Dr. Melvyn Hecht Joins
MJHHA Medical Staff
Dr. Melvyn Hecht has joined the
medical staff of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
at Douglas Gardens.
Dr. Hecht is a diplomate of the
American Board of Internal
Medicine and has completed a
fellowship in geriatrics at the Cor-
nell University Medical Center in
New York. Piror to joining the
staff of the Miami Jewish Home,
he has served as a Director of a
Social Health Maintenance
Organization Project in New York
associated with Cornell Universi-
ty and has been a consultant
physician to the Metropolitan
Jewish Geriatric Center in
Brooklyn. He has also served as a
Clinical Assistant Professor of
Medicine at New York
Hospital/Cornell Medical Center,
as Physician in Charge of the
Geriatric Evaluation Unit at
Brooklyn Caledonian Hospital and
Associate Director of Geriatrics of
the Brooklyn Hospital in
Brooklyn. N.Y.
"Dr. Hecht's appointment is the
first of many that will take place
here at the Miami Jewish Home as
we expand our capacity to provide
medical care to the residents of
Douglas Gardens and the clients
Dr. Melwn Hecht
of the Ambulatory Services
Department." noted Dr Charles
Beber. Medical Director. "Wi-arc
also establishing an academic pro-
gram of teaching, training, and
clinical research fur gt-riatni
professionals."
Klezmer Conservatory Band
To Preform Wednesday
The Klezmer Conservatory
Band, the critically acclaimed
leader of the current klezmer
music renaissance, will perform
Wednesday at Temple Beth
Sholom. The band will perform in
the temple sanctuary, beginning
at 8 p.m.. according to cultural
director Judy Drucker.
The joyful program of Yiddish
soul music includes the traditional
tunes often played at weddings
and other celebrations, albeit with
some modern improvisation.
The KCB was formed in 1980 by
Hankus Netsky. descended from a
grandfather and an uncle who
were klezmer musicians in
Philadelphia in the 1920s. In-
spired by a desire to return to his
roots, combined with a natural at
traction to the exuberant music.
Netsky formed the band while an
instructor at the New England
Conservator)- of Music The band
is comprised of conservatory
trained musicians.
Senior Olympics Rescheduled
The Fourth Annual Senior
Olympics of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged,
canceled due to inclement
weather on March 21. has been
rescheduled for Friday. April 4
The event will take place between
9:30 a.m.. beginning with the
Grand Processional and 2:30 p.m.
on the Douglas Gardens campus.
Over 20 frail older adults served
by the Miami Jewish Home in its
nursing facility, its two adult day
centers and adult congregate liv-
ing facility will "go for the gold"
in such competitions as
wheelchair relays, walking races,
distance throwing and more.
The Royal Hungarian
RESTAURANT
Qlatt Kosher
Organization*: Inquire About Our FacUHlea For Luncheona
2001 CoMmAvwMM Mtami Boh. National Kaannith (NK) Qlatt
Who* to Broward Wart our now location at 342 So. Slat* Rd. 7. Uargata
538-5401 PROP Weiss Family
VJP Leo Osheroff To Address Chug Aliyah
Senator Jack Gordon was
honored with an award for
regional performance and
outstanding service to the
organization at the American
Jewish Congress' Biennial Nn-
11 on a I Convention in
Washington.
Temple Judea Hosts
Interfaith Day
Temple Judea will host a Com-
munity Interfaith Day on Wednes-
day "The Changing Role of
Women in Religion." will be the
topic discussed, according to co-
chairmen. Rita Wachs and Doris
Gold.
Rev. Lisa Saunders will be
keynote speaker and will be joined
for the morning session, by Rabbi
Rachael Hertzman. Dr. Samuel
Jones. Sister Roa Monique. and
Rev. Debbie McLeod.
The afternoon session will in-
coude Dr. Carroll Shuster. Rabbi
Michael B. Eisenstat. Father
Ronald Fox, Mon John W Glorie.
and Rev. Richard Neal
Amit
Women
Galil Chapter of Amit Women
will meet on Monday, at noon, at
Young Israel Synagogue. North
Miami Beach. Dr Bertram
Shapiro will be guest speaker
The meeting of Geula Chapter
of Amit Women has been changed
to a pre-holiday gathering on
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the
Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center.
Hatikvah/Miami Beach Chapter
of Amit Women monthly meeting
will take place on Thursday, April
10. at noon, at the Kneseth Israel
Social Hall.
Shalom Chapter of Amit
Women will meet Tuesday, at
noon, at 100 Lincoln Road. Club
Room. A model seder and a
discourse of laws and customs for
the preparation of Passover will
be given by Rabbi Yehuda Melber
of Temple Beth Raphael.
Full-Time Position
Ritual, Youth and Programming.
Ubaral Conaarvatlva Congrega-
tion. Roaumoa:
""soar*
Omaha, NE 68132
YUM!
PAC-MAN is a Dig machei with
all the Ms1 So they'll really
gobble up PAC-MAN shaped
pasta in spaghetti sauce
with cheese flavor It s delicious
and it s packed with goodness
From Chef Boy-ar-dee'O
ncawiiMc mc tt.-1 ** u
_____________________j'l^nfeigM
The South Florida Chug Aliyah
Group will hold a meeting for
Dade members and friends on
Sunday at 7:80 p.m. at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Building
Guest speaker will be Leo
Osheroff. short-term shahach for
the Association of Americans and
Canadians in Israel He will
discuss "Business and Financial
Opportunities in the State ol
Israel "
Mr Osheroff made Aliyah in
1959 from Miami Beach, and is a
graduate of the University of
Florida in Gainesville. He settled
OB a kibbutz in the Negev. the only
American there, and met his wife.
Tamar After three years, tie left
to manage th.- Dan II
Aviv and in 1965 wit:
began Arta. Ltd., specializing iii
fine and commercial .-- ,,,,
engineering Nipplies
Toda) Arta II
business of ts type i Israel
employing 110 people
wholly-owned retail branchet
throughout the -ountn
Mr Osheroff also ia active in the
Israel Sports Federation Ma,
cahiah Games The Societ) rthe
Preservation of Nature trie Hai
Bar Project to restore to Israel all
of the animals mentioned in the
Bible, and has neen on a mission
to the US for Israel Bonds to meet
with American i>usiness leaders
Observant Jews May Now Resume
Eating Heinz Vegetarian Beans
Carroll said that Heinz has
discontinued the practice that
allowed the mislabeling to occur in
the first place
Heinz USA announced this
week that it has discovered the
reason for perk found in cans of
vegetarian baked beans it
manufactures. The cans
themselves were reported in a
Miami Beach supermarket, and
Orthodox rabbis here promptly
issued a warning to Jews who
observe the dietary laws of
kashruth to refrain from using the
product until the rabbis checked
with the manufacturer.
Heinz USA said in its announce-
ment that only a single can of the
vegetarian beans was involved
and that it has already corrected
the problem
"We can only surmise that what
might have happened was a can of
pork and beans produced on a
previous shift got set aside and
was put back in when we were
labeling vegetarian baked beans,
explained Harry Carroll, general
manager of communications and
labor relations for Heinz USA, a
Pittsburgh-based company
Miami Beach Rabbi Albert
Schwartz. Florida director of the
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregations of America, said nere
that observant Jew- ..,. dot
resume eating Heinz beans, ex-
cept for those dated September
1988 and stamped with a lot
number 2715PBSI tne iot
number of the single can found
with pork in it.
Ner Tamid
Sisterhood
Ner Tamid Sisterhood will hold
their Angel Appreciation Lun-
cheon on Tuesday noon in the
Sklar Auditorium
The angels will be recognized
and honored by Chairman Mrs
Jack Greenberg The program is
arranged by Vice President Mrs
Abe Meyer, Miss Marmi. and
Frances Glazer
traditional seders
Temple Menorah
RAM! MATCH ABRAMOWITZ
Conducting
Caitor Murray Yavneh
The Temple Choir
Wednesday, April 23rd & Thursday. April 24th
FOR INFORMATION: 866-0221
Start a tasteful tradition. Make your
knaidlach with G. Washington's'
Seasoning and Broth.
G. WASHINGTON'S
For an extra special seder
make knaidlach that are different
from all other knaidlach with
G Washington s Seasoning and
Broth G Washington s is more
than a flavor enhancer
It s a complete seasoning
The unique Diend ol herbs and
spices flavors your knaidlach m
more ways than one
Serve knaidlach made with
G Washington s and hear your
guests sing their praises'
KNAIDLACH
*52ff
7 aMMMH vegetable oil
* cm* mm* meal
1
5 packets GWasMftetefls
GoMe* Seasoning *>* rm
Mu tggs od l cacfcei G Wastii- gton s ana pepper Gradually add mttuh meal
stirring until truck Retngerate iO minules m covered Bowl form doug" inte 6
Dalis Add remaining 4 packer* J Washington s to boiling water stir Drop mat
/an balls into worn simme-30 mmutes Makes 8 mauan bans
r&T/Aecf Kos- '.issover m SpoCiaHy'Marked-Packages


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Dennis Prager To
Speak At Fundraiser
Dennis Prager, co-author of
The Nine Questions People Ask
About Judaism" and "Why the
Jews' The Reasons for Anti-
l Semitism." will be the featured
I -neater at the scholarship fun-
Sg dessert affair for the
Jewish High School of South
Florida on April 16 at the Sans
Souci Hotel on Miami Beach.
In a telephone interview,
Prager provided a preview of his
answer to the question, "Why
Shouldn't Our Children
Assimilate?"
"The great majority of Jews
have no rational answer to this
question," Prager said.
He said Jewish institutions to-
day are preoccupied with "how to
survive." Jewish survival today is
"predicated on hostile forces to
the Jews."
Prager said Jewish institutions
do good work "by fighting anti-
Semitism, by fighting Israel's
enemies and by fighting for Soviet
Jewry."
But Jewish institutions are not
asking the question, "why we
should survive?"
"That is the question Jews are
asking and they are receiving no
answer and many of them are op-
ting not to survive," Prager said.
He said assimilation by Jews in
American society is a major pro-
blem. "It's happening every day
by the thousands."
Prager believes that Jews
should choose to survive because
they have a "unique role to play in
human history. We' have a
mission."
Prager said Jews have
something to say to the world.
"We must bring Judaism to Jews
and ethical monotheism to the
world."
The answer to the questions ac-
cording to Prager is, in one word,
"Judaism."
"There is no non-religious
answer to the question, 'why
should Jews survive?' The answer
is Judaism," he said.
Prager has been described by
Jhe Los Angeles Times as an
"amazingly gifted man and
charismatic moralist whose
mission in life already has been
crystalized ... to get people
obsessed with what's right and
wrong."
He has achieved his mission
>ugh his critically acclaimed
woks, his quarterly magazine
Ultimate Issues," his lectures
and his nightly radio show.
n the radio show, Prager ap-
plies moral values to the great
Jwl. political and personal
if"es of the day. While many
wondered if such a show could
succeed, it has, in fact, become the
most widely listened to early
evening show in Southern
California.
offer'S fPP*"mce on behalf
oftheJewlsh High School reflects
fund Raiser Set At
Temple Judea
nil5ft Judea n*8 scheduled a
tTJ., evenin* Pra 12 to ""<*
C,tAT renovation of the facility
l(*>ted in Coral Gables.
felLNigh^ At Th* ****' **
25? a, late buffet 8PPr. "
WfcB of valuable goods and ser-
tCl. onated *>y people
^hout the community and a
525 of games. 'A Night At The
Temn. '8 o- '^-Production" of the
^jership of Susan Feingold and
^ael,Br0therh00d',edby
the level and quality of education
the High School strives to obtain,
according to Ellie Katz, president
of the Jewish High School of
South Florida.
The reason for the April fun-
draiser is to raise more money for
the scholarship fund at the Jewish
High School.
"We're hoping to give the op-
portunity to attend the Jewish
High School to as many students
as possible," Mrs. Katz said. More
than one-third of the students at-
tending the Jewish High School
receive scholarships, although
each student pays at least a small
portion of the tuition.
"On April 16 we want to give
the community the opportunity to
demonstrate their support for
Jewish education in general, and
for the Jewish High School in par-
ticular," Mrs. Katz said.
"Even parents of grown
children who did not have the op-
portunity to attend a Jewish in-
stitution at the high school level
are very enthusiastic about our
school," Mrs. Katz said. "They
feel the very existence of such an
institution demonstrates our com-
munity's commitment to Jewish
education."
She said all Jewish children
should have the opportunity to
"learn about their roots and tradi-
tions as well as receive an ex-
cellent secular education, and this
is provided by the Jewish High
School, which has an excellent
reputation for its academic both
Jewish and secular programs."
Sxeeu^i^
Wate****
w.
our second locavon
?h the appointment
with the apv rs for
as Exclusive Cater*
ESS*
Some choice dates
aresti//ava./ab'es
P,ease contact us at
534-7213/945-2221
U Located At:
gsssss
Kfln Hebre^ongregation
Temp' Bern
1700 Michigan avi39
Miami Beach, F.


Sf
It couldn't be anything
but Maxwell House;
j^Good to the last Drop-

K Cm lifted Kothar


Page4-B TV Jewish FToridiaaTriday. April 4. 1986
A*wm 5 Kv>." \eft -- m --
Flor-..:.: \w' -7~.:,: ~- : .- .-'.:
Ammtmmitr \[ \[ -: -
SmAmat I -vote Durnferfor*. TV 4
HOLLYWOOD
Retirement Home
Great Food
Laundry Reasonable
Call Gloria
922-6924
Almanac
Available
Congregation Kol Y'lsroei
Charenm and its pabbc informs -
?on arm. the Jewish Community
lirfmiiiiliini Council, im issued a
Passover Almanac which a being
distributed free of charge m time
for the Passover festival which
starts on Wednesday evening
Apr. 23.
Rabbi Rubin R Doom, spiritual
leader of the congregation and
mauraac of the Coonai. exptair.-
ed that the Passover Almanac
contains information about
Passover, ooe of the most impor-
tant holidays in the Jewish
calendar
Included in the Passover
Almanac are speca. prayers and
recitations a.-'
historical background aboc. the
- _- "' "..-.- -.: >ii> I -ir-i.
. -._ lealirg
-'? various customs
:ere- sected
Hav t i Seder foe
..:' :' -
ira:
-eip r. pnpviag -
for Pass.?'.
Balmoral and Bal Harbour 101
To Hold Federation Event Sunda
Passover Calorie
Guide
Catones. Sodtam. Jwwiirol r
SO Psaacti foods. traOHiooai
^cm Sand S5 X F Stem.
Boj Si Laon.a. HJ 07SOS
The residents of Balmoral and
Bal Harbour 101 will bold a
cocktail party and buffet dinner
on Defaalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's 1986 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Project
Reoewai-Or Akrva Campaign on
Sunday, at 6 p.m. in the main din-
ing room of the 101 Building.
Norman Braman. a Federation
vxe-president will be the special
guest speaker Braman has served
x many leadership positions in
this community and at the na-
tional ievei. Twice he has served
as genera, chairman of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Err.erger.cy Fund Campaign. He
! served as a special consultant
to the chairmar. of the President's
Commission oa the Holocaust, and
a memoer of the board of
directors of the United Israe. Ap-
pea. and Tei Aviv University
BnaMB was dv^en by President
Reagan :. serve on the United
States r. i ist Merr
Na'amat USA
A :a.-: ta..;. .s .-r. tap :'--.-- .:
r:.-i ~-~:.~z I ".."- A. -.
Chapter t Na ama: USA I
neld Twain r : : rr. at the
id Carter S r~ Miami
Beach.
MvgM acting presi
i. ore: ta
upcoming holiday of Passover.
I
Council.
Sam Rosenfeid will chair ft,
event sponsored by Federation's
Alliance Dms>on. E-nt.- Leg^
reception chairman.
Members of the 101 Buildup
Executive Committee inch*
Isidore Abrams. Leon Cohen
Jules Gerson. Frances HanJ?
Cal Kovens. Irv Kover.. Rohen
Marun. Charies Menrtier itA
Millstein. Murray Puterrran and
Edward Shapiro.
The Balmoral Executive Coo.
mittee is comprsec .:' Sidrw
Feldman. Walter Le
Howard Mescoc
and
Live In
Housekeeper
For f amity of three
adults and small
friendly dog. Private
home in NE Dade.
Experienced, ref-
erences required.
Please call 576-4000.
ext. 220 between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m..
Monday through
Friday.
WEDNESDAY. APRDL 9 at 8 pan.
KLEZMER gS;NSERVATORY
Yiddish Vocal 4 I
tal Music
Ticket Info: S32-U91
Tickets: Ail Select-A
t Uencio 4 All Baas loca
i
Concert in ike Snnctuarv of: TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
of GREATER MLAMI. 4144 Chase A ve Miami Beach
Tradition.
Fruity and hearty
traditional Kosher
red and white wines
i^t
KOSHER BOBOwBt W01ES
\


Friday, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
V ,,, fiance and Allied Trades Division Annual Dinner held
,, hSalfofthe 19*6 CJA-1EF Campaign were.Jrom left Sher-
wwd(Woedy) Wei*r, Honorary Committee chairman; and Ezra
Kail, chairman of the Division.
i\'
si HI I I
Residents of the Kenilworth and the Tiffany gathered far a buffet
dinner on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewkh Federation 1986
CJA-IEF Campaign. Seen at the event were.Jrom left. Kenilwor-
h Tiffany Alliance Chairmen Dr. Berniee Miller and Rubin
PntMin; event guest speaker Israel Amitai; and KenilworthlTif
fnny Chairman Seymour Roth.
**************** **************"J
* Women's Division of the
J Greater Miami j
I Jewish Federation J
* NOMINATING COMMITTEE
J PRESENTS THE FOLLOWING SLATE {
* OF OFFICERS FOR 1986-87 *
* President..........................Dorothy Podhurst
* *
* Vice President, J
* Portfolio of Campaign..............Gail Jaffe Newman f
Vice President, *
* Portfolio of Campaign Designate............Amy Dean
* Vice President, J
j Portfolio of Community Education.......Terry Drucker *
Vice President, *
* Portfolio of Leadership *
* Development......................Robbie Herakowita a
J Secretary.................................Elaine rosa *
* Parliamentarian.........................Sue Graubert ^
\l *
* Nominating Committee *
* Chairwoman........................Maxine Schwartz *
L Immediate Past J
President............................Mikki Futernick J
I* *
accordance with the By- a
liami Jewish Federation
l*Sctionir -a
*The list of nominees shall be presented to the Women's Division by +
publication no later than April 15. ?
LSfctionHJ J
Lj Additional nominations may be made only by peUtion carrying fifteen ^
lyai or more signatures of persons with voting privileges, proyiaea
1^, consent of the nominee has been obtained in advance. These petitions J
U.must rech the Chairman of the Nominating Committee not later than j
l^'ourteen 114) days after the slate has been published. J
'Section II *
H there are no further nominations, the slate as published shall be *
Jcons,dered elected on May. 1 J
] WOMEN'S DIVISION NOMINATING COMMITTEE *
Cutting the ribbon to officially open the May
Visitors Center were (lift to right) President
Harold Beck; chairman of the Board Judge Ir-
ving Cypen; Past Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged Executive Director and
President of Mount Sinai Medical Center,
Fred D. Hirt; Isabel and Sam May and Ex-
ecutive Director Marc Lichtman.
Eva Rosner (Stern '68), second from left, was
recently honored by the Florida Friends of
Yeshiva University as Alumnus of the Year at
its Heritage Award Dinner on Miami Beach.
Pictured with Mrs. Rosner are (left to right)
her husband Alexander, Senator for Florida
Paula Hawkins, Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University Chairman Dr. Matthew Zucker-
man, Mrs. Shirley Gross and Rabbi Shraga
Gross. Senator Hawkins was the recipient of
the Distinguished Public Service Award and
keynote speaker. Mrs. Gross is the wife, and
Rabbi Gross the son, of the late Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross, whose memory was honored at
the Dinner.
You Are Cordially Invited To
Judge/Deputy Commissioner Trask's
Judicial Retirement Dinner
Judge/Deputy Commission*
David L. Trask
has retired from the Bench after 12 years
of dadlcatad Judicial Services.
The DINNER will be held at the
KONOVER HOTEL (Grand American Ballroom)
Thursday, April 17th, 1986
7:00 p.m. Reception 8:00 p.m. Dinner and Dancing
to the Music of Ted Martin Orchestra
PROGRAM INCLUDES ENTERTAINMENT, FUN (IZZY ABRAMS, ESQ.) ale. ate.
$37.50 per person (Includes tax, gratuities, and free Hotal Valet Parking)
IF YOU PLAN TO ATTEND, PLEASE SEND YOUR RESERVATION(a) and check, to:
HOWARD N. PELZNER, Esquire, Committee Chairman
Suite 800, Roberts Building
28 West Flagler Street /an*\ 17Q.R.1^5
Miami, Florida 33130 TEL: (JU5) d I 9 -B440
NOT A Campaign Dinner NOT A Fund Ralelng Dinner
JUDGE TRASK neither Stake, nor I. a candidate tor any Qov^nmenta. Office._______________
s
All Judges who retire from the Bench after years of dedicated
Judicial Services to and for the community, deserve
community appreciation.
------Konover Hotel


J
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, April 4, 1986
Sharon Shenhav To Meet With
50 Na'amat USA Chapters
Sharon Shenhav. director of
Na'amat Legal Services in
Jerusalem, will be in South
Florida Monday and Tuesday to
meet with leaders of the area's
judiciary, Zionist organisations
and Na'amat USA. the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America.
Mrs. Shenhav, who is visiting
the United States under the
auspices of the World Zionist
Organization, American Zionist
Federation and Na'amat USA,
will address Dade County judges
and attorneys Monday, from 4:30
to 6 p.m. at a reception at South
Shore Hospital and Medical
Center, hosted by the center.
Circuit Court Judges Thomas
Carney and Murray Goldman and
Dade County Judges Joan Lenard
and Celeste Muir are co-
chairpersons of the reception at
which Mrs. Shenhav will discuss
the legal status of women in Israel
and Na'amat's legal aid services
to women.
In addition, Mrs. Shenhav will
meet with leaders of more than 50
Na'amat USA chapters, dubs and
councils from throughout Palm
Beach, Broward and Dade coun-
ties Tuesday, at a Southeast Area
board meeting and luncheon. The
event is slated at the Konover
Hotel, from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Israel Bonds To Honor
North Miami Beach Resident
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Helene
Ungar of North Miami Beach on
Monday, at the Admiral's Port
condominium in North Miami
Beach. The event, which will be
held in the condominium's east
card room, will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Ungar. who will receive the
Israel Freedom Award, is being
recognized for her work on behalf
of many Jewish causes and for her
support of the State of Israel
through the Israel Bond program,
both in Miami and Long Island.
Ungar has served as a vice
president of the National Council
of Jewish Women. Peninsula Sec-
tion, and as vice president for
three years of the Long Island
branch of the National Women's
League of United Synagogues.
She has also served as treasurer
of the Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry and as president of
the Mt. Scopus Chapter of
Hadaasah for three years.
Serving as chairman of the Ad-
HeleaeUagar
mini's Port Israel Bonds Commit-
tee is Eric Salm.
Hadassah Chapter
Honors Child Life
Members
On Sunday, April 6, the
Hatikvah Chapter of Hadassah is
sponsoring a luncheon to honor its
child life members. Young ladies
as young as eight months will
dress in their most fashionable at-
tire, be adorned with real cor-
sages and select from a menu of
peanut butter and jelly, plain jelly,
cream cheese and jelly, or plain
cream cheese sandwiches. The
11:30 a. m. event will take place at
the Kendall home of Amy Mit-
telberg, Hatikvah's life member-
ship chairman, who is coor-
dinating the affair.
"Hadassah goes to a lot of effort
to make those who have commit-
ted themselves to life membership
feel special." Mittelberg explain-
ed. "Many of our daughters have
been made life members. They
always watch their mommies
dressing up for Hadassah lun-
cheons, and we decided they are
entitled to their OWN special
day."
All the girls were mailed writ-
ten invitations, and they will leave
the luncheon with party favors in
hand, just like real Hadassah
ladies.
Art Week At
Hebrew
Academy
Activities and demonstrations
depicting various artistic techni-
ques and art forms will be held at
die Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Elementary
school this week.
Observing "Art Week." the
agenda of activities will include
demonstrations by guest artists
who will visit the school: Tallis
Weaving by Florette Semigram, a
lecture on Architecture at the
Center for Fine Arts; trips to the
Bass Museum and to Lincoln Road
where they will experience a Pot-
ters Wheel and Clay demonstra-
tion by Phyllis Greenhouse.
Moonlight Madness was the theme of the 1st Annaul North Dade-
Broward Sew Leadership Dinner Dance held recently at the
Bonaventure Hotel in Hollywood. The Sew Leadership is a divi-
sion of the State of Israel Bond Organization and consists of
young professionals who purchase Israel Bonds in an effort to
help the Jewish nation gain economic independence. Making the
event extra special for Diane Gorfinkel, second from right, was
the fact that she was awarded a trip to Israel on the Sew Leader-
ship Israel Bond Mission in July. With her at the presentation
are her husband Marcos {rights and Mario and Eileen Ginzberg.
who was awarded a free trip to Israel at last year's Sew Leader-
ship Dinner Donee,
TMC AIR COWOITIOMCO ~^K?5|
Waldman
worn
HOTEL
STRICTLY KOSHER CUISINE
IN
I OLA TT
KMN BS FO A I
$35P"i
$35 p" i
$60 pen
8 Dinners
M*| Bodi Sedan)
$195 p^p****"
ruiiniiarcm
REUVEN BLUM
For W Ca* SAM WAUMtAN
5385731 or 534-4751
On The Oce mt Of St Mhml Bch
JWV Auxiliary Post 682
Installs Officers April 13
The Abe Horowiti Post No. 682
and Ladies Auxiliary Jewish War
Veterans, are having: installation
of 1986/87 officers on Sunday
morning, April 13.
The program will begin at 10:30
a.m. at the McDonald Center,
North Miami Beach. There will be
an award given to the North
Miami Beach "Policeman of the
Year." Donald Reynolds.
Newly elected Post Officers are:
Commander, Bernard Massarsky;
Senior Vice Commander. Herbert
Bergen; First Junior Vice Com-
mander. Max S. Simon; Second
Junior Vice Commander, Eugene
Ferber; Judge Advocate, Bernard
Chaney; Chaplain, Seymour
Hoberman; Post Surgeon, Dr.
Jack Gerard and Adjutant, Soil
Weinberg.
Also. Quartermaster. Morris
Greebel: Officer of the Day.
Willian Schneider; Servi* J
fleer, Herbert Bergm- nJ
Year Trustee. Frank qZ
Two-Year Trustee!^
One-Year Trustee *m3
Schneider .* aJJS|
fleer, Carmen Goldapple.
Newly elected Aiuoliv, J
ficers are: President, JJ3
Alter; Senior Vice PresZ
Selma Levine; Junior VicTS
dent, Rose Weinberg, ChJ*
Rose Greebel; Patriotic hSj
tor, Faye Goldapple and ComW
tress, Claire Natter.
Also, Treasurer, Sylvia WflU
Guard, Florence Gilde; Histok
Yvette Gromet; Trustees, Jufc
Warmbrandt, Alice Brunnertf
Ann Friedman; RecordiJ
Secretary, Ruth Weinganw
Financial Secretary, GertmJ
Barnathan and Correspond* I
Secretary. May Steinberg.
Rabbi Brilliant To Speak At Hadassah
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant will be the
speaker at the concluding Spring
meeting of the Torah Chapter of
Hadassah at Harris Hall of Tem-
ple Zamora. Coral Gables on Mon-
day. April 14. Time is 12:30. Of-
ficers will be installed by Area
Vice-President. Bess Lieblich. in-
cluding: President, Vera Fiedler;
Administrative Vice-President.
Olga Issenberg; Education Vice-
President. Meiba Stern; Fundrais-
ing Vice-President. Rose Lauren
Membership Vice-President
Dorothy Spector; and Progmt
Vice-Presidents, Libby Ueber-
man and Diane Nichtbe'rger.
Also, Financial Secrettrj.
Jeanne Fish man; Treasurer, Let
Stiglitz; Recording Secreurt.
Ann Young: Corresponding
Secretary, Mary Zack ind |
Jarliamentanar. Ann Goldberg
NASSAU GARDENS
Beautiful Garden Apt.
1 Bedroom Adult Apt.
1495 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach
653-2217
Try the\
T>KY
This Passover, experience a
delightful change of taste:
Dry Chablis and Dry Burgundy,
new from Manischewit:.
Made for nine drinkers
who prefer the popular
taste of dry nines, both are
Kosher for Passover and,
of course, the year round.
Celebrate Passover
with the wines that will
become as welcome a tra-
dition as Manischewitz
traditional wines: new
Manischewitz On Chablis
and Dry Burgundy
Ask your wine merchant
to be sure to order them
m time for Passover.
wutuhjs MAM8CMCW w&hFrgini* 1-------
-_
Manischeibitzj
^_^ ,984Maaanft Wmb BrooUvn. Ml IUH


Rep. Elaine Bloom Sworn Into Office
FYida'y, April 4, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7 6
History was made as newly
elected ftepresentative Elaine
Bloom was sworn into office when
her husband. Circuit. Court Judge
Philip Bloom administered the
oath of office in the House
Chambers in Tallahassee. Judge
Bloom was assisted by Supreme
Court Justice Rosemary Barkett.
who became the first woman ap-
pointed to Florida's highest Court
I in 1985.
Representative Bloom, (D) who
represents District 104, was
[elected in a special election on
March 4 to fill the seat vacated by
Barry Kutun who resigned to run
I for Governor.
Representative Bloom previous-
ly represented most of the area
when she served two terms in the
House of Representatives from
: 1974-78. She was returned to of-
Ifice in a landslide Democratic
primary victory with 76.8 percent
of the' vote. Dr. Allen Morris,
Clerk of the House of Represen-
tatives also officiated at the
| ceremony.
Representative Bloom, 48, dur-
i ing her prior years as a member of
the House, chaired the Joint Com-
mittee on Economic Policy and
the Federal/State Appropriations
Committee. She served on nine
Conference Committees, in-
cluding three years of service on
Conference Committees on the
Budget. She authored over 30
I pieces of legislation which became
law. including the Florida Interna-
1 tional Banking Act which, accor-
ding to a recent University of
Miami study, now produces over
700 million dollars worth of
economic activity annually in
South Florida along with a total of
over 4000 new jobs.
Temple N
Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EQANVX0LU_V1PI07 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-18T03:28:45Z PACKAGE AA00010090_02983
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES