The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02979

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. .. Special Insert
eJeTOish Floridliaim
Volume 59-Number 10
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, March 7,1986
MaiM BvMd.l<">
Price 50 Cents
Anthropologist Joe Zias studies a skull from the Hellenistic
period (200 BCE) which was recently unearthed in the Negev
Jbesert. The skull, on display at Jerusalem's Rockefeller Museum,
hhou's one of the earliest examples of operative dentistry.
AIDS
National Jewish Project
To Help Victims, Families
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) -
|A National Jewish AIDS
I Project has been established
here to generate, mobilize
land coordinate efforts in the
community to respond to
the needs of victims of the
Ifatal disease and their
[families.
t The project was launched at a
meeting at the Reconstructionist
Foundation which brought
together key figures from Jewish
religious organizations and
welfare agencies with gay ac-
tivists. The impetus for the
meeting and the project came
from Foundation executive direc-
tor Rabbi David Teutsch.
Describing AIDS (Acquired Im-
mune Deficiency Syndrome) as
"the most rapidly developing
health crisis in American society
since World War II," Teutsch
pointed out that the number of
people affected by it goes beyond
the gay Jewish population and
their families, and "is much vaster
than people realize." People who
Continued on Page 10-A
At U. of Maryland
Anti-Zionist Wrath
Stokes Carmichael
BALTIMORE (JTA) -
A crude anti-Zionist remark
allegedly made by Black ac-
tivist Kwame Toure at a
meeting sponsored by the
Black Student Union (BSU)
of the University of
Maryland Feb. 5 has spark-
ed tension between Jewish
and Black students on the
College Park campus.
About 50 Jewish students held
a protest rally recently deman-
ding that the university ad-
ministration, the student govern-
ment and the BSU repudiate the
purported statement by Toure,
formerly known as Stokely Car-
michael, that "the only good
Zionist is a dead Zionist."
THE RALLY ended with a
candlelight march to the home of
university president John Toll,
where an unlighted candle was
left "to be relit only when Jewish
student concerns were
respected."
Rabbi Robert Saks, director of
the Jewish Student Center, said
he was trying to find out whether
Toure actually made the state-
ment attributed to him, or other
anti-Zionist or anti-Israel
statements. If he did, Saks said,
he personally would protest to the
Student Government Association,
the student affairs office,
chancellor John Slaughter and the
University Board of Regents.
"I take that (the statement) as
an incitement to violence," Saks
said according to the campus
newspaper Diamondback. "I con-
sider it an outrage that the presi-
dent of the Black Student Union
and other students attending gave
him (Toure) a standing ovation."
SLAUGHTER, addressing the
Student Senate before the rally,
said "just because Toure spoke
here does not in any way mean
that the University condones his
ideas or even that the BSU con-
dones them." BSU Vice President
Ed Martin rejected a demand by
the Jewish Student Union for an
apology. "We at BSU apologize
for nothing and no one,"
Continued on Page 15-A
STOKELY CARMICHAEL: days of the big mouth.
Trial in Making
It's Mistaken Identity,
Demjanjuk Declares
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The arrival here of accused
Nazi war criminal John
Demjanjuk under escort of
United States and Israeli
marshals has triggered
stepped-up efforts designed
to pave the way for the se-
cond war crimes trial in the
38-year history of the
Jewish State.
Demjanjuk, a native of the
Ukraine, lost his last legal barrier
preventing his extradition to
Israel when the United States
Supreme Court declined to review
a lower court ruling that found
"probable cause" that Demjanjuk
Invitation to PLO
State Dep't. Stands by UN 242 Rule
Bernard Kalb
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The State Department
maintained that it would not
have invited the Palestine
Liberation Organization to
an international conference
without Israel's agreement.
Department spokesman Ber-
nard Kalb also stressed that the
offer to the PLO was part of a
"package"* designed to bring
about direct negotiations between
Israel and a Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation.
Kalb's comments came as he
raffirmed that Jordan's King Hus-
sein was correct when he said that
the United States had agreed to
invite the PLO to an international
conference if the PLO accepted
United Nations Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338, agreed
to negotiations with Israel and re-
nounced terrorism.
HUSSEIN REVEALED the of
fer in a television speech in which
he announced he was ending a
year-long effort to work out a
joint peace strategy with PLO
leader Yasir Arafat because the
word of the PLO leadership could
Continued on Page 7-A
was a guard at the Nazi death
camps at Treblinka and Sobibor.
The 65-year-old retired
Cleveland auto worker is expected
to be tried here under a 1950 law,
Punishment of Nazis and their
Collaborators. He faces possible
execution if tried and convicted of
the murder of Jews in World War
II.
THE ONLY other person to be
tried and convicted under this law
was Adolf Eichmann, who was
kidnapped by Israeli intelligence
agents in Argentina and hanged
in Jerusalem on May 31, 1962.
The United States Justice
Department accused Demjanjuk,
known to death camp inmates as
"Ivan the Terrible," for his cruel
treatment of prisoners, with
operating the gas chambers at
Treblinka where some 900,000
Jews were murdered during the
Holocaust.
Demjanjuk was brought to
Israel aboard a direct El Al flight
from New York, as a landing,
even briefly, in an intermediate
airfield might have embarrassed a
foreign government during the
Continued on Page 7-A
mm?



Page 2-A The Jewish rTon&an/Triday. March 7, 1986
Assassination
Spells Damage to Israel's System
JERUSALEM Arab
self-rule on the West Bank,
a treasured dream of the
Peres regirrfc. was set back
Sunday with the assassina-
tion of" Mayor Zafer al-Masri
of Nablus.
The moderate Palestinian, who
was a frank supporter of Israeli
plans to hand back authority to
the Arabs over their own affairs.
was shot in the chest as be arrived
to work at the Nablus municipali-
ty building. He died on the way to
the hospital.
PRIME MINISTER Shimon
Peres reported to the Cabinet
Sunday that despite the murder.
he would not give up. "The
murder will not deter the Israel
government from proposing to
the residents of the territories
that they administer their own af-
fairs." he vowed.
Israel is determined to restore
this administrative autonomy to a
number of West Bank towns
whose mayors were deposed by
Israel in 1982 on the ground that
they had engaged in nationalistic
politic incitement.
"Our policy is constant."
declared Ephraim Sneh. director
of the Israeli West Bank civil ad-
ministration. "Such incidents (the
assassination of Mayor al-Masri)
do not change policy."
But it was clear that the threat
U.S. Backs Israel At ICAO;
Arabs Hope for Condemnation Move
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL iJTAi Israel,
backed by the United States,
defended itself at a meeting of the
International Civil Aviation
Organization's (ICAOt Governing
Council here against a move by
Syria and Libya to have the
33-member body condemn the
Israel Air Force interception of a
private Libyan plane which Israel
had reason to believe was carry-
ing Palestinian terrorist leaders.
Israei. at the same time, charged
Libya with threatening Israeli
civilian aircraft.
The interception occurred on
Feb. 4 when a Libyan Grumman
Gulf stream executive jet enroute
from Benghazi, Libya to
Damascus, was forced to land at
an Israeli Air Force base for an
identity check of its nine
passengers and three crew
it>ef iiijei b.
The passengers turned out to be
Syrian political figures returning
from a meeting in Tripoli. Libya.
and the plane was released after
4% hours to complete its flight.
THE DISCUSSION at the
ICAO Governing Council meeting
focused on whether the Libyan
aircraft was on State or civilian
business when it was intercepted
over the Mediterranean. Israel
contends it was on official
and therefore was not
I by the 1944 Chicago Con-
on international law
civil aviation.
The U.S. was the only country
to defend the Israeli action. The
American delegate. Edmund
Stohr. maintained the intercep-
tion was justified in light of
Libya's reputation as a refuge for
"resistance fighters.'' He stated
that "as a general principle, the
U.S. opposes the interception of
aircraft but concern for
security does not mean
have a sanctuary in
aircraft-"
The Soviet delegate. Vakry Sin-
jushkin. denounced the intercep-
tion as "piratical" and "state ter-
rorism." Condemnations in a
similar vein were voiced by the
delegates from Algeria. Pakistan.
PASSOVER1S>8<5
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DIPLOMAT. FLORIDA
Senegal. Indonesia.
Czechoslovakia. Lebanon. China.
Iraq and Egypt.
LAST OCTOBER, an Egyptian
commercial aircraft carrying
Palestinian terrorists believed
responsible for the hijacking of
the Italian cruise ship Achille
Lauro and the murder of one of its
passengers. Leon Klinghoffer. an
elderly American Jew. was forced
by U.S. fighter planes to land on
an airbase in Sicily.
The Israeli delegation, headed
by Jacob Aviad. Israel's Consul
General in Montreal and its per-
manent representative to the
ICAO. asked the President of the
Governing Council. Dr. Assad
Kotaite of Lebanon, to circulate to
all ICAO member states a letter
signed by Israel's Minister of
Transportation. Haim Corfu.
The letter cites numerous
threats by the Libyan government
and by Libya's ruler. Col. Muam-
mar Khadafy. to attack Israeli
civilian planes flying over the
Mediterranean and force them to
land in Libya in order "to discover
Israeli terrorists against Libya."
THE LETTER states that
"such threats constitute a grave
and permanent danger to the
security of passengers and repre-
sent a flagrant violation of the
Chicago Convention."
The ICAO. headquartered in
Montreal, is a United Nations
agency. Israel. Syria and Libya
are members but do not sit on its
Governing Council.
of assassination was in fact
dissuading other moderate
Palestinians from working in
cooperation with Israel toward
the resumption of the kind of
modified self-rule the Israel
government has in mind.
ACCORDING TO Shmuel
Goren. "The system has been
damaged. We have a problem on
our hands." Goren is coordinator
of Israeli activities on the West
Bank and in the Gaza Strip. "It's a
challenge posed by the terrorist
organizations, and I hope we can
overcome it."
While Palestinian political
leaders in the occupied territories
have unanimously condemned the
assassination, they warn that it
mav weD end cooperation with
Israel.
Bethlehem Mayor Elias Freij's
opinion is that "It's a character
assassination of the Arab
moderates. It will be very difficult
now to have Arab (municipal)
councils take over the Arab COVM
of Hebron. Ramallah. el-Bireh and
Gaza." Some of these moderates
have already asked that their
names be removed from
consideration.
Anwar Nusseibeh. a former Jor-
danian parliament member, said
al-Marsi "was one of those people
the Palestinians could little afford
to lose."
Two 'Rejection Front" groups,
the Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine, headed by
George Habash. and the Abu
Nidal splinter group, have claimed
responsibility for the assassina-
tion in separate announcements
from Damascus and Beirut.
THE PFLP statement, broad-
cast on Syrian radio, said that the
assassination of al-Masri was the
result of Israel's determination to
transfer power to local Palesti-
nians. It also pointed the finger at
Jordan King Hussein's statement
last month announcing that he
was splitting from PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat whose word, he said.
could not be counted on.
The PFLP issued a warning
against further Arab cooperation
with any and all efforts in the part
of Israel and/or Jordan to find a
substitute leadership for the PLO.
Al-Masri. himself, in a recent
radio interview, said he was work-
ing cooperatively with Israel to
bring "things hack to normal." He
emphasized that his goal was to
better the hves of the residents of
Nablus. "It has nothing to do with
the political process or the peace
process." be said.
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Scholar-in-Residence Hariva Avi-Gai talks with Jordan Horvatk
of the University of California at Berkeley, national chairman
the National Jewish Law Students Network, in the Tel Avit
Municipality Council hall during his recent visit to Israel. Hor-
vath headed the mission of American Jewish law students.
Britain's Oil Boycott of Israel
Said Not To Breach EEC Law
By MAURICE SAMIELSON
LONDON (JTA> Britain's
oil export policy, which effectively
boycotts sales to Israel, does not
breach the law of the European
Economic Community, the Euro-
pean Court of Justice in Luxem-
bourg has ruled
The ruling last week is the
latest, and possibly final step, in a
five-year legal battle between the
Swiss-based Bulk Oil Trading
Company, which buys oil for
Israel, and Sun Oil. a major
American oil company which
operates in the North Sea.
Sun had sued Bulk for about $15
million in damages over the
cancellation of an oil deliver}'
after it transpired that the oil was
bound for Israel, and therefore
contrary to the British govern-
ment's export guidelines.
But although the British courts
ruled in favor of Sun. the;, allowed
Bulk to appeal to the t^rjpem
Court over whether Brita
export policy breached the 1975
Free Trade Agreemer
Israel and the European C
Market.
After two years of deliberations
the European Court last week re-
jected Bulk Oil's appeal. H iwew,
it also criticized Britain for failing
to register its export polk} with
the European Commit
It remains to be set-
Sun Oil can recover the :a.~.ages
which it expects following the rul-
ing.
Rabbi Lintz Named
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
Rabbi George Lintz has been nam-
ed spiritual leader of Young Israel
of Northridge in the North San
Fernando Valiev.
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Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Catholic Dialogue
Must Go Beyond Narrow Focus
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Catholic-Jewish dialogue
must move beyond a nar-
rowly theological focus and
engage difficult matters
such as the centrality of
Israel for Jews and
Judaism, and obtaining the
Vatican's recognition of the
State of Israel.
This was the assessment shared
here by two of America's preemi-
nent pioneers in Catholic-Jewish
dialogue, the Rev. Edward Flan-
nery, former executive secretary
of the National Conference of
Catholic Bishops' Secretariat for
Catholic-Jewish Relations, and
Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, vice
president of the World Jewish
Congress, who addressed a
workshop on "Catholic-Jewish
Relations: 20 Years After Nostra
Aetate." held at New York's
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel during a
National Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council's session.
NJCRAC is the national coor-
dinating body for the field of
Jewish community relations, com-
prised of 11 national and 113 local
Jewish community relations agen-
cies. NJCRAC's Plenary Session
is held each winter to assist its
member agencies to define major
issues facing the American Jewish
community during the coming
year, and to plan goals and
strategies for national and local
action.
Referring to controversy
generated last year when the
Vatican published a document for
pastoral leaders and religious
teachers entitled "Notes on the
Correct Way to Present Jews and
Judaism in Preaching and
Catechesia in the Roman Catholic
Church," Fr. Flannery advised his
audience that the "Notes" ought
not to be used as a measure of pro-
gress or the lack of it in
Catholic-Jewish dialogue. "It is a
suitement that is meant for
elucidating a number of
theological points and doesn't deal
with the entire Catholic-Jewish
enterprise, which consists of more
than theological exchange."
Fr. Flannery suggested that in
order to make progress, dialogue
must take into account the
historical and humanitarian
perspectives through which Jews
understand the Holocaust, the
State of Israel, and anti-Zionism
as a cover for anti-Semitism.
Paying tribute to Rev. Flan-
nery's and the American Catholic
Church's contributions to
Catholic-Jewish dialogue, Rabbi
Hertzberg asserted that the key
to major advances in understan-
ding among the two faiths is
securing the Vatican's diplomatic
recognition of Israel.
HERTZBERG, speaking in
what he acknowledged were blunt
terms, stated that Jewish leaders
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in the interreligious dialogue
"have had it all wrong when they
believe we are the prime
beneficiaries of the dialogue
because the Vatican has denounc-
ed anti-Semitism.
"The truth of the matter," he
declared, "is that the Vatican
needs dialogue more than we do,
because from it the Vatican
regains credibility it lost as a
result of its inaction on behalf of
the Jews during World War II.
The Vatican needs Jewish
legitimization and some of our
Jewish ecumenists have been sell-
ing it cheap."
Hertzberg went on to score the
Vatican for refusing to extend
diplomatic recognition to Israel.
"The Vatican explains its
refusal on the grounds that, as a
matter of principle, it does not
recognize states whose borders
are unstable. That is strictly
nonsense. West Germany doesn't
recognize its border with East
Germany as permanent, so that's
not a stable border. But,
nonetheless, the Vatican main-
tains diplomatic relations with
West Germany.
"MY POINT is elementary,"
Hertzberg continued. "The mat-
ter of diplomatic recognition or
the lack of it is a matter of
legitimization. And he who does
not legitimize Israel delegitimize
Israel."
Asked to comment, Fr. Flan-
nery responded that, in his view,
the Vatican's concern about stable
borders was "an outmoded con-
cept" and ought to be dropped. He
noted that he had made this point
to Vatican officials a number of
times during official visits to
Rome.
Flannery went on to observe
that achieving such recognition
through interreligious dialogue
channels was, at best, difficult due
to the Vatican's structure. In the
wake of reforms wrought by the
Second Vatican Council, the
Church was no longer organized
along strictly hierarchical lines.
Thus, when leaders engaged in
Catholic-Jewish dialogue bring up
the question of diplomatic
recognition, it is referred to that
part of the Vatican's bureaucracy
that deals with dialogue with
various faiths, not the office deal-
ing with matters of state.
"We are dealing with a
bureaucracy. I don't have to ex-
plain what that means. It doesn't
mean, however, that we should
not continue to raise the issue
through those channels that are
open and most receptive to us."
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. March 7. 1986
| Moderate Arabs
I Ducking New Power
:|i; Several moderate Palestinians have already
:: asked that their names be removed from con-
sideration as mayors in Arab town? like Hebron.
Ramallah. el-Bireh and Gaza. They have reacted
swiftly to the assassination Sunday of Zafer al-
Masri. who had taken on the office of Mayor of
Nablus.
Up until 1982. the mayor there was Bassam
Shak'a. That year, many mayors of West Bank
towns were deposed on charges that they were
inciting Arabs against Israeli rule in the cause of
a separate state under Palestine Liberation
Organization rule. Al-Masri took on the job in
last December.
Apart from the tragedy of al-Masri's murder
itself and the persistent determination of ter-
rorist Palestinians to assassinate anyone with
the least scent of moderation about him the
passing of al-Masri poses a serious challenge to
Israel.
The Peres regime has long harbored a dream
of returning responsibility for local administra-
tion to the West Bank Palestinians themselves.
Peres' dream has longstanding roots in the
Camp David accord itself, which envisioned a
West Bank Palestinian entity in loose confedera-
tion with Jordan.
Indeed, a few weeks before his murder, al-
Masri had gone to Jordan to ask for financial
support for Nablus. Fact is that Jordan has been
giving this kind of aid to West Bank
municipalities as a means of maintaining at least
some kind of influence over them a policy it
has atempted to follow since 1967. when Jordan
lost the West Bank to Israel in the Six-Day War.
The difference between Mikhail Gorbachev and his predecessors
Israel's Broken Dream
There have been various kinds of contact and
Jordanian participation in West Bank affairs for
a long time, and Israel has been anxious to keep
it going in the hope of seeking an alternative for
moderate Palestinians to the PLO of Yasir
Arafat.
With the speech of King Hussein last month,
in which the King brought to an end his continu-
ing effort to hammer out an Arafat-led Palesti-
nian entity on the West Bank and in Gaza based
on Arafat's acceptance of Israel's right to exist
a declaration Arafat has refused to make
Israel hoped that its dreams had finally come
true.
But the assassination of al-Masri means a
staggering blow to Israel's hope. Bethlehem's
Mayor Elias Freij has said that the al-Masri
murder "is character assassination of the Arab
moderates. It will be very difficult now to have
Arab councils take over the Arab towns ..."
That is precisely what the Popular Front for
the Liberation of Palestine aimed at when it
broadcast Sunday its claim for responsibility, ad-
ding that al-Masri's assassination should serve
as a warning against further cooperation with
Jordan or Israel as an alternative to absolute
Palestinian rule.
When Shmuel Goren. coordinator of Israeli ac-
tivities on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip,
declared that "The system has been damaged
we have a problmem on our hands." nothing
more pointed could possibly have been said to
emphasize that, at least for the moment, it is
time for Israel to wake up from the dream.
Kremlin-Watchers' Day
Kremlin-watchers are attempting to assess
the results of the Communisty Party Congress.
They are having a difficult time of it*. For a long
time, the adjective "inscrutable'' typically ac-
companied all seemingly incomprehensible ac-
tions of Orientals. More recently, it appears
more aptly to describe the Soviets.
There is little doubt that Mikhail Gorbachev is
different from most if not all of his predecessors.
Jewish Floridiao
Nothing emphasizes this more than his comment
to the Congress that the Soviet Union must
begin to adopt some of the production and
marketing principles of the Western capitalist
world. And. therefore, of the Chinese, too.
And yet. before Gorbachev stands the
bureaucracy of the Supreme Soviet, no less than
of the Politburo and the Congress themselves,
none of which is likely to cotton to such dramatic
change. Gorbachev may recommend, but recom-
mendation is a long way from implementation.
So far as the Soviet Union's Jewish communi-
ty is concerned. Gorbachev is on far more solid
ground. There does not appear to be much that
can change Gorbachev's own assessemnt of his
country's Jews that they have no Jewish pro-
blem. Hence, what is there to discuss?
Still, so many want to leave, and if Gorbachev
is bent upon modeling his rule along the lines of
Western leaders whose way he appears to ad-
mire, we should not be surprised if those mam-
Jews who want to leave finally get a chance to
do so. In one thing at least Western leadership is
uniform in its opinion about Jews in Russia
that they should be free to go.
Gorbachev already knows how much Western
pressure can be brought to bear on this question,
which he says does not exist as a problem. The
case of Anatoly Sharanksy has surely taught
him that nobody believes his clever tautology.
Perhaps that is why so many Israelis these
days seem to be preparing themselves for the
"inevitable" arrival of "masses" of new im-
migrants in their midst.
Dade Countians Join Together in Stand Against Drugs
Dade Countians will be joining together on
Mar. 12 to make a stand against drugs. A unique
day in Miami's history, the observance will be
committed to the idea of "Just Sav No to
Drugs."
Gov. Bob Graham's 44-member Red Ribbon
Council has been working for months now in
preparation for this day. And to make the red
ribbon a symbol of our community's determina-
tion to make a united stand against illegal drugs.
Red ribbons and bows will be displayed on
homes, offices, buildings, cars and trucks. In
fact, some businesses will be wrapping their
facilities in red.
Jewish Family and Children's Service offices
have been keeping red ribbons from the recent
holiday season to make bows for their doors
The Hebrew Academy will join other Khoob
in special red ribbon events the week of Mar.
10-14. On Monday. Mar. 10. football star George
Mira and Miami Vices Eddie Olmos will visit the
school. And on Mar. 14. there will be a Red Rib-
bon ceremony running ribbon from the Hebrew
Academy through the Miami Beach Fire Station
to Miami Beach Senior High.
Illegal drugs hit even,- face of our community
state and nations. They are no respecter of age.
sex. social station or financial capability
Children are its victims. Adults are too. That is
why this united Dade County event is so impor-
tant. Let's get behind it. Our red ribbon on our
Front Page symbolizes this effort.
:::::::::
In Lebanon
Anti-Jewish Terror Mounts Alarmingly

Friday. March 1966
Volume 59
26 1 ADAR 5746
Number 10
By DR. GEORGE GRIEN
The murder of two
Lebanese Jews within the
past few weeks by a readical
Shiite Moslem group in-
dicates an intensification of
the terrorist campaign
against Lebanon's tiny and
defenseless Jewish
community.
The latest victim is Dr. Elie
Hallak. 60. a prominent pediatri-
cian and vice president of the
High Council of the Lebanese
Jewish community. In a statement
published in the Lebanese daily
An-S'ahar and in the French
press, the group, whkh calls itself
The Organization of the Oppress-
ed in the World, said it would not
release Hallak's bodv until the
Israelis had left Lebanon.
A POLAROID photograph ac-
companying the statement con-
firmed that Hallak was in their
hands, but it could not be deter-
mined from it whether he was
dead or alive.
The caption provided by the
group depicted him as "a leader of
The spelling* or the name* of Lebanese Jens who haw been m tin
news lately and eim their ages, keep changing depending on tiu
sources or the reports, making U difficult to standardize thu-
formation. The article by Dr. George Gruen. director of.MiddU
hast Affairs or the American Jewish Committee, provides tiu
most authoritative spellings and ages to date
the Mossad." the Israeli in-
telligence service.
This is ominous since the charge
of spying for Israel was used by
the group to justify its killing of
three other innocent Lebanese
Jews within the past three
months.
The Organization of the Op-
pressed had not earlier admitted
to holding Hallak. although he
was kidnapped at the end of
March. 1985 together with three
other Lebanese Jews, presumably
because it knew how patently
false the charge of spying was
Hallak was a much-loved and
highly respected doctor whose pa-
tients came from all ethnic and
religious segments of Beirut's
society Indeed, some years back
he *- d the soa of one of the
lead- the PLO.
WHEN NEWS of his abdu
was revealed, the kidnapping was
condemned by Christian and
Moslem officials including
Lebanese Justice Minister Nabih
Bern, the leader of the mainline
Shiite group. Amal.
Following Hallak's kidnapping
his wife. Rachel Hallak. who was
in Paris at the time, went to
Beirut and remained there for
several months, trying, in vain, to
obtain his release. She is hack in
Paris now with the couple's three
sons Andre. Alain, and Man
who range in age from 17 to 21 -
who were sent there to Mud)
several years ago because of the
turmoil in Lebanon.
During Hallak's months of cap-
tivity, he was reported to have
Coatianed on Page 13-A
**
Ute


Communist Congress
Will Not Mean
Dramatic Changes
Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
shadow of Leonid Brezhnev follows Mikhail Gorbachev.
By DR.
SCHNEIER LEVENBERG
London Chronicle Syndicate
The Jewish world closely
watched the 27th Congress
of the Soviet Communist
Party which opened in
Moscow last week, the first
such gathering since
February, 1981.
During the last years of
Leonid Brezhnev's life and in the
brief periods under Andropov and
Chernenko, the Soviet Union was
in many ways paralyzed. Now it is
coming to life again. Changes are
in the air. The question is, are
these changes real, and how will
they affect internal and foreign
polity issues, specifically, the rela-
tionship with Israel, the emigra-
tion problem and the position of
the .Jewish community-.'
WHILE LAST week's con-
ference had been prefaced by an
enormous publicity campaign
within the Soviet Union and
abroad, it is necessary to warn
against the great expectations
aroused by it. Communist con-
gresses take the form of mass
demonstrations. Everything is
fixed in advance: who is elected as
a delegate, the list of speakers,
the character of the debate, the
text of the unanimously-adopted
resolutions. But it would be a
mistake to ignore the importance
of the Moscow conference.
While the Communist con-
gresses of 1971, 1976 and 1981
were dominated by the personali-
ty of Leonid Brezhnev, the new
general secretary, who was
selected last March, has still to
emerge as the unchallenged
leader of the Soviet Union. This
may seem routine if we ignore the
great internal changes within the
USSR, the forthcoming election
of the central committee and the
all-powerful Politburo, and the
ambitions and character of
Mikhail Gorbachev.
An internal revolution, long
delayed, is taking place in Russia
which may deeply affect the posi-
tion of Jews in the various Soviet
republics. It is significant that the
large majority of delegates at the
27th Congress were unknown
faces (including women). A new
generation is anxious to take over
the key positions in various walks
of life, better educated than the
old one, but no less ambitious and
not necessarily more moderate in
its outlook or free from an-
tagonism to minorities. Jews, an
important element in certain
fields, may be pushed out by the
"new cadres."
GORBACHEV is no dictator.
He deliberately avoids the prac-
tice of the personality cult, but he
has already managed to free
himself from a number of his
adversaries and to surround
himself with his own followers.
His aim is to have his own people
not only in the Soviet Union, but
at the head of other Communist
countries as well.
What kind of man is Gorbachev?
Hailing from the city of Stavropol
in the Caucasus, he is an expert in
agriculture and was prominent as
a Communist leader in the city of
his birth. While Stalin,
Khrushchev and Brezhnev had no
formal education, Gorbachev
studied law at Moscow University
and is known as a man of culture.
A number of prominent Soviet
leaders used to come on vacation
in his region. He made their ac-
quaintance, learned the art of
public relations and this led him
to the Politburgin 1981.
On the question of Jewish af-
fairs, an interview he gave to the
Paris Communist daily, Humanite
reprinted two weeks on the
front pages of Pravda and
Izvestia, repeats various Soviet
statements made abroad. But
coming from a person in his posi-
tion, it deserves close study.
GORBACHEV condemns the
talk about persecution of Jews in
Russia aa part of an "anti-Soviet
campaign, a real psychological
war against the USSR." He
asserts that anti-Semitic pro-
LEONID BBREZHNEV: the vicious press campaign against Israel.
MIKHAIL GORBACHEV: he is no dictator.
paganda is forbidden by law, is a
crime. He claims that, within the
Soviet Union, the desecration of
Jewish cemeteries, the activities
of neo-Nazi organizations which
have spread hatred towards Jews
through newspapers and radio, is
impossible, though it often hap-
pens in the United States, France
and other Western countries.
Gorbachev claims that Jews in
the Soviet Union are free and en-
joy equality with people of other
nationalities. They take an active
part in public life and State life
within the USSR. Books, journals
and newspapers are published in
Yiddish; synagogues exist. He
believes that in a civilized society,
there is no place for anti-Semitism
and Zionism. He asks: for how
many years "the facts are
known" have the Arab people
of Palestine remained expelled
from their land?
Gorbachev's statement
demonstrates a new approach to
Soviet Jews as a clever public rela-
tions exercise. Still, it is better
than silence, and it could form the
beginning of talks based on the
well-known epigram, "Facts are
sacred, comment is free." It is
easy to prove that some of Gor-
bachev's facts are wrong.
WITH REGARD to the Middle
East, no fundamental changes
have occurred in Soviet policy
since the report of the Central
Committee to the 26th Congress
delivered by Leonid Brezhnev on
Feb. 23, 1981. In that report, he
denounced the "separate deal"
between Israel and Egypt, and "it
is time to go back to the honest
collective search of an all-
embracing, just and realistic
settlement.
"In the circumstances, this
could be done, say, in the
framework of a specially-
convened international con-
ference. We are prepared to do so
jointly with other interested par-
ties the Arabs (naturally in-
cluding the Palestine Liberation
Organization) and Israel.
"We are prepared for such a
search jointly with the United
States. We are prepared to
cooperate with the European
countries and with all those who
show a sincere striving to secure a
just and durable peace in the Mid-
dle East. The United Nations, too,
the first Israeli Ambassador to the
Soviet Union, told me that when
she arrived in Moscow on
September 6, 1948, the reception
was warm. But when she raised
the problem of aliya at her first
meeting with the head of the
Foreign Ministry's Middle East
department, there was no reply
just silence.
Shmuel Eliashiv, another Israeli
Ambassador to the Soviet Union,
described to me his first talk with
Foreign Minister Gromyko on
December 21, 1953. The latter's
Jewish problem is an anti-Soviet
campaign, according to Gorbachev.
new generation is anxwus to take
over the key positwns of power.
could evidently continue to play a
useful part in all this.
"We are still convinced that if
there is to be real peace in the
Middle East, the Israeli occupa-
tion of all Arab territories cap-
tured in 1967 must be ended. The
inalienable rights of the Arab peo-
ple of Palestine must be secured,
up to and including the establish-
ment of their own State.
"IT IS essential," he said, "to
ensure the security and sovereign-
ty of all the States of the region,
incluidng those of Israel. These
are the basic principles. As for the
details, they could naturally be
considered in the negotiations."
There is a difference in em-
phasis between Brezhnev's
general statement, which remains
the Soviet Government policy,
and the violent press campaign
against Israel, combined with sup-
port for Syria, Libya, South
Yemen and the struggle of the
PLO. Moscow denounced the
Hussein-Arafat understanding of
February 11, 1985, and pleads for
unity among the Palestinians. Its
major aim is to achieve equal
status with the United States at
an international conference on the
Arab-Israel conflict.
There has so far been no word in
the Communist press on the
resumption of diplomatic relations
with Israel. This silence is due to
three main reasons: a desire not to
upset the Arab rejectionist States;
to have "a bargaining card" in
negotiations with America; and to
avoid discussing controversial
issues (the attitude to Israel is one
such topic) prior to the Congress.
IT REMAINS to be seen
whether what Gorbachev said dur-
ing his major address to the con-
ference constituted anything new.
But even if he confines himself to
generalities, this should not be
considered as the last word.
Previous experience has shown
that discussions on delicate pro-
blems, whenever a decision is
urgent, are of n 'eft to the Polit-
buro after t.u Congress.
Aliya, or the emigration of Jews
from the USSR, is a separate
problem.
The late Golda Meir, who was
refusal to discuss the emigration
of Jews was both harsh and
resolute; indeed, he expressed
surprise that the issue had been
raised at all.
IN THE light of this attitude,
and despite "normal diplomatic
relations," it is not surprising that
the number of Jews allowed to
leave the Soviet Union was only
5,378 during the entire period of
1961 to 1967. Large-scale Jewish
emigration from the Soviet Union
only started in 1971 and reached
its peak (51,000) in 1979, when
there were no diplomatic relations
with Israel.
While furthering detente is an
important factor, emigration is an
internal Soviet problem. Pressure
from outside is resented, although
it may help in certain
circumstances.
Within the Soviet Union, views
about Jewish emigration are
divided. The main arguments
against are on ideological and
practical grounds: Those who
leave are traitors to the Com-
munist way of life. Those who
want to go are victims of
"unscrupulous Zionist propagan-
da." To open the door for Jews
would invite pressure from other
groups Ukrainians, Latvians,
Lithuanians, Armenians, Ger-
mans and would anger other
Russians whose freedom to travel
is restricted.
Those who go, endanger the
security of the State. The emigra-
tion of Jews is resented by Arab
opinion. And the Jews are a
valuable element in society: their
departure constitutes a loss of
skilled and technical manpower of
a vital element in many walks of
life.
THOSE WHO do not oppose
the emigration of Jews contend
that it is better to get rid of
"trouble-makers;" that the
refuseniks have created a "Zionist
center" which encourages
dissidents; that respect for
unification of families creates a
better climate of opinion for the
Soviet Union in the outside world:
and that those Jews who leave
Continued on Page 12-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Reagan Administration Assaults
Focus On Country's Judicial System
NEW YORK Assaults by the
Reagan Administration on con-
stitutional guarantees of church-
state separation and other in-
dividual liberties are now being
focused on the country's judicial
system, Abraham S. Goldstein,
Sterling Professor of Law at Yale
Attorney General Meese
University, and Mark H. Gitens-
tein, Minority Chief Counsel of
the Senate Committee on the
Judiciary, told delegates atten-
ding the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory Coun-
cil's deliberations last week at
New York's Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel.
Reviewing the controversy
generated recently, when At-
torney General Edwin Meese
criticized justices of the U.S.
Supreme Court for failing to in-
terpret the Constitution according
to the "original intention" of the
Founding Fathers, and instead
imposing their own policy
preference in cases involving
abortion, church-state separation
and defendants' rights, Prof.
Goldstein asserted that the At-
torney General, in proposing his
theories about "the jurisprudence
of original intent," had created a
"straw man."
"NO ONE disagrees with Mr.
Meese when he says that the Con-
stitution is the basic text from
which constitutional interpreta-
tion derives," the Yale legal
scholar observed. "But I agree
with Supreme Court Justice
William Brennan who, in answer-
ing the Attorney General's
criticism, rightly pointed out that
the debate is really over how to
read the text."
In actual practice. Goldstein ex-
plained, judges and justices who
rule on constitutional cases con
stantly grapple with the problem
of how to apply the Constitution's
words to contemporary situations
that did not exist in 1787. From
such attempts at elucidation and
emerge, and there is no ready for-
mula to answer these questions."
Indeed, Goldstein asserted, "if
one reads his speeches, one
realizes Mr. Meese recognizes
that constitutional interpretation
is not something that can be done
mechanically. The fact is that Mr.
Meese's theory about
'jurisprudence of original inten-
tion' does not amount to much,
and even he is backing away from
it.
"The Attorney General," Prof.
Goldstein continued, "doesn't
really want the courts to return to
interpreting the Constitution to
its 'original intentions.' What he
wants is for the courts to decide
cases according to his interpreta-
tion of the Constitution. And in
the Attorney General's inter-
pretation, the Constitution would
Zahava Barashi, a recovering kidney
transplant patient (left) watches from her
Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center
hospital bed as her eldest son, L'zi. is married
to Carmela Joshua, u-hile her husband.
Sasson, helps hold up the canopy. Mrs
Barashi. who suffered complications from her
illness, did not want to delay the wedding, and
doctors hoped that the pleasure of the .
would aid her convalescence.
permit religion in the public
schools and capital punishment,
and prohibit abortion."
MARK H. GITENSTEIN. the
Senate Judiciary- Committee's
Minority Chief Counsel, drew at-
tention in his presentation to the
Administration's attempts to
enact its social agenda by seeking
appointment of federal judges
who would rule in its favor when
related cases came before their
courts.
He warned against the danger
of any attempts to extract pledges
from judicial nominees as to how
they would vote on specific issues
once they were appointed. The
judiciary's role, he asserted, was
to check the Executive and
Legislative branches from infring-
ing upon each others' and in-
dividual citizens' rights.
Any attempt to predetermine
how a constitutional case would be
decided would compromise the in-
dependence of the judiciary-,
thereby striking a damaging blow
to the foundation upon which
America's democratic freedom
have developed, he warned.
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view with Voice of Israel Radio
that all Israelis there were well.
He said that everything seemed
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he then witnessed thousands of
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Friday, March i, l$86rthe'Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
4
Trial in Making
It's Mistaken Identity Demjanjuk
State Dep't. Stands by UN Rule
Calling for Israel's Recognition
Continued from Page 1-A
passage of the controversial
figure. Demjanjuk was held in a
federal prison facility in Spr-
ingfield, Mo.
Officials of the Justice Ministry,
the Attorney General's Office, the
police and prison service had con-
tingency plans developed last year
when it became apparent that
there was a strong possibility that
Demjanjuk might be extradited to
Israel under terms of a 1963 ex-
tradition agreement with the U.S.
DEMJANJUK, who has main-
tained his innocence, saying he
was a Soviet soldier during the
war who was captured by the
Nazis, has argued through his at-
torney that the extradition treaty
between the two governments did
not allow for him to be sent to
Israel. He is the first person ex-
tradited from the U.S. to Israel
for crimes committed during
World War II.
Justice Minister Moshe Nissim
said that Demjanjuk would be
tried in the Jerusalem district
court by a panel of three judges
headed by a Justice of the
Supreme Court. While the At-
torney General's office and the
police are preparing the charge
sheet, other officials are deciding
on where the trial will take place.
Cairo Woes
To Slow Peace?
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Political sources express
concern that unrest in Cairo
will slow down the process
of normalization between
Egpt and Israel.
According to these sources.
President Hosni Mubarak, con-
fronted by rioting police con-
scripts and related problems, will
be unable to honor his com-
mitments to pursue the normaliza-
tion process. The process has been
proceeding in tandem wjth Israel-
Egyptian negotiations over ar-
bitration of the Taba border
dispute.
BUT ONE of Israel's chief
negotiators, Avraham Tamir,
director general of the Prime
Minister's Office, said that the
riots would not affect relations
between the two countries.
He told Haaretz that the Israeli
negotiating team, which he heads
jointly with David Kimche, direc-
tor general of the Foreign
Ministry, would go to Cairo as
planned Monday for the latest
round of talks. The last round was
held at Herzliya a week ago.
Tamir said that once Mubarak
puts down the present unrest he
would have stronger control over
extremists in the opposition.
More than 2,000 police con-
scripts went on a rampage in
Cairo, wrecking four tourists
hotels and engaging in gun battles
with military units. They were
enflamed by rumors which the
government says are false that
their three-year required tour of
duty would be extended by
another year.
MOSHE SASSON, Israels
Ambassador in Cairo, told the
Israeli media that all Israeli
diplomats in the capital and their
families are safe. He said Egyp-
tian security forces are in control
of the situation and spirits have
already calmed down.
The Egyptian authorities have
reinformced security guards
around all foreign legations, in-
cluding the Isreli Embassy and
ambassadorial residences.
The venue must be dignified
enough to serve as a court and
large enough to accommodate the
large number of people, including
hundreds of foreign reporters, ex-
pected to view the trial. Justice
Ministry personnel have inspected
and found suitable for use in the
Demjanjuk trial the bullet-proof
glass box which encased the stand
at which Eichmann sat during his
trial. It has been preserved as an
exhibit at the Kibbutz Lochamei
Hagetaot Museum.
DEMJANJUK is being held
during the preparations for his
trial, including his interrogation
by the police for preparation of
the charge sheet which may
take several months in the
same special cell at the Ramie
Prison which housed Eichmann.
His prison guards were chosen
from a panel of individuals who
have had no connection with the
Nazis, either directly in their own
person or through members of
their family, to avoid the possibli-
ty of personal revenge.
But the question of who will
represent Demjanjuk is still to be
settled. Under Israeli law, only
lawyers registered in Israel may
plead in Israeli courts. It will not
be easy to find a local attorney
ready to undertake the defense of
Demjanjuk, and the accused war
criminal may request an attorney
from abroad.
In the case of Eichmann, a
special law was passed to enable a
West German attorney, Robert
Servatius, to appear in the
Jerusalem court to defend him.
DURING arraignment pro-
ceedings in Jerusalem Sunday,
Demjanjuk steadfastly denied the
charges against him. "I never
served the Nazis," he said. "I only
served my family."
He added: "I am completely the
wrong person. I was never in that
place what everybody tells me,
Treblinka." Demjanjuk spoke in
English.
Among the list of charges
against him is this gruesome
description of Demjanjunk's
method of operation: "After the
doors of the chamber had been
closed, the suspect would operate
the engine, which sent exhaust
fumes into the chambers. In this
way, the victims were choked to
death."
He is also said to have "killed
with his own hands Jews from
among the work parties that
labored in the camp."
Continued from Page 1-A
not be relied upon.
Kalb said that the offer was one
of the many aspects as the U.S.
"attempted to help construct a
package that would facilitate
direct negotiations between Israel
and the Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation looking toward the
establishment of peace between
Israel and all its Arab neighbors.
"As it is always the case in such
situations, no single issue can be
satisfactorily addressed without
reference to the full package of
which it is part.
"Moreover, if that package
could have been constructed, it
goes without saying that it would
not have been implemented
without agreement to the full
package by all sides."
KALB STRESSED that
Israelis on a senior level had been
kept informed of all U.S. discus-
sions on the peace process, as had
the Jordanians. There have been
reports from Jerusalem that
Premier Shimon Peres knew of
the offer but Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir didn't. While
refusing to describe any other
aspects of the "package," Kalb
said that "now that the PLO has
failed the King's test there is no
package, and this isolated ques-
tion is moot."
He reiterated the U.S. position
that now is a time for "reflection"
and stressed it was "premature"
to specualte on the next step by
the U.S. At the same time, Kalb
said for the "record," he wanted
to reiterate the long-standing
U.S. policy on the PLO.
"We will not recognize nor
negotiate with the PLO so long as
the PLO does not recognize
Israel's right to exist and does not
accept Security Council Resolu-
tions 242 and 338," he said. "And
we made it clear that those who
refuse to renounce violence and
terrorism have no place at the
negotiating table."
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Prime Minister Shimon Peres (left) and
Spanish Premier Felipe Gonzalez toast each
other at the Dutch Premiers official residence
in The Hague. Both leaders had just signed
and sealed the agreement to establish
diplomatic relations between Spain and
Israel.
Majo
r Achievement
Diplomatic Ties for Spain, Israel
By YOEL COHEN
The establishment of
diplomatic ties between
Spain and Israel is a major
achievement in Israeli
foreign relations. Now
Israel can claim to have
diplomatic ties with every
one of the Western
democratic family of
nations.
Spain holds a special place in
Jewish history, for producing such
giants as Maimonides, Judah
HaLevi and Solomon Ibn Gvirol
during its Golden Age. In a broad
historical sense, Spain's recogni-
tion of Israel may be seen as mak-
ing amends for the expulsion of
the Jews from Spain in 1492.
The absence of diplomatic ties
between the two countries has a
history of its own. In 1950, Israel
supported a resolution in the
United Nations to boycott Spain
because of its alliance with Nazi
Germany in the Second World
War.
ALTHOUGH Spain had helped
to save thousands of Jews in the
Second World War. Israel, as a
young member of the UN. was not
prepared to break rank on a
resolution with symbolic meaning
to the Jewish State. When the
Franco government fell some ten
years ago. and the Israel govern-
ment put out diplomatic feelers to
Madrid to recognize Israel.
Spanish officials referred back to
the boycott.
Unofficial ties between the two
countries have existed since 1983
in the form of a foreign ministry
official. Shmuel Hadas, Israel's
representative at the Madrid-
based World Tourism Organiza-
tion. Hadas has been appointed
Israel's first Ambassador to
Spain.
Even five years ago, there was
just limited support among
Spain's political parties for formal
recognition of Israel. Only the
small Popular Party favored such
a public act. Today, recognition is
certainly due in part to the good
personal relationship between
Socialist Prime Minister Felipe
Gonzalez and Prime Minister
Shimon Peres, who have known
one another for a long time
through the Socialist
International.
OTHERS in the Socialist Party,
however, such as Fernando
Moran, the former foreign
minister, opposed such a step
fearing it would threaten Spain's
close ties with the Arab world.
All of Spain's politial parties,
apart from the Communists, have
welcomed the Socialist govern-
ment's decision to recognize
Israel. The Spanish media gave
wide coverage to the decision, as
well as to other topics regarding
Israel. Recent opinion polls in-
dicated that some 70 percent of
the Spanish public favored
recognition.
More important than personal
ties, and popular approval,
however, was Spain's entry into
the European Economic Com-
munity in January. Spain would
have been the only EEC member
without formal diplomatic ties to
Jerusalem. Some reports claimed
that the lack of recognition was an
obstacle to Spain in gaining accep-
tance to the community and that
EEC countries put pressure on
Madrid to recognize Israel. Other
reports, however, suggested that
Spain tried to use the card of
recognition of Israel during
negotiations to gain entry, but
that EEC countries refused to tie
the two issues.
Spain's entry to the EEC may
be costly to Israel: its duty-free
fruits, notably oranges, present a
threat to Israeli agricultural ex-
ports to EEC countries. Israel has
failed to obtain adequate
safeguards in terms of tariff con-
cessions from the EEC. A car-
toonist in the leading daily.
Haaretz, depicted the announce-
ment of Spanish recognition with
Prime Minister Peres standing
underneath a fruit tree labeled
"Spain." holding out a basket to
catch one fruit labeled "recogni-
tion of Israel." while another fruit
labeled "Spanish exports to the
EEC" lands on Peres' head.
IN BILATERAL terms, there
is a growing trade relationship
between the two countries. In the
first 11 months of 1985, Spanish
exports to Israel amounted to $73
million a one thousand percent
increase since 1977 and Spanish
imports from Israel amounted to
$28 million.
Exports to Spain include water
irrigation equipment, and imports
by Israel include trucks and trac-
tors. Last year, the two countries
set up direct air links, with El Al
and Iberia Air Lines making
regular flights.
These economic ties are minor
however, when compared with the
close economic ties between Spain
and the Arab world. Up to 80 per
cent of Spain's oil comes from
Arab countries, and Spanish ex
ports and building contracts with
those nations amount to more
than $2 billion a year.
Despite the satisfaction in Israel
over official diplomatic ties.
Spain's basic support for the Arab
point of view including the posi-
tion that the PLO be involved in
peace negotiations ronaini
unchanged.
MOREOVER, with the addition
of Spain to the EEC. which
already hosts several pro-Arab na-
tions, any future EEC policy
statements regarding the Arab-
Israeli dispute can be exptected to
shift further to the Arab point of
view.
Mr. Peres has alluded to the
possibility that Spain's good con-
nections with the Arab world may
contribute toward establishing a
dialogue with Israel. Given
Spain's limited involvement in in-
ternational diplomacy, however,
such assistance, at this point,
seems unlikely at best.
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Thru March 31. 1986


.
Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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Page 10-A The Jewish FlQridiap/FrMky.-March 7, 1986
AFDS
Jewish Project To Help Victims

Continued from Page 1-A
have had blood transfusions
longer than six months ago are at
risk, he said.
THE PROJECT will provide
education and information to the
Jewish community about AIDS
and how to help its victims,
galvanize the "pooling of
resources" on their behalf, and
function as a clearing-house for
the victims themselves as to
whom to turn to in the community
for pastoral counseling, family
and home care services and legal
assistance.
A top priority, Teutsch told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency, will
be to educate rabbis, rabbinical
students, chaplains, and Jewish
communal service professionals
on AIDS and how to work with
the victims and their families.
"Members of synagogues are
afraid to tell their own rabbis their
children are dying in another ci-
ty," he said. Educating rabbis,
Teutsch believes, is crucial, not
only because they do pastoral
counseling but also because
through their sermons and in-
fluence "they can open up the
issue in the community."
It is not only rabbis who need
sensitizing on the issue, Teutsch
continued. It is also funeral direc-
tors, who need to treat AIDS vic-
tims in the same manner as other
deceased persons; doctors and
dentists; and synagogue groups
doing "bikur cholim" (visiting the
sick). All of these need informa-
tion to be able to "overcome their
fears" of contact with AIDS vic-
tims and their families, he said.
A SECOND major goal -
mobilizing, developing and coor-
dinating home care resources for
AIDS victims derives from the
fact that they are "best cared for
iiwish
rwncxwL
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL

THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer...
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
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at home," he said. Provisions need
to be made for their meals, in-
cluding kosher food for those who
need it, and occasional transporta-
tion. Various Jewish agencies and
bikur cholim groups could provide
them with such services.
A third aim is to involve various
Jewish civil rights organizations
in "advocacy" on behalf of AIDS
patients. This includes legal work
for AIDS victims who are fired or
evicted, and legislative lobbying
for government fundings of
hospice programs and other non-
hospital services.
The director of the project will
be Daniel Najjar, a Board member
of Bet Mishpacha, the 20-year-old
gay and lesbian synagogue in
Washington, D.C., who organized
the New York meeting. Najjar
told the JTA that Jewish AIDS
victims feel "they can't turn to
the community for help even when
they are dying. They have a
desperate need to link up" with
the Jewish community, he said.
Najjar estimated that at least
300 to 500 Jews have been
diagnosed as AIDS victims since
1979. This estimate is based on
taking 2.2 percent (the Jewish
percentage in the population) of
the Center for Disease Control
(CDC) figure of 17,361 reported
diagnosed cases. Of these 48 per-
cent about 163 Jews are still
alive.
HOWEVER, he noted, CDC
stated that 15,000 to 20,000 new
cases will be reported diagnosed
by the end of 1986 bringing the
estimated number of additional
Jewish victims to 440.
Najjar pointed out that
"thousands of Jews may also be
assumed to be carriers of AIDS
since the federal government has
estimated that up to one million
persons are possibly HTLV-III
positive (having the virus that
causes the disease). These persons
may become ill at some later time
in their lrwe, even-if they do not
develop full-blown AIDS symp-
toms within the near future."
Synagogues in Los Angeles,
San Francisco and New York
"have lost members to AIDS, and
most major cities' Jewish com-
munities currently have members
who are sick and dying," Najjar
said. "Those areas of the country
which have been hardest hit by the
disease are also the largest areas
of Jewish population New
York, California and Florida."
RABBI YOEL KAHN, spiritual
leader of Shaar Zahav in San
Francisco, said that he is being
referred one AIDS case per week.
Everyone in his congregation, he
said, "has lost a close friend. Most
lost several. Older members .
have stopped counting after 20."
The Jewish organizations whose
key figures are involved with the
project include the (Reform)
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, the (Conservative)
Rabbinical Assembly, the Associa-
tion of Jeviih -Family and
Children's Agencies, the Council
of Jewish Federations, the
Federation of Reconstructionist
Congregations and Havurot and
the World Congress of Gav and
Lesbian Jewish Organizations.
Najjar said the project has
already had some initial pledges of
funds and that it will be seeking
additional seed money to get it
underway. The National Jewish
AIDS Project will initially operate
out of offices 2025 I St NW
Washington, D.C. 2006.
"AIDS victims feel a sense of
abandonment, which augments
and intensifies their tragedy"
Teutsch told the JTA. The com-
munity can and must deal with
this sense of abandonment by
"reaching out" to them, and
showing them that "the vast ma-
jority of Jews are deeply
concerned."
Israeli Attends Notre Dame
To Spur His Great Fencing Skills
NOTRE DAME. Ind. (JTA)
Notre Dame, a bastion of
Roman Catholic education, enroll-
ed its first Israeli undergraduate
student this academic year. He is
22-year-old Yehuda Kovacs,
whose course of study is
mathematics but whose avocation
and reason for choosing Notre
Dame is fencing. Kovacs is a
former national junior fencing
champion in Israel. Wishing to
further his skills in the sport and,
in the absence of such university
programs in Israel, he wrote to 13
American schools with top-flight
fencing programs. One of the 13
was Notre Dame.
Coach Mike DeCicco showed
Kovacs' letter to University Presi-
dent Rev. Theodore Hesburgh
who, he said, was "ecstatic" at
the possibility of enrolling the col-
lege's first Israeli "We wanted
him as much as he wanted to be in
this country," said the coach.
DeCicco approached a friend.
Rabbi Yisrael Gettinger of the
Hebrew Orthodox Congregation
of South Bend, to discuss the
question of money, as there are no
fencing scholarships at Notre
Dame. Gettinger mobilized his
congregation to raise over half of
Kovacs' tuition and a great part of
his living expenses. He wrote
Kovacs that the city's Jewish com-
munity would welcome him with
open arms.
Kovacs, one of the college's 18
Jews out of a student body of
7,500, has flourished at Notre
Dame and on its fencing squad,
which also includes a Soviet
Jewish immigrant. He finished as
a runner-up in his first tourna-
ment, racked up a 29-3 record,
and recently bested a Wayne
State student who is the defen-
ding national collegiate foil
champion.
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Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Peres Tells Knesset Israel Should Welcome King Hussein's Decision
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres told
the Knesset that Israel
should welcome King Hus-
sein's decision to end his ef-
forts to bring the Palestine
Liberation Organization in-
to the peace process. The
Jordanian ruler left the door
open to negotiations and
Israel will leave the door
open because it desires
peace. Peres said.
He spoke in reply to five agenda
motions concerning Israel's reac-
tion to Hussein's speech of
February 19 in which he made
clear he could not develop a joint
peace strategy with PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat because the world of
the PLO leadership could not be
relied upon. Peres stressed that
Hussein's speech was important
because he saddled the PLO with
most of the responsibility for the
failure.
HE NOTED further that
neither Hussein in his speech nor
the PLO in its reaction blamed
Israel for the collapse of their
talks, but, rather, accused each
other. The PLO hasn't changed,
Peres said. It refuses to accept
United Nations Security Council
Resolution 242 but seeks to alter
the resolution.
Peres' upbeat response to Hus-
sein's speech was attacked from
both ends of the political spec-
trum. Rightwingers called the
King's criticism of the PLO a
"smokescreen." The far left in-
sisted that by excluding the PLO,
Hussein was excluding the
Palestinian people. According to
Ran Cohen of the Civil Rights
Movement (CRM), the PLO
represents more than 60 percent
of the Palestinians.
Peres disputed that figure but
said even if it were accurate it
would change nothing. "So I'll
speak to the other 40 percent," he
declared.
PLO SUPPORTERS in the
West Bank, meanwhile, have
launched a campaign in support of
Arafat. Rallies were held last
week at the university in
Bethlehem and at Al Najah
University in Nablus. Adver-
tisements were published in East
Jerusalem Arabic newspapers
urging Hussein not to break ties
with the PLO. Increased tension
in the territory may or may not be
related to Hussein's breach with
Arafat.
Most of it concentrated around
the Balata refugee camp in
Nablus, the largest Palestinian
refugee camp in the West Bank.
Recently, the army closed a girl's
school in the camp after a nearby
Israel Defense force position was
pelted with rocks from behind the
school walls.
A curfew was imposed on Deir
Al Khatab after rocks were
thrown at military vehicles. Rocks
were thrown at an Israeli vehicle
in Halhoul recently. A small child
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March :. 1986
Genocide Vote Would Have
Pleased Legal Scholar Lemkin
By WILLIAM KOREY
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Raphael Lemkin. the great
Polish-Jewish legal scholar,
would have been pleased by
the Senate 83-to-ll vote
ratifying the Genocide Con-
vention. "An epitaph on my
mother's grave" that is
how he had described the
treaty for which he was
largerly responsible.
If Winston Churchill called the
mass destruction of a people
because of their race or religion or
ethnic origin "a crime without a
name." Lemkin gave it a name:
"genocide." He fervetly hoped
that America would be the first to
ratify the treaty. But at his death
in 1959 the U.S. Senate had still
not given it its approval.
FOR LEMKIN. it was not only
an international juridical matter.
It was also deeply personal.
Forty-seven members of his fami-
ly, including his beloved mother,
had been massacred by the Nazis.
He was determined to prevent its
recurrence, whether against Jews
or Christians or Armenians or
dozens of others who. in his un-
finished history of genocide, he
had closely surveyed.
As the "unofficial man" at the
UN during 1946-48 Lemkin lob-
bied mightily until the General
Assembly adopted on December 9,
1948 the "Convention on the
Prevention and Punishment of the
Crime of Genocide."
Appropriately, if today
somewhat ironically, Lemkin's
oiggest backer was the U.S. Its
delegation demanded a strong and
unanimous vote before the UN
General Assembly ended its 1948
session. And the U.S. was the first
to sign the Convention two days
after it was approved.
PRESIDENT Harry Truman
sent it to the Senate for its "con-
sent" in June. 1949. The Ad-
ministration urged early Senate
action to "demonstrate to the rest
of the world that the United
States is determined to maintain
its moral leadershp in interna-
tional affairs.
But a combination of factors
halted the early drive toward
ratification: resistance from the
American Bar Association (which
was completely reversed in 1976);
a growing isolationism and
xenophobia flowing from the
Korean War and a rampaging Mc-
Carthyism; anxieties of segrega-
tionists from the Deep South; and
the Bricker movement to limit the
treaty-making authority of the
Executive. Later, only inertia and
a vague fear that ratification
would threaten U.S. sovereignty
prevented Senate action.
Sen. William Proxmire (D.,
Wise.), who delivered 3,000 pro-
Dr. William Korey is direc-
tor of International Policy
Research of the B 'nai B 'rith In-
ternational Council.
ratification speeches from the
Senate floor since 1967, observed
that "there is not a single pro-
posal that has been before the
Senate as long." The inertia was
ended when President Reagan in
September. 1984. just prior to his
speech to the B'nai convention,
demanded Senate action in order
to assist "our efforts to expand
human freedom and fight human
rights abuses around the world."
STATE DEPARTMENT
human rights specialist Elliott
Abrams told the Senate. "We
have all delayed too long" in ad-
ding "America's moral and
political prestige to this landmark
in international law."
Now that the U.S. has joined 95
other countries which have
ratified the genocide treaty, what
can be expected? Certainly, to an-
ticipate a significant reduction in
the number of instances of
genocide would be overly
sanguine. Since 1965, there have
taken place nearly a dozen in-
stances of genocide, and the inter-
national response has been
negligible.
These include the massacres of
Chinese in Indonesia (1965), Ibos
in Nigeria (1968), Bengalis in East
Pakistan (1971), and Hutus in
Burundi (1972). Especially shock-
ing was the massive slaughter of
Cambodians by the Khmer Rouge
regime in the mid-1970's, which
went unnoticed.
REALITY 's that no effective
international machinery exists for
coping with genocide. The treaty
largely depends upon national
legislation and. where the deter-
mination to prevent geno con-
tributed to the personality of the
Rebbe. Every emissary feels that
he serves in an army where the
Rebbe is its Commander-in-Chief.
One goes where the Rebbe asks
him to. One fulfills all the requests
of the Rebbe.
Come what may. a solution is
always found. One finds philan-
thropists to cover the budget ex-
penditures; one finds Jews who
help here and there. "I sought and
I found believe," the Talmud
states. When we deal with seek-
ing, one must have faith.
I am enthusiastically moved by
the Rebbes emissaries. I see them
on the battlefield. I see how they
educate children, how they speak
to estranged people. How can one
stand from the side? One must
lend a hand. One must respond by
saying, Amen.
I must add that their personal
conduct is to be admired.
Whatever they or their families
do, it is done for the sake of the
cause.
Little Expected in Wake Of
Last Week's Communist Congress
Continued from Page 5-A
enable others to take over their
jobs, housing and places at institu-
tions of higher education.
The counter arguments have
thus created the schizophrenic
Soviet attitude to Jewish
emigration.
The neshira ("drop out") pro-
blem plays little part in the
calculations of the Politburo, and
the issue is seldom discussed in
the Soviet Press.
In recent years the Soviet Union
has never closed its doors entirely
last year 1,140 Jews were
allowed to leave mainly on the
ground that those who wanted to
leave were only a small number
and that humanitarian considera-
tions were indeed valid.
The release of Anatoly Sharan-
sky does not signify any change of
policy. But the timing w signifi-
cant: a gesture in "the spirit of
Geneva" and a desire to create a
better atmosphere around the
27th Congress. The Soviets are
always sensitive on the eve of
their five-yearly gatherings.
The congress was unlikely to
discuss the Jewish problem, but
sooner or later the new Politburo
will have to confront it. It will
hardly change the character of the
Soviet regime, but a large-scale
emigration of Jews may well
follow. In the meantime, both
"quiet diplomacy" and the strug-
gle for Jewish rights on the
basis of facts must go on. There
is no place for either illusions or
pessimism.
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Friday. March 7. 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Bookcase: New Blitzer Effort
Judged A Work of 'Chutzpah'
#

A group of Arab doctors from Gaza tour the
facilities of the Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center urith Dr. Gabriel Ullmann,
deputy director general of the center (second
from left), leading the tour. The Hadassah
Medical Center, which has always had a close
working relationship with the hospitals in
Gaza, continues to treat patients in other
Mideast countries who still have no
diplomatic relations with Israel.
In Lebanon
Terrorist Drive Against Jews Intensifies
Continued from Page 4-A
served as a physician. The
Irganization of the Oppressed is
ipparently connected to the pro-
ranian Hezhullah (the Party of
Sod), as one of the Americans
teld captive by the fundamentalist
ilezhullah at the time of the TWA
lijacking reportedly saw Hallak
reating patients.
THE ORGANIZATION of the
tppressed kidnapped and
nurdered Haim Cohen and Prof,
saac Tarrab in late December. At
hat time, it threatened to kidnap
md kill additional Jews unless its
lemands that "Shiite mu-
lhidin (holy warriors)" captured
iv the Israel-backed South
_.i'hanon Army were promptly
cleascd from a detention camp in
Khiyam were met.
[brahim (Abraham) Benisti, a
Activists Stage
Hunger Strike
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Igrnup of Soviet Jewry activists
llielil a 36-hour hunger strike in Tel
[Aviv on behalf of Prisoner of Zion
I Ida Nudel.
The strike, by the "Thirty-Five
iGroup" that has campaigned for
[years for Nudel, began Tuesday
|night as another group was en-
ding a 24-hour strike outside the
headquarters of the Israeli Com-
[munist (Rakah) Party in
(Jerusalem.
The protests, part of an interna-
Itinnal student solidarity week for
ISoviet Jews, were timed to coin-
fide with the opening of the Soviet
Communist Party's 27th Con-
gress in Moscow Tuesday.
The Jerusalem protesters hand-
ed Rakah member Felicia Langer
topies of a letter from a group of
[Soviet Jews asking for the release
>f Prisoners of Zion, and a cable
from a group of Jewish mothers in
khe USSR stating: "Allow us to
live and to bring up our children in
(the State of Israel."
Meanwhile, the Knesset Aliya
and Absorption Committee has
babied the French, Italian and
T)utch Communist Party delega-
tions to the Moscow Congress ask-
ing them to raise the issue of
(Soviet Jewry at the Congress.
Blatt Reelected
I CINCINNATI (JTA) -
Robert Blatt was reelected presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of
Cincinnati at its 89th annual
Imeeting.
Lebanese Jew in his forties, and
his 68-year-old father, Yehuda,
were kidnapped in the past few
weeks. Yehuda's other son,
Youssuf, 33, had been seized in
May, 1985.
The Organization of the Op-
pressed brutally murdered
Ibrahim Benisti on Feb. 15. Ac-
cording to the Beirut police, his
body was found the morning of
Feb. 16 wrapped in blankets in a
street in west Beirut near the line
dividing the predominantly
Moslem section from Christian
east Beirut. The coroner's office
reported that Benisti's body bore
signs of torture and beatings to
the head. He was shot twice and
then strangled.
Near the body was a copy of the
statement issued by the Organiza-
tion of the Oppressed to the press,
declaring that Benisti had been "a
prominent agent" of the Mossad.
The charges were categorically
denied as "nonsense" by the
Israeli Foreign Ministry.
INDEED, none of the kidnap
victims had been involved either
in internal Lebanese politics or
the Arab-Israel conflict. Outraged
students and friends of Tarrab at-
tested that the distinguished
retired professor of mathematics
had only nominally been Jewish
and had had no connection to
Israel.
Cohen was a department store
accountant known as a kind and
gentle person, who chose not to go
to Israel, his sister-in-law.
Rosemary Cohen, declared in Los
Angeles.*l>ecause "he did not wish
to face the possibility of killing his
Arab friends in battle."
It was precisely because they
felt fully integrated in Lebanese
society and had both Moslem and
Christian friends that the kidnap
victims chose to remain in
Lebanon even after the over-
whelming majority of Lebanon s
6 000 Jews left in the years after
the 1967 Six-Day War and the
decade of internal strife following
the eruption of the civil war in
1975. Today fewer than 75
Lebanese Jews remain, most in
east Beirut.
THE TRAGIC fate of the
Benisti family is typical of the
misplaced trust of those Lebanese
Jews who remained. The family
lived in the Wadi Abu Jamil sec-
tion of Moslem west Beirut near
the main synagogue. Yehuda
Benisti operated a gift shop and
general store near the Beirut air-
port, which adjoins a Shnte and
Palestinian neighborhood.
When his other son, Youssuf,
was abducted last May 18. the
father at first did not notify the
nolice or the Jewish community,
because he believed that his
friends and customers from
within the Shiite community
would discreetly intervene on
behalf of his son and arrange for
his release. It was only toward the
end of the year, when all quiet in-
terventions had failed, that
Yehuda Benisti approached the
Jewish community in east Beirut
for help.
According to the Feb. 15 state-
ment by the Organization of the
Oppressed, they had seized
Ibrahim Benisti as well as
Yehuda and Youssuf because
"all three were part of an Israeli
spy network."
IN ITS statement, published in
An-Nahar the next day, the
Organization of the Oppressed
declared that Ibrahim had been
slain in revenge for Israel's
presence in south Lebanon, the
alleged "violation of the Al Aqsa
mosque in Jerusalem ... by the
filthy boots of Jewish Israeli oc-
cupation." and the shelling of
Shiite Moslem villages in south
Lebanon.
The fanatical Shiite group also
threatened that "all those in-
terested in having any kind of
relations with Israel" would face
"adequate measures from us." It
added that "the punishment of the
spy Ibrahim Benisti should serve
as a warning."
The latest kidnappings bring to
10 the number of Jews known to
have been abducted in the past
two years. There are hopes that
five are still alive. The Organiza-
tion of the Oppressed had earlier
claimed to be holding Elie
(Youssef) Srour, 68. who was in
charge of preparing the dead fcr
burial according to Jewish rites,
and Isaac Sasson, in his mid-60's.
a pharmaceutical executive who is
the president of the Lebanese
Jewish community. Both were
kidnapped at the end of March
1985.
ON JULY 1. 1984. Raoul Sobhi
Mizrahi, 54. an electrical engineer
who ran an electrical supply com-
pany, was kidnapped by three
armed gunmen from his apart-
ment in west Beirut. There were
no ransom demands. He was
beaten to death, and his body was
discovered on July 3. A group call-
ing itself the "National Resistance
Army The Nation's Liberation
Faction" said it had killed Mizrahi
"because he was an Israeli
agent." This was firmly denied by
his family.
Still missing is Salim Jammous.
secretary general of the Lebanese
Jewish community. He was kid-
napped on August 15. 1984.
reportedly by three armed men
who abducted him from his car
near the communal office located
in the compound of the main
synagogue m west Beirut.
Jfjfseri'irr*
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Between Washington and
Jerusalem: A Reporter's
Notebook. By Wolf Blitzer.
New York: Oxford University
Press, 1985. 259 pp. $15.95.
The author of this book is the
Washington correspondent for
.three Israeli newspapers, in-
cluding the Jerusalem Post. His
articles often appear in American
periodicals such as the Hadassah
Magazine, and he is also known to
Americans because of his frequent
appearances on the lecture circuit.
Blitzer is an American who is
fluent in Hebrew. He makes good
use of these assets in understan-
ding the subject of his book which
is the relationship between Israel
and the United States. As a
reporter, he has written about
events in both countries and their
connections to each other. These
stories form the basis of the book.
HE BEGINS by discussing two
bureaucracies: the Americans in
the State Department and the
Israelis in the Washington em-
bassy. The struggle for control
over American policy between the
career diplomats and the political
leaders is examined through
several United Nations votes on
Middle East issues. In similar
anecdotal fashion, Blitzer tells
about Israeli ambassadors to the
United States, paying particular
attention to Ephraim "Eppy"
Evron and Moshe Arens.
The superficial nature of
Blitzer's description of the Israeli
presence in the United States is
revealed by his focus on
Washington. He fails to address
the problem of rivalry among the
embassy, the UN mission and the
Consulate-General in New York,
and he doesn't even mention the
defense purchasing and economic
missions which report to the
Defense and Finance Ministries in
Israel regarding themselves as
completely separate from the em-
bassy in Washington.
A more useful discussion of the
Israeli presence in the United
States would recognize the degree
to which inter-ministerial and par-
ty rivalries in Israel are reflected
in Israeli officialdom in the United
States.
STRATEGIC cooperation bet-
ween the two countries and the
exchange of information by their
intelligence services occupy the
next two chapters. Here. Blitzer
makes out a good case for the
value that Israel has for the
United States. For example, he
points out that we have hundreds
of thousands of soldiers in Europe
and the Far East but practically
none in the Middle East, since we
can rely on Israel to protect
United States security interests.
He also mentions the military
cooperation which he calls an
"emerging alliance." The CIA and
the Mossad (its Israeli equivalent)
work with each other, but these
ties are more difficult to pin down
because of the inevitable secrecy
of intelligence agencies.
The Jonathan Pollard spy case
shows just how thin is Blitzer's
analysis, since he fails completely
to recognize the competition
among intelligence agencies
within each country. It now ap-
pears that Pollard was working
for Lekem. an intelligence agenc)
parallel to Mossad.
But the Israelis also have Shin
Bet and army intelligence ser-
vices. The United States has the
CIA, FBI, National Security
Agency and intelligence branches
of the military services. Blitzer
limits his consideration to the CIA
and the Mossad, thus missing the
complexity of these relationships
and offering a journalistic over-
simplification of what the situa-
tion actually is.
BLITZER next moves to Israel
and the Congress, following this
with two chapters on American
Jews and their influence on
United States-Israel relation-
ships. He pays particular atten-
tion to the importance of AIPAC
and its growing status within the
Jewish community, as well as its
effectiveness in influencing
United States policy in the Middle
East.
The rest of the book proceeds
without logical sequence and with
no organizing principle. Blitzer
writes about the media, "think
tanks," unions, blacks and Chris-
tians. He then winds up with three
chapters on Kissinger and Israel.
Carter and Camp David, and
Reagan and Israel. He presents no
new revelations despite his in-
troductory assertion that the book
enables him to print material
which was previously "off the
record."
The book ends abruptly with a
quotation from Reagan, promis-
ing that the United States will
make sure that Israel will not lose
its "qualitative edge" over the
Arabs. There is no conclusion and
no effort to draw any insights
from the incidents which Blitzer
describes.
AS AN experienced journalist.
Blitzer writes well, and the book is
easy to read, but there are too
many repetitions and too many
references to himself as the reci-
pient of news. Over and over
again. Blitzer uses phrases such as
"in an interview with me," he told
me." "I was talking with ." The
worst instance of self-
aggrandizement is in the preface
which tells about a news con-
ference held by Anwar Sadat in
Washington in April. 1977.
Blitzer asked a question about
direct contact with Israel, and
Sadat replied that he had no objec-
tion to such contacts. This inter-
change "triggered the chain of
events which led to his decision"
(to visit in November. 1977).
Such chutzpah by Blitzer is
enough to turn the reader against
the book but. if one skips the
preface and persists, there are oc-
casional nuggets which hold some
interest.
Kaye Elected Prexy
TORONTO (JTA) David
Kaye of Westlake Village, Calif,
was elected president for 1986 of
United Synagogue Youth at its
35th annual international conven-
tion attended here recently by
some 1.200 high school students
from all over North America.
Israel's Herzog Sent Greetings
To Aquino After Swearing-in
JERUSALEM (JTA) President Chaim Herzog
sent a message of congratulations to Filipino leader Cor-
azon Aquino after she was sworn in as the new President
last week. Israel was one of the first countries to recognize
the new government. The Philippine Embassy in Israel an-
nounced that it supported Aquino. Herzog, in his message,
praised Aquino and the Filipino people for their devotion to
democracy.






*
Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Despite Fears
Travel to Israel Is Safer Than One Year Ago
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Despite many travelers'
fears, a journey to Israel is
safer now than a year ago,
and total travel to Israel
was up in 1985, according to
Hedy Shulman, public rela-
tions director, and Uzi Gaf-
ni, Southern Regional direc-
tor, of the Israeli Ministry of
Tourism.
Shulman and Gafni made their
comments at a luncheon in Miami
last week hosted by the Ministry
at the Pavillion Hotel.
SHULMAN STRESSED the
need to communicate the message
to South Florida's Jewish com-
munity, and the Christian
pilgrimage market as well, that
flying to Israel out of Miami on El
Al is safer than from any other
domestic airport that El Al
serves.
"We've got our own security
over here at Miami Interna-
tional," Gafni said, adding that
passengers picking up baggage
and tickets are always scrutinized.
When reminded that Miami In-
ternational has been the jumping
off point for more American hi-
jacking than any other airport,
Shulman shrugged it off. "When I
flew down here yesterday, I said
to a friend, 'If I end up in Havana
I'll bring you a cigar!' "
ACCORDING to Shulman. the
Federal Aviation Administration
has strengthened security
measures throughout the United
States. "I have no way of knowing
what degree of success they've
had," she said, "but the FA A* has
beefed up security at all the major
airports," as well as requesting
Peres Hails
Aquino
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Shimon
Peres has sent a warm
message of congratulations
to the new President of the
Philippines, Corazon
Aquino.
"... your victory is the victory
of democracy in the Philippines.
We here in Israel followed your
struggle with concern. We knew
that the great majority of the
Filipino nation stood at your
side."
The Premier praised Aquino's
"unusual courage," and said
Israel had known all along that
justice would triumph in the end.
"We were enchanted by the way
you pursued the struggle ... to
improve the lot of your people,"
Peres stated.
The tenor and tone of the
Premier's cable transcended
regular diplomatic practice, and
reflected in this way the sincere
sense of gratification which most
Israelis feel at the outcome of the
power struggle in the Philippines.
Relations between the two coun-
tries were warm under former
President Marcos and Israeli
officials believe they will be no
less cordial under President
Aquino.
Israeli experts work in the
Philippines in agriculture and
other fields, and a surprisingly
large number of ordinary Israelis
have visited as tourists. Invariably
they have found a warm and
hospitable country, whose people
relate without ideological
Ereconceptions to Israel and the
lideast conflict.
Uzi Gafni
foreign airports to do likewise.
As an example, she described an
experience traveling from Israel
to Los Angeles. In all her years of
traveling, she had never failed to
pass the cursory security ex-
aminations in most airports. Yet,
when her suitcase was passed
through the scanner, an opaque
shadow was revealed.
"Apparently my travel iron
showed up on the screen as
something they couldn't identify,"
Shulman said. By the time they
finished their search, she was sure
she'd missed her flight.
"I just stood there laughing at
myself as I was being nervous,
thinking, 'This is what they're
supposed to be doing which they
have never done before in all of my
travels half the time they're not
even paying attention. But they
are really looking now. They're
paying much more attention."
El Al has scheduled more non-
stop flights to avoid terrorist in-
filtration during ground service
and refueling, according to Gafni.
So has TWA, Shulman added.
When pressed to reveal any new
tactics, she demurred. "Actually,
El Al does not discuss specific
security measures. They just do
what they have to do."
PUBLIC RELATIONS pro-
blems have plagued overseas
travel promoters because of the
exaggeration of terrorist in the
press, Shulman believes. "People
are literally terrified," she said.
"They are terrified to go
anywhere except close to home,
where nothing has been in the
press."
Doesn't that prove that ter-
rorism works?
"If you allow it to, absolutely,"
Shulman said. "That's what we
want to get into the press. We're
playing into the hands of the ter-
rorists by at home or diverting
cruises suddenly from all parts of
the world. In that case, we're
"simply perpetuating what the
terrorist is trying to accomplish."
Although ship travel in the
Eastern Mediterranean has drop-
ped off, there has never been a
problem at either of Israel's major
ports, Haifa or Ashdod, according
to Gazni. "There is tight securi-
ty," he said, "the same kind as in
the airports."
SOUTH FLORIDA senior
citizens comprise 80 percent of
the total number of travelers to
Israel, but according to Shulman,
"they are the first to go when
they think it's safe, and the first
to cancel when they think it's
not." Twenty-five thousand
toruists visited Israel from
Florida last year, and 80 percent
of those were from Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach Coun-
Hedy Shulman
ties, she said, but April bookings
in 1986 are down from last year.
American tourism to Israel was
up six percent over last year,
Shulman said, which was lower
than projections. However,
overall tourism was up 15 percent!
mostly from large numbers of
Germans, British and French
making up for the American
shortfall.
"Our commercials that have
been running here really encap-
sulate the message that we are
trying to get across to the
American public," she said.
"Israel is an incredibly safe, warm
destination, and Israelis do view-
Americans as friends. It's almost
an extended family as far is Israel
is concerned."
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Vaccine Refused
Jewish Group's Aid Effort Stymied by UK
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An effort by the American
Jewish World Service
(AJWS) organization to
send some $150,000 worth
of scarce meningitis vaccine
to Burkina Faso was
thwarted by OXFAM
United Kingdom, which
refused to accept the
medical supplies for
distribution in the West
African nation, it was learn-
ed here recently. Instead,
the medical supplies were
sent by AJWS to Nepal to
meet health needs there.
OXFAM UK, one of six loosely-
affiliated though independent OX-
FAM offices working in 72 coun-
tries, appeared to have refused
ihe vaccine out of fear said to
be unfounded that the govern-
ment of Burkina Faso would pre-
vent its distribution because its
source was a Jewish relief
organization, according to of-
ficials representing OXFAM UK
and the AJWS.
DEREK WARREN, press of-
ficer for OXFAM UK, said the
ilecision to reject the vaccine was
taken on a local level by a
representative in Ouagadougou,
the capital of Burkina Faso,
formerly Upper Volta. There was
fear that the origin of the vaccine
would cause it to be impounded,
Warren said.
Kahane Files
Complaint
JERUSALEM (JTA) Rab-
bi Meir Kahane filed a complaint
with the Supreme Court alleging
that the Israel Broadcasting
Authority (IBA) is discriminating
against him and his Kach Party.
Kahane's lawyer contended that
the IBA is denying the controver-
sial Knesset member air-time and
thereby deprives him of freedom
of speech and a public platform.
The IBA, a State-owned
autonomous agency, conceded
that it "distinguishes between
Kahane and other members of the
Knesset" but maintained that this
does not constitute discrimina-
tion. According to the IBA,
Kahane's extremist views are
"contrary to the spirit of the
Broadcasting Law."
Kahane and Kach have been
widely denounced as racist for ad-
vocating the expulsion of all
Arabs from Israel and the ad-
ministered territories and other
measures aimed against Israeli
I Arabs.
President Chaim Herzog, ad-
Idressing high school students in
I the context of a study day on
[democracy Feb. 19, warned
lagainst "dangerous ideologies
Ithat recall the darkest age of
I humanity and of the annals of our
[people." He referred to
|"Kahanism" in that respect.
Stokley's Back
Continued from Page 1-A
LDiamondback quoted him as
| ^ymg.
Protesters at the Jewish
I students' rally were joined by a
|;,e*'sh Defense Organization
l(JD0) contingent from New York
[headed by its leader, Mordechai
ILevy. Levy claimed that Jewish
Tstudents were assaulted physical-
ly as well as verbally, a charge not
confirmed by other student
sources. But Jewish students ex-
pressed concern over a swastika
irawn on the door of the Jewish
Fampus monthly, Mitzpeh about
nree weeks ago.
I.
"If it was impounded at the air-
port, it would be no good at the
time of release," Warren said in a
telephone interview from Oxford,
England, with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. He noted
that the vaccine must remain
refrigerated. Burkina Faso does
not maintain diplomatic relations
with Israel.
Both OXFAM UK and AJWS
officials indicated they hoped the
incident was now behind the
organizations, and that the groups
will work with one another in
future endeavors. "OXFAM UK is
very sorry for the way the situa-
tion was handled," Warren said.
Laurence Simon, president of
AJWS, wrote a letter to Frank
Judd, director of OXFAM UK,
protesting the incident which
prevented the much-needed
medicine from being transferred
to Burkina Faso. He described the
incident as "scandalous," in a Jan.
Friday, March 7^1986/^16 Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
AJWS, based in Cambridge,
Massachusetts, was founded in
May, 1985. It has concentrated its
humanitarian programs, primarily
technical and community health-
related initiatives, in five coun-
tries. Last September, it airlifted
$750,000 in medical supplies to
Mozambique, in an action dubbed,
"Operation L'Chayim."
The incident involving OXFAM
UK occurred late last year after
an urgent appeal was issued from
OXFAM UK's health unit seeking
the vaccine for meningitis for use
in Burkina Faso. According to
Simon, AJWS filed the ap-
propriate gift documents in order
to pave the way for delivery of the
medicine.
8 letter to Judd, obtained by JTA.
FURTHERMORE, Simon
discussed the incident with Lean-
dre Bassole, the Burkina Faso
Ambassador to the United Na-
tions. According to Simon, the
Ambassador said that in spite of
his government's differences with
Israel, this in no way would have
any bearing on the acceptance of
humanitarian aid provided by an
American Jewish relief
organization.
Drop in to Carteret's
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Kohl Says Anti-Semitism Can Return to Germany
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) -
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has
acknowledged the danger
that anti-Semitism could
reoccur in Germany, but his
ruling Christian Democratic
Union (CDU) appears
unanimously opposed to a
debate on the subject being
urged by coalition as well as
opposition members of
parliament.
Kohl told the Bundestag last
Thursday that everybody is aware
of the danger of recurrent anti-
Semitism though he warned
against generalization. His con-
cern, he said, was over isolated in-
cidents, not an anti-Semitic wave.
The Chancellor also reaffirmed
that reconciliation and solidarity
with Jewish fellow-citizens and
close relations with Israel will re-
main principles of West Ger-
many's policy.
BUT THE isolated incidents
which trouble Kohl have led to
calls for an urgent debate.
Hildegard Hamm-Bruecher of the
Free Democratic Party (FDP), a
coalition partner, was the first to
raise the subject. She said that
while there is no upsurge of anti-
Semitism, there are alarming
tendencies in that direction. She
referred to recent remarks by
respectable political figures which
outraged Jews and non-Jews.
Hitherto, only neo-Nazis are on
record for making such remarks,
she noted.
The FDP member was referring
to the statement last month by
Hermann Fellner, a ranking
member of the (Bavarian) Chris-
tian Social Union (CSU)
Bundestag faction, that Jews who
seek reparations from German
firms that used them as slave
laborers during World War II
create the impression that "Jews
are quick to show up when money
jingles in German cashboxes."
That remark was followed by
the disclosure that Mayor
Wilederich von Mierbach of
Korschenbroich in North Rhine-
Westphalia, a CDU member, told
his town council's budget commit-
tee last December that "a few rich
Jews should be slain" in order to
balance the budget.
THOSE REMARKS had
strong impact on many Bundesta!
members. Bundestag Vice JW
dent Annemarie Renger of the rlrt'
position Social Democratic P
(SPD) observed Thursday S
Germany's relations with Je
and with Israel are a barometer o
democracy in this country *
representative of the opposition
Green Party warned that 5
Semitism is still alive in Germany
and was to some extent the con*
quence of trying to suppress and
cover up the Nazi era.
Werner Nachmann. chairman of
West Germany's Jewish com
munity, said last week that he wU
seek meetings with rankine
representatives of all major par
ties to discuss the issue.
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J
s
T
s
A
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Federation
To Stage Post
Super Sunday
Phonathon
Following the most successful
Super Sunday/Super Week effort
in the history of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign, a
phonathon will be held on Sunday,
March 16 at the Federation
Building.
"The purpose of the March 16
effort is to obtain pledges from
our contributors whom we didn't
reach during Super Sunday and
Super Week," noted General
Campaign Chairman Aaron
Podhurst. We've established a
goal of $150,000 for the day, one
we can easily attain and surpass if
we have enough volunteers."
Podhurst noted that fifty phone
lines will be available to make
calls. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. and from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Brunch will be available to the
morning session, and a kosher piz-
Continued on Page 3-B
Rabbi's 'Installation Weekend' At Temple
Beth Sholom To Be A Musical Celebration
The continuity of the past and the future
"M'Dor L'Dor" will be celebrated at Temple
Beth Sholom this weekend when Gary Glickstein is
installed as rabbi of the congregation. It will be the
first such installation since Senior Founding Rabbi
Leon Kronish took the helm of the 44 year-old con-
gregation on Miami Beach.
Temple Beth Sholom, renowned for its cultural
presentations by the Great Artists Series, will
celebrate the new rabbi's installation with an
elaborate musical weekend.
Following a Friday evening Shabbat dinner for
the temple board and their families, the University
of Miami singers, led by Danny Green, will per-
form Leonard Bernstein's "Chichester Psalms,"
commissioned in 1965 by the British cathedrals of
Chichester, Winchester and Salisbury for their an-
nual summer festival.
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, president of the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, will
perform the formal installation, beginning at 8:15
p.m. Senior Founding Rabbi Leon Kronish also
will play an important role in the celebration.
As a rabbinic student at the College-Institute's
California School Rabbi Glickstein first studied
theology under Dr. Gottschalk. who was the Dean.
While a senior at Hebrew Union College he worked
as an office assistant under Gottschalk, learning
the administrative skills necessary to lead a major
congregation.
"It was a very small student body and we had a
Continued on Page 2-B
Legislature To Study Bill Aiming To
Deny Liquor Licenses To Restricted Clubs
Rabbi Gary Glickstein
Elaine Bloom won a landslide
victory in Tuesday's special
election for State House of
Representative, District 10U.
When the Florida State
Legislature gets into the
heat of its new session,
members will be considering
Senate Bill I proposed by
Sen. Jack Gordon (D.,
Miami Beach).
The bill would deny liquor
licenses to clubs that discriminate
against blacks, Jews, Latins and
women. Current count shows that
25 of the state's 40 senators are
co-sponsors. It is modeled on the
similar law in Maine that aims to
protect people against discrim-
mination in the grounds of race,
religion, sex, or national origin.
According to Sen. Gordon, clubs
with non-discriminatory member-
ship policies would merely have to
file a letter with the state to that
effect, and then the state would
pursue the matter further only if
someone registered a complaint
against the facility in question.
"I SEE this as a very fun-
damental question," Gordon said.
"When you look at people as a
group rather than as individuals
you demean them. That's what
apartheid does, and that's what
the Holocaust did."
But managers of private clubs in
South Florida and officers of
those clubs don't agree. "You
can't legislate whom a man will
spend his social hours with," said
George Matthews, who is on the
board of directors of Palm Beach's
Governor's Club. "I have talked to
no member of any club who thinks
it's a good bill."
At Riviera Country Club <>f Cor-
al Gables, which has no black or
Jewish members according to a
survey by the Miami Herald last
year, Richard Fox, general
manager, in a letter to members,
argues that "We believe passage
(of Senate Bill I) would be
disastrous for this club and all
other clubs in Florida."
Anil the National Clubs Associa-
tion, a lobbying group based in
Washington, calls Sen. Gordon's
bill "an unconstitutional violation
of the freedoms of association and
privacy of members of private
clubs in Florida."
AS SEN. GORDON sees it,
"There's going to be a real trouble
Continued on Page 3-B
Annual Purim Ball
Moshe Rivlin Guest Speaker At JNF
The Jewish National
Fund-Keren Kayemeth an-
nual traditional Purim Ball
will be held on Sunday noon,
Mar. 23, at the Konover
Hotel. According to Rabbi
Irving Lehrman, chairman
of the JNF Foundation, the
event will be dedicated to
establishing the Fund's Kin-
neret Development Project.
Honorees at the Purim Ball will
be Cecilia Grunhut. who is
scheduled to be crowned Purim
Queen Esther; and fcditn
Hochhauser and Florence
Waldman. princesses. The JNi-
Mordecai will be Abraham
Hon. Moshe Rivlin
Grunhut, president of the Jewish
National Fund of Greater Miami.
ZEV W. KOGAN. president .f
the JNF Southern Region. '
nounced that guest speak." te
function will be Moshe Rivlin.
Continued from Page 15-B
Abraham Grunhut
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
dTewislfo Floridi
Miami, Florida Friday, March 7,1986 Se


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Rabbi Swift To Be Speaker
At Shul Of Bal Harbour
Rabbi Isaac L. Swift of
:nglewood. New Jersey, rabbinic
scholar and orator, will be the
keynote speaker at the Fourth
Annual Banquet of the Shul of Bal
Harbour on Wednesday evening,
in the Eden Roc Hotel, at 6:30
p.m.
Rabbi Emeritus of Congrega-
tion Ahavath Torah in
Englewood, Rabbi Swift served as
a rabbi of Sydney, Australia, and
as vice-president of the Zionist
Federation of Australia and New
Zealand prior to coming to the
United States.
The banquet gathering will also
hear messages from Rabbi Sholom
D. Lipskar, spiritual leader of the
Shul of Bal Harbour and from
Sam Greenberg, founder of the
three-year-old synagogue.
The following will be presented
annual awards for significant ser-
vice contributions to the con-
gregation: Theodore Atlas
Outstanding Service Award:
Gabriel Levine Humanitarian
Service Award; Morris Resnick
Leadership Award; Pearl Gelman
"Woman of Valor" Award;
Sidney Feigenbaum Ritual Ser-
vices Award; and Marc H.
Sheridan Outstanding Aleph
Service Award.
Rabbi Isaac L. Swift
Dinner program chairman will
be Arthur Slutsky, one of the
three persons chairing the ar-
rangements. Other chairpersons
are Mrs. Pearl Gelman and Abe
Stein.
Other members of the planning
committee are Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Atlas. Mr. and Mrs.
Elias Barnatan. Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Feigenbaum. Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Flyer. Dr. and Mrs. Shmuel
Katz, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Kimerling, Mrs. Chani Lipskar,
Mr. and Mrs. Moises Pancer. Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Resnick. Mr. and
Mrs. Lester Rhine. Mrs. Arthur
Slutsky. and Mrs. Lillian Strudler.
Rav Meir Schlesinger Of
Yeshivat Sha'alvim Visits Miami
Rav Meir Schlesinger. renown-
ed Rosh Hayeshiva of Israel's
Yeshivat Sha'alvim, will visit the
Miami area during the weekend of
Parshat Vayakhel, March 7-9. Rav
Schlesinger is the founder of
Sha'alvim, whose students com-
bine intensive Torah study with
military service in the Israel
Defense Forces. Sha'alvim
students and alumni have been
noted for their accomplishments
both in the IDF and in Jewish
scholarship and communal
service.
A reception in honor of Rav
Schlesinger, a towering Torah
scholar and educator, will be held
at the home of Rabbi and Mrs.
Chaim Messinger. Miami Beach,
on Saturday evening, at 9 p.m.
The Messingers' son, Shlomo, is
Rav Meir Schlesinger
currently a second-year student in
Sha'alvim's highly regarded
Overseas Division at the Yeshivat
Hesder.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation recent-
ly held its Annual Builders. Real Estate.
Finance and Allied Trades Division Dinner
on behalf of the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency FundJProject Renewal-Or
Akiva Campaign. Shown above, from Ujft,
Ezra Katz. chairman of the Builders, Krai
Estate, Finance and Allied Trades D\
Stephen Bittel. chairman oftht Young Leader
Rabbi's Installation
Continued from Page 1-B
very close relationship." Rabbi Glickstein said of
the man he considers to be his mentor.
The installation also is a first for Rabbi Glicks-
tein. "My first position was as assistant rabbi at
Rockdale Temple in Cincinnati. Rockdale did not
install rabbis. At Temple Sinai in Worcester. Ma.
we were a struggling young congregation.
Somehow time just slipped by and I was never
installed.
"For both the temple and me this is a new ex-
perience. I'm very excited," Rabbi Glickstein said,
"With the support of Rabbi Leon Kronish 1 have
been able to begin my tenure here on such a happy
and productive note."
Services that evening will include original music
written by Rabbi Glickstein and arranged for the
Temple Beth Sholom choir by cantor David Con-
viser. An Oneg Shabbat will follow.
Students through the eighth grade will par-
ticipate in leading the Saturday morning service.
ship Council Campaign Committee Buii^A
Real Estate, Finance and AIIted Trades buA
sion; Ben Holloway. guest of honor; SttA
Crisman; Rita Holloway; Mnriel HeminnJi
Judy Wetter; the Very Revert .. p^\
Morton, honorary eommittet member; m\
Sherwood Woody) Weiser v-mitff
tee chairman
beginning at 10:45 a.m. The sermon will beoffmll
by Rabbi Glickstein's longtime friend. Wt\
Michael Zedek. of Kansas City. Missouri's B'
Jehudah congregation.
"Almost ten years ago, when Rabbi Zedeknl
installed at B'Nai Jehudah, I was present. Aril
now he helps complete our cycle. Rabbi GlicksaJ
observed.
The Rabbi's family from California will fly mt|
"celebrate this new beginning
A Saturday evening Havdalah reception for j
pie members will be followed by a Havdalah l
vice led by members of the youth grwpi|
BESHTY and Junior BESHTY
Also as part of the weekend celebration the T|
pie Beth Sholom Sisterhood have arranged in L'
a.m. Sunday brunch at to introduce the new R|
bitzen Joan Glickstein to temple members.
Later that afternoon the Chamber Music Sooff I
of Lincoln Center will performing the temple S|
tuary as part of the "Sundays at 4" concert ami
'U;
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Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Solomon Named to Federation's
Planning and Budgeting Dept.
Ijacob Solomon has been ap-
|inte 1 the Planning and Budgeting
Apartment of the Greater Miami
fwish Federation announced
arming and Budget Chairman,
In Kislak.
Solomon, who has served as
Tiociate director of the depart-
fent since 1983, succeeds Jeffrey
ein. who has been named the ex-
utive director of the Palm
ch Federation.
Solomon holds a masters degree
Social Work from Yeshiva
diversity's Wurzweiler School of
[rial Work. His studies concen-
fted on community social work,
i he was the recipient of a
.deration Executive Recruit-
lint and Education Program
IEREP) scholarship. His
aster's thesis focused on
(deration responses to the
rish poor.
.olomon will be responsible for
Brseeing a department which
rks closely with a large net-
.rk of community lay leaders.
Jrough the Planning and
dgeting committee structure,
deration allocates more than
. million dollars to thirty local
neficiary agencies, national and
erseas organizations and the
feted Jewish Appeal.
In his position as associate
ector, Solomon staffed several
jimittees including the Subcom-
Etee on Education, Culture and
jligion, the Subcommittee on
vish Community Centers, and
j Agency Administrative Prac-
es Committee. He was also in-
Phonathon
| Continued from Page 1-B
party will await those
unteering during the evening
ITS.
^odhurst indicated that calls
be made to all campaign divi-
ns including the trades and pro-
tons, the Alliance Division, the
nens Division, the Young
idership campaign, the Latin
Hsion and Special Gifts. "It is
peal that we reach these poten-
| contributors and secure their
said Podhurst. "Other
lerations in South Florida will
holding their own Super Sun-
I on March 16, and we feel that
j Federation has the opportuni-
i make this a great day for the
re South Florida region as we
apt to do all we can to meet
fish needs."
ny individual who wishes to
fcnteer for the March 16
ithon can do so by contacting
Jreater Miami Jewish Federa-
or simply come to
eration Building on Ms'
Jacob Solomon
timately involved in Federation's
Long Range Planning Process
which was concluded in 1984.
Through a series of subcommit-
tees, Miami Jewish community
leaders mapped a blueprint for
growth into the next decade which
is currently in the implementation
stage.
Commenting on Solomon's ap-
pointment, Kislak noted "Jacob
Solomon possesses vast amounts
of knowledge related to the com-
munal process of planning and
budgeting. He has had extensive
contact with a wide variety of
Jewish agencies and organiza-
tions. Our Federation is fortunate
to have such a seasoned profes-
sional overseeing the department.
Gralnik To Kick-Off
Evangelical Jewish
Dialogue At Prayer Service
William A. Gralnick, Southeast
Regional director will kick-off the
American Jewish Committee's
Evangelical-Jewish dialogue with
an address at a prayer service at
the Key Biscayne Presbyterian
Church on Wednesday evening at
7 p.m.
The formal two-day conference
will take place Thursday and Fri-
day, March 20 and 21 and will be
sponsored by the American
Jewish Committee, the Key Bis-
cayne Presbyterian Church, Tem-
ple Beth Sholom, and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Keynoting the conference will
be Dr. Marvin Wilson and Rabbi
Alan Mittleman, both of whom
will speak on Thursday evening at
7:30 p.m. at the church on the sub
ject, "Jews and Evangelicals A
Definition by the Book."
On Friday morning, at Temple
Beth Sholom, Jerusalem, Pro-
selytizing, and Conversion are
among those topics to be
discussed.
Luncheon and an afternoon post
discussion will take place, follow-
ed by evening services at Temple
Beth Sholom with Rev. Steven
Brown delivering the sermon.
KDOOOOOOO

-
Appointment
SNVER (JTA) Sheldon
ihauser, executive director of
[Allied Jewish Federation of
ver, received a Humanitarian
from the Martin Luther
t, Jr. Colorado Holiday Com-
[sion for having been
oughout the years an in-
tigable advocate for human
Steinhauser served as
ar of the Anti-Defamation
ne of B'nai B'rith office here
1957-1986.
iquor Licenses
ontinued from Page 1-B
ng this because the clubs are
nting quite a campaign.
r ve managed to get everyone
Hd about their constitutional
i being threatened."
t Gordon believes that the bill
n't take away anyone's right
xdation. I just don't see why
i to help you get drunk while
Kercise that right"

Give Honor Unto Whom Honor is Due

(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
Jewish National Fund Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
Tribute Banquet
In Honor Of
Distinguished Quest Speaker
!.-.. BJ
Leon Schuster
For 50 Years of Dedicated Service to
Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
In Celebration of his 80th Birthday
PARTICIPATING CONGREGATIONS
Cuban Hebrew Congregation.... Rabbi Barry J. Konovitch
Sergio Grobler, President
Temple Menorah...............Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Harvey Abramson, President
Temple Moses...................Rabbi Amram Amselem
Juan Matalon, President
i
i
i
Hon. Moshe Rlvlin
World Chairman Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
Mrs. Harvey Abramson
Bin. Margot Backer
Mr. and Mrs. Moiaes Bonder
Mr. Jack Cheater
Mr. and Mrs. Fima Falic
Mrs. Cyrla Farber
Mr. Sabeto Garazi
Mr. and Mrs. Salomon Garazi
Mr. and Mrs. Saul Ginsburg
BANQUET COMMITTEE
Mr. and Mrs. Raul Gorfinkel
Mrs. Sergio Grobler
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Gutt
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Huppert
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Klaiman
Mrs. Eva B. Kokiel
Mrs. Leika Koxolchyk
Mr. and Mrs. Moises Kriger
Mr. and Mrs. Moises Levin
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Luski
Mrs. Juan Matalon
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Minaki
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Olemberg
Mr. and Mrs. Julio Schniadoski
Mrs. Sabina Schniadoski
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Terner
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Terner
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Parks and Shevin Co-Chair ADL
Women of Achievement Luncheon
So. Fla. Rabbis Participate In Confab On Israel Tourisr
Jerome C. Berlin, Chairman of
the Florida Regional Board of the
Anti-Defamation League, along
with Jerome B. Homer, Chairman
of the Florida Society of Fellows,
announce that Arva Parks and
Myrna Shevin have agreed to
serve as luncheon co-chairpersons
for the Anti-Defamation Leagues
first annual Woman of Achieve-
ment Award Luncheon. This
award will be presented to the
First Lady of Florida, Adele
Graham, wife of Florida Governor
Bob Graham at the League's Lun-
cheon to be held on Monday.
March 17. at the Pavillion Hotel,
at noon.
Mrs. Graham was raised in
Miami Shores and attended Miami
Edison High School. She married
Bob Graham in 1959. when they
were students at the University of
Florida. The Graham's moved to
Cambridge. Massachusetts where
Bob Graham attended Harvard
Law School. Adele received her
degree at Boston University, and
for two years taught English and
History in the public schools of
Wellesley. Massachusetts. The
Grahams returned to the Miami
area where her husband and his
older brother. Bill, developed
Miami Lakes.
As first Lady. Mrs. Graham has
been extremely active and her
volunteer work has been exten-
sive and varied. Some of the
highlights of Mrs. Graham's ac-
complishments include, leading a
Junior League project to clean up
the Miami River, tutoring at
Miami Lakes Elementary School.
serving as the honorary Chairper-
son for the Aging and Adult Ser-
vices State Advisory Council, and
is on the Board of WPBT-Channel
2 and the Beaux Arts Board.
The first Lady's other communi-
ty services include serving as
Honorary Chairperson for the
1980 International Year of the
Child: the Florida House located
Jewish Agency
To Appeal
Court Ruling
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Jewish Agency is expected to ap
peal a Jerusalem magistrate's rul-
ing that Binyanei Haooma.
Jerusalem's convention center,
cannot deny Rabbi Meir Kahane's
extremist Kach Party the right to
hold its convention there next
week after agreeing to rent the
premises to Kach.
Zionist leaders who learned of
the rental agreement after the
fact were outraged. Leon Dulzin.
chairman of the Jewish Agency
and World Zionist Organization
Executives, declared that the
Zionist movement would not serve
as the platform for an "anti-
Zionist, anti-democratic body"
such as Kach.
The WZO Executive subse-
quently adopted a resolution to
cancel the rental agreement. The
Binyanei Haooma is owned by the
Jewish agency.
Kach appealed to the courts,
and the chief magistrate. Judge
Aharon Simha, found in its favor.
He said the political views espous
ed by Kahane's party had no bear-
ing on its legitimate right to rent
public premises.
Altiva Levinsky, Jewish Agency
treasurer, said recently that he
hoped the Agency's legal advisors
would know how to tndle the
matter. An appeal a higher
court to overrule Juage Simha is
the most likely step.
Five rabbis from the Greater
Miami area have been taking part
this week in a special North
American Rabbinic Conference on
Tourism in Israel, which was call-
ed on short notice, as part of the
new State of Israel Bond effort to
help expand the number of
visitors to Israel and thereby fur-
ther strengthen Israel's economy.
Rabbis from this area who are
attending the conference include:
Mayer Abramowitz of Temple
Menorah in Miami Beach; David
B. Saltzman of the Aventura
Jewish Center in North Miami
Beach: Solomon Schiff of Miami
Beach; Amram Amselem of
Sephardic Congregation of
Florida in Miami Beach; and
Rubin R. Dobin of Young Israel of
Sunny Isles in Miami Beach.
In the course of the three-day
conference, the rabbis met with
Prime Minister Shimon Peres,
President Chaim Heraog, Finance
Minister Yitzhak Moda'i, Tourism
Minister Avraham Sharir, Mayor
of Tel Aviv Shlomo Lahat and
senior representative of the hotel,
travel and tourism industries.
The conference was held under
the auspices of the Israel Bond
National Rabbinic Cabinet, with
the cooperation of "Operation In-
dependence," the Israel Ministry'
of Tourism. El Al Airlines and the
Synagogue Council of America.
"Operation Independence" is a
joint program by the Government
Comptroller Lewis Returns Overpaid
Student Fees To Rightful Owners
of Israel and prominent business
and commuatf! leaders abroad
whose aim is to help expand
tourism, trade and investment in
Israel.
Rabbi Stanley Davids 0f
Worcester, Mass., National Chair-
man of the Israel Bond Rabbinic
Cabinet, led the delegation with
co-chairmen Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, Rabbi Reuven Bulb
of Ottawa and Rabbi Pesach
Levovitz of Lake wood. N.J.
Noting that tourism is Israel's
biggest source of earnings of
foreign revenue. Rabbi Davids
said, "Last year, tourists brought
$1.4 billion to Israel and provided
a living for 50,000 Israeli families.
Our purpose is to motivate people
to visit Israel as well as to
organize tourist groups from our
congregations and communities.
The Bond Organization, through
the National Rabbinic Cabintt, is
pleased to participate in this key
program to strengthen Israel's
economy."
Adele Graham
in Washington D.C.; the Towle
House; Freedom for Ida Nudel;
and the Florida Commission for
the State of Women.
In the field of art. Mrs. Graham
has obtained renowned artwork
for the Mansion, and has also been
actively involved in the Mansion
Foundation, which she created to
provide money from the private
sector to maintain and enhance
the historic value of the public
rooms for the decent program
that she established at the
Mansion.
In December 1982. Barry
University conferred upon Mrs.
Graham the Honorary Degree of
Doctor of Laws in recognition of
her dedicated service as wife,
mother, educator and concerned
citizen.
TALLAHASSEE Thousands of
dollars in overpaid college student
fees have been refunded to the
students by Florida Comptroller
Gerald Lewis, the Comptroller's
Office announces, and there's
more to be returned.
The money is being forwarded
to Lewis' office by nine state
universities and 28 community
colleges. The University of South
Florida has already turned over
$346,000 to Lewis. Of that
amount, more than $10,000 has
been refunded to about 200
former students. Other schools
are in the process of turning funds
over to the Comptroller.
"We'd like to be able to refund
all of this money, but we need the
former students' help." said
Lewis. He continued. "If you
think you might be eligible for a
refund, all you have to do is write
to me and tell me your name as it
was listed in college records and
your social security number. Our
office will do the research and
notify you of the results."
Lewis has asked that the col-
leges comply with the law and for-
ward the funds to his office.
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Vandalism To Be
TV Panel Subject
Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Cantor Stern To Appear In Concert
Temple Shir Ami was vandaliz-
ed two weeks ago, when a
swastika and other graffiti defac-
ed a sign announcing the temple's
construction plans.
Rabbi Brett Goldstein, spiritual
leader of Temple Shir Ami, and
president of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association, will join
other members of a dialogue
group in discussion of "Trends in
Anti-Semitism" to be aired on the
television program, "Still Small
Voice," on Sunday morning, Mar.
9, at 7:30 a.m.
Joining him on the panel will be
Arthur Teitelbaum, Southern
area director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith; Julie Russin, assistant area
director of the American Jewish
Committee; and Rabbi Marvin
Rose, spiritual leader of Temple
Beth El of North Bay Village.
Members of Temple Shir Ami's
youth group are now assisting in
the resurfacing of the defaced
sign announcing construction of
the Temple building later this spr-
Moshe Stern, cantorial artist,
will appear in concert on Sunday,
March 9 at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth
Shmuel, Cuban-Hebrew
Congregation.
Born in Budapest in 1935. Can-
tor Stern was a child prodigy who
performed at the Musical
Academy. He continued his
musical studies in Jerusalem after
World War II.
Besides cantorial pieces, he also
performs numbers from the
literature, Yiddish folk songs,
modern Hebrew songs, and
operatic arias.
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
ing. Members of the nearby
Calusa Presbyterian Church have
also pledged to lend a hand with
the reconstruction project in the
South Dade Sunset neighborhood.
Ahuva Retter To Be Honored At
Hebrew Academy Gala Event
The Hebrew Academy Choir
together with the Academy Dance
Troupe, will portray in song and
dance the theme "Helping
Hands" at a gala life membership
and Binyan Brick luncheon. The
event sponsored by the Hebrew
Academy Women and PTA is
scheduled to take place on Tues-
day, March 18 at the Biscayne
Bay Marriott Hotel at 12 noon; ac-
cording to Dahlia Lipner, presi-
dent of the Women's group and
chairman of the event.
The highlight of the afternoon's
program will be a special tribute
to Ahuva Retter, a parent of the
school who has served as PTA
president for the past four years.
In addition to this office, she
serves as a member of the Ex-
ecutive Board of the Academy, its
Board of Admissions, and as an
Educational Consultant. A
member of the Executive Board of
the Hebrew Academy Women,
Ahuva has given inumerous ser-
vice to the Academy throughout
the years, volunteering her ser-
vices as teacher, nurse, secretary
and any other capacity she has
been called upon to fill. A native of
Haifa, Israel, Ahuva graduated
from the famed Gordon's
Teachers Seminary and the Dunia
Weitzman School of Music.
She and her husband, Dr. It-
zhak, a cardiologist, made their
home here in Miami Beach five
years ago. At that time their
daughter, Shirley, started school
at the Academy, and so did
Ahuva. Younger sister, Lee, now
in Kindergarten, has joined them
at the Academy, and now all the
Retter girls come to school daily.
Lunch, especially prepared by
Rena Kramer of Claudine Uzan
will be served.
A fashion show featuring ex-
clusive European fashions by
Cugene, directed by Susan
Schechter, will climax the after-
noon's program.
Chairperson involved in plann-
ing and creating the event are:
Helen Ciment and Bonita Slavin,
Co-chairmen; Decorations, Helen
Ciment; Favors, Mildred Nyman,
Pam Turetsky, Rita Galbut; Desk
Control, Bea Slavin, Sadie Pedis,
Bess Jacobs, Belan Kuker; Ar-
rangements, Rena Kramer.
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(p
Page6-B The Jewish Floridian/Fridy, March 7, 1986
'
**
Miriaai asd Rkkard Zadanoff
Loia Awl Alaa Dasia
Israel Bonds Adath Yeshumn To
Honor N. Miami Beach Couples
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization and Adath
Yeshurun wiD honor two North
Miami Beach couples during the
temple's Israel Bonds Breakfast
on March 16. The Breakfast,
which costs $7.50 per person, will
begin at 10:30 am. in the Social
Hall, 1025 N.E. Miami Gardens
Drive, North Miami Beach.
Being recognized for their in-
volvement with philanthropic,
community and charitable
organizations, as well as their
staunch support of the State of
Israel through the Israel Bond
program, will be Lois and Alan
Daws and Miriam and Richard
Zadanoff. Both couples will
receive the Israel Freedom
Award.
Dams, a project manager with
Fogel and Associates, serves as
chairman of the board of directors
at Adath Yeshurun, a position he
has held since 1983. Previously,
he wms the temple's Youth Comis-
sioner for two years. As a member
of the International Society for
Hybrid Microelectronics, he serv-
ed as the South Florida vice chair-
man and the Metropolitan New
York Chapter's chairman. He is
also active with the Institute of
Electrical and Electronic
Engineering.
His wife, Lois, is an assistant
vice president and director of
training at Flagter Federal Sav-
ings and Loan Association. She is
a charter member of the Greater
Miami Israel Bonds Professioal
Women's Cabinet, and was presi-
dent of a New Jersey Chapter of
AMR Women and membership
vice president of Temple Adath
Yeshurun. She currently serves as
the temple's Adult Education
chairman.
Zadanoff. executive ad-
ministrator of Menorah Chapels,
has also been active at Adath
Yeshurun. He is currently serving
as a msmriri of the board of direc-
tors, the Budget and Finance
Committee. Also active with the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center in North Miami
Beach, he currently serves on the
board of directors and as vice
president. He has held other poa-
tkH s, including chairman of Fund
Raising-Special Events.
Employed in the communica-
tions department of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, Miriam
Zadanoff combined her work at
Federation with Adath Yeshurun
by being the temple's 1986 Super
Sunday Chairman. For ten years.
she was an active Sisterhood
member, sitting on the executive
board for eight years, and was the
founder and first president of the
temple's Young Couples Club. She
is a charter member and public
relations chairman for the newly-
founded Women's American ORT
Golden Shore Chapter.
Special guest speaker will be
Gerda Weismann Klein, a
distinguished author, historian
and lecturer. A colomnist for the
Buffalo Newt and a survivor of the
Holocaust, two of her books. All
But My Lift and Promise of a New
Spring, deal with her experiences
in Nazi-occupied Europe. She has
also written 7V Blue Rote in
which she explored the work of a
retarded child.
Acting as general chairman for
the Adath Yeshurun Israel Bonds
Breakfast is Dr. Joseph Singer.
Serving as breakfast chairman are
Alice and Gary Hottzman.
For breakfast reservations or
further information, contact
Sharon Curtis at the Israel Bonds
office at 531-6731.
Amit Women
Florida Council of Amit Women
will hold their Annual Scholarship
Luncheon on Sunday at noon at
the Konover Hotel. Shirley Gross,
public relations chairman of the
Hebrew Academy, will speak.
Shalom Chapter of Amit
Women will celebrate Punm with
a party on Tuesday at 11:30 a.m.
in the' Club room at 100 Lincoln
Road. Helen Fishman. the 1986
Queen Esther, will be honored.
Hatikvah-Miami Beach Chapter
of Amit Women will celebrate
Purim with a party on Thursday.
March 20 at noon at the Kneseth
Israel Social HaO.
Dvorah Chapter of Amit
Women will hold a bazaar in the
auditorium of the Roney Plaza
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednes-
day, March 19.
Chamber Music
Society of Lincoln
Center To Perform
The Chamber Musk Society of
Lincoln Center, considered the
"musical success story of the
generation" by the New York
Times, will perform March 9 at
Temple Beth Sholom as part of
the "Sundays at 4" concert series.
The concert will be in the temple
sanctuary at 4 p.m.
"Twilight Music" will make its
Miami premiere March 9. Its com-
poser, John Harbison, a conductor
and chamber musk player, was in-
spired by the three instruments
"meeting best under cover of
dusk." Commissioned by the
Society, the work made its world
premkre March 1985 at New
York's Ahca Tully Hall.
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Committee members for the "Spring Fling" auction on Sunday
March 16 in the Ruby auditorium, to benefit the Miami Jewish
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right): Pauline Mark, *Nancy Rauch, Bella Goldstein. Muriel
Rudolph is chairman.
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Friday. March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
'Just To Say No To Drugs'
At Mount Sinai Medical
Center of Greater Miami
The Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization
recently honored nine residents of the Tower
U condominium in Miami Beach during a
special "Salute to Israel Luncheon" in the
Tmrer Suite Restaurant. The residents were
honored for their staunch support of Israel
thrimgh the Israel Bond program. Attending
the luncheon as honorees were, from left to
right: Rose Brest; Ann and Mates Wallach;
Ann and Samuel Weintraub; chairpersons
Fay and Abe Cohen; Irving and Rose Re-
ingold; and Clara Ort.
B'nai B'rith Lodge To
Hear Louis Fischer
Sholem Lodge 1024 of B'nai
B'rith will meet on Sunday to hear
Louis C. Fischer, director of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
For the Aged speak on, "Aging
Today and into the 21st Century,"
at the Home at 10:30 a.m.
In support of Governor
Graham's Red Ribbon Day, Dr.
Dolores Morgan, director of Ad-
dictionology Services at Mount
Sinai Medical Center of Greater
Miami, will reach new heights to
"just say no to drugs."
On Wednesday, March 12 at
11:15 a.m.. Dr. Morgan will go up
in a hook and ladder truck basket
high atop of Mount Sinai to of-
ficially tie an enormous red ribbon
around the Medical Center's Main
Building. As a member of the Red
Ribbon committee against drug
abuse and one of Miami's pioneers
in the fild of addiction, Dr.
Morgan said, "an event like this
will create community awareness
surrounding durg addiction and
will help us in combatting the
problem."
Corporations and medical in-
stitutions throughout Dade Coun-
ty have been asked to participate
in this community awareness pro-
gram. With Dr. Morgan at the
helm, Mount Sinai has pulled out
all the stops to promote the
Governor's Red Ribbon motto.
"just say no to drugs."
Mount Sinai will be a flurry of
activity for Red Ribbon Day. Pa-
tients from the Addiction Treat-
ment Program are creating
special "red ribbon" objects d'art
to show off their artistic talents.
An exhibit displaying their wares
will be in the Main Lobby. As part
of their drug rehabilitation pro-
gram, the patients participate in
an art therapy class.
The Addiction Treatment Pro-
gram staff, outfitted in red, will
also join in the festivities. They
will be distributing red balloons
adorned with red ribbons to
everyone who passes through the
Main Lobby. "We want everyone
to know that the red ribbon is
symbolic of having a day set aside
to try and inform the community
about its substance abuse pro-
blem," said Dr. Morgan. "Long
after the red ribbons are gone, the
problem will still be here. We will,
however, have accomplished our
mission if Red Ribbon Day helped
enlighten the general public about
the drug problem.
The Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization and the Surfside
community recently honored Mayor Ben Levine, second from
right, during a special Salute to Israel celebration. Mayor Levine
was recognized for his contribution to the town of Surfside, as
well as to the State of Israel. Through his active participation in
the Israel Bond program, he received the Israel Freedom Award
from Israel Bond Executive Director, Howard Klein, second from
left. Also observing the presentation were chairman Louis
Fenichel and special gvest, Eddie Schaffer. a Jewish American
folk humorist.
,''.
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' The Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami
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Ijdl de Dui i
"A Masked Dinner Dance and Gaming Gala"
Saturday, March 15.1986
8 O'clock in the Evening
Omni International Hotel Ballroom
$125. per person
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A chance to win a 1986 Dodge Convertible
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Page 8-B The .Jewish j'loridian/Friday, March 7, 1986^
Stacey Belfer Named
National Award Winner
In Speech and Drama
Stacey Belfer, a Miami
Beach High School senior,
has been named by the
United States Achievement
Academy as a National
Award Winner in Speech
and Drama.
Her coach, Ed Corbin,
nominated her for the
award, which she received
in mid-February.
"I'm very proud," said her
grandfather, Sender Kaplan, head
of the Cuban Hebrew division of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and longtime supporter of
Miami Beach's Cuban Hebrew
Congregation. "Stacey's a
wonderful girl. She's always winn-
ing one kind of award or another.
We often have our own debates."
STACEY CLEARLY
remembers her first public
speech.
"My first important speech was
in sixth grade," the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. William (Esther)
Belfer, of Miami Beach said. "We
had a tradition where everyone
would write a two-minute speech,
and the best one would be read to
the class. All the speeches were
supposed to be two minutes or
less, but mine was ten minutes. It
started off kind of funny, then
talked about the importance of
teaching in life. They liked it so
much they let me deliver it in spite
of its length."
Evidently, Stacey showed a cer-
tain verbal acuity from even
earlier in her life. According to
her mother, Stacey was able to
tell stories without actually hav-
ing learned how to talk. "She was
bright and was able to speak at a
very early age. She was always
talking to people."
STACEY'S specialty is oratory,
in which the speaker has ten
minutes to prepare a speech
designed to persuade the listener.
"I've done it for all four years" in
high school, she said. "When I'm
inspired, I'm trying to inspire
others at the same time."
A joiner as well as a leader,
she's a member of so many clubs
Stacey Belfer
and organizations that her
schedule simply does not allow for
much free time. Her favorite club
is young business Leaders of
America. Eventually, she plans on
a business major "if I don't study
choreography" at the University
of Pennsylvania, Brandeis or the
University of Miami, her top three
choices.
Her philosophy of life reflects
her greatest infuences: her
parents, grandfather and faith.
"So many in my school don't ap-
preciate Judaism or being Jewish.
There is so much assimilation it's
unbelievable. Everything I've
learned is to stregnthen my
Jewish identity. People should
learn from the example of people
who have been successful, not
follow in the footsteps of
underachievers."
Stacey Belfer, no
underachiever, is listed in Who's
Who Among American High
School Students and is a recipient
of the National Forensic League's
Degrees of Merit, Honor, Ex-
cellence and Distinction, she is a
Governor'8 Honor Student and
has been a finalist or winner in
district and state oratorical com-
petitions seven times.
Ohev Shalom Congregation To
Pay Tribute To Harry Yellin
Ohev Shalom Congregation will
hold its 25th Anniversary Dinner
on Sunday, March 16 at 1 p.m. at
the Casablanca Hotel. The con-
gregation will pay tribute to
Harry Yellin, chairman of the
board of Trustees of the
synagogue, as Man of the Year,
according to Leo Hack, president.
Mayor Alex Daoud will also pre-
sent Yellin with the Keys to Miami
Beach and newly elected officers
will be installed.
In highlighting this event, Rabbi
Pinchas Weberman praised Mr.
Yellin for his many beneficences.
"Harry Yellin has been indeed a
pillar of strength for us. He has
beautified the Sanctuary and is
now dedicating the Sanctuary by
placing a memorial plague at our
"Western Wall."
Hadassah Events
Torah Chapter of Hadassah will
hold a general meeting at 12:30
p.m. on Monday at Temple
Zamora. Robert Strauss of "Swim
Gym," will discuss Waterobics for
adults.
Zohara Chapter of Hadassah
will hold a general meeting on
Monday, the Aventura Jewish
Center. On Thursday, the chapter
will hold their Youth Day Dinner.
A board meeting will be held
Thursday, March 20 to be follow-
ed by an Oneg Shabbat on Friday
evening at the Center.
Sunday. March 23 the chapter
will host their Woman of the Year
Luncheon at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel at 11 a.m. to honor Cele
Dobuler.
Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will meet on Monday, at
12:30 p.m. at the Banquet Hall.
Elsie Rubin will review Joseph
Viertell's book, "Life Line."
On Monday, March 31 at noon,
the chapter will hold an Eye Bank
Luncheon at the 1100 West Ave.
restaurant
Naomi Chapter of Hadassah will
hold a Crown and Tiara Purim
Party at their next general
meeting on Monday, at 8 p.m. at
the Tamarind Apartments
Clubhouse in Kendall.
Henrietta Siold Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their next
regular meeting on Monday, at 11
a.m. at the Shelborne Hotel.
Hatikvah Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its monthly meeting on
Thursday March 13 at 7:45 p.m. at
Temple Israel in Kendall.
Southgate Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its regular monthly
meeting on Monday at 1 p.m. in
the Terrace room. Ruth Katz,
Muriel Kovinow, Esther Meltzer,
and Gilda T. Fisher, will perform a
Purim play, written by Mrs.
Kovinow. _____
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Monday at
12:30 p.m. at the Morton Towers
auditorium.
Aliyah Chapter of Hadassah will
hold their annual Spring Lun-
cheon on Thursday, at 11 a.m. at
the Radisson Hotel. The program,
"Winter Fantasy," will be chaired
by Marilyn Krick, Lois Ostrofsky
and Daphne Weiner, assisted by
President Gail Rosenberg.
Renanah Chapter of Hadassah
will meet on Monday to celebrate
Purim. A board meeting will take
place at 10:30 and a lunch and
general meeting will follow at the
home of Frances Goldberg.
Harry Yellin
The festivities of Purim will be
celebrated at the Beba Idelson
Chapter of Na'amat USA meeting
Wednesday, at 11:30 a.m. in the
clubroom at 100 Lincoln Road.
Marion Soshuk. a frequent
traveler to Israel, will be the
/J/'a/i/i* *****#&
Miami Dade Community College will hold its next Lunchtime
Lively Arts Series on Wednesday at noon at the Wolfson Cam
pus The Norman Luboff Choir will perform and Norman Uboff
will conduct.
The Ruth Foreman Theatre will present the comedy "The 49th
Cousin." starring Richard Lederer. Tom Disney. Ben Baccarro.
Hal Bennett. Deborah Solkhof. and Arthur Eden. The show will
be on Wednesday evening through Sunday evening at 8 p.m.
The American Jewish Committees Greater Miami Chapter
and the South Dade Jewish Community Center will sponsor Dr
Steven Bayme. National Assistant Program Director of the
Jewish Communal Affairs Department of the AJC. in his lecture
on "The Impact of Intermarriage on the American Jewish Fami-
ly." on Tuesday at 730 p.m. at the Center.
The committee to honor the Ram Bam will hold its 2nd Annual
Celebration Siyum of the Ram Bam (Maimonides) on Tuesday at
Temple Moses. Rabbi Isaac Swift will be keynote speaker
George N. Caylor's Forte Forum will present Abraham Git-
telson. associate director of Jewish Education for the Central
Agency for Jewish Education of Greater Miami. He will discuss
"Jewish Pioneers in Florida." on Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the 1000
West Ave. auditorium.
Sandy Lane, former executive director for Economic Develop-
ment for the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce, has been
promoted to vice president.
National Asthma Center North Dade-Broward Chapter will hold
their annual Bazaar and Auction on Saturday. March IS at the
McDonald Senior Center Auditorium. The preview will begin at 6
p.m.. the auction will follow.
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial Center and the
National Conference of Christians and Jews will present the first
in a series of films at Florida International University's Bay Vista
campus on Monday, at 1 p.m. "The Last Chapter" will depict the
history of Jewish life and culture in Poland.
Jewish Vocational Service is offering a free "College
Knowledge" Workshop on Tuesday.'at 7:30 p.m. at the South
Dade JCC for high school students and their parents.
The Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami will present a
discussion by Laura Fink. RN. of Mount Sinai Medical Center, tid-
ed. "What Do You Do When Your Number Is Up?" on Monday
The JETset program for seniors opens at 1 p.m. with the lecture
at 1:30 at Beth David Congregation.
Mount Sinai Medical Center and the National Migraine Founda-
tion will sponsor a free educational seminar titled. "Headaches:
Their Nature. Prevention, and Treatment." to be held on Satur
day. March 8 from 10 a.m. to noon in Mount Sinai's Wolfson
Auditorium.
Gottlieb Hammer, a member of Temple Beth Moshe in Bay
Harbor Islands will be guest lecturer at the synagogoue this Friday
evening at 8 p.m.
Celia Siegel. a member of South Shore Hospital and Medial
Center Auxiliary has donated a plaque to the hospital in memory
of her husband. Sidney and son Stanley. The dedication will take
place Thursday at 11:30 a.m. in the main lobby of the hospital
Beba Idelson Chapter of Na'amat USA
featured speaker highlighting
various aspects of Israel. Purim
songs by Esther Weinstein,
selected as "Queen Esther" for
the Purim festivities.
Refreshments will be served by
Sarah Kerbs and Mildred Frank.
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Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
(CC Announces Nominees For First Annual Bal de Purim Orchestre Symphonique de Montreal
I The Jewish Community Centers
If Greater Miami have named six
iominees for its first annual Bal
le Purim King and Queen Leader-
hip Award.
Three men have been
ominated for the King award and
i.ree women have been
Cminated for the Queen award,
his represents two candidates
,m each of the three JCCs in
de County, which collectively
njce-up the Jewish Community
enter of Greater Miami.
They are William Lehman, Jr.
nd Fern Canter from the
[ichael-Ann Ruasell Center in
forth Dade, Gerald K. Schwartz
Ld Bonnie Epstein from the
iiami Beach JCC and Joel I. Levy
lid Laurel Shapiro from the
puth Dade JCC.
The nominees were announced
Harry A. "Hap" Levy, chair-
i an of the Board of the JCCs,
10 with his wife Davida is chair-
the Bal de Purim, Dinner,
ice and Gaming Gala.
This award was set-up to
cognize individuals who have
iven of their time and energy to
agency and have
emonstrated outstanding leader-
hip at their particular Center,
William Lehman Jr. Gerald K. Schwartz Bonnie Epstein
Laurel Shapiro
Joel I. Levy
noted Harry A. "Hap" Levy.
The Bal de Purim leadership
recognition award honoring a
King and Queen of the Bal de
Fern Canter
Purim will be presented on Satur-
day evening, March 15, at the
First Annual Bal de Purim at the
Omni International Hotel.
lorida Friends of Yeshiva University to
Honor Alumnus Eva Rosner
Eva Rosner, a 1968 graduate of
ktern College for Women of
Yeshiva University, will be
konored as Alumnus of the Year
fy the Florida Friends of Yeshiva
Jniversity, at its Pre-Centennial
leritage Award Dinner on Sun-
ay evening, March 16, at the
[onover Hotel..
announcing the honor. Dr.
i itthew Zuckerman, chairman of
"otida Friends, stated: "Eva
lisher is deeply committed to
ft w\sh education and works
sly on its behalf; successful
nbining working for com-
educational and Jewish
it ions with her roles as
and mother and
swoman. We believe she
>lifies today's Stern
Whle at Stern, she met and
larried Alexander Rosner, who
lad come originally from Brazil to
^ttend Yeshiva University High
chool.
After graduation, Mrs. Rosner
her husband in business, a
tnership that has endured for
nore than f5 years.
In 1970, the Rosners moved to
Iiami Beach, where they both
Eva Rosner
became active in Jewish communi-
ty affairs. They are deeply involv-
ed with the Hebrew Academy of
Miami Beach, which their
children, Jennifer, and Joel, at-
tend; and chaired the Annual
Scholarship Dinner for three
years. Mr. Rosner currently
serves as Senior Vice President of
the Academy.
To Perform March 10, 11
The Orchestre Symphonique de
Montreal (OSM), led by maestro
Charles Dutoit, will present two
area programs March 10-11 with
violinist Isaac Stern and pianist
Yefim Bronfman to kick off their
1986 U.S. tour.
The March 10 program at the
Miami Beach Theater of the Per-
forming Arts, is sponsored by the
Great Artists Series of Temple
Beth Sholom, will include Richard
Strauss's "Don Juan," Debussy's
"Iberia," and the Daphnis et
Chloe suite No. 2 by Maurice
Ravel. Isaac Stem will perform
the Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1,
according to temple cultural direc-
tor Judy Drucker.
The March 11 program at the
Dade County Auditorium, is spon-
sored by the Concert Association
of Greater Miami.
Isaac Stern is universally
recognized as one of the great
violinists of the age. For more
than half a century, he has ap-
peared as soloist in major concert
halls around the world and in the
distinguished company of the
foremost artists and orchestras.
Mr. Stern's career has taken him
to nearly every corner of the
globe, and his numerous recor-
dings, which have garnered Gram-
my Awards and other prizes, have
brought his art to many millions of
listeners.
Pianist Yefim Bronfman made
his North American debut with
the Orchestre Symphonique de
Montreal in 1975 and at age 17
gained recognition as one of the
leading performing artists of our
day. Since then, his career has
taken him to five continents for
appearances with many of the
world's great orchestras, in-
cluding the Berlin Philharmonic,
Chicago Symphony, Philadelphia
Orchestra, Detroit Symphony,
Los Angeles Philharmonic, and
London's Philharmonia Orchestra
and Royal Philharmonic.
Charles Dutoit, guest conductor
for the Miami performances of the
Cleveland Orchestra, is music
director and principal conductor
of the Montreal Symphony Or-
chestra, a post he had held since
1977.
Daoud Installs Men's
Social Club Officers
Men's Social Club of 100 Lin-
coln Road installed the newly
elected officials. Harry Burns,
was elected president; Marty
Aronowitz, vice-president; Bruno
Loeb as treasurer; Dave Gelb as
recording secretary; and Jaime
Biniaconski and Bill Kleinberg as
Sergeant-at-arms.
Board members include Harry
Abrams, Irving Shapiro, Harry T.
Aronsberg, Abe Barret, Ben
Friedlander, Norman Hill,
Stanley Stockman, Rollo Jacob-
son, and Lou Summers.
The Rosners are members of
both Beth Israel and Ohr Chaim
congregations in Miami Beach,
and Mrs. Rosner serves on the
Youth Committee of Beth Israel.
They are also active in the Miami
Beach Jewish Community Center.
"I think," Mrs. Rosner explains,
"that one of the most pleasant
aspects of Stern was the freedom
from certain pressures there
was no need to explain or justify
oneself as a Jew, which made it
possible to concentrate on learn-
ing and enjoying oneself. Beyond
the education itself, the most im-
portant lesson I learned which
has shaped the rest of my life is
that it is possible to live fully in
two worlds, to live as a committed
Jew and to follow whatever pro-
fession one chooses." She added
that she made many friendships at
Stern which endure to this day.
The Dinner will also honor,
posthumously, Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross, founder/mentor of the
Hebrew Academy. The Hon.
Paula Hawkins, U.S. Senator for
Florida, will be the keynote
speaker and recipient of the
Distinguished Public Service
Award.
Dr. Dannon To Conduct A
Series Of Science Forums
Dr. David Dannon, geron-
tologist and professor of mem-
brane research at the Weizmann
Institute of Science in Israel, will
inaugurate a series of science
forums here sponsored by the
Florida Region of the American
Committee. He will present two
lectures titled, "Aging: It's Great
to Be Alive!" on Friday, March 14
at Temple Moses and Monday,
March 17 at Turnberry Isle, accor-
ding to Lee Millman, exeuctive
director of the region.
Dr. Dannon will deliver his lec-
ture in Spanish for Temple Moses'
large Sephardic congregation, ac-
cording to Solomon Garazi,
honorary president of the Sephar-
dic Congregation of Florida,
chairman of the Weizmann's
Latin American Committee.
The lecture and reception at
Turnberry Isle will be hosted by
Sylvia and Rowland Schaefer,
Dr. David Dannon
donors of a million dollars to the
Weizmann Institute for construc-
tion and maintenance of solar
energy complex in energy
research.
American Friends of Hebrew U
Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion, American Friends of the
Hebrew University, will hold a
luncheon meeting on Thursday
March 13, at 11:46 a.m. at the
Sans Souci Hotel.'
Betty Schaffer, chairman of
the afternoon session, announc-
ed the program would be a
presentation of the slides show-
ing Jerusalem, Modern Israel,
Views of the Hebrew University
plus Archae logical Sites.
Presented hfDr. and Shulomith
Cohen, narrated by Dr. Ar-
chibjJ^rCohen. The Cohens have
Sntly returned from an ex-
tended Israel visit studying.
Members of the committee an-
nounced by Mrs. Schaffer, in-
clude Viola Chareowsky. Ruth
Irene Raczkowski and
Stella Topol with Florence D.
Feldman, director of the Greater
Miami Women's Division,
coordinator.
Holocaust Center and
NCGJ Present
1st Film Series
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center and
the National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews will present its
first Annual Holocaust Film
Series for four consecutive Mon-
davi starting this week, lne
Last Chapter will be shown at 1
p.m. at FIU's Bay Vista Campus
Academic I building.
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Mrs. Joseph H. Kanter, profes-
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will appear at the Upstairs at
Greene Street supper club in
New York Thursday evening,
March IS. Musical director,
Roger Kellaway will be her
accompanist.
The Royal Hungarian
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Community Corner
Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami Beach will hold its 30th An-
niversary Diamond Celebration for their benefit of emo-
tionally disturbed children on Thursday, March 13, at
11:30 a.m. at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, according to
Mrs. Lawrence A. Weston, chairman.
Rabbi Jack Reimer. spiritual leader of Congregation
Beth El of La Jolla, California, will speak on "Ethical
Wills-Voices From the Beyond," on Tuesday evening,
March 18, at 8 p.m. at Aventura Jewish Center.
Justine Louise Wise Chapter of the American Jewish
Congress will hold a general meeting on Thursday,
March 13 at 12:30 p.m. at the American Savings and
Loan building on Alton and Lincoln Roads.
Temple Samu-EI will hold its first annual Goods and
Services Auction on Saturday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at
the temple. Money raised will benefit Jewish education
programs and the synagogue's operating expenses.
Temple Emanu-EI's Men's Club will present President
Emeritus, Dr. Bernard Mandelbaum, of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America and former professor
of Midrash and Homeletics on Sunday, March 16 at
9:30 a.m. in Sirkin Hall.
Senator Albert A. Gore, Jr. (D., Tenn.) will be guest
speaker March 9 at the Westview Country Club's an-
nual dinner on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1986 CJA-IEF campaign, announced
Sidney Cooperman, chairman of the event, and James
Asher, vice chairman.
Miami Beach Branch 1059 of Workmen's Circle will
meet on Wednesday, at noon at Surfside Community
Center. '
Cantor Moshe Stern will appear in concert on Sun-
day, at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth Shmuel, Cuban Hebrew
. Congregation.
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beginning next Friday at 8 p.m.
Dr. Stanley Wagner. Rabbi of the
Beth Ha Medrosh Hagadol Con-
gregation in Denver. Colorado,
and professor of Judaic Studies at
the University of Denver, will be
guest speaker.
His Friday night lecture will be,
"Jewish Schisms In History: The
Anatomy of Jewish Controversy,"
according to Rabbi Simcha Freed-
man, spiritual leader of the
congregation.
Judge Shapiro
To Be Honored
Retired Judge Herbert S.
Shapiro will be honored by the
Federal Bar Association Thurs-
day, at a 12:15 p.m. luncheon at
the Hyatt Regency Hotel in
downtown Miami hosted by the
South Florida chapter of the FBA.
Judge Shapiro, who retired in
February after more than eight
years of service as United States
Magistrate in the United States
District Court in Miami, will be
feted for his distinguished service
in that post. Judge Shapiro earlier
served as assistant county
solicitor of Dade County and as ci-
ty judge of North Bay Village. He
now is a partner in the law firm of
Shapiro and Weil.
Federal Senior Judge Joe
Eaton, who was chief judpe of the
district court during much of
Judge Shapiro's service, will be
the guest speaker.
Judge Shapiro has served as
president of Temple Emanu-El of
Greater Miami and as an officer of
the Israel Histadrut Foundation.
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Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Jewish National Fund-Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael to Honor Leon Schuster
The Jewish National Fund-
Karen Kayemeth Leisrael salutes
Leon Schuster on his 50th year of
dedicated service to the JNF-
Keren Kayemeth Lasrael and
romrratulations him on his 80th
birthday. A gala Tribute Banquet
fahto honor will be held at the
Konover Hotel on March 22
Guest speaker for the event will
I be the honorable Moshe Rivhn,
IWorld Chairman of Karen
Kayemeth Leisrael. Leon
Schuster is one of the "Last of the
Mohicans" carrying the torch
which lit the long dark road to
Israel's independence, and the
establishment of the State of
Israel," stated Zev W. Kogan,
I President JNF Southern Region.
Leon Schuster was born in 1906
in Przemysl, Galicia, which was
then part of Austria. In 1914 his
family immigrated to Nicolsburg
(Moravia-Behmen) from the war
zone Przemysl. In 1915 they mov-
ed to Graz-Steiermark where he
and his family lived during the
War, and he studied there until
they returned to Przemysl in
1922. In Graz he made all four
| classes Mittelshule, but in Poland
he became a businessman.
In 1931 he married and opened
a business, and in 1934 he, with
! his wife Genendla and daughter
Rela, emigrated to Cuba where his
wife had three brothers. They
were in business 300 miles from
Havana and in the beginning they
all worked together. One year
later, Leon went into business for
himself. He also started with his
Jewish neighbors, six families all
total, to collect twice a year
Leon Schuster
money for Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael. He also did this with
other Jewish families who lived in
neighboring towns, and sent the
money to the Zionist Organization
in Havana. In 1946 he moved to
Marianao, Havana, where he
started to participate in the
Zionist Organization. In 1947 he
was elected Vice President of
Keren Kayemeth Leisrael Land
Director in Cuba, and in 1950 was
elected President. He was a
founder of the Centro Israelita de
Marianao, and a few times was
elected as a Secretary or as a
Treasurer. He founded and was
President of the Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael Committee by Centro
Israelita de Marianao which Com-
mittee was very active in support
of Keren Kayemeth Leisrael. He
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Tortion
. -And they came, both men and women, as many as were
willing-hearted, and brought all jewels of gold"
(ExodwsS5.it).
VAYAKHEL
VAYAKHEL Moses gathered the people together and in-
structed them in the holiness of the Sabbath. He also instructed
them in how to build the Tabernacle and its vessels. Bezalel and
Oholiab headed the skilled craftsmen working on the Tabernacle.
The people gave liberally toward the sanctuary so liberally, in
fact, that it was necessary to ask them to stop. Once again, the
details of the Tabernacle and its vessels are given, at the end ol
this portion.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion o tho U>H fJdracNd J,"d
upon "Tho Graphic History ol tho Jewish Heritage," edited by ">*
Tsamir, $1$, published by ShengoM. The volume Is """e t j^ Melden
Lane, New York, N.Y. lOOSs. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
was a member and as well as a
Member of the Board of Directors
of the Zionist Organization. A
Member of the Board of Directors
of the Casa Patronato de la Com-
unidad Hebrea de Cuba, and a
founder of Adath Israel.
In 1962 he emigrated to the
United States and now lives on
Miami Beach. He is a founder and
member of the Circulo Cubano
Hebreo, and on the Board of
Directors since its founding until
1983.
He is a member and dedicated
worker of the Jewish National
Fund-Keren Kayemeth Leisrael of
Greater Miami, and the laision to
the Cuban Jewish Community. He
is a member of the Israel Bond
Drive Committee, and was
honored by that Organization in
1980. He is a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, a member of the American
Friends of the Association for
Welfare of Soldiers in Israel and is
a member of Temple Menorah.
Wherever there is a worthy
cause for the State of Israel, Leon
Schuster is there, to do
everything he can, above and
beyond the call of duty, according
to Zev Kogan.
Participating in this gala occa-
sion are: Cuban Hebrew Con-
gregation, Rabbi Barry J.
Konoviteh, spiritual leader and
Sergio Grobler, president; Temple
Menorah Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, spiritual leader, and
Harvey Abramson, president;
Temple Moses, Rabbi Amream
Amseiem, spiritual leader, and
Juan Matalon, president.
The Banquet committee is: Mrs.
Harvey Abramson, Mrs. Margot
Backer, Mr. and Mrs. Moises Bon-
der, Mr. Jack Chester, Mr. and
Mrs. Fima Falic, Mrs. Cyria
Farber, Mr. Sabeto Garazi, Mr.
and Mrs. Salomon Garazi, Mr. and
Mrs. Saul Ginsburg, Mr. and Mrs.
Raul Gorfinkel, Mrs. Sergio
Grobler, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Gutt,
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Huppert, Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Klaiman, Mrs. Eva
B. Kokiel, Mrs. Leika Kozolchyk,
Mr. and Mrs. Moises Kriger, Mr.
and Mrs. Moises Levin, Mr. and
Mrs. Oscar Luski, Mrs. Juan
Matalon, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Min-
ski, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Olemberg,
Mr. and Mrs. Julio Schniadoski,
Mrs. Sabina Shniadoski, Mr. and
Mrs. Benjamin Terner, Mr. and
Mrs. Solomon Terner, Mr. and
Mrs. David Week.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
INSURANCE HOSPITAL
Medicare Participating Memorial
Insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participation
ALLAN WOLPOWITZ. M.D.
3427 Johnson Street
Hollywood. Florida 33021
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305)962-5400
Hallandale Condo
1 bed 1V, bath, upgraded,
2 walk-In closet*. Walk to
Temples, shopping snd
buses. Must be seen. Mid
40's. Owner 458-6176.
FOR SALE:
Miami Gardens Drive, 1
Bedroom condo In Buckley
Towers West. Bssutlful
Isk* view. Call 756-8589.
Barnett Banks Trust Co. N.A.
Physician
Referral
Service
referral to over 300 doctors
868-2728;
i
first appointment wHWn 2 days I
NEW JERSEY YM-YWHA CAMPS
ROUND LAKE CAMP
Lake Come Pa
niCaillKI*m*IIIML
Ifllllll IIMIIUTIEl
EMmKi'inmrnit """"
WITH AUK-IC mMfMTK WHIT
rMFEIlltlAl llrtinilll. ""
CIITinll SKCUl EIKHTIM IRCUUITI
Sims on Individual Growth in M Activity
Low C impei lo Slid Ratio
1200 Aero Catnpsite wdh 65 Acr Lake
Special Teen Program
Emphasis on Recreation
Jewish CuBuro. Oietiry Laws Observed
Seven week sleep eway program
AIIUndwlsports.culls.music pwneei
mg. computers, nature, photo, drama
FOR INFORMATION CALL:
305-851 -8748
ON WRITE
The N.J. YM-YWHA Cimps
21 Prymouth St., Fairfield, NJ 07006
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:06 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tample Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
S3#-7213-534-7214 ^
Barry J. Konoviteh. Rabbi $> )
Moene Buryn. Cantor %'
S*rglO Grobler. President
Sholem Epalbaum, President
Religious Committee
Shabbat Service* 830 a.m.
Sermon 10:30.
Dally Mlnyen
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Mr Mlnyen 7.30 a.m. and I p.m.
Sat 6: JO a.m. Bat Mttxvah,
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami SS7-SM7
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senkx Rabbi
James L. Simon. Asaoclate Rabbi
FrL 7-JO Nt Family eerrlee.
SabM aeuwgard wO. apooaionthe
"Mew To Catoh the Wind."
Sal. 11:15 a.m.
Mi Mltzveh. Jettrev Herat*.
rUbbt Beumoard wMl apeak on,
"ktOeaTer
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving Lahrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shilman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Frl.lp.mlUbblSerearwwIpoMCtic
"Word* We Uee -AndaSueeT
Sjtam Cimlliiaaea utan let* ^
Or. leravaen will pieaoh on va ameeJv
BorMonot ate Bane.
Cantor Shrtmen will ohent at both
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon ScMH
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 SW 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, ,_=:-
Rabbi Emeritus ff)
Rev. Milton Freeman, -S"
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot Greater Miami
a****. Wieur aeeanw Cesesaoii
137 N.E. 1tth St.. Miami. S73-SS00
9000 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi HartaB Bamat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perl me tar
Cantor Jacob G Bornetein
Associate Cantor rtechete F. Nataon
Executive Director Pttlllp S Goktin
Director ot Education
And Prograrnmrng Jack L. Sperki
Fit p.m. Downtown, RobolP.flm.te! WIN
peek on, "Loving Aartoe." Centor
VnM
i Bomitem
BJ Kendall. Or. Jeok L. Spar*. eOJepeakon.
"Peddling At Feal Aa I Can m The Sendee
Ot The Lars."
Cantor Nil.on wW chant.________
Sat B em Kktdkh
""ItttSb,
eh al 6:10 p.m. Dally aenrtcee .re
wnoey.t a.m. and 6:30 p.m., Monday and
/45 a.m. end 5.J0 p.m
_ .eaveavofi-
Baa w\\m e^sijaev
Mlohiv.Cloee.Wodnoodoy 7:30 p.m. _
BETHKODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krtaaai
Rose Berlin: Executive
6566334
Secretary
Sal. S: 46 a.m.
The edejH eertee eoirllnuee
on Sunday momIng.
at: JO a.m.
<>
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33161
981 5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Dr. Joseph A. Gorfinkel,
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
FrL Gottlieb Hammer, oueel ?'jS
DI.COM, "l.reel: The Miracle ol It. Birth
Sat RabM JeeebiiwjjjIpweehi on.-Huaiary
f>
TEMPLEJUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. ",mT!
Coral Gabies i7M8r
M+chaei B. Elsenslet. Rabbi
Friday .errlcei:!5 p.m
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
tlO Uriooln Rd. TM\U**
OR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoehanah Raab. Cantor
Serrlcee Frl. 7:30 p.m.
SaLfcSOaja.
TEMPLE MENORAH .-_M-
820-78th St., Miami Beach 33141^
Rabbi Mayer AbramowlU ,*|
Cantor Murray Yavneh
rt 1:16 p.m Sal t e-m. Pool Serend Sal
Mfaveh leenaoera ssfj Peeent
eennon and ehantTebW A*nmowjt wW
deliver e charge to Mva peielBerrta and Iheu
parenta. "WhereTie Voum?"
TEMPLE NER TAMID 666-4345
7902 Carlyle Ave 666 9633
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovib conoeneie
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Servlcee S e.m. and 6:JO p.m.
Sat. 8:48 a.m
Frl. late aerrlce 8 p m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S4S Jefferson Ave., M.B.. FL 33139
Tel. SSS-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda MeibeK
Cantor Nieeim Senyamlm
EoWSrSe^"**^*48
BET SHIRA CONOREGATION
7S00S.W. 120th Street _
23S-2S01 '>,
RabM David H. Auerbech .%>
Cantor Howard Bonder
Cantor Saul Meieete
Snabbat Servleea FrL S p-m. Sat : so a .at
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
71 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARETEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-06M
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem onnodoa
HaaM Kaaitl will lenvporertly condoct
eaparele avlcee Set. 30 a.m. at Tnple
'^taaiavaSSMS.tAMSJJdAve..
eouih ol N. Kendall Drive.
TEMPLE SeTH 4W6lom BE HH
Chaa* Ave. It 41st St. tN>e.ai
?aTd^M^"Tp-
CT^:^teS------MS
Set 10:45 a.m.
Caaesr Cowrteec end ohoer wlH ohenl
Mhodiaervloea.
TEMPLE SINAI 18*01 NE 22 Ave
North Dado's Retorrn Congregation
Ralph P Kinosley. Rabbi 32-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fit
Sat
7 M ml Rahhl Wnae*e)^eeeejet_I
mily eonnce leraefl dancing lo loHow
S7I-. Portion ir m. -*- <
OvanHa
aVBom,
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7529
10S1 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Mas A. Llpschlti. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally eerrleee Monday-Thuredey
7 J6 a.m. and 530 p.m. Friday
7:J0 aje- 5:15 p m and 8 p.m.;
Salurday 8:25 a.m. end6 p.m.;
Sunday 8 a m and S:S0 p.m.
f
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Or. Conservstlve
2712311 , Dr NormanN.Shapiro.Rabbi IWJ
Benjamin Adler. Cantor -7
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan Sorncoa 7 a.m Mondeva and
Thtaredaye, and Sunday. 8 a.m. Frl. St5
F.mtty aonrlcee D Shapiro will wul
CanvorAoHorwllIchenl.
Sat 8 a.m. Sun S p.m. "Hello. Dolly.


Da 1 n r
Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Legal Notices \
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR I
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1290
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER DAVIS WEINSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ESTHER DAVIS
WEINSTEIN, deceased, File
Number 86-1290, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and *
the personal representative's j
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF |
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on March 7. 1986.
Personal Representative:
LOUIS WEINSTEIN
921 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
GALBUT. GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19653 March 7. 14. 1986
.wnii ut ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH. JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-05434(18)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION ,
TN RE: The Marriage of {
LAURA ELENA WANG,
Petitioner, I
and
KAY WANG YIAU,
Respondent.
TO: KAY WANG YIAU
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MELVTN J. ASHER,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 826 South
Bsysnore Drive, Suite 543, Miami
PL 38181, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 14, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered'
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this day of February 7, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dsde County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19697 Februsryl4.21.28;
March 7,1985
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 28, 1986.
Personal Representatives:
MELVIN BLOOM
HOWARD BLOOM
c/o Henry M. Waitzkin, Lawyer
800 71st Street
P.O. Box 4631
Miami Beach. FL 33141-4631
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
Fla. Bar No. 084038
800 71st Street
Miami Beach, FL 33141-4631
Telephone: (306) 865-0353 ,
19630 February 28;
March 7,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 86-07315
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEONARDO ZARSUELA.
Petitione
LUCILLA ZARSUELA.
Respondent.
TO: LUCILLA ZARSUELA
1173 Anne Street
Bacoor Cavita. Phillipines
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
GEOFFREY W PINES. Esq.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 6731 Red Road Coral
Gables. FL 33143, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March 28,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 20 day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
By CLARTNDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEOFFREY W. PrNES, Esq.
6781 Red Road
Coral Gables, FL 33143
Tel. 662-1818
Attorney for Petitioner
19683 February 28;
March 7, 14, 21, 1986
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FUe NisWr 86-635
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
T1LLIE BLOOM
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of TTLLIE BLOOM, deceased. File
Number 86-685, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Fmgier Street, Miami. Florida
33132. The names and addresses
of the persons] representative and
the personal representative's
sttorney are set forth below.
All interested persons sre
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actios No. 84-08215 (28)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CHRISTTNE JACKSON,
wife,
and
DOUGLAS JACKSON,
husband.
TO: DOUGLAS JACKSON
13009 Chestnut
Ridge Road
North Ridgeville,
Ohio 38009
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve s copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on ARTHUR
H. LIPSON, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 801 Nor-
theast 167 St, Miami. FL 33162.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before April 4, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26 day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: E. Sexil
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19646 March 7,14,21,28,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-05344 FC 21
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
PATRICIA OSBOURNE.
Petitioner/Wife
and
CHARLES OSBOURNE.
Respondent/Husband
TO: CHARLES OSBOURNE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on USHER BRYN. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 309. 420 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach, Florida 33139
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before March 28.1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
court at Miami. Florida on this 24
day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk. Circuit Court.
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
Suite 309, 420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(Phone) (305) 532-1155
19637 February 28;
March 7, 14.21.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. M 07256(21)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JAVIER ALVAREZ.
Petitioner,
and
ANA CRISTTNA BUILES.
Respondent
TO: ANA CRISTTNA BUILES
Carrera 100 No. 4489
MedeUin, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve s
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MELVTN J. ASHER,
ESQ. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 826 South
Bayshore Drive, Suite 643, Miami
FL 88181, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 20 day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19629 February 28;
March 7,14,21,986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GTVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name M.R. Miami Plastic at
525 W. 26 Street. Hialeah, FL
33010 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Marcelo Rodriguez
19613 February 14,21, 28;
March 7.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-10045
Division 04
TN RE: E8TATE OF
ESTHER BRIDGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Esther Bridger, deceased, File
Number 86-10046, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dsde County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 28, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Homer J. Bridger
2410 Barnes Avenue
Bronx, New York 10467
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Abraham M. Mora, Esquire
Blank, Rome, Comisky &
McCauley
1401 Forum Way, 7th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (305) 686-8100
19639 February 28. March 7,1986
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-47170 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
YVONNE BOGLE; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA;
METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY, a political subdivision of
the State of Florida; W. PAUL
SMITH, and the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against him:
MERCY HOSPITAL, INC.. a
Florida corporation; CITY
STORES. INC.. a Delaware
corporation d/b/a/ RICHARDS;
STATE OF FLORIDA.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND
EMPLOYMENT SECURITY.
DIVISION OF LABOR AND
EMPLOYMENT SECURITY; SY
SIFLINGER; MELISSA FAYE
MAXWELL: MIAMI BEACH
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, a
United States corporation:
HOSPITAL CORPORATION OF
AMERICA d/b/a/ CORAL REEF
GENERAL HOSPITAL, a
Tennessee corporation; HCA
HEALTH SERVICES OF
FLORIDA. INC. d/b/a/ CORAL
REEF GENERAL HOSPITAL
f/k/a MIAMI-DADE GENERAL
HOSPITAL, a Florida
corporation.
Defendants.
To: W. Paul Smith and Melissa
Faye Maxwell, whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who
msy be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grsntees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOUv.ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dsde
County, Florida:
Lot 7, less the East 20 feet,
and the East 30 feet of Lot 8,
in Block 28, of SUNKIST
GROVE, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 8, at Page 49, of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before March
14, 1986, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on February 10, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
SWD No 306675-1-575-S
FHA No. 092-311287-203
19611 February 14,21,28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
F1CTTTIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LA VOZ DE MIAMI
BEACH NEWSPAPER,
MAGAZINE, DISTRIBUTOR.
MARKETING. PROMOTIONS,
ADVERTISING, at 2899 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
A. Purrinos
19605 February 14. 21,28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Euster's The Fur-
niture Warehouse at 3300 N.E.
2nd Avenue. Miami, Florida 33137
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Euster's The Furniture
Warehouse. Inc.
By: Jay Euster. President
Myers, Kenin. Levinson &
Richards
Attorneys for Euster's
The Furniture Warehouse, Inc.
19652 March 7. 14.21.28. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-524 (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REBE ROTHENBERG
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of REBE ROTHENBERG.
deceased, File Number 86-524 (02),
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons sre
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 28, 1986.
Personal Representative
Arthur Rothenberg
667 Theresa Avenue
West Hempstead, New York
11662
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
NELSON FELDMAN, P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33164
Telephone: (306) 866-5716
19627 February 28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTrriOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Six Points Crabmeat
Co. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
H. Susskind & Co. Inc.
19647 March 7. 14.21,28, 1986
EN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FUe Number 86-738
Division CP-03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOLLY WARREN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of DOLLY WARREN,
deceased. File Number 86-788, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 38180. The Co-personal
representatives of the estate are
RICHARD NEAL WAYNE AND
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY
OF FLORIDA, N.A.. whose
addresses are 69 Pinecroft Road.
Weston, Massachusetts 02193 and
250 Royal Palm Way. Palm Beach.
Florida 33450. The name and
address of the co-personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATlnv n.
THIS NOTICE. towfS?1
clerk of the above can ,"!*
statement of any claim or deZ*
they may have. Each claim JS
in writing and must indie* ill
basis for the claim, the nan* ml
address of the creditor or ffl
or attorney, and the mT
,imS Whenj't wi" ^meZ
shall be stated. If the claim ,
contingent or unliquidated ,
nature of the uncertainty shall t,
stated. If the claim is secured Z
security shall be described 'tv!
claimant shall deliver sunW
copies of the claim to the clerk Z
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in th,
state to whom a copy of this Notice'
of Administration has been muled
are required, WITHIN THRFF
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifications
of the personal representatives, or
the venue or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
February 28, 1986.
RICHARD NEAL WAYNE
BANKERS TRUST COMPANl
OF FLORIDA. N.A
By: L. EDWARD MITCHELL '
As Co-Personal Representatives o[
the Estate of
DOLLY WARREN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MARVIN I. MOSS, P.A.
P O. Box 6250
Surfside. Florida 33154
Telephone: 865-6736
19635 February 28;
March 7.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-337
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERBERT FREEMAN
a/k/a MAX FRIEDMAN
Deceased
NOTICE '
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HERBERT FREEMAN a/k/a
MAX FRIEDMAN, deceased, File
Number 86-337, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All- interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice hw
begun on March 7, 1986
Personal Representative:
SAM BERNSTEIN
746 Euclid Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19654 March 7.14.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring tt *
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SHORT STOP BAR
at 781-786 Opa Locka Boulevard.
Ops Locks, Florida intends w
register said name with the Clerk
Court of Dade County, Florida.
BERNARD MILSTEIN and
BENEDETTA MILSTEIN.
his wife
Sole Owners
MIRIAM BECKERMAN
Attorney for Applicant
6460 S.W. 126th Street Road
Miami, Florida 33156
665-353 ,oa
March 7, 14,21.28.1*


Friday, March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Legal Notices
N"the circuit court for
ADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-96S
Division 04
k RE: ESTATE OF
BsiPORE YAGODA
Deceased __
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSONS HAVING
LAIMS OR DEMANDS
[GAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
OVSARE HEREBY NOTI-
KIFD that the administration of
, estate of ISIDORE YAGODA.
deceased, File Number 86-963, is
nding in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Hvision, the address of which is 73
Vest Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
|r,.,,resentative of the estate is
Fheodore m. TRUSHIN.
nhose address is 360 North
Mji Drive. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. The name and
iddresa of the personal
fepresentative's attorney are set
bra below.
All persons having claims or
Igainst the estate are
.......red WITHIN THREE
,1(!nTH> FROM THE DATE OF
HE F1RS1 PUBLICATION OF
HIS NOTICE, to file with the
,. sbove coon a written
>f .my claim or demand
,.. Each claim must be
writing ami must indicate the
isis tor the claim, the name and
ddren of the creditor or his agent
r attorney, and the amount
aimed. If the claim is not yet due,
le date when it will become due
all be stated. If the claim is
ntingent or unliquidated, the
ature of the uncertainty shall be
Rated. If the claim is secured, the
urity shall be described. The
laimant shall deliver sufficient
ipies of the claim to the clerk to
nable the clerk to mail one copy to
saeh personal representative.
All persons interested in the
late to whom a copy of this Notice
f Administration has been mailed
re required. WITHIN THREE
1NTHS FROM THE DATE OF
HE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
HIS NOTICE, to file any
bjectioni they may have that
hallenges the validity of the
ecedent'a will, the qualifications
f the personal representative, or
venue or jurisdiction of the
>urt.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
ND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
[LED WILL BE FOREVER
ARRED.
Date of the first publication of
us Notice of Administration:
ebruary 28. 1986.
Theodore M. Trushin
\- Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ISIDORE YAGODA
Deceased
TTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
EPRESENTATIVE:
ALTER B. LEBOWrrZ, ESQ.
"I Arthur Godfrey Road
liarm Beach, Florida 33140
9634 February 28;
March 7. 1986
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
March 28, 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 20th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19631 February 28;
March 7,14,21,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-02313 CA-22
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
MICHIGAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA JEAN PACE, et al..
Defendants.
TO: Barbara Jean Pace
323 NoWesUiwn Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15205
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 4 in Block 14 of
WINONA PARK, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 14, at Page 64. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146 on or before
March 14. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney of immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 5th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19598 February 14, 21,28;
March 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
|THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-50039 CA 22
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
IEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
|AGE ASSOCIATION, an
Isociation organized and existing
fider the laws of the United
ates of America.
| Plaintiff
)SE ELIAS MORROBEL, et al.,
|I)efendants.
JOSE ELIAS MORROBEL,
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
JOSE ELIAS MORROBEL,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
OU ARE NOTIFIED that an
'on to foreclose a mortgage on
following property in DADE
unty, Florida:
Lot 19, Block 8, of
iROVELAND PARK,
^according to the Plat thereof,
recorded in Plat Book 6, at
Page 91, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
>rida,
) been filed against you and vou
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, tt)
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-00591 FC 01
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBORAH ANN HOWARD,
Petitioner
and
RAYMOND HOWARD,
Respondent
TO: RAYMOND HOWARD
Residence: Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 28. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 18th day of February. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone (305) 532-1155
19625 February 21.28;
March 7, 14.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-3896 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
PETER STANHAM. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ELIZABETH A. MOLINA
and BEATRIZ DE MOLINA
Avenida Say
Calle 29 Este
No. 29-10
Panama. Republic of Panama
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: .,
Lot 1, Block 107, BENT
TREE SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 103.
at Page 48, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida,
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Sheppard Faber,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146 on or before March
14, 1986 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 10th day of
February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19609 February 14,21,28;
March 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-50038 CA 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GMAC MORTGAGE CORPO-
RATION OF PA, f/k/a
COLONIAL MORTGAGE
SERVICE COMPANY,
Plaintiff
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-06322 FC 23
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
BETTY JEAN RAMIREZ,
Petitioner
and
ANMANDO RAMIREZ.
Respondent
TO: ANMANDO RAMIREZ
100 Central Avenue No. F-2
Goose Creek. South Carolina
29445
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copv of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite, 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 18th day of February, 1986.
RICAHRD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone (306) 532-1155
UMV24 February 21.28;
March 7, 14,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO: 86-8339 (06)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANTOINE DEMOSTHENE.
Petitioner/Husband
vs.
VIOLETTE A. DEMOSTHENE
Respondent/Wife
TO: VIOLETTE A
DEMOSTHENE NOVION
PORT MARGOT. HAITI
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before April 4, 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 27. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: JOHN C. BRANDA
19642 March 7.14.21,28, 1986
EDGARD CERENORD. et ux.. et
al..
Defendants.
TO: LUIS BANOS
Residence Unknon
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against
him, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
You are hereby notified
that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in DADE County,
Florida:
Lot 21. of RESUBDIVISION
OF BLOCK 9, of
NORTHGATE. according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded
in Plat Book 9, at Page 157,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
March 28, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 18th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19623 February 21,28;
March 7. 14.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT D>J AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 864)5585 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Fla. Bar No. 058744)
OLGA M. HERNANDEZ,
Petitioner,
vs.
JESUS HERNANDEZ.
Respondent.
TO: JESUS HERNANDEZ.
Residence Unknown
Last known address:
1867 N.W. 19 Terrace
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on LEON G. NICHOLS, Peti-
tioner's Attorney, whose address.
is 8500 W. Flagler Street, Suite j
A-107, Miami, Florida 33144, on or
before March 14, 1986. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Peti-
tioner's Attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATES this 7 day of February,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
as Deputy Clerk
19602 Februarv 14. 21. 28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Hil Associates Corp.
of Miami Beach d/b/a Prince
Michael Hotel at 2618 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Fla. intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Hil Associates Corp. of Miami
Beach
19650 March 7. 14.21.28. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 864)5120
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
JUAN JOSE CARPIO,
Petitioner/H usband
and
MARIA S. CHUNN,
Respondent/Wife
TO: MARIA S. CHUNN
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
LEONARDO P. MENDEZ, ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 1437 S.W. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33135 (305)
649-5486 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 14.1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 5 day of February, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LEONARDO P. MENDEZ, ESQ.
1437 S.W. 1st Street
Miami. Florida 33135
(305) 649-5486
Attorney for Petitioner
19601 February 14,21.28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FUTORRY
ASSOCIATES at 12300 N.W.
32nd Avenue, Miami, Florida
33167 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
MORRIS FUTERNICK and
MIRIAM FUTERNICK. his wife,
as to an undivided 50% interest
NEIL NORRY and
SHARON NORRY, his wife,
as to an undivided 50% interest
MYERS. KENIN. LEVINSON
& RICHARDS
Attorney for
FUTORRY ASSOCIATES,
a Floridan General Partnership
19620 February 21, 28;
March 7. 14, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1052
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOLLIE K. RUSKIN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MOLLIE K. RUSKIN,
deceased. File Number 86-1052, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
jiersonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL (LAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARKED
Publication of this Notice hat
begun on March 7, 1986.
Personal Representatives:
LLOYD L. RUSKIN
5500 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
CHARLYNE R. MEYER
1100N.E. 84th Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
LLOYD L. RUSKIN
5500 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (305) 865-4482
19651 March 7,14.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-51522 FC-07
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLENDA WILCOX
Petitioner/Wife,
and
KENNETH WAYNE POPEJOY
a/k/a KENNETH ROSETTI
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr. Kenneth Wayne Popejoy
Route 2, Box 5
Skiatook, Oklahoma 74070
and
Mr. Kenneth Wayne Popejoy
c/o Tulsa Community
Treatement Center
112 East ltth Street
Tulsa. Oklahoma 74119
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Alan H. Miller, Esq.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317, Miami,
Florida 33189, and file the original |
; with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 14. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6th day of February 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller. Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd.. Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
Telephone: (305) 238-1080
19599 February 14. 21.28;
March 7. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-5147 1 CA 14
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
QUARTZ INTERNATIONAL.
INC. a Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs
P and R FINEST PRODUCTS
CORP., a Florida corporation.
Defendant.
TO: P and R FINEST PRODUCTS
CORP.. a Florida corporation
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Damages has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copv of your written defenses, if
any. to it on JAMES M. SCHIFF.
ESQ.. attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is 1501 Venera Avenue.
Suite 205. Park Place II. Miami
Florida 33f46. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the compalint.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 20 day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JAMES M. SCHIFF, ESQ.
The Schiff Law Firm. Chartered
Park Place II. Suite 205
1501 Venera Avenue
Miami, Florida 33146
Attorney for Petitioner
19632 February 28;
March 7.14,21.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name D.I.M. AUTO SALES
at 9815 NW 27th Avenue. Miami,
FL 33147, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
A.J.O.
Import & Export, Inc.
a Florida corporation
by
Aladier J. Osorio, Pres.
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Applicant
825 South Bay shore Drive
Suite 543
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: 541-2586
19641 March 7. 14,21,28. 1986


Patrp 19.R TK T~...:~u M..,i.
Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, March 7, 1986
Public Notices/t
NOTICE UNDER
Ficrrnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JIMMY LINARES at
7430 SW 82nd Street, Apt. D-205,
Miami. FL 33143 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SANTIAGO LINARES
MELVTN J. ASHER
Attorney for Owner
826 So. Bavshore Drive
Suite 543
Miami. FL 33131
Tel. 541-2585
19696 February 14.21.28;
March 7.1906
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in bushy under the fic-
titious name Spectrum at 241 23rd
Street Miami Beach. Florida 33139
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Alan Otter
Michael Stean
19604 Fabraaryl4.21.28;
March?, 1986
J
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. D* AND FOE
DAM COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-4M77 CA 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
GOLDOME BANK FOR
SAVINGS, a New York
corporation.
Plaintiff
T.
WILBERT PETERSON and
EDNA PETERSON a/k/a PEARL
PETERSON, his wife; ROSIA M.
JENKINS a/k/a ROSIA MARIE
JENKINS a/k/a ROSIA M.
JENKINS PETERSON, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through,
under or against her, LESLIE
ESTATES HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION NO. 1. INC.;
FORD MOTOR CREDIT
COMPANY, an involuntarily
rhssohred Delaware corporation;
AMERICAN EXPRESS
TRAVEL RELATED SERVICES
COMPANY, INC., a New York
corporation; FEDERATED
DEPARTMENT STORES. INC.
d/b/s BURDINES. an Ohio
corporation; AMERIFIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION, a United
States corporation; and
CONSOLIDATED BANK, N.A
United States corporation;
Defendant*
To: Rosia M. Jenkins a/k/a/ Roaia
Marie Jenkins a/k/a Rosia M
Jenkins Peterson, whose
residence is unknown, and
the unknown parties who
may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees.
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by. through.
under or against said
Defendant, who are not
known to be dead or alive.
and all parties having or
Hsiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4, in Block 3. of LESLIE
ESTATES, SECTION ONE,
according to the Plat thereof,
aa recorded in Plat Book 93,
at Page 64, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Eaquire, of
Roeenthal A Yarchin. P.A.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3060 Biatajrae Boulevard. Mauni.
Florida 33137. on or before March
28, ltM. and to fits the original
with the Clerk of that Court other
before service en Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately II
> a default will H
you for the
I m the CfltnpsaiB*.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
that Court on February 18. 1966
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clark
By: DC BRYANT
Deputy dark
8WD No. 171880-1-215-Y
FHA No. 088-188808-8X1
February 21.28;
March 7. 14. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-37384 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
THE FLOYSTAD
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation, et al..
Defendants.
TO: N. D. BROWER and RUTH
BROWER. residence and
whereabouts unknown, being
all of the members of the
Last Board of Directors of
ABC0RE WORLD VAN
SERVICES. INC.. a
dissolved Florida
corporation, as Trustees of
said dissolved corporation
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida:
Unit No. Hi. of the
WOODLANDS OF MIAMI,
INC., a condominium,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, at
recorded in Official Records
Book 8826. at Page 296. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, together
with all improvements,
appliances, and fixtures
located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis A Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whote
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street.
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
April 4, 1986, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 27th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19644 March 7.14.21.28.1986
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 86-07701
IN RE: The Marriage of
LUCIEN JEAN-BAPTISTE.
Petitioner Husband
vs.
AMANCIA JEAN-BAPTISTE
Respondent/Wife
TO: AMANCIA
JEAN-BAPTISTE
Cap Harden
Rue Fatima No. 219.
Haiti
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before March 28. 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
February 24, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
ByJ. Byron
19636 February 28;
March 7,14.21,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in hntintf under the fic-
titious name FAMILY HEARING
CENTER OF DADE at 167 Nor-
theast 167th Street, North Miami
Beach, Florida 83162 intend to
register amid name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
HEAR AMERICA. rNC.
By Alan D. Dans, President
CANNER AND GLASSER
1X80 E. Hatandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale. Florida S3009
March 7,14,21.28,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the MJttut8Ma\ sinks i to
under the fie
boas Inc.
D/B/A Paraiao Infanta" at 1276
Wats Flegter Street Miami Fk
88186 mtendt to register amid
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Eyda Cabrera
18628 February 28:
March 7. 14.21. 1986
I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
. THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-37384 (CA 29)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
THE FLOYSTAD
CORPORATION, a Florida
corporation, et al..
Defendants.
TO: MARION N. SHAFFER.
residence unknown, if alive.
and if dead, to all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against the said
MARION N. SHAFFER, and
all other parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Unit No. HI. of THE
WOODLANDS OF MIAMI.
INC., a condominium,
according to the Declaration
of Condominium thereof, as
recorded in Official Records
Book 8826. at Page 286. of
the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, together
with all improvements,
appliances, and fixtures
located thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis A Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose
address is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
April 4. 1986. and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneyi or immediately
thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 27th day of
February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19643 MarchT. 14.21,28, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-1998 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
J. L KISLAK
MORTGAGE CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
JUAN L. MEZA.
et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: JUAN L. MEZA sad ROSY
MEZA. his wife. Av. 27 de
Febrero 259-Piantini. Santo
Domingo, Dominican
Repubbc
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 3-K in BRICKELL
HARBOUR
CONDOMINIUM the
Declaration of which
was filed February 29,
1980 under Clerk's File
No. 80R-58664 and in
Official Records Book
10674. Page 717. of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
together with an
undivided interest in
the common elements
appurtenant thereto set
forth in said
Declaration,
hat bean filed against you
and you are required to serve a
W of your written defenses. if
any, to it on Shepperd Fiber.
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gabies
Florida 38146 on or before March
14, 1986 and file the ongmal with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff t
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
btered against you for the
"*"^ *!! riimwatail
WITNESS my hand and the teal
of this Court this 10th day of
February. 1886.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Osrk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
,_ ^DytyCMrk
FsbnBvyl4.2l.a8;
7.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Csse No. 85-42162 CA 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
WESLEY T. CURRAN and
HUGHETTE CURRAN. his wife.
Defendants
TO: Wesley T. Curran and
Hughette Curran, his wife,
whose residences are
unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors.
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against taid
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive,
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 15. in Block 3. of
LEISURE HEIGHTS,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 93,
at Page 39. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire, of
Rosenthal A Yarchin, P.A.,
Attorneyi for Plaintiff, Suite 800.
3060 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami.
Florida 33137. on or before April
11, 1986, and to file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneyt or immediately
thereafter, otherwise, a default
wul be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 3, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19648ISMarch 7. 14. 21. 28. 1966
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-06845-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
RAUL LONGUEIRA.
et ux.. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: RAUL LONGUEIRA
and MIRIAM E.
LONGUEIRA. his wife
Edifioo Luxerna
Avenida Francisco de
Miranda No. 763
Chacao, Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 13-14 of TERRANOVA
3, a Condominium according
to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded April 5. 1983 in
Official Records Book 11749,
at Page 429. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
bss been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to h% on Sbsppard Faber,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
sddress is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables,
Florida 38146, on or before March
21. 1986 and file the original with
the Clerk of tint Court either
before service on Plaintiff i
attorney or immediately
thereafter, othervnee a default wOl
8 nterad against you for the
rehef demanded in the coinpiaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of thai Court thai 11th day of
February, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19814 February 14, 21. 28
March 7,1986
1 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8672 CP 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAUL K. HEPNER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
uor, of the estate of PAUL K.
HEPNER. deceased, File Number
85-8672 CP 03, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler.
Miami, Florida The personal
representative fit the estate is
HELEN CEASAR, whose address
is 14844 Cedar Road, University
Heights, Cleveland, Ohio. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the dark of
the sbove court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the chum is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated If the
claim is secured shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to esch personal
representative.
AD persons interested in the
estate to whom s copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THI
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge
validity of the decedent's was, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
February 28, 1986.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
PAUL K. HEPNER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Law Offices of
Norman K. Schwan, P.A.
407 Lincoln Road
Suite 10-A.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-1222
19640 February 28;
March 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Atioa No. 8848887
IN RE: The marriage of
BRIGIDA GRAJ, wife.
and
SZYMON ALEKSANDER
GRAJ, husband
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTON
OF MARRIAGE
TO: SZYMON
ALEKSANDER GRAJ
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve s copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if sny. to it on AR-
THUR H. LTPSON. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 187 St. Mauni F1
88182 and file the original with the
dark of the above styled court on
or before March 21. 1986; other
"* a default will be entered
against you for the rehef demand-
d m the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Floods on
this 12 day of February. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: J Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JW16 February 14,81,28;
March 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT a, j
THE ELEVENTH JUDirtii
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLOtS.
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-53369 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATI0\A,|
MORTGAGE CORPORATION
United States corporation
Plaintiff.
HARVEY SPENCER MA1Y
SPENCER, and the onltZl
heirs, deviaeet. grantee,
creditors, or other parti s claims I
by, through, under or againstC
ALINE JOAN HENGErI
METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY, apolitical subdivision of I
the State of Florida; DEL-RIO
FINANCE CORP. a Flond.
corporation; and PARKWAY
REGIONAL MEDICAL
CENTER. INC.. a Florid,
corporation;
Defendants.
TO: Mary Spencer, whoie i
residence is unknown, laj
the unknown parties who I
may be heirs, devisee) i
grantees, assignees, lienort
creditors, trustees and a| j
parties claiming interest bj,
through, under or againit I
said Defendant, who ire not
known to be dead or tint,
and all parties baring or
canning to have any right,
title, or interest is the |
property herein described
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that a I
action to foreclose s mortgage x
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4, in Block 139. of SIXTH
ADDITION TO CAROL
CITY, according to the Plat
thereof, at recorded in Plat
Book 88. at Page 54, of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of j
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire, ol)
Rosenthal A Yarchin, P.A.
Attorneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before April
11. 1986. and to file the origins!
with the Clerk of "this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on March 3. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19649ISMarch 7. 14. 21. 28. 1986
notice of action
constructive service
(no property)
in the circuit court of
the Eleventh judicial
circuit of florida. ln
and for dade county
Civil Aetioa No. 86-006
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RAUL SEGUNDO SOC ARRAS
Petitioner
and
LARTTZA SOC ARRAS
Respondent
TO: LARTTZA SOCARRAS
Residence Unknown:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your wnfta
defenses, if any. to it on David K
Sostchin. Esquire, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1800
W. 49th Street, Suite No. 218.
Hialeah. Florida 33012. and &
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 4, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
Thia notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
sseutrre weeks m THE JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of taid court at Miami. Florida on
this 27 day of February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florids
By: D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David M. Sostchin. Esquire
1800 W. 49th Street
Suite No. 211
rfinasab, Florida 88012
Attorney to Petitioner
Telephone: (806) 884-0162
19846 March 7.14,21,28,1*


Moshe Rivlin Guest Speaker
at JNF Purim Ball
Obituaries
Friday. March 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Continued from Page 1-B
world chairman of the Keren
Kavenieth Jerusalem. According
[n" Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
chairman of the JNF Executive
Board a musical program will be
under the direction of Shmuel
Fershko.
The Jewish National Fund Kin-
neret Development Project "is an
all-important step in the develop-
ment of the Galilee." according to
Rabbi Lehrman. "The project will
contribute to the welfare of
citizens, as well as to the security
of the region." he said.
Rabbi Lehrman said that, in ad-
dition to the development of the
entire Lake Kinneret area in
Tiberias, the JNF. in association
with the Jordan Valley Regional
Council. Kibbutz Kinneret and the
Kinneret Local Council, "will be
creating a 'living museum' on the
site of the historic Kevutzat Kin-
neret. which spawned a new con-
cept of rural settlement, the
kibbutz "
THE ORIGINAL settlement
itahlisbed on land purchased
Jewish National Fund.
i ./.. ion responsible for
. station and land reciama-
[srael Located 200 yards
from the Sea of Galilee near
Tiberias top : km to i2l it was
a pioneering agncultutal settle-
ment which played a central role
in the birth of the State of Israel.
With the creation of the State of
Israel and, until 1975. Kinneret
served as an Israel Defense Nahal
Camp, housing thousands of
soldiers who subsequently found-
ed new rural communities
throughout Israel.
As an honoree at the Mar. 23
Purim Ball event. Grunhut served
in 1949-54 as assistant to the
manager of the Issue Department
of Bank Leumi in Israel. In this
capacity, he was responsible for
the creation, administration and
safe-keeping of the then-new
Israeli currency.
For 25 years, on his arrival in
South Florida, Grunhut was vice
president of the Washington
Federal Savings and Loan
Association on Miami Beach
(now. the First Nationwide).
Thereafter, he assumed the post
of manager of the Washington
Avenue branch.
He is a graduate in journalism
from the British Institute of
Jerusalem in London. In addition
to his role as president of the JNF
here, hfl has served as vice presi
dent of Technion and chairman of
the Banks and Savings and lioan
Division of the Combined Jewish
Appeal. He is a lecturer on the
Middle East. Israel, economics
and banks.
3,000 People Participate In A
Memorial Tribute To Judith Resnik
By SHARON MANDEL
AKRON (JTA) Sen. John
Glenn (D., Ohio) told close to 3,000
participants in a memorial tribute
last week to Dr. Judith Resnik,
the astronaut who perished with
Legal Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
<'nKagc in business under the fic-
titious name AUTO-BLE ALARM
SYSTEMS at 2020 NORTH EAST
135 STREET intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Mitchcl L. Lazarus
19621 February 21.28;
March 7. U. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-07923 FC 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GREGORY GROSSBARD.
husband,
and
ROBERTA L. GROSSBARD.
wife.
TO: ROBERTA L. GROSSBARD
333 WEST 86th STREET.
APT 910
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10024
VOL" ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
COUNTY NATIONAL BANK
BLDG.. 801 NORTHEAST 167
STREET. MIAMI. FL. S3162, and
file the original with the clerk .of
the above styled court on o before
April 4. 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the **J
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 25 day of February, 1986.
RICHARD P. 8RINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court I
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19638 February 28;
March 7, 14.21, 1986
six of her colleagues in the
Challenger shuttle tragedy, that a
way to celebrate her life was to
"celebrate the cause for which she
gave it." Glenn said:
"As we reflect on Judy's life,
and the Challenger's last voyage,
I hope we never forget the last
words that came from that crew.
Those words were: Go with throt-
tle up.' Those words are far more
than a courageous epitaph. They
are America's history, and they
are America's destiny. And they
will turn tragedy into triumph
once again."
CROWDING INTO the gym
nasium of the high school from
which Resnik graduated with
honors in 1966 were 50 alumni
from her class; 20 astronauts, in-
cluding Sally Ride, the first
woman to go up into space;
several scientist from the NASA
Lewis Research Center; students
from the school and others in the
city; and city officials.
Wayne Thompkins. president of
the Class of 1966. and teachers
Donald Nutter and Burton
Willeford, who had known Resnik
well, also paid tribute to her, as
did Principal Robert Hatherill.
School superintendent Conrad Ott
and Mayor Thomas Sawyer, who
organized the meeting, also spoke
in honor of Resnik. Dagmar
Celeste, who represented her hus-
band, Ohio Governor Richard
Celeste, was another speaker.
Dr. Marvin Resnik, the fallen
astronaut's father, thanked the
participants for caring so much.
He quoted from a letter written by
one of his neighbors: "As parents,
there is a personal door to grief no
one else can enter .... But the
sheer number of people who
mourn with you must be a great
comfort now."
TWO MEMBERS of the clergy
also participated in the tribute.
Rabbi Abraham Feffer, spiritual
leader of Temple Beth El. where
Resnik was Bat Mitzvah and con-
firmed, gave the invocation.
Reverend Eugene Morgan, Jr., a
Black minister, made toe closing
benediction.
At the end of the tribute,
students from Firestone High
School, Resnik's alma mater, gave
several musical selections: < '
Isaac labif Passes Suddenly
Isaac Habif, 79. of Miami
Beach, passed away suddenly last
Saturday.
Mr. Habif is survived by his wife
Ena, children Zenaida and
Moreno Habif and Miriam and
Paul Muskat and his grand
children. Phil, Alen. and Michael
Muskat. Enita Habif and Marsha
Zarco, brother, Alberto and
sisters, Sally, Zelda, Sara and Bet-
ty. He was 33rd Degree Mason of
Hibiscus Lodge, Shriner of the
Mahi Temple.
In Cuba he was Past-President
of the Sephardic Community
Chevet-Ahim, also Past President
of B'nai B'rith Maimonides Lodge
and very active in Masonic
Lodges.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday with Riverside Chapel in
charge of arrangements. Inter-
ment followed in Mt. Sinai
Cemetery.
He was Past President of the
Sephardic Jewish Center.
GORDON, Anne, 72. of Miami Beach Fab.
26. The Riverside.
KEl.'TER. Esther E of Miami Beach. Feb.
26. Services were held.
SCHAEFFEK. Mary K4. of Miami Fet. 24
Sen iosi wera held
GOTTESMAN, Max S2 of Miami Beach
Fel. 'i? The Riversul..-
JACOBSON, Steven, U of Miami. Feb. 27
The Riverside.
l.ll'l'. Herman (Hy) of Miami Beach Fel,
27 Blasberg Chapel.
PRESS, Edward, of Miami Beach. Service-,
and interment in N.J.
K1TSCHER. Ida. 98. of Miami. Feb. 2S
l^evitt-Weinstein
LEON, Mrs. Anna R.. of Miami Beach
Rulnn-Zillwri Memorial Chapel.
NORKIN. Louis, of Miami Beach. Feb. 27.
Services were held.
SEGALL, Rose Nee Frank, of Miami
Beach. Services held in Randallstown. Md
COHEN. Hyman, of Miami Beach. Sen-ices
and interment in N.Y. Rubin-Zilbert
Memorial Chapel.
DAVID. Jack. 66, March 1. Services were
held.
KOLB, Joseph, of Miami Beach. Services
and interment in N.Y. Rubin-Zilbert
Memorial Chapel.
MORRISON. Florence, of Miami Beach
Services and interment in N.Y. Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
RATINER. Nathan. 78. of Miami Beach.
March 2. The Riverside.
SCHWARTZ. Rosalind, (Johnson), nee Kop-
oelman. March 1. Services were held
BOLOTIN, Henrietta. 89. of Miami Beach.
March 2. The Riverside.
BRAUN, Kitty, of North Miami Beach.
March 2. Levitt-Weinstein.
DOAN. Louis, 82. of North Miami Beach
March 2. The Riverside.
SILVERMAN. Irving. Interment in
Pinelawn. N.Y.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DjyClosed Sabb.<1n
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Isaac Habif
EBSTEIN. Libyan, of Golden Beach. Feb.
24 The Riverside
ELLINPORT. Abraham. 80. of North
Miami Beach Feb. 26. Services were held.
HABIF
Isaac. 19, of Miami Beach, died Saturday.
Mr. Habif is sunned by his wife Ena,
children Zenaida anil Moreno Habif and
Miriam and Paul Muskat and his grand
children. Phil. Alen. and Michael Muskat.
Enita Habif and Marsha Zarco. brother.
Alberto and sisters. Sally. Zelda. Sara and
Bet iv He was Past President of the Sephar
die Jewish Center He was :t3rd Degree
Mason of Hibiscus Lodge. Shriner of the
Mahi Temple. In Cuba be was Past
President of the Sephardic Community
Chevet-Ahim. also Past President of B'nai
B'rith Maimonides Lodge. He was very ac-
tive in the Masonic Lodges. Funeral ser
vices were held. The Riverside Alton Road
Chapel in charge of arrangements Inter
ment at Mt. Sinai Cemetery
GOLDSTEIN, Jerome S.. of North Miami
Beach. March 3. The Riverside.
HERRMAN, Myron, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices were held.
MORITSKY. Abe. of North Miami Beach.
Services were held.
SHUGAR. Harry Abe. 84. March 8. Ser
vices were held
MARCO. Lillian. Fell. 26. Blasberg Chapel
M1LLIS. Anna J.. of Miami. Feb. 27. The
Riverside.
SCHUSTER, Rose, 83. of Miami Beach.
Feb 26. The Riverside
WEISFELDT. Harry .1.. 80. of North Miami
Beach Feb. 27. Sen-ices were held.
BOC.EL Harry, 74. of Miami Beach. Feb.
24 Kubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
26640 (ireenfield Rd.
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service From Florida Vim
Your First Call tolls amII
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
.532-2099
Represented liv Riverside Memorial Chapel IW
New York: (212)263 7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y.
1 HAVE
YOU BEEN
COMPARING
APPLES m ORANGES
AMONG PBE-AKRANGEMENT PLANS?
If you've shopped lor funeral pre-arrangements.
you've found there are some big differences among them.
Some "package'' plans look economical but then you read the tine
print and discover the add-ons. surcharges, hidden costs they lorgot tc.
mention At Menorah you'll find the custom-designed pre-need plan f
your pocketbook with extra value, extra attention and no extra chen
If vou have a plan now, bring it in and we'll write a Menorah Pre-Need
for lea and give you a dozen oranges. Mow isn't that a p*acn of an offer?
i.
i

Gardens and Funeral Chapels
1
vywr^Bea* 627-2277-DeerteldBec^
--------__4__;---------------i_j^---------------------.....----------
**


P%"l..2J- Tiw'iiV^TV.nVlunTnari/hnday, March 7. 1986
Members often North Miami Beach communities joined together
recently for the Alliance Division North Premier Event on behalf
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign. Joseph "Tommy" Lapid, senior editor of Ma'aric, was the
guest speaker. Shown above, from left, Alliance Division chair-
man Herbert Canarick and Lapid.
Israel and the EEC Negotiating
Adjustment of 1975 Trade Accord
BRUSSELS (JTA) Israel
and the European Economic Com-
munity (EEC) have ended the first
week of what promises to be pro-
longed negotiations aimed at ad-
justing their 1975 trade accord to
accommodate the entry of Spain
and Portugal into the Common
Market, both exporters of
agricultural products that com-
pete with Israel's exports to the
Continent.
Temple Zion Israelite Center's Theatre Guild
will continue its presentation of "Hello, Dol-
ly, with shows on March 8, 9, and 15 at 8
p.m. at the center. Stars pictured are, (left to
right): Terry Lynn Taylor, Sanford Schnier
Darci Oswcky, Lourdes Iglesias. Viki Setter
Michael Walsh, Oscar Cheda, Jr., Sheila S
Chait, and Robert T. Davis.
"Although they have not been
conclusive, we have made pro-
gress." an Israel Embassy official
told the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy. He was speaking of the first
round of meetings here between
the EEC Executive Commission
and an Israeli delegation headed
by Yossef Hadass, Israel's Am-
bassador to Belgium and to the
EEC.
THE OFFICIAL said Israel
welcomed, with reservations,
some of the EEC proposals. One is
the progressive dismantling, over
a 10-year period, of all remaining
tariffs on agricultural exports
from non-EEC Mediterranean
countries.
This would parallel the elimina-
tion of tariffs on such exports
from Spain and Portugal which
joined the Common Market on
Jan. 1. Another suggestion is to
reduce, by 1991, what are called
the import reference prices for
five sensitive products, including
oranges, if export conditions
deteriorate.
Israel has expressed fear that
such a move would introduce an
element of insecurity for the pro-
ducers and the European im-
porters of those products. Israel
has also complained that the ex-
port quotas proposed by the EEC
were based on a 10 member-state
Economic Community whereas
there are now 12 member states.
ISRAEL IS asking the Commis-
sion in addition to eliminate tariffs
on raw materials and finished
goods and to take up the problem
of quotas on fresh cut flowers, an
important Israeli export to the
Common Market countries.
Na'amat USA
"Membership Focus" is the
topic to be addressed by Leah
Benson, membership vice presi-
dent of the South Florida Council
of Na'amat USA on Tuesday, at
the 12:30 p.m. meeting of the
Aviva Chapter of Na'amat USA.
The session will be held in the
auditorium of McDonald Center,
North Miami Beach.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Mads with Fresh Strawberries
Strawberry
Tarts
79*
each
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Light, Plain
Cheese
p99
7-inch
size
(With Fruit ..................S3.5g)
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Fresh Baked
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Pumpernickel
Bread
79
Mb.
loaf
S*1"
True Homemade Flavor
Hot Cross Buns..........
Made with Delicious Ingredients
Apple Bran Muffins .6 to, $169
Mini
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
You May Choose From
Jelly Donuts or
Apple Fritters...............4 m $1
Powdered Donuts.....
Prices Effective
March 6 thru 12,1986
'K-M*
GIVE YOUR STAMPS OF APPROVAL
Turn Your S&H Green Stamps into
Free PACE CONCERTS in South
Florida schools
Deposit vour extra Crccn
Stamps in school wishing
wclb found at vour local
Puhlix
For morr informa-
tion contact PACE
CONCERTS at
9 856*836 Uade
764-4270 Bruward
19 m>
Quantity
Rights Reserved.
Publix


Mmk 1686
FOUNDATION INVESTING IN
OUR COMMUNITY'S FUTURE
'At the heart of
philanthropic work lies
the concept of giving,
not to charity hut to life.'
David Ben Gurion
ZERO COUPON BOND
PROGRAM ENHANCES JEWISH
COMMUNITY TRUST
FUND
See Page 12



CAMPAIGN
A:soraey* Drrsare araj Gamer oc March 13
M a-spie" Appeal raViTjea Teaf^r=ied by Board of Directors
Wcnew Cocesry Car r--- fearsres US Senator Gore
ALLIANCE DIVISION'CAMPAIGN
r erec: g-.-g--- .\_ao.t Drr_sc March Apri events
CC Rtris ;r:-i= :er..-.s :.:^mey
WOMEN'S DIVISION
"AT -.en
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<*> ar:a.r e-
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FEDERATION SOUTH DADE BRANCH
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new journeys to Lsraei
SOLTH DADE YLC AGENCIES
r-iit: fr:c 'e rase r:ocs .r:.: :.:r. Mtrx 22
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AGENCIES
Lsraei 5- ;r:c-^ses r^-r. :':c a_
>rC Soge Dao Cec^er "..: mc P"^rzr rvr.
"5 eEXtoycer;: ?:*zzsp^=i iiajabil :: MMM >5 mm Ml
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MISSIONS ISRAEL
Federsaoc $ Mas-rca r^carsrec:
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JFTV an new thorn for teens
Tikiuauu Magarine features Purim special
10
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T airs "Heritage: Grfiiiatjon and the Jews'"
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CALENDAR
15
Editor
-w*^iiijnliijii3MiaGrM*ae*. Inc.. TOlSomtlsiaA**"-.
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2 F


I Attorneys Division to hear
lewscaster Schorr
Board of Directors reaffirms
Multiple Appeals guidelines
Charles Citrin
Amy Dean
The Attorneys Division of the
Creater Miami Jewish Federation
hold its annual Cocktail Party
Mid Dinner on Thursday, March 13 at
5:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Ho-
1, announced Dinner Committee Co-
Chairmen Charles A. Citrin and
Jerald K. Schwartz.
Daniel Schorr, senior correspon-
dent for Cable News Network, will be
fuest speaker. Schorr, once describ-
as "maybe the best television
lewsman in the field today," is best
remembered for his excellent
Coverage of the Watergate affair. He
has had a long and varied journalism
Liver, beginning in 1948 as a foreign
icrrespondent for the New York
Times.
hiniel Schorr
Schorr served with distinction for
'BS from 1955 covering many major
events in the Soviet Union, Cuba,
Jerlin and in the United States. His
Relentless search for the truth and his
Adherence to ethical journalistic prac-
ices are trademarks of the Schorr
ktyle of reporting. His book, Clearing
he Air, recounts his fascinating,
wmetimes grim experiences as a
?porter investigating government
candal in a government-regulated
nedium.
Most recently Schorr has provided
lear and informative accounts in the
vake of the latest surge in terrorist
ctivities. His reports, his wealth of
Ixperience and unique insights of a
vorld in turmoil, coupled with his
Engaging presentations, have earned
lim the respect of professional jour-
Hists and the public.
Amy Dean, chairman of the At-
>rneys Division, indicated that this
ear's dinner should be the most suc-
essful ever. "We anticipate reaching
tie goal we established for the Divi-
|on last fall. Each and every member
our steering committee Has work-
very hard to insure our success.
fe also owe a great deal of thanks to
ie firms which have participated as
fenefactors for the Attorneys
1 vision."
Gerald K. Schwartz
Participation at the Attorneys Divi-
sion Cocktail Party and Dinner will
require a minimum family gift of $500
to the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign.
Members of the Young Lawyers Sec-
tion of the Florida Bar will be re-
quired to make a $365 minimum gift.
Previous gifts to the 1986 Campaign
are applicable to this event's
minimum gift requirement. The din-
ner couvert is $40 per person and
dietary laws will be strictly observed.
Serving on the Dinner Committee
are Gisela Cardonne, Jane
Estreicher, Alan Jay Friedman,
Melvin B. Frumkes, Carol Gersten,
Bruce Goldberg, Ruben Gottlieb,
Robert Kaplan, L. Barry Keyfetz.
Alan J. Kluger, Judge Robert H.
Newman, Marvin Nodel, Michael
.Olin, Andrew Parish, Harry Payton,
Steven Peretz, Lawrence M. Schantz,
Hon. Barry Schreiber, Jerome
Shevin, Harry B. Smith, Henry
Smyler, J. Bernard Spector, John
Sumberg, Arthur W. Tifford, Robert
H. Traurig and Mark R. Vogel.
Firms which are 1986 Attorneys
Division benefactors include: Aker-
man, Senterfitt & Eidson; Arky,
Freed, Stearns, Watson, Greer &
Weaver; Bierman, Sonnett, Shohat &
Sale; Blank, Rome, Comisky & Mc-
Cauley; Britton, Cassel, Schantz &
Schatzman; Broad & Cassel; Samuel
I. Burstyn; Cypen, Cypen & Dribin;
Entin, Schwartz, Dion, Sclafani &
Cullen; Fine, Jacobson, Schwartz,
Nash, Block & England; Finley, Rum-
ble, Wagner, Heine, Underberg,
Manley & Casey; Fuller & Feingold;
& Greenberg, Traurig, Askew, Hoff-
man, Lipoff, Rosen & Quentel.
Also, Haddad, Josephs & Jack;
Kenny, Nachwalter & Seymour; Alan
J. Kluger; Kornreich & Estreicher;
Mershon, Sawyer, Johnston, Dun-
wody & Cole; Myers, Kenin, Levinson
& Richards; Paul, Landy, Beiley &
Harper; Payton & Rachlin; Podhurst,
Orseck, Parks, Josefsberg, Eaton,
Meadow & Olin; Rosenthal & Yar-
chin; Rubin, Baum, Levin, Constant,
Friedman & Bilzin; Salley, Barns, Pa-
jon, Guttman & Del Valle; Shutts &
Bowen; Smith & Mandler; Sparber,
Shevin, Shapo & Heilbronner; Steel,
Hector & Davis; Therrel, Baisden, &
Meyer Weiss; Weiner, Robbins,
Tunkey & Ross; and Young, Stern &
Tannenbaum. .
For additional information about
the Attorneys Division Cocktail Par-
ty and Dinner, please contact Daniel
Lepow at 576-4000, extension 250.
The Board of Directors of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, at
its February meeting, adopted a
resolution reaffirming its support of
the Multiple Appeals guidelines.
These guidelines, first adopted in
1970 and revised in 1983, were
established to coordinate all Jewish
community fund raising drives so
that no one campaign interferes with
the timing, focus or potential of
others.
According to Multiple Appeals
Committee Chairman Eli Timoner,
"the guidelines recognize that while a
wide variety of Jewish interests
testify to the health and vitality of
our community, there must be an
orderly and coordinated framework
to facilitate more effective fund rais-
ing efforts throughout the entire
Greater Miami Jewish community."
Timoner added, "The Multiple Ap-
peals process is essential in assuring
the continued success of Federation's
annual Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign,
which makes allocations to a full spec-
trum of social services in the local
community, Israel and worldwide."
The guidelines specify that the
period between January 1 and March
15 is to be reserved for the Federa-
tion campaign. Federation's Multiple
Appeals Committee will not approve
or endorse any fund raising drive
publicized or conducted by any
Jewish organization during this
period. Timoner pointed out, "This
principle applies to all campaigns, in-
cluding but not limited to capital, en-
dowment, membership and
maintenance."
Beneficiary agencies of the Federa-
tion may conduct supplementary
membership campaigns provided that
the maximum individual membership
dues or charge for dinner, concerts
and/or other benefit events shall not
exceed $200 per year per person;
beneficiaries shall observe the timing
restrictions for the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, and
beneficiaries or agency affiliated
groups which seek to exceed the $200
limitation must seek annual approval
from the Multiple Appeals
Committee.
Timoner also noted that any Jewish
organization wishing to conduct a
fund raising drive in Greater Miami
must file an application with the
Multiple Appeals Committee. "Even
though an organization may not stage
its fund raising drive during the
period reserved for the Federation
campaign, it still must be approved by
the Multiple Appeals Committee.
This assures that only worthwhile
and credible organizations are asking
for the dollars from our community."
Those individuals who wish to in-
quire about any organization's status
in regard to Multiple Appeals may do
so by contacting the Federation at
576-4000. extension 228.
U.S. Senator Gore
featured at Westview C. C.
***w
Senator Albert Gore, Jr.
The Westview Country Club will
hold its annual dinner on behalf of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign on Sunday,
March 9 at the Westview Country
Club.
United States Senator Albert Gore,
Jr. (D-Tennessee) will be the special
guest speaker, announced Westview
Federation Committee Chairman
Sidney Cooperman. The event will
begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by dinner at 7:30.
Gore was elected to the Senate in
1984 in his first statewide campaign
for public office. He came to the
Senate after having served eight
years as a member of the House of
Representatives. A vocal advocate
for the State of Israel, Gore serves on
three key Senate committees:
Governmental Affairs; Commerce,
Science and Transportation; and
Rules.
One of Gore's primary goals in the
Senate is to work toward a mutual
and verifiable arms control agree-
ment between our nation and the
Soviet Union. He has developed a
comprehensive set of guidelines
which have been adopted as the Ad-
ministration's position in strategic
arms negotiations with the Soviets.
"Our Westview Community is in-
deed privileged to have the oppor-
tunity to hear Senator Gore," noted
Cooperman. "He is a rising star in na-
tional politics, and a great friend of
Israel and the Jewish people."
James Asher serves as vice chair-
man of the Westview Federation
Committee. Other committee
members include L. Jules Arkin,
Richard Berkowitz, Dr. Jeffrey M.
Blumenthal, Paul M. Cummings,
Gary W. Dix, Alvin Entin, Allen D.
Fuller, Bernard C. Fuller, John
Fuller, Larry Fuller, Dr. Edward
Galler, Dr. Mark Gordon, Burt Haft,
Edward Harris, M. Jack Herman,
Donald Jacobson, Dr. Norman Jaffe,
Dr. Daniel Kane, Dr. Sherman
Kaplan, Sidney Lefcourt, David J.
Levy Jr., Harry A. (Hap) Levy, Ber-
nard Loring, Gerald A. Marco, Leon
R. Margules, Jeffrey E. Newman,
Wallace Plapinger, Dr. Robert
Rasken, Harry Rott, Dr. Norman J.
Russ, Richard P. Russ, Sid Shneider,
George M. Simon, Nathan Slewett,
Seymour Smoller, Simeon D. Spear
and Judge Eugene Weiss.
For reservations or additional in-
formation please contact Ellen
Brazer at 576-4000, extension 215.
Federation, March 1986 3


Alliance Division campaign in full swing
Events planned for March and April
Herbert Canarick, chairman of
Federation's Alliance Division, an-
nounced that during March and
April, campaign events will be held
for several of the Division's consti-
tuent communities and alliances.
"With several exciting events
behind us, such as the Alliance North
Premier Event and the Fabulous Fif-
tys Alliance Event, which were held
in February for first-time alliances,
the Division's campaign is far from
over," said Canarick. "Our over-
whelming successes in the past few
months serve as an inspiration for
our Division's volunteers and staff to
make the upcoming events even more
successful. We are all looking for-
ward to an outstanding 1986 CJA-
IEF campaign for Miami's high-rise,
condominium and townhouse
communities."
Turn berry Isle Alliance
The Turnberry Isle Alliance will
hold its Second Annual Ambassador's
Ball on Tuesday, April 1, beginning
with cocktails at 7 p.m. The black-tie
dinner and reception will be held at
the Diplomat Hotel.
Harry Gampel, who was honored
along with his wife Edith at last
year's Ambassador's Ball for outstan-
ding service to Federation and the
Jewish community, will serve as
chairman for this year's Ball.
"Residents of Turnberry Isle have
always shared a strong sense of unity
when it came to supporting the work
of the Federation," said Gampel.
Because of this. I expect that not only
will this year's Ambassador's Ball be
a wonderful and exciting affair, but
also that our community's campaign
which has topped the $1 million
mark in the past will be the best
ever."
Guest speaker at the Ambassador's
Ball will be Asher Nairn, minister of
information for the Israel Embassy in
Washington.
A minimum gift of $1,800 is re-
quired for attendance at the Turn-
berry Isle Alliance Second Annual
Ambassador's Ball, and couvert is
$75 per person. For reservations or
more information, please call Susan
Marx at 576-4000. extension 202.
Harry and Edith Gampel
Aventura Alliance
Under the leadership of Hazel
Canarick. Aventura Alliance chair-
man, the Aventura community will
hold a brunch on behalf of Federa-
tion's 1986 can on Sunday.
March 23 at 10:30 a m. in the Garden
Room of the Turnberry Country
Club.
The brunch will be held in honor of
the chairmen of the nine buildings
which constitute the Aventura
community.
Ambassador Yaacov Morris, press
officer of Israel's Permanent Mission
to the United Nations and former
Israeli ambassador to Brazil, will be
guest speaker at the brunch.
Attendance at the Aventura Com-
munity Brunch requires a minimum
gift of $100 to the 1986 CJA-IEF, and
couvert is $10 per person.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please call Judy Eitelberg at
576-4000. extension 216.
Hazel Canarick
Winston Towers Alliance
Residents of Winston Towers are
invited to attend a luncheon on Sun-
day, March 16, honoring Esther and
Joseph Reisel for their many years of
service to the Federation and the
Jewish community. The luncheon,
which begins at 12 noon in the
Winston Towers "200" Building, will
benefit the 1986 CJA-IEF campaign.
Guest speaker at the luncheon.
Israel Amitai, is a noted Israeli jour-
nalist, author and television
producer.
Jerome Berliner serves as overall
chairman for the Winston Towers
community.
A minimum gift of $100 to Federa-
tion's 1986 campaign is required for
attendance at the luncheon, and
couvert is $5 per person.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please contact Adele Lurie at
576-4000, extension 310.
Bal Harbour 101
Thanks to the work of a devoted
group from the Bal Harbour 101
building, a Federation event for
residents which was held in
previous, but not recent, years will
be rejuvenated in the form of the Bal
Harbour 101 Premier Event, schedul-
ed for Sunday evening, April 6. The
cocktail party and buffet dinner
begins at 6 p.m. in the main dining
room.
According to Sam Rosenfield, Bal
Harbor 101 chairman, "the commit-
tee hopes that this reception will
serve as a pilot program for future
alliances in Bal Harbour."
Edith Legum, reception chairman,
added that "We are very happy that
after many years, the door nas re-
opened for Federation campaign
events in this community."
Attendance at the Bal Harbour 101
Premier Event requires a minimum
gift of $2,500 to the 1986 CJA-IEF.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please contact Susan Marx at
576-4000, extension 202.
Del Prado Alliance
The Del Prado Alliance will hold a
brunch on behalf of the Federation's
campaign on Sunday, April 6. Jerome
Gleekel, Middle East expert, will be
guest speaker at the brunch, which
begins at 10:30 a.m.
Charles Wilder serves as chairman
of the Del Prado Alliance; and
Jeanette Blumenthal is co-chairman.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please call Lynda Greenfield at
576-4000, extension 356.
Charles Wilder
Edith Legum and Sam Rosenfield
Westview C.C. tennis tourney
benefits CJA-IEF
The Westview Country Club recently staged its first pro-am tenni.-
tournament on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
Dr. Norman Jaffe serves as chairman of the Westview C.C. Tennis Com
mittee. The winning pro-am team consisted of tennis professional John
Geraghty and club member Bob Ferman.
The following club members participated in the tournament: Dr. Mar
Jaffe. Dr. Sherman Kay. Dr. Mike Gilbert. Joe Kanter. Sidney Cooperman
Bob Ferman. Murray Candib. Seymour Brodie. Dr. Norman Jaffe, Dr. Gar.
Jaffe. Bobby Hoffman. Dr. Milton Caster. M. Jack Herman and Jack
Carmel.
Sidney Cooperman is chairman of the Westview/ Federation Commit
tee. M. Jack Herman is president of the Westview Country Club.
?77 aiiheJiegtwu' CC pro-am tennis tournament on behalf of th,
LJA-lEr Campaign are (from left to right i M. Jack Herman.
Geraghty. Bob Ferman. Sidney Cooperman. Cor* Waldman. Dr. Norman
Jaffe. Dr. Gary Jaffe and George Glowa.
I Federation, March 1986


Spring learn-in explores
Passover traditions
The Federation Women's Division,
in conjunction with the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education (CAJE), will
hold its annual "Spring Learn-In" in
the form of a three-part educational
series on Passover and the Hagadah,
announced Robbie Herskowitz, WD
vice president for Community
Education.
Rabbi Norman Lipson, director of
CAJE's Institute for Jewish Studies,
will lead the workshops, which will
provide an overview of the Passover
Haggadah as studied and read
throughout Jewish history.
"It is important that we unders-
tand the meaning of the Passover
tradition and the rituals which we
practice during this joyous season.
Our Learn-In will certainly prove to
be an enlightening experience for all
the participants," said Mitzi Center,
chairwoman of the Learn-In.
For more information about the
Spring Learn-In, please call the
Women's Division at 576-4000.
BPW "networks9 at art gallery
The new "networking" branch of the Federation's Business and Profes-
sional Women's Division (BPW) held the first in its series of programs this
month. The group met at the Barbara Gillman Gallery to view the private art col-
lection of Ruth and Richard Shack.
The networking branch, under the leadership of Lisa Treister, BPW vice
president for Leadership Development, is designed for women wishing to meet
other professionals in their respective fields.
The next networking program will be held Wednesday, April 2; and subse-
quent sessions will be held the first Wednesday of each month.
Maryanne Witkin serves as chairwoman of the BPW.
More information about the April 2 and subsequent sessions can be obtained
by calling the Women's Division at 576-4000.
Photo highlights
WD campaign events
The Business and Professional Women recently held a $100 minimum gift event at the
Mayfair House on behalf of the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Pro-
ject Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign. Seen at the event are (from left to right) Karen Brown
Spunk and Ray Ellen Yarkin. BPW campaign co-chairwomen; Susan Neshick, event co-
chairwoman; guest speaker Dora Roth; Ileane Rayman Kaufman, event co-chairwoman
and WD Campaign Chairwoman Gail Newman.
Miami Beach women took to the high seas aboard the S.S. Doral on behalf of the 1986 CJA-
IEF. Seen at the $1X5 minimum gift event are (from Uft to right) WL> Campaignthair-
woman Gail Newman; Vicki Land, event chairwoman; WD President Dorothy Podhurst,;
Barbara Aronson and Helene Berkowitz, Miami Beach campaign co-chairwomen; Airxa
Raskin, Miami Beach area chairwoman; and seated is Federation Board of Directors
member and guest speaker for the event, Myra Farr.
The South Dade area of the Women s Division held a $200 minimum gift luncteon and tour
of the gardens and villa of Vizcaya. Seen at the event were: (left to right) Linda Jas
Connie Nahmad, event co-chairwomen; Gail Newman; Dorothy Podhurst; Barbara Kasper
and Micki Hochberg, South Dade vice chairwomen for campaign; and Elaine Koss, chair-
woman of the South Dade Board.
WD gets to the core
of the Big Apple
This month, members of the
Federation Women's Division will get
to the core of the "Big Apple" and
taste a Jewish experience with a
three-day mission to New York,
scheduled for March 18-20, announc-
ed Gail Meyers and Elaine Richman,
mission co-chairwomen.
As a major highlight of the trip,
Muriel Russel, who has been an active
member of the Federation and the
Women's Division for many years,
will host a cocktail party for mission
participants at New York's Harmonie
Club.
The Harmonie, founded in 1852, is
one of the oldest social clubs in the ci-
ty. For its first 41 years, the club was
called the "Harmony Gesellschaft;"
German was its "official" language
and the Kaiser's portrait hung in the
hall. But like American society, the
club eventually became more tolerant
and allowed Jewish members. Today,
bar mitzvahs are as common at the
club as cotillions.
Other highlights of the "Big Apple
Mission" include an in-depth explora-
tion of New York's Lower East Side,
with visits to a mikvah and the shops
of a Torah scribe and a tallit maker.
Mission participants will tour the
fascinating Jewish Museum, which in-
cludes exhibits on the Jews of
Kayfeng, China; and Treasures of the
Jewish Museum.
A cocktail reception will be held
with Arthur Kurzweil, foremost
Jewish geneologist; and mission par-
ticipants will be extended hospitality
at the home of the Israeli consul. Also
as part of the trip, participants will
visit Russian immigrants at Brighton
Beach and will tour the oldest Jewish
congregation in North America, Con-
gregation Shearith Israel, a Spanish
and Portuguese synagogue. Par-
ticipants will also be treated to a
joyous Jewish Musical, "The Golden
Land," with an authentic klezmer or-
chestra at a Yiddish Theater.
"When most of our parents and
grandparents came to the United
States from Europe, they settled in
New York," explained Gail Meyers.
"It was in this city that the roots
were planted for what grew into the
Jewish-American culture we know
today."
Elaine Richman added that "All of
the things we will see and places we
will visit on the mission will help us to
become closer to our Jewishness and
its origins. It will help to refresh our
sense of purpose for the work we do
for the Federation and its Women's
Division in Miami.''
Dorothy Podhurst serves as presi-
dent of the Women's Division and
Gail Jaffe Newman is campaign chair-
woman. Participating in the mission
are: Amy Dean, Phyllis Harte, Micki
Hochberg, Elaine Ross and Elly
Wolff. Also, Betty Cooper, Mikki
Futernick, Joan Hayet, Meryle Lor-
ing, Estelle Segal, and Margie
Spritzer.
For more information about the
New York mission, please call the
Women's Division at 576-4000.
The Southwest Dade area of the Women s Division recently staged a $52 minimum gift
event. The theme of the event was 'Generation to Generation," highlighted by a fashion
show and brunch at the Mayfair House. Seen at the event are (from Uft to right) Judy
Levenshon, event co-chairwoman; Judy Adler, Southwest Dade area chairwoman; Federa-
tion Associate Treasurer and event guest speaker Michael M. Adler; Vim Brownstein,
event co-chairwoman and Liz Litowitz, Southwest Dade campaign chairwoman.
The North Dade area of Federation s Women *s Division recently held its ninth annual lun-
cheon and tennis tournament to benefit the 1986 CJAIEF. Seen at the $200 minimum gift
event are standing (from left to right) WD Campaign Chairwoman Gail Newman; event
guest speaker Dora Roth; Sandy Belkind and Lenore Elias, North Dade campaign co-
chairwomen; WD President Dorothy Podhurst and Debbie Edelman, North Dade area
chairu>oman. Seated are (from left to right) event Co-chairwomen Steffi Cohen, Susan
Kleinberg and Nettie Weiner.
Hold the Date
Thursday, March 13:
Campaign Steering Committee
Meeting
10 a.m.
Federation Building
Monday, March 17:
WD Nominating Committee Meeting
10 a.m.
Federation Building
Tuesday, March 18 Thursday,
March 20:
New York Mission
Monday, March 24 and Tuesday.
March 25:
WD Area Board Meetings
Wednesday, April 2:
BPW Networking Program
5:45 p.m.
Location to be announced
Federation, March 1986 5


SB Board shares special Shabbat SB Shalom holds
"The room was filled with such
ruach. such a feeling of warmth and
family that it was hard to believe we
were the same group which is usually
together to discuss matters of com-
munity concern in the formal setting
of a board meeting." These com-
ments by Dr. Gail Kwal describe her
reaction to a special Tu B'shevat
Shabbat shared recently by members
of Federation South Dade Branch's
Board of Directors and their families.
Kwal served as chairman of the
event.
SB offers Rx to
medical professionals
Under the chairmanship of Drs.
Nilza and Robert Karl. Federation's
South Dade Branch has established a
leadership outreach program for
medical professionals in the area.
The program, which will consist of
a series on Jewish consciousness-
raising and leadership skills, will
begin with a meeting scheduled for
Wednesday. March 26 at S p.m.
"The South Dade Human Resource
Outreach Committee has been trying
for a while to get a program designed
to encourage and train medical pro-
fessionals to become involved in
Federation and other Jewish com-
munity organizations." said Robert
More than 70 people congregated
at Federation Gardens for an evening
complete with a Shabbat service led
by Larry Metsch. South Dade's vice
chairman for Community Education;
a special Tu B'sheixit seder with
tasting of the first wines and fruits of
the season and readings by Board
members, led by Paul Berkowiti; and
a traditional Shabbat dinner. Prior :
dinner. Mike Samole led the group in
the kiddush. the nu,t;i and in the
blessing of the children. He also led
the group in Knbalat Shabbat songs.
_ Marlene Olin made "kiddy bags"
filled with Israeli bubble gam and
toys for Board members'"children
who attended. Following dinner.
Maureen Berkowitz and Sara
Gamberg led the children in Israeli
song and dance.
Berkowitz. who is South Dade's
vice chairman for Human Resource
Outreach, said that the event more
than attained its goal of enhancing
the sense of community and family
among the Board members. "And the
fact that the administration of
Federation Gardens was very kind in
working hand-in-hand with" us and
allowing us the use of their facilities,
further extended that feeling of com-
munity. We were so impressed with
the spirit of the evening, that Board
members keep asking when we'll plan
the next one."
Karl. "It is good to see that our work
is finally coming to fruition."
He added that the program's pur-
pose is "to teach participants about
the workings of the Jewish communi-
ty and to help raise their level of per-
sonal identification with their
Jewishness. thereby giving them the
inspiration to "use their new-
knowledge for the community's
benefit."
Paul Berkowitz serves as the South
Dade Branch's vice chairman for
Human Resource Outreach.
For more information on the
Medical Outreach Group, call Marcia
Sue Needle at 251-9334.
Israel 38 inarches' ahead
Plans for the South Dade "Israel
3S March, scheduled for Sunday.
April 13. are being finalized and the
March is taking a more elaborate and
parade-like form than ever before
announced Susan Metsch. South
Dade March chairman.
Metsch said that in addition to
floats, and banners carried by par-
ticipating organizations, the March
will include bands from Booker T
y> ashington Junior High School. Cor-
?: Par^ Senk>r ***&> School and
Kilhan Senior High School.
This year, the March Committee
will work with the South Florida Con-
ff^nce on Soviet Jewry, an arm of
the Federation's Community Rela-
tions Committee, to create a Soviet
Jewry theme for the March. Par-
ticipants will walk on behalf of Soviet
Jews who are unable to march in
celebration of Yom Ha'atzmaut
(1* al Independence Day). As proof
sponsors who have pledged
donations to the Federation's CJA-
IE. campaign if their sponsored mar-
cher completes the walk marchers
will turn in post cards to President
Reagan urging pressure on Soviet
leaders to free those Jews who wish
to emigrate.
Metsch said she hopes and expects
that every organiraooo in the area
*:- hi ti -.-:- n w
ticipate. so that one massive state-
ment of solidarity on behalf of the
Jewish people may be made in the
form of thousands marching in unity
and celebration of Israel's 38th
birthday.
In order to obtain community par-
ticipation, a meeting to plan recruit-
ment strategies was held February
12 in the home of Debbv Grodnick.
March Recruitment Committee
Chairman. A February 24 meeting at
the South Dade Branch included
representatives of South Dade
synagogues, agencies and
organizations.
The israel 38" March in South
L>ade is part of a community-wide
lorn Haatzmaut celebration coor-
dinated bv the Jewish Communitv
Lenters of Greater Miami in coopera-
tion with Federation. The March will
be followed by the South Dade JCC =
Israel 38 Celebration, which begins
at 4 p.m. on the grounds of the South
Dsde Branch and South Dade JCC
the ending point for the March.
rki^ for "re information about
the Israe: UT March and CeJebra-
oon in next months edition of
rederanon. For more informatioo
bom the March in SoaA Dad/
&*!! *"** ^ at
newcomers reception
The South Dade Shalom Committee of Federation's South Dade Branch will
hold a dessert reception on Wednesday evening. March 12, for newcomers to the
South Dade area. The Shalom committee was formed to act as a Jewish
"welcome wagon" and make new residents feel comfortable in the community
them to the workings of the South Dade Jewish community."
At the reception, newcomers will meet representatives of the Jew
munity Centers oi Greater Miami, the Jewish Vocational Service, the J
Family Service of Greater Miami and Federation's South Dade Branch. There
they can get a more in-depth understanding of the variety of services which are
available in the area.
"The Jewish community in South Dade is vibrant and growing." said Br.die
"It is often hard for a newcomer to learn about all of the many services ai
tivities here, so through the reception, we hope to provide them* with some i if this
information. We also hope to help them feel more at home here, help them meet
other newcomers and encourage them to take advantage of the mam u;.;
tunities for involvement."
If you are a newcomer to the South Dade community and would like to attend
the reception, please call Marcia Sue Needle at 251-9334.
Seen at a recent S li
Dade area "Blast fr
Past" table cap'
meeting were (left to right
standing) Fran Berrin.
event co-chairman:
Lloyd Broum, South 11 i
Branch chai r m Norman Lieberman. South
Dade Branch campaign
chairman; Larry Berrin;
and Sheryl Berrin.
Kneeling (left to righ
David Abramou-it: and
Bob Berrin. event ro-
cha irmen.
Leadership development series
nearing completion
As the Federation South Dade
Branch's Leadership Development
Group I approaches the final session
of its series of informative
workshops. Leadership Development
Group II has passed the halfway point
m its series.
Marilyn Kohn. who serves as co-
teader of Group I with her husband
Ron. said "Members of our Leader-
ship Development Group are looking
forward to our 'graduation' from the
program and hope to use our newlv-
gained knowledge to aid our involve-
ment in South Dade's Jewish
community."
The final program for Leadership
Development Group I will focus on
Meeting Jewish Community Needs
g Miami: The Federation and its
f Tft ?u ^P1*""*" T^ Program,
to be held Thursday, April 3 at 745
p.m.. will also aid graduates in fin-
j^gtheir places among South Dade's
Leadership Development Group II
met February 25 in the home of
lSL!? S*m H*rte- who ser'-'e as
***** Jacob Solomon, associate
R-Tr g**-Srt PlannS^SS
Bjoget Department, spoke on "The
Greater Miami Jewish Federation:
The Central Address of the Jewish
Community.
"Protecting Jewish Interests: The
Role of Community Relations."
A new leadership development
group will form soon in South Dade.
For more information, call Marcia
Sue Needle at 251-9334.
Group II will meet
iav Ni-
agara on Tues-
Hold the Date
Tuesday. March 11:
South Dade Board of Directors
meeting and learning institute (thini
session)
South Dade Hebrew Acaderm
Cafeteria
7:45 p.m.
Wednesday, March 12:
South Dade Shalom Newcomers
Reception
8:00 p.m.
Tuesday. March 18:
Leadership Development Group II
Saturday. March 22:
SD/YLC "Blast from the Pa<=t
Event
Hyatt Regency Hotel
8:00 p.m.
Tuesday. March 25:
Israel 38 March Recruitment Meeting
r ederation South Dade Branch
:45 p.m.
Wednesday. March 2:
Medical Outreach Group
Federation South Dade Branch
8:00 p.m.
Thursday. April 3
Leadership Development Group I


Grab your "main squeeze" and join
the Federation's South Dade Branch
and Young Leadership Council for a
Blast From the Past," an evening of
dinner and dancing to the music of
The Dovells, The Shirelles and Danny
and the Juniors, stars of the 1950s
and '60s. The event, which is schedul-
ed for Saturday, March 22 at 8 p.m.,
will be held at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel in downtown Miami.
The "Blast From the Past" corn-
dines the South Dade Branch's an-
nual "Bigger and Better Event" with
a Young Leadership Council (YLC)
event, thereby promising to be a very
special one.
Participation in the event requires
a minimum gift of $365 to the 1986
CJA-IEF, and couvert is $40 per
person.
YLC and SD
'Blast from
the Past'
Mona and David Abramowitz and
Fran and Robert Berrin are chairmen
of the event. Richard A. Berkowitz is
YLC campaign chairman; and Nor-
man Lieberman is the South Dade
Branch's campaign chairman.
"We are very excited about the pro-
spect of South Dade and YLC holding
a joint event." said Jack H. Levine.
chairman of the YLC. "We expect
the evening to be extra special for
several reasons. First, the food will
be prepared by the Hyatt's chefs
under rabbinical supervision, so it
should be top-notch. And, second, the
entertainment promises to be
exceptional."
Alvin Lloyd Brown, chairman of
the South Dade Branch, added that
"because both groups are
predominantly young and vibrant,
the evening should prove to be an
upbeat and exciting one."
Both groups urge each of their
members to "be there or be square!"
For more information about the
"Blast From the Past" event, call
Jerry Neimand at the South Dade
Branch, 251-9334, or Marsha Kolman
of the YLC, 576-4000.
GUSMAN CULTURAL CENTER
174 EAST FLAGLER STREET IN DOWNTOWN MIAMI
South Dade Hebrew Academy
elects new officers
Ron Kriss
The South Dade Hebrew Academy
(SDHA), located on the premises of
the South Dade Jewish Community
Center, 12401 S.W. 102 Avenue, is
pleased to announce the election of its
new officers for the coming year.
Ron Kriss will serve as president of
the school. He is a commercial at-
torney, board member of the Temple
Zion-Israelite Center and a member
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Planning and Budget Commit-
tee. He succeeds Jack Goldstrich, a
CPA who served as president for
three and one-half years. Mr.
the Board as treasurer.
Also elected were Dr. Ruben Gur-
vich, as vice president Education;
Mrs. Sandy Cantor, as vice president
- Enrollment; Gideon Ben-Ami, as
vice president Fund Raising;
aheila Wagner, as vice president
Projects; and Hector Vergara, as
secretary.
The school is honored to have pro-
minent members of the Greater
Miami Jewish community serving on
its board, including Circuit Court
Judge Fred Barad; Barry White, a
member of the Federation Planning
and Budget Committee; Martha
Moses, treasurer of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education (CA-
JE); Joe Huppert, a CPA, member of
the executive board of CAJE and
past President of SDHA; and Dr.
Lana Monchek, director of develop-
ment research at the University of
Miami.
Other board members include Dr.
Andre Abitbol, Dr. Jeff Blatt, Lisa
Blatt, Nurit Cohen, Effrat Afek,
Helen Elfenbein, Chet Elfenbein,
Rabbi Edwin Farber, Claire
Greenberg, Rabbi Warren Kasztl,
Gail Kasztl, Marni Kriss, Karen
Levin, Deborah Monchek, Marsha
Rosenbloom, Shellie Sherry, Cathy
Shmalo, Amanda Vergara and
Richard Wagner.
SDHA Principal Marlene Mitchell
congratulated the new board
members on their appointments. She
also extended heartfelt thanks to
Goldstrich. "The significance of Mr.
Goldstrich's contribution to SDHA
far exceeded what one might expect
from the president of a day school. He
was personally concerned with every
aspect of the total school right
down to knowing every child's
name."
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman continues
to serve as headmaster of the school
and is responsible for the Judaic
Studies Department. The school has
begun accepting registration for the
1986-87 academic year. For more in-
formation, call or visit the SDHA of-
fice, 253-2300.
The South Dade Hebrew Academy
is a member of Federation's Family
of Agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
(HIGHEST RATING}
A MASTERWORK...
A BEAUTIFUL FILM,
AN ELEGIAC FILM.
An astonishing achievement, a probing, vibrant
examination that penetrates to the vortex of the
Holocaust. M contains no archival footage. No atrocity
scenes. Rather. SHOAH' moves along swiftly in an
impassioned-yet-dispassionate way...making what
happened more crystal clear than anything within
memory. Lanzmann stretches a great canvas and
paints upon it like Seurat."
Leo Seligsohn. Newsday
SHOAH
A FILM BY CLAUDE LANZMANN
APRIL 8-18
Call 372-0925 for more information
Young Leadership Council
Hold the Date
Thursday, February 27
6:00 p.m.
YLC Program & Education
Committee
Meeting at the Federation
Sunday-Tuesday, March 2-4
5th National UJA Young
Leadership Conference
Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, March 4
7:30 p.m.
YLC Program & Education
Committee
Movie Learn-In
at the Beaumont Cinema, University
of Miami
"Symphony for the Six Million"
Tuesday March 11, 18, 25
Tuesday, April 1, 8, 15
7:30 p.m.
YLC Program & Education
Committee
Spring Learn-In
"From Womb to Tomb"
at the Federation
Wednesday, March 12
6:00 p.m.
YLC Community & Political
Involvement Committee
meeting at the Federation
Wednesday, March 19
6:00 p.m.
YLC Singles Committee Meeting
at the Federation
Wednesday, March 19
7:30 p.m.
YLC Board Meeting
Saturday, March 22
8:00 p.m.
YLC/Federation South Dade Branch
$365 Minimum Gift Campaign Event
"A Blast from the Past"
at the Hyatt Regency Hotel
Thursday, March 27
7:00 p.m.
YLC Washington Conference Follow-
UP
and Tallahassee Mission Orientation
at the Federation
Sunday, March 30
11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
YLC Program & Education
Committee
Sandra C. Goldstein Jewish Public
Affairs Forum
"A Day With Danny Siegel"
Wednesday, April 2
6:00 p.m.
YLC Program & Education Commit-
tee Meeting
Federation, March 1986 7


7
1
THE GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
SALUTES ITS SUPER SUNDAY/SUPER WEEK VOLUNTEERS
Stuart Abcug
Mam Abel
Mfckey Abaftop
Jack Abfove
Barbara Abrama
Bets Aon
Michael M Adkx
Annete Aenanson
Karen Alexander
SNorm Alexander
Jeanette Alfassa
Arnold Altman
Kan Scott Altman
Carole Amster
Helen R Amater
Larry Apple
Lisa Apple
Herman Apptabaum
lertza Arad
Markn Arky
Slwlay Aron
Kevin Aronoff
Leonard Aronoff
Barbara Aronaon
James Aaher
Lon Aszhenes
Rosa Aug
Corey Augenstem
MT August
SyMa Amttach
Charles Axekod
Juke Batjcrsck t
Sophie Bach
Florence Badanes
Samuel Badanes
L*an Baker
Mtton D Balaam
Toby Barter
Marshal Baltuch
Marcia G Band
Robert Band
Mark Baranek
Stacy Baranek
Stacy Barasch
Howard Barbanal
Ben B Barn
Lean Bartuch
Etta Bamett
Eunice Baros
Jbn Baros
Edltti Baum
Murry Baum
Lang Baumgarten
Base Back
AJna Backer
LyOaBMCfatr
Douglas Beek
I'wm Bear
Jutalta Bear
yoshua Sal Bshar
Zrvw Beadal
Pamela Daley
M Bety
Zev Ben Beitchman
Joyce Betar
Isaac Bekerman
Suzanne Boko
Stacy Betf*r
iizi B**nd
r*coie Befcnd
Sandy Be* md
Jack Batock
Elame Benenson
Mtdred Bartrs
Norton Banrs
Scot Bennett
Mchaal Benowrtz
Joseph Barenhut
Isaac Berazdrvm
Mat L Berezm
Halene Berger
Ida Berger
Pola Barggrum
Shatey Bergman
Bobbie Berkan
Michael A Berke
Bebbie Berko
Shirley Berko
Beatrice Berkowlt/
HMwSMCIOlU
Isaac Cohen
Jennifer Cohen
M Cohan
Katy Cohan
Uaan Cohan
laty S Cohen
Loony Cohen
Lon Arm Cohen
Rose Cohan
Shalom Cohen
Steffi Cohan
Theodora Cohen
Tim Cohan
Deborah Cohn
Lane Coleman
Alan Cook
Mara Coopefman
Joann Cowan
Pam Cowper
Lisa Crane
JoseCradl
Owen Crosby
SyMa Crowe*
Doma Cutter
Brian Darnels
Ale. Daoud
Efyse Dauman
Leonard Davidson
R Davidson
Amy Davis
Barbara Dans
Amy Dean
Pearl Debram
Betty Sue Dekro
Sophie Demevo
Dortan S Denburg
Mark Danon
Carol Deprtmo
Marti Oepnmo
Mtikl Depnmo
Motses Oefednnker
Katie Dams
CM Diamond
Ian Diamond
Thafma Diamond
Adnane Gumn DKkter
Meddrth Dobelstem
Dorothy Doom
Marvin Dom
Merov Droda
Cham Dromi
Mm/am Drorm
Wy Druckar
Sam Dubbin
Wcnata Duchon
Jeff Ducker
Alee Durst
Fred Durst
Herman J Eaton
Dabble Edetman
Ethel Edetman
Jack Edetman
Lenny Edalateln
Unda Enrich
Ian Bsenberg
Martin Eisenman
Dome Bsenstat
Larry Eiaenstat
Rabbi Michael Eisenstat
Dabra Bafnger
Enriqua Bber
Chary Bbrand
Dan Bbrand
Stanley Bbrand
Jenny EtgJarsn
Ruth Bglarsh
Kl. Ekas
FJfyn Buns
Lots Bath manual
Marcia Engefman
Tern Enraa
Josephine Epefbaum
Unda Epabaum
Sholem Epesbaum
Mm Sholem Epeabaum
Alan W Epstein
Bermce Epstein
Bonnie Epstein
Clara Epalawi
Harvey L Goldstein
Henrietta Goldstein
Rose Goldstein
Barry GofdstJen
BaaaQokWrtch
Gat GokJwaser
Alan GokJwyn
Mrs Sol Golub
Sol S Golub
Barbara Goodman
Evelyn Goodman
Florence Goodman
Hilary Goodman
Jennifer Goodman
Marty Goodman
Mary Goodman
Sidney Goodman
Morton Gooze
Alan D Gordon
Saot Gordon
Jason Gordon
Mark Gordon
Tracy Gordon
JeflGothetf
Deborah Gottrwb
Rebecca Gottleb
Cranj Goutd
Erraty Goutd
Greg Gowan
Sue Grabow
Harry W Graff
Michael Graff
Governor Bob Graham
Laune Grand
Jeff Granoff
Doron Granovsky
Stuart Grant
Sue Graubert
David Gray
Bertha Green
Thaia Green
Renay Greenbaum
Ann Greenberg
Praappe Greenberg
Sam Greenbarg
Susan Greenberg
Traci Greenberg
Yetta Greenblatt
Regma GreenM
Betty Greenspan
Esther Greenspan
Eugene Greenspan
Mornque Greenwald
Ben Grenatd
Bat Grodnick
Martin Grossman
Setma Grossman
Annette Gruber
Anal Grunberg
Moms Guberman
Stela Gumbi
Jacky Gull
Anme Gyory
Stela Haas
Medred Hachman
Gaa Hadara
Paola Haowa
Mlton Hahn
Tracy Halas
Ale> Hatjerstem
Ronnie Halpem
Mnam Hansen
Doty Hams
Dora Hards
Ed Hams
Gal Hams
Jon Hams
Kan Hams
Uaan Harris
Shirley Hams
Shirley Hams
Mnam Harrison
Phytis Harte
Samuel Harte
Ji Hartley
Martin Haskel
Laa Hautman
US San Paula Hawkins
Joan Hayet
Charlotta Held
Sue Herfman
Esther Hetor
Phylis Henann
Jose Heres
MBOV IWB5
Ma*a Herkes
Adam Herman
Debbie Herman
Fred Hersch
Ida Herscowttz
Rebecca Hsrscowitz
Kim Herskowttz
Robbie Herskowltz
Chavl Hertz
Mantyn Hknmef
Marcie Hirshberg
Rochele Hlttnar
Mek. Hochberg
Sam Hochberg
Karol Hochman
Kenneth Hoffman
Unda Hoffman
Susan Hoffman
Emty Hoftnar
AJma Hofstadter
Newton Hofstadter
Shan Hofbert
Bonnie Hoaander
Aace Hcxtzman
Gary Y Hottzman
Susan Hcxtzman
Wendy Horreck
Bunny Horowitz
Esther Horowitz
Nkssa Horowitz
Paula Horton
Harold Hoo.il/
Els* Howard
Roberta Craprut Hulce
Alan Hupert
Greta Hupert
Louis igtarsh
Lous Iglarsh
Pean Iglarsh
Clara las
Ruth knmerman
Zena Inden
Marfyn Ipp
Diane Israel
Gladys Israel
Joanna Jacowitz
Leah S Jaffe
Scott Jaffa
Unda Jamas
Ruth Jankowitz
Sarah Janover
Artaan Jenks
Frances Johnson
Alex Joseph
Paula Joseph
Metesa Kadan
Cheryl Kadar
Paul M Kade
Arle Kadun
Karen Katm
Diane Kahn
Jack Kahn
Matthew Kahn
Helen Kaistone
Channon Kane
Rachel Kann
Betty Kaplan
Joseph Kaplan
ins Kaplan
Jock Kaplan
Robert Kaplan
Robert A Kaplan
Sol Kaplan
Feme Karnes
Baa Karp
Ann Karpel
Gertrude Kartzmer
MaMn Kartzmer
Tin Kashuk
Barbara Kasper
Martin Kasper
Benemarte Kass
FJeanore Kalian
Ezra Katz
Jack Katz
LBan Katz
Mary Katz
Rhonda Katz
Jack Kaufman
Ruth Kaufman
Ji Kavotchyk
Harvey Keck
Marcos Karbel
Michael Keshen
Nelson C Keshen
Ida Kessefman
Saggy KIk
Sheparfl King
Jarsh Kmaty
B.A Kirschenbaum
SyMa Kirschenbaum
Jose Klahr
Edna Kiar
Rose Klausner
Gertrude Klem
Lee Kiem
Susan Kleinbarg
Joseph KWnman
Charlotte B Kaaman
Alan J Ktuger
fssac Knoi
Eva KokW
Andy Konenberg
Jerry Kopek-nan
Marcia Kopelrnan
Audrey Kosnrtzky
Harry Kosnrtzky
Vetta Koster
Hedy Kovac
MJke Kovac
Brian Kovter
Bane Kramer
Florence Kramer
Ida Kramer
Ruth Krantz
Stuart Krantz
Sloven J Kravltz
Richard Krtgel
L Krttzman
AJaaon KrongoU
Robbie KrongokJ
Leonard Kronstadt
Dorothy Kroop
Zvi Krugtak
Randee Kuper
Dna Kuperman
Bonnie Kutneb
Alan Lads
Martyn Lacks
Etta Lattn
Barbara Lam
Helene Lanster
Ester Lapidus
Eryse Larkn
Jeremy Larkm
Leda Laachower
Edward Lasoff
Marva Lasoff
Adefe Lassar
Robert Laton
Susan Lavm
Lym Lawrence
f*cote Lawrence
Vickie Lawrence
Al Lazarus
Aace Lazarus
B Carol Lazarus
Tec* Lazarus
Gna Lazoff
June Lebovrtz
Luba Lecher
Ann LeChowitz
Joann Lederman
Josh Lee
Yvonne Lee
Beverly Lafcourt
Jeffrey Lafcourt
Jennifer Lafcourt
Seth Lafkow
Johanna Lefkowitz
Don Latton
Unda Legra
Ftosaand Lehrman
Helene Leoowitz
Rachrmel Lekach
Ira Latchuk
SyMa Lancz
Elaine Leon
Elsie Leopold
Larry Lamer
Michael Lamer
fvahdy Lessem
Shato Lessem
Cad Letwar
Robert J Lav
Oomy Levan
Barnett Levandov
Martha Levandov
Fran Levey
Helen Levin
Morses Lavm
Jack H Levme
Jeffrey Lewie
Maa Levme
Steve Levme
Gertrude Levy
Harry A. (Hap| Levy
Herschel Levy
Joel Levy
Karen Levy
Racheae Levy
Rosita Levy
Spence Levy
Marteatha Lewis
Rosalie Lewkowtcz
Jerry Ubbm
Natalie Ubow
Norman Ueberman
Lallan Lieberwltz
Mole Uebman
Charlotte Lieberman
Carolyn W Ught
Beverly Under
Stuart Lmdtor
Diane Lindner
David E Unn
Ann Upoff
Nancy Upoff
Norman Upoff
Tammy Upp
Norman Upson
Ladd J Ussauer
Michael Ustoped
Liz Utowttz
Bobbi Utt
Beanor Uttenberg
Sanford Uttenberg
Carl Utwer
Beatrice Lowenthal
Sandy Logan
Myma Loman
Mark Lomaskxi
Mmam Lomaakn
Stacy London
Meryfe Lonng
Laurie Low
Dawna Lubel
Myron Lubel
Evelyn Lubn
Henry Lubn
Yacov Lubn
Dana Lucas
Howard Lucas
Marsha Lucas
Mlchese Lucas
Mac Luck
Rose Lunger
Joan Lym
Natalie Lyons
Misty Macnow
Arden Magoon
George Makn
Jenrater Malm
Blanche Mandat
Seth Mandafbaum
Eton Mandtor
EmJ Mam
Jerace Marmng
Helen Mantel
Robin Maranz
Rosele Marder
Gary J Margots
Lester Margots
Paula Mark
Dorothy Marks
Darnel Marmorstem
Hlton MarweJ
Peart Marwel
Juaa Math
Juan Mataton
Jeanelte Matz
Stanley Matz
Corlnne Maya
Enc Mayer
Mark Mayrsohn
Adeline Mazks
Anasa Mechoutam
El Mechoutam
MkeJk) Mechoutam
Yata Manstem
Morns Matrnan
Tal Metzer
Barbara Menachem
Naal Menachem
Guy Menard
Robert J Mertn
Ruth Msrtik
Florence Mescon
Madelyn Messnger
Laurence Metsch
Alan Metzger
Lance Metzger
Nancy Metzger
Arnold Meyer
Carrie Meyer
Gal Mayers
Mrs Ernie W Mchel
Bernard Mehelson
Estele MKheJson
Max MVJtelson
Janice Mlder
Arnold Mater
Buddy Mavjr
Craig Mater
Douglas J Mater
Elaine Mater
Feace Maer
Harvey Maer
Lauren Meier
Usa Mater
Phytis tvater
Jessica Mastone
Norman Mkanberg
Pam Mnkes
Eton Mrowitz
Mark Mitauer
HSda Mltrani
Esmeratda MUra|
Judy Motne
Lois Mondres
M*e Moody
Laune Morel
Ethetyne Morns
MHchef Moms
Ron Morn*
Rita Morton
Edythe Moskowitz
Norma Moskowitz
Marge Moss
Henry J Moll
Daniel Muhtor
Sara Mutons
Ralph Muskat
Ronna Mutzman
Alexander Nacfrt
Howard Nadei
Connie Nahmad
Joseph Nahoum
Frances Nathanson
Carey Nation
Rosake Nava
Gal Newman
Ben J Newmark
Sid Newmark
Stan Newmark
Batty Nlaman
Karyn Heranberg
Nancy Nltzberg
Lon Nlzat
Steven A NotH
Jack Norton
Susan Norton
Dons Notanus
Michael H Novak
Dorothy Novis
Lmsa Nuabaum
Karen Okrent
Gerald Otn
Marsha Otn
Charlotte Over
Adam Olrack
Sandy Otshen
Dorothy Oppenhelm
Mark Oren
Nedra Oren
Rick Orlan
Rachel Ortand
Karen J Ortn
Norma Orovttz
Unda Osher
George Ossm
tsabela Ostrofi
Rhonda Paish
Leo L Pam
Stanley Pangman
Brett Pargman
Joy Pargman
Kxnberty Pargman
DavW Parish
Mmduj Pamess
Ann Pasternak
Melissa Paston
Samantha Paston
Eddl Pautger
Harry Payton
Lisa Payton
Manuel Pearl
Gal Past
Joe Peftan
Leslie Peiken
Ema Peter
Steven Peloovlch
Katherme Pener
Aklba Percal
Deborah Percal
Henry Percal
Susan Percal
Ben Perk-nutter
David Perkns
Evelyn Penman
Nancy Perserry
Ronnie Pevaas
Corneta Pralpson
Amy Praia?
Annette PhJaps
Roslyn L Phatps
LaVan Pichett
Edith Pisk
Theodore Pbjk
Bhor Podafsky
Dorothy Podhurst
Barry Podolsky
Susan Podolsky
Lyn J Pont
Barbara Pores
Todd Poses
Al Postal
Rose Postal
Leslie Potter
Barbara Pozen
Don Pravda
Room Prever
Esther Propis
Carta Pugh
Debbie tJuartm
Julie Raab
Michael Rabnovch
Forrest Ratfel
SUPER 5UMDAY
FEB2<>1986
1986 SUPER SUNDAY/SUPER WEEK
Saby Behar Judi Billig Ellen Rose
Judge Robert H. Newman William F. Saulson
Co-Chairmen
K>Mrirt-i 7ntii < ky. Super Sunday/Super \AJm~t< Coordtt tfor.
Barbara Ramsay
Setma Rappaport
Herman Rapport
Rosaknd Ftapport
SyMa Hazel Ratner
Peter Ratzan
Unda A Ray
Sandy Ray
Irene Reen
Judith Retch
Mma Renter
Barry Raner
Beth Remhard
ja Rnsman
Randi Retsman
Smon Reisman
Saul Retss
Fell Rayter
Henrietta Rhetn
Eddy Rcchetson
Flip Rice
Leigh Rice
Jennifer Rich
Marcie Rich
Nan Rich
Bane Rtcnman
Paul Richman
Annal Rigodon
Helen Ring
Jukus Rmg
Rose Robbms
Joan Robns
Ortefcc Rodriguez
Aids Roisman
Joseph Roisman
SyMa Role
Lisa Romer
Brook Rood
Richard Rose
Bntt J. Rosen
Don* Roen
Audrey Rosen
Edward Rosen
Joey Rosen
Mae Rosen
Manam Rosen
Nat Rosen
Dora Rosenberg
Lon Rosenberg
Sidney Rosenberg
Sidney Rosenberg
Chartes Rosenblatt
LI Rosenblatt
SyMa Rosenblatt
Teddy Rosenblatt
Leonard Rosenblatt
Rose Rosenbkjm
SyMa Rosenbtum
Zeke Rosentetd
Susan Rosensten
Arieen Rosenthal
Herschel Rosenthal
Bame Ross
Joe Rots
Mary Ross
Shen Ross
Syoata Ross
Hlda Roth
Peart Roth
Rusty Rothman
SyMa Rothstan
Betty Romatatn
Ruth Rothstan
Am Rotman
Lmda Rotsztem
Ida Routberg
Naum Rozen
Bfty Ruben
Karen Rubens
Munef Rubenstem
Evelyn Rubin
Uaam Rutsn
Ban Sachs
Carome Sachs
Fran Sachs
Leon Sachs
Alberto Safacke
Nisan Safadw
Bruce Sakowitz
Haw Sakinn
J*mn Sain
Ufaan SMMn
Nathan Skonlck
June Slavm
Ruth Slov*
Mltchet Smat
Dan Srnigrod
Diana Smith
Hatary Smith
Max l Smith
Jay Sobel
Maxme Sobel
Paul Sobel
Steven Sobel
Rose Sohn
Heidi Sokol
Lisa Sokotowlcz
Lorrane Solomon
Pattie Solomon
Rose Sommers
Sara Sonantatd
Dov Sostchm
Gutatrmo Sostchm
Keta Sostchm
Mmam Sostchm
Shoshana Sostchm
Shney Spear
Wikam Spear
Ruth Spector
Oarael M Spfvack
Jerry Spotter
SyMa Sprntz
Saul Srebnick
Todd Statxaski
Jean Stamfs
Elame Stem
Lmda Stem
Edith K Steinberg
Burghard Sterner
Bertha P Stanttz
Charlotte Stempel
Jukus Stempel
Joe. Stem
Mafka Stern
Marta Stern
Shauna Stem
Leon Stemberg
Shara L Stock
Jeane Stockhaam
Nancy Stotlie
David Stosman
Juaa Stotman
Jacouaine Stdzenberg
Sandra Stonberg
Adeto Stone
Arthur Stone
DawJ Stone
Fannie Stone
Fred Stone
Helen Stone
Moms Stonena
Ruth Stosser
Murtal Stout
Berrace Straus
PataVat StrauM
Reuben Sireem
Richard Stuart
Robyn Stuart
Louis Slubms
Norman Superstem
Beth Susman
Laurel Susman
Cart Susskmd
Martha Susskmd
Esther Sussman
Ida Susaman
Jerry Sussman
Oscar Syger
Rom Syger
Mark Sykes
Maureen Sykas
Lisa Synatorski
Lara Tahky
Florence Tamarkm
Rachel E Tannenbaum
Pamela Tarquno
nirTtClv'jY i#^*)CrrjT
Esh JtKhner
Amia lettaRMum
Marsha Tfda
ene lemcrm
1


aue ocxowiiz
Vida Berkowitz
Carol Berkaon
Jenny Berlenee
Lon Barman
Stephannie J Berman
Helen Berne
Harry Bemsten
Jack G. Bernstein
Peart Bernstein
Ray Barrtn
Roseryn Bemn
Lynette Berry
Shirley Benin
Harvey Bets
Mchef Besso
Dov Btonck
Rosetta Barman
Israel Bkjeknan
Joel BHjotman
Raquel BH
Andrew BBg
MternaaaJB
Dawd BMngs
Nancy Bngs
Barbara BUCK
OvJy Barslem
Grace Btasberg
Joyce Btoch
Bame Btoom
Greg Btoom
RanrJ Btoom
Renata Btoom
Bessie Bunenmal
LKx)a Bogn
Clara Bomze
Nathan Bomze
Gary Bomzer
Thomas Borm
Adrenne Bonsman
Jacob Bomstem
Anshel Borzykowski
B* BoshnicK
George Bosm
Shirley Bosm
Marsha Bolkm
Bruce Botwirw.
Sharon Botwm*
Noel Brand
Larry Brant
Robert Brajtt .
Stwley Brant
Ruth L Braun
May Braunslem
Richard Bravermen
MeMn Brazer
Esther Brenner
Crag Breslaver
Terry Brestow
Gertrude Bressler
Ryan Bnl
Kathenne Brftz
Lorraine Brod
Charlotte Brodks
Shely Brod*
Steve BrorJe
Ji Brodsky
Beatrice R Bronstien
David Brook
Alvin Brown
Bert Brown
Jennifer Brown
Karen Brown
Mekssa Brown
Michael Brown
Karen Browner
Munel Brownstem
Errary Buchbader
Fredl Budd
Barry Burak
Abbe Busch
Sunny Buxbaum
EMn Cahen
G yuan S Cahn
Robert L Cahn
Hazel Cananck
Herbert Cananck
Irving Canner
Jus Canter
Deborah Cantor
Steven L Cantor
Ann Carretta
Thekna Cassettorf
Lauren Center
Mitzi Center
Sylvia Chabler
Hyman Chabner
SaraChaptya
Margie Charles
Brenda Ovamtov
Michael Charms
Germy Chertofl
Gifl Citm
Jeremy Oestler
Esther Cohan
Alan Arthur Cohen
Dora Cohen
Dorothy Cohen
Faith Cohen
Helene Cohen
Irene Cohen
Atyssa Eskm
Becky Essinger
Marc Essmger
Eve Evans
Tna Fan
Alison Fall
Myra Farr
Paul Feigenbturn
Eric Feler
George Feldenkreis
AndylFettman
Fvnk F6Wman
Hy FeMrnan
MoteFeldman
Anita Feler
Clara Feterman
ma Fetsher
UaFensWr
Rachel Fester
Dons Keener Feuer
Lorrane Feuer
Susan Fields
Pat Fine
Srarley Ftokel
Muriel Fischer
M*e Fisher
Eric Fiehman
Lawrence M Fishman
Netn FShman
Susanne Fishman
Ben Fistel
Samuel Fistel
Martyn Flam
Jeffrey Fleisher
Dee Floyd
Theresa Ftoyd
JurJ Fogel
Lewis Fogei
Mndi Lea Forer
Room Forest
Rose Forman
Carl Forsetter
Karen Foster
Barbara Fox
Roberta Fulton Fox
Jon Franck
Faye Frankel
Marc Frankel
Dorothy FrankfekJt
Shirley Frankhn
Serakjne Frantes
Dons Frantz
Linda Fraynd
Paul Fraynd
Howard Freedman
Simcha Freedman
Anne Frei
Charles Freaster
Syfvia Fried
Alfred Friedman
Harvey Friedman
Jennifer Friedman
Jodye Friedman
Reva Friedman
Jonathan Fneze
Mfcki Futerrack
Moms Futerrnck
Michele Gaber
Gabnel Gabor
Jay Gamborg
Ann Gappatjerg
VerorKa Garazi
Tony Garcia
Alan Gartmkei
Deleon Gaynar
Russel Geiger
Dan Getoer
Lyn Light Geler
Rosale Gelman
Ben Gennakj
Mershel Gerson
Phtto Gartner
Joel Gewirtz
Debbie OHM
Mmam Grata
Abraham Gmeison
Shutamt Gittefson
Lisa Gitien
Howard Glass
Maryon B Glass*'
Santord Glassman
Irving Glck
Mary Gtck
Esther Gfcoken
Irving Ghcken
Betty Gkckman
Stacy Glckman
Jennie Gimsky
Betty Glussman
Jason Gold
Helen Goldberg
Alfred Golden
MarJeryn GoUenberg
Irving Goldfned
Rose Gotom
Marvin Goldman
Reuben Goldman
Syfvia Goldsmith
Bunny Goldstein
Doris Goldstein
Evelyn Goldstein
""IT*"
rTTT
id U Art, 1111
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
Aaron Podhurst, General Campaign Chairman
Samuel I. Adter Myron J. Brodie
President Executive Vice President

m
j
THANKS TO OUR CORPORATE PHONE SPONSORS
First Financial Advisors of Florida, Inc.
SokJia Diamond import Company
Suriand Flowers Corp.
Bsner & Lubin
Dade Paper Company
Mr. & Mrs. Harvey R Chaplin
Mason Distributors, Inc.
Biscayne Bank
Sunburst Farms, Inc.
Nine Island Avenue Associates, Ltd.
Lehman Auto World
Jefferson National Bank
Genesis Development Group Inc.
City National Bank of Miami
West-Hem Aircraft Supplies Inc.
Carlton Witoert Vault
Vector Land Group, Inc.
Caplan Morrison, Brown & Company, CPA's
L. Luria & Son, Inc.
Solo Air Conditioning & Heating Co. Inc.
Radisson Mart Plaza Hotel
Trans-Chemical Corp.
Accounting Systems, Inc.
Displayarama
Benttey's Luggage Corp.
John Saxon & Son Inc.
Schechter Beame Burstein Price & Co. PA.
Baron Displays
Capital Bank
Studio Graphics
Rolyn Lithographers
Southern Audio Visual
PhiHipe European Men's Shop
Kkbaner Sales Agency, Inc.
Supreme International Corp.
Mr. Joseph Handelman
Moore's Wholesale, Inc.
ArJer Group, Inc.
Nu-Art
Mac Don aids
Mr. Phip Warren
Mr. Jeffrey Berkowitz
Mr. Barry Weinberger
Perfume International
American Equity
Entin Schwartz
Ernst & Whinney
Dade Business Systems Inc.
Laventhol & Horwath
Greenberg, fraurig, Askew, Hoffman,
Lipoff, Rosen & Quentel, PA.
Enterprise Bank of Florida
Mr. Alan J. KKiger
GoMfarb and Gold, P.A.
Weberman Caterers Inc.
Cypen, Cypen & Dribin
Fleeman Builders
The Concord Shopping Plaza
AmenFirst BuirJng
>bung Women's Leadership Cabinet
Women's Division Executive Committee
New Generation Computers
Rhobbe inc.
Dave Zinn Toyota Inc.
Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel and Marina
Metro Taxi
Caribbean Radio
Hi-Grade Food Co.
Pic-N-Pay
Paramount Bakery
Claudia's Kitchen
Essen Dei
Barnett's Office Supplies
John Saxon & Son Inc.
Marco Polo Hotel
LOPC Office Supplies
Carnival Fruit Co.
Henry Lee Company
Novie Iceland
Bay Purveyors & Distrib. Inc.
A&B Bakery
Church! Coffee
Lender's Bagel Bakery, Inc.
Entenmann's Bakery of IvSami, Inc.
Bagel Bar
Perfume International

Flagler Greyhound Track
Luria's
Jordan Marsh
Signature Caterers
Chase & Sanbom Coffee
Weberman Caterers Inc.
Isra Trade Assoc.
Miami Tobacco Co.
Fine Distributing
Arnold's Bakery
Isaac's Kosher Kitchen & Catering
AmenFirst Federal Savings &
Loan Assoc.
Tofutti Non-Dairy Products
Christian Dior New \brk Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. Phi Newman
Hebrew National Kosher Foods
Spec's Music & Tapes
Jewish Vocational Service
Nutritional Project
Anonymous
Sun Chevrolet Inc.
Smith, Mandter
Mr. Barry Ross
That Girl In Miami. Inc.
Barco Chemical Division Inc.
Dr. George S. Wise
Farr lours & Travel
Beber-Sirverstein & Partners
The Continental Companies
The 24 Cotectton
Sykes Ace Hardware
Mayors Jewelers
Gurtand & Goldberg. PA.
Signature Caterers
Milton Medical & Drug Co.
Ctaudine Uzan Caterers
Group M, General Contractors, Inc.
H R Mortgage & Realty
Sara's Kosher Pizza & Dairy Restaurant
Kaufman Press
Mann Judd Landau, CPA's
Myers, Kenin, Levinson, Frank & Richards
International Dental Plans, Inc.
Levenson, FrierJander & Katzin
Costain Florida Inc.
Rachin & Cohen, CPA's
Setdman & Seidman BOO
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Staff
The Sweet Tooth
Pasadena Homes, Inc.
#%ND, THANKS TO THOSE WHO
DONATED GOODS AND SERVICES
TO SUPER SUNDAY/SUPER WEEK
biHin RMI JcWtSn I MOW KM
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
(305) 516-4000
The Ust of Super Sunday/Super Week volun-
teers seen m this ad was obtained from final
pre-registration information as of 1/30786
Federation also wishes to acknowledge
.orunteers who did participate during
Super Sunday/Super Week but whose names
did lot appear on pre-reastration lists
Sandi Samole
Stacey Samole
Milon Samuels
Stacy Sand
Marlene Sands
Jessica Sanski
Charlotte Saper
Isabel Saperstem
Marsha Sapozruck
Ua Saulson
Claire Savitt
Syfvia Sax
Augusta Sane
Carter Saxon
Mams Schaachter
Edgar Schaked
GlonaSchaitn
Howard Ecfiarm
Harvey Schechter
Syd Schechter
Marc Schectman
Racquet Scheck
tvtcheal Scheck
llelane Schenker
Marvin Schenker
Arnold Scher
Mrs Amok) Scher
Oary Scnaer
Jerry Scriander
Matthew Schtoss
Bane Schneider
ZeMa Schneider
Irvmg SchoenteW
Jeff SchoenWd
Ruth Schoer#etd
Barry 0 Schreiber
Debra Schrter
Anita Schutman
Ctff Schulman
Joseph Schulman
Mckie Schulman
Siva Schulman
Alex Schuster
Adam Schwartz
Debby Schwartz
Gerald K Schwartz
Ken Schwartz
Lane Schwartz
Lee Schwartz
Maxine E Schwartz
Tom Schwartz
Adolph Schwarzkopf
Roberta Schwedok
Barbara Schwm-imer
Denis ScuVvck
Bernard Segal
Estate Segal
Eugene Segal
Mafhan Segal
Sara Segal
Betty Sehres
Ethel Seidei
Bess Selevan
Mark Selevan
Marion Semon
Adele Senter
Phi Serin
Dorothy Serotta
Mark Setton
Abraham Shabsels
Sylvia Shabsets
Bette Shadoway
Yehuda Shamir
Lee Shapiro
Morris Shapiro
Laurel Shapiro
Esther Shatkhm
Esther Shechtman
Ada Shectman
Tamra Sherrman
MHred Sheldman
Anne Sheldon
Nancy Shelton
Anila Sherman
Beatrice Sherman
Mmdy Sherman
Hlek Shifman
Ann Shires
Teddy Skcxhick
Robert Shostak
MtokM Sholman
Leon Shuster
Beverly Shwartz
Martyn Sieger
Rose Sigman
Florence Stberteid
Morton SaoarWd
Mindy Stberstem
Charles Siverberg
George Stverman
Dorothy Stverman
Evelyn Stverman
Jody Stverman
Bane Stverstem
Martyn Smon
PhBp Simon
Al Singer
Gordon Singer
Mmam Singer
Shirley B. Srk*
Susan Skotta
Sam Tietdbaum
Alfred Tireta
Sandy Tobier
Dod t*|1man
Lisa Treiste*
Enc Turelsky
Pamela Turetsky
David Unch
Muriel Uklch
Naomi Umans
Fred UmscTNveis
Helen Vaccaro
Pearl Vaupen
Judy MM
Todd Victor
Ron Vlgdor
Martha M. Warm
AJce VMk
Harold Vr*
VM Vlnokurov
Laura Vbgei
Salomon Wachberg
J Wachtel
Isai Wagenberg
Sato VVagenberg
Sal Wanberg
Beth Wafd
Detores Watoman
Doty VVaWman
Heidi Waffish
Jean Walters
Jeffrey C Wander
Susan Waraatt
Rose Wasserman
Bob Waterstone
Dolores Wax
Robert Waxman
Rebecca Webb
Dawn Wechsler
H. M Wetoenfelf
Betty Weiner
Marc WMWJlMl
David Wemreicn
Etzabeth Weinreich
Ubby VVearisMn
Alex Weoberg
Steven Weoberg
Bane VVetsbrod
Sidney Weisbrod
Bobbe Weiser
Bradey Weiss
Ctftord Weiss
Bfnede G Weiss
Helen Weiss
Jom Weas
u Weas
Theodore Weiss
Tobe Weiss
Gen Wettzman
Sol Wettzman
John N Werksman
Barry White
Mehele Whitney
Hermine Wiener
By Wigutow
Lisa Wider
Nada Ws
Hy Winar
MWred Wnefz
JurJ Winston
Barbara Wlnton
GH Wlnton
Carl H Wissbrun
Oare Wltkn
Leia Wittenberg
Dolores Wolf
Joetyn Wolf
Mtohasf Woff
Blnor Wolff
Betty Woens
Charles Woins
Mona Worshan
Ann Woskow
Stacey Wruble
Diane Wyche
Ann Yabrove
D Yaffie
E Yathe
Barry Yard*
Charles Yavars
Lauren YeMngton
Abe Yormack
Margaret Young
Bane Ybungentob
Diane Zacher
DanaZadanoff
Richarrj Zadanoff
Avion Zadspiner
OigaZagatos
Mfion Zatinsky
Shona ZaUnsky
MardaZedeck
Steve Zeitz
Sharon Zeaar
Lauren ZeHker
Jeffrey Zamtock
Beniamm Zlberberg
Fay Zkm
Harold Zomback
Lous Zuckerman


Isr^aeL
On Sunday, April 13, the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami will sponsor its annual
community-wide celebration of Israel
Independence Day at each of its three
Centers, the Michael-Ann Russell
Center in North Dade. the South
Dade Center and the Miami Beach
Center.
This year, for Israel's 38th anniver-
sary, the JCC plans a massive county-
wide celebration, beginning with a
parade in North Dade at Miami
Gardens Drive and ending at the
Michael-Ann Russell Center, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue. The parade will
feature bands, floats and ap-
pearances by celebrities. Everyone is
invited to watch or participate in the
parade. Once at the Center, the
festivities will include games, rides
for children, a Shuk (Israeli
marketplace), Israeli dancing, art ex-
hibits and food.
The excitement doesn't end there.
The South Dade Center will hold a
IVi-mile march from Ron Ehmann
Park, 10995 S.W. 97 Avenue to the
Center, 12401 S.W. 102 Avenue. The
march begins at 3 p.m. after the con-
clusion of opening ceremonies at the
park. Upon arrival at the Center, the
celebration gets underway with
musical entertainment by the inter-
national music band "Shachar" and
dance troupe "Nitzanim." The
festivities include rides and game
booths for children, Israeli foods,
films, displays, a petting zoo, and a
Shuk. In the evening, the South Dade
Center celebration will feature an
Israeli-style bonfire with entertain-
ment, singing and dancing, plus a
special fireworks display.
Also that afternoon, the Miami
Beach Center. 4221 Pine Tree Drive,
will also hold a 1'/2-mile march. As the
march concludes at the Center, par-
ticipants and spectators will find non-
stop entertainment, delicious Israeli
foods and an Israeli marketplace. The
Center, in conjunction with local
synagogues, will also prepare an
Israeli museum, highlighting the
38-year history of the country.
The JCC needs volunteers to make
this day a success. If you would like to
participate in the excitement of
"Israel 38" in North Dade, call
932-4200; in South Dade, 251-1394
and on Miami Beach, 534-3206.
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami is part of Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.

JVS offers
employment assistance
The Jewish Vocational Service
(JVS), under the Productive Older
Workers Program, offers help in ob-
taining full or part-time jobs in
private industry to individuals 55 or
older who qualify for employment
assistance.
The jobs are in various areas such
as clerical, sales, and security.
However, they have one thing in com-
mon. Each has an On The Job Train-
ing component. The employer is reim-
bursed 50 percent of the cost of train-
ing or "breaking in" the older worker
for the particular job. These funds
are available to JVS from the South
Florida Employment and Training
Consortium and the Private Industry
Council.
In order to make it easier for those
interested in finding employment.
several locations are now available
for meeting with a program
representative:
Miami Beach-JVS, 920 Alton Road-
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-11 a.m.
South Dade-JVS, 8353 S.W. 124
Street; Thursday 1-3 p.m.
North Dade-Job Service, 133 N.E
167 Street; Tuesday 8:30 a.m.-3:45
p.m.
Central JVS Office, 310 N.W. 25
Street; by appointment.
If you are 55 years old or older, call
Dolores at 673-2132 for further infor-
mation. You may stop by at any con-
venient location; however, an ap-
pointment is suggested.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Hillel retreat focuses
on social action

South Dade JCC sponsors
second annual Purim run
Members and non-members of the
Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center,
will put on their running shoes on
Sunday, March 23 at 8 a.m. for the
JCC's 2nd Annual Purim Run. The
run will begin and end at the South
Dade Center, 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue. Running times will be given
to all finishers along with split times,
which will be read at every mile. En-
trants will compete against men and
women in their respective age
categories with prizes awarded to
those finishing in first, second, third
and fourth places.
T-shirts will be awarded to the first
500 registrants and a raffle drawing
will be held upon completion of the
race. All runners are eligible for
valuable prizes.
Registration for the South Dade
Center's Purim Run is open to the
community at an entry fee of $6 per
person. Entries should be postmark-
ed no later than March 17. After that
date, the entry fee will be $8.
For more information, call Gary
Bomzer at 251-1394, or pick up an ap-
plication at the Center.
Social activism is once again ap-
pearing on the college campuses of
South Florida. This resurgence of in-
terest was demonstrated most
recently at a weekend retreat
organized by the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations of Greater Miami. The
program, called "We Are The World:
Politics and Social Action in the
Jewish Tradition," attracted 60
students from campuses in Dade.
Broward and Palm Beach counties to
a two-day retreat at Camp Owaissa
Bauer in Homestead.
Jonathan Kessler. director of the
Political Leadership Development
Program of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC).
was a scholar-in-residence for the
weekend. In his keynote discussion,
"Reflections of an Activist," Kessler
explained opportunities for student
participation in Congressional elec-
tions and lobbying for legislation at
the local and national levels. During
workshops and lectures. Kessler
discussed the importance of responsi-
ble and informed involvement by
students in the political process.
The theme of the weekend was the
importance of social change and the
need to work cooperatively within the
Jewish community to achieve this
goal. In a series of discussion groups,
students explored several issues of
concern, including poverty and
hunger, care for the elderly
substance abuse among friends
Israel and Jewish identity, and 1
responses to anti-Semitism'. Raff,'
Miller, community shaliach, led a
workshop on the use of creative
thinking in understanding the needs
of others.
The participants learned that social
change can be instigated bv organiz-
ing large groups or through in-
dividual acts. Jason Yedwah, a
sophomore at Florida International
University, remarked that he "had
already been exposed to AIPAC from
previous programs on campus, hut
having a weekend to learn about it
and so many other issues made the
retreat very meaningful."
Marc Slotnick, a sophomore at the
University of Miami and president of
its Organization of Jewish Students,
agreed. "Many of us will return to
our schools with a new goal for the
spring semester. A weekend away
from campus with this kind of pro- '
gram helps to give us a new perspec-
tive on our lives and priorities lieyond
the classroom."
The Hillel Jewish Student Centers
of Greater Miami is a member of
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
K
ftLEIDOSCOP"
YOUNG SHOW-GOBS SERIES
F
As part of "Kaleidoscope A
Young, Show-Goers Series," the
Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center,
will present "Dinosaur Rock" on
April 1. The program will be held at
the Miami Senior High School
Auditorium, 2450 S.W. 1 Street, at
11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Dinosaurs are extinct aren't
they? Not to the cast of "Dinosaur
Rock," or to the thousands of
children and adults who have seen the
program and sung along with Stella
Stegosaurus, Dinah Diplodocus, the
Hadrosaur from Hackensack and a
host of other prehistoric characters
which populate this adventure into
the long-ago land of the dinosaur.
"Dinosaur Rock" began as an en-
thusiastically received record album
in the Spring of 1984, and has now
been adapted to the stage, with all of
the liveliness and variety of its
original songs, plus the spectacular
addition of walking, talking dinosaurs
of every conceivable height and
width.
Authors Michele Valerie and
Michael Stein have collaborated with
Emmy-award -winning puppeteer In-
grid Crepeau and musician Pete Ken-
nedy to create a show that combines
top-notch music and showmanship
with the fascinating facts of the great
lizards' lives.
The cost for this performance is $5
for children and adults. Tickets can
be purchased at all BASS Ticket
Outlets, 633-BASS, or at the South
Dade Center, 251-1394.
"D^tXS'-tein aUd M{chele Valerie with "* /the Prehistoric star* of
10 Federation, March 1986


THIS Year in Jerusalem
Bifarrra nmn nxvn
1986 SPRING ADVENTURE MISSION
TO HUNGARY & ISRAEL
May 4-18
SUMMER FAMILY
"GRANDPARENTS TO GRANDCHILDREN"
MISSION TO ISRAEL
July 30-August 10
* On the Spring Adventure Mission, experience three days in
Budapest, Hungary, home to the remnant of a 1,7(H)-year-old
Jewish community
* On both missions, see the Jewish homeland up close: Visit
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, the Dead Sea, Masada, the Western Wall and
much, much more
* Meet Israel's leading opinion makers-the people who shape her
destiny
* Enjoy 5-star accommodations
* Singles and entire families welcome
* Costs: Spring Adventure Mission to Budapest and
Israel: $2,400 per person, double occupancy.
Summer Family Mission to Israel: $1,999
pp. dbl. occ. Discounts for children. Packages
all-inclusive.
Walk in the footsteps of your parents grandparents .
the bubbehs and zaydehs of a hallowed Jewish past .
Encounter the living miracle of Israel.
TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE EXPERIENCE OF YOUR
LIFETIME, CALL ELLEN BRAZER, MISSIONS
COORDINATOR, AT 576-4000.
*s
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
YLC missions to Israel
The Federation's Young Leader-
ship Council (YLC) is pleased to offer
a unique opportunity for young
leaders between the ages of 22 and 40
to join with their peers from across
the nation and learn first-hand about
our Jewish heritage through the
"Ruach Mission" to Israel, scheduled
for May 11-20, and the "Summer
Singles Mission," scheduled for July
13-23 and August 17-27, both in
cooperation with the United Jewish
Appeal.
Highlights of the "Ruach Mission"
include dancing in the streets on Yom
Ha'atzmaut (Israel Independence
Day); climbing Masada at sunrise; a
visit to Or Akiva, Miami's Project
Renewal Sister City; a visit to the
Western Wall; a first-hand study of
Israel's high-tech industries;
meetings with young Knesset
members; and home hospitality with
young Israeli community leaders.
On either of the selected dates for
the Summer Singles Mission, par-
ticipants will see modern Tel Aviv
and shop on Dizengoff Street, visit
the Golan, swim in the Kinneret (Sea
of Galilee), meet the artists of Safed,
visit Or Akiva, and enjoy home
hospitality.
For more information about these
or other missions of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, please call
Missions Director Ellen Brazer at
576-4000.
NOW MORE THAN EVER, Israel needs its friends. And, in 1986 our friends
will get more when they visit Israel more warm hospitality. moreper-
I sonalized service more new and remodeled hotels from which to choose ...
and, a lot more for your money.
NOW MORE THAN EVER, Israel wants to extend a hearty welcome to our
American friends and awaits the opportunity to express our sincere appreciation
I for your loyal support. .
NOW MORE THAN EVER, EL AL Israel Airlines is the way to travel bet-
ween Florida and Tel Aviv. Two direct flights weekly from Miami and three non-
stop 747s from New York provide the shortest and most direct routes between
friends. Our rates and all-inclusive package tours for short and long stays make
your 1986 visit to Israel most affordable.
If your last visit to Israel was more than a couple of years ago g* g"
return visit in 1986. If you have never visited Israel, 1986 is THE year to turn
that dream into reality.
COME TO ISRAEL in 1986. It's a good year to enjoy friends.
For information and reservations, see your travel agent or call 532-5441.
Israel summer programs
for all teenagers
According to Raffi Miller, director
of the Israel Programs Office of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, an
exciting program of intellectual, emo-
tional and spiritual growth awaits
every teenager in Israel this summer.
This summer, several six-week pro-
grams are planned for teens with a
wide variety of interests. These in-
clude a bar/bat mitzvah program for
youth and their families, and others
designed for teens interested in art,
film making, religion, touring, work-
ing on kibbutzim, study, and sports.
AH programs are designed and im-
plemented by experienced youth
organizers, with the safely and well-
being of the children held in highest
priority. Each group of program
leaden is comprugd of Israeli and
American professionals, specially
trained for we programs.
The programs range in coat from
$1,880 to $2,400, inchKbng airfare,
housing, meals and all other ex-
penses. Scholarships are available
through the Israel Programs Office
for qualified applicants.
"After teens visit Israel," Milter
says, "we see changes in how they
relate to their Jewish identity, ft
should be a must lor every yourigster in-
to experience Israel through one of
these programs. The programs make
children a part of tneir heritage in-
stead of just telling them about it.'
Information about specific pro-
grams, and help fa* finding the. one
most suitable to your needs, can be
obtained by calling Miller at
576-4000, extension 809.
A letter from Israel
Anni Fruchter made Aliyah upon her retirement in
1981. She recently wrote to the South Florida Aliyah
Council in order to share her special vision of Israel
with her good friends in Miami. Reprinted below is the
text of her letter.
SHALOM FRIENDS:
Five and one half years ago I realiz-
ed a life long dream and made Aliyah.
As I see it now, it was the most satis-
fying and fruitful move I ever made. I
came to Safed, not knowing anyone
here and not expecting too much.
Israel is a small country and it's most
easy to make friends. Now I live. In
Miami Beach I merely existed.
In our universities, hospitals and
museums, there is a marvelous fusion
of our 4,000-year-long and 38-year-
short history. The accomplishments
are mind-staggering!
I had been hoping to find paid work,
but Safed is a small town, so I turned
to volunteering. For the first 3 years
I visited our brave soldiers in the
hospital, which led to visits to Army
bases and delightful lunches with of-
ficers and soldiers, and sadly,
meeting the bereaved parents of our
fallen heroes. To attend a funeral or
"askara" (yahrzeit) for one of them
to see the griefstricken parents and
family is to die a little. It is here in
our small country that I have known
my chiefest joy and the greatest
sadness; being part of our glorious
past and hopeful, problem stricken
present. My poetry has started to sell
in a Swill Zionist monthly, published
in German and French. I am now
rehearsing in a play from a story by
A. Perez, "Devotion Without End"
(where I am miscast as an angel)
given by our local theater group.
I live in a one room apartment in
Beth Migurim, owned by the Jewish
Agency. The Galil is the most
beautiful part of Israel. We have an
infrastructure here for a computing
center and need Western settlers.
From my window I see the Kinneret.
I attend five classes a week in
Mishna, Tenach and Tanya. Three
classes are given by Rabbis from
Lubavitch, in my room. The Rabbis
have said "the air of Israel makes
wise" so there is still hope for me. We
have many Ethiopians here and feel a
great responsibility for their
absorption.
We are lucky to have Edyth Geiger
with us 6 months a year. Her work
for the Ethiopians is admirable. Also
she maintains a library for English
speaking Olim which gives us great
pleasure. We all miss her wise
counsel, her efficient way to over-
come problems when she is away
from us.
If you can't make aliyah come and
visit, and don't leave without seeing
Safed.
Love from Israel
Anni Frichter
FedeT^ition^Iarc/^m^^l


Zeroing in on the future
Arnold Gam
Leroy Raffel
Foundation develops new program to build
its general endowment fund
Imagine your business without an insurance policy or your home without a
roof. The consequences are unthinkable. It's this concept which drives all non-
profit organizations to have a general endowment fund. In the case of the
Federation, the general fund is entitled the "Jewish Community Trust Fund"
(JCTF) with assets of approximately $5.5 million. The remaining assets of the
Foundation, some $31 million, are primarily held in philanthropic funds, or what
some might think of as "charitable bank accounts." Philanthropic funds are
generally contributed by donors at the time of significant financial transactions
in their lives, and in each case an informal ability to make suggestions to the
Federation as to distributions from the fund is part of the agreement. From
these funds, Federation sends millions of dollars each year across the community
and the country to a wide variety of charities, both Jewish and secular, for many
purposes, all of which meet Federation objectives.
However, when faced with the challenge of developing the JCTF, the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies recently developed an innovative solution. What
is the answer? The Zero Coupon Bond, a popular investment vehicle used by
families for funding children's educations, IRA's and similar programs. "The
zero is like the old war bond according to Leroy Raffel, one of two Zero Coupon
Marketing Committee co-chairmen. "The reason I think this is important and it
is going to work," says Raffel, "is that we have come up with a simple concept
which is going to have substantial appeal, and because the need is so obviously
important."
"We are the third or fourth largest Jewish community in the country" says
Allan Yarkin, the other co-chairman of the committee. A member of the UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet and a vice president of Shearson American Express,
Yarkin also feels that "we don't have the kind of equity in our corporation that
any well managed large Federation should possess." "If the Cleveland, New
York and Baltimore Federations can have endowment funds of $50-150 million
there is no reason why the Miami Federation cannot develop a fund of 100 million
dollars in future value, he adds."
Originally conceived by Arnold Ganz, Foundation Investment Comittee
chairman, the idea was reviewed and approved by the Foundation Board on
recommendation of a Planning Committee of individual board members. It was
Tom e"thusiaftlcal!y approved by the Federation Board of Trustees in June,
1985 Since that time, a stunning brochure depicting the concept has been
developed; thirteen initial "sales" have been completed; a set of commemorative
photographs by noted photographer Robert Cumins has been commissioned; and
the first meeting of a new marketing committee has been held.
There are now seven members of the David Ben Gurion Million Dollar Socie-
ty. Membership is open to individuals or families who commit to a gift of $10 000
KESTaE five years. Six additional commitments of $25,000 (Benefactor) or
$1^,500 (Patron) have also been received, in addition to a matching commitment
from Shearson American Express, the first corporate donor, of $5000. Gifts are
tax deductible when paid Members of the Ben Gurion Society will receive one of
the Cumins photographs, framed and inscribed, and their names will be included
on a handsome commemorative wall to be erected at the Federation building.
HOW WILL THE FUNDS BE INVESTED?
According to Investment Committee chairman Arnold Ganz, "It is the in-
T2? hi comm'tte to 2* these funds in the longest possible maturities
ErfuC ?. eSt y,eJd cons,s^nt wth the Foundation's overall objectives of
Stl gIn SE endowm^ bv. "W "^e benefits of compounded interest and
k5L \k- K12 ta h,dlng a s^stantial asset base which will help to
finance this community's many growing needs." V
. _ThMSii one other very attractive feature of the program, comments Joe Im-
SSrf*A?^S2i*!2S "We "* P^ting 25 to designate 2?pS-
?S?3S proceeds to other local Jewish organizations which we
JKSSh^ Fed,eratl" fami'y- A" ^itional 25 percfnt may be dYrectafS
rf2L%3 & alma mater, museum, etc), if the individual desires. A numbe?
Th!Z2$final donors have ^^y let M know their thoughts on this subject
Sll nil Sf* "2?1 Prom,nent charities have received letters advisineS
they will benefit on the maturity of these bonds. We require that at least 50 oer
ESSttSEEr"'and dl of the di know 2S335
WILL THIS PROGRAM CONFLICT WITH THF CAMPAirv no tup
ONGOING PROCESS OF PHOANTOjJSf^MuSbSmMT1
Foundation leadership doesn't believe so. "As our committee is small and all
solicitations are done on an individual basis, we can make SreteffSSSS
gift has already been received," according to Allan Yarkin. No commSS to
12 Federation, March 1986
Allan Yarkin
Foundation Salutes
Zero Coupon Bond
Participants
David Ben-Gurion
Million Dollar Society
David Fleeman
Elinor & Arnold Ganz
Joseph Handleman
Jay I. Kislak
Sylvia & Sidney Lefcourt
Sidney L. Olson
Carl Zwerner
Benefactor
Sidney J. Rudolph
Patrons
Martin Kalb
Norman G. Lieberman
Nancy & Norman Lipoff
Philip M. Segal
Ray Ellen & Allan Yarkin
Corporate Donor
Shearson American Express
Questions and
Answers about
Zero Coupon '
Bonds
What is a Zero Coupon Bond?
A Zero Coupon Bond is a
receipt representing the
ownership of future interest or
principal payments on U.s
Treasury notes or bonds. The
underlying U.S. Treasury notes
or bonds are held by a custo-
dian and are issued to the
holder as proof of ownership.
The receipts become what are
known as Zero Coupon
Treasuries.
Zero Coupon Treasuries pay
no current income. Instead,
you purchase them at a
substantial discount and
receive the full face amount
when they mature.
Are Zero Coupons a Safe
Investment?
Yes. Zero Coupon Treasuries
are receipts which represent
ownership of future interest or
principal payments of U.S.
Treasury notes and bonds that
are direct obligations of the
U.S. government. Zero Coupon
CDs are insured up to $100,000
per depositor by either the
Federal Deposit Insurance Cor-
poration (FDIC) or the Federal
Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation (FSLIC).
The majority of Zero Coupon
corporate bonds are rated in-
vestment grade (BAA/BBB or
better) by two recognized
rating services Moody's and
Standard & Poor's.
Coupons Pay
Do Zero
Interest?
No. Zero Coupons do not pro-
vide any current income. They
do, however, offer the oppor-
tunity for substantial capital
accumulation. Also, the holder
realizes a true compounded-
yield to maturity since
------- reinvestment of interest pay-
___ ment is eliminated. The holder
-----~ thus locks in a high return.
NOTICE TO ALL DONORS
The Tax Reform Act of 1984 imposed new appraisal re-
quirements for charitable contributions of appreciated property
Jk iy ^^^ "^ certain corporation* in 1986 and
nSS^SL^L 1^J^f*Pa o all types of pr SS ifZ?"* ^^ t?*! **urities where STeteimed
l2&uJ*W& eSjSSiflS^3^^? **"** ****** ** for a
charitable contribution subject to these new rules, you must
^r SLdonated1P>Prty, to your 1986 federal income^
^retom Kease consult your tax advisor for more information
concerning' these requirements.
makeXTSfT/L^ a?Ce?edJf thB donor indicates that he or she would rather
peMe wKd?^SVfh5& camPaiKn- "We are dealing with sophisticated
ETKftfflffSSSJ 3t th,S ^Ver and above their campaign gifts, and that
cne gin is tor a specific purpose," Yarkin noted.
WHAT KIND OF PEOPLE MAKE THE BEST SOLICITORS?
^SiXSRfSR a"dliable askers according to Leroy Raffel.
Pie wth whom wfK i100 in the ,fir8t year is obtainable. The majority of peo-
^i^SS^JBgSSB^^the concept-and we are
576O4r000rther information- contact Joe Imberman at the Foundation Office,
&-....
__


Charitable contributions of real property
t
ISteven XI. Ha bib
"If the
contributed
property is a
'capital asset,' the
donor may be
better off by
contributing the
property rather
than selling the
property and
contributing the
after-tax
proceeds."
By STEVEN M. HABIB, CPA
Contributors of real property interests to recognized charities can en-
oy a number of income tax benefits. Not only will they be entitled to a
haritable deduction equal to the fair market value of the property, but the
ippredation in the value of the property will generally not be taxed.
JENERAL RULE
Taxpayers are allowed a deduction of up to 30 percent of adjusted
rross income (AGI) for gifts of appreciated property to qualified charities.
f the contributed property is a "capital asset," the donor may be better off
>y contributing the property rather than selling the property and con-
ributing the after-tax proceeds.
An example may be helpful to understand these rules:
EXAMPLE 1: Ben Cohen owns land he purchased in 1970 for $20,000,
which is currently worth $50,000, with no mortgage on the property.
Hen's adjusted gross income in 1985 is $200,000. Let's examine the
difference in tax consequences between a contribution of the land and
a contribution of after tax proceeds from the sale of the land.
r.WONSALE (ONTRIBUTION SALE
sales Price :'ost $ $50,000 20,000
rain Capital Gains Tax Rate -.- 30.000 20%
TAX $ $ 6,000
fAX SAVINGS ON CONTRIBUTION
'ontribution of Land Ontribution of After-Tax Cash -($50,000 -$6,000) $50,000 $ 44.000
-ontribution Deduction lax Rate 50,000 50% 44.000 50%
lax Savings Less: Tax Cost (As Above) 25,000 22.000 6.000
NKT TAX SAVINGS $25,000 $10,000
By donating the land. Ben saves $3,000 and the charity receives pro-
prty worth $6000 more.
ORDINARY INCOME PROPERTY
A taxpayer's contribution deduction will be diminished if the property
"ordinary income property." Examples of ordinary' income property are
(af)ital assets held for six months or less and property held primarily for
?sale. Another type of ordinary income property is real property that is
Jbject to depreciation recapture. If property is ordinary income property,
ie contribution deduction is reduced by the amount of ordinary income
lat would otherwise be recognized if the property were sold.
EXAMPLE 2:
Pair Market Value of Contributed Property
Ordinary Income Portion (Potential Depreciation Recapture)
P 'NTRIBUTION DEDUCTION
$50,000
10,000
$40,000
Although reducing the cost of charitable contributions by the deprecia-
lon recapture may seem unfair, keep in mind thai the I nttpturt woudkam
taxed '""pare the results.
EXAMPLE 3:
TAX ON SALE
CONTRIBUTION SALE
Sales Price Cost $ $50,000 20,000
Gain Ordinary Income -.- 30,000 10.000
CAPITAL GAIN $ $20,000
Tax on Ordinary Income (at 50%) Tax on Capital Gain (at 20%) $ -- $ 5.000 4,000
TOTAL TAX $ $ 9,000
TAX SAVINGS ON CONTRIBUTION CONTRIBUTION SALE
Contribution of Land Contribution of After Tax Cash ($50,000 $9,000) $40,000 $ 41,000
Contribution Deduction Tax Rate 40,000 50% 41,000 50%
Tax Savings Less: Tax Cost 20.000 20,500 9,000
NET TAX SAVINGS $20,000 $11,500
By donating the property, Ben saves $500 less than if he sold the pro-
perty; and the charity would receive worth $9000 more, if he
donated the property.
ALTERNATIVE MINIMUM TAX
Many taxpayers are faced with the possibility that they will be subject
to the Alternative Minimum Tax ("AMT"). Briefly, the AMT may affect
taxpayers with unusually large capital gains, tax credits, miscellaneous
deductions, or tax preference items. Taxpayers who fall into this category
will pay a tax of 20 percent of their alternative minimum taxable income
("AMTI"). Charitable contributions can reduce AMTI and consequently
reduce the AMT. Although the tax saving will be atia rate of 20 percent, it
does provide certain taxpayers with a method of reducing their tax
liabilities while escaping the tax on the appreciation.
APPRAISAL
The 1984 Tax Act requires that donors of appreciated property (with a
fair market value in excess of $5000) obtain an appraisal. The appraisal
must be obtained from an independent "qualified appraiser." The law also
requires that an "appraisal summary" be attached to the donor's tax
return. Failure to obtain an appraisal will result in a lost tax deduction. In-
cidentally, the cost of the appraisal is tax deductible as a miscellaneous
deduction and, accordingly, is not subject to the AGI percentage limiation.
CONCLUSION
The tax savings of a gift of appreciated property can reduce the cost of
the gift and may enhance the desire for many taxpayers to carry out their
philanthropic goals.
Otzma program develops
leadership skills
The adventure of a lifetime awaits
the talented young person, age 18-24,
who is selected to participate in the
OTZMA program (otzma is Hebrew
for strength) sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation in
cooperation with the United Jewish
Appeal Young Leadership Cabinet,
the World Zionist Organization, the
Council of Jewish Federations and
the Israeli Forum.
The OTZMA program will afford an
individual with the opportunity to
spend an entire year in Israel work-
ing side by side with the people of
Israel, and upon returning to the
United States, a chance to share new
knowledge working in the local
Jewish community.
The program has four exciting
elements:
1. Voluntary work and learning ex-
periences in Kibbutz Ulpan, a
Moshav, air force base, a Jewish Na-
tional Fund reforestation project, and
in Miami's Project Renewal sister ci-
ty, Or Akiva.
2. Classes and louring devoted to
Hebrew language. Jewish history,
knowledge and appreciation for the
land of Israel.
3. Adoption of the OTZMA partici-
pant for the entire year by families
who will be selected from the Israeli
Forum Young Leadership Group.
4. A commitment to ongoing and
active involvement in the local
Federation or campus Jewish com-
munity upon return to the United
States.
The entire cost for the OTZMA pro-
gram is limited to a registration fee
of $250. Other than that, OTZMA is a
full fellowship program including
roundtrip airfare from New York and
living expenses. Of course positions
for the OTZMA program are limited,
and candidates will be carefully
screened by the OTZMA Committee
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, which is chaired by Michael M.
Adler, National UJA Young Leader-
ship Cabinet Chairman and Federa-
tion associate treasurer.
If you are interested in applying to
participate in the OTZMA program,
please call Nate Geller. OTZMA
Coordinator in Miami at (305)
>7fi-4000. extension 355; or Raffi
Miller, Community Shaliach at (805)
570-4000, extension 309.
Federation, March t$86 13


,1
TeenTalk'premieres on JFTV
"TeenTalk," a new show featuring
local teens and experts discussing
issues of concern to Jewish youth,
will begin airing this month on JFTV.
The show is sponsored by the Jewish
Youth Directors Council of Greater
Miami and produced by JFTV.
According to Helene Leibowitz, co-
chairman of the Council, "TeenTalk"
will consist of 13 half-hour programs,
each featuring four teens in open
discussion with a local expert on the
day's topic. Leibowitz, teen coor-
dinator at the South Dade Center of
the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, and Randi Adler, of
the Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami, alternate as moderators of the
show.
Topics for upcoming installments of
"TeenTalk" include teen suicide,
date rape, music and music video cen-
sorship, eating disorders and safe
sex. All topics are decided upon by a
group of local teens who work with
Leibowitz, Adler and JFTV's crew to
oversee production of the show.
Among those serving on the "Teen-
Talk" Committee are: Jill Cohen,
Adriane Glick, Kim Green, Tracey
Green, Kim Haiman, Sandy
Leibowitz, Ronna Mutzman, Mike
Neumann, Scott Packman, Melissa
Paston, Steven Rappaport and Elaine
Stein.
In an installment of "TeenTalk" to
air Sunday, March 9 at 6:30 p.m., the
topic of conversation will be "The
Generation Gap." The special guest
for this installment is David Saltman.
executive director of the Jewish
Family Service. "Friendships" will
be discussed when Susan Rubin of the
Jewish Family Service joins the teens
in a segment to air at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday. March 13 and Sunday.
March 16.
Purim festival spotlighted
on Jewish Television Magazine
The celebration of the joyous holi-
day of Purim provides the theme for
the latest edition of "Jewish Televi-
sion Magazine," which will air on
JFTV on Tuesdays, March 11 and 25,
and Saturdays, March 22 and 29.
The program begins with a look at
some of the quaint and interesting
ritual art objects associated with
Purim, including some noisemakers
that date back hundreds of years.
The second segment of this install-
ment of "Jewish Television
Magazine" shows the traditional
burial of Jewish ritual objects and
sacred books which are too old or
worn to be used. The segment takes
viewers to Chicago, where the tradi-
tional "geniza" ceremony was recent-
ly reenacted at a Jewish cemetery
with local Hebrew school children"
participating in this profoundly mov-
ing service.
Children are also featured in the
program's third segment, which
highlights an innovative new pro-
gram that teaches youngsters in
Israel how to play tennis. This
month's edition of "Jewish Television
Magazine" concludes with a Begment
showing children in Israel excitedly
preparing for the celebration of
Purim.
'Heritage: Civilization and the
Jews9 chronicled on Channel 17
The original and evolution of at-
titudes and practices that have
become the heritage of Jewish men
and women are investigated in the
series HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION
AND THE JEWS, which was filmed
and researched over the span of four
vears in more than 18 nations on four
continents. HERITAGE. CIVILIZA-
TION AND THE JEWS, airing on
WLRNChannel 17 Mondays at 10
p.m., is hosted and narrated by Abba
Eban. Art and artifacts, historical
sites and primary literary sources are
used to tell this compelling story. The
final three installments will focus on
the following topics:
onday. March 10. 10 p.m. "The
Golden Land." Jewish emigration to
America from colonial times through
the Great Depression is traced in
this episode. The nature of Jewish in-
tegration into American society and
the variety of Jewish experiences in
different parts of the country are
examined.
Monday. March 17, 10 p.m. "Out of
the Ashes." The rise of Nazism and
the mass murder of European Jewry
as the universal meaning of the
Holocaust to all mankind is profiled.
Monday. March 24. 10 p.m. "Into
the Future." The final program in the
series explores the rise of the State of
Israel and its relationship with Jews
in other parts of the world.
Cablegrams
"Bulletin Board," a listing of hap-
penings in Greater Miami's Jewish
community, will once again appear on
JFTV starting this month. Merle
Schor, producer and host of "Q
watch JFTV on:
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29
Storer (South Dade) Channel 14
Harte-Hanks Channel 2
Dynamic Channel 43
Miami Cablevision Channel 84
Americable Channel 36
News," an in-house show for
residents of Quayside, will produce
and host the monthly update, which
will appear on JFTV on Wednesdays,
Fridays and Saturdays throughout
March. See the program guide below
for times.

The JFTV Super Sunday Telethon
was such an outstanding success that
station management decided to air it
throughout the week of Feb. 3. JFTV
and the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation extend their thanks to all
those who watched and called in their
pledges to the telethon.
JFTV

-CLIP AND SAVE
* Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc.
MARCH 1986*
5-5:30 p.m.
5:50-6 p.m.
6-6:30 p.m.
6:30-7 p.m.
7-7:30 p.m.
7:30-8 p.m.
Monday
Eenies
Kitchen
Checkup/
Mount
Slnal
we
Remember
The
Holocaust
San
Small
voice
or
viewpoint
Bet Din:
The Jewish
People's
court
Pillow
Talk
Tuesday
Film
Special
3/11*3/25:
Jewish TV
Magazine
3/4*3/18:
Film special
Film
Special
JCC:A
Special
Place
Jewish
Roundtabie
or
Aleph
Kaleidoscope
with
Suzanne
Lasky
^Subject to change
14 Federation, March 1986
Wednesday
Eenies
Kitchen
Hello
Jerusalem
Thursday
Film
Special
Checkup/
Mount
Sinai
Friday
Jewish
Roundtabie
or
Aleph
JFTV
Bulletin Board
Film
Special
Film
Special
Eenies
Kitchen
Teen
Talk
Still
Small
voice
or
viewpoint
Kaleidoscope
with
Suzanne
Lasky
Film
Special
Saturday
Hello
Jerusalem
we
Remember
The
Holocaust
Film
Special
Hello
erusalem
JFTV
Bulletin Board
JFTV
Bulletin Board
Checkup/
Mount
Sinai
Film
Special
Kaleidoscope
with
Suzanne
Lasky
3.22*3/29:
Jewish TV
Magazine
3/8:3/15:
Film Special
Sunday
JCC:A
Special
Place
Eenies
Kitchen
we
Remember
The
Holocaust
Teen
Talk
Bet Din:
The Jewish
P oples
court
Pillow
Talk
CLIP AND SAVE
I


TUESDAY. MARCH 4 AND SATURDAY
TV lewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami Michael-Ann Russell Center Singles
newrtment. 18900 NE 26th Avenue, sponsors
Jnirles support group beginning promptly at
30 p.m. The support group serves as a vehicle
or discussion on such issues as relationships,
pitesteem and interpersonal communication,
or more information, please call 932-4200.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 5
rtabbi Akiva Brilliant, spiritual leader of Tem-
tk Zamora, will be the discussion leader of
(Spiritual Giants of the Past Judah, Son of
gob" at the Miami Beach Public Library
from ifl:30 a.m. to noon. Sponsored by the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education, admission is
free and open to the public.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 5
[Jerusalem in the Perspective of History, a
Hebrew lecture, will be discussed by Efrat
Afek. a representative of the World Zionist
(Wanization, at 1 p.m. at the Miami Beach
public Library. Co-sponsored by the Central
Wgency for Jewish Education and Moadon Ivn-
frhe Hebrew Cultural Forum, admission is free
find open to the public.
THURSDAY. MARCH 6
f Women and Jewish Law" by David Biale, will
reviewed by Shirley Gross at the Miami
Beach Public Library at 1:30 p.m. Sponsored
py the Central Agency for Jewish Education.
idmission is free and open to the public.
Thursday, march 6
fhe American Technion Society. Women's
division Southern Region, will hold a scholar-
ship luncheon honoring Florence Baskin at the
poral Hotel on the Ocean at 11:30 a.m. For
hore information, please call Jean Zabin at
310005.
itONUAY. MARCH 10
fhe Torah Chapter of Hadassah will hold a
Cancer Seals meeting at Temple Zamora in
Coral Gables at 12:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call Vera Fiedler at 271-9490.
ITKSD \V. MARCH 11
fhe Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center. 18900 NE
fenth Avenue, presents an evening of illusion
ind sleight of hand with magician Robert Her-
mans. Doors open at 7:30 p.m., curtain rises
Promptly at 8 p.m. Social hour immediately
following the show. The cost is $6 per person,
phich includes a Viennese dessert table. For
tiore information, please call Marilyn at
132-4200, extension 217.
TUESDAY, MARCH 11
I you ever wanted to know about college ap-
plications, financial aid. career planning.
SATs, ACTs, and Jewish life on campus will be
presented at 7:30 pm. by the Jewish Vocational
ervice at the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, South Dade Center, 12401 SW
102 Avenue.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 12
[Teenage Depression and Suicide," a rap ses-
kion for 7th-12th grade teens, will be presented
by the Jewish Family Services at the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater Miami, Miami
peach Center. 4221 Pine Tree Drive. Admis-
pon is free and open to members and non-
members. Refreshments will be served.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 12
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
fliami. South Dade Center will present a day
amp open house for parents at 8 p.m. at the
Center, 12401 SW 102 Avenue. For more in-
formation, please call 251-1394.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 12
fliami Beach Branch 1059 Workmen's Circle
hold a monthly meeting at the Surfside
Community Center, 9301 Collins Avenue at
boon. For more information, please call Helen
tone at 864-5236.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
\ged Founders will hold a dinner meeting at 6
MB. in the Ruby Auditorium at Douglas
gardens. For more information, please call
teve Rose at 751-8626.
p-'EDNESDAY. MARCH 12
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Kged will sponsor an SGI Seminar: Increasing
Managerial Effectiveness, will be held at
4ount Sinai Medical Center. For more infor-
nation. please call Irma Emery at 751-8626.
(HURSDAY, MARCH 13
The Zohara Chapter of Hadassah will hold a
fouth Day Gala at the Hollywood Hilton Hotel
" 4 p.m. For more information, please call
ara Levy at 931-5802.
FRIDAY, MARCH 14
Temple Beth Sholom presents its Family
Education Series Shabbat Experience with
Dennis Prager speaking on "Why I Am a
Jew." At 8:15 p.m. in the Sanctuary, Temple
Beth Shalom, 4414 Chase Avenue, Miami
Beach. Free of charge. Call 532-3491 for more
information.
SATURDAY. MARCH 15
The Temple Beth Shalom Family Education
Series continues with Dennis Prager speaking
on "Are People Basically Good?" 9:15 a.m. in
the Temple Library. Cost is $4.50. Call
532-3491 for more information.
SUNDAY, MARCH 16
The Temple Beth Shalom Sunday Omnibus
Series features Dennis Prager speaking on
"Why the Jews The Reason for Anti-
Semitism and Anti-Zionism. 10:30 a.m. in the
Banquet Room. Cost is $4.50. Call 532-3491 for
more information.
SUNDAY. MARCH 16
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged will hold a "Spring Fling" Auction at 6
p.m. in the Rubi Auditorium at Douglas
Gardens. For more information, please call
Lou Fischer at 751-8626.
SUNDAY. MARCH 16
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Miami Beach Center, 4221 Pine Tree
Drive. Teens. 7th-12th Grade, are going to the
Dade County Youth Fair from 1-6 p.m. The
cost for members is $6. non-members $7. For
more information, please call Darcy at
534-3206.
SUNDAY. MARCH 16 TUESDAY.
MARCH 18
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged will sponsor "A Celebration of Aging," a
senior health and services fair at the Mall at
163rd Street. For more information, please call
Joanne Bander at 751-8626.
TUESDAY. MARCH 18
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy Women and PTA will hold a joint Bi-
nyan/Bnck Luncheon at the noon at the Bis-
cayne Bay Marriott. 1633 North Bay Shore
Drive. Ahuva Retter. president of the PTA,
will be honored. For more information, please
call 532-6421. extension 234.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 19
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Miami Beach Center. 4221 Pine Tree
Drive, Teens. 7th-12th grade, will have a
volleyball game from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. For
more information, please call Darcy at
534-3206.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 19
The Sisterhood of Temple Menorah will hold a
regular meeting at noon at the Temple, 7435
Carlyle Avenue, Miami Beach. For more infor-
mation, please call 865-1133.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 19
Rabbi Barry Konovitch. spiritual leader of the
Cuban Hebrew Congregation and Temple Beth
Shmuel, will be the discussion leader of
"Spiritual Giants of the Past Ezekiel" at 10
a.m. at the Miami Beach Public Library. Spon-
sored by the Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, admission is free and open to the public.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 19
Dr. Jehudah Melber, spiritual leader of Con-
gregation Beth Raphael and president of
Moadon Ivri-Hebrew Cultural Forum, will give
a Hebrew lecture on a talmudic subject at 1
p.m. at the Miami Beach Public Library. Co-
sponsored by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and the Moadon Ivn-Hebrew
Cultural Forum, the lecture is free and open to
the public.
THURSDAY. MARCH 20
Marc Pollick. director of the Elie Wiesel In-
stitute for Humanitarian Studies, will review
"Abandonment of the Jews" by David S>.
Wyman at the Great Jewish Books Discussion
Group at 1:30 p.m. at the Miami Beach Public
Library. Sponsored by the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, admission is free and open
to the public.
THURSDAY. MARCH 20 ,
The North Dade Chapter of the Women s Dm
sion of Technion will hold a meeting at 1401
NE 191st Street (Rolling Green s) Building U.
4th Floor at noon. Coffee and cake wil precede
the meeting. For more information, please call
Celia Mandel at 651-8545.
SATURDAY. MARCH 22
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Michael-Ann Russell Center. 18900 NE
25th Avenue, presents an evening of recrea
tional and Judaic fun and games at the Funm
Fun and Games Night at 7:30 p.m. The fees
are: after school program participants St.
per child: JCC members (first chid in family)
$10 JCC members (each additional child, same
family) $8; non-members $18>VdM. For
more information, please call 932-4200.
SUNDAY. MARCH 23
The Temple Beth Shalom Sunday Omnibus
Series features Father Edward Flannery
speaking on "The Anguish of the Jews." 10:30
a.m. in the Banquet Room. Cost is $4.50. Call
532-3491 for more information.
SUNDAY. MARCH 23
In conjunction with Purim and Jewish Book
Month, the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center,
presents a concert starring clarinetist Jaime
Bronsztein and his band at 1 p.m. plus a Stu-
dent Faculty Art Show. For more information,
please call 932-4200.
SUNDAY, MARCH 23
The dedication of the May Visitors Center will
be held at 11:30 a.m. at the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens. For more information, please call
751-8626.
SUNDAY. MARCH 23
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell Center, presents a
big band dance for singles 45 and over. Swing
to the sonds of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey
and Benny Goodman beginning at 7:30 p.m.
The cost is $7 per person, which includes one
drink. For more information, please call
932-4200, extension 217.
MONDAY. MARCH 24
The Yiddish Cultural Circle of Point East will
hold its Purim Festival with allegory, humor,
song, entertainment and refreshments in the
Rose Room at Point East beginning at 7:30
p.m. Donation is $3. For more information,
please call Morton Gerson at 935-1915.
MONDAY. MARCH 24 AND WEDNESDAY.
MARCH 26
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Miami Beach Center. 4221 Pine Tree
Drive, is holding an SAT prep course from 7 to
9 p.m. For fees and more information, please
call Darcy at 534-3206.
TUESDAY. MARCH 25
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center Teens. 7th-12th
grade, will enjoy Purim festivities and dinner
From 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Center, 4221
Pine tree Drive. For more information, please
call Darcy at 534-3206.
TUESDAY. MARCH 25
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Chapter, will hold a Purim
Festival beginning at 4 p.m. Activities will in-
clude face painting, games, contests and songs.
Prizes will be given for the most creative
costumes. For more information, please call
Fran at 534-3206.
SATURDAY. MARCH 29
The Golden Shores Chapter of Women s
American ORT invites you to a Latin Fiesta at
the home of Martha Praschnick. Gourmet food
Espanol will tempt your palate and please your
soul. Music and surprises will be yours, so
please make your reservation soon, as capacity
is limited. A donation of $20 per person is re-
quested. Please call Sandy at 891-5335.
MONDAY. MARCH 31
All spring classes will begin this week at the
Jewish Community Center of Greater Miami.
Miami Beach Center. Many classes for
children, teens and adults are offered. To
receive your program brochure, please call the
Center at 534-3206.
TUESDAY. APRIL 1
The Golden Shores Chapter of Women s
American ORT is holding a general meeting
and election of officers at the Hallandale
Library, 300 South Federal Highway at 7 p.m.
A panel discussion on "Jewish Affairs In the
Community and Worldwide" will also be
presented. For more information, please call
Carolyn at 932-3237.
FRIDAY. APRIL 4
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged will hold a Senior Olympics at 10 a.m. at
Douglas Gardens. For more information,
please call 751-8626.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
An exhibition of some 30 bronze figures of
dancers and Biblecal scenes by sculptor Ann
Froman will be on view through March 16 at
the Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery of Temple Beth
Sholom 4144 Chase Avenue. For more infor-
mation, please call 532-3491.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Miami Beach Center, is looking for
adult male and female players. 18 years and up.
for volleyball and softbaU. For more informa-
tion, please call Gary at 534-3206.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. Miami Beach Center, is offering a
developmental program for children age 2-3
years. The program includes basic climbing,
tumbling, balance, and eye-hand coordination
skills. Classes are on Tuesdays, 10 to 11 a.m.
For more information, please call Gary at
534-3206.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. South Dade Center, holds Israeli dance
classes every Monday at 7:30 p.m. The cost is
$2.50 per session for members, $3 for non-
members. For more information, please call
251-1394.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami. South Dade Center, holds teen exercise
classes every Monday from 5 to 6 p.m. For
more information, please call 251-1394.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, holds adult
volleyball games every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
The cost is free to members, $2 for non-
members. For more information, please call
251-1394.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, South Dade Center, holds Parents
Anonymous meetings every Thursday at 7:30
p m. For more information, please call
358-HELP.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, Michael-Ann Russell, Miami Beach and
South Dade Centers, will be offering special
programs for children on vacation from school.
Please call 932-4200, 534-3206 or 251 1394 for
more information.
People
Destiny
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for April events is March 14
Organization
Event -------
Place_______
Day ----------
Date.
.Time.
I a.m.
(p.m.
Your name
Title _
MAIL TO:
_ Phone No..
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33137
.
Federation, March 1986 15


"I gave at the office"
and other grim fairy tales
"Send me the card and I'll think about it."
"I have to talk to my accountant."
"I don't believe in parochial education."
"I don't want to give a new pledge until I've
paid off my old one."
"I have a problem with Israeli politics right now."
"I send my money directly to ."
"We've only been here a few years and don't
feel we're part of the community."
Fairy tales all.
When we call, we're not interested
in fairy tales.
Turning pumpkins into coaches takes
a lot of work and your financial
Yes, you!
We gave up on fairy godmothers a long
time ago.
Support the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign.
AARON PODHURST, Ganar.l Campaign Chairman
JOM Graatar Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33137
305-576-4000
SAMUEL I. ADLER
President
Executive
MYRON J.BRODIE
itlv. Vlc President
One People, One Destiny


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FILES


Alliance Division campaign in full swing
Events planned for March and April
Herbert Canarick, chairman of
Federation's Alliance Division, an-
nounced that during March and
April, campaign events will be held
for several of the Division's consti-
tuent communities and alliances.
"With several exciting events
behind us, such as the Alliance North
Premier Event and the Fabulous Fif-
tys Alliance Event, which were held
in February for first-time alliances,
the Division's campaign is far from
over," said Canarick. "Our over-
whelming successes in the past few
months serve as an inspiration for
our Division's volunteers and staff to
make the upcoming events even more
successful. We are all looking for-
ward to an outstanding 1986 CJA-
IEF campaign for Miami's high-rise,
condominium and townhouse
communities."
Turnberry Isle Alliance
The Turnberry Isle Alliance will
hold its Second Annual Ambassador's
Ball on Tuesday, April 1, beginning
with cocktails at 7 p.m. The black-tie
dinner and reception will be held at
the Diplomat Hotel.
Harry Gampel, who was honored
along with his wife Edith at last
year's Ambassador's Ball for outstan-
ding service to Federation and the
Jewish community, will serve as
chairman for this year's Ball.
"Residents of Turnberry Isle have
always shared a strong sense of unity
when it came to supporting the work
of the Federation," said Gampel.
Because of this, I expect that not only
will this year's Ambassador's Ball be
a wonderful and exciting affair, but
also that our community's campaign
which has topped the $1 million
mark in the past will be the best
ever."
Guest speaker at the Ambassador's
Ball will be Asher Nairn, minister of
information for the Israel Embassy in
Washington.
A minimum gift of $1,800 is re-
quired for attendance at the Turn-
berry Isle Alliance Second Annual
Ambassador's Ball, and couvert is
$75 per person. For reservations or
more information, please call Susan
Marx at 576-4000, extension 202.
Harry and Edith Gampel
Aventura Alliance
Under the leadership of Hazel
Canarick, Aventura Alliance chair-
man, the Aventura community will
hold a brunch on behalf of Federa-
tion's 1986 camp. :n on Sunday,
March 23 at 10:30 a in. in the Garden
Room of the Turnberry Country
Club.
The brunch will be held in honor of
the chairmen of the nine building6
which constitute the Aventura
community.
Ambassador Yaacov Morris, press
officer of Israel's Permanent Mission
to the United Nations and former
Israeli ambassador to Brazil, will be
guest speaker at the brunch.
Attendance at the Aventura Com-
munity Brunch requires a minimum
gift of $100 to the 1986 CJA-IEF, and
couvert is $10 per person.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please call Judy Eitelberg at
576-4000, extension 216.
Hazel Canarick
Winston Towers Alliance
Residents of Winston Towers are
invited to attend a luncheon on Sun-
day, March 16, honoring Esther and
Joseph Reisel for their many years of
service to the Federation and the
Jewish community. The luncheon,
which begins at 12 noon in the
Winston Towers "200" Building, will
benefit the 1986 CJA-IEF campaign.
Guest speaker at the luncheon,
Israel Amitai, is a noted Israeli jour-
nalist, author and television
producer.
Jerome Berliner serves as overall
chairman for the Winston Towers
community.
A minimum gift of $100 to Federa-
tion's 1986 campaign is required for
attendance at the luncheon, and
couvert is $5 per person.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please contact Adele Lurie at
576-4000, extension 310.
Jerome Berliner
Bal Harbour 101
Thanks to the work of a devoted
group from the Bal Harbour 101
building, a Federation event for
residents which was held in
previous, but not recent, years will
be rejuvenated in the form of the Bal
Harbour 101 Premier Event, schedul-
ed for Sunday evening, April 6. The
cocktail party and buffet dinner
begins at 6 p.m. in the main dining
room.
According to Sam Rosenfield, Bal
Harbor 101 chairman, "the commit-
tee hopes that this reception will
serve as a pilot program for future
alliances in Bal Harbour."
Edith Legum, reception chairman,
added that "We are very happy that
after many years, the door has re-
opened for Federation campaign
events in this community."
Attendance at the Bal Harbour 101
Premier Event requires a minimum
gift of $2,500 to the 1986 CJA-IEF.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please contact Susan Marx at
576-4000, extension 202.
Del Prado Alliance
The Del Prado Alliance will hold a
brunch on behalf of the Federation's
campaign on Sunday, April 6. Jerome
Gleekel, Middle East expert, will be
guest speaker at the brunch, which
begins at 10:30 a.m.
Charles Wilder serves as chairman
of the Del Prado Alliance; and
Jeanette Blumenthal is co-chairman.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please call Lynda Greenfield at
576-4000, extension 356.
Charles Wilder
Edith Legum and Sam Rosenfield
Westview C.C. tennis tourney
benefits CJA-IEF
The Westview Country Club recently staged its first pro-am tennis
tournament on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Combined
Cam-- PpeaNIsrael Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Dr. Norman Jaffe serves as chairman of the Westview C.C. Tennis I torn-
mittee. 1 he winning pro-am team consisted of tennis professional John
(>eraghty and club member Bob Ferman.
1ff Jhn/0i'wWinR dL-b members Participated in the tournament; Dr. Mark
Ron plrmf m an *& ?!" Mike Gilbert- J Kanter- Sidney Cooperman,
Iffp E' uTlty Can5lb' Seymour Brodie- Dr- Norman Jaffe, Dr. Gary
Camel Hoffman" Dr Milton Cas^r, M. Jack Herman and -lack
to Mdniey IpPerman is chairman of the Westview/ Federation Commit-
tee. M. Jack Herman is president of the Westview Country Club.
/ Federation, March 1986
cZjEF^ampaZ ZT"'" IT" '<<-^ behalf ofth, M*
Geragt^B^VeZanS^C^ '" *%' M~ Jack H('"
Jaffe. Dyr. Gary ^JcS^cC""" "'"H ^ *"


Spring learn-in explores
Passover traditions
The Federation Women's Division,
in conjunction with the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education (CAJE), will
hold its annual "Spring Learn-In" in
the form of a three-part educational
series on Passover and the Hagadah,
announced Robbie Herskowitz, WD
vice president for Community
Education.
Rabbi Norman Lipson, director of
CAJE's Institute for Jewish Studies,
will lead the workshops, which will
provide an overview of the Passover
Haggadah as studied and read
throughout Jewish history.
"It is important that we unders-
tand the meaning of the Passover
tradition and the rituals which we
practice during this joyous season.
Our Learn-In will certainly prove to
be an enlightening experience for all
the participants," said Mitzi Center,
chairwoman of the Learn-In.
For more information about the
Spring Learn-In, please call the
Women's Division at 576-4000.
BPW "networks' at art gallery
The new "networking" branch of the Federation's Business and Profes-
sional Women's Division (BPW) held the first in its series of programs this
month. The group met at the Barbara Gillman Gallery to view the private art col-
lection of Ruth and Richard Shack.
The networking branch, under the leadership of Lisa Treister, BPW vice
president for Leadership Development, is designed for women wishing to meet
other professionals in their respective fields.
The next networking program will be held Wednesday, April 2; and subse-
quent sessions will be held the first Wednesday of each month.
Maryanne Witkin serves as chairwoman of the BPW.
More information about the April 2 and subsequent sessions can be obtained
by calling the Women's Division at 576-4000.
Photo highlights
WD campaign events
Th, Business and Professional Women recently held a $100 minimum gift event at the
Ma ufa ir House on behalf of the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Pro-
ject Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign. Seen at the event are (from left to right) Karen Brown
Spivak and Ray Ellen Yarkin, BPW campaign co-chairwomen; Susan Neshick, event co-
chairwoman; guest speaker Dora Roth; Ileane Rayman Kaufman, event co-chairwoman
and WD Campaign Chairwoman Gail Newman.
Miami Beach women took to the high seas aboard the S.S. Doral on behalf of the k*J-
IEF. Seen at the $125 minimum gift event are (from Uft to right) "^J^SZffef^
woman Gail Newman; Vicki Land, event chairwoman; WD President Dorothy Podnurst,,
Barbara Aronson and Helene Berkowitz, Miami Beach campaign co-chairwomen; Aana
Raskin, Miami Beach area chairwoman; and seated is Federation Board oj Directors
member and guest speaker for the event, Myra Farr.
UfiTv' V
The South Dade area of the Women\ Division held a $200 n^1^^S
of the gardens and villa of Vizcaya. Seen at the event were; (Uft to ^ht) LiMan^sand
Connie Nahmad, event co-chairJomen; Gail Newman; Dorothy Podhurst BJ^ *^
and Micki Hochberg, South Dade vice chairwomen for campaign; and Elaine Koss, cnair-
woman of the South Dade Board. ________
WD gets to the core
of the Big Apple
This month, members of the
Federation Women's Division will get
to the core of the "Big Apple" and
taste a Jewish experience with a
three-day mission to New York,
scheduled for March 18-20, announc-
ed Gail Meyers and Elaine Richman,
mission co-chairwomen.
As a major highlight of the trip,
Muriel Russel, who has been an active
member of the Federation and the
Women's Division for many years,
will host a cocktail party for mission
participants at New York's Harmonie
Club.
The Harmonie, founded in 1852, is
one of the oldest social clubs in the ci-
ty. For its first 41 years, the club was
called the "Harmony Gesellschaft;"
German was its "official" language
and the Kaiser's portrait hung in the
hall. But like American society, the
club eventually became more tolerant
and allowed Jewish members. Today,
bar mitzvahs are as common at the
club as cotillions.
Other highlights of the "Big Apple
Mission" include an in-depth explora-
tion of New York's Lower East Side,
with visits to a mikvah and the shops
of a Torah scribe and a taU.it maker.
Mission participants will tour the
fascinating Jewish Museum, which in-
cludes exhibits on the Jews of
Kayfeng, China; and Treasures of the
Jewish Museum.
A cocktail reception will be held
with Arthur Kurzweil, foremost
Jewish geneologist; and mission par-
ticipants will be extended hospitality
at the home of the Israeli consul. Also
as part of the trip, participants will
visit Russian immigrants at Brighton
Beach and will tour the oldest Jewish
congregation in North America, Con-
gregation Shearith Israel, a Spanish
and Portuguese synagogue. Par-
ticipants will also be treated to a
joyous Jewish Musical, "The Golden
Land," with an authentic klezmer or-
chestra at a Yiddish Theater.
"When most of our parents and
grandparents came to the United
States from Europe, they settled in
New York," explained Gail Meyers.
"It was in this city that the roots
were planted for what grew into the
Jewish-American culture we know
today."
Elaine Richman added that "All of
the things we will see and places we
will visit on the mission will help us to
become closer to our Jewishness and
its origins. It will help to refresh our
sense of purpose for the work we do
for the Federation and its Women's
Division in Miami.",
Dorothy Podhurst serves as presi-
dent of the Women's Division and
Gail Jaffe Newman is campaign chair-
woman. Participating in the mission
are: Amy Dean, Phyllis Harte, Micki
Hochberg, Elaine Ross and Elly
Wolff. Also, Betty Cooper, Mikki
Futernick, Joan Hayet, Meryle Lor-
ing, Estelle Segal, and Margie
Spritzer.
For more information about the
New York mission, please call the
Women's Division at 576-4000.
The Southwest Dade area of the Women's Division recently staged a $52 minimum gift
event The theme of the event was Generation to Generation," highlighted by a fashion
show and brunch at the Mayfair House. Seen at the event are (from left to right) Judy
Levenshon event co-chairwoman; Judy Adler, Southwest Dade area chairwoman; Federa-
tion Associate Treasurer and event guest speaker Michael M. Adler; Vwi Brownstein,
event co-chairwoman and Liz Litowitz, Southwest Dade campaign chairwoman.
The North Dade area of Federation s Women's Division recently held its ninth annual lun-
cheon and tennis tournament to beruifit the 1986 CJA-IEF. Seen at the $200 minimum gift
event are standing (from Uft to right) WD Campaign Chairwoman Gail Newman; event
miest speaker Dora Roth; Sandy Belkind and Lenore Elvxs, North Dade campaign co-
chairwomen; WD President Dorothy Podhurst and Debbie Edelman North Dade area
chairwoman. Seated are (from Uft to right) event Co-chairwomen Steffi Cohen, Susan
KUinberg and Nettie Weiner.
Hold the Date
Thursday, March 13:
Campaign Steering Committee
Meeting
10 a.m.
Federation Building
Monday, March 17:
WD Nominating Committee Meeting
10 a.m.
Federation Building
Tuesday, March 18 Thursday,
March 20:
New York Mission
Monday, March 24 and Tuesday
March 25:
WD Area Board Meetings
Wednesday, April 2:
BPW Networking Program
5:45 p.m.
Location to be announced
Federation, March 1986 5