The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02969

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dTewisla Flor idliaim
/olume 58 Number 52 Two Sections Miami mUZlTTIZ-------T--------------
r______________________._______Miami, Florida Friday, December 27,1985
FratfMocftrt H, m.i.i S' 'S
Price 50 Cents
I To mark UN Human Rights Day, members of
\the 'S5s' women's campaign for Soviet Jewry
\ dress as Prisoners of Zion and hold a
I 'prisoners lunch' at the King David Hotel in
]py Problems
Jerusalem. 'Prisoners' ate bread and dried
nerving and drank water in a room of the hotel
which was made to resemble a prison by
Bezatel Art Academy students.
For Israel, the Soviets are Pivotal
London Chronicle Syndicate
|WASHINGTON Is it
ossible that Israel might
ae day be faced with the
time kind of spy scandal
hat has recently rocked
j'est Germany and the
Inited States?
[In recent days I put that ques-
bn to ^veral authoritative U.S.
felligence experts both in and
government. They included
ner U.S. officials who dealt
i Israel on a day to day basis.
Imost uniformly, they replied
that it was possible, although they
agreed that it was rather unlikely
that a Soviet agent today could
reach an equivalently high posi-
tion in Israeli intelligence.
They noted that Israel's internal
security was considered among
the best in the world. They had
very high regard for Israel's
counterintelligence methods and
capabilities. "The Israelis are very
careful." one U.S. sourced said.
BUT HE. as well as others, also
cautioned that Israel, like every
other Western country, has been
heavily targeted by the. Soviet
Federations Divest Themselves of
U.S. Holding in S. Africa
By AVIVA CANTOR
'JEW YORK (JTA) -
frree Jewish Federations
Boston, New York and
Rhode Island have decid-
ed to divest themselves of
holdings in American com-
panies operating in South
Africa which are not com-
mitted in principle and prac-
tice to the equality of non-
white workers with their
white employees.
Equal treatment for non-white
employees in South Africa is the
basis of the Sullivan Principles, a
voluntary code of conduct for-
Continued on Page 3-A
Union. "The KGB wants to know
very badly what's going on in
Israel," another American official
pointed out. "We have to assume
that they have tried to penetrate
the military, political and in-
telligence establishment theie."
Most specifically, the Soviets
want to know exactly what Israel
knows about them and their allies
in the region. This is their main
objective, according to U.S.
experts.
The Soviets have had some spec-
tacular successes over the years in
virtually every Western country.
The recent defection to East Ger-
many of Hans Joachim Tiedge, a
senior West German counter-
intelligence officer, was only the
most recent.
In the early 1950s, there was
the much celebrated case of Kim
Philby and his collaborators who
had risen in the ranks of British
intelligence as they reported to
their KGB masters. They had
been recruited by the Kremlin in
the 1930s during their student
days.
SYNDICATED columnist Jack
Anderson reported in The
Washington Post on Sept. 2 that
the U.S., for years, has particular-
ly worried about West German in-
telligence. "Fortunately," lfe
wrote, "the number of West Ger-
mans who have sold out over the
Continued on Page 8-A
Missile Crisis
Could Lead to
Confrontation
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin believes that the
elements of a serious con-
frontation between Israel
and Syria exist as a result of
Syria's recent deployment
of Soviet-made SAM-2
surface-to-air missiles along
its border with Lebanon
which abuts the Bekaa
Valley.
The Defense Minister outlined a
scenario that could lead to escala-
tion and conflict, in an address to
Israel Defense Force officer
cadets. Speaking at a Labor Party
seminar in Tel Aviv, Rabin
disclosed that Israel has warned
Syria that the SAM-2s on its
border could lead to conflict. He
said the warning was conveyed to
Damascus through the U.S.
HE DENIED reports that
Israel had apologized to Syria,
through the U.S., for shooting
down two Syrian jets last month,
in the course jf which Israeli
warplanes briefly entered Syrian
air space. Israeli officials are
reported tc have conceded that
this had been an error and asked
Washington to bring that view to
the attention of Damascus. But
according to Rabin, there was no
error.
He said the Syrian MIGs were
Continued on Page 12-A
U.S. May Require
Pollard Spy Case
Help From Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Washington has left open
the possibility that further
cooperation from Israel may
be necessary as the legal
process in the Jonathan
Pollard spy case unfolds in
the U.S. This is the inter-
pretation by observers here
of the statement released by
the State Department
Continued on Page 12-A
Bereaved Parents Press
For Lebanon Inquiry
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Bereaved parents of soldiers
killed in the Lebanon war are continuing to demand a full-
scale inquiry into the war. Premier Shimon Peres, who
himself once urged such an inquiry, believes it would be im-
practical to try to conduct one under present
circumstances.
That was the gist of his reply to Ephrat Spiegel, mother
of a fallen soldier, Yoav Spiegel. The family recently
returned to Peres a certificate of recognition of galant ser-
vice which the army sent posthumously.
"I know that my answer will not satisfy you, but who of
us can argue with a family which has lost their dearest
one," Peres wrote. He explained that there is no practical
chance at this time to form a committee to inquire into the
war, regardless of his personal views on the issue.
The Spiegel family recaled that Peres, when he headed
the opposition in parliament, has demanded an inquiry. He
Continued on Page 7-A
-- Orthodox Rabbi
Urges Reform To Retreat from Patrilineal Position
M>i Lookstein
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
Haskel Lookstein, spiritual leader
of Congregation Kehilath
Jeshurun, inducted into the
presidency of the New York
Board of Rabbis, has called upon
the Reform movement to
"retreat" from its "patrilineal
descent" decision according to
which children of intermarried
Jewish men are regarded as Jews
if brought up Jewishly and con-
nected to the temple.
The official statement of this
decision three years ago "has
driven a wedge between the left
and the right that fosters polariza-
tion, anger, resentment, bit-
terness and divisiveness," the Or-
thodox rabbi said.
LOOKSTEIN, who serves, too,
as the principal of Ramaz (day)
school in Manhattan, also called
for the exploration by rabbis of all
branches of American Judaism of
methods of conversion "which will
be acceptable by the Jewish peo-
ple as a whole, including Orthodox
Jews," and an agreement among
all branches that a Jewish
religious divorce (get) be given
when a marriage ends in civil
divorce, a practice Reform
Judaism does not require.
At the same time, Lookstein,
who described himself in his ac-
ceptance address as "part of cen-
trist Orthodox Judaism," voiced
strong criticism of those Orthodox
rabbis "who want no part of
dialogue" with their Reform and
Conservative counterparts "when
it comes to religious matters" and
who "are not ready to relate" to
Continued on Page 10-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
ADL Will Pay Legal
Fees for Protestors
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The local office of the
A nti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith announced that
it will pay all legal costs and
provide free legal counsel
for anyone arrested during
peaceful Soviet Jewry pro-
tests at the Soviet Embassy
here.
"This offer is effective im-
mediately, and will be extended
not just to those already arrested,
but to those who may be arrested
at future protests outside the Em-
bassy," Edward Leavy, the
ADL's Regional Director, said at
a press conference at the
Washington-Maryland regional
office.
Over 130 rabbis, cantors,
ministers, Hebrew school
teachers, college students and
others have already been arrested
in protests at the Embassy since
last May, when the Washington
Board of Rabbis began sponsoring
a series of planned arrests to
dramatize the plight of Soviet
Jews.
DM TWO separate court hear-
ings this month, 43 rabbis and a
Lutheran minister were convicted
of violating a District of Columbia
statute that prohibits demonstra-
tions within 500 feet of an Em-
bassy. Five of them decided last
week to go to jail rather than ac-
cept an offer of probation. They
began serving 15-day sentences
last Friday.
Spokesmen of the Washington
Board of Rabbis have repeatedly
stressed that the hope of those
who went to jail was to focus at-
tention on the persecution of Jews
in the Soviet Union and not on
their own imprisonment.
An appeal of the District
Court's refusal of bond for the
rabbis pending an appeal of their
convictions was rejected last Fri-
day, according to Dan Goldstein,
an attorney for one of the groups
of rabbis convicted this month.
GOLDSTEIN, who is also chair-
man of the ADL's Baltimore Law
Committee, and Edward Levin,
acounterpart in the ADL's D.C.
office, will coordinate the pro-
gram to provide the legal costs for
arrested protestors. This will be
the first time the committees
which include some 80 attorneys
as members will be involved in
the defense of individuals facing
criminal prosecution, Leavy said.
Leavy also indicated that the
committees will offer similar ser-
vices to anyone prosecuted for
demonstrating outside the South
African Embassy. None of the
hundreds of anti-apartheid pro-
testors arrested to date has been
prosecuted, something which has
prompted charges of "selective
prosecution" by the convicted rab-
bis and their attorneys.
Two other groups of Soviet
Jewry protestors are scheduled to
be tried next month and might
also consider opting for jail.
although no. decisions have been
made, according to spokesmen for
the Washington Board of Rabbis.
MEANWHILE, Jewish groups
are seeking to use the conviction
of the rabbis and the imprison-
ment of the five to stimulate
heightened Jewish involvement in
the Soviet Jewry activist said. He
said a telegram campaign has
been launched to express support
for the rabbis and their cause to
Attorney General Edwin Meese.
UN Calls for Hostage Release
Whoever Holds Them
By
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
The United Nations Security
Council has called for the release
of all hostages wherever and by
whomever they are held. The
resolution, adopted unanimously
by the 15-member body which in-
cludes the Soviet Union, con-
demned all acts of hostage-taking
and kidnapping without referring
to any specific instance.
The landmark resolution was
believed prompted by a series of
such acts in the Middle East and
Latin America. It followed by a
week the General Asembly's
unanimous condemnation of all
forms of terrorism as "criminal."
In October, the Security Council
unanimously condemned ter-
rorism "in all its forms," and,
specifically, the hijacking of the
Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro.
The resolution, adopted without
debate, was moved at the in-
itiative of the United States in
consultation with the Soviet
Union and other Security Council
members. It was sponsored by the
U.S., Britain, France, Denmark.
Australia, Egypt, Peru and
Trinidad-Tobago.
The draft urges the further
development of international
cooperation to find measures to
prevent, prosecute and punish all
acts of hostage-taking abduction
and other manifestations of inter-
national terrorism.
Vernon Walters. U.S. Am-
bassador to the UN. observed that
"only by concerted worldwide ac-
tion can we hope to put an end to
the repugnant practice of hostage
taking. It is dear from the resolu-
tion that no 'cause,' no 'excuses'
can justify such threats to human
rights and human lives."
He added that the resolution,
combined with the General
Assembly's earlier action, puts
the UN "firmly on record against
all terrorist crimes." He said that
while the "lunatic fringe" cannot
be expected to desist, "all law-
abiding states" are expected "to
take all practicable measures to
prevent terrorism and to pro-
secute and punish all terrorists
wherever they are."
Leonard Bernstein, conductor and composer,
shows his delight at receiving the National
Jewish Music Atvard from JWB blowing the
huge, triple-twisted Sephardic shqfar (ram's
Manhattan, took the form of the shofar, a
check, and a citation paying tribute to Bern.
tein for his 'significant contribution to the
field of Jewish music.' Looking on (left) Dr.
horn) presented to him by Janet and Leonard Tzipora H. Jochsberger, founder and director,
Kaplan of Boston (right) on behalf of JWB's Hebrew Arts and Music School, New York ci
Jewish Music Council, which Kaplan chairs. ty, chairman of jury which chose Bernstein to
The award, presented at Avery Fisher Hall in receive award.
Reaganites Say
Commies Have 'Flawed' Rights Record
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion charges that the Soviet
Union and its East Euro-
pean allies continue to have
a "seriously flawed" record
in human rights.
This assessment was made by
the State Department as it releas-
ed the 19th semiannual report on
compliance with the Helsinki
Final Act. The report, which
covers the period April 1 to Oc-
tober 1, 1985. was submitted to
Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R., N.Y.),
chairman of the Commission on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe.
"Although the record of com-
pliance varies among the Eastern
states during the six-month period
covered by the report, overall per-
formance remained seriously
flawed in the human rights and
humanitarian area," State
Department deputy spokesman
Charles Redman said.
FOR JEWS, the main area of
concern continues to be the Soviet
Union where persecution by
Soviet authorities continues and
only 457 Jews were allowed to
emigrate from Apr. 1 to Aug. 31.
"Individual Jewish refuseniks
have responded in various ways to
official intransigence on emigra-
tion," the report noted. "Some in
resignation have currently stop-
ped applying to leave, while
as frequently
once every
as
six
others apply
possible
months."
The report points out that dur-
ing the period it covers there was
"a continued crackdown on
Jewish, primarily refusenik.
cultural activists and teachers of
Hebrew. "'Describing the June
trial and "confession" to Zionist
and anti-Soviet activities by
Moscow Hebrew teacher Dan
Shapiro, the report concludes that
it "was widely interpreted as a
stern warning against assertion of
Jewish culture and identity."
THE REPORT outlines the ar-
rest of other Hebrew teachers and
said "the number of Hebrew
teachers and other Jews imprison-
ed for political reasons was con-
servatively estimated at 22 at the
end of the current review period."
During the six months covered
there has been "a continuation of
past patterns of thinly-veiled and
hostile 'anti-Zionist' rhetoric," the
report said. "Soviet propaganda
maintains that Israeli and
Western intelligence agencies en-
courage emigration in order to ob-
tain state secrets from Soviet
citizens.
"It further alleges that
'Zionists' collaborated with
fascists during World War II to
send many innocent Jews to their
deaths. These 'Zionist elements,'
so the argument goes, now com-
prise the ruling circles of Israel.
which have inherited Hitler's
fascist mantle.
"The anti-Zionist Committee of
the Soviet public, an officially
sanctioned group, continues to
lead the propaganda against
Jewish refuseniks and Zionists.'
A Soviet TV documentary and >
new Soviet 'White Book' have
alleged links between Zionist' ac-
tivities and Western intelligence
organ ixations."
Moslems
Threaten Murder
TEL AVTV (JTA) A Shih*
Moslem group in Lebanon has
threatened to murder four Beirut
Jews they kidnapped several mon-
ths ago unless Israel frees 300
Shiites the group claims are being
held prisoner in south Lebanon,
Israel Radio, quoting Beirut
newspapers Tuesday, identified
the Jewish hostages as Isaac
Sasson, Isaac Tarab, Eii Tsrirand
Haim Cohen Hallalah.
Gala
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Tuesday, December 31,1985
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3 Federations
Divest Themselves of U.S. Holdings in South Africa
Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Continued from Page 1-A
mulated in 1977 by Philadelphia
Minister Leon Sullivan. The Prin-
ciples call for equal pay for non-
whites, desegregation of the
workplace and the improvement
of the quality of life for non-whites
outside it. American companies
which are signatories to the Prin-
ciples are evaluated annually for
compliance with them, and for
progress toward their goals, by
the Arthur D. Little Company.
THE JEWISH Advocate of
Boston, in a front-page story by
Lawrence Harmon, reported that
the Combined Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater Boston
together with Beth Israel Hospital
and Temple Israel voted Nov.
26 to divest themselves within a
year of securities in American
companies which are non-
signatories of the Sullivan Prin-
ciples or which received low
.scores from the independent
I evaluation by the Little Company.
The decision also directed the
three institutions to make future
investments in accordance with
these guidelines.
The combined total of the in-
vestment portfolio of the three
Boston institutions is $75 million,
of which approximately $3 million
- about four percent for each is
invested in six companies which
received inadequate ratings for
compliance with the Sullivan Prin-
ciples. The institutions declined to
make known the names of the
| companies. Although each institu-
tion maintains independent in-
vestment portfolios, a joint board
of managers oversees investment
practices for all three, according
to the Advocate article.
the CJP share of the total
amount invested is $37 million, of
which about $1,480,000 is affected
by the divestiture decision, Har-
mon reported. The size of Beth
Israel s portfolio is "roughly in
hne with that of the CJP, accor-
ding to information received by
the weekly newspaper, although
the hospital officially acknowledg-
ed only a portfolio of $17 million.
Temple Israel's investments total
$2 million.
THE "key driving force for
divestment" in the Greater
Boston area, according to Har-
mon, is Justin Wyner, chairman of
the Board of Managers of Temple
Israel. "Many Jewish leaders have
talked about how terrible things
are in South Africa but never
looked at their own investments,"
Wyner told the Advocate. He
hoped, he said, that "all Jewish in-
stitutions will follow" the example
of the three Boston institutions
adding that "it's time for South
Africa to listen."
The Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies of New York an-
nounced the decision by its Board
of Trustees to have the FJP divest
itself of holdings in American
companies which do not subscribe
to the American companies which
do not subscribe to the Sullivan
Principles and to refrain from
future investments in such
companies.
The New York Federation has
investments totalling $11 million
in approximately 30 American
companies operating in South
Africa out of a total portfolio of
approximately $60 million,
William Kahn, its executive vice
president, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. Kahn declin-
ed to make available the names of
the companies involved other than
to say that some were "blue-chip"
corporations.
Barbie Trial Postponed
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The
Supreme Court has
postponed the trial of Nazi
war criminal Klaus Barbie
which had been scheduled to
open Feb. 3.
France's highest court an-
nounced the postponenment of
the trial after it overturned a
lower court decision and after it
ruled that the 73-year-old former
Gestapo officer could be charged
with crimes against French
resistance fighters as well as
crimes against Jewish civilians
who he oredered deported to
death camps.
LEGAL EXPERTS said that
I the trial could begin next March
I or April, at the earliest, after the
upcoming legislative elections.
Although the postponement is
not linked to the elections, many
believe that the government
wanted to avoid a possible
political scandal during the pre-
election period. Barbie's lawyer,
Jacques Verges, has said that he
intends to shed light on the
betrayal of France's wartime
resistance leader, Jean Moulin, to
the Nazis. Verges has implied that
other resistance leaders informed
the Gestapo of Moulin's
whereabouts for political reasons.
Some French newspapers
predicted that Barbie will never
be put on trial because of his poor
health. The Nazi war criminal is
under treatment for a variety of il-
lnesses at the Montluc Prison in
Lyon where he has been detained
since his expulsion from Bolivia in
February, 1983.
\\>ets
He said that the securities to be
divested are currently valued at
$1 million. The divestiture pro-
cedure will be carried out within a
month's time. In addition, Kahn
said that the FJP has $5 million in
companies which subscribe to the
Sullivan Principles but which
haven't made "significant move-
ment" toward implementing its
guidelines.
THESE COMPANIES will be
carefully monitored by the
Federation over the next year and
decision on divestment will be
made on a company-by-company
basis. An additional $5 million is
invested in companies which are
signatories to the Principles and
are "working actively to improve
the quality of life for all people" in
South Africa, Kahn said.
The divestment decision, an-
nounced by Federation President
Daniel Shapiro, was reached by
the Federation Committee on
Government Relations and the
Finance Committee, said Kahn.
Both committees shared a
"concern in terms of Federation
representing certain Jewish
values" which made it "inap-
propriate for Federation to hold
securities be part of the owner-
ship of companies in South
Africa which are not working
toward the democratic ideal of
people having the right to live a
full and complete life," Kahn said.
The Jewish Federation of Rhode
Island adopted a resolution June 6
endorsing the concept of divest-
ment from holdings in companies
which do not "adhere to anti-
apartheid standards such "as the
Sullivan Principles." The Federa-
tion has since that time divested
itself of "a few stocks," said ex-
ecutive Vice President Elliot
Cohan.
THESE HOLDINGS are in
companies which either did not
respond to the Federation's in-
quiries as to whether they were
signatories to the Sullivan Prin-
ciples, or who informed the
Federation they did not sign the
Priciples and which the Federa-
tion felt did not give "ample
reason" for this, or which showed
"no evidence of participating in
any constructive efforts for Black
workers."
The Rhode Island Jewish
Federation declined to reveal the
amount of money invested in
South African companies, the
names of the companies, or the
value of the divested stock or of
its total investment portfolio.
Did you Know?
More than 70% of
Israel's scientists
and engineers are
Technion
graduates.
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reminds us that different people,
with different views, should be
able to live in harmony.
American Savings is pleased
to help bring Anne's timeless
message to our community
Anne Frank In The World: 1929-1945
An exhibition of her original
diary 800photographs, a model
of the secret annex and a video
presentation.
Main Library
Metro-Dade Cultural Center
101W. Flagler StreetMiami
Dec. io Jan. 26


Page 4-A The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Rabbis Could Hardly
Strike A Bargain
Imagine the horror of five rabbis sitting in
jail five of an oriyrinal 22 who were ar-
rested, along with a Lutheran minister, for
staging a Soviet Jewry demonstration
within 500 feet of the Soviet Embassy in
Washington last May.
Yet there they are, serving a 15-day
prison sentence handed down by Judge Col-
een Kollar Kotelly, who reacted to the rab-
bis' refusal to accept a suspended sentence
by saying, "You do not wish to remain in the
community."
No reference to the issue of Soviet oppres-
sion came from the Judge, no reference to
the principle involved in the rabbi's rejection
of striking bargains for their freedom at the
same time that the purpose of their
demonstration was to bring national atten-
tion to the plight of Soviet Jews.
Soviet Jews have no choice not even the
insensitive choice that Judge Kotelly offered
the rabbis. Soviet Jews are oppressed ex-
clusively because they are Jews who want to
live as Jews, not the automatons that the
Soviet Union would make of all its people.
How in the world can they make a deal to
stay out of prison? Would uiey if they could?
Hardly likely.
And so in Washington, D.C., the capital of
the leading free world power, five rabbis
languish in jail because a Judge refused to
understand a principle of human freedom. A
Judge chose the 500-foot sanctity of the
Soviet Embassy over a human rights issue.
The Soviet Union got its way in Washington
just like it gets its way in Moscow.
Soviets Win in D.C.
There is something strange in all of this.
The rumor mill suggests that, shortly before
President Reagan left for his summit en-
counter with Mikhail Gorbachev, that most
utilitarian American politico of them all,
Richard Nixon, urged Mr. Reagan not to
raise the Soviet Jewry issue publicly in
Geneva. The story is that he agreed.
But in Geneva, Mr. Reagan addressed the
issue head on with Gorbachev by telling the
Soviet leader that Americans want positive
results, not just fancy PR emanating from
Moscow.
What the President may have had in mind
was the result of the Rev. Jesse Jackson's
meeting with Gorbachev in Geneva, when
Jackson spoke in behalf of dissident Jews.
The upshot of that meeting was the Gor-
bachev reaction that has since been
emblazoned in the minds of all people long
accustomed to Soviet duplicity:
"We would like to say," decalred Gor-
bachev, "that the Jews are a part of the
Soviet people. They are fine people. They
contribute a lot to the development of our
country. They are a very talented people ...
Therefore, the so-called problem of Jews in
the Soviet Union does not exist."
In a reverse order, the philosopher, St.
Anselm, argued in the 11th Century that, of
course, God exists. His scientific proof?
"Can you imagine that he does not exist?"
The Gorbachev ontology is much the same.
"The Jews are fine .. they contribute ...
they are talented ... Therefore, the so-
called problem ... does not exist."
Some 100 years after Anselm, another
Catholic philosopher, Aquinas, called
Jewish Floridian
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Anselm's "proof for the existence of God
hokum. Post-Geneva, the Gorbachev state-
ment deserves similar treatment.
In Geneva, the President of the United
States took on the Soviet Union's Big Chief,
telling him the American people expect
positive results on the summit agenda and
on human rights, as well. But in
Washington, D.C, five rabbis languish in
prison because they did precisely what the
President had done in Geneva.
Sheer Insurrection
In an article appearing recently in a set-
tlers' periodical, Aleph Yud, which is an
acronym for Erez Yisrael, a writer urges
settlers "to prepare to take up arms and
fight brother against brother" to prevent
the government from ceding any of Judea,
Samaria or Gaza to the Arabs.
In the writer's view, "We may well be
witness to a most horrifying scene in which
there will be widespread underground ac-
tivity within the Green Line, mutiny in the
Israel Defense Forces, subversion in the
security services, an armed insurrection in
the territories and, in the end, a war of Jew
against Jew."
This is stern stuff. Nevertheless, it shows
the frustration that many Israelis feel as the
prospect looms larger of still more amputa-
tions of the country in the cause of elusive
peace.
It is easy to understand the political dif-
ferences on this issue between, say, the rul-
.,
ing Laborites and the Likud opposition now
waiting their turn to take over under the
Unity Government plan. These are dif-
ferences that are rather profound. Conven-
tional wisdom is that Labor would gladly
give more for peace than the Likud.
But does the Aleph Yud article go even
further? We expect so. Furthermore, we
believe it is sheer fantasy. The article
reminds us of the atmosphere attending the
vacating of Yamit, the final northern settle-
ment enclave in the Sinai when Israel ceded
that peninsula to Egypt in the cause of the
Camp David peace accord.
Will one ever forget IDF struggling with
settlers to tear them from their apartments?
That was torturous enough.
But what Aleph Yud encourages is sheer
insurrection. May none of it ever occur.
Jewish Feminist Movement
Celebrating Its Bar Mitzvah Year
, doc* C* -** "-
Friday, December 27, 1985
Volume 58
15TEVETH5746
Number 52
By GLORIA DEUTSCH
London Chronicle Syndicate
The Israeli feminist move-
ment has just passed if a
metaphor from the male
world is permissible its
Bar Mitzvah year. Thirteen
years ago the first tentative
moves were made to bring
awareness of Women's Lib
to male-oriented Israeli
society.
The movement, perpetually
plagued by internal personality
clashes, conflicts of interest and
aims between the lesbian and
heterosexual elements, external
disappointments and betrayals,
can now look back on a period of
achievement tempered by set-
backs in which the status of
women has at least become an
issue that no one laughs about any
more. But, as one activist put it,
"the revolution has not yet
come."
It all began in the winter of
1971, when two groups were
established quite by coincidence
and independently of each other.
IN HAIFA, Marcia Freedman,
a young American immigrant
teaching philosophy at the Univer-
sity, began to put around ideas
about equality for women which
must have sounded as revolu-
tionary as Galileo's theories to the
fixed-idea mentality in which they
both operated. In Jerusalem, a
left-wing oriented group,
dominated by Community lawyer
Leah Tsemel, began their
activities.
The press started to bite. Mar-
cia Freedman gave an interview
to La'iska, the woman's glossy
magazine, and spoke on radio. In
Tel Aviv, her ideas struck a chord
in the mind of a young housewife,
Esther Eilam, a sociologist and
mother of two. She contacted
Marcia, who instructed her to
read Betty Friedan, sent other
material and helped her to
establish the Tel Aviv group.
"We advertised our first
meeting at the university, and
four women turned up, but by the
time we held our second meeting,
we were 14." They held
consciousness-raising discussions
(libbers' jargon for being taught
*e "right" attitudes) and talked
out their problems.
"We all felt there was
something wrong in our lives. One
of the first discussions was on who
was supposed to clean out the
toilet. It was like a symbol of the
woman's role; in every case the
woman was the one to do it."
LIKE HER American sisters,
Esther began to question her
whole way of life. "I was doing an
important job 24 hours a day and
was taken for granted. No one
thought about me as a person. I
felt. outside of life."
The small nucleus of Womens'
Lib in Tel Aviv found some initial
support in Naamat, the pioneer
women's labor organization. A
joint meeting was held, addressed
by Knesset Member Shulamit
Aloni (known even then for her
stand on human rights), Marcia
Freedman and Ruth Rasnic, who
later became a familiar figure in
the fight against violence towards
women, particularly battered
wives.
When the feminists decided to
hold their first demonstration
against an Ideal Woman contest
being held in Tel Aviv's Mann
Auditorium the male
chauvinists around realized that
Women's Lib had finally arrived
in Israel. "We had achieved our
first aim," recalls Esther, "of con-
vincing people that there was a
problem."
The movement received a
tremendous boost with the elec-
tion in 1973 of Marcia Freedman
to the Knesset, where she made
herself heard on the subject of
battered women (she had already
opened the first shelter in Haifa).
Watching a film clip recently of
her maiden speech, one is struck,
to boiling point, by the rows of
elderly male members of the
Knesset sniggering at the whole
idea and Marcia, her Hebrew une-
qual to the task of answering
them, having to content herself
with flashing her dark eyes at
them disgustedly, in a quite un-
parliamentary way.
EVEN WITH their "own"
Knesset member, however, the
feminists were dissatisfied with
their progress. And relations with
Marica Freedman were not good.
Says Esther Eilam:
"She told us that she was
elected not just for women's
rights, but for all citizens, and
again we felt betrayed. As an im-
migrant, she didn't really know
enough about Israeli women. She
was unpopular because of her very
left-wing political views, and yet
the public considered her our
spokeswoman."
Possibly her outspoken views in
favor of lesbianism did nothing to
improve the image of the women's
movement in general, and in 1977
she was attacked for having
criticized the Israeli Government
while in America. I interviewed
Marcia then and recall her
scathing reference to her ex-
husband and men in general.
"Picking up and washing his
smelly socks isn't my idea of
fulfillment," she told me. dismiss-
ing all her critics as either fascists
or mentally deranged.
THE FIRST practical achieve-
ment of the feminist movement
came at the beginning of 1974,
when the issue for which they had
come out on the streets for the
first time abortion law reform
- was debated in the Knesset.
As early as 1972, Uri Avnery,
the left-wing editor of Hadan
Hazeh, had raised the issue, and
although Marcia Freedman had
suggested they support it, they
felt they could not work with him,
given the pornographic nature of
his publication. So they acted
alone, demonstrating outside the
Knesset for the right of women to
control their own bodies. (At the
time abortion was totally illegal-
and back-street abortions were
rife.)
The Bill, proposed by Shulamit
Aloni, was passed with the famous
clause allowing abortion for social
reasons which has since been
repealed by the Likud. The
feminists were not satisfied even
Continued on Page 10-A


Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
How U.S. Forces Chased Enemy Behind Lines
By MIMI FOUNTAIN
When the 100th Infantry
Division crossed the Rhine
River on March 22, 1945, in
hot pursuit of the retreating
German forces, Pfc. Keith
Winston, a combat medic,
managed to get a succinct
comment past the military
censor to his wife back in
Philadelphia:
"I'm sure you can guess where
ve are now. But in case you can't
- I can probably get away with
saying that when we reached this
sacred soil' everyone stopped,
and every troop, in ceremonious
style, urinated."
WINSTON was 32 years old.
Jewish, and the father of two
children when he was drafted into
ihe Army in the spring of 1944.
Assigned to the 100th Division
shortly before it departed for
France later that year, he served
throughout the Century Division's
170 days of front line duty, and as
a combat medic usually managed
to pen a few lines to his wife
almost every day.
Winston died in 1970, and his
widow, Sarah Winston, had edited
his wartime letters into a book,
"V-Mail: Letters of a World War
II Combat Medic" (Algonquin
Books of Chapel Hill), which the
military historian, John S.D.
Eisenhower, describes in his in-
troduction as offering "a new
perspective" to the written record
of World War II.
Winston's letters, he says, pro-
vide a look at the war it seemed to
the men in the ranks at the time:
"No ike and Monty' controver-
sies; no 'Blood and Guts' flam-
boyance just reality."
Like most American civilians of
his age who are forced to leave
their jobs and families and become
part of America's military
machine, Winston didn't want to
go, and intensely disliked the
regimented nature of life in the
Army. His early letters home,
written while he underwent basic
infantry training, are filled with
'I'm sure you can guess where we are now. But
in case you can't I can probably get away
with saying that when we reached this 'sacred
soil' everyone stopped, and every troop, in
ceremonious style, urinated.'
Excerpts From A Soldier's Letters
"It's Sunday, but you wouldn't know it unless
someone told you. You'll get a kick out of this. One
of the Medics decided he'd like to attend Jewish
services but since there's no Jewish Chaplain, he
conducted the services himself. I was there with 15
others. The Catholic Chaplain supplied us with
Jewish prayer books, and this young Medic did an
excellent job. There was humor in it, too. This
fellow was so determined to have a good number
show up, he kept looking out of the window to see
if any more were coming. He watched as one boy
from a foxhole walked right past (the poor guy
couldn't find the place), and he says, "That son of a
bitch.' The guy finally came in."

"Remember Mox? The Jewish refugee boy who
had relatives over here? Today we heard a rending,
pitiful story. He was finally able to visit his home
town, and when he got to his old house, the oc-
cupants told him his parents had been sent to
Lublin concentration camp three years ago and
you know what that means wholesale slaughter.
The poor guy. You should have seen him when he
came back. His eyes were red and swollen, his face
wet with tears. No one or nothing could console
him.
"The boys were tripping over one another trying
to make him feel a little better. What can you say
to a boy with a tragedy so decimating as his? No
one could find the right words. Even Chuck, the
'rough' GI from Arkansas, who's never at a loss
for words. Then he stuttered, his'voice husky with
emotion, 'God damn, Mox, I'll get me a rifle and go
out pussonly and pick off a few Krauts. Them
lousy, heartless sonofabitches.' He was dead
serious, and even Mox smiled through his tears."
the griping that was the American
GI's prerogative.
FOLLOWING basic training
and assignment to the 100th Divi-
sion, he was interviewed before
being placed in a unit. He men-
tioned that he had been known to
faint at the sight of blood. In
characteristic Army fashion, he
was assigned to the 398th Infan-
try Regiment as a combat medic.
Shortly after his outfit went in-
to action in the Vosges Mountains
of France, he was sent to rescue a
wounded soldier. "I was deter-
mined to avoid looking at this
catastrophe and tried to keep
my head averted as much as it was
possible," he wrote home.
"But somehow and this is
really uncanny the first thing
that drew my eyes, as if magnetiz-
ed, was this torn-off leg. I was
almost in a state of shock, and I
just stood there, staring, almost
not believing what I saw.
"But Honey, somehow a
superstrength rushed through in
moments like these and I was
aware that the life of this boy
depended upon our immediate and
careful attention. To make a long,
gruesome story short, I did what I
was sent out to do and that was
my first and thorough initiation.
After that, I was about; ready for
anything."
WINSTON WAS soon wounded
himself, and was later awarded
the Purple Heart medal. He
became a valuable member of his
medical detachment and after the
fighting was over was awarded a
Bronze Star for meritorious ser-
vice in combat; on one occasion,
his commanding officer referred
to him as "the one indispensable
man" in the detachment.
The 100th Division participated
in the U.S. Seventh Army's drive
to oust the Germans from the
Vosges Mountains, cracked the
formidable Maginot Line fortifica-
tions which the Germans had oc-
cupied after the French surrender
in 1940, withstood savage
counterattacks as a consequence
Continued on Page 9-A
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud A Charmer'
t
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writtr
First of all, he was 45
minutes late. Second,
throughout the entire inter-
view, phones rang and peo-
ple wandered in and out of
is office. Yet, Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud still
came off smelling like the
proverbial rose.
This man is a charmer. No
doubt about it.
He is also the consummate
politician.
Hi! How are ya?" "Nice to see
ya, old buddy." "Jewish Flori-
dian? Super publication." A real
haimisch mensch.
ON HIS WALL, sandwiched
between newspaper cover-stories
of his electoral victory and a color
print of him finishing a nine-mile
run down his city's sand, are
photos of his heroes. Yitzhak
Shamir and Meanchem Begin.
Both have lauded Daoud for his
"devotion to the State of Israel."
He doesn't miss a chance to be
before the public.
He presented Col. Lou Lenart,
the father of the Israel Air Force,
with a key to the city. He also
gave one to Ambassador Eliahu
Ben-Elissar before 600 people at a
banquet of the Jewish National
Fund. All within a matter of two
days.
BORN IN Miami Beach in 1944,
this son of a Lebanese Christian
father and a Jewish mother grew
up during the zenith and nadir of
Miami Beach's struggle for
respect as a city.
He learned to speak Spanish
fluently "out of respect for the
Cuban-Jewish community."
Does this man sound like a
politician?
On his defeated predecessor:
"Malcolm Fromberg is a nice per-
son, competent and a good trial
attorney."
On Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez:
"He's a wonderful man."
On Metro-Dade Mayor Steve
Clark: "Mayor Clark is very, very
nice."
On his Miami Beach Commis-
sion: "I feel good about them. This
is the finest commission ever
elected."
ALEX DAOUD manages to
avoid controversy like an anorexic
avoids food. "I don't gamble,
drink or smoke," he said, "and I
don't think you can legislate
morality." That's why he favors a
state lottery.
Mention casinos, and a slightly
different tune emerges. "The
casino gambling issue can be a
two-edged sword. It depends on
how much revenue a municipality
gets in return. Casino gambling
can be good or bad depending on
how it's structured."
"We have gambling in our com-
munity," he continued. "We have
the horses, we have the dog
tracks, jai-alai, So I don't think it's
an ethical or moral question. I
think you have to deal with the
question of the income that will be
returned to the community. If it's
voted for, I'll support it 100
percent."
How is he going to vote on the
issue when it appears on the 1986
ballot? "I'll have to see how it's
structured," Daoud said.
TO DEMONSTRATE his
solidarity with the United Farm-
workers Union, Daoud instructed
Senior Assistant City Attorney
Jean Olin to draft a resolution call-
ing for a boycott of California
grapes. Insecticide containers
have been used by farmworkers to
wash fruit, and to drink from.
"I met with Cesar Chavez, Sen.
Jack Gordon and Rep. Mike Fried-
man. The grapes coming out of
California are extremely hazar-
dous, loaded with pesticides and
other contaminants. The rights of
Continued on Page 11-A
He doesn't miss a chance to be in public.
MIAMI BEACH MAYOR DAOUD


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Poles, WJC Negotiate
Over Jewish Culture
CD ve
WARSAW- (JTA) The
nature and extent of Jewish
claims regarding the protection
and restoration of the 1,000-year-
old Polish-Jewish cultural and
religious heritage have been defin-
ed here in negotiations between
the Polish government and an
eight-member Jewish delegation
headed by World Jewish Congress
President Edgar Bronfman. The
negotiations followed a three-day
official visit to Warsaw by the
Jewish delegation.
"The agenda has been defined
and agreement on all but the most
technical of points has been reach-
ed," said Kalman Sultanik, WJC
vice president
IN A RELEASE here, the of-
ficial Polish press agency describ-
ed the negotiated items as en-
visaging "the problems of
maintenance and display of
religious objects related to the
Mosaic faith, archives on the life
of Jews in Poland, commemora-
tion of sites of Nazi mass crimes
committed against Jews, the
Jewish pavillion at the Auschwitz
museum, Jewish cemeteries and
other issues."
The Jewish delegation
represented the so-called "Tripar-
tite Commission" which was
formed to coordinate representa-
tions to the Polish authorities. The
Commission includes the WJC and
two of its affiliated bodies which
Career Scientist
Has Deep
Jewish Links
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) Dr.
Steven Rosenberg, head of the
research team at the National
Cancer Institute in Bethesda,
Md., credited with a major
breakthrough in the treatment of
malignant tumors, had an Or-
thodox Jewish upbringing in The
Bronx and is a member, with his
wife Alice, of Beth-El Synagogue,
a Conservative congregation in
Bethesda where the oldest of his
three daughters, Beth, was Bat
Mitzvah last year.
Rosenberg's parents, Abraham
and Harriet Rosenberg, have been
residents of Israel for the last 12
years. They are 86 and 80 years of
age, respectively, and see their
son on his visits to Israel at least
once a year. These trips have kept
the familial bond intact despite
the distance separating parents
and son, Rosenberg told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency in a
telephone interview.
HE CAME to media pro-
minence last summer as
spokesman for the medical team
that operated on President
Reagan for cancer of the colon.
He broke into the news again last
week when the Institute announc-
ed dramatic results achieved by
using genetically engineered pro-
tein to loll cancer cells.
The process, which is complex
and still in the experimental
stage, is baaed on enhancing the
body's immune system so that it
produces "killer cells" which at-
tack some forms of cancer.
The Institute announced Dec. 4
that Rosenberg'8 technique had
achieved a remarkable rate of suc-
cess, reducing by over 50 percent
the size of tumors in 11 of 25 pa-
tients with terminal cancer. The
patients were too far gone to res-
pond to radiation, chemotherapy
or surgery. In the case of one, all
traces of cancer were eliminated.
But the treatment appears to
have severe side effects for some,
which are still under study.
are competent to deal with the
issues involved the World
Federation of Polish Jews and the
World Federation of Jewish
Fighters, Partisans and Camp In-
mates. Stephen Grayek, who
headed a three-member delega-
tion from Israel, represented the
latter two bodies.
On the Polish side, negotiations
were headed by the Minister for
Religious Affairs, Adam Lopatka,
and included representatives of
the Ministry of Culture and Arts;
Ministry of Labor, Wages and
Social Affairs; Ministry of Con-
struction, Regional Planning, and
Municipal Economy; the main
board of the state archives; and
the Council for Protection of
Monuments to Struggle and
Martyrdom.
SULTANIK SAID that a six-
hour marathon negotiating ses-
sion encompassed the following
points:
The transfer of sacred Jewish
objects, once the property of
Jewish communities in Poland, for
use in Israel and other Jewish
communities outside of Poland for
their preservation and exhibition
as memorabilia of the Jewry of
Poland.
Assurance for the continuance
and restoration of existing Jewish
cemeteries and agreement to
erect memorials in places of mass
burials.
Agreements for the continua-
tion of access to archives, in order
to receive material regarding the
life of Polish Jews, and also and to
Jewish institutions abroad.
Insuring that survivors of the
Holocaust, who had acquired
vested pension or similar social
security entitlement, under the
Polish Pension Law of 1968,
should not be deprived of their
benefits.
Discussion regarding the sub-
ject of Jewish communal proper-
ty, which is presently in the use of
various institutions.
ACCORDING to WJC
Secretary-General Israel Singer,
who along with executive director
Elan Steinberg participated in the
delegation, a two-hour meeting
with Polish leader Gen. Wojciech
Jaruzelski dealt with a "wide-
ranging political agenda involving
discussions of a general character
as well as those relating to East-
West relations and the Middle
East situation."
Following the meeting in a
ceremony carried by Polish televi-
sion Jaruzelski presented
Bronfman with a 200-year-old
Torah adorned with a silver crown
along with a unique three-foot
high silver menorah. The WJC
said that Bronfman will transfer
these rare items of Judaica to an
appropriate public exhibition
setting.
The Jewish delegation began its
visit to Warsaw with a wreath-
layng ceremony at the monument
of the site of the Warsaw Ghetto
uprising. Afterwards, at the
Nozyk Synagogue, the sole Jewish
house of worship in Warsaw to
survive World War II, the delega-
tion met with leaders and
representatives of the
6,000-member Polish Jewish com-
munity who had come from
throughout Poland.
FOLLOWING a gala perfor-
mance of the Yiddish play, "The
Dybbuk," the group attended the
official ceremonies in which ar-
tists of the Warsaw Jewish
Theater, under the directorship of
Szymon Szurmiej, were awarded
state medals on the occasion of
the theater's 35th anniversary.
The delegation concluded its visit
with a wreath-laying ceremony at
the site of the Treblinka death
camp.
President Reagan meets with American
Friends of the Lubavitch to welcome the obser-
vance of Chanukah. The President is shown
accepting a monorah, similar to the National
Menorah situated in Lafayette Park.
Photographed with Mr. Reagan are (left to
right) Rabbis Abraham Shemtov, national ex-
ecutive director, American Friends of
State Dep 't
Lubavitch, Philadelphia; Moshe Herson dean.
Rabbinical College of America, Morristmn,
N.J.; Israel Shmotkin, director, Lubavitch
Outreach, Midwest Region, Milwaukee; Yossef
Groner, director, Lubavitch, Southern
Region, Charlotte, N.C.; Moshe Feller, Upper
Midwest Regional director, Lubavitch, St
Paul. Minn.
Will Ask Iraq for Terrorist Abbas
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The State Department
said that it will ask Iraq to
extradite Mohammed Abbas
if the high-ranking Palestine
Liberation Organization of-
ficial, believed to have
masterminded the hijacking
of the Italian liner Achille
Lauro, is in the Arab
country.
But State Department deputy
spokesman Charles Redman said
the United States has no "confir-
mation" that Abbas was in Iraq
after the hijacking, except for
press reports, and doesn't know
where he is now.
In addition, Redman said that
the Iraqis "have indicated publicly
that they don't believe Abbas is
subject to extradition under the
U.S.-Iraq extradition treaty."
SECRETARY of State George
Shultz in Yugoslavia last week
reportedly accused Iraq of appear-
ing to give safe haven to Abbas,
but rejected a suggestion that
Iraq would be again listed by the
U.S. as a country that supports
terrorism.
"People like Abbas move from
one country to another," Redman
quoted Shultz as saying. "We're
not going to put every country he
goes to on the terrorist list."
Redman said that "we have put
the Iraqis formally on notice that
we will formally request Abba's
extradition if we obtain confirma-
tion that Abbas is in Iraq."
Redman referred to Shultz's
statement at a press conference in
Belgrade in which the Secretary
QjROWARD
IJAPER 4
Packaging
pounded a table in anger after
Yugoslav Foreign Minister Raif
Dizdarevic said that in speaking of
terrorism "one must also view the
causes that lead to it" Shultz
earlier expressed "my disappoint-
ment" that Abbas had been allow-
ed to go through Yugoslavia.
"I'D LIKE TO add a point, if I
may, on the question of causes,"
Shultz said, interrupting the
Foreign Minister. "Hijacking the
Italian ship, murdering an
American, torturing and holding a
whole bunch of other Americans,
is not justified by any cause that I
know of. There is no connection
with any cause. It's wrong."
Shultz then pounded on the
table twice and added, "and the
international community must
step up to this probem and deal
with it unequivocally, firmly,
definitively. There must be no
place to hide for people who do
that kind of thing."
Meanwhile, Redman said that
both the State Department and
Justice Department still had
"under review" demands by
private groups for the Justice
Department to indict PLO leader
Yasir Arafat for the murder in
1973 of Cleo Noel, U.S. Am-
bassador to the Sudan, and his
Charge d'Affairs, George Moore.
There are reports that the U.S.
has tapes and other information
that the terrorists did not murder
the two diplomats in Khartoum
until they received a coded
message from the PLO head-
quarters in Beirut where Arafat
was at the time.
THE EFFORT was begun by
Charles Lichenstein, a former
Deputy U.S. Ambassador to the
United Nations, who is now a
senior fellow at the Washington-
based conservative think-tank,
the Heritage Foundation. He rais-
ed the issue with Attorney
General Edwin Meese.
The American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee has been
distributing information about the
issue. Noting Arafat's role in
worldwide terrorism, an AIPAC
spokesman said, "You can't have
a serious anti-terror policy
without dealing with the top
figures."
The latest to join the effort is
the National Jewish Coalition
whose chairman, Richard Fox,
urged the Justice Department "to
act promptly." Fox noted that
Sen. William Armstrong (R.,
Colo.), chairman of the Senate
Republican Policy Committee, has
written Meese urging "a high
priority to the resolution of this
case."
It is believed that if the U.S.
does indict Arafat it would impede
his ability to travel to Western
Europe and to other countries
friendly to the U.S.
Miller Gets Award
NEW YORK (JTA) The
annual celebration of Women
Award of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat has been
presented to Joyce Miller, presi-
dent of the Coalition of Labor
Union Women and vice president
of the AFL-CIO executive council.
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Sexton Beaten
Refused Access to Torah Scrolls
Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
MILWAUKEE (JTA) -
I Police here have hot yet caught
I any of the three men who beat and
I burned Sexton Buzz Cody of
I Reform Congregation Emanu-El
B'nei Jeshurun when he refused
I to give them access to the
[synagogue's Torah scrolls. Cody
j was hospitalized and released six
[days after the attack. The in-
Ivestigation, by a pair of detectives
I on each of the force's three shifts,
[has produced no leads so far.
The incident, on Dec. 7,
I however, generated a storm of
protest when Police Lieutenant
William Vogl, who was not assign-
ed to the case, told The Milwaukee
Journal that he doubted Cody's
story. After the congregation's
Rabbi Francis Barry Silberg pro-
tested this statement, the police
[department repudiated it, and
[police Chief Robert Ziarnik
[assured the Milwaukee Jewish
Council that the case was being
| investigated.
ACCORDING TO a report in
[the Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle
by its editor, Andy Muchin,
35-year-old Cody, who converted
to Judaism 12 years ago, was ac-
costed shortly after 8 a.m. on
Saturday morning, Dec. 7 in the
synagogue's sanctuary by three
men. They demanded access to
the Torah scrolls, four of which
are stored in the ark behind locked
brass doors.
When Cody, who had a key to
the ark, refused to open it, the
men beat him, then dragged him
up the stairs to the second floor,
which serves as a storeroom, and
choir and organ loft. There,
holding a knife to his throat, they
cut his hand and leg, tore off his
shirt, and poured a caustic liquid
drain cleaner on his bare chest,
Muchin reported.
Cody kicked one of the men.
They fled, taking the $100 they
had robbed him of. Cody crawled
to the elevator and made it to the
lobby, where the janitor found
him. He was taken to the hospital
with second-degree bums.
THE POLICE, who came to the
synagogue when Silberg called
them, found a can of lye crystals,
a carving knife, two yellow rubber
gloves, and a bottle of liquid drain
cleaner on the second floor, ap-
Israeli Child Flown to U.S. For
Liver Transplant Operation
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
[Health Ministry flew three-year-
old Meir Zorea of Migdal Haemek
to the U.S. Sunday for an
[urgently-needed liver transplant
[operation which hopefully, will
[save his life.
Health Minister Mordechai Gur
I ordered the Ministry last Friday
Ito arrange the flight and pay all
[expenses after the child's family
Iwas unable to raise $150,000
Ineeded for the trip and surgery.
Gur acted under mounting public
land political pressure from
[Knesset members when doctors
[warned that the gravely ill
|youngster could die any day.
Leading Israeli doctors insist
Ithe liver transplant can be suc-
cessfully performed in Israel but
|is not because of budgetary con-
ptraints on the Health Ministry.
The child was born with a
Lookstein Named
NEW YORK (JTA) Rabbi
|Haskel Lookstein, rabbi of Con-
gregation Kehilath Jeshurun in
Yew York City, has been named
jhairman of the United Jewish
Appeal Rabbinic Cabinet, suc-
ceeding Rabbi Stanley Kessler of
pest Hartford. Conn.
malfunctioning liver and has
spent most of his three years in
hospitals. Recently his condition
worsened. Fund-raising efforts by
family and friends produced
$25,000, but the public campaign
picked up momentum when the
case was widely publicized last
Thursday.
Several Knesset members said
they would personally collect
public donations and hand them
over to the Health Ministry.
Histadrut's sick-fund, Kupat
Holim, said it would cover half the
cost of the boy's mother's flight to
the U.S. and would contribute
$160 per day toward the medical
treatment.
Dr. Amram Ayalon- of the
Hadassah Medical Center here
said the operation could be per-
formed in Jerusalem if a donor
was available, and certain devices
were purchased, but it would take
three months to prepare teams for
the surgery. He said that the
techniques of procedure have
already been learned by Hadassah
medical staff, and the operation, if
performed here, would cost about
a tenth of what it costs in the U.S.
Meanwhile, the Health Ministry
has given a commitment to an
American hospital, reportedly one
in Pittsburgh, to cover all costs
for Meir Zorea.
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parently left behind by the at-
tackers. Silberg told the Jewish
Chronicle that Cody had said the
attackers had "Middle Eastern ac-
cents" and spoke in Arabic. Cody
later told police that the men men-
tioned the initials "PDL." These
initials, said Randy Kahn, Wiscon-
sin coordinator for B'nai B'rith's
Anti-Defamation League, could
stand for Palestinian Defense
League.
The Chronicle, wrote Muchin,
received a telephone call the day
before the attack from an uniden-
tified man who, said secretary
Pam Burns, had said,
"... Defense League is at war
with the Jewish community." A
similar declaration by the Palesti-
nian Defense League was receiv-
ed in a letter to a Colorado Spr-
ings newspaper in March, 1983,
according to Kahn.
The attack on Cody followed the
unsolved July spray-painting of
swastikas and anti-Semitic graf-
fiti on the exterior the Jewish
Community Center and the ad-
joining Helfaer Community Ser-
vices Building and a restaurant,
and a similar incident a year-and-
a-half ago involving a suburban
synagogue.
JUDY MANN, executive direc-
tor of the Milwaukee Jewish
Council, called the Cody attack
"more than alarming" but urged
Jews, as she had, as well, after the
July incident, to remain calm and
keep it in perspective. She said
that Police Chief Ziarnik had
"reassured" her about the in-
vestigation of the Cody attack.
Ziarnik subsequently told the
Jewish Chronicle that he did not
"know what was at the bottom of
this ... We're going to work at it.
Somebody was seriously hurt."
County Deputy District Attorney
General Thomas Schneider told
the Chronicle that the police
department has assured him it
believed Cody's complaint to be
valid, but that he would
"monitor" their investigation to
make sure it was "thorough."
Schneider added that Det. Vogl
had no authority to comment on
the case, as he had not been
assigned to it. Vogl had said he
doubted Cody's story of the attack
on him because "when you're talk-
ing about something involving a
radical group, they don't operate
in this manner."
Prime Minister Shimon Peres congratulates Gloria Elbling
right, newly-elected national president ofNa'Amat U.S.A., and
Phyllis Sutker (left), immediate past president, at their recent
convention in Israel. The name change from Pioneer
WomenlNa'amat to Na'amat U.S.A., was adopted to signify the
unification of purpose with Na'amat, the largest women's
organization in Israel.
More Coalition Seen As
Taba Talks Continue
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
More coalition tension
this time over foreign policy
is being predicted in
political circles here follow-
ing the successful conclu-
sion of three days of talks
between Israel and Egypt
on Taba. The talks, in
Herzliya, wound with both
sides report in progress.
Details were not immediately
available. But there was talk of
"tying loose ends," and it seemed
clear that the issue would now
come up before the Inner Cabinet
next week where the coalition
tensions over the Taba issue could
easily explode.
Plainly, the negotiators
senior civil servants from the
Foreign Ministry and the Defense
Ministry have reached the
outlines of an accord with Egypt
on a procedure, while not entail-
ing an immediate submission of
Taba to arbitration, nevertheless
involving preparations for arbitra-
tion while simultaneously seeking
a compromise solution.
The Likud under Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir has always
demanded that conciliation be
tried first before the sides sub-
mit the issue to binding interna-
tional arbitration.
Premier Shimon Peres and his
Labor Party have been prepared
to accept Egypt's position that ar-
bitration be invoked without any
effort at conciliation.
The tension on Taba, if it indeed
erupts, will have been heightened
by the ongoing and worsening
feud between the two main coali-
tion parties
Bereaved Parents Want Inquiry
Continued from Page 1-A
subsequently received a mandate from his voters to change
the existing situation, Spiegel said. "We shall continue to
wage the campaign of all the families which demand an in-
vestigation of the war and the trial and punishment of
those responsible," she wrote.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Spy Problems
For Israel, the Soviets are Pivotal
Continued from Page 1-A
years for love, money or ideology
convinced the CIA long ago that
its Bonn counterpart could not be
trusted with U.S. secrets that are
routinely shared with other
allies."
Anderson quoted from a recent
U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency
report which summarized 30 cases
of individuals who betrayed
NATO secrets to the Soviet bloc
since 1949. Eleven were West
Germans, five were East German
"plants." four were French, four
were Belgium, two were Italian,
and the remaining four were
Canadian, British. Turkish and
American.
Israeli officials privately con-
cede that Israel like these other
countries does indeed have a
very serious security problem.
The possibility of the Soviets'
placing an agent in a senior posi-
tion in Israel is constantly a mat-
ter of deep concern. One
American official described this as
Israel's "great nightmare." In-
deed, there have been precedents.
There was the case of Yisrael
Beer, the personal secretary to
the late Prime Minister David
Ben-Gurion. He was a Soviet
agent in Israel for years before his
capture. Beer, a Lt. Colonel in the
reserves, had patiently worked his
way up the ladder.
HIS STORY was recalled in the
now defunct Washington Star on
July 4, 1980, in an article by Prof.
John P. Roche, currently the dean
of the Fletcher School of Law and
Diplomacy at Tufts University in
Boston and a former senior White
House official during the Johnson
Administration.
"I was in Israel (in 1960) at the
request of the Hebrew University
to evaluate their social science
programs, and had gone to dinner
at the Gondola, run, if memory
serves, by Italian Jews from Peru,
Roche wrote.
"As I was enjoying the food, an
American came over to the table
and asked, 'Are You John Roche?'
I said 'yes,' and he went on to re-
mind me of our previous acquain-
tance, which had been quite
casual: He had been active in
socialist anti-Mussolini activities
among New York's Italo-
Americans. I was one of the kids
who opened the mail, got the
lunch sandwiches and were, in a
word, 'go-fers.' But we would see
him conferring with Norman
Thomas.
"Tony Ferraro (let's call him)
was something of a hero to us
j youngsters because he had fought
in the International Brigade for
the Spanish Republic against
Franco.
I DIDN'T recognize him he
was probably 10 yeas older than I
am and since our last encounter
had gone bald but we combined
forces on the pasta and discussed
the previous 20 years. He had
gone into the OSS (Office of
Strategic Services, the forerunner
of the Central Intelligence Agen-
cy) during the war.
"He was vague about his post-
war employment he 'worked for
the government' so I figured
CLV He was in Israel to attend
his daughter's wedding to a kib-
butznik the kind of cross-
pollination which drives both
priests and rabbis crazy.
"Then, an odd thing happened:
"Don't move abruptly,' he said,
'but next time you look around the
room focus on that Israeli colon* '
two tables over.'
"I did a horizon sweep and saw
a man in uniform with almost a
death's head, dried-out sunken
features.
" 'Looks like a charmer,' I
noted.
'Israeli officials privately concede that Israel like these
other countries (West Germany, East Germany, France,
Belgium, Italy, Canada, Great Britain, Turkey and the United
States) does indeed have a very serious security problem.
This report was written well before the two spy scandals
broke involving Israeli espionage against the United States. In
this light, the report may seem bitterly amusing, but it never-
theless emphasizes all the more forcefully the deep concern that the
Soviet spy network poses for Israel.
Because of the Soviet Union's desperate effort to become rein-
volved in the'Middle East peace process, the threat of Soviet es-
pionage may indeed explain Israel's own spy scandals today.
" 'He is,' said Tony. 'The last
time I saw him, he was my GPU
(the forerunner of the Soviet
KGB) interrogator at their prison
in Alcara de Henares outside
Madrid. He accused me of being a
Trotskyist-fascist spy only my
American passport saved me.' '
ROCHE continued his report.
"How did a GPU torturer
graduate to be a colonel in the
Israeli Defense Forces?," he ask-
ed. "I gathered Tony planned to
find out.
"The story broke shortly after I
returned from Israel. The colonel,
who went by the name of Beer,
was David Ben Gurion's private
secretary and an East German
spy. After Spain, the GPU had in-
vented an entirely new identity
a 'legend' as it's called in the trade
for him.
"He had turned up at the end of
World War II in a DP camp claim-
ing to have survived a concentra-
tion camp, and was bootlegged in-
to Palestine. He had ingratiated
himself with the 'Old Man' and
risen rapidly to a spy's dream of
heaven, the Cabinet's papers."
Roche, during a telephone inter-
view, told me that he always
believed that his Italian-American
friend had tipped off Israeli
security personnel about Beer,
who was later arrested and died in
prison. "That's my guess but I
don't know for sure," Roche said.
U.S. OFFICIALS said Israeli
intelligence leaders are very much
aware of the dangers of penetra-
tion by the Soviet Union and other
adversaries, including the Arab
states. In the old days, there was
mostly the lure of ideology
working for the Communist cause.
But U.S. intelligence experts
cite other objectives today as the
major drive in attracting traitors.
The most important, they said, is
money. The KGB, simply put, can
dangle enormous sums in front of
possible spies.
They also have used blackmail,
particularly involving sex, in win-
ning over some people. Several
U.S. military personnel, arrested
in recent years, were entrapped
by these means.
The Soviets are known for their
extreme patience, allowing a
"mole" to operate silently,
without any contact with the
KGB. even for years before using
him.
A March, 1979 report by the
CIA on Israel's foreign in-
telligence and security services,
obtained by Iranian revolu-
tionaries following the overthrow
of the Shah and subsequently
published in The Washington Post
and other newspapers,
documented Israel's special con-
cerns in this area of possible
penetration.
"THERE ARE a little over
1,000 persons working as staff of-
ficers for Mossad and Shin Beth,
all of whom have been given a
long, thorough security check,"
the report said. "If there is the
slightest doubt raised against an
individual, the application is re-
jected. Personnel with leftist
backgrounds generally are not
trusted by leading members of the
intelligence and security services.
"This attitude did not always
apply to former members of Euro-
pean Communist Parties, some of
whom were eminently qualified
for clandestine service, especially
if they had renounced their Com-
munist Ideology and affiliated
with the Israeli Labor Party. This
exemption, however, has not ap-
plied since the exposure of several
high-level espionage cases in
governmental and political circles
in the late 1950s and early 1960s."
The CIA report referred
specifically to Beer, Aharon
Cohen, described as "a professor
of physics at the Technion in Haifa
who worked for the Czech in-
telligence service. These three
cases caused the Shin Beth, the
report said, "to reconsider its own
security procedures while
stimulating considerable doubt
about the reliability of recanted
Marxists."
The report added: "The (Israeli)
services have devised internal
security systems to expose
ideological weaklings by more
thorough periodic security checks.
The Israelis believe such in-
dividuals constitute a possible
long-term security threat. Israeli
citizens are subjected to stringent
registration requirements and
must carry identification papers.
"WITHIN THE intelligence
and security community great
pains are taken not to reveal the
identities of personnel even to the
average Israeli employed in the
government at large. Compart-
mentalization is strictly maintain-
ed between services with only
designated individuals, usually
members of the "hardcore,"
crossing lines. The national prac-
tice of Hebraicizing European or
Yiddish birth names also makes
the identification of some Israelis
Visiting foreign officials and
agents never use the same car
twice when meeting clandestinely
with Israeli officers within the
country. Certain unlisted official
and personal telephone numbers
are known only to relatively few
people. This type of professional
demeanor at home provides ex-
cellent daily training for in-
telligence and security personnel
before receiving foreign
assignments."
A major headache for Israel's
security services has involved the
large number of Soviet Jewish im-
migrants who have arrived since
the early 1970s. U.S. and other
experts in Washington are con-
vinced that the KGB has in-
filtrated some of its own agents
into the ranks of Soviet Jewish ar-
rivals. This, by the way, also in-
cludes Jewish immigrants to the
United States, Canada and other
countries.
ACCORDING TO U.S. experts,
this effort almost certainly has in-
volved the creation of false iden-
tities for some immigrants and the
blackmail of others. With close
family members left behind in the
Soviet Union, some of these im-
migrants are especially vulnerable
to threats against their loved
ones. U.S. experts agree that
Israel Minister of Defense Yitzhak Rabin visits a critically in-
jured 19-year-old soldier rushed to Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center's Burns Unit after he was trapped with lb others
in afire in his barracks in Samaria.
some immigrants may still be
ideologically aligned with the
Soviet Union.
The 1979 CIA report referred to
this fear in Israel. "New im-
migrants from the USSR and
East European countries are nor-
mally denied access to classified
information for a minimum of four
or five years," it said. "This ruling
is not always possible to enforce
because of proteksia."
Still, several former U.S. in-
telligence officials, who asked not
to be identified, said Israeli
counterintelligence authorities
were believed very efficient in
avoiding penetration. The
Americans noted, for example,
that while the Israeli intelligence
services were quite thorough in
obtaining very useful information
from Soviet immigrants "They
know how to pick their brains," a
U.S. official said there was very
little secret information made
available to the Soviet im-
migrants. It's basically a "one-
way street," the U.S. official said.
IN SHORT, American in
telligence officials generally have
high confidence in their Israeli
counterparts. There is very close
collaboration in a "whole host of
Vreas, especially in combating ter-
rorism. In some areas, there is
even closer ties with Israel than
with some of the NATO allies,
especially West Germany.
The U.S. provides Israel with
considerable information from
satellites and other highly
sophisticated electronic means.
Israel, in return, has some very
useful "human sources" on the
ground and in key locations, ac-
cording to U.S. officials.
Both Washington and J
Jerusalem, however, retain a
healthy nervousness about the en-
tire extremely sensitive subject.
This is understandable. There
have been too many failures in the
past. Hopefully, they have learned
from their earlier mistakes.
Peres Says Ivory Coast Will
Reestablish Diplomatic Ties
GENEVA (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres an-
nounced here that Ivory
Coast will re-establish
diplomatic relations with
Israel, broken off 12 years
ago during the Yom Kippur
War.
Peres, who arrived here made
the announcement after a four-
hour meeting with President Felix
Houphouet-Boigny of Ivory Coast.
The two leaders issued a joint
statement saying, "We have
decided to recommend to our
governments to re-establish
diplomatic relations." Peres told a
press conference later, "I imagine
that our government will follow
our recommendations."
ISRAEL has been working
strenuously for years to restore
relations with the Black African
nations that abruptly broke them
off in 1973 apparently under Arab
pressure. So far it has succeeded
with two, Liberia and Zaire, which
re-established their ties with
Israel last year.
The Israel Premier made his
unannounced flight here today
especially to meet with
Houphouet-Boigm/. He was ac-
companied by David Kimche.
Director General of the Foreign
Ministry. They will return to
Israel tonight.
Uri Savid, a spokesman for the
Prime Minister, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Peres in-
tended to make his meeting with
Houphouet-Boigny public only if
the outcome was positive. That
was the reason for the secrecy
surrounding his one-day trip to
Geneva.
THE 80-year-old African leader
announced last October that he
planned to re-establish diplomatic
relations with Israel before his
retirement next year. Ivory Coast
is one of the richest African state
and politically one of the mos
stable. It now becomes the third oi
those that broke with Israel to
renew ties.
Diplomatic sources here sail
two others may soon follow sun.
Gabon and Cameroon.
Israel presently has diplomatic
relations with seven nations on
the African continent. These*
Egypt, which signed a peacearea
ty wiih Israel in 1979, Sou*
Africa, Liberia, Zaire, L**>
Malawi and Swaziland. The W*
three, controlled by South Africa,
never broke with Israel.


Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Bookcase
Place-Bound Volumes on U.S. Jews
Anglican volunteer rushes to save 11-year-old Jewish boy- Dr
Shimon Slainn head of Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical
Center s Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, thanks Susan Hunt of
Middlesex England who left her job to try and save a leukemia-
ttncken child by donating her marrow.
Gov't. Economy Plan Begins
To Show Satisfactory Results
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- The government's
economic recovery plan is
beginning to show results.
It has already had a strong
mpact on inflation, exports
we up, imports are down,
and there is renewed public
xmfidence in the economy
overall, according to a
lackground report released
>y the Treasury.
The inflation rate is declining
or the first time in recent years,
he report noted. The monthly
ate is down from a 15 percent
verage to an average of three-
Jur percent. Last month the in-
lation rate increased by just one
alf of one percent.
Private consumption is down by
1 percent for the first half of
985, the Treasury says, and is ex-
erted to drop by three percent
hen the year ends. The govern-
ient has pared its budget. Sub-
dies for basic foods and services
ave been cut. Vacant jobs have
ot been filled. Fuel and electrici-
1 prices have gone down for the
fst time in 20 years. The four
percent reduction in the cost of
fuel may lead to a $60 million in-
crease in the gross national pro-
duet as a result of lower produc-
tion costs.
Imports have declined six per-
cent, mainly appliances and lux-
ury goods, the Treasury reported.
Exports are up by seven percent
this year. In October industrial ex-
ports were 31.7 percent higher
than in October of the previous
year.
The controversial $300 per
capita travel tax imposed during
the summer months has had spec-
tacular results, leading to
substantial savings of foreign cur-
rency. According to the Treasury
report, 48 percent fewer Israelis
went abroad last July than in July,
1984. This translates into an an-
nual figure of 288,400 fewer
Israelis spending badly needed
dollars overseas this year.
The report, entitled "The
Economic Turnaround," main-
tains that public confidence has
been buoyed as a result of the
government's economic policies.
The private sector no longer sees
a need to invest in foreign curren-
cy as a hedge against inflation.
How U.S. Forces Pursued Enemy
Behind German Lines
[Continued from Page 5-A
the German winter offensive
lowing the Ardennes
feakthrough further to the
th, then after the U.S. First
Ny's seizure of the bridge at
pnagen, smashed the Nazi
del at Bitche, drove to and
jross the Rhine.
[Afterward, in some of the most
>ere fighting of the war, the
fOth Division took the city of
filbronn over fanatical opposi-
fj by SS and Hitler Youth units,
|d linked up with French forces
I Stuttgart and helped to clean
F pockets of resistance in
Jvaria before the German
pender.
P ALL, the 100th Division was
aged in front line combat
?rations for 170 straight days.
I* division was never a
Wliner, always relegated to
|gh fighting in the underplayed
Seventh Army. "This lack of
glamour, however," John
Eisenhower declares in his in-
troduction, "helps to make Keith
Winston's story more significant
for what it is. Had the 100th Divi-
sion hit the Normandy beaches,
held a shoulder of the Bulge, or
seized a bridge over the Rhine,
readers would be tempted to refer
to Winston's eyewitness account
to learn about a special event. As
it is, we are attracted to it only as
the sage of a single combat medic
an aid man who previously
fainted at the sight of blood. His
story is undiluted."
Winston was a native of
Philadelphia, Pa., and graduated
from Girard College. In 1932, in
the height of the Depression, he
found a job as an insurance under-
writer. Following his army ser-
vice, he returned to insurance
work, later retiring to work with
his wife on magazine assignments.
He died in 1970.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
I Am From Brownsville. By Ar-
thur Granit. New York:
Philosophical Library, 1985.
270 pp. $16.95.
Canarsie: The Jews and Italians
of Brooklyn Against
Liberalism. By Jonathan
Rieder. Cambridge, Mass.:
Harvard University Press,
1985. 290 pp. $22.50.
Family Connections: A History
of Italian and Jewish Im-
migrant Lives in Providence,
Rhode Island, 1900-1940. By
Judith E. Smith. Albany: State
University of New York Press,
1985. 228 pp. $39.50 (cloth),
$12.95 (paper back).
These three place-bound books
all deal with Jews in America.
They are set in Brownsville,
Canarsie and Providence, R.I. The
first is a series of vignettes about
growing up in Brownsville during
the Great Depression of the
1930's. The other two are scholar-
ly works on Italians and Jews, the
first focusing on the "crisis of
liberalism" in Canarsie between
1960 and 1980 and the second on
immigrants in Providence bet-
ween 1900 and 1940.
Arthur Granit writes about a
Brooklyn neighborhood which
many Jews will remember as
"Brunsville," not Brownsville.
Pronounciation and spelling of its
name aside, those who come from
Brooklyn will find this book to be
a pleasant exercise in nostalgia.
The places, the characters and the
street names evoke memories, not
all of which are fond. Who can
recall with any fondness the Bank
of the United States and its
failure.
ON THE OTHER hand, there*
are pleasant feelings attached to
the movie theatre that had an in-
side of Byzantine rococo and an
outside of Brownsville Barogue.
The corner candy store, the
storefront shul and the
Workmen's Circle school all have
a tender spot in the hearts of
those who recall them.
Reflections of various kinds are
brought to mind by the street
names Pitkin and Powell,
Junius, Livonia and Dumont,
Blake and Stone, Sack man and
Hopkinson. And many can
recollect individuals similar to
Granit's colorful characters with
their aptly descriptive designa-
tions Kid Itzik, Feather-
Plucker, Fat Moe the Dope, Big
Mouth Hymie the Squealer, Good
Time Charlie, Tessie the Slob,
Gussie the Beautician, Louie the
lip and Blickstein the Butcher.
Granit is a native of
Brownsville. His book is a loving
tribute to the place of his birth and
to the time of his youth. His
reminiscences provide warmth to
all who look back to the place they
came from with affection an
emotion that grows in intensity
the farther away we are in miles
and in years.
In 1972, Brownsville, now a
desolate Black ghetto, was
ordered to bus students into its
neighboring community of Canar-
sie. The Jews and Italians of
Canarsie united to block this in-
trusion. These events initiated a
convervative coalition which is the
focus of Jonathan Rieder's book.
He studied Canarsie off and on for
five years from 1975 to 1980.
A SOCIOLOGIST, he adapted
the anthropological approach of
participant-observation. Unlike
the anthropologist, however, he
did not actually live in Canarsie,
nor did he concern himself with
the sum total of its residents'
lives, as does an anthropologist.
Rather, he concentrated on the
political shift from liberalism to
conservatism which, in the 1980
presidential election, found
Canarsie Italians voting 60-65
percent for Reagan and Canarsie
Jews giving him 50-60 percent of
their votes, a major change from
easy Democratic victories in
previous elections.
Rieder accounts for this dif-
ference almost exclusively in
terms of the Black-White confron-
tation which took place in New
York in the 1960's and 1970's.
Some Jews who reacted with
"white flight" from Brownsville
and East New York settled in
Canarsie where they joined with
the Italians in responding to the
encroaching Blacks with hostility,
fear and resentment.
Jews and Italians differed in
what Rieder calls their "liberal
betrayal." The Italians were
direct and candid. The Jews
wrestled "with a buried part of
their past that seemed to have
turned against them." Both
groups militantly opposed in-
tegration although, for some
Jews, the tradition of social
justice evoked a sense of guilt
about their reaction to the Blacks.
RIEDER'S BOOK is long on
description and short on analysis.
It ends weakly without any con-
clusion except for a brief comment
about the significance of leaders
in determining a community's
response to trouble.
By contrast, Judith E. Smith
both describes and analyzes
Jewish and Italian immigrants in
Providence over a 40-year period.
Her theme is the changes which
took place among these families in
relation to work, kinfolk and
fraternal associations. She traces
these changes in fascinating
detail, making out a strong case
for her argument that there were
striking similarities among Jews
and Italians as they faced these
alterations in their kinship
systems and in their associational
ties.
Unlike Rieder, Smith offers a
concluding chapter in which she
does a fine job of pulling her book
together. She summarizes her fin-
ding that the immigrant families
of 1900 became the ethnic families
of 1940. Subjected to many
changes during the 40-year period
changes which pushed in the
direction of homogenization the
families constructed an ethnic
identity which resulted in a
healthy, pluralistic American
society rather than a dull melting
pot of boring sameness.
Anti-Israel
Cartoon Tiff
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The Jewish
community of East Berlin has pro-
tested against an anti-Israel
newspaper cartoon which non-
Jewish intellectuals there private-
ly described as anti-Semitic. The
cartoon as well as the com-
munity's protest, which came in
the form of a letter to the editor
appeared in the Berliner Zextung,
the official organ of the East Ger-
man Communist Party.
The cartoon, published last
week, depicts a stereo-typically
Jewish character dispatching an
armored car filled with soldiers
from Israel over south Lebanon to
remote Arab lands. In private con-
versations, non-Jewish intellec-
tuals in Berlin described the car-
toon as taken directly from the
Nazi Party newspaper Der
Stuermer.
The letter to the editor of the
Berliner Zeitung by Dr. Peter Kir-
chner, chairman of the Jewish
community of East Berlin,
represents the" first official Jewish
communal protest in East Ger-
many against anti-Semitism in the
German Democratic Republic.
The GDR (East German) regime
has consistently portrayed Israel
as a source of evil and
malfeasance in international rela-
tions. But it has taken points to
show that no anti-Semitic tenden-
cies are involved in its anti-Israel
policy, and that its tiny communi-
ty of 700 Jews enjoys full religious
liberties.
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TELEPHONE: (305) 865-1500
TOLL FREE: (800) 327-0555
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Noted Editor
Helen Alpert, Dead in Miami Beach
Urge Reform Rabbis To Give
Up on Patrilineal Position
Other Obituaries ... Sec. B
Helen Alpert. a South Florida
pioneer publicist and a national
leader in gerontological concerns,
died Dec. 17 in Miami Beach. A
graduate of Goucher College, she
began her long career as a writer
for the Baltimore Sun and the
Albany (New York) Times Union.
She came to Miami Beach in
1945. For many years, she was a
columnist for The Jewish Flori-
dian and a well-known hotel
publicist. She later changed the
focus of her writing interests and
became an initial developer of
geriatric services in South
Florida, including the retirment
villages of East Ridge and Lehigh
Acres.
IN HER position as vice presi-
dent of the First Retirement
Foundation, she was one of the
first top-level women executives
in the nation concerned with the
problems of aging. Together with
the late Dr. Samuel Gertman, who
was then on the consulting staff of
the Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, in 1961 she co-authored
"Wake Up Younger," a pioneer-
ing guide to gerontological
practices.
She moved to New York in
1966, where she became a resear-
cher for Time-Life. Shortly
thereafter, she accepted the post
of associate editor of "Harvest
Helen Alpert
Years," later renamed "Retire-
ment Living" Magazine, a Jock
Whitney national publication. She
also served as vice president of
Periwinkle Productions, a non-
profit, award-winning educational
theater.
Israel's Feminist Movement
Celebrates Bar Mitzvah Year
As an officer of the Overseas
Press Club in New York and for
many years editor of the OPC Na-
tional Newsletter, she traveled to
Russia in the mid-1970's and
reported back her experiences
with KGB harrassment of Jews,
both Soviet and American
tourists, which she experienced
first-hand.
AMONG HER many citations
were those from the City of Miami
Beach Beautification Committee
and the Florida Development
Commission. Nationally, she
received awards from the
American Association of Retired
Persons and National Association
of Senior Citizens. In 1977, she
won the prestigious Russell E.
Cecil Writing Award of the Na-
tional Arthritis Foundation. She
was also recognized by Who's
Who of American Women and
Two Thousand Women of
Achievement.
She is survived by her
daughters, Hilary (Mrs. Leo)
Mindlin, of Miami, and Brett (Mrs.
John) Pinto, Huntington, N.Y.
She leaves three grandchildren,
Jeremy and Jacob Mindlin, both of
Houston, Tex.; and Jordana Bern-
stein, a scholarship student at
Harvard; also a niece, Martha
Frazer, New York; and nephew,
Judge Jonathan Alpert, St.
Petersburg, Fla.
In lieu of flowers, the family
suggests donations to the
Overseas Press Club, 52 E. 41st
St., N.Y. 10017, or to Periwinkle
Productions, Inc., 19 Clinton
Ave., MonticeUo, N.Y. 12701.
Continued from Page 4-A
then as they had demanded a far
more liberal law.
They made news again when
another piece of legislation they
had initiated the basic law on
equal rights for men and women
' \ was killed on its second reading
under the influence of the Na-
tional Religious Party in the last
Rabin Government. A huge
demonstration and mock funeral
in Jerusalem ended in violence
and arrests.
IN THE 1977 elections, the
decision was taken to create the
Women's Party. Marcia Freed-
man financed it out of her Knesset
salary, and the campaign, run on a
shoestring budget and with much
public derision, collected nearly
6,000 votes. Again, all was not
harmony in the movement, with
many feeling that they should be
apolitical.
The main result of the fling with
politics was. again, consciousness-
raising. Perhaps a more damaging
crack in the facade of women's
unity was the dichotomy between
the lesbian and heterosexual
camps.
The lesbians demanded that the
movement provide for their
specific needs social gather-
ings. Friday night parties where
they could' (like Radclyffe Hall
decades before) "'find
themselves."
The non-lesbians felt these
demands were outside the scope
of their movement. The lesbians
broke away to form Aleph-Irgun
Lesbiot Feministiot but also, in-
cidentally the acronym for
Citizens for Peres!
For several years, they went
underground after one of their
leaders was fired from her
t+w^h'ng job, having been seen on
television in a gay rights march in
Td Arrr. They are just now, five
years later, tentatively emerging
from the cjoeeat to test whether
the climate of tolerance in Israel
has improved.
WITH THE advent of the
Likud Government in 1977, the
movement felt they had lost some
of the ground gained with the
Alignment. They had just begun
to make some progress, such as
getting sexist stereotypes remov-
ed from textbooks and being in-
vited to lecture to schools. "We
felt we were beginning to change
society," says Esther.
Faced with a reactionary
government and hindered by lack
of money, they decided to change
direction, switching the emphasis
from attempts to alter legislation
and putting all their energies into
caring for the woman as victim.
Besides battered women
shelters which existed in Herzlia
and Jerusalem, Rape Crisis
Centers were established in the
three main towns with some
municipal help. Women's collec-
tives opened, where women could
meet socially and where feminist
literature was available (much of
it translated from English). The
Second Sex publishing house was
established specifically to make
good the gaps in existing Hebrew
feminist literature.
SO HAS the status of women in
Israel changed? A committee
chaired by Ora Namir, sitting bet-
ween 1975 and 1977. came up
with many suggestions, but
nothing was implemented.
Women still have many gripes
the power of the rabbinical
courts in divorce, the insufficiency
of daycare centers and the short
school day causing mothers to
take unrewarding part-time work,
the non-enforcement of laws
against sex discrimination, the
pressures to put marriage and
mothering before career in Israeli
society.
"Men still run the show," says
Esther, "but at a grassroots level,
I see many signs that women are
IwMm and thinking differently.
We have to take power for
ourselves. I think there will be in
teresting developments."
Continued from Page 1-A
them "except on broad communal
issues." He continued:
"Are we really afraid that par-
ticipating together in joint ven-
tures means giving endorsement
to those with whom we may
disagree? Nobody has asked us for
our endorsement nor is anyone in-
terested in it. Individual com-
munities give legitimacy to their
own religious leaders. We of the
Orthodox movement have no
monopoly on granting or
withholding legitimacy. No one
has given us the right to judge the
qualifications of others."
LOOKSTEIN URGED Or-
thodox rabbis "to extend a hand
of friendship and love" to Conser-
vative and Reform rabbis and
"not to be afraid to sitdown with
them in order to find acceptable
solutions to our problems." Con-
servative and Reform rabbis, he
stressed unequivocally, "are the
recognized leaders of those
groups and they must be ap-
proached with respect and
regard."
These suggestions, addressed to
what Lookstein called the "left"
and the "right" in rabbinical
circles, came in the context of his
call to rabbis of all branches of
Judaism to head off while there
was still time the "growing
polarization that exists in the
religious communities" in the
U.S. and Israel. Criticizing
severely the unwillingness of
many rabbis of different branches
"to speak to each other civilly"
and the way "religious rightists
and leftists throw epithets at each
other," Lookstein commented.
there is a lot of hatred out thJ
m the Jewish world. It .3
rivals in intensity the hatreds
vicious anti-Semites."
THE RESULT of rabbis of J
ferent branches not talking!
each other and the actions of J
American religious leaders \,\
said, could be "a comi.,|
cataclysm in the form of an J|
pected schism between half th.1
Jewish people in America and SI
other half which will preclud*!
social relationships and intrant
nage between one group and!
another." |
The lack of a get in terminated
Reform marriages, he said, d
make children born to second marl
riages contracted by former!
spouses "ineligible for marriipl
with the more traditional!
segments of Jewish society."
The induction of Lookstein uti I
the presidency of the New York!
Board of Rabbis, the world's!
largest inter-denominational rift l
binical organization, represent!
the first time in the Board'il
105-year history that a son of 11
past president in this case, the I
late Rabbi Joseph Lookstein -I
will serve in the same capacity I
Lookstein also serves as chairmal
of the National Rabbinic Cabinctl
of the United Jewish Appeal anil
is vice chairman of the Coalition to |
Free Soviet Jews.
St amp-Collectors Elect |
TORONTO (JTA) Ariehl
Ben David has been elected presi-
dent of the World Philatelic Con-
gress of Israel-Holy Land Judaic |
Societies.
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Life. Be in it.
VT-


New Beach Mayor
Daoud Sees Self 'Most Effective
Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
It Fits Family Business to Politics
Continued from Page 5-A
the farmworkers are being
Isolated because of the use of cer-
Itain pesticides. I got involved
(because I was asked to. It's a
Ihuman rights issue, and Cesar
[Chavez is a very dedicated
I individual."
"Of course we can throw in a
boycott of California oranges
Jso," he added with a hearty
[laugh.
HOW DOES Daoud see his
Icommunity right now?
"Right now I think it's a
Iwonderful community and I think
we're starting to take the ap-
propriate steps to make our city a
at community."
One of the steps Daoud pointed
is the development of the
outhpoint project, as well as the
completion of the city's new
r stice facility. Daoud is also pro-
ud of the decrease in crime in
jiami Beach, although "it's not
i large a decrease as I would like
or as large as it's going to be."
Daoud believes the potential for
he city's growth is "tremen-
dous." despite the general percep-
tion of Miami Beach as a giant
etirement community. "I look
forward to seeing a balanced com-
nunity," he said, "in the sense
hat the elderly want to live with
he young and the young want to
with the elderly. No one
*rants to live in a city that's com-
pletely dominated by one group or
nother.
"It's so amazing to watch the
flances now. There are elderly
ople coming in with the young
ople, and they're showing each
bther dance steps. I think it helps
he elderly to be around young
ople and vice versa."
THE DROP in the median age
pf the city's residents is also
eneficial to increasing the poten
1 for Miami Beach's growth, he
aid. Nevertheless, Daoud refuses
target young people as the
primary force in rejuvenating the
ommunity. "You don't just want
i see the young, you want to see
tlso the middle aged and the
enior citizens come to Miami
ch. We're encouraging all peo-
to come back to Miami Beach
by making it a better city."
Keeping the streets clean and
Bafe are Daoud's highest
briorities. "If we can clean the
Fleets and make it safer within
' community, we're going to be
apable of achieving many dif-
ferent things in our future."
(Israeli Will Not Play
In South Africa
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
Israeli violinist Lydia Mor-
PKovitch of Israel has provided
jne United Nations Special Com-
mittee Against Apartheid with a
'Titten pledge not to perform in
outh Africa until apartheid is
washed. Subsequently, Mor-
ftpyitch has been deleted from a
Jistry of entertainers, actors
nd others who have performed in
uth Africa.
["I have been made aware of the
that the Norwegian Council
" Southern Africa has reported
1 to the United Nations Centre
jainst Apartheid's register of
ftertainers, actors and others
^o have performed in South
nca, said Mordkovitch in a let-
" w the UN committee.
rjSince I in no manner wish my
_t to South Africa to be seen as
WttO the apartheid state, I
I like to hereby regret my ap-
arances in South Africa in
P>nry, i982. Moreover, I have
I desire to return to South
inca as long as apartheid exists
country."
Once again, Daoud pointed to
bouthpoint as an example of how
to keep the city safe. According to
him, the demolition of the older
dilapidated buildings in South
Beach and the influx of financial
capital fa) the area will cause the
transients and criminals" to find
XK? place- But what about the
elderly who also live in those
buildings?
"I THINK it's going to make it
much nicer and better for them
because I don't think the elderly
people living on fixed incomes are
living in those derelict,
dilapidated buildings." Most of
them, Daoud said, are living in
"moderate-type buildings, decent
housing" that happens to be sur-
rounded by older, neglected
structures.
Private development and
restoration, including federal
funds, are the keys to insuring the
desirability of life in Miami Beach
for the younger people the Beach
needs, as well as the older people
the Beach already has, Daoud
said.
Implementation of a three-point
plan to expand Miami Beach's
revenues is also high on Daoud's
538-1000
list of priorities. Increasing
tourism, encouraging develop-
ment and inspiring people to move
into his city should shift the
Beach's finances to a broader tax
base less dependent on the fixed-
income elderly, he said.
How does the Mayor see
himself?
"My greatest strength is that I
like people," he said. "No, I love
people. I love all people. I love to
be around the elderly, the young. I
like to touch 'em, to hold 'em, to
talk with 'em, because we're all
human beings. We all breathe the
same air and dream the same
dreams."
IS HE ambitious?
"I think that confidence in the
ability to achieve, especially when
it comes to making Miami Beach
better, is my greatest asset. I
know we can make it better here,
and we will make it better
together."
Where does the Mayor see
himself in the future?
Lengthy pause. "I see myself as
having been the most effective,
the greatest mayor that Miami
Beach has ever had in its history."
A. Alexander Daoud was born
in Miami Beach in 1944. He
graduated from St. Patrick's High
School and went on to St. Leo's
College, where he received an AA
degree. In 1967, he graduated
from the University of Tampa and
in 1978 received the JD degree
from Northern Illinois
Univeristy's College of Law.
While a law student, 'Daoud was
named to the Dean's List and
elected president of his freshman
law class.
Daoud was elected to the Miami
Beach City Commission for the
first time in 1978, and reelected in
1981 and 1983. He was the assis-
tant city attorney and vice mayor
prior to his ascendance to the
mayoralty in November, 1985.
Before entering public service,
Daoud said he worked "in the
family business" from 1967-1978.
He served as president, then
chairman of the Miami Beach
Chapter of the American Federa-
tion of Senior Citiznes from
1981-85, and is legal counsel to
the Dade County Council of
Senior Citizens, the Tenant's
Association of Florida, the Miami
Beach Hispanic-American
Political Organization and the
Guardian Angels.
Daoud is a member of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce, the
Elks, Masons, Shriners, Knights
of Pythias, St. Patrick's Church,
and founder of the Alex Daoud
Service Club.
He is married to the former
Nona Breeland.
Kahane To Appeal
TEL AVIV (JTA) Rabbi
Meir Kahane plans to appeal to
the U.S. State Department
against the revocation of his
American citizenship. He was in-
formed by the U.S. Consulate in
Jerusalem last week that his
passport is being withdrawn
because a U.S. citizen cannot sit in
the parliament of a foreign coun-
try. Kahane represents the ex-
tremist Kach party in the
Knesset. If the State Department
rejects his appeal, he is entitled to
appeal to the U.S. courts.
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Mi


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985

U.S. May Require Pollard Spy Case Help from Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
following the return to
Washington of the team of
U.S. investigators sent to
Israel two weeks ago to
question persons who
allegedly had contacts with
Pollard.
The case therefore was
not closed by the American
statment. Its wording, im-
plying that the U.S. expects
ongoing cooperation from
Israel was insisted on by
State Department legal ad-
visor Abraham Sofaer, who
headed the American team.
it is awkward for Israel,
observers say, because
while Jerusalem was indeed
anxious to return to the
U.S. sensitive documents it
obtained by unauthorized
means, it is not willing to
contribute directly to the
conviction of Pollard in an
American court.
According to these
observers, Israel and the
U.S. Justice Department as
well would prefer that the
3 1 -year-old Navy
counterintelligence analyst
plead guilty to lesser
charges than espionage.
Such a plea would relieve
Israel of any further role in
the legal process and would
avoid a long, unprepossess-
ing trial with intense media
coverage focussed on Israel.
Missile Crisis
Continued from Page 1-A
downed when they presented an
aggressive posture toward Israel
aircraft flying routine recon
naissance flights over Lebanon It
was a split-second decision by the
local commander with which he
fully concurred, Rabin said.
The Defense Minister noted that
within days of the incident, the
Syrians moved SAM-6 and SAM-8
anti-aircraft missiles into eastern
Lebanon and SAM-2s to the bor-
der. The former were withdrawn
a day or so later, but the SAM-2s
remain and pose a threat, he said.
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"Jewislb Floridiai
[Miami, Florida Friday, December 27,1985 Section B
Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein
Elected President Of
JNF Of America
I Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein
Dr. Joseph P. Sternstein,
Iformer president of the Zionist
Organization of America and Rab-
bi of Temple Beth Sholom, Long
Island, has been elected president
of the Jewish National Fund of
[America, at a recent board
[meeting at the JNF headquarters
[in New York. He succeeds
Charlotte Jacobson, who served
[two two-year terms as president
|of JNF, the organization responsi-
ble for afforestation and land
(reclamation in Israel.
In accepting his new position,
[Sternstein stated that "JNF is the
concrete manifestation of the
[rebuilding of a people on a former-
ly arid, sterile land. The history of
[JNF is a saga which must never be
[forgotten The interconnection
[between the Jewish people and
[the land of Israel is the catalyst
[which continues to revolutionize
[Jewish life." He emphasized,
f'unless we are rooted in the land
|we have nothing. Redeeming the
land of our forefathers provides a
[never-ending source of Jewish
[strength and dignity."
Officers elected include ex-
hcutive vice president, Dr. Samuel
|I. Cohen; honorary presidents,
[Rabbi William Berkowitz, Dr.
[Israel Goldstein, Charlotte Jacob-
[son, Meyer Pesin, and Herman
jWeisman; vice presidents
[Beatrice L. Feldman, Hadassah,
[Gilbert Gertner, National Leader-
[ahip Council, Jack Lefkowitz,
[Zionist Organization of America,
[Zelda Lemberger, Na'Amat USA,
[L. Kenneth Rosett, Arza, and
[Hilde Zauderer, Amit Women
[associate treasurers, Rabbi Ezra
[Gellman, Religious Zionists of
|America, And I.K. Goldstein,
w Zionists of America; and
Secretary, Rose Goldman,
'ladassah.
Since its creation in 1901, the
Jewish National Fund has planted
over 170 million trees; reclaimed
close to 270,000 acres of difficult
errain for farming, housing, and
fndustry; prepared land for 800
ural villages; built over 3,000
niles of rural roads; and created
HO major parks and picnic areas
|throughout Israel.
A prominent national Zionist
ind Jewish leader, Sternstein is
President of the Histadrut Ivrit,
fhe Hebrew culture movement of
fhe United States; vice chairman
F the National Conference of
Soviet Jewry; treasurer of the
New York Board of Rabbis; vice
Jha'rman of the American Zionist
Charlotte Jacobson
Youth Foundation; member of the
World Executive Board of the
World Union of General Zionists;
and member of the Advisory
Council of the State University of
New York at Stony Brook. He has
also served as president of the
American Zionist Federation, and
was a member of the World Ex-
ecutive of the World Zionist
Organization and the Jewish
Agency Board.
Charlotte Jacobson, who was
elected treasurer of NJF, spoke of
some of the organization's major
activities during the past few
years. "One of the most exciting
achievements," she said, "has
been JNF's land reclamation work
in the barren, hilly Galilee,"
Israel's new northern frontier for
industry and communities. "I'm
glad to have participated in a
small way in promoting this
development." She also noted
that JNF's creation of Timna
Park in the Negev as a major
recreational facility represents
"history in the making and will be
a tremendous asset to the
Southern region's economy." In
view of the strict economic deci-
sion taken by the Israeli
government, Jacobson urged the
Diaspora, particularly the
American Jewish community, to
increase its support of JNF ac-
tivities vital to Israel's future.
He has travelled widely on
behalf of international Jewish af-
fairs, and was the first American
Zionist leader received by the late
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat,
for a private meeting of one and a
half hours. His meetings with top
world statesmen also took him on
an extensive trip to Russia and
other countries behind the Iron
Curtain. Sternstein was invited by
the Government of Israel to head
the American Jewish community
to mobilize large-scale tourism to
the Jewish state.
Addressing the board, Sterns-
tein reported on a recent meeting
of the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, which was conven-
ed in Washington, D.C. The
discussion focused on the
U.S.-Soviet summit conference in
Geneva, and its possible effects on
Soviet Jews. He stated that dur-
ing a meeting held a few months
ago President Reagan told
Jewish leaders, "If we do not hear
of any public report on the issue of
Soviet Jewry, do not assume that
Continued on Page 12-B
Sue Fisher
Photojournalist
Fisher Reaps Rewards of Long Career
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Photojournalist Ray Fisher
has been named the Univer-
sity of Miami College of
Arts and Sciences
"Outstanding Alumnus" for
1985.
How was the news
received?
"I was very surprised," Fisher
said, grinning broadly. "In fact, I
was at a brunch when my wife
came up to me and said, 'Did you
know about this?" Frankly, I was
amazed."
FISHER, 61, was a 1953
graduate of the school. "It had
grown since the days of the old
'cardboard college' and was inun-
dated with something like 18,000
veterans attending on the G.I.
Bill," he recalled.
During World War II, Fisher,
who was working for NBC in New
York prior to Pearl Harbor,
became a combat photographer
assigned to Omar Bradley's head-
quarters. Later, while serving
under General George Patton,
Fisher photographed Patton tak-
ing his own photos with a
liberated camera. Three days
before the war ended, Fisher was
wounded.
While at UM, he edited various
school publications and founded
the University Photo Center on
his way to earning a BA degree.
His first job after graduation was
as a staff photographer for the
Miami Herald.
HE STAYED there for 16 years
and rose through the ranks,
ultimately becoming the
newspaper's photo editor.
While at the UM, Fisher became
associated with former Life
Magazine photo editor Wilson
Hicks, who was instrumental in
helping Fisher's career develop;
his photographs have appeared in
numerous Time-Life publications
as a result.
Fisher is best known for his
photographs of celebrity South
Florida visitors. They cover a
40-year span. "I have shots of
every president since Hoover,
with the exception of Franklin
Roosevelt," he said, adding, "but
I do have a picture of Eleanor."
"MY FIRST photo of Ronald
Reagan was in 1939, after he stop-
ped being 'Dutch.' He was touring
with Louella Parsons and a bunch
of starlets, including Susan
Hayward and Jane Wyman. I sent
him a print, and he acknowledged
receiving it with a nice letter."
Fisher's awards include the
Penney/Missouri Journalism
Award in Photography, as well as
others given by such noteworthy
organizations as the National
Press Photographer's Associa-
tion, Sigma Delta Chi, the
Associated Press and the New
York Art Directors. As his fame
spread beyond the Miami area,
why did he decide to stay?
"Where else," Fisher asked,
"can you sit around in short
sleeves with the air-conditioning
on in the middle of December?"
MIAMI'S MAJOR drawback.
Fisher said, is the self-interest of
each municipality, the inability of
each city government to set aside
politics in favor of mutual sup-
port. "None of them care about
the other. People in Opa-Locka
couldn't care less about what hep-
pens to the people in Miami
Beach. It's crazy. It irritates me
because, in actuality, they all need
each other. They survive because
of each other."
As a specialist in shooting enter-
tainers, Fisher remembers most
fondly the glory years of Miami
Beach nightlife. He is sad about
the changes that have taken place.
"The Beach is dying. The reason
is that the people who originally
built Miami Beach made their
money and left. With few excep-
tions of people who put money
back in, everyone else took their
money out and split, leaving
behind a bunch of old hotels." On-
ly recently, Fisher claims, have
Beachites reinvested to begin
reestablishing their city.
BRINGING tourists back is
another problem, he said. After
the war, many of the Beach's
neighborhoods were populated by
soldiers who had been stationed
here, people who wanted to come
back with their families. Now, the
children of those people don't
want to stay.
"Also," Fisher said, "you can
go to London or Paris from New
York for the same money and
have a better time, unless you're
coming for the sun. Besides the
sun, look at what we have to offer:
race tracks, jai-alai, theme parks,
stuff you can find practically
anywhere."
Fisher's personal favorites in
the world of photography include
the work of David Douglas Dun-
can and Phillipe Halsman's
portraiture.
"In fact, I just had an in-
teresting experience involving
Duncan and the producers of
"Miami Vice." Remember the
episode where an old Vietnam
buddy of Crockett's returns while
chasing down a story about some
tainted heroin? Did you notice any
of the wall treatments in the
Continued on Page 12-B
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation formally launched its
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign with the Campaign Opening Din-
ner. Seen at the affair were: (from left to right) Elaine Bloom, co-
chairman of the event along with Howard R. Scharlin (not pic-
tured); State Senator Given Margolis; and Federation Board
member Jeffrey Berkowitz.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
From the Pulpit
Can Jews Debate With Christians?
By RABBI
ISRAEL JACOBS
Temple Beth Moehe
Is there any value, from a
Jewish point of view, in discussing
religion with Christians? The
answer depends largely on
whether some basic problems can
first be resolved. Before embark-
ing on dialogue, certain fun-
damental differences between
Christians and Jews have to be
candidly aired.
Christians would love to save
every Jewish soul. Christian mis-
sionaries utilize the mail, radio,
TV, direct solicitation. They spare
no pains to convert us to their
"truth." Occasionally, I get ir-
ritated, but mostly I pay little at-
tention. The tracts they send me
go directly into the wastebasket.
GENERALLY. I ignore their
confused theological dialectics.
Not that Christianity holds no in-
terest for me, after all, it is an off-
shoot of Judaism and retains
many doctrines of its mother
religion. The problem is that
Christians who express interest in
dialogue too often begin with
unacceptable pre-conditions. They
start from the premise that the
New Testament has replaced our
Hebrew scriptures and that the
Torah is no longer operative.
That is monologue, not
dialogue. Trying to exchange
ideas in such a setting is like try-
ing to listen to the sound of one
hand clapping. In past centuries,
when Christianity ruled the state,
Jews had do choice but to listen.
Fortunately, that condition no
longer obtains.
A second trouble spot is the
flagrant error that New Testa-
ment interpretations of passages
in our Hebrew scriptures are ac-
curate. These interpretations in-
volve convoluted arguments to
prove that the Hebrew prophets
predicted the birth, crucifixion
and ressurectjon of Jesus.
NO REPUTABLE biblical
scholar, whether Jewish, Roman
Catholic or Protestant, accepts
these interpretations as valid.
They, in fact, come from the
perspective of Christians living in
a particular period and intellec-
tual climate reading their
preconceived ideas into the text.
The rabbis of the Talmudic period
did the same thing. The process
was called Midrach. Thousands of
such interpretations were col-
lected. But the rabbis were careful
to distinguish between the literal
meaning and subjective inter-
pretations. An example of this
process is the verse in Gen. 1:26.
GOD SATS. "Let us make man
in our image, after our likeness."
Who is the "us" in this verse?
Who. besides God existed at the
time of creabon' Probably it is the
majestic "we," the style in which
kings spoke The Midrash weaves
a fanaful interpretation
God consulted truth and mercy
before deciding on whether to
create man. Truth cautioned God
not to create man. because man
will lie and cheat. Mercy.
urged God to create
God heard them out then
cast truth to the ground, created
man. after which He restored
truth to its former position of
Midrash was not meant to
be taken as the priaoary meaning
of the text, but as a homily about
the nature of ebbb and and God's
'Of]
ANOTHER HURDLE that
stands in the way of frwAful
dialogue is the Ckrisban dogma
that God fathered a son. .Vat si the
sshiil sease. that we are al
God's children, as Judaism
Ilia 11. bat Bterafly. a
eahftb^a won. born
Rabbi Jacobs
child is born, who walked the
earth in the form of man, was
crucified for man's sins and was
resurrected.
Jews can never accommodate to
such a theology and remain Jews.
The doctrine that God was obliged
to send His son to die on the cross
in order to obtain atonement for
some original sin, and nothing
man does on his own can earn
forgiveness or acceptance, con-
tradicts everything a Jew believes
in.
Jewish theology depends on per-
sonal confession, true repentance
and a commitment to a moral and
just life. The idea that God would
consign any of His children to
eternal damnation because they
do not accept this or that doctrine
is incompatible with Jewish
thought
THE CHRISTIAN obsession
with personal salvation is also a
problem to Jews. Jews fear this
obsession and for good reason.
It sparked inquisitions, forced
baptism and autos da ft. The rab-
bis of the Talmudic era gave con-
siderable thought to personal
salvation, but their major concern
was collective salvation, not in
some mystical other wordly ex-
istence, but here on earth.
Passover and Easter
demonstrate this difference in em-
phasis. Easter dramatizes the pro-
mise of everlasting life through
Jesus. It highlites the Christian
dogma that salvation and eternal
life are reserved for believers.
Passover rehearses the history
and promise of national freedom
and connects this promise not to
correct belief but to righteous
deeds.
Finally, dialogue must deal with
the record of Jewish suffering at
Christian hands. A dark record
that stretches through centuries
in an unbroken line. A record of
official and unofficial defamation
and degradation of Jews in Chris-
NEW JERSEY TM-YWHA CAMPS
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tian lands. Of pogroms and
massacres, of forced conversions
and expulsions from countries in
which Jews lived for centuries. A
record of overt and covert anti-
Semitism that paved the way for
the unparalleled monstrosities of
Nazi Germany.
NEITHER PIOUS platitudes
nor back-handed pronouncements
that not all Jews are to be held ac-
countable for the crucifixion of
Jesus will wash away that stai-
nand ameliorate Jewish suspicions
of Christian intentions. To win
Jewish trust both Christian clergy
and laity must take concrete
measures locally and on the world
scene that will clearly, une-
quivocally spell out a change of
heart.
Judaism and Christianity share
common ground on many issues
and to a degree we share common
hopes and even theology.
Dialogue could prove fruitful, but
it requires two parties who speak
as equals, respectful of one
another's creeds. Both our faiths
are in agreement that the God we
reach out to is ultimately
unknowable and that only a glimp-
se of His infinite glory and truth
has been revealed to our finite
minds. The Menorah and the
Cross cannot merge, but Chris-
tians and Jews can learn to com-
municate with each other and
share their respective insights in-
to god and man.
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Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
ouis and Beu Stein
Steins To Receive Humanitarian
Of The Year Award
Miami Jewish Home and
hospital for the Aged Men's Club
\x Douglas Gardens has announc-
. that Miami Beach residents
ess and Louis Stein will be the
1986 recipients of their
Humanitarian Award. The Award
prill be presented at a dinner and
I held in the Stein's honor on
Sunday Jan. 5, at Douglas
Gardens.
"Louis and Bess Stein are in-
dividuals of vision whose leader-
pip has brought great distinction
i all of their endeavors both here
bid abroad," said Men's Club
president Dr. Jon Rauch.
Bess Stein formed and chaired
i first Allied Jewish Appeal in
(New Jersey. She has served as
airperson for the Albert Eins-
ein Medical School. She was the
cipient of the American Cancer
ciety's Humanitarian Award
nd also received the "Woman of
he Year" award from the Greater
iliami Women's Auxiliary of the
*liami Jewish Home and Hospital
lor the Aged at Douglas Gardens,
pf which she is a vice president.
Louis Stein has displayed an ex-
ordinary degree of involve-
nent in the philanthropic com-
nunity. An attorney with more
than 30 years in practice, Mr.
Stein retired as chairman of the
Board of Food Fair Stores in
1971. He holds Honorary Doctor
of Law degrees from Drexel
University, Fordham University
and LaSalle University. He is a
member of the Board of Trustees
of the American and International
Technion Societies, the Jewish
Theological Seminary and Mt.
Sinai Hospital of Miami Beach. He
is a vice president of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens and cur-
rently serves and president of the
FOUNDERS ofthe Miami Jewish
Home.
Bess and Louis Stein together
established a chair in pediatrics
and the Stein Research Center at
Jefferson University Medical
School. They have endowed the
Stein Institute of Legal Ethics at
Fordham University, the Mother
and Child Clinic in Jerusalem and
the Amphitheatre at Liberty Bell
Park in Jerusalem. At the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens, Lou
and Bess Stein endowed the Stein
Gerontological Institue and the
forthcoming Stein Commons
Building.
o.

U the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Campaign Opening
*nner, which formally launched the 1986 CJA-IEF Campaign,
who made first-time gifts in the Women s pgg**
- category were awarded Shomer pins. W ^npaign Chairwoman Gail Jaffe Newman is seen at left presen-
"^ a pin to new Shomer Helaine Herskowttz.
Talmudic U. Dinner Sunday
Balogh, Bierman to Get Doctorates;
Alumni Named for Honors by Dr. Alfred Swire
Rabbi Youi Heber
Rabbi Zvi Rosenbaum
Robert N. Rosenberg:
Alfred and Sadye Swire
Greater Miami's first Jewish institution
of higher learning now the largest in the
South will honor its alumni, bestow two
honorary doctorates and observe its 11th
anniversary at a communitywide dinner S-
unday (Dec. 29) evening at the Crown
Hotel, 4041 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.
Talmudic University of Florida will hold
its annual banquet beginning with a recep-
tion at 6:30 p.m., foUowea by dinner at
7:30. Reservations for the $54-a-couple
event may be made by telephoning
534-7050 or 534-8444.
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, president and
Rosh Hayeshiva, and Dr. Alfred E. Swire,
honorary president, announced the selec-
tion of nine alumni now living in South
Florida for special awards. Murray (Moshe
Chaim) Berkowitz, chairman of the board,
announced the selection of David Balogh
and Professor Jacquin Bierman to receive
the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris
causa.
Rabbi Yossi Heber, principal of the
junior and senior high schools of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy and
spiritual leader of Knesseth Israel Con-
gregation in Miami Beach, will be the prin-
cipal speaker.
He is one of the nine alumni to be
honored, making the dinner one of the
most unusual in the annals of Jewish
education, according to dinner chairmen
Jack Zweig and Abbey Berkowitz.
Honorary chairmen of the anniversary
celebration are Seymour Rubin and Russell
Galbut. Former Vice Mayor Joseph Malek
and Rabbi Jeremiah Burstyn, executive
vice president of Talmudic University, are
dinner vice chairmen.
The Alfred and Sadye Swire College of
Judaic Studies of Talmudic University
already has achieved an international rep-
utation for highly personalized studies at
the graduate and undergraduate level.
Alumni fill numerous positions in the
rabbinate and in Jewish education and
community work here and around the
nation.
Rabbi Zweig, a renowned Talm
scholar, is a frequent lecturer at congrega-
tions and campuses across the country, and
has spearheaded the development of even-
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig
Talmudic U. President
ing courses aimed at individuals with both
extensive and limited backgrounds in
Jewish knowledge.
Other alumni who will be honored Dec.
29 include Robert N. Rosenberg, a real
estate broker associate with the Keyes
Company; Rabbi Aryeh Zak, who owns and
operates Torah Treasures in Miami Beach,
largest outlet in the state for Jewish
religious books and Judaica; Rabbi Zvi
Rosenbaum, executive secretary of the Or-
thodox Rabbinical Council of South
Florida; Rabbi David Gray, insurance
agent; Rabbi Shimshon Mindick, former
executive director of the Louis Merwitzer
Mesivta High School of Miami Beach who
now is an insurance agent; Michael Levi,
who heads the telecommunications division
of Universal Enterprises of North Miami
Beach; Rabbi Shaya Greenberg, an instruc-
tor at Talmudic University; and Rabbi
Binyomin Rachmani, a graduate of
Talmudic University enrolled in
postgraduate studies there and who also
teaches at Talmudic U. and at the Mesivta
High School. He earned a secular degree in
computer science that he utilizes in
teaching at the high school.
Balogh, who owns together with his
family a chain of high-range jewelry stores,
is a former director of Jefferson National
Bank who has been active in the develop-
ment of the 41st Street business district.
Professor Bierman, a professor of law at
the University of Miami, has been active in
the establishment of the Alfred and Sadye
Swire College of Judaic Studies at
Talmudic University of Florida, whose
main campus is located at 1910 Alton
Road, Miami Beach.
Elie Weisel, the chairman of the Presi-
dent's Holocaust Commission, received the
first honorary degree from Talmudic
University several years ago.
Rabbi Heber is former spiritual leader of
Congregation Etz Chaim in Miami Beach,
and is enrolled in a doctoral program in
educational administration at Florida In-
ternational University. He earned a BBA
degree at F.I.U., a masters degree in
school administration at F.I.U. and became
a certified public accountant in 1978.


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Top Cityff Hope Post
For Former Floridian
Dr. Sanford M. Shapero, cur-
rently associate executive director
of the City of Hope National
Medical Center, will assume the
post of executive director effec-
tive Jan. 1, City of Hope president
Abraham S. "Abe" Bolsky
announced.
"Dr. Shapero brings a wealth of
special expertise as a health care
administrator, gerontologist,
business executive, consultant,
public speaker and author to the
position," Bolsky said. "He has
been a member of the senior staff
since 1979. As executive director,
Dr. Shapero will be responsible
for the management of all ad-
ministrative and fundraising
operations of the City of Hope
throughout the nation."
Prior to joining the City of
Hope, Dr. Shapero was an active
member of the Florida business
community serving as a vice presi-
dent of North American
Biologicals, Inc. in Miami and was
a widely known consultant in the
fields of health care and housing
projects in Baltimore and Miami.
He was regional director for the
Southeastern States of Miami-
based Union of American Hebrew
Congregations. His career as a
clergyman included being a Rabbi
at Temple Emanuel in Fort
Lauderdale.
The 72-year-old City of Hope,
housed in 50 buildings on 93 acres
Dr. Sanford M. Shapero
in Duarte, located in metropolitan
Los Angeles, has a current annual
operating budget of $100 million.
There are 45 volunteer support
chapters for the City of Hope in
Florida.
Dr. Shapero joined the City of
Hope as national director of com-
munity affairs and subsequently
was named associate executive
director. "In addition to organiza-
tion responsibilities he has served
as a national spokesman for the
City of Hope," Bolsky, president
of Tishman Construction Corp. of
California, said.
Cantor Swerling Joins Staff Of
Union Of Hebrew Congregations
The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations has added Cantor
Norman P. Swerling as staff
member to the new department at
the Miami office, according to
Rabbi Lewis Littman, regional
director of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations. Littman
explained, "While the rise in
numbers is always cause for
celebration, we must see to it that
we have programs and facilities to
properly serve the growing
constituency."
He said that while Sterling's
primary responsibility will be
toward helping new congrega-
tions get started, he will also be
available to serve as a resource
person to all the existing pro-
grams and congregations in the
region. Rabbi Swerling will
assume the responsibility for
Development of New
Congregations.
Rabbi Swerling is a graduate of
the Cantonal Department of the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, he has served
as cantor, educator, and youth
director for synagogues.
For the past 10 years, he was
director of the UAHC Eisner
Camp-Institute for Living
Judaism in Great Barrington,
Massachusetts.
No Chance For Israel-Jordan
Peace In The Near Future
LONDON (ZINS) The an-
nual survey of the Institute of
Strategic Studies published in
London says that Syria has nearly
doubled its armed forces in the
past two years and has almost
three times as many men in its
regular army as Israel. The
survey says that Syrian combined
regular forces have jumped from
220.000 in 1983 to 402.000 as of
today, awl 272.500 reservists.
Israel has 142.000 troops in its
minaw farces aad 400.000 upon
moMhatiaB of reserves. Syria
also has 4^200 tanks to Israel's
3.600. Only in combat aircraft
Israel atal has a numerical advan-
tage 684 planes to Syria's 500.
The report gives a detailed
breakdown of each country's
military strength. The Institute
says that Jordan has 796 tanks
and 121 combat aircraft. Saudi
Arabian armed forces total
62,500. The Saudis have 450 tanks
and 205 combat aircraft. Syria,
Jordan and Saudi Arabia,
therefore, have a combined total
of 826 aircraft, against Israel's
684. The three states have 5,445
tanks, outnumbering Israel's
3.600.
Numbers apart, the report
states, Israel continues to main-
tain a position of superiority over
any of the neighbors. But it warns
that the emergence of the myth
among Lebanese guerrilla groups
that the IDF was defeated and
driven out of Lebanon, is disturb-
ing the future peace. Meanwhile.
Dr. Robert Onel. head of the In-
stitute of Strategic Studies.
vaatod Israel past week. He told
the dairy Ha 'aretz that he dismiss-
ed the possibility of an Israel-
Jordan peace in the next two
years.
At the 9th annual Chanukah Run, hosted by
the Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami, after having crossed the finish line,
are (left to right): Mike Edelman; Gerald K.
Schwartz, Federation board member; Aaron
Podhurst, 1986, CJA-IEF General Campam
chairman; Kenneth J. Schwartz; and Morris
Futernick, Federation board member The
race was sponsored by Mt. Sinai Medical
Center and S-P-O-R-T Clinic.
Members of the Host Committee for the
American Ballet Theatre Gala gathered at the
Star Island home of Florence Hecht to plan for
the Jan. 28 benefit at the Pavilion Hotel. The
gala ball will follow the AST performance of
"Giselle," featuring Mikhail Baryshnikov
and Alessandra Ferri. (Left to right) front
row: Joan Glickstein, Audre Mendel, Florence
Hadassah
Events
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah will hold an Eye Bank
Luncheon Meeting on Monday.
Jan. 6 at 11:30 a.m. at the Ocean
Pavillion. Dr. Joseph Hoffman.
Ophthalmologist, will speak on
eye care; Mary Uchitel will
entertain.
Bay Harbour Chapter of Had
assah will honor Mrs. Helen C.
Katzman at a luncheon on Thurs-
day, Jan. 9. according to Eleanor
Potash, president of the chapter.
Hatikvah Chapter of Hadassah
will hold its monthly meeting on
Thursday. Jan. 9 at 7:45 at Te-
mple Israel in Kendall.
Gordman Elected
cSAn\~ (JTA> *"*
Gordman has been elected inter-
national president of B'nai Brith
Giris.
Hecht, Millie Ser. Second row: Elaine Leviru,
Harriet Glickstein, Marcia Green, Bonnie
Albert. Third row: Doris Pardo, Isabell Am-
dur, Roselle Marder, Judy Drucker. Fourth
row: Betty Snetman, Dahlia Glottman, Carole
Samet, Andrea Edelstein. Micki Rosenblom
is not shown.
Bronfman In Warsaw to Confer
With Polish President

PARIS (JTA) World
Jewish Congress President Edgar
Bronfman arrived in Warsaw for
a two-day stay during which he
conferred with Polish President
Wojciech Jaruxelski. met local
Jewish community leaders and at-
tended a performance of the War-
saw Yiddish Theater now
celebrating its 35th anniversary.
Bronfman arrived in Warsaw
from Moscow. No details were im-
mediately available on his stay in
the Soviet Union.
The Jewish leader was welcom-
ed at Warsaw Airport by the
Polish Minister for Religious Af-
fairs, Adam Lopatki, who
because of the role of the Catholic
Church in Poland, is considered
one of the three most prominent
ministers in the Polish
eovernment.
JARUZELSKI'S special ad
viser. Maj. Wiealaw Gornioki. said
that Poland is "warmly welcom-
ing" the eight-man Jewish delega-
tion led by Bronfman. He said the M
main subjects to be discussed
dealt with the protection of
Jewish monuments, the preserva-
tion of Jewish culture, and the
upkeep of Jewish cemeteries and
museums.
According to foreign cor-
respondents in Warsaw contacted
by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
by telephone, Bronfman told
reporters at Warsaw Airport
upon arrival, "I have come to
Warsaw to discuss strictly Polish
Jewish problems." He denied \
rumors that he plants to discuss
Soviet-Israeli relations or emigra-
tion plans for Soviet Jews
The World Jewish Congress
president met Jaruxelski in
September in New York where
the Polish President attended the
UN General Assembly
*
:~rK*;3*S*&


Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Temple Shir Ami will be selling Lox Boxes to be delivered on Bum.
Bowl Sunday, in the Kendall, South Miami, Coral Gabies and Miam
Beach areas. Deadline date at the Temple will be Jan. 15
Sephardlc Jewish Center of North Miami Beach will hold the se-
cond annual Gala New Year s Party on Tuesday night at 9 o m Th*
party will take place at the center. u pmme
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens
and two of Its subsidiary Senior Adult Day Centers will sponsor a
theatre production on Friday, Jan. 3 at 1 p.m. The Fantasy Theatre
Factory, a group of young comedians, will present, "Commedv with a
Twist of Lemon, at the Legion Park Senior Adult Day Care Center
The South Dade Council of B'nai B'rith Lodges/Units is looking for
nominations for the 1986 Dade County Outstanding Citizen Award.
The award selection is based on civic contributions and the in-
dividual's desire to improve the quality of life in the community and
must represent a recognized community group.
Forward your nominee's current resume to: Mr. Harry Yablin 14715
SW 84th Terrace. Miami, 33193. Deadline is Jan. 10.
Rabbi and Mrs. Ralph P. Klngsley will host a luncheon tor
homecoming college students after Saturday morning services
which begin at 10:30 a.m. in the Synagogue's Wiener Social Hall.
Airman First Class Henry Karpel, son of Jose and Miriam Karpel of
Miami Beach, has graduated from the U.S. Air Force Information
Systems Operators Course at Sheppard Air Force Base in Texas
Karpel is scheduled to serve with the 2137th Information Systems
Squadron in West Germany.
Forte Forum will present Dr. Robert Sandier, professor of English,
specializing In American literature and contemporary American
culture, on Tuesday, Jan. 7 at the 1000 West Ave. Banquet Hall at 1
p.m.
The next Mount Sinai Medical Pacemaker Seminar on Tuesday,
Jan. 14 at 10 a.m., will feature guest speaker Dr. Philip Samet, Chief
of Division of Cardiology, who will speak on "The History of Cardiac
Pacing." The discussion will take place at the Wolfson Auditorium.
Alfred J. Holzman of Cleveland, Ohio, has been chosen as the first
Lincoln Road Management and Development director. He was
selected by the Lincoln Road Management and Development Ad-
visory Board and will assume his position on Jan. 1.
The Central Agency for Jewish Education will present Rabbi Mit-
chell Chefitz on Thursday, Jan. 2 at 1 30 p.m. He will review the Zohar,
the central book of Jewish mysticism for the Great Jewish Books
Discussion Group at the Miami Beach Public Library.
Miami Heart Institute will celebrate the completion of their new
medical facility at "An International Affair of the Heart," on Friday,
Jan. 3 at the Fontalnebleau Hilton Hotel. Richard A. Elias, M.D., is
chairman of the event; and Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Hooper are hosts.
CAMP DIRECTOR
Year-round position, co-ed Jewish camp lor 8-15 year
olds, nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains of N.C.,
winter office in Atlanta, GA., diversified responsibilities,
salary commensurate with experience. Written reply
with resume to:
CAMPJUDEA,
1655 Peacetree St., Suite 405,
Atlanta, QA. 30309
MARINE

Kendall's Newest
Restaurant & Seafood Market
Excitingly New
Always Fresh
Select Wine List
Lunch Special
Take Out Available
Fresh Catch
Maine Seafood
Salmon
White Fish
OPEN 7 DAYS
liOEI
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS
KENDALL SQUARE
13716 N.Kendall Dr.
At the recent annual Weizmann Institute
dinner-dance, (left to right): Gottlieb Hammer;
Mr. and Mrs. Harry "Hap" Levy, chairman
of the dance; Mr. and Mrs. Rowland Schaefer,
honorees; and keynote speaker Professor
Michael Sela, immediate past president and
now deputy chairman of the Institute. The
dance was sponsored by the Florida Region of
the American Committee for the Weizmann
Institute of Science.
Participating in the recent annual meeting of
the B'nai B'rith Youth Commission
in
Washington are: back row (left to right):
Steven Klein of Miami, Jeffrey Hoffman, Jef-
frey Ackerman and Dr. Daniel Thursz. In the
second row, from left, are: Jerry Sugarman,
Dr. Max Baer, Andrea Gordman, Louis Hym-
son of Miami and Paul Backman of Pembroke
Pines. Front row, from left, are: Clarence
Hourvitz of Margate, Alma Hofstadter of
North Miami Beach, Janet Sugarman, Anit
Perlman of Fort Lauderdale, Carol Hymson
of Miami and Alvin Singer.
386-4600
Adath Yeshurun will honor
Larry and Jan Udell, on
Saturday evening Feb. 15 at
the 11th annual dinner-dance.
Mr. Udell is the founder and
corporate executive officer of
Florida Frozen Foods, and
Southeast Frozen Foods.
'Piece To Jerusalem'
Creators On
Miami Beach
Mr. and Mrs. Simcha Friedman,
of Friedman Enterprises, game
creators, will be on Miami Beach
from this week to promote their
new game, Target 613 and puzzle,
"Piece To Jerusalem." Mr. Fried-
man, who taught at the Hebrew
Academy, will present Target 613
to the students.
Community Calendar
Biscayne Chapter, Women's American ORT, will hold their
next meeting on Thursday, Jan. 2, at 12:30 p.m. in the Morton
Towers Auditorium.
Temple Beth Raphael will hold its annual Gala Installation on
Sunday, Jan. 5 at noon at the Konover Hotel, according to Leo
Bell, vice president.
YIVO Committee of Miami will open its 39th Annual Forum on
Wednesday, Jan. 8 at 1:30 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, with
Samuel Norich, YIVO director speaking on, "YIVO Facing The
Future." Leah Koenig and Zvi Stopler, Habimah stars, will
perform.
On Sunday, Jan. 26, YIVO will hold their Banquet at 12:30 p.m.
at the Deauville Hotel.
Temple Menorah Sisterhood will host its regular meeting on
Wednesday, Jan. 8 at noon. Harold Sandier, violinist, will
perform.
Galil Chapter of Amit Women will hold a meeting on Monday,
Jan. 6 at noon in the Masonic Hall, North Miami Beach. The pro-
gram will include the movie, "Good Morning Israel."
Coral Gables Chapter of Amit Women will hold a meeting and
luncheon on Tuesday, Jan 7 at noon at Temple Zamora.
The Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami and the Jewish
Community Centers will hold the JETset "Topic of the Day"
discussion on Monday, Jan. 6 at 1 p.m. Sue Gordon, MSW, will
present the discussion taking place at Beth David Congregation.
American Jewish Congress Justine Louise Wise Chapter will
meet Thursday, Jan. 9, at 12:30 p.m. at American Savings and
Loan Association Bank Building, Alton and Lincoln Roads.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Evie Nelson Receives National ASCAP Award
Evie Nelson of Bay Harbour
Islands, a student at Berklee
School of Music in Boston, was
awarded the National ASCAP
award for 1985 as the student ad-
judged by the faculty "most
talented" in the total range of
musical pursuits such as compos-
ing, performance, arranging and
screen scoring.
Evie is daughter of Suki Nelson,
music specialist at the Lehrman
Day School; sister of Cantor
Rachelle Nelson of Temple Israel,
Miami; granddaughter of Lillian
Nelson, former concert pianist;
and niece of Judy Drucker, direc-
tor of the Great Artist Series at
Temple Beth Sholom.
Evie Nelson
Israel Consul Gmeral Yehoshua Trigor, se-
cond from the left, joins members of the South
Florida Jewish community who recently
volunteered to make calls on behalf of the
Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization to
people who have not yet paid their 1985 Bond
commitment. Aiding Israel during Cash
Mobilization Sunday were, from left to right:
Jack Bellock, Jack Chester and Eric Salm.
/CosherJ&rner
RES T/XUR/\rSJT
2701 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. Rorida 33140 305-674 9222
New Glatt Kosher Restaurant Under ORC supervision
Eat in. takeout, delivery, catering
Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization
honored Turnberry Isle Woman of the Year
Ida Softer Reis, second from left, and Loretta
and Harry Rosen, third and second from
right, during the recent Aventura-Turnberry
Israel Bond Brunch at the Turnberry Isle
Garden Room, Reis and the Rosens were
presented the Israel Heritage Award for their
involvement in philanthropic and community
organizations, as well as their staunch sup-
port of the Jewish State through the Israel
Bond program. With the honorees are Brunch
Chairmen, Irving Stessel, left; Dr. Esther
Morningstar, center, and guest speaker Wolf
Blitzer, Washington Bureau Chief for the
Jerusalem Post.
Anong delegates who attended Amit Women '$
60tk anniversary convention at Grossingers
are stated left to right; Dora Pariser of
Rtskona Chapter in West Palm Beach; Bea
Harris of Choi Chapter in South Miami; Ida
Arluk, member of the presidium of Amit
Women Florida Council and president of
Galil Chapter in Morth Miami Beach: Frieda
C. Kufeld. unanimously reelected Amit
Wome* Motional President, and Saundra
Rothenberg. a member of Yered Chapter in
Morth Miami Beach and member of the
presidium of Florida Council.
Temple Emanu-EI
Of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
PRESENTS
The 1986 Cultural Series
Five Outstanding Evenings
ArtBuchwald
Marvin Kalb
GeraIdine A. Feuaro
January 9
YehudaShifman
March 12
Eban
February 18
January 30
8 p.m. in the Temple Sanctuary
FOR TICKETS CALL 538-2503 ext. 14


inopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
r -And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon
[Ephraim's head, who was the younger, and his left, hand upon
lUanasseh's head"
(Genesis 48. U)
VAYEHI
IvAYEHI Jacob lived in Egypt 17 years. On his death bed, he
blessed his sons, predicting the destiny of the tribes that were to
descend from each of them. Ephraim and Manasseh, Joseph's two
sons, were included in the roster of Jacob's sons, the heads of
future tribes. Jacob died; the Egyptian physicians embalmed his
body, after the custom of the country. Jacob was buried in the
land of Canaan, in the Cave of Machpelah, together with his
ancestors. Joseph continued to provide for his brothers after their
father's death. Before his own death, Joseph made his brothers
kswear that when they returned to Canaan they would take his
[bones with them to the Promised Land, Joseph died; meanwhile,
his embalmed body was placed in a coffin, awaiting the return to
Canaan.
(The rtcountlnt of Ml* Weekly Portion of the Law it extracted and based
I upon "Tha Graphic History of tht Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamlr, 111. poblllhad by Shengold. Tha volume is available at 7s Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10011. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis
iributing the volume.)
Bar/ Bat Mitzvah
Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
[Shultz Raps West Europeans For
Moving To Legitimize The
}L0 Before It Changes Its Policy
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State
urge Shultz has criticized
|r'ashington's West Euro-
ean allies for moving
bward legitimizing the
Palestine Liberation
frganization before the ter-
orist organization changes
; policy.
I "If PLO policy changes, that
kct will be acknowledged,"
nultz said in a speech to the
filgrims Society in London.
L'nlike some of our European
fiends, however, we feel that
fstures toward the PLO while it
i not accepted (United Nations
curity Council Resolutions) 242
nd 338 only mislead its leaders
i international acceptance and
ature."
IN HIS speech, copies of which
made available by the State
epartment here, Shultz stressed
hat "it seems obvious that the
PLO excludes itself as a player as
prig as it rejects" the two Securi-
Council resolutions "and
srael's right to exist."
-MODERN LANGUAGES~
French Spanish Hebrew
Individual and group
tuition by highly qualified
teacher with wide experi-
ence abroad. Call (305)
9372364 after 6 p.m.
Shultz added that "we shall
see" whether the PLO becomes a
more moderate organization or re-
nounces the "armed struggle"
against Israel. "Meanwhile, the
PLO is not entitled to any pay-
ment in advance so long as it re-
jects what are, after all, the basic
premise of the peace process. A
country cannot be expected to
make concessions to those who
resort to terrorism and who treat
negotiation as only a way station
on the road to its ultimate destruc-
tion," he said.
Shultz said that the U.S. seeks
to encourage "moderate solu-
tions" in the Mideast and
elsewhere "not only by our own
good faith but by denying success
to those who seek radical
solutions."
HE NOTED that "moderates
like Egypt and Jordan work ac-
tively for peace. But radicals op-
pose it." He said it was "partly
true" that "the slowness of the
peace process is a source of
radicalism because it builds
frustration."
However, Shultz stressed, "the
violence comes from the enemies
of peace, from those who would be
more angry if the peace process
were making rapid progress.
These extremists must be
resisted, not appeased. They must
be shown that military options
don't exist, that blackmail and
pressures will get nowhere and
that negotiation is the only possi-
ble hope for achievement of
legitimate Arab objectives."
Mandee Heller Bernard Egozi
MANDEE HELLER
Mandee Heller daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. David Heller will be call-
ed to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah
on Saturday at Shabbat services
at Temple Beth Sholom. Rabbis
Leon Kronish, Gary Glickstein,
Harry Jolt and Paul Caplan will
officiate.
Mandee is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5748.
BERNARD EGOZI
Bernard Lewis Egozi, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jose Egozi of North
Miami Beach, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day, Jan. 4 at 9 a.m. at Temple
Menorah.
Bernie is a student at the Alex-
ander Gross Hebrew Academy
and a member of Young Judaea.
Mr. and Mrs. Egozi will host the
Kiddush following the services
and will celebrate a dinner-dance
at Temple Emanuel that evening.
Bernie's special guests will in-
clude 75 relatives and friends who
will come from Atlanta, where he
formerly resided, as well as his
grandparents, Mrs. Luisa Egozi
and Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Lew
and other relatives and friends
from Miami.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
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insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participation
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Tel. (305) 962-5400
'SPECIALIZED CARE'
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R.N.'s, L.P.N.'s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
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I Miami 576-0383 Hwd. 963-1417 Ft. Laud. 566-6500
Na'amat U.S.A.
The holiday of Tu Bi-Shevat will
be discussed by Rabbi Jehuda
Melber at the Monday, Jan. 6, 1
p.m. meeting of Eilat Chapter of
Na'amat USA to take place in the
civic auditorium of American Sav-
ings and Loan Association, 890
Washington Ave.
Rabbi Melber, spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Raphael on Miami
Beach, will speak about the impor-
tance of the holiday which begins
January 25 and traditionally
marks the festive "New Year of
Trees."
Program chairman Frieda
Levitan has arranged a musical
program to highlight the special
day. Jewish National Fund chair-
man, Olga Prince, will talk about
the importance of buying trees for
Israel.
"Very Much A Lady," a book
written by Shana Alexander, will
be reviewed by Sophie Weissman
at the Thursday, Jan. 2, 11:30
a.m. mini-lunch meeting of the li-
ana Chapter of Na'amat USA.
The event is scheduled in the par-
ty room of Winston Tower 600,
174th Street and Collins Ave.
Lillian Hoffman, president, will
speak briefly about the upcoming
holiday of Tu Bi-Shevat.
New Settlement
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
first new settlement to be
established under the unity
government was opened Wednes-
day at a ceremony attended by
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
The settlement, Migdalim, on the
trans-Samaria road, is the first of
six new settlements scheduled to
be established in the West Bank
and Gaza under the terms of the
coalition agreement between
Labor and Likud. The first civilian
settlers will be moving into
Mipdalim within the next few
days.
T
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:16 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmual
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Baach
534-7213-534-7214 _
Barry J. Konovltch. Rabbi f tt)
Moane Buryn, Cantor .5'
Sergio Grobiar. Praaldant
Sholem Epelbaum, Praaldant,
Religious Commlttaa
Shabbat Servleee M0 a.m.
Serm on 10:30
O.lly Mlnyen
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardana Drive
North Miami Baach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Fraadman
Cantor Ian Alpam Conaarvatlve
Ftl. a p.m. Sabbath eervtoe.
Sat.8:30a.m.B.rl
r MKmh, David Much nick
TEMPLE BETH AM
5050 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 007-0667
Dr. Harbart Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Jamae L Simon. Aaaoclate Rabbi
Frt. i:18 p.m. Sabbath eervlce. Rabbi Simon
XII apeak on. "MAZON A Moat Powerful
id.i Who.. Tim. M. Fln.lly Come."
Sal. 11:16 e.m. Bar Mltrr.h Marshal Chilian
Jonathan Hollm.n Rabbi Baumgard
will .peek on the subptcl.
"From Generation lo Oaneretlon."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, ,_=-.
Rabbi Emeritus '!
Rev. Milton Freeman, x3l>
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
Frl. 5:30 p.m. Sabbath i.rvlc.
Sal. 9 a.m. Rabbi Landau will apeak on.
"The J.wl.h N.w. ol 1885 and Pro|actlon
lor 196. Mlnchah .1 5:20 p.m. Dally service.
.re, Sundey, a a.m. and 530 p.m.. Monday
and Thursdsy 7:30 a.m. end 5 30 p.m..
Tue.d.y, Wedneed.y. end Friday 7:46 e.m.
and 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Baach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shltman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Frl. 6 p.m. Annual Homecoming Sabbath.
Or Lehrman will praach on, -Youth Hi Search
... of What?" Cantor Shltman will chant.
Sat. 9 a.m. Dr. Lehrmen vri* preeeh on the
WMkly portion ol m. BIN.
Dally Mrvtcee a s.m. and S p.m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetrae Drive. Miami Baach
532-0421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schlfl
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
tft.rm'i nonw IMrorm ConffHon
137 NE. 19th St., Miami. 57*5900
9000 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskali Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bornateln
Aaaodate Cantor RacheNe F. Netaon
Executive Director Philip S. Goldln
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Spark
Frl. at Kendall Cantor Bornateln, "Why Uncle
Saymour Sold Chrietmaa Tree..'
Downtown, Rabbi B.rnai, Centor N.i.on.
Congreeemen William Lehmen. "Campu.
Contronta The Congreee."
BETH KODESH
Conaarvatlve
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krieael
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
8566334
Frt. 8:16 p.m. Rabbi Shapiro will dlacu...
"What Do I Expect ol the New Yeor?
Cantor Krlu.l will chant
i>
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5500 Conaarvatlve
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi
Rabbi Joaeph A. Gorflnkel. '
Rabbi Emerltua
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
>
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gablee 667 5657
Michael 0. Eleenetat, Rabbi
Friday aervlcee 8:16 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
Service. Frl. 7:30 p.m
Sal. 9.30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morning eervlcea 8 am
Friday late evening Mrvtce
8:16 p.m.
Saturday8am end7:46p.m.
>
TEMPLE NERTAMID 666-6345
7002 Cartyte Ave., 600-0033
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz coraerv.tive
Cantor Edward Klein
o.lly Service. 6 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:46 a.m.
Fn.lateaerv.ap.m.
Frl. 8 p.m. Rabbi Oorllnk.l will dlacu...
"Today. Not Tomorrow."
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeffereon Ave.. MB. FL 33139
Tel. 534-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Centor Nlsaim Benyamini
Dally aervlcee 6 e.m. 8 5:30p.m. Sat. 8:15 a.m.
Rabbit claaees Monday Advanced Hebrew
930a.m.Tues. English Blbl.Claae9 45a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 k-
Rabbi Devid H. Auerbach ?,
Cantor Howard Bander
Cantor Saul MeieeU
Shabbat Service. Frl. 8 p.m. Set. 9:30 a.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Baach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382 0898
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem Orinoco.
R.bbl Kaeitl will temporarily conduct
.eparete services Set. 8:30 e.m. at Temple
Semu-EI. 8383 S.W 182nd Ave..
oulh ol N. Kendell Drtv*.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. 41at St. .540-7231
OR LEON KRONISH. RABBI liberal
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Frl. 8-15 p.m. Rabbi Caplan will .peek on,
"Our Dreem. For the New Yeer.
Sat. 10:46 a.m. Bel Mitzvah. M.nda. H.ller.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd
Dr. Max A. Lipschltz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Aast. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Centor
Harve- !>own. Exec. Director
Dally aervlcee, Monday-Thuredey *
7:30 e.m. end 6:30 p.m.:Frtdey i
7:30 a.m.. 5:15 p.m. and 8 p.m.:
Saturday 8:25 a.m. and 5 p.m.; Sunday
8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m
TEMPLE SINAI 16601 NE 22 Ave.
North Dada'S Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Klng.l.y will preeeh on.
"Catholic-J.wl.h Relation.: Ha. tha Racnt
Synod Helped?" Centor Shulkee will chant
Set. 10:30 am. College Student
Homecoming .tt.rw.rd.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 /,*
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi Benjamin Adler, Cantor v-3'
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Frl. 8:15 p.m. College Homecoming Wek.nd
Sal. 9 am. Mlnyan Servlo. Monday, and
Thursday. 7 a.m.. Sundaya 9 a.m.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue. Miami. Florida
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16 packets
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SAFETY- COATS) ASPMN
75 Tablets
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30
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t %t\
V i
Anna Mae Ross (left) received the Hannah G. Solomon Award,
National Council of Jewish Women's highest honor. Carol
Grunberg. President of the Greater Miami Section. National]
Council of Jewish Women, presented the award at the Council's
15th Annual Child Care Gala Luncheon. The event it held an-
nually to raise funds to support local Children and Youth Pro-
grams. Ms. Ross received the award for her outstanding]
achievements as a volunteer in community services, and her com-1
mitments to human rights.
I
Participants in Temple Shir Ami's Adult Bar/Bat Mittnk
Class, supervised by Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein are pictured (left to
right): Romi Colton. Joan Marn. Wayne Muller. Howard Sher-
man. Ellen Sherman. Rabbi Goldstein, and Ellen Bobu-r. They
u-xll conduct the u-orship service on Friday. Jan. 10.
Gerald Schwartz Named Miami
Beach CC Vice President
For Tourism And Conventions
Gerald Schwartz, president of a
public relations and marketing
agency, has been named vice
president for tourism and conven-
tions of the Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce. His election was an-
nounced by Ira Giller. president of
the Beach Chamber.
Schwartz, who has been a
member of the board of governors
of the Beach Chamber for the past
eight years, is an honorary life
trustee of the organization and
previously served as vice presi-
dent for public affairs. He suc-
ceeds Arthur Surin.
Vice president of the Civic
League of Miami Beach. Schwartz
is vice chairperson of the Urban
League of Greater Miami, and a
member of the boards of the
Beach Taxpayers Association.
Beach Police Athletic League and
other civic groups. He is a foun-
ding member of the Hwiwi Coun-
cil, a member ai the Sparts Action
Committee of the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce ar.d an ac-
credited member of the Public
Relations Society of America.
Schwartz said the tourism and
conventions committee wffl con-
centrate during 1986 M such
items as expediting comp.etion of i
the expansion of the Mian.; Beach
Convention Center, upgrading
more Miami Beach major noteis
which serve significant conven-
tions, aiding small and medium-
sized hotels with promotional pro-
grams and working to insure the
coordination of all marketing ac-
tivities for Miami Beach and
Greater Miami hotels, restaurants
and other tourist attractions.
Leonard (Doc) Baker, executive
vice president of the Miam: Beach
Chamber of Commerce, said the i
tourism and conventions commit-
tee will have top priority next
year because of the convention
center expansion, which hasjwen
the No. 1 goal of the
Chamber for several years
Beach


Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B^
[artin Fine Elected To MDCC Post
Martin Fine, senior partner in
.he law firm of Fine, Jacobson,
bchwartz, Nash, Block, and
England, and civic activist, has
J, elected chairman of the
(Kiami-Dade Community College
foundation Board.
Fine replaces former chairman
niel Gill, and will immediately
^ume the responsibility for
leading the board, in raising
money for the college's endow-
ment program which supports
Scholarships and special
(program8-
Fine, a graduate of Temple
University and the University of
IMiami Law School, is also chair-
Iman of the Greater Miami
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9834
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA TENENBAUM,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANNA TENENBAUM, deceas-
ed, File Number 86-9884 (02), is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
igainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 20, 1985.
Personal Representative:
SAM TENENBAUM
4101 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Nelson and Feldman, P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Island, FL 33154
Telephone: 866-5716
19478 December 20, 27,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-9659
Division 03
046228
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAIER POLLAK
a/k/a MICHAEL POLLAK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MAIER POLLAK a/k/a
MICHAEL POLLAK, deceased,
File Number 85-9669, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
I-, THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
V* THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 27, 1985.
Personal Representative:
SARA POLLAK
6060 N. Bay Road
Miami Beach, Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SAMUEL I. LEFF, ESQ.
Len*. Pesetsky and Zack, P.A.
1367 N.E. 162nd Street
N Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Telephone: (305) 945-7501
19498 December 27, 1986;
January 3,1986
A
Martin Fine
Chamber of Commerce. He is a
member of the Board of Directors
of the City National Bank of
Miami, member of the Board of
Trustees of the United Way of
Dade County, former chairman of
the City of Miami Housing
Authority and the New World Ac-
tion Committee and has served as
a member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Gary D. Lipson
Becomes Partner
In Law Firm
Gary D. Lipson has become a
member of the law firm of Fine
Jacobson Schwartz Nash Block
and England, P.A. Lipson, a
securities lawyer, will serve in the
firm's corporate division and will
be involved primarily with
mergers and acquisitions.
Rossman Named
Chairman Of
Advisory Council
Steve Rossman, of Rossman,
Baumberger, and Peltz, whose
law firm specializes in medical
malpractice Litigation, has been
named chairman of the
Legislative Advisory Council of
the Academy of Florida Trial
Lawyers. He also became a
Trustee of the Florida Lawyers
Action Group.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-44552
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FB 226096
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JESUS RAFAEL OJEDA,
Petitioner,
and
IVONNE MARIA CRUZ.
Respondent.
TO: IVONNE MARIA CRUZ
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on ARMANDO GUTIERREZ, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2153 Coral Way. Suite
400 Miami, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
24, 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
SvTweek. in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. ,
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Armando, Gutierrez, Esq^
2153 Coral Way, Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33145
Telephone: 305-358-0444
,4494 December 27. 1985
January 3, 10,17,1986
Mrs. Michal Modai, chairman of the World WIZO Executive and
wife of Yitzhak Modai, Minister of finance of Israel, visited
Miami recently to celebrate 65 years of worldwide cooperation
between the 50 WIZO Federations. Joining Mrs. Modai at the
cocktail reception (left to right) Commissioner Bary Schreiber,
Lea Freund, chairman of WIZO Miami Executive Board, Mrs.
Modai, and A.J. Daoud, brother of Miami Beach Mayor Alex
Daoud as he presents Mrs. Modai with the Key to the City of
Miami Beach.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-10679
Division 03
Florida Bar No. 049834
IN RE: ESTATE OF
YETTA PADWA,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of YETTA PAD-
WA, deceased, File Number
85-10579, is pending in the Ci-cuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler, Third
Floor, Miami, Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is NED PADWA, whose address is
18710 Canastra street, Tarzana,
California 91356. The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the ciaim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 27, 1985.
NED PADWA
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Yetta Padwa
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JOSEPH W. MALEK, Esq.
350 Lincoln Road Suite 501
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4431
19497 December 27. 1986
January 3.1986
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-7023
Division CP-03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABE BORENSTEIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ABE
BORENSTEIN, deceased, File
Number 86-7026 CP-03, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler, Third Floor, Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
JERRY PRESZOW, whose ad-
dress is c/o Douglas D. Stratton,
420 Lincoln Rd., Ste. 382, Miami
Beach, FL 33139. The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the ciaim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration.
December 27, 1985.
JERRY PRESZOW
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ABE BORENSTEIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE.
DOUGLAS D. STRATTON
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 3"
Miami Beach, Florida f
Telephone: (305) 67
19496 r
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Printers' Service at
6645 N.W. 84 Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33166 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
PRINTERS' SERVICE
OF FLORIDA, INC.
David Schwartz
Vice President
Nelson C. Keshen, Esq.
Attorney for Printers' Service of
Florida, Inc.
8905 S.W. 87th Avenue.
Suite 209
Miami, Florida 33176
Telephone: (305) 595-1538
19495 December 27, 1985
January 3,10,17.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-10676
Division 02
FLA. BAR No. 205656
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEAH SWEDE STEINFELDT,
Deceased
NOTICE OF ANCILLARY
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LEAH SWEDE STEIN-
FELDT, deceased. File
Number 85-10566, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 20, 1985.
Personal Representative:
SHIRLEY SWEDE WELLS
2268 Coldwater Canyon
Beverly Hills, California 90210
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBIN, ESQ.
CYPEN. CYPEN & DRIBIN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 632-3200
19487 December 20.27.1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10223
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLAERE H. MATHES,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CLAERE H. MATHES,
deceased. File Number 86-10223.
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 20, 1985.
Per* al Representative:
WRY NORTON
IP rfer Street
^33130
for Personal Repre-
jve:
.NRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street
Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone (305) 374-3116
1 46 December 20. 27, 1985


p
.agelO-B
The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 27, 1985
Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IS
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CiTil Action No. 85-51265 PC 10
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDGAR D. KEENE,
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARIA HORTENSIA KEENE,
Respondent/Wife
TO: Maria Hortensia Keene
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 309, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 24,
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17th day of December, 19S5.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
19491 December 20,27, 1986;
January 3,10.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasiber: 86-10712
DfeWssuM
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
DOROTHY Y. YANUZIS,
Deceased.
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DOROTHY Y. YANUZIS,
decead. File Number 86-10712,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which it 73
West Flagler Street, Dade County
Courthouse, Miami. Florida 33130.
The names and tddreases of the
personal representative and tbet
personal representative's attorney |
are set forth below. .
All interested persons arei
required to file with this court,!
WITHDJ THREE MONTHS OF!
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OT\
THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate,
and
(2) any objections by an'
interested person to whom notice |
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-f
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED'
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publcation of this Notice began
on December 20, 1986.
Personal Representative:
BERNADINE Y. BROWN
19729 S.W. 114 Ave. No. 261
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Walter B. Lebowitz
801 Arthur Godfrey Rd., 2nd Floor J
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (306) 532-0000
19493 December 20,27,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-61371(04)
IN RE: THE MARRAIGE OF:
SAMUEL ERROL PENNANT
Petitioner/Husband,
and
VERNA MAUD FRASER
PENNANT.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: VERNA MAUD FRASER
PENNANT
264 East 31 Street
Patterson, NJ
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defesnes, if any, to it on
DAVID S. BERGER, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 100 N.
Biscayne Blvd., Suite 1707 New
World Tower, Miami, Florida
33132 (305)371-4555, and file the
original with the cleric of the above
styled court on or before 17
January, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the teal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12 day of December, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. LOGIE
At Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
LAW OFFICES OF BERNSTEIN
& BERGER
Suite 1707 New World Tower
100 North Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33132
Attorney for Petitioner/Husband
(306)371-4566
19683 December 20,27,1986;
Januarys, 10,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SERVICEMASTER
OF MIAMI at 13011 Southwest
84th Street, Miami, Florida 33183,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
DGR
ENTERPRISES, INC.
By LARRY DIAMOND,
President
ALAN S. KESSLER
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaia, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-4421
19490 December 20,27,1986;
January 3,10, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BATES
ASSOCIATES, at 7800 S.W. 74th.
Place, Miami, Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
MOISES M. BARCIMANTO
SUSANA M.T. BARCIMANTO
19470 December 13,20,27,1985;
January 3, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ALINA BAKERY at
1561 W. Okeechobee Road,
Hialeah, Florida 33010 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
LEMAT CORPORATION
By: ROBERTO LEAL,
President
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
Attorney for LEMAT
CORPORATION
19462 r.iir-*-"6, IS, 20.27,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A & R Dental
Laboratory at 9809 NW 80 Ave
No. 9-W Hialeah Garden. Fla.
33016 at intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ROBERTO CAMPOS
9809 NW 80 Ave.
Hialeah Garden, Fla. 33016
19479 December 20,27,1986;
Januarys. 10.1986

ww"
T*"5
-. NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Doris Madas at 106
SW 22nd Road, Miami, Fla. 33129
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dora Martini
19461 Dsosmbar 6. 13, SO, 27.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. 04
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-27834 CA-18
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GOLDOME FSB. f/k/a
Buffalo Savings Bank,
Plaintiff
vs.
AUGUSTO MURUA.
et uz., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: AUGUSTO MURUA and
ELIDA M. MURUA, his wife
1004 Ladrada Drive
Dallas, Texas 76261
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 4, Block 1, of
MIAMI MODENS MANORS,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 59, Page 70,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
January 17, 1986. and Die the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney of immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19486 December 20,27, 1985
January 3,10,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-61617 (25)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN MORTGAGE CORP..
f/k/a COMMUNITY FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCLVTION,
Plaintiff
vs.
RAUL MONTEJO, et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: Sewell Supply Company
c/o Henry L. Sewell. Jr.,
273 Oakland Avenue, SE
Atlanta, GA 30312
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lots 14 and 16, in Block
14, of OLYMPIC HEIGHTS,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 10, at Page
2, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
January 17, 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney of immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 13th day of
December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By J. LOGIE
As Deputy Clerk
19484 December 20,27.1985
January 3.10.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of ALARM A
SCREENS at number 1968 NE
149 Street, in the City of N. Miami,
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv
Florida. '
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 9
day of December, 1986.
SECURITY FABRICS. INC
1968 NE 149 St N. Miami, Fl
By: IRA ZIPKIN
Sheldon Zipkin
Attorney for Applicant
19482 Danambi 20,27,1966
8.10,1988
NOTICE UNDER .
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lia's For Hair at 1661
to Sunset Drive, South Miami in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
H & H Auto
Services. Inc.
Audrey Hilversum
19474 December 13,20, 27,1985;
January 6,1986
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 86-60707
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NIMIA DUENAS.
Petitioner,
and
JESUS V. DUENAS,
Respondent.
TO: JESUS V. DUENAS
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before January 10th,
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered.
DATED: December 9, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
19473 December 13,20,27,1985;
January 3,1986
(Circuit Court Seal)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasiber 85-10637
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCISCO JIMENEZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE STATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FRANCISCO
JIMENEZ, deceased. File Number
86-10637, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
JUAN JIMENEZ, whose address
is 703 N.W. 44th Street. Miami,
Florida 33127. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
taive's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE FO THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 20, 1986.
Juan Jimenez
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FRANCISCO JIMENEZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JOSEPH W. MALEX. Esquire
360 Lincoln Road Suite 501
Miami Batch, Florida 33139
Telephone: 588-4431
1*81 DaettBbtr80.27.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DDE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Pile Number 86-9492
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARINA de LARA
a/k/a MARINA DELARA
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: MAGALY ALVAREZ
ZUNIGA
Address Unknown
RAUL ALVAREZ
Address Unknown
RICKY DE LARA
Address Unknown
and Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs-at-Law. Living or dead,
their respective heirs and all per-
sons claiming by, through and
under and or may be infants, in-
competents or otherwise sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for sale
of property has been filed in this
court You are required to serve
written defenses to the petition not
later than January 6, 1986, on peti-
tioner's attorney, whose name and
address are:
Abraham A. Galbut Esquire
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on December 2, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
19463 December 6.13, 20.27. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-42740 CA-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ADA PEREZ, et al., -
Defendants.
TO: ADA PEREZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ADA PEREZ,
and all parties having or claiming
to have any right title or interest in
the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
That certain Condominium
Parcel Composed of Unit 206, of
GROVE ESTATES CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as recorded in
Official Records Book 11769, at
Page 3123, of the Public Record;
of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 10. 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 5 day of December,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19468 December 13, 20, 27, 1985;
January 3. 1986
Ud
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT or
THE ELEVENTH ClK
COURT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORm,
C No.: 8V28730,11,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERvL
No. 090723
VENETIAN HEIGHTS, mC
Honda corporation '
Plaintiff.
WAYNE FLOWERS, et d
Defendants.
TO: WAYNE FLOWERS
GEORGIANA FLOWERS
wife, if living and unknown pan*
claiming by. through. Jj*
-gainst the named Defendant
not known to be dead or a&,7
whether said unknown fjSt
claims as heirs, devisees, pintoT
".gnees. lienors, cred,t
trustees, or other claimant*
RESIDENCE UNK0WN
YOU ARE HERFRv
NOTIFIED that n 'Jg**
foreclose a mortgage on the folio,.
mg described property in Did,
County, Florida:
iton' BlockJ1' of LIBERTV
fAKMb, according to the fU
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
61 at Page 46, of the Pubb;
Records of Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and yofi
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any to it
on MORTON B. ZEMEL, rW
tiffs attorney, whose address
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue, Suite
111, North Miami Beach. Florii
33162, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before January 10, 1986
otherwise a judgment may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
THIS NOTICE shall be publish-
ed once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in The Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Dade County.
Florida on this 5 dav of December
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
of the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
19467 December 13,20,27,1986
January 3,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Machinery and Equip-
ment for Plastic at 3217 SW 60
Ave., Miami, Fla. 33156 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
HERNAN N. RESTREDO
S217 SW 60 AVE.
Miami. Fla. 33166
194*8 November29;
December 13. 20. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to.
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of HAMPTON
ACRES INDUSTRIAL CENTER
No. 2 PARTNERSHIP at number
5682 Northwest 79th Avenue in
the City of Miami, Florida, intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED at Miami. Florida, this
29th day of November, 1985.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MELVIN POLLAK
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MAXWELL WAAS
BARBARA WAAS
MARTIN A WAAS
RICHARD M. WAAS
JOSEPH SACCO
DAVID STONE
NORMAN M. WAAS
SUSAN W. KAPLAN
GIOVANNI DE PANI
HUGUETTE DE PANI
TIMOTHY GAMWELL
GABRIELLA J. LANDAU
ALAN ROSENTHAL
BARRY YARCHIN
REFAS LEASING AND
INVESTMENT CO.
(Not Incorporated)
ALAN J. DAVIS
BARBARA H. DAVIS
DANIEL DAVIS
NANCY DAVIS
DANNY J.SHAW f^)J
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin, PA.
Suite. 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Attorney for
Applicants
19469 December 13, 20,27,1985
January 3,1986
.
.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring w
engage in business under the fio_
titious name ARGE.Ni
FASHIONS INC D/B/A MK
ALEX at 293 N.E. 2nd Ave
Miami. Fla. 33132 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Manual Laeayo, Jr.
19480 Dtcmbtr 8.18,20.27,1


Inflation In Israel 60 Percent
In 1985 In Comparison
With 800 Percent In 1984
. : .:v ::::> : ": '&' '" ".
Friday, December 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
JERUSALEM (ZINS) The
conomic reform package in-
tituted last July by Prime
Minister Shimon Peres and
[Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai
has dragged down the rate of in-
flation from the 800 percent
stratosphere to a "marginal"
50-60 percent per annum. The bad
yis: The economic reform has
?nt unemployment heading
jJIwani nine percent from six
percent.
"There has been a return to
sanity," said David Klein, head of
strategic planning for Bank
Uumi. "We have gone from a
mood in which people felt that the
Government had lost control of
the economy and that there might
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-52088
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARGARITA ANGELA
CAMPOS CANDELA
Petitioner
and
GULLERMO VICTOR
RAIL CANDELA
Respondent
TO: Guillermo Victor
Raul Candela
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Arthur H. Lipson, Esquire,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 801 NE 167 St., North
Miami Beach. Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January 24. 1986,' otherwise a
default will be' entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of December, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER*
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19492 December 20,27.1985;
Januarys, 10, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10576
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH BURNS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
,f JOSEPH BURNS, deceased,
File Number 86-10576. is pending
m the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address if which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
jTHIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
*gainst the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
"egun on December 20, 1986.
Personal Representative:
BARBARA JOAN JOSLYN
4451 Alton Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
LESLIE EDWARD BURNS
41 West 72nd Street, Apt. 9-A
New York, New York 10023
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
RAPHAEL K. YUNES
*20 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Flmn4a CSKM
Telephone.-<806, *?>' "***'
19488 December 20,27, 1985
be a need for a 'strong hand,' to
an atmosphere in which people
believe the Government knows
what it is doing and has a plan
that it can achieve."
Michael Bruno, a Hebrew
University economist and one of
the main architects of the
economic recovery program, said
in a radio interview: "The biggest
danger now is being too pleased at
what has already been achieved.
We have given a very ill patient a
huge dose of tranquilizers and the
immediate effect has been to
make him feel good. Many think it
was the cure and that the opera-
tion is not needed now. But the
truth is, we are still in the midst of
surgery, and we must not stop
now."
According to the daily Ha'aretz,
the economy is in a painful transi-
tion. No one knows how long this
transition will last. But economist
and Government officials hope it
will lead to real growth, according
to Ha'aretz.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-3784
Division CP 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIE COHEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
SOPHIE COHEN, deceased, File
Number 84-3784 CP 03. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 78 West. ,
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Marlene Patterson, whose address
is 7610 Coquina Drive, North Bay
Village, Florida. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due,
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 20, 1985.
Marlene Patterson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Sophie Cohn
Deceased.
WHITMAN, WOLFE, GROSS &
SHAFFEL
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Irving J. Whitman, Esq.
10651 N. Kendall Dr., Suite 200
Miami, Florida 33176 a .
Telephone: (80o 279-7000 :
19489 December 20,27,1985
Obituaries
KAPLAN
Patricia, 59, of Mismi. Dec. 21. She was a
resident here for the past 40 years. She was
a teacher with the FT. Tucker Elementary
School for 18 years. Wife of Stanley; mother
of Edward (Marcia) Kaplan, Jackson, Miss.;
Karen Kaplan. Miami; sister of Dr. Edward
(Bemice) Einhorn, Syossett, N.Y.; Fay (Irv-
ing! Whitman. Phyllis (Bernard) Greenfield:
Mickey (Phil) Kaplan; Shirley Einhorn;
Sarah Einhorn, all of Miami; Marilyn (Dr.
Norman) Gaylord. Somerset, N.J.; Louise
(Jerry) Soowal. Fort Lauderdale, and two
grandchildren, Paul and Brett. Services and
interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
IIIKSCHKIKl.il
Howard Jeffrey, 41, of Miami. He served on
the National Jewish Federation Young
Leadership Cabinet; was a Charter Founder
of Florida International University; a past
director of Temple Emanu El's Men's Club;
served with Miami Jewish Federation; ac-
tive in the local art community; member of
the Standard Club of Miami; Charter
Founder of B'nai B'rith Group and State
Planning Council of Miami. He was a CLU
member of Gold Key Society. Son of Harold
Hirschfield of Miami and Ruth Hirschfield
of Pompano Beach; brother of Barbara
(Mathew) Perry of Miami; and Dr. Robert
(Sheri Ann) Hirschfield of Miami. Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel. Interment at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
DORANZ. Joan Leslie, of Miami Beach
Services were held.
GAINES, Herman, of Surfside. Services
were held.
RE1BACK, Dr. Sidney Marshall, 84. Dec.
19. Services were held.
PACKAR. Joseph. 70, of North Miami
Beach. Dec. 20. Levitt-Weinstein.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888

jsr*
ittC >
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
COOPER, Pauline, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel. Services and in-
terment in New Jersey.
FINKELSTEIN. Louis, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel. Services
held in New Jersey.
JOSEPHER. Sam. 88. of Miami Beach. Dec.
18. The Riverside.
KARP. Rose, of North Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
KUPPER. Frances. 74. of Miami. Services
were held.
LECHSTEIN, Joseph, 79. of North Miami
Dec. 17. Levitt-Weinstein.
SANDLER. Ceha Rudolph. Dec. 17 Ser-
vices were held.
BARLOW. Irving, 77. of North Miami
Beach. Dec. 18. The Riverside.
BERGEN. Hannah, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel. Services and in-
terment held in New York.
GLANZER. lsidor. Services were held.
HIRSCHENSOHN. Mollie F.. of Hallan
dale. Dec. 18. Services and interment in
Pelham. Ga.
LEVINE, Samuel, 80, of North Miami
Beach. Dec. 18. The Riverside.
CUTLER, Stacy M.. 24. of North Miami
Dec. 12. The Riverside.
ZIMMERMAN, Jacob B., of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel. Services
and interment in New York.
SALIT, Mable, of Miami Beam. Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel. Servuvs and in-
terment held in Connnecticut.
SAPERSTEIN. Suzan K.. Services were
held.
WARREN, Dollie. of Miami Beach. Dec. 20.
Blasberg Chapel.
/AK. Iser. of Miami Beach. Rubin Zilbert
Memorial Chapel.
KLEIN, Michael, of Miami Beach. Dec. 19.
The Riverside.
Vernon "Doc" Carlyle Born October 2,1902,
departed Decembers, 1985. Beloved husband
of Eleanor, Stepfather to Michael Solomon,
friend, counselor, "father" to many... We
will all sadly miss you.
Dr. B. Stein
,
26640 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park. MichiKan 48237
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable, Traditional
with
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Complete Shipping Service Kroni Honda Arr;i
Your First Call to Us will
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When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and.
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
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RUBIN-ZILBERT
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Murray Rubin, F.D.
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Leonard Zilbert, Founder
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Miami Beach '
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538-6371
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Pan 12-B IV Jwwam Floodmn/Frriay,
27. 1965
Fisher Reaps Rewards
Coatimaed from Page IB
scenes shot at aw Y.A.* TV pro-
Aacer; got in touch with Duncan
in Pahs to get permission to use
some of hi* photos, and he told
then to cal me. 8a thev did. and I
worked with then to select and
saJirg* four prints as photo
nurats in the background "
Fisher wouldn't say how much
money exchanged hands, but im-
plied the deal was a bonanza, con-
sidering the time he spent and the
time the photos were actually or.
screen
ALTHOUGH FISHEI is a
member of Tempie Israel ("nil my
kids were Bar Mitxvah there"!, he
admitted that he's "not that ac-
tive" h the Jewish community
Ye:, some of his favorite portraits
are of subjects straight out of
"Who's Who in World Jewry
They include such notables as
authors Leon I'ris. Bennet Cerf.
Herman Wouk and Isaac Bashevts
who was photographed
one of the Nobel Prixe
Laureate's work sessions in Y.o
dam longhand.
Jewish entertainers who have
appeared before Fisher's lens in-
clude Jack Benny. Milton Berie.
Jerry Lewis. Yehudi Menuhin and
Leonard Bernstein. Fisher cares
bttle about the rehgious affiliation
of his subjects, however. "I try to
get a feel for their personahty
because that's what I use to get an
wfnmoa or a look, not their
ethnic background." he said.
AFTER t years of shooting,
what a his greatest satisfaction?
"That I'm stau wot king." be saw
without hoaJUhi.ni "I still enjoy
taking pictures. I Hke people very
mack, the theater, even industry
I always find the iemgn elements
exist in an industrial product
I a typewriter or a video display
Of course, a good art
can do wonders."
shoots regularly, and is
cthr gomg over and picking
-.egatrves of old photos he's
er prmtcd. "I'm always fin-
Tee never seen before. I
_ at some shots of an
oai production of The Odd Om>
ple' that starred E G Marshal.
mi Ml the >:s:era I '."> i:\ir'.
mat bmldkng was a very yoang
LoreoaSww.

Sternstein
Page IB
asue *s not rammLIi
.be Isaac, and I an] i
He also noted that as ae-
stated
I cannot let sr
BBjsaam. m ~-s &sjt since
""it ia aww nr 11 that the Sewaet
I'moa recogama how Asrncac
pakwc opammi propriaaag the
Presadeet %.- do soaarthaag about
tke issue .-/ Sent Jews Ssera*-
am waned, owtiir that a*
s mm by Jcane :*>?
meecag
far emafvaaem the
S there w* lame to ae-*ftsa>-
AMHfJu
OfCmAfcftd
Romfaac baaaanag Aiex
mar of Mams RsaanY. a
afaVYaar*
1U-
some photos of a production of
Peter Pan." starring Betsy
Palmer. I kept looking and looking
at this pretty young girl who
played Wendy, and I couldn't
hebeve it was Sandy Duncan '
FISHER'S WORKS are cur-
rently on display it. the lobby of
Gusman Hall in downtown Miami
as weil as the Museum of the City
of New York. The Gusman exhibi-
tion, titled Onstage in Miami."
features shots of various per-
formers playing "our town."
Fisher's favorite in this collection
is a print of Mickey Rooney wear-
ing a turtaenerk sweater, part of
his wardrobe for a presentation of
No Sex. Please."
The New York show, titled
"Saving Faces. displays gtar.t
blowsaps of 20 ceiebrity authors
and Broadway stage performers.
"Saving Faces." which opened in
September, has been extended to
run through March. 1986.
Future plans include coo tmumg
to shoot for Time and other major
publications, more exhibits of his
work, and a book "Most of i-
he said. "I still expect to take
pictures."
PuMi

a* Al Putts
Dr. Edward T. Fort* II ilefi). president of the
University of Miami, and Dr. Pxedad Robert-
son ileft centeri. nee president for Education
at Miami Dade Community College, are join-
id by Lotos Woirson III irygktj. neviy-eiected
rice cAatnauzn of Miami Dade Comrnmity Col-
0Pwilt8O0A.il.
Kringle
Coffee Cake
StoroM with Frorsh
teoxi or Topped with PotodawtJ Sugar
Fruit Stolen.................. S^59
Holiday CupCakes. 6 *, $1
Danish Cherry Strip.....a****!89
< 0pp#O Wl AMOT1M Fnjt
Pricts Efftctivt Individual Danish..........3 ** s1
26 tferaJiManr 1.1986. -
Mini Danish
Rugalach
.

mm


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