The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02976

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T "dfewlslfo FloifidliairiL
Volume 59 Number 7
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, February 14,1986
Frf
By Man SI >5
Price 50 Cents
Nazi Enjoys Immunity
Syrian Gov't. Refuses To Extradite Brunner to West Germany
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Officials here report
that the Syrian government has refused a
West German request for the extradition of
Nazi war criminal Alois Brunner who has
been living in Damascus at least since 1958.
Brunner, widely described as "the right
hand" of Adolf Eichmann, is held responsi-
ble for the deportation of more than 100,000
Jews to death camps. According to
testimony by survivors, he personally
murdered at least one Jew on a transport
from Vienna to Riga.
WALTER GRIEBEL, the prosecutor
general in Frankfurt, said the Syrian
authorities refused to confirm published
newspaper reports that Brunner was inter-
viewed in Damascus with their approval. He
said additional material is being studied for
another official extradition request. But the
Bonn government is not known to be apply-
ing any pressure on Syria toward that end.
Brunner, now 74, has abandoned his alias,
"Dr. Georg Fischer," and is now living open-
ly under his own name, sources here said.
They said his exact location in Damascus has
been documented in West Germany since
June 22, 1960.
Anatoly Sharansky Walks to Freedom
Yitzhak Navon, former President of Israel,
with Collette Avital former Minister
Counsellor at the Israeli embassy in Paris.
Both appeared at a press conference in May,
198J>, organized by Avital, who was in charge
of press and information at the time.
Women Diplomats
Is Male Chauvinism Slowing
By SHELLEY VON BERG
It all began in the fall of
1948, when a former school
teacher from the United
States was appointed
Israel's first Ambassador to
the Soviet Union. Golda
Meir later went on to serve
as Israel's Minister of Labor
and then as Minister of
Foreign Affairs from 1956
to 1966, and reached the
peak of her career as Prime
Them Down?
Minister from 1969-1974.
Today, women continue to
make great gains in the Foreign
Ministry. Israel currently has two
female ambassadors abroad,
career officer Anne-Marie
Lambert, Ambassador to Nepal,
and Ambassador to Norway
Judith Hubner, former deputy
director general of the Ministry of
the Interior.
Others are ascending quickly
through the diplomatic ranks. Col-
lette Avital, 22 years in the
ministry, has served in Montreal,
Brussels, Boston and Paris. She is
now senior director of the Foreign
Ministry's training programs.
JUDITH Varnai-Dranger, prin-
cipal assistant to the Department
of North America, has served in
the ministry 10 years. She recent-
Continued on Page 8-A
*
Uneasy Alliance
Evangelicals Eat Breakfast for Israel
By JUDITH KOHN
I WASHINGTON (JTA)
- Hundreds of conservative
evangelical leaders
gathered in a show of sup-
port for Israel at the fifth
annual National Prayer
Breakfast honoring the
Jewish State last week.
In fire-and-brimstone style,
some of the nation's most promi-
nent evangelist orators told of
God's special relationship with the
Jewish people and of the terrible
destiny that awaits those who
seek to crush the nation He has
chosen.
Many cited Biblical passages;
others talked in terms of U.S.
strategic interests as well. All
Continued on Page 14-A
Avital Joins Husband
On Flight to Israel
WEST BERLIN -
Anatoly Sharansky is a free
man. Sharansky came into
this city early Tuesday by
walking across the Glienicke
Bridge which links West
Berlin with Potsdam in East
Germany. Sharansky's walk
into freedom came as part
of an exchange of prisoners
between American and
Soviet authorities involving
undercover agents.
But the United States made it
crystal clear Monday that it would
have no part of the exchange
unless Sharansky were permitted
to walk into West Berlin all by
Continued on Page 12-A
Anatoly Sharansky
W. German Warns
Against Anti-Semitism
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A leading West German
politician has warned here
that recent anti-Semitic
statements by political
figures in his country are "a
small flame that can develop
into a fire."
Johannes Rau, Minister
President of the Federal State of
North Rhine-Westphalia, who is
the opposition Social Democratic
Party's (SPD) probable candidate
to unseat Chancellor Helmut Kohl
in the 1987 elections, spoke at a
press conference at American
Jewish Congress headquarters
after a luncheon meeting with
more than 30 prominent
American Jewish leaders.
RAU, who just ended a three-
day visit to the U.S. replied to
questions about the anti-Semitic
remarks recently made by Her-
mann Felner, a leading Bundestag
member of the Bavarian Christian
Social Union (CSU), and Mayor
Wilderich Von Mierbach of
Korschenbroich, a town in North
Rhine-Westphalia. Rau said that
although West Germany is a solid
democracy now, it has to be more
sensitive to such remarks because
of Germany's past.
Felner, whose party is allied
with Kohl's ruling Christian
Democratic Union (CDU), said
recently that former Jewish slave
laborers of the Nazi regime who
seek reparations create the im-
pression that "Jews always show
up when money jingles in German
cash boxes."
Von Mierbach, a member of the
Continued on Page 2-A
Jeanne Kirkpatrick


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Rabin Vows
Israel Will Fight Terrorists Again
Diplomatic Missions Around World
On Alert Against Retaliation
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel will continue to take
the initiative in its war
against terrorism, Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin pro-
mised last week, even if it
sometimes makes mistakes,
as happened when an in-
tercepted private Libyan jet
turned out not to be carry-
ing the top terrorism
leaders believed to have
been aboard.
The war against terrorism
must be waged by daring, un-
conventional means. Rabin told a
group of settlers in northern
Israel. "We have to show in-
itiative. We have to be daring
even if we do not always achieve
our objectives in full. Yesterday
(the day of the interception, Feb.
4), we did not achieve our full
aims, maybe not even partially,"
he said. But the Defense Minister
stressed that terrorism cannot be
defeated on the basis only of
retaliation for specific acts.
HE SAID the Arab countries
continue to finance international
terrosim. They provide terrorist
organizations with funds and
shelter, training bases and aid via
diplomatic pouches. He accused
George Habash
some governments in Europe of
not joining the fight against inter-
national terrorism and in fact
distinguishing between "good"
and "bad" terrorists.
Israel was clearly embarrassed
by last week's incident which in"
'Small Flame' Warned Against
Continued from Page 1-A
CDU, told his town council's
budget committee that the best
way to balance the budget was to
"kill a few rich Jews."
KAl MAINTAINED there are
"no significant rightwing radical
groups" in West Germany today.
He added, nevertheless, such
groups as there are have to be
watched "very carefully." He said
he did not know why these expres-
sions of anti-Semitism were voic-
ed or if they signify a trend in Ger-
man society. "Personally. I felt
very sorry for them (the remarks)
and deeply regret them," he said.
Henry Siegman, executive
director of the American Jewish
Congress, who opened the press
conference, said Rau was invited
in the aftermath of the Bitburg
controversy' because the Jewish
position on President Reagan's
visit to the German war cemetery
last May was misunderstood in
Germany.
Jews and many others objected
to Reagan placing a wreath at a
cemetery where members of the
notorious Waffen SS are buried
along with other German war
dead.
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I
I
I
dicated a serious failure of in-
telligence and a high degree of
cunning on the part of terrorist
leaders. Israeli intelligence had
what it considered sufficient
evidence that such Palestinian ter-
rorists as George Habash and Abu
Nidal were passengers in the
Gulfstream executive jet forced
by the Israel Air Force to land at
an air base in northern Israel.
The Libyan aircraft was enroute
from Benghazi. Libya, to
Damascus with nine passengers
and three crew. The passengers
turned out to be Syrian politician
figures returning to Damascus
from a conference of Arab
radicals in Tripoli, the Libyan
capital. After a thorough check of
the identities of those aboard,
Israel released the plane four-and-
a-half hours after intercepting it.
THE TWO-day conference,
chaired by Libyan leader Col.
Muammar Khadafy. was attended
by delegates from 22 hard-line
Arab movements, including
Palestinian terrorist groups op-
posed to Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir Arafat.
Habash, who heads the Popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine, was among them. He
boasted that he had foiled Israel's
efforts to catch the "big fish."
Abu Nidal is the leader of the
terrorist gang held responsible for
the Dec. 27 attacks at the Rome
and Vienna airports, which
resulted in the deaths of 19 peo-
ple. His group operates under a
variety of names and while it is
said to have no more than a few
hundred members, its record of
assassinations PLO officials as
well as Israelis makes it one of
the most dangerous terrorist
organizations. It is supported by
Khaddafy and also, according to
Israel, by the Syrian government.
Terrorists like Habash and
Nidal are wily. They rarely sleep
in the same building twice and
switch planes at the last minute
when they travel. That apparently
is what they did when thev left
Tripoli.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israeli Embassies and
diplomatic missions around
the world have been put on
alert for possible terrorist
retaliation as the country's
leaders continue to debate
the wisdom of forcing a
private Libyan plane to land
at an Israel Air Force base
last week because top
Palestinian terrorist leaders
were believed to have been
aboard.
The plane, a Gulfstream ex-
ecutive jet enroute from
Benghazi, Libya, to Damascus,
was released four and a half hours
after it was intercepted following
an identity check which determin-
ed there were no terrorists among
its nine passengers and three-man
crew.
The incident, in addition to be-
ing an embarrassment to Israel,
raised strong possibilities that ter-
rorists would launch new strikes
at Israeli targets. Libyan leader
Col. Muammar Khadafy has vow-
ed reprisals. Ahmed Jibril, one of
the terrorists presumed to have
been on the plane, warned
civilians to stay off Israeli and
American airliners.
A SPOKESMAN for El Al,
Israel's national airline, said there
were no grounds to fear a ter-
rorist response because El Al
maintains the most stringent
security measures, and its flight
paths take it for from Libyan
airspace.
Several Cabinet members
stressed they were not notified or
consulted in advance on the deci-
sion to intercept the Libyan plane.
Premier Shimon Peres told the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee that the deci-
sion had to be made in a matter of
minutes, leaving no time for
general discussion. Only he.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe
Levy were consulted and all ap-
proved the interception.
Foreign Minister YitzhaK
Shamir, the Likud leader, said he
had not been privy to the plan but
would have approved it had he
been asked. He said, in an Israel
Radio interview, that Israel would
continue to act against terrorist
leaders by every possible means
and he was convinced they would
ultimately be captured and
punished.
RABIN MADE a similar state
ment, saying Israel would con-
tinue to combat terrorism by
every means, even if sometimes it
makes mistakes, as it did last
week.
But Minister-Without-Portfoliu
Ezer Weizman said in a television
interview that had he been con-
Continued on Page 16-A
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
;^<4
Technion President Josef Singer (left) and Gen. David Ivry,
chairman of the Board of Israel Aircraft Industries and former
commander of the Israel Air Force, joined leaders of the
American Society for Technionrlsraeli Institute of Technology in
Dallas in mid-January who adopted a $25 million campaign goal
for 1986 on behalf of Israel's only comprehensive technological
university.
Israel Enjoys Zero Inflation
Last Two Weeks of January
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
inflation rate was zero in the last
two weeks of January, and the
estimate of about 1.5 percent for
the full month would be the
smallest rise of the consumer
price index in eight years. That
and other good economic news
just released by the Central
Bureau of Statistics has put
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai
in a strong position for his upcom-
ing contract negotiations with
HistadruL
He said that with inflation vir-
tually non-existent there is no
need to abandon the wage/price
freeze which he credited for en-
ding the spiral of devaluation and
price hikes. Modai urged the trade
union federation not to demand
wage increases but rather main-
tain the present situation in which
consumer buying power is
guaranteed.
The successes of the economic
austerity programs is threatened
however by the Cabinet's decision
to increase the defense budget by
$37 million. Modai warned that if
this trend continues it would undo
, what has been accomplished so far
j in setting the economy right.
Israel's trade deficit shrank by
16.4 percent last month compared
to the same amount a year ago, an
improvement attributed to the
combined effects of plunging oil
prices, a weaker U.S. dollar, and a
rise in Israel's military exports.
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry Ariel Sharon expressed
satisfaction with the latest figures
that showed a 16 percent increase
of industrial exports.
They totalled $517 million last
month, a 2.6 percent increase over
January, 1985. Imports amounted
to $593 million, 3.5 percent higher
than the same month last year but
the net deficit was reduced to
$176 million. The export of metal
and electronic products which are
generally of a military nature, was
up 26 percent last month. Textile
exports rose by 22 percent.
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MORT GOLDBERG, Florid* Director


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Anatoly Sharansky: He's
Where He Longed To Be
It is difficult to conceive of. Anatoly
Sharansky is free. Finally, one man's agony
in the Soviet Garden of Eden is over.
Sharansky, who over the years has become a
symbol of oppressed people everywhere, is
finally where he belongs: with his wife and
family in Israel, the country he longed to live
in.
For this, he has his wife, A vital, to thank.
She it was who for years kept the story of
her husband's imprisonment at the hands of
a paranoid Soviet Union emblazoned in the
headlines of the world's press.
For this, he has such leaders as President
Reagan, French President Francois Mitter-
rand and West Germany's Chancellor
Helmut Kohl to thank. Theirs was a steady
drumbeat they kept up in the cause of
Sharansky's freedom at the highest levels of
Soviet leadership and on every occassion
that Soviet officials met with Western heads
of state in their own capital cities.
Soviet Boast Was Wrong
The Soviets were clearly wrong when they
imprisoned Sharansky and boasted to him
that he could say goodbye to the world out-
side because no one would care about his
fate. This may be what they counted on, but
it didn't turn out that way. When Sharansky
walked across the Glienicke Bridge from
East Berlin into West Berlin on Tuesday
morning, the Soviets were making a clear
confession that they had been defeated by
world opinion.
Furthermore, the United States deserves
special praise for its insistance as late as
Monday that Sharansky had to make his
walk to freedom by himself, not together
with the undercover agents who were also a
part of the exchange arrangement. From
the U.S. point of view, as indeed from any
one else's who knew the truth, Sharansky
was no spy.
In this, too, the Soviet Union, acceding to
the U.S. demand, for Sharansky did indeed
walk alone, demostrated to a watching
world that their original charges against
Sharansky were lies.
Only One Man Freed
What all this says at first glance is that the
masters at the Kremlin can be swayed from
their paranoid delusions, given sufficient
pressure from abroad. Still, the fact is that
in the release of Anatoly Sharansky, only
one man has been freed even if it is a man of
such symbolic importance and pesonal digni-
ty as characterize him.
As the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry points out in a statement in
Miami, "Even as he is freed from prison,
and from the larger jail of the Soviet state,
other Soviet Jews also guilty of the 'crime'
of wishing to live as Jews in the Soviet
Union, or to emigrate to Israel, or be
reunited with their families, remain harass-
ed, arrested, imprisoned."
We agree. As much as all of us rejoice at
Anatoly Sharansky's release, until the
others are free, the world cannot be appeas-
ed by this gesture on Tuesday.
U.S. Veto At UN
The United States has already vetoed a
Security Council resolution that would have
condemned Israel for intercepting the Li-
Floridiiar*
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byan jet last week on which the government
thought several notorious Palestinian ter-
rorists were traveling to Syria.
The resolution, in the eyes of the
American delegation, failed to uphold the
right of countries to intercept planes under
"exceptional circumstances." Hence the
veto. But that is too broad an observation.
Under its skirts, much mischief can be
produced.
And so Vernon Walters, the U.S. Am-
bassador to the United Nations, fudged and
felt compelled to include that, veto or no
veto, the Israeli interception of the Libyan
glane did not meet the criterion that a state
rst have the "strongest and clearest
evidence that the terrorists are on board."
Then is the criterion that the legality of an
act of piracy depends upon whether or not it
succeeds?
But even given this pragmatic assurance,
there are clear problems. More than
anything else, the by now trite observation
that one man's terrorist is another man's
freedom-fighter may well justify tomorrow
or next week or next month or next year a
Syrian or Libyan interception of an Israeli
plane. Or an American plane predicated on
Syria's and Libya's stated belief that, after
all, tiiie Israelis are mere surrogates for the
alleged American war against Arab freedom
in the Middle East.
Legality Is the Issue
Israel's Ambassador to the United Na-
tions Binyamin Netanyahu is correct when
he declares that "We are witnessing a new
kind of war a regime that systematically
conducts worldwide terrorism. What are we
going to do about this kind of phenomenon?
What are we going to do to prevent future
Romes, Viennas and the like?"
On the other hand, precedent of illegality
on the other side is no genuine justification
for the legality or illegality of piracy, no
matter who engages in it.
What justification, for example, can Israel
find for its failed attempt last week in the
fact that on November 10, 1958 the Syrian
air force intercepted King Hussein's jet in
Syrian airspace after Damascus had given
permission for his aircraft to enter Syria and
that when the King refused to obey a Syrian
order to land his plane in Damascus, it tried
to shoot it down?
Or that on July 22, 1971, following a coup
attempt against Sudan's leader Numeiri.
then an ally of Libya's Muommar Khadaty. a
BOAC airplane on a flight from London to
Khartoum was ordered, while flying in Li-
byan airspace, to land at Benina airfield
near Benghazi? Two Sudanese coup leaders
were on board and transferred to Tripoli
once the plane landed, after which it was
permitted to return to London.
Acts of piracy? Or acts of self-defense?
Needed is an international sense of accord
on the justice of intercepting airplanes.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin's statement
before the Knesset on Sunday that Israel
will never "give terrorist leaders insurance
policies" is brave. It may also be foolhardy,
since it opens a veritable Pandora's Box of
retaliatory possibility.
Mainly, it does not address the issue of
legality. And that needs to be addressed.
Right now.
United Opposition
AJCong. Warns Against New Right Threat

NEW YORK Represen-
tatives to a conference of
Jewish, Christian, and
human rights organizations
have warned against the
threat posed by the religious
new right to religious
freedom and women's
rights.
The conference, held at
American Jewish Congress head-
quarters here. Jan. 13, issued a
call for united opposition to the
political activism of right-wing
fundamentalist groups.
THE CONFERENCE was co-
sponsored by the American
Jewish Congress and the
Women's American Organization
for Rehabilitation Through
Training.
'"Our very hves as people of
faith depend on religious freedom
and pluralism." Blu Greenberg.
author of "On Women and
Judaism." told the audience of
more than 100 people who attend-
ed the convocation.
"As I watch some of the
evangelical programs, as I read
their pronouncements. I fed very
frightened." she said. "And I'm
sure that Catholics and Pro-
testants who locate themselves
along different points on the
religious spectrum feel the same
fear." she added
Friday. February 14. 1966
Volume 5t
5 1 ADAR 5746
Number 7
HER WARNING was underlin-
ed by feminist and author Bettv
Friedan who cautioned against a
"strange convergence." a battle
against women's emergence to
full equality and control of our
own destiny and threats to the
pluralism and diversity of
religious belief that is so basic to
American democracy and the
flourishing of the highest values in
this country and the world."
The past ten years have
witnessed the growth of the fun-
damentalist right in the United
States." Friedan stated, "first
successfully defeating the Equal
Rights Amendment, and now try-
ing to take away the right of
women to decide whether to have
a child."
"We must be aware of the com-
mon danger." Friedan said. "Our
battle to preserve religious
freedom and our rights as women
is a common battle and it goes to
the very basis of our human values
and our highest spiritual values."
"The people who are trying to
break away from pluralism, im-
posing prayer of a given religion
in the schools, are the same
groups that fight the right of a
woman to control her own body in
the matter of abortion, or that
would outlaw schoolbooks that
show women in non-traditional
roles."
OUTLINING the theme of the
conference. Norman Redlich.
dean of the New York University
School of Law and co-chairman of
the AJCongreas Cotmr on
Law and BacU Action he
history si the Estx -nt
Clause, which he said, states
clearly the principle of "no
government support for religion."
He said recent Supreme Court
decisions appeared to jeopardize
the traditional separation of
church and state. The pluralism
that we enjoy in this country, the
right to be different, derives from
Constitutional protection of
religious freedom, he said.
Religiously defined roles for men
and women and all of the varia-
tions in lifestyles that comprise
religion, ought not be locked into
the law of the land, he added
Congressman William Green
(R-. NY.) delivered the keynote
address, sharply criticizing groups
that have used the issue of morali-
ty as justification for blocking
liberal measures from passage in
Congress, such as funding for
family planning facilities and
abortions for poor women.
STAN HASTE Y. director of In
formation Services for the Baptis:
Committee on Public Affairs, said
that the Fundamentalist rejection
of pluralism threatens to under-
mine traditional Baptist unity
"But it is a much larger debate as
well." he declared Constitutions!
principles must be protected, he
stated.
The Rev. Jerry Fahrell recently
announced that his Moral Majori-
ty is forming a new "Liberty
Federation" to lobby for politica.
causes. The conference organizers
Continued oa Page e-A
*


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
From Road Salesman to Temple Israel Founder
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Nat Roth, the last surviv-
ing founder of Miami's Tem-
ple Israel, is one heck of a
nice guy- Anyone who
knows him well will tell you.
Except Nat Roth.
His modest apartment in
Pembroke Pines is
decorated with plaques, old
photos, testimonials and
honors from the people he
touched in both his business
and civic lives thousands
of people, all across the
country.
If a truly modest man ever ex-
isted, Nat Roth is one.
Born October 2, 1896, on New
York City's East Side, Roth mov-
ed to South Florida with his
father, an immigrant from
Austria-Hungary. The year was
1912.
"HE NEVER was a wealthy
man," Roth recalled, "and he real-
ly hated the cold weather. At the
time, he was a contractor in coats
and suits. Since I was the worst
student in the family, the
'dumbest' of my brothers, I moved
with him to Daytona Beach to help
him get started in business. It was
just the two of us."
The elder Roth became a tailor
and eventually expanded the
business to include ladies' ready-
to-wear and dry cleaning.
Customers were the staff and
tourists in the hotels.
Panama hats were the biggest
selling item.
"Right after we started selling
apparel," Roth said, "The Florida
East Coast Railroad built this
hotel in Ormond Beach. Their
train ran to Palm Beach where
they had another hotel. The help
had no place to shop. So, I started
to peddle. I'd go on the bus from
Daytona south to Palm Beach and
Ormond Beach, and I'd bring
dresses and samples of women's
apparel, and I'd sell to the girls
who worked in the kitchen and
cleaned rooms."
ROTH BECAME one of the
pioneer road salesmen in the rag
trade, although at that time, roads
were few and far between.
"There were no roads south of
Palm Beach," Roth said. "Only
wood block trails." On one trip
from Titusville to Cocoa, only a
five mile distance, a thunderstorm
washed out the road. Roth
estimates 30 or 40 cars had to be
towed out, including his. "I spent
the night in my car, and it wound
up taking 18 hours to eomplete a
five-mile trip."
While in Palm Beach, Roth
became acquainted with a dress
shop-owner who also had a store
in Miami. He offered Roth a job,
which he accepted.
So, he moved from Daytona and
stayed at the Biscayne Hotel,
where Burdine's stands today.
The year was 1916.
AT THE outbreak of World
War I, Roth enlisted in the Navy.
His brother had come to Miami to
enlist, believing he'd be stationed
in Florida, and was posted to a
base in Pensacola. Roth did the
same, but wound up a machinist's
mate on a submarine-chaser that
patrolled the seaboard from
Pelham Bay in New York to Nor-
folk, Va.
On his discharge in 1919, Roth
immediately headed back to
Florida from New York, making
only one stop along the way.
Nat Roth Remembers Signs
Warning 'No Jews Allowed'
"Before the war, when I lived in
Daytona Beach, I wold take the
train to Jacksonville frequently,"
he said. "I used to enjoy playing
basketball at the YMHA."
There, he met a girl.
"Her name was Pearl Lasky,
and she really was a pearl. So, on
my way down to Miami from New
York, I stopped at Jacksonville
and married her."
Mr. and Mrs. Roth arrived in
Miami, where Nat got a job with
another dress shop, this time as
the manager. "The shop was on
Flagler Street, which at that time
was called Twelfth Street it
was before Flagler built his
railroad."
DURING THIS period, Miami
had only one Jewish house of wor-
ship, Beth David Synagogue,
which had originally been organiz-
ed by Isidor Cohen as Beth Zion
Synagogue. Cohen had been in
Miami since 1896, the year Roth
was born, and was strongly com-
mitted to Orthodox Judaism.
Roth was a member of Beth
David but had a major complaint.
His first daughter, Millicent, was
five years old and ready to begin
her Jewish education. "I tried to
get Beth David to become a Con-
servative synagogue," he said,
"because the Sunday school
teaching was not what I wanted
for my daughter." A clash ensued
between Roth and Cohen over
ideology.
"I tried to get the board of
directors to change the Sunday
school into one that was partially
Conservative, taught in English. I
had a lot of opposition from Isidor
Cohen, who wanted it to remain
as an Orthodox congregation. I
then decided I would try to
organize a Reform temple."
"I REMEMBER Isidore
Cohen," said Millicent Roth
Spikla. "He died sometime around
1935." Most of the Jews in Miami
knew each other because "the
Jewish community was very small
here," she said. Does she recall
why her father wanted to split
from Beth David?
"He was brought up in an Or-
thodox home," she said. "Maybe
he just wanted to break away.
Maybe he just wanted more liberal
Jewish teaching." Millicent
knows. She was the first child to
grow up at Temple Israel, starting
from kindergarten and moving on
through high school graduation.
Sometime in the fall of 1921, a
meeting was held at the home of
Morris Cowen. Present were
Cowen, Morris Plant (nee Plikan-
sky), Dr. Salo Stein, Harry
Simons, Philip Ullendorff, Louis
Wolfson and Roth.
IN HIS BOOK, "Synagogue in
the Central City: Temple Israel
1922-1972," Carlton Tebeau
claims that Simons, who became
the temple's first president, was
the prime mover. Roth isn't so
sure.
"Ullendorff was a butcher who
had made a lot of money by sell-
ing meat to the hotels and the
Clyde Line steamships that used
to bring tourists from New York,"
he said. "He gave us the land for
the original temple."
Miami at the time was rife with
anti-Semitism, according to Roth.
"There were signs all around,
especially on the beaches, that
said, 'No Jews or dogs allowed.' It
The White Front leaders were driven
~ i from Miami and never heard from again.
was a rough time for Jews living
in Miami. We were blackballed if
we tried to join an organization
like the Masons. They said we. had
to show nnj contribution to the
community."
MILLICENT AGREED. "It
was unusual for a Jew to get into
certain organizations. We weren't
ostracized I don't think, but we
weren't invited, and many Jews
just didn't get involved. There
was a lot of anti-Semitism,
though, especially at the hotels
and country clubs. I remember the
signs in Golden Beach, right on
A1A at both ends, saying, 'No
Jews.' It was very prevalent then
and not that long ago."
Roth did become a Shriner, and
was elected to their Legion of
Honor. He was also an Elk, and an
original member of the Jewish
War Veterans' Norman Bruce
Brown Post, one of that organiza-
tion's oldest. Eventually, he rose
to State Commander.
"He used to wear this fancy
uniform with a shiny metal
helmet, jodhpurs and these high
boots," Millicent recalled. "I used
to have to help him put them on,
they were so big. He was always
very involved in religious and civic
activities as I was growing up. He
has 50-year pins that he wears
proudly today."
THE ORIGINAL Temple Israel
was a 30-by-100-feet wood frame
structure that held around 300
worshippers. Built on Ullendorff s
land at 275 Northeast 14th Street,
and named after his father, "it
was an open-air temple with walls
that went halfway up," Roth said.
"We installed screens to keep the
mosquitos out and curtains that
we could roll up and down to keep
out the rain."
Only a year later, members
were looking for another site.
"By this time the temple's
growth was so rapid, the place
was too small to accommodate all
the newcomers," Roth said.
Ultimately, Sears Roebuck built
their store on the land.
"Money for a new temple was
raised in a lot of different ways,"
Roth said. "We would hold these
bazaars over at the pier where
Bayfront Park is now. We'd raffle
off anything, even chickens. We'd
have circuses. The main thing was
the temple, everything was the
temple."
ON OCTOBER 26, 1926, Mor
ris Plant, with Nat Roth and
daughter Millicent standing in
front of the crowd, broke ground
at Temple Israel's site on Nor-
theast 19th Street.
"I was only about five at the
time, but I do remember it," Milli-
cent said. "We had movies of it."
"We shot some 16 millimeter
home movies of the groundbreak-
ing," Roth said, "and I gave them
to Cantor (Jacob) Bornstein
around ten years ago."
The rest, as they say, is history.
MEANWHILE, Roth's ladies'
ready-to-wear shop failed, and he
took a job as a sales rep for Louis
Robinson, a manufacturer of coats
and suits. This led to his associa-
tion with Seymour Graff of Graff
of California, a major maker of
women's and children's wear.
Roth sold for Graff for over 43
years.
During World War II, Roth was
the only Jew in Florida appointed
to a draft board. According to
Millicent, he was very fair when it
came to making a decision about a
fellow Jew. "When someone
wanted him to intercede on behalf
of their son, he would declare
himself neutral if the kid was
Jewish," she said. "That way,
everybody \B involved in the war
effort, and with the lottery
system, the way the number fell
determined the way someone was
taken into the service."
Roth also fought a different
kind of war on the homp front.
Hate groups -ere becoming more
active, and Roth, a longtime B'nai
B'rith member, decided to do
something about it.
MILLICENT Roth Spilka: "I
remember there was trouble with
the Ku Klux Klan. They were go-
ing to have a march and a rally
somewhere down in the Redlands.
They used to burn crosses down
Roth's major
complaint: 'I
wanted a different
Sunday School
teaching for my
daughter ... I had
a lot of opposition
from Isidor Cohen'
who came to
Miami in 1896.
there and in Homestead. I can
remember my father going out
with a group of friends and break-
ing up these things."
"The KKK was strong down
here," Roth said. "As Jews
bought property, the goyim
resented it." Another group, the
White Front, was a Nazi organiza-
tion connected to the German-
American Bund. Roth remembers
them well.
"This White Front announced
they were going to have a big rally
under a tent," he recalls. "So my
brothers, Burnie and Dan, along
with Sam Winer and I, got it in
our heads to stop them from hav-
ing this meeting. We were able to
organize a bunch of guys from the
JWV and made these weapons out
of iron pipes. They tried to have
their rally, and we showed up,
about 50 of us, and we broke up
their meeting." The White Front
leaders were driven from the com-
munity, and the organization was
never heard from again.
DURING THE course of his
career with Graff, Roth had many
notable achievements. He con-
vinced Serbin Company, a
Cleveland clothing manufacturer,
to relocate to Miami and provide
hundreds of job opportunities. He
organized NAWCAS, the Na-
tional Association of Women's
and Children's Apparel Salesmen,
and guided it to its place as one of
the nation's largest.
Through NAWCAS, he
established a foundation to sup-
port indigent widows of clothing
salesmen. He struggled with the
federal government to assure that
Social Security benefits are ap-
plied universally, including to in-
dependent salesmen whose
employers were not deducting
from their pay to provide income
after retirement.
"All my life," Roth said, "I've
been concerned with poor people
who were not covered under the
law."
IN A LIFE full of accomplish-
ment, of which is Roth proudest?
"Other than my childrenn Milli-
cent, Bernadien and Stanley, I'm
proudest of the teaching I receiv-
ed at the beginning of my career
with Seymour Graff. He told me I
should always consider people in
need.
"These honors," he said, gestur-
ing toward the table piled with
plaques and certificates of ap-
preciation, "are nothing. I'm only
glad I've been able to do wor-
thwhile things. And I will as long
as I live."


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Interfaith Series
Controversial Issues Met Fairly
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
South Florida's Catholic
and Jews will meet to
discuss "What Is a Jew? at
the next interfaith en-
counter jointly sponsored by
the American Jewish Com-
mittee and the National
Conference of Christians
and Jews to be held Feb. 27
at the home of Thomas and
Joan Weidenfeld in South
Dade.
According to Julie Russin.
AJC's assistant area director, a
new series of interfaith en-
counters involving Jews and
Evangelical Christians is slated to
begin in March.
Russin, 24, is the program's is
coordinated. Their first discussion
group, held Jan. 16 at the home of
Sebastian and Rosary Mangano,
centered around the topic of
"Social Gospel," and according to
Russin, the program is gaining
momentum. How did the idea
come about?
"THE DIALOGUE itself is an
outgrowth of the Vatican II com-
memoration that we did in con-
junction with the Archdiocese of
Miami," Russin said. "Through
this commemoration, we had
workshops in education and, as a
follow up, Fr. James Fetscher of
St. Louis Catholic Church and
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff of Tem-
ple Bet B reira has a public discus-
sion at St. Louis. The people from
Bet Breira who went were very in-
terested in having a discussion
group, as were the people from
the&urch."
Arrangements were made for
Fr. Fetscher to address the con-
gregants of Temple Bet Breira on
a Friday night Once again, the
subject of a discussion group
arose, "and there was even more
excitement" over the idea, accor-
ding to Russin. What is the
group's purpose?
"The basic point of having this
dialogue," Russin replied, "is to
increase understanding between
Catholics and Jews with regard to
religion and what's important to
each of them on a daily basis."
Although she admits that
''there are a lot of
disagreements," between both
faiths. Russin believes disagree-
ment "increases the understan-
Julie Russin
ding" between the two. "We
discussed Social Gospel. We
haven't discussed Vatican II or
other areas of great disagreement
yet."
IS THE group skirting around
the more controversial subject
areas? Not really.
"With the issues that we've
raised to begin with," she said,
"we're trying to create a certain
amount of togetherness within the
group so that the barriers will be
less intense, and people can
discuss what's on their minds
more freely."
An additional side benefit is in-
creasing the camaraderie among
neighbors in South Dade, par-
ticularly Kendall, Dade's fastest-
growing area, she added.
, Catholic turnout at the last
discussion session exceeded both
expectations and Jewish par-
ticipants. "Ninety percent of the
Catholics we invited showed up,"
Russin reported, "and altogether,
we had 20 Catholics and 15 Jews.
The Catholics," she added, "are
very committed. I believe they'll
all show up again."
RABBI NORMAN LIPSON,
director of the Institute for
Jewish Studies of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, will
lead the "What Is a Jew?" discus-
sion. Russin hopes for increased
Jewish attendance.
"I'm hoping for more Jewish
participation because it's a Jewish
issue, and it's at a Jewish home, so
it may bring out more Jews. It's a
heated issue for Jews, and even
though we're doing this through
5ei ErcirS, a Reform synagogue,
we have an Orthodox participant
and a Conservative participant as
well. Rabbi Tabachnikoff will be
there, which should add a little
flavor to it.
Russin has been involved in
Jewish issues since her high
school days in Miami Beach.
Daughter of a prominent medical
family of orthopedists, her fist ac-
tivities were through Temple Beth
Sholom's youth group. A one-time
"radical Zionist," she studied in
Israel, and graduated from Sim-
mons College in Boston in 1983.
While a student at Simmons,
Russin was instrumental in
developing a pilot program to
counter pro-Arab propaganda
during the Israeli invasion of
Lebanon. "The PLO came and
spoke at Harvard and Boston
University," she recalled, "and
there were a lot of professors on
campuses teaming up with pro-
Palestinians to hold these discus-
sions. There was a lot of
propaganda."
AT A SLIDE show of pictures
from the Lebanese war presented
by Simmons' only instructor of
Middle East affairs, Russin notic-
ed one shot was of a village
massacre by Lebanese militiamen
that had taken place in 1977. "She
pointed it out as an example of
what the Israelis had done,"
Russin said.
Pdssover
at the Concord
Wed. April 23-Thurs. May 1
The observonce of tra-
dition, the magnificence
of the Sedorim. the beauty
of the Services, the bril-
liance of the Holiday Pro-
gramming.
Cantor Herman
Molomood, assisted by
the Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Mothew Lazar
ond Dan Vogel. to offidote
at the Services and
Sedorim.
Outstanding leaders
from Government, Press,
the Arts ond Literature.
Great films. Music day ond
night on weekdays.
Speciol programs for tots,
tweeners ond teens.
Rabbi Simon Cohen
ond resident Rabbi Eli
Mozur oversee constant
Koshruth supervision and
Dietary Law observonce.
I
m\,
oasiooRD
RESORT HOTtL/Q\
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Lipson Tabachnikoff
To combat pro-Arab informa-
tion dissemination, Russin's pro-
gram involved planting ques-
tioners in the audience. "The
questions we would plant would
counteract and put pressure on
the speaker. Boston is an intellec-
tual community and attracted a
lot of Arab politicos, and we'd do
this all over town. It was ex-
citing." Since then, Russin's pro-
gram has been implemented
nationwide.
According to Russin Vatican II
has far-reaching effect on the
Catholic faith. Among its points,
the Catholic hierarchy has called
for several measures concerning
Jews. In a document titled Nostra
Aetate ("Our Time"), Catholic
leaders called for a greater and
more meaningful relationship
with Jews, repudiated the concept
of the Jews' responsibility for the
death of Jesus, denounced at-
tempts at converting Jews to
Catholicism, increased teaching of
Jesus's Jewish background, and
rejected both the notion and
teaching of the Jewish people's re-
jection by God.
RUSSIN DEFINES her job at
the AJC as "non-defensive. It's
more of bringing together people
who are interested in Judaism .-i-
intergroup relations." Now A rial
she's seen hoW Catholics and'jew-
can get along in small groups,
what does she think the future
holds for relations between the
two faiths?
"From what I've seen in the
group and at the Archdiocese of
Miami, if the rest of the countr\ i
like this, the prognosis is very
good," she said. "The people in
the group I've worked with are
open, both to AJC and Jews a* a
group. We should be so lucky in
the rest of the country."
Hotel Bombing
Arabs' Work?
PARIS (JTA) A group call
ing itself the Solidarity Commit
tee with the Arab Politic;,
Prisoners and the Middle Ea.-'
claimed responsibility for setting
off the bomb which exploded i
the busy Claridge Hotel shopping
arcade off the Champs-Elyse
injuring seven people three
seriously.
The Committee's OOBUnunka
tion to a French news agency here
gave no details to substantiate its
claim of responsibility for the
blast, which caused extensive
damage. The communication also
called for the release of three ter-
rorists imprisoned in France.
The terrorists are Georges
Ibrahim Abdullah, believed to be
the head of the Lebanese Revolu
tionary Armed Factions; Anis
Nat-cache, who tried to murder
former Iranian Premier Shapour
Bakhtiar; and Waroujan Garbi
jian, an Armenian, who set off a
bomb at Orly Airport in the sum
mer of 1983.
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News in Brief
Soviets Ban Use of 'Holocaust'
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By JTA Services
BONN The East German
Communist regime is campaign-
ing to end the use of the word
"Holocaust" as synonym for Nazi
atrocities because, according to
the official weekly Weltbuehne
published in East Berlin, it
originated in that sense in the
capitalist West as a means, of
depicting Nazi crimes against
Jews as a unique event, un-
paralleled by other war crimes.
The East German leadership
and its media have long played
down crimes against Jews as such
while emphasizing atrocities com-
mitted by the Nazis against Com-
munists and against the Soviet
Union. The Democratic Republic
refused to screen the American-
made television series
"Holocaust" in 1982. It was
shown twice on West German
television which can be seen in
most parts of East Germany.
According to Weltbuehne. that
series brought the word
"Holocaust" into the popular lex-
icon, even in East Germany,
^ though it did not penetrate East
German history textbooks. The
word "artificially places a
language barrier between the
truth about the (Nazi) past and the
ability to understand it," the Com-
munist weekly stated.
U.S. Vetoes Anti-Israel
Resolution Third Time
UNITED NATIONS For the
third time in the last four weeks,
the United States vetoed an anti-
Israel resolution in the Security
Council. The latest veto, last
Thursday night, was on a resolu-
tion condemning Israel for its in-
terception of a Libyan aircraft on
Feb. 4.
Israeli action an "act of aerial hi-
jacking and piracy." The
15-member Council voted 10-1 for
the resolution. France, Britain,
Australia and Denmark abstained.
Explaining the veto, the U.S.
Ambassador to the UN, Vemon
Walters, said: "My government
cannot accept a resolution which
implies that interception of an air-
craft is wrongful per se, without
regard to the possibility that the
action may be justified. We must
be clear that terrorist violence,
and not the response to terrorist
violence, is the cause of the cycle
of violence which tragically mars
the Middle East and the entire
world."
Marilyn Klinghoffer Dead
Of Cancer At Age 58
NEW YORK Marilyn Kl-
inghoffer, the widow of Leon Kl-
inghoffer who was murdered by
Palestinian terrorists during the
sea-jacking of the Italian cruise
ship Achille Lauro last October,
died Sunday at Lenox Hill
Hospital, reportedly of cancer.
She was 58 years old and lived in
Manhattan.
Klinghoffer and her husband
were among the several hundred
passengers aboard the cruise ship
when it was hijacked off the Egyp-
tian coast by Palestinian ter-
rorists who demanded freedom of
Palestinians held in prisons in
Israel.
Leon Klinghoffer became the
sole fatality of the two-day ordeal
when he was shot and killed by the
terrorists who then dumped his
body into the Mediterranean. His
body later washed ashore on the
Syrian coast and was subsequent-
ly returned to the U.S. for burial.
The spokesperson said the Leon
Klinghoffer Memorial Founda-
tion, established after the Achille
Lauro incident, will change its
name to the Leon and Marilyn Kl-
inghoffer Memorial Foundation,
and that the family intends to con-
tinue on with the foundation's
work of fighting terrorism.
Herzl Stamp Gives Russians
Hives, They Say 'Nyet'
JERUSALEM Hundreds of
letters mailed by Israelis to their
relatives in the Soviet Union
recently have been returned to
Israel because the Soviet
authorites object to the stamp on
the envelopes.
The overseas mail stamp bears
the likeness of Theodor Herzl,
founder of modern Zionism. The
Russians, unwilling to have his
picture distributed among Soviet
Jews, have not allowed the letters
to reach their destination and are
returning them, overprinted with
the words "addressee unknown."
Soviet aliya activists in Israel
are appealing to the Israeli postal
authorities to supply stamps for
letters to the Soviet Union with
the portrait of a Jewish personali-
ty that would not cause the Rus-
sians to object.
Former Nazi's Election
At UN Brings Protests
LOS ANGELES The Simon
Wiesenthal Center has protested
to United Nations Secretary
General Javier Perez de Cuellar,
over the Feb. 3 vote at the UN in
Geneva, which elected a former
Nazi Party member as vice presi-
dent of the UN's Commission on
Human Rights.
Hermann Klenner, who entered
the Nazi Party on April 20, 1944
(Hitler's birthday) with a card
bearing the number 9756141, was
nominated for the post of second
vice president for the Commission
on Human Rights by the Soviet
Union's Byelorussian delegate,
with the backing of Arab
representatives.
The nomination was approved
by voice acclamation over the
vehement protest of Israel's Am-
bassador Efraim Dubek.
Memorial for Astronauts
Announced in Jerusalem
NEW YORK A memorial will
be established in honor of Judith
Resnik and her fellow Challenger
astronauts at the Beit Halochem
Center in Jerusalem, it was an-
nounced by Ernest Zelig, presi-
dent of the Bnai Zion Foundation.
The memorial will consist of a
physiotherapy room that will
become an integral part of the
rehabilitation complex. Beit
Halochem Centers provide com-
prehensive services to over 35,000
disabled Israeli war veterans.
"An Ad Hoc Committee of pro-
minent Americans is being formed
to implement the establishment of
the memorial," Zelig stated.
"Bnai Zion believes that the ef-
forts of the disabled to rise above
their physical limitations to lead,
once more, as normal a life as
possible, should serve as a fitting
memorial to the spirit of the
heroic astronauts."
Defense Expert Galili
Dead in Israel At 76
JERUSALEM Funeral ser-
vices were held Sunday for
Yisrael Galili, one of Israel's
leading defense policy makers
from pre-State days until recent
years. He died at his home Satur-
day at the age of 76. He had been
ill for the last two years.
Born in Brailov, Ukraine, Galili
was brought to Palestine by his
mother and uncle when he was
four years old. In 1930, he was
one of the founders of Kibbutz
Naan near Ramla, where he re-
mained an active member for the
rest of his life.
In the years which proceeded
the establishment of the State,
Galili was the head of the
Haganah national command. In
that capacity he was largely
responsible for preparing the
Haganah to meet the Arab attack
which followed the partition plan
in 1947.
Jordan, PLO Talks Were
'Total Failure'Peres
JERUSALEM Premier
Shimon Peres said Sunday that at-
tempts to bring the PLO into the
peace process have been a "total
failure." Peres spoke at a recep-
tion in Tel Aviv after he was brief-
ed by Wat Cluverius, the U.S.
special envoy to the Middle East,
who came to Jerusalem from Am-
man last Friday. Cluverius also
briefed Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir at a separate meeting.
The American diplomat had an
indirect dialogue with PLO chief
Yasir Arafat. The intermediaries
were Hanna Seniora, editor of the
East Jerusalem Arabic daily Al-
Fajer, and Faez Abu Rahma, a
lawyer from Gaza, both prominent
figures in the Palestinian
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community.
Arafat departed Amman Sun-
day after apparently rejecting
American terms offered for PLO
participation in peace negotia-
tions and stating conditions of his
own that were unacceptable to the
U.S. to Israel and possibly even to
King Hussein of Jordan.
Although diplomatic sources
here and in Amman insisted that
efforts are continuing to bridge
the gap between Hussein and
Arafat, their talks have ended.
Israeli sources publicly dismissed
claims from Amman that the talks
were still alive.
Strengthen Commitment To
RefuseniksU.S. Lawmakers
NEW YORK Three New
York area Congressmen, in-
cluding Sen. Alfonse D'Amato
(R), have urged a continued com-
mitment to the freedom of Soviet
Jews despite the release this week
of Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Cons-
cience Anatoly Sharansky.
The Washington lawmakers
said that while they were clearly
pleased with the release of
Sharansky as part of an East-
West prisoner exchange, this
should not preclude further ef-
forts toward a general easing of
the plight of Jews in the Soviet
Union.
David Hen (iiirion:
"Technion is one of the
cornerstones of Israel's
development. Its
scientific and technical
staff an' always
available to the
gotirnrnent.
UTECHNION
ISRAEL INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
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Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer...
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
4. The JNF needs you but you need
the JNF much more
The JNF gives life to the desert
And strength to Israel.
Keren
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Jewish National Fund
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538-6464
J


Page 8-A The Jewiah Ftoridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Women Diplomats
Is Male Chauvinism Undoing Them?
Continued from Page 1-A
ly returned from a five-year
assignment in New York as
spokesperson for the Israeli Mis-
sion at the United Nations where
she participated daily in
multilateral relations and hobnob-
bed with ambassadors and
diplomats far above her ranking.
Tamar Samash, also 10 years in
the service, acts as principal assis-
tant to the Cultural and Scientific
Relations Department. She serv-
ed three years as consul in
Motreal often working 18 hours
a day while caring for a 3-year-
old son in the absence of a hus-
band who was drafted to serve in
the 1982 War in Lebanon.
In all, 36 female Foreign
Ministry career officers serve to-
day in posts ranging from second
secretary to ambassador in Israel
and abroad. Yet these officers
constitute less five percent of the
ministry's combined ad-
ministrative and political force,
and, though one of them, Yael
Vered, is an adviser to the
Foreign Minister, no woman
presently serves as deputy direc-
tor or director general of a
department.
A VITAL, Dranger and Samash
agree that the lack of women of-
ficers serving in the more
distinguished ministerial echelons
does not stem from discrimination
salaries, ranks and promotions
are equal between the sexes nor
deficiencies in the women's per-
formance. There is simply a small
number of female cadettes enter-
ing the ministry each year and
thus an even smaller number ris-
ing through its ranks.
Deputy director for personnel
Abraham Sitton insists that the
presence of women in the Foreign
Ministry has risen in the past
decade, from 3 to 10 percent (in
the political department) today.
Yet, according to Avital, five
women entered the ministry in
1983, three in 1984, and only one
entered this year.
Sitton offers and explanation.
"It'shard to go abroad," he says.
"The job demands that you spend
long hours out of the home, so a
woman who would like to raise a
family and dedicate a lot of time to
her children finds herself in con-
tradiction to the meaning of the
job of the diplomat."
A husband can also be a deterr-
ing factor, objecting to his wife be-
ing sent abroad as a represen-
tative of Israel while he merely ac-
companies her. It is not the
responsibility of the ministry to
assure jobs for spouses when a
diplomat is stationed abroad.
U.S. Rabbi Urges
Religious MK's Resign
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Rabbi Louis Bernstein,
president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, has urg-
ed religious members of the
Knesset to resign in wake of
the overwhelming defeat of
the "Who is a Jew" amend-
ment in the Knesset.
The American Orthodox leader
said he spoke for all American.
Canadian and British Mizrachi
delegates to the Zionist General
Council meeting here when he
said the religious MKs produced a
fiasco by pressing the controver-
sial measure for a vote when its
adoption was unlikely.
According to Bernstein, the out-
come of the 61-47 defeat would be
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"to increase intermarriage in the
United States and elsewhere."
The amendment would have, in ef-
fect, invalidated conversions to
Judaism performed by non-
Orthodox rabbis.
He said the Knesset was
perceived to have "legislated
against halacha" and warned that
if the religious parties reintroduce
the measure in six months as
they will be allowed to under the
law he and other diaspora Or-
thodox leaders would publicly
dissociate themselves from the
effort.
The amendment which sustain-
ed its third defeat in recent years
is considered likely to be defeated
a fourth time if introduced in six
months.
Bernstein's position was akin to
that of Religious Affairs Minister
Yosef Burg, a leader of Mizrachi.
who refused to cut short a visit to
the U.S. return home for the
Knesset debate after warning that
the amendment lacked the votes
for passage and should not have
been introduced at this time.
"This sometimes creates con-
flict," Sitton continues. "But if a
woman is willing to face this con-
flict and forfeit a lot of things she
wouldn't have to give up if she
wasn't a diplomat, she will be
successful."
TAMAR SAMASH epitomizes
such a success story. Encouraged
by her husband to join the
ministry, she found herself in
Montreal in 1981 at a time when
Canada was experiencing heavy
economic difficulties. Never-
theless, her husband secured
employment only to be called
back to Israel at the onset of the
war in Lebanon.
In addition to caring for her son,
Samash often found herself work-
ing 18 hours a day, attending
meetings and speeches in the
evening. On top of all of this, she
had to deal with a "very
chauvinistic head of mission.
When he was told a woman was
coming, I don't think he was very
keen to get me," she recalls. "But
during the difficult period, that's
when he learned to appreciate me.
When he saw I was doing my job
we developed a good relationship.
At this point came the realization
that a woman can do the job as
well as, it not better than, a man."
Collette Avital elaborates. "If
there is a specific contribution of a
woman," she admits, "I think she
probably works harder. She has to
do both things have a job and be
a housewife." For instance, Avital
continues, "A male diplomat
relies on his wife to entertain. A
woman in the service does both
the work and the entertaining. In
terms of office time and the
amount of energy they put into
their job, they're probably giving
a lot more of themselves."
SAMASH CITES one advan-
tage of women in the Foreign
Ministry. "When you're trying to
get a message through to so-
meone, sometimes when a man is
speaking, it sounds like propagan-
da. But when a woman says it, it
works."
Judith Varnai-Dranger agrees.
"You tell a woman more than a
man, and sometimes you listen to
a woman more than to a man.
Sure." she smiles, "sometimes its
because of her perfume, the way
she looks, the way she dresses.
But. once you establish your
credibility, even if you change
your perfume, you stay the same.
"Status in the foreign service
depends on how you present
yourself, how you insist on being
treated, whether you are a woman
or a man." she adds. "If you are a
person who comes with authority
and credibility, if you know what
you want represent something
you care for, you will be treated
accordingly."
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Vernon Walters, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, shakes
hands with Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir in his office.
Walters was in Israel to address the World Jewish Congress
Assembly in Jerusalem. The thrust of his speech was directed
against international terrorism and UN resolutions condemning
Israel following Israeli actions against terrorists.
Religious New Right Warning
Continued from Page 4-A
said in a statement that "the
dangerous mix of ultra-Right
politics and Fundamentalist
dogma powering the Moral Ma-
jority, and presumably its suc-
cessor, Liberty Federation,
represents a dramatic escalation
of the threats to pluralism and to
the climate of tolerance in our
nation."
Organizations participating in
the conference included the
American Jewish Committee.
Catholics for a Free Choice.
Christie Institute, Church of the
Brethren Washington Office.
Federation of Reconstructionist
Congregations and Havurot,
Hadassah, National Coalition
Against Censorship, National
Council of La Raza, National
Jewish Community Relations Ad-
visory Council (NJCRAC), New
York State Catholics for a Free
Choice, People for the American
Way, Religious Coalition for
Abortion Rights, and United
Synagogue of America.
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
^ Keren Kayemeth Latin Division Annual Banquet Attracts
rwiofw.
(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
A Galaxy Of Notables
Prior to the Annual Banquet held recently in the Konover Hotel, Dorita
and Gorge Feldenkreis opened their beautiful home to friends and leaders to
meet with Ambassador Ehahu Ben Elissar, Member of the Knesset, and
Israel s First Ambassador to Egypt, the Hon. Mordechai Dayan, World Co-
Chairman Keren Kayemeth Leisrael, and Shlomo Ariav, also from Keren
Kayemeth Jerusalem. The Annual Banquet held during Chanukah was a most
beautiful, joyous, and electrifying affair, which launched the Kinneret
Development Project in the Galil. His Excellency Eliahu Ben Elissar, and the
Hon. Mordechai Dayan delivered spellbinding addresses. The Master of
Ceremonies of the evening was Nily Falic, Director of the Keren Kayemeth
Latin Division. She conducted the affair with much dignity, aplomb and
beauty.
The invocation was given by Rabbi Amram Amselem, Spiritual Leader of
Temple Moses, The Blessing of the Chanukah caandles was made by Rabbi
Barry J. Konovitch, Spiritual Leader, Cuban Hebrew Congregation, Isaac
Mildenberg, JNF supporter made the Hamotzei. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board and Spiritual Leader of Temple Menorah, introduc-
ed the Guest Speakers.
Beautiful presentations were made by the Hon. Alex Daoud, Mayor of the
City of Miami Beach, and by Jimmy Resnick, representing the Hon. Xavier
Suarez, Mayor of the City of Miami. The National Anthem and Hatikvah were
sung by Cantor Arieh Ovadia, of Temple Moses. A most beautiful musical pro-
gram was presented by Maestro Shmuel Fershko, Israeli Pianist and Com-
poser who played a medley of his own compositions, Claude Kadosh, Interna-
tional Israeli Singing Star, and Nava Knopf, Israeli Dancer.
li -~
fcv.
\
i
Host and Hostess. Dorita and George Feldenkreis, Mrs. Ben Elissar. Am-
bassador Eliahu Ben Elissar. Nily Falic.

4*
George Feldenkreis. Host, Nily Falic, Director Keren Kayemeth Latin Divi-
sion, Mordechai Dayan, World Co-Chairman, Keren Kayemeth Leisrael,
Roslyn Unger, Administrator Jewish National Fund, Abraham Grunhut.
Pres. JNF Gr. Miami, Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern Region.
I
n%- -
m
Ambassador and Mrs. Eliahu Ben Elissar, Dorita and George Feldenkreis, Ni- His Excellency Ambassador Eliahu Ben Elissar, Nily Falic, George
fly Falic, Shlomo Ariav, and Hon. Yehoshua Trigor, Consul General State of Feldenkreis, Hon. Mordechai Dayan, and Shlomo Ariav.
I \lsrael.
*\
~**i
I
I
V
^9
m
dor and Mrs. Eliahu Ben Elissar with Mr. and Mrs. BernardoBenes. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Feldenkreis with Ambassador and Mrs. Eliahu Ben
hj ixssav.
Jewish National Fund. Keren Kayemeth Leisrael Latin Division, 420 Lincoln Road, Suite 353-349. Miami Beach. Fla. 33139 538-6464 or 531-8706


(KEREN KAYEMETH
lEISRAEL) INC
IOOOOOOOCTI
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/FrkUy, Februap 14, 1986
DOOOOOQQOOOOOOOBOQOOI
nSSSt Keren Kayemeth Latin Division Annual Bam
Hem. Shlomo Ariav. Keren Keyemeth Leisrael. Jerusalem. Ambassador Eliahu
Ben Elissar, Sily Falic, Hon. Mordechai Dayan, Co-Chairman Keren
Kayemeth Leisrael. and Zev W. Kogan. Pres. JNF Southern Region.
His Excellency Eliahu Ben Elissar, M.K.. and Guest Speaker,
addresses the Banquet of the Keren Kayemeth Latin Division,
under the portrait of Former Prime Minister Menachem
Begin.
I
Nil* Falic, Director of
and Master of ('imnwmi
dience. while' Ambastut
Mordechai Dayan. Guest
*!
M
Jimmy Resnick representing Hon. Mayor Xavier Suarez,
presents the Key to the City of Miami to His Excellency Eliahu
Ben Elissar.
His Excellency Ambassador Eliahu Ba
Falic, Director Keren Kayemeth Lewi
Amselem, Spiritual Leader Temple Ma
Chairman Keren Kayemeth Leisrael. Jti
M
Commissioner Abe Resnick and Hon. Mayor Daoud. City of
Miami Beach, present a Proclamation, and Key to the City to
His Excellency Ambassador Eliahu Ben Elissar.
Leon Schuster, Dean of the JNF Cuban Jewish Community
lights a Chanukah candle, while at the microphone is NUy
Falic, Director Keren Kayemeth Latin Division.
Dahlia and Michael Tainesofl
porters take joy in lighting tktl
Hon. Mordechax Dayan. Sxly Falic. Mrs. Ben Elissar fS'itzaj. His Excellency
Ambassador Eliahu Ben Elissar. Suzanne and Fred Shochet, Publisher of the
Jewish Floridian.
Hon. Shlomo Ariav. Mrs. and Mr. Isaac MUdenberg. Sily Falic, Ambassador
Eliahu Ben Elissar. Mrs. Ben Elissar. and Hon. Mordechai Dayan.
.
Ambassador Eliahu Ben Eltssar. Peg Gorson, Mrs. Ben Elissar. Nily False,
and Rabbi Sri Raphaely. prominent Israeli artist
oooooeooBooi
SrL5*^ iru"'- S** Falic- Al**>****dor Eliahu Ben Elissar. Nitn
T-Trf* ST* Konoviteh. and Rabbi Barry J. Konoxitch. Spiritual
Leader Cuban Hebrew Congregation.



Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
et and Beautiful Candlelighting Ceremony
lni|trii
(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
\eren Kayemeth Latin Division,
the Banquet addresses the au-
Uiahu Ben Elissar and Hon.
rs look on.
MF L i
iMflH
Hon. Mordechai Dayan, Cohairman Keren Kayemeth Zev W. Kogan, President Jewish National Fund Southern
Leisrael delivers a spellbinding address, while His Excellency Region presents the Medal of Honor to Michael and Dahlia
Eliahu Ben Elissar looks on. Taines of Boca Raton, while Mrs. Ben Elissar looks on.
\ar, M.K., Guest Speaker, Nily
trs. Amselem, Rabbi Amram
Hon. Mordechai Dayan, Co-
Judge and Mrs. Joseph Cohen, ofNatanya, Israel, and Parents
of Nily Falic, light the Chanukah Candle.
Rabbi Barry J. Konovitch, Spiritual Leader Cuban Hebrew
Congregation, Hon. David Cohen, Consul State of Israel,
Mordechai Dayan, Co-Chairman Keren Kayemeth Leisrael,
Jerusalem, Rabbi Amram Amselem, Spiritual Leader Temple
Moses.
t, ardent JNF sup-
candle.
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Feldenkreis, representing their parents,
Dorita and George Feldenkreis light the Candle.
Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Mildenberg, philanthropists and ardent
JNF supporters light the Chanukah candle.
i
SB
YndreBialolenki^ice^res. JNF Gr. Miami, Ambassador Eliahu Ben
f, Hon Mordechai Dayan, Roslyn Unger, Administrator JNF, Rabbi
IA bramowitz, Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board and Spiritual Leader Temple
\, Mrs. Eliahu Ben Elissar, and Hon. Shlomo Anav.

Fima Falic, Sonja Zuckerman, Nily Falic, Mrs. Ben Elissar, and Ambassador
Eliahu Ben Elissar.
i i n
n*
58
Jerome, Simon and Mrs. Simon Falic. children of NilyFalw..stand
with Nily Falic, and Ambassador and Mrs. Eliahu Ben Elissar.
Ambassador Eliahu Ben Elissar, Mrs. and Mr. Isaac Mildenberg, Nily Falic,
and Hon. Mordechai Dayan.


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Sharansky Walks to Freedom
Wife Avital Joins Him on Flight Back
V
Continued from Page 1-A
himself, thus emphasizing that he,
himself, was not a spy and that his
arrival in the free world was
unrelated to the undercover agent
exchange. The Soviets apparently
acceded.
SHARANSKY was quickly
escorted to the waiting Mercedes
Benz of the U.S. Ambassador and
then whisked away to the airport,
where he boarded a plane for
Frankfurt and his wife, Avital,
who came to Frankfurt from Tel
Aviv to await his arrival. From
there, they boarded a plane to
Israel.
Some ten minutes later, the
undercover agent exchange occur-
red at the center of the Glienicke
Bridge, and those freed boarded
buses waiting for them.
Sharansky was arrested nine
years ago and served eight years
of a 13-year sentence for allegedly
spying for the United States.
Negotiations for the swap have
been underway for the better part
of a year and were expedited at
the Geneva summit meeting bet-
ween President Reagan and
' Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
last November.
THERE WERE also reports
Tuesday that Sharansky's
mother, Ida Milgrom, who lives in
Moscow, will be allowed to leave
the Soviet Union at a later date to
join her son in Israel.
Ben Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv
was meanwhile besieged by scores
of organizations which wanted to
participate in the arrival
ceremonies. Authorities there
hoped to keep the reception low
key because of Sharansky's
delicate health. As late as Mon-
day, there was confusion as to the
whereabouts of Avital Sharansky,
whose worldwide campaign for
the release of her husband is now
ended. Friends of the Sharanskys
continued to say that she was still
in Israel and would not leave for
West Berlin until she had word
that her husband was definitely
being freed. Earlier reports said
that she had already left for
Berlin.
In Bonn, a report declared that
Avital Sharansky was already
there and that journalists and
television camera crews were try-
ing to track her down in the divid-
ed city.
ANATOLY SHARANSKY was
born on Jan. 20. 1948 in Moscow.
A computer technologist, he was
arrested on March 15, 1977 and
tried one year later on July 14.
Following the 1974 denial of his
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emigration request on the
grounds that "it is against state
interests," Sharansky was the
subject of continuous harassment,
surveillance and interrogations.
At times, up to eight KGB agents
trailed him.
He met Avital in 1973 outside
the Moscow Synagogue. They
were married despite difficulty in
obtaining a rabbi and attempts by
the authorities at blocking the
union. One day after their wed-
ding, Mrs. Sharansky emigrated
to Israel. In March, 1975, after a
series of arrests, Sharansky was
informed by the KGB: "Your
destiny is in our hands. You saw
what happened to your friends.
No one in the West is interested in
you and what you are doing here,
and nobody will say a word in the
entire world if there is one more
Prisoner of Conscience in the
Soviet Union."
In 1977, Sharansky filed suit,
along with fellow activist Vladimir
Slepak, and claimed Soviet Jews
were defamed as a result of two
broadcasts of the anti-Semitic
television documentary, "Buyers
of Souls."
THE SOVIET newspaper.
Izvestia. accused Sharansky of
working for the CIA. Shortly
thereafter, in March 1977, he was
arrested by the Soviet secret
police and detained in Moscow's
Lefortovo prison until his trial in
July, 1978. Convicted on charges
of "treason" and "anti-Soviet
agitation and propaganda," he
was sentenced to 13 years in
prison and labor camps, and
began his term at Chistopol
prison.
Throughout his imprisonment,
Sharansky was held incom-
municado, unable to see or speak
with anyone except the KGB. He
was also not permitted legal
counsel, despite relentless efforts
by his family to secure an attorney
for him. His plight drew interna-
tional attention and became a
focal point of U.S.-Soviet rela-
tions; numerous senators, con-
gressmen and then-President Jim-
my Carter voiced their assurances
of Sharansky's innocence. Colum-
bia University President William
McGili headed a special Ad Hoc
Commission on Justice for Anato-
ly Sharansky, which convened in
October, 1977, to hear testimony
in Sharansky's defense.
March, 1980 marked Sharan-
sky's transfer from Chistopol to
Perm Labor Camp, where he was
destined to serve the second phase
of his 13-year sentence. In April,
his mother, Ida Milgrom, and his
brother, Leonid, were permitted
to visit with him for 24 hours
the first time since his initial im-
prisonment in 1978 that he was
allowed visitors. The following
September, they were again
granted a visitation permit, for a
brief period and under heavy
guard.
IN A LATE-September letter
to Mrs. Milgrom from his Perm
location, Sharansky made
reference to his ill-health. More
specifically, he complained of
severe stomach and back pains.
The new year, 1981, brought a
worsening state of health.
Two weeks of solitary confine-
ment filled February. 1981.
Sharansky was further burdened
with the harsh conditions and
minimal food rations and exercise
characteristic of such detainment.
In addition, all of his scheduled
1981 meetings with family
members were abruptly cancelled,
and his letter-writing allotment
was cut back to one letter every
two months from an original
allowance of two letters every one
month.
V

v
Sharansky relayed details of his
deteriorating health in cor
respondence to Mrs. Milgrom
Among his complaints were con
tinued severe headaches and in
adequate medical attention.
During an early-May visit to
Perm, Mrs. Milgrom. accom
panied by her daughter-in-law
Ray a, was emphatically refused
permission to see her son. Labor
camp authorities told Milgrom
that Sharansky's health sun
"satisfactory." From her ionveJ|
sation with authorities, she learr.
ed of his "systematic punish
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ment" in isolated cells for alleged-
ly refusing to work. It was later
confirmed that Sharansky did, in-
deed, suffer from a chronic weak
condition which included fainting
spells and stemmed from a lack of
proper vitamins.
Meanwhile, in Washington.
D.C., efforts on Sharansky's
behalf continued as Mrs. Sharan-
sky and former POC Iosif
Mendelevich were received at the
White House by President Reagan
and Vice President Bush. Na-
tional Security Adviser Richard
Allen was also present at the May
28 meeting.
Supplementary medical updates
became known when Mrs.
Milgrom received a lengthy letter
from her son in September. The
correspondence, dated July 1 and
postmarked Aug. 30, included a
comprehensive summary of
ailments, treatment and condi-
tions at Perm by Sharansky. Both
his health and spirit had
improved.
In November, 1981, a surprise
transfer once again brought
Sharansky to Chistopol Prison.
No concrete explanation for the
sudden move was given by
authorities, at that time.
In January, 1982, Mrs. Milgrom
and Raya visited Sharansky at
Chistopol. In noticeably poor
health, Anatoly described for
them his previous year and a half
at Perm, and his placement in
solitary confinement during that
time. They learned that Anatoly
had been sentenced to a concur-
rent three-year prison sentence in
October for failure to admit his
guilt over the charges brought
against him in 1977.
In Jerusalem, Mrs. Sharansky
met with U.S. Secretary of State
Alexander Haig, who vowed to
raise Sharansky's plight at an up-
coming meeting in Geneva with
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko. At that time, Haig
drew particular attention to
Sharansky's case.
MRS. MILGROM again travell-
ed to Chistopol an arduous
500-mile journey in April, but
was prohibited from seeing her
son. She did, however, meet with
camp and health authorities. She
discussed his again being placed in
solitary confinement in prison for
three months, exacerbating his
already poor health, as well as the
denial of his correspondence and
visitation rights.
In May, exiled Soviet physicist
Andrei Sakharov issued an appeal
to France's President Francois
Mitterrand to intervene on
Sharansky's behalf. In the letter,
he stressed that "Sharansky was
chosen as a victim in view of the
fact that he was not only a partici-
pant in the Jewish emigration
movement, but was also active in
the struggle for all human rights
in the USSR." That same month
efforts to negotiate the exchange
of Major Aleksei Koslov. a KGB
spy held captive in South Africa,
for the release to Sharansky, were
unsuccessful.
On Sept. 27, on the eve of Yom
Kippur, Sharansky began a
hunger strike that was to last 109
days. The strike was to protest
prison officials' confiscation of his
mail and their refusal to allow him
to receive visits from his family,
despite such allowances under the
Soviet penal system. In response
to the act, a State Department
spokesman stated that the U.S.
government "thoroughly deplores
the Soviet authorities' willful
abuse of Mr. Sharansky's rights
which led to this desperate deci-
sion," and called upon Soviet
authorities to reconsider their
treatment of Sharansky.
IN AN UNUSUAL move, then-
Soviet Communist Party leader
Yuri Andropov sent a letter on
Jan. 18, made public on the 24, in
which he stated that Sharansky
"had contact with his mother and
ceased his hunger strike" in
Chistopol prison and that "there
is no threat to his life." The letter
was in response to an inquiry from
French Communist Party leader
Georges Marchais. According to
Le Monde, however, Marchais was
"not satisfied" with Andropov's
reply.
At the end of February, Sharan-
sky's mother, Ida Milgrom, finally
received a letter from her son in
which he stated that he had in fact
ended his hunger strike on Jan.
14. Sharansky remained in critical
condition as a result of the strike.
On January 5, 1984, Sharansky
was visited by his mother and
brother at Chistopol Prison.
Unable to sleep because of the
pain in his chest, he raised the
question of hospitalization with
prison authorities, who told him
that convicts are hospitalized only
in "extreme" cases. After the
two-hour visit, his mother appeal-
ed to local health officials, but, in
what may be an attempt to
frustrate her efforts, was told to
contact Moscow.
Sharansky had requested that a
lawyer be found who could act as
an intermediary with prison of-
ficials. He feared that by acting on
his own, he could face an exten-
sion of his sentence allowed by a
new law instituted in October,
1983. The law stipulates up to five
additional years for "opposing"
those in charge.
DESPITE HIS condition,
Sharansky's spirits were up. In
early January, he ended a two-day
hunger strike protesting the
blocking of his mail to his wife.
Avital. Both she and his mother
were receiving his letters on a
regular basis.
In October, 1984. Anatoly was
due to be transferred from
Chistopol prison to a labor camp.
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After receiving no word from him
in two months, his mother went to
the Interior Ministry in Moscow,
in December, where she was
received by the Deputy Minister.
A few days later, the Deputy
Minster contacted Ida Milgrom at
home and informed her that her
son was in Camp 34 in the Urals
the Perm labor camp.
Sharansky had reached the
Perm camp on Nov. 13, where he
was immediately hospitalized in a
"pre-heart attack" condition. His
medical treatment in the hospital
was the best he has had in years,
as was the food he was given
there. It seemed that official
notification of Sharansky's arrival
at the Perm labor camp was stall-
ed until after he had been released
from the hospital.
Mrs. Milgrom was granted per-
mission to visit her son at the
camp, and she spent two days
with him there on Jan. 14 and 15,
1985. During the visit she was in-
formed by camp authorities that
the officials were considering
Sharansky's release on an amnes-
ty basis.
IN MARCH, however, Mrs.
Milgrom was informed that all
correspondence between her and
Anatoly had been confiscated, and
that no more visits would be
allowed in 1985.
In May, Mrs. Milgrom finally
received a letter from her son in
which he informed her that letters
could only be written every two
months. The letter was terse and
Mrs. Milgrom remarked that "it
sounds like a letter they told him
to write to show that he is there
and not on a hunger strike."
But the effort in behalf of
Sharansky never let up, including
the persistent approaches to the
Soviet Union's Mikhail Gorbachev
by President Reagan and other
leaders of West European na-
tions. And meanwhile, Avital
Sharansky's worldwide touring in
the cause of her husband's
freedom kept the issue in the
forefront as a constant subject of
media speculation.
IN MIAMI, Hinda Cantor and
Shireley Pollak, co-chairmen of
the South Florida Conference, an
arm of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Community Relations
Committee, noted that "Sharan-
sky's release will now give hope to
the many others who remain
behind, still trapped in the Soviet
Union: to Jews for whom he
became a symbol through nearly a
decade of imprisonment, and to
non-Jews, who were emboldened
by Anatoly's advocacy of the idea
that all Soviet citizens have rights
assured them under the Helsinki
Accords which the Soviet Union
signed in 1975.
"While he is an important sym-
bol, he is but one man. Moreover,
if the emigration trends of the last
few years continue to hold true,
then he will be but one of a hun
dred or so Soviet Jews who will be
permitted to emigrate in
February 1986. From a high of
more than 51,000 in 1979, the
figure for last year dropped to just
1,140. This past month, January,
only 79 Soviet Jews were allowed
to emigrate," said Cantor and
Pollak.
Federation: More To Be Done
The president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, Samuel
I. Adler, Tuesday issued a state-
ment of community reaction to
the release of former Soviet
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly
Sharansky.
"We caution against complacen-
cy about the release of Anatoly
Sharansky so as to not abate our
efforts and struggle on behalf of
Soviet Jewry.
"Sharansky, symbol of the
human rights movement in the
Soviet Union and the right of
Soviet Jews to emigrate to Israel,
is today a free man. We rejoice
with him, his long-suffering wife,
Avital, and the thousands of peo-
ple throughout the Free World
who have worked so long and hard
for his freedom these past nine
years.
"This Board of Directors and
our entire Federation have a right
to feel proud on this day. Through
our fund-raising efforts and the
work of our Community Relations
Committee, we have contributed
in part to Sharansky's freedom.
We will continue this struggle un-
til all Soviet Jews are free.
"While Sharansky's release will
now give renewed hope to the
hundreds of thousands of Soviet
Jews still trapped in the Soviet
Union Jews to whom Sharan-
sky has become an important sym-
bol he is still but one man. As
important as his release is, the
world cannot be appeased by this
symbolic gesture from the Soviet
Union because for each man
freed, another is harassed, ar-
rested and imprisoned for the
'crime' of wishing to live freely as
a Jew in the Soviet Union or to
emigrate to Israel."
Miami Rabbis Urges Prayers
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami has issued a state-
ment calling for prayers of
gratitude during the coming Sab-
bath services for the release of the
Soviet Jewish dissident Anatoly
Sharansky.
"We call upon the community to
express its gratitude for the
release of Anatoly Sharansky,"
the statement declares. "Mr.
Sharansky, whose only crime was
being Jewish and pressing the
Soviet government to respect the
human rights and emigration
rights of Soviet Jews, has suffered
great personal indignities for this
sacred cause.
"We express our gratitude to
the United States government for
pressing the case with the Soviet
authorities to the successful con-
clusion of the Sharansky release.
We call upon our government to
further press for the rights of all
Soviet Jews to live as Jews or
leave into freedom as guaranteed
by the Helsinki Human Rights
Accords.
"We commit ourselves to labor
with unflinching vigor toward the
fulfillment of these goals."
The statement was issued in the
name of the Association by its
president, Rabbi Brett S. Golds-
tein of Temple Shir Ami, and its
executive vice president. Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, director of
chaplaincy for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Uneasy Alliance
Evangelicals Eat Breakfast for Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
pledged to stand by Israel in its ef-
forts to surivive amidst a sea of
enemies.
COINCIDING with the strong
Christian fervor was the ex-
pectedly unmistakable political air
in the overpacked ballroom.
Among the preachers at the dais
were the Rev. Jerry Falwell,
founder of the Moral Majority and
of the recently created Liberty
Federation a political organiza-
tion devoted specifically to pro-
moting the views of the Christian
right and the Rev. Pat Robert-
son, who has long been considered
a likely contender for the
Republican nomination for
President.
Interspersed among the
ministers and lay leaders who ad-
dressed the early morning diners
were conservative members of
Congress and some of Israel's
most vocal supporters.
They included Rep. Mark Sil-
jander (R., Mich.); Sen. Albert
Gore (D., Tenn.), who recently
returned from his first trip to
Israel; Sen. Arlen Specter (R.,
Pa.), and Sen. Chic Hecht (R.,
Nev.,) a staunchly conservative
Jewish Senator who escorted Sen.
Jerry Falwell
Jesse Helms (R., N.C.) on the lat-
ter's first trip to Israel last
summer.
HECHT and Specter were
among a handful of Jewish par-
ticipants who were also either
honored at the dais or were there
to receive the fiery praise of the
orators for the Jewish people and
their State. They included the
Jewish Agency Told To Prepare
For Big Immigrant Move to Israel
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Akiva Lewinsky, treasurer
of the Jewish Agency and
the World Zionist Organiza-
tion, said that the Jewish
Agency should be
''prepared" fiJr the possibili-
ty of large numbers of im-
migrants from distressed
Jewish communities around
the world coming to Israel.
Speaking at a press con-
ference at Jewish Agency head-
quarters here, Lewinsky declined
to specify from which countries
such aliya might come. But he
hinted at the Soviet Union when
he said, "Jews are behind all kinds
of curtains, and these curtains
might be lifted. Relationships bet-
ween countries are changing. The
situation is not frozen." Asked if
Israel and the Jewish Agency are
prepared to absorb, say, 50,000
Russian Jews, he said that such
immigration would contribute to
Israel's economy and that world
Jewry would no doubt come for-
ward to assist in the absorption in
the event of such large-scale
immigration.
Questioned about immigration
from Ethiopia to complement the
10,000 Ethiopian Jews airlifted to
Israel more than a year ago,
Lewinsky said there are presently
about 8.000 Jews left behind in
Ethiopia. He said their situation
has worsened since the airlift
because they have been subjected
to all manner of maltreatment.
LEWINSKY also said, in reply
to a question, that he expects
more than 1,000 new immigrants
from South Africa in the coming
year. He noted that last year only
300 South African Jews im-
migrated to Israel. He did not say
on what he based his prediction
for this year.
Lewinsky's press conference
was called to announce the
meeting of the Jewish Agency's
Board of Governors which will be
held in New York Feb. 18-19 with
the participation of some 200 pro-
minent Jewish leaders from all
over the world.
Following the Board of Gover-
nors meeting, Board members
and their staffs will participate in
Jewish Agency Week, a series of
visits to about 50 Jewish com-
munities in the U.S. and Canada.
Lewinsky said that the Board
will discuss a projected budget of
$381 million for the next year, in
addition to the $48 million budget
for Project Renewal.
HE SAID the two major pro-
blems of the Jewish Agency with
respect to the budget are the ab-
sorption of new immigrants and
their final integration into the
mainstream of life in Israel, and
the efforts of the Jewish Agency
to help some 400 settlements in
Israel which are under its care and
which, according to Lewinsky, are
under severe economic strain.
Noting that the Jewish Agency
has had a balanced budget for the
last four years, he said that is the
goal of this year's operations as
well. According to Lewinsky, the
absorption of the Ethiopian Jews
airlifted into Israel has cost $350
million so far, an amount shared
by the Jewish Agency in Israel.
He said that presently there are
about 12,000 immigrants in ab-
sorption centers in Israel.
usual representation from the
Israel Embassy and some of the
major American Jewish
organizations.
But the uneasy alliance that has
been forged between the
evangelicals and the Jewish com-
munity by a common declared
commitment to Israel also reveal-
ed the pressure that seem to work
at unhinging that bond. At the
heart of those pressures has been
the whole question of church-state
relations in this country.
On that issue, Robertson ad-
dressed himself to the American
Jewish Community, saying that
"it does not serve your ends to
strip the religious symbols" from
the "public squares of America,"
and that "it does not advance the
cause of Judaism to diminish the
faith of evangelical Christians"
who value those symbols.
HE REFERRED specifically to
the issue of school prayer, which
has been vigorously opposed by
many of the major American
Jewish organizations.
Another speaker, evangelist
Moody Adams explained Arab
hostility to Israel by the fact that
there are "800 million people who
believe that God wrote a book call-
ed the Koran," which he said pro-
mises heavenly rewards to those
who kill Jews.
But the keynote speaker,
former Ambassador to the United
Nations Jeanne Kirkpatrick,
avoided reference to the Bible or
other Scripture, citing instead the
words of Libyan leader Muammar
Khadafy and her memories at the
UN as reference points for her ex-
pressions of support for Israel.
If Khadafy "were the only
leader and Libya the only nation
dedicated to the destruction of
Israel," Kirkpatrick said, "Israel
problems would be much simpler
than they really are." But other
states, she stressed, "are just as
dedicated as Colonel Khadafy.
RECALLING what she said
was the flagrant imbalance in the
UN's treatment of Israel,
Kirkpatrick urged that the U.S.
refuse to cooperate on any UN
resolutions sponsored and sup-
ported by delegations which
refuse Israel "fair play."
Responding to thunderous ap-
plause, she observed that perhaps
the audience did not perceive
what a radical step she was calling
for. To take up her recommenda-
tion, she said, would mean that
"we would almost have to leave
the United Nations" a sugges-
tion that brought further
applause.
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French Police Believe Arab
Terrorists' Claim for Bombings
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) r
French police are taking
seriously the claim by an
Arab terrorist group, believ-
ed to be Lebanese, that it is
responsible for the wave of
bombings in Paris that in-
jured more than 50 people in
recent months.
The latest bomb ripped
through a crowded bookstore in
the Latin Quarter, injuring four
people. Eight people were injured,
three seriously, when another
bomb exploded in a shopping ar-
cade on the fashionable Champs-
Elysees. An unexploded bomb
found in the rest room of a
restaurant on the lower level of
the Eiffel Tower was safely defus-
ed by police.
A GROUP calling itself the
Solidarity Committee With Arab
Political Prisoners and the Middle
East said it set off the bombs, and
the police believe the claim is
authentic, Le Monde reported.
The terrorists are believed to be
Lebanese Shiites attempting to
pressure the government to meet
terrorist demands on four French
hostages being held in Lebanon.
The group, hitherto unknown, is
demanding the release of two
Arabs and an American from
French prisons where they were
confined in connection with ter-
rorist acts in Paris. One of them,
Abdul-Kader Saadi, was im-
plicated in the April 3, 1982
murder of Israeli diplomat Yacov
Bar Siman-Tov. He was gunned
down, reportedly by a woman, as
he left his apartment building.
Saadi is also suspected of the
murder a month earlier, of the
Military Attache at the U.S. Em-
bassy here. The other jailed ter-
rorists are Anis Naccache. ar-
rested for the attempted
assassination of former Iranian
Prime Minister Shahpur Bakhtiar
in Paris in 1980; and Varadjian
Garbidjian, imprisoned for the
1983 bombing at Orly Airport
which killed eight people.
THE MOST recent bombings
before last week's occurred last
Dec. 7 when 35 people were in
jured by explosions in two Paris
department stores crowded with
Christmas shoppers.
The kidnappers of the four
Frenchmen held by pro-Iranian
terrorists in Lebanon have
demanded the release of the three
men and payment of $1 billion in
U.S. currency, matching the Ira
man assets frozen by the U.S.
when the A vat oil ah Khomeini
took power in Teheran in 1979.
Israel's UN Envoy in Geneva
Denounces Election of Ex-Nazi
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) The election of Herman Klenner.
a Nazi party memebr during World War II, as vice presi-
dent of the United Nations Human Rights Commission
headquarters here, was forcefully denounced by Israel's
Ambassador to the UN in Geneva, Efraim Dubek. Klenner
heads the East German delegation to the Human Rights
Commission annual conference, which opened last week.
DUBEK CALLED his election by the conference a
demonstration of the "political cynicism and moral
degradation prevailing in this international body." He add-
ed that the elevation of an ex-Nazi to the vice presidency of
the Commission "questions the credibility and efficacy of
the Commission's work in the field of human rights."
The Israeli envoy noted that Klenner ioined the Nazi
party on April 20, 1944 and was issued card No. 97-56-141.
Dubek found it morally objectionable in 1984 that a card-
holding Nazi should head his country's delegation to the
Human Rights conference.
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Stiff Terms
'Order' Gang Get 40-100 Years
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A_
|
By ELLEN MARKS
SEATTLE (JTA) -
Ten members of a radical
neo-Nazi gang have been
given stiff prison terms
ranging between 40 and 100
years for following a bizarre
plot to overthrow the
government and establish
an Aryan society.
U.S. District Judge Walter
McGovern made little comment
when members of the group. The
Order, were sentenced here last
week for racketeering and
conspiracy.
Prosecutors, during a three-
and-a-half month trial last fall, ac-
cused the group of committing
two murders, robbery,
counterfeiting, and other crimes
as it sought to kill Jews, deport
minorities, and create an all-white
nation.
THE HARSHEST sentences
went to those accused of commit-
ting murder. McGovern ordered a
100-year sentence for Bruce Car-
roll Pierce, suspected of being the
triggerman in the June, 1984
machinegun slaying of Denver
radio personality Alan Berg.
Government authorities claimed
Pierce, 31, of Hayden Lake,
Idaho, and several other group
members decided to kill Berg
because he was Jewish and relish-
ed baiting anti-Semites
Also given a 100-year sentence
was Randolph Duey, 34, of
Spokane, Wash. Duey was accus-
ed of murdering fellow white
supremacist Walter West because
he was believed to be leaking in-
formation about The Order.
Gary Lee Yarbrough, sentenced
to 60 years for racketeering and
armed robbery, compared the
defendants to patriots, and told
McGovern during the hearing that
the lengthy trial was a sham.
"This was a political trial," said
Yarbrough, 29, of Sandpoint,
Idaho. "These men are no more
criminals than the men who took
part in the Boston Tea Party."
Yarbrough warned the judge that
The Order's cause would be pro-
moted by "200,000 faithful
Mintz Elected
NEW ORLEANS (JTA) -
Donald Mintz has been elected
president of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Greater New Orleans, suc-
ceeding Louis Rippner.
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation.
Passover
Wed April 23Thurs May 1
Cantor
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and the Nadel Choir
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will offer a program of
lectures and conduct
seminars during the holiday
mmt
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Hotel 914 647 6000
800-647-6000
See Your Travel Agent
members and 100.000 supporters.
There will be many more. The
blood will flow, and it grieves
me."
But Assistant U.S. Attorney
Gene Wilson, who headed the
government's six-member pro-
secution team, praised the
sentences and said they would
serve as warning for others who
commit serious crimes for
ideological purposes.
The youngest Order member.
23-year-old Richard Kemp of
Salinas. Calif., was given a
60-year prison term, while the six
other members were sentenced to
40 years each.
EIGHT OF the 10 defendants
have said they will appeal their
sentences to the Ninth Circuit
Court of Appeals, while the re-
maining two have not yet filed the
required appeal notices.
Federal law requires the defen-
dants to serve at least 10 years
before they can be considered for
parole, although they are likely to
serve longer because of the nature
of their crimes, a federal proba-
tion officer here said.
Jurors in the trial said they
found the only female defendants,
52-year-old Jean Craig of
Laramie, Wyoming, guilty of
surveilling Berg before he was
killed, but they did not say
whether they believed that Order
members were involved in the
murder.
The case was tried under the
Racketeer and Influenced Corrupt
Organizations (RICO) Act, which
requires a jury to find the accused
guilty of a minimum of two crimes
committed to further the illegal
group. The jury in The Order case
was not required to say which two
crimes constituted the minimum
for each defendant.
David Lane, believed to have
driven the getaway car in the
Berg murder, read a long state-
ment during the sentencing hear-
ing, reiterating the group's aim of
saving the Aryan race from im-
purity. "I've given all that I am
and all that I have to awaken my
people from their death," said
Lane, 46, of Denver, who was
sentenced to 40 years.
All the defendants were con-
victed of racketeering and con-
spiracy to commit racketeering in
the trial that ended Dec. 30. Some
defendants were also convicted of
additional federal crimes, in-
cluding armored car robberies and
illegal weapons possession.
The Middle East peace process was the main topic covered in the
recent Bonn talks between Israel's Prime Minister Shimon Peres
(left.) and German Chancellor Helmut Kohl. Peres was only the se-
cond Israeli head of government to pay the Federal Republic of
Germany an official visit. The first was Yitzhak Rabin.
(DaD/Bundesbildstelle).
Explosive Charge Discovered At Bus Stop
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
small explosive charge was
discovered at a suburban
Jerusalem bus stop Monday after-
noon and defused by police sap-
pers. The bomb was wrapped in an
innocent-looking white plastic
bag. but it aroused the suspicion
of Reuven Sharbani who had been
wounded by a bomb explosion in
the capital in 1974. He stopped a
passing cab and asked the driver
to alert the police on his two-way
radio.
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Vage 1H 'V the'j'ewTsh Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Filling in Background
Israeli Jets Hoped
To Bag Arab Terrorists
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel Air Force jets in-
tercepted a private Libyan
plane bound for Damascus
last week and forced it to
land at a military airfield in
northern Israel to check out
its passengers for possible
terrorists. None were
found, and the aircraft was
released after four and a
half hours and allowed to
proceed to its destination.
Syria has demanded an im-
mediate meeting of the United
Nations Security Council to take
up the incident, which it described
as piracy, Damascus Radio
reported. Tripoli Radio in Libya
also branded the incident as an act
of piracy and accused the United
State of abetting it.
ISRAELI OFFICIALS said the
aircraft was intercepted because
there was reason to believe
dangerous terrorists were aboard.
They claimed Israel had a legal
right to force the plane to land for
interrogation as part of the inter-
nationally sanctioned campaign to
combat terrorism.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, addressing delegates to
the meeting of the Zionist General
Council in Jerusalem, said the in-
terception was "one of the means
we have to resort to in order to de-
fend ourselves."
He said that since Libya is a
known "center of international
terrorism," and the Libyan
government aids terrorists who
perpetrate acts of violence against
Israelis and Jews, "when reports
reach us of such dangers, Israel
has the right to take steps to pre-
vent acts of murder and terror."
Only Syrian political figures
were aboard. One was identified
as Abdallah El-Akhmer, deputy
secretary general of the Syrian
Ba'ath Party. The passengers and
crew were well treated, the IDF
said.
THE ARMY Radio said the
plane was a twin-engined
Gulf stream executive jet carrying
nine passengers and a crew of
three. It took off from Tripoli at
12:30 p.m., Feb. 4, and was in-
tercepted shortly before 2 p.m.
local time.
According to Tripoli Radio, the
pilot reported 55 miles east of
Cyprus, nearing the Syrian coast,
that he was being tailed by
unidentified aircraft. A report
from an airfield in northern
Cyprus said the interceptors were
two Israeli jets. Tripoli Radio said
contact was lost with the plane
after the pilot reported he was be-
ing followed.
Libya charged that the U.S.
Sixth Fleet, operating off its
coast, helped the Israelis identify
and pinpoint the plane.
On February 22, 1973, Israel
Air Force jets shot down a Libyan
commercial airliner enroute from
Benghazi to Cairo, which had
strayed into Israeli airspace over
Sinai. Israel subsequently paid
$300,000 indemnification to the
families of the 108 airliner
passengers and crew who died.
IN WASHINGTON, a State
Department spokesman said of
the incident, "There was no U.S.
involvement of any kind." A
Defense Department spokesman
also said there was no basis for a
Libyan news agency report that
U.S. warships in the Mediterra-
nean used electronic surveillance
methods to guide the Israelis to
their target.
Diplomatic Missions Around World
On Alert Against Retaliation
Continued from Page 2-A
suited in advance, he would have
opposed the interception. He rais-
ed what he said was a major pro-
blem: What would Israel have
done with the terrorists had any
been captured?
Putting them on trial, like cap-
tured Nazi war criminal Adolf
Eichmann, who was tried in 1961
and subsequently executed
would only invite more terrorist
attempts to seize Israelis as
hostages and hold them for the
release of the captured terrorist
leaders, Weizman said.
OTHERS MADE the same
point. Police Minister Haim
Barlev noted that the Cabinet has
thoroughly debated how to fight
terrorism, but has not yet discuss-
ed what to do with any terrorist
leader who may be caught.
Barlev warned that Israel
should prepare itself for the
possibility that Syria and Libya
would try to take revenge for the
interception. The nine passengers
in the jet turned out to be Syrian
political figures, including the
deputy secretary of the Ba'ath
Party, who were returning home
from a conference of Arab radical
groups in Tripoli, Libya.
Peres told the Zionist General
Council meeting in Jerusalem that
Israel would never flinch from any
measures aimed at preventing ter-
rorism on land, sea or in the air.
Histadrat Strike Shuts Down
Gov't. Offices, Public Services
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
two-hour general strike called by
Histadrat shut down all govern-
ment offices and most public ser-
vices in a protest against what the
trade union federation called the
deteriorating economic situation.
The private sector was not af-
fected, however. A labor court rul-
ed that private employees could
"assemble for protest meetings"
during work hours but could not
strike.
Nevertheless, airports were
closed, docks were idle, and there
was no train or bus service for the
duration of the strike. Kupat
Hoiim, the Histadrat sick-fund,
shut its doors, as did chain food
and department stores affiliated
with Histadrat. Classes were
suspended in schools for two
hours, and radio and television
broadcasting was blacked out ex-
cept for hourly news bulletins.
Histadrut Secretary General
Yiarael Keaser said the strike was
intended "to awaken the govern-
ment to worsening unemploy-
ment." But Finance Minister Yit-
zkah Modai said the strike was a
"Histadrat" tactic to pressure the
government on the eve of new
wage hikes that would undermine
economic stability."
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John Jay Iselin, president of WNET/New
York; Eli N. Evans, president of the Charles
H. Rev8on Foundation; former Israeli Am-
bassador Abba Eban, host and narrator of the
WNETproduced public television series,
'HERITAGE: Civilization and the Jews'; and
Arnold Labaton, executive producer of
Heritage,' attended the Jan. 15 presentation
of WNET/New York's Distinguished Service
Medal to the Charles H. Revson Foundation
and Milton Petrie (not pictured), of Petrie
Stores Corporation, for their efforts on behalf
of the video program, the epic nine-part series
which encored on public television beginning
Jan. 23 and is being shown in Miami over
WPBT Ch. 2.
Bookcase
Two Volumes on the Nazi Theme
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Music in Terezin 1941-1945. By
Joza Karas. New York:
Beaufort Books, 1985. 223 pp.
$16.95.
Terezin is the Chechoslovakian
name for Theresienstadt, a name
which lives on in infamy. Located
about an hour's drive from
Prague, it was the main Nazi con-
centration camp in
Czechoslovakia. Although it was
not one of the notorious Nazi
death camps, more than 33,000
Jews died there because of
sickness and starvation. Jews
were sent from Terezin to
Auschwitz where they were put to
death in the gas chambers. When
the camp was liberated in May,
1945, some 17,000 survivors were
found.
In the twisted calculations of
the Nazis, Terezin was a show
place, designed to deceive the In-
ternational Red Cross into believ-
ing that the Jews were comfor-
table and happy there. To achieve
this monstrous fraud, the Nazis
permitted artists to paint and
musicians to stage operas and con-
certs before sending them to their
doom in Auschwitz.
IN 1978, the novelist, Gerald
Green, published a book called
"The Artists of Terezin" which
contained pictures of the pain-
tings, sketches and drawings done
by the inmates of the concentra-
tion camp. His fine book was part-
ly based on an exhibit of these
works, including a number done
by children, which travelled
throughout the United States.
Now, Karas has tried to do for
the musicians of Terezin what
Green did for the artists. Unfor-
tunately, these two forms of
creative expression do not lend
themselves equally to portrayal in
a book. Green's volume is power-
ful and moving because he was
able to show the poignant pictures
of Terezin's artists. Karas is
limited to showing us the pro-
grams of concerts performed at
Terezin.
Ramat Gan Bomb
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
people were slightly injured when
an explosive charge went off in
the main street in Ramat Gan
Tuesday morning. The bomb had
been placed in a garbage can near
a bus stop in busy Rehov Jabotin-
sky. Police detained some 30 per-
sons for quejsJifJVJDg, but moat
were released immediately.
Karas has produced a harrow-
ing account of how musicians tried
to bring "a little beauty, diver-
sion, even laughter" into the terri-
ble lives of Terezin's prisoners.
The musicians tried to maintain
their sanity by putting on concerts
and by composing new works,
hoping against hope that some
day, they might resume their nor-
mal lives. For most of them, as
Karas sadly sets forth in in-
dividual biographies, this was a
vain hope.
THE AUTHOR is himself a
musician who spent the first 23
years of his life in Prague. He now
lives in Hartford, Conn., where he
is a violinist, violin teacher and
writer of articles on music. He
spent 11 years tracking down the
compositions left by Terezin musi-
cians and searching out their life
stories.
He has formed a string quartet
to perform their works, and he
hopes to record them. His book
preserves the memory of many in-
dividual musicians who were
slaughtered by the Nazis, and it
helps to fill in another segment of
our knowledge about the
unspeakable horrors of the
Holocaust.
The Tale of the Ring: A Kad-
diah. By Frank Stiff el. New
York: Bantam Books, 1984.
349 pp. $9.95 (paper back).
The Nazis murdered six-million
Jews. That stark statement has
almost lost its power to rouse our
emotions because it is a statistic
and a fact beyond our comprehen-
sion. By contrast, the harrowing
and horrible story of one man's
struggle to survive the Nazi terror
can move us and forcibly stir our
senses. Such is the achievement of
Frank Stiffel who recreated from
his hidden diary this striking tale
of his wretched suffering in the
years between 1939 and 1945.
Stiffel was a young medical stu-
dent in Poland when his town was
captured by the Russians. His
family succeeded in securing
Ecuadoran passports, but before
they could obtain exit visas, the
Germans took over. Increasing
oppression and news about mass
killings led them to flee Warsaw.
For a short time, Stiffel worked m
a hospital but he was then sent to
Treblinka where people "were
drowning in a sea of death.
STIFFEL SOMEHOW manag
ed to escape from Treblinka and
endured for a time by black-
market trading. He was eventual
lv captured and sent to Auschwitz
where, after a while, he was for-
tunate enough to be assigned to
the hospital. He thus avoided the
gas chambers of Birkenau and
despite dreadful torments, he
outlasted the Nazis until the Rus-
sians captured the concentration
camp.
For a time, thereafter, he was
involved with a group that was
leading Jewish survivors out of
Poland to Palestine. However, he
felt that preferential considera-
tion was being given to left-wing
Zionists, and he withdrew from
this activity. He finally found his
way to the United States where he
now lives in New York City. He
worked for many years for the
New York State Department of
Labor, and he is now pursuing a
career as a writer.
The "ring" in the title of the
book refers to a cameo ring which
he kept for a long time as a good-
luck charm. He believed in is
mystical power to protect him,
and since he did escape with his
life, who can challenge him?
Practically all members of that
pitifully small minority who sur-
vived the Holocaust have hair-
raising stories to tell. Stiffel's
story is in this too-tiny category.
It should be read to remind us that
the unutterable and unimaginable
terror of the Holocaust must
never again be repeated.
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-A
Lilli Palmer Enjoyed Great
Repute on Stage and Screen
By MARGRET STILL
BONN (DaD) Lilli
Palmer, who died in
Hollywood last month at
age 71 after a lengthy il-
lness, enjoyed international
repute as a stage and screen
star. She was also a
distinguished amateur
painter and, later in life, as
well-known and well-loved
writer in Germany and
abroad.
The popular German actress
was born on May 14, 1914 in
Posen, now Poland. Hers was a
decent family, she wrote in her
autobiography, not without an
ironic undertone. But her mother
had been an actress and Lilli
Palmer first worked as an actress
in Berlin at the age of 18. Her
career in Germany was brought to
an early end by the Nazi takeover
in 1933. As a Jew, she promptly
left the country and work in a
cabaret in Paris.
SHE ACHIEVED her interna-
tional breakthrough in 1936, when
she met Alfred Hitchcock and
starred alongside Peter Lorre in
Hitchcock's "Secret Agent." She
and her first husband, Rex Har-
rison, were enormously successful
in Hollywood after war World
War II. She also starred on
Lilli Palmer
Broadway.
Despite her Hollywood success
she returned to Germany in 1953
and was welcomed with open
arms, starring in box office hits
such as "Teufel in Seide,"
"Anastasia and Maedchen in
Uniform" (also starring Romy
Schneider). From the mid-1970s
she also made a name for herself
as an amateur painter and a
writer.
Her autobiography, published in
1974, sold 1.3 million copies and
was translated into many other
languages. Her last book,
der Nachtvogel Schreit, is
published in March.
Wenn
to be
Drive Mounts To Save
Lavie from Abandonment
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The head of Israel's largest
defense contractor has
argued forcefully against
Eroposals to abandon the
avie, Israel's second
generation jet-fighter, on
economic grounds. David
Ivri, chairman of Israel Air-
craft Industries (IAI), told
reporters that a decision to
terminate the project would
cost more than $200 million
in cancelled contracts.
This sum, he stressed, would
not come from U.S. military aid
funds but from the Defense
Ministry's already shrunken
budget. Replying to suggestions
that it would be cheaper for Israel
to buy its new jet-fighters abroad
than build them at home, Ivri said
the estimated cost of the Lavie
and of the U.S. F-16 is about the
same between $13.5 and $15.5
million per plane. But over a
period of time, the economic ad-
vantage would go to the Lavie, he
said.
IVRI, a former commander of
the Israel Air Force, conducted a
group of military correspondents
on a tour of the LAI plant. He said
a prototype of the Lavie will be
ready for test flights next
September. The prototype will be
a fuuly equipped model except for
the ground support systems,
which will be built once the plane
goes into production.
Opponents of the Lavie say IAI
would have to sell at least 300
planes to the Air Force in order to
break even. Orders of that
magnitude are unlikely, given the
present budgetary constraints.
In another defense-related
development, Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin disclosed that the
Soviet Union has supplied Syria
with additional submarines.
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f age 18-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Third Defeat
'Who Is A Jew' Law
Change Shot Down Again
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The resounding defeat sus-
tained by the "Who Is A
Jew" amendment to the
Law of Return in the
Knesset last week its
third defeat in recent years
was a major disappoint-
ment to the religious parties
which had forced the issue
once again to the Knesset
floor.
The fiercely controversial
measure was overwhelmed by a
61-47 vote, with two abstentions,
a far larger margin of defeat than
its sponsors had expected. The Or-
thodox Morasha party was embit-
tered by the failure of many Likud
MKs to support the amendment.
The disappointment of Shas, a
member of the urvty coalition
government, was muted. The four
MKs of that ultra-Orthodox fac-
tion apparently do not consider
the defeat a reason to create a
crisis with Likud or within the
coalition.
THE ORTHODOX parties have
been pressing the "Who Is A
Jew" amendment for years. It
would define a Jew as anyone
born of a Jewish mother or con-
verted to Judaism "according to
halacha."
The Addition of the last three
words is the source of the conflict,
for it would in effect invalidate
Draper Named
U.S. Consul
JERUSALEM (JTA) Mor-
ris Draper, a veteran United
States diplomat in Middle East
politics, recently began serving as
the U.S. Consul General in
Jerusalem. Draper replaced
another veteran Mideast
diplomat, Wat Cluverius, who was
appointed special advisor on the
Mideast peace process to Assis-
tant Secretary of State Richard
Murphy. ,
The U.S. has traditionally kept a
Consul General in Jerusalem in
addition to the one in Tel Aviv
since the early days of the State,
when it endorsed the interna-
tionalization of the city. The Con-
sul General resides and has offices
in West Jerusalem, as well as a
consular section in East
Jerusalem.
Unofficially, the Consul General
is described as the American
"Ambassador" to the Ad-
ministered territories. As such, he
has few formal contacts with the
Foreign Ministry, which, of
course, refused to recognize
legitimacy of a separate
diplomatic function in the
territories.
However, Draper has had ex-
cellent contacts with many Israeli
policy-makers ever since the
Lebanon war.
conversions performed outside
Israel by other than Orthodox rab-
bis. The amendment has been
forcefully opposed in Israel and by
the Reform and Conservative
branches of Judaism in the U.S.
Premier Shimon Peres, who
spoke for the government in the
debate preceding the vote, warn-
ed that passage of the amendment
would have a divisive effect on
Jewish life in Israel and abroad.
"Is it in our interest to weaken the
bonds which grow steadily
stronger between the Conser-
vative and Reform movements
and Israel?" Peres asked, address-
ing himself to "my friends, the Or-
thodox members of the Knesset."
The Premier also spoke out
against a counter-amendment in-
troduced by the Civil Rights
Movement (CRM) which would
define a Jew as anyone declaring
themselves to be a Jew. That
amendment was also defeated.
YOSEF BURG, veteran leader
of the National Religious Party
who is Minister of Religious Af-
fairs, was to have spoken for the
amendment. But Burg, who was
visiting the U.S., flatly refused
pleas from Orthodox colleagues as
saying that he had strongly advis-
ed against introducing the
amemdment at this time, since
there was no assured majority for
its passage. Under the law, the
amendment cannot be reintroduc-
ed for at least sue months.
The Orthodox parties were
rankled by the absence of two
Likud ministers, Ariel Sharon and
Moshe Arens, from the chamber
and abstentions by Rafael Eitan
of the rightwing Tehiya Party and
Ehud Olmert (Likud-Herut) -
especially Olmert, who in the past
had supported the amendment
Olmert told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he has
proposed a formula to resolve the
conflict to the satisfaction of all
three branches of Judaism. He
said he would create a Bet Din
(religious court) that would con-
sist of three Orthodox rabbis and
one each from the Reform and
Conservative movements. He
noted that the latter would have
to be personally observant in their
lifestyles and that the Orthodox
rabbis would constitute a quorum.
"IT IS NOT an ideal solution
but there are no ideal solutions,"
Olmert said. He claimed he
already has support for his pro-
posal among non-Orthodox
religious Jews in Israel and the
U.S. He named Rabbi Richard
Hirsch, president of the World
Union for Progressive Judaism, as
the Reform movement is known in
Israel, and mentioned leading
Conservative rabbis from the U.S.
whom he did not name.
Olmert said he would continue
to seek the support of rabbis and
lay religious figures in the U.S.
and observed that his campaign
could harm his own political
career but would demonstrate his
determination and sincerity to
resolve a vexing problem.
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Border policemen examine the car of
policeman Sgt. Maj. Avrakam Bayazi, SO,
after he had been assassinated early on Jan.
SO at the Jaffa Gate in Jerusalem's Old City.
Bayazi served as Chief intelligence officer for
the past year, and his assassins had been lying
in wait for him on his way to work. Three
East Jerusalem residents were arrested
within an hour of the shooting.
Egypt Sentences Israeli Smuggler to Death -
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A 43-year-old Israeli,
sentenced to death in Egypt
for smuggling heroin, is
casting a grim new shadow
over the already severely
strained relations between
Israel and Egypt.
Yosef Tahan, of Ashdod, was
transferred to death row in a
Cairo prison while Israeli leaders
mulled over how to deal with the
situation. His sentence must be
approved by the Council of Muftis
(Moslem religious leaders) before
it is carried out. The official Egyp-
tian news agency, Mena, reported
that a decision would be announc-
ed on March 6.
THE EGYPTIAN government
recently mounted an intensive
campaign against drug smuggling
and the courts have pronounced
death sentences on several
foreigners convicted of the crime,
but none, so far, have been ex-
ecuted. The possibility that
Tahan, the father of four young
children, could be the first has
given this criminal case a political
dimension.
He was arrested at Cairo Air-
port last August on his way home
from Bombay. He reportedly con-
fessed to the Egyptian authorities
that he planned to smuggle 1.25
kilograms of heroin into Israel to
sell. Drug smuggling is a serious
crime in Israel, but there is no
capital punishment here.
Attorney General Yitzhak
Zamir said he was shocked by the
sentence and intended to see
"what could be done about it"
Israeli officials were careful to
limit their comments to the
humanitarian aspects involved.
Minister-Without-Portfolio Ezer
Weizman said that Israelis involv-
ed in criminal activity abroad
could not expect Israeli
protection.
However, Weizman said if he
were asked by the government, he
would not hesitate to go to Cairo
to exert his influence there to
have the death sentence com-
muted. Tahan's wife, Violet, 35,
has appealed to Weizman to use
his friendly relations with Egyp-
tian officials to get the sentence
reduced or her husband returned
to Israel to stand trial here for
drug trafficking.
Rabbi Named
WARRINGTON. Pa. (JTA)-
Sandra Berliner of Toledo has
been named rabbi of Tifereth
B'nai Israel in Warrington.
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Gorbachev Attacks
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-A
Weizman Predicts New Elections
Aims At Soviet Jewry Campaigns Wil1 Be Held To Keep Peres
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Soviet
eader Mikhail Gorbachev
ias attacked campaigns on
?ehalf of Soviet Jewry as
part of a vociferous anti-
ioviet campaign, a veritable
,ct of psychological warfare
gainst the Soviet Union."
In an interview with the French
r ommunist paper L 'Humanite,
k>rbachev said, "Jews are free
id have equal rights with other
lationalities."
The Soviet leader drew a
irallel between anti-Semitism
nd Zionism as he said, "I believe
hat in a civilized society there
lould be no anti-Semitism nor
fiy Zionism nor. more generally
leaking, any nationalism,
lauvinism or racism."
HE NOTED that racism in
:>uth Africa and "racist crimes"
Western Europe and the
Inited States are increasing. He
^ded, as part of these examples
racism, "And for how many
^ars already, and for well known
isons, have the Arab people of
destine remained chased away
lorn its land?"
Mikhail Gorbachev
Turning to the specific question
dealing with Soviet Jewry, he
said:
"In our country, anti-Semitic
propaganda and other forms of
racial discrimination are legally
forbidden and are considered a
crime. It is unimaginable for
things which happen in France
and other Western countries, such
as the profanation of Jewish
cemeteries or the open activity of
neo-Nazi organizations which
spread anti-Jewish propaganda"
to take place in the Soviet Union.
Gorbachev added, "I believe
that the special interest taken by
Zionist propaganda and anti-
Communists in general on the
question of Jews in the Soviet
Union has nothing to do with the
fate of the Jews and is a
hypocritical veil to disseminate
other political objectives."
THE SOVIET leader also said
that dissident physicist Andrei
Sakharov has committed criminal
acts and will not be allowed to
leave the Soviet Union because of
his knowledge of state and
military secrets.
Gorbachev's reference to the
Jewish question was far more ag-
gressive than past statements
made during his official trip to
Paris last autumn and his recent
meetings with President Reagan
in Geneva. Jewish sources here
said they see a stiffening and
toughening of the Soviet stand on
this issue.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Minister-Without-Portfolio
Ezer Weizman predicted that new elections will be held in
Israel, possibly next summer, before Premier Shimon Peres is
required to hand over his office to Likud leader Yitzhak
Shamir under the terms of the Labor-Likud unity coalition
agreement.
WEIZMAN, who heads the Yahad Party which is closely
aligned to the Labor Party, maintained it was vital that Peres
remain Premier. He said the angry debate between the Labor
and Likud ministers in the Inner Cabinet over how to resolve
the Taba border dispute with Egypt made clear that the unity
government has exhausted its political options.
Herzliah Mayor Warns Drivers
Against 'Tax Collectors Ahead'
VIA Knew It
But Assisted Nazi Into U.S. Anyway
By KEVIN FREEMAN
| NEW YORK (JTA) -
75-year-old Westchester
junty man accused of war
imes and collaborating
|th the Nazis during World
jar II was provided entry
to the United States near-
130 years ago by the Cen-
Intelligence Agency,
jspite agency knowledge
lis past activities, it was
pclosed here last week.
T<>rding to the Village Voice.
ich made the disclosure.
|k"la Lebed of Yonkers. New
c. was brought into the coun-
;:: 1948 under an assumed
and was subsequently given
anent residence under Sec-
- of the CIA Act of 1949
I .li allows the CIA to bring 100
fviduals a year to the U.S. for
tional security reasons
iniless of their past.
Jie Justice Department's Of-
>f Special Investigations is
irtedly looking into the allega
\- The CIA, maintaining agen-
policy, declined to comment on
reports. Several calls by the
fish Telegraphic Agency to
ed's listed telphone number
|t unanswered. He declined to
iiss his past activities with the
?e Voice staff writers, the
IE VOICE disclosed that
is the same individual iden-
only as "Subject D" in a
?e report issued last June by
United States General accoun-
| Office. The report focused on
government's use of Nazi and
collaborators for post-war
lap-Makers Honor
tesnik, McAuliffe
[ASHINGTON (JTA) -
jet cartographers mapping the
ace of Venus will name two
ers in honor of Judith Resnik,
Jewish woman astronaut, and
fon Christa McAuliffe, the
Hampshire schoolteacher,
were among the seven who
in the Challenger explosion,
. the official Soviet news
icy, reported.
anti-Communist Intelligence
work.
The GAO report on former
Nazis and collaborators "with
undesirable or questionable
backgrounds" whom the office
found had been assisted into the
country by intelligence agencies
for anti-Communist operations,
were not identified by name, but
only as "Subjects A-E."
The GAO report, which devoted
nearly two full pages to "Subject
D," and The Village Voice article,
written by Joe Conason, said Leb-
ed was convicted in Poland in
1934 for plotting to assassinate an
East European official. This of-
ficial was identified as Polish In-
terior Minister Bronislaw
Pieracki. His sentence was later
commuted to life imprisonment.
ACCORDING TO documenta
tion obtained by the Village Voice,
including heavily censored in-
telligence reports, Lebed was a
leader in the Organization of
Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN),
described as a rightwing na-
tionalist group. Lebed reportedly
ran the Sluzhba Bezpeky, "its
reputedly murderous security
force," the Voice said.
Lebed also attended for a brief
time the Gestapo school in
Zakopane, a district of Cracow.
Poland, according to Counter In-
telligence Corps files obtained by
the Voice. Complicity between the
Nazis and the OUN is confirmed
by documentation provided by
Yad Vashem in Israel.
The GAO report, though
general in detail, said that "Sub-
ject D" "was considered extreme-
ly valuable by U.S. Intelligence.
Because of fear for his personal
safety and his familiarity with
U.S. intelligence operations, the
CIA brought him to the United
States under an assumed name.
THE REPORT continued that
after he was slipped into the coun-
try, the Immigration and
Naturalization Service learned of
Lebed's true identity and past a<-
nvities and opened an investiga-
tion. The CIA is reported to have
then acknowledged details of his
past background and secured his
residency in this country in 1952
under Section 8 of the CIA Act of
1949. Lebed became a U.S. citizen
in 1957.
It was unclear whether Lebed
could be deported from the coun-
try if the OSI chose to take legal
action. Brooklyn District At-
torney Elizabeth Holtzman, a
former House Representative,
thinks Lebed could be deported.
She said that a 1978 Amendment
to the immigration law that she
sponsored would bar Lebed or
anyone else who had participated
in Nazi persecution.
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tually put up signs reading
"detour tax collectors ahead."
But he may as well have, consider-
ing that motorists driving through
that town north of Tel Aviv are
being diverted around roadblocks
set up by tax-collectors.
The income tax authorities
established checkpoints on the
main highway through Herzliah in
an effort to apprehend tax-
evaders. Vehicles are flagged
down, and the information on the
driver's license and registration is
compared by computer to a list of
tax delinquents.
Motorists found to be in default
are issued a summons on the spot
with the threat that their cars will
be impounded if they do not settle
up promptly with the government.
But the process created huge
traffic jams and Landau ordered
his road maintenance crews to
. direct drivers away from the
roadblocks. The tax authorities in-
sist they are legally allowed to
take all necessary measures to col-
lect backtaxes. Landau maintains
that he has an equal right under
the law to direct traffic around
obstructions, which he identified,
in this case, to be the tax-
collectors roadblocks.
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face 18-A Thp .Ipwish li'lnriHiofi/liVwl""
p~k-.--------1 *
Page 20-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
-*1
--k
It 'Self-Destructed'
Why Did Liberalism Give Way to Reagan Triumph?
NEW YORK Why did
Reaganism triumph and
liberalism collapse? Two
political and economic ex-
perts give their answers in
the current issue of Present
Tense magazine published
by the American Jewish
Committee.
According to Fred Siegel, pro-
fessor of history at Cooper Union,
liberalism self-destructed. More
and more dependent on the
courts, he says, liberals forgot to
talk to most Americans and build
public support through
persuasion.
Bernard Lefkowitz, a social
policy consultant, largely blames
effective right-wing propaganda
that social welfare programs
create a class of indolents.
Says Siegel: "this rise of the
right is the result not of a growing
popular faith in the free-market
system or big business, but a loss
of faith in the primary instrument
of liberal reform: government."
Paradoxically, he adds, this
liberal loss of standing over the
past decade occurred even as the
Great Society programs were con-
tinuity to demonstrate their suc-
cess, especially in relieving the
symptoms of poverty.
But this, he says, was negated
by major errors, with such great
accomplishments as Social Securi-
ty undermined politically and
socially by the means used to
finance it.
"THE SOCIAL Security tax
was and is highly regressive,"
Siegel asserts. "Today it is paid by
everyone at the same rate,
regardless of income and only up
to $40,000 in earnings. This
means that for young workers just
starting out, the Social Security
tax is often greater than their in-
come tax."
He continues: "Because Social
Security is most justifiably an
almost universal benefit, the ef-
fect is that tax money taken from
low-income young workers serves,
in part, to benefit the well-to-do
elderly."
Liberals, Siegel believes, have
to regain a touch of the populism
that characterized the Franklin
Delano Roosevelt era. There are
liberals, he says, who are williing
to face up to the problems. They
have to recognize that the
bywords for the revival of
American liberalism have to be:
populism, persuasion and public
accountability.
"In the popular mind," he con-
tinues, "the sense of social
breakdown and the perceived
failure of the welfare state merge,
unfortunately, into the image of
the black, unwed teenage mother.
Teenage pregancy has come, cor-
rectly or not, to symbolize the
union of laissez-faire morals and
Holocaust Film
Nominated
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council
documentary, "The Courage to
Care," has been nominated for an
Academy Award in the best
documentary short subject
category.
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the
Council, narrates the film, for
which Sister Carol Rittner of
Detroit and Sondra Myers of
Scranton, Pa., were the executive
producers.
"The Courage to Care" will be
mown nationally by the PBS Net-
work. The showing is tentatively
scheduled for Wednesday, May 7.
welfare-state paternalism."
HE ADDS: "Liberals have in-
sisted, at one and the same time,
that neither they nor anyone else
has the right to tell the poor black
how to live and that it was the
financial and social responsibility
of the Federal Government to see
to it that people were lifted out of
poverty. It has been an un-
workable combination."
In Lefkowitz's view, Govern-
ment intervention is significant to
American Jews. Generations of
them escaped poverty, he says,
because government helped.
"I could not have afforded to go
to college if not for the public
funds that provided a tuition-free
education at City College in New
York," Lefkowitz says. "My
74-year-old mother, along with
many others in her situation,
would not have been able to retain
her situation, would not have been
able to retain her independence
after my father died if not for
Social Security, Medicaid,
Medicare and a vast array of
other programs that benefit the
elderly."
ASSERTING that it was temp-
ting "in these cold times to think
of poverty as somebody else's m
blem," Lefkowitz adds that "
forget how quickly the nJ
serious recession can wipe om
what gains we have achieved r!
continues:
"The next time some cons*
vative Jews extol the virtues of k
dependence and self-sufficiency
they might consider where thev
and their constituencies would b
if not for unemployment educa
tion, social education programs
government regulations requiring
a safe workplace, and subsidized
housing."
Large assertions, however flaw-
ed, he says, lead to
sweeping conclusions.
ever more
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Funny Jewish Tradition
Yiddish Comedian: He's A Dying Breed
dfewislh Floridlia
Miami, Florida Friday, February 14,1986 Section B
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Simon Nussbaum represents a
very funny Jewish tradition.
Nussbaum is a Yiddish come-
dian a member of a dying breed
of performer. His show, "Melacht
A Lebn," ends Sunday at the
Surfside Community Center.
Nussbaum travelled a long way
before coming here.
He was born in Lodz, Poland
in 1917 to a family that had show
business in its blood. Nussbaum's
father was a musician and actor,
his uncle "a big film actor" in
Poland. Nussbaum passed the
genes along to his son, Sergio,
who is a musician and composer.
DURING THE early part of his
life, Simon Nussbaum studied
.lance and acting in Lodz at the
School of Jewish Theater. As his
talent blossomed, he became a
member of Dzigan and
Schumacher's revue, the most
popular Yiddish comedy troupe in
pre-war Europe.
Suddenly, the whole world
|changed.
"We were performing in War-
saw," Nussbaum recalled, "when
the Nazis came and arrested the
entire troupe. We were taken to a
concentration camp called Alens-
tein Ost-Praisen, a place where
they held prisoners of war."
Although Nussbaum described the
conditions as "brutal," at that
time, in 1939, Hitler had not yet
completed death camps like
Auschwitz and Treblinka.
AFTER A FEW weeks of inter-
ment, he escaped. "One night,
Polish Army units led by Jewish
officers and aided by partisans,
came to the camp and during a
change of guards, let us out."
Nussbaum doesn't want to
remember how he finally made it
back to Lodz, "sometime in
1940." During an animated con-
versation with his son as
translator of his rapid Yiddish
believers, Nussbaum described
how he was able to survive
because of his comedic talent and
fluency in Russian and Rumanian.
Somehow, with the help of the
Polish partisans with whom he
had hooked up, Nussbaum made
contact with the Russian Army, at
the time the war's momentum was
turning against the Nazis. "The
Russians had kicked out the Nazis
in Lodz, and I would entertain the
troops."
For six years thereafter, he "liv-
ed with the Russian Army as an
actor/soldier."
WHAT KINDS of material did
Soviet soldiers prefer?
"They liked jokes, eccentric
comedy, and dancing," he said.
Performances were in both Rus-
sian and Yiddish.
After the war, Nussbaum
travelled the world. Stops includ-
ed all the major cities of Central
and South America, Europe, and
Israel. Eventually, he settled in
Buenos Aires, Argentina, where
Sergio was born. Sergio, Simon,
and Simon's wife, Sonia Lemberg,
are residents of the United States,
although in their program, they
also claim Paris, France as a
home.
Simon and Sonia are not only
marriage partners, but business
partners as well. They have been
"performing together" since
1951. In the current production of
"Melacht A Lebn," Sonia
Lemberg is a co-star, receives
equal billing, performs two duets
with Simon, a duet with goldie
Garshell, and a solo number in Act
One, titled A Brivele Der
Mamen."
HOW HAVE audiences reacted
to the show?
"Show is big success!"
Nussbaum exalted. "We get ex-
cellent audience reaction!"
"Melacht A Lebn" is not a
bunch of recycled material,
Nussbaum insists. "We have a
mix of both old and new material
in this. We have plenty of new
jokes." And, he added, it's all
"clean" humor.
SIMON NUSSBAUM: 'big success!'
Rabbi Reminisces
He's Saddened By Orthodox Split
By RABBI
MAYER ABRAMOWrrZ
TempU Menorah
An anniversary is a time for
reminiscing and for assessing. To
recall what has happened in the
| aat is significant only if it affects
a hat is happening in the present.
I recall the first community
iiieeting that I attended in Temple
Israel not long after I arrived in
Miami Beach in 1951. It was the
meeting of the Rabbinical
Association when the aged Rabbi
Jacob Kaplan presided with the
six practicing rabbis attending.
Three of us were Conservative,
two were Reform, and one was
Orthodox.
I recall that meeting and subse-
[quent meetings when all of us,
| representing all branches of
Judaism, would get together once
| a month to meet the challenge of
the-then young and expanding
I Jewish community of Greater
Miami.
IT IS NOT only nostalgic in-
, volvement but rather an attempt
to compare the present posture of
the Jewish community with the
| past.
I can not forget the inspiration
las we worked together in those
early years to solve "non-
religious" issues such issues as
civic elections, school exams, and
college registrations which had
been scheduled on Jewish
holidays.
There were problems with local
I hospitals requesting rabbinical
visitations for patients and lec-
tures for staff. There were also
recurring instances of anti-
I Semitic and other racist acts in
"ur city.
And, of course, there was the
issue of Israel which looked to the
Irabbis for help both in fund-
Iraising and in political support.
pVe, Orthodox. Reform and Con-
servative, were resolutely united
las we grappled with these issues.
AS THE Jewish community
pew, it was at these meetings
hat we welcomed the newly-
On Saturday evening, Feb. 15, Rabbi and Mrs. Mayer
Abramowitz will be honored for their 35 years of service to
Temple Menorah, Miami Beach. In this article, Rabbi
Abramowitz reminisces on the 35 years since he first ac-
cepted spiritual leadership of the Temple and what he sees
as the growing isolation of the Orthodox rabbinate from
their Conservative and Reform colleagues here since that
time.
Although he thinks Miami is
"very nice," he sees a major pro-
blem here. "Miami is big for
tourists," he said, "but there is no
leadership in Jewish cultural and
social life. There are plenty of peo-
[ile but little activity." He would
ike to see the people of Miami and
Miami Beach get together to
create a strong, viable Yiddish
Theater.
AFTER MIAMI, the
Nussbaum/Lemberg team hits the
road for performances in
Venezuela, Chile, Tel Aviv and
Paris.
Of all the places he's been,
where is his favorite?
"Buenos Aires," he said. "The
Jewish community of Argentina is
most like the European Jewish
community. They keep alive the
traditions."
Traditions like Jewish humor.
And Simon Nussbaum.
"Melacht A Lebn" can be seen
Sunday at 8 p.m.
Schuster To Be Honored
At JNF Banquet
Rabbi Abramowitz
arrived rabbis, harnessing them to
our joint work for the betterment
of our rapidly expanding kehUlah.
There was a camaraderie among
the rabbis that made for a healthy,
vibrant, exciting rabbinic leader-
ship. I recall the presidency of
Rabbi Moses Mescheloff, spiritual
leader of the "Third Street Shul"
(Beth Jacob Congregation), work-
ing in close harmony with Rabbis
Irving Lehrman, Joseph R. Narot
and myself.
philosophical lee-
like Rabbi Tibor
made ordinary
the Rabbinical
Association exhilarating Torah
sessions.
Then, about ten years ago, a
boycott was proclaimed.
Orthodox rabbis withdrew from
the Association, and that spelled
the end to concerted community
efforts by the rabbis. During the
Miami race riots, for example, ac-
I recall the
tures of men
Stern, who
meetings of
tion of the rabbis was requested
by our civic officials, but the Or-
thodox rabbis were promient by
their absence.
WHEN THE war in Lebanon
took place, we had to call separate
meetings of the Orthodox rabbis
for State of Israel Bonds functions
because they would not par-
ticipate with other community
rabbis. Even in the television pro-
grams, sponsored by the Rab-
binical Association, Orthodox rab-
bis would no longer appear with
non-Orthodox men.
At this time, as I look back on
my own 35 years in Miami Beach,
I have sadly to admit that the
boycott of the Orthodox rabbinate
is complete. Not only is there a
separation, but there is a rejec-
tion. The Conservative rabbis are
even denied the use of the com-
munity mikveh which many of us
helped to build. The Reform rab-
bis, many of whom require the
ritual of immersion in a mikveh tor
their conversions, are likewise
refused.
Regrettably, there is no in-
stance of community cooperation
by the Orthodox rabbinate. Yet
many of the problems which our
community faced then are recurr-
ing today.
WHY? Why the isolation of the
Orthodox rabbinate? Why is there
no cooperation between it and
other rabbis of our city in affairs
affecting the welfare of the entire
Jewish community?
The answer lies in an issur. a
prohibition, issued in 1956 by the
eminent Rav Moshe Feinstein
who called for a total separation
of Orthodox rabbis from the
Continued on Page 2-B
Leon Schuster, a leader in the
Cuban Jewish community, will be
honored by the Jewish National
Fund on March 22 at a Tribute
Banquet beginning with cocktails
at 8 p.m. at the Konover Hotel, ac-
cording to Abraham Grunhut,
president of the Jewish National
Fund of Greater Miami and Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, chairman of
the JNF Executive board.
This occasion will mark
Schuster's Golden Anniversary of
dedicated service to the Jewish
National Fund, as well as to
celebrate his 80th birthday. The
banquet will launch the establish-
ment of the Leon Schuster Family
Forest and Playground in the Kin-
neret Development in the Galil.
"Leon Schuster is deserving of
this great honor by virtue of his
exemplary life as a human being
and as a Jew. For 50 years, star-
ting with his years in Havana until
today in Miami, he has labored in
Continued on Page 4-B
Federation Alliance
Division To Hold
Campaign Events
February 23 will be a busy day
for the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Allliance Division,
with three events on behalf of the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund scheduled
for the Division's constituent
alliance and communities, an-
nounced Herbert Canarick,
Alliance Division chairman.
The "Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance
Premier Event, scheduled for 11
a.m. on the 23rd, will bring
together residents of 10 high rises
on the 50s blocks of Collins
Avenue for a first-time-ever com-
bined brunch. According to
Sidney Olson, chairman of the
"Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance, the
event is a milestone for Greater
Miami's Jewish community.
"In the past, residents of some
of these buildings held their own
campaign events while others did
not have the opportunity to par-
ticipate. With this combined effort
replacing individual events, our
community becomes united. As
the Federation's campaign theme
puts it, we are one people, with
one destiny," said Olson.
The "Fabulous Fiftys" Alliance
Premier Event will be held in the
Palladium Room of the Konover
Hotel, and will feature a discus-
sion with Jerome Gleekel. expert
on Middle East Affairs. Participa-
tion in the event requires a
minimum gift of $250 to the
Federation's 1986 CJA-IEF
Continued on Page 4-B


Kaorp IX. A
I'hi
mnoh li'l^
iJJiBJJ... r-i.----------- **
Page 2-B The Jewish Ftoridjan/Friday, February 14, 1986
>
Morris Dan
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Dan and Rose Launch Art of
Jewish Living Program
Morris Dan, newly elected
president of the Florida Region of
the Federation of Jewish Men's
Clubs, together with the newly in-
stalled Spiritual Advisor, Rabbi
Marvin Rose of Temple Beth El of
North Bay Village, will launch the
Art of Jewish Living program
throughout the Florida region on
Sunday, Feb. 23 at Temple Beth
Torah. This program will feature
the "Shabbat Seder," or order of
Shabbat observances in the
Jewish home. It is the latest of a
series, based on the principle of
"Laymen Teaching Laymen."
Dr. Morton R. Lang of Mon-
treal, guest speaker, will discuss,
"Overcoming Complacency and
Indifference Toward Religion,"
Seymour Feldstein, president of
the temple's Men's Club, will
speak on the Burning Bush Fund
Program.
Morris Dan, a Holocaust sur-
vivor, has come to South Florida
from Canada, where he resided
for over 25 years. Since his arrival
in Miami in 1977, he has been in-
volved in community and
synagogue affairs, having served
as president of the Beth David
Men's Club prior to assuming the
presidency of the Florida Region.
Dan is also acting acancs chair-
man of these meetings, along with
Michael M. Exelbert, president of
Temple Zion Congregation.
Rabbi Rose is a graduate of
Yeshiva University and has serv-
ed as Rabbi of Temple Beth El for
the past 10 years.
Jack Gordon Guest
At Breakfast Forum
State Senator Jack Gordon,
chairman of the Senate Transpor-
tation Committee and Director of
the Institute of Public Policy and
Citizenship Studies at Florida In-
ternational University, will be the
guest speaker at the next Temple
Israel Business Breakfast Forum,
Thursday, Feb. 20, at 7:45 a.m.,
Downtown Temple. The pubic is
invited to attend. The session con-
cludes promptly at 9 a.m.
Breakfast committee members
include Eunice and Jim Baros,
Norma Orovitz, Henry Wolff, Jr.,
and Harold Evensky.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
LATE FRIDAY EVENING SERVICE
FEBRUARY 14
at 8 P.M.
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL PREACH ON
"Love Thy Neighbor As Thyself"
in honor of
Brotherhood Month
"He will comment on the Shcharansky release."
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN WILL CHANT
Assisted by the Temple Choir
SATURDAY MORNING SERVICE AT 9 A.M.
......
Rabbi Reminisces
He's Saddened By Orthodox Split
Continued from Page 1-B
Am rican rabbis. At that time,
few of the leading Orthodox rab-
bis in America agreed with the
prohibition, so that the coopera-
tion between the rabbis continued
uninterrupted.
But now, 20 years later, for
reasons that are quite obscure, the
Orthodox rabbis fell in line with
the Rav Feinstein's issur. The
separation became final.
I do not know the basis of that
issur, but I have learned from my
Orthodox colleagues about its
motivation.
"When people see us together
on TV or at any public platform,"
the argument went, "we will lend
legitimacy to your rabbinate."
TO ME, that is unfortunate.
Unfortunate, not because I need
acceptance by my Orthodox col-
leagues, but because it robs me of
the hevruta and inspiration we all
so desperately need in our rab-
binical responsibilities. Unfor-
tunate, because the Jewish com-
munity is being robbed of the
spiritual input of so many great
minds.
There is no question that there
are differences, basic differences
in interpretations, between the
Conservative and Reform rabbis,
on the one hand, and the Orthodox
on the other. The American rab-
binate reflects the varied make up
of American Jewry with its
respective yeshvot. seminars and
institutes.
These differences, however,
ought not to impoverish the
Jewish community, denying it the
concerted action which is so
necessary for the very survival of
our people.
Some have suggested that the
separation of the Orthodox is an
importation from Israel. I do not
know how valid that is. However,
even though the split between the
religious and non-religious is more
pronounced in Israel, the danger
of such a split here in America is
more perilous.
THERE IS no danger to the
physical survival of the Israeli Jew
but there undoubtedly is such a
danger facing the American Jew.
In the diaspora we need each
other to guarantee each other's
surivival.
The Orthodox can contribute
more to the enhancement of
Jewish living and to the enrich-
ment of our community by being
part of the community rather than
by divorcing itself from it.
This is evident in the strides we
have already made in such issues
as kashrut for all community func-
tions, in the universal acceptance
of circumcision (by a mohel), and
in the deeper appreciation for
traditional Judaism in so many
other areas of communal life.
I do not ask for the legitimiza-
tion of rabbis but for the frater-
nization of Jews. Isolation can on
ly lead to the weakening of the
fiber that makes us one people
Because the laity, the general
public, will ultimately suffer if this
is allowed to continue, I feel thai
this issue ought to be aired in
public.
I HARBOR no feelings of
acrimony as I write about this
troubling situation. Quite the con
trary. I am in love with Jews as I
am with Judaism. Today, as
throughout our existence, the
need for unity ought to be a priori
ty for our people. I believe that,
more than at any other time, it is
vital to restate the Jewish axiom
of faith, "all Israelites are respon
sible one for the other." This was
the key to Jewish survival in the
past, and it must remain inviolate
today.
So, as I reminisce about the past
35 years of my rabbinate in Miami
Beach, I assert that the axiom,
"we are one," whether Orthodox,
Reform, or Conservative, is the
only guarantee of our survival.
Hebrew Academy Elects Officers
Ron Kriss, attorney, has
recently been elected as president
of the South Dade Hebrew
Academy.
Joining Kriss in his new posi-
tion, will be Dr. Ruben Gurvich as
vice-president of education; Mrs.
Sandy Cantor, vice-president of
enrollment; Gideon Ben-Ami as
vice-president of fundraising; and
Mrs. Sheila Wagner as vice-
president of projects. Hector
Vergara was elected secretary .
Marlene Mitchell is principal of
the school.
Members of the school board in-
clude, Judge Fred Barad Barry
White, Martha Moses, Joe Hup-
pert.and Dr. Lana Monchek.
Additional board members are:
Dr. Andre Abitbol, Dr. Jeff and
Lisa Blatt, Nurit Cohen, Efrat
Afek, Chet and Helen Elfenbein,
Rabbi Edwin Farber, Claire
Greenberg, Rabbi Warren Kasztl,
Marni Kriss, Karen Levin,
Deborah Monchek, Marsha
Rosenbloom, Shellie Sherry,
Cathy Shmalo, Amanda Vergara,
and Richard Wagner.
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman will
continue to serve as headmaster
of the school and is responsible for
the Judaic Studies Department.
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Box BE c/o Jewish Floridian
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Ron Kriaa
IN MEMORIAM
We mourn the untimely passing of our colleague and friend
Rabbi Arnold Richter
man fan 7ax ram p 3i"in lm* am
and extend deepest condolences to his wife, Marlene, his children,
Mo she & Shira and his brothers, Rabbi Chaim, Rabbi Yisroel and Albert.
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Hebrew Educators Alliance
Last Performance Saturday 8:15 p.m.
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Tickets $10.00 at all BASS Ticket Outlets.
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Dade: 633-BASS Broward: 741-3000
p-""B""h9*:'"s-


Mti/vfivnintyb
"A Match Made in Heaven" the nostalgic Yiddish musical com-
edy will be at Miami Beach Theatre of the Performing Arts on
February 26 and 27 for four performances only. Call 673-8300
for information and tickets also available at Select-A-Seat loca-
tions including Jordan Marsh Stores and Chargit
1 -800-468-3540. _____
The Senior Club of the South Dade Jewish Community Center
announces that William F Saulson will be the guest speaker for
their noon meeting on Sunday with Mr. Saulson. a family consul-
tant and vice president of Riverside Memorial Chapel. Israel
Upbeat, is the title of his talk for the CJA/1EF campaign meeting
at Federation Gardens. 10905 SW 112 Ave.
The Florida Atlantic University Foundation's Benefit Concert
will take place on Sunday. Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. at the FAU Theatre.
The featured performer will be violinist. Yehudi Menuhin.
Tropical Cancer League will hold their next regular luncheon
meeting on Friday. Feb. 21 at the Ocean Pavillion at 11:45 a.m.
Black Butterfly, singer, will be accomanied by her son Nicki.
Weizmann Institute of Science will invite seventy high school
students worldwide to participate in the 18th Annual Bessie F
Lawrence International Summer Science Institute at Revohot.
Israel, from Jury 7 to Aug. 7. To apply for the program, write Lee
Millman. Executive Director. Florida Region of the American
Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science. 1550 NE
Miami Gardens Drive. Suite 405. N. Miami Beach. FL 33179
United Order of True Sisters sent a check in the amount of
$50,000 on behalf of the organization to the Miami Children's
Hospital to be used for the children's bone marrow transplant
department and for the children's oncology department, according
| to Jules M. Hinkes. president.
Adath Yeshurun Congregation will hold its Eleventh Annual
(Dedication Dinner-Dance on Saturday evenning at 8 p.m. Larry
aiuI Jan Udell will be honored guests at the event to take place at
^he Rosenberg Social Hall.
Miami Dade Community College will present Erwin Heifer and
Friends for its Lunchtime Lively Arts Series on Wednesday at
sn at the Worfson Campus Auditorium.
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS
7 days 4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Vt Broiled Chicken..................$5.25
Fillet of Solo........................$4.75
Baked Meatloaf.....................$4.75
_________Includes Potato, ggjgtgMg Club Salad__________
Bring in or mention this sd for your 10% discount
off eny item.
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Temple Zion Israelite Center well present the Theatre Guild's
production of Jerry Herman's classic. "Hello Dolly.'' beginning
Saturday evening. Feb. 22 at 8 at the center. Other show dates
are Feb. 23. March 1. 2. 8. 9. and 15 Michael Vaughn will be
directing the performances.
The Lorber Chapter of the National Jewish Center for Im-
munology will hold their annual auction on Friday. Feb. 21 at
7:30 p.m. at the Kendall Town Club House. Neil Levine will be
auctioneer for the benefit of asthmatic children.
Steven I. Hershkowitz. son of Rosh/n Hershkowitz and nephew
of Arnold Riebel. both of North Miami Beach. Fla. have been pro-
moted in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of staff sergeant. Her-
shkowitz is an aerospace ground equipment mechanic in Italy,
with the 40th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron. He is
a 1980 graduate of North Miami Beach High School.
Children In Distress will sponsor a Day At Gulfstream on Tues-
day. Feb. 25. announced Michelle Leblang. president of the
tiroup CID is a voluntary support organization for the Division of
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. University of Miami School of
Medicine --------
YIVO Committee of Miami will present its 7th Yiddish lecture
on Wednesday, at 1:30 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom. Prof.
Eugene Orenstein will commemorate David Bergelson on his
KKhh Birthday.
The Sunflower Society will meet on Tuesday, at noon at the
Jockey Club to hear Libby A. Tanner. MSW-LCSW speak on
the topic. "Sexuality and Relationships (Venus after 40)." accor-
ding to Connie Morrow, president.
Sergio Periera. Dade County Manager will be honored at a din-
ner of the B'nai B'rith Foundation of the United States with the
Great American Traditions Award on Sunday. April 13 at the
Omni International Hotel.______
Temple Israel of Greater Miami will present Senator Jack Gor-
don at its Business Breakfast Forum on Thursday. Feb. 20. at
745 a.m. at the synagogue.
OLIqiMreofOiMM
Offer ExpirM
2-15-S6
Omni International Mall
1801 Biscayna Blvd.
Miami Phone: 358-8700
Marjorie Housen To Speak To Hadassah Audiences
Hadassah National Vice Presi-
dent Marjorie Housen will talk
about the ever changing role of
the volunteer in today's society in
a series of speaking engagements
before Miami Hadassah audiences
Sunday through Tuesday.
Housen will provide update on
the latest news from the
Hadassah Medical Organization as
well as the most policy statements
issued by the Zionist organization
on such current topic as ter-
rorism, Spanish-Israel and
Vatican-Israel relations and
Israel's law of return.
The speaking appearances have
been scheduled in both north and
south Dade, afternoons and even-
ings, to enable as many Hadassah
women and men as interested to
attend.
Housen will address the
Hadassah Associates, the men's
support organization, on Sunday
at 2 p.m. at the Skylake Gardens
Recreation Hall.
Monday, she will be the guest at
a meeting of the Chai Chapter,
beginning at 8 p.m. at the Sephar-
dic Jewish Center of North Miami
Beach.
Tuesday afternoon, Housen will
address a meeting of the Judea
Chapter. The meeting, in the
Moorings Auditorium, begins at
12:30.
Those living in South Dade are
invited to hear Housen speak
Tuesday evening, beginning at 8
in the auditorium of the Suburban
Medical Center in Perrine.
These meetings are open to all
Hadassah members and guests.
At the close of her Dade speak-
ing tour, Housen will head for
Puerto Rico to address members
of the island's Hadassah chapter,
a part of the Miami Region.
Histadrut Conference Features
Yiddish Symposium on 'Israel 1986'
Dr. Sol Stein
Dr. Sol Stein, Founding presi-
dent of the Israel Histadrut Foun-
dation and Dr. Berl Frymer,
former Histadrut Cultural direc-
tor for Tel Aviv and Jaffe will be
the featured speakers at the Yid-
dish Brunch Session of the
Histadrut Foundation Conference
on Sunday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m. at
the Konover Hotel in Miami
Beach.
Dr. Stein has recently returned
from Israel where he met with
Histadrut and government
leaders to discuss the current
economic political crisis that con-
fronts the people of Israel. Dr.
Stein received his PhD in
Economics from the famed
University of Ghent in Belgium.
For 20 years Dr. Stein served as
director of the Jewish National
Dr. Berl Frymer
Fund in Philadelphia. For the past
26 years, Dr. Stein has led the
Israel Histadrut Foundation in
raising the impressive total of $85
Million for Israel. He was a radio
commentator for many years on
N.Y.'s WEVD, and a columnist
for the Jewish Daily Forward.
Currently, Dr. Stein serves as
president of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation.
The Brunch will be chaired by
Morris Fisher, the Histadrut
Foundation's chairman of the
Golden Chain of Yiddish Culture
Fund.
Entertainment will be provided
by the star of Yiddish Theatre.
Minna Bern and the international
vocalist, Shoshana Ron. They will
be accompanied by the Maestro
Shmuel Fershko.
The Royal Hungarian
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->rseianoFoods inc SiamHxd C" WSOI


Morro 1 SI A 'I'K* l~~----1. '----=------X-!-l-~
Page 4-B TheJewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
b
Tribute To Rabbi And Rachel
Federation Abramowitz Saturday Evening
Leon Schuster
Moshe Rivlin
Schuster To Be Honored
At JNF Banquet
Continued from Page 1-B
the vineyard of the Keren
Kayemeth-Jewish National Fund
unselfishly with great devotion
and remarkable zeal," said
Abraham Grunhut, president of
JNF Greater Miami.
The Honorable Moshe Rivlin,
World chairman of Keren
Kayemet Leisrael. will be guest
speaker.
Participating in the event are
Cuban Hebrew Congregation,
with Rabbi Barry J. Konovitz;
Temple Menorah, with Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz; and Temple
Moses, with Rabbi Amram
Amselem.
The Banquet committee in-
cludes Mr. and Mrs. Harvey
Abramson, Mrs. Margot Backer,
Mr. and Mrs. Moises Bondar, Mr.
and Mrs. Fima Falic, Mrs. Cyrla
Farber. Mr. Sabeto Garazi, Mr.
and Mrs. Saul Ginsburg, Mr. and
Mrs. Raul Gorfinkel, Mr. and Mrs.
Sergio Grobler, and Mr. and Mrs.
Jacob Gutt.
Also, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Hup-
pert, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Klaiman,
Setting The
Record Straight
Podolaky
Sisselman
A story in the Feb. 7 edition of
the Jewish Floridian reports the
appointment of Barry Podolsky as
associate executive director of the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center of North Dade.
Podolsky's appointemnt is a pro-
motion into the agency's ex-
ecutive offices from his previous
post as director of the 17-acre
facility. Beginning in March,
Podolsky will be responsible for
the overall administration, finan-
cial planning and automation of
the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami.
The same edition announces the
election of Murray Sisselman as
president of the Tiger Bay Club.
Sisselman, who is also president
of the United Teachers of Dade,
succeeds Alan Rosenthal, who
served three one-year terms.
The Jewish Floridian sincerely
regrets that the two photographs
accompanying these items were
inadvertently switched and hopes
that the error did not cause Mr.
Podolsky. Mr. Sisselman or their
>ective.organizations any un-
di inconvenien
Mrs. Eva B. Kokiel, Mrs. Leika
Kozolchyk, Mr. and Mrs. Moises
Kriger, Mr. and Mrs. Moises
Levin, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Luski,
Mr. and Mrs. Juan Matalon, Mr.
and Mrs. Julio Schniadoski, Mrs.
Sabina Shniadoski, Mr. and Mrs.
Benjamin Terner, and Mr. and
Mrs. Solomon Terner.
Continued from Page 1-B
campaign.
Also scheduled for Feb. 23 is a
brunch for residents of Harbour
House and Carlton Terrace.
Israeli Ambassador Shaul Ramati
will be guest speaker at the event,
which will be held in the White
Cypress Restaurant in Harbour
House South.
Harbour House/Carlton Terrace
Alliance Chairmen Ruth K. Her-
cher, Dr. and Mrs. Elton Resnick
and Mr. Hank Wolfe also serve as
chairmen of the event.
Jerry Hyams, long-time
organizer for the Federation cam-
paign in the California Club Com-
munity, will be the guest of honor
at his community's annual
UJA/Federation dinner. The
California Club Community event,
will be held on the 23rd, beginning
with cocktails at 5:30 p.m., at the
Coral Creek Country Club. The
evening will feature a talk by
Israeli Ambassador Shaul Ramati.
A minimum gift of $250 to the
1986 CJA-IEF is required for at
tendance at the dinner.
Jack Gellman serves as cam-
paign chairman for the California
Club Community. Herb Polow is
dinner chairman; and Lorraine
Weintraub is co-chairman.
"We Were There," a musical
dialogue, will be presented at the
banquet honoring Rabbi and
Rachel Abramowitz for their 35
years of service to Temple
Menorah. the conservative temple
in the North Shore area of Miami
Beach. The anniversary dinner,
which will be held in the Olemberg
Hall of Temple Menorah on Satur-
day evening, is the temple's
scholarship function and is co-
chaired by President Harvey
Abramson and Vice-president
Isaac Olemberg.
The presentation will be a
dramatic reading by the Vice-
Presidents. Gedaleh Feldenkreis
and Joel Gray in which prominent
members of the community will
tell the "behind-the-scenes" ac-
count of the life of the Temple's
spiritual leader and his wife. Par-
ticipating in the program will be
Shepard Broad, former mayor of
Bay Harbor Islands, Miami Beach
Mayer Alex Daoud, Jerry
Sussman, Honorary Vice Presi-
dent Moni Terner, Mrs. Luisa Ler-
man, and Dr. Mario Ginzburg. The
presentation will be interspersed
with music both by the audience
and by the Kadosh Klezmer Band.
Highlighting the evening will be
a program to be presented by
Dahlia Oppenheimer, David
Abramowitz and Reena
Greenberg the children of Rau
and Mrs. Abramowitz.
As an added attraction, tW
will be a private exhibit of work
by Rachel Abramow.t? 2?
sculptures are on displav in Z
library of FIU anV,^
Lochamey Hagetaot Museum k
Israel. ffl
At the Late Friday Eveni*,
Services this week Rabb
Abramowitz will preach on Z
subject "A Rabbi Reminisces" 1
which he will share with the con-
gregation some of the experiences
he has had during the past 35
years.
Fonteyn to Perform
Sleeping Beauty
Dame Margot Fonteyn, 67 ye
old prima ballerina, will perform
the role of Queen Mother for two
performances of the Sadler's
Wells Royal Ballet production of
Sleeping Beauty.
Dame Margot will come out of
retirement for the Tuesday and
Wednesday performances at the
Dade County Auditorium, accor
ding to Judy Drucker. president of
the Concert Association of
Greater Miami.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded,
Sliced or UnsHced
Rye Bread
J9*
Available at Publix Store* with
Freah Danish Bakeries Only.
A Valentine Treat, Decorsted
Heart Cake
ch da^h
(With Freeh Strewberrtee,
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Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 ,., $1"
Made with the Freshest Fruit and Raisins
Hot Cross Buns............JiS:$179
Danish Cherry Strip......* $1"
Prices Effective
February 13 thru 19.1986.
Available at Pubix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain, Powdered Sugar or Cinnamon
CakeDonuts..............6 tor 89*
Decorated
Mini Heart Cake.............ech$129
(With Fresh Strawberries,
If Available................................ #acn $1.gg)

, Publix
f*


.

UJA/Federation Campaigns
Begin At Local Campuses
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
[Local college students, who will
ve as chairmen for the United
bwish Appeal/Federation cam-
rns at their respective carri-
es, recently returned from a
iay student leadership mission
Israel, conducted by the UJA
subsidized by the Greater
ii Jewish Federation.
'What impressed me most dur-
my trip to Israel was visiting
Ethiopian center," said Elissa
eberman, a University of Miami
iior who participated in the mis-
on. "The kids at the absorption
liters were so happy. Then,
;n I came back to America, I
i a program on television which
[>wed children still starving in
liopia. It made me feel very
jud that the money raised in
community does such wonder-
things."
The mission was Lieberman's
Bt visit to Israel, and she said it
helped her become more
spared for organizing the
^A/Federation campaign at the
jiiversity of Miami. "We visited
oject Renewal towns, youth
yah villages, schools and other
ces where UJA/Federation
Ida are at work helping peo-
she explained. "Now I can
this first-hand knowledge
other students and hopefully
jire them to make generous
to the campaign."
ISteve Nobil, a Florida Interna-
i University (FIU) junior who
I chair the UJA/Federation
ipaigns at FIU's Tamiami
Jth) Campus and at Miami-
ide Community College's
)CC) South Campus, also
tted Israel for the first time on
student leadership mission.
("While in Israel, I really got the
?ling that I hadn't left home,"
t>il said. "I learned how impor-
tant it is to keep the American
Jewish community strong. As a
result of supporting the Federa-
tion and UJA, we're ensuring the
strength of Israel and Jews
everywhere."
UJA/Federation campaigns at
local colleges and universities
began on Jan. 27 and will last until
March 1. The primary focus of the
campaigns under Nobil's leader-
ship, he says, "is to raise the stu-
dent's awareness of what the cam-
paign can accomplish, and the im-
portance of supporting it."
Nobil and members of campus
campaign committees have work-
ed with UJA to arrange several
educational programs for
students at FIU and MDCC South
campuses. Avi Harpaz, Israeli
economic consul, spoke with
students about Israel's economy
and the importance of supporting
it through the UJA/Fedeartion
campaign. Wayne Firestone, local
activist on behalf of Soviet Jewry,
spoke to students about the im-
portance of the campaign to Jews
in the Soviet Union. In addition,
during a weekly entertainment
program at FIU's student center,
Nobil and other campaign commit-
tee members have been staffing
tables with information about the
campaign.
The campaign at FIU and
MDCC South campuses is being
conducted primarily through
telephone solicitations and a
limited number of face-to-face
solicitations, Nobil said. He added
that the students' response to the
campaign has been good. "About
60 percent of those solicited
agreed to make pledges."
According to Lieberman, the
campaign at the University of
Miami began with a barbeque in-
tended for recruiting workers.
The campaign workers, having
been trained by UJA professional,
are conducting face-to-face and
telephone solicitations with their
piers. In addition, group solicita-
tions are being conducted at each
of the university's fraternities ane
sororities. The campaign at the
University of Miami will end
March 1 with a party for those
who have made gifts to the
campaign.
Nobil said that "As the future
leaders of Greater Miami's Jewish
community, students need to get
inolved by both working for the
Federation and making pledges.
Federation is the vehicle through
which we'll be able to have the
most effective and positive in-
fluence on this Jewish community.
It is important for us for we
who care about our Jewishness
to pave the way for the future
strength of the Jewish
community."
Chairmen of the UJA/Federation campaigns at college campuses
recently participated in a mission to Israel intended to help
prepare them for the campaigns, which are currently in progress.
Seen atop Massada were: (left, to right) Elissa Lieberman, Annie
Malka, Steve Nobil, Wendy Glass, Rabbi Mark Kram and Mindy
Kram.
Agudath Israel To Present Yiddish Film
Agudath Israel Hebrew In- The Congregation will present
stitute Miami Beach, will feautre the Yiddish film, "Mirele Efros,"
Cantor Benzion Miller, who will w,"> Berta Gersten and Michael
render the liturgical service on Rosenberg m the portrayal of a
Saturday, at 8:30 a.m. female "King Lear" with subtitles
on Thursday Feb. 20 at 7 p.m.
SANITARY FISH MARKET
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Just when District 104 needs her!
She's an effective, experienced legislator
who doesn't need any on-the-job training!
Elaine BLOOM is endorsed by:
AFL-CIO of South Florida
United Teachers of Dade/T.I.G.E.R.-C.O.P.E.
Dade County Police Benevolent Association

L. Jules Arkin
Jonathan Beloff
Richard Berkowitz
Benjamin Botwinik
Mayor Steve Clark
Jack Chester
Sidney Cooperman
Arthur Courshon
Myra Farr
George Feldenkreis
Clara Fisher
Gary Gerson
Peter Goldring
Rep. Elaine Gordon
Lila G. Heatter
Belle Jurkowitz
Neisen O. Kasdin
Lillian Kronish
Congressman Bill Lehman
David Nevel
Arthur Pearlman
Aaron Podhurst
Gerald K. Schwartz
Max Serchuk
Dorothy Serotta
Louella Shapiro
Harry B. Smith
Dr. Garth R. Thompson
Eric Turetsky
Debbie Wernick
. and hundreds of others!
On March 4th, we can vote for Elaine Bloom
in this special election. She is returning to elected
office to fill the leadership role of Barry Kutun.
In her four years as our full-time state represen-
tative, Elaine Bloom achieved more than many
legislators accomplish in an entire career.
Over 30 bills authored by Elaine Bloom were
passed into Florida law during those four years.
They range in subject matter from the economy to
education, from senior citizen concerns to family
law and the criminal justice system.

Special
) POL. ADV.
For a Ride to the Polls, Call Bloom Headquarters: 534-4888
Punch
\


Fairp 1K-A 'I'ho .......>> b'l~~<4;----;rJ I*-'-----

Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Legal Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-1991* CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
J, 1. KIS1.AK
MORTGAGE CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
JUAN L MEZA,
et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: JUAN L MEZA and ROSY
MEZA. his wife. Av 27 de
Febrero 259-Piantini. Santo
Domingo. Dominican
Republic
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 3-K in BRICKELL
HARBOUR
CONDOMINIUM the
Declaration of which
was filed February 29.
1980 under Clerk's File
No. 80R-58564 and in
Official Records Book
10674. Page 717. of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
together with an
undivided interest in
the common elements
appurtenant thereto set
forth in said
Declaration,
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Sheppard Faber.
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables,
Florida S3146 on or before March
14. 1986 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 10th day of
February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19608 February 14. 21.28;
March 7. 1986
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Rep. Elaine Gordon to Receive
'Celebration of Women' Award
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
More than 250 people will be in
attendance when State Rep.
Elaine Gordon receives the 1986
"Celebration of Women" Award
of the South Florida Council of
Na'amat U.S.A., the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America, on Sunday.
Florida State Senator Jack D.
Gordon (Dem.-Miami Beach) will
be the principal speaker honoring
Rep. Gordon, Speaker Pro Tem-
pore of the Florida House of
Representatives.
The noon luncheon at the
Konover Hotel, is open to the
public, but reservations are
required.
The luncheon is one of several
being held in major American
Jewish communities around the
nation honoring outstanding
women in each area.
The South Florida Council of
Na'amat U.S.A. includes 18 clubs
in South Florida, 12 of which are
based in Miami Beach.
Members of the luncheon com-
mittee include chairperson Felice
P. Schwartz, hostess chairpersons
Elaine Gordon
Lillian Hoffman and Shirley Part-
ner, ticket chairpersons Leah
Benson and Veda Gruber, reser-
vations chairpersons Vera Gorfine
and Dora Halpern, and decora-
tions chairpersons Margot
Bergthal and Lillian Davis.
Greater Miami JCCs Win
Communication Awards
The Jewish Community Centers
uf Greater Miami have won six
awards in the 1986 JWB Biennial
Communications Awards Com-
petition, it has been announced by
Alvin L. Gray, of Cleveland, chair-
man of JWB's Communications
Committee. This is the largest
number of awards won by a single
communal agency, he said.
"There were 334 entries from
90 Jewish Community Centers
and 11 military installations,"
Gray announced. "This was the
largest and most enthusiastic
competition in JWB's history.
"This is a genuine tribute to all
entrants for the justifiable pride
they have in their Jewish com-
munities, both in the Jewish Com-
munity Center sector and in the
military."
A delegation from Miami will at-
tend the JWB Biennial, to take
place April 9-13 at the Sheraton
Convention Centre in Toronto.
In the area of Best Multi-Media
Presentations, the Greater Miami
JCC won in Category A for "A
Special Place" and its Miami
Beach JCC won in Category D for
its videotape, "Israel's 36th Birth-
day." "A Special Place" pro-
moted the JCC program which
airs over Jewish Federation Cable
TV. Categories were set accor-
ding to Center budgets.
In the Best Public Service An-
nouncements area, the Greater
Miami JCC won for its PSA, "A
Center for Jewish Life, and the
Miami Beach JCC won for
"Israel's 36th Birthday."
In the area of Best Special
Events Promotions, the Michael-
Ann Russell JCC won for its pro-
motion of its cultural arts pro-
tgram that featured the klezmer
j musician Giora Feidman.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC
Vandals
Arrested
Miami Beach detectives ar
[rested the thieves who broke into
land vandalized the Hebrew
[Academy on the weekend of Jan.
|81-Feb. 2.
The perpetrators were two
youths, a 14 and a 15 year old boy,
*ho said they broke in "for the
an of it."
The youths, who stole valuables
nd vandalized computer equip-
t, classrooms and lockers,
Irere taken to Youth Hall and
vere charged with burglary,
Criminal mischief, and theft.
also won in the Best Special Pro-
motional Materials division for the
way it promoted its membership
saturation campaign.
"The Jewish Community
Center," Gray said, "is an ideal
voluntary setting for Jewish
education programs, among other
things. It is also particularly at-
tractive as a 're-entry' point into
the Jewish community for persons
who are otherwise not identified
with anything Jewish.
"The enhancement of the image
of the JCC in the Jewish com-
munity and its importance to
Jewish life is vital. This the JWB
Communications Awards Com-
petition has accomplished."
Neal J. Menachem is president
of the Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami. Elton Kerness
is executive director. Bonnie
Reiter is director of public
relations.
Na'amat U.S.A.
"Na'amat U.S.A.," is the topic
of Shirley Bogen's talk at the
regular meeting of the Na'amat
U.S.A. Kinneret Chapter at noon
on Monday, in the Social Hall at
Temple Ner Tamid.
Bogen, from New York, is vice
president of the Brooklyn Council
of Na'amat U.S.A. and a former
national board member. She will
discuss Na'amat U.S.A.
Rita Adoff, president of the Kin-
neret Chapter, said there will be
entertainment performed by well-
known musician Michael Skorr,
who sings and plays the cordovox.
A musical program will be
featured at the Na'amat U.S.A.
Chai Chapter meeting at 1 p.m.
Monday, at the Jefferson Hotel.
The musical program will be
presented by Sonia and Harry
Fox, Rose Gershen, Rebecca
Horowitz, Gertrude Mintz, Max
Griedman, and Tille and Sol
Winnick.
CAJE Lecture
Schedule
Central Agency for Jewish
Education will continue its
Spiritual Giants of the Past lec-
ture series with a discussion of Gi-
deon on Wednesday, at 10:30 a.m.
at the Miami Beach Public
Library.
Rabbi David Saltzman, spiritual
leader of Aventura Jewish Center
will speak.
On Thursday, Miles Bunder,
director of the department of
Synagogue Schools of CAJE will
review the book, "A Certain Peo-
ple," by Charles Silberman at the
Miami Beach Library at 1:30 p.m.
"New Approaches in Teaching
the Bible," will be the subject of a
Hebrew Lecture in the forthcom-
ing session of the Moadon Ivri,
Hebrew Cultural Forum on Tues-
day, at 1:30 at the Library. Mr.
Baruch Kaizler, instructor in the
high school department of the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy will speak.
Ensign Bank Announces
Promotions Of Jeffrey J. Kramer,
And Robert D. Jacoby
An appointment and a promotion was announced by Alan E.
Master, President and Chief Executive Officer of Ensign Bank,
FSB.
Jeffrey J. Kramer has been appointed to head up the Bank's
Commercial Lending Division, succeeding John Gilpatric, who is
now functioning as Senior Vice President for Administration in
the Office of the President.
"Part of Mr. Kramer's mandate in heading up the commercial
loan operation will be to broaden our portfolio base and to
strengthen its identity by focusing on lending to certain key in-
dustries," noted Master in announcing the appointment. "Mr.
Kramer, for instance, has considerable experience in lending to
the jewelry and women's accessories industry, and we hope that
Ensign can profit from his contacts and expertise in that area."
In addition, Mr. Kramer will strive to establish contact with
other local and regional banks in order to pool resources to create
greater lending power, Master noted.
Prior to joining Ensign, Kramer served as Vice President, Cor-
porate Lending Jewelry Group for the New England-based
Fleet National Bank and was a Commercial Lending Officer for
Bank Leumi, New York City. He holds a BA and an MA in
political Science from St. John's University.
At the same time, Robert D. Jacoby has been promoted to
Senior Vice President, Consumer Lending at Ensign, where he
will oversee all consumer lending activities in new York and
Florida, including the Bank's highly-successful Home Equity
Loan Program. (HELP)
"We are putting a primary emphasis on developing our com-
sumer lending operations. Today's healthy economy, coupled with
low interest rates, means that there is far greater disposable in-
come for purchases. This, in turn, enhances the willingness for
consumer borrowing. It is Mr. Jacoby's mission to ensure that the
consumer loan products and services we offer are very well suited
to meet out customer needs," Master said in announcing the
promotion.
Mr. Jacoby formerly served as Vice President at Ensign.
Before joining the Bank, he served as a Credit Executive with
Norstar Bank.
M ANTELL PLAZA
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Pool
255 24 St., Miami Beach
Ph: 538-1821
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//
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Two meals daily in the Orchid Room.
Maid service.
Activities and social events.
Near Aventura Mall.
No endowment or entrance fees.
For more information call 935-1801 or send coupon to
Port Sonata: 2751 N.E. 183rd St.. North Miami Beach, PL 33160
MODEL APARTMENT OPEN
18405 BISCAYNE BLVD.
(Near Bltcayne fc 183rd Street)
Port Sonata.... Created for the upscale,
mobile, independent well-elderly. A unique
concept in housing offers rentals combined with
a lifestyle of elegance and carefree living.
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. .*"'
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Israel Bonds To Bonor Couple
From Burleigh House
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Max and
Sarah Gleiberman of Miami Beach
during a "Night in Israel"
celebration on Sunday, Feb. 23 in
the Social Hall of Burleigh House.
The festivities will begin at 7:30
p.m. The Gleibermans are being
recognized with the Israel
Freedom Award for their
dedicated and devoted service to
numerous philanthropic organiza-
tions, as well as to the economic
development of Israel through the
Israel Bond program.
Gleiberman is involved with
many Jewish agencies in both
Miami and New York. He served
as secretary of the Workman's
Circle for 21 years in New York,
where he was also a member of
the Jewish Center of University
Heights and Young Israel of New
Rochelle. As a Yiddish teacher, he
has devoted much of his life to the
promotion of the Yiddish
language and today serves as co-
chairman of the YTVO Committee
of Greater Miami and as a national
board member of the Jewish
Labor Committee.
He and his wife, Sarah, are
dedicated members of the Israel
Histadrut Councils of South
Florida and of the Ohev Shalom
Max and Sarah Gleiberman
Congregation. Seven perpetual
funds and annual scholarships
established by the Gleibermans
have assured the continued educa-
tion of hundreds of Israeli youths.
Guest speaker will be George
Flesch, a founder of the Jewish
State and a member of the first
Knesset He has served Israel in
numerous capacities as a member
of the Foreign Affairs and
Defense Committee and is con-
sidered one of the nation's top
authorities in foreign affairs.
Acting as Chairman is Moe
Kossar, with David Greenberg,
co-chairman.
Israel Bonds To Recognize
Couple At El Conquistador
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Jerome
and Eleanor Drew of Miami dur-
ing a special "Night in Israel"
celebration on Saturday, at the El
Conquistador Club House. The
festivities, open to the public, will
begin at 7:30 p.m.
The Drews are being recognized
with the Israel Freedom Award
for their dedicated and devoted
service to numerous philanthropic
organizations, as well as to the
State of Israel Bond Organization.
A charter member of the Elec-
trical Industrial Lodge of the
B'nai B'rith, Drew has served as
its president and financial securi-
ty. He is also an Associate
Member of Hadassah and
treasurer of El Conquistador's
Young at Heart group.
His wife, Eleanor, is a member
of the Jewish Community Center
and the Gallon Club of Florida. A
Life Member of Hadassah, she is a
member of the Kinneret Chapter,
where she has served as president
and fund-raising vice president.
She is also active with the Sunny
Seniors of Temple Israel and the
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Drew
American Cancer Society.
The Drews are members of
Temple Samu-El.
Guest speaker at the event,
sponsored by the El Conquistador
State of Israel Bond Committee,
will be Jerome Gleekel, a Mid-
East expert and political scientist.
Chairing the "Night in Israel"
celebration is Max Shaw.
Honorary chairman is Joseph
Fleekop. Co-chairmen are Julius
Bloom, Ernest Cheraoff, William
Gabeloff, Anthony D. Panaccio
and Alvin Schainholtz.
Orthodox Rabbis Conduct Seminar
-.
The Max Stern Division of Com-
munal Services (MSDCS) of the
Yeshiva University-affiliated Rab-
bi Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary (RIETS) in New York
City, is sponsoring a one-day
seminar at which leading or-
thodox rabbis from the southeast
will meet in Miami Beach to
discuss many issues confronting
the rabbinate including, "The
Jewish Family in Crisis."
The Wednesday seminar will be
hosted by Rabbi Amram
Amselem, spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Moses, where the seminar will
beheld.
Speakers for the event will in-
clude: Rabbi Yaakov Sprung, and
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro for die
first session chaired by Rabbi
Howard Messinger.
Rabbi Edward Davis, Dr.
Wallace Greene and Rabbi
Menachem Raab will include those
speaking at the second session,
chaired by Rabbi Simcha
Freed man.
The lunch session will feature
Rabbi Pinchas Weberman, who
will deliver a D'var Torah;
Michael Kanner, MD; and Rabbi
Milton Polin. Rabbi Barry
Konovitch will chair the luncheon.
In the afternoon, Rabbi Warren
Kasztl, Rabbi David Lehrfield;
and Arnold Feiner, PhD; will
speak. Rabbi Solomon Schiff will
chair the meeting, Rabbi Mark
Dratch will chair a shiur by Rabbi
Herahel Schachter, who is coor-
dinator of the event.
Barbara Leslie
Barbara Leslie To
Speak At
NCJW Feb. 20
National Council of Jewish
Women, Greater Miami Section
will hold it's Section Membership
meeting on Thursday, Feb. 20, at
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Auditorium, 10 am. to 12:30
p.m. Barbara Leslie is the
featured speaker.
In her capacity as UN Observer
fo NCJW, Ms. Leslie was involved
with the UN Decade for Women,
serving as a delegate to both the
Mid-Decade Conference in
Copenhagen in 1980 and the End
of Decade Conference in Nairobi
in 1985.
An active proponent of equal op-
portunity for women on a
worldwide basis, Ms. Leslie has
written articles on that subject for
both national and international
publications. She has also spoken
on many topics including the
political, social, and economic
aspects of the UN and its
specialized agencies; she also lec-
tures on Women's issues. Her au-
diences have been in countries on
five continents, including
Australia, New Zealand, France,
Belgium, Denmark, Israel, and
the United States.
Ms. Leslie is currently the vice
president of the International
Council of Jewish Women (ICJ W),
a volunteer service organization
with affiliate groups in 35 coun-
tries. National Council of Jewish
Women is the largest associate
group of the million members in
the U.S.
Kleinberg To
Speak At JCC
Simcha-Aventura Lodge of
B'nai B'rith will hold a breakfast
meeting on Sunday, at 10 a.m. at
the Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center. Howard
Kleinberg, editor of the Miami
News and a member of the
Associated Press Managing
Editors Association, will speak.
His main topic will be, "The
Jews in the Media." However, in
addition, Mr. Kleinberg will speak
on the Middle-East and will hold a
question and answer discussion
period after his primary talk, ac-
cording to Irving Stessel, presi-
dent of the lodge.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
INSURANCE HOSPITAL
Medicare Participating
Insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participation
ALLAN WOLPOWITZ. M.D.
3427 Johnson Street
Hollywood. Florida 33021
Memorial
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305) 962-5400
New Standard Of Service Set With
Opening Of Claridge House
Nursing And Rehabilitation Center!
Claridge House, a new nursing and rehabilitation center, has
opened in Miami.
' The newly built facility provides both short and long term care
as well as rehabilitation services. Distictively and graciously
decorated, Claridge House also offers a complete, strictly super-
vised, Kosher Kitchen.
"At Claridge House, we are commited to providing quality care
in a home-like and attractive enviroment," explained Ad-
ministrator Larry Mankoff.
The facility also offers special recreation areas, patients
lounges, and some suites. Staff members include qualified RN'g,
dietitians physical therapists, social workers amd many others to
help give special attention to Claridge House residents.
"Actually, staying at Claridge House is not unlike staying at a
fine hotel the difference is our dedicated team of medical pro-
fessionals," said Mankoff.
He added, "the facilities, service and even the food were plann-
ed with our own families' needs in mind."
Claridge House is located at 13900 NE Third Court in North
Miami.
For more information about Claridge House or a free informa-
tional brochure, call 893-2288 and ask for Beverly Gordon.
JCC to Present 'Sorcerer's Apprentice'
"Sorcerer's Apprentice and
Other Magical Tales" is presented
by the Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami, South Dade
Center, Kaleidoscope-A Young
Show-Goers Series. The magical
production, is by two-time Emmy
Award winner Marshall lien. Tlw
performance will be held at ti*
Miami Senior High School
Auditorium, on Monday, 11 am.
and 1 p.m.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads got response! Cost li
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Florldian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Blond, handsome Latin Jewish gentleman, 31 yaars,
atrigle, professional and cheerful nefci serious American
Jewish lady max. 33 years for stable relationship.
Marriage possible. Please send biography and photo-
raph. Write Box BH c/o Jewish Florldian. P.O. Box
12973, Miami. Fla. 33101.
I
Active lady, 65 + seeks senior gentleman with sense
of humor. I need companion for movies, theater, beach,
quiet times. I am 5 feet 2 Inches, 130 lbs. Write to Box
25423, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33321.
Good-looking Michigan Jewish bachelor of good
means wishes to meet nice, tall, good looking middle
aged woman for marriage. Owns home end has no
dependants. Write Q1033 Balmoral Pfcwy., Flint,
Michigan 48504.
Israel postage stamp deeler, childless, widower age
72, 5 5' tall, Dietary Laws observer, Zionist, wishes to
meet attrective ledy age 6265, 5'3" or taller, for serious
?,atin*h,D- Wrtle to HR c/o Jewieh Florldian, P.O.
Box 012973. Miami, Fla. 33101.
Jewish Singles South, a social group for adults 35 and
older will hold e Washington's Birthday Ball on
SSflfi y*afc F- 22 et 8 et the Ramblewood
condominium Clubhouse In Kendale Lakes. For
information call 258-3264.
Part?*in,.?,nQ,M hav,nfl Outetandlno Singly
^ffSfffiJS^ P= 3 thenD.p.om.t


Friday, February 14,1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Moreover thou, shall make the tabernacle with ten curtains"
(Exodus 96.1).
. "And thou shall hang up the veil under the clasps, and shall
ing in thither within the veil the ark of the testimony"
(Exodus t6.SS).
TERUMAH
5 RUM AH The children of Israel were asked for an offering
ward the construction of the Tabernacle and its vessels: "Gold,
id silver, and brass; and blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine
len, and goats' hair; and rams' skins dyed red, and sealskins,
id acacia-wood; oil for the light, spices for the anointing oil, and
>r the sweet incense, onyx stones, and stones to be set, for the
hod, and for the breastplate" (Exodus 25.3-7. The ark was to be
ie of acacia-wood, covered inside and out with gold. The table
was to be made of acacia-wood. There were to be a golden
ndelabra, a tent of curtains and boards, outer curtains and in-
er curtains, and an altar of acacia-wood, covered with copper.
Finally, the construction of the court-yard of the Tabernacle was
escribed.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of ttie Law Is extracted and based
on "The Graphic History of too Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
mlr, fit. published by Shengold The volume Is available at 7j Maiden
me, Now York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society dis
Ibuting the volume.)
Elaine Bloom Seeks To
in Vacated House Seat
her mission to return to of
as a State Representative,
Be Bloom has won the official
ement of three of South
^ida's political organizations.
ithin the past week, Bloom
eived formal notification of
M-sement by the AFL-CIO of
Ith Florida, the United
lere of Dade (TIGER-COPE)
the Dade County Police
evolent Association.
im, a two-term veteran
glator who served in the
pda House of Representatives
1974 till 1978, seeks to win
it vacated by Barry Kutun,
[resigned on New York's Eve
for Governor.
service as a legislator was
hted by authorship of more
[80 bills which are now law in
la, and chairmanship of two
' committees: the Joint Com-
on Economic Policy and
House Federal-State Ap-
ations Committee.
1978, Bloom has con-
! actively in public service as
rernmentaJ relations consul
(for the Florida Association of
|sh Federations and the
Protestant Appeal. Her
sntials also include numerous
i on the boards of directors of
ater Miami Jewish Federa-
| the Greater Miami Chamber
Mnmerce, the presidency of
National Council of Jewish
en, and a host of other civic
[community roles. She was
founding chairperson of the
County Commission on the
Status of Women. Bloom is the
wife of Circuit Court Judge Philip
Bloom.
The special election for the
District 104 seat takes place on
Tuesday, March 4. As it is the only
contest on that date, a low voter
turn-out is projected. The district
involves 28 precincts; 23 of which
are in Miami Beach proper.
Bloom's campaign is co-chaired
by a committee including Harry
B. Smith, Gary Gerson, Martin
Fine, Arthur Courshon, Myra
Farr, Richard Berkowitz and Eric
(Ricky) Turetsky.
Daniel Schorr To
Speak At Attorneys
Division Dinner
Daniel Schorr, described as
"maybe the best television
newsman in the field today" by
William Safire and one of
America'!, most honored names in
print journalism, will be guest
speaker at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Attorneys
Division annual dinner, to be held
Thursday, March 13, announced
Division Chairman Amy Dean.
According to Charles Citrin and
Gerald K. Schwartz, co-chairmen
of the event, Schorr's discussion
should be of particular interest to
attorneys, as his career has been
an extraordinary victory of First
Amendment rights to freedom of
speech and the press.
Jewish Day School and
Synagogue School Teacher
jht for exciting poisition in vibrant Midwestern city.
Jld possess a bachelor's degree in education (pref er-
elementary), a B.H.L. or equivalent, and fluency in
>raw. Highly competitive salary and excellent fringe
lafits. Sand resume with references to:
Dr. Jonathan Rosenbaum,
Bureau of Jewish Education,
333 South 132nd Street,
Omaha, Nebraska 68154
Are You Single?
Do You Play Golf?
456-2828
Pachter Siegel
BarI Bat Mitzvah
BRIAN PACHTER
Brian Gilbert Pachter, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Irvin (Honey)
Pachter will be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday at
9:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Brian is a seventh grade honor
student at Ransom School. He is
an avid sports enthusiast, enjoy-
ing football, soccer and tennis.
Brian has received many
awards for his academic and
athletic prowess including the
Presidential Academic Fitness
Award and the American Legion
Physical Fitness Award. He was
named Best Camper at Camp Blue
Ridge in 1985.
A party in Brian's honor will
take place Saturday evening at
Temple Emanu-El.
Many relatives and friends will
be coming from out of town to
help celebrate this happy occasion
including Israel, Maryland and
New York.
JUSTIN SIEGEL
Justin Siegel, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Julian Siegel will become a
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth
Moshe on Saturday. Rabbi Israel
Jacobs will officiate and Hazzan
Moshe Friedler will chant the Sab-
bath Liturgy.
Justin is a 7th grade student at
Lear's School. He excels in all
sports.
In Justin's honor his parents
will sponsor the kiddush following
the services in the Clara and
Seymour Smoller Ballroom and in
the evening a reception at Mayfair
House in the Grove.
Honored guests will be friends,
Myra Topf from Israel, Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Vosko from Montreal
and Mr. and Mrs. Sol Zuckerman
from Montreal.
JESSICA WALLACE
Jessica Wallack daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Mark K. Wallack will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah at Shabbat Services on Satur-
day at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbis Leon Kronish, Gary
Glickstein, Harry Jolt and Paul
Caplan will officiate.
Jessica is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5748.
SHARON CLAYMAN
Sharon Clayman, daugh' r of
Marilyn Clayman and Dr. henry
Clayman will become a Bat Mitz-
vah at Temple Beth Moshe on Fri-
day night. Rabbi Israel Jacobs will
officiate and Hazzan Moshe
Friedler will chant the liturgy.
Sharon is a 7th grade student at
North Miami Junior High, good in
all sports.
In Sharon's honor her parents
will sponsor the Oneg Shabbat
following the service in the Clara
and Seymour Smoller Ballroom
and a reception Saturday evening
at the Cricket Club.
Honored guests will be Aunts
and Uncles Doris and Alex
Clayman from London, England
and Muriel Campaglia from
Washington, D.C.
FOR SALE
Tower 41. Beautiful apartment
lor sale one bedroom, furnished
or unfurnished one-hall bath
room. Mortooge tW% 17 floor
beautiful view. Tel.
538-6867
T
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:54 p.m.
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
FrL p.m. Loul> Mertzer, praeMent of UnrkM
Synagogue, SE Region will uxit
Sat 1:30 a.m. Bar Mrtzveh. Seth bamsky.
So vie l Twin. MntheM Boneovlton Raft man
TEMPLE BETH AM
9M0 N. Kendall Or.
s Miami nr-mn
rjr. Herbert Beumoeid
tenlor Rabbi
James L Simon. Associate Rabbi
Frl. *1 S p.m. RaoM Sknan wM apeak on the
subject, "loee and Dearth Learning
Mow to Orleve "
Sat 11:15 a.m. Bat Mltxvehe, Ceren Penman
paid Kefany KaoMien. The eermon theme
will be. "And This Is the Pattern"
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
262SS.W. 3rd Avenue
Or. Sol Landeu, .\
Rabbi EmarituB (W)
Rev. Milton Freeman, x ~
Ritual Diractor
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
fWjttr
Set.9a.m.MtnchatiBp.m
rjaltyServlcee Sunday a e.m. end*: 10p.m.,
McvdeyervaTrjrsdayet 7:10 ajn. and Jop.m.
and Tueedey. Wednesday end Friday at
7:48 am. and(.10p.m. RabbiFannerwW
officiate, etong wllli guoot center, Zvi
Rozon trom Johannoeburg, South Atrlca
BETH KODESH
1101 S.W. 12 Ave. .
Rabbi Max Shapiro BSS-S334
Canlor Joeaph Krtaaat
ritnTExecuttve Secretary
Bat. :* a.m. Rabbi Shapiro
ajMcuee, Aibsbjocsj e'
toiaiinjipoidtu
Washington's birthdays. Cantor
Krleael wto chant The eduH series cow
on Sundey mornings at B-.JO a.m.
(f)
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami, FL SHS1
91-5506 Conservative
Dr Israai Jacobs, Rabbi _
Rabbi Joaaph A Gorflnkai, f\
Rabbi Emaritus *%'
Mtiln Frtadfaf, Cantor
Frl. Bat Mitzvah. Sharon dayman.
Sst 10 45 s.m. Rabbi Jscobs sermon.
improving the Eatorter Can Mend interior
Ber Mitzvah Justin Siegel
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S4S Jefferson Ava.. M.B.. FL 33138
Tal. 52*4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mssssr
Cantor Niaaim Banyamtni
Dally eervlceei am 8 5 JO p.m Bat llli.m.
Rabbi's dsseee Monday Advsnoed Hebrew
110 a m Tuee Enghoh Btbte Class 8:48 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
230-2001 ,
Rabbi DavM H. Auerbech .%/
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Metsels
Shabbat Services Frl .8 p.m BetBJO s m
liberal
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 534 7231
ChaaaAve .a41etSt.
DR. LEON KRONlSrl, F
OART A. QLICKSTON.
HARRY JOLT, AMaty RaMM
PAUL D. CAPLAN, Aaeietant Rabbi
CANTOR DAVID CON WISER
F.I 1:15 p.m Rabbi Olleaeletn will speak on.
"BuWo^va Sanctuaries end Making Ottering*
Set 10:45 a.m. Bat MHzveh. Jeeslca Wallack
Cantor Convteot wMI chant.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION M7-752I
1051 N. Miami Beech Blvd.
Or. Max A. Lipschttz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Arooi, Cantor
Harvay L. Brown, Exec. Oirector
Oairy services, Monday Thursday
7:JO a.mend 8: JO pm "
'hursday /&.
7:J0s.m.S1Sp.m .and 8 p.m.: yZt.'
Saturday 8 28 a.m. and S p.m Sunday a.m
end S JO p.m. Fit. Sat Mitzvah Monk* Mayer.
Sat. Bar Mltxveh Adam grant_______
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534 7213-534 7214 _
Barry J. Konovltch. Rabbi '*.
Mosne Buryn. Cantor >.? /
Sargio Groblar, Presidant
Sholam Epalbaum, Presidant.
Raligious Committee
fJaSJaSj Service t: jo a.m.
Sermon tO: JO
Defty Hkiyao
TEMPLE EMANU-EL ^_
1701 Washington Avanua f >
Miami Beech vf'
Dr. Irving Lahrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bargar
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Miurlca Klain. Ritual Diractor
Oerald Taub. Exacutiva Diractor
Frt. t p.m Or. Lehrman will preech on, "Love
Thy Neighbor As Thyself." In honor o(
Brotherhood Night.
Sat. I a.m. the RaoM arM preeoh on the weekly
portion ot the BKXa
Bar Mitzvah, Brian Qilbert
Canlor Shltman will chant at both services.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
SSavBfl WBBBai aabwa Caagrigstiew
137 NE. Itth St.. Miami. S73-SSOO
9090 N. Kendall Dr.. 5*5-5055
.Senior Rabbi Heefcetf Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex 0. Perimetar
Cantor Jacob Q. Bornatein
Aaaociete Cantor RecheBs F. Watson
Exacutiva Diractor Philip S Gc4dn
Otoector of Education
And Programming Jack L. Spark j
Frl s p.m.: Downtown, Raobl Bemet. Cantor
Nelson, and Dr^ack t-Baarka will conduct
iducators' taboath "
PfBaTlfSMMjaX IfafHI BOtMIK Ofl,
Cantor Boms lain will chant.
Kendall, Rabbi
Loving Advtoe
TEMPLE JUOEA
5500 Granada Brvd
Coral Pastes 667-5857
Michael B. Etoonetat. Rabbi
FrWaiy BetvioeeS:16 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal 534-9776
DR DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoeheneh Maas. Cantor
Ftt.
Sat e-SO
TEMPLE
620-75th St,
Rabbi Mayor
Cantor Money
ktl
Saturdeyt
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7002 Cartyta Ava..
Miami Beech 29141
Rabbi Eugene Lebovftz
r Edward
Cantor I
vardKtetn
Dally Servtcee I a.m end : JO p.m.
SlIIUlK
Frl.lsteeerv.Bpjn
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382 0898
Rabbi Warren KaSZtl Modem Orthodoi
RabtM Kasztl wW temoersrWy conduct
separats servtcee Sat. fhJO a.m. at Temp
Samu-EI, tJM S.W 1 Wnd Ava..
eouth or N Kendall Drive
TEMPLE StNAJIBBOlINE22Ava.
North OeMJoj* n#fuiMi Conaraoctton
Ralph P. Ktngslay, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shutkes. Canlor
Barbara S. Ramsey. Administrator
inniprn RabW Klngatey will narrate prayer
pertleoe os the vacfia Secvtce ol Emoat
Btooh. Cantor SfaavbM HM ohent eieng
with Nova Unrveralty Singers and
TeaewtoCvtotr
Sat BarMHzveh.OerrenMorfb
get
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Or. Conservative
2712311 .
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi (
Beniamin Adler. Cantor
David Rosenthat. Auxiliary Cantor
Frl. tl S p.m Or. Shapiro will ofttciato and
Cantor Adtor aaW chant.
Sat. B am Mmyan Servtoas Mondays and
Thursdays 7 am and Sundays S a.m


Macro 1M-A
>k fc,l~:j;.'E':->--- t^.v.
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
CAMPS & TEEN TOURS
Pat Horowitz
Referral Services
Free information and consulta-
tion are available to help you
select the most appropriate camp
experience for your child. The ser-
vice represents fine camps in all
locations, price ranges and
categories, general, sports,
drama, weight loss, tennis, music,
art, computer and teen tours.
Blue Ridge
Blue Ridge Camp and Resort
located in Mountain City, Georgia
offers camping experiences for
boys and girls ages 6 to 16.
Activities range from water
sports at the camps twin spring
fed lakes, white water rafting,
water skiing, rappelling, aerobics,
tennis, arts and crafts, sailing,
hockey, science programs, com-
puters, soccer, rollerskating and
many more.
The camp has a complete
medical staff available at all
times. All dietary laws are observ-
ed and the camp provides Shabbat
Services.
New Jersey
YMHA-YWHA Camps
The YMHA-YWHA Camps
located at Milford, Pa., offers
1200 acres, three lakes, athletics,
tennis, gymnastics, scuba diving,
astronomy, horseback riding,
computers, jet skis, Jewish
culture and many many more
activities.
Eight-week sessions are offered
as well as July or August sessions.
"Y" membership is not required
and the camp offers reductions for
siblings.
Pocono Highland
Located high in the heart of the
picturesque Pocono Mountains of
northeastern Pennsylvania at an
elevation of 1850 feet, on a large
private lake with boys and girls
camps at each end. Campers ages
range from 5 to 16.
Pocono Highland offers a wide
range of activities from waterski-
ing, bowling, Dane, English or
Western riding instructions, com-
puters, golf, and many many
more.
The camp has a complete
medical center on grounds staffed
by a rotating practicing physician
in residence and R.N.'s. Separate
clinics, private rooms and special
diet kitchen. County hospital
nearby.
The camps offer a truly fun fill-
ed summer adventure.
Israel Friendship
The Israel Friendship Camp,
which brings together North
American and European youth
with young Israelis for a unique
cultural exchange, announces its
third summer session in Israel.
The camp accepts students from
grades 7-11.
The camp's program involves
intensive interaction with Israelis
of all sorts. Joining the 100
campers from North America and
Europe are 50 Israeli teenagers.
The group spends a month and a
half living side-by-side, sharing
their experiences from their
respective cultures. This sharing
forms lasting bonds. In a further
interaction of cultures, campers
spend a weekend with Arab
families in nearby communities.
The Israel Friendship Camp
takes a pluralistic approach to the
religious experience. Oppor-
tunities for traditional observance
are supervised by Rabbi Michael
Paley, director of Hillel at Dart-
mouth College.
The Advisory Service
On Camps And
Private Schools
The Advisory Service
represents many camps in many
parts of the country. Its function
is to analyze the camper's needs
and recommend the summer pro-
gram which best suits each
camper.
Evaluation is possible because
the staff of the Advisory Service
is familiar with different types of
summer programs, facilities and
the calibre of the staff employed
at the camps.
The needs and interest of each
child, the strength of each camp's
program and specialties, and the
means of the parent are all match-
ed by the Advisory Service.
Free consultation services, in-
vestigated summer programs, ex-
tensive file of catalogs are all
available from the service.
Camp Sinai
Camp Sinai offers several pro-
grams from the Parent/Child Pro-
gram, First Timers (9 a.m.-noon),
NEW JERSEY YMHA-YWHA CAMP
.* rV.
AT MILFORD, PA
1200 Acres 3 Lakes Athletics Terms
Gymnastics Swimming Sailing Canoeing
Ads & Crafts Dramatics Pioneering Nature
Photography Horseback Riding Ham
Radio & Broadcasting Professional Staff Jewish
Culture Dietary Laws Group Living & individual
Development Olympic Pool Computers Jet
Skis Scuba Diving Astronomy
INCLUSIVE FEES: 8 wteki $2055
July $1075. Aug $980.
(Reductions lot siblings)
"V" membership is not required.
26.00 surcharge for non-members
CALL BARBARA ZALCBERG at (306) 488-1766
Tiny Tots (9 a.m.-2 p.m.) and of
course Full Day Program (9 a.m.-4
p.m.)
Activities include swimming in-
struction, arts and crafts,
ceramics, field trips, photography,
music, Israeli dancing, sports,
bowling, special camp shows, and
many, many more.
An introduction to computers is
also offered. Younger campers
will learn to operate a computer
and develop familiarity with the
keyboard and play games in the
process. Older campers will be in-
troduced to "Basic," a language
of computer programming. They
will learn to make the computer
respond to their commands and
have fun with their newly ac-
quired skills.
UAHC Camp Coleman
Memorable moments of moun-
tains, valleys, lakes and streams
combined with the rich and varied
programs make this camp far
more than the usual summer cam-
ping experience. Camp Coleman is
located 90 miles north of Atlanta,
Georgia, in the Blue Ridge Moun-
tains. A program to fit every age
from Juniors ages 8-11, Tweens
ages 12-13, Pioneers ages 14-15 is
offered.
Opportunities for creative ex-
pression, through arts and crafts,
dramatics, creative visuals, music,
folk dance, writing and
photography supplement a full
recreational program.
UAHC Camp Coleman is a
Camp-institute serving all of the
Reform Congregations in the
Southeast Region. It provides
both young and old an opportunity
to grow and learn at the same
time.
Camp Wohelo, Comet,
Comet Trails
Girls from seven to 16 will enjoy
the activities, sparkling mountain
air and warm friendly atmosphere
of Camp Wohelo.
Sports such as archery, dance,
ping-pong, baskeball, and track
and field are offered.
Camp Comet, a brother camp to
Camp Wohelo for girls, attract
campers from all over the United
States and from many foreign
countries.
The two camps were the first to
introduce science into an exciting
and worthwhile program with
rocketry, ham radio,
photography, computers and
aerospace.
Comet Trails, for teenage boys,
was started in 1972 in answer to
the need for a special program
and facility that would keep boys
ages 13 through 16 actively in-
terested in camping. Nineteen
tennis courts, two pools, two
lakes, indoor and outdoor basket-
ball courts and frequently planned
social activities keep these
campers active and happy.
CAMPS
and
TOURS
FREE INFORMATION
AND CONSULTATION
Let us help you select the most
appropriate camp experience
for your child. We represent
very fine camps in all locations,
price ranges & categories
general sports drama
weight loss tennis music
art computer teen tours.
PAT HOROWITZ
REFERRAL SERVICES
13919 SW 84 ST.
MIAMI, FL33183
DADE (305) 387-4981
(OUTSIDE DADE CALL COLLECT)
WHICH
PRIVATE
CAMPo
a variety of privets carnr*? *
represent the finest wtom?
every location and prtcsriL j
Our-experience and expend
the campmg field can hefcZ i
choose the appropriate c*rL
your chiW whetner thecZ?,?
"rat, .sports, fser^Z?
mi. theatre, science, wsZZ
MRS. GRACE &TH||
ADVISORY SERVICE
ON CAMPS 4 PRIVATE SOW
P O Bo. 67, Hellandt.. fh u*
:.05) 45--7W9 B.ow0

,CON
'OL.G$?
Our 51st
3Ut Year of Quality Campug .. r~t-ri- t. iHetw*
pr*. foil, aswesasl !** -u w tnu* baasM foci* <
m nUnkUtm. aaiH. .!*. Wwlta. i- rmao in,.. Mi
parMfet
rlialxM
mlUMka.
FOR BROCHURE CALL:
MIAMI OFFICE:
(305) 758 9454
or 858-1190
craft*. rtMDpuiar rlMMidd
CALL COLLECT OR Wim|
Lou Weinberg-Draaj
6528 Castor An
Philadelphia. Pennsylvanu Dill
i215l5lS|
BLUE RIDGE
CAMP and RESORT
For Boys A Girls 6-16
OUR MOUNTAIN OF WVM Where Spring
Comes A Spends the Summer
MOUNTAIN CITY. GEORGIA
Al! Water Sports in Our Own Twin, Spring Fed
Lakes White Water Rafting Water skiing
Rappelling Aerobics Tennis Arts 4 Cratts
Sailing Gymnastics and Dance Go Carts
Rollerskating Computers Rock Climbing
Basketball Soccer Softball Hockey
Zoological & Science Program All Dietary Laws
Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Member American Camping Association
Under the Operation ol
COACH J. I. MONTGOMERY. C.C.D.
MORRIS ft SHEILA W At DM AN
Miami Beach Phone 1 305 538 3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888, Miami Beach, Fla. 33140
STAFF INQUIRIES NOW
CAMP SINAI
brings
SUNSHINE
into your child's llfo this summer
^M,,S,NA,: CAMP DATES
JUNE23-JULY18
JULY21-AUQUST15
Ages 18 months through completion
of 4th grade.
Temple Sinai of North Dade
18801 N.E. 22nd Ave.
North Miami Beach
For Brochure and Information call
932-9010
extended hours for working parents
bus transportation available
on-premise pool
secluded on 13 beautifully
landscaped acres
3 fully equipped playgrounds
large individual air-conditioned roof"
Rldfi^S&SSS^SSSSh ,*"n !" PtVtlcl sducstlon
programming-dram. .225? SI 3* V" ** l"*" Juf",C,a
special art. ft craft* cer!mf/. *,d ft! karat# eiwtlva movement/d.nc.
* BiiS2 M* ome of the many fun things on our
Program for this summer.
Berber. M^fgggS
Artene Lasko. C.mp
Ralph P. kii
Julian I. C
(ingeley,.
took, Associate Rabbi
.


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
.eft to right: Life Chairman
ionja Zuckerman. Ball Chair-
in Kathy Simkins, Interna-
tional Chairman Barry Gibb.
Mr. and Mrs. Abel Holtz
Diabetes Fundraising Ball Set
Miami's first formal fundraising
[event for the Diabetes Research
Institute, A "Red Hot Ball," will
[be held on Saturday evening at 7
|p.m. at the Fontainebleau Hilton
I Hotel, according to Life Chair-
[man. Sonja Zuckerman.
In addition to the dining and
lancing, the evening will feature
Ian auction of an original diamond
and ruby ensemble.
Special recognition will be given
to Mr. and Mrs. Abel Holtz, long
time supporters of the Institute
who were named Honorary Co-
chairmen of the event.
Ball chairmen are Kathy and
Leon Simkins and International
chairmen are Linda and Barrv
Gibb.
Cherrick Speaks At UM
The North-South Center of the
graduate School of International
Studies of the University of Miami
id American Friends of Hebrew
Jniversity will present Dr. Ber-
ird Cherrick, vice president of
the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem, who will speak on
Monday, Feb. 24 at 12:30 p.m. at
the UM Faculty Club.
"Israel: The Reality of the
Dream," will be the subject.
Camp Pine wood
Camp Pinewood is located
>ut one mile east of Henderson
fille, N.C. in a secluded and
ivate wooded domain, in a
Brfect setting on gentle rolling
ireage, 2200 feet above sea level.
Campers will be visiting Ghost
fown, the Fish Hatchery, Sliding
ack, Ruby Mines, Toxaway
falls, Devil's Courthouse, Cradle
' Forestry, Carl Sandburg Home
id Holmes State Forest. In addi-
>n, optional trips are offered to
kiltmore House, Cherokee "Unto
These Hills," Flat Rock
Playhouse, Magic Waters and
Roller Skating.
Camp Pinewood emphasizes
supervision by a conservative
staff -in offering children an ex-
tremely well rounded structured
traditional program. The camp of-
fers over 30 different activites, in-
cluding a brand new Olympic
heated swimming pool, three
water ski boats, lighted tennis
courts, horseback riding. All
cabins have indoor private bath*
-* BLAZING A BRIGHT PATH *
IN CAMPING FOR 58 YEARS ^
*
^95, Comet Trails Wohelo
Brother-Sister Camps, High in the Blue Ridge Mountains
12811 Old Rt. 16, Woynesboro, Pa. 17268
* JOIN US tO* TNI BEST IN SPORTS NATUlf ARTS SCIENCE
Owned & Operated by a Miami Family since 1929
CALL TODAY ... MORGAN I. LEVY, C.C.D. (305) 591 3339
OPEN HOUSE & REUNION ... MARCH 1st...
CALL FOR INVITATION.
Deborah Kaplan
Kaplan To Speak At
Oncology Luncheon
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah announced that Mrs.
Deborah Kaplan will be guest
speaker at the Region's annual
Oncology Research luncheon on
Sunday, Feb. 23 at the Doral
Beach Hotel in the Starlight
Room.
Mrs. Kaplan is national
treasurer of Hadassah, past coor-
dinator for the Education Divi-
sion, and chairman of Special
Events for the Jewish Education
Department.
Mrs. Henrietta London will
chair the event. Mrs. Jean Temkin
is president of the Miami Beach
Region of Hadassah.
Kinneret Chapter of Hadassah
of Kendale Lakes will hold its
regular meeting on Tuesday at
12:30 p.m. at the El Conquistador
Clubhouse. Rabbi Edwin Farber
will speak on Children and
Parents: Their Problems Based on
Biblical Traditions.
On Tuesday, Feb. 25. the
chapter will hold its Youth Aliyah
luncheon at the Coconut Grove
Hotel at noon.
I.R. Goodman Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its regular
meeting on Sunday, at 1 p.m. at
the Hadassah region office on
Miami Beach. Mrs. Elsie Rubin,
program vice-president of the
region will conduct a book review.
On Sunday. Feb. 23, they will
hold a mini-luncheon at Forte
Towers at 12:30 p.m.
UAHC CAMP COLEMAN
Serving Reform Congregations in the Southeast
Boys & Girls Ages 7-15
lin'N
.nn.-rt> Session I: June 22-July 20 Session II: July 21 -August 17
"pnoJo Pull Session: June 22-August 17
Drama
Journalism
Tennis
Racquetball
Arts & Crafts
Computer
Camp-Craft
Backpacking
Canoeing
Sailing
Swimming
Plus many more Exciting Activities
Field Sports
Choir-Guitar
Audiovisual
Radio Station
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Horseback Riding
Located^n the Foothills
of the Georgia
Blue Ridge Mountains
Accredited by the
American Camping Association
Call Ginger at Miami Office
305 592-4792
Community Corner
Yiddish Branch 679. Workmen s Circle will present a
concert-meeting on Sunday. Feb. 23 at 1 p.m. at the
Newport Hotel
Dina Halpern. Yiddisn actress, will be the guest star
of a program featuring selections from Yiddish
literature.
Temple Menorah Sisterhood will hold a regular Torah
meeting on Wednesday, at noon at the Social Hall on
Carlyle Ave. Rabbi Abramowitz and his wife, Dr.
Rachel, will speak and Cantor Yavnes will participate in
the program.
Temple Zamora Sisterhood will hold a luncheon and
card party in honor of Hostess, Rose Shapiro's birthday
at noon on Wednesday, at the synagogue.
South Florida Chug Aliyah Group will hold a meeting
on Sunday at 7:30 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. Ms. Susan Becker, national president of
North American Aliyah Movement, will discuss the
latest information from NAAM headquarters in New
York.
Temple Beth Sholom will present its next "Coffee,
Culture and Conversation" program on Sunday morn-
ing at 10:30 at the synagogue. The film, Hester Street,
will be presented, according to Rabbi Harry Jolt, in
charge of the Adult Education Series at the Temple.
The Meadowbrook Chapter of Hadassah, of North
Miami Beach, is having an Ima luncheon at the Prince
Hamlet Restaurant, Wednesday, March 5 at noon.
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will host
the fifth lecture of the Outstanding Jewish Per-
sonalities of the Hassidic Era on Wednesday morning
at 10:30. Rabbi Meir Felman will speak on the life of
Rabbi Nachman Bratslav and Mrs. Felman will review
the book, "Holy Days The World of a Hassidic
Lubavitcher Family," by Liz Harris.
Beth Israel Congregation will hold the next forum of
the temple's lecture series on Sunday at 10 a.m. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Dr. Max Kirschblum and he will
speak on, "Rabbi Abraham Kuk The Divine
Romanticist." ,
Ohav Shalom Congregation will hold a general
membership meeting on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. at the
synagogue for final nominations and election of of-
ficers. After this meeting, there will be a brief meeting
of the Board of Trustees to elect a new Chairman of the
Board.
Dr. Bernard Cherrick, vice-president of tne Hebrew
University in Jerusalem, will be guest speaker at the
American Friends of Hebrew University, Woman of the
Year Luncheon, honoring Esther Reisel on Thursday,
Feb. 20 at noon in the Doral Beach Hotel. Starlight
Roof, according to Florence D. Feldman, coordinator of
the event.
Chai Chapter of Amit Women will hold an outdoor
flea market at Temple Or Olom every Sunday during the
month of February from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Shoshana Chapter of Amit Women will celebrate
President Rose Shapiro's birthday at a party on Sun-
day, Feb. 23 at the Konover Hotel.
For Children With Minimal Laarning Disabilities
New Jersey YM-YWH A Camps
ROUND LAKE CAMP, Lake Como, Pa.
ENGINEERED ATMOSPHERE FOR SUCCESS WITH ACADEMIC THERAPEUTIC
,E wwJrTSmruiioNAi MM nwMxm, directed by
CERTIFIED SPECIAL EDUCATION SPECIALISTS.
Stress on Individual Growth In Emphasis on Recreation
All Activities JewWjCuNure Dietary
Low Camper to Staff Ratio LawsObeerved
Attend a Camp Presentation Monday, February 24,1986,
7:30 p.m. at Michael-Ann Russell JCC,
18900 NE 25 Ave., North Miami Beach.
For More Information call Gail Adler 651-0746______
naw*r>mauswfl\awaTm\ai\aig\aic
Israel Friendship Camp
and Travel Explorations
Jve, loam, travel and explore In Israel with 160 North American,
Israeli, and European students. The Israel Friendship Camp combines
a unique residential camp program with unusual opportunities for,
travel, study, adventure and cross-cultural experience.

DATE: July 7-August 18,1986
GRADES: 7 through 12
tor more information write.
Inter! ocken
RFD2. Box 165
Hillsboro, NH 0324<
Or call:
603-478-3166


i'I>a l~..~.i. t'l-----:-i-----JKV--J--
Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
J -
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-47170 CA 29
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY,
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff.
v.
YVONNE BOGLE; UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA;
METROPOLITAN DADE
COUNTY, a political subdivision of
the State of Florida; W. PAUL
SMITH, and the unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against him;
MERCY HOSPITAL. INC.. a
Florida corporation; CITY
STORES. INC.. a Delaware
corporation d/b/a/ RICHARDS;
STATE OF FLORIDA.
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR AND
EMPLOYMENT SECURITY.
DIVISION OF LABOR AND
F.MPLOYMENT SECURITY; SY
SIFLINGER; MELISSA FAYE
MAXWELL; MIAMI BEACH
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, a
United States corporation;
HOSPITAL CORPORATION OF
AMERICA d/b/a/ CORAL REEF
GENERAL HOSPITAL, a
Tennessee corporation; HCA
HEALTH SERVICES OF
FLORIDA. INC. a7b/a/ CORAL
REEF GENERAL HOSPITAL
f/k/a MIAMI-DADE GENERAL
HOSPITAL, a Florida
corporation.
Defendants.
To: W. Paul Smith and Melissa
Faye Maxwell, whose
residences are unknown, and
the unknown parties who
may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said
Defendants, who are not
known to be dead or alive.
and all parties having or
claiming to have any right,
title, or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 7, less the East 20 feet
and the East 30 feet of
Lot 8, in Block 23. of
SUNKIST GROVE,
according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 8. at Page 49.
of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you
and you arc required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Barry S. Yarchin,
Esquire, of Rosen trial & Yarchin,
PA., Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite
800. 3050 Biscayne Boulevard.
Miami. Florida 33137, on or before
March 14, 1986, and to file the
>riginal with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
mmediately thereafter; otherwise
i default will be entered against
.ou for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on February 10, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
SWD No 306675- 1-575-S
FHA No. 092-311287-203
19611 February 14,21. 28;
March 7,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
.'ngage in business under the fa-
ctious name Spectrum at 241 23rd
Street Miami Beach. Florida 33139
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
AlanOster
Michael Steen
19604 February 14,21,28;
March 7,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name DORA PALMER in
tends to register said nam with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of]
Dade County, Florida.
Luis O. Argibay
1255 Collins Ave.
Apt. No. 907
Miami Beach, FL 33139
19675 January 31;
February 7,14,21,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-3896 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
PETER STANHAM. et al..
Defendants.
TO: ELIZABETH A. MOLINA
and BEATRIZ DE MOLINA
Avenida Say
Calle 29 Este
No. 29-10
Panama. Republic of Panama
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 1. Block 107. BENT
TREE SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book 103.
at Page 48. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Sheppard Faber.
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables.
Florida 33146 on or before March
14, 1986 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 10th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19609 February 14, 21,28;
March 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-06586 10
NOTICE OF ACTION
(FU. Bar No. 068744)
OLGA M. HERNANDEZ,
Petitioner,
vs.
JESUS HERNANDEZ.
Respondent.
TO: JESUS HERNANDEZ,
Residence Unknown
Last known address:
1857 N.W. 19 Terrace
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on LEON G. NICHOLS. Peti-
tioner's Attorney, whose address
is 8500 W. Flagler Street. Suite
A 107 Miami. Florida 33144, on or
before March 14.1986. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Peti-
tioner's Attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded inthe complaint or
petition.
DATED this 7 day of February,
1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
as Deputy Clerk
19602 February 14. 21.28;
March 7.1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-03258 (26)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
BRANET BRIGNOLLE.
Petitioner,
and
PENELOPE BRIGNOLLE
Respondent.
TO: PENELOPE BRIGNOLLE
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before Feb. 28, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered.
January 24, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Caaamayor
19667 January 31;
February 7. 14,21,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PROFESSIONAL
DENTAL NETWORK at 2550 S.
Dixie Highway, Miami, FL 33133
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dental Management
Group, Inc.
19549 January 31;
February 7,14,21.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LA VOZ DE MIAMI
BEACH NEWSPAPER.
MAGAZINE. DISTRIBUTOR,
MARKETING, PROMOTIONS,
ADVERTISING, at 2899 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33140 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
A. Purrinos
19605 February 14, 21, 28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH. JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-06434(18)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
LAURA ELENA WANG.
Petitioner,
and
KAY WANG YIAU.
Respondent.
TO: KAY WANG YIAU
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MELVIN J. ASHER,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 825 South
Bayshore Drive, Suite 543. Miami,
FL 33131, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 14, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this day of February 7, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19597 February 14,21,28;
March 7, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-478
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BERT C. BATEMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BERT C. BATEMAN. deceas-
ed, File Number 86-478, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (I) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 14, 1986.
Personal Representative:
LENA BATEMAN
1111 Crandon Boulevard
Apartment A1106
Key Biscayne, Florida 33149
ALAN R. LORBER. P.A.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
By: Alan R. Lorber
1111 Lincoln Road, Suite 680
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-1401
19603 February 14.21,1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-02270
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARITZA PRADO.
Petitioner,
and
ALEJANDRO G. PRADO.
Respondent.
TO: ALEJANDRO G. PRADO.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida. 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before February 21. 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 17, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19551 January 24, 31;
February 7, 14. 1986
DN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-02313 CA-22
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
MICHIGAN MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
BARBARA JEAN PACE, et al..
Defendants.
TO: Barbara Jean Pace
323 Noblestown Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15205
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 4 in Block 14 of
WINONA PARK, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 14, at Page 64, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146 on or before
March 14. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney of immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 5th day of
February, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19598 February 14, 21, 28;
March 7. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-06120
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
JUAN JOSE CARPIO.
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARIA S. CHUNN,
Respondent/Wife
TO: MARIA S. CHUNN
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
LEONARDO P. MENDEZ. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 1437 S.W. 1st Street.
Miami. Florida 33135 (305)
649-5486 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 14. 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 5 day of February, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LEONARDO P MENDEZ, ESQ
1437 S.W. 1st Street ^
Miami, Florida 33135
(305) 649-6486
Attorney for Petitioner
19601 February 14,21,28;
March 7, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JIMMY LINARES at
7430 SW 82nd Street, Apt. D-206,
Miami, FL 33143 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SANTIAGO LINARES
MELVIN J. ASHER
Attorney for Owner
825 So. Bayshore Drive
Suite 643
Miami. FL 33131
Tel. 541-2585
19595 February 14. 21.28;
March 7, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nmmber 85-8516
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Martha J. Brown
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Martha J. Brown, deceased. File
Number 85-8516. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Room 307. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (l)all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 14, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Bethany Hughes
P.O. Box SS 6303. Nassau.
Bahamas
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Robert A. Stamen
Packman. Neuwahl & Rosenberg
1500 San Remo Avenue. Suite 200
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
19612 February 14. 21. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-61522 FC-07
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLENDA WILCOX
Petitioner/Wife,
nd
KENNETH WAYNE POPEJOY
a/k/a KENNETH ROSETTI
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr. Kenneth Wayne Popejoy
Route 2. Box 5
Skiatook. Oklahoma 74070
and
Mr. Kenneth Wayne Popejoy
c/o Tulsa Community
Treatement Center
112 East 11th Street
Tulsa. Oklahoma 74119
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Alan H Miller, Esq., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 10700
Caribbean Blvd.. Suite 317. Miami.
Florida 33189, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 14, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 6th day of February 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Alan H. Miller. Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd., Suite 317
Miami, Florida 33189
Telephone: (306) 238-1080
1959U February 14, 21,28;
March 7, 1986
PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS
ANNUAL RETURN 8
The annual return of tht nf^
foundation pnv
THE DR. HERBERT A wP
THEIM FOUNDATION ,P
required to be filed under ^L
6033 Intend Revenue GcT*
available for public inspect*^ *
principal office 4470 SW?*
Avenue Miami, Florida 33155 Z
inspection during regular fcll
hoursby any citizen upon rwT
within 180 days rfjftft
this publication. *
DR. HERBERT A WERTHEIk
Principal Manager
Publication of this notice .
February 14, 1986 *
19606 February U ]<$
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-592
Divisioa 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
GERTRUDE KARLINS.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Gertrude Karlins. deceased. File
Number 86-592. is pending in u>
Circuit Court for Dade Countv
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 W
Flagler Street. Miami. Flondi
33130. The names and addresses
of the ancillary persons
representative and the ancillirv
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons ire
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) an;
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
ancillary personal representative.
venue, or jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice hat
begun on February 14. 1986.
Ancillary Personal
Representative:
STUART KARLINS
83 Sturges Highway
Westport, CT 06880
Attorney for Ancillary
Personal Representative:
SPARBER. SHEVIN. SHAPO
HEILBRONNER A BOOK. PA
One Southeast Third Avenue
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (305) 347-4700
19596 Februan14.21.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT. OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. IMM1I
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ZVI ADIVI. a/k/a HELMUT
HOFLICH.
Petitioner/Husband
and
RACHEL ADIVI.
Respondent/Wife
TO: RACHEL ADIVI
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for dissolution
of marriage has been filed agin*
you and you are required to serve!
copy of your written defenses, a
any. to it on JAMES M SCHIFF
attorney for Petitioner, whose M
dress is 1501 Venera Avenue. Pv*
Place II. Suite 206, Miami Flondi
33146. and file the original
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 14th. 19*.
otherwise a default will bt entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be pubW
once each week for four f
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. |
WITNESS my hand and the:se*
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 6 day of February. 198*
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JAMES M. SCHIFF
The Schiff Law Firm.
Chartered
1601 Venera Avenue
Park Place II. Suite 205
Miami. Florida 33146
Attorney for Petitioner
19593 FebnM2,'6
21,28. 1W


\Public Notices
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR THE 11TH JUDICIAL
[CIRCUIT IN DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-02095
| ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 045920
,J RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KARTHA SOCORRO BORRAS.
PETITIONER/WIFE
JAN BORRAS.
RESPONDANT
): JUAN BORRAS.
Resident and address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
hssolution of Marriage has been
|]ed against you and you are re-
uired to serve a copy of your writ-
en defenses, if any, to it on
WALTER B. LEBOWITZ. at-
ey for Petitioner, whose ad-
i is 801 Arthur Godfrey Road.
nd Floor, Miami Beach, Florida
B140, and file the original with
|ie clerk of the above styled court
or before February 21, 1986;
herwise a default will be entered
ainst you for the relief demand-
i in the complaint or petition.
[WITNESS my hand and the seal
' said court at Miami, Florida on
bis 17 day of January. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
lircuit Court Seal)
lALTER B LEBOWITZ. ESQ.
>1 Arthur Godfrey Rd.. 2nd Floor
iii Beach. Florida 33140
D5) 532-0000
552 January 24,31;
February 7, 14. 1986
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
i AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-51517 CA-2S
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
HSIGN MORTGAGE
)RPORATION, f/k/a
IMMUNITY FEDERAL
kVINGS AND LOAN
SOCIATION,
laintiff
HIL MONTEJO. et ux.. et al.,
efendants
RAUL MONTEJO and
fNIA MONTEJO, his wife.
aidence Unknown. If alive, and
[ dead, all parties claiming
st by, through, under or
Mnst RAUL MONTEJO and
*1A MONTEJO. his wife, and
| parties having or claiming to
1 *ny right, title or interest in
I property herein described.
|ou are hereby notified that an
on to foreclose a mortgage on
following property in Dade
nty. Florida:
Ms 14 and 15, in Block 14. of
1PIC HEIGHTS, according
he Plat thereof, as recorded in
Book 10. at Page 2. of the
lie Records of Dade County.
rida. has been filed against you
you are required to serve a
of your written defenses, if
to it, on Sheppard Faber,
ney for Plaintiff, whose
ress is Suite 214, 1670
Avenue. Coral Gables,
pda. 33146 on or before
28. 1986. and file the
I with the clerk of this court
before service on Plaintiffs
irney or immediately
" t, otherwise a default will
ntered against you for the
| demanded in the complaint.
TNESS my hand and the seal
court this 24th day of
y. 1986.
UCHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
January 31;
February 7.14,21.1986
NOTICE UNDER
ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
["ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
;e in business under the fic-
ns names TRIG Manufactur-
Dompany and TR1-G Manufac-
at 251 N.W. 23 Street,
ii, Florida intend to register
names with the Clerk of the
Jit Court of Dade County.
ida.
3 GGG Enterprises, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
Ruth Glueck. President
February 7,
14.21.28.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME STATUTE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names of Miami Slice or
Miami Slice Sandwich Shop at
number 830 So. Miami Avenue, in
the City of Miami, Florida, intends
to register the said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED at Miami. Florida, this
30 day of January, 1986.
Leedor Investments Corporation
Harriett Berkelhammer,
as Vice President
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorneys for Applicant
19582 February 7.
14.21,28.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name TOBA APART-
MENTS at 1023 Pennsylvania
Avenue. Miami Beach. Fla. intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
David Muhlrad
Candace G. Muhlrad
19576 January 31;
February 7, 14.21.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10684
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BILL IRA SMITH
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of BILL IRA
SMITH, deceased. File Number
85-10684. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Third Floor, Miami, Florida. The
personal representative of the
estate is ROBBYN DE BIEN,
whose address is 7616 West 8th
Avenue, Hialeah. Florida 38014.
The name and adress of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk ol
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice ol Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
February 14. 1986.
As Persona] Representative
of the Estate of
BILL IRA SMITH
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LAW OFFICES OF HARVEY
D. FRIEDMAN
420 Uncoln Road Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 531-0391
19616 February 14.21. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-02944
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ZVI HORE BERCOVITS.
Petitioner/Husband
and
SANDRA JEAN BERCOVITS,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Sandra Jean Bercovits
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Divorce
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on MICHAEL J. ALMAN.
ESQUIRE, attorney for Husband,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MICHAEL J. ALMAN,
ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Husband
19558 January 31;
February 7. 14.21, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 86-01945
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARLI RODRIGUEZ.
Petitioner/Wife
and
ROBERTO BELTRAN
RODRIGUEZ
Respondent/Husband.
TO: ROBERTO BELTRAN
RODRIGUEZ
Cordoba 2635 1st Floor.
Apt. No. 4
Buenos Aires, Argentina, S.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE L. MACHIN. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 1840 West 49th St.. Suite
105 Hialeah. FL 33012. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before February
21st, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: J. BYRON
as Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
George L. Machin, Esq.
1840 West 49th Street/Suite 105
Hialeah. FL 33012
19546 January 24.31;
February 7.14. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-03257 (12)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ODELIN COLIN,
Petitioner,
and
ELOl'ISE COLIN,
Respondent.
TO: E LOUISE COLIN
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before Feb. 28, 1986: otherwise a
default will be entered
January 24, 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
19566 January 31;
February 7. 14.21.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-04488
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 147801
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARINA E. SANCHEZ
DE MONTALVO,
Petitioner,
and
CARIX)S C. MONTALVO,
Respondent.
TO: Carlos C. Montalvo
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on A.
KOSS, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 4843 West
Flagler Street. Fourth Floor, Suite
404, Miami. Florida 33134, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 7. 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 31st day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner
4343 West Flagler Street
Fourth Floor Suite 404
Miami. Florida 33134
Tel.: (305) 443-4343
19585 Februarv7.14.21.28.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(REAL PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47705 (02)
ACTION FOR SPECIFIC
PERFORMANCE, UNJUST
ENRICHMENT
All of Lot 2, Edgewater Park
Manor, recorded in Plat Book 48 at
oaee 30 of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida a/k/a 800
South Royal Poinciana, Miami Spr-
ings. Florida.
EIGHT HUNDRED POIN
CIANA, INC.,
Plaintiff
VS.
JUAN LUQUE,
Defendant
TO: JUAN LUQUE
2929 Riverland Rd.
Ft. Lauderdale. Fla.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
fied that an action for for Specific
Performance and Unjust Enrich-
ment has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on ALAN S. KESSLER.
attorney for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is The Roney Plaza, Suite
M-8. 2301 Collins Ave.. Miami
Beach. Florida 33139, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before February
21, 1986, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN S. KESSLER. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 CoUins Ave.
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telphone: (305) 538-4421
19553 January 24. 31;
____________February 7,14,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-02662
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
GREGORIO CHIRINO
GRAVERAN.
Petitioner,
and
RAMONA NUNEZ,
Respondent.
TO: RAMONA NUNEZ
Calle 28. No. 356
Vedado. Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
Jcopy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER.
[ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 825 South
I Bay shore Drive, Suite 543, Miami,
Florida 33131. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 28.
1986. otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of January. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19557 January 24,31;
February 7, 14.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names INTERNATIONAL
PARTS AND ACCESSORIES
and INTERNATIONAL
MARKETERS, 11054 S.W. 127
Court, Miami, Florida intends to
register said names with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
BLAS OYARZUN AND
ASSOCIATES, INC.
BLAS OYARZUN,
PRESIDENT
Attorney ROSA M. VEGA
19990 February?.
14.21,28.198C
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 86-03255 (20)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
BERTHA SAINT-VIL.
Petitioner/Wife,
vs.
PAUL MICHEL SAINT-VIL,
Respondent.
TO: PAUL MICHEL
SAINT-VIL
RUE 3L No. 143
Cap Haitian. HAITI
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before Feb. 28. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered.
January 24. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
19565 January 31;
_________February 7, 14,21. 1986
Consolidated geeort al Condition et
" MIAMI MBM---------------
CROVECATE BANK
An* Foreign an* Oonaetle bMlllirlai, at tha clone* of bu.ln.ae
nFCFMBKR 11
banking U*i of this etate and a
,11 85 a MM* banking lnatltwtlen organise* end operating M*H tha
etea. rubllehed In KlKtaKl with a call
leaking Authority aa* hy tha federal lank af thla Dtetrlct
Caah an* kelanceo due Iro. deaoeltery laetlcetlene
Kontntereat-bearlng belencee and currency ana cola.
Inlaraac-b*,rIng balane...........................
af Dallata
3B
^1
of CM book and af lta Idaa and Aflraatwni aooaldlarlaa, asvd 1
Loans and ltm (inane in* racalvaalaa:
Loans and lititi, B*t o( unearned lncotM...................
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allowance and rti.tv,......................................
Aaaete hold In trading iccavnii .............................
Fra-laas and fl.ad aaaaCt (Includl*. caoltalltad Uaaaa).....
Othar rsal aacata ov*ed .....................................
lavaacoa-aca la caaeal laatea auhaldiar1st and aooactatad c
Cuacoaara' liability to cats bank oa NMpMMN o-ietaf*din
Intangla aaaaca ...........................................
Othar Aaants ...............................................
Total Assets ...............................................
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Total eawlty capital ..................................................
Total liabilities Halted -life preferred alack and sanity capital -------
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aaaaUnad by ue aa* to tha kaat al knovla*ga an* holla! haa Wan1 pranaWa* In ronforoanaKa with tha Inafrurtlona laauad
ky tha Boar* el Cevemora e! tha Pa*erel Reeerve lyatan on* tha\stata| Banking Authorltk an* la true aad correct.
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Sworn to and euhecrlke* kelore no thla
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DAN1EL
Dlrsc.cr
Director
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Dlre-tn
Ftbnuu-y U, li-


M.,.r,, IV A

Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Public Notices/
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-03367 (09)
N RE: The Marriage of:
GWENDOLYN TAYLOR.
Petitioner/Wife
and
STEVE TAYLOR.
Respondent/Husband
TO: Mr. Steve Taylor
38B Ward Avenue
Mandeville. Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Divorce
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
.our written defenses, if any, to it,
on HOWARD H. GALBUT..
ESQUIRE, attorney for Wife,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HOWARD N. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE
i.ALBUT. GALBUT A MENIN
999 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Wife
19669 January 31;
February 7,14,21.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-02158
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla Bar No. 151(23
IN RE: The Marriage of
URIAH R. GRANT.
Petitioner,
and
TRACIE Y. GRANT,
Respondent.
TO: TRACIE Y. GRANT
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on ALAN S.
KESSLER, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is The
Roney Plaza, Suite M-8, 2301 Col-
lins Ave., Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 21, 1986,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16th day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN S. KESSLER, ESQ.
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telphone: (306) 538-4421
19654 January 24,31;
February 7,14.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-03199
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ORCHID GOMES.
Petitioner/Wife
and
ANTHONY GOMES.
Respondent/H usband
TO: Mr. Anthony Gomes
Darceuil Lane,
Belmont. Trinidad
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Arthur H. Lipson, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
NE 167 Street. Suite 312. Miami
Beach, Florida 33162. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before February
28. 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 23rd day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19559 January 31:
February 7.14.21.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Super Value
Warehouses at 1500 San Remo
Avenue. Suite 200, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
SH0PCEN II
INVESTMENTS
19661 January 31;
February 7.14,21.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-03368 (08)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEANETTE MARIE RHULE
Petitioner/Wife
and
CLEMENT GEORGE RHULE
Respondent/Husband
TO: Clement George Rhule
Parks Road. Salisbury Plain
St. Andrew, Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Divorce
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on HOWARD H. GALBUT,
ESQUIRE, attorney for Wife,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of January. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HOWARD N. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT A MENIN
999 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Wife
19568 January 31;
February 7,14,21,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EL MUNDO
GROCERY at 1565 Washington
Ave. Miami Beach intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
AlcidesP.
1566 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla.
19671 January 31;
__________February 7,14.21,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICnTIOU8 NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FELLER
PROPERTIES at 3580 N.W. 52nd
Street, Miami. Florida 33142 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Ivan Feller
Natalie Cohen
Attorney for Applicant
Stanley M. Pred. Esquire
19578 January 31;
February 7, 14.21, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Bank Marketing Inc.
d/b/a Southeast Bankcard
Hospitality Insert Program at 244
Biscayne Blvd. 2nd Floor 33132 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Ron Fried
Bank Marketing, Inc.
19583 February 7,
14,21,28.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT LN
AND FOR THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 86-02095
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 04S920
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA SOCORRO BORRAS.
PETITIONER/WIFE
vs.
JUAN BORRAS
RESPONDENT
TO: JUAN BORRAS,
Resident and address
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
WALTER B. LEBOWITZ. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 801 Arthur Godfrey Road.
2nd Floor, Miami Beach, Florida
33140, an file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before February 21. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17 day of January, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
WALTER B. LEBOWITZ. ESQ.
801 Arthur Godfrey Rd.. 2nd Floor
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
(305) 532-0000
19552 January 24,31;
February 7, 14.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 86-8917
DIVISON 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA S. KAUFMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ANNA S.
KAUFMAN deceased, late of
Dade County, Florida. File
Number 86-8517 is pending in the
Circuit Court in and for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 3rd Floor. J
Dade County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The name and address of
the personal representatives of
this estate are set forth below.
All interested persons are re
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Personal Representatives:
SONYA SCHATTMAN,
5101 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla 33140
MIRIAM STEARN,
3675 N. Country Club Drive
North Miami Beach. Florida 33160
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 7 day of
February. 1986.
HARRY ZUK^RNICK
420 Lincoln Road Suite 329
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone 682-0099
19586 February 7, 14. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Piergiorgio at
1669-1673 N.W. 79th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33126. intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Tirabasso Piergiorgio
of Florida. Inc.
19562 January 31:
February 7. 14.21.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-04363
IN RE: The Marriage of:
AUDELI VELASQUEZ,
and
DIANA ALVAREZ-GONZALES
TO: Diana Alvarei-Gonzales
Respondent/Wife
Barriada La Mayor
Apt. 634 Isabela
Puerto Rico 00662
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for divorce
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on ARNIE S. MUSKAT.
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 999
Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach. Florida 33139. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March 7,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 31st day of January. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT. ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT A MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19587 February 7, 14, 21. 28. 1986
LN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-39618 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
LIBERTY SAVINGS
BANK. F.S.B.,
Plaintiff
vs.
OSCAR SARMIENTO.
et ux. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: OSCAR SARMIENTO and
ELMA SARMIENTO. his wife,
Residence Unknown. If alive, and
if dead, all parties claiming in-
terest by, through, under or
against OSCAR SARMIENTO and
ELMA SARMIENTO, his wife.
and all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or interest
in the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot I, in Block 3, of TOBLER
TERRACE. FIRST ADDITION
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 51, at Page
97, of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Sheppard
Faber. Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables
Florida. 33146 on or before
February 28. 1986, and file the
inginal with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the compalint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 24th day of
January, 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
1953 January 31;
February 7. 14.21, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-03523
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JOSEPHINE B. PARODI,
Petitioner/Wife
and
HERNAN PARODI,
Respondent/Husband
TO: Hernan Parodi
Address and Residence
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
JOSEPH W. MALEK, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
360 Lincoln Road. Suite 501,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
March 7, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 31st day of January. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W MALEK
350 Lincoln Road. Suite 501
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19584 February 7. 14 21. 28. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-546
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAVID THERMAN KLINE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DAVID THERMAN KLINE,
deceased. File Number 86-646. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33131. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 7, 1986.
Personal Representative:
MELVIN KLINE
c/o GALBUT. GALBUT &
MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HOWARD N GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
19688 February 7,14.1986
ELEVENT CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 86-63286 (23)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LEONTES AUGUSTAL.
Petitioner,
and
ANN VERA AUGUSTAL,
Respondent.
TO: ANN VERA AUGUSTAL.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before February 28. 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered.
January 24. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. CASAMAYOR
19564 January 31;
February 7. 14.21,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTS,,
DADE COUNTY. fhSn?
fSnATLD,V,sS
File Number 85-10271
Division 01
IN RE:ESTATE OF
HELMUT MAX DANZIGER
a/k/a MAX H. DANZIGER
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the M,..
of HELMUT MAX DanS
a/k/a MAX H. DANzK
deceased. File Number 85-1027,
^n*"th. Circuit Com fc
Dade County. Florida. prohu.
Division, the address of which"!
Dade County Courthouse Tkwl
Flagler Street. Mian,,,' FlorS
33130. The names and addres*,
of the personal representative and
the personal representative1,
attorney are set forth below
All interested persons ,
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS ftp
THE FIRST PUBLICATON OF
THIS NOTICE: (1, all dZ
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was ftr.ti
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 7. iy86.
Personal Representative-
ISLE SIMONHOFF
5101 Collins Avenue Apt. 8H
Miami Beach FL 33140
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
MICHAEL A DRIBIN
ESQUIRE
CYPEN. CYPEN & DRIBOi
825 Arthur Godfrey Koad
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19580 February 7,14.1966
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-05015 I
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Mamage of
NAOMI SHOUREK.
Petitioner/Husband
and
YITZCHAK SHOUREK
Respondent/Wife
TO: YITZCHAK SHOUREK
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for dissolution
of marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to servei
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on JAMES M SCHIFF
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 1601 Venera Avenue. Pirt
Place n. Suite 206, Miami. Floridi
33146. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 14th. 1986:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
one* each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the m
of said Court at Miami. Florid* on
this 5 day of February. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Clannda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JAMES M. SCHIFF
The Schiff Law Firm.
Chartered
1601 Venera Avenue
Park Place II. Suite 205
Miami. Florida, 33146
Attorney for Petitioner
19692 February 7, It
21.28.1<
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBY iM*
that the undersigned, **"
engage in business under thtsj
titious name CARY d LW-
AND ASSOCIATES at 1J
BrickeU Avenue, Suite *
Miami. Florid* 33129 'n"*I
register said name with "*-*"
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
CARY de LEON
LESTER ROGERS. P-A-
Attorney for CARY de LEON
19681 wsrsJ
14.21.28. "


ATT
Hd. 64, of Miami, puaed away Tuesday,
4. He was a 60-year resident of Miami,
[was a teacher and school administrator
|Oie Dade County Public School System
lover 30 years. He is survived by his
Wen Sheila (Peter) Fixler, Helene (Man
[Diner, and Cynthia (Mark) Hummel;
her Samuel, and 8 grandchildren. The
trside.
riMs
Si. of North Miami Beach, passed away
En'esday. Feb. 5. She was a resident of
,ida for more than 50 years. Interment
|t Nebo Cemetery. The Riverside.
.'FIELD. Benjamin, of Bay Harbor
Cd. Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
LDSTEIN, Dr. Louis J., 82, of Miami
th Feb. 10. The Riverside
LSOti. Bemice. of North Miami Beach,
tires were held.
(ORIN. Mary G., of Miami Beach. Ser-
t were held.
PKBERG. Sara Hirshleifer. 89. of North
tii Beach. Feb. 9. Services were held.
1EICHER, Raaie. 66. of Miami Beach
, 10. The Riverside.
|KN. Mae, 91. of Miami Beach. Feb. 5.
tees were held.
INSKY, Anna, of Miami Beach. Rubin
art Memorial Chapel.
Il'BART, Fred, of Miami Beach. Rubin
In Memorial Chapel.
Obituaries
KOTTZ, Hattie, 92, of Miami. Feb. 6. Ser-
vices and interment in New Jersey.
STEINER. Edgar N., 81, of North Miami
Beach. Feb. 7. The Riverside.
ZIMMERMAN. Fay, of North Miami Beach.
Services were held.
MARCUS. David. 76. of North Miami
Beach. Feb. 8. The Riverside.
REIMAN. Etta, 87. Services held in New
York. Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
SCHERTZ. Morris, 86, of North Miami
Beach. Services held in New Jersey. Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
BLASHEK. Lillian (nee David), of Abbey
Delray. Feb. 9. Services were held.
GLUCK. William J. The Riverside.
HOLBERG, Harold, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices and Interment in New York.
SPIVAK, Esther, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel
BLANKEN. Samuel, of North Miami
Beach. Feb. 5. Services and interment in
Maryland.
TUNIS, Mollie, of North Miami Beach. Ser-
vices were held.
WErNER, Anne, 64, of Miami. Feb. 5. Ser
vices were held.
KATZ. Paul. 65. of Miami. Feb. 5. The
Riverside.
METZ, Harry, 84, of Miami Beach. Feb. 5.
The Riverside.
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
>ade County
1532-2099
Broward County
532 2099
Represented hv Riverside Memorial Chapel. Iltf
Jew York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills. NY.
.egal Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
DTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
Re in business under the flc-
us name ANGEL DE LA PAZ
uls Up register said name with
|Clerk of the Circuit Court of
i County. Florida.
Fernando A. Grosso
T>50 Jefferson Ave.. No. 7
Miami Beach. FL 33139
January 31;
February 7. U. 21. 1986
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
iE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
PIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
VND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Ation No. 86-06087
IRE: The marriage of
BC.IDA GRAJ, wife.
ITMON ALEKSANDER
M, husband
^CTION FOR DISSOLUTON
OF MARRIAGE
ISZYMON
EKSANDER GRAJ
Bdence Unknown:
[OU ARE HEREBY
IFIED that an action for
olution of Marriage has been
gainst you and you are re-
I to serve a copy of your writ-
I defenses, if any. to it on AR-
JR H. LIPSON, attorney for
tioner, whose address is 801
heast 167 St., Miami, Fl
p2 and file the original with the
[ of the above styled court on
efore March 21, 1986; other-
a default will be entered
nst you for the relief demand
i the complaint or petition.
'TNESS my hand and the seal
ud court at Miami, Florida on
j 12 day of February, 1986.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
uit Court Seal)
February 14.21.28;
March 7. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-05845-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
RAUL LONGUE1KA.
et u.v. et al..
Defendants.
TO: RAUL LONGUEIRA
and MIRIAM E.
LONGUEIRA. his wife
Edificio Luzerna
Avenida Francisco de
Miranda No. 763
Chacao, Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Unit 13-14 of TERRANOVA
3, a Condominium, according
to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as
recorded April 5. 1983 in
Official Records Book 11749.
at Page 429, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida,
has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on Sheppard Faber.
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before March
21, 1986 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
February. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19614 February 14.21.28;
March 7. 1986
PINKS
Pamela, who was born and raised in Miami
Beach, died Jan. 15 of a cerebral hemor-
rhage in the Margaret F. Pardee Memorial
Hospital in Hendersonville, N.C. She was
34. Before moving to Hendersonville in
1980, Pinks was an executive secretary,
medical assistant and personnel officer for
12 years at South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center in Miami Beach. She
graduated from Nautilus Jr. High School
and Miami Beach Senior High. She is surviv-
ed by her parents. Dr. David Pinks, medical
director of South Shore Hospital, and Betty
Pinks, a son Adam of Hendersonville, and a
brother. Richard Pinks, of Miami. Pinks,
who was known for her love of animals,
served as an officer on the board of direc-
tors of the Humane Society of Henderson
County of North Carolina as its recording
secretary. Private memorial services will be
held in Hendersonville. Memorials may be
made to the Pamela Pinks Memorial Funds,
c/o Henderson County Humane Society, I
P.O. Box 706, Hendersonville. North
Carolina 28793. Funds are being raised to
dedicate a building at the Humane Society
in her memory.
BEGEL. Joseph, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
BORUCHIN, Mrs. Gecheved (Ana), of
Miami Beach. Rubin-Zilbert Memorial
Chapel.
LEVIN. Rose. 81. of North Miami Beach.
Feb. 11. Levitt-Weinstein.
MARCUS. Bertram, 57, of Hallandale, Feb.
10. Menorah Chapels.
TOPP. Mrs. Sara, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
FISS, Roger Shalom, of Bay Harbor Island.
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
KASSACK. Michael Leon, 16, of Miami.
Feb. 2. The Riverside.
KATZ, Marvin, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
POLISSKY. Yelena, 49. of Miami. Feb. 1.
The Riverside.
ROBERT. Sally Rashall Rubin-Zilbert
Memorial Chapel.
BAKER, Clara A., 83, of Miami. Feb. 1. The
Riverside
KLEIMAN. Max. 80. of Miami Beach. Jan.
31. The Riverside.
RAPPAPORT. Leonard H, 68, of Miami.
Feb. 1. The Riverside.
SOLLOD, Florence L., 79, of Surfside. Jan.
31. The Riverside.
Legal Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name M.R. Miami Plastic at
525 W. 26 Street. Hialeah, FL
33010 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Marcelo Rodriguez
19613 February 14,21,28;
March 7,1986
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Kumily owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
HJNERAl DIRECTOR
M*si President Jewish Funeiai
DfeeiO'% o' America
>HiS{VlNTv MRS! STREET
865-2353
MIAMI Ht Al.H I UIHIDA
/-^fW/JP Gralch-Mandet
M. fV ji\ Hartman-Millet
^We/nste/i^
and
Sons
Lorn passion. L.oncern
v-i consideration
In Chicago. In South Florida. We are the Jewish funeral
directors you have known and trusted for generations.
SOOTH FLORIDA LOCATIONS:
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 20955 Blscayne Bh/d.-935-3939
SUNRISE: 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd. 742-6000
MARGATE: 5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441-975-0011
DEERF1ELD BEACH: 2305 W. Hillsboro Brvd,427 4700
WEST PALM BEACH: 9321 Memorial Park Rd.-627-2277
Funeral Chapels Cemetery Mausoleum Pre-Need Planning
SMenofihT
^^^*-_______ __J tN..*l rk>A.la
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
Levitt-Weinstein
presents the New
Beth David Memorial Gardens
and what it means to
South Florida.
Now Levitt-Weinstein offers the con-
venience of a complete funeral chapel
and interment service at one location.
Now Star of David of Hollywood
becomes Beth David Memorial
Gardens... the only Jewish family-
owned-and operated cemetery and
chapel facility in Dade and Broward
Beth David Memorial Gardens offer
a choice of above ground mausoleum
entombment or ground burial... mon-
ument sections... strict adherence to
Jewish burial and funeral laws... Jew-
ish funeral directors on call 24 hours
... and pre-arrangement plans provid-
ing comfort, security and cost savings.
Counties.
... because the griefs enough to handle.
Memorial Chapels
North Miami Beach, 949-6315 Hollywood, 921-7200
West Palm Beach, 689-8700 Boca/Deerfield Beach, 427-6500
HI rHDAVD
Ml MORI Al GARDENS
3201N. 72nd Avenue Hollywood, FL. 963-2400

A


y-o iu a
'I'K-* u.....k I.H-_:-*;iF.i. i
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14 1986
Miami Contingent To Attend NJCRAC Plenum
Jeffrey Berkowitz and Donald
E. Lefton will lead a delegation of
representatives of the Community
Relations Committee (CRC) of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
to the National Jewish Communi-
ty Relations Advisory Council's
(NJCRAC) 40th Annual Plenary
Session, which will be held Feb.
16-19 in New York City. The
Miami contingent will join with
delegates of 112 local and 11 na-
tional Jewish community relations
agencies in articulating American
Jewry's public affairs agenda for
1986-87.
"The heart of the NJCRAC
Plenum is joining with other local
community relations and national
agency leaders to identify and
evaluate significant trends and
issues we expect will affect our
community during the next 18
months," said Berkowitz, who
serves as chairman of Federa-
tion's CRC. Lefton added that
"the Plenum sessions will help us
develop a consensus on joint
policies and strategies we can all
use to maintain and improve
Jewish security at home and
abroad.
Berkowitz is scheduled to speak
at the Plenum on the community
relations field and the political
process. Lefton, among other
tasks, will serve as chairman of a
major luncheon honoring Outgo-
ing NJCRAC Chairman Jac-
queline Levine. Lefton is a past
chairman of the Federation's CRC
and a vice president of NJCRAC.
Among experts who will provide
perspectives on current interna-
tional and domestic developments
during the four-day Plenum will
be his Excellency Meir Rosenne,
Israel's Ambassador to the United
States; and Lawrence S.
Eagleburger, former United
States Under Secretary of State.
They will provide candid analyses
of "The United States, Israel and
the Peace Process."
Other special guest speakers
will be United States Con-
gressman William Gary III, chair-
man of the House Budget Com-
mittee: Robert J. Samuelson,
Newsweek Magazine columnist;
Morris Abram, chairman of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry; Professor Seweryn Bialer,
expert on Soviet Jewry; New
York Mayor Edward I. Koch;
Jerry Abramson, Mayor of
Louisville, Kentucky; and author
Charles Silberman.
Among those joining Berkowitz
and Lefton in the Miami con-
tingent to the Plenum are Nan
Rich, chairwoman of the CRC's
Domestic Concerns Committee;
and Edward Rosenthal and Judy
Gilbert, director and assistant
director of the CRC.
Fla. Yeshiva
Undergrade Selected
for Who's Who
Five Florida residents, all
undergraduates of Yeshiva
University in New York City,
have been selected for the 1986
edition of Who's Who Among
American Universities and Col-
leges. The residents are: Robert
Frohlinger of Boca Raton; Elana
Ungar and Samuel Galitzer,
North Miami Beach, Avi Litwin,
Miami Beach and Hy Pomerance,
West Palm Beach.
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
founderImentor of the Hebrew
Academy of Miami Beach, will
he honored posthumously at the
P re-Centennial Heritaqt
Award Dinner of the Florida
Friends of Yeshiva University
scheduled for Sunday, March
16, at the Konover Hotel
Miami Beach.
OCX ?ooooooo
(KEREN KAYEMETH
LEISRAEL) INC.
Come and Rejoice in the Celebration of Purim
and the Reclamation of the Land of Israel
tdn*Ut4 tffiuuUfamaJ 2uee*i S&iAeb fflubvnt S&tUi
&***n u4wn 4986
8\*nce6&
ffitinc^Ab
CECILE GRUNHUT
tyMouJectU
EDITH HOCHHAUSER
FLORENCE WALDM AN
ABRAHAM GRUNHUT
Pres. JNF (Jr. Miami
i SPutufap, *AUvuA 23, 4986 42:OO jVn
5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Florida

Abraham Grunhut
Pres. JNF Or. Miami
Zav W. Kogan
Pres. JNF Southern Region.
Rsbbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Emest Samuels
V.P. JNF Or. Miami
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
For Information and Reservations-
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suit, 353 Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 538-6464
)OOOOOOOOI
?OCX


Full Text
3&l/l/ieM44t "A Match Made in Heaven" the nostalgic Yiddish musical com-
dy will be at Miami Beach Theatre of the Performing Arts on
February 26 and 27 for four performances only. Call 673-8300
jr information and tickets also available at Select-A-Seat loca-
lions including Jordan Marsh Stores and Chargit
1-800-468-3540. ______
The Senior Club of the South Dade Jewish Community Center
tnounces that William F. Saulson will be the guest speaker for
heir noon meeting on Sunday with Mr. Saulson. a family consul
ant and vice president of Riverside Memorial Chapel. Israel
Jpbeat. is the title of his talk for the CJA/IEF campaign meeting
Federation Gardens. 10905 SW 112 Ave
Temple Zion Israelite Center well present the Theatre Guild's
-oduction of Jerry Herman's classic. "Hello Dolly." beginning
aturday evening. Feb. 22 at 8 at the center. Other show dates
Feb 23. March 1. 2. 8. 9. and 15 Michael Vaughn will be
ecting the performances.
The Lorber Chapter of the National Jewish Center for Im-
munology will hold their annual auction on Friday. Feb. 21 at
j:30 p.m. at the Kendall Town Club House. Neil Levine will be
lictioneer for the benefit of asthmatic children.
I Steven 1. Hershkowitz. son of Rosryn Hershkowitz and nephew
I Arnold Riebel. both of North Miami Beach. Fla. have been pro-
ofed in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of staff sergeant. Her-
kowitz is an aerospace ground equipment mechanic in Italy.
,jth the 40th Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron. He is
11980 graduate of North Miami Beach High School
Children In Distress will sponsor a Day At Gulfstream on Tues-
ky. Feb. 25. announced Michelle Leblang. president of the
oup CID is a voluntary support organization for the Division of
llild and Adolescent Psychiatry. University of Miami School of
edkine ---------
iTVO Committee of Miami will present its 7th Yiddish lecture
Wednesday, at 1:30 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom. Prof.
iene Orenstein will commemorate David Bergelson on his
th Birthday.
The Sunflower Society will meet on Tuesday, at noon at the
topic. "Sexuality and Relationships (Venus after 40)." accor-
H to Connie Morrow, president.
?rgio Periera. Dade County Manager will be honored at a din-
of the B'nai B'rith Foundation of the United States with the
eat American Traditions Award on Sunday. April 13 at the
ii International Hotel.______
Temple Israel of Greater Miami will present Senator Jack Gor-
at its Business Breakfast Forum on Thursday. Feb. 20. at
a.m. at the synagogue.
lie Florida Atlantic University Foundation's Benefit Concert
I take place on Sunday. Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. at the FAU Theatre,
featured performer will be violinist. Yehudi Menuhin.
fropical Cancer League will hold their next regular luncheon
ting on Friday. Feb. 21 at the Ocean Pavillion at 11 45 a.m.
Butterfly, singer, will be accomanied by her son Nicki.
reizmann Institute of Science will invite seventy high school
ents worldwide to participate in the 18th Annual Bessie F.
rence International Summer Science Institute at Revohot.
el. from Jury 7 to Aug. 7. To apply for the program, write Lee
man. Executive Director. Florida Region of the American
Kmi Gardens Drive. Suite 405. N Miami Beach. FL 33179
tln.i
mpii
Jmted Order of True Sisters sent a check in the amount of
L000 on behalf of the organization to the Miami Children's
pitdi to be used for the children's bone marrow transplant
krtment and for the children's oncology department, according
to Jules W Hmkes. president.
Math Yeshurun Congregation will hold its Eleventh Annual
canon Dinner-Dance on Saturday evenning at 8 p.m. Larry
Wan Udell will be honored guests at the event to take place at
the Rosenberg Social Hall______
mi Dade Community College will present Erwin Heifer and
for its Lunchtime Lively Arts Series on Wednesday at
at the Wolf son Campus Auditorium.
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS
7 days 4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Broiled Chicken..................$5.25
Met of Sole........................$4.75
iked Meatloaf.....................$4.75
tnchid Potato, EejejjjMg Club Salad_________
Ing in or mention this ad for your 10% discount
off any item.
Offer Expires
2-15-86
Omni International Mall
1601 Blscayne Blvd.
Miami Phone: 358-8700
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Marjorie Housen To Speak To Hadassah Audiences
Hadassah National Vice Presi-
dent Marjorie Housen will talk
about the ever changing role of
the volunteer in today's society in
a series of speaking engagements
before Miami Hadassah audiences
Sunday through Tuesday.
Housen will provide update on
the latest news from the
Hadassah Medical Organization as
well as the most policy statements
issued by the Zionist organization
on such current topic as ter-
rorism, Spanish-Israel and
Vatican-Israel relations and
Israel's law of return.
The speaking appearances have
been scheduled in both north and
south Dade, afternoons and even-
ings, to enable as many Hadassah
women and men as interested to
attend.
Housen will address the
Hadassah Associates, the men's
support organization, on Sunday
at 2 p.m. at the Skylake Gardens
Recreation Hall.
Monday, she will be the guest at
a meeting of the Chai Chapter,
beginning at 8 p.m. at the Sephar-
dic Jewish Center of North Miami
Beach.
Tuesday afternoon, Housen will
address a meeting of the Judea
Chapter. The meeting, in the
Moorings Auditorium, begins at
12:30.
Those living in South Dade are
invited to hear Housen speak
Tuesday evening, beginning at 8
in the auditorium of the Suburban
Medical Center in Perrine.
These meetings are open to all
Hadassah members and guests.
At the close of her Dade speak-
ing tour, Housen will head for
Puerto Rico to address members
of the island's Hadassah chapter,
a part of the Miami Reeion.
Histadrut Conference Features
Yiddish Symposium on 'Israel 1986'
Dr. Sol Stein
Dr. Sol Stein, Founding presi-
dent of the Israel Histadrut Foun-
dation and Dr. Berl Frymer,
former Histadrut Cultural direc-
tor for Tel Aviv and Jaffe will be
the featured speakers at the Yid-
dish Brunch Session of the
Histadrut Foundation Conference
on Sunday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m. at
the Konover Hotel in Miami
Beach.
Dr. Stein has recently returned
from Israel where he met with
Histadrut and government
leaders to discuss the current
economic political crisis that con-
fronts the people of Israel. Dr.
Stein received his PhD in
Economics from the famed
University of Ghent in Belgium.
For 20 years Dr. Stein served as
director of the Jewish National
Dr. Berl Frymer
Fund in Philadelphia. For the past
26 years, Dr. Stein has led the
Israel Histadrut Foundation in
raising the impressive total of $85
Million for Israel. He was a radio
commentator for many years on
N.Y.'s WEVD, and a columnist
for the Jewish Daily Forward.
Currently, Dr. Stein serves as
president of the Israel Histadrut
Foundation.
The Brunch will be chaired by
Morris Fisher, the Histadrut
Foundation's chairman of the
Golden Chain of Yiddish Culture
Fund.
Entertainment will be provided
by the star of Yiddish Theatre.
Minna Bern and the international
vocalist, Shoshana Ron. They will
be accompanied by the Maestro
Shmuel Fershko.
Jarlsberg.
Its a big
wheel with
all lovers of
flue cheese.
The flavor of Jarlsberg Brand Cheese is as natural as fhe Norwegians who
make it. The full. rich, distinctive, nut-like taste makes it a favorite for noshing,
nibbling, serving with fruit or wine, and using it in your recipes. Jarlsberg.
Every good stor^ carries it.
* njoy Ski Queen Brand Gjetost cheese. Nokkelost
heese and many other fine cheeses ftom Norway.
..KStianO Foods Inc Siamtorfl C" ^90'


f age 18-A The Jewish KIoridian/FriHftv Fchm.om i- iqoc
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
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Morris Dan
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Dan and Rose Launch Art of
Jewish Living Program
Morris Dan, newly elected
president of the Florida Region of
the Federation of Jewish Men's
Clubs, together with the newly in-
stalled Spiritual Advisor, Rabbi
Marvin Rose of Temple Beth El of
North Bay Village, will launch the
Art of Jewish Living program
throughout the Florida region on
Sunday, Feb. 23 at Temple Beth
Torah. This program will feature
the "Shabbat Seder," or order of
Shabbat observances in the
Jewish home. It is the latest of a
series, based on the principle of
"Laymen Teaching Laymen."
Dr. Morton R. Lang of Mon-
treal, guest speaker, will discuss,
"Overcoming Complacency and
Indifference Toward Religion,"
Seymour Feldstein, president of
the temple's Men's Club, will
speak on the Burning Bush Fund
Program.
Morris Dan, a Holocaust sur-
vivor, has come to South Florida
from Canada, where he resided
for over 25 years. Since his arrival
in Miami in 1977, he has been in-
volved in community and
synagogue affairs, having served
as president of the Beth David
Men's Club prior to assuming the
presidency of the Florida Region.
Dan is also acting acancs chair-
man of these meetings, along with
Michael M. Exelbert, president of
Temple Zion Congregation.
Rabbi Rose is a graduate of
Yeshiva University and has serv-
ed as Rabbi of Temple Beth El for
the past 10 years.
Jack Gordon Guest
At Breakfast Forum
State Senator Jack Gordon,
chairman of the Senate Transpor-
tation Committee and Director of
the Institute of Public Policy and
Citizenship Studies at Florida In-
ternational University, will be the
guest speaker at the next Temple
Israel Business Breakfast Forum,
Thursday, Feb. 20, at 7:45 am.,
Downtown Temple. The pubic is
invited to attend. The session con-
cludes promptly at 9 a.m.
Breakfast committee members
include Eunice and Jim Baros,
Norma Orovitz, Henry Wolff, Jr.,
and Harold Evensky.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
LATE FRIDAY EVENING SERVICE
FEBRUARY 14
at 8 P.M.
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL PREACH ON
"Love Thy Neighbor As Thyself"
in honor of
Brotherhood Month
"He will comment on the Shcharansky release."
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN WILL CHANT
Assisted by the Temple Choir
SATURDAY MORNING SERVICE AT 9 A.M.
Rabbi Reminisces
He's Saddened By Orthodox Split
Continued from Page 1-B
Am rican rabbis. At that time.
few of the leading Orthodox rab-
bis in America agreed with the
prohibition, so that the coopera-
tion between the rabbis continued
uninterrupted.
But now, 20 years later, for
reasons that are quite obscure, the
Orthodox rabbis fell in line with
the Rav Feinstein's issur. The
separation became final.
I do not know the basis of that
issur. but I have learned from my
Orthodox colleagues about its
motivation.
"When people see us together
on TV or at any public platform."
the argument went, "we will lend
legitimacy to your rabbinate."
TO ME. that is unfortunate.
Unfortunate, not because I need
acceptance by my Orthodox col-
leagues, but because it robs me of
the kevruta and inspiration we all
so desperately need in our rab-
binical responsibilities. Unfor-
tunate, because the Jewish com-
munity is being robbed of the
spiritual input of so many great
minds.
There is no question that there
are differences, basic differences
in interpretations, between the
Conservative and Reform rabbis,
on the one hand, and the Orthodox
on the other. The American rab-
binate reflects the varied make up
of American Jewry with its
respective yeskvot, seminars and
institutes.
These differences, however,
ought not to impoverish the
Jewish community, denying it the
concerted action which is so
necessary for the very survival of
our people.
Some have suggested that the
separation of the Orthodox is an
importation from Israel. I do not
know how valid that is. However,
even though the split between the
religious and non-religious is more
pronounced in Israel, the danger
of such a split here in America is
more perilous.
THERE IS no danger to the
physical survival of the Israeli Jew
but there undoubtedly is such a
danger facing the American Jew.
In the diaspora we need each
other to guarantee each other's
surivival.
The Orthodox can contribute
more to the enhancement of
Jewish living and to the enrich-
ment of our community by being
part of the community rather than
by divorcing itself from it.
This is evident in the strides we
have already made in such issues
as kaskrut for all community func-
tions, in the universal acceptance
of circumcision (by a mokel). and
in the deeper appreciation for
traditional Judaism in so many
other areas of communal life.
I do not ask for the legitimiza-
tion of rabbis but for the fratr.
nization of Jews. Isolation can on-
ly lead to the weakening of the
fiber that makes us one people
Because the laity, the general
public, will ultimately suffer if this
is allowed to continue. I feel that
this issue ought to be aired in
public.
I HARBOR no feelings of
acrimony as I write about this
troubling situation. Quite the con
trary. I am in love with Jews as I
am with Judaism. Todav,
throughout our existence, the
need for unity ought to be a priori
ty for our people. I believe that.
more than at any other time, it is
vital to restate the Jewish axiom
of faith, "all Israelites are respon
sible one for the other." This was
the key to Jewish survival in the
past, and it must remain inviolate
today.
So, as I reminisce about the past
35 years of my rabbinate in Miami
Beach, I assert that the axiom
"we are one." whether Orthodox.
Reform, or Conservative, is the
only guarantee of our survival
Hebrew Academy Elects Officers
Ron Kriss. attorney, has
recently been elected as president
of the South Dade Hebrew
Academy.
Joining Kriss in his new posi-
tion, will be Dr. Ruben Gurvich as
vice-president of education; Mrs.
Sandy Cantor, vice-president of
enrollment; Gideon Ben-Ami as
vice-president of fundraising; and
Mrs. Sheila Wagner as vice-
president of projects. Hector
Vergara was elected secretary
Marlene Mitchell is principal of
the school.
Members of the school board in-
clude. Judge Fred Barad Barn.
White. Martha Moses. Joe Hup-
pert.and Dr. Lana Monchek
Additional board members are;
Dr. Andre Abitbol, Dr. Jeff and
Lisa Blatt. Nurit Cohen, Efrat
Afek. Chet and Helen Elfenbein.
Rabbi Edwin Farber. Claire
Greenberg, Rabbi Warren Kasztl.
Marni Kriss. Karen Levin.
Deborah Monchek. Marsha
Rosenbloom. Shellie Sherry,
Cathy Shmalo. Amanda Vergara.
and Richard Wagner.
Rabbi Ralph Z. Glixman will
continue to serve as headmaster
of the school and is responsible for
the Judaic Studies Department.
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Initial screening in Florida. Salary negotiable.
Send reply to:
Box BE c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
Ron Kris
IN MEMORIAM
We mourn the untimely passing of our colleague and friend
Rabbi Arnold Richter
iron inn 'ax HM P 'aim linn am
and extend deepest condolences to his wife, Marlene, his children,
Moshe & Shira and his brothers, Rabbi Chaim, Rabbi Yisroel and Albert.
"0"nn iiixa miix innro *nej"
Hebrew Educators Alliance
Last Performance Saturday 8:15 p.m.
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Tickets $10.00 at all BASS Ticket Outlets.
For information:
Dade: 633-BASS Broward: 741-3000


News in Brief
Soviets Ban Use of 'Holocaust'
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By JTA Services
BONN The East German
Communist regime is campaign-
ing to end the use of the word
"Holocaust" as synonym for Nazi
atrocities because, according to
the official weekly Weltbuehne
published in East Berlin, it
originated in that sense in the
capitalist West as a means, of
depicting Nazi crimes against
Jews as a unique event, un-
paralleled by other war crimes.
The East German leadership
and its media have long played
down crimes against Jews as such
while emphasizing atrocities com-
mitted by the Nazis against Com-
munists and against the Soviet
Union. The Democratic Republic
refused to screen the American-
made television series
"Holocaust" in 1982. It was
shown twice on West German
television which can be seen in
most parts of East Germany.
According to Weltbuehne, that
series brought the word
"Holocaust" into the popular lex-
icon, even in East Germany,
though it did not penetrate East
i German history textbooks. The
word "artificially places a
language barrier between the
truth about the (Nazi) past and the
lability to understand it," the Com-
I munist weekly stated.
U.S. Vetoes Anti-Israel
Resolution Third Time
UNITED NATIONS For the
[third time in the last four weeks,
[the United States vetoed an anti-
I Israel resolution in the Security
[Council. The latest veto, last
Thursday night, was on a resolu-
tion condemning Israel for its in-
Iterception of a Libyan aircraft on
[Feb. 4.
The resolution termed the
[Israeli action an "act of aerial hi-
jacking and piracy." The
|15-member Council voted 10-1 for
tie resolution. France, Britain,
Australia and Denmark abstained.
Explaining the veto, the U.S.
Ambassador to the UN, Vernon
/alters, said: "My government
innot accept a resolution which
nplies that interception of an air-
craft is wrongful per se, without
regard to the possibility that the
action may be justified. We must
clear that terrorist violence,
nd not the response to terrorist
violence, is the cause of the cycle
)f violence which tragically mars
^he Middle East and the entire
forld."
(Marilyn Klinghoffer Dead
[Of Cancer At Age 58
NEW YORK Marilyn Kl-
ughoffer. the widow of Leon Kl-
tighoffer who was murdered by
Palestinian terrorists during the
ea-jacking of the Italian cruise
hip Achille Lauro last October,
led Sunday at Lenox Hill
gospital, reportedly of cancer.
ne was 58 years old and lived in
la11hat I;in.
I Klinghoffer and her husband
Jere among the several hundred
ssengers aboard the cruise ship
tien it was hijacked off the Egyp-
in coast by Palestinian ter-
^rists who demanded freedom of
lestinians held in prisons in
rael.
I Leon Klinghoffer became the
We fatality of the two-day ordeal
"hen he was shot and killed by the
rrorists who then dumped his
dy into the Mediterranean. His
dy later washed ashore on the
rian coast and was subsequent-
|returned to the U.S. for burial.
fie spokesperson said the Leon
pnghoffer Memorial Founda-
established after the Achille
iro incident, will change its
ie to the Leon and Marilyn Kl-
fioffer Memorial Foundation,
and that the family intends to con-
tinue on with the foundation's
work of fighting terrorism.
Herzl Stamp Gives Russians
Hives, They Say' Nyef
JERUSALEM Hundreds of
letters mailed by Israelis to their
relatives in the Soviet Union
recently have been returned to
Israel because the Soviet
authorites object to the stamp on
the envelopes.
The overseas mail stamp bears
the likeness of Theodor Herzl,
founder of modern Zionism. The
Russians, unwilling to have his
picture distributed among Soviet
Jews, have not allowed the letters
to reach their destination and are
returning them, overprinted with
the words "addressee unknown."
Soviet aliya activists in Israel
are appealing to the Israeli postal
authorities to supply stamps for
letters to the Soviet Union with
the portrait of a Jewish personali-
ty that would not cause the Rus-
sians to object.
Former Nazi's Election
At UN Brings Protests
LOS ANGELES The Simon
Wiesenthal Center has protested
to United Nations Secretary
General Javier Perez de Cuellar,
over the Feb. 3 vote at the UN in
Geneva, which elected a former
Nazi Party member as vice presi-
dent of the UN's Commission on
Human Rights.
Hermann Klenner, who entered
the Nazi Party on April 20, 1944
(Hitler's birthday) with a card
bearing the number 9756141, was
nominated for the post of second
vice president for the Commission
on Human Rights by the Soviet
Union's Byelorussian delegate,
with the backing of Arab
representatives.
The nomination was approved
by voice acclamation over the
vehement protest of Israel's Am-
bassador Efraim Dubek.
Memorial for Astronauts
Announced in Jerusalem
NEW YORK A memorial will
be established in honor of Judith
Resnik and her fellow Challenger
astronauts at the Beit Halochem
Center in Jerusalem, it was an-
nounced by Ernest Zelig, presi-
dent of the Bnai Zion Foundation.
The memorial will consist of a
physiotherapy room that will
become an integral part of the
rehabilitation complex. Beit
Halochem Centers provide com-
prehensive services to over 35,000
disabled Israeli war veterans.
"An Ad Hoc Committee of pro-
minent Americans is being formed
to implement the establishment of
the memorial," Zelig stated.
"Bnai Zion believes that the ef-
forts of the disabled to rise above
their physical limitations to lead,
once more, as normal a life as
possible, should serve as a fitting
memorial to the spirit of the
heroic astronauts."
Defense Expert Galili
Dead in Israel At 76
JERUSALEM Funeral ser-
vices were held Sunday for
Yisrael Galili, one of Israel's
leading defense policy makers
from pre-State days until recent
years. He died at his home Satur-
day at the age of 76. He had been
ill for the last two years.
Born in Brailov, Ukraine, Galili
was brought to Palestine by his
mother and uncle when he was
four years old. In 1930, he was
one of the founders of Kibbutz
Naan near Ramla, where he re-
mained an active member for the
rest of his life.
In the years which proceeded
the establishment of the State,
Galili was the head of the
Haganah national command. In
that capacity he was largely
responsible for preparing the
Haganah to meet the Arab attack
which followed the partition plan
in 1947.
Jordan, PLO Talks Were
Total Failure'Peres
JERUSALEM Premier
Shimon Peres said Sunday that at-
tempts to bring the PLO into the
peace process have been a "total
failure." Peres spoke at a recep-
tion in Tel Aviv after he was brief-
ed by Wat Cluverius, the U.S.
special envoy to the Middle East,
who came to Jerusalem from Am-
man last Friday. Cluverius also
briefed Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir at a separate meeting.
The American diplomat had an
indirect dialogue with PLO chief
Yasir Arafat. The intermediaries
were Hanna Seniora, editor of the
East Jerusalem Arabic daily Al-
Fajer, and Faez Abu Rahma, a
lawyer from Gaza, both prominent
figures in the Palestinian
LEASE
OFFICE SPACE
Excellent Location
24 Hour Security
Modern, Spacious
Meeting Rooms
Available Spring 1986
Contact: Franklin M. Einbinder
Director of Office Management
(305) 576-4000 ext. 300
community.
Arafat departed Amman Sun-
day after apparently rejecting
American terms offered for PLO
participation in peace negotia-
tions and stating conditions of his
own that were unacceptable to the
U.S. to Israel and possibly even to
King Hussein of Jordan.
Although diplomatic sources
here and in Amman insisted that
efforts are continuing to bridge
the gap between Hussein and
Arafat, their talks have ended.
Israeli sources publicly dismissed
claims from Amman that the talks
were still alive.
Strengthen Commitment To
RefuseniksU.S. Lawmakers
NEW YORK Three New
York area Congressmen, in-
cluding Sen. Alfonse D'Amato
(R), have urged a continued com-
mitment to the freedom of Soviet
Jews despite the release this week
of Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Cons-
cience Anatoly Sharansky.
The Washington lawmakers
said that while they were clearly
pleased with the release of
Sharansky as part of an East-
West prisoner exchange, this
should not preclude further ef-
forts toward a general easing of
the plight of Jews in the Soviet
Union.
David Hen (iurion:
"Technion is one of the
cornerstones development. /Is
scientific and technical
staff arc always
available to the
government. "
UTECHNION
ISRAEL INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
868-5666
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JEWISH
rwnonu
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer. .
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
4. The JNF needs you .. but you need
the JNF much more
i

** Greater MiamiJewish Federation
mA 4200 Biscayne Boulevard
T^^ RO. Box 370100
~~ Miami. Florida 33137-0100


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FILES


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
From Road Salesman to Temple Israel Founder
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Nat Roth, the last surviv-
ing founder of Miami's Tem-
ple Israel, is one heck of a
nice guy- Anyone who
knows him well will tell you.
Except Nat Roth.
His modest apartment in
Pembroke Pines is
decorated with plaques, old
photos, testimonials and
honors from the people he
touched in both his business
and civic lives thousands
of people, all across the
country.
If a truly modest man ever ex-
isted, Nat Roth is one.
Born October 2, 1896, on New
York City's East Side, Roth mov-
ed to South Florida with his
father, an immigrant from
Austria-Hungary. The year was
1912.
"HE NEVER was a wealthy
man," Roth recalled, "and he real-
ly hated the cold weather. At the
time, he was a contractor in coats
and suits. Since I was the worst
student in the family, the
'dumbest' of my brothers, I moved
with him to Daytona Beach to help
him get started in business. It was
just the two of us."
The elder Roth became a tailor
and eventually expanded the
business to include ladies' ready-
to-wear and dry cleaning.
Customers were the staff and
tourists in the hotels.
Panama hats were the biggest
selling item.
"Right after we started selling
apparel," Roth said, "The Florida
East Coast Railroad built this
hotel in Ormond Beach. Their
train ran to Palm Beach where
they had another hotel. The help
had no place to shop. So, I started
to peddle. I'd go on the bus from
Daytona south to Palm Beach and
Ormond Beach, and I'd bring
dresses and samples of women's
apparel, and I'd sell to the girls
who worked in the kitchen and
cleaned rooms."
ROTH BECAME one of the
pioneer road salesmen in the rag
trade, although at that time, roads
were few and far between.
"There were no roads south of
Palm Beach," Roth said. "Only
wood block trails." On one trip
from Titusville to Cocoa, only a
five mile distance, a thunderstorm
washed out the road. Roth
estimates 30 or 40 cars had to be
towed out, including his. "I spent
the night in my car, and it wound
up taking 18 hours to eomplete a
five-mile trip."
While in Palm Beach, Roth
became acquainted with a dress
shop-owner who also had a store
in Miami. He offered Roth a job,
which he accepted.
So, he moved from Daytona and
stayed at the Biscayne Hotel,
where Burdine's stands today.
The year was 1916.
AT THE outbreak of World
War I, Roth enlisted in the Navy.
His brother had come to Miami to
enlist, believing he'd be stationed
in Florida, and was posted to a
base in Pensacola. Roth did the
same, but wound up a machinist's
mate on a submarine-chaser that
patrolled the seaboard from
Pelham Bay in New York to Nor-
r folk, Va.
On his discharge in 1919, Roth
I immediately headed back to
1 Florida from New York, making
t only one stop along the way.
Nat Roth Remembers Signs
Warning 'No Jews Allowed'
"Before the war, when I lived in
Daytona Beach, I wold take the
train to Jacksonville frequently,"
he said. "I used to enjoy playing
basketball at the YMHA."
There, he met a girl.
"Her name was Pearl Lasky,
and she really was a pearl. So, on
my way down to Miami from New
York, I stopped at Jacksonville
and married her."
Mr. and Mrs. Roth arrived in
Miami, where Nat got a job with
another dress shop, this time as
the manager. "The shop was on
Flagler Street, which at that time
was called Twelfth Street it
was before Flagler built his
railroad."
DURING THIS period, Miami
had only one Jewish house of wor-
ship, Beth David Synagogue,
which had originally been organiz-
ed by Isidor Cohen as Beth Zion
Synagogue. Cohen had been in
Miami since 18%, the year Roth
was born, and was strongly com-
mitted to Orthodox Judaism.
Roth was a member of Beth
David but had a major complaint.
His first daughter, Millicent, was
five years old and ready to begin
her Jewish education. "I tried to
get Beth David to become a Con-
servative synagogue," he said,
"because the Sunday school
teaching was not what I wanted
for my daughter." A clash ensued
between Roth and Cohen over
ideology.
"I tried to get the board of
directors to change the Sunday
school into one that was partially
Conservative, taught in English. I
had a lot of opposition from Isidor
Cohen, who wanted it to remain
as an Orthodox congregation. I
then decided I would try to
organize a Reform temple."
"I REMEMBER Isidore
Cohen," said Millicent Roth
Spikla. "He died sometime around
1935." Most of the Jews in Miami
knew each other because "the
Jewish community was very small
here," she said. Does she recall
why her father wanted to split
from Beth David?
"He was brought up in an Or-
thodox home," she said. "Maybe
he just wanted to break away.
Maybe he just wanted more liberal
Jewish teaching." Millicent
knows. She was the first child to
grow up at Temple Israel, starting
from kindergarten and moving on
through high school graduation.
Sometime in the fall of 1921, a
meeting was held at the home of
Morris Cowen. Present were
Cowen, Morris Plant (nee Plikan-
sky), Dr. Salo Stein, Harry
Simons, Philip Ullendorff, Louis
Wolf son and Roth.
IN HIS BOOK, "Synagogue in
the Central City: Temple Israel
1922-1972," Carlton Tebeau
claims that Simons, who became
the temple's first president, was
the prime mover. Roth isn't so
sure.
"Ullendorff was a butcher who
had made a lot of money by sell-
ing meat to the hotels and the
Clyde Line steamships that used
to bring tourists from New York,"
he said. "He gave us the land for
the original temple."
Miami at the time was rife with
anti-Semitism, according to Roth.
"There were signs all around,
especially on the beaches, that
said, 'No Jews or dogs allowed.' It
The White Front leaders were driven
. from Miami and never heard from again.

was a rough time for Jews living
in Miami. We were blackballed if
we tried to join an organization
like the Masons. They said we had
to show 22 contribution to the
community."
MILLICENT AGREED. "It
was unusual for a Jew to get into
certain organizations. We weren't
ostracized I don't think, but we
weren't invited, and many Jews
just didn't get involved. There
was a lot of anti-Semitism,
though, especially at the hotels
and country clubs. I remember the
signs in Golden Beach, right on
A1A at both ends, saying, 'No
Jews.' It was very prevalent then
and not that long ago."
Roth did become a Shriner, and
was elected to their Legion of
Honor. He was also an Elk, and an
original member of the Jewish
War Veterans' Norman Bruce
Brown Post, one of that organiza-
tion's oldest. Eventually, he rose
to State Commander.
"He used to wear this fancy
uniform with a shiny metal
helmet, jodhpurs and these high
boots," Millicent recalled. "I used
to have to help him put them on,
they were so big. He was always
very involved in religious and civic
activities as I was growing up. He
has 50-year pins that he wears
proudly today."
THE ORIGINAL Temple Israel
was a 30-by-100-feet wood frame
structure that held around 300
worshippers. Built on Ullendorff s
land at 275 Northeast 14th Street,
and named after his father, "it
was an open-air temple with walls
that went halfway up," Roth said.
"We installed screens to keep the
mosquitos out and curtains that
we could roll up and down to keep
out the rain."
Only a year later, members
were looking for another site.
"By this time the temple's
growth was so rapid, the place
was too small to accommodate all
the newcomers," Roth said.
Ultimately, Sears Roebuck built
their store on the land.
"Money for a new temple was
raised in a lot of different ways,"
Roth said. "We would hold these
bazaars over at the pier where
Bayfront Park is now. We'd raffle
off anything, even chickens. We'd
have circuses. The main thing was
the temple, everything was the
temple."
ON OCTOBER 26, 1926, Mor
ris Plant, with Nat Roth and
daughter Millicent standing in
front of the crowd, broke ground
at Temple Israel's site on Nor-
theast 19th Street.
"I was only about five at the
time, but I do remember it," Milli-
cent said. "We had movies of it."
"We shot some 16 millimeter
home movies of the groundbreak-
ing," Roth said, "and I gave them
to Cantor (Jacob) Bornstein
around ten years ago."
The rest, as they say, is history.
MEANWHILE, Roth's ladies'
ready-to-wear shop failed, and he
took a job as a sales rep for Louis
Robinson, a manufacturer of coats
and suits. This led to his associa-
tion with Seymour Graff of Graff
of California, a major maker of
women's and children's wear.
Roth sold for Graff for over 43
years.
During World War II, Roth was
the only Jew in Florida appointed
to a draft board. According to
Millicent, he was very fair when it
came to making a decision about a
fellow Jew. "When someone
wanted him to intercede on behalf
of their son, he would declare
himself neutral if the kid was
Jewish," she said. "That way,
everybody \> us involved in the war
effort, and with the lottery
system, the way the number fell
determined the way someone was
taken into the service."
Roth also fought a different
kind of war on the home front.
Hate groun= -^ere becoming more
active, and Roth, a longtime B'nai
B'rith member, decided to do
something about it.
MILLICENT Roth Spilka: "I
remember there was trouble with
the Ku Klux Klan. They were go-
ing to have a march and a rally
somewhere down in the Redlands.
They used to burn crosses down
Roths major
complaint: 'I
wanted a different
Sunday School
teaching for my
daughter ... I had
a lot of opposition
from Isidor Cohen'
who came to
Miami in 1896.
there and in Homestead. I can
remember my father going out
with a group of friends and break-
ing up these things."
"The KKK was strong down
here," Roth said. "As Jews
bought property, the goyim
resented it." Another group, the
White Front, was a Nazi organiza-
tion connected to the German-
American Bund. Roth remembers
them well.
"This White Front announced
they were going to have a big rally
under a tent," he recalls. "So my
brothers, Burnie and Dan, along
with Sam Winer and I, got it in
our heads to stop them from hav-
ing this meeting. We were able to
organize a bunch of guys from the
JWV and made these weapons out
of iron pipes. They tried to have
their rally, and we showed up,
about 50 of us, and we broke up
their meeting." The White Front
leaders were driven from the com-
munity, and the organization was
never heard from again.
DURING THE course of his
career with Graff, Roth had many
notable achievements. He con-
vinced Serbin Company, a
Cleveland clothing manufacturer,
to relocate to Miami and provide
hundreds of job opportunities. He
organized NAWCAS, the Na-
tional Association of Women's
and Children's Apparel Salesmen,
and guided it to its place as one of
the nation's largest.
Through NAWCAS, he
established a foundation to sup-
port indigent widows of clothing
salesmen. He struggled with the
federal government to assure that
Social Security benefits are ap-
plied universally, including to in-
dependent salesmen whose
employers were not deducting
from their pay to provide income
after retirement.
"All my life," Roth said, "I've
been concerned with poor people
who were not covered under the
law."
IN A LIFE full of accomplish-
ment, of which is Roth proudest?
"Other than my childrenn Milli-
cent, Bernadien and Stanley, I'm
proudest of the teaching I receiv-
ed at the beginning of my career
with Seymour Graff. He told me I
should always consider people in
need.
"These honors," he said, gestur-
ing toward the table piled with
plaques and certificates of ap-
preciation, "are nothing. I'm only
glad I've been able to do wor-
thwhile things. And I will as long
as I live."


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Anatoly Sharansky: He's
Where He Longed To Be
It is difficult to conceive of. Anatoly
Sharansky is free. Finally, one man's agony
in the Soviet Garden of Eden is over.
Sharansky, who over the years has become a
symbol of oppressed people everywhere, is
finally where he belongs: with his wife and
family in Israel, the country he longed to live
in.
For this, he has his wife, Avital, to thank.
She it was who for years kept the story of
her husband's imprisonment at the hands of
a paranoid Soviet Union emblazoned in the
headlines of the world's press.
For this, he has such leaders as President
Reagan, French President Francois Mitter-
rand and West Germany's Chancellor
Helmut Kohl to thank. Theirs was a steady
drumbeat they kept up in the cause of
Sharansky's freedom at the highest levels of
Soviet leadership and on every occassion
that Soviet officials met with Western heads
of state in their own capital cities.
Soviet Boast Was Wrong
The Soviets were clearly wrong when they
imprisoned Sharansky and boasted to him
that he could say goodbye to the world out-
side because no one would care about his
fate. This may be what they counted on, but
it didn't turn out that way. When Sharansky
walked across the Glienicke Bridge from
East Berlin into West Berlin on Tuesday
morning, the Soviets were making a clear
confession that they had been defeated by
world opinion.
Furthermore, the United States deserves
special praise for its insistence as late as
Monday that Sharansky had to make his
walk to freedom by himself, not together
with the undercover agents who were also a
part of the exchange arrangement. From
the U.S. point of view, as indeed from any
one else's who knew the truth, Sharansky
was no spy.
In this, too, the Soviet Union, acceding to
the U.S. demand, for Sharansky did indeed
walk alone, demostrated to a watching
world that their original charges against
Sharansky were lies.
Only One Man Freed
What all this says at first glance is that the
masters at the Kremlin can be swayed from
their paranoid delusions, given sufficient
pressure from abroad. Still, the fact is that
in the release of Anatoly Sharansky, only
one man has been freed even if it is a man of
such symbolic importance and pesonal digni-
ty as characterize him.
As the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry points out in a statement in
Miami, "Even as he is freed from prison,
and from the larger jail of the Soviet state,
other Soviet Jews also guilty of the 'crime'
of wishing to live as Jews in the Soviet
Union, or to emigrate to Israel, or be
reunited with their families, remain harass-
ed, arrested, imprisoned."
We agree. As much as all of us rejoice at
Anatoly Sharansky's release, until the
others are free, the world cannot be appeas-
ed by this gesture on Tuesday.
U.S. Veto At UN
The United States has already vetoed a
Security Council resolution that would have
condemned Israel for intercepting the Li-
Jewish Florxdian
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byan jet last week on which the government
thought several notorious Palestinian ter-
rorists were traveling to Syria.
The resolution, in the eyes of the
American delegation, failed to uphold the
right of countries to intercept planes under
"exceptional circumstances." Hence the
veto. But that is too broad an observation.
Under its skirts, much mischief can be
produced.
And so Vernon Walters, the U.S. Am-
bassador to the United Nations, fudged and
felt compelled to include that, veto or no
veto, the Israeli interception of the Libyan
plane did not meet the criterion that a state
first have the "strongest and clearest
evidence that the terrorists are on board."
Then is the criterion that the legality of an
act of piracy depends upon whether or not it
succeeds?
But even given this pragmatic assurance,
there are clear problems. More than
anything else, the by now trite observation
that one man's terrorist is another man's
freedom-fighter may well justify tomorrow
or next week or next month or next year a
Syrian or Libyan interception of an Israeli
plane. Or an American plane predicated on
Syria's and Libya's stated belief that, after
all, the Israelis are mere surrogates for the
alleged American war against Arab freedom
in the Middle East.
Legality Is the Issue
Israel's Ambassador to the United Na-
tions Binyamin Netanyahu is correct when
he declares that "We are witnessing a new
kind of war a regime that systematically
conducts worldwide terrorism. What are we
going to do about this kind of phenomenon?
What are we going to do to prevent future
Romes, Viennas and the like?"
On the other hand, precedent of illegality
on the other side is no genuine justification
for the legality or illegality of piracy, no
matter who engages in it.
What justification, for example, can Israel
find for its failed attempt last week in the
fact that on November 10, 1958 the Syrian
air force intercepted King Hussein's jet in
Syrian airspace after Damascus had given
permission for his aircraft to enter Syria and
that when the King refused to obey a Syrian
order to land his plane in Damascus, it tried
to shoot it down?
Or that on July 22, 1971, following a coup
attempt against Sudan's leader Numeiri,
then an ally of Libya's Muommar Khadafy, a
BOAC airplane on a flight from London to
Khartoum was ordered, while flying in Li-
byan airspace, to land at Benina airfield
near Benghazi? Two Sudanese coup leaders
were on board and transferred to Tripoli
once the plane landed, after which it was
permitted to return to London.
Acts of piracy? Or acts of self-defense?
Needed is an international sense of accord
on the justice of intercepting airplanes.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin's statement
before the Knesset on Sunday that Israel
will never "give terrorist leaders insurance
policies" is brave. It may also be foolhardy,
since it opens a veritable Pandora's Box of
retaliatory possibility.
Mainly, it does not address the issue of
legality. And that needs to be addressed.
Right now.
United Opposition
AJCovg. Warns Against New Right Threat
Friday. February 14,1986
Volume 59
51 ADAR5746
Number 7
NEW YORK-Represen-
tatives to a conference of
Jewish, Christian, and
human rights organizations
have warned against the
threat posed by the religious
new right to religious
freedom and women's
rights.
The conference, held at
American Jewish Congress head-
quarters here, Jan. 13, issued a
call for united opposition to the
political activism of right-wing
fundamentalist groups.
THE CONFERENCE was co
sponsored by the American
Jewish Congress and the
Women's American Organization
for Rehabilitation Through
Training.
"Our very lives as people of
faith depend on religious freedom
and pluralism," Blu Greenberg
author of "On Women and
Judaism," told the audience of
more than 100 people who attend-
ed the convocation.
"As I watch some of the
evangelical programs, as I read
their pronouncements, I feel very
frightened," she said. "And I'm
sure that Catholics and Pro-
testants who locate themselves
along different points on the
religious spectrum feel the same
fear," she added.
HER WARNING was underlin-
ed by feminist and author Betty
Fnedan who cautioned against a
"strange convergence," a battle
against women's emergence to
full equality and control of our
own destiny and threats to the
pluralism and diversity of
religious belief that is so basic to
American democracy and the
flourishing of the highest values in
this country and the world."
The past ten years have
witnessed the growth of the fun-
damentalist right in the United
States." Friedan stated, "first
successfully defeating the Equal
Rights Amendment, and now try-
ing to take away the right of
women to decide whether to have
a child."
"We must be aware of the com-
mon danger," Friedan said. "Our
battle to preserve religious
freedom and our rights as women
is a common battle and it goes to
the very basis of our human values
and our highest spiritual values."
"The people who are trying to
break away from pluralism, im-
posing prayer of a given religion
in the schools, are the same
groups that fight the right of a
woman to control her own body in
the matter of abortion, or that
would ouUaw schoolbooks that
show women in non-traditional
OUTLINING the theme of the
conference, Norman Redlich
sXL? ?,e New York Univers *
School of Uw co^hairman of
tne AJCongress Comir- ., on
Law and Social Action he
history of the Est; ."
Clause, which he said, states
clearly the principle of "no
government support for religion."
He said recent Supreme Court
decisions appeared to jeopardize
the traditional separation of
church and state. The pluralism
that we enjoy in this country, the
right to be different, derives from
Constitutional protection of
religious freedom, he said.
Religiously defined roles for men
and women and all of the varia-
tions in lifestyles that comprise
religion, ought not be locked into
the law of the land, he added.
Congressman William Green
(R., N.Y.) delivered the keynote
address, sharply criticizing groups
that have used the issue of morali-
ty as justification for blocking
liberal measures from passage in
Congress, such as funding for
family planning facilities and
abortions for poor women.
STAN HASTE Y. director of In-
formation Services for the Baptist
Committee on Public Affairs, said
that the Fundamentalist rejection
of pluralism threatens to under
mine traditional Baptist unity
"But it is a much larger debate as
well," he declared. Constitution*
principles must be protected, he
stated.
The Rev. Jerry Falwell recently
announced that his Moral Major
ty is forming a new "Libert}
Federation" to lobby for politica.
causes. The conference organizers
Continued on Page 8-A
4


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, February 14, 1986
Interfaith Series
Controversial Issues Met Fairly
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
South Florida's Catholic
and Jews will meet to
discuss "What Is a Jew? at
the next interfaith en-
counter jointly sponsored by
the American Jewish Com-
mittee and the National
Conference of Christians
and Jews to be held Feb. 27
at the home of Thomas and
Joan Weidenfeld in South
Dade.
According to Julie Russin,
AJC's assistant area director, a
new series of interfaith en-
counters involving Jews and
Evangelical Christians is slated to
begin in March.
Russin, 24, is the program's is
coordinated. Their first discussion
group, held Jan. 16 at the home of
Sebastian and Rosary Mangano,
centered around the topic of
"Social Gospel," and according to
Russin, the program is gaining
momentum. How did the idea
come about?
"THE DIALOGUE itself is an
outgrowth of the Vatican II com-
memoration that we did in con-
junction with the Archdiocese of
Miami," Russin said. "Through
this commemoration, we had
workshops in education and, as a
follow up, Fr. James Fetscher of
St Louis Catholic Church and
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff of Tem-
ple Bet Breira has a public discus-
sion at St. Louis. The people from
Bet Breira who went were very in-
terested in having a discussion
group, as were the people from
the5jbureh.M :
Arrangements were made for
Fr. Fetscher to address the con-
gregants of Temple Bet Breira on
a Friday night Once again, the
subject of a discussion group
arose, "and there was even more
excitement" over the idea, accor-
ding to Russin. What is the
group's purpose?
"The bask point of having this
dialogue," Russin replied, "is to
increase understanding between
Catholics and Jews with regard to
religion and what's important to
each of them on a daily basis."
Although she admits that
''there are a lot of
disagreements," between both
faiths. Russin believes disagree-
ment "increases the understan-
Julie Russin
ding" between the two. "We
discussed Social Gospel. We
haven't discussed Vatican II or
other areas of great disagreement
yet."
IS THE group skirting around
the more controversial subject
areas? Not really.
"With the issues that we've
raised to begin with," she said,
"we're trying to create a certain
amount of togetherness within the
group so that the barriers will be
less intense, and people can
discuss what's on their minds
more freely."
An additional side benefit is in-
creasing the camaraderie among
neighbors in South Dade, par-
ticularly Kendall, Dade's fastest-
growing area, she added.
, Catholic turnout at the last
discussion session exceeded both
expectations and Jewish par-
ticipants. "Ninety percent of the
Catholics we invited showed up,"
Russin reported, "and altogether,
we had 20 Catholics and 15 Jews.
The Catholics," she added, "are
very committed. I believe they'll
all show up again."
RABBI NORMAN LIPSON.
director of the Institute for
Jewish Studies of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, will
lead the "What Is a Jew?" discus-
sion. Russin hopes for increased
Jewish attendance.
"I'm hoping for more Jewish
participation because it's a Jewish
issue, and it's at a Jewish home, so
it may bring out more Jews. It's a
heated issue for Jews, and even
though we're doing this through
Sei Ercir2, a Reform synagogue,
we have an Orthodox participant
and a Conservative participant as
well. Rabbi Tabachnikoff will be
there, which should add a little
flavor to it.
Russin has been involved in
Jewish issues since her high
school days in Miami Beach.
Daughter of a prominent medical
family of orthopedists, her fist ac-
tivities were through Temple Beth
Sholom's youth group. A one-time
"radical Zionist," she studied in
Israel, and graduated from Sim-
mons College in Boston in 1983.
While a student at Simmons,
Russin was instrumental in
developing a pilot program to
counter pro-Arab propaganda
during the Israeli invasion of
Lebanon. "The PLO came and
spoke at Harvard and Boston
University," she recalled, "and
there were a lot of professors on
campuses teaming up with pro-
Palestinians to hold these discus-
sions. There was a lot of
propaganda."
AT A SLIDE show of pictures
from the Lebanese war presented
by Simmons' only instructor of
Middle East affairs, Russin notic-
ed one shot was of a village
massacre by Lebanese militiamen
that had taken place in 1977. "She
pointed it out as an example of
what the Israelis had done,"
Russin said.
Pdssover
at the Concord
Wed. April 23-Thurs. Moy 1
The observonce of tra-
dition, the mognificence
of the Sedorim, the beouty
of the Services, the bril-
lionce of the Holidoy Pro-
gramming.
Cantor Herman
Malomood, assisted by
the Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Mothew Lazar
ond Don Vogel, to offidote
at the Services ond
Sedorim.
Outstanding leaders
from Government, Press,
the Arts ond Literature.
Great films. Music day ond
night on weekdays.
Special programs for tors,
rweeners and teens.
Rabbi Simon Cohen
ond resident Rabbi Eli
Mazur oversee constant
Kashruth supervision ond
Dietary Law observonce.
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Lipson Tabachnikoff
To combat pro-Arab informa-
tion dissemination, Russin's pro-
gram involved planting ques-
tioners in the audience. "The
questions we would plant would
counteract and put pressure on
the speaker. Boston is an intellec-
tual community and attracted a
lot of Arab politicos, and we'd do
this all over town. It was ex-
citing." Since then, Russin's pro-
gram has been implemented
nationwide.
According to Russin Vatican II
has far-reaching effect on the
Catholic faith. Among its points,
the Catholic hierarchy has called
for several measures concerning
Jews. In a document titled Nostra
Aetate ("Our Time"), Catholic
leaders called for a greater and
more meaningful relationship
with Jews, repudiated the concept
of the Jews' responsibility for the
death of Jesus, denounced at-
tempts at converting Jews to
Catholicism, increased teaching of
Jesus's Jewish background, and
rejected both the notion and
teaching of the Jewish people's re-
jection by God.
RUSSIN DEFINES her job at
the AJC as "non-defensive. It's
more of bringing together people
who are interested in Judaism-and
intergroup relations." Now that
she's Seen hoW Catholics and Jews
can get along in small groups,
what does she think the future
holds for relations between the
two faiths?
"From what I've seen in the
group and at the Archdiocese of
Miami, if the rest of the country is
like this, the prognosis is very
good," she said. "The people in
the group I've worked with are
open, both to AJC and Jews as a
group. We should be so lucky in
the rest of the country."
Hotel Bombing
Arabs' Work?
PARIS (JTA) A group .ail-
ing itself the Solidarity Commit-
tee with the Arab Political
Prisoners and the Middle Kast
claimed responsibility for setting
off the bomb which explode! in
the busy Claridge Hotel shopping
arcade off the Champs-Eh sees,
injuring seven people three
seriously.
The Committee's communica-
tion to a French news agency here
gave no details to substantiate its
claim of responsibility fur the
blast, which caused exti
damage. The communication also
called for the release of three ter-
rorists imprisoned in France.
The terrorists are Georges
Ibrahim Abdullah, believed to be
the head of the Lebanese Revolu-
tionary Armed Factions; Anis
Naccache, who tried to murder
former Iranian Premier Shapour
Bakhtiar; and Waroujan Garbi-
jian, an Armenian, who set off a
bomb at Orly Airport in the sum-
mer of 1983.
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