The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02964

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dlewlslh Flor idliaim
Volume
58 Number 47 Two Sections Miami, Florida Friday, November 22,1985
ftmd Shochel BvMrfiiJ' '*
Price 50 Cents
Right To Challenge
Radio License OK'd
FORMER PRIME MINISTER BEGIN
Makes Sense
Begin Said To Suffer
From Alzheimer's Disease
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Former Israeli Prime Minister,
lenachem Begin, who has been living as a recluse since his
|ahrupt retirement two years ago, is believed to be suffering
om Alzheimer's disease.
The suggestion that Begin is suffering from it, current
[among responsible medical circles, provides the first credi-
ile explanation of why Israel's charismatic leader, who
Continued on Page 12-A
Soviets Predicted
Rights Would Be Ignored At Geneva
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Federal Communications Com-
mission, responding to a petition
filed by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, has
granted permission to the ADL to
challenge the licese renewal ap-
plication of a Kansas radio station
that brodcasts anti-Semitic and
anti-black programs.
At the same time, the ADL fil-
ed a motion seeking that the
issues in the case against KTTL-
FM of Dodge City be enlarged to
include consideratio of anti-
Semitic and racist threats con-
taied inprograms broadcast by the
station in 1983 and 1984.
THE FCC has ruled that these
broadcasts be barred from con-
sideration by a administrative law
judge when he hears the case on
KTTL's licence application. A
Kansas group, Community Ser-
vices Broadcast Inc.. has Filed an
application competing for the
KTTL frequency.
The ADL has welcomed the
decision by the FCC to permit it to
be a party to the case, but con-
tiued to express disagreement
with the FCC's ruling on what the
administrative judge, John
Frysiak. could consider in
reaching his decisions.
"As yet the FCC has not permit-
ted testimony on the incitements
to anti-Semitic and racist violence
included in KTTL's programs on
the ground that broadcast speech,
no matter how offensive, is pro-
tected under the First Amend-
ment," said Nathan Perlmutter,
Continued on Page 2-A
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Two
[Soviet officials, Justice
[Minister Alexander
|Soukharev and Samouil
Zivce, a specialist on human
rights, who is Jewish, held a
press conference here just a
Reagan Would Raise Human Rights Issue Page 8-A
Administration Doesn't Think So Page 9-A
Faint Hope from Bronfman Page 9-A
week in advance of the sum-
mit meetings between
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev and President
Reagan.
The gathering at the salon at
the United Nations Press Associa-
tion was clearly a public relations
event aimed at the Western
media. No Soviet journalists were
present.
The two emissaries from
Moscow stressed the overiding
importance of peace between the
superpowers. In that context they
contended that human rights
issues should not be raised at the
summit because it would only
divert Reagan and Gorbachev
Continued on Page 10-A
Prime Minister Shimon Peres (center) of Israel receives an
honorary degree from New York University at a convocation dur-
ing the Prime Minister's recent visit to the United States. The
honorary Doctor of Law Degree was conferred by NYU President
John Brademas (right). Laurence Tisch, chairman of the NYU
Board of Trustees, also participated in the ceremonies.
Rabin to CJF
Israel Will Negotiate With
Palestinians, But Not PLO
Hussein Must Make Honest Effort Page 3-A
Needed: A Sense of National Community Page 10-A
Encouraging Moderate Palestinians Page 13-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -.(JTA)
Israeli Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin said here that
if Jordan ends its demands
that "declared members" of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization be included in
peace negotiations, Israel
would not object to an
"international umbrella"
for direct negotiations with
Jordan."
Israel wants "direct and
bilateral" negotiations with Jor-
dan and "Palestinians that are not
declared PLO members," Rabin
told the 3,200 delgates to the 54th
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations at the
Washington Hilton Hotel. "With
the PLO we'll not negotiate."
RABIN SAID that while "some
international support" cannot be
a substitute for direct negotia-
tions, if it is needed to bring Jor-
dan "or any other Arab country to
decide to negotiate for peace, (it)
should be more than welcomed by
us."
Rabin made the same point
earlier in the day to reporters at
the State Department after a
meeting with Secretary of State
George Shultz. He said Premier
Shimon Peres had offered to enter
into direct negotiations with Jor-
dan, but there were two
"obstacles" Jordan's insistence
on the participation of PLO
members and an international
conference.
Rabin said if the "major
obstacle" of demanding "declared
PLO members" is removed, then
the obstacle of the "international
umbrella" is "removable." But he
Continued on Page 7-A
Miamian Elected
Kreutzer Named United Synagogue's Int'l. President
Franklin D. Kreutzer
Franklin D. Kreutzer of
Miami was installed as in-
ternational president of the
United Synagogue of
America at the 1985 bien-
nial convention of the
organization Nov. 15-21 at
the Concord Hotel in
Kiamisha Lake, N.Y.
Installation was at a banquet
and special ceremonies Wednes-
day evening.
Kreutzer is a practicing at-
torney and has served as a Special
Assistant Attorney General of the
State of Florida and Special
Counsel to the Comptroller-
Banking Commissioner of
Florida.
A FORMER president of the
Temple Zion Israelite Center in
Miami, he recently completed two
terms as president of the
Southeast Region of United
Syangogues and was a central
vice president holding several
portfolios, most notably 1985
biennial convention chairman and
chairman of the Central Council of
Regional Presidents.
Kreutzer received both his
undergraduate and law degrees
from the University of Miami. He
was a president of the Greater
Miami Hebrew Free Loan
Association and the South Florida
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. He is
Continued on Page 3-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Peres Said
He'd Fire Sharon Maybe
Bv DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Shimon Peres
formally informed the
Cabinet last week that he in-
tended to dismiss Ariel
Sharon as Minister of Com-
merce and Industry but
stopped short of actually
handing Sharon a letter of
dismissal.
It was a day-long cliff-hanger
during which Sharon offered an
equivocal apology for his scathing
denunciation of Peres and his
policies at a Herut meeting in
Haifa, and Peres rejected the
apology. The dismissal move was
based on legal ground violation
of the basic law by which all
Ministers assume collective
responsibility for government
policy decisions.
:JL DISMISSAL takes effect in
48 ^ours. Observers said that
within that time Sharon could
revise his apology to make it ac-
ceptable to Peres, and the latter
could rescind his dismissal of the
Likud Minister. Such a scenario, if
it materialized, would probably
save the fragile Labor-Likud coali-
tion which neither partner seemed
prepared to dissolve at this time.
Sharon offered his public
apology before entering a meeting
with Likud colleagues prior to the
Cabinet session. "I find it proper
to clarify that if words which I
spoke were interpreted as a per-
sonal attack on the Prime
Minister, Mr. Shimon Peres, I
hereby express my apology,"
Sharon said.
He added: "However, I stand on
my opinion regarding the substan-
tial issues. These issues are what
is really important for the security
of the State and its survival. I
want to clarify further that the ex-
istence of the national unity
government is very important in
my view especially at this time
when we face many national
challenges. I hope, too. that all
those who make a habit of attack-
ing me will now follow my
example."
SHARON'S reference to the
importance of the unity govern-
ment was seen by some as an at-
tempt to place the onus on Peres if
the government fell as a result of
the crisis precipitated by his Haifa
speech. Likud sources said Peres'
response to Sharon's apology
would determine whether the
Premier genuinely wanted to
resolve the crisis or whether his
real aim is to bring down the unity
government.
Aides to Peres implied that
Sharon's apologies are worthless.
They recalled that he has apologiz-
ed before for itemperate remarks.
Last Aug. 1. he said. "I apologize.
I overdid it." in connection with a
speech against government
policies. In a subsequent television
interview, he said. "If anyone felt
attacked by the style, I retract it
and apologize."
The aides pointed out that while
Sharon apologizes for what is con-
strued as personal attacks on his
IDF Mobilization
Practice Reported
TEL AVTV (JTA) The IDF
has announced a forthcoming
open mobilization practice, to take
place shortly. The IDF spokesman
said that several thousand men
and a number of private cars and
trucks which serve as reserve
transport would be mobilized for a
few hours, as a test of the efficien-
cy of the system. The advance
warning is intended to prevent
misinterpretations by the Arab
states of Israeli intentions.
Gen. Sharon
Compromise helped
cool things down .
Page 14-A
political adversaries, he makes no
apologies for his attacks on their
policies. "The results of these pur-
ported apologies are clear,"
Peres' aides said.
THE LATEST one was "no
apology at all but a rehearsal in
form and substance of what he
said." They cited a Cabinet deci-
sion of last Aug. 25 that any
minister who attacks the Prime
Minister must resign. -' "
According to Israel Radio.
Sharon was induced to apologize
by the Minister of Interior. Rabbi
Yitzhak Peretz, who has been try-
ing urgently in the last two days
to resolve the crisis. Peretz's for-
mula included an expression of
confidence by Sharon, in Peres,
but Sharon balked at this, Israel
Radio said.
Sharon's speech to his Herut
Likud colleagues was a blast at
the delicate negotiations Peres
has been conducting aimed at
direct negotiations between Israel
and a Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation. It also seemed
calculated to further inflame the
passions of militant Jewish set-
tlers in the West Bank where
clashes between Jews and Arabs
have escalated in recent months.
SHARON, a former Defense
Minister and the most vociferous
hawk in the coalition government,
accused Peres of "unparalleled
cynicism" and "total contempt for
proper governmental procedure."
He charged that Peres "is capable
of conducting negotiations with
the PLO. and even of much graver
things too. His behavior is weak
and lacking in self-respect. (he)
is leading the government by the
nose down a twisted path without
members of the Cabinet knowing
what is going on."
Under the coalition agreement.
Peres and Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir, the Likud leader,
waived the right of the Prime
Minister to dismiss a Cabinet
member of the other's party.
Shamir will become Prime
Minister next summer under the
rotation clause of the coalition
agreement.
Peres met with Shamir last
Wednesday and Thursday. He ex-
plained his decision to fire Sharon
for falsely accusing the govern-
ment of encouraging terrorist at-
tacks and of willingness to
negotiate with the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
HE TOLD Shamir that if
Sharon could not accept the
Cabinet's obligation of collective
responsibility he should have
resigned. He said under the cir-
cumstances, Shamir, as leader of
Sharon's party, should have
dismissed the Minister, but since
Shamir has declined to do so, he,
Peres, woud.
Dnder the coalition agreement.
Shamir has the right to veto the
dismissal of a Likud minister. But
the basic law of collective respon-
sibility supersedes the coalition
agreement, Peres said.
Leaders of both parties met
separately later to see if there was
any way to resolve the crisis.
Several Labor Ministers said they
believed Sharon should be fired,
even though Sharon told the
Cabinet he had the same "con-
fidence" in Peres as other
ministers had. Shamir told the
Cabinet that if Peres dismisses
Sharon, he should resign im-
mediately, himself.
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Beauty Parlor on Premises
An Ethiopian teenager, now a student in Israel, bidsjareweUto
two new friends after the 1985 International Jewish Student En-
counter The annual institute, sponsored by the World Union oi
Jewish Students and the Student Divisum of theWZO. brings
toaether Jewish students from throughout the world for an inten-
sive encounter with Israel. They were joined for thejx r*t time this
vear by a group of students recently arrived in Israel from
Ethiopia. Their participation was sponsored in part by a grant
from the North American Conference on Ethiopian Jewry.
FCC OK's Challenge
Of Racist Radio's License
Continued from Page 1-A
director of the ADL.
"We are of hte view that it is
not simply a question of whether
one can use the media to be anti-
Semitic and racist." said Perlmut-
ter. adding that "I believe
freedom of speech is important."
but "what is at issue is the use of
the airwaves for inciting to
murde.r"
THE OWNERS of the radio
static Charles and Nellie Babbs.
boradcast taped messages from
rightwing extremist orgaizations.
For example, a 1983 broadcast by
William Gale, a retired army col-
onel who has long been associated
with right wing groups, told
listeers. "We're gonna cleanse
our land And we're gona do it
with violence."
'You better start- making
dossiers, names, addresses, phone
numbers, car license numbers, on
every damn Jew rabbi in this land,
and everv Anti-Defamation
League leader or JDL leader in
this land, and you better start do
ing it now," Gale was quoted in
the broadcast as sayig.
Gale continued: "And know
where he is. If you have to be told
any more than that, you're too
damn dumb to bother with. You
get these roadblock locations.
where you can set up ambushes.
and get it all working now."
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Dole Believes
Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Arms Sale Postponement Leaves Options Open
Bv DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- Senate Majority Leader
Robert Dole (R., Kan.) said
that Congress postponed
President Reagan's propos-
ed sale of arms to Jordan
until Mar. 1 to leave "all the
options open" and give the
Middle East peace process a
chance to work.
"If between now and Mar. 1
then is an honest effort by King
Hussein ... to sit down with the
Prime Minister (Shimon Peres of
Israel) and try to work out some
kind of agreement, then we
believe we will have a chance to
take another look," Dole told the
closing plenary of the 54th
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations (CJF) at
the Washington Hilton Hotel.
"THE ONE thing we did not
want to do is torpedo the peace
process." Dole stressed. "If there
is a glimmer of hope, as the Prime
Minister indicates, we want to en-
courage that hope. So when next
Mar. 1 comes, who knows. It may
be postponed again, we may
decide to reject it out of hand." He
added that "We thought the worst
thing we can do is approve such an
arms sale before we even have
negotiations."
On the peace process itself,
Samuel Lewis told the 3,200
delegates to the general Assembly
that when he left Israel last June
after serving as U.S. Ambassador
there for eight years, most
Israelis did not take the peace ef-
fort with Jordan seriously. But, he '
added, when he returned there for
a visit earlier this month he found
"surprising readiness" by Israelis
to believe that "something might
just happen."
However, Lewis said, he does
not believe that negotiations bet-
ween Israel and Jordan are yet at
Kreutzer
Named
Synagogue
Unit Prexy
Continued from Page 1-A
listed in "Who's Who in American
I Law" and "Who's Who in
American Jewry."
I Kreutzer succeeded Marshall
Wolke of Chicago in the interna-
Itional president's post.
THEME OF the biennial con-
Ivention was "The Conservative
E-'ew in a Secular Society" and was
Ikeynoted by novelist Elie Wiesel,
|*ho received the Solomon
fchechter Award at the
[convention.
I Other speakers included Dr.
>avid Wyman, author of the best-
seller, "The Abandoment of the
Pews;" Avraham Sharir, Minister
f>( Tourism for the State of Israel;
fcnd Rabbi Irving Greenberg,
fcuthor of "Will There Be A
Jewish People in the Year 2000?"
Plenary sessions featured as
lubjects of discussion "Conser-
|ative Judaism and Jewish Law"
|nd "The Jew on the North
American Political Scene." Par-
ticipants included Dr. Joel Roth,
Inairman of the Committee on
Jewish Law and Standards of the
|onservative Movement, and
lacob Stein, former White House
laison to the Jewish Community
|i the Reagan Administration.
The United Synagogue of
|menca is one of the largest of all
fcnagogue organizations in the
tprld today, with a membership
two million and representing
|ne 900 synagogues throughout
forth America.
Sen. Dole
hand. "I'm not wildly optimistic
myself because I see the obstacles
on both the Arab and Israeli sides
as very great," he said. "But
there is something happening and
that something has given a new
sense of hope to a lot of Israelis."
LEWIS SAID he also found on
his visit that Israel is making pro-
gress in solving its economic dif-
ficulties. But, he said, this pro-
gress has caused problems of
deepening recession, unemploy-
ment, bankruptcy for many com-
panies and hardships for the
Israeli people. But, he said, the
Israeli people are accepting these
difficulties as necessary and if the
government can stick to its pre-
sent course, the measure will
work.
Dole noted that there is a
"bipartisan," "deep" and
"unswerving" commitment in
Congress to do what is necessary
to keep Israel strong militarily
and economically. But he said
Israel's economic independence
depends in the long run on
building up its export industries
and he is proud of his efforts in
putting through the Free Trade
Agreement with Israel.
The Senate leader reiterated his
promise that the Senate will ratify
the Genocide Convention. He said
if it cannot be done in the few
weeks left to Congress before it
adjourns for the holidays, it will be
the first thing on the agenda when
the Senate returns in January.
DOLE ALSO said he welcomed
the summit conference this week
in Geneva between President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev because "you cannot
settle your differences without sit-
ting down with your adversaries."
But, he said, "if the Soviets are
serious about improving relations
with the U.S. there are three con-
crete steps they should take." He
said these were "resume
diplomatic relations with the
State of Israel, disavow the UN
resolution equating Zionism with
racism becasue it is an abomina-
tion, and let all Soviet Jews who
want to join their families in Israel
go."
A third speaker was Max
Kampelman, head of the U.S.
delegation to the Geneva Negotia-
tions on Nuclear and Space Arms,
who stressed that "we must work
for peace and the reduction of
arms."
BUT HE SAID this effort must
be based on "reality" and the U.S.
cannot "ignore" such Soviet in-
ternational violations as the con-
tinuation of its troops in
Afghanistan, the abuse of
psychiatry for political punish-
ment. State-sponsored anti-
Semitism the severe curtailmen
of Jewish emigration and the
persecution of religious believers.
"There can be no international
order and stability if any country
reserves the right to decide which
of the agreements it signs it is
prepared to accept," Kampelman
said.
"If any single institu-
tion can be named
as supremely vital
to the peace and
survival of Israel and
the entire Middle
East, that institution
is Technion."
David Ben-Gurion
L^TECHNION
ISRAEL INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
868-5666
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Mubarak's Remark
Is Worth Recalling
Israel's Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
was obviously speaking for the Unity
Government when he told a session of the
CJF General Assembly in Washington that
Israel is prepared for direct negotiations
with Jordan providing King Hussein would
bend on his view of which Palestinians were
appropriate to take part in the negotiations.
Given that the King would bend, said
Rabin, Israel might even be amenable to
peace talks under the auspices of an "inter-
national umbrella."
What Rabin had in mind was the Palestine
Liberation Organization as inappropriate
representatives of Palestinian aspirations.
In this sense, he told the CJF Assembly
nothing new. Nor should it be surprising to
Rabin or to any other Israeli in the Unity
Government that King Hussein would not be
likely to accede to the suggestion.
It makes us feel mighty uncomfortable,
but we are reminded of some commentary
on this same issue by Egypt's President
Mubarak during his visit to the United
States last March. What Mubarak said was
that it would be unrealistic to look for
Palestinians who are not in their heart of
hearts PLO.
What Arab Isn't PLO ?
We do not mean that most Palestinians
are PLO in their allegiance to Yasir Arafat
or even to Arafat's credo rooted in the need
to destroy the existence of Israel. But they
are mainly PLO in their allegiance to the
principle of establishing yet another Palesti-
nian state carved out of the Israeli hide.
That this truth lies at the heart of
Mubarak's observation should make Rabin's
comment before the CJF Assembly an even
more chilling one. Egypt and Israel post-
Camp David are not what Camp Davkl eayi-.-.
sioned as a relationship between the two
signatory nations.
This would be the same given appropriate
"Palestinian" representation in bilateral
talks involving Jordan and Israel. From a
West Bank Jordanian "confederation"
would be a hop, skip and jump to a new
Palestinian state.
Is it possible that Mr. Rabin does not know
this? Or that those whom he represents do
not know this either?
Honor To A Native Son
Once again, Miami takes proud note of the
achievement of one of its native sons.
Franklin D. Kreutzer was this week install-
ed as international president of the United
Synagogue of America, an organization
representing a membership of two million
and an affiliation of some 900 conservative
synagogues throughout North America.
Kreutzer's elevation to so distinguished a
post in a sense seemed predestined. An at-
torney (he earned his law degree at the
University of Miami), Kreutzer almost from
the beginning of his career melded his pro-
fessional interest with his Jewish heritage.
In the law, he saw a clear link to the domi-
nant concerns of his religious affiliation.
He served as a Special Assistant Attorney
General of the State of Florida and Special
Counsel to the Comptroller-Banking Com-
missioner of Florida. In these capacities, it
seemed almost natural for Kreutzer to
graduate into the presidency of Temple Zion
Israelite Center in Miami and also to serve
two terms as president of the Southeast
Region of United Synagogue, as well as
chairman of its Council of Regional
Presidents.
That Kreutzer is listed in "Who's Who in
American Law" and "Who's Who in
American Jewry" best symbolizes the twin
elements of his professional and spiritual
concern.
Miami is proud of Kreutzer's achievement.
The United Synagogue of America may well
share that pride in this native son as his en-
thusiasm and intelligence take the helm in
his new two-year term as international
president.
Beth Kodesh: A Symbol
Temple Beth Kodesh is celebrating its
40th anniversary. A Founders Day program
marked the occasion at the Temple last
Sunday.
Beth Kodesh is, itself, a genuine symbol of
the Jewish will to survive in the face of
challenge and adversity. Founded in 1945, it
did not move into its permanent home on
SW 12th Avenue until two years later.
Over the next decades, it went through
several name changes, beginning with
Miami Hebrew School and Junior Congrega-
tion, modifying that through two more
changes to Miami Congregation and finally
adopting its present name in the early
1960's.
From a wandering congregation that met
in various founding family members' homes
to its permanent site; from its earliest
names signifying the congregation's various
stages of interest-emphasis Hebrew and
Sunday schools and Scout troop for children,
to the unique family member needs it meets
today through all these stages of its
development, Beth Kodesh has adapted
itself and its purpose to the educational,
religious and Jewish culture needs that
changed for its congregation over the years.
In perhaps its most serious challenge
resulting from Beth Kodesh's location in
what later became Little Havana, the con-
gregation has proudly managed to survive a
rapidly diminishing Jewish family consti-
tuency in the neighborhood.
Not even demographics have been able to
alter this congregation's proud will to sur-
vive and to serve. The 40th anniversary
celebration last Sunday heartily attests to
that.
On Stage in Moscow


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Friday, November 22,1985
Volume 58
9 KISLEV 5746
Number 47
By VICTOR LOUIS
London Chroniclt Syndicate
MOSCOW Moscow's
Jewish community is in a
state of intense excitement
as rumors spread of a possi-
ble airlift of Soviet Jews to
Tel Aviv via the Romanian
capital, Bucharest, either
aboard El Al planes or
French aircraft.
Some were joking about
whether the planes would refuel in
Paris and allow them some time to
enjoy themselves there.
Although there is no solid basis
for these rumors, Moscow Jews
are now linking them to the stag-
ing of a highly unusual play by the
Stanislavsky Theatre, in
Moscow's main thoroughfare,
Gorky Street.
FOR THE first time in almost
35 years, theatre-goers can hear
the word "Jew" pronounced on
the stage and see contemporary
Jewish characters portrayed with
warmth and sympathy.
However, the most exciting
aspect of the play entitled "40
Sholem Aleichem Street" and
written by Arkady Stavitsky, a
Jew is that its protagonists are
not merely talking of emigrating
to Israel, but even set out on their
journey of no return.
This is astonishing, considering
the practice over the years of the
Soviet mass media to maintain
total silence about the taboo sub-
ject of Jewish emigration.
ONLY A couple of years ago
"Theme," a film by Gleb Lanfilov,
one of the Soviet Union's leading
directors, was shelved indefinitely
because it broke this taboo.
The address in the title of the
new play is in Odessa. Number 40
is an old apartment building in-
habited by several different
families.
Jewish
It is their varying reactions to
the decision of one of their
number, the Margolins, to
emigrate which forms the
backbone of the play. Margolin is
a well-known Jewish surname in
the Soviet Union.
Rosa Margolin, an elderly
housewife who is well-loved by her
neighbors for her warmth and
generosity, is ready to leave the
country.
SHE BEARS no grudge
against the Soviet regime: "It is
kind. It has given us Jews a good
education, and we of the older
generation still remember the
times of the Pale under the Csar.
Nevertheless, she refuses to
regard herself, her family and any
other Jew wishing to emigrate as
traitors.
This is in stark contrast to her
hard-liner husband, Simeon, who
is a non-party Bolshevik.
The very idea of emigration
seems monstrous to Simeon. To
him, it is nothing less than high
treason. Yet it is also unthinkable
for him to remain and watch his
wife and children leave the
country.
Unable to face the dilemma, he
commits suicide and his wife
stays behind to bury him while
their two sons leave.
THESE SONS, both of whom
have made their homes in
Moscow, are the real driving force
behind the family decision to leave
the Soviet Union.
Both are well-educated. One is a
professor of physics and the other
a surgeon. The latter explains his
reason for emigrating: "I don't
want to see my successes claimed
by my colleague, just because I am
a Margolin, and he has a Russian
name.
The author of the play, Mr.
Stavitsky, certainly makes some
attempt to present the sons'
Seriously
motive for emigrating as selfish.
He tries to refute the surgeon's
motto: "Your motherland is not
where you happened to be born, it
is a place where you feel you
belong." However, his efforts to
castigate the would-be emigres
are half-hearted and
unconvincing.
DURING THE dress rehear
sals, people were wondering about
the battle the theatre directors
must have had to obtain permis-
sion to perform the play, but
perhaps the most astonishing
aspect of the whole affair is that
there was no battle.
No theatre director sane enough
to hold his position would even
have dreamed of trying to gain
permission to stage a play like "40
Sholem Aleichem Street."
In fact, the play was recom-
mended by none other than the
Soviet Ministry of Culture itself
The audience attending the
dress rehearsals was mixed. It in
:luded non-Jews as well as Jews,
among them many Moscow
theatrical personalities.
THE REACTIONS to the play
were highly emotional sobs, ap-
plause, laughter and gasps of
amazement. The performance of
Anna Bykov, the actress playing
Rosa Margolin, was especially
brilliant.
Although the actors playing the
Margolin family use Odessa
speech slightly colored with a
Jewish accent, they scrupulously
avoid even the slightest hint of
caricature.
A man in the fifties sitting
beside me murmured several
times: "I cannot believe my eyes
and ears. For the first time in
years, these Jews on the stage are
real people and not just poor tools
of anti-Zionist propaganda."
I LOOKED across to where
Continued on Page 12A


Friday, November 22, 1985/Th'e Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Jews Finally To Exit ? It's Anyone's Guess
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
Copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Ml Publication Rights Reserved
As the two superpowers
got nearer to their summit
in Geneva this week, and
the possibility increased of
peace talks in the Middle
East, reports became more
and more common that
large numbers of Jews will
soon leave the Soviet Union.
Estimates of the numbers of
Jews that may leave the USSR
range from 3,000 a month for
several years to 15,000 over a few
months to 400,000 over three
years. Speculation on the dates
they may leave the Soviet Union
ranged from just before the
Geneva summit or during the first
week in December or whenever
if ever the Russians decide to
issue exit visas.
SOME OF these rumors have
been tracked to a report two
weeks ago in the French
newspaper, Le Monde, that Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev had ask-
ed France to fly several thousand
Soviet Jews to Israel on a special
airlift. Other rumors have been
percolating from the offices of
Soviet Jewry groups in the U.S.
from press conferences held by
Israeli officials and from the
unflagging hopes of ordinary peo-
ple that the Russians would relax
their virtual ban on Jewish
emigration.
While one official at a national
Jewish organization tartly called
the immigration of 400,000 Jews
"propaganda from overly op-
timistic American Jews," Robert
0. Freedman, dean of the
graduate school of the Baltimore
Hebrew College, treated the
estimate more seriously.
"If 400,000 do get out," said
Fredman, an expert on Soviet
Jewry, "they will probably be
released over the next three
years."
THE RELEASE of thousands
of Soviet Jews is one of several
gambits that have recently surfac-
ed that could ease U.S.-Soviet ten-
sions, plus improve the chances of
peace in the Mideast. Among
these are:
Soviet permission three weeks
ago to the wife of Russian dissi-
dent Andrei Sakharov to travel to
the West for medical treatment.
A phone call by Sakharov to
his children and mother-in-law
now living in the United States.
Rumors are flying about a major
breakthrough in the long struggle to
bring the Jews of Russia to Israel.
Sakharov, who is in "internal ex-
ile" in the Russian city of Gorky,
had not been allowed to speak
with his family for six years.
Unsubstantiated reports of a
spy swap between the U.S. and
the Soviet Union. This would in-
clude the release of Sakharov and
Anatol Shcharansky:
Imprisoned for "treason"
since 1978, the mathema-
tician first applied for
a visa to Israel In
1973. Ha has boon linked
to a possible East/West
spy swap.
another famous Soviet dissident,
Anatoly Scharasky.
The spy swap, which would
ostensibly occur after the
Gorbachev-Reagan summit, was
reported last week by a West Ger-
man newspaper, the Hamburg
Bild. It would allegedly free
several jailed Soviet and East
German spies in exchange for the
same number of Western agents
who have been imprisoned i
Russia and East Germany.
Reports of the spy swap have
been denied by American and
West German officials.
OFFICIALS OF organizations
in the United States working on
behalf of Soviet Jewry
characterized the rosy reports
about Jews in the USSR as
"rumor," "unsubstantiated
hope," and "disinformation."
"As always," said Billy Keyserl-
ing, Washington director of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, "there is reason for hope.
But right now, there is no reason
for optimism."
Reports of the Russian emigra-
tion door opening "have absolute-
ly no credence whatsoever," said
Keyserling. "Luckily, this issue is
extremely verifiable. We just look
at the numbers getting out of the
Soviet Union and they are still
abysmally low."
(Last month, 124 Jews
emjgrated from Russia. In each of
the three preceding months, 93,
29 and 174 Jews left. These com-
pare to 4,000 a month in 1979.)
ALSO DEFLATING the op-
timism was an observation from
Karl Zukerman, national ex-
ecutive vice president of HIAS
(the Hebrew Immigration Aid
Society): "The earliest possible
sign that there is movement
would be word from Soviet Jews
that they are leaving. In the past,
they have been told that they will
receive their visas in one to three
months. As soon as they hear this,
they call their relatives in the
West."
"No one," said Zukerman, "has
received such a call."
Nevertheless, the head of one
international human rights group
confirmed that "something is
definitely going on." And Robert
Freedman cautioned that "We are
most certainly at an extremely
delicate stage."
THE MORE lenient Soviet at-
titude toward the Sakharovs and
reports of the imminent release of
Soviet Jews seem to be the result
of the convergence in time of two
events that may have long-term
influence on global relations.
These are:
The Geneva summit, with its
first face-to-face meeting between
Ronald Reagan and Mikhail
Gorbachev;
The possibility of direct
Mideast negotiations between
Israel, Jordan, Palestinian
representatives, the United
States and, perhaps, the Soviet
Union.
Insiders say that most of the
talk about increased Soviet
Jewish emigration stemmed from
pre-summit jockeying. This is not,
they say, to entirely dismiss the
speculation. But for both
diplomatic and public relations
purposes, the Soviets
disseminated information that
made it appear that a thaw in
East-West relations could also
produce a thaw in the condition of
Jews in Russia. And the
Americans disseminated informa-
tion that made it appear that such
a thaw would be contingent to the
easing of immigration for Jews
from the Soviet Union.
More likely, though, is the pro-
bability that all the talk about
emigration stems from the
Soviets' desire not to be frozen
out of any Mideast peace talks.
Since the Russians would sit down
at the negotiating table party at
the sufferance of Israel, the
Israelis, for once, have some
leverage they can use to unlock
Russia's emigration doors. But
the Russians, partly to satisfy
themselves and partly to placate
the more radical Arab states, have
refused to be bulldozed by Israel
into making any major
concessions.
ACCORDING TO the
Baltimore Hebrew College's
Freedman, the Soviets have been
modifying their long-standing
animosity toward Israel for
several months. Beginning, said
Freedman, with the announce-
ment of a new peace proposal last
February by Jordan's King Hus-
sein and the PLO's Yassir Arafat,
"the Soviets have been concerned
that they will be left at the sta-
tion" and will not be allowed to
Continued on Page 11-A
Israel Unlikely To Be Able To Absorb Them
With Israel still reeling from the recent influx of
more than 15,000 Ethiopian immigrants, doubts
have surfaced about its ability to absorb a large
number of Soviet emigres.
More conservative estimates of the number of
Russian Jews who may soon arrive in Israel vir-
tually equal the number of Falashas who arrived in
Israel near the end of 1984 and the begining of this
year. The Ethiopians strained the ability of both
the Jewish State to integrate them and pf world
Jewry to raise funds to care for them. Israeli ab-
sorption centers have been so taxed that over
1,600 Ethiopians are still housed in hotels. Many
have not yet learned Hebrew or been trained in
skills that are marketable in Israel.
Americans Jews pledged $63 million toward
aiding Israel with the Falashas. According to the
Jewish Agency, the cost to date to Israel of absorb-
ing the Falashas has been $150 million. While
there are reports that up to 400,000 Russian Jews
may leave the USSR, their per capita absorption
expenses would probably be lower than for the
Ethiopians. The incoming Soviet Jews will be more
highly trained and better educated than have been
their Ethiopian counterparts.
"America Jews and Israelis would welcome the
problems that Russian immigrants would bring to
Israel," said Karl Zukerman. executive vice presi-
dent of HIAS. "This is the sort of 'problem' for
which we've been praying for years."
-AJM.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Top Nazi's Apprehension
Praised By Jewish Groups
Bv KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Three leading Jewish
organizations last weekend
praised the apprehension in
Argentina of 71-year-old
Walter Kutschmann, a
former Nazi SS officer and
Gestapo official, arrested
near Buenos Aires on a
special extradition request
from West Germany.
Kutschmann. who has been liv-
ing in Argentina under the alias of
Pedro Ricardo Olmo since 1947. is
reported to have told arresting of-
ficers last Thursday night. "The
chase is over. I will not run.** Ar-
rested by four police agents work-
ing with Interpol. the interna-
tional police identification
netowrk. he is one of the highest
ranking former Nazi officials alive
today.
AMONG THE charges facing
Kutschmann in West Germany
are that as an SS officer and
Gestapo official in 1941 and 1942
he ordered the execution of 1.300
Jews in Berezhany and Podgaisty
and the killing of 20 university
professors and their families in
Lvov, an area of then-German oc-
cupied Poland, and now part of
the Soviet l"kraine.
Reports from Argentina said
Kutschmann continued after his
arrest to maintain that he was not
Kutschmann. but that he was
Pedro Olmo. Officials in Argen-
tina failed to say how long it
would take the judge to hand
down a decision on the extradition
request from West Germany.
There is no formal extradition
treaty between West Germany
and Argentina.
Officials of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith have pro-
vided extensive information on
Kutschmann's presence in Argen-
tina. As recently as last March.
Rabbi Morton Rosenthal. director
of the ADL's Latin American Af-
fairs Department, and Elliot
Welles, head of the ADL's Nazi
war criminals task force, testified
before a Congressional subcom-
mittee on Kutschmann.
ROSENTHAL and Welles told
the subcommittee that Pedro
Olmo could be identified as
K ;tschmanr. by scars on his upper
thigh received when he was
wounded while fighting in the
Spanish Civil War In addition,
the ADL officials said
Kutschmann had his blood type
tatooed under his arm in accor-
dance with SS practices.
The ADL praised the arrest of
Kutschmann. ADL director
Nathan Perlmutter described the
arrest as "an historic accomplish-
ment" that "should serve as a
warning to Nazi war criminals .
that the international community
is still conscious of their heinous
crimes and that only the grave
will give them immunity from
prosecution."
Wallenberg Will
Be Remembered
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Senate has approved legislation to
name a street in front of the soon-
to-be built U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Museum as "Raoul
Wallenberg Place" in honor of the
Swedish diplomat who saved some
100,000 Jews in Hungary during
Worid War II
The naming of the street was in
am amendment to the District of
Columbia Appropriation Bill in-
troduced by Sen. Carl Levin (D..
Mich.). The House took similar ac-
tion earner this year. Levin said it
was "appropriate" that the street
be named for Wallenberg, "a man
who saved so many from the hor-
ror of the Holocaust."
World Jewish Congress Presi-
dent Edgar Bronfmann sent a
cable to President Raul Alfonsin
of Argentina applauding "this
historic action" and urging speedy
extradition of Kutschmann to
West Germany. The WJC said it
will open its archives to make
available all evidence in this case
to West Germany and Argenti-
nian authorities.
THE LOS ANGELES-based
Simon Wiesenthal Center said the
apprehension of Kutschmann
"could be a significant develop-
ment in the arrest of other war
criminals still at large in South
America." Nazi-hunter Simon
Wiesenthal has been in touch in
recent months with the West Ger-
man prosecutors in Berlin to
discuss the progress of the
Kutschmann case, Wiesenthal
Center officials asserted.
Born in Dresden on May 25.
1914. Kutschmann lived most of
his early life in Berlin. He was
trained by the Luftwaffe prior to
joining the Nazi party in February
1940. and the SS in"December of
the same year. As a 27-year-old
SS lieutenant. Kutschmann was
involved in the extermination of
Polish university professors and
members of their families.
The Argentine weekly
magazine. Gente. reported in 1983
that these executions were part of
the Nazi plan to kill some 5.000
Jewish academicians in order to
"diminish the intellectual poten-
tial of the country," ADL officials
reported.
KUTSCHMANN was subse
quently promoted to an SS post in
the Galician town of Tarnopol,
later becoming chief of Gestapo in
Berezhany. where he allegedly
was responsible for the assassina-
tion of more than 1.500 Jews. Ac-
cording to SS documents.
Kutschmann was transferred to
France during the closing days of
the war but was listed as a
deserter in 1945. He reportedly fl-
ed to Spain and finally to Argen-
tina where he assumed his new
identity.
In Argentina. Kutschmann
worked for the West German
Osram Electric Company, accor-
ding to ADL officials. A
spokesman for the firm in Munich
stated in 1975 that Kutschmann
revealed his true identity to the
firm. In 1975. also. Simon Wiesen-
thal publicly identified
Kutschmann as a Nazi war
criminal and photos of him were
published in Argentine papers and
magazines. In a press conference
that same year. Kutschmann
asserted that his German accent
was due to the fact that he had liv-
ed in Germany as a child.
Congressman William Lehman (center) meets
in Washington with members of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, an arm
oftkt Greater Miami Jewish Federation, who
were attending the annual meeting of the
Union of Councils for Sox'iet Jews. Lehman
recently wrote to President Reagan urging
him to raise Soviet Jewish emigration and
human rights issues with Secretary Gor-
bachev at the Geneva summit. From left are
Howard Cantor. Doris Hochstadt. Hindu
Cantor. Rep. Lehman. Adele Sandberg.
Shirley Pollak. Joel Sandberg.
Policymakers Locked in Budget Battle
Bv DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israeli policymakers are
locked in a battle of the
budget. Finance Minister
Yitzhak Modai is urging
cuts totalling a half billion
dollars in the 1986-87
budgets of the Defense,
Education and Health
Ministries. Premier Shimon
Peres is adamantly opposed.
The budget for the next fiscal
year must be submitted to the
Cabinet soon. A series of
meetings between Peres and
Modai has failed to break the
deadlock. Modai reportedly has
warned that without the specific
cuts, important goals of his
economic austerity program will
not be met on schedule.
AFTER A late night meeting,
aides to Peres said the Premier
would allow "no further blows at
defense, education and health."
They noted that cuts in the
defense budget inevitably resulted
in lay-offs and closures
throughout the economy because
the defense establishment is a ma-
jor contractor of a host of civilian
industries.
There is a political element in
the economic discussions. The
three ministries most affected are
headed by Laborites Yitzhak
Rabin. Defense: Yitzhak Navon.
Education: and Mordachai Gur.
Health. Modai is a Likud Liberal
and there is suspicion in Labor
circles that his demand for cuts is
motivated at least partly by par-
tisan political considerations.
Meanwhile, the government has
relaxed its policy toward certain
sectors of the economy that are in
especially dire straits. The
Cabinet last week approved a $90
million loan to farmers and agreed
to make $50 million in govern-
ment funds available to hardpress-
ed local authorities. Development
towns have been exempted from
the blanket freeze on public
building and investment.
ALSO UNDER consideration is
the creation of a $100 million loan
fund to business firms facing
serious but temporary economic
problems. Hebrew University
economist Michael Bruno, one of
the authors of the government's
austerity program, said in a
speech last week that while he op-
posed indiscriminate government
bailouts of failing businesses, he
did believe that certain companies
which are fundamentally sound
should be helped by the govern-
ment through temporary dif-
ficulties brought about by the
economic squeeze.
Among such firms hard hit of
late are Elscint. the Haifa-based
manufacturer of medical equip-
ment, and Solel Boneh,
Histadrut's giant construction
company.
Meanwhile, the Central Bureau
of Statistics announced that
Israel's balance of trade gap in the
last quarter was 27 percent
smaller than in the same three
month period last year.
THAT GOOD news was
tempered by official concern over
a recent rise in the import of con-
sumer durables, including cars.
They attribute it to the anticipa-
tion by dealers of a consumer buy-
ing spree fueled by the redemp-
tion by old-age pensioners of their
frozen bank shares.
Persons under 65 who held bank
shares when the market collapsed
in October. 1983, are now permit
ted to sell them.
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Rabin to CJF
Israel Will Negotiate With Palestinians, Not PLO
Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Egypt Says Investigation
Results in Shootings Ready Soon
Continued from Page 1-A
stressed that Israel prefers the
pattern used in the Egyptian-
Israeli talks; the two sides with
the participation of the United
States. Rabin said it was up to
Jordan now. "The ball is in the
Jordanian court," he said.
IN HIS address to the CJF,
Rabin said he believes Israel must
"take risks for peace. We have
taken too many risks at war."
He stressed that "for peace you
have to compromise." He said in
negotiations some of the demands
of the other side must be met as
long as they "don't undermine the
purpose of Israel, the security of
Israel."
However, he said that in
negotiations with Jordan, the pat-
tern with Egypt will not be follow-
ed where every inch of territory
acquired in the" 1967 Six-Day War
was returned. But to get peace
without giving anything is an
illusion."
On Israel's northern border,
Rabin said Israel has withdrawn
from Lebanon and is now concern-
ed with safeguarding the borders
and protecting the towns and peo-
ple in the north.
He said Israel is able to deal
with terrorism but there is no way
to completely ensure against acts
of terrorism. "It is an illusion to
assume that by one good war you
can finish all wars, all terrorism,"
he said. "We have paid too heavily
for the belief in such an illusion."
AT THE start of his talk, he
noted that the "mini-crisis" over
Ariel Sharon has captured the
headlines. But he said this had
nothing to do with Israel's real
problems.
Israel must take risks
for peace. 'We have
taken too many risks
for war'
Yitzhak Rabin
At the State Department, when
he was asked if he had discussed
the Cabinet crisis with Shultz,
Rabin replied, "What do we have
to discuss in Washington pro-
blems that have to be solved in
Jerusalem.
The Labor Party leader said
that the national unity govern-
ment of Labor and Likud has
worked to help solve Israel's
economic problems. He said suc-
cess has been achieved by large
cuts in the Israeli standard of liv-
ing and for the first time in the
military budget.
"Israel has never taken such a
security risk," he said, adding it
has cut its military budget while
the Arab countries continue to
build up their arms.
DURING THE program, there
was a commemoration of the 40th
anniversary of the liberation of
the death camps, with
Washington area day school
children lighting six large
memorial candles.
The most moving moment was
an appearance by Avital Sharan-
sky, wife of Anatoly Sharansky,
who had been conducting a vigil
outside the Soviet Embassy here
before leaving for the Geneva
summit.
She urged all the General
Assembly delegates to participate
in the various demonstrations go-
ing on to show the Soviet Union
the massive support in this coun-
try for Soviet Jews. On Friday
morning, following her short ad-
dress to the Assembly, more than
600 delegates joined her in a two-
hour vigil opposite the Soviet
Embassy.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Egypt has assured Israel
that the results of its in-
vestigation into the fatal
shooting of seven Israeli
tourists, four of them
children, at Ras Burka in
Sinai in September will be
forthcoming within the next
few days.
The Egyptian Charge d'Af-
faires in Tel Aviv, Mohammad
Basyouni, told officials that the
killer would be placed on trial. He
was described by the Egyptians at
the time as a policeman who went
berserk. Many Israelis contend he
was a soldier. The Egyptian-
Israeli peace treaty of 1979 for-
bids Egypt to station soldiers in
the part of Sinai where the
shooting occured.
ISRAELI OFFICIALS promis-
ed the families of the victims that
the government would make
every effort to help them and will
continue to demand from Egypt a
detailed and comprehensive in-
vestigation into the circumstances
of the tragedy.
Autopsies by Israeli doctors in-
dicated that five of the seven vic-
tims might have lived, had their
wounds been treated on the spot.
According to Israeli eye-
witnesses, the wounded were left
unattended for four hours.
Although Egypt promised a
speedy investigation it has not
been completed more than a
month later.
Three Israelis who were at Ras
Burka at the time testified before
the Egyptian inquiry commission
two weeks ago.
Representatives of the victims'
families were invited to a meeting
of the ministerial directors
general committee which was
established to follow
developments in the case. They
will be updated at another
meeting .
Israel's Diamonds Lose Sparkle
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's diamond industry,
which anticipated record Christmas season sales barely a
month ago, has been plunged into gloom. The outlook, so
promising in October, is bleak in November, according to
Moshe Schnitzer, the usually ebulliently optimistic presi-
dent of the diamond bourse in Ramat Can.
FINISHED DIAMONDS for industrial use and
jewelry are one of Israel's chief exports. Japan is a major
customer. A group of Japanese buyers visited the Ramat
Gan exchange recently to place orders. Spirits soared. But
then they plummeted. The Japanese, at the last minute,
withheld orders. Several buyers cancelled contracts
already signed.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Summit Eve: 'Confidence' Reagan Would Raise Human Rights Issue
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Two leaders of the Na-
tional Conference of Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ) said that they
were "confident" that
President Reagan would
deal with the issue of Soviet
Jewry when he met with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev in Geneva and
stressed that it was up to
Oil Minister
Doing Business
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Egypt's Oil Minister, Abdul Hadi
Kandil, was expected here for
talks with Energy Minister Moshe
Shahal. The contract for Israel's
purchase of Sinai oil from Egypt
will expire shortly. The Egyptians
are expected to sign a new
contract.
Reagan to decide how he
does it.
Gerald Kraft, an NCSJ vice
president and president of B'nai
B'rith International, and Jerry
Goodman, the NCSJ's executive
director, said that they have
received both public and private
pledges from Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz
that the issue would be dealt with
"seriously." Kraft noted that the
President personally considers
the issue important.
"WE LOOK to the President
and his Administration as the
ones who will carry the message
in whatever means the President
thinks as best," Goodman said.
"He is essentially, in this regard,
our messenger."
Reagan, in an interview with
wire service reporters last
Wednesday, said that human
rights would be discussed at the
Geneva summit. "But I don't
think that it is profitable to put
things of this kind out in public
where any change in policy would
be viewed as succumbing to
another power," the President
said.
"This is a tactic which we
understand and which we approve
of and we know it has worked in
the past in negotiations with the
Soviets," Kraft said.
However, Kraft noted that
there has been little pre-summit
attention to human rights in the
media partially because the Presi-
dent wants to make "headway in-
stead of headlines" and because
he said some in the media do not
want to ask tough questions of the
Soviets for fear of losing access to
Gorbachev and other Soviet of-
ficials at the summit.
FOR THIS REASON. Kraft
said the Jewish community in the
United States and abroad, sup-
ported by many non-Jews, is seek-
ing to bring the issue of Soviet
Jewry to public attention both to
support Reagan's efforts and to
let Gorbachev know of the con-
cern of world public opinion.
There are a series of educational
programs in the U.S. and abroad
and numerous demonstrations are
planned throughout the United
States. A major event was a rally
in Lafayette Park, Sunday, which
included a march past the White
House to the Soviet Embassy.
In addition, Kraft said
synagogues and churches were be-
ing asked to hold prayer services
for Soviet Jews on Monday and he
and other Soviet Jewish leaders of
the World Conference on Soviet
Jewry would be in Geneva during
the summit. There was a day of
solidarity with Soviet Jews
throughout the world on Tuesday.
BOTH KRAFT and Goodman
discounted as rumors reports that
the Soviet Union might allow
large numbers of Jews to
emigrate before the summit.
Goodman noted one figure men-
tioned was 15,000 which he said is
the estimated number of
refuseniks.
Kraft said he was in Europe
when the rumors began to appear
in the European press, and he
tried to confirm them and found
they were false. "When people ar-
rive, however they arrive
that's the only means test we
have," Goodman said. He said on
ly 124 Jews left the USSR in 0e.
tober, and he did not expect the
figures to be any better this
month or in December.
Both leaders stressed that Jews
want the summit to succeed
Goodman said the organized T
Jewish community was ''not ami
Soviet, but pro-Soviet Jewry."
Kraft said there was no request
that there be "linkage'' between
human rights and an arms agree
ment. "If the Soviet Union is to be
trusted on an issue as vital to the
peace of the world as arms con-
trol, then they are going to have
to prove that they can be trusted
as a signatory to human rights
agreements," he said.
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Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
... But Administration Frankly Doesn't Think So
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- The Reagan Administra-
tion said it did not expect
any agreement on human
rights to emerge from the
summit between President
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev in
Geneva this week.
Instead, a senior Administra-
tion official said that President
Reagan would raise concerns and
hope there will be some specific
action following the summit. The
official, briefing reporters on the
summit, said there is no need for
any new agreements on human
rights since it is all contained in
the Helsinki accords. "It's all
there, we don't need anything fur-
ther other than human rights
adherence," he said.
HUMAN RIGHTS was not an
agenda item but would be raised
by the President as Secretary of
State George Shulta did in hjs
meeting with Gorbachev in
Moscow last week, the official
said. He noted that Gorbachev did
not say it was an internal matter
but instead charged the U.S. with
human rights violations.
The official said the specific con-
cerns are increased emigration,
the release of prisoners and allow-
ing them to emigrate, and the
need for the Soviet Union to be a
more open society.
However, the official said the
"only signal" so far from the
Soviet Union was the permission
granted to Yelena Bonner, wife of
Andrei Sakharov, to go to the
West for medical treatment and
to return.
The official stressed that the
U.S. would not negotiate on a "tit
for tat basis X number of people
(are allowed to leave) we do this,
Y number of people we do that."
INSTEAD, he said the U.S. will
present its concerns and "see
whether we can get some sort of
response from them and then
there might be responses from our
part."
The official noted that the
Soviets know that the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment provides that
if the President determines
emigration from the USSR has
improved, then the U.S. can pro-
vide the Soviet Union with Most
Favored Nation trade benefits
and other exchanges.
Leaders At Geneva
Pessimistic About USSR's Ability To Abide By Arms Agreement
By TAMAR LEVY
And EDWIN EYTAN
GENEVA (JTA) -
Jewish leaders from around
the world, gathered here on
the eve of the summit con-
ference between President
Reagan and Soviet Leader
Mikhail Gorbachev, stressed
Monday that if the USSR
does not abide by the human
rights clauses of the
Helsinki accords, to which it
is a signatory, it cannot be
trusted to honor an arms
limitation agreement.
That point was emphasized
repeatedly by speakers at two
press conferences, one held by
Edgar Bronsman
faint note of hope
Jewish leaders this morning and
the other early in the afternoon by
the Los Angeles-based Simon
Wiesenthal Center. Both were at-
tended by large contingents of the
international media. Some
observers suggested they took at-
tention away from the arrival of
Gorbachev who landed here at
noon. Reagan arrived in Geneva
Saturday.
THE ONLY faintly optimistic
outlook with respect to Soviet
Jews was expressed by Edgar
Bronfman, president of the World
Jewish Congress, who visited the
Soviet Union recently. He said he
had contact there with Gorbachev,
and "We were given to unders-
tand that the Soviet Union might
make a gesture."
But Avital Sharansky, wife of
Vandalism
Boro Park Has Own 'Kristallnacht'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Vandalism against Jewish-
owned stores in the heavily
42S Orthodox Boro Park section
of Brooklyn recently has
aroused serious concern
among community leaders
who believe it was a
premeditated act of anti-
Semitism planned to coin-
cide with the 47th anniver-
sary of Kristallnacht. the
destruction of Jewish pro-
perty in Nazi Germany dur-
ing the night of Nov. 8-9,
1938.
Rabbi Israel Steinberg, director
ommunity relations of the
New York State Division of
Human Rights, a Boro Park resi-
dent, told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agencv that the windows of 14
Jewish-owned or Jewish-
indentified shops were smashed
with "heavy rocks" along a
10-block stretch of 13th Avenue,
the neighborhood shopping
center.
NON-JEWISH shops and
businesses were untouched, he
said. There were no graffiti or
slogans. Steinberg said damage to
the windows alone would amount
to about $3,000. Merchandise was
damaged, but there were no
thefts.
New York State Assemblyman
Dov Hikind, who represents the
district, said he inspected the
damage Sunday. He told the JTA
he was convinced the vandalism
was "well planned" and
"methodical." He agreed with
N.Y. Police Form Special Force
To Study Jewish Store Havoc
NEW YORK (JTA) The New York Police Depart-
ment has established a special task force to investigate the
smashing, last weekend, of the windows of 13 Jewish-
owned or Jewish-identified stores in Boro Park, the Jewish
Community Relations Council announced. The task force,
which will work exclusively on the case around the clock,
will draw detectives from the Bias Squad and from
Brooklyn South, where it will be headquartered.
AT THE SAME TIME, the JCRC announced it is of-
fering a $4,000 reward for information leading to the arrest
and conviction of the perpetrators of the crime. This sup-
plements the $1,000 reward posted by Assemblyman Dov
Hilkind, who represents the Boro Park district, and the
13th Street Merchants Association's President, Mendy
Klin and Vice President, Joseph Goldstein. The vandalism
occurred along a 10-block stretch of that avenue, the
'K'ltfhborhood's main shopping center.
Hilkind, a Boro Park resident, said earlier this week
that lie was convinced the vandalism was "well planned"
;|||(I "methodical." He said he agreed with the theory that
the vandalism may have been timed to coincide with the
|7th anniversary'of Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken
pogrom in Germany the ni^ht of November 8-9, 1938,
Steinberg that the act could have
been timed to coincide with the
Kristallnacht anniversary and the
10th anniversary of the passage of
the "Zionism is Racism" resolu-
tion by the UN General Assembly
on Nov. 10, 1975.
He also suggested that the anti-
Semitic attacks by the Rev. Louis
Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of
Islam, could have been a factor.
HIKIND NOTED that more
Holocaust survivors live in Boro
Park than in any other part of the
country. Steinberg said the rock-
throwers must have been out-
siders. He said there have been no
racial incidents in the
neighborhood.
Hikind and Steinberg, who met
with Capt. Donald Thrash of the
66th Precinct, said the police have
classified the vandalism as a "bias
incident," meaning racially
motivated and detectives of the
special "bias squad" have been
assigned to the investigation.
But Sgt. Diane Kubler of the
Police Department's information
office said there was no evidence
yet to "substantiate" racial
motivation. She said detectives
are canvassing the area for
witnesses. So far no suspects have
been apprehended.
HiTech Reps
Have Job Offers
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Representatives of hi-tech in-
dustries in Israel met here with
more than 900 Israelis who live in
the New York area and potential
American olim in a special "face-
to-face" campaign offering them
jobs in Israel.
According to Consul Amos Had-
dad, head of the delegation of
Israel's Ministry of Labor in the
U.S. the hi-tech representatives
are seeking about 60(1 profes
sional Israelis and potential olim
work in Israel's expanding
science, engineering and com-
puter industries.
imprisoned activist Anatoly
Sharansky, charged at the other
press conference that the situa-
tion of Soviet Jews has
deteriorated drastically in recent
months. She maintained that
rumors to the contrary are "an ex-
ample of Soviet misinformation."
According to Sharansky, since
Gorbachev came to power, the lot
of Soviet Jews has worsened.
Avraham Harman, president of
the Israeli Council for Soviet
Jewry, told the morning press
conference, "While the situation
of Soviet Jewry continues there
can be no trust in the Soviet
Union for progress in any of the
grave issues facing the world."
GERALD KRAFT, president of
B'nai B'rith International, said,
"The Soviets must honor these
(human rights) commitments if
they want us to believe that they
will honor any new pledges they
make. If the Soviet Union wants
the world to believe it will honor
an agreement on arms control or
missile limitations, they must
demonstrate their credibility by
honoring an agreement already
signed the Helsinki accord. On-
ly then can the world be certain
that a Soviet pledge can be taken
seriously.'"
Members of the executive com-
mittee of the World Conference
on Soviet Jewry (successor to the
Brussels Conference) make it
clear that they are not opposed to
either the Soviet government or
the Soviet people. "What we
want, and this is the reason for
our meeting here, is to state our
concern for Soviet Jewry," they
said, pointing out that the situa-
tion is critical. There are 21
Jewish activists in prison or exile.
Last month only 124 Jews were
allowed to leave the USSR.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
CJF Chief Fears
U.S. Jews May Lose Commitment
2 Soviets Predicted Human
Rights Would Be Ignored
1
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Shoshana Cardin, presi-
dent of the Council of
Jewish Federations
declared that with Jews
moving increasingly to new
locales in North America,
the Federations in the
United States and Canada
must reach out to them to
involve them in the local
Jewish community in order
to foster a "sense of na-
tional community with na-
tional commitments."
"The single greatest threat to
our Jewish community is disaf-
filiation and non-affiliaton," she
told a plenary meeting of the
CJF's 54th General Assembly at
the Kennedy Center.
MORE THAN 3,000 delegates,
representing 200 Federations
from 800 North American com-
munities, attended the four-day
Assembly with the theme,. "The
coming of age of North American
Jewry."
"History has proven that Jews
need fraternity with other Jews
to assure their continuity the ac-
tive, creative affiliation of Jews is,
therefore, a value which we must
foster with ever increasing en-
thusiasm," Cardin said. "Affilia-
tion with Jewish organizational
life is a Jewish value in and of
itself."
Cardin, of Baltimore, said
Federations "have to encourage
Jews to join and participate in
Jewish community centers,
synagogues, Jewish communal
organizations, Jewish women's
and men's groups, youths and
young adult organizations, Jewish
educational environments, both
formal and informal." She stress-
ed this was a major "responsibili-
ty to Jewish continuity" since
"unaffiliated Jews rarely transmit
the value of continuity to those
who follow them."
p
IN ADDITION, "we ought not
to fear diversity, we ought not
fear pluralism," Cardin stressed.
"Jewish life was never monolithic.
Diverse opinions, different points
of view and diverse ideologies
must fill a sense of comfort and
security in our Federations pro-
vided, of course, that these do not
compel us, Federations and CJF,
Shoshana Cardin
to become instruments of
divisiveness in Jewish life. We
must and we do stand firm and
together on matters that threaten
our security and continuity."
Cardin added, "The Federation
movement must foster Jewish
continuity as the most serious
dimension of our Israel-diaspora
agenda. Israel is a 'magical' ingre-
dient in motivating Jews to want
to maintain and enhance their
Jewishness.
"We must, therefore, seek
broader, deeper, more personal
and more meaningful experiences
for Federations, for CJF, our con-
stituencies and, of course,
ourselves, the leadership,
volunteer and professional, in an
Israel connection."
IN HER address, Cardin noted
that the General Assembly was
meeting on the eve of the summit
in Geneva between President
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev. "The plight of Soviet
Jewry is always uppermost in our
minds" and during the CJF
meeting here, delegates would be
delivering a stream of letters to
the Soviet Embassy "beseeching
Soviet leadership to let our people
go," Cardin said.
She announced that she had
sent a telegram to Reagan declar-
ing that the delegates to the
General Assembly "send you our
blessings and best wishes for suc-
cessful deliberations at your for-
thcoming historic summit with
Secretary General Gorbachev."
The telegram urged Reagan "to
demand of the Secretary General
that the Soviet Union permit the
well over 400,000 Soviet Jews
wishing to emigrate from the
Soviet Union to do so. The
credibility of the Soviet Union's
agreements is at stake and their
commitment to universal human
rights, which they have signed, is
under serious question."
CARDIN PRAISED Reagan
for his pledge last week to work
for the removal of the United Na-
tions General Assembly Resolu-
tion equating Zionism with
racism. "For us Zionism
represents one of the most noble
movements in the history of our
people and all of mankind," she
said. "We pledge ourselves to the
abhorence of racism; wherever it
may be found including among our
own."
Cardin noted that this year is
the 90th anniversary of the foun-
ding of the first two Federations,
in Boston and Cincinnati. She said
that the Federations and the CJF
have always been devoted to
philanthropy and rescue.
"Essentially, our hallmark is
caring," Cardin said. But she
stressed it was not limited to the
Jewish community. "We cannot
achieve maximally if the broader
community in which we live falls
behind," she stressed. "It is our
responsibility to participate in our
general community in a giving
way, in a caring manner and
through responsible leadership."
Washington Mayor Marion
Barry welcomed the CJF not only
as the city's Mayor but as a
representative of another minori-
ty who had suffered discrimina-
tion and oppression.
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from the subject of war or peace.
PROF. ZIVCE acknowledged
that he was of Jewish origin, 'but
I am not a practicing Jew." When
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
asked how he could tolerate the
anti-Semitic propaganda in the
Soviet press, he replied, "You do
not read our press, you just hear
false propaganda."
Many reporters pressed him on
the condition of Soviet Jews and
their desire to emigrate. He said
many thousands of Jews have left
the USSR. He admitted that
several thousand still want to
emigrate but cannot be granted
exit visas because they held, or
still hold, key positions which
make them privy to State secrets.
Zivce maintained that many
Jews who have emigrated now
wish they hadn't. He said, "I met
several thousand Jews who left
our country and live miserably in
Vienna, Brooklyn and Brighton
Beach (in Brooklyn). I can assure
you there is nothing to envy them
for. They have a terrible existence
and want to return to the Soviet
Union."
ZIVCE, who is vice president of
the anti-Zionist Committee of the
Soviet People, insisted there was
no Jewish problem in the USSR
and no anti-Semitism. "The Jews
are only 0.69 percent of our
population, so how can there be a
Jewish problem?' he asked.
He recited a list of Jews who
hold high positions in the Soviet
Union or who have been recipients
of prizes. He maintained that"
what the West calls anti-Semitism
is in fact anti-Zionism. "We are
anti-Zionist concerning the Middle
East," he said.
Soukharev declared his country-
is eager to reestablish diplomtic
relations with Israel and contacts
on that subject are continuing. He
noted that the Soviet Union had
"helped in the creation of the
Jewish State" in 1948.
Jordanian Minister Visits Israel
JERUSALEM (JTA) An official delegation
representing the Jordanian Ministry of Agriculture visited
Israel recently and spent four days talking to Arab farmers
in the West Bank, Deputy Minister of Agriculture
Avraham Katz-Oz disclosed Friday. He said it was the
fourth such visit by an agricultural working group from
Jordan.
HE SAID the visitors crossed the Jordan River bridge
and reported formally to the Israel government and to the
West Bank Military Governor before embarking on their
tour of Arab farms in the territory. Katz-Oz met with them
in his official capacity.
Jordan still maintains nominal responsibility for Arab
residents in the West Bank who are governed by Jordanian
law.
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j
Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Are The Gates
Of Oppression
About To Open?
ontinued from Page 5-A
ticipate in a Mideast
ement
ith (iorbachev's rise to power
larch, said Freedman, there as
n a subtle but perceptible
fening of the Soviet Union's ai-
de inward Israel. A front-page
ry in Izcestiu in May, for exam-
. mentioned that Israeli Presi-
t Chain) Herzog had thanked
Russian people for helping to
feat the Nazis in World War II.
is was a major departure, said
eednian, from the Soviets'
lal equation of Zionism with
seism.
ext came a meeting in mid-
y in Paris between the Israeli
I Soviet ambassadors. This
urred speculation that the two
it i<>ns would soon resume
ilomatic relations. But radical
ab stales, such as Syria and
uth Yemen, protested that none
If Israel's opponents including
e Soviet Union should
establish relations with the
ewish State until Israel relin-
uished some of the land it has oc-
^ipied since the 1967 Six-Day
"ir.
ii response to the Arab out-
|urst. the Soviets said any formal
latinns between the USSR and
rael would be at an extremely
w diplomatic level, perhaps, for
Russians, through the em-
assy in Tel Aviv of another
laslern bloc natiOH.-* r'
I NEVERTHELESS, the pace of
>ntact between Russia and Israel
las been quickening. In early
fe|itember, Edgar Bronfman,
-J -ad of the World Jewish Con-
ess, visited Moscow with a let-
r from Israeli Prime Minister
limon Peres to Soviet leader
jrhachev. There have been press
ports that Peres offered to
duee Israeli anti-Soviet pro-
p'nda in exchange for increas-
lewish emigration.
While there is no confirmation
these reports, it is clear that
onfman discussed with Kremlin
aders the entire spectrum of
sues affecting Soviet Jews: re-
nt arrests of Jewish activists,
creased emigration, direct
iKhts for Jews from Russia to
irael. greater tolerance for Jews'
ik'i"us practices.
It has also been learned that
tlj after Bronfman's visit,
resentatives from El Al, the
ficial Israel airlines, journeyed
Russia to discuss with Soviet
Jthonties the feasibility of direct
U-'hts to Israel on El Al for Soviet
wish emigres. The idea was nix-
\ the Russians.
ABOUT TWO weeks after his
. t<> Russia, Bronfman met at
e UN with Polish Prime
mister General Wojciech
aruzelski. Five days later,
Poland and Israel announced they
pould exchange "interest sec-
Jons" (a form of low-level
Iplomatic recognition). Such an
Exchange, it is believed, could only
i done with the approval of the
oviet Union.
| Also in September, Gorbachev
d while on an official visit to
fans, that he would consider the
migration of certain Soviet
roups for the purposes of "family
^unification." Signatories to the
lelsinki Accords, which include
ve Soviet Union, agree not to in-
Jrfere with emigration that
lould reunite families. Critics of
?vi-t policies have charged that
psia has persistently violated
}' pro\ ision of the accords.

Andrei Sakharov: Father off
the Soviet H-bomb, the
Nobel Peace Prize winner
has been held virtually
Incommunicado In Gorky
since 1980. His wife will
travel to the U.S. late this
month for medical care.
They spoke by telephone
with their family In Boston
on Monday for the first
time in six years.
The rumor mill was given new
grist late last month when Israeli
Prime Minister Peres discussed
Soviet Jewish emigration with the
Soviet Foreign Minister at the UN
and later that same week with
French President Francois
Mitterand.
IN PUBLIC statements about
these meetings statements
whose frankness surprised many
diplomats and officials working
for the release of Soviet Jews
Peres said that Mitterand had of-
fered to provide a direct airlift for
Jews from Russia to Israel.
Peres also said that increased
emigration would be acceptable to
the Russians "if we do not lose
any Jews along the way." Peres
was referring to the frequent
preference in the past of Russian
Jews to travel to the U.S. or
Western Europe rather than to
Israel once they left the Soviet
Union.
Veterans of the Soviet Jewry
movement cannot remember a
time when rumors about immigra-
tion from Russia were so fast and
furious. Or when hope was so
high. But they repeatedly placed
the current optimism against the
backdrop of international politics.
With the Geneva summit this
week and the vague beginnings of
some kind of Mideast peace talks
taking shape, the affected nations
are all jockeying for the best
position.
Israel wants to get as much as it
can out of Russia before it agrees
to let it sit down at the Mideast
negotiating table. The U.S. wants
to work out a quid pro quo in ex-
change for arms reduction. And
the Soviet Union and especially its
new, untried leader, Mikhail Gor-
bachev, wants to appear open,
tolerant and more humane.
BUT ALL the speculation and
all the gestures everything
from the talk about thousands of
Jews leaving the Soviet Union to
Sakharov phoning his family in
Boston, to his wife going there for
heart surgery are largely
smoke screens and PR coups.
Most everyone, including the few
who are lucky enough to secure an
exit visa, knows that. As the head
of one U.S. Soviet Jewry group
said of the decision of Sakharov's
wife not to travel to the West for
medical treatment until late
November, "She's smart enough
not to leave the Soviet Union
before the summit. The the Rus-
sians could point to her and say,
'See, we treat our Jews well."
Unfortunately, until visas are
issued by the thousands and not
handed out one by one, the case of
Yelena Bonner will be an anoma-
ly. The proof of a new Russian at-
titude toward human rights a
new attitude which has been
hinted at by the Soviets and the
Israelis and even by some very
tired and maybe overly jaundiced
Soviet Jewish activists in the U.S.
will be evident when Soviet
Jews in the thousands board out-
ward bound planes, when those
who remain are allowed to prac-
tice their religion as they wish,
and when Jews are not arrested
for teaching their culture and
their history and the Hebrew
language.
Until then, all should be viewed
with a healthy cynicism tempered
by an undying hope.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Curtain Descends

On Anti-Semitic Play For Now
By DAVID KANTOR
FRANKFURT Guen-
ther Ruehle, director of the
controversial Fassbinder
play "Garbage, the City and
Death," labeled anti-Semitic
by the local and national
Jewish communities and by
some newspaper critics, an-
nounced here that he had
dropped plans to stage it for
the time being because the
pressure to prevent its
showing had become
unbearable.
The Jewish community here,
which had stated on several occa-
sions its intentions to prevent the
Nov. 13 premiere of the play,
welcomed the decision as a victory
for reason and common sense.
Community spokesperson Michel
Friedman said that "with this
decision, further damage to the
relations between Jews and non-
Jews has been avoided."
THE CONFLICT over the play
showed that Jews had a future in
Germany only if they stood up for
themselves, he told a news con-
ference here.
But angry commentators on
West German radio stations at-
tacked the Jewish community for
"censorship through violence."
Some warned that the Jewish suc-
cess in blocking the staging of the
play would not be lasting and
might trigger more anti-Semitism
in the country.
Meanwhile, the Ulm theater
said it would seek to stage the
Ruehle version of the play. The
theaters of Cologne and Bochum
also announced their interest in
performing the play, but their
theater directors apparently plan
to prepare an altogether new
performance.
RUEHLE SAID in his anounce-
ment that he still believed the play
was not necessarily anti-Semitic
but that he had no choice but to
abandon his plans of putting it on
at this time because of the
pressure of the Jewish comunity
and others. He was reported to
have fought back tears as he
spoke.
The announcement came follow-
ing several hours of intensive
talks between Ruehle, Frankfurt
mayor Walter Wallman, and other
political figures. Wallmann had
told a largely Jewish audience
marking the 47th anniversary of
the Kristallnacht (Night of
Broken Glass) pogrom of 1938
that he could not accede to calls by
Jewish leaders to ban the play but
Avital Tried To Deliver
Letter to Gorbachev at Summit
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Avital Sharansky, wife of im-
prisoned Soviet Jewish activist
Anatoly Sharansky, tried to
deliver a letter to Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev during his
summit meeting with President
Reagan in Geneva this week, ap-
pealing for the release of her
husband.
Mrs. Sharansky, who began a
three-day vigil across from the
Soviet Embassy here to draw at-
tention to her husband's plight
and that of other Soviet Jews,
tried unsuccessfully to present her
letter to the Embassy. She drop-
ped it through the iron gate after
a voice on the Embassy PA
system rejected her request to
submit it personally.
The letter, addressed to Gor-
bachev said: "The release of
Anatoly Sharansky, Mr.
Dragunsky |
Stony
As Play
Is Staged
Continued from Page 4-A
Gen. David Dragunsky, the head
of the Soviet Public Anti-Zionist
Committee, was sitting. His face
was stony.
It is crucially important that the
play admits that the Jewish com-
plaints about being discriminated
against in Soviet society are
justified and allows a man to
declare himself openly to be a
Zionist for the first time for
decades.
Joseph Finklestone, the Foreign
Editor, writes: Victor Louis said
that the author of the play had
been emotionally overcome after
the performance.
"Not only were Stavitsky's
words presented well and the
roles of Jews played by Russian
Gentile with respect and
brilliance, but the audience joined
in the applause when typically
freilach dancing was skilfully in-
corporated into the play, as in
'Fiddler on the Roof,' Louis
said.
Secretary General, would signal a
new and human approach to the
problem of the last remnant of
Eastern European Jewry trapped
within the borders of the Soviet
Union. Anything less, Mr. Gor-
bachev, would be a betrayal of
those basic human values on
which all civilization is based."
The Embassy vigil was part of
an 11-day campaign that began
with a sit-in in front of the Soviet
Mission to the United Nations and
was to end at the Reagan-
Gorbachev summit in Geneva this
week. Mrs. Sharansky is one of
the numerous Soviet Jewish ac-
tivists who see the summit as a
critical opportunity to press the
case of refuseniks and Prisoners
of Conscience.
She had been hoping for a White
House meeting with Reagan
before he left for the summit.
that he had urged Ruehle not to
stage it.
In a related development, a non-
Jewish official responsible for
cultural affairs in the Bonn
municipality, Rolf Schlessmann,
announced he would join the
demonstrators who planned to
prevent the play's premiere if he
got the green light from the
Jewish community. He said that
many Germans still demonstrated
a lack of sensitivity when it came
to combatting anti-Semitism, but
did not mention Ruehle by name
in this connection.
SCHLESSMANN made his an-
noucement and remarks at a ser-
vice in Bonn over the weekend
commemorating Kristallnacht
Night of Broken Glass). The
ceremony took place at the site of
the former main synagogue of the
city.
A demonstrator carried a ban-
ner reading "Garbage, the City
and this Place," a reference both
to the Fassbinder play and to the
failure of the Bonn authoritities to
approve the building of a
documentary center opposing
anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism at
that site.
The play had become a storm
center of controversy, which in-
tensified after a special staging
last week for journalists and
critics. Some of them wrote that,
despite the changes made by
Ruehle in down-playing the cen-
tral character of the nameless
"Rich Jew" a ruthless real
estate speculator who gets away
with murder because the Germans
feel they owe the Jews something
the play remainded anti-
Semitic.
THE PUBLISHER of Der
Spiegel, Rudolf A ugstein, strongly
attacked the play in the issue of
the influential left of center week-
ly that hit the newsstands. Calling
the play "anti-Semtdc, colored
over as pro-Semitic," Augstein
charged that the decision to stage
it demonstrated "a monstrous
lack of sensitivity."
The conservativeFrankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung, which had op-
posed the performance of the play
all along, said in an editiorial that
Ruehle had failed to recognize the
legitimate right of the Jewish
community to protest against an
anti-Semitic piece, thus creating a
needless debacle.
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so negligible, Mountain Valley can be used in a salt-free
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Makes Sense
Begin Said To Suffer
From Alzheimer's Disease
Continued from Page 1-A
revelled in politics, suddenly and irrevocably withdrew
from the world at the age of 70.
UNTIL NOW his family and his closest medical and
political advisers have kept the precise nature of his condi-
tion a deep secret, fostering speculation that he retired in a
mixture of despair over the costly Israeli intervention \p.
Lebanon and the death of his beloved wife Aliza in 1982.
His resignation, which caused consternation among his
supporters, also sparked protracted speculation that this
was only a strategic withdrawal, like that staged in the ear-
ly 1950's by David Ben-Gurion, and that he might suddenly
make a dramatic comeback.
It was also rumored for a time that he was engaged in
writing a modern history of the Jewish people.
BUT IN RETROSPECT, these hypotheses must now
be regarded as incompatible with an illness which doctors
say is associated with diffuse degenration of the brain. :,
Recently, Begin made one of his very rare public ap-
pearances in Jerusalem when he attended a memorial ser-
vice at his wife's graveside. Closely hemmed in by his
children, he looked a frail, aged and broken man.
However, the disease would appear to be still in its ear-
ly stages, judging by a report only four months ago that the
former Prime Minister still avidly reads the daily press, is
in touch with political events and retains his sharp,
penetrating expression.
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Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page. 13-A
---------------------------------------------------1---------------a------------,---------------.f |
Bookcase
A Potpourri of Writing
For A Variety of Interests
vrman of the Administrative Con-
" the United States Marshall Breger
sworn in by Vice President George
aiding the Bible is Chairman Breger's
wife, Jennifer. Breger was previously public
liaison for President Reagan with special
responsibility for Jewish affairs.
aves Liaison
Breger Named Top Reagan Aide
[HINGTON Marshall J. Breger
jrn in on Nov. 13 by Vice Presi-
Ithe United States George Bush as
In of the Administrative Con-
of the United States. The
ly, held in the Indian Treaty
of the Old Executive Office
was attended by numerous
louse and other government of-
| Ambassador Max Kampelman in-
the Vice President and Chair-
NPThhom V 4 /.- A j
eing promoted to his new position, after
ktion by the United States Senate last
Jreger was Special Assistant to President
Ifor Public Liaison, with special respon-
V Jewish affairs. The Administrative Con-
p the United States is the government's
iy on administrative law the branch of
Ithat governs the government's internal
procedures and those that it uses to adopt rules
and regulations affecting all citizens.
Following the ceremony, Senators Dole, Hecht
and D'Amato and Representatives Michel and
Kemp hosted a reception for Breger in the Senate
Hart Office Building. United Nations Ambassador
Vernon Walters and several members of the Con-
gress lauded Breger's performance as Jewish af-
fairs liaison. Ambassador Walters said that, dur-
ing his tenure at the White House, "Breger's abili-
ty to accomplish to deliver on what he undertook
was nothing short of phenomenal."
Chairman Breger will inaugurate his term as Ad-
ministrative Conference chairman by presiding
over its next Plenary Session Dec. 12 and 13 in
Washington. The Conference will be considering
two recommendations pertaining to the immigra-
tion law reform bills now pending in the Congress,
and another recommendation concerning
"negotiated rulemaking," a reform measure in the
processes used by Federal agencies to write new
regulations.
ilson Urges:
Encourage Moderate Arab Leaders
I JUDITH KOHN
[INGTON (JTA)
ler head of Israel's
linistration on the
lank has called on
in Jewish groups to
)ward establishing
rams for West Bank
|ans in order to en-
moderate leaders
at the 54th General
on the Council of
[Federations here,
Milsen, a professor of
erature at the Hebrew
in Jerusalem who
I civil administration for
^r it was formed in 1981,
lie way U.S. aid to West
lestinians has been
ID that the Private
I Organizations (PVO's),
funded, largely by the
rncy for International
ent, have served to
in already present
lism among the
|ream" Palestinian
fcets of U.S. aid, Milsen
have been those peo-
eived to represent
>nal views." But it is
the conventional posi-
is to be discouraged,
"What does it mean to repre-
sent the conventional views? It
means American aid going to peo-
ple who are opposed to peace with
Israel. It's a travesty, but it's also
a reality," Milsen maintained.
To help foster what he said was
currently a minority position
among West Bank Palestinians,
Milsen suggested that American
Jewish groups might help initiate
their own form of PVOs on the
West Bank that would work
through moderate Arab leaders.
IF ARAB radicalism is permit-
ted to grow unchecked, he said, so
too, would the "dangerous
phenomenon" of the ultra-
nationalist Gush Emunim and
Kach leader Rabbi Meit Kahane
whose "obnoxious" fundamen-
talism thrives on the continued in-
trasigence of the Palestinian
leadership.
Those moderate Arab leaders,
he said, "are not exactly the same
guys who were the prospective
beneficiaries of the State Depart-
ment's help, because I think that
the principle of selection was
wrong." He was referring
specifically to U.S. aid aimed at
improving "the qualify of life" for
the West Bank Arabs.
While the PVOs "work
strengthening groups devoted to
non-recognition of Israel," Milsen
suggested, "a different type of
Private Voluntary American
organization should launch a cam-
paign to encourage Palestinian
groups dedicated to the idea of
negotiations with Israel and a
political settlement between the
Palestinians and the sovereign
state of Israel."
ISRAELI OFFICIALS have
long been critical of the PVOs,
which they perceive as highly
politicized in favor of the radical
Palestinian nationalists, and have
suggested that U.S. aid money for
the West Bank should be channel-
ed through the Israeli
government.
The type of moderate leadership
that needs to emerge, Milsen said,
can no longer be fostered through
the Arab "village leagues." Form-
ed in the late 1970s, those leagues
failed to win any kind of credibili-
ty among the Arab population of
the West Bank, and even the U.S.
Administration has refused to
recognize them or to deal with
their representatives.
Milsen, who left his post in 1982
after the Israeli government in-
itially refused to establish an in-
quiry commission following the
massacre of Palestinians by Chris-
tian militiamen at the Sabra and
Shatila refugee camps in Beirut,
had been at odds with members of
the government over the handling
of the village leagues.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Writing From Down
Under: Australia and New
Zealand. Edited by Robert and
Roberta Kalechofsky.
Marblehead, Mass.: Micah
Publications, 1984. 292 pp.,
$10 (paper back).
Australia and New Zealand are
countries which seem so far away.
If we think of them at all. we con-
jure up images of kangaroos,
boomerangs, sheep herds, Maoris
and Aboriginals. Recently, New
Zealand has been in the news for
its insistence on keeping out
American warships that carry
nuclear weapons. Also, its
Auckland harbor was put on the
map when French agents bombed
a ship which was about to sail in
protest against a French nuclear
test.
Australia was the subject of a
recent lead article in the Sunday
New York Times Magazine, testi-
fying to its growing importance,
especially as an American military
base.
BOTH THESE countries stress
Western values and have
therefore attracted Jewish im-
migration. In 1788, nine Jewish
convicts from England arrived in
Australia, and in 1840, three Jews
landed in New Zealand which had
been called "the Britain of the
South" by a British member of the
Montfiore family who visited New
Zealand in 1930.
Ever since, small numbers of
Jews have found their way to
Australia and New Zealand,
establishing vibrant Jewish com-
munities. The success of their in-
tegration into "Down Under" is
richly revealed by this anthology
of poems and short stories.
The publisher of this book lists it
as the fourth in a series of contem-
porary Jewish writing. Preceding
it have been anthologies of Latin
American Jewish writing, South
African Jewish writing and con-
temporary Jewish voices.
THIS PARTICULAR entry in
the series contains short stories,
poems and memoirs. They attest
to the universality of the Jewish
experience even though they are
greatly uneven in quality. It is
hard to single out one item from
the 29 pieces in the book.
However, there is a special appeal
to Serge Liberman's short story,
"Drifting," which deals with a
father's rejection of a son who has
intermarried.
The rejection remains firm even
after the son's wife gives birth to
a child. The story evokes
memories of an earlier time in the
United States when intermar-
riage was considered a tragedy.
Similarly, other stories and poems
remind us of phases in American
Jewish history.
The anthology is evidence of
how far "wandering Jews" roam
and how they succeed in making a
life for themselves, even in
"Down Under."
Curtain Time! Compiled and
edited by Zara Shakow. Middle
Village, New York: Jonathan
David Publishers, 1985. 422
pp., $9.95 (paper back).
Group leaders and teachers will
find this a useful mannual in put-
ting on dramatic presentations. It
begins with specific directions
about settings, costumes, casting,
rehearsals, lighting, acting, direc-
ting, make-up, and it winds up
with a couple of pages on curtain
calls.
The bulk of the book is a series
of selections poems, sketches,
readings, plays and songs ar-
ranged in accordance with Jewish
and American holidays.
Additional items are provided
for American Jewish History
Week and Brotherhood Week.
Production notes and notes to the
director accompany many of the
selections, helping to make this a
practical guide for Jewish schools,
synagogue-centers, Y's and
camps.
A Brotherhood of Memory:
Jewish Landsmanshaftn in
New World. By Michael R.
Weisser. New York: Basic
Books. 1985. 303 pp.. $18.95.
The Jewish community has
always been noted for its many
organizational forms. In 1918, the
Jewish Communal Register com-
piled a list of almost 3,700 Jewish
organizations in New York City
alone. There are some who argue
that we have far too many
organizations, a number of which
duplicate each other.
A contrary view holds that hav-
ing a variety of Jewish organiza-
tions provides numerous oppor-
tunities for Jews to express their
Jewish identification through af-
filiating with organizations which
suit their needs.
One such organizational form
was the landsmanshaft a socie-
ty based on common geographical
residence in Eastern European
shtetlach. As the immigrant
population died off, this kind of
organization became extinct. The
author of this book has tried to
capture the essence of the land-
smanshaft before it completely
disappears.
HE CLAIMS that perhaps half
the two million Jews who landed
in New York between 1880 and
1923 belonged to a landsmanshaft
at some point in their lives. Today,
these organizations which once
numbered some 1,500 have all but
faded from the scene. Most of to-
day's American Jews were born in
the United States, and they have
severed their relationship with the
culture of their forbears. The
needs which were fulfilled by the
landsmanshaft are either no
longer pertinent or have been
taken over by other institutions.
For example, an important func-
tion of the landsmanshaft was to
aid new immigrants. For those
few Jewish immigrants who still
come here, there are no profes-
sional welfare organizations. The
burial responsibilities of the land-
smanshaft are now carried by
commercial funeral directors and
profit-making cemeteries. Main-
taining nostalgic memories of the
shtetl has no significance for those
who never lived in a shtetl.
What Weisser has done in his
book is to trace the rise and fall of
the landsmanshaft. He makes
good use of the minutes of a cou-
ple of them to tell their story, and
he traces their roots in Eastern
European shtetlach. He also gives
a good account of landsmanshaft
efforts to help their relatives and
friends after the two world wars.
UNLIKE MANY organizations
in both the general and the Jewish
community which persist in sur-
viving even though their original
function has either disappeared or
changed, the landsmanshaft were
born, developed and have now just
about died off. The book is a useful
record of their history.
Rockets Dismantled
TEL AVIV (JTA) South
Lebanon Army forces in the
security belt in south Lebanon
found and dismantled eight
Katyusha rocket launchers in the
past two days, according to Israel
Radio. Four of the launchers were
sited a few hundred meters from
the border, aimed towards
Galilee.


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Peres, Shamir in Compromise
Effort To Cool Sharon Crisis <
At a conference on the 10th anniversary of the
UN resolution equating Zionism with racism,
Christian, Jewish and black leaders gathered
to denounced the slander and reaffirm inden-
tification with Zionism and the Jewish state.
(Left to right) are Benjamin Netanyahu,
Israel's envoy to the UN; Jeane J.
Kirkpatrick, former U.S. ambassador to the
UN; and Kenneth J. Bialkin, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, who co-chaired the
meeting held at the United Nations in New
York
Reagan Supports
Removal of Zionism/Racism Blot
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) President Reagan
has pledged his support for
removal from the record of
the United Nations the
"blot" of the Zionism-is-
racism resolution adopted
by the UN General
Assembly on November 10,
1975.
Reagan made his pledge in a
message to the Conference on
Israel, Zionism and the UN at-
tended by more than 1.000
Jewish, Christian and civic
leaders at UN headquarters
before his departure for a summit
conference with the Soviet
Union's Mikhail Gorbachev in
Geneva.
THE CONFERENCE was co-
chaired by two former U.S. Am-
bassadors to the UN, Sen. Daniel
Moynihan (D., N.Y.) and Jeane
Kirkpatrick, and by Kenneth
Bialkin, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
and Binyamin Netanyahu, Israel's
Ambassador to the UN. Moynihan
was Ambassador at the time the
resolution was passed.
Reagan, in his message, read to
the conference by Netanyahu,
declared: "Few events have so of-
fended the American people as the
'Zionism-is-racism' resolution of
November 10,1975. It was as if all
America stood to affirm the
response of our chief delegate,
Daniel Patrick Moynihan: 'The
United States rises to declare
before the General Assembly of
the United Nations and before the
world that it does not
acknowledge, it will never abide
by, it will never acquiesce in this
infamous act.' "
Reagan added, "The U.S.,
under the leadership of three dif-
ferent Presidents, has remained
true to that pledge. Today, I am
proud to reaffirm that promise
and further, to pledge my support
for the removal of this blot from
the UN record."
PRESIDENT Chaim Herzog of
Israel, who in 1975 was Israel's
Ambassador to the UN, also sent
a message to the conference. Her-
zog said, "My thoughts go back t<>-
Sailors Lend Hand
TEL AVIV (JTA) Several
hundred sailors from visiting
ships of the U.S. Sixth Fleet used
their recent shore leave in Haifa
to lend a helping hand to sick or
elderly people. Some of the
seamen volunteered to paint the
children's ward at Rothschild
Hospital. Other seamen toured
rundown neighborhoods to clean
and paint the homes of invalids
and other shut-ins.
day to the historic debate in the
UN on the infamous resolution on
Zionism by the General Assembly.
The issue before the Assembly
was neither Israel nor Zionism. It
was the continued existence of the
UN which had been dragged to its
lowest point of discredit by a coali-
tion of despots and racists."
Herzog's message continued:
"A great evil was done to the
Jewish people at that time but, as
in the past, so now, too, the op-
pressors of our people pass into
oblivion while we, the Jewish peo-
ple, which has survived them all,
will survive the shameful exhibi-
tion in the UN and the proponents
of the resolution."
The resolution equating Zionism
with racism was supported by 72
countries, most of them Arab,
Third World or Soviet bloc coun-
tries. It was opposed by 35, main-
ly Western democracies. There
were 32 abstentions.
MOYNIHAN recalled that
before the resolution was adopted,
the governments of Israel and the
U.S. were not fully aware of the
danger of the resolution and its
consequences. He charged that
since the resolution was passed,
there has not been a serious study
or scholarly learning on the sub-
ject and the motives behind the
thinking of the Soviets, the Arab
and non-aligned countries which
supported the anti-Israel, anti-
Jewish resolution. Moynihan said,
however, that with "patience and
tenacity" the resolution can even-
tually be expunged.
Vemon Walters, the current
U.S. Ambassador to the UN. told
the conference: "The U.S. govern-
ment vigorously condemns UN
General Assembly Resolution
3379 which declared that Zionism
is a form of racism. President
Ronald Reagan referred to
Resolution 3379 as 'the total in-
version of morality' in his speech
at the UN 40th anniversary com- >
memoration on October 24,
1985."
Walters noted that "The U.S.
Mission speaks out forcefully
against this statement and the evil
it embodies and will continue to do
so as long as necessary."
KIRKPATRICK declared: "It
is a short step from the proposi-
tion that Zionism-is-racism to the
proposition that the State of
Israel is based on aggression."
She added, "In UN language, the
Zionism-is-racism resolution
declared open season on the State
of Israel. Henceforth, Israel
would be fair game for armed
'liberation.' "
Bayard Rustin, the Black civil
rights leader who is chairman of
the A. Philip Randolph Institute,
raid that the resolution equating
Zionism with racism "obscures
the true nature of racism and thus
has impeded the fight against it."
-
He observed that "Those nations,
including many African states
which supported that obscene
resolution, dealt a monstrous blow
to themselves and to everyone op-
pressed by racist ideology, par-
ticularly to Blacks who are
brutalized by apartheid in South
Africa."
Bialkin charged that the attack
on Zionism derives from a fun-
damental hostility to a Jewish
presence in its ancient homeland
that is fueled by anti-Jewish pre-
judices. "The Zionism-is-racism
slogan is itself a manifestation of
racism," he said.
NETANYAHU noted that after
the rescue of Israel of the Jews of
Ethiopia, "the Zionism-is-racism
slander becomes too preposterous
to tolerate" by responsible states.
"This is what explains the block-
ing of the Zionism-is-racism clause
in the recent UN conference in
Nairobi. This is what explains the
refusal to invite (Palestine Libera-
tion Organization chief Yasir)
Arafat to the UN commemorative
session. This is what explains the
growing support of Israel in cer-
tain key resolutions in recent
days."
He concluded: "We must en-
courage this trend. Against the
big lie, we must pit the big truth.
If we do not succeed, Zionism will
live but this body (the UN) will be
doomed to moral and political ir-
relevance. And if we do succeed,
we might yet begin the moral and
political reconstruction of the
UN."
Avital Sharansky, wife of
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly
Sharansky, led a march of almost
1,000 Jewish students from the
United Nations site to the Soviet
Mission to the UN.
Mrs. Sharanky, who flew in
from Jerusalem for the event, call-
ed, as other speakers did in front
of the Soviet Mission, on Presi-
dent Reagan to raise the issue of
Soviet Jewry when he meets with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
in Geneva this week.
THE MARCH and rally, spon-
sored by the Student Zionist
Council of the U.S., included
students from a number of states,
including New York, New Jersey,
Connecticut and Massachusetts,
according to Steven Feuerstein.
The march and demonstration in
front of the Soviet Mission, in-
itiated all national and interna-
tional student demonstrations
that are to occur between now and
the summit conference, he said.
Avital Sharansky began a three-
day vigil outside the Mission at
the conclusion of the demonstra-
tion. Upon the conclusion of the
vigil Wednesday, she flew to
Washington to join students and
other members of the community
to protest outside the Soviet
Embassy.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, leader of Likud,
met last Friday to work out
a compromise to end the
week-long coalition crisis
precipitated by Ariel
Sharon's harsh public attack
on Peres and his policies.
The crisis, with the potential to
destroy the fragile Labor-Likud
unity government, peaked Thurs-
day when Peres flatly rejected an
equivocal apology offered by
Sharon and told a specially Con-
vened Cabinet meeting that he in-
tended to dismiss the outspoken
Likud hawk who serves as
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry. But Peres refrained at the
last minute from handling Sharon
a formal letter of dismissal.
THE MOOD here was one of
relief and optimism as the cliff-
hanger aspects of the situation
faded. Political pundits believe the
moment had passed for Peres to
dismiss Sharon, and it was now a
matter of working out an accep-
table formula to allow both men to
retreat from the brink without los-
ing face. Which one of them
emerged the winner in the con-
frontation will probably be a sub-
ject of debate for weeks or months
to come.
Peres, addressing the Labor
Party Center in Tel Aviv Thurs-
day, said two conditions had to be
met to end the crisis.
One was a coalition agreement
recognizing the exclusive
prerogative of the Prime Minister
to dismiss a minister of any party.
As the agreement now stands,
both Peres and Shamir, who is
scheduled to take over the office
of Prime Minister next summer,
waived the right to dismiss a
minister of the other's party.
THE SECOND condition
demanded by Peres was a public
retraction by Sharon of specific
charges he levelled against Peres
in his speech to Herut colleagues
in Haifa.
These were that Peres has been
conducting secret negotiations
with Jordan and the Palestinians
for the past seven months without
the Cabinet's knowledge; that he
has agreed to try to include Syria;
and thst he has agreed to an inter-
national conference.
That "the contempt and
cynicism" of the Labor Party has
cost much blood, and its policies, if
carried out. will bring even more
bloodshed: that the government is
being "led by the nose" without
knowing where it is going; that
Peres refused to say explicitly
that the Palestine Liberation
Organization will not be included
in the negotiations and is trying to
avoid such a commitment.
That the peace with Egypt is en-
dangered because of the "weak
policy" pursued by the govern-
ment and the Prime Minister; that
Sharon encountered "cynicism"
when he demanded "that we
should notify Jordan that there
would be no negotiations until the
PLO headquarters office is remov-
ed from Amman."
PERES TOLD the Labor Party
meeting that when Sharon made
that demand in the Inner Cabinet
no one supported it. and it was
dropped. Sharon must
acknowledge that. Peres said. He
stressed that Israel has not had
any negotiations with Syria on the
Golan Heights or on any other
issue.
Peres said he was patient, in-
dicating there was no immediate
deadline for Sharon to comply
with his conditions. Sharon, in ~ J
fact, was scheduled to leave for
South America Thursday night on
an Israel Bonds speaking tour.
Other key ministers are or will
be going abroad. Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin is in Washington.
Minister-Without-Portfolio Moshe
Arens, a powerful figure in Likud,
was due in the U.S. Sunday.
Efforts continued, meanwhile,
to find a formula to end the crisis.
Interior Minister Yitzhak Peretz
has been in the forefront and he f
was joined Thursday by two pro-
minent Laborites, Education
Minister Yitzhak Navon and
Energy Minister Moshe Shahal.
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FridayJSTovember 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
il PP
Jewish National Fund-Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
Keren Dorot Founders Club Is Launched -^

to right: Roslyn Unger, Administrator JNF, Abraham Grunhut, Pres. JNF Gr.
\mi, Igor Schultz, Chairman JNF Keren Dorot Club, Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Chair-
I JNF Foundation, Zev W. Kogan, President JNF Southern Region, Prof. Andre
lolenki, Vice-Pres. JNF Gr. Miami.
Vren Dorot Founders Club at the Inaugural Luncheon: Mr. and Mrs. Albert Anker,
\. and Mrs. Lou Aronson, Abraham Bodow, Prof. Andre Bialolenki, Ella Bram, Mr.
1 Mrs. Abraham Goldman, Lee Hartman, Edith Hochhauser, Edward Kapit, Rose
ss, Roe Kaufman, Rebecca Kaufman, Otilia Kellerman, Rose Leiter, Theresa Levine,
k and Mrs. Philip Richland, Lillian Perlow, Birdie Pompter, Sadie Reiffen, Frieda
ck, Mr. and Mrs. Igor Schultz, Leon Schuster, Doris Skol. Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
bach, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Waldman.
ley and Gussie Tabach, second and fourth from left, establish a Keren Dorot in
'ibration of their 60th Wedding Anniversary. Left to right: Roslyn Unger, Sidney
fach, Igor Schultz, Gussie Tabach, Abraham Grunhut, Prof. Andre Bialolenki.
JEWISH
rvMiorw
runo
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer .
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
4. The JNF needs you but you need
the JNF much more
The JNF gives life to the desert
And strength to Israel.
K,reDorotAgree.t
IEWISH
rwiorw
flM>
(Keren Kayemetn Leivaell Inc
.Yes, I am
;=s-
^^.
r
tbrating Anniversaries and establishing Keren Dorots are left to right: Mary and
\raham Goldman, Anna and Albert Anker.
interested in
becoming a Keren
Dorot donor.
Name___________
Address
City, State, Zip
Phone _______
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Rd., #353
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
538-6464
|ln a most thrilling and emotional atmosphere, the Jewish National
' of Greater Miami launched the establishment of the Keren Dorot
Bders Club, whereby for every $1,000 made available to the Jewish
lonal Fund, the benefactor designates a beneficiary who, for 10 years
pe a $100 return from Keren Kayemeth Leisrael. Jerusalem accom-
by a most beautiful acknowledgement. This serves to strengthen
pies between generations.
The Keren Dorot Founders Club was launched with a most beautiful
fteon held in the JNF Board Room, 420 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach.
[ Chairman of the Founders Club is Igor Schultz, Co-Chairmen are
i and Lou Aronson. All members of the Club have established Keren
>ts. for relatives, friends, children, grandchildren, and great-grand-
ren. Some members have named the Jewish National Fund as
sients.
M
yraham Grunhut
6. JNF Gr. Miami
"It is a most beautiful and exciting program." said Rabbi Irving
Lehrman, Chairman of JNF Foundation, "forging a link from generation
to generation, and providing at the same time immediate capital for the
redemption and reclamation work of the JNF." '
The Keren Dorot Luncheons will be held monthly and the names of
benefactors will be publicized and added to the list of Keren Dorot Club
members.
The Jewish National Fund invites all lovers of Israel to come and join
the Keren Dorot Club, and strengthen the eternal link between genera-
tions and the State of Israel.
A most beautiful musical program was presented under the auspices
of Maestro Shmuel Fershko.

' s
Zev W. Kogan
Pres. JNF Southern Region
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Ernest Samuels
V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
Rabbi Mayer Abramotrili
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC. 420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida Phone: 538-6464
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Sen. Chiles To Speak
At Chernin Dedication
Ben. Lawton Chiles (D., Fla.)
be the featured speaker at the
jjication of the Harry Chernin
llled Nursing Building of the
Bmi Jewish Home and Hospital
the Aged at Douglas Gardens
[Sunday, Dec. 1 at 11 a.m.
[One of the primary guidelines
the design of the Harry Cher-
Skilled Nursing Building was
[retain the greatest degree of
vacy and most homelike en-
rmment possible. The result is
of the most progressive and
native architectural designs
a long-term care facility ever
pmpted in this country; one
it will be a model for similar
ilities for many years to come,"
ilained Fred D. Hirt, executive
ector of the Home.
lie Miriam and Sidney Olson
kpital located on the second
Or of the 5-story building, will
ft 32 private and semi-private
ms, the latest in medical equip-
nt. as well as fully equipped
pica! and occupational therapy
For the first time, the
ipital unit at Douglas Gardens
be open to admissions from
community as well as the
identa of the longterm care
ility. Also for the first time, 40
I <-n the third floor of the Cher-
| Building will be used for short-
m rehabilitation, a service now
UK offered by the Miami Jewish
me through special funding of
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
People recovering from
tikes, serious fractures, or
ilar illnesses or accidents will
eive the post-hospital care
ilable at the Harold and Tricia
[pel Rehabilitation Center.
ther features include indoor g-
en areas and outside terraces.
Sen. Lawton Chiles
recreational lounges and meeting
rooms for each wing. The Chernin
Building, designed to serve 192
residents, will be open for new ad-
missions by mid-December.
Sen. Chiles, a U.S. Senator
since 1971, has received are "Man
of the Year" Award from the
American Federation of Senior
Citizens in 1982, the United
Synagogue Youth Soviet Jewry
Award in 1984 and an honorarium
from the American-Israel Friend-
ship League. The Senator is cur-
rently a member of the Senate's
Special Committee on Aging and
the Labor/Health and Human Ser-
vices/Education Subcommittee.
He is the Co-Chairman of the
Democratic Leadership Council
and has been awarded honorary
degrees from four institutions of
higher education in Florida.
la. Attorney General To
Speak At JNF Banquet
ablii Irving Lehrman, chair-
>f Jewish National Fund
indation and Abraham
lhut, president of JNF
|rter Miami, have announced
Florida Attorney General,
|Smith, will bring greetings at
Jewish National Fund Tribute
quet on Sunday, Dec. 15 at
at the Konover Hotel.
The Attorney General is
vn as a humanitarian, and a
friend to the people and the
of Israel," said Dr. Richard
chwarz Chairman of Special
fits. "He reflects the best in
an qualities, and it is a
sure and honor to welcome
this auspicious banquet."
r. Smith became the second
lgest elected Attorney
eral in Florida history when
ras elected in 1978 in his first
for public office. In 1982, he
reelection in the Democratic
primary. Smith is an Army
Brve Captain and has worked
[way up Florida's political
Excellency Eliahu Ben
Attorney General Jim Smith
Elissar, member of the Knesset,
former chairman of the Defense
and Foreign Affairs Committee,
and first Ambassador of Israel to
Egypt after the conclusion of the
Peace Treaty between Israel and
Egypt, is guest speaker at the
banquet.
foung Man Stabbed Near Damascus
fRUSALEM (JTA) A
ear-old Jewish man was stab-
I seriously wounded near
Damascus Gate in the Old Ci-
*e was rushed to Hadassah
'ital on Mt. Scopus where he
prwent emergency surgery.
cording to police reports, the
Yosef Martin, age 24, was
Wg with a woman friend
a lone assailant plunged a
p" knife into his back. The
Ml may have punctured his
-
th" <'""< ><-
tack an Israeli civilian last
weekend and the second stabbing
in a week near the Damascus
Gate. On Friday night, a Jewish
settler, Gabi Bartal, 30, of Beit
Hagai in the Hebron region of the
West Bank, was ambushed while
driving from his home to Kiryat
Arba. He was treated at Hadassah
Hospital in Jerusalem for hand
and leg wounds.
Last week, a 60-year-old man
was stabbed while shopping near
Damascus Gate. He is still
h(nitali7pH
More Than 300 Expected To
Attend Federation Dinner
More than 300 of the Jewish
community's top leaders are ex-
pected to turn out on Tuesday,
Nov. 26, to attend the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
"Pacesetter Dinner" featuring
entertainer Anthony Newley, an-
nounced Pacesetter Division
Chairman Maxine E. Schwartz.
"The Pacesetter Dinner is a
way in which we annually reward
ourselves as workers and givers,"
Mrs. Schwartz said. ."Givers on
the Pacesetter level are those who
are truly committed to the Jewish
community, both locally and
worldwide, and the event is a way
in which we are able to thank
ourselves and each other for this
dedication."
The gala affair, which will be Maxine E. Schwartz
held at the Fontainebleau Hilton
on Miami Beach, is for those who
make a minimum $10,000 gift to
the Federation's 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
At the event, MVP (Most
Valuable Pacesetter Worker)
Awards will be given to those
Pacesetters who have brought in
at least five gifts in the category.
Unlike previous Pacesetter Din-
ners, at this year's event there
will be no public announcement of
gifts, Mrs. Schwartz said.
In addition to Newley's perfor-
mance, dinner and dance music
will be provided by the Jerry Mar-
shall Orchestra. The event begins
with cocktails at 6:30 p.m.
NCJW To Hold 15th Annual
Child Care Luncheon
Greater Miami Section, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
will hold it's 15th Annual Child
Care Luncheon on Wednesday,
Dec. 4,11:30 a.m., at the Radisson
Mart Plaza Hotel.
At that time, NCJW's highest
honor, the HANNAH G.
SOLOMON AWARD, will be
presented to ANNA MAE ROSS.
This award is given annually to a
person who is known for his or her
interst, activity and stand on vital
issues with which NCJW is in
sympathy and has helped to
translate them into community
programs on a national scale.
Anne Mae Ross is receiving this
award for her outstanding
achievements as a volunteer in
community services, and her com-
mittments to human rights.
Her major contribution has been
her work as a volunteer advocate
striving to improve the quality of
life for all people. In addition, she
has shared her own expertise by
training volunteers in other
organizations in the art of ad-
vocacy. She has worked with the
National Council of Jewish
Women; Junior League; Women's
Division of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. Among her
achievements are advocacy,
monitoring and securing funding
for the Florida State Guardian Ad
Litem program which became, as
a result of her efforts, an integral
part of Florida's Juvenile Court
System for the protection of abus-
ed and neglected children.
She was instrumental in secur-
ing state funding for the first
Crisis Nursery Center in Dade
County several years ago. There
are now two Crisis Nursery
Centers and both provide a much
needed service to families in
crisis. More recently, Ms. Ross
has helped establish the
CHARLEE program in Dade
County, working with Junior
League and National Council of
Jewish Women. The CHARLEE
program is long-term family care
homes for dependent children who
have been abandoned, neglected
or abused. These children have
been committed to the custody of
the State of Florida and the best
location for them, it has been
determined, is to be in a home-like
setting with a fam ily
environment.
CHARLEE stands for Children
Have All Rights, Legal, Educa-
tional, Emotional.
She is a long-standing member
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Community Relations
Committee and a past chair-
woman of it's Domestic Concerns
Sub-committee.
Anna Mae Ross
she has been a leader in the fight
for passage of the Equal Rights
Ammendment and for the protec-
tion of every woman's reproduc-
tive freedoms. She coordinated
and directed advocacy efforts of
the National Council of Jewish
Women's twenty sections in the
state of Florida and is presently a
National Board Member of the
NCJW. Although she has served
that organization nationally in a
variety of capacities, her major
focus has been to monitor legisla-
tion on the national scene.
This gala luncheon will have
entertainment provided by the
University of Miami Jazz Vocal I
Ensemble, under the Direction of
Larry Lapin.
All proceeds and donations sup-
port NCJW programs for
Children and Youth in Dade
County.
Rabbis, Religious School
Principals And Teachers
Arrested At A Rally
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Hundreds of Washington
area Jewish youth and
adults greeted the Reagan-
Gorbachev summit in
Geneva with demonstra-
tions, a march and a folk
sing-in here, on behalf of
Soviet Jewry. One of the
protests led to the planned
arrest of more than 40
religious school principals,
teachers, rabbis and
synagogue congregants.
As the demonstrators
assembled first outside the
Soviet Embassy, and then at
Lafayette Park across from the
White House similar protests
were taking place or scheduled to
take place over the next few days
in New York, Chicago, London,
Paris and Jerusalem.
THE DEMONSTRATION in
front of the Embassy brought the
largest number of arrests since
the Washington Board of Rabbis
began sponsoring the protests last
May. As volunteers prepared to be
arrested by moving to within 500
feet of the Embassy, some 300
others, many of them children and
teenagers, watched silently across
the street.
Like the 90 rabbis, ministers,
students and others arrested in
the six previous demonstrations
sponsored by the Board, those ar-
rested were expected to be charg-
ed and released pending trial.
ADDRESSING the rally at the
park, Rep. Steny Hoyer (D., Md.),
a co-chairman of the Committee
on Security and Cooperation in
Europe and of the Helsinki Com-
mission, which monitors Soviet
compliance with the 1975 Helsinki
accords, called this week's summit
in Geneva "an appropriate forum
at which to insert political and
moral pressure upon the Soviet
government to undertake just and
expeditious actions to alleviate
human rights abuses and to take
steps that indicate an intent to
abide by past international
agreements such as the Helsinki
Final Act."
In 111,
\i'^mon c
^Jewish Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday, November 22,1985 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. November 22. 1985

From the Pulpit
The 'Tower of David'
Bv RABBI
BARRY KONOVITCH
Temple Beth Shmuel-
Cuban Hebrew Congregation
High on Jerusalem's old city
walls stands the "Tower of
David." It points its slender
finger at God in heaven reminding
him that the Messiah is too slow in
coming. Tall and straight, sitting
astride the formidable fortifica-
tions guarding the Jaffa Gate, the
tower is certainly an appropriate
representation of the power of
David, the first Jewish ruler of
Jerusalem.
Yet the Tower, and for that
matter the wall complex, have
nothing to do with David. Ar-
chaeologists have long ago deter-
mined that the walls were built by
the Ottomans under Suleiman the
Magnificient. some 2.500 years
after David. And the Tower is. in
reality, the minaret of a mosque
from whence the muezzin pro-
claimed the ascendancy of Islam.
David, interred in his city to the
south on the Ophel Ridge, would
not rest easy had he known.
PERHAPS it is just as well that
we know the truth about the
Tower. Because David chose a dif-
ferent structure to represent his
life. According to his own writing
{in the book of Psalms), he refers
to the Sukkah. or desert hut. as af-
fording him the greatest protec-
tion from his enemies. Not a
tower, not a palace, but a flimsy
Rabbi Barrv Konovitch
booth of branches and sticks.
The Sukkah represented
David's life on the run. comman-
ding a guerrilla army trying to
elude the forces of King Saul.
hiding in the natural terrain on
the edge of the desert, away from
prying eyes. It afforded him
natural camouflage and constant
mobility.
In the South Hebron Hills, or at
the oasis of Ein Gedi. David's
"mighty men" adapted to their
natural surroundings. They could
Community Corner
South Florida Chug Alivah group will hold a Chanukah meeting
and party on Sunday. Dec. 8. at 6 p.m.. at the Michael Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center. Katz Auditorium.
The meeting will celebrate the Chanukah holiday and offer a
chance for those interested in Alivah to meet.
B'rith Harmonv Lodge No. 2463 will hold their next meeting on
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. at Pythian Hall. North Miami Beach. ON.
Nicholas. Southern Bell, will speak on. "Welcome to the Informa-
tion Age." ____
Pacemaker Club of Dade County will feature, as their next
meeting, the Annual Party and Luncheon on Monday. Dec. 9 at 10
a-m. at Parkway Regional Medical Center in the auditorium.
A comedian will follow a short program for installation of r.e*
officers- ---------
Parents ot North American Israelis tPNAI. formerly APAI)
will hold a regular meeting on Sunday. Dec. 1. at 1 p.m.. at the
Federation Building. Meeting will include installation of officers
and guest speaker. _____
B'nai B'rith Harmony Lodge No. 2463 will hold their next
meeting on Sundav at 9:30 a.m. at Pvthian Hall. North Miami
Beach Philip N. Nicholas. Southern Bell, will speak on.
'Wekotne to the Information Age."
Emanu-El Sisterhood To Sponsor Luncheon
Tempie Emanu-El Sisterhood
will hoid its Annual Mid-Winter
Luncheon and Book Review or.
Wednesday. Dec. 4 a: 11:30 a.m.
in the Friedland Ballroom, an-
nounced President Mrs Mortor.
Lar*
Dr. Irnng Lecrman. spiritual
reader of the coogregatxxL will
review Last Wise" by Bet^
Rolbx. Dr. Lebrnsar will dhraw
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:he strong wffl fcre: Mrs. Jerry
Pocasfcmes. cf-^rpersoc of the
Great Part-Time Job
Metropolitan Mortgage Company needs
2 Experienced Telephone Solicitors.
We offer top pay and a pleasant environment.
Morning or evening hours".
Please can Mr. Burton at
573-8800
4700 Biscayne Boulevard
venture forth, undetected, to
harass Saul's armies. A
stronghold was too confining for
such tactics, a fixed position too
limiting
AND YET. a person who for-
sakes a palace for a Sukkah hut
must have more than strategy in
mind. Open to the elements, total-
ly unprotected and exposed to at-
tack, the Sukkah reminded David
that in the end only faith in the
power of God would save him. It
was this beautiful, personal,
trusting relationship that David
had with his Creator that is
represented by the Sukkah.
In later years. David finally
built his tower. It was atop his
palace in the new Jewish capital.
Jerusalem. And judging from its
recently-excavated foundation, it
was a "mighty fortress. Such are
the trappings of Kingship ex-
pected from a powerful potentate.
Yet. David never forgot the "old
days." trying to stay alive and
consolidate his power. It was
always clear to him that without
God's help, his swords and spears
would not carry the day.
Some 3.000 years after David.
our world also seems to be
represented by the "Tower": the
long fingers of intercontinental
missiles that "Tower" over our
civilization threatening to erase
all traces of our existence. Those
ICBM fingers point accusingly at
us all: we have allowed it to
happen.
PERHAPS we would be better
represented by the Sukkah. a
symbol of an open, uncomplicated,
trusting time when leaders put
their faith in God. and respected
His creations.
Is it unrealistic to envision a day
when the silos in New Mexico and
Novosibirsk will stand empty,
overgrown with "Sukkah brush.'
silent testimony to the triumph of
man's innate intelligence, and the
expression of his Divine image*
Jayne Achter. Chairperson. Founders Fashion Luncheon. grts
Sydney G. Levison. President. The Founders (left/ and fed Sn-
nan. Executive Director. Mount Sinai Medical Center
Foundation.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
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from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC s& 123 s
from Chef
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letters and
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with a nch tomato sauce The
children wiM absdutety love rt as
a debaous hot lunch and as a
tasty dwine' sde-dish And so
w* the adufts' Erther way you
serve rt. getting the chiioren to
eat is as easy as AJeph Bez1
rr
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U
It's the time of your life
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of your life
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IN ASHKELON, ISRAEL
Aim:
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up. Occupancy Summer 1986 (292 Apartments)
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Facilities
include: Recreation Hall. Library. Club. Restaurant & Cafeteria.
Mini-Market. Laundermat and 24 Hour Clinic on premisis.
Surroundings: Walking distance to shopping, bus station, two miles to
ocean, and short drive to Tel Avh/ and Jerusalem.
BmUder. Yuval Gad. a subsidiary of KOOR Industries Ltd. Israel's
largest industrial conglomerate
OUTSTANDING MORTGAGE PROGRAM
CONTACT
MS. LEVIN, 312-677-3164, P.O. BOX 1533, SKOKIE, IL 60076
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21


Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Hebrew Academy Annual
Scholarship Dinner
To Be Chanukah Gala
Help Your Neighbors Celebrate Christmas
"Providing the Light for Jewish
Education" will be theme of the
38th Annual Scholarship Dinner
of the Rabbi Alexandr S. Gross
Hebrew Academy which will take
place on Sunday, Dec. 8, the se-
cond night of Chanukah at 6 p.m.
at the Eden Roc Hotel, Dr. David
Reinhard, president has
announced.
Mr. Michael Brumer and Mr.
Howard Plezner will serve as
honorary chairmen of the
Academy's Annual Highlight
Event.
Heading this year's Dinner
Committee are: Dr. and Mrs.
Lawrence (Helen) Ciment, Mr.
and Mrs. David (Elaine) Dobin,
and Mr. and Mrs. Max (Saundra)
Rothenberg, who have revealed
that the theme of the decor and
entertainment for the evening will
feature the Chanukah Holiday and
its festivities.
According to Jack Burstein,
chairman of the board of the
Academy, "It is most fitting that
the theme of this dinner is Pro-
viding Light for Jewish Educa-
tion. Chanukah is the Festival of
Light, a light that our ancient and
modern day adversaries have at-
tempted unsuccessfully to
extinguish."
Highlighting the evening's
festivities will be the presentation
of the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Menorah
Award to Sirs Associates Ltd., in
recognition in expanding cor-
porate giving.
"Their outstanding generosity
has made it possible for the
Hebrew Academy to continue to
provide for excellence in Jewish
Education," Mr. Burstein said.
The Awardee Corporation con-
sists of Brumer, Cohen, Logan
and Kandell, Pelzner, Schwedock,
Finkelstein and Klausner, Dr. Ar-
thur Kapit, and Milton
Ehretireich.
"Help Your Neighbors
Celebrate Christmas" is a new
program organized by the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami to help relieve Christian
volunteers and professionals dur-
ing the Christmas holiday by staff-
ing service programs with Jewish
volunteers.
The Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami will organize,
recruit and train people to "step-
in" to continue vital services for
United Way beneficiary agencies
throughout Dade County.
The pilot program, the first of
its kind, will take place in Miami
on Christmas Eve, Tuesday, Dec.
24 and Christmas Day, Wednes-
day, December 25.
"This program provides a
tremendous opportunity to spread
goodwill and unite various sectors
of the community in voluntary ac-
tion," said Harry A. "Hap" Levy,
Chairman of the Board of the
Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami. Levy added, "It is
a wonderful way for the Jewish
Community Centers to reach out
and help the needy on this holiday.
One way volunteers can help is
to serve meals for the elderly and
homeless at feeding sites such as
the Salvation Army and continue
to provide a communication link
with the hearing world for those
that are hearing impaired by
working at Deaf Services Bureau.
Future plans, include expanding
and incorporating more services
and reciprocity by the Christian
community on the Jewish
Holidays next year.
Agencies and volunteers who
have an interest in participating
in the Jewish Community Centers
of Greater Miami "Help Your
Neighbors Celebrate Christmas"
program may call Bennett at
932-4200.
The deadline for participating is
Monday, Dec. 2.
'Create Land From Sand'
Temple Israel To Present
National Issues Forum Friday
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
will present National Issues
Forum, on Friday at 8 p.m. ser-
vices, downtown. The forum is en-
titled "Welfare: Who Should Be
Entitled To Help?"
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat will
conduct the service, with Cantor
Rachelle F. Nelson chanting the
liturgy.
Other participants in the forum
are Dr. Joseph S. Julian, vice
president of Syracuse University;
Dr. Michael Freedman, head of
the Anthropology Department at
Syracuse; and Dr. Sanford L.
Kravitz, of Florida International
University.
Dr. Julian will be a pulpit guest
and moderator of the forum. Dr.
Freedman will be visiting pro-
gram expert. Dr. Karvitz, pro-
fessor of Public Affairs and an ex-
pert on welfare policy issues, is co-
chairman of the Temple Israel
Social Action Committee and
responsible for the Temple's par-
ticipation in the program.
Part of a nationwide network of
organizations including libraries,
universities, and religious institu-
tions, the program is sponsored by
Altschuler's Lecture
At Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai of North Dade
will present Professors David
and Linda Altschuler as
scholars-in-residence this week-
end, Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley,
the synagogue's spiritual leader
announced.
Lecture topics will include:
"Heroism, Hellenism, and
Chanukah," "Beauty and
Holiness: An Introduction to
Art," and "Josephus: The Man
and the Historian."
David Altschuler is the
Charles E. Smith professor of
Judaic Studies at George
Washington University. He
earned his master degree in
religious studies at Brown
University and his PhD in the
History of Judaism at the
Hebrew-Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion.
Linda Altschuler, his wife
since 1973, is director of the
Bnai B'rith Kutznick Museum
"'Art in Washington, D.C.,
holding a degree in Art History
jrom Case Western Reserve
"mversity in, Cleveland. Jewish
Art is her area of expertise.
the Domestic Policy Association.
The program will address such
issues as: Would poor people do
more to improve their situation if
government benefits weren't so
generous?; As the federal gov-
ernment has taken on more
responsibility for social programs,
are people less inclined to help one
another?; Which benefits should
the federal government make con-
tributions toward?; Do many
benefits go to the middle class and
not enough to those who are ne-
edy?; and Should we be prepared
to pay higher taxes to assure a de-
cent standard of living for all?
tfet&i&A tAwtfonmd{Watt*/
DO YOU HAVE a share in the redemption of
THE LAND OF ISRAEL?
HAVE YOU MADE your contribution to the
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL)?
IF NOT NOW... WHEN?
DO IT NOW!!!
Enclosed is my gift of: $____________
Name_
_Phone
Address^
.Apt. No.
All contributions to JNF are tax deductible.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, INC.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 353 Miami Beach, Florida 33139 Phone: 538-6464
GO STIR CRAZY
Make a delicious oriental stir fried dish in a snap. All it takes is one of the
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To use BIRDS EYE' Farm Fiesh M'xluies Cauliflower Baby Whole Carrols and Snow Pea Pods or
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mg packet using 14 package (2 cupsi vegetables and increasing soy sauce to ? tablespoons
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Rich Elected President CAJE
many other educational task force
teams in both the secular com-
munity and also within the Jewish
Community in such organizations
as the National Council of Jewish
Women, Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and Temple Beth Am.
Rich recently appointed Past
President of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education and presi-
dent of Riverside Memorial
Chapels, Al Golden, to head a
Task Force on Jewish Education.
The purpose of the task force is to
investigate and pursue all possible
ways and means to encourage
non-affiliated Jewish families to
send their children to available
Jewish institutions to receive a
Jewish education, according to
Golden.
Mrs. Nan Rich was recently
elected president of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, af-
filiated with the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
In the field of public education,
Mrs. Rich is presently the presi-
dent of CHARLEE of Dade Coun-
ty, the Committee for Residential
Homes for Abused and Neglected
Children; chairperson for the In-
structional Oversight Committee
of Dade County Public Schools,
secretary of the Dade County
Foundation for Excellence in
Public Education; member of the
Dade County Child Abuse task
force and member of the Dade
County Governor's Constituency
for Children.
In the past. Rich has served on
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A New Name And Logo For Miami's JCCs
The Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida, beginning this
month will officially become the
Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami.
Not since 1973 has Miami's
Jewish Community Centers
changed their name, but in
August of that year the Agency at
its annual meeting officially
changed from the YM & YWHA,
Young Men's and Young
Women's Hebrew Association, to
the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida. "But now we are
changing our name again," noted
Harry A "Hap" Levy, chairman
of the board for the organization.
Levy added. "The new name will
clarify for the community exactly
who we serve, residents of
Greater Miami from the
Dade/Broward County line to
South Miami." The Agency
operates four centers. The
Michael-Ann Russell JCC in North
Miami Beach, the South Dade JCC
in Kendall, the Miami Beach JCC
and Senior Center on Miami
Beach and the Executive Offices
located in the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation building. Each
JCC provides cultural, social,
educational and recreational pro-
grams for infants through senior
adults.
"The new name will help give
the Centers a new presence in
Dade County, an area the Agency
has been serving for more than 50
years, and differentiate it from
other Jewish Community Centers
in adjacent areas of Broward and
Palm Beach counties."
The Jewish Community Centers
are a beneficiary Agency of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and the United Way of Dade
County.
As part of the name change pro-
gram, a new logo is being
developed for the Agency to in-
crease awareness among those
people the-Centers-serve;.which,
presently exceeds more- than
Harry A. "Hap" Levy
15,000 men, women and children
annually, and those we will be ser-
ving in the years ahead.
The new logo for the Jewish
Community Centers of Greater
Miami is being developed by na-
tionally known Jewish American
graphic designer Avrum I. Ashery
of Potomac, Maryland.
Ashery, 39, was commissioned
by the JCCs to develop a new
graphic symbol to add to the iden-
tity and help define the organiza-
tion in its communication process
to the public.
Ashery is convinced of the need
for forceful, appealing and
coherent symbols in Jewish
organizations. To create those
symbols, Ashery integrates
Hebrew and English texts with
modern Jewish symbology.
The new logo for Dade County's
newly-named organization, the
Jewish Community Centers of
Greater Miami, should be unveiled
to the public in December.
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.
3tfi/wnng&
Dr. Barry Eichenbaum has been named to the Board of Directors of
the Hearing and Speech Center of Florida. Dr. Eichenbaum is a Doc-
tor of Optometry who practices in Coral Gables and currently serves
as Vice President of the Dade County Optometrlc Association.
Ha Bima Miami, Greater Miami's New Jewish theatre company is
auditioning for its next production, "Trial and Error." Men and
women, ages 15-60, backstage help, and your interested parties are
invited to auditions to be held at University of Miami Hillel on Sunday
from 12-3 p.m.
Mikvas Blima of North Dade and South Broward annunce its annual
Melava Malka on Saturday night, 8:30 p.m., at the Eden Roc Hotel.
Beth David Sisterhood will hold a Bazaar-Flea Market Sunday, Dec.
1 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the synagogue. Both old and new home
merchandise will be for sale.
Millie Braverman and Fritzi Sherr will chair the bazaar.
Victoria Hospital opened its Center for Addiction Treatment on
Wednesday on the fifth floor of the hospital. The adult 20-bed unit
will specialize in the treatment of cocaine addiction in response to
the growing use of cocaine in Dade County and Florida.
Pvt. Adam L. Berman, son of Leslie M. Berman and Joyce B. Ber-
man both of North Miami Beach, has completed basic training at Fort
Dix. He is a 1985 graduate of Castle Heights Military Academy,
Lebanon, Tenn.
The Yivo Committee of Miami is hosting a farewell banquet for
author, orator, and scholar, Dr. Heszel Klepfisz, prior to his move to
Israel, at the Eden Roc Hotel, Sunday, Dec. 15 at 12:30 p.m.
Moshe Buryn will also present a musical program.
The Miami-Coral Gables Dade Chapter, Women's Division
American Society for Technion, will meet on Monday at 11:30 a.m. at
the University of Miami Faculty Club.
Sam B. Topf will be guest speaker; there will also be a film with
Theodore Bikel.
Natalie Lyons is president of the Chapter.
Barbara Haven Biscayne Cancer League presents Casino Royale
on Saturday night at the Eden Roc Hotel. Hors d'oeuvres begin at 8
p.m. Raquol Berman, Adrienne Anchell, and Lois Hildebrandt are in
charge. _____
Greater Miami's Jewish Federation's 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Project Renewal Or Akiva Campaign,
presents the Pacesetter Dinner on Tuesday. Anthony Newly will be
the special guest artist. Cocktails begin at 6:30 p.m.; dinner is at 7:30
at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
National Council of Jewish Women held their Advocacy Training
Conference last week in Washington, D.C. Among those in atten-
dance representing Greater Miami Section of NCJW, were Nan Rich,
national board member; Anna Mae Ross, national board member;
Sylvia Oberstein, vice president of Public Affairs; and Beth Chait,
banner chairwoman. Ways and Means Committee.
Shaare Zedek Medical Center South Florida Women's Committee
will meet Wednesday at noon at the Casablanca Hotel. Lecturer and
Doctor Of Hebrew Literature and Cultural Chairman of the Beth Israel
Lecture Forum Rabbi Meir Felman will be the guest speaker. A
musical program is also planned. All are invited.
A Holiday Tradition at the
cSewpori A
pub
^Restaurant
Complete tEljanksgftring Dinner
With All the Trimmings!!!
8 lb. WHOLE TURKEY
For Four! Carve il yourself!
$9,95 per person*
Additional persons $4.95 per person
INCLUDES ALL THE HOLIDAY TRIMMINGS:
HOMEMADE STUFFING
CRANBERRY SAUCE
HOLIDAY VEGETABLES
SWEET POTATOES
fi
PUB BAKERY BREAD LOAVES
FRESH BAKED DESSERTS
BEVERAGE
Served from 12:30 p.m. Nov. 28th
A WHOLE TURKEY $29.90 FOR TWO
PLUS 2 ADDITIONAL SHARES
AT $4.95 PER PERSON
RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED 947-8088
167th STREET & COLLINS AVE.
ON THE OCEAN
SUNNY ISLES. MIAMI BEACH
fi
Touro College
Comes To Miami
Max and Saundra Rothenberg
will host a brunch for Touro Col-
lege at their home in North Miami
Beach on Sunday at 10 a.m. Dur-
ing the brunch, interested high
school juniors, seniors and their
parents will have the opportunity
to meet with Dr. Myron B.
Chaitovsky, Director of Admis-
sions and Ms. Abby Aronson, Ad-
ministrator of the Women's Divi-
sion. They will discuss the variety
of study options available at the
New York based school. The pro-
gram is scheduled to end by noon.
Touro College is an urban in-
stitution of higher and profes-
sional learning committed to in-
struction, scholarship and
research, with an emphasis on the
relevance of the Jewish heritage
to the general culture of Western
civilization and on service to the
wider community in its ethnic and
cultural diversity.
Theo Tobiasse's Works
At Temple Beth Am
Temple Beth Am announces the
exclusive showing of Israeli artist,
Theo Tobiasse's works. The ex-
hibit has been installed by the
Judy Blackman Gallery and will
continue through December.
Tobiasse survived the Nazi ter-
rorism in Paris during World War
II, when his family had to hide out
in an apartment building, often
squeezing into a "false attic" to
avoid the Gestapo. To retain his
sanity, the young Tobiasse read
and drew pictures.
Tobiasse now believes that
because of his experiences, he
gradually developed his own sur-
realistic art style.
Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
. '
B'nai Zion Plan Chanukah Party
'
B'nai Zion Miami Beach
Chapter 186 will hold a
Chanukah gala evening of Din-
ner and Dance on Sunday, Dec. 8
in the Palladium Ballroom at the
Konover Hotel. The Chapter's
next scheduled Social and
Games are on Sunday, Dec. 1
and Dec. 15, and every second
Sunday thereafter, at 1 p.m. at
the Surfside Holiday Inn.
TOURO COLLEGE
COMES TO
MIAMI
WHEN: NOVEMBER 24,1985,10 a.m.-12 Noon
WHERE: The home of
Max and Saundra Rothenberg
(1320 NE 172nd Street,
North Miami Beach)
WHAT YOU WILL FIND: Brunch and a visit by
Touro College representatives who will
discuss study opportunities at
Touro College in New York.
RSVP: By November 21
Daytime (305) 532-6421
Evenings (305) 653-1704
Come and explore your future at Touro
the personal college.
Our new package shows
our bread is letter perfect.
Just take one look at August Bros, new package and you'll know
why the bread inside is baked to perfection.
Because not only do we bake our delicious breads slowly and with
the finest ingredients... the k-parve symbol on the wrapper tells you it's
kosher supervision is just as meticulous.
Now you can get that authentic old-world deli style flavor in Rye,
Pumpernickel, White, Wheat, ChalJah and rolls. And every one is certified
k-parve.
So next time you're looking for delicious tasty bread
and rolls, try August Bros.
Our new package shows you we're
letter perfect. And our taste proves it.
COUPON EXPIRES 12/31/86
SAVE 15< ON ANY
kUtfUSt
<=4>ros.
DREAD OR ROLLS
M< Grace Arnold Foods Compani inc m* i
Deer complied itn o ou and lie consul*
coupons submitted must oe shewn on resmcted oj la* CasD value t ?0< Oitei
to Mm me last 90
misi De paid Dy ihe co
M coupon dp' specified pradKi
terns cl this oda tiar
il meicnandlse cojo
Mwfipii nhtOiled
I sue ANivntHtR
fietTOONSTiIulfc FRAUD i 'eoempiion of pojat* waved and Handled coupons nalto AinuM Foods
mo P0 fini 1466 Clinton ia',im 73040
9 lama
mc*
15'


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
*' "7

me\ -SWIRF
Pictured here from left to right, Gary Y.
Holtzman, Michael-Ann Russell JCC Presi-
dent; Dora Surire, Herman Gaba, Con-
gressman William Lehman, Harry A. "Hap"
Levy, Chairman of the Board of the JCCs of
JCCs Gaba-Swire
Circle Dedication
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center, a
branch of the Jewish Community
Centers of Greater Miami, has
completed major renovations on
the front entry-way circle into the
Center's 17 acre facility located in
North Dade.
Miami Jewish Home Next Generation
Presents 'Murder In The Gardens'
At Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens the Next Generation will
present "Murder in the Gardens"
on Saturday. 7:30 p.m., in the
Ruby Auditorium.
During cocktails and buffet din-
ner, guests will be the characters
in an unfolding plot written and
produced especially for this even-
ing of intrigue.
"The 'winners' will be the
brilliant sleuths whose dazzling
powers of deductive reasoning
pierce the maze of confusing and
unrelated clues to uncover the
murderer in their midst; the
'loser' will be the "victim." The
Next Generation is the newest
support group of the Miami
Jewish Home. Its members
number up-and-coming business
and professional people, each ->[
whom has pledged at least
$10,000 over a ten-year period to
the Miami Jewish Home The
group was formed in order to in-
volve younger people in the work
of the Miami Jewish Home." ex-
plained Next Generation Presi-
dent Nancy Rauch.
New Tract Studied
Talmud Study Group of Young
Israel of Sunny Isles will begin the
study of a new Talmudic tract on
Saturday afternoon. Mr. Hillel
Price. Young Israel president, ex-
plained that the study group
meets every Saturday after the
afternoon service. Thus far. thev
have completed the Mishna por-
tions of ten Talmud tractates.
Greater Miami; and Elton J. Kerness, ex-
ecutive director of the JCCs of Greater Miami
at the dedication of the Gaba-Swire Circle at
the Michael-Ann Russell Jeunsh Community
Center,
Thanks to the generosity of
Herman Gaba. a retired Certified
Public Accountant and his wife
Dora, a nationally know cookbook
author, and their friends Al and
Sadie Swire, the Gaba-Swire Cir-
cle was renovated and unveiled to
the community this month.
Under the guidance of William
Lehman, Jr., past president of the
Michael-Ann Russell Community
Center and Dr. Harvey Zalaznick,
JCC House Committee Chairman,
the project began August 19 and
reached its completion in early
November with the help of JCC
president Gary Y. Holtzman and
Center Director, Barry Podolsky.
The goal was to complete the land-
scaping and redesign the traffic
pattern for greater safety and ac-
cessibility to the facility.
More than 5,000 cars and
pedestrians weekly will pass
through the Gaba-Swire Circle at
the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center.
Bonds To Present
'Night In Israel'
The Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization will present a
"Night in Israel" on Tuesday.
Dec. 10, at the New Horizons
Auditorium, at 7:30 p.m.
In addition to celebrating the
Jewish State's 37th birthday, the
evening will include a salute to the
defenders of Israel.
Special guest will be American-
Jewish Folk humorist Eddie
Schaffer. Also on the agenda is
the New Horizons Choral Group.
Arthur Schloss is chairman for
the event.
Wanted: Assistant Rabbi
For largest Conservative Congre-
gation in Northeast Nassau
County (New York).
Call 516-293-2270. or write Box
WR C/O Jewish Flondian. P.O.
Box 012973, Miami. Fla. 33101.
Opening Soon
/CosherflCorner
R ESTAURAMT
2701 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida 33140 305-674-9222
New Glatt Kosher Restaurant Under ORC supervision
Eat in. takeout, delivery, catering
538-1000
A 30 YEAR TRADITION
525-9300
AV//A
FOR 32 YEARS. SOUTH FLORIDA'S MOST RESPECTED
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THE AUTO LEASING BUSINESS! PERSHING OFFERS ITS 24 HOUR "PEACE OF MIND" LEASING SER
VICE, AT ABSOLUTELY ROCK BOTTOM MONTHLY RATES!
DAILY/WEEKLY RENTALS
FOR OCCASIONAL USE, RENT A CAR YOU CAN TRUST. FROM PERSHING. SOUTH FLORIDA'S
LARGEST INDEPENDENT AUTO RENTAL AGENCY! THE GRANDEST VARIETY COMPACTS TO
CADILLACS. DEPEND ON PERSHINGS REPUTATION FOR QUALITY CARS AT MOST REASONABLE
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GREAT SAVINGS ON ANY OF OUR 2 AND 3 YEAR OLD. "OFF LEASE" USED CARS' FOR 32 YEARS
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PERSHING OFFERS ThiS AREA S FINE DONOR CREDIT PROGRAM' RAISE CASH AND
PROVIDE A VALUABLE SERVICE TO I MEMBERS OF YOUR DRGA^ZATION- CALL OUR
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT JOSEPH -jrT|S FOR DETAli


Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Or. David Hartman, renowned
scholar and author, was
featured speaker at the first
annual Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment
Forum. The forum, which this
year consisted of six lectures
with the theme "A Living Cove-
nant," was sponsored by the
i; ater Miami Jewish Federa-
under a grant from the
Marilyn K. Smith Philan-
thropic Fund. Seen at the lec-
ture given for the Federation's
Women's Division were Dr.
tin rt man and Dorothy
Podhurst, Women's Division
president.
As part of the Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum, designed to honor
Smith's memory and perpetuate her vibrant
spirit and lifelong concern for the learning
and sharing of Jewish ideals. Seen at the lec-
ture were (from left to right): Greater Miami
Jewish Federation President Samuel I. Adler,
Harry B. Smith, Lou Ann Smith, Dr. Hart-
man, Joseph A. Smith and David B. Smith.
Hadassah
Events
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their HMO
Luncheon on Monday, Dec. 2,
11:30 a.m. at the Ocean Pavilion.
Guest speaker will be Mrs. Bertha
Kohansov of Miami Beach Region.
Pat Gail will entertain.
The Hannah Senesch Chapter
of Hadassah will hold their lun-
cheon meeting at noon, Tuesday,
Dec. 3, at the Shelborne Hotel.
Aliyah chapter of Hadassah will
hold a dinner meeting on Tuesday,
Dec. 3, at 7 p.m. at Le Glacier, the
Atrium. Howard Joffe, Channel
1" troubleshooter, will be
speaking.
Jeannin*
former itar
Folitw Birgtrti
Ma Solie
Jamoui French Keiluurant
MOBILE GUIDE AWARD
COMMUNITY REPORTER AWARD
Elegant Dining
& Reasonable Prices
if la Jolie ^trench Cuiune
1045 95th STREET, BAY HARBOR IS.
PHONE: 865-6011 MIAMI BEACH
Your Hont: PATRICK
Famous Chef from Limoges, France
Schimelman Joins Mount Sinai
Foundation As Associate Director
Ted Safian. executive director
of Mount Sinai Medical Center
Foundation announced that Nor-
man Schimelman has joined the
organisation as its Associate
Director. Mr. Schimelman, has 20
years of fundraising experience
and for the past nine years, he has
l>een the executive director of
Palm Beach County Jewish
Federation. During his tenure, the
Federation's campaign increased
from less than $1 million to more
than $7 million amd many new
community programs and services
were established.
Mr. Schimelman has been af-
filiated with Dallas Jewish
Federation. Brandeis University
and Rhode Island Jewish Federa-
tion. He is a graduate of Indiana
University with a master's degree
in social work.
The Foundation, a not-for-profit
corporation, actively solicits con- Norman Schimelman
tnbutions to improve the delivery
of health care at Mount Sinai.

FEDERAL PRECIOUS METAL DEPOSITORY CORPORATION
250 N.E. 17th Terrace At the Total Bank Miami. FL 33132
We proudly announce
our new jewelry department featuring
Italian gold jewelry, diamonds and coin jewelry.
We welcome you to visit us for
your holiday gift needs.
Telephone (305) 379-5772
Outside Florida 1-800-327-9266 Florida Toll Free 1-800-432-3022
/ .^v X ^^^aa^M^^n^M
IO 1 Hi 7 l*i
RETAILER This coupon is ^H I for redemption Other use constitutes fraud -1
redeemable for face value ^H
and b* handling charges ^H nrnvided at follows ins ^H Coupon may not be p assigned or transferred Customer must pay any g sales taa Void where pro- vj

waived on a wail ulr ^^M
o< ihe oroducisDeofied ^^H m^c^^i ^^b^b
herein You mail it to bflMI mK hibited taxed license
Sun-Diamond Growers ****-. required or restricted by J
of California Dept S902 ElPaso law Cash value 20* Good nly m US A Offer limned to
TX 79966 On request you must
supply invoices one coupon per
proving sufft- pun hase
ZSS 7DMSD lD0fl?3 COUPON EXPIRES
covering coupons submitted December 11
1986
AMERICA*S FAVORITE FIGS
RETAILER Th.s
coupon is redeema
We tor face value
indW handling
charges provided as
follows it is received
onarrttil Wleof the
product specified herein
You mail it to Sun-Diamond Growers
of California Dept S902 i
79966 On request you must supply
invoices
proving suffi-
S3S? 411M3
covtnni
I coupons submit-
' ted for redemp-
tion Other use
constitutes fraud
_ ^-P*^ ^ .; commutes rraua
/(V# r^ ^7 Coupon may not be
i^*-/'. 7*0 assigned or trans
ferred Customer must
/ oay any sales tax Void
where prohibited,
taxed license required or restricted by law
Cash value I-2CK Good only m U S A Offer "
limited to one
coupon per pur-
chase COUPON
EXPIRES Decem-
berjt. 1986
IDblSS
AMERICA'S RAISIN CHOICE
RETAILER This coupon is
redeemable to' '** value
and fW handling charges
provided as follows it is
received on a retail sale o'
the product specified herein
You mail it to Sun-Diamond
Growers of California. Dept
S902 El Paso TX 79966
On request you must supply
invoices
proving suffi-
cient Stock pur
chasescov q-i -i nq
ermg coupons "Jl J J
submitted for
redemption
IDblMfl
Other use constitutes
fraud Coupon may not
be assigned or trans- z
ferred Customer must p
pay Jtr>r sales tax Void ^
where prohibited o
ta*ed license required <->
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limited to one
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purchase
COUPON
EXPlRtS
December II
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They're America's favorite noshes.
with a fresh, naturally sweet taste you won't find
anywhere else. And they're certified kosher!
*Sun-Damond Growers otCai'lcKnia 198*


'wivti rinnmunlhrwl.ni M....^,l..._ )) inoc
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Mr. and Mrs. William (Jodi) Midtack and Mr. and Mrs. Dave
(Marilyn) Zinn, Chairmen of Mount Sinai Medical Center Young
Presidents Club costume ball, "Pairs."
Young Presidents Club Presents 'Paris'
Mr. and Mrs. William (Jodi)
Multack and Mr. and Mrs. Dave
(Marilyn) Zinn of the Young Presi-
dent's Club of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, will serve as
chairman of "PAIRS," a tribute
to twosomes, the theme of their
annual costume extravaganza
which will be held at the Doral
Beach Hotel on Saturday, Dec. 14.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael C.
.
Marilyn Weil, newly elected
president of the Greater Miami
Women's Auxiliary of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged with out-
going President Myra Farr.
Enrico Macias
At TOPA
The Miami Beach Theatre of
the Performing Arts will present
Enrico Macias, international
singer and composer for one
show on Saturday, Nov. 30 at
8:30 p.m.
Macias has performed his
songs of love, joy, hope and en-
chantment in France, the Soviet
Union, Japan, Israel, Africa, Ita-
ly, Spain, Brazil, England, and
by personal invitation, by the
late President and Mrs. Anwar
Sadat, in Egypt.
The Israeli Chassidic Festival
'85 will follow the next day with
a 7:30 p.m. single performance,
also at TOPA.
Alumna Establishes
Liberal Arts Award
Florence Beth Snyder, partner
in the Miami law firm of Milledge,
Iden, and Snyder, has established
an annual award for a liberal arts
graduate in Florida Atlantic
University's College of
Humanities. The award was
established with a gift and Presi-
dent's Club commitment to the
FAU Foundation; funding is
guaranteed for 20 years.
Snyder is a 1973 alumna and
was a faculty scholar at FAU and
then attended Emory Law School;
she is a member of the Florida and
Georgia Bars.
(Margie) Blasberg are the
chairmen of the Host ad Hostess
Committee.
The Young Presidents Club pro-
vides financial support coupled
with their time and talent to
establish programs at Mount Sinai
to benefit the people of the com-
munity, Barton S. Goldberg,
chairman of the Young Presidents
Club at Mount Sinai pointed out.
Amit Women
Shoshana Chapter of Amit
Women will hold their next
meeting on Tuesday, at noon, in
the State Room of Seacoast
Towers South.
Sim.-ha Chapter of Amit
Women will hold their next
meeting on Monday at noon at
Winston Towers 300.
Geula Chapter of Amit Women
will meet on Wednesday at 7:30
p.m. in the Jewish Community
Center.
Migdal Chapter of Amit Women
will meet Wednesday, at noon, at
the Forte Towers.
Golda Meir Chapter of Amit
Women will be spending their an-
nual Thanksgiving day weekend
at the Saxony Hotel. Hostess for
the weekend will be Yetta Bor-
tunk, who is also presidium of the
chapter, along with Bea Fuchs
and Lucy Frankel.
Hadar Chapter of Amit Women
will hold a luncheon and games to
raise funds for their "Cherish a
Child" project on Thursday, Dec.
5, at noon, in the Byron Hall
Social Hall.
Mrs. Dorothy Gruen, director of Early Childhood program at
Samuel Scheck HiUel Community Day School with a member of
the Metro-Dade police department. The two organizations, under
the direction of Lieutenant Commander Michael Gruen, teach
children about community safety and the role of the police, durinq
Safety Day.
Yiddish Production At Shelborne Hotel
Following its successful world
tour, "Humorovich," an all-
Yiddish production featuring
Jackie Jacob, is being staged here
in a six-month run by Interna-
tional Artistic Production at the
Shelborne Beach Hotel.
"Humorovich" presents the
Shalom Dancers featuring Sisi
Lobato. Choreography and direc-
tion are by Eber Lobato.
Shows are scheduled Wednes-
day, Saturday, and Sunday.
The production had its Miami
Beach premiere last Saturday
evening.
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8.00 A.M.
Prices Effective Nov. 21 thru 27.1985
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Perfect for Your
Thanksgiving Meal
Cranberry and
Pumpkin Loaf
$199
Mb.
if %
loaf
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Freshly Baked
Dinner Roils
12.79
0
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Wagon
Wheel
Rolls
\m
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Blueberry Muffins......6 **Y*
Especially Decorated
Holiday Cup Cakes......,5J $189
Deep South
Carrot Cake....................ch$269
Topped with Icing or Powdered Sugar
Fruit Stollen....................ch$259
Quantity Rights Reserved
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Mini
Bagelettes...........
12 rer 99*
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into full
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen, bake and
serve horsd oeuvres for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Danish
Bakery Department Only)
^f!; *9........................................................... $11.05
ior>ct. pkg..........................................................$19 95
__________________Available at Publix Stores with Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie
$169
re
8-inch
APPle ........................$1.89
Apple Crumb ............$1.89
Peach ........................$2.09
Pumpkin ...................$IM
Egg Custard ..............$1.89
Pecn ........................$2.89
Sweet Potato ............$1.89
Cherry.......................$2.79
Blueberry ..................$2.49
Lemon Meringue.......$1.89
Mince ........................$1.89
Coconut Custard .......$1.89
10-inch
$3.39
$3.99
$3.29
$3.59
$4.99
$4.69
$4.89
$3.29
$4.09
$3.59
AveMabie at PubNx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pecan Pie
$989
8-inch
size

f
j


Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
^The first educational seminar on trauma care, since the incep-
tion of the Trauma Network ofDade County will feature physi-
cians from Israel's Rambam Medical Center and other speakers
addressing the "Contrasts in Trauma Care, the American/Israel
views," on Monday, at Mount Sinai Medical Center. From left to
right are Esther Cohen, coordinator of Mount Sinai's Continuing
Education Department and Trauma Conference Coordinator-
Dr. David Russin, Acting Director of Trauma, Mount Sinai
Medical Center, and Program Chairman for the Trauma Con-
ference; and Elaine Bloom, former State Representative.
v Amit Women Plan Campaign
Florida Council of Amit Women
are preparing for their annual
Child's Day campaign. This year,
the usual three-day solicitation
drive will be extended to three
months, beginning Dec. 1.
All proceeds from this door to
door fund raising effort will help
maintain Amit Women's 20 pro-
jects in Israel, which house and
educate over 16,000 children.
Amit Women has placed 200
Ethiopian children, recently
Airlifted to Israel, into their youth
villages.

Shown left to right, making
plans for the Child's Day Cam-
paign, are Chairmen Blanche
Cantor and Laura Vogel.
E
M
B
A
S
S
Y
RESERVE FOR COMPLETE THANKSGIVING DINNERS
AT ALL 3 LOCATIONS!
1
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Sun. 4-9 P.M., Mon. Thurs. S- P.M.
Unlimited Salad Bar
with Wnnei
Bkd Wnnaf
Mon Thura 54 p.m.
EMBASSY FORTYONE KOSHER DELICATE ESSEN
534 41 it Straat Miami Baach 534 7550
LUNCH DELI TAKE OUT FOOD ALA CARTE DINNER
Opan Sun. Thurs. 11 30 AM 9 P.M.; Fri 9 AM 3 P.M.
EMBA SS Y CA TERERS 534-7550 538-7550
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Wedding
FELLMANDORFMAN
The marriage of Lesli Denyse Fellman and Mr.
Jonathan Michael Dorfman took place Oct. 13 at
Park Avenue Synagogue, New York with Rabbi
Harlan Wechsler officiating. A reception followed
at The Pierre, New York.
The bride is the daughter of Mrs. Marilyn
Fellman and the late Mr. Morton R. Fellman of
Miami.
The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Sumner
Dorfman of Boston.
Attending the bride as matron of honor was Mrs.
Shelley Ardis Bergman of San Francisco, sister of
the bride. The groom was attended by his brother
Douglas Dorfman, as best man. Ushers were
Barry Lorin Fellman and Seth Howard Fellman,
brothers of the bride. Master Jeremy Arditi of
New York served as ring bearer.
The bride wore a designers gown completely
adorned with re-embroidered Alecon lace and seed
pearls. The high neckline, long slim sleeves and
tightly fitted gown has a silk taffeta flounce
hemline with a sweep-train taffeta bow in back.
Her head dress had a flower profile effect with
seed pearls cascading down into the tulle draped
veiling of Alecon lace applique.
The bride is an associate in the corporate finance
department of Shearson Lehman Brothers, invest-
ment bankers. She previously was a tax consultant
for Touche Ross in Los Angeles and is also a CPA.
A graduate from the University of Michigan, Ann
Arbor, she received a Masters in Taxation from
the University of Southern California and her
MBA from the Wharton School of Finance. Her
late father was president of Fellman-Reiff
Associates of Miami, a prominent architechural-
engineering firm specializing in commercial and in-
dustrial developments throughout the country.
The bride's mother is a real estate broker with
Merrill Lynch Realty in Miami and has been active-
ly involved in many of the city's civic and cultural
organizations.
Mr. Dorfman is an executive in the Institutional
Research Network (IRN), a private television net-

Mrs. Jonathan Dorfman
work for institutional investors. IRN is a subsidary
of Private Satellite Network. He is a graduate of
the Saint Mark's School in Southborough, Mass., j
Harvard College, Cambridge, and received an ad-
vanced degree from Yale School of Organization
and Management, New Haven. He also previously
served as an assistant to Michael S. Dukakis.,
Governor of Massachusetts, and Senator Daniel
Patrick Moynihan of New York.
His father is President of Dorfman Jewelers of
Boston, where his mother is buyer and advertising
consultant.
Following a honeymoon in Bermuda the couple
will reside in New York.
Looking Cantor Job
Year round reference my perfor-
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Miami and vicinity.
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Our old-fashioned Roast Turkey with
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plus Bourbon Glazed Ham, cool, refreshing
salads, an international cheese board, creamy
mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, wild rice with
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i-U Cl: J:/n_: j___ v>.......
P.O. 1 .4 A TU. I.
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
w
Bella London
Samuel Epstein
Israel Bonds To Honor
2 Star Lakes Residents
The Greater Miami Israel Bod
Organization will honor Samuel
Epstein and Bella London during
a "Night in Israel" celebration on
Sunday at the Star Lakes Social
Hall (North Miami Beach). Both
Epstein and London, residents of
Star Lakes, will receive the Israel
Leadership Award for their sup-
port of the Jewish State during
the celebration, scheduled to
begin at 9:30 a.m.
Both originally from New York.
Epstein and London have been in-
volved in various philanthropic
and community organizations.
Epstein has been a member of
the Maimonides Lodge of the
B'nai B'rith for 10 years, holding
the positions of secretary and
treasurer. He has also been a
member of the Jewish War
Veterans and the Star Lakes
Men's Club.
London has been involved with
the Ein Karem Chapter of
Hadassah. serving as its member-
ship secretary for four years. She
has also served as a co-chairman
of the Hadassah Medical
Organization and has been involv-
ed with the Eye Bank Program.
Guest speaker at the celebration
will be Anne Ackerman, a civil
and political activist.
The David Hill family in celebra-
tion of their mother, Rose Hill's
90th birthday, is sponsoring the
breakfast.
Chairman of the "Night in
Israel" is Maurice Mehlman, while
Doris Kesner is serving as co-
chairman. Sponsoring organiza-
tions are Congregation Agudath
Achim, Hadassah and the
Maimonides Lodge of the B'nai
B'rith.
Rabbi Strajcher Receives Award
At Annual Torah Umesorah Dinner
Former Miamian. Rabbi Sholom
Strajcher, dean of Providence
Hebrew Day School and New
England Academy of Torah, and
son of Miami Beach residents, Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Levy, owners of
the Palmer House Hotel, will
receive the Innovator's Award at
the 42nd Annual Dinner of Torah
Umesorah to be held on Sunday at
New York's Sheraton Centre, an-
nounced Sheldon Beren,
president.
According to Rabbi Joshua
Fishman, executive vice-president
of Torah Umesorah, "Rabbi Stra-
jcher will be given the highest
honor of Torah Umesorah because
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impact of his leadership on the na-
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Rabbi Strajcher graduated from
the Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy and the Louis Mer-
witzer/Mesivta of Greater Miami;
he now holds the key to the City of
Miami Beach, along with many
other local and New England area
honors and accomplishments.
In New England, Rabbi Stra-
jcher initiated a Bait Medrash pro-
gram for advanced Talmudic
studies, under the auspices of the
New England Academy of Torah,
Dormitory Corporation.
In addition, the rabbi formed a
preparatory program to enable
students who don't have a full day
school background, to have the op-
portunity of enjoying a Yeshiva
high school education.
Rabbi Strajcher received his or-
dination from the Yeshiva Rabbi
Chaim Berlin Rabbinical Academy
of Brooklyn, New York.
His Bachelor of Arts degree in
Psychology is from Long Island
University and his Master of Arts
is from Memphis State
University.
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Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
jige Berger
FISHMAN
nan, son of Dr. and
phman, will be called
as Bar Mitzvah
10:30 a.m. at Temple
it is a student in the
ly School, Kadima,
Synagogue Youth
Dana Kotzen
Mishel Benei Leibovitz
Eric Fishman
and is active in various
organizations.
He attends Lehrman Day
School where he is in the 8th
grade. He is a member of the
Gifted Class, a winner of the
Hebrew English and History Bee,
Vice President of Student Council
in the 7th grade and an excellent
isis Of The Weekly Torah Portio
\he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and
ft reached to heaven; and behold the angels of God ascen-
escending on it"
(Genesis 28.12)
VAYETZE-'
On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to rest at a
re God appeared to him in a dream, promising to be with
i give the land to him and his seed after him. Rising the
ling. Jacob lifted the stone on which he had slept, and
i a pillar. He called the place Beth-el, meaning "house of
vowed to serve God there when he returned to his
juse. The Lord would be his God. In Haran Jacob work-
years as a shepherd for Laban seven years for his
Leah, seven years for his second wife, Rachel, and six
the sheep. His wives gave him their maid servants
Zilpah as wives. Jacob's four wives bore him 11 sons:
[Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher,
|Zelmlun, and Joseph; he also had one daughter named
God's direction, Jacob returned home to his father's
the way he met the angels of God.
unting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
[Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage, .edited by P. Wollman-
published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7s Maiden
[ York, N.Y. 1003*. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
i volume.)
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INC. |
N.W. 33rd Avenue, Suite 106 J
, FL 33309 305-486-6119 J
student.
Dr. and Mrs. Fishman will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion and a
reception Saturday evening at the
Mayfair House.
Special guests will include Mr.
and Mrs. Solomon Finvarh (aunt
and uncle) from Bogota, Colom-
bia; Dr. Michael and Phyliss
Telson and Sylvia Telson from
Washington, D.C.; grandparents
Mr. and Mrs. Julio Fishman, Mr.
and Mrs. Morty Reiss and many
more friends and relatives from
home and out-of-town.
DANA KOTZEN
Dana Kotzen, daughter of
Jessica Siskind and Dr. Sephen
Kotzen, will become a Bat Mitz-
vah at Temple Beth Moshe, Satur-
day. Rabbi Israel Jacobs will of-
ficiate and Hazzan Moshe Friedler
will chant the liturgy.
Dana is an 8th grade student at
North Miami Junior High. Her
hobby is aerobic dancing.
In Dana's honor her parents will
sponsor the Kiddush following the
services in the Clara and Seymour
Smoller Ballroom, and a reception
at Turnberry Isle.
AIMEE BERGER
Aimee Paige Berger, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Berger will be
called to the Torah as Bat Mitz-
vah, Saturday at 9:30 a.m. at Bet
Shira Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in the
Bet Shira Yachad and Pre-
Confirmation Class.
She attends Palmetto Junior
High where she is in the 8th
grade.
Aimee is a State Ranked Junior
Tennis player.
Mr. and Mrs. Berger will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion and a
reception Saturday at Faces in the
Grove at Mayfair.
Special guests will include Mr.
Burton Berger of Oceanside, New
York; Mr. Joel Ezru of Rockville
Center, New York; Mrs. Steven
Bernstein, Jeffrey and Ricky
Bernstein of Rockville Center,
New York; and Mr. and Mrs. Zev
Cohen of Ormand Beach, Florida.
MISHEL LEIBOVITZ
Mishel Benei Leibovitz,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
Leibovitz, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah Saturday
at 9 a.m. at Temple Samu-El.
The celebrant is a student in the
Pre-Confirmation class at Temple
Samu-El.
She attends Hammocks Junior
High School where she is in the
8th grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Leibovitz
will host the Oneg Shabbat follow-
ing the services in honor of the oc-
casion and a reception will be held
Sunday.
Special guests will include
Mishel's uncle and aunt from
Liverpool, England, Mr. and Mrs.
Eric Bennet and her great-aunt
Anne Bennett of Silver Springs,
Maryland.
BRANDON ROTBART
Brandon Rotbart, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Abraham Rotbart, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah at the Shabbat service on
Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbis Leon Kronish, Gary
Glickstein, Harry Jolt and Paul
Caplan will officiate.
Brandon is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5748.
T
Synagogue
Listing
CandlelightingTime
5:09 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Dally Mlnyen 7:30 a.m. a 5:15 p.m.
Lai* Frl. eervlcea 8:15 p.m
Frl. 8 p.m. Bat Mitzvah: Bath Sulzar
Sat. 5:15 p.m. Bar Mitzvah: Jordan Fral
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534 7213-534-7214 _.
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi MS",
Moshe Buryn, Cantor kJ^
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
Shabbat Services 8 JO a m Sermon 10 JO
Da.i, Minyan
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 667-6667
Or. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgafd will
speak on tha theme "Sail.Fulfillment and the
Family Ar* They at Odda With On* Another?"
Sat. 8:15 a.m. aervice. Bar Mltzvahe. Jaaon and
Jared Lamms
Sat it 15 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Andrew Kapuatln.
Bat Mitzvah: Allison Stieglit;
Sermon th*m* "Jacob* Dream"
()
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau,
Rabbi Emeritus
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Jacob E. Tambor. Cantor
Frl. av* family aervice 7:30 p.m.
Tu*., Wad. S Frl. 7:45 a.m. a 5:30 p.m.
Sun. Richard Waa* will apeak on Houee
and Patio Plant* fO-11 a-m.
Mlncheti 5:15 p.m. Oalh-eervleoe
Sun. a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah claaaea Sunday
8:30-10:30 a.m.
8586334
BETH KOOESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor: Joeeph Kriaael
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
Service! Morning* 7:30 a.m. ^__^
Saturday: 8:45 *.m. ,'.
Evening*: 5:00 p.m. IWI
Inaugural Late Frl. av* aarvlc* \ 3/
8:15 p.m. N*w member* will be
welcomed. Rabbi Max Shapiro Canto. Joaeph
Kriaael will officiate. Thome "What Are
My Inner Thoughta!"
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi ^
Rabbi Joseph A. Gorf inkel. f* B j
Rabbi Emeritus '
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Services Frl. 0 p.m. Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Dally 8 a.m.. 5 p.m. Sun. 8:30 a.m.
Rlbbl Jacobs sermon
"Mow to Say Thank You."
Bat Mitzvah Dana Kotzen.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeftereon Ave., MB.. FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nissttn Benyamtnt
Daily services 8 m S 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 8.15a.m.
Rabble cla*** Mondey Advanced Hebrew
9 30 a m. Tuaa. English Blot* Cl** 9:45 em
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 :'9h'i
Rabbi David H. Auerbach JT/
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Meieels
Shabbat Sarvlc** Ftl. 8 p.m. Sat. *30 a.m.
Bet Mitzvah ot Aimee Pelgo Bargar.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL _,
1701 Washington Avenue JjS',
Miami Beach "
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat 5 p.m.
Sal service 9 m Dr Irving Lehimen
will preach on "Tne Weekly Portion
ol the Bible
Cantor Yehuda Shllmen will chant
Bar Mltzveh: Eric Flehman
Dally aerv. 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlft
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Greater Miami
Miami* Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 191h St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor Racheite F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Director ot Education
And Programming Jack L Sparks
Frl. eve. Rabbi Rax. D. Perimeter "Whan
Camalot Enda."
Liturgy: Cantor Jacob Q. Bornt*ln.
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. R*,'K
Coral Gables 887 5657
Michael B. Elsenstat. Rabbi
Friday aervlcea 8:15 p.m.
Bat Mitzvah. Julia Beth Ketx. Set.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
ServiceeFrt 7.30 p.m.
Sat. 9: 30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morning services Sam
Friday late evening service
8:15 pm
Saturday tern and 7 45 pm
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902CarlylaAva, 866-9633
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein -c>B
Dally *arvlce* 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Frl late aarv. 8 p.m. Rabbi Labovitz eermon
theme "Run For Your Lite."
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
TEMPLE BETH SHpLOM
Chase Ave. 6 41 st St. .538 7231
OR LEON KRONISH. RABBI L'*aal
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAULO.XA>i>N. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVtSER
Frl. evening 8:15 p.m
Rabbi Gary Qltektafn will *p**k on mi;
Hate* Draam." Sat 10:45 a.m. Bar Mitzvah:
Brandon Rothbarl.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
382 0898
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem orthodox
Rabbi K jsiii will temporenly conduct
separate services Sat. 9 30 e m. et Temple
Samu-El, S3S3S W 152nd Av*. *outh ol
N. Kendall Drive
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dede's Reform Cororeoatton
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Sbulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Ftt.eenrlca8:15p.m.
Sat. 10:30 a.m
Prof. David S Li.vda Altachuler will be
Scholer* In Reeldenc* Frl thru Sun.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd
Or. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Dally *rvlce* 7:30 e.m., 5:30 p.m
Frl. aarv. 5:15 p.m. Late aerv. 8 p.m
Sal 8 15*.m t Sp m
Sal 5 p.m. Bar Mitzvah: Seth Sherman
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservetlve
2712311 ,
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi I
Beniamm Adler, Cantor
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Mlnyan aervice 7 a.m. Mon. a Thur*. 9 a.m.
Frl eve. 8:15gueelpeak*r Dr. Abraham
Benyunes "Our Sacred Musical Heritage
Sat 9:30 a m Shabbath a*rv
Bat Mitzvah: Janet Boll


Pagel2-B Th Jewish Florichan/Friday, November 22, 186
At Miami Festival
Israeli Arabian Horse Farm With Prize
Stud Launches American Program
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
TEL AVTV A promising new
export trade linked with the
return of the pure bred Arabian
horse to the area in which the
breed originated is being launched
by Israel's first privately-owned
stud farm.
The "Shatir Stud" ranch of
Rosh Pina, in the ancient green
slopes overlooking the Sea of
Galilee, made its first commerical
venture to the United States
horse market at the Arabian
Horse Festivals in Miami, through
this weekend. This unique enter-
prise is headed by a prominent Tel
Aviv businessman, veteran
Galilee rancher and immigrant
English livestock specialist. Presi-
dent of the growing Israeli Arab
Horse Society is Minister of Police
General (Res.) Haim Bar-Lev.
The star attraction of the new
Israeli project is the champion
stallion "Shatir." Born of pure
Crabbit bloodlines in England he
was raised in the rugged hills of
Rosh Pina (founded at the turn of
the century by Baron Jacob
Rothschild as the first Zionist set-
tlement in the Galilee. The million
dollar stud has been brought to
Miami after winning important
prizes in Israel and at previous
American and Canadian shows.
Among these awards are: U.S.
National Semi-finalist, Region XII
(Southeast U.S.) Champion, and
Canadian National Top Ten, all in
1984.
N.Y. Archbishop Urges Parish
Priests To Light Candles For Soviet
Jews On Reagan-Gorbachev Meeting
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
John Cardinal O'Connor has
written a letter to all parish
priests of the Archdiocese of
New York urging them to
light a candle for Soviet
Jews on the eve of the sum-
mit meeting this week bet-
ween President Reagan and
Rutenberg Re-elected
Charles Rutenberg, a promi-
nent resident of Belleair Bluffs,
Florida, has been re-elected
treasurer of the Board of Gover-
nors of Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion for
1986.
A member of the Board of
Governors since 1977, Rutenberg
is engaged as a private investor. A
former chairman of the U.S.
Home Corporation in Clearwater,
he has served on the executive
committee of the United Jewish
Appeal, the Board of Trustees of
the American Friends of Haifa
University and on the develop-
ment committee and council of the
Morton F. Plant Hospital in
Clearwater.
Ronald Book has been made a
partner in the Miami law firm
of Sparber, Shewn, Shapo,
Heilbronner P. A. He joined the
firm in 1981 and, as Byron
Sparber said, "became one of
the firm's most active par-
ticipants in governmental and
administrative matters."
Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev.
Recalling paragraph four of
the Second Vatican Council's
document Nostra Aetate, which
deplored persecution and anti-
Semitism, the Cardinal wrote to
the 450 parish priests of the Ar-
chdiocese, "In this spirit of Chris-
tian charity, I ask you and your
parishes to observe Nov. 18 as a
day of remembrance for
persecuted Jews.
"I ASK YOU and your
parishioners to light a candle on
the evening of the 18th to pray for
world peace and the release of
Soviet Jewish prisoners," O'Con-
nor wrote in the letter dated Nov
5 A copy of the letter was provid-
ed to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency by Rabbi Allan
Meyerowitz, Soviet Jewry chair-
man of the Rabbinical Assembly,
the international association of
Conservative Rabbis.
Meyerowitz said that the letter
was in reaction to an appeal last
month by the RA to O'Connor
that the Archdiocese, which
represents some two million
Catholics in New York, make
some sort of public gesture on
behalf of Soviet Jews. Meyerowitz
said similar action involving Ar-
chdioceses In other cities was
underway.
The Cardinal, in his letter,
noted that he was "quite moved"
on the issue of Soviet Jews last
month when he spoke at a day-
long conference at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America,
sponsored by the RA. At that con-
ference, O'Connor recalled in the
letter, "A Jewish seminarian,
Leonard Feldman, spoke vividly
about his experience in his native
land, the Soviet Union.
"LEONARD recounted how his
countrymen persecuted him and
his family as well as other Soviet
Jews. I was quite moved by
Leonard Feldman's account of
what it meant to be a Jew in the
Soviet Unio," O'Connor wrote.
Feldman was a refusenik who now
studies at the JTS.
Meyerowitz, meanwhile, an-
nounced that local rabbis were to
stage civil disobedience and pro-
test demonstrations on behalf of
Soviet Jewry outside the Soviet
Embassy in Washington Sunday;
in San Francisco, Nov. 18, outside
the Soviet Consulate; ad in New
York, Nov. 18, at the Soviet Mis-
sion to the United Nations.
The export possibilities of the
endeavor are centered around the
45 splendid horses for sale, many
sired by Shatir, all products of ex-
pert training and carefree roam-
ing in the rich and rock Galilee
foothills. These pure Arabian
horses, for show, cow herding or
investment, are priced in the
$25-40,000 range landed in the
United States. It is expected that
such exports may reach half a
million dollars annually in a few
years- providing Israel with an en-
tirely new trade branch.
The breeding services of the
magnificent Shatir are being of-
fered to mare owners in the
United States from Miami. Oppor-
tunities to take part in the growth
of this new area of Israeli enter-
prise may also be made available
to horse lovers and investors
abroad.
Tel Aviv builder Avraham Pilz,
developer of Dizengoff Center,
will represent the Galilee horse
venture in the U.S. along with the
"Shatir" stallion himself now at
the Wright Arabian farms in
Miami. His consortium partners
are Gideon Raski, veteran Galilee
cattle breeder and devoted
horseman for half a century, and
Richard Woolf of England, now
also a Galilee resident.
While several kibbutzim have
developed horse breeding bran-
ches and riding schools, and
horseback tours are becoming
part of the Israeli scene, the
Shatir ranch venture, it was said,
is the first launched as a commer-
cial initiative to realize the poten-
tial of Arabian horse Deeding in
Israel.
Are you an assertive Single? Whether the answer is yes or no vn
are still Interested in Information about other Singles. What are th
doing? Where are they meeting now? How do I become a part of iS
RESPECTABLE Singles action? ,ne
To help you with answers to these questions, The Jewish FioriHia
is introducing "Specially for Singles." Ulan
JASS, Jewish Association Serving Singles, offers the JASS
line, a 24-hour hotline to find out what's happening in Dade Coun
ty for Jewish single adults; just dial 573-JASS. JASS is sponsored4
by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and the Jewish Con
munity Centers of South Florida.
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization, BBYO, is a group for Jewish
high school age students who want to get involved in community
and international leadership programs in Judaism. Lifelone
friendships and relationships are among the possibilities. For
more information on membership or involvement as a volunteer
advisor please call 253-7400.
Aventura Jewish Center will hold a meeting for singles forty
plus on Monday, at 7:30 p.m. at the center.
*<
The "New" New Beginning is having a singles social sponsored
by Temple Beth Am on Sunday, Dec,. 1 at 8 p.m. at the Upstairs
at the Sundowner/Brothers Two. Open to all singles 35-54'/2. Live
Music, Dancing. For more information call: 667-6667
573-JASS.
or
The second annual Nationwide Jewish Singles Super Cruise,
sponsored by the St. Louis Jewish Community Centers Associa-
tion, will take place in March, 1986. Jewish singles ages 20-40 will
sail on March 9; singles 40-60 will sail on March 16, both of which
are 7-day Caribbean cruises from Miami. For more information
call Hirson at the St. Louis JCCA (314) 432-5700, Extension 154
or Cruise Holidays at (314) 351-4444 or your local JCC
Singles/Adult Coordinator.
Singles Support Group of Southeast Medical Service holds
group discussions, followed by dancing Mondays and Fridays at 8
p.m. at the Inn on the Bay. Some topics discussed are relation-
ships, loneliness, self-esteem and inter-personal communications.
Dr. Marshall Zipper PhD. is the facilitator. For information call,
866-7691.
Looking for a physician
you can still call "Doc"?
Some may dismiss this sentiment as old-
fashioned. At St Francis Hospital, we believe
* strong patient-physician relationship is
important for good health. A personal pfaysi
dan cts to know you and your health care
needs. And you get to Imow and rely on him
Than why we established the
St Francis Hospital Physician Referral
Service we want to help people find a
personal physician, and we don't want
them to have to pick a name blindly
from the Yellow Pages
So if you are looking far a hospital
affiliated physician in private practice
to be your personal physician, or if you
need referral to a specialist, call the
St Francis Hoi^taII>hysicianResrrral
Service at 868-2728 (Monday through
Friday, during business hours) we guar
antee a first appointment within two
working days.
868-2728
The
Physician
Referral
Service
(D
250 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach, FL 33141
Life. Be in it.


Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B


iblic Notices
nffi CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IaDE COUNTY. FLORIDA
1 PROBATE DIVISION
file Number 85-9523
Diviiion 01
kg. ESTATE OF
fcRY MILLER,
, NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
Ha. Bar No. 20666
me administration of the estate
HARRY MILLER, deceased,
I Number 85-9523. is pending in
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Tjl Probate Division, the
of which is 73 West
jjfer Street. Miami, Florida
Erfk names and addresses
The personal representative and
personal represenative's
ey are set forth below.
Interested persons are
ire,i to file with this court,
H|\ THREE MONTHS OF
; FIRST PUBLICATION OF
j NOTICE: (1) all claims
nst the estate (2) any objection
n interested person on whom
Mtice was served that
lenpes the validity of the will.
(qualifications of the personal
tentative, venue, or
J : the court.
It. CLAIMS AND OB-
JIONS NOT SO FILED
-XBE FOREVER BARRED.
Lbiication of this Notice has
|un on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
JEANNETTE MILLER
1 Wayne Avenue. Apt. 11A
llliami Beach. Florida 33140
tomey for Personal Repre-
Itative:
CHAEL A. DRIBIN. ESQ.
PEN, CYPEN & DRIBIN
I. BOX 402099
i Beach, Florida 33140
phijo*: (305) 532-3200
'-' November 15.22, 1985
THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
IADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8875
Division 03
RE: ESTATE OF
MAN D1ENSTAG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
administration of the estate
iyman Dienstag, deceased. File
iber 85-8875, is pending in the
i Court for Dade County,
'.. Probate Division, the ad-
*s of which is 73 West Flagler
eel. 3rd PI., Miami, Florida
n.
interest.il persons are re-
red to file with this court,
THIN THREE MONTHS OF
E FIRST ITBLICATION OF
IS NOTICE: (1) all claims
mst the estate and (2) any ob-
Ul interested person on
this in ,t ice was served that
Inget the validity of the will,
qualifications of the personal
resentauve. venue, or jurisdic-
of the court.
L CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TS Not si) FILED WILL BE
KKVF.K BARRED.
ublication of this Notice has
m on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Jerome Dienstag
26 East Blvd.
ester New York 14610
y for Personal
tentative:
n M Herman, Esquire
nl.. Rome, Comisky &
auley
Usnyne Blvd., 12th Fl.
|ni. Florida 33137
phone: (305) 573-5500
November. 15,22. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9524
Diviiion 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAM FRAEMAN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ABRAM FRAEMAN, deceased,
File Number 85-9524. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
St., Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 16, 1985.
Personal Representative:
MARTIN FRAEMAN
9 Barclay Court
Rockville, Maryland 20850
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Michael A. Dribin, Esq.
Cypen, Cypen and Dribin
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19414 November 15. 22, 1985
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
ADE COUNTY.FLORIDA
Cut No. 85-47740 (11)-
'. The Marriage of:
H0LAS MARSEILLE,
Witioner-Husband
tRVEILLEUSE D.
iRSEILLE,
spondent-Wife
IMERVEILLEUSE D.
MARSEILLE,
[Residence Unknown,
il serve copy of your Answer to
' Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
fney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
i Florida, 33136, and file
i*l with Court Clerk on or
December 20. 1985, other-
-i default will be entered.
TK1>: November 15. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: J, Logie
November 22, 29;
December 6,13, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 85-45871 -FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
DEBORAH J. CLANCY
Petitioner
and
THOMAS A. CLANCY
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THOMAS A. CLANCY
15 Comet Rd..
Rocky Point,
N.Y. 11778
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before December 6. 1985. and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
lie entered against you for.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By K. Seifried
As Deputv Clerk
1940!) Novembers. 15. 22. 29 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SER-
VICEMASTER MAINTENANCE
SYSTEMS OF MIAMI at 13011
Southwest 84th Street, Miami,
Florida 33183, intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DGR ENTERPRISES, INC.
By LARRY DIAMOND. President
ALAN S. KESSLER
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19401 November 8. 15.22, 29.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name PUMA ADVERTIS
ING. MARKETING. PROMO-
TIONS, PUBLIC RELATIONS.
PRODUCTIONS. MAGAZINE,
NEWSPAPER, DISTRIBUTOR.
PUBLISHING AGENCY at 2899
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach,
Florida 33140 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Antonio Purrinos
19429 November 22.29;
December 6. 13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9486
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JACK WOLFE, a/k/a
SAMUEL WOLFE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACK WOLFE, a/k/a SAMUEL
WOLFE, deceased, File Number
85-9486, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
>egun on November 15. 1985.
Personal Representatives:
HOWARD WOLFE
15 Aldren Drive
West Caldwell. N.J. 07002
MICHAEL WOLFE
77 St. Marks Place
New York, N.Y. 10003
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue -
Miami Beach, Florida
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19419 November 15. 22, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47712
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA LORENA
BARRAGAN
PETITIONER,
and
DAVID ARTHUR BARRAGAN
RESPONDENT.
TO: DAVID ARTHUR
BARRAGAN
c/oJARAMILLO
11501 Meadow Brook
EL PASO
TEXAS 79936
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage lias been filed and commenc-
ed In this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any. to it on MAR-
SHALL IVES, ESQUIRE. At
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress" is 5900 S.W. 73rd Street.
Suite 205. Miami, Florida. 33143.
and file the Original with the Clerk
of the above-styled Court on or
before December 20, 1985; other-,
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on
this 15 day of November.1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
MARSHALL IVES. ESQ.
5900 S.W. 73 St.. Suite 205
Miami. Florida 33143
19436 November 22,29;
December 6, 13, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name ROYAL PALM
TRADING COMPANY, d/b/a MY-
AN-MI SOCCER CAMP at 250
Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33134, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ROYAL PALM TRADING
COMPANY, d/b/a/ MY-AN-MI
SOCCER CAMP
GEOFFREY W. PINES, Esq.
Attorney for
ROYAL PALM TRADING
COMPANY, d/b/a/ MY-AN-MI
SOCCER CAMP
19405 November 8. 15. 22. 29. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-47842 CA 17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
IRVIN PEARLSTEIN and
NATALIE MARGOLIS,
Plaintiff
vs.
JESSE LEE DAVIS, et ux., et a).,
Defendants.
TO: UNION MORTGAGE
COMPANY, INC.
16910 Dallas Parkway
Suite 212
Dallas, Texas
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: LOT 30, BLOCK 11,
WINDWARD ESTATES,
SECTION TWO, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 68. at Page 98. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146. on or before
December 20, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15th day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
19441 November 22, 29;
December 6,13, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of REI IN-
VESTMENTS PARTNERSHIP
at number 5582 Northwest 79th
Avenue, in the City of Miami.
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
OWNERS NAMES:
LARRY WOLFE and
DOROTHY F. WOLFE
MAX WAAS
BERNARD ROSENBLUM
MELVIN POLLAK
PAUL FOURNIER
ALAN ROSENTHAL
IRA P. FEDERER
RICHARD M. WAAS
MARTIN A. WAAS
KIP AMAZON
A. GERALD REISS
NORMAN WAAS
SUSAN KAPLAN
Barry S Yarchin. Esquire
Rosenthal and Yarchin, P.A.
Suite 800.
3050 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Attorney for Applicant
19434 Novemlier 22, 29;
December 6, 13, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name STUDIO 54 CUT-
TING CONCEPTS at 736 N.E.
167th Street. North Miami Beach,
Fla. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
COLOSAL
INTERNATIONAL INC.
By: JOSE R. CONDE,
Pres.
Carlos M. Mendez, Esq.
Attorney for Colosal
International Inc.
200 West 49th St.
Hialeah, Florida 33012
19421 November 15, 22,29,1985
December 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name General Services at
446 N.W. 28 Street, Miami, Fla.
'3127 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Latin American
Electrical Corp.
Leonard Kalish
Attorney for
Latin American Electrical Corp.
19412 November 8, 15, 22, 29, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 85-38847 CA-01
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE M. RIVERA, et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE M. RIVERA
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JOSE M.
RIVERA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida: Unit 6-1.
LAKESIDE XI CONDOMINIUM,
a Condominium according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 11619. at Page
1469. amended by instrument
recorded in Official Records Book
11747. at Page 1472. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146, on or before
December 6, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 30th day of
October, 1985.
RICAHRD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19402 November 8. 15, 22, 29, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9686
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
PAULINE SAMET.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PAULINE SAMET, deceased,
File Number 85-9686. is pending in
the l iriuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33180. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (II all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
ALVIN M. SAMET
5724 Michaelangelo St.
Coral Gables. Florida 33146
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19422 November 15,22, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Su tienda latina de
gomas & Su tienda de gomas latina
at 2199 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Flagler Tire Corporation
By: ANGEL L. GARCIA
PRESIDENT
KARLICK. DROESE &
BUCKLEY
19389 November 1.8, 15,22.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 85-47727
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United states
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANGEL R. ALVAREZ, et at.,
Defendants.
TO: CITIBANK (SOUTH
DAKOTA) N.A.
RICHARD
MCCROWSSEN -
701 East 60 Street N.
Sioux Falls.
South Dakota 57104
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4. in Block 9 of SCOTT
LAKE MANOR SECTION TWO,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat 60. at Page 58 of
the Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
December 20. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 15 day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
19435 November 22, 29;
December 6,13, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47711
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PAUL ROSSY,
PETITIONER/HUSBAND
and
LUCINDA S. ROSSY
RESPONDENT/WIFE
TO: LUCINDA S. ROSSY
4837 Tilden Avenue
Los Angeles.
California 5 1423
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if anv, to it on
MARSHALL IVES. ESQUIRE.
Attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 5900 S.W. 73rd Street.
Suite 205. Miami, Florida. 33143.
and file the Original with the Clerk
of the above-styled Court on or
before December 20, 1985; other
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed in
the Complaint or Petition.
This Notice shall l>e published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida, on
this 15 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
MARSHALL IVES. ESQ.
5900 S.W. 73 St. Suite 205
Miami, Florida 33143
Telephone: (305) 667-2111
19437 November 22. 29;
December 6. 13. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FALCO'S PIZZERIA
at Suite 100, Fransher Bldg., 9300
South Dixie Highway. Miami, Fla.
33156, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
FELLIPPO. INC.
By Phillip Falco. Jr.
ALAN S. KESSLER. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139 .
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19425 November 15. 22, 29,
December 6. 1985


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 22, 1985
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-44469 (24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
FRANCISCO GUTIERREZ, et
ux et al..
Defendants.
TO: HANNANALI ESPAHBODI
and POURAN ESPAHBODI, his
wife, 33 Pond Avenue. B624.
Brookline, Massachusetts
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: LOT 18 IN BLOCK 9,
OF DEVON AIRE ESTATE,
SECTION TWO, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF. AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 104
AT PAGE 30, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA, has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on Sheppard Faber,
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 33146 on or before
December 2. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 23rd day of
October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Lisamarie Marcano
As Deputy Clerk
19391 November 1, 8, 15,22.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-45191
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SARA BERMUDEZ SERRANO.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ALIRIO SERRANO.
Respondent/Husband
TO: ALIRIO SERRANO
CaIle93A/ll-07
Apt. 506
Bogota, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on David
S. Berger, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 6, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(305) 672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
19398 November 1,8,15,22,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-47279
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ETHEL VIDAL
DE ARREDONDO
Petitioner/Wife,
and
FIDEL ARREDONDO,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Fidel Arredondo
C/O Gabriella Arredondo
Enrique Foster N.
085 Apt. 72
Santiago, Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE T. RAMANI, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
711 Biscayne Bldg., 19 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 20, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint of
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 13th day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Biscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
19432 November 22,29;
December 6,13,1985
NOTICE UNDER
' FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MONICA'S IN-
TERIOR at 331 SW 104 Ct. Miami
- Florida 33174 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Daniel Castro
& Monica Castro, Ptr.
19426 November 15, 22.29;
December 6. 1985
-v
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-42235 CA-06
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
LARGO,
Plaintiff
vs.
JAMES R. THOMAS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: JAMES R. THOMAS,
CAREY B. THOMAS and
YOLANDA THOMAS, Residence
Unknown, if alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against JAMES
R. THOMAS, CAREY B.
THOMAS and YOLANDA
THOMAS, and all parties having
or claiming to have any right, title
or interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida: Lot 19, in Block
5, of RICMAR HEIGHTS,
according to the Plat thereof, asj
recorded in Plat Book 53, at Page,
32, of the Public Records of Dade'
County. Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
December 20, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before servjce on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 13th day of
November, 1985.
RICHARD P. PRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19430 November 22, 28;
December 6.13.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GrVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name ILS
PUBLICATIONS INC d/b/a
SOUTH FLORIDA MAGAZINE
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Mark Weissman
19427 November 22,29;
December 6.18.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-45187
FAMILY DIVISION
Florida Bar No. 032230
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PHILIP UDAIRIGO
TRUGLIO
Petitioner/H usband
and
MELINDA JANE TRUGLIO
Respondent/Wife
TO: MELINDA JANE
TRUGLIO
c/o Mrs. Jill Montague
17 Beach Road.
Bondi Beach
Sidney 2026
New South Wales,
Australia
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on HAYS, GRUND-
WERG & VANN attorneys for
Petitioner, whose address is 28
West Flagler Street. Suite 800.
Miami. Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 6. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29 day of October, 1985.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Moses J. Grundwerg
Hays, Grundwerg & Vann
28 West Flagler St.,
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 379-8435
(Attorney for Petitioner
19396 November 1,8,16, 22,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-33392 CA 18
NOTICE OF ACTION
BUCKEYE FEDERAL
SAVINGS and LOAN
ASSOCIATION, an Ohio
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
JOSE M. LEDON and TAN1A M.
LEDON, his wife.
Defendants.
To: Jose M. Ledon and Tania M.
Ledon, his wife, whose residences
are unknown, and the unknown
parties who may be heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 24, in Block
32, of COUNTRY LAKE
MANORS, SECTION THREE,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 119, at Page
50, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Barry S.
Yarchin, Esquire, of Rosenthal &
Yarchin, P.A., Attorneys for
Plaintiff, Suite 800, 3050 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137,
on or before December 20, 1985^
and to file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 13, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19431 November 22,29;
December 6,13, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-46661
Florida Bar Number 72210
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
PAMELA DE QUINDE
Wife/Petitioner
and
JUAN C. QUINDE,
Husband/Respondent
TO: JUAN C. QUINDE
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on
LEONARD SELKOWITZ, J.D..
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 810 Biscayne
Bulding, 19 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 13th, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 7 day of November. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Leonard Selkowitz, J.D.
Suite 810 Biscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 358-2900
19415 November 15,22,29;
December 6, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46851
Florida Bar No. 232221
In Re: Marriage of
ANTOLIN O. SIERRA
Petitioner,
and
EVARISTA L. SIERRA
Respondent,
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Evarista L. Sierra
4903 Kennedy Boulevard
North Bergen, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the
Petition upon the Petitioner's
attorney, CARLOS M. MENDEZ
ESQ., at 200 West 49th Street,
Hialeah, Florida 33012, and file
the original Response of Pleading
in the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, on or before the
13th day of December. 1985. If you
fail to do so, a Default Judgment
will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
This Notice shall be published
once each week, for four
consecutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN, Miami, Florida.
Dated at Dade County, Florida,
this 8th day of November, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, LAW
OFFICES
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33012
By: Carlos M. Mendez, Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
19420 November 5,22,29;
December 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
MW,XB? JEWEL J at I6<0
*v. isth Avenue, Miami, Fla in-
tend to register said name with the
Uerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
William Schneider Inc
Roy L. Weiss
Attorney for William Schneider
inc.
19418 November 15, 22,29;
December 6, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-7725
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT THOMAS
EDWARDS
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALBERT THOMAS
EDWARDS, deceased, File
Number 85-7725, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 W. Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 22, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Glendena C. Edwards
1480 Northwest 55th Terrace
Miami, Florida 33124
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Stanley M. Pred
1515 Northwest 7th Street,
Suite 106
Miami. Florida 33125
Telephone: (305) 642-5300
19428 November 22,29, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COIJ
THE ELEVENTHjrM
CIRCUIT IN ffitf
DADE COUNTY Plfil
PROBATE D ViStoM
File No. 85-JiS?1
IN RE: ESTATE of "
RUTH WOODS
Deceased
NOTICE
ESTATE AND AVJ2?
saw?-*
YOU ARE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY,
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-5464 CA 08
NOTICE OF ACTION
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a
United States corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
ALBERT E. FRANCIS and
LORRAINE R. FRANCIS.
Defendants.
To: Lorraine R. Francis, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees and all parties claiming
interest by, through, under or
against said Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
all parties having or claiming to
have any right, title, or interest in
the property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block
118. of LESLIE ESATES
SECTION 12, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 106, at Page 100 of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on Barry S. Yarchin,
Esquire, of Rosenthal & Yarchin,
P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff, Suite
800, 3050 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, Florida 33137, on or before
December 20. 1985, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on November 14, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19433 November 22.29;
December 6.13.1985
t.s.",,;;' SZS
Florida, File Number 85-Wv
pending in the CrcuitCounmJ
for Dade Coumv. Flonda I
Ehviann the address ofwhichi
3rd Floor, Dade Co.J
Courthouse. 73 West Fai
Street, Miami. Florida 33130 1
personal representative of
estate is REBECCA GOME
whose address is 90 N.E 143$
Miami, Florida 33161. The M
and address of the attorney fortl
personal representative are
forth below.
All persons having claims
demands against the estat*
required. WITHIN THREs
MONTHS FROM THE DATE (
THE FIRST PUBLICATION (
THIS NOTICE, to file with 1
clerk of the above court a wri
statement of any claim or den
they may have. Each claim mustli
in writing and must indicate t
basis for the claim, the name 1
address of the creditor or his 1
or attorney, and the
claimed. If the claim is not yetd
the date when it will become j
shall be stated. If the cliiai
contingent or unliquidated, ll
nature of the uncertainty shilij
stated. If the claim is secureii
security shall be described Tl
claimant shall deliver suffiaal
copies of the claim to the deitfl
the above styled court to rafcl
the clerk to mail one copy u cm |
personal representative.
All persons interested in kl
estate to whom a copy of lit I
Notice of Administration hubs) I
mailed are required, Wmffl
THREE MONTHS FROM IB!
DATE OF THE FIRSIl
PUBLICATION OF THISl
NOTICE, to file any objeflail
they may have that challenge al
validity of the decedent's vS-'t
qualifications of the
representative, or the venae |
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS J
AND OBJECTIONS NOT 901
FILED WILL BE FOREVBI
BARRED.
DATED at Miami, Floridi|
this 6th day of November, 198.
REBECCA GOMEZ
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
RUTH WOODS
Deceucd
First publication of this noticed
administration on the 22nd tJ|
November, 1985.
Law Offices of
WALTER J. MIGOSKI
14299 N.E.
South Biscayne River Dr.
Miami, Florida 33161
Telephone: (305) 681-8401
19438 November 22.29.1|
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Recreational Services
Inc. at 6700 N. Kendall Drive.
Miami. FL 33156 intends
register said name with the Cleric
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Myrna R. Grushy
Martin Grushy *
Milton C. Goodman
Attorney for
Myrna and Martin Grushy
19411 November 8, 15,22,29,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigne, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
mii name NAUTICAL
PLEASURE at 7980 NW 56th
street, Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
NAUTICAL
1 iVfU November 15.22.29; I
December 6, 1985|
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA"
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
engage in business under the ^
titious name JC Coin Laundry
1677 NW 27 Ave. Miami, ex-
tends to register said name M
the Clerk of the Circuit Court M
Dade County, Florida
Pascual Riveron
1677 NW 27 Ave.
Miami, Fla.
19417 November 15,-i.:
Decembers. 1W


Ethiopian Jews In Israel Urged
'o Retain Their Cultural Heritage
By KEVIN FREEMAN
,'EW YORK (JTA) -
though it has been 15 years
Esther Wube Hollander
arded the plane that brought
to Israel, the status of Jews in
native homeland of Ethiopia,
Id the future role of Ehiopian
|wa in Israel, continue to preoc-
Ipv her thoughts.
I hope the Ethiopian Jews in
Irael will learn Hebrew and
Iraeli culture," she said in an in-
ferview. But at the same time she
xpressed a fierce concern that
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9542
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
LILLIAN GOTTFRIED
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LILLIAN GOTTFRIED,
deceased, File Number 85-9542, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
.IFXTIONS NOT SO FILED '
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
LOUIS C. GOTTFRIED
1351 N.E. Miami Gardens Dr.
North Miami Beach. FL 33179
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
RLII'SSFARTI
17971 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 108
North Miami Beach, FL 33160
Telephone: (305) 931-8730
Flu Bar No. 270989
19423 November 15.22, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-45301 1111
DAVID LIJEK.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
EVA MALTZ LIJEK
Respondent/Wife.
T<>: EVA MALTZ LIJEK
18 Gainsborough Gardens
Golders Green, NW II
London, England
yOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Divorce has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on HYMAN P. GALBUT,
attorney for Husband, whose ad-
dress is 999 Washington Ave.,
Miami Beach, FL 33139, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 30. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
KLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 30th day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HYMAN P. GALBUT. ESQ.
Galbut, Galbut and Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19400 November 1, 8, 15. 22. 1985
Ethiopian Jews "maintain the
culture of Ethiopia. This is
important."
Hollander, here on a 17-day
speaking tour sponsored by the
American Association of Ethio-
pian Jewry, is scheduled to attend
the General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations in
Washington.
HOLLANDER who has
devoted considerable time as a
volunteer at various Ethiopian ab-
sorption centers in Israel, said the
dramatic cultural changes faced
by recently arrived immigrants
have been difficult for many
Ethiopians, especially the elderly.
And, she said, the recent battle
between the Ethiopians and the
Chief Rabbinate in Israel has only
exacerbated the situation.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-44644
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
DR. AQUIBA S. BENARROCH.
et ux.. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: DR. AQUIBA S.
BENARROCH and COTA
BENARROCH, his wife, Ave. C
Qta Montse Planta Baja, Caracas,
Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Unit 704. of ROYAL
CLUB CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 11979, at Page
1624. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida, has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it, on
Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
December 2. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 24th day of
October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19390 November 1,8, 15, 22, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE I1TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-39766
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The adoption of
CESAR TORRES
by
JUAN TORRES AND
MARGARET TORRES, his wife.
Petitioners.
TO: FRANCES ROJAS
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for the Adoption of
CESAR TORRES has been filed
and you, being the natural mother
of said CESAR TORRES, are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
Petitioners' attorney, whose ad-
dress is 9995 Sunset Drive, Suite
108, Miami, FL 33173. on or
before December 2. 1985, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on Peti-
tioners' attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
l entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED this 23 day of October,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19392 November 1. 8, 15, 22, 198">
But Hollander said the dramatic
rescue of Ethiopian Jews
airlifted last winter from the
Sudan was too late for her
mother and sister who died
several years ago from what she
described as negligent medical
treatment. Her father, however,
now lives in Israel as do her eight
brothers and sisters.
The 34-year-old Hollander was
born in the Ethiopian village of
Wenige in Gondar Province. She
is a small, slight woman, a mother
of two children, married to a
Polish Jew living in Herzliya. An
ardent Zionist, she had no misgiv-
ings about leaving Ethiopia in
1971 to make aliya.
GROWING UP in her village in
Gondar Province was very dif-
ficult, Hollander recalled. She said
she was the only Jewish student in
her class and that there was some
anti-Jewish sentiments from other
students toward her." It was very
hard," she said. I'm a Jew, and
I'm not afraid to be a Jew."
She has not returned to
Ethiopia. But last summer
Hollander had her first opportuni-
ty to return to Africa after 15
years. She was the only Ethiopian
Jew in the Israeli delegation to the
Women's Conference Forum at
the Nairobi End of the Decade
Women's Conference.
Her views on the conference
and her return to Africa after so
many years were mixed. She was
able to speak with women from
other parts of the world attending
the United Nations sponsored
gathering but she also en-
countered the hostility that is
usually reserved for the Israelis.
SHE RECALLED an incident
at a workshop on the situation of
refugee women and children
organized by Palestinian women.
At that workshop, the chairperson
would not allow the Israeli women
to speak. Finally, the represen-
tative from Iraq spoke and accus-
ed Israel and other states of
responsibility for the Iran-Iraq
war.
Public Notices
Friday, November 22, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Obituaries
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Human Ex-
perience Associates at 19612 N.E.
First Avenue, North Miami Beach,
Fla. 33179 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Dr. Scott Simon Fehr
19406November 8, 15, 22, 29, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-45192
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
VERONICA DOBSON ROLLE,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
MELFORD ROLLE,
Kespondent/Husliand.
TO: Melford Rolle
Address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on David
S. Berger. attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styles court
on or before December 6, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the compalint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of October. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
(305) 672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner/Wife
19399 November 1, 8. 15, 22. 1985
KIPNIS
Lena, of Miami Beach, passed away
November 18. She was a resident of Miami
Beach since 1948. She was a founding
member of Temple Emanu-EI of Miami
Beach Godmother and a life member of Mt.
Sinai Medical Center and a Member of Fight
for Sight and a supporter of Douglas
Gardens Home for the Aged. She is survived
by her children Ted (Pearl) Kipnis. Evelyn
(Arthur) Lowell and grandchildren Priscilla
(Allan) Friedland, Alan (Anna-Marie) Kip-
nis. Susan Lowell and Joanne Lowell. Ser-
vices were held. Biasberg Chapel.
BRODSKY. Mrs. Dotti. of Miami Beach.
Rubin Zilbert.
SPERO. Mildred. 93. of Ocala and Miami.
Services were held.
COMRAS, Rose, of North Miami Beach.
November 18. Levitt-Weinstein.
ESKELES, Birdie W.. 90, of Coral Gables,
formerly of St. Louis. Mo. Services were
held.
SEGAL. Samuel. 94. of Miami Beach.
November 17. Services were held
ZIMMERMAN. Gertrude, 59. of North
Miami Beach. November 16. Menorah
Chapels.
SIRKIS. Rose. Services held in Hackett
stown, New Jersey.
HAYWORTH, Edith Rosenblatt. November
16. Services private.
RATNER. Samuel A.. North Miami Beach.
The Riverside.
SALMANSON, Samuel. Services were held.
TUCKER, Helen. 86. of Miami, November
16. Services were held.
HERMAN. Joseph, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices were held.
BRAVERMAN. Mrs. Henrietta, of Miami
Beach. Rubin-Zilbert.
LEVINE. Adele M., 89, of Miami,
November 12. The Riverside.
LIND, Dr. Benjamin, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices were held.
PRICEMAN, Gertrude, 64, of North Miami
Beach, November 12. Levitt-Weinstein.
RABINOWITZ, Solomon, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
SANDLER, Martin. Services were held.
SENTER, Max. 67, of North Miami Beach.
November 13. The Riverside.
STEMPA, Fred, of Miami Beach,
November 14. Biasberg Chapel.
ARONSON, Evelyn (Eva), Nov. 10. The
Riverside.
BERNSTEIN, Paul S., of North Miami
Beach, Nov. 11. Menorah Chapels.
BUXBAUM DAVIS, Marie of Miami Beach.
Services in Massachusetts. The Riverside.
GORDON. Ida P., 78, of Coral Gables, Nov.
10. Services and interment in Baltimore.
SMITH. Louise. Nov. 10. Rubin-Zilbert.
MORRIS. Lenora. of Miami Beach. Nov. 10.
Biasberg Chapel.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
FREEHLING
Marion W., 82, died Nov. 14. A native of
Chicago, she resided in Miami since 1938.
She is survived by Jeanne (Mrs. Myron)
Sterman of Fayette. Ala. and Rabbi Allen I.
Freehling of Los Angeles. California; plus
five grandchildren and three great-
grandchildren. Memorial services were held
at Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
BARRETT. Robert A., 39, Nov. 10. Ser-
vices were held, interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
BARSHAK. Muriel Hope, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
CASPER. Ralph, 87. of Miami. Nov. 18. The
Riverside.
DRAPKIN. Mollie Glish. Services were
held.
FELDMAN. Morris. 58. Nov. 18. Services
were held.
GOLD, Samuel, 90. of Miami. Nov. 18. The
Riverside.
LEVY, Harold, of Miami Beach. Services
private.
PLATT. Edna F., 60, of Miami, Nov. 18.
The Riverside.
STREIFER, George, of North Miami
Beach, Nov. 14. Services were held.

: '- & 6
$M
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261 7612
Through years ol dedicated service.
w* have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
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When a loss occurs
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to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Browdrd County
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Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. November 22. 1985
-*
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