The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02982

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
dTewIslfo FloFidiamL
M0M
59 Number 13
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, March 28,1986
PratfMocfMt BvMdHSl '6
Price 50 Cents
iambi, the first Israeli-made robot designed to
neutralize explosive devices-, is unveiled by the
Police Bomb Disposal Unit. The robot, which
climb stairs, is equipped with an
automatic rifle that can be Jtred to detonate
bombs. Bambi has two cameras for eyes and a
build-in closed-circuit TV in its forehead so
that sappers can direct its moves safely from a
distance.
Mrae As PM
Won't Change French Mideast Policy
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
rice's close friendship
hd support for Israel
Ithin the context of a
jnerally even-handed
flicy in the Middle East
be unchanged as a
suit of President Francois
Stterrand's appointment
of Jacques Chirac to be the
new Prime Minister.
A center-right coalition, con-
sisting of Chirac's neo-Gaullist
Rally for the Republic (RPR) and
the liberal Union for French
Democracy (UDF), won 293 seats
in the parliamentary elections giv-
ing it an absolute majority on the
577-seat National Assembly. The
Socialist Mitterrand, whose term
expires in 1988. and the conser-
few Evidence Uncovered
About Waldheim's Past
le World Jewish Congress
i released a 1948 U.S. Ar-
document showing that,
erWorldWarll.boththe
ny and the United Na-
fcis War Crimes Commis-
|n (UNWCC) listed Kurt
ildheim as a suspected
war criminal.
ne document a page from
the Army's "Combined Registry
of War Criminals and Security
Suspects" ("CROWCASS") -
reports that Waldheim's ap-
prehension was being sought by
Yugoslavia on suspicion of com-
plicity in what the Registry listed
as "murder."
Waldheim, who served as
Secretary-General of the United
Nations from 1972 to 1981, has
been at the center of a storm of
controversy since the first week of
March, when the Austrian
Continued on Page 6-A
vative Chirac, will be sharing
power in the realm of foreign
policy and other affairs of govern-
ment. Both men are considered
staunch friends of Israel.
THEY REPORTEDLY have
agreed to name Bernard Rai-
mond, a 60-year-old career
diplomat, as Foreign Minister and
Didier Bariani. a long-time friend
of Israel, as Deputy Foreign
Minister. Bariani's sphere is ex-
pected to be European affairs.
Israelis and most members of
the French Jewish community
hold Mitterrand to be one of
Israel's best friends in Europe. He
was, in fact, openly favored before
the elections by his fellow member
of the Socialist International,
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres.
There is a general consensus
between Mitterrand and the new
parliamentary majority on most
foreign issues, including the Mid-
dle East. Both sides support
Israel's right to exist within
secure, recognized borders. They
also favor Palestinian participa-
tion in peace talks and recognize
the Palestine Liberation
Organization as one of the main, if
not the only legitimate represen-
Continued on Page 2-A
Israel PACs
Seen Growing
Up Rapidly
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
While a debate continues
in the American Jewish
community whether it is
wise to be perceived as a
single-issue community,
political action committees
(PACs) formed to ensure
continued support for Israel
are expanding rapidly.
A recent report by Common
Cause, the citizen's advocacy
group, asserts that "the pro-Israel
PACs' contributions may well
have been the fastest growing of
all interested groups during the
past five years," increasing their
contributions between the 1980
and 1984 elections by nine times
as compared to a doubling by all
PACs during the same period.
Since 1981, 65 pro-Israel PACs
have contributed $6,120,713 to
candidates for the Senate and the
House.
IN 1985, the pro-Israel PACs
gave Congressional candidates
$853,520, according to Common
Cause. The top recipient was Sen.
Robert Kasten (R., Wise.), chair-
Continued on Page 9-A
Sen. Alan Cranston
Rep. Larry Smith
Israel 'Confident'
Egypt Will Do Everything
To Find Ambush Terrorists
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel expressed con-
fidence Sunday that the
Egyptian government will
do everything possible to
find and punish the ter-
rorists who fatally shot an
Israeli woman and wounded
three other Israelis in a car
ambush outside the Cairo
International Trade Fair.
The victims were Israeli
Embassy staff members in
Cairo.
A statement issued by
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
after Sunday's Cabinet meeting
said he was satisfied with the way
the Egyptian authorities are
handling the case and the wide
coverage it has gotten in the
Egyptian media.
ISRAEL'S Minister of
Tourism, Avraham Sharir. who
Continued on Page 9-A
Dodd Urges
Jews Share Their Main Concerns With Non-Jews
to. Christopher Dodd
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Sen. Christopher Dodd
(D., Conn.) is urging
American Jews to discuss
the issues that concern the
Jewish community, not only
among themselves and
members of Congress, but
with their non-Jewish
friends and neighbors.
"To not discuss these sub-
jects" with non-Jews "is a
mistake of monumental propor-
tions," he told the 500 delegates
attending the closing luncheon of
the national biennial convention of
the American Jewish Congress at
the Omni-Shoreham Hotel. "You
cannot sustain any policy in a
democracy without broad-based
public support for what you are
doing," Dodd asserted.
HE SAID Jews have been
neglecting this "important educa-
tional process." He said he knew
it was "awkward" to discuss these
issues with people who may be ig-
norant of the issues and even ask
"offensive" questions, but it has
to be done.
Dodd said members of Con-
gress, who for the most part sup-
port Israel and other issues of par-
ticular concern to Jews, were also
"to blame" because they discuss
these issues only before Jewish
audiences. He said he has begun
talking about them in his general
foreign policy speeches.
Dodd said his concern comes
from his father, the late Sen.
Thomas Dodd (D., Conn.), who
served as prosecutor under
Robert Jackson at the Nuremburg
Continued on Page 6-A
\


.*-*
Page 2-A The Jewish rlorkfiaa'Fnday. March 28. Tj86_
Jews Stunned
LaRouche Wins Seen As Freak Events
X x
>.
Bt KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK Jew
in Chicago are express:!-.,:
surpr.se a: the 5Tur.r..:\j:
pofataad -pse: ac-evec ir.
the Illinois Democraoc Par-
ty primary eiecnor.s ^a>:
week by two follower?
ultra-conservative ano ex-
tremist Lyndon LaRouche.
Jr.
Bat these officnis suggest at
the victories by Mart Fairehfld for
the Democraoc nomination for
Lieutenant Governor and Jazuce
Hart as the party's nocunaooc for
Secretary of State were not in-
dications of support for LaRouche
and the views of bis pobtieal
organizacor..
Instead. they see the victory as
the remit of a combtnarjon of'fac-
tors, including the iow voter ru-
nout about K percent of the
state's 1.6 miliior. registers:
;ters due to raxy weather
ng voter apathy r -_-r
political process, and a re;ect:
of the Democraoc Party car-
es running agai^: the
LaRouche fbilowers.
DEMOCRATIC Parr, affl
> condemned the statewide
resu-ts hi lEinots. "These peopie
invade sar parr.' sa:c Ca.
-airman of the n¬s
Der>xrat:v- Parr. They're ex-
tremists. They're not x the
mainstream. ::' Dem. ?:rat. :
l- _*: : r : -
c-ectxmabie-
I n W a s : n g t o Par:;.
spokesman Terr. Mxhae. ia.t
*ers ::"
Lyndon LaRouche have heer. abie
lo deeerre voters in the Ma
proar. LaRouche represe-
>. t't.z --.canpol:t -
: -
Jonathan Levme of the American.
JaaU '-*** **** Michael
Kotsr. af the Art:-Defamation
League :f B'na: B'r.zr.
Jewish Telegraphic Agenc
seoarate telephone interriews Last
from Chicago tha
eiecooa* do not indicate new-
fooad suppor. for LaRouche
They anrteted it to voter at
i-: i> ::' ~r-::- .erage :'. tr.e
two e.cted andantes.
~n was rr.ucr. i media'
preoccupaboc wttfc the ekcoom
::' i. :v -- > y.r-7- ~.- .r.t>
wards that virtually al other
oons were not cove**-"- a', all
and certainly not the rr.rr.ar.es :": r
- t. a.-.: Secretar.
State - neg>: na. rep reset tat: -
BIT. i.-. -:.:.; t L
- : seej : -
_crrs:e-: as i.:
rr.rr.er.tat. rs it:
. : ir.-itta thai aa i :te was
a re>ecooc ar>i
Hint :: re'.ts
""- L.iF. i.T.t : r";
I a 2S-;.ea.-
oor. : votes ir. BM ra~>
II State S rg
Sangr-.r >: ;at :_--.-
v-.ct:r. ty ir- :.- 1
running against Aureja Pat
IsjajMBr I Mi fCMaaji I baa-
known politicians. AJderman and
former Congressman Rorr.ar.
PucinskL
The eJeeoons. in addition M *
ving as ar. ern.tmrrassmeot to the
Democraoc Part}-, also pose a
serious threat to Democrat
Stevenson Ill's secor.d quest ton
the governorship of Illinois. He
has issued a statement in which he
vowed. "I wiL never run on a
ticket with candidates who
espouse the hate-filled folly of
Lyndon LaRouche."
HE SAID he would seek legal
ways to purge these bnarre and
dangerous extremists off the
ocket." There is speculation that
9aa etison may chose to form a sc-
calied "new Democraoc slate.'
--.i effectively eaving the
LaRouche candidates on the
Democraoc list without a guber-
natorial candidate. Other options
are aa* being explored by
Stevenson.
LevsM .-.i : there _as r:
spent much money thesr tarr
psjfl >r that they -artpaigneG
B -t 1 :
-. I the I 11i I
B
._..... .
Democraoc Par:.
LaRouch i Sal
- -

i -
- > raaoe
SBsaeensA I S Presjcr
>"- --: The
Asa sted I bbm
- .-. '.' -.r-
i Dresider.r-a.
Dr Paul E Gray ilefii. prtsuient of MIT. ttmfi /Sr;r|
.Vunn. acting president of Tecknwn-h*- tuit A
Technology, during his recent visit to Hiv'i A i ../)njA
-:. r T'xhmon uns attended by M'' -.'..' '..4^1
and MTT aiumnx in Israel.
Chirac As PM Won't Change
French Mideast Policy
Speculation Grows
Is Sharansky In Poor Health?
By DAVID LANDAl"
And HIGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM 1JTA1
Growing specuiation tha:
Anatoiy Sharansky is in
poor health was connrmeo!
by his wife. Avital. But she
said a report that he was too
ill to attend a banquet in his
honor last week was "a httle
exaggerated."
Avtta. Sharansky *?.; vn
reosMed with her r^sraac x
West Germany oe Fee II when
he was released by Soviet
aathorroes a aa East-West
praoaer exchange after
f-ne years ?._ssan praons
labor tamp*, said he -has to rest
. He 3 resong now He has
wak a x. "
SHE ALSO disclosed
iiT"Ji!ii m ^*
psBashanesK eel.'" He bad bees

. -:. _
that
agaxst r^s tarsr. treatment.
A-.ta. r^t-r -
repty to ouesooas daring a oner*
?pearanA.-e mi ore a conference
here of the U.S. Union of Coaoh
for Soviet Jewry-, the Bratsk
"Gronp of 35." wmch has beer
ta-ri:g-r for e = .gnat::r
ngho for Sovwt Jews: and the
In an 11 -oased Soviet Jewry
Edccatioc aad Information
Center
Tne Group of 35" head a ban-
quet -t. Tei Aviv ast week to
honor Sharansky. He dai not ap-
pear and Sovkc ajya sources said
he was too a" even to record
greecngs the banquet.
The same sources said he has
sat been abie to sieepor to adapt
* a norms' da* after years x
.Tin 1 at the Sowtet Gaiag
Accordxag to these soui.es
S^irarjiiL;. Vr -jj troaiae wai-
iag any desunce secaase sj a
the\'re called legacies ot love
last \ear HADASSAH received
hundreds ot them from
forward-looking men & women
raaaocT hom
K>C IOO OW
P$*. TH4I
tovt KAim
ifcao wmx
im on 4 oh a
CM V* HADASSAH
a* BBAH.
BBM roenxooo-
BIT HIS wtfe sa>d ne was
" '-- -- -- -J-Xr:
- artin content aad her
resaark that "he has to walk a kit'
tee me: :: >::-_.- rec:rts trtat he
: *i^iri
-:n;ern. :. er Sriranskj 5
vea.tr ar>se oecacse he has not
seer seen m pobhc for several
weecs He and ha wtfe have bees
at a hoaday resort at northere
Israei When the ooapie was
raaated ost rsocth aey hadn't
sees each other since rhW wec-
SBf Moscow m l>-< 1:
they
after the
received oc
hasarrivai tr Israe.
At that one. he knked fh. wa!k-
*d orakiy. spoke to reporters and
addressed B wuhers at teagth.
Doctors who exaaaced hha after
ses arrrral fooad bbb to be
tkOQgh
troai
oaa. Avaai' said her
:_>:
Maj hi on ides'
^irthday Noted
A iMJm OTA) A
arg> rxc x Jewak Mini
recency gacaeree m a private
hasae a Msseoar a eaaaaeaarace
*hr ItTk in i j jf j__;
at Maaaaades. Sonet 1
ax Israel wx
P* gaibiii, sfTfiii ay C
Coatiaaed froa Page 1-A
- :' ---
.-arKKis Aral
:at :.i_i and x Jeraaierr. H^
-. .:' a PLC roie was
jei Taar Arafhl -
>L : -
oonal Palesoniar. peace con-
re" in Par;
C J1RAC. *r. asraal ai E
IGakaai vt govenuneai ::
President Vaierjr Giseard 1 Eata-
xg. deveioped a dose w:--
reiaoonsfaip witk the Jewtsh cor-
naaaty in Paris during his nine
years as Mayor ::" the rVsaeh
faprtal. an office he curr
holds. This bebevec : have
altered some of his positions on
the MkkDe East
Aa Prerr.ser fr.r -~i~r
Chirac engineered French rap-
proeheaaert w.th. the Arah' works.
He negooared Ae sale
rjoear reactor to Iraq, which
israe; destroyed in an air raid in
Joae. 1961. He was a persona-
fraud of Iraqi leader Saddam.
asaaatfc
Now. Cmrac a cotadered to be
Oie Frer. 1
Israel aivt I
- Hi He vis:t
December 1
Jewish Telegr 1 I
I
I
Syria's Jews an |
oSe cour.t-.
-ac. 55. is I
: -ter.ir-: for um 1 res ienc] :i|
France K ; tes say hi
crwnts or Je rt A n*|
of Jew.- I
rand" in 1961
PASSOVER- liP6
laaaaaaaoaaai -nix

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Baauty ParkK on


News in Brief
U.S. Lawyer Seeks to Defend Demjanjuk
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By JTA Services
JERUSALEM The Justice
Ministry is considering a request
by an American attorney, Mark
O'Connor, to represent alleged
Nazi war criminal John Demjan-
juk when he stands trial in an
Israeli court.
O'Connor, who came to Israel
last week, submitted a formal re-
quest Friday to Meir Gabai, Direc-
tor General of the Justice
Ministry, and Dennis Gouldman,
head of the Ministry's Interna-
tional Department. Justice
Minister Moshe Nissim will con-
sult with the National Council of
the Chamber of Advocates. The
question is whether a foreign at-
torney not a member of the Israel
Bar may argue a case in an Israeli
court.
If O'Connor's request is denied,
an Israeli defense attorney will be
appointed for Demjanjuk. But it
appeared likely Sunday that the
Justice Ministry will allow O'Con-
nor to plead. A West German at-
torney was permitted to defend
Nazi war criminal Adolf
I Eichmann at his trial in Jerusalem
I in 1961.
Rabbis Urge Pope
To Review Convent Plan
PARIS Five chief rabbis
from four European countries
have urged Pope John Paul II to
reconsider plans by the Roman
Catholic Church to establish a con-
vent at the site of the Auschwitz
death camp in Poland.
A letter to the Pontiff was sign-
ed by Chief Rabbi Immanuel
Jakobovits of Britain; Chief Rabbi
Rene Sirat of France; Max
Warschawski, Chief Rabbi of
Alsatia; Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen
of Rumania; and Chief Rabbi
Mordechai Piron of Zurich.
They stated in their letter, "The
site of the former concentration
camp has become synonymous
with the Holocaust (of the Jewish
people)" and "turning it into a
religious pilgrimage would be both
painful and injurious." The pro-
posed convent would house nuns
of the Carmelite order from a half
dozen countriss, including Ger-
many and Poland.
Golan Oruze 'Normal'
Following Demonstration
JERUSALEM The four
Druze villages on the Golan
Heights remained quiet Sunday
after a noisy mass demonstration
against the Israeli government
Friday in which one police officer
| was injured.
Several thousand Golan Druze
converged on Majdal Shams, the
largest of the villages, to protest a
police raid on a local refrigerated
I warehouse where agricultural
[produce is stored. The police con-
fiscated two tons of apples belong-
ing to Druze growers who alleged-
ly failed to submit income tax
I returns.
The Druze claim the Israeli
authorities have been harassing
|tnem, especially since last month
when Premier Shimon Peres
ESPJ*- ternary formally an-
Tlexed by Israel in 1981. Police ar-
Fested 32 Druze youths for
noting. Violent demonstrations
"ad also greeted Peres' visit.
[Croatian Paper Rapped
for Anti-Semitism
NEW YORK The Australian
Kress Council has censured a
l^roatian weekly weekly
rew,sPaPer. Hrvatski Tiednik, for
pubhshing an article that contains
I wild and unsubstantiated" anti-
Semitic statements. The Press
l^ouncU, according to information
made available here by the Anti-
defamation League of B'nai
" nth, acted on a complaint filed
"gainst the weekly by the Anti-
v fam*tion Commiawcn of B'nai
< nth District 21 of Australia and
New Zealand.
The article, which charged that
Jewish organizations "run the
world," was a "classic case of con-
spiracy theory which has been us-
ed by anti-Semites for the past
century," according to the Press
Council, adding that it was
"typical of the kind of propaganda
that has been used to stir up anti-
Jewish prejudice and justify racial
persecution.
Sharansky: I'm Tired,
But Otherwise Well
JERUSALEM Anatoly
Sharansky says he is feeling
"quite well." The 38-year-old aliya
activist who spent nine years in
the Soviet Gulag told reporters
here that reports that his health
deteriorated since he arived in
Israel February 11 are untrue.
"According to the newspapers,
I am in very bad health. But the
truth is that I actually feel quite
well. I am only tired, and regret
that vacation is over," he said. He
was referring to his month-long
vacation with his wife, Avital,
which kept him out of the public
view. That apparently gave rise to
rumors he was ill.
Sharansky returned to his job at
the Council for Soviet Jewry Sun-
day. He is scheduled to undergo
another series of medical check-
ups at Hadassah Hospital. His on-
ly complaint is that he is unable to
sleep more than four hours a
night. He said it might be the
result of the excitement attending
his arrival in Israel. He also admit-
ted he suffers from nightmares.
Rival Herat Factions
Seek Power Accord
JERUSALEM The rival fac-
tions of Herut went to the peace
table Monday to seek an agree-
ment on power sharing and
possibly to reconvene Herat's
15th convention which
disintegraed in chaos two weeks
ago.
The latest development follow-
ed a meeting Sunday between
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
and Housing Minister David Levy.
It was their second get-together
since the convention aborted and
Shamir had to be escorted from
the hall by police under taunts
from Levy's largely Sephardic
supporters.
But passions apparently have
calmed and the two men agreed to
have their representatives meet to
discuss issues over which they ap-
peared earlier to be hopelessly
divided. One of them is the pro-
portion of representatives of each
faction in the party's institutions.
The factions are headed by
Shamir, Levy and Minister of
Commerce and Industry Ariel
Sharon respectively.
No More Foreign
Volunteers, Kibbutz Says
TEL AVIV Degania Aleph,
Israel's oldest and largest kibbutz,
had decided the time has come to
end its 18-year-old policy of accep-
ting foreign volunteers. The
reason, according to the kibbutz,
which was established by Jewish
pioneers in 1909, is that the
volunteers have a negative in-
fluence on kibbutz youth and their
presence has led to intermarriage
and emigration.
The volunteers work in the kib-
butz fields and factories for mon-
ths at a time in return for bed,
board and small amounts of
pocket money, and an opportunity
to tour Israel at little expense.
Israel's 200 kibbutzim play host to
about 20,000 volunteers a year,
half of them non-Jews.
Many of the latter are West
Germans or Scandinavians. They
have been coming to Israel in
large numbers since the 1967 Six-
Day War and, at that time, were
welcomed both as staunch friends
of Israel and much needed
volunteer labor.
Uruguay Will Continue
Friendship With Israel
MONTEVIDEO Foreign
Minister Enrique Iglesias con-
firmed that President Jufio
Sanguinetti will visit Israel next
Irving Kessler, executive vice chairman of the United Israel Ap-
peal (left), and Irwin S. Field, VIA's chairman (right), smile over
changes in UIA 's by-laws, which will expand its Board of Direc-
tors from 39 to 63, give more direct participation to local Jewish
Federations and the National UJA and increase the powers of the
organization's Board of Trustees. United Israel Appeal receives
funds raised from national UJA campaigns, as well as U.S. State
Department grants, and administers and allocates these funds in
Israel through the Jewish Agency there.
month and will also visit the
United Nations peace-keeping
force in the Sinai, of which
Uruguay is part. "As a symbol of
this adherence, Uruguay stands
for peace, Uruguay stands for
Israel and this will always be so,"
Iglesias told a B'nai B'rith forum
here last week.
The Foreign Minister, who was
keynote speaker in B'nai B'rith
District 25's first monthly
speakers forum of the year,
assured his audience that his na-
tion will not alter its friendship
with Israel despite the fact that
Uruguay will open up to the Third
World.
Iglesias, a noted economist who
for many years has served as ex-
ecutive head of the Economic
Commission for Latin America of
the United Nations, explained
that Uruguay and other Latin
American countries had to begin
"establishing relationships and
doing business with all nations" if
they were to solve their economic
crisis. "But," he emphasized,
"this does not mean that there is
even the slightest change in our
traditional friendship with
Israel."
Don't Send Children
To Co-Ed Schools Rabbis
JERUSALEM Israel rabbis
are exhorting parents not to send
their children to non-Orthodox
religious schools or to State-run
religious schools that are co-
educational. They also object to
schools where Jewish and Arab
pupils might meet.
These schools, though not for-
mally linked with the Conser-
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
Libya, Retaliation and the Sandinista 'Invasion'
The confrontation between the United States
and Libya in the Gulf of Sidra was manufactured
by the Reagan Administration weeks if not mon-
ths ago when the U.S. first announced its deter-
mination to test Moammar Khadafy's "line of
death" which far exceeds the internationally-
accepted, although not always practiced, 12-mile
limit on a country's sovereignty over its coastal
waters.
But we made no secret, almost from the start
of our naval maneuvers along the coast of Libya,
that our dominant intent was to breach
Khadafy's line in an effort to provoke him. The
line is about 150 miles offshore, which seems a
bit much compared to the international "norm."
Still, no one seems to be getting especially hot
under the collar about the 200-mile limit that
some of the Latin nations have announced.
While many observers, and the Administra-
tion itself, emphasize the importance for naval
nations to test these limits from time to time in
order to maintain the established precedence of
the 12-mile limit, the fact in this case is that we
are still seething over Khadafy's role in the
training and staging of international terrorist
acts, especially the recent shoot-outs at airports
in Rome and Vienna, where many Americans
were killed.
U.S. Can't Be Faulted
It is difficult to be critical of the Administra-
tion's motives. Someone, somewhere needs to
strike back, as we did after the Achille Lauro af-
fair in our effort to intercept the mastermind
behind the murder of the American, Leon Kl-
inghoffer, aboard the ship, no less than the hi-
jacking itself. And as the Israelis did in its bomb-
ing of Palestine Liberation Organization head-
quarters in Tunis.
President Reagn himself has argued, par-
ticularly after the bombing of our embassy in
Beirut, which resulted in the loss of some 250
Marines, that we cannot respond to terrorism
without knowing precisely who is responsible for
terrorist acts and where these terrorists may be
found and punished. To use military force in-
discriminately, he said, to kill innocent persons,
would be* no less terrorist than the act that pro-
voked our retaliation.
In the case of the current confrontation with
Khadafy, there is no doubt about the man, his
motives and his polices. Nor is there any doubt
about the missile-launching site at Suit from
which came the missiles fired by Libya at U.S.
naval planes.
At this point, the likelihood that the confronta-
tion will escalate into something far wider seems
slight. Khadafy will undoubtedly make exag-
gerated claims about his success in overpower-
ing Uncle Sam and sending him on his way from
the Gulf of Sidra. Then, he will simply quit.
Two Dominant Issues
But two dominant issues remain. One is
whether the confrontation will chasten
Khadafy's terrorist behavior. Khadafy himself
has already threatened Americans with
assassination in retaliation.
The second issue is in the nature of a question.
How is it that the confrontation, announced on
Monday, came simultaneously with a second an-
nouncement the alleged "invasion" of Hon-
duras by Nicaraguan Sandinistas in search of
Contras hiding there? As of mid-week, Hon-
duras continued to insist it knew of no such
invasion.
What is at stake? Could it be President
Reagan's bid in the Senate to override his defeat
in the House for $100 million in aid to the Con-
tras? In the heated fervor of the moment, when
Americans who appear generally to oppose our
military intervention in Nicaragua unite over
the shoot-out at the Gulf of Sidra, it is not
unlikely that the Administration can use that
energetic response to initiate an end sweep
around the Sandinista line.
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Pope's Synagogue Visit
On Apr. 13, Pope John Paul II is scheduled to
visit the synagogue in Rome's Jewish ghetto. In
1980, the Pope met with Rome's Chief Rabbi
Elio Toaff at a church next to the ghetto
situated about 100 yards from the synagogue.
Step by deliberate step. Pope John Paul has
taken the road toward what may well be the first
papal visit ever to a synagogue. Tullia Zevi,
president of the Union of Italian Jewish Com-
munities, has observed that the visit could be a
"fantastic step forward, or it could be a
perpetuation of ambiguities."
In this, Zevi appears to be responding to two
Jewish community points of view one, that
the visit will be little more than a symbolic
gesture to the Jewish people; the second, that it
will contribute substantially to Catholic-Jewish
relations.
Either way, there is little doubt that there has
been severe strain between the Jewish and
Catholic communities during the past few years.
And that one of the points of sharpest conten-
tion between the two has been the Vatican's
adamant refusal to extend formal diplomatic
relations with Israel.
These differences came as many celebrated 20
years of success in relations between Catholics
and Jews since Vatican Council II. At the same
time of the celebration, there was the publica-
tion in June, 1985 of Nostra Aetate, the
Vatican's "Notes on the Correct Way to Present
the Jews and Judiasm in Preaching the
Catechesis in the Roman Catholic Church." an
instrument which received sharp Jewish
ecumenical criticism in response.
We welcome the Pope's efforts to strengthen
Catholic-Jewish friendship, especially in light of
the recent strains. But we would also welcome
the Pope's ultimate gesture that it is incum-
bent upon him to understand the centrality of
Israel to the Jewish people.
Nostra Aetate failed to acknowledge the
religious significance of Israel to the Jewish peo-
ple. Furthermore, it mentioned the Holocaust
only briefly and superficially.
The Pope's Apr. 13 visit to the synagogue in
Rome is welcomed. But the Pope's step-by-step
trip there must now take him to his final station.
Ethnic Slurs
Bush's Tactics Wake Up Sleeping Giant
tUMCMPTIOM RATES m AdvAAOA ILOCAf AIM) Ona VAAf-SIAOO. Two VMrt-tMO) ThfA
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Friday, March 28,1986
Volume 59
17 2ADAR5746
Number 13
By ROBERT SEGAL
It may be that Vice
President Bush, shortly
after accusing New York
Gov. Cuomo of generating
divisiveness in America,
read about the death of the
theologian, Dr. Everett
Clinchy. If he did take note
of one Clinchy achievement,
Mr. Bush might realize his
conception of the
mischievous use of religious
and ethnic bias at election
time is a bit flawed.
It was Dr. Clinchy who helped
organize and for some time
directed the National Conference
of Christians and Jews. History
records that prominent
Republicans and Democrats
agreed after Al Smith's defeat in
his try for the presidency in 1928
that the nation was shamed when
the religious infighting during the
election bore the odor of the Ku
KluxKlan.
THE NCCJ aimed to promote
just ice, amity, understanding and
cooperation among religious
groups. An expressed hope was to
"eliminate intergroup prejudices
which disfigure and distort
religious, business, social, and
political relations."
The Bush-Cuomo square-off
began when columnists Rowland
Evans and Robert Novak wrote
that some politicians had mention-
ed that a Catholic-American of
Italian ancestry seeking the
presidency would be carrying a
double handicap, religious and
ethnic. This irked Gov. Cuomo
who was bothered also by another
columnist's comment that the
governor looked like a "guy from
'The Godfather.' "
Cuomo struck back at once, un-
doubtedly recalling that John F.
Kennedy early in his campaign 26
years ago smashed much of the
bias by making clear to a large
Protestant gathering that his
Catholic faith and.the guarantee,
given him by the Constitution that
Vice President Bush
Gov. Mario Cuomo
no religious test shall ever be re-
quired as a qualification for any
office had convinced him that the
separation of church and state is
"l"tf to our American con-
cept and heritage and should re-
main so.
"I AM disturbed by- increasing
reference to my ethnicity," said
Cuomo, referring specifically to
the Evans-Novak comment that
he faced ethnic difficulty. The col-
umnists rubbed salt in the wound
by citing a statement said to have
been made by a Democratic na
tional committeeman from the
deep South who saw failure ahead
for Cuomo in that region: "Bet
ween Richmond and Houston
there are no Cuomos and damned
few Marios."
Cuomo's mention of bias pro-
mpted Bush to accuse Cuomo of
fostering divisiveness. As Bush
saw it. Cuomo was "telling us to
ignore the millions of blacks.
Jews. Irish. Italians. Latins and
Poles who shattered the bonds of
discrimination."
Support for Cuomo came quick
ly from a usually cautious and con-
servative George Will. His thrust
was sharp. He viewed the Bush
criticism of Cuomo as a clumsy ef-
fort to gain favor among far right
Republicans. This, Will said, was a
lap dog type of action.
It seems reasonable to ask for
proof of the Bush statement that
Cuomo is telling Americans to ig-
nore minorities. Where can one
find a politician so foolhardly and
inept? What aspirant for high ol-
fice would write off 41 million
Hispanics, 30 million blacks, o
million Jews, more Americans ot
Italian descent than the enure
population of Italy, and more
Irish-Americans than the enure
population of Ireland?
MR. BUSH says the millions of
ethnics he regards as written*
by Mr. Cuomo "shattered"*
bonds of discrimination." True,
they had a hand in that pea
American triumph; but the back or
discrimination was broken*
large part by enactment of strong
civu rights legislation.
And it is a very vital sector of
the federal government
U.S. Commission on Civil Rig^
- set up to uphold and advance
those vital safeguards again
discrimination that the Reagan;
Bush Administration is in the pw
cess of undermining.
WNSSeven Arts


Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Yamit Settlers Still Recall Evacuation With Bitterness
By SIMON GRIVER
London Chronicle Syndicate
The 2,000 Israeli families
who were evacuated from
the Sinai in April, 1982 were
quickly forgotten. It was on-
ly six weeks later that the
Israel Defense Forces em-
barked upon Operation
Peace for Galilee, and conse-
quently all eyes shifted their
raze from the south and
were focused firmly on the
north.
The national trauma caused by
the abandonment of Yamit and
the other Sinai settlements was
soon eclipsed by the bloody hor-
rors of Lebanon. However, for the
families who paid the price of evic-
tion for the sake of the Camp
David accords and peace with
Egypt, the memories of lives left
in tatters still looms large.
WITH DEGREES of success
and failure, the Sinai settlers have
built new lives elsewhere, but all
retain deep-rooted recollections of
bitterness, frustration and
anguish, and all recall the sands of
the Sinai with romanticized tales
that smack of mourners speaking
of a fondly missed relative.
T he sure, the Sinai was en-
dowed with idyllic charms. But
the former residents of the land
returned to Egypt have elevated
their former homes, conjuring up
images of the Garden of Eden
amidst the gently shifting sands.
There were more than 1,000
families who lived in Ophira near
Sharm el-Sheikh and other
smaller settlements along the Red
Sea coast. Yet it was the 600
families who lived in Yamit, in the
Rafiah Salient on the Mediterra-
nean coast south of the Gaza
Strip, and the 400 families who in-
habited the surrounding 14 set-
tlements, who captured most of
the headlines and came to sym-
bolize the sacrifice that Israel had
made for peace.
IN PART, the relinquishing of
Yamit was left deeply engraved in
the Israeli psyche because the
rightwing "Stop the Withdrawal"
movement transported down
thousands of supporters and bar-
ricaded them in the town. But,
more significantly, the settlers in
the Yamit area embodied the
traditions of the Zionist pioneer-
ing spirit.
Most were Labor Party sup-
porters and had been promised by
the Labor-led government of the
early 1970s that their corner of
the Sinai would never be return-
ed, even if a peace treaty was one
day signed with Egypt. In the
event, the more hawkish
Menachem Begin was prepared to
return their land.
"The Yamit settlers felt as if
they had been stabbed in the back
by the Israeli government," ex-
plains David Nahmias, who until
| 1982 was director of the southern
region of the Jewish Agency's set-
tlement department. "I think
almost all of them have now got
over the trauma, but most remain
bitter and most are not satisfied
with their new lives."
Many become hostile when the
subject is merely mentioned and
several former Yamit settlers
stated in vehement language that
they do not grant interviews to
journalists. According to them,
|'journalists have helped to ruin
i their lives through their probing
I and prying and were currently
engaged in ruining the country.
THIS PERSONAL hatred
towards the media probably stems
from the fact that $360 million
was dished out in compensation to
the 2,000 families who left Sinai in
1982, and Israeli investigative
journalists went on the rampage
exposing supposed excesses and
abuses in the money awarded.
"Much of the media coverage of
A
Resistinq evacuation in Yamit, settlers use ... _. ,.>____*,w */
wooderTpoUs and tires in rooftop fighting sands of the Sinai with romanticized tabs
ZS IDF soldiers ordered to remove them that smack of mourners speaking of a fondly
on April 1, 1982. Today, all of them 'recall the missed relative.
1 people get angry, but if you watch them
you will see how optimistic they are /
the compensation was unfair and
exaggerated," says Nahmias.
"The money replaced homes,
fields, businesses and stores, but
not the endeavor and dreams that
had gone into them.
"The compensation was fair,
but it should not have been given
in such large lump sums. People
suddenly felt they were rich and
wasted their money on expensive
holidays abroad and on videos and
Volvos. They started houses that
were bigger than they could af-
ford. Many ran out of money
before they could replace what
they had left behind, and others
invested unwisely, losing money
when the bank shares collapsed."
Nahmias estimates that 40 per-
cent of those who lived in the
Yamit region have stayed in the
area, moving to settlements in the
neighboring Besor and Katif
regions. A further 40 percent
have moved to settlements all
over Israel, while the remainder
have moved to cities around the
country, almost all of them having
lived in Yamit itself.
THERE IS virtually unanimous
scorn among the former Sinai
residents for the concept of peace
with Egypt. "You call this
Sce ks Yahudit Sahflan.
formerly editor of the Yamit
newspaper, Yamiton, and now
one of 35 families from Yamit on
Moshav Dekel, some ten miles in-
land from their old homes, close to
the new border with Egypt. "Our
moshav is fenced in, border
patrols are always passing by, our
children are scared and we do not
trust the Egyptians."
Shaflan's husband, Yitzhak,
worked as an irrigation engineer
in Yamit. On Dekel, he has his
own land and greenhouses and
grows melons, eggplants and
vegetables for export during the
winter to Europe.
"With the exception of last
year," says Yehudit Shaflan, "we
earned a good living. We remain
idealists, despite the poor way we
have been treated. The govern-
ment has not come up with the
funds it promised to develop the
area. The parks and cultural
facilities, banks and supermarkets
have not been built. Everybody
wants to develop the Galilee now
and we are low down on the list of
priorities."
SHAFLAN, like all the former
Yamit settlers, is not prepared to
reveal how much money the fami-
ly received. She describes their
compensation as fair, though adds
that no amount of money can fully
make up for their shattered
dreams, and she complains that
she has not been able to find full-
time employment as a journalist.
If the Shaflans have adhered to
the pioneering spirit, others have
not had the same energy. David
Kami moved down to Yamit in
1978 from Jerusalem with his
wife, Bertha. "I was offered a job
down there," he recalls, "and at
that time the notion of being
pioneers was attractive. But in
1982 we decided we were too old
to start all over again and so we
came back to Jerusalem."
Kami found work at the
Ministry of Housing and claims
that his compensation was just
enough to buy a similar size flat in
an outer suburb of Jerusalem. He
patronizingly explains why the
Camp David accords are doomed
to failure.
"I came to the Middle East from
Poland 45 years ago," he says, "so
after all this time in the region, I
understand the Arabs. You cannot
trust the Arabs. Some individuals
are pleasant and moderate, but
collectively you cannot trust
them, and you cannot trust their
political leadership. If big men like
the philosopher Martin Buber
talked to the Arabs and failed,
what chance do the rest of us
have?"
AN ALMOST lone voice in this
wilderness of mistrust comes from
the Keidar family. Ovadia and
Roni Keidar moved to Netiv
Ha'asara in Sinai in 1973 and
moved again to the new Netiv
Ha'asara at the northern tip of the
Gaza Strip in 1982. Of 57 families
on the original moshav, only 36
families moved to the new
settlement.
Ovadia Keidar, who came to
Israel from Egypt in 1956, was
appointed agricultural attache to
the Israeli Embassy in Egypt and
now lives in Cairo with his
London-born wife, Roni, and then-
five children. "At first we were
bitterly opposed to Camp David,"
Roni recalls. "Like all the people
'Some people got
greedy and
over-extended
themselves .'
in the Yamit region, we thought
peace didn't stand a chance. But
now that we've met so many
Egyptians and seen how genuine
and sincere they are about peace,
we've changed our minds."
"I think that most of the people
here at Netiv Ha'asara get
misrepresented by the press," she
observes. "By asking about the
past, people get angry and mor-
bid, but if you watch those people
going about their everyday lives,
you will see how optimistic, en-
thusiastic and idealistic they re-
main, despite the painful events of
history."
THE KEIDARS were satisfied
with their compensation, though
Roni Keidar complains that the
money was distributed in an
unhealthy way. "All that money
was dumped in our laps," she
remarks, "but we had had no
training in managing large
finances like that.
"Some people got greedy and
over-extended themselves. The
whole region is dotted with the
shells of large homes that settlers
do not have the money to
complete."
While many settlers drifted into
financial difficulties, for others
employment has been the major
problem. Chaim and Sarah Feifel
owned the general store in Yamit.
They were part of a group of 25
families from America who
emigrated to Israel together in
1975 to become Yamit's founding
families. Of those 25 families, only
three families remain in Israel.
The Feifels now live in Zichron
Ya'akov, near Haifa. "We came to
live in Israel, not specifically in
Yamit," asserts Chaim Feifel. The
compensation we received was
enough to buy a good house, but
not enough to purchase a new
store.
"By training I am a rehabilita-
tion counselor. I have a Master's
degree in rehabilitation counsel-
ing, but because I am over 50 and
was out of my profession for so
long, I have no chance of getting a
fulfilling job. I get by with odd
teaching jobs."
DESPITE THE complaints, the
former Sinai settlers have had to
face up to new realities. It is to
their credit that, beneath the
anger, bitterness and frustration
they feel towards the Israeli
government and towards Egypt,
there remains the energy and
drive to build new lives.
They have achieved this with
varying degrees of success, and
the ultimate success is that all
have resisted the temptation to
cur) up indifferently into a corner.
They are annoyed, but at least
they have not become apathetic.
Time will tell whether Camp
David was worth it.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
New Evidence
Points At WaldheiitTs Criminal Past
Continued froa Page 1-A
magazine Profii charged that he
had falsely denied membership in
two Nazi organizations, including
the SA ("Brownshirt")
storm troopers.
A WORLD Jewish Congress in-
vestigation discovered that
Waldheim concealed for 40 years
his wartime military service in
Yugoslavia and Greece on the
staff of Alexander Loehr, a
notorious Nazi general who was
hanged in 1947 for war crimes.
Waldheim is currently a candidate
for the Presidency of Austria.
Waldheim's CROWCASS
listing notes that he served during
1944-45 as a staff officer in
Department IC (Intelligence) of
the General Staff of Army C
Group E ("Heeresgruppe E") in
Yugoslavia. Army Group E was
headed by General Loehr. On
March 4, the WJC released a
photograph taken from a German
Army newspaper showing First
Lieutenant Waldheim meeting
with Loehr in Nazi-occupied Sara-
jevo, Yugoslavia, in late 1944.
Waldheim's CROWCASS
listing also shows that he served
as an officer in the Abwehr, the
military intelligence service of the
High Command of the German
Armed Forces. This is the first
time that Waldheim has been
publicly linked to the Abwehr.
Dodd Urges
A WJC spokesman said that his
organization had located the Ar-
my CROWCASS document in
public archives of the U.S. govern-
ment He expressed profound
"dismay" that the Army, in
responding on February 20 to a
Freedom of Information Act re-
quest made by the WJC for all
documents "referring or relating
to" Waldheim, had failed to
disclose Waldheim's listing as a
war crimes suspect.
ACCORDING TO the WJC, the
Army instead made available
three innocuous documents
relating to Waldheim's post-war
civil service employment in
Austria, and claimed that these
were the only locatable Army
records pertaining to Waldheim.
Waldheim is listed on the
CROWCASS document as suspect
number 79/724 of the UNWCC.
According to the WJC,
Waldheim's listing by the now-
defunct Commission means that
there should be a 'case file' on
Waldheim among the approx-
imately 40,000 such files contain-
ed in the Commission's records.
Those records have long been in
the custody of the UN, and access
to them even by UN member-
nations is permitted only by
special permission of the UN
Secretariat.
On March 6, the WJC released
documents, including a 1980 letter
Jews Share Their Concerns
With Non-Jewish Friends
Continued from Page 1-A
war crimes trial. He said his
father discussed what he had
learned later with his children,
and Dodd maintains that as an
adolescent he knew more about
the Holocaust than most Jewish
youngsters his age.
DODD SAID his father was the
first civilian witness to testify for
ratification of the Genocide Con-
vention before the Senate in 1951.
This year Dodd was one of the
Senators who introduced the
resolution which the Senate
adopted, ratifying the convention.
On more specific issues. Dodd
said he was "disappointed" that
the Middle East peace process ap-
pears to have stalled. "I thought
something was going to happen,"
he said. But he stressed that
"ultimately there will only be
peace and security and stability
for the State of Israel in the Mid-
dle East through a political pro-
cess." Meanwhile, he stressed it is
necessary to support Israel's
economic and military security.
Dodd said most members of
Congress are opposed to the sale
of $354 million in missiles to Saudi
Arabia, as they were to the sale of
arms to Jordan, until the Saudis
shows signs of moving toward
peace with Israel. "On a daily
basis Saudi Arabia is still the prin-
cipal financial institution that sup-
ports terrorism in the world." he
said.
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from the U.S. Attorney General
Benjamin Civiletti to Waldheim,
thanking him for the agreement of
the Secretariat staff to allow the
U.S. Justice Department to ex-
amine these files in connection
with war crimes investigations it
was conducting in this country.
ACCORDING TO the Justice
Department, the UN never did
make the files available to U.S.
authorities; nor did the UN accede
to a request for access made at the
same time by the Hellenic Foun-
dation, an organization of Greek
Americans that was conducting
research on Nazi crimes in
Greece.
Meanwhile, in Vienna,
Waldheim continued to deny an
alleged Nazi past. He said claims
to the effect that he belonged to
the SA and Nazi student groups
stemmed from the fact that he
went horse-riding with a student
group that was later, without his
knowledge, absorbed into the SA.
This led Austrian Chancellor Fred
Sinowatz to tell a news conference
last week: "We take note of the
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Concerted Effort
Israel, Egypt Promote Tourism
By HUGH ORGEL
. TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel and Egypt have join-
in a concerted effort to
promote and develop
Kourism between the two
Icountries, Israel's Minister
Jof Tourism Avraham bnanr
(reported to the Cabinet
ISunday. Sharir returned
from an official visit to
|Cairo last Thursday.
The night before, terrorists
Ifatallv shot an Israeli woman and
hounded three other Israelis in a
Icar ambush as they left the Cairo
International Trade Fair. The vic-
Itims were members of the Israel
Embassy staff and had been staff-
ling the Israel pavilion at the fair.
Sharir said President Hosni
Mubarak and top ranking Egyp-
tian ministers expressed genuine
shock over the attack and told him
those responsible were not Egyp-
tians and would be tracked down
and punished. Mubarak also
stressed Egypt's desire to pursue
the peace process, and he has
taken concrete steps in that direc-
tion, according to Sharir.
IN THE area of tourism, he
said, the Israel and Egyptian
governments will establish a joint
committee of travel agents to ex-
amine entry permits and fees
relating to Israeli visits to Egypt.
The purpose is to expedite pro-
cedures to increase tourist traffic.
The committee will also draft pro-
posals for the formation of Egyp-
tian tourism to Israel.
A joint fund will be created to
publicize Egypt-Israel package
tours in Europe and the U.S. by
advertising and public relations in
those countries. Mutual study
tours by Israeli and Egyptian
travel agents and media represen-
tatives will be undertaken to im-
prove the atmosphere and
stimulate tourism.
These steps were agreed to at
meetings between the 15 Israeli
travel agents who accompanied
Sharir to Cairo and 40 Egyptian
travel agents. Sharir reported in
addition that Mubarak has
abolished the special visas
necessary for Egyptians to visit
Israel. He has ordered an end to
trade restrictions, thereby giving
Israel equal status with European
Glubb Pasha, 88
He Founded Jordan's Arab Legion
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Lt.
iGeneral Sir John Glubb who, as
Glubb Pasha was commander of
(Jordan's Arab Legion, died Mar.
117 at the age of 88.
More so than the legendary
I Lawrence of Arabia, Glubb per-
I sonified romantic British iden-
tification with the Arab cause,
I which he supported both as a
I soldier and as a distinguished
I author and historian. His service
I in the Middle East spanned the
I rise and fall of Britain as the most
[influential power in the region.
When he arrived in Iraq in 1920,
[British influence was at its height
but when he was expelled from
Jordan 36 years later it was
crumbling rapidly.
IN MARCH, 1939, Glubb was
appointed by Emir Abdullah to
command of the Arab Legion
which, as a small mechanized
force of Bedouin, had been involv-
ed in skirmishes with Arab gangs
infiltrating through Transjordan
to fight the British in Palestine.
With the outbreak of World War
II, the force was expanded and
took part in the suppression of the
pro-Nazi coup in Iraq in 1941.
After the war, Glubb and his
Legion were drawn into the
escalating Arab-Jewish conflict
over Palestine. With its British of-
State Dep't. Says PLO At Fault
For Mideast Peace Process Failure
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
I State Department reiterated
I Monday that the breakdown in the
I peace process is due to the failure
lof the Palestine Liberation
(Organization to accept the
[necessary conditions for
| negotiations.
"The current hiatus in the peace
[process is due to the PLO's failure
|{ accept the challenge," State
I Department deputy spokesman
I Charles Redman said. He noted
Ithe PLO "did not accept" United
Nations Security Council Resolu-
tions 242 and 338, "did not agree
Iff negotiate" with Israel nor
I cease violence" as efforts to br-
|ing about direct negotiations were
|going on.
Redman was responding to a
report from Cairo that Arafat was
aemanding the United States res-
Pond to his proposals for a Middle
P" ^^e. The proposals which
B!" on acceptance by all parties
I01 ^e right of self-determination
fcr D?,falestinians in excnange
Pr PLO acceptance of Resolu-
tions: 242 and 338 were sent to
Washington through Egyptian
Pres.dent Hosni Mubarak and
JJig Hussein of Jordan, accor-
P'ng to Arafat.
ni?.'8 Up to the American Ad-
ministration to give us a formal
Pnswer to these ideas and I am
pwaiting their official reply,"
ratat told reporters after he met
C* tnree hours with Mubarak.
i."ffm, announced last month
fcffn- ^ given UP a year-long
port to work with the PLO on
Sgy effrt because the PLO
^ership could not be relied on
1 keep its word.
IT?** Department sources
bft.?, Arafat was trying to
wut the blame to the U.S. in his
talk with Mideast leaders to "ob-
fuscate" his responsibility for the
breakdown in the peace process.
Meanwhile, Redman said that
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
met last Saturday with Hanna
Seniora, editor of the pro-PLO
East Jerusalem daily Al-Fajr and
one of two West Bank Palesti-
nians acceptable both to the PLO
and Israel as a possible represen-
tative on a Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation for negotiations with
Israel.
ficers, the 4,000-strong Legion
proved to be the most effective
Arab army in the 1948 Palestine
war. As a result, it succeeded in
holding much of the West Bank
territory allotted to the Arabs in
the United Nations partition
resolution of November 29, 1947.
Glubb remained head of the
Legion after the signing of ar-
mistice agreements between
Israel and her neighbors. But with
the assassination of King Ab-
dullah in 1951, his pesonal posi-
tion was seriously weakened. He
became a target of anti-British
fanaticism whipped up by Presi-
dent Gamel Abdel Nasser of
Egypt, and in 1956 King Hussein
expelled him from Jordan on
seven hours' notice.
HE REMAINED true to the
Arab cause nevertheless and an
unbending critic of Israel. In his
autobiography, published a ye*ar
after his ejection from Jordan,
Glubb wrote:
"I believe that the creation and
maintenance of the State of Israel
by armed force was a mistake.
That the result has been
disastrous for the British and
Arabs alike is only too obvious. It
seems to me not improbable that
it will ultimately prove to be
disastrous for the Jews also."
Following the Six-Day War, he
advanced the theory that the war
had been stirred up by the Soviet
Union deliberately to weaken the
Arabs and make them permanent-
ly dependent on it.
?j ^ UK] Glott Kosher
J Passover
Deauville
AT
THE
1986
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of Israel t LA
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridlan Page 7-A
countries doing business with
Egypt, Sharir told the Cabinet.
He said chances were good to
reach a $150 million trade agree-
ment with Israel.
THE TOURISM Minister said
Egyptian officials expressed ap-
preciation over the way the Israeli
media treated recent unrest in
Cairo.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir praised the Egyptian
media for the sympathetic
coverage it gave to the attack on
the Israelis last Wednesday night.
Only one newspaper, Al
Goumhuriya, struck an anti-Israel
note when it maintained that
Israeli diplomatic personnel in
Egypt would be safe only when
Israel changed its policies with
respect to Lebanon and the ad-
ministered territories.
Shamir, who has always taken a
hard line toward Egypt, had rare
praise for the way the Egyptians
behaved after the attack. He
disclosed that President Mubarak
had personally ordered the Cairo
hospital where the victims were
taken immediately after the at-
tack to give them priority
treatment.
Glott Kosher C04 1AAA
For information & Reservations Call 3J1 "Of'tW
or write Passover '86 Deauville P.O. Box 402868
Miami Beach, Florida 33140_________
Martin Kellner of Los Angeles
has been reelected for a third
one-year term as national
president of the American
Society for Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology. A
graduate of the Georgia In-
stitute of Technology, Dr.
Kellner taught at the Universi-
ty of Dayton.
oooooo
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THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer...
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
Rome % Jews Elated
Pope Plans To Visit Synagogue on Apr. 13
By USA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Jewish community has
warmly welcomed the
Vatican's announcement
that Pope John Paul II will
visit Rome' s main
synagogue next month.
But while this is viewed as an
"historic gesture" which may well
be the first Papal visit ever to a
Jewish house of worship, the feel-
ing among Jewish leaders is that
it will be up to the Pontiff whether
the occasion is merely "symbolic"
or contributes substantive!) to
Catholic-Jewish relations.
"It could be a fantastic step for-
ward," said Tullia Zevi. president
of the Union of Italian Jewish
Communities, "or it could be a
perpetuation of ambiguities." She
was referring to certain fun-
damental issues that remain
unresolved after more than 20
years of Vatican-Jewish dialogue
that began after Vatican Council
II in 1965.
THE CHIEF Vatican
spokesman. Joaquin Navarro
Vallis, announced at a press con-
ference that the Pope's visit
would take place in the afternoon
of Apr. 13. He said it would be the
first such visit in living memory,
though he could not be certain it
would be an historic precedent.
The Jewish community, in a
statement released last Monday
night, expressed its "satisfaction
at the decision of Pope John Paul
II to visit the synagouge of
Rome," adding that "this will
mark an important step in the
direction of an ever more rewar-
ding dialogue."
The Rome synagogue was the
scene of a traumatic event in Oc-
tober, 1982 when worshippers
were attacked by Arab terrorists
with machineguns and grenades.
A two-year-old boy, Stefano
Tache, was killed and 34 persons
were wounded.
MORE THAN a year earlier, on
February 9. 1981, the spiritual
leader of the synagogue, Rome's
Chief Rabbi Elio Toaff. met with
the Pope at a church adjacent to
the old Jewish ghetto, about 100
yards from the synagogue. From
that time on, a Papal visit to the
synagogue itself seemed more and
more in the realm of possibility,
awaiting only the appropriate
"conditions."
Zevi stressed in her remarks that
the conditions could never have
materialized but for the changes
in Catholic-Jewish relations
engendered by Vatican II. Yet
there is disappointment in Jewish
circles here and abroad that the
changes have not progressed fur-
ther than they have. One issue
that wrankles Jews is the
Vatican's persistent refusal to ex
tend formal recognition of the
State of Israel.
This was one of the main
criticisms vented by a Jewish
ecumenical group in June, 1985
over a just published Vatican
document called "Notes on the
Correct Way to Present the Jews
and Judaism in Preaching the
Catechesis in the Roman Catholic
Church."
ACCORDING TO the Interna-
tional Jewish Committee on Inter-
religious Consultations (IJCIC),
the Notes fail to acknowledge the
religious significance of Israel to
the Jewish people and refer only
briefly and superficially to the
Holocaust.
The IJCIC called them a
retrogression from the historic
Nostra Attate (Our Times) which
emerged from Vatican Council II
in 1964 and the December 1. 1974
"Guidelines and Suggestions for
the Application of the Declaration
Noetra Attate."
Dr. Joseph Lichten, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith liaison with the Vatican,
told the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy that the Pope's forthcoming
visit to the synagogue "will cer-
tainly be an historical event.
Never before has a Pope set foot
in a Jewish place of worship." He
added. "I did not expect this to
come about so soon, but I am
pleasantly touched that it has."
A Papal visit to the synagogue
has been long considered a
necessary "next step" in the in-
terreligious dialogue by Jews and
by enlightened Christians. But it
was never openly solicited by
Rome's Jewish community.
THE JEWISH community,
which has existed for 2,000 years
and survived more than a millen-
nium under the "shadow" of the
Vatican, in good times and bad.
has always felt itself to be the
"wronged party." It therefore
considered it inappropriate to
take the "first step" for this
potently symbolic move.
It would be up to the Vatican to
make the move, the Jews always
She dislikes filling out forms
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felt, considering the historical
context of Jewish relations with
the Church of Rome. The ground-
work was laid by the Pope's visit
several months ago to the
Waldensian Protestant Church in
Rome, another historical "first."
John Paul II, moreover, has
received more world Jewish
leaders in audience than any of his
predecessors. Wherever possible,
he has met with Jewish leaders
abroad in the course of his con-
siderable travels.
The main synagogue is an
historical landmark in Rome.
Located in the Lungotevere Cen-
ci, near the River Tiber, it was laid
down in 1900. On July 2, 1904, it
was officially visited by King Vic-
tor Emanuel III. It was formally
dedicated on July 28 of that year
at ceremonies attended by the
highest authorities of the Italian
State and the Rome municipality.
Wolf Blttzer, Jerusalem p^
correspondent, will receive i
CommunuxUor's Award at the
JWB Biennial Convention
Apr. 9-13 in Toronto. Blitur
will receive the award at the
Media Showcase, scheduled for
Apr. 10. He will speak on the
'Political Situation in the Mid-
dle East and Relations Bet-
ween the US. Government and
Israel.'
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Israel PAC's
They Grow in Strength Rapidly
. ConUnued from Pe l-A
|man of the Senate Appropriations
IJubcommitteeonForejgjnC^ra-
loons, who received $107,600 in
I1985-
1 He was followed by Sen. Arlen
Iwcter (R Pa-). a subcommittee
Sr $70,375; and Sen Alan
lcranston(D.,Cal.).amemberof
Ithe Senate Foreign Relations
Icommittee, $57,250. All three
Jface tough reelection campaigns
this year.
I The report shows that five other
Isenators, who are either on the
I Foreign Operations Subcommit-
Itee or the Foreign Relations Com-
Imittee and are seeking reelection
I received large contributions last
I year.
| They are Daniel Inouye (D.,
Irlawaii). $29,050; Christopher
lDodd(D., Conn.) $28,250; Alfonse
iDAmato (R.. N.Y.), $28,250;
| Frank Murkowsi (R., Alaska)
8000; and Patrick Leahy (D.,
I Vt.) $3,500.
COMMON CAUSE also points
to contributions in 1985 to
members of the House Foreign
Affairs Committee. They are
Reps. Lawrence Smith (D., Fla.)
$15,000; Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.)
$11,800; John McCain $11,000; Sam Gejdensen (D.,
Conn.) $9,250; Harry Reid (D.,
Nev.) $6,000; and Mark Siljander
(R.. Mich.) $5,000.
Those who received contribu-
tions from pro-Israel PACs do not
always win. Of the 10 candidates
receiving the most funds from
1981 through 1984, four were
defeated, including the second
highest recipient, James Hunt,
who was defeated by Sen. Jesse
Helms (R., N.C.) in 1984.
In the House, eight of the top
recipients for the same period are
still in Congress. But the top reci-
pient. Rep. Clarence Long (D.,
Mil), who was chairman of the
House Appropriations Subcom-
mittee on Foreign Operations,
was defeated in 1984 by his
Republican opponent, Helen
Israel 'Confident' Egypt
Will Do Right Thing
Continued from Page 1-A
was on an official visit to Cairo
hen the attack occurred, return-
I home with a personal message
|fmm President Hosni Mubarak
pledging to press the investiga-
tion into the attack and track
down the assailants.
The plane that flew Sharir from
Cairo also carried the body of Etti
Ial-Or, 24. who was killed by the
nbushers. She was the wife of an
Embassy official. She was buried
st Friday at a cemetery in Beer-
heba, her home city, where
Shamir delivered a eulogy. Her
hree companions who were flown
i Israel immediately after the at-
ck were reported in stable con-
dition after surgery at Sheba
Hospital in Tel Hashomer.
Vascular surgery was perform-
|Mohels Must Pay
JERUSALEM (JTA) Tax
ollectors here were cut to the
huick by the realization that they
were not receiving a fair slice of
'he profits made by Israel's
Ms (ritual circumcisors). They
acted sharply upon learning
*at, with only 94 of the 224
licensed circumcisors bothering to
fie returns for 1984, they had on-
|) scratched the surface of the
k& income.
The 130 mohels who did not pay
Nes, Israel television reported,
Nl now be subjected to acute
pdjtl and their incomes most pro-
N>ly slashed.
ed on Savid Zruya, who was
struck by bullets in his chest and
left thigh. Esther Yefet, 26, was
hit in her jaw, left shoulder and
wrist. Uri Ziv, 31, suffered
wounds in both hands. Both
underwent lengthy surgery.
THE FOUR young Israelis had
been staffing the Israel pavilion at
the Trade Fair. The pavilion
manager, Yossi Peri, reported
that in the two weeks it was open
prior to the attack, the Israeli ex-
hibits were visited by about
40,000 Cairenes who eagerly pick-
ed up pamphlets and brochures
promoting Israeli industrial and
agricultural technology. Peri said
that millions of dollars worth of
orders were placed with Israeli
firms during the fair.
The attack was the third on
Israeli Embassy personnel in the
Egyptian capital and the second
to cause fatalities. Last August,
Albert Atrakchi, an ad-
ministrative attache, was killed in
his car in the Maadi quarter of
Cairo.
In June, 1984, another Embassy
official, Zvi Kedar, was wounded
by gunmen but survived. A group
calling itself "Egypt's Revolu-
tion" claimed credit for those
shootings and for Wednesday
night's ambush killing.
There have also been at least
two sabotage attempts, one
against the Embassy in Cairo and
the other aimed at the Israel Con-
sulate in Alexandria.
Bentley.
Common Cause also found that
18 pro-Israel PACs contributed
more than $100,000 for the five-
year period through 1985.
Leading them all was the
Washington-based National PAC
with $1,352,000.
COMMON CAUSE president
Fred Wertheimer, in commenting
on his organization's report, said
it "provides a classic case study of
the PAC problem in our political
system the proliferation of
PACs, the increase of PAC
dollars, the concentration of in-
terest group money in key Con-
gressional committees, and the
single-minded focus of PAC-
giving."
Richard Altman, head of the Na-
tional PAC, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the Com-
mon Cause report made him
"proud" that so many supporters
of Israel were willing to respond
in the same way their fellow
Americans supported issues im-
portant to them.
Altman noted that NatPAC was
created not to support PACs but
to stand by those who reflect the
belief that the survival of Israel is
important to the United States.
There are many in the Jewish
community who believe, along
with Common Cause, that PACs
pose a danger to the political
system. But as long as PACs ex-
ist, there is no reason why sup-
porters of Israel should not make
their influences felt just as every
other interest group does.
CRITICS OF pro-Israel PACs
point to the part they played in
the defeat of Sen. Charles Percy
(R., 111.) in 1984 and Rep. Paul
Findley (R., 111.) in 1982. But they
fail to mention that these two can-
didates received large contribu-
tions from oil companies, com-
panies that do business in the
Arab countries and others who
want the U.S. commitment to
Israel lessened. Should Israel's
supporters leave the field open to
them? This is a question frequent-
ly posed.
Some Jews argue that the com-
munity should not be viewed as
single-issue oriented and as
evidence of this point to the for-
mation of the Illinois Multi-Issue
PAC. This is all to the good, but it
is still important to focus atten-
tion on the American Jewish com-
mitment to Israel. After all, it is
pointed out, Jews who contribute
to pro-Israel PACs can still con-
tribute to other PACs that sup-
port the many other issues with
which American Jews are
concerned.
Whether one likes it or not,
PACs are the political game in the
U.S. today. Jews and other sup-
porters of Israel cannot be criticiz-
ed for playing it just as everybody
else does.
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Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Terrorist Gangs Rounded Up;
All Associated With El Fatah
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
An aggregation of terrorist
gangs believed responsible
for scores of bombings in
Israel and the West Bank
over a 20-month period was
rounded up by security
forces in recent weeks, the
army disclosed Monday. All
of the gangs were
associated with El Fatah,
the terrorist arm of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
In addition, security forces
have taken into custody terrorist
groups operating independently,
with no known affiliations. They
engaged mainly in throwing
Molotov cocktails at Israeli
vehicles in the West Bank and a
similar attack on the Labor ex-
change in Jenin.
MOST OF the Fatah terrorists
were residents of East Jerusalem
and Ramallah. One terrorist cell
was based in Jericho. Their cap-
ture was one of the major suc-
cesses of the security forces in re-
cent years. According to military
sources, 40 Arabs were arrested.
The Fatah cells were generally
small. But one of them comprised
as many as 20 terrorists.
The list of terrorist acts commit-
ted by the gangs fills several
pages. They include the planting
of a boobytrapped car filled with
containers of cooking gas in the
Mea Shearim quarter of
Jerusalem on September 22, 1985
and the placement of explosive
devices in a restaurant in Mifgash
Beit-El on October 8, 1985.
They also planted explosive
devices on a No. 27 bus in
Jerusalem on December 13, 1985;
an explosive device in Ramat Gan
on January 3, 1985; and another
on a No. 66 bus in Bnai Brak
which exploded on September 4,
1985 injuring eight passengers.
Gang members planted ex-
plosives at an intersection near
Ben Gurion Airport where
soldiers hitch rides, on Feb. 28.
The Jerusalem-based gang is held
responsible for three fire-
bombings in the Neve Yaacov
quarter in January and February,
1986. Terrorists, whose cells were
uncovered in the Samaria district
of the West Bank, threw fire
bombs at Israeli vehicles near the
Elon Moreh settlement on Feb.
25, in Kalkilya on March 1, and in
Jenin in October, 1985.
THESE GANGS are also
believed to have attacked Arabs
suspected of collaborating with
the Israeli authorites.
The Fatah cell in Jericho was
responsible for terrorist attacks in
that region and planting ex-
plosives on Naomi Street in
Jerusalem on July 23,1985. A ter-
rorist member of another Fatah
cell, a resident of the Jebaliya
refugee camp in the Gaza Strip,
was arrested on suspicion of stab-
bing an Israeli civilian in the Old
City of Jerusalem on March 8.
Meanwhile, security forces put
out a dragnet Monday for two
men who allegedly attempted to
stab an Israeli soldier on the
Shefaram-Nazareth highway Sun-
day night. The soldier was
reported in good condition after
surgery.
He had been hitchhiking and
was picked up by two men, one of
whom knifed him in the chest. The
soldier wrestled with his
assailants. The car was forced off
the road and both the knife-
wielder and driver escaped.
U.S. 'Confident'
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
State Department has expressed
confidence that the Egyptian
government would find and arrest
those responsible for the attack on
the four Israelis in Cairo last
week. "We strongly deplore this
repugnant act and offer our con-
dolences to the family of the
woman who was killed," State
Department deputy spokesman
Charles Redman said. "We wish
speedy recovery for those wound-
ed in the attack. We are fully con-
fident of the Egyptian determina-
tion to bring those behind the at-
tack to justice."
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. March 28, 1986
'

Prize- Winner
Novelist Malamud Dies at Age 71
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) Ber-
nard Malamud. the Pulitzer Prize-
winning American Jewish author,
died in his Manhattan apartment
last week of what police described
as natural causes. He was 71
years old.
Malamud was the author of
eight novels and four collections
of short stories, which, critics
noted, showed the influence of
both the 19th Century Russian
masters of fiction and the tradi-
tional Jewish story tellers.
Permeating many of his works
was the concept that human salva-
tion came from adherence to a
strict code of personal morality in
the face of life's overwhelming
despair and oppression.
HIS BEST-KNOWN and most
controversial novel. "The Fixer"
(1966), was the story of a han-
dyman, Yakov Bok. falsely accus-
ed by Czarist officials of a ritual
murder. The story drew very
loosely on the notorious Mendel
Beilis case of 1911-1913. which
ended in Beilis' acquittal.
In Malamud's book. Bok
emerges from the Kafkaesque
labyrinth of the degrading Czarist
penal system with his integrity in-
tact. He declares at the end of the
novel that there is "no such thing
as an unpolitical man, especially a
Jew."
Malamud won a Pulitzer Prize
as well as his second National
Book Award for "The Fixer," in
1967. His first NBA was for "The
Magic Barrel," a collection of
short stories, in 1958. Other
honors included election to the
National Institute of Arts and
Letters and the American
Academy of Ar\s and Sciences.
MALAMUD was bom April 26,
Bernard Malamud
1914 in Brooklyn, the elder of two
sons of Max and Bertha Fidelman
Malamud. poor immigrants from
Czarist Russia who worked
16-hour days in their small
grocery store.
The author later described the
environment of his childhood as
Jewish though non-religious. Yid-
dish was spoken at home, and
some of his mother's family per-
formed on the Yiddish stage.
He graduated Erasmus Hall
High School, where he was the
editor of the school magazine, go-
ing on to receive a BA from City
College in 1936, and after stints
working in the family store, fac-
tories, and the census bureau
his MA from Columbia Unversity
in 1942.
Teaching English at night in his
old high school and others.
Malamud continued in his spare
time the short story writing he
had begun as a boy in the
Growing Numbers of Israelis
In U.S., Canada Going Home
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) A
growing number of Israelis who
have resided in the United States
and Canada for a number of years
are returning to Israel, despite
the precarious economic situation
there. According to Israel's
Ministry of Labor and Social Af-
fairs, 1.700 Israelis returned
home in 1985.
Consul Amos Haddad, head of
the Ministry of Labor's delegation
here, said in a summary report on
1985 to Moshe Katzav. Israel's
Labor Minister, that among the
Israelis returning to Israel are in-
dividuals who left excellent high-
paying jobs in the U.S. or Canada
"for more satisfying jobs in Israel,
although the pay is considerably
lower." According to Haddad, the
yordim. Israelis who left Israel,
who are returning home resided in
North America between two and
11 years.
Haddad s report, which was
released here recently, stated that
some of the returning Israelis said
they decided to go back because
they preferred to give their
children an Israeli education,
although the relocation meant
lowering their standard of living.
The report disclosed that the
number of yordim that have
registered with the Ministry of
Labor's delegation in New York,
indicating their wish to return to
Israel, reached, by the end of
1985. 13.400 heads of families, or
approximately 40.200 individuals.
In 1984. the report said, 10,850
heads of families had registered.
Haddad noted in his report that
approximately 700 families
registered to return to Israel dur-
ing employment fairs in October-
November 1985 which the
Ministry of Labor's delegation
organized in cooperation with
high technology industries in
Israel. The fairs were held in New
York, Los Angeles. San Jose and
Toronto.
In addition. Haddad said, more
than 100 Israelis signed work con-
tracts with employers in Israel at
those employment fairs.
backroom of his family's grocery
store.
THE RISE of Nazism and
Stalinism, the coming of World
War II. and the Holocaust helped
Malamud decide what he wanted
to say as a writer and how he in-
terpreted his Jewishness. He
began reading Jewish history and
literature and later said. "I for
one believe that not enough has
been made of the destruction of
six million Jews. Somebody has to
cry. even if it's just a writer. 20
years later."
Following his first novel. "The
Natural" (1952). which is unique
among his works in its absence of
Jewish characters. Malamud
began writing fiction that showed
the strong influence of his Jewish
background and identification. In
a 1983 piece in The New York
Times Book Review, he said of his
early writing:
"... almost without understan-
ding why. I was thinking about my
father's immigrant life, how he
earned his meager living, and
what he paid for it. and about my
mother's, diminished by fear and
suffering ... I had them in mind
as I invented the characters who
became their fictional
counterparts."
"The Assistant" (1957) drew
heavily on the grocery- story en-
vironment of Malamud's
childhood. The story is of a non-
Jewish youth who atones for his
robbery of an elderly Jewish
grocer, and later converts to
Judaism.
HE WAS thinking of his father
as he began writing "The Assis-
tant." Malamud noted in The
Times article, and "felt I would
often be writing about Jews, in
celebration and expiation" for
marrying a non-Jewish woman.
Ann de Chiara. with whom he had
a son and a daughter.
"The Assistant" marked
Malamud's emergence as a major
writer of the American Jewish
novel. He has often been linked
with Saul Bellow and Philip Roth
in the triumvirate that has
dominated the genre.
The author divided his time bet-
ween writing his other noveL
included "The Tenants." "Dubin's
Lives." and "God's Grace" and
teaching fiction, first at Oregon
State College and. after 1961.
Bennington. He also served as
president of the American Center
of PEN. the writer's organization.
Labor Won't
Renege on Plan
Bt DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Shimon Peres
has firmly rejected the idea
that his Labor Party would
renege on its rotation agree-
ment with the Likud before
its Oct. 13 implementation
date.
But Peres, addressing a ses-
sion of the Labor Party's Central
Committee in Tel Aviv Sunday,
declared that Labor would not
hesitate to quit the national unity
government after the rotation if
the Likud sought to force its own
policies upon the unity
government.
"If they (the Likud, after the
rotation) violate the agreement
about (West Bank) settlements, or
if they impede the peace process,
or if they conduct an economic
policy that means (major)
unemployment and inequitable
sharing of the burden we will
not stay inside the government
for a single moment," Peres
assured his Party.
AT PERES' behest, the Central
Committee deferred deliberation
on a motion presented by former
Knesset member Michael Ben-
Zohar. and supported by 104 Com-
mittee members out of a total of
901 members, proposing that
Labor leave the unity government
now. The proposal is to be discuss-
ed at the Party's national conven-
tion April 8 in Tel Aviv.
Political observers were im-
pressed by the deliberate tone of
determination and certainty
which the Prime Minister adopted
in making his declaration in favor
of implementing the rotation
accord.
In previous statements. Peres
has often referred to implementa-
tion of the rotation of the Prime
Ministership as one of three linked
elements in the unity government
coalition accord the other two
being the peace policy and
economic policy. Peres has tended
William Belzberg. financial in-
dustry leader, has been elected
national chairman of State of
Israel Bonds, the organization
which markets worldwide
various Israel Government
securities for the nation's
economic development.
Belzberg and hit brothers.
Samuel and Human, founded
one of Canada's largest trust
companies. First City Trust.
He is now a resident of Beverly
Hills. Calif
to make the fulfillment of each
conditional upon the other two -
thereby appearing to leave an
escape hatch out of fulfilling th
rotation.
IN HIS statement Sunday,
however, Peres seemed to count the possibility of the rota-
tion not going into effect as
scheduled. Instead, he applied the
tripartite linkage doctrine to the
Likud's policy-performance in the
period following the rotation.
The question of whether Peres
will go through with the rotation.
which has constantly intrigued
Laborites and outsiders, has
taken on new vigor and im-
mediacy in the wake of the
aborted Herut Party convention
earlier this month. Anti-rotation
spokesmen in Labor argue that
Deputy Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
the Herut-Likud leader, is not fit
politically to be entrusted with the
premiership.
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Top Jewish Leaders Arrested in D.C.
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
I Bt DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON-(JTA)
1 six national and regional
ders of the American
vish Congress were ar-
Cd last week as they
U "Hatikvah" and other
L in Hebrew at the gate
7 the Soviet Embassy here.
iThose arrested were:
Veodore Mann, who was just
Selected to his second two-year
trm as president of the
{[Congress; Theodore Bikel, an
[[Congress senior vice president;
Jacqueline Levine, honorary
chairperson of the governing
council; and Henry Siegman, the
organization's executive director.
Also arrested were Steve Israel,
director of the Suffolk County of-
fice of the Long Island division,
and Martin Raffel, director of the
Pennsylvania region.
The demonstration took place
after the AJCongress ended its
national biennial convention, at-
tended by some 500 delegates at
the Omni Shoreham Hotel.
SOME 30-40 delegates
gathered a block-and-a-half from
the Embassy from where the six
were driven by car to the Em-
bassy. Police there had been
alerted in advance that they were
planning to break the law against
demonstrations within 500 feet of
an Embassy. The six AJCongress
leaders walked up to the Embassy
gate and began singing "We Shall
Overcome" and Hebrew songs in-
cluidng, "Hatikvah."
As they continued singing, they
were led away by police one by
one and placed in a patrol wagon
after being frisked and handcuff-
ed. They were released later on
$50 bail each, pending a hearing
Thursday morning.
"Our arrest today is an effort to
draw public notice once again to
the unremitting oppression of
Soviey Jews," the six who were
arrested said in a written state-
ment. "We know that our arrest
cannot mitigate the official abuse
to which Soviet Jews are daily
subjected, but it is the least we
can do in an effort to break
through the anonymity of their
persecution."
BIKEL TOLD reporters that
American Jews are "frustrated"
because after Anatoly Sharansky
was released they had hoped it
was a sign that there would be an
improvement.
The 61-year-old actor and folk
singer said it is hoped the arrests
will draw attention to the plight of
Soviet Jews. But he said those ar-
rested were also doing it for
themselves because they need to
feel that justice will be done.
Mann said that the Reagan Ad-
ministration has done everything
possible for Soviet Jewry. But
there is a need now for American
Jews to raise the "level of
demonstrations," he added.
Mann, Siegman and Bikel were
also arrested in Washington on
December 10, 1984, in a protest at
the South African Embassy
against apartheid.
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rage ~iz-a the Jewish FToridian/Friday. March 28, 1986
Peres Points to Syria
As 'Most Radical' Neighbor
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 NE 1st Avenue Miami. Florida
'
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres
answered a wide range of
questions on domestic and
foreign policy matters dur-
ing a tour of northern Israel
last week. He pointed to
Syria as the most dangerous
and "most radical" of
Israel's neighbors.
He expressed concern over the
rise of Islamic fundamentalism
and economic deterioration in the
region. On the home front, he
reiterated that he intends to abide
by the rotation-of-power agree-
ment with Likud, but mentioned
two conditions.
UNDER THE Labor-Likud
agreement. Peres must turn over
the office of Prime Minister to
Herat's Yitzhak Shamir next Oct.
13. But the failure of the recent
Herat convention to endorse
Shamir as party leader has raised
doubts about the rotation. The
agreement specifies that only
Shamir will be Peres' successor.
"Regarding rotation. I am firm
in my belief in implementing it."
Peres told reporters. He added,
however, that rotation would be
implemented if two conditions are
met progress toward peace and
a genuine healing of the country's
economic ills without preference
for one sector over another.
He said Labor Party figures
who have voiced opinions to the
contrary were expressing their
own personal views. The Party
has not yet taken an official stand,
he said. There has been pressure
on Peres fromsome Laborites to
New 'Rose Gardens'
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
From garbage dump to rose
garden. This transformation will
result from two Jewish National
Fund projects to improve the
quality of life for Tel Aviv area
residents.
The JNF announced it will
create a park on a 750-acre waste
site near the depressed Hatikva
quarter of Tel Aviv. Grass, trees
and flowers will boom, fertilized
by the thousands of tons of refuse
which not occupy the area. A
similar garbage dump at the
southeastern outskirts of the city,
along the highway from Ben
Gurion Airport, will also be turned
into a park.
cancel the rouuaon agreement in
view of the bitter power struggle
within Herat which caused its con-
vention to break up in chaos.
PERES STRESSED that
"Israel must make an unceasing
effort" to search for peace with its
neighbors. He said that Israel has
offered King Hussein of Jordan
immediate, direct peace negotia-
tions. But Hussein believed he
could bring the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization into the peace
talks. Only lately did he realize
that while he might not be able to
enter peace negotiations without
the PLO. he could not do so with
the current PLO leadership. Peres
said.
He said that both Syria and Iran
are making efforts to gain control
of Lebanon, the latter by pro-
viding financial support to the ex-
tremist 'Hezbollah'' movement,
an organization that "has no pro-
blem in killing people, in murder-
ing people from all nations not
only ours, by the way." Peres
said.
He said the current deployment
of the Israel Defense Force with
respect to Lebanon is the best
possible under present
circumstances.
THE IDF will withdraw from
the border security zone when
they (terrorists) stop sending car
bombs to attack our border."
Peres said. He reiterated that
Israel has no design on Lebanese
territory or its water resources.
Its primary iterest is to protect
the northern border towns from
attack.
Peres observed that Israel's
"problems with Lebanon no
longer stem from relations bet-
ween Israel and Lebanon in and of
themselves, but are more the fruit
of the sad situation in Lebanon
itself." As long as tension con-
tinues in other parts of Lebanon,
the situation on the border will
not improve, he said.
Peres maintained, as he has on
many occasions in the past, that
Syria is the "most radical" of
Israel's neighbors and its Presi-
dent. Hafez Assad, the most
radical Arab leader and "the most
serious in his radicalism." Never
theless. he suggested that Israel
refrain from polemics with Syria.
Its policy should be "as little talk
as possible and as much alertness
as possible." he said. Assad con-
tinues to seek "strategic parity"
with Israel but "he still has a long
way to go." Peres added.
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Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Bole International Airport in Ethiopia,
rhane Deressa. deputy commissioner of the
hiopian Relief and Rehabilitation Commis-
on welcomes leaders of the American Jewish
bin? Distribution Committee at a meeting
Ud shortly after their arrival Ethiopia.
M to riniii are Dr. Saul B. Cohen, JDC ex-
ecutive vice president; Commissioner
Berhane; and Henry Taub, JDC Board chair-
man. The JDC leadership viewed a number of
the relief and rehabilitation projects it has
sponsored and discussed future programs
unth officials of the. government.
\ookcase
Biblical Scholarship Alive and Well
Bj MORTON I. TEICHER
Art of Biblical Poetry. By
Robert Alter. New York: Basic
Books, 1985. 220 pp. $17.95.
Poetics of Biblical Nar-
itive. By Meir Sternberg.
Bloomington. Indiana: Indiana
L'niversity Press. 1985. 580 pp.
157.50.
dnm of the Hebrew Epic:
en Sira's Hymn of Praise of
khe Fathers. By Burton L.
Mack. Chicago: University of
Chicago Press, 1986. 263 pp.
"25.
lersuasive proof of just how
Te and complex is Biblical
Warshp is readily found in
e three books. Each, in its
way, shows how academi-
s find stimulation and endless
irch opportunities in the
hose who think that examining
" al poetry is a matter of little
quence will be abruptly
jht up short by Alter's men-
i in his first chapter of Paul
pis' experience. This obscure
ientalist wanted to
fconstrate that the Old Testa-
fct was originally written in
* When he discovered that
i could not be sustained,
Munitted suicide. Unhappily,
' tells this intriguing story on
14, and his book steadily goes
'I from there.
[ESPITE THE publisher's
which brazenly calls the
"highly readable" and
nd. it is, in fact, an illustra-
i of abstruseness and incom-
Wnsibihty at their worst. It is
1 with such terms as: "seman-
I Parallism," "synonymity,"
anal multiples," "verset,"
y-iormulaic," "paradoxical
imauon." "bicola or
"Miches,'' 'retrospective ellip-
and "prosodic system." The
*r of ordinary intelligence
*s and wonders just who is
genera] reader" supposedly
". addressed by Alter.
' are an expert in the Bible,
I criticism, poetry, Hebrew
, J2> allegory and religion,
"JW get some sense from
L ,k J is a to*"** to the
w that he possessfes all these
f knowledge but, for or-
' moirtals, this is a book to be
usly avoided.
% abstruse is Meir Stern-
discussion of Biblical
t least- there is a
wmng feature in that his book
T|y directed to his fellow-
s'There are no fraudulent
1 by the publisher to the
t."?' reader.- Indiana
Fm Press haabaan staking
I laim fr specializing in the
field of Jewish studies, describing
itself as "leading the field." It
does not pretend to look for
readers who lack scholarly exper-
tise, calling this book the first
volume in a major, new series of
studies in Biblical literature.
THOSE WHO are not scholars
will be amused by the academic
mud-slinging with which Stern-
berg begins. He accuses David
Robertson, a fellow-scholar, of
"incompetence" and of offering a
"hodgepodge of vulgarized
truisms and plain nonsense."
He then takes on Robert Alter,
the author of the first book in this
review, and he asserts that "he
(Alter) comes to grief." Alter's
work suffers from a "fatal flaw,"
says Sternberg. He is guilty of a
"conceptual fallacy." Other
scholars are similar targets for
Sternberg's poison pen. They are
"on a wild goose chase"; they are
"hopelessly indeterminate," they *
are accused of "loose thinking."
Sternberg asserts that the Bible
is a work of literature which
reveals truth while covering it up
with gaps, ambiguities and dispar-
ities. He examines in detail a
number of Bible stories to prove
the validity of his argument, but
his analysis is obscure and
esoteric. Uninformed readers will
get lost in such jargon as:
"equipollent," counter-speech."
"prospection," "actional,"
"reportive," "proleptic," etc.
STERNBERG and Alter both
have minimal capacity to com-
municate, except perhaps to each
other and to a sparse assemblage
of academicians who share their
imposing ability to wallow in
complexity.
The author of the third book,
Burton L. Mack, is a Biblical
scholar who shares the interest of
Alter and Sternberg in textual
analysis. Rather than the Bible
itself, however, the subject of his
study is a poem written by a
Jewish priest named Ben Sira in
Jerusalem in 180 BCE. The poem
tells about Jewish leaders, beginn-
ing with Noah and ending with
Simon. It is found in Ben Sira's
book of ethical precepts and has
been preserved in the Apocrypha.
By contrast with Alter and
Sternberg, Mack writes in an
understandable style. However,
he fails to reckon with the fact
that, unlike Alter and Sternberg
who wrote about the Bible, the
subject of his inquiry is neither
readily obtainable nor familiar to
most people. This disadvantage is
only remedied in part by Mack's
incomplete description of the
poem.
Apparently, it is actually a
series of poems, each of which
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deals with one of Israel's leaders.
Ben Sira eulogizes them in what
he calls "Hymn in Praise of the
Fathers."
Ben Sira wrote at the time of
the Second Temple when
Hellenistic influence on the Jews
was strong, and he reflects the
cultural tradition in which he liv-
ed. His intellectual and literary
achievements led him to be loyal
to Judaism and cautious about
Hellenism. He knew the Torah
thoroughly and was also familiar
with Greek literature, synthesiz-
ing these two streams of thought
in his book.
MACK'S conclusion is curious.
He says that the people in Ben
Sira's poem are really not
"heroes." "They are ideal figures
of official functions." He is trying
to say, somewhat clumsily, that
the role makes the man. The
leaders in Ben Sira's poem are not
great because of their qualities;
they are great because of the roles
they fill. They are "merely" of-
ficials who were glorified by Ben
Sira because of the social cir-
cumstances in which he lived.
This is an instance of social
determinism gone wild. Mack
retreats from this position in his
final sentence by expressing the
hope that his book has not "tar-
nished (the) brilliance" of
Ben Sira's work.
Druze Rioters Out of Jail;
Tough Bail Conditions Imposed
By GIL SEDAN
NAZARETH (JTA) Six-
teen Druze charged with rioting
during Premier Shimon Peres'
visit to the Golan Heights last
month were released on bail by a
Nazareth District Court. But
presiding judge Avraham Assa
imposed tough conditions.
They may not leave their village
without prior approval by police.
They cannot leave their homes
after dark, and they must not
engage in public activities. "In a
respectable society, citizens
should know how to control
themselves," Judge Assa said.
But he found the charges
against the defendants were in-
sufficient to remand them in
custody pending the outcome of
legal proceedings. The prosecu-
tion had demanded their
incarceration.
The rioting was the latest
disorder in a conflict between the
12.000 Golan Druze and Israeli
authorities since Israel formally
annexed the Golan Heights four
years ago. The Druze, claiming
they are citizens of Syria, refused
to accept Israeli identification
cards. When the authorities tried
to force them to take the cards,
the Druze declared a general
strike which lasted several
months.
The demonstration against
Peres was a reminder that they
still refuse to accept Israel
hegemony over the territory.
Iraqi Army's
Strength Up
TEL AVIV (JTA) Iraq,
now in the sixth year of its war
with Iran, has approximately 40
divisions and one million men
under arms, more than the com-
bined strength of all the Arab con-
frontation states facing Israel, ac-
cording to an analysis by the
Israel Defense Force intelligence
services published in the IDF
Journal this week.
The Iraqi army, now four times
the size of the Syrian army, grew
sevenfold in strength since the
war with Iran began in 1980. Bet-
ween the Yom Kippur War in
1973 and 1980 it had only doubled
in size, from six to 12 divisions
numbering 150,000 troops.
Since 1980, the IDF says, the
Iraqi order of battle includes
5,000 tanks. 3,500 artillery pieces
and 600 aircraft. The IDF also
noted that the Iraqi armed forces
are now battle-trained in the
longest sustained conflict in the
region.
SOME PEOPLE LIVE THEIR
ENTIRE LIVES WITHOUT
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Some people have never tasted water
that's fresh and pure as a spring. Water
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Water with nothing added, nothing taken
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If you're one of those people, try
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,. .


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
Holtzman
Calls for Laws To Speed Nazi Deportations
courtj
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman has call-
ed for new federal legisla-
tion to speed up the process
of deporting Nazi war
criminals living in the U.S.
because the present pro-
cedures are "intolerably
slow."
Holtzman, when a member of
Congress, authored an amend-
ment which authorizes deporta-
tion of war criminals. She believes
roughly 10,000 former Nazis are
still at large in the U.S. To date 11
alleged war criminals have been
deported or extradited or have
left the country voluntarily rather
than face deportation hearings.
HOLTZMAN, addressing a
meeting of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith of Long
Island, cited the casse of a Long
Island resident, Karl Linnas, who
faces deportation to the Soviet
Union where he was convicted in
absentia of war crimes. Linnas,
who has been living in the U.S. for
over 30 years, was a guard and
later commandant at the concen-
tration camp in Tartu, Estonia,
during World War II, where he
participated directly in the
murders of Jews and other in-
mates. Later he served in the SS.
Linnas, 66, was stripped of his
American citizenship in 1981 after
it was found that he lied about his
Nazi past to gain admittance to
this country. He is fighting depor-
tation on grounds that the
)
Elizabeth Holtzman
Holtzman Amendment is
unconstitutional.
He was ordered deported in
1985. Linnas' appeal is being
heard by a three-judge panel of
the U.S. Court of Appeals for the
Second Circuit in New York. Last
week, the Court reserved decision
in the case, further delaying
deportation.
HOLTZMAN SAID the current
method of deporting Nazi war
criminals allows years of delay
before the criminal can be forced
to leave the country. "There are
now two separate and time-
consuming processes which must
take place before a Nazi war
criminal can be deported," she ex-
plained. "First comes the
denaturalization proceeding,
which can result in stripping of
U.S. citizenship. Then an entirely
new set of deportation pro-
ceedings is required.
"The process is excruciatingly
slow. It is intolerably slow. Con-
gress must pass the laws that will
speed up the process and ensure
that Hitler's henchmen who came
here after World War II are
removed from our country."
Holtzman also renewed her call
for creation of a special commis-
sion to investigate the full scope of
U.S. government assistance to,
and protection of Nazi war
criminals after World War II.
"After fighting Hitler, this
country provided aid, employment
and protection to many of his hen-
chmen. The role of the U.S.
government in this sordid chapter
of our history must be thoroughly
investigated And the U.S. of-
ficials responsible for these ac-
tions must be exposed," the
Brooklyn DA said.
WITH RESPECT to Linnas,
Holtzman said in a statement
released by her office that his
argument that the Holtzman
Amendment is unconstitutional
"is ludicrous and it has been re-
jected by other courts."
"There must be no haven in this
country for brutal Nazi murderers
like him and there is no justifica-
tion for his continued presence
here," Holtzman declared. "The
presence of Karl Linnas in this
country desecrates the memories
not only of those who perished in
Hitler's death camps but of those
176 000 Americans who died
fighting Hitler in World War II."
A friend of the court brief filed
by four Jewish organizations
charged that federal
needlessly allow deportaC
ceedings against Nazi
criminals to stretch out for
The brief, prepared bv"
American Jewish Comma,
signed
by the National J,
Community Relations Ad
Council, the New York
Community Relations
and the National Jewish \,
sion on Law and Public
was filed in connection w
nas' appeal hearing.
Israel Mum on Report 'Ivan the
Terrible' Is Long Dead
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Justice Ministry declined to com-
ment on a 20-year-old report in
the Bar Ilan University archives
that the Treblinka death camp
guard kown as "Ivan the Terri-
ble" was killed by inmates during
a prison revolt in 1943. Sources at
the Yad Vashem Holocaust
Memorial archives dismissed the
report out of hand.
John Demjanjuk, a Ukrainian-
born former U.S. citizen, was ex-
tradited to Israel three weeks ago
on the basis of eyewitness iden-
tification that he was the guard
known as "Ivan the Terrible."
Demjanjuk is being held at Ayalon
prison near Ramla while police ex-
amine the evidence that will be us-
ed to prepare the charges on
which Demjanjuk will be placed on
trial.
THE ACCUSED man insists he
is a victim of mistaken identity.
The information pointing to that
possibility was obtained by a stu-
dent at Bar Ilan University's
Holocaust Research Center,
A
which conducted an oral ...
research project in the 1960s1
document events related to tt
Holocaust from the testimony!
survivors who witnessed
events.
The student heard an ace
from a Treblinka survi
Abraham Goldfarb, that a j.
of inmates stormed the
chambers in 1943, killed "Ivan
Terrible" and another guard
threw their bodies into
crematorium furnace. Gold,.
died last year. His nine pages
testimony came to light durinfj
check of the Bar Ilan archito,
Justice Ministry sources ajj
they could not comment beau
the case is sub judice. Sources i
the Yad Vashem archives said o-l
pert testimony can be taken onljl
by trained experts, not by a"nm|
student."
A Jerusalem district court judpl
has remanded Demjanjuk ill
custody for another 13 days on the!
basis of identification froil
photographs by 12 Treblinbl
survivors.
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Friday, March 28. 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
INTRODUCING ELv4LS OWN
MILK AHD HONEY WGfflONS
TO ISRAEL
Now you can enjoy our new Milk and
Honey Vacation packages, for nine or thirteen
nights.
You'll get superior class or deluxe hotels,
sightseeing with an English guide, full Israeli
breakfast daily, dinners at a Kibbutz guest
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As always, El Al has the most non-stop
and direct flights to the Holyland. And you'll
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So when you go to Israel, go with the peo-
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. ->
Tage 16-A the Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
You've got what It takes.
Share the spirit. Share the refreshment.

SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
By Pregnant Women May Result in Fetal
Injury, Premature Birth. And Low Birth Weight.


Page 24-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
jjewjgh Floridiari
Miami, Florida Friday, March 28,1986 Section B
L Community Agency Partnership
Developing Prejudice Project
'Celebration of Aging," a senior health and
services fair, coordinated by the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged as
part of its UOth Anniversary Celebration, and
sponsored by AmeriFirst and its Board of
Directors. Pictured at the function are left to
right Executive Director of the Home Marc
Lichtman, Congressman Claude Pepper and
Clara and Mike Behrman.
High Court Rules Against Him
Capt. Goldman Loses Yarmulke Battle
WASHINGTON Rabbi
Simcha Goldman has lost
his battle for the right to
wear his yarmulke. Or-
thodox Rabbi Goldman is a
psychologist serving in the
United States Air Force.
The Supreme Court Tuesday
ruled that the Air Force is entitl-
ed to bar him from wearing a
religious skullcap on duty. The
vote was 5-4. The Court argued
that First Amendment
guarantees of freedom of
religion do not apply to the
military's "view that they would
detract from the uniformity
sought by the d r e as
regulations."
Writing for the majority,
Justice William Rehnquist
declared that "When evaluating
whether military needs justify a
particular restriction on
religiously-motivated conduct,
courts must give great deference
to the professional judgment of
military authorities."
RABBI GOLDMAN had argued
that he wore his yarmulke at all
times as "an expression of
respect for God."
In 1981, he testified for the
defense in a court-martial. He
wore his yarmulke at the hear-
ing, as he had done for six years
before that while on Air Force
duty. Following his court ap-
pearance, Capt. Goldman's com-
manding officer at March Air
Force Base near Riverside,
Calif., cracked down on him.
Thenceforward, he was forbid-
den to wear the yarmulke, even
in the base hospital where he
worked most of the time. Accor-
ding to Goldman, he was
threatened with court-martial if
he did. An Air Force regulation
is specific on this point, declar-
ing that "headgear will not be
worn while indoors except by
armed security police in the per-
formance of their duties.
GOLDMAN FILED suit. He
declared that his small yarmulke
could not possibly threaten
discipline. He argued that
religious exceptions to the
military regulation would make
the Air Force a more humane
place and increase morale.
Addressing this argument in his
majority opinion, Rehnquist
Terrorist Bomb In Paris
Kills One Person, Injures 22
PARIS (JTA) One person was killed and 22 were
I injured, 11 of them critically, when 9 powerful bomb ex-
: ploded on the Champs-Elysees. An Arab terrorist group,
"The Union for Arab Political Prisoners in the Middle
East," claimed responsibility for the outrage. It occurred
only 15 minutes after Jacques Chirac was sworn in as
I France's new Prime Minister.
At Services Mar. 30
wrote that standardized
uniforms are needed to subor-
dinate "personal preferences
and identities in favor of the
overall group mission."
Joining Rehnquist was Justice
John Paul Stevens, whose opi-
nion said that Capt. Goldman
had made a strong case in behalf
of an exception for his yarmulke,
but if the exception were
granted, then Sikhs might ask to
wear turbans and Rastafarians
demand the right to wear their
hair in dreadlocks.
Dissenters to the majority in-
cluded Justices William Bren-
nan, Thurgood Marshall, Harry
Blackmun and Sandra Day
O'Connor.
WRITING FOR the dissent.
Justice Brennan argued that "If
a branch of the military declares
one of its rules sufficiently im-
portant to outweigh a service
person's constitutional rights, it
seems that the court will accept
that conclusion, no matter how
absurd or unsupported it may
be."
Brennan expressed surprise,
finding it unbelievable that if Or-
thodox Jews were allowed to
wear yarmulkes on duty, "our
fighting forces (would) slip down
the treacherous slope toward
unkempt appearance, anarchy
and, ultimately defeat."
According to O'Connor, the
Court should have considered
"the special importance of
defending our nation without
abandoning completely the
freedoms that make it worth
defending."
A partnership of community
agencies and corporations has an-
nounced the development of an
ambitious year-long project to
reduce prejudice and improve in-
tergroup understanding, involv-
ing the commitment of over $1
million in television time and the
creation of specially produced
materials for school classrooms in
Dade, Broward and Monroe
counties.
The project, called "A World of
Difference," is a cooperative ef-
fort of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, WPLG-
TV Channel 10, Greater Miami
United and CenTrust Savings
Bank. It is being brought to South
Florida by the ADL after a very
successful experience with the
concept in the Boston area.
A key element of the project is a
major commitment of resources
by WPLG-TV valued at $1.2
million for the on-air time alone,
exclusive of production costs
for the creation of programs,
features and sport an-
nouncements intended to counter
prejudice and to profile the area's
various racial, ethnic and religious
groups. The project's general
theme is. "a little understanding
can make a world of difference."
The media campaign will be
coupled with the extensive
distribution in the three-county
area of specially prepared cur-
riculum materials for schools and
workshops for teachers, keyed to
the dual aims of the project, pre-
judice reduction and intergroup
understanding. The school-based
portion of the campaign will be
underwritten by a grant from
CenTrust Savings.
Under the guidance of Greater
Miami United, a special writing
team of area educators has been
assembled. They will produce a
"South Florida component" for
the in-school teaching materials,
which focus on teaching about
cultural diversity and democratic
values.
The public awareness objectives
of the project will get a boost from
$50,000 in billboard space donated
Continued on Page 15-B
JCC Centers Announce
'Share Your Seder' Program
The Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami in cooperation
with the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami and the Jewish
Association Serving Singles
(JASS) are inviting people who
are alone on Passover to celebrate
with a family in the community,
through the "Share Your Seder
Program."
"Part- of the tradition of the
Passover holiday is Jewish people
reaching out to those of our faith
who are less fortunate," said
Elton J. Kerness, Executive
Director of the Jewish Communi-
ty Centers of Greater Miami. He
added "whether or not they are
single, young or old is not impor-
tant; what is important is that
they not be alone on one of the
most important holidays on the
Jewish calendar. The tradition is
to invite the 'stranger' into the
home."
As Kerness explained, the pro-
gram is set-up so that people who
have an available place at their
dinner table and would like to
uphold the tradition of the holiday
should contact the Jewish Com-
munity Centers and let them
know that their home is available.
Also let the Centers know how
many people they can accom-
modate at their Seder, whether
they will hold the first or second
Seder, or both, what time a guest
should arrive and if they observe
Jewish dietary laws.
Anyone in the community who
is interested in attending a Seder
should contact the Centers as
well, so that an appropriate match
can be made.
"The Rabbinical Association is
having its Rabbis announce the
program to their congregations so
that those who might be alone are
aware of the program," said
Harry A. "Hap" Levy, Chairman
of the Board for the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Greater Miami.
"This program is a wonderful way
for Jewish agencies to reach out
together serving Miami's Jewish
Community at this holiday," he
added.
Anyone interested in par-
ticipating in the "Share Your
Seder Program." either by offer-
ing your home or sharing a Seder
with a family should contact San-
dra Henchy at the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Greater
Miami's Executive Office.
Miami To Mourn Passing of Rabbi Feinstein
Greater Miami's rabbinate and
the student bodies of all yeshivoth
and day schools here, their deans
I and teachers, will gather with the
Jewish community Sunday night,
30, at the Crown Hotel on
Miami Beach to mourn the pass-
"?K in New York of Rabbi Moses
| feinstein.
.&ahbi Feinstein died on Sunday
"ht, Mar. 13, the eve of the Fast
Esther, at the age of 91. He was
President of the Union of Or-
thodox Rabbis of the United
states and Canada. He was also
^airman of the World Council of
&ages and dean and founder of the
Kabbinical College of Mesivta
I Wereth in Jerusalem.
ONE OF the world's authorities
ion Jewish law and author of multi-
vohune texts of responsa and
Talmudic commentary, he was
readily accessible to both scholars
and laiety alike.
In New York, at least 50,000
mourners packed the streets out-
side Tifereth Jerusalem, the
yeahiva where Feinstein served as
dean since he came to the United
States in 1937. Afterwards, a long
cortege followed his casket to
JFK Airport. His body was flown
to Israel Monday for burial at Har
Menuchot cemetery in Jerusalem
Tuesday night.
Associates recalled Feinstein's
hasmada (diligence). He struc-
tured every minute of the day for
some scholarly pursuit, such as a
review of two chapters of
Mishnayos while folding his
tefillin straps. He reviewed the
Shukhan Aruch, the code of
Jewish law, more than 300 times
during his life.
Feinstein served as president of
Agudas Israel of America from
1966-1980 and had beaded its
Bresidium since the early 1960's.
[e also headed the organization's
Moetzes Gadolei HaTorah (Coun-
cil of Torah Sages) which he
chaired since 1962; and was presi-
dent of the Agudas Harabbonim
(Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the
U.S. and Canada) from 1968 to
1980.
HE WAS a member of the rab-
binical board of Torah Umesorah,
the National Society of Hebrew
Day Schools, of which he served
as vice president and was a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of Chinuch Ataamai/Torah
Schools for Israel.
Feinstein's prolific responsa to
halachic qoeries'from all over the
Jewish world from 1950-75 were
published in the seven-volume Ig-
roth Moshe (Letters of Moshe). He
also published, between 1948-79,
13 volumes of Talmudic commen-
tary Dibroth Moshe (Moshe's
Statements).
Feinstein was bom in 1895 in
Uzda, near Pinsk, Russia, and was
reared in an atmosphere of rab-
binic scholarship and responsibili-
ty. His father. Rabbi Dovid Feins-
tein, served as rabbi of Uzda for
25 years and then assumed the
rabbinate in Starobin. where he
Continued on Page 15-B
Rabbi Moses Feinstein



Page 3-B The^ewi3h FloridJan/Frflay. March 28. 1986
Federation To Hold Second
Annual Ambassador's Ball
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Turnberry Isle
Alliance will hold its Second An-
nual Ambassador's Ball on Tues-
day, beginning with cocktails at 7
p.m. The black-tie dinner and
reception will be held at the
Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood.
Harry Gampel. who was
honored at last year's Am-
bassador's Ball for his outstan-
ding service to Federation and the
Jewish community, will serve as
chairman for this year's Ball.
Residents of Turnberry Isle
have always shared a strong sense
of unity when it came to suppor-
ting the work of the Federation,"
said Gampel. "I expect that not
only will this year's Ambassador's
BaU be a wonderful and exciting
affair, but also that our com-
munity's campaign will top the $1
million mark."
Asher Nairn, minister of infor-
mation for the Israeli Embassy in
Washington. D.C.. will be guest
speaker at the event.
Serving with Gampel as recep-
tion co-chairmen are Syd Cutler.
Sally Fishman and Phyllis
Kovens.
The Business and Professional Women of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation recently
sponsored its first in a series of networking
programs at the Barbara Oilman Gallery to
new the private art collection of Ruth and
Richard Shack. The networking branch is
designed for women wish ing to meet other pro-
fessionals in their respective fields. Shown
above at the event, from left, BPW Networking
Recruitment Chairwoman Diana Fleeman
BPW Vice Chairwoman tor Leadershn
Development Lisa Treister. BPW Network-
ing Programming Chairwoman Barbara
Gillman, and BPW Networking Ar-
rangements Chairwoman Cornelia Philipm
The residents of Admiral Port and Commodore Plaza recently
sponsored a combined event on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federations 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign. Shown above. Meyer Siegel (left)
prcseute award to Commodore Plaza Building Chairman Irving
Bxcofsky who was honored at the event.
ThcAttorneys Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
m*n//y held a cocktail reception and dinner on behalf of the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency FundJProject
Kenewal-Or Akiva Campaign. Seen above, at the event are dinner
committee cc-chairmen Gerald K. Schwartz (left) and Charles 4
Citrm.
Traditional Passover Seders
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19*4 Sum Hurts


Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
His new Hebrew name
isNatan.
The world knows him as
Anatoiy Shcharansky.
After 9 years in Soviet
prisons, including 400 days
in solitary confinement,
Shcharansky is in Israel.
Free at last
And we did it
Shcharansky said so
himself. I "kept going... because
all of Israel was with me and
many people around the world
supported me."
In Greater Miami we
maintain a tireless, relentless
pipeline of concern to Jews in
Russia. We keep letters flow-
ing to Soviet Jews. We lobby
United States and Soviet offi-
cials and contact the media to
keep the issue before the public.
A Soviet Jew's existence
is dairy torment Harassed.
Frequently arrested Often impris-
oned No official recognition of
their individual existence.
We're their only hope.
They're alive because we won't
let them be ignored to death.
Our awareness of their plight
makes Russia more cautious.
The miracle of
Shcharansky's release must
be repeated.
We can, and must do it
again, again and again until all
400,000 Soviet Jews request-
ing exit visas are free.
Give to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal Or
Akiva Campaign. Phone in
your pledge today. 5764000.
w
OMEV
PEOPLE
ONE
DESTINY
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137-0100


Pay 4-B The Jewah rTcewJauVrriday. March 28. 1986
.4*-:* :h-: Mid-Winter Conference y :he Israel
Histadnd Foundation, which raised $U
million uere ileft to right/: Rabin Morton
Jaaiaratv Z" Sol Sze^n. H
Rabbi Leon K-ynish. Rmht
and H:m. H
Master
* # -.

Florida Senator Larry Piummer ipu tke
juest of honor at the Miami Reguyn of
Hadassah $ second annual Woman of the Year
Luncheon. Pictured from left are Region
President Diane Issenberg. Herman,
co-chairman. Sen. Plummer; Eddyse Kessier.
co-chairman; and Barbara Bretan Klein.
Tgvyn membership coordina:. -
Debate On Single-Issue PACs
WASHINGTON -1JTA)
A fonzm on Jewish
poiirxal power erupted into
a sharp debate on "single-
issue PACs'" at the
American Jewish Congress"
1986 National Biennial Con-
vention here at the
Shoreham Hotel.
Rep. Barney Frank Masai. Hi iTiiig tact more than
90 percent of aaaaann of Coc-
Bajpaal Luaei and do ao for
not financial reatoai.
charged dial pro-Israel.
bane PACs often end op
by politicians who
not
even o deneed PAL
fmyirc funds to
howlers or rantinatrs "is mo often
"Yob don't bar support for
Israel with JenuL money." be
and. "Thai j what oar enemas
say We get support for Lsra*-.
because it a z the moral and
strategic mterest of the Ci
States v support the
Scate."
T00 FETLT. ne
on. pro-Israel PACa wfl
who, emeyt far
of Israel. fier
noted, cannot afford to nrnore
eg-.s^aiors and candidates front
soch areas, and it a anportaat for
at Jewah i iihnibmtj to en-
courage sopport of La at! through
|Ji.l C0BtTCC30C3.
Watteaoerg noted that the
Unrted States a a nation of
aaariaViaftBMBl pawan that r.^r
make trade-offs on poaocal i
In some instances, tha aay in-
volve difficult comprocuses. ne
suggested- "Lf 90 percent of a
school prayer, and he a for lsraei.
then yon shooldn't withhold
money because of his pueiua on
school prayer." be said- He also
aawiTiil that the
aanaty itself a spat on a i
Frank repbed that m instances
pro-Ismei candwares are
against each other.
Jews shooid support
the canrtirinte who best represents
then- pawMna on non-Lsmei aaaes.
WATTENBEKG declared that
"the anat hap it mt bang for
lsraei a a strccg natniu United
States pohcy aroand the world."
For that reason, he added, oppos
aal by jra-5 ,: laawau anas-
Ina and
an ag-
hai oeer,
gressrve Aserxaa pobq
HUlUI JJULUI l-
Wattenberg errbetred those
who he claimed want Israel to be
treated as a specs, rase in terms
of American foreign policy,
"lsraei a part of the world." be
ad. -The D-S. has a gwbai
pobcy that cannot be put
afaranec-j m aw hraal
and another for the rest of the
assertive
Frank retorted that
thane demanding an assertive
pobcy m other parts of the world
were far from favoring an ag-
gressive American stance in op-
| apartheid in Sooth Afnca.
Coder argued against a percep-
Qon of lanrb laat sopport for
lsraei "The concern I have these
days." she said, "a that we (the
Rnai =r .-: jr-r. *-_ :* ^^r. is
a angle-asue community We
should make a dear statement
that we are interested in and will
give money for other issues."
Wane she accepted the concept
of wagip inn PACs for Israel
she saai the Jewan
should go beyuad that to
najaaai aaa* i>>?<
Community Corner
The Papanicolaou Cancer Research Foundation t!1 present I
raaaacn Gala on Friday Aprs 4 at the Doral on the Ocean AB
Soviet Jewish Refusenik
Sentenced To Three Years
WASHDiGTOS \JTA) -
Soviet Jew ah iifmul Y\
Lrsa Caber, rice eaarperson of
the Democratic National
i of other
Lifshitx was convicted and tnm <** bh .aaaroaea
taank to three years I^>aagrad daraaj a search carried
far aao-Soviet aander wt prior to ha arrest.
J to the L'aion of Cooacas
far Saras
was m first Sonet Jew
Pnraetnps *
proceeds aal benefit the CAncer center at the L
nrversm of \\uuni
Arlene Rosenfeld U aes has routed Commufuty An Alliance is
(krector at pabhewy **d promotion, announced Esther Shr
president at the firm.
wwJb,
The Abe Horrowttz Post 682 and Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jernxsh War \ eterans are holding thew Annual Donor Banquet
Saiurdav n*ht at 7 p m at the Holy-wood Beach Hihon accor
3ng to chairmen. Justine W armbrandt and Al Fneoman
Photographer Barry FeDman wiH present hn exhibit. The
Sown of Place, ai the Lowe Levmson An GaJler> at Temple
Beth Sholom The one-man show J run from Sunday umj
\V ednesday Aprd 25 according to cultural director Jab
Drucker
The Judaic Studies program at the Lnnersay of Miami will pn?.
sent Professor Elaine Pagels of the Depanmenr o Rehiyon at
Princeton Lni\ersity lecturing Monday night at 8 p m on The
Gnosuc Gospels as one of the concluding events oi the Spnng
Semester
Nina Beilina the \ioliniv who immigrated to this icuniry from
the Soviet Lruon 10 years ago will conclude the first season of
Temple Beth Sholom s Sundays at 4 concert sen*-, or, April6
at 4 p m in the sanctuary according to Judy bracket ultural
ovector
Dr Ste\en Rosenberg research soenttsi mil speak on A
New Approach to the Immunotherapy at Cancer at Mount Sinai
Medtcal Center's Second Annual Oncology Seminar on Tuesday
at 8 loam
Temple Shir Ami Players will stage three performances of
Agatha Christie s play The Mousetrap on Saturday April -5 and
matinee on Sunday and Saturday April 12 at the Harmony
Creame Arts Center to rase funds for its new building
The next Coffee. Culture and Conversation Program of
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater Miami wtD be held on Sunday
monung at 10 30am presenting Joadum Schoenfeld author of
jhten Memoirs
An exhibition at paintings. Faces and Places near and far
by Reyna Youngerman is now being held at Gallery ;*>!
Barbara Stein and Betty Lawton Co-chairpersons or the invita-
tion committee for a Miami KJhan hbgh School benefit announce
a preview and art auction at Ngnature Gardens. South Miami
starting at 7 p m wah the auction slated for 8 p m
California Club Women's American ORT luncheon meeting
wifl take place Tuesday at noon wan an open forum at the Caw
Creek Country Club formerly the Caaforma Club. North Miami
Beach
Army Private Adam L Bet-man son at Leshe M Berman of
North Miami Beach, has completed a parachute packing
maintenance and airdrop course at the L S Army Quartermaster
School Fort Lee
Army Capt Manhew L Hodes. son of Henry L and Ruth
Hodes of Miami, has armed for duty wh the 782nd
Maintenance Battalion Fort Bragg
Tech Sgt Victor A Schwaru. son of Ida D Lederman of
North Miami Beach, has been decorated wwh the Air Force
Achievement Medal at Eielson Aa- Force Base Alaska
The Jewish Fund for Justice recently announced the award of a
$5 000 grant to the Florida Farmworker Association of Apopka.
Florida to support the Association s People s Enterprise Protect
The protect seeks to end the exploaanon of migrant workers
The South Florida Chug Abyah Group at hold a meeting on
Saaday. Apr* 6at730pmatthe Greater Miami Jewuh
Federaoon 4200 Bacayne Bhd
The Royal Hungarian rxfl
RESTAimAifT mM*
ftcSTAURAMT
Qlatt Koahar
S3a-S401
r^Lawehsoiw
.00$atat*i'wr"'
PROP WaiM Fa*[


Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Friends of Koch will sponsor Rabbi Meir Kahane,
member of the Knesset, as guest speaker at Beth Israel
Congregation on Monday, April 7 at 7:30 p.m.
Na'amat USA
In preparation for Temple Emanu-El
Scholarship Ball. Left to right Chairmen Mr.
and Mrs. George Goldbloom with Dr. and
Mrs. Irving Lehrman.
Emanu-El Scholarship Ball Set For Saturday Night
Leaders of Temple Emanu-El
will gather on Saturday, at the
Eighteenth Scholarship Ball on
behalf of the Lehrman Day
School, with the theme, "Educa-
tion Is The Highest
Commandment."
"We are warmed by the
response of our congregation who
realize the importance of educa-
tion as the cornerstone of
Judaism. Without them, the ex-
cellence we attain at Lehrman
Dav School would be impossible,"
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi, said.
They will be honoring Hal Kaye,
vice president of the Temple, with
the Maimonides Award which is
given in recognition of exemplary
dedication to the synagogue, the
community and its people. Kaye
serves on the Board of Education
for the Lehrman Day School.
A black tie affair, the Ball will
be held in the Friedland Ballroom,
with a reception at 7:30 p.m. and
dinner at 8:30 p.m.
Chairing the event are Mr. and
Hebrew Academy To Commemorate
Yahrzeit Of Rabbi Gross
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy will com-
memorate the Yahrzeit of its
founder and guiding spirit, Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross, on Tuesday
evening, with a Yahrzeit lecture
and Torah study classes in
memory of the man whose name
the school bears.
Rabbi Yossi Heber, principal of
the Junior, Senior High School
will deliver a lecture entitled
"Parenting in Jewish Law and
I How It Culminates With
Passover." at 8 p.m. in the
auditorium of the Academy.
A special Torah learning session
of Fathers and Sons will also be
held at the school that evening
from 7:30 till 9:30 p.m., headed by
Rabbi Elias Hochner, an alumnus
of the school and now a faculty
member.
Hebrew Academy Alumni will
hold a special session in memory
of their former principal at a
Torah for Women session to be
held at the home of Ora Lee Gross
Kanner, a daughter of Rabbi
Gross.
Award Named In Honor Of Anne Ackerman
Burton Young, president of The
I Forum of North Dade, has an-
nounced the establishment of an
I award to be given annually in
I honor of Anne Ackerman, to be
called the "Anne Ackerman Great
|Floridian Award."
The award will be bestowed
upon its recipient annually at a
dinner and the award will carry
with it a monetary prize.
Young said he "perceives that
this a *ard will become one of the
most coveted of its kind to be
bestowed in the State of Florida."
3t/t/ie*Ung6
Temple Zamora Sisterhood will hold their annual
uonor Luncheon on Sunday, April 6 at 12:30 p.m. at the
12,2" HoteL Libby Lieberman Is the donor chairman
and Rose Lauretz is president.
Ms. Eileen Lipp, of the Consumer Advocate's Office
win speak at the next general meeting of the
sisterhood on Wednesday, April 16 at 12:30 p.m. at the
.25? Annual "Second Seder" will be held on Thursday,
pm 24 at 7 p.m. at the synagogue.
u2StZ Wo,,e- librarian of the Central Agency for
H Education will review "A Morning Moon," by
2J2? 7?,bel at the forthcoming session of the Great
owns Discussion Group on Thursday, April 3 at 1:30
P-n. at the Miami Beach Public Library.
JIWPI Chapter of Women's American ORT will
' 'a ,,nlr next meeting on Thursday, April 3 at 12:30
P-n. m the Morton Towers Auditorium.
rJ"ne Parents of North American Israelis will hold a
pguiar meeting on Sunday, April 6 at 1:30 p.m. at the
deration building.
Mrs. George Goldbloom; honorary
chairmen are Mr. and Mrs. Ted
Arison, Mr. and Mrs. B. Morton
Gittlin, Mrs. Alexander Muss, Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Stein and Dr. and
Mrs. George S. Wise.
Funds from the Ball are ear-
marked to offset the deficit of
Lehrman Day School, the Conser-
vative Day School on Miami
Beach, named in honor of Dr. Irv-
ing Lehrman. on the occasion of
his 25th anniversary as rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El.
Sophie Weissman will review
the book "A Bintele Brief at the
monthly meeting of the liana
chapter of Na'amat USA, Thurs-
day, April 3, at 11:30 a.m. at
Winston Tower 400, 231 174th
Street, Sunny Isles.
liana chapter president Lillian
Hoffman said a mini lunch will be
served.
A new movie entitled, "The
Future is Now," depicting
Na'amat's projects and activities
in Israel and in the United States,
will be featured at the first annual
"Rally Round" of the Hi Rise
Tikvah chapter of Na'amat USA
to be held Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in
the meeting room of Forte
Towers.
Harriet Green, National vice
president of Na'amat USA, will be
the featured speaker.
Speaking on membership will be
Leah Benson, vice president of
the South Florida Council of
Na'amat.
Sally Gersten is president of the
chapter.
A report about the donor lun-
cheon will be featured at the
meeting of the Masada chapter of
Na'amat USA, Wednesday at
12:30 p.m. in Room 600 at 605
Lincoln Road, according to
chapter president Bertha
Liebman.
r
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Of*c* Nrwig Soulhem Flood* and ManhMttn. The Bronx, and WaalchaatarandRocMand countocmrV^Myfc


Page 6-B The Jewish Horidan/Friday. March 28, 1986
Max and Sarah Gleiberman display the Israei
Freedom Award they received from the
Greater Miami Israei Bond Organization
during a recent Sight in Israel celebration at
the Burieigh House condominium in Miami
Beach. Chairing the happy moment with the
Gleibermans are Burieigh House Israel Bond
Committee Chairman Mot Kossar {left) and
Co-chairman David Greenberg. right'
LL Danny Tadmore, of the Israel Defense Forces, was the special
guest speaker at a recent Salute to Israel sponsored by the Buckley
Towers Israel Bonds Committee. With Tadmore are Jack Leeb
left, and Mary Ross, who served as chairpersons for the event
Israel Bonds To Honor
North Bay Village Couple
On Sunday. April 6. Charles and
Ignore Feinberg of North Bay
Village wiD reccne the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organization
tribute during a Salute to Israei
Dinner at Temple Beth EL North
Bay Milage.
Sponsored by the Temple, the
event will begin at 130 p.m. in
the Temple Social Hal
The Fembergs, who wiD receite
the Israel Freedom Award, are
being recognised for their active
parbcxpaoon in various philan-
thropic agencies and for their sup-
port of Israel through the Israel
Bond program, both in Miami and
Detroit.
As a ribrant and energetic
86-year-old man. Feinberg eon-
onoes to be active with various
organisations today. In addition to
Israei Bonds, he has bees a
member of B'nai B'rith for many
years, and was a Founder's
Member of the Hebrew University
in Jerusalem. He is hated in the
1972 edition of Who's Wko ta
Mrs. Feinberg is a member of
the Temple's mux hood and hav-
Chairpersons Named For Bonds Janet Reno Dinner
Five local women have been
named co-chairpersons for the
II Bonds Testimonial Dinner
honoring Dade County Sta.te At-
torney Janet Reno on Sunday.
April 13. at the Biscayne Bay
Mamott Hotel in Miami. The
chairpersons are aD members of
the Professional Women's
Cabinet division of the local Israel
Bonds Organization.
Accepting to act as chairpersons
for the dinner are Rep. Elaine
Bloom. Sen. Roberta Fox. Niety
Gerson. Rep. Elaine Gordon and
Sen. Gwen Margolis.
Reno is being honored for her
service to the community, her sup-
port of Israel and her strong com-
mitment to human rights and the
rule of law.
"I have worked with Janet Reno
on many of our Jewish concern
over the last decade," noted
Bloom. "In 1979. when we set up
an effort to help free Ida Nudd.
known as the "Angel of the
Refusniks." from Soviet oppres-
sion. Janet Reno came forward to
help lead our cause. She was
always at the forefront of the
flight for human rights for all
people.
Israel Bonds To Honor Louis Rones at Luncheon
Fetaberg
ing served as a past director. She
has also been a nwiw of
Hadassah and is active with the
Council of Jewish Women and
ORT.
Guest speaker for the Sahite to
Israei celebration wiD be Debbte
Wernkk.
Serving as chapman for the
Temple Beth El Israei Bonds com-
mittee is Irving Burns. Acting as
30-ehairman is Irvmg Ceranka.
Women's History Month Program Set
The American Jewish Commit-
tee and the Dade Historical
Association of South Florida wiE
celebrate Women's History
Month with an oral history pro-
gram entitled "Jewish Women of
Achievement." It wC feature Sve
interviews of Roth Greenfield.
Bertha Lee. and Mahriaa L*ec-
mac The program w take pace
at 4 p-bl Sunday, at the Histora.
Museum
Program C
Fmkebtein said that the inter-
views are meant to be represec-
tacve of a collection begun by
AJC. The "Jewish Women of
Achievement Collection."' which it
part of a national project of the
Wuham E Werner Oral History
IJbrary m AJC's national office, is
being housed permanently at the
MK= Eacr. ::" thairtaniNMi
was a paooeer in Dade County in
their own right.
A*rrt
J '
With G. Washington s* Season*ng
and Broth you'll never have
wsfta tr n saeoa
tmtmi
MCjraK **<
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Louis
Room during a luncheon on
Thursday. April 10. at the Coral
Creek Country Club. North Miami
Beach, sponsored by the Califor-
nia Club Community and the Lake
Carmei Lodge B'nai B'rith.
In addition to his efforts on
behalf of the Israel Bonds
Organization. Louis has been af-
filiated with the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation where he has
been a member of the Ad-
ministrative Committee since
1964 For two years, he served as
the Chairman of the Federation's
drive in the California Club area-
He has also been active in New
Tomb Of
Mordechai and
Esther Damaged
TEL AVIV ,JTA1 The
traditional tome of Mordechai and
Esther m Iran (Persia in ancient
umest has beer damaged by Iraqi
bombings, and the ancient Persian
town at Shushan. scene of the
Parin story, has been almost com-
plecefy destroyed in the Gulf war.
according to a report in last
Thursdays .ssne of the ufcra-
Orthodox Jerusalem weekrv Et:
Jersey where he belonged to
various Jewish agencies, including
the United Jewish Appeal where
he served as the South Orange
chairman. He was active with the
Jewish Community Foundation in
Essex County, where he served as
vice president and the Jewish
Community Council where he was
a trustee.
Dr. Ruth Gruber. an author,
foreign correspondent and
authority on the Middle East, will
be the guest speaker at the
luncheon.
Serving as co-chairmen of the
Israel Bonds Committee and the
luncheon are Harvey Berman.
Jack Gellman and Herman Sacks.
Lonii Roses
The newspaper's correspon-
dent, reporting from Cairo.
quotes an Egyptian source who
often travels to Iran and is
faiiliar with the tomb in
Hamadar a site venerated by
Jews and Modems ajke Accor-
dng to the rgjpiiaa adbr^aat.
as Iraqi boob which fell near the
tome massed the coCapae of some
of ks terra, sc.ia.ute.
amajamm ---<
rrtms rcetmoe to
Whereas fortrty
re naaiy Jewish.
Invar enciieiy
The report says
:
of'
JEWISH
BRAIN
TEASER
THE ORIGINAL JEWISH
TRIVIA GAME
InTwcEdftions
Exciting, Educational and Entertaining Game
For Tha Whola Family'
4Awo.
I
r-i
Satisfaction Guarantdor Your ktonay Back
a,
Icha*-*-
OAOE* WTTM YOU* CHECK Oft VISA ACCOUNT *0E" TO:
MJ).G. lane* laparia Ltd.
. 51 Woodhrook Way S.W.
C%y. Aha. Canada TZW 4E7


nan
Mel Roth, Executive Vice President, Dade region of the First
American Bank and Trust, presents a check of $500,000 to Israeli
Consul General Yehoshua Trigor, left, after the bank purchased a
State of Israel Bonds note.
Israelis Continue To Be Troubled
By Possible Syrian Aggression
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The possibility of aggressive
action by Syria continues to
trouble Israeli political and
military leaders. Premier
Shimon Peres warned Tues-
day, with reference to
Syria, that "we must not be
blinded by our desire for
peace." If Israel is attacked,
it will fight back but will use
its military might only in
self-defense, he said.
Peres was addressing students
in Ashdod. Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee that recent "ag-
gressive statements" by Syrian
President Hafez Assad required
Israel to be on the alert to "pre-
vent an undesired war."
SPEAKING TO reporters,
Rabin accused Syria of "en-
couraging and aiding terrorism in
general." Damascus Radio
retorted by accusing Israel of
waging psychological warfare
against Syria.
The preoccupation with Syria as
a potential menace to peace in the
region was noted earlier this
month when Peres, briefing the
same Knesset committee, refer-
red to that country's severe
economic crisis. He implied it pos-
ed a danger to Israel should
Damascus try to divert public at-
tention to mounting hardships at
home by military adventurism
abroad.
At the same time, Peres said,
the economic crisis could impel
Syria to abandon its traditional
hard-line policy and possibly even
Participate in the Middle East
peace process. Peres noted that
Damascus continues to honor the
separation of forces agreements
on the Golan Heights, which was
arranged with Israel after the
Yom Kippur War in 1973. He urg-
w Syria to go all the way and
make peace with Israel.
BUT RECENT remarks by
Rabin, Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe
^evy and Maj. Gen. Yossi Peled,
who will shortly succeed Gen. Uri
rr as commander of the northern
region, pointed to Syria as the
Primary military threat to Israel
at this time.
Rabin also warned that recent
^ents in Egypt could jeopardize
Peace in the region, a reference to
lfie two days of rioting by police
conscripts in Cairo which has
caused many political pundits here
and abroad to voice concern for
the future of President Hosni
Mubarak's regime.
Levy told an Israel Television
interviewer that it was irrelevant
whether or not Syria actually
orders terrorist groups to try to
infiltrate into Israel. It is suffi-
cient that the Syrians shelter
Palestinian rejectionist groups
and provide them with an in-
frastructure. He noted that
Lebanese Smite extremists nur-
tured by Iran have their head-
quarters in Damascus, train ter-
rorists there and receive the
wherewithal to attack Israel.
"IT IS VERY comfortable for
the Syrians to keep us busy (in
South Lebanon), and if they want
to attack us they just have to
make sure there is no quiet
there," Levy said. He said the
same applied to the various ter-
rorist splinter groups active in re-
cent weeks.
Levy noted that the main pro-
blem in the north is that Israel has
a border with a country (Lebanon)
whose government has no control,
and there are many elements
which exploit that fact.
Peled warned that Syria is
preparing for an all-out military
confrontation with Israel. They .
now have long-range" weapons
that enable them to strike further
inside Israel than ever before, he
said, and an Israeli counterattack
would have to overcome
minefields, anti-tank ditches and
other dug-in emplacements not
encountered in previous conflicts.
ADL Survey
NEW YORK (JTA) Pro-
mpted by recent outbreaks of anti-
Semitism in West Germany, the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith announced the commission-
ing of a six-month "definitive"
survey of the extent of anti-
Jewish attitudes in that country.
Abraham Foxman, ADL's
associate national director and
head of its International Affairs
Division, said the survey will be
carried out by a leading West Ger-
man polling organization, the In-
stitute for Demoscopy based in
Allensbach, with the assistance of
the Center for the Study of Anti-
Semitism of the Technische
Universitat Berlin.
Vegetarian
Beans Found
With Pork
Don't eat or buy cans of Heinz
vegetarian baked beans until fur-
ther notice. This is the advice of
Orthodox rabbis who have found
pork in a can of supposedly kosher
beans.
Rabbi Tibor Stern, vice presi-
dent of the Union of Orthodox
Rabbis of the United States and
Canada, explained that the beans
were probably mislabeled. He said
that a representative of the Union
was to contact Heinz early this
week to clear up the problem.
Rabbi Stern is spiritual leader of
the Jacob C. Cohen Community
Synagogue of Miami Beach.
He cautioned that "We do not
know how many hundreds or
thousands of these cans there may
be." adding that "it was probably
a mistake."
Orthodox Jews who follow
dietary laws would be committing
"an inadvertent sin, and they are
not responsible for it" if they ate
what are presumably the mislabel-
ed beans.
But. he said, "If they do use it
(the beans), all their dishes and
utensils will become non-kosher."
Kushner To Speak
On Breast Cancer
Rose Kushner, presidential ap-
pointee to the National Cancer
Advisory Board will address
breast cancer and its devastating
effects at a special lecture
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the
AMI Palmetto General Medical
Plaza Berg-Truppman Conference
Center, ground floor, presented
by the Miami Cancer Conference.
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish,Floridian Page IrB
w.
Maxwell
House
Haggadah
50th Anniversary
This Passover, Jews all over America will continue a tradition
that began 50 years ago. They'll be asking the Four Questions
with the help of an old and welcome friend: the Maxwell House
Coffee Haggadah.
Maxwell House will mark this 50-year milestone by making
800,000 Haggadahs available in grocery outlets throughout the
nation. Even more impressive, notes Richard Jacobs, President of
the Joseph Jacobs Organization, the company which originally
conceived of the program, a grand total of 20,000.000 Haggadahs
have been made available free of charge during the past 50 years.
"There is hardly a Jewish family in America that has not read
from the Maxwell House Haggadah." says Mr. Jacobs. "In fact,
many Jews have come to associate Maxwell House as the
Passover coffee because of the company's participation in the
holiday celebration via publishing and distributing the
Haggadah."
The Haggadah program exemplifies Maxwell House's long-
standing commitment to promote its quality coffee by gaining the
respect and loyalty of Jewish consumers. Richard Jacobs points
out that it all began 60 years ago when his father, the late Joseph
Jacobs, persuaded Maxwell House to obtain Passover certifica-
tion, setting it apart from other coffee brands. Maxwell House
was then heavily sold and merchandised through grocery outlets
in Jewish neighborhoods in New York and supported by special
advertising in Jewish newspapers. Today, Maxwell House con-
tinues to advertise heavily in Jewish media and sponsors such
events as an Israel Sweepstakes.
Years after the first Haggadah was ever distributed, the rela-
tionship between Maxwell House and the Jewish community is as
strong as ever. Mr. Jacobs believes the latest advertisement pro-
duced by Maxwell House for the Jewish market sums up the feel-
ing between the coffee maker and the Jewish community. The ad
reads: "Maxwell House has been at so many seders, we feel like
part of the family."
as Exc/us/ve Ca e
The^at.^ia^ Beach
^Michigan Avenue
Please contaciu
C34-7213/945-222
&thT'^S Beach 6l
CuM^BethShmue'
Temple Bern
Miami Beach, FIB.


Page 8-R The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986

United States Senator Albert Gore, Jr. (D-
Term) was the guest speaker at the Westview
Country Club Annual Dinner held on behalf of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign.
Shown above at the dinner, from left,
Westview Federation Committee Chairman
Sidney Cooperman, GMJF Associate
Treasurer Michael M. Adler, Gore, GMJF
President Samuel I. Adler, and 1986 General
Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
HAPPENINGS SINGLES la having an OUTSTANDING SINGLES PARTY
on FRIDAY, APRIL 4, 1986 at 9:00 P.M., at the DIPLOMAT COUNTRY
CLUB, 501 DIPLOMAT PARKWAY, Hallandala, Florida. Thar, will b.
DANCING, LIVE BAND, CONTINUOUS HORS D'OEUVRES. GIFT
DRAWINGS and SURPRISES. Admlaalon la S6.00. For mora Intorma
tlon call Sharon Silver 3SS-1255.
Doctor, 49, 5*10", would like to meet attractive, intelli-
gent, health-minded female (non-smoker) for serious
relationship. Please give phone number. P.O. Box 2044,
Miami Beach, Florida 33140.
Orthodox, charming woman in the 60s, kind, affection-
ate, refined, wishes to meet orthodox man 68-72 yrs.
Hebrew scholar with good character, a real partner in
life. Reply Box MC, c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Are you a successful, Jewish, professional gentleman,
kindhearted, to 42, who enjoys theater, sports, dining,
dancing? An attractive, educated, sensitive, Jewish
lady seeks you for a serious relationship. Please write
Box CE, c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami,
Fla. 33101.
Fire Ruins Matza Factory
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A fire
which swept through the Aviv
matza bakery in the religious
township of Bnei Brak last week
sent two firemen to the hospital
for treatment for smoke inhala-
tion and destroyed more than
100,000 packages of matza intend-
ed for export.
The bakery is one of the three
run hy the Aviv company and, ac-
cording to iLs spokesman, the fire
wiii not affect Passover supplies.
Aviv provides about fiO percent of
Israel'? matzot and its packages
are a familiar sight in American
supermarkets during the
Passover season.
According to the fire depart-
ment, the blaze was caused by an
electric short-circuit. It raged for
hours and was still smouldering
the next morning. Ten fire com-
panies fought the conflagration
which forced a diversion of traffic
from the main highway between
Petach Tikva and Tel Aviv that
runs through Bnei Brak.
Electric power was cut off for
hours in nearby Pardess Katz and
parts of Bnei Brak. Residents o!
buildings near the burning factory
were evacuated to hotels in Tel
Aviv.
NCJW
Events
Coral Branch of the National
Council of Jewish Women.
Greater Miami Section will hold a
luncheon at noon on Wednesday
at the Studio Restaurant. Jeffrey
Dorn will speak and life members
will be honored.
Bay Harbor Branch of National
Council of Jewish Women,
Greater Miami section will hold
their monthly meeting at 11:30
a.m. on Wednesday at the Surf-
side Community Center. Gottlieb
Hammer will be guest speaker
and life members will be honored.
National Council of Jewish
Women's Kendall Evening
Branch of the Greater Miami Sec-
tion will hold their monthly
meeting on Wednesday at 7:45
p.m. Blanche Brass will speak on,
"The Art of Conversation," and
life members will be honored.
Lakes Branch of the Greater
Miami Section of the National
Council of Jewish Women will
hold their monthly meeting at 11
a.m. on Wednesday, at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center. Sophie Weissman
will present a book review.
On Wednesday, April 16 at
noon, the branch will hold a lun-
cheon at the Bayswater Cafe in
Hallandale.
The Miami Beach Branch of the
Greater Miami Section of the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
will hold a luncheon on Wednes-
day at noon at the Carriage Club
North Restaurant. Myra Farr will
speak and life members will be
honored.
Flagler Opening
Features Ribbon of
$50 Bills
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association is announces the
opening of its 39th branch in the
new Bakery Centre in South
Miami.
Flagler will celebrate the Grand
Opening and Ribbon Cutting
Ceremony on Tuesday, April 8, at
11 a.m. South Miami Mayor Bill
Porter will cut the ribbon, made
up of $50 bills, which will be
distributed to local (harities.
There will be music and
refreshments following the Rib-
bon Cutting.
Foe Whitman, of North Miami Beach, with an Israeli pupil she ix
tutoring in English in Netanya, Israel. She is spending thru
months as a volunteer participating in Hadassah's "Lie-h"
program for retirees. Apart from tutoring, she is also working h
a Jewish National Fund forest, clearing undergrowth and prun-
ing trees.
MJHHA Executive Director Marc Lichtman (left) and Chairman
of the Board Judge Irving Cypen (right) presented sjxriol award*
to 25-year employees Rosemary Chalifand Ramon Ru-ardo.
Study Predicts That Unity Will
Outweigh Divisions Among Jews
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Despite deeply rooted
conflicts within the
American Jewish communi-
ty, the forces that unite it
will continue to outweigh
the pressures that divide it,
according to a sociologist
specializing in Jewish
affairs.
Dr. Samuel Heilman, professor
of sociology at Queens College of
the City University of New York,
asserted in a report that "sec-
tarianism, division and dissensus
have been a continuing element of
Jewish communal existence from
the beginning and throughout the
century."
The 39-page study, "American-
Jewish Disunity: An Overview,"
was commissioned by the
American Jewish Congress and
released at its 1986 biennial con-
vention at the Shoreham Hotel
here.
DIRE WARNINGS of Jewish
disunity have been issued in
newspapers, periodicals and jour-
nals, according to Heilman, citing
a number of major areas of divi-
sion such as the dispute over con-
version, the definition of "Who is
a Jew," and the status of women
in Judaism.
However, Heilman said that
while the Jewish community has
always lived with agmentation,
'the experience of history sug-
gests that even the bitterest
disputes get resolved in one way
or another either the various
groups of Jews find that the
forces that divide them are less
significant than those that unite
them, or some external adversary.
reminds them that they are one."
The rifts in the American
Jewish community are not merely
between Orthodox and non-
Orthodox elements Conser-
vative and Reform Jews are also
divided on many issues, and the
Orthodox are divided into modem
and traditional groups, Heilman
wrote in the report.
HEILMAN suggested that the
division between various groups
appear to be based on "competing
worldviews." He said that "one
worldview seeks to prevent all
change while the other en
courages or embraces change
Both views, however, remain con
vinced that they will ensure the
survival of Judaism and tw
Jews."
The first view, he said, holds
that change is suspect ana
ultimately threatens to erode
Judaism, while the second says
that those who fail to adapt ana
change will stagnate. In addition,
Heilman pointed out that there
also remains Jewish groups W*
are in the "ambiguous middle
position" between the extremes.
But Heilman also noted that
despite divisions on variou
issues, it is difficult to
characterize today's divisions a.
any deeper than those that have
divided Jewish life throughout tne
ages. Equally significant, ne
wrote, are some strong signs
unity, one of the strongest being
the willingness of a number
leaders from the Orthodox, Wv
servative and Reform brand
talk to each other and work '
'understand i:-
rapprochement.'


Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Wedding
\ The Miami Jevnsh Home and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens presented its first "Spring Fling" Auction, raising oi>er
\$38,000 for the Home. Pictured left to right Nancy Ranch. Chair-
'woman 'Muriel Rudolph, Executive Director Marc Lichtman and
\ Bella Goldstein. Auctioner was Boh Sugarman.
Hadassah Events
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah will hold a "Welcome
Luncheon" to honor New Life
Members at noon on Wednesday,
April 9 at the home of Ricki Igra,
region administrative vice
president.
Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their luncheon
meeting at noon on Tuesday at the
Shelborne Hotel.
The Ko'ach Chapter of Miami
Beach Region of Hadassah will
sponsor its Annual White
Elephant Sale Sunday, April 6
from 10 a.m. in Muss Park,
covered area, Miami Beach.
Chairmen are Dorothy Cohn and
Sandi Landfield.
The Opt i-Mrs. Club of Miami
\ Beach at their annual fun-
drawing luncheon observed the
\S0th Anniversary Diamond
\ Celebration in the cause for
'mnjionally disturbed
\ children. Lett to right are
{publicity chairman Mrs.
William (Dorothy) Carmel and
Mrs. Lawrence (Muriel)
Westan, overall chairperson.
B'nai B'rith Names
Fields-McLamore
Black Archives founder Dorothy
Fields and James W. McLamore,
:hairman of the board of trustees
if the University of Miami, receiv-
ed the Dade County Outstanding
Citizens Award from the South
Dade Council of B'nai B'rith.
Fields is founder and chief ar-
"hivist of the Black Archives of
*e History and Research Founda-
tion of South Florida.
McLamore is a benefactor of the
Children's Home Society of
Florida and general campaign
chairman of the Heart Association
of Greater Miami.
Position open lor Conservative
Rabbi. Must be Shomer Shabbat.
With Housing. Reply: Temple
Bnai Zion, 200 178th Street,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33160.
Tel. 1-305-932-2159.
DICKGREENSTEIN
Michelle Dick, daughter of Cynthia and William
Pintzow of Miami, became the bride of Alan
Greenstein, son of Edith and Dudlev Greenstein of
White Plains, New York, on March 22. Dr. Sol
Landau officiated at the ceremony.
Attending the bride were Maid of Honor Andrea
Dick, bridesmaids Ilene Pintzow, Laura Shevin,
Leslie Bott and Lynn Sharon.
The groom was served by Best Man Richard
Greenstein, ushers Pedro Echarte, Steve Levine,
Rory Stein, Stephen Dick, Perry Pintzow and
Gregg Bott.
The bride wore a gown of ivory satin trimmed in
Queens lace.
The bride is an attorney in the Public Defenders
office. She enjoys scuba diving and jogging.
The groom is an attorney in the Public
Defenders office. He enjoys sports, particularly
softball, basketball and football.
After a honeymoon in London and Paris the cou-
ple plan to reside in North Miami Beach.
Sharon Shenhav, director oj
Na'amat Legal Services in
Jerusalem, Israel, will be in
South Florida April 7 and 8 to
^l With leaders of the area's
judiciary, Zionist organiza-
tions and Na'amat USA, the
Women's Labor Zionist
"'''J'inization of America.
where shopping is o pleasure 7days o week
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Large
Double Egg
ill98
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Sliced or Unsliced.
Plain or Seeded
Rye Bread
79
Mb.
loaf
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Beautifully Decorated
Easter Basket
Cake
$R98
8-inch B
size ^#
6?1 $169
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Hot Cross Buns.........
Decorated for Easter ^oQ
Holiday Cup Cakes ...6 M
Danish Pecan Ring eacn$1"
Bran Muffins..............6 -<* $119
Prices Effective March 27 thru April 2.1986 Q
\&isi8&s& ***** &&&&* $*
&W*2Srt$^*\ RiahU Reserved. &JMs]Slh&. */
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
With Marshmallow or Buttercream Icing
Easter Bunny Cake......each H80
Easter Bread................aS"$189
Small Oval Basket........each$ 129
Filled and Decorated
Small Eggs....................each 69*
^ Dinner
IM Rolls..........12 .or 89'
ami
______ ejTAK-F
I
X
\
Publix


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
"i4n Evening of Fine Dining" benefiting the Miami Lighthouse
for the Blind at the Hotel St. Michel. Among the benefactors pre-
sent were Corey Augenstein and Mr. and Mrs. Alan Potamkin.
Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky of Brooklyn, Chairman of the Board of
Rabbis, presents Certificate of Koshruth for Passover 1986 for
The B. Manischewitz Company to Robert M. Starr, President,
as the Board of Rabbis and Company officials gathered for the
annual baking of Schmura Matzo for Passover at the
Manischewitz matzo bakery. Shown left to right: Rabbi
Emanuel Gettinger, New York City; Robert A. Mann, Vice
President; Rabbi Chaim Karlinsky; Robert M. Starr; Rabbi
David L. Silver, Harrisburg, Pa.; Robert J. Solot, Director of
Operations and Rabbi Maurice L. Schwartz, Bronx, New
York.
So. Fla BB To
Install Officers
The South Florida Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges will hold its
officers and board of trustees in-
stallation on Sunday, 10 a.m. at
the Deauville hotel.
Nathan Guzovsky, former B'nai
B'rith National Youth Commis-
sioner, will be installed as the
South Florida Council president.
The South Florida Council
president-elect is Mickey Balsam.
Vice-presidents are Jack Gould,
Bernard Graber, Fred Hirsch, and
Max Mickelson.
Leo Pam is treasurer and Max
Mickelson is also secretary.
The 1986 Board of Trustees in-
cludes Dr. Max Cooper, Nat Eps-
tein, Abe Feldman, Max Golden.
Mike Maged, Lucy Kalusin. Moe
Mehlman, Mannie Pearl, Archie
Soroker, and Reuben Streem.
Na'amat USA Sheva
Chapter Receives
Charter
The newest chapter ol
Na'amat USA will receive its of-
ficial charter from the organiza-
tion's national and regional
presidents Sunday, during the an-
nual Donor Luncheon of the South
Florida Council of Na'amat USA
at 12 noon at the Eden Roc Hotel.
Sophia Winkler of North Bay
Village, acting president of the
Sheva Chapter, will receive the
charter from Gloria Elbling of Pit-
tsburgh, national president, and
Harriet Green of Miami Beach
and Coral Gables, national vice
president and president of the
South Florida Council.
The new chapter will serve
women in the North Bay Village
area, and joins more than 50
others in Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
'TeeirBetween' Program of JVS CAJE Events
Receives Counseling Program Award
"Teen Between," a program
providing vocational and career
counseling for learning disabled
adolescents was awarded
"Counseling Program of the
Year" at the Conference of the
National Association of Jewish
Vocational Services." The NA-
JVS 46th Annual Awards Dinner
was attended by Eugene
Greenspan, JVS executive direc-
tor; Rachel E. Tannenbaum,
associate executive director; Pat
P. Fine, Board president; and
Willian J. Baros, Jr., past presi-
dent of JVS and NAJVS, and his
wife Irene Baros.
Upon accepting this distinguish
jd award, Mrs. Pat Fine, presi-
dent of the Miami Jewish Voca-
tional Service commented, "The
jroblems of the older learning
disabled student are rapidly
amerging as a national concern
and I am proud that the Miami
JVS is taking a leadership role in
aiding these students and their
families in their transition to
employment, training or higher
educational programs. Experts
are now recognizing that a very
high percentage of learning
disabled students do not "out-
grow" their learning problems
and are in need of vocational
direction."
The Jewish Vocational Service
is the accredited nonprofit agency
providing career and vocational
counseling in Dade County. JVS is
a beneficiary agency of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and The United Way of Dade
County.
"The Purim and Passover
Festivals in the Light of Jewish
Law," will be the theme of the
Isaiah Adler Memorial Lecture to
be delivered by Rabbi Dr. Jehudah
Melber at the Central Agency for
Jewish Education's forthcoming
meeting of Moadon Ivri
Hebrew Cultural Forum on Tues-
day at 1:30 p.m at the Miami
Beach Public Library.
FUNDRAISER
Israeli university seeks part-time consultant
for Florida. Phone:
212/713-1515
F
Full-Time Position
Ritual, Youth and Programming.
Liberal Conservative Congraga-
tlon. Reaumea:
Bath El Synagogue
Omaha, r'E 88132
RABBINICAL/CANTORIAL
Student (female) seeks
High Holiday position. Call
evenings:
(203) 397-8080
k
Who says
QUALITY
CONVENIENCE
& AFFORDABDJTY
don't go together?
You'll find all three at the
St. Francis Health Care Center
? We're open 7 days a week, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.
? No appointment is necessary
? We accept Medicare assignment
? Affiliated with St. Francis Hospital
? Look for us north of the Rascal House
St. Franc is Health Care Center
17230 Collins Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 35160
949-3100
Abraham Halpern and Arnold Picker, founders of the South**.
Florida Holocaust Memorial Center, will be honored at SJffl
Annual Testimonial on Tuesday, at 7:80 p.m. at the nvw^l.
Hotel. Rabbi Irving (Yitz) Greenberg, president o/tejKH
Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, will be feniVrA
speaker. um
Photographed with their awards are CAJE's honorees at their
annual dinner, left to right: Ben Millstein, Rabbi Leon Kronish
and Malvina Liebman.
Sinai Academy
of Temple Sinai
of North Dade
YOUR CHILDREN DESERVE THE BEST!
Temple Sinai of North Dade offers the most
exciting educational alternative at North
Dade's only Liberal Jewish Day School.
An enriched, challenging curriculum
A creative and loving faculty
A beautiful natural setting for learning and
playing
Register now for Fall '86 Kindergarten
through Sixth Grade.
Call RABBI COOK at 932-9010 for details
Sinai Academy does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, religion, sex or national origin.
ANYTHING LESS JUST ISN'T
CARPET CLEANING
CLEANING
SERVICES
PROMPT EXPERT SERVICE
COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL
LICENSED AND INSURED
MCTHM !0n^EE/.STEA EXTRACTION
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RESTORATION
SERVICE CONTRACTS AVAILABLE
ee
This Month's
Special
Living Room/
Dining Boom
A 2 Bedrooms
195
I Bgrtrt>aard 758-2500


Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
."And he poured of the anointing oil upon Aaron's head, and
anointed him, to sanctify him"
(Leviticus 8.12).
TZAV
T2AV An elaboration of the sacrificial laws: the burnt-
offering, the meal offering, the sin-offering; guilt-offering and
peace-offering. Moses consecrated Aaron and his sons for the
priesthood: he made their offerings of consecration, sprinkled
them with the oil of anointment, and taught them the order of
sacrifice "And at the door of the tent of meeting shall ye abide
day and night seven days, and keep the charge of the Lord, that
ye die not; for so I am commanded" (Leviticus 8.S5).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Low It extracted and bated
uooa ,.T(W Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman -
Ttaniir SIS< published by ShengoW. The volumo is availabte at 7S Maiden
Lint, New York, N.Y. '0031. Joseph Schlans It protMont of the society dis-
tributing the votumt.)
Soviet Refusenik Arrested
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Vladimir Magarik of Moscow, a
longtime refusenik, was arrested
I recently on a charge of "drug
possession." He was the second
I refusenik. within a week to be ar-
I rested by Soviet authorities.
Bezalel Shalolashvili of Tbilisi, 22,
[was charged with "draft eva-
I sion." According to the Coalition
I to Free Soviet Jews, Magarik, 52,
a computer programmer, first ap-
I plied for a visa to emigrate in
11977.
Alan Pesky. Coalition chairman,
I said that the two arrests ended a
two-month lull in the imprison-
ment of refuseniks. The charges
against the two men, he said, are
fabrications, and the only crime
these men have committed is ap-
plying for visas to Israel. Magarik
has asserted that the drugs were
planted on him. Shalolashvili says
he never received the draft notice
that the authorities claim was sent
to him.
"The arrests of Magarik and
Shalolashvili unfortunately prove
true Anatoly Sharansky's predic-
tion that following his release
there would be increased internal
repression," Pesky said. "The
Soviets frequently follow a
positive gesture with a negative
one." He referred to an incident
in January when the Soviets gave
an exit visa to refusenik Yakov
Gorodetsky on the same day they
arrested his friend, Vladimir
Lifshitz.
New So. Bell Executive For Florida
Southern Bell recently an-
nounced that H. C. (Buddy)
Henry, Jr. was promoted to its top
[ execuitve post in the state, Vice
President-Florida.
Henry replaces Walter Alford
as the director of the company's
Florida operations. Alford was
promoted to the new position of
Vice President and corporation
j counsel for BellSouth.
Henry returns to Florida after
two years as Southern Bell's Vice
President, for South Carolina.
Henry joined Southern Bell in
its engineering department in
1965 in his hometown of Colum-
bia, South Carolina. He graduated
from the University of South
Carolina and has an MBA degree
from Florida Atlantic University.
He served as general manager of
residence service for Southeast
Florida in 1981. From his office in
Ft. Lauderdale, he directed the
company's residential operations
in Broward, Palm Beach, Martin,
t. Lucie, and Indian River
[ counties.
In 1982, Henry moved to the
company's Miami headquarters as
Assistant Vice President for
H.C. Henry, Jr.
regulatory relations and external
affairs in Florida. He directed the
company's relations with the
Florida Public Service Commis-
sion and its statewide public rela-
tions effort.
In 1984, Henry was promoted to
Vice President-South Carolina.
RIDGE ft
CAMP and RESORT
For Boys A Girls 6-16
OUR MOUNTAIN OF FUN Whore Spring
Comes A Spends the Summer
MOUNTAIN CITY. GEORGIA
All Water Sports in Our Own Twin Spring Fed
Lakes White Water Rafting Water skiing
Rappelhng Aerobics Tennis Arts & Crafts
Sailing Gymnastics and Dance Go Carts
Rollerskating Computers Rock Climbing
Basketball Soccer Softball Hockey
Zoological & Science Program All Dietary Laws
Observed Snabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Member American Camping Aaaoclatlon
IMw Mm OparaSon of
COACH J. I. MONTMME.iV. C.C.D.
mooomj a sheila walpmam ,
Miami Beach Phono 1-305-538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888, Miemi Beach, Fla. 33140
STAFF INQUIRIES WOW
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B

ADAM LITTMAN
Adam Stuart Littman, son of
Rabbi and Mrs. Lewis C. Littman
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at Temple
Sinai of North Dade.
The celebrant is a student in the
Temple Sinai Religious School.
He attends Norland North
Center for the Arts where he is in
the seventh grade.
He is a member of the Juggling
Troupe, and Thespians.
Rabbi and Mrs. Littman will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception Saturday evening
at Temple Sinai.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. William Gruslow and
Mr. and Mrs. Ignace Littman,
grandparents. Ms. Lori, Bea and
Ann Gruslow, Mrs. Michael
Idelacato and son Anthony, Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Cunningham and
Mr. Bill Sanford.
MARNI KRAMS
Marni Ellen Krams, daughter of
Susan and Kenneth Krams, will be
called to the Torah as Bat Mitzvah
on Saturday at 8 p.m. at Temple
Adath Yeshurun.
The celebrant is a student in the
Hay Class at Adath Yeshurun
Religious School and is a seventh
grade student at Highland Oaks
Junior High.
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Krams
will host the Shala Seudot in
honor of the occasion.
SHARI CUENCA
Shari Cuenca, daughter of Judy
and Sam Cuenca, will become a
Bat Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Moshe on Saturday. Rabbi Israel
Jacobs will officiate and Hazzan
Moshe Friedler will chant the
liturgy.
Shari is a seventh grade student
at Highland Oaks Junior High
School. She excels in swimming.
In Shari's honor her parents will
sponsor the kiddush following the
services in the Clara and Seymour
Smoller Ballroom and a luncheon
following the kiddush.
MARY PALOGER
Mary Paloger, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Michael Paloger will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah at Temple Beth Sholom at
Shabbat Services on Saturday.
Rabbis Leon Kronish, Gary
Glickstein, Harry Jolt and Paul
Caplan will officiate.
Mary is a student of the Confir-
mation Class of 5748.
Barell Named
NEW YORK (JTA) Martin
Barell of Muttontown, N.Y.,
chancellor of the New York State
Board of Regents, has been nam-
ed chairman of the Board of
Governors of the Synagogue
Council of America.
NEW YORK (JTA) Zmira
Goodman has been named ex-
ecutive director of Hadassah, the
Women's Zionist Organization of
America, according to an an-
nouncement by its president,
Ruth Popkin.
NEW JERSEY YMYWHA CAMPS
ROUND LAKE CAMP
Lake Como. Pa.
nicitiMusrraaiiiMi
laimc iiiuiuriEi
EMIIEEIEI ftTaMMEK FM MCCESS
with nuMiit a munvnt umv
pmfeiiiiml unman, imktii
CEWFIEI SKCIM EIICaTIM IKCUUtTS
Slrtts on Individual Growth in AH Activities
Low Camper 10 Staff Ratio
1200 Acre Campsite *5 *a> ""
Special Teen Program
Emphasis on Recreation
jc*ish Cuttura. Dietary Laws Observed
Seven week sleep away program
AlllanrJ&waHrsporls.crafts.music, rxoneei
rng computers, natura. photo, drama
FON INFORMATION CALL:
305-6510746
Off WHITE:
THeN.J. YMYWHA Canps
21 Plymouth St., FairfWd. N.J 07006
I
X
Synagogue
Listing
Candlel ighting Time
6:16 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tampla Bath Shmual
1700 Michigan Ava., Miami Baach
53*7213-534 7214 _
Barry J. Kortovitch. Rabbi f flK \
Moano Buryn, Cantor .J|,/'
Sarglo Groblar, Preaidant
Shoram Epalbaum, Prasidanl,
Religious Committaa
Han. btoene Deyen. toraaH Ambeosedor to
Ouatomata will bo |imt laiaairat lam
Sat Bhabbat MMMH -Tito
MMo and tho Land of torooT MB bo
nil
ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Cardans Drive
North Miami Baach 9471435
Rabbi Slmcha Fraadman
Cantor Ian Alpam Conaarvatlva
Maj tatnyoa raf am. Ufa pun.
Fit Ski am YMMoti Baal orftti
rrof. londor and Wooed Waiaman.
Sal. MO a.m. Set. bUnoha 6:10 p.m.
jh. Bet btKxven Kami Krame.
Sun. 9:90 e.m.-6 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
S950N KandallDr.
S. Miami 087-0667
Or. Harbart Baumgard
Sank* Rabbi
Jamaa L. Simon, Aaaociata Rabbi
Frt. an5 p.m. RabM Baumgard will peak
"AmHMVBeharanaky Hope For All
Freedom Seekers.
Set 11:15 e.m. 'Keep The Flree Burning."
Bar M ItzYehe, Jeffrey Lawrence and
May Bredkrn.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
262S S. W 3rd A van ua 854-3911
Dr. Sol Landau, ,<_?
Rabbi Emarttus '!)
Rav. Milton Fraaman, *
Ritual Diractor
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
Fit. ovo. M0 p.m.
Sat. I a.m. KMdaoh Mtoering aonioo.
Mlnohah at tat) bjw. Pexey aorvfooa:
Sun. a.m. A 5:J0|p.m.. Won. Thure.
7:10 a-m, 5:90 pun. Toe, Mod, Fit
7:6ajn,0p.m.
BETH KODESH
Conaarvatlva
1101 S.W. 12 Ava.
RabM Max Shapiro
Cantor Joaaph Krtaaal
Roaa Baffin: Exacutlva Sacretary
8586334
f
w
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33161
891 5508 Conaarvatlva
Dr. laraal Jacoba, Rabbi .
Dr. Joaaph A. Gorf Inkal. f )
Rabbi Emarltua *3,'
Moaha Frladlar, Cantor
Frt. Family Snabbat M ervey
Friedma n, guest apookor.
iXaooba
Sat. Rabbi.
10:30 ajn. "Ufa Is a Puntement
Bat Mitzvah Snarl Cuenca
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jotforaon Ava.. M.B., FL 33130
Tai.S3M112
Rabbi Dr. Jahuda Maabar
Cantor Nlaalm Banyamtni
Dally services a.m. p.m.
Sat. S: 15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Straat
236-2001 '>,
Rabbi David H. Auarbach ,%>
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul MoraalB
Snabbat Sentooe Frt. p.m. Bat MO o.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL _,
1701 Washington A van ua ( *>
Miami Baach '*'
Dr. Irving Lahrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwall Bargar
Yahuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurlca Klaln. Ritual Diractor
Garald Taub. Exacutlva Diractor
Late Frt. eve eervtoe ( p.m.
Dr. Irving Lohnnan wttl proMtim 'Are you
Thaxe When Needear
Cantor Yehuda Shrtman aril chant
Bat eervtoe ( a.m. Annual Scholarship
Ball Sat. eve 7:90 p.m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnotroa Drtvo. Miami Baach
5328421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greatar Miami
Pioneer naw>rm Cowfiegeriee
137 N.E. 10th St., Miami, 573 5900
9000 N. Kandall Dr.. 595-5055
Sanlo. Rabbi HaekaH Bornat
Aaaiatant Rabbi Ron D. Partmatar
Cantor Jacob 0. Bomatatn
Aaaociata Carttor RarjhoBa F Nataon
Exacutlva Diractor Philip S. GofcrJin
Diractor ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Spark
Frt. a p.m. Downtown: Or Jack L Sperka
"Reliving a Bar Mitzvah, tl Years Latar."
liturgy: Carrlor Bometeln
Kandall: "Roenania, RomaMa, Bomanle",
RabM HeeAaM 9. Bamot
CBfltO* Ra>Cf*e)aJa)aJ F. NMOtOfT
TEMPLEJUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. "'"S
Coral Oablaa 667 5667
MtehaeM B. Elaanatat, RabM
Friday
:15 p.m.
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
010 Llncofn M Tal 534-9778
Oft DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
BantcoaFrt.7:S0p.m.
Sat. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75tti St., Miami Baach 33141
RabW Mayor Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavnoh
Bat. 9 a.m. Sabbath service
Dally atlnenah Sunday-Friday S a.m. and t p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. and 6:15 p.m
aiai
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyla Ava .
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Euoana Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klaln
Dally Sanrtcee t ajn. and 6:30 p.m.
Bai. a 46 a.m.
Frt. late service S p.m.
888-8345
888-9833
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
971 Northaaat 172nd St.
North Miami Baach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0898
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modern omwdoi
R.bbi Kaaitl -tH anofary oorjduct
seperete servtcee Sat ft a.m. at Tempee
^aWf3,ftMfWMfandA.
outti of NKondaM Drtvo.
TEMPLE SINAI 16601 NE 22 Ava
TEMPLE BETH' SHOLOM 538 7231
ChaaeAva. A 41 at St. iiawei
Fft7^p*Ceitl.Claaavapiv*ant
Ihetmwtkf A faadarn Day Mf**^f~'
ol Hope.* Sat. 10:90 a.m. Pal btKzveh
"~y'*i~-------------------
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1051 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Dr. Mai A. Lipachltz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
It Aroni, Cantor
Harvay L. Broavn, Eac. Diractor
Jelly eerv
7:96a.m.
Da
I atenday Tnuraday
MMfc|uetyiirMay' (Sb\
T^ajn..fclP-m.and;pji^ v
a^bjrdaySSia.m. and! p.m :
Sunday 9 a.m. and 5:90 p.m.
Bai blruvah ftobyn Battuck
North Dade's Raform Conrjragation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi
9010
Julian I Cool. Aaaociata Rabbi
Irving Shulkas, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. AdminiBtratof
Frt. 6:1Sp.m. RebtX
Sat. Bar atruCSh.
netpri Klngeley will
Uttman.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Millar Or. Conservativa
2712311 d
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi f
Baniamm Adlar, Cantor
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Frt. 9:1 S p.m
Set. 9:90 a.m. Shebbel
Aid'
Jayaat9i


i.-. .? m-aT Marc*. 2S
Business Notes
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Funk Joins Firm


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. *ftC'r* E. ZawpcUl has
-wr*li|r irm appointed prtn-
im. due/ executive officer.
Baaa1 aSiWlBr <>f' tA Bank of
FUf^a m South Miami.
fVBa*aaHBa)l ZanginU served at
esxcunvt nce-pretxdent of the
usnk. at well at U's affiliate.
r.A/ S'atwnai Barsk of Florida
znd rupernsed the lending
fmkC\':m tfbctk banks.
IN THE CTBCITT COl^T Of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIBCXTT OF FLORIDA. IN
4MB FOB DADE COLNTY
Cml.ActaaaN* *-#215 "
ACTION FOB DISSOLITION
OF M.ARRLAGE
I THE MARRIAGE Of
HRI5TTNE .'a KS >
iLASJA K* S
TO DCH.GLA5 JACKSON
urn ---><:-_-
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RKTHARDP BRINKER
As Clark. Caw: OaaJl
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.VOTKE OF ACTION
CONSTBICTTVE SERVKK
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDKXAL
CTRCUTT OF FLORIDA. LN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CM ActMK Ma. M-MMi-ci
NOTICE
BT rTBLlCAnON
"N RE THE MARRLAGE OF
TERESA SIT HKES aifa
aaa
DAXIE1G HK'KS
TV- r.AMELG fflCKS
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Clark
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man, has jotaea the aw fair.
y 0F ACTION
CONBTBXCnvE BBBTKl
IN THE CIBCITT COUBT or
THB BLBTEvrH JlDICUi
CTBCITT OF FLORIDA
AND FOB DADE COl-VTV
Cml Art Ma I***,
D* E TV Adopt*-'. :;
TO ROBERT ELUS
tSrDCNCE UNKNOWN
Y01.ARE HEREBY
MmFTED tiw ptraon for
A*"*a t Sw and com-
-mmc u tkai oocn ind tou
rwaraa Bj arrr, t ~?y of y(W
LSHERBRYN E5* itor,5
ataoacr vxm* aotmt is'20
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naraaiSSi^inafiJtii,,
l-raaatarrt f-ji above
Tfa" art oa or ofor April 25.
lHkfc ocamnat a selaJt wiH be
^r-."": -.pUnn or
pcaaai
WITNESS -,. -a-,: i.-^ ;n seal
V aaaj ewa-. a: Mar. F,.ndaon
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RICHARD P BRISKER
A* Qen jn
B? D C BRYANT
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ktk nan Per --
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; II 1MI
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COIRT
D.ADE COUNT"! FLORIDA
case no 4-o22t.2i
IN RE TV Mi.-- .
J A Cli K S \!.\RIE
KERNESANT E". ARISTE
PlaMMaaa""
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Bl"RNESTTNE E UUSTE
Bwaiwiliat
TO BURNESTINE EVARISTE.
RaaaaBBec anmewr.. jm shall
aerrr eopy of your ABfaar to the
Ptutvos '.: '. M Itioa of
Marriage .:- GEORGE
NICHOLAS Attaraay, 612
Vr-^e^-. '..-.- .- Baai
33136 arc Bf ongual
1 Caare On ;<. : r otion May
2. 1MB otaarrjw i >fa-t will be
Jta.-= B
RJCH.ARD P BRINKER
Cow; Ciark
BY DC BRYANT
DafaajrOcrl
MBBI M*r<*28--
4pri ; :: > IMI
EN THE CIRCUIT COIRT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CTBCITT EN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Caar Ma **-l4* (M)
FVaraaa Bar Na. MBW
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTBICTIVE SERVICE
XAMCT 4BRA 1
faiar fTir-i -
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GUSTAVO A BaABBAGA
Dafaaaaec RMCKaaaBt
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BJCHABDP BRINKER
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By IXC BBYA.VT
MAR1AM0 SOLE. ESQ
SBI34
AIL IB.


-.
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
tblic Notices
Fl 'notice of action
IrnNSTBUCTIVE SERVICE
IvTHl CIRCUIT COURT OF
El ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I (1RCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IS FOR DADE COUNTY
R.Uction No. 86*9816 FC 30
[SOTICE BY PUBLICATION
1 pk The Marriage of
Lqsi dobrowolski.
Ipeutioner
KgaLI DOBROWOLSKI.
feuWBROWOLSKI
3 St Ann's Avenue Apt. 4B
York New York 10454
lYOU ARE HEREBY
lffTIFIED that a petition for
Ulution of Marriage has been
4 and commenced in this court
M vou are required to serve a
m'of fOUT written defenses, if
Ztoi.onrSHERBRYN.ESQ.
I for Petition*, whose ad-
. ISO Lincoln Road Suite
-.Miami Beach. FL 33139 and
e the original with the clerk of
I, above styled court on or before
Inl 18, 1986; otherwise a default
, teredagainsl you for the
, ..,,! for in the complaint
i petition
WITNESS my hand and the atal
{saidcourt at Miami. Florida on
[,. day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P BRISKER,
rk, Circuit Court
Bade CountN. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal I
itliimev f'T Petitioner:
RHERBRYN. ESQ.
En Lincoln Road
Kami Beach, Florida 33139
Ihone) (305) 532-1155
1678 March 21. 28;
April 4. 11.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-04961 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
TEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, an
issociation organized and existing
kder the laws of the United
Jtates of America,
Plaintiff
ftl'BY M. PALOMINO, et al..
1 Defendants
fO: Rl'BY M PALOMINO
740 S.W. 109th Avenue
No. 310
Miami. Florida 33174
I YOU ARE NOTIFED that an ac-
*>n for Foreclosure of Mortgage
In the following described
Iroperty:
1 That certain Condominium
Parcel composed of Unit No.
310. of GROVE ESTATES
C0MDOMINIUM. according
the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 11769, Page 3123, of
the Public Records of Dade
| County, Florida
I been filed against you and you
1 required to serve a copy of
Nr written defenses, if any, to it.
i Sbeppard Faber, Attorney for
aintiff. whose address is Suite
P*. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Jwles. Florida 33146, on or before
|Pnl 18, 1986 and file the original
T* the Clerk of this Court either
flore service on Plaintiffs
Ptorney or immediately
^eafter; otherwise a default will
entered against you for the
LSM in the complaint.
^*rrNESS my hand and the seal
; Court this 12th day of
*>"*. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
^ Clerk of the Court
By: DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clark
March 21.28;
April 4,11.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-37384 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
THE FLOYSTAD
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation, et al..
Defendants.
TO: N. D. BROWER and RUTH
BROWER. residence and
whereabouts unknown, being
all of the members of the
Last Board of Directors of
ABCORE WORLD VAN
SERVICES. INC.. a
dissolved Florida
corporation, as Trustees of
said dissolved corporation
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. HI. of the
WOODLANDS OF MIAMI.
INC.. a condominium.
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 8826, at Page 295, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, together
with all improvements.
appliances, and fixtures
located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 4, 1986, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 27th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk'of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19644 March 7. 14.21.28. 1986
NOTICE UNDUE
L,,J'CE IS HEREBY GIVEN
*e undersigned, desiring to
***" m business under the fie
pous name Fermograco Building
f****** at 826-830 Euclid Ave.,
B* Re^h. Fl. 33139 intend to
raster said name with the Clerk
} we Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
| Florida.
Gabriel Fernandez
Jorge Moya
Antonio Grana
Rigoberto M. Colom
March 14,21, 28;
April 4,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-11085
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
ALFRED MOSS a/k/a/ ALFRED
I. MOSS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ALFRED MOSS a/k/a
ALFRED I. MOSS,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against the said
ALFRED MOSS a/k/a
ALFRED I. MOSS, and all
other parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lots 21 and 22, in Block 9,
WASHINGTON PARK,
according to the plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 2, at
Page 96, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack. Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 26, 1986, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 18th day of
March, 1986. ";
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
.agao March 21.28;
April4.11.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-37384 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
THE FLOYSTAD
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARION N. SHAFFER,
residence unknown, if alive,
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against the said
MARION N. SHAFFER, and
all other parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Unit No. HI, of THE
WOODLANDS OF MIAMI.
INC., a condominium,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 8826, at Page 295, of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, together
with all improvements,
appliances, and fixtures
located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 4, 1986, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 27th day of
February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19643 March 7. 14, 21.28. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-00327 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
IVAN VILACHA L.
et ux., et al
Defendants.
TO: IVAN VILACHA L. and
MYRIAM GARCIA DE
VILACHA. his wife
Calle San Ant. Urban
San Ant. Sebana Grande
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
CONDOMINIUM NUMBER
9, BUILDING NUBMER 14,
OF INDIAN LAKE
VILLAGE II CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof and
Exhibits attached hereto as
recorded in Official Records
Book 10483, Page 2666, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sbeppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
April 11. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of March,
1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
,9666 March 14.21,28;
April 4, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-09311
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
INEL1A PROSPERE PIERRE
Petitioner
and
ROSEME PIERRE
Respondent
TO: ROSEME PIERRE
Residence: UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of vour written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139 and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 18, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 11 dav of March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
19677 March 14,21,28;
April 4, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-42162 CA 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
WESLEY T. CURRAN and
HUGHETTE CURRAN. his wife.
Defendants.
TO: Wesley T. Curran and
Hughette Curran, his wife,
whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 15, in Block 3, of
LEISURE HEIGHTS,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 93.
at Page 39, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal 4 Yarchin, P.A.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before April
11, 1986. and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 3. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19648ISMarch 7, 14. 21. 28. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 86-11613 FC-02
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
MICHAEL W. WHITE
Petitioner
and
TAMMY D. WHITE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: TAMMY D. WHITE
4100 Cusseta Rd No. 28A
Columbus. Ga. 31903
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.
JEROME GRAFF. ESQ., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167 St. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162, on or before
April 25, 1986. and file the original
with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 20. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19696 March 28;
April 4. 11.18. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-2549 FC-10
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
BRENDA GAIL PRINCE
Petitioner
and
DAVID W. PRINCE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DAVID W. PRINCE
5028 18 Ct.
Birmingham, Ala. 35203
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses to it on I.
JEROME GRAFF. ESQ., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167 St. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162, on or before
April 25, 1986, and file the original
with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: March 20, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
19697 March 28;
April 4.11,18.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name OCEAN BLUES at
2029 N.W. 22 Court, Miami. Fl.
33142 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Rafael Pardo President
Attorney for R.P. Fashions Inc.
19659 March 14, 21.28;
April 4.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-53369 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a
United States corporation,
Plaintiff,
HARVEY SPENCER; MARY
SPENCER, and the unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against her:
ALINE JOAN HENGER;
METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY, a political subdivision of
the State of Florida; DEL-RIO
FINANCE CORP., a Florida
corporation; and PARKWAY
REGION A L MEDICAL
CENTER. INC.. a Florida
corporation;
Defendants.
TO: Mary Spencer, whose
i residence is unknown, and
I the unknown parties who
may be heirs, devisees.
grantees, assignees, lienors
creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against
said Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive.
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right.
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4, in Block 139, of SIXTH
ADDITION TO CAROL
CITY, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 68, at Page 54, of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A..
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before April
11, 1986, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 3. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19649ISMarch 7, 14. 21, 28, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FAMILY HEARING
CENTER OF DADE at 167 Nor-
theast 167th Street. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
HEAR AMERICA. INC.
By Alan D. Daw, President
CANNER AND GLASSER
1250 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale. Florida 33009
March 7,14,21,28.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Six Points Crabmeat
Co. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
H. Susskind & Co. Inc.
19647 March 7.14,21,28.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SHORT STOP BAR
at 781-785 Opa Locks Boulevard.
Opa Locks, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
Court of Dade County, Florida.
BERNARD MILSTEIN and
BENEDETTA MILSTEIN.
his wife
Sole Owners
MIRIAM BECKERMAN
Attorney for Applicant
6450 S.W. 126th Street Road
Miami, Florida 33156
665-0353
March 7. 14, 21,28, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-08096
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RAUL SEGUNDO SOCARRAS
Petitioner
and
LARITZA SOCARRAS
Respondent
TO: LARITZA SOCARRAS
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on David M.
Sostchin, Esquire, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1800
W. 49th Street, Suite No. 218.
Hialeah. Florida 33012, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 4, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27 day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dsde County, Florida
By: D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David M. Sostchin. Esquire
1800 W. 49th Street
Suite No. 218
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305) 364-0162
I 19645 March 7.14. 21.28,1986


PageH-B___The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 28, 1986
Public Notices


.
NOTICE Or ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TBE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-09179
FC It
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OK MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR. NO. 151623
IN RE:
RUTH BADARANI
and
ZAID BADARANI
TO: ZAID BADARANI
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
nwfsnspw, if any. to it on ALAN S.
KESSLER, attorney for Peti
tioner. whose address is The
Roney Plata. 2301 Collins Ave.
Suite M-8, Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 11, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN S. KESSLER, ESQ.
Attorney and Counselor at Law
The Roney Plaza
2301 Collins Avenue
Mezzanine Suite M-8
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19668 March 14,21,28;
April 4', 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ALEXANDER AP
PLIANCES at 3094 N.W. 27
Avenue. Miami. FL 33142 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Murray Spector
Harold A. Turtletaub
Attorney for Murray Spector
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, FL 33173
19676 March 14,21,28;
April 4,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name
INTERNATIONAL
TYPOGRAPHY SERVICES at
519 N.E. 26 Street, in the City of
Wilton Manors, Florida, intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
21st day of March. 1986.
scg. mc.
By. Nelson C. Keahen, Secretary
NELSON C. KESHEN,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 209
8906 S.W. 87th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33176
Telephone: (305) 596-1538
19700 March 28;
__________ April 4,11,18, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-02268-21
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JACQUES MARIE KERNE-
SANT EVARISTE
Petitioner,
and
BURNESTINE EVARISTE
Respondent.
TO: BURNESTINE EVARISTE,
Residence unknown, you shall;
serve copy of your Answer to the j
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, *U HUmst 12th
Ave., Miami, Wwkla, 33136. and
file original with Ceurt Clerk on or
before April 26, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered.
March 18, 1906.
RICHARD BRrNKER
BY: D.C. BRYANT
19M8 March 21,28;
April 4,11,1966
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nambsr 86-559
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NOEMIGEORGE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of NOEMI GEORGE, deceased.
File Number 86-659, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, FL 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 28, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Ronald L. George
10706 SW 134th Court
Miami. FL 33186
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Abraham M. Mora, Esquire
Blank, Rome, Comisky &
McCauley
1401 Forum Way, 7th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (305) 686-8100
19701 March 28;
April 4,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-11765 (IS)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GUILD LOAN *
INVESTMENT COMPANY
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN J. MACALUSO,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: JOHN T. MACALUSO
240 Nice Lane, No. 306
Newport Beach, CA 92663
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14, Block 43, HEFLER
HOMES SUNSET PARK,
.SECTION 3. Plat Book 75,
Page 88, Public Records of
Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
April 25, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 21st day of
March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19698 March 28;
April 4,11,18, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-8739 Sect. 09
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VINCENT A. HAUGHTON.
husband,
and
GLORIA HAUGHTON, wife.
TO: GLORIA HAUGHTON
1682 Westwood Drive
Charleston, So. Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
NORTHEAST 167 STREET,
MIAMI. FL 33162, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April 18.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of March, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19679 March 21,28;
April 4,11,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Euster's The Fur-
niture Warehouse at 3300 N.E.
2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida 33137
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Euster's The Furniture
Warehouse, Inc.
By: Jay Euster, President
Myers. Kenin, Levinson &
Richards
Attorneys for Euster's
The Furniture Warehouse. Inc.
19652 March 7,14, 21,28, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Love Store at
1275-1277 West Flagier St. intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Marbetty Inc.
19672 March 14,21,28;
April 4,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in buaaeas under the
fictitious name Asociacion Privada
en Defensa del Consumidor,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Angel Maldonado
and Nestor i. Barbosa
19667 March 14,21,28;
April 4. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-08761 FC 27
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
DM RE: The Adoption of:
Minor Children
TO: JERRY ABRAHAM
Residence UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Adoption has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
USHER BRYN, ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is Suite
309 420 Lincoln Road Miami
Beach, FL 33139 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before April 18.
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
Suite 309 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
'9681 March 21.28;
April 4, 11,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO: 86-8339 (06)
IN RE: The Marriage of
ANTOINE DEMOSTHENE,
Petitioner/Husband
vs.
VIOLETTE A. DEMOSTHENE
Respondent/Wife
TO: VIOLETTE A
DEMOSTHENE NOVION
PORT MARGOT, HAITI
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue'
Miami, Florida, 38136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before April 4, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 27, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: JOHN C. BRANDA
19642 March 7.14,21,28,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-43816 FC-01
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
FLORETTE BEAUSIL,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ESTOFIL BEAUSIL,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr. Estofil Beausil
Residence unknown
Address:
16 Emory Street
Jersey City, New Jersey
07304
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Alan
H. Miller, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317, Miami,
Florida 33189, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 18. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14th day of March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller, Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317
Miami, Florida 33189
Telephone: (305) 238-1080
Attorney for Petitioner
19687 March 21, 28;
Asrl4.ll, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name D.I.M. AUTO SALES
at 9815 NW 27th Avenue. Miami.
FL 33147, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
A.J.O.
Import & Export, Inc.
a Florida corporation
by
Aladier J. Osorio, Pres.
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Applicant
825 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 643
Miami, FL 33131
Telephone: 541-2585
19641 March 7, 14,21,28, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-11612 FC-0S
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
GEORGE TOOMER
Petitioner
and
GLADYS B. TOOMER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: GLADYS B. TOOMER
Rt. 3, Bx 139-B
Ft. Valley, Ga. 31030
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.
JEROME GRAFF, ESQ., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
633 N.E. 167 St. North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162, on or before
April 25, 1986, and file the original
with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you. %
DATED: March 20, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19696 |Ur n 28;
April 4,11,18 .986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Maritaa Luna D/B/A
Luna Services at 8260 S.W 89
Ave. Miami Fla. 38173 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Maritaa Luna
19675 March 14.21,28;
April 4,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.85-48625 FC 21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE:
JOANNE MCKENZIE,
Petitioner
and
BURCHELL L. ARCHER,
Respondent
TO: Burchell T. Archer
226 Benziger Avenue
Staten Island, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
CUSTODY AND DETERMINA-
TION OF PATERNITY has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on ARTHUR H. LIPSON
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 NE 167 St.. Miami. FI.
33162 and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before April 11,1986; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6th day of March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade-County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19665 March 14. 21,28;
April 4,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Hil Associates Corp.
of Miami Beach d/b/a Prince
Michael Hotel at 2618 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Fla. intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Hil Associates Corp. of Miami
Beach
19650 March 7, 14.21,28, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-2000 CA 19
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
THE 1250 WEST AVENUE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
FELIX BURGUET, et al ,
Defendants.
TO: FELIX BURGUET
2748 S.W. 14th Street
Miami, Florida 33145
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 2-L in BAY GARDEN
MANOR CONDOMINIUM,
according to the Declaration
recorded in Official Records
Book 10661 at Page 2436, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
April 25, 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
le entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 18th day of
March, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19691 March 21, 28;
April 4,11.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS at 220 71 Street No.
206, Miami Beach, Florida 88141.
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ATLAS HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS, INC.
Joshua D. Manaster, Esquire
Attorney for ATLAS HEALTH
CARE SYSTEMS, TNC.
19694 March 28;
April 4, 11. 18, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT C0in>n
THE KUtVENTHiSR?
CIRCUrTlNAftt*1
DADE COUNTY. Fli
i u. VL BAR 3ou
in re tne marriage of
MARTA L. VASQUEZ
Petitioner
and
VICTOR M. RISSO
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
-VICTOR IRbSSJ
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that .
has been filed against youandyS
are required to serve a cW?f
GR^F^FsVefenSeS !" U
.RAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti.
tioner, whose address is 633 \ t
W St. N.MB. Florid. JsToi
or before April 25. 1986, and
the original with the clerk of Z
court otherwise a default will he
entered against you.
March 12, 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19683 March 21,28;
April 4.11,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-10341(25rFC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In the marriage of
ANGELA DIAZ
Petitioner
and
DANIEL DIAZ
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DANIEL DIAZ, 813 FAILE
ST., No. 5, BRONX. NT 10474
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that in
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162,00
or before 25 April 1986. and file
the original with the clerk of tin
rourt otherwise a default will be
mtered against you.
March 12, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By JOHN C. BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
19684 March 21.28.
April 4,11, UN
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. LN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CiYil Action No. 86-10632
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
BELMA ROMERO AFANADOR.
Petitioner,
and
JOSE A. AFANADOR
Respondent.
TO: Jose A. Afanador
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this coon
and you are required to serve 1
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 825 South
Bayshore Drive, Suite 543. Miami.
FL 33131, and file the onpni
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 25. 19*&
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the sen
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of March. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: JOHN C BRANDA
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19686 March 21,
April 4,11,1*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV
that the undesigned. <***""*.";
engage in busineas under Uie w
titious naais Flagier '
iiiiH 'U*2*V&
and 1281 West Flagier St. *
33136 intend to register said n*"
with the Clerk of the Circuit (**
of Dade County, Florida.
April 4.1*
19671


Griffin Bell:
Bill Of Rights Must Be Safeguarded
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Griffin Bell, who was U.S. At-
torney General under President
Carter, stressed that freedom of
religion, a right Americans have
enjoyed since the Bill of Rights
was added to the Constitution in
1791, must be constantly
safeguarded.
"Freedom of religion in this
Rabbi Feinstein
Continued from Page 1-B
served another 22 years. As a
voung man. Moshe Feinstein
studied at the famed yeshiva of
Slutsk. under Rabbi Issur Zalman
Meltzer. and later in Schklov
under Rabbi Pesach Pruskin.
FOLLOWING his ordination in
1921. Feinstein assumed the rab-
binate in Luban. Russia, a position
he held until 1936. But for more
than 10 years he was under house
arrest in Luban for religious ac-
tivities. Nevertheless, he con-
tinued to gain international
renown as an outstanding
Talmudic scholar. Through
diplomatic intervention, he suc-
ceeded in obtaining an exit visa to
the U.S. in 1936.
On his arrival here the following
year, Feinstein was invited to
head the yeshiva Tifereth
Jerusalem on East Broadway on
the Lower East Side, then still a
flourishing center of Jewish life,
learning and culture. Tifereth
Jerusalem was a small school.
Under Feinstein's leadership it
grew, reaching its peak enroll-
ment of 800 students during the
lull's
country must be constantly
safeguarded," Bell told the bien-
nial convention of the American
Jewish Congress at the Omni
Shoreham Hotel here. "1 think it
is contantly in danger, however."
The theme of the convention, at-
tended by 500 delegates, is "The
Jewish Experience in American
Democracy: 200 Years Under The
Constitution."
"Separation of church and state
is fundamental to our nation,"
said Bell, who is now an Atlanta
lawyer.
HE SAID one of the reasons
people came to America was for
freedom of religion. Bell said
while most attention is paid to the
issue of prayers in the schools, he
said there are numerous cases in-
volving separation of church and
state before the courts. He quip-
ped that lawyers will have to
become ecclesiastical lawyers.
Howard Squadron, a former
president of the AJCongress, said
that while for 25 years the
AJCongress and other Jewish
groups have been successful in
suits they have filed or in joining
Community
Agency
Continued from Page 1-B
by Ackerley Communications.
Arthur Teitelbaum, Southern
Area director for the ADL. said
the "World of Difference" cam-
paign involves "a serious and sus-
tained application of time and
resources, a blending of media
and education, in the fight against
bigotry and for harmony. We
know this effort is needed in our
area, and we are certain the pro-
ject will make important contribu-
tions towards the goal of positive
intergroup relations."
with others on separaton of
church and state issues, the pen-
dulum is now swinging the other
way.
He said part of this is "cyclical"
and part is that the Supreme
Court is responding to what it
senses is the national mood as
reflected by the Reagan Ad-
ministration. He charged that
President Reagan and his At-
torney General, Edwin Meese III,
"believe in the Christian nation
concept. They believe that the
concept of God as they view it
should be expressed in the public
institutions of this country."
SQUADRON NOTED that the
Orthodox Jewish community,
which used to support the rest of
the organized Jewish community
in the fight for church-state
separation, has broken away
because of concern for its schools.
"While Jewish education is ex-
tremely important, we in the
Jewish community will find a way
to support it without government
entanglement," he declared.
Squadron stressed that it is
Jewish "self-interest" to support
the First Amendment since Jews
are a small minority in this coun-
try. "We are using the First
Amendment as it was meant to be
used," Squadron said, "not in-
tolerance to religion, on the con-
trary, but ensuring that all
religions will be tolerated. And
that is in our interest." He con-
cluded that this has always been
the role of the AJCongress and
"God willing we will continue the
fight."
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Friday, March 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B^
Obituaries
RKKGER
Row S.. a board member of the Miami
Cancer League, died at her home Mar She had lived in Bal Harbour for 17 years
since retiring from Providence R.I. Mrs.
Berger was a member of the American
Jewish Congress and Temple Emanu El
Synagogue of Miami Beach. Mrs. Berger is
survived by a sister. Flora Kronick of North
Miami Beach. Services were held in Woon-
socket, R.I. Rubin-Zilbert in charge of
arrangements.
APPEL, Francis (Fanny). 91. of Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert.
FEINSTEIN. Manny, 65, of Miami. March
22. Services were held.
MUNACH. Jack. 70. of Miami Beach. March
22. The Riverside.
L1FCHUTZ, Yetta. of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
COTLER, Harold. 65, North Miami Beach,
March 19. Levitt-Weinstein.
FRIEDSON. Harry, of North Miami Beach
and Coral Gables. March 18. Menorah
Chapels.
FINKELSTEIN, Mary, 94, of Miami Beach,
March 17. Services were held in Queens,
New York.
FLORMAN. Marvin S.. 67. March 19. Ser-
vices were held.
BURSTEIN. Anna K., of Surfside, March
19. The Riverside.
FRIED, Mary. 69. The Riverside. Interment
at Mt. Nebo Cemetery
GALL. Nathan, of North Bay Village.
March 22. Levitt-Weinstein.
Isaac Toubin
Passes at 70
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Funeral services were held Tues-
day for Isaac Toubin, a leading
Jewish educator, who died Sunday
after a short illness. He was 70
years old. He was a graduate of
Yeshiva University and of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, where he received his
ordination, Masters of Hebrew
Literature and Doctor of Hebrew
Literature degrees.
BERMAN, Miriam, March 24. Services
were held in Hartford. Ct.
DAVIDSON. Violet E 73, of North Miami
Beach, March 23. Levitt-Weinstein.
NADEL, Isidor N., 71, of Miami, March 24.
The Riverside.
PARNES, Bernard, of Miami Beach Rubin-
Zilbert.
DONNER. NiU Miriam Caplain. of Miami,
March 18. Services were held in
Brookline. Mass.
LE RAL. Lee, Feb 24. Services were held.
SCHNEIDER, Flora, 72, March 20 The
Riverside.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
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V


Page 16-B_ ^Thejewish^F^ridian/Friday JHarchj, 1986
i

50 THE WINTER SHOULDN'T BE A TOTAL LOSS,
SUN WORLD IS BRINGING IN THE GESHMAK
NEW JAFFA ORANGES FROM ISRAEL.
For the uninitiated Geshmak
is the Yiddish word for delicious.
So if you could combine the
best qualities of Navels, ^lencias
and Royal Mandarins, you'd have o
Geshmak orange!
Actually you'd have the Jaffa. Flooded
with juice, alive with sweetness,
brilliant with flavor, brimming
with vitamins and minerals, the
life has everything going for it.
Except it's shaped kind of like an
egg. But not to worry. Something
)ecial should look special right?
Publix Super Markets
m* FOR YOUR GOOD HEAUH FROM
^vSUfl WORLD
J


Full Text
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P^e 16-B The Jewish FToridJan/Frkhy, MarA 21, 1986

MANCE COUNTS^
OF REAL CIGARETTE TASTE IN A


cJewislh Floridiaini
, 59 Number 13 Two Actions Miami, Florida Friday, March 28,1986
FratfSftOCMf
, Ud< $1 "i
Price 50 Cents
-?-.
*"m*
vnbi. the first Israeli-made robot designed to
iralize explosive devices-, is unveiled by the
Mice Bomb Disposal Unit. The robot, which
In climb stairs, is equipped with an
itomatie rifle that can be fired to detonate
bombs. Bambi has two cameras for eyes and a
build-in closed-circuit TV in its forehead so
that sappers can direct its moves safely from a
distance.
Mrac As PM
Won't Change French Mideast Policy
By EDWIN EYTAN
'ARIS (JTA) -
fice's close friendship
support for Israel
run the context of a
lerally even-handed
icy in the Middle East
be unchanged as a
alt of President Francois
Jterrand's appointment
of Jacques Chirac to be the
new Prime Minister.
A center-right coalition, con-
sisting of Chirac's neo-GaulIist
Rally for the Republic (RPR) and
the liberal Union for French
Democracy (UDF), won 293 seats
in the parliamentary elections giv-
ing it an absolute majority on the
577-seat National Assembly. The
Socialist Mitterrand, whose term
expires in 1988, and the conser-
few Evidence Uncovered
About Waldheim's Past
IEW YORK (JTA) -
I World Jewish Congress
(released a 1948 U.S. Ar-
Idocument showing that,
f World Warn, both the
Iy and the United Na-
te War Crimes Commis-
\ (UNWCC) listed Kurt
fdheim as a suspected
i war criminal.
document a page from
the Army's "Combined Registry
of War Criminals and Security
Suspects" ("CROWCASS") -
reports that Waldheim's ap-
prehension was being sought by
Yugoslavia on suspicion of com-
plicity in what the Registry listed
as "murder."
Waldheim. who served as
Secretary-General of the United
Nations from 1972 to 1981, has
been at the center of a storm of
controversy since the first week of
March, when the Austrian
Continued on Page 6-A
vative Chirac, will be sharing
power in the realm of foreign
policy and other affairs of govern-
ment. Both men are considered
staunch friends of Israel.
THEY REPORTEDLY have
agreed to name Bernard Rai-
mond, a 60-year-old career
diplomat, as Foreign Minister and
Didier Bariani. a long-time friend
of Israel, as Deputy Foreign
Minister. Bariani's sphere is ex-
pected to be European affairs.
Israelis and most members of
the French Jewish community
hold Mitterrand to be one of
Israel's best friends in Europe. He
was, in fact, openly favored before
the elections by his fellow member
of the Socialist International,
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres.
There is a general consensus
between Mitterrand and the new
parliamentary majority on most
foreign issues, including the Mid-
dle East. Both sides support
Israel's right to exist within
secure, recognized borders. They
also favor Palestinian participa-
tion in peace talks and recognize
the Palestine Liberation
Organization as one of the main, if
not the only legitimate represen-
Continued on Page 2-A
Israel PACs
Seen Growing
Up Rapidly
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
While a debate continues
in the American Jewish
community whether it is
wise to be perceived as a
single-issue community,
political action committees
(PACs) formed to ensure
continued support for Israel
are expanding rapidly.
A recent report by Common
Cause, the citizen's advocacy
group, asserts that "the pro-Israel
PACs' contributions may well
have been the fastest growing of
all interested groups during the
past five years," increasing their
contributions between the 1980
and 1984 elections by nine times
as compared to a doubling by all
PACs during the same period.
Since 1981, 65 pro-Israel PACs
have contributed $6,120,713 to
candidates for the Senate and the
House.
IN 1985, the pro-Israel PACs
gave Congressional candidates
$853,520, according to Common
Cause. The top recipient was Sen.
Robert Kasten (R., Wise.), chair-
Continued on Page 9-A
Sen. Alan Cranston
Rep. Larry Smith
Israel 'Confident'
Egypt Will Do Everything
To Find Ambush Terrorists
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel expressed con-
fidence Sunday that the
Egyptian government will
do everything possible to
find and punish the ter-
rorists who fatally shot an
Israeli woman and wounded
three other Israelis in a car
ambush outside the Cairo
International Trade Fair.
The victims were Israeli
Embassy staff members in
Cairo.
A statement issued by
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
after Sunday's Cabinet meeting
said he was satisfied with the way
the Egyptian authorities are
handling the case and the wide
coverage it has gotten in the
Egyptian media.
ISRAEL'S Minister of
Tourism, Avraham Sharir. who
Continued on Page 9-A
Dodd Urges
Jews Share Their Main Concerns With Non-Jews
Christopher Dodd
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Sen. Christopher Dodd
(D., Conn.) is urging
American Jews to discuss
the issues that concern the
Jewish community, not only
among themselves and
members of Congress, but
with their non-Jewish
friends and neighbors.
"To not discuss these sub-
jects" with non-Jews "is a
mistake of monumental propor-
tions," he told the 500 delegates
attending the closing luncheon of
the national biennial convention of
the American Jewish Congress at
the Omni-Shoreham Hotel. "You
cannot sustain any policy in a
democracy without broad-based
public support for what you are
doing," Dodd asserted.
HE SAID Jews have been
neglecting^this "important educa-
tional process." He said he knew
it was "awkward" to discuss these
issues with people who may be ig-
norant of the issues and even ask
"offensive" questions, but it has
to be done.
Dodd said members of Con-
gress, who for the most part sup-
port Israel and other issues of par-
ticular concern to Jews, were also
"to blame" because they discuss
these issues only before Jewish
audiences. He said he has begun
talking about them in his general
foreign policy speeches.
Dodd said his concern comes
from his father, the late Sen.
Thomas Dodd (D., Conn.), who
served as prosecutor under
Robert Jackson at the Nuremburg
Continued on Page 6-A
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