The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02968

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
dfewlslli Floridliami
P^8-NumbrS1 Two Sections Miami, Florida Friday, December 20,1985
Frtd Shochtt By Man 1
Price 50 Cents
Irst Envoy to Egypt
Ben-Elissar Feels Little Optimism for Improved Relations
By ERIC MOSS
sk Floridian Staff Writer
nbassador Eliahu Ben-
Jssar, Israel's first
llomatic representative to
rot, predicted that the
[p government's offer to
sponsor the PLO's
establishment of a military
training facility there will
only lead to more violence in
the Middle East.
Ben-Elissar was in Miami
Sunday to address the Jewish Na-
tional Fund's Annual Banquet at
the Konover Hotel.
"Whoever opens the door to the
PLO is working against peace in
the Middle East," Ben-Elissar
said in an exclusive interview with
the Jewish Floridian. "If Iraq
decides to shelter the PLO, more
violence will ultimately result."
"And Iraq will suffer," he add-
ed, ominously.
DESPITE THE downturn in
relations with Iraq and negligible
progress with the Mubarak
government, Ben-Elissar believes
that peace between Egypt and
Israel will continue to exist. "It is
a necessity that the members of
both parties, Egyptians and
Israelis, understand that improv-
Continued on Page 11-A
Jews Sense Loyalty
Being Questioned
\
rime Minister of Israel, Shimon Peres meets Kenneth Bialkin at
\Hilton Hotel in Jerusalem. Left is Kenneth Bialkin, chairman
President's Conference of Jewish Organizations, which
tited Israel for four days.
foiled Rabbis
Focus on Soviet
Inhumanity-JSTot Us
Bv JUDITH KOHN
[WASHINGTON Five
bbis arrested at a Soviet
ky demonstration last
y began a 15-day prison
htence last Friday urging
pbera of the media to
us not on them personal-
I but on the conditions of
vs in the Soviet Union
h the planned arrest
imprisonment were
it to dramatize.
his act will be worthwhile on-
it will generate awareness
,*..
It
and action on behalf of Prisoners
of Conscience languishing in
Soviet prisons," the rabbis said in
a statement read to reporters by
Gary Fink, another rabbi arrested
last May.
LIKE MOST of the 23
demonstrators convicted last
Wednesday of violating a District
of Columbia statute against
demonstrating within 600 feet of
an Embassy, Fink accepted the
original suspended 15-day prison
sentence, together with six mon-
ths unsupervised probation and a
$50 fine.
But the five rabbis who began
their prison term last Firday re-
jected the offer of a suspended
sentence and probation in order to
dramatize the plight of Soviet
Jewry.
"This dramatic act, we hope,
Continued on Page 10-A
Another Spy-By 2-A
Prosecuting Pollard 3-A
Bush Lashes Out 3-A
HOLLYWOOD An
American Zionist leader
charged Sunday night that
the response of "some
Jewish spokesmen" to the
Jonathan Pollard spy case
revealed a "real inferiority
complex" among American
Jews.
Jacques Torczyner, president
of the World Union of General
Zionists, made the statement in an
address at the opening session of
the Union's third Pan American
Convention here. Some 200
leaders of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America and affiliated
organizations in Canada and Latin
America have been joined by
Israeli poliltical figures, including
Knesset members and Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the World
Zionist Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives.
IN HIS ADDRESS, Torczyner
asked, "Why must American
Jews repeatedly affirm our
patriotism, thus raising the spec-
tre of dual loyalty? Did any
Chinese Americans take to the
media when a citizen of Chinese
origin was arrested recently for
espionage? The existence of Israel
and the vindication of the Zionist
dream should have put an end to
the grovelling of American Jewish
leaders." "Torczyner did not iden-
tify the persons he had in mind.
Alleck Resnick, president of the
ZOA the U.S. affiliate of the
World Union said the ZOA was
drawing plans for nationwide pro-
gram to block proposed U.S. arms
sales to Jordan and Saudi Arabia,
to alert the country to the "new
reapprochement" between Syria
and Jordan and to analyze the
fallout from the Pollard affair.
Jacques Torczyner
The case reveals a real
inferiority complex
among American Jews.
He warned that "many people
in this country would like to keep
the spy story burning before the
American public. Anti-Israel
abuse, whose effect, if not intent,
is to delegitimize Israel, can only
give satisfaction to the enemies of
Israel," he said.
State Dep't. Admits
U.S. Limits Intelligence
Information Exchange
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion is limiting its exchange
of intelligence with Israel in
the wake of the case of
Jonathan Pollard.
State Department deputy
spokesman Charles Redman con-
ceded recently, noting that the
step was taken in the "immediate
aftermath" of the arrest of
Pollard, a Navy civilian
counter-intelligence expert, who
has been charged with selling
secret United States information
to Israel.
REDMAN SAID that pending a
"clear assessment" of how much
U.S. security had been com-
promised, "some discreet limita-
tions were placed on selected in-
telligence exchanges with Israel,"
he added, "this was a logical and
prudent step."
Redman's statement came after
Richard Armitage, Assistant
Secretary of Defense for Interna-
tional Security Affairs, revealed
the restriction on sharing in-
telligence in an interview in last
week's New York Times.
"We're waiting the results of
the Pollard fact-finding investiga-
tion," Armitage was quoted as
saying. A group of State and
Justice Department officials,
headed by Abraham Sofaer. the
State Department legal advisor,
are in Israel to investigate the
Pollard case.
ISRAEL AND the U.S. have a
long record of sharing intelligence
information which has been of
benefit to both countries.
Meanwhile, Redman said there
was no "apparent" link of the
Continued on Page 7-A
/>
Mideast Danger
Press Camp David Before Likud Returns to Power
iSol Linowitz
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
When President Jimmy
Carter left the White House
in January, 1981, Israel and
Egypt had agreed on nearly
all the details of a Palesti-
nian autonomy arrange-
ment based on the plan set
out in the 1978 Camp David
accords.
Four-and-a-half years hence,
the opportunity remains, but
hesitation to assert a more ag-
gressive U.S. role is allowing it to
slip away, leaving the Middle East
more open than ever to the terri-
ble dangers of conflagration."
So says Sol Linowitz about the
peace process that the Camp
David summit initiated and which
he, as the President's personal
representative for the Middle
East negotiations from
November, 1979 to January, 1981,
had a vital role in nudging toward
the distant objective of a com-
prehensive peace that the accords
envisaged.
EGYPT AND Israel had made it
over 60 percent of the way toward
agreement on the powers and
Continued on Page 7-A


.'A !b Jeans*
1JI-C
Rabin Is Puzzled
Latest U.S. Charge Seen As A Riddle
JERUSALEM (JTA> -
?-acc jzfzrrjec 2 -~afirrc
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wttk U 5 AaaWssadcr
-as p-ister^y i::ir: i^
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portiag daanfied
aacarv ^errryiingT v IsTfc
beenaes from *ae Defense
and Commerce
Ua aac 3* aatec at et-^y
sad far ac rriara.-<:c :t ae if
iaa a -<~=j Vapec ac .-' Ter
due israei sgsee at
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apJy ace :peniy
Laos aecaree aac t-i r snr-
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"^snet zc tesfrrire Is-ve j -a.-:e
THE MATTER aae -: recta
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feat af ae V 5 Aarraey :&
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T^uuacay 2a: V i Liaccira
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a.. r;e-ya.~^ir rr-:eese aee r
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are seen asdfacec a pat
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Peres Cables Grief Over Gander
Air Disaster That Gaimed 248
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM JTA -
?-maau Saaaoa Peres aaaai
F'-ffltr* Ecagjar tc express
Israei i fnef 3r ae a^ uasar
a Gander. Newfocrcla.*:
Ue AancK se-
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terriae aayect tbeywaajmer.
who ice; thea ires a ae pame
aasc ere servaaj ae caose of
ra.ta--_-- ^orid peace.' Peres
wrote.
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a%i kHat A :.~ Z-iittm >
tiaaad a a* Sxa. i pasl :' --
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aarterec piaae. a= Arryw Air
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baB Ta-t: E^t*. rr ^"^^t
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txi )SbM
a.~es
To terrorart
disaster -jr. m
fnonted a* n.- ^ r,_-:
It his avt-.e "-: r-ea^v: ar
Thursday -igr* Peres aan aac
that "I auuid ate to eaaar; the
smcere eoodoiecces :f ae f-.Tert-
meot aad peopie :f Israe-. a ae
Americas peopie ao: ae cerea-
ed fanabes-"
Defetae Ma-ster Yraaak Satac
sett a srr-'a.- saajaaaji aj '.' 5
Defe-s lacratarj 7aj;ar
Weaoeryer Israei: Ccie: ::' S-taff
_ I-ec- Mate Lery =acec ae
:' 5-at ate ae eoeasaader ae
Saa. M--n-at.:ca. F:r
>
lu'.hgate ^o*wer
Hotels & Apart merits
Watedront Rental Apartments'
900 West Ave. On The Bay
Miami Beach, Fie.
672-2412
2*3'" Lsaaaa Anaasat
Marr* arc c*f^ Par
arrc socaa actwaas
to aa yoar aaara aaaaay
= e s-.s S*'. :*
FURN A UNFURM. EFFK3EMCY
FURN a UNFURM. 1 BEDROOM. 1 BATH
rmc a Israei
repcrady are aaesonszaj
amcaa itit :c3n saa: ".: haaa
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cc a tenax xncnccec r
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:ficaji are rfasec "-
epij -.ei s scce aesr BJaal a^
THE REPOBTS a! the alea*:-
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z fcavj aec a stay araie t ae
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F:r
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: i .: :e ctazec :c riva tZ :e
y.rxetec.
Tradition, it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're beside vou
when you need us
most. After all. Our
Real Involvement is
with the Living.

Riverside
MemoriBl Chapel
(305)531-1151


W Chief Says
We Want To Prosecute Pollard
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
r| WASHINGTON (JTA)
|_ FBI Director William
Webster said that the
United States government's
main interest in the case of
Jonathan Pollard, the Naval
civilian counter-intelligence
[expert charged with selling
[classified information to
Israel, is in prosecuting an
American eitizen who
|violated the law.
"We do not sanction, we do not
Icondone, we do not knowingly
(permit friendly countries to
[operate agents in this country,"
I Webster said in reply to a ques-
tion following his luncheon ad-
Idress to the National Press Club.
"When we find out about it, we
|stop it."
WEBSTER SAID the Pollard
[case was "a little different mat-
Iter, however, than someone who
[is trying to destroy this country.
It does not excuse the conduct of
the American citizen who violates
the law and betrays his trust, and
we will prosecute them."
Noting that the FBI concen-
trates its limited personnel on
Soviet bloc countries, Webster
said it would be "a waste of
resources" to have agents
monitor friendly countries "who
occasionally become overzealous.
We would rather work in
diplomatic channels and get them
to pull in and in many cases
this works."
As Webster was speaking, an
FBI agent was part of a Justice
and State Department team in
Israel to interview Israelis im-
plicated in the Pollard case. The
group led by the State Depart-
ment's legal adivisor, Abraham
Sofaer, arrived in Israel last
Wednesday (Dec. 11).
AT THE State Department,
deputy spokesman Charles Red-
man said the Sofaer group will
look into "all aspects" of the
Pollard case. He noted that
Secretary of State George Shultz
Bush Attacks Politicos Who
Make Hay of Pollard Case
NEW YORK (JTA) -
I Vice President George Bush
[lashed out Sunday night
[against political leaders who
use the Jonathan Pollard
spy case "to make
generalizations about 'divid-
led loyalties' of American
[Jews. He also criticized
I politicians who refuse to
speak out against Louis Far-
rakhan, whom he called the
["vilest peddler of anti-
[Semitism."
Bush spoke at a special con-
Ivocation preceding Yeshiva
[University's pre-centennial
IChanukah dinner at which he
received an honorary Doctor of
lLaws degree from the university.
|Similar degrees were conferred
i Meir Rosenne, Israel's Am-
ssador to the United States,
nd five business and communal
ers who are benefactors of the
[university.
ADDRESSING himself to the
|case of Pollard, a
Dunterintelligence analyst
nployed by the Navy who was
Tested last month for allegedly
elling U.S. secret information to
'1, Bush said:
"I've heard criticism of the
American Jewish community for
lits vocal support of Israel and of
jother issues its members believe
p. I for one, am deeply disturbed
"ien I hear people in public life
eak of American Jews as though
hey are some sort of monolithic
with improper influence on
JS. policy."
Bush called on American Jews
continue their political ac-
'ism. "Citizen advocacy
rengthens our country. It gives
merica vitality. It's part of why
America is so great."
THE VICE President, who is a
former U.S. Ambassador to the
United Nations, strongly de-
nounced anti-Semitism which
he called a "disgusting disease"
and international terrorism. He
affirmed the U.S. determination
not to negotiate with the
Palestine Liberation Organization
until it renounces terrorism and
recognizes Israel's right to exist.
Referring to recent incidents of
terrorism, Bush asked, "What
else but evil can we call the
beating and murder on TWA
Flight 847 of young Navy Petty
Officer Robert Stethem, or the
machinegunning of six young
Marines in El Salvador? What else
but evil can we call the murder on
the Achille Lauro of Leon Kl-
inghoffer, who was confined to a
wheelchair, victim of a stroke?"
"The goal of the terrorism we
see in the world today," Bush
decalred. "is to undermine
Western democratic society, to
undermine the institutions, values
and traditions that are the founda-
tions of our civilizations."
ROSENNE WAS the featured
speaker at the dinner. Recalling
his escape with his parents from
Nazi-occupied Rumania in 1944,
the Ambassador accepted his
honorary Doctor of Laws degree
"for the Jews of Yassi and for the
Jews of all other European towns
and shtetlach (villages) who died
because they were Jews."
The Five business and com-
munal leaders who received
honorary degrees were David
Berg of New York, J. Morton
David of New York, Joseph Gruss
of New York, Herbert Schiff of
Columbus, Ohio, and Leonard
Stern of New York.
Bronfman Meets Jamzelski
PARIS (JTA) World
Jewish Congress President Edgar
"ronfman held a three-hour
neeting last Thursday with Polish
resident Wojciech Jaruzelski
v"th whom he reviewed all
outstanding problems of mutual
interest. Bronfman -remained in
Poland over the weekend to visit
he site of the former Auschwitz
poncentration camp.
Polish officials, queried by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency by
elepnone, said that the meeting
had been friendly and sincere.
They said that only subjects of
mutual interest had been discuss-
ed. Thursday's meeting was the
second of this year. Bronfman and
Jaruzelski met in September in
New York where the Polish leader
attended the United Nations
General Assembly.
Bronfman had earlier last week
attended a two-day business
meeting in Moscow during which
he conferred with a variety of
Soviet personalities.
said that there are no other cases
of Israeli espionage in the U.S.
"that we know of."
Meanwhile, Webster said that
the recent attacks against the of-
fices of the American-Arab Anti-
Discrimination Committee in
Boston, Los Angeles and
Washington appeared not to be
aimed at Arab-Americans in
general but at "enemies of
Israel," including "neo-Nazis."
Noting that he had to choose his
words carefully, Webster said, "I
think I can safely say that Arab in-
dividuals or those supportive of
Arab points of view have come
within the zone of danger of
targeting by the group, as yet to
be fully identified and brought to
justice."
WEBSTER noted that "one
organization's name appears in
telephone calls and other claims.
The organization itself em-
phatically denies participation
although sympathizing with the
activity, and it has been
repudiated by every reputable
Jewish organization in the coun-
try." He did not name the group.
He said that the FBI was conduc-
ting a full-scale national investiga-
tion and is "making significant
progress."
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Flag That Draped Klinghoffer's
Casket Goes to West Point Museum
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American flag that draped the
casket of Leon Klinghoffer,
murdered by terrorists in the
Achille Lauro hijacking, will
reside permanently in the Jewish
Chapel at the United States
Military Academy at West Point.
In ceremonies last week, Kl-
inghoffer's widow, Marilyn,
presented the flag to represen-
tatives of the West Point Jewish
Chapel.
Accepting the flag were
Herbert Ames, president, West
Point Jewish Chapel Fund;
Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Marc
Abramowitz, the first military
Jewish Chaplain assigned to West
Point; Maj. Gen. Jerome Waldor,
USAF (Res.), an alumnus of West
Point, Class of 1950; and Cadet
Matthew Kuperstein, member of
the Corps of Cadets, Class of
1987.
The Klinghoffers, who were
married by the late Rabbi
Avraham Soltes, who served West
Point's Jewish community from
1963 to 1983, were celebrating
their 36th wedding anniversary
with a cruise on the Achille Lauro.
The West Point Jewish Chapel,
completed in the spring of 1984, is
the first facility dedicated to serv-
ing the Jewish tradition, religion
and culture at West Point. The
Jewish Chapel's Museum-Gallery,
through displays and exhibitions,
portrays the contibutions of Jews
to this nation and its military
forces. The Klinghoffer American
Flag will be housed in the
Museum-Gallery's permanent
collection.
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4-A The
tarn
A/^ftf^wrrnja* h**,^,
tSeculared' Chanukah Should Not Be Blurred into Christmas
may be over, but the spirit
on. This is especially trae for those
who hare only a weakened view of what
Chanukah is aD about. And who. in the spirit
of the advent of Christmas next week, see
the two holidays in much the same light.
That fight is secularized, and certainly, the
~thar.-_5 :f the pjaajj li il they am '' aaV
courage these pe: vie m their be-lief that both
Chrtstmas arxi Chanukah are more about
gift-giving (and buying* than they are about
the kind of profound religious beliefs that
distinguish them as holidays ajaj from the
other.
It is sad but true that even among Jews
who know aD about Chanukah and
therefore understand that it is totally
unrelated to Christmas m meaning and pur-
pose nevertheless extend the spirit of the
Chanukah celebration into the Yuieode
A New Spy Case?
Under no circumstances are we through
we the Jonathan Pollard spy case. U.S. of-
ficials were in Israel this week examining
both officials of the government and other
persons in the fields of science and
technology to determine their culpability in
the case.
As we opined in these columns last week,
the United States has its own agenda for
pressing the case to its omits. But hardly did
the officials begin their investigation, when
new charges have arisen that Israel has been
"sneaking'' high-tech military secrets out of
the country.
As in the Pollard espionage case, the na-
tion's media were quick to accuse, judge and
demand retribution before the facts couid be
sorted out.
This time. Israel has responded with a re-
sounding denial. Involved is a chrome-
plating process of cannon barrels that main-
tains the integrity and accuracy of the bar-
rels for far many more rounds than without
it. Purportedly, only the U.S. had this pro-
cess and enjoyed this advantage until now.
'Why' A Second Time
But according to the Israelis, they had
been purchasing the equipment in question
directly from its American manufacturers
under the terms of officially-sanctioned con-
tracts and payments recorded both in the
appropriate American and Israeli bookkeep-
ing systems.
If America's pursuit of the Pollard spy
case is unique and it is then the latest
charge against the Israelis is even more uni-
que (if a double superlative is possible). The
Poflard case has no prior role model. What
nation accused of spying acknowledges it.
apologues for it. and cooperates by permit-
ting offiriah of another nation to launch an
investigation into the case on its own
territory*
Beyond this, the question is why? Not only
why the United States pursues th Poflard
case with such a sense of vindicbveness. but
why. in the face of an atmosphere already
muddied, are new charges made in another
case, however unsubstantiated almost from
the start?
Time will tell and. in our view, pretty soon
Jewish Floriciiari
season and the storm of that season's gift-
giving occasion.
For these Jews, who should know better.
die traditional excuse is that they are btarr-
jaw the rstuictxns between As tl
boodavs '. r:er :: t reveal aVair daMna
front suT---.r i. ^rV '-'..' '
they are .'..,-*< s. the Western
;-.-'-:?.--.i. -te- 3-- : ^ that.
:------ -..--. ...... -- "_..;-- i.-.. ;;-e
'.---- r..:r -.i_-:-ri -.-err. >.
CRC's Worthy Thinking

_s a tart ::' that r_r:-: ry T: l.
:: z-es^ ,V-:i s :: :: i i-^rr :e :: :: tr.
Furthermore, studies show that it does not
achieve immunity against alienation.
Especially, in the case of children, it only
makes them more confused.
It is to deal with precisely these [
that the Community Relations Committee of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation is
once again distributing a set of guidelines to
help prevent children from being exposed to
the psychological embarrassment of ac-
tivities surrounding the holiday season.
Of special significance is that the CRC has
distributed copies of the guidelines to public
schools and to the Dade County Board of
Public Instruction itself. In a covering let-
ter. CRC officials have explained to school
officials that "This year it is critical that we
remain firm in our commitment to the
separation of church and state, and it is
essential that we encourage our pubbc
schools to maintain a high level of religious
r.e'-itrahtv."
Once again, as in the past wner. the CRC
previously distributed its guidelines we ap-
plaud the Committee's effort. W are
especially gratified to note that the Commit-
tee emphasizes that it "in no way meant to
suggest that the separation of church and
state has been violated" by tr.e school
system during this holiday season.
More at issue is that the separation prin-
ciples needs reaffinnabon particularly at
this time of the year, when the spirit of
brotherhood, which should be encouraged by
us all. tends to weaken the unique distinc-
tions between the two major faiths, which
an enlightened brotherhood should always
be careful to avoid at all cost.
Populist Party
Closely Linked to Liberty Lobby
BOSTON The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has revealed that the
Populist Parry is the major
right wing extremist
organization in the nation
attempting to exploit the
farm crisis by recruiting
distressed farmers.
According to an ADL report.
the Populist Party a csoacty Baked
to the anti-Jewac Lfcerty Lobby
Mpapsai aaaas^aaiaBaasas' -
Wascmgtoo and Beaded by Wuis
A. Carto. who is a member of the
Party* Executive Csaai
The Leagoe dejerfced Liberty
Loboy as the most rrnftwional
BsaaaU nati ."r* di -.-
ers vest otto high
this year after a
oe a*-.
u:r "... :i_ -e-f *ii i
"* Parrr's li?4

M
i^ A." li
Daifeed 5-_a:.?s
THE ADL report, issued a: a
BMior : se Lccu-.r I Kattaaai
Z\rr .'.. "----"&f r-r" T u
Bostor. 5 ~*> .<. said
Party acQTBts kave baaa
iZlZ
- IEVETB 5741
SI
.-. ."_-s
aajaaaan
nsaa
Seymour D. Reset, rx -
toe League's namnal Crri Bights
Coeanattee. told the partaepar.:s
1: Urn r^ Iftal Am Party ?
to make iecuads among
is based oa
extremal soaa-
rkms" to toe farm mm
The report, prepared cy ADL*
Crri Rajhts Drnaba. says that
the Party, portraying sseif a* a
mnearnatjoc of the 19tfc Century
Popuast Movement, seeks to ckak
itaaV m tke seeaaaar respectabawr
of aarinI ilutoral poetics. It
pat forward a Presidential eaa-
a the 1964 eseetaoc -
sack star Bob Richaroa.
Olympic Gold Medahtt. wha
>ml4atatea.
left the Party.
ITS EFFORTS to attract
___________________
' achieved of -
as: vear m
5 ittle
-.-- Party 5
met with
>"i uiTtwhi ae report poets
spread erery week m toe pages of
"Tae ^aag#x. waica has a eir-
." iTisa of more toan 130.000.
IN DESCRIBING the
raoLzrocai and persoaahtka of
toe Popcust Party, the ADL
report said the groap ts a "
haarhni to proaaxe the
of Liberty Lobby." It
toe latost effort by the Lobby's
ieader. WHbs Carto. to generate
ac aura of li giriiaai j for has
>>year-oid program of bigotry.
Carto has cafied the defeat ot
Adatf Hitler "the defeat of
laoa'
Jews." The strategy, ac-
to ADL. is. in effect, to
ase toe Popofist Party aa a-Tro-
jar. Horse" to break toroagh the
boaadar 5 separatiag
The PopoJist Parr- previously I
boosed in Lfcerr. L boy's hai
qoartors buudicg ~s. ^'ishington.
is now loca:*: Sat Diego, Calif. I
In addition to ;.
with Liberty Lobe;, some jnpor-
tant actmsts Ike Poc _:*: Party |
have imks to Mher -rx^emisl
^rganaatiocs. T>.t
Jerrv Pope 10 of the 1
Kentaciy Pepahs: Party
veterar. "" Naooml |
S^:es P^cn Parr -< viratafr
hr ano-Senutx: aad ra a pothkal j
vehkle of Ga rgl W
J3. Stoc*r
Vac Loeca.- -" of the
Ohio Popnbst Pi ; ^,
didatc f Clt>:,
CoondL was an -- '-'^
Dragon of the Or
KuKha Kan.
Ketth Shnre. acn
of the Popohst Par: 'Kan^1"
a maitant acu >
aatffpacfcsssssi' leader t *
Farmers Lftansioo
-- -- ":C-
of the Popokat Parry ***
sin. has been aenve *
S*mioc parami^-A-. ~ -- ^"J
Fjsse Cocmtatus.
Robert H. Weesa Jr- J
MisssBBapi. a famer :uW|
Partv chairman, has r^r. TAOfr
ed with the Sawoa S R#
Partv for over a decace and m
coaectioas with toe K^c The *
rent chairman of toe Party a *
Coutnre. a Waeoosc
and kmgthae right adag
THE ADL report I
that while it woe!-:
ta exaggerate I
significance." contiwed
ingis needed m view
to draw apea the -
resources of L*e-r. I "
though farmers ha
sought ninaaiT remediei '
their prabkems. tfaerv
ss: :.--. ''u'
ir-jrneyi
r.duded

H iera|



Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
'ope's Words Don't Always Reflect His Politics
By VICTOR PERRY
/hile Pope John Paul II
fcsed a mini-storm in
[ael by declaring, during
recent visit to Morocco,
at Jerusalem's status
lould be reviewed, one
Jl-informed Israeli bare-
[raised an eyebrow.
[)r. Meir Mendes, who served
13 years as the country's
I diplomatic representative
the Vatican, believes that
bh statements have little
[istance and that the Vatican's
Ltude toward and relations
th the Jewish people and their
fete have significantly
proved. -
THE VATICAN'S traditional
End was that Jerusalem should
[internationalized, a view that
Is modified after the Six-Day
tr. with a call only for "inter-
fconal guarantees" for the
ristian holy places. For an in-
liution that took 400 years to
ablish full diplomatic reta-
ins with Britain (after Henry
|II dissolved the monasteries
established "in protest"
otestantism) this should in-
I be considered progress, ac-
ding to Mendes.
Ae has outlined this process in
|treatise published recently by
Leonard Davis Institute for
ernational Relations at the
threw University. Mendes,
i teaches at Bar-Ilan and Tel
nv universities, points out in
study that contemporary
ti-Semitism had its roots in
^me under the Christians, not
der the ancient Romans.
large Jewish community
lurished in Rome from 60 BCE
I earlier until the Fourth Cen-
7 CE, he points out. This in-
Expert believes no change in Vatican's
attitude toward Israel expected
eluded the period following the
destruction of the Temple in 70
CE, when Jewish prisoners were
brought to Rome in chains.
THE VATICAN'S hostility to
the Jewish people began with
the establishment of Christianity
as the official religion of the
Roman Empire in 313 CE. The
doctrine of "deicide," the killing
of Christ by the Jews, soon
spread throughout the Christian
world.
When one considers the anti-
Jewish atrocities of the
Crusaders, the Spanish Inquisi-
tion, auto-da-fes and countless
blood libels, as opposed to the re-
cent official admissions of
Vatican errors vis-a-vis the Jews
and the official accreditation of
an Israeli diplomatic represen-
tative to the Vatican, Jews can
indeed view the present situa-
tion with a degree of
satisfaction.
Greater progress has been
made in the Vatican's attitude
towards the Jews than towards
their country. In the landmark
Second Ecumenical Council in
1963, Pope John XXIII, one of
the most humane and liberal
popes, not only absolved the
Jews of deicide, but recognized
their status as precursors of
Christians. Since then these
themes have been elaborated in
three documents and inter-
preted as guides for Catholic
teaching.
EXPERTS SUCH as Mendes
have expressed some disappoint-
ment in the latest document,
issued in June. While it rein-
forces the more liberal and sym-
pathetic statements towards
Jews and Judaism expressed in
the previous two documents, it
distinguishes between the
Jewish religion and the State.
Concurrently, it adopts a narrow
view of Judaism as having mere-
ly prepared the path for the com-
ing of Jesus.
Israel is not seen, in the latest
Vatican document, as connected
intimately to Judaism, but
rather as a political entity to be
judged in the context of '.'inter-
national law."
Mendes believes this document
provides the religious-ideological
foundation for the Vatican's
non-recognition of Israel. Thus,
while it has posted papal nuncios
(denoting full official recogni-
tion) to some 90 nations it has
sent only an apostolic delegate (a
lower-grade official) to Israel,
who serves Jordan as well.
WHILE THE official reason
for not recognizing Israel is that
its borders are not yet finalized
and that it is still in a state of
war with Jordan, the Vatican
has not withheld recognition
from other states in similar
situations, such as Taiwan and
several warring Arab states.
Surprisingly it was only last,
year, under the Reagan ad-
ministration favored by the
Vatican for its attitude towards
church-state relations, that it
granted official recognition to
the United States and sent a
papal nuncio there.
The true reasons for not
recognizing Israel are rooted in
Catholic dogma which viewed
the dispersion of the Jewish peo-
ple in 70 CE as punishment for
the "Christ-killers," who refus-
Continued on Pace 8-A
Inglish 'Ham'
In Israel, He Tracks the World With His Radio
By JEFF BLACK
ion Tavor, a 40-year-old
liahman who emigrated to
^ei 20 years ago has, up to very
pntly. enjoyed the pleasant
nymity of moshavnik living
working on a moshav near
usalem. But ever since the last
Me of the space shuttle
llwnger, Tavor has had to
lome accustomed to the
hands and the attention of the
Seli mass media.
ivor is what's known as a
ham," for two hours every
. and even more at
Wends, he can be found sitting
nis radio transmitter, contac-
and receiving calls from all
of the globe. His interest in
fcteur radio began in 1975 after
prrific injury during his army
rice when, on the way to the
h Pass in the Sinai Desert, he
fpeil on an unexploded anti-
missile which had been
ked by sand.
he resultant explosion damag-
th his legs and left him blind
lone eye, and during his
Operation, Tavor felt the need
i hobby which would, as he put
[give me something to get my
into."
TARING OFF with a small
> transitter which cost him
Tavor ten years later now
IS 1,000 worth of equipment at
|home on Moshav Shoresh, a
}jav of 50 families. During the
lenger's recent voyage,
or received a phone call telling
[that in 50 minutes time, the
|e shuttle would be in orbit
lr Israel and that the
pnauts were looking forward
taking contact with a local
radio ham.
With his antennae set at 45
degress over Tel Aviv, Tavor
established contact with the
Challenger, which was then flying
at the relatively low height of 350
kilometers above the earth, and
for two minutes he maintained a
radio link with the American
space shuttle.
Opening up his transmission
with his call sign 4Z4ZB, Tavor
then received the call sign of the
Challenger and the name of the
astronaut broadcasting, Tony.
The preliminaries now over, the
moshavnik explained to the
astronaut that he lived on a farm
near Jerusalem, the capital of
Israel. Tony then repeated this
message to show that contact had
been made and added the remark
that from space Israel looked
great. Tavor then wished the
astronauts a safe journey, and the
contact faded.
Back in his office in the kitchen
of Moshav Shoresh's hotel, where
Tavor is the food and beverage
manager, the now-famous radio
ham is only too happy to talk
about his passion for amateur
radio.
THE FASCINATION for him
of being a radio ham stems from a
desire to communicate with peo-
ple from a totally different
background, and as Tavor says,
"On the air you're not allowed to
talk politics, you mustn't talk
about business, so all you're left
with is the good things in life."
The location of Moshav Shoresh,
on top of a hill, enables Tavor to
receive better than normal recep-
tion on his transmitter, and for so-
Amateur radio operator Alon Tavor, UZltZB, of Moshav Shoresh,
recently established radio contact vnth the American space shut-
tle Challenger.
Back at the Moshav
hotel, Tavor is only too
happy to talk about his
passion for amateur
radio. His fascination
with being a ham'
stems from his desire to
communicate with
people living in other
backgrounds.
in i i ii m
meone to whom amateur radio is
so important, this is no minor
consideration.
Amateur radio can often be us-
ed to help people. On occasion,
Tavor established contact with a
ship sailing out of California,
among whose crewmen was an
Israeli whose mother had just
undergone surgery in a Tel Aviv
hospital. When learning that
Tavor was transmitting from
Israel, the anxious crewman ask-
ed him to find out how his mother
was.
Later that same evening, Tavor
was able to relay the message that
the woman was well on the way to
recovery. In fact, each evening at
midnight in Washington and New
York a "Jewish Net" operates
whereby Israeli radio hams con-
tact their counterparts in Ameria
so as to send messages to their
Continued on Page 8-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. December 20, 1985
Emotional Case
Jewish Man Behind Vandalism in Boro Park
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A 38-year-old Jewish man
charged with smashing the
windows of 21 Jewish-
owned shops during two
rock-throwing sprees in the
Boro Park and Flatbush sec-
tions of Brooklyn last month
was arraigned in Criminal
Court last week on 13
counts of felony and misde-
meanor, a spokesperson for
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman inform-
ed the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency.
If convinced on all counts, the
suspect, Gary Dworkin. could be
sentenced to up to 18 years in
prison, according to the DA's of-
fice. One of die misdemeanor
counts is violation of civil rights
and discrimination because
Dworlrin's alleged vandalism was
carried out specifically against
Jewish property.
HE WAS arrested at his Boro
Park home Dec. 9 and reportedly
confessed. Capt. Donald
Bromberg, commander of the
Emigre Figures
Lower Than Tallied
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Three hundred and thirty
thousands Jews have emigrated
from Israel since the establish-
ment of the State, according to a
report presented to the Cabinet
Sunday by Absorption Minister
Yaacov Tsur. These figures are
substantially lower than previous
estimates of between 500.000 and
750.000.
New York Police Department bias
unit which was assigned to the
case because of its anti-Semitic
implications, said Dworkin "is
Jewish and has a history of
psychological problems."
He is accused of throwing rocks
through the windows of 13
Jewish-owned shops during the
night of Nov. 9-10 along a seven-
block strip of 13th Avenue, the
main shopping center of Boro
Park where the population is 80
percent Jewish, mostly ultra-
Orthodox and Hasidic.
He is accused of repeating the
act two weeks later, during the
night of Nov. 23, when five Aore
shop windows in Boro Park were
smashed and three shop windows
on Avenue J in the adjoining Mid-
wood section of Flatbush, also
heavily populated by Orthodox
Jews.
BROMBERG noted in a
prepared statement that Dworkin
came under suspicion as a result
of information supplied by
members of the public and that his
arrest was based on that informa-
tion and on statements by the
suspect. He said police found
rocks in the trunk of Dworking's
car similar to the rocks thrown
through the shop windows.
The vandalism gave rise to ten-
sion in the tightly-knit Jewish
communities of Boro Park and
Flatbush where racial incidents
have been rare in recent years.
A new wave of anti-Semitism
was feared, especially because the
date of the first rock-throwing
coincided with the 47th anniver-
sary of Kristallnacht, November
9. 1938. when rampaging Nazis
smashed the windows of Jewish
homes, businesses and
synagogues all over Germany, lit-
tering the streets with broken
glass.
The attacks in Brooklyn were
carried out on Sabbath night when
the streets of the Orthodox
neighborhoods were deserted.
The rocks apparently were
thrown from a passing car. The
windows of non-Jewish shops
were spared. But one ingredient
common to anti-Semitic van-
dalism was missing: there were no
swastikas or anti-Semitic graffiti
and no anonymous telephone calls
to the police or the media boasting
of the deeds.
Nevertheless, New York State
Assemblyman Dov Hi kind, a Boro
Park resident who represents the
district, said that he was "95 per-
cent sure" that anti-Semitism
motivated at least the first attack
because it coincided with the
KristaUnacKt anniversary. Hikind
said he was "convinced that Mr.
Dworkin was not responsible for
the first attack."
But New York City Councilman
Noach Dear, who also represents
the district, told the JTA he
believes Dworkin was responsible
but that he could not have acted
alone given the wide area over
which the windows were smashed
and the size and weight of the
rocks.
Dear said he asked police to con-
tinue the investigation and to con-
tinue their tight surveillance in
the neighborhoods lest would-be
vandals take Dworlrin's arrest as
a signal that it is now safe to com-
mit similar acts.
According to Dear. Dworkin
was motivated by a personal
vendetta with several Israelis and
Hasidic Jews and took revenge on
the entire community. He said the
police, acting on a tip, questioned
two youths in their early twenties.
The latter, he said, led them to
Dworkin.
The New York City Council and
the Jewish Community Bj-
Council posted rewards toSfc
$15,000 last month for Jg*
*?**-
leading to Dworkins arrest "w
are thankful that we seem to have
a resolution in this matter"
Tishman said.
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U.S., Israel Discuss Military,
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for the 1987 fiscal year which begins next Oct. 1, the State
Department said.
But State Department deputy spokesman Charles Red
man refused to disclose the amount of aid under discussion
"We expect to have an agreement which takes into account
both Israel's aid requirements and U.S. budgetary
restraints," Redman said.
HE WOULD not comment on a report from Jerusalem
that Israel has requested $3.5 billion in economic assistance
for the 1987 fiscal year. The report said the aid request was
presented to Thomas Pickering, the U.S. Ambassador in
Israel, by Israeli Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai.
Israel is receiving this year, $1.2 billion in economic aid
and another $1.8 billion in military aid, all of it as a grant.
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Mideast Danger
Press Peace Before Likud Returns
Continued from Page 1-A
responsibilities of the proposed
self-governing authority for
Palestinians of the West Bank and
Gaza, Linowitz said last week in a
luncheon address to the Women's
National Democratic Club.
He was repeating.a theme from
the Middle East chapter of his
recently-published memoirs, in
which he maintains that an
autonomy agreement could have
been achieved in 1981, "for the
simplest of reasons the leaders
were Anwar Sadat and Menachem
Begin."
The two heads of state,
Linowtiz observed in his book,
"The Making of a Public Man,"
"knew and respected each other,
and understood each other's
political bases, strengths and
weaknesses."
IT CAME as little surprise
when, in his address last week, the
man who for 14 grueling months
worked at playing midwife for the
plan conceived at Camp David
which ultimately ceased to
develop, persisted in calling the
Camp David Process as he does
in his memoirs "the only game
in town."
But his impromptu warning on
the dangers of U.S. inaction in the
face of an impending change of
government in Israel, coupled
with lavish praise for Egypt's
President Hosni Mubarak, went
somewhat beyond the substance
and tone of his book.
Whereas Linowitz's account of
Begin in the book is relatively
sympathetic he bases his belief
that the autonomy talks could
have succeeded on the fact that
Begin and Sadat were the leaders
his vision of the prospects for
[>eace under a new Likud govern-
ment is bleak.
PRIME MINISTER Shimon
Peres has 10 more months in his
post, under the national unity
agreement worked out between
his Labor Party and the Likud,
Linowitz observed.
"He will be followed by Shamir
of the Likud. The Likud Party, as
Intelligence Limited
Continued from Page 1-A
Pollard case with the raid by U.S.
Customs agents last week on
three companies in a case involv-
ing the alledged transfer of hi-
tech equipment to Israel.
Customs said that the com-
panies were searched but did not
indicate whether anything was
seized. No arrests have been made
and the investigation is continu-
ing, according to the Customs
spokesman.
King Hussein
we all know from the Begin ex-
perience, is far less flexible, far
less forthcoming, far more apt to
adopt a belligerent attitude rather
than the kind of flexible,
reasonable attitude that is being
shown by Peres. Those ten mon-
ths are critical, and we ought to
know that, and we ought to act on
it, and I think we need pressure to
achieve it," Linowitz said.
In Egypt, meanwhile, Linowitz
sees signs for encouragement in
spite of recent setbacks. The
Egyptian government, he said,
"has sought to normalize relations
with Israel, in the face of strong,
even fierce, reaction" at home and
from former Arab allies.
Admittedly, relations have
deteriorated under Mubarak
because of differences over the
Lebanese war, Taba and other
issues, and in Mubarak's desire to
reestablish Egypt's ties with the
Arab world.
BUT SADAT'S successor,
Linowitz maintained, "has shown
willingness to become involved
and to take leadership, and we
(the U.S.) should quickly
recognize this and endorse his
efforts."
He noted that Mubarak "con-
tinues to make clear that he in-
tends fully to abide by the terms
of the Israel-Egypt treaty, and
observed "how much more grim
and threatening the situation
would be in the Middle East" if
the treaty did not exist.
Responding to a question on
Mubarak, Linowitz lamented the
attitude of the Reagan Ad-
ministration: "We have not paid
enough attention to him, have not
encouraged him, have not let him
know that he has our full
support."
On Jordan, the former envoy's
disappointment continued to come
through, in spite of what he called
in his book "some new promise of
progress" offered by King Hus-
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sein in recent months. The success
of the Camp David framework for
peace had hinged on Hussein's
willingness to join negotiations
along the lines set out in the ac-
cord, but the Jordanian monarch
rejected that framework.
LINOWTIZ SAID that Jordan
and Saudi Arabia "have not been
helpful" in their rejection of the
Camp David process, and he
criticized Hussein's insistence on
an international conference with
PLO participation in a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation.
But Linowitz praised Hussein
for his efforts to get Syrian Presi-
dent Hafez Assad's endorsement
for any initiatives he might decide
to take. "If somehow Hussein can
be encouraged to move forward
with the knowledge that Syria
would not oppose him, I think that
this would take the next step,"
Linowitz said in repsonse to a
question.
Meetings between Jordanian
and Syrian officials last month
resulted in an agreement that op-
posed direct and separate peace
talks with Israel. The two regimes
have long been at loggerheads,
and Syria has been viewed as a
potentially disruptive force in any
Middle East talks, in part because
it sees little prospect of regaining
the Golan Heights captured by
Israel in 1967 and annexed in
1981.
LINOWITZ SAID he felt that
the U.S. has been wrong in the
past "in acting as though Syria
was beyond the pale," and that if
a basis for peace was found that
was in Syria's interest
presumably, including the return
of the Golan Heights "it will
respect it." On the situation of the
Palestinians, Linowitz had as
much criticism of Israel and the
U.S. as he did of the Arab world
for perpetuating their troubles.
"One of the great tragedies of our
time is what we've done to the
Palestinian people," Linowitz
said. "We all ought to be asham-
ed, all of us we in this part of
the world, and they in that part of
the world."
Speaking to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency following his
address, Linowitz said he was
referring to the failure of the U.S.
to play a leading role in the Middle
East under the Reagan
Administration.
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Move To Lower Israel's Interest
On Debt to U.S. Abandoned
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A move to reduce the in-
terest on existing Israeli
debts to the U.S. was aban-
doned last week in the
Senate as too costly in the
light of budgetary con-
straints. In a joint state-
ment, Sens. Daniel Inouye
(D.,Hi.) and Robert Kasten
(R., Wis.), who sponsored
the bill, said they were
withdrawing it is spite of
"widespread support"
because they were unable to
resolve technical questions
raised by the budget
committee.
Approved by the Senate Ap-
propriations Committee in Oc-
tober, the bill would have reduced
Israel's annual interest to five
percent, saving the financially
pressed Jewish State billions of
dollars over the next several
years. Many of the loans made to
Israel since the 1973 War
amounting to nearly $10 billion
carry a current annual interest
rate of approximately 10 to 11
percent.
THE PROPOSED legislation
had apparently met with reserva-
tions not only from within the
Senate, but from among pro-
Israel activists, who questioned
the wisdom of further taxing the
U.S. budget when cuts are being
implemented elsewhere.

Some lobbyists at the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC) reportedly feared that
passage of tile bill could backfire
by fostering resentment over the
effective appropriations of further
American tax dollars to help the
Jewish State.
As Congress was considering an
aid package for Israel last spring,
for example, the National Associa-
tion of Arab Americans placed
radio advertisements playing up
the theme of American's being
asked to sacrifice while Israel was
raking in the U.S. taxpayer's
money. Congress ultimately ap-
proved the $3 billion aid package
for 1986, plus $1.5 billion in
emergency economic assistance.
RECENTLY, however
AIPAC's executive director,
Thomas Dine, came out publicly in
support of the Kasten-Inouye bill,
while acknowledging that the
issue "is a toughie."
There have been talks of revis-
ing the bill in a way that would
spread out the effects over a
longer period of time, such as ap-
plying the interest reduction only
to military loans for the first year.
But staff members at the offices
of Kasten and Inouye said the
Senators were unable to work out
an agreement with the Budget
Committee.
In their statement last week,
the two Senators said they have
concluded that pushing the bill
would be inappropriate "at this
time," suggesting they would take
it up at a later date. One informed
source said he had reason to
believe that the issue is still very
much alive and could be brought
up again in the near future.
Friend Elected
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sharlee Friend of Houston has
been elected president of the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans of U.S.A., suc-
ceeding Jeanette Schneider of
New York.
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SOL SCHREIBER. PRESIDENT
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"Create Land From Sand"
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HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
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toooeoeooooo


' Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1985
View of Pope
Words Don't Always Equal Political Position
Continued from Page 5-A
ed to accept him as the true
Messiah. A more practical con-
sideration is the political
pressure from Arab and Moslem
states, in particular those with
large Catholic populations.
Mendes believes no change in
the Vatican's attitude towards
this country can be expected in
the near future, although he
thinks its many statements and
actions politically recognizing
Israel de facto may eventually
lead to full diplomatic
recognition.
TAKING A different view.
David Flusser. professor of com-
parative religion at the Hebrew
University, sees mainly disad-
vantages for this country in of-
ficial Vatican recognition. This
would mean greater Vatican
demands for control over the ho-
ly sites, institutions and proper-
ties, thus compromising Israel's
sovereignty, he says. He sees no
justification for granting the
Vatican full diplomatic status
before it expresses guilt for
Christian treatment of Jews
over the centuries.
Echoing Stalin's famous
query."How many battalions
does the Pope have?", Flusser
claims the Vatican's influence is
overestimated. There may be
Sign Treaty,
Israel Urged
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
State Department has again urg-
ed Israel to sign the nuclear non-
proliferation treaty. "We believe
that regional stability in the Mid-
dle East will be enhanced if all
states in the region accepted com-
prehensive safeguards and
adhered to the nonproliferation
treaty," State Department deputy
spokesman Charles Redman said
at the daily press briefing in
response to a reporter's question
on Israel's failure, so far. to sign
the treaty.
"We are concerned by the ex-
istence of unsafeguarded nuclear
facilities in Israel and have made
this concern known to the Israeli
government,"' Redman added.
"We have repeatedly urged Israel
to accept comprehensive
safeguards."
However. Redman noted that
"Israel has stated publicly that it
will not be the first nation to in-
troduce nuclear weapons in the
region.'
Although Israel has never ad-
mitted to have nuclear weapons.
Leonard Spector. a senior
associate at the Washington-
based Carnegie Endowment for
International Peace, in his recent-
ly published "The New Nuclear
Nations.' Carnegie's second an-
nual report on the spread of
nuclear weapons, said that Israel
is believed to have 20 to 25
aircraft-deliverable nuclear
weapons.
Amateur Radio Fan
Tracked Challenger
Continued from Page 5-A
families in the States and of
course vice versa.
With the memory of his contact
with the space shuttle beginning
to fade into the past, Tavor still
maintains his schedules of dailv
transmissions, and he says, with a
wry smile on his face, "After mak
ing contact with the Challenger.
I'm now waiting for the Rus-
sians." Perhaps, one day, he
might just surprise a cosmonaut
with his call sign 4Z4ZB a number
which has been heard by so many
people in so many countries.
800 million Catholics in the
world, he notes, but national and
secular authorities hold the reins
of power, rather than the
church.
Despite the steady improve-
ment in the Vatican's relations
with Israel there have been a
number of deviations from this
path in recent years, such as the
Pope's reception of PLO leader
Yassir Arafat and his attitude
towards convicted PLO arms-
runner Archbishop Hilarion
Capucci.
MENDES. like Catholic
theologian Father Marcel
Dubois. chairman of the Hebrew
University's Philosophy Depart-
ment, feels that the reception of
Arafat was a mistaken aberra-
tion, not indicating any real
change of direction in papal
policies. The Pope received
Arafat under the pressure of
world sympathy for the PLO
leader following his expulsion
from Beirut and the massacre in
the Sabra and Shatila refugee
camps, says Mendes.
According to Dubois, the Pope
believed he could persuade
Arafat to abandon terror and
recognize Israel.
Shortly after the meeting,
Arab terrorists attacked wor-
shippers at a synagogue in
Rome, killing a small child.
Vatican officials reportedly ad-
mitted in private that the au-
dience with Arafat had been a
mistake.
Archbishop Hilarion Capucci,
then head of the Greek Catholic
Church in Jerusalem, was con-
victed in 1974 of smuggling
arms for the PLO and sentenced
to 12 years' imprisonment, only
to be released three years later
after extensive Vatican
pressure. Mendes. who was in-
volved in the negotiations, im-
plies that Israel's agreement to
release Capucci was a decision
based on practical political con-
siderations, rather than yielding
to pressure.
ISRAEL WANTED to keep
the door open, he notes, for
reciprocal requests for Vatican
intervention to save Jews con-
demned to hanging in Iraq or to
help Israeli POWs. There was a
precedent in the case of Elie
Cohen, the Israeli convicted of
and hanged for spying in Syria.
While Vatican intervention rare-
ly saved Jewish prisoners' lives,
it did help to establish contact
with them and ease their lot at
times.
When Capucci violated the
condition of his Vatican-
negotiated release that he would
stay out of the Middle East and
refrain from becoming involved
again in PLO affairs, the
Vatican appeared unable or un-
willing to influence him. Perhaps
this was a reflection of the
Vatican's more forgiving at-
titude towards Islam's anti-
Christian manifestations.
Among the more glaring ex-
amples were its general silence
over the plight of the Christians
in Lebanon and its establish-
ment of diplomatic relations
with almost all Arab states. "In
the final analysis." says Mendes.
"it was the Jews who killed
Christ, not the Moslems."
IN KEEPING with such
Realpolitik considerations, the
Pope and his spokesmen seldom
fail to mention the "legitimate
rights of the Palestinian people"
during or after each meeting
with an Israeli personality. This
was the case when former Prime
Minister Golda Meir met with
the Pope in 1973.
When the present Polish-born
Pope reiterated to Prime
Minister Shimon Peres, earlier
this year, the Vatican's call for
the internationalization of the
holy places in Jerusalem, Peres
responded: "You already have
the Russians in Poland. Do you
want them in Jerusalem too?"
Dr. Meir Mendes was sent to
Rome in 1967 at a day's notice to
establish for the first time a
liaison office with the Vatican at
the Israel Embassy in Rome, a
few weeks after the Six-Day
War, when virtually all of the
Catholic holy places in this coun-
try came under Israeli jurisdic-
tion. Mendes was well prepared
for the mission. A native of Italy
who could trace his ancestry
back to 1510 in Portugal,
Mendes specialized in canon law
at the University of Rome.
HIS FATHER had reached
one of the highest positions of
any Jew in Italy as chief medical
officer of the Italian army in
World War I. with the rank of
general. Despite his status and
the privileges which accom-
panied it, he left his native coun-
try for Palestine with his family
at"the outbreak of World War II.
During the 1948 War of In-
dependence. Mendes was
military liaison officer to the
various religious order in
Jerusalem. He subsequently
worked for the Ministry of
Religious Affairs and for the
Foreign Ministry.
During his 13 years in Rome,
he established good relations
with top Vatican officials, in-
cluding cardinals, archbishops
and most notably the Vatican's
Foreign Minister. Achille
Silvestrini. who was a frequent
visitor at Mendes' home, if not at
Gala
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his Israeli embassy office.
ONLY TWO years after
assuming his post did he meet
Pope Paul VI when he accom-
panied then Foreign Minister
Abba Eban to an audience. All
subsequent contacts with the
Pope were on formal occasions.
It was only with the advent of
the present Pope, John Paul II.
that relations warmed up.
Demonstrating a more informal
style than almost any other pon-
tiff. John Paul II proved to be
more accessible than his
predecessors.
Mendes cherishes the memory
of his and his wife's farewell
visit to the Pope's summer
residence in Castelgondolfo out-
side Rome. The visit followed a
rare private invitation from the
Pope which had been changed
from its original date when it
transpired that it had been set
for Rosh Hashanah. Spurning
protocol, the Pope came out to
greet the Mendeses in his living
room, sitting at the same level as
his guests instead of above them,
as is customary in audiences
with the Pope. He spoke in the
first person, Mendes recalls, us-
ing the personal pronoun "I" in-
stead of the customary "we."
When Mendes begged off from
answering certain questions on
diplomatic grounds the Pope
MIAMI
BEACHS
GLATT
KOSHER
L.J
persevered: "But you have long
experience. Give me your per-
sonal advice." Mendes reminded
the Pope of the Jewish people's
strong religious and historic ties
to the Land of Israel. The Pope's
interjections from time to time
concerned the Palestinian
problem.
"AT THE conclusion, the
Pope rose and accompanied us to
the door," Mendes relates,
"thanking me for my long ser-
vice representing Israel at the
Vatican." While commending
the Pope for his informal and
populist attitude, Mendes feels
he is no less doctrinaire than
previous popes. Mendes is
cautiously optimistic, however,
regarding future improvements
in the relations between the
Church, the Jewish people and
Israel.
A little noticed indication of
the ultimate affinity of
Catholicism to Judaism, he
points out, is the fact that the
Church's recent documents on
relations with Israel and the
Jewish people have been issued
by the pontifical commission for
religious relations with Judaism.
While this commission,
established in 1947, is attached
to the secretariat for promoting
Christian unity, the commission
for relations with Islam is at-
tached to the secretariat for
relations with non-Christians.
This special status accorded
Judiasm is just one more sign of
the Vatican's growing realiza-
tion that 20 centuries of hostlity
towards the Jews should be
ended.
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Bookcase
Novelist Adds to His Reputation
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Before My Life Began. By Jay
Neugeboren. New York: Simon
and Schuster, 1985. 392 pp.
$18.95.
With five novels and a number
of short stories to his credit, Jay
Neugeboren adds considerably to
his reputation with this, his sixth
novel. He tells a well-crafted story
that captures and holds our
interest.
The hero of the tale is Davey
Voloshin, born in Brooklyn in
1935. Former residents of
Brooklyn will be nostalgically
reminded of many streets and
places. Davey's uncle, Abe, who is
a dominant influence in his life,
was one of that special breed of
Jewish gangsters who ran many
rackets in the 1930's and 1940's.
Davey's father, an ineffectual in-
dividual a netrish works for
Abe, but it is Davey who is being
trained to take over his uncle's
petty empire in Brooklyn.
BEFORE THIS can occur, a
turf battle with an Italian gang
takes place, and Abe is murdered.
In anticipation, Abe has prepared
a new identity for Davey to pre-
vent him from meeting the same
fate as his uncle. By the time this
transpires, Davey is married and
has a daughter. To assume his
new name and his manufactured
history, he abandons his wife,
daughter, widowed mother and
friends, never to see them again.
The second part of the book
deals with Davey in his new life in
New England where, under the
assumed name of Aaron Levin, he
is married, has two children and is
subsequently divorced. One of the
best chapters in the book tells
about Davey's experience (as
Aaron Levin) in Mississippi during
the civil rights struggle.
Neugeboren introduces a
number of colorful characters and
succeeds admirably in keeping the
story flowing. He keeps emphasiz-
ing the theme of choice. Are we
truly the masters of our fate? Was
Jay Neugeboren
Shakespeare correct when he
wrote, "The fault, dear Brutus,
lies not in our stars but in
ourselves that we are
underlings"?
How much free will do humans
actually have? These are the ques-
tions posed by this fine novel.
They are questions which have
been long debated but never final-
ly resolved. Neugeboren im-
pressively contributes to that
debate by giving us an entertain-
ing story which keeps us turning
the pages while raising the ques-
tions without plunging us into a
philosophical mire.
Streets of Gold. By Sidney Jacob-
son. New York: Pocket Books,
1985. 312 pp. $3.95 (paper
back).
One of the characters in this
light, slight novel said that she
gave up reading "The Brothers
Karamazov" because "I can't
Activist Rabbi Says He No Longer
Supports Violence Against Arabs
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Rabbi Moshe Levinger, a
leader of the militant Gush
Emunim, says he no longer
supports the kind of violent
acts against West Bank
Arabs for which members of
a Jewish terrorist
underground are currently
serving prison sentences.
He was seconded in that
view by a lawyer, Elyakim
Haetzni, who is associated
with the settlers movement.
The two men discussed the
future of the territory at a gather-
ing in Yitzhar, a Gush settlement
in the Samaria district this week.
Haetzni said the Jewish
underground caused "terrible
damage," but he conceded that
there had been considerable
Jewish support for such acts as
the June, 1980 car bombings
which maimed two Arab mayors
and blinded an Israeli police
sapper.
LEVINGER AND Haetzni dif-
'abbi in New Pulpit
ENGLEWOOD, N.J. (JTA) -
labbi Stephen Listfield has been
pmed rabbi of Temple Emanu-EI
ere. succeeding Rabbi Arthur
lertzberg, author, scholar and
Vional Jewish leader. Hertzberg
Imains as rabbi emeritus.
fered over how they would resist
possible territorial concessions in
Judaea and Samaria. Levinger
urged that the "pioneer image" of
Jewish settlers be stressed to at-
tract more followers, enabling the
Gush Emunim to establish more
settlements.
Haetzni argued that the ex-
perience in Sinai, which was
returned to Egypt, proved that
settlements alone could not stand
in the way of territorial conces-
sions made for political reasons.
He proposed that the Israeli
public be made aware of the
dangers of concessions to the
point of hysteria. "I want to
create hysteria. During the
Holocaust those who were
hysterical were saved," the
lawyer maintained.
Levinger said he feared the
future struggle over the ter-
ritories would lead to bloodshed.
The gathering ended with adop-
tion of a resolution warning the
government that it "has no
authority to negotiate concessions
in Eretz Israel" because "such
concessions lack any legal or
moral authority."
In another development, set-
tlers in Sanur, in Samaria, aban-
doned a nearby mosque they had
seized and converted to a
synagogue. They agreed to leave
the mosque after what was
described as several months of
"quiet persuasion" by the West
Bank civil administration headed
by Col. Efraim Sneh.
keep track of all the people .
And, frankly, I don't much care
for them." Unfortunately, the
same might be said for "Streets of
Gold," although its author could
hardly be mentioned in the same
breath as Dostoyevsky. Jacob-
son's characters are poorly
developed, and there are so many
of them as to cause confusion.
The book is divided into two
equal parts with the first half be-
ing set in the Russian Pale of Set-
tlement and the second in
America. The story begins in 1880
and ends in 1924. Some of the in-
gredients of the old-fashioned Yid-
dish theatre are to be found in the
book two brothers in love with
the same women, stormy father-
son relationships, a philandering
husband, rich girl-poor boy, etc.
If one can cut through the dross,
there is a picture of pogroms and
the plight of immigrants which is
worth seeing. But the reader must
first "keep track of all the people"
and find a way of overcoming the
feeling that "I don't much care for
them."
The Golden Age Hotel. By David
Lewis Stein. Toronto: Mac-
millan of Canada, 1984. 237 pp.
$15. 95.
The setting for this moving,
thought-provoking novel will
seem familiar to Miamians, and its
characters will remind us of peo-
ple we know. However, the scene
is not Miami, although it might
have been. The story actually
takes place in Long Island, New
York in a hotel for senior citizens.
The residents and owners of the
hotel might be our neighbors.
Lily Monteith and her second
husband, Stan, with little money
of their own and with a bank loan,
take over an old hotel and fix it up
as a residential hotel, catering to
old people. Over the course of a
year, they manage to make it a
profitable enterprise. Things turn
sour when Stan takes all of their
money to save his son by his first
marriage.
The son is a ne'er-do-well and a
small-time drug smuggler who
desperately needs the money to
avoid being killed by some of his
cohorts. Incidentally, this part of
the story does take place in
Miami. As a consequence of Stan's
embezzling their money, Lily buys
him out; they separate, and she
becomes the "Chief Innkeeper,"
as the story ends.
What makes the book so poig-
nant and so alive is the description
in each chapter of a hotel guest
and his or her problems, especially
with adult sons and daughters.
The lives of the residents, their
families, the owners and the
employees are all closely intert-
wined, providing scenes which are
sometimes funny and sometimes
sad. Each one is an individual with
an unique story. Even one of the
winos who works in the kitchen
claims to have once been a physi-
cian and has "good, tough
wisdom."
We tend to generalize about
people because, too often, we
think about them in categories.
"Golden Agers" is such a
category, and our use of the term
blurs out all the distinctiveness
and individuality which each per-
son possesses. Gently and
humorously, this book reminds us
that we should perceive each per-
son as an individual human begin
who, in some respects, is like all
other human beings; in some
respects, like some other human
beings; but, in some respects, is
like no other human being.
The author is a newspaperman
in Toronto. He has written five
other books, a play and some short
stories. This book makes me want
to read what he has already
published and to look forward to
his future works.
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Hitler-Lover Quits New Jersey Pub,
Goes Back to Germany
\
ELIZABETH, N.J. -
(JTA) Dieter Homburg,
who celebrated Hitler's bir-
thday with a party at his
tavern, Loni's Pub, every
year for the past 10 years,
has sold out and returned to
his native Germany.
His departure was apparently
prompted by a sharp decline in
business after his Hitler bash on
Apr. 21 triggered an angry pro-
test demonstration last May 31 by
local Jewish and veterans
organizations. Elizabeth has one
of the largest Jewish populations
in New Jersey.
THE PROTEST brought Hom-
burg and his activities unwanted
publicity in the media though it
did not result in closing the bar.
Law enforcement authorities said
the parties, though repugnant,
violated no local ordinance and
were in accordance with the legal
exercise of freedom of speech.
The parties, held on the second
floor of the tavern, usually drew
about 30 guests "from all walks of
life," Homburg was quoted as tell-
ing the media. They were open to
anyone willing to pay $15 for four
hours of food and drink.
According to witnesses, at least
one guest turned up in a storm
trooper uniform last April. The
party featured a birthday cake
with a swastika.
ALAN SHELTON, president of
the Zionist Association of Kean
College in nearby Union, N.J., one
of the groups that demonstrated,
said he was "overjoyed that Hom-
burg found conditions so difficult
that he chose to return to Ger-
many, but the fact that he was
able to attract area residents on a
yearly basis to pay homage to
Hitler is clear evidence Homburg
was not alone in his pro-Nazi
sentiments."
Homburg always insisted he
was not affiliated with any Nazi
group He said he was puzzled by
the outrage over what he con-
sidered just "a joke" to have "a
good time." But the Fuehrer's ad-
mirer, who was born after the col-
lapse of the Third Reich, said he
was "tired" of hearing about the
Holocaust.
He gave reporters handouts
commending President Reagan
for honoring his commitment to
place a wreath at the German war
cemetery at Bitburg last May
where about 50 members of the
Waffen SS are buried along with
other war dead.
The worldwide protests aroused
by Reagan's visit to Bitburg
"resulted in the biggest hate cam-
paign against Germans," accor-
ding to the material handed out by
Homburg.
THE MAY 31 demonstration
was a small one. It drew no more
than 30 people, according to the
Newark Star Ledger. But is was
apparently effective. Elizabeth
police who began to monitor the
pub reported a sharp fall-off in
business.
The sponsors of the May 31
demonstratioon were, in addition
to Shelton's group, the New
Jersey Coalition Against Nazis;
the Elmora Hebrew Center of
Elizabeth; the Second Generation
of Metro, N.J. an organization
of children of Holocaust survivors;
the Jewish War Veterans of
America; and the New Jewish
Agenda of South Orange.
The new owner of the tavern,
now known as Rodz's Pub, is Rick
Rodriguez, whose father, Joseph,
was its manager and a partner of
Homburg until three years ago.
The German flags have been
removed. The pub will continue to
serve German food prepared by
the same cook. But Hiller's birth-
day celebration apparently are a
thing of the past.
Former Defense Aide Arraigned
On Charges of Land Sales Fraud
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Avi Tzur, a former aide to
Deputy Defense Minister
Michael Dekel when the lat-
ter was Deputy Minister of
Agriculture, was arraigned
to magistrates court here
Monday on charges of pro-
moting land sales in the
West Bank with forged
documents and accepting
bribes from land developers.
Tzur, who works for the Air-
port Authority, is one of two
former aides of Dekel, arrested
last week on suspicion of land
sales fraud. The other, Claude
Malka, an aide now to Transport
Minister Haim Corfu, is free on
bail. Dekel, who was named to the
Defense Ministry post only last
week, was questioned for five
hours by Chief Superintendent of
Police Shimon Savir, head of the
serious crimes division.
REPORTEDLY, he was ques-
tioned about forged documents
issued in his name by Tzur; about
his management of West Bank
settlement affairs during his
tenure at the Agriculture
Ministry; his knowlede, if any, of
letters issued on his personal
Ministry stationery, signed by
Tzur; and about the suspected
misappropriation of funds con-
tributed to the Likud 1984 elec-
tion campaign chest.
Dekel's appearance was volun-
tary, and he has not been accused
of any offense. But the arrests of
his two ex-aides triggered charges
by Likud that the police were ac-
ting from political motivations.
The Police Ministry is headed by a
prominent Laborite, Haim Barlev.
Tzur is accused of having receiv-
ed about 30 million Shekels (more
than $50,00 at the time) to get
government approval of new set-
tlements in the West Bank where
developers wanted to sell land to
the public.
HE IS SAID to have pocketed
part of the money and passed the
rest on to a Likud group pro-
moting increased settlement ac-
tivity. He is also accused of giving
developers forge documents to
dupe potential land buyers. The
documents indicated that certain
settlements had been approved by
the Cabinet when in fact they had
not.
Meanwhile, Avraham Gindi, a
land developer accused of pro-
moting fraudulent sales with let-
ters supplied by Tzur, remains
under 24-hour surveillance in a
Tel Aviv jail cell. Last Friday, he
attempted to jump from a sixth
floor window in Tel Aviv District
Court just as police finished
reading charges against him.
Gindi's brothers, Moshe and
Yigal, who own and manage the
Friendly Rival Land Development
Co., are wanted for questioning.
They bolted the country sevenil
week ago. for the U.S., with their
families. Israel Radio said that the
two men left their families in
America and are now in Brazil
which has no extradition treaty
with Israel.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20. 1985
Jailed Rabbis
Focus on Soviet Oppression Not Us
UN Votes To Condemn All
Acts of Terrorism As 'Criminal'
Continued from Page 1-A
will focus attention on the harass-
ment and imprisonment of our
Soviet brethren whose only crime
was to study Bible and practice
their religious heritage," said
Rabbi David CHer, chairman of the
Washington Board of Rabbis'
Soviet Jewry Action Committee.
THE FIVE rabbis imprisoned
were among 22 rabbis and a
Lutheran minister Rev. John
Steinbruck who were arrested
outside the Soviet Embassy here
in the first of a series of planned
arrests sponsored by the
Washington Board of Rabbis.
Some 132 people in all, including
rabbis, ministers, Hebrew
teachers, cantors and college
students have been arrested in
seven such demonstrations here
to date.
The first demonstrators to be
tried, a group of 21 rabbis, were
found guilty two weeks ago of
violating the District law banning
demonstrations within 500 feet of
an Embassy and sentenced to a
15-day suspended jail term, six
months probation and a $50 fine
the same penalty initially hand-
ed down to all but one of the 23
whose case was heard last
Wednesday.
The exception was Michael
Berenbaum, opinion page editor
of The Washington Jewish Week,
who received a reduced fine of $10
to cover court costs, after
pleading guilty. The five rabbis
who began their prison terms
were Oler, Harold Bayer, Leonard
Cahan, Mark Levine and Bruce
Kahn. They reported to the
Petersburg Prison in Virginia.
IN HANDING down the
sentence, Judge Colleen Kollar
Kotelly told the group of five that
her initial verdict was made as a
way of keeping the rabbis in the
community. But in view of their
decision to reject the suspended
sentence, she said, "You do not
wish to remain in the
community."
The rabbis like the first group
of 21 rabbis expressed distress
over the harshness of the initial
sentence, especially in light of the
prosecution's recommendation
that there be no fine or jail
sentence. Several protested that
the Soviet Jewry demonstrators
were being subjected to selective
prosecution at the behest of the
Soviet Embassy and observed
that none of those arrested in
Israel Monitors Syria's Move Of
Missiles into Overflight Pattern
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Syria's forward movement
of its Soviet-made SAM-2
surface-to-air missiles is
viewed by the Israel
Defense Force as a potential
threat to reconnaissance
flights over Lebanon to
monitor terrorist activity.
Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe
Levy, who disclosed the
movement, said the IDF is
considering possible steps to
be taken.
But military commentators
suggest that Israel will take no ac-
tion as long as the Syrian SAM-2s
are kept inactive. Nevertheless,
diplomatic efforts probably will be
made to persuade Damascus to
pull back the missiles.
THEIR MOVEMENT closer to
Syria's border with Lebanon is
seen here as a breach of the unof-
ficial unwritten understanding
between Israel and Syria that
Israel will continue to fly recon-
naissance flights over Lebanon
undisturbed. The understanding
had been worked out through the
good offices of the United States.
Abba Eban, chairman of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, told Israel
Radio that there was no unwritten
agreement with the Syrians. But
both sides tacitly acknowledged
the existence of a "red line"
beyond which neither would ex
Arabs Blocked
From
Meeting Arafat
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
group of Palestinians who said
they wanted to persuade Yasir
Arafat to accept United Nations
Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338 were refused permission
by the West Bank military
government to go to Jordan Mon-
day to meet the, PLO chief.
Several Knesset members were
critical of the refusal, among them
Abba Eban, chairman of the
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee.
tend its forces. Israel regards the
SAM-2 movements as a breach of
that understanding.
LAST MONTH the Israeli Air
Force shot down two Syrian jets
which had taken an aggressive
posture toward planes flying
reconnaissance over Lebanon. In
the course of that long-range
engagement, Israeli fighter
planes briefly overflew Syrian ter-
ritory. Subsequently, military and
diplomatic observers here sug-
gested the attack on the Syrian
planes was an error, and that view
was brought to the attention of
Damascus by the U.S.
The incident served to
underscore that Israel seeks no
confrontation with Syria but con-
siders its almost daily recon-
naissance flights over Lebanon a
vital safeguard against terrorist
attacks from Lebaon and will
tolerate no interference with
them."
The Syrians so far have been
cautious. Recently they placed
SAM-6 and SAM-8 surface-to-air
missiles on the Beirut-Damascus
highway and near Baalbek in the
Bekaa Valley of eastern Lebanon.
But they were promptly
withdrawn.
DEFENSE MINISTER Yit-
zhak Rabin told a meeting in
Jerusalem that there are no
political reasons for a war in the
Middle East at the moment, but
the Arab states are building up
their military strength which
might force a war on Israel. The
deployment of Syrian surface-to-
air missiles in Lebanon in 1982
was one of the factors that
precipitated Israel's invasion of
Lebanon.
The SAM-2 is a non-mobile
system designed for defense
against medium and high altitude
warplanes-. It has been deployed in
the Middle East since the 1967
war. The Egyptians used them in
the war of attrition in 1970 and
they and the Syrians again in the
1973 Yom Kippur War.
Each battery has six launchers
which propel a 10.7 meter-long
missile armed with radar-directed
130 kg explosive warheads. The
missiles have a maximum effec-
tive range of 40-50 kilometers and
an altitude of 18 kilometers. They
are vulnerable however to radar
jamming.
similar demonstrations at the
South African Embassy in
which some of the same rabbis had
participated have actually been
tried.
But the judge appeared to go
beyond what the group of five had
effectively invited her to do by re-
jecting the initial sentence, when
she dismissed out-of-hand a re-
quest to consider bail. Henry
Asbill, attorney for 22 rabbis and
one Lutheran minister, argued
that the five should be permitted
to postpone serving the sentence
after posting bail because there
was "a likelihood of reversal" of
the verdict on appeal.
THE ISSUES were the
"defense of necessity" by which
Asbill said the rabbis had the
religious and moral imperative to
violate the District statute in
order to prevent a greater harm
from being done, and the constitu-
tionality of the statue itself. In ad-
dition, Asbill indicated he would
press the question of selective pro-
secution which, he said,
characterized the charges against
the Soviet Jewry activists.
Their action, he maintained,
was direectly linked to the fate of
those six including Prisoner of
Conscience Anatoly Sharansky
and all legal alternatives had been
exhausted. However, the judge
maintained that there was insuffi-
cient basis to permit the case to be
defended on the basis of
"necessity."
By KEVIN FREEMAN
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The United Nations
voted unanimously last
week to unequivocally con-
demn "as criminal all acts,
methods and practices of
terrorism wherever and by
whomever committed, in-
cluding those which jeopar-
dize friendly relations
among states and their
security."
The historic vote, the first
time the world body has approved
a universal declaration on ter-
rorism, received the support of
Israel after it had abstained, along
with Burkina Faso, formerly Up-
per Volta, when the Assembly's
legal committee voted on the draft
resolution last Friday.
"The adoption of this resolu-
tion, even with its shortcomings,
gives the responsible members of
this body additional backing to
wage a renewed campaign against
international terrorism," said
Israel's Ambassador to the UN,
Binyamin Netanyahu, in a speech
prior to the General Assembly
vote.
NETANYAHU applauded .the
condemnation of terrorism
"wherever and by whomever" it
is committed, saying, "This is
something we have fought for.
called for. and insisted upon
throughout the debate on this
issue ... It is the essence of
Israel's policy against terrorism,"
In addition, the Israeli Am.
lor welcomed the res*
tion's call on states to
Prosecute
or extradite terrorists, and to L
plement the international conven-
tions against terrorism
resolution seeks that all suta
prosecute and extradiu
terrorists. '
"There are important ad
vances," Netanyahu said. "Bui
their real meaning will only be
assessed by how far the intern*
tional community will pressure of-
fending states to comply." He
charged that some states suPPor.
ing the resolution in the General
Assembly, such as Libya, Syria,
Iraq, Iran and South Yemen, "de-
fend" and 'encourage" terrorists
NETANYAHU expressed
disapproval over attempts by
some members of the General
Assembly to link terrorism to a
"struggle for self-determination
Somehow, we are told by the ter-
rorists and their apologists, if you
are fighting for that goal, the
systematic murder of civilians is
not terrorism," The Israel envoy
said. "This is nonsense.
According to Netanyahu, a
grave injustice is thus committed
against those who fight for "ge-
nuine freedom and do not engage
in terrorism. We have no objec-
tion in principle to such struggles.
Indeed we ourselves engaged in
such a battle for independence
Those who truly fight for national
freedom respect all human
freedoms."
Tis the season
to be cautions.
We joyously supply the power that lights up
your holiday season. And we ask you -
please use it carefully. Always read
and follow instructions that come with gifts
that are powered by electricity. For example, use
only grounded extension cords, don't trim hedges
when the ground is wet and keep electric cords
out of the way of cutting edges.
Christmas lights also should be used with care.
Keep them away from flammable decorations.
check for worn or broken sockets, cracked insulation
and frayed cords, turn them off when you go out
and use no more than three sets of lights
on an extension cord. And of course.
never put lights on a metal tree.
Make safety your first New Years resolution.
And have a most joyous holiday season.
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


First Envoy to Egypt
Little Optimism for Improved Ties
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11 -A

Continued from Page 1-A
ing relations with Israel is a step
forward toward peace. The Egyp-
tians haven't fully understood it
yet."
Another disturbing factor in the
Middle East equation is the PLO's
increasing influence in Egypt. Ac-
cording to Ben-Elissar, Egypt has
started to "flirt" with PLO
leader, Yasir Arafat in spite of
U.S. and Israeli positions.
"All we can say is, wherever
you have Arafat, wherever you
have the PLO, you have violence,
you have war. There is no ar-
rangement possible," he said.
Israel has made, and will con-
tinue to make, Jewish blood "very
expensive," Ben-Elissar added.
"And nobody will be allowed to
teach us a lesson."
THE AMBASSADOR was ap-
pointed following the Camp David
accord in typical Israeli fashion-
informally. Ben-Elissar's office
was two doors away from then-
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin's, and a summons from the
head of government was common.
"One day, the Prime Minister
invited me to his office, which hap-
pened often, and I didn't think it
was going to be for something im-
portant. And then he told me, 'Eli,
you're going to be Israel's am-
bassador to Egypt. How do you
like that?' So I said, 'Mr. Begin,
will you allow me to ask my wife
whether she would be willing to
come with me to Egypt?' He said.
Will 24 hours be enough?' know-
ing very well the answer."
Interestingly, an event three
yean prior to this foreshadowed
Ben-Elissar's appointment.
DURING A conference held
I .'tween Israeli and Egyptian
diplomats in 1977, Ambassador
Ben-Elissar shared a car with
Meir Rosenne, now Israel's Am-
bassador to the U.S., and a high-
ranking Egyptian political figure.
The Egyptian official pointed at
Ben-Elissar and said, "You, Mr.
Ben-Elissar, are going to become
Israel's ambassador in Egypt."
This was three years before he
was named ambassador, and two
years before the peace treaty was
signed.
How was he first greeted by the
Egyptians?
After conquering his initial fear
of being assassinated, ("I would
have preferred to be Israel's se-
cond ambassador," he joked) he
had "the best experience a Jew,
an Israeli can have. I was present
at the Royal Palace in Cairo and
was greeted by an Egyptian
military orchestra playing the
Hatikvah. I don't think I'll ever
live through such a moving mo-
ment again, especially knowing
very well who I represented."
ALTHOUGH he was warmly
welcomed by President Sadat, the
Egyptian political establishment
and the general populace, Ben-
Elissar noticed he was coolly
received by Egypt's intelligentsia.
"Surprisingly," he said, "those
who were most uncooperative, the
least hospitable, were the
members of the press and the
academics. In fact, three unions
adopted resolutions opposing my
being in Egypt the doctors, the
lawyers, and the media."
After Sadat's assassination and
Hosni Mubarak's ascendance to
power, Ben-Elissar became aware
of Egypt's reluctance to continue
normalizing relations with Israel.
"Unlike Egypt, we never
withdrew our ambassador; that
Supreme Court Snubs Appeal
Of Ex-Nazi's Deportation Order
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Supreme Court Monday
refused to hear an appeal of
a deportation order from
John Demjanjuk, a
Ukrainian-born war
criminal charged with the
murder of 900,000 Jews at
ie Treblinka death camp
uring World War II.
The court's action is separate
rom a pending petition for review
f an extradition request from
srael for Demjanjuk. Israel has
(ought his extradition for two
/ears based on a 1963 extradition
treaty it has with the U.S.
IF THE extradition order is im-
plemented, Demjanjuk would be
the first Nazi war criminal ever
extradited to Israel for trial and
could face the death penalty if
found guilty of war crimes. Israel
tried and executed war criminal
Adolf Eichmann in 1961 after he
was captured by Israeli agents in
Buenos Aires.
Demjanjuk, a 65-year-old
retired automobile worker from
Cleveland, was stripped of his
U.S. citizenship in 1981, after be-
ing charged by the Justice Depart-
ment with having lied about his
past activities when he entered
the U.S. in 1952.
A District Court in Cleveland
confirmed his identity as the
brutal death camp guard known
as "Ivan the Terrible" to the in-
mates of Treblinka where he
allegedly tortured Jews and
operated the gas chambers.
HE WAS identified by Jewish
survivors of Treblinka and by a
former SS man, now a West Ger-
many resident, who knew him at
the Polish death camp. His
lawyers have contended that their
client is a victim of fraudulent
evidence manufactured by the
KGB.
In a related development, a
scheduled benefit dinner Sunday
night in a Buffalo, New York
suburb to aid the defense fund of
Demjanjuk was cancelled on ac-
count of poor weather conditions,
according to the chairman of the
group sponsoring the dinner.
Zenon Botnarskyj, identified as
the chairman of the Western
Branch of the Americans for
Human Rights in the Ukraine,
told a Buffalo newspaper that the
fund-raiser will be rescheduled,
although he said a date had not
yet been set. About 10 inches of
snow fell on the Buffalo area last
weekend.
act was a violation of the treaty. I
was not recalled or removed. I
simply returned to Israel to par-
ticipate in the Knesset elections.
The peace treaty stipulated that
both countries were to exchange
resident ambassadors. The Egyp-
tians chose not to keep their am-
bassador in Israel."
Concerning the present at-
mosphere in Cairo, Ben-Elissar is
guardedly optimistic. "I'm op-
timistic on the maintenance of
peace, but I'm not optimistic that
there will be an improvement in
relations. Right now, relations are
being kept at a low profile."
REGARDING JORDAN, Ben
Elissar said Israel is anxious to
enter into peace negotiations with
King Hussein, but only after Hus-
sein settles his domestic "Arab af-
fairs with Arafat. Until then,
there will be no peace."
"Israel has proven how much
we are ready to pay for a peace
treaty. We've given away the
whole Sinai to the Egyptians
oil, air force bases, military
facilities, everything all in the
cause of peace. There is no nation
in the world today that would give
away its oil resources for anything
in the world."
Ben-Elissar affirmed, however,
that Israel will not give away
anything his country considers en-
dangering to "our life, our ex-
istence in the Middle East."
Since the mass media were in-
strumental in spreading discon-
tent about the peace accords in
Egypt, could they be construed as
anti-Semitic?
"I CAN'T say the Egyptian
press is actually promoting anti-
Semitism," he said, adding that it
would be a violation of the peace
treaty to incite the populace
through misuse of the press. Still,
he doesn't think the Egyptian
media's relations with Israel are
going to improve.
When asked how his country
could justify resisting Egypt's re-
quest for the return of the resort
town of Taba, after giving away
the entire Sinai and all its oil and
military bases, Ben-Elissar
reversed the question.
"Why are the Egyptians strug-
gling over Taba? They have vowed
not to give up one single grain of
Sinai sand. We've given away all
but one square kilometer. There is
a procedure that must be follow-
ed. I wish there was a shortcut to
settling this, but our attitude is,
'Why give them more presents?' "
TWO SPY scandals in one
month, Ben-Elissar dismissed
simply as "something that hap-
pened amongst family. Some
things happen that shouldn't, but
there's no question about the fact
that this was a blunder."
He justifies Israeli involvement
only where thwarting Soviet in-
terests are concerned. "So much
espionage has been discovered
recently," he said. "It's been
unveiled in Britain and France as
well. These situations never smell
like Chanel Number Five on the
surface, officially, spying is
something that's not done, but
everyone knows it's widely done.
"I know we've acted wrongly,"
he confessed, "and on behalf of
my government, I offer an
apology."
NEVERTHELESS, maintain-
ing Israel's military strength is
foremost in the minds of most
Israelis, including Ambassador
Ben-Elissar. "Military force is the
difference between life and
death," he said.
"Had Israel been weak, Sadat
never would have signed the
Camp David accords. He
understood, and he was the first
Arab leader courageous enough to
draw the logical conclusion that
the Arab world, let alone Egypt,
can not defeat the State of
Israel."
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8 IDF Killed in Blaze Buried
As Thousands Mourn
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The eight Israeli soldiers
who were reported missing
in last week's predawn blaze
that swept through an army
barracks in Samaria were
found dead after
firefighters brought the fire
under control and made
their way through the rub-
ble. Seven other soldiers
(not 15 as inadvertently
reported) were injured,
none of them seriously.
Funeral services were held
Dec. 9 for the eight victims.
Thousands of people, friends,
relatives, as well as soldiers and
army officers, attended the
funerals in the cities in which the
eight men had resided. The blaze
was described as one of the worst
tragedies in the Israel Defense
Force within Israeli territory in
peacetime.
THE EIGHT dead were iden-
tified as Avraham Avizraz, of
Netanya; Yaacov Avragil, Tel
Aviv; Moshe Aharaon,
Mevasseret Zion; David Lankry.
Ashkelon; Roni Mazalevi, Ramie;
David-Hayim, Markewitz.
Jerusalem; Elhanan Nathan,
Jerusalem; and Daniel Shuval,
Jerusalem
The IDF has launched an inten-
sive investigation into the cause of
the fire at the Mavo Shiloh Ar-
tillery Corps base near Maale
Ephraim overlooking the Jordan
valley. The, cause of the fire has
not yet been established.
Maj. Gen. Amnon Shahak, who
is in charge of the Central Com-
mand, said the fire was probably
caused by a lit candle that might
have been knocked over acciden-
tally or by a cigarette that had
been left lit.
IDF INVESTIGATORS did not
immediately rule.out the possibili-
ty of terrorist action, but said this
was unlikely. An army official at
the camp said everything was be-
ing checked out. "Nobody heard
an explosion. There were guards,
but no one was seen running
away. It looks like it was an acci-
dent." Army trackers searched
the area but found no footprints
or any other sign of infiltration.
The fire spread through the
16-room barracks within a matter
of minutes as several dozen
soldiers were asleep. Most of the
soldiers escaped through win-
dows. Investigators said that the
blaze spread quickly because the
soldiers' sleeping quarters were in
prefabricated housing, made of
highly flammable material. The
speed with which the fire spread
and the intense heat, made rescue
work difficult and dangerous.
Rabin Vows There'll Be No More
Flammable Prefabricated Barracks
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin promised that
soldiers will no longer be
housed in flammable
prefabricated barracks such
as the one destroyed by fire
early last week in which
eight soldiers died, and
seven were injured. There
are thousands of such bar-
racks in army camps all over
Israel.
Rabin, who visited the scene, an
artillery corps camp in the
Samaria district of the West
Bank, said this was one of the
lessons learned from the tragedy.
Five of the injured soldiers have
been discharged from the
hospital. One remains in the inten-
sive care unit.
EIGHTY-FOUR soldiers were
asleep in the barracks, built of
wood and synthetic materials,
when the blaze broke out at 1 a.m.
and swept through the structure
in minutes. Most managed to
escape.
Heat prevented rescuers from
entering the barracks until later
in the morning when the remains
of the eight dead soldiers were
found. The Defense Ministry has
named a special team to in-
vestigate the disaster. It will
report to Chief of Staff. Gen.
Moshe Levy.
Meanwhile, anger was
generated in the Knesset when a
member of-the Orthodox Shas
Party contended that the tragedy
was divine retribution for the lack
of religious observance in Israel.
A similar explanation was given
for the deaths of two dozen high
school children in a train-bus colli-
sion earlier this year by Shas
leader Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz, the
Minister of Interior.
Low Inflation
Rise Noted
TEL AVIV (JTA) The con-
sumer price index rose by 0.5 per-
cent during November the
lowest monthly cost of living in-
crease in nine years, the Central
Bureau of Statistics announced
Sunday. The increase was due to
higher costs of clothing and
footwear, health costs, and house
upkeep, including municipal
rates, offset by seasonal reduc-
tions in the price of fruit and
vegetables.
Hi^H


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1985

A.T.S. Holds Annual Gala
(Seated) Charles Reskin, Mrs. Reskin, Mrs. Benjamin Botwinick. (Standing)
Mrs. Bess Stein, Lou Stein and Benjamin Botwinick, members of Board of
Directors.
(Left to right) Jerrold Goodman, Chairman of the Board of the Greater Miami
Chapter with Mrs. Goodman, Israel Consul General Yehosua Trigor and Mrs
Ruth Cohen and Sam H. Cohen, community leaders.
(Left to right) Sam B. Topf, Southern Regional Chairman with Mrs. Topfand
Mrs. and Mr. Al Isaacson, Vice President of the Greater Miami Chapter.
I 4
(From left to right) Shecky Greene, with Morris Kirsh and Ms. Linda SigaL In
the background Jerrold Goodman and Louis Stein
(Left to right) Mrs. Sondra Reiff, Shecky Greene, Hershel Rosen thai.
(Left to right) PegE. Gorson, Norman Gorson and Sonja Zuckerman.
(Left to right, George Feldenkreis, Dorita Feldenkreis, Eve Topf, Sam B. Topf. ,Left to right, Mr. .dS^S! Mr. a7!T^S^
(Left to right) Dade County Commissioner Barry Schreiber, Mrs. Schreiber
and Mr. Jay E. Leshaw, President of the Greater Miami Chapter.
"Almost 400 people attended the Greater Miami Chapter, American
Technion Society's Annual Gala at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel,"
announced Jay E. Leshaw, Chapter President and Chairman of the evening.
Hie program included blues singer Sandy Paton and headliner
Shecky Greene, who regaled the audience with his singing, dancing and
comedic humor.
"The lavish buffet supper and Viennese dessert table which was
'saidenbei-8^ ArtHur and Flrence Rosichan, and Florence and Theodore
Tr^tfiZ to lli- "rtwtainniBiit, was a gourmet's delight." Stated Sao
Vice President member of the Board of Governors and National
of fcwT^m?0nL.'l8?,el lMttute of Technology, located in Haifa, is one
corWh^F technploK1fal universities in the world, and is Israels most
Sm*$S*2* f ^hno,Pcal education and applied research.
Techmon d 8cientist8 "d engineers are graduates of
.


Jewish! Floridia.
Diami, Florida Friday, December 20,1985
Section B
Protecting Civil Liberties
AJCongress' Mann on Firing Line
By ERIC MOSS
,-wish Floridian Staff Writer
Theodore R. Mann, presi-
lent of the American
Jewish Congress, revealed
[hat his organization has fil-
fcd suit in Chicago to have
3th a menorah and a creche
Removed from public
property.
"We filed the suit in early
November," Mann said in an in-
erview with The Jewish Flori-
tan," and I'm sure this is the first
time we've been both counsel and
blaintiff in this type of major
privation.
MANN, a Philadelphia-born at-
arney specializing in constitu-
tional, anti-trust and securities
mud litigation, has successfully
pgued before the U.S. Supreme
nirt three of the most-influential
puea involving religious liberty:
[he Schempp public school Bible-
leading case, the Braunfeld Sun-
tfiiy blue-law case, and Lemn v.
iurtzmann. where the Court rul-
: kid to parochial schools.
Mann is also currently involved
ii a suit against the accounting
firm of Coopers and Lybrand on
ehalf of several hundred clients
yho were misled on the tax conse-
quences of a recommended
Investment.
"The Chicago suit represents
the most important issue of the
pas) .'i8 years," Mann said. "It's
pntical to the development of the
political personality of the
American Jewish community."
SYMBOLISM is the issue, par-
ticularly the symbols of Christiani-
Theodore Mann
ty throughout the nation. "It's
critically important that these
symbols never Income govern-
mental." he said. "This is the
same principle as a nativity scene
at a courthouse or Bible reading in
a school, or the Chanukah
menorah."
Obviously, the menorah is not a
Christian symbol. But Jews, Mann
believes, must oppose its use as a
symbol on public display to
which they reluctantly accede if
only to "counterbalance" the use
of Christian symbols during the
Christmas season. They must op-
pose it with the same vigor that
they muster, say, against the
Christmas tree, and for the very
same reason.
All of these issues are based on
the First Amendment as written.
"There is no more important func-
tion for American Jews than to
become part of the political effort
to defeat any attempt to permit
prayer in schools," Mann said.
MANN is also well-versed on a
wide variety of other issues.
Regarding the Rev. Jesse
Jackson's meeting with Soviet
Premier Mikhail Gorbachev on
behalf of Jewish political
prisoners, Mann said, "From the
moment I watched it on TV, it
struck me as an extraordinary
event for anyone to let a Russian
leader know that a Jewish issue is
also a concern to the entire world
community."
Nevertheless, Mann exphasized
the AJCongress will not "stay
quiet when he (Jackson) does his
(anti-Semitic) thing, and we don't
like it. But the ways he put this
issue to Gorbachev makes it an
American issue, and it's helpful to
the cause."
WHEN ISRAELI Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir denounc-
ed an AJCongress mission to
Cairo and Amman by saying that
Jewish organizations shouldn't
undertake political work except at
the behest of the Israeli govern-
ment, Mann was astounded.
"Every major political figure in
Israel, other than Meir Kahane,
supported us."
"Right now, there is a battle for
leadership of the unity Israeli
government; it's sort of two-
headed. Prime Minister Shimon
Peres is the main leader, and if he
and Secretary of State Shultz
hadn't approved of the mission,
we wouldn't have gone." Shamir,
who is Likud and No. 2 at this
time, is entitled to say what he
Continued on Page 2-B
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Division recent-
ly held its annual "Ruby 10" Luncheon in honor of those women
who made minimum gifts of $10,000 in the Pacesetter category to
the 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign. The women who attended the event collectively gave more
than $500,000. Seen at the Ruby 10 Luncheon were: (left to right)
Bunny Adler, honorary chairwoman of the event; Dorothy
Podhurst, Women's Division President; Gloria Scharlin,
Pacesetter chairwoman; and Paula Friedland, chairwoman and
hostess of the Ruby 10 Luncheon.
Temple Emanu-El Spiritual leader Rabbi Irving Lehman and
his wife Belle stand in front of the Lehrman Day School on 77th
Street in Miami Beach immediately following dedication
ceremonies. The newly renovated and expanded Lehrman Day
School represents a $2,000,000 investment.
Federation Issues Guidelines For Public Schools
Jeffrey L. Berkowitz, chairman
bf the Greater Miami Jewish
federation's Community Rela-
ions Committee (CRC), and Nan
tich, chairwoman of CRC's
mestic Concerns Committee,
kave announced the committee's
ssuing again guidelines to public
Jchools and officials developed to
^elp prevent programs which
Duld create embarrassment and
sychological discomfort for any
hild in the public schools as a
Jesuit of school activities surroun-
ling the winter holidays.
In letters sent to community
leaders and to officials of the Dade
County school system, Berkowitz
and Rich noted, "It is important
to realize that religious neutrality
allows all religious groups to
thrive and to prosper in our
democratic pluralistic society.
This year it is critical that we re-
main firm in our commitment to
the separation of church and
state, and it is essential that we
encourage our public schools to
maintain a high level of religious
neutrality."
"The CRC guidelines were
developed solely for the purpose
of better understanding the prin-
ciple of church and state as it ap-
plies to public schools and holiday
observances, and are in no way
meant to suggest that the separa-
tion of church and state has been
violated," said Berkowitz.
Rich indicated that the
guidelines have traditionally been
well received by school board of-
ficials. Janet R. McAiley, writing
on behalf of the Dade County
School Board, said, "Your letter
regarding religion and the public
schools is welcomed Thank
you for reinforcing this most
essential concept of separation of
church and state as it applies to
the Dade County Public Schools."
School board vice chairman,
Kathleen B. Magrath added, "I
wholeheartedly endorse the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's efforts to encourage sen-
sitivity to religious pluralism."
The guidelines contain a policy
statement, suggested public
school practices and an appendix
Rabbinic Guide to Parents
How To Answer Children's Christmas Questions
Each year during this holiday
eason, The Jewish Floridian
kublishes "A Guide for Jewish
prents Regarding Christmas" to
|elp parents resolve the conflict
nd confusion which the holiday
Joses for them and their children.
I The Guide is issued by the Rab-
'inical Association of Greater
liami.
Q. Isn't Christmas a national
loliday which all Jews can
Jbserve in good conscience?
A. Banks and government
trencies do close, but above all
fings, Christmas is a major
'hristian holy day which
elebrates the birth of Jesus, the
iristian Messiah. To suggest to
lur Christian friends that
phristmas is anything else would
presumptuous. Christmas is
rt in the same category as
hanksgiving Day, Fourth of Ju-
1. Decoration Day, or any other
American holiday. Since we do not
regard Jesus as our savior, we can
not in good conscience observe
Christmas. To do so is to violate
our religious principles.
Q.How do Christian
clergymen and the responsible
Christian laiety regard the
problem?
A. Responsible Christian
leaders bemoan the perversion of
the Christmas season and are try-
ing to do something about it.
Christian clergymen and laymen
constantly speak out against the
commercialization of the
Christmas celebration. It is a
religious holiday, and should be
regarded as such.
Q. Would it not be the better
part of discretin to "go along"
with our Christian neighbors,
een if it means observing
Christmas?
A. No matter involving viola-
tions of strong religious convic-
tions can be regarded as trivial or
minor. The true spirit of
Americanism would never compel
anyone to act in conflict with his
freedom of conscience. Our early
American forebearers came to
these shores precisely for the op-
portunity to worship G-d accor-
ding to the dictates of their
hearts.
Q. W What about the
Christmas tree?
A. The Christmas tree is
distinctively a Christmas symbol.
Since Christmas is for Christians,
the Christmas tree is appropriate
for Christians only. The
Christmas tree has no place in the
Jewish home, nor should any
Jewish child be compelled to par-
ticipate in observances involving
Christmas trees.
Q. Should Jewish children
participate in Christmas parties
in the public schools?
A. Parties designated as
Christmas parties or having the
appearance of Christmas parties
have no place in the public shools.
Winter or year end parties of a
general nature are acceptable.
Q. Is it appropriate to give
gifts to Christian friends?
A. It is appropriate to give
Christmas gifts to our Christian
friends. However, it is not ap-
propriate to present Christmas
gifts to Jews.
Q. Shuould Jewish children
participate in Christmas plays in
public schools?
A. No. Christmas plays general-
ly portray religious themes which
have no place in a public school.
Continued on Page 3-B
which summarizes how the United
States Supreme Court has ruled in
relation to religious practices and
the public schools. The guidelines
cover what schools may teach
about religion, religious programs
that may not be held under public
school auspices, discouraging joint
holiday observances (for example,
Christmas and Chanukah), en-
couraging non-sectarian music
programs and policies related to
excused absences for religious
holidays.
Berkowitz and Rich call upon in-
dividuals in the community who
encounter activities which they
perceive as violating the principle
of separation of church and estate
to communicate their concerns to
the Community Relations Com-
mittee. Copies of the guidelines
are available upon request.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Attorney's Divi-
sion held a reception in honor
of local county and federal
judges. Seen above are: (left to
right) Judge Gerald T. Wether-
ington. Chief Judge, 11th
Judicial Circuit, Dade County;
and Alan J. Kluger, co-
chairman of the event.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1985
Protecting Civil Liberties
Coatiaaed froea Pigt IB
wishes but the AJCongress had
the same right to do what it wish-
ed, he implied.
On the PLO's role in the Middle
East peace process. Mann said
that as long as the PLO is viewed
by Jordan. West Bank Palesti
mans, the Europeans, or the U.S.
as an essential part of the peace
process, there's not going to be a
peace process.
THE PALESTINIANS in the
West Bank and Gaza need to
select a person who truly wants to
co-exist with the Israelis." Mann
suggested. "Until they do. no ad-
vances can begin to happen." He
added that the black eye the PLO
received as a result of the Achille
Lauro piracy has caused the U.S.
to "begin to view the PLO as writ-
ten out of the process."
In response to the TWA sky-
jacking. Mann's office issued a
statement supporting President
Reagan's stand refusing to deal
with terrorists. "We've been sug-
gesting a strict legislative ap-
proach since the late seventies."
he elaborated, "with little suc-
cess." Although the AJCongress
has encouraged pilots to boycott
airports that are unsafe, legisla-
tion requiring airlines to exclude
these airports from their routes
has never gone anywhere. "The
time may be right for Congress to
get serious and realize that what
the President's been saying is
right."
Sinai Academy-
Students Place First
In Spelling Contest
Sixth grade students at Sinai
Academy. Temple Sinai of North
Dades liberal Jewish Day School.
took first place in the annual
Inter-School Spelling Contest,
sponsored by the Central Agency
far Jewish Education under the
direction of Mrs. Jean Gordon.
Eight South Florida Jewish Day
Schools participated in the recent
contest. Sinai winners were Viklri
ffristiinamn Cheryl Roth, Daria
Lidsky. and Kim Segall; Lisbeth
Klau was the alternate.
Sinai Academy, in existence
since 1981, will graduate its first
class, the sixth grade, in June.
The school, which began with 16
students has grown to 85.
Rabbi Julian I. Cook is the
school's director.
$ > a $
Ma-Ka
Seafood Dinner
Soup, steamed rice, tea
& ice cream
Or*, $8.95
your iwaMfWDOti for
754-3061
Concerning Israel's close ties
with South Africa in view of the
latter country's continuing racial
oppression. Mann summarized his
opinion succinctly. "No one has
asked them to break ties," he said,
adding that as a superpower, the
U.S. is in a position to use its
strength to help bring about
changes in South Africa.
"In fact. Mann said, "South
Africa's trade relations with other
countries, particularly those with
in Black African nations, are more
substantial than with Israel.
There is no evidence that Israeli
weapons have been used against
any Black African countries, so
why should Israel shoot itself in
the foot by breaking relations?"
BUOYED by his organization's
"burgeoning" membership, Mann
said. "American Jews are respon-
ding to our call. The AJCongress
has been around for 70 years, car-
rying on the tradition of our
founders. Rabbi Stephen Wise
and Justice Louis Brandeis. The
major part of our mission is
politicizing the American Jewish
community."
A year-and-a-half ago. the
AJCongress decided to seek at-
large members, recognizing that
regional offices were unable to
service the small groups of Jews
dispersed throughout the country.
A direct-mail campaign has been
'"extraordinarily successful."
Mann said.
"We're planning on a vast
membership increase in the next
couple of years," he said, adding
that numbers are going to be im-
portant when it comes to
"fighting OPEC's increasingly in-
fluence in the near future."
The American Jewish Con-
gress's Southeast Region office is
headed by President Norma
Orovitx recently-relocated Ronald
G. Conn serving as regional
director.
Federation Initiates Telephone Sponsorship
Program For Super Sunday
As part of "Super Sun-
day/Super Week," the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
massive annual phonaton on
behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund,
Federation this year has in-
stituted a new corporate
telephone sponsorship program.
For a one-time contribution of
$250. individuals or corporations
become Super Sunday/Super
Week Sponsors, in addition to
having their name, logo or
message permanently mounted on
telephones.
"Super Sunday is the single
largest effort on behalf of the
CJA-IEF Campaign, in which we
reach out to all of the members of
Greater Miami's community to
join with us in support of Jews
-throughout the world, said Aaron
-*Podhurst, 1986 general campaign
chairman. "It is important that
local businesses take their place
with individuals in the community
to make this statement of
solidarity."
"This year, the need which must
be met by the campaign are even
larger than ever before, and they
are continuously growing. On
Super Sunday, every one of us has
the opportunity to help meet those
needs." Podhurst added.
On Super Sunday, Feb. 2, more
than 3.000 volunteers will man
phones at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, from 9 a.m. to 9
p.m. During Super Week. Feb.
3-6, phones will be manned from
noon to 8 p.m. daily.
During last year's Super Sun-
day and Super Week, volunteers
raised $2 million through this
community-wide effort. Accor-
ding to Super Sunday/Super
Week co-chairmen Sabv Behar,
Judi Billig. Judge Robert H.
Newman, Ellen Rose and William
F. Saulson, this year's effort is ex-
Seen at a recent Super Sunday/Super Week planning meeting
were: (left to right) Co-Chairmen Ellen Rose, Judi BtUig. Saby
Behar and William F. Saulson,
pected to surpass previous efforts.
As part of Super Sunday, an Ex-
po Center will feature displays
and multi-media presentations by
Jewish agencies and organiza-
tions. The day also will be
highlighted by the participation of
promineoj celebrities and
dignitaries. Door prize drawings
will be held for all volunteers, and
free day care will be available for
volunteers with children.
VILLA DEL!
1608 Alton Rd.
538-4552
is
NOW OPEN ON SUNDAYS!
Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
also
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2



How Should Parents Answer
Children About Christmas?
Continued from Page 1-B
On the other hand, some schools
hold a so-called "Winter Festival"
in which an attempt is made to
avoid all religious connotations,
gut it is sometimes difficult to
draw the distinction. If the
parents feel that the performance
is free of all religious overtones,
children may certainly
participate.
Q. Should Jewish children
ting Christnuu carols?
A. No. Carols, being religious
hymns, do not belong in the public
school. Jewish children should not
be required to sing hymns which
embody a theology they do not ac-
cept. Neutral songs that have no
religious reference, however, are
acceptable.
Q. Do we harm oar children by
directing then not to
participate?
A. No. The classroom is one
among many places which reveals
\he existence of differences. We
further our children's personal
growth and maturity by teaching
them that they can respect the
faith of their neighbor without
embracing that faith. We can
clearly mark these differences by
such simple statements as, "This
is what we do," and "This is what
we do not do."
Q. What about other Jewish
children who participate in
Christmas observances in the
public schools?
. A. There are now, as there
always have been, parents who do
not accept the viewpoint of
responsible Jewish leadership.
They proceed on their own when
they permit their children to par-
ticipate in Christmas observances.
This confuses the children of
parents who do follow the
thoughtful recommendations of
Jewish leadership.
Fred D. Hirt
Fred Hirt Named
NAAJHHA
President Elect
Fred D. Hirt, executive director
of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens, was recently named as
President-Elect of the North
American Association of Jewish
Homes and Housing for the Aged
(NAAJHHA).
NAAJHHA is the nation-wide
organization of non-profit
facilities that provide residential
and long-term care for the elderly.
"Here and abroad, NAAJHHA
ls a respected advocate for the
welfare of the elderly," noted Mr.
Hirt. "Its membership roster
ooasts some of the finest geriatric
facilities in the world, all of which
*ork toward one common goal
""proving the quality of life for
our elderly. I am honored to have
been nominated for this office by
gNttae I hold in such esteem."
Mr. Hirt has been Executive
wector of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
since 1969. During this time, he
has made significant contributions
toward improving the quality of
llfe for Florida's elderly.
Jewish parents will help their
children most if they (1) accept
diversity in the ranks of Jewry as
a normal condition in the
American environment; (2) know
and understand the thinking of
responsible Jewish leadership and
recognize that most parents are
anxious to follow it; and (3) assure
their children that despite the par-
ticipation of some Jewish
children, Jewish leaders have
taken a strong position for non-
participation in observances of a
holiday not their own, and that
this is also their position.
Q. Would not the entire pro-
blem be solved in the public
school by joint Christmas and
Chanukah celebration?
A. No. It is a violation of the
Constitution to observe any sec-
tarian holiday in the public school,
be it joint observance or other-
wise. We do not correct an error
by compounding the error.
Q.Should Chanukah be
celebrated in the public schools?
A. No. To do so violates the
Constitution, uses the taxpayer's
money for sectarian purposes, and
jeopardizes the principle of the
separation of church and state,
without which there can be no
religious freedom.
Sudan Moves To
Block Departure of
Ethiopian Jews
LONDON (JTA) Sudanese
officials have called for increased
vigilance in order to thwart at-
tempts by Ethiopian Jews in
Sudanese refugee camps to escape
to Israel, the World Jewish Con-
gress reports.
According to monitoring
sources of the WJC here, the of-
ficial Sudanese radio, last week,
aired demands by local officials
for tighter surveillance of volun-
tary relief organizations working
in the refugee camps, "to prevent
the departure of more Falasha
Jews" from camps in the Awa,
Aru and Wad Sherifi areas.
The Dec. 2 broadcast also
reported that "large groups of
Falasha Jews are still coming" to
eastern Sudan in order to escape
the devastating famine and civil
war in Ethiopia.
Graduates Reunion
Young Judea, Hashachar will
hold a reunion for all graduates of
the program from 1981 and prior,
on Sunday, Dec. 29 at 11 a.m. at
the home of Jack H. Levine. The
event is a celebration of the 75th
birthday of the Hadassah spon-
sored zionist youth movement.
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Talmudic U. Alumni To Be
Honored At Anniversary Dinner
Nine alumni of Talmudic
University of Florida who live and
work in the Greater Miami area
will be guests of honor at the 11th
Anniversary dinner of the Miami
Beach-headquartered university
Sunday, Dec. 29, at the Crown
Hotel.
One of their number also will be
principal speaker at the banquet
which will mark the granting of
honorary doctorates to Beach
civic and religious leaders David
Balogh and Prof. Jacquin
Bierman.
Rabbi Yossi Haber, principal of
a the junior and senior high schools
of the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy and spiritual leader of
Knesset Israel Congregation of
Miami Beach, has been selected by
his fellow alumni to represent
them at the dinner.
Announcement of his selection
was made by Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig, president and Rosh
Hayeshiva of Talmudic University
of Florida, the largest Jewish in-
stitution of higher learning in the
South.
Other alumni who will be
honored include Robert N.
Rosenberg, Rabbi Aryeh Zak,
Rabbi Zvi Rosenbaum, Rabbi
David Gray, Rabbi Shimshon Min-
dick, Michael Levi, Rabbi Shaya
Greenberg, and Rabbi Binyomin
Rachmani.
Rabbi Heber is former spiritual
leader of Congregation Etz Chaim
in Miami Beach, and is enrolled in
a doctoral program in educational
administration at Florida Interna-
tional University. He earned a
BBA degree at FIU, a masters
degree in school administration at
FIU and became a certified public
account in 1978.
JWV Post Treat Vets
To Dolphin Game
Jewish War Veterans of
U.S.A., Post 440 of Boynton
Beach, will treat the paraplegic
veterans who are confined at the
Miami Beach Veterans Hospital,
to a day watching the Miami
Dolphins vs. Buffalo Bills football
game at the Orange Bowl on Sun-
day, Dec. 22.
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries opon at 8:00 A.M.
-------------\ /
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Danish
Christmas Tree
Coffee Cake
.
$4
24-02: Lm
size ~
50
"\ r
Available at Publix Store* with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pecan Pie
8-locn ^f
size
59
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Festively Decorated
Wreath, Tree
or Bell Cake
$VI50
each
4
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Fruit Stollen.................. St 2*
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 ^ $ 1"
Powdered Sugar
Mini Donuts...................IK*!"
Quantity
Rights Reserved ^
'^jm&' v-->-- / a^TTt:

'
...>.'<>

Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie..................W1*
Mince Pie...................... ST*!*
Dinner Rolls.............12 tor 89*
Wagon Wheel
Dinner Rolls................12 tor $1
Parkerhouse or
Cloverleaf Rolls.......12 m*V*
Gingerbread houses are available to be ordered now.
Display as a centerpiece for the entire holiday season.
$15.95
Order Now! German Lebkucken (Honey Cake) in an
assortment of packages is available.
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen, bake and
serve hors'd oeuvres for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
50-Ct. pkg........................................................... $11.95
100-Ct. pkg.......................................................... $19.95
Prir* Rfective
Dectiiu*dr19thr 4.1985.


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1985
Nova's Veep
Happy About Univ. Accreditation
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Dr. Stephen L. Golds-
tein, Nova University's vice
president for University
Relations and Development,
announced Dec. 4 his in-
stitution's ten-year reac-
creditation by the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools. The news coincides
with the 21st anniversary of
Nova's founding.
Goldstein, whose respon-
sibilities include overseeing
Nova's public relations,
marketing and fund-raising, was
somewhat relieved by the news,
which came at a time when
adverse publicity surrounding
several controversial programs at
the Fort Lauderdale institution
could have jeopardized the ac-
creditation process.
"All of our programs were
reviewed and scrutinized during
the accreditation and licensing
procedure." he said, refuting the
naysayers who had criticized the
university's innovative approach
to higher education.
TWO PROGRAMS in par-
ticular have come under fire
recently: the Educational Leader
concept and the Graduate Educa-
tion Modules (GEM) program that
allows students to attend classes
on Saturdays, at night, during
holidays and on satellite cam-
puses. GEM students are also of-
fered the choice of writing a
Israel Bonds To
Honor Couple
At Jade Winds
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Miriam
and Marvin Gross on Sunday,
Dec 29. at the Jade Winds con-
dominium during a special
"Salute to Israel." Sponsored by
the Jade Winds Israel Bond Com-
mittee, the event will begin at
9:30 a.m. at the Jade Winds
Tower Auditorium. North Miami
Beach.
Recognized for their involve-
ment in philanthropic and com-
munity organizations, as well as
their support of the Israel Bond
program, the Grosses will receive
the Israel Freedom Award. In
1976. the couple was honored by
the Israel Bond Organization in
Buffalo, receiving the David Ben
Gurion Award.
Marvin is an active Board
member of the Dedication Lodge
of B'nai B nth. the Jade Winds
Men's Club and the Horowitz Post
of Jewish War Veterans. Addi-
tionally, he has been a volunteer
in the Emergency Room at the
Parkway Medical Center for more
than six years.
A Life Member of Hadasamh.
Miriam currently serves as a
Board member and ADL Chair-
maa of B'nai B'nth. a former
of ORT and a cur
of the Jade Winds
Wobmb's Club.
Together. Miriam and Marvin
art captanis of the United Way.
members of both the
Red Mami David and
Cimgiwgifwn
wH be Dade
Barry
aad Amb. Zvi Broah.
The National Anthem aad
Hatsvafc wfl be sung by Harriet
hwS'
Mostoff. A branch
Acting as chairman is Irving
FeJdman. Co-Chairmen are Her-
miooe Spahn. Bernard Graber and
Isaac "Pat" Herah.
thesis, or doing a practicum.
where they actually implement
their research in classroom
situations.
"They are bringing down the
quality of doctoral work in educa-
tion in this country," said Penn-
sylvania State University's
Donald Willower in the national
media prior to the ^accreditation
announcement.
One former GEM student
agreed with Willower's assertion:
"Sure the value of the degree is
lowered," according to Arthur D.
Diamond, Science Department
chairman at Miami Lakes Junior
High. "In my opinion, the univer-
sity buckled under to pressure
from minorities to make it as easy
as possible to get an advanced
degree. It's like going to Laverne
and Shirley University."
Diamond, one of the first GEM
students to enroll in the unor-
thodox program, believes that
although Nova's curriculum must
meet state rules, these rules are
too broadly interpreted. "Take
their MBA (Masters in Business
Administration) program for ex-
ample. It's not at the same level as
other universities in the state. If
an employer is considering hiring
someone with an MBA from Nova
or the University of Miami, my
guess is they'd hire the person
fromUM."
DESPITE Nova's reputation as
a "diploma mill," Goldstein
believes his school is maligned, in
much the same way as the UM's
"Suntan U" identification created
negative perceptions of that in-
stitution years ago, along with
"Cardboard College."
"In order to be pioneers, we
have to take risks," he said. When
he arrived as a consultant in 1978,
the negativism expressed by col-
leagues in academia didn't square
with what he saw. "I found that
the people here are committed to
doing a good job under bad cir-
cumstances a better job, in fact,
than people at supposedly non-
controversial institutions.
Everyone here is aware of the
enormous potential we have. I pic-
ture what a great university we
can be."
All three of Goldstein's degrees
are from Columbia University,
and his seven years as a faculty
member and administrator at the
University of Maryland attest to
his familiarity with great
Continued on Following Page
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Women's Division AFHU Luncheon
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Greater Miami Women's Divi-
sion, American Friends of the
Hebrew University held a lun-
cheon meeting on Thursday, at
11:45 a.m. at the Sans Souci
Hotel.
Betty Schaffer, chairman of the
afternoon session, announced the
program would be a presentation
by Gerald C. Crane, director of
the American Friends of the
Nova's Veep
Happy About
Accreditation
Continued from Preceding Page
universities.
"If I weren't proud of this place,
I wouldn't be here," he said.
"There are some people who look
at our campus, and all they see is a
bunch of vacant scrubland and a
few buildings. We're building this
institution to last forever, and
were not going to waste the land.
This scrub is our future, and you
can't build the future carelessly."
MISPERCEPTIONS of Nova
don't affect Goldstein's fund-
raising efforts. "My job is to help
people create a different, more
constructive perception of this
school by showing the oppor-
tunities, the successes, the com-
mitment to integrity here. I pro-
vide information enabling people
to make an intelligent opinion of
Nova."
"We have nothing to hide
here," he continued. Community
members are welcome to visit the
campus to "get the true picture"
of the university's financial and
academic programs.
According to Goldstein, a "new
exuberance" at Nova has been a
by-product of improvements in
the school's finances, reputation
and academic quality. Some
lingering negativism remains,
however. "Now we're united
against a common enemy
negativism. We are no longer
laboring under a siege mentality
and I expect people to be
positive."
GOLDSTEIN predicts a rosy
future for Nova. Most important,
Goldstein wants Nova to "take a
leadership role in higher educa-
tion nationwide."
His concept of the university as
a place for dialogue between
South Florida's diverse cultures is
a reflection of his own cultural
awareness. Born in New Haven,
Conn., the 42-year-old attended
Temple Mishkin, Israel, one of the
oldest Reform synagogues in that
region. Rabbi Robert E. Goldberg,
spiritual leader, was a friend of
Author Arthur Miller and con-
verted Marilyn Monroe to
Judaism prior to her marriage to
Miller.
Another objective Goldstein has
set at the Fort Lauderdale cam-
pus is establishing an Institute of
Social Issues that would invite
people to discuss topics related to
social justice and human rights.
ALTHOUGH HE said he hasn't
encountered any anti-Semitism
during his tenure at Nova, he did
recall an incident while on the
staff at the University of
Maryland. "One time, at a party,
someone made a reference to the
'liberal Jewish media conspiracy'
that really made me think. I just
can't tolerate injustice."
PHILOSOPHICALLY, Golds
tein sees parallels between the
reaction to immigration now and
during World War II. "For some
reason," he said, "it's more
palatable for some people to ac-
cept extermination than to deal
"ith an influx of immigrants. I
can't believe how some South
Floridians whose families were
killed in the Holocaust are mong
the first to say, "These people are
undesirable,' when a boatload of
refugees lands. How short are
people's memories?"
Hebrew University, Palm Beach
Office formerly assistant dean of
New York University School of
Crane's subject at this luncheon
meeting wr.ll be "The Quest for
Peace Through Higher Educa-
tion. Crane helped create a pro-
gram between Israel and
moderate Arab countries on the
legal aspects of the Transfer of
lecnnology; a seminar program
between Hebrew University Law
hchool and legal experts from
African and Asian countries after
the six day war.
Members of the committee an-
nounced by Mrs. Schaffer include
Viola Charcowsky, Ruth Platt,
Irene Raczkowski, Stella Topol,
Helen Katzman and Sara Anchin.
The 11:45 session, which is open
to the public is being coordinated
by Florence D. Feldman, director
of the Greater Miami Women's
Division.
FIU Announces
$1 Million Eminent
Scholars Chair
Florida International Universi-
ty President Gregory B. Wolfe
has announced the establishment
of the university's first eminent
scholars chair, the Edna Gene and
Jordan Davidson Eminent
Scholars Chair in the Humanities.
The chair is made possible
through a $1 million endowment,
including a $600,000 gift from Ed-
na Gene Davidson and the late
Jordan Davidson and $400,000 in
matching funds from the State of
Florida Eminent Scholars
Program.
Native Floridian Celeste
Harare Muir, 36, has been ap-
pointed Dade County Judge by
Governor Bob Graham follow-
ing her selection by the
Judicial Nominating Commis-
sion. Mrs. Muir, a Coconut
Grove attorney and civic
leader, will begin serving Jan.
1 in the new judicial seat
established by the 1985 session
of the Florida legislature.
Amit Women
Plan Meetings
Migdal Chapter of Amit Women
will hold a luncheon on Wednes-
day in the card room of the Forte
Towers Building.
Simcha Chapter of Amit
Women will hold a luncheon
meeting on Monday at the
Winston Towers.
Shoshana Chapter of Amit
Women will hold a luncheon
meeting on Tuesday at the
Seacoast Towers, Miami Beach.
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS
7 days 4:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m.
Vi Broiled Chicken..................$5.25
Fillet of Sole........................$4.75
Baked Meatloaf.....................$4.75
__________Includes Potato. VjyjeteMo Club Salad_________
Bring In or mention this ad for your 10% discount
off any Item.
MHUpwi> ONtrEukN
iar*M6
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1601 Blecayne Blvd.
Miami Phone: 358-8700
GRAND OPENING!
drdjeonous
A Miami Beach Jeanery
2214ColllnsAve.
538-1744
Featuring: Levi's, Edwin, Pepe, Nol, Union Bay & Morel
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Indian Orchard
Pennsylvania
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF REGISTRATION
FOR THE 1986 CAMPING SEASON
REGISTER NOW! BEFORE FEBRUARY 1st FOR SPECIAL DISCOUNT
in. SSMSSSSW of Modem lataal
An advantura In MSjSW BSSM "*
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Eiportontlal Looming
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SERVING JEWISH YOUTH FOR MORE THAN 50 YEARS
Alan Sllwmsn, Director 25 West 2Mh Street, New York, N.Y. 10010
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Sponaorod by Bnol Akla ol North Amortf anal WaSgloua Zlonlla o> Amartca
Comptata Sporta Praoyam
Mw> Pool ft Complata Wataflronl
Nalura, Camping. Mualc. Oanca. Orama
3i/i/w4ti*ig Nachman Arluck Cultural Circle will meet on Friday, Dec. 27 at
American Savings. Morris Becicer, Lector Reglma Balln, singer, and
Helen Scolnick at the piano, will perform, according to Morris Fisher,
vice president of the circle who will conduct the meeting.
Beth Israel Congregation will hold the second lecture of the
1985-1986 Series on Sunday at 10 a.m. in the Temple Auditorium.
Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud will speak, according to Rabbi Meir
Felman, chairman of the cultural committee of the temple.
Jewish Community Centers of Greater Miami will volunteer their
time for the "Help Your Neighbors Celebrate Christmas" program on
Tuesday, beginning at 9 a.m. and then again on Christmas Day.
Adath Yeshurun will present Amy~Goldsteln, student at the Manhat-
tan School of Music and Lucy Arner of the University of Miami on
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the temple.
Ruth Foreman Theatre will present the 1984 Tony Award winning
musical, "Baby," written by Sybllle Pearson, opening Thursday, Jan.
2 at 8 p.m. Bob Bogdanoff, Carbonell award winner, will direct; Kay
Brady, will star. Music and lyrics are by David Shire and Richard
Maltby Jr., respectively. ----------
Miami Dade Public Library System will display a painting of Pablo
Picasso, Homage To Picasso, by Miami artist, Jonas Gerard, In the
lobby of the new Main Library in the Metro Dade Cultural Center.
Gerard painted Homage, in remembrance of the late artist, and In
conjunction with the Picasso exhibit at the Center for the Fine Arts.
Camp Mountain Lake will hold a party and reunion on Sunday at 1
p.m. at the Marco Polo Hotel, Compass Room, Miami Beach.
The Royal Hungarians
RESTAURANT
Glatt Koeher
i PtMid stt nfan hate> |fii.
st am BesuUTwl Sss eon Hotel
FRtOAYHtQHTOMHtMmWftPAlOMpj*
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Organizations: Inquire About Our Facilities For Luncheons
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Mien fn Browtrd visit our new location at 342 So. Stata Rd. 7, Margata
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R ESTAURAMT
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3^- A Musical Comedy Cabaret Show
Featuring the great songs of Brice Tucker
Jolson and Cantei1
Sung by an all New York cast
Tues -Sun 8 pm Wed & Sun 2 pm
Fn & Sat Late Show at 10 30 pm
Tickets $15 & $12 50 (2 free drinks)
CLUB SANS SOUCI SANS SOUCI HOTEL
31st and Collins Ave Miami Beach
For reservations and group discounts call
(305)674-8774
Tickets also available a! Bass Cutlets
orTIXby-Phone Dade 633-BASSor
Broward 741-3000 and at a.: Select-n-Seat
Outlets inci Jordan Marsh stores
Dade 625-5100 or Browaid 462-7900


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1985
Cherie Hutman Space Station Project Engineer
Ambassador Thomas Pickering, United States envoy to Israel,
greets Harriet Green, left, national vice president of Na'amat
and Sylvia Snyder of Delray Beach, member of the Na'amat
chairman for the Southeastern area. Mrs. Green, of Coral Gables
and Miami Beach, is president of the South Florida Council of
Na'amat USA, the Women's Labor Zionist Organization of
America.
Miami Beach Bar Elects Officers
Cherie Hutman
Miss Cherie Hutman recently reported to K
nedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, where she?"
employed in the System Software Section as Soar
Station Project Engineer. "
The Design Engineering Division of the Soap*
Station project is the only division in NASA where
the civil servants co-operate on design with in
dependent contractors. She is currently workin
on data control systems and the application of ar
tificial intelligence to robotics.
Miss Hutman is a May graduate of the Universi
ty of Miami where she was conferred the Bachelor
of Electrical Engineering degree, and later
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science in
August.
Miss Hutman's senior project, incorporated
robotics and artificial intelligence in the design and
construction of a micro-processor based robot
which successfully found its way out of a maze and
stored this information in its memory bank for
future application.
Miss Hutman served as both treasurer and vice
president of the Institute of Electrical and Elec-
tronics Engineers (IEEE) while at the University
of Miami.
Miss Hutman, a 1980 graduate of the Hebrew
Academy, is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Burton
Hutman of Miami Beach.
Miami Beach's Bar Association
recently held its annual Installa-
tion Luncheon, with the following
new officers sworn in by Past
President: Howard Gross,
Jonathan D. Beloff, president, S.
Harvey Ziegler is president-elect,
Leonard Lewis first vice-
president; David J. Berger second
vice president, Stephen Cypen
treasurer, Sally Spindel
secretary, and Im S. Krieger,
historian of the Bar.
New members of the Board of
Directors are: Jeffrey Barash,
Allen Fuller, Lawrence Fuller,
Abraham Galbut, James R.
Sabatino, Ivar Starr, Sherri R.
Samberg, Bruce Singer, Robert
Switkes, Scott Jay, Judge
Leonard Rivkind, Arthur D.
Frishman, Joel Newman, Norman
K. Schwartz, Harry Zukernick,
Lyle D. Holcomb Jr., Judge
Howard Gross and Harry
Tempkins.
Joseph J. Reiter, president-elect
of the Florida Bar, delivered the
keynote address.
Engagement
COHENSCHMIDT
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis F. Cohen of
Miami, announce the engagement
of their daughter, Dianne, to Ed-
ward Leslie Schmidt, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles H. Schmidt of
Great Neck, New York.
Miss Cohen attended Tulane
University and will graduate in
May from Florida International
University with a BS in Dietetics
and Nutrition. Mr. Schmidt is a
graduate of the University of
Miami Business School with a
BBA in Finance.
Birth Announcement A June wedding in planned.
Rabbi Mayer and Rachel
Abramowitz, of Temple Menorah
are the proud grandparents of
identical twins, born December 13
to Dr. Steven and Dahlia Op-
penheimer. Eli and Joshua were
born; each over five pounds.
Community Corner
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater Miami will continue their "Cof-
fee, Culture, and Conversation" program on Sunday morning at
10:30 a.m. at the temple. Rabbi Louis C. Littman will speak on,
"The state of Reform Judaism," according to Rabbi Harry Jolt!
Auxiliary Rabbi in charge of the Adult Education Series.
Isaiah Chapter of the American Red Magen David will hold a
cocktail reception on Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at the Jade Winds Con-
dominium. Pnina Lipsky will speak to members and contributors
on "Yiddish Humor."
The Isaac Bashevis Singer Yiddish Cultural Club will meet on
Thursday, Dec. 26 at 1:30 at the Surfside Community Center.
Irene Lieblich, illustrator of Singer's books, will be guest
speaker.
707 ME Btti SfrMt. Ft Laud*
THE PARKER PLAYHOUSE
NOW thru SUN., JAN. 5
Jerome Kern's Joyous Musical
* Thomas GruanawaM
OPERA HOUSE
CmRSIT-BY-PHONE -.*, <~r..~ 1-800-468-3
TICKETS ON SALE AT ALL SELECT-A-SEAT LOCATIONS
For Theater Parties or Corporate Information. Call 764-4904
New Year Eve Menu
For 10 PM Sitting
MA FOLIE RESTA URANT
J^^^fe FRENCH CUISINE
1045 95th .Street, Bay Harbor Island
Miami Beach
Tef, 865-6011
**A(4u>ne SfmmSacti oBitQH*
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JMe/ ot &lac6 Ba*nA ffiougueltete
> Afa/vole^n
^afevt Pen
$75 fat tio + / faille cAatn/taptie
A t our 6 'oclock and 8 o 'clock sitting
we will serve our regular a la carte menu.
Better bodies don't
always make better backs.
Toe touches may be great for the
waist, but they are very hard on
your back. So are many
of the exercises we do
today to stay in shape.
Even simple activities
of daily living can put
great stress on our backs.
The St. Francis Hospital
Back School & Fitness
Course helps people,
especially people with
minor back pain, learn
to exercise safely and
to protect their backs
from injury. The 4-week
course is taught by an
orthopedic physician
and registered physical
therapists. Class fee
isS90.
The Back School & Fitness
Course is a program of the
St. Francis Hospital Spine
'Center, an outpatient
facility for the treatment
of back pain and injury.
The Center's staff takes a
conservative approach to treat-
ment, using gentle mobilization
techniques, physical therapy,
exercise and education.
lb register for the
Back School ft Fitness
Course, or to find out more
about the St. Francis
Hospital Spine Center,
call 868-2797.
THE
Back School
*Spine Center.
($)
Stfiwcis^ 2
290 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach, FL 33141
Life. Be in it


r
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
%io/m Of The Weekly Torah Portion
J... "And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they had
Igotten in the land of Canaan, and came into Egypt, Jacob, and all
\his seed with him"
(Genesis U6.6).
VAYIGASH
IvAYIGASH JUDAH approached Joseph and offered himself
las a servant in Benjamin's stead, as he was responsible for the
youngest son to their father. Unable to contain himself any
longer, Joseph revealed himself to his dumb-struck brothers. He
bade them return to Canaan, gather together their families and
possessions, and return to Egypt for the duration of the famine.
At Beersheba God removed Jacob's doubts as to the wisdom of
this course of action; He appeared to Jacob with the words: "Fear
hot to go down into Egypt; for I will there make of thee a great
ration" (Genesis U6.S). Jacob came to Egypt "with seventy
souls." Joseph gave them the land of Goshen to settle in. There
|they flourished and multiplied.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of tht Law it extracted and based
hpon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage,'' edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, Sis, publish** by Shengold. Th* volume is available at 7s Maiden
ane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
puting the volume.)
lajor Israeli university seeks full-time
loutheastern Area Director
\o be based in Miami/Ft. Lauderdale area.
Exciting career opportunity for self-starter,
person to person solicitation and organiza-
tional skills essential. Knowledge of South
Florida a must. Ability to organize and
notivate volunteers. All replies confidential.
Send resume to S. Ross, Suite 104,
535 W. Commercial Blvd., Tamarac, FL 33319
>EN HEART SURGERY
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The FLORIDA CENTER FOR PLASTIC SURGERY
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CALL 961-5500
4001 HOLLYWOOD BLVD.,
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Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
anning for the Gala New Year's Celebration for the Isaiah
BEof itJnru^n V ^ DavU '<" w ST
feUmrne Hotel of Miami Beach are, from left to riaht ,/,
C an IsaiaA Chapter Board MenuJrTSJSi ?rT&Z
W of Food Serves attheShelboume; Edna KalToThe
^ainment Committee of the Jade Winds CondomdiuZ
after ofARMDI of North Miami Beach.
Michael Rosengmus
MICHAEL ROSENGAUS
Michael Rosengaus, son of Mrs.
Nilda Rosengaus, was called to
the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
November 16 at Beth Torah
Congregation.
The celebrant is an eighth grade
student at John F. Kennedy
Junior High School in North
Miami Beach. Michael also at-
tends the Judaica High School at
the Benny Role Campus of Beth
Torah, where he is a Hey class
student.
JILL WEIN8TEIN
Jill Weinstein, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Weinstein, will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah at Shabbat Services on
Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbis Gary Glickstein, Leon
Kroniah, Harry Jolt and Paul
Caplan will officiate. Jill is a student of the Confirma-
tion Class of 5748.
David Shein To
Head El Al's
U.S. Operations
Rafi Harlev, president of El Al
Israel Airlines, announced the ap-
pointment of David Shein as vice
president and general manager
for North and Central America,
effective Dec. 23.
Baruch Lilo, most recently with
Foreign Tours, a major tour
operator, will replace Shein as
deputy general manager.
"David Shein's extensive and
varied experience with El Al has
been an important asset to the
airline. As head of our North and
Central American operations, I'm
confident that his leadership and
marketing abilities will plot a win-
ning course for us during a very
competitive time in the travel in-
dustry," said Harlev. "His talents
are especially important now as
we enter one of the most ag-
gressive marketing phases in our
history."
Shein joined El Al in 1952 in the
engineering department during
the earliest days of the Israeli na-
tional carrier. He saw the airline
through its first demanding years
to its current, prominent position
as a leading international carrier.
In 1978, Shein was appointed
vice president of maintenance and
engineering in Israel. As
technology in the airline industry
was rapidly changing, he met a
variety of engineering challenges
in this position, including El Al's
switch from C-46s to 767s. Four
years later, Shein became vice
president of human resources and
administration. During this period
in 1982, he was responsible for
reorganizing the airline's man-
power when El Al resumed ser-
vice after four months of suspend-
ed operations due to union strikes.
David Shein received his degree
in electronic engineering from the
University of London and a
master's in business administra-
tion from Tel Aviv University.
Miami Crisis Line In
Need Of Volunteers
Switchboard of Miami's Crisis
Line "is urgently in need of more
community volunteers who are
willing to help answer the phones.
I'm concerned about those who
are trying to reach us, but can't
get through," said George McKin-
ney, director of the crisis line.
Telephone calls have increased 22
percent over the same six months
period (May-Oct.) as a year ago.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:13 p.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Baach
534-7213 534-7214 _
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi \
Mosha Buryn. Cantor l JI
Sergio Groblar, President
Sholam Epalbaum. President.
Religious Committee
Shabbat Service. 1:30 a.m.
SMIIHMI 10:30.
Daily Mlnyan
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Garden. Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Fraadman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Frl. p.m Late Servtcee
Saturday 1:30 a.m.
Sabbath Swvtc.6p.in.
Bar Mltivah J.llr.y Kahan.
TEMPLE BETH AM
SM0 N. Kendall Or.
& Miami 667-6667
Or. Harbart Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Jama* L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Fit. 6:15 p.m. Sabbath Swvto*.
RabM BAumgard will apeak on th. theme.
"Th. Importance ol Sharing Your Jewish
Eipertenoee."Set. a:16 a.m. Bel Mitzvah,
Katharine Thurer. Sal. 11:15 a.m. Bar Mltivah.
Darren Wrabel, MIchaai Weinteid
Sermon thama, "Qlvl ng ol OneselI "
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Baach
Or. Irving Lahrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Barger
Yehuda Srtlf man. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Frt. services 6 p.m
Sat 9 a.m. Alumni Sabbath, dedic. led to
Lahrman Day School gradual.*. Or. Lahrman
im apeak on ''Th. weekly portion ol th. BIN..'
Dally tennoaa el 8 s .m. and 6 p.m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONG REGATION
2400 Plnatree Drive, Miami Baach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schtfl
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avanue
Dr. Sol Landau, *g>.
Rabbi Emeritus (VJ
Rav. Milton Freemen. *S-
Rltual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
Shabbat eve aarvlc. 5:30 p.m. Sal. 9 a.m.
Rabbi Landau'a aarmon, "How Integrity Dalaata
Daapalr." Kldduah follows Dally Services.
Sun. 6 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon. and Thura.
7:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.. Tues.. Wad., and
Frt. 7:46 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
RabM Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krlssel
Roaa Berlin: Executive Secretary
658-6334
Frt. 6:15 p.m. RabM Max Shapiro f8b*)
will discuss. "Whara Ara W,'
Our Friends?1
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. PL 33181
8915506 Conservative
Dr. laraal Jacobs. Rabbi
Rabbi Joseph A. Gorfinkel. '
Rabbi Emeritus
Mosha Priadlar, Cantor
f>
Sat. 10:30 a.m. Rabbi's sermon. "Old Wine
In New Bottles Bar Mitzvah, Matbew Green*.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeflerson Ava., M.B., FL 3313S
Tel. 536-4112
RabM Dr. Jahuda Matbax
Cantor Nlaaim Banyamini
Dally services 6 a.m. a 6:10 p.m. Sat. 8:16 a.m.
Rabble classes Monday Advanced Hebrew
9:30 a m Tues. English Bible Class 8:45 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
75O0S W 1201h Street
236 2601 "
Rabbi David H Auerbach \W)
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul Meisels
Shabbat Services Frt. p.m. Sat. 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chaaa Ava. 41at St. .536 7231
Oft LEON KRONISH. RABBI I .he.al
HARRY JOLT AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL 0 CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVIS6R
Frt. 8:16 p.m. RabM Qllcksteln will apeak on.
"Anwtce: noinleed Land Or Ooehen?
Sat. 10:46 a.m. Bat Mitzvah, Jill Weinstein
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Or. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
! Harvey L. Br--/t, Exec Director
Dally eervlce 7:30 a.m.. 5:10 p.m.
Frl. eery. 6:15 p.m.
Late eerv. 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Greater Miami
MratrYII 1 PIO**#ajf R#iO"n COOfl76)flja>ffOrl
137 NE. 19th St.. Miami. S73-SB00
MM N. Kendall Or.. 595-5055
Senior RabM HaskeJI Bamat
Assistant Rabbi Rax 0. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstatn
AaaociatB Cantor BachBia F. Nation
Executive Director Philip S. Qotdin
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks.
Downtown Rabbi Re D Perimeter Conteealoni
Ol a Dynasty Junkie '' Liturgy: Cantor
Jacob O. Borratetn.
Kendall RabM Massell M. Bamat "la Kehsne
Really Jewleh Fstrakhan?'
Cantor Rechetle F. Nelson
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
Friday services 8:1 S p.m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Servlcee Frt. 7:30 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayor AMamowlu ,_,
Cantor Murray Yavnah ,'Jjf\
Morning services 8 a.m. H*-'
Friday late evening service
8:18 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:46 p.m.
TEMPLE NERTAMIO 666-6345
7902 Cirlyle Ave., 866-9633
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz Coneanat.v.
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Services 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Frl. late serv 8 p.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Baach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0898
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem onnodo.
RabM Kasitl will temporarily conduct
aepatste servlcee Bat. 9-30 a.m. at Tempi.
Samu El, 9161 S.W 152nd Ave..
eouth ol N. Kendall Drive.
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ava.
North Dada'S Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingslay, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frl .6: 16 p.m. RebM King.ley will preach
Godparent, group win be honored.
Sat Bat Mitzvah. Karen Sussmsn
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Or. Conservative
2712311 ,-fce.
Dr. Norman N.Shapiro, Rabbi ')
Benjamin Ad let. Cantor V-S.'
David Rosanthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan Services 7 a.m.. Mon. and Thura., 9 a.m .
Sun. Frt. Adult Forum Shabbat. William
F Saulaon, vie* president M Riverside Memorial
Chapel will speak on. Th. Criela In the Jawlah
Community. Sat Services 9 a.m.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, DecemDer i:0, 1985
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES

FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 NE 1st Avenue. Miami. PlO'ida
41 year old gentleman, suffering from back pain caused
by an automobile accident, wishes to meet a 35/45 year
old lady with aame or similar physical Impairment for a
long lasting relationship. Pleaae answer Box #SPS c/o
Jewish Floridlan. P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101. j
Your letter will be answered.
I love beaches, ballet, and the bubbly, but I can also enjoy
home Betamax, baseball, and beer. If you love any or all
of the above, or went to love someone who does write
and send a reason why I would want to meet you. Me, c/o
Jewish Floridlan, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Jewish Singles will climb the heights of Masada, discover the
Old City of Jerusalem and explore pioneering life in the set-
tlements of the mountainous Galilee when they visit Israel with
the United Jewish Appeal National Winter Singles Mission
January 12-22.
Geared for Single men and women between the ages of 24 to 40,
the mission will visit Israel on a specially planned encounter with
the country and its people, according to Lawrence S. Jackier of
Southfield, chairman of the UJA Department of Overseas Pro-
grams. Information may be obtained from local Federations.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FABULOUS
ESCORTS at 215 SW 17 Ave.
Miami Fla. 33136 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Robert Rkard
19448 November 29;
December 6.13.20.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
i lajaQI in business under Uw fic-
titious name ALLNA BAKERY at
1561 W. Okeechobee Road.
Hialeah. Florida 33010 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
LEMAT CORPORATION
By. ROBERTO LEAL.
President
CARLOS M. MENDEZ. Esq.
Attorney for LEMAT
CORPORATION
19462 December 6. IS, 20. 27.1985
LN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasakar S6-1067*
DmsioaM
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH BURNS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOSEPH BURNS, deceased.
File Number 86-10676. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address if which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Florida
33130 The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FLRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TiONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 20. 1985.
Personal Representative:
BARBARA JOAN JOSLYN
4451 Ahon Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
LESLIE EDWARD BURNS
41 West 72nd Street, Apt. 9-A
New York. New York 10023
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
RAPHAEL K. YUNES
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-6216
1948* December 2. 27. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Doris Madas at 105
SW 22nd Road. Miami. Fla. 33129
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dora Martinez
19461 December 6,13,20.27, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PROFESSIONAL
PROPERTIES ONE/MILAN 25
at c/o 5300 N.W. 77th Court.
Miami. Florida 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
JULES LIPP. AS TRUSTEE
Applicant
Attorneys for Applicant
Rubinstein and Komik. P.A.
798 Brickell Plaza/
59 S.E. 8th Street
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone (305) 371-6800
November 29. December 6, 13. 20
LN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaaber 85-10675
DiTi.io02
FLA. BAR No. 20666C
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEAH SWEDE STEINFELDT.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ANCILLARY
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LEAH SWEDE STEIN
FELDT, deceased, File
Number 85-10566. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WTTHLN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (21 any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLALMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 20. 1986
Personal Representative:
SHIRLEY SWEDE WELLS
2268 Coldwater Canyon
Beverly Hate. California 90210
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBLN. ESQ
CYPEN. CYPEN A DRIBLN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (306) 532-3200
19487 December 20. 27.1985
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89$
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3/3.5 oz.
s2.79


Public Notices
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION 04
File No. 85-10323
DIVISION
(Florida Rar No. 032230)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO REINHARD
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
VERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of LEO
REINHARD, deceased, File
Number 85-10323, is pending in
the Circuit Court in and for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse, 73 West Flagler,
Miami, Florida 33130. The name
and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
,/orth below.
All interested persons interested
in the estate are required to file
with this court, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom this
notice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
I qualifications of the personal
I representative, venue, or jurisdic-
I :ion of the court.
I ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
I TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
I FOREVER BARRED.
Personal Representative:
MIRIAM E. REINHARD
3490 Prairie Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
I First publication of this notice of
I administration on the 13 day of
I December, 1985.
I Moses J. Grundwerg
I Of Law Offices of
I Hays, Grundwerg and Vann
I 28 West Flagler St.,
I Suite 800
I Miami. Florida 33130
I Telephone: (305) 379-8435
I Attorneys for Personal
I Representative:
I 19476 December 13,20.1985
f IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-48471 (08)
NOTICE OF ACTION
I FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
I AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
I MIAMI.
I a United States corporation,
Plaintiff.
I vs.
lEDUARDO DIAZ and MARIA
I ESTHER DE DIAZ,
I his wife, et al..
Defendants.
I TO: EDUARDO DIAZ and
MARIA ESTHER
DE DIAZ
Avenida Pocaterra,
Residencias Taurus
g* Penthouse
El Trig*!, Valencia
Venezuela, S. A.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
I action to foreclose a mortgage on
I the following described property in
I DADE County, Florida:
I Unit No. 401, of BYRON BAY
I CONDOMINIUM, according to the
I Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 10450, at Page
I 2466, and amended by Amend-
| ent filed in Official Records Book
L Records of Dade County, Florida.
I has been filed against you and you
|re required to serve a copy of
I your written defenses, if any, to it
I n Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
I Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
I dreas is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
I Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
[December 27.1985, and file the
I original with the Clerk of this
IS""-1 ^ther before service on
I Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate
I 'y thereafter; otherwise, a default
I will be entered against you for the
Ijdief demanded in the complaint.
rlTNESS my hand and seal of
l*is Court on the 20 day of
November, 1985.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
|M Clerk of said Court
By: T. Casamayor
as Deputy Clerk
November 29;
December 6,13.20, 1985
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lia's For Hair at 1561
W Sunset Drive, South Miami in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
H 4 H Auto
Services, Inc.
Audrey Hilversum
19474 December 13,20,27, 1985;
January 6,1986
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 85-50707
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NIMIA DUENAS,
Petitioner,
and
JESUS V. DUENAS,
Respondent.
TO: JESUS V. DUENAS
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before January 10th.
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered.
DATED: December 9. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
19473 December 13, 20, 27, 1985;
January 3, 1986
(Circuit Court Seal)
119445
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10637
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCISCO JIMENEZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE STATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FRANCISCO
JIMENEZ, deceased, File Number
85-10637, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
JUAN JIMENEZ, whose address
is 703 N.W. 44th Street, Miami,
Florida 33127. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
taive's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE FO THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, W1TODJ
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 20, 1985.
Juan Jimenez
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FRANCISCO JIMENEZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JOSEPH W. MALEX. Esquire
350 Lincoln Road Suite 501
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-4431
19481 December 20,27,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-27834 CA-18
AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GOLDOME FSB, f/k/a
Buffalo Savings Bank,
Plaintiff
vs.
AUGUSTO MURUA,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: AUGUSTO MURUA and
ELIDA M. MURUA, his wife
1004 Ladrada Drive
Dallas, Texas 76261
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 4, Block 1, of
MIAMI MODENS MANORS,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 59, Page 70,
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
January 17. 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney of immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the sea!
of this Court this 11th day of
December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19485 December 20,27,1985
January 3,10,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
- Case No. 86-51617 (25)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN MORTGAGE CORP.,
f/k/a COMMUNITY FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
RAUL MONTEJO, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: Sewell Supply Company
c/o Henry L. Sewell, Jr.,
273 Oakland Avenue, SE
Atlanta, GA 30312
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lots 14 and 15, in Block
14, of OLYMPIC HEIGHTS,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 10, at Page
2, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
January 17, 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney of immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the sea!
of this Court this 13th day of
December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By J. LOGIE
As Deputy Clerk
19484 December 20,27,1986
January 3,10,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of ALARM-A-
SCREENS at number 1968 NE
149 Street, in the City of N. Miami,
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 9
day of December, 1986.
SECURITY FABRICS, INC.
1958 NE 149 St. N. Miami, Fl.
By: IRA ZIPKIN
Sheldon Zipkin
Attorney for Applicant
19482 December 20,27,1985;
January 3, 10,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of HAMPTON
ACRES INDUSTRIAL CENTER
No. 2 PARTNERSHIP at number
5582 Northwest 79th Avenue in
the City of Miami, Florida, intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED at Miami, Florida, this
29th day of November. 1986.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MELVIN POLLAK
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MAXWELL WAAS
BARBARA WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
RICHARD M. WAAS
JOSEPH SACCO
DAVID STONE
NORMAN M. WAAS
SUSAN W. KAPLAN
GIOVANNI DE PANI
HUGUETTE DE PANI
TIMOTHY GAMWELL
GABRIELLA J. LANDAU
ALAN ROSENTHAL
BARRY YARCHIN
REFAS LEASING AND
INVESTMENT CO.
(Not Incorporated)
ALAN J. DAVIS
BARBARA H. DAVIS
DANIEL DAVIS
NANCY DAVIS
DANNY J. SHAW
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosentha! and Yarchin, P.A.
Suite, 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for
Applicants
19469 December 13, 20, 27, 1985
January 3, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. rN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-49152
(08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CURLENA BRITT,
Petitioner/Wife,
MELVIN U. BRITT,
Respondent/H usband.
TO: MELVIN U. BRITT
RESIDENCE AND MAILING
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE T. RAMANI, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
711 Biscayne Bldg. 19 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before January 3. 1986;
otherwise a deafult will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 26 day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. LOGIE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Biscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
(306) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
19464 November 29;
December 6,13,20,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COirNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-51371(04)
i IN RE: THE MARRAIGE OF:
SAMUEL ERROL PENNANT
Petitioner/Husband,
and
VERNA MAUD FRASER
PENNANT,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: VERNA MAUD FRASER
I PENNANT
264 East 31 Street
Patterson, NJ
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defesnes, if any, to it on
DAVID S. BERGER, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 100 N.
Biscayne Blvd., Suite 1707 New
World Tower, Miami, Florida
33132 (305)371-4556, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before 17
January, 1986; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the sea!
of said court at Miami, Florida on
I this 12 day of December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. LOGIE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
LAW OFFICES OF BERNSTEIN
& BERGER
Suite 1707 New World Tower
100 North Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33132
Attorney for Petitioner/Husband
(305)371-4555
19583 December 20,27,1985;
January 3, 10,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name A A R Dental
Laboratory at 9809 NW 80 Ave
No. 9-W Hialeah Garden, Fla.
33016 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ROBERTO CAMPOS
9809 NW 80 A ve
Hialeah Garden, Fla. 33016
19479 December 20.27.1985
January 3.10.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46348 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
VS.
TIMOTHY A. EISENMAN,
et ux., et a!.,
Defendant
TO: TIMOTHY A. EISENMAN
and TERESA A.
EISENMAN.
his wife
Frisco, Colorado 80443
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 17, Block 15, on SOUTH
MIAMI HEIGHTS MANOR, ac-
cording to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 68, at Page
70, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1670 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 3, 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of
November, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk ,
19467 November 29;
December 6,13,20. i 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LEPARDO at 2029
NW 22 Court. Miami, FL 33142 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RAFAEL PARDO President
Attorney for R.P. Fashions Inc.
19459 November 29;
December 6.13. 20.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OT
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-48470 (19)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
NARASINHA S. RAO.
Petitioner/Husband
and
SHANTA RAO,
Respondent/Wife
TO: SHANTA RAO
20 Vaishali Apts.,
J. P. Road
7 Bungalows,
Andheri, West
Bombay 400058
INDIA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE T. RAMANI, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
711 Biscayne Bldg., 19 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the abot styled court
on or before December 27, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published one
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
20 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Biscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
19443 November 29;
December 6,13,20, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-42165 CA 21
Fla. Bar No. 241709
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
f/k/a
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI, as trustee for the Dade
County Housing Finance
Authority,
Plaintiff,
v.
JEAN JASMIN and JACKIE
JASMIN, his wife, etal.,
Defendants.
To: Jean Jasmin, Clovis Charles
and Yolanda Charles, his wife,
whose residences are unknown,
and the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
The North Vt of Lot 12, and all of
Lot 13, in Block 2, of EDISON
HEIGHTS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
34, at Page 86, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosentha! & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
January 3, 1986. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and sea! of
this Court on November 26, 1985.
Richard P. Brinker, Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
SWDNo. 245536-1 323-T
FHA No. 092286030-303
19455 November 29;
December 6. 13.20. 1985


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1985
Public Notices!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 85-40*54 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY
DAVIN AND COMPANY, i
Florida corporation.
Plaintiff.
v.
FELIX RODRIGUEZ. DIANA
DOLORES PABON. STEPHEN
M. TRAVIS and EUGENIA M.
TRAVIS, hit wife, and the
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against
them; THE PUBLIC HEALTH
TRUST OF DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA, an agency and in-
strumentality of Dade County,
Florida, which operates
JACKSON MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA; and RANCO CON-
TROLS, a division of RANCO IN-
CORPORATED, an Ohio
corporation.
Defendants.
To: Felix Rodriguez and Diana
Dolors Pabon, whose residence are
unknown, and the unknown par-
ties who may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors. creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not known to
be dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose s mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4, in Block 3, of FAIRWAY
LAKE SOUTH SECTION ONE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 76. at Page
64. of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire, of
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
January 3. 1986. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 26, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D. C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
19466 November 29;
December 6, 13,20, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10439
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN GYULAI.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
NO. 090723
The administration of the Estate
of HELEN GYULAI, Deceased.
File Number 85-10439. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida 33131. The names and
addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) aD claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
T10NS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of tint Notice has
begun on December 13, 1985.
MORTON B. ZEMEL
Personal Representative:
MORTON B. ZEMEL. Esq.
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite 111
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162
Telephone: (305) 949-4237
19472 December 13.20.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aetioa No. 85-48788
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
DANIEL NORBERTO TALAMO
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARIA CARMEN ARCE ;
TALAMO.
Respondent/Wife
TO: MARIA CARMEN ARCE
TALAMO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Divorce has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on ARNIE S. MI SKAT.
ESQUIRE attorney for Husband
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 3rd, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORJDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
22 day of November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Dade County. Florida
By: J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT. ESQ.
GeJbut. Gaibut and Menm
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
19449 November 29;
December 6. 13.20, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
COURT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No.: 85-28730 (14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
No. 090723
VENETIAN HEIGHTS. INC.. a
Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS, et. al..
Defendants.
TO: WAYNE FLOWERS and
GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, if living and unknown parties
claiming by, through, under or
against the named Defendants are
not known to be dead or alive
whether said unknown parties
claims as heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or other claimants.
RESIDENCE UNKOWN.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing described property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 1. Block 1. of LIBERTY
FARMS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
51 at Page 46. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MORTON B. ZEMEL, Plain-
tiff's attorney, whose address is
16666 N.E. 19tfa Avenue. Suite
111. North Miami Beach. Florida
33162, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before January 10, 1986;
otherwise a judgment may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
THIS NOTICE shall be publish
ed once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in The Jewish
Flondian
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Dade County,
Florida on this 5 day of December
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
of the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
19467 December 13.20.27.1985
January 3. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10396
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LENA KIPNIS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
; ADMINISTRATION
(Fla. Bar No. 017442)
The administration of the estate
of LENA KIPNIS, deceased. File
Number 85-10396. is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami. Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WrTHTN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 13, 1985.
Personal Representatives:
THEODORE R. KIPNIS
115 Fourth Terrace.
DiUdo Island
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
EVELYN LOWELL
111 Fourth Terrace.
DiLido Island
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Cypen. Cypen and Dribin
IRVING CYPEN, ESQ.
P. 0. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19471 December 13.20. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name SERVICEMASTER
OF MIAMI at 13011 Southwest
84th Street. Miami. Florida 33183,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
DGR
ENTERPRISES. INC.
By LARRY DIAMOND.
President
ALAN S. KESSLER
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19490 December 20,27.1985;
January 3.10.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DELUXE PAINT
AND BODY SHOP at 14450 W.
Dixie Hwy.. N. Miami, Fla. 33161
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ARNOLD LIBERMAN
19442 November 29.
December 6. 13.20. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaabar 85-10202
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE DAVIS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARIE DAVIS, deceased. File
Number 86-10202, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street. Miami. Florida,
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 13. 1986.
Personal Representative:
PHIUP SAHL
Apt 407. Bldg 24
7240 Huntington Lane
Delray Beach. Fla. 33446
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT. Esq.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
19477 December 13,20.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-37244 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. FSB.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association
Plaintiff
HERBERT R. WfeBB.
et ux.. et al..
Defendants
TO: PATRICIA G. WEBB
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgate
on the following described
property:
Lot 48. of Unrecorded Plat of HID-
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of Tract 11, of FLORIDA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION of the NE Vi of
Section 25, Township 52 South,
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, at Page 17. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida;
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15' 30" West for
25.02 feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing of Tract of land herein after
described: thence continue North 2
degrees 16" 30" West parallel
with the West line of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 45' 09" West for
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
December 27, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 21 day of
November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19446 November 29;
December 6,13. 20. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BATES
ASSOCIATES, at 7800 S.W. 74th.
Place. Miami. Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
MOISES M. BARCIMANTO
SUSAN A M.T. BARCIMANTO
19470 December 13.20.27, 1985;
January 3.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name QUALITY IN-
TERIORS at 2400 NW 16 Street
Rd. Apt. 101 Miami Fla. 33125 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Robert Ricard
19447 November 29:
December 6. 13.20.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie-
titious name ARGENT
FASHIONS INC D/B/A MR
ALEX at 293 N.E. 2nd Ave..
Miami. Fla. 33132 intends to
register said name with the Clerk,
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida
Manuel Lacayo. Jr.
19460 December 6. 13. 20. 27.1966
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DDE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9492
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARINA de LARA
a/k/a MARINA DELARA
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: MAGALY ALVAREZ
ZUNIGA
Address Unknown
RAUL ALVAREZ
Address Unknown
RICKY DE LARA
Address Unknown
and Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs-at-Law. Living or dead,
their respective heirs and all per-
sons claiming by, through and
under and or may be infants, in-
competents or otherwise sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for sale
of property has been filed in this
court. You are required to serve
written defenses to the petition not
later than January 6,1986, on peti-
tioner's attorney, whose name and
address are:
Abraham A. Galbut, Esquire
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on December 2, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
19463 December 6, 13. 20. 27. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 85-42740 CA-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
ADA PEREZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ADA PEREZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against ADA PEREZ,
and all parties having or claiming
to have any right title or interest in
the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida:
That certain Condominium
Parcel Composed of Unit 206. of
GROVE ESTATES CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as recorded in
Official Records Book 11769. at
Page 3123. of the Public Record;
of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
January 10, 1986. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 5 day of December.
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19468 December 13.20.27.1985;
January 3. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Machinery and Equip-
ment for Plastic at 3217 SW 60
Ave.. Miami, Fla. 33155 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
HERNAN N. RESTREDO
3217 SW 60 AVE.
Miami. Fla. 33155
19458 November 29;
December 13. 20. 1985
jNJHE CIRCUIT COURT n-
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIBnS
DAMCOUNn.Flffi1'
PROBATEDIV.s.oT*
File Number 85-984)
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LYDIA OPSCHA
NOTICE OF *****
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVnr
CLAIMS OR DEaUvS
AGAINST THE AB0B
ESTATE AND ALL ObS
YOU ARE HERERT
NOT1* that the .tfg ,
tion of the estate of LYTir* *1
OPSCHA. deceased, File figf
86-9869, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County Florida
Probate Division, the iddnu. j
which is 73 W. Flagier StJ
*mi. Florida. The penwai
representative of the estat, k
ALAN S. KESSLER;, whoa, a)
drees is The Roney Plaza 2301C4
lins Ave. Suite M-8 Miami Beach,
Fl. 33139. The name and iotas
of the personal representative's it
torney are set forth below.
AD persons having cliinu or
demands against the estate trt r*
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the de* of
the above court a written state
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim mutt be in
writing and must indicate the ban
for the claim, the name and id
dress of the creditor or hit agent or
attorney, and the contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient ocpies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objection they
may have that challenge the validi-
ty of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 13, 1986.
ALAN S. KESSLER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LYDIA OPSCHA
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Robert M. Jasinski
The Roney Plaza 2301
Collins Ave. Suite M-8
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19475 December 13.20.1985
>-'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. LN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-48627 (191
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
RAQUEL DE ALMEIDA,
wife
and
CARLOS A. BUSTAMANTE.
husband
TO: CARLOS A.
BUSTAMANTE
AV-EL-SOL-927 No. 1
LIMA. PERU (4)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action ftf
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your t
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney W
Petitioner, whose address is Wi
Northeast 167 St. Miami. f
33162, and file the original witfl
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 2..I**
otherwise a default will be enterrt
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the sealoi
said court at Miami. Florida on tins
20 day of November, 1985n
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: J. Log*
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) _,
19444 Novembers
December6.13,20.l9


honoring Myra Farr (second from left) the "Woman of the Year"
fe a luncheon were (left to right): Greater Miami Women's Aux-
Miary President Marilyn Weil, Hannah Troy and Luncheon
Chairwoman Ltietile Chernin.
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9834
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA TENENBAUM,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANNA TENENBAUM. deceas-
ed. File Number 85-9834 (02). is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami. FL
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 20, 1985.
Personal Representative:
SAM TENENBAUM
4101 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Nelson and Feldman. P.A.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Island. FL 33164
Telephone: 865-5716
19478 December 20, 27,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10223
Diviiion 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CI.AERE H. MATHES.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CLAERE H. MATHES,
deceased. File Number 85-10223.
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
*est Flagier Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
'THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
SECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
""gun on December 20, 1985.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street
suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagier Street
Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone (305) 374-3116
19486 December 20. 27.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 86-10712
Diviiion: 03
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF
DOROTHY Y. YANUZIS,
Deceased.
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of DOROTHY Y. YANUZIS.
deceased. File Number 85-10712,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Dade County
Courthouse, Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate.
and
(2) any objections by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publcation of this Notice began
on December 20, 1985.
Personal Representative:
BERNADINE Y. BROWN
19729 S.W. 114 Ave. No. 251
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Walter B. Lebowitz
801 Arthur Godfrey Rd.. 2nd Floor
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-0000
19493 December 20.27.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-51265 FC 10
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDGAR D. KEENE.
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARIA HORTENSIA KEENE,
Respondent/Wife
TO: Maria Hortensia Keene
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on USHER BRYN.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 309, Miami Beach.
Florida 33139, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 24.
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 17th day of December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 309
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-1155
19491 December 20, 27,1985;
January 3.10,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-62088
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARGARITA ANGELA
CAMPOS CANDELA
Petitioner
and
GUILLERMO VICTOR
RAUL CANDELA
Respondent
TO: Guillermo Victor
Raul Candela
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Arthur H. Lipson, Esquire,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 801 NE 167 St., North
Miami Beach, Florida 33162, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January 24, 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of December, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19492 December 20,27,1985;
January 3.10.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-3784
Diviiion CP 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIE COHEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
SOPHIE COHEN, deceased, File
Number 84-3784 CP 03, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Marlene Patterson, whose address
is 7610 Coquina Drive, North Bay
Village, Florida. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due,
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 20, 1985.
Marlene Patterson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Sophie Cohn
Deceased.
WHITMAN. WOLFE. GROSS &
SHAFFEL
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Irving J. Whitman, Esq.
10651 N. Kendall Dr.. Suite 200
Miami, Florida 33176
Telephone: (305) 279-7000
iqiQ rWemherWl 27 19K.r.
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Obituaries
BARON
Eva (Green), died Saturday, November 16
at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston after a
short illness. She was 84. Mrs. Baron was
the beloved wife of Louis Baron. She was
the mother of Herbert Baron of Waltham.
Jacob J. Baron of Brockton and Charlotte
Kleiman of Miami. Florida. Mrs. Baron is
also survived by 13 grandchildren. Mrs.
Baron was born in Maryland, but was a resi-
dent of Winthrop. Mass, for 46 years. She
was active in the community as a member of
Hadassah, B'nai B'rith, Winthrop Ladies
Auxiliary, Temple Tifereth Israel of Win-
throp, Hebrew Rehab Center in Roslindale.
Senior Citizens' Group No. 2, and Winthrop
Community Hospital. Mrs. Baron was inter-
red at Beth Shalom Cemetery in Everett.
Rabbi Hyman Friedman of Winthrop of-
ficiated the services. Arrangements were
made by Torff Funeral Chapel, Chelsea.
Memorial contributions may be made in her
name to Laaell Jr. College, Attn: Bonnie
Bortle, 1844 Commonwealth Avenue,
Newton, Mass. 02166 in memory of Eileen
Moses. Memorial week was held at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Jordan Krigest.
APPLEBAUM, Joseph, 79, of Miami Beach.
December 13. The Riverside.
HI 'I )l I. Cele White of Miami, December 14.
The Riverside.
HENIG, Rose, of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
PERL, Harry, of North Miami Beach,
December 13. Services held in Hartford.
Conn.
FAUNCE. Sanford Sidney, 73, of Miami,
December 10. Services were held.
REICHMAN, Dennis. 72, of Miami.
December 12. Services were held.
SCHWARTZ Joseph, 69, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
BEILLY, Dora, of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
SCHERAGO, Dorothy (nee Bank) 89, of
Miami, December 12. Menorah Chapels.
LEVI. Alfred, of Miami Beach, December
14, The Riverside.
MARKS, Joseph Baer. of North Miami
Beach, December 14. Services were held.
SHKOLN1K, Srulls (Israel), of Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
WINSTON. Marilyn, of North Miami Beach,
December 13. Levitt-Weinstein.
BERGER, Cecily B.. of Bay Harbour,
December 10. The Riverside.
FREEMOND, Faye, of North Miami Beach.
Services were held.
SCHWARTZ, Joseph, 69, of North Miami
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein.
STEIN, Jerome, of Miami Beach, December
10. Blaiberg Chapel.
BERSON, Bessie, of North Miami, Dec. 20.
Services were held.
GLOZER, Isaac Abraham, of Miami Beach.
Services were held.
KARLIN. Roy. 64. of Kendale Lakes,
December 15. Services were held. Schwartz
Bra*.
LEVTNSON. Albert, 87. Services were held
in Forest Hills. NY.
ROSENBERG, Morris. 86, of Miami Beach.
December 16. The Riverside.
PASKOW
Larry. 74, of Bal Harbour, passed away
December 17. He is survived by his wife
Ricky R.; sons, Stuart (Audrey), Michael
(Rita), Geoffrey, and Ira; daughter Patricia
(Rob); brother, Albert (Evelyn), and grand-
children. Randi. Risa, Erika, Andy, and
Justin. He was Man of the Year for the City
of Hope and Past President of the Florida
State Chapter of the City of Hope. The
Nutritional Clinic of the City of Hope
Hospital was named in his honor. He was a
founder of Mt. SAiai Hospital, St. Francis
Hospital, and the Miami Heart Institute. A
staunch supporter of Israel, and Israel
Bonds; he has received many awards from
Federation and Yeahiva University. Profes-
sionally, he was a pioneer in the hotel in-
dustry and opened one of the first Spa's in
the United States. Services were held at
Temple Emanu-EI, interment at Mt. Nebo
with Blaaberg in charge of arrangements.
ARONOWSKY
Eliezer. 86 of Miami Beach. He was born in
Poland, immigrated to Cuba and then to the
U.S. He is survived by his children.
Abraham and Arlene Aronowsky and Sara
and Jaime Chiz. He was a writer and a poet
who published books for worldwide Jewish
audiences and for the Library of Congress.
He was a member of the Cuban Hebrew
Congregation. Services were held at Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
LIGHT
Jessie, a resident of Miami Beach for the
past 33 years passed away on December 11.
She was the wife of the late George Light
and is survived by her children, Kenneth
Light and Arlene and Larrie Blaaberg. Ser-
vices were held at Blaaberg Chapel.
RIVKIND
Mae E., of Miami Beach, December 13. She
was the wife of the late Samuel A., a Miami
Beach hotel piOkeer and is survived by her
sons, Dade County Judge Leonard Rivkind
and U.S. District Director of Immigration
and Naturalization Service, Perry Rivkind,
daughters Natalie Steinberg and Rhoda
Golden. Private services were held at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery under the direction of
Blaaberg Chapel.
BLACK, Abraham, of Miami Beach, Dec.
16. The Riverside
DENERSTEIN, Edward, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel
ELFMAN, Ruth, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert Memorial Chapel
FOX. Jacob, of Miami Beach. Dec. 16. The
Riverside.
GURWTTZ, Frank, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert Memorial Chapel.
KARNAL. Florence, 81. Dec. 9. Services
held in Ridgewood, N.Y. The Riverside.
L1EBMAN. Sam. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
STEINBERG, Samuel, of Miami Beach. In-
terment in New York. Rubin-Zilbert.
STEINBERG. Sidney. 79, of Bay Harbour
Island. Dec. 9. The Riverside.
YOUNGFIELD. Rothstein Natalie, 86 of
Miami Beach. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery. Rubin-Zilbert.
Through years ol dedicated service,
we hav- become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
I IJNIHAl IllHK.KJR
linn' !,- ni Amenta
Ibl VI NI < 1 IHSI '."'I i '
8652353
M:AMi HI Ai.m 1 i IMlOA
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and.
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2000
Broward County
532-2099
:
Ki'prrsrntifi liv KiviTsidr Memorial (hufwl Inc
New York: (2l2)263-7A0O(|umni Blvd. & 7th Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y.


.. .. .====?wag
Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 20, 1886
Cedars Medical Center's ^^ICO^l^^ Benefit for Cardiac Services
lit K i
\a* >._ w
^A ^r.^H>> rll ^P^r ^v
r
"Itt
Ball chairmen Irela and Pepe Saumat with Rosa Dr. Francisco and Estela Borges with ball co- Becky and Dr. Staffan Nordqvist, president of the
Maria Mayorga and Dr. Alvaro Mayorga-Cortes. chairmen Bibi Perez Teran de Conde and Dr. hospital's medical staff.
Cesar Conde.
Rochelle Fein with Dr. Robert and Barbara Reis, Joan Schein and Earle V. Rifas.
ball co-chairmen.
Dr. Mariano and Connie Garcia with Jay Hager
and Rosalie Broudy.
Dr. Jerry and Colleen Enis
Ann and Morris Goldfarb
Dr. Marshal and Patricia Rosenberg with Judy
and Dr. Fred Schild.
Harold Fein and Donald S. Rosenberg of the Board member Robert and Lillian Turchin with David Balogh, Louis Handler and Harold Fein.
hospital's development committee. board chairman Arno and Beverlv Mueller.
Joyce and Seymour Barsky.
Dr. Lewis SniUer and Roselida Alexander with Cecilia Norrman with Dr. Richard Krieger ana
Dr. Kenneth and Joyce Keusch. Linda and Dr. Jay Mid wall


Full Text
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Federation Initiates Telephone Sponsorship
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dTewislii Floridliami
|^e 58 Numtr 51 Two Sections Miami, Florida Friday, December 20,1985
Pmt&HUm BvMaiiSi >>
Price 50 Cents
irst Envoy to Egypt
Ben-Elissar Feels Little Optimism for Improved Relations
By ERIC MOSS
luA Floridian Staff Writer
nbassador Eliahu Ben-
ksar, Israel's first
bmatic representative to
pt, predicted that the
government's offer to
sponsor the PLO's
establishment of a military
training facility there will
only lead to more violence in
the Middle East.
Ben-Elissar was in Miami
Sunday to address the Jewish Na-
A'
'.Minister of Israel, Shimon Peres meets Kenneth Bialkin at
filton Hotel in Jerusalem. Left is Kenneth Bialkin, 'hairman
President's Conference of Jewish Organizations, which
W Israel for four days.
died Rabbis
Focus on Soviet
liumaiiity-RTot Us
By JUDITH KOHN
IASHINGTON Five
ps arrested at a Soviet
demonstration last
began a 15-day prison
ence last Friday urging
>bers of the media to
not on them personal-
it on the conditions of
in the Soviet Union
the planned arrest
imprisonment were
it to dramatize.
his act will be worthwhile on-
lit will generate awareness
and action on behalf of Prisoners
of Conscience languishing in
Soviet prisons," the rabbis said in
a statement read to reporters by
Gary Fink, another rabbi arrested
last May.
LIKE MOST of the 23
demonstrators convicted last
Wednesday of violating a District
of Columbia statute against
demonstrating within 600 feet of
an Embassy, Fink accepted the
original suspended 15-day prison
sentence, together with six mon-
ths unsupervised probation and a
$50 fine.
But the five rabbis who began
their prison term last Firday re-
jected the offer of a suspended
sentence and probation in order to
dramatize the plight of Soviet
Jewry.
"This dramatic act, we hope,
Continued on Page 10-A
tional Fund's Annual Banquet at
the Konover Hotel.
"Whoever opens the door to the
PLO is working against peace in
the Middle East," Ben-Elissar
said in an exclusive interview with
the Jewish Floridian. "If Iraq
decides to shelter the PLO, more
violence will ultimately result."
"And Iraq will suffer," he add-
ed, ominously.
DESPITE THE downturn in
relations with Iraq and negligible
progress with the Mubarak
government, Ben-Elissar believes
that peace between Egypt and
Israel will continue to exist. "It is
a necessity that the members of
both parties, Egyptians and
Israelis, understand that improv-
Continued on Page 11-A
Jews Sense Loyalty
Being Questioned
Another Spy-By 2-A
Prosecuting Pollard 3-A
Bush Lashes Out. 3-A
HOLLYWOOD An
American Zionist leader
charged Sunday night that
the response of "some
Jewish spokesmen" to the
Jonathan Pollard spy case
revealed a "real inferiority
complex" among American
Jews.
Jacques Torczyner, president
of the World Union of General
Zionists, made the statement in an
address at the opening session of
the Union's thhxl Pan American
Convention here. Some 200
leaders of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America and affiliated
organizations in Canada and Latin
America have been joined by
Israeli poliltical figures, including
Knesset members and Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the World
Zionist Organization and Jewish
Agency Executives.
IN HIS ADDRESS, Torczyner
asked, "Why must American
Jews repeatedly affirm our
patriotism, thus raising the spec-
tre of dual loyalty? Did any
Chinese Americans take to the
media when a citizen of Chinese
origin was arrested recently for
espionage? The existence of Israel
and the vindication of the Zionist
dream should have put an end to
the grovelling of American Jewish
leaders." "Torczyner did not iden-
tify the persons he had in mind.
Alleck Resnick, president of the
ZOA the U.S. affiliate of the
World Union said the ZOA was
drawing plans for nationwide pro-
gram to block proposed U.S. arms
sales to Jordan and Saudi Arabia,
to alert the country to the "new
reapprochement" between Syria
and Jordan and to analyze the
fallout from the Pollard affair.
Jacques Torczyner
The case reveals a real
inferiority complex
among American Jews.
He warned that "many people
in this country would like to keep
the spy story burning before the
American public. Anti-Israel
abuse, whose effect, if not intent,
is to delegitimize Israel, can only
give satisfaction to the enemies of
Israel," he said.
State Dep't. Admits
U.S. Limits Intelligence
Information Exchange
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion is limiting its exchange
of intelligence with Israel in
the wake of the case of
Jonathan Pollard.
State Department deputy
spokesman Charles Redman con-
ceded recently, noting that the
step was taken in the "immediate
aftermath" of the arrest of
Pollard, a Navy civilian
counter-intelligence expert, who
has been charged with selling
secret United States information
to Israel.
REDMAN SAID that pending a
"clear assessment" of how much
U.S. security had been com-
promised, "some discreet limita-
tions were placed on selected in-
telligence exchanges with Israel,"
he added, "this was a logical and
prudent step."
Redman's statement came after
Richard Armitage, Assistant
Secretary of Defense for Interna-
tional Security Affairs, revealed
the restriction on sharing in-
telligence in an interview in last
week's New York Times.
"We're waiting the results of
the Pollard fact-finding investiga-
tion," Armitage was quoted as
saying. A group of State and
Justice Department officials,
headed by Abraham Sofaer, the
State Department legal advisor,
are in Israel to investigate the
Pollard case.
ISRAEL AND the U.S. have a
long record of sharing intelligence
information which has been of
benefit to both countries.
Meanwhile, Redman said there
was no "apparent" link of the
Continued on Page 7-A
A
Mideast Banger
Press Camp David Before Likud Returns to Power
Linowitz
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
When President Jimmy
Carter left the White House
in January, 1981, Israel and
Egypt had agreed on nearly
all the details of a Palesti-
nian autonomy arrange-
ment based on the plan set
out in the 1978 Camp David
accords.
Four-and-a-half years hence,
the opportunity remains, but
hesitation to assert a more ag-
gressive U.S. role is allowing it to
slip away, leaving the Middle East
more open than ever to the terri-
ble dangers of conflagration."
So says Sol Linowitz about the
peace process that the Camp
David summit initiated and which
he, as the President's personal
representative for the Middle
East negotiations from
November, 1979 to January, 1981,
had a vital role in nudging toward
the distant objective of a com-
prehensive peace that the accords
envisaged.
EGYPT AND Israel had made it
over 60 percent of the way toward
agreement on the powers and
Continued on Page 7-A


How Should Parents Answer
Children About Christmas?
Continued from Page 1-B
)n the other hand, some schools
iold a so-called "Winter Festival"
n which an attempt is made to
ivoid all religious connotations.
lut it is sometimes difficult to
Iraw the distinction. If the
arents feel that the performance
free of all religious overtones,
hildren may certainly
acipate.
Q. Should Jewish children
ling Christinas carols?
A. No. Carols, being religious
nns, do not belong in the public
hool. Jewish children should not
required to sing hymns which
Jmbody a theology they do not ac-
ept. Neutral songs that have no
eligious reference, however, are
cceptable.
I Q. Do we harm our children by
lirecting them not to
ticipate?
A. No. The classroom is one
nong many places which reveals
be existence of differences. We
her our children's personal
owth and maturity by teaching
hem that they can respect the
lith of their neighbor without
nbracing that faith. We can
pearly mark these differences by
uch simple statements as, "This
I what we do," and "This is what
^e do not do."
Q. What about other Jewish
Uiildren who participate in
Christmas observances in the
ublic schools?
A. There are now, as there
Sways have been, parents who do
lot accept the viewpoint of
esponsible Jewish leadership.
may proceed on their own when
hey permit their children to par-
Scipate in Christmas observances.
this confuses the children of
parents who do follow the
houghtful recommendations of
ewish leadership.
Fred D. Hirt
rred Hirt Named
NAAJHHA
President Elect
Fred D. Hirt, executive director
the Miami Jewish Home and
[ospital for the Aged at Douglas
ardens, was recently named as
resident-Elect of the North
nerican Association of Jewish
lomes and Housing for the Aged
NAAJHHA).
[NAAJHHA is the nation-wide
rganization of non-profit
tcilities that provide residential
hd long-term care for the elderly.
"Here and abroad, NAAJHHA
I a respected advocate for the
fclfare of the elderly," noted Mr.
frt- "Its membership roster
IWta some of the finest geriatric
cilities in the world, all of which
ork toward one common goal
hproving the quality of life for
pr elderly. I am honored to have
^en nominated for this office by
ose I hold in such esteem."
[Mr. Hirt has been Executive
Vector of the Miami Jewish
Dme and Hospital for the Aged
fice 1969. During this time, he
Is made significant contributions
vard improving the quality of
for Florida's elderly.
Jewish parents will help their
children most if they (1) accept
diversity in the ranks of Jewry as
a normal condition in the
American environment; (2) know
and understand the thinking of
responsible Jewish leadership and
recognize that most parents are
anxious to follow it; and (3) assure
their children that despite the par-
ticipation of some Jewish
children, Jewish leaders have
taken a strong position for non-
participation in observances of a
holiday not their own, and that
this is also their position.
Q. Would not the entire pro-
blem be solved in the public
school by joint Christmas and
Chanukah celebration?
A. No. It is a violation of the
Constitution to observe any sec-
tarian holiday in the public school,
be it joint observance or other-
wise. We do not correct an error
by compounding the error.
Q.Should Chanukah be
celebrated in the public schools?
A. No. To do so violates the
Constitution, uses the taxpayer's
money for sectarian purposes, and
jeopardizes the principle of the
separation of church and state,
without which there can be no
religious freedom.
Sudan Moves To
Block Departure of
Ethiopian Jews
LONDON (JTA) Sudanese
officials have called for increased
vigilance in order to thwart at-
tempts by Ethiopian Jews in
Sudanese refugee camps to escape
to Israel, the World Jewish Con-
gress reports.
According to monitoring
sources of the WJC here, the of-
ficial Sudanese radio, last week,
aired demands by local officials
for tighter surveillance of volun-
tary relief organizations working
in the refugee camps, "to prevent
the departure of more Falasha
Jews" from camps in the Awa,
Am and Wad Sherifi areas.
The Dec. 2 broadcast also
reported that "large groups of
Falasha Jews are still coming" to
eastern Sudan in order to escape
the devastating famine and civil
war in Ethiopia.
Graduates Reunion
Young Judea, Hashachar will
hold a reunion for all graduates of
the program from 1981 and prior,
on Sunday, Dec. 29 at 11 a.m. at
the home of Jack H. Levine. The
event is a celebration of the 75th
birthday of the Hadassah spon-
sored zionist youth movement.
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Talmudic U. Alumni To Be
Honored At Anniversary Dinner
Nine alumni of Talmudic
University of Florida who live and
work in the Greater Miami area
will be guests of honor at the 11th
Anniversary dinner of the Miami
Beach-headquartered university
Sunday, Dec. 29, at the Crown
Hotel.
One of their number also will be
principal speaker at the banquet
which will mark the granting of
honorary doctorates to Beach
civic and religious leaders David
Balogh and Prof. Jacquin
Bierman.
Rabbi Yossi Haber, principal of
the junior and senior high schools
of the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy and spiritual leader of
Knesset Israel Congregation of
Miami Beach, has been selected by
his fellow alumni to represent
them at the dinner.
Announcement of his selection
was made by Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig, president and Rosh
Hayeshiva of Talmudic University
of Florida, the largest Jewish in-
stitution of higher learning in the
South.
Other alumni who will be
honored include Robert N.
Rosenberg, Rabbi Aryeh Zak,
Rabbi Zvi Rosenbaum, Rabbi
David Gray, Rabbi Shimshon Min-
dick, Michael Levi, Rabbi Shaya
Greenberg, and Rabbi Binyomin
Rachmani.
Rabbi Heber is former spiritual
leader of Congregation Etz Chaim
in Miami Beach, and is enrolled in
a doctoral program in educational
administration at Florida Interna-
tional University. He earned a
BBA degree at FIU, a masters
degree in school administration at
FIU and became a certified public
account in 1978.
JWV Post Treat Vets
To Dolphin Game
Jewish War Veterans of
U.S.A., Post 440 of Boynton
Beach, will treat the paraplegic
veterans who are confined at the
Miami Beach Veterans Hospital,
to a day watching the Miami
Dolphins vs. Buffalo Bills football
game at the Orange Bowl on Sun-
day, Dec. 22.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days o week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Danish
Christmas Tree
Coffee Cake
24-OxT flX
size Tf
50
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pecan Pie
8-mcKr f
size mm
59
y
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Festively Decorated
Wreath, Tree
or Bell Cake
$A
each TT
50
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Fruit Stollen.................. *S *259
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 for $ 1"
Powdered Sugar .
Mini Donuts...................5?1
Quantity
Rights Reserved SK
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie..................*%v
Mince Pie...................... *f*1
Dinner Rolls.............12 89*
Wagon Wheel
Dinner Rolls................12 for $1
Parkerhouse or
Cloverleaf Rolls.......12 for $ 129
Gingerbread houses are available to be ordered now.
Display as a centerpiece for the entire holiday season.
$15.95
Order Now! German Lebkucken (Honey Cake) in an
assortment of packages is available.
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen, bake and
serve hors'd oeuvres for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
50-Ct. pkg........................................................... $11.95
100-ct. pkg.......................................................... $19.95
Prir* Effective
Deccmudr19tlir 4,1985.


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
30th Anniversary Dinner
Rackman Heads Bar-Dan U.
Tribute To Rabbi Carl Klein
Sherman Winn Honored For 20
Years Of Community Service
Dr. Emanuei Rackman. presi-
dent of Bar-Ilan University, will
preside at a a dinner of the Florida
Friends marking the inauguration
of the Rabbi Carl and Helen Klein
Chair in Rabbinic Personalities at
the University in Ramat Gan.
Israel.
The dinner, celebrating Bar-
Ilan's 30th anniversary, will take
place Wednesday evening, in the
Diplomat Hotel. It will also
feature a tribute by Dr. Irving
Lehrman, rabbi of Temple
Emanu-El, Miami Beach to the
late Samuel N. Friedland. chair-
man emeritus of Food Fair, and
long prominent civic leader and
philanthropist in the Miami area.
Rabbi Klein, spiritual leader of
the Hallandale Jewish Center and
a prominent figure in Florida com-
munal affairs for many years, will
be guest of honor.
Scion of an illustrious rabbinical
family, Dr. Klein serves as vice
president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami. A
pioneer supporter of the Universi-
ty, he is a member of its American
Board of Overseen.
Mr. Friedland, a nationally-
known business figure, founded
the Food Fair chain of super-
markets in 1933 and was chair-
man emeritus at the time of his
death this year.
A major supporter and leader of
numerous religious, civic and
charitable organizations, he was a
founder and leader of Mount Sinai
Hospital and Temple Emanu-El in
Miami Beach and had lead the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the Combined Jewish Appeal
and the Greater Miami Committee
for Israel Bonds.
Among the honors accorded Mr.
JWV Post
40th Anniversary
Commander Alexander Green-
wald of the Norman Bruce Brown
Post 174, Florida's Pioneer
Jewish War Veterans of the
United States announces the
celebration of its 49th
Anniversary
For this special occasion. Post
174 will honor its World War One
Veterans with a Deli-Lunch on
Dec. 16 at 12:30 p.m.. South
Miami Community Center.
The ages of these World War
One Veterans range from 87 to 96
years of age. They are: Louis
Aronoff, Edward Brenner, Morris
Goldenberg, Herman Goldstein,
George Graham, Adolph Haimes,
David Harris, Harry Markowitz,
Aaron Rosenberg, Nathan Roth,
Sam Srednick, Solly Wildstein,
Abram Lurie.
Past National Ainslee R. Ferdie
will be guest speaker. The Ladies
Auxiliary will act as hostesses for
this event.
Beth Moshe Flag
Raising Ceremony
Tuesday afternoon, at 4 p.m., a
special flag raising ceremony will
take place on the Temple Beth
Moshe grounds.
Colonel Norman Marcus has ar-
ranged for an Ameican Flag that
flew over the nation's capitol
dome to be donated to the Temple.
Congressman William Lehman
will make the official presentation
and Michael Dzubin and the Eagle
Scout troop will participate in the
ceremony.
Dr. Emanuei Rackman
Friedland were awards by the
Synagogue Council of America
and the National Conference of
Christians and Jews.
A renowned rabbi, scholar and
educator. Dr. Rackman came to
the presidency of Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity in 1977 after a rich and varied
career in the United States. He
has combined scholarly at-
tainments in both the religious
and secular worlds with broad ac-
complishments in communal
leadership.
Dr. Rackman received his rab-
binic training at Yeshiva Universi-
ty, was graduated from Columbia
Law School and holds a doctorate
in political science from Columbia
University. He was president of
the New "York Board of Rabbis
and the Rabbinical Council of
America and served as profesor of
Jewish Studies and consultant to
the chancellor of the University of
New York on Jewish Studies. He
holds the rank of Chaplain
(Colonel) in the United States Air
Force Reserves and was a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Jewish Agency.
Dade County Commissioner
Sherman Winn will be honored by
friends for 20 years of service to
the community, on Sunday. 9:30
a.m. at the Doral Beach Hotel.
His political career spans two
decades in which he has served as
the first ever elected Mayor of
North Miami for two terms, a
State Representative in the
Florida House of Representatives,
a Senator in the Florida Senate,
where he was chosen by his col-
leagues to serve as the first ever
President Pro-Tern from the
South Florida delegavion.
The senator left his political
career briefly to accept a challeng-
ing position as director of the
Hotel and Restaurant Division in
Tallahassee, where he is credit^;
with revamping the entire depart-
ment and making major!
budgetary shifts, making tin]
department run more efficiently
and effectively than ever before '
Senator Winn left this post to
accept the Executive Director's I
position with the Greater Miami
Hotel Association, a position
which he still holds.
When a County Commisskn>
seat vacated in the District in
which the Winn family resides,
friends convinced Senator Winn
to make a commitment to public
service and he ran for the Metro
Dade County Commission, the
seat which he currently holds.
Dr. Shamir To Speak At Public Library
Dr. Yehuda Shamir, professor
of Judaica at the University of
Miami, Barry University, and
Florida International University,
will speak at the next lecture of
the Moadon Ivri-Hebrew Cultural
Forum on Tuesday from 1-3 p.m.
at the Miami Beach Publifl
Library.
Dr. Shamir will speak on
" Maimonides His Life and ffij
Work," in honor of the 850th an-
niversary of his birth.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Prices Effective December 12 thru 18.1985.
Available at PubH x Stores with
Fresh Djnlsh^akarles Only.
Raisin
Pumpernickel
' V I
it
Holiday Pies
Available at Publix Stores with Freah Danish Bakeries Only.
Apple Crumb
Peach .......
PtUMpluil .......
EgC*atard .
Pecan _........
8-inch 10-inch
$149 $349
$149
$249 $3.99
$1.89 $349
$149 $3.59
$249 $4.99
8-inch
Sweet Potato.....,
Cherry.............
Braeocrty...........
Lemon Meringue ,
Mince __________
Coconut Custard
-----$149
___$2.79
......$2.49
......$189
......$2.19
......$149
10-inch
$4.69
$4 89
$3.29
$4.09
$359
4 S
Available at Pubiix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Gingerbread houses are available to be ordered now.
Display as a centerpiece for the entire holiday season.
$15.95
Order Now) German Lebkucken (Honey Cake) in an
assortment of packages is available.
Holiday Bell Cookies.... each 18*
Almond, Cinnamon,
Cream Cheese or Strawberry Filled
Croissants....................each 69*
Mini Bagelettes.......12 for 99*
Deluxe
Fruit Cake Ring............ $349
Deluxe
Fruit Cake Ring............2*ig
Gourmet
Fruit Cake Bar..............1.*$2"
Pfeffernuesse
Cookies.........................S *129
Holiday Tree Cookies... -*. 25*
Quantity Righto Reserved
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen bake and
serve hors'd oeuvres for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
50-Ct pkg. .......................................................... $11.95
100-Ct pkg____.................................................... $ig.95
Available at AM Pubfix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Deluxe Cookies............ $3"
(3-lb. box.........................................$11.50)
Deluxe
Party Cookie Tray........ 5S$9M
Danish Pecan Ring.......each$1"
Gourmet Brownies....... $ 1"
Apple Bran Muffins ...6 for *159
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 for $1"
where *i shopping is a
Publix


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How Should Parents Answer
Children About Christmas?
Continued from Page 1-B
the other hand, some schools
J a so-called "Winter Festival"
which an attempt is made to
Ld all religious connotations.
it is sometimes difficult to
n the distinction. If the
ents feel that the performance
J-ee of all religious overtones,
jldren may certainly
ticipate.
, Should Jewish children
I Christmas carols?
No. Carols, being religious
ins, do not belong in the public
1. Jewish children should not
to sing hymns which
dy a theology they do not ac-
Neutral songs that have no
nous reference, however, are
pptable.
Do we harm our children by
ecting them not to
icipate?
[. No. The classroom is one
|>ng many places which reveals
existence of differences. We
her our children's personal
vth and maturity by teaching
that they can respect the
of their neighbor without
gracing that faith. We can
rly mark these differences by
simple statements as, "This
frhat we do," and "This is what
do not do."
What about other Jewish
pdren who participate in
istmas observances in the
lie schools?
. There are now, as there
ys have been, parents who do
accept the viewpoint of
insible Jewish leadership,
proceed on their own when
permit their children to par-
ate in Christmas observances,
confuses the children of
ents who do follow the
?htful recommendations of
leadership.
ed D. Hirt
*ed Hirt Named
NAAJHHA
resident Elect
^ed D. Hirt, executive director
lie Miami Jewish Home and
pital for the Aged at Douglas
lens, was recently named as
Wdent-Elect of the North
^rican Association of Jewish
i and Housing for the Aged
UHHA).
^AJHHA is the nation-wide
inization of non-profit
Ities that provide residential
long-term care for the elderly.
pere and abroad, NAAJHHA
respected advocate for the
re of the elderly," noted Mr.
"Its membership roster
ts some of the finest geriatric
Ities in the world, all of which
toward one common goal
Dving the quality of life for
^lderly. I am honored to have
; nominated for this office by
I hold in such esteem."
Hirt has been Executive
or of the Miami Jewish
and Hospital for the Aged
1969. During this time, he
ie significant contributions
improving the quality of
to- Florida's elderly.
Jewish parents will help their
children most if they (1) accept
diversity in the ranks of Jewry as
a normal condition in the
American environment; (2) know
and understand the thinking of
responsible Jewish leadership and
recognize that most parents are
anxious to follow it; and (3) assure
their children that despite the par-
ticipation of some Jewish
children, Jewish leaders have
taken a strong position for non-
participation in observances of a
holiday not their own, and that
this is also their position.
Q. Would not the entire pro-
blem be solved in the public
school by joint Christmas and
Chanukah celebration?
A. No. It is a violation of the
Constitution to observe any sec-
tarian holiday in the public school,
be it joint observance or other-
wise. We do not correct an error
by compounding the error.
Q.Should Chanukah be
celebrated in the public schools?
A. No. To do so violates the
Constitution, uses the taxpayer's
money for sectarian purposes, and
jeopardizes the principle of the
separation of church and state,
without which there can be no
religious freedom.
Sudan Moves To
Block Departure of
Ethiopian Jews
LONDON (JTA) Sudanese
officials have called for increased
vigilance in order to thwart at-
tempts by Ethiopian Jews in
Sudanese refugee camps to escape
to Israel, the World Jewish Con-
gress reports.
According to monitoring
sources of the WJC here, the of-
ficial Sudanese radio, last week,
aired demands by local officials
for tighter surveillance of volun-
tary relief organizations working
in the refugee camps, "to prevent
the departure of more Falasha
Jews" from camps in the Awa,
Am and Wad Sherifi areas.
The Dec. 2 broadcast also
reported that "large groups of
Falasha Jews are still coming" to
eastern Sudan in order to escape
the devastating famine and civil
war in Ethiopia.
Graduates Reunion
Young Judea, Hashachar will
hold a reunion for all graduates of
the program from 1981 and prior,
on Sunday, Dec. 29 at 11 a.m. at
the home of Jack H. Levine. The
event is a celebration of the 75th
birthday of the Hadassah spon-
sored zionist youth movement.
Friday, December 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Talmudic U. Alumni To Be
Honored At Anniversary Dinner
honored include Robert N.
Rosenberg, Rabbi Aryeh Zak,
Rabbi Zvi Rosenbaum, Rabbi
David Gray, Rabbi Shimshon Min-
dick, Michael Levi, Rabbi Shaya
Greenberg, and Rabbi Binyomin
Rachmani.
Rabbi Heber is former spiritual
leader of Congregation Etz Chaim
in Miami Beach, and is enrolled in
a doctoral program in educational
administration at Florida Interna-
tional University. He earned a
BBA degree at FIU, a masters
degree in school administration at
FIU and became a certified public
account in 1978.
Nine alumni of Talmudic
University of Florida who live and
work in the Greater Miami area
will be guests of honor at the 11th
Anniversary dinner of the Miami
Beach-headquartered university
Sunday, Dec. 29, at the Crown
Hotel.
One of their number also will be
principal speaker at the banquet
which will mark the granting of
honorary doctorates to Beach
civic and religious leaders David
Balogh and Prof. Jacquin
Bierman.
Rabbi Yossi Haber, principal of
> the junior and senior high schools
of the Greater Miami Hebrew
Academy and spiritual leader of
Knesset Israel Congregation of
Miami Beach, has been selected by
his fellow alumni to represent
them at the dinner.
Announcement of his selection
was made by Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig, president and Rosh
Hayeshiva of Talmudic University
of Florida, the largest Jewish in-
stitution of higher learning in the
South.
Other alumni who will be
JWV Post Treat Vets
To Dolphin Game
Jewish War Veterans of
U.S.A., Post 440 of Boynton
Beach, will treat the paraplegic
veterans who are confined at the
Miami Beach Veterans Hospital,
to a day watching the Miami
Dolphins vs. Buffalo Bills football
game at the Orange Bowl on Sun-
day, Dec. 22.
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7 days o week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
\ /
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Danish
Christmas Tree
Coffee Cake
24-oz! 1A
size T
50
\ /"
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pecan Pie
8-incrT^^
size
59
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Festively Decorated
Wreath, Tree
or Bell Cake
$A
each TT
50
Available at All PubKx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Fruit Stollen.................. $259
Holiday Cup Cakes ...6 $1"
Powdered Sugar
Mini Donuts................... Kf'l08
Quantity ^^
Rights Reserved ^'
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie..................^M69
Mince Pie......................W*
Dinner Rolls.............12 m 89*
Wagon Wheel
Dinner Rolls................12 tor $1
Parkerhouse or
Cloverleaf Rolls.......12 *, *1
Gingerbread houses are available to be ordered now.
Display as a centerpiece for the entire holiday season.
$15.95
Order Now! German Lebkucken (Honey Cake) in an
assortment of packages is available.
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen, bake and
serve hors'd oeuvree for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
50-Ct. pkg........................................................... $11.95
lOO-ct. pkg.......................................................... $19.95
Prir Effective
Decuudr19thr 4.1985.