The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02967

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dTewislfo FloiridHara
Volume 58 Number 50 Two Sections Miami, Florida Friday, December 13,1985
Fltd Shochtl BvMi.iSi "i
Price 50 Cents
Leaders Who Will Take Part in Dinner Function At Fontaim bleau
------- 11
Sanuel Adler Howard Scharlin Aaron Podhurst Dorothy Podhurst Elaine Bloom Stanley Myers Maxine Schwartz Gail Jaffee Newman Arnold Altman Steven KrayiU
'86 CJA/IEF
Federation Campaign Opener Saturday
The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will
launch the 1986 Combined
'Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign this Saturday night at
a campaign opening dinner
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton
Hotel on Miami Beach.
The dinner will feature special
guest speaker, U.S. Sen. Joseph
R. Biden, Jr. (D., Del.).
THE EVENT will mark the
beginning of the Greater Miami
Jewish community's annual effort
to provide a broad spectrum of
human services programs in Dade
County, Israel and Jewish com-
Sen. Joseph Biden
World's
Bloodiest Hijack
lVagging Questions
Unanswered
Bv EDWIN EYTAN
VALLETA, Malta -
(JTA) The world's
bloodiest hijack 59 dead,
32 wounded began Satur-
day afternoon. Nov. 23,
shortly after Egyptair
Flight 648 took off unevent-
fully from Athens, bound
for Cairo.
It ended 24 hours later in an in-
ferno of fire and machinegun
bullets on the airport of this tiny,
rockbound island nation in the
mid-Mediterranean between Sici-
ly, Tunisia and Libya.
I arrived here a day after the
harrowing events. Through inter-
views with survivors,
eyewitnesses, Maltese officials
and foreign diplomats. I was able
to piece together an account for
the orderal which, weeks later,
still shocks the world and has rais-
ed many serious questions that re-
main unanswered.
ONE OF the survivors I spoke
to was Tamar Artzi, 24. a trim, at-
tractive brunette from Kibbutz
Continued on Page 10-A
munities throughout the world.
Persons who attend the opening
dinner will make a minimum gift
of $1,000 to the campaign.
The campaign opener will begin
with cocktails at 7:30 p.m., follow-
ed by dinner at 8:30. Dietary laws
will be strictly observed. Elaine
Bloom and Howard R. Scharlin,
who serve as dinner co-chairmen,
point out that reservations are
still being accepted for the dinner.
"The theme for this year's CJA-
IEF campaign, 'One People, One
Destiny,' relects our ongoing con-
cern for the welfare of our Jewish
brethren," noted Aaron Podhurst,
1986 CJA-IEF general campaign
chairman.
"Here in Miami and in Israel,
we are continually challenged to
support programs and services
which provide sustenance to
countless individuals."
"IN OUR own community,"
Podhurst continued, "there are
significant numbers of needy Jews
who are the innocent victims of
economic strain and diminishing
government funding for social
services. While we are able to
meet basic program needs for our
30 local beneficiary agencies,
there is still a large gap between
what we are able to fund and what
we cannot.
"Last year alone, there were 60
vitally needed programs and ser-
vices we couldn't support due to
limited resources," Podhurst
pointed out.
Samuel I. Adler, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, added, "The responsibility
placed upon us this year presents
a tremendous challenge which will
test the resolve and commitment
of our entire Jewish community. I
am confident that we will respond
to the urgent needs of Jews
worldwide, and that our 1986
campaign will be the most suc-
cessful in the history of
Federation.
PODHURST also indicated that
Continued on Page 7-A
U.S. Officials
In Israel
On Spy Case
Peres: Air Has Been Cleared Page 8-A
U.S. Still Irritated Page 9-A
Arena Back from Secret Meeting Page 9-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) A delegation of State and
Justice Department officials went to Israel early this week
to interview Israelis implicated in the case of Jonathan
Pollard.
Secretary of State George Shultz said, "We have every
reason to believe that the issue involved will be resolved
satisfactorily." He said the team is headed by Abraham
Sofaer, the State Department's legal advisor.
OTHERS IN THE TEAM representng the Justice
Department are Deputy Assistant Attorney General Mark
Continued on Page 8-A
U.S. Seeks Syrian Role
In Mideast Peace Talks
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion appears to be making a
concerted effort to get Syria
involved in the Middle East
peace process, or at least
agree not to continue trying
to sabotage it.
"We hope that Syria can be
helpful in the peace process,"
Secretary of State George Shultz
said at a State Department press
conference last Friday. But Shultz
conceded that Syria does not sup-
port the Administration's basic re-
quirement for a peace agreement
direct negotiations between
Israel and its Arab neighbors.
SHULTZ however, said that
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
had some "very interesting and
worthwhile discussions" during
his recent visit to Syria.
Shultz's remarks followed a
statement by State Department
spokesman Bernard Kalb in which
he said the United States hoped
that Syria would join the peace
process and stressed that it is U.S.
policy that the future of the Golan
Heights, not just the West Bank
and Gaza, should be resolved
through negotiations.
At his press conference Friday,
Continued on Page 6-A
In Talk to President's Confab
Shamir Mistrusts Hussein's Peace Commitment
Foreign Minister Shamir
By YITZHAK RABI
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir mistrusts King Hus-
sein's commitment to peace.
The more Israel urges the
Jordanian ruler to come to
the negotiating table the
more he distances himself
from us and binds himself to
those who are opposed to a
settlement with Israel,"
Shamir said in an address to
the Conference of
Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions here.
Israel will judge Hussein by
his actions, not his words, Shamir
said. "It is a fact that he is preven-
ting direct attacks on us from Jor-
danian territory and is keeping a
close watch on the PLO presence
in the Kingdom. We want to
believe that he is interested in
peace. But his political alliance
with the PLO and his recent
understanding with Syria are
bound to create certain dynamics
which we have witnessed in the
past and these dynamics were not
all positive," Shamir said.
HE MAY have been referring to
Jordan's participation in the 1967
Six-Day War. On the other hand,
Hussein did not join Syria and
Egypt in their October, 1973 at-
tack on Israel, the Yom Kippur
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Pollard Crisis 'Over'
U.S. Envoy Told Jewish Prexies
By YITZHAK RABI
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Conference of
Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions has concluded a hectic
three-day mission which
brought American Jewish
leaders face to face with
Israel's major economic,
social and politial problems
and challenges.
After meeting, listening and
talking with almost everyone in
positions of power and of impor-
tance in Israel including the
Premier, President, more than 10
Cabinet Ministers, the Israel
Defense Force Chief of Staff,
Jewish Agency officials, and
university professors, as well as
with new immigrants and Jewish
settlers in Judaea and Samaria,
there was unanimous agreement
among the 75 delegates that the
mission had been successful and
productive.
ALTHOUGH the case of
Jonathan Pollard, the U.S. Navy
counterintelligence analyst ar-
rested for allegedly spying for
Israel, was clearly an issue
throughout the three days
almost every Israeli official found
it necessary to refer to it con-
cerns that it would overshadow
the meetings were proven un-
founded from the start.
At a reception for the arriving
delegates, U.S. Ambassador
Thomas Pickering pleasantly sur-
prised the Jewish leaders by mak-
ing an appearance and announc-
ing that "the crisis" between the
U.S. and Israel was in effect over,
following the "excellent" state-
ment by Premier Shimon Peres
apologizing to the U.S. over
allegations that Pollard was spy-
ing for Israel.
Peres issued the statement on
behalf of the Cabinet earlier in the
day. The Cabinet statement itself
followed by an almost eight hour
telephone conversation between
Peres in Jerusalem and U.S.
Secretary of State George Shultz
in Washington.
"THE MISSION started off on
the right foot," Yehuda Hellman,
executive vice chairman of the
Presidents Conference, said with
obvious satisfaction after Picker-
U.S. Jewish Differences Erupt
Over Orthodox Law of Return
tipn
By YITZHAK RABI
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The sharp differences in the
American Jewish communi-
ty over an Orthodox propos-
ed amendment of the Law
of Return erupted here as
American Jewish religious
leaders and heads of Jewish
organizations took time out
from the deliberations of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations to state their
cases in two separate press
conferences.
The Conservative and Reform
leaders who oppose the change,
called on the leaders of Israel "to
reject the demand for a change in
the Law of Return." In a state-
ment signed by 17 leaders of
Reform and Conservative affilia-
tion, they said:
"The self-serving demands of
one group of Jews that they be
recognized as the sole inter-
preters of the Jewish religion
and specifically that their authori-
ty to determine the legitimacy of
conversions performed outside
Israel be spelled out in the secular
law of Israel is morally and
religiously unacceptable to us: It
Activist Gives
Church $7,000
NEW YORK (JTA) Israeli
peace activist and philanthropist
Abie Nathan has donated $7,000
to St Patrick's Cathedral after he
viewed media reports on a rob-
bery there last weekend. "Last
night, I saw the story on TV and I
was just mad, angry that people
should do that," Nathan told
reporters. "There are so many
places to steal from, I can't
understand it. It's terrible, ab-
solutely terrible."
Two gunmen robbed the
Cathedral Saturday, Nov. 30 of
more than $7,000 in poor box,
votive candle and collection plate
donations. He reportedly called
his bank in Israel and had dona-
tion wired to New York.
is contrary to the interests and
welfare of world Jewry. The pro-
posed change in the Law of
Return will do harm to the princi-
ple of Jewish unity and jeopardize
the sense of solidarity that binds
the Jewish people everywhere to
the State of Israel."
At a separate press conference,
leaders of six Orthodox Jewish
groups declared, in a joint state-
ment that they reject the recent
proposal of Prime Minister
Shimon Peres to freeze the issue
of "Who is a Jew" for a period of
10 years, and not to bring it to a
vote in the Knesset.
They warned that the decision
to postpone a vote would increase
assimilation by many Jews. They
claimed that the process has
already started in the decision of
the American Reform movement
to accept as Jews children born to
Jewish fathers and non-Jewish
mothers. They appealed to the
Prime Minister and the Israeli
goverment not to succumb to
pressure from abroad on the issue.
Among those who signed the
statement of the Conservative
and Reform movements were
Franklin Kreutzer, president,
United Synagogue of America;
Rabbi Jack Stern, president, Cen-
tral Conference of American Rab-
bis; Selma Weintraub, president,
Women's League for Conser-
vative Judaism; and Rabbi Wolfe
Kelman, executive vice president.
Rabbinical Assembly.
Among the Orthodox organiza-
tions were the Rabbinical Council
of America, the Union of Or-
thodox Jewish Congregations,
and the AMIT Mizrachi Women.
ing's warm welcome to the Jewish
leaders.
Kenneth Bialkin. chairman of
the Presidents Conference, said
that the American Jewish leaders
were leaving Jerusalem with "a
sense of heightened appreciation
of the dedication of the govern-
ment and the people of Israel to
peace, to friendship with the U.S.,
and to the continued responsibili-
ty of returning to Zion all those
Jews in the Soviet Union and
other lands who seek desperately
to reach these shores."
Referring to the Pollard case.
Bialkin said: "As Americans, we
are particularly gratified that the
government of Israel acted pro-
mptly and vigorously to
underscore the policy of not
engaging in espionage against the
U.S. and to apologize for the
regrettable violation of that policy
that became publicly known only a
few days before our arrival. We
hope this unfortunate episode is
behind us and that both countries
will pursue their common in-
terests in furthering democracy
and freedom throughout the
world."
CONCLUDING, he said. "We
return home strengthened in our
commitment to the welfare of
Israel and the unity of the Jewish
people. The memories we take
with us will serve as a continuous
inspiration in our own efforts to
strengthen the bonds of friend-
ship, of interest and of human in-
spiration that ties our own land.
America, with the land of Israel."
Julius Berman, immediate past
chairman of the Presidents Con-
ference, Said that he was return-
ing home strengthened and en-
couraged after the opportunity he
had during the mission to learn
first hand of Israel's problems and
achievements. He also said that
the meetings here provided a rare
opportunity for American Jewish
leaders to meet each other for a
longer period of time and discuss
mutual problems.
"By coming here we have also
learned how important it is for
Israeli leaders to meet with us and
give us a better understanding of
the problems they are struggling
with," Berman said.
Ernest Zelig, the president of
B'nai Zion, said that "we emerge
from this mission feeling that the
bond between us is stronger and
deeper than ever before."
THE PRESENCE of the
American Jewish leaders in
Jerusalem was also a major media
event with Israeli newspapers,
radio and television which gave
detailed coverage of discussions.
Furthermore, the public itself
showed its interest in the event as
hundreds of Israelis turned out
last night to take part in a sym-
posium on "Israel and American
Jewry: Reciprocity and Respon-
sibility," with the American
Jewish leaders and Israelis
panelists.
Most of the delegates returned
to New York after attending a
reception in their honor at the
home of Pickering in Herzlia.
as
Opening Date Dec. 15
iCosheriCorner
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New Glatt Kosher Restaurant Under ORC supervision
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Chanukah Menorah As Art
A modular Chanukah lamp, by Niels Diffrient, a Connecticut
designer, is part of an exhibition at the Israel Museum
Jerusalem, featuring light in its varied forms and how light plays
a major role in Judaism. The exhibit features the work of ar-
tisans and craftsmen from around the world specializing in
Judaica, in beautiful, one-of-a-kind pieces. Chanukah, the
Festival of Lights, ends on Sunday. The last of eight candles will
be lit Saturday night.
Shamir Says He Mistrusts King
Hussein's Peace Commitment
Continued from Page 1-A
War.
Shamir called Hussein's
demands for an international con-
ference with PLO participation to
serve as the framework of talks
with Israel "non-starters that can-
not lead to peace and cannot be ac-
ceptable to us." He reiterated
Israel's absolute opposition to any
kind of Palestinian state in the
West Bank, which, he contended,
would be "a mortal danger" to
Israel.
Shamir rapped Egypt for failing
to explain why Egyptian
authorities waited four hours
before they permitted medical aid
to reach Israeli tourists gunned
down by a berserk Egyptian
policeman at Ras Burka in Sinai
% 5' JSe^eno includine four
children died. Some might have
been saved had they received pro-
mpt medical attention, Israeli doc-
tors have said.
SHAMIR noted that Israel and
Egypt are about to resume talks
to resolve their border dispute
over Taba, a sliver of beach near
Eilat that both countries claim.
According to Shamir. "On the
basis of very extensive research,
we have concluded that Taba
belongs to Israel. However, we
are willing to discuss the issue
with Egypt in accordance with the
procedures laid down in the peace
treaty."
PLO Scores Stunning Record
Of Terror Since '82 War
NEW YORK (JTA) Since
being expelled from Lebanon in
1982. the Palestine Liberation
Organization and other Palesti-
nian terrorist groups have carried
out terrorist actions throughout
the world on an average of once a
week, according to the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
The ADL issued a research
report, "PLO and Palestinian-
Inspired Terrorism, 1982-1985:
The Continuing Record of
Violence," which cites and
describes terrorist incidents and
victims since the 1982 expulsion
of the PLO from Lebanon to the
hijacking of an Egyptair plane to
Malta last month.
According to the report, in the
past three years, the PLO has car
ried out attacks worldwide, in
eluding incidents in Ankara
Athens, Bangkok. Bogota
Brussels, Buenos Aires
Frankfurt, Hamburg. London
Madrid, Marseilles, Milan. New
Delhi, Nicosia, Paris, Quito, Rome
and Vienna.
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News in Brief
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
2 Activist Rabbis Given Suspended Sentences
By JTA Servian
WASHINGTON A Superior
Court judge found 21 rabbis guilty
of taking part in illegal
demonstrations last summer in
front of the Soviet Embassy. Each
defendant was given a suspended
15-day jail term, six months un-
supervised probation and a $50
fine.
They had protested the treat-
ment of Jews in the Soviet Union.
They were arrested on charges of
violating a law banning such
demonstrations within 500 feet of
an Embassy. The case was the
first to be tried after more than
150 arrests in 3even demonstra-
tions at the Soviet Embassy from
May to November.
Previously, a motion for
dismissal on grounds of incon-
sistency had been denied. The
defendants argued that none of
the more than 2,000
demonstrators in similar actions
in front of the South African Em-
bassy had been arrested.
Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly
ruled last Thursday the
demonstration by the rabbis was
illegal and imposed the sentences.
French Foreign Minister
In Visit To Israel
JERUSALEM Foreign
Minister Roland Dumas of France
was due in Israel this week, main-
ly to discuss Israel's export rela-
tionship with the European
Economic Community after Spain
and Portugal join the EEC next
year.
Dumas, regarded as a friend of
Israel, will be returning Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir's visit to
France last June. He was due here
on a two-day official visit follow-
ing the meeting of the EEC
foreign ministers in Brussels.
Meanwhile, an Israeli delega-
tion representing several govern-
ment departments left for
Brussels Monday for talks on such
matters as how many tons of
avocados and flowers Israel may
export to the EEC countries each
year without tariff and how high
the tariffs will be on each ton over
the tariff-free ceiling.
OSI in Deportation
Proceedings in California
NEW YORK Justice Depart-
ment officials confirmed that the
Office of Special Investigations
has begun deportation pro-
ceedings against a 65-year-old
Califoria man accused of member-
ship in the Nazi Waffen SS and
serving as a guard at two concen-
tration camps during World War
II.
An "order to show cause" was
filed last week by the Justice
Department against Bruno Karl
Blach of La Habra, a suburb near
Los Angeles. The OSI alleges that
Blach entered the country illegally
in 1956, having lied to authorities
about his wartime activities.
Blach maintains that he was in the
German army and air force, accor-
ding to OSI officials involved in
the case.
The OSI alleges that Blach, a
native of Czechoslovakia, volun-
tarily joined the Nazi Party in
1939 and in June 1940 became a
member of the Waffen SS. It is
further alleged that Blach served
as a guard and a dog handler in
the Dachau death camp between
1940 and 1943, and at the Wiener-
Neudorf camp in Austria from
1943 to 1945.
But his
a party
Herzog At Opening
01 Rakah Convention
JERUSALEM President
Chain) Herzog appeared at the of-
ficial opening of the Rakah (Com-
munist) Party's four-day conven-
tion last week, becoming the first
President of Israel ever to extend
that courtesy to the pro-Moscow,
anti-Zionist faction,
gesture to Rakah,
represented in the Knesset but
which is anathema to most
Israelis, brought him only a rebuff
from the Soviet delegate.
The latter. Michael Menashev
said Friday that Herzog's
presence would not influence
Kremlin policy on Soviet-Jewish
emigration nor would it advance
the renewal of diplomatic ties with
Israel, broken since 1967. The
man from Moscow suggested,
however, that the President's at-
tendance reflected Rakah's
"growing influence in Israeli
political life."
Greece Asked to File
Brunner Extradition Plea
ATHENS The Greek Jewish
community has called upon the
government of Greece to demand
the extradition of Alois Brunner,
the former aide to Adolf
Eichmann now living in Syria, the
World Jewish Congress reported
here.
The Central Board of Jewish
Communities of Greece, the
representative body of Greek
Jewry and the WJC affiliate, has
formally urged the Athens
government to seek Brunner's ex-
tradition to stand trial before a
Greek court on charges of com-
plicity in the deportation of Nazi
death camps of tens of thousands
of Greek Jews from Thessaloniki.
More than 50,000 of the deportees
perished.
The Central Board, in calling for
Brunner's extradition, noted that
he recently gave an interview to a
West German magazine in which
he confirmed that he has been
residing in Syria for many years.
House Passes Bill
Seeking Gift Disclosure
NEW YORK The House of
Representatives approved a
Higher Education bill that would
require colleges and universities
receiving federal aid to disclose
sizeable gifts from foreign donors.
Similar legislation is expected to
come before the Senate in 1986.
The House legislation, passed
last week, was introduced by Rep.
Robert Matsui (D., Calif.). Based
on a proposal drafted by
American Jewish Congress
lawyers, the bill is designed to
discourage intrusions on academic
freedom by foreign sources that
attempt to tie political or pro-
paganda strings to such gifts or
obtain exclusive rights to universi-
ty research findings.
Deschenes Extension
Sought in Canada
MONTREAL More than
1,000 people gathered at the
Tifereth Beth David Jerusalem
Synagogue in Cote St. Luc Sun-
day urging Prime Minister Brian
Mulroney to approve a six-month
extension for the Deschenes Com-
mission to gather information
abroad on suspected war
criminals living in Canada.
Irwin Cotler, McGuill Universi-
ty law professor and counsel to
the Canadian Jewish Congress,
told the gathering that the com-
mission, headed by Justice Jules
Deschenes, through its activities,
has put an end to 40 years of
government inaction. The com-
mission was set up last February
and ended its hearing last week.
Deschenes has already asked for
a six-month extension of his man-
date to allow lawyers Micheal
Meighen and Yves Fortier to
gather information abroad.
McFarlane Successor
Riddle on Middle East
WASHINGTON Vice Ad
miral .John Poindexter, whom
President Reagan named last
week to replace Robert
McFarlane as his National Securi-
ty adviser, does not have a public
record as to his views on the Mid-
dle East or other foreign policy
issues.
Jewish sources here did not
know too much about him. But
they hoped that he would be like
McFarlane who, one source
described as a "pillar of strength"
when it came to Israel. McFarlane
was credited with working out the
strategic alliance between Israel
and the United States which one
source said would be his "legacy."
The hope of supporters of Israel
is based on the fact that the
49-year-old Poindexter, who has
been on the National Security
Council since 1981, was
McFarlane's deputy since 1983
when McFarlane took over the
post after serving a brief period as
Reagan's special envoy to the
Mideast. Reagan, in announcing
Poindexter's appointment, said he
wanted continuity in foreign
policy.
Jewish Undergrounders
Given Amnesty
JERUSALEM President
Chaim Herzog has granted
amnesty to two of the 27 members
of a Jewish underground terrorist
network in the West Bank serving
sentences for acts of violence
against Arabs, his office
announced.
Most were convicted and
sentenced earlier this year. Dan
Be'eri, 41, a former Roman
Catholic from France who con-
verted to Judaism, and Yosef
Tzuria, a 26-year-old Jewish set-
tler in the West Bank, were
sentenced in 1984 for plotting to
blow up Islamic shrines on the
Temple Mount in East Jerusalem.
Each was given three years and
would have been eligible for
parole in several months had Her-
zog not intervened to release
them sooner.
Arab Youth Slayer Charged
With Manslaughter
JERUSALEM Meir Braver
man, 65, has been charged with
manslaughter in the slaying of an
Arab youth on Saladin Street, the
main street in East Jerusalem,
last Yom Kippur eve. Braverman,
who shot the Arab in the head,
claimed self-defense. He said the
Arab, Ali Mash'hour, was harass-
ing his woman companion, Tikva
Cohen, while on a shopping trip.
Braverman contends that when
the man ignored his warnings and
continued to shout oaths and
menace the couple, he took out his
pistol and fired into the air. But
the police say Braverman fired at
the young man's head, killing him.
15 Soldiers Injured, 8 Missing
In Fire at Base in Samaria
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fif-
teen soldiers were injured, and
eight are missing in a fire that
broke out early Monday in an ar-
my base in Samaria. There was no
immediate indication of the cause
of the fire which swept through
the 16-room base within a matter
of minutes as several dozen
soldiers were asleep. There were
no signs of arson.
The fire broke out long after the
electric power generator in the
base had been turned off. The in-
itial investigation, therefore, rul-
ed out the possibility that a short
circuit had caused the fire. In-
vestigators pointed out that the
fire had spread quickly because
the soldier's sleeping quarters
were in prefabricated housing,
made of highly flammable
material.
The speed with which the fire
spread and the intense heat made
rescue work difficult and
dangerous. A senior army officer
expressed surprise that soldiers
would be housed in such a flam-
mable building.
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East, that institution
is Technion. '
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Porra 9.4 TUr. T nit 1 cii__:j;.
Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Administration
Won't Be Mollified
For its own particular purposes, the Ad-
ministration is intent on blowing up the
Jonathan Pollard spy case out of all propor-
tion. The case comes down to size. Big coun-
tries can ignore and even disavow their own
spies. Little countries are regarded as
upstarts for trying.
The fact is that every country is engaged
in espionage big and small. It has been
known for years that the United States uses
its "consulate" in East Jerusalem for
precisely these purposes so that it can better
monitor what Israel does in the so-called
"occupied territories."
Since the Jonathan Pollard bash, the
Israelis frankly complained that they have
caught the U.S. spying on them numerous
times in the past and never made a big
thing of it in the media.
Then what's behind the report this week
that the Administration is still miffed at
Israel this time, just days after a state-
ment by Secretary of State Shultz that he
was confident things were now back on
track between the two countries?
Apology Doesn't Help
"Now" means after Israel has finally for-
mally apologized. "Now" means after State
Department personnel were dispatched this
week to Israel to interview several Israelis
apparently suspected of deep involvement in
the Pollard case.
What the U.S. is getting out of all of this is
hard to say. Extracting an apology from
Israel, whose Prime Minister Peres made
the apology "to the extent that it (Pollard's
espionage) did take place" still strikes us as
a strange maneuver between friends.
Wouldn't it have been better, as we
' "editorialized here several weeks ago, to wait
for Israel's promised investigation report
before conclusions are drawn about who
holds the ultimate responsibility in this
unhappy affair?
JNF Banquet Sunday
The Jewish National Fund's annual
tribute banquet Sunday noon at the Konover
Hotel on Miami Beach will be dedicated to
the completion of the Menachem Begin and
Aliza Begin Peace Park in the Negev. For
this reason alone, it is an important
function.
Former Prime Minister Begin, in the tur-
bulent years of his tenure in office, establish-
ed himself in the immortal rock of Israel's
history as the first leader of .his modern na-
tion to bring peace with an Arab adversary.
His achievement in the case of Egypt led
him to Operation Peace for the Galilee in
Lebanon in 1982, where he almost brought
off a second Israeli treaty with a second
Arab adversary and would have, but for
the harsh and indifferent handling by the
world media which appeared to embrace
another, self-serving agenda at the time and
which encouraged the Lebanese to abrogate
the treaty agreement in short order.
There can be little doubt that this broke
Mr. Begin's health. The death of his beloved
wife, Aliza, shortly thereafter caused him to
announce his resignation into a reclusive
retirment.
By completing the Menachem Begin and
Jewish Floridia 0
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Aliza Begin Peace Park in the Negev, the
Jewish National Fund, always a leader,
always an innovator in the resurrection of
modern Israel from the malaria-infested
mud flats and swamps of near-2,000 years of
Arab neglect, has added to the distinction of
its unique vision and vigorous programs
dedicated to the rebuilding of Israel, as well
as to its security.
Miamians who attend the tribute banquet
on Sunday noon will have an opportunity to
send a message to one of Israel's modern
and immortal leaders that they have not
forgotten the commitment of Prime
Minister Begin to the cause of his people.
But there is a second bonus attached to
the Sunday function. Guest speaker will be
Eliahu Ben Elissar, Israel's first am-
bassador to Egypt following the conclusion
of the Israel-Egypt peace accord. Am-
bassador Elissar knows first-hand about the
difficulties that have since plagued that ac-
cord not the reality of it, for it never
became that, but its promise.
This is especially so today when Israel and
Egypt are once again locked in struggle to
place the accord back on track in their effort
to see the promise of peace finally fulfilled.
It is a fitting rostrum from which Am-
bassador Elissar will speak. As the Jewish
National Fund continues its own agenda of
upbuilding the land of Israel, the Am-
bassador will report to Miami Sunday on his
own role in the upbuilding of rapprochement
between his country and the ring of Arab
enemies placing it in constant siege.
Well-Known Nazi Haven
Reich Roster Is Impressive
***CPTIO.. RAIfS I" ***** llo... -.. One tm, HBOC '; M*
jun UUOuloi !** coonlrv uVO" ' Friday, December 13.1985
Volume 58
1 TEVETH 5746
Number 50
By MORTON M. ROSENTHAL
Hotel Tyll. in the Brazilian
resort town of Itatiaia. was the
site of an international gathering
in April, 1978. The occasion -
Hitler's 89th birthday brought
together many Nazis living openly
or in secret in Brazil, plus more
than a score from overseas, in-
cluding Manfred Roeder, the
leader of Germany's neo-Nazi
movement, and Hans Werner
Shutte, a leader of the German
Reich Liberation Movement. It is
possible that Dr. Josef Mengele
was one of the guests.
The news of Mengele's death
and the fact that he had lived for
many years near Sao Paulo.
Brazil, was greeted with shock
and disbelief by many who think
of Paraguay and Argentina as the
primary havens for Nazis in Latin
America. Ironically, the media, in
reporting the Mengele discover)-,
generally failed to inform the
public that Brazil has long been
the nerve center for the Nazi net-
work in South America.
SEVERAL NAZIS known to
have lived in Brazil were responsi-
ble for the death of more than one
million Jews during the Hitler era.
The roster is impressive: Franz
Stangl, Gustav Franz Wagner.
Herbert Cukurs, and now Josef
Mengele.
Franz Stangl's curriculum tntar
is that of a master Nazi criminal.
He served as police superinten-
dent of the Euthanasia Institute.
Schloss Hartheim, November
1940-February. 1942; komman-
dant of Sobibor concentration
camp, March, 1942-September,
1942; /commandant of Treblinka
concentration camp, September
1942-August, 1943.
After the war, Stangl and his
deputy at Treblinka, Gustav
Franz Wagner, made their way to
Rome to connect with the
"Vatican "route" to South
America. In Rome they learned
that Syria was recruiting German
officers to tram its army, so both
men went first to Damascus and
later to Beirut.
STANGL and his family moved
to Brazil in 1951, after getting a
visa readily from the Brazilian
consul in Beirut. Using his own
name, he worked for several tex-
tile firms in Brazil and later got a
job with Volkswagen where he
was employed at the time of his
Rabbi Morton M. Rosenthal
is director of the Latin
American Affairs Department
ofADL 's International Affairs
Dixnsion.
arrest in February, 1967. Return-
ed to Germany, he was sentenced
on December 22, 1970 in
Dusseldorf to life imprisonment
for co-responsibility in the murder
of 900,000 people at Treblinka.
Gustav Franz Wagner served as
komrnandant of Sobibor concen-
tration camp where inmates called
him "the human beast." Sobibor
was different from other concen-
tration camps because it had no
work facilities. It has been
described as "a killing machine"
where men, women and children
were gassed within hours after be-
ing herded off arriving trains.
A monument, ten feet tall, now
at Sobibor, commemorates "the
250.000 Russian, Polish, Jewish
and Gypsy prisoners murdered in
this place from May 1942 until Oc-
tober, 1943."
SURVIVORS of Sobibor have
testified that Wagner personally
joined in the slaughter, on one oc-
casion splitting a man's head with
a shovel.
"When he killed, he smiled,"
said one former inmate.
Wagner lived inconspicuously
and did not think a pseudonym
necessary when he entered Brazil
in 1952. Although Franz Stangl
disclosed, during his 1970 trial
that Wagner was living in Brazil
Brazilian authorities made no ef-
fort to apprehend him.
Vyag!ier was arrested belatedly
m 1978, in the wake of publicity
surrounding the Nazi meeting at
the Hotel Tyll. Justice, however
was denied by the Brazilian
bupreme Court which blocked ex-
tradition requests by four coun-
tries. The court based its ruling on
a technical error in translation of
a court document, even though
Wagner had confessed his guilt
Wagner committed suicide at
nis farm in October, 1980.
HERBERT CUKURS was
S2SoZ8iblf f0Vhe m**acreof
.1^,000 Latvian Jews in 1941 Col-
umnist Jack Anderson reported
that eyewitnesses described
5?? ?, stru"inK about in a
black leather coat, brandishing a
pistol" as Jews were brutalized
and murdered. He also barricaded
some Jews in their synagogue
where they were burned alive.
Cukurs arrived in Rio de Janeiro
in 1946. After he was identified in
1949 as the man responsible for
the mass killing of Jews in Riga,
the Jewish Federation of Rio de
Janeiro presented Brazilian
authorities with sworn statements
by survivors about Cukurs' war
crimes and demanded that he be
expelled. The government refused
because he had fathered a child
born in Brazil.
The most that Jewish leaders
were able to accomplish was to
block Cukurs' three attempts to
become a naturalized Brazilian
citizen.
Cukurs' body was found stuffed
in a trunk in a beach house in
Montevideo. Uruguay in 1965
where he reportedly had been
lured on a business deal. His
killers left a note pinned to his
leather jacket which said, "The
Committee That Never Forgets."
THE NAZIS* main base is in
southern Brazil in the suites of
Rio Grande do Sul, Santa
Catarina and Parana which
border on Paraguay, Argentina
and Uruguay. German immigra-
tion to this part of Brazil l>egan
about 1825 and continued in in-
creasingly large numbers; by
1940, it totaled more than one
million. So dominant is the (>er
man influence in the region that
even today that language is the
vernacular in many cities
Nazi bund groups sprang up in
Brazil in the 1930s. In the early
1940s, a large number of pro-
sperous German businessmen
moved to Brazil from other coun-
tries in Latin America. The
reason? The size of the country
made it more difficult for
authorities to keep an effective
check on them.
The United States Charge d'Af-
faires in Brazil, William C.
Burdett, in a memo to the State
Department in January, 1941.
reported that the Brazilian state
of Santa Catarina was "the head-
quarters of the Nazi organization
in South America." The memo
told of an extremely effective Nazi
network throughout Brazil,
noting that the Nazi party
Continued on Page 14-A


Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Terrorism conference panelists are (left to right) R. Bruce McColm, Inter-
American Commission on Human Rights; Ambassador Ambler Moss (chairman);
Prof. Yoram Dinstein, Tel Aviv University; Louis 0. Giuffrida, former director
ofFEMA; J. Robert McBrien, U.S. Department of the Treasury.
International Terrorism Can Strike Us Here;
Panel of Experts Detail Domestic Vulnerabilities
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Scenario: You're enjoy-
ing lunch with several
business associates at an
outdoor cafe. Suddenly, an
inconspicuous station
wagon pulls up to the curb
and with shouts of "Death
to the Zionist pigs," the oc-
cupants leap out, firing
automatic weapons.
Not here? Not in OUR Miami?
Wrong!
According to the panelists at a
conference on "International Ter-
rorism: Threats and Responses,"
held at the Knight Center in
dowtown Miami last Friday,
unless governments act now, and
with a coordinated effort to com-
bat terrorism, incidents like the
scenario above will become more
common.
THE CONFERENCE, spon
sored jointly by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and the University of
Miami's Graduate School of Inter-
national Studies, included such
topics as, ''Domestic
Vulnerabilities," "National
Emergency Management," and
"The Soviet Role." Speakers in-
cluded experts in the fields of
counterterrorism, law and human
rights.
"It's easy to understand the in-
ability of governments to act
when there's not even a common
definition of terrorism," said J.
Robert McBrien of the U.S.
Treasury Department. "We have
to remember that terrorism is
theater of the first order."
Prof. Yoram Dinstein of Tel
Aviv University believes that ter-
rorism is "any significant act of
violence intended to instill fear in
the victim or someone else." But,
he blames the press for helping in-
still that fear. "The media are a
major problem where terrorism is
concerned," he said. "Not every
terrorist is motivated by his con-
cept of immortality, but by the
prospect of two minutes on the 7
o'clock news."
CENSORSHIP,as unsavory as
it seems, could be part of the
answer. "The time may come,"
Prof. Dinstein said, "when we
may have to impose some degree
of censorship. After all, in war-
fare, censorship is considered to
be legitimate. Right now, we're
involved in a war of survival and
fighting a battle for public
opinion."
"The terrorist's intention is to
shock and stun," said the
Treasury Department's McBrien.
"THeir effect actually goes
beyond destruction because of
their ability to manipulate the
media."
While nearly every speaker at-
tempted to define "terrorism,"
few offered real solutions to the
problem. Most of the discussion
centered around the speakers'
main themes; several presenta-
tions were purely Socratic ques-
tion followed by another question.
"WHAT DO we mean by 'na-
tional security?' asked Louis O.
Giuffrida, former director of the
Federal Emergency Management
Agency. "How can we talk about
threats to our national security if
we can't even reach a consensus
on the definition?"
When FEMA was first organiz-
ed from elements of several dif-
ferent agencies in the federal
government, the first task was to
assemble a list of emergencies the
agency would have to manage.
Under the heading "floods," a list
of needs to handle that particular
kind of emergency was created,
along with similar lists for earth-
quakes, nuclear power plants, and
others. Surprisingly, "their re-
quirements were virtually the
same," Giuffrida said, as for
counter terrorism.
After installing a new internal
emergency management system,
the agency then undertook
responsibility for creating a chain
of emergency operations centers
across the country, and upgrading
the communications links between
them by requiring use of a com-
mon vocabulary.
"ONE THING we found distur-
bing," said Giuffrida. "Our plans
at nuclear power plants were
organized around the concept of
getting the terrorist out after the
incursion had already taken place.
We had to shift our thinking to
prepare for denying the terrorist
access in the first place. The key
to that is intelligence."
Yonah Alexander, senior
member of Georgetown Univer-
sity's Center for Strategic and In-
ternational Studies, and one of the
world's most prolific authors on
the subject of terrorism, said im-
proved intelligence is one of three
major steps needed to defeat the
threat.
"In addition to that," he said,
"We need to see stronger govern-
mental responses to the terrorist,
as well as greater cooperation
among governments to legally
deal with the terrorist." Alex-
Meinhoff gang is not loss of life,
but loss of alliances."
PROF. DINSTEIN claims that
because all terrorist organizations
are intertwined, each helps to in-
sure the success of another.
"These people are only interested
in killing for the sake of killing,"
he said. "Their motto is, 'I kill,
'Promise them anything, give them
Arpege, then drown them in it'
ander noted the escalating trend
of terrorist incidents, and pointed
to several reasons: expressions of
revolutionary fervor (Nicaragua),
religious fanaticism (Iran),
"narco-terrorism" (Colombia),
and the presence of an interna-
tional terrorist network, funded
by the Palestine Liberation
Organization's billion-dollar-per-
year investment program.
GATHERING intelligence on
the international terrorist is ex-
tremely difficult, according to Joel
Lisker, general counsel to the
U.S. Senate's Sub-Committee on
Terrorism and Security. "For one
thing," he said, "this is a problem
of global proportions. We've
found it very hard penetrating
Arabic-speaking terrorist units
simply because there are so few
people in the United States who
are able to speak the language."
One area vital to U.S. interests
is South Africa, supplier of 86 per-
cent of the world's platinum and
95 percent of the chromium, both
metals critical to U.S. industries.
Yet, Lisker said, the West has
allowed communists to infiltrate
the leadership of organizations
like the African National Con-
gress and the South West African
People's Organization, both of
which are dedicated to violent
overthrow of the Botha regime.
Another area of importance to
U.S. interests is Europe, where
terrorist bomgings are geared
toward disrupting NATO. "The
issue for someone in the Baader-
therefore I exist.' They can only
be fought by an equal coordination
of effort, a collaboration against
terrorists everywhere."
Dinstein, whose hardline speech
was warmly received, was one of
the few who offered specific sug-
gestions on how to control the
level of terrorism throughout the
world. The Tel Aviv University
expert's recommendations includ-
ed imposing economic sanctions
on nations that directly or in-
directly support terrorism. Libya,
for example, supplies direct sup-
port, while Greece allows the air-
port at Athens to remain ac-
cessable to weapon-bearing ter-
rorist accomplices. "Why does
Greece allow this?" he asked. "It's
simple. Greece remains the only
leftist government in NATO."
Legally, extradition pro-
ceedings are often denied by
governments that provide indirect
terrorist support. This has to
cease, according to Prof. Dinstein.
"We have got to be able to pro-
secute these cases to conviction
and ultimately take away what
these people see as benefits of
their action."
ON THE SUBJECT of negotia
tion with terrorists, Dinstein
became more forceful. "It is
unheard of to make agreements
with terrorists. Take the agree-
ment with Iran to defreeze their
assets in exchange for release of
the hostages. This agreement is
Continued on Page 14-A
riaticmal
Joel Lisker, General Counsel to the Senate's terrorism sub-
committee, poses a question to members of the afternoon panel.
security if we have no definition?'


?^^A__.Th^Je*rMmo^ 1985
Reaganites Push Syria
To Join Jordan
In Talks With Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion has urged Syria, as well
as Jordan, to agree to direct
negotiations with Israel.
State Department
spokesman Bernard Kalb
stressed that it has always
been United States policy
that United Nations Securi-
ty Council Resolutions 242
and 338 called for negotia-
Bernard Kalb
tions on the Golan Heights,
as well as the West Bank
and Gaza.
Kalb read a long prepared
statement, on the subject in the
wake of report* that Richard Mur-
phy, Assistant Secretary of State
for Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs, told Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres that King Hussein
of Jordan was seeking a rap-
prochement with Syria in order to
involve Damascus in the peace
process.
Syrian President Hafez Assad
has been opposed to Hussein's
peace initiative. Most Mideast
observers believe Hussein turned
to Assad after he realized that
Palestine Liberation Organization
leader Yasir Arafat could not be
relied upon to support Jordan's ef-
forts at getting negotiations with
Israel started.
KALB'S STATEMENT, in full,
said:
"Our current efforts are
directed toward initiation of
direct negotiations between Israel
and a Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation. If those efforts are to
be successful they will involve dif-
ficult decisions and political risk
by all parties. That is why we have
consistently cautioned against
looking for any sudden
breakthroughs.
"Our ultimate objective is a just,
comprehensive settlement bet-
ween Israel and all of its Arab
neighbors. We believe that UN
Security Council Resolution 242
applies to all fronts involved in the
1967 war, including the Golan
Heights, and that Syria has a
place in the peace process if it
wishes to participate.
"We continue to hope that all
parties in the dispute, including
Syria, will recognize the oppor-
tunity inherent in the current
peace process and elect to par-
ticipate constructively.
"THE FOCUS of our attention
in all of the discussions has re-
mained direct negotiations. In this
regard, the Israelis, the Jorda-
nians and the Egyptians have ac-
cepted the need for a supportive
international context for such
negotiations. A number of ideas
have been put forward. The mat-
ter remains under consideration."
However finding an interna-
tional context still remains an
obstacle to progress since Jordan
wants an international conference
which would include the Soviet
Union. But the U.S. and Israel are
opposed to Soviet participation as
long as Moscow does not have
diplomatic relations with Israel.
The other major obstacle is Hus-
sein's insistence that the PLO
must be represented on the joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation
which both Israel and the U.S.
reject.
THERE IS speculation that an
effort to solve this problem was
the reason for the meeting Mur-
phy had with nine Palestinians at
the U.S. Consulate in East
Jerusalem. Kalb said recently that
the State Department has decided
not to release the names of the
Palestinians.
Meanwhile. Kalb was reminded
that during President Reagan's
meetings with Israeli and Arab
leaders earlier this fall, the Presi-
dent said he was confident that
negotiations would begin by the
end of the year, but it was now
December.
U.S. Seeks Syrian Role
In Mideast Peace Process
Continued from Page 1- A
Shultz maintained that "there has
been some very considerable pro-
gress" in the peace process. "I
think the recognition all around
that in the end direct negotiations
has to be the way in which an
answer is found is positive," he
said.
BUT WHEN he was asked if he
was including Syria, he said he
was not, but was thinking about
Jordan, Egypt, Israel and some
"moderate elements" supporting
them.
Shultz said another positive
development is "the recognition
that it's the process that we need
to get going rather than feeling
that there has to be an end result
preordained."
"There isn't any preordained
outcome," he said. "That's the
whole point of negotiations."
However, Shultz said the pro-
blems remain of finding "what the
right way is to represent Palesti-
V ....,-'
nians" on a joint delegation with
Jordan and some "appropriate in-
ternational context" for the
negotiations.
THE SECRETARY continued
to rule out an international con-
ference sought by King Hussein
because it would include the
Soviet Union. He said the USSR
would first have to establish
diplomatic relations with Israel,
"examine the way it treats Jews
in the Soviet Union" and "take a
look at its emigration policy."
Meanwhile, Shultz pointed out
that the "bloodiest war" now in
the M'deast is the war between
Iran : nd Iraq "which we would
like t see draw to an end." He
said the U.S. has urged its friends
to stop supplying arms to Iran and
if all countries, including the
Soviet Union, ended their arms
supplies to the two countries
"perhaps we can see a resolution
to that war."
''
Delegates at the 40th anniversary CSU Party
conference in Munich, West Germany, have
unanimously reflected Franz-Josef Strauss as
their chairman for the Uth time in succession
since 1961 with an overwhelming vote percent. (DaD/dpa).
Sailors Did Good Deeds During Haifa Shore Leave
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Sailors
from the visitingU.S. aircraft car-
rier Coral Sea volunteered much
of their shore leave in Haifa last
week to do good deeds for local
children and the elderly and to ap-
ply fresh paint to shabby homes in
rundown neighborhoods. They
also raised money to send a young
Haifa girl to the U.S. for a life-
saving operation.
But the sea did not reward their
kindness. High waves whipped by
winds howling across Haifa Bay
swept away the landing stage and
gangway, making it impossible for
the men to rejoin their ship Satur-
day night. Many were invited by
Haifa families to spend the night.
Others were provided with beds at
a nearby Israel Navy base. Some
slept at dockside.
The storm forced postponement
of a show aboard the Coral Sea by
entertainers flown from the U.S.
by the Defense Department. Also
put off was a ceremony at which a
check was to be presented to
11 -year-old Moshit Shabo to fly
her and her mother to the U.S. for
an urgently-needed liver
transplant, an operation that can-
not be performed in Israel because
it is forbidden by the Orthodox
religious authorities.
The show will go on, however
Moshit will be in the audience, and
parts of Haifa will look a good deal
better because of the Coral Sea's
visit. Her men were only com-
pleting a job started by their
fellow-salts from the carrier. I'SS
Saratoga, which berthed in Haifa
two weeks ago.
About 40 seamen went to the
Rothschild Hospital to finish pain-
ting popular cartoon characten
on the walls of the children's
ward. Later, they visited an old
aged home to help cheer up the
residents.
The Coral Sea's skipper, ("apt.
Bob Ferguson, said the work done
by his men in their free time was
of benefit to all concerned The
children and the aged were
helped, and the sailors had a
chance to meet people other than
their shipmates with whom they
live in close quarters for long
periods of time.
Announcing
Shirt Sleeve
Cash Bonuses
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Fascell Warns
Human Rights Key to U.S.-Soviet Tie CamPaiSn Opener Saturday Eve
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
'86 CJA/IEF Federation
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Rep. Dante Pascell (D.,
Fla.), chairman of the House
Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, warned Monday that if
the United States and the
Soviet Union conclude a
"verifiable" arms control
agreement, public pressure
would require ratification
without assurances of im-
provements in Soviet
human rights policies.
"It is our job in every step of
the way to make absolutely sure
that the totality of our relation-
ship depends on improvements in
human rights." Fascell told the
1985 leadership conference of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry. The NCSJ is planning its
strategy following the Geneva
summit between President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
FASCELL AGREED with the
official NCSJ position that while
there is no "formal linkage" bet-
ween arms control or any other
U.S.-Soviet agreements, "the
linkage is there" with human
rights.
"You really cannot have any im-
provements of bilateral relations
until ultimately the question of
human rights is ameliorated," he
said. Fascell noted that this was
the position of Congress as well as
that of both Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz.
While Reagan is now seeking to
raise the human rights issue
through quiet diplomacy, Fascell
stressed that Congress and the
Jewish community should con-
tinue bringing the issue up before
the public.
"I can't see why that (quiet
diplomacy) should inhibit anything
at all," Fascell said., "As a matter
of fact, it would be worse if we fell
into the trap of saying let's just lie
low and see what happens."
FASCELL SAID he saw as "a
hopeful sign" from the summit
that there was a "de-escalation of
the rhetoric." But what he was
waiting for was some concrete
signs, such as improvement in the
Rep. Dante Fascell
conditions of Soviet Jews. "I ain't
seen anything yet," he said, ad-
ding he hopes that some indica-
tions could come before Gor-
bachev arrives in the U.S. next
June.
Fascell said that while he
welcomed the agreements for ex-
changes signed at Geneva, they
were just "atmospherics."
Jerry Goodman, the NCSJ's ex-
ecutive director, warned that in
the eagerness for commercial
agreements and scientific and
cultural exchanges, the "fate" of
Soviet Jews could be "bargained
away."
Fascell also expressed the fear
that the Soviets might try to leave
the issue of human rights for last,
after other agreements had been
reached.
Israeli, Egyptian Delegates
Resume Taba Talks
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Israeli and Egyptian delegations,
which resumed talks on the Taba
border dispute in Cairo last week,
met for a second session Tuesday
at a Hotel in Herzliya, north of Tel
Aviv.
Informed sources said the two
sides are on the same wavelength
but still separated by a wide gulf.
The situation is complicated by a
sharp division inside the Israeli
delegation reflecting the dif-
ferences between Labor and
Likud over how the dispute should
be settled.
SOME NEWSPAPERS here
reported that Foreign Minister
and Deputy Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, leader of Likud, has ex-
pressed dissatisfaction over the
way the talks went at the Mena
House in Cairo last week.
Specifically, he has accused the
head of the delegation, Gen.
Avraham Tamir, director general
of the Prime Minister's Office, of
taking a too conciliatory attitude
toward the Egyptians.
Tamir is a Laborite. Likud is
represented on the delegation by
David Kimche, director general of
the Foreign Ministry. Labor is ap-
parently willing to meet Egypt's
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long-standing demand that the
Taba dispute be put to finding ar-
bitration. Likud insists on con-
ciliation, with arbitration only a
last resort. Both methods are
allowed under the terms of the
1979 Israeli-Egyptian peace
treaty.
Labor and Likud were unable to
reconcile their different ap-
proaches before the Taba talks
were resumed last week after a
prolonged hiatus.
TAMIR WAS said to be inching
toward a practical discussion of
how to prepare for arbitration, for
example, the nature of the ques-
tions the arbitrator would be ask-
ed to decide on, while trying con-
ciliation essentially compromise
in the interim.
The dual process would be given
a trial period, presumably three
months, after which, if concilia-
tion fails, arbitration would be
automatic.
Highly placed sources told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the major obstacle is Egypt's ab-
solute refusal to countenance even
the use of the term conciliation
and Shamir's equally adamant in-
sistence on conciliation.
Continued from Page 1-A
Israel's economic difficulties,
compounded by the influx of
20,000 Ethiopian Jews in the past
year, necessitate enhanced giving
on a communitywide basis.
"Operation Moses proved to the
world once again that Jews will do
whatever is required to preserve
the well being of our people," he
said.
"While many Ethiopian Jews
are now secure in Israel, there is
still before use the task of ade-
quately absorbing them into
modern Israeli society. The ac-
tions that we take today will have
a great deal to say about the
welfare and security of the Jewish
State for years to come."
The dinner, which coincides
with the final night of Chanukah,
will feature a candlelighting
ceremony and a special event,
which Bloom and Scharlin pro-
mise will be long remembered by
dinner participants. "The cam-
paign opening dinner blends the
seriousness of our commitment to
Jewish needs with a celebration of
our Jewish identity and heritage,"
noted Bloom.
SCHARLIN CONCLUDED,
"The opening dinner program
should appeal to all dinner at-
tendees, and it should serve to
motivate them to participate fully
in the Federation campaign as
workers. If each individual who
attends the dinner is willing to
carry our campaign message to
just a few friends and colleagues,
the quality of Jewish life will be
enhanced well beyond all our
expectations."
Scharlin serves as a member of
Federation's Campaign Steering
Committee and is a federation
vice president. Bloom, also a
Steering Committee member, is
director of the Governmental Af-
fairs Office of the Florida Associa-
tion of Jewish Federations. Also
serving on the Campaign Steering
Committee, in addition to
Podhurst and Adler are:
Myron J Brodie, executive vice president;
Michael M. Adler. UJA Young Leadership Cabinet
chairman; Arnold Altman. Special Gifts chairman;
Alan Aronson. Chaiak co-chairman; James C
Asher. Westview Country Club vice chairman;
Saby Behar. Super Sunday co-chairman; Yoshua
Sal Behar. Jack Belloek. Jeffrey L Berkowitz. Paul
Herkowitx. Richard BerkowiU. Young Leadership
Council campaign chairman.
Dr. Jack I Beme. Dental Division chairman; Judt
Billig. Super Sunday co-chairman. Thomas Bonn.
Food and Allied Trades Division chairman. Norman
Braman. immediate past campaign chairman. Alvin
Lloyd Brown. South I>ade Branch chairman; Hazel
Cananck. Aventura chairman;
Herbert Canarick. Aliance Division chairman;
Kalph Chemin. Sidney Cooperman. Westview
Country Club campaign chairman; Amy Dean. At-
torneys Division chairman, Dr Jay Ellenby. Mark
Knedland. Chazak co-chairman: and Harvey Fried-
man, Buddy 1'p Day co-chairman.
Also Barton S. Goldberg. Bankers Division chair-
man; Alfred Golden. Special Gifts co-chairman; Dr.
Elliott Gordon. Alei Halberstein. Latin Division
chairman; Charlotte Held. Buddy Up Day co
chairman; F.ira Kalx. Builders. Real Estate and
Allied Trades Division chairman," Jonathan Kialak.
Rose Klausner. Steven J Kraviti Vanguard Divi-
sion chairman, Jeffrey Lefeourt. Special Gifts co-
chairman; Donald E. Lefton. Summit Division
chairman. Jack 11 Levine. Young Leadership
Council chairman; Harry A (Hap) Levy, Joel Levy.
Norman Lieberman South Dade campaign chair-
man; Nancy Lipoff. Federation/Agency Campaign
Cabinet chairman; Norman H. Lipoff, Treasurer's
Committee chairman and Ellen Mandler
Also Stanley C. Myers. Project Renewal chair-
man. Gail Jaffe Newman. Women's Division cam-
paign chairwoman; Judge Robert H. Newman.
Super Sunday co-chairman; Gerald Olin, Missions
Committee chairman; Nedra Oren. Dorothy
Podhurst. Women's Division president. Forrest
Kaffel, Stephen L Riemer. Insurance Division
chairman; Louis Rones. Ellen Rose. Super Sunday
co-chairman; Sandi Samole. South Dade
Pathfinders co-chairman;
William F. Saulson. Super Sunday co-chairman;
Kenneth J. Schwartz. Maxine E. Schwartz.
Pacesetter Division chairman; Marc Sheridan.
Chazak co-chairman; Susan Rose Sirotta. Young
Leadership Council campaign vice chairman;
Howard Socol, Mercantile Division dinner chair
man, Guillerzno Sostchin. Eli Timoner. Multiple Ap-
peals chairman; Philip T Warren. Long Range
Campaign Planning Committee chairman; and Nor-
man L Weiner. Insurance Division vice chairman
Recognize
Israel,
Vatican Asked
NEW YORK (JTA) Edgar
Bronfman, president of the World
Jewish Congress, says that the
WJC "is launching a global cam-
paign to press for formal recogni-
tion of Israel by the Vatican." He
has urged the Jewish leadership of
70 countries where there are
Jewish communities from
Argentina to Zimbabwe to raise
the subject of diplomatic recogni-
tion of Israel at every meeting
they have with the Pope or with
reprentatives of the Holy See.
Stressing the WJC's commit-
ment to "a fruitful dialogue" with
the Church of Rome to achieve "a
normalization of relations" bet-
ween Catholics and Jews, Bronf-
man declared that the Vatican
"must understand that Jews are
unalterably united" in the view
that this cannot take place until
the Church accepts "the fun-
damental assertion of national
Jewish identity in our time," the
birth of the State of Israel.
KOOO
"Create Land From Sand"
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
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All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach. Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464


D
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Peres:
Air 'Cleared' in Pollard Spy Case
By YITZHAK RABI
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Shimon Peres
told a group of American
Jewish leaders here that the
air has been cleared bet-
ween Israel and the U.S. in
the case of Jonathan
Pollard, the U.S. Navy
counterintelligence analyst
accused of spying for Israel.
Addressing a breakfast
meeting of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations at the
Jerusalem Hilton Hotel, Peres
said, "During the past 24 hours
we cleared up a great deal of
misunderstanding and I am op-
timistic that we will return to the
close relationship between our
two countries which reached new
heights recently."
HE DISCLOSED that
Secretary of State George Shultz
had telephoned him at home at 3
a.m., local time, the day before to
discuss the case and clear up the
misunderstandings between
Israel and the U.S. In Houston,
Shultz told reporters the U.S. was
"satisfied" with Israel's apology
for the affair and "wholeheartedly
welcome it." The apology was in a
statement issued after the weekly
Cabinet meeting.
Peres said he and Shultz spoke
for more than 30 minutes and that
Shultz was not aware he had
awakened the Prime Minister
from sleep.
Peres stressed to the American
V
Prime Minister Peres
Jewish leaders that the Pollard
case was not one of Israel spying
on the U.S. but of a single person
Pollard spying. He reiterated
that the policy of the Israel
government is not to engage in es-
pionage in the U.S. The whole af-
fair, he said, was a test of rela-
tions between Israel and the U.S.,
and they have been cleared up
now, and "I hope they are back to
normal."
PERES ALSO cautioned that a
case like Pollard's should not be
perceived as a Jewish or national
affair but as a singular incident.
Israel, he said, would draw conclu-
Suspect Arson in D.C. Blaze
At Arab Organization's Offices
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
fire department suspects arson in
a blaze that raged through two ad-
joining buildings containing the
local offices of the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Committee
and other tenants here at the end
of November.
The fire, officially termed
"suspicious," marked the third
time in four months that offices of
the committee have been the
,itarget of apparently wilful
violence. The most serious inci-
dent occurred on Oct. 11 when a
bomb exploded at the Santa Ana,
Calif., office, killing Alex Odeh,
41, the committee's regional
director.
Only the day before he had ap-
peared on a television interview
program where he denied that the
Palestine Liberation Organization
and its chief, Yasir Arafat, were
responsible for the Achille Lauro
hijacking. An explosion ripped the
committee's office in Boston last
Aug. 16, injuring a policeman.
There were no injuries in the
fire here, but damage to the com-
mittee's offices alone are
estimated at $450,000. Ray
Alford, a spokesman for the Fire
Department, told reporters.
"There's too much there for it to
have been accidental but not
enough to declare it arson, so we
are classifying it at the present
time as suspicious."
James Zogby, former executive
director of the committee, said the
fire was not accidental. "We've
seen too many for it not to be a
pattern. At this point it's too
many times," he said.
The FBI reportedly suspects
Jewish Defense League involve-
ment in the fatal Santa Ana bomb-
ing, but so far no one has been
charged, and no arrests have been
made. JDL national chairman Irv-
ing Rubin, who denied respon-
sibility for the bombing, also
denied the JDL was involved in
the fire here, though the
authorities have not suggested it
was.
Meanwhile, the Los Angeles
police bomb squad safely charmed
a primed explosive device found
on the steps of the Masjid al-
Mumin Mosque near downtown
Los Angeles last Thursday. It was
discovered by congregants arriv-
ing for worship. No group has
taken credit for the attempt, and
none has been accused so fa.-.
sions from its investigation so as
never to repeat the failure.
Peres" references to the Pollard
case were largely in response to
questions from Kenneth Bialkin.
chairman of the Presidents Con-
ference. On his arrival here,
bialkin blamed the State Depart-
ment for criticism of Israel in the
American media.
He maintained, however, that
American Jews could not come to
terms with the Pollard case. If it is
indeed true that Pollard was sell-
ing U.S. secrets to Israel, it is a
very serious matter that
American Jews cannot accept, he
said.
Asked by Bialkin what priorities
he set for the Presidents Con-
ference to pursue in the U..S.,
Peres stressed the issue of Soviet
Jews and Jewish education. He
also urged eery American Jew to
visit Israel, at least once.
THE PREMIER was not overly
optimisic that Soviet Jews would
soon be allowed to emigrate. He
said the exit of Jews from the
USSR is closely related to improv-
ed relations between Washington
and Moscow; also, the Soviets will
not permit Jews to leave unless
they are bound for Israel, not the
U.S. or elsewhere. The majority of
Jews who left the USSR in recent
years have gone to the U.S.
Referring to the summit
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev in Geneva. Peres said.
"I was told Reagan spoke very
movingly in the recent summit on
the fate of Soviet Jews but Gor-
bachev was not moved."
He said Israel cannot see how
the Soviet Union can be a party to
an international conference on the
Middle East as long as it has no
diplomatic ties with Israel and
Soviet Jews are not permitted to
reunite with their families in
Israel. He added that an interna-
tional conference is no substitute
for direct negotiations between
Israel and the Arabs.
,Photo|
Zafer al-Masri, president of the Nablus local Chamber of Com-
merce, receives the news of his appointment as mayor from Col
Ephraim Sneh, head of the Civil Administration in Judea and
Samaria. The military government in the West Bank announced
the appointment as the first in a drive to reintroduce a measure
of local rule in several major West Bank cities which have been
run by IDF officers since Israel clamped down on the Palestine
National Guidance Committee three years ago.
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U.S. Officials in Israel on Spy Case
Continued front Page 1-A
Richard; John Martin, head of the Justice Department's
unit that manages espionage investigations; and Joseph
diGenova, the U.S. Attorney for Washington. There are
also members of the FBI, but they were not identified.
Pollard, 31, a U.S. Navy counterintelligence analyst, is
being held without bail on the charge of selling classified in-
formation to Israel. His wife, Anne Henderson-Pollard, 25,
is also being held without bail on the charge of unauthoriz-
ed possessions of classified documents.
Third Pan American Convention
WORLD UNION OF GENERAL ZIONISTS
SUNDAY, DEC. IS through TUESDAY, DEC. 17
Diplomat Hotel, Hollywood, Fla.
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO THESE OPEN SESSIONS:
Sunday, Dec. 15 at 8 PM
SPEAKERS:
_. Loon Dulzln
Chairman, Jewish Agency-World Zionist Organization
Alleck Resnlck
Pres., Zionist Organization of America
Jacques Torczyner
Pres., World Union of General Zionists
SPECIAL QUEST SPEAKER:
Yitzhak Modal
Finance Minister of Israel
See ttoHanukah Torch, Lighted in Modl'lm, Israal
Brought to tha Convantion by Masada Zionist Youth
Monday, Dec. 16 at 8 PM Kosher Dinner
SPEAKERS:
Senator Paula Hawkins of Florida
and
Dr. Juan Carlos Pugliese
President of the Parliament of Argentina
T. a*.~i- i2f Members: $35 Non-members: $50
Tuesday, Dec. 17 at 12 Noon Kosher Luncheon
SPEAKER:
Meir Rosenne
Ambassador of Israel to the U S
ZOA Members: $15 Non-members: $25
J^urthennformation, call (3051 566-0402


Despite Shultz Assurances
U.S. Said Still To Be Miffed
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Arens Back from Secret Visit
With Shultz in Washington
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- U.S. officials are in Israel
to interview two diplomats
and others said to be
-knowledgeable" in the
case of Jonathan Pollard,
the U.S. Navy con-
terintelligence analyst
charged with spying for
Israel. But whether
U.S.-Israel relations are
back fully on track remains
to be seen.
The severe jolt they sustained
when the Pollard case broke last
month appeared to have been
smoothed out by the compiemen-
tal statements of Premier Shimon
Peres and Secretary of State
George Shultz. But not everyone
in the Reagan Administration is
satisfied. Officials of the Justice
Department, which is expected to
bring Pollard to trial, are reported
to be still irritated by what they
perceive as Israel's lack of
cooperation.
ONE OFFICIAL quoted by the
media said news dispatches from
Jerusalem about Pollard's alleged
activities have provided more in-
formation so far than has come
through official channels.
Peres' statement came a full
week after Pollard was arrested
by the FBI near the Israel Em-
in Washington and after
two Israeli diplomats, one based
at the Embassy and the other at
the Israel Consulate in New York.
were called home.
It was an apology, not a formal
denial of the charges against
Pollard, and stressed that Israel
was "progressing vigorously"
with a full inquiry. "If the allega-
tions are confirmed, those respon-
sible will be brought to account,"
Peres said.
Shultz reacted promptly. In a
statement from Houston, the
Secretary called Peres' statement
"excellent" and said "we are
satisfied by it and wholeheartedly
welcome it"
BUT REPORTS persisted in
the U.S. and Israel that Peres'
apology and Shultz's eager accep-
tance of it were the results of an
early morning telephone conver-
sation between the two men, eight
hours before the Israel Cabinet
met and Peres released his
statement.
The implication, according to
analysts here and in Jerusalem, is
that the apology and its accep-
tance were agreed by Shultz and
Peres for diplomatic and political
purposes. The Israel government
and the Reagan Admainistration
were, each for their own reasons,
acutely embarrased by the episode
and anxious to put it behind them.
Peres vigorously denied such
was the case. He acknowledged,
however, that he received a
telephone call from Shultz at 3
a.m. Sunday. Dec. 1, Jerusalem
time he was awakened from
sleep and that they conversed
for 30 minutes.
THE U.S. understandably is
anxious to find out exactly what
information Pollard passed on to
Israel over an 18-month period
which ended last year for a
reported payment of $2,500 a
month and two free trips to
Europe.
According to media reports,
Israel was seeking information
about the military capabilities of
moderate Arab states friendly to
the U.S. Egypt and Jordan
which have been recipients of
American military aid. It has also
been alleged that Pollard passed
on to Israel American radar jam-
ming techniques and other elec-
tronic information. It was not yet
clear whether the U.S. will de-
mand the return of the stolen
documents or whether Israel will
comply if it does.
Another source of friction is
over how soon U.S. agents will be
allowed to interrogate the Israelis
believed implicated in the affair.
The Administration is said to be
pushing for an early date: the
Israelis prefer delay to let the
publicity over the affair fade.
Preliminary discussions began
in Washington when two senior
Israeli officials of the Defense and
Foreign Ministries met with State
Department officials for what was
termed as the regular semi-annual
review of the 1981-U.S.-Israel
strategic cooperation agreement.
The men they want to talk to
are Dan Ravid, deputy science at-
tache at the Washington Em-
bassy, and Yosef Yagur, science
attache at the Consulate in New
York. Both were called home
before they could be questioned by
the FBI much to the anger of
the Justice Department.
ALSO ON the list of interrogees
is Raphael Eitan, a former head of
Mossad, Israel's secret service,
and more recently an adviser to
Premier Menachem Begin and
Yitzhak Shamir on terrorism and
security matters. Eitan has been
named by the Israel media as
Pollard's "handler" and the man
who recruited the 33-year-old
American Jewish civilian
employee of the Naval In-
vestigative Service to spy for pay.
Eitan is a former aide to Ariel
State Hospitals Face Paralyzing
Close-Downs for Lack of Funds
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's
state hospitals are faced with
- paralysis and the danger of having
to close down because of a shor-
tage of funds to pay suppliers. The
director of the Sheba Hospital in
Tel Hashomer, one of the largest
medical centers in the country,
was quoted as having begged the
electric corporation not to cut off
eurrent to the hospital because of
a large debt because "this will be
condemning patients to death."
Other hospitals report they have
been informed by the Tnuva Dairy
, ( ompany that no more milk of
dairy products will be supplied
because of over $1 million outstan-
ding for past deliveries.
Other hospitals complain that
they have run out of injection
needles and equipment for blood
testing and dialysis machines, and
suppliers refuse to send in new
stocks until old deliveries are paid
for.
The Finance Ministry says the
Health Ministry must play its part
in overall budget cuts, and the
shortage of hospital funds can be
made up by prompt payment by
the Histadrut Kupat Holim and
other sick-funds, for patients' ser-
vices for which the funds have
been billed.
But the funds counter-claim
that they have not received their
promised subventions from the
Finance Ministry.
The situation is not helped by
personal animosity between
Labor Party Health Minister
Mordechai Gur and Lil>eral-Likud
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai,
who have been feuding in public,
trading insults and blaming each
cither for mismanagement.
Sharon and has been described as
a protege of the outspoken Likud
hawk who served Begin as
Defense Minister and is presently
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry in the Labor-Likud unity
coalition government.
Sharon, who returned to Israel
last week from a visit to Latin
America, angrily denied reports
linking him or Begin with the
Pollard case.
"ATTEMPTS IN Israel to pin
the Pollard case on previous
governments and on people like
Menachem Begin and on myself,
who had no connection with the
case, are very serious and already
have caused heavy damage,"
Sharon said. He implied the
linkage was attributable to his
enemies in the Labor Party.
Sharon shrugged off any con-
nection between Eitan and
Pollard Eitan himself has
denied it and insisted that he,
Sharon "didn't know anything,
and I wasn't involved."
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Minister-Without-Portfolio
Moshe Arens, a former Am-
bassador to the U.S.,
returned Sunday from an
unpublicized visit to
Washington where he met
with Secretary of State
George Shultz, reportedly
to discuss ground rules for
the interrogation by U.S.
Department of Justice
agents of Israeli diplomats
and other officials allegedly
involved in the Jonathan
Pollard spy case.
Immediately on his return,
Arens entered a closed-door
meeting with Premier Shimon
Peres, Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin. Pollard, a U.S. Navy
civilian counterintelligence
analyst, was arrested by the FBI
on Nov. 21 and charged with sell-
ing classified information to
Israel.
ARENS REFUSED to discuss
details of his trip to Washington,
nor would aides to the Prime
Minister. Official sources here in
dicated. however, that his mission
was to establish the limits of the
"interviews" the L'.S. in-
vestigators would conduct here.
The Americans were expected
to question two Israeli diplomats
called home immediately after
Pollard was arrested. They are II
an Ravid, deputy science attache
at the Embassy in Washington
and Yosef Yagur, science officer
at the Israel Consulate in New
York. Both are believed to have
had contacts with, Pollard.
In addition, the U.S. team was
expected to question Raphael
Eitan, former chief of Mossad, the
Israeli secret service, who, accor-
ding to unconfirmed media
reports here, recruited and
"handled" Pollard.
Greenwald Elected
CANTON, Ohio (JTA) -
Stanley Greenwald has been
elected president of the Canton
Jewish Community Federation,
succeeding Irvin Rudick.
"In spite of everything,
I still believe that
people are really good
at heart"
AMERICAN
SAVINGS
AND LOAM ASSOCIATION Of FLORIOA
AnneFrank's i
reminds us that different}
with different views, shouUbe
able to live in harmony.
American Savings ispkased
to help bring Anne's timeless
message to our community.
Anne Frank In The World: 1929-1945
An exhibition of her original
diary, 8O0photographs, a model
of the secret annex and a video
presentation.
Main Library
Metro-Dade Cultural Center
101W. Flagler StreetMiami
Dec. 1bIan. 2b


Kl<
Pa 9. A
Tk .
Page 10-A The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
World's Bloodiest Hijack
Many Nagging Questions Remain Unanswered
Continued from Page 1-A
Revivim in the Negev. She and
her travelling companion, Nitzan
Mendelson, 23. of Kibbutz Hulata
in Galilee, were the only Israelis
among the nearly 100 passengers
and crew of 14 nationalities
aboard the Egyptian Boeing 737
when it left Athens for the two-
hour flight to Cairo.
I could not speak to Nitzan
Mendelson. She was shot point
blank in the back of her head by a
hijacker and shoved off the plane.
Doctors at St. Lukes Hospital
here declard her clinically dead
with a bullet in her brain. She died
Dec. 1 after being hooked up to a
respiration machine that kept her
lungs and heart functioning.
Her parents, who flew here
from Israel, accompanied by their
own physician, made the agoniz-
ing decision whether or not to
unplug her from the life-
supporting device.
Artzi was also shot in the head
by the same hijacker and shoved
from the plane. Fate was kinder
to her. The small caliber bullet,
fired at about a six-foot range,
grazed the right side of her cheek
and ear lobe. When I visited her at
the hospital a few days later, she
had only a black-and-blue mark on
her cheek and a small bruise on
her ear. But she was still suffering
the traumatic effects of her
ordeal. She has since then
recoverd and returned to Israel.
ARTZI RECALLED that her
name was one of 11 called over the
loudspeaker. She believed she was
about to be released. Other
passengers recall that as she stood
at the edge of the plane door, a hi-
jacker shot her, and she was push-
ed or fell from the plane. Accor-
ding to Artzi, "I stumbled down
the steps and lay under them."
She could not remember
whether she felt pain. But she did
know deadly fear. She remembers
that a few minutes later there
were several more shots from in-
side the plane and first one body,
then another, fell down the steps
next to her. The first body to fall
was that of her friend, Mendelson.
Other surviving passengers told
me that when Mendelson heard
her name called she was frighten-
ed and crouched in her seat as if to
hide. The passengers recall that a
hijacker walked over and tried to
pry her out.
ONE PASSENGER, Tony
Lyons, an Australian, said that a
person who seemed to be an
Egyptair crew member dragged
Mendelson out of her seat at the
orders of the hijacker. Other
passengers confirmed this.
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60th Victim Flown to Her Burial
TEL AVIV (JTA) The body of Nitzan Mendelson
has been flown to Israel from Malta for burial in Kibbutz
Hulata, in Galilee, which was her home. Mendelson, mortal-
ly wounded by the hijackers of Egyptair Flight 648 in Malta
more than a week ago, died Dec. 1 at St. Lukes Hospital
there where she had been .kept alive by heart and lung
machines in the intensive care unit. Doctors had pronounc-
ed her clinically dead several days ago.
THEY WOULD NOT SAY whether she died a natural
death or was detached from the life-support machines. She
had been in a coma ever since she was shot in the head by a
hijacker on Nov. 23. Her parents were at her bedside since
then.
The death of the 23-year-old Israeli woman brought to
60 the number of fatalities resulting from the Egyptair hi-
jack. Mendelson and her travelling companion, Tamar Art-
zi of Kibbutz Revivim in the Negev, were on a holiday trip
to Egypt and the Far East when they became hijack vic-
tims. Artzi, 24, was also shot by a hijacker but only slightly
wounded. She returned to Israel with her parents Dec. 2.
Though they are not sure if the
crew member was a man or
woman, they recognized the dark
jacket of the Egyptair uniform.
According to these accounts,
Mendelson clung to her seat, digg-
ing her fingernails into the cloth
cover. She screamed, "Save me,
spare me." She was dragged by
her feet along the central aisle,
digging her nails into the carpet.
Survivors said this was an
unbearable scene, worse even
than the actual shootings. At the
open door to the plane, Mendelson
was shot point blank in the back of
her head.
A FEW minutes later a third
victim was shot, Patrick Scott
Baker, a 28-year-old American
fisherman-biologist. He tumbled
down the steps. Like Artzi, his
head was only grazed by the
bullet, and as soon as he recovered
his wits he sprang from the wet
tarmac and raced for the airport
control tower. Two other
Americans with him, both women,
were less fortunate.
Artzi lay under the steps,
disoriented, for what seemed like
ages, she said. "I did not know
where I was. I did not know
whether I was in Saudi Arabia or
Libya," she told me.
After lying motionless in the
rain and dark for about three
hours, she began to crawl from
the plane. One of the hijackers
saw her move and fired a bullet
which struck her thight. It as a
superficial wound from which she
has made a rapid recovery.
While Artzi lay dazed under the
plane steps alongside her un-
conscious companion, Mendelson.
a 38-year-old American woman,
Scarlett Marie Rogenkamp, a
U.S. Air Force employee from
Athens, was shot in the head and
died on the spot.
Another American woman,
Jackie Pflug, was wounded and
left sprawling on the steps. Both
women had their hands bound
behind their backs with neckties
taken from male passengers. At
about 3 a.m., local time, the hi-
jackers allowed Maltese rescue
workers to recover the bodies of
the dead and wounded.
THE CRITICALLY wounded
included a 20-year-old Arab,
known as Omar Marzuk, believed
to have been the leader of the hi-
jackers. There were five hijackers
in all. Early on, it was thought the
only Marzuk survived. A report
from Malta later said one of his
companions was wounded and
alive.
According to the account of the
Egyptian pilot, Capt. Hani Galal.
the hijack occurred about 10
minutes after leaving Athens,
when the plane leveled off at its
cruising altitude of 34.000 feet.
He said two men. one dressed in a
grey suit, burst into the cockpit.
One held a live hand grenade to
the pilot's head.
Galal recalled later there,
political statemei
only demand was thf
course from Cairo to Maflar-fts
soon as the air crew realized what
was happening, co-pilot Emad
Bahey pushed and emergency but-
ton which alerted dozens of radio
ilk
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stations in the area.
BEHIND THE cockpit, the
passengers heard a voice speaking
in English with what they describ-
ed as a heavy Arab accent. The
voice on the loudspeaker told
them, "This is a hijack." They
were warned to obey all orders,
the first of which was to hold up
their right hands with their
passports. One of the two hi-
jackers who had been in the
cockpit walked up and down the
aisles collecting the passports.
The first bloodshed occurred
when the hijacker came up to a
passenger sitting near the front of
the plane who was an Egyptian
security agent. A 20-year-old
Egyptian woman, Lauretana
Chafik, who was sitting next to
him, recalled that he reached
behind as if his passport was in his
hip pocket, pulled out a gun and
fired point blank into the hi-
jacker's face.
The mas was mortally wounded,
but his companion shot and
seriously wounded the Egyptian
security man. He survived only
because the hijackers were con-
vinced he was dead.
TWO EGYPTAIR flight atten
dants were wounded in the shoot-
out. Two or three bullets breached
the fuselage, causing decompres-
sion in the cabin. Capt. Galal dove
the plane to 14,000 fet and oxygen
masks were released.
A tense calm reigned for a
while. The hijackers began to
rearrange the passengers accor-
ding to nationality. Palestinians
were seated at the left rear, Greek
passengers at the right rear.
Those seat changes proved fatal
to eight Palestinian children who
died when the plane was stormed,
apparently from smoke
asphyxiation.
The two Israels were seated at
the right front, American and
Australian passengers next to
them. It was a process of selektzia
reminiscent of the death camps.
The plane made its first ap-
proach over Luqa Airport, Malta,
at about 9:30 p.m., local time.
Carmelo Mifsud Bonnici, Prime
Minister of Malta, told the Parlia-
ment later that if landing had
been refused the plane might have
disintegrated. As far as this
reporter knows, he did not explain
why. The hijacker's only demand
of the Maltese authorities was for
food and for a doctor.
WHO THiJY were, what thai-
motives were, remains a mystery.
Here are other questions yet to be
answered:
Why did the Maltese prevent
the Americans, who might have
supplied the Egyptian commando
with much needed technical know-
how sooner and probably saved
many of the 59 lives lost in the at-
tack, from arriving in time?
Was the Egyptian paratroop
commando as inefficient as it ap-
peared, or did it act on the basis of
wrong or misleading information?
Why did only one of the four or
five Egyptian security men on
board resist the hijack attempt?
Why did the other Egyptian air
marshalls fail even to try and
rescue their colleagues?
Did the Egyptian crew, as
some survivors charge, cooperate,
willingly or unwillingly, with the
hijackers in dragging out of their
seats for executions some of the
passengers, including the serious-
ly injured Israeli?
Where did the weapons used
by the hijackers come from? Were
they on board the place when it
landed at Athens from Cairo
before it was forced to fly to
Malta, or where they smuggled on
board at Athens Airport.?
Who were the hijackers, what
did they want and who was behind
them? During the 24 hours they
controlled the plane, they made no
political demands adn said
nothing which could reveal their
identities or political ideology.
$8 Million ..
Project Told
MONTREAL (JTA) David
Azrieli, a prominent Montreal
builder and former student at the
Haifa Technion in Israel, announc-
ed that he is sponsoring an $8
million project to construct a new
building to house the faculty of ar-
chitecture on the Technion
campus.
It will replace a 74-year-old
building erected in 1911 by Arthur
Ruppin which is no longer able to
satisfy the requirements of the
profession. About 70 percent of
Israeli architects graduate from
the Haifa Technion.
The new structure, to be named
the David J. Azrieli Building, will
provide space for 860 students. It
will house a 12.000-square foot
library, the gift of the Riesman
Family of Montreal and Rhode
Island.
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1
' York's Gov. Mario Cuomo (left) and Fred Wilpon, president
fi/w Nw> York Mets (right) are shown after receiving 1985
then S. Wise Awards from Howard M. Squadron, honorary
sident of the American Jewish Congress.
22 Cabinet Members
Went on 84 Junkets
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Twenty-two Israelis of
linet rank visited 94
tintries on 84 junkets
road in the 14 months
ice the Labor-Likud unity
lition government was
irmed, and at least one
lesset member has asked,
ere those trips necessary?
Yossi Sarid of the opposition
ivil Rights Movement (CRM)
the question in the context
Israel's severe economic dif-
Ities which the government
ks to solve by drastically cut-
expenditures and urging
ater productivity. He noted
! apart from the costs of their
leys borne by the taxpayers,
ministers' travels occupied
tectively 812 working days.
Deputy Finance Minister Adi
lorai, responding to Sarid,
tod that overseas trips by
lior government officials have
dined sijmificantly since the
vernment introduced its
iterity economic program last
y. Before that, the government
iroved 4X2 out of 544 requests
minister- and senior officials to
vel abroad. Since the belt-
htening. there have been only
requests and only 92 were ap-
ved. Amorai said.
THE ISSUE, long simmering.
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flared anew a week ago when
Minister of Tourism Avraham
Sharir returned from a 24-day trip
to the U.S. and other countries.
He was sharply criticized by the
public and the press for staying
away longer than he was authoriz-
ed to by the Cabinet and because
his absence coincided with the in-
ternational conference on tourism
of the Skol travel agents in
Jerusalem which, normally, the
Minister of Tourism would have
hosted.
When Sharir landed at Ben
Gurion Airport a week ago,
newspaper reporters handed him
a wreath of flowers bound with
ribbon bearing the words,
"Welcome to Israel."
The irony, not lost on the
minister, infuriated him. At a
Cabinet meeting the next day,
Sharir told his colleagues that his
presentation with a "funeral
wreath" was an act tantamount
with undermining the foundations
of the State.
IN A STATEMENT issued
later through the Government
Press Office, Sharir said the
criticism of his trip went beyond
acceptable limits. "Not one of my
critics took the trouble to find out
the details of my trip and how
carefully it was planned," the
statement said.
Sharir explained that he had
working meetings with tourism
representatives and had address-
ed Jewish congregations and com-
munity leaders on the importance
of tourism to Israel, especially
since it has lagged badly since the
Achille Lauro hijack in October.
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Cuomo Warns:
Politics, Religion Don't Mix in U.S.
NEW YORK New
York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo
has warned against any at-
tempt to try to make
America "a Christian na-
tion" at a dinner held by the
American Jewish Congress
at the Pierre Hotel here.
Gov. Cuomo addressed an au-
dience of 300 who gathered for
the presentation of the 1985
AJCongress Stephen S. Wise
Awards to the Governor and to
Fred Wilpon, chairman of the
l>oard of Sterling Equities and
president of the New York Mets.
Cuomo was honored for his
"lifelong commitment to human
rights and social justice."
"THE AMERICAN Jewish
Congress reminds us constantly
that one of the bases of our
democracy is the rejection by law
of the notion that any formal
philosophical or religious test
should be used to grant or
withhold the rights of citizen-
ship," Cuomo said.
"The truth is that some people
see a very different fundamental
principle, one that is contradic-
tory of this freedom. They tell us
that to be strong as a nation we
must return to what they say we
were meant to be a Christian
nation. "The idea that religion
and politics don't mix," Rev.
(Jerry) Falwell says, "was in-
vented by the devil to keep Chris-
tians from running their coun-
try," the governor continued.
The "Christian nation" concept,
we went on, "is a perversion of
our Constitution and a dangerous
one for all people who believe that
our greatest gift and our greatest
strength is the right to choose
what we will be and what we will
believe."
HE CITED the recurrence in
U.S. history of a "nativist senti-
ment" calling on people to stop
being what they are in order to
become "real Americans." The
Governor remarked that the im-
migrants who fought and died for
America "never forgot who they
were and where they came from
... They never gave up their
language or their faith. "Today,
he said, "we're stronger because
of the diversity the immigrants in-
sisted on and wiser. We've learn-
ed to encourage the identity of all
the fragments that have con-
tributed to our greatness."
Related to the idea of diversity
and pluralism is the idea of family
and the common welfare, the
governor said, noting that there
are those who would substitute in-
dividualism for compassion.
"At our very best, we have
helped ourselves by having our
people collectively, as a govern-
ment, help one another," he said.
Jews, he continued, have furnish-
ed an example. "Everywhere
where poverty and exploitation
were found, Jews have fought
against it," and have identified
themselves with the struggle for
social justice and educational
reform.
In his acceptance remarks, Fred
Wilpon said that "being a
humanist is not a luxury you
can l>e tough-minded, but not
hard-hearted." Mr. Wilpon was
cited for "distinguished leader-
ship in community relations and
social welfare.
HOWARD M. SQUADRON,
honorary president of
AJCongress, served as dinner
When the World was
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It rained over Hot Springs. Arkansas 3500 year. ago.
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chairman. Theordore R. Mann,
president, and Henry Siegman,
executive director of AJCongress,
presented greetings.
Wilpon serves as director of the
Foundation for Children with
Learning Disabilities, the New
York City Partnership and United
Services Organizations of
Metropolitan New York. He also
serves as a trustee of the Jewish
Institute for Geriatric care.
Previous recipients of the
Stephen S. Wise Awards have in-
cluded Golda Meir. Robert F. Ken-
nedy, Harry S. Truman, Adlai E.
Stevenson, Leonard Bernstein,
and Walter Mondale.
Police Not Sure Whether Murder
Was Intended To Terrorize
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
police have not yet determined
whether the murder of Aziz
Shehade, a prominent Palestinian
lawyer and political moderate,
outside his home in Ramallah was
an act of terror intended to warn
all moderates in the West Bank or
a criminal assault motivated by
one of Shehade's intricate, far-
flung and often mysterious
business deals.
The 73-year-old lawyer, describ-
ed by some as a multi-millionaire,
was killed by a knife slash across
the left side of his neck after park-
ing his car in his garage. He died
instantly. The weapon was found
50 meters from Shehade's home.
The police deduce from the
nature of the wound that at least
two assailants were involved, one
to hold the victim while the other
wielded the knife. But there are
no clues and so far no arrests.
Police said that for the moment
they were giving equal weight to
political or criminal motivation.
Shehade was considered one of
the leading Palestinian moderates
in the West Bank. Though he ad-
vocated a Palestinian state which
he saw living in peace side-by-side
with Israel, he favored dialogue
over violence. In 1968, he was Lie
first West Bank lawyer to break a
strike called by Palestinian
lawyers to protest Israel's occupa-
tion of the territory after the Six-
Day War.
In 1977, before President An-
war Sadat of Egypt visited Israel,
Shehade was one of a group of
Palestinians who met with U.S.
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and presented him with a position
paper outlining a peaceful solution
of the Israeli-Palestinian dispute.
Shehade was known to have
close contacts with senior Israeli -
officials which, alone, would make
him a likely target of Palestinian
extremists. But in recent years he
has shied away from politics,
devoting himself full time to his
law practice and business which
he conducted with both Jews and
Arabs. For that reason, many
observers doubt the murder was
politically inspired.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Mubarak's 'Warm' Message
Raises Cautious Optimism
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue. Miami. Florida
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
President Hosni Mubarak's
latest message to Premier
Shimon Peres has raised ge-
nuine, if cautious optimism,
here, that Israeli-Egyptian
relations will soon be
significantly improved.
The message was delivered to
Peres by Egypt's Oil Minister, Ab-
President Mubarak
dul Hadi Kandil, who came here
on a two-day official visit. Its con-
tents were released on the eve of
the departure for Cairo of a high
level Israeli delegation to resume
talks with Egypt over the Taba
border dispute.
The message, warm and friend-
ly in tone, dealt with the peace
process, bilateral issues and the
murder of seven Israeli tourists at
Ras Burka in Sinai in October by
an alleged berserk Egyptian
policeman.
FOUR OF the victims were
children, and passions are still
running high in Israel because of
allegations the Egyptian
authorities were tardy in pro-
viding medical help and because
their official investigation is still
not completed.
Mubarak expressed understan-
ding of Israeli anger. He termed
the crime a deviant act that did
not reflect the feelings of the
Egyptian people. He said the in-
vestigation is being pursued i n ten
sively, and if there has been a
paucity of details it was only to
avoid interference with the
judicial process which he hoped
would be completed shortly.
Mubarak said he hoped the
Israelis would not judge the Ras
Burka tragedy simplistically. He
added that it was important for
Egypt to preserve its tradition of
safeguarding its guests.
THE EGYPTIAN President
had warm words for Israel's peace
efforts. He said he was aware of
Israel's opposition to inclusion of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization in peace talks but
was convinced that PLO Chief
Yasir Arafat understands he must
take a stand against terrorism.
According to Mubarak, the
chances for regional peace have
improved because certain parties
who did not accept the idea of co-
existence with Israel have recent-
ly moved in that direction. He
hoped bilateral relations with
Israel would improve, though they
have not as yet, and noted that the
Taba talks are about to be resum-
ed after a long hiatus.
The Israeli view here is that the
new round of talks will take place
under much more auspicious cir-
cumstances in light of Mubarak's
letter to Peres.
THE ISRAELI negotiating
team which went to Cairo consists
of Gen. Avraham Tamir, director
general of the Prime Minister's
Office; David Kimche, director
general of the Foreign Ministry;
and Dov Sion, of the Defense
Ministry.
Kimche recently accused Egypt
publicly of some 40 violations of
the 1979 peace treaty clauses
delaing with the normalization of
relations between Egypt and
Israel.
Normal relations and the Ras
Burka killings are the first items
on the agenda of the Cairo talks.
They were to be followed by the
Taba border dispute. The Israeli
delegation is itself divided on that
issue. The Prime Minister's Of-
fice, representing Labor Party
views, is willing to accept Egypt's
demand for arbitration. The
Foreign Ministry, controlled by
Likud, insists that conciliation
must be given a serious try, with
arbitration only a last resort.
With respect to the Ras Burka
affairs, Sion is scheduled to con-
sult with Egyptian Gen. Tarek
Labib on procedures for the
evacuation of Israeli tourists from
Sinai in cases of emergency or
serious accidents. Israel has pro-
posed that evacuation in such in-
stances should be coordinated
with the Multinational Force in
Sinai.
Like It or Not
PLO Sole Representative
Of Palestinians Mubarak
WASHINGTON (JTA) "The PLO is the sole
representative of the Palestinians, whether we like it or
not," said Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in an inter-
view with The Washington Post published Monday. He said
the United States should not try to weaken the strength of
the PLO, saying, "Trying to solve the problem and, at the
same time trying to ignore the PLO this will never lead
to a comprehensive peace."
IN AN HOUR-LONG interview in the Oruba Palace in
Cairo, Mubarak also praised Israeli Premier Shimon Peres
for his "flexibility" on a number of issues and suggested,
the Post reported, that the only thing now blocking a
meeting between the two leaders is the dispute over Taba.
Such a meeting, Mubarak said, could be( accompanied by a
return to Israel of Egypt's Ambassador, who was
withdrawn in 1982.
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Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Maritime Exhibit from Israel
\ookcase
About Yael's Father And Herself 0n View At Miami'8 PIanet 0cean
JllyMORTONI.TEICHER
Lv Father, His Daughter. By
P Yel Dayan. New York: Far-
rgr, Straus and Giroux, 1985.
289 pp- J17-95.
I An accomplished writer with
Lral fine books to her credit,
Fiel Dayan has beautifully
Lonstrated her literary talents
Tthis excellent book. She has ac-
biplished the unusual feat of
mbining a penetrating
_*fraphy of her father. Moshe
Ciyan, with a revealing
Lobiography and a perceptive
Cscription of their difficult rela-
ionship to each other.
J She has also managed to include
listinctive portraits of her
Tjther, her step-mother, her
[randparents and her two
rothers. All of this is achieved in
lyle that is disarmingly direct
i simple.
|lHE BOOK opens with a
rription of Moshe Dayan's
jth and funeral in 1981. These
rents are plainly set forth in
ightfoward fashion, but the
.ation can take its place with
jer literary references to death,
t can rank alongside Tennyson's
joem on the death of King Ar-
fcur, Tolstoy's short story, "The
SUBJECT
th of Ivan Ilych" and Thomas
's eloquent accounts of the
th of his father and his
ther. Ben.
Death is a perennial subject in
rature, and each author puts
or her own stamp on the
ital. Yael Dayan's imprint is
and clean. It moves us with
honesty and its lack of
ornment.
Although she returns to Moshe
ayan's death and its consc-
iences at the end of the book, the
nor moves easily from beginn-
at the end of his life to Dayan's
tual beginnings and roots.
MOSHE DAYAN'S parents
ho came to Palestine from
ussia were among the founders
I the first kibbutz, Dagania,
'here Dayan was born. When he
'as six years old, the family mov-
to Nahalal to help establish a
iav which retained some of
cooperative features of the
ihbutz but which afforded oppor-
wities for privacy and individual
Wiership. Dayan lived in other
aces, but Nahalal was always
ome, and that is where he is
uried.
Dayan's life before the rebirth
'Israel is traced through his join-
ng the Haganah at the age of 14,
is marriage to Ruth, his training
"th Wingate, the birth of Yael
her brothers, his imprison-
ient by the British, his participa-
on in the invasion of Syria where
* lost an eye, the first of many
eturns to Nahalal, his service at
aganah headquarters, his elee-
on as a delegate to the Zionist
ongress in 1946 in Basel and his
womplishments in the Israeli
ar of Independence where he
AUTHOR
became Ben-Gurion's favorite
general.
After the War of Independence,
Dayan was a commander in the ar-
my, eventually being appointed
Chief of Staff of Israel's Armed
Forces. In 1959, Dayan entered
politics, and for most of the rest of
his life, he was a cabinet minister
and a member of the Knesset.
HE SERVED as Minister of
Defense and as Minister of
Foreign Affairs. In this latter
capacity, he played an influential
part in the Camp David negotia-
tions. This did not completely
make up for his role in the Yom
Kippur War, and eventually, the
cabinet of which he was a member
under Golda Meir, was forced to
resign.
Strewn throughout the stories
of war, government service and
archaeological collecting are clues
of stormy father-daughter rela-
tionships, many of them con-
nected to Dayan's incessant
philandering. The daughter
reiterates her love for her father
and his love for her, but these
come across as overly loud
protestations.
They fail to prepare the reader
for the stinging bitterness which
was evoked by Dayan's last will
and testament. After many affairs
with "vulgar women," as his
daughter calls them, Dayan finally
divorced his wife and married
Rahel to whom he willed
everything except for a small
piece of land and a half-interest in
an apartment. Apparently, there
was a sizeable estate, built up by
lecture fees, book royalties and
profits from selling archaeological
artifacts.
NO MONEY was left to the
three children nor to Dayan's first
wife. Consideration was given by
them to contesting the will, but
this was rejected, and lawyers
finally worked out a settlement
that did not ease the anger and
resentment. Udi, the older of
Dayan's two sons, wrote a "Let-
ter to a Dead Father" in which he
spoke hatefully of Dayan's
"greed, his lust for third-rate
women ... his craving for fame
and publicity, his translating
ideals into hard cash and his im-
morality." Similarly, Yael accuses
her father of being "miserly,"
obsessed with money and of
leading a "petty, pseudo-
sophisticated life."
There is no denying that Dayan
was an important statesman and a
military hero. He lived for 33
years after the State of Israel was
reborn, and he was a significant
participant in the events of those
years, often making crucial con-
tributions to shaping those
events. This book exposes many of
his personal frailties and raises
the question of whether he and
David Ben-Gurion were correct in
their insistence that one's private
life and morals are nobody's
business.
When Dayan's first wife, Ruth,
appealed to Ben-Gurion because
of her husband's constant extra-
marital relationships, Ben-
Gurion's response was that her
husband was going to be a na-
tional leader and that "his record
in bed was not going to stand in
his way."
THE FACT is, however, that
for whatever reason, Dayan never
became Prime Minister. Should
one accused of personal immorali-
ty be permitted to capture the
highest position in his country?
More than enough information is
provided in this book to enable its
readers to deal with this question.
Two Senior Likud Aides
Arrested for Alleged Land Fraud
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
arrest of two senior Likud aides
for alleged involvement in a West
Bank land sales fraud has sparked
new tension between Likud and
its Labor Party partner in the uni-
ty coalition government. Likud
MK Haim Kaufman, chairman of
the coalition executive, accused
Police Minister Haim Barlev
(Labor) of waging a political war
and warned "he will pay the
price."
The detained officials are Avi
Tzur, spokesman for the Airport
Authority, and Claude Malka,
assistant to Transport Minister
Haim Corfu of Likud. Both were
formerly aides to Deputy Minister
of Agriculture Michael Dekel who
was named Deputy Defense
Minister this week.
According to the police, Tzur
allegedly gave a Jewish contrac-
tor presently on trial a letter
informing the contractor that the
government had approved the set-
tlement of Kramim in the Samaria
distict when no such approval had
been forthcoming.
Tzur is also suspected of having
taken bribes. Police has testified
at the contractor's trial that some
of the bribe money went into
Tzur's pocket and some to Likud.
Kaufman accused Barlev of
political motives. He claimed
financial scandals involving
businesses close to the Labor Par-
ty were never investigated by the
police.
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
"Crossroads of the Ancient
World: Israel's Archaeological
Heritage," an exhibition of over
200 artifacts from Haifa's
Maritime Museum, will be on
display at Planet Ocean through
Jan. 31, 1986.
Dr. F.G. Walton Smith, Planet
Ocean's founder and the original
dean of the University of Miami's
Rosenthal School "of Marine and
Atmospheric Sciences, was the
primary force in bringing the ex-
hibit to Miami during its national
tour, which has included stops at
Harvard University, Atlanta and
Texas.
Dr. Smith, an internationally-
renowned scholar and educator,
often refers to Miami as the
"crossroads of the modern
world," and he has adapted the
phrase to capture the essence of
this exhibition.
DR. SMITH also heads the In-
ternational Oceanographic Foun-
dation, sponsor of the
presentation.
"It's ironic and fitting the ex-
hibit should be here," said Dr.
John Hall, chairman of the
University of Miami's An-
thropology Department.
"Especially when you consider
how Miami has become a major
traffic center where objects and
peoples meet, just like in that area
of the world in ancient times."
Star of the show is an exact
fiberglass replica of a bronze bat-
tering ram originally mounted on
the bow of a warship from the
Hasmonean culture, to which the
Maccabees belonged and noted for
its leadership and patriotism.
Artifacts on display cover a
wide period of time when Egyp-
tians, Phoenicians, Canaanites,
Greeks, Romans and Byzantines
competed on the high seas for
dominant positions in world trade.
According to Dr. Hall, the exhibit
shows how long trade has been oc-
curring in that part of the
Mediterranean, and the variety of
ancient cultures that were
present.
"The chronological sweep is
from 1800 BCE to the Sixth or
Seventh Century CE," Hall said,
"and it really shows the
unbelievable extent of trade all
around the world."
THE BATTERING ram, which
Hall described as "extraor-
dinary," was discovered by a
scuba diver off Haifa and is so
heavy, a duplicate had to be con-
tracted to make it mobile enough
for a travelling exhibition. It
measures roughly three meters
long, two meters high and two
meters deep.
Another interesting find is a
large, double-handled conical vase
called an amphora, in which up to
nine gallons of solids or liquids
were stored during ocean
voyages. Other containers on
display were used to keep a wide
range of goods, such as olive oil,
grain and wine.
Several bear the stamp of the
particular king in power at the
time the container was made, as
well as the marks made by the
port inspectors of the various har-
bors in which ancient cargo
freighters anchored.
HOW VALUABLE are these
objects?
"These are not exactly museum
masterpieces," Dr. Hall said, "but
they are of great historical value.
You just can't put a dollar value
on historical objects. All the pieces
are priceless documents of our
past, documents of life as it was."
"Crossroads of the Ancient
World" is open to the public from
10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. every day at
Planet Ocean's facility on the
Rickenbacker Causeway.
Thumbs Down
On $10 Million
JERUSALEM. (JTA) The
Knesset Finance Committee turn-
ed thumbs down Monday on a $10
million allocation to Histadrut's
sick-fund, Kupat Holim, which the
Cabinet approved Sunday over
the objections of Finance Minister
Yitzhak Modai to relieve the
financial crisis in the country's
hospitals.
The committee withheld ap-
proval because it was not satisfied
with explanations of how the
money would be used. Kupat
Holim, with a serious cash flow
problem, has been unable to pay
for patients' services for which it
has been billed.
The same problem has affected
other sick funds, with the result
that Israel's public hospitals can-
not meet bills long outstanding
and may be forced to curtail ser-
vices and possibly shut down.
Hospital directors across the
country said the situation has
passed the red line the danger
point. Several hospitals are digg-
ing into their emergency medical
supplies without approval of the
army which is in charge of
emergency medical store rooms.
The situation touched off an
angry exchange between Modai
and Premier Shimon Peres at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
U.S. Downplays It
Murphy's Meeting With Palestinians
Hitler's Birthday Brought Out
Nazis Living in Brazil

By JUDITH KOHN
(Washington)
And DAVID LANDAU
(Jerusalem)
The State Department
has announced that Assis-
tant Secretary of State
Richard Murphy met with
nine Palestinians from the
West Bank and Gaza Strip
but strongly played down
the significance of the
meeting held at the U.S.
Consulate in East
Jerusalem.
Department spokesman Ber-
nard Kalb called it "routine" and
cautioned "against reading any
new development" into the
meeting. He did not name the
Palestinian participants, saying
only that they are among the
"normal contacts" of the Con-
sulate in Jerusalem. He stressed
that the purpose of the meeting
was not to "screen candidates."
PRESUMABLY, he was referr
ing to Murphy's unsuccessful at-
tempt last summer to find Palesti-
nian representatives for a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation
acceptable both to Israel and Jor-
dan. The attempt foundered over
King Hussein's insistance on in-
cluding Palestine Liberation
Organization figures on his pro-
posed list.
Soldier's Body
Discovered
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
body of an 18-year-old soldier was
discovered on the road from Petah
Tikva to Lod near Mazor village
last Thursday night. He was iden-
tified as Moshe Levy of Petah
Tikva. He had died as a result of
stab wounds. Police said his body
had been burned after the
stabbing.
Police are trying to establish
whether his death was due to ter-
rorist activity. He had reportedly
been hitch-hiking home from an
IDF base together with another
soldier who left the vehicle earlier.
Police have asked the driver of a
car, which gave lifts to the two
soldiers and let them off at two
different places before continuing
to Rehovot, to come forward.
Police are also investigating the
deaths of two Arabs whose bodies
were found Thursday in an
avocado orchard of Moshav Sdot
Micha seven kilometers southwest
of Beit Shemesh, not far from
where the bodies of two Jews had
been found some months ago.
The murdered Arabs, whose
names were not made public, were
29 and 31 years old. They were
from Ramallah on the West Bank
and from East Jerusalem. One
was said to be known to the police
as involved in drug traffic. The
men had been shot in the head and
the chest. They had been'carrying
identity cards and a large quantity
of money.
Terrorism
In Miami?
Continued from Page 5-A
absurd, because under interna-
tional law, treaties that are signed
under duress are null and void. If
we sign agreements with ter-
rorists, it means we have to abide?
Baloney!"
The lack of willpower on the
part of governments acts as a
stimulus to terrorists," he said.
"The only way to negotiate with
them is to promise them anything,
give them Arpege, and then
drown them in it!"
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
Assistant Secretary of State Richard Murphy meets with Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir in his Jerusalem office. Murphy came
from Geneva to report to Israeli leaders on how 'the issues of the
Middle East and Soviet Jewry were handled at the summit bet-
ween President Reagan and the Soviet Union's Mikhail
Gorbachev.
Kalb declined to comment on
whether any of the Palestinians
with whom Murphy met were on
the Jordanian list. He said the
purpose of the meeting was to
discuss a variety of issues, in-
cluding President Reagan's
meeting with Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev in Geneva last
month.
Murphy, who is Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
arrived in Israel from Syria to
brief Premier Shimon Peres on his
latest contacts with Arab leaders.
He was accompanied by Wat
Claverius, the U.S. special envoy
to the Middle East.
THE STATE of Middle East
peace diplomacy is especially sen-
sitive at the present juncture, ac-
cording to Israeli officials, for
several reasons: Jordan and Syria
have recently started a process of
rapprochement after years of
estrangement; Jordan has given
PLO chief Yasir Arafat to unders-
tand that he must accept United
Nations Security Council resolu-
tions 242 and 338, the framework
of Mideast negotiations, by the
end of this year if he wants the
PLO to have any role in future
peace talks.
Israelis are wary of Jordan's
overtures to Damascus. Some
observers see in them a deter-
mination by King Hussein to
weaken the position of Arafat who
has long been at odds with the
Syrian regime. At the same time,
it is feared in Jerusalem that by
coming closer to Syria's President
Hafez Assad, a hardline leader of
the rejectionist camp, Jordan's
own position toward possible
negotiations with Israel may
harden.
Israeli officials do not expect
Arafat to conform to Hussein's
urgings to accept the two key UN
resolutions. They believe that
Hussein would then feel freer to
draw up his own list of Palestinian
representatives on a joint delega-
tion which would meet first with
American officials and then with
Israel.
A spokesman for Peres said
Murphy informed the Premier
that Hussein is determined to win
approval of a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation to
negotiate with Israel. Murphy also
briefed Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir.
JTA Services
r
Who says
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S
1^
160 ssA
Continued from Page 4-A
"perfects its plans to the smallest
detail. Every block where Ger-
mans live has a leader ..."
THE MAJORITY of the Ger-
mans in Brazil were enthusiastic
supporters of Hitler and his
aspirations to convert the
Southern Cone of South America
into another German state.
Mr. Burdett reported in 1940, in
a secret message to the Secretary
of State, that the Brazilian am-
bassador in Germany had told his
government that he had reason to
believe that "the Germans envi-
sioned taking over sections of
Brazil in the event of their victory,
and that they are already prepar-
ing 'Fifth Column' activities."
There is ample evidence that the
passage of more than 40 years has
not diminished Nazi sentiment in
Brazil. When police .interrupted
the Hotel Tyll meeting, they found
the participants wearing lapel
pins which said,
Freiheitsbewegung Deutsches
Reich (Freedom Movement: The
German Reich). In the hotel, own-
ed by Alfred Winkelmann, they
found large quantities of anti-
Semitic literature with swastikas
and photos of Hitler.
Winkelmann. a member of a
German spy network in the 1940s,
was convicted by a Brazilian court
and sentenced to two years in jail.
After the Itatiaia meeting,
Winkelmann told reporters for
the newspaper 0 Estado de Sao
Paulo (April 26, 1978) that "The
IV Reich is our dream and our ma-
jor objective. They killed Hitler,
but they will never kill his
philosophy, which is ours."
THE MASSIVE outburst of
anti-Semitic demonstrations in
the wake of Gustav Franz
Wagner's arrest in 1978 is even
more dramatic proof that Nazism
is still a vital and popular force in
the heartland of German-Brazil.
Given the large German popula-
tion and the popularity of Nazism
among them, the attitude of
Brazilian authorities toward this
anti-democratic menace is crucial.
During World War II, the govern-
ment investigated the Nazi net-
work, which included many Ger-
man cultural and social institu-
tions. One measure to control pro-
Nazi activities imposed restric-
tions on German schools.
German propaganda activity,
well financed and very extensive,
was carefully monitored, and
several German spy rings were
broken up. However, the govern-
ment was reluctant to take more
severe measures because of the
vital role which Germans, par-
ticularly those living in the w
played in the nation's economj]
Since the war. the Bra?i
government has shown Ifou
terest in curbing or invest
Nazi activities. The of
tion to the lUtiaia meeting,
the outburst of anti-SemitUm
followed Wagner's aTres?'
particularly troubling to Br,
Jewish community 0f
imately 150,000.
. MUNICIPAL and state offi*
in Rio Grande do Sul larKe|v^
counted the seriousness of
situation and federal offio
were also reluctant to attach i
portance to the renascent
activity.
O Estado de Sao PauU, renor;
on April 25, 1978 that in Bra*
the capital, the Nazi meeting,
viewed "without surpri,
because right wing governme
have such dread of Communi
that "they fall into the arms"
the opposite ideology x^
and fascism.
Colonel Rubin Ludwia
spokesman for President Ernest!
Geisel, told reporters that
Itatiaia meeting would not
brought to the President's
tion unless the matter bu,
more serious, dismissing it
"nothing more than a
together of nostalgic old men/'
Mayor Antonio Carlos Bor8M,
Santa Rosa audaciously suggesti
that Jews may be responsible I
the manifestations of Nazism
strengthen the defense of
Jewish people." _
AFTER THE war. thousands*
SS officers, Gestapo members 1
other Nazis fled to Brazil. Stat
Wagner, Cukurs and Mengelei
but four brought to the surfau..
Other Nazis have found shelter ml
the vastness of Brazil and the!
fraternal intimacy of large Gerf
man communities.
The restoration of democratic!
government this year, after 2l|
years of military rule, coupledl
with the publicity surrounding the!
Mengele case, create an opporl
tune moment for authorities tol
rout the Nazis from Brazil. Thel
United States experience mayf
serve as a useful model. Afterl
decades of similar indifference,!
the Justice Department establish-]
ed the Office of Special Investigal
tions (OSI) which has been in-1
strumental in locating, bringing to I
trial and deporting Nazi war!
criminals.
Fishgall Installed
ST. LOUIS (JTA) Sybil
Fishgall has been installed asl
president of the United Order of|
True Sisters.
FANNY 8c SOPHIE & JOLIE 8c EDDIE
Invite you to come
^l to a party. *
a Be A Part Of The Singingest, *r
^ Happiest Vaudeville Cabaret"
Direct From New York
Previews begin December 17
Tuesday thru Sunday at 8 PM
Wednesday & Sunday Matinee at 2 PM
Friday & Saturday Late Show at 10 30 PM
Tickets $15 & $12 50 (2 Free Drinks)
Special Preview Prices December 17-19.
CLUB SANS SOUCI SANS SOUCI HOTEL
31st and Collins Ave Miami Beach
Foi reservations and group bookings call
(305) 458-1494 orDade (305) 674-8774
Group Discounts Available


\W. Bank Arabs
Put Off By PLO Terrorism
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
By YITZHAK RABI
IjERUSALEM (JTA)
1 f),e recent wave of ter-
Lst attacks the Achille
lauro hijack and the
Lrders of Israelis in Lar-
a, Cyprus and Barcelona
have proven to be
Liter-productive as far as
lalestinian Arabs are
ncerned.
jffhe Palestinians are beginn-
L to realize that such outrages
fcally damage their cause and
. the first time, local Palesti-
bns have openly criticized the
llestine liberation Organization,
dI. Ephraim Sneh, head of the
Jest Bank civil administration,
Ed a meeting of the Conference
] Presidents of Major American
Ivish Organizations at the
ilem Hilton Hotel.
[ACCORDING TO Sneh, West
Palestinians are becoming
i moderate. A majority of
n no longer talk of pushing the
ielis "into the sea," and most
; of negotiations with Israel
J the basis of the June, 1967
lrders, not the borders of the
J47 UN partition resolution as
ley have in the past. The Palesti-
salso recognize that Jordan is
necessary partner in any
Kotiations with Israel, Sneh
_ jt, he cautioned, if militancy is
i the wane among West Bank
lestinians the territory was
faatively quiet in November
iich in the past has been a very
lolent month they are sinking
o pessimism and despair. They
i disappointed because Jordan
i not offered much help and
ause Israel has not been more
Irthcoming with compromise.
lit would be dangerous,
pwever, for Israel to draw the
ong conclusions from the sp-
ent apathy of the Palestinians,
'h warned. This situation can
to desperation and despera-
ican erupt in violence, he said.
75 members of the
esidents Conference delegation
de their first offical tour of the
Bank the next day. They
sited the Jewish settlement,
riel, in the Samaria district
here they were greeted by flag-
ving school children who
Irenaded them with a medley of
Tebrew songs. In addition to the
hool, they visited a hi-tech fac-
r and met with the Mayor, Ron
nman.
American Jewish leaders
ously were impressed. Some
later that they had gotten "a
'ererent feel" for the settlers'
One member of the delega-
said that he got a new
^rspective on Israel's security
n he found he could see the
alom Tower, a high rise office
"Wing in Tel Aviv, from Ariel.
The Presidents Conference
legates heard a vigorous debate
Sholom Aleichem's
Daughter Dead, 94
NEW YORK (JTA) Marie
we, the last surving child of
w>m Aleichem has died at the
*wh Home for the Aged. She
18 94 years old. Waife, who
metimes used the name Marie
atfe-Goldberg after her mar-
e to R.Z. Goldberg, the Yid-
^ journalist who died in 1974,
the author in 1968 of "May
wer, Sholom Aleichem."
}j the last of Aleichem's six
wen, she faithfully carried out
; request in his will that his
Pendants assemble with
ends on the anniversary of his
W to read his stories and to
Wude the gathering by serving
B and cookies.
over the future of the territories,
a problem that divides Israelis and
also American Jews. The Labor
Party's case for territorial com-
promise as they way to peace was
presented by Abba Eban, chair-
man of the Knesset's Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee and
a former Foreign Minister. Likud
MK Dan Meridor argues his
party's stand that the territories
are an indivisible part of Israel
and any compromise would
threaten its survival.
ACCORDING TO Eban, the
real issue is not where Israel's
borders will be but what kind of
state it will become in the future.
Israel, he said, "must disengage
itself from the Arab population of
the West Bank and Gaza in order
to remain a Jewish state."
Meridor claimed that regardless
of objections by the Arab popula-
tion, "we must deal with reality,
not with wishful thinking." Giving
up any part of the territories
would pose a major security
threat to Israel, he said.
Considerable time was devoted
by the Jewish leaders recently to
the case of Jonathan Pollard, the
U.S. Navy counterintelligence
analyst arrested for allegedly spy-
ing for Israel. Addressing the
group, Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin rejected as "total
nonsense" and "completely incor-
rect" reports that Israel used in-
formation provided by Pollard to
carry out its air raid on the PLO
base in Tunisia Oct. 1.
"ISRAEL WOULD have been
in bad shape if it had to depend on
such sources to carry out such a
raid," Rabin said. He said that
while the Pollard case has "over-
shadowed" U.S-Israel relations,
he believed the solid friendship
between the two countries will not
be affected in the long run.
Speaking on security matters,
Rabin said the most powerful
threat to Israel now comes from
Syria. He warned that while Israel
took serious risks by reducing its
defense budget by $650 million
this year, the Arab countries are
re-arming themselves on a
massive scale, spending more
than $20 billion a year on Soviet
and Western arms.
Rabin acknowledged that ter-
rorism cannot be eliminaed
altogether. But he vowed that
Israelis, who have to cope with
terrorism daily, will continue to
fight it with the goal of "minimiz-
ing our damage and maximizing
their (the terrorists) damage.
Former Prisoner of Conscience Ida Nudel was exiled to Moldavia
after a four-year banishment in Siberia as punishment for her
advocacy on behalf of the Gulag's denizens. In a photo obtained by
the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry, she sits and waits for news
of yet another application to emigrate to Israel. SSSJ urges let-
ters of support to Nudel at Ulitsa Sovietskaya 69, Apt. 2,
Bendery, Moldavian SSR, USSR.
Bill To Decriminalize Homosexuality
JERUSALEM (JTA) A bill
to de-criminalize homosexuality
and anal intercourse between men
and women was introduced in the
Knesset Monday. Its sponsors,
Shulamit Aloni and Yossi Sarid of
the Civil Rights Movement
(CRM), argued that such acts bet-
ween consenting adults in privacy
have no place in the Criminal
Code. In practice, they have rare-
ly been prosecuted.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1966
After \j\j years
of achievement, we're still
At AM IT Women we're
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It's one word that sums up our
tremendous success of the past
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Because beginning new pro-
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Women and continues to be our
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In fact we've made it our
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J


Je wisli Floridia
Miami. Florida Friday, December 13,1985 Section B
Rabbi Gary Glickstein
Jewish National Fund
Annual Banquet Sunday
The Annual Jewish National
fund Tribute Banquet will be held
unriay, in the Konover Hotel at
loon, and will be a tribute to the
rompletion of the Menachem
iegin ami Aliza Begin Peace Park
the Negev, scheduled for the
nd of the year.
The Peace Park Project was
auncheu in Miami in December
984 with the appearance of Am-
assador Moshe Arens, former
lefense Minister, and presently
linister without Portfolio, and
be concluded with the ap-
arance of Ambassador Eliahu
len Elissar, first Israeli Am-
issador to Egypt, former chair-
an of the Knesset Defense and
oreign Affairs Committee,
Baar currently serves as a
lember of the committee.
"Ambassador Elissar was a
UitDt leader and fighter for
irael Independence and has con-
futed immeasurably for the
r Temple Israel Business
rVm Forum, in its second
EL Miami'* Reform con-
K071- wiU meet on Thurs-
Vhf 19 ** 7:1*5 fir
jt and conversation
""* newest of Miami's an-
"*n John Hambrick.
peace process and the welfare of
Israel" said Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, chairman of the .INF
Executive Board.
Ambassador Elissar. was born
in Poland and smuggled to Israel,
from Europe during the
Holocaust.
He studied in England and took
his doctoral studies at the Univer-
sity of Geneva. He served with
Israel's Foreign Ministry in
France and America, and Egypt.
Following President Sadat's
visit to Jerusalem in 1977. Dr.
Ben Elissar headed the Israeli
delegation to the Cairo talks. He
is co-author of "The Arab-Israel
COnflict" and is author of "The
Foreign Policy of the Third Reich
and the Jews."
Proclamations will be presented
by the City of Miami Beach and
Dade County.
A musical Program is being ar-
ranged by Maestro Shmuel
Fershko.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, is chair-
man Jewish National Fund Foun-
dation and Abraham Grunhut,
President JNF Greater Miami.
$10 Million
For Health Care
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet approved an additional
$10 million for health care as
hospitals, unable to pay their bills,
said they were running out of
medicine, food and fuel. The
Tnuva dairy conglomerate has
stopped supplying several
hospitals with milk, saying the
Finance Ministry owes it some
$1.3 million.
A Cabinet spokesman said the
extra $10 million was for the
Histadrut's sick-fund to help pay
its debts to government and
Histadrut-owned hospitals. Some
hospitals are seeking private
donations to provide food and
medicine.
Beth Sholom's New Rabbi
He's Aware Of Shoes He Must Fill
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Funk and Wagnalls defines
"dynamic" as "mentally or
spiritually energetic, forceful or
powerful." To the members of
Miami Beach's Temple Beth
Sholom, it means Rabbi Gary
Glickstein.
The 38-year-old native of Santa
Monica, Calif., arrived in
November to assume respon-
sibilities for the congregation's
spiritual welfare after Dr. Leon
Kronish. Founding Rabbi, was
felled by a stroke. Now, after his
first full month on the job, the
word is out: Temple Beth Sholom
is doing just fine.
"WHEN YOU follow in the
footsteps of a man like Rabbi
Kronish," Glickstein said, "you
realize that you can never fill his
shoes. He has a unique place in the
world, in Miami Beach, and in
Jewish history." Kronish, who
still maintains an active, although
reduced role at Beth Sholom,
grew with his congregation from
its founding families to its current
level of "around 1.200," accor-
ding to Glickstein.
"My role right now is to find my
own place, to use my unique
talents," he said, even though cer-
tain aspects of his job are as yet to
be determined. The first hurdle
Rabbi Glickstein encountered was
establishing a rapport with his
staff, as well as chemistry with
the congregation. "My first priori-
ty is to start the temple moving
again, to provide it with some
direction."
Apparently, the congregation
had been stunned by Dr.
Kronish's illness and found it
almost impossible to find their
way without him. As a result,
Glickstein's immediate impression
of Beth Sholom after his arrival
was "a drifting ship without a rud-
der, one that needed guidance.
There isn't one area where I
haven't infused my energy. I'm
going to see that the light is
rekindled."
When it comes to del"neating
new programs, Rabbi Glickstein
refused to be specific. "My feeling
is that programs are less impor-
tant than setting a tone and infus-
ing the congregation with hope
for a strong future."
NEVERTHELESS, will any of
the Temple's services and pro-
grams be affected during this
transitional period?
"All of our cultural arts pro-
grams, which are a massive
undertaking, will remain substan-
tially the same," he said. "Our
religious school will be continuing,
as will our early childhood pro-
grams. We do plan on expanding
our adult education program
somewhat, including revitalizing
Continued on Page 2-B
Dedication For Lehrman Day School
Expanded Facilities Sunday
U. S. Congressman Claude Pep-
per, Temple Emanu-El Rabbi Irv-
ing Lehrman, the Temple Emanu-
El Congregation and other local
and national dignitaries will join
in the dedication Sunday, 10:45
a.m. of the newly renovated and
expanded Lehrman Day School,
according to President Sidney
Cooperman. The state of the art
facility is located at 727-77th
Street in Miami Beach.
Temple dignitaries speaking in-
clude Rochelle Malek, chair of the
Board of Education, Carol
Greenberg, chair of the
Redevelopment Program and
Lawrence Schantz, chair of the
Dedication Ceremonies. The
building will be open for media
and the public for tours after the
formal dedication ceremony.
Originally built to achieve the
educational goals of the eminent
Dr. Irving Lehrman in whose
honor the school was renamed in
1968 on the occasion of his 25th
anniversary as rabbi of the tem-
ple, this $2,000,000 facility
represents the finest available in
educational equipment and
materials.
The Lehrman Day School's new
building comprises 20 classrooms;
a library that exceeds Florida
state book requirements; a com-
puter lab complete with Apple
computers, Viewtron and color
monitors; a science laboratory the
equivalent of any university facili-
ty and fully equipped art and
music rooms. A large assembly
and dining hall, as well as a con-
temporary kitchen and three-
story lobby were also constructed.
In addition to the indoor
facilities, the Lehrman Day
School's outdoor plaza houses
facilities for a Family Center, a
spacious playground complete
with a toddlers' bike path and
vegetable garden, and a large
physical education area. The en-
tire complex is monitored by a
sophisticated security system and
full time security staff.
Dr. Lehrman recently told the
Temple congregation that "we
are proud to offer the best in high
quality education to our children."
Rosenne
Torczvner
Hawkins
General Zionist Union
Gathers In Hollywood Sunday
Cong. Claude Pepper
The third Pan American
Convention of the World
Union of General Zionists,
with some 200 represen-
tatives from a dozen coun-
tries in North and South
America, will open in the
Diplomat Hotel in
Hollywood on Sunday, Dec.
15 with three days of discus-
sion and debate featuring
some of the outstanding
leaders of Israel and world
Jewry.
Hosting the meeting is the
Zionist Organization of America,
whose president Alleck Resnick
of Baltimore, Md. will address
the opening session Sunday even-
ing at 8 p.m. Featured speakers
will be Yitzhak Modai. Finance
Minister of Israel; Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the Jewish Agency
World Zionist Organization; and
Jacques Torczyner, president of
the World Union of General
Zionists.
A HIGHLIGHT of the meeting
will be the carrying of a Chanukah
torch, initially lighted in the
Israeli town of Modi'im, ancient
headquarters of the Maccabees,
into the opening session by
Florida members of the Zionist
youth group, Masada. They will
run with the torch from Ft.
Lauderdale through the streets of
Hollywood to the hotel.
The convention will continue
Monday morning with a discus-
sion on the proposed merger of
the Herut and Liberal Parties in
Israel by Dulzin, Manuel Levinsky
of Mexico, and Carlos Yablonov-
sky of Argentina. At 10:30 a.m.,
Rabbi Joseph Sternstein of
Roslyn, N.Y., past president of
the American Zionist Federation,
will discuss the issue with Pinkhas
Goldstein, a member of Israel's
Knesset.
At a 12:30 p.m. luncheon Mon-
day, the speaker will be Elliot
Abrams, Assistant Secretary of
State for Latin-American Affairs.
THE AFTERNOON session
Monday, beginning at 2 p.m., will
feature a discussion on "The
Future of American Jewry As It
Relates to Israel and the United
States." Speakers will include
Paul Flacks, executive director of
the Zionist Organization of
America; Yehuda Hellman, ex-
ecutive vice chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations;
Israel Singer, director general of
the World Jewish Congress; and
Prof. Steven Spiegel of the
University of California at Los
Angeles.
Later Monday afternoon, a
discussion of "The Future of
Continued on Page 3-B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Rabbi Glickstein
Infuses Energy at Beth Sholom
Foundation Sponsors
Financial Seminar
Continued from Page 1-B
Sisterhood, which has been dor-
mant, and providing our
Brotherhood with new direction
and purpose."
Another area of concern is Beth
Sholom's youth group BESHTY.
"We're going to try to change the
focus of our youth group. Aley
Sheer, our Youth Activities coor-
dinator, has done a great job. but
without direction the program has
not been as effective as it could
be."
Specific changes?
"We're going to make some
cuts in order to infuse the group
with more Jewish content and
deemphasize sports and
entertainment."
Another move Rabbi Glickstein
initiated was assigning Assistant
Rabbi Paul Caplan the job of
leading BESHTY.
THE DEMOGRAPHIC data
depicting Miami Beach as a giant
retirement home hardly deters
Beth Sholom's new spiritual
leader from his path. A slight
dropoff in membership, he at-
tributes to attrition. However,
growth in the synagogue's Foun-
dation School for ages 2-6 indicate
increasing numbers of con-
gregants in the "under 45"
category, currently at around 20
percent of total membership.
"This is the group that is grow-
ing most rapidly." Rabbi Glicks-
tein said. "We are reflecting this
city's slow shift to a younger
population."
Before deciding to accept the
position at Beth Sholom. he in-
vestigated the quality of life in
Miami Beach. "In my opinion.
Miami Beach has turned the cor-
ner. This city is climbing toward a
demographic balance that will be
able to solve its problems. Miami
Beach is becoming desirable
again, and Temple Beth Sholom
will reap the benefits."
RABBI GLICKSTEIN confess
ed that Beth Sholom "has not had
a bottom line in the black" for
some time. Part of the problem,
he adds, is a direct result of Dr.
Kronish's inability to devote the
time and effort in fund-raising, a
congregational and philanthropic
endeavor in which his reputation
is unparallelled internationally.
This has made the temple's pro-
blems even more complicated,
coupled with payments due on the
construction of a new building.
The building project was launch-
ed with the dear understanding
that funds would have to be raised
to complete it. The rabbi's illness.
Glickstein explained, interrupted
the fund-raising effort. The pro-
ject is now near completion.
"Our major challenge will be
gearing up a campaign to secure
the future of this congregation.
We ail know that good fund-
raising is hard work, but now is
the time to endow the future." An
endowment program is currently
in the pWirT""g stages, an area in
which Glickstein looks to Dr.
Kronish for guidance and
drf wi"*-mT>r'"g input.
ONE PBKSON Rabbi Glicks-
tein can rttj on is impresaha Judy
Drucker. founder and director of
the Great Artists Series, which
has virtually become the nucleus
of musical life in South Florida.
"Althot^fa our deal with Miami
Beach's Theater of the Perform-
ing Arts may require a slight
reduction in the number of shows,
from eight to six. we will be conti-
noing with our other successful
programs.
Judy Drucker has become a
hiw hnlrt name, not only in South
Florida, howerer. She is an
emeiging giant in music promo-
tion worldwide. How does Temple
Beth Sholom view this?
"Judy and I have devaioped a
The Women's Committee of the
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will offer the
third in a series of financial
awareness seminars for women
entitled "A Woman and Her
Money, III on Monday, from 9:30
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Palace
Playhouse. Seacoast East
Building.
A large contingent of women is
expected to attend the seminar
which will focus on "Planning for
the Cost of Health Care." A pane!
of experts will cover such topics
as: "How can I best spend my
health care dollars for my own and
my family's benefit?: What are the
options available for caring for
frail elderly?: How can I deter-
mine the quality of a health care
organization?: and How can I re-
tain an income during my life
while receiving the tax benefits of
a charitable gift?"
The panel of experts include:
Dr. Phyllis Ehrlich, director of the
Older Adult Service Department
of the Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami: Steven
Sonenreich, director of marketing
for Mount Sinai Medical Center
Rabbi Glickstein in his study.
Broad Background of Study, Service
Gary Alan Glickstein was born
October 27.1947 in Santa Monica.
Calif. He graduated from the
University of California in Los
Angeles in 1969 with a Bachelor
of Arts degree. From there, he at-
tended the Hebrew Union Col-
lege's Jewish Institute of Religion
in Los Angeles, where he
graduated with a Bachelor's
degree in Hebrew Letters.
In 1974, Rabbi Glickstein was
awarded a Master of Arts degree
in Hebrew Letters from the
Hebrew Union College's Jewish
Institute of Religion in Cincinnati,
where he was ordained.
As a student. Rabbi Glickstein
was both rabbi and cantor at the
Vista Del Mar Child Care Service
in Los Angeles, and served as stu-
dent rabbi at Temple B'nai Israel.
Hattiesberg. Miss. From 197:574
he was an administrative intern at
the office of the president of the
HUC-JIR.
Since his ordination, he served
as assistant rabbi at Congregation
Bene Israel/Rockdale Temple in
Cincinnati until 1977. From there,
he became the assistant rabbi at
Temple Sinai. Worcester. Mass.
until his election to Temple Beth
Sholom last month.
He is a member of the National
Rabbinic Cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal, a year-round
delegate to the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds,
and a member of the National
Committee on Leadership
Development of the UJA.
Rabbi Glickstein and his wife.
Joan, have three children. Avi.
Sarah and Jesse. They reside in
Miami Beach.
good working relationship." he
said. "Let's face it. Through her
effort and skill. Temple Beth
Sholom has been able to ac-
complish something no other con-
gregation in the world has. Our in-
terest is to nurture and see the
cultural life of this congregation
continue to develop." And the
community's as well.
DOES THE temple's financial
problems jeopardize that
relationship?
Not according to Glickstein
"once we settle these financial
issues." He added, "We have to
remember that Judy has her own
ambitions, she's involved in many
cultural and vt endeavors. I think
that she enjoys her Beth Sboknn
activities, but I can't say where
she'll be in ten years. Her future is
where she wants to make it."
Drucker's influence extends in-
to educational areas as well. A
school of fine arts, emphasixing
activities like ceramics and
drama, has been instituted and is
generating a positive response.
Another new project that bears
her mark is a series of "Sundays
At 4:00" concerts in the main
sanctuary. Exhibitions in the art
gallery will continue to number
between six and ten per year.
The Omnibus Series of lectures
by noted world figures wffl also
continue, unaffected by the
changes taking place at Beth
Sholom.
One new program that Glicks-
tem is implementing is a Mkxvah
j>rogram for the eMerty which wiii
include hospital visits by lay
members of the congregation, as
well as regular visits to the homes
of shut-ins to oversee their
welfare. Also, transportation
needs of the congregation will be
met with a new service that will
insure that any member who
wants to attend a temple function
will be able to.
IN ADDITION to programs for
the infirm elderly, provisions for
the well-elderly are also under-
way. These include what Glicks-
tein calls "Intergenerational Ac-
tivities," where kids, parents and
grandparents will form sports
leagues and study groups.
"I want our congregation to be
thought of as a caring communi-
ty," he said. "We're going to
develop the concept of the extend-
ed family in this era alienation and
loneliness An innovative pro-
gram involving groups of ten
famines hmvurot (Hebrew for
"small grouping") meeting
weekly at congregants' homes to
disucss central themes important
to the members, is in the works.
Glickstein and his wife. Joan,
have three children, and no doubt
in his "beautiful old Art Deco
Mediterranean house built in
1932."
"What I want to do most is ig-
nite a spark in the members."
Glickstein said. "I want to get
them involved to show them
that it's not enough to buy a ticket
anymore This tempie will have
active participants.'
and Elliot Stern, associate direc-
tor of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged. Sue Ro*
Samuels, an attorney who
specialize in marital and family
law, and is past chair of the Mii
Health Trust will act as
moderator.
The program also will featun,
presentations by tax attorney
Norman H. Lipoff on "Tax Plann-
ing," and prominent investments
advisor Arnold Ganz. who will
discuss "Investment Strategies
for Longer Living."
Betty Cooper and Jackie
Traurig serve as co-chairs for "A
Woman and Her Money, HI."
Ellie Ganz is chair of Foundation's
Women's Committee.
Other Women's Committee
members are: Eva Abrahamer,
Florence Abrams. Bunny Adler]
Judy Applestein, Etta Bamett
Sue Berkowitz, Amy Dean. Eva
Feig, Mikki Futernick, Ceil
Greenspon, Charlotte Held, Gert
Kartzmer, Nancy Lipoff, Meryle
Loring. Bluma Marcus. Pat Pap-
per, Rosalie Prager, Gloria Raffel,
Anita Robbins. Sandra Saxon,
Marvis Schaecter, Maxine
Schwartz and Ray Ellen Yarkin.
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Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Brandeis University To Honor Five Local Residents
ILillian Kronish
|Rabbi Leon Kronish, spiritual
\er of Temple Beth Shalom in
Beach for more than four
des, and his wife, Lillian, who
) has been prominent in Jewish
nmunal life for many years, will
receive Brandeis Univer-
Distinguished Community
vice Award on Sunday, at a
i at the Grand Bay Hotel in
onut Grove.
The Brandeis Distinguished
Immunity Service Award is
tented periodically by the na-
|n's only Jewish-sponsored,
nsectarian university to men
1 women who have combined a
Iccessful professional career
i an exemplary record of ser-
> to their communities.
It the same event honoring the
kr.ish couple, three Miami
pdents, Melvin and Sondra
erand Donald E. Lefton, will
[formally inducted as Brandeis
plows. As Fellows of the liberal
s and research university near
fcton, they will join about 350
i and women from across the
tted States who lend support to
relopment and planning pro-
s at Brandeis.
ceeds from the event will go
General
[ionist
Jnion
Continued from Page 1-B
tin-American Jewry and Its
lations With Israel" will hear
p three leaders of the Jewish
pmunity of Latin-America:
i Gottlieb, of Brazil, Ber-
Olesker, Uruguay; and
rios Yablonovsky, Argentina,
p. Paula Hawkins of Florida
I Dr. Juan Carlos Pugliese of
jenos Aires, president of the
"-eso de Nacion (Parliament)
jentina, will address a Con-
loon dinner Monday night.
"BSDAY MORNING, the
jvention will discuss ZOA pro-
s ranging from investments in
if,1 .t0 youth development.
[W Azreah of Toronto, presi-
of the General Zionists of
". will speak on ZOA
Ue projects, while Bernard
" of Washington, national
an of the ZOA's Masada
movement, and Nathan
Mb of Sao Paulo, president of
general Zionists of Brazil, will
* n youth work in Latin
Pica.
**''s Ambassador to the
Ito a8, Meir Rosenne. will
V the convention Tuesday,
y'. to address a luncheon at
Pm The session will also be
f to the public.
|f luncheon sesson, which
Tsat 12:30 p.m. will be follow-
' tbe concluding meeting of
invention, at which Jacques
>erofNew York, president
I* ord Union of General
Pts. will preside.
events in recent years. A retired
dentist, he also is a past president
of Congregation Beth O'r in Deer-
neld, 111. and a former co-
chairman of the Young People's
Combined Jewish Appeal
Deerfield.
in
Rabbi Leon Kronish
toward scholarships at Brandeis
for South Florida students.
Rabbi Kronish, who has been at
Temple Beth Sholom since 1944
has been a leader of the State of
Israel Bond campaign since its in-
ception in 1951. He is currently
associate international chairman
of the Israel Bonds Organization
and national chairman of the
Israel Bonds Rabbinic Cabinet.
Lillian Kronish has also been in-
volved for many years in a variety
of religious, philanthropic,
Donald E. Lefton
humanitarian and community
organizations. She is a former vice
president of the Miami Beach
chapter of the Brandeis Universi-
ty National Women's Committee.
She also has served as president
of the local chapter of American
Friends of The Hebrew Universi-
ty in Jerusalem and has been pro-
gramming chairman and guidance
advisor to the sisterhood of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom.
A past commodore of the Miami
Beach Yacht Club, Melvin Homer
has served with his wife as co-
chairman of numerous Brandeis
Sondra Homer has served in a
number of leadership capacities
with the Brandeis National
Women's Committee. She is cur-
rently national chairman of its
Planned Giving program, and has
served previously as national vice
president and national chairman
for the organization, which has
more than 65,000 members in
various chapters across the coun-
try. Mrs. Homer also has served
as co-chairman of many Brandeis
events in the Miami area.
President of The Continental
Companies, developers, owners
and operators of nationwide
hotels, Donald Lefton has been in-
volved in many recent Brandeis
development events and has made
his philanthropic presence felt in
many organizations including the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the American Friends of The
Hebrew University, and the Na-
tional Jewish Advisory Council of
New York. Among his honors are
the State of Israel Bonds' Leader-
ship Award in 1980 and the
Founders Award of The Hebrew
University, presented in 1981.
Eight communal leaders in
South Florida Elaine Bloom of
North Miami Beach, Harry B.
Smith and Irma and Norman
Braman of Miami Beach, Gloria
and Leonard Luria of Miami, and
Judy and Sherwood Weiser of
Coral Gables are serving as co-
chairmen of the Brandeis event in
Coconut Grove.
Shul of Bal Harbour
Plan Chanukah Party
Shul of Bal Harbour will
celebrate Chanukah on Thursday,
at a Gala Outdoor Chanukah Par-
ty, in the parking lot of the Sun
Bank at the corner of Collins
Avenue and 97 St., facing the
shops. The candlelighting
ceremony will begin at 5:45 p.m.;
the party at 6:15.
Participating honorees will in-
clude Tim Cohen and Eric Turet-
sky, members of the board of the
Jewish Federation of Greater
Miami, and the board members of
the Aleph Institute.
On Saturday evening at 7 p.m.
John Sherman, Mayor of Bal Har-
bour and Mr. Sol Taplin will be
honored.
Sondra Homer
Melvin Homer
Rep. Lehman Speaker At
Ensign Bank's Senior Seminar
Ensign Bank, FSB, will launch
its Ensign Senior Club in the
South Florida area with a special
Free Senior Seminar, Tuesday, at
5 p.m., at Ensign's North Miami
branch office.
Congressman Bill Lehman will
address the assembled group of in-
terested seniors on political issues
relating to the older population.
Ensign Bank President and Chief
Executive Office Alan E. Master
will also speak, presenting his
forecast concerning the many
changes which will continue to oc-
cur in today's deregulated bank-
ing industry, and will offer an
analysis of the specific effects
these changes will have on the
senior population.
Ensign Bank was chartered in
1983 as a result of the merger bet-
ween Washington Federal in New
York and Community Federal,
Hialeah, Florida. The Bank now
has 16 offices in New York and
South Florida, and has nearly $1
billion in assets.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
LATE FRIDAY EVENING SERVICE
THIS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13
at 8 P.M.
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL PREACH ON
"THE CHANUKAH MYSTIQUE"
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN WILL CHANT
Assisted by the Temple Choir
SATURDAY MORNING SERVICE
at 9 A.M.
Very Interested Parents Sabbath
The Rabbi Will Preach
The Cantor Will Chant
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
State and City Officials Designate Anne Frank Day
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Latin-American Doc-
tor's Division recently held a parlor meeting featuring a lecture
on new developments in radiology with guest speaker Dr. Manuel
Viamonte, president and director of the Department of Radiology
at Mount Sinai Medical Center and University of Miami pro-
fessor. Seen at the meeting in the home of Elsie and Alex Halbers-
tein were: (left to right) Halberstein, president of the Latin-
American Doctors Division; Dr. Viamonte and Dr. Moises Rub,
president of the Latin-American Doctor Committee.
More than 375 people attended the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion 's Annual Reception held recently at Temple Beth David in
honor of community judges. Seen addressing the group were: (left
to right) Aaron Podhurst, Federation's general chairman of the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign, who spoke about the services offered to the community by
Federation's beneficiary agencies; Amy Dean, chairman of the
Attorney's Division; and Judge Robert H. Newman, who served
as co-chairman of the event.
A joint statement was issued in
Miami and New York City an-
nouncing the opening of the inter-
national exhibition Anne Frank In
The World: 1929-1945.
The exhibition marks the 40th
anniversary of the death of Anne
Frank at Bergen Belsen. It was
opened on June 12, in New York
City and was honored with a joint
resolution in the United States
Congress.
Created by the Anne Frank
Foundation of the Netherlands
and brought to the United States
by the American Friends of the
Anne Frank Center, the exhibi-
Lit Torch to Be
Flown From Israel
Throughout Chanukah, the
Greater Miami Jewish Community
Centers will celebrate the holiday.
Masada, the National Youth
Movement of the Zionist
Organization of America, will
send a runner, 19-year-old, Eli II-
dys, the son of a Holocaust sur-
vivor, with the torch from Modin,
the city of the Maccabean revolt,
to the States, as it does every
year.
The bronze torch will be lit in
Israel and flown on El-Al Airlines
under the auspices of the Israel
Programs office of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. The
flame is a symbolic proclamation
to the world of the spirit of the
Maccabees.
Plans have been made to include
the Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami in the event. Ac-
cording to Harry A. "Hap" Levy,
chairman of the board of the
Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, the four-and-a-
half mile run will involve Michael-
Ann Russell in North Miami
Beach, the Miami Beach JCC, and
the South Dade JCC.
tion is currently touring Europe
and will tour a total of 30 cities
throughout the United States.
Metro Dade Mayor Steven
Clark has designated Dec. 15 as
Anne Frank Day throughout the
county in honor of the opening of
the exhibition in Miami and will
officiate at opening ceremonies on
that date at the Main Library.
This will be the occasion for a
benefit reception for the work of
the Anne Frank Center in the
United States.
Merle Saferstein, chairman of
the Anne Frank Exhibition Civic
Committee of Greater Miami, an-
nounced that city-wide educa-
tional activities surrounding the
exhibition and in cooperation with
Dade County Public Schools hn.
been underway for some months
These include an art contest and
an easay contest on the theme of
Anne Frank's life and death.
In addition to local official,
other national and international
dignitaries who will participate in
opening activities include
Representative William Lehman
Bauco van der Wal, International
Director of the Anne Frank Foun
dation, Thomas Osborne
Associate Director in the United
States, and Archbishop Edward
McCarthy. L
A public grand opening of the
exhibition will take place on Tues-
day, Dec. 17, from 5 to 8 p.m. at
the Main Library.
Elie Wiesel To Speak
At Temple Beth Sholom
Temple Israel To Present Annual Combined Service
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
will present their annual combin-
ed worship service at the
Downtown facility. Kendall will be
closed for this special occasion.
The service will feature Rabbi
Haskell Bernat and Rabbi Rex D.
Perimeter, assited by Cantor
Jacob Bornstein and the Adult
Choral Society and Cantor
Rachelle Nelson with children
from both religious schools and
the Cantor's Club. Dr. Jack
Sparks will assist by coordination
of art and other special projects
United Way 12
Percent Gain
More than one thousand United
Way volunteers gathered at the
Grand Ballroom of the Omni
Hotel, Wednesday night to
celebrate the grand finale of Cam-
paign '85.
"Twelve weeks ago we started
our general campaign," Richard
G. Capen, Jr. campaign chairman
and chairman and publisher of the
Miami Herald, said. "Our goal
was to raise 10 percent more than
the $15.5 million raised last year.
We met our goal by raising
$17,385,002, but more important
than reaching the goal, we
boosted giving by 12 percent,
that's an increase of $1,861,918
new dollars." "Those new dollars
will allow the United Way, not on-
ly to continue meeting the health
and human service needs of Dade
County residents, but also to ex-
pand the number of pr 'rams."
Guillermo Benites and Leticia
Cnltava WLTV-Channel 23 an-
rs were Master of Ceremonies,
...
from both schools.
Highlighting the evening will be
the lighting of hundreds of
candles by new members,
Trustees of the Congregation and
the Confirmation Class.
The service will be signed for
the deaf by Temple Israel's inter-
preter, Paula Epstein.
There will be a Sabbath dinner
for all Temple members at 6:45
P.M. bv reservation.
Renowned for his writings on
Jewish life, and as the official
chronicler of the Holocaust,
author and humanitarian Elie
Wiesel will be the concluding
speaker in the Great Speakers
Forum, sponsored by the cultural
arts department of Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami, on Dec.
21.
Wiesel will discuss "Fears and
Hopes of Jews Today," according
to Judy Drucker, temple cultural
director. The talk will begin at 8
p.m. in the Temple Sanctuary.
Chairman of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council and the author
of more than 22 books, Wiesel is
the recipient of numerous honors.
Last spring, after a joint resolu-
tion of Congress, President
Reagan awarded Wiesel a Con-
gressional Gold Medal at the
White House, "in recognition of
his humanitarian efforts and
outstanding contributions to
world literature and human
rights." Inscribed on the medal
were the words Author. Teacher,
Witness.
Wiesel was 15 years old when
sent from his home in Sighet.
Transylvania, Hungary, to the
Nazi death camps Auschwitz and
Buchenwald. Following the war.
Wiesel settled in France, where
he worked as a journalist. His first
volume. "Night." was published
Elie Wiesel
in France in 1959, appearing the
following year in the U.S. Now an
American citizen, Wiesel makes
his home in New York City with
his wife and son.
Wiesel serves as the Andrew
Mellon Professor of the
Humanities at Boston University.
His most recent work. The
Fifth Son," garnered the 1984
Grand Prize for Literature for the
city of Paris. He was recently
named a Commander of the
French Legion of Honor.
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-
M^V*!^nr
The Accountants Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion recently held a cocktail reception on behalf of the 1986 Com-
bined Jewwh Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project Renewed-
(>r Akiva Campaign at the Biscayne Bay Marriott. Norman S
Rachhn (seen on right) was honored as the Division's first-ever
"Accountant of the Year." Rachlin, the founding managing part-
ner 0} the firm Rachlin and Cohen, has dedicated many years of
[service to the Division, having served as its chairman in 1984
I rmn of the Accountants Division is seen presenting an award to
I Rachlin at the reception.
Latin Jewry Is
Subject Of
Dr. Freund
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's South Dade Branch
will present a public lecture on
Latin-American Jewry, to be held
Monday, Jan. 6 at 8 p.m., Larry
Metsch, the South Dade Branch's
vice chairman for community
education announced. Rabbi Dr.
Richard A. Freund, vice rector of
the Seminario Rabinico
LatinoAmericano in Buenos
Aires, will speak on "The Rise and
Fall of Latin American Jewry" in
the South Dade Hebrew Academy
cafeteria.
Alvin Lloyd Brown, chairman of
South Dade's Board of Directors,
said "It is important for us to
learn about the status of Latin-
American Jews. Today, very few
Jewish communties, such as those
in Israel and the United States,
are allowed to thrive in complete
freedom, without overt anti-
Semitism or government in-
tervention," he said. "We must
study these dwindling com-
munities in other countries in
order to take responsibility for the
continued growth and well-being
of our own community."
As vice rector of the Seminario,
Dr. Freund directs programs for
the 65 affiliated communities in
Latin America and supervises
more than 400 students in the five
Seminario institutes. He is chair-
man of the Seminario's depart-
ments of Jewish Philosophy and
Rabbinics. The Seminario
Rabinico is the only combined rab-
binical seminary and educational
institute training rabbis and
Jewish educators in Latin
America.
Orthodox Leaders Denounce Reform
And Conservative Judaism
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
JWV Ladies Auxiliary President
Makes Official So. Fla. Visit
Department of Florida Jewish
War Veterans Ladies Auxiliary
will welcome Mrs. Sharlee Friend
of Houston, national president
when she makes her official visit
to Florida, Saturday, Sunday and
Monday. Department President
Mrs. Edith Novins will be official
hostess.
Mrs. Friend a member of JWV A
for 40 years has served on every
echelon on the State and National
levels. She is a life member of the
National Ladies Auxiliary,
Hadassah, and B'nai B'rith
Women where she held the office
of state president.
Friend earned her Bachelor of
Science degree at Sam Houston
State University in Social
Rehabilitation and the Master of
Social Work Degree at the
University of Houston. Sharlee is
a certified Social Worker and has
been a Social Worker for the
Texas Department of Human
Resources for the past 22 years,
and is listed in the 1985-1986 edi-
tion of "Who's Who In American
Women."
Mrs. Billie Kern, Past National
President is chairman of the Na-
tional Presidents visit and has
planned the reception and pro-
grams, assisted by Mrs. Rose
Rosenberg, PDP, and Claire
Newman, PDP.
Sharlee Friend
Mrs. Friend will speak at a
meeting of the Department of
Florida Ladies Auxiliary Sunday
morning followed by a luncheon in
her honor.
On Monday she will be honored
with a breakfast at the Miami
Veterans Medical Center. There
will be presentations to the
Hospital in her honor. At noon
there will be a luncheon at the
Oakland Park Clinic with addi-
tional presentations. Evelyn
Levine, PDP who is the VAVS
representative is in charge.
Opening Date Dec. 15
/Cosher/Corner
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New Glatl Kosher Restaurant Under ORC supervision
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RYE BROOK. N.Y. (JTA) -
[Leaders of the Agudath Israel of
I America and its Council of Torah
ISages delivered scathing attacks
Ion Reform and Conservative
[Judaism at their 63rd national
|convention here.
They strenuously decried any
[form nf dialogue with "the official
Ispiritual leadership" of the two
[movements but urged Orthodox
IJews nevertheless to create rela-
tionships on a personal level with
Individual members of Reform
and Conservative Judaism who
['have been misled by their rabbis
' believe, that 'you don't have to
'- Jewish to be a Jew."
RABBI MOSHE SHEREK.
resident of Agudath Israel of
America, singled out for atc&ck
abbi Alexander Schindler, presi-
^
*wen Margolis, State Senator
w District 87, will be guest
taker for the Sans Souci
Wge 8065, B'nai B'rith on
Monday, Dec. 28 at 7:1,5 p.m. at
N North Miami Community
tenter.
dent of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations (Reform),
in response, he said, to Schindler's
attacks on Orthodoxy emanating
"from a growing realization
among the Reform leaders that
their brand of Jewish religion is
sterile, and is incapable of bearing
children who will remain a living
part of the Jewish people."
The "accelerated strident" at-
tacks on Orthodoxy by "the
Reformers" serve to "strengthen
our resolve not to give up on any
single Jew, and not to concede
even one iota in our dedication to
save Jews from succumbing to the
onslaught of a hostile society,"
Sherer declared.
THE THEME of the keynote
session was "Building Bridges
and Barriers for the Unity of Klal
Yisroel." One speaker, Rabbi
Shimon Schwab, told the 3,000
-delegates, "There is no bridge
between Torah Judaism and any
other kind of Judaism," but he
and others implored Orthodox
Jews to extend themselves per-
sonally with Ahavas Yisroel (love
of Israel) to reach out to non-
observant Jews.
SCHWAB, a scholar and author
who heads the German-Jewish
community in America, urged
that the "battle against falsifica-
tion of Jewish religious beliefs" be
carried on without "com-
bativeness or gloating" but with
"tears in the heart" for the
"tragic path taken by errant
Jews."
At another session, Rabbi
Avrohom Pam, a member of the
Council of Torah Sages, urged the
Orthodox community to muster
its resources to provide a Torah
education for all children
regardless of cost, even children
of non-religious backgrounds.
Pam pleaded for help on the
Israel scene, where, he said, for
shortage of funds the Indepen-
dent Torah Schools (Chinuch Atz-
mai) have been unable, with
government funds alone, to open
adequate facilities around the
country. "The war for the image
of the Jewish people in Israel will
be waged in the educational in-
stitutions," he said, declaring that
the responsibility fell on the
shoulders of American Orthodox
Jews to ensure that the Torah
school system be able financially
to carry out its work.
Hadassah Events
Natanya Chapter of Hadassah
will hold their annual Paid-Up
Membership Meeting on Tuesday,
at noon at Winston Towers.
Hadassah's founder, Henrietta
Szold's birthday will be celebrated
and Lee Lobel Zwang will speak
on "Jewish Cultural Education."
Kinneret Chapter of Hadassah,
Kendale Lakes, will hold its next
general meeting on Tuesday, at
12:30 p.m. at the El Conquistador
Clubhouse.
Two Elected
In Quebec
MONTREAL (JTA) Two
Jews were reelected in over-
whelming Liberal Party victory
over the parti Quebecois, which
has been in office for nine years.
Herbert Marx, the son of Jewish
immigrants from Lithuania and a
Harvard Law School graduate,
was reelected with more than
20,000 votes in the D'arcy McGee
district. He is slated to become the
first Jewish Justice Minister in
Quebec. Also reelected to the Pro-
vincial National Assembly was
Maximilien Pollak, representing
the Saint Ann district. He receiv-
ed more than 12,000 votes.
r
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Planters
Shoes
T-shirts
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DECEMBER 15
FROM 10:00 AM-6:00 PM
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Food
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Famous Chef from Limoges, Frame


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Forum Of North
Balogh. Bierman Receive Honorary Dq^ To Hold
Doctorates From Talmudic U. Installation Dinner
David Balogh. Miami Beach
jewelry executive and civic leader,
and Professor Jacquin Bierman.
Miami Beach educator and
religious leader, have been
selected to receive honorary doc-
torates from Talmudic University
of Florida.
They will receive the degree of
Doctor of Laws, honoris causa,
from Rabbi Yochanan Zweig.
president and Rosh Hayeshiva of
Talmudic University, at the 11th
Anniversary Dinner of the Beach-
headquartered university Sunday.
Dec. 29. at the Crown Hotel.
Balogh. who owns together with
his family, a chain of high-range
jewelry stores, is a former direc-
tor of Jefferson National Bank
who has been active in the
development of the 41st Street
business district.
Professor Bierman. a professor
of law at the University of Miami,
has been active in the establish-
ment of the Alfred and Sadye
Swire College of Judaic Studies at
Talmudic University of Florida,
whose main campus is located at
1910 Alton Road. Miami Beach.
Announcement of the awarding
of the two honorary degrees was
made by Rabbi Zweig and by Mur-
ray (Moshe Chaim) Berkowitz.
chairman of the board of Talmudic
University.
Ehe Weisel. the chairman of the
President's Holocaust Commis-
sion, received the first honorary
David Balogh
degree from Talmudic University
several years ago.
Honorees at this year's dinner
will be distinguished alumni of the
university, a training center for
rabbis and Jewish community
workers with a student body from
throughout the United States and
from several foreign countries.
Rabbi Jeremia Burstyn is ex-
ecutive vice president of the
institution.
The Forum of North Dade will
hold their 3rd annual installation
dinner on Sunday. Cocktails will
be at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m.
at Dominique's Restaurant.
Dade County Chief Judge
Gerald Wetherington will serve as
the installing officer, and Ann
Bishop of WPLG. Channel 10. will
be the guest speaker.
1985-86 president will be Bur-
ton Young, vice president. Anne
Ackerman: secretary. Kenneth
Friedman, and treasurer. William
Farber.
The new board of directors to be
installed that evening will be
Floyd Blanton. Terry Cuson. Irv-
ing H. Cypers. Lori Fein.
Charlotte Greenberg. Larry
Kloskv. Bob Koch. Howard
Lenard. Jeff Mell. Ken Meller.
Geneva Miller. Joe Miller. Caryn
E. Montague. David Peckins.
Maurice Rosen, Sallie Sattin.
Evelyn Schengrund. Saul Simons.
George Spirer. and David H.
Young.
Iola Shaw serves as executive
director and Robert M. Levy is
currently acting executive direc-
tor for the organization.
Across from 163 St., directly across from
Publbx, Jordan Marsh, Burdines and
hundred* more.
Luxurious spacious sir conditioned apts.,
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and hallway. On-prsmlsss temples, and
social dub. Security, Cable TV and 24-hour
inside management.
Windsor Towers
1551 N.E. 167th St.
North Miami Beach
Open Monday-Friday 9 to 6 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Pho, 947-6093
Awank
tfarfftyftlA
SPOHSOREDBY
FOMW&FANCOF-
-----The 4th Z
World Assembly
Of Jewish
War Veterans
> OF THE ASSOCIATION
I* ISRAEL IMC
In Jerusalem, Israel
February 22-28,1986
aasw Phat50f*gi*trmttomFm
PACKAGE: 59*79 P*P*W doubt, occupanc?
Hotel 4 Rouodtrip Airfare NYATLV
and
to Israel's htgh-tech industries, tank corps and
and an absorption center for Ethiopian
Social SSSaSi and ceremonies, including a reception
hosted by the Mayor of Jorusaiem.
Optional Tours, before and after the Assernbty,
For
information contact the JWV Assembly Desk
at f*1347S3S or (SOP) 223-9910._________
highly nutritious. It's the best
source o< hagh baoio^caJ proton
in the entre plant kingdom
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no cholesterol problems'). It's
versatile Serve as a defcoous side
cash in place of rice or potatoes.
Add to soups or stews. Use at
stuong for vegetables, meat or
fish. Abo popular as a hot
breakfast cereal
and a 25* ofl coupon on wur next
purchase o( WCLFFS Kasha -aend
a stamped. m.M *! i u AUf
to Boa JP-8
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pool, laundry facility. Walk to I
all shopping.
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895-0255
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UNTIL DEC. 25
European Ladies Apparel
Open To The Public
Smtmr+ny A Suslay Hours 10-6
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BAOHaVat PtsWOajy lfcst Pasm Born. H
7:45
Mi
fcSO
11:30
FOLLOW THE TORCH FROM ISRAEL
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15,1985
Tha taraall torch runner will toad cultural and sport acthHttaathfooghoui Miami.
Mich4 Awn Russell J.C.C., Torch Ralay
Michael Aim fhmaM. J.C.C Manorah Lighting Caromony
Ralay trow Michael-Ann sSBSl J-CC. to Heoratea Conununrty CenW
najorwca M#oorsn ugnuny tartmony
naaaaadSf S. Qroaa Hebrew Acadawy, Miami Beach, Chanukah Play
and Torch Presentation by the J.C.C.
Congregation Bet BroLra relay to South Dado J.C.C.
Presentation or the Torch and a Ctaanukah Party, South Dada J.C.C.
Tha Torch adibapp......datS^DIplrjniatHoaaUlloSyuJod.Ratt
PAN AMERICAN CONVENTION OF GENERAL ZIONISTS
Sossk
LsonDutzan
Chairman. Jewish Agency-World
Zionist Organization
Allscfc nsanick
Pres.. Zionist Organization of America
3:30
4.U0
At
Jscquss Torczynaf
Pros.. World Union of General Zionis
SPECIAL QUEST SPEAKER:
Yitzhak Modal
Finance Minister of Israe
THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO THESE EVENTS


Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
1986 Curacao Jewish Festival Combines
Culture and Caribbean Vacation
The 1986 Curacao Jewish
Festival offers the opportunity to
combine a joyous cultural renewal
with one of the most historic-
Jewish communities in the
western hemisphere and a fun-
filled vacation at the height of the
Caribbean winter season.
This unique program, to be con-
ducted Jan. 5 through 23, was
organized by the Curacao Tourist
Board in cooperation with five na-
tional Jewish organizations, the
government of Curacao and the
island's Jewish community.
The focal points of this in-
augural Festival will be religious
services and a reception hosted by
the Curacao Jewish Community at
the Mikve-Israel Synagogue,
oldest in the western hemisphere,
and a gala Jewish Festival Ban-
quet during which a joint presen-
tation will be made by the par-
ticipating American Jewish
organizations to the Curacao
government in recognition of its
enlightened relationship with
World Jewry. These events will be
conducted twice during the course
of the Curacao Jewish Festival
(Jan. 10 and 11; Jan. 17 and 18) to
enable all guests to participate in
these special ceremonies.
A five days/four nights or eight
days/seven nights specially priced
package from $544 will be
available exclusively through the
travel departments of B'nai
B'rith. B'nai Zion, National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women, Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
and United Synagogue of
America.
Curacao, the largest of the
Netherland Antilles islands, is a
38-mile long tropical paradise that
combines the traditions and
history of more than 50 nations. It
offers the tourist a variety of col-
orful atmosphere, cuisine, enter-
tainment, shopping, water and
land sports.
Jewish roots run deep in
Curacao. As early as 1651.
Sephardic Jews from Holland
crossed the Atlantic to establish a
congregation on Curacao. These
early arrivals were soon joined by
other lews from Portugal and
Brazil seeking refuge from the
I rsecution of the Inquisition. In
an atmosphere of temperance and
d respect, the Jews of
to liecame an active and
perous community.
1732, the island's Jewish
Community built Mikve Israel-
Emanuel, reminiscent of the old
Portugese synagogue in Amster-
dam with its pastel yellow facade
and gabled roof. It remains the
oldest synagogue in continuous
use in the Western Hemisphere.
Its Spanish tiled courtyard, rich
mahogony doors and carved
i panelling, white sand temple floor
and antique brass chandeliers
suspended from the lofty ceiling
provide a setting as breathtaking
| as it is reverential.
A corner of the outside cour-
I tyard is occupied by the Jewish
Cultural Museum which houses a
I priceless collection of ritual ob-
Ijects and memorabilia from
Curacao's Jewish community.
Rabbi Aaron Peller is the spiritual
[leader of the Mikve-Israel
I synagogue.
The Curacao Jewish Festival
[renews the ties that unite
I worldwide Jewry and will honor a
government and its people who
Ihave provided an englightened
[humanitarian haven for Jewish
religious and cultural traditions
|for over 300 years.
For information on the Curacao
Jewish Festival, contact the
^uracao Tourist Board, 400
ladison Ave., NY 10017, tel.
212/751-8266.
Mikve-Israel Synagogue in Willemstad, Curacao, fminded in 1732
and the oldest Jewish synagogue in continuous use in the Western
Hemisphere. A highlight of the 1986 Curacao Jewish Festival,
Jan. 5-23, will be Friday night services and a reception hosted by
the Curacao Jewish community.
Rabbi Aaron Peller points to replicas of the oldest and most
elaborate gravestones (dating back to 1659) from Beth Haim
Cemetery in Curacao, on display in the courtyard museum of
Mikve-Israel Synagogue, the oldest in continuous use in the
Western Hemisphere. A highlight of the 1986 Curacao Jewish
Festival, Jan. 5-23, will be Friday night services and a reception
hosted by the Curacao Jewish community.
Opening Date Dec. 15
^sher/Corner
2701 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida 33140 305-674-9222
New Glatt Kosher Restaurant Under ORC supervision
Eat in, takeout, delivery, catering______________
f^t/i/ven^n^
The Leonard L. Abess Human Relations Award Luncheon honoring
Martin Fine, will take place Sunday, Jan. 19 at the Omni International
Hotel.
Rabbi David Saltzman of the Aventura Jewish Center will be the
guest speaker discussing "Major Issues in the Current Middle East
Situation" at a meeting of the Aventura Chapter of the American Red
Magen David for Israel scheduled for 1:30 p.m. on Monday, at the
Aventura Jewish Center.
Local volunteers of THE HUNGER PROJECT will present a special
evening about UNICEF on Tuesday at 8 p.m., in the Recreation Room
of Ocean Park Condominium.
The Bay Vista Democratic Club will hold their regular monthly
meeting on Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m. at the Bay Harbor Islands City
Hall. Guest speaker will be Dade County Public Defender Bennett
Brummer.
Florida Kiwanis. Key Club International, Circle K International, and
the Metro-Dade Transporation Administration will sponsor the third
annual "Walk for Mankind," a 20 kilometer fund-raising event on
Saturday, at 9 a.m.
Metro Commissioner Barry Schreiber, chairman of the Dade County
Public Safety Committee, announces a new special High Rise Fire
Prevention Education Program, which will educate condominium
residents on fire prevention and fire safety. Chief Brannock from the
Metro-Dade Fire Department will coordinate the effort on a coun-
tywide basis.
Harry Smith of Miami is among 200 community leaders from across
the United States and Canada, who were elected to the Board of
Directors of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee at its
71st Annual Meeting in New York.
Young Israel of Sunny Isles will serve as local ARGA sponsors of a
marathon in Israel to dramatize the plight of Jewish hostages held in
the Soviet Union and in Syria, on Thursday, Jan. 9. Rabbi Rubin R.
Dobin, spiritual leader of the Congregation will act as coordinator of
the project.
Tropical Cancer League's next luncheon meeting will take place on
Friday, Dec. 20 at the Ocean Pavillion. Luncheon will begin at 11:45.
Ann Fleer, nutritionist, therapist, and astrologer, will speak.
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will sponsor a series of
lectures on Wednesdays, at 10:30 a.m. Rabbi Dr. and Mrs. Meir
Felman will be lecturers as a continuation of the series "Great
Jewish Personalities from Biblical to Modern Times."
----- -or
Madrid Denies That
Ties Between Spain and
Israel Will Be Delayed
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Spanish goveunment has denied a
report published recently that
Spain has decided to postpone the
establishment of formal
iplomatic relations with Israel,
the World Jewish Congress
discloses.
According to the W.IC. Am-
>assador Manuel Sassot, the
Spanish Cunsul-Oeneral in New
York, assured WJC Executive
Director Israel Singer during a
private meeting last week that
there will be no delay of any kind
in the establishment of formal
ties.
Wire services reports on Nov.
said that Jorge Dezcaller,
Spain's director general of
Foreign Policy for the Middle
iast, told officials in the United
Arab Emirates that Spain would
postpone the announcement of
full ties with Israel until at least
October, 1986.
Sassot told Singer that he has
been assured by the Foreign
Ministry in Madrid that the report
is incorrect, and that the com-
mencement of relations would
take place, as originally planned,
during the current legislative ses-
sion in Spain. According to
.Sassot. this means that relations
will begin well before October.
1986.
Sassot also told the WJC that
officials of the United Arab
Emirates apparently relased the
inaccurate story in order to
prepare their countrymen for
what the Arab officials view as the
inevitability of Spain-Israel ties.
Israel has long had diplomatic-
relations with the members of the
European Economic Community
(EEC) which Spain is scheduled to
join on Jan. 1.
The WJC also said it learned
that Spanish security officials
have visited their Embassies in
the Middle East to make final
preparations for the establish-
ment of formal relations between
Spain and the Jewish State.
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Planning for the upcoming Na'amat Champagne Luncheon at the
Deauville Hotel at noon Tuesday,honoring Life Members, com-
mittee members are, from left, Lillian Hoffman of Sunny Isles,
chairman of the day; Miriam Gingold of Miami Beach, national
advisor; Sylvia Schneider, Southeast Area Na'amat chairman
and Bebee Pullman, program chair for the event open to the those
who pledge Life Membership in the organization which operates a
network in institutions for children, teenagers and women in the
State of Israel.
'Drop Off Set For Dec. 15
dent of the South Dade Friends,
"The Thrift Shops help to provide
what are, for the frail elderly,
basic necessities of life such as
hearing aids, eyeglasses, dentures
and pharmaceuticals. Many older
adults would lose much of their
cherished independence and digni-
ty without these things."
For pick-up of those items too
large to transport easily, call
Karen Zuckerman at the home.
B'nai Zion Presents
Yiddish and
English Actors
The South Dade friends of
Douglas Gardens will hold a
"Drop-Off Day" for the Douglas
Gardens Thrift Shops on Sunday.
The drop-off site is Suchman's
Real Estate parking lot at 9205 S.
Dixie Highway.
The Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops, a divison of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged, uses the proceeds from the
sales of donated furniture, ap-
pliances, clothing and household
goods to buy vital medicines and
supplies for the indigent residents
of the Miami Jewish Home.
Said Bernie Goodman, presi-
'Piece To Jerusalem'
A Jigsaw Puzzle
The original impetus for "Piece
to Jerusalem," came from the
Torah Education and Culture
Department of the World Zionist
Organization over 10 years ago.
Today they gave the task to
Friedman Enterprises, game
creators who have created the
new "Piece to Jerusalem," a
jigsaw puzzle which portrays
Jerusalem, featuring a vision of
the Third Bet Hamikdash.
"Piece to Jerusalem," is a rain-
bow of colors radiating outward
from the Temple Mount. A map
also includes many places in
Modern-Day Jerusalem, such as
the Knesset, Hebrew University,
and Yad Vashem.
OPENS THIS WED. at 8 PM
LOW PRICE PREVIEW THIS TUES.
at 8 PM ALL SEATS S25.00
BROADWAY BECaNS AT
DAVID MERRICKS
Stolper
Koenif
GOWER CHAMPION
TUES. DEC. 17tlini SUN. JAN. 5
Hebrew Academy To Open
Early Childhood Playgroup
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Early
Childhood Education Department
will initiate a Toddler Playgroup
Program next month. The pro-
gram which is open to toddlers 24
months old will meet three days a
week, from 9 a.m. till noon, and is
geared as an initial experience for
children prior to a full program in
nursery school.
According to Alida Bunder,
director of Early Childhood
Education at the Ararfa-,
children wil, be expJSj?^
vironment of exciting acthffi*
eluding arts and cnSSfi*
American children's Z*o!
and Jewish folklore and Hn>
Israeli dances and creative ^
ment Special emphasi Jj
placed on social and motor7 "
The program will also i,u
parent enrichment Stt
well as parent education lect^
workshops and other progj
Dorita Feldenkreis will be
honord as Humanitarian of the
Year at the Spirit of Life Lun-
cheon for the City of Hope,
Phyllis Dropkin Chapter on
Wednesday at noon in the
Grand Ballroom at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Shaare Zedek Honors Arthur Surin
Mrs. Robert Z. (Nancy) Greene.
Life Chairman of the Board of
the Women's Cancer League of
Miami Beach will underwrite
'JOY IN JANUARY," the
27th Annual Luncheon which
will take place at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton Hotel on
Wednesday, January 15.
The Shaare Zedek Medical
Center in Jerusalem will honor
Arthur A. Surin, senior vice presi-
dent for the Eastern Region of the
Hilton Hotel Corporation, on Sun-
day, Dec. 22, at the
Fontainebleau-HUton Hotel in
Miami Beach. Cocktails are at 6
p.m., dinner at 7 p.m.
New Cabaret Revue
At Club Sans Souci
A new cabaret the Club Sans
Souci, in the Sans Souci Hotel has
announced special half-price
tickets for the vaudeville revue,
"Fanny and Sophie and Jolie and
Eddie Invite You to Come to a
Party."
The show opens Dec. 17 for
previews and features the music
of Fanny Bnce. Sophie Tucker. Al
Jolson and Eddie Cantor. Four
performers: Harriet Leider. Judy
Premus. Alan Tulin and Sandy
Levitt will present a nostalgic
journey through 40 song and
dance numbers. Ed Linderman.
Broadway composer of
"Something's Afoot" and "Oy
Mama! Am I in Love!" created the
revue and will musical direct. This
musical and comedy revue plays
Tuesday through Sunday at 8 p.m.
Wednesday and Sunday matinees
at 2 p.m. Late shows Friday and
Saturday at 10:30 p.m.
Sunn is to receive the m
Jerusalem Founders Man of Z
Year Award. The guest spei
will be General Yaacov AdW
chief director. Emergency j
Trauma Department, Shun
Zedek Medical Center.
Dinner chair is Stephen Soni*
bend, president of the Sonesu
Beach Hotel.
The event is coordinated by
Michele Ofir, national director (or
special projects for Shaare Zedek.

Helen Cezer Katzman is being
honored by the Bay Harior
Chapter of Hadassah at alar
cheon to be held at theEdah
Hotel on Thursday, January}.
B'nai Zion Rumanian Chapter
of Florida presents, in Yiddish
and English, actors from the
Israeli National Theatre
Habimah, Lea Koenig and Zwi
Stolper, in A Couple from
Heaven, a comedy with music, on
Sunday, December 29, at 8 p.m. at
Seacoast Towers East.
Proceeds will benefit Beit
Halochem Rehabilitation Centers
for disabled Israeli War Veterans,
nd B'nai Zion homes for Retard-
Children in Israel.
Renee Steele Elected
President Of ARN
Renee Steele Rosomoff, pro-
gram director of Miami Beach's
South Shore Hospital and Medical
Center's University of Miami
Comprehensive Pain and
Rehabilitation Center, has been
elected national president of the
Association of Rehabilitation
Nurses (ARN). She was installed
during the organization's 11th an-
nual education conference held in
Atlanta, sponsored by the ARN's
Rehabilitation Nursing Institute.
Mrs. Rosomoff is adjunct pro-
fessor in the University of Miami
School of Medicine, Department
of Neurological Surgery. South
Shore Hospital and Medical
Center is affiliated with the UM
School of Medicine, which recent-
ly reloctated its Pain Center to
three floors of the hospital's new,
10-story glass tower building.
4
Girls' Town/Or Chadash
Tha Educational Centar in the Qalll
Kfar ChasskMm Refcaalm, Israel
The Home and School for 500 children bein
despair In order to bring "new light'
iren being brought out of the cycle of poverty m
Into their lives so they may realize their full potanm
Ann* Hlmelateln Director of Development Southeastern Region
955 79th Terrace, Suite #18, Miami Beach, Florida 33141
raw roua coNvaNWNCf mnmmMH
CAN at MADI TO VISIT
aiALB- TOWM/O* CHADASH OM rOU"[
THI* TO MMAIL. *OA MOW *w**"
UAH CONTACT ANN! HUNUTW
OMECTOR Of OeVILOWNKT
OUTHCA8TERN WtOIQN (W!_
"OR CHADASH" means "NEWLIGHT"
Dear Ann*, .
YES... I REALIZE MY CONTRIBUTION 18 IMPORTANT to bring
a "NEW LIGHT" to the homeless girls who need a decent place to live...
a "NEW LIGHT" to the girls needing an Academic and Vocational education, hoping tf*"
the skills that will make them proud and productive members of Israeli society
a "NEW LIGHT" to the girls needing a Jewish education to help them find their Je*isn
identity...
Kindling a "NEW LIGHT' will warm your heart!
Off*]
oiKS-rowwo^^HPrt'," JSJ "! UOHVIiiaahi 11 aaeTfcape *"*" *
UIHL5 TOWN/OR CHADASH. Enclosed please find my donation of S__________________-
I would like to become a "Sponsoring:"
------Mother------Father------Parents------Grandmother____Grandfather____Grandparents Slit*
f^fAatlaaaaaaaartajria mmgamt* wo* of giruTtown/or chadash. with w\**' "JjS
. monthly contribution of. $5.00------$10.00____$1100 (Chal a Month)____$2SJ___*0M W
------_____CAnv other ammmtt
envelope, and ma" w:
CU* HERE
(Any other amount)
2T?2 a" X by y0uf choices IPlease cl|P,ne boNom of this Ad. place in an
GIRLS TOWN/OR CHADASH. 955 7th Terrac. Miami B-ch. Florid. 33141.
Contributors Name____________________________________AddfeM_____________
C,,y-------------------------------s,a,_____________.Zip___________Telephone No
A" Contributions to GIRLS' TOWN/OR CHADASH are Tax Deductible
anScome wou?rL?^ti0nct0 GIRLS' TOWN'OR CHADASH. we thank you, and we woukl appj
ana welcome your becoming a "Sponsoring Monthly Member" of our Girls' town/Or Chadash Fa


Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Ij4mi'f Women will honor
I "Shomrim contributors at a gala
ICocktail Reception to be held on
Sunday afternoon, at the home of
tCommissioner and Mrs. Barry
Kehreiber honoring Mrs. Bashie
Selevan, who has been involved in
Amit Women and in Zionist af
birs from the time she was a
teenager and was appointed vice
president of the organization and
i member of its executive board.
Na'amat U.S.A.
Upcoming meetings of various
tlubs and chapters of Na'amat,
fc.S.A. will highlight a new film,
Chanukah programs, musicales
nd the formation of a new club of
loung. professional women in the
tendall area.
J The newly-formed Shira
thapiir. comprised of young pro
< us in the Southwest and
lends i area will meet Monday at
lp.ni. in the Last Kendall home of
lenii; Schwartz.
IA new film, entitled. "The
future is Now," will be shown for
ke first time in the Miami area. It
^emiered at the recent 29th na-
pnal biennial convention held in
ael.
on tap as the meeting will
a Chanukah celebration and
Widay refreshments, including
itato latkes.
Bheva Berland will report on the
ui biennial convention which
s attended in Israel at the Mon-
f, noon meeting of the Kinnere t
Jpter to be held in the social
1 of Temple Ner Tamid.
ose Lusky, will tell the story of
nukah and its significance in
| world today.
, musical program is on tap at
[Monday, 1 p.m. meeting of the
Chapter to take place in the
: auditorium of American Sav-
and Loan Association, 899
hington Avenue.
he musicale will feature
|>bers Sonia Fox, Rose Ger-
Rebecca Horowitz, Tillie
ck and Friends of Na'amat,
ry Fox and Sol Winnick.
ra Kaufman, president of
I will present her newest knit-
fcreations in a brief modeling
briefing on the Na'amat con-
by former national board
er Leah Benson and pianist
Markcity will highlight the
iy. 1 p.m. meeting of the
on Chapter is scheduled at
6th floor meeting room of the
Freedoms House.
id Street'At TOPA
lores Gray and Barry Nelson
ar in David Merrick's "42nd
." which scored both Broad-
Tony and London's Oliver
as Best Musical of the
I The show will make its ex-
South Florida debut when
ns a three-week run beginn-
pesday, Dec. 17 at 8 p.m. at
pami Beach Theatre of the
ung Arts, launching Zev
in's five production,
|th subscription season.
Oliver Drugs & Pharmacy
93 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables 445-1059
Happy Chanukah
Cottex of Israel
Merchandise Mart
777 NW 72nd Ave., Miami261-4700
Happy Chanukah
The Z Shop
iL50SDIx,e Hvfy- Miami-253-5680
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Anvil Metals Inc.
840 West 20th St., Hialeah-887-5525
Happy Chanukah
CAPTAIN JOHN CALLAN
Of the HELEN C
16375 Collins Avenue
947-4081
Happy Chanukah
Bay Harbor Fine Foods
1077 95th St.
Bay Harbor Island865-0331
Happy Chanukah
Jeannetts Dresses
423 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach, Fl., 531-7562
Wishes You A Happy Chanukah
BiscayneMiracle Mile
1 Cafeteria
147 Miracle Mile
Coral Gables 444-9005
Happy Chanukah To All__________
Charade Restaurant
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.Miami
448-6077
Happy Chanukah
Aaron Air
Distributors Inc.
1860 NW 95th St., Miami
Holiday Greetings
FINCHER
Oldsmobile amc Jeep Renault
Dade 373-8351 Broward 921-5200
1740 NE 2nd Ave. Miami
____________Happy Chanukah
Boniske Insurance Agency
17101 NE 6th Ave.-Miami
652-7101
"Service Is Our Policy"
Happy Chanukah
Miami Rug Co.
11150NW32Ave.
Miami 685-8444
Happy Chanukah
Zalman Bacheikov, D.D.S.
420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 344
Miami Beach 33139 Phone 532-6795
Happy Chanukah
The Palette
125 NE 26th St., Miami573-0980
Happy Chanukah
Joy To The World
Happy Chanukah
Dr. Mark A. Laporta
Animal Lovers west
8454 SW 24th St.
Mlami-223-7141
Happy Chanukah
Howard Shutter Co.
7731 N.W. 73rd Ct., Miami 33166
Phone 887-9509
Wish All Customers, Friends A Family
A Happy A Healthy Chanukah
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Road538-8533
Holiday Greetings
REG'S KOSHER FRESH FISH MARKET
1676 N.E. 164th St., No. Miami Beach 33162
-Phone 640-1718
Only Kosher Fish Market In Florida Under Supervision of O.R.C.
Wishes All Customers and Friends A Happy Chanukah
El cid Restaurant
& Lounge
Le Jeune and Flagler St.541-3514
Happy Chanukah
Renee De Paris
6608 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach 33141
Phone 865-7631
Happy Chanukah
Andalusia Bake Shop
248 Andalusia Ave.
Coral Gables-445-8696
Happy Chanukah
Newport Pub Restaurant
16701 Collins Avenue Miami Beach 33160
Phone 947-8088
Wish All Customers A Friends
A Happy A Healthy Chanukah
Morris Wolf Photography
1615 NE 163 St.
No. Miami Beach-944-2424
Happy Chanukah
Atlas Metal Industries
1135 NW 159 Dr., Miami, Fla. 33169
Phone -625-2451
Wish All Friends & Clients
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
Helen and Sam Cohen, (center) receive the City of Peace Award,
presented to them by the Greater Miami Israel Bond Organiza-
tion during the recent Hadassah Bond-with-Israel Luncheon at
the Eden Roc Hotel. The Cohens were honored for their many
years of support of Israel through the Israel Bond program, as
well as for their involvement with other philanthropic, communi-
ty and charitable organizations. Presenting the City of Peace
Au while General Campaign Chairman Philip T. Warren, presents
the special Women of Valor pin to Mrs. Cohen.
Ida Softer Reis
Harry and Loretta Rosen
Bonds To Honor Turnberry
Isle Women Of The Year
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will honor Turn-
herr* [ah Woman of the Year Ida
Softer Reis. and Harry and Loret-
a Room ol Aventura with special
.wards during the annual Aven-
tura Turnberry Israel Bond
Brunch on Sunday, at Turnberrry
[a e s Garden Room. Reis and the
DA are being recognized for
their many years of dedication
and commitment to the State of
Israel and the Jewish people.
Special guest speaker \v:!l be
Israel Finance Minister Yitzhak
Modai. The brunch will bee
noon and is 'fen to anyone a
minimum fBOfl Israel Bond
purchase
Israel Bonds. Maison Grande
To Celebrate A Bar Mitzvah
Th Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization and the Maison
Grande condominium will
.-e.ebrate a Bar Mitzvah on Sun-
day, when the two recognize their
13th year of Israel Bonds-Maison
Grande functions during a cocktail
The special occasion will beheld
t the Maison Grande Rotunda
Room beginning at 7:30 p.m.
The Israel Bonds Ma.sor.
Grande Committee will salute the
past honorees from the past 13
years. Being recognised wffl be:
Isadore and Florence Abrams.
Birdie Bernbaum. Sadie Brodsky.
Louis and Elsie Friedman. Her
man and Sarah Gordon. Sam and
Joan Kotler. Meyer and Bea
Levinson. Charles and Helen Mer
witzer. Sidney and Barbara Silk
and Abraham and Lillian I'dell.
Guest speaker at the Bar Mitz-
vah Celebration will be Jerome
Gleekel. Mid-East expert and
political scientist.
Acting as co-chairmen for the 13
years anniversary celebration will
be Meyer and Bea Levinson and
Louis and Elsie Friedman.
Special Education Chanukah Party
The Association for Jewish
Special Education win hold its
Ninth Annual Chanakah Party.
Sunday. l:30-&30 p-m.. at Oty of
Legion Memonal Park, as
1 by Chairperson Benee
I and refreshments.
The Association is a private.
non-profit organisation whose
main purposes are to organize and
effect educational. sodaL cutaaral
and I'fhgir activities for,
Proudly displaying the ambulance which they
have donated to the people of Israel, are Julius
and Fay Hager. On the door are inscribed the
names of their relatives, all of whom have
perished in the Holocaust, in whose memory
this lifesaving gift was presented to Israel.
Friends and relatives of the Hagers par-
ticipated with them at the ambulance dedica-
tion ceremony which took place to celebrate
this event. During the ceremony the Hagers
received a plaque presented by Robert L
Schwartz. Southeast District Director of the
American Red Magen David.
YIVO Hosting
Farewell Banquet
The YIVO Committee of Miami
is hosting a farewell banquet on
Sunday at 12:30 p.m. at the Eden
Roc Hotel in honor of Dr. Heszel
Klepfisz. author orator and
scholar, prior to his move to
Israel.
A musical program will be
presented by Moshe Buryn. M.
Feldstein. J. Bernhaut. G. Kahn
and M. Weisman are in charge of
arrangements.
Jewish Book Review Series Continues
At Miami Beach Public Library
"Back To the Sources."' a book
on the classics of Jewish thought
and literature, will be the subject
of the forthcoming discussion in
the "Great Jewish Books Discus-
sion'' series, sponsored by the
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, to be held on Thursday, at
1:30 p.m. at the Miami Beach
Public Library.
Rabbi Menachem Raab, director
of the Day School Department of
the Central Agency lor Jewish
Education will review the book.
Rabbi Raab will focus on the ma-
jor works of Jewish literature that
are highlighted in the book, in-
cluding the Bible, the Talmud, the
Midrash. the medieval
philosophers and the Zohar, the I
book of mysticism, and will show
how these works provide the basis |
for Jewish belief and action today.
vour neighborhood.

The Mobile Health Uahof St. Francis
Hospital is preventive medicine
on wheels Our health care van
visits businesses, condominiums, com
munity centers, churches and temples to
screen people for high
blood pressure, stress,
colon cancer, respira-
tory disease, back
problems, diabeto
and vision and
hearing problems
I
We also provide lectures and demon-
strations on nutrition, hypertension.
tardiopulinonary rcsusciuuon
(CPR). personal safety, hurricane prepared-
ness and mam other health topics Our
Mobile Health Init also can provide first
aid for large outdoor events.
If you would like to have the St Francis
Hospital Mobile Health Unit visit your
group or business, just give us a call: The
Cornmunitv Relations Department
St Francis Hospital. 868-2~81
The Mobile
Health Unit.
290 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach. FL 39*41
Life Be in it.


Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
... And Joseph was the governor over the land... And JosevhS
brethren came, and bowed down to him" Joseph, s
(Genesis 42.6).
MIKETZ
EHJL: T^ yCarS ,ar> JPharaoh dreamt a dream in two
slightly different versions. The dream terrified the kin* of Eevnt
but none of his sages could explain it satisfactorily Pharaoh's
buder remembered Joseph s masterly interpretations of dreams
and informed Pharaoh. Joseph was brought before Pharaoh and
explained the dream as forecasting seven years of plenty that
were to come to the land of Egypt, only to be succeeded by seven
years of famine. He advised Pharaoh to appoint a wise overseer to
collect wheat during the years of plenty and distribute it during
the years of famine. Pharaoh appointed Joseph himself to this
post as his viceroy. As Joseph had forecast, the Egyptian stores of
wheat were in great demand during the seven years of famine
Among those who came to buy wheat in Egypt were Joseph's
older brothers. Joseph recognized them, but they did not know
him. Joseph so contrived that the brothers came to Egypt a se-
cond time, bringing Benjamin, Joseph's full brother with them
Joseph received them cordially; but then he made it seem as
though Benjamin had stolen a goblet, and insisted that he stay
behind as a servant. The brothers refused to abandon Benjamin
and all decided to return to Joseph's home.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Lew is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P Woiirrun-
Tsatnlr, *T5, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7s Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10036. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis
tributing the volume.) '
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B

Community Corner
Miami, Coral Gable, Dade Chapters, Women's Division
American Society for Technion, will meet at Temple Judea, on
Monday at 12:30 p.m.
Mr. William Baren, financial counsellor, will speak on
"Productive Investment Procedures for Retired People."
Temple Zamora Sisterhood will hold their next general meeting
on Wednesday, at 12:30 p.m. at the synagogue. The program will
be entitled, "The Chanukah Story."
Temple Beth Am Brotherhood will hold its Breakfast Forum on
Sunday morning in the youth lounge. Rabbi Kachael Hertzmmn,
the first woman Rabbi to be ordained in Florida, will speak on,
"Women in the Rabbinate."
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged's Annual
Holiday Bazaar is slated for Friday, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
Home's Douglas Gardens campus.
Agudath Israel Congregation will be featuring the Yiddish Film
entitled, "De Groise Aitzah Gebber" (The Great Advisor), starr-
ing Irving Jacobson and Yetta Zwelling on Wednesday at 6:45
p.m.
Cuban Hebrew Congregation of Miami, Cultural Committee
presents "It is a Crazy World!" in Yiddish, starring Lea
Koenig and Zwi Stopler on Sunday, Dec. 22 at 8 p.m. in the
Olemberg Ballroom.
Cantor Matus Radzivilover, known as the "Last Vohliner
Chazzan," and famous intepreter of Hebrew Liturgy, will per-
form the Saturday, Chanukah Service at 8:30 a.m. at Agudath
Israel Hebrew Institute.
B'nai Zion Chapter 147 is holding an open wine and cheese
meeting on Wednesday, at 8 p.m. at the Sunrise Savings and
Loan on Hallandale Beach Blvd.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
INSURANCE HOSPITAL
Medicare Participating Memorial
Insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participation
ALLAN WOLPOWITZ, M.D.
3427 Johnson Street
Hollywood, Florida 33021
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305) 962-5400
'SPECIALIZED CARE'
FORTHEHOMEBOUNO
24 hr. nursing service since 1972
Serving All Dade & Broward Counties
R.N.'s, L.P.N.'s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
Specialize in Live-Ins & Post Hospital Care
Insurance Assignments
ALL DADE HOME CARE
Miami 576-0383 Hwd. 963-1417 Ft. Laud. 566-6503
.
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
GREGORY SHUGAR
Gregory Shugar, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Irving Shugar, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah, at
Shabbat Services on Saturday at
Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbis Gary Glickstein, Leon
Kronish, Harry Jolt and Paul
Caplan will officiate.
Gregory is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5748.
JENNIFER G. BROWN
Jennifer Gail Brown, daughter
of Harvey and Judy Brown will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah, Friday at 8 p.m. at Beth
Torah Congregation.
The celebrant has been a stu-
dent at the Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School where she
is currently in the eighth grade.
Harvey and Judy Brown will
host the Oneg following services
in honor of the occasion and a din-
ner dance Saturday night at Beth
Torah.
Special guest include grand
parents from Philadelphia, Ben-
jamin and Sylvia Brown and
grandparents from Miami, Harry
and Mary Adelman.
The entire professional staff of
Beth Torah inducing Rabbi Max
A. Lipschitz, Rabbi Randall J.
Konigsburg, Cantor Zvee Aroni,
Rev. Mordechai Adler and Jen-
nifer's father, executive director
Harvey Brown will participate in
the service.
CAJE Sponsored
Biblical Lectures
To Continue
Biblical figure, Aaron, the first
of the High Priests in Jewish life,
will be the subject of the next lec-
ture in the series of "Spiritual
Giants," sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education on
Wednesday, at 10 a.m. at the
Maimi Beach Public Library.
Mr. Elliot Pearlson, director of
education at Temple Menorah,
will discuss Aaron's character and
explore the relationship between
Aaron and his younger brother
Moses.
Samuel Reiser, is founder and
consultant for the "Spiritual
Giants" program. The series is
held every two weeks, on the first
and third Wednesdays of the
month, at the Public Libray.
'Show and TeW
Final Class of '85
Nancy Alterman's students
who range in age from 80 to 95
will present an adult, nostalgic
version of "show and tell" when
they meet for their final class of
the year at the Carlyle On the Bay
retirement hotel on Tuesday, 1:30
p.m.
"We've asked the residents to
bring objects from their lives
which have importance to them,
and to be ready to share stories
about the particular ac-
complishments of which they are
most proud," said Alterman, a
social worker with Rona
Bartelstone Associates, a private
social work agency specializing in
serving older adults and their
families.
St. Francis Hospital
[Dedicates Fitness Trail
St. Francis Hospital dedicated a
new fitness trail to the City of
Miami Beach on Tuesday, Dec. 10.
Mayor Alex Daoud spoke; former
Miami Dolphin's quarterback, Bob
Griese was the guest of honor to
begin the "Life. Be In It," cam-
paign, for which the trail was a
part.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:1,0 p.m.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Cardans Drive
North Miami Baach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
FrI 5:48 p.m. Kabbalat Sarvlca. Sabbath
IlltrtiooO dlnnar No lit* aarvlca.
8.30 a.m. Sat. Bar MHmh Lane* Ud.i I
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 _
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi flf.
Moan* Buryn, Cantor '. J'
Sergio Grobler, Preident
Sholem Epelbaum. President,
Religious Committee
Shabbat Saica> 6 30 a m Sarmon 10 30
Daily Mtnyan
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Baach
Or. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shitman, Cantor
Maurice Klein. Ritual Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Lala Friday avanlng aarvkaa 8 p.m.
" "Of'. Irving Lahrman will praach on
Tha Chanukah Myatlqua Cantor Shlfman
will chant. V.I.P. and conaacratlon Sat. 9 a.m.
Tha Rabbi will praach on tha WMkly
portion ol tha Blbia
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 067-8667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Aasoclate Rabbi
FrL p.m. Chanukah CandMlaM aarylca Youth
Choir iTHMtcal program. Rabbi a
Baumgard will
. gFaltfiWH
Mlatory." Set *1 a a.m.
Kloln, tamar ralnooad. Bat. 11:15 a.m. Bar
Idrvah Toad Altai. Here
thorn* "Living
apaakon tha thama "Kaaotng Faltn With
~ m. Bat Mitzvah Batay
d. Sal 11:15 a m Bar
Mitzvah Todd Alky. Bate taHlsarloi. Batmen
ing with tha Good and tha Bad '
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
2825 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, ^z-.
Rabbi Emeritus fS)
Rev. Milton Freemen, *3K-
Rltual Director
Jacob E. Tambor, Cantor
Shabbat ava lam*, aarv. 7:10 p.m. Bat. >
Do Maka Htotory." KMHtuoh tottoara. Bun. Dr.
Maloawa Ouvwuw a* afoa* 10-11 am Tu*.
I Ckab 7:30 am. **d. II
.aMnotum.^p.
Bun a a.m.* 5:10 p.m.
tan Thora. 7:30 a.m. a5:J0 p.m.
Tu**. WeB. | FitT-M bjw. > 8.-S0 paw.
658-6334
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krissei
ROB* Berlin: Executive Secretary
Sarvtc: Mornlnga 7:30 a.m. J
Saturday: lt am f
F.anlnoa 5:00 p.m.
Lata Frl. avalarvtce 8:15 p.m
Rabbi Max Shapiro will dracuu "W* Ll.a Onl"
Bun. 10 am Chanukah braak laat
I>
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami, FL 33181
881 5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi _
Rabbi Joseph A. Qorflnkel, ffln'i
Rabbi Emeritus -%'
Meshe Frtedler, Cantor
:tat10:4aji.
Dally a.m., 5 p.m. Sun. S:30 a.m.
FrL 7:30 p.m. Rabbi Jacob* aarmon "Allan Oil
Bail MlfcrvBh YtonM CotOony.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S4S Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Meiber
Cantor Nisslrn Beny amlni
Daily aarvlcM a.m. B 5 JO p.m.
Sat I 15a m
Rabbi'a claaaai Monday Advanced Mabcaw
30 a.m. Tuea. EneUah BaMe Claaa 45 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2801 r
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Howard Bender
CantorSaulMelsels
Shabbat BarvtoM FrL B pjn. Bat *?*> *.m
f
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM.......
Chase Ave. *41st St. ,538-7231
OR. LEON KRONISH, RABBI I ibar a I
HANKY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL 0 CAP1AN, ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CON VISE"
Frl ahabbathaar 7:30 p.m. Rabbta Gary
ullckal**. Laon Kroraah. Ha.
Caplan. Sat. 10:45 am
Qrogory Shugar
Harry Jolt. P.
Bar Mitzvah
Paul
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONQREQATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Lipschitz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvse Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Defly aonrtcaa 7:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m
Frl. aarv. 5:15p.m. Lat*aarv I:i5p.m
Bat Mitzvah Jannllar Brown.
>
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-8421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitt
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
awami'i Plonaar Raform Coogragahon
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9090 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
iSenior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob Q. Bornsteln
AaaociBTst Cantor Racha8s F. Nalaon
Executive Director Philip S. Gotdln
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Spark
Friday avantng I p.m.
Chanukah oataEraitan
Annual
naw mombara. Rabbi Haakall M Bam.I and
' Rabbi Rax D. Parlmatar. Cantor Jacob Q.
I Bornaaaln and Cantor BacrnBi F. Nalaon.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Qranada Blvd. Relorm
Coral QaWee 887-5867
Michael B. El senate t, Rabbi
Friday
*1B|
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tet 5344776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoshenah Raab, Cantor
Samoa* Frl. 7.30 p.m
Sal a 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morrwne aarvlc** B a.m
Friday lala ***Mng aarvtca
B: 15 p.m
Saturdays* m and 7 45p.m
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Ca rlyle A ve., 868-9833
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene LabovtU cor*>r**tiv*
Cantor Edward Kloln
Dally Same** a.m. and 5 30 p.m
Sal 145 a.m.
Frl. lata aen.S p.m.
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
851-1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0696
Rabbi Warren Kaaztl Mod* orthodox
Rabbi Kaaztl will lamporarlly conduct
seaerate aervleea Set 30 m ai Tampla
Samu El. S3S3 S.W. 1 Bind Ava.. aouth ol
N. Kendall Drlv*
TEMPLE SINAI 18901 NEM Ave.
r^tortf. DfKjW* RejHonT. ConorMction
Ralph PKingsley, Rabbi 9324010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving ShulkeS, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl. BaaBaVaj 7:30 p.m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Dr. Conservative
271 2311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi (
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan larvlca 7 am Mon B Thura 9 a.m.
Frl 11:15 p m Con lactation Sabbath.
Conaacranta: Hillary t"
Altman, Siaphanl* Bolt, Ian
Oaraon, Jannllar Hank In.
Aaena Krees. Marc Kropl. H.
n, Slaci Roa
Tarah Sharon.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, Decejnber 13, 1985
Business Notes
Richard A. Berkowitz, an at-
torney and certified Public ac-
countant with the firm ,
Berkowitz and Kaplan, has been
elected to the Board of Directors
of Plaza Bank of Miami.
Alan E. Master, president and
chief executive officer of Ensign
Federal Savings Bank, announces
two new appointments: Stuart
Sugarman has been assigned to
the positions of counsel and cor-
porate secretary, and Judith L.
Pagar has been named assistant
corporate secretary.
Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTIOi.
CONSTRUCTIVE SKRVK ,.
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-48788
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
DANIEL NORBERTO TALAMO
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARIA CARMEN ARCE
TALAMO,
Respondent/Wife
TO: MARIA CARMEN ARCE
TALAMO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Divorce has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on ARNIE S. MUSKAT,
ESQUIRE attorney for Husband
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 3rd, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
22 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Dade County. Florida
By: J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT, ESQ.
Galbut, Galbut and Menm
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
19449 November 29;
December 6, 13,20. 1985
*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10202
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE DAVIS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARIE DAVIS, deceased. File
Number 85-10202, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida,
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 13, 1985.
Personal Representative:
PHILIP SAHL
Apt 407, Bldg. 24
7240 Huntington Lane
Deh-ay Beach. Fla. 33446
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT. Esq.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
19477 December 13,20.1985
Edward H. Savitt, a plan con-
sultant, author and lecturer, has
formed Savitt Consulting Corp., a
South Florida pension consulting
and service organization with of-
fices located in Bay Harbor
Islands.
Alan B. Goldstein, former
senior vice president of American
Savings and Loan Association of
Florida, has been promoted to the
position of executive vice presi-
dent/general counsel and cor-
x>rate secretary.
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name RE1 IN-
VESTMENTS PARTNERSHIP
at number 5582 Northwest 79th
Avenue, in the City of Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE and
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MAXWELL WAAS
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MELVIN POLLAK
PAUL FOURNIER
ALAN ROSENTHAL
IRA P. FEDERER
RICHARD M. WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
KIP AMAZON
A. GERALD REISS
NORMAN WAAS
SUSAN KAPLAN
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for Applicant
19434 November 22,29;
December 6.13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION 04
File No. 86-10323
DIVISION
(Florida Bar No. 032230)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO REINHARD
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of LEO
REINHARD. deceased. File
Number 85-10323. is pending in
the Circuit Court in and for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse, 73 West Flagler.
Miami, Florida 33130. The name
and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons interested
in the estate are required to file
with this court. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom this
notice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Personal Representative:
MIRIAM E. REINHARD
3490 Prairie Avenue
. Miami Beach, Florida 33140
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 13 day of
December, 1985.
Moses J. Grandwerg
Of Law Offices of
Hays, Grundwerg and Vann
28 West Flagler St.,
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 379-8435
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
19476 December 13.20.1985
Bomb Explodes
In Afula
TEL AVIV (JTA) A bomb
went off in the center of Afula
Tuesday but caused no casualties,
police said. It was the sixth ex-
plosive charge in the center of
Jezreel valley town in recent mon-
ths.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT O.
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
. CASE NO. 85-47727
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United states
of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
ANGEL R. ALVAREZ, et at..
Defendants.
TO: CITIBANK (SOUTH
DAKOTA) N.A.
RICHARD
MCCROWSSEN -
701 East 60 Street N.
Sioux Falls.
South Dakota 57104
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4, in Block 9 of SCOTT
LAKE MANOR SECTION TWO.
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat 60. at Page 58 of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 20. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 15 day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
19435 November 22,29;
December 6, 13.1985
SPECIALLY FOR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
COURT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No.: 85-28730 (14)
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
No. 090723
VENETIAN HEIGHTS. INC.. a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff.
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS, et. al..
Defendants.
TO: WAYNE FLOWERS and
GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, if living and unknown parties
claiming by, through, under or
against the named Defendants are
not known to be dead or alive
whether said unknown parties
claims as heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, or other claimants.
RESIDENCE UNKOWN.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing described property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 1. Block 1. of LIBERTY
FARMS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
51 at Page 46. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MORTON B. ZEMEL, Plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue, Suite
111, North Miami Beach, Florida
33162. and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled Court
on or before January 10, 1986;
otherwise a judgment may be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
THIS NOTICE shall be publish-
ed once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in The Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Dade County,
Florida on this 5 day of December
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
of the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
19467 December 13.20,27,1985
January 3, 1986
SINGLES
Are you an assertive Single? Whether the answer is yes or no w
are still interested In information about other Singles. What are'the
doing? Where are they meeting now? How do I become a Dart of .5!
RESPECTABLE Singles action? ",ne
To help you with answers to these questions, The Jewish F|oridin
is introducing "Specially for Singles."
Jewish Singles South, a social group for mature adults 35 and
older in the south of Dade County, welcomes people from all of
South Florida. Parties and other events are held every month.
The After Chanukah Latke Party will be held on Sunday evening
Dec. 22. Phone 258-3264 or 595-5567 for more information.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Lia's For Hair at 1561
'h Sunset Drive. South Miami in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
H & H Auto
Services. Inc.
Audrey Hilversum
19474 December 13. 20. 27, 1985;
January 6, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-37244 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association
Plaintiff
vs.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux.. et al..
Defendants
TO: PATRICIA G. WEBB
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgate
on the following described
property:
Lot 48, of Unrecorded Plat of HID-
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of Tract 11. of FLORIDA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION of the NE 'A of
Section 25. Township 52 South.
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2. at Page 17. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida;
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15' 30" West for
25.02 feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing of Tract of land herein after
described; thence continue North 2
degrees 16' 30" West parallel
with the West line of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point: thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 45' 09" West for
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
Curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 21 day of
November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19446 November 29;
December 6, 13, 20.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47711
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PAUL ROSSY
PETITIONER/HUSBAND
and
LUCINDA S. ROSSY
RESPONDENT/WIFE
TO: LUCINDA S. ROSSY
4837 Tilden Avenue
Los Angeles.
California 91423
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if anv. to it on
MARSHALL IVES, ESQUIRE.
Attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 5900 S.W. 73rd Street,
Suite 205. Miami. Florida. 33143,
and file the Original with the Clerk
of the above-styled Court on ot
before December 20, 1985; other
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed in
the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on
this 15 dav of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputv Clerk
MARSHALL IVES. ESQ.
5900 S.W. 73 St. Suite 205
Miami, Florida 38148
Telephone: (30516*7 2111
19437 November 22.29;
December6.13.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47712
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA LORENA
BARRAGAN
PETITIONER
and _,.,
DAVID ARTHUR BARRAGAN
RESPONDENT
TO: DAVID ARTHUR
BARRAGAN
c/oJARAMll.I."
11501 Meadow Brook
EX PA80
TEXAS 79936
YOU ARE NOTIFIED thai a
Petition for Dissolution ot >'r
riage has been filed ami commenc-
ed in this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy ol your wrii
ten defenses, if any. ";'t"MA.,
SHALL IVES. ESQUIRE. At-
torney for Petitioner, whose aa
dress is 5900 S.W 78rt Sm*
Suite 205. Miami. Hrula.WH*
and f.le the Original wth the tler
of the above-styled I """
before December 20,1985; oj*
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the &*&*
tor in the Complaint ...-PeW*
This Notice shall be publishedlow
each week for four eM-gJ*
weeks in JEWISH F1.0RI'WVf
WITNESS my hand ami he*
said court at Mianu Florida.
this 15 day of NownrtwJ**
RICHARD P HKINKtR
as Clerk. Circuit I ourt
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
MARSHALL IVES, fcS*
5900 S.W. 73 St.. Suite 4
Miami, Florida 33143 ^
19436 "EfttB
December b. w.-


Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-47279
| ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
i RE: The Marriage of
fcTHEL VIDAL
pE ARREDONDO
i Petitioner/Wife.
HDEL ARREDONDO,
[ Respondent/Husband.
JO: Fidel Arredondo
CO Gabriella Arredondo
Enrique Foster N.
085 Apt. 72
Santiago, Chile
lyor ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Kssolutinn of Marriage has been
led against you and you are
quired to serve a copy of your
ritten defenses, if any, to it on
IEORC.E T. RAMANI, attorney
Petitioner, whose address is
Hi Biscayne Bldg., 19 West
flaglfr Street, Miami, Florida
;|30. and file the original with
fcr clerk of the above styled court
or before December 20, 1985;
tierwise a default will be entered
gainst you for the relief
imanded in the complaint of
btition.
notice shall be published
each week for four
tmsecutive weeks in THE
EWISH FLORIDIAN.
[WITNESS my hand and the seal
Jsaid court at Miami, Florida on
fs 13th day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
Brcuit Court Seal)
TORGE T. RAMANI
1 Biscayne Bldg.
(West Flagler Street
ami, Florida 33130
ttomey for Petitioner
November 22,29;
December 6.13. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
J^TITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name QUALITY IN
TERIORS at 2400 NW 16 Street
Rd. Apt. 101 Miami Fla. 33125 in-
tends to register said name with
?A r* { the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Robert Ricard
19447 November 29;
December 6,13,20, 1985
I This
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FABULOUS
ESCORTS at 215 SW 17 Ave
Miami Fla. 33135 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Robert Ricard
19448 November 29;
December 6, 13,20, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PROFESSIONA1
PROPERTIES ONE/MILAN 25
at c/o 5300 N.W. 77th Court,
Miami, Florida 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
JULES LIPP, AS TRUSTEE
Applicant
Attorneys for Applicant
Rubinstein and Kornik, P.A.
798 Brickell Plaza/
59 S.E. 8th Street
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone (305) 371-6800
November 29, December 6,13 20
0000
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRC LIT. IN AND FOR
HADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-48471 (08)
NOTICE OF ACTION
AGI.KK FEDERAL SAVINGS
I LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
m
State! corporation.
Plaintiff.
DIAZ and MARIA
I IE DIAZ.
al..
Defendants.
\ IRDO DIAZ and
MARIA ESTHER
IDE DIAZ
kja I'iK-aterra,
h- I nciai Tauros
use
|EI l rigal. Valencia
Venezuela, S. A.
M \KK NOTIFIED, that an
t" foreclose a mortgage on
[lowing described property in
'E County, Florida:
No 401, of BYRON BAY
|D()MINIUM. according to the
ration of Condominium
f. as recorded in Official
fc Book 10450, at Page
'nd amended by Amend-
t filed in Official Records Book
at Page 1463, of the Pubic
Ifds of Dade County, Florida.
en filed against you and you
quired to serve a copy of
written defenses, if any, to it
Pth. Mack, Lewis and Allison,
toff's attorneys, whose ad-
. is HI N.E. 1st Street,
. Florida 33132, on or before
nber 27,1985, and file the
with the Clerk of this
either before service on
luff s attorneys or immediate
?"after; otherwise, a default
entered against you for the
demanded in the complaint.
"ESS my hand and seal of
-"urt on the 20 day of
il>er, 1985.
WD P. BRINKER
k of said Court
By: T. Casamayor
as Deputy Clerk
November 29;
December 6, 13,20, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-42235 CA-06
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
LARGO,
Plaintiff
vs.
JAMES R. THOMAS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: JAMES R. THOMAS,
CAREY B. THOMAS and
YOLANDA THOMAS. Residence
Unknown, if alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against JAMES
R. THOMAS. CAREY B.
THOMAS and YOLANDA
THOMAS, and all parties having
or Claiming to have any right, title
i>r interest in the property herein
described.
l*OU are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following properly in DADE
C'ounn. Florida: Lot 19, in Block
5. of RICMAR HEIGHTS.
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 53. at Page
32. of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Sheppard
F'aber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, ("oral Gables,
Florida 33146. on or before
December 20, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 13th day of
November. 1985.
RICHARD P. PRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19430 November 22, 28;
December 6, 13,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious rfame ILS
PUBLICATIONS INC d/b/a
SOUTH FLORIDA MAGAZINE
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Mark Weissman
19427 November 22. 29;
December 6.13, 1985
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
,m BCA8E N0 : 86-50707
IN RE: The Marriage of
NIMIA DUENAS
Petitioner,
and
JESUS V. DUENAS.
Respondent.
TO: JESUS V. DUENAS
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolu
52L& Marrue upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida,
*1M, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before January 10th,
1986, otherwise a default will be
entered.
DATED: December 9, 1985
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
19473 December 13, 20, 27, 1985;
-_, January 3, 1986
(Circuit Court Seal)
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of REI IN-
VESTMENTS PARTNERSHIP
at number 5582 Northwest 79th
Avenue, in the City of Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE and
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MAX WAAS
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MELVIN POLLAK
PAUL FOURNIER
ALAN ROSE NTH AL
IRA P. FEDERER
RICHARD M. WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
KIP AMAZON
A. GERALD REISS
NORMAN WAAS
SUSAN KAPLAN
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for Applicant
19434 November 22, 29;
___________December 6,13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-33392 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
BUCKEYE FEDERAL
SAVINGS and LOAN
ASSOCIATION, an Ohio
Corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSE M. LEDON and TANIA M
LEDON, his wife.
Defendants.
I', .lose M. Ledon and Tania M.
I.edon. his wife, whose residences
are unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees. Honors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 24, in Block
88, of COUNTRY LAKE
MANORS, SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 119, at Page
50. of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Barry S.
Yarchin. Esquire, of Rosenthal &
Yarchin, P.A., Attorneys for
Plaintiff, Suite 800, 3050 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami. Florida 33137,
on or before December 20, 1985.
and to file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 13, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19431 November 22. 29;
December 6. 13, 1985 |
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of HAMPTON
ACRES INDUSTRIAL CENTER
No. 2 PARTNERSHIP at number
5582 Northwest 79th Avenue in
the City of Miami, Florida, intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
DATED at Miami. Florida, this
29th day of November, 1985.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MELVIN POLLAK
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MAXWELL WAAS
BARBARA WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
RICHARD M. WAAS
JOSEPH SACCO
DAVID STONE
NORMAN M. WAAS
SUSAN W. KAPLAN
GIOVANNI DE PANI
HUGUETTE DE PANI
TIMOTHY GAMWELL
GABRIELLA J. LANDAU
ALAN ROSENTHAL
BARRY YARCHIN
REFAS LEASING AND
INVESTMENT CO.
(Not Incorporated)
ALAN J. DAVIS
BARBARA H. DAVIS
DANIEL DAVIS
NANCY DAVIS
DANNY J. SHAW
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A.
Suite, 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for
Applicants
19469 December 13, 20. 27, 1985
January 3,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-49152
(08)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CURLENA BRITT,
Petitioner/Wife,
MELVIN U. BRITT,
Respondent/H usband.
TO: MELVIN U. BRITT
RESIDENCE AND MAILING
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE T. RAMANI. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
711 Biscayne Bldg. 19 West
F'lagler Street, Miami. Florida
88180, and file the original with
the clerk of the al>ove styled court
on or before January :i. 1986;
otherwise a deafult will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
onre each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 26 day of
November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. LOGIE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Biscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
(306) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
19454 November 29;
December 6,13,20, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PUMA ADVERTIS-
ING. MARKETING, PROMO-
TIONS, PUBLIC RELATIONS,
PRODUCTIONS, MAGAZINE,
NEWSPAPER, DISTRIBUTOR,
PUBLISHING AGENCY at 2899
Collins Avenue. Miami Beach,
Florida 33140 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
F'lorida.
Antonio Purrinos
19429 November 22. 29;
December 6, 13, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-5464 CA 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
ALBERT E. FRANCIS and
LORRAINE R. FRANCIS.
Defendants.
To: Lorraine R. Francis, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees and all parties claiming
interest by, through, under or
against said Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block
118, of LESLIE ESATES
SECTION 12, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 106, at Page 100 of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Barry S. Yarchin.
Esquire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin,
P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff. Suite
800, 3050 Biscayne Boulevard.
Miami, Florida 33137, on or before
December 20, 1986, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 14, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19433 November 22, 29;
____________December 6,13,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46348 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FINANCIAL
GREAT
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
EISENMAN.
TIMOTHY A
et ux., et al.,
Defendant
TO: TIMOTHY A. EISENMAN
and TERESA A.
EISENMAN.
his wife
Frisco, Colorado K0443
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 17. Block 15. on SOUTH
MIAMI HEIGHTS MANOR, ac-
cording to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book <>. at Page
70, of the Public Records of Dade
County. F'lorida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard F'aber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 3. 1986. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19457 Novemb-
December 6,13,r
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-48470 (19)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
NARASINHA S. RAO,
Petitioner/Husband
and
SHANTA RAO,
Respondent/Wife
TO: SHANTA RAO
20 Vaishali Apts.,
J. P. Road
7 Bungalows,
Andheri, West
Bombay 400058
INDIA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE T. RAMANI, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
711 Biscayne Bldg., 19 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the abot styled court
on or before December 27, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published one
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
20 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Biscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
19443 November 29;
December 6, 13,20.1985

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LEPARDO at 2029
NW 22 Court, Miami. FL 33142 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RAFAEL PARDO President
Attorney for HP. Fashions Inc.
19459 November 89;
December 6, 13,20. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-42165 CA 21
Fla. Bar No. 241709
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
f/k/a
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI, as trustee for the Dade
County Housing Finance
Authority.
Plaintiff,
v
JEAN JASMIN and JACKIE
JASMIN. Ins wife, etal..
Defendants.
To: Jean Jasmin Clovil Charles
and Yoianda Charles, his wife,
whose residences are unknown,
and the unknown partial who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all partial having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
The North Vt of Lot 12, and all of
Lot 13, in Block 2, of EDISON
HEIGHTS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
34, at Page 86. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
i has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
January 3. 1986. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 26, 1985.
Richard P. Brinker, Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
SWD No. 245536- 1-323-T
FHA No. 092-286030303
19455 November 29.
Decemlier 6. 18. 2(1. 1985


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
.
Public Noticesj
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cut No. 85-40*54 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEV,
DAVIN AND COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
FELIX RODRIGUEZ. DIANA
DOLORES PABON, STEPHEN
M. TRAVIS and EUGENIA M.
TRAVIS, hia wife, and the
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against
them; THE PUBLIC HEALTH
TRUST OF DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, an agency and in-
strumentality of Dade County,
Florida, which operates
JACKSON MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA; and RANCO CON
TROLS, a division of RANCO BJ-
CORPORATED, an Ohio
corporation.
Defendants.
To: Felix Rodriguez and Diana
Dolors Pabon, whose residence are
unknown, and the unknown par-
ties who may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not known to
be dead or alive, and ail parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 4. in Block 3, of FAIRWAY
LAKE SOUTH SECTION ONE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 76, at Page
64, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys tor Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3060 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
January 3, 1986, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter, otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 26, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D. C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
19466 November 29;
December 6,13.20,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ALINA BAKERY at
1661 W. Okeechobee Road,
Hialeah, Florida 33010 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
LEMAT CORPORATION
By: ROBERTO LEAL.
President
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
Attorney for LEMAT
CORPORATION .
19462 December 6,13.20. 27.1986
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC Case No. 86-47740 (11)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NICHOLAS MARSEILLE,
Petitioner-Husband
and
MERVEILLEUSE D.
MARSEILLE,
Respondent-Wife
To: MERVEILLEUSE D.
MARSEILLE,
Residence Unknown,
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florid*. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before December 20. 1986. other-
wise a default will be entered.
DATED: November 15. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: J. Logie
19440 November 22, 29;
December 6. 13. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-10439
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN GYULAI,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
NO. 090723
The administration of the Estate
of HELEN GYULAI, Deceased,
File Number 86-10439, is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Dade Coun-
ty, Florida 33131. The names and
addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) ail claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 13, 1986.
MORTON B. ZEMEL
Personal Representative:
MORTON B. ZEMEL, Esq.
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite 111
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162
Telephone: (306) 949-4237
19472 December 13,20,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaber 86-10023
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Sarah I. Sacks
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Sarah I. Sacks, deceased, File
Number 86-10023 (04), is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West i
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida'
33130, (Dade County Courthouse).
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WrriHN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 6, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Gerson L. Sacks
10304 S.W. 117th Street
Miami, Florida 33176
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
J. David Liebman, P.A.
3226 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: 306/441-9030
19464 December 6, 13,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ILS PUBLICA-
TIONS INC d/b/a SOUTH
FLORIDA BUSINESS!
MAGAZINE intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Mark Weissman
19427
November 22.29;
December 6, 13, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DELUXE PAINT
AND BODY SHOP at 14460 W.
Dixie Hwy., N. Miami, Fla. 33161
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ARNOLD LIBERMAN
19442 November 29;
December 6, 13,20.1985 I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to I
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Machinery and Equip-
ment for Plastic at 3217 SW 60
Ave., Miami, Fla. 33155 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-'
tv. Florida.
HERNAN N. RESTREDO
3217 SW 60 AVE.
Miami. Fla. 33156
19468 November 29;
December 13, 20. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuber 85-10396
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LENA KD7NIS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
(Fla. Bar No. 017442)
The administration of the estate
of LENA KIPNIS. deceased. File
Number 85-10396, is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 13, 1985.
Personal Representatives:
THEODORE R. KIPNIS
115 Fourth Terrace,
DiLido Island
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
EVELYN LOWELL
111 Fourth Terrace,
DiLido Island
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Cypen, Cypen and Dribin
IRVING CYPEN, ESQ.
P. O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19471 December 13, 20,1985
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 85-9908
Diviaioa 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CURT HEILBRl'N.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CURT HEILBRUN, deceased, ~
File Number 86-9908, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 6, 1986.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201,
Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201,
Biscayne Building.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 374-3116
19466 December 6,13.1986
TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION-
CASE NO. 86-47842 CA 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
003481
IRVIN PEARLSTEIN and
NATALIE MARGOLIS.
Plaintiff
vs.
JESSE LEE DAVIS, et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: UNION MORTGAGE
COMPANY, rNC.
16910 Dallas Parkway
Suite 212
Dallas. Texas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: LOT 30. BLOCK 11.
WINDWARD ESTATES,
SECTION TWO. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 68, at Page 98, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146, on or before
December 20, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 16th day of
November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
19441 November 22. 29;
December 6,13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 85-10092
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HILDEGARDE SINGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HILDEGARDE SINGER,
deceased, File Number 85-10092.
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 6, 1985.
Personal Representative:
IRVING CYPEN, ESQUIRE
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CYPEN. CYPEN AND DRIBIN
P. O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19465 December 6.13. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Doris Madas at 105
SW 22nd Road. Miami. Fla. 33129
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dora Martinez
19461 December 6.13,20,27,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ARGENT
FASHIONS INC D/B/A MR
ALEX at 293 N.E. 2nd Ave.!
Miami. Fla. 33132 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo, Jr.
19460 December 6. 13, 20. 27. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DDE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuber 85-42
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARINA de LARA
a/k/a MARINA DELARA
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: MAGALY ALVAREZ
ZUNIGA
Address Unknown
RAUL ALVAREZ
Address Unknown
RICKY DE LARA
Address Unknown
and Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs-at-Law. Living or dead,
their respective heirs and all per-
sons claiming by, through and
under and or may be infants, in-
competents or otherwise sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for sale
of property has been filed in this
court. You are required to serve
written defenses to the petition not
later than January 6, 1986, on peti-
tioner's attorney, whose name and
address are:
Abraham A. Galbut. Esquire
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on December 2, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
19463 December 6.13, 20, 27, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-42740 CA-18
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
V8.
ADA PEREZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ADA PEREZ
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against ADA PEREZ,
and all parties having or claiming
to have any right title or interest in
the property herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
That certain Condominium
Parcel Composed of Unit 206, of
GROVE ESTATES CON-
DOMINIUM, a Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration of Con-
dominium thereof, as recorded in
Official Records Book 11769, at
Page 3123, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
January 10, 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this court this 5 day of December.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19468 December 13,20,27,1986;
January 3, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOB
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRciirt
DADE COUNTY. FL0R"da
PROBATE DIVI8I0N
File Nuber 85-S869
Diviaioa 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LYDIA OPSCHA
Deceivd
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE AB0BE
ESTATE AND ALL 0THFR
PERSONS INTERESTED ffl
THE ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra.
tion of the estate of LYDU
OPSCHA, deceased. File Number
86-9869, is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida. The personai
representative of the estate is
ALAN S. KESSLER;, whose ad-
dress is The Roney Plaza 2301 Col-
lins Ave. Suite M-8 Miami Beach
Fl. 33139. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE M0N
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient ocpies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objection they
may have that challenge the validi-
ty of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
December 13, 1986.
ALAN S. KESSLER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LYDIA OPSCHA
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Robert M. Jasinski
The Roney Phua 2301
Collins Ave. Suite M-8
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19475 December 13,20,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BATES
ASSOCIATES, at 7800 S.W. 74th.
Place, Miami, Florida, intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
MOISES M. BARCIMANTO
SUSANA M.T. BARCIMANTO
19470 December 13.20,27.1985;
January 3. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
Civil Actiea No. 86-48627 (1)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
RAQUEL DE ALMEIDA,
wife
and
CARLOS A. BUSTAMANTE,
husband
TO: CARLOS A.
BUSTAMANTE
AV-EL-SOL-927 No. 1
LIMA, PERU (4)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage ha? been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 801
Northeast 167 St.. Miami. Fla.
33162, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 27. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
20 day of November, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: J. Logie
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19444 November 29:
December 6. 13.20.1986


Names In News
Barbara Mandell Inducted Into
Ohio Women's Hall of Fame

Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Obituaries
Barbara A. Mandel, national
president of the National Council
bf Jewish Women, was inducted
into the 1985 Ohio Women's Hall
bf Fame at a recent reception at
|the Sheraton Plaza in Columbus,
Ohio. Gov. Richard F. Celeste
presented the award.
Mandel, a native of Cleveland,
selected for the honor
ause of "her achievements in
the areas of volunteer work,
Ihuman services and religion and
[philosophy."
The Ohio Women's Hall of
frame was established in 1978 by
[the Women's Division of the Ohio
bureau of Employment Servioes
to recojmize Ohio women who
[have achieved distinction in their
fields.
The National Conference of
Christians and Jews has an-
nounced 14 American fellows who
[will participate in the second an-
nual theological seminar in
[Jerusalem scheduled for January.
The 14 Christian scholars from
[across the United States will join
[five Europeans at the Shalom
IHartman Institute, where they
1 work throughout the month of
Jjanuary with Israeli Talmud
[students and scholars from the In-
stitute to examine how the Jewish
nd Christian traditions have used
|and interpreted the Bible.
South Florida Conference on
ISoviet Jewry, a local Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews affiliate,
has learned that 12-year-Soviet
Jewish refusenik, Ilya Essas. of
Moscow, has been granted per-
nission to emigrate from the
ISoviet Union.
Essas, a mathemati-
Ician/physicist, first applied to
(emigrate to Israel in August of
r.973, but was almost immediately
Irefused permission on the
grounds of the "secrecy of his
[work." He was a lecturer in
(Mathematics in the Moscow
]Medical Institute.
Word of Essas' pending emigra-
tion was received by Judy
Gilbert, associate director of the
South Florida Conference of
Soviet Jewry, in a telephone call
from Congressman Bill Lehman
Fla.). Lehman was informed
bf the release by Victor Isakov.
number two man at the Soviet
K* \o *
SS-0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
Embassy in Washington.
Israeli President Chaim Herzog
will be host of the 1986 United
Jewish Appeal President's Mis-
sion to Israel Jan. 19-24, welcom-
ing American Jewish community
leaders from around the country
for an intensive four-day visit.
There will also be a pre-mission
to Morocco on January 15-19.
Bernard Borine of Philadelphia, a
UJA national vice chairman, is
mission chairman.
Participants in the fifth annual
winter mission are expected to be
addressed by Prime Minister
Shimon Peres and Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem and the University of
Madrid have signed an agreement
providing for academic, scientific
and cultural cooperation between
the two institutions.
Present at the signing of the
agreement at the Hebrew Univer-
sity on Mount Scopus were Prof.
Amnon Pazy, rector of the
Hebrew University, and Prof.
Amador Schueller Perez.rector
of the University of Madrid.
In his remarks accompanying
the signing ceremony, Prof.
Schueller stated that he had
brought a personal letter from the
speaker of the Spanish parliament
to Shlomo Hillel, speaker of the
Knesset, inviting Hillel to be his
guest for an official visit to Spain.
In his statement, Pazy expressed
his hope that the agreement bet-
ween the Hebrew University and
the University of Madrid would
further the development of
diplomatic relations between
Spain and Israel.
Four-hundred delegates from
the Eastern Seaboard were to
converge at New York City's Park
Avenue Synagogue on Thursday,
Dec. 12, to attend "Forcus on Two
Fronts," Women's League for
Conservative Judaism's 19th
Biennial World Affairs
Conference.
Women's League President
Selma Weintraub has appointed
Frances Unger of Manhattan to
chair the day-long conference at
which several distinguished
speakers were scheduled to
debate issues regarding chur-
ch/state and Israel.
Coinciding with the Chanukah
Christmans holiday season,
when religious symbols are fre-
quently placed on public property,
Jesuit Priest Charles M. Whelan,
a professor at Fordham Law
School, and Henry Siegman, ex-
ecutive director of the American
Jewish Congress, were to discuss
separation of church and state.
The American Jewish Congress
has condemned bigotry and
violence in a white Philadelphia
neighborhood aimed at driving a
black family out of its newly pur-
chased home.
A statement by Arnold Silvers,
president of the Pennsylvania
region of AJCongress, said: "We
are outraged that vandalism and
racial picketings by their
Elmwood white neighbors have
driven the Williams family from
their newly purchased home in
Philadelphia, Pa. The success of
these intolerable acts of bigotry il-
lustrate once again how far
American society must still trave
to achieve equal rights and racial
harmony in its neighborhoods.
Benjamin Netanyahu, perma-
nent representative of Israel to
the United Nations, will address
the Diamond Key Dinner of
Emunah Women of American on
Sunday evening, Dec. 15, at the
New York Hilton Hotel.
The dinner, which will be at-
tended by some 1,000 members,
supporters and friends of
Emunah, will honor Charlotte
and Harold Dacha, of Great
Neck, N.Y., said Beverly Segal,
national president of Emunah
Women.
A Presidential Task Force on
the Rabbinic Curriculum has been
appointed by Dr. Alfred Gott-
schalk. president of Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion, to undertake a two-year
study of the institution's training
program for rabbis.
Dr. Eugene Mihaly, academic
vice president and professor of
rabbinic literature and homiletics,
is chairing the Task Force.
KAPLAN, Greta C, of Miami. The
Riverside.
PRESS, Fay, 81, Dec. 8. The Riverside.
STEINBERG, Sidney, 70, of Bay Harbour
Island, Dec. 9. The Riverside.
GOLDMAN, Esther, 74. Dec. 9. The
Riverside.
LEVIN, Sarah, of Miami. Services were
held.
SPITZ, Carl, 76, of Miami, Dec. 8. Levitt-
Weinstein.
ZIPES, Phillip P.. 75, of Miami Beach, Dec.
8. Interment in New York. The Riverside.
ARON, Leah, of Surfside, Dec. 7. Levitt-
Weinstein.
ROWITZ, Betty P., 65, of North Miami
Beach, Dec. 8. Menorah Chapels
MEISELMAN, Anne, 71, of Miami, Dec. 7.
Services were held.
ROSENSTEIN, Alvin Philip. 72, of Miami
Beach and Chicago. Services held in Skokie,
m.
BATEMAN. Bertram C. 75, of Key Bis
cayne, Dec. 9. The Riverside.
WEINBERGER. Harold, 80, of North
Miami, Dec. 9. Services were held.
KARNAL, Florence, 81, Dec. 9. Services
held in Ridgewood, N.Y. The Riverside.
LIEBMAN. Sam, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
STEINBERG. Samuel, of Miami Beach. In-
terment in New York. Rubin-Zilbert.
STEINBERG, Sidney. 79, of Bay Harbour
Island, Dec. 9. The Riverside.
YOUNGFIELD, Rothstein Natalie, 86 of
Miami Beach. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery. Rubin-Zilbert.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
ruin,'
&Monument, Inc.
76'0 Northeast 2nJ Avenue
Phone 759-1669
SANDLER
Matilda (Tillie). 76. of Miami, passed away
December 3. Mrs. Sandier had made her
home here for the past 41 years coming
from Verona. New Jersey. She and her late
husband, Fred, were recipients of the Israel
Bonds Medal of Valor. She was President of
Kadimah Chapter of Pioneer Women
(Na'amat) USA. member for over 20 years.
Member of JWV West Miami Post No. 223
Auxiliary for over 20 years. She is survived
by her children Charlotte (Murray) Mittler.
Myrna (Ralph) Fistel. and Carol (Stanley
Gold. Services were held at Temple Or Olom
with interment at Star of David Memorial
Park.
(X)LDBERG, Irving D.. 91. of North Miami
Beach, December 4. The Riverside
GLTT, Chaime. 71, of Miami Beach,
December 5. The Riverside.
MAYER. Alvin. 76. of North Miami Beach.
December 4. The Riverside.
GANZ. Joseph H.. of Miami Beach.
December 2. The Riverside.
COHEN, Sophie, of North Miami Beach
Dec. 6. Blasberg Chapel.
KELLERT, Andor, 70. formerly of North
Miami Beach. Services were held.
KAPLAN. Greta C. of Miami. The
Riverside.
PRESS. Fay. 81. Dec. 8. The Riverside.
STEINBERG, Sidney. 70. of Bay Harbour
Island. Dec. 9. The Riverside.
GOLDMAN, Esther. 74, Dec. 9. The
Riverside.
LEVIN, Sarah, of Miami. Services were
held.
SPITZ, Carl, 76. of Miami. Dec. 8. Levitt-
Weinstein.
ZIPES, Phillip P.. 75, of Miami Beach, Dec.
8. Interment in New York. The Riverside.
ARON. Leah, of Surfside, Dec. 7. Levitt
Weinstein.
ROWITZ, Betty P., 65. of North Miami
Beach. Dec. 8. Menorah Chapels.
MEISELMAN. Anne. 71. of Miami. Dec. 7
Services were held.
ROSENSTEIN. Alvin Philip, 72. of Miami
Beach and Chicago. Services held in Skokie,
III.
BATEMAN. Bertram C, 75. of Key Bis
cayne, Dec. 9. The Riverside.
WEINBERGER. Harold. 80, of North
Miami, Dec. 9. Services were held.
KARNAL, Florence, 81. Dec. 9. Services
held in Ridgewood. N.Y. The Riverside.
LIEBMAN. Sam. of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
STEINBERG. Samuel, of Miami Beach. In
terment in New York. Rubin-Zilbert.
STEINBERG, Sidney, 79, of Bay Harbour
Island, Dec. 9. The Riverside.
YOUNGFIELD. Rothstein Natalie. 86 of
Miami Beach. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery. Rubin-Zilbert.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbatt-
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
26640 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
(3131 543 1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service Front Kliirida Area
Your First Call to Us will
_____Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and.
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Kl9pif*Ht*nt4*d by Hivi*rsid> Memorial Chap**!, Inr
New York: (212)263-7600Queens Blvd. & 7fith Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Four Locations Serving
Miami Beach The Jew'sh Community
Coral Gables _. _
Soutn Miami-Kendall The Only No. Miami Beach Hallandale
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456-4011
Pre-Arrangements
with
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Main Oftice: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridiap/Friday, December 13, 1985
30th Anniversary
Rackman Heads Bar-Dan U.
Tribute To Rabbi Carl Klein
Sherman Winn Honored For 20
Years Of Community Service
Dr. Emanuei Rackman, presi-
dent of Bar-Dan University, will
preside at a a dinner of the Florida
Friends marking the inauguration
of the Rabbi Carl and Helen Klein
Chair in Rabbinic Personalities at
the University in Ramat Gan.
Israel.
The dinner, celebrating Bar-
Ilan's 30th anniversary, will take
place Wednesday evening, in the
Diplomat Hotel. It will also
feature a tribute by Dr. Irving
Lehrman. rabbi of Temple
Smanu-El. Miami Beach to the
late Samuel N. Friedland. chair-
man emeritus of Food Fair, and
long prominent civic leader and
philanthropist in the Miami area.
Rabbi Klein, spiritual leader of
the Hallandale Jewish Center and
a prominent figure in Florida com-
munal affairs for many years, will
be guest of honor.
Scion of an illustrious rabbinical
family. Dr. Klein serves as vice
president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami A
pioneer supporter of the Universi-
ty, he is a member of its American
Board of Overseers.
Mr. Friedland, a nationally-
known business figure, founded
the Food Fair chain of super-
markets in 1933 and was chair-
man emeritus at the time of his
death this year.
A major supporter and leader of
numerous religious, civic and
charitable organizations, he was a
founder and leader of Mount Sinai
Hospital and Temple Emanu-El in
Miami Beach and had lead the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the Combined Jewish Appeal
and the Greater Miami Committee
for Israel Bonds.
Among the honors accorded Mr.
JWVPost
40th Anniversary
Commander Alexander Green-
waki of the Norman Bruce Brown
Post 174. Florida's Pioneer
Jewish War Veterans of the
United States announces the
celebration of its 49th
Anniversary.
For this special occasion. Post
174 will honor its World War One
Veterans with a Deli-Lunch on
Dec. 16 at 12:30 p.m.. South
Miami Community Center.
The ages of these World War
One Veterans range from 87 to 96
years of age. They are: Louis
Aronoff. Edward Brenner. Morris
Goldenberg. Herman Goldstein.
George Graham. Adolph Haimes.
David Harris. Harry Markowitz.
Aaron Rosenberg. Nathan Roth.
Sam Srednick. Solly Wildstein.
Abram Lurie.
Past National Ainslee R. Ferdie
will be guest speaker. The Ladies
Auxibary will act as hostesses for
this event.
Beth Moshe Flag
Raising Ceremony
Tuesday afternoon, at 4 p.m.. a
special Sag raising ceremony will
take place on the Temple Beth
Moshe grounds.
Colonel Norman Marcus has ar-
ranged for an Aaaekan Flag that
flew over the nation's capitol
dome to be donated to the Temple.
Congressman William Lehman
wfl make the official presentation
and Michael Dsubtn and the Eagle
Scout troop wfl participate in the
Dr. Emanuel Rackman
Friedland were awards by the
Synagogue Council of America
and the National Conference of
Christians and Jews.
A renowned rabbi, scholar and
educator. Dr. Rackman came to
the presidency of Bar-Ilan Univer-
sity in 1977 after a rich and varied
career in the United States. He
has combined scholarly at-
tainments in both the religious
and secular worlds with broad ac-
complishments in communal
leadership.
Dr. Rackman received his rab-
binic training at Yeshiva Universi-
ty, was graduated from Columbia
Law School and holds a doctorate
in political science from Columbia
University. He was president of
the New "York Board of Rabbis
and the Rabbinical Council of
America and served as profesor of
Jewish Studies and consultant to
the chancellor of the University of
New York on Jewish Studies. He
holds the rank of Chaplain
(Colonel) in the United States Air
Force Reserves and was a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Jewish Agency.
Dade County Commissioner
Sherman Winn will be honored by
friends for 20 years of service to
the community, on Sunday. 9:30
a.m. at the Doral Beach Hotel.
His political career spans two
decades in which he has served as
the first ever elected Mayor of
North Miami for two terms, a
State Representative in the
Florida House of Representatives,
a Senator in the Florida Senate,
where he was chosen by his col-
leagues to serve as the first ever
President Pro-Tern from the
South Florida delegavion.
The senator left his political
career briefly to accept a challeng-
ing position as director of the
Hotel and Restaurant Division in
Tallahassee, where he isc j
with revamping the entire <
ment and making maW]
budgetary shuts, making
department run more efficientwl
and effectively than ever befool
Senator Winn left this post k]
accept the Executive Directed
position with the Greater Miami
Hotel Association, a
which he still holds.
positial
When a County Con
seat vacated in the District
which the Winn family read*!
friends convinced Senator Wnl
to make a commitment to pctiH
service and he ran for the Metrtl
Dade County Commission, thai
seat which he currently holds.
Dr. Shamir To Speak At Public Library
Dr. Yehuda Shamir, professor
of Judaica at the University of
Miami. Barry University, and
Florida International University,
will speak at the next lecture of
the Moadon Ivri-Hebrew Cultural
Forum on Tuesday from 1-3 p.m.
at the Miami Beach
Library.
Dr. Shamir will speak i
Maimonides His Life and
Work," in honor of the 850th|
niversary of his birth.
where shopping is a pleasure 7doys a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8.-00 A.M.
Prices Effective December 12 thru 18.1985.
Available at PubHx Stores with
Freeh Danish ^sk^eries Only.
Raisin
Pumpernickel
Holiday Pies
Available at PubHx Storas with Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
I Custard
8-inch 10-inch
$l- $339
%IM
$209 $3.99
$1.89 $339
$1.89 $3.59
$2.89 $4.99
S-istch
Sweet Potato
Cherry
Blaeberry
I. foil
Coconat Caetard
10-inch
$469
$4 89
$3.29
$4 09
$3 59
4 s.
Available at Pubfcx Storas with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Gingerbread houses arc available to be ordered now.
Display as a centerpiece for the retire holiday season.
$15.95
Order Now! German Lebkwcken (Honey Cake) in an
assortment of packages is available.
Holiday Bell Cookies... each 18*
Ahnond, Cinnamon,
Cream Cheese or Strawberry Filled
Croissants....................each 69*
Mini Bagelettes.......12 99*
Deluxe
Fruit Cake Ring............ SS $849
Deluxe
Fruit Cake Ring............S*ig
Gourmet
Fruit Cake Bar..............1^*2"
Pfeffemuesse
Cookies.........................SS*"!2*
Hofday Tree Cookies... 25*
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
wing. Pick up a box of delicious, fact frozen, bake and
serve hors'd oeuvres for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
50-cL pkg. ---------------------............._____............ $11.95
10Oct. pkg....................................________....... $19.95
Available at AN Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Deluxe Cookies............ $3"
(3-lb. box.........................................$11.50)
Deluxe
Party Cookie Tray........ -5*9"
Danish Pecan Ring.......^h$1"
Gourmet Brownies.......5S $1"
Apple Bran Muffins .6 for $159
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 m $1*
wttere^shoppingisa


Full Text
Friday, December 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
'V
:'s Gov. Mario Cuomo (left.) and Fred Wilpon, president
\\'ew York Mets (right) are shown after receiving 1985
m S. Wise Awards from Howard M. Squadron, honorary
ml of the American Jewish Congress.
22 Cabinet Members
Went on 84 Junkets
By GIL SEDAN
lUSALEM (JTA)
jrenty-two Israelis of
et rank visited 94
pes on 84 junkets
in the 14 months
pie Labor-Likud unity
sn government was
and at least one
et member has asked,
those trips necessary?
Sarid of the opposition
(lights Movement (CRM)
he question in the context
el's severe economic dif-
which the government
solve by drastically cut-
Kpenditures and urging
productivity. He noted
art from the costs of their
; borne by the taxpayers,
nisters' travels occupied
ely 812 working days.
Iv Finance Minister Adi
responding to Sarid,
Ithat overseas trips by
[overnment officials have
significantly since the
kment introduced its
ly economic program last
More that, the government
id 482 out of 544 requests
teters and senior officials to
abroad. Since the belt-
ing, there have been only
Quests and only 92 were ap-
Amorai said.
ISSUE, long simmering,
ion Roofing
iSheet Metal
cs, Inc.
I W. 21st Street
i 325-8287
k'our roof repaired now;
III save on a new roof later
^factory Work by
lienced Men"
DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 800 432 3708
flared anew a week ago when
Minister of Tourism Avraham
Sharir returned from a 24-day trip
to the U.S. and other countries.
He was sharply criticized by the
public and the press for staying
away longer than he was authoriz-
ed to by the Cabinet and because
his absence coincided with the in-
ternational conference on tourism
of the Skol travel agents in
Jerusalem which, normally, the
Minister of Tourism would have
hosted.
When Sharir landed at Ben
Gurion Airport a week ago,
newspaper reporters handed him
a wreath of flowers bound with
ribbon bearing the words,
"Welcome to Israel."
The irony, not lost on the
minister, infuriated him. At a
Cabinet meeting the next day.
Sharir told his colleagues that his
presentation with a "funeral
wreath" was an act tantamount
with undermining the foundations
of the State.
IN A STATEMENT issued
later through the Government
Press Office. Sharir said the
criticism of his trip went lieyond
acceptable limits. "Not one of my
critics took the trouble to find out
the details of my trip and how
carefully it was planned," the
statement said.
Sharir explained that he had
working meetings with tourism
representatives and had address-
ed Jewish congregations and com-
munity leaders on the importance
of tourism to Israel, especially
since it has lagged badly since the
Achille Lauro hijack in October.
Cuomo Warns:
Politics, Religion Don't Mix in U.S.
NEW YORK New
York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo
has warned against any at-
tempt to try to make
America "a Christian na-
tion" at a dinner held by the
American Jewish Congress
at the Pierre Hotel here.
Gov. Cuomo addressed an au-
dience of 300 who gathered for
the presentation of the 1985
AJCongress Stephen S. Wise
Awards to the Governor and to
Fred Wilpon, chairman of the
board of Sterling Equities and
president of the New York Mets.
Cuomo was honored for his
"lifelong commitment to human
rights and social justice."
"THE AMERICAN Jewish
Congress reminds us constantly
that one of the bases of our
democracy is the rejection by law
of the notion that any formal
philosophical or religious test
should be used to grant or
withhold the rights of citizen-
ship," Cuomo said.
"The truth is that some people
see a very different fundamental
principle, one that is contradic-
tory of this freedom. They tell us
that to be strong as a nation we
must return to what they say we
were meant to be a Christian
nation. "The idea that religion
and politics don't mix," Rev.
(Jerry) Falwell says, "was in-
vented by the devil to keep Chris-
tians from running their coun-
try," the governor continued.
The "Christian nation" concept,
we went on, "is a perversion of
our Constitution and a dangerous
one for all people who believe that
our greatest gift and our greatest
strength is the right to choose
what we will be and what we will
believe."
HE CITED the recurrence in
U.S. history of a "nativist senti-
ment" calling on people to stop
being what they are in order to
become "real Americans." The
Governor remarked that the im-
migrants who fought and died for
America "never forgot who they
were and where they came from
. They never gave up their
language or their faith. "Today,
he said, "we're stronger because
of the diversity the immigrants in-
sisted on and wiser. We've learn-
ed to encourage the identity of all
the fragments that have con-
tributed to our greatness."
Related to the idea of diversity
and pluralism is the idea of family
and the common welfare, the
governor said, noting that there
are those who would substitute in-
dividualism for compassion.
"At our very best, we have
helped ourselves by having our
people collectively, as a govern-
ment, help one another," he said.
Jews, he continued, have furnish-
ed an example. "Everywhere
where poverty and exploitation
were found, Jews have fought
against it," and have identified
themselves with the struggle for
social justice and educational
reform.
In his acceptance remarks, Fred
Wilpon said that "being a
humanist is not a luxury you
can be tough-minded, but not
hard-hearted." Mr. Wilpon was
cited for "distinguished leader-
ship in community relations and
social welfare.
HOWARD M. SQUADRON,
honorary president of
AJCongress, served as dinner
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chairman. Theordore R. Mann,
president, and Henry Siegman,
executive director of AJCongress,
presented greetings.
Wilpon serves as director of the
Foundation for Children with
Learning Disabilities, the New
York City Partnership and United
Services Organizations of
Metropolitan New York. He also
serves as a trustee of the Jewish
Institute for Geriatric care.
Previous recipients of the
Stephen S. Wise Awards have in-
cluded Golda Meir, Robert F. Ken-
nedy, Harry S. Truman, Adlai E.
Stevenson, Leonard Bernstein,
and Walter Mondale.
Police Not Sure Whether Murder
Was Intended To Terrorize
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
police have not yet determined
whether the murder of Aziz
Shehade, a prominent Palestinian
lawyer and political moderate,
outside his home in Ramallah was
an act of terror intended to warn
all moderates in the West Bank or
a criminal assault motivated by
one of Shehade's intricate, far-
flung and often mysterious
business deals.
The 73-year-old lawyer, describ-
ed by some as a multi-millionaire,
was killed by a knife slash across
the left side of his neck after park-
ing his car in his garage. He died
instantly. The weapon was found
50 meters from Shehade's home.
The police deduce from the
nature of the wound that at least
two assailants were involved, one
to hold the victim while the other
wielded the knife. But there are
no clues and so far no arrests.
Police said that for the moment
they were giving equal weight to
political or criminal motivation.
Shehade was considered one of
the leading Palestinian moderates
in the West Bank. Though he ad-
vocated a Palestinian state which
he saw living in peace side-by-side
with Israel, he favored dialogue
over violence. In 1968, he was Lie
first West Bank lawyer to break a
strike called by Palestinian
lawyers to protest Israel's occupa-
tion of the territory after the Six-
Day War.
In 1977, before President An-
war Sadat of Egypt visited Israel,
Shehade was one of a group of
Palestinians who met with U.S.
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and presented him with a position
paper outlining a peaceful solution
of the Israeli-Palestinian dispute.
Shehade was known to have
close contacts with senior IsraaK
officials which, alone, would make
him a likely target of Palestinian
extremists. But in recent years he
has shied away from politics,
devoting himself full time to his
law practice and business which
he conducted with both Jews and
Arabs. For that reason, many
observers doubt the murder was
politically inspired.
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Page 16
Federation, December 1985
Agencies
jvs news

The Association of Jewish Voca
tional Service Professionals (AJVSP)
held its Biennial International Con-
ference in Toronto last month. Rachel
E. Tannenbaum, associate executive
director of the Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice in Miami and current president
of AJVSP, said that the conference
title, "Challenge and Change," was
particularly appropriate in light of
the continuing efforts of the Jewish
vocational service field to enhance
programs in reponse to changing
community needs.
Although it was a wet week in
Canada, the Miami contingent of the
conference was able to share some
sunshine with more than 100 Jewish
Vocational Service workers from as
far away as Seattle, Dallas, San Fran-
cisco, Boston and Montreal. There
was a bright interchange of ideas
about current economics, the employ-
ment situation in North America,
older workers, innovative program-
ming for the handicapped, new voca-
tional counseling techniques and the
impact of technology on the work
world.
For more information about this
conference or about the AJVSP
organization, please contact Rachel
E. Tannenbaum at 576-3220.
Pat. P. Fine, president of Miami's
Jewish Vocational Service (JVS), and
Eugene Greenspan, executive direc-
tor, are pleased to announce the re-
cent appointment of Barbara J. Fox
as coordinator of the Homemaker
Referral Service. In this capacity,
Fox will serve the elderly on Miami
Beach and North Miami Beach.
Fox received her bachelor's degree
in psychology from Syracuse Univer-
sity, and her master's degree in social
work from the State University of
New York.
Fox has extensive background in
the evaluation and counseling of
clients, and in staff training. JVS
President Pat P. Fine said "Her
sincerity, warmth, and special in-
terest in gerontology will certainly
add to the effectiveness and growth
of the Homemaker Referral Service."
Fox says she is "looking forward to
providing quality in home
assessments and the finest
homemakers and nurse's aides
available for hire."
For further information, contact
Barbara Fox at 672-2184, where a
helping hand and a helpful
homemaker are available to serve the
community.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Students to
begin campus
campaigns
If student Federation-United
Jewish Appeal campaigns begin after
winter break, then spring has come
early to South Florida campuses.
Leadership training is under way,
calendars are being planned, and
workers are being recruited.
Students are now preparing to put
their programs into action in the com-
ing months.
Preparation for the campaign
began at the National Student
Leadership Training Conference in
Washington, D.C. on November 1-3.
At this weekend conference spon-
sored by the University Programs
Department of the United Jewish Ap-
peal, workshops were conducted on
calendar planning, publicity and pro-
motion, solicitation training,
outreach techniques and special
events.
The conference was especially
helpful to Elissa Lieberman, Univer-
sity of Miami campaign chairman and
a senior majoring in speech com-
munications. She was "psyched"
after the weekend. "The group
clicked. We worked well together and
motivated each other," she said.
"Organizing our own campaigns can
be very demanding. There was a
tremendous feeling of mutual support
and commitment from the beginning,
and together we developed a lot of ex-
citing new ideas for our own
schools."
Two weeks later, on November 17, a
workshop was conducted for local
students at the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at the University of
Miami. Sponsored by Hillel Jewish
Student Centers of Greater Miami.
Broward and Palm Beach counties,
the U.J.A. University Programs
Department and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the workshop
presented the role of the Jewish com-
munity Federation. The participants
were the chairpersons and other cam-
paign leaders of colleges in Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties.
Rabbi Steven Abrams, director of
planning at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, discussed the func-
tion of Federation in meeting com-
munity needs, and emphasized the
importance of student participation
in that activity.
Lisa Diamond, a Florida Interna-
tional University sophomore who
chairs the North Dade area cam-
paign, explained how her campaign
will affect students. "It teaches us
about our responsibility to help
others by giving of ourselves." The
major purpose of the campaign, she
says, is "to tell students everyone
we can reach about the needs of
other Jews and to show them how to
make a difference by working with
Several of the chairpersons will
participate in a mission to Israel from
December 24 to January 3. Planned
by U.J.A. for national student cam-
paign leadership, the mission is the
final program to be held before the
campaigns begin.
Equipped with basic organizational
skills and a working knowledge of
Jewish community needs and- ser-
vices, the student leaders agree that
the campus campaign should educate
and activate students. According to
Annie Malka, University of Miami
Law School campaign chairman and a
former Florida International Univer-
sity campaign leader, "my job is to
get the law students to care."
Graduate students, she feels, "should
view this as an aspect of their educa-
tion, a way to express their Jewish
identities by joining in a communal
activity and becoming a part of the
community."
Jewish students have conducted
campus campaigns for several years,
dating back to the aftermath of the
Sue-Day War. Locally, the student
campaign was initiated by Hillel at
the University of Miami during the
late 1970's. Campaigns are now being
conducted in Dade County at the
University of Miami, Florida Interna-
tional University, Miami-Dade Com-
munity College, Barry University,
and the Southeastern College of
Osteopathic Medicine. Elsewhere in
the state, student campaigns are
run at Florida Atlantic University,
Broward Community College, the
University of Florida and Florida
State University.
For more information, contact Bar-
bara Rothenberg at 661-8649.
BBYO offers something
for everyone
Members of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization's AZA boys' clubs and
their parents shared a very special
Shabbat on November 22 at Temple
Judea in Coral Gables. The services
were a combination of creative and
traditional prayers led by AZA
members. Dr. Scott Roseman spoke
on "Teen Stress Lessening the
Pressures on Today's Youth."
Many BBYOers are now preparing
for BBYO's Greater Miami Council
contests, to be held December 15 at
the South Dade Jewish Community
Center. In a public speaking competi-
tion, the subject for AZAs will be
"What is a True Jew?" and for BBG
girls' clubs, "Who Determines Who is
a Jew?" The topic for AZA story-
telling is "Why Do I Pray Only When
I'm in Trouble?" BBGs will tell
stories around the theme "The Light
at the End of the Tunnel."
Other areas of competition include
Israeli dancing; songs; best chapter
newspaper, scrapbook. banner and
photograph; trivial pursuit; AZA
debate; and BBG art and handicrafts.
BBYOers from throughout the
Florida region determine the
categories for each year's competi-
tion. Winners of the Greater Miami 1
Council competition will g0 on tn
compete with other Florida councils
at the annual Florida Reeion
convention.
The Florida Region Convention will'
be held December 23-27, durinJ
winter break from classes, in Fust,?
Florida. "You & Me and the Land |
Milk & Honey" will be theme of this
year's convention. The five day event
will include programs on Israel
discussion groups, athletics a slide
show, an awards banquet and election
of Florida Region officers.
BBYO is open to all Jewish high I
school youth. Each member's p,,!en.'
tial for personal growth, involvement
and lifelong friendships is multiplied,
by the limitless progran
social experiences which members^
are offered. 7
For more information on memheil
ship or involvement as a volunteer an
visor or lay board memlwr. please)
call 253-7400.
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion is a member of Federations
family of agencies and a Ixmefieiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
NAAM sponsors pre-Alivan
seminar in Israel
The North American Aliyah Move-
ment (NAAM), headquartered in
New York, is happy to announce a
pre-Aliyah seminar in Israel for
students, young adults and profes-
sionals, which will take place
December 25 through January 7.
NAAM's two-week tours, which are
geared specifically for people con-
sidering Aliyah, include visits to ab-
sorption centers and lectures on
housing, employment, banking, the
medical system, education and all
aspects of life in Israel. Most impor-
tantly, participants get to meet with
people in their professional field and
with established North American
olim (immigrants) with similar
backgrounds.
The cost of the seminar is only
$960, and includes round-trip airfare
from New York, with an optional
stop-over in Europe; all hotel and
land arrangements; and two kosher
meals a day, with three meals on
Shabbat.
NAAM's next seminars are
scheduled for February 3,1986 for all
ages; May 19 for retirees; July 8 for
singles; and August 18 for all ages.
For more information, please contact
the Israel Aliyah Center, at 573-2556.
The Israel Aliyah Center is a
member of Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
Members of Temple Shir Ami recently hosted a Shabbat Dinner for the residents of
federation Gardens, a congregate living facility located in South Dade. Temple
znir Ami family members donated the food for the dinner. Following the festive
7^lFe^!^^l9ar(U^reindents attended s ,
a member of the Shir Ami Youth Group serves challah to a Federation Gardens
resident, bandy Levinson of Temple Shir Ami was the coordinator of this com-
munity event. Rabbi Brett Goldstein, president of the Rabbinical Association oj
greater Miami, is the spiritual leader of Temple Shir Ami.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 13, 1985
- /
World's Bloodiest Hijack
Many Nagging Questions Remain Unanswered
Continued from Page 1-A
Revivim in the Negev. She and
her travelling companion, Nitzan
Mendel son, 23, of Kibbutz Hulata
in Galilee, were the only Israelis
among the nearly 100 passengers
and crew of 14 nationalities
aboard the Egyptian Boeing 737
when it left Athens for the two-
hour flight to Cairo.
I could not speak to Nitzan
Mendelson. She was shot point
blank in the back of her head by a
hijacker and shoved off the plane.
Doctors at St. Lukes Hospital
here declard her clinically dead
with a bullet in her brain. She died
Dec. 1 after being hooked up to a
respiration machine that kept her
lungs and heart functioning.
Her parents, who flew here
from Israel, accompanied by their
own physician, made the agoniz-
ing decision whether or not to
unplug her from the life-
supporting device.
Artzi was also shot in the head
by the same hijacker and shoved
from the plane. Fate was kinder
to her. The small caliber bullet,
fired at about a six-foot range,
grazed the right side of her cheek
and ear lobe. When I visited her at
the hospital a few days later, she
had only a black-and-blue mark on
her cheek and a small bruise on
her ear. But she was still suffering
the traumatic effects of her
ordeal. She has since then
recoverd and returned to Israel.
ARTZI RECALLED that her
name was one of 11 called over the
loudspeaker. She believed she was
about to be released. Other
passengers recall that as she stood
at the edge of the plane door, a hi-
jacker shot her, and she was push-
ed or fell from the plane. Accor-
ding to Artzi, "I stumbled down
the steps and lay under them."
She could not remember
whether she felt pain. But she did
know deadly fear. She remembers
that a few minutes later there
were several more shots from in-
side the plane and first one body,
then another, fell down the steps
next to her. The first body to fall
was that of her friend, Mendelson.
Other surviving passengers told
me that when Mendelson heard
her name called she was frighten-
ed and crouched in her seat as if to
hide. The passengers recall that a
hijacker walked over and tried to
pry her out.
ONE PASSENGER, Tony
Lyons, an Australian, said that a
person who seemed to be an
Egyptair crew member dragged
Mendelson out of her seat at the
orders of the hijacker. Other
passengers confirmed this.
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LETTER
60th Victim Flown to Her Burial
TEL AVIV (JTA) The body of Nitzan Mendelson
has been flown to Israel from Malta for burial in Kibbutz
Hulata, in Galilee, which was her home. Mendelson, mortal-
ly wounded by the hijackers of Egyptair Flight 648 in Malta
more than a week ago, died Dec. 1 at St. Lukes Hospital
there where she had been .kept alive by heart and lung
machines in the intensive care unit. Doctors had pronounc-
ed her clinically dead several days ago.
THEY WOULD NOT SAY whether she died a natural
death or was detached from the life-support machines. She
had been in a coma ever since she was shot in the head by a
hijacker on Nov. 23. Her parents were at her bedside since
then.
The death of the 23-year-old Israeli woman brought to
60 the number of fatalities resulting from the Egyptair hi-
jack. Mendelson and her travelling companion, Tamar Art-
zi of Kibbutz Revivim in the Negev, were on a holiday trip
to Egypt and the Far East when they became hijack vic-
tims. Artzi, 24, was also shot by a hijacker but only slightly
wounded. She returned to Israel with her parents Dec. 2.
Though they are not sure if the
crew member was a man or
woman, they recognized the dark
jacket of the Egyptair uniform.
According to these accounts,
Mendelson clung to her seat, digg-
ing her fingernails into the cloth
cover. She screamed, "Save me,
spare me." She was dragged by
her feet along the central aisle,
digging her nails into the carpet.
Survivors said this was an
unbearable scene, worse even
than the actual shootings. At the
open door to the plane, Mendelson
was shot point blank in the back of
her head.
A FEW minutes later a third
victim was shot, Patrick Scott
Baker, a 28-year-old American
fisherman-biologist. He tumbled
down the steps. Like Artzi, his
head was only grazed by the
bullet, and as soon as he recovered
his wits he sprang from the wet
tarmac and raced for the airport
control tower. Two other
Americans with him, both women,
were less fortunate.
Artzi lay under the steps,
disoriented, for what seemed like
ages, she said. "I did not know
where I was. I did not know
whether I was in Saudi Arabia or
Libya," she told me.
After lying motionless in the
rain and dark for about three
hours, she began to crawl from
the plane. One of the hijackers
saw her move and fired a bullet
which struck her thight. It as a
superficial wound from which she
has made a rapid recovery.
While Artzi lay dazed under the
plane steps alongside her un-
conscious companion, Mendelson.
a 38-year-old American woman,
Scarlett Marie Rogenkamp, a
U.S. Air Force employee from
Athens, was shot in the head and
died on the spot.
Another American woman,
Jackie Pflug, was wounded and
left sprawling on the steps. Both
women had their hands bound
behind their backs with neckties
taken from male passengers. At
about 3 a.m., local time, the hi-
jackers allowed Maltese rescue
workers to recover the bodies of
the dead and wounded.
THE CRITICALLY wounded
included a 20-year-old Arab,
known as Omar Marzuk, believed
to have been the leader of the hi-
jackers. There were five hijackers
in all. Early on, it was thought the
only Marzuk survived. A report
from Malta later said one of his
companions was wounded and
alive.
According to the account of the
Egyptian pilot, Capt. Hani Galal,
the hijack occurred about 10
minutes after leaving Athens,
when the plane leveled off at its
cruising altitude of 34,000 feet.
He said two men, one dressed in a
grey suit, burst into the cockpit.
One held a live hand grenade to
the pilot's head.
Galal recalled later there
no political statemei
only demand was th
course from Cairo to MaltaXs
soon as the air crew realized what
was happening, co-pilot Emad
Hali.-v pushed and emergency but-
ton which alerted dozens of radio
stations in the area.
BEHIND THE cockpit, the
passengers heard a voice speaking
in English with what they describ-
ed as a heavy Arab accent. The
voice on the loudspeaker told
them, "This is a hijack." They
were warned to obey all orders,
the first of which was to hold up
their right hands with their
passports. One of the two hi-
jackers who had been in the
cockpit walked up and down the
aisles collecting the passports.
The first bloodshed occurred
when the hijacker came up to a
passenger sitting near the front of
the plane who was an Egyptian
security agent. A 20-year-old
Egyptian woman, Lauretana
Chafik, who was sitting next to
him, recalled that he reached
behind as if his passport was in his
hip pocket, pulled out a gun and
fired point blank into the hi-
jacker's face.
The mas was mortally wounded,
but his companion shot and
seriously wounded the Egyptian
security man. He survived only
because the hijackers were con-
vinced he was dead.
TWO EGYPTAIR flight atten-
dants were wounded in the shoot-
out. Two or three bullets breached
the fuselage, causing decompres-
sion in the cabin. Capt. Galal dove
the plane to 14,000 fet and oxygen
masks were released.
A tense calm reigned for a
while. The hijackers began to
rearrange the passengers accor-
ding to nationality. Palestinians
were seated at the left rear, Greek
passengers at the right rear.
Those seat changes proved fatal
to eight Palestinian children who
died when the plane was stormed,
apparently from smoke
asphyxiation.
The two Israels were seated at
the right front, American and
Australian passengers next to
them. It was a process of selektzia
reminiscent of the death camps.
The plane made its first ap-
proach over Luqa Airport, Malta,
at about 9:30 p.m., local time.
Carmelo Mifsud Bonnici, Prime
Minister of Malta, told the Parlia-
ment later that if landing had
been refused the plane might have
disintegrated. As far as this
reporter knows, he did not explain
why. The hijacker's only demand
of the Maltese authorities was J
food and for a doctor. 1
WHO THEY were, what thai
moUves were, remains a mvttH
Here are other questions &
answered: ^
Why did the Maltese prevJ
the Americans, who mitrht h.J
supplied the Egyptian commJS
with much needed technical kno1
how sooner and probably .3
many of the 59 lives lost in the?
tack, from arriving in time?
Was the Egyptian paratrj
commando as inefficient as itJ
peared, or did it act on the basuTf
wrongror misleading inforrnat, J
Why did oily one of the four 2
five Egyptian security men J
board resist the hijack attend
Why did the other EgyS*
marshalls fail even g^jj
rescue their colleagues?
Did the Egyptian crew J
some survivors charge, cooperate
willingly or unwillingly, with M
hijackers in dragging out of their
seats for executions some of the
passengers, including the serious.
ly injured Israeli?
Where did the weapons used
by the hijackers come from? Were
they on board the place when it
landed at Athens from Cairo
before it was forced to fly to
Malta, or where they smuggled on
board at Athens Airport.?
Who were the hijackers, what
did they want and who was behind
them? During the 24 hours they
controlled the plane, they made no
political demands adn said
nothing which could reveal their
identities or political ideology.
$8 Million .
Project Told
MONTREAL (JTA) David
Azneli, a prominent Montreal
builder and former student at the
Haifa Technion in Israel, announc-
ed that he is sponsoring an $8
million project to construct a new
building to house the faculty of ar-
chitecture on the Technion
campus.
It will replace a 74-year-old
building erected in 1911 by Arthur
Ruppin which is no longer able to
satisfy the requirements of the
profession. About 70 percent of
Israeli architects graduate from
the Haifa Technion.
The new structure, to be named
the David J. Azrieli Building, will
provide space for 860 students. It
will house a 12,000-square foot
library, the gift of the Riesman
Family of Montreal and Rhode
Island.
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Tuesday, December 31,1985
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Snacks on Every Table
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eJewislh. Flour idliami

Volume 58 Number 50 Two Sections Miami, Florida Friday, December 13,1985
f aShochtt By Ma.i$1 ">
Price 50 Cents
Leaders Who Will Take Part in Dinner Function At Fontainebleau
Samuel Adler Howard Scharlin Aaron Podhurst Dorothy Podhurst Elaine Bloom Stanley Myers Maxine Schwartz Gail Jaffee Newman Arnold Altman Steven Kravitz
'86 CJA/IEF
Federation Campaign Opener Saturday
The Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will
launch the 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign this Saturday night at
a campaign opening dinner
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton
Hotel on Miami Beach.
The dinner will feature special
guest speaker, U.S. Sen. Joseph
R. Biden, Jr. (D., Del.).
THE EVENT will mark the
beginning of the Greater Miami
Jewish community's annual effort
to provide a broad spectrum of
human services programs in Dade
Countv, Israel and Jewish com-
Sen. Joseph Biden
World's
Bloodiest Hijack
lagging Questions
Unanswered
Bv EDWIN EYTAN
VALLETA, Malta -
(JTA) The world's
bloodiest hijack 59 dead.
32 wounded began Satur-
day afternoon. Nov. 23,
shortly after Egyptair
Flight 648 took off unevent-
fully from Athens, bound
for Cairo.
It ended 24 hours later in an in-
ferno of fire and machinegun
bullets on the airport of this tiny,
rockbound island nation in the
mid-Mediterranean between Sici-
ly, Tunisia and Libya.
I arrived here a day after the
harrowing events. Through inter-
views with survivors,
eyewitnesses, Maltese officials
and foreign diplomats. I was able
to piece together an account for
the orderal which, weeks later,
still shocks the world and has rais-
ed many serious questions that re-
main unanswered.
ONE OF the survivors I spoke
to was Tamar Artzi. 24. a trim, at-
tractive brunette from Kibbutz
Continued on Page 10-A
munities throughout the world.
Persons who attend the opening
dinner will make a minimum gift
of $1,000 to the campaign.
The campaign opener will begin
with cocktails at 7:30 p.m., follow-
ed by dinner at 8:30. Dietary laws
will be strictly observed. Elaine
Bloom and Howard R. Scharlin.
who serve as dinner co-chairmen,
point out that reservations are
still being accepted for the dinner.
"The theme for this year's CJA-
IEF campaign, 'One People, One
Destiny,' relects our ongoing con-
cern for the welfare of our Jewish
brethren," noted Aaron Podhurst,
1986 CJA-IEF general campaign
chairman.
"Here in Miami and in Israel,
we are continually challenged to
support programs and services
which provide sustenance to
countless individuals."
"IN OUR own community."
Podhurst continued, "there are
significant numbers of needy Jews
who are the innocent victims of
economic strain and diminishing
government funding for social
services. While we are able to
meet basic program needs for our
30 local beneficiary agencies,
there is still a large gap between
what we are able to fund and what
we cannot.
"Last year alone, there were 60
vitally needed programs and ser-
vices we couldn't support due to
limited resources." Podhurst
pointed out.
Samuel I. Adler. president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, added, "The responsibility
placed upon us this year presents
a tremendous challenge which will
test the resolve and commitment
of our entire Jewish community. I
am confident that we will respond
to the urgent needs of Jews
worldwide, and that our 1986
campaign will be the most suc-
cessful in the history of
Federation.
PODHURST also indicated that
Continued on Page 7-A
U.S. Officials
In Israel
On Spy Case
Peres: Air Has Been Cleared Page 8-A
U.S. Still Irritated Page 9-A
Arens Back from Secret Meeting Page 9-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) A delegation of State and
Justice Department officials went to Israel early this week
to interview Israelis implicated in the case of Jonathan
Pollard.
Secretary of State George Shultz said, "We have every
reason to believe that the issue involved will be resolved
satisfactorily." He said the team is headed by Abraham
Sofaer, the State Department's legal advisor.
OTHERS IN THE TEAM representng the Justice
Department are Deputy Assistant Attorney General Mark
Continued on Page 8-A
U.S. Seeks Syrian Role
In Mideast Peace Talks
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion appears to be making a
concerted effort to get Syria
involved in the Middle East
peace process, or at least
agree not to continue trying
to sabotage it.
"We hope that Syria can be
helpful in the peace process."
Secretary of State George Shultz
said at a State Department press
conference last Friday. But Shultz
conceded that Syria does not sup-
port the Administration's basic re-
quirement for a peace agreement
direct negotiations between
Israel and its Arab neighbors.
SHULTZ however, said that
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
had some "very interesting and
worthwhile discussions" during
his recent visit to Syria.
Shultz's remarks followed a
statement by State Department
spokesman Bernard Kalb in which
he said the United States hoped
that Syria would join the peace
process and stressed that it is U.S.
policy that the future of the Golan
Heights, not just the West Bank
and Gaza, should be resolved
through negotiations.
At his press conference Friday,
Continued on Page 6-A
In Talk to President's Confab
Shamir Mistrusts Hussein's Peace Commitment
Foreign Minister Shamir
By YITZHAK RABI
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir mistrusts King Hus-
sein's commitment to peace.
The more Israel urges the
Jordanian ruler to come to
the negotiating table the
more he distances himselt
from us and binds himself to
those who are opposed to a
settlement with Israel,"
Shamir said in an address to
the Conference of
Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions here.
Israel will judge Hussein by
his actions, not his words, Shamir
said. "It is a fact that he is preven-
ting direct attacks on us from Jor-
danian territory and is keeping a
close watch on the PLO presence
in the Kingdom. We want to
believe that he is interested in
peace. But his political alliance
with the PLO and his recent
understanding with Syria are
bound to create certain dynamics
which we have witnessed in the
past and these dynamics were not
all positive," Shamir said.
HE MAY have been referring to
Jordan's participation in the 1967
Six-Day War. On the other hand,
Hussein did not join Syria and
Egypt in their October, 1973 at-
tack on Israel, the Yom Kippur
Continued on Page 2-A


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