The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02966

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Happy Chanukah 5746
Israel Apologizes
Spying on U.S. Is Contrary to Our Policy, Peres Declares
[ERUSALEM An
ology was tendered Sun-
to the United States by
pel's Prime Minister
Pmoi) Peres. In the
>'ogy, the Prime Minister
ie close to admitting that
Pm had employed U.S.
Jvy analyst Jonathan
"lard to spy on its closest
[Spying on the United States
stands in total contradicition of
our policy," Peres told his
Cabinet. "Such activity, to the ex-
tent that it did take place, was
wrong, and the government of
Israel apologizes."
PERES PROMISED that such
an occurrence would not take
place again. "The relations with
the U.S. are based on solid foun-
dations of deep friendship, close
affinity and mutual trust," he
declared.
In his statement before the
Cabinet, the Prime Minister also
promised to "uncover all the facts
to the last detail, no matter where
the trail may lead."
A copy of the statement was
later delivered to U.S. Am-
bassador Thomas Pickering.
THE STATEMENT, read to a
gathering of journalists by
Cabinet Secretary Yossi Beilin,
was the latest scene in the spy
scandal involving Israel that
began Nov. 21, when Pollard was
arrested as he attempted to break
into the Israeli Embassy in
Washington where he hoped to
ask for refuge.
Pollard has since allegedly ad-
mitted selling dozens of secret
documents to Israel during the
past 18 months.
In Washington, meanwhile,
Secretary of State George Shultz
welcomed the apology. Shultz
declared he was certain that
Prime Minister Peres knew
nothing about Pollard's spying for
Israel.
Israeli politicians and the press
have meanwhile demanded rapid
progress in an investigation into
the Pollard affair. They fear a
cover-up because they continue to
insist that disclosure of the details
surrounding the inquiry appears
to be released only very slowly
and mainly in the forms of leaks.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert


ij-^rtl"



Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6. 1985
Judge Ruled Wo Case'
But Swiss Police Still Roughed Up Activists
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Steven Feuerstein, a
23-year-old New Yorker,
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that he and four
other activists for Soviet
Jewry were treated harshly
by Swiss police who ar-
rested them on Nov. 19,
during the Reagan-
Gorbachev summit meeting
in Geneva, after they staged
a peaceful sit-in at the local
office of Aeroflot, the Soviet
airline.
Feuerstein. who is national
director of the Student Zionist
Council of the United States, said
he and his companions were held
in solitary confinement for much
of their 48 hours in custody.
They were also.-placed in caHs
with hardened criminals, sub-
jected to strip searches and other
indignities, handcuffed and forced
to go without food for 20-24 hours
because no kosher food was pro-
Jobless Mothers
Survey in Texas
SAN ANTONIO. Texas (JTA)
A study to locate unmarried,
jobless Jewish mothers in San An-
tonio is being conducted by the
Jewish Family Service.
"(.'letting into or getting back in-
to the job market can seem to be
an insurmountable obstacle for
single moms," Ruth Fagan. JFS
diector of professional sen-ices.
told the Jewish Journal.
PHOTO CREDIT
The candles of Chanukah will
take on a special glow this year
graced by the 'Rejoice' Menorah
made available by the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations.
The nine-branch Menorah. design-
ed in polished bronze by artist Eli
Karpel. stands 11 inches high on
its own base. Each Menorah in
this limited edition available from
the UAHC Art Project in New
York City is numbered and signed
by the artist. Photo is on Page
1 A
vided at the Champs Dollon prison
where they spent their first day in
custody.
FEUERSTEIN said that
although he and two of the other
activists are Americans, the U.S.
Consulate in Geneva made no at-
tempt to contact them or send a
representative to visit them while
they were in police custody, nor-
mally a routine practice when
U.S. nationals are arrested
abroad. He said a formal protest
would be lodged with the State
Department in Washington in the
next few days.
The others arrested with
Feuerstein were Rabbi Avi Weiss
of Riversale. N.Y., chairman of
the Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry; David Makovsky. chair-
man of the World Union of Jewish
Students; Moshe Ronen. a Cana-
dian, who is chairman of the
North American Jewish Student
Network*, and Yesef Mendelevich,
ah Israeli who spent 1} years in a
Soviet prison before he was per-
mitted to emigrate.
Feuerstein said his personal
suspicion is that they were ig-
nored by the U.S. Consulate
because of pressure from the Rus-
sians. He noted that the Canadian
and Israeli Consulates in Geneva
each sent officials to try to see
Ronen and Mendelevich, respec-
tively though they were turned
away by the police.
FEUERSTEIN told the JTA
that he went to Geneva at the in-
vitation of the North American
Jewish Student Network to par-
ticipate in demonstrations for
Soviet Jews with about 800 other
students from the U.S.. Israel and
about a half dozen West European
countries. He said he and his four
companions decided a "more
dramatic" message was needed to
reach the leaders of the two
superpowers.
He said they decided to sit-in at
the Aeroflot office because an
airline is symbolic of open
borders, yet no Jew can board a
plane to leave Russia. He said
when they entered the office at 11
a.m. on Tuesday. Nov. 19. Weiss
went to the ticket counter, pro-
duced a credit card and asked to
book a flight for Anatoly Sharan-
sky from Moscow to Israel.
FEUERSTEIN said the office
was staffed by two women. One
made a hurried telephone call and
within five minutes, four KGB
men showed up. He said the KGB
K
I
if
s
agents pulled the yarmulkas from
the heads of the activists, grabbed
their praye* books and threw
them in the gutter outside the of-
fice all in the presence of about
30-40 reporters who had been
alerted to the sit-in.
Feuerstein said his proudest
moment was when Mendelevich
produced a large photograph of
Sharansky and slapped it over a
portrait of Lenin hanging in the
office.
The sit-in lasted about 90
minutes before 30-40 Swiss
policemen entered the office.
Feuerstein said he and the others
lay flat on the floor offering no
resistance. They were handcuffed
and driven to the local police sta-
tion where they were interrogated
seaparately for about 11 hours.
They were then placed individual-
ly into cells about two feet by
three feet in size.
FEUERSTEIN said that when
they refused the food offered
them, Ronen was allowed to go to
a nearby restaurant, handcuffed
and heavily guarded, to procure
kosher food. But after they were
transported to Champs Dollon
prison, this was not allowed.
Each of the five was taken
separately to the court on Nov. 20
where, after manv hours of
waiting, they were brought before
a magistrate. The Soviets had
them arrested for trespassing and
damage to property. But when no
Soviet representative appeared to
make the formal charge, the
magistrate threw out the case and
ordered the five released.
The police, however, ignored
the release order and all were
taken back in handcuffs to the
police station where, again, they
were allowed to send out for
kosher food. On Nov. 21, after the
summit ended/each was driven
separately to the airport, escorted
by police aboard an aircraft and
formally expelled fro
Switzerland.
FEUERSTEIN stressed
repeatedly his conviction that
Jews must not remain silent or re-
ly on "quiet diplomacy." "We win
not be pacified by political
rhetoric," he said. He said there is
"no question the message sent in
Geneva was received on all
levels." But he is reserving ju ment as to whether the summit
will produce relief for Soviet
Jews.
"We will not be satisfied until
Anatoly Sharansky and all other
Jewish prisoners are freed, until
every Soviet Jew who wishes to
board a place for Israel," Feuers-
tein said.
Happy Chanukah
Alfred Golden. President
Leo Hack, V.P.
William Saulson. V.P.
Douglas Lazarus, V.P., F.D.
William Seitles
Barney Sel by
Jack Kasdan
Edward Dobin
FredSnyder
Jay Lewis
Abraham Daoud
Joshua Schlinsky
Carl Grossberg
Riverside Memorial ChapeU
Commitment it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're beside you
when you need us
most. After all, Our
Real Involvement is
with the Living
Riverside
Memorial Chapel
(305)531-1151
M-12445
M_lt-*
aSSBBBi


JDO Teaches 'Lesson'
Jewish Militants Patrol Boro Park
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Mordechai Levy, head of the
Jewish Defense Organiza-
tion (JDO) which he
describes as "more mili-
tant" than the Jewish
Defense League (JDL), is
organizing night patrols to
"teach a lesson" to vandals
that "Jews won't be pushed
around."
Levy, 24, a journalism major at
Hunter College, said that this was
in response to the recent window-
smashing of Jewish-owned shops
in Boro Park and the Midwood
section of Flatbush, Brooklyn
neighborhoods heavily populated
by Orthodox Jews. He said the
patrols, on foot and in cars, would
be armed with "legal but deadly"
weapons. Asked what such
weapons were, he mentioned
"chains and baseball bats."
But New York State
Assemblyman Dov Hikind, who
represents the districts, strongly
opposes the JDO's plans. He said
there was absolutely no need for
its presence in the affected
neighborhoods.
HE ACCUSED the JDO of
"taking advantage" of a situation
of concern to the community and
warned their tactics would only
arouse fear, especially among
elderly Jews, that conditions are
worse than they are.
Hikind confirmed that he spoke
MIAMI
BEACH'S
GIATT
KOSHER
11
to Levy last week, trying to
dissuade him, but without success.
He dismissed as "baloney" Levy's
claim that the very presence of his
patrols would bring more police
into the streets where Jewish pro-
perty is threatened.
Hikind said the police are doing
an "excellent" job. Nevertheless,
there have been no arrests and ap-
parently no clues so far to the per-
sons responsible for heaving
heavy rocks through the windows
of 13 Jewish-owned shops in Boro
Park during the early hours of
Saturday, Nov. 9, and again, on
Saturday morning, Nov. 23,
smashing the windows of five
shops in Boro Park and three on
Avenue J, the main shopping
center of Midwood.
HIKIND HAS asked the FBI to
help local police track down the
vandals but the federal agency
must determine there was a civil
rights violation before it can enter
the case.
New York City is offering a
$10,000 reward for information
leading to the arrest and convic-
tion of the perpetrators. The
Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York has offered a
$5,000 reward.
Levy said the JDO opened
"headquarters" in Boro Park with
a "mass rally" and already has
"over a hundred volunteers" for
the patrols. He said they ranged
from teen-agers and college
students to older adults, including
women. But the JDO accepts only
males, he said "for protection
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reasons.
He said the patrols would cover
Boro Park, Flatbush and
"anywhere else" that Jews or
Jewish property are threatened.
He suggested the police should be
"glad of the help."
LEVY DID not say his patrols
would summon the police if they
caught anyone in a destructive
act. He stressed "teaching a
lesson." He claimed that 10 JDO
members gave a lesson "in Jewish
justice" to six teen-age vandals
they found desecrating
Washington Cemetery, a Jewish
cemetery on the borderline bet-
ween Boro Park and Midwood on
October 31, the night of Hallo-
ween. Asked what constituted
"Jewish justice," he said "beating
up and worse."
Hikind, a Democrat who con-
firmed that he was once a member
of the JDL, indicated he deplored
the JDO's actions in his district
but suggested they might be
"useful" in other areas. He said
he told Levy they should go to
East New York and Brownsville,
severely depressed neighborhoods
in Brooklyn, and to Manhattan's
Lower East Side where, he said,
elderly Jews live in terror and are
afraid to leave their apartments.
Hikind said he thought it was
"healthy" for Jews to learn how
to use weapons and other forms of
self-defense and that he did not
want to "impugn the intentions"
of the JDO. But he insisted their
tactics were not needed and would
be counter-productive in his
districts. He said there is virtually
no problem of anti-Semitism in
Boro Park, "probably because 85
percent of the residents are
Jews," 65 percent of them
Orthodox.
HIKIND SAID that while the
wave of rock throwing at Jewish-
owned shops non-Jewish shops
in the neighborhoods were spared
smells strongly of anti-
Semitism, "we have no leads. We
don't know for sure if it was anti-
Semitism."
He stressed again that "no one
asked the JDO to come" and
noted that there is a community
patrol in Boro Park made up of
"professionals" who carry licens-
ed weapons.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Joyous Chanukah
Begins Saturday
We light the first Chanukah candle on
Saturday evening (Dec. 7). For eight nights
on Chanukah we add another one candle in
succession thereafter until the last on Sun-
day, Dec. 15.
Chanukah is such a joyous occasion, and it
celebrates such a resounding Jewish victory
the defeat of the Graeco-Assyrians by the
sons of Mattathias, the Maccabees that
few if any indeed are there who do not know
the story of the Festival of the Lights.
I Maccabees (4:36-59) tells us that Judah
Maccabee defeated Lysias. Then, he entered
Jerusalem and purified the Temple. What
has been defiled in the Temple was
demolished and rebuilt. Then, Judah made
new holy vessels a candelabrum, an altar
for incense, a table and curtains. In the end,
he set the date for the rededication of the
Temple on Kislev 25.
What is especially exciting about this is
that the day of rededication coincided with
the third anniversary of the proclamation of
the restrictive edicts of Anthiochus
Epiphanes in which he decreed that
idolatrous sacrifices should be offered on a
platform that he had erected on the altar,
thus defiling it.
'Different' Stories the Same
There are, of course, other discussions of
the origins of Chanukah. For example, II
Maccabees (1:8; 10:1-5) tells essentially the
same story as in I Maccabees. Josephus, the
great Jewish historian of the Roman era,
bases his own account of the holiday on I
Maccabees, but he fails to mention
Chanukah, meaning rededication, as the
name of the holiday.
Most Chanukah traditions pretty much tell
the same story. Perhaps the most compell-
ing of these is the "miracle" of the holiday.
One jug of consecrated oil found in the Tem-
ftle sufficient for only one night's burning
asted for eight days hence the eight
candles of the Menorah. This, in the face of
the fact that I Maccabees reports that Judah
merely decreed that the holiday should last
for eight days, and that they be designated
as days of rejoicing for future generations
anxious to celebrate Chanukah.
Whatever the view of the holiday, it is a
happy one. And that is the spirit we extend
to all on this occasion.
Shifting the Emphasis
It is still too early to judge whether the
Jonathan Pollard spy affair did in fact reach
into the highest levels of the Israel govern-
ment. It is interesting to note that Secretary
of State George Shultz, who said he felt "in-
sulted" when the story broke on Nov. 21,
declared last Sunday that he was now confi-
dent that Prime Minister Shimon Peres
knew nothing about Pollard and his
espionage.
This is a heartening reaction especially
so because the United States seems to have
pressed the case with greater strength and
more wide-ranging use of its media muscle
at a time when less was known about it than
is known even now.
The question remains why this is so, par-
ticularly when Israel has caught the United
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States in the same kind of spying against it
on a number of occasions in the past. It is
not a question of two wrongs making one
right but that the nasty realities of govern-
ments everywhere are such that espionage
is a way of life among them.
On none of those occasions did the Israelis
make an international circus of their
discoveries. Why does the United States do
so in the Pollard case now? Pollard's work
for Israeli intelligence seems to have focus-
ed on Jordanian and Egyptian military
capabilities intelligence that the United
States does not share with Israel.
As former Israeli Ambassador to the
United States Simcha Dinitz told ABC-TV's
David Brinkley on Sunday, Israel's survival
edge in a world of Arab enemies surroun-
ding it is so slender that he could well
understand, if not condone, the need of his
country's intelligence community for the
kind of information Pollard may have had.
Far from being outraged, the Reagan Ad-
ministration might better move to unders-
tand this dilemma of a tiny besieged nation
that does not want any more amputations of
its geographic being amputations that are
most certainly on the American drawing
boards at this very moment.
50 Years for Rabbis
The Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
celebrated its 50th anniversary at a dinner
honoring past presidents last Sunday. In the
face of the fact that South Florida itself is
hardly a century old as an organized com-
munity, such a golden anniversary here is an
auspicious one indeed.
The Rabbinical Association now has a
membership in both Dade and Broward
Counties of more than a hundred spiritual
leaders. Its works have a profound effect on
our Jewish community as both a teaching
and a religious organization.
As well, for the past 25 years, the Rab-
binical Association has participated in the
Clergy Dialogue Group of the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews, hence con-
tributing to valuable interfaith activities
that keep both communities on a course of
effective relations in the cause of
brotherhood.
The Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
is to be congratulated for its half-century-
long tenure. South Floridians wish it con-
tinued good service.
i
Halley's Comet

An Historic Jewish Perspective
suucnmoM uus
Friday, December 6,1985
Volume 58
2 KISLEV 5746
Number 49
By RABBI
BEREL BERKOVITS
London Chronicle Syndirat*
LONDON Halley's com-
et is with us once again.
Last observed 75 years ago,
when the movement of the
earth through its tail gave
rise to predictions of the end
of the world, forecast for
May 19, 1910, it will pass us
by this time at the safe
distance of 40 million miles
on its lonely orbit through
the solar system.
It will be visible in December
and April to observers in the
southern hemisphere, and even, in
the clear December sky, to
amateur astronomers in England.
Historically, comets have always
been taken as omens or harb-
ingers of bad news. The Bayeux
Tapestry graphically illustrates
King Harold's shock and anxiety
at the appearance of Halley's com-
et in 1066, a few months before
the Battle of Hastings, depicting
him faint and tottering on his
throne.
MORE INTERESTING from a
Jewish perspective was the ap-
pearance of Halley's comet in the
year 66 CE, shortly before the
commencement of the Roman
siege that led to the destruction of
the Temple. This appearance was
commemorated after many cen-
turies in Stanislaus de Lubieniet-
ski's book of comets, published in
1666, which includes an engraving
of the comet hovering over
Jerusalem.
Comets are referred to in a
number of places in the Talmud.
Samuel, in the second century,
was renowned for his mastery of
astronomy, declaring that "the
paths of the skies are as familiar
to me as the streets of (my home
town) Nehardea," but even he had
to admit that he had no adequate
explanation for the appearance
and disappearance of comets
(Berachot 58b). Not so surprising
as contemporary scientists ad-
mit that we, too, are largely ig-
norant of the nature of comets.
Until recently it was thought
that they consisted of large "bee
swarms" of rocky grains, but this
hypothesis failed to explain a
number of known features of their
behavior.
THE MODERN theory is that
comets consist of a central "dirty
snowball" of ice and dust, which
gives rise to gas and dust tails as
it approaches the sun and is par-
tially melted. Hopefully we should
discover more in April, 1986,
when the European spacecraft
Giotto is due to approach and scan
the nucleus of Halley's comet.
Whatever their true nature,
however, the regularity of comets'
appearances has been known for a
long time. Perhaps the earliest
reference, however, to the
periodic nature of Halley's orbit is
a story in the Talmud concerning
a sea voyage in the first century.
Rabbi Gamliel, himself no mean
astronomer, took with him some
bread, which ran out in the course
of the voyage, whereas his compa-
nion, Rabbi Yehoshua, had
brought along supplies of flour in
addition.
To Rabbi Gamliel's surprised
question, "How did you know we
would have such a long delay?",
Rabbi Yehoshua replied, "There is
a 'star' which appears once every
seventy years and misleads the
sailors (in their navigation), and I
thought maybe it would appear in
the course of our voyage"
(Horayoth 10a). Assuming that
the "seventy" years is a round,
and not precise, figure (Halley's
comet has a period of 75-76 years),
Rabbi Yehoshua may well be the
earliest figure to have accurately
predicted the return of the comet
- probably that of 66 CE.
SO MUCH FOR the "scientific"
references in Jewish literature.
What does Judaism have to say,
however, by way of spiritual or
religious insights into the
phenomenon of comets? In mark-
ed contrast to the superstitions
generally attached to comet ap-
pearances, the Torah treats them
as events of neutral significance in
terms of their impact on human
fortunes. Consider, for instance,
the striking declaration of the pro-
phet Jeremiah: "Thus says God:
'Do not learn from the way of the
nations, and do not be dismayed
by the signs of the heavens,
although other nations are
dismayed by them because
they can neither cause harm, nor
bring about good'" (Jeremiah
10:2 and 5).
It is interesting to compare this
sane and rationalistic approach
with, for instance, the attitude of
Pope Calixtus II on the ap
pearance of Halley's comet in
1456. Even if he did not, as tradi-
tion has it, actually excom-
municate the comet from
membership of the Catholic
Church, he certainly declared it
was "an agent of the Devil."
Jeremiah's approach was
powerfully echoed in the 12th
Century in Maimonides' scathing
attack on what was then the
almost-universal belief in
astrology and the powers of the
stars. In his famous "Letter to
Yemen," for example, he exhorts
his readers to "remove all this
from your heart, and purify your
Continued on Page 13-A


Chanukah-Christmas
Season Is Upon Us;
They're Not the Same
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By BORIS SMOLAR
The Chanukah-Christmas
season is upon us, and with it, also
the issue of placing creches and
menorahs on public property a
very sensitive issue creating tense
feelings between Jewish and
Christian groups in a number of
communities.
The overall status of church-
state separation is now, following
the Supreme Court decisions on
church-state matters, somewhat
more favorable than it appeared
to be two years ago. However,
High Court rulings regarding the
erection of the Nativity scene on
public property continue to pre-
sent highly visible and sensitive
community relations dilemmas.
A number of actions are being
undertaken by Jewish organiza-
tions to address such controver-
sies. They include delivering of
testimony on behalf of the Na-
tional Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council by the
American Jewish Congress to a
hearing by the National Park Ser-
vice of the Department of Interior
concerning a Nativity scene that
has been part of the annual
"Pageant for Peace" display on
the Ellipse in Washington, D.C.
LEADING JEWISH organiza-
tions, always fighting to maintain
a firm line of separation between
church and state, are opposed to
the practice of displaying creches,
as well as Chanukah menorahs, on
public property. They are deter-
mined to protect the principle of
church-state separation at this
time, in a period in which efforts
to bring religion into public life
are intensified, as are efforts by
some to identify the United States
as a Christian country.
There was as increase last year
in attempts by community groups
and state and local officials to in-
volve governments in nativity
displays during the Christmas
season. The practice of displaying
Chanukah menorahs on public
property has also occurred in a
number of communities. The
NJCRAC, as roof-organization of
11 leading national Jewish bodies
and 113 Jewish community coun-
cils, is opposed to all government
involvement in religious displays
as a violation of the principle of
church-state separation. This in-
cludes opposition to government
support for the display of creches,
menorahs, or any religious
symbols.
Jewish organizations expect an
even greater increase than last
year in attempts to involve
government in displays of
religious symbols during the holi-
day season because of a 5-4 vote
decision by the Supreme Court in
a creche case permitting govern-
ment support for public displays
of the Nativity scene.
IN THIS ruling, Chief Justice
Warren Burger justified the use
of muni -ipal tax funds to purchase
a display of a Nativity scene, in
part on the basis that the creche
was part of a large non-religious
holiday display, which had no
primary religious purpose. He
characterized the creche as a
"passive symbol" to be equated
with objects of art.
In another decision in a 4-4
deadlock that set no precedent
the Supreme Court left standing a
lower court ruling that allowed a
private creche display in a public
park in Scarsdale, N.Y. It is bin-
ding only on the parties to the ac-
tual dispute. The creche was
erected by private citizens and
displayed by itself in a public park.
It raised the question of whether a
municipal government is
obligated to allow a display of the
Nativity scene on the basis that a
park is a "traditional public
forum."
The NJCRAC, reflecting the
sentiments of its national Jewish
organizations and local Jewish
community councils, advises
Jewish communities not to accept
invitations to erect a menorah on
a municipal location. To such in-
vitations, the NJCRAC suggests,
the answer must be that it is not
appropriate for the Jewish com-
munity to engage in what the com-
munity believes is an essentially
non-constitutional act. Com-
munities might, however, explore
placing a menorah in a prominent
public location on private proper-
ty. This would underscore the
Jewish position but still
demonstrate the pluralistic
Nativity scenes on public property-
present visible relations dilemmas
character of the community.
WITH REGARD to negotia
tions on Christian religious sym-
bols, the NJCRAC advises that
every effort should be made to en-
courage the placement of the sym-
bol on private property, instead of
on public property, and without
government involvement. A front
lawn of a church in the heart of a
busy center is seen fit to be used.
The minimal funding required
could easily be raised from volun-
tary non-governmental
contributions.
In challenges on church-state
situations, the advice is that per-
suasion should be the primary tool
of the Jewish community; litiga-
tion should be an option that
should not be taken lightly. It
Continued on Page 12-A
Brink of Sporting Sensation
Bowls Is No Old Man's Game Anymore
South African Cecil Bransky, who immigrated to Israel in 1980,
has had tremendous success on the international lawn bowls
.'
By LAWRENCE STONE
Israel is on the brink of a spor-
ting sensation. And it has nothing
to do with basketball giants Mac-
cabi Tel Aviv or tennis stars
Shlomo Glickstein and Shahar
Perkis. The only tenuous connec-
tion is that the young Perkis was
preferred by the editors of the
Jerusalem Post as their Israeli
Sportsman of the Year over Cecil
Bransky. Their decision was based
on the fact that lawn bowls
Bransky's speciality is a minor
sport in this country.
Hut nothing could be further
from the truth, for bowls is boom-
ing up and down the country, as
well as being an international
sport played around the globe.
Bransky's success on the interna-
tional circuit he finished sixth in
the singles of the Men's World
Lawn Bowls Championship in
Aberdeen last summer and was
runner-up in the World Indoor
Championship in Glasgow last
February is certain to have con-
tributed in no small way to the
rise in popularity of the game in
Israel.
BRANSKY RECENTLY head
ed a five-man Israeli team on a
tour of Northern Ireland, the first
time Israel has been invited to
tour another bowling nation. "It's
thebiggest thing that has happen-
ed to bowls in this country," Bran-
sky declared. "The kind of
breakthrough we have been
waiting for."
And Bransky's optimism is
shared by Israeli bowls supremo
Jack Rabin. With an eye cast in
Bransky's direction, Rabin
predicts: "Israel will soon boast a
world champion. Not only that,
but the atmosphere within the
Israeli game at the moment is
electric. After carefully laying the
foundations, we are on the verge
of exploding on to the sports
scene," says a super-confident
Rabin, who is at present the presi-
dent of the' Israel Bowling
Association. '
Between 1953 and 1975. there
were only two bowling greens in
Israel. Today, there are seven
clubs in Ramat Gan, Caesarea.
Netanya. Ra'anana, Savyon, Kfar
Hamaccabiah and Haifa, and land
has been approved next to the
Knesset for the first green to be
built in Jerusalem.
NEGOTIATIONS have also
started in Carmiel, while
strenuous efforts are being made
to win over the kibbutzim and
moshavim to the sport. "The
game has really taken off in the
last couple of years," beams
49-year-old Rabin, a native South
African who came to this country
24 years ago.
"It's been a major breakthrough
with an influx of Hebrew-
speaking yw,' rs joining
the game. Tha .< ._,. we've been
waiting for. Now we must con-
tinue to attract new blood; that in
turn will keep the old guard on
Continaea an Page 12-A


mmm
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Benvenisti Charges
West Bank Gets Biggest Cut of Pie
AFL-CIO Urges Affiliates Support
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Meron Benvenisti, probably
Israel's leading authority on
the demographics of the
West Bank, charged that
the government and the
World Zionist Organization
are pumping money into un-
productive settlements in
the territory at a rate far
higher than funds made
available per unit or per
capita to needy settlements
and villages in Israel proper.
Most of the Jewish set-
tlements in the West Bank are too
weak to sustain themselves and
would collapse if the government
stopped pouring in money to prop
them up, Benvenisti, a former
deputy mayor of Jerusalem, told a
press conference here.
HE HEADS the West Bank
Data Project, a private Israeli
research organization financed by
the Ford Foundation and the
Rockefeller Foundation. He
reported that the Jewish popula-
tion of the territory increased by
21.5 percent last year to number
about 51,600. But the main in-
crease has been in the areas in the
immediate vicinity of Jerusalem
Phoenix Elects Gross
PHOENIX, (JTA) Jerry
Gross has been elected president
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Phoenix.
and the Tel Aviv region where
two-thirds of the Jewish popula-
tion of the territory resides.
The Gush Emunim. militant na-
tionalists number about 10,000,
Benvenisti said. That is the hard
core which has established 52 set-
tlements mostly surrounding
Arab villages and towns. But they
seem to have run out of steam.
Hardly any new settlers joined
them in the past year, Benvenisti
said.
The bulk of the new settlers are
Israelis affected by the acute shor-
tage of affordable housing in
Israel. They have been attracted
by offers of cheap, high quality
government subsidized housing in
the territory only a 10 minute
drive from Tel Aviv or Jerusalem.
THESE RESIDENTS com-
mute daily to jobs in the two big
cities. There are few jobs available
in the settlement area, little local
industry and even less agriculture
because of the nature of the land,
Benvenisti said.
He estimated that as many as 66
of the 104 settlements in the ter-
ritory have fewer than 200
residents each, too few to ensure
growth. They cannot stand on
their own feet but the government
and WZO support them at the ex-
pense of Israeli towns and
villages.
The Data Project's statistical
studies show, for example, that
the regular budgets fo the
regional councils in 1983 totalled
$230 for every resident of Gush
Etzion south of Jerusalem, $408
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per capita for residents of the Jor-
dan Valley and $357 per capita for
residents of Samaria.
BY CONTRAST, the govern
ment has provided $126 percapita
in the Shaar Hanegev region in
Israel and only $97 per capita in
Upper Galilee. According to
Benvenisti, government grants to
West Bank settlements were 3-4
times as much as for those inside
Israel.
The moment the government
tells the Gush Emunim and other
West Bank settlers they must
stand on their own feet, at least 70
settlements will cease to exist,
Benevenisti said. But he doubted
the government would ever take
such measures because of political
considerations.
The biggest surge in Jewish set-
tlement of the territory which has
an Arab population of close to a
million, occurred during the
Likud-led administration of
Premier Menachem Begin. The
present Labor-Likud national uni-
ty coalition government* has im-
posed a virtual freeze on new set-
tlements because of economic
constraints.
NEVERTHELESS, 9,165
Israelis moved into apartments or
houses in the West Bank between
October, 1984 and October, 1985.
They moved into existing housing
built a year ago. "The halt in the
construction of new settlements
does not in any way affect the
pace of construction and settle-
ment in the large urban centers in
the territories which continued
unabated at the rate of
1,500-2,000 new families per an-
num," Benvenisti reported.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
AFL-CIO has urged its affiliates
and 13 million members to sup-
port the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Museum and "to contribute funds
for its construction." The action
came in a resolution passed
unanimously by delegates to the
organization's recent convention
in Anaheim, Calif.
The museum, planned by the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council,
is being built entirely with private
funds on Federal land in
Washington. The volunteer-led
United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum Campaign,
with President Reagan as
honorary chairman, is raising
$100 million nationwide to con-
struct, equip and endow the
museum.
The AFL-CIO resolution follows
recent donations to the museum
campaign by the American
Federation of Teachers and the
AFL-CIO's Executive Council.
When AFL-CIO president Lane
Kirkland turned over the con-
tribution to campaign co-chairmen
Miles Lerman and Signiund
Strochlitz, he remarked: "From
the earliest days of Hitler's rise to
power, the American labor move-
ment has repeatedly condemned
and actively opposed the Nttfi
persecution of the Jews and their
suppression of rights ... Thj5
museum will serve as an impor-
tant reminder of the events and
will help strenghten the resolve of
all Americans to assure that no
such horror ever happens again"
Other union support has come
recently from the United
Steelworkers of American and
from the Communications
Workers of America.
Lone Assailants
Mainly Responsible
TEL AVIV (JTA) At least
half of the recent attacks on Jews
in the West Bank were by lone
assailants acting on their own in-
itiative or by small groups not af-
filiated with any terroist organiza-
tion, Maj. Gen. Amnon Shahak,
commanding officer of the central
region, told reporters.
He said that while there has
been a significant increase in the
number of attacks, most Arab
residents of the territory favor a
peaceful settlement with Israel.
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Names in News
Bush To Get Honorary Degree
The Vice President of the
United States, George Bush,
Israel's Ambassador to the United
States, Meir Rosenne, and an ar-
ray of five business and communal
leaders who have been benefac-
tors of Yeshiva University will
receive honorary degrees at the
University's Pre-Centennial
Chanukah Dinner and Convoca-
tion on Dec. 15. at the Waldorf-
Astoria in New York City.
The dinner will be preceded at 4
p.m. by a special Convocation
where Dr. Norman Lamm, the
University's president, will pre-
sent honorary degrees to Vice
President Bush, Ambassador
Rosenne, and the five
benefactors.
B'nai B'rith Women President
Beverly Davis has invited White
House Chief of Staff Donald T.
Regan to meet a sampling of
American women and expand his
"knowledge and understanding of
what women in this country are
about today."
"I was deeply distressed," Mrs.
Davis wrote in her invitation, "to
read about your comment that
women do not understand issues
such as human rights and
Afghanistan. It shows a gap in
understanding about the work and
interests of women who belong,
by the millions, to organizations
such as ours.
"I could list dozens of projects
that just this organization has
undertaken to further interna-
tional understanding and human
rights around the world. And our
work is only a small share of that
to which women in every city
Vice President George Bush
will receive an honorary degree
from Yeshiva University on
Dec. 15.
devote their efforts in both profes-
sional and volunteer capacities."
Beginning September, 1986, all
students admitted to the School of
Sacred Music of Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion will be required to spend
their first year of study at the
HUC campus in Jerusalem. The
cantorial students will join the col-
lege's rabbinic and religious
education students who have par-
ticipated in this unique Year-In-
Israel Program for more than a
decade.
"We are determined," Dr.
Alfred Gottschalk, president of
Hebrew Union College, explained,
"to provide our cantorial students
with equality of opportunity, as
well as the finest professional
training."
The four-year course of study
offered at the School of Sacred
Music culminates in both the
awarding of the Master of Sacred
Music degree and investiture as a
cantor.
For the first time in its history,
two Jewish sisters are enrolled as
cadets in the U.S. Military
Academy at West Point.
Sherri Crystal Langston, 19,
began the rigors of West Point
academics this semester, joining
her sister. Brandy Hope
Langston, 20, who is a junior.
Both are from Walkill, N.Y.
The sisters are also the first
members of their family to join
the military. Before enrolling at
West Point, neither sister was
associated with any Temple.
However, tody both are active
members of the West Point
Jewish Chapel.
Women began attending the
U.S. Military Academy in the
1970's, and while other sisters
have attended, this is the first
time two Jewish sisters have been
cadets. On average, 40-to-60
members of the Jewish faith are in
attendance at the four year
school.
Ernest Zelig, president of B'nai
Zion, a major American Jewish
fraternal organization, has called
upon Mayor Edward I. Koch and
the New York City Council to
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
The award, conferred by the
JWB Jewish Music Council, is en-
dowed by Janet and Leonard
Kaplan, long-time Boston Jewish
communal leaders, and is given to
a living American or Canadian
composer, scholar of Jewish
music, or music educator, whose
creative work has made a "signifi-
cant contribution to the field of
Jewish music."
This is the second time the Na-
tional Jewish Music Award has
ever been presented. Dr. Eric
Werner, professor emeritus of
sacred music at Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion (HUC-JIR), was the first
recipient of the award.
Leonard Bernstein, composer
and conductor, is the recipient
of this year's National Jewish
Music Award. Presentation
will be made Friday at Avery
Fisher Hall in Manhattan.
rename the Manhattan street on
which the PLO's U.S. head-
quarters is situated, "Leon Kl-
inghoffer Square."
"It is fitting that East 65th
Street between Park and Lex-
ington Avenues be renamed in
honor of the innocent and
courageous New Yorker who died
as a result of PLO terrorism,"
Zelig stated.
"Diplomatic reality makes it im-
possible for the PLO to be made to
leave New York, but we can at
least send a message to this
obscene gang that Leon Klinghof-
fer and all other victims of the
PLO will never be forgotten."
Leonard Bernstein, the con-
ductor and composer, will receive
the National Jewish Music Award
on Friday afternoon in the Green
Room of Avery Fisher Hall in
Manhattan following a concert to
be conducted by him.
Yosef Olmert, head of the
Syrian and Lebanon Desks at the
Shiloach Institute of Tel Aviv
University, and a leading consul-
tant to Israeli policy-makers, will
be resident scholar at an upcom-
ing seminar for Zionist activists
from Canada and the United
States. Olmert is currently a
visiting professor at York Univer-
sity in Toronto.
The seminar will be held Dec.
26-29 in Blairstown, N.J., and is
being sponsored by the United
Kibbutz Movement/TAKAM.
Olmert is designing the seminar in
conjunction with the youth leaders
of Habonim Dror Labor Zionist
Youth, Hamagshimim, and
Netzer/Garin Arava.
An intensive three-day seminar
on the Nazi Holocaust,
"Perpetrators, Victims,
Bystanders" will take place Dec.
16-18, at the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith national
headquarters in New York.
The seminar, led by Raul
Hilberg, professor of Political
Science at the University of Ver-
mont and a leading scholar of the
Holocaust, is sponsored by ADL's
International Center for
Holocaust Studies.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
'Number One' Enemy
IDF Spokesman Says It's Syrian Army
Basketball Chief Dead at 95
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Syrian army is Israel's
"number one" enemy and a
major threat to Israel today,
according to Brig. Gen.
Ephraim Lapid, chief
spokesman of the Israel
Defense Force.
Syria, Lapid asserted in an in-
terview, has one of the best-
equipped armies in the Mideast,
with sophisticated Soviet arms, as
well as helicopters and missiles
from France and communication
systems from Italy.
According to Lapid, the Syrian
army has doubled its power since
1982 and has now more than 4,500
tanks and 600 jets and about a half
million troops. In addition, Lapid
disclosed, Syria possesses the
deadly surface-to-surface Soviet
missile SS-21 and the Soviet-made
surface-to-air missile SA-5-
"BOTH MISSILES have an
enormous range and they pose,
therefore, a real threat to Israel's
population centers in the heart of
the country and to Israeli aircraft
flying far away from the Syrian
border," Lapid said.
The IDF spokesman said,
however, that "the real question
is whether Syria and Jordan will
form a coalition against Israel,"
because "we (Israel) assume that
Syria will not open a war against
Israel by herself." He noted that
Jordan also has a meaningful
military power, with an army well
modernized with 1,000 tanks and
150 jets, all British.^American and
French-made.
Lapid declined to give the
number of tanks or jets the IDF
has, but, according to Western
sources, the IDF is estimated as
having 4,000 tanks and some 500
jets, mostly American-made, and
the Israeli-made Merkava tanks.
ASKED IF Israel has "the best
army in the Mideast,*' Lapid
replied, "absolutely." He said that
this was proven during the
Lebanon war which Israel launch-
ed on June 5, 1982.
"The war in Lebanon did not
reflect the IDF"s abilities in all
areas of fighting. It did show,
however, the superiority of
Israel's Air Force," Lapid said.
He noted that in air battles bet-
ween Israeli and Syrian jets, Syria
lost 90 planes while Israel did not
lose a single plane. The air force
also showed its ability in attacking
Syrian missile batteries in
Lebanon.
"But I do not underestimate the
enemy," Lapid continued. "The
Syrian armed forces had proven
Jewish Worker Exempted When
Union Voices Support of PLO
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) A
Jewish worker, who ob-
jected to his union's expres-
sion of support for an in-
dependent Palestinian
homeland, has been granted
an exemption from paying
his union dues.
The decision, handed down
several days ago by the Ontario
Court of Appeals, reversed an
earlier lower court ruling that
Chaim Forer's objection to a
resolution adopted by the Ontario
Federation of Labor supporting a
Palestinian homeland was not bas-
ed on religious grounds and
therefore did not entitle him to
send his dues to a charity instead
of the union.
A SECTION of the Crown
Employees Collective Bargaining
Act provides that employees can
pay union dues to a charity if they
object to sending the money to a
union "because of religious con-
victions or belief."
Forer, an employee of the On-
tario provincial government and a
member of the Ontario Public Ser-
vice Employees, said the resolu-
tion adopted by the Labor Federa-
tion in 1983 was "inimical to
every human being in general and
every Jew in particular who
believes in the eternality of the
Jewish people and in their God-
given right to the land of Israel."
He stated that it is "most ob-
noxious that I, a believer, should
be required to pay dues to an
organization whose membership
in the Ontario Federation of
Labor contributes to the Federa-
tion's influence on public opinion
in a manner contrary to my beliefs
and ideals."
APPEAL COURT Justice D.G.
Blair said in his ruling, "It seems
to me that in a multicultural coun-
try which Canada has become
there will have to be an even
greater toleration of a wide varie-
ty of religious beliefs and prac-
tices than existed before the
Charter of Rights and
Freedoms." He noted that
previous Court of Appeal deci-
sions have stressed that what may
be regarded as a religious belief
by one religion may be regarded
as secular by another. The resolu-
tion, adopted in the aftermath of
Israel's invasion of Lebanon in
June 1982, urged the Canadian
Labor Congress, the national
trade union body, to call on the
Canadian government to support
"all avenues toward lasting
peace" in the Middle East.
itself during the war and the
Syrian soldier was a much better
fighter in 1982 than in the Yom
Kippur War in 1973," Lapid
contended.
Lapid was in the United States
for the last two weeks to meet
with American news organiza-
tions and members of the media.
His visit was sponsored by the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
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WEST HAVEN. Conn. (JTA)
Funeral services were held last
week for Maurice Podoloff, the
former commissioner of the Na-
tional Basketball Association, who
died here Nov. 24 at a rest home.
He was 95 years old.
Born in Russia in 1890, Podoloff
came to the United States as a
child, later attending Yale Law
School from where he graduated
in 1915. In 1926, Podoloff, along,
with his brother and father, built
an arena here and placed a team
in the Canadian-American Hockey
League.
He held various posts in the
Canadian-American Hockey
Leaeue. funally becoming it presi-
dent in 1936. He was later named
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Podoloff, who was fluent in Yidd-
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1963.
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re'11 Keep Trying
Peres Wants Meeting With Hassan ...
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
It All Started When King
'Misspoke' to Reporters
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres
stresses that he will con-
tinue to seek direct negotia-
tions with Arab leaders
despite the apparent set-
back inflicted by King
Hassan of Morocco who
publicly expressed readiness
Unlikely Praise
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin on Mon-
day praised Syria for keeping its
borders with Israel closed to ter-
rorists and noted that Damascus
^ad finally expelled the PLO from
ehanon and is keeping them out.
le made this remark in an ad-
Iress to the Haifa Maritime and
Economic Club.
to meet with Peres for
peace talks last week and
then denied that he had ever
extended such an offer.
Hassan, the current chairman
of the Arab League who has been
on a three-day visit to France, told
French journalists Sunday that he
would like to meet the Israeli
Premier for direct negotiations if
Peres came up with serious pro-
posals for a solution to the Middle
East conflict. His remarks, on
French television, were welcomed
by Peres who said he would gladly
meet Hassan anywhere, including
Jerusalem.
But Hassan declared on televi-
sion later that he had "neither
directly nor indirectly" addressed
an invitation to Peres. The two
men reportedly met secretly in
Morocco five years ago when the
Likud government was in power,
and Peres was a member of the
Labor opposition.
Peres said he had not known in
advance that Hassan would an-
nounce publicly an invitation for a
dialogue and had no idea why it
was abruptly withdrawn. He said
he responded to the invitation
after he saw Hassan deliver it on
television.
The U.S. also apparently took
Hassan's remarks as an invitation
to Peres. U.S. Ambassador
Thomas Pickering said his govern-
ment was disappointed by
Hassan's denial. "It would have
been a real contribution to have
such a meeting. We were very en-
couraged by Premier Peres' im-
mediate acceptance and are disap-
pointed that it does not now seem
possible," the American envoy
said in Tel Aviv.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Political analysts here said
that a meeting between
Premier 'Shimon Peres and
King Hassan of Morocco
was unlikely at this time,
although the two leaders
have just stated publicly
they would be willing to
meet.
Hassan told French journalists
he would like to meet the Israeli
Premier for direct negotiations if
Peres came up with serious pro-
posals for a solution of the Middle
East conflict. Peres said here that
he would gladly visit Morocco or
anywhere else at any time if he
received an invitation from
Hassan, or that he would gladly
host Hassan in Jerusalem "to talk
peace."
"HE CONFIRMED there have
been "exchanging of messages"
between himself and the Moroc-
can rulers who is the current
chairman of the Arab League.
"In my view, anyone can con-
tribute to the advancement of
peace in our region, especially
heads of state. King Hassan could
have an important contribution,"
Peres said in response to Hassan's
statement.
But the analysts said that Peres
does not need Hassan's mediation
in the peace process at present
because the main objective of his
foreign policy is to reach some
sort of agreement with King Hus-
sein of Jordan.
They noted that unlike the
negotiations that preceded Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat's trip to
Jerusalem in 1977 which
Hassan played an important part
in arranging Jordanian-Israeli
contacts do not depend on outside
Arab intervention. The U.S. is the
main broker in that process.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Interim Report
Israel Sends Hurried Word to U.S.
Pollard Said To Have Told FBI
He Was Getting $2,500 Monthly
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel is reported to have
sent the State Department
an interim report of its in-
vestigation of allegations
that Jonathan Pollard, a
U S N a v y
counterintelligence analyst
arrested by the FBI in
Washingotn, was spying for
Israel.
The Foreign Ministry announc-
ed that it has launched a thorough
probe into the affair and would
keep the U.S. informed. The
10-man Inner Cabinet met in
Jerusalem but touched only brief-
ly on the spy case, according to
reports.
The U.S. Administration is
publicly playing down the impor-
tance of the incident. The State
Department's deputy spokesman,
Charles Redman, said that the
U.S. welcomed the promptness
with which Israel launched its in-
vestigation, expressed confidence
it would be conducted expeditious-
ly and accepted without question
that Israeli policy is not to spy on
the U.S.
BUT POLITICAL sources in
Jerusalem were quoted as ex-
pressing indignation over the tone
and extent of U.S. demands on
Israel in connection with the spy
case. They said the Americans
demanded the return of
documents, a full explanation and
Masked Marchers
In Tel Aviv
TEL AVIV Several hundred
people, many of them wearing
black masks, marched from City
Hall to the South African Em-
bassy last week to protest against
apartheid. The demonstration was
organized by Abie Nathan, who
operates the "Voice of Peace"
radio ship just outside Israeli ter-
ritorial waters.
the right to question Israeli
diplomats in Washington, several
of whom reportedly have been
recalled.
According to the sources, these
demands were unprecedented.
Their reaction was the first public
indication here that the U.S. has
made any specific demands on
Israel. Premier Shimon Peres
refused to be drawn into the issue.
"We do not interfere with
American legal procedures inside
the U.S., and inside Israel we act
in accordance with Israeli law,"
he said in a television interview.
Israel's top leadership has
avowed they knew nothing
whatever of Pollard or his alleged
activities and said they learned of
it with "shock and consterna-
tion." Israel Radio said that an of-
ficial at the Israel Embassy in
Washington will be recalled at the
request of the State Department.
HE WAS pinpointed as the of-
ficial contacted by Pollard who
was reportedly seeking asylum at
the Embassy when he was picked
up by FBI agents nearby on
Thursday, Nov. 21. The Embassy
official was not identified by
name. But the Israeli media nam-
ed Raphael (Rafi) Eitan, a former
Mossad (secret service) operative
who served former Premier
Menachem Begin and Yitzhak
Shamir as an adviser on ter-
rorism, as the Israel official who
recruited Pollard and operated
him.
Begin was quoted in Maariv as
stating, through his personal aide,
Yechiel Kadishai, that he never
heard of Pollard before he read
the newspaper reports of his
arrest.
The Israeli press got Eitan's
name from the first draft of an ar-
ticle written for The Washington
Post. The name was deleted from
the published article.
THE JERUSALEM Post said
that Eitan spent most of his pro-
fessional life in the secret service.
Reputedly, he was the man who
assaulted and kidnapped Nazi war
criminal Adolf Eichmann near his
home in a Buenos Aires suburb in
1960. Eventually, Eitan headed
the Mossad. Israel's senior secret
intelligence service.
He remained with Mossad until
the middle 1960's when Ariel
Sharon briefly served then
Premier Yitzhak Rabin as adviser
on security measures. Sharon co-
opted Eitan as his assistant, the
Post account said. After that,
Eitan went into private business
and became a member of the Cen-
tral Committee of Begin's Herut
Party.
He returned to security matters
when Likud came to power in the
1977 Knesset elections. Begin ap-
pointed him adviser on terrorism
in July, 1978, replacing Amitai
Paglin who was killed in a car acci-
dent. Eitan worked out of the
Prime Minister's Office.
ACCORDING TO the
Jerusalem Post, Begin did not
concern himself directly with anti-
terrorist activities. He gave his
adviser much leeway and Eitan's
status received a further boost,
the Post said, when Sharon
became Defense Minister in 1981.
The Post noted that Eitan created
controversy when he stated on
Israel Radio that Israel would
have to live with terrorism for the
next 100 years.
When Shimon Peres became
Premier in the Labor-Likud unity
coalition government, he replaced
Eitan with Laborite Amiram Nir.
But Eitan was allowed to remain
in the Prime Minister's Office in
an unspecified capacity.
Israel Radio said that the Em-
bassy official facing recall from
Washington was apparently trac-
ed to Pollard through taps, either
on Pollard's telephone or an Em-
bassy phone. He will return home
only after the spy case opens in
federal court, and after the U.S.
authorities have questioned him
with Israel's consent about
what he knows of the case.
Opening December 8
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WASHINGTON (JTA)
Jonathan Pollard, the
Navy counterintelligence,
analyst arrested on es-
pionage charges, told U.S.
agents he had been paid
$2,500 a month and two
trips to Europe for passing
on secret information to
Israel over an 18-month
period, according to
testimony from a Federal
Bureau of Investigation
agent attached to the case.
The FBI agent, Eugene
Noltkamper, said at a bail hearing
for Pollard and his wife, Ann
Henderson-Pollard, who was ar-
rested the day after her husband
for unauthorized possession of
classified U.S. documents, that
highly-classified material found in
a search of their apartment con-
tained information on the military
and intelligence-gathering
capabilities "of foreign
countries."
THE ONLY country of those
which were the subjects of the
seized documents specifically
cited by the agent was the Peo-
ple's Republic of China.
Presumably, the papers Pollard
said had already been turned over
to the Israeli authorites contained
intelligence information on the
military capabilities of pro-
Western Arab countries, su
Egypt and Jordan, which the III
does not provide Israel within,
framework of the eld
intelligence-sharing relation
the two countries enjoy.
Pollard said a suitcase seizedk
agents from his apartment d
Mrs. Pollard allegedly attemu
to have a friend remove the a
case for destruction between I
time FBI agents had first *,
prehended her husband and Zl
time he was arrested contain^
documents which had alreajfl
been turned over to the Isr
Embassy and were to be retur
to his workplace, aecordine
Noltkamper.
Mrs. Pollard, the FBI
said, had told the friend than
suitcase contained classify
documents to be used for
presentation" at the Chinese El
bassy in Washington. Other s
papers were found in PollardiL
possession when he was first K\
prehended by agents three daf
before his arrest, and subsequent]
ly, in boxes in his apartment, i|
Mrs. Pollard's purse and in tbe|
suitcase.
ACCORDING TO Koltkamper]
Pollard said the payment to hiil
was made by his "handler," hut ml
name was given, nor was it clear!
whether Pollard has named!
anyone from the Israeli Embasjl
in his interviews with the agentt. I
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Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
foreign aid, Jerusalem, and the
free trade bill.
The Princeton and Stanford-
educated Zschau is actively con-
sidering a Senate run in 1986
against the veteran Alan
Cranston (D., Calif.) who has been
one of Israel's most important and
effective friends in the Senate for
many years. But with the distinct
possibility of there being a
number of other strong con-
tenders in the Republican
primary, Zschau could lose his bid,
York University confers honorary Degree of Doctor of
trinity on Dr. Alfred Gottschalk (right), president of Hebrew
Citon College-Jewish Institute of Religion. The recent ceremony
ok place at the Washington Square Campus. The degree was
inferred by Dr. John Brademas (center), with the assistance of
jurence Tisch, chairman of the NYU Board of Trustees.
Israel Has And Needs Many
Good Friends on Capitol Hill
Bv MORRIS J. AMITAY
IWASHINGTON Israel
fortunate in having so
>any good friends in the
ongress who mirror the
}rong public support in this
juntry for the only
emocratic and reliable U.S.
ly in the Middle East.
ITime and time again, whether
|e issue is economic aid or arms
lies to Arab nations, the Con-
ess has shown sympathy for
Irael's security needs. However,
|ere is still a small number of
ouse members who are out of
ep on the subject of Israel with
vast maj?'-i(rf.:.*keir
leagues.
(While -very member of Con-
fess is certainly entitled to his or
}r views, and unanimity on most
lues is rare in the Congress, a
iw consistent detractors of Israel
kn l>e identified.
THE MOST senior of this group
terms of years of service in the
nise of Representatives is
bmocrat .John Conyers of
troit. Ten years ago, Conyers
I not sign the Black Caucus
tement denouncing the in-
mous I'.S. resolution equating
onism with racism. Since then
has defended Palestinian
ayors facing expulsion, has
ught to stop the extradition to
rael (if a terrorist who fled to
is country, and called for the
spension of U.S. military
sistanee to Israel.
Conyers has invited his col-
agues to meet with PLO
presentatives and has spon-
ged and appeared at numerous
'ents hosted by avowedly anti-
rael organizations.
Most recently, Conyers sent a
tter to the President protesting
Israeli raid on PLO head-
uarters in Tunis and expressed
js "outrage" at Israel's use of
"S. equipment.
FUORTUNATELY, Conyers
K's not wield much influence
ith his colleagues, and the
6-year-old ten-term veteran's
rcastic and abrasive style has
'ade it difficult for him to work
nth other members to accomplish
s goals.
The most visible and outspoken
f Israel's detractors in the House
'ith the defeat at the polls of
aul Findley in 1982) is Nick
ahall, Democrat of West
lrginia. Along with pushing coal
rests, pushing Israel around
ms to be Rahall's favorite ac-
ty. The authoritative Politics
' America, which is certainly
even-handed" in its descriptions
' politicians, states:
"Of Lebanese heritage, Rahall
1 as emerged as a leading congres-
i
and thus not return to Congress at
all.
Ironically, this was the same
scenario that led to the end of the
Congressional career of Zschau's
predecessor, Paul "Pete" Mc-
CLoskey, whose bitter diatribes
against Israel have continued to
this day. However, as in the case
of Paul Findley, it is far better
that they air their views as private
citizens than as U.S.
Representatives.
Neturei Karta
Wants Counting
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Neturei Karta, the virulently anti-
Zionist ultra-Orthodox sect, has
applied for representation on the
central committee of the Palestine
National Council, the so-called
Palestinian parliament-in-exile
which Israeli regard as part of the
PLO.
sional critic of Israel. As part of a
congressional delegation that
toured Beirut in 1982, he met with
Palestine Liberation Organization
leader Yasir Arafat. In 1983 and
1984, Rahall tried to kill U.S. fun-
ding for Israeli development of
the new Lavi fighter bomber,
which will be built partly in the
United States and partly in Israel.
He labeled the plan a 'dangerous
precedent' that would cost some
6,000 jobs for Americans and com-
pete with U.S. planes. Lavi sup-
porters said Rahall's motion was a
threat to U.S. Israeli security
ties, and it was defeated, 379-40."
Among other extreme
statements, Rahall has called
- Israel a "ruthless and. barbario-
country" on the House floor. It is
no wonder Rahall is the favorite of
the National Association of Arab
Americans, which tries to be the
pro-PLO counterpart of the
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee. Fortunately, Rahall
does not serve on any of the key
committees which deal with
Israel-related issues, but his seat,
as Conyers,' is secure as long as
he chooses to run.
ANOTHER Michigan Democrat
with negative inclinations is
George Crockett, who does serve
on an important committee
Foreign Affairs. While Crockett
occasionally votes foreign aid, in
early 1985 he unsuccessfully
sought to arrange for the PLO's
UN representative to brief
members of Congress in
Washington.
Previously, he was one of the
most vocal opponents of moving
the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem and in 1984 charged
that the Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee was acting because of political
pressure exerted by "the
strongest lobby the Israeli lob-
by." Crockett's seat in a majority
black district is safe, but at age
76, a future replacement is in the
offing.
Still another Michigan
Democrat, David Bonior,
displayed a great deal of animosi-
ty toward the Jewish state.
Elected in 1986, Bonior earlier
this year hosted a reception for
Findley's book, "They Dare To
Speak Out" a volume universal-
ly penned by critics as an expres-
sion of the frustrations of a
defeated politician. Like Rahall, a
supporter of Arafat who has met
with the PLO chieftain, he has in-
serted numerous anti-Israel ar-
ticles in the Congressional record.
ON THE Republican side of the
Committee, Ed Zschau of Califor-
nia has emerged as Israel s chiet
foe. Zschau, 45, a successful com-
puter executive is a relative
newcomer, having been elected in
1982. In Committee, Zschau has
adopted negative stances Oil
"Create Land From Sand"
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
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JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Bowls in Israel No Old Man's
Lawn Game Anymore
Continued from Page 5-A
their toes and above all produce a
local player capable of winning a
world title."
The Israeli climate is almost
perfect for year-round bowling,
and the highly social aspect of the
game, with its appeal to both
sexes of all age groups, combine
to create a relaxing atmosphere
much needed in the hectic world
of daily living in this country.
That's a view shared by the
father of Israeli bowls, 78-year-old
Max Spitz, who brought the game
here from South Africa in 1950,
together with Percy Manham and
the late Jack Raphael. They ac-
quired a site in Ramat Gan from
one time Mayor Avraham Krinitz
and, after a lot of hard work and
sweat, the Ramat Gan club was
founded with a single green. Now
Ramat Gan boasts two rinks and a
superb $250,000 new clubhouse.
"The game here has tremendous
potential, and the way things are
going it has a terrific future,"
says Spitz, who now holds the
esteemed office of honorary life
president of the IBA.
IN THOSE early days, and even
today, Spitz is aware of the impor-
tance of attracting Sabras to the
sport. He persuaded one young
Tel Aviv neighbor to try her hand
at the sport, and Rina Lebel has
never looked back. A first genera-
tion sabra, she won the first
women's singles championship
held in this country and is still
ranked among the top five female
bowlers in Israel. Earlier this
year, she travelled to Melbourne,
Australia as part of the five-
strong Israeli women's team, to
compete in the women's world
bowls championship.
"Israeli bowls has come a long
way, and the best is yet to come,"
says Bransky. The 42-year-old
South African immigrated to
Israel in 1980, when he had
already won his Springbok colors
and had established his place
among the world's best bowlers.
And he ridicules the popular
misconception that bowls is a
game played only by doddering
old fogies.
"Championship bowls is a young
man's game," he insists. "In
South Africa, people start playing
it in their teens. In Australia, they
have 750,000 active bowlers, and
the average age has dropped from
60 to 40. Like any other sport,
success depends on having natural
ability, and then practicing and
practicing and practicing."
BRANSKY'S dogged deter-
mination to be a winner has won
him many a victory as well as the
honor of being acclaimed by the
magazine. World Bowls, as "one
of the world's most distinguished
bowlers of recent years." Perhaps
this year, Bransky will win that
Sportsman of the Year title a
crown he so richly deserves.
Mayors Urged Reagan Demand
Soviet Hold to Commitments
NEW YORK (JTA) The
mayors of 101 cities across the
United States signed a letter,
transmitted last Thursday to
President Reagan, urging that the
President "hold the Soviets to
their commitments on the human
rights of Soviet Jews" during his
summit conference with Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev in
Geneva:.
The letter was presented to the
White House by New Orleans
Mayor Ernest Morial, president of
the United States Conference of
Mayors. "This letter is being sent
on the eve of the Geneva summit
so that President Reagan will be
able to show the Soviet leadership
that Americans throughout the
United States care about the
declining number of Soviet Jews
who are being permitted to
emigrate and the increased
number of Hebrew teachers who
have been arrested this year."
In the letter, the mayors recall-
ed that Gorbachev told a Paris
news conference in October that
Soviet citizens who know "state
secrets" have to wait only "five to
ten years" to leave. But the
mayors countered in their letter
that "thousands of Soviet Jews
waited that requisite term and are
still waiting." Such actions, the
letter said, raised questions about
the USSR's credibility regarding
international commitments.
Chanukah, Christmas Not the Same
Continued from Page 5-A
would be undertaken only when
the best possible situation
presents itself and all other op-
tions have been exhausted. In the
current situation, litigation in-
itiated in state courts, rather than
in federal courts, may be ad-
visable; constitutional strictures
are often more tightly drawn in
state constitutions.
When litigation is contemplated
locally, it should be a matter for
national inter-agency consulta-
tion, through the NJCRAC, for
the purpose of determining
whether such a suit is desirable
and necessary. The consequences
of litigation initiated locally can
have national ramifications.
JTA Syndicate
Canada's Conservatives Pick Jew
TORONTO (JTA) Larry Grossman, a 43-year-old
lawyer, member of the Ontario provincial legislature and a
former Cabinet Minister, was elected leader of the Ontario
Progressive Conservative Party at the organization's re-
cent convention. This is the party which ruled Ontario,
Canada's most populous province, for 42 years until it
received a setback at the polls last May.
GROSSMAN, who will lead the opposition in the On-
tario legislature, is the son of Allan Grossman who held
several Cabinet posts in earlier Conservative Administra-
tions until his retirement several years ago. Both father
and son are actively involved in Jewish community life.
Larry Grossman's election is especially significant
because the party has always been indentified in the past
with white Anglo-Saxon ProtestantsiaCanada.
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Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
A Jewish Perspective
Of the 75-Year Comet
Members of the dais gather around to con-
ratulate Judge Simon H. Rifkind (seated
mter) on his acceptance of the Jewish
ogical Seminary of America's Centen-
nial Medal at The Plaza Hotel. Judge Rifkind
kceived the Centennial Medal last week for his
lifetime of service to the Seminary, Conser-
ative Judaism and Jewish causes. Left tc
right (standind) are Stephen M. Peck, chair-
man of the Seminary's Board of Directors and
Executive Committee; Lester Crown,
Seminary Centennial chairman; Mark
Belnick, dinner co-chairman. Seated are Ken-
neth J. Bialkin, guest speaker; Judge Rifkind;
and Morris B. Abram, dinner chairman.
bookcase
Three Volumes of Jewish Interest
\By MORTON I. TEICHER
ly the Jews? The reason for
ti-Semitism. By Dennis
I Prager and Joseph Telushkin.
New York: Touchstone Books,
1985. 238 pp., $5.95 (paper
[back).
3n September 30, 1983, the
bth bound edition of this book
reived a favorable review in the
wish Floridian. This new paper
ck edition makes the book more
nerally available at a price
is about one-third of the
jinal edition.
The review which was printed in
63 concluded as follows: "All in
] this is a thoughtful and easy-
|read piece of work. It succeeds
presenting an acceptable
fewer to the difficult question of
ny Jew-hatred persists.
kwever. it fails in telling us what
I do once we have the correct
fewer. Nevertheless, the book
buld be judged affirmatively for
success rather than for its
pure. The suggestions for action
only one of 14 chapters.
I other 13 chapters vigorously
tkle a tough question and are
of a wide readership."
here is no reason to change
M conclusion. This inexpensive
Jtion should help to provide the
readership which the book
erves.
h Sea Stories. Edited by
Samuel Sobel. Middle Village,
New York: Jonathan David
| Publishers, 1985. 338
9.95 (paper back).
espite the stories of Jonah and
'whale and the crossing of the
"I Sea and despite the allegation
Columbus was a Jew, there
to be little basis for think-
out the Jews as a sea-faring
The editor of this an-
alogy, a former United States
[vy chaplain, believes that Jews
ked with the sea and has
n I this collection of
ns to prove his point.
?.!>m.ust be granted a measure
'for his thesis, given the
nous authors whose works are
Bsented in evidence for his con-
ation. They include: Robert
han, Chaim Nahum Bialik,
Wer Levin, Howard Fast, S.J.
RJ. Y.L. Peretz, Sholem
**. Sholem Aleichem, Jerome
adman, Herman Wouk, Leon
"a, among others.
obel offers 39 selections, in-
pp.
eluding passages from the Bible
and Talmud, and excerpts from
novels. But, mainly, he has
brought together a fascinating ar-
ray of short stories which have the
sea as a common theme.
Jews in an Arab Land: Libya,
1835-1970. By Renzo De
Felice. Translated by Judith
Roumani. Austin: University of
Texas Press, 1985. 406 pp.,
$22.50.
The sad story of how an ancient
Jewish community died is re-
counted in this book, written by
an Italian historian and published
originally in his native tongue in
1978. The present translation
makes his valuable work available
to an English-speaking audience,
placing us in debt to the
translator, Judith Roumani, who
was assisted in her labors by the
author himself.
Although the title indicates
1835 as the starting point, actual-
ly De Felice tells us that Jews
were present in Libya since the
3rd Century BCE, possibly even
300 years earlier. They were
repressed by the Romans,
mistreated by the Arabs,
persecuted by the Ottomans,
"civilized" by the Italians, sub-
jected to racism by the Fascists,
betrayed by the British and finally
permitted to emigrate by the
Libyans.
Once numbering 25,000 the Li-
byan Jewish community was
reduced to 100 by September
1967. Under Muammar Khadaffi,
the current dangerous dictator of
Libya, even the Jewish cemeteries
have been destroyed, erasing the
last vestiges of a 2,500-year
history.
De Felice gives details of the
pogroms and oppression to which
Libyan Jews were subjected. He
gives the lie to the myth that Jews
were well-treated by the Arabs
before the State of Israel was
reborn. What shines through the
bitter tale is the amazing
resilience of these people who sur-
vived in the face of great adversi-
ty and who, for the most part,
have now adapted themselves to
life in Israel.
The Therapy of Avram Blok. By
Simon Louvish. New York:
Stein and Day. 1985. 328 pp.,
$16.95.
Through a dense flog of tawdry
pornography and disgustingly foul
language, the frail outline of a
sleazy story can be dimly discern-
ed in this peculiar novel. The
story, such as it is, turns on the
sexual fantasies and escapades of
a Jerusalem native, Avram Blok,
who is the zany protagonist of this
crack-brained book. It opens with
his arrest for voyeurism and it
proceeds backwards and forwards
in episodic jerks through his ex-
ploits in Paris, London and New
York, always returning to the
primary setting in Israel where,
from time to time, Blok is
hospitalized in a very odd
psychiatric institution.
This is a first book for the
author, Simon Louvish, who
makes unconventional documen-
tary films and who teaches at the
London International Film
School. His style of writing is
directly derived from Joseph
Heller's "Catch 22" with echoes
of Kurt Vonnegut's
"Slaughterhouse Five." There are
no time constraints and no notions
of linear development.
Louvish writes as though he
never heard of beginnings, mid-
dles and endings. He tosses in
special typography and unusual
sketches to send his message a
message which is mysterious, am-
biguous and esoteric. Marshall
MacLuhan once taught us that the
medium is the message. Louvish
confounds both medium and
message to deliver a satire which
could easily win an award for
obscurantism, obfuscation,
biguity and abstruseness.
am-
Continued from Page 4-A
thoughts of it, and cleanse your
minds of it, as one washed clothes
of their dirt... for these things
are false and empty they are
all completely untrue, and
whoever relates them is either a
fool or a trickster."
IN THE Jewish view, it is not
the stars, or heavenly bodies,
which influence or control our
lives, for they are but objects
created by God. It is God's will
alone which decides our fate, and
this in turn depends primarily on
how we conduct our lives. From a
Torah perspective, it is man's
ethical and spiritual conduct
which influences the universe, and
not the forces of nature which
determine human fortune.
Whilst strongly critical of belief
in astrology, the Sages were
wholeheartedly in favor of the
study of astronomy. They
understood the Torah's statement
about Jewish "wisdom and
understanding in the eyes of the
nations" (Deuteronony 5:6) as a
reference to the specific study of
astronomy, and declared that
anyone who is capable of its study,
but neglects it, is guilty of "ignor-
ing the creation of God and
disregarding His handiwork"
(Sabbath 75a).
The origin of this idea appears
to be found in passages such as
that quoted above from Jeremiah,
which, in words read every year
during the period of selvchot,
directly connect "the signs of the
heavens" with the greatness of
God. "There is none like You, 0
God; great are You, and great is
Your Name in might. Who does
not fear You, 0 King of all na-
tions .!" The rabbis also
understood, with penetrating in-
tuition, that a man who is blind to
the physical wonders of nature
will be correspondingly insen-
sitive to the spiritual greatness of
its Creator.
THIS IDEA is strikingly ex-
pressed in the incomparable
words of Maimonides: "How does
one achieve the love and fear of
God? When a person reflects upon
His great and wonderful deeds
and creations, and sees in them
His limitless and infinite wisdom,
he will immediately be inspired to
love, praise and glorify God, and
will be filled with a great longing
to know His great Name, as King
David said: 'My soul thirsts for
God, the living Creator.' And
when he reflects about these same
things, he will immediately be
taken aback and afraid, and will
realize that he is but a small and
insignificant creation, who stands,
in his fallible and limited
knowledge, before He who is
perfect in all knowledge, as David
said: 'When I see Your heavens,
the work of Your Fingers. .
what is man that You should
remember him!'" (Yesodei
Hatorah, 2:2).
And with their instinctive
genius for translating abstract
religious concepts into practical
expression, the Rabbis ordained
that a special blessing be said on
witnessing a celestial wonder, a
blessing which in the case of
Halley's comet will be truly a
once-in-a-Iifetime experience
"Upon seeing zikim (shooting
Stars, meteors or comets) one says
'Blessed art Thou. () Lord our
God, King of the universe, Who
makes the words of creation,' or
(if one so wishes) '. Whose
strength and power fill the whole
world.' (Shulchan Aruch. Orach
Chayim 227:1).
The grammatical form of the
blessing ("Who makes," and not
"Who made") reflects the fun-
damental Jewish belief that God
constantly, each day, renews the
work of creation. It is, perhaps, a
particularly apt formulation for
the appearance of Halley's comet,
which emerges, after 75 years of
unnoticed and solitary orbit, from
one extreme of frozen lifelessness
to the opposite extreme of burn-
ing incandescence. And perhaps it
is not too fanciful to see in it a
symbol of the constant renewal of
the Jewish people, a renewal
which we have witnessed so
remarkably in our own recent
history.
Israel Radio
Names Three
Diplomats
Brought Home
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
Radio named three Israeli
diplomats in the U.S. who it said
were being recalled for involve-
ment with Jonathan Pollard, the
U.S. Navy counterintelligence
analyst arrested by the FBI for
allegedly spying for Israel. There
was no official confirmation of the
Israel Radio report in Jerusalem
or Washington.
The men named are Menachem
Tasse, Scientific Attache at the
Israel Embassy in Washington; II-
an Raviv, Deputy Scientific At-
tache; and Yossi Agur, Scientific
Attache at the Israel Consulate
General in New York.
Agur was described as an
aeronautical engineer. Tasse took
up his post only a few months ago,
replacing Na'aman Belkind who
returned to Israel.
Israel Radio did not give the
source of its information. It
reported that a journalist was im-
plicated as a go-between in
Pollard's contacts with Israeli of-
ficials but did not identify the
journalist.
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*'
Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Peres Pleased
Egypt Airs Murder of Tourists
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Shimon Peres
apparently is pleased with
Egypt's efforts to advance
the Middle East peace pro-
cess and with its investiga-
tion, so far, into the murder
of seven Israeli tourists in
Sinai last Oct. 5 by an
allegedly beserk Egyptian
policeman or soldier.
But while Peres extended a
warm welcome to Egypt's Oil
Minister, Abdel Hadi Kandil, who
arrived here on a two-day official
visit with a personal message for
the Premier from President Hosni
Mubarak, the director general of
Israel's Foreign Ministry, David
Kimche, unleased a scathing at-
tack on Egypt during a sym-
posium in Tel Aviv where he and
Kandil both spoke.
ACCORDING TO Kimche,
Egypt has failed to honor almost
all of the terms of its 1979 peace
treaty with Israel, and the Egyp-
tian press continues to publish
scurrilous anti-Israel material.
Peres, who hosted Kandil at his
home, told reporters that
Mubarak, in his message, express-
ed willingness and readiness to
move ahead in efforts to bring
about peace talks between Israel,
Jordan and the Palestinians.
Mubarak reported to Peres that
King Hussein shared the desire
for a comprehensive peace and
that he, Mubarak, was trying to
persuade the Palestine Liberation
Organization to accept United Na-
tions Security Council Resolutions
242 and 338, the framework for
general Middle East peace talks
for the past 18 years.
MUBARAK ALSO sent con-
dolences to the families of the
seven Israelis four of them
children gunned down at Ras
Burka, a beach in Eastern Sinai
last month, Peres reported. As for
Egypt's investigation into the
tragedy, Peres said Mubarak's
message contained what he con-
sidered a fairly detailed interim
report. It is not, however, the full
report the Egyptians had promis-
ed would be forthcoming.
Peres went out of his way to
demonstrate friendship with
Egypt. Breaking protocol, he per-
sonally escorted the Egyptian
minister to his car after their
meeting at the Prime Minister's
David Kimche
home.
Kimche was in quite a different
mood at a symposium on Israeli-
Egyptian relations organized by
Tel Aviv University's Jaffee
Center for Strategic Studies to
mark the eight anniversary of
President Anwar Sadat's visit to
Jerusalem.
THE TOP-RANKING Foreign
Ministry official is to go to Cairo
next week with a high-level Israeli
delegation for a discussion of
outstanding issues between the
two countries. He said Israel
would propose that the autonomy
talks provided for by the Camp
David accords be resumed after
years in limbo. However, the
burden of his speech was that
Egypt is not living up to its peace
treaty obligations.
"There is no cultural relation-
ship, no trade to speak of, no
political dialogue, no Egyptian
tourists, no scientific or
technological cooperation. In fact,
very little of anything
characterizes our relations to-
day," he charged.
Kimche called on Egypt to halt
what he called a "dangerous
deterioration" in relations which
would have "terrible conse-
quences." He accused the Egyp-
tian press of mounting vicious,
scurrilous attacks onlsrael and
charged that the Cairo govern-
ment muzzled Israel's Am-
International Terrorism Will Be
Studied At Miami Conference
Can Nations respond both legal-
ly and effectively to international
terrorism? That thorny question,
among others, will be on the
minds of a number of the nation's
leading experts on international
terrorism, who will be in Miami
Friday for a conference on how
best to cope with terrorist threats
and actions.
The conference on "Interna-
tional Terrorism: Threats and
Responses" is scheduled to begin
at 9 a.m. at the Knight Center in
the Hyatt Regence Hotel in
downtown Miami. It is being held
Protection Requested
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
Lebanese villages have asked to
be incorporated into the security
zone north of the Israel border
which is protected by the Israel-
backed South Lebanon Army
(SLA) and elements of the Israel
Defense Force. The villages lie
just outside the zone.
under the combined sponsorship
of the University of Miami's In-
stitute of Interamerican Studies,
the Institute for Studies in Inter-
national Terrorism of the State
University of New York, and the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Among the topics set for discus-
sion are the Soviet role in suppor-
ting terrorism, vulnerable ter-
rorist targets in the U.S., coping
with terrorism legally, and na-
tional emergency management.
Speakers at the conference in-
clude Prof. Yonah Alexander,
director of the Institute for
Studies in International Ter-
rorism; Joel Lisker, general
counsel to the Senate Sub-
committee on Terrorism and
Security; and Bernard Stewart,
director of the Ter-
rorism/Countermeasures Group,
SRI International.
Theconference is open to the
public. In charge of registration is
Georgina Olano at the University
of Miami.
bassador there, not allowing him
to speak in public.
"Instead of marching forward
to normal peaceful relations,
Egypt is doing exactly the op-
posite, and I fear that instead of
marching forward to greater
cooperation and understanding,
we are in fact sliding down hill,"
Kimche said.
KANDIL TOLD the symposium
of Egypt's efforts to persuade the
PLO to renounce terrorism and
accept the pertinent UN resolu-
tions. He said Egypt believes the
PLO is not as bad as other Palesti-
nian organizations.
"We are trying to get them to
put their case in a dignified way,"
he said. As for the return of
Egypt's Ambassador to Israel,
recalled in 1982 during the
Lebanon war, Kandil said that
would depend on the forthcoming
talks between the two countries in
Cairo next week. He said the talks
would cover normalization of rela-
tions and ways to resolve the Taba
border dispute.
According to Kandil, the
outstanding issue is the process of
finding a solution to the problems
between the two countries. He
said he was confident they would
be sorted out and that relations
would be strengthened.
ONE OF Kandil's first acts
after his arrival was to pay a con-
dolence call on the family of Dinah
Berri, one of two 12-year-old girls
killed in the Ras Burka shooting.
He had planned also to visit the
family of another young victim.
Amir Baum 10.
He cancelled when he learned
that the Baums live in the Ramot
quarter of Jerusalem, built on
land captured by Israel in the
1967 Six-Day War which no Arab
state recognizes as part of Israel.
At the Simon Wiesenthal Center's Nov. 10 gala tribute (o tk\
American liberators and Holocaust survivors of World War JJ
Mistress of Ceremonies Barbara Walters (right), is joined tJ
Chairwoman Elizabeth Taylor (left), and famed Nazi-hunS\
Simon Wiesenthal (center), who flew in from Vienna. WiesenthA
was one of 11 survivors and liberators who received awards in a I
emotional ceremony attended by over 1,600 persons. Melissa Mat|
Chester was guest entertainer.
PLO Sued for $1.5 Billion
NEW YORK (JTA) A $1.5 billion suit was filed I
against the Palestine Liberation Organization in State!
Supreme Court here by the family of Leon Klinghoffer, the!
elderly American Jew murdered by the Palestinian hi-
jackers of the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro off Egyptian!
waters.
THE SUIT ACCUSES the PLO of "wanton and coll
dblooded murder" and asks for $100 million on each of m
separate counts. Klinghoffer, who was confined to aj
wheelchair, was murdered by the hijackers and his body I
thrown overboard.
The Klinghoffer family is also suing the owners of the
Achille Lauro, Chandris of Italy, Inc.; the port of Genoa,
where the hijackers boarded the ship; and Club ABC Tours,
Inc. The charges are negligence and failure to adequately!
insure the safety of Klinghoffer and his wife, Marilvn.
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Rabbi Feels
Summit May Lead to Soviet Easing
t I'
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Solon Pleased with Move
To Force Univ. Disclosures
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen of
lumania suggested that the
lit in Geneva between
Resident Reagan and
(oviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev may lead to an even-
easing of the plight of
jviet Jews. However, in
jsessing the summit's
.esults, he cautioned, "I'm
[nly a rabbi, not a prophet."
Speaking to reporters at a
ews conference at the head-
arters of the American Jewish
ommittee, Rosen indicated that
lie summit may be the beginning
I an overall improvement in the
elations between the two super-
owers. This, he said, could result
a better situation for Jews in
i Soviet Union.
THE summit conference,
he issue of Soviet Jewry was rais-
j by President Reagan and other
kdministration officials. But in a
bint statement at the summit's
onclusion, there was only brief
Mention of human rights and by
nplication, Jewish emigration.
fhe statement said the two
fcaders "agreed on the impor-
ice of resolving humanitarian
es in the spirit of cooperation."
73-year-old Rosen, who
esides over a small, though
Jewish community of
is in the U.S. on one of his
Regular visits to meet with Jewish
Toups interested in Rumanian
Jewry. The American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee pro-
lides substantial funding to
Jumerous programs for Ruma-
|ian Jewry,
Prior to World War II. the
lewish population of Rumania
Mailed about 800,000. While
p/ne 400.000 survived the
Rabbi Rosen
Holocaust, Rosen prides himself
on the fact that 380,000 Ruma-
nian Jews have made aliya in the
last 40 years. Aliya, he said, is
continuing.
ROSEN NOTED that Ruma-
nian Jews have been able to study
and practice Judaism, unlike the
Jews in the Soviet Union and
other Eastern bloc countries. He
attributed this to behind-the-
scenes diplomacy. According to
Rosen, this tactic has been
successful.
He told reporters that Rumania
has 11 kosher restaurants in
which 4,000 persons eat every
day; a network of old age homes
with nearly 500 beds, a meals-on-
wheels program for over 900 bed-
ridden people and programs pro-
viding money, food, clothes, and
Jewish Leaders Meet DeCuellar
With Zionism/Racism Petition
Bv YITZHAK RABI
I'XITED NATIONS -
JTA) The leaders of
hree Jewish organizations
het here with Secretary
general Javier Perez de
puellar and presented him
pth a petition signed by
renowned personalities
rom 27 countries asking his
upport in reversing the
1^75 General Assembly
^solution equating Zionism
pith racism.
Gerald Kraft, president of
F'nai B'rith International; Ber-
fce Tannenbaum, chairperson of
|e World Zionist Organization
jmerican Section; and Israel
|mger, executive director of the
'rid Jewish Congress,
esented the petition to de
"liar.
called on the Secretary
eneral "to take appropriate ae-
on to help remove from the
wrds of the UN the stain of
Soldiers Wounded
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
* Defense Force soldiers
"* wounded in south Lebanon
en their vehicle, part of an IDF
*>1 convoy, was damaged by a
*>side homb near the village of
11 Ya'un in the north central
'or of the security belt. The
0 soldiers wounded brought to
WPthe number of IDF casualties
tte area in the past two days.
Resolution 3379" which equates
Zionism with racism.
THE THREE Jewish leaders
were joined in their 20-minute
meeting with de Cuellar by Uzi
Narkiss, chairperson of the WZO
Information Department.
A spokesperson for B'nai B'rith
International said, after the
meeting, that the Secretary
General disassociated himself
from the General Assembly
resolution. "He indicated that he
understands our concerns," the
spokesperson said.
The petition was signed by per-
sonalities in the fields of politics,
arts, sciences, religion, trade
unions and journalism. Among the
signers were Jorge Luis Borges,
the Argentinian writer; Isaiah
Berlin, the philosopher and
historian who lives in England;
Australian Prime Minister Robert
Hawke; former French President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing; West
German Bundestag President H.
Jennuger; Cardinal Jean Marie
Lustiger of Paris; and Sweden's
Social Democratic Party
Secretary General Bo Toresson.
During their meeting with de
Cuellar, the Jewish leaders also
presented him with an original
work of art by Israeli artist
Yaacov Agam, which was special-
ly created for de Cuellar, on which
the artist quoted from the UN
Charter the provision that states,
"to practice and live together in
peace with one another as good
neighbors."
Sunday, Nov. 10, marked the
10th anniversary of the Zionism-
racism resolution.
medical help for more than 6,000
people. The JDC has aided in
these programs.
Rosen, who has been a member
of the Rumanian Parliament since
1957, serving as representative of
the Jewish community, said that
Rumanian authorities have allow-
ed the publication of a biweekly
magazine, Revista, in Rumanian,
Hebrew, Yiddish and English. He
said the magazine is circulated all
over Europe, including the Soviet
Union and other Communist
countries.
SOVIET AUTHORITIES, he
said, have allowed the publication
to enter the country because, he
said.the magazine is not fighting
the Soviets. He said some 800
copies make it into the Soviet
Union where they are copied and
circulated within the Jewish com-
munity. He said the magazine has
a total press run of 10,000 copies.
While the Jewish community in
Rumania is allowed certain
freedoms that are barred in other
Communist countries, Rosen said.
"We have a problem with anti-
Semitism." He said that prior to
1980 this was not a major con-
cern, but that since then there has
appeared in the press and books
attacks on him and other Jews. "I
didn't believe it was possible in
Rumania," he said.
He said he has made personal
contacts with President Nicolae
Ceausescu to intervene in the
situation, adding that since last
April, after his last meeting with
the President, the situation ap-
pears to have stopped. He said he
hoped the appearance of anti-
Semitic attacks in Rumania "is
finished."
WASHINGTON Con-
gressman Stephen J. Solarz
(D., N.Y.), a member of the
House Subcommittee on
Postsecondary Education,
said this week that he is
^''extremely satisfied" with
the inclusion of a new provi-
sion in the Higher Educa-
tion Act that forces univer-
sities to disclose education
gifts in excess of $100,000
received from foreign
governments and their
nationals.
The provision, which is already
a state law in six states including
New York, was originally drafted
by the American Jewish Congress
in an effort to ensure that such
gifts are not used to generate
anti-Semitism, anti-Zionism, or
racism at these institutions.
SOLARZ NOTED that in the
past there have been many in-
stances where academic freedom
has been threatened by financial
arrangements with foreign
governments. In particular, he
cited the Georgetown University
Center for Contemporary Arab
Studies.
"Beginning in 1975, grants of
monies from Omar and the United
Arab Emirates (UAE) were made
to Georgetown University to
establish a Center for Contem-
porary Arab Studies," Solarz
stated. "The 'academic cost' of
this Center was the release by
Georgetown of control over the
Center."
The Congressman noted that
although the Center was part of
Georgetown, it was actually con-
trolled by seven individuals: three
were high officials of Arab
governments, one was a lobbyist
for UAE, two were former State
Department officials, and one was
a representative of Mobil Oil
Company.
SOLARZ ADDED although the
Center employed Clovis Maksaud,
the Arab League's representative
in Washington, D.C., to teach
diplomacy, the hiring of Israeli
professors was prohibited.
"The amendment we adopted
sends a very strong signal to those
Arab governments who are trying
to subvert the educational process
in the United States by buying our
students' minds with Arab
petrodollars. It does not prevent
these gifts, which by law the
schools are free to accept, but it
increases academic freedom, by
letting the students and faculty of
the schools know of any implicit or
explicit agreements between the
school and the donor," said
Solarz.
The disclosure amendment is in-
cluded in the Higher Education
Act, which is currently undergo-
ing reauthorization. In completing
its markup on the package, Solarz
and the other members of the
committee approved legislation
authorizing more than $12 billion
for student aid programs. The bill
will now be sent to the full Com-
mittee on Education and Labor.
Overtures Urged
NEW YORK (JTA) Elie
Wiesel, author of widely acclaim-
ed books on the Holocaust, Soviet
Jewry, and Chasidic lore, has call-
ed upon the Synagogue Council of
America (SCA) to "reach out and
make overtures" to Islam and
Buddhism toward initiating a
dialogue with these faiths.
Live more of your life today!
Join Bob Griese and the St. Francis Hospital
staff, December 10th, as we dedicate our
new community fitness trail.
It will be a day of fun and excitement. On Tuesday, December 10,
St. Francis Hospital will dedicate its new "Life. Be in it." Fitness
Trail for the City of Miami Beach. Former Dolphin Quarterback
Bob Griese will be there to take the first runthrough and
christen the course.
Then, we challenge our neighbors to come and partici-
pate. The fitness trail, located on Indian Creek Boulevard
just north of 63rd Street, consists of a 1.5-mile run
sprinkled with exercise stations for sit-ups, leg stretches,
pull-ups and more.
%
We will have a Senior Citizens Challenge
with prizes, a Challenge to Miami
Beach City Officials, a Doctors' Challenge
and more. There will also be free refresh-
ments and "Life. Be in it." balloons,
bumper stickers and free t-shirts
to the first 50 participants.
Festivities begin at 1p.m. /ST\
and run until 4:30 p.m. So come and
take the "Life. Be in it." Challenge on
December 10. Wc also hope you'll keep
coming back to use our "Life. Be in it."
Fitness Trail for regular fun and exercise.
For more information, call our
Community Relations Department
at 868-2783
250 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach, FL 33141

Life. Be in it.


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
\
I
i


Jewislfo Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday, December 6,1985
Section B
For Chanukah
How To Make Your Own Candles
With the start of Chanukah on
Sunday, windows in Jewish homes
throughout the world will be
enhanced by the glow of
Chanukah Menorahs.
Each year, on the 25th of Kislev
on the Jewish calendar, the
Chanukah Menorah is brought out
polished and cleaned, and placed
on the window sill for the
neighborhood to see. As twilight
approaches and the first star ap-
pears, Jews around the world say
blessings and light the first can-
dle. Chanukah has then officialy
begun.
ON EACH of the next seven
nights, the number of candles lit is
increased by one, kindled right to
left, so that at the end of the holi-
day, eight candles, plus the Sham-
mash, stands aflame. The Shain-
mash is a "helper" candle which
stands above the rest, either in
the center or to one side of the
Menorah, and is used to kindle the
flame of the other candles.
The lighting of the Menorah
commemorates the rededication
of the Temple in Jerusalem by
Judah Maccabee and his followers
who, against overwhelming odds,
fought to practice their religious
beliefs. The Chanukah Menorah is
the most important symbol of
Chanukah. Originally, Chanukiot
were oil candlesticks of all shapes.
Eventually, however, the familiar
shape of eight branches plus a
Shammash became popular.
Although the original Menorahs
were kindled with oil and wicks,
today's candles are the more
familiar source of light. The
lighting of the Chanukah
Menorah, which is such a treat for
children, will be even more of a
treat when the candles are
homemade. This candle-dipping
recipe can be made easily by
parents and children together.
FOR THE candle-dipping you
will need: paraffin, cotton string
or store-bought candle wicks,
newspaper, cooking pot, tall tin
can (should fit comfortable in pot),
fork, and scissors.
Candle dipping can be messy.
Continued on Page 17-B
Victim of Beasts
Miami Exhibit Recalls Anne Frank
Tiro small patients are fascinated by the flicker of candles being
Hi by nurses in the Pediatric Ward at the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center, commemorating the celebration of
Chanukah, the festival of light, hope and miracles. Chanukah
begins with the lighting of the first candle Saturday night.
Games for Children Appropriate
To the Spirit of the Holiday
NEW YORK Chanukah
begins Sunday, Dec. 8, and while
gifts for children and adults
abound, Judaic items are more dif-
ficult to find. At the same time,
the tremendous appeal to young
children of Christmas decorations
and media campaigns becomes
problematic when it leads parents
to use Chanukah as a "Jewish
''hristmas," sa; ^ Dr. Alvin I.
Schiff, executive vice president of
the Board of Jewish Education of
ireater New York.
To ease the natural envy the
Jewish child might feel for the
commercialism surrounding
i i.ristmas, and to stress the
Jewish value of Chanukah, the
K.IK suggests giving gifts which
have lasting Jewish and educa-
tional value.
DR. SCHIFF notes that "The
need for sustaining the holiday as
separate and unique to the Jewish
le is critical, especially for
children, given the fact that
('!ianukah begins during the
height of the Christmas season."
A full range of Judaic and
liticational gifts suitable for ail
the ages is readily available. (lifts
range from a Chanukah Learning
r the entire family to puzzles
U>d games in Hebrew for young
hildren. The following are just a
f w of the items:
"hanukah Learning Kit:
Prepared by educators, this kit is
'he most comprehensive
1 i'anukah package available. The
kit, which includes seven booklets,
aboard game and cassette, pro-
vides an introduction to the
history and meaning of the holi-
day through stories, recipes, arts
and crafts and projects, and
Kames.
Children's Holiday Puzzles:
This series of puzzles illustrates
various holiday preparations and
ls a delightful way to teach
jhildren about Chanukah. "My
jfiwt Hanukkah Puzzle," for ages
- and up, has brightly-colored
wood pieces with large knobs for
easy handling.
Chilren's Books: For children
ages 3-6, the celebration of
Chanukah is portrayed in
'Chanukkiyah for Dina," a
storybook in English, with il-
lustrations and a sensitive
dialogue developed by early
childhood professionals. "My Lit-
tle Dictionary," imported from
Israel, features over 500 words
colorfully illustrated with Hebrew
and English translation.
Holiday Melodies: "Latkes
and Hamentashen," a collection of
popular holiday songs in English,
is designed for singing along, so
Continued on Page 2-B
..;, -;:.y^.-^.
By ERIC MOSS
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
"In spite of everything, I still
believe that people are really good
at heart." Anne Frank, 1944.
These innocently optimistic
words hardly foretold the sad con-
clusion of a brief life. However,
the questions raised about the
true nature of racism and
discrimination never cease.
To offer an insight into some of
these questions, "Anne Frank In
the World: 1929-1945." an exhibi-
tion of over 800 previously un-
published photographs from
Dutch and German archives and
private collections, as well as a
model of the "secret annex" in
which the Frank family hid, will
be on display Dec. 16-Jan. 26 at
the Miami Public library Main
Branch.
COMMEMORATING the 40th
anniversary of Anne Frank's
death in the Bergen-Belsen con-
centration camp, the exhibition
has been touring the world since
its simultaneous openings in
Frankfurt, Anne's birthplace;
Amsterdam, where she lived until
her seizure by the Nazis; and New
York, widespread publicity has
caused renewed interest in her life
and the time in which she lived.
"We want to show that the issue
Anne Frank
of discrimination goes beyond a
Jewish issue," said Merle Safers-
tein, Anne Frank Exhibition Civic
Committee Coordinator. "Our
goal is to unite people of different
groups."
But as some questions have
been answered, new ones have
been raised.
Could Anne Frank have counted
on our help if she had been our
neighbor? Would we have
recognized the seeds and dangers
of fascism? Would we have believ-
ed the propaganda that Jews are
less than human?
Would we have agreed that
Jews, or any other minority
group, are less than human, or are
the causes of most of the world's
problems?
IN SOUTH FLORIDA, Safers
tein's committee was formed to
raise the public's consciousness
about the exhibition. Notables on
the committee include Gov. Bob
Graham, U.S. Representatives
Dante Fascell, William Lehman,
Claude Pepper and Larry Smith;
educators, Dr. Willie Robinson of
Florida Memorial College, Dr.
Henry Green of the University of
Miami's Judaic Studies Program,
and Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin,
president of Barry University;
and civic leaders Dr. Horacio
Aguirre of Diario Las Americas
and Metro-Dade Commissioner
Barbara Carey.
One way in which Greater Mia-
mians are addressing these ques-
tions is through an educational
program created with the
assistance of Dr. Leonard Britton,
Continued on Page 2-B
Images in the Life of a Young Martyr Due Here

A member of the SA (right) serves as a police officer. The original
caption of this photo read: 'Law and order restored in the streets
of Berlin.'
The SA in action. Their victims have no rights.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Exhibit in Miami Will Recall
Life of Anne Frank
Continued from Page 1-B
superintendant of the Dade Coun-
ty Public School System. In addi-
tion to school-sponsored field trips
to the exhibition, a county-wide
contest open to students in grades
8-10, Anne Frank's age group at
the time of her death, offers the
winner a $500 prize for the best
essay on the topic, "What Anne
Frank Means To Me In My World
and In My Country." The essay
contest, as well as an art competi-
tion for students in grades 9-12 to
students enrolled in private and
parochial schools as well.
"It's vital that children learn
about the Holocaust," said Goldie
Goldstein, executive vice presi-
dent of the Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center at
Florida International University's
Bay Vista Campus.
"Parents are encouraged to
read Anne Frank's Diary, then
have their children read the book,
and then visit the exhibition.
TEENAGERS in particular
should benefit most from the ex-
perience, she said, since Anne's
New Torah Dedication
A new Torah scroll will be
dedicated by the Young Israel of
Sunny Isles on Sunday morning,
according to Mr. Hillel Price,
president. Mr. and Mrs. Emery
Shmuts, long time residents of
Sunny Isles and active members
of the synagogue will present the
Torah to the synagogue; Rabbi
Rubin R. Dobin, spiritual leader,
will lead the dedication
ceremonies.
Chanukah Games
For Children
Continued front Page 1-B
children can learn the stories of
the holiday. "Chanukah Songs for
Children" comes with a song
sheet with lyrics in Hebrew,
English and transliteration.
Games: "Scramble" is the
first Jewish lotto game designed
to encourage holiday learning
through play. It is designed for
children ages 4-8.
"language in the book is
something they can relate to.
After all, Anne lived through all
the traumas of a typical teenager
in one room in 25 months."
A "Teen Symposium," crossing
the area's ethnic boundaries is
slated to run throughout January.
University of Miami's Dr.
Green, one of the judges of the
essay contest, observes a trend of
increasing sophistication among
the students whose essays he
read. "They are afraid of nuclear
holocaust as the down side of their
experience wondering if we
have learned from our lessons."
Many offered social comments
on today's problems using the
Anne Frank experience as a
lesson on how we can raise
ourselves above mundane
spiritually, he added. "All were
able to generalize about the condi-
tion of mankind, as well as per-
sonalize Anne' story to their own
lives."
A TRIUMVIRATE of organiza-
tions is sponsoring the exhibition,
led by the Anne Frank Founda-
tion in Amsterdam, whose direc-
tor, Bauco Van Der Wal, will be
on hand for the opening. The
other organizations involved are
the American Friends of the Anne
Frank Center and the American
Forum on Religion and Politics, a
non-sectarian group of business,
political, professional and
religious leaders committed to the
separation of church and state and
to advancing social change by en-
couraging dialogue between
diverse cultures.
The exhibition not only features
the scale model of the house on
the Prinsengracht in Amsterdam
and the recently discovered
photographs, but audiovisual
displays and newly-released
passages in Anne's diary that
detail her awakening sexuality,
passages that her father, Otto,
deleted from the manuscript.
Metro-Dade Mayor Steve Clark
will officially open the exhibition
Dec. 15 at the Main Library. From
Dec. 17, the public will be invited
to open viewings, which will run
through Jan. 26.
CAMP DIRECTOR
For 8 week summer camp -
N.M.B. Synagogue. Must have
local credentials. Send resume
to Box CD c/o Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami,
Fla. 33101
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth you'll never have
mish-mash kasha!
G WASHINGTON S
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c_________________________________________--------------------------
Dr. Marvin A. Sweeney
Dr. Sweeney To Speak
On American Judaism
Dr. Marvin A. Sweeney, assis-
tant Professor of Religion at the
University of Miami will speak on
"American Judaism: The
Emergence of the New
Diaspora," at the annual Scholar-
ship and Special Gifts Luncheon
of the Florida Friends of Dropsie
University on Sunday, Dec. 15 at
noon.
The luncheon, chaired by Mrs.
Miriam Shindler, will be held in
the Crystal Dining Room of the
Seaview Hotel.
Beth Torah Chanukah
Cantorial Concert
Beth Torah Congregation will
present a Chanukah Cantorial
Concert on Tuesday, Dec. 17 at
7:30 p.m., according to Dr. Max
A. Lipschitz, rabbi.
Cantors Moshe Stern,
Jerusalem; Seymour Schwart-
zman, New York; Zvee Aroni, will
be performing along with Greta
Fleissig, leader of the Beth Torah
Youth Choir. Jack Baras will be
piano accompanist.

Congressman William Lehman met with Nan Rich and Anna
Mae Ross of the National Council of Jewish Women during a re-
cent Washington conference.
Happy Chanukah
from your friends
and neighbors at
Flagler Federal
%U Savings & Loan Association
It takes hometown people
to understand the needs of a hometown.
HHIMJ
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Over 270 Branches and Offices in Israel and Abroad
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In New York: Israel Discount Bank of New York
Main Office: 511 Fifth Avenue (212) 551-8500
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Montreal Representative Office 2000 Peel Street (514) 849-1237
Total Consolidated Assets Exceed $10 Billion


From the Pulpit
Rededicating Ourselves to Meaningful Victories
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
By RABBI
MICHAEL EISENSTAT
Temple Jtidea
While the daylight hours are
rapidly growing shorter, the
Jewish world will experience
great brightness as this Shabbat
concludes. We conclude our Shab-
bat with havdalah and its bright
candle glow and immediately com-
mence to light the first light of
Chanukah. A veritable weekend of
candlelight. The Shabbat lights,
havdalah, and Chanukah; each
follow upon the heels of the other.
Chanukah is one of our most
happy holidays. We had a
righteous cause, and we were
triumphant. The armies that
sought to prevent us from the
worship of our God were defeated.
The forces that sought to impose
practices upon us that were
anathema to us were overcome. In
joy, our people marched to the
Temple in order to rededicate it.
IN A LARGER sense, that
original Chanukah has recurred so
very many times throughout
Jewish history. There have been
so many times when we have had
to fight the odds, overcome the
impossible in order to achieve the
ends and goals of a righteous
cause.
How many times, did the ragtag
guerillas under the leadership of
the Maccabees feel the pressure of
trying to accomplish the impossi-
ble as they strove to defeat the
mighty armies of the Assyrians?
How many times were they driven
to emotional exhaustion? How
many times must they have said
we have gone as far as we can?. .
no more.
And yet, each time they reached
another nadir, they reached
within themselves and found that
they had just a bit more strength,
just a bit more courage than they
thought they had, and they fought
on.
SO OUR PEOPLE found the
courage to endure just a bit more
in their struggle against Rome.
The Romans defeated the Jews in
battle, but we won the war of
history, enduring in a vital way,
contributing to civilization, wor-
shipping our God, long after Rome
disappeared.
So it was as we suffered the ini-
quities and the inhumanities of the
Spanish Inquisition. The in-
quisitors are gone, the Inquisition
is over, and Jews and Judaism
continue to live and to flourish,
even in Spain.
Even in Germany, where the
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4 TAKEOUT
Rabbi Eisenstat
night was darkest, we have lived
to see a Jewish community begin
to breathe the breath of life once
again. The Nazi Party has died; its
doctrine has been repudiated. Our
people and their faith have risen,
phoenix-like, from the ashes. Ours
is the ultimate triumph.
outlasted an enemy is insufficient
triumph for the Household of
Israel. The defeat of an enemy is a
hollow triumph if we do not make
a positive step forward after our
victory.
WHEN ISRAEL had defeated
the Assyrians they immediately
went to the Temple to cleanse and
rededicate it. The rededication of
the Temple was the positive step
forward after military victory.
And with the rededication of the
Temple, the people rededicated
themselves to the service of God
through the performance of His
mitzvot. His commandements.
That is the challenge that faces
the Jewish people today. We
achieved a great victory through
Operation Moses. Now we must
step forward to consolidate that
victory by seeing to it that those
Jews we brought for Ethiopia
have the opportunity to live like
menschen, to learn and to practice
the Judaism for which they have
hungered.
That challenge is present today
as we continue to strive for the
freedom of our Soviet brethren.
Our triumph will come when they
are allowed to emigrate from the
Soviet Union.
consolidated by the Jewish com-
munity coming forth to embrace
them in their freedom and to ex-
tend the opportunity and the at-
mosphere in which they can
become part of a religious Jewish
bMlibUfnityV It is .tot enough to
free them from Soviet oppression
M that they can go to the free
world and assimilate.
To allow that would be tanta-
mount to snatching defeat from
the jaws of victory. At this Season-
of Light, may we rededicate
ourselves to meaningful victories
of the spirit for all our people.
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1

Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
David Wyman to Speak On
"Abandonment of The Jews'
. ..
So. Fla. Chassidic %lHHhHhHHHrtNrtHHb^i
Chanukah Festival *r -
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will present two public
lectures on the Holocaust by
David Wyman, historian. Wyman
is author of the book "Abandon-
ment of the Jews," and will speak
on that topic at each of the
lectures.
In the lectures, as in his book,
Wyman will present controversial
revelations, which indicate the
precise degree to which segments
of the American population, in-
cluding the churches and the
Jewish community, failed to come
to the aid of European Jews dur-
ing the Holocaust.
The first lecture, presented by
Federation's Young Leadership
Council's (YLC) Program and
Education Committee under the
auspices of the Sandra C. Golds-
tein Jewish Public Affairs Forum,
will be held Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Israel.
Wyman's second lecture,
presented under the auspices of
Federation's South Dade
Branch's "Federation Forum,"
will be held Dec. 19 at 8 p.m. in
the South Dade Jewish Communi-
ty Center Social Hall.
Larry Metsch, Federation's
South Dade Branch's vice chair-
man for Community Education,
said "We are very fortunate to
have a well-known speaker such
as Wyman to educate our com-
munity about the Holocaust. His
books present some of his
fascinating insights concerning
the Free World's response to the
Holocaust, and I anticipate that
his lectures will do the same," he
said.
Wyman, a Protestant, has serv-
ed as chairman of the Judaic
Studies Program at the Universi-
ty of Massachusetts and as
associate chairman of the Depart-
ment of History at that university.
He is special advisor to the United
States Holocaust Memorial Coun-
cil and a member of the Interna-
tional Academic Advisory Board
of the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
Among those involved in ar-
ranging Wyman's lectures are:
Robert Maland, YLC Program
and Education Committee chair-
man; Michelle Merlin, vice chair-
man; Jim Baros, chairman of the
YLC's; Sandra Goldstein, Jewish
Public Affairs Forum; Larry
Metsch, Federation's South Dade
Branch's vice chairman for Com-
munity Education; and Sharon
Azoulay. chairman of South
Dade's Community Education
Committee.
Chanukah Week At Hebrew Academy
A bevy of activities for the
Chanukah holiday have been plan-
ned by the students and faculty of
the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy, Rabbis Harvey
Silberstein and Yossi Heber have
announced.
Dramatic presentations depic-
ting ancient and modern Israel
will be held at daily holiday
assemblies. A Maccabiah sports
day. visits to hospitals and old age
homes, and class Chanukah par-
ties will take place throughout the
weeklong Chanukah holiday.
The highlight of all Chanukah
activities will be the school's
Torah Fair wherein each child of
the school will exhibit a project
about a Torah law. Jewish custom
or practice. The fair will be open
to the public on Wednesday morn-
ing and afternoon. December 11
from 9 a.m. till 11 a.m. and from 1
p.m. till 3 p.m.
Set for Dec. 12
The Sixth Annual South Florida
Chassidic Chanukah Festival,
sponsored by Chabad of South
Broward, Congregation Levi
Yitzchok-Lubavitch, and Free
Hebrew for Juniors, will be held
on Thursday, Dec. 12 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Young Circle Bandshell in
Hollywood.
Rabbi Raphael Tennenhaus is
coordinating the festival, which
features the kindling of South
Florida's largest Menorah,
authentic Chassidic dancers, and a
live band. Dreidls, Chanukah gelt,
and other prizes will be given to
the estimated 4,000 people ex-
pected to attend.
Did you Know?
One reason that
Haifa has emerged
as Israel's Silicon
Valley, is the pre-
sence of Technion.
Israel's most com-
prehensive center
of technological
education and
applied research.
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VALET PARKING
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
Announces the Re-Opening of
Late Friday Evening Services
For the 1985-1986 Season
Friday, December 6 at 8 p.m.
i
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL OFFICIATE
Guest Speaker
Ivan J. Novick, Chairman of the Board,
Zionist Organization of America
CANTOR YEHUDA SHIFMAN WILL CHANT
Assisted by the Temple Choir end the
Lehrman Day School Junior Choir
under the direction of Shmuel Fershko
N a'am at
U.S.A.
A Champagne Luncheon honor-
ing Life Members of Na'amat
U.S.A. in Dade and Broward
counties will be held Tuesday.
Dec. 17. at noon at the Deauville
Hotel.
Sponsored by the South Florida
Council of Na'amat U.S.A.. which
recently changed its name from
Pioneer Women/Na'amat. the
event will salute the 60th Jubilee
Year of the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America.
The luncheon is open to all Life
Members and prospective Life
Members of Na'amat U.S.A. or its
auxiliary for men. Friends of
Naamat U.S.A.
Harriet Green, president of the
South Florida Council and na-
tional vice president, named
Lillian Hoffman of Sunny Isles as
chairman of the day for the Cham-
pagne Luncheon. Leah Benson of
Miami Beach, vice president for
membership of the council, will be
the guest speaker.
A special session to acquaint the
presidents and executive boards
of all clubs and chapters of
Na'amat with the Southeast Area
operations of the organization will
take place Thursday, Dec. 5, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Southeast
Area offices, 605 Lincoln Road,
Suite 600, Miami Beach.
: couldn't be anything
but Maxwell House.
^Good to the Last Drop-
K Certified Kosher


Temple Emanu-El to Dedicate Day
School's New Art Facility
In keeping with Maimonides'
tradition which states, "The ad-
vancement of learning is the
highest commandment," Temple
Emanu-El will dedicate the
Lehrman Day School's recently
completed, state of the art facility
on Sunday, Dec. 15 at 10:45 a.m.,
announced President Sidney
Cooperman.
U.S. Congressman Claude Pep-
per and other local and national
dignitaries will be there as sup-
port at the ceremony taking place
at the school. Temple officials
speaking at the dedication include
Rochelle Malek, chairman of the
Board of Education; Carol
Greenberg, chairman of the
Redevelopment Program and
Lawrence Schantz, chairman of
the Dedication Ceremonies. Guid-
ed tours of the building will be
conducted after the formal dedica-
tion ceremony.
Built to achieve the educational
goals of the eminent Dr. Irving
Lehrman in whose honor the
school was renamed in 1968 on the
occasion of his 25th anniversary
as rabbi of the temple, this
$2,000,000 structure represents
the finest in educational equip-
ment and materials.
"We are very proud to offer the
best in high quality education to
our children," said Dr. Lehrman.
"This new building is an integral
part of our commitment to their
preparation for the future.
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Sutton Square Apts.
Spacious 1 & 2 bedroom apts.,
pool, laundry facility. Walk to
all shopping.
11930 N.E. 19th Drive
North Miami 33181
895-0255
Jewish Federations from the United States and Canada sent
leadership award winners to the 5J,th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations in Washington, D.C. last month.
I hi rid Gutin (center) of Philadelphia, chairman of the Council of
! >rish Federations' Leadership Development Committee is seen
- ng Susan Sirotta and Eric (Rick) Turetsky of Miami. Sirot-
vnd Turetsky were recipients of the 1985 Stanley C. Myers
dents Leadership Award, named in honor of the founding
ident of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Not pictured
> Ezra Katz, also a recipient of the Presidents Leadership
A card.
Happy
< Imimkiili
From
Yo i r Friends
at
Capital B
Throughout Dade, Broward and Palm Beach Counties
Member fDIC
GO STIR CRAZY
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Emanu-El's Late
Sabbath Services
Begin Friday
The opening of Late Services al
Temple Emanu-El will be held on
f ndayv at 8 p.m. in the temple's
sanctuary, President Sidney
Cooperman announced.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of the congregation, will of-
ficiate at the service which has
been dedicated as a Zionist
Organization of America Sabbath.
Ivan J. Novick, chairman of the
Board of the Zionist Organization
f America will speak and the
Lehrman Day School Choir will
Pai ticipate under the direction of
Untor Yehuda Shifman and Mrs.
Morris Listopad.
Preceding services, the temple
*>ard members will host a Tradi-
tional Family Sabbath Dinner
beginning at 6 p.m. in Sirkin Hall,
announced chairpersons of the
evening Judge and Mrs. Herbert
Shapiro,
Make a delicious oriental stir fried dish in a snap. All it takes i. one of the
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Combine Vi teaspoon ginger. 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 minced garlic clove in a bowl Slice
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reduce heat Cover and simmer 3 minutes, stirring once Sprinkle contents ot seasoning
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Cook and stir about 1 minute until thickened Makes about 3 cups or 3 servings Serve with
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To use BIROS EVE- Farm Fresh Mixtures Cauliflower Baby Whole Carrots and Snow Pea Pods or
Broccoli Red Peppers Bamboo Shoots and Straw Mushrooms Prepare recipe as directed without season-
ing packet using '- package I? cups) vegetables and increasing soy sauce to 2 tablespoons
< 1985 Gn.l Foods Corpotanor


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Community Corner
Rabbi Paul Caplaa, assistant rabbi of Temple Beth Sholom of
Miami Beach, will be guest speaker at the Wednesday, Dec. 11,
noon meeting of the Beba Idelson Chapter of Na'amat U.S.A., to
be held in the club room of the 100 Lincoln Road Building.
Esther Weinstein, vice president, will present her rendition of
Chanukah songs. Refreshments will be served by hostesses Sarah
Kerb* and MiMred Fraak._____
Beth Torah Congregation Sunday School will host a Tri-
ck-ne rational Chanukah Workshop for the kindergarten, first and
second grade classes on Sunday from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on the Ben-
ny Rok Campus. Dr. Joel Heyman is the kindergarten teacher
who conceived the idea.
Yiddish Branch 679 of Workman's Circle will present a Gala
Chanukah Party on Saturday, Dec. 14 at 6:30 p.m. at Newport
Hotel. Epstein Brothers Trio^iHentertain.
"Abandon Me Not: The Jews of Ethiopia," an exhibition of
documentary photographs and Ethiopian artifacts, will remain on
view until Jan. 1 at the Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery of Temple
Beth Sholom. _____
Yiddish Cultural Circle of Point East will hold its Chanukah
Festival on Thursday, Dec. 12 at 7:30 p.m. in the Rose Room.
Morton Gerson will conduct the candlelighting ceremony,
Walter Schwartz will tell a story, and Cantor Moshe Burin will
sine. _____
Henrietta Szold Chapter of Hadassah will hold their next lun-
cheon meeting on Monday at 11 a.m. at the Shelborne Hotel.
Chanukah will be celebrated. _
Miami Beach Zionist District will hold their next regular
meeting on Monday, Dec. 16 at 1 p.m. at the American Savings
and Loan Auditorium at the corner of Lincoln and Alton Roads.
Karen Jama, from Southern Bell will speak.
Association for Jewish Special Education will present a
Chanukah celebration on Sunday, Dec. 15 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
at the City of Miami Legion Memorial Park.
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater Miami will hold the "Coffee,
Culture, and Conversation" program on Sunday morning at 10:30
a.m. at the Temple, according to Rabbi Harry Jolt, Auxiliary
Rabbi in charge of the Adult Education Series.
Dr. Oscar Kraines, retired professor of law at New York
University, will speak.
B'nai Zion, Miami Beach Chapter No. 186 will hold a Social and
Card Party on Sunday, Dec. 15, and again on Dec. 19, at 1 p.m. at
the Surfside Holiday Inn.
Rabbi Abraham Korf, regional director of Chabad Lubavitch in
Florida will honor Alex Daoud, newly-elected Mayor of Miami
Beach on Feb. 23 at a Charity Benefit for scholarships for needy
and underprivileged children.
Temple Emanu-El's Forty Niners will hold their Annual
Chanukah Party on Thursday, Dec. 12 at 3 p.m. in Sirkin Hall.
Temple B'nai Zion Sisterhood will hold their next meeting on
Tuesday at noon in the auditorium. Ruth Rosenberg will speak
concerning "Current Events in Israel."
Beth Israel Congregation will hold the First Cultural Program
of the season's Fifth Educational Forum Series on Sunday at 10
a.m. Rabbi and Mrs. Mordecai Shapiro will lecture on their trip
to Australia. "Is Jewish Life 'Down Under' Looking Up?"
Jewish Family Service and Jewish Community Center will pre-
sent Laura Fink, RN, of Mount Sinai Medical Center to speak for
the JETset program Dec. 9 at 1 p.m. at Beth David Coral Way
Congregation. She will speak about "The Confusing World of
Vitamins and Minerals."
Women's League for Israel are calling volunteers together for
the "Chain of Life" luncheon on Monday, at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour.
Heritage Council of B'nai B'rith Women and Parkway Regional
Hospital will hold a free seminar and luncheon on Thursday, Dec.
19 at 9:30 a.m. at the California Club Mall, Community Room.
Myra Farr, chosen "Woman of the Year" for 1985-86 by the
Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens will be honored at a
luncheon at the Doral Hotel on Tuesday.
South Florida Women's Committee of Shaare Zedek, Medical
Center will hold its installation luncheon conducted by Rebbetzin
Judi Bidnick on Tuesday Dec. 17, at 11:30 a.m. in the Tower 41
Restaurant. Dr. Giaella Perl, of The "Angel of Auschwitz" will
speak; also a film about Jewish life will be presented.
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood will hold their annual member-
ship luncheon on Tuesday, Dec. 17 at noon in the Sklar
Auditorium. Rabbi Dr. Eugene Labovitz will be guest speaker.
Celia Cohen is sponsor of the affair.
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry will hold their next
meeting on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. Dr. Jiri Valenta, director of the Soviet and Strategic
Studies program for the Graduate School of International Studies
at the University of Miami, will speak.
Beth Moshe
Chanukah Dinner
Temple Beth Moshe will hold
their annual Chanukah Dinner, on
Wednesday evening at the
synagogue. Mrs. Gertrude
Feulner Bayles, a member of the
Temple's Board of Directors, will
be honored by Rabbi Israel Jacobs
and President Saby Behar.
Also that evening the Bimah in
the sanctuary will be dedicated in
memory of Dr. Clarence Bayles
and Harry Feulner.
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For Chanukah
A New Candle Light After Light
By LOUISE RESSLER
There's a new candle on the
block for Chanukah, and its Kindl,
in a new book, "Light After
Light," by Barbara Birenbaum.
Many holidays ago, Kindl was
searching through the calendar
and found a very puzzling holiday
in December, a festival which
lasts eight days and nights.
Oh, he thought, eight wonderful
days in which to celebrate, and
when he saw the box with so many
candles in it, he hopped in with the
other 43.
Reluctant to participate, Kindl
watched the celebration night
after night and learned the mean-
ing of each candle from the talk-
ing Menorah.
Finally, on the eighth day he
was awakened by a hearty Good
Morning from the Menorah. Kindl
thought since it was the eighth
night, he wanted to help. The rest
Hadassah
Events
Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will host their annual
Hadassah Medical Organization
luncheon at noon, Tuesday, Dec.
17. at the Shelborne Hotel.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular meeting on Wednesday,
Dec. 11, at 12:45 p.m. at the Mor-
ton Towers Auditorium. Southern
Bell Now will be the topic for
discussion.
I. R. Goodman Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a monthly
Oneg Shabbat on Saturday, at the
Hadassah regional office, Miami
Beach
On Sunday, the chapter will
hold their next regular meeting at
1 p.m. at the same location. A
candlelighting ceremony will ac-
company the meeting.
Southgate Chapter of Hadassah
will hold their next meeting on
Monday at 1 p.m. at the Terrace
Room. A candlelighting ceremonj
will be presented, according tc
Tillie Lewis, program chairman.
Torah Chapter of Hadassah will
hold its regular meeting Monday,
at 12:30 p.m. at Temple Zamora.
Rose Lauretz, a vice president
who is celebrating her 80th birth
day will host the Social Hour.
The program will present "Tht
Hadasah Schpeillers," directed by
Libby Lieberman. Mrs. Lieber
man will also give a "Soviet
Update."
Golda Meir Chapter ol
Hadassah will hold an HMO Lun
cheon on Monday at noon at the
Doral Beach Hotel. Proceeds will
help support the Hadassah
Medical Center.
Ko'ach Chapter of Hadassah,
Miami Beach Region, will meet on
Tuesday evening, at 7:45 p.m. at
|he Cadillac Hotel. Walter
>artland, consumer advocate of
I'acle County, will speak.
JUDAIC TEACHER
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of the candles decide to make this
Kindl's night and let him be the
shamus to light the whole
Menorah for courage. The story
ends with Kindl's own surprise
announcement.
This delightful holiday book
geared for youngsters ages 3-9
also includes an original song,
written by author Barbara Biren-
baum with music composed by
Richelle Birenbaum, which
musically tells Kindl's story.
Barbara, a Clearwater resident
since 1979 and member of Temple
B'nai Israel, is a prolific writer of
poetry, humor and children's
adventure stories including Light
After Light and a Haloween tale
The Gooblin's Night.
A former elementary school
teacher and psychologist, Barbara
served as poet-in-residence for the
Pinellas County schools in 1981-83
and taught creative writing and
poetry in 20 schools.
She is a life member of
Hadassah and a member of the
National Council of Jewish
Women.
"Light After Light" can be pur-
chased at selected book stores.
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Andrew Blank
Blank Appointed To
M-D Board
Andrew Blank, vice president
of National Brands, and Seaboard
Warehouse Terminals, has been
appointed to the Miami-Dade
Community College Foundation
Board.
Blank serves as chairman of the
Corporate and Industrial Commit-
tee of Miami-Dade's $5 million
Margin of Excellence Campaign
and is a member of the campaign's
Steering Committee.
A native Miamian, Blank receiv-
ed his bachelor and master
degrees from the University of
Miami.
we Wish You A
very Happy
Chanukah
Executive Offices:
801 NE 167th St.
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
305/651-7110
A County Dank
COUNTY NATIONAL BANK MOf SOUTH FLOW*
651-7110
-r.rr.
MemDer
FDIC
to your whole family
from the people at Publix.
May the spirit of the season bless
(Fj you with peace, joy and love.
where shopping is a pleasure
Publfx


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Ancient Modi'im Chassidic Center Today
By SIMON GRIVER
Few people celebrate Chanukah
as enthusiastically as the
residents of Me'or Modi'im. The
Orthodox settlement is located by
the historical home town of Mat-
tathias the Hasmonean, and it was
here in the second century BCE
that the Maccabean revolt against
the Greeks broke out led by Mat-
tathias' five sons.
The very name of the modern
settlement recalls Chanukah. The
current settlers came in 1976 and
renamed the place Me'or Modi'im.
Me'or derives from the Hebrew
meaning "from the light," thus
alluding to Chanukah, the Festival
of Lights, and the name is also in
memory of Rabbi Meir Kalish, the
spiritual light of the settlers who
died just before they arrived at
Modi'i.
"Our physical location half-way
between the Holy City of
Jerusalem and the beaches of Tel
Aviv symbolizes what we repre-
sent," explains Alon Teeger, the
secretary of Me'r Modi'im. "We
lead a Chassidic lifestyle but wear
jeans and tee shirts rather than
black hats and coats and generally
create an atmosphere that is com-
fortable for Jews who do not come
from an othodox background."
TEEGER HIMSELF was born
into a non-Orthodox family in
Johannesburg, South Africa,
though most of the 25 families liv-
ing in the settlement are of
American origin. The modern set-
tlement was first founded in 1965
as a nahal army outpost on what
was then the border with Jordan.
In 1968 it became a settlement of
the Poalei Agudat Yisrael move-
ment, but the settlers could not
make their village economically
viable and they left in 1974.
Then came the present
residents who changed the name
of the village from Mevo Modi'im
to Me'or Modi'im. The settlement
remains affiliated to the Poalei
Agudat Yisrael movement and
operates as a moshav shitufi, an
agricultural cooperative in which
all economic activity is shared,
though unlike in a kibbutz there
are no communal facilities for dai-
ly meals and children.
The current settlers have also
had their economic problems:
their health food factory went
bankrupt two years ago, and
establishing industry has been dif-
ficult. However, the recent open-
ing of a new Tel Aviv-Jerusalem
highway which runs right by the
settlement has breathed new life
into the village. Now Me'or
Modi'im, instead of being off the
beaten track, is less than 30
minutes ride from the heart of
both Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
A NEW optimism prevails that
Me'or Modi'im cannot only
become a flourishing economic
enterprise but can better spread
its message. "The message of the
Maccabees is as relevant today as
it was 2,000 years ago," asserts
Nechama Silver, a resident of the
settlement who was born in
Philadelphia, Pa. "The story of
Chanukah teaches us that the
Maccabees rebelled against
assimilation despite the attrac-
tions of Greek culture a story
which is as relevant today."
The residents of Me'or Modi'im
teach this message at their center
for Jewish Education. This
seminary conducts a range of pro-
grams for both children and adults
from Israel and the Diaspora aim-
ed at instilling participants with
an appreciation for the values of
Orthodox Judaism. During 1984,
some 5,000 people attended these
courses, most of them youngsters
sent by the Jewish Agency's
Youthand Hechalutz Department
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During Chanukah, the Center
for Jewish Education holds special
seminars to teach the significance
of the festival. Parties and
festivities for the occasion involve
the village's most celebrated resi-
dent and spiritual mentor. Rabbi
Shlomo Carlebach. Often
nicknamed the "hippy Hasid," the
famous singer spends most of his
time abroad giving concerts, liv-
ing in his house at Me'or Modi'im
for only three months of the year.
He does, of course, always make a
point of being home for
Chanukah.
ALTHOUGH Modi'im is men-
tioned in the Mishnah and was the
home town of Rabbi Eliezer of
Modi'im, a cousin of Bar Kochba,
the entire region remains best
known for its connection to
Chanukah. Each year at
Chanukah, a torch is lit at the
nearby tombs of the Maccabees
and carried by runner to
Jerusalem. Near the graves of the
Maccabees a Hasmonean style
village has been recreated, while
also in the district the biblical park
of Neot Kedumin illustrates the
link between the Jewish heritage
Continued on Page 14-B
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Chanukah: Rare Among Our Holidays
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
By CAROL GREEN
No festival in the Jewish calen-
dar is as much loved as Chanukah.
Rare among Jewish holidays, it
carries no aura of solemnity, nor
does it impose any special restric-
tions. Instead, Chanukah is a time
for thanksgiving and lighthearfed
rejoicing. It is a time when family
and friends gather together
around the Chanukah lights to
play games while enjoying special
holiday snacks. But Chanukah
rituals, foods and games are more
than quaint folk customs; they are
rich in symbolic meaning and pro-
ride insights into the meaning of
the holiday and the history of the
Jewish people.
The Chanukah menorah, or
candelabrum, is the most promi-
nent symbol of the holiday for it is
a reminder of the menorah that
once stood in the Temple in Jer-
sualem. Its eight lights recall the
miracle of the oil: when the Mac-
cabees reentered the holy Temple
they sought to light the menorah,
however they found only one flask
of pure olive oil, supply enough for
one day.
Eager to rededicate the Temple
after years of disuse, they lit the
menorah anyway. Miraculously,
the oil continued to burn for eight
days long enough for a fresh
supply of oil to be pressed. To
commemorate the miracle, we add
an additional light to the menorah
on each night of the holiday.
JEWISH LAW does not re-
quire that the menorah assume a
specific form, only that it have
room enough for eight lights plus
a shamash or servicing light from
which the other lights are kindled.
Talmudic dictim requires that the
menorah be prominently position-
ed outside the front entrance to
the house as a public affirmation
of the miracles of the holiday and
the cities of ancient Israel were
aglow with the lights of these
menorahs.
Archaeologists have unearthed
ong vertical bases onto which the
lights were mounted for public
display. If, however, anti-
Semitism made public display im-
possible, the menorah went in-
doors. In Muslim Spain, the Jews
developed a small portable
menorah which was hung inside
the house near the door opposite
the mezuza. This portable "ben-
chtype," often ornately
decorated, later became popular
throughout Europe.
Menorah designs reflect the in-
fluences of both Jewish tradition
and the surrounding culture. In
Spain the backwall or bench of the
menorah was often fashioned
from Arabic curl patterns, while
in Italy during the renaissance,
menorahs were adorned with
cherubs, masks and cornucopiae.
Jewish decorative motifs such as
stars of David, lions of Judah and
scenes from the Chanukah story
were universally popular.
JEWS HAVE traditionally
been willing to lavish large sums
of money on a beautiful menorah.
Thus menorahs were carved by
the finest Jewish artisans. In
Europe, menorahs were fashioned
from copper, bronze and silver,
while the Jewish craftsmen of
Morocco and North Africa
distinguished themselves with
their elegant glazed pottery
menorahs.
During the Second World War,
Jews exposed themselves to grave
danger to be able to kindle the
Chanukah lights. Concentration
camp inmates fashioned crude
menorahs from raw potatoes, us-
ing pieces of fat they had saved
from their meager rations as fuel
Federal Precious Metal
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Wish All Customers A Friends
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The Officers and Staff of
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a Happy Chanukah
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of South Florida, N.A.
and thread torn from their
uniforms as wicks.
In modern Israel, the menorah
is once again proudly displayed in
public. Menorahs are lit in front of
all major public buildings and
monuments, including the
Knesset and the mountain top for-
tress of Masada. The light of
Chanukah is also recalled in a
torch relay originating from
Modi'im, the home of the Mac-
cabees. On the first night of the
holiday, the torch is lit in a special
ceremony at Modi'im and then is
carried by runners throughout
Israel to Jerusalem.
THE FESTIVAL cuisine also
recalls the miracle of the oil, as
throughout the Jewish world it is
customary on Chanukah to eat
pastry or potato dishes fried in oil.
Among the Sephardim, a delicacy
called birmennailes, a tortilla like
pancake made from fried meal, is
quite popular. In the Ashkenazi
communities, the pancake batter
is made from grated potatoes, and
the dish is called lathes and eaten
Continued on Page 15-B
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Happy Chanukah
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592-8000
Happy Chanukah To All Our Friends
Del Amo Plumbing Inc.
7323 N.W. 8th St., Miami 264-9712
Wishes All Their Friends And Customers
A Happy Chanukah
Southgate Towers
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Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Phone 672-2412
Wish Tenants and Friends
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
How the Nazis Used Film for Propaganda
By JEFF BLACK
The life of Rembrandt hardly
seems a suitable topic for the war-
time Nazi propaganda machine,
and yet the film "Rembrandt,"
made in Germany in 1942, is today
categorized by the West German
government as a classified film,
unsuitable for public showing. The
major part of this feature film is a
pure and simple documentary ac-
count of Rembrandt's life, the
style of the film mirroring that of
Rembrandt's own work. And yet,
in one short, one-minute scene,
the hand behind the production of
this film is revealed.
One of the departments in Josef
Goebbels' Ministry of Propaganda
was the Reich Chamber of Film,
to which all film scripts had to be
sent and finished products ap-
proved. If a film met with Goeb-
bels' approval, due to its correct
portrayal of Nazi ideology, the
films' producers could relax in the
knowledge that their product
would be widely screened all over
Germany and Occupied Europe
and their production costs hand-
somely met.
TODAY, psychologists,
sociologists and film theorists all
agree with Goebbels in one thing
"hidden" propaganda is much
more effective than more direct
efforts. In the film "Rembrandt,"
there is a scene showing the
painter as a young man, a pen-
niless artist living in a garret, who
gives his paintings to his elderly
landlady in lieu of rent.
Somehow, three men get to
hear about this arrangement and
offer to buy the paintings from the
landlady for what, in light of their
true worth, is a very low sum. The
landlady agrees, and the transac-
tion is completed, but later on, the
elderly woman realizes she has
practically given away a fortune,
and through shock and disappoint-
ment, dies.
All this seems innocuous enough
but for the fact that the three men
who purchased the paintings have
'Eternal Jew,' a propagandist documentary film considered the
'Mein Kampf of the cinema during the period of the anti-Semitic
Nazi regime. The Germans saw the images of the eternal Jew and
the wandering Jew as one, symbolizing thecurse and the pariah
that, for the Christian world, was the Jewish people.
all the characteristics of the Jew
as defined by Nazi ideology: long,
crooked noses, a stooping stance,
and an unnatural devotion 'to
money. The film makes no further
reference to Jews, but it has done
its work, for as Dr. Baruch Gitlis,
a leading Israeli expert on film
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Rosenkranz
are happy to announce
the birth of their new grandson
Craig Allan Rosenkranz
Born December 3,1985
Proud parents
Dr. and Mrs. Nell E. Rosenkranz
Atlanta, Georgia

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and hallway. On-premises temples, and
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Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Phone: 947-6093
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IlWIMlllMIIIIIMIIIKIWftttttlltWIIIililililililll'I'I'lililil'lil'l-l'I't'lil'I'llll
propaganda remarks, "Films rein-
force people's opinions, and one of
the most important elements of
propaganda is to reinforce these
opinions."
IN THE 1938 film, "Robert and
Bertram," and the 1941 "Jud
Suss," one can see how the Ger-
man people's image of the Jew
altered as Hitler's Final Solution
progressed. The earlier film is a
musical about two German men,
and in it, Jews are seen as grotes-
que people, but not dangerous.
The audience is encouraged to
laugh at them but not fear them.
By 1941, the situation had
changed, and Jews are no longer
grotesque but dangerous. In "Jud
Suss," a film for which Goebbels
was personally responsible, the
Jud Suss is finally hanged for rap-
ing a German girl after having
been clearly defined as a threat to
the German nation and its purity.
For the German people of the
time, this film was entertainment
and not propaganda. It had a
strong story-line, and the au-
dience could identify with the
defiled German girl and celebrate
at the death of the Jewish rapist
just as today we identify with
Luke Skywalker. the hero of Star
Wars, and rejoice in the defeat of
his enemy Dart h Vader.
These films were produced for
mass audiences and were basically
simple in story-line but
sophisticated in their techniques.
They presented straight-forward
heroes and a black and white
ideology; if two men, one German
and one American, fell in love
with a German girl, the happy en-
ding would be the girl marrying
the German suitor, and such films
had a large appeal among an un-
sophisticated audience.
Goebbels certainly did not
underestimate their value, and
even as the tide turned against
Germany on the battlefronts, the
trains needed for transporting
troops were often utilized to
distribute copies of a newly-
released film.
IT IS only recently that an
evaluation of the role of film in
Nazi propaganda has been under-
taken, and Dr. Gitlis himself, last
year, published a book called
"Film and Propaganda the Nazi
Anti-Semitic Film," which is the
culmination of five years of
research, experiments and view-
ing of classified Nazi films.
In an experiment he conducted
in Munich, a group of elderly Ger-
mans were invited to view "Jud
Suss," regarded as the most anti-
Semtiic of all the Nazi films, and
the experimentees were asked to
press a button on the armrest of
their chairs whenever they saw
any anti-Semitic portrayals
These buttons, if pressed, would
activate a light in a control room
where Dr. Gitlis sat, ready to
record the groups reaction.
Not once did the light come on
and in conversations after the
screening, the German ex
peiimentees said that "Jud Suss"
portrayed the Jews just as they
Ire and that there were no anti-
Semitic overtones in the fi|m
whatsoever. While this in itself is
upsetting, it does point out the ef-
ficacy of Goebbels' Reich
Chamber of Film and how pro.
paganda can be hidden from its in-
tended audience.
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Pictured above (from left to right) are Dr. Joseph Harris vice
president of the South Florida Chapter of the American Physi-
cians Fellowship for Medicine in Israel; Cal Kovens, chairman of
the Board of Trustees, Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater
Miami; and Dr. Isaac Knoll, president, Florida APF for the 11th
consecutive year.
American Physicians Fellowship For
Medicine In Israel To Meet
The South Florida Chapter of
the American Physicians
Fellowship for Medicine will hold
its 11th annual organizational
meeting on Wednesday, at 7:30
p.m. at Mount Sinai Medical
Center's Wolfson Auditorium.
The agenda for the December
meeting will include the installa-
tion of officers by Miami Beach
Mayor Alex Daoud, an address by
the national secretary, Dr. Manuel
M. Glazier, and an Israeli film
presentation. There will also be a
brief memorial service. Following
the meeting there will be a social
hour hosted by Dr. and Mrs.
Arkadi Rywlin, Dr. Rywlin is a
former national APF president
and a physician at Mount Sinai
Medical Center.
Since its inception in 1975, the
South Florida Chapter of the
APF, has been contributing its
support to the national organiza-
tion in an effort to help improve
medical care in Israel. "During
the course of a year, our support
takes on many shapes and sizes,"
said Dr. Isaac Knoll, president of
the South Florida Chapter.
On an annual basis, the APF
grants fellowships to 80 Israeli
doctors for postgraduate study in
the United States and Canada,
and conducts seminars in Israel's
four medical centers at Rambam
University, Bar Sheva University,
Tel Aviv University and Hadassah
University.
The organization was responsi-
ble for building, and is now main-
taining the Jerusalem Academy of
Medicine and the Israel Institute
of the History of Medicine. In ad-
dition, it funds original medical
research in Israel and conducts a
seminar on general medicine
every winter in Miami.
* mm *
Chanukah Greetings From
Bet Shira Congregation
A New Conservative Synagogue in South Dade
7500 S.W. 120th St.
Miami, Fla. 33156
Phone 238-2601
Affiliated with the United Synagogue of America
Temple Beth Am
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Miami
Phone-667-6667
Happy Chanukah To All Members & Friends
Temple Beth-El
7800 Hispanola Ave.
North Bay Village, Florida 33141
Wish The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Temple Emanu-EI
1701 Washington Ave.. Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Phone 538-2503
Dr. Irving Lehnnan, Rabbi Sidney Cooperman, President
Wish All Members and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah________
Temple Judea
5500 Granada Blvd., Coral Gables 33146
Phone 667-5657
Happy Chanukah
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
Two Jewish
Women Lead
Drug Campaign
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Two Canadian young
Jewish women have
organized a program, "High
on Life," created to help
children avoid drug abuse.
Susan Rakita and Rhonda
Solomon-Katz spent tht
summer visiting park pro-
jects, community centers,
day camps and overnight
camps in the Montreal area.
The program began, according
to the Canadian Jewish News,
when Rakita 23, director for three
years of a local summer day camp
for underprivileged children,
observed that many of the young
campers were experimenting with
drugs.
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
She said she found the children
were "very naive" about drugs.
So Rakita, who has a Bachelor's
degree from McGill University
and hopes to take a special one-
year Bachelor of Social Work Pro-
gram, set out to teach the
youngsters, who were as young as
five, the facts about drugs.
SHE WAS joined by Solomon-
Katz, 24, a sociology graduate
with a diploma in Later Childhood
Education, who had taught at a
synagogue nursery school.
The pair picked up drug educa-
tion material from federal health
agencies, the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police and other groups.
They simplified the material,
preparing two booklets about
drugs, one for children aged six to
10, the other for children 10 to 16.
They had found the the detailed
pamphlets for teenagers were too
advanced for pre-teens and that
the ones for pre-teens and
younger were "judgemental and
patronizing."
RAKITA SAID the pamphlets
distinguish among mood-altering
drugs, therapeutic drugs and "in-
visible drugs," caffeine,
nicotine and alcohol.
They said that their program
uses unconventional teaching
methods treasure hunts and
relay races, "Family Feud"
type quizzes and role-playing to
get the facts across.
Rakita said "the relay race in-
volves passing fact cards about
drugs, alcohol and cigarettes; the
Family Feud questions are about
drugs and nutrition." After the
activities, there are discussion
groups to allow for questions
and to teach children how to com-
bat peer pressure, "a difficult
thing" for youngsters to deal
with.
They insist there is no moraliz-
ing about drug abuse. The two feel
that "we try to educate them so
that when they are faced with a
decision about whether or not to
take drugs, they will refuse the
drugs. They will make an
educated decision based on facts.
THEY ARGUE that the infor-
mation can't come too soon. By
age, 15, they declared, most
children have tried cigarettes and
alcohol. More frightening, they
say, some seven-year-olds and
eight-year-olds are sniffing glue.
They hope to bring "High on
Life" into classroom and com-
munity centers, explaining that
the program, geared to camps,
will be modified for schools. But
the drug facts and the non-
traditional approach are unchang-
ed. Rakita said "We are focussing
on alternatives to drug use and
abuse. We can't say 'don't take
drugs' but we can provide the
facts."
Beth Torah Congregation
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd., N.M.B.. Fla.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Robert Whitebook. President
Harvey L. Brown, Executive Director
Happy Chanukah
||
Temple Adath Yeshurun
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern
Phone-947-4435
Congregation President, Benjamin Lechner
Sisterhood President, Trudy Lechner
Men's Club President, Joseph Raylson
Religious School Principal, Rachel Baltuch
Early Childhood, Joan Bergman
Happy Chanukah
m
Hallandale Jewish Center
416 N.E. 8th Ave.
Hallandale, Fla. 33009
Wishes All Members and Friends
A Happy Chanukah
Temple Or Olom
8755 S.W. 16th St. Miami, Fla. 33165
Phone 221-9131
Wishes Members and Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Beth Kodesh Congregation
1101 S.W. 12th Ave. Miami 33129
Phone 858-6334
Happy Chanukah
Temple B'nai Zion
200 -178th Street Miami Beach 33160
Phone 932-2159
Happy Chanukah
Temple King Solomon
Extends Chanukah Greetings
To All Our Members and Friends
Ur David Hub. Kabbi
Morris Klotz, President
Sam Hrill. Pits Men'*Club
Shoabanah Kaab, Cantor
Molly Jacobs. Prea Sisterhood
Temple Moses
1200 Normandy Dr.
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Happy Chanukah
Amit Women
(Formerly American Mlzrachi Woman)
633 N.E. 167th St., Suite 815
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Phone 651-1444 Miami Beach Office 531-5344
Happy Chanukah
Hadassah
541 Lincoln ltd.. Suite 300 Miami Beach 33139
Wishes All Members and Friends A Happy Chanukah
Mrs. Jean Temkin President
Miami Beach Region of Hadassah
Mogen David Congregation
9348 Harding Ave. Surfside, Fla. 33154
Phone 865-9714
Wishes All Members and Friends A Happy Chanukah


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Dedicates Chernin Building
Miami Jewish Home
Celebrates 40th Anniversary
"Today is a celebration of life
and of new beginnings. We are a
part of it. We are the history and
the future. We are the fulfillment
and the promise. It is a proud and
honorable place for all of us to
be."
With these words, Judge Irving
Cypen, chairman of the Board of
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens (MJHHA), proclaimed
Dec. 1 a milestone in the history of
the Home.
On that day, the Miami Jewish
Home began its fortieth year of
service to the elderly of South
Florida with the dedication of the
Harry Chernin Skilled Nursing
Building.
Governor Bob Graham, speak-
ing before more than 1,000 civic
and philanthropic leaders who fill-
ed the gardens for the morning
dedication ceremonies compared
the Miami Jewish Home to a
strong tree whose roots are deep
and well-planted. "It is to those
roots of foundation and tradition
and ultimate strength that we
dedicate this facility and that we
express our thanks to the Chernin
family for their contribution," he
said.
Commenting on the unique posi-
tion of Florida and Miami in terms
of its large elderly population,
Governor Graham noted that "ex-
tended ages create new
challenges, and premier among
those is how to provide for years
of respect and dignity and in-
dependence and involvement as
Dr. and Mrs. Jack Brenner
With All Friends and Patients
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Harold Cease and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Vary Happy Chanukah
Dr. and Mr*. E. Dauar
Wishes Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Q. Feldenkrels and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. A. Ferdle
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fink
Wish All Friends and Clients
A Happy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Morry Fox and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Qaler
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Lenore and Milton Gay nor and Family
Wish To Extend Chanukah Greetings
To All Their Friends and Relatives
Harry Chernin speaks before a backdrop of the
new Chernin Building. Sharing the dais are
(left, to right): Fred D. Hirt. Governor Bob
Graham, Arthur Pearlman and Judge Irving
Cypen.
our years become longer." Shif-
ting his focus to Douglas Gardens,
he concluded, "It is to that dignity
and respect of those advanced
years that this great institution
has been dedicated."
Judge Irving Cypen, in
acknowledging the many people
who helped lay the foundation for
the Chernin Building, gave special
thanks to the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, United Way of
Dade County and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
"We have built the buildings," he
said. "These organizations have
allowed us to open our doors to all
those in need," he continued,
referring to their role in meeting
the deficit incurred in caring for
the indigent residents of the
Home. Over 70 percent of the resi-
dent population falls into that
category.
Judge Cypen also noted that, in
addition to long-term skilled nurs-
ing care, the five story, 192 bed
Harry Chernin Skilled Nursing
Building will offer ahort-term
rehabilitation and hospital ser-
vices to the general community
for the first time.
The most touching moment of
the ceremony came when Harry
Chernin expressed his thanks to
the large gathering. Deeply mov-
ed, with tears in his eyes, he said,
"You have made my dream come
true. Now this great, big,
beautiful building belongs to
everybody."
Seated on the dais along with
Governor Graham, Judge Cypen
and Mr. and Mrs. Chernin and
joining in the ribbon cutting and
mezuzah hanging which concluded
the ceremony were: MJHHA
President Arthur Pearlman,
MJHHA Executive Director Fred
D. Hirt; MJHHA Building Com-
mittee Chairperson David
Fleeman; Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
who delivered the invocation,
Rabbi Solomon Schiff who blessed
and affixed the mezuzah; Myron
Brodie and Aaron Podhurst
representing the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation; Wayne
Casebolt representing the United
Way of Dade County; and Rose
Machenberg, President of the
MJHHA Residents' Council.
Later that day, over 200
members of the MJHHA Board of
Directors and special guests
gathered in the Ruby Auditorium
for the 40th Annual Meeting and
Dinner-Dance.
Others who participated in the
evening's festivities were Maurice
Sherman and Rose Machenberg,
residents of the nursing facility,
and Samuel Goldstein, a tenant of
MJHHA's adult congregate living
facility, Irving Cypen Tower.
Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Gerson and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Barton S. Goldberg
Wish All Friends
A Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Gordon and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry lean
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy Chanukah
Dr. Bruce A. Jullen
Dr. Arthur J. Schatz
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Irwin and Rosalind Kulbersh and Children
llene, Jay, Rachel, Brian
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lawrence
of
Lawrence Plumbing
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Lopez
28 WFIagler Street-Suite 202, Miami Florida
Phone3771462
Wish All Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Matter
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah


Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Schwalb and Family
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sures
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
the 40th Annual Meeting and Dinner
\w, newly installed President Arthur
arlman (left) with Representative Elaine
Gordon,
Hirt.
Judge Irving Cypen and Fred D.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Traurig and Family
Wish All their Friends
A Very Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Mesh
Scott Mesh Ronna and Dan Walner
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Jules Minkes
Danny-Robbie-KennySussiePammy-Bonnie
Wish All Their Friends
A Vary Happy Chanukah
Councilman and Mrs. Ted Nelson and Family
Bay Harbour Island
Happy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Perle
Extend Season Greetings To
Their Many Friends and Relatives
Mr. and Mrs. E. Pertnoy
Wlah All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Paul Richman and Daughter
Wish Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Mr. and Mrs. L. Rogers
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Morton Rosenbluth
Wish All Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
Dr. and Mrs. Bruce Rosenkrantz and Staff
Wish Everyone A Happy Chanukah
Miami Region Hadassah Big Gifts Celebration Dr. and Mrs. Hugh Unger Wish All Patients and Friends A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
The Miami Region of Hadassah will hold their eighth annual Big Gifts Celebration Brunch on Sunday, Dec. 15 at the Radisson ^e^^aM
-iii^ '^M^aM Mr. and Mrs. Irving Mark Wolff Extend Seasonal Greetings To Their Many Friends and Rlatlves
Mart Plaza Hotel, ^K m according to ^ | J^
Diane Issenberg, Kalmanson region president. More than 350 people are expected to attend the Brunch, Co-chairman Shirley Grossman said. Those in attendance will hear National Hadassah Vice President, Mr. and Mrs. Slgmund Zllber Wish The Community A Happy Chanukah
Carmela Kalmanson speak about
the strides made by Hadassah
Medical Organization.
.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Scharlin and Family
Wish A Happy and Healthy Chanukah To All
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU
A HAPPY CHANUKAH
In the trodition of the holiday season. Jordan Marsh
extends to you our sincerest wishes for a truly grand
eight-day Chanukah celebration
prdan
Jmarsn

FLORIDA
Use your Jordan Marsh charge card, American Express, Diners Club We welcome them all'


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1986
JFTV To Present Chanukah Story Shoiom Lodge
Miriam, Yoni, and the Young
Man discover the missing clay
jar in a scene from "Lights,
Gesher's half-hour animated
TV special for Chanukah.
JFTV Cable, Miami, will pre-
sent a Chanukah show produced
by Gesher in Jerusalem, called
"Lights." The production will be
aired during prime time hours on
Tuesday at 5 p.m. Thursday, Dec.
12 at 6:30 p.m., and Sunday, Dec.
15 at 6:30.p.m.
"Lights" is a fantasy-adventure
Miami Hadassah
Plea For
Soviet Jews
Miami Region of Hadassah will
sponsor the Women's Plea for
Human Rights for Soviet Jews on
Tuesday, at 10:45 a.m. at the Bis-
cayne Bay Marriott Hotel. The
rally will include a slide presenta-
tion, narrated by National
Hadassah board member Helen
Weisberg. It will also present
Congressman William Lehman.
Hinda Cantor, vice president of
the Union of Councils of Soviet
Jewry and Shirley Pollak, co-
chairman of the South Florida
Council of Soviet Jewry, will
speak.
Modi'im
Chassidic Today
Continued from Page 8B
wooded hills are also proving
popular with Tel Aviv commuters
as suburban settlements spring up
throughout the district. Me'or
Modi'im hopes to cash in on the
district newfound popularity and
develop a tourist industry as well
as reviving its health food
enterprise.
The settlers of Me'or Modi'im
see their future inextricably tied
with Chanukah for they feel that
they are reviving the Maccabean
dream of a Jewish life in the Holy
Land. And where better to revive
that dream than the site of the
Maccabean revolt?
Federal
Discount
Pharmacy
532 N.E. 79th St.
Miami, Florida 33138
Phone 758-1653
Wish All Customers
& Friends A Happy
A Healthy Chanukah
Berkshire Life
Insurance
8401 N.W. 53rd Terrace
Suite #202
Miami 33166
Phone 593-1564
Happy Chanukah
which retells, in allegory form, the
story of Chanukah. It is the first
major production from Israel's
animation industry.
Two years in production, the
film stars Judd Hirsch (from Or-
dinary People and television's
Taxi), as narrator. Leonard
Nimoy of Star Trek and Paul
Michael Glazer, of Starsky and
Hutch, will portray two of the
animation's major characters.
Faith Hubley, of New York,
designed the film and Bill Little-
john of MGM supervised the initial
layouts.
Chanukah Gala Set
Sholom Lodge 1024 will present
their Chanukah Celebration at the
University of Miami Hillel House
on Sunday, Dec. 8 at 12:30 p.m.
The event will be hosting children
of the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center and their families.
The children will present the pro-
gram under the leadership of Ms.
Sharon Hines and Mr. Gary
Bomzer. Rabbi Akiba Brilliant will
officaite.
Diabetes Research Institute
Martin KleimanPresident
Myron BerezinExecutive Director
7525 N.W. 74th Ave., Miami888-3437
Happy Chanukah
Cafe Ambiance
9700 Collins Ave., Bal Harbor, Florida 33154
Phone -861-9700
Happy Chanukah To All Customers and Friends
Ben Garber's Ladies Wear
1325 NE 163rd Street
945-4171
Happy Chanukah
Bellmar Flowers & Gifts
17608 Biscayne Blvd.,
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33160
Wishes Friends & Customers
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah
MILLER & SOLOMON
460 South Dixie Hwy., Miami 661-3403
Happy Chanukah
Gulliver Academy
12595 Red Road, Coral Gables
665-3593
Happy Chanukah
Window Mart
12330 NW 7th Avenue
No. Miami 687-0808
Happy Chanukah
A1A Employment of Miami
1326 NE 1st Ave., Miami 379-8401
Happy Chanukah
Simon & Rose Insurance
2901 Bridgeport Ave.
Miami 443-4886
Happy Chanukah
George Bernstein, CLU
7550 SW 57 Ave., Ste. 119
So. Miami 662-4131
Happy Chanukah To All
Southern Wine & Spirits
1600 NW 163 St., Miami 625-4171
Happy Chanukah
Planet Ocean
Rickenbacker Causeway Miami
361-9455
Happy Chanukah
MA-KAO RESTAURANT
8001 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 33138 Phone 759-9445|
Specialty Cantonese Food
Wish All Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy Chanukah
Endurance Floors
Wish Happy Holidays To All
18460 NE 2 Ave., Miami 652-6481
K&K Trailer Supplies
23215 South U.S. 1
Miami 258-1212
Happy Chanukah
Reliatex Inc.
2201 NW 72 Ave. Miami 592-3220
Happy Chanukah
Florida Keys Seafood
Fish Market
947 Fish Market Washington Avenue
Miami Beach Phone 672-4187
Wish All Customers Friends A Happy Healthy Chanukih
Country Gentleman Stables
Lou Callesis
15500 Quail Roost Dr. Miami 233-6615
Happy Chanukah
Spectors & Son
575 SW 22 Ave. Miami 642-3151
"Three Generations of Builders"
Happy Chanukah
Brooks-American Sprinkler Co.
2430 NW 79 St.
Miami -691-1182
Happy Chanukah
LEAR SCHOOL
11211 Biscayne Blvd.,
North Miami Beach 893-5351
Happy Chanukah
B & B Discount Grocery
1421 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach 534-6779
Happy Chanukah
Happy Chanukah Greetings and Peace To All *4
Judge and Mrs. David L. TrasK


Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Ftoridian Page 15-B
i. .
*w
.
1605 Washington Ave., Miami Beach
531-7307
Happy Chanukah

Spec's Music Co.
Happy Chanukah
>S
00'

brass Chanukah menorah hand-made by
rt/enr-oM Dudi-k Sweid. The menorafi, which
Ku >f>:>nrd by east European Cltxisidic
gHorot, has glass doors to prevent the flames
from being extinguished as the menorah
stands in front of the house. To the right of the
picture is a brass wick-holder and to the left a
brass dreidl. Both are made by Sweid and fit
into the back of the menorah.
n
Jack Thomas Inc. Realtor
311 NE 13th Terr., Miami 358-5511
Happy Chanukah
Chanukah: Rare Among Our Holidays
Continued from Page 9-B
[[ether with apple sauce or sour
. In Israel, the entire nation
cks on sufganiot, fried jelly
|nats. either of the home-made
ety or ones bought on street
ner stands.
ilanv Jewish communities have
Itradition of eating dairy pro-
ds to recall the bravery of
dith. According to Jewish
crypha the beautiful Judith,
putedly a member of the
smonean (Maccabee) family, in-
ked the enemy general
klofernes to a banquet. Judith
|isted on feeding him only dairy
ducts, and when he grew thirs-
bhe gave him wine to quench his
rst until he fell into a drunken
Jpor, whereupon she proceeded
ptab him to death.
In some Sephardic com-
nities. the seventh day of
nukah is observed as a special
nen's feast honoring Judith. In
Africa, women and girls
uld fill the synagogue where
Jy withdrew the Torah scrolls
i the Ark and kissed them. In
ecial service they then recited
?yers and blessings invoking
d's protection of women, after
i they returned home and ate
cheese dishes and engaged in song
and dance. The women of Hebron
also set aside the seventh day of
Chanukah to celebrate and eat
dairy delicacies.
LIKE CHANUKAH foods,
Chanukah games are also deeply
symbolic. Although Jewish tradi-
tion generally frowns on gambling
and games of chance, on
Chanukah such games are permit-
ted. The most popular is the spinn-
ing top or dreidl game, where
even children may be found bet-
ting on the turn of the dreidl using
nuts or Chanukah gelt as their
stakes. Although the game
originates from early medieval
Europe, it is popular with Sephar-
dim as well as Ashkenazim.
The top's Yiddish name, dreidl,
comes from the German dreihn or
to turn over. The game sym-
bolically recalls the turn of events
when Judah Maccabee and his
small rag tag army defeated the
mighty Greek empire. On the
dreidl are carved the Hebrew let-
ters which form an acrostic for the
phrase "a great miracle happened
there," or in Israel, "here." These
letters simultaneously indicate the
player's next move in the game.
So inherent a part of Chanukah
was this festival game that con-
centration camp inmates carved
dreidls from their woodenshoes.
Like much else in today's world,
dreidls are now made from plastic,
there are menorot which use elec-
tric light, and supermarkets which
stock ready-to-use frozen lathes.
But the spirit remains, and the
Maccabean story of Jewish revival
and victory of the few over the
many is as timely today as ever
before.
Rose and Irving
NEWMAN
and Son Jeffrey
Insurance Agency, Inc.
1558 NE 162nd St.
North Miami Beach, Florida
Tel.: 940-7515 Broward: 921-0616
A Happy and Healthy Chanukah
To All Our Customers

Looking for a physician
you can stiU call "Doc"?
Looking for former
YOUNG JUDAEANS
&CAMPJUDAEANS
for December 29 Miami Reunion.
If you can help us locate these people, call:
947-0637
MICHAEL-ANN RUSSELL
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Presents
Israeli Folk Dance
Hanukah Party
featuring
Yaacov Sassi
Sing-along Israeli Dancing (all levels)
Refreshments
DECEMBER 15th 8:00 p.m.
at the JCC
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue
North Miami Beach
[3.00 members For >n,ormat'on call:
fcoonpn-members 9324200
Some may dismiss this.sentiment as old-
fashioned. At St. Francis Hospital, we believe
a strong patient physician relationship is
important for good health. A personal physi-
cian gets to know you and your health care
needs. And, you get to know and rely on him.
That's why we established the
St. Francis Hospital Physician Referral
Service. We want to help people find a
personal physician, and we don't want
them to have to pick a name blindly
from the Yellow Pages.
So if you are looking for a hospital-
affiliated physician in private practice
to be your personal physician, or if you
need referral to a specialist, call the
St. Francis Hospital Physician Referral
Service at 868-2728 (Monday through
Friday, during business hours). We guar-
antee a fust appointment within two
working days.
868-2728
The
Physician
Referral
%
**?
250 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach, FL 33141
-.
Life. Be in it.


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
VILLA DELI
1608 Alton J
538-4552
is
NOW OPEN ON SUNDAYS!
Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
also
INTRODUCING OUR NEW
SMOKED FISH APPETIZING DEPT.
Taking part in Temple Emanu-El's
Chanukah celebration: (left to right) Israel
Keren, regional manager, El Al Israel
Airlines; Todd Stabinski; Eric Fishman; Rab-
bi Irving Lehrman; Dr. Amir Baron, Emanu-
El education director.
Emanu-El to Host Chanukah
Lighting Ceremony, Celebration
Temple Emanu-El will host a
Chanukah Candlelighting
Ceremony and Celebration to be
held on Sunday, at 5:30 p.m.
Students from the Lehrman
Day School, Religious School and
the youth of Temple Emanu-El
will run from the school to the
temple with the Torch of Freedom
from Modi-in Israel, the Tomb of
the Maccabee soldiers.
At 5:30 p.m. the runners will
present the torch to Dr. Irving
Lehrman, spiritual leader of the
congregation, who will light the
community menorah stationed on
the outside steps of the
synagogue. The traditional bless-
ings over the candles will be
recited, Chanukah songs will be
sung, led by the Lehrman Day
School Choir, and the carnival
block party sponsored by the Tem-
ple Emanu-El PTA will take
place.
HAPPY
HANNUKAH
from
Universal National Bank
17701 Biscayne Boulevard
and
2142 N.E. 123rd Street
Telephone: 937 BANK
Board of Directors
GEORGE FELDENKREIS
Chairman
MOISESCHOROWSKI
GARY OIX
allen fuller
mhmm
LARRY PERL
Vic* Chairman
ROBERT L BRUNNER'
Pre s idem
ISAAC LIF
CAROLYN MILLER
COMMISSIONER BARRY SCHREIBEft|
SAM B. TOPF
Happy Chanukah
to the entire Jewish Community
from
Senator Paula Hawkins
Paid for by the Florida Victory Committee. The Republican Party of Florida.


Miami Beach Region Of
{Hadassah Speaker On Tour
s Lee Lobel-Zwang will be
ISpeaker-On-Tour for the
i 3each Region of Hadassah
iduled for Sunday, December
[through Thursday, Dec. 19,
Lw to Mrs. Jean Temkin,
Ident of the Miami Beach
Ion.
s Lobel-Zwang is a member
fthe National Board of
lassah. and the Women's
Est Organization of America,
fpresent portfolio is chairman
e National Promotion Depart-
having served as Fund
tng chairman for Hadassah
let Education Services
Iperson for Fashion Show,
Lrship Development and
L Aids and Exhibits.
Is. Zwang is a member of the
1,1 of the Jewish National
H. a leader in Hadassah, a par-
kin in the United Jewish Ap-
[and in Jewish Community
Iff activities.
Zwang is scheduled to
at the following chapter
lions:
hday evening at 7:30 p.m. she
laddrss the Sophie Tucker
ltd on the Hadassah Medical
Dilation.
Inday. Hoc. Hi at 10 a.m. the
Issah Region Board meeting.
(then at noon at the Mount
lus Chapter. Hadassah
leal Organization Luncheon at
Eden Ro Motel.
low To Make
Your Own
Candles
pntinued from Page 1-B
kd newspaper around where
fill be working.
J the can about 2/3 full of
and place it in the pot. Kill
\ ut s full of water, and
jier medium boat.
the water in the pot and
to boil, add chunks of
(fin to th( can until it is near-
lighter than water.
it will form a layer
| of the water.
lor candle-dipping, the
wax musl be at just the
temperature not too hot,
' wax will slide off the wick;
W cool, or it will be too thick
bping. You'll have to find the
ftemperature by trial and er-
pn general, turn the heat
to a low setting once the
kas melted, or else turn it off.
Jm turn the heat off, make
Ithe wax does not begin to
W
tot a piece of cotton string or
g material at least twice as
5 the can is high, and weave
veen the prongs of a fork,
fg the ends dangling.
lolding the fork handle, dip
langling wicks into the can
| they touch bottom. As the
1 pass through the layer of
rolten wax, the wax will be
fjted on them. Pull the wicks
the can, and wait for the
harden. Be sure to keep
po wicks separated.
ontinue to dip, always let-
Re wax harden between dip-
After a few dippings, the
may need to be straighten-
ft as the wax builds up, the
ps will become quite stiff and
W on their own. Dip the
quickly in and out of the
until the candles are the
less you want. It takes many
|SS sometimes 50
J the candle is fat. (You may
1UP the process by filling a
Ptcner with cold water and
Pkly dipping the candles
en the wax and the water).
hen your candles are com-
l*ej will have the connec
Jick between them. Snip the
I scissors and trim the
Ho about half-an-inch.
Lee Lobel-Zwang
Tuesday, December 17,
Natanya Chapter, Membership
meeting.
Wednesday, Dec. 18, Maison
Grande, Hadassah Medical
Organization luncheon at the
Doral Hotel.
Thursday, Dee. 19, Masada
Chapter Hadassah Medical
Organization luncheon at Tower
41.
Duo Pianists
Return To TOPA
Duo pianists Katia and Marielle
Labeque from Prance, will return
to Miami for a Saturday perfor-
mance at 8:15 p.m. at the Miami
Beach Theatre of the Performing
Arts, according to temple Cultural
Director, Judy Drucker.
Drucker explained that, "Dur-
ing the first dozen years of their
careers, the Labeques established
a reputation across Europe and
the United States for extraor-
dinary versatility."
Yiddish Cultural
Winkle To Meet
Yiddish Cultural Winkle will
hold their third cultural gathering
of the season on Thursday, Dec.
12 at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Ner
Tamid. Jacob Blank, educator,
essayist, and lecturer, will discuss
"The Macabees, Past and Pre-
sent, in Jewish Life."
Cantor Moshe Kriedler and
Maestro Shmuel Kershko have ar-
ranged a presentation of Yiddish
and Hebrew Chanukah songs;
Rosa Lusky will perform, accor-
ding to Menasha Keldstein,
chairman.
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
_Busch
Gardens.
THI DARK CONTINENT
Enjoy wild jungle animals, wilder thrill rides,
delicious food and fascinating shows at
The Dark Continent in Tampa.
$4900
*
3 days/2 nights
Packaflc InrlwWa-
Deluxe room for 2 nights
Welcome cocktails
1 Admission Ticket per person
to Bunch Gardens (A 81 *BO value)
Free shuttle to and from Bunch Gardens
u Ili'v enjoy our heated pool sanna. Janirrl,
V restaurant and lounge. ,,
Ptr aaaaa, dcubk aaaaaaa;. Ta* and gnaaaiuaa as)
Included Tbto caVr food only with advance mrmun
and eachidcai Holiday*
Safari Resort Inn
/'Aft
Across from Busch
4139 E Bosch BM
1-800- 262 7932
Florida 33617
A OWHS ON GO"T
jw where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Deluxe
Gourmet
Fruit Cake Bar
$999
12-oz. m^
size
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie
$169
each
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Deluxe
Fruit Cake
Rin
size ^#
49
Available at All PuMx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Fruit Stollen.................. 1 $239
Mini Donuts...................lit 99*
Banana
Bran Muffins..............6 tor $159
Quantity
Rights Rasorvsd ^
Available at Publix Storss with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Gingerbread houses are available to be ordered now.
Display as a centerpiece for the entire holiday season.
$15.95
Order Now! German Lebkuclcen (Honey Cake) in an
assortment of packages is available.
Tha lima for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen, bake and
serve hors'd oeuvres for your gathering. Wo now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available In Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
50-ct pkg...........................................................$11.95
100-cL pkg.......................................................... $10.95
Plain or Raisin
Bagels...,....................6 for 99*
An Italian Treat
Cannoli or
Sfogliatelli.....................-* 79*
Deluxe
Fruit Cake Ring............2SM900
Pf eff ernuesse
Cookies......................... *$- $129
Prices Effective
December 5 thru 11.1985.


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
Murray Berkowitz
Alfred E. Swire
Talmudic U. Anniversary
Dinner Set For Dec. 29
Eleventh Anniversary Dinner
of Talmudic University of Florida,
will be held at the Crown'Hotel in
Miami Beach Sunday, Dec. 29,
and will honor the alumni of the
institution. A 6:30 p.m. reception
will precede the 7:30 p.m. dinner.
Announcement of the annual
event, which is open to the public,
was made by Murray (Moshe
Chaim) Berkowitz, chairman of
the board of the Talmudic Univer-
sity and of its Alfred and Sadye
Swire College of Judaic Studies.
The university is headquartered
on Alton Road in Miami Beach.
Berkowitz announced that Jack
Zweig and Abbey Berkowitz,
Miami Beach civic and religious
leaders, will serve as chairmen of
the dinner committee. Russell
Galbut and Seymour Rubin were
named as honorary chairmen and
Rabbi Jeremiah Burstyn and
former Beach Vice Mayor Joseph
W. Malek were appointed as vice
chairmen of the dinner
committee.
Dr. Alfred E. Swire, honorary
president of Talmudic University,
said that those alumni who are
now in South Florida will be
special honorees at the dinner.
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, presi-
dent and Rosh Hayeshiva of the
university, said the dinner this
year "will demonstrate to the en-
tire community the pivotal role
which Talmudic University has in
promoting Jewish scholarship and
values to Miami Beach, Greater
Miami and many other areas
where our graduates have made
their presence felt."
Miami Opera To
Honor Manager
Robert Herman
The Greater Miami Opera wil.
honor retiring General Manager,
Robert Herman with a Winter
Opera Gala Evening on Friday,
Dec. 13 at 7:30 at Miami Gusman
Cultural Center, downtown. Mrs.
Charles L. Eldredge and Mrs.
David C. Melin will chair the
committee.
Vice-chairmen are: Mrs. Harry
A. Ash, Mrs. A.J. Montanari, Mrs.
Emil Morton, Mrs. Alexander
Muss, Mrs. Harry L. Nathenson,
and Mrs. Albert Vadia.
This event coincides with
OPERA America's XVI Annual
Conference "Exploring Options,"
in Miami Beach from Thursday,
Dec. 12 to Saturday, Dec. 14 at
the Fontainebleau Hilton. Robert
Herman, OPERA America's
president, will preside.
Consumers Price
Index Drops
TEL AVIV (JTA) The con-
sumer price index dropped by 1.25
percent during the first two
weeks of November, compared
with the final two weeks of
October.
Sinai Publishes Book Of First 35 y
The Board of Trustees of the
Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami presents a recently
published book containing the
development and history of the
first 35 years of the Center's ex-
istence. The book, "Visions, Ac-
complishments, Challenges:
Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami 1949-1984," was
written by Dr. Paul S. George,
PhD.
Many members 0f th J
community assit*f
_e in the umierta^
which he was commi? "*'
George in the
the Preface, he mentions,
many: Gina Lipianin, Judv
ton, Dr. William R. 'Sf
S2E A-. Marti". and
Ooldin, who conceived the
and "helped it along 1
stage." 6 n
Adanuj
THE JIGSAW PUZZLE YOU'VE BEEN
WAITING TORTOR CENTURIES!
The Map Of Jerusalem Today With
The Vision Of The Bet Hamlkdash' On Its Way!
AT STORES OR CALL (718) 756-0710
FANNY & SOPHIE & JOUE & EDDIE
Invite you to come
^ to a party. ?
a Be A Part Of The Singingest, ^f
"T Happiest Vaudeville Cabaret"
New Opening Date Dec. 15
^Cosher/Corner
RESIAURAMT
2701 Collins AvwtiM, Miami teach, Florida 33140 3056749222
New Glatt Kosher Restaurant Under ORC supervision
Eat in, takeout, delivery, catering
Direct From New York
Previews begin December 17
Tuesday thru Sunday at 8 PM
Wednesday & Sunday Matinee at 2 PM
Friday & Saturday Late Show at 10 30 PM
Tickets $ 15 & $ 12 50 (2 Free Drinks)
Special Preview Prices December 17-19
CLUB SANS SOUCI SANS SOUCI HOTEL
31st and Collins Ave Miami Beach
For reservations and group bookings call
(305) 458-1494 or Dad- (305) 674-8774
Group Discounts Available


CTT
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
-And it came to pass, when Joseph was come unto his
hren. that they stripped Joseph of his coat"
(Genesis S7.2S).
VAYESHEV
\YESHEV Jacob and his sons dwelt in the land of Canaan as
ipherds. Of all his sons, Jacob loves Joseph best. His obvious
loritism, and Joseph's account of his grandiose dreams, produc-
! hatred and jealousy among the brothers. Joseph's brothers
'd the hated favorite to some Ishmalite merchants, who took
eph to Egypt with them. There Potiphar, an officer of the
araoh and captain of his guard, bought Joseph as a slave. The
brew lad quickly rose to a position of responsibility in his
-ster's household. However, Joseph rejected the advances of
tiphar's wife; she slandered him, and he was imprisoned. But in
ton, too. God was with Joseph, and he won the confidence of
Ijailers. He became known as an interpreter of dreams by cor-
Itly reading the significance of the dreams of the Pharaoh's
ller and baker when they were his prison-mates.
hue recounting o trie WMkly Portion of the Law it extracted and based
In -The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Wollman
Imir. *I5, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 71 Maiden
C New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the sociMy dfs
Ltmg the volume.) '
I R. Ferdie, president of the Jewish War Veterans USA
! Memorial in Washington, and Coral Gables attorney,
the Commodore Uriah P. Levy Award to Samuel Winik
Utxmore. Pictured left to right: Hon. Arthur S. Alperstein,
far of the Maryland House of Delegates and 1984 Award red-
[Samuel Winik, recipient and Baltimore businessman and
\h Community leader; Ainslee R. Ferdie; and Major General
*1 B. Solomon of Baltimore.
Fen heart surgery
hollywood heart surgery
Jypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
BURANCE HOSPITAL
lirare Parti, paling Memorial
entire Assignment Accepted
|llh Plan Participation
LAN WOLPOWITZ, M.D.
'Johnson Street
ywood. Florida 33021
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305) 962-5400
Happy
Chanukah
2001 West 68th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33016
305-823-5000
sJum
^s^l ^ An American Medical International, Inc.
Health Care Center
BANK
OFM/AM/
J*> SW 17th AVENUE / MIAMI. FLA. 33144 / Phone 266 1000
'"ches: 6600 SW 8th Street, 11439 SW 40th Street (Bird Rd I
"toer FDIC /An Equal Housing Lander /An affiliate of Flori-
Commercial Banks. Inc., a registered bank holding company.
Happy Chanukah
Bar Mitzvah
Friday, December6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Richard L. Steinberg
RICHARD STEINBERG
Richard Lawrence Steinberg
son of Senator and Mrs. Paul
Steinberg will be called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah Saturday at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-EI.
The celebrant has been a :.cu-
dent at Temple Emanu-EI
Religious School.
He attends Nautilus Junior
High School where he is in the 8th
grade.
He is an honor math student and
enjoys working with computers.
Senator and Mrs. Paul
Steinberg will host the Kiddush
following the services in honor of
the occasion and a reception
Saturday night at the Doral Beach
Hotel.
Special guests will include many
friends and relatives from home
and out-of-town.
SETH BRODSKY
Seth Brodsky, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Brodsky, will be call-
ed to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah
Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbis Leon Kronish, Gary
Glickstein, Harry Jolt and Paul
Caplan will officiate.
Seth is a student of the Confir-
mation Class of 5748.
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, presi-
dent ofTalmudic University of
Florida, will serve as a
scholar-in-residence this (Dec.
6-8) weekend at the Woodside
Synagogue of Greater
Washington, will address
students of the Hebrew
Academy of Greater
Washington, and speak to the
community at large on Sunday
on Chanukah and the prin-
ciples of Jewish education.
Hebrew Academy
Women, PTA
Celebrate Chanukah
Sizzling latkes will be the main
menu feature at a Chanukah lun-
cheon sponsored by the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy Women and PTA on
Wednesday at noon at the
Casablanca Hotel. The after-
noon's festivities, under the chair-
manship of Ahuva Retter and
Mabel Kopp, will include
Chanukah games and a musical
presentation by the students of
the Academy's kindergarten class
under the direction of Aliza
Sebag, musical director of the
school.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:09 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Garden* Drive
North Miami Baach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmchi Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
OsHy Mlnysn 7:30 Ml. 5:00 p.m.
Cat* Frl ..ic.i 40p.m.
Frl p.m Bat Mitzvah Marnl Llchatrahl
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmual
1700 Michigan Ava Miami Baach
534-7213-534 7?14 _
Barry J. Konovltch. Rabbi ttK ,
Moan* Buryn, Cantor vj'
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epalbaum. President,
Religious Committee
Shabbal Ser.ices 10 a m Salmon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE BETH AM
5050 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami BB7-0667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Jamas L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl. aw. 7 30 p.m Family Service
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard will apaak on Mm
theme "Mow A Few Breve People Defeated
A Big Army."
Sat. 11:18 a.m. earn Bat Mitzvah Bonnie
RoeenfteM, Bar Mitzvah Robby Oral!
Sermon theme "The Hated Dreamer."
BETH OAVIO CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, av
Rabbi Emarltus !%)
Rev Milton Freeman, *X-'
Ritual Director
Jacob F.-Tambor, Cantor
Shabbal Servteea 5:30 p.m. Mlnchah 5:15 p.m.
SUn. t a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Mon. 4 Thura. 7.30 a.m. i 5:30 p.m.
Tuee., Wad. A Fit. 7:48 a.m. A 5:30 p.m
Sat.: Welcome Heme From laraal Seboeth.
Sun. Contemporary American Crafts 10-11 a.m.
Religious School Hanukkah
program 11-11:30 a.m.
BETH KOOESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ava.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krissel
Rosa Berlin: Executive Secretary
856-6334
*
Sarvlcea: Momlnga 7:30 a.m.
Saturday: 8:48 a.m. (
Evanlnga: 5:00 p.m. >
Late Frl. eve aervtce 8:18 p.m.
Dr. Donald Mlchalson guest speaker. Rabb
Max Shapiro and Cantor Joaaph Krlaaal
will olliciata
TEMPLE EMANAjEL
1701 Washington Avenue f
Miami Baach .
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwall Bargar
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Late Friday evening services 8 p m
Dr. Lehrman will officiate. Quasi speaker
Ivan J. Novlck. Cantor Shit man will chant
Sat Morning service a.m. Dr. Lehrman
will preach. Bar Mltnah Richard Lawrence
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetrea Drive, Miami Baach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schlff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami nwiw n^loim Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
'9090 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
ISenior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomstetn
Aaaociata Cantor Rsotertls F. Nsison
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Spark
Friday evening 8 p.m.
Downtown: Rabb! Haskell M. Bemat "Jews
and Blacka; What Happened To Ua?" Liturgy
Cantor Jacob Q Bomatefn.
Kandall: Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter "Conf eselons
of a 'Dynasty' Junkie." Liturgy:
________Center WaerisSi F. Weteen.
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Raform
Coral Gables 6675667
Michael B. Elsanetat, Rabbi
Friday
3:18p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Servicea Frl 7:30 p.m.
Set. 9.30 am
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. FL 33161
8915506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabbi ,_,
Rabbi Joseph A. Gorfinkel. t M\
Rabbi Emeritus > f.'
Msshe Friedler, Cantor
Servtoea: Frl. p.m. Sat. 10:48 a.m
DeHy Sam.. 8 p.m Sun. 8.30 a.m.
Rabbi Jacobs aarmon:
"Menorah and Tha Cross."
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., MB, FL 33139
Tel 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mother
Cantor Nlssim Benyamini
Dally services Sam* 8:30 p.m
Sal. 8:18 a.m.
Rabbi's claaaat Monday Advanced Habraw
9 30 a.m. Tuea English Bible Claaa 9:48 am
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 1201h Street
238-2601 ,
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Mslssls
Shabbal Services Frl. p.m Set. 9:30 a.m.
Bat Mltnah Jennller Anna Splegalman
f
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ava. 41 at St. .536 7231
DR. LEON KRONISH, RABBI Liberal
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL D. CAPLAN, ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVIO CONVISER
Frl evening Kit p.m
Rabbi Paul Caplan will apeak on "Soviet
Jewrv and The Summit."
Bar Mltnah Seth Brodsky
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7526
1061 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Or. Max A. Lipschlu. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Areni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally services 730 a.m., 8:30
Frl sen. 5:15 p.m. Less sen.
Mml-G)
TEMPLE MENORAH
620- 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowit/ ,
Cantor Murray Yavneh (
Morning aarvicas Sam
Friday lata evening service
9 15pm
Saturday Sam and 7 45 p m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 6664345
7902 Carlyle Ave 666-9633
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conaenative
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Servicea a a.m. and 5.30 p.m
Set S45am
Frl. late aerv. 8 p.m.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Baach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382-0898
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modern orthodox
Rabbi Kasztl will temporarily conduct
separata services Sat. 9:30 a.m. at Temple
Samu-EI. 9353 SW 152nd Ave south ol
N. Kandall Drive
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl. evening 7:30 p.m. eervice assisted by
students of the SnJ a eth grades ot the
temple's day school Stnal Academy 8th grade
will perform "The Yenta Who Came lor Yom
Toy" Immediately lol lowing aerv Sat. am
Bar MItzvah Adam Kuahner and
Lawrence Oxenberg.
Sat 10:30 a m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 /S.
Dr Norman N Shapiro. Rabbi (&))
Benjamin Adlar, Cantor v SW
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan asrvfee 7 am Mon a Thura 9 a.m.
8 30 p m Family SsbbSth Dr. Norman N.
Shapiro will Wees all children with birthdays
In December Cantor Benjamin Adter will chant
the liturgy Set. S a.m. service.


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
3i/i/ie*ivng&
Tropical Cancer League will sponsor a holiday bazaar on Sunday
from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Hibiscus Auditorium, Miami Beach.
Clothing, household Items, and gifts will be available.
Bass Museum of Art Is sponsoring a concert by Judith Cohen,
pianist, In a solo recital on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Her performance will in-
clude works by Mozart, Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff, and Ravel.
Ruth Foreman Children's Theatre announces that the run on Kunl-
Leml, the musical which has won four Outer Critics Circle Awards, in-
cluding Best Musical, has been extended until Feb. 12. Ruth
Foreman is the director.
Joseph Ungaro, administrative director, Radiology at Mount Sinai
Medical Center of Greater Miami, has been reappointed as a member
of the Advisory Council on Radiation Protection for a second term.
Arta Films, Inc. has launched the sale of the first instructional
home video Hebrew cassette. The program, "Basic Hebrew," is
designed as an introductory course for all age groups and teaches
students some 1,000 words and phrases of modern conversational
Hebrew. For further Information call (212) 362-8535 or (212) 535-5494
or write Arta Films, Inc., 2130 Broadway, Ste. 1602, New York, NY
10023.
Young Presidents at Mount Sinai Medical Center will hold their an-
nual gala, "Pairs," on Saturday night, December 14 at 7:30 at the
Doral Beach Hotel. Chairmen for the ball are Jodi and Bill Multack,
and Marilyn and Dave Zinn; Margie and Michael C. Blasberg are host
and hostess for the event.
Barry University will hold the Starlight Ball on Saturday, December
14 at 7:30 p.m. in the Abel Holtz Quadrangle, announced Sister
Jeanne O'Laughlin OP. Mr. and Mrs. David Melin are chairs for the
event.
Florida International University invites Florida playwrights to sub-
mit original plays for the second annual New Playwrights Festival
'86. Authors may submit either one original, unproduced full length
and or one one act play. No adaptations from other media will be ac-
cepted. Production at FIU Theatre and cash prizes will be awarded.
Jan A. Pfelffer, senior vice president of Jefferson National Bank,
has been named chairperson of United Cerebral Palsy's 1986
Weekend With the Stars Telethon "Very Influential Person" program.
Florida Klwanls are sponsoring Project Concern's Third Annual
"Walk for Mankind" on Saturday, December 14, at 8:30 a.m. It will
begin on the University of Miami Campus and will wind its way
through Coral Gables and Coconut Grove.
Jewish Vocational Service will hold Its Fourth Annual "Friends of
the Jewish Vocational Service Nutritional Project" on Wednesday,
December 11, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Project's main office, 920 Alton
Road. Dinner and special presentations will highlight the event.
Edward T. Newman, president of Newman Funeral Home has Dvwii
named Special Member Emeritus of Congressman Dante B. Fascell's
Citizens Rating Board, of which he has been a key member and has
served for 32 years.
Mikhail Baryshnikov. American Ballet Theatre artistic director, will
dance the role of Prince Albrecht in the ABT Gala Benefit Perfor-
mance of "Giselle" Tuesday, Jan. 28, his first performance anywhere
since a knee injury sidelined him last August, according to Judy
Drucker, Great Artists Series director, sponsor of the ABT Miami
season. .
Volunteers are needed for a study being done on brain function at
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami. The study is designed
to examine the risk factors for the development of strokes.
Volunteers should be 50 years of age or older. For additional informa-
tion, call 674-2927.
World of Poetry is sponsoring their Eleventh Annual poetry Con-
test, open to all poets. The grand prize is $1,000. In addition, 99 other
awards will be given.
Joseph Mellon is the contest director. For rules and official entry
forms write. World of Poetry, Dept. PR, 2431 Stockton Blvd.,
Sacramento, California 95817.
Miami Heart Institute is holding a dinner dance gala on Friday,
Jan. 3, at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel. Richard A. Elias, MD,
trustee and chairman of development announced.
Opti-Mrs of Miami Beach will hold their monthly luncheon on
Wednesday, at Harbor House South. Kay Vingette, handwriting ex-
pert, will speak.
The Forte Forum will hold a lecture on Tuesday, at 1200 West Ave.
Auditorium. Rabbi Lewis Llttman will speak on "The American
Jewish Community: What Price Unity?"
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Happenings Singles is having a Singles Party on Friday, Dec.
13 at 9 p.m. a the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood. There will be a
live band, dancing and hors d'oeuvres.
Atlanta Jewish Community Center is sponsoring Ski Jeans
Weekend V, Jan. 17-19 to be held at Beach Mountain, North
Carolina. $150 covers lodging, dinner Sunday night and transpor-
tation to and from Atlanta. All other meals, lift tickets and ski
equipment rentals are not included.
Thereas Cohen is the weekend chairman, 764 Pennsylvania
Ave. Atlanta, GA 30303 or phone (404) 873-1304 or Patsy at the
Center at (404) 875-7881.

Progress Club Elects
Wohl President
Michael Wohl, 35, a three-year
veteran of the Progress Club of
Miami and an officer since 1983,
was elected president of the club,
one of Miami's leading business
organizations.
Wohl, a senior partner in the
law firm of Steinberg, Wohl and
Merlin in Miami Beach, is a
member of both the Florida and
New York Bar.
Elected to serve on the Board
with Wohl are vice-president
Jerry Syphurs, secretary-
treasurer Ronald Levitt, Andy
Burns, Steven Dohan, Norman
Gabe, James Mattei, Paul Naron
and Ronald Lieberman.
Attorney Ronald S. Lieberman
was honored as Man-of-the Year
during the Progress Club of
Miami's annual Founders Day
Dinner.
Newman Passes
Insurance Exam
Jeffrey M. Newman of the
Newman Insurance Agency has
passed his 220 state insurance ex-
amination. Newman becomes a
fully licensed property and casual-
ty insurance agent, which he will
now incorporate into his business
dealings, heading the Life and
Health Department of the
Newman Agency.
Business Note
Alan B. Goldstein, former
senior vice president of American
Savings and Loan Association of
Florida, has been promoted to the
position of executive vice presi-
ient/jreneral counsel and cor-
wrate secretary.
Charles Baumberger
Elected Sec. Bar Assn.
Charles Baumberger of
Rossman, Baumberger and Peltz,
P. A. has been elected Secretary of
the Dade County Bar Association,
and re-elected to the Board of
Directors of the Academy of
Florida Trial Lawyers.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9908
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CURT HEILBRUN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of CURT HEILBRUN, deceased.
File Number 85-9908, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will, -
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 6, 1985.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201,
Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201,
Biscayne Building.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-3116
19466 December 6.13.1985
Pan Am Sets Israel Tours For New Sei
Pan American World Airways, which recently inaugurauj i
first scheduled service between the U.S. and Israel is offP "j
series of package tours in the market for the 1985/86 seaso
The packages range from five nights for $639, including h
accomodations and roundtrip air travel between New York
Tel Aviv, to 13 nights for $1,249, including hotel accomodati'
roundtrip New York-Tel Aviv air travel, most meals and d I
motorcoach tours featuring Hadassah, Yad Vashem; Old
Bethlehem; Beersheba, Yad Mordechai; Dead Sea Mai
Tiberias, Nazareth; Golan, Safed; Akko, Haifa; and JaftV
Aviv.
Tours covering nine and eleven nights are also available
The packages feature the deluxe Dan Hotels with a five nk
stay in any combination of the King David in Jerusalem
Tel Aviv and Dan Carmel in Haifa at $699 including roundtrio
fare from New York. An optional Budget car rental is bmIlS
for $20 per day. *
The packages. Pan Am Holiday 432, are offered in conju
with JP Travel and Tours, Ltd., a major tour operator.
Pan Am offers single-carrier service from 22 cities throughon!
the U.S. to Israel. For additional information contact JP TrawiF
telephone 800-345-3502 or 212-758-7557 in New York State I
Ocean Electric Co.
1526 Alton Road Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Phone 672-7233
Wish Customers & Friends
A Happy A Healthy Chanukah
Tides Hotel &
Apartments
1220 ocean Drive, Miami Beach531-6701
Happy Chanukah
Sun Chevrolet
7220 No. Kendall Drive, Miami
661-2521
Wish All Customers and Friends A Happy ('hanukah
BARRY
UNIVERSITY
A Catholic International I niversitj
"Fix A Time For The Study Of Torah"
Shammal (Ethics Of The Fathers 1:1S
The M.A. program In JEWISH STUDIES is pleased to announct*|
lollowing Spring Semester schedule:
SPRING, 1986: JANUARY 14 MAY 9
MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT (RJS 631) An analysis]
of the thought of such contemporary Jewish thinker
as Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Abrahai
Joshua Heschel. The course will be given on Monda
evenings, from 6:30-9:30 p.m., in the Andreas Building
Room 104. The instructor will be Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
PROPHECY (RJS 650) A study of the prophetic persorj
ality in ancient Israel along with the major contributions
of Biblical prophecy: The relationship of ritual to ethics
repentance, redemption and messianism. The cours
will be given on Thursday mornings, from 9:00-12:0
noon, in the library, Room 101. The instructor will 6
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman.
JEWISH-CHRISTIAN RELATIONS (RJS 623) Aspect
of the history of Jewish-Christian relations *i
emphasis on such topics as Antisemitism and it
origins, theological perspectives, and the mode^
Jewish-Christian dialogue. The course will be given on
Thursday evenings, from 6:30-9:30 p.m., in the Andrea^
Building, Room 108. The instructor will be Dr. Jeremia
Unterman.
Generous scholarship aid is available for qual
students and auditors will be granted a 50% discount.
For an appointment or further information
please contact:
JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM
Barry University
11300 N.E. 2nd Avenue Miami Shores, Florida 33161
Telephone (305) 758-3392, Ext. 524
FL ToU Free 1-800-551-0586


. I
..,
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 21-B^
iblic Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
INSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
u ajo PROPERTY)
Tub circuit court of
eleventh judicial
^rcl'it of florida. in
*d for dade county
M Action No. 85-47279
ION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
The Marriage of
[EL VIDAL
jtREDONDO
itioner/Wife,
, ARREDONDO.
.ondent/Husband.
fidel Arredondo
|C/0 Gabriella Arredondo
Enrique Foster N.
Io85 Apt. 72
Santiago, Cliile
ID ARE HEREBY NOTI-
ID that an action for
yution of Marriage has been
against you and you are
d to serve a copy of your
_.i defenses, if any, to it on
JrGE T. RAMANI, attorney
Petitioner, whose address is
FBiscayne Bldg., 19 West
Her Street, Miami, Florida
JO. and file the original with
ferk of the above styled court
r before December 20, 1985;
wise a default will be entered
tnst you for the relief
inded in the complaint of
ton
i notice shall be published
each week for four
kecutive weeks in THE
IISH FLORIDIAN.
ITNESS my hand and the seal
Id court at Miami. Florida on
|13th dav of November. 1985.
fi/CHARD P. BRINKER
[AsClerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
tut Court Seal)
|RCE T. RAMANI
Biscayne Bldg.
lest Flagler Street
|ni. Florida 33130
ley for Petitioner
November 22,29;
Kvemlicr 6, 13, 1985
ilE (Mid IT COURT OF
^ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
tIRCITT. I\ AND FOR
\W. (Ol NTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Task NO, 45-48471 (081
(NOTICE 01 ution
FEDERAL SAVINGS
OAK ASSOCIATION OF
f 'l-oration,
Plaintiff.
lRDO DIAZ and MARIA
BERDK DIAZ.
|ife. et al
Defendants.
fDlAklHi DIAZ and
JIARIA ESTHER
K DIAZ
fvenida Pocaterra,
IsMenciat Tauros
Penthouse
jTfjgal, Valencia
?enezuel.i, S. A.
F ARK NOTIFIED,, that an
ti to foreclose a mortgage on
flowing described property in
E County, Florida:
\^o 401, 0f BYRON BAY
TlOIlINIt'M, according to the
Mtion of Condominium
. as recorded in Official
fds Book 10450, at Page
.and amended by Amend-
Inled m Official Records Book
f, at Page H53. of the Pubic
^ of Dadc County, Florida.
fcn filed against you and you
tquired to serve a copy of
l*rittcn defenses, if any, to it
f|th, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
F*rs attorneys, whose ad-
1 's 111 N.E. 1st Street,
P. Florida 33132. on or before
>r 27,1985, and file the
with the Clerk of thia
either before sendee on
[UJs attorneys or immediate-
*eftor; otherwise, a default
* entered against you for the
demanded in the complaint.
*ESS my hand and seal of
' ourt on the 20 day of
Jer. I9g5
I^D P. BRINKER
P* of said Court
%: T. Casamayor
m Deputy Clerk
November 29;
_ December 6, 13,20,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name QUALITY IN-
TERIORS at 2400 NW 16 Street
Rd. Apt. 101 Miami Fla. 33125 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Robert Ricard
19447 November 29;
December 6,13,20,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MONICA'S IN-
TERIOR at 331 SW 104 Ct. Miami
- Florida 33174 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Daniel Castro
& Monica Castro, Ptr.
19426 November 15,22,29;
December 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PROFESSIONAL
PROPERTIES ONE/MILAN 25
at c/o 5300 N.W. 77th Court,
Miami, Florida 33166 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
JULES LIPP, AS TRUSTEE
Applicant
Attorneys for Applicant
Rubinstein and Kornik. P.A.
798 Brickell Plaza/
59 S.E. 8th Street
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone (305) 371-6800
November 29. December 6,13.20
0000
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigne, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NAUTICAL
PLEASURE at 7980 NW 56th
Street. Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
NAUTICAL
PLEASURE, INC.
19413 November 15,22, 29;
December 6. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-42235 CA-06
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
LARGO.
Plaintiff
vs.
JAMES R. THOMAS, el ai.,
Defendants,
TO: .IAMF.S K THOMAS.
CAREY B Til ('MAS and
YOLANDA THOMAS. Residence
Unknown, if alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against JAMES
R. THOMAS. CAREY B.
THOMAS and YOLANDA
THOMAS, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right, title
or interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County. Florida: Lot 19, in Block
5, of RICMAR HEIGHTS,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 53. at Page
32, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
December 20, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 13th day of
November. 1985.
RICHARD P. PRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19430 November 22.28;
December 6,18,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name I L, S
PUBLICATIONS INC d/b/a
SOUTH FLORIDA MAGAZINE
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Mark Weissman
19427 November 22, 29;
December 6.13.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JC Coin Laundry at
1677 NW 27 Ave. Miami, Fla. in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Pascual Riveron
1677 NW 27 Ave.
Miami, Fla.
19417 November 15,22,29;
______________December 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of REI IN-
VESTMENTS PARTNERSHIP
at number 5582 Northwest 79th
Avenue, in the City of Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE and
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MAX WAAS
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MELVIN POLLAK
PAUL FOURNIER
ALAN ROSENTHAL
IRA P. FEDERER
RICHARD M. WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
KIP AMAZON
A. GERALD REISS
NORMAN WAAS
SUSAN KAPLAN
Barry S. Yarchin. Esquire
Kosenthal and Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for Applicant
19434 November 22. 29;
December 6, 13. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN
WD FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-3.1392 (A 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
BUCKEYE FEDERAL
S A V 1 N (i S a n (I LO A N
ASSOCIATION, an Ohio
(lorporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSE M. LEIX1N and TANIA M.
LEDON, his wife.
Defendants.
To: Jose M. Ledon and Tania M.
Ledon, his wife, whose residences
are unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to lie dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida: Lot 24, in Block
32, of COUNTRY LAKE
MANORS. SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 119. at Page
50, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Barry S.
Yarchin, Esquire, of Rosenthal &
Yarchin, P.A.. Attorneys for
Plaintiff, Suite 800, 3050 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137,
on or before December 20. 1985,
and to file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before,
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 13. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19431 November 22, 29;
December 6,13, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-46661
Florida Bar Number 72210
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
PAMELA DE QUINDE
Wife/Petitioner
and
JUAN C. QUINDE,
Husband/Respondent
TO: JUAN C. QUINDE
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you arc required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on
LEONARD SELKOWrrZ, J.D.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 810 Biscayne
Bulding. 19 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 13th, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Leonard Selkowitz, J.D.
Suite 810 Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 358-2900
19415 November 15, 22, 29;
December 6.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE C ?
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46851
Florida Bar No. 232221
In Re: Marriage of
ANTOLIN O. SIERRA
Petitioner,
anil
i:\akista I. SIERRA
Respondent,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Evarista I. Sierra
4903 Kennedy Boulevard
North Bergen. New JerSB]
YOU A K E II E R E i< V
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the
Petition upon the Petitioner's
attorney, CARLOS M. MENDEZ,
ESQ., at 200 West 49lh Street.
Hialeah. Florida 33012. and file
the original Response of Pleading
in the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, on or before the
13th day of December. 1985. If you
fail to do BO, a Default Judgment
will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
This Notice shall be published
once each week, for four
consecutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. Miami, Florida. '
Dated at Dade County, Florida,
this 8th day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, LAW
OFFICES
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33012
By: Carlos M. Mender.. Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
.19420 November 5.22, 29;
December 6,1986
NOTICE UNDER ,
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PUMA ADVERTIS-
ING, MARKETING. PROMO-
TIONS. PUBLIC RELATIONS.
PRODUCTIONS, MAGAZINE,
NEWSPAPER. DISTRIBUTOR,
PUBLISHING AGENCY at 2899
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach,
Florida 33140 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Antonio Purrinos
19429 November 22,29;
December 6.13, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-5464 CA 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
ALBERT E. FRANCIS and
LORRAINE R. FRANCIS,
Defendants.
To: Lorraine R. Francis, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claiming
interest by, through, under or
against said Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block
118, of LESLIE ESATES
SECTION 12, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 106, at Page 100 of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Barry S. Yarchin,
Esquire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin.
P.A.. Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite
800, 3050 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, Florida 33137, on or before
December 20, 1985. and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 14. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19433 November 22. 29;
____________December 6.13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46348 CA-25
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
TIMOTHY A. EISENMAN,
et ux.. et a!..
Defendant
TO: TIMOTHY A. EISENMAN
and TERESA A.
EISENMAN,
his wife
Frisco. Colorado 80443
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 17, Block 15. on SOUTH
MIAMI HEIGHTS MANOR, ac
cording to the plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 68, at Page
70. of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida.
has lieen filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Falnir, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
January 3. 1986, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19457 NovermV
December 6,13,'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name LEPARDO at 2029
NW 22 Court, Miami, FL 33142 in
tends to register aaid name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RAFAEL PARDO President
Attorney for R.P. Fashions Inc.
19459 November 29;
December 6. 13,20,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-48470 (19)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
NARASINHA S. RAO,
Petitioner/H usband
and
SHANTA RAO,
Respondent/Wife
TO: SHANTA RAO .
20 Vaishali Apts ,
J. P. Road
7 Bungalows,
Andheri, West
Bombay 400058
INDIA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE T. RAMANI, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
711 Biscayne Bldg., 19 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the abot styled court
on or before December 27. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published one
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
20 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Biscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
19443 November 29;
December 6. 13.20, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-42165 CA 21
Fla. Bar No. 241709
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
f/k/a
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK OF
MIAMI, as trustee for the Dade
County Housing Finance
Authority,
Plaintiff,
v.
JEAN JASMIN and JACKIE
JASMIN, his wife, etal..
Defendants.
To: Jean Jasmin. Clovis Charles
and Yolanda Charles, his wife,
whose residences are unknown,
and the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all partial
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
The North Mi of Lot 12. and all of
Lot 13. in Block 2. of EDISON
HEIGHTS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
34. at Page 86. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33187, on or before
January 8. 1986, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 26, 1985.
Richard P. Brinker, Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
SWD No. 245536-"l-323-T
FHA No. 092-286030-303
19455 November 29;
December 6, 13,20. 1985
*.%


Page 22-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985
r* i i. -.t I IN THK CIRCUIT COURT FOR
Public Notices DADE C0UNTY- flor,,)a
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-7921
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NATHAN GOLDEN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of NATHAN GOLDEN, deceased,
File Number 86-7921, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 3rd Floor Dade
County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida.
The names and addresses of the
perrsonal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
! representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
1 ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 29, 1985.
Personal Representative:
RUTH G. RUSS
9350 W. Bay Harbor. Dr.
No. 4-C
Bay Harbor. Islands, FL 33164
LEONARD A. GOLDEN
180 Lelak Avenue
Springfield. NJ 07081
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
DENIS A. RUSS
1370 Washington Ave.,
Suite 209
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 632-6621
19452 November 29;
December 6,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-48627 (19)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
RAQUEL DE ALMEIDA,
wife
and
CARLOS A. BUSTAMANTE,
husband
TO: CARLOS A.
BUSTAMANTE
AV-EL-SOL-927 No. 1
LIMA. PERU (4)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
THUR H. LIPSON, attorney for'
Petitioner, w.iose address is 801
Northeast K.7 St., Miami, Fla.
33162. and rile the original with
che clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 27, 1985;
1 otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
i WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
20 day of November, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: J. Logie
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19444 November 29;
December 6, 13.20, 1985
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10002
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOSEPH W. WITT. SR.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Joseph W. Witt, Sr.. deceased.
File Number 85-10002, is pending
in the Circuit Court for DADE
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 W.
Flagter St., Miami, Fla. 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 29, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Herbert J. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Fl. 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Herbert J. Lerner
801 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Fl. 33140
Telephone: 305 673-3000
19451 November 29;
December 6, 1985
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Caae No. 86-4774* (11)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NICHOLAS MARSEILLE.
Petitioner-Husband !
and
MERVE1LLEUSE D.
MARSEILLE,
Respondent Wife I
To: MERVEILLEUSE D.
MARSEILLE,
Residence Unknown,
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar ,
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.)
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before December 20. 1986, other-)!
wise a default will be entered.
DATED: November 16, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: J Logie
19440 November 22.29;
December 6,13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10023
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
Sarah I. Sacks
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Sarah I. Sacks, deceased. File
Number 86-10023 (04). is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130, (Dade County Courthouse).
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 6, 1986.
Personal Representative:
Gerson L. Sacks
10304 S.W. 117th Street
Miami, Florida 33176
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
J. David Liebman, P.A.
3226 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: 305/441-9030
19464 December 6,13.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ILS PUBLICA-
TIONS INC dibit SOUTH
FLORIDA BUSINESS
MAGAZINE intends to register
said name with the Cleric of the 1
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
. Mark Weissman
19427 November 22,29;
December 6,13.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name DELUXE PAINT
AND BODY SHOP at 14460 W.
Dixie Hwy., N. Miami. Fla. 33161
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ARNOLD LIBERMAN
19442 November 29;
December 6,13.20.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-48788
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
DANIEL NORBERTO TALAMO
Petitioner/Husband
and
MARIA CARMEN ARCE
TALAMO,
Respondent/Wife
TO: MARIA CARMEN ARCE
TALAMO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Divorce has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on ARNIE S. MUSKAT,
ESQUIRE attorney for Husband
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 3rd, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
22 day of November, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Dade County, Florida
By: J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT, ESQ.
Galbut, Galbut and Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
19449 November 29;
December 6. 13.20. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN .
AND FOR FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-47712
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA LORENA
BARRAGAN
PETITIONER,
and
DAVID ARTHUR BARRAGAN
RESPONDENT.
TO: DAVID ARTHUR
BARRAGAN
c/o JARAMILLO
11601 Meadow Brook
EL PASO
TEXAS 79936
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed and commenc-
ed in this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on MAR-
SHALL IVES, ESQUIRE. At-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 5900 S.W. 73rd Street,
Suite 205, Miami, Florida, 33143.
and file the Original with the Clerk
of the above-styled Court on or
before December 20, 1985; other-,
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida, on
this 16 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
MARSHALL IVES, ESQ.
5900 S.W. 73 St, Suite 206
Miami, Florida 33143
19436 November 22,29;
December 6,13,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name ROYAL PALM
TRADnJG COMPANY, d/b/a MY
AN-MI SOCCER CAMP at 250
Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33134. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
ROYAL PALM TRADING
COMPANY, d/b/a/ MY AN MI
SOCCER CAMP
GEOFFREY W. PINES. Esq.
Attorney for
ROYAL PALM TRADING
COMPANY, d/b/a/ MY-AN-MI
SOCCER CAMP
19406 November 8, 16,22,29. 1985

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-47842 CA 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
IRVIN PEARLSTEIN and
NATALIE MARGOLIS.
Plaintiff
vs.
JESSE LEE DAVIS, et ux., et at..
Defendants.
TO: UNION MORTGAGE
COMPANY. INC.
16910 Dallas Parkway
Suite 212
Dallas, Texas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: LOT 30, BLOCK 11.
WINDWARD ESTATES.
SECTION TWO. according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 68, at Page 98, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
December 20, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15th day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
19441 November 22.29;
December 6, 13, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-10092
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HILDEGARDE SINGER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HILDEGARDE SINGER,
deceased, File Number 85-10092,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 6, 1986.
Personal Representative:
IRVING CYPEN, ESQUIRE
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CYPEN, CYPEN AND DRIBW
P. O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (306) 532-3200
19465 December 6,13.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Doris Madas at 105
SW 22nd Road, Miami, Fla. 33129
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dora Martinez
19461 December 6,13.20,27,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engsge in business under the fic-
titious name ARGENT
FASHIONS INC D/B/A MR
ALEX at 293 N.E. 2nd Ave.
Miami, Fla. 33132 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-1
ty, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo. Jr.
19460 December 6. 13.20, 27,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DDE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9492
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARINA de LARA
a/k/a MARINA DELARA
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: MAGALY ALVAREZ
ZUNIGA
Address Unknown
RAUL ALVAREZ
Address Unknown
RICKY DE LARA
Address Unknown
and Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs-at-Law. Living or dead,
their respective heirs and all per-
sons claiming by, through and
under and or may be infants, in-
competents or otherwise sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for sale
of property has been filed in this
court You are required to serve
written defenses to the petition not
later than January 6. 1986, on peti-
tioner's attorney, whose name and
address are:
Abraham A. Galbut. Esquire
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on December 2, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By HOLLIS L. LANGE
As Deputy Clerk
19463 December 6. 13. 20. 27. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in b'isiness under the fie
titious name REI IN-
VESTMENTS PARTNERSHIP
at number 5582 Northwest 79th
Avenue, in the City of Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE and
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MAXWELL WAAS
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MELVIN POLLAK
PAUL FOURNIER
ALAN ROSENTHAL
IRA P. FEDERER
RICHARD M. WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
KIP AMAZON
A. GERALD REISS
NORMAN WAAS
SUSAN KAPLAN
Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin. P.A.
Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for Applicant
19434 November 22.29;
December 6,13.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name STUDIO 64 CUT-
TING CONCEPTS at 736 N.E.
167th Street North Miami Beach.
Fla. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
COLOSAL
INTERNATIONAL INC.
By: JOSE R CONDE,
Pres.
Carlos M. Mendez, Esq.
Attorney for Colossi
International Inc.
200 West 49th St
Hialeah. Florida 33012
19421 November 15.22.29,1985
December 6.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ALINA BAKERY at
1661 W. Okeechobee Road.
Hialeah. Florida 33010 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
LEMAT CORPORATION
By: ROBERTO LEAL,
President
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
Attorney for LEMAT
CORPORATION
19462 December 6. 13,20. 27, 1986 I
THE ELEVENTH jt ,5,?
CIRCUIT OK FI.0H1K
AND FOR DADE cSStZ
CASE NO.*:,. 1T7 7n
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL Mm
GAGE ASSOCIATION
association organized and eri
under the laws of the United.
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANGEL R. ALVAREZ etat
Defendants. ^
TO: CITIBANK (SOUTH
DAKOTA) N.A.
RICHARD
MCCROWSSEN -
701 East 60 Street N
Sioux Falls.
South Dakota 57104
YOU ARE NOTIFIED tr-
action for Foreclosure of J
on the following
property:
Lot 4, in Block 9 of S 1
LAKE MANOR SECTION Tl3
according to the Plat thereof,!
recorded in Plat 60, at Pap 31
the Public Records of Dtdt(
ty, Florida,
has been filed against you and)
are required to serve a copy.
your written defenses, if any, to)
on Sheppard Faber, Attoi
Plaintiff, whose address is ,
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, (
Gables, Florida. 33146 on orb
December 20. 1985 and file I
original with the Clerk of 1
Court either before service
Plaintiffs attorney or imn _
thereafter; otherwise a defauhi
be entered against you for 1
relief demanded in the compi
WITNESS my hand and the sold
this Court this 15 day
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputv Clerk
19435 November 22. a]
Decemlier6,13, lid
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP j
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL I
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47711
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PAUL ROSSY,
PETITIONE R/H I'SBAND
and
LUCINDA S. ROSSY
RESPONDENTAVIFE
TO: LUCINDA S. ROSSY
4837 Tilden Avenue
Los Angeles.
California 91423
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that il
Petition for Dissolution of yon I
Marriage has been filed and coo-l
menced in this court and you Ml
required to serve a copy of ywl
written defenses, if any, to it ttl
MARSHALL IVES. ESQLIRtl
Attorney for Petitioner, whose til
dress is 5900 S.W. 73rd SWAI
Suite 205. Miami, Florida, 33141
and file the Original with the Clerkj
of the above-styled Court 1
before December 20. 1985; oil
wise a Default will be en
against you for the relief prayed I
the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall be published c
each week for four comcM
weeks in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.,
WITNESS my hand and the seal i
said court at Miami, Flonda,|
this 15 day of November, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
MARSHALL IVES. ESQ.
5900 S.W. 73 St Suite 205
Miami. Florida 33143
Telephone: (305) 667-2111
19437 November22, .
December 6,13.13*1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVES
that the undersigned, desiring
engage in business under the
titSusnameFALCO'SPIZZERU
at Suite 100. Fransher Bldg. m
South Dixie Highway. Miami, r
33166, intends to register a
name with the Clerk of the Ore*
Court of Dade County, Florida
FELLIPPO, INC.
By Phillip Falco, Jr.
ALAN S. KESSLER. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant .'
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. Ha. 33139
Telephone: (306) 538-4421
19425 November 15. .*
December b. iw


Eliezer Berlinger Passes At 81
Friday, December 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 28-B
LsTERDAM (JTA) -
f Rabbi Eliezer Berlinger of
Itrecht district of Holland has
Lre at the age of 81, after a
Lcted illness. Following
trial services last Sunday at
Ljn Ashkenazic synagogue
he was provisionally buried
luiderberg cemetery outside
I His remains will eventually
"insferred to the Mount of
s cemetery in Jerusalem.
Obituaries
NOTICE OF ACTION
DNSTRUTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
HE CIRCUIT COURT OF
J ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
bm FOR DADE COUNTY
E ACTION NO. -4152
(08)
BON FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
The Marriage of
LENA BRITT,
. joner/Wife.
E.VTN U. BRITT,
__indent/H usband.
Kelvin u. britt
esidence and maiung
bRESS UNKNOWN
H' ARE HEREBY
,..1ED that an action for
ilution of Marriage has been
| against you and you are re-
I to serve a copy of your
Jen defenses, if any, to it on
ErGE T KAMANI, attorney
petitioner, whose address is
[Biscayne Bldg. 19 West
ler Street, Miami, Florida
JO. and file the original with
lerk of the above styled court
before January 3, 1986;
irwise a deafult will be
J*d against you for the relief
mded in the complaint or
M.
j notice shall be published
Teach week for four con-
live weeks in THE JEWISH
Indian.
JTNESS my hand and the
I of said court at Miami,
lida on this 26 day of
.mber, 1985.
klCHARD P. BRINKER
lAs Clerk, Circuit Court
1 Dade County, Florida
By J. LOGIE
As Deputy Clerk
Juit Court Seal)
Irge T. RAMANI
Biscayne Bldg.
Jest Flagler Street
.Florida XI130
1374-4340
mey for Petitioner
November 29;
Decembt: 6,13,20.1985
HE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IDE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
1 File Number 85-8502
Diviiiion 04
: ESTATE OF
B TRAM a/k/a JACK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
I ADMINISTRATION
t administration of the estate
fCOB URAM a/k/a JACK
deceased, File Number
W. is pending in the Circuit
for Dade County, Florida.
te Division, the address of
{is 73 West Flagler Street.
I Florida 33130. The names
|ddresses of the personal
Tentative and the personal
sentative's attorney are set
I below.
I interested persons are re-
V to file with this court,
p THREE MONTHS OF
[FIRST PUBLICATION OF
NOTICE: (1) ,11 claims
the estate and (2) any ob-
J by an interested person on
) this notice was served that
PS the validity of the will,
Wincations of the personal
tentative, venue, or jurisdic-
the court.
[CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
IVER BARRED.
lotion of this Notice has
ln November 29, 1985.
[wsonal Representative:
"RAM a/k/a EARL M.
URAM
'East Bay Harbor Drive
By Harbor Islands
J Florida 33154
fey for Personal
Tntative:
N- Talianoff, P.A.
**"h Bayshore Drive.
.Florida .i:ii:i;{
f* (3U5) 8684880
November 29;
I h-ivmber 6, 1985
Berlinger served as a rabbi in
Malmo, Sweden, during World
War II. In 1943 he was helpful in
receiving the 6,000 Jews ferried
over from Nazi-occupied Den-
mark. He was presented with a
High Danish Royal Award for his
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JEWEL J at 16400
N.W. 15th Avenue, Miami, Fla. in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
William Schneider, Inc.
Jack W. Reiff, President
Roy L. Weiss
Attorney for William Schneider,
Inc.
19418 November 15,22,29;
December 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FABULOUS
ESCORTS at 215 SW 17 Ave.
Miami Fla. 33136 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Robert Ricard
19448 November 29;
December 6,13,20,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-37244 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK, F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association
Plaintiff
vs.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants
TO: PATRICIA G. WEBB
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgate
on the following described
property:
Lot 48, of Unrecorded Plat of HID-
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of Tract 11, of FLORIDA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION of the NE Section 25, Township 52 South,
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2. at Page 17. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida;
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15' 30" West for
25.02 feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing of Tract of land herein after
described; thence continue North 2
degrees 16' 30" West parallel
with the West line of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 45' 09" West for
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS mv hand and the seal ol
this Court' this 21 day of
November, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
m44,; November 29
Decembers, 18,20,1986
aid to the rescued Jews of that
country. Immediately after the
war, he helped bring large
numbers of liberated concentra-
tion camp inmates to Sweden.
In 1956, Berlinger was ap-
pointed Chief Rabbi of the
Utrecht district of Holland, which
covers the entire country except
for Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and
The Hague, a demanding post he
held until the end of his life.
He was born in 1904 in Saar-
bruecken, then lived in Prussia
and now part of West Germany,
and was ordained at the Rab-
binical Seminary in Berlin. After
his service in various congrega-
tions in Germany, and in Malmo,
he became Chief Rabbi of Finland
in 1946, a post he held until he
came to Holland in 1954. He was
honored by the Netherlands in be-
ing made an officer in the Dutch
Order of Orange Nassau.,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Machinery and Equip-
ment for Plastic at 3217 SW 60
Ave., Miami, Fla. 33165 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
HERNAN N. RESTREDO
3217 SW 60 AVE.
Miami, Fla. 33155
19458 November 29;
December 13. 20,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cue No. 85-40654 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN AND COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff.
v.
FELIX RODRIGUEZ. DIANA
DOLORES PABON, STEPHEN
M. TRAVIS and EUGENIA M.
TRAVIS, his wife, and the
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, under or against
them; THE PUBLIC HEALTH
TRUST OF DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA, an agency and in-
strumentality of Dade County,
Florida, which operates
JACKSON MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA; and RANCO CON-
TROLS, a division of RANCO IN-
CORPORATED, an Ohio
corporation.
Defendants.
To: Felix Rodriguez and Diana
Dolors Pabon, whose residence are
unknown, and the unknown par-
ties who may be spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
honors, creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendants, who are not known to
be dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County. Florida:
Lot 4, in Block 3, of FAIRWAY
LAKE SOUTH SECTION ONE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 76, at Page
64, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
January 3, 1986, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 26. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D. C. Bryant
'Deputy Clerk
] D456 November 29;
December 6. 18,80,1985
AURITT, Louis, of North Miami Beach.
Levitt-Wei nstein
BLOCK, Leon, of Bay Harbor Island. Dec
3. The Riverside.
EICHENBAUM. Hattie. of Miami Beach.
Services were held. Interment at Mt. Nebo.
FRIED, Sarah, of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
SWERDLOFF, Richard. 42, of Miami, Dec.
2. The Riverside.
GOLDMAN, Mrs. Ida, of Miami. Rubin
Zilbert.
MELINECH. Lillian, of Miami Beach. Ser
vices were held.
MORRIS. Attorney Robert, of North Miami
Beach, Nov. 28. Services were held in New
York.
WEISS, Arnold Joseph, 66, Dec. 1. The
Riverside.
NEVINS, Nathan M 86. Nov. 26. Menorah
Chapels.
BERKOWrrZ, Albert, 77, of Miami Beach.
Nov. 29. Services were held.
KOSED, Betti C. 73. of Miami, Nov. 29.
The Riverside.
LEIBERMAN, Rose. Services were held in
Jersey City. N J.
WISOTSKY, Martin, 63, of Miami, Nov. 28.
The Riverside.
BERSON, Ralph. 75, of Miami Beach, Nov.
29. The Riverside.
HANAUF.R. Irma. 80, of Normandy Isles
and Miami Beach, Nov. 28. Services held in
Philadelphia, Pa.
KEESING, Maurice, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices and interment in New York. Rubin-
Zilbert.
SCHLOSSBERG. Harry, of Miami Beach.
GITLES, Milton F.. 83, of North Miami
Beach, Nov. 28. Menorah Chapels.
MALIS, William, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
WISOTSKY, Martin, 63, Nov. 28. Inter
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery. The Riverside.
FUCHS, Rose, of North Bay Village. Ser
vices and interment in Flushing, New York.
HASTERLIK, Otto, 83, of Miami Beech,
Dec i. Blasberg Chapel.
PRICE. Bessie Yanofaky, 93, of Miami, Dec.
1. Services were held.
SISKIN, David. Services were held at
Rockville Centre. Long Island.


,<*>
,1 N


Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261-7612
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have In-come the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
1 UNI MAI lllHI (.HjR
.1 PfMHjOfll JmwisK FuMwal
IJIIIN t',< Ill Ai'tpxi.rf
MVINI' MHblS'HUI
8652353
MIAMI HI Al.l. I I
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
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.'
Page 24-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, December 6, 1985

K

\y
If the Wedding's at Signature Gardens,
do I need to bring a better gift?"

Your guests bring their best
to a celebration at Signature
Gardens. Because we put our
best into it.
It's as if you inherited an
elegant, polished Mediterranean
villa-with an equally elegant,
polished staff.
Unlike hotels or country
clubs, swimmers in dripping
bathing suits, boisterous conven-
tioneers, and golfers in spikes
are nowhere to be seen or beard,
unless you chose to invite them.
No detail has been overlooked,
from private courtyard flower
gardens for cocktail parties and
receptions, to a Chapel designed
especially for weddings, to a Ball-
room with oversized dance floors
and Italian crystal chandeliers.
There's even a safe-deposit box
in your personal Dressing Suite.
Our Gourmet Service features
Sambonet silver flatware. Leaded
crystal stemware imported from
France. Villeroy & Boch porcelain
from Luxembourg. Water pitchers
and coffee pots imported from Italy.
And cuisine imported from the
Waldorf; the Plaza and the world's
great hotels (by way of managers
and chefs we lured to Florida).
Signature Gardens is avail-
able for events from 50 to 2,000.
Do consult Steven Kozik, our
Managing Director. To discover
prices that are unexpectedly afford-
able. And Jo plan an event that's
uniquely yours.
wM,
]22 Avenue, Miami. FL 331.
Phone 251-5000.


mjhha Special insert Pages 7-10
DECEMBER 1985
h/rUn, iAwiek
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's annual Campaign
Opening Dinner, which will formal-
ly launch the 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign, will be held Saturday
evening, December 14, at Miami
Beach's Fontainebleau Hilton, an-
nounced General Campaign Chair-
man Aaron Podhurst.
"The Campaign Opening Dinner is a
mass statement of this community's unity
and commitment to aid our fellow Jews/'
said Howard R. Scharlin, who is co-
chairman of the event, along with Elaine
Bloom.
Bloom added, "We expect nearly
2,000 people to attend, so the Opening
Dinner will most certainly provide a strong
beginning for the 1986 campaign."
United States Senator Joseph R.
Biden, Jr., a Democrat from Delaware,
will be the featured speaker at the gala
event. Biden is widely considered to be a
true friend and champion of the state of
Israel. He has served on a number of Con-
gressional committees, including the sub-
committees on Security and Terrorism,
Criminal Laws and European Affairs. He
also served on the Commission on
U.S./Soviet Relations and as chairman of
both the Senate Delegation on SALT II
U.S. Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr.
and the Senate Delegation to the North
Atlantic Assembly.
This is the first year in which the Cam-
paign Opening Dinner will be held on a
Saturday night. "Holding the event on the
weekend will add to the festive at-
mosphere we try to create," Bloom said.
"There should be a certain joy in giving
and in our community's collective commit-
(ContInued on Page S)
Elaine Bloom
Howard R. Scharlin


' -
Page 2
Federation, December 1985
A Tribute to Martha Cohen
Last month. Federation said a fond "so long'' to Martha
Cohen, who retired after nearly a decade as director of Federa-
tion's Information and Referral Service, and 27 years of service
to Miami's Jewish community. We will miss her delightful per-
sonality and concern for all whose lives she touched.
Martha has devoted her life to helping others. She has served
since 1949 in the field of social work for various hospitals and
Jewish community agencies, including Miami's Jewish Family
and Children's Service and the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged.
On behalf of the Officers, Board of Directors and staff of the
Federation. I wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to Martha for
her years of service and for her deep concern for the welfare of
others. Her daily presence here will be sorely missed.
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation

contents
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
December 6.1985 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel
Director of Communications
Nicholas Simmonds
Newsmagazine Editor
Mark Freed man
Staff Writers
Ruth Korenvaes
Beth Rubin
CAMPAIGN 3
Sign-up now for Super Sunday
Alliance Division photos
PACESETTER DINNER HIGHLIGHTS 4-5
1986 CAMPAIGN STEERING COMMITTEE 6
MIAMI JEWISH HOME AND HOSPITAL
FOR THE AGED SPECIAL HWJ^^^^g^^g
WOMEN'S DIVISION 11
Photo highlights of Federation Tuesday/BPW Community
Ed. night
WD plans mission to the "Big Apple"
Chanukah celebrated at special events
Lion of Judah Luncheon honors WD Trustees
Hold the Date
SOUTH DADE/AGENCIES 12
South Dade Shalom offers warm welcome to new residents
David wyman to speak on "Abandonment of the Jews"
Synagogue/Federation relationships explored by committee
South Dade Hold the Date
South Dade JCC presents entertaining series for youngsters
FOUNDATION/ MISSIONS /P&B 13
Foundation off ers end of year tax advice
"A Woman and Her Money, ill" scheduled for" December 16
Planning and Budget Task Force explores duplication of services
Missions Program set for 1986
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION
Animated tale recounts story of Chanukah
Cablegrams
Program Guide
CALENDAR
AGENCIES
update from the Jewish vocational Service
Hiliel students mobilize on behalf of CJA-IEF campaign
BBYO programs offer variety for teens
Aliyah council sponsors seminar in Israel
14
15
16


campaign
Federation. December 1985
Page 3
campaign Opening Dinner
ment. We try to capture this spirit at
the Opening Dinner." This year, the
dinner occurs on the last night of
Chanukah, and Bloom promises a
surprise that will bring the spirit of
the holiday to participants.
The Campaign Opening Dinner will
begin with cocktails at 7:30 p.m. Din-
ner will be served at 8:30, with
dietary laws observed. Couvert is $50
per person. Attendance at the Cam-
paign Opening Dinner requires a
minimum $1,000 gift to the 1986
CJA-IEF Campaign. Members of
Federation's Young Leadership
Council who are age 30 or younger
may attend the dinner by making a
$500 minimum gift to the annual
campaign.
Table captains are now needed
for the Campaign Opening Dinner.
Please volunteer to fill a table with
10 friends by calling Marty Barasch
at 576-4000, extension 274.
Vice chairmen for the event in-
clude: Michael M. Adler, Arnold
Altman, Saby Behar, Jack Bellock,
Adolph Berger, Helene Berger, Dr.
Jack Berne, Norman Braman, Alvin
Alliance Division photo update
Lloyd Brown, Herbert Canarick, Tim
R. Cohen, Sidney Cooperman, Irving
Cypers, Amy Dean, Dorian Denburg,
Terry Drucker, Dr. Jay Ellenby,
Myra Farr, Mark Friedland, Harvey
Friedman, Dr. Isaac Garazi, Al
Golden, Dr. Elliot Gordon, Alex
Halberstein, Samuel Harte, Charlotte
Held, Linda Hoffman, Gary
Holtzman, Gertrude Kartzmer, Ezra
Katz, Steven J. Kravitz, Jack H.
Levine, Davida Levy, Joel Levy, Nor-
man Lieberman, Nancy Lipoff, Ellen
Mandler, Neal Menachem, Gail
Meyers, Sanford Miot, Gail Jaffe
Newman, Nedra Oren, Dorothy
Podhurst, Elaine Richman, Sandi
Samole, Gloria Scharlin, Kenneth J.
Schwartz, Maxine E. Schwartz,
Susan Sirotta, Guillermo Sostchin,
Norman Weiner and Maryanne
Witkin. Additional vice chairman for
the event are currently being
recruited.
To make reservations or request
additional information about the
Campaign Opening Dinner, please
contact Marty Barasch at 576-4000,
extension 274.
Super Sunday
57 days and counting!!
On February 2, 1986, phones
throughout Dade County will ring for
Jewish brotherhood for the people
of Israel and for Jews all over the
world. February 2 is "Super Sun-
day," a massive annual pnonathon
designed to reach every Jew in Dade
County on behalf of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign.
"Super Sunday is the single largest
effort on behalf of the CJA-IEF Cam-
paign, in which we reach out to all of
the members of Greater Miami's
Jewish community to join with us in
support and solidarity with Jews
throughout the world," said Aaron
Podhurst, general campaign chair-
man. "This year, the needs which
must be met by the campaign are
even larger than ever before, and
they are continuously growing. On
Super Sunday, every one of us has
the opportunity to help meet those
needs."
On Super Sunday, more than 3,000
volunteers will man phones at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, 137 N.E. 19
Street, from 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
During "Super Week," February 3-6,
phones will be manned from 12:00
noon to 8:00 p.m. daily.
During last year's Super Sunday
"arid Super Week, volunteers raised
more than $2 million through this
community-wide effort. It is expected
that this year's Super Sunday/Super
Week will surpass all previous ef-
forts. However, only YOU and
thousands of other super volunteers
can make the event a super success.
In addition to volunteering to man
phones on Super Sunday, you or your
company can help Federation offset
the cost of purchasing telephones for
this most important event. For a one-
time, tax-deductible donation of $250
per phone, your company's name,
message and/or logo will be per-
manently mounted on a Super Sun-
day telephone, to remain there for
the life of the phone. In addition,
Federation will place advertisements
in local newspapers acknowledging
your sponsorship, and mention your
company name in press releases and
feature stores about the event.
Serving as co-chairmen of Super
Sunday/Super Week are Saby Behar,
Judi Billig, Judge Robert H.
Newman, Ellen Rose and William F.
Saul son.
As part of Super Sunday, an Expo
Center will feature displays and
multi-media presentations by Jewish
agencies and organizations. The day
also will be highlighted by the par-
ticipation of prominent celebrities
and dignitaries. Door prize drawings
will be held hourly for all volunteers,
and day care will be available for
volunteers with children. Super Sun-
day will be catered by the Jewish
Vocational Service's Kosher Kitchen
program.
So mark your calendar for Super
Sunday, February 2, and Super
Week, February 3-6, and be a Super
Person by volunteering on these
super days.
For more information about becom-
ing a super volunteer and/or sponsor-
ing telephones, please call Miriam
Zatinsky at 576-4000. extension 299.
The California Club Community is actively planning for an Alliance Division
reception on behalf of the 1986 CJA-IEF Campaign scheduled for Sunday,
February 23 at the Coral Creek Country Club. Seen at the planning meeting are:
standing (left to right) Forrest Raffel, Advisory Chairman; Rose Klausner,
Canongate Co-Chairman; Herb Polow, Reception Chairman; Lou Rones, Ad-
visory Chairman; Jerry Hyams, Coral Creek Country Club Chairman; Jack
Gellman, General Chairman, California Club Community; and Mireya Rones,
Canongate Co-Chairman. Sitting (left to right): Harry Miller, Cedar Glen Co-
Chairman; Harold Less, Cedar Glen Co^hairman; and Helen Maislen, Azure
Lakes Co-Chairman. Not pictured are: Ben Rabinowitz, Chantilly Co-Chairman;
Phil Ross and Zelda Soloman, Azure Lakes Co-Chairmen; Dr. Iving Fernebok and
Lester Levine, Sandpiper Co-Chairmen; Lorraine Weintraub, Reception Co-
Chairman; Herb Lelchuk, Skylake Villas Co-Chairman; and Harvey Berman,
Royal Oaks Co-Chairmen.
The Key Biscayne Community will hold a dinner on behalf of the CJA-IEF Cam-
paign on Saturday evening, January 25 at the Sonesta Beach Hotel. Seen at a Key
Biscayne Community committee meeting are: standing (left to right) Jerry Rosen,
Ted Kreuter, Dr. Arthur Schrager and General Chairman David Jacobson. Sit-
ting (left to right): Sandy Shapiro and Marge Hill. Not pictured is Reception
Chairman Shirley Schrager.
The Skylake and Marlen Gardens Communities have formed the Menorah
Alliance. They will hold a brunch on behalf of the CJA-IEF Campaign on Thurit-
day, January 23. Leaders of the Menorah Alliance seen above are: top row (left to
right) Al.Postal, Marlen Gardens; George Spitzer, New Horizons; Dr. Max
Cooper, Moorings; and Jack Baras, Wilshire. Bottom row (left to right): Jack
Leeb, Buckley Towers; Harry Rothman, Jade Winds; Victor Siegel, New
Horizons; Mary Ross, Buckley Towers; and Innng Feldman. Jade Winds. Not
pictured are Jack Ablove, Royal Bahamian; Charles Lang, Skyinke; and Eugene
Kornguth, Star Lakes.


Donald E. Lefton (top row on left) joins the 1986 Pacesetter MVPs (Most
Valuable Pacesetter Workers.) From left in top row are Lefton, Howard
R. Scharlin, Harvey Friedman, Jonathan Kislak, Bunny Adler, Steven J.
Kravitz, Marine E. Schwartz and Alex Halberstein. Bottom row (from
left) are: Gloria Scharlin, Paula Friedland, Herbert Canarick, Nancy
Lipoff, Norman H. Lipoff, Ellen Mandler, Kenneth J. Schwartz and
Aaron Podhurst. Not pictured is Irma Braman.
Gloria Scharlin and Helene Berger
listen attentively as Howard Scharlin
makes a Pacesetter point.
WD President Dorothy Podhurst with Racquel Scheck
and Terry Drucker during the cocktail hour.
Mikki and Morris Futernick.
Eileen Silberman (left) and Nancy
Lipoff.
Federation President Samuel I. Adler (left) and Howard
R. Scharlin.
Gloria and Harvey Friedman on the dance floor during
,
dinner.
*w>*
Hazel Canarick (right) presenting
Joan Galison with a Lion of Judah
pin.
P -'


Hazel and Herbert Canarick making
the "paces" on the dance floor.
i
Pacesetter Division Chairman
GMJF Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie with Marine E. Schwartz pinning a Lion
1986 General Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst. qfJudah pin on Tina Kislak.
Helene and Adolph Berger.
Pacesetters dance the night away at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton.
Dmmmld E. Lefton, Ted Arison and Jeffrey Berkowitz.


page6
Federation, December 1985
1986 Campaign Steering committee
Aaron Podhurst Samuel I. Adler Myron J. Brodie Michael M. Adler Arnold Allrnan Alan Aronson James G. Asher Saby Bekar Yoskua Sal Behar
Jack Bellock Jeffrey L. Berkowitz Paul Berkowitz Richard Berkowitz Dr. Jack I. Berne Judi Billig Elaine Bloom Thomas Borin Norman Brama*
Alvin Lloyd Brown Hazel Canarux Herbert Cananck Ralph Chernin Sidney Cooperman Amy Dean Dr. Jay Ellenby MarkFriedland Harlvy Fn<,
Barton S. Goldberg Alfred Golden Dr. Elliot Gordon Alex Halberstein Charlotte Held Ezra Katz Jonathan Kislak Rose Ktausn*
Jeffrey Lefeourt Donald E. Lefton
) "
Jack H. Levine Harr A fl"i Joel Levy
Levy
Norman Lieberman Nancy Lipoff Norman H. Lipoff Ellen Mandlr
Neal Menachem Stanley C. Myers
Gail Jaffe Newman Judge Robert H. Gerald Olin
Newman
Nedra Oren
Dorothy Podhurst Forrest Raffel Stephen L. Rurmer
Louis Ron** Ellen Rote Sandi Samole
William F. Saulson Howard
R. Scharlin
Kenneth J.
Schwartz
Marine E. Schwartz Marc Sheridan Susan Rose Sirotta
People

Howard Socol Guillermo Sottchin Eli Timoner Philip T. Warren Norman L. Weiner
mifcttm mini
One
Destiny
*


MIAMI JKW ISU IIOMK AM) HOSPITAL FOR THE AGED AT DOUGLAS GARDENS-40 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE ELI >ERLY
7
Years of Service
A Trad iI ion of Caring...
The Promise of the Future
ON THE afternoon of
January 5.1940. Mrs.
Isidor Cohen invited a
group of men and women to her
home and told them about a
friend of hers. Adam Reiss. who
was very ill. Mr. Reiss was a
Lutheran of German descent who
wanted to make in-kind bequests
In three facilities that would
care for the aged: a Catholic, a
I'rotestant. and a Jewish one.
Each would receive $10,000.
Alter listening to an enthusiastic
talk by Mrs. Cohen about the
need for a Jewish Home and Reiss'
offering, the group of 12 decided
to organize the Miami Hebrew
Aged Home. They drafted by-laws
and paid their first vear's dues ...
$3.00 each.
Mr. Reiss never lived to see the
Home for which he provided
"seed" money. It was not until
December 18.1945 that the
Jewish Home for the Aged was
dedicated at its original address.
335 Southwest 12th Avenue
in Miami.
Begun as a 23-bed facility, the
Home quickly outgrew its site as
well as its philosophy of care.
More and more people were retiring
in Florida and living longer than
ever before. This new trend
demanded types and varieties of
services that were previously
unknown ... in Florida or any-
where else.
seven acres of land at 151
Northeast 52nd Street in Miami.
Its name was "Douglas Gardens."
By 1954 the Ablin Memorial
Building had been constructed ...
the first specially designed and
equipped facility for the sick and
incapacitated older adult. It
provided such services as general,
medical and psychiatric care,
trained nurses around the clock,
physical and occupational therapy
and social services. With the
advent of the Ablin Memorial
Building and the vision and
support of philanthropists like
Jack Ablin. the Home began
its emergence as a modern, long-
term care geriatric facility.
After the Cus Trau Pavilion
opened in 1956. the Home moved
to combine private and public
financing by obtaining loans from
the Federal Housing Authority to
build four more pavilions. These
five pavilions contained 50 private
and 10 semi-private rooms with an
emphasis on privacy, comtort and
beauty. The innovative concept
behind pavilion residences ...
which proved to be the forerunner
of adult congregate living.
sparked international attention
and. as a result, people from all
over the world began to
visit Douglas Gardens.
By 1962. the needs of a
burgeoning elderly population
again outstripped the resources
of the Home and an $800,000
capital fund campaign was
launched in conjunction with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
One year later, the Ablin Me-
morial Building had grown from
one to three stories resulting in a
net increase of 115 beds. Still
insufficient to meet the growing
needs, a second skilled nursing
facility was constructed in 1977
through the generosity of Baron
and Polly deHirsch Meyer and the
support of the Jewish community
of South Florida. With the com-
bined resources of the Ablin
Memorial Building, the Baron and
Polly deHirsch Meyer Building and
the five pavilions, over 376 elderly
adults could be served each year.
Today, with the opening of the
Harry Chernin Skilled Nursing
Building, the frail elderly popu-
lation receiving long-term skilled
nursing services has superseded
the 500 mark.
This gradual expansion of skilled
nursing facilities was mandated
by the growing numbers of
chronically disabled, "old old"
frail elderly in South Florida.
However, there were thousands
more older adults whose problems
were not severe enough to require
long-term skilled nursing care,
but for whom community living
without some supportive services
Growing... Because We Must
was a burden that could not
be endured. Recognizing early
on that only a small portion of
the elderly could ever... or
should ever ... be cared for in a
long-term care facility, and with
the expertise and knowledge
gained from over 30 years
of experience, the Miami Jewish
Home in the 1970's became a
forerunner of community service
delivery. In so doing, it also
became the forerunner of the
sophisticated, geriatric care
complex that is today emerging
throughout the country and
the world. Appropriately, in 1973
the facility changed its name to
Continued on page 10
IT IS said that a dream only
reflects the dreamer's
thoughts. Since the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens
opened its doors, the dream of a
community has been put to work.
The dramatic development of the
Miami Jewish Home parallels the
growth of South Florida and has
been uniquely attuned to the
community's need for improved
services for the aged. Yet. today
we must do more. Nowhere in the
United States is the elderly
population growing faster than in
South Florida. More than 1.000
frail elderly in our community
desperately need skilled care in a
nursing facility ... today.
Today Douglas Gardens is in the
midst of a five-year capital
expansion program which will
help meet the needs of our aging
community. Late in 1987.
when the last piece of building
machinery leaves the Douglas
Gardens campus and the dust of
construction finally clears, the
dreams of thousands of dedicated
individuals will have expressed
themselves in a new kind of
geriatric care center.
This new era in geriatric care will
come to fruition with the
completion of:
the Harry Chernin Skilled
Nursing Building,
the Sam and Isabel May
Visitors Center,
the Louis and Bess Stein
Commons Building,
and Rowland and Sylvia
Schaefer Hall.
The challenges will continue. The
human needs will grow. And the
Miami Jewish Home will be here
... to respond.
Artist's Rendering of Harry Chernin Skilled Nursing Building
Harry Chernin
Skilled Nursing Building
Dedication: December 1,1985
One of the primary guidelines for
the design of the Harry Chernin
Skilled Nursing Building was
to retain the greatest degree
of privacy and most home-like
environment possible. The result
is one of the most progressive and
innovative architectural designs
for a long-term care facility ever
attempted in this country: one
that will be a model for similar
facilities for many years to come.
Designed to serve 192 residents
who need varying levels of care,
this five-story building features
beautifully decorated private and
semi-private rooms, individual
dining rooms, indoor garden
areas and outside lanai terraces
on each floor, as well as a recrea-
tion lounge and meeting room
for each wing. Each bed hasa win-
dow view and each semi-private
room has a removable partition to
enhance the privacy of the
resident.
Continued on page 10


I MIAMI JEWISH HOME AND HOSPITAL FOR THE AGED \T DOUGLAS GARDENS-40 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE ELDE1
Healthy, Alert and Living Longer
% Wl
K V*
ALMOST 11 years ago. City
Commissioner Rose
Gordon sought help for a
uui-so-visible or vocal group that
desperately needed it. Living
alone, unable to get out or care
for themselves, a large number
of frail elderly were becoming
prisoners in their own homes.
Commissioner Gordon obtained
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds
and persuaded the City of Miami
to donate a space at Legion Park.
Because of a proven track record
in elderly services, the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged was approached by the City
You've Got
What It
Takes...
And You May
Not Even
Know It
HELP those in need and
help yourself to a
tax-deduction at the same
he Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops turn your gifts of resalable
furniture, clothing and house-
wares into the vital dollars that
buy medicines and medical sup-
plies for the indigent residents of
the Miami Jewish Home. Last year,
the Thrift Shops raised over $1
million for the Home's residents,
over 70% of whom are Medicaid
patients.
Shopping at the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops is one of the best
deals in town. Written up by
"Miami/South Florida" Mag-
azine and the Miami "Herald" as
one of the top bargains in town,
the Thrift Shops offer high-
quality merchandise at unbeliev-
ably low prices.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
are at two cooven ien t locations.
In Dade. at 5713 NW 27th
Avenue, and in Broward, at 3149
Hallandale Beach Boulevard. For
free door-to-door pickup of
donations, call 751-3988 in Dade
and 981-8245 in Broward.

of Miami and asked to take on
this new project as a subsidiary
of its own.
So was born the Legion Park
Senior Adult Center, the first
adult day care center in South
Florida. The project was so
successful that two years later,
in order to serve more elderly
participants, the Miami Jewish
Home obtained funds from the
State of Florida to open a second
adult center, the Community Care
Adult Day Center at Douglas
Gardens.
By providing structured.
therapeutic activities, medical
and health care and the company
of other people, the day centers
help to keep frail elderly people
active, alert, and independent for
as long as possible "Over 75%
of our participants would be in
institutions if not for the day
centers." noted Rosalyn Kupin,
Director of the Legion Park
facihty since its inception. "They
are healthier, more productive and
are always redeveloping and
learning new skills."
Combined, both centers serve
approximately 100 people daily.
Participants are picked up at
home and brought to and from
the centers by specially equipped
vehicles operated by the Miami
Jewish Home. At the centers they
are offered a comprehensive
rehabilitative program that
includes: a full range of medical
services, mental health services,
kosher hot lunch and snacks,
recreational therapy services,
educational and cultural
activities, and rest facilities.
$m
Alzheimer's Respite (are.
Research. Training and Planning
. Thrift Shops
> Adult
Congregat
Living
i Adult Day
Care
Home Health System
Senior Employment
Mental Health Servict
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
New Responses to Mental Disorders
m --IAMII
(V/l bustlir
X"|divers
mentaThealth i
IAMIBEACHisa
bustling, ethnically
diverse community. The
i care needs of
such a community are as diverse
as the population.
Douglas Gardens Community
Mental Health Center, a division
of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, serves
residents of Miami Beach of all
ages. Whether it be the depressed
and isolated elderly, those recently
released from institutions, newly
arrived immigrants who are having
trouble adjusting or individuals
with marital, alcohol or drug
abuse problems, the Center
is there to help.
Recently, in response to the
changing mental health needs of
the elderly in particular, three
new services are being offered by
the Community Mental Health
Center.
Geriatric Residential
Treatment Systems
Because of recent changes in
state and federal policy,
chronically mentally disabled
elderly are now being released
from institutions back to the
community. Having spent most
of their lives in an institutional
setting, these individuals, aged 55
and over, require a great deal of
specialized care and support
if their transition back to com-
munity living is to be successful.
The Geriatric Residential Treat-
ment System (CRTS) has been
started to ensure that success.
The first program of its kind in
Dade County, this state-funded
special project is scheduled to
begin operations early in 1986.
Four levels of supervised housing
will be available to provide the
most appropriate placement at
any one point in time Gradually,
through training, rehabilitation
and therapy, these older adults
will learn a new way of life...
outside the closed walls of an
institution.
Respite Care
As debilitating as Alzheimer's
Disease te to the victim, it also
tabes its toll on the family.
"Respite Care" is a new program
designed to provide temporary
relief for the primary caregivers of
individuals suffering from
Alzheimer's Disease and related
disorders. The first and only
program of its kind in Dade
County, it was developed as part
of a comprehensive package of
mental health services offered to
the elderly through the Miami
Jewish Home. One day each
week, in a positive, stimulating
environment, the Respite program
provides Alzheimer's sufferers
with re-motivation, continence
training, recreational therapy,
lunch and transportation under
the constant supervision of a
registered nurse, social worker
and recreational therapist.
Based on the expertise gained
from this initial pilot Respite
program, the Miami Jewish Home
has received a special allocation
from United Way to open a compre
hensive program for Alzheimer's
sufferers. Planned to serve the
populations of North Dade and
South Broward, it will be
operational in mid-1986.
EMerfy Services Division
This division of the Center
provides people age 55 and older
with psychiatric services, coun-
seling, medication monitoring
and a host of other services
designed to help the elderly with
the multiple losses associated with
the aging process. Through the
indigent drug program, eligible
elderly are provided with psy-
chotropic medication free of charge
Research, Planj
THE FUTURE-Graying
of America" is already
taking place in the State of
Florida. With people over age 60
exceeding 17 percent of the
population, innovative responses
to the critical questions of geri-
atric care are needed now. The
Stein Gerontological Institute at
Douglas Gardens is here to
respond ... for Floridians today
... and for everyone tomorrow.
Founded in 1976 and endowed in
1981 by Bess and Louis Stein, the
Stein Gerontological Institute
(SCI) has developed a
three-pronged approach toward
meeting the unique needs of frail
elderly.
The Research Division
People are living longer, but
are they living better? SGI
is studying ways in which the
physical and psychological
aspects o!' the environment mil
-*-----------------------*-


Ml JEWISH IK >MK AND HOSPITAL FOR THE AGED AT DOUGLAS GARDENS-40 YEARS < >F SERVICE TO THE ELDERLY
rum
(-Term Rehabilitation
.Case Management
Meals
Transportation
[ Information &
Referral
- Nursing Home & Hospital
Physical
Therapy
Speech Therapy
Occupational Therapy
> Outpatient Medical Services
Me Aged at Douglas Gardens
\
:
I research on human factors engineering.
and Training
Ited to allow older people
"in independent longer.
(havioral approach
rch has attracted major
find local funding for
Jh on the physical
Iment in the area of human
[engineering; the social
|ment with studies on
ent and relocation: and
udies involving the care
Iment.
and conferences for the
professional and lay communities.
ning Division
term care, the quality of
,nd Programs depends
,Pn Quality education
"ice providers and
"> The Training Division
rovides regular oppor-
for professional, parapro-
and community train-
jWtology, including a
nsed Nurse Aide
School
: continuing
ncoursi -mars
The Planning Division
The Planning Division examines
emergent population and service
trends in the field of gerontology.
This analysis leads to short and
long-term planning for geriatric
services that are sensitive to
problems, opportunities, costs
and benefits available to the
elderly.
Staff
SGI maintains its own staff of
Ph.D. researchers, Master-level
researchers, educators, planners
and information management
specialists. A network of
relationships with 10 major
universities and research centers
in South Florida expands the
Institute's access to other clinical
and applied researchers
concerned with aging.
When Someone You Love Needs Help
IV
r*
&f~"**A
^
**
MRS. G. is92 years old and
almost blind. She lives
alone on Miami Beach.
Her daughter lives in California.
She has lived in her apartment
for a long time and is comfort-
able there. Although she can no
longer take care of herself, she
does not want to move into a
nursing home.
What are the alternatives in a
society that is not only aging, but
mobile as well? Concerned children
are often too far away to directly
provide their parents with the
support they need to remain at
home and independent. To help
such families, the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
has established two sister
programs. "Channeling" and
"Project Independence."
"Project Independence" is an
offspring of the Miami Jewish
Home's Long-Term Care Channel-
ing Project, a research program
established in 1982 by the federal
government to test the feasibility
of at-home care as an alternative
to the nursing home. Because
of the Miami Jewish Home's high
standards and history of providing
superior care, it was chosen as
one of 10 sites nationwide to
Congregate Living at its Best
OURS is a society that
takes personal freedom for
granted. Rarely do we
think of it as a goal toward which
to strive. Yet, many thousands of
elderly struggle each day to
retain their personal freedom
and dignity. These are
individuals who enjoy generally
good health in their advanced
years, but no longer want to cope
entirely on their own. For them,
Irving Cypen Tower is the
answer.
A division of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged,
Irving Cypen Tower (ICT) is
considered one of the best
examples of adult congregate
living in the country. Located on
the Douglas Gardens campus, the
eight-story facility is as renowned
for its architectural design and
beautiful setting as it is for the
plethora of services it offers.
Meals, maid service,
transportation, social and
recreational activities and
24-hour security are all provided
as part of the rental agreement.
In addition, each of the 102
studio and one-bedroom rental
apartments are specially designed
to make independent living a
reality for the older adult. For a
safe and secure environment,
each apartment contains an
emergency call system. Security
guards, a building manager and
emergency help ensure
round-the-clock protection.
Should a wheelchair be
temporarily needed, the
apartments are designed
for their use with five-foot
turning radii in the bathrooms
and kitchens, wide doorways
and waist-high light switches.
Single-control faucets assist the
person suffering from arthritis or
partial paralysis. The bathtubs
have tiled benches at one end and
grab rails on the walls for added
safety.
Kitchen storage cabinets are
hung low for easy accessibility,
and stove controls are on the
front of the appliance at waist
level to avoid the reach over hot
burners. The eating counters
are low and open underneath to
accommodate wheelchairs.
At the present time, 116 tenants,
whose average age is 83, live at
ICT. Seventeen of these tenants
are over the age of 90. Yet this
vigorous group of oldsters remain
active and involved with the
people and activities of their
complex.
The result of creativity and
continued independence in later
life is a healthier and happier
individual. At ICT, cultural
events, shopping trips, visits to
local museums and an active
social life are all on the agenda.
Through a grant from the Florida
Department of Cultural Affairs,
tenants are now working with
professional artists who instruct
them in painting, sculpting or
creating ceramics or fibre art -
often for the first time in their lives.
Medical attention is readily
accessible to ICT tenants
through the Douglas
Gardens Ambulatory
Health Center
implement this pilot program. The
results have been impressive.
For the past three years, the Miami
Jewish Home has been proving
that effective, well-organized use
of community services can prevent
the need for institutionalization
for many of our frail elderly.
July 1985 marked the end of
federal subsidies to "Channeling."
but the State of Florida, recog-
nizing the importance of the
project, continued it with state and
matching federal funds. Unlike
the original "Channeling"
program, however, only those
elderly eligible for Medicaid can
now receive "Channeling"
services. Project Independence
was developed so that those
people no longer eligible for
Channeling services could receive
the kind of care they need on a
private-pay basis.
In addition to providing clients
with home visits and telephone
contact, "Project Independence"
and "Channeling" case managers
develop individualized service
plans to meet the needs of the
elderly in their care. Such services
as housekeeping, home-delivered
meals, skilled nursing, respite
care, escorts, companions,
physical, speech, and occupa-
tional therapies, nutrition assess-
ment and a broad array of
specialized services can all be
arranged through "Project
Independence" and "Channeling"
case workers.
Today, thanks to "Project
Independence," Mrs. G. has a
housekeeper four hours
a day. six days a week. Her
housekeeper helps Mrs. G bathe,
dress, prepares her meals, and
keeps her home a clean and
pleasant place in which to live.
Twice monthly, a physician makes
at-home monitoring visits and
Mrs. C's family is kept apprised of
her health and well-being. All of
these services are supervised and
coordinated by her case manager,
who visits Mrs. G regularly and
has established a personal
rapport with her. "If not for this
program, I would be in a nursing
home,'' said Mrs. G."It's just
that simple."
located on the Douglas Gardens
campus. Here physicians
representing 35 specialties attend
to the tenants' physical and
mental well-being. Tenants are, of
course, free to use physicians
other than those at the
Ambulatory Health Center.
Meal times are shared among
friends at ICT. In a restaurant-
type ambiance, tenants always
have a choice of at least two deli-
cious, strictly kosher entrees for
their daily main meal.
By physical design, innovation
and services and an earto the
voice of the tenants, Irving
Cypen Tower represents the best
of congregate living in
South
Florida.


10
Growing...
Continued from page 7
The Miriam and Sidney Olson
Hospital located on the second
floor will have 32 private and
semi-private rooms, the latest in
medical equipment as well as fully
equipped physical and occupa-
tional therapy units. For the first
time, the hospital unit at Douglas
Hardens will he opened to short-
term admissions from the com-
munity as well as the residents of
the long-term care facility.
PAlso for the first
time, forty beds
on the third floor
oftheChernin
Building will be
used for short-
term rehabilitation
a service now
Harry Chernin being offered by
the Miami
Jewish Home thanks to special
funding from the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. People
recovering from strokes, serious
fractures or similar illnesses or
accidents will receive the best
post-hospital care available
at the Harold and Patricia Toppel1
Rehabilitation Center.
Sam and Isabel May
Visitors Center
Dedication: January 19,1986
Sam and Isabel May
The gateway pavilion to Douglas
Gardens, this multi-purpose
building will be the focal point
upon entering the Douglas
Gardens campus.
The 6.000-square-foot Sam and
Isabel May Visitors Center will
house the main reception area
and a library that can be closed
off for small meetings. The Grand
Salon section will feature
exhibition space for traveling art
shows and an area suitable for
theatrical performances and con-
certs. A real tum-of-the-century
type ice cream parlor, along with
a sundry gift shop, will open onto a
sensory garden filled with fragrant
orange and lemon trees.
The front of the center will be
graced with a water garden, a
three-tiered reflecting pool and
gazebo, while the walkway lead-
ing to the Ablin Memorial Building
will serve as a FOUNDERS Hall
where benefactors of the Home
are honored.
Louis and Bess Stein
Commons Building
Groundbreaking: Spring, 1986
Louis and Bess Stein
This unique, three-story bujidi ig
opening onto the central garden
has been designed specifically
to house staff and services that
make the Miami Jewish Home a
medical, research and training
center for both residential and
community-based services.
The first floor of the Stein
Commons Building will house
the Gordon Ambulatory Health
Center. It will have complete
suites of radiology, laboratory,
treatment and exam rooms as well
as medical offices for the 35
specialties offered by physicians
at the Center.
The second and third floors
will house the research and
training staff and the equipment
fundamental to the regional
teaching nursing facility. This
will include office space, meeting
rooms and lecture halls for the
ongoing training and education
programs conducted by the Nurse
Aide Training School. Project
Independence. Channeling.
Human Factors research, the
robotics program and the
research library. A video-taping
and computer center has been
designed for investigative
research.
Rowland and Sylvia Schaefer Hall
Groundbreaking: Spring, 1986
Addition of Caring.
Continued from page 7
Sylvia and Rowland Schaefer
This three-story building with a
five-story clock tower will
accommodate residential as well
as community services. The new
Beck Dining Room for residents,
with large open windows that face
the central courtyard gardens,
will occupy the first floor along
with a new kitchen facility.
The physical rehabilitation
center on the second floor,
offering the latest in special
equipment for rehabilitative
medicine, will be used by the
residents of the long-term care
facility as well as community
clients. The second floor will be
connected to the Louis and Bess
Stein Commons Building to allow
easy interaction between
educators, researchers and the
frail elderly population. The third
floor of Schaefer Hall will house
the matrix of the Miami Jewish
Home's computer and financial
center.
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens
151 Northeast 52 Street
Miami. Florida 33137
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a
beneficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. We
gratefully acknowledge the
donation of this space so that the
story of the Miami Jewish Home
can be told.
reflect its changing role ... the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged at Douglas Gardens.
The first adult day care center in
Dade County was established by
the Miami Jewish Home over ten
years ago The first free-standing
geriatric mental health center
in South Florida was the one at
Douglas Gardens. The first
"Channeling" program, which is
redefining the management and
delivery of community services,
was started as a model for the
country in 1981. That was the
same year that research, training
and planning... the corner-
stones for the future of geriatric
care... was consolidated under
the auspices of the Stein Ceronto-
logical Institute at Douglas
Gardens.
To properly address the mul-
tiple needs of South Florida's
population, the Miami Jewish
Home eventually established a
full spectrum of community and
residential services. It started an
ambulatory health clinic where
medical and pharmacological
needs could be managed in a
coordinated fashion: an adult
congregate living facility for the
"well" elderly who needed some
supports to maintain quality
lifestyles: an employment
program for older adults who
needed to keep active in a work
environment: a community mental
health center for people of all
ages living on Miami Beach: a
school to train nurse aides with a
geriatric specialty: and thrift
shops to ensure a steady flow of
dollars to provide medicine aJ
med.cal supplies for residents?
the nursing facility who could
afford the cost of their care.
Today, the Miami Jewish Hob.1
many things to many people
a total community, it contimJ
pursue the ideal upon which jtf
ww founded: to care for the I
human being: bndv. mind and
spirit, rhe foresight of its
leadership has directed time j1
time again that Douglas Cat
take pioneering steps to plan |
and address the growing needd
its community. Whatever it 3
be called ... the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Age
Douglas Gardens, or simply
"the Home." its philosophy is
straightforward: to sustain
strength during the trials of oil
age and more, to make the
"olden" years "golden" Wars.
an epic of inner enrichment.
continued achievement and
personal fulfillment.
It is with this humanistically
guided tradition of caring,
coupled with the most advanced I
technologies and research I
available, that the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the AgJ
at Douglas Gardens celebrates it/
40th year... and looks toward
the 21st century
In Appreciation
SINCE its inception by a
group of dedicated civic
leaders in 1945, the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens has
been nourished and guided by
a spiritual family of caring from
throughout South Florida. They
have inspired and supported
innovative ideas and actions that
today are expressed in a broad
spectrum of residential and
community programs.
Our policy of providing these
services, regardless of an indi-
vidual's ability to pay. underscores
our commitment to the preser-
vation of human dignity. Last
year, with the help of the South
Florida community, the Miami
Jewish Home provided over
$3,000,000 in free care to those
unable to pay for their services.
It is their commitment to life and
to those in need that constantly
revitalizes our spirit and creates
anew in each generation a recogni-
tion of the need to keep faith with
our fathers... and our mothers.
For day-to-day operations, the
Miami Jewish Home receives
generous funding from the
Creater Miami Jewish Federation
and United Way of Dade County,
as well as support from the South
Broward Jewish Federation. This
helps address the large deficit
incurred each year due to the
residents of the nursing home
who are unable to pay for the cost
of their care. Over 70% of the
resident population falls into this
category.
For research, education and
special projects, grants are
sought and. because of the Miami
Jewish Home's reputation for
excellence, have been awarded
from a variety of agencies and
foundations.
Yet, these sources of funding can
only go so far. For capital
expansion, for new facilities and
programs, the Miami Jewish
Home turns to the generosity of
the more than 5.000 people
nationwide who are committed to
the work of Douglas Gardens.
To all of them... the I
agencies, foundations, co
sponsors, families and
Individuals, we say thank j
With your help, we will conti
to respond to frail elderly in
need. It is our tradition... and
our promise
Irving Cypen
Chairman of the Board
Arthur Pearlman
President
Fred D. Hirt
Executive Director
Charles Beber, M.D.
Medical Director
Directory of Programs
Admissions Office for Long-Term Care 751*1
Facility. Short-Term Rehabilitation &
Hospital Unit
Alzheimer's Respite Care Program
331-8M
Ambulatory Medical Center
Channeling Program
Community Care Senior Adult Day Center
751-86J
731-86
734-1
To Donate Development Office
Douglas Gardens Community Mental Health Center
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops (for pickups) Dade
___________________________Broward___
Elderly Services Division. Community Mental Health Center
Geriatric Residential Treatment System___________
Irving Cypen Tower
Legion Park Senior Adult Day Center
Mt. Sinai/Miami Jewish Home Home Health Agency
751-8631
531-5*
Nurse Aide Training School
Project Independence
Stein Gerontological Institute
To Volunteer
751-398
98L824S
531-880
756-858
754-rji]
751-862
25J:
751-862
TsTSS


Federation. December 1985
Page 11
men's Division
Ihoto highlights of WD events
V
tt
.?
S**,. -J,
-<~-
i above at the Women's Division's Business and Professional Women's Com-
vnity Education Night on November U were: (from left to right standing)
\iureen Berkowitz, BPW vice chairwoman for community education; Sue
rrt; Robbie Herskowitz, WD vice president for community education;'Anne
wn; and WD President Dorothy Podhurst. Also seen were: (from left to right
med) Nancy Berkowitz, BPW vice chairwoman for community education;
irienne Messing, Community Education Night co-chairwoman; guest speaker
Mor Nora Ephron; and Anne Bloom, Community Education Night cc-
hxrwoman.
mred below at the Women's Division's "Federation Tuesday" on November 5
\re:(from left to right standing) guest speaker Michael Wolf, deputy director of
lOffice of Special Investigations of the United States Department of Justice; and
tne Sheldon and Sue Graubert, Federation Tuesday co-chairwomen. Also seen
We (from left to right seated) guest speaker Nora Ephron; Dorothy Podhurst;
ttt speaker Norman Lear, television producer and activist on behalf of Con-
Vulional rights; and Robbie Herskowitz.

A
as*
I

> -v..
V.
" j.
Take a bite of the 'Big Apple'
Federation's Women's Division
plans to get to the core of the "Big
Apple" and taste a Jewish experience
with a mission to New York, schedul-
ed for March 18-20, 1986, announced
Gail Meyers and Elaine Richman, co-
chairwomen of the mission.
"Through the mission, we hope to
explore our Jewish American roots,"
Richman explained. "New York is
really the birth place of Jewish
American culture because most of
our parents or grandparents settled
there first after emigrating from
their countries of origin. It was in
New York that the old ways of Euro-
pean Jewish culture became
Americanized."
Meyers added that "Seeing how
our ancestors lived will help us to
clarify the meaning and implications
of our own Jewishness. It will also
help enhance the spirit of
camaraderie among the women,
which has obvious benefits for our
working together in Miami."
Highlights of the "Big Apple Mis-
sion' include an in-depth Iook at New
York's Lower East Side, including
tours of a tallis factory, synagogues,
a mikvah and watching a Torah scribe
at work; an evening at a Yiddish
theater; visits to the Jewish Museum,
Battery Park and the YTVO Institute;
a special lecture on Jewish geneology
by Arthur Kurzweil; and a private
reception with Benjamin Natanyahu,
Israel's Ambassador to the United
Nations.
The "Big Apple Mission" is open to
all women who make a minimum gift
of $1,250 to the 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
For more information, please call
the Women's Division at 576-4000.
Hold the Date
Monday, Dec. 9 Lion of Judah Luncheon 11 a.m. Fontainebleau Hilton
Wednesday, Dec. 11 I Miami Beach Special Event 9:30 a.m.
Young Women's Leadership Cabinet 7 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 12 Campaign Steering Committee 10 a.m.
Saturday, Dec. 14 OPENING DINNER FONTAINEBLEAU HILTON
Monday, Dec. 16 Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies Women's Seminar 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Palace Playhouse Seacoast Towers
Wednesday, Dec. 18 SW Area Board Meeting 9:15 a.m. Anne Frank Exhibit Main Library
Thursday, Dec. 19 SD Area Board Meeting 9 a.m. Anne Frank Exhibit Main Library
roman!...
That you?'
JThe Women's Division's "Lion of
^dah" Luncheon, honoring
ustees, will be held December 9 at
Fontainebleau Hilton on Miami
pen. The more than 300 Paceset-
and Trustees of the Women's
fvision those making minimum
fs of $10,000 and $5,000 respec-
ply comprise approximately half
[the total WD campaign.
lie event, featuring an original
sical revue describing the history
I the Trustee category and a fashion
* with fashions by Dianny featur-
i Marcy and Co., promises to pro-
Pe an enjoyable and fitting tribute
the Trustees.
he musical revue, entitled
man!... Is That You?" will
ture semi-professional singers and
icers. The revue was written by
"artist Phyllis Green, who also
1 direct the production. Lyrics
e been written to popular tunes
' as "Do, Re, Mi," "I Am
man," and "Puttin" On the Ritz."
rene Baros and Marvis Shaecter
'e as co-chairwomen of the Lion of
an Luncheon; and Ellen Mandler
tileen Silberman serve as
stee co-chairwomen.
or more information or for reser-
!|is. please contact the Women's
"sion at 576-4000.

WD lights up' Chanukah spirit
rh
The South and North Dade divi-
sions of the Federation's Women's
Division held very successful special
events last month in celebration of
Chanukah, according to Marlene
Olin, special events chairwoman.
"These special events were de-
signed not only to call attention to a
festive time," Olin said. "But they
also were educational and served as
an introduction to the Women's Divi-
sion, drawing in prospective board
members and encouraging women's
giving."
Both events featured the Chanukah
Story, told by Rabbi Norman Lipson
at the South Dade event, and by Rab-
bi Abraham Gittelson at the North
Dade event.
Also highlighting the South Dade
special event, held November 20 in
the home of Connie Nahmad, was a
Chanukah bazaar featuring crafts,
jewelry, clothing and other gift items.
Gail Newman, WD campaign chair-
woman, addressed the group and em-
phasized the need for involvement
and commitment of every member of
the Jewish community.
Steffi Cohen and Dorothy Zveibil
served as South Dade special event
co-chairwomen. Micki Hochberg and
Barbara Kasper are South Dade cam-
paign vice chairwomen; and Elaine
Ross is chairwoman of the South
Dade board.
The North Dade event, held
November 21 in the home of Helene
Cohen, featured a cooking
demonstration. Gift ideas were
presented by Smartland gift store.
Maxine E. Schwartz, past WD presi-
dent, discussed the case for the 1986
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund and the vital role
which the Women's Division plays in
the campaign.
Eileen Ginzburg, Monica Cur land
and Stephanie Hirsch served as
North Dade special event co-
chairwomen. Sandy Belkind and
Lenore Elias are North Dade cam-
paign vice chairwomen; and Debbie
Edelman is chairwoman of the North
Dade board.
Seen at the Women's Division's South Dade special event
were: (left to right) Gail Newman, Marlene Olin, Micki
Hochberg, Rabbi Norman Lipson, Elaine Ross, Barbara
Kasper,'Steffi Cohen and Dorothy Zveibil.
Seen at the North Dade special event were: (left to right} Gail
Newman, Marlene Olin, Monica Gurland, Eileen Ginzburg,
Ellen Elbrand, Debbie Edelman, Helen Berne, Sandy
Belkind and Maxine E. Schwartz.
-.
>


.v>
Page 12
Federation, December 1985
- 'i


South Dade Shalom 'blitzes1
for newcomers
Seen at the 'South Dade Shalom Phone and Basket Blitz'' were: (from left to right)
Ellen Spiegal; Shelly Brodie, Shalom chairman; Larry Metsch, South Dade's vice
chairman for community education; Sandy Halpern; Nancy Levitt; and Shelley
Rosenberg.
Federation's South Dade Branch
held a "Shalom Phone and Basket
Blitz" on October 22 and 23.
During the blitz, Shalom Commit-
tee members and South Dade Board
members made telephone calls to
newcomers in the area, providing in-
formation and arranging for home
visits.
"As a result of the Phone and
Basket Blitz, home visits were ar-
ranged with 25 newcomers," said
Shelly Brodie, chairman of the South
Dade Shalom Committee. "Commit-
tee members have been paired up
with these newcomers and the visits
should be made by the end of
December," she added.
Welcome baskets were also
prepared during the blitz, to be
presented to the newcomers when
committee members visit them at
their homes. The baskets contain can-
dies, Shabbat candles, mezzuzahs and
information booklets showing the ser-
vices provided in the area by Federa-
tion and its beneficiary agencies.
The purpose of the visits is to
welcome newcomers, provide them
with information about the South
Dade Jewish community and to en-
courage their involvement in
Federation.
South Dade
Hold the Date
Sunday, Dec. 8:
Pathfinder Event
at Signature Gardens
7:00 p.m.
Monday. Dec. 9:
Community Services and Planning
meeting with Temple Israel
at Temple Israel Kendall Branch
7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 14:
GMJF Campaign Opening Dinner
at the Fontainebleau Hilton
7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 19:
Community Education Federation
Forum/Public Affairs Lecture with
special guest David Wyman
at the South Dade JCC Social Hall
8:00 p.m.
"It is sometimes very difficult for a
newcomer to take the first step in
becoming involved in our Jewish com-
munity," Brodie said. "The Shalom
program eases newcomers' ap-
prehension by approaching them and
inviting them to become involved, in-
stead of waiting for them to come to
us."
Planning
Committee
moves ahead
Federation's South Dade Branch's
Community Services and Planning
Committee, under the chairmanship
of Roslyn K. Berrin, is about to con-
clude the first phase of a project aim-
ed at enhancing Federation's rela-
tionships with South Dade
synagogues and Jewish
organizations.
Berrin said that "It is very impor-
tant for all of the synagogues and
agencies in South Dade, including
Federation, to form productive work-
ing relationships with one another.
We are a Jewish community which is
growing and developing rapidly, and
we should all work together
whenever we can for the furtherance
of our mutual goals."
In the very near future, the com-
mittee will have completed a series of
meetings with a representative
sampling of South Dade synagogues.
At that time, the committee will pre-
sent its recommendations for improv-
ing Federation/synagogue relation-
ships to the branch's Board of
Directors.
Once the committee has presented
its recommendations to the board, it
will begin the second phase of the
program. In this phase, the commit-
tee will meet with a representative
sampling of Jewish community agen-
cies and organizations in order to
prepare recommendations to the
board for improving relationships on
that front.
Judge Robert H. Newman serves as
South Dade's vice chairman for com-
munity service and planning.
For more information on this pro-
ject or other projects of the Com-
munity Services and Planning Com-
mittee, please call Marcia Needle at
251-9334.
Noted author to speak
on Holocaust
As part of its annual "Federation Forum," the South Dade Branch will
sent a public lecture on the Holocaust with special guest speaker David W
announced Larry Metsch, the branch's vice chairman for Community Ed
Wyman is author of the book Abandonment of the Jews, and will speak
topic at the lecture, which will be held December 19 at 8 p.m. in the South"
Jewish Community Center Social Hall. n
Sharon Azoulay, chairman of the Community Education Committee
"We are very fortunate to have a speaker of David Wyman's caliber as m
the 'Federation Forum.' He is a highly-qualified speaker on the Holocaust J
expect his lecture to be very interesting." *f
Wyman has served as chairman of the Judaic Studies Pro?
at the University of Massachusetts and as associate chairman of the Departm
of History at that university. He is special advisor to the United States Holoca
Memorial Council and a member of the International Academic Advisnn- rT
of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. V'
In the lecture, as in his book, Wyman will present some stunning revelation
backed by meticulous research, which show the precise degree to whk
segments of the American population including the churches and the Jem
community failed to come to the aid of European Jews during the Holocau
The lecture is open to the entire community, and there is no charge for m
ding. There will be no solicitation of funds.
For more information, please call Marcia Needle at 251-9334.
ftJLEIDOSCOP
YOUNG SHOW GOERS SERIES
E
School holidays are approaching
quickly. Instead of letting your
children sit in front of the television,
let their imaginations run wild at the
third annual "Kaleidoscope-Young
Show Goers Series," presented by the
South Dade Jewish Community
Center (JCC), a branch of the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami (formerly the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Florida).
This year, the series will consist of
three outstanding programs designed
to stimulate the minds of young
children and provide an opportunity
for them and their parents to spend
time together during the school
holidays.
Nine-foot-high puppets are the ac-
tors in the first of the three programs
in the series. Presented by the "Bits
N Pieces Puppet Theatre" of Tampa,
tJe..actors perform musicals based on
children s classics, combining the art
of puppetry with music and dance.
This first Kaleidoscope perfor-
mance is the story of "Rip Van
W'nkle Share with Rip in
childhoods sweetest pleasures and
discover the lessons Rip learns as he
journeys to a mysterious mountain,
encounters mischievious elves and
meets his most famous destiny
The presentation will be held att
University of Miami Auditork
Knight Center at the Hyatt Regen
Hotel in downtown Miami, on Thu
day, Dec. 23. Showtynes are 111
and 1 p.m.
The second program in the seric^
features the Emmy-award-winnin
talents of Marshall Izen. Izen will p
form "The Sorcerer's Apprentices
Other Magical Tales." With magic
its theme, this show includes lar;
paper bag puppets in an African
story. Izen portrays the sorcerer i
this lively tale set to music. He maki
the characters come to life using on
the simplest materials as props.
entertaining show is a great way
introduce children to classical mu
Izen creates excitement and
thusiasm in his young audienct
causing them to use their imagin
tions to create plays and puppets i
their own.
This program will be held on Monj
day, Feb. 17 at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.:
the Miami Senior High Scho
Auditorium.
Singer and songwriter Michel*!
Valen, a gifted children's enter|
tainer, completes this year'i
Kaleidoscope series.
Valeri's program is an entertaini:
and educational look at the world
dinosaurs. Rock, ragtime and couni
music beats enhance this liv>
musical adventure on Tuesday, Apnl
1. Program times are 11 a.m. and 1
p.m. at the Miami Senior High Sch
Auditorium.
ini'iiii
Cost is $12 for the entire
Kaleidoscope series or $5 per u
dividual ticket. Call 251-139
more information.
for
The Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami is a member o^
Federation's family of agencies and*
beneficiary of the Combined Jews"
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.



Federation, December 1985
oundation / Missions / pub
ami
in open letter to the
lewish community
||tf END TAX PLANNING
IPS FOR THE SAVVY PHILANTHROPIST
Lon May 29, 1985, President Ronald Reagan introduced his tax proposal to
Ingress. As the proposed changes would have an impact on the tax consc-
iences of charitable giving, donors should be advised of the tax benefits they
In take advantage of in 1985.
reposed Bracket Reductions
The president's tax proposals would reduce the maximum federal tax rate for
Lividuals from 50 percent to 35 percent, effective in 1986. Therefore, a donor
|iay be able to maximize his tax benefits from charitable contributions by making
jiem on or before December 31, 1985, when he may be in as high as a 50 percent
nx bracket. In fact, it may be very advantageous for a donor to establish a
hilanthropic fund to maximize his deduction this year while reserving the right
j recommend charitable distributions for years to come.
lifts of Appreciated Property
[Current law allows a charitable contribution deduction for the fair market
due of long term capital gains appreciated property donated to charities. A tax-
Lyer who presently makes a gift of appreciated property to a charity does not
alize income with respect to any long term capital gains appreciation in the
roperty's value.
Under the proposal, the deduction for the full fair market value of appreciated
roperty has been maintained with one important caveat taxpayers whose tax
Abilities are substantially reduced by tax preferences are subject to an alter-
ative minimum tax. The alternative tax would impose a rate of 20 percent on
dternative minimum taxable income."
(Included in items making up this income would be the excess of the fair market
due of appreciated property given to a charity over the donor's basis in such
bperty. Accordingly, in instances where the minimum tax is applicable, a tax
puld be imposed on the donor for the appreciation in the value of the donated
operty.
king Advantage of Current Tax Laws
(A donor may make gifts of appreciated securities this year and obtain a
ritable deduction for the full fair market value. The unused charitable deduc-
^n portion of gifts whose value is in excess of 30 percent of the donor's adjusted
oss income can be carried forward for up to five additional years.
Donors with closely held corporate stock may want to consider a sizable
ft this year, the redemption of which could be spread out over a series of
ars.
Iln light of the anticipated decline in marginal tax rates and the proposal that
Irealized appreciation of gifts of property be subject to a minimum tax, it is
(commended that donors be advised to take advantage of the present state
I the tax law by considering accelerating their gifts to the annual campaign
|d/or a variety of creative endowment fund opportunities. For example, you
h set up an endowment fund today, which is designated to provide gifts to the
nual campaign for a term of years, or in perpetuity.
^f you have any questions concerning this, please contact your tax advisor, or
' Foundation office at 576-4000.
<2pUNPAT10N OF
UeVWSrripHILANrHRpPieS
women's seminar to
be held December 16
t(lhrht*imtm
[artin Kalb
rofessional Advisory Committee Chairman
Melvin L. Kartzmer
Chairman
Ellie Ganz, chairman of the
Women's Committee of the Founda-
tion of Jewish Philanthropies of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
proudly announces the third in a
series of financial awareness
seminars for women. "A Woman and
Her Money, III," co-chaired by Betty
Cooper of Miami Beach and Jackie
Traurig of Coral Gables, will focus on
"Planning for the Cost of Health
Care."
A large crowd is expected to attend
the workshop at Miami Beach's
Seacoast East Building on December
16. Speakers will include Elliot Stern,
associate director of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged; Steven Sonenreich, marketing
director of Mount Sinai Hospital; and
Dr. Phyllis Ehrlich, director of Older
Adults Services for the Jewish Fami-
ly Service. A panel discussion will be
moderated by Sue Rose Samuels,
Family Law attorney and immediate
past chairman of the Dade County
Public Health Trust.
The program also will feature
presentations by noted tax attorney
and national Jewish leader Norman
H. Lipoff on "Tax Planning," and
prominent investment advisor Ar-
nold Ganz, who will talk about
"Investment Strategies for Longer
Living." For reservation informa-
tion, please contact Penny Marlin at
the Foundation Office, 576-4000.
Missions... we solve identity crises
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Missions Program has schedul-
ed four exciting missions and premis-
sions for 1986. Missions provide for
the unique opportunity to learn first-
hand about our heritage. Plan to par-
ticipate and rediscover your Jewish
identity.
Upcoming missions include:
Spring Mission to Latin America
March 16-28. This mission is coor-
dinated through the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee (JDC) and promises
to provide a detailed look at Jewish
life in South America. Mission par-
ticipants will visit Santiago, Chile;
Buenos Aires, Argentina; and
Montevideo, Uruguay. As capacity is
limited to 60 participants, we urge
you to make reservations today.
Spring Adventure Mission to
Israel May 3-18. (Premission to
Budapest, Hungary). Visit the city
of Budapest which sits on the rolling
hills of Huda Marvel at the Danube,
central Europe's greatest river. In
Israel, scuba and snorkel in the Red
Sea off Eilat. Camp out at the base of
Masada with campfire and song, then
climb Masada at dawn. Dance in the
streets of Jerusalem on Israel In-
dependence Day. All this and more on
the Spring Adventure Mission.
Spring Mission to Israel May
7-20. (Premission to Poland or
Spain). In Poland (May 7-12), visit
Warsaw and Cracow. Demonstrate
your solidarity with the remaining
residents of a once proud Jewish com-
munity and honor the memory of the
Six Million at Auschwitz.
In Spain (May 8-12), visit Madrid,
Toledo and Cordoba. Explore the an-
cient Jewish heritage that is part of
the history of Spain, including the
Golden Age of Spanish Jewry.
While in Israel (May 11-20), spend
wondrous days immersed in the
"heart and soul" of Israel with young
leaders from around the United
States. Learn about the problems and
accomplishments of the Jewish State
first hand; meet its people and its
leaders and celebrate Israel In-
dependence Day, the most exciting
and popular day of the year in Israel.
The Spring Mission to Israel is
sponsored by the Young Leadership
Council of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation in cooperation with the
UJA Young Leadership Cabinets.
Summer Family Mission to Israel
July 30-August 10. The goal of
this mission is to spark the imagina-
tion of both child and parent. It in-
cludes entire group programming as
well as separate activities for adults
and children.
Experience you child's bar or bat
mitzvah at the Western Wall or atop
Masada. Visit Or Akiva, Miami's Pro-
ject Renewal twin city. And share
home hospitality with Israeli families.
This is Federation's most popular
mission, and we suggest early
registration to insure your family's
space.
Costs vary for each mission, and
some require a minimum gift to the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign. Please call'Ellen
Brazer, Federation's Missions direc-
tor, at 576-4000 for more information
about the 1986 Missions Program.
ask force seeks to avoid duplication of services
Planning and Budget Committee
force, chaired by Alfred Golden,
begin this month to clarify the
and service area of each Federa-
beneficiary agency providing in-
dual and health services. The task
*. which is currently in forma-
was instituted in response to
mmendations made by Federa-
s Long Range Planning/Capital
ds Subcommittee on Individual
Health Services.
Because Federation provides
jng for a large number of local in-
dual and health service agencies,
a vested interest in seeing that
^oney is used to its fullest poten-
Golden said. "This task force
.helP to ensure that unnecessary
''cation of services is avoided.
wever," he added, "there is a
to provide the same types of
ices to people from different
faphical areas or with differing

incomes or specific needs."
After reviewing the Long Range
Planning/Capital Needs Subcom-
mitee's recommendations, the Plann-
ing and Budget Subcommittee on In-
dividual and Health Services, chaired
by Jack H. Levine, met with several
beneficiary agencies to discuss ser-
vice duplication. It was found that the
most likely area of service duplication
is in community-based services to the
elderly.
The need for Federation's planning
intervention having thereby been
established, the task force was in-
itiated to conduct a detailed review of
possible areas of duplication. The
review to be prepared by the task
force will include:
* A determination of the feasibility
and desirability of a central body for
planning and coordinating service^W..
The elderly;
* An evaluation of tn*- jtease.call
the
benefits of consolidating existing
and/or future services to the elderly,
including a coordinated or centralized
client assessment system;
* An investigation of the availabili-
of outside funding for services to
e elderly, which may include the
identification of new programs to fill
existing service gaps;
* An evaluation of demographic
changes affecting the elderly popula-
tion and the placement of services in
areas of greatest change;
* Achieving an understanding and
agreement among providers of men-
tal health counseling services to iden-
tify the nature of clients appropriate
for referral, and the agency or agen-
cies appropriate to provide treatment
to specific client populations.
The task force will accomplish its
goals by involving beneficiary agen-
cies in discussions and decisions
lating to the coordination and/or
consolidation of specific service
areas.
Each agency has been asked to ex-
amine its mission statement and
redefine its goals where necessary.
The task force will work with each of
the agencies to help assure that every
program provided by the agency falls
within the parameters established by
its mission statement, thus avoiding
duplication of services.
"Work done by the Planning and
Budget Subcommittee thus far has
shown that unnecessary duplication
of services is the exception rather
than the rule," Golden said. "The
task force will help to assure that the
situation remains this way in the
future. We are optimistic that as the
evaluation process continues, the
partnership between Federation and
its beneficiary agencies and the spirit
of cooperation among the agencies
will be strengthened to the benefit of
the Greater_M.iami._ JewisJl
community."


Pageia
Federation, December 1985
Chanukah special
de Lights viewers
Miriam and Yoni discover the miss-
ing jar in a scene from "Lights."
Throughout the month, JFTV will
air "Lights," an allegorical, animated
Chanukah special narrated by Judd
Hirsch and using the voices of major
Hollywood talent, including Leonard
Nimoy and Paul Michael Glazer.
The half-hour program', produced in
Jerusalem, is the first major produc-
tion of Israel's young animation in-
dustry. .The fantasy-adventure story
took two years to produce, and in-
volved 80 people working in seven
teams.
"Lights" depicts the Maccabean
period and the Miracle of the Lights,
while offering universal appeal.
Designed to compete with top net-
work holiday entertainment,
"Lights" delivers its powerful
message without once using the word
"Jewish."
With lovable characters as its stars,
"Lights" tells the story of young
Miriam and her little brother Yoni.
They are part of a people to whom a
great gift was given the gift of
lights. The wonderful lights, com-
posed of Hebrew letters that dance
and sparkle, subtly teach them to
do mitzvot.
The drama unfolds as we are in-
troduced to The Young Man, one of
the people of the light, who admires
the Greeks living alongside his peo-
ple. The Greeks pursuade The Young
Man to shed his light and help them
modernize others.
The program's universal message
is that everyone has the right to be
different. Further, "Lights" shows
that it is not just a right, but an
obligation, to preserve the unique
traditions of one's heritage against
the prevailing culture, regardless of
how enlightened and sophisticated
that culture might be.
"Lights" will air on JFTV on Tues-
day, December 10 at 5:00 p.m.; on
Thursday, December 12 at 6:30 p.m.;
and on Sunday, December 15 at 6:30
p.m.

Watch JFTV on:
Storer (North Dade)
Storer (South Dade)
Harte-Hanks
Dynamic
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Channel P-29
Channel 14
Channel 2
Channel 43
(SeeCh. 12)
Channel 25
cablegrams
Eenie Cooks Up Holiday Fun
This month on "Eenie's Kitchen," Eenie celebrates Chanukah hv J
her recipe for potato latkes and demonstrating her special technique for
ing cut-out cookies.
"Candle Unto Candle"
Explores Chanukah Traditions
Throughout the month, JFTV will air an informative and ente
Chanukah special entitled "Candle Unto Candle." The program offers son
fun as various aspects of the holiday, ranging from cooking to oil makine an.
plored. The program includes a medley of songs performed by entertainefiL
Burstyn. "Candle Unto Candle" was produced by WJFT, the television statila
the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago, in cooperation with IsrariT
structional Television, Kastel Communications and Jewish Media Serviced
The hour-long show will air every Wednesday in December at 6:30 pm i
"Jewish Television Magazine"
Highlights Children and the Elderly
This month's installment of "Jewish Television Magazine" features)
segments on the important work being done with the elderly in Israel am,
learning-disabled children in California. The first segment of the program L
a heartwarming look at a facility in Israel where some elderly people Bm
others just spend their daytime hours enjoying a program that ranges fromt
tional holiday celebrations to yoga classes. The second segment zeroes in
remarkable 92-year-old man who doesn't seem to need any formalized proer
but lives alone, maintaining his affairs and exuding an inspiring attitude tow
life.
In the third segment, viewers are taken to a very unusual Hebrew school j
Los Angeles where teachers are patiently reaching out to children with lean
disabilities so the children do not lose out on the chance to learn about!
heritage. Please see the program schedule below for air times.


k I .fits 4 hep
JFTV'8 crew has returned frm
Israel with videotape of many
interesting sites and activity*.
Seen filming Alexander Muss
High School in Israel students
planting trees atop a hill in
Jerusalem were: (from left too
right) Suzanne Lasky, JFTV't
director of broadcast operations;
Lee Rubin, associate producer;
and Barry Sonshine, production
assistant.
Programming Schedule Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc. DECEMBER 1985*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenie's Kitchen 12/10: Lights 12/17,24.51: Film special Eenie's Kitchen 12/12. Making ofa Miracle 12/19,26: Film Special Jewish Roundtable or Aleph Hello Jerusalem JCC:A Special Place
5:30-6 p.m. Check up/ Mount Slnal 12/10,24: JewlshTV Magazine 12/17.51: Film special Hello Jerusalem Check up/ Mount Sinai 12/15: Making of a Miracle Eenie's Kitchen
JFTV Bulletin Board
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust 12/10: Making of a Miracle 12/17,24,51: Film Special Eenie's Kitchen We Remember The Holocaust Check up/ Mount Slnal We Remember The Holocaust
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. Still Small voice or viewpoint JCC:A Special Place Whole month: candle unto Candle 12/12: Lights 12/5,19,26: Film Special Film Special 12/14.28: RedMagen oavid Special 12/17.21: Film Special 12/15: Lights 12/8,22,29 Film Special
7-7:30 p.m. Bet Din: The Jewish Peoples court Jewish Roundtable or Aleph Still Small Voice or viewpoint Hello Jerusalem Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Bet Dlh: The Jewish peoples court
7:30-8 p.m. Pillow Talk Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky 12/18: RedMagen David Special 12/11,25: Film special Kaleidoscope i with Suzanne Lasky 12/21,28: Jewish TV Magazine 12/7,14: Film Special Pillow Talk
JFTV Bulletin Board
I 'Subject to cnan ge a* ------------------------------------' -



"'Set iq && ,rvai*nresf*!?
Federation. December 1985
Page 15
\en
I'RDAY. DECEMBER 7
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
iir presents its second annual "Games
* beginning at 8 p.m. at the Center, 18900
25 Avenue, North Miami Beach. The cost
I oer person, which includes open bar and
it dinner. The proceeds will benefit the
Summer Camp Scholarship Fund. For
information, please call 932-4200.
lfl)AV, DECEMBER 8
f South Florida Chug Aliyah group will hold
Lnukah meeting and party at 6:00 p.m. at
iMirhael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Ler Katz Auditorium, 18900 N.E. 25
Cj North Miami Beach. Anyone in-
fested in Israel, or wishing to discuss aspects
k|iyah is invited to attend. Donation is (1
| refreshments will be served. For more in-
tion. please call the Israel Aliyah Center
173-2556.
DAY. DECEMBER 8
[ Inaugural Pathfinder Gala on behalf of the
i CJA-IEF will begin at 7:00 p.m. at
ature Gardens, 12725 S.W. 122 Avenue. A
limum gift of $5,000 to the campaign is re-
el. Dinner couvert is $50 per person, and
'/ laws will be strictly observed. For more
ation, please call Jerry Neimand at
1-9334.
1NDAY. DECEMBER 9
L Confusing World of Vitamins
and
irals." will be presented by Laura Fink,
of Project Sinai, beginning at 1:30 p.m. at
Jewish Family Service/Jewish Community
ter JETset meeting for the elderly at Beth
id Congregation. For more information,
call 279-6611.
InDAY. DECEMBER 9
TTorah Chapter of Hadassah will present a
liet Jewry Update at its monthly meeting to
held at Temple Zamora in Coral Gables. For
I information, please call 649-7134.
tNDAY. DECEMBER 9
[ Miami Beach Jewish Community Center's
een Club for 7th-9th graders will hold a
jnukah party with games and all the latkes
lean eat. from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30. The cost is
for members and $3 for non-members. For
fe information, please call Darcy at
1-3206.
ESDAY. DECEMBER 10
Lewis I jttman "will discuss "The
erican Jewish Community: What Price Uni-
f" at the Forte Forum lecture series at 1:00
. in the auditorium of the North building.
Towers, 1200 West Avenue, Miami
h. For more information, please call Elsie
bin at 673-1979..
ESDAY. DECEMBER 10
I second investment seminar series at the
ni Beach Jewish Community Center will be
7:30 p.m. at the Center, 4221 Pine Tree
I've, Miami Beach. The topic will be "Stock
1 Bond Strategies." There is no charge for
nbers, $1 donation for non-members.
Ireshments will be served. For more infor-
ftion or reservations, please call 534-3206.
ESDAY. DECEMBER 10
an Rights Day will be commemorated at
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
nter with a slide presentation of a visit to
(Soviet Union. The presentation, beginning
9:30 a.m., will feature three Russian
|fusenik families. For more information,
I call 932-4200.
pESDAY. DECEMBER 10
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
nter will present a mini workshop on
fighting up Your Life and the Holiday
on." The "Singles Holiday Rapp" will
[in at 7:30 p.m. with a social hour, and the
kshop will follow. The cost is $4 for
ers and $5 for non-members. For more
formation, please call 932-4200.
EDNESDAY. DECEMBER 11
Jewish Vocational Service will hold its
"rth Annual "Friends of the Jewish Voca-
nal Sen-ice Nutritional Project" celebration
M 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Project's
"in office, 920 Alton Road, Miami Beach. For
"' information, please call 673-5106.
EDNESDAY. DECEMBER 11
* American Physicians Fellowship, Inc. for
dicine in Israel will hold its 11th Annual
nizational Meeting at 7:30 p.m. in Wolfson
orium at Mount Sinai Hospital. For more
formation, please call Dr. Isaac Knoll at
H3601.
EDNESDAY. DECEMBER 11
prkmens Circle, Miami Beach Branch 1059,
I hold a meeting and Chanukah program at
"i at the Surfside Community Center. For
I information, please call Sophie Noble at
'2101.
lEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 11
f* Teen Club of the Miami Beach Jewish
nmunity Center for 9th through 12th
wrs, will have a Chanukah party from 7.00
i. to 9:00 p.m. The cost is $2 for members
Jo $3 for non-members. For more informs
K please call Darcy at 534-8206.
WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 11
A Picasso film and lecture will be presented at
the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center from 10:00 a.m. to noon. The cost is $5
per person. For reservations and information,
please call 932-4200.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 12
An exhibit of fine art wine labels will be on ex-
hibit as the Young Leadership Council of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation sponsors an
evening at the Lowe Art Museum, from 6:00 to
9:00 p.m. The cost of admission, which is $5 per
person, will include one complimentary drink
and access to the art gallery's current exhibit.
For more information, please call the Young
Leadership Council at 576-4000.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 12
Pearl Bailey, internationally-acclaimed singer
and actress, will make a special guest ap-
pearance at the annual dinner-dance sponsored
by the Florida Region of the American Com-
mittee for the Weizmann Institute of Science
at the Omni International Hotel this evening.
Please call 940-7377 for more information.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 12
Pioneer Women "Or" Chapter will hold a bingo
lunch beginning at 11:00 a.m. at 8777 Collins
Avenue. For more information, please call Ra-
quel Rub at 932-4470.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 12
American Jewish Congress, Justine-Louise
Wise Chapter, will meet at noon at the
American Savings and Loan Association Blank
Building at the intersection of Alton and Lin-
coln roads. For more information, please call
864-1355.
FRIDAY. DECEMBER 13
The South Dade Jewish Community Center
Singles Network will sponsor a late night
singles servii "t Temple Judea, 5500 Granada
Boulevard, Co. al Gables. For more informa-
tion, please call 251-1394.
SATURDAY. DECEMBER 14
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Cam-
paign Opening Dinner will begin with cocktails
at 7:30 p.m. and dinner at 8:30 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hilton on Miami Beach. U.S.
Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (Democrat,
Delaware) will be the guest speaker. A
minimum gift of $1,000 to the 1986 CJA-IEF is
required. Dinner couvert is $50 per person, and
dietary laws will be strictly observed. For more
information, please call Marty Baraach at
576-4000.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER IS
The Couples Committee of the Young Leader-
ship Council of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will sponsor a visit to Planet Ocean .
and discover "The Crossroads of the Ancient
World." treasures of Israel's archeological
heritage, at 5:00 p.m. The cost, which includes
dinner and admission to all exhibits, is $10 per
adult and $7 per child under the age of 10;
children under 3 are admitted free. For more
information, please call Marsha Kolman at
576-4000, exension 290.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER IS
"The Frisco Kid" will be shown today in the
banquet hall of Temple Beth Sholom at 10:30
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. For more information,
please call 532-3491.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER IS
The Association for Jewish Special Education
will hold a Chanukah party at the City of Miami
Legion Memorial Park from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
For more information, please call 596-5525.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 15
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center's "Daddy and Me" group will take a
trip to Metro Zoo from noon to 5:00 p.m. The
bus leaves the Center at 12:15. For more infor-
mation, please call Joel Linden at 652-6478 or
Bennet Bramson at 932-4200.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 15
A cafe style Chanukah celebration will be held
at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue, beginning at
800 p.m. There will be music, dancing and
entertainment with Yaacov Sassi. The cost is
$3 for members and $5 for non-members. For
more information, please call 932-4200.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 15
The Michael-Ann Russell, South Dade, and
Miami Beach Jewish Community Centers
singles departments will present their second
annual "Festival of Lights Dance at the
Coconut Grove Hotel. 2679 South Bayshore
Drive at 7:30 p.m. Please call 932-4200.
251-1394. or 534-3206 for more information.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 15
The Ninth Annual 10K Chanukah Run and 5K
Maccabiah Run will be held at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center at 8.00 a.m.
For a race application, please call 932-4200.
MONDAY. DECEMBER 16
A discussion on intermarriage will be led by
Rabbi Norman Lipson of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education beginning at 1:30 p.m. at
the Jewish Family Service/ Jewish Community
Center JETset meeting at Beth David Con-
gregation. For more information, pjease.call.
279-6611.
MONDAY. DECEMBER 16
The Women's Committee of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will present "A Woman and
Her Money, III," the third in a series of finan-
cial awareness seminars for women, beginning
at 9:30 a.m. at Seacoast Towers East. For
more information, please call Penny Marlin at
576-4000.
MONDAY. DECEMBER 16
An intergenerational Chanukah party will be
held at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center, with the Jewish High School of
South Florida. Entertainment will be provided
by the American Balilika Troupe. Please call
932-4200 for more information.
TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17
David Wyman, author of "The Abandonment
of the Jews," will be the guest speaker at the
Sandra C. Goldstein Jewish Public Affairs
Forum at 7:30 p.m. at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, 137 N.E. 19 Street. The cost is $5 per
person and the lecture is open to the public.
The Forum is sponsored by the Young Leader-
ship Council of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. For more information, please call
Milton Heller at 576-4000, extension 279.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17
The final investment seminar at the Miami
Beach Jewish Community Center, 4221 Pine
Tree Drive, will be held at 7:30 p.m. The topic
will be "Investment Outlook for 1986." There
is no charge for members, $1 donation for non-
members. Refreshments will be served. Please
call 534-3206 for reservations and information.
TUESDAY. DECEMBER 17
Edna Buchanan will discuss "Is Miami the
Crime Capitol of America?" at the Forte
Forum lecture series at 1:00 p.m. in the
auditorium of the North building, Forte
Towers, 1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach. For
more information, please call Elsie Rubin at
673-1979.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19
The South Dade Jewish Community Center
Singles Network invites you to view original
wine bibles done by the Masters beginning at
7:30 p.m. at the Lowe Art Museum. A $6
couvert includes a wine and cheese party with
music. For more information, please call
251-1394.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 19
The Greater Miami Women's Division of the
American Friends of the Hebrew University
will hold a meeting today.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 19
The North Dade Chapter of Technion will spon-
sor a trip to Palm Beach and Chanukah
meeting beginning at noon at 1401 N.E. 191
Street, Rolling Green Auditorium. For more
information, please call 651-8545.
SATURDAY. DECEMBER 21
Elie Wiesel will be the guest speaker at Temple
Beth Sholom this evening at 8:00 in the sanc-
tuary. Tickets prices range from $7.50 to
$12.50, student tickets will be available for half
price. For more information, please call
532-3491.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26
The South Dade Jewish Community Center
presents "Rip Van Winkle" as the first feature
of its Kaleidoscope-A Young Show-Goers
Series, at 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. at the Universi-
ty of Miami Auditorium. Hyatt Regency. 400
S.E. 2 Avenue. The cost is $12 for a full three
show series for children and adults. Individual
tickets are at $5.00 each. For more informa-
tion, please call Marsha at 251-1394.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
Jazzercise for the 60 plus is held every
Thursday at 10:30 a.m. at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center. 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue. There is no charge. For more informa-
tion, please call 251-1394.
Creative Creepers, an infant growth and
development program for babies six months to
one year, is offered each Wednesday from 9:15
to 10:00 a.m. at the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center.
Yoga stretching, breathing, and relaxation
exercises are offered every Tuesday, 10:30 to
11:30 a.m. at the South Dade Jewish Communi-
ty Center. The cost of eight lessons is $8 for
members and $12 for non-members.
Yiddish and Jewish literature classes are of-
fered every Sunday from 2:00 to 3:30 p.m. at
Federation Gardens. Sponsored by the South
Dade JCC, there is no charge for the course,
which combines language with readings of
classical and Jewish literature. For more infor-
mation, please call Sherry at 251-1394.
A workshop on caring for infants and tod-
dlers will be offered at the South Dade JCC
every Wednesday from 10:10to 11:10a.m.and
on Thursday from 8:00 to 9:30 p.m. For more
information, please call 251-1394.
"Mommy and Me," a social and physical
development program for children, age 13
months to 2Vi years, and their mothers, is of-
fered by the South Dade Jewish Community
Center. For more information, please call
251-1394.
The South Dade Jewish Community Center
offers a basic course in Hebrew to help seniors
read, understand and converse in the Hebrew
language. Classes meet every Wednesday from
2:00 to 3:00 p.m. at a cost of $4. Please call
Sherry at 251-1394 for more information.
A Winterwonder mini-camp at the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community Center will
feature full days of activity including special
events, field trips, swimming and much more.
Camp runs from Monday, December 23
through Friday, January 3. Please call Ronnie
Schorehart at 932-4200 for more information.
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center
will also sponsor a winter camp. Call 534-3206
for more information.
A teen travel program will be sponsored by
the Miami Beach Jewish Community Center
from December 22 through December 27.
Visits to Busch Gardens, Circus World, Epcot
and Disney World are planned. Please call Dar-
cy at 534-3206 for more information.
A singles support group will be holding bi-
monthly meetings at the Michael Ann Russell
JCC. For more information, please call
932-4200.
The Jewish Community Centers of Greater
Miami are helping their neighbors celebrate
Christmas by providing volunteers to help
maintain vital services in our community on
Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, so that
their Christian counterparts can enjoy the holi-
day with their families. To volunteer, please
call Bennett at 932-4200.
"Ancient Jewelry for the Modem Woman,"
jewelry by Sarah Einstein, will be on display
from December 1 through January 5 at the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery at Temple Beth
Sholom. For more information, please call
532-3491.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for January events is Dec. 9,1985
Organization
Event _____
Place
Date
.Time
.( )a.m. ( )p.m.
Your name
Title _____
Phone No.
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, Florida 33137
'l'3S3zi:: -.,.


Page 16
federation, December 1985
Agencies
JVS news
The Association of Jewish Voca-
tional Service Professionals (AJVSP)
held its Biennial International Con-
ference in Toronto last month. Rachel
E. Tannenbaum, associate executive
director of the Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice in Miami and current president
of AJVSP, said that the conference
title, "Challenge and Change," was
particularly appropriate in light of
the continuing efforts of the Jewish
vocational service field to enhance
programs in reponse to changing
community needs.
Although it was a wet week in
Canada, the Miami contingent of the
conference was able to share some
sunshine with more than 100 Jewish
Vocational Service workers from as
far away as Seattle, Dallas, San Fran-
cisco, Boston and Montreal. There
was a bright interchange of ideas
about current economics, the employ-
ment situation in North America,
older workers, innovative program-
ming for the handicapped, new voca-
tional counseling techniques and the
impact of technology on the work
world.
For more information about this
conference or about the AJVSP
organization, please contact Rachel
E. Tannenbaum at 576-3220.
Pat. P. Fine, president of Miami's
Jewish Vocational Service (JVS), and
Eugene Greenspan, executive direc-
tor, are pleased to announce the re-
cent appointment of Barbara J. Fox
as coordinator of the Homemaker
Referral Service. In this capacity,
Fox will serve the elderly on Miami
Beach and North Miami Beach.
Fox received her bachelor's degree
in psychology from Syracuse Univer-
sity, and her master's degree in social
work from the State University of
New York.
Fox has extensive background in
the evaluation and counseling of
clients, and in staff training. JVS
President Pat P. Fine said "Her
sincerity, warmth, and special in-
terest in gerontology will certainly
add to the effectiveness and growth
of the Homemaker Referral Service."
Fox says she is "looking forward to
providing quality in home
assessments and the finest
homemakers and nurse's aides
available for hire."
For further information, contact
Barbara Fox at 672-2184, where a
helping hand and a helpful
homemaker are available to serve the
community.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Students to
begin campus
campaigns
If student Federation-United
Jewish Appeal campaigns begin after
winter break, then spring has come
early to South Florida campuses.
Leadership training is under way,
calendars are being planned, and
workers are being recruited.
Students are now preparing to put
their programs into action in the com-
ing months.
Preparation for the campaign
began at the National Student
Leadership Training Conference in
Washington, D.C. on November 1-3.
At this weekend conference spon-
sored by the University Programs
Department of the United Jewish Ap-
peal, workshops were conducted on
calendar planning, publicity and pro-
motion, solicitation training,
outreach techniques and special
events.
The conference was especially
helpful to Elissa Lieberman, Univer-
sity of Miami campaign chairman and
a senior majoring in speech com-
munications. She was "psyched"
after the weekend. "The group
clicked. We worked well together and
motivated each other," she said.
"Organizing our own campaigns can
be very demanding. There was a
tremendous feeling of mutual support
and commitment from the beginning,
and together we developed a lot of ex-
citing new ideas for our own
schools."
Two weeks later, on November 17, a
workshop was conducted for local
students at the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation at the University of
Miami. Sponsored by Hillel Jewish
Student Centers of Greater Miami.
Broward and Palm Beach counties,
the U.J.A. University Programs
Department and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the workshop
presented the role of the Jewish com-
munity Federation. The participants
were the chairpersons and other cam-
paign leaders of colleges in Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties.
Rabbi Steven Abrams, director of
planning at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, discussed the func-
tion of Federation in meeting com-
munity needs, and emphasized the
importance of student participation
in that activity.
Lisa Diamond, a Florida Interna-
tional University sophomore who
chairs the North Dade area cam-
paign, explained how her campaign
will affect students. "It teaches us
about our responsibility to help
others by giving of ourselves." The
major purpose of the campaign, she
says, is "to tell students everyone
we can reach about the needs of
other Jews and to show them how to
make a difference by working with
us."
Several of the chairpersons will
participate in a mission to Israel from
December 24 to January 3. Planned
by U.J.A. for national student cam-
paign leadership, the mission is the
final program to be held before the
campaigns begin.
Equipped with basic organizational
skills and a working knowledge of
Jewish community needs and- ser-
vices, the student leaders agree that
the campus campaign should educate
and activate students. According to
Annie Malka, University of Miami
Law School campaign chairman and a
former Florida International Univer-
sity campaign leader, "my job is to
get the law students to care."
Graduate students, she feels, "should
view this as an aspect of their educa-
tion, a way to express their Jewish
identities by joining in a communal
activity and becoming a part of the
community."
Jewish students have conducted
campus campaigns for several years,
dating back to the aftermath of the
Sec-Day War. Locally, the student
campaign was initiated by Hillel at
the University of Miami during the
late 1970's. Campaigns are now being
conducted in Dade County at the
University of Miami, Florida Interna-
tional University, Miami-Dade Com-
munity College, Barry University,
and the Southeastern College of
Osteopathic Medicine. Elsewhere in
the state, student campaigns are
run at Florida Atlantic University,
Broward Community College, the
University of Florida and Florida
State University.
For more information, contact Bar-
bara Rothenberg at 661-8549.
BBYO offers something
for everyone
Members of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization's AZA boys' clubs and
their parents shared a very special
Shabbat on November 22 at Temple
Judea in Coral Gables. The services
were a combination of creative and
traditional prayers led by AZA
members. Dr. Scott Roseman spoke
on "Teen Stress Lessening the
Pressures on Today's Youth."
Many BBYOers are now preparing
for BBYO's Greater Miami Council
contests, to be held December 15 at
the South Dade Jewish Community
Center. In a public speaking competi-
tion, the subject for AZAs will be
"What is a True Jew?" and for BBG
girls' clubs, "Who Determines Who is
a Jew?" The topic for AZA story-
telling is "Why Do I Pray Only When
I'm in Trbuble?" BBGs will tell
stories around the theme "The Light
at the End of the Tunnel."
Other areas of competition include
Israeli dancing; songs; best chapter
newspaper, scrapbook, banner and
photograph; trivial pursuit; AZA
debate; and BBG art and handicrafts.
BBYOers from throughout the
Florida region determine the
categories for each year's competi-
tion. Winners of the Greater Mia
Council competition will Ro on
compete with other Florida counc,
at the annual Florida Reein
convention. 8
The Florida Region Convention w
be held December 23-27 durir
winter break from classes in Fikh
Florida. "You & Me and the u3
Milk & Honey" will be theme of th
year's convention. The five-day evei
will include programs on Isra
discussion groups, athletics a d
show, an awards banquet and electi
of Florida Region officers.
BBYO is open to all Jewish
school youth. Each member's pote
tial for personal growth, involveme
and lifelong friendships is multiple
by the limitless programming a|
social experiences which membe
are offered.
For more information on memlier
ship or involvement as a volunteer ad
visor or lay board member, pleas
call 253-7400.
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion is a member of Federation'!
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.

NAAM sponsors pre-Aliyah
seminar in Israel
The North American Aliyah Move-
ment (NAAM), headquartered in
New York, is happy to announce a
pre-Aliyah seminar in Israel for
students, young adults and profes-
sionals, which will take place
December 25 through January 7.
NAAM's two-week tours, which are
geared specifically for people con-
sidering Aliyah, include visits to ab-
sorption centers and lectures on
housing, employment, banking, the
medical system, education and all
aspects of life in Israel. Most impor-
tantly, participants get to meet with
people in their professional field and
with established North American
olim (immigrants) with similar
backgrounds.
The cost of the seminar is only
$960, and includes round-trip airfare
from New York, with an optional
stop-over in Europe; all hotel and
land arrangements; and two kosher
meals a day, with three meals on
Shabbat.
NAAM's next seminars are
scheduled for February 3,1986 foraD
ages; May 19 for retirees; July 8 for
singles; and August 18 for all ages
For more information, please contact
the Israel Aliyah Center, at 573-2556.
The Israel Aliyah Center is t
member of Federation's family
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
A/ewoers of Temple Shir Ami recently hosted a Shabbat Dinner for the residents of
teaeratumGardens, a congregate living facility located in South Dade. Tempi*
znir Ami family members donated the food for the dinner. Following the festive
dinner Federation Gardens residents attended services at the temple. Seen above.
a member of the Shir Ami Youth Group serves challah to a Federation Gardens
resident. Sandy Levinson of Temple Shir Ami was the coordinator of this com-
munity event. Rabbi Brett Goldstein, president of the Rabbinical Association oj\
Greater Miami, is the spiritual leader of Temple Shir Ami.
-------------------------._____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



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