The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02963

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
T "dTewislfo Floi-idliami
Volume 58 Number 46 Two Sections Miami, Florida Friday, November 15,1985
FfdShocht) By Mail $135
Price 50 Cents
Tax Reform
May Undermine Philanthropic Giving
By BORIS SMOLAR
president Reagan is now
intensifying his efforts to
5CCUT, passage in Congress
I of the tax-reform proposals
' wbmitted by the Treasury
Department to the Senate
and the House of Represen-
tatives. Some of the pro-
posals undermine fund-
raising by institutions enjoy-
ing tax deduction. They are
strongly opposed by Jewish.
Catholic. Protestant and
other non-profit organiza-
tions and institutions stan-
ding to lose some $6 billion
annually in contributions, if
the new tax structure pro-
posed by the Administration
is passed by Congress.
There is today a coalition of
about 800 central .Jewish and non-
Jewish bodies philanthropic,
welfare, cultural, educational.
religious which sponsor fund-
raising lor communal causes and
are fighting the Administration's
tax reform plan, jointly and in-
dividually. They all make it clear
Continued on Page 2-A

Minister of Defense Yitzhak Rabin, along with
Knesset members, congratulate Prime
Minister Shimon Peres on his success against
the Tehiya Party's recent no-confidence mo-
Fnlloiving the Prime Minister's speech
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
about his peace talks offer to Jordan, the
Knesset demonstrated confidence in the
government by a vote of 68-10 with 10
abstentions.
Paper Shut Down
For Urging No West Bank Pullback
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has ordered the
closure of the West Bank
settlers' publication Alef
IYod after Attorney General
Yitzhak Zamir charged it
with incitement to revolt.
Rabin acted against the bi-
weekly only hours after Zamir
stated there were grounds to
suspect that an aricle entitled
'Judaea and Samaria Will Not
Fall Again." signed by M. Ben-
Yisrael and published Nov. 1, con-
stituted incitement to revolt, a
crime under the Penal Code.
ZAMIR ADDED that AlefYod,
based in the West Bank town of
Ariel, was published without a
license, in violation of Article 6 of
Military Command Order 101
which prohibits incitement and
hostile propaganda.
The article urged Jewish set-
tlers in the West Bank to fight by
any and all means a purported
plan of the government to relin-
quish parts of the West Bank and
Gaza Strip in exchange for a peace
settlement with King Hussein of
Jordan and the Palestinians.
Ben Yisrael, believd to be a
pseudonym, wrote that in the
event of a possible peace settle-
ment with Jordan, "Each and
everyone (of the Jewish settlers)
should prepare himself spiritually
Continued on Page 15-A
Gush Leader:
Peres Wants
Int'l. Talks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Daniella Weiss, secretary
general of Gush Emunim,
charged here that Premier
Shimon Peres has secretly
agreed that Israel will par-
ticipate in an international
conference to discuss a Mid-
dle East peace settlement
which will open in Geneva
within two months.
Speaking at a press conference
at the offices of Americans for a
Safe Israel. Weiss said she receiv-
ed this information from
ministerial sources just two hours
before she left Israel.
The participants would be
Israel. Jordan, Egypt, Syria, the
United States and the Palestine
Liberation Organization, accor-
ding to Weiss. She later explained
that the PLO representatives
would be people agreed upon by
i he PLO chief Yasir Arafat and
King Hussein of Jordan and ac-
cepted by Peres.
.>6H A-tt4r4~ EMBASSY
spokesman Yosef Gal said there
was no truth in Weiss' claim. He
said Israel's position on the PLO
and an international conference is
well-known. He noted that Peres,
in his speech before the UN
General Assembly, stressed that
an international conference can-
Continued on Page 14-A
Cardinal O'Connor
Cardinal O'Connor Asked To Press
Pope on Recognition of Israel
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
John Cardinal O'Connor,
the spiritual head of two
million Catholics in the Ar-
chdiocese of New York, was
urged here to press the
Vatican toward the
establishment of diplomatic
recognition of the State of
Israel.
The dramatic appeal, believed
to be the first direct public request
to the Cardinal on the issue from a
prominent Jewish leader, was
made by Edgar Bronfman, pr-
esident of the World Jewish Con-
gress, at a dinner presenting
O'Connor with the first Cardinal
Bea Interfaith Award of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Some 700 guests attended
the event.
"PLease convey to Rome the
importance to Jews everywhere
for normalizing relations between
the Vatican and Israel which is the
home for so much of Jewish
culture and so many of the world's
Jews so that all of us Jews
and Catholics alike may work
together for a better world,"
Bronfman declared.
THE CARDINAL, after receiv
ing the award, did not refer to
Bronfman's appeal in addressing
the guests at the Marriott Mar-
quis Hotel. However, he told
reporters later that the decision
on diplomatic recognition of Israel
is solely that of the Vatican.
While the Cardinal told
reporters he "had no hesitation at
all' about bringing the message to
Continued on Page 7-A
Zionism /Racism
Envoy Says Purveyors Undermine U.S. Policy
Alan Keyes
Ambassador Alan Keyes,
assistant secretary of State-
designate for International
Organization Affairs, has
sharply denounced the
"Zionism is racism" resolu-
tion adopted by the United
Nations 10 years ago, say-
ing it was harmful, not only
to Israel, but also to the
United States and to the UN
itself.
Ambassador Keyes spoke at the
major dinner session of the
American Jewish Committee's an-
nual National Exeutive Council
meeting at the Hyatt Regency
Miami Hotel. Keyes, who was a
U.S. delegate to the recent United
Nations Women's Conference in
Nairobi, received a citation from
the AJC for his contributions to
the conference.
AT THE same dinner sessio,
AJC presented a similar citation
to Dame Nita Barrow, convener
of the nongovernmental women's-
issues forum that ran ap-
proximately side-by-side with the
official UN conference.
Ambassador Keyes, who was
U.S. Representative to the UN
Economic and < Social Council,
helped lead American efforts to
prevent "Zionist is racism"
language from being included in
the final Nairobi Conference
document.
"By trying to harm U.S.-Israeli
Continued on Page 6-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Tax Reform
May Undermine Philanthropic Giving
Reform Leader: 'We Won't Be
Read Out of Jewish Fold'
Continued from Page 1-A
that they are not against tax
reforms in general, but are con-
cerned exclusively with the provi-
sions in the Administration's pro-
posals that repeal, or cut.
charitable deductions. They deal
only with the adverse impact of
these provisions on charitable
giving.
THE COUNCIL of Jewish
Federations is one of the founders
and leading members of this coali-
tion. It includes the Red Cross,
Salvation Army, National Council
of Philanthropy, United Way of
America, American Hospital
Association, American Council of
Education, and practically all
groups in the country conducting
fund-raising, including the Na-
tional Conference of Catholic
Philanthropies and the National
Urban League. A study under-
taken for this coalition established
that the Treasury plan would br-
ing about a reduction of 28 per-
cent in the level of cash-giving to
charity and a 38 percent decline in
gifts of securities and other ap-
preciated property.
The Jewish Federations, which
raise more than $600 million an-
nually, would stand to lose about
$125 million a year. The United
Jewish Appeal would lose in
substantial contributions from
large givers whose federal tax is
currently limited to 50 percent of
their income, but will be reduced
to 35 percent under the Ad-
ministration's tax proposals,
thereby discouraging the incen-
tive of giving to tax deductible
causes.
Many of the tax-payers in the
category of the reduced 15 per-
cent tax might be tempted to
benefit for themselves from this
reduction. Other Jewish causes
which raise a total of about $130
million a year under the present
tax-deductible system will also
suffer.
THERE IS ALSO an important
aspect in the Administration's tax
reform structure which evokes
special concern of Jewish
organizations engaged in fighting
anti-Semitism and preventing
conflicts between Jews and other
ethnic groups the proposal to
eliminate the deductibility of state
and local taxes from the federal
tax return.
All leading Jewish organizations
interested in preventing tension
among racial and ethnic
minorities fear that this provision
would exacerbate intergroup con-
flicts as competition for scarce
funds intensifies.
A joint statement opposing this
proposal was submitted to both
Houses of Congress by the
American Jewish Congress on
behalf of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC) and the Na-
tional Urban Coalition (NUC).
The joint statement emphasizes
that the constituent groups of
these two umbrella organizations
of the community relations agen-
cies "are not only concerned with
the potential for substantive
budget cuts which the Administra-
tion's tax structure would bring,"
but "also with how these would af-
fect relations between racial and
ethnic groups." Deductibility of
state and local taxes from federal
income tax has been a part of the
Internal Revenue Code since 1913
with the adoption of a federal in-
come tax.
"The Treasury Department's
proposal to repeal the deductibili-
ty of taxes paid to state and local
governments would severely
hamper their ability to fund vital
programs for their residents and
would almost immediately fire a
revolt by taxpayers to lower state
and local taxes since they would
become more costly in after-tax
dollars," the joint memorandum
warns. It predicts that "such a
revolt would have a strong chance
of success." Some 33 million
households take the deductions
for state and local taxes.
PRESIDENT REAGAN, in
defending the Administration's
proposal to eliminate state and
municipal taxes from federal in-
come tax, says this is necessary
for the reduction of the huge
federal deficit in the shortest
possible time. The Treasury
Department asserts that without
the substantial revenues from
elimination of state and local tax
deductions, the whole tax reform
package would be in jeopardy.
The constituent organizations of
the National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council and of
the National Urban Coalition re-
ject this formulation. They assert
that deductibility could be retain-
ed, if adjustments were made in
other parts of the Administra-
tion's proposal, including a
substantial tax on import oil.
How would the shifting of
responsibilities and functions
from the national level to state
and local government affect
schools, hospitals, welfare and
other institutions which have
already cut their budgets earlier?
The National Association of
Counties, analyzing the strong
Catholic-Jewish Relations Confab
Affirms Zionism Equals Liberty
By DAVID MARKL'S
SAO PAULO (JTA) The
first Pan-American conference on
Catholic-Jewish relations conclud-
ed here with the adoption of a
document recognizing that
Zionism is an expression of the
Jewish people's wish for liberty
and is uncontaminated by racism
or despotism.
But the delegates to the two-day
conference declined to pass a mo-
tion to condemn the infamous UN
resolution equating Zionism with
racism, whose 10th anniversary
was on Sunday. The motion was
introduced by Brazil's former Am-
bassador to Israel, Jose Oswaldo
Meira Pena.
NOR DID the conference sup-
port the appeal made at its con-
cluding session by Rabbi Henry
Sobel of the Israelite Congrega-
tion here, that the Vatican official-
ly recognize Israel.
The two-day conference, held at
the Hebraica Center here, was
aimed at evaluating the impact on
Catholic-Jewish Relations in the
Western Hemisphere of Vatican
Council IPs Nostra Aetate, the
declaration on the Jews, and com-
memorate its 20th anniversary.
The conference condemned anti-
Semitism, and the Rev. Jorge Me-
jia, Secretary to the Vatican's
Commission for Religious Rela-
tions with the Jews gave
assurances that Pope John Paul II
will persist in advancing
Christian-Jewish relations. No
door is closed for any dialogue, he
said.
In addition to Mejia, there were
several other important Church
figures at the conference, both
from Europe and from South
America, as well as Catholic and
Jewish leaders from the entire
Western Hemisphere.
M-ll-15-85
negative impact which the
elimination of deductibility would
have, came to the conclusion that
the loss of deductibility "would
wreak havoc on state and local
governments."
THE NJCRAC and the NUC
consider that the Administra-
tion's proposal is "a mere shifting
of responsibilities without the
financial means to provide for
their implementation, and that
states, cities, counties would find
it impossible to implement these
responsibilities."
There are serious differences
between the Senate and the
House of Representatives with
regard to some parts of the Ad-
ministration's tax plan. Experts
believe that it will take a long time
before a joint committee of both
Houses, now negotiating the dif-
ferences, will reach a compromise
decision which will bring the
measure to a vote on the floor of
the Congress.
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
Rabbi Alexander Schindler. presi-
dent of the (Reform) Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
has assailed attacks on Reform
Judaism by some Orthodox
spokesmen and vowed that "we
will not be read out of the Jewish
fold not in Israel, not in
Europe, nor anywhere else on
God's earth."
In his presidential address to
3.000 delegates attending the
UAHC's general assembly as
representatives of its 791 member
congregations. Schindler stressed
that he was "not speaking out
against Orthodoxy as such" and
that he truly respects "a more ge-
nuine Orthodoxy" than that of
certain spokesmen and considers
it "essential to Jewish life." He
continued:
"I speak out against a politiciz-
ed Orthodox establishment that is
interested only in power .. that
seeks to bolster its waning
authority with a scornful, rigid ex-
clusiveness." Schindler, in his ad-
dress, called upon the rabbinical
seminaries of Orthodox, Conser-
vative, and Reform Judaism to
launch a series of joint studies "jn
the hope of evolving a trans-
denominational approach to mar-
riage and conversion."
He urged the adoption of a
resolution at the convention sup-
porting the principle of con-
tinuous dialogue" amon^ all
religious branches of Judaism.
The process of joint study of the
marriage and conversion issues.
Schindler continued, "has a worth
all its own." In such a process, he .
told delegates. "I am certaiiT*
Reform (Judaism) will not be
found wanting provided only <,
that the 'how' and not the who' '
becomes the object of the
scholars' quest, and every group
accords the other respect."
Whatever the results of such an
effort, Schindler continued, "the
Jewish world must know this:
Reform is an adjective, not a
noun. The noun is Jew. And so we
are Jews." He deplored those Or-
thodox spokesmen who "presum- '
ed to know just which rites and
prayers are and are not acceptable *d
to the Almighty."
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Friday. November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Sidney J. Brawn, a Washington, D.C. builder-developer, attorney
and philanthropist, gives the first $1 million pledge for the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Museum to Museum Campaign Co-chairmen
Siqmund Strochlitz (left), of New London, Conn., and Miles Ler-
nian (right), of Vineland, N.J. The national Memorial to the
Holocaust victims will be constructed entirely with private funds
on Federal land in Washington. Overall campaign goal is $100
million.
3 Israelis To Testify
At Egyptian Inquiry
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Three Israelis were ex-
pected to testify before an
Egyptian inquiry into the
killing of seven Israeli
tourists in Sinai last month
- allegedly by an Egyptian
soldier, the Foreign
Ministry announced.
However, two of the three
Israelis were not expected to at-
tend the inquiry on the scheduled
date since that day marks the 30th
day after the murder of ope of the
witness' sons in the tragic inci-
dent at Ras Burka, some 40
kilometers south of Eilat.
The Foreign Ministry said
Sarah Baum and her 12-year-old
son, Ehud, together with Gera
Koren. would give evidence at the
inquiry in Neviot in the Sinai. But
Baum indicated a conflict with
scheduling, saying she will be at-
tending a memorial service at the
gravesite of her other son,
1 o-year-old Amir, a victim of the
Sinai attack.
EHUD, her other son, said he
refused to enter the area again
unless he was accompanied by a
large force of armed Israeli
soldiers to ensure the security of
his family.
Meanwhile. Sarah Baum and
other eye-witnesses said that the
persons called to give evidence to
the Egyptian inquiry are not the
right people to describe what hap-
pened and give an accurate ac-
count of the delays by the Egyp-
tians in administering first aid to
the wounded, which some experts
said would probably have saved
the lives of at least five of the
seven people killed in the attack.
These eye-witnesses said that
others present at the foot of the
sand dune or in the vicinity could
see more than the three persons
summoned to appear before the
inquiry, who had been pinned
down by the soldier's fire and the
orders of other Egyptian soldiers
on the spot.
ACCORDING TO Baum, the
Egyptians do not want to hear
eye-witnesses whose evidence will
unmask glaring mistakes by the
Egyptians, and she blames the
Israeli Foreign Ministry for not
pressing the Egyptians enough to
complete a speedy investigation of
the incident.
She suggested that the Israeli
government does not want to em-
barrass Cairo and hamper any
peace negotiations. The Foreign
Ministry rejects the charges.
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In Latin America
Arab World Pushes PLO Cause
CARTAGENA (JTA) -
Some 300 delegates from
the Latin American conti-
nent and the Arab world
met here in the Seventh
Congress of the Federation
of American Arab Organiza-
tions, where they adopted a
program aimed at advanc-
ing the cause of the PLO on
the continent, the World
Jewish Congress reports.
The Colombian press reported
that the meeting considered two
main issues: the organization of
joint Chambers of Commerce link-
ing the Arab countries with those
in Latin America where they do
not yet exist, "for the economic
cooperation between the Arab and
American peoples"; and an ag-
gressive pro-PLO and anti-Israel
propaganda campaign including
the defamation of Zionism.
THE LATIN American branch
of the WJC quoted one of the
delegates as saying that "the
struggle against Zionism is not
fought only in Palestine or any
other Middle Eastern place, but
everywhere. The battle is not only
one with weapons, but a social,
cultural and spiritual war."
The president of FEARAB?
Rams Chacra, called upon all the
affiliates on the continent "to
make a major effort in the strug-
gle against the common enemy, so
as to incite the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization, sole represen-
tative of the Palestine people, to
unite its forces towards the crea-
tion of a free and sovereign
Palestinian state."
Chacra added that the holding
of this Congress in Colombia is
"not accidental" but the result of
several factors, such as the impor-
tance of the Arab communities in
the country and in Central
America, according to the El
Espectador newspaper.
Another daily El Tiempo,
reports that during the meeting,
Jose Name Teran, former presi-
dent of the Colombian Parlia-
ment, "gave his most explicit sup-
port to the Arab cause, particular-
ly the struggle of the heroic
Palestinian people."
ELSEWHERE, in the city of
Sao Paulo, Brazil, in Avenida
Paulista, one of the major
thoroughfares, representatives of
the Arab-Palestinian-Brazilian
organizations held a public protest
against Israel, stopped traffic for
some time and distributed
pamphlets.
In a Brazilian daily, Fernando
Moreira de Castro, a columnist,
warns against the growing ag-
gressiveness of the PLO in Latin
America and its links with ex-
treme leftwing terrorist
movements.
Castro states that "PLO is in
full swing in Chile, Argentina,
Uruguay and Bolivia through a
revolutionary coordination jun-
ta," and he concludes that "the
penetration of PLO in Latin
America is obvious and that may
threaten the security of the Latin
American countries."
Malin Elected
MEMPHIS (JTA) Arthur
Malin has been elected president
of the Memphis Jewish Federa-
tion, succeeding Ronald Harkavy.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
,
Better Jaw-Jaw
Than War-War
It would be nice to think that when Pre-
sident Reagan and the Soviet Union's
Mikhail Gorbachev get together in Geneva
many problems will be solved. The likelihood
is that they will not. The question of global
war or peace is only one part of the agenda
about which neither side is bound to be very
giving.
The fact is that both the United States and
the Soviet Union have agendas of their own
so far as this issue is concerned. The nuclear
missile buildup, in which the Soviets, we are
told, already have an advantage, is balanced
in this war of intimidations by Mr. Reagan's
Strategic Defense Initiative.
The President has already said that SDI,
more familiarly known as Star Wars, is not
negotiable, but the Soviets are trying to do
just that negotiate the unnegotiable by of-
fering to give up some of their missile ad-
vantage for a reduction in the Star Wars
effort.
No Soviet Sacrifices
But the Soviets are said in Washington
already to have a Star Wars program all of
their own, and since ours would likely be far
more technologically advanced, they would
rather not play catch-up with us, argues
Washington, in this expensive business at a
time when Mr. Gorbachev, quite frankly,
confesses to profound and growing domestic
economic woes.
Hence, the Soviet leader's willingness to
bargain at a time when the Administration
declares that bargaining is irrelevant to its
own Star Wars efforts. And anyway, if the
Soviets really want to bargain how about
putting a lock on their own version of Mr.
Reagan's SDI? Or so the query goes. If the
U.S. gives up Star Wars, the Soviets still
have theirs. And so what are they giving up?
If for no other reasons, and there are
others, the pre-summit gamesmanship on
the eve of the summit's opening has sought
to focus on propaganda efforts by both sides
each determined to show the world its
own humanity as opposed to the other side's
insensitivity toward the larger issue: atomic
holocaust.
Curiously, in the face of this superpower
willingness to play games with mankind's
future, there are collateral human issues
that the Administration at least says it in-
tends to explore at Geneva. One involves the
plight of Soviet Jewry. The other is the
ongoing turmoil in the Middle East in which
the Russians play a frank hand of
responsibility.
The Jewish Exodus
This second issue is likely to focus on the
Soviet Union's anxious determination to
return in force to the Middle East's
Realpolitik. But Israel's Prime Minister
Peres has put it succinctly: A party that has
no diplomatic relations with Israel and, on
the contrary, bankrolls so many Arab in-
terests, including Arab terrorists, can not be
expected to be acceptable to Israel as part of
a proposed international conference on
peace in the Middle East.
No one can expect the Russians to accept
so simple and yet cogent an assertion of
their ineligibility in the peace process. But
on the first issue, that of Soviet Jewry, Mr.
Gorbachev has shown a singular capacity to
Jewish Florida a in
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be frank in his sentiments. One is that the
Soviets are dominantly concerned by the
major brain drain that a mass exodus of
Jews would pose they have said this
before.
The other is that they have been
dissatisfied with the arrangements even at
the height of the exodus in the past. They
want no half-way stops not in Rome, not
in Vienna. Jews* who depart with a visa to
Israel ought to go there not to a major
European capital and thence to the United
States.
Jewish Sympathies
In this, not so strangely, the Soviets have
much sympathy from many Jewish leaders,
both inside of Israel and out, who feel exa-
ctly the same way. The French offer to ferry
massive numbers of Jews out of the Soviet
Union directly to Israel is appealing to some,
but one can bet that these kinds of ar-
rangements are mere stops on the way to
the larger Soviet refusal, whether for fear of
a brain drain or any other reason.
We should therefore not be too disap-
pointed if neither issue not the Jewish ex-
odus and not the means of exodus takes
up much time on the U.S.-Soviet agenda in
Geneva. And unfortunately, no matter how
much time both sides spend on world peace.
Tunisia's Jews
n
including peace in the Middle East, we
should similarly not be too disappointed if
little progress is made on these priority
items either.
As the summit is set to begin, the best we
can hope for is an agreement to continue
talking another time, beyond Geneva, now
that the talking has finally started.
Dying a Painful, Lingering Death
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Number 46
Friday, November 15, 1985
Volume 58
By NEIL COHEN
London Chronicle Syndicate
The Tunisian Jewish com-
munity, after Morocco the
second largest in the Arab
world, is dying a painful,
lingering death. This is
largely the result of the
political situation, which
makes it extremely difficult
to export money.
With most of the young leaving,
the community is growing ever
older. Nevertheless, those who re-
main display resilience and. while
few are observant, assimilation is
minimal. Of 4,000 Jews remain-
ing, some 2,000 are in Tunis,
about 900 in Djerba, and the rest
scattered between Sousse, Sfax
and Gabes.
Although the Djerban communi-
ty is smaller than that in Tunis, it
is going out with a bang rather
than a whimper. Most are obser-
vant or traditional, community
life is strong and, unlike in Tunis,
weddings are not a total rarity.
LEADERSHIP has always
been at a premium. Until the
death last summer of the Chief
Rabbi, Jewish life in Tunis revolv-
ed around him and the Lubavitch
shaliach. The Chief Rabbi, whom I
met before his death, was a portly,
dignified, Oriental figure who
seemed not to have noticed the
passing of the decades and the
coming of the modern era.
He presided over the Great
Synagogue and its tiny school,
whose classes he taught in the
local Judaeo-Arabic dialect, like
the king of a once-great but now
crumbling kingdom.
He had gone to great lengths to
impress upon me the quality of
Jewish life in Tunis. Sadly, his
conviction has not been borne out
by the fact that, following his
death, there has been a vacuum
since he had looked after both the
spiritual and the organizational
nee-Is of the community.
W HEN I recently visited Tunis,
the -lders were looking for a suc-
cessor, but it was unclear quite
where they might find one.
Fortunately, the Lubavitch
shaliach and his wife are such
12*
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Mike in Yediot Achronot. (WZPS, Jerusalem I.
remarkable people that Tunisian
Jewry will not be a flock without a
shepherd. They live a frugal, tir-
ing existence, eating no meat
(apart from the chickens he
himself slaughters) or milk
products.
Rabbi P. and his wife have been
in Tunis for 25 years, bringing up
five children, all of whom have
now left for France or America.
As the only Ashkenazim in
Tunisia, they lead a lonely ex-
istence, but their reserves of faith
and courage are immense.
Despite the various problems
that have presented themselves
over the years denunciation to
the police as a Zionist agent by
Jews disgruntled at his success as
an educator, regular anti-Semitic
attacks, a lack of teachers and
teaching materials Rabbi P. has
managed to set up three schools
(two in Tunis and one in Djerba)
with government approval and a
balanced curriculum of religious
and secular studies. Altogether
around 120 pupils attend the
schools.
AT SUKKOTH, Rabbi P. im-
ported the entire community's
etrogim from Casablanca and
went with his lulav to the old-age
heme at Khereddine, an outlying
suburb of Tunis, where he was
greeted with enthusiasm by the
withered, often crippled and
bedridden residents, even though
they had little idea of what to do
with the lulav.
Among the stranger institutions
of Tunisian Jewry are two eating
establishments. One, the Robin-
son Restaurant, appears to the un-
trained eye to be a normal.
moderately-priced establishment,
but on closer inspection it reveals
a small sign saying Cachere; if any
of the clientele are Jewish, they
are doing their best to hide the
fact.
There is also a woman called
Madamme B. who cooks kosher
meals in her small, dingy apart-
ment. Her establishment, which
can accommodate no more than
three people at a time, is publiciz-
ed only by word of mouth.
While the government officially
protects the Jewish community.
anti-Semitic attacks are not rare
as events demonstrated follow-
ing Israel's bombing of PLO head-
quarters in Tunis and anyone
who can be identified as a Jew is
liable to be abused, verbally or
physically. The police can, or will,
Continued on Page 10-A
> T


Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Soviet Tone Changes: Softer Policy Far Behind?
1
London Chronicle Syndicate
There is agreement in
Washington that the Soviet
Union, at a minimum, has
recently shifted the tone of
its policy toward Israel. But
whether or not this easing
of official anti-Israeli hostili-
ty will continue to the point
of a formal resumption of
diplomatic ties between the
two countries is still
unclear.
U.S. officials, who have
monitored the ups and downs of
the Soviet-Israeli relationship
over the years, warned in recent
days that there have been similar
periods of optimism in the past.
But those earlier expectations of a
real change never materialized.
The same, they said, could happen
now.
WHAT IS apparent, according
to almost all knowledgeable
sources in Washington, is that the
outcome of President Ronald
Reagan's summit next week in
Geneva with Soviet General
Secretary Mikail Gorbachev will
have a very serious impact on of-
ficial Soviet attitudes toward
Israel. A successful summit could
have a dramatic spillover effect on
other "side" issues, including
Soviet policy in the Middle East
and of emigration for Soviet Jews.
There is no doubt that the Reag-
i an-Gorbachev meeting will be ex-
tremely crucial in setting the tone
for all sorts of superpower-related
issues in the foreseeable future.
Thus, all of the news media hype
about the summit especially in
the United States is fully
understandable, although ex-
perience U.S. foreign affairs ex-
perts are already cautioning about
overly inflated expectations. "We
all could be in for a big let down,"
one of them commented.
That the Soviets were trying to
y score some public relations points
on the eve of the summit is ob-
vious. This was true in connection
with the U.S.-Soviet arms control
negotiations, as well as with other
issues, including the Middle East.
This was especially the case when
it came to the Kremlin's most re-
cent statements vis-a-vis Israel.
SOVIETS also have tried to
tantalize Israel and its many sup-
porters in the United States,
especially in the American Jewish
h
tduard Shevardnadze
to Shimon Peres: Let's
wait and see.'
At eve of Geneva summit, what can these
two leaders hope to achieve for world
peace?
community and on Capitol Hill, by
holding out the hope for increased
emigration for Jews. A few promi-
nent refuseniks, for example,
have been allowed to leave in re-
cent weeks, although the overall
number of exit permits remains
dismal. Harassment continues
unabated.
Clearly, the Soviet strategy is to
try to use Israel and the Jewish
community to put pressure on the
Reagan Administration to warm
up the relationship and to ac-
cept certan Soviet policies by
holding out this carrot of increas-
ed emigration. From the Soviet
point of view, linkage in foreign
affairs is alive and well.
Beyond that, of course, is the
matter of a restoration of
diplomatic relations between the
Soviet Union and Israel and a
more "constructive" Soviet policy
in the Middle East.
Prime Minister Peres, during
his many meetings in the United
States last month, made clear that
Israel would be prepared to go the
extra mile in meeting certain
Soviet needs, provided that
diplomatic relations were renew-
ed and that emigration was
increased.
PERES WAS very flexible in
signalling an Israeli readiness to
accept some sort of international
support for direct Arab-Israeli
peace negotiations, including the
involvement of the Soviet Union.
"The permanent members of
the Security Council may be in-
vited to support the initiation of
these negotiations," Peres told
the UN. "It is our position that
those who confine their diplomatic
relations to one side of the conflict
exclude themselves from such a
role."
The thrust of Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevardnadze's
message to Peres during their
brief chat at a diplomatic recep-
tion in New York three days later
was that a thaw in Soviet-Israeli
relations was indeed possible, but
only after the summit in Geneva.
"Let's wait and see," Shevard-
nadze reportedly told Peres.
OTHER SOVIET officials have
privately suggested that an Israeli
readiness to accept a more active
Soviet diplomatic role in the peace
negotiations as was briefly the
case during the convening of the
Geneva conference following the
1973 Yom Kippur War could
lead to restored relations at a
later point. But Israel wants the
resumption of ties to come first.
Thus, a very clear and im-
mediate indication of a more
positive Soviet attitude would
come in the form of a Soviet
restoration of diplomatic ties,
even in a limited form.
The New York Times reported
on Oct. 26, that the Soviets were
indeed considering the exchange
of diplomatic "interest sections"
with Israel. That would result in t-
he return of Soviet diplomats to
Tel Aviv, where they would result
in the return of Soviet diplomats
to Tel Aviv, where they would be
based in a third-country embassy,
and the return of Israeli officials
to Moscow under identical cir-
cumstances. Poland is also said to
have received the green light for
such limited diplomatic ties as a
sign of Soviet goodwill. Hungary
could follow.
But a willingness to permit
direct flights of immigrants from
the Soviet Union to Israel is also
seen as critical litmus test of in-
tentions by Israel. The transit
stops in Vienna and Rome would
thus be removed from the scene,
and the propensity for Soviet
Jews to "drop out" by opting for
the United States, Canada and
elsewhere in the West would be
curtailed.
FOR ISRAEL, the matter is
very significant. If the Jews come
directly to Israel, they presumably
Continued on Page 12-A
Hitler Movies Sent Out Signals
But Jewish Distributors Chose to Ignore Them
By BEN GALLOB
A Hartford University
cinema expert has asserted
that "every movie" that
came from Germany after
1933, when Hitler came to
power, "sent out signals"
and that the decision of
Jewish distributors outside
of Germany against
distribution of such films
had the "horrible irony" of
in effect withholding vital
lessons about the genocide
the Nazis were planning.
The background of this evalua-
tion by Prof. Paul Stacy was his
conviction, stated in the same ad-
dress at the university, that films
force viewers to look at the truth,
in this case, specifically about the
Holocaust, in a way that words
cannot.
Stacy's talk was one in a sym-
posium series on "The Holocaust
in Historical Perspective," spon-
sored by the university. During
his talk, Stacy showed excerpts
from films to buttress his conclu-
sions. He declared that
"Holocaust movies assault us with
images so honest, so painful and
so despairing that they ac-
cumulate into an unprecedented
belief in our own fearfulness."
THE CINEMA scholar asserted
that in Sidney Lumet's film, "The
Pawnbroker"- (1964), the past
eclipses the present for Holocaust
survivor Nazerman, portrayed by
Rod Steiger. The survivor's total
abdication from life even as he
goes on living is made totally
clear in the film by dialogue, ac-
ting and photography and, above
all, by "an astonishing editing
whereby the past assassinates a
man's psyche."
He said no book could have
presented "a more seething truth
about the death camps" than
"Night and Fog" (1964) by Alain
Resnais. Stacy said the most ef-
fective scenes in that film are
photos of mountains of such ob-
jects as spectacles, hair and shoes.
He said "the significance of these
objects torn out of context"
such as when they are presented
in poetry as "imaginism" is
"magnified and given totemic
power."
Stacy described how the film
"Cabaret" (1972) communicated
the rise of the Nazi movement. In
an apparently idyllic scene in a
beer garden, the camera zooms in
on the angelic face of a teenager
starting to sing. As the camera
moves back, it becomes clear that
the teenager is wearing a uniform
with a swastika armband. His
companions join in the song and
end up giving the Nazi salute.
"COULD WE not see in Ger-
man movies the boycotting of
Jewish shops, the burning of
Jewish books, Jewish profes-
sionals barred from practice; Jews
barred from the German army,
forbidden to fly the German flag,
to hire a German maid or to marry
an Aryan; German universities
segregating Jewish students;
Jews being forced to register their
property, having trouble with
passports or changing names"?
Stacy asserted that mankind
"will not believe that which is too
painful to live with." He declared
that people in the 1930's might
have been more aware of the in-
evitability of what was coming, if
it had not been such an unaccep-
table vision.
Stacy said that, given that
scenario, it was possible to make
some cross-connections between
Holocaust films and fictional film
portrayals about the atomic
destruction of modern civilization.
He said that what the two have
in common is "killing on a
massive, a horrendous scale." The
distinction, he said, is that "a
death from science comes from
above, from intellectuality, from a
divine abstraction of technology, a
lofty experiment out of control."
But, he said, death from
Holocaust, "comes from below,
from a subhuman instinct, a
demonic master of ceremonies.
The scientific death an atomic
death is an intellectual achieve-
ment; the Holocaust death is irra-
tional, cannibalistic."
STACY DECLARED that a
final consequence of all Holocaust
films, as well as end-of-the world
films, is a prevailing climate of
Continued on Page 14-A
They withheld the vital
lessons about genocide.



Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. November 15, 1985
Zionism /Racism
Purveyors Undermine U.S. Policy
Continued from Page 1-A
relations and to deligitimize
Israel." said Ambassador Keyes
at tonight's dinner, "the
purveyors of 'Zionism is racism'
are also trying to undermine U.S.
policy the ability to further
peace in the Middle East."
Moreover, said Keyes. the
Zionism-racism resolution
which was adopted 10 years ago
tomorrow "is downright harm-
ful to the UN itself, since the basic
UN goal is peacekeeping, and the
injection of these contentious
political issues into that effort
undermines that goal." He added:
"It undermines the credibility of
the UN, and it undermines respect
for the UN in the United States
and among reasonable nations
everywhere."
DISCUSSING the way the
"Zionism is racism" issue was
handled at the nongovernmental
women's forum in Nairobi. Dame
Nita Barrow
Nita said that "there were 13.503
women there women concerned
with development, peace, equali-
ty, health, employment, educa-
tion, and other vital issues and
because there were so many
issues of deep concern, and so
many women from different
backgrounds, there was no time
for one contentious issue to
dominate."
Turning to the real purpose of
the conference women's issues
Dame Nita said that one great
benefit of the conference was that
"so many international contacts
were made, and so much ground-
work for future networking was
laid."
The AJC citation to Ambass-
ador Keyes. presented by Suzanne
Elson, chair of AJC's National
Committee on Women's Issues,
said: "In grateful recognition of y-
our vigorous and eloquent ar-
ticulation of America's commit-
ment to the ideals of the United
Nations Charter universality,
tolerance, and peace at the
United Nations Decade for
Women Conference."
I
Rabbi Simcha Freedman of Temple Adath Yeshurun (center/ tn
North Miam i Beach poses with Majority Leader Jim Wright tleft)
and Congressman William Lehman after delivering the opening
invocation at a recent session of the U.S. House of
Representatives.
Dr. Gordis Urges
Declare Terrorism An 'Int'l. Crime'
The citation to Dame Nita,
presented by Mimi Alperin, chair
of AJC's Interreligious Affairs
Commission, said: "In grateful
recognition of your successful
stewardship of the NGO Forum at
the United Nations Decade for
Women Conference, which helped
make it a vehicle of positive
dialogue and constructive
cooperation."
QjROWARD
[JAPER &
QACKAGING
The executive head of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee has urged that terrorism
be declared "an interna-
tional crime" no matter
what the political agenda
behind it.
Speaking to the agency's Na-
tional Executive Council, which
continues its annual meeting
through Sunday at the Hyatt
Regency Miami Hotel here. Dr.
David M. Gordis asserted that
"we guarantee success to the ter-
rorists" when the world gives
"center stage" to their political
agenda rather than to their
murderous deeds.
In underlining his warning. Dr.
Gordis, AJC's executive vice
president, pointed to two recent
events: the Achille Lauro hijack-
ing and Israel's strike against a
terrorist attack by hitting PLO
headquarters in Tunis.
ON THE Achille Lauro affair:
"The world proclaims its opposi-
tion to terrorism. How then to ex-
plain the eagerness of the two
governments most directly involv-
ed Italy, whose record of inter-
nal terrorism has been so good:
and Egypt, a friend of the U.S.
and at peace with Israel to
return perpetrators of that piracy
and murder to their terrorist
masters and free the architect of
the entire plot? And then the
ultimate absurdity to demand
apologies from the U.S. for finally
taking strong, resolute action
against terrorism."
On Israel's attack on PLO head
quarters in Tunis: "The PLO
states its goal to be the destruc-
tion of the State of Israel and
declares its right to attack all
Jews and Zionists anywhere in the
world. But when Israel strikes
back against a terrorist attack by
hitting the PLO headquarters in
Tunis, it is condemned for that
strike, even by its friends, who
argue that the attack violates
Tunisian sovereignty."
"Such responses." Dr. Gordis
went on. "are dangerous not only
because they egg the terrorists on
to greater and greater outrages,
but because they shift the
precarious center and drive the
moderates and would-be
moderates in the direction of
extremism."
democratic values in a pluralist
Israeli environment."
DR. GORDIS challenged the
members of AJC's National Ex-
ecutive Council, who were
gathered from all over the coun-
try, "to communicate another vi-
sion than that projected by ex-
tremists, non-Jewish and
Jewish," becoming "the focus for
those who affirm the centrality of
democratic values and their com-
patibility with Judaism."
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Dr. Gordis
Dr. Gordis placed his appeal for
terrorism to be declared "an in-
ternational crime" within the con-
text of recent events, where we
are experiencing "the ascendancy
of mindlessness and extremism, a
hardening of positions, a toughen-
ing of attitudes, a driving apart of
those who should be partners,
both within the Jewish community
and betweer the Jewish communi-
ty and groups in our larger
society."
He explained that "the sense of
economic and social vulnerability"
had grown among the disadvan-
taged: blacks. Hispanics. women,
the elderly, the family farmers
and that this had emboldened
"those who always exploit such
vulnerability" to preach hatred
and foment violence.
"IN RECENT months." he
went on, "we have seen these
hatemongers make common cause
with religious extremists to
scapegoat Jews and the 'Eastern
establishment' and enlist new sup-
port for a campaign to 'Chris-
tianize America." Couple his with
the renewed political asser-
tiveness on the part of religious
ideologues, and we have a
blueprint for polarization and in-
creasing difficulty in maintaining
the liveable middle ground essen-
tial to the functioning of a
pluralist society."
Nor is the Jewish community
immune, he continued, pointing
out that it contains whose "who
make excuses for bigotry, and
even for the terrorism of extreme
Orthodox fundamentalism." an
extremism reinforced by "the
monopoly of legitimacy granted
by the Jewish State of Israel to a
single group in Jewish life."
"Part of the price Israel pays
for the Orthodox monopoly." he
continued, "is its inability to nur-
ture a synthesis of Jewish and
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. '. .-.v. .
Hussein Says
He Favors Int'l. Peace Conference
Friday, November 15,J985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Cardinal O'Connor Asked To Press
Pope on Recognition of Israel
1
By YOSSI LEMPKOWICZ
LUXEMBOURG (JTA)
King Hussein of Jordan
has renewed his call for an
international peace con-
ference on the Middle East
conflict while reaffirming
his commitment to the ac-
cord reached last Feb. 11
with the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization in the
search for a peace
settlement.
Addressing the Luxembourg
Chamber of Deputies on the se-
cond day of his three-day visit
here, the Jordanian monarch
recalled that the United Nations
has recognized the PLO as the
legitimate representative of the
Palestinian people. For that
reason, the King added, the PLO
should be invited to participate in
any meaningful negotiations
which led to peace.
THE INTERNATIONAL
peace conference, according to
Hussein, should be held under
United Nations auspice with the
participation of the five perma-
nent members of the UN Security
Council and all the parties involv-
ed in the Mideast conflict. The
Jordanian leader also urged the
United States to participate in
such a conference as a demonstra-
tion of a more positive approach
to the conflict.
"Little can be achieved if the
United States shirks its respon-
sibilities as a superpower and as a
champion of human rights,
freedom and the right to self-
determination," said Hussein.
"We hope the United States will
participate and participate
actively."
Describing the situation in the
Mideast as deadlocked, Hussein
asserted that Israel has chosen to
occupy Arab territories rather
than take a course toward peace.
"It's totally unrealistic to think
Parliament Supports Peres
STRASBOURG (JTA) The
European Parliament voted to
ack "with all its available
means" Israeli Prime Minister
shimon Peres peace plan. The
Parliament, which represents the
Id European Economic Communi-
member-states. also called on
Jordan to heed the Israeli
! Vernier's calls.
The resolution, proposed by the
Socialist group and backed by the
Italian Communists, also called
for the recognition of the
Palestine Liberation Organization
as the representative of the
Palestinian people and said it
should take part in the Middle
East peace process. The resolu-
tion was adopted by a show of
hands without an actual vote
count.
The European Parliament,
elected by the 10 EEE member-
states directly, has only a con-
sultative status.
that a people subject to such con-
ditions of occupation could stand
passive," Hussein said.
THE JORDANIAN leader, who
met with Grand Duke Jean of
Luxembourg, also had talks with
Prime Minister Jacques Santer
and later with Foreign Minister
Jacques Poos. Luxembourg cur-
rently holds the rotative presiden-
cy of the European Economic
community.
Hussein, according to Poos,
outlined during their private
meeting a four-stage plan to bring
about a settlement to the Mideast
crisis. This is reportedly said to
contain explicit PLO recognition
of Israel and de facto recognition
of the PLO by the United States.
Speaking to reporters after his
meeting with Hussein, Poos said
that the plan outlined by Hussein
would include, as a start, a
meeting between a Jordanian
delgation and representatives of
the U.S. The PLO Poos said,
would then announce explicit
recognition of the State of Israel.
AN INTERNATIONAL con-
ference would soon follow, clear-
ing the process to direct talks and
a settlement of the conflict, accor-
ding to Poos. The plan does not
call for formal recognition of the
PLO by the U.S. although it sees
"de facto" recognition if both par-
ties attend the international
confab.
Poos told reporters that the
PLO must still renounce ter-
rorism, but added that the plan
leserves the support of the EEC
member states. Hussein was
scheduled to leave for Paris for
meetings with President Francois
Mitterrand.
Continued from Page 1-A
the Pope, he added: "It would be
presumptuous of me to think that
I could do more than that, to ex-
press the feelings of the Jewish
community that I meet here in
New York. And I have great trust
for the understanding of the ques-
tion on the part of the Holy See."
The Vatican has been urged on
numerous occasions by Jewish
groups and even members of Con-
gress to extend formal diplomatic
recognition to Israel. Last year,
26 Jewish and Roman Catholic
members of the House Represen-
tatives issued a letter urging that
Pope John Paul II recognize Is-
rael.
THE CURRENTLY exists
what is described as "de facto"
recognition of Israel by the
Vatican, exemplified, Vatican of-
ficials say, by meetings between
Pope John Paul and Israeli of-
ficials in past years. Last
February, the Pope met with Isra-
eli Premier Shimon Peres.
But the issue is complicated by
the Pope's repeated calls for a
special internationalized status
for Jerusalem, so that, according
to the Pope, "one side or the other
cannot place it under discrimina-
tion." He has also called for "a
just solution for the Palestinian
people."
Bronfman, in remarks to
reporters during the dinner, said
that the issue of Jerusalem should
not prevent the Vatican from
recognizing Israel. "If there are
problems that the Vatican may
have over Jerusalem, somebody
ught to hear about them." Bronf-
man said. "These things should be
opened for discussion."
THE AWARD to O'Connor
commemorated the 20th anniver-
sary of Nostra Aetate, the Second
Vatican Council declaration that
deplored anti-Semitism and
deicide charges. According to
Bronfman, while Nostra Aetate
was a landmark in Christian-
Jewish relations, there remains
much work ahead toward better-
ing relations between the two
people.
"There's a lot more to be done,
including Vatican recognition of
the State of Israel," he said. "To
stop at a point that was reached
20 years ago with Nostra Aetate,
and that's it, is a great mistake."
Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the ADL, praised the
success of Nostra Aetate and the
"remarkable progress' by the
Catholic Church in its teachings
about Jews. "To belittle the pro-
gress made in 20 years following
2,000 years of teaching of con-
tempt is to overlook the efforts
the Church has made to clean its
liturgy in its teachings of the
Jews."
But, he said, "The fact is that 20
years later, our hearts are in adif-
ferent place. As a people, the
Jewish people are deeply, deeply
concerned with the security of the
State of Israel." To that extent,
he said, security can be "heighten-
ed" by papal recognition. He said
the ADL has raised this point with
the Vatican in past meetings.
Kerbel Elected Veep
WILMINGTON. Del. (JTA)
Robert Kerbel has been named
executive vice president of the J-
ewish Federation of Delaware, ac-
cording to Martin Mand, Federa-
tion president. Kerbel has been
acting executive director since
Morris Lapidos retired in August.
* *
ANNUAL TRIB UTE BANQ VET
THE MEN A CHEM BEGIN and ALIZA BEGIN
PEACE PARK IN THE NEGEV
Guest Speaker
Member of the Knesset
First Israeli Ambassador to Egypt
SUNDA Y, DECEMBER 15,1985 12 NOON
GRAND BALLROOM KONO VER HOTEL, 5445 COLLINS A VENUE, MIAMI BE A CH
Zev W. Kogan
Pres. JNFSouthern Region
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn.
Ernest Samuels
V.P.JNFGr. Miami
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
For Information and Reservations:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139 Phone 538-6464
ooooooooooooooooooooow


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Rage on Both Sides
But Tempers Over Play Calm Down
By DAVID KANTOR
FRANKFURT (JTA) -
The Jewish community here
and the director of a play it
views as anti-Semitic moved
closer toward a confronta-
tion after he restated last
week his intention to
premiere the play on Nov.
13; the community's leaders
announced its members
would take over the stage
and prevent the
performance. ,
Guenther Ruehle, director of
"Garbage: The City of Death" by
the late Rainer Werner
Fassbinder. said after a special
performance of the play for jour-
nalists and critics, "We did not do
all this work for nothing." He
continued:
"I do believe that our Jewish
citizens recognize that they have
acted against the law. Let's hope
they will not disturb the next per-
formance ..." His reference
about law-breaking was to the
disruption of the original
premiere of the play by 30
members of the community, who
took over the stage and stopped
the show from going on.
THE JEWISH community
responded by stating that it will
not allow the rescheduled
premiere to take place. Members
of the community have already
bought tickets to the show and in-
tend to occupy the stage again, if
all other measures fail to stop the
performance.
Several such measures are pen-
ding. An unidentified Jewish resi-
dent of Frankfurt has asked a
court here to issue an interim
order cancelling the premiere. At
the same time, the Zentralrat der
Juden in Deutschland, the West
German Jewish community's of-
ficial body, called upon Frankfurt
Mayor Walter Wallman to use his
authority to ban the premiere.
In a letter to Wallman, Zen-
tralrat's President, Werner
Nachman, said the municipal
theater of Frankfurt, where the
play is being readied for its new
premiere, was abusing the
freedom of the arts to circulate
anti-Semitic attitudes and
legitimize such views. This
behavior, Nachman continued,
contradicts basic principles of
democracy and tolerance, and en-
dangers the reconciliation bet-
ween Jews and non-Jews.
WALLMAN WAS scheduled to
address a meeting of the
Frankfurt Jewish community last
Sunday, three days before the
rescheduled premiere. While some
observers here believed he would
announce at that time whether or
not the show will go on, others
pointed out that such a decision
would put Wallman in a difficult
position. He would appear, they
said, as a politician trying to im-
pose his views in an extremely
sensitive area.
Ruehle has carefully tried to
head off criticism of the play as
anti-Semitic by the use of several
threatrical techniques. One is to
downplay the role of the main
character, the unnamed "Rich
Jew," a heartless real estate
U.S. Funds to UN Proscribed
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
Senate by a 90-2 vote last week
prohibited any voluntary contribu-
tions by the United States to the
United Nations from being used
for programs for the Palestine
Liberation Organization. The pro-
hibition was in the form of an
amendment introduced by Sen.
Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) to
the appropriations bill for the
Commerce, Justice and State
Departments.
The PLO "is committed, on
paper and in practice, to the
destruction of one of our closest
allies, Israel," Lautenberg told
the Senate last Friday. "And ter-
ror is its chosen means of achiev-
ing its goals. Recent events only
confirm this conclusion."
Lautenberg noted that for the
past several years foreign aid bills
have prohibited the use of U.S.
voluntary contributions to the
UN. Since 1980, the State Depart-
ment authorization bill reduces
the U.S. assessed contribution to
the UN budget by the amount that
would be used for projects that
benefit the PLO, about $1 million.
Lautenberg stressed that his
amendment reaffirms this policy
in the appropriation bill since "the
appropriations process is the final
arbiter of how this country
actually spends its money."
Sens. Barry Goldwater (R.,
Ariz.) and Charles Mathias (R.,
Md.) voted against the amend-
ment but did not give any reasons
for doing so.
NOU15-20
&S3Bt
27th Ave. and S ^^^^
Everything from living
rooms to bedrooms.
bathrooms to
kitchens floors to
ceilings, windows
to walls pools.
patios, spas and
so much more .
speculator who kills a woman he
loves and escapes prosecution
because the Germans feel they
owe the Jews something.
In Ruehle's version, other
issues, such as the homosexual
relations between the characters,
is given more prominence. Addi-
tionally, there is a heavy use of
music and dance, which
sometimes gives the play the
flavor of a musical.
COMMENTING on these
changes. Marcel Reich-Ranicki,
the editor of the literary supple-
ment of the AUgemeine Zeitung of
Frankfurt, said that "what they
have done is ridiculous. They tried
to give the bad 'Rich Jew,' who is
undoubtedly the most important
character, a supporting role only.
And they made of him a melan-
cholic rather than a sadistic per-
son, as he was in the original ver-
sion." He added:
"Another thing they have done
is to give the role of the Rich Jew
to someone who has an 'Aryan'
appearance. But all this is
nonsense. It makes no difference
whatsoever. Of course the play re-
mains an anti-Semitic piece."
Criticizing the play along
similar lines, German author
Rudolf Kraemer-Badone lashed
out at the municipal theater staff,
saying they had "made a parody
of the play, thus hoping to defuse
some of its anti-Semitic elements.
The result is an unsuccessful and
contemptible cover-up operation."
He continued:
"It is worse than the original
Fassbinder (version). All the
original anti-Semitic elements are
there."
THE 34th ANNUAL
NOVEMBER
i
A LARRY PERL
EXPOSITION
yOURSELF TIPS!
SAMPLES'- ^
Adult discount with
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OPENS TODAV

f

Henry Siegman, (center), executive director of the American
Jewish Congress, presents the agency's 1985 Cultural Achieve-
ment Award to Mike Stoller (left) and Jerry Leiber (right) at a
dinner held at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. One of
America's best known songwriting teams, Leiber and Stoller are
recognized as the creators of'rock and roll.' They have written for
Elvis Presley, Peggy Lee, Edith Piafand many others.
Israeli Jew Stabbed in Jerusalem

JERUSALEM (JTA) An
Israeli Jew was stabbed and
seriously injured near the
Damascus Gate in East
Jerusalem. The victim, identified
as Ovadia Baruchi, 60, a resident
of the Bukharan Quarter in
Jerusalem, underwent emergency
surgery.
The assailant was reported to
have been a young Arab, about 20
years of age. who had been seen
fleeing from the scene. Police *
rounded up about a dozen <
suspects for questioning, but the
attacker was apparently not
among them.
Baruchi was reported to have
been shopping near the scene of
the attack.
A health care series about men:
For women only
As a woman, you know your own
body. Information on female health
care is abundant. But how much do
you know about the health needs
of men? If you are like most women,
you worry about the health of your
husband, son or father. Do you some-
times feel ill-equipped to discuss
or help with their health problems?
Come to St. Francis Hospital for
"A Health Care Series About Men: For
women Only." Beginning Monday.
November 18, we will offer a free
4 -part lecture series and forum for
open discussion of such male health
care topics as: impotence, prostate
trouble, colon cancer, stress, heart
disease and plastic surgery. The
series will run for four consecutive
Mondays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in
the Hospital's Wiegand Auditorium.
To register for this free health series,
call the St. Francis Hospital Depart-
ment of Community Relations at
868-2783.
Barbara Sloan,
news anchor/
reporter for WCIX-TV
(Channel 6), will
act as moderator
for this very
special series.
(i>
Nov. 18 THE ANXIOUS MA|,F
Strcs/ricers/Colon Cancer/Nutrition
Nov. 24 THEACTIVF.MA|,p
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Life. Be in it


Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
I, Conflict Brewing
Zionists, Fund-Raisers Clash Over Plans To Pack Boards
NEW YORK (JTA) A con-
flict is brewing in the United
Israel Appeal between represen-
tatives of Zionist organizations
and representatives of community
fund-raising organizations.
At issue, according to reports,
are "proposals made by communi-
ty representatives of the UIA's
Board of Directors to radically
change the composition of its
Membership by substantially in-
creasing community representa-
tion while retaining the same
number of Zionist represen-
tatives." This is being challenged
by the Zionist representatives of
the UIA's Board of Trustees.
The Zionist trustees, who met to
discuss this proposed change,
asserted that any attempt to
change this ratio "would create
disunity and would constitute a
disrupting influence in the historic
partnership between the Zionist
movement and the fund-raising
community in the U.S., which
have traditionally worked har-
moniously together in the tasks of
upbuilding Israel," according to a
statement issued by the World
Zionist Organization-American
Section which selects the Zionist
representatives to the UIA's
Board of Directors.
THE MAJOR governing body
of the UIA, the Board of Direc-
tors, now consists of 36 members:
12 Zionists from various parties
and 24 representatives from the
United Jewish Appeal and
Federations elected from the com-
munities. According to a
spokesman from the Zionist
representatives, fund-raising
representatives are proposing to
retain the present number of Zion-
ists but to increase the community
representatives to 60, thus enlarg-
ing the Board membership to 72.
According to a UIA spoke-
sperson, there is no formal pro-
posal to change the ratio of
representatives on the Board, and
a "scenario" of a possible change
was brought up by one Board
member in the process of an ongo-
ing discussion on updating the
UIA by-laws. The spokesperson
said that "no decision has yet been
made" and that the discussion is
"wide open." The spokesperson
expressed surprise that the Zi-
onist representatives went public
in the middle of a discussion.
Since 1950, the UIA has been a
partnership between the UJA/F-
ederations and the American
Zionist movement "and
throughout the years the com-
munity representation has been
greatly increased on the Board of
Directors of the UIA in recogni-
tion of the increased role of the
Federations in the affairs of the
UIA and the Jewish Agency in
Israel," the WZO-Ameican Sec-
tion statement said.
"IN THE reconstitution of the
Jewish Agency in 1971, represen-
tatives of the fund-raising com-
munities throughout the free
world were brought into this part-
nership on a 50-50 basis to
manage the affairs of the Jewish
Agency. The Zionist trustees of
UIA strongly feel that the present
drive to increase community
representation at the expense of
Zionist representation in the UIA
is a threat to this historic partner-
ship, and will also affect the cur-
rent partnership in the Jewish
Agency.
"The Zionist trustees expressed
great understanding of the need
for increased participation of the
American Jewish communities in
the work of the UIA, in order to
meet the new and expanding
needs of Israel and also to give
greater voice to community
leadership in that effort," the
WZO statement said. But, the
Zionist trustees said, "this does
not have to be achieved by reduc-
ing the ratio of the Zionist
representatives.''
The three members of the WZO-
American Section Executive who
will deal with this issue are Ber-
nice Tannenbaum, chairperson of
the WZO-American Section; Rab-
bi Alexander Schindler, president
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations; and Harry
Taubenfield, honorary
chairperson of Herat. They will
convey the united Zionist position
to members of the recently
established special UIA commit-
tee dealing with this proposal at
the committee's next meeting in
April.
Feltman Named
HARTFORD (JTA) Philip
Feltman has been elected presi-
dent of the Greater Hartford
Jewish Federation, succeeding
Simon Konover.
If you've reached the
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Introducing AmeriPlus 55.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Israel Asks To Extradite
Nazi Brunner from Syria
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Israel has asked
the United Nations to issue
a demand to Syria that it ex-
tradite Nazi war criminal
Alois Brunner, who has
been sheltered in Damascus
by the Syrian government
for almost 30 years.
In a letter to Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar, Israel's
Ambassador to the UN, Binyamin
Netanyahu, said that since Syria
has steadfastly refused extradi-
tion requests from France, West
Germany and other countries,
Syria should "hand over Brunner
to an impartial international
tribunal that will try him for his
crimes against humanity."
NOTING THAT Brunner, a
former captain of the Nazi SS, "is
responsible for sending more than
120,000 Jews from Austria, Ger-
many, France, Slovakia and
Greece to their deaths in Nazi con-
centration camps," Netanyahu
said that after the war Brunner
escaped to Syria, "posing as
business associate of Adolf
Eichmann, using the alias Georg
Fischer."
During the war, Eichmann, the
Israeli envoy continued, "was so
impressed with Brunner's 'effi-
ciency' that he put him in charge
of the Zentralstelle fuer Juede
Auswanderung, the infamous
bureau responsible for 'cleansing'
Nazi Germany of Jews."
Recently, the German weekly
Bunte interviewed and
photographed Brunner in his villa
in Damascus. Despite this and
other evidence, the Syrians con-
tinue to deny that Brunner is liv-
ing in Syria. "Brunner's recent in-
terview with Bunte reveals that
he was a 'close security adviser' to
Rifaat al-Assad, the brother of
Syria's ruler" Hafez Assad,
Netanyahu told the Secretary
General.
THE ISRAELI envoy charged
that by shielding Brunner, Syria
violates the Convention on the
Prevention and Punishment of the
Crime of Genocide, which
Damascus signed in 1955. The
Convention, Netanyahu noted,
calls for punishing persons guilty
of genocide and demands their
extradition.
Ji-\
Bethlehem, Mayor Elias Freij at the Allenby
Bridge on the way to his recent talks with panied by
King Hussein of Jordan. Freij was accom- Seniora.
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
the editor of al-Fajr, Hanna
UJA Raises $598 Million As of End of August
f
UAHC Joins Christians
In Sanctuary Approval
LOS ANGELES (JTA) In
a precedent-setting action, the
L'nion of American Hebrew Con-
gregations (UAHC) endorsed the
principle of Reform Jewish day
schools as a "valid educational op-
tion" while rejecting public funds
for the support of private
education.
By a two-to-one margin,
delegates to the UAHC's 58th
biennial convention voted to
develop curricula and materials
for "full-time Reform Jewish
schools," and to prepare training
programs for teachers and ad-
ministrators. The 3,000 delegates
also voted "to provide guidance
and counsel to those congrega-
tions and communities that are
considering the establishment od
such schools."
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
president of the UAHC, hailed the
adoption of the resolution, declar-
ing: "The vote moves our religious
community toward a future of
greater self-reliance. It gives us a
way to harvest the fruits of our
deepening commitment to
Judaism without betraying our
universalist concerns." A similar
resolution had been defeated
twice before at previous UAHC
Tunisia's
Jews Dying
Continued from Page 1-A
do little.
THE SITUATION is, however,
much better than it was in 1967,
when a frenzied mob roamed the
streets attacking anything and
everything Jewish, culminating in
the burning of the Great
Synagogue, though this was
subsequently rebuilt by the
government.
The Jews who remain are most-
ly craftsmen, jewelers and small
businessmen who have wares,
rather than skills, which they can-
not take out of the country. Some
express a desire to leave, while
others seem content to live out
their lives in the land of their
birth.
The demise of the once-
flourishing community is a sad
;ight, but the resilience of its rem-
nants is not without a flicker of
hope.
conventions.
The resolution said, in part:
"The UAHC reaffirms its commit-
ment to the principles of public
education and calls upon our con-
gregations and our Commission
on Social Action to develop pro-
grams aimed at encouraging our
congregants to involve
themselves actively and directly in
efforts to strengthen their local
public systems."
The resolution opposed tuition
tax credits for private schools and
called for more federal funds for
education programs designed to
help minority, disadvantaged and
disabled students. The resolution
added: "Today many public
schools are plagued by economic,
educational and social problems.
It is incumbent on the Jewish com-
munity to be deeply involved in
the struggle to strengthen and re-
invigorate our public school
systems."
The resolution noted with
"pride and appreciation" that
about 10 Reform Jewish day
schools are already in operation,
and that other congregants are
currently exploring the establish-
ment of such schools.
NEW YORK (JTA) Alex
Grass, national chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal,"reporting
on the success of the 1985
UJA/Federation Community
Campaigns, stated that $598
million had been raised as of Aug.
28, compared to $533.5 million
pledged by the same donors last
year. This represented a 12.1 per-
cent card-for-card increase and a
dollar gain of $64.5 million.
His reports were made to the
UJA's Board of Trustees, the
Board of Directors of the United
Israel Appeal, the Council of
Jewish Federations and the
Jewish Agency Executive
meeting, all in New York City.
GRASS ADDED that a total of
$162.6 million hasbfcen raised fo
Project Renewal including $10
million pledged during the '85
Campaign. Project Renewal is the
program specifically designed to
aid distressed neighborhoods in
Israel by linking them to
American communities.
The national chairman also an-
nounced that Operation Moses,
the special campaign to raise
money for the absorption of
Ethiopian Jewry, has raised $63.9
million, including pledgesand com-
munity guarantees. Nineteen ma-
jor and 29 intermediate com-
munities have already achieved or
exceeded their goals in record
time, Grass said.
Concerning total calendar year
cash collections, he reported that
$237.1 million has been collected
as of August 31, compared to
$205.3 million at the same time
last year.
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the recent successful Major Gifts
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Europe and Israel, under the
leadership of national vice chair-
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Warsaw, Prague and Bucharest
and met with members of the rem-
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In Israel, they exchanged
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Herzog and viewed Israel's
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1,000 Leaders Meet in D.C.
it 54th General Assembly
INGTON Some 3,000
immunity leaders from
It North America are in
at the 54th General
I of the Council of Jewish
Ins, through Sunday at
pinjfton Hilton Hotel.
embly has as its theme
ling of Age of North
Jewry: Strengthening
6h Affirmation."
first time, the opening
sssion was held in a loca-
de the convention hotel:
Jtdy Center. Keynote ad-
I delivered by CJF Presi-
|shana S. Cardin. The
included a dramatic
ition. "The Golden
acclaimed musical that
the mood for the theme
by portraying the past
of changing Jewish im-
to North America.
also featured two mini-
is on topics of major
concern "Jewish
Education" and "New Life Styles
and Jewish Populations at Risk"
followed by workshops design-
ed to permit participants to
discuss the issues raised in
greater depth and from several
different perspectives.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is the national association of
200 Jewish Federations, the cen-
tral community organizations
which serve nearly 800 localities
embracing a Jewish population of
more than 5.7 million in the U.S.
and Canada.
Established in 1932. CJF helps
strenthen the work and the im-
pact of Jewish Federations by
developing programs to meet
changing needs, providing an ex-
change of successful community
experiences, establishing
guidelines for fund raising and
operations and engaging in joint
planning and action on common
purposes dealing with local,
regional and international needs.
>St'
Reform Group Endorses Day
Schools As 'Valid Option'
[ANGELES (JTA) -
|ion of American Hebrew
itions (UAHC) became
>t Jewish religious
in ion to join Christian
nations in endorsing the
ry movement and oppos-
deportation of Central
Can refugees from the
States.
3,000 delegates from
| the U.S. and Canada voted
UAHC's biennial general
bly to support the sanctuary
nent despite "serious legal
ations" of providing "sup-
|protection and advocacy"
gal aliens.
[a two-to-one margin the
called on its 791
bgues to furnish material
Financial aid to Central
can refugees and to join
I efforts to- overturn the
i Administration's policy of
ling them.
Rabbi Joseph Weizenbaum,
whose Temple Emanu-El in Tuc-
son, Ariz, is part of the santuary
movement, told the convention
that his temple "provides every
form of aid and support short of
housing."
Jury selection is underway in a
federal court in Tucson in a case
involving 11 people, including
Roman Catholic and Protestant
clergymen, accused of operating
an underground railroad for
refugees in flight from persecu-
tion and possible death in El
Salvador and Guatemala.
The Reform resolution began by
citing Leviticus 19:33 about loving
sojourning strangers in your own
land. "While we acknowledge that
religious institutions do not stand
outside the law," the resolution
said, "the selective interpretation
of the law and the human
tragedies that have resulted from
that interpretation call for a moral
response from us as Jews.
How to Choose
our Drinking Water
Mountain Valley come* from a natural spring lo-
cated m virgin timberland at Hot Springs, Ark
The water rising in the spring today fell as rain 3500
years ago, long before pollution
YouII like it from the first sip. Its taste reflects the
natural spring source.
Mountain Valley, bottled constantly for 112 years, is
the only water popular across the nation.
The main minerals arc calcium and magnesium,
ideal in water, ft contains so little sodkim it is used in
a salt free diet
Mountain Valley is so bght on the system, one
glassful invites another.
Some people have been drinking it for SOto 70years
'does
ste?
(known?
rab
i in it?
lit
rated?
ildrink
regularly?
| it well
rotected?
A glass dome covers the spring AD bottling is in
glass containers.
I Mountain Valley Water delivered to your home and office
Dade
696-1333
Broward
563-6114
buntaii\,cVSlley<\^ter
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11 A
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/FrirfnY, November 15, 1985
Soviet Tone Shifts
But Will It Mean Policy Change?
Continued from Page 5-A
would immediately be caught up
in the emotions of the Jewish
homeland and would also quickly
discover that so much of the of-
ficial anti-Israel propaganda fed
to them over the years by the
Soviet state machinery was not
true.
But while Peres told reporters
that France was already prepared
to operate such direct flights
don't hold your breath waiting for
El Al service to and from Moscow
there is still no hard evidence
that the Kremlin is prepared to ac-
cept them.
And a final Soviet decision on
the matter is almost out of the
question before the Reagan-
Gorbachev summit It's
another carrot for Israel, the
United States and the West.
Flora Lewis, the foreign affairs
columnist of The New York
Times, wrote on Oct. 29 that Gor-
bachev "is sending massages that
he is prepared to move
dramatically on Jewish emigra-
tion and limited relations with
Israel if the United States-Soviet
climate is favorable."
SHE ADDED: "The French of-
fer to airlift Jewish emigrants
directly from the Soviet Union to
Tel Aviv is based on private ex-
changes that make that a real
possibility.
The Russian have told Western
diplomats they made a mistake in-
sisting in the past that the people
they let out go somewhere other
than Israel first, because then
large numbers went instead to the
United States. That undermined
the claim that the movement was
only reunifying families, not a
special exit privilege for Jews
denied to other citizens."
The columnist pointed out that
any easing of the Soviet attitude
on Jewish emigration would of
course represent "a brilliant sue-
JFWBH
rvvnorw
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer. .
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
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Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
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And strength to Israel.
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538^464
Peres Presses His Initiative
To Pursue Mideast Peace
cess" for President Reagan's
human rights policy. "That should
be an additional incentive to make
the summit conference work
well," she added.
But there are other conflicting
pressures on Moscow, especially
from radicals in the Arab world
with whom the Soviets are usually
on very good terms. The prospect
of large numbers of Jews arriving
in Israel is not very warmly
received in Syria, Iraq, South
Yemen, Libya, and, especially by
the PLO.
FOR ONE THING, the Jewish
immigrants are seen as future
Israeli soldiers. The possibility
that some of them may even settle
on the West Bank is a further irri-
tant and embarrassment one
the Soviets are very well aware of.
Indeed, the airlift of Jews to
Israel from Ethiopia through
the Sudan brought this same
fear to the surface. It was bitterly
condemned in much of the Arab
world. There were additional com-
plaints that the Ethiopian Jews
were supposedly taking up the
space of Palestinians. Certainly,
the prospect of many more young,
educated and committed Soviet
Jews arriving in Israel and
strengthening the country in one
way or another is not something
the Arabs are anxious to see
and the Soviets know it very well.
Thus, one U.S. Sovietologist
said, it is by no means certain that
the new Soviet leadership of Gor-
bachev and Shevardnadze will res-
pond positively to Israel's pleas
for increased alilya and direct
flights.
That same fear of an Arab
backlash against Moscow is
behind the Kremlin's refusal to
bite the bullet and to restore
diplomatic ties with Israel. There
are very powerful countervailing
pressures on the Soviets preven-
ting them from even meeting
Israel half way.
"THE URGENT Soviet desire
to participate in an international
conference that would provide an
umbrella for Israeli-Jordanian
negotiations shows that Moscow
now takes the possiblity of talks
seriously and is determined not to
be left out," Flora Lewis wrote.
"Recently, a high-level Soviet
diplomat repeated to a senior
Israeli Ambassador that in cur-
rent Moscow judgment it was a
mistake to break relations with
Israel after the 1967 war."
But very often, correcting a
mistake is not as easy as making it
in the first place.
In his new monograph on the
Arab-Israeli conflict, Harold
Saunders, the former Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs
during the Carter Administration,
quoted Soviet officials as arguing
that they indeed have an interest
in promoting peace in the Middle
East.
THESE SOVIETS, he said, i-
nsist that "the Soviet Union has
an interest in moving toward a
settlement of the Arab-Israeli con-
flict because the Soviets do not
want another Arab-Israeli war in
which they will be asked to send
troops to prevent another Arab
defeat."
But Saunders noted that the
Soviets have not exactly been
very helpful in promoting peace in
recent years. There is con-
siderable reason to believe that
they have been trying to "keep
the pot boiling" in order to gain
entry into the region. Some have
called this a policy of "controlled
tension."
Still, Saunders acknowledged
that the Soviet Union has often at-
tempted to moderate the PLO
urging Yasir Arafat to accept the
reality of Israel.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres, pressing
ahead with his efforts to revive
the faltering Middle East peace
process, met with U.S. Am-
bassador Thomas Pickering to
discuss ways to arrange interna-
tional auspices for direct talks bet-
ween Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation.
King Hussein of Jordan insists
an international framework is
necessary if he is to negotiate with
Israel. Israel has rejected Hus-
sein's proposal that the talks be
held under the auspices of the
United Nations Security Council
with the participation of its five
permanent members, including
the Soviet Union.
Pickering was accompanied at
the meeting by Wat Cluverius, the
outgoing U.S. Consul in East
Jerusalem who has been ap-
pointed the State Department's
special envoy to promote Middle
East peace negotiations.
Cluverius will be replaced by
another veteran of Mideast
diplomacy. Morris Draper, who
was closely involved with former
special envoy Philip Habib in try-
ing to resolve the Lebanon co-
nflict several years ago.
Israeli sources said Pickering
briefed Peres on the outcome of
Secretary of State George
Shultz's pre-summit talks
Moscow last week. He briefed
Foreign Minister and Depm,,
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir
separately on the same subject.
Israel Radio reported that
Shultz had failed to persuade the
Kremlin to free imprisoned
Jewish activist Anatolv Sha-
ransky as a goodwill gesture in ad-
vance to this month's .summit
meeting between President i
Reagan and Soviet leader Mikh?H
Gorbachev.
Meanwhile, officials her*
dismissed as worthless Palestine "
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat's statement in Cairo
that the PLO opposed all terrorist
acts against innocent, defenseless
people. Arafat sought to
distinguish between such attacks
and what he called legitimate
resistance to the Israeli occupa-
tion of Palestine.
A spokesman for the Prime-
Minister's Office asked rhetorical-
ly, "What fool would believe'*
Arafat?"
Medal for Rifkind
NEW YORK (JTA) Simon
Rifkind will receive the C-
entennial Medal of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America
at the Louis Marshall Centennial
Dinner Nov. 24 at the Plaza Hotel.
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r
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
IARON GUY DE ROTHSCHILD
House Demos Agree To Postpone
$1.9 Billion Sale to Jordan
Bv DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
I- The House Democratic
Upcus has agreed on a
lution postponing the
lagan Administration's
oposed $1.9 billion arms
e to Jordan until Mar. 1,
t with more restrictions
an contained in the
nate resolution adopted
t. 24.
JV'hile the House resolution has
been made public, a Congres-
Inai aide told the Jewish
_^Kfraphic Agency that among
^ral additions to the Senate
plution is one requiring Presi-
Reagan to resubmit his Oct.
'till' ation to Congress of the
psed sale.
IE HOUSE Foreign Affairs
nittee was to have acted on
[resolution, but after a
mute delay, its chairman,
1 Dante Fascell (D.. Fla.),
pned the meeting because he
hat several members who
1 to participate could not be
t.
Senate resolution, which
Jlopted by a 97-1 vote, man-
|hat before Mar. 1 "no letter
shall be valid with respect
of the proposed sales to
of advanced weapons
Is, including advanced air-
Ind advanced air defense
p" described in Reagan's
I notification letter "unless
land meaningful peace
fions between Israel and
are underway."
|Senate resolution was
out by Sen Richard Lugar
(R., Ind.), with opponents and sup-
porters of the sale, after it became
clear that the sale would be re-
jected since 74 senators had sign-
ed a resolution to disallow it.
IN THE HOUSE there is a
similar majority with at least 275
congressmen having signed a
resolution to reject the sale of
arms to Jordan. During the
Senate debate, Lugar said the
resolution could not be amended,
since this was the agreement of
both sides and because the Presi-
dent had agreed to accept it in
that way.
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D..
Conn.) cast the lone vote against
the resolution because he wanted
an additional paragraph that
would "guarantee" the right of
the Congress to reject the sale.
Lugar and Senate Majority
Leader Robert Dole (R., Kans.)
stressed that anytime before Mar.
1, if senators saw a lack of pro-
gress in the peace process, they
could reintroduce the resolution
rejecting the sale.
TESTIFYING before the
House Committee's Subcommit-
tee on Europe and the Middle
East, Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
said this was also the way the Ad-
ministration read the resolution.
But he said that if no action is
taken by Mar. 1, then the sale can
go through.
If the House resolution is dif-
ferent than the one adopted by the
Senate, there would have to be a
conference meeting to work out
the differences between the two
resolutions.
(Council
(tor
?ook
pouk
1 M 3 1 i T 4 T s A n s H O E t M t A D n A n R s
u A s 0 R D A 16 1 0 N 1 A H
17 J E w 1 S H B O 0 K M 0 N T
A R E A L M R 1 7! R L
73 E L 0 0 Ml 1 1 N T
W S E I JO 0 V R M D 1 34 s
A B B A s 0 M 40 E 4' G 0 U D A
49 M 0 R D E A 1 M K A P L A N
A B E A M 1 P] R 1 v *' L
H E R 1 S E Y || S 1 A B
A F 1 M A| i v. A 1
E L 61 M 62 s L 0 0 1 s eJ FT t I R _Q_ N
P K H i A E A H 0 JL O p R Y M I Y 0 E. 0 s E K [
It A N
s t E X a]
Bookcase
Frank Story of Pursuit of Pleasure
By MORTON I. TEICHER
The Whims of Fortune: The
Memoirs of Guy de
Rothschild. By Guy de
Rothschild. New York: Ran-
dom House, 1985. 338 pp.
$19.95.
The name of Rothschild im-
mediately brings to mind images
of fabulous opulence. Such images
are well-founded on a bedrock of
reality as is clearly demonstrated
by this autobiography.
Guy de Rothschild is descended
from the Five Gentlemen of
Frankfurt, sons of Mayer
Amschel Rothschild, who founded
the family fortune at the beginn-
ing of the 19th Century. The firm
which they established eventually
had branches in Frankfurt.
Naples, Vienna, London, Paris,
and New York. The Paris office
controlled most of the large Euro-
pean loans in the 19th Century,
and also became involved in min-
ing, cotton, tobacco, shipping, and
railroads.
THE AUTHOR'S grandfather,
Alphonse, and his father,
Edouard, added enormously to
the family's wealth, so that it
reached truly unimaginable pro-
portions. Guy de Rothschild con-
tinued that tradition, piling up
new riches in gigantic amounts.
Most of the book is devoted to
accounts of how this immense for-
tune was used to maintain lives of
profuse luxury, almost beyond
belief. Despite his self-
characterization as "discreet,"
Rothschild lets himself go as he
describes the family chateau at
Ferrieres, one of his childhood
homes.
This castle had more rooms than
one could count, although
Rothschild indicates that there
were 30 suites for guests. The
resplandent edifice was set on
1,000 acres with vast lawns,
stables, deer parks, a pheasant
preserve, a golf course, a lake and
a forest.
THERE WAS an extensive art
collection, including paintings, ar-
mor, sculpture, tapestries and
bronzes. To avoid undesirable
cooking odors, the kitchens were
buried underground 150 yards
from the castle, with the food be-
ing transported through tunnels
on a heated miniature railroad
train.
There were 100 servants and 50
gardeners. All this sumptuous
magnificence was used for just
three months a year with
Christmas being "the climax of
the season." The balance of the
year was spent in a Paris mansion
on the Place de la Concorde and in
a manor at Chantilly where the
Rothschild race horses were
trained.
Guy de Rothschild restored the
chateau at Ferrieres after World
War II, and he also resurrected an
18th Century palace in Paris. His
other dazzling homes included a
manor and a chalet.
IN THESE extravagantly
lavish residences, the Rothschilds
had elaborate balls, three of which
are described in tasteless detail.
One of these balls had. as its
culmination, "a huge platter car-
ried by eight men, with a nude
woman reclining on a bed of
roses."
An avid sportsman, Rothschild
treats us to stories of his golf pro-
wess and his imposing
achievements with horses rac-
ing, buying, breeding, owning and
training them.
The ostentatious display which
occupies most of the book is reliev-
ed by chapters on Rothschild's
military service in World War II,
on Georges Pompidou who work-
ed for the Rothschild bank before
becoming De Gaulle's Prime
Minister and then his successor as
President of France, on financial
dealings, on an attempt to kidnap
his son, on his Jewish identity and,
finally, on his farewell to France
(he now lives in New York) after
the Rothschild bank was na-
tionalized in 1982.
THE CHAPTER on his
Jewishness includes mention of
his Bar Mitzvah which he calls
"the equivalent of a First Commu-
nion." He tells us that he fasted
on Yom Kippur "during my entire
childhood, after my Bar Mitzvah."
His parents drilled into him the in-
junction against marrying a non-
Jew which he proceeded to ig-
nore in his second marriage. To
his credit, he served for 30 years
as the president of the French
Jewish organization which raises
money for Jewish causes.
He says that he became a
Zionist after World War II, rever-
sing the family's "reserved at-
titude toward Zionism." On
several of his trips to Israel after
the Six-Day War, he advocated
that Israel give up its "occupation
of the Right Bank of the Jordan."
His support for Israel is
tempered by his insistence that
the "noble destiny" of the Jews
demands that Israel must do
something to settle the problem of
the Palestinians.
Augmented by 32 pages of
photos, half of which are in color,
the book provides a peek into the
lives of the very rich. It proves
beyond any possible doubt that
"very rich" is an accurate
synonym for Rothschild.
Louisville Gets Abramson,
First Jewish Mayor
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (JTA) Jerry Abramson, a
former Democratic Alderman and member of the United
Jewish Appeal's Young Leadership Cabinet has become the
first Jewish mayor of this city.
Abramson picked up 73 percent of the city's votes in
defeating his opponent, Republican Bob Heleringer.
Abramson succeeds Harvey Sloane. The 73 percent plurali-
ty represents the largest margin of victory ever by a mayor
in Louisville.
THE 39-YEAR-OLD ABRAMSON, bom in Louisville,
is an active member of Congregation Knesseth Israel (Or-
thodox). He has, in the past, been active in numerous
Jewish organizations and activities.
Besides his involvement with the UJA, he has been ac-
tive as a member of the Board of Directors of the Jewish
Community Federation of Louisville, on the executive
board of the local chapter of B'nai B'rith, and former chair-
man of the local affiliate of the National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council.
There are an estimated 13,000 Jews in Kentucky
representing about 0.4 percent of the state's overall
population. Some 9,000 Jews live in Louisville.
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TELEX: 512615


PorrA 1 O A mi
Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Gush Leader Says
Peres Seeks Secret Peace Deal
Continued from Page 1-A
not be a substitute for direct
negotiations.
Weiss' charges also dispute the
official position of the U.S. which
has been stressing for months
that Hussein's demand for an in-
ternational conference has been
the major stumbling block in ad-
vancing the peace process. The
U.S. also has maintained that the
ultimate goal is direct ne-
gotiations.
Weiss, despite denials from the
Israeli government, said that
Peres and Hussein have agreed on
establishing a "condominium," or
joint Israeli-Jordanian rule of the
West Bank and Gaza, as the first
step. She said the joint govern-
ment would deal with such things
as water resources and land use.
HOWEVER. Weiss stressed
that the biggest fear of the Gush
Emunim is that a peace con-
ference would lead to territorial
concessions, not only in Judaea
and Samaria, but because of
Syria's participation, on the Golan
Heights, too.
"This is the thing we are very
much against because we believe
that territorial concessions are
dangerous for the future of the
State of Israel," Weiss said. She
added, "and for American and
free world interests in the Middle
East as well."
Weiss stressed that this is why
Gush Emunim wants to stop the
peace process now before it r-
eaches a stage when it is "much
harder" to prevent territorial con-
Interest
To Decline
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
government is to take steps
within the next few days to lower
interest rates, Prime Minister
Shimon Peres told the Histadrut
convention meeting here.
Peres' address to the 1,501
delegates was devoted to a wide-
ranging review of the economic
situation, during which he singled
out tax reform and the lowering of
interest rates as the most impor-
tant short-range goals facing the
government.
He committed the government
to drawing up and implementing a
growth policy that would provide
150,000 new jobs within the next
five years
Before Peres spoke, Histadrut
Secretary-General Yisrael Kessar
announced that workers commit-
tees in factories and institutions
accounting for some 350,000
workers had pledged their sup-
port for the Histadrut's new
growth fund.
Hitler Era
'Horrible Irony'
Continued from Page 5-A
apocalypse.
He said films present the end of
civilization in many ways. Some
are attempts at documentary-like
catastrophe, such as "The Day the
Earth Caught Fire." Others are
science-fiction outer-space films,
notably "Star Wars." Still others
are those portraying the defeat or
destruction of civilization by
extra-terrestrials and andromeda
strains from far distances, such as
"They Came from Outer Space."
The cinema expert declared that
"All of these films create in our
minds visual images of a new kind
of destruction. This is not destruc-
tion by floods, tornadoes or hur-
ricanes which have always been
with us but images that are pro-
jections or materializations of our
own destructive urges."
essions. To help this effort,
Weiss, who has had meetings at
the State Department and with
members of the Senate and
House, said she came to the U.S.
to set up an office for Gush
Emunim in New York and later in
other major cities, including
Washington.
SHE SAID there was a
"vacuum of information" in the
U.S. on some factors of Israel's in-
terests. "Once Americans and
once American Jews realize what
this so-called peace process leads
to, they will very much support
the cause of remaining in Judaea
and Samaria and not withdraw
from there," she said. She said
peace requires a change in the
Palestinian covenant and the at-
titude of Arab leaders towards
Israel.
Weiss declared that Peres is
keeping the agreement for an in-
ternational conference secret
because it is the only way he "can
proceed with the peace process
without being stopped by the in-
ner opposition within his own
government," including some
Labor ministers. She also said the
majority of the Israeli people are
DADE
538-1000
against any territorial
concessions.
But no matter what happens,
Weiss, who said she was the
spokesperson for the 60,000
Jewish settlers in Judaea,
Samaria and Gaza, asserted that
"we will stay in our homes."
SHE SAID it was "not a
political matter; it is a matter of
the soul, body, heart and the inner
spark of the Jewish nation." She
said if there was an attempt to
remove the settlers, not only
would masses of Israelis join them
to "protect" them, but so would
"Jews from the world over."
Weiss denied she was talking
about a violent clash with the
government. She said she was
"democratically oriented" and
has seen through the experience
of Gush Emunim that democracy
allows an activist group to get
results, as Gush did when it first
moved into Samaria. "When you
bring people to the street then you
can change policies," she said.
However, she added that some
settlers may not be so "gentle,"
but said she hopes to have the
"power to restrain the more harsh
expressions."
Irwin S. Field (left), chairman of the United Israel Appeal, and
Akiva Lewinsky, treasurer of the Jewish Agency, sign an agree-
ment renewing the relationship between the two organizations.
UIA principal beneficiary of the United Jewish Appeal Cam-
paign, allocated $4U million to the Jewish Agency in fiscal year
1985. "
Soccer Failure To Be Studied
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Football Association has ap-
pointed an internal inquiry com-
mittee to investigate the dismal
failure of the national soccer team
in its World Cup qualifying games
against Australia and New
Zealand. The Israeli team was
trounced by Australia in its games
in both Israel and in Australia,
and by New Zealand in its
Aukland match last month.
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I


tiling in Background
Peres Denounces Arrogant Settlers
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Rabin Shuts Down Paper
For Urging No Pullback
L DAVID LANDAU
fAnd GIL SEDAN
lUSALEM (JTA) -
r Shimon Peres has
iced West Bank set-
,-ho have threatened
rage in civil disobe-
against the govern-
las "overweening ar-
and warned that
I would be a com-
|sive investigation by
iforcement agencies
ses of incitement.
kicle in a West Bank set-
Jweekly, Aleph Yod, urged
to fight through all
any possible decision to
sh parts of Judaea and
and the Gaza Strip, in a
ed plan by the present
nent to give up parts of
fisrael in a peace settle-
with King Hussein of
Jordan.
A DECLARATION issued by
the Council of Jewish settlement
in Judaea and Samaria which
represents the Jewish settlers -
stated that the plans purportedly
being contemplated by Peres "of
handing over to the enemy all or
part of the Land of Israel are an il-
legal action and must not be
obeyed." It continued: "Any
government that performs the
aforementioned actions should be
regarded as an illegal govern-
ment. We warn that any partition
of the country will cause a rift in
the nation."
Peres, in response to parliamen-
tary questions concerning the
Aleph Yod article and the Coun-
cil's statement, told the Knesset:
"I utterly reject this attempt at
overweening arrogance, at in-
culcating fear and planting
falsehood."
He said that the Council was ar-
rogating unto itself the role of the
mpite Rumors
(Only 124 Jews Came West
Irom Soviet Union in October
YORK (JTA) -
i rumors of an accelerated
emigration from the
Dnly 124 Jews from the
jlnion arrived in the West
lOctober," according to
oodman, executive direc-
le National Conference on
Jewry (NCSJ). The data,
by the NCSJ Research
reflects the norm
ned in 1984, when 896
ft the Soviet Union.
ding to the NCSJ, "there
hdence. based on perfor-
sf any changes in Soviet
despite rumors and
Its made by Secretary
Mikhail Gorbachev in
\\ month." The organiza-
il that only two weeks
id Volvovsky of Gorky
need to three years in a
imp. for circulating
|allegedly "defaming the
;iic"
pky is one of the prime
of Hebrew teaching and
ause which is assumed to
teal crime." In the last
Jewish activist per
sentenced to prison or
fcp. Virtually all of them
rom among the
fed Hebrew teachers,
reported.
While there is a great deal of
speculation, on the eve of the sum-
mit meeting between President
Reagan and Gorbachev, about the
movement of Jews from the
Soviet Union, "this cannot be
documented at this time," Good-
man said. He expressed hope,
however, that the estimated
15,000 Jewish refuseniks would
soon receive permission to leave, a
development which "would be
well received in this country,"
Goodman said.
In a related matter, the NCSJ
submitted a list to the State
Department of over 200 Jewish
families waiting more than 10
years to leave the USSR, or who
remain divided by Soviet policy.
The NCSJ pointed out that Gor-
bachev had indicated in inter-
views, at the time he met with Fr-
ench President Francois Mitter-
rand in Paris last month, that if
there is a problem of family reu-
nion, it will be solved.
Gorbachev was also quoted as
saying that "we prevent such a
solution only if state secrets are
involved Even to these people
we give the possibility (of waiting)
five or ten years." Goodman said
that "we have prepared the list of
such persons. It is now Moscow's
decision."
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Knesset determining what was
legal and what was illegal. Peres
added that the statement had also
sought to "sow an atmosphere of
fear instead of balanced debate."
The Premier also denounced the
settlers' council statement as a
perversion of the government's
position by attributing to govern-
ment leaders baseless statements.
Peres said he was confident that
many Jews in Judaea and Samaria
would reject the Council's tone
and tenor as would most citizens
of Israel.
MEANWHILE Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir is review-
ing the article in Aleph Yod to
determine if there are grounds to
sue the publication for having in-
cited the settlers to rebellion.
Zamir is acting on a request by
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Sources at the Defense Ministry
said that if Zamir ruled that there
was a violation of the law, the
publication will be ordered closed
and the editor will be sued.
Rabin was reported to be ex-
tremely angry with the article,
which called for civil disobedience
and resistance, even if it meant
fighting with Israel Defense
Force soldiers, in case a peace set-
tlement would require a territorial
compromise in the West Bank.
There was also widespread
anger in government circles
because the settler's council state-
ment termed anyone ceding ter-
ritory a "traitor" to Israel and
said that any leader who cedes
soveriegn territory should be
treated the way French leader
Gen. Charles de Gaulle treated
Marshall Henri Petain, who had
collaborated with Nazi Germany.
Continued from Page 1-A
to stand in Judaea, Samaria and
the Gaza region, and to raise his
arm and his gun against his
brother. In that hour of national
emergency, most of the means
will be legitimate, in the absence
of a more comfortable and accep-
table choice."
RABIN REPORTEDLY felt
that if the message carried in this
article was not met by swift ac-
tion, it could be interpreted, de
facto, as a legitimization of the
points of view expressed. The
Defense Minister is said to have
decided to act on Zamir's recom-
mendations because even though
the prospect of civil war is not on
the horizon, such phenomena
must be nipped in the bud.
Yaacov Rahamim, editor of Alef
Yod, denounced the shutdown
order as a severe blow to
democracy and freedom of speech.
He claimed the Ben-Yisrael article
was published only to alert the
public to the sentiments prevalent
among Jewish settlers in the West
Bank.
The militant Gush Emunim
reacted angrily as well. It claimed
that the Arabic press in East
Jerusalem published thousands of
words of incitement every day
without punitive action by the At-
torney General, "who is known
for his left of center tendencies."
WHILE THE Gush criticized
the contents of the article general-
ly, it saw it as a "declaration of
principle" that to give up any
parts of "Eretz Yisrael" would be
an illegal act.
Zamir, meanwhile, is reviewing
a request by the Defense Ministry
to consider whether a resolution
adopted by the Council of Jewish
Settlements in Judaea and
Samaria is also subject to legal
action.
The resolution stated that plans
allegedly contemplated by the
government of Premier Shimon
Peres "of handing over to the
enemy all or part of the Land of
Israel are an illegal action and
must not be obeyed. Any govern
ment that performs the aforemen-
tioned actions should be regarded
as an illegal government." The
resolution warned that "any parti-
tion of the country will cause a rift
in the nation."
Despite
Criticism,
Film Will
Be Shown
WARSAW (JTA) The
French film, "Shoah," widely
criticized in Poland for suggesting
that a large section of Polish socie-
ty condoned the Nazi's anti-
Jewish wartime policies, will be
shown in Poland, the World
Jewish Congress reports.
Polish government spokesman
Jerzy Urban confirmed that the
close to 10-hour film will be shown
while reiterating that the movie is
defamatory and is being used as a
pretext to continue the anti-Polish
press campaign in France.
"The fact that the film will be
shown displays the respect with
which Polish public opinion is
treated," Urban said. "The policy
is to present the facts, to speak
frankly on all subjects, and to per
mit everyone to form their own
views," he added.
Do You Own
Real Property
in Israel?
m
Then
The Israel Histadrut Foundation
Invites You To Exchange It For
A High Life-Income Annuity
Payable in American Dollars
Contribute your real property to the
Israel Histadrut Foundation and receive either:
1. A fixed, high life-income annuity payable in American dollars,
with a partial charitable tax deduction calculated on the net
value of your property,
or
2. A full charitable tax deduction on the value of your property.
*
I
CLIP AND MAII THIS COUPON
For full details and Information, please contact!
Israel Histadrut Foundation
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. FL 33 I 39
Telephone: 305 531-8702
ATTENTION: Mr. Lewis Alpert, Executive Director
Name:
Phone:
Address:
Zip:


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
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Soviet Jewry Vigil At
Courthouse Monday
Joining in solidarity with hun-
dreds of other major communities
across the nation, the South
Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, an arm of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee, and
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami will hold a Soviet
fJewrj Vigil on Monday, at noon
nr>. the steps of the Dade County
Courthouse.
Vigil is a culmination of
months of effort keyed toward the
Summit Conference between
President Reagan and Soviet
leafier Gorbachev. The Vigil will
take place on the eve of the
November 19 summit, and offers
an unprecendented opportunity to
actively draw public attention to
the terrible pattern of oppression
suffered by Soviet Jews.
The Vigil will include a march of
Torahs, prayers, songs and
readings by community rabbis and
cantors. The Vigil is designed to
focus on the plight of a particular-
ly beleagured group the Soviet
Jewish Hebrew teachers, 10 of
who have been arrested and im-
prisoned during the past year.
Metro-Dade Commissioner
Barry Schreiber will attend the
Vigil, representing the County to
offer a proclamation declaring
November 18 "Soviet Jewry
Day." Other dignitaries attending
the Vigil are Rabbi Brett Golds-
tein, president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami, and
Hinda Cantor and Shirley Pollak.
co-chairmen of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
In months and weeks prior to t-
he summit, the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry has coor-
dinated a massive post card cam-
paign targeted at President
Reagan, urging him to make the
issue of Soviet Jewry emigration
an integral part of the summit
agenda. More than one million
post cards nationwide including
35,000 from South Florida, have
reached the White House.
38
Temple Beth Kodesh
5l Celebrates 40th |
Anniversary
A Pounders Day program Sun-
p.m., will celebrate the 40th
inniversary of Temple Beth
!\ desh. The program will begin
with greetings bv Jack Bernstein,
: resident of Beth Kodesh. and an
cation by Rabbi Max Shapiro.
ader.
1 toest speakers will include Rab-
mon Schiff, executive vice
lent Rabbinical Association
reater Miami, director of
Chaplaincy for the Greater Miami
Federation.
Beth Kodesh President Berns-
tein will present certificates to
founders and past presidents of
the Temple. Refreshments in the
Elsa Kreutzer Auditorium of the
Temple will follow a program of
entertainment offered by Harvey
Kaufman, Miami Jewish educator
and folk-singer.
Originally from Brooklyn, N.Y.,
Kaufman is an accomplished per-
former of Jewish and American
folk music. He lives with his wife,
>an; son. Jack; and daughter,
Julie, in West Kendall. The couple
were married at Beth Kodesh by
Rabbi Shapiro in December, 1978
after meeting in Israel.
j ft was 40 years ago that the
Miami Hebrew School and Junior
Congregation was originally
founded by Rabbi Simon April,
who conducted Torah and Hebrew
passes daily and Sunday in
various homes throughout the
fluthwest section of Miami.
lyron M. Newman served as first
president.
In 1947, Miami Hebrew School
"id Junior Congregation began
perating at its permanent home
lt HOI SW 12th Avenue. Three
ears later, its name was changed
Miami Hebrew School and Con-
ation, when President Jack
'tone invited the community to
take advantage of and enjoy our
ate Friday night services, our
"^standing Hebrew and Sunday
""l>. our Scout troop, our
pnior l ongregatkm and our fine
I and Sabbath services.''
time, eight years later,
'ivle Kelemer had joined
Rabbi April, a new name-change
established the institution as
Miami Hebrew Congregation.
In 1965, Rabbi Shapiro became
spiritual leader: an active
Sisterhood and Men's Club were
giving financial support and
creating social programs to com-
plement synagogue life, and the
congregation was once again
renamed this time to today's,
Beth Kodesh Congregation.
Soon President Sam Schulwolf
was heading a growing organiza-
tion which included Cantor Ben-
jamin Ari, a sexton and an ex-
ecutive secretary.
Beth Kodesh soon found itself in
the midst of what has since
become Little Havana. The
number of young Jewish families
living in the community rapidly
diminished, and by 1970 its
classrooms were empty. But
despite the seemingly insurmoun-
table demographic changes, in its
25th year, led by President
Nathan K. Spector, Beth Kodesh
continued to be a vital
congregation.
Schulwolf was again president
when Cantor Leon Segal joined
Rabbi Shapiro on the bimah. ___
ed as president a total of seven
years.
Today, 40 years since its incep-
tion, many of the founding
families are still represented and
active at Beth Kodesh. This year's
president, Jack Bernstein, is the
son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Dave
Kleber. Sam Cohen, Victor Rutan-
sky, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Rutansky; Fay Coulton, Bess
Feldan, Hershey Glantz, and Mr.
and Mrs. Dave Meltzer are among
those on the Board of Directors.
Sara Stone, who along with her
sons, Jack, George, Louis and
Bennie. was responsible for much
of the initial funding and on-going
support of the synagogue.
Today George Bernstein, son-in-
law of .Julie and Jack Stone, main-
tains I he Stone family affiliation
by Berving on the Beth Kodesh
Board.
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry
members join Congressman Dante Fascell
after he received the Anatoly Sharansky
Freedom Award. Left to right are Hinda Can-
tor, chair of the South Florida Conference, Dr.
Gary Frank, Rep. Fascell, Doris Hochstadt,
Dr. Joel Sandberg, Shirley Pollak, Adele
Sandberg, Mrs. Dante Fascell, Rabbi Simcha ,
Freedman.
Fascell Presented With UCSJ
Anatoly Sharansky Freedom Award
WASHINGTON Con-
gressman Dante Fascell (D., Fla.)
was presented with the Anatoly
Sharansky Freedom Award
following a banquet in his honor at
the Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews annual meeting here.
Rep. Fascell. chairman of the
House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee, and chairman of the Helsinki
Commission from its establis-
hment in 1976 until 1985, in ac-
cepting the award stated. "I
would like to thank the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews for this
award. I am overwhelmed to be
associated with an award with the
name of Sharansky, and would
like to commend your organiza-
tion for the outstanding contribu-
tion you have made on behalf of
those in the Soviet Union who
desperately need our help and
attention.'
The Sharansky Award is
presented annually to an outstan-
ding individual in recognition of
concern and commitment to the
plight and cause of Jews and
others in the Soviet Union. It is
named for Soviet prisoner of cons-
cience Anatoly Sharansky who
has been in prison since 1973 and
was one of the leaders of the
Moscow Helsinki human rights
monitoring group. Previous win-
ners of the award include Am-
bassador Max Kampelman, Sen.
Christopher Dodd (D., Conn.), and
Sen. Charles Grassley (R. Iowa).
In concluding his remarks,
Fascell expressed hope about the
upcoming summit between Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary
General Gorbachev and asked the
crowd to "never keep silent" on
Suarez, Kennedy,
Dawkins Winners
In Miami Runoff
Xavier Suarez was elected
Mayor of Miami in Tuesday's
runoff election by a substantial
majority.
Victorious Commissioners
were Rosarm Kennedy and
Miller Dawkins.
Left to right are Morey Schapira. UCSJ national president; Mrs.
Hinda Cantor, UCSJ vice-president and chair of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry; Rep. Dante Fascell; and
Stuart Eizenstat, general counsel, UCSJ.
behalf of those still trapped in the
Soviet Union.
The UCSJ is a 50,000-member
organization composed of 38 local
Soviet Jewry organizations
throughout the United States, and
is dedicated to furthering the
rights and interests of Soviet
Jews.
Bulletin
Labor-Likud Confrontation
JERUSALEM (JTA) A blast by Ariel Sharon against
Premier Shimon Peres will lead to a showdown confrontation
that could destroy the fragile Labor-Likud unity coalition
government.
Key Labor sources said that relations between the coalition
partners reached a state of crisis as the result of a speech by
Sharon to Herut colleagues in Haifa in which he attacked Peres
in language usually heard only in the heat of an election cam-
paign. Peres has asked Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, the
Likud leader, to meet with him to discuss Sharon's speech.
Labor sources said they are vigorously urging the Premier to
fire Sharon who is Minister of Commerce and Industry in the
coalition cabinet. Normally, a Premier is empowered to dismiss
any cabinet minister. But under the coalition agreement, Peres
and Shamir each waived the right to exercise that power with
respect to a member of the other's party.
ejfewisla Floridla
Miami, Florida Friday, November 15. 1985 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Kurzban Brothers To Be Honored By ORT
Prominent local attorneys Mar-
vin and Ira J. Kurzban will be
honored for their humanitarian,
philanthropic and community ser-
vice efforts by the Dade South
Region of Women's American
ORT at the first Annual Friends
of ORT Tribute Dinner, Sunday,
at the Grand Bay Hotel, Coconut
Grove.
Marvin Kurzban specializes in
litigation law and has participated
in several landmark decisions in
the state of Florida. Mr. Kurzban
is well known as a major con-
tributor to the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, Jewish Na-
tional Fund, March of Dimes,
United Way Fund, University of
Miami and the Juvenile Diabetes
Research Foundation.
Ira Kurzban is known notary for
his pro bono work on behalf of the
Haitian Refugees. He has been
the recipient of the Jack Wasser-
man Award, the Tobias Simon Pro
Bono Award and has published
several papers dealing with im-
migration and refugee law. He
was interviewed by Time
Magazine in July for their special
immigrants issue "The Changing
Face of America."
Marvin Kurzban
In selecting the Kurzban
brothers as honorees, Mrs. Laurel
Shapiro, President of the Dade
South Region, stated that their
philosophy is in keeping with
Women's American ORT's posi-
tion on human rights. She further
raised the committee chaired by
Steffi Cohen, and including
Ira J. Kurzban
Loisbeth Emanuel, Sheila Ellen-
bogen, Ann Aibel, JoAnne Brown,
Hedy Carlin, Sylvia Deakter,
Gloria Chekanow and Adrienne
Tabin, Chairman of the Executive
Committee, for creating a
prestigious event which will serve
as the forerunner of Friends of
ORT Tribute Dinners to follow.
' oconut Grove's largest consumer Home Show, the 3Uh annual
November Home Show, Nov. 15-20 at the Coconut Grove Exhibi-
tion Center, features the newest home products, sendees and
'! ^rating ideas.
Tribute To George Abbott
FEMALE ROOMMATE
Large 2/2 condo, Kendall near
US1 & 826, security, pool, tennis.
Jacuzzi, $275 & Vi utilities.
(279-7240)
Scheduled For Sat. Evening I Wanted: Assistant Rabbi
Cedars Medical Center's Nov.
16 "Hats Off To Broadway"
benefit for cardiovascular services
will be a tribute to 98-year-old
Broadway director and producer
George Abbott.
"When Mr. Abbott accepted our
invitation to stage the entertain-
ment at the ball, the committee
was thrilled," said Marlene S.
Erven, Cedars' director of
development.
Proceeds from the event at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel will
benefit Cedars' Cardiac Center.
The hospital has plans to
renovate and expand the existing
catheterization laboratory, in-
cluding major purchases of state-
of-the-art equipment; establish a
second operating suite available
for open heart procedures; com-
puterize the cardiovascular
Adath Yeshurun To
Honor Students
Adath Yeshurun will be honor-
ing its students who are
celebrating their birthdays in
November. The students will be
part of the main congregational
service November 23, where Rab-
bi Simcha Freedman will speak to
the students and recite a special
blessing with them.
clinical care units; and increase
diagnostic capabilities with the ad-
dition of some portable items and
additional sophisticated tools.
For largest Conservative Congre-
gation In Northeast Nassau
County (New York).
Call 516-293-2270, or write Box
WR c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O
Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
D'eOTn nmiR
i
^
The Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami
prays for the success of
the summit negotiations
between President
Ronald Reagan and
General Secretary
Mikhail Gorbachev.
We respectfully urge our President to
appeal in the strongest possible terms on
behalf of the Jewish Prisoners of
Conscience and Refuseniks who are denied
the right to emigrate in defiance of the
Soviet commitment to the
Helsinki Accords.
We ask President Reagan to appeal for the
human rights of all the Soviet citizens.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
President
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Norman S. Rachlin To Be
Honored By Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
Neal Menachem, chairman of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Accountants Division, has
announced that Norman S.
Rachlin will be honored as the
division's "Accountant of the
Year." at its Annual Cocktail
Reception on Thursday. Nov. 21,
at 6 at the Biscayne Bay Marriott.
"This represents the first time
that the Accountants Division has
chosen to honor one of its
members, and the choice of Nor-
man Rachlin is an excellent one,"
noted Menachem. "For nearly
three decades, Norman has
dedicated much of his time toward
the betterment of our Jewish c-
ommunity."
Rachlin is the founding manag-
ing partner of Rachlin and Cohen,
Certified Public Accountants. He
is also the author of the book,
Eleven Steps to Building a Pro-
fitable Accounting Practice. He
has conducted over 100 profes-
sional seminars in all parts of the
United States, and has been a
guest lecturer for a variety of
business and professional
organizations. In addition to his
book, Rachlin has had numerous
works appear in professional jour-
nals including the Journal of
Accountancy. The Practicing CPA
and The Practical Accountant.
Rachlin has played an integral
role in the growth and the
development of the Accountants
Division. He served as its chair-
man during the 1984 CJA-IEF
campaign, and under his leadersh-
ip the division established a record
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number of gifts and significantly
increased its membership base.
The Annual Cocktail Reception
will also feature an address by
Aaron Podhurst, the general
chairman of the 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiv'a
Campaign. Music will be perform-
ed by the Israeli group "Shajar."
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aro welcome.
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Rabbi Baumgard To Be Installed President
Synagogue Council Of America
Rabbi Arthur Lelyveld of
Cleveland, Ohio, a past president
of The Synagogue Council of
America, will represent that
organisation in installing Rabbi
Herbert M. Baumgard of Temple
Beth Am, as the current Presi-
dent as part of the Friday evening
service at 8:15 p.m. Reuben
Askew, immediate past governor
of the State of Florida will also
^peak.
The Synagogue Council of
America is the umbrella organiza-
tion which includes the major in-
stitutions of all branches of
Judaism in America, Orthodox,
Conservative, and Reform. The
constituent organizations include.
The United Synagogue and The
Rabbinical Assembly of Con-
servative Judaism, The Union of
Orthodox Congregations and the
Rabbinical Council of America of
Orthodox Judaism, and The Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions and The Central Conference
of American Rabbis of Reform
Judaism. Some three thousand
congregations are represented by
these organizations.
K;il>l>i Baumbard has been
through a period of four years
when he has been respectively Se-
cond vice-president and then First
vice-president of the Synagogue
Council of America. His terms as
president will be for two years.
The Synagogue Council of
America represents the Jewish
community in relating to the Na-
tional Council of Churches and the
National Council of Catholic
Bishops. On the international
scene it represents American
synagogues when relating to the
national bodies of other countries
and in relation to the Vatican and
the World Council of Churches.
Rabbi Lelyveld, the installing
is Senior Rabbi of Fair-
mount Temple in Cleveland, and is
President of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
.'.mi the American Jewish
"<>npr< is.
bi Herbert M. Baumgard is
unding Rabbi of Temple
' \m. South Miami. Florida.
ngregation came into l>eing
6 and today is one of the
larger Reform Jewish congrega-
tions in the United States.
Rabbi Baumgard serves as the
National President of the
Synagogue Council of America,
having been elected to that office
in July. The SCA represents the
major institutions of Orthodox,
Conservative, and Reform
Judaism in the United States.
Rabbi Baumgard has served as
chairperson of the Dade County
Community Relations Board,
19X1-H2. and as President of the
[Interfaith Agency for Social
Justice (Dade County). 1967-68, a
precursor of the CRB. Other com-
munity service activities include:
Metro Representative-Economic
Opportunity Board of Dade Coun-
ty: Youth Advisory Commission,
Pity of Miami; Citizens' Advisory
Commission, City of Miami; Ur-
ban League Board; Clergy
dialogue Group, NCCJ; Religious
iLeaders' Coalition of Greater
Miami,
for many years. Rabbi Bau-
mgard represented the Jewish
community on the interfaith TV
show, "Man To Man" on Channel
_>; He is a life member of the
Mional Association For The Ad-
vancement of Colored People, and
Mj the Spring of 1985, represented
Miami at a national interracial
conference held in Washington,
P-C., co-sponsored by the NAACP
M the UAHC. He is the recipient
JT ''< Good Faith Award of the
rM; "'" Archives History and
NVesearch Foundation. Rabbi
wimgard worked closely with
he Reverence Ed Graham and
anon Theodore Gibson in the
?'' s when important civil rights
>ns were made in Dade County.
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
ORT Sabbath At
Temple Beth Am Friday
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
Rabbi Baumgard was awarded
the Leonard Abess Human R-
elations Award by the Anti-
Defamation League in 1984. He
was awarded an honorary Doctor
of Divinity degree by the Hebrew
Union College. Jewish Institute of
Religion in 1975. He holds his
earned doctorate (DHL) from that
institution (in 1962).
Rabbi Baumgard has served as
president of the Alumni Associa-
tion of the HUC-JIR; president of
the Southeast Region. Central
Conference of American Rabbis,
1980-1981; president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater
Miami, 1970-1971; and as director
of the South Florida Federation of
Reform Synagogues (1956-1959).
Rabbi Baumgard currently
serves as the chairperson, Inter-
faith Committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and is a member of that
Regional Board. He serves as a
member of the National Commi-
ssion on Jewish Education of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations, as a member of the
Advisory Board of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, and the
Board of the American Jewish
Committee. He has served in the
past as a member of the Board of
the American Jewish Committee.
He has served in the past as a
member of the Board of Trustees
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and the Board of
Governors of the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion.
Rabbi Baumgard has taught
Beth Am To Roast
Rabbi Baumgard
Sunday night, Temple Beth Am
will "Roast" Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard with a champagne
tribute beginning at 6:30 p.m. at
the Temple.
Participating in the program
"Telling it Like it is With a Rabbi
Who is So Community Spirited,"
will be Rabbi Michael Eisenstat,
Robert Simms, Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
Frank J. Magrath, and Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley.
Jewish Humor
At Workmen's Circle
Our Jewish Humor will be pres-
ented by Sunny Landsman An-
thologist, at Workmen's Circle's
next meeting for members of
working age under 55, Sunday,
November 24. at 7:30 p.m. All
potential working-age members
are invited to attend Sunday.
November 24, 7:30 p.m. at the
Jewish Community Center, Fort
Lauderdale.
religion courses at the University
of Miami and at Florida Interna-
tional University. He has served
as Visiting Lecturer at the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In-
stitute of Religion in New York, at
Eckerd College, St. Petersburg,
Florida State University,
Tallahassee, and St. Thomas Col-
lege, Miami.
Rabbi Baumgard is the author
of two books: "Judaism And
Prayer; Growing Towards God,"
published by the UAHC, New
York, 1964 and "Loving What Is
Close," Palmetto Press, Miami,
1980. He has authored an original
"haggadah" for Passover and a
prayerbook entitled, "Sabbath
Eve Services," both published by
Temple Beth Am. He has written
chapters for the books, "Currents
And Trends In Contemporary
Jewish Thought." KTAV
Publishing. New York. 1965,
"Strmonettes For Young
People," ed. Silver, Bloch
Publishing, New York.
"Challenge To Morality," ed. C.
Wellborn. Florida State Universi-
ty, 1966. "A Minute Of Prayer,"
ed. C. Cross. Pocket Books. 1954,
"Gates of Mitzvah," ed. S. Maslin,
CCAR, New York, 1979. He is the
author of numerous pamphlets
which have received national
circulation.
ORT Sabbath 1985 will take
place on Friday, and will be
observed by South Dade's Temple
Beth Am, Congregation Bet
Breira, Temple Judea, and Tem-
ple Samuel. These services repre-
sent the culmination of a week of
educational and informational ac-
tivities of ORT observed nation-
wide, whose global vocational,
technical, and scientific education
and training programs have aided
persecuted Jews the world over.
Mrs. Laurel Shapiro, president
of the Dade South region, stated,
"ORT week is a period of time
during which we reflect and con-
sider what the ORT program has
been able to accomplish over its
105 years of existence." She con-
tinued. "ORT's network on five
continents have contributed to the
rehabilitaion of over two million,
uprooted, deprived, and
persecuted Jews in many coun-
tries of the world."
Price Index Rises
TEL AVIV (JTA) The con-
sumer price index rose by 2.5 per-
cent during the first two weeks of
October, the Central Bureau of
Statistics reports. It was higher
than the 1.5 percent rise during
the last two weeks of September.
Adrienne Tabin. chairman of
the executive committee, said,
"ORT's operations build in-
dividual's lives and the economic
fabric of nations, alike; ORT's net-
works are proving instrumental in
developing the most precious
resource of all a human being."
The best of our
officers in the Air
Force, the Tank
Corps, the Navy.
Communications.
Artillery and the
Engineering Corps
are nearly all of
them Technion
graduates."
Gen. Moshe Dayan
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Seen at a planning meeting for the "Pathfinder" Event were:
(standing) Sandi Samole and (seated left to right) Norman Lieber-
man and Mike Samole.
So. Dade Branch of Federation
To Hold First 'Pathfinder' Event
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's South Dade Branch
will hold its first annual
"Pathfinder" event on Sunday
evening. Dec. 8, announced Nor-
man Lieberman, South Dade
Branch's vice chairman for cam-
paign. Pathfinders are those who
make a minimum $5,000 family
gift to the 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
"The new Pathfinder group has
given South Dade's Jewish com-
munity an enhanced sense of unity
and belonging," said Sandi
Samole, who serves with her hus-
band, Mike, as co-chairman of the
group. "It brings a feeling of new
beginnings for building a solid
base of committed Jewish com-
munity members."
Mike Samole added that "Since
the group was formed, many new
Pathfinders have already been
recruited."
The Pathfinder event, which
will begin at 7 p.m. at Signature
$3.5 Million Pledged
To Israel Bonds
More than $3.5 million in
pledges for Israel Bonds to aid in
economic development were an-
nounced at a national food in-
dustry dinner which honored J.
Jeffrey Cambell, chairman and
chief executive officer of the
Burger King Corporation, in New
York.
Campbell received the organiza-
tion's Israel Prime Minister's
Medal "in recognition of his ser-
vice to his industry, his
humanitarian activities and for
furthering good relations between
the people of Israel and the
United States." Campbell led a
delegation of fast-food industry
leaders which visited Israel last
year.
Joel Weiss of Miami, senior vice
president of Burger King, served
as chairman of the dinner. Jay
Darling, president of Burger
King, headed the Dinner Commit-
tee, while Morris Bailey and
Manuel Garcia III were co-
chairmen of the Host Committee.
Gardens, will include dinner and
musical entertainment.
Members of the Pathfinder com-
mittee are Alvin Lloyd Brown,
chairman of South Dade's Board
of Directors; Norman Lieberman;
Robert and Fran Berrin; Tom and
Sara Borin; Dr. Eugene and
Karen Eisner; Sam and Phyllis
Harte; Jean Lieberman; Bernard
and Ellen Mandler; Dr. Mark and
Nedra Oren; and Norman and
Irene Sholk.
Miami Author
To Be Temple
Sinai Guest
Evelyn Wilde Mayerson.
nominated by Doubleday for a
Pulitzer prize for her book. No
Enemy But Time, will be the
pulpit guest at Temple Sinai of
North Dade on Friday evening.
Nov. 15. at the 8:15 Sabbath Eve
Service. Mrs. Mayerson has
authored a number of books and
teaches at the University of
Miami. Her theme on Friday even-
ing will be: "Writing Books From
the Perspective of a Jewish Au-
thor."
The occasion for Professor
Mayerson's appearance at Temple
Sinai is Jewish Book Month,
which will be celebrated throu-
ghout the country during the
week beginning on Nov. 17.
The worship service will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Ralph P.
Kingslev and Cantor Irving
Shulkes.*
The women of ORT the
organization for rehabilitation and
training will be guests of Tem-
ple Sinai on the occasion of ORT
Sabbath. Rabbi Kingsley will
acknowledge ORT's contribution
during the service.
Mrs. Mayerson will be available
for coffee and conversation in
Temple Sinai's Hollander-
Rachleff Library after the service.
Sabbath morning services will
be conducted at Temple Sinai at
10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16.
The weekly Torah portion will be
studied.
Arthur Pear/man To
Receive ADL Award
The Anti-Defamation League
will present its 1985 Man of
Achievement Award to Arthur
Pearlman, president of Duke
Industries, at a dinner-dance on
Saturday night. The event will
take place at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel.
Jay Leshaw (center), president of the Greater Miami Chapter of
the American Technion Society, checks seating plan for Chn pi
upcoming "Gala Evening with Shecky Greene" with board
members Al Isaacson (left) and Morris Kirsh. The taei
scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 23, at the Fontainebleau Hilton.
The agenda includes a buffet dinner, enteratinment by nightclub
comedian Shecky Greene, and dancing.
Bonds To Honor Rabbi Lehrman
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, a
mainstay in the South Florida
Jewish community for over 40
years, will be presented with the
coveted Golda Meir Leadership
Award by the State of Israel Bond
Organization at a dinner in his
honor on Thursday night,
February 6, at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel.
"Rabbi Lehrman is very deserv-
ing of this honor and award." said
Philip T. Warren, general cam
paign chairman of the Greater
Miami Israel Bond office. "On
many occasions throughout this
life, Rabbi Lehrman has shown his
dedication and devotion to his con-
gregation, the Jewish community
of South Florida and to the State
of Israel."
Serving as Dinner Chairman for
the gala event is Sidney
Cooperman.
Jeb Bush Guest Speaker
At Temple Israel Nov. 21
Jeb Bush, chairman of the
Republican Party's Executive
Committee in Miami/Dade Coun-
ty, and son of the vice president of
the United States, will be the
guest speaker at Temple Israel's
Downtown Business Breakfast
Forum. Thursday. Nov. 21 at 7:30
a.m.
Questions and answer will
follow Bush's presentation. The
forum is promptly concluded at 9
a.m
Business and professional peo-
ple from the downtown area are
encouraged to attend the
breakfast, said Phil Goldin, the
Temple's executive director. Com-
mittee chairpeople of the forum
are Norma Orovitz, Eunice and
Jim Baros. Harold Evenskv and
Henry Wolff. Jr.
1
Our dinner was by candlelight
The dessert was by citylight.
Cup after cup.
The coffee was Brim.*
Fill your cup to the rim
With the richness of Brim*
11985 MM Foods Corporation FOODS


Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
* Musical Revue, Fashion Show Highlights
Lion Of Judah Luncheon
A very special program is planned for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's Divi-
sion's "Lion of Judah" Luncheon, scheduled for
Monday, Dec. 9. at the Fontainebleau Hilton on
Miami Beach. The luncheon will be highlighted by
an original musical presentation entitled "Woman!
... Is That You? and a fashion show with fashions
by Dianny, featuring Marcy and Company.
The musical presentation "represents a new in-
novation for the Women's Division." said Marvis
Schaecter, who serves as co-chairman of the event
along with Irene Baros. Baros explained that the
show will portray the history of the Lion of Judah
I rustee category and will recognize those women
who make gifts in this category.
As part of the luncheon program. Lion of Judah
pins will be awarded to those women making their
first gift of $5,000 or more to the 1986 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
Baros and Schaechter say they hope that many
past Trustees will renew their gifts and be honored
at the luncheon.
Ellen Mandler and Eileen Silberman serve as
I rustee co-chairwomen.
Jewish National Fund Annual
Tribute Banquet Dec. 15
Peter Goldring, President of Florida Friends of Bar-Ran an-
nounced that in celebration ofBar-Ilan University ofRamat Gan.
Israel s 80th Anniversary dinner Wednesday evening, December
18at the Diplomat Hotel will honor Dr. Carl Klein and pay
tribute to the memory of Samuel N. Friedland.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, chair-
man Jewish National Fund Foun-
dation and Abraham Grunhut,
President JNF Greater Miami,
have announced that the Annual
Tribute Banquet will be held on
Sunday, Dec. 15, in the Konover
Hotel at noon, and will be a
tribute to the completion of the
Menachem Begin and Aliza Begin
Peace Park in the Negev, schedul-
ed for the end of the year.
The Peace Park Project was
launched in December 1984 with
the appearance of Ambassador
Moshe Arens, former Defense
Minister, and presently Minister
without Portfolio, and will be con-
cluded with the appearance of
Ambassador Eliahu Ben Elissar,
first Israeli Ambassador to Egypt,
former chairman of the Knesset
Defense and Foreign Affairs
Committee, Elissar currently
serves as a member of the
committee.
"Ambassador Elissar was a
valiant leader and fighter for
Israel Independence and has con-
tributed immeasurably for the
peace process and the welfare of
Israel" said Rabbi Mayer
Hebrew Academy
Tennis
Tournament
Steven and Barbara Berk
together with Judge Alan and
Belan Kuker will once again chair
the Annual Doubles Tennis Tour-
nament of the Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy on Sun-
day, at noon in the Flamingo Park
Tennis Center.
Sponsored by Sun Bank of
Miami, the tournament will draw
many big name players and Rank
Tennis pros who will participate in
the Matches for adults ages 17
and over and for children of ages
H) to 16.
A special apperance of guest
celebrity Barry Gibb of the
popular BG's Rock Group will
highlight the afternoon's
activities.
All proceeds of the Tournament
( go to the scholarship fund of the
school where 65 percent of the
student body receives scholarship
financial assistance.
Edward Villella To
Head Miami City Ballet
Edweard Villella, veteran of a
spectacular 20-year career with
George Balanchine's New York
City Ballet, has been named Ar-
tistic Director of the newly-
>4 Auditions for the new company
will be held in Miami and New
York City next March, and reh-
earsals are scheduled to begin in
mid-August.
Eliahu Ben Elissar
Abramowitz, chairman of the JNF
Executive Board.
Ambassador Elissar, was born
in Poland and smuggled to Israel,
from Europe during the
Holocaust.
He studied in England and took
his doctoral studies at the Univer-
sity of Geneva. He served with
Israel's Foreign Ministry in
France and America, and Egypt.
Following President Sadat's
visit to Jerusalem in 1977, Dr.
Ben Elissar headed the Israeli
delegation to the Cairo talks. He
is co-author of "The Arab-Israel
Conflict" and is author of "The
Foreign Policy of the Third Reich
and the Jews."
Proclamations will be presented
by the City of Miami Beach and
Dade County.
A musical Program is being ar-
ranged by Maestro Shmuel
Fershko.
Gloomy Forecast On Employment
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
gloomy forecast regarding
employment in the country was
presented to the Cabinet last
week by Labor and Welfare
Minister Moshe Katzav. He
predicted that by the end of the
fiscal year, the number of
unemployed will total some
150,000, almost 10 percent of the
labor force, some 2.5 percent
higher than the forecast by the
Treasury.
Katzav said the problem was
especially acute in the develop-
ment towns. In August, he
reported that some 6,000 people
were unemployment for six days
or more, some 27 percent of all
the jobless.
Minister-Without-Port folio
Yosef Shapira (Morasha) and In-
terior Minister Yitzhak Peretz
(Shas) proposed easing the
unemployment rate by decreasing
the number of workers from the
administered territories and alien
workers.
Community Corner
Temple Israel has resumed Friday night Broadcasts on Radio
Station WTMI 93.1 FM dial. Temple Israel had been off the air for
a few months, but now has returned to broadcast Friday night
services every Friday night from its Downtown facility from 8 to
9 p.m.
Jewish war Veterans of Harry H. Cohen Post and Auxiliary 723
of USA will meet on Sunday at 10 a.m. at Surfside Community
Center.
Temple Israel presents its Business Breakfast Forum, featur-
ing Jeb Bush, chairman of the Republican Party of Dade County.
He will speak on Thursday, Nov. 21, at 9 a.m. at the temple.
A book review of Howard Fast's novel, "The Outsider," will be
presented for Jewish elderly at the Jewish Family Service JETset
program on Monday, Nov. 25 at 1:30 p.m. at Beth David.
Nachman Arluck Culture Circle will meet Friday, Nov. 22, at 10
a.m. at the American Savings Bank on Alton and Lincoln Rd.
Morris Becker will lecture.
Judaic Studies Program
The University of Central
Florida will hold a lecture on "The
Discovery of the Oldest
Synagogue Ark," sponsored by
the Judaic Studies program.
Department of Foreign
Languages on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at
8 p.m. The lecture will be held at
the Engineering Auditorium on
campus, according to Dr. Moshe
Pelli, Judaic Studies director.
On Wednesday, Dec. 4, at 11
a.m., Professor Eric Meyers will
conduct a seminar in the
Humanities and Fine Arts
Building on "Archaeology and the
Study of Biblical History."
Enjoy the taste and spreadability of
whipped butter without the cholesterol.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1986
3a/i/ie*ti*MJ&
Tropical Cancer League's next regular luncheon meeting will take
place on Friday at the Ocean Pavillion, Miami Beach, beginning at
11:45 a.m.; the meeting is at 1 p.m., both on the mezzanine floor. New
members will be honored. The Barry College High-Liters have plann-
ed the program.
Women's American ORT, Golden Shores Chapter, is holding a Latin
Fiesta and dinner, on Saturday night, Nov. 23, at the home of Martha
Praschnlk in North Miami Beach at 7:30 p.m.
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami has hired Lori
Fagenholz In the Public Relations department as their Media Rela
tions Specialist. She will coordinate hospital information released to
the news.
Pacemaker Club of South Shore Hospital and Medical Center will
hold Its next meeting on Tuesday, from 1 to 3 p.m., in room 1003 of
South Shore Hospital. The topic of the seminar will be 'Pacemaker:
Pre and Post Operative, Seminar Two.
Chea Haran, president of the Pacemaker Club, and registered
nurse, will speak.
Ruth Foreman Theatre will present the show, The Red Shoes. Open-
ing night is Friday, Nov. 22, and it will continue to run throughout the
holiday season.
AMIT Women of Chicago, Tikvah Chapter, announces its Fourth
National Jewish Singles Conference to be held Thanksgiving
Weekend, Thursday, Nov. 28 Sunday, Dec. 1, at the Americana
Lake Geneva Resort in Lake Geneva, Wise. The weekend is designed
for Jewish singles throughout the country ages 21-35 seeking social,
recreational and educational activities in a Jewish atmosphere.
"Due to the overwhelming success of our past weekends, Jewish
singles from all over the country are expected," according to Mark
Tannenbaum, event coordinator.
A Day at the Races, an annual event sponsored by the South Shore
Hospital Auxiliary, will take place Friday, Nov. 22 at Tropical at
Calder Race Track. According to Peppy Fields, chairman of the day, t-
here will be round-trip bus transportation leaving from the hospital at
10:30 a.m..
The Miami Beach Community Theater and the Miami Beach
Children's Theater present One Act Play Festival In the Miami Beach
Senior High School Auditorium, starting Thursday, Nov. 21.
Airman Frank B. Schreiber, son of Bernard F. Schrelber, Miami
Beach, and Barbara D. Ryan, has been assigned to Presidio of
Monterey, Calif., after completing Air Force basic training. He is a
1985 graduate of Miami Beach Senior High School.
United Way of Dade County will hold its Grand Finale for Campaign
'85 on Wednesday in the Grand Ballroom at Omni International Hotel.
The reception begins at 6 p.m.; dinner is at 7 p.m. Dick Capen, ch*.1'-
man, will tally the final results.
South Florida Women's Committee will meet Wednesday, Nov. 26,
at noon, at the Casablanca Hotel. Rabbi Melr Felman, lecturer and
doctor of Hebrew literature and cultural chairman of the Beth Israel
lecture forum, will be guest speaker. A musical program will also be
presented.
Prime Minister Peres spoke of the educational accomplishments of
Ramot Shapira World Youth Center in Beit Meir, Israel to an audience
of a delegation of dedicators from several countries of the Western
World. Dr. Alvin and Betty Stern of Miami Beach were guests of
honor. The gathering was held in conjunction with the dedication
ceremonies of a new classroom wing and related facilties.
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The "Chai" luncheon of Israel Histadrut
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Gleibermans with the Keter Shem Tov Plaque.
Left, to right Joe Walker, executive vice chair-
man; Irving Gordon, Histadrut's Southern
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TEL AVIV (JTA) Four
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parts of Israel. There were no
fatalities in any of them. A small
bomb exploded near a high school
in Afula today but did not cause
any casualties or damage. It was
timed to go off at noon, as pupils
were leaving the school for their
midday break, but because of an
apparent faulty timing
mechanism in the home-made
bomb, it went off 20 minutes
earlier when the playground was
empty.
Police said that, had the bomb
exploded at the planned time,
there would have been many
casualties. It was the fifth ter-
rorist bombing attempt in Afula in
recent weeks.
In another terrorist incident,
several Katyusha rockets were
fired into the Galilee panhandle
last night. There were no
casualties but some of the fields
were slightly damaged. Police and
security forces were today sear-
ching the area to determine the
point or origin of the rockets.
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close to a bus stop in the northern
city suburb of French Hill. In an
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leading Druze sheikhs from the
village of Hasbaya in the zone.
They were identified as Said
Barakat, 80, Muhammed
Dabayeh, 75, and Najib and Faud
Barakat, both 60.
IDF sources said they were
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Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Marriott Cuts M
PrimeRateTb$8.95
U.S. Sen. Bill Bradley (D., N.J.), shoum se-
cond from left, receives the American ORT
Federation Community Achievement Award
at a recent AOF dinner in Secaucus, N.J. for
his contributions to education and his ac-
complishments on behalf of the people of New
Jersey and the country at large. Left to right
are: Albert Burstein, dinner co-chairman;
Sen. Bradley; Alvin L. Gray, American ORT
Federation president; Joseph Wilf, dinner co-
chairman; and Robert Slater, dinner co-
chairman.
Names in News
AJC: Nativity Scene Is Divisive
An American Jewish Congress
officer has told the U.S. National
Park Service that its plan to in-
clude a nativity scene, or creche,
i ui public property near the White
[louse as part of its holiday season
display is divisive, even if
constitutional.
In testimony prepared for a
public meeting of the park service
and the Pageant of Peace Com-
mittee. Joel Levy, a Washington
attorney and co-chairman of the
Governing Council of the
American Jewish Congress, urged
that a creche not be included as
part of the annual 'Christmas'
Pageant for Peace next month.
Levy testified on behalf of ten
Jewish agencies, as well as
AJCongress. Last year, for the
first time in a decade, a Christmas
creche was included in the holiday
season display near the White
House.
The National Park Service said
it based its decision to place a
creche on the Elipse, a national
park near the White House, on a
1984 Supreme Court ruling that it
was legal for the city of
Pawtucket, Rhode Island, to erect
a publicly funded creche on
private property.
"Whether or not it is constitu-
tionally permissible to include a
creche (or other religious symbol)
in the pageant, its inclusion cer-
tainly is not constitutionally re-
quired," Mr. Levy stated.
A major American women's
religious Zionist organization,
Amit Women (formerly American
Mizrachi Women), presented the
America-Israel Friendship Award
to former Israeli Ambassador
Samuel W. Lewis and his wife,
Sallie, at its 60th anniversary
convention.
During the full four-day
meeting beginning last Sunday at
Grossinger's in Liberty, N.Y.,
special tribute was paid to those
who have made outstanding con-
tributions to the State of Israel.
Raoul Wallenberg, the former
Swedish emissary who saved
thousands of Jews in Hungary
from the Nazis, was given one
such special tribute. Drs. Ruth
and Victor Nussenzweig, recent
developers of an experimental
malaria vaccine, were honored.
The convention theme, "Old
Dreams, New Visions," reviewed
six decades of Amit Women ac-
complishments on behalf of disad-
vantaged Jewish children and
adults in the Land of Israel.
Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler. president of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, has called on the movement
of Reform Judaism, which he
heads, to reach a "collective con-
sensus" on religious practice for
the 1.3 million members of
Reform synagogues in the U.S.
and Canada.
In an address to 3,000 delegates
attending the 58th biennial
general assembly of the UAHC in
Los Angeles, Rabbi Schindler said
that despite the recent growth in
numbers of Reform synagogues
iHid their memberships, "the
quality of affiliation" of many
Reform Jews "gives substance to
the perception that Reform
Judaism is but a religion of conve-
nience that we need commit or
do little if anything at all, yet we
still can call ourselves Jews."
In his presidential address to
the convention, Rabbi Schindler
said that individual autonomy
should not be permitted to become
"the central, exclusive concept of
liberal Judaism."
Seeking to build on nature's
blessings of majestic mountains
and the serene Sea of Galilee, the
Jewish Agency Settlement plans
to develop Israel's Upper Galilee
as a major overseas vacation
center.
Moshe Gourelick, the Agency's
Upper Galilee Settlement direc-
tor, said in an interview in Sfad
that 10 to 15 tourism-based
moshavim could be initiated in the
next five years, "more if funds are
available."
"Our budget is $16 million, and
we initiate two to three new set-
tlements a year," said Gourlick,
whose region encompasses
400,000 acres west and south of
the border with Syria, well within
Israel's pre-1967 borders. "For
each additional $1-1.5 million, we
could initiate another settlement.
We could put $9 million more to
work within a year if we have it."
Terming quick ratification of
the Genocide Convention vital to
United States' interests, B'nai
B'rith International has called on
two Senate Republican leaders to
bring the treaty to the floor of the
Senate at the earliest opportunity.
Gerald Kraft, president of
B'nai B'rith International, said in
letters to President Reagan
Senate Majority Leader Robert
Dole of Kansas, and Foreign Rela-
tions Committee Chairman
Richard Lugar of Indiana that
further delay in ratifying the
37-year-old accord "will only give
America's adversaries more am-
munition with which to attack us,
both in world forums and in
bilateral meetings."
On the other hand. Kraft said,
ratification would "bolster
America's efforts to advance the
cause of human rights around the
world."
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Boom Of Jewish Day Schools
Appear To Have Peaked
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The steady expansion in the
number of Jewish day
schools in the United States
and Canada, which boomed
during the past decade, ap-
pears to have peaked, accor-
ding to data provided to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
for its annual survey of the
status of the day schools.
Torah Umesorah, the National
Society for Hebrew Day Schools,
an Orthodox agency, reported
that two more elementary schools
and two more high schools were
added for the 1985-86 school year,
and that four high schools were
closed, for a total for the 1985-86
year of 498 schools, the same
number as in the previous school
year.
The agency for Conservative
day schools, the Solomon
Schechter Day School Associa-
tion, reported continued growth
in the United States. Three new
elementary schools brought the
total of Solomon Schechter
schools for the current school year
to 66 such schools 59 elemen-
tary and seven high schools. That
was three more than the U.S.
total of Solomon Schechter
schools in the 1984-85 school year.
RABBI DAVID SAPE-
RSTEIN, staff director of the
task force for Jewish education of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC), reported
that there are at present II
Reform day schools in the U.S.
and Canada, with 1,100 pupils.
Rabbi Joshua Fishman, Torah
Umesorah executive vice presi-
dent, reported that the four addi-
tional schools were the Savannah
Hebrew Academy, a communal
school launched by the Savannah
Jewish Council, and the Torah
Day School of Atlanta, the
elementary schools; and the In-
stitute for Torah and Technology
in Morganville, N.J., a vocational
high school for boys, and the
Yeshiva High School for Boys in
Monsey, N.Y.
Fishman reported that the four
high schools closed this year were
the Torah Academy of Milwaukee,
a girls' school, which opened in
September, 1984, and closed after
one year; the New England
Academy for Jewish Studies in


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New Haven, a girls' school, which
was closed becuase of "the finan-
cial crunch"; the San Diego
School, Etz Chaim Institute of
California, started in September,
1984; and the Maimonides High
School in Minneapolis, founded in
1982.
MEIR EFRATI, director of the
Solomon Schechter association,
said the added elementary schools
were in Phoenix, Ariz.; Pompton
Lakes, N.J.; and Oklahoma City.
Efrati, who is also assitant direc-
tor of the United Synagogue of
America Education Department,
reported that the Phoenix school
was not a new school but was a
new member of the association.
Both officials reported there
had been no changes in the
numbers of day schools in Canada.
Fishman reported that the total of
affiliated or service Orthodox day
schools in Canada remained this
school year at 59 schools, 43
elementary and 16 high schools in
10 provinces, with a total enrolle-
ment of 11,000.
Efrati reported there were
1,131 pupils in the three elemen-
tary Solomon Schechter schools in
Canada. Fishman reported that
the total enrollment in the Ortho-
dox day schools in the U.S. in the
1984-85 year was 86,450; and
87,250 in the current school year.
Efrati said that the Conservative
day school enrollment in the U.S.
was 12,341 for the 1983-84 school
year, and 12,720 for the 1984-85
years.
He also reported that data were
not complete for the Solomon
Schechter day schools in the U.S.
and Canada for the current school
year. Fishman reported that tui-
tion fees continued to "creep
upwards."
Picture is Tip O'Neil, leader of the House of Representatives and
Congressman William Lehman presenting a certificate to Rabbi
Simcha Freedman ofAdath Yeshurunfor offering the prayer at
the opening of the House session on Oct. 22.
Wedding
KENINSTEIN
The marriage of Maria Ruth
Kenin and David Brian Stein took
place on November 9, at Temple
Beth Sholom, Miami Beach. The
bride is the daughter of Donna
Kenin. Miami, and David Kenin,
Miami Beach.
The groom is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Max Stein, Miami.
The Steins will be honeymoon-
ing in the Carribbean and will be
residing in Miami.
Reform Jewish Leader Charges
Assault Against Bill Of Rights
Jtuuiiru*
formtritar
Fall Btrgw
LOS ANGELES (JTA) A
reform Jewish leader has charged
that the Reagan Administration is
waging an "unprecedented
assault" against the Bill of Rights,
and called upon American Jews to
defend it.
Albert Vorspan, director of the
Reform Jewish movement's Com-
mission on Social Action and a
senior vice president of its Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, told the UAHC's convention
here that the Jewish community
has a special interest in opposing
"extremist and nativist voices
clamoring for the Christianizing
of America."
He charged that President
Reagan, Attorney General Edwin
Meese and others in the ad-
ministration are promoting the
view that "the wall of separation
between church and state is a
quaint and irrelevant notion"; ad-
vocating public prayer, aid to
parochial schools, and "equal ac-
cess" by religion to public schools,
"even if that brings in the Klan
and the cults"; trying to ban abor-
NFAA To Accept
Cultural Award
The Miami-based non-profit in-
stitution that aims to further the
training and opportunities for
aspiring young artists, National
Foundation For the Advancement
In the Arts (NFAA), will accept
an award for their commitment to
furthering the cultural awareness
in South Florida at the Adath
Yeshurun Concert Saturday
Night, at 8 p.m. Mr. Grant Be-
glarian, president of NFAA will
be on hand to accept the award on
behalf of the Foundation.
In the first of its four series c-
oncerts, Adath Yeshurun is
featuring a String Trio of Award
winning artists "who will surely
be at the top of their respective p-
rofessions in a few short years,"
according to Rabbi Simcha Freed-
man. The performers are Bion
Tsang on Cello; David Winkelman
on Piano; and, Timothy Ying on
Violin.
The concerts will be held at
Adath Yeshurun.
tion; and stating that "only the
anti-God forces talk about such ar-
cane matters as the First
Amendment."
Assailing, as well, the ad-
ministration's "dangerous experi-
ment to see if it is possible ... to
dismantle the social welfare
system," Vorspan stated that
Jews must "confront the moral
horror that the policies of our
government are today neglecting
and abusing the weakest and most
vulnerable members of our socie-
ty" including the country's
children.
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Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Pioneer Women Will Be Marking
Their 60th Anniversary Next Week
i
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) In
1924, Rahel Yanait Ben-Zvi a
leader of the halutzic (pioneering)
movement in Palestine (and later,
wife of Israel's second president)
sent an SOS to a friend in
America. She had founded a
women's agricultural training
' farm in the stony hills outside
Jerusalem. Now it urgently need-
ed $500 for a well.
The story of the well is also the
story of the founding of Pioneer
Women now a 50,000-member
organization which is celebrating
its 60th annivesary at its 29th
biennial convention in Israel Nov.
11-20.
Yanait had dispatched the SOS
to Sophie Udin, a member of
Poale Zion, the Labor Zionist
Organization of America. Poale
Zion, although theoretically com-
mitted to women's equality, did
not practice it.
IT WAS at this juncture that
Udin, receiving the SOS about the
well, organized a group of seven
wives of Poale Zion leaders, who
raised the $500 and sent it off.
This group become the nucleus of
Pioneer Women. After others
joined, the group declared itself
an independent Labor Zionist
organization, and incorported a
K year later under the name Pioneer
' Women.
Shortly after. Pioneer Women
affiliated itself with Moetzet
Hapoalot (Working Women's
Council of Palestine), now called
Na'amat, an acronym of Working
and Volunteering Women.
Na'amat is today Israel's largest
women's organization, with
750,000 members and a network
of more than 1.000 educational,
vocational, and social service
centers. It is now, as then,
dedicated to creating a more
' equitable society and establishing
equal rights for women in it.
As the organization prepared to
mark its 60th anniversary, the
.Jewish Telegraphic Agency asked
its national president, Phyllis
Sutker of Chicago, if the organiza-
tion is still devoted to the same
goals, uses the same methods, and
has the same kind of members as
when it began.
"IT'S A MATTER of great
pride for us that, ideologically and
philosophically, this is the same
organization as when it started,"
she answered. "Pioneer Women is
the practical expression of
building the programs and institu-
tions that will help make Israel
the kind of equal and just society
*>c want it to be, and to give
women the opportunity to be
Looking Cantor Job
Year round reference my perfor-
mance. Baritone. Like remain
Miami and vicinity.
534-4000, 8-9 p.m.
significantly contributing
members of this society."
All the programs of Pioneer
Women since its inception, she
said, have stemmed from its vision
of the future of Israeli society, and
its philosophy of women's equali-
ty. "But you can't be equal unless
you have opportunities," she
continued. Na'amat has provided
them, initially via training farms,
now through its vocational educa-
tion, social servies, legislative
work and lobbying. And Pioneer
Women has supported Na'amat in
this work.
One significant difference with
other American Jewish o-
rganizations that has continued to
today, she said, is that Pioneer
Women was "not established as a
philanthropic organization."
WHILE OTHER Zionist
organizations were established
here to help Israel in specific pro-
grams, only Pioneer Women "was
an outgrowth from the Israel
scene to here and the only
organization that has a sister
organization with the kind of nu-
mbers that constitute a women's
movement in Israel," Sutker said.
Pioneer Women raises about $3
million annually toward the sup-
port of Na'amat.
In the U.S., Pioneer Women "is
connected with the same issues as
in Israel," Sutker continued. It
supports legislation and initiates
special action to promote equal
rights for women, reproductive
rights, day care, and social service
programs.
Asked about his possibility of
Pioneer Women's becoming in-
volved in Jewish day care in the
U.S. as a way of reaching out to
working mothers one of its aims
Sutker said, this "would have
been a natural thing to do if the
needs in Israel were not
escalating."
POINTING TO Na'amat con-
cern about having to close day-
care centers in Israel because of
the economic crunch, Sutker
stressed that Pioneer Women's
"funds and energies need to be
directed to Israel. The situation
does not permit us the luxury of
cutting down on that aspect and
elevating another."
Na'amat, like other Jewish
women's organizations, is con-
cerned about recruiting young
working women, and working
mothers, and providing some
"incentive" for them to become
organizationally active, and also
responding "structurally" to the
problem of time availability affec-
ting women today, a subject the
National Board has been studying
carefully, Sutker said.
About one-half to one-third of
the members of Pioneer Women
are gainfully employed. "Working
class women were the founders of
Pioneer Women," Sutker said.
Therefore, when women began
returning to the workplace in the
Dr. S. Nussbaum
OPTOMETRIST
Eyes Examined
Contact Lenses
Announces
Removal of his offices
to
1661-A MERIDIAN AVENUE
MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
(Offices next to Manny's Restaurant)
PHONES: 538-1201 or 531-0094
1970's, Pioneer Women did not
have the same philosophical dif-
ficulties in dealing with this as did
other organizations. "Working
was not anathema to our women,"
she said.
THE MOST obvious change
since the early days of Pioneer
Women has to do with the
dramatic shift in the kind of work
it supports in Israel and the peo-
ple who are doing it, since the
establishment of the Jewish State.
A series of articles in Pioneer
Woman Magazine in 1980, a con-
densation of the Yale University
thesis of Nick Mandelkern (whose
late grandmother was an early
and long-term member), traced
the organizations evolution. Ac-
cording to Mandelkern's thesis,
Pioneer Women's early members
strongly identified with the halut-
za (woman pioneer). What seemed
to be her "incredibly romantic,
adventurous and free life excited
their imagination .. women
could only dream" about the "vir-
tual equality" the halutza had
achieved.
Pioneer Women, Sutker
acknowledged, provided its
members in pre-State days with a
"vicarious experience" by enabl-
ing them to "help the women who
were doing things in Palestine
that they wanted to do there and
couldn't do here."
Asked whether today's
members could, in the absence of
the halutzot. experience the same
kind of spiritual satisfaction,
Sutker said, "The fact that
Na'amat keeps moving into new
fields to meet new needs still gives
us the feeling that we are
pioneering."
Volunteers For Israel
By BENJAMIN DINKES
The purpose of Volunteers for Israel is to provide the State of
Israel with civilian volunteer manpower to perform maintenance,
warehouse sorting, and cleaning or packing duties normally done
by Israeli Reservists.
The volunteers live on an army base where they will work, eat
and be housed with Israeli soldiers. Accommodations are basic
and the sanitary facilities not quite up to the standards of a five-
star hotel.
The exchange of ideas and lifestyles during work is both an
enlightening and educational experience for the Israeli and the
volunteer. The Israelis express pleasure that the Jews of the
diaspora care enough to give of themselves. The relationship is
further strengthened by the fact that the volunteers pay a
registration fee and their own airfare to Israel, just to work on
the program.
The experience for the volunteer is without parallel. To see
Israel from the inside, as it really is, cannot be compared to the
tourist whose experience is limited to living and traveling in a
controlled environment. The volunteer's attitude towards Israel
suddenly changes from skepticism to optimism and admiration,
and feels that in spite of all its difficulties, Israel will survive.
The program is open to all between the ages of 18 to 65. Work
periods vary. From November 1 to March 31, the commitment is
for three weeks. Thereafter it is for four weeks. There are special
rates for matriculating students under 26 years of age.
Applicants who are in good health can secure an application at
the Volunteers for Israel office located at the Jewish Community
Center, 6501 West Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33313 or
phone (305) 792-6700. The office is open Monday, Tuesday, Thurs-
day and Friday from 1-4 p.m.
POSITION AVAILABLE
The UJA of Naples is looking for a Managing
Director to assume general duties with
emphasis on Young Leadership.
Please write: UJA
Collier County
P.O. Box 8613
Naples, FL 33941
Enclose full resume.
Better bodies don't
always make better backs.
Ibc touches may be great for the
waist, but they are very hard on
your back. So are many
of the exercises we do
today to stay In shape.
Even simple activities
of daily living can put
great stress on our backs.
The St. Francis Hospital
Back School & Fitness
Course helps people,
especially people with
minor back pain, learn
to exercise safely and
to protect their backs
from injury. The 4-week
course is taught by an
orthopedic physician
and registered physical
therapists. Class fee
is 190.
The Back School & Fitness
Course is a program of the
St. Francis Hospital Spine
Center, an outpatient
facility for the treatment
of back pain and i n jury.
The Centers staff takes a
conservative approach to treat-
ment, using gentle mobilization
techniques, physical therapy,
exercise and education.
lb register for the
Back School ft Fitness
Course, or to find out more
about the St. Francis
Hospital Spine Center,
call 868-2797.
THE
Back School
*SpineCentei:
mi^i
$
250 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach, FL 33141
Life. Be in it


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Director Of AACI
To Address
Chug Aliyah
The South Florida Chug Aliyah
Group will hold a meeting on Sun-
day, at 7 p.m., at the Michael Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center, Katz Auditorium.
Guest speaker will be Mr. Joe
Wernick, executive director of the
AACI (Association of Americans
and Canadians in Israel). He will
address: "The Oleh's Absorption
Process."
Mr. Wernick was born in the
U.S. Ordained as a Rabbi by the
Jewish Theological Seminary, he
made Aliyah in 1969 and was
chairman of the Jerusalem region
of AACI until seven years ago
when he became national director.
Mr. Wernick was one of the
founders of the AACA (Associa-
tion of Americans and Canadians
Yiddish actors Shemuel Rodensky and Lea Duliskya welcoming in America) which was the
those present at the festive opening of Golda's Restaurant with forerunner of NAAM, North
'Golda' from 'Fiddler on the Roof.' American Aliyah Movement.
The second half of the meeting,
~y __ will break into small groups to
Golda s Restaurant SSSTiiTiJ^StS
also a singles group.
A Taste Of The Old Country
JERUSALEM Golda's
Restaurant opened at the newly-
expanded Moriah Jerusalem
Hotel. Now Israelis and tourists
from all over finally have a place
to eat traditionally-Jewish cook-
ing notably missing from Israel
for too long.
Delicacies such as fresh gefilte
fish, with Jewish "dristan"
horseradish that brings tears to
the eyes, kugel, p'tcha and
chicken soup with kneidlach or
kreplach like mother's milk ex-
cept it is "fleishig" are now
served six nights a week.
The menu specializes in
nostalgic Jewish cooking. Yet, it
even offers choices for those who
do not yearn for kishke with
cholent. "Golda's typifies the style
and approach of the entire hotel,"
says Gabriel Katz. Moriah
Jerusalem's general manager.
"We enjoy tradition in the com-
forts of modern life."
Golda's opened up to rave
reviews by discriminating' food
critics and congratulations from
the Foreign Office and Ministry of
Tourism. Golda's Restaurant is
open to guests of the hotel and
anyone craving such
gastronomical fare. Golda's is just
one of the restaurants at the
newly-renovated and expanded
Moriah Jerusalem Hotel.
The Moriah chain of hotels in
Israel is principally owned by
Ampal-American Israel Corpora-
tion, an American corporation
primarily engaged in financing
and investing in industry,
tourism, advanced technology and
agriculture in Israel.
Had ass ah
Events
Hatikvah Hadassah will have its
third annual Flea Market Bazaar
on Sunday, November 24, at the
corner of SW 104 St. and S. Dixie
Highway from 8 a.m.-l p.m., proc-
eeds to benefit Hadassah Medical
Organization.
'SPECIALIZED CARE'
FORTHEHOMEBOUND
24 hr. nursing service since 1972
Serving All Dade & Broward Counties
R.N.'s, L.P.N.s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
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ALL DADE HOME CARE
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Aliyah chapter of Hadassah will
hold a dinner meeting on Tuesday,
Dec. 3, at 7 p.m. at Le Glacier, the
Atrium. Howard Joffe, Channel
10 troubleshooter, will be
speaking.
Aliyah chapter of Hadassah will
hold a paid-up membership event,
A Day at the Spa, on Thursday at
9:30 a.m. The day will begin with
breakfast and include swimming,
tennis, games, and lunch.
Southgate chapter of Hadassah
will hold its annual Hadassah
Medical Organization luncheon
honoring Mr. and Mrs. Harry Car-
son for their dedication to
Hadassah's cause. The luncheon
will take place on Thursday, Nov.
21 at noon at Temple Emanu-El.
Jean Temkin, Miami Beach region
president, will speak, along with a
musical program.
'Recipes For Your Leftover
Thanksgiving Turkey
From Empire Kosher'
Thanksgiving is the traditional time for a big, delicious roast
turkey dinner with family and friends. Just as much a part of the
season seems to be the tradition of leftover turkey and the tradi-
tional question of what to do with it.
To provide a few answers to the question of what to do with that
leftover turkey, the good cooks at Empire Kosher Foods provide
the following recipe suggestions:
TURKEY VEGETABLE SOUP
1 can corn (8 oz.)
1 can tomatoes (7Vz oz.)
V2 cup carrots (diced)
V2 cup celery (diced)
1 small onion (diced)
V2 Tsp. salt
'/* Tsp. pepper
V2 cup uncooked noodles
'/i cup frozen peas
l'/2 cups cooked turkey (cubed)
2'/2 cups turkey or chicken broth
Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil.
Reduce heat and simmer for about 45 minutes. Serves 4.
HOT TURKEY SANDWICH :
2 Tsp. margarine
1 medium onion (sliced)
2 Tsp. flour
2/3 cup turkey or chicken broth
lh Tsp. salt
8 oz. sliced turkey (cooked)
2 slices rye or pumpernickle bread (toasted)
In a small sauce pan heat margarine until melted. Add onion
and salt, saute until translucent. Sprinkle flour over mixture and
stir. Stir in broth. Continue to stir until mixture thickens. Reduce
heat, add turkey and simmer until meat is heated. Arrange turkey
on toast and pour gravy over top. Serves 2.
TURKEY, PECAN
AND GRAPE SALAD
3 cups turkey (cooked and cubed)
*k cup pecan halves
1 lb. seedless green grapes
mayonnaise (to taste)
salt and pepper (to taste)
Toss turkey, pecans and grapes together with enough mayon-
naise to make a creamy consistancy. Add salt and pepper to taste.
Serve on lettuce. Serves 4.
For additional holiday recipes, contact Empire Kosher Foods,
P.O. Box 165, Mifflintown, Pa. 17059 or call the Empire Kosher
Consumer Information Line at 1-800-EMPIRE-4.
SHELBORNE BEACH HOTEL -1801 COLLINS AVE., MIAMI BEACH
For the First Time in U.S.A. After a very successful World Tour
PRESENTED BY INTERNATIONAL ARTISTIC PRODUCTION
JACKIE JACOB '* "HUMOROVICH
The Revival of The International Jewish Review
FEATURING!!! SISSY LOBATO
99
TICKETS ON SALE
AT HOTELS BOX OFFICE
Or Reserve By Phone:
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(305) 947-0804 (305) 381 -9045
COSTUME DESIGN,
CHOREOGRAPHY & DIRECTION BY
EBER LOBATO
AND
THE SHALOM DANCERS
OPENING NIGHT!!
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16th
at 9 P.M.
SHOWS
WEDNESDAYS 8 P.M.
SATURDAYS 8 410 P.M.
SUNDAYS 2 4 7 P.M.


Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
-And his father Isaac said unto him: 'Come near now and
tciss me, my son ... And he smelled the smell of his raiment, and
llessed him"
(Genesis 27.X6-87).
TOLEDOT
3LEDOT Like Sarah, Rebekah at first was barren. After
Isaac prayed to God on her behalf, she bore twin boys Esau and
Jacob. Esau grew up a hunter, Jacob an upright dweller in tents
One day, Esau returnedfrom the field very hungry, and disdain-
Fully sold his "elder son" birthright to Jacob for a pot of lentil
koup. Isaac was old and blind and likely to die soon. He called
Esau and instructed him to prepare Isaac's favorite dishes, that
he might bless him before his death. However, Rebekah who
favored Jacob for his superior merits, arranged for Jacob to
lecure his father's coveted blessing instead of his elder brother,
rearing Esau's revenge, and anxious lest Jacob marry a Ca-
iaanite woman, his mother sent him to her brother Laban, who
Ived in Paddan-Aram. Before leaving, Jacob received Isaac's
Ilessing, the continuation of God's original blessing to Abraham:
fiat he and his seed would inherit the land of Canaan, Isaac bade
Jacob marry one of his uncle Laban's daughters.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage/Edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, *1S, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7s Maiden
|Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
West German-Israel
Relations Improving
By DAVID KANTOR
iONN (JTA) The
Ejected visit of Israeli
>mier Shimon Peres here
the beginnng of 1986
Jects steadily improved
itions between Israel and
fst Germany, according
aides of Chancellor
|lmut Kohl, who extended
invitation to Peres dur-
a recent meeting bet-
Jen the two leaders at UN
adquarters in New York.
Cohl's aides, trying to put
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NASD* MFC*
5g^rfp
behind them Israeli irritation over
Bonn's vigorous condemnation of
the bombing of PLO headquarters
in Tunisia, pointed to the steady
progress in contacts between the
two nations since Kohl took of-
fiece in 1982.
THEY RECALLED, as well,
that Kohl had put an end to years
of misunderstandings and hesita-
tions that had characterized the
regime of former Chancellor
Helmut Schmidt, who had
demonstratively rejected an
Israeli invitation to visit
Jerusalem.
Bonn's apparent conciliatory at-
titude towards Israel emerged in
the wake of criticism within the
government over the initial West
German reaction to the Tunis
raid. Several ministers said that
the vigorous condemnation by
Bonn was not consistent with its
pledges to fight international
terrorism.
The Ministers further pointed
out that PLO terrorists were
working together with both leftw-
ing so-called urban guerrillas as
well as neo-Nazi groups.
THE CRITICS became more
outspoken after internal in-
telligence reports and press ac-
counts indicated that the PLO was
ultimately responsible for the hi-
jacking of the Italian cruise ship
Achille Lauro at the beginning of
last month.
At the same time, German of-
ficials here revealed that Israeli
President Chaim Herzog is also
likely to visit Bonn next year. He
was invited, they said, by West
German President Richard von
Weiszaecker, who visited Israel
recently despite objections of the
Foreign Ministry, which was con-
cerned about Arab reactions
following the Tunis air aid.
Peres will be the second Israeli
Prime Minister to visit Bonn. The
first was Yitzhak Rabin who was
here in 1975.
PEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery. Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
INSURANCE HOSPITAL
Medicare Participating Memorial
Insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participation
ALLAN WOLPOWITZ. M.D.
3427 Johnson Street
Hollywood. Florida .M021
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305) 962-5400
Bar Mitzvah
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Joseph Ronald Molko
JOSEPH RONALD MOLKO
Joseph Ronald Molko son of Mr.
and Mrs. Ronald Molko will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Emanu-EI.
The celebrant is a student in the
Temple Emanu-EI religious
school.
He attends Ransom Everglades
School where he is in the eighth
grade.
He is a member of the Student
Council, and enjoys computers
and sports.
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Molko will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception on Saturday at the
Fontainebleu.
Many relatives and friends from
home and out of town will attend.
Pioneer Women
A playlet entitled "The An-
niversary" will be enacted by
Sonia and Harry Fox at the Mon-
day, 1 p.m. meeting of the Chai
Chapter of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat to take place in
the community room of the
American Savings and Loan
Association, Miami Beach.
Rose Gershon, sopranist, will
also entertain at. the monthly
session.
The popular book, "The Out-
sider" by Howard Fast, will be
reviewed by Bertha Liebmann at
the Monday, noon meeting of the
Kinneret Chapter of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat to be held in the
social auditorium of Temple Ner
Tamid.
The social hour will be hosted by
Ray Dentz in honor of the birth of
a new family member.
Musical Achievement
For Ruth Brotman
Dr. Ruth Brotman, Laureate of
the Quebec College of Music, is 91
years old this year. She is a singer
who is planning a concert for
young scholarship students at the
Bass Museum. Brotman has been
a founder member of many of
Florida's organizations and volun-
tarily sang for Isadore Cohen, one
of the founders of the city of
Miami, to help raise money for the
Home for the Aged.
She founded many of the com-
munity's concert events, and the
Miami Beach Music and Arts
League. Brotman was a mention
in Claude Pepper's Congressional
Record as a promoter of artists,
including many South Florida ear-
ly cantors.
Concerts Bring Culture
To Northeast Dade
Adath Yeshurun announces a
Concert Series for the 1985-86
season, offering young musicians
who have shown themselves to be
highly recognized in their profes-
sion the chance to perform in a
concert setting.
The first concert will take place
Saturday, November 16. at 8
p.m., presenting the String Trio
of Award Winning Young Artists,
Bion Tsang on Cello, David
Winkelman on Piano and Timothy
Ying on Violin. All the concerts
will take place at Adath
Yeshurun.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:12 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freadmen
Cantor Ian Alpem Conaervatlve
Dally Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. a 5:15 p.m.
Bar Mitzvah Joshua Halpeiln 8 30 a.m Sal.
(altar Frl night ervlcea) Qua.t Speaker
Jerome B. Homer "Antl-Semlilem: la II
Happening Here."
OftT Shaboain
Late Frl. aenrleee 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
& Miami 667-8867
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Sankx Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
i
Frl. 1 p.m. Rabbi Herbert M Baumgard will
be Installed as the National President oi
tha Synagogue Council ol Amarlca
Sun. 8:30 p.m. champagne tribute and "Roast"
lor Rabbi Baumgard
BETH OAVID CONGREGATION
2825 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, ^.
Rabbi Emaritus (St)
Rev Milton Fraaman, v^-
Ritual Director
Frl. evening 5:30 p.m
Mlnehah 5:15 p.m Dally servtCM
Sun. S a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
son. a TOurs. 7:M a s-.So p.m
Tus. 4 Wed. 7:45 a.m. a fcMp.ni.
Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah clasaaa Sunday
8:30-10:30 a.m
Sun. Israeli dancing 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Sun. Children's book fair 8:30-10:30 a.m.
8586334
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krissei
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
Services: Mornings 7:30 a.m. i
8:45 a.i
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214 _
Barry J. Konovltch, Rsbbi .'>,
Moshe Buryn, Cantor > %'
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
Shabbai Services 8 JO a m Sermon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue f
Miami Beach ,'
Dr. Irving Lehrmen, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shit man. Cantor
Maurice Klein. Rltuel Director
Gerald Taub. Executive Director
Ksbbalal Shabbai 5 p.m.
Sat service 9 am Dr. Irving Lehrmen
will preech on "The Weekly Portion
ol the Sable."
Cantor Yehuda Shllman will chant.
Bar Mitzvah Joseph Ronald Molko
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetroe Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlfl
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
ssimi'i Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 1th St.. Miami. 573-5000
MOM N. Kendall Dr., 505-5055
(Senior Rabbi HesfceM Berne t
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomstein
Associate Cantor Rachsii F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Qotdm
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks]
DOWNTOWN: Rabbi Rex Perimeter "We
Haven't Spoken In Yeers." Liturgy
Centor Jacob O. Bomstein
KENDALL: Babbl Hasksil M. Bernal
"Lessons from the Theater." Liturgy:
Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 607-5857
Michael B. Etsenatat, Rabbi
Friday services :1t p.m
Saturday: 8 4
Evenings: 5:00 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5506 Conservative
Dr. Isrssl Jacobs, Rabbi
Rabbi Joseph A. Gorf Inkel,
Rabbi Emeritus
Moshe Friedler, Centor
Q
Sendees: Frl. 8 p.m Set. 8:48 am
Dally 8 a.m., S p.m. Sun. 6:30 a.m.
Rabbi Jacobs sermon
"To Infamous Birthdays."
Sat. Bar Mitzvah Ronald fencer.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33130
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mother
Cantor Niaaim Benyemini
Dally services tim.lSMp.m
Sat. 8:15a.m.
Rabbi's classss Monday Advanced Hebrew
9:30 a.m. Tues. English Bible Class 9 45 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
230-2001 '"Sir*.
Rabbi David H. Auerbech # I
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Melsals
Shabbai Services Frt S p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m.
Sal Mitzvah Emily Rebecca Kaufman
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
|CheseAve.41stSt. .530-7231
DR LEON KRONISH. RABBI liberal
I HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL D. CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
I CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Frl. evening 8:15 p.m.
HebblCsplan will report on The
UAHC BIENNIAL CONVENTION.
Set. Service 10:45 am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 047-7520
1051 N. Miami Beech Blvd.
Or. Max A Upechitz, Rabbi
Randall Kcnigsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally services 7*30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m
late service Frl. 8p.m. Sal. 8:25 am
Set. 5 10 p.m.
Sunday 6 a.m.. 5.30 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
Services Frl. 7:30 p.m.
Sat 8:30 am
< TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morning services 8 s.m
Friday lele evening service
8:15pm
I Saturday S am end 7.45 p.m
D
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-0345
7902 Cartyle Ave.. 000-0033
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
Daily Services 8 a m and 5 30 p m ,
Sal 8:45 a m
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miemi Beech
071 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaekov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
3820898
Rabbi Warren Kaaztl Modem or>odo
Rabbi Kaaztl will temporarily conduct
separate ssrvfose Set. 8:30 a m at Temple
Samu F.I. 9353 S.W. 1 S2nd Ave.. south of
N. Kendall Drive.
TEMPLE SINAI 10001 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congrsgetlon
Ralph P. Klngaley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Aaaociate Rabbi
Irving Shulkea, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl Service 8 15 p.m
Sat 10 30 am
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
0000 Miller Or. Conservative
2712311 a
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi .
Benjamin Adier, Centor
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan service 7 a.m. Mon S Thaws. S s.m.
Fri eve 8:15 Of. Norman N. Shapiro will
olliciate Cantor Benjamin Adler will chant
Sat 9 00 Sabbath service
Sun. 7:30 p.m. theatre guilj try-outs lor
production ol "Hello Doily."


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
Fuller Elected To Board Of
Universal National Bank
Allen D. Fuller, partner in the
Miami Beach law firm of Fuller
and Feingold, has been elected to
the board of directors of Universal
National Bank. His election was
announced by George Fel-
denkreis, chairman of the board of
Universal, which is building a
new. three-story bank building on
the site of its present head-
quarters at 17701 Biscayne Blvd.
in North Dade.
Fuller also is a registered real
estate broker with the Allen
Fuller Company and is a
registered mortgage broker. He is
a former director of the Miami
Beach of Realtors, a director of
the Miami Beach Bar Association
and a member of the City of
Miami Beach Safety Committee.
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name STUDIO 54 CUT-
TING CONCEPTS at 736 N.E.
167th Street, North Miami Beach.
Fla. intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
COLOSAL
INTERNATIONAL INC.
By: JOSE R. CONDE,
Pres.
Carlos M. Mendez, Esq.
Attorney for Colosal
International Inc.
200 West 49th St.
Hialeah, Florida 33012
19421 November 15,22. 29,1985
December 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Recreational Services
Inc. at 6700 N. Kendall Drive.
Miami, FL 33156 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Myma R. Grushy
Martin Grushy
Milton C. Goodman
Attorney for
Myrna and Martin Grushy
19411 November 8, 15,22,29, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9542
DivUion 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
LILLIAN GOTTFRIED
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of LILLIAN GOTTFRIED,
deceased. File Number 85-9542. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
LOUIS C. GOTTFRIED
1351 N.E. Miami Gardens Dr.
North Miami Beach, FL 33179
Attorney for Personal Repre
sentative:
JULIUS SFARTI
17971 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 108
North Miami Beach. FL 33160
Telephone: (305) 931-8730
Fla. Bar No. 270989
1M0 November 15.22, 1985
Theologian
Universal Bank To Calls For Active Affirmation
Open Branch Of Interreligious Dialogue
In North Miami
Allen D. Fuller
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name General Services at
446 N.W. 28 Street, Miami, Fla.
'3127 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Latin American
Electrical Corp.
Leonard Kalish
Attorney for
Latin American Electrical Corp.
19412November8, 15,22, 29, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MONICA'S IN-
TERIOR at 331 SW 104 Ct. Miami
- Florida 33174 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Daniel Castro
& Monica Castro, Ptr.
19426 November 15.22. 29;
December 6, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9686
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
PAULINE SAMET,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of PAULINE SAMET, deceased.
File Number 85-9686. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
"the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
ALVIN M. SAMET
5724 Michaelangelo St.
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19422 November 15, 22, 1985
Universal National Bank will
open a branch office in the Sans
Souci Shopping Center, North
Miami, Friday, Nov. 22.
North Miami Mayor Marco B.
Loffredo, Jr.. Dade Couty Com-
missioner Barry Schreiber and
other top government, business
and civic leaders will take part in
dedication ceremonies for the
grand opening at 10 a.m.
Announcement of approval of
the new office and its immediate
opening was made by George
Feldenkreis, chairman of the
board of Universal National Bank.
The bank is headquartered at
17701 Biscayne Boulevard in
North Dade, where a three-story
bank building is under
construction.
Feldenkreis said the bank's
board of directors has "made a
strong commitment to investing
in North Miami and to being a
good cooperate citizen of the city.
We believe that the economic pro-
gress of the entire North Dade
area is assured by the diversity of
business and the strength on com-
munity leadership."
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CRT Associates at
8821 SW 69 Ct., Suite D Miami,
Florida 33156 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
JERALD N. COHN
HARVEY A. ROSENBAUM
DAVID E. TANNEN
19383 October 25,
November 1,8.15,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name The Human Ex-
perience Associates at 19612 N.E.
First Avenue, North Miami Beach,
Fla. 33179 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Dr. Scott Simon Fehr
19406November 8. 15, 22, 29. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9008
Diviaion (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANTONIA KORNITZER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ANTONIA KORNITZER.
deceased. File Number 85-9008, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
WEST FLAGLER STREET,
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney arc
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on NOVEMBER 8, 1985.
Personal Representative:
CELIA BABYATSKY
910 West Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 1201
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 374-3116
19403 November 8,15, 1985
One of America's
foremost theologians has
called for an "active affir-
mation" of interreligious
dialogue as a way of
avoiding "religious im-
perialism" and the threat of
a monolithic future.
Speaking at a session of the
American Jewish Committee's
National Executive Council
meeting at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel in Miami, Prof. Harvey Cox
added that a greater acceptance
of religious pluralism was
necessary to offset the fear of the
escalating power of Christian
fundamentalism.
Cox, who is the Victor S.
Thomas Professor of Divinity at
the Harvard University Divinity
School, asserted: "Christian fun-
damentalism is misleading, and
not a healthy basis for inter-
religious dialogue. It is a relation-
ship based on a theology that
forces one group against the
other."
COX, a Baptist minister and
well-known author of many books
and articles on religious topics,
told the audience of Jewish
leaders from the U.S. and Central
America that it was imperative to
encourage dialogue at religious
and theological levels and that to
avoid talking about divisive topics
was not constructive. He
continued:
"In order to get past im-
perialism, we must look toward
the spiritual integrity of the other,
which does not have to be based
on agreement. It is a Providential
gift that we be different. We are
at a stage in history where there is
more of a religious and spiritual
basis needed, where we must
strive toward the active nur-
turance of a religiously pluralistic
situation."
This historic stage, he went on,
stems from "the unexpected rate
of artificial intelligence, combined
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9241
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IAN BERK.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Ian Berk, deceased. File
Number 85-9241, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representatives and the
the personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 8. 1985.
Personal Representatives:
MARY BERK
ANNIE BERK
c/o 9400 Old Cutler Road
Miami, Florida 33156
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
S". SHEVIN. SHAPO &
HEILBRONNER, P.A.
One Southed Third Avenue
Miami, Florid* 33131
Telephone: M6) 347-4700
19404 Novembers, 15, 1985
with a world headed for
homogeneity. We face what might
be called a man-made singie truth
My colleagues at MIT talk of
'world digitization.1 in which we
would be dependent on informa
tion that can be coded by com-
puters. That would leave the
human spirit in danger, when we
would face the fear of excluding
the nuances and the variety of
human life."
"Christians and Jews must mf
beyond mere toleration." he
asserted. "We must accept and
respect the rights of others. By
rereading religious texts, we find
a celebration of the diversity of
pluralism."
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8875
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HYMAN DIENSTAG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Hyman Dienstag. deceased. File
Number 85-8875. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. 3rd PL, Miami. Florida
33130.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND 0BJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 15. 1985.
Personal Representative:
Jerome Dienstag
26 East Blvd.
Rochester. New York 14610
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Robert M. Herman, Esquire
Blank, Rome, Comisky ,'.
McCauley
4770 Biscayne Blvd.. 12th Fl.
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 573-5500
19424 November. 15. 22.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-43759 CA-01
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
CHASE FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOHN WORTH ADAMS, et ux et
al..
Defendants.
TO: HOUSEHOLD FINANCE
CORPORATION OF ALU'S
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 4. Block 2.
FAIRWAY PLAZA. ICCOrdiM to
the Plat thereof, as recorded hi
Plat Book 78, at Page 33. of <*"
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida, has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it, on Sheppard Faber.
Attorney for Plaintiff, "hose
address is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Cables.
Florida 33146. on or before
December 6, 1985 and Be the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief .demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 4th day
November. 1985.
RICHARD P- BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19410November8. 15,22,29.1
ol


Friday, November 15. 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
blic Notices
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
[ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
BfUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
"l, FOR BADE COUNTY
FSFR-U. JURISDICTION
DIVISION
f ASE NO. 85-44469 (24)
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
E A T FINANCIAL
tERAI-
aintiff
llJCISCO GUTIERREZ, et
et al..
,f,.ndants.
HANNANAL1 ESPAHBODI
POURAN ESPAHBODI, his
88 Pond Avenue. B624,
Wine. Massachusetts
., ARE NOTIFIED that an
m (or Foreclosure of Mortgage
the following described
fcertv LOT 18 IN BLOCK 9.
DEVI IN AIRE ESTATE,
rjON TWO; ACCORDING
THE PLAT THEREOF. AS
-ORPEP IN PLAT BOOK 104
GE 30, OF THE PUBLIC
CORDS OF DADE COUNTY,
WIPA. has been filed against
and you are required to serve a
of your written defenses, if
to it. on Sheppard Faber,
urnej for Plaintiff, whose
ress is Suite 214. 1570
Irupi Avenue. Coral Gables.
rj,ia. 33146 on or before
ember 2. 1985 and file the
inal with the Clerk of this
either before service on
mtiff"s attorney or immediately
after: otherwise a default will
entered against you for the
.(demanded in the complaint.
TTNESS my hand and the seal
this Court this 23rd day of
aber. 1985.
RICHARB P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By Lisamarie Marcano
' As Deputy Clerk
}1 November 1,8, 15,22,1985
NOTICE UNDER
flCTITIOUS NAME LAW
DTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
H!e in business under the Re-
name C.I.C. MANAGE-
at 8821 S.W. 69 Ct., Suite
ni. Florida 33156 intend to
er said name with the Clerk
Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
Horida.
t.I.C. FINANCIAL, INC.
l.A./C.I.C MANAGEMENT
October 25.
N remberl,8,15.1985
NOTICE UNDER
|crmors name law
Tl( I IS HEREBY GIVEN
lie undersigned, desiring to
in business under the
lious name INTERNAL
pCDJE ASSOCIATES OF
STRINGS at 232
ard Drive, Miami Springs.
i 33166, intend to register
M with the Clerk of the
Court of Dade County.
I0LDBERG, GELLES,
KUTELL & REED.
M.D.'S. P.A.
| LEONARD GOLDBERG,
PRESIDENT
M. FROMBERG. ESQ.
fney for GOLDBERG,
LES. K1TELL & REED,
P.A
October 25;
November 1,8. 15, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
PCTITIOUS NAME LAW
THE IS HEREBY GIVEN
le undersigned, desiring to
1 in business under the fie-
I name Su tienda latina de
s & Su tienda de gomas latina
J199 West Flagler Street
p. Florida intend to register
me with the Clerk of the
Court of Dade County,
Flagler Tire Corporation
py: ANGEL L. GARCIA
PRESIDENT
'LICK, DROESE &
PU.EY
November 1,8.15,22, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
ICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
fto undersigned, desiring to
p m business under the Be-
name The Miami Back
12405 NE 6 Avenue.
gwami. Fla. 33161 intend to
F.said name with the Clerk
t-ircuit Court of Dade Coun-
Rida.
Citation Physicians Inc.
October 25.
November 1,8.15,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-45191
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SARA BERMUDEZ SERRANO.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ALIRIO SERRANO.
Respondent/H usband
TO: ALIRIO SERRANO
Calle93A/ll-07
Apt. 506
Bogota, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on David
S. Berger, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 6, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(305) 672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
19398 November 1,8,15, 22,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-45301 (11)
DAVID LIJEK.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
EVA MALTZ LIJEK
Respondent/Wife.
TO: EVA MALTZ LIJEK
18 Gainsborough Gardens
Golders Green. NW II
London. England
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Divorce has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of vour written defenses, if
any. to Ron HYMAN P. GALBUT,
attorney for Husband, whose ad-
dress is 999 Washington Ave..
Miami Beach. FL 33139. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 30, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 30th day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQ.
Galbut. Galbut and Menin
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19400 November 1,8,15,22,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name INTERNAL
MEDICINE ASSOCIATES OF
MIAMI LAKES GOLDBERG,
GELLES, KUTELL & REED,
M.D.'S at 7480 Fairway Drive,
Miami Lakes, Florida 33014,
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GOLDBERG, GELLES,
KUTELL & REED,
M D 'S PA.
BY: LEONARD GOLDBERG,
PRESIDENT
LYNN W. FROMBERG. ESQ.
Attorney for GOLDBERG.
GELLES, KUTELL & REED,
M.D.'S. P.A.
19388 October 25;
November 1,8.15. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-45192
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
VERONICA DOBSON ROLLE.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
MELFORD ROLLE.
Respondent/H usband.
TO: Melford Rolle
Address unknown'
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on David
S. Berger, attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styles court
on or before December 6, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the compalint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(305) 672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner/Wife
19399 November 1,8,15.22.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-45187
FAMILY DIVISION
Florida Bar No. 032230
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PHILIP UDAIRIGO
TRUGLIO
Petitioner/Husband
and
MELINDA JANE TRUGLIO
Respondent/Wife
TO: MELINDA JANE
TRUGLIO
c/o Mrs. Jill Montague
17 Beach Road.
Bondi Beach
Sidney 2026
New South Wales.
Australia
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on HAYS, GRUND-
WERG & VANN attorneys for
Petitioner, whose address is 28
West Flagler Street, Suite 800,
Miami. Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 6, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 29 day of October, 1985.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Moses J. Grandwerg
Hays. Grundwerg & Vann
28 West Flagler St.,
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 379-8435
(Attorney for Petitioner
19396 November 1.8. 15. 22. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-46661
Florida Bar Number 72210
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
PAMELA DE QUINDE
Wife/Petitioner
and
JUAN C. QUINDE.
Husband/Respondent
TO: JUAN C. QUINDE
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an petition for
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on
LEONARD SELKOWITZ, J.D..
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Suite 810 Biscay ne
Bulding. 19 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 13th. 1985; otherwise a
default will lie entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 7 day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Leonard Selkowitz, J.D.
Suite 810 Biscaynr Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: (305) 358-2900
19415 November 15, 22, 29;
December 6, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name COFINO FLOWERS
at 555 East 25 Street, No. 106.
Hialeah. Fl. 33013 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Santiago S. Rodriguez,
Ines C. Rodriguez
19375 October 25;
November 1.8,15,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-46851
Florida Bar No. 232221
In Re: Marriage of
ANTOLIN O. SIERRA
Petitioner,
and
EVARISTA L. SIERRA
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Evarista L. Sierra
4903 Kennedy Boulevard
North Bergen, New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the
Petition upon the Petitioner's
attorney. CARLOS M. MENDEZ.
ESQ.. at 200 West 49th Street.
Hialeah, Florida 33012, and file
the original Response of Pleading
in the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, on or before the
13th day of December, 1985. If you
fail to do so, a Default Judgment
will be taken against you for the
relief demanded in the Petition.
This Notice shall be published
once each week, for four
consecutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN, Miami. Florida.
Dated at Dade County, Florida,
this 8th day of November, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, LAW
OFFICES
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33012
By: Carlos M. Mendez, Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
19420 November 5. 22. 29;
December 6,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
(iENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-44644
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
DR. AQUIBA S. BENARROCH,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: DR. AQUIBA S .
BENARROCH and COTA
BENARROCH. his wife. Ave. C
Qta Montse Planta Baja. Caracas.
Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Unit 704, of ROYAL
CLUB CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium according to the
Declaration of Comdominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 11979. at Page
1624. of the Public Records of
Dade County. Florida, has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it, on
Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
December 2, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 24th day of
October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19390 November 1,8,15.22, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JEWEL J at 16400
N.W. 15th Avenue, Miami, Fla. in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
William Schneider, Inc.
Jack W. Reiff, President
Roy L. Weiss
Attorney for William Schneider,
Inc.
19418 November 15, 22, 29;
December 6, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-43016
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FB 225096
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROSMIRA FRANCO.
Petitioner,
and
JORGE PEREZ.
Respondent.
TO: JORGE PEREZ
1951 NE 167 Street No. 6
N. Miami Beach. FL 33160
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
MANDO GUTIERREZ, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400. Miami.
Florida 33145. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before Nov. 22, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeJts in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 16 day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ
Attorney for Petitioner
2153 Coral Way, Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33145
19367 October 25;
November 1.8, 15, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EMBASSY FORTY-
ONE, EMBASSY 41, EMBASSY
FORTY-ONE KOSHER
DELICATE-ESSEN, EMBASSY
41 KOSHER DELICATE-ESSEN
at 534 Arthur Godfrey Road Miami
Beach, FL. 33140 intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
BARDA 41, INC.
By: Phillip Goodman, Pres.
19376 October 25;
November 1.8.15, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION-
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-39018 CA-29
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
.States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
LUIS M. LOPEZ.
Defendant.
TO: LUIS M. LOPEZ
9360-70 S.W. 87th Avenue.
No. S-19
Miami, Florida 33176
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Unit S-19. of
BRITTANY HOUSE
CONDOMINIUM, a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium, filed
under Clerk's File no. 83R-352885.
in Official Records Book 11995, at
Page 1385, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida, has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146, on or before
December 2, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 21st day of
October. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19381 October 25;
November 1,8,15, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-43233
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
OLIVIA E. DIEZ.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
BERNARDO DIEZ.
Respondent/H usband.
TO: (LAST KNOWN ADDRESS)
Mr. Bernardo Diez
2903 N.E. 163rd. Street
Apt. 1009
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33160
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Gregg
Pessin, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1401 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33135. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 22. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
ince each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16 dav of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: GWEN D. ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Gregg Pessin, Esquire
Stone & Sostchin, P.A.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
19365 October 25;
November 1.8.15.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name JC Coin Laundry at
1677 NW 27 Ave. Miami. Fla. in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Pascual Riveron
1677 NW 27 Ave.
Miami. Fla.
19417 November 15. 22.29;
December 6.1985


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 15, 1985
:
Public Notices!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9523
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY MILLER,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
Fla. Bar No. 205656
The administration of the estate
of HARRY MILLER, deceased,
File Number 85-9523, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal represenative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are^
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate (2) any objection
by an interested person on whom
this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT. SO FILED
WILL BrJ FOREVgR BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
JEANNETTE MILLER
7441 Wayne Avenue. Apt. 11 A
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBIN, ESQ.
CYPEN. CYPEN & DRIBIN
P.O. BOX 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (306) 532-3200
19416 November 15. 22, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Caac No. 86-40112-FC-16
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of i
SHARON GRISHAM )
Petitioner
and
RICHARD GRISHAM
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RICHARD GRISHAM.
1808-A Hurry Ct., Arlington, Tx
76010.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.3. Florida 33162, on
or before, Nov. 22, 1985, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered agiinst you.
Dated: October 16, 1985.
RICH \RD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
B> D.C. BRYANT
as Deputy Clerk
19366 October 25,
November 1,8,15,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 85-44244
FAMILY DIVISION
FLORIDA BAR NO. 402280
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARLEN PAULA
ARGUEDAS GARCIA,
Petitioner,
and
LUIZ GARCIA.
Respondent.
TO: LUIZ GARCIA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Petition
upon the Petitioner's attorney,
CHARLOTTE E. KARLAN, ESQ.
at 5901 S.W. 74th Street, Suite
400, S. Miami, Florida, and file the
original Answer or Pleading in the J
office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, on or before the 2 day of
December. 1985. If you fail to do
so, a Default Judgment will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition. :
DATED at Miami, Dade County,1
Florida this 22 day of October.,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Clarinda Brown i
Deputy Clerk
19382 October 25;
November 1.8, 15, 1985:]
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9524
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAM FRAEMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ABRAM FRAEMAN. deceased.
File Number 85-9524, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
St., Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. 0) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 15, 1985.
Personal Representative:
MARTIN FRAEMAN
9 Barclay Court
Rockville, Maryland 20860
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Michael A. Dribin, Esq.
Cypen. Cypen and Dribin
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19414 November 15, 22, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 85-45871-FC-
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
DEBORAH J. CLANCY
Petitioner
and
THOMAS A. CLANCY
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: THOMAS A. CLANCY
15 Comet Rd..
Rocky Point,
N.Y. 11778
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been tiled against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B. Florida 33162, on
or before December 6. 1985, and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you for.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By K. Seifried
As Deputy Clerk
19409 November 8, 15.22, 29 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SER-
VICEMASTER MAINTENANCE
SYSTEMS OF MIAMI at 13011
Southwest 84th Street, Miami,
Florida 33183. intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DGR ENTERPRISES. INC.
By LARRY DIAMOND, President
ALAN S. KESSLER
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19401 November 8, 15,22. 29, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9486
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JACK WOLFE, a/k/a
SAMUEL WOLFE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACK WOLFE, a/k/a SAMUEL
WOLFE, deceased. File Number
85-9486, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, vei.ae. or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
>egun on November 15, 1985.
Personal Representatives:
HOWARD WOLFE
15 Aldren Drive
West Caldwell, N.J. 07002
MICHAEL WOLFE
77 St. Marks Place
New York. N.Y. 10003
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19419 November 15.22, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CARIBBEAN
FISHING ENTERPRISE at 1748
NE 158 Street NORTH MIAMI
BEACH. FL. 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
SYDNEY A. FRANCIS
JOSHUA D. BASH. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 228
1926 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, FL. 33020
305-940-1200/922-1400
19377 October 25;
November 1,8. 15,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-41856 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
RESIDENTIAL FINANCIAL
CORP..
Plaintiff
GARY WALKUP. etal..
Defendants.
TO: GARY WALKUP
10900 South Poria
Chicago, Illinois
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Unit No. 407. of
WINSTON TOWERS 700
CONDOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded November 25,
1980, in Official Records Book
10939, at Page 2094, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida 33146, on or before
December 2, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 21st day of
October. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19380 October 25;
November 1,8, 15, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name ROYAL PALM
TRADING COMPANY, d/b/a MY
AN-MI SOCCER CAMP at 250
Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables.
Florida 33134, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv
Florida.
ROYAL PALM TRADING
COMPANY, d/b/a/ MY AN MI
SOCCER CAMP
GEOFFREY W. PINES. Esq.
Attorney for
ROYAL PALM TRADING
COMPANY, d/b/a/ MY-AN-MI
SOCCER CAMP
19405 November 8, 15, 22,29.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-9005
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL M. ABENSON.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of SAMUEL M.
BENSON, deceased, File Number
85-9005, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
SYFRA BRUHN. whose address
is 84 Cedarview Drive, Wheeling,
West Virginia 26003. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
state to whom a copy of this
Votice of Administration has been
nailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
1ATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
N'OTICE, to file any objections
hey may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
November 8. 1985.
S/ SYFRA BRUHN
As Personal Representative
uf the Estate of
Samuel M. Abenson.
Deceased
SILVER & SILVER
Attorneys for Personal
Representative
Suite 1326
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Tel. (305) 374-4888
By: S/MAX R. SILVER
19408 November8. 15. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name FALCO'S PIZZERIA
at Suite 100. Fransher Bldg., 9300
South Dixie Highway, Miami, Fla.
33156, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
FELLIPPO, INC.
By Phillip Falco, Jr.
ALAN S. KESSLER, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19425 November 15.22.29;
December 6, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigne, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name NAUTICAL
PLEASURE at 7980 NW 56th
Street, Miami, Florida intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
NAUTICAL
PLEASURE, INC.
19413 November 15. 22, 29;
December 6, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 86-38847 CA-01
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE M. RIVERA, et al
Defendants.
TO: JOSE M. RIVERA
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against JOSE M.
RIVERA, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida: Unit 6-1,
LAKESIDE XI CONDOMINIUM,
a Condominium according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded in Official
Records Book 11619, at Page
1469, amended by instrument
recorded in Official Records Book
11747, at Page 1472. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida 33146. on or before
December 6, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 30th day of
October. 1985.
RICAHRD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19402 November 8, 15. 22,29, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-39766
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The adoption of
CESAR TORRES
by
JUAN TORRES AND
MARGARET TORRES, his wife.
Petitioners.
TO: FRANCES ROJAS
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for the Adoption- of
CESAR TORRES has been filed
and you, being the natural mother
of said CESAR TORRES, are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
Petitioners' attorney, whose ad-
dress is 9995 Sunset Drive, Suite
108. Miami, FL 33173. on or
before December 2, 1985, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on Peti-
tioners' attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
DATED this 23 day of October
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19392 November 1,8, 15,22, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name INTERNAL
MEDICINE ASSOCIATES OF
MIAMI LAKES at 7480 Fairway
Drive, Miami Lakes, Florida
33014, intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
GOLDBERG, GELLES
KUTELL & REED,
M.D.'S, P.A.
BY: LEONARD GOLDBERG
PRESIDENT
LYNN W. FROMBERG, ESQ.
Attorney for GOLDBERG
Srrsp KUTELL & REED'
19387 October 26-
November 1,8. 15. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-37830 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JAMES W. KING, et ux., et al .
Defendants.
TO: ALTHEA M. KING |
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: LOT 9, BLOCK 6.
LAKE LUCERNE, SECTION
NO. 1, according to the plat
thereof, recorded in plat book 70,
page 89, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
November 22, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 16th day of
October. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19368 October 25;
November 1,8, 15,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-39618 CA-10
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
WMAC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
OSCAR SARMIENTO. et ux.. et
al..
Defendants.
TO: OSCAR SARMIENTO and
EI.MA SARMIENTO. his wife.
George West, Texas 78022
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 1, in Block 3. of
TOBLER TERRACE. FIRST
ADDITION, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
51, at Pag? 97. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
November 22, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will *.
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 16th day of
October, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19369 October 25;
November 1,8,15,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name INTERNAL
MEDICINE ASSOCIATES OF
MIAMI SPRINGS GOLDBERG,
GELLES. KUTELL & REED,
M.D.'S, at 232 Westward Drive,
Miami Springs, Florida 33166,
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
GOLDBERG, GELLES,
KUTELL & REED.
M.D.'S, P.A.
BY: LEONARD GOLDBERG,
PRESIDENT
LYNN W. FROMBERG, ESQ.
Attorney for GOLDBERG.
GELLES, KUTELL & REED,
M.D.'S
19385 October 25;
November 1.8, 15, 1985
V


Obituaries
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
of Miami Beach, passed away
I Aronovitz was a pioneer Mia-
resided here 65 years, coming
Inville. She was a pioneer
Lmpie Israel of Greater Miami.
W by a daughter. Arline Kent
ird of Miami Beach, a grand-
iKent and three other jrrand-
rices were held with interment
[emetery.
' Miami, passed away Nov. 7.
j made his home in Miami for
jars coming from Birmingham,
i member of Tempel Or-Olom.
J by his wife Jennie Mae; sons
[lla) Clein of Miami: Haiman
En of Old Saybrook. Conn.;
lie) Clein of Miami; Robert
_ein of Ivoryton. Conn.;
Inn (Allan) Rose of Silver Spr-
1 Helene Radoff of Miami. Ser-
jd at Temple Or-Olom with in-
|t. Nebo Cemetery.
jEvelyn (Eva). Nov. 10. The
Paul S., of North Miami
II. Menorah Chapels.
IIAVIS, Marie of Miami Beach,
lassachusetts. The Riverside,
i P.. 78, of Coral Gables, Nov.
I interment in Baltimore.
|se, Nov. 10. Rubin-Zilbert.
nora, of Miami Beach, Nov. 10.
kpel.
>nna. of North Miami Beach.
J held.
fS.. 82, of Miami Beach, Nov. 9.
on. of Miami Beach. Rubin-
! Tillie. Nov. 3. Services were
COHEN. Harry, of North Bay Village.
Rubin-Zilbert. ^
BORENSTE1N. Celia. of North Miami. Ser
vices were held.
KASTENBAI'M. Ann. of Miami Beach.
Blasberg Chain-:
GALLNER. Ruth, Tl, of Coral Gables. Nov.
4. Services were held.
GENDELMAN, Sam, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices were held.
I.EVINE. Rheta. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilberl.
SACKNER, Albert B.. 79. of North Miami
Beach. Nov. 4. The Riversi.i.
WOLF. Carol, of Miami Beach. Nov. 4. Ser-
vices were held.
GRAND, Adele, of North Miami Beach.
Nov. 4. Mi norah Chapels.
OLSHEN. Mrs. Elsa. Rubin Zilbert.
KAUFMAN. Anna (Jacobs). 72. of Lake
Park. Nov. 2. Riverside West Palm Beach
Chapel.
LEVINE, Marion. 68. of North Miami
Beach. Nov. 4. Levitt-Weinstein.
TRAUGOT. Max. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
MORRIS, Charles S of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices private. Union, New Jersey.
CUTTLER, Morry, 62, Oct. 31. The
Riverside.
SMOLIN, EtU, of Bal Harbour. Oct. 30.
Services and entombment in Elmont, New
York. The Riverside in charge of
arrangement:;
YAEGER, Seymour, of North Miami Beach.
Oct. 31. Services were held at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
LEVY, Netty, of Miami Beach. Services
were held.
MARKS, Helen, 82, of Miami, Oct. 30. Ser-
vices were held.
ROSENVALD. Chaim. 79, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
FREEDMAN. Rachel May. 79. of North
Miami Beach and Erie. Pa.. Oct. 26
ItriiKNSTEIN. Allen I.. 77, of Miami, Nov.
>i. Menorah Chapels.
GUTERMAN. Hannah, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
BELL. David. 64, of Miami. Nov. 5. The
Riverside.
SINGER, Libby. 43. of Miami. Nov. 8. Ser
vires were held.
CARROLL, Thelma (SALE) of Miami
Beach. Nov. 6. The Riverside.
LINTON. Leo, 73. Nov. 5. Services were
held.
LURENSKY, Anna Goren, 87. of North
Miami Beach and Hallandale. Nov. 6. Inter
ment in Sharon, Massachusetts Menorah
Chapaji,
SIROVICH, Raymond, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
KRANZ. Nathan. 88. The Riverside
EINHORN. Edward, of Surfside. Nov. 8.
Blasberg Chapel.
KAPLAN. Geraldine. 76. of North Miami
Beach. Nov. 6. Levitt-Weinstein.
EMMERGLICK. Seymour A.. 79, of Bal
Harbour. Nm\ 7 The Riverside.
NEUFELD, Gertrude C. 78, of North
Miami Beach. Nov. 6. The Riverside.
BERNSTEIN. Rose L. 85. of Miami Beach,
Nov. 6. The Riverside.
Kirrrnfirld Hd
rk. Michigan 482:17
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and I'nderstanding
Complete shipping Service Knim Florida f\reu
Your First Call to Us will
_____Handle All Funeral Arrangements
ROBERTJACOBSON
le death of Robert Jacobson of Miami Beach and Cincinnati
loid in the philanthropic community that will be felt in every
*1 charitable fundraising.
\ Jacobson was a Founder and a member of its board at Mt.
Hedicai Center. He also served on the board of the National
kon Foundation. He was a Free Mason and a Shriner and a
us contributor to the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
kater Miami Jewish Home for the Aged. He was a member of
piety of Fellows of the Anti-Defamation League and was a
of B'nai B'rith s Century and President's clubs. Mr.
Dn also held membership in the Bascom-Palmer Society of
nd was a donor at the Miami Heart Institute. He was a sup-
kf Israel Bonds and the Jewish Theological Seminary and was
" as "Man of the Year" by both these organizations during his
He was a Hadassah Associate and a supporter of the
Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem. He contributed to the Technion
Irty and the Tel Aviv University in Israel.
Jacobson was also a supporter of Christ Hospital in
Hi. the United Way, the Salvation Army and the Catholic
vn in that community.
vas a life member of Klwanis and belonged to the Torch Club
Cinnati Club, as well.
Jacobson's commitment to Judaism was reflected in his
ship in the Adath Israel Congregation and Wise Temple in
Hi and Temple EmanuEl and Temple Israel locally.
[is survived by his beloved wife, Jean, a brother, Harry, of
and sister, Anna, of Detroit, Michigan. Interment took place
Wt with memorial services In Cincinnati and at Temple
I with Rabbi Irving Lehrman officiating.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
?REST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
County
Broward County
5.12-2099
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL tX
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
The Only
Guaranteed
No. Miami Beach Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
Pre-Arrangements
with
No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
K.pr..s..ni.-<| in Hiwt-hI,. Memorial Chapel. In.
n: (212)268-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., forest Hills. N.Y
Tradition, it's what
makes us Jews. That's
why we're beside you
when you need us
most. After all, Our
Real Involvement is
with the Living.
Riverside
Memorial Chapel
(305)531-1151
Dade Broward Palm Beach New York


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Fridsy, November 15, 1985
Miami AJC Present
Medallions to Eight Mayors
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Young Leadership Council (YLC) kicked off its
effort on behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund with a
"Salute to Broadway," a first-time ever
$2,500 minimum gift, black tie affair held
recently at Coconut Grove's Grand Bay Hotel.
The Fate
Of The
Jewish People
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
multiplicity of denominations
within the Jewish religion
enhances Jewish options. But the
recent trend toward polarization
and increased interdenomina-
tional clashes within Judaism is
jeopardizing the ideological
pluralism in Jewish life.
This condition was examined at
a symposium presented by the
faculty of the National Jewish
Center for Learning and Leader-
ship (CLAL). Addressing the
question. "Will There Be One
Jewish People in the Year 2000?".
Rabbi Irving Greenberg. presi-
dent of CLAL. detailed the
roadblocks to unifying the Jewish
people and proposed practical
solutions to "bridge religious
gaps" between the Orthodox.
Reform and Conservative
movements.
Greenberg, an Orthodox Rabbi,
warned that, while there is an im-
age of Jews being clannish, "we
are heading toward a communal
and personal tragedy... a fun-
damental split in the Jewish
people."
Citing a recent Wall Street
Journal survey, Greenberg said
that there are about 10,000 con-
verts to Judaism annually in the
U.S., and he predicted that 90 per-
cent of them will be Reform, not
fulfilling the conversion re-
quirements demanded by Or-
thodox and Conservative Jews.
Seen at the event were (left to right): Susan
Sirotta, YLC campaign vice chairman; Susan
Kleinberg, co-chairman of the event; Richard
Berkowitz, YLC campaign chairman; Nancy
Berkowitz; Maria Shohat; and Ed Shohat,
event co-chairman.
The Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee has presented special
medallions to the mayors of
eight municipalities that
passed the AJC social club
anti-discrimination
ordinance.
Gerald Katcher. representing
the chapter, made the presenta-
tions at a reception at Vizcaya
Museum during the Committee's
annual National Executive Com-
mittee meeting, which closed here
Sunday.
Those honored were Mayors
Martin Shapiro, of Bar Harbor
Islands; Dorothy Thomson, Coral
Gables; Stephen Clark, Dade
County; Raul Martinez, Hialeah;
Daniel Riccio, Hialeah Gardens,
Maurice Ferre, Miami; Malcolm
Fromberg, Miami Beach; and
Aramando A. Penedo,
Sweetwater.
A SPECIAL AWARD was
presented to Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, of Dade County "for
his initiative prohibiting County
money going to groups using
discriminatory clubs."
In making the presentations,
Katcher hailed the passage of the
ordinance as "a victory where
ethics triumphed over vested in-
terest and convention."
Calling attention to the
medallion with its Biblical quota-
tion. "As my parents planted for
me, so I plant for my children,''
Katcher observed:
"This victory had its ripple ef-
fects. Nine publically elected
bodies became aware that social
clubs are the last legal bastion of
discrimination in this country, and
without membership ones pro-
gress up the corporate ladder is
limited." He added:
"The first Cuban elected to the
city commission of Coral Gables
carried the coals to his commis-
sion. A four-group coalition of
Jews, Blacks, and Hispanics -
one a women's group stood
together on the issue."
Violinist. Peter Zazofsky. and
Miami pianist. Michel* Levin
will perform on Sunday even-
ing. Nov. U oi 7&0 p.m.f-r A
ing ujf Music -it Temple
Beth Am. Doreen Man 00*
niTfur,.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Sliced or Unsliced,
Baked Fresh Daily
Pumpernickel
Bread
.69
Available at Publix Store* with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Onion Bagels
699
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Serve with Publix Premium
Vanilla Ice Cream
Apple Pie
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.................^h$169
Tender and Moist
Gourmet Brownies.......55 H*
Great for Dunking
Plain Mini Donuts..........*? 99*
Prices Effective
Nov. 14 thru 20,1985
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Perfect to Make Your Homemade Dressing
or Staffing
Stuffing Bread.............. 99*
Tea aas for faeay iaaaitaji "<* ptb is iiBss tats tun
wing. Pick up a box of o*ciou, fast lionn, bak aod
s#rv hors'd oauvre* for your gathering. Wa now have two
sizss from which to chooaa. (Avalabla in Our Fraati Danish
Bakary Dapartmant Only)
50-cLpfcg._______________________________S11.05
10Oct. pfcg.______________________________$10.05


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