The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02959

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
"dTewIslhi Floif idiamL
volume 58 Number 42
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, October 18,1985
Fill Shochtl By Mail $1 35
Price 50 Cents
in Hollywood Leaders Rap Deal
Women's ORT Confab ^v,**%awc x*c*js x^v^c**
to Hear Top stars Xhat Freed Pirates
Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg
lot New Jersey and feminist
author Marilyn French will
be special guest speakers at
I the opening banquet of the
28th Biennial National Con-
vention of Women's
American ORT (Organiza-
tion for Rehabilitation
through Training) on Sun-
day, Oct. 20. The four-day
convention through Oct. 23,
[is being held at the Diplomat
I Hotel in Hollywood, Fla.
The convention will bring
I together top leaders from nearly
11,300 chapters across the United
States to review current prc-
Igrams and policy, elect new of-
ficers, and work on new program
proposals. In addition, says Ger-
|trude S. White, national president
of Women's American ORT, the
convention serves as a forum
vhere national leaders can ex-
change information and be briefed
on overseas developments by in-
emational representatives of the
Vorld ORT Union.
SANDRA ISENSTEIN of
highland Park, 111., is chairman of
he National Convention. Bernice
Sturtz of Livingston, N.J.; Ruth
laffel of Manhasset, N.Y., and
lalkmdale, Fla., are co-chairmen,
eese Feldman of Tenfly, N.J., is
Chairman of the National Ex-
ecutive Committee, Women's
Continued on Page 10-A
Gertrude S. White
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Conference of
Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions has condemned all
"gentlemen's agreements"
that led to the release of the
Palestinians who hijacked
the Italian cruise ship
Achille Lauro, and urged
the U.S. to begin taking "a
strong position" not only
toward terrorists but
toward Arab countries that
harbor and support them.
Speaking at a press conference
here, Presidents Conference
chairman Kenneth Bialkin said
the Western world was capable of
dealing with "Arab terrorism"
and "we require only the will to
act." Reading from a prepared
statement, he added, "We must
act to reject any deal with ter-
rorists that give them safe
passage after they commit their
crimes."
REFERRING obliquely to
Egypt's acknowledgement that it
permitted the ship hijackers to go
free after the passengers were
released, Bialkin said that "we
condemn all 'gentlemen's
agreements' that promised them
freedom from arrest and trial.
And we call on our government to
demand that the terrorists be
brought to justice by Italy, by
Egypt and by the U.S."
The statement asserted that
fighting terrorism effectively call-
ed for "a strong position" with
governments that supply ter-
rorists with arms, training, money
and safe haven." He included Jor-
dan, Saudi Arabia, Syria, South
Yemen, Libya and the Soviet
Union.
Although Egypt was omitted
from the list, Bialkin criticized
Egypt's conduct of its relations
with Israel since the conclusion of
the peace treaty between them in
1979.
In response to questions,
Bialkin said that "strong action"
should include the refusal to sell
Kenneth Bialkin
new arms to Jordan until King
Hussein recognizes Israel and
negotiates with it, and conveying
a "clear message" to other Arab
states that the nature of U.S. rela-
tions with these countries in-
cluding arms sales and economic
cooperation depends on their
willingness to make peace with
Israel.
Peace Back on Track
Peres to Talk to Reagan This Week
Sen. Frank Lautenberg
Terrorists* Victim
Klinghoffer Was Chief
Of Israel Bonds Division
Bv BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Maurice Blond, a boyhood
friend of Leon Klinghoffer
bf New York, the only
bassenger on the Italian
truise liner Achille Lauro to
murdered by the Arab
Brrorists hijackers, believes
[hat there was "no ques-
tion" that Klinghoffer had
een slain "because he was
a Jew."
Blond, who is chairman of the
Board of the Israel Bond cam-
paign's New York Division of
Organizations, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Kl-
inghoffer was a regular con-
tributor to New York synagogues
and was always "very generous"
in giving to Jewish causes.
BLOND SAID his friend has
been very active in the
Brotherhood Synagogue in Green-
Continued on Page 8-A
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres was
to make new proposals to
President Reagan on how to
bring Jordan and non-
Palestine Liberation
Organization Palestinians to
the peace table with Israel,
aides of the Premier told
reporters here. He was to
meet Reagan in Washington
later this week.
They said Peres believes the
discrediting of the PLO and its
discomfiture over the Achille
Lauro hijack affair could be a pro-
pitious turning point in Middle
East peace efforts.
THE PREMIER will make use
of his visit to Washington to con-
vince Administration and public
opinion in the U.S. that there is a
close, direct relationship between
PLO leader Yasir Arafat and all of
the PLO leadership with recent
terrorist events in the Middle
East, including the seizure of the
Italian cruise ship and the murder
of one of its passengers, Leon Kl-
inghoffer, by Palestinian
terrorists.
Peres has praised the U.S. in-
terception of the four hijackers
when the Egyptian airliner carry-
ing them to freedom was forced
by U.S. Navy fighter planes to
land in Sicily. He called it "a land-
mark in the fight to eradicate ter-
rorism" in a letter he sent to
Reagan. He sent a similar letter to
Secretary of State George Shultz.
At Sunday's Cabinet session,
Peres rejected Likud demands for
a full-scale policy debate by the
cabinet or the Knesset before his
departure for the U.S. He said the
positions he would present in
Washington conformed to the
policy guidelines of the national
unity government drawn up by
the Labor Party and Likud when
they formed their coalition in
September, 1984.
PERES" AIDES maintained
that the guidelines allow the
Premier to be flexible and for-
thcoming. He left Tuesday for
Vienna to attend the meeting
there of the Socialist Interna-
tional and then was to go to
Washington for meetings with
Reagan and top Administration
officials.
Peres is scheduled to address
the 40th anniversary session of
the United Nations General
Assembly in New York on Mon-
day. Officials here said he would
cancel that appearance if an in-
vitation was extended to PLO
Chief Arafat. The invitation was
Continued on Page 12-A
Inside
48 Hours of Terror,
Death 2-A
First Rumors of
Murder 3-A
U.S. Will Deal Harshly in
Future... 8-A
Did Victim Have Heart
Attack? 14-A
'Maximum' Prosecution
Urged .. 14-A
Cranston Vows
Reagan Will Lose on Arms to Jordan
LOS ANGELES Sen. Alan
Cranston warned last week that
President Reagan "faces almost
certain defeat" by the Congress in
his announced plan to sell U.S.
;u*ms to Jordan.
At a press conference held in
Westwood, Cranston also ex-
pressed deep concern about the
announcement by Great Britain of
a proposed $5 billion arms sale to
Saudi Arabia.
The President last Friday pro-
posed a $1.5 to $1.9 billion sale of
advanced combat fighters and
other weapons to Jordan. King
Hussein of Jordan addressed the
United Nations on Friday and met
with President Reagan and Con-
gressional leaders in Washington
last week.
FULL TEXT of Cranston's
statement reads:
"I am deeply concerned about
the President's announcement to
sell from $1.5 to $1.9 billion in
arms to Jordan and a previous an-
nouncement by Great Britain that
Continued on Page 15-A
Prime Minister Peres


P*je 2-A T*e
FVwVfianrFridar. October 18. 19S5
Only 48 Hours
But They Left Terror,
Death in Their Wake


JTA l*trr*atvmal H'tnr Serw
The hijack of the Italian
cruise ship Achille Lauro by
four Palestinian terrorists
off Egypt's Mediterranean
coast last week, though
lasting little more than 4
hours, left death in its wake,
and an intraabonal furor
over the killers" apparent
escape from justice.
The United Sates aiu^ the
"brutal killing" . identified as Leon KI-
69. a New York City
who was Jewish and
warmed to a wbeeJchair. His
death, intimated after the hi-
jackers surrendered off Port Said.
Egypt, was confirmed some hours
inter by the VS. Ambassador to
Egypt Nicholas Vebotes who
w landed in Cairo that Egypt
prosecute "those sons of bitches
But the Egyptian authorities,
who granted the hijackers safe
conduct out of Egypt probably a
condition of the surrender, in-
they knew nothing of Ki-
r's niadii at the time
IN A Jerusalem radio interview
last Thursday. Premier Shimon
Peres declared Israel would not
irg-.ve or iaaM --e aaa The
world, he said, is witnessing "a
new kind of racism in which an
eJderry man m a wheeJeha^-
murdered ui cold blood just
tca^se rus name sounds Jewish."
Peres bluntly accused the
PaJestme Liberation Orgamzatioc
and its leader. Yasr Arafat, of
respoBsaffity for the tragedy. The
PLO deroed ccrapiiery and' even
boaae: ti^t i:r-.-:rriacy~ had
MM a affecting the n>
jaam surrender hereby savir^
--" t> .. _~t t rrvw rrrr 9 M"">
ir.o ;issev-~? *^ ^-
La---, when she was seire-i
..-___- i_.. -_i- -
BMV(^ : 1 f r-f Bjaj -.-. -
^'-i- ? .: '. jraei was :r-
r*.:'i.- as tr.e r_-rker
nan
-->>:-*; ri.estLr_ar .c-
fart -^i: tr.e A.-r-".e Lasrc oc a
Gerj.-a. was scaec*: :.: ia_ a:
the Israei: par: if Aseooc after
raj Egypt Accorczg M
Pam Mi :tr-e- Israei: fr:_j_;
the hijackers intended to
perpetrate a spectacuiar terrorist
attack at Ashdod. but their pins
went awry
PERES, meeting ast Thursday
with United Nations
Undersecretary General Briar.
Urquhart. contended that the
PLO and Arafat personally were
responsfcle not only for the
Acratte Lauro hijacking but for the
torture-murder of two Israei: mer-
chant seamen m a Barcelona.
Spam, apartment Oct. 9 and the
Sept. 25 murders of three Israelis
aboard a yacht in Lamaca.
Cyprus According to Peres
Arafat ts determined to derail the
peace efforts being pursued by
King Hussein of Jordan.
Peres apoeared ready to grre
President Hosci Mubarak the
benefit of the doubt at ieast for
the tune being, with respect to
Egypt's conduct after the ship hi-
jackers surrendered. Mubarak
told reporters in Cairo iast Thurs-
day that the four Palestinians )eft
the country five hours before
Egypt knew that an Amencac
hostage had been murdered
"If we knew about the Idling.
we would have changed our pos*-
tioc oc the who* operation." be
said. Egypcan :ff*ria-s said they
received then- afonnaboe about
what was happening aooard ve
vesse-: fr:rr ts Master fir:
Gerard-: ae ?.:<& '.--
after the surrender Am apaa
was ;::te: -.- saving i
tasser-gers ar : ;r*ri i-rre i. i
ar.o r.. a.-.-: :.-a: er :-r *a:
Marred :.- -^ :.-. i.-x.
ITALY'S PREMIER Be--,:

~. -- :.>.--
Cart, a ?..;ssa mfomed has a a
rafetacttaai apart baa da
ship that an American paaanger
was mating and presumed
and de Rosa, who had his
paajari -.: the aaj m
Baa aaaar: The paaaaai
Dsr.r"r: _- -. .- ::,-
H death was confirmed oy
from Cairo to Port Said and. a
President Reagan s reouest was
permitted to board the AchaV
La^r-: an-: -.:.Ufrv>ew the freed
ackers as
m release of the hostages. The
iaaer were the Ambassadors at
Itah Britain and West Germany
m Egypt, a representanTe of the
Intemaaoca. Red Cross and two
or more recreseotaUTes d the
PLO. sa*i to have been dispatched
by Arafat
Ita.ar_ Br.^sr ir.-z Wat Ger-
rr.ar. ail if aeB a;
Amer.car-s were arr.:ng the
b-Mtages ar>2 tae err. ; ? ?f tr-. ccurtrws were se.#cte>! r;> tne _
jacker;
F:-e^rc Master G: -\t>i~ :
:. ka: ..-. r. e that r.e agreed
wttr. E^Tt 5 F>retgr. M^aMr
Ismat Abde-l Met-- : v
jackers should be treate>t ierject;.
provided :<:* ;:" 'Sx ".-tages was
harmed.
THE FOUR Parser-.a,-- SM
taken off the Ach2e Lauro m a
Port Said harbor tagboat They
were last seen wavmg at teievt-
sno camera crews aboard another
harbor craft Some reports said
they were taken to an Egyptian
naval base. Other reports had
than in custody of PLO represen-
tatives- Egyptian authorities ap-
peared to confirm late Wednesday
night Oct 9. that they were no
longer in Egypt, their
e "rar- : ts '_- r.. r.
In Waahmgton. State Depart-
ment officials said they were
furious at the speed with which
the various negotiators aUowec
the hijackers to go free White
House spokesman Larry Speakes
expressed anger at both the
Itahan and Egyptian authonoes-
In a statement after Klmghof-
-i- i death was confirmed.
Speakes said. "From the outset
tne United States government
made it ciear to the government of
Egypt and the the government of
Italy our opposzooc to negotia-
tions with the terrorists and our
expectaooc that the terrorists
would be apprehended, pro-
secuted and punished. The United
' determir.ed to
responsthe (
heinous act be brought
and punished to the an
tent There must be an a
terrorism. We adv.s-r:
against the release '. -j*
rorists or any eonca
them."
IT WAS NOT dear bv a
Thursday whether buy a-oJuT
mand their extradiuor. ud iZ
to whom the demand -^.d'be ad'
dressed. Some aporu qu,^
Arafat as saying the PLO woS
hand over tne kilier- to itZ
Other reports suggest*: on pn,
would mete out ^isace .tself
There was no aainlju
pianatioo of why -..- ^
chose to surrender rw bnafla
semng the vessel Her j*,^
Ftetta Lauro of Maples, now
tnere were ample apphes --f food 4
fresh water and fue. v. -errim sea ]
for many days. Bu the terron*
may have become ner.-: a about I
their abflity to aaati ntrol(
the 23.600 gross tor. ship ,1
veritable floating r.: te. over, j
long period. They Maght asyhn
at a fnendry port.
Capt de Rosa was rieredtol
take her to the port ,: Tartous, k
northern Syna But the Svruc
authorities firmly refused entry.
The ship then steered for Cyprus
Coatiaaed aa Page 12-A
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-


PLO Uninvited
Thatcher Angered By Brits' Decision Settlers At Point of No Return
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Experts Dispute West Bank
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Bri-
tain's independent initiative
over the Arab-Israeli con-
flict disintegrated in total
fiasco Monday when the
government abruptly scrap-
ped talks it was to have held
with two senior members of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Sir Geoffrey Howe, Foreign
Secretary, called off the meeting
after his two Palestinian guests,
Mohammed Milhem and Bishop
Elias Khoury, refused to given an
unconditional renunciation of
violence in pursuing the ambitions
of the Palestinian people. The two
PLO men were here in a joint
delegation with two Jordanian
ministers.
THE FARCICAL last-minute
cancelation of the meeting with
Howe was the latest in the series
of events surrounding the Palesti-
nian capture of the Italian cruise
ship Achille Lauro, the murder of
an American Jewish passenger,
and the subsequent mid-air cap-
ture of the four hijackers.
The cancellation was received
here with quiet satisfaction by
Israeli Ambassador Yehuda
Avner. Later he described the
PLO visitors as representatives of
the godfathers of international
terrorism. The PLO visit had
seriously strained UK-Israeli rela-
tions. But following the dramatic
development there is now a much
better climate for the visit which
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres
is
Prime Minister Thatcher
due to make to London early next
year.
The Arab world, by contrast, is
incensed by what it sees as Bri-
tain's total submission to pressure
by the United States and Israel.
Unless Britain moves quickly to
contain the diplomatic damage, it
is feared here that British citizens
and property will be increasingly
vulnerable to Arab terrorist
action.
THE TWO PLO men were in-
vited to London last month by
Prime Minister Margaret That-
cher during her visit to Jordan. At
the time, she said she had done so
after receiving assurances that
Milhem and Bishop Khoury were
committed to peaceful methods of
advancing the Palestinian cause
and the renunciation of terrorism.
She maintained this position in
the face of pleas by Israel that
both men had been implicated in
terrorist incidents. When told last
week of Khoury's expulsion for
smuggling explosives into Israel,
she snapped back: "Then why
wasn't he charged?"
In the wake of the severe em-
barrassment that has been caus-
ed, the Prime Minister is expected
to demand a searching inquiry in-
to the quality of the advice she and
Foreign Secretary Howe have
been receiving from the Foreign
Office.
THATCHER IS already known
for her deep distrust of the
Foreign Office. She blamed it for
the surprise with which Britain
was taken four years ago by the
Argentinian invasion of the
Falkland Islands. The fact that
she was persuaded to follow the
Foreign Office's advice on the
Middle East in the last few weeks
is attributed here to her close
trust in Howe.
In Britain, too, the cancelation
of the talk is expected to be
welcomed not only in the Jewish
community but among the Prime
Minister's own traditional middle-
of-the-road and rightwing sup-
porters who, judging by press
comment, had been most vocal in
their opposition to the PLO visit.
Pirates' Surrender Followed Rumors
American Passenger Was Murdered
JTA International Wire Services
The surrender of the
Palestinian hijackers of the
Italian cruise ship Achille
Lauro to Egyptian
authorities at Port Said late
last Wednesday was follow-
ed by a spate of conflicting
reports that one of the
passengers, an American,
had been killed.
Italian Prime Minister Bettino
Craxi told reporters in Rome that
"Only now it has been ascertained
that a U.S. citizen has been kill-
ed." An aide identified the victim
as Leon Klinghoffer, 69, of New
York City.
Pressed for details, Craxi said
no body had been found in the
ship, but "this person is missing."
He said the Achille Lauro's
Master, Capt. Gerrardo de Rosa,
has the missing man's passport
and assumed the body was thrown
into the sea.
EARLIER, Egyptian Foreign
Minister Esmat Abdel Meguid
said in Cairo that all 500
passengers and crew members
held hostage for some 48 hours at
sea were safe and well. He said
the information at hand indicated
no one was killed or injured. Capt.
de Rosa was also quoted as saying
all the passengers were well, and
no violence had occurred during
the hijack ordeal.
There had been reports from
Israel before the surrender that a
Jewish couple aboard the ship was
slain. The reference may have
been to Klinghoffer, who is
Jewish. He was traveling with his
wife, Marilyn and confined to a
wheelchair.
In New york, Klinghoffer*s
family, friends and neighbors
were jubilant at the early reports
that all passengers were safe. But
this turned to sorrow with later
reports that he was dead. Many of
those interviewed by the media
said Klinghoffer was "a beautiful
human being" and liked by all who
knew him for being gentle, caring
and loving.
BEFORE CRAXI spoke to the
press, Italy's Foreign Minister,
Giulio Andreotti, said at a
separate news conference that he
agreed with Meguid that the hi-
jackers should be treated leniently
if there had been no bloodshed
aboard the vessel.
The hijackers, who numbered
only four Palestinians according
to Egyptian officials, surrendered
at 5:15 p.m. local time and were
removed from the ship by an
Egyptian Navy launch at Port
Said. Port officials said they were
taken to a nearby naval base.
The surrender followed a parley
between the hijackers and Egyp-
tian and Italian officials and two
representatives of the Palestine
Liberation Organization sent to
Port Said by PLO chief Yasir
Arafat. The PLO later claimed a
"success" for its diplomacy.
THE SHIP was seized at sea
while enroute from Alexandria to
Port Said, part of a Mediterra-
nean cruise that began at Genoa.
There were about 350 crew
members, mostly Italian, and
70-80 passengers of many na-
tionalities aboard. The bulk of the
more than 600 passengers were
on sightseeing excursions in
Egypt and were to rejoin the
vessel at Port Said.
The hijackers demanded Israel's
immediate release of 50 imprison-
ed Palestinian terrorists. Israel
maintained a low profile
throughout the incident, noting
that the ship was Italian, was not
hijacked in Israeli waters and that
no country had asked Israel to
take any action.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Raanan Weitz, former head of the
World Zionist Organization's set-
tlement department, has disputed
the contention by an expert on
West Bank demographics that the
extent of Jewish settlement in the
territory has already reached the
point of no return, rendering the
idea of territorial compromise in
return for peace with the Arab
world academic.
That view has been expressed
by Meron Benvenisti, a former
Deputy Mayor of Jersualem, who
has closely monitored the expan-
sion of Jewish settlements in the
West Bank, especially during the
Likud-led administrations
1977-1984 when settlement was
actively encouraged and heavily
subsidized by the government.
According to Benvenisti,
demographic trends indicate that
Jews will be a majority in the
West Bank by the year 2000. But
Weitz, speaking at the executive
meeting of the International
Center for Peace in the Middle
East over the weekend, maintain-
ed that Jews in the West Bank
would not exceed 2-3 percent of
the population at the turn of the
century. There is no reason, he
said, why territorial compromise
is impossible.
Weitz also disclosed that im-
mediately after the 1967 Six-Day
War, then Defense Minister
Moshe Dayan sought to encourage
West Bank Arabs to emigrate to
Latin America by offering each
family a premium of $3,000, later
raised to $5,000.
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Klinghoffer Killed
Because He Was A Jew
There can be little doubt that Leon Klinghoffer, the
frail 69-year-old New York stroke victim, was singled
out for murder by the terrorists who took over the
Italian cruise liner Achille Lauro last week simply
because he was Jewish. The second announced victim,
to whom the terrorists fortunately never got in their
plan, was a Jewish woman, apparently also singled
out for the same reason.
The ship was taken over on Monday of last week
(Oct. 7). It was not until the terrorists "gave up" on
Wednesday, or perhaps a day or two after, that Kl-
inghoffer's murder and identity were confirmed.
Certainly, the terrorists themselves did not report
that they had shuffled passenger passports like decks
of cards to come up with "Jewish-sounding names."
That information came from others. Indeed, as of last
Monday, representatives of the Palestine Liberation
Organization at the United Nations and elsewhere in
the world, as well as Egypt's President Hosni
Mubarak himself, were still insisting that there had
been no murder at all that Klinghoffer was simply
"frightened to death." After all, he had a bad heart,
didn't he? The body of an old man that washed up in
Syria Tuesday perhaps tells their lie.
It is a rare tribute to the media that they made little
or nothing of the fact that Klinghoffer was Jewish or,
indeed, a chairman of an Israel Bonds campaign divi-
sion in New York City.
If something positive at all has come out of. the
Achille Lauro affair, it is that for the first time the
United States stood up to terrorists and put them on
warning, in President Reagan's words: "You can run,
but you can't hide." The startling American intercep-
tion of the Egyptian jetliner spiriting the terrorists
away in the deal arranged for their freedom by Presi-
dent Mubarak to leave the Italian liner and its
passengers in peace took a forthright stand: Don't
mess with our citizens anymore not Jewish, not
hyphenated-anything, not any American citizens.
Americans Stand Proud
It is the interception itself that raises the negatives
the anger between the United States and the
Italians for letting Muhammed Abbas go. Abbas was
recently elected to the PLO's 11-member executive
committee with the special blessing of Yasir Arafat.
He was one of two PLO officials sent to the Achille
Lauro tied up at Port Said to "negotiate" the depar-
ture of the terrorists, and who accompanied them on
the Egyptian jetliner out of the country when U.S.
fighter planes intercepted it and forced it to land in
Italy.
There is also the anger between the U.S. and
Egypt, stirred by President Mubarak's demand Mon-
day that President Reagan apologize to all Egyptians
because of the interception a demand Mr. Reagan
said Tuesday he has no intention of doing.
The list of negatives is long and complicated, but in
the end Americans for the moment stand a bit pro-
uder because of what our government did in retalia-
tion against the terrorists. Moreover, there is the
sense for the first time that finally the Administration
understands in its gut what terrorism is all about and
that people like Yasir Arafat are not simply what they
claim to be.
Women's American ORT
Women's American ORT (Organization for
Rehabilitation Through Training) was founded in
1927. Its occupational object: to serve as the voca-
tional, technical and scientific education program of
the Jewish people. Its underlying philosophical princi-
ple: originally founded in anti-Semitic Czarist Russia
in 1880, to train Jews for professions from which they
had traditionally been excluded.
ORT is now a global network comprising 800
schools with an enrollment of 130,000.
Now, Women's American ORT will be gathering
beginning Sunday, Oct. 20, for a four-day convention
at the Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood. A variety of
panel discussions featuring distinguished guests will
focus on the organization's programs and deal with
issues including, among others, "Women in Transi-
tion" and "Jewish Community As a Global Village."
Women's American ORT is the largest of the ORT
Jewish Florxdian
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membership organizations. In the United States, the
Bramson ORT Technical Institute in New York and
the ORT Technical Institute of Los Angeles are but
two of other such technical training facilities in a
variety of fields in Israel and throughout the world.
Here in Florida, ORT is represented by its pro-
grams for students in our community's Jewish day
schools.
In all, ORT and its women's branch have scored im-
portant successes for decades based on the proven
philosophy that not all Jews are best served educa-
tionally by strict academic, scholarly or religious
training that many are better served by occupa-
tional instruction in a variety of vocational fields
ranging from fashion (there will be an ORT fashion
show accessorized bv nationally-famous Cache Bouti-
que on Tuesday, Oct" 22. at 8:30 p.m.) to electronics to
computer technology, with the object of giving Jews
the wherewithal to work and fulfil their own needs in
complete dignity and with a high degree of self-
respect.
We welcome the Women's American ORT conven-
tion to South Florida, whose agenda beginning Sun-
day should help amply to inform the community about
its many successful programs.

Miami Is Better Off for the Good Works of Mr. Myers
It is with a sense of gratification that we note the
80th birthday of pioneer Miamian Stanley C. Myers.
Select longtime colleagues of Mr. Myers this week
gathered to pay tribute to him on this august
occasion.
On his arrival here in the late 1920's, Mr. Myers
built an enviable practice that is still a hallmark of the
legal profession today. But preceding that, already in
his teens, Mr. Myers had made the central focus of his
everyday life an exemplary devotion to humanitarian
causes, especially on the Jewish scene.
It was natural, then, that he helped found the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, which he served as
its first president, returning later to serve in that
capacity again. On the national scene, he served as
president for five terms of the Council of Jewish
Federations and Welfare Funds, contributing in that
capacity both leadership and philosophical meaning to
the organization's purposes at a time when Jews
everywhere were joining hands to meet the particular
requirements of post-World War II Jewish philan-
thropic need.
Here in Miami, Mr. Myers also served as a "friend
of the community" to whom agencies and the people
they served came for his help in ameliorating difficult
situations resulting from South Florida's rapidly ex-
panding Jewish population.
To attempt to list all of Mr. Myers' contributions to
Jewish and general civic and philanthropic need
would be more fitting for a catalogue than for reflec-
tion on this, his "80th birthday. Suffice it to say that
the distinguishing quality of his dominant life's pas-
Stanley C. Myers
sion was inspired by his compassionate capacity suc-
cessfully to keep on track the many problems that our
community inevitably faced in its breathtakingly
rapid development.
As he enters his ninth decade, we join the communi-
ty in, wishing Mr. Myers many more years of fruitful
life in the contemplation of what his energies have
wrought in the field of communal endeavor and
harmony.
Research Seeking
Secret of Children's Nightmare Terrors

Friday, October iv 1985
Volume 58
3 HESHVAN 5746
Number 42
By NAT KAMENY
The calm of a sleeping child
is a reassuring sight. But
the inner turmoil, the terror
of a nightmare, is not
always apparent, except for
Dr. Naomi Amir and her
staff in the unique Sleep
Clinic of Bikur Holim
Hospital in downtown
Jerusalem.
A section of the pediatric
neurology department of the
hospital, the Sleep Clinic is the
latest innovation in the 150-year-
old institutionfh6used in a group
of aging buildings. Amir heads the
department in which the clinic
was established only little more
than a year ago, thanks largely to
a sophisticated sleep monitoring
machine recently acquired by the
department.
PARENTS OFTEN experience
the signs of nighttime problems of
their children, through the
evidence of bedwetting and fitful
sleep, as well as awakening
nightmares. Some children walk
in their sleep, emit cries, pick im-
agined creatures from their
pajamas.
Common among children bet-
ween the ages of 4 and 10. accor-
ding to Amir, these often are
manifestations of terror resulting
from bad dreams and not serious
disorders. But the clinic, through
extensive research, often relates
these signs to serious neurologic,
psychiatric, physiologic and other
maladies. The exact nature of the
problem is carefully analyzed
from the acute monitoring of sleep
patterns.
Amir, one of Israel's leading
pediatric neurologists, believes
the Sleep Clinic at her hospital to
be one of the very few focusing en-
tirely on children. "The still
developing nervous system," says
Amir, "differs in many ways from
that of an adult."
SHE CITED as one such exam-
ple the case of a child known to
have epilepsy, and who is a som-
nambulist, or sleepwalker. In-
creasing the epilepsy medication
to alleviate the sleep walking is an
error, because the clinical
research will show the unrelated
nature of the two problems.
Two of the currently growing
fields of medical research are en-
docrinology (or the way the body
produces and uses hormones) and
the study of 24-hour body
rhythms. Both are greatly aided
by sleep study.
Approaching patients in their
early years, and getting them to
sleep, is no easy task. Typically, a
child coming to the clinic for sleep
monitoring would have wasted
most of the night ridding himself
of anxiety of strange surroun-
dings and all the electrodes at-
tache.) to the body. At Bikur
Holim the child's mother sleeps
alongside, with a doctor
simultaneously on duty through
the night.
TO FURTHER ease the ten
sions, the monitoring machine and
technician are in an adjoining
room, out of sight, monitoring the
child, and guarding via a video
screen. Within two to three
nights, a child's true sleep pattern
appears and the clues to the
disturbance are revealed.
The reams of data recorded by
the monitor's six channels of brain
wave readings, as well as recor-
ding REM (rapid eye movement
while dreaming), muscle tone,
body temperature, chest expan-
sion, breath expiration and more.
are a wealth of information to the
medical staff. Additionally, sleep
apnea, a condition in which
breathing stops for a few seconds
during sleep, is carefully
monitored.
Amir's clinic was the natural
outgrowth of another pioneering
effort, Bikur Holim's Day-
Hospital for children with
neurological problems. In opera-
tion since 1979, over 1.000
children from throughout Israel
have been screened in this unique
daytime hospital.
CHILDREN CHECK in early
in the day, and are home by late
afternoon. The burden of a
Continued on Page 7-A


Friday. October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridjan_Page_5-A_
Evangelist Came A Cropper At New York Mayor's Hands
By ROBERT SEGAL
Shortly after the Rev.
jerry Falwell returned from
his five-day visit to South
Africa in August, he came a
cropper at the hands of
Mayor Ed Koch of New
York.
This drama took place
when the two were pitted
against each other on Cable
TV. The encounter deserves
more than a footnote in
history.
Falwell asserted that in making
his visit to South Africa, he was
performing a service to President
Reagan. His reasoning seemed to
be that when he met with South
Africa's President P.W. Botha, he
was just testing the water, just
imbibing the point of view of the
beleaguered white people in
power, not really defending apar-
theid, but proving the danger of
American-imposed sanctions.
At that point, Ed Koch shot
down the evangelical fact-finder.
"What you did with your trip to
South Africa," Koch pointed out,
"resembles what Charles Lind-
bergh did through his trips to Nazi
Germany in 1936 and 1938 you
strengthened the persecutors and
oppressors while representing
yourself as a peace maker."
Falwell was not offered, nor did
he accept, a medal from Pretoria.
When Herman Goering pinned the
Berlin Order of Merit of the Ger-
man Eagle on Lindbergh, October
19, 1938, the flyer did accept it
and never sent it back.
WHAT DID Lindbergh tell
American political and military
leaders when he returned? He
warned that the Nazis were invin-
cible, that the British and French
were doomed. He warned
America "not to meddle in
Europe's internal affairs."
Lindbergh insisted that he went
to Germany at the urging of the
U.S. government. When he
returned full of praise for Nazi
armed strength, President
Roosevelt referred to him as a
copperhead.
This was only the beginning of
Lindbergh's rapid descent from a
hero's Parnassus. On September
11, 1941, speaking for America
First in Des Moines, he declared:
'The three most important
groups which have been pressing
this country toward war are the
British, the Jews and the
Roosevelt administration."
He counseled Jews to oppose
the war. Taking his cue from
Falwell, Koch in TV Drama, Bare
Heart of U.S., South Africa Travail
Joseph Goebbels, he insisted that
Jewish large ownership and in-
fluence in our motion pictures, our
press, our radio, and our govern-
ment" constitute the greatest
danger to U.S. from Jews.
THUS AN American hero
became a born-again hero but
this time for the Nazis. A few
years later, when Fight for
Freedom staged an anti-Nazi rally
during wartime, Christian
Fronters and American Bundists
invaded the meeting and cried:
"We want Hitler; we want
Lindbergh."
More to the point, writing for
Reader's Digest in November,
1939, Lindbergh stated: "We, the
heirs of European culture, are on
the verge of a disastrous war... a
war which will reduce the
reasures of the White race, a war
which may even lead to the end of
our civilization ... It is time to
. build our White ramparts
again." And still later in his
memoirs he wrote: "We lost the
genetic heredity formed through
aeons in many million lives."
Fortunately, today most of
Ameria is awake to South Africa's
determination to freeze the status
quo. to refuse to give voting rights
to blacks, to deny protest, to use
pistol and whip against those who
attend funerals of blacks slain in
their revolt against apartheid in
perpetuity.
THEY SEE in Falwell's recom-
mendations a formula for further
failure in South Africa a grow-
ing economic crisis, an inability to
pay off foreign debts. When Presi-
dent Botha cries: "We have cross-
ed the Rubicon," they inhale the
odor of a latter-day Caesarism.
At last, some of South Africa's
most prominent leaders in com-
merce and industry, the producers
of platinum, chromium, gold, are
crying "Enough!" They are ap-
palled at daily reports of the
government's murder of those
who speak for freedom, sick at the
thought that arrested children are
denied even limited rights in
prison.
They are demanding a halt to
Botha's effort to settle with the
butts of guns a crisis solvable only
by consultation with the oppress-
ed. In short, they have learned
from Germany's venture into
Nazism in a way that Col. Lind-
bergh never did.
Can Reagan's Resolve To Sell Jordan Arms
Be Reconciled With Mideast Peace Process?
By JUDITH KOHN
As the Administration
gropes for evidence of
movement in the Mideast
peace process that would
bolster its case for selling
new arms to Jordan, the
current sequence of visits
here by the Egyptian and
Jordanian heads of state
seems to underscore how lit-
tle has changed since they
were in Washington last
spring.
SOUTH AFRICA'S PIK BOTHA
In fact, the appearance here of
Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak
and Jordan's King Hussein both
of whom arrived in the country
primarily to address the United
Nations General Assembly but
also to meet with President
Reagan and other Administration
officials in Washington looked
like reruns of an old serial with
some minor splicing here and
there.
MUBARAK MET with Reagan
where, according to a State
Department briefer, he tried, as
he did during his visit last March,
to persuade the Administration to
take the initiative in moving the
peace process ahead.
Although no statements were
made by the two Presidents
following the White House
meeting those are generally
reserved for official state visits
it appeared that Mubarak had
tried, as he did the last time, to
persuade the U.S. to meet with a
joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation even if it includes
delegates closely associated with
the PLO.
Since Mubarak's last visit here,
the Administration has agreed to
consider meeting with such a
delegation if it does not include
any PLO representatives and if
there is a clear indication that the
talks would lead to direct negotia-
tions between Jordan and Israel.
ASSISTANT Secretary of
State Richard Murphy went to the
Middle East last summer in an at-
tempt to reach agreement on the
composition of a delegation accep-
table to the United States.
Washington has assured Israel it
will not meet with PLO represen-
tatives until the organization
recognizes the existence of Israel
and renounces terrorism.
But the trip failed to produce
any agreement, and Mubarak ap-
peared to have returned to the
White House re-reciting his
March appeal, and to have left
with nothing more to show for it.
Still stinging from the domestic
criticism that followed its attempt
to pass off the March visit as a
smashing success, the Egyptian
government is doubly wary of
displaying his most recent
meetings as having scored any
major accomplishments for
Mubarak in the peace process. Ac-
cordingly, a commentary on the
Egyptian state-controlled radio
warned:
"Anyone who believes that any
meeting between Mubarak and
Reagan will produce immediate
results or, in other words, will
completely change Washington's
stand toward the PLO. is
mistaken. A change of stand re-
quires an exhaustive study of all
aspects of the problems." The
commentary stressed that "there
should be no hasty judgement
about the result of the Mubarak-
Reagan meeting."
THE CONTINUED lack of
movement was also underscored
in a speech here by Egyptian
Foreign Minister Ismat Abdel
Meguid. who lamented -that
"promising chances for peace con-
tinue to be missed."
"Imposing limited concepts and
insistence of guaranteeing the
outcomes of the preliminary
dialogue before it starts would
create by itself an unnecessary
obstacle which may hamper our
efforts in the search for a peaceful
settlement," Meguid warned in a
keynote address to the annual
King Hussein
conference of the Middle East
Institute.
The Egyptian Embassy's Depu-
ty Chief of Mission, Raouf
Ghoneim, delivered the speech
because the Foreign Minister had
been detained in New York.
Meguid, in his prepared keynote
address, called it "unfair" in the
1980's "to strictly adhere to for-
mulas of the 1970's like that of
not recognizing or negotiating
with the PLO."
MUBARAK HIMSELF, in his
General Assembly address, hardly
touched on the peace process,
focusing instead on economic
development issues.
In any case, it is Hussein on
whom progress in the peace pro-
cess is hinging now, and the
Continued on Page 12-A
Jordan's King, Egypt's
President in Replay
it I now ,&*"#.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
UN Tells Arafat
He Can't Address Special Session
Security Council Unanimously
Condemns Terrorist Hijacking
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Yasir Arafat,
leader of the Palestine
Liberation Organization,
will not come to address the
special commemorative ses-
sion for the 40th anniver-
sary of the United Nations.
This became a fact Monday
after a draft resolution proposing
that Arafat be invited to take part
in the 40th anniversary com-
memoration was withdrawn.
The decision of the sponsors of
the resolution India, Iraq,
Kuwait, Nigeria, Senegal and
Yemen to withdraw their pro-
posal came after intense
diplomatic lobbying and pressure
over the weekend, especially by
the United States and other
Western countries. The United
States, according to diplomatic
sources, warned that if Arafat
was invited, President Reagan
would not come to address the
special session.
DIPLOMATS here described
the turn of events as a severe blow
to the prestige of the PLO, which
has observer status at the UN.
Arafat appeared once before at a
General Assembly session in
November. 1974.
The announcement of the
withdrawal of the draft resolution
was made at the opening of the
commemorative 'session Monday
by General Assembly President
Janie de Pinies of Spain.
After the announcement was
made, Israel's Ambassador to the
UN, Binyamin Netanyahu, issued
the following statement:
"The removal of the proposal to
invite the international terror
organization of the PLO and its
leader, Yasir Arafat, to the 40th
De Cuellar Denounces Hijacking
AiT'Criminal, Unjustifiable'
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar has
sharply denounced the hi-
jacking of an Italian cruise
ship with more than 400
people aboard by PLO ter-
rorists, calling it "criminal
and unjustifiable."
"The Secretary General, who
condemns all acts of terrorism,
has learned with horror of the hi-
jacking of an Italian cruise ship,
which constitutes yet another
escalation of violence in the
Mideast," a statement, read by a
UN spokesman, said.
The Secretary General, the
statement continued, "urges
those responsible to understand
that their act is criminal and un-
justifiable and should be ended
without delay in a manner that
would avoid further suffering by
innocent victims."
EARLIER, the Secretary
General had condemned Israel for
its raid on PLO bases in Tunisia.
In his newest statement, the
Secretary General did not men-
tion the PLO, referring only to
"those responsible" for the
action.
In a separate statement here,
the President of the General
MROWARD
IJAPER &
(JACKAGING
Assembly, Jaime de Pinies of
Spain, expressed "great concern"
over the hijacking. He said he was
"particularly worried by the hi-
jackers' threats to start killing the
hostages." He termed the hijack-
ing "most serious and regrettable
escalation of terrorism against in-
nocent civilians."
Meanwhile, no request was
made by any member-state to con-
vene the Security Council to con-
demn the hijacking. Italy's Depu-
ty Permanent Representative to
the UN, Gaetano Zucconi, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the mission received no instruc-
tions from Rome to ask for a
Security Council meeting.
A UN spokesman said that the
Security Council takes up com-
plaints of one sate against another
and that the hijackers of the
cruise ship do not represent any
state. He said, in response to
another question, that the hi-
jackers said they did not belong to
the PLO. The PLO has observer
status at the UN and is regularly
seated at the Security Council
table at any Mideast debate.
Diplomats at the UN said that
there is not a chance that the
Council will go into session. One
diplomat said caustically: "The
Security Council meets only when
Israel is involved."
anniversary celebration of the UN
is a sign of a soberizing process in
the Western world regarding the
real nature of the PLO and the
moral distortion which such an in-
vitation to Arafat would have con-
stituted. The UN would have
fulfilled its real obligation by br-
inging the PLO and Arafat to an
international court that would
judge them for their terrible
crimes against the Jewish people
and humanity."
DIPLOMATS HERE noted
that Arafat, theoretically, can still
be invited to the UN General
Assembly to participate in the
Middle East debate and the
debate on the Palestinian issue
after the special anniversary ses-
sion ends.
Another possibility, though very
remote according to the
diplomats, is that the Arabs and
their allies will introduce a new
resolution in the next few days to
invite Arafat to the special adver-
sary session.
Israeli sources declared that the
decision not to introduce the
resolution inviting Arafat was the
result of intense pressure by the
U.S., by leaders of other Western
countries, by Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar and by the
President of the General
Assembly.
The Assembly was scheduled to
vote on the resolution Friday, but
because of this pressure, which in-
cluded diplomatic contacts in
various capitals in which Israeli
diplomats participated, the deci-
sion was made to postpone the
vote until Monday.
A LEADING force in these ef-
forts to remove the draft resolu-
tion was Canada, according to
diplomats. Canada made it clear
that its Prime Minister would not
participate in the anniversary ses-
sion if Arafat was invited.
Canada, it was noted, has good
ties with Third World countries
and exerted its influence with
them. Major Western European
countries had contacts with Third
World countries, explaining to
them that to invite Arafat would
in effect destroy the 40th anniver-
sary session and would have a
severe impact on the future opera-
tions of the UN and its credibility.
When Assembly President de
Pinies announced that the resolu-
tion was removed, most of the
Arab countries and the sponsors
of the resolution were absent from
the hall. Only a few Western coun-
tries, the U.S. and Israel, were
present. "There was a clear feel-
ing of defeat for the Arabs in the
General Assembly hall this morn-
ing," a top Israeli diplomat said.
The commemorative session,
which opened Monday, will last
two weeks. It will be addressed by
more tan 80 heads of state and
governments, among them Presi-
dent Reagan and Israel's Premier,
Shimon Peres.
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c^ountaiii^ASlley^ter
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS In
an unprecedented move, the
Security Council has
unanimously condemned
"the unjustifiable and
criminal" hijacking of the
Italian cruise ship Achille
Lauro by Palestinian
terrorists.
For the first time in its 40-year
history, the Security Council also
condemned "terrorism in all its
forms, wherever and by
whomever committed."
The condemnation was issued in
a statement, read by United
States Ambassador to the UN,
Vernon Walters, who is this
month's President of the Security
Council. The statement deplored
"the death of a passenger," Leon
Klinghoffer, 69, of New York Ci-
ty, who was killed by the Palesti-
nian terrorists, and welcomed the
release of the passengers and the
crew of the hijacked ship.
The statement, which was
issued at a brief Council meeting
after all 15 members agreed
privately on the wording, read:
"The members of the Security
Council welcome the news of the
release of the passengers and the
crew of the cruise ship Achille
Lauro and deplore the reported
death of a passenger. They
resolutely condemn this un-
justifiable and criminal hijacking
as well as other acts of terrorism,
including hostage taking. They
also condemn terrorism in all its
forms, wherever and by
whomever committed."
Ferraro Reports to Israel
On Her Meeting With Gromyko
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former Democratic Vice
Presidential candidate Geraldine
Ferraro called for an international
convention against terrorism and
urged the United States govern-
ment to act instead of merely talk
about this scourge. She recalled
that President Reagan pledged
firm action against terrorism in
the aftermath of the Teheran
hostage crisis.
Ferraro, a former member of
Congress, made her remarks at a
luncheon given by Deputy Foreign
Minister Ronnie Milo, a Likud
MK. She was in Israel on a five-
day visit.
IN A MEETING with Premier
Shimon Peres, Ferraro reported
on her lengthy discussions in
Moscow recently with President
Andrei Gromyko and the Soviet
expert on American affairs,
Georgi Arbatov.
She later told reporters that she
had found the Soviets unexpected-
ly "open" on the issue of Soviet
Jewry. However, she cautioned
that it does not mean there would
necessarily be a relaxation in
emigration policy.
Ferraro said Gromyko noted
that large-scale Jewish emigration
could mean a "tremendous hrain
drain" for the Soviet Union. Ar-
batov said that Jewish emigration
applications caused resentment in
the USSR because they often
came from university-educated
people who had edged out others
from an academic education, she
reported.
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Reagan, Shultz
Couldn't Get Their Act Together
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan and Secretary
of State George Shultz offered
conflicting Administration posi-
tions on whether Palestine
Liberation Organization chair-
man Yasir Arafat should be con-
sidered an acceptable authority
for prosecuting the four Palesti-
nian terrorists who murdered an
elderlv American Jew the day
before releasing the Italian cruise
ship, Achille Lauro, near Port
Said.
At Chicago's O'Hare Airport.
President Reagan said last week
that a demand should be made to
Arafat to turn the hijackers over
for prosecution. But when asked if
the United States would be
satisfied if Arafat himself tried
the hijackers, Reagan said that he
"would like to believe" that the
Pediatric Specialists Probe Secrets
Of Children's Nightmare Terrors
Continued from Page 4-A
hospital stay, on both the parent
and the nation's hospital system,
is considerably lessened, to say
nothing of the relief of this
hospital's methodology on the pa-
tient. But it does require excep-
tionally tight scheduling and ad-
vance preparation to maximize
useful time for the patients and
the staff.
The Day-Hospital has grown to
lie the largest pediatric neurology
unit in Israel, and is now staffed
by four full-time senior physi-
cians, each a top specialist in their
discipline. Additionally, other
medical experts including a car-
diologist, psychologists and
pysiotherapists ensure the best
multi-disciplinary evaluation for
each child.
A moving force in this unique
facility for the children of Israel is
Amir, a former American. A
serious physician attracted to the
then unique concept of a woman
physician who could be both
pediatrician and neurologist,
Amir has practiced at Bikur
Holim for more than 20 years.
IT ALL STARTED by Amir's
meeting at that time with Dr.
Helena Kagan. who was head of
Bikur Holim's pediatric depart-
ment. Like the magic meeting of
two souls whose vision and goals
synched, Kagan offered Amir the
job she had dreamt of, and Amir
stepped on board. This led her to
further study at Columbia Univer-
sity, under one of the fathers of
pediatric neurology, Dr. Sidney
Carter.
This modest, unassuming
woman who grew up in Brooklyn,
proceeded to help Israel take the
lead in innovative medical
research and practice. And Amir's
dream, which built a clinic study-
ing children's dreams, is only the
beginning of the bigger dream:
spreading advanced medical care
to the children at peace in the en-
tire Middle East.
While so much of Israel's atten-
tion is devoted to preventing war
and destruction, those like Amir
in Israel work to build the in-
struments of a better society at
peace.
PLO "can bring them to justice."
IN RESPONSE to a follow-up
question, Reagan said that pro-
secution of the four terrorists by
the PLO would not be tantamount
to diplomatic recognition of the
organization. "I don't think that
would necessarily follow,
"Reagan said. He later retracted
his statement about Arafat's role,
saying he "was speaking
vengence instead of justice" when
he commented initially.
Speaking before the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
Shultz repeated earlier
statements by the White House
and State Department that the
Administration would "insist that
there be no sanctuary for these
people, that there be no safe har-
bor, that there be no escape from
justice."
Apparently alluding to sugges-
tions by Arafat that the PLO
would try the hijackers if they fell
into his hands, Shultz stressed
that it was "up to a government"
to prosecute the terrorists.
EGYPTIAN President Hosni
Mubarak said that the terrorists
had left the area of Port Said -
presumably into PLO hands but
there was still no confirmation
that Arafat's wing of the PLO was
holding them.
Mubarak told reporters in
Egypt that when his government
arranged to negotiate the release
of the hostages, in return for sur-
rendering the hijackers to the
PLO "on the high seas," he had
relied on reports from the ship
that no one had been harmed. Had
he known that a passenger had in
fact been killed, Mubarak said,
Egypt would have responded
differently.
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
FBI Probes Santa Ana
Bombing of Arab Rights Quarters
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
The FBI is continuing its in-
vestigation of the bombing of the
office of an American Arab rights
group in Santa Ana, the Anti-
American Anti-Discrimination
Committee, last Friday in which
Alex Odeh, 41, the regional direc-
tor on the West Coast, was killed
and seven other people were in-
jured. No one has claimed respon-
sibility for the attack.
John Hoos, an FBI spokesman,
said that in days prior to the bom-
bing the group had told the FBI of
harassing telephone calls. On
Thursday night, Odeh in a TV in-
terview, defended PLO chief
Yasir Arafat and said that the
news media had mistakenly linked
the PLO to the hijacking of the
Italian cruise liner Achille Lauro.
Jewish organizations condemn-
ed the attack. Burton Levinson,
chairman of the national ex-
ecutive committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, termed the bombing as
"domestic terrorism which cannot
be tolerated."
Theodore Mann, president of
the American Jewish Congress,
condemned the attack and sent
condolences and sympathies to
the victims' families. He termed
the attack an "inexcusable act of
terrorism" and added that no
political disagreement "justifies
attacks on those engaged in
peaceful and lawful pursuits."
In Washington the White
House, in a statement issued
under the name of Larry Speakes,
the White House spokesman, con-
demned the bombing. It said:
"The Administration deeply
deplores this tragic event and con-
demns in the strongest possible
terms the criminal use of violence
and terrorism to achieve political
ends." Speakes said that Presi-
dent Reagan extended his
"sincere condolences" to Odeh's
family.
Unrelated
Violence
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Unrelated incidents of violence in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip
damaged property and inflicted
minor injuries on one man, a
70-year-old Jewish merchant from
Beersheba, Lazar Brenner.
Brenner was attacked from
behind with an axe while buying
paints in an Arab shop in Khan
Yunis in the northern Gaza Strip.
He was treated for cuts at a local
hospital and sent home. His
assailant was not caught. Brenner
said he would continue to shop in
the Arab town because prices are
lower.
A trailer serving as the tem-
porary home of a Jewish family
outside the Gush Emunim settle-
ment of Eilon Moreh near Nablus
was set on fire while the family
was out. Furniture and books
were piled in the center of the
trailer and set ablaze. In another
part of the trailer the initials PLO.
were scrawled on the walls and
floor.
A Jerusalem to Haifa train was
stoned while passing through Bat
tir village near Jerusalem. Win-
dows were broken, but no one was
hurt.
JEWISH
rvurofw
runo
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ANNUAL TRIBUTE BANQUET
THE MEN A CHEM BEGIN and ALIZA BEGIN
PEACE PARK IN THE NEGEV
Guest Speaker
Member of the Knesset
First Israeli Ambassador to Egypt
Who Contributed Immensely to the Peace
SUNDA Y, DECEMBER 15,1985 -12 NOON
GRAND BALLROOM KONOVER HOTEL, 5445 COLLINS A VENUE, MIAMI BEACH
Abraham Grunhut
Pres. JNF Gr. Miami
Zev W. Kogan
Pres. JNF Southern Region
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
For Information and Reservations:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND, 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139 Phone 538-6464
looooooooa


*J VVWX4' -* "***
Reagan Warns Hijackers
U.S. Will Deal Harshly With Others in Future
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion announced late last
Thursday that U.S. war
planes had intercepted an
Egyptian civilian air carrier
transporting the hijackers
of the Italian cruise ship
Achille Lauro and, without
firing a shot, forced it to
land in Sigonella, Italy,
where the terrorists were
taken into Italian custody
for eventual prosecution.
In a statement at the White
House on Friday, Reagan said the
operation should demonstrate to
terrorists the world over that the
U.S. would come down hard on
them in the future.
"All civilized peoples welcome
the apprehension of the terrorists
responsible for the seizure of the
Achille Lauro and the brutal
murder of (American Jewish
passenger) Leon Klinghoffer,"
Reagan declared. He said the mid-
air capture had "sent a message
to terrorists everywhere .. that
you can run but you can't hide."
BUT ALTHOUGH the hostage
crisis concluded on a gratifying
note with the hijackers facing pro-
secution by Italy, the U.S. or both,
the unfolding of last week's drama
appeared to be just beginning.
The interception of the plane,
which also carried two Palesti-
nians who had come to Egypt to
negotiate with the gunmen raised
new questions about the possible
role in the hijack of Yasir Arafat's
wing of the PLO, as well as the
part that Egypt played in harbor-
ing the terrorists as its President,
Hosni Mubarak, declared that
they had already departed for
another country.
The Administration took pains
to emphasize the positive aspects
of Egypt's conduct in securing the
release of the ship's passengers
and crew. At the same time, it ap-
peared eager to deflect specula-
tion that Mubarak may have
secretly cooperated with the
Americans in their effort to ap-
prehend the terrorists.
President Mubarak
HAVING LAUDED Italy for its
role in the operation, Reagan
noted his "gratitude that the
government of Egypt was able to
end the crisis without additional
loss of life, although I disagreed
with their disposition of the
terrorists."
Responding to questions,
Reagan stressed that Mubarak
had not been informed in advance
of the intercept plan, and he
played down the significance of
the circumstances in which the
terrorists were apprehended.
"We disagree, but we have had
too firm a relationship between
our two countries, and there is too
much at stake with respect to
peace in the Middle East for us to
let a single incident of this kind or
a disagreement of this kind color
that relationship," the President
said.
But Mubarak expressed harsh
criticism of the U.S. for its in-
tercept of the Egyptian plane. He
said the U.S. action and Israel's
air strike against the PLO head-
quarters in Tunisia three weeks
ago were "serious setbacks" to
Mideast peace. Monday, he
demanded the U.S. publicly
apologize for intercepting the
plane and at the same time con-
gratulated the crew of the plane
for their "gallant and heroic ac-
tion." He also called the intercep-
tion an act of piracy. Asked
Klinghoffer Was Chief
Of Israel Bonds Division
Continued from Page 1-A
wich Village where Klinghoffer
had resided, and a consistent con-
tributor to synagogues on the
Lower East Side where the two
men had been active as youths in
the Grand Street Settlement
House, a gathering place for
Jewish immigrants. Blond said
that Klinghoffer had been "a
great believer in Judaism."
Klinghoffer and his wife,
Marilyn, had celebrated their 36th
wedding anniversary on Sept. 18
and had at the time talked excited-
ly about the cruise they would
take, Blond recalled. Marilyn was
not aboard the ship when the ter-
rorists seized it and later shot Kl-
inghoffer and threw his body over-
board. She had remained in Egypt
with other passengers to go
sightseeing.
Blond said that the news of his
death, after initial reports that
none of the passengers or crew
members had been hurt during
the two-day orderal, was "the
worst thing" for his family and
friends to have to accept.
KLINGHOFFER'S daughters,
Ilsa and Lisa, stayed in the
bedrooms of their homes, crying
inconsolably after receiving the
tragic news. Friends and
neighbors who had been rejoicing
with the family after receiving
word that the ship was released
with no one harmed were hor-
rified and distraught to learn of
Klinghoffer's death.
A family friend, Benson Imber-
man, said, "This is just savagery.
This was a pleasant man who
would sit in his wheelchair in front
of the building (where he had
resided) and greet people. If you
wanted to chat, he would chat
with you. He never intruded,
though."
Carol Hodes of Woodbridge,
N.J., whose mother, Millie, was
one of the cruise passengers, said,
"I can't believe it. Why would
they pick on him? He was an elder-
ly man, such an innocent victim*"
Klinghoffer was confined to a
wheelchair after suffering a
paralyzing stroke. Some of his
friends speculated that the ter-
rorists had ordered him to move,
and when he didn't or couldn't do
so fast enough, they shot him.
whether, before demanding a
Reagan apology, he had read the
President's letter to him, he
replied "frankly, no" because "I
am very upset."
AT A BRIEFING immediately
following Reagan's comments, the
President's National Security Ad-
viser, Robert McFarlane, said in
response to a question that he had
no reason to believe Mubarak lied
when he told reporters hours
before the plane with the ter-
rorists departed from Egypt
that the hijackers were not on
Egyptian territory."
"We cannot know what in-
fluenced Mubarak's govern-
ment," McFarlane said. "Our
separate reporting which may
well have been very different
from his suggested the pro-
bability that they were still there,
and so we had to use the evidence
that we had. And he was acting on
his own set of facts and I wouldn't
second-guess that."
The Administration also used
the occasion to belatedly score
some needed points with Tunisia's
President Habib Bourguiba, after
the initial American endorsement
and subsequent mild condemna-
tion of Israel's raid three weeks
ago on PLO headquarters in
Tunis. Reagan praised Bourguiba
for refusing the Egyptian plane
landing rights after it was in-
tercepted by the U.S. jets.
Although Greece also denied the
plane permission to land, its role
was not cited in statements of
praise by the Administration.
THE U.S. operation also raised
questions about possible involve-
ment in the hijack by Arafat's
wing of the PLO. Israel has
asserted that the attack on the
Achille Lauro was the work of a
pro-Arafat faction of the Palestine
Liberation Front, headed by
Muhammad Abbas who, according
to the Israelis, was recently
elected to the PLO's 11-member
executive committee at Arafat's
behest.
Abbas was one of the two
Palestinians who accompanied the
hijackers on the Egyptian plane
after having negotiated their sur-
render. The other passenger was
reportedly a PLO official who was
sent by Arafat to Port Said as
well, to act as an intermediary in
the negotiations.
Abbas was released by Italian
authorities last Saturday, and he
left for Yugoslavia. Monday, it
was reported from Belgrade that
Abbas had left the country for an
undisclosed destination.
Yugoslavia, a nonaligned nation
supports the PLO which has an
embassy in Belgrade.
THE REAGAN Administration
was livid at Italy's action. The
U.S. Ambassador, Maxwell Rabb,
met with Foreign Minister Giulio
Andreotti for over two hours Sun-
day, during which he reiterated
the U.S. Administration's view
that the release of Abbas was "in-
comprehensible to the United
States." fRabb said after his
meeting with Andreotti that
Washington would continue to
press for the extradition of the
four hijackers.
In a statement by Larry
Speakes, the White House
spokesman, he referred to Abbas
also known as Abu Khaled, as
one of the most notorious
Palestinian terrorists and has
been involved in savage attacks on
civilians. Evidence at hand
strongly suggests that Abbas was
criminally implicated in the hijack-
ing of the Achille Lauro indeed
that he planned and controlled the
operation."
Speakes also stated that a U.S
Federal judge on Saturday
issued a warrant for Abbas' ar-
rest charging him with
hostage taking as well as piracy'
and conspiracy to commit both of-
fenses." The U.S. government is
"astonished" at Italy's "breach of
any reasonable standard of due
process and is deeply disap-
pointed" that Abbas was allowed
to leave the country.
MEANWHILE, the questions
of whether the four hijackers
would stand trial in Italy, the U.S.
or both remained open. The
Italians, who have no capital
punishment, do not extradite
prisoners to countries that do
have a death penalty.
However, U.S. Administration
officials said that the U.S. law cur-
rently does not include the killing
of American non-diplomat
civilians overseas as a crime, and
that it was possible that hijackers
could only be prosecuted here for
hostage taking a crime that
would not involve the death penal-
ty. The possibility, however, was
not ruled out that the hijackers
would stand trial in Italy and then
be extradited to the U.S. to face
separate charges.
The successful American opera-
tion also triggered endless detail-
ed questions about the Ad-
ministration's planning and tim-
ing of the intercept and related
developments that would give
some clue as to who knew what
when.
ONE INTERESTING sugges-
tion emerging from the piecing
together of McFarlane's
responses to these questions is
that Reagan's comment to
President Reagan
reporters in Chicago the morn-
ing before the intercept that he
would be amenable to a PLO trial
for the hijackers, was not a cover
for a plan already in progress
Reagan subsequently retracted
the statement, saying he had been
"thinking vengeance" rather than
"justice."
McFarlane said that Reagan
was initially informed of the plan
in principle at his first stop of a
Chicago speaking tour. The Presi
dent made his initial comments to
reporters on arrival at Chicago's
O'Hare International Airport, ap-
parently prior to the time
McFarlane said that Reagan was
informed.
The image of an Administration
headed by an Executive with a
forceful and consistent policy on
terrorism finally given the cir-
cumstances for implementation
thus stands in contrast with the
picture of a President who, just
moments before approving the
plan, inadvertently suggested
that the PLO was an acceptable
authority for trying terrorists.
Unbelievable: Syria Apologizes
To Israel for Missile 'Misfiring'
TEL AVIV (JTA) Syria
has apologized for the recent fir-
ing of a shoulder-held missile at an
IDF plane flying over the Golan
Heights, saying it was the
unauthorized action of a junior of-
ficer, acting beyond his standing
orders.
The missile, fired from the
demilitarized zone on the Heights
from where such arms are bann-
ed, missed its target. Israel lodged
a protest with the UN peacekeep-
ing forces on the Golan Heights.
Military observers welcomed the
Syrian apology, saying such ad-
missions were rare.
^jM5H Jewish National Fund
5agB^(Keren Kayemeth LeisraeDj
| Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
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Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish nondian rage v-A
We're Celebrating 5746 With Our First Flights
Starting October 30.
Pan Am is proud to introduce new service to
Tel Aviv. And it's really something to celebrate.
Because we're offering incredibly low
introductory fares. Plus the convenience of
flying five days a week from JFK. We're even
serving kosher meals for those who wish them.
Andthit'jnotall.
Our Two Exciting Tours Are More Reason to
Celebrate.
See the spectacular beauty and rich history of
Jerusalem, Haifa, Massada and more. Pan Am's
Tel Aviv
!34950
Based on Roundtrip Purchase.
two 9-day tours from $432-$525 make it all so
easy. For more information on Pan Am Holiday
No. 448, call your Travel Agent or Pan Am in
Miami at (305) 874-5000, in Ft. Lauderdale/
Hollywood at (305) 462-6600, and in other areas
call 1-800-221-1111.
Fare requires a 7 day advance purchase, with a minimum 7 days
and a maximum slay of 21 days. Introductory airfare is i ..ive 10730/85
thru 12/15/85, is subject to government approval, and does not include a
$3 departure tax Fare Code: BRINT. Schedule sub|ect to change without
notice : IVr person, based on double occupancy, excluding airfare
% Rmi AmAbu Canit Beat The Experience."


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
At ORT Confab Opening Here
Top Officials Worldwide Will Be Guests At Diplomat Hotel
'
Joseph Harmatz, director
general of the World ORT
Union, and four overseas
ORT directors will be
special guests at the 28th
Biennial National Conven-
tion of Women's American
ORT set for Oct. 20-23 at
the Diplomat Hotel in
Hollywood, Fla.
Attending will be Israel
Goralnik, director general. ORT
Israel; Jules Bloch. director
general, ORT France; Joshua
Flidel. director. World ORT
Union for Lating America; and
Jean-Claude Nedjar, project direc-
tor of a mother and childcare pro-
gram and a preschool program in
Lima, Peru.
They will be key participants in
panel discussions on topics rang-
ing from the survival of the
Jewish family to an assessment of
Israel in the aftermath of its cam-
paign in Lebanon. Pavine Motam-
ed, director of United States
Operations, World ORT Union,
will be part of a special panel on
education.
The directors reflect the diversi-
ty of cultural backgrounds, ex-
perience, and knowledge which
has traditionally been a unique
strength of the worldwide ORT
program.
JOSEPH HARMATZ, bom and
educated in Lithuania, was active
in the resistance movement dur-
ing World War II. Afterward, he
made his way to Israel during
the period when immigration was
still illegal giving up his studies
in law and economics to work for
the Palestine Electrical
Corporation.
He fought in the Haganah dur-
ing the War of Independence and
later, working for the Jewish
Agency Settlement Department,
Jules Bloch
Jean-Claude Nedjar Joseph Harmatz
Parvine Motamed
Israel Goralnik
immigration
and Eastern
helped coordinate
from North Africa
Europe to Israel.
Harmatz joined ORT as com-
ptroller of ORT Israel in 1960. and
was appointed director general
seven years later. He fought in the
Six-Day War and, together with
his older son in the Yom Kippur
War of 1973.
In 1980, Harmatz was elected
director general of the World
ORT Union at their Centenary
Congress. He and his wife make
their home in London, operational
headquarters of the World ORT
Union.
ISRAEL GORALNIK, director
general, ORT Israel, has been
deeply involved in the twin fields
of education and vocational train-
ing since he was awarded his
diploma in elementary and secon-
dary school teaching in 1951.
From his first job as director of
the working youth institute at
Kibbutz Palmachim to his rise to
the position of director general of
the Ministry of Labor and Social
Welfare, Goralnik has become ex-
pert in all aspects of vocational
and technological training and
National Women's Leaders Stated
Sandra Isenstein Ruth Taffel
Reese Feldman
Delegates from 1,300 Chapters
Will Participate in Programs
Continued from Page 1-A
American ORT.
ORT the vocational, technical
and scientific education program
of the Jewish people has been in
operation since 1880. Originally
founded in Czarist Russia to train
Jews for professions from which
they had traditionally been ex-
cluded. ORT is now a global net-
work comprising 800 schools with
an annual enrollment of 130,000.
Women's American ORT was
founded in 1927. It is the largest
of the ORT membership organiza-
tions. In this country, the Bram-
son ORT Technical Institute, in
New York City, the Lob Angeles
ORT Technical Institute and a
series of programs operated
through the Jewish day school
movement in Florida represent
ORT's operational contibution to
quality education in America.
application in ministration
Marilyn French
their practical
Israel.
In addition to his duties as head
,of ORT Israel, Goralnik serves as
chairman of the Council of the
Center for Employment of Profes-
sionals, chairman of the Commit-
tee for the Prevention of
Unemployment and for Raising
Productivity, and head of the
Israel Mission to the International
Labour Organization.
JULES BLOCH'S family
returned to France from
Nuremberg, Germany, where
they had been living when the
Nazis came to power in 1933.
The family was ultimately
evacuated to Perigueux in
southwestern France, when the
war broke out in 1939. Fourteen-
year-old Jules was enrolled in an
ORT school along with his father,
who was there to learn a trade.
The ORT school became a
center of resistance for
southwestern France. In the fall
of 1942, along with all his fellow
students, many of the instructors,
and the director, himself, Bloch
joined the Maquis. A year later he
and 20 other Resistance members
were arrested by German troops
while carrying out an armed
sabotage mission. They were
deported to Dachau concentration
camp near Munich.
Bloch and his companions sur-
vived deportation and camp life
mainly because of their youth and
their determination to stick
together. After the camp was
liberated by the Americans, Bloch
returned to France. He accepted a
temporary assignment with ORT
to help relocate its school from
Perigueux to Strasbourg.
From instructor to professor, to
head of works, to assistant direc-
tor of the Montxeuil Center, Bloch
grew up in the ORT movement
and rose in its ranks. In 1976, he
was appointed director general of
ORT France.
JOSHUA FLIDEL moved from
Frankfurt to Israel with his family
when he was still a young child.
He was graduated from Hebrew
University in Jerusalem with a
degree in physics, then earned a
Master's degree with a specializa-
tion in biophysics and educational
research ..from the Weizmann
Institute.-
Flidel joined ORT Israel in 1961
as supervisor of studies in
mathematics, physics, and
chemistry. In 1969, he became
director of the Technical
Pedagogical Department and
later was appointed assistant
director general of ORT Israel.
Two years ago Flidel left Israel
to take up a new appointment as
director general for ORT Latin
America.
JEAN-CLAUDE NEDJARS
work for ORT has taken him to
several continents since he receiv-
ed his own diploma from the ORT
school in Paris.
Nedjar was born in Algeria and
originally trained for a career in
accounting and business ad-
in France. During
the mid-1960's, he worked as an
accountant for Colgate-Palmolive
and Coca-Cola in Paris, leaving to
enroll in the ORT school, where he
was trained as a refrigeration and
air-conditioning technician. He
continued his studies, eventually
becoming a practical engineer. In
1972, he went to Chile to help set
up an ORT technical school.
His next ORT mission took him
to Morocco, where he carried out
a study of the training of technical
maintenance personnel for a hotel
chain.
In 1978, Nedjar took on the job
of project director of a rural in-
tegrated development program in
Ethiopia. He remained in Ethiopia
for four years. Nedjar is currently
project director of a mother and
childcare program and a pre-
school program in Lima, Peru.
^PARVINE MOTAMED,
Iranian-born, was educated in her
native country and in Europe. She
was one of the first women in Iran
to enter the university, which she
did after marriage and the'birth of
two sons. She holds a Bachelor's
degree in French and a Master's
degree in education and
psychology.
Motamed began working as an
ORT teacher in Iran in 1956. By
1973, she was director general for
ORT Iran.
When the political situation
forced the closing of ORT Opera-
tions in Iran, Motamed went to
London as a senior official of the
World ORT Union. She acted as
liaison to several countries, and
had the major responsibility for
promoting the integration of
women into non-traditional fields.
In 1983, Motamed became direc-
tor of United States Operations,
World ORT Union.
...
Panel
Discussions
Will Deal With Issues Such As
Women in Transition
A variety of panel discus-
sions will be featured at the
four-day Women's
American ORT 28th Bien-
nial National Convention at
the Diplomat Hotel in
Hollywood Oct. 20-23.
In Transition" will cover such
issues as volunteerism, the work
force, the political scene and
education. Guest panelists will in-
clude Dr. Janet Canterbury, im-
mediate past president, Florida
National Organization for
Women; Dr. Philip A. Levin,, na-
tional vice chairman. United
Jewish Appeal and past president
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward; Rebecca Roper Matkov,
president, Junior League of
Miami; Dr. Judith Stein, presi-
dent, American Association of
Career Education; Frederica
Gray, Dade County Public Schools
Director of Career Education and
Dropout Prevention.
Also, Andrew Deering, public
information officer for the Perma-
nent Commission on the Status of
Women, State of Connecticut;
Mara Giulianti, business represen-
tative, Federation of Public
Employees and state public af-
fairs coordinator, National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women; Carrie
Meek, Florida State Senator,
District 36; Dr. Diane Balser, ex-
ecutive director, Women's
Legislative Network of
Massachusetts; the Rev. Joan
Campbell, assistant general
secretary, National Council of
Churches of Christ, U.S.A.; Toni
Siskin, chairperson, Broward
County School Board.
Jewish Community As a
Global Village" will cover such
topics as Living with Hi-Tech,
Israel, anti-Semitism, the Jewish
Family. Panelists will include
Eugene Greenspan, executive
director, Miami Jewish Vocational
Sevice; Fred D. Hirt, executive
director, Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged; Eric B.
Turetsky, senior vice president.
Genesis Development Group; Rafi
Danziger, policy analyst, Commis-
sion on International Affairs of
the American Jewish Congress,
Jim Davis, religion editor, Fort
Lauderdale Sun Sentinel News.
Also Jonathan Kessler, leader-
ship development coordinator,
AIPAC; Marvin S. Rappaport,
director of international projects,
Anti-Defamation League; Mar-
shall Slavin, editor-in-chief,
Woodbine House; Dr. Sandy An-
dron, director of youth program-
ming, Central Agency for Jewish
Education in Miami; Sherwin H.
Rosenstein, executive director,
Jewish Family Service, Broward
County; Lise-Lotte Wolfe,
chairperson, Mid-Atlantic Region
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations "Outreach
Program."


ute Couture
Marcy and Co. To Show for ORT
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Tunisian Policeman Shoots 4 Jews,
Is Killed By Security Agents
Lefton, president
\y and Co., the inter-
1 haute couture
\r, will be commen-
Ifor the Premiere
; of the newest ORT
to be presented at
Biennial National
ktion of Women's
fcan ORT at the
(mat Hotel in
ad on Tuesday, Oct.
fc30 p.m.
amatic fashions, hand-
ily ORT students from
land Israel, will be ac-
hy nationally-famous
outique. The lavish outfits
| for the woman of today
modeled by local ORT
)ani Blumenthal, Maxine
), Rhoda Gould, Wendy
Barbara Pearlman,
Shapiro, Janice Rodkin,
Robbins, Lenore
in, Ellen Soffian, Linda
Marcy Lefton
Swyer, Less Masserman and
Jeannette Wurtzburg.
THE FASHION show, one of
the highlights of the four-day con-
vention which will bring 1,200
delegates from across the United
States to South Florida, has been
coordinated by Millicent Caplan
and Linda Sawyer.
Needle trades have been taught
since ORTs inception in Russia
105 years ago.
In the early 1940's, ORT's
Bramson School for Needle
Trades in New York was
established to help refugees in this
country adapt to the demands of
the American industry.
The collection presented at this
convention reflects the meticulous
workmanship, the fresh creativity
of ORT designers, and the ex-
cellence of ORT teching. Whether
fashion, electronics or computers,
new "creations" are being
developed by the hands and minds
of more than the 130,000 students
in the World OT Union network.
nger Rising
gainst Egyptian's Murder of Israelis
{v HUGH ORGEL
AVIV (JTA) -
is rising in Israel
Ihe behavior of Egyp-
kficial officials in the
of seven Israeli
its, four of them
?n, by a berserk Egyp-
Sinai.
vitness accounts carried by
tilished and broadcast media
! officials responsible for at
pme of the deaths by delay-
five hours the removal of
fed Israelis from the site of
footing to an Egyptian
station for treatment.
rding to the witnesses,
.an security men prevented
|s from going to the aid of
itims. Israeli doctors were
J as saying the victims not
[outright may have died
loss of blood because of
I treatment.
IRE IS also strong suspi-
cion here that the gunman was an
Egyptian soldier, not a member of
the Sinai security police as Egyp-
tian authorites say. The 1979
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty for-
bids the presence of soldiers in the
area of eastern Sinai where the
killings occurred.
Acting Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens has demanded from Egypt
detailed replies to a series of ques-
tions about the incident within 48
hours and a full account of the of-
ficial inquiry Cairo says it is
conducting.
Israel wants to know why the
berserk man possessed an
automatic rifle with which he fired
at the tourists inasmuch as Egyp-
tian police may carry only
sidearms and less lethal personal
weapons. Israel wants a full ex-
planation why medical aid to the
victims was delayed and why the
man who ran amok was not quick-
ly overpowered by other armed
Egyptian officers in the vicinity.
THAT POINT was raised in the
Mubarak Promises Peres
hi Make Inquiry Into Shootings
By DAVID LANDAU
IUSALEM (JTA) Egypt's President Hosni
fcik, has written to Premier Shimon Peres to assure
Egypt's determination to thoroughly examine the
[event in the Sinai on Oct. 4. The message referred to
looting by an Egyptian soldier or policeman of seven
I campers at Ras Burka, 40 kilometers south of Eilat.
subsequently said the assailant had run amok.
i ORAL MESSAGE from Mubarak delivered by
^ptian Charge d'Affaires, Mohammed Bassium, last
Jay night, Egypt's leader assured Peres, moreover,
fie would personally follow the course of the
7gation.
rak instructed the envoy to tell Peres that Egypt's
... over the affair was no less grave than Israel s. He
acquaint Peres with the findings of the investigation,
I was proceeding with urgency, Mubarak said.
IES READ OUT the message at Sunday's weekly
,et meeting, and it was later released to the press. The
fer's office clearly hopes the Egyptian President s
Cnent so different from his initial dismissal of the at-
5 a small accident woud help ease the strains that
ieveloped in relations between the two countries as a
, of the killings.
barak's message ended with the suggestion that all
Fations tending to complicate the issue ought
forth to be avoided.
detailed eyewitness account of the
attack by David Bernstein, a
senior member of the editorial
staff of The Jerusalem Post who
was on one of his frequent outings
to Sinai with his family when the
tragedy occurred.
Bernstein was on the beach at
Ras Burka when the gunman
opened fire on the Israelis from a
hilltop. He said that other Egyp-
tian soldiers at a nearby post did
nothing to stop or overpower the
man.
Funeral services were held in
Jerusalem for the three members
of one family killed in the shooting
rampage. The coffins of
Jerusalem Magistrate Haman
Shelah, his wife, liana, and their
12-year-old daughter, Zelil, lay in
state outside the Supreme Court
building. They were buried at Kib-
butz Nachsholim. Two other
young victims, Dinah Berri, 12,
and Amir Baum, 10 were buried in
Jerusalem.
Funeral services were held later
for Anita Griffel, 35, and Ofra Gila
Turel, 12.
SPEAKING AT the memorial
ceremony at the Supreme Court
building, Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim said the Sinai attack had
been cold-blooded murder and not
a minor incident as depicted by
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak. He noted that, accor-
ding to first reports, the lives of
the victims might have been saved
by timely medical aid.
Feelings of bitterniss toward
the Egyptians were hardly
mollified by a television clip
shown here of American reporters
questioning Mubarak about the
shootings. Mubarak, interviewed
on a Cairo street, seemed to shrug
off the attack as a small incident,
the work of a madman and of no
importance.
PARIS-(JTA)-A Tuni-
sian policeman fatally shot
four Jews, one of them a
four-year-old boy, and
wounded eight others last
week when he opened fire
on worshippers attending
Simchat Torah services at
the El Ghirba synagogue on
Jerba island just off the Tui-
sian coast.
He then shot to death a Tuni-
sian truck driver before he was
apprehended by security agents
who said the killer had gone
berserk.
According to reports from
Tunis, the Jewish gunned down at
the synagogue were identified as
Haim Cohen, 56, who died instant-
ly, four-year-old Ben Inane Had-
dad, who died at a hospital; and
two other adults, one a 20-year-
old woman, who also died at a
hospital. A teen-age girl identified
as Judith Boukhris was reported
on the danger list. The other
Jewish wounded have been releas-
ed from the hospital, Tunisian
sources said.
THE SYNAGOGUE attack
sent shock waves through
Tunisia's 5,000-member Jewish
community where tension has
been running high since the Oct. 1
Israel Air Force raid on Palestine
Liberation Organization head-
quarters near Tunis in which
about 60 Palestinians and Tuni-
sians were killed. It also stirred
deep emotions among former
Tunisian Jews living in France.
Tunisia's Premier Mohammed
M'Zali visited the scene of the
synagogue attack in the old
Jewish quarter of Hara Srira on
Jerba. He assured the country's
Jewish community that the ad-
ministration of President Habib
Bourguib will do everything possi-
ble to protect Jewish lives, proper-
ty and civil rights. M'Zali blamed
neighboring Libya for inflaming
anti-Jewish passions.
He noted that since the Israeli
air raid, Libyan radio has been
calling on Tunisians to seek
revenge and "massacre all of
Tunisia's Jews." M'Zali urged the
Jewish community to remain
calm.
EYEWITNESS accounts said
the attack occurred shortly after
9:30 a.m. local time when the
historic El Ghirba synagogue, the
oldest in Tunisia, was packed with
worshippers. The policeman "who
suddenly went berserk," accor-
ding to the witnesses, opened fire
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and pandemonium broke out in
the synagogue as the dead and
wounded fell, crying out in pin.
Tunisian authorities said the
killer raced to a nearby highway
where he tied to commander a
truck. When the driver, a Moslem,
resisted, he was shot to death.
Security agents later cornered the
policeman who, they said, resisted
arrest and was slightly wounded.
Tunisian Jews were described
as being "very, very worried"
despite Bourguiba's long personal
record of moderation and pro-
mises of protection. Community
leaders and members plainly fear
new outbreaks of anti-Jewish
violence.
THEY POINT out that when
the synagogue was being attack-
ed, local school children were
holding an ti-Israel demonstra-
tions nearby.
In France, Tunisian and other
Jews saw parallels between the
Jerba shootings ad the 1980 bomb
attack on the Rue Copernic
synagogue in Paris which killed
four people and wounded nine. It
also occurred on Simchat Torah.
Shultz Saddened
By Seamen's
Deaths
JERUSALEM (JTA) U.S.
Secretary of State George Shultz
has expressed deep sympathy and
revulsion over the murder of two
Israeli merchant seamen in
Barcelona, Spain, last week.
Israeli officials have said the two
men were killed by the PLO. Their
bodies, which had apparently been
tortured before death, were found
in an apartment in the city by
Spanish police.
IN A LETTER to Premier
Shimon Peres Sunday, Shultz
wrote: "Dear Shimon, I want to
thank you for your message on the
interception of the Achille Lauro
hijackers and at the same time ex-
press my deep sympathy and
revulsion at brutal murders of two
Israeli seamen in Spain. The ter-
rorist murders of innocent citizens
of both our countries must serve
to strengthen our determination,
which I know you share, to expose
and eliminate the scourge of ter-
rorism. I look forward to seeing
you" in Washington this week.

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HOTELS:
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Tel Aviv 6 nights Carlton
Jerusalem 6 nights Laromme
AIR FRANCE M/S
For Brochure Send Coupon to Air France
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fetffpMBflBWtfrjBflfltfS^flMB^SllllI'liii ii fc


>w. lAsnot M lAMlianiliM/lau i inrnr^*. iM ivjm-n
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
< .
Only 48 Hours, But They Left
Death, Terror in Their Wake
Continued from Page 2-A
but was rebuffed there and
returned to a point outside Egyp-
tian territorial waters, off Port
Said. Eyewitness accounts of the
ordeal said Klinghoffer was
murdered while the ship was near
Tartous. There was no clear in-
dication how he was killed or why.
ITALY'S Ambassador to
Egypt, Giovani Migliuolo, who
boarded the Achille Lauro after
the surrender, told reporters
Thursday, "There were a number
of cases where passengers were
threatened with death." He con-
firmed that Klinghoffer was
murdered Tuesday, Oct. 9, off
Tartous.
Migliuolo also said that "With
the intervention of the officers of
the ship, and some help from one
of the four (hijackers), lives were
saved." An American woman,
identified as Millie Hodes of Short
Hills, N.J., was reportedly told by
the hijackers that she would be
the second to die after Klinghof-
fer. That threat was not carried
out.
Klinghoffer, a stroke victim,
was able to leave his wheelchair
for only short intervals and could
not walk unassisted. That would
seem to account for his not joining
his wife on the sightseiing excur-
sion ashore.
ACCORDING to Am-
bassador Migliuolo, the hijackers
were armed with "Kalachnikovs
(assault rifles), granades, and they
put gasoline tanks (apparently
Molotov cocktails) in different
places where the passengers
were, but mainly the American
and British passengers. They
separated the British and
Americans from the rest," he
said.
The Italian envoy said he
thought the hijackers boarded the
ship at' the start of the cruise in
Genoa. They reportedly said after
their surrencer that their weapons
were concealed in vegetable
crates taken aboard at Genoa
where the ship provisioned for the
cruise.
In a bizarre footnote to the
tragedy, some sources suggested
that the terrorists seized the
wrong ship. According to those
sources, their target was a
Norwegian cruise ship in the
Eastern Mediterranean at the
same time, one of whose
passenger was President
Reagan's daughter, Maureen
Reagan. She arrived safely in
Israel.
A physician at the Hadassah-Hebrew Univer-
sity Medical Center's Margulies Osteoporosis
Center in Jerusalem tests the prototype of a
new device which utilizes low-level gamma ray
radiation to measure bone density. The device,
developed by the Medical Center and scientists
at Hebrew University's Racah Institute of
Physics, provide a highly accurate measure of
the effects of various treatments for
osteoporosis, a debilitating bone disease which
physicians say strikes about one-third of all
women at some point in their lifetimes.
Peres To Talk to Reagan
On Getting Peace Talks Going
Bookcase
Four Works in Capsule Reviews
Continued from Page 1-A
withdrawn Monday.
Peres' letter to Reagan said:
"We salute your courageous deci-
sion and decisive action. We con-
gratulate you and the U.S. Navy
on the flawless implementation: A
major contribution to the interna-
tional struggle against the double
plague of cold-blooded murders
and outright lies by both the
perpetrators and their superiors.
Your action is a landmark in the
fight to eradicate terrorism and a
shining example of your resolve."
Peres wrote to Shultz: "Dear
George, I would like to express my
personal admiration and a na-
tional sense of relief at your
resolve in taking this action. We
admire the decision as well as the
flawless implementation by the
U.S. Navy flyers.
"IT IS ONLY through such
demonstration of determination
that the bloody nature of interna-
tional terrorism and its cowardly
lies can be exposed and
eradicated. We stand reassured
by the evidence that we are
together in the war against
terrorism."
But if Israel-U.S. relations have
become closer as a result of the
capture of the Achille Lauro hi-
jackers, an open conflict brewing
between Peres and Austria's rul-
ing Socialist Party over Israel's
bombing of PLO bases in Tunisia
three weeks ago has clouded the
Socialist International meeting.
Former Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky, a deputy chairman of the
Socialist International, has sug-
gested that whoever ordered the
bombing may no longer have a
place in the International. Peres
retorted sharply, calling Kreisky a
"Jewish anti-Semite." Austrian
Socialist leaders have defended
Kreisky but, with a single excep-
tion, rejected the idea that Peres
be ousted from the International.
Reagan's Plan to Sell Jordan
Arms Is Nothing Very New
Continued from Page 5-A
Reagan Administration was un-
doubtedly hoping for a tangible
sign of some movement on his
part that would both enable the
U.S. to meet with the joint delega-
tion and justify the proposed sale
of new arms to Jordan.
The Administration gave Con-
gress informal notificationn at the
end of September of its intention
to provide the Jordanians with a
$1.55 to $1.9 billion arms package
that includes 40 F20s or F16
fighter jets; 12 mobile improved
Hawks surface-to-air missile bat-
teries and equipment to convert
14 batteries into mobile units; 72
Stinger shoulder-fired surface-to-
air missiles and 36 reloads; 300
AIM-9P4 infrared air-to-air
missiles; and 32 Bradley fighting
vehicles.
A provision in the recently pass-
ed foreign aid bill makes new
arms sales to Jordan contingent
on the King's public commitment
to recognize Israel and negotiate
with it "promptly and directly."
THE ADMINISTRATION has
argued that Hussein has already
met these conditions, but
legislators have made it clear that
the Jordanian monarch will need
to take a bold move if a battle with
Congress is to be avoided.
Consequently, while the Ad-
ministration may be quick to seize
Hussein's address to the UN
General Assembly as new
evidence that Jordan has met the
demands of Congress, the King's
more explicit hints of Jordan's
willingness to negotiate directly
with Israel appear unlikely to
satisfy a majority of legislators.
Using the language of the
foreign aid act amendment, Hus-
sein said in his address: "We are
prepared to negotiate under ap-
propriate auspices with the
government of Israel, promptly
and directly, under the basic
tenets of Security Council Resolu-
tions 242 and 338."
However, Hussein insisted, ,as
he did in his visit here last may,
that "appropriate auspices'"
should be an international con-
ference. Hussein also met with
Mr. Reagan in Washington and
with members of Congress the
next day.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
We Lived There Too. By Ken-
neth Libo and Irving Howe.
New York: St. Martin's/Marek,
1984. 347 pp. $24.95.
Too small for the coffee table
and too large for the bookcase,
this effort to tell about the Jews in
the Western United States just
doesn't come off. It relies on let-
ters, diaries, poems, newspaper
articles and pictures. But the pic-
tures are often blurry and the
documents frequently refer to
Jews on the Atlantic seaboard
rather than the West.
The book is divided into three
overlapping sections: Sephardim
and Ashkenazim 1630-1830; The
Central European Experience
1830-1910; East European Jews
1880-1930. This unhelpful division
does little to illuminate the theme
of the book. It only leads to confu-
sion and repetition, especially bet-
ween the second two sections.
Some material occasionally cap-
tures the reader's interest, but it
is hard to read the book straight
through. Even dipping into the
book from time to time won't help
much. On the plus side, there are
two essays by Irving Howe which
open and close the book. His con-
cluding statement is a penetrating
analysis of American Jewry to-
day, it goes far beyond the subject
of the book. However, five
thoughtful pages of epilogue can-
not atone for the uncoordinated
hodge-podge which precedes
them.
General Sharon's War Against
Time Magazine: His Trial and
Vindication. By Dov Aharoni
New York: Steimatzkv
Publishers Inc., 1985. 336 dd
$4.95..(Paper Back).
Just four months after the jury
handed down its verdict in Ariel
Sharon's case for libel against
Time magazine, this book hastily
appeared. Numerous
typographical errors attest to the
speed with which it was rushed in-
to print. More time might have
produced a book that was not only
free of typographical errors but
that might have manifested a bit
more balance.
Just as David Halevy, the Time
correspondent who was responsi-
ble for the story that caused the
hbel case, was clearly biased
against Sharon, so is the author of
the book clearly prejudiced in
favor of Sharon. Aharoni's ad-
miration for Sharon is boundless
to the point of sycophancy; it
blocks an objective view of the
trial from emerging.
What does emerge is Time's
culpability. The jury found that
the Time had defamed Sharon and
that it had printed a false story,
but it also found that Sharon had
not proven malice, and so no
monetary damages were award-
ed. Aharoni sees this as a com-
plete victory. More sober reflec-
tion would question this view.
Aharoni fawns over Sharon as
though there were no censure by
the Kahan Commission and no
removal of him' from his post as
Minster of Defense.
If you want to read a jour-
nalistic account which tells one
side of a trial that ended in
January, 1985, then the book has
some merit. A longer interval is
needed for a more dispassionate
verdict.
The Rise and Fall of Paradise.
By Elmer Bendiner. New
York: G.P. Putnam's Sons,
1983. 256 pp. $17.95.
A dizzying procession of people
and groups parade through the
muddled pages of this book. The
author set out to tell the story of
Jews and Arabs in southern Spain
during the 7th to the 10th Cen-
turies. He was tripped up along
the way by his dazzling erudition
with which he overwhelmed both
himself and his readers.
He has a cast of thousands, in- .
eluding such obscure characters
as: Ibn Al-Fakin Abu Bekr Ahmad
Ben Muhammed Ben Ishak Al
Hamadani (that's one name!)
Buzorq Ibn Shahriyar Ot Ramhor-
moz, Foulfoul, and Abu-Yusuf
Hasda Ben Isaac Ibn Shaprut.
They are caliphs and kings, emirs
and viziers, doctors and eunuchs
poisoners and beheaders!
assassins and rapists.
They belong to such groups as
Andalusians, Abbasids, Berbers
Babylonians, Cordobans, Carol-
lngians, Franks, Falashas,
Fatimids, Khazars, Karaites,
Kalbites, Kaisites and so on, to
name just a few.
The bewildering names flash by
many appearing for a fleeting
vignette. By the end, if the reader
has lasted that long, one is
bludgeoned into acknowledging
that the author has read many
esoteric works. To leave no doubt
* this' he ^s six-page
bibliographic note" with many
obscure sources. The befuddled
and bewildered reader can only
groan "enoutrh! enouo-hf"
groan "enough! enough!'
God in the Teaching of Conser-
vative Judaism. Edited by
Seymour Siegel and Elliot
Gertel. New York: The Rab-
binical Assembly, 1985.'
Distributed by Ktav Publishing
House. 278 pp. $20.
Judaism is often said to be a
religion of deeds rather than
creeds and that, therefore,
theology plays a subordiante role.
This book richly demonstrates
that theology is alive and well in
Judaism. -It brings together 20
essays, most of which were
previously published in journals or
as book chapters. They were writ-
ten during the last 50 years, most-
ly in the 1950's and 1960's. The
authors are leading Conservative
rabbis and teachers associated
with "the Jewish Theological
Seminary. They include such
luminaries as Mordecai Kaplan.
Robert Gordis, Abraham Heschel
and Milton Steinberg.
The essays deal with approaches
to God in Conservative Judaism
and show how varied these ap-
proaches are within one sector of
Judaism. Seymour Siegel, one of
the editors, has written an ex-
cellent introduction and both
editors have provided useful cap-
sule summaries of each essay.
The editors identify as their
goal the provision of an introdiu -
tion "to the wealth of ideas and
convictions that Conservative
Judiasm has brought to contem-' *
porary Jewish life." In this objec-
tive, they have succeeded
admirably.
Schifter
Nominated
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Richard Schifter. U.S. represen- %
tative to the United Nations Com-
mission for Human Rights since
1981, has been nominated by
President Reagan to be Assistant
Secretary of State for Human
Rights and Humanitarian Affairs.
He succeeds Elliott Abrams, who
has been named Assistant
Secretary of State for Inter-
American Affairs.
The 62-year-old Schifter was
also Deputy U.S. Representative
to the United Nations Security
Council in 1984-85. A Washington "
lawyer, he has been a member of
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council since 1980. Born in Vien-
na, Austria, he is a graduate of the
College of the City of New York
and Yale Law School.
gely


Shamir Affirms Jews Oppose
apartheid, Racial Discrimination
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
EW YORK (JTA) -
be a Jew means to be
nst apartheid. To be a
means to be against
ial discrimination,"
lared Yitzhak Shamir,
,utv Prime Minister and
eign Minister of Israel.
hamir stated categorically
the position of Israel, the
e of Israel, and the govern-
t f Israel on South Africa is
r "We are against apartheid,
oppose any racial discrimina-
and we have said it openly
[ore other governments ever
d to say anything on this
iject."
ddressing a group of civic
Jers and government officials
,vened by the Jewish Communi-
Relations Council of New York,
jamir asserted that the system
apartheid could never be accep-
to Israel because it stands in
sition to its moral principles.
partheid is against all of the
isons of Jewish history,"
amir said, and Israel has com-
nicated this to the South
[ricans at all appropriate inter-
tional forums.
N RESPONSE to a question
>m the publisher of the Amster-
m News, a leading black weekly
blished in New York, Shamir
ited that Israel maintains
lomatic relations with Pretoria
Jgely because of the need to
intain contact with the Jewish
Jnmunity in South Africa which
clearly stated its opposition to
leid.
owever, the Foreign Minister
le it very clear that beyond
)matic relations, all other ties
i South Africa are "constrain-
nd very reduced more so than
> almost all Western and some
ican countries."
93 Jews Exit
EW YORK (JTA) Only
Jews were permitted to
grate from the USSR during
fember. the National Con-
ice on Soviet Jewry reported.
late, a total of 796 Jews were
Ited visas in 1985.
Shamir expressed his disap-
pointment with the failure of the
global community to give enough
importance to solving the famine
ravaging the African continent
which "may be the most impor-
tant international problem after
the peace issue."
THE FOREIGN Minister
outlined Israel's extensive pro-
grams of cooperation with black
African countries that try to
develop an infran structure for the
production of food utilizing
achievements in agricultural
technology and innovative irriga-
tion techniques developed in
Israel.
Shamir called on the countries
of the free world to "take this ex-
ample and work together with us
towards saving millions of starv-
ing suffering men, women and
children."
Commenting on the role of the
Soviet Union in the Middle East,
the Foreign Minister said that
although he has detected a change
in style, there have been no
changes in the policies of the
Soviet Union in regard to Israel
and Jewish emigration. However,
Shamir said he believes that
Soviet bloc countries are altering
their attitude toward Israel and
he stressed that they must be
given every oppourtunity "to take
such a step even if they are
hesitant."
IN VIEW of this positive trend
among those aligned with the
Soviets, Shamir expressed the
hope that "in the interest of Israel
and the free world," responsible
governments will "encourage any
sign of change in the intransigent
and stubborn positions of the
Soviet Union."
The meeting was chaired by
Peggy Tishman, president of the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York. Other
Israeli officials in attendance in-
cluded Israel's Ambassador to the
UN, Binyamin Netanhayu, and
Counsul General Moshe Yegar.
Among those in attendance were
leaders of the black and Hispanic
communities, top city and state of-
ficials, legislators, educators and
organizational leaders.
Key speakers at the biennial general assembly
of the Union of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions in Los Angeles Oct. Sl-Nov. 5 are (left to
right) Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler, presi-
dent of the UAHC; Nobel laureate Isaac
Bashevis Singer; Los Angeles Mayor Thomas
Bradley; and Abba Eban, chairman of the
Knesset Committee on Security and Foreign
Affairs. Some 8,000 delegates are expected to
attend the Reform convention which will be
held at the Century Plaza Hotel.
Von Weizsaecker
Makes Official Visit to Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
President Richard von
Weizsaecker of West Ger-
many placed a wreath on
the tomb of Theodor Herzl
last week. The first German
chief of state ever to come
to Israel, von Weizsaecker
arrived on a four-day official
visit accompanied by his
wife, Marianne.
Within an hour after landing at
Ben Gurion Airport where they
were greeted warmly by Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog, the couple
paid a solemn visit to the Yad
Vashem Holocaust memorial in
Jerusalem in tribute to the six
million Jews slain by the Nazis in
World War II.
EARLIER, as he stepped from
his special Lufthansa airplane, the
West German President spoke
forthrightly of the Holocaust.
"We Germans will certainly not
thrust away remembrance of the
past," he said, speaking in
English." The Jewish people were
subjected to untold persecution.
The past cannot be wiped out. The
more openly we face the truth, the
freer we are to meet present day
challenges."
Herzog noted in response that
von Weizsaecker has
demonstrated on many ocasions
throughout his career "your
dedication to reconciliation and
your concern for our future." At
an official dinner later, Herzog
made a point of praising von Weiz-
saecker's Bundestag speech of
last May 8, commemorating the
40th anniversary of the end of the
war and the fall of the Third
Reich.
The German President met with
Premier Shimon Peres and, accor-
ding to Israeli sources, indicated
President Von Weizsaecker
he was very encouraged by Peres'
outline of diplomatic prospects for
peace and Israel's intentions.
Much of his discussions with Peres
and other Israeli officials focused
on international terrorism and its
latest manifestation, the hijacking
of the Italian cruise ship Achille
Lauro by Palestinian gunmen who
held 400 passengers and crew
members hostage, including a
large number of German nationals
among the former.
PERES EXPRESSED the
view that the fight against ter-
rorism enhanced rather than im-
peded the peace process. Unbridl-
ed terrorism diminishes the pro-
spects for peace, he said.
Peres cited evidence which he
said proved direct links between
the Palestine Liberation
Organization base in Tunisia,
destroyed by Israeli bombers, and
the murder of three Israeli
civilians by Palestinian terrorists
aboard a yacht at Larnaca,
Cyprus Sept. 25. The Premier
bluntly expressed his bafflement
at Europe's wholesale condemna-
tion of Israel for the raid.
According to unconfirmed
reports circulating here, Peres
may boycott the session of the
Socialist International in Vienna
next week which he planned to at-
tend enroute to the United States.
This would be an expression of his
displeasure at the wave of
criticism of the air raid from
Socialist and other quarters in
Europe.
Von Weizsaecker visited holy
sites in East and West Jerusalem.
His visited to East Jerusalem was
made in private rather than of-
ficial capacity.
He Gets
Honorary PhD
TEL AVIV (JTA) West
German President Richard von
Weizsaecker was granted an
honorary degree of doctor of
philosophy by the Weizmann In-
stitute at a brief ceremony at the
Institute in Rehovot on Friday
some hours before he left for
home after a four-day official visit
to Israel the first ever by a Ger-
man President.
Strike Ends
Ethiopians May Have New Accord
Ethiopians march to the Western Wall in Jerusalem's
I to protest the Chief Rabbit' demand that Ethiopian Jews
\a ritual immersion ceremony prior to marriage.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A four-week protest sit-
down strike by Ethiopian
Jews outside Chief Rab-
binate headquarters ended
here after the strike leaders
were convinced that the
Chief Rabbis would formally
endorse an accord reached
in a bitter dispute over the
Ethiopian immigrants'
status as Jews.
The two Chief Rabbis,
Mordechai Eliahu (Sephardic) and
Avraham Shapiro (Ashkenazic)
had demanded that the emigres
submit to ritual immersion, a
religious conversion rite, before
they would be allowed to marry.
The Ethiopians considered this a
gross insult that questioned their
authenticity as Jews.
AFTER WEEKS of negotia-
tions in which Premier, Shimon
Peres personally intervened, an
agreement was reached whereby
a panel of Ethiopian Kessim
(elders) would investigate the
family history of each couple ap-
plying for a marriage certificate
to ascertain whether they were
Jewish by halachic standards.
The marriage registrars will be
required to accept the findings of
the Kessim. except where the
evidence was insufficient, and
ritual conversion would be
waived.
The strike leaders balked at en-
ding the sit-down when they
discovered the Chief Rabbis had
not actually signed the document
of agreement but instead sent a
letter to Peres undertaking to
recommend it to the 10-member
Chief Rabbinate Council. They
were finally persuaded, however,
that the undertaking was tanta-
mount to endorsement.
BUT MISTRUST persists bet-
ween the Ethiopians and the Or-
thodox religious establishment.
The immigrants said they would
have several couples from around
the country apply for marriage
licenses under the agreement to
test its sincerity and workability.
The Chief Rabbis may iiave ag-
gravated the mistrust by alleging
the dispute was "incited" by Com-
munist agitators among the
Ethiopians, a charge hotly denied.


"Page 14-*A~ TheJewishTToridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
i
Incredible!
PLO Says Victim Had Heart Attack
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The Palestine
Liberation Organization has
suggested that Leon Kl-
inghoffer. an American
passenger aboard the hi-
jacked Italian cruise ship
Achille Lauro, was not
murdered by the Palestinian
terrorists who seized the
vessel last week but died of
a heart attack.
Farouk Kaddoumi, represen-
tative of the PLO, told a meeting
of the Security Council on the
Middle East that there was no
evidence that Klinghoffer was
murdered. He said there have
been reports that he suffered
from heart disease and was in
poor health. "If there was
evidence that he was killed, then
where was that evidence?" Kad-
doumi asked.
SECURITY COUNCIL was
convened at the request of India
on behalf of the non-aligned coun-
tries to discuss "the Middle East
problem, including the question of
Palestine." But it was evident
from the start of the deliberations
that this meeting of the Security
Council would concentrate on the
ship hijacking.
In his speech. Kaddoumi blamed
Israel and the U.S. for the
absence of peace in the Middle
East. His suggestion that the
American hijack hostage was not
killed by the terrorists raised
eyebrows here. Diplomats private-
ly expressed disbelief in the PLO's
claim and amazement at its
audacity.
Israel's Ambassador to the UN,
Binyamin Netanyahu, had no
chance to respond to Kaddoumi
immediately.
THE U.S. Ambassador to the
UN, Vernon Walters, said that
while his country is relieved by the
news that the hijacked passengers
have been released, that relief was
tinged with sadness and anger
over the brutal murder by the ter-
Reaganites Want 'Maximum Extent'
Prosecution of Ship's Terrorists
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion called for the prosecu-
tion "to the maximum ex-
tent possible" of the ter-
rorists who hijacked the
Italian cruise ship seized
near Port Said and released
near the same site last
Wednesday.
At first, the White House and
the State Department said they
were still awaiting details as to
whether all the passengers had
been released safely or whether
the hijackers had been granted
safe passage by the Egyptians.
The Administration was waiting
for word from U.S. Ambassador
to Egypt Nicholas Veliotes who
was enroute to Port Said. The
Egyptian government claimed
that the ship and all of the some
500 passengers and crew aboard,
including about a dozen
Americans, had been released
unharmed. The Egyptian account
conflicted with the subsequent
report by Italian Prime Minister
Bettino Craxi that one of the
passengers had been killed.
READING FROM a prepared
statement, Charles Redman, a
State Department spokesman,
said, "Our position on hostage
taking is clear. We believe those
responsible should be prosecuted
to the maximum extent possible."
But Redman would not com-
ment on what role the U.S. had,
beyond general consultations with
the governments of countries in
the region or whose citizens were
aboard the ship. He stressed, in
response to questions, that
whatever decision had been taken
by Egypt to resolve the crisis
"was an independent Egyptian
decision" and that the "details
were arranged strictly by the
Egyptian government."
Redman also declined to say
whether the U.S. had been involv-
ed in any discussions with the
World Assembly Set
MONTREAL (JTA) The
first World Assembly of Moroccan
Jewry is taking place here Oct.
17-19, bringing together leaders
of Jewish communities in Europe,
North and South America, Israel
and Morocco itself.
rorists of an American passenger,
Klinghoffer.
Walters said the U.S. will con-
tinue in the search for a lasting
peace in the Middle East. "Let me
be unequivocal in saying that the
peace which we all desire will not
be achieved by the terrorists or
through their actions, but at the
negotiating table," he said.
The American envoy, however,
did not memtion the PLO in his
speech or the fact that the hi-
jackers of the Achille Lauro were
released with impunity.
IN ANOTHER development,
the General Assembly was ex-
pected to vote on a proposal spon-
sored by India, Iraq, Kuwait,
Nigeria, Senegal and Yemen to in-
vite PLO chief Yasir Arafat to ad-
dress the UN's 40th anniversary
commemorative session. The ses-
sion opened Monday and will con-
tinue through Oct. 24. Until now,
the UN has invited only heads of
government and state to attend.
The proposal to invite Arafat in-
jected the first controversy over
the 40th anniversary ceremonies
at the UN. So far, all ar-
rangements and decisions with
respect to that event had been
made by unanimous consent. The
U.S. and other Western countries
lobbied intensively to prevent the
invitation to Arafat from coming
to a vote last Friday.
Meanwhile, Mayor Edward
Koch of New York announced
that he decided to cancel his of-
ficial trip to India in Mid-
November to protest India's ef-
forts to obtain an invitation for
Arafat. Koch made his announce-
ment during a protest rally out-
side the PLO office in Manhattan
against the ship hijack.
Foreign Minister Shamir
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, although he maintained that
neither the U.S. policy of not talk-
ing to the PLO or American will-
ingness to have "discusions" with
anyone toward obtaining the safe-
ty of U.S. citizens had changed,
and that the two policies were
"not contradictory."
EARLIER, Secretary of State
George Shultz and visiting Israeli
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
emerged from a morning meeting
with brief statemens saying they
concurred on the need to deal
firmly with terrorism.
Shultz said the two were in
"complete agreement on the fact
that terrorism is a great threat to
all of us and it must be dealt with
firmly and stopped."
Alluding to the U.S. reaction to
Israel's attack on the PLO head-
quarters in Tunis the Ad-
ministration called the move a
legitimate act of self-defense,
then "deplored" the raid
Shamir said: "There could be
some differences from time to
time, but there is no doubt that we
have a common gain and we
believe the United States and
Israel believe that we have to
struggle and stand firmly against
all terrorist activities."
The two, who were to meet
again later in the day, said they
spoke generally about the opera-
tion of the joint U.S.-Israel
political military groups, the
Israeli economy, the peace pro-
cess, Soviet Jewry and U.S. arms
sales to Jordan. Shultz will testify
tomorrow before the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee on
the proposed arms sale.
Miami's Israel Bond campaign was honored for special achieve-
ment by its Ambassador's Society of Trustees at the International
Leadership Conference of Israel Bonds held recently in Detroit.
Accepting the Community Achievement Award is Larry Gottlieb
(center) Miami Bonds leader, a member of the National Cam-
paign Cabinet. With him are Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan (left),
guest speaker at the awards luncheon, and David B. Hermelin,
national campaign chairman of Israel Bonds.
JDC Reveals U.S. Jews Raised
$300,000 for Earthquake Victims
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish community and
members of the general public
moved with alacrity in response to
the Mexico City earthquake and
the announcement that the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee (JDC) was open-
ing its mailbox to earmarked
donations.
The JDC, the overseas relief
agency of the American Jewish
community, announced that dona-
tions and pledges had risen to
over $300,000 and were still com-
ing in.
Even before the post office had
a chance to make its first
deliveries of thousands of in-
dividual responses, there were
telephone calls from lay leaders
and professionals in Jewish com-
munities across the country pledg-
ing their help.
The Associated Jewish
Charities of Baltimore, Maryland
pledged $25,000; the Jewish
Federation Council of Greater Los
Angeles pledged $10,000; Temple
Emanuel of New York pledged
$10,000; the Jewish Federation of
Cincinnati pledged $5,000; the
Jewish Federation of Reading; *>A
Pa., pledged $5,000.
Other Federations across the
country publicized the address of
the JDC open mailbox, encourag-
ing members of their communities
to respond, as did many rabbis
who used the opportunity
presented by the Jewish holidays
to issue an appeal.
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"ranston Vows
Reagan Will Lose on Arms to Jordan
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Jordan May Be Open to Attack
If PLO Is Permitted To Stay On
Continued from Page 1-A
intends to sell $5 billion in com-
it planes and other weapons to
iudi Arabia.
"These two events, occurring
ithin two days, could result in a
ingerous new escalation of the
ms race in the Middle East.
"Both are unacceptable and,
hile the Congress can have no
rect effect on the British
rovernment, we do have the legal
ithority to stop the Reagan Ad-
ministration from selling lethal
'eapons to the Arabs.
PRESIDENT Reagan faces
Jmost certain defeat from the
ingress if he proceeds with his
ilans to sell advanced fighter
.lanes and other weapons to
lordan.
"A resolution opposing sales to
Ijordan, which I am supporting
land will work for in the Senate,
[already has 70 Senate signatures.
"And in recent days, I and Sen.
Bob Packwood of Oregon have
secured almost 60 signatures in
the Senate opposing U.S. arms
I sales to the Saudis.
"So clearly the Senate has
grave concerns about the arms
buildup in the Middle East both by
the Arabs and Israel.
"King Hussein and President
Reagan will be meeting in
Washington (Sept. 30) to discuss
the Middle East. The King has
also indicated that he will talk
with Congressional leaders.
"ON FRIDAY, (Sept. 27),
before the United Nations, the
King pledged his support for new
peace talks with Israel.
"The King will learn while he is
in Washington that the Congress
also supports a genuine new peace
initiative in the Middle East.
"But any peace move must be
based on two unalterable
conditions:
"First, the Arab nations must
drop their long-standing state of
war against Israel and agree to
recognize its existence as a nation
Reagan
Praises
Bourguiba
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan, in his weekly
radio address, praised Tunisia and
President Habib Bourguiba's role
in seeking to bring about a resolu-
tion to the Arab-Israel conflict.
"There is a particularly bitter
irony about recent events because
President Bourguiba was one of
the very first to urge a negotiated
settlement of the Arab-Israel con-
flict," Reagan said. "Our hearts
go out to him and to the innocent
Tunisians swept up in this
violence.
"In this horror, our hope lies in
statesmen like President
Bourguiba and King Hussein,
President Mubarak, and Prime
Minister Peres. They are men of
vision and peace who deserve our
support and our prayers."
The President's address seemed
an attempt to mend the frayed
relations with Tunisia in the after-
math of the Israeli air attack on
Palestine Liberation Organization
headquarters in Tunisia. At least
W persons were reported killed in
the attack.
Reagan also expressed "shock
and dismay" at "the murderous
attacks on Israeli civilians, and in
response an Israeli military raid
n a PLO headquarters in a coun-
ty that is an old friend of the
Jn'ted States."
Sen Alan Cranston
under United Nations Security
Council resolutions 242 and 338.
"Second, they must agree to
negotiate directly with Israel on
terms of a peace agreement.
"Until these conditions are met,
there should be no new arms to
the Arabs and there can be no real
peace effort in the Middle East.
"PRESIDENT Reagan has
said that his proposed arms sale to
Jordan is necessary because of a
threat to that nation from Syria.
"That is an unacceptably
misleading attempt to rationalize
an escalation of the arms race in
the Middle East that will under-
mine Israel's security.
"More arms to the Saudis and
Jordan could also be costly to
American security interests and
to our taxpayers. To meet the
threat of new arms by their Arab
neighbors, Israel will be forced to
increase its defense spending, fur-
ther exacerbating its already
serious economic problems. This,
in turn, could lead to requests for
more economic aid from the
United States.
THE HISTORY of the Middle
East is a history of the futility of
arms buildups which have only led
in one direction to war and
endless death and bloodshed.
"The United States and Great
Britain, both of which have long
involvement and experience in the
Middle East, should know better.
"It has to stop someplace,
sometime.
"I will do my part to stop it
now."
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Israeli Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin appeared to
suggest that if Jordan
allows Palestine Liberation
Organization personnel to
remain on its territory, it
would be open to an Israeli
attack similar to that car-
ried out against the PLO's
headquarters in Tunis.
Speaking on the CBS-TV "Face
the Nation" program, Rabin
warned all countries to "be aware
that whoever gives refuge to ter-
rorists will pay for keeping them
there." When he was asked if
these countries included Jordan,
Rabin said:
"I WOULD advise the Jorda-
nian government to refrain from
allowing it to be done and to
restore the policy that was kept by
Jordan for almost 15 years ... a
policy which practically prevented
any terror acts to be originated or
to be carried out from Jordan."
Rabin was not asked if "allow-
ing it to be done" referred to an
Israeli raid or to the taking of
refuge by terrorists in Jordan.
But Israel has charged Jordan's
538-1000
A 30 YEAR TRADITION
King Hussein with allowing the in-
flux of ranking PLO officials and
other personnel into his country in
recent months.
Although a spate of murders of
Jews by West Bank Palestinians
most recently the killing of
three Israelis whose bodies were
discovered last week appear to
have been random attacks by
Arab youths, Israel has blamed
the PLO, and Israeli military of-
ficials have reportedly linked
them indirectly with the PLO
presence in Amman.
FOLLOWING THE Tunis raid.
Israeli Minister of Commerce and
Industry Ariel Sharon is reported
to have threatened that Israel
would attack bases in Jordan in a
similar fashion. But no such direct
warning has come from the Prime
Minister or from the Defense or
Foreign Ministries to date.
Rabin declinated to comment on
how Israel intended to react to the
murder of the three Israelis whose
bodies were found last week. But
he warned that "no doubt terror
organizations are going to pay
much more heavily for their inten-
tions and for their acts of con-
tinuous terror against us." The
Israeli Defense Minister denied
any U.S. complicity in the Israeli
raid.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 18. 1985
You ve got what it takes.
i
Share the spirit. Share the refreshment.
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Quitting Smoking
Now Greatry Reduces Serious Risks to Your Hearth.
it


lampaign For And Against
Proposed U.S. Arms
Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum Set
Sales To Jordan
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
|_ Overshadowed in the
news media last week by the
hijacking of the Italian
J;e ship Achille Lauro
jid its aftermath, was the
ongoing and gradually ac-
celerating campaigns here
for and against the Ad-
linistration's proposed sale
of advanced arms to Jordan.
Both Secretary of State George
Shafts and Israeli Deputy Prime
Minister and Foreign Minister
itzhak Shamir put their oppos-
ing cases before members of Con-
press last Thursday. Meanwhile,
opponents of the sale in both the
Emu of Representatives and the
Senate were collecting signatures
for what they hope will ultimately
(turn into a Congressional veto of
he arms package if the Ad-
ninistration refuses to back
flown.
PRESIDENT Reagan gave
Congress informal notice on Sept.
27 of his intent to sell Jordanian
arms package that includes 40
-16 or F-20 jet fighters, 300
MM-9P-4 air-to-air missiles, 12
Improved Hawk anti-aircraft
nissiles with 36 reloads, and 32
Bradley fighting vehicles.
The Arms Export Act provides
for a 20-day informal notification
period, after which formal
notification can be made to Con-
gress which then has 30 days in
vhich it can veto the sale. Senate
pemocratic Whip Alan Cranston
ID.. Calif.) said at a press con-
ference at the end of September
hal Reagan "faces almost certain
in his plan to sell the
peapons to Jordan.
Cranston and five other
Senators Edward Kennedy (D.,
Mass. i. Rudy Boschwitz (R..
Minn.), John Heinz (R.. Pa.),
Paniel Inouye (D., Ha.) and
obert Kasten (R.. Wis.) have
Misted substantial bi-partisan
lupport for a resolution disap-
proving of the sale. By the. end of
last month, the Senators said they
had over 70 signatures.
In addition, a "dear colleague"
letter co-sponsored by 12
Representatives, including Dante
Fascell (D., Fla.), chairman of the
House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee, and Larry Smith (D., Fla.),
began circulating in the House at
the beginning of this month and,
according to Smith, has won some
75 signatures to date. Reps.
James Florio (D., N.J.) and Nor-
man Lent (R., N.Y.) have enlisted
76 co-sponsors for a sense of the
Congress resolution opposing the
sale until Jordan negotiates with
Israel.
THE ADMINISTRATION has
given no indication so far that it
will be deterred by the strong op-
position it faces in Congress over
the arms package. To the con-
trary, Shultz made it clear in a
hearing of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee last Thurs-
day that the President would
press ahead on schedule, in spite
of requests that he postpone the
debate for at least another few
months, pending developments in
the Mideast peace process.
In his testimony, Shultz
repeated earlier arguments by the
Administration that Jordan's
King Hussein has fulfilled the re-
quirements set out in the 1984
Foreign Aid Act for the transfer
of new U.S. arms to Jordan. The
legislation links any such sale to
public commitment by Jordan that
it recognizes Israel and will
negotiate with it "promptly and
directly." It also requires the
President to certify that these
conditions have been met when
the Administration proposes a
major sale.
Shultz noted, in particular, the
King's statement during his re-
cent visit here that he was willing
to negotiate "promptly and direct-
ly" with Israel under the "ap-
propriate auspices." However,
Hussein stressed that such
auspices would be an international
conference in which the Soviet
Continued on Page 2-B
Rabbi Meir Kahane
Rabbi Kahane To Speak
At Eden Roc Wednesday
Greater Miami Friends of Kach will present member of
Cnesset Rabbi Meir Kahane on Wednesday evening, Oct.
23. at 7:30 p.m. at the Eden Roc Hotel.
A member of the Knesset, Rabbi Meir Kahane is a con-
troversial Jewish leader, currently challenging the U.S.
State Department decision to revoke his American
pitizenship.
Rabbi Kahane will discuss "The State of Israel: Jewish
>r Western Democracy?"
(iami, Florida Friday, October 18,1985 Section B
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, under a grant
from the Marilyn K. Smith
Philanthropic Fund, will
sponsor the first annual
Marilyn K. Smith Leader-
ship Enrichment Forum on
Oct. 28-30.
The fund was established in
memory of Mrs. Smith, who died
on January 1, 1985 at the age of
48. Dr. David Hartman, world-
renowned scholar and author, will
speak on "The Living Covenant,"
the theme of this year's forum at a
series of six lectures.
AT THE time of her death.
Marilyn Smith was a vice presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, a post she held since
1982. She was an active communi-
ty leader for more than 25 years,
and in addition to her service to
Miami's Jewish community, she
was a member of the Board of
Directors of the United Way of
Dade County.
A native of Chicago, Mrs. Smith
lived in Miami for 40 years. She
graduated from Miami Beach
High School and attended the
University of Miami.
Samuel I. Adler, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, commenting on the Leader-
ship Enrichment Forum, said that
"Marilyn Smith possessed all of
the qualities that epitomize the
dedicated volunteer. She touched
and influenced so many of us in
the Jewish community and the
community at large. Through the
Marilyn K. Smith Philanthropic
Fund, we intend to honor all that
she stood for by perpetuating her
vibrant spirit and lifelong concern
for the learning and sharing of
humanitarian ideals."
SMITH WAS active on virtual-
ly every front of Jewish communi-
ty needs. She was the founder of
the Young Women's Division of
Federation, served as president of
the Women's Division in 1975-76,
was chairman of the Planning and
Budget Committee, and sat as a
member on the Community Rela-
tions, Administrative, and Com-
munications Committees.
She was always active in
Federation's annual Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, having served as
vice chairman of the 1983 Cam-
paign, as a member of the Cam-
paign Steering Committee, and as
the 1982 chairman of the Paceset-
ter Dinner.
On the national level, she was a
board member of the Council of
Jewish Federations, a member of
the Executive Committee of the
national Women's Division of the
United Jewish Appeal, and a
member of the Campaign Policy
Board of the United Jewish
Appeal.
LOCALLY, Mrs. Smith served
as a trustee of the National Foun-
dation for Advancement in the
Arts and as a member of the
Miami Opera Guild. She was also
active in Hadassah, the League of
Women Voters, South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry, Na-
tional Jewish Resource Center,
and YIVO Institute.
"When you consider her level of
involvement," Adler stated, "it
makes you realize what a great
loss we suffered with her passing.
Through the Leadership Enrich-
ment Forum, we have the unique
opportunity to encourage many
individuals to take an active role
in community service, to seek
solutions and build new bridges of
understanding in Miami."
Mrs. Smith was married to
Harry B. Smith, senior partner in
the law firm of Smith and
Marilyn K. Smith
Mandler. Harry Smith has also
devoted many years of service to
Miami's Jewish community
through his involvement in the
Federation. "I am very ap-
preciative of the numerous con-
tributions that have been made to
the Philanthropic Fund, and I'm
certain that the Leadership
Enrichment Forum will become a
fundamental component in
Federation's efforts to enhance
community consciousness and
awareness of Jewish issues which
shape all of our lives," Smith said.
DR. HARTMAN'S lectures will
offer his personal perspective on
the present state of the Jewish
people and their development dur-
ing the next decade, with a par-
ticular emphasis on the problems
facing the American Jewish com-
munity in a pluralistic society
today.
Hartman is the author of
numerous philosophical works.
His latest book is "The Living
Covenant," which will be released
this fall.
The Marilyn K. Smith Leader-
ship Enrichment Forum will be
held on Monday, Oct. 28, through
Wednesday, Oct. 30. Six lectures
are planned during the three-day
event. Attendance at the lectures
is by invitation only. The schedule
is as follows:
Monday, Oct. 28, for Federa-
tion board members, Pacesetter
and Vanguard Division members
at the Omni International Hotel,
1601 Biscayne Blvd., at 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 29, for Jewish
community professionals of
Federation and its beneficiary
agencies at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, 137 NE 19th St.,
at 8:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Oct 29, for key
leaders of the Greater Miami com-
munity at the Omni International
Hotel at 12 noon.
Tuesday, Oct. 29, for key
leaders of the Greater Miami
Jewish community at Temple
Beth Sholom, 4144 Chase Ave.,
Miami Bech, at 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 30, for
members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's
Division at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami at 12 noon.
Wednesday, Oct. 30, for
members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Young
Leadership Council at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami at 7:30
p.m.
TRUSTEES of the Marilyn K.
Smith Philanthropic Fund are
Harry B. Smith, Joseph A. Smith,
David B. Smith, Lou Ann Smith,
Federation President Samuel 1.
Adler, Federation Executive Vice
President Myron J. Brodie and
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion President Nan Rich.
Further information concerning
the First Annual Marilyn K.
Smith Leadership Enrichment
Forum or the Marilyn K. Smith
Philanthropic Fund is available
from Federation's Assistant Ex-
ecutive Vice President Arthur L.
Flink.
Local Leaders to Attend Int'L
Confab of Weizmann
Institute in Spain
Solomon Garazi, presi-
dent of the Sephardic Con-
gregation of South Florida
at Temple Moses, Miami
Beach, will lead a delegation
from this community to the
Fifth International Con-
ference of the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science slated for
Oct. 22-30 in Barcelona and
Madrid, Spain.
Joining Garazi as delegation
leader will be Lee Millman, ex-
ecutive director of the Florida
region of the American Commit-
tee for the Weizmann Institute of
Science.
"The University of Science"
will be the theme of the con-
ference, whose objective is to fur-
ther the relationship between
Spain and Israel, to give the scien-
tific image of Israel and the Weiz-
mann Institute to Spain's national
scientific body, and to bring
members of the Weizmann family
into direct contact with the
Spanish-Jewish heritage.
THERE ARE currently 12,000
Jews living in Spain, according to
Garazi and Millman. Some 4,000
each are in Madrid and Barcelona,
and the balance are represented
throughout the rest of the
country.
"We look forward to attending
this major international con-
ference," said Garazi. "The con-
ference is a tribute to the Institute
in that it fulfills a prophecy made
by the Institute's founder, Chaim
Weizmann, 'of building a bridge
between science and the spirit of
man.'
"It is fitting, too," Garazi add-
ed, "that this year marks the
850th anniversary of the birth of
Moses Maimonides, the Rambam
the great Spanish theologian,
philosopher and astronomer
whose analysis of the religious
treatises of the Torah are to this
day studied by scholars of the
Bible."
SCIENTIFIC TOPICS to be
discussed at the conference will
include "The Laser Revolution,"
with Prof. Asher Friesem;
"Disease As a Failure in the Pro-
cess of Life," Prof. Samuel
Shaltiel; "Cancer As a Social Pro-
blem," Prof. Nathan Trainin.
Also "Aging of the Brain,"
Prof. David Samuel, and "The
Mathematical Revolution," Prof.
Lee Segel. A special lecture on
"The Jewish Heritage in Spain"
will also be given.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18. 1985
Fischler, Lefton, And Goldstein Elected Barbara Walters Speaker At
To Holocaust Memorial Center
Dr. Abraham S. Fischler has
been elected president of the
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, succeeding Dr.
Gregory B. Wolfe. Dr. Fischler.
President of Nova University.
Fort Lauderdale. will head a
Board of Directors whose
members are drawn from
throughout Dade and Broward
counties.
Donald E. Lefton is the newly
elected Chairman of the Ex-
ecutive Committee. Mr. Lefton is
president of the Continental Com-
panies, developers, owners and
operators of hotels throughout
North America. He is also vice
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
Continuing as Executive Vice
President is Goldie R. Goldstein,
long time volunteer in civic and
religious activities. Mrs. Goldstein
is the founding administrator of
the Holocaust Memorial Center
since its creation in 1979.
In addition to the conduct of
educational activities to keep the
lessons of the Nazi Holocaust
alive, the Center has developed a
unique program of taking
testimonies of Holocaust sur-
vivors on video tape. These tapes
are used widely in educational in-
stitutions throughout South
Florida. The Center is located on
the Bay Vista Campus of Florida
International University of North
Miami. In addition to the record of
the survivor's experiences, the
Center has also captured on tape
and film the testimony of
liberators, protectors and
Rescuers of Holocaust victims.
TV g&m aad Ewnt C mm rtt wi
V Prradrati Or A Hat* .last IM
Abraham S. Fiachler Donald E. Lefton Goldie R. Goldstein
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Miami Jewish Home Gala
\BC News Correspondent Bar-
bara Walters will address the
Founders of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
at their Gala on November 2. The
third annual anniversary celebra-
tion, expected to draw over 300
Founders and their guests, will be
held at the Starlight Rooftop of
the Doral-on-the-Ocean. Miami
Beach.
This year's Gala theme is
-Magical" Mystery Tour." and
Founders' President Sidney Olson
says that "It will be a night of
wizardry' for all who attend, and a
large part of the evening's magic
will be the captivating presence of
Barbara Walters."
Ms. Walters was awarded the
Hubert H. Humphrey Freedom
prize by the Anti-Defamation
League in 1978.
Ms. Walters has twice appeared
on the cover of "Newsweek"
magazine and was included by
'Time" magazine in its list of the
"100 most influential leaders in
America." Other honors include
"Broadcaster of the Year" award
by the International Radio and
Television Society of 1975, an
EMMY presented by the National
Academy of Television Arts and
Sciences, and numerous honorary
doctorates. She is the author of
the book ffoir To Talk With Prac-
tically Anybody About Practically
Anything.
Barbara Walters
Ms. Walters is one of 236
Founders who, to date, have rais-
ed in excess of $16 million toward
the capital expansion of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for th
Aged.
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Arms Sales To Jordan
Caataaaed from Page IB
Union would participate. Both the
D S and Israel have rejected this
framework.
SHULTZ ALSO stressed the
military arguments for the sale,
namely, that Jordan's air defense
ts obsolete, and that the King's ef-
forts toward peace have so im-
pressed the opyuueiiU of peace,
especially Syria, that he mast be
encouraged and his government
iniUkiil by the U.S. with better
air power to confront increasing
stuaitj threats to has country.
suggests it includes the more ex-
pensive F-16s as opposed to
F-20s. Asked how Jordan planned
to pay for it. he said he expected
the U.S would be asked "to play a
strong part" in footing the ball!
indicated that the Ad-
ootd oppose any
restricoons on the empkr>Toec":
and utilization of the Hawk
aaaSaies sooght for Jordan, simuar
to those isaposed on arms sold to
Jordan and Saudi Arabia in the
1970s. The current |aiiia|,i for
Jordan mrtnrtri i ifia;m in to
make the aaaaie mobile But
Sbuta said that if aataahera of
Congress "have a profaata. and
they want to dmcast it. we are
araaaaa- tr rSi iaaa at "
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Rowland Schaefer Donates $1 Million To
Israel's Weizmann Institute Of Science
A $1 million donation by
Rowland Schaefer, president and
chairman of the Board of Claire's
Stores, Inc., to build a solar fur-
nace at Israel's Weizmann In-
stitute of Science that will provide
the basis for significant
technological advances in ac-
cumulating, converting and stor-
ing solar energy, was announced
by Stephen Stulman, executive
director of the American Commit-
tee for the Weizmann Institute.
'Mr. Schaefer's generosity and
vision in providing the funds for
the solar furnace and the Weiz-
mann Institute's solar research
complex is extremely timely and
of great encouragement to the
dedicated scientists at the In-
stitute who are striving to meet
future global energy needs," said
Mr. Stulman.
The Weizmann Institute of
Science is recognized for its far-
reaching research in solar energy.
Research efforts focus on ex-
periments to develop processes
and technologies that will make it
Rowland Schaefer
possible to substitute solar energy
for oil. The Weizmann complex is
one of only two such solar plants
in the world.
The Solar Research Complex is
also designed to serve all ex-
perimental needs of scientists in
the field of high temperature
chemistry and high intensity
Noted Advocate For Soviet
Jews To Speak In Miami
Yosef Mendelevich, one of the original 11 Soviet citizens con-
victed in the infamous 1970 Leningrad "hijacking" trials which
rekindled the Soviet Jewry emigration movement, will speak at a
special event in North Miami Beach on Thursday, Oct. 24 at 7:30
p.m. at Temple Adath Yeshurun.
The real "crime" of the group was a desire to emigrate to Israel.
In desperation, they had planned to take a plane and fly to Scan-
dinavia. But the flight to freedom was never carried out.
Mendelevich, and his compatriots were arrested before ever
reaching the plane. In a slanted trial, the 11 were found guilty and
sentenced to penalties ranging from four years in prison to death.
The death sentences later were communted to 15 years in Soviet
labor camps, following worldwide protests.
The trials served to awaken the world to struggle for human
rights within the Soviet Union and to strengthen the resolve of the
Soviet Jews to explore their Jewish identities. In the years that
followed, the numbers applying for visas to Israel, joining Hebrew
classes, and studying Jewish history and culture multiplied beyond
all expectations.
After ten years of imprisonment in the Soviet Union, Mendelevich
was freed in a surprise move by the Soviet government in February
of 1981. Since his release, Mendelevich has emigrated to Israel and
he has become an outspoken advocate for Soviet Jews. Known as
the "Voice of the Refuseniks" in Israel, he is chairmn of the Soviet
Jewry Education and Information Center in Jerusalem which
serves as the official representative organization of Soviet Jewish
refuseniks in the West. Refuseniks are Soviet Jews who have been
denied exit visas by the Soviet regime.
Mendelevich will focus his discussion on the drastically worsened
plight of Soviet Jews and the role that the American Jewish com-
munity can play in assisting Soviet Jews who seek religious freedom
within the Soviet Union, or assisting those who wish to leave that
country. His appearance will be most timely in that it precedes by a
very few weeks the upcoming summit conference meeting between
Soviet leader Gorbachev and President Reagan.
This program is co-sponsored by the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, an arm of the Community Relations Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Temple Adath Yeshurun and the
Central Agency for Jewish Education. Attendance is free of charge
and open to the public.
Shultz Sends Letter
Of Encouragement
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
"rime Minister Shimon Peres
cently received a letter of en-
couragement from U.S. Secretary
F State George Shultz for the
|overnment's efforts to boost
foreign investments in private
Israeli industry.
Shultz wrote that he had been
fnefed on the recent session in
lenisalem of the special task force
F international and Israeli
lusinessmen, Operation In-
dependence. "You know how in-
vested I am in the long-term
development of the Israeli
economy and its great potential,"
Shultz wrote.
"I am pleased and encouraged
that you and your government are
working with (Detroit in-
dustrialist, philanthropist and
Republican Party supporter) Max
Fisher and the Project In-
dependence group as one way to
promote long-range growth, while
you work simultaneously to imple-
ment and broaden your stabiliza-
tion plan. This is exactly as it
should be."
photochemistry.
The soon-to-be built solar fur-
nace will facilitate a broad spec-
trum of research and projects in-
cluding high power solar driven
lasers, the collecting, storing and
transporting of solar energy, and
the testing of high temperature
materials. The solar furnace com-
prises a Heliostat, a main concen-
trator, an attentuator and an ex-
perimental platform.
Recognized as one of the
world's foremost centers of scien-
tific research, the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science, located in
Rehovot, Israel, has achieved its
prominence by making important
contributions in the study of
cancer, multiple sclerosis,
children's diseases, problems of
aging, neurological and im-
munological disorders, plant
genetics, energy research, com-
puter science and industrial
research to name a few.
Rowland Schaefer oversees the
operation of 250 Claire's Stores,
jewelry and specialty retailers, in
32 states. Claire's Stores, current-
ly a $60 million annual operation,
last year increased both its sales
and its profits by more than 50
percent. Anticipated sales by 1990
are $251 million. Originally from
Chicago, Mr. Schaefer has been
married for 37 years and has five
children.
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Golden Nominated Vice President
Of United Synagogues of America
Joseph Golden of North Miami
Beach has been nominated Vice
President of United Synagogue of
America. The election will take
place at the Biennial Convention
at the Concord Hotel in Kiamesha
Lake, New York, on Nov. 17-21.
Mr. Golden, who is a past presi-
dent of the Southeast Region and
Beth Torah Congregation in
North Miami Beach, is a Past
North Dade Chairman of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal, and current-
ly serves as a member of the
North Dade Lodge of B'nai Brith,
the Board of Hillel Community
Day School and the National
Board of United Synagogue of
America.
He possesses a Juris Doctor
Degree from the School of Law,
University of Miami, and is cur-
rently Vice President and
Associate Manager of Shearson,
Leahman Brothers, Inc.,
Hallandale.
Mr. Golden's wife, Henni, is also
active in Beth Torah Congrega-
tion and Hillel Community Day
School, and is a founder of the
United Synagogue Youth Pro-
gram at Beth Torah.
Franklin D. Kreutzer of Miami
will be installed as international
president of the United
Synagogue of America. The
Southeast Region serves more
than 125 Conservative Congrega-
tions in seven states and Puerto
Rico.
Joseph Golden
Complaint Against
Israel's Air Raid
TEL AVIV (JTA) The UN-
affiliated International Civil Avia-
tion Organization (ICAO) has in-
formed Transport Minister Haim
Corfu that the organization's
Council will discuss a Tunisian
complaint against Israel's air raid
on PLO headquarters in Tunisia
at its meeting in Montreal on
Wednesday.
TO CREATE ITS FRESHEST COFFEE EVER,
MAXWELL HOUSE HAD TO BEAT
ITS SINGLE MOST RUTHLESS COMPETITOR.
Time is the enemy of all things fresh.
And, of course, ground coffee is no
exception.
Recognizing that freshness is fleeting.
Maxwell House set out to cut down the
time between grinding and packing. In
doing so, they have successfully created
their freshest coffee ever.
THE STORY SO FAR.
After a coffee bean is
roasted and ground, it
reaches its very peak of
freshness. That's why, after
grinding, it is essential to seal
coffee into a can as quickly as possible.
But, until now, freshly ground
coffee had to wait before it could be
vacuum packed. And as it waited,
time took its toll on precious freshness
and aroma.
MAXWELL HOUSE
BROKE THE TIME BARRIER.
Now Maxwell House has found an
exclusive new way to pack coffee
immediately after grinding.
It's called the Fresh Lock"
packet. It allows Maxwell
House to pack coffee sooner
than ever before. Literally within
minutes of grinding. So now,
Maxwell House can seal into each
can grinder freshness.
GRAND OPENING.
It begins with a "whoosh!"
the moment you open the
can. A sound that says more
eloquently than words that
Maxwell House is fresh.
And the aroma? Well, it
speaks for itself.
Try the freshest ever Maxwell
House" Coffee. Now more than
ever, it's Good to the last drop."
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE:
K
Kosher


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 18. 1
Father Wendell Hainlin. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Rabbi Schiff Steps Down
As Chairman Of
Clergy Dialogue Group
At the annual meeting of the
National Conference of Christians
and Jews" (NCCJ) Clergy
Dialogue Group, the chairmanship
was passed from Rabbi Solomon
Schiff. the first Orthodox rabbi to
hold the position, to Father
Wendell Hainlin of the All Angels
Episcopal Church of Miami Spr-
ings. The annual meeting was held
recently at the Greater Miami
Jew.sh Federation building.
The NCCJs a Clergy Dialogue
Group in this community is the
oldest such group in the United
States, consisting of ministers.
priests, rabbis and nuns. The
group has met or. a regular basis
for 25 years to explore common
faith heritage and deal m areas of
theological and philosophical
differences
In transferring the gavel. Rabbi
Schiff. Federation's director of
chaplaincy and executive rice
president of the Rabb
Association of Greater Miami.
said, i am cocfider.: that Father
Hainan will lead the group with
distinction and wisdom."
Rabbi Schiff further stated that
'the past year was a very
enriching experience personally.
as well as a fruitful year for the
other clergy of the Dialogue
Group. The programs were infor-
mative and stimulating and the
presence of the clergy leadership
of the community helped add tc
the collegiality and friendship of
the participants.'"
Frank Magrath. Florida region
director of the NCCJ. commended
Rabbi Schiff for his dedicated ser-
vice to the group, and especially
for his leadership in working with
the other clergy and with the
NCCJ in developing a brochure
entitled Suggested Inter-
religious Guidelines for Prayer on
Public Occasions.'' The brochure,
said Magrath. "will advance the
principle of non-denominational
: rayer at public occasions and is
being widely distributed to clergy
and public officials throughout the
tatt
Upon conclusion of the meeting.
Magrath presented Rabbi Schiff
with a plaque of appreciation on
r.*half :-f the group.
2 Persons Injured
By Terrorist Bomb
JERUSALEM tJTA. la
persons were shghdy injured in a
terrorist bomb blast in Jemsa.err.
but week. The charge exploded
behind a bos stop on Mt. Scopus,
site of the Hebrew University
Four Terrorists Killed, One Wounded
In Shoot-out With Border Police
Bv HIGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV iJTA)
Four members of a terrorist
gang which had been
operating in the Jerusalem
hills for nearly two years
were killed and a fifth
wounded in a shoot-out with
members of the special
border police anti-terrorist
unit. The gang was cornered
near Hebron.
Security auv >aid that
. .
succe- -.-:--
Israe. IV:Vr.s<- F r i I Vntral
mand Ma; Gei A
Shahak. -
cleaned :' terr rists New-
tbden be aoti oed
campers to tak
ir. the area in groups, not singly
nor in pairs, and to go armed.
THE GANG il reported to nave
earned out a number of attacks.
murdering five Israelis These in-
clude Edna Haran. 22, and
Mordechai Suissa. 24. whose
bullet-riddled bodies were found
last week after extensive sear-
The capital's Pobce Chief. In-
spector Haim Alcaldes, warned
the pubbe once again to keep a
watchful eye open especially
during this hobday period.
Earlier, citixens' wariness
_ J a terror tragedy m the
of the ultra-Orthodox Mea
i quarter A car filled with
gas canaisters and explosives was
left parked on the roadside just
near the Four Specaes market
where Jerusalemites come each
rear before Sukkoth to buy the
ches. The gang wounded 18 other
Israelis in the last 17 months.
Its members had been living off
the land, obtaining arms, ammuni-
tion and food and other supplies
from local Arab villagers. Many of
the latter have been detained for
-:ioning.
-aid the gang s
r-gan with a solo attack
- leader. Mohammed Hassan
..mat. 31. of Surif village. He
led an Israel: hiker in the
Fukir. area southwest of
.Jerusalem ir. May. 19S4.
EMPLOYED AS a laborer in
Beth Shemesh. he subsequently
recruited two relatives from his
native village. Mahmoud
Ghnaimat and Mohammed Bar-
daiya M hammed A-Tus of
nearby Jab'a village and Ali
Haleila of Samu'a.
Equipped with weapons, some
of them stolen, or bought from
people who had stolen them from
the IDF. the gang is believed to
have murdered Meir Ben-Yair and
Michal Cohen in Massu'a forest
and to have carried out a number
of rifle attacks on Jewish buses,
including a recent attack on an
Egged bus near Halhoul soutt, 0f
Jerusalem.
The exposure of the fang is
believed to have resulted from im-
proved intelligence work follow-
ing the concentration of in-
telligence agents and per- r.nel in
the West Bank after the IDF
withdrew from Lehar.on last
June.
Canadian Jeicish
Congress Resolution
TORONTO (JTAl The
Canadian Jewish C ess' na-
tional executive committee
recently adopted m af-
firming its '"repugnar.i :' apar-
theid as alien to the Jew.-: ethic."
The resolution added: "We call on
the South African goverr.emnt to
abolish without delay any laws
based on racial discrimination and
to bring about a just society based
on negotiations with al races."
The resolution follows a similar
motion adopted at the Com-
monweath Jewish Council con-
ference recently heid in i >ttawa.
Instead of serving the same old thing this Shabbos why not try Ronzoni" pasta9 Your
family will be delighted as they spin their forks and soak up their sauce with any one of
our 70 shapes and varieties All made to our exacting standards with 100c semolina 'or
unsurpassed taste and texture
Ronzoni is not only goco for Shabbos. it s good tor you Made of completely
natural ngreoents. our pasta s low .n cholesterol and contains no added salt
whatsoever And of course ts absolutely Kosner and Parve
So start a new tradition trvs Shabbos w up better

luiav and etrog for the festiva..
Meanwhile. Jerusalem pobce
have indicated they wfll probably
not press charges against a
iSS-vear-old Petah Turra man..
Meir Braverman. who shot and
killed an Arab near Herod's gate
early last Tuesday morning.
Braverman said the victim.
Hassan fliiin Mashara. had at-
tacked Btaiei man's wife as the
couple stood by Mashara s fresh
bagel staL
Eyewitnesses broadly bore oat
BraVeraaa's iei ikwi. ""^ local
people noted that Mashara. 3s.
has a long history of mental il-
lness. Braverman was released on
bail over Yom Kippur and told to
return to Jerusalem pobce head-
quarters for further i
S~
CHICKEN CACCIATORE
ojo as-purpose Hour
': teasoooc sa"
dasr of seocw
2 I Dcxxos cftcxer ^eces
2 tar>escco-:s :
2 taDesooons "-a-game
i mexaumoraon taetydced
a^ge green pepper finely
dead
: pound mushrooms sKed
1 large dove garlic rmnced
1 ar. 15 02 i preparec
soagnett sauce
cup red wine
teaspoon oregano
teaspoon each thyme a-tf
marjoram
package (8 oz I
RONZONI' Spagnen
tablespoon parsley
chopped
V cv s>i sa* anc secce- r>eoge ch<*en w> seasoned ^our Heat smiiet with oi and 1 taWesoo-
M .=-zz~-i 2-=.-e :-.:-" sal Ightr. ry^wned Ramma horn pan Aooorwonanapepoe'a^c-^-'i
"j '_-es Add >z-3~ saj sa^;e aaai seasc- np and oh Ctan la Da- arvi tying to a rx> Reduce
*,ear T^L ^ s*nrneT ^ w *vtes or unw cheken is done
Meanwnae cow pasta according to package owenons Dram and add 1 tablespoon marga
Sen* cftckerano sauce c%c spagnec Sonwie wh chopped parsley Makes 4 servings


Peres To Be Featured In Zionist
Teleconference From Israel
Israel Prime Minister Shimon
Peres will be featured in a live Na-
tional Zionist Teleconference
from Jerusalem to Miami Beach
and 17 other American cities Sun-
day. October 27.
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
will be the site of the unique op-
portunity for South Florida
Zionists and Jewish community
members to see, hear and ques-
tion the Israeli premier on an open
line to Jerusalem.
The day's program, featuring a
Zionist Fair and an Israel Quiz for
Dade County day school and
religious school students, will get
under way at 1 p.m., with the
90-minute teleconference starting
promptly at 3, according to Coun-
ts Commissioner Barry Schreiber,
president of the American Zionist
Federation of South Florida.
Harriet Green, chairman of the
AZF of South Florida board and
national vice president of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat, is co-ordinator
of the afternoon event which is
under the auspices of the World
Zionist Organization, the Jewish
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Peres Makes Clear
His Differences
With Shamir
Barry Schreiber
Agency and the American Zionist
Federation.
Peres, who served as Israeli
Defense Minister prior to being
elected Prime Minister last year,
will be questioned by a panel in
Koch Calls On U.S. To Employ
Economic Sanctions Against Egypt
By ROCHELLE SAIDhI.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
United States should employ
economic sanctions against Egypt
for ignoring a United States re-
quest not to release the four Arab
terrorists who hijacked an Italian
cruise ship, Mayor Edward Koch
said here last Thursday.
He spoke at a protest
demonstration organized by the
Jewish Community Relations
Council near the New York office
Palestine Liberation
'ii/ation in response to the hi-
ind 'he murder of an
in Jewish passenger, Leon
ffer of New York
KOCH TOLD the 100
rators that one of the pro-
in reacting t<> acts of Aral)
:\ was that the United
as still not punished any
"i the terrorists. He noted that
Israel had punished Arab ter-
rorists in its raid on PLO head-
quarters near Tunnis and that it
was appropriate" that it did so.
He said "we must take action,
military if required," economic
and diplomatic against those
slates which encourgae ter-
rorism." Koch said, "If you allow
murderers of Americans to go
free, you have to pay the price."
Asserting that there were some
countries prepared to accept the
death of Jews, he added, "We do
not accept the death of anyone
killed by terrorists and certainly
not killings of Jews.
The Mayor said it was "an ab-
solute outrage and encourage-
ment of terrorism" for PLO head
Yasir Arafat to be invited, as a
"head of state" to address the
current session of the United Na-
tions General Assembly.
RABBI Avi Weiss of Riverdale,
who recently organized a Coali-
tion to Stop PLO Terrorism, said,
"the blood of Leon Klinghoffer is
dripping from Arafat's hands."
He said "Arafat masterminds
murder and then pulls back."
Arafat has declared publicly that
the PLO was not associated with
the seizure of the liner and con-
demned the seizure.
Malcolm Hoenlein, JCRC ex-
ecutive director, asked what the
State Department should have
done, said there should have been
a clear declaration to the PLO and
to Arafat to turn the terrorists
over to the proper authorities and
a warning that action would be
taken against the PLO and any
country which harbors terrorists.
He said, "We have all become cap-
tives of these terroists and what
have we done nothing."
A coffin with a sign, "Murdered
by the PLO," was on display at
the rally. Later it was carried
from the site of the deomstration
to the Egyptian Mission to the
UN.
Harriet Green
New York comprised of U.S. Sen.
Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.), past
national chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal; Brooklyn District
Attorney and former Con-
gresswoman Elizabeth Holtzman;
Jewish National Fund leader and
former national Hadassah presi-
dent Charlotte Jacobson; and
Daniel Schorr, veteran television
commentator.
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education is coordinating the
Israel Quiz, according to Gerald
Schwartz of Miami Beach, na-
tional vice president of the
American Zionist Federation.
Among the organizations which
will have booths at the Zionist
Fair admission is free to the
fair and the teleconference are
Hadassah, Pioneer
Women/Na'amat, B'nai Zion, the
Zionist Organization of America,
Amit Women, Beth Shirah Con-
gregation, the Greater Miami
Aliyah Council and the American
Technion Society.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres has
made clear that his own
position toward a possible
future role of the Soviet
Union in the Middle East
peace process differs sharp-
ly from the totally negative
position of Deputy Premier
and Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir. But he flatly
denied a press report that
Israel has offered to
withdraw from the Golan
Heights if Moscow would
restore diplomatic ties.
The matter was raised at Sun-
day's Cabinet meeting by Hosef
Shapira of the religious party,
Morasha, on the basis of a report
in Yediot Achronot that Peres had
asked World Jewish Congress
president Edgar Bronfman to con-
vey the offer during his visit to the
USSR last month. Peres said he
made no such request of Bronf-
man, nor did Bronfman take up
such matters with Soviet officials.
PERES REFUSED Shapiras
request that he meet with Golan
settlers who are agitated over the
report, because they pounced on it
without bothering to ascertain
whether it was true. According to
Yediot Achronot, Bronfman and
his aide, Israel Singer, brought to
Moscow an Israeli proposal for a
phased pullback from the Golan
Heights and demilitarization of
the area.
Bronfman was personally at-
tacked by Shamir for visiting the
Soviet Union in an effort to ease
emigration restrictions for Jews.
According to the Likud leader, he
was interfering in matters best
left to Israel.
Shamir said in Washington last
Wednesday that he would oppose
an international peace conference
on the Middle East with Soviet
participation even if the Soviets
restored diplomatic relations with
Israel. Such a conference is the
framework King Hussein of Jor-
dan insists is necessary for
negotiations with Israel.
PERES WAS questioned by the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee last Thurs-
day about Shamir's remarks in
Washington. In response, he
reiterated that if the USSR
reestablished diplomatic ties with
Israel it would have a role to play
in future peace negotiations. He
noted that while Israel will con-
tinue to oppose Hussein's pro-
posal for a conference under the
auspices of the five permanent
members of the Security Council,
other ideas could be examined.
If the Soviets resumed
diplomatic ties they would certain-
ly be able to play a role, "and we
could then discuss what precisely
that role could be," Peres said. He
recently sent a letter to Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev urging
a resumption of ties between the
two countries regardless of their
political differences.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
ARMDI Appoints Sectional Chairmen
In Bade, Broward, and Palm Beach
American Red Magen David for
Israel i ARMDI) announced that as
a result of the growth in the
membership of ARMDI in Dade.
Broward and Palm Beach coun-
ties. Sectional Chairmen will
assist the various Chapters in
their areas.
Sectional Chairmen are Arthur
Kepes. president of the Point East
Chapter, Dade County chairman;
Wilber (Buddy) Neustein, former
president of the Ashkelon
Chapter, chairman of Broward
County; and Harry Lerner, outgo-
ing President of the Netanya
Chapter, chairman for Palm
Beach County.
"I expect that these new
Chairmen will add a new dimen-
sion to the Southeast District of
ARMDI." said Southeast District
Director. Robert L. Schwartz.
In addition, new Members ap-
pointed to the Southeast District
Steering Committee include: Ar-
von Beilen of Fort Lauderdale.
Seymore Brief of North Miami
Beach. Robert Diamond of Boca
Raton. Carol Jacobs of Miami
Beach. Dr. Murray Kane, promi-
nent North Miami Beach pediatri-
cian, Gary Lam pert. NHA, ex-
ecutive director of Aviva Manor of
Lauderdale Lakes. Joseph Rose of
Pembroke Pines, Ronald L. Seigel
of Boca Raton and Irving (Doc)
Lebow of Oakland Toyota of Fort
Lauderdale.

f
A group of Miami women recently par-
ticipated in the United Jewish Appeal's Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet annual retreat.
From left to right are: Ray Ellen Yarkin,
Phyllis' Harte. Nancy Berkowitz, Liz
Hem., l
Litountz, Gail Myers, Barbara Kipnis, .4 ml
Dean, Judy Adler, Maureen Berkowitz, Ba
bara A ronson, Ellen Rose. Sara Ra iflj Susa
Kleinberg and Susan Sirotta.
Pioneer Women To Hold 29th Miami Women participate In UJA Retrei
National Convention In Jerusalem
Delegates to the 29th National
Biennial Convention of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat from throughout
Dade. Broward and Palm Beach
counties will meet Monday, at 11
a.m. at the Gait Ocean Mile Hotel.
Fort Lauderdale.
The representatives of the
organization will caucus prior to
attending the national convention
which will be held in Jerusalem,
Israel from November 10 until 20
celebrating the 60th anniversary
of Pioneer Women/Na'amat, also
known as the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America.
Bebee Pullman of Fort Lauder-
dale. Southeastern area coor-
dinator; Mildred Weiss of Deer-
field Beach, liaison for new clubs:
Gert Aaron of Hallandale,
membership chairman for the
Southeast: and Harriet Green of
Miami Beach and Coral Gables,
national vice president, will brief
delegates and lead the discussions
of the upcoming conference.
Felice Schwartz of Miami
Beach, vice president of the
Pioneer Women Council of South
Florida, is Southeastern area
public relations chairman. Mrs
Pullman. Mrs. Weiss. Mrs. Aaron
and Mrs. Green all serve on the
national board of the
organization.
Gorbachev: Resumption
Of Diplomatic Ties With
Israel Linked To Mideast
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev
said here that the resump-
tion of diplomatic relations
with Israel is linked to "a
normalization" of the situa-
tion in the Middle East.
Speaking at a press conference
before his return to Moscow after
a four-day visit to France, Gor-
bachev refused to give any details
on the conditions of detained
Jewish and non-Jewish activists in
the USSR or to be drawn into a
discussion on the condition of the
Jewish population inside the
Soviet Union.
Gorbachev, who fielded several
questions on these issues, did not
mention the Israeli air raid on a
Palestinian terrorist base near
Tunis and refrained from voicing
the traditional Soviet anti-Israeli
accusations.
DIPLOMATIC observers said
they were pleasantly surprised by
what they termed "a certain
dispassionate moderation" in Gor-
bachev's tone. They said that the
arguments have remained un-
changed but the approach has lost
its former anti-Israeli ring.
On the subject of the resump-
tion of diplomatic relations, the
Soviet leader said: "The Israeli
government has a short-sighted
policy. It wants to achieve its ends
by reaching separate agreements
(with the Arab states) while the
situation calls for a global
agreement.
Gorbachev stressed that the
Soviet Union is ready to take part
in the search for a global solution,
a clear reference to the interna-
tional conference, with Moscow's
participation, called- for by Jor-
dan's King Hussein.
"The sooner the (Middle East)
situation will be normalized, the
sooner we shall be able to start
studying the normalizations of our
relations (with Israel)," Gor-
bachev said.
HE ADDED: "We have par-
ticipated in the creation of the
State of Israel, we recognize its
sovereignty, its right to exist, its
legitimate interests and its securi-
ty needs. We have different ideas,
however, of what (are) its security
needs."
The Soviet leader enumerated
four points which he considers
essential in the search for a global
solution: Israel's withdrawal from
the occupied territories, the
Palestinian's right to self-
determination, the respect of
Lebanon's sovereignty and ter-
ritorial integrity, and Israel's
right to exist.
Temple Emanu-El To
Sponsor Sock Hop
The PTA of Temple Emanu-El
will sponsor "Sock Hop '85" on
Sunday, Oct. 17 at 5 p.m. in the
Temples Friedland Ballroom,
PTA President Mrs. John Shapiro
announced.
Open to the public, the dance
party will feature music by disc
jockey GABY and dinner.
After dinner, contests will he
held for the Best Fifties Costume.
Best Dancer. Best Decorated
Socks arid Best Hooia Hoop-er.
Chairman of the evening is Mrs.
Elias Mitrani. Proceeds from the
Sock Hop will benefit the
Lehrman Day School.
A contingent of women active
in the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division
recently participated in the
United Jewish Appeal's Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet an-
nual retreat at the Hudson River
Conference Center in Ossining.
NY
At the retreat, the women heard
prominent speakers and par-
ticipated in workshops aimed at
making them more effective fun-
draisers and participants in the
Greater Miami Jewish
community.
"The retreat gave me an oppor-
tunity to share ideas and pro-
grams with women from
throughout the country," said
participant Amy Dean, chair-
woman of Federation's Attorneys
Division and Women's Division
(WD) chairwoman for cmapaign
training. "It also served as a great
kick-off for the beginning of this
campaign year in that it's always
a thrill to come into contact with
other women who are just as com-
The American Jewish Congress
has stepped up its marketing
efforts in Florida by appoin-
ting Gil Elan as the permanent
Southeast Regional Manager
for its International Travel
Program. Gil Elan will be bas-
ed in Midmi.
Young Israel Sponsors
Awards Breakfast
Four members of the Young
Israel of Suny Isles, Rubin Pinsky,
Abraham Cohen, Abraham Ishai
and Moise Blau, wul be honored at
the annual Torah Awards
Breakfast which will be held at the
Synagogue on Sunday morning
at 9 a.m. Hillel Price. Young
Israel president, announced that
the four honorees were chosen for
their exemplary devotion to the
programs of the Young Israel.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin. volunteer
Spiritual Leader of the Young
Israel, will address those atten-
ding the Torah Awards Breakfast.
mitted as the women in our
community."
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Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Key participants in the sixth annual Tower of
Hope Ball of the Israel Cancer Research Fund,
scheduled for Nov. 10 in New York City, are
(left to right) Art Buchwald, journalist and
author; Henry L. Bayles, vice president of
ICRF, guest of honor: and Leonard Goldstein.
dinner chairman. Proceeds of the ball will
support the research efforts of Israeli scien-
tists to find the causes and cures of cancer. A
fellowship in Buchwald's name for cancer
research in Israel will be announced at the
event.
Security Situation In
The West Bank
By GIL SEDAN
RAMA LLAH (JTA) As the
heightened security situation in
the Administered territories ap-
peared to ease over the weekend,
the army said it was investigating
a relatively large number of com-
plaints filed by local Arab
residents of harassment by Israel
Defense Force soldiers.
While military sources said the
findings of those investigations
could be publicized early this
week, they noted that attempts by
the military police to verify
reports in the press of mistreat-
ment of civilians by Israeli
soldiers were difficult to trace,
since few Arabs dared to provide
evidence.
The streets in the town of
Ramallah were relatively empty
on a recent Friday both of
soldiers and civilians. Local
residents said that this was partly
because it was Friday the
Moslem Sabbath but also
because of the fear of many to
take to the streets unless
necessary.
Local residents complained of
harsh treatment by IDF soldiers.
Young men, the residents said,
were required to present their
identity cards, while standing
with their legs spread and arms up
against a wall. Some complained
of beatings, while others said that
regular security measures, which
in the past were a matter of
routine, have now become a mat-
ter of nuisance.
Shown at the presentation of the Rena Zemel Beth Medrash Study
Hall are Rena Zemel with her children (left to right), Nathan and
^Ruth Zemel and Judy and Morton Zemel.
Rena Zemel Bet Medrash Torah
Study Hall Dedicated
In anticipation of their Mother Rena's 90th Birthday, her sons
Nathan and Morton pondered upon a fitting gift for this dynamic
and pious woman. Having been raised with her love for Torah
learning and her strong support of Jewish education, the brothers
came upon the idea of presenting their Mother with a Torah
Study Hall (Bet Medrash) at the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy of Miami Beach. Amid the gathering of family
and friends who came to celebrate Rena's Birthday, a plaque in-
dicating the new Rena Zemel Bet Medrash Torah Study Hall was
presented to the matriarch of the family.
The Rena Zemel Bet Medrash Torah Study Hall accommodates
some 200 Hebrew Academy Junior and Senior High School
students who frequent the hall for daily prayer services each mor-
ning and afternoon. Talmud classes are held n the Bet Medrash,
. and twice weekly Mishmar evening study sessions take place in
the facility.
Rena Zemel was born in Newark, New Jersey and raised her
family in her native city. She was one of the founders of the
Hadassah Maternity project and was an active member of many
religious and civic organizations in that city. In Miami Beach,
Mrs. Zemel serves as Chaplain of the Devorah Chapter of Amit
Women.
A prominent New Jersey family, the Zemels' are known for
their philanthropic activities and religious involvement in the
Newark and Oranges communities.
Whether those stories were true
and there was no way to verify
them they indicated a strong
feeling of frustration among the
local population. They came on
top of local press reports of
mistreatment by soldiers of
Arabs.
Harry ("Hap ") Levy will serve
as chairman of the Florida
Region's American Committee
for the Weizmann Institute of
Science Dinner-Dance to be
held on Thursday evening,
December 12 at the Omni Inter-
national Hotel in Miami.
Pioneer Women
A well-known Sholom Aleichem
comedy play entitled "A
Restaurant in Kasrilevka" will be
presented by Sonia and Harry
Fox at the Monday, 1 p.m.
meeting of the Chai Chapter of
Pioneer Women/Na'amat schedul-
ed at the civic auditorium of
American Savings and Loan
Association, 890 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach.
Rose Gershen, sopranist, will be
featured in the musical portion of
the program.
According to Eva Kaufman,
president, those who enroll as new
members will receive a gift, as
well as those who missed receiv-
ing theirs in the past year.
Leah Benson, former national
officer of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat will be guest
speaker at the Monday, Oct. 21,
12 noon meeting of the Kinneret
Chapter of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat to be held in the
auditorium of Temple Ner Tamid.
Mrs. Benson, membership vice
president of the South Florida
Council of the organization, will
speak about "The importance of
Strength Through Increased
Numbers."
Pat Gayle will play the accor-
dipn and sing during the enter-
tainment portion of the meeting.
Rita Adoff serves as presiden*
of the group.
FPL Test Finds Solar Power
Reliable and Expensive
After a year of operating its first solar generating unit, Florida
Power and Light Company has found the technology to be as
reliable as the sun that powers it, but more expensive than conven-
tional power generating systems.
The test is being conducted over a five-year period to learn how
much electricity such a unit actually generates in the South Florida
environment.
"So far we have learned that the system works whenever the sun
shines. It is very reliable in that respect, but the problem is that the
sun is often blocked or filtered by clouds." according to Project
Manager Gary Michel.
Even when there appears to be little available sun, the system
operates, but at greatly reduced power output, Michel noted. If
there had been no clouds in the nine months since the data collection
system for the solar panels began operating, it would have
measured output of about 19,600 kilowatt hours. The actual output
was about 12,100 kilowatt hours.
The cost of each solar-generated kilowatt hour during the first
year was about 57 cents, Michel said. The comparative figure for
conventional oil-fired generation is 6.4 cents and for nuclear genera-
tion, 3.5 cents.
Although solar electrical energy is more expensive than energy
available from conventional sources, the price has been decreasing
as research continues. A breakthrough could make solar power
economically feasible and, if so, FPL wants to gain experience with
it through use of the present system, Michel said.
The test unit at a substation near the company's headquarters
building at 9250 West Flagler Street began operating in August
1984. Output from the unit feeds transformer fans and other equip-
ment at the substation. When this equipment does not require
power, the excess is fed into the FPL system.
The unit converts solar energy directly into electrical energy as
sunlight strikes silicon photovoltaic cells. The system is comprised
of two rows of solar panels, each 70 feet long and 8 feet wide. It has
the added feature of tracking the sun; both rows of panels slowly
pivot in order to continue to face the sun directly, thus getting the
maximum benefit throughout the day.
The five-year test will cost approximately $280,000.
Nassau Garden
1 & 2 bedroom adult apt.
1495 N.E. 167th Street
North Miami Beach
947-9163
SOUTH DADE
MIDRASHA
CENTRAL AGENCY FOR JEWISH EDUCATION
and
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
PRESENT
Dr. Kenneth Stein
"Arab Terrorism; the Plague of the 80's"
(Executive Director of the Carter Center and Associate Professor
of Near Eastern History, Emory University, Atlanta Georgia)
Co-author of "The Blood of Abraham"
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20,1985 8 p.m.
Bet Shira Congregation
7500 S.W. 120th Street
Miami
$4.00 Midrasha Members $5.00 Non-Members
Tickets Available at the Door
Co-Sponsoring Institutions
Bet Shira Congregation Temple Both Am
Central Agency for Jewish Education Temple Israel
Chavurah ol South Florida Temple Judea
Congregation Bet Breira Temple Samu-EI
Congregation Beth Or Temple Zlon
JCC of South Dade
University ol Miami Judaic Studies Dept
University ol Miami Hittel
v


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
Presidents Council
Regional Meet
WIOD's Stu Goldstein with members of Douglas Gardens South
Dade Friends' Sock Hop Committee (left to right): Irene
Grossman, Jill Mark, Barbara Silverman and Phyllis Harte.
The event this month was financially successful, according to Ber-
nie Goodman.
Community Corner
Second Lt. David A. Ginsburg, son of Gertrude E. Ginsburg,
Miami Beach has completed a signal officer basic course at the
U.S. Army Signal School, Fort Gordon, Ga. He is a 1981 graduate
of Miami Beach Senior High School.
The next meeting of Mount Sinai Medical Center's Alzheimer's
Disease Club will be on Wednesday, Oct 23 at 1 p.m. in the
hospital's Chernin Auditorium.
The Southeast Region of United
Synagogue of America will be
sponsoring a Presidents' Council
Meeting at Temple Beth Am,
Margate, on Oct. 24, at 6:30 p.m..
in cooperation with the Southeast
Region Rabbinical Assembly and
the National Association of
Synagogue Administrators. The
meeting will address "Reaching
the Unaffiliated."
Synagogue leaders, especially
Executive Officers and Member-
ship Chairmen and their commit-
tees, in addition to Rabbis and Ex-
ecutive Directors will be atten-
ding from all over the Southern
Council of the Southeast Region.
The featured speaker will be
Rabbi Paul Plotkin of Temple
Beth Am, Margate. This an-
nouncement was made by Lou
Meltzer, president of the
Southeast Region of United
Synagogue, and Harold Wishna,
executive director.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman is the
president of the Southeast Region
Rabbinical Assembly and Harvey
Brown is the president of the Na-
tional Association of Synagogue
Administrators.
Beth Torah To Inaugurate Scholar
In Residence Program Oct 25
Beth Torah Congregation wiH
inaugurate its new Evelyn and
Monroe Mitchel and Family
Scholar-in-Residence Series on
Oct. 25-26, with Dr. I. David
Passow. professor emeritus and
former chairman, Department of
History and Jewish Thought at
Gratz College. Philadelphia.
Dr. Passow will present three
lectures at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion, Benny Rok Campus, in con-
nection with Shabbat services. On
Friday, Oct. 25 at 8 p.m. Dr.
Passow will lecture on "Changing
Times, Chainging Perceptions-
Israeli Society and the Future of
the Jewish State."
On Saturday, Oct. 26 at 8:25
Menorah Sisterhood
Hold Luncheon
The Temple Menorah
Sisterhood is planning a luncheon
and card party for Wednesday,
Oct. 23, 12 noon, to be held at the
Temple. Pauline Kaplan is in
charge.
Dr. I. David Passow
a.m., he will address the topic,
"Religion in Israel-Spirituality
and Authoritarianism." There will
be a special luncheon and lecture
for Scholar-in Residence Patrons
at Noon on Saturday, Dr.
Passow's topic will be "An In
siders View of Life in Israel."
International singer and com-
poser Enrico Macias will per-
form in concert on Saturday.
Nov. SO at the Theatre of Per-
forming Arts, Miami Beach.
Egypt Bars Israel
From 1986 Book Fair
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel will not be allowed to par-
ticipate in the 1986 international
book fair in Cairo next January.
Egyptian Culture Minister Ahmed
Heikeal was quoted by the state-
owned Middle East News Agency
as saying that his ministry "has
rejected an Israeli request for par-
ticipation in the fair."
Heikal gave no reason, but his
statement came after Egypt's
denunciation of Israel's recent air
attack on PLO headquarters in
Tunisia. Israel was allowed to par-
ticipate in this year's fair after it
withdrew its troops from
Lebanon. It was barred from the
fairs in 1983 and 1984 as a protest
by Egypt to Israel's invasion of
Lebanon in 1982.
Silver mans 50th
More than 200 friends, family
and admirers of Lillian and Ben-
nett Silverman gathered to
celebrate their 50th anniversary
at a Kkkhish luncheon at the Rab-
bi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy Beth El Congregation.
Lillian and Bennett who were
married in Brooklyn, N.Y. have
been residents of Miami Beach for
the past 18 years.
Bennett is a member of the
Board of the Hebrew Academy
and is a daily congregant of the
Beth El Congregation.
Lillian serves as Vice President
of the Hebrew Academy Women
and is chairperson and sponsor of
their annual Imma luncheon.
We're glad you're back in South Florida.To cele-
brate your return and to help insure your
health, the IMC Gold Plus Plan is sponsoring free
blood pressure checks at our Miami Beach locations
starting October 14 for one week only.
The IMC Gold Plus Plan is Florida's largest health
maintenance organization dedicated to providing the
finest healthcare and preventive medicine, to close to
200,000 members throughout Florida.
And the Gold Plus Plan offers seniors more than
Medicare at no additional cost and with no monthly
premiums.
With over 10 locations on Miami Beach from
Golden Beach to South Beach there's sure to be a
location near you. So call 642-5252 for an appoint-
ment today and ask for Miss Roberts.
gg IMC Gold Plus Plan
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t 1985 lntemat,onalMedalCen,ery inc. E,ecut,veO,ceJ 1505NW 167,hSt. M,am,.FL 33,69


Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Happenings
DA **+&*&. Pac^f'at e Blue Mis' Resort Motel, Miami
Beach, with Lester and Edythe Rosenthal will start Sundav The
Rosenthals can be reached at 1-473-9873.
The Dade/Broward Lupus Foundation's monthly meeting at
Parkway Regional Medical Center, North Miami Beach, will be held
on Wednesday, Oct. 23. at 8 p.m. Mr. Roger Sturdevant operational
Vice President of the Lupus Foundation of America, will be featured
speaker.
If you're a painter, sculptor, weaver, jewelry maker, craftsman or
other type of artist. Nov. 1 is the deadline to enter the 12th Annual
Miami Beach Festival of the Arts, set for next February. Miami Beach
Fine Arts Board 673-7733.
Mount Sinai newly opened Resell-A-Bration Thrift Shop sells
clothing as well as gift items, nik-naks, small appliances, silverware
and jewelry.
The Third Annual Spinal Cord Injury Research Golf Tournament will
be held at Tumberry Isle Country Club on Oct. 25, announced
Honorary Chairman Bob Kuechenberg.
Growth, Inc., 893-4484, provides group, family and private counsel-
ing to adults, teens and adolescents with drug dependencies. Warren
Klein Is counselor.
Zolla Oe Zayas former Associate dean for Extended Educational
Services, has been appointed dean of the division after only two mon-
ths as associate dean, Miami-Dade Community College.
Miami Postmaster Woodrow Conner, along with Congressman
William Lehman, dedicated South Florida's first mobile post office
Tuesday, Oct. 15, at 10 a.m. at the Point East Condominium's Recrea-
tion Center.
The students of the University of Miami will sponsor several
Democratic Members of Congress, including Congresman Larry
Smith (D., Fla.) as host congressman, at a "Forum for the Future,"
Monday, Oct. 21, 1-3 p.m., at the UN Norman Whitten Student Union
International Lounge, second floor, Coral Gables.
Hailed by new York Post critic Clive Barnes as a "vastly superior ex-
ample of its genre." the new comedy-thriller Corpse! by English
playwright Gerald Moon will be opening the '85-'86 season from Oct.
25 through Nov. 10.
Marc Hauser, a Bey Harbor Islands attorney, was installed as Presi-
dent of the North Shore Kiwanis Club. Mr. Hauser has been an active
member of the club for the past 10 years, and prior to his election to
President, held the position of First Vice President. For the past two
years, he served as the editor of the Club's monthly bulletin. Mr.
Hauser is also a Director of the Florida Gold Coast Chamber of
Commerce.
This week marks Miami City Commissioner J. L Plummer Jr.'s 15th
anniversary as a member. Originally appointed to the Commission In
Oct. 1970, Plummer has been reelected to that post in three subse-
quent elections. A fifth generation Floridian, Plummer is chairman of
the board of the AhernPlummer Funeral Homes.
The St. Francis Health Care Center at 17230 Collins Ave., North
Miami Beach has recently opened in order to offer the community a
wide range of general primary health care services on a convenient
basis.
Robin M. Matell has joined Hank Meyer Associates of Miami as a
vice president. Matell had operated his own Miami public ralations
firm for five years. Previously, he was vice president-public relations
of National Airlines until its merger with Pan American World Air-
ways In 1980.
Jamie Barkin, MD, Chief of Gastroenterology at Mount Sinai
Medical Center of Greater Miami has received the 1985 George Paff
Award for teaching excellence from the University of Miami School of
Medicine. George Paff was the first Professor of Anatomy at the
University of Miami.
David Schack has joined First Miami Development Co. as con-
troller, annnounced company President John K. Meyer. Prior to join-
ing first Miami Development Co., Schack served as a senior auditor
and senior tax specialist with the international accounting firm of
Peat, Warwick, Mitchell and Co.
PATTI PERLMAN PSY. D.
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COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE INCLUDES
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
"Go forth from the ark, thou, and thy wife"
NOAH
(Genesis 8.16)
NOAH*- Noah was commanded to build an Ark for shelter from
the Flood that would overwhelm the earth. In the Ark he placed
his wife and three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, together with
their wives; also two of each species of creature on earth, one
male and one female to perpetuate the species (seven were allow-
ed for the species that were ritually clean). The Flood that
covered the earth drowned all living things except those in the
Ark with Noah. After a year, the waters receded and the earth
dried. Noah let all the creatures out of the Ark, that they might be
fruitful and multiply on earth. He sacrificed in thanksgiving to
God. God, for His part, promised Noah that He would never again
send a flood that would destroy the earth. The sign for this agree-
ment, or covenant, is the rainbow. Men increased and spread over
the world: in the land of Shinar they sought to build a tower
whose peak should reach to heaven. Here, they thought to concen-
trate all the earth's population. But God, irked at man's presump-
tion, confused their speech. Previously all men had spoken one
language. Now they spoke various languages; not being able to
understand each other, they could not work together, and the
building of the Tower of Babel ceased. Terah, the father of
Abram, came to Haran.
(Th recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law it extracted end based
upon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, $15, published by ShengoM. The volume is available at 7$ Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. '0038 Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
Israel Asking Egypt For Full
Account Of Sinai Mass Killing
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has asked Egypt for a
full and exhaustive account
of the fatal mass shooting
incident that occurred in the
Sinai.
Acting Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens has instructed Israel's Am-
bassador To Egypt, Moshe
Sasson, to seek explanations,
within 48 hours, on several key
points regarding the course of
events on the Ras Burka beach
near Nueiba, especially regarding
the events after the shooting.
Israeli eyewitnesses have claim-
ed that Israeli medics on hand at
the time were barred from giving
first-aid to the wounded. This has
been strongly denied by the Egyp-
tian Charge d'Affaires in Tel
Aviv, Mohammed Bassiouni.
GOVERNMENT sources in
Jerusalem said there would be an
official statement issued only
after the full picture was clear to
the Cabinet.
Sasson, meanwhile, spoke out in
favor of persevering with efforts
to improve ties with Egypt
despite this tragic event. And a
former Ambassador, Eliahu Ben-
Elissar, now a leading Likud MK,
sought to explain the delays in
treating the wounded by referring
to a general phenomenon in Egyp-
tian life whereby officials are
reluctant to become invoved in
something bad unless expressly
ordered to do so by their
superiors.
The Egyptian leadership moved
quickly to isolate this incident and
prevent it damaging the already
strained relationship between the
two countries.
PRESIDENT Hosni Mubarak
sent a message of condolences to
Premier Shimon Peres, and in
public statements stressed that
the event was caused by one craz-
ed man and was not linked to cur-
rent events.
Egyptian Foreign Minister
Esmat Abdel Meguid and Defense
Minister Mohammed Abu Ghazala
were in personal contact with
Sasson, offering sympathies and
reassurances that there was
nothing remotely official or inter-
national behind the attack. They
said the policeman faces a court
martial.
SPECIALIZED CARE
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Mitzvah
Galbut Stuppel
BRIAN GALBUT
Brian Howard Galbut, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Robert N. Galbut,
will be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah, Saturday, October 19 at
9 a.m. (Parshas Noah) at Beth
Israel Congregation.
Brian is an honor student at the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy of Miami Beach. He is
on the football and basketball
teams and is also a member of the
debating team. He sang in the
school choir and he also enjoys
tennis and computer
programming.
Brian's three sisters will attend
his Bar Mitzvah as well as his
grandparents, Capt. and Mrs.
Hyman P. Galbut, and his grand-
mother, Mrs. Lillian Horowitz.
Special guests will also include
family and friends from New
York, Montreal and Maine.
Dr. and Mrs. Galbut will host a
Kiddush following services in
honor of the occasion.
GLENN MARKOWITZ
Glenn Steven Markowitz, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Alan Kaplan, will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
vah, Saturday, October 19 at 9:30
a.m. at Bet Shira Congregation.
The celebrant is a graduate of
the religious school and is in pre-
confirmation class.
He attends Arvida Junior High
School where is in the 8th grade.
Dr. and Mrs. Kaplan will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion and a
reception on Saturday at the
Charade Restaurant.
Special guests will include
grandparents Morris and Eleanor
Malff of South Bend, Indiana and
great-grandmother Adele
Rosenkranz of Tampa, Florida.
IAN STUPPEL
Ian Stuppel, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Stuppel will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
October 19, at 9 a.m. at Beth
Torah Congregation.
The celebrant is an eighth-grade
student at Highland Oaks Junior
High School, and a former student
of the Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School.
Ian attends the Judaica High
School at the Benny Rok Campus
of Beth Torah, where he is an
eighth-grade student. He will be
conducting the eritire Torah ser-
vice as part of his Bar Mitzvah.
Mr. and "Mrs. Sam Stuppel will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion.
MOTY FRENCH
Moty Frenck, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Zigmundo Markevitz, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah, Saturday at 10:45 a.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom. Rabbis
Leon Kronish, Harry Jolt and
Paul Caplan will officiate. Moty is
a student of the Confirmation
Class of 5748.
HOUSEKEEPER WANTED
Elderly gentleman seeks house
keeper to prepare meals, clean *
companion. Familiar with Jewish
cooking. Live-In preferred.
Call: 652-2741
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
6:32 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Qardena Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conaervatlve
lalaln Samcaill^pm
Daily Miny.n 7:30 am and 6:30 p.m
Sal 8 30 a m
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 687-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Fri. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard will
apoak on the thama "Earthquake In Maxli
XICO.
Hurrlcana In Nam England."
Sinolaa Service(J.A.S.S.) 10p.m.
Sal. 11 15 a.m. Sarmon lluma The Rainbow
Sign." Bat Mitzvah: Slacl Cohan
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214 .
Barry J. Konovltch, Rabbi i If".
Moshe Buryn, Cantor v'
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epelbaum. President,
Religious Committee
Shabbai Service-. 8 30 a m Seimon 10 30
Daily Mtnyan
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalal Shabbai p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. Dr. lehrman will preach on tha
weekly portion ol the Bible
Cantor Shllman will chant.
Sat. Bar Mitzvah M Brian.
Dally aervlcee Sam. and 6:30 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, -_-.
Rabbi Emeritus (W)
Rev. Milton Freeman, s3
Ritual Director
Frl. 5:30 p.m. aervtce.
Sat *O0 a.m. Kiddueh follows.
Mlnchah 835 p.m. Mew member Sab-bath -
cone aeration ol New Memberi
Sun. 10 a.m. Dr. Richard Tolater will apeak
on Parent Child relallonihlpa
BETH KODESH
Conaervatlve
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krissel
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
856-6334
m
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
8915508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi ,_.
Rabbi Joseph A. Gorlinkel, t JJh \
Rabbi Emeritus 3f'
Moshe Friedler, Cantor
Frl. 6 p.m.
Sat. 8:45 a.m.
Daily 8 a.m., 5 p.m.
Sun. S:30 a.m.
Rabbi Jacobe will apeak on the thama
"Was Noah Jewfah?" Frl. S p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Centor Niasim Benyamini
Dally Mlnyan 6:00 a.m. and 7:15 p.m.
Sal. 8:15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 1201 h Street
238-2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach {
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Meisels
Shabbai Services Frl. 8 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. 8,41 st St. 538-7231
DR. LEON KRONISH. RABBI Liberal
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
MB.?!0/***! ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAV10CONVISER
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Harry Jolt will speak
. .^?P "T#*u ol Character."
Set. 10:46 a.m. Bar Mitzvah Moty Frenck
PSRllWW CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Or. Max A. Llpachltz, Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg, Aaat. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally aemces 7:30 e.m.. 5:30 p m
l":z?zFri i" s* ***-
and 6.45 p.m. Sat. Bar mitzvah
Ian Stuppel
Sunday 6 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Roreocwakg, Rabbi
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Greater Miami
Miami's Ptont Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomateln
Associate Cantor Rachelie F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
Downtown: Dr. Jack L. Sparka, Cantor
Rachelie F. Nelaon: "Noah's Rlohleoueness
Whet Is Rlohteousneee Toda y 7"
Kendall: Rabbi Re Pertmeaar. Cantor Jacob
Q Bomateln "How to Become a
Petnerch and Influence People
TEMPLE JUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
Friday aervlcee 6:15 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVI0 RAAB, Rebbi
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
Memorial eervlce Mon 6 Tuee.
Slmchaa Torah 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abremowitz __.
Cantor Murray Yavneh (
Morning services 8 s.m.
Frldsy late evening service
8:15 pm
Saturday 6 e.m. and 7:45 p.m
)
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Cartyle Ave., 866-9633
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beech
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. 75 St., 382-3343
Rabbi Warren KasztI MooamOiiHxio.
Frl. Service 6:55 p.m. Set. 9:30 a.m. Mlncha 20
minutes betora sundown.
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade'a Reform Cortgregation
Ralph P. Klngaley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkea, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramaay, Administrator
Frl. Service 6:15 p.m.
Sat. 10:30 a.m.
Sat. mom. Bar Mitzvah Erie Garcia
Nuptial Masting of George Berlin
and Nancy Tobln
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
MOO Miller Or. Conservative
271-2311 m
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi f I
Benjamin Adler, Centor -V*
David Roaenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Frl. 6:15 Choir sabbath service
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro will officiate Cantor
Benjamin Adler will chant the liturgy
Sat. 9 a.m. service
Sun. 9 a.m. Mlnyan
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
I


Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
>nts Conference Assails U.S.
Failure To Veto
?curity Council Resolution
FREEMAN
tK (JTA) -
States absten-
Jnited Nations
incil resolution
ig Israel's
ration against
Liberation
n bases in
en assailed by
[erence of
of Major
Jewish
Be Minister Yit-
^king on the CBS-
lation" program,
[>pointment over
ention but was
criticism of the
which initially
ili attack on the
larter as an
ct of self-defense
virv much what
he President im-
[the raid," Rabin
tided, "I'm sorry
States did not
|on. I understand
other considera-
lin blame is on the
vhich pretends to
Organization and
tnst international
IAT "American
sen shaken and
nerica'scommit-
jainst terrorism
luestion," the
lerence chairman,
said "terrorists
take heart' at
to stand with
the resolution."
^tion was approv-
lity Council by a
He United States
nber of the Coun-
supporting the
ikh the Council
ously the act of
perpetrated by
jnisian territory
joint inn of the
fnited Nations, in-
and norms of
also said the air
headquarters in
ve a "serious ef-
to bring about a
i Middle East con-
requests UN
"take measures
I from resorting
st the sovereign-
rial integrity of
and declared
the right to
i result of the loss
erial damage in-
attack.
WALTERS, the
or to the UN, said
itinistration decid
art the resolution
proportionately''
oe for this latest
rising spiral of
Middle East onto
ilders, while not
lult those respon-
rorist acts which
absolutely ex-
Jued, "in identify-
fireat all civilized
ng. That threat is
the failure ade-
jress the subject
[government from
resolution." He
tations from some
that the United
>ted in the raid.
attack'' involved
M5 aircraft that
1,500 miles over
the Mediterranean to strike at the
PLO' military and political head-
quarters at Hamman on the Tuni-
sian coast, some 20 miles from the
capital of Tunis. At least 60 per-
sons were reported killed in the
attack.
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the
UN, Binyamin Netanyahu,
defended the raid. "A country,"
he said, "cannot claim territorial
sovereignty when it knowingly of-
fers its country as a base for ter-
rorism." He said the attack was
an attempt to "weaken and
destroy the nerve center of world
terrorism."
The UN resolution, while
forcefully condemning the Israeli
attack, failed to call for interna-
tional sanctions against Israel,
and a reference in a draft resolu-
tion condemning Israel's "policy
of state terrorism" was
eliminated. Reports said the pro-
visions were dropped for fear of a
U.S. veto of the resolution.
President Chaim Herzog of Israel (left)
receives the key to Boys Town Jerusalem from
student Eli Peretz on a i>isit to the eight-school
education center during the opening week of
the 1985 Fall term. Upon learning from Dean
Moshe Linchner (second from left) that Boys
Town has enrolled 72 Ethiopian students
recent immigrants who, in escaping famine
and oppression in their native land, had been
forced to leave their parents and families
behind President Herzog said, 'Here, at
Boys Town Jerusalem, I have found a source
of hope for unity and love among, different
parts of the Jewish people.'
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Creamy, Spicy, Finest
Pumpkin Pie
$149
each 1
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Egg
Bagels
699
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded,
Sliced or Unsliced
Italian Bread
jB9

Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Cheese Raisin
Coffee Cake...................ch$169
Banana Bran Muffins.... Si*"!29
Golden Loaf
Pound Cake..................e.ch*119
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Iced with Creamy Chocolate
Eclairs...........................2 for $1
Prices Effective
October 17 thru 23.1985



Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
Business Note
VMS Realty, Inc. announces
three new appointments to Har-
bour House, 10275 Collins
Avenue, Bal Harbour. Gerald
Orange, Executive Director;
Roberta Paul, Director of Leas-
ing; and Sheri Greer, Leasing
Representative.
Chicago-based VMS is one of
the nation's largest apartment
management firms in the United
States. Other North Dade proper-
ties include Lancelot Hall, Bay
Harbor Island; three Treasure
House buildings, North Bay
Village; eight Galahad buildings,
Byron Hall and 5600 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach. VMS
recently purchased Boca Raton
Hotel and Club, Sonesta Beach
Hotel and 28 Holiday Inns.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MIAMI DATE
PHONE at P.O. Box 398 Miami
Beach, Fl. 33119 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
DAN KRANSDORF
19360 October 18.25;
November 1.8. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DATE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8527 (0-1)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIA DOMINGA GOMEZ
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of MARIA DOMINGA
GOMEZ, deceased, File Number
85-8527 CP-04, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of the
estate is Ana Gloria Gadala Maria,
whose address is 10020 S.W. 79th
Court. Miami. Florida. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
ind* against the estate are
requ red WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST I" BLICATION OF
THIS Nl i ttl
ttei
and
the at be
in writing and must indicate the
- the claim, the name anil
tddresi of the creditor or Ins agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall I* stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objection they
may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 11. 1985.
Ana Glorida
Gadala Maria
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Maria Doming* Gomel
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
FERDIE AND GOUZ &
RICHARD BURNS
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Suite 215
Coral Gables. FL 33134
and
623 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL 33130
Telephone: (305) 446-3557
19344 October 11,18, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39161-21
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 0475203
IN RE: The Marriage of
HANNIA DARROW.
Petitioner/Wife
and
WILLIAM DARROW.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: WILLIAM DARROW
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Usher
Bryn. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is The Roney Plaza.
Suite M-8. 2301 Collins Ave..
Miami Beach, Florida 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 25. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 19th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
USHER BRYN, ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave..
Miami Beach FL 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19317 September 17;
October 4, 11,18, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-43175
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
RAFAE1 I. NONES -t ax el
TO: RAFAEL I. NONES
Group of
Puerto Rk
1413 Las Talmas
Santuree, Puerto Kico imi909
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Unit 2222, of SAMARI
LAKES EAST, a Condominium
located in the City of Hialeah
Gardens.. Dade County, Florida,
pursuant to the Declaration of
Condominium for SAMARI
LAKES EAST, as recorded in
Official Records Book 9831, at
Page 1411, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida, lias been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146 on or before
November 22, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 16th day of
October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19362 October 18,25;
November 1,8,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Alina Menendez d/b/a*
Alina Menendez Co., at 5306 NW
35 Ave., Miami. Florida 33142, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Alina Menendez
19327 October 4,11, 18,25.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39894 (02)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VICTORIANO GIMENO LEIRA.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
KIMIKO KASUYA
Resondent/Wife.
TO: KIMIKO KASUYA
43 Hin Seng Gardens
West Coast Road
Singapore (S0512)
Republic of Singapore
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Luis
Vidal, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1840 W.
49th Street, Suite 105. Hialeah,
Florida 33012 U.S.A., and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 1, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 W. 49th Street/Suite 105
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
19323 September 27;
October 4,11,18,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH CIRCUIT COURT,
IN AND
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 85-28730 (14)
AMENDED
NOTICE OF LIS PENDENS
No. 090723
VENETIAN HEIGHTS. INC.. a
Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS and
GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
i and any unknown party who
i- or 'nay be interested in tl i
ject matt'! icUon whose
names and re
diligent search ami inquiry are
unknown to Plaintiff in which said
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees or other claimants by.
through, under or against the said
Defendants. WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, or either of them, who are
not known to be dead or alive.
Defendants.
NOTICE is given that a suit was
instituted in the Circuit Court in
and for Dade County, Florida on
the day of 1985, by the Plaintiff.
VENETIAN HEIGHTS. INC., a
Florida corporation, against the
Defendants. WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, and any unknown party who
is or may be interested in the sub-
ject matter of this actin whose
names and residences, after
diligent search and inquiry are
unknown to Plaintiff in which said
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees.' lienors, creditors,
trustees or other claimants by,
through, under or against the said
Defendants. WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, or either of them, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
the following described- real pro-
perty lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, to wit:
Lot 1, in Block 1, of LIBERTY
FARMS, according to the Plat
thereof, as record in Plat Book 51
at Page 46, of the Public Records
of Dade County Florida; commonly
known as 1646 NW. 68th Street
Dade, Florida.
1. The relief sought in this suit is
the foreclosure of Mortgage
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Plaintiff
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite 111
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Telephone (305) 949-4237
19320 September 27;
October 4,11,18,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-42765
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OLGA RAMOS,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
EDWIN RAMOS.
Respondent/H usband.
TO: EDWIN RAMOS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
LESTER ROGERS, PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is Suite 200, 1454 N.W.
17th Avenue, Miami, Florida
33125, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 22, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 1 lth day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LESTER ROGERS, P.A.
Suite 200. 1454 N.W. 17th Ave.
Miami, Florida 33125
Attorney for Petitioner
19361 October 18, 25;
November 1,8,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-40796
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ELEXANDRO EUGENIO
SOKOLOWSKI,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MARTHA MARIA CLORINDA
ARCE SOKOLOWSKY.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Martha Maria Clorinda
Arce Sokolowski
CalleNo. 10-134 (31 -6 -A)
Ventanilla C'allao
Lima 39. Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
Marriage has lieen died
against you and y to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on David S.
Berger, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 1, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 30th day of September. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By GWEN D. ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David S. Berger
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner/Husband.
19331 October 4, 11,18.25, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85 41198 (11)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
FRANCIANE BROWN.
Petitioner,
and
ELEAZAR BROWN,
Respondent.
TO: ELEAZAR BROWN,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before November 8, 1985, other-
wise a default will be entered.
October 2, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: LISAMARIE MARCANO
19336 October 4,11,
18.25.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 85-42632 (24)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In Re: The Marriage of
GIAN M. FASANI
Petitioner
and
MARISA T. FASANI
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Marisa T. Fasani
Via C. Fontana, 19
Carrara, Italy
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 633
N.E. 167 St. North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162. on or before
November 15, 1985. and file the
original with the clerk of this
court, otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
Dated: October 10, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
19356 Octobert 18, 25;
November 1.8, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85 8364
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MORRIS WIESENTHAL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
MORRIS WIESENTHAL.
deceased. File Number 85-8364. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
FAY WIESENTHAL, ulo.se
addres- i 1680 NE 191 Street.
\i.i 316, Nor:h Miami Beach. FL.
The name and address of the
personal representative's attorney
11 forth below,
All persons h
the
required. WITHIN I'llkF.E
Months FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must l>e
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not yet due.
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 11, 1985.
FAY WIESENTHAL
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MORRIS WIESENTHAL
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, Penthouse
Miami Beach, FL 3S139
Telephone: 306/534-4721
19347 October 11.18,1985


Friday, October 18, lgBS/TheJewirii Floridian PggejjjL
lotices
JF ACTION
iVE SERVICE
. i;iT COURT OF
INTH JUDICIAL
FLORIDA. IN
*DE COUNTY
; No. 85-40200 10
No. 030112
PUBLICATION
1ARRIAGE OF
BE,
KJE,
hAl'.K
office
BIN
HEREBY NOTI
Petition for DtaKHU-
has been (Bed and
this court and you
Mrve a copy of
Lfenaes, if any. to it
(,i MIDMAN. Esq.,
[,..: hut. whose ad-
Flagler Street,
,, Florida 33130.
iginal with the clerk
[ Jtyted court on or
,!., i. 1986; other-
hh will be entered
the relief prayed
plain) or petition,
shall be published
,.,.(( for four con-
, in THE JEWISH
ny hand and the seal
.. Miami, Florida on
of September, 1985.
[d p. BRINKER
, Circuit Court
Bounty, Florida
\RIE MARCANO
eputy Clerk
Seal)
lOODMAN, ESQ.
rier Street, Suite 520
i 33130
9-1885
er4.11,18, 25,1985
JtCUIT COURT OF
pENTH JUDICIAL
' FLORIDA. IN
! DADE COUNTY
kior, No.85-42158
BY PUBLICATION
I marriage of:
Inningham.
ll'NNINGHAM.
EL CUNNINGHAM
|nce Unknown)
RE HEREBY
that a petition for
ION OF MARRIAGE
led and commenced in
id you are required to
ipv of your written
_y, to It on ARTHUR
. Esquire, attorney for
a-hose address is 801
Street. Ste. 312. North
... Florida 33162, and
jinal with the clerk of
lyled court on or before
1985; otherwise a
he entered against you
ef prayed in the com-
Itition.
i my hand and the seal
at Miami, Florida on
of October, 1985.
LrD P. BRINKER
erk. Circuit Court
I County, Florida
tlarinda Brown
f Deputy Clerk
jirt Seal)
October 11, 18,25;
November 1.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11th JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE No. 85-41484 (06)
BAR NO. 122298
NOTICE OF SUIT
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUCILLE M. DEVITO.
Petitioner AV ife
and
GEORGE C. DEVITO.
Respondent/H usband
TO: GEORGE C. DEVITO,
1602 E. 18th St..
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11230
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you. and you ire re
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it. on H.
LAWRENCE ASHER. Attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
16211 Northeast 12th Avenue.
North Miami Beach, FL. 33162,
and file the original with the Clerk
of the above styled Court on or
before November 8, 1985; other-
wise a Judgment may be entered
against you for relief demanded in
the Petition.
THIS NOTICE shall be publish-
ed once each week for four (4) con-
secutive weeks in The Jewish
Floridan, 120 Northeast 6th
Street. Miami, Florida 33132.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF THIS COURT AT
MIAMI. FLORIDA on this Oc
tober 3, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
H. LAWRENCE ASHER
Attorney for Petitioner
16211 Northeast 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach, FL. 33162
949-3557 (DADE)
525-1178 (BROWARD)
19339 October 11,18.25;
November 1 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-41382
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
SANTANDER BORRF.RO. et al ,
Defendants.
TO: SANTANDER BORRERO
Edificio Las Hadas
6th Floor No. 6
Ave. Principal Las Palmas
( araras, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Unit 702-B. of THE
ROYAL CLUB CONDOMINIUM,
according to the declaration ol
condominium thereof, as recorded
in Official Records Book 11979. at
Page 1624, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida, has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it. on
Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
November 8, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 3rd day of
October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By GWEN D. ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
19341 October 11.18.25;
November 1.1985
.. J OF ACTION
CIRCUIT COURT OF
[JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
I AND FOR
tOUNTY. FLORIDA
(CTION NO: 85 40807
; MARRIAGE OF
,ROYAL
.ROYAL
i Royal
I Street.
[Town, St. Catherine
of
in
for Dissolution
jiage has been filed
land you are required to
copy of your written
pn Alec Ross, attorney
pner, at 16400 N.E. 19
ni, Fla and file the
i the clerk of the above
or before November 1.
krwise a default will be
linst you.
Miami on September
RD BRINKER. Clerk
I County, Florida
3.P. COPELAND
> Deputy Clerk
ourt Seal)
October 4.11,
18,25.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
enuage in business under the fic-
titious name SCS ASSOCIATES ,
at 1815 Fairhaven Place, Miami,
Florida 33133 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ENRIQUE CASTRO
KEVIN SMITH &
YIRIS SMITH, his wife
DAVID SHERIDAN
MIRIAM BECKERMAN
Attorney for Applicants
6450 S.W. 126th Street Road
Miami, Florida 33156
19343 October 11. 18, 25;
November 1.1985
NOTICE" OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39889 (03)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MAGALY COTO,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JOSE R. COTTO
Respondent/H usband.
TO: JOSE R. COTTO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action foi
Dissolution of Marriage has beer
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on Luis
Vidal, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1840 W.
49th Street, Suite 105, Hialeah,
Florida 33012, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 1.
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint c
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four^con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cler, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 W. 49th Street/Suite 105
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attoreney for Petitioner
19322 September 27;
0ctober4.il. 18.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name La Casa de los
Matrimonios, at 1466 SW 1st
Street No. 2. Miami. Florida
33135, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Osvaldo Osear Sanchez
Rodolfo Perez
Partners
19326 October 4, 11, 18. 25, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85 42296
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 058653
IN RE: The Marriage of
KATHARINE RICE SHAFER.
Wife,
RANDALL CLARK SHAFER.
Husband.
TO RANDALL CLARK
SHAFER
1137 Roewill Drive
Apt. 2
San Jos.-, CA 9511.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has lieen
filed against you and you are re-
u,r,,l to servo a copy of ymir writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK. at-
torney for Petitioner, *" *
dWil 9400 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 300 Miami
Florida 33156. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 15.,
1985; otherwise a default will In-
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
^ThTnotice shall be published
once each week f' fr <<
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
f said court at Miami, Florida on
this 9th day of October 198o.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
SS5&EYM. NEWMARK. ESQ.
SJ sT Dadeland Blvd., Suite 300
Miami FL 33156
Tdephone: (305) 665-9775
Attorney for PeUtioner
i qiak October 11.18, >,
19^ November 1.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8533 CP-04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERTO ANTONIO
FLORES
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
I STATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
Y 0 U A R E H E R E B Y
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ROBERTO
ANTONIO FLORES. deceased.
File Number 86-8588 CP-04, is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
I livision. the address of which is 73
Wegl Flagier Street. Miami. FL.
The personal representative of the
estate is ANA GLORIA GADALA
MARIA, whose address is 10020
S.W. 79th Court. Miami. Florida.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands agains' the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. .
Date of the first publication ot
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 11. 1985.
Ana Gloria Gadala Maria
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Rotierto Antonio Flores
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
FERDIE AND GOUZ
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Suite 215
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: 445-3557
RICHARD BURNS
623 West Flagier Street
Miami. FL 33130
L9S45 October 11.18. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8526 (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RAQUEL PATRICIA
FLORES
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Raquel
Patricia Flores. deceased. File
Number 86-8626 CP-04. is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division.
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of the
estate is ANA GLORIA GADALA
MARIA, whose address is 10020
S.W. 79th Court. Miami. Florida.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney arc
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 11, 1985.
Ana Gloria Gadala Maria
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Raquel Patricia Flores
Deceased
A ITORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
FERDIE AND GOUZ
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Suite 215
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: 4464667
RICHARD BURNS
623 West Flagier Street
Miami. FL 33130
19346 October 11. 18, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39894 (02)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VICTORIANO GIMENO LEIRA,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
KIMIKO KASUYA
Respondent/Wife.
TO: KAMIKO KASUYA
43 Hin Seng Gardens
West Coast Road
SingaPor<'(S0512)
Republic of Singapore.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has bam
filed aga'nst .vou an(l >'"" ar'' n'
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on Luis
Vidal. Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1840 W.
49th Street. Suite 105. Hialeah.
Florida 33012 U.S.A.. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 1, 1985; otherwise a
default will 1* entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cler, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal. Esq.
1840 W. 49th Street/Suite 105
' Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attoreney for Petitioner
19323 September 27;
October 4. 11, 18. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
NO. 85-35853 Div. 22
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 345741
CARMEN V1LLARREAL,
Petitioner,
FELIPE JUAN FONTA.
Respondent.
TO: FELIPE JUAN FONTA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY required
to file your answer to the petition
for custody and for mutual
restraining order with the Clerk of
the above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner's
attorneys, HERMAN COHEN &
MARTIN COHEN. 622 S.W. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. on
or before November 8, 1985, or
else petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami, Dade
County, Florida, this October 7,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19353 October 11, 18,25;
November 1,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 85-40111 -FC-27
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In Re: The Marriage of
AL ANN TERNENT
'Petitioner
and
JIMMY PATTERSON
TERNENT
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Jimmy Patterson Ternent
7242 Montgomery Rd. No. 1C
Elkridge, Md. 22127
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 633
N.E. 167 St. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, on or before
November 15. 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this
court, otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
| Dated: October 10. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19357 Octobert 18,25;
November 1.8,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85 42295 12
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ANGEL AMADO VILLAMOR.
Petitioner,
and-
BERTHA MARCELA
MONTANEZ.
Respondent.
TO: BERTHA MARCELA
MONTANEZ
Santa Maria
delaCabeza 130-5D
Madrid 26, Spain
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced in this court
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on MELVIN J. ASHER,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 825 South
Bayshore Drive. Suite 543, Miami.
FL 33131. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 15.
1S86; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 9th day of October. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Lisamarie Mareano
' As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19849 October 11,18,26;
November 1, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Lerness Shoe at
number 561 S.W. 22nd Avenue, in
the City of Miami. Florida, intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this 11
day of September, 1985.
SURGICAL AND HEALTH
CARE OF FLORIDA, INC.
By: Guy Saracino, President
SILVER & SILVER
I Attorney for Applicant
. Max R. Silver
. 150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
19332 October 4.11.
18.25.1985


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 18, 1985
Public Notices!
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-41435
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: In The Marriage of:
CESAR E. BLAS
Petitioner/Husband
and
AURA E. PINEDA BLAS
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Aura E. Pineda Bias
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DAVID S.
BERGER, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach. Florida,
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 8, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 3rd day of October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19340 October 11, 18,25;
November 1,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5771
Diviiion 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDWIN R. SHWAKE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EDWIN R. SHWAKE.
deceased. File Number 85-5771, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida. The names and addresses
of the personal representatives
and the personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representatives, venue,
or jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 11. 1985.
Personal Representatives:
IDA SHWAKE
and
RAYMOND N. SHWAKE
17000 N.E. 6th Court
North Miami Beach, Florida
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
MYERS, KENIN. LEVINSON,
FRANK & RICHARDS
1428 Brickell Avenue. Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
By Kathleen Markey
Telephone: (305) 271-9041
19355 October 11, 18, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-42110
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla. Bar No. 147529
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CLIFFORD KLEINHAMPLE,
and
FREIDA KLEINHAMPLE
TO: FREIDA KLEINHAMPLE
Respondent
Road No. 2, Station Hill Road
Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 15044
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on i
WARREN JACOBS, ESQ
attorney for Petitioner, whose'
address is 3301 Northeast Second
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33137,
Telephone: 576-6300. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 15, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 8th day of October. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
WARREN JACOBS, ESQ.
3301 N.E. Second Avenue
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 576-6300
Attorney for Petitioner
19351 October 11, 18.25;"
November 1,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name La Estrella de
Nicaragua at 13207 S.W. 44th
Lane, Miami, Florida 33175,
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Rene A. Quinonez
Vice President
BLUE STAR
PUBLISHING AND P.R., CORP.
19359 October 18, 25,
November 1,8,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
PATRICK S. O'MALLEY, et al..
Defendants.
TO: Patrick S. O'Malley
7411 S.W. 64 Street
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: Lot 2, Block 20, of
BISCAYNE KEY ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof, as
recorded in Plat Book 50, at Page
61, of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Sheppard
Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida 33146, on or before
November 8, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 4th day of
October, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
19354 October 11,18,25;
November 1,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name LAS LLAVES at
271 N.W. 51 Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33126, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Pedro A. Conde
19342 October 11,18,26;
November 1,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CROSSINGS WINE
AND LIQUORS at 12991 SW 112
Street, Miami, Florida 33186, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LENOX LIQUORS
NO. 5. INC.
19324 September 27;
October 4, 11, 18, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33931 (CA 01)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE BLANCO, et al.. et al.
Defendants.
TO: LAND & DEVELOPMENT
OF THE AMERICAS. INC..
a Florida corporation,
4559 N.W. 7th Street Suite 231
Miami, Florida 33126
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 6, in Block 11, of GLEN COVE
SECTION TWO, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 113, at Page 36, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
together with all improvements,
appliances and fixtures located
thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
November 8, 1985, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plai-
ntiffs attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 2 day of October,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19334 October 4,11,
_____________________18.26.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38998 (20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff
vs.
DIETER KRENTZIEN, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: DIETER KRENTZIEN and
EGLEE KRENTZIEN, his wife,
a/k/a DIETER KRENTRIEN and
EGLEE KRENTRIEN, his wife
Alto Alegre,
Torre C 1-B
C. Bello Monte
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: Unit 536, in
KEY COLONY NO. 3 CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration recorded August 21,
1980 in Official Records Book
10846, Page 1456, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
as amended; together with all im-
provements, appliances, and fix-
tures located thereon, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Keith,
Mack, Lewis & Allison, Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street, Miami, Florida
33132, on or before October 25,
1985, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in. the
complaint. ,.
WITNESS my hand and-seal of
this Court on the 18th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: J. BYRON
Deputy Clerk
19318 September 27;
October 4,11,18,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name I.L.S. PUBLISHING
D/B/A .SOUTH FLORIDA
BUSINESS MAGAZINE at 2461
Brickell Ave. No. 2H Miami, Fla.
33129 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
LEE SYROP
19337 October 11.18,26;
November 1,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name I.L.S. PUBLISHING
D/B/A SOUTH FLORIDA
BUSINESS MAGAZINE at 2451
Brickell Ave. No. 24 Miami, Fla.
33129 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
LEE SYROP
19337 October 11, 18,25;
November 1.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS at 220 71st Street. No.
205, Miami Beach, Florida 33141
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
DAVID SCHWARTZ
JOSHUA D. MANASTER.
ESQUIRE
Attorney for DAVID SCHWARTZ
19316 September 27;
October 4,11,18,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 85-41964
IN RE: The Marriage of
CARLINE ALEXANDRE,
Petitioner/wife
vs.
MICHEL H. ALEXANDRE.
Respondent/husband
TO: MICHEL H. ALEXANDRE
1360 New York Avenue Apt.
4-A
Brooklyn, New York 11203
Shall serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attorney,
612 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
November 8, 1985, otherwise a
default will be entered.
October 7, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: C.P. COPELAND
19352 October 11,18,25;
______________November 1.1986
Statement of Ownership, Manage-
ment and Circulation (required by
39 USC 3686): 1 Title of publica-
tion: Jewish Flondan (Miami).
Publication No. 275320. 2 Date
of filing: Sept. 30, 1985. 8 Fre-
quency of issue: Weekly. A No.
of issues published annually: 52. B
Annual subscription price:
$18.00. 4 Location of known of-
fice of publication: 120 N.E. 6
Sreet, Miami. Fla. 33132. 5 -
Location's headquarters of
publishers: 120 N.E.- 6 Street,
Miami, Fla. 33132. 6 Publisher,
editor, managing editor: Fred K.
Shochet, 120 N.E. 6 Street, Miami.
Fla. 33132. 7 Owner. Fred K.
Shochet, 120 N.E. 6 Street, Miami,
Fla. 33132. 8 Known bon-
dholders, mortgagees and other
security holders holding or owning
0 percent or more of total amount
of bonds, mortgages or other
securities, if any: None. 9 for
completion by non-profit organiza-
tion: None. 10 Extent and
nature of circulation, given in this
order: average no. copies each
issue during preceding 12 months
followed by actual no. copies single
issue published nearest to filing
date: A) total no. copies printed
(net press run): 28.910, 68,000; B)
paid circulation: 1 sales through
dealers and carriers, street ven-
dors and counter sales, 66, 72; 2
mail subscriptions: 26,215, 64,931;
C) total paid circulation; 26,281,
65,003; D) free distribution by
mail, carrier, or other means,
samples, complimentary and other
free copies, 1,437, 1,470. E) total
distribution 27,718, 66,473. F)
copies not distribued: 1) office use,
left over, unaccounted for, spoiled
after printing. 1.192, 1,527; 2)
returns from news agents; 0, 0. G)
Total: 28,910,68,000.1 certify that
statements made by me above are
correct and complete.
s. Fred K. Shochet, publisher.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name El Billete de Oro -
Billete de Oro at Concursos
Publicaciones, Radio TV. Par-
ticipaciones, Premios intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
MARIA OFELIA PEREZ
ROURA
19333 Octobers 11,
18.26.1985
IH THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-7165
DIVISION JUDGE CHRISTIE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SADIE BISHOP
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of SADIE
BISHOP, deceased. File Number
85-7155. is pending in the Circuit
Court for DADE County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Fl. 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
BARRETT M. ROTHENBERG,
whose address is 9690 West Sam-
ple Road. Coral Springs. Fl. 33065.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claims is not yet due, the
date when it will become due shall
be stated. If the claim is contingent
or unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 11. 1985.
BARRETT M. ROTHENBERG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SADIE BISHOP
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
BARRETT M. ROTHENBERG
9690 West Sample Road
Coral Springs, Fl. 33065
Telephone: 945-2211
19338 October 11,18,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-38163
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANTOINE ST. LOUIS,
Petitioner,
and
TAMYE ST. LOUIS
Respondent.
TO: TAMYE ST. LOUIS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before November 8, 1985, other-
wise a default will be entered.
October 2, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19335 Octobers 11,
18,25,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name 79th Street
Chevron and Food Mart at 570
N.W. 79th Street, Miami. Florida
33150, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Nelson Jenkins
Sol Alexander
Attorney for Nelson Jenkins
19358 October 18,26;
November 1,8,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION '
File Number 85 8364
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MORRIS WIESENTHAL.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MORRIS
WIESENTHAL. deceased, File
Number 85-8364, is pending in the
Circuit Court for DADE County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is FAY WIESENTHAL,
whose address is 1680 NE 191
Street, Apt. 315, North Miami
Beach, FL. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THI?
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall he
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: Oc-
tober 11, 1985.
FAY WIESENTHAL
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MORRIS WIESENTHAL
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, Penthouse
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Telephone: 305/634-4721
19347 October 11.26, If
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-40328 (06)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
IDANLA VELAZQUEZ,
Petitioner,
and
JAMES VELAZQUEZ,
Respondent.
TO: JAMES VELAZQUEZ
c/o Geroge Vasquez
90 Degraw Avenue
Newark, NJ 07104
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner whose ad-
dress is 826 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami, Florida 33131,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 1, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19330 October 4,11,18,26


Relief For Israel
Bond Holders
Friday, October 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
JDITHKOHN
jflNGTON (JTA)
Bond holders may
Ived to learn that
ilure to declare in-
they never earned
Ibably not be con-
fa violation of U.S.
liuse Ways and Means
approved last Friday
that would exempt
Israel Bonds from a
of the 1984 Deficit
Act requiring lenders
Ion the full amount of in-
would accure if the
made at prevailing
iputcii interest provi-
aimed against those
i artificially low-interest
legal means of tax eva-
re the legislation, for ex-
^althy parents could ex-
amounts of money to
Iren in order to exploit
: lower tax rates.
LEL BONDS are not ex-
am the 1984 act, holders
I required to pay tax on
pme than they actually
older of a $1,000 bond,
pie, would earn $40 at
interest rate of four
Jut he would be required
| the $100 in interest in-
ould have received if the
I been issued at the cur-
Dximate market rate of
the House Ways and
nmittee approved a pro-
posal sponsored by Rep. Charles
Range! (D., N.Y.) to exempt Israel
Bonds from the 1984 law. Similar
legislation has been introduced in
the Senate Finance Committee by
Pete Wilson (R., Cal.).
"It is clear that Congress never
intended to include Israel Bonds
in this particular tax law change,
but today's action by the Ways
and Means Committee makes that
crystal clear," Charles Schumer
(D., N.Y.), a cosponsor of the
House bill, said here.
"NO ONE buys Israel Bonds as
a tax shelter," Schumer added.
"American Jews and others buy
these bonds out of a sense of devo-
tion to the State of Israel, and
they do so with full understanding
that they will get a relatively low
rate of return for their invest-
ment. There is no reason that they
should actually be penalized
because they chose this form of
philanthropy."
Schumer stressed that failure to
exempt the bonds would
discourage taxpayers from buying
them.
Passage by the full House and
Senate exempting Israel Bonds
from the Deficit Reduction Act
appears to be essentially a matter
of time. But, according to an aide
in Schumer's office, it could get
bogged down in a debate over con-
troversial tax reform legislation if
a general tax reform bill is used as
the context for the bonus
exemption.
The aide, however, added that
the House would always have the
option of passing a separate bill on
the Israel Bonds question.
ilocaust Teacher Opposes
i
[-Long Course In Public Schools
)UVER (JTA) A
^ncouver teacher who
jlocaust courses in a
hool has expressed op-
|to having that subject
11-time in the public
rieger, history and
studies teacher at the
econdary School for the
tie, said his opposition is
his determination to
that Jews are never
ed as victims by the non-

g\
t*

t t I C 4 &
&&
>unt Nebo
Cemetery
Jorthwest 3rd Street
>1 7612
Jewish community.
He told the Jewish Western
Bulletin that he was worried that
Jews "will be perceived" by non-
Jews "solely as victims. The
delicate balance is to com-
municate the experience of the
Holocaust, the terrible reality of a
culture and civilization and not to
create despair."
Krieger teaches the Holocaust
to grade 12 students for six weeks
of the school year. He said the
idea of a year-round course is
looked on favorably by many sur-
vivors because they fear that non-
Jews may forget the six million
victims.
Krieger said he shared their
concerns but that he also is wor-
ried that "institutionalizing"
Holocaust teachings in the public
school system could be detrimen-
tal to Jews. He also has contended
that most teachers are profes-
sionally poorly trained to teach
that subject and some are uneasy
about discussing it with their
pupils.
In May, he and a survivor,
David Erlich, went to Kimberly
and Cranbrook to address
students as part of a remem-
brance sponsored by the British
Columbia Teachers Federation.
For two days, Krieger and Erlich
discussed the Holocaust with
1,500 students in grades 11 and 12
during nine one-hour sessions.
He said the Teachers Federa-
tion had focussed on those two
B.C. towns because there had
been some evidence at these
schools of anti-Semitism, though
this was later denied by school
officials.
Krieger said he and Erlich were
the first Jewish residents the
town had ever seen. He said it ap-
peared there were no Jews in the
two towns, adding he was sure
that if there are, "they don't iden-
tify themselves as such."
Noah Mozes Dead At 73
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset Speaker, Cabinet
ministers, Knesset members, rab-
bis and public figures were among
the many hundreds who attended
the funeral in Tel Aviv of Noah
Mozes, editor-in-chief and chair-
man of the Board of Israel's
largest newspaper, Yediot
Achronot, and a member of the
Board of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency.
Mozes was knocked down by a
bus on the Tel Aviv-Petah Tikva
highway outside his newspaper's
offices. He received grave head in-
juries from which he never
recovered consciousness, and died
in the hospital the next morning.
He was 73 years old.
Born in 1912 in Kalisch into a
Zionist home, he came to
Palestine with his family in 1924
and studied at the famed Herzliya
High School. Later he joined a kib-
butz, studied agriculture in
France, and spent many years
working in agriculture until his
father, Yehuda Mozes asked him
to come into a family business
the newspaper Hadashot Haerev.
Mozes was responsible for
shepherding this paper, subse-
quently called Yediot Achronot,
OILMAN, Mrs. Goldine (Goldie), 97. of
Miami, October 14. Services were held.
STEMER, Toni, 65, of North Miami Beach.
Levitt-Weinstein.


t*
il1
pSe

through a near-fatal crisis in 1948,
when its top writers and editors
left it en masse, to become today
by far the largest-selling
newspaper in Israel. According to
a recent survey, 53 percent of all
papers sold in Israel are that of
Yediot.
Together with his cousin, Dov
Yudkovsky, Mozes ran both the
editorial and the business sides of
this expanding empire until his
death. He was responsible for the
construction in the late 1970's of
Yediot 's imposing modern bulding
in downtown Tel Aviv.
In a cable to the bereaved fami-
ly, Prime Minister Shimon Peres
wrote that Mozes was one of the
individuals who helped mold the
characteristics of "our society .. .
His open approach, his warm per-
sonality and his sense of justice
made Yediot more than just a
record of events, but also a (paper
which) expressed criticism, took
positions, and favorably influenc-
ed our society. It would be fitting
if in the future, too, the paper will
continue on the path which the
late Noah Mozes mapped out."
KARP, Shirley. 62. of North Miami Beach,
October 9. Levitt-Weinstein.
LEITMAN, Dr. Howard J., 61, of Miami,
October 7. Riverside.
SHACTER. Jack. 83. of North Miami
Beach. October 10. Levitt-Weinstein.
SWEDLER. Diana. 80, of Kendall. October
10. Services were held.
BERK, Ian, 72, of Miami, October 12. Ser
vices were held.
SCHLEFSTEIN. Jules. 73, of Miami. Oc
tober 11. Services were held.
STEIN. Frieda. 84. of Miami. October 12.
Services were held.
KORNICKS, Jrvin H., 68, of Miami, October
11. Riverside.
SHAHAF, Capt. Eliahu. Services held in
Israel Rubin-Zilbert.
AIDMAN, Rose. 90. of Kendall, October 11.
Services were held with interment at Mt.
Nebo.
MILLER, Harry, of Miami Beach. Blasberg
Chapel.
KRAMER, Lt. Col. Stanley, 57, U.S. Army
(Ret.), of Kendall, October 10. Services held
at Arlington National Cemetery, Va.
ROSS, Angel, 74. of Miami, October 12. Ser-
vices were held.
UAI'.M. Hugo of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
BRODER, Amy S 69, of North Miami
Beach. October 9. Riverside.
FREED. Celia. 84, of North Miami Beach.
October 8. Menorah Chapels.
JOSEPH, Leanore G.. of Miami. Rubin-
Zilbert. Interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
KRAKOWER. Elaine D., of Coral Gables.
October 13. Services were held.
RESNICK. Katherine. October 8. River-
side. Interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
SHAPIRO, Ruth, 71. of North Bay Village.
October 9. Riverside.
EMANUEL. Leo, 86. of Miami. October 14.
Services private.
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:.-
P>Ce 16-B The Jewish fVri>iMaffT>chY. October 18. 1965
Now is lowest.
By US. Gov't, testing method.
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