The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02957

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
heater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert
fume 58-Number 20
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, October 4,1985
Fred Sftocfwt By Mail $135 PriCO 50 COOtS
russein Appears
Ready To Talk Directly ... But
Soviets, PLO Must Participate
UNITED NATIONS In
an address before the
General Assembly, Jordan's
King Hussein said last Fri-
day that he is ready* to
negotiate "promtply and
directly" with Israel for a
peace settlement between
the two countries.
But once again, he specified
that the talks be held within the
framework of a United Nations-
sponsored international con-
ference, a demand that Israel has
repeatedly rejected in the past.
SUCH A conference, under
what Hussein emphasized must be
"appropriated auspices," would
involve the five permanent
members of the Security Council,
including the Soviet Union. Hus-
sein has also insisted that "all the
parties to the conflict," must in-
clude the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
In his address here, Hussein ex-
pressed his hope that the United
States "would join hands" in
sponsoring him and the peace in-
itiative he worked out last
February with both Egypt's
President Hoeni Mubarak and
PLO Chairman Yasir Arafat.
In Washington, President
Reagan promptly announced what
he said he would delay until after
the Jewish High Holy Days: a pro-
posal by his Administration to sell
$1.5 billion in arms to Jordan, in-
cluding 40 advanced fighter
aircraft.
REAGAN, who met Monday
Continued on Page 8-A
% >
f+% '
Peres Tells Cabinet
King's Address Was Encouraging
M a 'New Zionists' honor 150 Bar Mitzvah-aged children by
kting trees in the Jewish National Fund's Mayuka forest
\ted in Jerusalem's Ramot Active Recreation Park. Founded
t Japanese scholar in 19U8, the Mayuka Movement today has
Isands of followers. They regard themselves as descendants of
[lost tribe of Dan, and see Israel as a divine instrument for
\an salvation. Mayvkas study Hebrew, and some study ar-
fology and biblical history at Israeli universities.
trits Deny Rolf Mengele
Controlled TV Film
S.v LESLEY FRIEDMAN
London Chronicle
)NDON Central TV
strongly denied reports
Dr. Josef Mengele's
Rolf, was given some
torial control over the
jumentary film screened
1TV here.
[ccording to the reports, the
broadcaster, David Frost, refused
to allow his name to appear as ex-
ecutive producer or to narrate the
film, "Mengele," in protest at the
alleged degree of involvement of
Mengele, as well as a payment to
the Bosserts, an Austrian couple
who shielded the Auschwitz
"Angel of Death" after 1975.
BUT THE producer-director of
Continued on Page 7-A
JERUSALEM In a
report to Israel's Cabinet on
Sunday, Prime Minister
Shimon Peres, reacting to
King Hussein's speech
before the United Nations
General Assembly the
previous Friday, said that
"This is the first time in
which the King of Jordan
spoke about direct and im-
mediate negotiations."
Peres said that the King in ef-
fect agreed that "there is no need
for an additional framework (for
peace talks), which would only
make more problems and result in
everlasting delays."
At the same time, according to
Cabinet Secretary Yossi Beilin,
Peres repeated emphatically that
Israel "does not see the PLO as a
partner to negotiations, and the
objection to the PLO has been in-
tensified further in recent days
due to terrorist activity."
PERES apparently was referr-
ing to the murder of three Israeli
civilians aboard a yacht in Cyprus
by three PLO members, as well as
to numerous bombings and other
terrorist acts in Israel during the
last several weeks.
The most recent of these was a
bomb that exploded in Haifa's
central market on Sunday. Five
Israelis were injured.
Despite the fact that Peres, in
his remarks to the Cabinet, ap-
peared to be pleased by King Hus-
sein's address to the General
Assembly, he emphasized once
again Israel's own two main con-
ditions for peace talks.
One involves Hussein's in-
sistence upon "appropriate
auspices," which would include
participation by the Soviet Union
as a permanent member of the
Security Council. The other is the
King's demand for representation
by the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
WHILE King Hussein appears
to have dropped his earlier de-
mand for pre-negotiations
meetings involving the United
States, Jordan, Egypt and "ac-
ceptable to Israel" Palestinian
representatives, Peres told the
Cabinet that PLO of any stripe
are absolutely out.
So far as the Soviet Union is
concerned, Peres has never kept
secret of the fact that he con-
tinues to pursue the possibility of
resumed diplomatic relations with
Moscow.
But he continues to believe that
the Soviets are more interested in
making trouble than peace in the
Middle East, and to include them
as a peace-broker in future Israeli
peace talks with the Arabs would
be counterproductive.
Returning to the PLO as the
Continued on Page 7-A
'Xtradition Denied... Page 2-a
Shamir Says PLO Was Behind Triple Murder
By YITZHAK RABI
IEW YORK (JTA) -
lei's Foreign Minister
Deputy Premier Yithak
tmir has accused the
lestine Liberation
inization of responsibili-
tor the murder of three
ielis aboard a yacht in
Larnaca, Cyprus last Thurs-
day. "Yom Kippur was
disturbed by a cold-blooded
and savage murder by the
killers of the PLO," Shamir
told a meeting of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish
Organizations here.
The Israeli minister said the
PLO perpetrated and stood
behind all recent acts of terror in
Israel. "These acts of terror were
done by the PLO and its leader
(Yasir) Arafat," he said. Shamir
added, "We will find a way to put
an end to it. We will overcome it.
We will overcome them."
PLO has not changed its nature,
though, he noted, attempts have
been made recently, even in
Western countries, to prove the
contrary. "The PLO is a terrorist
movement. Their acts are a com-
bination of murder, crimes and
lies. They perpetrate crimes of
terrorism, and then they deny it,"
SHAMIR CHARGED that the Continued on Page 8-A
Foreign Minister Shamir


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
Terrorists Surrender
Cyprus Denies Extradition
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has been denied ex-
tradition of three terrorists
who murdered an Israeli
navy veteran, his wife and
their friend aboard a yacht
docked at a marina in Lar-
naca. Cyprus on Sept. 25.
The victims, Reuven
Paltsur, 53, his wife,
Esther, 50, of Haifa, and
Avraham Avneri. of Arad.
were shot to death. Their
bodies were flown to Israel
for burial.
The terrorists surrendered to
Cypriot authorities about 10 hours
after they seized the Yacht in
what appeared to be an attempt to
take the Israelis hostage. Elias
Georgidis. a Cypriot government
spokesman, identified them as
Elias Yehiya and Nasif Mahmoud.
both 22. and Georfee Hannah. 27.
The three claimed to be Palesti-
nians but had no documents to
prove their identity.
PREMIER Shimon Peres, Ac-
ting Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens and Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim conferred early last Thurs-
day morning. Immediately after-
wards, Nissim instructed At-
torney Genera] Yitzhak Zamir to
draw up the necessary documents
for extradition. Cyprus has since
refused on the ground that the
crime was not committed in
Israel.
While Israel and Cyprus have no
mutual extradition treaty, both
countries are among the 16
signatories to the European
Economic Community's (EEC)
general extradition agreement
whereby any one of them can re-
quest the extradition of a person
who has committed a crime
against a national of the other.
Earlier, it was thought in
Jerusalem that the only obstacle
in the way of extradition would
arise if the Cypriot authorities
claim the murders were politically
motivated. The killers have been
remanded in custody by a Larnaca
court pending trial.
It is generally assumed in Israel
that the killers belong to Force 1".
the elite unit of El Fatah, the ter-
rorist arm of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization which has
recendy carried out "'showcase"
terrorist acts. The PLO disclaim-
ed responsibility.
BUT ISRAELI sources said
this may be because the gunmen
failed in their mission. It ap-
parently was to hold the three
Israelis aboard the yacht hostage
for Israel's release of about 20
PLO terrorists, including ranking
members of Force 17. captured at
sea by the Israel Navy in recent
weeks.
The captured terrorists had
been enroute to Lebanon from
where they planned to infiltrate
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Israel, according to documents in
their possession. Israel is skep-
tical of the PLO disclaimer
because persons purporting to
speak for Force 17 telephoned the
Jerusalem office of the French
news agency. Agence France
Presse. two weeks ago saying
they were planning to retaliate for
the Navy's seizures.
An anonymous telephone call to
the same news agency claimed
Force 17 took over the Israeli
yacht in Larnaca because the
three Isrelis aboard were secret
agents monitoring the movements
of Palestinian boats between
Cyprus and Lebanon while posing
as tourists.
ISRAELI SOURCES flatly
denied the allegation. The
murders occurred Yom Kippur
morning but were not reported
here until Israel Radio resumed
broadcasting at 7 p.m., Sept. 25,
after the Day of Atonement.
The murder victims left Haifa
Sept. 16 on a short holiday cruise
to Cyprus. On arrival at Larnaca
they tied up at the tourist marina.
There were perhaps a dozen other
Israeli yachts at the marina at the
time, along with Lebanese yachts.
According to reports from
Cyprus, the gunmen, armed with
Kalachnikof assault rifles, Brown-
ing automatics, pistols and
grenades, boarded the Israeli
yacht at about 4:30 a.m. local
time. Apparently they en-
countered Esther Paltsur who ap-
peared to have put up a struggle.
She was the first to be shot. Her
body, clad only in a nightgown,
was left lying on the deck for 10
hours, until the gunmen
surrendered.
Cypriot police are not certain
when Paltsur and Avneri were
murdered. Their bodies were
found in the yacht's cabin when
police boarded the vessel at 2 p.m.
BOTH MEN were bound hand
and foot, and each was shot
several times in the head. It was
not certain whether they were
already dead when the killers
began bargaining for the release
of the Force 17 men held by
Israel.
At their demand, the Cypriot In-
terior Minister, Dinos
Michaelides, came to the marina
to negotiate, as did the Egyptian
Ambassador to Cyprus and two
representatives of the PLO from
Nicosia, the capital.
At one point the terrorists
threatened to blow up the yacht if
their demands were not met. They
set a 10 a.m. deadline but did not
carry out the threat. They threw
down their weapons and sur-
rendered at 1:55 p.m.
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to
T
Cyprus, Meir Gavish, who^
home leave, flew to Cyprus! 1
Air Force plane accompany!
army communications expert tl
the time they landed, the |
Israelis had been found dead
the Ambassador returned hoi
The Cypriot government sm|
message of condolence to
government and people of h
The message also stated
Cyprus did not want to be di
ed into a conflict between i
parties but wished to live in r
with all.
Paltsur, who owned the va
was described by friends* as]
dedicated sailor who servedint
Israel navy and was active in i
Sea Scouts and other movema,
promoting seafaring anioj
Israelis.
France, Iraq Sign
$2 Billion Arms Deal
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) France and Iraq have concluded
agreement for the sale of 24 Mirage F-l's, equipped for til
flight refuelling and capable of firing air-to-air Exocetl
missiles.
The plane's manufacturer, Marcel Dassault, 93, perl
sonally announced the sale, saying that Iraq has agreed tol
pay for the planes in cash, some 15 billion Francs, or somel
$2 billion. The planes will be delivered over an 18-month|
period.
IRAQ ALREADY has 89 F-l's but the new model wffll
have, thanks to their in-flight refuelling facilities, a farl
longer strike range. They will carry two 30 mm. guns and|
seven air-to-air to air-to-sea missiles.
The Exocet is the super sophisticated air-to-sea missilf I
used with devastating effects by the Argentinians during j
their battle with the British over the Falkland Islands. Iraqi
has used the Exocets to strike and sink tankers carrying |
Iranian oil from the Kharg terminal.
French experts, at a press conference held by Dassault, I
privately told reporters they were deeply impressed by the I
high level maintenance of the planes by the Iraqi ground
crews and by combat capabilities of the air crews. The
French technicians said that the long war with Iran has
given the Iraqis the combat experience needed to turn |
them into a modern and efficient air force.

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Israel Protests
Britain's Arms Sale to Saudis
Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
[*
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A
strong official protest has
been presented from Israel
in response to Prime
Minister Margaret That-
cher's invitation to two
members of the Palestine
Liberation Organization to
meet with her in London as
part of a joint Jordanian-
^Palestinian delegation.
Thatcher announced the invita-
tion in Amman at the end of her
visit to Jordan. Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres told a Cabinet
meeting in Jerusalem that he in-
tended to send a letter to That-
cher protesting her intention to
meet with the PLO men and the
arms sales deal she set up with
Jordan and Saudi Arabia.
THE JOINT delegation to meet
with Thatcher and Foreign
Secretary Sir Geoffrey Howe here
includes Jordan's Depty Premier
Abdel Wahab Al-Majali, Foreign
Minister Taher Al-Masri and two
Palestinians Mohammed
Milhem, former Mayor of Halhoul,
whom the Israelis expelled from
the West Bank in 1980, and
Bishop Elia Khoury, Suffragan
(Anglican) Archbishop of
Jerusalem.
Milhem is a member of the
15-man PLO Executive. Khoury is
a member of the Palestine Na-
tional Council (PNC), the Palesti-
nian parliament-in-exile, which
. Israel considers to be a PLO body.
Thatcher is the first head of a
Western government to meet of-
ficially with PLO members. Peres
New Year
Celebration
Was Aired
>* MONTEVIDEO-(JTA)-The
celebration of Rosh Hashanah in
Montevideo had a very significant
impact in the general population
of Uruguay, thanks to the in-
itiative of B'nai B'rith in this
country.
Alfredo Neuburger. B'nai B'rith
International's director for South
America, reported that three
special programs on the
significance of Jewish New Year
were aired by three of the four
television stations.
liie programs included a
presentation by Vito Atijas. ac-
ting president of the Uruguayan
district of B'nai B'rith. and
Eduardo Kohn, executive direc-
tor; greetings by the Israeli Am-
bassador in Uruguay, Dr. Mana-
jem Carmi; and films showing
Tawiah life in Israel and the
diaspora.
"The best of our
officers in the Air
Force, the Tank
Corps, the Navy.
Communications.
Artillery and the
Engineering Corps
are nearly all of
them Technion
graduates."
Gen. Moshe Dayan
^JTECHNION
ISRAEL INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
868-5666
Prime Minister Thatcher
tojd his Cabinet that she main-
tains that these two men "want
peace."
SHE INSISTED in her an-
nouncement in Jordan that the in-
vitiation does not mean Britain
recognizes the PLO. But she
denied strongly that the meeting
would be an empty gesture. She
said it was intended to give
positive support to King Hussein's
peace initiative which she said was
proceeding more slowly than
expected.
There is some conjecture here
that Thatcher's meeting with the
joint delegation will lay the
groundwork for a similar meeting
by U.S. officials.
Peres is reported to have noted
bitterly that Britain, with its Irish
problem, was especially sensitive
to terrorism, and it was therefore
all the more incomprehensible and
regrettable that Mrs. Thatcher
should have invited two high rank-
ing PLO members.
$4.3 Billion Deal Will
Send 132 Planes to Saudis
LONDON (JTA) The British and Saudi Arabian
governments have signed a memorandum of agreement for
the sale by Britain of 132 warplanes to the Saudi kingdom
valued at $4.3 billion exclusive of the cost of spare parts
and support facilities.
Described by a British spokesman as "our biggest arms
deal ever," it was angrily opposed by Israel but may have
had the tacit blessings of the Reagan Administration. The
Saudis recently dropped plans to buy U.S. F-15 jet fighter-
bombers, apparently because a long drawn-out battle seem-
ed inevitable between the Administration and majorities in
both houses of Congress which oppose U.S. arms sales to
Arab states technically at war with Israel.
THE SALES agreement was initialed here by the
Defense Minister of Saudi Arabia, Prince Sultan Iban
Abdelazziz, and Britith Defense Secretary Michael
Heseltine. The deal is for 72 of the highly-rated Tornado jet
fighters which are built by a British-West German-Italian
consortium, 30 PC-9 defense aircraft and 30 Hawk
trainers. Sources here said the Saudis originally intended
to buy only 48 Tornados but incresed their order after
deciding not to seek the F-15s.
Israel's Acting Foreign Minister Moshe Arens sum-
moned the British Ambassador in Tel Aviv, William Squire,
to the Foreign Ministry last week to convey his govern-
ment's extreme displeasure over the Saudi arms deal, then
pending. Arens said Israel was especially disturbed by the
Tornado's high speed, low level penetration capabilities
which suits them for raids against Israel from the Saudi Air
base at Tabuk.
The arms deal is without conditions, meaning that Bri-
tain did not stipulate that the weapons must not be used
agaisnt Israel.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
Shun Terrorists, Or There'll Be No Peace
What is different about King Hussein's
speech before the General Assembly last
Friday, a difference with which Israel's
Prime Minister Shimon Peres appears to be
guardedly pleased, is that the King seems to
have given up on one of his preconditions for
peace talks.
This is the one which would exclude Israel
and involve a meeting among represen-
tatives from Jordan, Egypt and the
Palestine Liberation Organization all sitting
at the feet of Uncle Sam in Washington and
setting things up beforehand.
Supposedly, this would satisfy those of the
Arabs at the meeting who cannot bring
themselves to recognize Israel as a nation in
the first place those of the Arabs who con-
tinue to speak of Israel as the "Zionist enti-
ty." Hussein's sop to Israel is that the
Israelis would have veto power over those
Palestinians on a list of possible candidates
who would participate in the goings on.
No nation whose facticity is denied could
possibly have acceded to this insulting Hus-
sein precondition, and this is precisely what
the Israelis did. They rejected it.
What seems to please Peres for the mo-
ment is that in the King's speech last Fri-
day, he apparently dropped that demand. On
the other hand, he holds on to his two
others: (1) the participation of the Soviet
Union, as a permanent member of the
Security Council, in the international forum
before which the peace talks between Israel
and Jordan would ultimately be held; (2) par-
ticipation by the PLO.
With respect to the first, Peres is right
when he argues that the Soviet Union's
main interest in the Middle East is fomen-
ting more trouble between Israel and the
Arabs than already exists. It is hardly peace
that Moscow has in mind.
With respect to the second, if no other act
of terrorism can dissuade Israel otherwise,
and there have been many in the past few
weeks, then the murder of three Israeli
civilians by PLO members in Cyprus last
week surely explains why Israel can never
negotiate with the PLO.
Joys of Simhat Torah
Simhat Torah is one of the most joyous
and engaging of Jewish holidays. At the
centerpiece of the occasion is the Torah
itself, the eternal Law of the Jewish people,
which we celebrate.
In this sense, Simhat Torah, our joy in the
Torah, is an ongoing and never-ending
event.
On this day, which we will celebrate on
Tuesday, Oct. 8, thus bringing to an end the
High Holy Day season, we complete our an-
nual reading of the Torah, and we com-
mence reading the Torah all over again.
From the last of Deuteronomy to the first of
Genesis, we exult in the end and, equally, in
a new beginning.
Where better than on Simhat Torah do we
celebrate the eternality of the Jewish people
themselves? And where better than on
Simhat Torah can we emphasize that this
eternality springs from the Torah itself, our
centerpiece and our reason for living?
MMMMMMM
Jewish Floridian
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Especially those American politicos who
seem to see in Israel's position on this a kind
of self-defeating paranoia ought to rethink
their opinions as they assess the latest Arab
terrorist threat about murdering the six
American hostages they are still holding in
Lebanon for the past 16 months if the
United States cannot, or will not, put
pressure on Kuwait to release 17 terrorists
from prison in that country for a series of
bombings in 1983.
We can understand why King Hussein ap-
pears to be attempting to cover all bases as
he moves clumsily toward rapprochement
with Israel. He does not want his move to
end the same way Egypt President Sadat's
did assassination at the hands of Moslem
extremists.
But until he comes to realize that no one
can do business with terrorism as he did
when he kicked the PLO out of Jordan in
1970 neither can he make peace with
Israel.
The pool of Shiloah (Siloam) in Jerusalem
from which, in Temple times, water was
drawn for the 'Drawing of the Waters'
ceremony on Sukkoth. The Sukkoth holidays
end with Shemini Atzereth and Simhat Torah
on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 7 and 8.
Stalled Middle East Process
Can It Be Sparked to Life ?
Friday, October 4,1985
Volume 58
19TISHRI5746
Number 40
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
President Reagan's
meetings with Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak
on Sept. 23 and King Hus-
sein of Jordan Sept. 30 were
viewed by the Reagan Ad-
ministration as an oppor-
tunity to get the stalled Mid-
dle East peace process
moving.
A senior Administration official
pointedly noted that the United
States is committed to the goal
enunciated by Arab leaders to
"use this year as the year of op-
portunity ... to get to direct
negotiations" between Israel and
the Arabs.
The two Arab leaders were in
the U.S. to participate in the 40th
anniversary session of the United
Nations General Assembly.
Mubarak addressed the General
Assembly on Wednesday, Sept.
25, Yom Kippur, and Hussein on
Friday.
WHILE NORMAL procedure
has been for Secretary of State
George Shultz to meet with
visiting foreign leaders in New
York during the General
Assembly session, the Ad-
ministration apparently wanted
the White House meetings to
assure the Arab leaders of the
President's personal interest in
the Mideast peace process.
Shultz, who addressed the
General Assembly on Tuesday,
Sept. 24, returned to Washington
after his speech for the Reagan-
Mubarak visit.
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir was scheduled to address
the General Assembly on Oct. 2
and Premier Shimon Peres on
Oct. 20. Both were also scheduled
to meet with Reagan.
Mubarak, who arrived in
Washington Sept. 21, met Reagan
after a working lunch with Vice
President George Bush. Before
that, he met with Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger and
discussed economic issues with
Administration officials led by
Treasury Secretary James Baker.
A SENIOR Administration of-
ficial, briefing reporters on the
Mubarak visit, stressed that the
Egyptian President wants to get
things moving in the peace pro-
cess. He noted that when Egypt
signed a peace treaty with Israel
it dit not want this to be the last
step.
"Egypt has every motivation to
expand the process and to bring
into the negotiating process the
Jordanians, the Palestinians, and
hopefully one of these days, the
Syrians," the official said.
The present impasse is due to
the fact that the U.S. does not see
how the present position of Hus-
sein will provide a "mechanism"
leading to direct negotiations bet-
ween Israel and a delegation of
Jordanians and Palestinians, the
official said. He said the goal is
"not peace between the Arabs and
the United States, but peace with
Israel and the Arabs."
The official said the problem is
not so much the proposed Palesti-
nian delegates for a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation
to meet with the U.S., but Jor-
dan's insistence on an interna-
tional conference for negotiations.
He said while the U.S.
understands the need for an
"international context," it
believes that an international con-
ference will result in "political
rhetoric," not negotiations.
IN ADDITION, Jordan wants
the five permanent members of
the UN Security Council as par-
ticipants, which would include the
Soviet Union. The participation of
the Soviets would add to the trou-
ble, not lessen the trouble in get-
ting anything started, the official
said.
The official also stressed that
Hussein understands that the
U.S. will not meet with any
members of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization. This is why the
U.S. has held up approval of the
list of Palestinians for the joint
delegation submitted to
Washington by Hussein.
"We are interested in getting
the mesage out that our terms for
a meeting with the PLO remains
what they were announced in
1975," the official said. "We are
not going to make them any
harder, or any easier."
The official indicated that the
U.S. would not follow the move
announced by British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher in
Jordan. She said that British
Foreign Secretary Geoffrey Howe
would meet with two PLO
members in London if they re-
nounced violence and said they ac-
cepted UN Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338.
THE OFFICIAL said that
when Hussein was m Washington
in May he maintained that the
PLO met the U.S. conditions
because its leader, Yasir Arafat,
assured him that the PLO ac-
cepted the two resolutions and
agreed to Israel's right to exist.
But the official said that if the
PLO does accept the U.S. condi-
tions, "let them say it very simply,
very clearly. They have not done
so. They have danced around it."
The official also stressed that
one of the hindrances to progress
in recent months has been the up-
surge of violence in the West
Bank. He reiterated Shultz's
statement that while violence can-
not be allowed to derail the peace
process, "We just can't take
seriously anyone that is pushing
violence as a participant in the
peace process."
THE OFFICIAL also pointed
to recent improvements in rela-
tions between Israel and Egypt
and expressed the hope that the
talks in which the two countries
have been engaged will lead to an
early settlement of the Taba con
troversy and the return of the
Egyptian Ambassador to Israel.
Not mentioned is the Ad-
ministration's hope that move
ment in the peace process can be
demonstrated by the visits of
Mubarak and Hussein so that the
Administration can avoid a bloody
battle with Congress, similar to
that over the sale of AWACS to
Saudi Arabia in 1981, over its pre-
sent plans to sell arms to Jordan
and Saudi Arabia.
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
in testifying before Senate and
House subcommittees, stressed
that the Administration plans to
go ahead with sales of fighter
planes and anti-aircraft systems
to Jordan and to restock existing
Saudi arms.
Majorities in both the Senate
and House are on record as oppos-
ed to any sale to Jordan unless
Amman is committed to negotia-
tions with Israel, and this is man-
dated in the 1986 Foreign Aid
Act. Sen. Alan Cranston (D..
Calif.) is prepared to introduce a
joint resolution opposed to arms
sales to the Saudis as soon as it is
announced.
JTA Service


Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
.
World Body Conducts Work With Modesty
'-?MK
By BORIS SMOLAR
On 370 Seventh Avenue in New
York, on the 16th floor, there is an
institution helping victims of Nazi
persecution with legal aid to pro-
cure restitution and indemnifica-
tion from the West German
government for sufferings in-
flicted by the Nazi regime.
The name of this institution is
United Restitution Organization
(URO). It acts as the legal aid arm
of the Conference on Jewish
Material Claims Against Germany
a world body composed of 23 of
the most important Jewish
organizations in the world. It is
being directed by a brilliant
woman-lawyer, Dr. Edith
Dosmar-Kosterlitz, herself a vic-
tim of the Nazi regime.
It conducts its work efficiently
and with great modesty. It pays
no attention to publicity. Its name
is in fact very little known to the
average American Jew. One
seldom reads about it in the press,
^despite the fact that it has helped
many thousands of Nazi victims to
receive millions of dollars in
claims against Germany during its
existence since 1948, and is still
actively engaged in this mission.
THE CLAIMS Conference, to
which the URO is linked, was
organized following negotiations
by Dr. Nahum Goldman, the late
world Jewish leader, with
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer of
the German Federal Republic.
These negotiations led to the sign-
ing of two sets of agreements
one, between the governments of
West Germany and Israel, signed
by Israel's Foreign Minister
Moshe Sharett and by Adenauer,
and the other, between the West
German government and the
Claims Conference. The Claims
Conference sought to attain two
major objectives:
To obtain funds from. the.
Bonn government for the relief,
rehabilitation and resettlement of
Jewish victims of Nazi persecu-
tion, and to aid in rebuilding
*Jewish communities and institu-
tions devastated by the Nazi
regime in Germany and in Nazi-
held countries.
To gain indemnification for in-
juries inflicted upon individual vic-
tims of Nazi persecution, and
restitution for properties con-
fiscated by the Nazis.
The agreement between the
West German government and
the Claims Conference provided
for enactment of laws that would
compensate Nazi victims directly
for indemnification and restitu-
tion claims arising from Nazi
persecution.
UNDER THIS agreement, the
West German government under-
took also to pay directly to the
Claims Conference the sum of
,,450,000,000 German Marks -
about $110,000,000 for relief,
resettlement and rehabilitation of
i Jewish victims of Nazi persecu-
tion. A substantial proportion of
this sum was allocated by the
Claims Conference for the
reconstruction of Jewish com-
munities and their institutions
destroyed by the Nazis. Some 480
capital projects were undertaken
in 29 countries with Conference
^ aid. With the allocations from the
Conference and funds from the
Joint Distribution Committee the
shattered Jewish communities
were gradually brought back to
normal life.
The West German government
paid out through December 31,
1983 more than 66 billion German
Marks currently about $23
billion in benefits to victims of
Nazi persecution. This sum is ex-
clusive of the 3 billion Marks paid
.to the government of Israel in
goods and services and to the
$450 million paid directly to the
Claims Conference.
The Claims Conference
estimates that 53 billion Marks
was paid out to Jewish victims of
Nazi persecution throughout the
world until now. The German
Finance Ministry estimates that
betwen now and the end of this
century it will still pay out another
16 billion Marks in benefits on the
basis of the existing laws which
were enacted as the result of the
agreements between the Claims
Conference and the German
Federal Republic.
HUNDREDS OF thousands of
Jewish Nazi victims throughout
the world continue to look to the
Claims Conference for the protec-
tion of their interests under the
Indemnification Laws. Close to
100,000 in Israel are today receiv-
ing annuities from the German
government, and 100,000 more in
other countries. Victims receiving
indemnification and annuities in-
clude also Jews from countries
that were occupied by the Nazis
claimants who could not file
claims before they emigrated
from these countries.
They include those from the
Soviet Union, the Baltic countries,
the part of Poland in the Lemberg
region which was first occupied by
the Nazis and later annexed by the
Soviet Union as part of the
Ukraine.
The large number of Jewish in-
dividuals who received compensa-
tion from the German govern-
ment for sufferings under the
Nazis would have fallen heavy on
the welfare of the Jewish com-
munities in the countries into
which they were admitted. The in-
demnification and annuities which
they received from Germany
under the agreements with the
Claims Conference have helped
them to estalish themselves in
these countries.
More than a half of them have
died with the march of time, but
there are still about 200,000 reci-
pients of pensions alive today.
About 900 million Marks about
$300 million a year continue to
come to Israel to Nazi victims
from the German government as
legal obligation under the
agreements with the Claims
Conference.
THE GERMAN government
has also committed itself to a
Claims Conference Hardship
Fund up to 400 million Marks.
Under German guidelines which
govern the operations, the Fund
limits per capita payments to
5,000 Marks.
As of March this year over
57,500 payments were authorized
from the Fund, including 37,405
Their fate cried out for human
restitution, and great leaders answered.
Konrad Adenauer
guiding conscience
for applicants from Israel and
about 15,000 for applicants from
the United States. The remainder
were authorized for applications
from other countries. The total
number of applications received is
about 70,000 from Israel, more
than 35,000 from the United
States, and about 17,000 from
other countries.
Priority in the processing of the
applications, thus far, was accord-
ed to Jewish Nazi victims who left
Eastern Europe after 1965 and
who were 60 years or older
(women), 65 years or older (men),
or disabled. The Claims Con-
ference completed the processing
of most of the applications falling
within these categories.
Of the 400 million Marks com-
mitted by the West German
government "for the Hardship
Fund, 20 million were earmarked
for allocations to organizations
providing shelter to Jewish vic-
tims of Nazi persecution. These
funds were allocated from 1981
through 1985 primarily for homes
for the aged caring for substantial
numbers of elderly survivors. The
allocations were made to 69 in-
stitutions located in Israel,
France, Great Britain, Australia
and a number of Latin American
countries.
THE SCOPE of the indem-
nification and restitution program
under the agreements with the
Claims Conference has reached
great magnitudes in the first 20
years of the existence of the
Claims Conference. Nazi victims
submitted over 4,200,000 claims
under the provisions of just the
first agreement, and 75 percent of
the funds paid went directly to the
claimants who made their homes
in countries other than Germany.
Virtually all were Jews. Some
277,000 have received life-time
annuities. Scores of thosuands of
them were old, or ill, crippled or
otherwise unfit to earn a
livelihood from the effects of Nazi
persecution.
The president of the Claims
Conference during the first
decades of its existence was Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, who succeeded
in bringing about the recognition
by the West German government
of its obligation to pay reparations
to the victims of Nazi persecution.
Senior vice president was Jacob
Blaustein, the prominent
American Jewish leader and late
president of the American Jewish
Committee.
The president of the Claims
Conference today is Dr. Israel
Miller, the noted Jewish leader
who distinguished himself when
he served as president of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
Jewish Organizations which coor-
dinates the activities of 37 major
Jewish groups in the United
States as they related to
American-Israeli affairs. Dr.
Miller is also the senior vice presi-
dent of the Yeshivah University,
and is active in various leading
Jewish organizations in this
country.
The exeuctive director and
scretary of the Claims Conference
is Saul Kagan, who has an en-
viable record as a very able direc-
tor in the field of restitution. He
has been involved in this field for
37 years. He directed the ac-
tivities of the Jewish Restitution
Successor Organization (JRSO)
which preceded the formation of
the Claims Conference. He helped
to establish the Claims Con-
ference of which he became the
first executive director. He is also
the administrator of the Heirless
Property Fund, the establishment
of which was agreed upon by the
West German government in
1980. He is a very active member
of the executive of the Joint
Distribution Committee
Among the Prime Movers
Moshe Sharett
Dr. Nahum Goldmann


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
N. Y. 's Koch
Farrakhan Is 'Nazi in Clerical Collar'
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Mayor Edward Koch has de-
nounced Black Muslim
leader Louis Farrakhan as a
"Nazi in a clerical collar"
and said he hoped Far-
rakhan's scheduled rally at
Madison Square Garden on
Oct. 7 does not draw protest
demonstrations "so as not
to give him even greater
notoriety."
"I hope that no one will do
that," declared Koch in remarks
during dedication ceremonies of
the new Riverdale YM-YWHA,
the Fred and Anna Landau
Building. "But I am sure that
those hopes are in vain because
there will be people not recogniz-
ing that they are helping him, who
in justifiable anger indeed fury
will do that."
Koch was meeting with Jewish
leaders to map strategy regarding
Farrakhan's scheduled rally, it
was learned here.
THE MAYOR noted that
ecumenical services will take
place on Oct. 5 in New York mark-
ing a "national day of mourning"
for black South Africans, and he
suggested that this forum be used
by leaders especially non-
Jewish leaders to speak out
against Farrakhan. Koch, in other
remarks, noted that despite Far-
rakhan's anti-Semitic preachings,
he "has the right to speak" at the
rally.
Farrakhan, head of the Chicago-
based Nation of Islam, propelled
himself into the national spotlight
last year with his association with
the Rev. Jesse Jackson during the
Democratic Presidential primary
campaign. He accompanied
Jackson to Syria to help negotiate
the release of a captured Navy air-
man. Later, Jackson dropped Far-
rakhan from the campaign.
He Canceled Talk in Miami
Gusman, announced a $3,200
charge for its services, including
$1,400 for 14 extra security per-
sonnel, which the Authority felt it
needed in order to assure both
speaker and audience safety.
Farrakhan promptly canceled
and accused Miami officials of de-
nying him his right to freedom of
speech.
The address that Black Muslim
leader Louis Farrakhan was sup-
posed to deliver in Miami's
Gusman Hall last Saturday night
was abruptly cancelled by Far-
rakhan himself.
Farrakhan was angered when
the Miami Off-Street Parking
Authority, which manages
But it was Farrakhan's anti-
Semitic, anti-Zionist diatribes that
drew much national attention, and
particularly angered the Jewish
community. He has been quoted
as describing Judaism as a "dirty
religion," and calling "the
presence of a state called Israel
... an outlaw act."
IN A JUNE, 1984 speech at his
headquarters in Chicago, broad-
cast on local WBEE radio, Far-
rakhan said Israel "will never
have any peace because there can
be no peace structured on in-
justice, lying and deceit and using
the name of God to shield your dir-
ty religion under His holy and
righteous name."
But despite the intense criticism
of Farrakhan from a wide spec-
trum of the religious and political
community, he has retained his
drawing power. Last June he ad-
dressed a rally of some 10,000 at
the Convention Center in
Washington, and in September he
addressed more than 15,000 at a
rally at the Forum in Los Angeles.
Both speeches contained Far-
rakhan's usual vicious anti-
Semitic canards. In Washington,
he said, "I'm not backing down
from the Jews because I know
their wickedness. I'm not
separating just Zionists out
because the Zionists are the
outgrowth of Jewish
transgressions."
THE SPEECH in Los Angeles,
site of the second largest Jewish
community in the United States,
resulted in serious strains bet-
ween black and Jewish leaders.
Jewish leaders called on black civil
rights and political leaders to de-
nounce Farrakhan before the
speech for his past "anti-Semitic
and anti-American" remarks.
According to Rabbi Marvin
Hier, dean of the Simon Wiesen-
thal Center in Los Angeles, some
"moderate" black leaders failed
to condemn Farrakhan, and he
noted, some of these same leaders
had seats on the stage at the
Forum during Farrakhan's
address.
Mayor Tom Bradley, who is
black, refused repeated private
and public requests from Jewish
officials in Los Angeles to de-
nounce Farrakhan prior to the
speech. Bradley later condemned
Farrakhan's racism and bigotry.
Bradley said local black leaders
met at his request with Far-
rakhan's representatives seeking
to urge the Black Muslim to delete
"the rhetoric of racism and hate."
FARRAKHAN told his Los
Mayor Koch
Angeles audience: "I did not come
here to Los Angeles to attack
Jews or to attack anyone but to
tell the truth." He asserted that
Jewish groups opposed to him had
gone "to black leaders with an
already signed statement telling
them to sign it or else."
He said some black leaders bow-,
ed to the pressure by Jewiai'
leaders while those who did not
were told by Jewish leaders they
would not forget. Farrakhan then
said: "We will never forget who
sold our fathers into slavery.
Don't push your six-million down
our throats when we lost 100
million" in slavery.
-
Univ. Picks Gartner
NEW YORK (JTA) Donald
Gartner has been named ex-
ecutive vice president of the
American Associates, Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev, accor-
ding to Jack Spitzer, American
Associates president. Gartner has
been executive director of the
American Associates since 1982.
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British Deny Report
Rolf Mengele Controlled TV Film
Continued from Page 1-A
the documentary. Brian Moser,
said: "Rolf Mengele had no con-
trol whatsoever. It is a nasty,
filthy story, and it is incredible
that anyone could write such
lies."
A spokeswoman for Central, the
Brimingham-based ITV company,
said there were "several serious
errors in the reports." Frost's
company, David Paradine Prouc-
tions, was listed in the credits at
the end of the program.
Peres:
King's
Talk Was
Encouraging
Continued from Page 1-A
major source of terrorist activity
directed against Israel, Peres
criticized King Hussein for
distinguishing between terror and
national liberation action.
SAID CABINET Secretary
Beilin in reporting on Peres'
remarks to the Cabinet Sunday,
"Violence is violence, and no
liberation movement can justify
the murder of innocent men,
women and children."
Meanwhile Dan Meridor, a close
associate of former Prime
Minister Menachem Begin, has
declared that if Hussein genuinely
wants peace with Israel, then "he
can come to Jerusalem tomorrow,
and he would be welcomed by both
major parties with open arms. But
if he only wants to do the PLO a
service, he might as well stay
home."
Central, not Frost, had decided
to use an anonymous narrator, as
was normal company practice.
Rolf Mengele was "compen-
sated for the three or four days he
spent on the film," but did not
receive a fee, she added.
FROST WOULD be narrating
the American TV version of the
program, which would be 30
minutes shorter than the one seen
on ITV, the spokeswoman said, -.
The program supported the
view that Mengele is dead.
Frost, who is in Greece on holi-
day, was not available for
comment.
Meanwhile, David Markus cabl-
ed from Rio de Janeiro: Israel
does not consider the Mengele
case closed. Menachem Russek, of
the Israeli special department for
the investigation of Nazi war
criminals, flew up to Sao Paulo
with his assistant, Haim Golan, to
attend a federal police hearing
dealing with Geza Stammer.
MENGELE STAYED with
Stammer and his wife, Gitta, for
12 years. This was Stammer's
first testimony in the case he
had just returned from a long
journey.
During the questioning. Stam-
mer revealed that Mengele had
had visible signs on his forehead
of having undergone an operation.
Russek and Golan want to know
more about Stammer's
background. They suspect that he
belongs to an organization which
shelters Nazi criminals in Brazil
and elsewhere in South America.
When the World was 9
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Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
German Publisher Springer Dead
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Israel has lost a man who was
very close to her, Jerusalem
Mayor Teddy Kollek said Sept. 23
eulogizing West German press
magnate Axel Springer who died
Sept. 22 in West Berlin at the age
of 73.
Kollek said he had also lost a
personal friend whom he had
known for more than 20 years.
Springer regarded Jerusalem as
his second home, Kollek said. He
owned a house on King David
Street. Kollek recalled that Spr-
inger used to come to Israel at her
most difficult times, such as the
first days of the Six-Day War and
the Yom Kippur War.
He used to defend the case of
Israel in every form and every
forum. He was a central fighter
against the supply of German
arms to the Arab countries. He
did his utmost to prevent the sale
of Leopard tanks to Arab armies.
There was not one speech in which
he failed to mention Jerusalem.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
'J'Accuse'
Shamir Says PLO Was Behind Triple Murder
Continued from Page 1-A
Shamir said.
Turning to another subject,
Shamir pointed out that this is the
first anniversary of Israel's
Labor-Likud unity government
which, he said, has recorded con-
siderable achievements in the
economic field and the Lebanon
problem. Shamir, leader of Likud,
is scheduled, under the terms of
the unity coalition agreement, to
replace Laborite Shimon Peres as
Premier in October, 1986.
He said that while Israel's
economy has still not recovered,
there is a feeling in the govern-
ment that the direction taken is
positive. "We feel we are making
progress," he said. As for
Lebanon, he said the situation is
much better than last year when
Israeli forces still occupied part of
that country and noted that the
PLO is no longer on Israel's nor-
thern border. There is a feeling of
security for the inhabitants of
Galilee, he observed.
SHAMIR SAID that despite
differences in the national unity
government, there is agreement
on a number of principles. These
are, he said, no negotiations with
the PLO, no Palestinian state,
commitment to the Camp David
accords, readiness to negotiate
with Jordan without precondi-
tions, and rejection of negotia-
tions with a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation. In addi-
tion, he said, the government is
united in its opposition to an inter-
national conference to solve the
Middle East conflict.
Shamir referred to his recent
remarks to a Jerusalem Post
reporter (David Landau, who is
also Jerusalem Bureau chief of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency) about
contacts some American Jewish
leaders had made in Arab coun-
tries. He said he appreciates the
efforts of Jews on behalf of
Israel's well-being.
But he stressed that it has been
the position of all leaders of Israel
Hussein Says He's Ready
To Talk But
Continued from Page 1-A
with Hussein at the White House,
declared that such a sale would
send "a powerful message of U.S.
political support for King Hus-
sein's efforts to bring about a
comprehensive, lasting peace set-
tlement between Israel and the
Arab world."
According to the President, the
package would "meet Jordan's
most pressing military deficiency
its ability to provide adequate
air defense against an external at-
tack and military intimidation by
the adversaries of peace."
On Capitol Hill, Senate Foreign
Relations Committee Chairman
Richard Lugar (R., Ind.) declared
that there are legal requirements
that must first be met before the
Administration's proposal can be
considered.
Lugar said that any sale of arms
to Hussein may be consummated
"only if Jordan gives a public com-
mitment to recognize Israel and to
negotiate promptly and directly
with Israel."
NOTING King Hussein's ad-
dress at the United Nations,
Lugar said that "The King of Jor-
dan has taken steps in this direc-
tion ... but to date, these steps
have fallen short of the re-
quirements of the law."
Other critics of the sale are
noting that it is wrong for the
Reagan Administration to sell
weapons to Jordan before that
country begins peace negotiations
with Israel. They also question the
King's insistence upon participa-
tion by the five permanent
members of the Security Council,
which sets up within the Ad-
ministration itself contradictory
resistance to permitting the
Soviet Union to return in force as
a power broker in the Middle
East.
These critics appear to be the
vanguard of an impending strug-
gle on Capitol Hill against the sale
of arms to Jordan and/or Saudi
Arabia for fear of upsetting the
military balance in the Middle
East so far as Israel is concerned.
It had been thought up until
now that the announcement by
Great Britan last week of its own
$4.3 billion sale to the Saudis and
of the Administration's deter-
mination to keep the Soviets out
of future Israel-Arab peace talks
might dampen the President's
determination to go ahead with
his $1.5 billion arms sale proposal
for King Hussein.

t m m
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IN ISRAEL
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Tel Aviv 6 nights Carlton
Jerusalem 6 nights Laromme
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over the years "that there are
most delicate and most important
issues that only elected officials of
Israel can deal with. These are
relations with our neighbors and
matters relating to Israel's
security."
SHAMIR SAID these issues
are a matter of "life and death for
the Jewish State" and that the
Israelis themselves have to
negotiate them and not "people
living abroad." He said the Arabs
try to separate and drive a wedge
between Jews around the world
and in Israel, and the Israelis and
Jews abroad should not play into
their hands.
"I have nothing personal
against those mentioned in the ar-
ticle. It is a matter of principle,
something which is related to our
future," he said.
Shamir was referring to his
remarks reported in the
Jerusalem Post and the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency two weeks
ago, angrily attacking a group of
American Jewish Congress
leaders who visited Cairo and Am-
man, and Edgar Bronfman, presi-
dent of the World Jewish Con-
gress, who visited Moscow to
discuss the plight of Soviet Jews
with Soviet officials.
Turning to Israel's relations
with the international community,
Shamir described U.S.-Israel rela-
tions as "excellent, better than
ever before." He said Israel is
looking for improved relations
with Japan, following his recent
visit there, and he hoped the im-
provement would have a positive
impact on Israel's economy.
HE ALSO expressed hope that
Spain will soon open diplomatic
relations with Israel. He called on
the U.S. to use its influence with
Spain to that end.
Shamir, who met here last week
with Egyptian Foreign Minister
Abdel Ismat Meguid, said Egypt
is willing to seek new avenues,
other than conciliation or arbitra-
tion, to solve its border dispute
with Israel over Taba. But,
Shamir said, the Egyptian
minister would not promise that
after the Taba dispute is resolved,
Egypt will return its Ambassador
to Israel.
The Egyptians, said Shamir,
want progress on the Palestinian
question before they return their
Ambassador. He declared,
however, that Israel cannot ac-
cept the Egyptian approach that
brings up one new issue after
another as a condition for a
general improvement in relations
between the two countries.
He said he offered the Egyptian
Foreign Minister to establish two
commissions, one on the
ministerial level and one on the
high officials level, to seek pro-
gress on the Palestinian question.
MEANWHILE, Shamir at the
United Nations last Friday had
what his spokesman and aide
described as an historic meeting
with the Foreign Minister of
Hungary, Peter Varkonyi. It was
the first meeting ever between an
Israeli and Hungarian foreign
minister.
Shamir's aide said the half-hour
meeting was held in a "friendly at-
mosphere." He said the
Hungarian minister said his coun-
try was willing to expand com-
mercial, cultural and sports con-
tacts with Israel and expressed a
willingness for the two countries
to exchange visitors in an unof-
ficial capacity.
The Hungarian Foreign
Minister emphasized, however,
that his country is part of the
Eastern bloc. He made that point
two or three times, Shamir's aide
said. The aide noted that "the im-
portance of the meeting was in the
fact it took place."
Shamir also met with Belgium's
Foreign Minister, Leo Tindemans,
Foreign Minister Joe Clark of
Canada and the Foreign Minister
of Finland, Paavo Vayrynen. He
discussed bilateral questions with
all three, his aide said.
B'nai B'rith
Sends Earthquake Aid
WASHINGTON B'nai B'rith
International has allocated an in-
itial $1,000 for disaster relief in
Mexico and called on its lodges,
units and individual members to
make similar contributions.
B'nai B'rith International Presi-
dent Gerald Kraft, who announc-
ed the plan to aid the victims of
the recent disaster earthquake,
said that funds would be
distributed as soon as the most ef-
fective use of the money can be
determined.
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'ookcase
Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Bomb
2 Novels, Varying Quality, But Enjoyable
MORTON I. TEICHER
^ye Karl Erich. By Sam
nn. New York: St. Martin's
fcss, 1985. 231 pp., $15.95.
rs Children. By Gloria
Idreich. New York: Mac-
flan Publishing Co., 1985.
pp. $16.95.
)s are written to give
re; they are read to receive
^e. We read novels to be
lined to be caught up
ie experiences and the feel-
(the characters in the novel,
degree that the author
such a response, to that
the novel has succeeded,
tie other hand, we derive no
from the novel, if we are
f we put the novel down
tied, then the novelist has
these tests, both these
I reasonably successful,
than the other. Gloria
ch has written a Jewish
pera. The situations she
es are relatively familiar,
sense that her characters
I. We respond to them, and
I concerned with what hap-
i them.
DANN, by contrast, is
at less successful, partly
his characters are not
ir to us. Despite the
ess of his theme, his novel
| and slight.
r's book opens in a Miami
hotel room where Dr.
Stammler, the house
m, is called to tend to a
nest who turns out to be
Schneider, a former col-
f his in Germany. They
Bsidents together in a Ger-
aspital in the 1930's just
litler came to power.
r fled from the Nazis
ae to America, where he
, life for himself as a Miami
an. When he became too
his regular practice and
Ibi Bogin Named
TARK (JTA) Rabbi
rin of Morristown has
amed assistant rabbi of
B'nai Or of Morristown,
when his wife died, he took on the
job of hotel doctor. ,
Schneider had joined the Nazi
Party and survived the war, but
blocked out memory of his ex-
periences. As the story opens, he
is a tourist in Miami, but he is a
sick old man, confined to a
wheelchair. The meeting of the
two old friends opens a floodgate
of recollections for Stammler.
Most of the book takes us back to
Germany in the early 1930's.
STAMMLER treated Karl
Erich of the book's title, a young
man who was suffering from a
hysterical inability to speak,
brought on by his father's death in
World War I. He is cured of his af-
fliction by Stammler and becomes
a leading member of the Nazi Par-
ty. Just before Stammler carries
out his determination to flee from
Germany, he accidentally meets
Karl Erich who tries to repay his
debt to Stammler by urging him
to stay, promising that he will
make Stammler the most impor-
tant doctor in Germany.
Stammler then reveals that he is
a Jew and Karl Erich, a stalwart
Nazi, is so shocked by this revela-
tion that he falls back into
mutism. Stammler's final words
to him, "Goodbye Karl Erich,"
became the book's title.
There are a few sub-plots, but
the story of Stammler and Karl
Erich is the central emphasis.
Although the author makes a
valiant effort to give the book
significance by trying to paint a
picture of pre-Hitler Germany, he
does this with thin brush strokes
that suggest a mood but which
lack depth and which come across
as colorless daubs.
CONVERSELY, Goldreich's
pictures of life in Scarsdale, in
Mississippi and on and Israeli kib-
butz have a measure of richness
and authenticity. Her book is a se-
quel to "Leah's Journey" which
told the story of a woman wno
became a Jewish matriarch.
Unlike the Jewish mama of
chicken soup and newspapers on
the kitchen floor before Shabbos,
Leah became a Scarsdale matron,
maintaining a successful career as
wife, mother, artist and designer.
The first book told of her
sacrifices in supporting her hus-
band through medical school and
in raising three children. This se-
quel, as the name indicates, tells
about her daughter and two sons.
The story of each of the three
lives is told as a novella. Aaron,
the eldest, is a successful lawyer,
later a judge. He accepts a mission
given to him by his Israeli brother-
in-law to rescue a Jewish physicist
from Hungary. The physicist
turns out to be a beautiful woman
who later marries Aaron. In New
York, she combines her scientific
career with being a wife and a
mother, producing three children
and a special radar invention
which helps the Israelis.
REBECCA, the daughter, mar-
ried an Israeli after working with
him in saving Jewish children
from Europe. She and her hus-
band live on a kibbutz where she is
an accomplished artist and he is a
member of the Israeli intelligence
establishment. Their marriage
falters because he is often absent
for long periods on secret
assignments, because he is
haunted by memories of his first
wife who was killed while protec-
ting him and because a son from
that marriage is killed by the
Arabs. After Rebecca has an af-
fair during a visit to America, she
decides to return to her husband
and her two sons in Israel.
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Michael, the second son, is a
sociology professor at Sarah
Lawrence College, thinly disguis-
ed as Hutchinson College, in
Westchester County, New York.
He spent three summers in the
early 1960's in Mississippi, par-
ticipating in the civil rights ac-
tivism of those days. He was
beaten up by the local police, lear-
ning to his dismay that his ex-
posure to arrest was planned for
publicity purposes by the local
black civil rights leader.
This denouement put an end to
his involvement with a black
woman who recruited him for
work in Mississippi and who is
also there as a civil rights activist.
Michael then marries an Israeli,
the adopted daughter of his sister.
LEAH, the Jewish mother, has
a strong part in each of these
novellas, providing a unifying
presence. It is appropriate to call
the book, "Leah's Children."
These two novels succeed in
keeping the reader reading,
although one is tempted from time
to time to put Dann's book down.
Neither one is great literature by
any stretch of the imagination,
but both are entertaining. They do
not instruct us but that is not
their purpose. They amuse and
divert us. If this low level of ex-
pectation is enough, then they can
be rated as satisfactory.
Rips Rome
ROME (JTA) A powerful
bomb exploded at the British Air-
ways office, wounding 14 persons,
some seriously. Police arrested a
Palestinian, Hassan A tab, 18, who
had confessed to hurling the ex-
plosive through the door of the
airline office.
Atab told police he was a
member of the Revolutionary
Organization of Socialist
Moslems, the same group which
had claimed responsibility for a
grenade attack on a Rome cafe on
Sept. 16. The Organization is
strongly opposed to Yasir
Arafat's leadership of the PLO
and is believed to have ties with
the pro-Syrian anti-Arafat group
led by Abu Nidal.
Atab told police he was born in
the Shatila refugee camp in Beirut
and had acted out of "hatred" for
Israel. Another Palestinian,
Ahmad al Hussein Abu Sareya,
26, charged with the Sept. 16 at-
tack against the Cafe de Paris,
just up the street from last week's
blast, also said he grew up in a
Beirut refugee camp.
The explosion sent shards of
glass some 60 yards along one of
the city's most fashionable
neighborhoods, smashed windows
in nearby buildings, and shook the
American Embassy building
around the corner.
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-TJUUCllIUCI LVOU
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4. 1985
Earthquake Devastation
6 Jews Among Huge Death Toll in Mexico City
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Six Jews were killed by the
earthquake that devastated
the center of Mexico City
Sept. 19. They were buried
Sunday, Sept. 22, Rabbi
Morton Rosenthal, director
of the Latin American Af-
fairs department of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, informed the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Between 3,000 and 5,000
people were killed in the
earthquake.
One of the dead was a woman
who succumbed to a heart attack,
brought on apparently by the
quake. The others appear to have
died in the rubble of collapsed
buildings. Rosenthal obtained his
IDF, Engineers Join
Fight To Save Lives
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
. Civil defense specialists and
Israel Defense Force
engineers were in Mexico
City to assist in ongoing
rescue operations following
the major earthquake that
devastated the heart of the
Mexican capital with a
death toll estimated bet-
ween 3,000 and 5,000.
The first group of civil defense
experts left just before the IDF
engineers departed, taking with
them not only sophisticated equip-
ment but know-how gained in
Lebanon, rescuing people buried
in the rubble of buildings blasted
by terrorist bombs.
ISRAEL'S ACTION was in
response to a general appeal for
help from the Mexican govern-
ment. Israeli amateur radio
operators (hams) have already
established a communication net-
work with Jewish radio hams in
Mexico.
They have volunteered to pass
messages between Mexico and
Israel, transmitting information
and inquiries among concerned
citizens of both countries.
The Israeli rescue teams also
carried communications equip-
ment by which they keep in touch
with Israel via the Israel em-
bassies in Mexico City and the
U.S.
THE EQUIPMENT in Mexico
with the Israeli specialists in-
cludes sensory devices which can
pinpoint the faintest sounds com-
ing from beneath rubble;
specially-designed inflatable air-
bags to be used as jacks to careful-
ly lift fallen masonry or steel
girders weighing as much as 54
tons.
This equipment enables
rescuers to crawl beneath rubble
to extricate survivors or the
bodies of victims.
information from sources in
Guadalajara, Mexico's second
largest city, who were unable to
supply names or ages of Jewish
victims.
The sources told him they had
telex communications with Mex-
ico City which, four days after the
disaster, remained unreachable by
telephone from the United States.
Rosenthal confirmed reports
from other Jewish groups here
that the main Jewish residential
neighborhoods in Mexico City sus-
tained little or no earthquake
damage. But Jewish-owned
businesses, warehouses and fac-
tories near the center of the city
are believed to have suffered
severe damage, and property loss
could be heavy. Those premises,
however, were not occupied dur-
ing the early morning hours when
the quake struck.
ROSENTHAL WAS the first to
report Jewish fatalities. He said
that the Ashkenazic Kehila
building, known locally by its ad-
dress, Acapulco 70, had smashed
windows but apparently no other
serious damage. The building,
housing the offices of the
Ashkenazic community, is located
in the Condessa district, not far
from the center of the city.
Rosenthal said there was also
some damage to an old Sephardic
synagogue. Otherwise, the
Sephardic neighborhood in the
Polanka district was unharmed,
according to Yitzhak Schonfeld, a
22-year-old Brooklynite who has
been a student at the Keter Tora
Yeshiva in Mexico City for four
years.
He has spoken to the JTA by
phone.
He said, "Many buildings were
destroyed" in the Jewish textile
industry section of the city and
some buildings in the Ashkenazic
neighborhood were cracked.
A SPOKESPERSON for the
American Jewish Committee told
the JTA that as far as they knew,
"the neighborhoods more or less
where Jews live were not touch-
ed" by the earthquake and that
the Israel Embassy in Mexico City
was not damaged. _
Sidney Gruber of the World
Jewish Congress, said he heard
"second hand" that the areas
where most Jews live were un-
damaged. He said he has been try-
ing, so far without success, to con-
tact the offices of the Committee
Central Israelita de Mexico.
Jacob Kovadloff of the AJCom-
mittee's Latin American Depart-
ment told the JTA he had to rely
on friends in Houston for informa-
tion on Mexico City Jews because
telephone and cable connections
were down.
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Friday. October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A

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We're Celebrating 5746 With Our First Flights
Starting October 30.
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Shamir Meets With
Foreign Ministers
From Numerous Countries
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
|(JTA) Yitzhak Shamir,
Foreign Minister and Depu-
ty Premier of Israel, who ar-
rived in New York to par-
ticipate in the 40th session
of the General Assembly,
opened his diplomatic activi-
ty in a 45-minute meeting
with Foreign Minister Giulio
Andreotti of Italy.
The meeting was centered on
Israel's economic problems with
the European Economic Com-
'munity (EEC), according to
Shamir's aide and advisor, Avi
Pazner, who briefed Israeli
reporters here. He said Shamir
asked for Italian support of
Israel's desire that its exports to
Europe would remain at the same
level after Spain joins the EEC at
the end of the year.
ANDREOTTI reportedly said
that Italy is committed to resolve
this issue to Israel's satisfaction
during the next three months. The
two Foreign Ministers also
discussed the present situation in
the Middle East. Pazner said
I Shamir stressed the latest ter-
rorist activity against Israel, in-
cluding a booby-trapped van
discovered in a Jerusalem street
| Sunday and safely defused.
He said the Palestine Liberation
I Organization was behind this act
and asked the Italian diplomat
how Israel can be expected to
negotiate with an organization
I such as the PLO which undertakes
[terrorist acts against Israel.
Oilier subjects discussed, accor-
ding to Pazner, included the situa-
tion of Soviet Jews. Shamir asked
>r ihe Italian goverment's help to
id Soviet Jews and Andreotti
feportedly agreed to assist on that
ssue.
ONE OF Shamir's most impor-
nt meetings was with Abdel
kmat Meguid, the Foreign
linister of Egypt. Shamir's aide
kid the main subject was the
^rder dispute between Israel and
pt over Taba. Shamir attemp-
to convince Meguid to resolve
problem through conciliation
I that this approach, favored by
', is better than arbitration
is preferred by Egypt,
leguid, according to an Israeli
tkesman, told Shamir that a
olution of the Taba dispute
bg with progress toward solv-
|the Palestinian question is a
t before Egypt would agree to
its Ambassador to Israel.
The Egyptian Ambassador was
recalled to Cairo at the beginning
of the Lebanon war in the summer
of 1982.
Shamir's meeting with Meguid
was the first in a year between
diplomats of the two countries on
the foreign ministerial level.
Other meetings have been at
lower levels.
OTHER appointments on
Shamir's agenda included
meetings with the West German
Foreign Minister, Hans-Dietrich
Genscher; Foreign Minister Hans
van der Broek of The
Netherlands; Foreign Minister
Errol Mahabir of Trinidad-
Tobago; and Foreign Minister
Jacques Poos of Luxembourg,
who represents the EEC.
Shamir's schedule also included
an appearance on the ABC-TV
"Good Morning America" pro-
gram. He said that Israel is in-
terested now in opening negotia-
tions with Jordan "just as we talk-
ed before with Egypt. We have to
proceed step-by-step, one Arab
country after the other."
The Israeli Foreign Minister
repeated Israel's opposition to
any dealings with the PLO.
"There are millions of Palestinian
Arabs who are not members of the
PLO," with whom Israel will be
willing to negotiate, Shamir said.
Shamir suggested that King
Hussein of Jordan has risked his
own position by attempting to br-
ing PLO members into the peace
process. He said that the presence
of the PLO in Jordan poses a
threat to the King. Shamir said
that the U.S. should try to con-
vince Jordan to enter into direct
negotiations with Israel. "This is
the best way that will lead to
peace," he stated.
BEFORE THE start of Yom
Kippur, Shamir sheduled
meetings with President Julio
Sanquinetti of Uruguay and with
five Foreign Ministers. They are
Sir Geoffrey Howe of Britain,
Roland Dumas of France, Peter
Barry of Ireland, Augusto Ocam-
po of Colombia, and Enrique In-
glesias of Uruguay. Shamir at-
tended Yom Kippur services at
the Park East Synagogue.
On his further agenda are
meetings with Secretary of State
George Shultz and other ranking
U.S. officials in Washington on
Oct. 8, and meetings with the
foreign ministers of two East
European countries, Poland and
Hungary. His meeting with the
latter will be the first ever bet-
ween Israeli and Hungarian
foreign ministers.
In Daring Raid
Israeli Jets Hit PLO in Tunisia
JERUSALEM in an
unprecedented operation
that took them accross the
Mediterranean Sea, Israeli
warplanes Tuesday flew to
Tunisia where they bombed
the organizational head-
quarters of the Palestine
Liberation Organization
Officials here declared that the
bombing was in retaliation for the
kidnapping and murder by PLO
terrorists in Cyprus last week of
three Israeli vacationers aboard
their yacht at Larnaca.
Reports from Tunisia place the
casualties in the Israeli jets' pin-
point bombing attack at 30 dead
and many more injured, although
both CBS and NBC, in their night-
ly news broadcasts, declared
Tuesday that the numbers were at
least twice that high.
PLO CHAIRMAN Yasir Arafat
was not at his base during the at-
tack, and he had left his house on-
ly minutes before the Israeli jets
swooped down and seriously
damaged it, too. A visibly shaken
Arafat returned there after the
bombing to survey the
destruction.
The PLO headquarters was
moved from Beirut to Tunisia in
September, 1982 when Israel's
Operation Peace for Galilee
destroyed Arafat's base there and
ousted him from Lebanon. The
new headquarters were in a
seaside town resort, Hamam
Plage, about 12 miles south of
Tunis.
Reports from the Israeli pilots
indicate that they left the PLO
headquarters on fire and that
many of the buildings in the head-
quarters complex were destroyed,
including Arafat's own office.
While the PLO has consistently
denied responsibility for the ter-
rorist attack in Larnaca last week,
\Sukkoth
Sunday Evening Service Brings
Holiday To Festive Close
Phol Hamoed Sukkoth, the four days
Pwing the beginning of the Sukkoth
|day, concludes at services on Satur-
Oct. 5. Sukkoth was launched on
Way and Tuesday, Sept. 30 and Oct. 1.
special memorial prayers for the
departed. On Tuesday, Oct. 8, Simchat
Torah winds up the Holy Day season.
Simchat Torah features reading the
concluding passages of Dvorim
e last of the Holy Day season celebra- ^TST^ISZ^^SL^
begins with Hoshanah Rabbah ser-
in synagogues throughout South
[da on Sunday, Oct. 6.
|nday, Oct. 7,
I services will
is Shemini Atzereth.
include Yizkor. the
Torah and beginning with the opening
passages of Bereshit (Genesis). The holi-
day includes hakofot. joyous processir-s
through the synagogue that carry the
Torah in celebration of this annual
occasion.
Israeli officials have since insisted
that the three men arrested and
being held in Cyprus for trial
claim to have acted on behalf of
Palestinian refugees.
THE ISRAELIS say that they
were members of the PLO's Force
17, which is a commando unit
reportedly under Arafat's per-
sonal control.
Military sources in Jerusalem
declare that Force 17 has emerg-
ed from the Black September unit
of the 1970s, which took its name
from the struggle the PLO waged
for its survival in 1970 when King
Hussein successfully ousted
Arafat from Jordan.
According to these sources,
Arafat gave Force 17 primary
responsibility for PLO operations
in Israel and are responsible for
the recent mounting of attacks on
numerous Israelis in Jerusalem,
Haifa, the West Bank and Gaza.
Commander of Force 17 is
Mahmoud Natur, whose code
name is Abu Tayib, a close Arafat
associate. Reports here indicate
that he was killed in the air raid on
Hamam Plage on Tuesday.
Israel declares that Force 17
gives Arafat a chance to keep up
his terrorist attacks while denying
all responsibility for them.
ONLY HOURS before Israels
raid, Prime Minister Shimon
Peres declared that Israel would
"not forget or forgive the Lar-
naca affair."
After reports of the raid cap-
tured headlines around the world,
Peres declared: "Tunisia granted
refuge to PLO headquarters,
which is not at all subject to the
laws and sovereignty of Tunisia.
In reality, Tunisia granted the
PLO territory that was
transformed into independent ter-
ritory and the center of terrorist
headquarters."
Said Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin: "No PLO terrorist target
is immune, no matter where it is
located, against attack by us."
THE PLANES participating in
Tuesday's raid were said by Arab
observers to be either U.S.-built
F-16s or French Mirages. Accor-
ding to Israeli Air Force Com-
mander Amos Lapidot, "All our
planes returned safely." He said
nothing about their source of
manufacture.
To reach their target, the planes
were refueled in midair over the
Mediterranean before they began
their bombing runs and then
returned home on their 3,000-mile
journey.
According to Army Chief of
Staff Moseh Levy, the jets avoid-
ed a boarding school near Arafat's
command post and otherwise took
great precautions against harm-
ing civilians.
Rabin emphasized that Israel is
determined to respond with in-
creasing vigor to terrorist attacks
directed against it.
He added: "The time has come
to hit' at not only the im-
plemented, not only the im-
termediate levels, not only the in-
stigators, but at the upper echelon
that takes the decisions."
IN RESPONSE to questions
about the possible impact of the
retaliatory raid on the Middle
East peace process, Rabin said
that ."If there is anything that
harms the prospects of the peace
process it is the PLO's terrorist
effort headed by Arafat."
But Egypt Tuesday promptly
canceled its ongoing negotiations
with Israel in Cairo over Taba.
President Hosni Mubarak sent a
cable to President Reagan in
which he spoke in angry terms
about Israel's "wanton terrorist
attack.
And Egyptian Foreign Minister
Esmat Abdel-Meguid in Cairo call-
ed the raid a "heinous criminal
action."
BUT IN Washington, the
Reagan Administration called the
Israeli action "a legitimate
response 'to terrorism.' "
White House spokesman Larry
Speakes called retaliations
against terrorism "an expression
of self-defense. From the
preliminary reports available to
us, this appears to be what was in-
volved in this case."
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman, acknowledging
that "We understand American
equipment was used," declared
that, "as a matter of principle, in
our view it is legitimate self-
defense to respond to acts of
terrorism."
Due to the Observance
of Sukkoth Holidays
The Jewish Floridian
is maintaining
an early deadline.
dfewislhi Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday, October 4. 1985
Section B


Th*
ok dij:irr%.
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
Hadassah Prevue Luncheon
Israel Bonds To Sponsor
The Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization will hold its annual
Hadassah Bond-with-Israel
Prevue Luncheon on Thursday,
Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m., at Temple
Emanu-El in Miami Beach.
The luncheon is being held as a
forerunner to the annual city-wide
Hadassah Bond-with-Israel
Tribute Luncheon, which this year
will be in honor of Helen and Sam
Cohen and is scheduled for Thurs-
day, Nov. 7, at the Eden Roc
Hotel. Open to members of the
Miami Beach Region of Hadassah
who have pledged to purchase a
minimum of $1,000 in Israel
Bonds, the Prevue Luncheon is
held to finalize the plans for the
November luncheon.
Special guest at the Prevue
Luncheon will be Gerda Weisman
Klein, a distinguished author,
journalist, historian and lecturer.
She has written two books, "AH
But My Life," and "Promise of a
New Spring," on the Holocaust,
including her own experiences in
Nazi-occupied Europe. Another
book she has written, "The Blue
Rose," deals with the mentally-
retarded.
President of the Miami Beach
Haddash is Jean Temkin while
Henrietta Nortman serves as
Region Bond Chairman. Acting as
Prevue Luncheon Chairman is
Louella Shapiro.
Abel Holtz To Receive 1985
Claude Pepper Award
Abel Holtz, Miami Beach
business and civic leader, has been
selected to receive the 1985
Claude Pepper Award of South
Shore Hospital and Medical
Center, affiliated with the Univer-
sity of Miami School of Medicine.
Holtz, president and chairman
of the board of Capital Bank, will
receive the medical center's
highest recognition Saturday
night, October 12 at the hospital's
17th Annual Grand Ball. The
black-tie dinner and dance is
scheduled at the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel, with a cocktail
reception at 7 p.m. preceding an 8
p.m. banquet.
Announcement of Holtz's selec-
tion was made by Marshall H.
Berk son. president and chairman
of the board of South Shore
Hospital and Medical Center. Con-
gressman Claude Pepper, chair-
man of the House Rules Commit-
tee and former United States
Senator from Florida, was the
first recipient of South Shore's an-
nual award for "distinguished ser-
vice to the medical and general
communities of Miami Beach,"
and the award was subsequently
named in his honor.
In little more than a decade.
Holtz has transformed the Miami-
based bank from a one-office loca-
tion in North Bay Village to a
growth-oriented financial institu-
tion with 17 offices in South
Florida and assets of more than
$600 million.
Holtz is a trustee of Miami
Children's Hospital, a Founder of
Mount Sinai Medical Center, a
member of the Citizens' Board of
the University of Miami and a
member of the board of trustees
of Barry University. The 50-year-
old banker lives in Miami Beach
with his wife and sons Daniel and
Javier, who also are active in
Capital Bank management.
Lodge To Present
'Show of Shows'
B'nai B'rith Foundation and
Ben Yehuda Lodge will present
the "Show of Shows" on Wednes-
day, Oct. 16, at 8 p.m., in Victory
Park Hall, North Miami Beach.
The show is for the benefit of
B'nai B'rith Youth Services.
Archie Soroker is chairman.
Mickey Balsam, producer, and
Aileen Ross represents the B'nai
B'rith Foundation.
Are You A People Person?
National Women's Zionist Organization needs
a creative self-starter to work with existing
chapters, and develop new ones.
Part-time flexible hours car necessary.
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Comedian Shecky Greene will
headline the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Technion
Society's Gala Evening, scheduled
for Saturday evening. Nov. 23. at
the Fontainebleau Hotel on Miami
Beach.
Dr. Haber
To Speak
"How to Keep Happy in Spite
of Stress" will be the topic of a
talk by Dr. Leonard Haber,
clinical psychologist and former
mayor of Miami Beach, at the
Wednesday, Oct. 9, 1 p.m.
meeting of the Miami Beach
Retirees. The session will take
place in the second floor
auditorium of American Savings
and Loan Association, 1200 Lin-
coln Road.
Also on tap will be a discussion
of the upcoming Miami Beach
police and fire bond issue vote to
be held in the Nov. 5, general elec-
tion1. Miami Beach Police; Chief
Kenneth Glassman and Fire Chief
Braniard Dorris will lead this
discussion.
Harry Mildner. president of the
Retirees, has announced his sup-
port of the bond issue.
Kline Named
To FIU Post
Lee J. Kline, director of college
relations at Elmira College, New
York, from 1976-1985. has been
named director of development at
Florida International University
in Miami.
Kline, who authored the case
statement and was coordinator of
a successful $12.5 milion capital
campaign at Elmira. will work
with David Surbrook. vice presi-
dent for development and alumni
affairs, in initiating and leading
FIU's comprehensive develop-
ment and alumni program.
Ira Giller Elected President of
Beach Chamber of Commerce
Ira Giler has been elected to
serve as President of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce for
the 1985-86 fiscal year beginning
Oct. 1. Other officers named were
Norman Frank, president-elect;
Perry M. Fabina, treasurer;
Beverly Aberbach, vice president,
Membership Development.
Governors elected to serve for
three years by the gen. |
membership are Beverly al
bach, Norman Frank, j(S
Kovens, Neisen Kasdin, Scottr
Ross. l
Appointed to serve as Gom.l
nors for one year were (U.-I
Blum, Sidney Goldin. ChristoSI
Perks, Gary Allington, Wei
Gibbs and Andre Schaefer.
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Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Stone Endorsement Swells Daoud Lead
Flanked by some 100 of his ar-
dent supporters, Commissioner
Alex Daoud last week became
the first candidate to officially
qualify for Mayor of Miami
Beach. Daoud, dean of the Miami
Beach commission by virtue of
three consecutive terms won by
overwhelming majorities, is
heavily favored to unseat
Malcolm Fromberg in the
citywide, non-partisan contest
Tuesday, Nov. 5.
Daoud'8 campaign gained
even more momentum follow-
in); a luncheon at the
-in I bourne Hotel, attended by
a capacity crowd of 350 civic,
business and religious leaders,
at which former United States
Senator Richard (Dick) Stone
formally endorsed Daoud and
accepted a position aa co-
chairman of his campaign.
Daoud also gained strength
with announcement of his
designation by Florida Commis-
sioner of Education Ralph Turl-
ington as Miami Beach co-
ordinator for the E.X.C.E.L.
(Excellence Campaign: An
Educational Lottery) drive to
put a state lottery on the 1986
Florida election ballot.
Turlington noted that Miami
Beach has gone on record
through a four-to-one vote
margin in a straw ballot a few
years ago in favor of a lottery
and named Daoud, twice
elected Vice Mayor of Miami
Beach, to head a drive which
has condominium activist Anne
Ackerman as its c o -
chairpernon in Dade County
with Daoud.
Daoud, who is chairman of the
board of the American Federa-
tion of Senior Citizens Miami
Beach Chapter and past presi-
dent of the seniors organization,
said "there simply is no reason
why Florida should not join the
more than 20 states which
already have a state lottery. It is
a completely fair method of
securing more funds for
education."
New endorsers of Daoud, in
addition to Senator Stone
who campaigned together with
Daoud in the highly successful
Miami Beach Presidential cam-
Abel Holtz. left, recipient-elect of the Congressman Claude
Pepper Award of South Shore Hospital and Medical Center
and president of Capital Bank; former U.S. Senator Dick
Stone, co-chairman of the Alex Daoud for Mayor campaign;
and Commissioner Daoud reflect the success of a recent
luncheon at the Shelborne Hotel honoring Stone and Daoud.
Holtz is a member of the Daoud steering committee.
Leaders of the whirlwind Daoud campaign
smile at one of many campaign events
honoring the incoming Mayor of Miami
Beach. From left are former Vice Mayor
Hyman P. Galbut and his wife, Bessie
Galbut; Nona Daoud, wife of Commissioner
Daoud and former associate professor of
dental hygiene at Miami-Dade Community
College; and Daoud, counsel for wills and
bequest for Miami Beach chapters of both
Hadassah and Pioneer Women/Na 'amat.
paign of the late Sen. Henry M.
(Scoop) Jackson include
Aaron Farr and James McDon-
nell, past presidents of the
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce; William Donner, Tem-
ple Beth Sholom director and
successful real estate
developer; and former Vice
Mayor Hyman Galbut.
Daoud, who is campaigning
against the dramatic increase in
crime and taxes under the
Fromberg administration, won
endorsements from Gerald Ness,
senior vice president of the
Hebrew Academy; attorneys
Allen, John, Lawrence and Ber-
nard Fuller; VCA member Larry
Feingold; American Zionist
Federation chairman Harriet
Green; and from Felice P.
Schwartz, past Hadassah presi-
dent and vice president of the
South Florida Council of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat.
Hal Hertz; Arthur Berkey;
Marilyn Meyerson; former
Mayors Leonard Haber and
Norman Ciment; Isaac Sklar;
Ferdie Pacheco; Barry Gibb of
the Bee-Gees; Abel Holtz; Ida
Grossman; Louis Mussman;
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Ratner,
Milton Sirkin and Ben Giller
also endorsed Daoud.
Commissioner Grenald Widens Margin
Miami Beach City Commis-
isioner Ben Z. Grenald
[strengthened his commanding
I lead in his dynamic campaign for
Ben Z. Grenald
re-election this week as he con-
tinued to win endorsements
from many of the city's foremost
community leaders.
Grenald was joined by his cam-
paign co-chairpersons, Harry
and Pauline Mildner, and dozens
of hard-working volunteers as
City Clerk Elaine Matthews
Baker administered the can-
didate's oath to him at im-
pressive city hall ceremonies.
Those signing on as members
of the Grenald team include L.
Jules Ark in. past president of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation; Neal Amdur,
president of Temple Beth
Sholom; Oscar Baisman;
former Judge Jason Berkman;
VCA member Murray Candib;
attorney Marwin Cassel; Carol
B. Courshon; former Jaycees
president A. J. Daoud; at-
torneys John, Larry, Allen and
Bernard Fuller; and former
Vice Mayor Hyman P. Galbut.
Grenald, himself a former
Vice Mayor and veteran of 11
years on the Miami Beach
Tourist Development Authority
and VCA, received formal
pledges of support from Jeffer-
son National Bank president
Barton S. Goldberg; civic ac-
tivist Ben Giller; past Kiwanis
president Stephen Cypen; Man-
ny Diaz, Southgate managing
director and civic leader; former
Sen. Paul B. Steinberg and from
Capital Bank president Abel
Holtz.
Others joining the Grenald
Team last week were E. Albert
Pallot. honorary international
vice president of B'nai B'rith,
VCA member Larry Feingold;
Convention Center Authority
member Mike Schneider; Bis-
cayne Democratic Club presi-
dent Larry Taylor; civic ac-
tivist Louis Baron; hotel
association executive director
Murray Gold; and Felice P.
Schwartz, past Hadassah and
Pioneer Women/Na'amat
president.
Grenald also won en-
dorsements from planning board
member Russell Galbut, former
Miami Beach Realtors president
Harold Segal; Zoning Board
member Daniel Holtz; Hurricane
committee chairman Robert
Blum; Sidney Goodman, past
B'nai B'rith president; and from
Johnny Wayne, program direc-
tor of Seacoast Towers Rental
Apartments.
Others who joined in backing
Grenald, one of the South's
foremost pharmacists and
manufacturers of medical pro-
ducts, are Beach Jaycees presi-
dent Ivy Korman, acting as an
individual; Deputy State
Athletic Commissioner Stuart
Graver; Roney Plaza leader
Clara Fischer; Benjamin Bot-
winick; past Jaycees president
Richard Chervony; Dr. Joseph
Harris, chief of the medical staff
at Mount Sinai Medical Center;
Billie Kern, president of the
Civic League; Clara Plevinsky,
president of the Adlai Stevenson
Democratic Women's Club';
Molly B. Stein; former Vice
Mayor Robert L. Turchin; and
past Temple Emanu-EI Men's
Club president Herbert C.
Zemel.
Abe Resnick Gets Total Support
First candidate to qualify for
I the open seat, Resnick quickly
Iwon support from Dade County
iCommissioner Barry Schreiber,
president of the AZF of South
[Florida; Gerald Ness, senior vice
president of the Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew
lAcademy; and from business
leader Dov Dunaevsky, his
[longtime partner in successful
liami Beach developments.
Luisa Lerman, active leader
rn the Cuban Hebrew com-
munity; Allen Fuller, partner
one of the city's top law
firms; and son James Resnick,
state Athletic Commissioner,
terved as chairpersons for the
highly successful Resnick
c>ckoff.
Joining the Resnick team
jere Hal Hertz, member of the
pity of Miami Beach Personnel
?ard; Meyer Kotler, leader of
"'"coin Road property owners;
Trude and Arthur Berkey,
leaders of Burleigh House; and
former Vice Mayor Hyman P.
Galbut. Other Resnick endorsers
include Harriet Green, national
vice president of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat; former Surf-
side Mayor Sam Brenner; and
Saul Zabel, executive vice presi-
dent for Florida of Shaare Zedek
Medical Center. Sid Gersh, past
president of Morton Towers
Social Club, also endorsed
Resnick.
Resnick, who served as a
combat veteran against the
Nazis in World War II and fled
Communism when Castro took
over Cuba, is a member of the
B'nai B'rith Century Club and
is a founder of the local unit of
the Association for the
Welfare of Soldiers in Israel.
He has served as a member of
the board of the Mount Sinai
Medical Center Foundation
Synagogue president and
business leader Abe Resnick this
week swept virtually every ma-
jor endorsement of community
supporters in his dramatic cam-
paign to fill the open City of
Miami Beach city commission
seat in the Nov. 5, citywide, non-
partisan election.
Resnick, who is
Southeastern United States
Chairman of the Conference of
American Jewish Survivors of
the Holocaust, has attracted
support from former Mayor
Harold Rosen; Miami Beach
Retirees leaders Pauline and
Harry Mildner; Mike
Schneider, member of the City
of Miami Beach Convention
Center Expansion Authority;
and Gerald Schwartz, national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation.
and is a director of the Hebrew
Academy.
Founder and life president of
Ohr Chaim Congregation, he has
been active in the Cuban Hebrew
Congregation since 1963. VCA
member Larry Feingold; Capital
Bank vice president and Zoning
Board member Daniel Holtz; and
Murray (Moshe Chaim)
Berkowitz, chairman of the
board of Talmudic University of
Florida, also joined the Resnick
campaign cabinet.
George Goldbloom, Rabbi
Sholom Lipskar, Rabbi Dov
Bidnick, Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz and Rabbi Tibor
Stern were among those who
participated in a community
testimonial to Resnick as he
launched his winning cam-
paign for the open seat on the
Beach commission.
Abe Resnick
Resnick also won support
from George Feldenkreis, chair-
man of Universal National Bank;
Dr. Philip Frost, Founder of
Mount Sinai Medical Center;
Anita Teitelbaum; and from at-
torney Murray Weil.
Pd Pol Advs


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
Pipe Bombs Placed At Synagogue,
An Anti-Semite Arrested On
Rabbi's House and A Political Party Char*es 0f Placing Pipe Bomb At
By PEGGY GLUCK
SAN FRANCISCO -
(JTA) Jewish community
groups here have joined
with the mayor's office in
offering rewards totaling
$20,000 for the arrest and
conviction of the person or
persons who placed pipe
bombs at a synagogue, a
rabbi's home and a political
party headquarters the first
day of Rosh Hashanah.
The bombs were said to have
the intensity of hand grenades
and "could have killed someone,"
according to a police department
spokesman.
The Jewish Comunity Federa-
tion and Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of San Francisco,
the Peninsula. Marin and Sonoma
Counties, the American Jewish
Congress' Northern California
Division, and Mayor Dianne
Feinstein's office announced the
rewards recently. Each organiza-
tion and the mayor's office put up
$5,000.
"Stop the Jew Food Tax,"
"Death To All Zionist Jews" and
"Free the People" was written on
"pieces of paper wrapped around
the bombs," according to Inspec-
tor Tom Dickson, the San Fran-
cisco Police Department's liaison
to the Jewish community.
ONE BOMB exploded at about
12:15 a.m. at the headquarters of
the Humanist Party in San Fran-
cisco's Sunset District. Two party
workers escaped injury in the
blast, which blew out a door and
broke windows. The new party
claims about 10,000 members, but
has no connection with the Jewish
community.
The second bomb was
discovered at the Horowitz
Cultural Center at Congregation
Beth Sholom in the city's Rich-
mond district about 8:30 a.m. by a
custodian "who went back around
to the school and saw the bomb on
a ledge." Dickson said.
The bomb at the Center, located
around the corner from the
synagogue's main entrance, was
discovered nearly an hour after
worshippers filled the sanctuary
for Rosh Hashanah services.
POLICE CLEARED a two-
block area near Congregation
Beth Sholom, which also included
the area near Congregation An-
shey Sfard, an Orthodox con-
gregation. Neither cars nor
pedestrians were allowed in the
area for nearly two hours. Con-
gregants walking to the Orthodox
Anshey Sfard were rerouted
around the block to reach their
synagogue.
The SFPD bomb squad
detonated the device, which was
surrounded by "the same paper
with the same words" as the bomb
that had exploded earlier, Dickson
said. "It was the same type of
bomb as the other place, including
the same timing device."
The Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee
urill present its 1985 Human
Relations Civic Achievement
Award to Lila Greenspan
Heatter on Thursday evening,
October 10 starting at 6:80 p.m.
at the Pavilion Hotel. David B.
Fleeman is honorary chair-
man, with Leonard L. Abess,
Sr. and Patricia Frost, co-
chairpersons of the event.
Menorah Sisterhood
Menorah Sisterhood will hold
the regular meeting on Wednes-
day, Oct. 16, noon at the Temple
Social Hall.
The entertainment will be a
book review by Anne Ackerman.
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The third was discovered mid-
afternoon at the home of Rabbi
Jacob Traub of Orthodox Con-
gregation Adath Israel in the
city's Sunset District, where a
pipe bomb was found in July.
Traub's next door neighbor
alerted the family to the
suspicious-looking pipe.
TRAUB, who is Orthodox, con-
tacted Dickson, who said he
alerted the neighborhood
precinct. Patrolmen from the sta-
tion "evacuated Traub's
neighbors on both sides and about
eight houses across the stret"
before the bomb squad detonated
the third bomb. The three bombs
were sent to the Federal Bureau
of Investigation for investigation,
according to Dickson.
Meanwhile, police placed
synagogues and Jewish institu-
tions, including the JCF building
which houses several organiza-
tions, under surveillance. Police
officers will be "physically sta-
tioned outside all synagogues,"
Dickson said, adding the patrols
would remain "24 hours a day
through Yom Kippur." Patrols
also will be passing rabbis' homes
on a frequent basis.
The latest incidents are believed
to be linked to two other pipe
bombs found in San Francisco
earlier this year, including one at
Traub's congregation, Dickson
said.
THE FBI has yet to complete
analysis of the pipe bomb found at
Congregation Adath Israel in Ju-
ly, Dickson said, but the recent in-
cidents "will probably expedite
analysis this time."
The SFPD was unable to solve
other ^ anti-Semitic .incidents Jast.
year: the defacing of six
synagogues, a Jewish day school
and five Jewish businesses with
anti-Semitic slogans in August,
1984; the desecration of San Fran-
cisco's monument to the
Holocaust two days after its
dedication in November; and a fire
at the headquarterts of Jewish
rock impresario Bill Graham
where a neo-Nazi group claimed
responsibility for the blaze.
Jewish and Non-Jewish Sites
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) Coy Ray Phelps, a
known anti-Semite with a prior police record, was arrested
and arraigned recently before U.S. Magistrate Frederick
Woelflen on charges of placing pipe bombs at several
Jewish and non-Jewish sites in San Francisco, including a
synagogue.
Information about Phelps collected by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith since 1979 "helped to
add credence" to the joint investigation of the suspect by
the San Francisco Police Department, the FBI and other
Federal agencies, according to Inspector Tom Dickson,
SFPD liaison to the Jewish community.
PHELPS WAS ARRAIGNED on four federal felony
counts for the placement of explosive devices in a business
and ethnic studies classroom at San Francisco State
University on May 14, Congregation Adath Israel on July 1
and the Horowitz Family Education Center at Congrega-
tion Beth Sholom here. He is also charged with planting a
device that exploded at the headquarters of the Humanist
Party.
Each count carries a 10-year sentence and $250,000
fine. Phelps is being held without bail at San Francisco
County Jail. He had a prior arrest on an explosives charge
in 1980 but eluded conviction on a "technicality," according
to Dickson. He had been a suspect in the 1979 bombings of
the now closed Merkaz Bookstore and Young Israel, both
near Congregation Adath Israel.
The ADL's regional director, Rhonda Abrams, describ-
ed Phelps as "extremely vicious, pro-violence, anti-Jewish,
anti-black and anti-Communist."
NCJW Panel Discussion
The National Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW). Greater Miami
Section will start the season with
a Member-Bring-A-Member panel
discussion meeting a'nd'limcVaf"
Temple Beth Shalom, Miami
Beach, on Oct. 16 from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. The program will showcase
community services and the role
of the volunteer. The panel of
community leaders includes: Dr.
Phyllis Ehrlich, director of the
Department of Older Adult Ser-
vices, Jewish Family Service;
Marilynn S. Bloom, educational
specialist. School Volunteer/Dade
Partners: and Joni Goodman. Cir-
cuit director, Guardian Ad Litem
Program.
The speakers will stimulate
...thinking. JO-p. jiew_ .areas of
volunteer ac"tfvity" as well as
recognize the role of the NCJW
volunteers in working with
children and elderly in the
community.
Lunch and discussion will follow
the presentation. New members
who have paid their dues after .Ju-
ly 28 or who join at the meeting
will be luncheon guests of NCJW.
Members who bring a new
member will also be NCJW
guests.
18'
A Check
Mutt Accompany Order
Name
As A New Subscriber To The Jewish Floridian,
I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
Please Start My Subscription Now!
Address.
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Mail To:
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s500 Publix I
Gift Certificate
With Each New Subscription


Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Polish Prime Minister and WJC
Officials Hold Friendly Meeting
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Prime Minister Wojcieck
Jaruzelski of Poland told a
group of World Jewish Con-
gress officials here, at a
meeting held at his request,
that the Polish government
hoped Western Jewish com-
munities would reciprocate
with goodwill for efforts by
his government on behalf of
Jewish causes.
Jaruzelski met for about an
hour at the Polish Misslbn to the
United Nations with Edgar Bronf-
man, WJC president; Kalman
Sultanik, WJC vice president; and
Elan Steinberg, WJC executive
director.
With the Polish Prime Minister
were Stefan Olscewski, the Polish
Minister of Foreign Affairs.
Sultanik told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
meeting was a friendly one.
JARUZELSKI referred
specifically to Polish government
efforts to restore the Jewish
pavilion at Auschwitz and the
abandoned Jewish cemeteries in
Poland. He also cited documenta-
tions sent to the Museum of the
Diaspora in Tel Aviv.
Jaruzelski formally invited the
WJC officials to a meeting
scheduled in Warsaw in
December, for which the meeting
at the Polish Mission was a
preliminary event, to discuss
"outstanding issues."
Bronfman, responding general-
ly for the WJC delegation, said
that improved relations between
the Polish regime and the
Western Jewish communities
depended greatly on the restora-
tion by Poland of normal relations
with Israel, broken off by the
Soviet government in the 1967
Six-Day War.
Sultanik said he had raised the
issue of the Auschwitz exhibit
which the Polish government is
sponsoring, first at the United Na-
tions in December and January,
starting Dec. 16, and then going
on tour of American cities.
Sultanik said the exhibit should
stress the sufferings of the Jewish
victims of the Nazi genocide and
that Jaruzelski assured him it
would.
Civil War Letters Of A
Jewish Colonel At UM Lecture
"I met today a Lieutenant ...
who told me that the 25th of this
month is Rosh Hashanah and the
4th next month Yom Cippur. He
says there is a Synagogue in Nor-
folk 12 miles from here. I shall go
at all events. You and the children
must keep both ... let us pray to
the Lord God of Israel for the
deliverance of this once happy
Country."
These are the thoughts of Ma-
rcus Spiegel, whose moving and
descriptive letters home have
recently been published as Your
True Marcus: The Civil War Let-
ters of a Jewish Colonel."
Spiegel's great-great
granddaughter, Miami native
Jean Powers Soman, will discuss
his unique experience of the Civil
War at a lecture at the University
of Miami on Wednesday, Oct. 9,
sponsored by the UM's Judaic
Studies Program.
Spiegel, the son of a German
Rabbi who emigrated to the U.S.,
was the highest ranking Jewish
officer under Grant's command
during the Civil War.
He fought in Virginia, Mississip-
pi, Arkansas and Louisiana, and
his name appears on the
monument to the 120th Ohio In-
fantry on the Vicksburg bat-
tlefield. The letters he wrote to his
wife and family back in Ohio pro-
vide a vivid view of the times:
descriptions of battles alternate
with meditations on the political
and moral issues at stake (the
abolition of slavery), and concern
for the welfare of his wife and
children.
Soman's lecture will be held on
Tuesday, Oct. 9, at 8 p.m. in the
University of Miami's Brockway
Lecture Hall.
Artists On Exhibit
New works by three contem-
porary artists will be on exhibit at
the Gloria Luria Gallery, Bay Har-
bor Islands, Oct. 11 to 30.
Philip Brooker, Sheila Elias and
E. George Lorio will be open to
the public 7-9 p.m. Friday, Oct.
11.
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tii
Wm. E. Shockett
For Beach Commission
Top Leaders Back
Shockett Again
Voted Miami Beach's most ef-
fective city commissioner, Vice
Mayor William E. Shockett this
week piled up scores of addi-
tional endorsements in his cam-
paign for reelection in the Tues-
day, Nov. 5, non-partisan
election.
Shockett, past president of the
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce and of the Beach Bar
Association, filed for office on
the first day of qualifying at city
hall, then stepped up his
citywide campaign in all sections
of the resort community.
Prominent new supporters
for Shockett announced this
week include Joseph Altschul.
president of Forte Social Club;
Arthur Berkey, president of
the Burleigh House; Max Bern-
stein, president of Admiral
Towers; Allen A. Dworkis.
president of the Miami Beach
Senior Citizens Orchestra;
Allen Goldberg, president of
the President's Club; and Bar-
ton S. Goldberg, president of
Jefferson National Bank and
past president of the Civic
League.
Shockett gained en-
dorsements from Nat Katz,
president of Forte Towers Men's
Club; Julia Kenny, president of
Ocean Point; Lou Kotick, vice
I president of Southgate Men's
|Club; Harry Lubetkin, president
!of Southgate's Men's Club;
Hadassah president Sylvia
Meyers; Louis Mussman, presi-
dent of the Maison Grande
'Social Club; and Harriet Green,
president of the South Florida
Council of Pioneer
1 Women/Na'amat.
Campaign chairman for
I Shockett is Stephen Cypen, at-
] torney and past president of the
Miami Beach Kiwanis Club.
Shockett is now president of
Kiwanis. Past Kiwanis president
Ira Giller, president of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce, is
treasurer of the Shockett
campaign.
Other key supporters of
Shockett include Manuel Car-
vajal and Jose Kaij; developer
Ronald S. Molko, Dr. Daniel
Wuensch; attorney Ira Elegent
and Temple Emanu-El leader
Ruth Regina. Shockett has
won formal endorsements from
Florence Hecht, Temple Beth
Sholom leader; Rabbi Stanley
Weiss; Mrs. Cece (Milton)
Weiss; past Chamber president
Leon Manne and Temple Israel
president Gerald K. Schwartz.
Shockett campaign leaders in-
clude former Justice of the
Peace Jason Berkman, Rabbi
David Gollowinski, Patti Weins-
tein; Keith Kovens. vice presi-
dent of the Beach Chamber and
chairman of the City of Miami
Beach Planning Board; Dr.
Ronald Shane, president of the
Beach Jewish Community
Center.
Also on the Shockett campaign
team are Morton Mayberg, past
president of Federation Harry
B. Smith; former State Senator
Kenneth Myers; Rabbi Shmuel
Mendelson; Jane Goodman,
Democratic leader Madelyn F.
Merritt; and Martin Taplin.
Shockett also won backing
from Rabbi Yaalov Werde,
former Florida Bar president
Gerald Richman, Neisen O.
Kasdin, former Chamber vice
president and Temple Menorah
past president Joel Gray, Jose
M. Castilla, Temple Beth Sholom
president Neal Amdur and
County Commissioner Harvey
Ruvin.
Shockett served as a member
of Temple Beth Sholom and the
American Zionist Federation,
Shockett was cubmaster at
Treasure Island Elementary
School and is a graduate of the
University of Miami and the U-M
School of Law with accounting
and Juris Doctor degrees. He is
a B'nai B'rith member, former
special assistant Dade County
Public Defender and trustee of
the University of Miami Law
School Alumni Association.
Pd. Pol Adv.


PoarO 9-R TKo lonnok -----"- -- irMTilln i /--*-___.
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. October 4, 1985
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director of the Chaplaincy of Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and Chaplain at Mount Sinai, con-
ducts Yom Kippur services for hospitalized Jewish patients at
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami.
Conrad Teitell To Lecture
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation will hold
its 13th Annual Tax Seminar on
Oct. 17 from noon to 3 p.m. at the
Omni International Hotel.
Ivan Faggen. a partner in the
accounting firm Arthur Andersen
and Co. and Chairman of this
year's seminar, has announced
that Conrad Teitell. lecturer and
partner in the New York law firm
Prerau and Teitell, will be the
featured speaker on Philanthropy
and Estate Planning Technique.
In the past 10 years. Teitell has
lectured for over 3,000 hours on
taxes and estate planning at pro-
grams sponsored by bar associa-
tions, tax conferences, estate
planning councils, law schools, col-
leges, universities, hospitals and
other institutions.
The seminar is being underwrit-
ten by contributions from 25 local
accounting and law firms and
there is no charge for participa-
tion by professionals in the
community.
This program has been credited
with a maximum of two hours of
designation credit by the Florida
Bar and qualifies for technical
business categorv CPE credit for
Florida CPAs. Reservations are
required. Anyone interested in at-
tending should contact Penny
Marlin at the Foundation office.
Mr. Louis Haber. a resident of
South Dade. has been elected
President of Score Chapter No.
29. A member of Score since
1981. Mr. Haber is a retired
CPA and has had extensive ex-
perience as a corporate ex-
ecutive. Mr. Haber will be in-
stalled, along with a complete
slate of new officers, at a lun-
cheon to be held on October 16
at the Harbour House South.
Kl UK SflNICK inc
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Thanks!
To our many friends,
from the family of
HELEN SPINGARN
for their kindness during her illness and their
expressions of sympathy and best
New Year Wishes.
CHARLES Z. SPINGARN
GUSTAVE and MILDRED SHAW
UM's Second Annual Jewish Film Festival
The original Yiddish film which
inspired the popular musical ""Fid-
dler on the Roof." will premiere at
the University of Miami*s Second
Annual Jewish Film Festival,
beginning Oct. 15. Sponsored by
the I'Ms Judaic Studies Program
and the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, the film
festival will feature four Yiddish
films that date back nearly one-
half century.
"Two of the films were produc-
ed in Poland before the Holocaust,
and they provide rare glimpses of
Yiddish artistic achievement." sa-
id Henry Green. PhD. director of
I'M's Judaic Studies Program.
The film series begins on Tues-
day. Oct. 15. with "Tevye der Mil-
chiker" (Tevye, The Dairyman).
This 1936 film, directed by
Maurice Schwartz, is a moving
and authentic tale of Sholem
Aleichem's characters: Tevye, the
dairyman, and his daughter.
Chave. who falls in love with a
Russian peasant and marries him
against the wishes of her parents.
"Tevye" is a classic among Yid-
dish cinema, and presents a very
different picture than
Hollvwood's musical "Fiddler on
the Roof."
A Yiddish interpretation of the
Faust legend is the premise for
the next film in the series, on Oct.
29. "Gott, Mensch. Teivel" (God.
Man and Devil) is a classic tale of
an aggressive businessman who
makes a deal with the devil. Pro-
duced in 1949 in the U.S., the film
stars Michael Michalesko and Ber-
ta Gersten.
The last two films take a lighter
tone. "Der Purimspieler.' (Th
Purim Clown) on Nov. 5. i- a bj(.
tersweet musical comedy which
focuses on a love triangle between
a shoemaker's daughter, a travell-
ing actor, and a jester. "Yidl Mitn
Fidl," (Yiddle with a Fiddle), on
Nov. 19 features actress Molly
Picon in her most famous role as a
girl who disguises herself as a boy
in order to join a band of travell-
ing musicians.
All the films in the series will be
shown at 7:30 p.m. in the UM's
Beaumont Cinema.
Women's League For Israel Installation
Women's League for Israel in
Aventura will celebrate the
season with an installation of of-
ficers and luncheon at the Pan A-
merican Ocean Resort Hotel on
Tuesday, Oct. 15, at noon.
Special entertainment and
prizes will be part of the program.
Miriam Rozvnes will be installed
as President of the Aventura
Chapter. Other officers are:
Mildred Marchant. Vice President
for Membership; Lillian Kaiser,
Vice President for Fund Raising-
Dorothy Brovner, Vice President
for Program; Dorothy Chopin,
Treasurer; Martha Hodes]
Bulletin; Doris Halperin, Finan-
cial Secretary.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:01 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jetlereon Ave., MB., FL 33130
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jafiuda Meiber
Cantor Niaalm Benyamini
Dally MinyanS 00 m and 7 15 p m
Sat. 8:15 a.m
Ylzkw aaryicn Mon. 10 30 a.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Cardans Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alparn Conservative
LalaFri Sameai 8:15 pm
Daily Mmyan 7 30 a.m. and 6 30 p m
Sal 8 30 a m
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Or.
S. Miami 667-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Jamea L. Simon, Aaaociate Rabbi
Frl 7:30 p.m. Family Sanrtca Rat*! Harbart
M. Baumgard will uait on the thnma.
-Came Dane* With Tha Torah."
Sat 1115 a.m. Adam Blndar .ill bn called
totha Ton*. Sarmon thama. "Tha Fragility
<* Human Ej.iat.nca" Torah Procaaaton
Sun. 7:30 pjn. Mi mortal Sanrtca Hon. fcOO ajn.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
236-2601 .
Rabbi David H. Auarbech ',
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul Maliajfci
Snabbat Sarvtcaa Frl 8 p.m. Sal. 9:30 am
I>
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave & 41st St 530-7231
OB. LEON KRONISH RABBI ,k-.
HMRY .KX.T, AUXILIARY RABBI !"''
PAU' a. CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Simchai Torah, Shamlnl Atzarat aarvlcaa
Sun. 7:30 p.m. Mon. 10:45 a.m. Conaacratlon
aarvlca. YWior will ba racltad
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7520
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Llpachltz, Rabbi
Randall Konfgaburg, Aaat. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvay L. Brown, Exac. Director
Dally aarvlcaa 7:30 a jn.. 5:30 p.m. ,
Saturday 8.25 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m. 1
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, .^.,
Rabbi Emeritus fSt)
Rev. Milton Freeman, ^-5-'
Ritual Director
JjJWM'Ipat Sun a m and 5:30 p.m.
Wad. Frt. 7:4* a jn. 4 5:30 p.m. Shabbat
BETHKODESH
C0OeMfvsthi,#
1101S.W.12Ae.
RabblMaxShap,ro
8566334
Cantor JoeanpffKrissei
Roea Berlin: Executive Secretary
'II1
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33101
^J^RM3"~*
Moehe Frkedter, Cantor
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
m
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwahj, Rabbi
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami' Pionaar ffa'orm Congraoation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomstein
Associate Cantor RacheJIe F Nelson
Executive Director Philip S Goldin
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
' IllSpn
Snabbat dlnnar to pracada aarvlca ai 6 30 in
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Elsanstat, Rabbi
Friday aarvlcaa : 1S p.m
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tat 534-9776
OR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Mamorial aarvtca Mon. a Tua.
Slmchaa Torah 9 30 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayor Abramowltz ,
Cantor Murray Yavneh J\
Morning aarvlcaa 6am
Friday lata ayaning aarvtca
8:16 pm
Saturday t a.m. and 7:45 p.m
TEMPLE NERTAMID 0064345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltr conaanatKa
Cantor Edward Klein
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
ITOOMaetilfjan Ava.,Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi fMv
Moshe Buryn, Cantor \Wl'
Sergto Grobier, President *
Sholam Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
Snabbat Sa.y.cas a 30 am Sarmon 10 30
Oaily Mmyan
TEMPLE EMANUEL
ssxsr,iHmm rfj
Dr. rrnngLahfman, Rabbi
AtuMtoo^RjbbJ Mmm| Bargar
Y^rtuttoShHman, Cantor "^
Garakj Taub, Executive Director

SHAARAYTF.FILLAH
of North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
061-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. 75 St., 302-3343
Rabbi Watran KasTtl Modarnonhodo.
Frl. Sanrtca 6:55 p.m. Sat 9:30 am Mlnch.20
mlnuaaa batora aundown
TEMPLE SINAI 10801 NE 22 Ava.
North Dade's Reform OoreMgatton
Ralph P. Klngeley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkee, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Canal

HEBREW ACADEMY
""H-ELTONGREGATIOt.
^OJfc^a Drive, Miami Beech
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Frl. Sarrlca 6:15 p.m
Sat. 1ft JO a.m.
Famary Sarvtoa Frl. 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE 230N ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservati
2712311 Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi (3
Banlamin Adler, Cantor **
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor


I
Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Rochelle Malek Kick Off Shows Wide
Support For Our Next Commissioner
Rochelle Malek greets Rabbi Irving Lehrman and wife Bell, Rabbi is the spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El. Rochelle is a past president of the Temple Emanu-El
FT A and currently serves as vice-president of the Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
and Temple Emanu-El Chairman of the Board of Education.
(Left to right) Morris Rapport, co-campaign manager for
Rochelle Malek and wife Susy Rapport, Rochelle Malek, Liba
Wasserstein, and Abram Wasserstein, co-campaign manager.
The campaign kick-off for Rochelle Malek reflected wide support for her bid
to unseat the appointed commissioner, making it clear that she will in fact be
our next Miami Beach City Commissioner. Hundreds of outstanding
religious, civic, fraternal, governmental, business, labor and senior citizen
leaders are supporting her candidacy and most turned out for the kick-off.
Rochelle's professional approach to problems is a result of her 20 years as a
Dade County School Teacher, four advanced university degrees in educa-
tional services. Among those attending but not pictured herein were Getti
Bauman, Betty Gottesman, former president of 100 Lincoln Road, Lou
Mussmaii of the Maison Grande condominium, Barbara Silk, The Dromi
Family, Ed Roberts, Shelly Roberts, Paul Kenner, Janet and Leo Cowan,
Sandy, Morty, and Zan Lang. Rochelle's knowledge of the community comes
through years of involvement in our community which was reflected in the
wide scope of leadership represented at her kick-off.

Joining the campaign kick-off is
former Mayor Harold Rosen and
Andre Biahlenki.
Asher Greenberg, Candy Muhlrad, Dila Muhlrad, Avi Ci-
nieitt, Joan Ciment, Micky Muhlrad, and David Muhlrad
are supporting the Campaign.
if 1 9MBWT I __
,' % m
1 m

(Left to right) Dr. Alan Land, campaign manager and wife
Vicki Land, Shirley Rothman and friend, Ilanit Goldwasser.
Robyn Malek and Jacqueline Land, present and future cam-
paign voters.
Visitor and Convention Authority
Board member Larry Feingold of
the law firm of Fuller and Feingold
proudly wears a Rochelle name tag.
(Left to right) Judge Otto C. Stegemann. Sylvia Lynn, Sam
Wirth, Paul Kanner, Rochelle Malek, Ed Roberts, Shelly
Roberts.
Former Mayor and newest member of the Visitor and Con-
vention Authority, Dr. Leonard Haber and son Joey (left to
right), and owners of the Embers on Miami Beach, Leila
and Blackie, who also sits as a member of the City of Miami
Beach Personnel Board.
Sidney Cooperman president of Temple
Emanu-El and wife Lorraine proudly with
Rochelle Malek.
(Left to right) Sam Handler, Lou and Evelyn Jacobson of
Ocean Electric, and he a former president of the Biscayne
Democratic Club, and front (left to right) Billie Kern,
president of the Miami Beach Civic League, and former
national president of the Jewish War Veterans Aux-
iliary, Carol Jacobs, an executive with VMS Corp., which
owns a number of properties on Miami Beach, Irene
Cooperman, a Housing Manager at Rebecca Towers in
Miami Beach.
Rabbi David Raab (left to right), spiritual leader of
Temple King Solomon and wife Soshanah who
serves as Cantor, candidate Rochelle Malek, and
Esther Lieber, co-campaign coordinator.
(Left to right) Stanley K. Shapiro, a member of the
Rochelle Malek campaign team. Sylvia Lynn,
Rochelle Malek, Arthur E. Sheppard, campaign
treasurer and a former president of the Miami
Beach Bar Association, and Ivy Korman, president
of the Miami Beach Jaycees.
(Left to right) Bob Rich, chairman of the Lincoln
Road Management Authority, candidate Rochelle
Malek, former State Senator Paul and Sandy
Steinberg.
\Left to right) Gabrielle Nash Tessler and Leon
Tessler, Civic Activists, Esther Wirth, Seymour
Deutsch, owner of the Continental Hotel, Sam
Wirth, a Zionist leader, Rochelle Malek, Lorraine
Crowley, Stanley Saul, Diane Saul, Rabbi Jory
Lang, Asher Greenberg and Anne Bondy, a leader
in the Mimosa building.
(Left to right) Marion Spear, Eric Zanegood, presi-
dent of the Resort Hotel Owners Association,
Rochelle Malek, Dr. Donald Applebaum and Doris
Drexler.
Lucy Morales, a former member of the Latin Af-
fairs Board of the City of Miami Beach (far Left)
and friends and supporters of Rochelle Malek from
the Hispanic community. Pd po, Aa,

H'Mi?' 'i!ft^,-i^s**se4Bj#,'.-2!*s>j>A


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Fridav. October 4, 1985
Weddings
NACHLASGILLMAN
The marriage of Rebecca Nachlas and Edward
Warren Gillman took place in August at Temple
B'nai Israel in Rockville, Maryland. The bride is
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Nachlas,
Rockville, Maryland.
The groom is the son of Judge Marvin and Bar-
bara Gillman and the grandson of Sam Seitlin and
the late Sylvia Seitlin, and Rosalyn and Louis
Gillman.
Matrons of Honor were Elizabeth Bartolo and
Amy Klein. Bridesmaids were Carolyn Gillman,
sister of the groom, Lynn Stearman. Barbara
Grayson, Ellen Doninger and Miriam Nachlas. The
best man was Henry Gillman, brother of the
groom. Ushers were Andrew Gillman, brother of
the groom; Arthur Nachlas. brother of the bride;
Don Baker; Michael Cook and Mark Teichner.
Mrs. Gillman attended the University of Virginia
and is now attending the University of Miami.
Mr. Gillman attended Ithaca College and
graduated from the University of Virginia. He
completed a graduate program at the College of
ORENSTEIN-RABINOWITZ
Arthur Rabinowitz, the editor of the Aventura
Jewish Center Publications, wed Selma Orenstein,
associate editor and publicity chairman, last Satur-
Yiddish Culture Winkle Meeting
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Gilman
Insurance in New York and is now employed by
Seitlin and Company Insurance.
Mr. and Mrs. Gillman will make their home in
Miami.
day evening at 8:15 p.m.
The ceremony was performed by Rabbi David B.
Saltzman, and assisted by Cantor Bernard Knee.
Yiddish Culture Winkle will
hold their first meeting of the new
season on Thursday, Oct. 10, at
Temple Ner Tamid. starting at
10:30 a.m.
Morris Becker, pedagogue and
lecturer, willl speak on "Peretz
Hirshbein" well known Yiddish
writer.
Leon Yudoff. will sing Hebrew
and Yiddish songs accompanied
by pianist, Oscar Shapiro.
The very talented recital ionist
Rosa Lusky, will recite various
poems in her inimitable manner
Menasha Feldstein, president
will preside at this meeting.
Please come and enjoy a
stimulating morning and bring
your friends.
Sunny Seniors On Sea Escape
Sunny Seniors of South Dade.
formerly South Dade Upbeat
Seniors, which is sponsored by
Temple Israel of Greater Miami,
will celebrate its first anniversary
on the cruise ship Sea Escape.
The club's next general meeting
will take place at the Kendall
facility, on Monday, at noon.
Rona Bartelstone, clinical social
worker and director of Rona
Bartelstone Associates, will ad-
dress the group.
Election of officers will take
place.
Focus of Sunny Seniors is on
social activity and cultural
growth. Betty and Norman
Rosenberg are presidents; Girt
Bossak, founder-coordinator. In-
terested persons may call Temple
Israel's Kendall facility.
Lefcourts Host
Hadassah Luncheon
Founding President of the
Torah Chapter of Hadassah
Sylvia Lefcourt and husband]
Sidney Lefcourt are celebrating a
50th wedding anniversary by
nosting a Member Bring "a
Member luncheon at the Oct. 14
regular meeting at noon in the
Harris Hall of Temple Zamora.
President of the chapter is Vera
Fiedler. The program will feature
a "Monologue on Jewish
Cookery" by Libby Lieberman.
.
Engagement
FINKEL-SCHULMAN
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Finkel announce the
engagement of their daughter Renee Sheri to Mr.
Jeffrey Schulman, son of Mrs. Lois Schulman of
Edison, New jersey, and Mr. Richard Schulman of
Freehold, New Jersey.
Renee is presently residing in Tampa, where she
is majoring in Microbiology at the University of
South Florida. Jeffrey is also attending the univer-
sity, where he is majoring in Finance.
Renee is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph Liberman of Miami, and Mr. and Mrs. Myer
Finkel of Miami Beach.
Jeffrey is the grandson of Mrs. Marie Schulman
of North Miami Beach, and Mr. Julius Bard of Fort
Lauderdale.
Swvtng Our Community since 1978
RKogntadM
IIwHmm
HmmI cow hmmiiki
m AW of Dode County
900 Ocean Onve Mtami Beocn
A UmS OCEAN MM TROflCAL SETTING OF MDMDUM. MM AWWTIWTS
V*B OUR MMM KCBVE AU THE MM WEY RESUME 24 HOURS A DAY
Anti-Racist Demonstrators Prevent
Kahane From Speaking
Excunfcm
LPNonSk*
24 Hour Companions
EmrajnoyOal
Choutmr Servtc*
h* Time f*creoon Drtdor -Special Due,
totfttnce Bating Drwmg AMttoraavtfiMNftxtons
Housekeeping Personal Laundry
Servosot3Complele Shopping
MeohperDoy RotlOOUOWldA.CLF.
FoRow The Golden Rule" and Cof Us
ot (305) 673-4422
Dovkj Walkx*. Owner and Executive Director
.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Thousands of anti-Kach and
anti-racist demonstrators
packed the Wollin Square in
Givatayim near Tel Aviv to
prevent Kach leader and
Knesset member Rabbi
Meir Kahane from making
his view heard.
The police at first refused a per-
mit to the anti-Kach
demonstrators, headed by a rare
coalition of all members of the
Givatayim town council, to hold a
counter-demonstration
simultaneously with Kahane.
Later they agreed that the rally
could be held at the conclusion of
Kahane's address.
Dade County Commissioner
Barry D. Schreiber has been
named Vice Chair of the Na-'
tional Association of Counties
(NACo) Taxation and Finance
Steering Committee by NACo
President Robert Aldemeyer
from Ken ton County,
Kentucky.
KACH HAD distributed
thousands of leaflets throughout
the town, asking residents to turn
out in force to attend his meeting
Givatayim Mayor Yitzhak Yaron
said: "We will respond to
Kahane's invitation to attend
but we won't let him be heard."
Hours before the scheduled
start of the Kach meeting the
square was packed with thousands
of people, many of them carrying
whistles, hooters and rattles and
clappers usually used on Purim to
drown out the name of Haman
during the reading of the
Megillah.
A number of Knesset members
mostly from the leftwing
segments, were among the crowd
as well as hundreds of members of
leftwing and Boy Scout vouth
movements.
Very heavy police rein-
forcements estimated at well over
600, stood by with water cannons
to form a protective wall between
Kahane and his followers and the
anti-racist demonstrators.
KAHANE WAS pelted with
eggs and tomatoes when he arriv-
ed. The windshield of his car was
broken by a stone. An overseas
television network cameraman
was also hit by a stone. Several ar-
rests were made.
Kahane tried to speak for about
half an hour, but only a score or so
of his followers in the front row of
the crowd could make out his
words because of the noise of
heckling and the sound of the
noisemakers.
Spokesmen for the anti-
discrimination demonstrators ap-
peared pleased by the results.
"We have struck the first blow for
democracy and against
Kahanism," one of them
announced.
AMERICAN ZIONIST FEDERATION PRESENTS:
AN OPEN LINE
TO PRIME
MINISTER
SHIMO
A National Zionist Teleconference
LIVE VIA SATELLITE
OCTOBER 27. 1985
Time: 1:00 P.M.
Place Temple Israel. 137 N.E. 19th Street
MIAMI
frx further infofmatIOn Horrt* Gf n ma^,, ,
A unique opportunity to see.
hear and question the
Prime Minister of Israel
on vital issues facing
the Jewish people today
The role of the Zionist Move-
ment, Aliyah. Israel-Diaspora
Relations, and other current
matters of concern. Join with
us for this special event.
'
loco. Sponwr SOUTH HONDA aoN.ST DATION
> I


Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B^
\For their fourth consecutive year of presenting fine music to the
South I)title community, Temple Beth Am's concert series will
begin its 1985-86 year on Sunday afternoon, October 27 at U p.m.
with a concert by The Sequoia String Quartet, who just entered
its second decade as one of America's outstanding string quartets.
1 Their program will include works by Mozart, Dvorak and Kurt
\Weill.
3vi/i/ie4twia&
Dade Score Chapter No. 29 will conduct a workshop on Wednes-
day. Oct. 9 at the Holiday Inn, North Miami, at 8:30 a.m.
Civic leader and Miami Beach Police Officer Abraham J. Daoud has
been selected as "an Outstanding Young Man of America for 1985."
He and his wife Lorl Freedline Daoud are active members of Temple
Beth Sholom and serve on committee of young families of the
congregation.
Edward Bramson, CPA, and Jeffrey R. Jacobs, CPA, have merged
their respective practices and have formed a South Miami-Kendall
public accounting firm known as Bramson, Jacobs and Associates,
PA. Offices for the new firm are located at 9370 Sunset Drive, Suite
A-220.
Florida International University will host a reception in honor of the
Dade Legislative Delegation on Tuesday, Oct. 15, from 5:30 to 7:30
p.m. at the Miami Airport Marriott.
On Wednesday, Nov. 13, the nonprofit Mid/LUe Services Founda-
tion will present their fourth annual major Conference, BODY AND
MIND IN THE MIDDLE YEARS, at the Holiday Inn at Brickell Point,
*495 Brickell Avenue, according to Foundation President and Ex-
ecutive Director, Dr. Sol Landau.
popopBal Bay Surf Unit of the Papanicolaou Comprehensive Cancer
Center will hold the first meeting of the season on Tuesday, Oct. 15
at noon at the Ocean Pavillion, Miami Beach. Dr. Norman Altman of
the Center will speak and Greta Fleissig will present a musical pro-
gram Mollie Rudt is President of the Unit.
On Saturday, Oct. 12, the Association for Retarded Citiznes, Dade
County, will sponsor a one-day advocacy conference entitled "Stepp-
ing through the systems ... you cant do it, too!"
The conference is being held at Cedars Medical Center, Miami, and
will be held from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m.
MBkw
[thers-In-Israel honored at Vered Chapter of AmitWomen/s
nual hat show, are seated left, to right: Gloria Schwartz Lena
!'W Marilyn Berney and Miriam Weissman. Standing lejt to
ht: Saundra Rothenberg, Serena "uh'7L*? Jm
twitz, Debbi* Galitzer and Maxine Shuman. Thisf*
y at the home of Saundra Rothenberg, member of the presidium
1 mit Women, Florida Council.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E 1st Avenue. Miami. Florida
PICE
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15oz. s1.99
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OLD
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60
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v. **^\jk;iiiu*zi \f. luov
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
Shultz: U.S. Is Committed To Continue
Israel-Arab Negotiations
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Secretary of State
George Shultz declared that
the U.S. is committed to
continue negotiations bet-
ween Israel and its Arab
neighbors with the goal of
reaching a peaceful
agreement.
The past year has seen major
efforts toward new negotiations
between Israel and its Arab
neighbors." Shultz told the
General Assembly las! week. The
Secretary state rho opened
:he Assei em "al debate,
added
"THE U.S. is committed and
engaged n support of thon
forts in accordance with President
Reagan's initiative of three years
agp." Shultz said that progress in
the Middle East can only be
achieved through direct negotia-
tions, based on United Nations
Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338.
"There is no other way, an eva-
sion of this reality only prolongs
suffering and heightens dangers.
Nothing positive will ever be
achieved by chasing illusions of
armed struggle': but much can be
accomplished by parties who are
committed to peace and engaged
in serious dialogue," Shultz said.
He concluded his brief remarks
on the Middle East by declaring
that "The moment is at hand
this year to make major pro-
gress and to begin direct
negotiations."
SHULTZ ALSO recalled that
15 years ago. peace between
Israel and any <>f its neighbors
seemed "a remote if not impossi-
ble dream." But he .-aid that final-
ly "a courageous leader. Anwar
Sadat, abandoned the old ways of
thinking and took the step no
other Arab leader was prepared
even to contemplate:
"He recognized that the State
of Israel was here to stay and,
with Prime Minister (Menachem)
Begin, vowed there would be no
more wars. Peace and normal
relations were established and the
Sinai was returned."
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, who arrived in New York,
was at the General Assembly dur-
ing Shtlltz's address. Later.
Shamir addressed the Presidents
Club of the Israel Bond
i Organization
Community Corner
Smith Dade Friends of Douglas Gardens present their ".'ill's
Sock Hop on Saturday. The evening will include entertainment
by WIOD's Stu Goldstein and Jill Adda, cocktails, dinner and
dancing. Proceeds go to benefit the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged.
Circuit Court Judge Ronald M. Friedman will serve as install-
ing officer for the B'nai B'rith Hillel Advisory Board of Greater
Miami. The function takes place Sunday, Oct. 13 at 11 a.m. at the
Hillel House at the University of Miami.
s500 Publix
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With Each New Subscription

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Mail To:
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Shamir: Beginning Of
Economic Recovery In
Israel Has Begun

By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir last week told
the Presidents Club of the
Israel Bond Organization
that although there is a long
way toward an economic
recovery in Israel, the
beginning of such a
recovery has already taken
place.
Speaking at the luncheon
meeting at the Regency Hotel
here, the Foreign Minister and
Deputy Premier said that Israel
needs now to increase exports and
increase investments in its
imy. '"For that we need the
support of the Jewish business
community in the United States
and around the world. There are
signs that we are going to get that
help,"' Shamir said.
RECALLING THAT he recent-
ly completed a visit to Japan,
Shamir noted that the Japanese
business community is extremely
fearful of the Arab boycott and
therefore has been withholding
conducting business with Israel.
He said that Israel is very much
interested in developing economic
ties with Japan. He called on
American Jewish businessmen
who do business with Japan to use
their influence with Japanese, and
convince them to do business with
the Jewish state.
Turning to Israel's relations
with its neighbors, Shamir said
that Israel is interested in improv-
ed relations with Egypt. He said
that there are differences in the
unity government in Israel as to/
how to get this irnprovement.
BUT HE SAID the main pro-
blem in the Middle East is that
Israel still faces the Arabs' denial
of its existence. "We still face ter-
rorist activities." Shamir said,
which is the "outstanding expres-
sion of the Aral) refusal to accept
Israel."
The Israeli Foreign Minister
blasted Britain and its Premier.
Margaret Thatcher, for inviting
two Palestine Liberation
Organization leaders to visit Loi
don. "It is a terrible blow to the
peace process in the Middle East,
and an appeasement of terrorism.
We hope no other Western coun-
try will behave likewise." Shamir
said.
He praised the United States'
strong position against terrorism.
He said that despite differences
between the two countries, the
relationship between Washington
and Jerusalem is very good, and
the cooperation on all levels bet-
ween the two governments con-
tinues. "We are friends." he
declared.
Reagan and Mubarak
Meet For An Hour;
No Change In U.S.
Or Arabs' Positions
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion is still hopeful that
direct negotiations between
Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation can
begin before the end of the
year, a senior Administra-
tion official says.
The official made the statement
as he briefed reporters on the one-
hour meeting at the White House
between Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak and President
Reagan at which he indicated
there has been no change in the
positions of the United States or
the Arab countries. When it was
suggested at the end of the brief-
ing that the report just given was
"bleak," the official replied, smil-
ing, "The situation is not bleak."
DURING A picture-taking ses-
sion in the Oval Office before the
meeting, Reagan was asked
whether he agreed with State
Department officials who had
been saying that this is the "year
of opportunity" for making pro-
gress toward a peace settlement
inthe Middle East. "Everyday is
an opportunity," the President
replied.
The official said that Mubarak
wants to push the momentum for-
ward on the peace process, and he
"thinks time is wasting" and
"hopes initiatives can be taken."
Mubarak "is anxious that the pro-
cess be given a push," the official
said. But while saying that
Mubarak has many ideas, the of-
ficial would not give any details of
how the Egyptian President sees
the process being pushed ahead.
>>
However, the official noted that
Mubarak believes the U.S. should
talk to a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation and stress-
ed that the Palestine Liberation
Organization has given "implicit"
recognition of United Nations
Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338 in the agreement signed
with King Hussein Feb. 11.
Mubarak said the PLO would
make this recognition "explicit"
during the "dialogue" between
the U.S. and a joint delegation.
REAGAN REITERATED the
U.S. position that the U.S. is
ready to talk to the PLO once it
accepts publicly the two UN
Resolutions and Israel's right to
exist. "We have asked very plain,
they must be equally plain," the
official said. He saidMubarak did
not discuss his meeting with King
Hussein recently, since Reagan
was hosting the Jordanian
monarch on Monday.
The two Presidents also discuss-
ed Israel-Egyptian relations, and
the Administration official said
the U.S. was "happy" that Egypt
and Israel had agreed to hold
another meeting on the Taba issue
in Cairo last Thursday which the
U.S. attended.
Mubarak met with Reagan after
meetings with Treasury Secretary
James Baker and Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger and
a luncheon meeting with Vice
President George Bush. He was
scheduled to meet with members *
of the Senate and House later
before leaving for New York
where he addressed the UN
General Assembly on Wednesday.
Hussein addressed the Assembly
on Friday.


Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
-*
\
I
ying the Young Presidents Club of Mount
Medical Center season opener,
lican Festival, "at the Konover Hotel
(left to right) Mr. and Mrs. Dave
lyn) Zinn, Mr. and Mrs. William (Jodi)
Multack and Mr. and Mrs. Les (Carol Ann)
Klein. The three couples are busily planning
"Pairs," a tribute to twosomes, the grup's an-
nual costume gala.
Hadassah Chapter Events
Florida Council Executive
1 Chapter Presidents of
/omen will hold a special
i warming" as their first ex-
: board meeting of the year,
|r new additional office in
Tirst Nationwide Bank
kit688NE 167 St., Suite
Tuesday, Oct. 15, at 10:30
buffet brunch will be serv-
plans for the coming year
discussed.
Chapter. Amit Women
jld its monthly meeting in
Hub Room of 100 Lincoln
Building Wednesday, Oct.
I a.m. Members will be in-
ed to two of the newly
presidum, Ida Arluk and
Schreiber. Heading the
will be Dr. Serena E.
nd a special candle lighting
will take place. Lunch will
Ired-
aonthly meeting of Miami
latikvah Amit Women will
in the Kneseth Israel
[all on Thursday, Oct. 17
Lunch will be served.
iyn Blitz, RNMS will speak
fiat Can You Do For Your
lealth."
tigate Chapter of Hadassah
I a regular meeting on
Oct. 14 at 1 p.m. at the
te Terrace Room. The
i will feature a celebration
Jth.
lenrietta Szold Chapter of
, Miami Beach, will hold
Jar meeting on Monday,
at 11 a.m. at the
le Hotel.
feature of the day will be a
Hadassah Israel Educa-
ice.
eret Hadassah of Kendale
will hold its first study
Ion Oct. 15 at noon. Rhoda
rdon Roofing
Sheet Metal
>rks, Inc.
I N.W. 21st Street
Mi 325-8287
i your roof repaired now;
vilt save on a new roof later
|is factory Work by
InencedMan"
Schwartz will carry on the tradi-
tion of opening her home for lun-
cheon. Rose Shaw will lead the
discussion "The Woman in the
Middle."
The Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Oct. 14. at
noon, in the Council Chambers of
the Bay Harbor Islands Town
Hall. Councilman Joseph Gardner
will install the new officers.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their next
regular meeting on Wednesday,
Oct. 9, at 12:45 p.m., at the Mor-
ton Towers Auditorium.
Dorothy Gaiter of the Miami
Herald's Editorial Board, will be
the guest speaker at the next
general meeting of the Naomi
Chapter of Hadassah. Her topic
will be "Black-Jewish Relations."
The meeting will be held on
Monday, Oct. 14, at the Tamarind
Apartments Clubhouse, at 8 p.m.
The first regular meeting of the
season of the Stephen S. Wise
Chapter of Hadassah will be held
on Monday, Oct. 14, at 11:30 a.m.
at the Ocean Pavilion.
Youth activities will be
featured, including an update of
Hashachar, the Young Judean
Youth Camps. Guests speaker will
l>e Zeev Shafrir. Rose Klein and
Betty Schafer are in charge.
The Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their luncheon
meeting at noon, Tuesday, Oct.
15, at the Shelborne Hotel.
On Oct. 10, the Hatikvah
Chapter of Hadassah will have its
monthly meeting. Sandra Felton,
president and founder of Messies
Anonymous will be the speaker.
The meeting starts at 7:30 p.m. at
Nob Hill West.
Workman's Circle
A concert and meeting will be
held on Oct. 20, at 1 p.m. at the
Newport Pub, Miami Beach.
Guest entertainer will be Cantor
Moshe Buryn, in a special selec-
tion of Yiddish and Hebrew songs.
A full-course dinner will be
served.
Miami Beach Branch 1059 will
meet on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at
noon, at the Surfside Community
Center. Guest speaker will be
Rabbi Marvin Rose, whose topic
will be "I'll See You In My
Dreams."
Ma SFoL
amoui
French Ke&tauranl
MOBILE GUIDE AWARD
COMMUNITY REPORTER AWARD
Elegant Dining
& Reasonable Prices
rfla Zroli* Jrtnck Cuisine
1045 95th STREET, BAY HARBOR IS.
PHONE: 865-6011 MIAMI BEACH
Your Hoit: PATRICK
Famous Chef from Limoget, France
Search Launched For
The 'Glory Grads of '35'
A search is under way for graduates of one of the most
celebrated classes in the history of New York's public schools for
the purposes of a 50th anniversary reunion party to be held Sun-
day afternoon, Oct. 13, at the Barbizon Plaza Hotel, New York.
The grads were members of the 1935 Class of James Madison
High in Brooklyn and the organizers of the search are Stanley H.
Kaplan, president of the nationwide chain of Stanley H. Kaplan
Educational Centers, and Ira Cahn, a retired publisher of Long
Island newspapers.
The Madisonians of '35 enjoyed the dual distinction of achieving
the highest scholastic average in New York City high schools that
year and of fielding a football team that won the city champion-
ship. Many went on to become medical specialists including Dr.
Marvin Kushner and Dr. Melvin Yahr.
David Blumstein, who was grade adviser to the '35 Class,
described his students at graduation as "endowed with a special
brilliance." Mr. Blumstein, now 82, will come up from his retire-
ment home in Delray for the reunion party. "The graduates have
lived up to all the expectations I had for them," he said.
Reflecting on the members of his graduating class. Mr. Kaplan
commented, "We were children of the Depression era, from poor
families and it was struggle, struggle, struggle to overcome many
obstacles including discrimination and prejudice. But we were
inspired by family tradition to persevere and achieve self-made
success."
Members of the '35 Class and/or their offspring are asked
to contact Mr. Kaplan at (212) 977-8687 or Mr. Cahn at (516)
785-7837.
KWISH
rwiofw_
FlflTD
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer. ..
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
4. The JNF needs you but you need
the JNF much more
The JNF gives life to the desert
And strength to Israel.
norotAg"*'"^.
11
I


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
El Al Reports Improved
Earnings and Performance
Israel's national flag carrier, El
Al Israel Airlines announced an
operational profit of $12.9 million
for the last fiscal year. In its 36th
year of operations, the airline also
reported improved performance
records and a stemming of
previous years losses. The
airline's on time performance
record reached a record 91
percent.
Dramatically increased tourism
to Israel, increased employee pro-
ductivity and a reduction of
operating expenses are credited
with the positive position of the
airline. Passenger load factors in-
creased by 18.7 percent to 1.47
million while freight tonnage
caried rose by 22.6 percent with
the North Atlantic load factor
climbing to 80 percent.
Since its incorporation in 1949,
El Al has carried more that 18
million passengers and has grown
from four destinations in 1949 to
28 cities on four continents. Dur-
ing the past year, operation was
expanded to include service to
Chicago and Los Angeles in the
U.S. and to Manchester, England.
In addition to daily flights bet-
ween New York and Tel Aviv, El
Al had twice weekly connections
between Miami and Tel Aviv.
First Jewish Member of Parliament
In The History of Bolivia
LA PAZ (JTA) As a
result of Bolivia's recent
elections, a Jewish
legislator, Jose Brecher, has
for the first time become a
member of the Chamber of
Deputies, the World Jewish
Congress reported.
The election of the Jewish
Parliamentarian coincides with a
political event here un-
precedented in the last quarter of
a century: an elected government
transmitted its rule to another
democratically-established
government, and a new parlia-
ment was peacefully inaugurated.
ACCORDING TO the Latin
American branch of the WJC, the
31-year-old Brecher, whose father
is a Holocaust survivor, was
elected with non-Jewish votes in
the city of Cochabamba. In all of
Bolivia the Jewish population does
not exceed 1,000 persons, and
there are small communities in La
Paz, Cochabamba, and Santa Cruz
de la Sierra.
Brecher is not merely known as
a Jew, but he has publicly taken
positions in favor of Israeli causes.
He chaired the Keren Kayemet in
Cochabamba and initiated the
planting of a Bolivia forest in
Israel.
The highly respected MP
belongs to the Accion
Democratica Nacionalista, which,
according to observers, tends to
the right wing of Bolivia's political
spectrum. He has been one of the
main supporters of the consolida-
tion of democratic institutions and
the rule of law in Bolivia, and is a
passionate supporter of the neo-
liberal economic model. In the
Chamber of Deputies, his party
has given him a seat on the impor-
tant Foreign Relations
Commission.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Classic Products International at 420
South Dixie Highway, 3rd Floor, Cor-
al Gables, FL 33146 intend to register
said name(s) with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Classic Products International,
Inc. YD Inc.
Lynn W. Fromberg, Esquire of
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross &
Shore, PA.
Attorney for Classic Products
International, Inc. Y-D Inc.
19298 September 13, 20,27;
October 4. 1985
Professional Note
Robert D. Peltz has become a
name partner with the 11 -year-old
Miami law firm now called
Rossman. Baumberger and Peltz.
P.A. He was named a partner of
the firm in 1981.
A Cum Laude graduate of the
University of Miami School of
Law, Peltz is active in a host of
professional associations in-
cluding the Dade County Trial
Lawyers, Academy of Florida
Trial Lawyers, American Trial
Lawyers, Dade County Bar,
Florida Bar and District of Colu-
mbnia Bar Associations.
Zamora Sisterhood
The guest speaker for the open-
ing meeting of the Sisterhood of
Temple Zamora will be Mrs. Ruth
Gross of the Jewish Community
Center. The topic will be "Senior
Crime Watch."
. The meeting will be held at the
Temple, on Wednesday, Oct. 16,
at 12:30 p.m.
Coffee and cake will be served.
Columnist
Guest Speaker
Local writer and columnist Bea
Hines will speak to members and
guests of the Miami Chapter of
the National Association of
Women Business Owners
(NAWBO) about "Feeling Good
about Yourself" during
NAWBO's October dinner-
meeting to be held on Thursday,
at the Sheraton River House.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titous name Paper Hangers Father
& Son at 13281 S.W. 71 St. Miami
Fl 33183 intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
HILARIO CEVASCO
19307 September 20,27;
October 4, 11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Alina Menendez d/b/a
Alina Menendez Co., at 5306 NW
35 Ave., Miami, Florida 33142, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Alina Menendez
19327 October 4, 11, 18, 25, 1983
s500 Publix
Gift Certificate
With Each New Subscription
1 Year $i QQ0 _
52 Issues
18
A Check
Must Accompany Order
Name
Address.
City ___
As A New Subscriber To The Jewish Floridian
I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
Please Start My Subscription Now!
.State
-Apt. #.
-Zip
NEW SUBSCRIBER -
DADE COUNTY ONLY A,,ow 4 to 6 "<
for delivery
OFFER EXTENDED UNTIL NOVEMBER 15,1985
Mail To:
JEWISH Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33931 (CA 01)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE BLANCO, et al., et al.
Defendants.
TO: LAND & DEVELOPMENT
OF THE AMERICAS, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
4599 N.W. 7th Street Suite 231
Miami, Florida 33126
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida:
Lot 6, in Block 11, of GLEN COVE
SECTION TWO, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 113. at Page 36, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
together with all improvements.
appliances and fixtures located
thereon
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Keith, Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida 33132, on or before
November 8. 1985, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plai-
ntiffs attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 2 day of October,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19334 October 4. 11.
18.25. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-40796
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ELEXANDRO EUGENIO
SOKOLOWSKI,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MARTHA MARIA CLORINDA
ARCE SOKOLOWSKY,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Martha Maria Clorinda
Arce Sokolowski
Calle No. 10-134 (31-5-A)
Ventanilla Callao
Lima 39, Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on David S.
Berger. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
\ venue, Miami Beach. Florida
88189, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 1. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 30th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By GWEN D. ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David S. Berger
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner/Husband
19331 October4, 11.18,25, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name El Billete de Oro -
Billete de Oro at Concursos
niblicaciones, Radio TV Par-
ticipaciones. Premios intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
MARIA OFELIA PEREZ
ROURA
19333 October 4.11.
.______ 18,25,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION .
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF *
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, I
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO: 85 40807
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NEZETA ROYAL
and
SYLVERA ROYAL
TO: Sylvera Royal
6 Nugent Street,
Spanish Town, St. Catherine
Jamaica
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19 y.
Ave., Miami, Fla and file the
original with the clerk of the above
court on or before November 1,
1985: otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
Dated in Miami on September
30, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER, Clerk
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19328 October 4,11,
18,26.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE *
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-40328 (05)
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
IDANIA VELAZQUEZ,
Petitioner,
and
JAMES VELAZQUEZ,
Respondent.
TO: JAMES VELAZQUEZ
c/o Geroge Vasquez
90 Degraw Avenue
Newark, NJ 07104
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami, Florida 33131.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 1, 1985; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of September, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19330 October 4,11.18.25
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-8500
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
MAX MARCUS.
I ki coated
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MAX MARCUS, deceased File
Number 85-8500, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade Countv.
Florida. Probate Division, the ail r
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida. 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MOTNHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICTION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that /
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 4. 1985.
Personal Representative-
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
EsSe^ J UMAN^
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19329 Octobers 11.1985


Friday, October 4, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
>lic Notices
1 CIRCUIT COURT Of
ELVENTH JUDICIAL
JIT OF FLORIDA IN
FOR DADE COUNTY
|RAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NO. 86-30031 CA-08
ICE OF ACTION
002481
JST SAVINGS BANK,
^DE SAVINGS AND
3SOCIATION,
PUENTE BLANCO,
ants.
i Puente Blanco
17 Avenue, No. 21N
Florida
IRE NOTIFIED that an
r Foreclosure of Mortgage
flowing described proper
ominium Unit No. 206, ol
ofessional Center Con-
ine, according to the
on of Condominium, as
I in Official Records Book
I Page 631. of the Public
of Dade County, Florida,
with an undivided in-
the Common Elements
pant thereto, has been fil-
st you and you arc re-
[serve a copy of your writ-
ses, if any, to it. on Shep-
er, Attorney for Plaintiff,
pdress is Suite 214, 1570
Avenue, Coral Gables.
133146 on or before Oc-
, 1985 and file the original
|Clerk of this Court either
ervice on Plaintiffs at-
immediately thereafter;
a default will be entered
^ou for the relief demand-
I complaint.
ESS my hand and the seal
I Court this 9th day of
er. 1985.
IARD P. BRINKER
I Clerk of the Court
6y D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
September 13,20.27;
October 4, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAME LAW
:E IS HEREBY GIVEN
undersigned, desiring to
Sn business under the fic-
name ALEX DUVIL at
pst Okeechobee Rd, No. 7
hardens Florida 33016 in-
register said name with
of the Circuit Court of
unty, florida.
Luis Lamar
?st Okeechobee Rd, No. 7
I (iardens Florida 33016
September 20, 27;
October 4, 11, 1985
fcNTH CIRCUIT COURT
: COUNTY. FLORIDA
ISE NO: 85 37301
The Marriage of:
lLAI'DE LORMAND.
lioner,
fCE LORMAND,
ondent.
CATRICE LORMAND.
Ce unknown, you shall
py of your Answer to the
for Dissolution of Mar-
on GEORGE NICHOLAS,
612 Northwest 12th
ami, Florida, 33136, and
I with Court Clerk on or
ctober 18, 1985, otherwise
; will be entered,
nber 6, 1985.
CHARD BRINKER
: C.P. COPELAND
September 13,20, 27;
October 4,1985
ENTH CIRCUIT COURT
)E COUNTY, FLORIDA
PASE NO: 85 37302
I The Marriage of:
PIERRE,
ptioner,
CLAUDE PIERRE,
ondent.
EAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
^ce unknown, you shall
opy of your Answer to the
for Dissolution of Mar-
on GEORGE NICHOLAS,
By, 612 Northwest 12th
Jiami, Florida. 33136, and
[inal with Court Clerk on or
ctober 18,1985. otherwise
lit will be entered,
ember 6, 1985.
MCHARD BRINKER
(\ C.P. COPELAND
September 13, 20, 27;
October 4. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-27117 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JORGE L. RAMOS, et ux.,
Defendants.
TO: JORGE L. RAMOS and
MARIA M. RAMOS, his wife
359 E. 13th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33010
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper
ty: Lot 14, in Block 1, of JAC-MO
HOMES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
92. at Page 67, of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deput Clerk
19293 September 13,20,27
October 4, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38998 (20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff
vs.
DIETER KRENTZIEN, et al..
Defendants.
TO: DIETER KRENTZIEN and
EGLEE KRENTZIEN. his wife,
a/k/a DIETER KRENTRIEN and
EGLEE KRENTRIEN, his wife
Alto Alegre,
Torre C IB
C. Bello Monte
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: Unit 536, in
KEY COLONY NO. 3 CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration recorded August 21,
1980 in Official Records Book
10846. Page 1456. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
as amended; together with all im-
provements, appliances, and fix-
tures located thereon, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Keith.
Mack. Lewis & Allison, Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street. Miami, Florida
33132, on or before October 25,
1985, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court qn the 18th day of
September. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: J. BYRON
Deputy Clerk
19318 September 27;
October 4,11.18,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS at 220 71st Street, No.
205. Miami Beach. Florida 33141
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
DAVID SCHWARTZ
JOSHUA D. MANASTER,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for DAVID SCHWARTZ
19316 September 27;
October 4. 11. 18. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6525
Diviaion 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
GEORGE J.KRZYZANIAK,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of GEORGE J. KRZYZANIAK,
deceased, File Number 85-6525, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler, Miami, FL 33160.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All intended persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
aginst the estate and (2) any objec-
tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 27, 1985.
Personal Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative
MICHAEL J. ALMAN.
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19319 September 27;
October 4, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85 41198(11)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
FRANCIANE BROWN.
Petitioner,
and
ELEAZAR BROWN.
Respondent.
TO: ELEAZAR BROWN,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before November 8, 1985, other-
wise a default will be entered.
October 2, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: LISAMARIE MARCANO
19336 October 4. 11,
18, 25. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of Lerness Shoe at
number 561 S.W. 22nd Avenue, in
the City of Miami, Florida, intends
to register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 11
day of September. 1985.
SURGICAL AND HEALTH
CARE OF FLORIDA. INC.
By: Guy Saracino, President
SILVER & SILVER
Attorney for Applicant
Max R. Silver
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
19332 October 4, 11.
18, 25. 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-38163
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANTOINE ST. LOUIS.
Petitioner,
and
TAMYE ST. LOUIS
Respondent.
TO: TAMYE ST. LOUIS,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before November 8, 1985, other-
wise a default will be entered.
October 2. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
1M86 October 4. 11.
18,25. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-34263 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID ALVAREZ,
Defendant.
TO: DAVID ALVAREZ
317 N.W. 109 Avenue, No. 2-C
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Condominium Unit No. 317-2C,
Building 317 N.W. 109 Avenue of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded June 5, 1985, in
Official Records Book 9009, Page
1608, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and Amend-
ments to Declaration of Con-
dominium, together with an un-
divided interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto, has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it. on
Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
October 18. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19301 September 13. 20, 27;
October 4. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.85-33276 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE HERNANDO VELAZ-
QUEZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE HERNANDO
VELAZQUEZ
Avenida Ipirange. No. 165
Sao Paulo, Brazil
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 27, in Block 4, WOOD
FIELD, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
113, at Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has ix--ii filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
Oct. 11. 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19290 September 13, 20, 27;
October 4, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Catalonia Import Ex-
port at Universal Parts, Inc. 7370
NW 36th St., Suite 319-F, Miami,
Florida 33166, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DAVID ROMANO
Universal Parts, Inc.
7370 NW 36th St., Suite 319-F
Miami, Florida 88186
19297 September 13, 20. 27;
October 4. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39161-21
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 0475203
IN RE: The Marriage of
HANNIA DARROW,
Petitioner/Wife
and
WILLIAM DARROW.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: WILLIAM DARROW
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and .you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Usher
Bryn, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is The Roney Plaza,
Suite M-8, 2301 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 25, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 19th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach FL 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19317 September 17;
October 4, 11, 18, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL '
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-38173-16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YOLANDA SANCHEZ
and
FABIO ALBERTO SANCHEZ
TO: Fabio Alberto Sanchez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Luis Vidal,
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1840 West 49th
Street. Suite 105, Hialeah. Florida
33012, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 18, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 West 49th Street
Hialeah, FL 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
19304 September 20, 27;
October 4. 11.1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-37302
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LISE PIERRE,
Petitioner,
and
JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE.
Respondent.
TO: JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest. 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19292 September 13.20, 27
October 4, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-37244
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK, F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association,
Plaintiff
VB.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: FREEDOM FINANCIAL
SERVICES
CORPORATION
C. T. Corportion
Systems
Attn: C. R. Ostheimer
208 South La Salle St.
Chicago, IL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 48. of Unrecorded Plat of HID-
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of Tract 11. of FLORIDA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION OF THE NE v,
OF Section 25, Township 52 South,
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2. at Page 17. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida:
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15' 30" West for
25.02 feet to the Point of Beginn
ing of Tract of land hereinafter
described; thence continue North 2
degrees 15' 30" West parallel
with the Westline of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 45' 09" West for
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 or or before
October 11, 1985 and file Un-
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6 day of September,
1985.
19296 September 13, 20. 27;
October 4. 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-38164
IN RE: The Marriage of;
WESNER THOMAS.
Petitioner,
md
BEVERLY THOMAS,
Respondent.
TO: BEVERLY THOMAS.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 12, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: LISAMARIE MACANO
19303 September 20,27
October 4. 11.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EL NINO
CAFETERIA, at 7498 N.W. 8th
Street. Miami. Florida 33126, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Fidel Iglesias
1900 S.W. 87th Court
Miami, Florida 33165
19313 September 20. 27
October 4. 11, 1985



Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, October 4, 1985
i
Public Noticed
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 85-40200 10
FLA EAR No. 030112
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOSEPH DALGE.
Petitioner,
and
MARILA DALGE.
Respondent.
TO: MARILA DALGE
C/O Post Office
Port dc Paix
Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
PIED THAT* petition fur Disaoiu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
art- required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on HILTON C GOODMAN, Esq.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 19 Wetl Flakier Street.
Sum 520, Miami, Florida 33130.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 1, 1985; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed
for in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORID1AN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 26th day of September. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MILTON C. GOODMAN, ESQ.
19 West Flagler Street, Suite 620
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone (305) 379-1885
19325 October 4,11,18,25,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Crril Action No. 85-39889 (03)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ttJ RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MAGALY COTO,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JOSE R. COTTO
Respondent/Husband.
TO: JOSE R. COTTO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for|
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-1
quired to servv a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Luis,
Vidal, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1840 W.
49th Street, Suite 105, Hialeah
Florida 33012, and file the original,
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 1,
1985: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24th day of September. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cler. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 W. 49th Street/Suite 105
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attoreney for Petitioner
19322 September 27;
October 4, 11,18, 1985
---------------------------------------------I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CROSSINGS WINE
AND LIQUORS at 12991 SW 112
Street, Miami, Florida 33186. in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LENOX LIQUORS
NO. 5, INC.
19324 September 27;
October 4,11.18,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY) '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38348-14
Florida Bar No. 049834
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SHRAGA GOLDENBERG
Petitioner/Husband
and
RACHEL GOLDENBERG
Respondent/Wife
TO: RACHEL GOLDENBERG
16 Avar inn I] Street
Karnal Hasharon, Israel
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed againstb you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSEPH W. MALEK. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501,
Miami Beach. Florida, 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 18, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK, Esquire
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139
19308 September 20,27;
October 4, 11,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH CIRCUIT COURT,
IN AND
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 86-28730 (14)
AMENDED
NOTICE OF LIS PENDENS
No. 090723
VENETIAN HEIGHTS, INC.. a
Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS and
GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, and any unknown party who
is or may be interested in the sub-
ject matter of this action whose
names and residences, after
diligent search and inquiry are
unknown to Plaintiff in which said
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees or other claimants by,
through, under or against the said
Defendants, WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, or either of them, who are
not known to be dead or alive.
Defendants.
NOTICE is given that a suit was
instituted in the Circuit Court in
and for Dade County, Florida on
the day of 1985, by the Plaintiff,
VENETIAN HEIGHTS, INC.. a
Florida corporation, against the
Defendants. WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, and any unknown party who
is or may be interested in the sub-
ject matter of this actin whose
names and residences, after
diligent search and inquiry are
unknown to Plaintiff in which said
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees or other claimants by.
through, under or against the said
Defendants, WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, or either of them, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
the following described real pro-
perty lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, to wit:
Lot 1, in Block 1, of LIBERTY
FARMS, according to the Plat
thereof, as record in Plat Book 51
at Page 46, of the Public Records
of Dade County Florida; commonly
known as 1646 N.W. 68th Street
Dade, Florida.
1. The relief sought in this suit is
the foreclosure of Mortgage.
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Plaintiff
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite 111
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Telephone (305) 949-4237
19320 September 27;
October 4,11,18,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Paperhangere Father
& Son at 13281 S.W. 71 St. Miami
Florida 33183 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
HILARIO CEVASCO
19307 September 20, 27;
October 4,11,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4637
Division 01
IN RE. ESTATE OF:
JOSEPH RASKIN.
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs at Law.
Living or dead, their respective
heirs and all persons claiming by,
through and under and or may be
infants, incompetents or otherwise
sui juris.
Residence unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Determination of
Heirs has been filed in this court.
You are required to serve written
defenses to the petition not later
than October 28, 1985. on peti-
tioner's attorney, whose name and
address are:
MICHAEL J. ALMAN ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on September 23,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CHARLOTTE W. GIRARD
As Deputy Clerk
19321 September 27;
October 4,1985
UN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caae No. 85-29018 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGATE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized
and existing uder the
laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
FERNANDO DE JESUS
SILVA, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: FERNANDO
DE JESUS SILVA
and DIANA SILVA,
his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against FERNANDO DE
JESUS SILVA and DIANA
SILVA, his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgate on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
The East 36 feet of Lot 14, all of
Lot 15. and all of Lot 16, less the
East 29 feet thereof, in Block 2. of
GARDEN HOMES, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 29, at Page 6, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19294 September 13,20,27;
October 4,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38856
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
SAVINGS ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
IVAN VILLA,
et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: IVAN VILLA and
DIOSELINA VILLA, his wife
Carrera 40, Numero 6948
Meddellin, Colombia
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Unit F-18 of VILLA
VENEZIA, a Condominium, in ac-
cordance with the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as recorded
in Official Records Book 11223. at
Page 1101, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida, has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it, on Shep-
pard Faber. Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gabies.
Florida. 33146 on or before Oc-
tober 25, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 18th day of
September. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19314 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titous name Payless Video Club,
Inc. at 467 N.E. 167th Street,
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
HECTOR RODRIGUEZ
LOURDES M. RODRIGUEZ
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
Attorney for Payless Video Club
Inc.
P.O. Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
19306 September 20,27;
Octobers 11,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39894 (02)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VICTORIANO GIMENO LEIRA.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
KIMIKO KASUYA
Respondent/Wife.
TO: KAMIKO KASUYA
43 Hin Seng Gardens
West Coast Road
Singapore (S0512)
Republic of Singapore.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on Luis
Vidal, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1840 W
49th Street, Suite 105. Hialeah
Florida 33012 U.S.A., and file the "
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 1, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of September, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cler, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
,. As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 W. 49th Street/Suite 105
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attoreney for Petitioner
19323 September 27;
___^^ October 4, 11,18,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name La Casa de los
Matrimonios, at 1466 SW 1st
Street No. 2, Miami, Florida
33135, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Osvaldo Osear Sanchez
Rodolfo Perez
Partners
19326 October 4, 11,18,25, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No. 85-11420-FC-05
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
PAMELA NICKLE
Petitioner
and
WILLIAM NICKLE
Respondent
TO: WILLIAM NICKLE
3619 BronxwoocWVve. No. 1
Bronx, NY 10467
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, on or before Oc-
tober 25. 1985, and file the original
with the clerk of this court, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: September 16, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19309 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of BUDGET PATH-
TING at 19814 S.W. 118th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33177 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
KEITH CLEMETSON d/b/a
BUDGET PAINTING
19814 S.W. 118th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33177
DENNIS P. SHEPPARD,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for KEITH
CLEMETSON
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, Florida 33173
(305) 279-0730
19306 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-38899
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla. Bar No. 147801
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ESPERANZA MATA
and
LUIS MATA
TO: LUIS MATA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. Koss,
Attorney at Law, P.A.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
4343 West Flagler Street, No. 404,
Miami, Florida 33134. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
25, 1985; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW
PA.
4343 West Flagler Street No. 404
Miami, Florida 33134
19315 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985


fulius Bernstein, 82, Watchmaker
Friday, October 4, 1985/Trre Jewish Floridian__Page 15-B
Rose Pred Joffee Passes
Ijstein, a retired wat-
retail jeweler, pass-
^day. He was 82.
jland, Mr. Bernstein
the United States
a watchmaker in
Bernstein started
fcis trade in New York
fimmediately after ar-
i city.
Ian extremely skillful
.lulius Bernstein
irak Calls For Establishment
Palestinian State As A Way
tesolve The Mideast Conflict
ITZHAK RABI
ID NATIONS -
President Hosni
of Egypt called
|ursday for the
lent of a Palesti-
ne as a way of
the Middle East
ising the General
Ithe Egyptian leader, in
|y short remarks on the
st situation, said that
Beves that UN resolu-
Vding Palestinian rights
letermination must be
ed.
Uestinian people still live
[yoke of occupation and
lie in the West Bank
Mubarak charged,
pttlements are still being
on their land, and
lis imposed on their
1 and political, economic
pal activities. Collective
neasures are still prac-
instthe Palestinian peo-
|tcts of violence and ex-
are still escalating."
MUBARAK ALSO said that
there is a necessity for halting
demographic changes in the oc-
cupied territories and said that
Arab, Islamic and Christian rights
in Jerusalem must be maintained.
The Foreign Minister of France,
Roland Dumas, speaking before
the General Assembly, declared
that his government supports
King Hussein of Jordan's in-
itiative of Feb. 11 in which he
reached an agreement with the
leader of the Palestine Liberation
Organization, Yasir Arafat, for a
joint delegation to negotiate with
Israel.
"My government as it has
demonstrated on many occasions
is ready to support the efforts
of those who sincerely desire to
work for peace, which can be bas-
ed only on Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338," Dumas
stated. "To endure, it must take
into account two principles that
are indivisible: Mainly, the right
of people to exist in security, and
the right of the Palestinian's to
self-determination, with all that
this implies.
person," said his daughter,
former state Rep. Elaine Bloom.
"He could fix the finest watches
and clocks.''
After a short time in the United
States, Mr. Bernstein was able to
open a jewelry store in Brooklyn.
But with the market crash of
1929, he lost his shop. The f-
ollowing year, he started all over
again and opened a second store
in Manhattan. For the next 31
years, Mr. Bernstein specialized
in clockmaking and fine jewelry.
In 1962, Mr.Bernstein retired
and moved to Miami. His vocation
became an avocation. Until his il-
lness a few months ago, he con-
tinued to repair friends' watches
simply for the joy of it.
A long time supporter of Israel,
Mr. Bernstein was a member of
Beth Torah Congregation, B'nai
B'rith and Farband, a Zionist
labor movement.
In addition to his daughter
Elaine Bloom, survivors include
his wife, Ethel; one son, Hirshel;
one brother, Leo; two sisters,
Sadie Graubart and Elka Eidlic
and four grandchildren.
Services were held at Riverside
North Miami Chapel.
Aiding Earthquake Victims
YORK (JTA) The American Jewish Joint
ktion Committee (JDC) has responded to the earth-
n Mexico, as it has in past cases of natural disaster
ponally, by opening its mailbox to donations for
racy relief and by implementing an assistance pro-
behalf of the American Jewish community.
I WITH previous relief efforts Cambodia 1980,
PI, Lebanon 1982, and Ethiopia 1984 JDC ac-
irallel those of Catholic, Protestant and non-
agencies providing humanitarian assistance to
victims.


Kit
2
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261-7612
Rose Pred Joffee, 92, of Miami
Beach, passed away last week.
She was the widow of Isaac Jof-
fee, Miami attorney and the first
executive director of the greater
Miami Jewish Federation. Mrs.
Joffee is survived by nieces and
nephews Felice and Gerald
BRAUN
David H.. 77. died September 27. Mr. Braun
was Chairman of the Board of Beth David
Svna^ojrue ami was a charter meml>er of
the Technion Institute in Tel Aviv. Israel.
He was also a major !>enefactor lo the
Jewish Theolotrical Seminary in New York.
He was a founder of the Miami Jewish
Home for the Ajjed. He is survived hy his
daughter. Arlene (Bubbles) Smolev S.-r
vices were held at Beth David Synagogue.
QELFAND
Abraham, of Hollywood and North Bay
Village, passed away Septemtter 2H. Mr.
Celfand was a member of Temple Beth El ol
North Bay Village. Lions Club and the
(ireater Miami Jewish Federation. He is
survived by his wife. Irene; daughter Mrs.
Roberta Bergman. North Miami Beach,
sister Mrs. Sadie Lauterbach. Brooklyn.
N.Y. Services were held. LevittWeinstein
in charge of arrangements. Interment at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Schwartz, Paula and Stanley Pred
and Laurette Sandier.
She was born in Bordeaux,
France, and moved to Omaha,
Nebraska as a child. Mrs. Joffee
moved to Dade County nearly 50
years ago. Interment was at
Mount Nebo Cemetery.,
LEBOWITZ
George. 76. of Miami Beach, passed away
September 26. Mr. LcbowitZ was a resident
of Miami Beach for the past 50 years coming
here from Massachusetts Mr. Lehowitz is
survived by his son, Walter B. (Rhoda): his
daughters. Barliara (Jordan) Seigelman and
Helene Frances Zeitzer. Services were held.
Interment at Mt.Nelxi Cemetery.
PUSHKIN
Lena, 90. of Miami Beach passed away
September 27. Mrs. Pushkin had made her
home here for the past 42 years coming
from Annapolis. Md. She is survived by her
son. Dr. Emanuel (Claire) Pushkin, Coral
Gables and a daughter Fay (Albert) Aron
son, Coral Gables. Services were held.
JASS1N, Fred. 63. of Miami Beach. The
Riverside.
DUBETSZTEJN.BasSheva(Sophia). 74, of
Miami. Rubin-Zilbert.
BERKMAN. Sylvan, of North Miami Beach.
Services held in New York.
MILLER. Maurice S 89. Services held in
Ohio.
FILS, Jack. 57. of Miami. September 26.
Services were held.
MARKS, Sylvia Cutler of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
DON, Doris, 58, of North Miami Beach,
September 24. LevittWeinstein.
FEIGEN. Charles. 89, of Miami Shores
passed away September 24. Services were
held.
LYONS, Jean. 78. of North Miami Beach.
September 24. Menorah Chapels.
SCHER, Murray H.. 73, of Miami Beach,
September 24. Services were held.
GUTT, Joae, 74, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert.
HARRIS, Gladys L.. 76, of Miami.
September 24. The Riverside.
BERKE, Dinah. 76. September 25. Services
held in New York.
KATZ. Sadie, 85, of North Miami Beach.
September 24. Levitt-Weinstain.
KOPET.'SyMa.'sl ofMlami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert.
GREENBERG. Marsha 8.. 49. of Miami.
September 29. Services and interment held
at Star of David Memorial Park.
GREEN. Jack I.., Miami Beach. Oct. I. Ser-
vices held in New York.
KICHMAN. Dr. Hyman B.. of Bal Harbour.
Oct. 1. Riverside.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
& Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phon 759-1669
26640 Greenfield Kd
Oak Hark, Michigan IHj:l7
(3131 543 1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service From rloritlu Arra
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Kiversule Memorial Chapel. Inc
New York: (212)298-7600 Queens Blvd. & 7fith Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL & Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
The Only
Guaranteed
No. Miami Beach Hallandale|
BROWARD
456-4011
538-6371 Pre-Arrangementa
with
No Money In Advance
Main Oftice: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


P^tlt-B TV
be*. The
( sLT'lSMk The EtSBV
ir. :e=.:escratar* have paM
c^saseracfe aahar aaanrt.
A ?*:.: :zs:j: :..
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kmbaMBoam^Kucr.
the Q*fl Bazftts
food to the prr a* anal i
:_-
Ethiopian Jews Stage
Protest March
B GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM JTA -
ChacdEg. ""We are Jevs
every army, the rabbis are
racists." some 400 Ethio-
pian Jews marched to the
Western Wal last week to
pray and protest against the
dwaanrh by the Chief Rax>
binkal Council tine they
reihgwas conversion rite.
before they can be aDonred
to marry.
T*w sarmer; re r: :c
y 1 qiaa 7i
.-nrr_iTi-"-? *- uw -*?- ra.-;-
zf for vee&i :r; -a/a* scsar*
oacade t* Hrra. Sateen*. Che/
Rar.c;-a:< -* a-: ;.:*..*.-;
thar anger against
aree They na-
stier -j xrra.- : '-.-:'-.
Moroeeca; Hwha i^fehareki aaa
Arraaaa Sanaa* tAsciteeazu:
:.r ;".- --.--;,. -_ -;
BBBI i----rr. j:;r. if laai
THX ETHIOPIANS. r
aeec>7 reaajsoos. irr
by secret air-ft frrc Soca.- :?:
e N'oreoaber. :?*4 i=:
18i5- IWt eiKurec
aarasoip u>3 -s*ec aar
tt> aase as* top. a fact a*7
t to their bitter niainwi
Israel's reapocs aisrontjes
Leaders of the Ethiopia*
9er~jOG&uaum% met with Acocrc-
tsce h*.r_st*r Yaacrv Trjr aaa
hat beee sympathetic aec
fnevances. They worked oct wra:
they aesuiied as a aaanraeaae
2,000 Rally
On Behalf
Of Soviet Jewry
NTW YOBK at.A) Sane
laraly hat
'^f I'zr^ii Ra>
. the hjaj of
Candidates To Speak At Temple Emanu-Ei
Temp*-Eaar^-E MeasCa. sekct awoe aaders aat ex h*^ jj^, r.
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GARDEN RAFrOU
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Chicago Hard Rois... 12
Jeiy Donate...............
PriCtS EfffCtlrl
Octtfctf 3 nVi 9. 1985
*. $1
30*




OCTOBER 1985
0cU&e*, 28-30, J985


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~-_-


Federation, October 1985
Campaign
A message from the 1986
General Campaign Chairman
Page 3
Aaron Podhurst
During recent weeks, many of us
have turned on our television sets and
seen President Reagan making an im-
passioned appeal on behalf of the cur-
rent United Way Campaign.
The appeal had an impact on me,
not only because of the human service
( needs that he talked about, but also
I because many of the terms he used to
describe the national United Way
campaign "voluntarism," "dedica-
| tion," "caring," "network of human
( service agencies" are directly rele-
vant to Federation's campaign. In
fact, when we discuss the concept of
"federated giving," which is common
to our campaign and to the United
Way's, the parallels are very striking.
It therefore is my belief that within
I the specific context of Jewish needs,
I the Federation campaign must be our
primary responsibility, just as the
United Way should be our principal
concern in terms of the general
| community.
We have chosen as our theme for
jthe 1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-
I Israel Emergency Fund "One people,
I One destiny." Not only does this ad-
I dress our collective historical ex-
perience as a people, it also testifies
I to the underlying imperative of our
[campaign. Namely, that the CJA-IEF
I must provide funds to meet the needs
lof the Jewish people on a worldwide
basis. No other campaign in our com-
Imunity funds more than 60 social
welfare and educational agencies,
llocally in Greater Miami, in the State
|of Israel and in more than 30 coun-
tries around the world where Jews
are in need.
Let's not equivocate; the needs
|which we must meet have an impact
on the lives of real people. Last year,
despite our best efforts, we were
forced to reject funding requests for
SO important human service pro-
grams in our own community. One of
the programs would have assisted
Jducable, mentally retarded
teenagers; another would have begun
[to fill a gap in the vitally important
WM of early childhood development,
while others involved improved levels
of service for our Jewish elderly. In
jeach case, our inability to provide the
funds meant some degree of suffer-
ing, some missed opportunity, some
ijew in Miami who needed help but
pouldn't get it.
But the story doesn't end here. Due
fp unfavorable economic conditions,
|ne Jewish Agency for Israel was
forced to slash $2 million from its
cal '85-'86 budget for Youth
Niyah. This will result in 1.600 kids
feing excluded from Youth Aliyah
programs in 1986. In the last two
years alone, the Agency has cut its
funding for higher education in Israel
by $26 million. A whole generation of
young Israelis the country's future
scientists, industrialists and political
leaders will be penalized.
In the 32 countries served by the
American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee, a major beneficiary of
Federation UJA funds, scarce
fiscal resources in 1984-85
necessitated budget cuts totaling
almost $4 million. These cuts included
$890,000 from a home renovation
project in Israel; $800,000 cut from
funds needed to expand a Jewish old
age home in Rumania; $60,000 cut
from Jewish education programs in
Morocco, and so the list continues.
All of the programs outlined above
should have been properly funded. If
Miami can meet its $25 million cam-
paign goal in 1986 and other com-
munities meet theirs, we can end the
suffering.
The $25 million goal is a real and a
realizable one. Based on 1984
statistics, Miami ranked 14th out of
17 large cities in terms of average per
capita giving. For a community of our
size and relative prosperity, that is in-
excusable. We are not looking for
miracles we merely need to become
average.
Together, as "givers" and
"askers," we can make $25 million a
reality in 1986. Please give me your
help.
Pacesetter
Dinner
to feature
Anthony Newley
Anthony Newley
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Pacesetter Dinner, the annual
gala event open to contributors of a
minimum of $10,000 to the 1986 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
cy Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign, will held Tuesday, Nov. 26
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton on Miami
Beach.
Anthony Newley, best known for
such classic tunes as "What Kind of
Fool Am I?," "Who Can I Turn to?,"
and "The Good Things In Life," will
be the special guest entertainer for
the evening. In 1977, Newley was
named "Male Musical Star of the
Year" at the Sixth Annual Las Vegas
Awards.
Anthony Newley's credits are long
and varied. He has directed, produc-
ed, or starred in numerous films in-
cluding: "Summertree," "It Seemed
Like A Good Idea At The Time," and
"Mr. Quilp," the musical version of
Dickens story "The Old Curiousity
Shop."_____________
The Pacesetter Dinner begins with
cocktails at 6:30 p.m. The couvert is
$75 per person and dietary laws will
be strictly observed.
Maxine E. Schwartz is chairman of
the Pacesetter Division, Steven J.
Kravitz is chairman of the Vanguard
Division and Donald E. Lefton is
chairman of the $100,000 Division.
For more information about the
Pacesetter Dinner, please call Jeff
Klein at Federation, 576-4000.
Treasurer's
Committee
performs
vital role
Norman H. Lipqff
Every business venture is depen-
dent upon adequate cash flow to en-
sure a smooth and successful opera-
tion. This principle also applies to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
which allocates the proceeds of its an-
nual CJA-IEF campaign to more than
60 local, national and overseas human
services agencies.
The Treasurer's Committee of
Federation (formerly the Cash Com-
mittee) is empowered to employ pro-
cedures designed to obtain speedy
and maximum payment of pledges
made to the Federation campaign.
According to Treasurer's Committee
Chairman Norman H. Lipoff, "Our
committee serves a vitally important
function for the Federation. Pledges
constitute the promise to assist our
fellow Jews, but it is the prompt pay-
ment of pledges which permit us to
support our agencies to the best of
our ability.
"Our contributors are the life blood
of the Federation campaign. We want
them to be aware of the pressing
need for cash. The longer the pay-
ment of a pledge is delayed the more
costly it becomes to the Federation
and the agencies that depend on us.
This is especially critical in relation to
the United Jewish Appeal. The value
of the dollar diminishes rapidly due to
the current economic crisis which
Israel is experiencing," Lipoff noted.
He continued, "We are going to
focus the efforts of the Treasurer's
Committee on pledges which are, by
definition, delinquent. These include
any pledges made to the 1982 or 1983
campaigns which have not been
fulfilled by payment. On December
31, 1985 delinquent accounts will in-
clude pledges made to the 1984 cam-
paign. We will make every effort
possible to contact individuals per-
sonally to discuss their accounts. We
will strive to be fair in resolving delin-
quent accounts."
The Treasurer's Committee has
been meeting on an ongoing basis
since early July, revising policies and
procedures and assigning delinquent
accounts to committee members.
"I'm greatly encouraged by the
dedication of the committee
members. They seem very committed
and are willing to invest the time and
effort to obtain the payment of
outstanding pledges," said Lipoff.
"Every individual who makes a
pledge to the Federation campaign
has the responsibility to meet the
obligation of paying it. Most do so
without having to be asked. Through
the efforts of the Treasurer's Com-
mittee, I'm hoping that all pledges
will be paid promptly, and this will
benefit all of us," Lipoff concluded.
Serving with Lipoff on the
Treasurer's Committee are: Michael
M. Adler, L. Jules Arkin, J. William
Baros, Jack Bellock, Ralph Chernin,
Terry Drucker, Dr. George
Feldenkreis, Harvey Friedman, Mor-
ris Futernick, Alan Kluger, Sidney
Lefcourt, Donald E. Lefton, Nancy
Lipoff, Stanley C. Myers, Gail
Newman, Forrest Raffel, Kenneth
Schwartz, Fred K. Shochet, Shirley
Spear and William Spear.
Hazel Canarick
to chair
Aventura
campaign
Hazel Canarick
Hazel Canarick has been appointed
as the first woman campaign chair-
man for the Aventura community, an-
nounced Aaron Podhurst, Federa-
tion's 1985-86 general campaign
chairman.
"I am delighted that Hazel has
agreed to give her time as Aventura
chairman," Podhurst said. "She
worked closely with her husband
Herb when he served in that position
last year and she has already made
many friends among the Aventura
leadership."
Hazel says she is looking forward to
working within the newly-formed
Alliance Division and that Aventura
can serve as a model for other com-
munities which are currently being
organized within the Division
structure.
"My husband Herb, who was
recently appointed chairman of the
Alliance Division, has laid the
groundwork for bringing the Federa-
tion campaign to previously unaf-
filiated communities," Hazel said.
"We all believe that this will make
the coming year's campaign the best
ever for the Alliance Division in
general, and I hope and expect that
the same will be especially true for
the Aventura campaign."
For more information about the
Alliance Division or the Aventura
campaign, please call Judy Eitelberg
at 576-4000, extension 216.


page 4
Federation, October 1985
YOUIT
$2500 black tie event to
kick-off 1986 ylc campaign
A $2,500 minimum gift reception
will kick off the 1986 Young Leader-
ship Council's (YLC) campaign calen-
dar. A black-tie affair, this first-time
ever effort, will be chaired by Ed
Shohat and Susan Kleinberg. The
event will take place on Saturday
evening, November 2, 1985 at the
Grand Bay Hotel in Coconut Grove. It
is expected that well over 300 young
men and women will attend and set
the pace for the rest of the YLC cam-
paign year.
Richard Berkowitz, chairman, and
Susan Sirotta, vice chairman of the
YLC Campaign Committee, an-
ticipate a year of unparalleled suc-
cess. Serving with them are John
Fuller, New Gifts vice chairman,
Alan Kluger, Solicitation vice chair-
man, and Paul Berkowitz, Division
vice chairman. Event chairmen in-
clude David Abramowitz, Dorian
Denburg, Ed Shohat, Susan
Kleinberg, Susan Neshick and Lyn J.
Pont. Division liaisons with the
Federation's Trades and Professions
are as follows: Roberto Kassin, Yacob
Lubin, Ray Ellen Yarkin, Amy Dean,
Mark Vogel, Steve Silvers, Isaac
Garazi, Bill Grodnick, Ellen Elbrand,
Jeff Newman, Jim Bams, Jim Asher,
Sanford Freedman and Tom Borin.
Members of the YLC Campaign
Committee had the opportunity to
get to know each other better and to
discuss plans for the 1986 campaign
on Thursday evening, August 22,
when Richard and Nancy Berkowitz
graciously hosted the Committee's
first meeting at their lovely home.
Berkowitz said, "The Committee
will focus on the celebration of giving
and Todah Rabah, thanking and
honoring those who truly do sustain
the community." He continued,
"What we are doing individually and
collectively is in the highest and best
calling of our faith and society. It is
time that we celebrate giving it is
time to celebrate our givers and it
is time to celebrate and particularly
honor those who ask."
The proposed calendar for the YLC
Campaign Committee includes the
$2,500 minimum gift event on Satur-
day, November 2, 1985; the Federa-
tion's Campaign Opening Dinner on
Saturday, December 14, 1985; Super
Sunday on February 2, 1986, a $365
minimum Gift Day, February 23,
1986; a $100 minimum gift Ex-
travaganza on Saturday, March 22,
1986; and the Young Leadership
Council's Thank You Day on Sunday,
June 8,1986.
"YLC's Campaign Committee
brings together outstanding
leaders," said Susan Sirotta, "whose
commitment and dedication to the
Jewish people and the State of Israel
will impact on and help shape the
future of the entire Miami
community."
3000 young leaders to gather
in Washington, D.c. for
UJA leadership conference
Michael M. Adler
The Fifth National Young Leader-
ship Conference sponsored by the
United Jewish Appeal Leadership
Cabinets will be held in Washington,
D.C. from March 2-4, 1986 at the Om-
ni Sheraton Hotel. The three-day con-
ference, which is expected to attract
3,000 young Jewish leaders, 22 to 45
years of age, from around the coun-
try, including 300 from Miami, will
focus on the critical issues facing
world Jewry today.
Robert J. Merlin and Barbara Kip-
nis, members of the UJA Young
Leadership Cabinet and UJA Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet respec-
tively, are serving as Miami co-
chairmen for this event. Ezra Katz
and Barbara Aronson, also members
of the UJA Young Leadership
Cabinet and UJA Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet respectively,
serve as Florida Regional chairmen.
Michael M. Adler of Miami, national
chairman of the UJA Young Leader-
ship Cabinet, will welcome con-
ference participants to Washington.
Conference participants will
receive briefings on domestic and
foreign affairs by high-ranking
members of the White House staff
and the State Department, members
of Congress, and top representatives
of the State of Israel. Sessions will in-
clude open discussions providing for
an exchange of views with govern-
ment officials and with other young
leaders from around the country.
Private briefings on Capitol Hill
will be arranged for members of the
Miami delegation with Florida
Senators Lawton Chiles and Paula
Hawkins and Representatives from
South Florida including Claude Pep-
per, William Lehman, Dante Fascell
and Larry Smith.
An interest-free pay-out plan is
available to make it easier for people
to attend the Conference.
Since registration and hotel ac-
comodations for the Conference are
limited, interested young men and
women are urged to complete
registration as early as possible to in-
sure that the entire Miami delegation
will be housed in the headquarters
hotel. To obtain the official con-
ference brochure and registration
form, please call Lisa Goldberg at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation of-
fice, 576-4000, Ext.278.
Miami singles participate
in national UJA mission
YLC members seen in Israel on the
National UJA Summer Singles
Mission.
Thirty-nine Miamians recently join-
ed the National UJA Hatikvah Sum-
mer Singles Mission which took 600
young, single Jewish men and women
to Israel. Local recruitment for the
mission was conducted by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Mission leader Joey Smith, who
was returning to Israel for the
seventh time, said, "The experience
of tracing our people's history and
heritage with my friends and peers
was indescribable. The rewards far
outweigh any work and preparation
for the mission. I received exceeding-
ly more than I gave. I thank all our
mission participants for helping me
grow as a human being and as a Jew.
I find my commitment ever
deepening."
Joining Smith as co-leaders were
Michael Novak and Hank Rodstein.
"Seeing the growth and rehabilita-
tion of the Jewish Quarter in the Old
City in comparison to two years
earlier was a highlight for me," said
Novak.
"For me," said Rodstein. "it was
meeting people from all over the
country, getting to know each other
and forming lasting relationships. I
had a fabulous time and made many
new friends."
Participants in the nine-day mission
divided their time between
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Eilat. They
relived the past, climbing Masada at 3
a.m. and visiting Jerusalem's Old Ci-
ty; experienced the present in
cosmopolitan Tel Aviv and on the
border of Lebanon where Israeli
soldiers protect their country from
attack; and looked toward the future
as they visited Israel's newest im-
migrants, the Ethiopian Jews, and
learned of Israel's amazing
techological successes while visiting
the Avdat Air Force Base.
"I was fascinated with the manner
in which modern Israeli settlers have
transformed the land from a dry, bar-
ren desert to a lush, productive
oasis," said Arden Magoon, who had
last been to Israel when she was in
high school.
For Ray Nahmad, also a second-
time visitor to Israel, his experience
was heightened by seeing the excit-
ment grow among his peers. "It was
wonderful to watch them all discover
what I had already discovered during
my first visit. I looked at Israel
through the eyes of my friends who
had never seen it before and renewed
my own feelings about Israel and be-
ing Jewish."
Emotions were intensified as the
group visited Or Akiva, Miami's Pro-
ject Renewal sister city, saw the
realities of their involvement and
took pride in the accomplishments of
the residents of this now thriving ci-
ty. They were deeply saddened by the
youth of the soldiers buried in Mount
Herlz Military Cemetary and
understood the importance of their
support and commitment.
Anita Altman, who participated in
the national pre-mission to Paris as
well, described her trip as one of the
most wonderful experiences in her
life. "It's been said before and I know
it sounds corny but, until it happens
to you, you won't really believe it it
DOES change your whole life. You'll
never be the same again."
Young Leadership council Calendar
October 10, 1985
YLC Community and Political Involvement Committee Meeting 6:00 p.m. at the
Federation Building
October 15, 1985
YLC Couples Committee Meeting 7:00 pm. at the Federation Building
October 16, 1985
YLC Singles Committee Meeting 6:00 p.m. at the Federation Building
October 16, 1985
YLC Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. at the Federation Building
November 2, 1985
$2500 Campaign Event sponsored by YLC Campaign Committe 8:00 p.m. at the
Grand Bay Hotel, Coconut Grove
November 5, 1985
Fall Learn-In Begins: "Everyman's Talmud: Everything You Wanted to Know
About. Sponsored by YLC Program and Education Committee 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Israel, 137 NE 19th St., Miami
(Learn-In No. 2 on Nov. 12, No. 3 on Nov. 19)
November 6, 1985
BL'klPr0gram and Education Committee Meeting 6:00 p.m. at the Federation


I.'
.*v*
Federation. October 1985
Page 5

Memories of Israel
by Gail Newman
Gail Newman
At the end of June, I spent a
wonderful week in Israel, joining
campaign chairpersons and their ex-
ecutive directors from many other
American cities.
Our trip coincided with the Jewish
Agency's Assembly, and together we
shared many memorable experiences.
During the final session of the
Assembly, we were privileged to hear
addresses by Prime Minister Shimon
Peres and Yitzhak Shamir, Israel's
deputy prime minister and minister
of defense.
In a meeting with Knesset member
Ehud Olmert, we gained valuable in-
sight into Israel's present economic
crisis. While we were in Israel, the
government once again devalued the
shekel and we could feel a change in
the mood of the people.
Yehuda Dominitz, director general
of the Jewish Agency's Aliyah
Department, spoke to us about the
economic effects of absorption. We
visited both a Youth Aliyah village
and an absorption center where
newly-arrived Ethiopian Jews were
being prepared for life in Israel. To
date $60 million has been spent, and a
like amount will be spent on com-
pleting the absorption process for
new immigrants. The progress made
thus far by the immigrants is
remarkable, but much more is yet to
be done.
Home hospitality in Jerusalem at
Theo and Miriam Zeibenberg's was
an afternoon we will all remember for
years to come. Theo has excavated
under his home and has traced his fin-
dings back several thousand years.
An Israeli comedienne, Zippy
Shavrit. invited us to join her and
other entertainers to "eat, drink and
be merry" on the rooftop of her
penthouse apartment overlooking all
of Tel Aviv.
Lunch at a women's army base and
a visit to Elscint, a high-tech in-
dustry, provided another perspective
of Israeli life and development.
During our week in Israel we ex-
perienced many exciting things which
I look forward to sharing with you
throughout the year. A visit to Israel
serves a very important purpose. It
demonstrates that all our efforts on
behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
translate into real programs and ser-
vices which benefit our Jewish
brethren. It underscores the impor-
tance of our campaign, and this year
our Women's Division goal is
$4,250,000, and with your help, I'm
certain we'll attain it. A record cam-
paign yields so many rewards, and
they simply cannot be measured
only in dollars and cents.
Shalom V'lehitraot,
Gail Newman,
Campaign Chairwoman
Women's Division
BPW Community Education Night and
Federation Tuesday on November 4-5
Three outstanding per-
sonalities will head a star-
studded cast at the Women's
Division's Federation Tues-
day, to be held November
5 at Miami Beach's
Fontainebleau-Hilton.
Guest speakers will be
Norman Lear, writer/
producer of the Emmy
Award winning television
favorite "All in the Family"
and co-founder of the non-
profit organization, People
for the American Way; Nora
Ephron, author of such well-
known books as Crazy Salad,
Crazy Salad Plus Nine and
Heartburn; and Neal Sher,
director of special investiga-
tions for the United States
Department of Justice, who
was involved with the recent
location of the remains wide-
ly considered to be those of
"The Angel of Death," Josef
Mengele.
Guest speakers at
Federation Tuesday, a day-
long event, will focus on a
number of issues of interest
to women in our Jewish com-
munity. Sue Graubert and
Anne Sheldon, co-
chairwomen of the event,
i fir on
Norman Lear
promise an enjoyable and was recently nominated for
educational day designed to an Academy Award as co-
broaden each participant's author of the screenplay for
perspective on her role as a "Silkwood," will also be
Jewish woman and as an ac-
tive .participant in the
Greater Miami Jewish
community.
Federation Tuesday will
begin at 9 a.m. with coffee
and registration. The pro-
gram and luncheon will be
held from 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
There is a $32 registration
fee for those who register
prior to October 15, after
that date the cost is $37.
Federation Tuesday
speaker Nora Ephron, who
featured speaker at the
Business and Professional
Women's Community Educa-
tion Night. This evening
reception will be held at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton on
November 4. Convert is $15
for those who register in
advance, or $18 at the door.
Dorothy Podhurst serves
as president of Women's
Division; Robbie Herskowitz
is vice president for com-
munity education; Maureen
Neal Sher
Berkowitz and Nancy
Berkowitz are BPW vice
chairwomen for community
education; Maryanne Witkin
is Business and Professional
Women chairwoman; and
Anne Bloom and Adrienne
Messing serve as co-
chairwomen of BPW Com-
munity Education Night.
For more information
about Federation Tuesday or
the Business and Profes-
sional Women's Community
Education Night, please call
the Women's Division at
576-4000.
Ruby 10 and Lion of Judah events in December
Plans are now in formation for the
Women's Division's Ruby 10" and
Lion of Judah luncheons, annual
events honoring women who make
minimum gifts in the Trustee and
Pacesetter categories.
The "Ruby 10" luncheon, schedul-
ed for December 5 in the home of
Luncheon Chairwoman Paula
Friedland, will honor those women
making a minimum gift of $10,000.
Women who make a gift in this
Pacesetter category will have a ruby
placed in the eye of their Lion of
Judah pin.
Helene Berger
elected
to CJF office
Helene
Berger, an of-
ficer on Federa-
tion's Board of
Directors and
past president
of Women's
Division, was
recently named
regional vice Helene Berger
chairwoman of the Council of Jewish
Federation's (CJF) Women's Divi-
sion. Her regional responsibilities in-
clude the states of Florida, Georgia,
North Carolina and South Carolina.
Berger has also served as regional
vice chairwoman and national chair-
woman for leadership development
for the CJF's Women's Division. She
is past president of the Central Agen-
cy for Jewish Education and has held
many other positions within the
Jewish community, both locally and
nationally.
Berger will be formally installed as
regional vice chairwoman at the
General Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations, to be held in
Washington, D.C., on November
12-17.
A very special program is planned
for the Lion of Judah luncheon, to be
held December 9 at Miami Beach's
Fontainebleau-Hilton. A musical per-
formance will honor women who have
made $5,000 minimum gifts" to the
Women's Division campaign. Lion of
Judah pins will be presented to those
women making their first gift in the
category. Irene Baros and Marvis
Schaecter hope that many past
Trustees will renew their com-
mitments and in doing so will be
honored at this elegant affair.
Irene Baros and Marvis Schaecter
serve as co-chairwomen of the Lion of
Judah luncheon; Ellen Mandler and
Eileen Silberman are Trustee co-
chairwomen; Paula Friedland serves
as chairwoman and hostess of the
Ruby 10 Luncheon; and Gloria
Scharlin is Pacesetter chairwoman.
Bunny Adler is the honorary chair-
woman of the Ruby 10 Pacesetter
luncheon.
For more information about the
Lion of Judah and Ruby 10 lun-
cheons, please call the Women's Divi-
sion at 576-4000.
Hold the date
Thurs., October 3
Wed., October 9
Wed.. October 9
Thurs.. October 10
Mon., October 21
Tues., October 22
Mon., October 28
Wed., October 30
Mon., November 4
Leadership Institute
Omni International Hotel
9:30 2:00 p.m.
SD Learn-In
South Dade JCC
12:30 2:30 p.m.
(first of a three-part series)
BPW Leadership Parlor
6:00 p.m.
Learn-In
Federation Building
12:30 2:30 p.m.
(first of a three-part series)
MB Constituent Board Meeting
SD Constituent Board Meeting
ND Constituent Board Meeting
WD Executive Committee
Temple Israel
10:00 a.m.
Luncheon Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment Forum 12:00 noon
Guest Speaker: Prof. David Harman
BPW Community Education Night
"An Evening With Nora Ephron"
Fontainebleau-Hilton
6:30 p.m.
Tues., November 5 Federation Tuesday
Fontainebleau-Hilton
9:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m.


Page6
South Pade
South Dade forms group to explore
Federation/synagogue relationships
First Annual Pathfinder event
scheduled for November 9
Judge Robert H. Newman
Under the leadership of Judge Robert H. Newman, South Dade Branch's
vice chairman for community services and planning, the South Dade
Branch has established a new group to determine whether an ongoing
liaison program with local synagogues would be beneficial for the develop-
ment of the area's Jewish community.
"After meetings with rabbis and board members from a sampling of local
synagogues, the South Dade Branch plans to institute some type of ongoing
forum for further developing Federation/synagogue relationships," said
Roz Berrin, chairman of the Federation/synagogue relationships group.
The group will work with synagogues to identify common concerns and to
identify and work toward resolving unmet needs within the South Dade
Jewish community.
"This is our first attempt in South Dade to organize such a community ac-
tivity," Berrin said. "We are all extremely pleased at the response thus far.
We can be proud that the community in which we live is setting a standard
for other Jewish communities."
Much interest has been expressed, both by Federation members and the
synagogues, in creating an ongoing forum to enhance communication and
cooperation. The synagogues approached thus far by Federation have
agreed to join with the South Dade Branch in implementing "Shalom South
Dade," the "welcome wagon" for Jewish newcomers in the area.
Thus far, the committee has met with representatives from Temple Judea
and Temple Beth Am. Arrangements are currently underway for meetings
with other South Dade synagogues to determine the best possible format
for establishing a working relationship between Federation and
synagogues which will serve mutual goals.
Members of the Federation/synagogue relationships group are: Tom
Bonn, Mel Brazer. G. Alan Brooks, Arthur Cohen, Evelyn Goodman, Sam
Harte, Joan Hayet, Nelson Keshen, Ron Kriss, Ellen Mandler, Oren Mann-
ing, Asher Melzer, Linda Minkes, Sandi and Sanford Miot, Dorothy Op-
Knheim, Selma Rappaport, Barry Ross, Sandi Samole, William Saulson,
. Bernard Schechterman, Norman Sholk, Barry White and Dror Zadok!
For more information about the Federation/synagogue relationship
group, please call Marcia Needle at 251-9334.
New staffer joins
South Dade branch
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion is pleased to introduce Marcia
Sue Needle, who recently joined the
South Dade Branch's staff as Com-
munity Development Associate after
five years of Jewish communal
service.
It is Needle's personal commitment
to Jewish communal life which keeps
her working in the field and which at-
tracted her to South Dade, she says.
"After working in several Jewish
communities throughout the United
States, I jumped at the chance to
work in South Dade," Needle said.
"The Jewish community here is just
beginning to grow and mature, and I
am glad that I will have the oppor-
tunity to help shape its growth.
Most recently, Needle held a posi-
tion with the South County Jewish
Federation in Boca Raton. There, she
served several functions, working tor
the United Jewish Appeal/Federation
campaign in leadership development,
and in organizing missions. Needle
has also worked at the Jewish
Federation in Las Vegas, Nevada,
and as director of student activities at
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at
the University of Wisconsin in
Madison.
Needle, born and reared in New
York, earned her bachelor's degree in
history and Jewish studies at
Washington University in St. Louis,
Missouri, and her master's degree in
Jewish communal service from
Brandeis University in Waltham,
Massachusetts.
As part of her undergraduate
degree, Needle studied for a year at
the Hebrew University in Jerusalem
and has visited Israel five times.
Myron and Sandi Samole recently hosted a planning meeting for the
"Pathfinder" event in their home. Seen above are Sandi Samole (stan-
ding); South Dade Vice Chairman for Campaign Norman Lieberman
(seated at left) and Myron Samole.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's South Dade Branch will hold its
first annual "Pathfinder Event" on
Saturday evening, November 9, an-
nounced Norman Lieberman, South
Dade Branch's vice chairman for
campaign. "Pathfinders" are those
making a minimum $5,000 family gift
to the 1986 CJA-IEF campaign.
"There is a tremendous sense of ex-
citement in South Dade about the
new Pathfinders," says Sandi
Samole, who, along with her husband
Mike, serves as co-chairman of the
group. "It brings a feeling of new
beginnings and new opportunities for
building this community."
The Pathfinder Event, to be held
Saturday. November 9 at 8:00 p.m. in
the Datran Center, 9200 S. Dadeland
Blvd. in South Dade, will include din-
ner and live musical entertainment.
Couvert is $50 per person.
Members of the Pathfinder commit-
tee are: Robert and Fran Berrin; Tom
and Sara Borin; Alvin Lloyd Brown,
chairman of the South Dade Branch's
board of directors; Dr. Eugene and
Karen Eisner; Sam and Phyllis
Harte; Norman and Jean Lieberman;
Bernard and Ellen Mandler: Dr.
Mark and Nedra Oren; Myron and
Sandi Samole; and Norman and Irene
Sholk.
For more information about the
Pathfinders, please call Jerry Nei-
mand. director of the South' Dade
Branch, at 251-9334.
Human resource outreach
begins second series
Paul Berkowitz
The South Dade Branch's Human
Resource Outreach Committee,
under the leadership of Paul
Berkowitz, began its second series
with a Jewish experiential" values
clarification workshop on October 2
The series of educational lectures
and workshops trains and encourages
individuals to become qualified board
and committee members of Federa-
tion, synagogue boards, agencies and
other community institutions.
The series intends to integrate
knowledge of Jewish history, current
issues and the structure of our Jewish
community with the clarification of
each participant's Jewish identity.
This way, not only will the participant
have factual knowledge which will
help him serve as a qualified com-
munity leader, but he will also have a
redefined sense of commitment to the
community.
Sara and Jay Gamberg and Sam
and Phyllis Harte are leading the new
group which began its series with the
October 2 workshop.
Another group, led by Marilyn and
Ronald Kohn, began the series
several months ago and, after a sum-
mer break, will reconvene on October
9 with an "Israel Update" seminar.
Room is still available for par-
ticipants in the second series. For
more information, please call Marcia
Needle at 251-9334.


Federation, October 1985
page 7
wrv
Facts at a glance about Ethiopian Jews
by Gerald S. Nagel editor, UJA Press Service
TTI-.
FIRST FOODS IN FREEDOM: Ethiopian Jews sit down for their first meal in Israel at a Jewish Agency ab-
sorption center. The meal consists of potatoes, rice, rolls and tea, to provide nutrition without complicating
common gastric problems. um p, s.m<* courtly of Aim shuimu
How many Ethiopian Jews are in Israel?
A clear majority of the approximately 24,500 Ethiopian Jews are in Israel. Several thousand remain in Africa, hoping
to be reunited with their families in Israel.
Where do they live in Israel?
Most live in absorption centers, and others live in apartments, hotels or other temporary housing. Over 2,000
teenagers live at Youth Aliyah villages. These homes are located across Israel. All are at or near comprehensive Jewish
Agency programs to aid their adjustment (absorption) in Israel.
How are they being helped?
They receive necessities such as food, clothing and shelter. Most, such as 1,400 adults, are in ulpan intensive
Hebrew-language courses. They are learning about Israel and contemporary life from Jewish Agency representatives
(many of whom speak Amharic, the Ethiopian Jews' native tongue) and from Israelis in nearby communities who have
overwhelmingly welcomed them. Many are learning contemporary job skills and academic subjects.
How is this Aliyah different from earlier groups of immigrants?
While Ethiopian Jews are black, there are two perhaps larger distinctions from earlier aliyah. First, these Jews face
the challenge of transition from a primitive culture to modern times. Many had never before seen machines machines
that move fast on a paved road, machines that make things rapidly in mass production, machines that fly. Second, most
are young, with over 70 percent under the age of 14 and most of these have arrived without parents. The challenge to
adjust in Israel is formidable, and these newest immigrants must confront it without parents, whose safety in Africa is
always on their minds.
Is anything special being done to help these youngsters?
Yes, many things. The Jewish Agency has substantially restructured its services, for example providing for group kit-
chen facilities whereas it used to have kitchens sectioned for use by families. Over 2,000 teenagers have been enroMed in
Youth Aliyah, a program that began 51 years ago by saving Jewish youngsters from the clutches of the Nazis and con-
tinues to enroll more Ethiopian Jews every month now that they are saved from famine and religious persecution.
Youth Aliyah residence provide essentials for survival, as well as education, job training and counseling services.
What are other Ethiopian Jews doing for their future?
6,000 are in schools
500 are in vocational-technical training programs
350 are graduating, prepared for vocational-technical positions
90 are in pre-college programs
, 70 are in colleges and universities
75 are becoming paraprofessionals, to aid absorption of others
23 are kessim (spiritual leaders) or learning to become kessim
Who is financing this absorption?
Jews around the world, mainly the people of Israel and American Jews who have a>M^d to'Of'"*"*^
American Jews, through the United Jewish Appeal/Federation Campaign, are the main source of funds for absorpt.on,
Youth Aliyah and other services.
Are there sufficient funds to help Ethiopian Jews become absorbed?
Not yet. Fundraising was successful to meet the initial costs of absorption, but ^e Jobjsnot complete.nor was; ,t ever
said that it would be complete through Operation Moses. American Jews wishing to participate may send a check to
their local federation.
Are Ethiopian Jews a large percentage now of the Israeli population?
Absolutely not. Israel has 4.2 million residents, including 3.5 million Jews within pre-1967 borders. So Ethiopian Jews
constitute only a fraction of a percent of Israel's population.
Can Israel absorb thousands of immigrants in a short period? ,a,a
While a majority of Ethiopian Jews are in Israel, this aliyah ^\^^%^^J^^tZ e
What is ahead for Ethiopian Jews? .. ... __,___mmm
m n ii i .u.^tir.n renters the youngsters moving onto Youth Aliyah villages in many
. Most will likely spend a year or so at absorption centers tne ynK Th m ,jk ^come blue collar workers,
instances and the adults moving into their own homes and *^ZX^JEff**mm. artists, musicians
white collar workers, high-technology specialists, *. lawyera^np {of h|ch,. wj|, |ook to the
and writers. Some will make it with lim.ted ^^^^^3^^through UJA/Federation Campaigns,
people of Israel and to the Jewish Agency and in effect to American uc e
Ethiopian Jewry:
After the
absorption centers
The Jewish Agency, in conjunction with Israel's
Ministry of Absorption, has been working to meet the
needs of Ethiopian Jews. To follow Jewish Agency
programs, the Ministry has established a longer-
range master plan committee to coordinate housing,
vocational training, health care and education.
Once families leave absorption centers and move in-
to permanent housing, there are numerous basic
household items such as beds, refrigerators, stoves,
heaters and furniture that must be purchased. The
Agency and Ministry provide for these.
Health education and preventive medicine are other
areas of involvement. The Ministry of Health reports
that numerous tests have been conducted for the
detection and treatment of illness. Funds have also
been allocated for the expansion of laboratory
facilities, the screening and treatment of children and
adults, and the testing of children's basic develop-
ment skills.
Vocational training to prepare immigrants for ex-
isting jobs in Israel is a top priority of the committee.
Steps taken to meet this objective include national
training programs, on-site training in high-tech skills,
development of job contacts in industry, creation of
curricula tailored to the needs of industry and helping
newcomers find suitable employment.
Educational programs have been developed by the
Ministry of Education in coordination with UJA-
supported agencies. Research has been commissioned
to monitor the learning patterns and progress of the
new students. Educational experts have helped il-
luminate and address special problems. Special cur-
ricular programming, a training center for Ethiopian
Jewish teachers, and written supplements for ex-
isting textbooks are ways Israel's school systems are
adjusting to information about the new immigrants.
In addition, an adolescent health education program
is underway in conjunction with Youth Aliyah,
Israel's program for teenagers which is supported by
the United Jewish Appeal/Federation campaign.
At 150 community centers in Israel which are aided
by the Joint Distribution Committee, a Federation
Campaign beneficiary agency, numerous programs
are offered to enhance the Israeli understanding of
Ethiopian Jews. Lectures and slide shows explaining
Ethiopian Jewish history illuminate various aspects
of Ethiopian Jewish culture with local residents. In
addition, centers offer Hebrew classes, homework
assistance for children, sports activities, music,
dance, arts and crafts and other cultural activities to
Ethiopian Jews and others. Some centers offer com-
prehensive educational programs for Ethiopian
children and adults.
Special programs help develop Ethiopian Jews'
spiritual leadership, with yeshiva scholarships for
kessim (priests) and training programs for future
kessim.
Veteran Ethiopian Jewish immigrants are also
trained as paraprofessionals to help newcomers
through the transition period.

* i*.
EDUCATION: THE KEY. Education has long
been a key to Jewish survival and the Jewish
Agency, funded largely by United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation campaigns. Here at a Jewish
Agency absorption center in Or Akiva, midway
between Haifa and Tel Aviv, Ethiopian Jewish
youngsters play and learn about life in their na-
tional homeland.
I'JA Pnm Strvirv I'holnn by Mark Bn.wdy (tu(>) n

Pages
Federation, October 1985
Marilyn
dership Enrichment Forum
Community events to focus on the
Jewish past, present and future
The pride of the
professional volunteer
by Marilyn K. Smith
Marilyn K. Smith
On January 1 of this year, our com-
munity suffered a great loss with the
passing of Marilyn K. Smith. Marilyn
dedicated her life to enhancing our
knowledge and concern for the quali-
ty of Jewish life around the world, in
Israel and in our own community.
Marilyn served in various leadership
capacities within Federation in-
cluding vice president of the Board of
Directors, president of the Women's
Division and chairman of the Plann-
ing and Budgeting Committee.
The Marilyn K. Smith Philan-
thropic Fund was established in her
memory, and later this month the
first annual Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment Forum.
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation through a grant
from the Fund, will be held in Miami.
This lecture series honors her
memory and continues to perpetuate
her vibrant spirit and lifelong concern
for the learning and sharing of
Jewish ideals. World renowned
scholar and author Dr. David Hart-
man will be the featured speaker for
the entire series of lectures.
Dr. Hartman's topic for the series
wfll be "The Living Covenant." He
will offer his personal perspective on
the present state of the Jewish people
and their development during the
next decade, with a particular em-
phasis on the problems and
challenges facing the American
Jewish community in a pluralistic
society.
David Hartman was raised in the
Brownsville section of Brooklyn. New
York where he attended a yeshiva.
He received his rabbinic ordination at
Yeshiva University in New York City
and his Ph.D at McGill University in
Montreal.
Dr. Hartman and his family moved
to Israel in 1971. He is the author of
numerous philosophical works. His
latest book is The Living Covenant
which will be released this fall. In
both the book and these lectures. Dr.
Hartman looks candidly at our collec-
tive present and future, exploring
both the dangers and the oppor-
tunities inherent in each.
The Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum wfll be held on
Monday, October 28 through
^ Wednesday, October 30. Six lectures
are planned during the three day
event, and attendance is by invitation
only. The schedule is as follows:
Monday, October 28 for Federation
board members. Pacesetter and
Vanguard Division members at the
Omni International Hotel, 1601 Bis-
cayne Boulevard at 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday. October 29 for Jewish
community professionals of Federa-
tion and its beneficiary agencies at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami, 137
NE 19th Street at 8:30 a.m.
Tuesday. October 29 for key
leaders of the Greater Miami com-
munity at the Omni International
Hotel at 12:00 noon.
Tuesday. October 29 for key
leaders of the Greater Miami Jewish
community at Temple Beth Sholom,
4144 Chase Avenue, Miami Beach at
8:00 p.m.
Dr. David Hartman
Wednesday. October 30 for
members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's Divi-
sion at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami at 12:00 noon.
Wednesday. October 30 for
members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Young Leader-
shp Council at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami at 7:30 p.m.
The trustees of the Marilyn K.
Smith Philanthropic Fund are Ham-
B. Smith. Joseph A. Smith. David B
Smith, Lou Ann Smith. Federation
President Samuel I. Adler, Federa-
tion Executive Vice President Myron
J. Brodie and Central Agency for
Jewish Education President Nan
Rich.
For more information concerning
the first annual Marilyn K. Smith
Leadership Enrichment Forum or
the Marilyn K. Smith Philanthropic
Fund, please contact Federation's
Assistant Executive Vice President
Arthur L. Flink at 576-4000. exten-
sion 220.
Editor'* male: Marilyn Smith was a
truly dedicated wunteer not only to
our Jewish community, she de>
herself to many causes. In this article.
" A Professional Volunteer: What's
that*" The question springs forth on
an airplane en route to a UJA train-
ing session, during chitchat at a
cocktail party, and from an in-
quisitive census-taker. When making
a new acquaintance. I used to have
fun answering a question with a ques-
tion: "What do you do? he or she
would ask. 'About what?" was my
reply. It is downright tiresome to
keep justifying the merits and pride
of the professional volunteer.
Let's parallel the career woman
and the professional volunteer. After
initial interest and motivation comes
schooling and training. A career per-
son may seek out or be recruited by
Air Florida or IBM, just as a
volunteer seeks out or is recruited by
UJA or Federation. Each ac-
cumulates a resume and an im-
pressive list of credentials. It's no dif-
ferent in either world. Career people
climb the corporate ladder with
salary hikes and prestigious titles.
Volunteers climb the organizational
ladder with extra bonuses that do not
put meat on the table, but do put flesh
on the soul.
Don't misunderstand. There's
nothing wrong with earning monev.
The sense of accomplishment arid
worth that accompanies a gratifying
career with attendant money." in-
dependence and power is understan-
dable. But hear this: we who choose
to volunteer our efforts a valiant,
smaller, not-dead-yet breed are
demanding society's respect. We are
at the heart of a civilized world. We
wield our own brand of power, in-
fluencing future generations. We are
needed desperately. We save the
government and taxpayers enormous
sums of money and time. Erma
Bombeck once compared volunteers
to yachts: "They could staV moored
where it s safe and still justify their
being, but they choose to cut through
rough waters, ride out storms and
take chances ... If vou have to ask
how much they cost, you can't afford
tnem. Amen.
It is often said. "But a volunteer
doesn t have to be on the job from
-o- Yes. but most volunteers I
know take their responsibilities as
seriously as if they were being paid bv
the hour. Its a matter of credibility
and purpose. And. it isn't just what
r;?JtL!n1*5 ** i convinced
tnat to be effective in our work we'd
better get something significant and
meanmgful out of it or get out of it.
Whatever it is that motivates us, our ,
ownperaonal needs must be satisfied.
Most volunteers I know feel thev
receive far more than they give.
ISiJZdo 2 receive a md
2"e rfop^nts of an enriching
pajload. Being a Professional
\olunteer u the most exciting and
challengmg thing since motherhood
and ^t,Ve' nurturmg- life-saving
w ,mJ. t'S?ma,nmg *"or J^sh
SSSriJL'" *" W^' ennobling
enterprise: part of a long tradition
which appeared originally ;r }f0.
meat Magazine, she explains
motivated her to dedicate her |
helping others.
But beware, there is always a price
to pay. Frequently, those im-
measurable pleasures give way to im-
mense pressures.
Did anyone tell us before we got in-
volved that our privacy would be in-
vaded? That our phones would ring
off the wall, especially at meal times?
That we would feel the pangs of guilt
about not spending enough time with
our kids? That we'd hurt and ache
about other people's apathy and indif-
ference? that we would be so super-
structured and over-scheduled? That
we'd have an agonizing conflict bet-
ween the needs of our loved ones, the
needs of the community, and the
needs of our own personal self" That
our single-minded commitment might *
fracture old-standing friendships
marching to a different tune?
Which of us has not craved a
hardearned. restful vacation: time
away from the usual stress and
strain, and our "Jewish Domain? We
book into some fabulous exotic spot.
and what do we do? Proceed to look
up any and every local Jew to discuss
you-know-what.
Apropos of the price one pavs. I
have a confession to make. Though
many of the male volunteers are my
friends. I used to resent them. I felt
abused rather than used, spending
many more hours and working far
more tirelessly than they did. I've
reconsidered, and possess renewed
respect for all both men and
women who earn a living day-by-
day and choose to spend "their
precious extra moments doing wor-
thwhile tasks in the Jewish communi-
ty. I can only hope that more of our
career women will continue to make
that extra effort as well. Their talents
and intelligence are badly needed in
order that we all take our rightful
places along side our male colleagues.
There are a vast number of other
things I'd love to do; but for me. right
now. the action is here as a volunteer.
It is my choice, and it is my pleasure.
Don't be misled. It's not all altruistic.
or payment of "Jewish Dues." Where
else can one find the potential for
such outstanding personal enhance-
ment: the superb opportunity to risk.
to learn and grow; the possibility of
sharing unique events with special
human beings; the occasion to par- *
ticipate in raising funds and render-
ing decisions that impact Jewish life
here, in Israel and in the world at
large? Where else can one feel so con-
gruent, working in a professinal
capacity with no monetary compensa
tion for something so positive and im-
portant as the perpetuation of the
dreams and values of our people?
So someday, somewhere, sometime
soon when you're asked, "What do
you do? What are you? Shout it out '
with a clarion "non-apologetic,
dignified rejoinder: "What am 1 A
Professional Volunteer, that's what!"


Federation, October 1985
Page 9
Campaign
iliance Division formed
Herbert Canarick
Aaron Podhurst, the 1986 CJA-
IEF general campaign chairman, has
announced that Federation's Hi-Rise
Division has been renamed the
Alliance Division. Podhurst also
anounced that Federation Board of
Directors member Herbert Canarick
has been appointed chairman of the
Alliance Division. Canarick previous-
ly served as general chairman of the
Aventura/Turnberry campaign.
Canarick sees enormous potential
for the Alliance Division which he
feels represents much more than a
name change. "There are literally
hundreds of hi-rise, townhouse and
condominium communities in Greater
Miami. In the past, we have concen-
trated our campaign efforts in
selected areas, each staging its own
campaign. More than half of the hi-
rise communities in Greater Miami do
not have an organized structure to
,stage. a Federation campaign. A ma-
jor goal of the Alliance Division is to
unite and build communities by bring-
ing the Federation message and cam-
paign case to previously unaffiliated
communities at larger and more ex-
citing Federation events. By doing so
we will increase our campaign
achievements while reducing the
costs incurred in raising funds."
Canarick has already laid the
groundwork for comprehensive
worker training for the Alliance Divi-
sion campaign. Members of the
Alliance Division will hold breakfast
meetings on the first Thursday of
each month at the Federation
building at 9:30 a.m. The first
meeting is scheduled for November 7.
"At these meetings we're going to
take a business-oriented approach.
'"We'll discuss our goals, what
obstacles we might encounter, and
what can we do as an alliance to over-
come any obstacles and reach our
goals," Canarick noted.
Canarick has announced that Ad-
miral's Port and Commodore Plaza in
North Dade are the first communities
to join the Alliance Division, and will
stage a joint 1986 fundraising drive.
"This is an indication that our Jewish
community supports the concept and
philosophy of the Alliance Division,
and I expect many more communities
to follow the lead of Admiral's Port
and Commodore Plaza in the next
few weeks," stated Canarick. Nate
Kazten serves as general chairman of
the Admiral's Port/Commodore Plaza
Federation campaign. MUt Engelman
is campaign chairman of Admiral's
^Port and Irving Bicofsky is campaign
chairman of Commodore Plaza.
I* lenarick indicated that negotia-
tions to form alliances are currently
underway with the following con-
dominium communities; Sky Lake,
Sunny Isles, Bal Harbour, Belle Isle
and others in Greater Miami.
Like any quality business ven-
ture," noted Canarick, "the success
of the Alliance Division will be
predicated on maximum use of
resources. Our resources are the
members of these communities who
are willing to expend the time and ef-
fort to reach out to their friends and
neighbors; to involve as many new
people as is possible in the Federation
campaign. With their support, and
with the assistance of a very capable
Federation staff, I have no doubt the
1986 Alliance Division campaign will
exceed all previous campaign
achievements.
To learn more about the Alliance
Division, please contact Alliance Divi-
sion Director Susan Marx by calling
576-4000, extension 202.
Canarick to lead
Pacesetter
Washington
Connection'
mission
Herbert Canarick, chairman of
Federation's Alliance Division, and
Hazel Canarick, chairman of the
Aventura campaign, will lead a group
of Pacesetters making the
"Washington Connection"
November 11-12.
The Greater Miami contingent will
join with a group of community
leaders from the United States and
Canada in our nation's capital for an
in-depth look at issues and legislation
which affect our Jewish community.
The group will then join with the
Council of Jewish Federations 54th
General Assembly, November 13-17,
the largest gathering of Jewish com-
munal lay leaders and professionals
in North America.
A minimum gift of $10,000 to the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund is required
for participation in the "Washington
Connection." Please call Susan Marx
at 576-4000, extension 202 for more
information.
Missions committee chairman
announces 1985-86 program
The 1985-86 Mis-
sions program of the
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
will be highlighted by
several missions that
are bound to suit
everyone's needsand ^^w
interests. Gerald Gerald Olin
Olin, the newly installed chairman
of the Missions Committee, com-
mented on this year's program.
"Beginning with our 13th Annual
Community Mission this month, and
continuing through the summer of
1986, I feel we will be offering a
series of missions which are of the
highest caliber. Missions allow par-
ticipants to visit Israel in the best
way possible. We have the finest ac-
commodations, obtain the services of
the best guides, and get to see places
and meet people that the ordinary
tourist rarely experiences."*
Olin continued, "And missions go
well beyond the Israel experience.
Our program of premissons offer
visits to cities on the European conti-
nent which have rich Judaic heritage
and tradition. For instance, the Com-
munity Mission will visit Paris,
France, home to Europe's largest
Jewish community. Other missions
visit Eastern European cities such as
Prague, Bucharest and Warsaw. By
bearing witness in these cities which
have remnant Jewish communities,
we learn powerful lessons about our
past, which serve to strengthen our
resolve as Jews and enhance our will
as a people."
The 1986 Missions program com-
mences with the Community Mission
to Paris and Israel on October 10-25.
Samuel I. Adler, Federation presi-
dent, and Aaron Podhurst, 1986 CJA-
IEF general campaign chairman will
join mission leaders, Gerald and Mar-
sha Olin and Ted and Elly Wolf on the
mission. More than 70 Jewish com-
munity leaders will be on this
mission.
Other missions planned for the year
ahead include a spring mission to
Bucharest, Rumania and Israel, May
3-18. Participants will be in Israel on
"Yom Haatzmaut," Israel's in-
dependence day celebrating the
State's 38th birthday. The leaders of
the spring mission are Norman and
Jean Lieberman and Myron and San-
di Samole.
Admiral's Port and Commodore Plaza have formed the first alliance for the 1986
CJA-IEF campaign. Seen at the organizational meeting are: (standing left, to
riaht) Admiral's Port Chairman MUt Engelman, Admiral's Port/Commodore
Plaza Chairman Nate Katzen, Al Morrows, Al Leventhal, Commodore Plaza
Chairman Irving Bicofsky, Meyer Siegel and Judy Schwartz. Seated (from left to
right) are- Sybil Phillips, Lil Friedman, Helen Feder and Leo Pam.
The Young Leadership Council of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
will sponsor the UJA National Mis-
sion to Israel on May 11-21. Two
premissions are available on May
7-11. The first. "Holocaust to
Rebirth," will visit Warsaw. Cracow
and Auschwitz in Poland. The other.
"Golden Age to Rebirth" will visit
Madrid, Toledo and Cordoba in Spain.
Dr. Doug and Jan Miller and Barbara
Kipnis will serve as mission leaders.
The Summer Family Mission is
scheduled for July 30 August 10.
This mission, geared to allow parents
and their children to share the Israel
experience together, provides the
perfect opportunity to have children
Bar or Bat Mitzvah in the biblical
homeland.
Olin indicated that other missions
are currently in the planning stages
and will be announced shortly. Ellen
Brazer has joined the professional
staff of Federation as Missions Coor-
dinator. "Having been on several
missions myself, I can say it truly
represents the experience of a
lifetime. As Missions Coordinator, I
would like as many people as possible
to share the feelings of excitement
and joy which emerge from a mission.
Here in Miami, I can only tell people
about it and encourage them to take
the opportunity to participate on a
mission. If they do, then they'll know
what it's all about," Brazer noted.
To learn more about Federation's
Missions program, or to receive
details on upcoming missions please
contact Ellen Brazer at 576-4000, ex-
tension 215.
Yeshiva
University
seminar series
The 1985-86 "Issues of our Times"
seminar series, sponsored by Yeshiva
University, takes pride in announcing
that this program will be expanded to
the Broward and Palm Beach County
areas.
Rabbi Warren Kasztl, the newly ap-
pointed field director for the Max
Stern Division of Communal Ser-
vices, explains, "This is one of many
services Yeshiva University will be
offering the Broward and Palm
Beach county areas. These represent
one of the fastest growing Jewish
areas in the country, and we want to
do what we can to do what we can to
assist in its qualitative growth."
The "Issues of our Times" seminar
series begins its fourth year, and, in
the past, has featured such noted
speakers as Alan Dershowitz,
renowned professor of law at Har-
vard University, and Dr. Fred
Rosner, famous author and expert in
the field of Jewish medical ethics. The
lectures will take place the first Tues-
day of each month, (November 5,
December 3, January 7, February 4,
and March 4), 7:30 p.m. at Congrega-
tion Anshei Emuna, Del ray Beach.
Yeshiva University, America's
oldest and largest University under
Jewish auspices, will ce'ebrate its
Centenniel in 1986.
For more information, please call
Rabbi Warren Kasztl at his Miami
Beach office. 538-5558.


Page 10
Federation, October 1985

Dr. Ruth speaks on sex
and the Jewish tradition
*.i
Simon wiesenthal lectures November 7
Dr. Ruth Westheimer
Dr. Ruth Westheimer, a 57-year-
old, 4' 7" psychosexual therapist who
has pioneered the field of media
psychology with her Sunday night
radio program, "Sexually Speaking"
and her television show, "Good Sex!
with Dr. Ruth Westheimer," will br-
ing "Good Sex" to the Coconut Grove
Playhouse in a lecture sponsored by
the South Dade Jewish Community
Center on Saturday, October 5 at 8
p.m.
Westheimer, known as "Dr. Ruth"
to her audience, will speak on "Sex
and the Jewish Tradition." Born in
Germany, a child of the Holocaust,
Dr. Westheimer went to Israel where
she fought for that country's in-
dependence as a member of the
Haganah. She lived in Paris for a
number of years where she studied
psychology at the Sorbonne. When
she came to this country she obtained
a masters degree in sociology from
the Graduate Faculty of the New
School of Social Research and a doc-
torate in the interdisciplinary study
of the family from Columbia
University.
She is an adjunct associate pro-
fessor at New York Hospital-Cornell
University Medical Center in the
well-known sex therapy teaching pro-
fram led by Dr. Helen Singer Kaplan,
he's a Fellow of the New York
Academy of medicine, and in addition
to her private practice. Dr.
Westheimer is a consultant at New
York University-Bellevue Hospital in
the Department of Geriatrics and at
Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in
the Department of Rehabilitation.
Dr. Westheimer also leads a monthly
seminar on adolescent sexuality for
residents and interns in pediatrics at
Brookdale Hospital, which is af-
filiated with Downstate Medical
Center.
She is the author or Dr. Ruth's
Guide To Good Sex (Warner Books)
which is being translated into Ger-
man, French, Japanese and Turkish,
and has contributed a chapter to a
textbook on sexuality and aging and
rehabilitative medicine published by
Sanders. Dr. Westheimer is married,
has two children and resides in New
York City.
Tickets for Dr. Ruth Westheimer's
lecture, "Sex and the Jewish Tradi-
tion" are available by calling the
South Dade Jewish Community
Center at 251-1394, or at all Bass
Ticket Outlets.
Ticket prices are $50 for patrons,
$25-$20 general admission and $15
for senior citizens. All proceeds will
benefit the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center. For more information
call 251-1394.
Simon Wiesenthal, internationally
known hunter of Nazi war criminals
who has been responsible for the ar-
rest of over 1,000 Nazi criminals, will
speak on Thursday, Nov. 7 at 7:30
p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, 4144
Chase Avenue, Miami Beach, His lec-
ture, "Murderers Among Us: Conse-
quences of the Holocaust," is spon-
sored by the Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center, the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center
and the Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center.
Wiesenthal has dedicated his life to
documenting the genocide that occur-
red in Europe under Hitler and hun-
ting down the perpetrators of that
crime who are still at large. "When
history looks back," Wiesenthal ex-
plains, "I want people to know the
Nazis weren't able to kill 11,000,000
people and get away with it."
He is the founder and head of the
Jewish Documentation Center in
Vienna. Wiesenthal, with the
cooperation of the United States,
Israeli, Austrian, West German and
other governments, ferreted out
nearly 1,100 war criminals, including
Adolf Eichmann, the "administrator
of the slaughter of the Jews"; Franz
Murer, "The Butcher of Wilno"; and
Erich Rajakinitsch, in charge of the
"death transports" in Holland.
Heading Wiesenthal's most wanted
list, in a persistent search that ended
this past June, was Josef Mengele,
"the Angel of Death," and the physi-
cian who chose the victims to be gass-
ed at Auschwitz. Mengele's remains
were exhumed from a grave in Brazil,
where he is believed to have lived
perhaps for as long as 18 years.
Wiesenthal gives detailed accounts of
his grim sleuthing in his memoirs,
The Murderers Among Us (1967). His
other books include Sails of Hope
(1973), The Sunflower (1970), and
Max and Helene (1982).
Simon Wiesenthal was born on
December 31, 1908, in what is now
the Lvov Oblast section of the
Ukraine. He went to the Technical
University of Prague, where he
received his degree in architectural
engineering in 1932. At the beginn-
ing of World War II, Wiesenthal and
his wife were assigned to a forced
labor camp. By this time, Wiesen-
thal's father and brother, had already
been killed. When the "final solution"
to the Jewish "problem" was formal-
ly decided upon at the notorious Wan-
nsee Conference by the Nazi hierar-
chy in 1942, most of Wiesenthal's and
his wife's relatives were dead; in all, a
total of eighty-nine members of both
families perished. When Wiesenthal
was liberated by an American ar-
mored unit on May 5th, 1945 from
Mauthausen concentrtion camp in up-
per Austria he was barely alive,
weighing less than 100 pounds.
Late in 1945, he and his wife, each
of whom had believed the other to be
dead, were reunited. As soon as his
health was sufficiently restored,
Wiesenthal began gathering and
preparing evidence on Nazi atrocities
for the War Crimes Section of the
United States Army. The evidence
supplied by Wiesenthal was used in
the United States zone war crime
trials.
In 1947, when his association ended
with the United States army, Wiesen-
thal opened the Jewish Historical
Documentation Center in Austria
However, in 1945, the offices were
dosed as the Cold War between the
United States and the Soviet Union
Simon Wiesenthal
intensified and both sides lost in-
terest in prosecuting Nazi war
criminals.
The files from the Center were
given to the Yad Vashem archives in
Israel, except for the documents of
Adolf Eichmann, the Chief of the
Gestapo's Jewish Department, who
had supervised the implementation of
the "final solution." Wiesenthal
never relaxed in his pursuit of
Eichmann. Finally through the col-
laborative efforts of Wiesenthal and
Israeli agents, Eichmann was located
living in Buenos Aires, Argentina in
1959. Captured and brought to Israel
for trial, Eichmann was found guilty
of mass murder and executed on May
31, 1961.
Encouraged by his success in the
Eichmann case, Wiesenthal reopened
the Jewish Documentation Center,
this time in Vienna, and concentrated
exclusively on hunting war criminals.
In 1966, sixteen SS officers, nine of
them found by Wiesenthal, went on
trial in Stutgart, West Germany for
participation in the extermination of
Jews in Lvov.
The work yet to be done is enor-
mous. The West German govern-
ment's war criminals files contains
more than 160,000 names, most
whom have never been tried, and
many still hold positions of pro-
minence in both West and East
Germany.
Wiesenthal's honors include
decorations from the Austrian and
French resistance movements, the
Dutch Freedom Medal, the Luxem-
burg Freedom Medal, the United Na-
tions League for the Help of
Refugees Award, and the U.S. Con-
gressional Gold Medal, presented to
him by President Jimmy Carter in
1980.
In the 1970's Wiesenthal was
honored for his work by Yeshiva
University, which has created the
Simon Wiesenthal Center for
Holocaust Studies in Los Angeles.
The Center has produced the
Academy Award winning documen-
tary, "Genocide," narrated by
Elizabeth Taylor and Orson Welles.
Simon Wiesenthal and his wife, the
former Cyla Muller, met as teenagers
while attending the Buczacs Gym-
nasium and were married in 1936
The Wiesenthals live in a modest
apartment and have little social life
Wiesenthal spends his evenines
answering letters, studying books
and files, and working on his stamp
collection. Their daughter, Pauline
67 now lives in Israel with her hus-
band and three children. A vigorous
man with piercing eyes and quick ner-
vous moments that give the impres-
sion of power and urgency, Wiesen-
thal stands about six feet tall, weighs
about 200 pounds, and has a steel-
gray mustache and thinning steel-'*
gray hair. According to some
observers he looks something like a
plainclothed policeman; others note
that his friendly, cheerful manner
belies the fact that his full-time oc-
cupation is tracking down murderers.
Wiesenthal has often been asked to
explain his motives for becoming a
Nazi hunter. According to Clyde
Fransworth, writing in the New York-
Times Magazine, (February 2, 1964),
Wiesenthal once spent the Sabbath at
the home of a former Mauthausen in-
mate, now a well-to-do jewelry
manufacturer. After dinner his host
said: "Simon, if you had gone back to
building houses, you'd be a
millionaire. Why didn't you?"
"You're a religious man," replied
Wiesenthal. "You believe in G-d and
life after death. I also believe, when
we come to the other world and meet
the millions of Jews who died in the
camps and they ask us, 'What have
you done?', there will be many
answers. You will say, 'I became a
jeweler,' another will say 'I smuggled
coffee and American cigarettes,' and
another will say, 'I built houses.' But
I will say, 'I didn't forget you.' "
Gifts, games and toys Summer
campers at the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC in North Dade gathered goodies
for Elisa (pictured in center), the sum-
mer teen exchange participant from
Or Akiva. The project was part of an
informal Jewish education program
for summer campers at all three JCC
branches.
Elisa's two month visit provided a
unique cultural exchange for
American teens who shared a slice of
Israeli life. Last summer the JCCs
sent three American teens to Israel to
spend time with Or Akiva youngsters.
Destiny


Federation, October 1985
page 11
presents special awards
-
/>

?ine presents the 1985 Special Awards at the JVS Annual Meeting.
Konigsberg (left) was named "Employer of the Year," and Bob Gadan.
partner Myron Irgang (not pictured) of Expressive Designs received the
Uor of the Year" award.
Jewish Vocational Service recently celebrated its Annual Board of
ors meeting and Special Awards presentation. This special evening
osted by Martin Fine and Pat P. Fine, president of the Board.
JVS Board and staff mingled during the dinner and social hour with
ed guests Dr. Mabel Gibby, V.A. Hospital Medical Center, Tayna
brook, United Way of Dade County, Hillel Levy, Greater Miami
ii Federation, and Harvey Goldman, National Association of Jewish
bonal Services. In addition, the 1985 JVS award recipients and their
es shared in the evening's festivities.
er attending to JVS Board matters, the Annual Meeting included a
ntation by guest speaker Harvey Goldman, executive director of the
,nal Association of Jewish Vocational Services. He spoke on the impor-
J of JVS in Miami, to the national organization, and the significant ser-
IjVS offers this community. Eugene Greenspan, JVS executive direc-
land Pat Fine, president, both commented on the many ac-
[ishments and expansion of services that have occured this past year,
I glimpse at the future outlook for JVS.
I highlight of the evening was the presentation of the 1985 JVS Special
is. Board members Shirley Spear and Jeff Stubins acknowledged the
; of this year's award recipients and their importance to JVS and its
. Honored were Nathan Koningsberg, 'Employer of the Year, of
IMasterbuilt Furniture, and Bob Gadan and his partner Myron Irgang,
Iractor of the Year,' of Expressive Designs. Each award winner spoke
b importance of their mutually beneficial relationships with the JVS>.
i evening ended with the presentation of new board members and the
186 JVS slate of officers. They include: President Pat P. Fine;
dent-Elect Shirley Spear; Vice-Presidents Fred Katz, Sandy Susman
Jarvev Weinberg; Treasurer Jeff Stubins; Assistant Treasurer Milli-
Beldner; Secretary Col. Arthur E. Conn and Assistant Secretary,
pile Merlin.
I Jewish Vocational Service is a member of Federation's family of
fies and a beneficiary of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergen-
nd Campaign.
ning disabled teens turn to JVS
ing as well as local and out-of-state
boarding schools and colleges. Sup-
portive and informational group
counseling for students and their
families will also be provided."
Arleen Rosenthal, M.S.W., will
coordinate the "Teen Between" pro-
gram. Mrs. Rosenthal, well known in
the community for her volunteer ser-
vices in the field of Learning
Disabilities, holds a BA degree from
Brandeis University and a M.b.W.
from the University of Chicago
School of Social Service Administra-
tion. Her expertise and unique skills
will provide a complete and diverse
program to service the vocational
needs of the learning disabled Jewish
population.
Individual referrals for the "Teen
Between" program may come from
sionals and other local Jewish com-
munity services.
The Jewish Vocational Service is
the only accredited nonprofit agency
providing career and vocational
?oruLelingg in Dade County JVS.s a
heneficiarv agency of the greater
E Jewish Federation and the
United Way of Dade Co^y- ^
more information about the Teen
Between" program, call JVS at
576-3220.
5at P. Fine, president of the
[Vocational Service, has an-
the expansion of the Com-
I Services Department with a
kice called "Teen Between"
[will provide vocational and
alanning for learning disabled
ladolescents.
said, "We are very pleased to
[agency selected to offer this
Leeded service. It is estimated
k-20 percent of Jewish secon-
[chool students in parochial,
knd private schools suffer from
[form of learning disability.
Btudents of normal intelligence
show an educationally signifi-
liscrepancy between their in-
Ual potential and their actual
If performance, due to a basic
pr in the learning process. Pro-
I vocational guidance for learn-
abled youngsters will direct
i forming realistic career plans
helpful in selecting fields of
[which can lead to actual job
ction."
brding to Eugene Greenspan,
W director of JVS, "Utilizing
idividualized approach,
felors will provide comprehen-
icploration of career values, in-
and abilities. They will offer
career information, including
Jle options for vocational train-
bbyo announces fall events
BBYOers (B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization) throughout the Florida
Region will be attending the annual
Regional Leadership Training Con-
ference at Camp Owaissa Bauer in
Homestead on October 4-6. The
weekend will provide an opportunity
for extensive leadership training for
newly elected presidents and other
key leaders. The weekend will also in-
clude meetings of chapter and
regional leaders to make decisions
and recommendations for the coming
program year. Observance and ex-
periencing Shabbat together will be a
highlight of the program.
Every Sunday morning BBYO's
fall athletic league will take place at
the South Dade Jewish Community
join JVS
employment
specialists
A special workshop, conducted by
the Jewish Vocational Service and
open to the public, will focus on "A
Guide to the Job Market." In
cooperation with the JCC, JVS
specialists in the field of career
counseling and job placement will
teach you how to realize your voca-
tional potential.
Topics will include networking,
resume writing, interviewing hints
and more. See what you can do for
yourself by attending this workshop
on Tuesday, October 22, 1985 at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900 NE
25th Avenue at 7:30 p.m. If you can-
not attend this enlightening evening,
you can receive employment
assistance and career counseling on
an individual appointment basis by
contacting JVS placement coor-
dinator, Dolores Waldman, 576-3220.
How to "improve
your space"
Large companies, small businesses,
professional offices, medical offices,
hospitals, and social service agencies
all too well know the difficulty of stor-
ing or warehousing large numbers of
files. Personnel records, financial
data and client files which require
safe storage are often exposed in
business offices, leaving them unsafe
as well as unsightly.
These important documents can
now be placed on microfilm and
stored securely within a minimal
amount of space. You will make bet-
ter use of precious office space by
contacting the Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice Micrographics Department for
all your microfilming needs. The JVS
now trains young adults on this state-
of-the-art equipment for your benefit.
Take advantage of this new service -
store your important source
documents securely and efficiently by
contacting Richard Gendel, 576-3220,
or by visiting the Micrographics
Department at the JVS Central
Facility, 318 NW 25th Street. You
too can "improve your space" in this
most creative and cost-effective
manner.
Center, 12401 SW 102nd Avenue,
Miami. AZAers will be participating
in flag football and BBGs in
volleyball.
Jewish teenagers between the ages
of 14 and 18 are welcome to become
involved in BBYO. Call 253-7400 now
to become involved in this year's fun
and activities. The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is the largest Jewish
youth organization in the world, serv-
ing over 25,000 youth. Don't miss out
call today!
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion is a member of Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
New Staffer
at Hillel
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
of Greater Miami is pleased to an-
nounce the appointment of Marcy
Hacker as program director for
North Dade Hillel. Hacker coor-
dinates programs and services for
Jewish students at Florida Interna-
tional University's Bay Vista campus,
Miami-Dade Community College
North; Barry University and the
Southeastern College of Osteopathic
Medicine. The central office is located
at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, with additional
facilities on each of the campuses.
Full-time service to these schools
was established over a year ago with
a grant from the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The program,
entering its second year, offers a
range of educational, social, cultural
and religious activities to Jewish
students attending college in the
North Dade area.
The Hillel program in North Dade
"brings to the campuses an
awareness of Hillel and the Jewish
student presence," according to
Hacker. Her immediate goals are "to
increase the impact of Hillel by
developing student leadership and of-
fering a comprehensive program of
holiday and Shabbat celebrations,
parties, community service projects,
Jewish cultural events, discussion
groups and, in general, providing
unlimited opportunity for student in-
volvement in Hillel."
Hacker, a graduate of the Universi-
ty of Florida, is enrolled in a master's
degree program in social work at the
Wurzweiler School of Social Work,
Yeshiva University. Last year she
was a program intern at the Universi-
ty of Miami Hillel Foundation, work-
ing with graduate student groups and
organizing dormitory outreach to
Jewish students. She enjoys working
with college students and likes the
campus atmosphere. "There is a lot
of commitment among students to
creating a more visible Jewish image
on campus. The enthusiasm our
students bring to Hillel e.icourages us
to meet this challenge."
For more information on Hillel in
North Dade call 932-4200. The Hillel
Jewish Student Centers of Greater
Miami is a beneficiary agency of the
Greater Miami^Iewish Federation.


\
Page 12
Federation, October 1985
Agencies
JFS to offer series of family life workshops
Communicating with teens, becom-
ing a step parent and adjusting to
divorce are just a few of the topics to
be offered in the fall series of Family
Life Education Workshops being
sponsored by Jewish Family Service
of Greater Miami (JFS).
"The series, which begins this
month, will offer a positive learning
experience for parents and step
parents, their teenage children,
divorced singles and homemakers,"
says Susan Rubin, director of the JFS
Prevention Department, which coor-
dinates the workshops.
"Each workshop is designed to
focus attention on issues of today that
have become pertinent to the chang-
ing lifestyles of Jews of all ages," she
explains.
Several workshops are offered for
parents who are interested in improv-
ing their parenting skills and learning
to cope with problems as a parent.
"Positive Parenting," is a four-week
program scheduled for Wednesdays,
7-8:30 p.m. beginning Oct. 23 at the
JFS Miami Beach Office, 7455 Collins
Avenue. This workshop is designed
for parents with children ages 3 to 11
and will teach positive methods of
discipline, motivation and
communication.
"Living With Your Teenager," a
five-week program scheduled for
Thursdays, 7-8:30 p.m., begins Oct.
24 at the JFS North Dade Office,
2040 N.E. 163rd St. Sessions will
focus on communication, discipline,
sexuality and peer relationships.
"Successful Step Parenting," a
five-week program scheduled for
Thursdays, 7:30-9 p.m., begins Oct.
24 at the JFS South Dade Office,
8905 S.W. 87th Avenue. This pro-
gram will discuss relationships with
ex-spouses, visitation, privacy, com-
munication, discipline, competition
and motivation.
For women who spend all or part of
their day working in the home, JFS
offers "Women At Home," a six-
week program scheduled for
Tuesdays, 10-11:30 a.m. beginning
Oct. 22 at the JFS Main Office, 1790
S.W. 27th Avenue, Miami. Topics to
Hillel sponsors leadership weekend
More than 80 South Florida college
students are expected to participate
in the fifth annual Hillel Student
Leadership Training Conference on
October 11 to 13 at the Hilton Inn,
Singer Island. The weekend, spon-
sored by the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foun-
dations of Greater Miami and
Broward-Palm Beach Hillel, is
designed to prepare students from
area campuses for leadership within
their Hillel or Jewish student
organization.
This year a scholar in residence will
be added to the program. Gene
GreenzWeig, executive director of the
"You've got what it takes...
... and you may not even know
it." With this new slogan and a new
marketing approach, the Douglas
Gardens Thrift Shops, a division of
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, is aggressively
reaching out to previously untapped
markets to help support their work.
Proceeds from the sale of merchan-
dise donated to the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops goes to buy life-giving
medicines and medical supplies for
the indigent residents of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged. "As our community grows, so
grows the need for funds by the
Thrift Shops," said Glenn Solomon,
director of Retail Operations. "Thrift
Shop sales must keep pace with the
needs of the elderly who depend on
us."
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops have
traditionally relied upon the well-
established Jewish community of
long-standing to donate merchandise.
Now, in a major effort to broaden
their donor base, the Thrift Shops are
actively enlisting the help of more re-
cent arrivals to Florida and the
younger community, as well as cor-
porate donors.
For over 20 years, the Douglas
Gardens Thrift Shops have been a
community resource, helping people
in all walks of life. In addition to pro-
viding money for medical necessities
that the indigent elderly would other-
wise have to do without, the Thrift
Shops serve a larger segment of the
community.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops pro-
vide jobs for local people and through
the CETA program, provide jobs and
job training for unemployed youths in
the community. The Thrift Shops also
enable a devoted following of shop-
pers to purchase affordable
household furnishings and clothing.
"We've got the goods," explained
Thrift Shop committee chairman
Aaron Kravitz. "Among expert
bargain hunters, we are known as the
best in town. Even the Miami Herald
recently rated us the best place to buy
used furniture."
Last year, Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops grossed over $1 million in
sales. With the push into new areas,
particularly communities springing
up in South Miami, Thrift Shops'
staff hopes to do even better this
year.
"What may be a cluttered attic or
closet to you can mean a lot to us,"
said Mr. Solomon. "All donations are
tax-deductible, picked up free of
charge and, best of all, work wonders
right here in our community."
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops are
located at 3149 Hallandale Beach
Boulevard in Hallandale and at 5713
NW 27 Avenue in Miami. For further
information or pick-up, please call
751-3988 in Dade, 981-8245 in
Broward.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a member of
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, will deliver a keynote address on
Jewish perspectives toward com-
munity leadership. He will also lead a
study group on contemporary and
traditional perspectives on Jewish
community leadership.
Hillel staff will conduct workshops
on program planning, group
dynamics, publicity and outreach, as
well as on Jewish ethics and values
clarification.
Call your Hillel director or the Area
Office at 661-8549 for more
information.
be discussed include the value of
homemaking in today's career-
oriented world, creating oppor-
tunities for personal growth and
development, evaluating the question
"does mother always have to come
last?," and managing time more
effectively.
Due to the community's over-
whelming response to the recent JFS
workshop "How To Survive In The
Sandwich Generation," the program
will be offered again for four weeks
on Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m. beginning
Oct. 28 at th JFS Main Office. This
workshop is specifically designed for
individuals who are "caught-in-
between" with obligations to aging
parents and to their own families.
Coping skills, resource exploration
and future planning will be discussed.
For divorced or separated men and
women, JFS is offering "Adjusting
To Divorce," a six-week program
scheduled for Mondays, 7-8:30 p.m.
beginning Nov. 4 at the JFS Main Of-
fice. Discussion will focus on coping
strategies, legal issues, finances and
the singles scene.
Teenagers 14 through 18 have the
opportunity to openly discuss topics
of concern to them in the JFS teen
forum entitled "What Do You
Think?" The four-week program is
scheduled for Tuesdays, 7-8:30 p.m.
beginning Nov. 12 at the JFS Main
Office. Teens may discuss anything
from sexuality and drugs to parents,
friends and school.
For a free brochure and registra-
tion form, or to register by phone,
call the JFS Main Office at 445-0555,
Monday through Friday from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m.
The Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami is a member of
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Ftfnd
Campaign.
Holocaust center lecture series
The Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center is pleas-
ed to announce that enrollment is
now being accepted for the Sixth An-
nual Volunteer Interviewer Training
Course and Holocaust Lecture Series
which began September 4. This class
is free of charge and the public is in-
vited to attend.
The lecture series covers the events
of the entire Holocaust period from
antecedents to modern day implic-
tions.
These subjects are dealt with
through the eyes of historians,
educators, psychologists, and most
importantly, through the words of
the eyewitnesses themselves the
Survivors, Liberators and
Protectors.
The Holocaust Lecture Series con-
cludes with specialized training for
those volunteers who wish to become
certified as interviewers for the
Center.
The course is accredited by local
universities and the Department of
Professional Regulations. The
Holocaust lectures will run through
December with interviewers' training
in January and February and will
meet each Wednesday from 1:00 to
4:00 p.m. on the Bay Vista Campus of
Florica International University.
Anyone interested in registering
should call the Center office at
940-5690.
1985/1986 SYLLABUS
TIME: Lectures: Wednesdays 1
p.m.-4 p.m.; Video Testimonies: Days
vary, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
PLACE: Florida International
University Trade Center Bide.
3rd Floor
Oct. 9
Survivors from Different Geographical
Areas
The Russian Experience. Rachel
Abramowiu. Ph.D., Prof, of Judaic Studies.
University of Miami
The Dutch Experience, Jerry Goldsmith.
M.D., Survivor from Holland
The Hungarian/Czechoslovakian Ex-
perience. Benjamin Amikam, M.D.. Survivor
from Hungary and Czechoslovakia
Oct. 16, 1:00-4:30 p.m.
Comparative Description of the Nazi Camp
System. Joe Unger. J.D.
The Holocaust Revisited: A Survivor
Returns to Auschwitz. Mildred Nitzbenr
Ph.D.. Wife of a Survivor
Oct. 23
Psychological Strategies of the Nazis and
Response from their Victims, Patricia A Lut-
wack. Ph.D., Director of Programs and
Research
the St. Louis." Joe Unger, Interviewer with
video excerpts from the testimony of Herbert
Karlmer, a Survivor from the St. Louis
S.S. Mobile Killing Units on the Eastern
Front, Rolf Wartenberg. Nuremberg Trials
Interrogator
Oct. 30
The Abandonment of the Jews, Book
Review of David Wyman's work by Annie
Ackerman
"The Message That Was Delivered But
Not Heard," Video Tape of Professor Jan
Karski
Nov. 6
The World We Lost: Eastern European
Jewry, Eugene Greenzweig. executive direc-
tor, Central Agency for Jewish Education
Film: "Image Before My Eyes"
Nov. 13
The Many Faces of Heroism: The Resistance
to Nazi Tyranny
Resistance Within the Ghetto and on the
Aryan Side, Rita Hofrichter, Survivor
Resistance in the Forests of Bialorussia,
Harold Zissman, Platoon Commander in Soviet
Underground
Nov. 20
The Implications and Dilemma of the
Judenrat
Film: "The Story of Chaim Rumkowski"
(and the Lodz Ghetto)
Film Discussion: Rabbi Solomon Schiff. ex-
ecutive vice president. Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
Dec. 4
Liberation, A New Life. A New Generation
Liberation of the Camps
Film: "To Bear Witness"
Liberation. Joe Shenker, Liberator
A New Life, Survivor (Speaker to be
scheduled)
A New Generation. A Child of Survivors
(Speaker to be scheduled)
Dec. 11
Implications of the Holocaust Today for the
Jewish and Christian World Arthur
Teitelbaum, Southern Area director, Ami,
Defamation League: Dr.Paul Kirsch, Luthtf an
Minister
Jan. 15. 1986
Developing Oral Historv Skills: Interview
Skills Workshop I. Patricia A. Lutwack.
Ph.D.. director of programs for the Center
The Experience of Interviewing for the
Center. Jeannette Strelitz, Volunteer
Interviewer
Jan. 22
Developing Oral History Skills: Interview
iu'H* ,Work"hoP Patricia A.Lutwack.
Ph.D.. director of programs for the Center*
Jan. 29
0J^.VeoP'n.K 0r'' Hi,tory Skil,8: Interview
duU* Work8hoP "' Patricia A. Lutwack.
Ph.D.. director of programs
Feb.-----
Questionnaire Workshop with the Sur-
vivor Questions, Mildred Nitzberg, Ph.D..
Chairman. Oral History Committee; and Joe
Unger, Co-Chairman, Oral History Committee
Viewing Documentaries
Nov. 19, 21 and Dec. 3. 5 10 a.m.12 p.m.
Viewing of Videotaped Interviews from the
Holocaust Memorial Center -* .
Four Interviews must be seen. Interviews in-
clude selections from Survivors with various
y*ff,J!l Holoc*wt experiences, Liberators,
and Protectors.


Federation, October 1985
Page 13

Letter of Intent
Honor Roll
.......
Abel
I Abrahamer
ny Adler
kael M. Adier
Jd Alexander
im Antin
Applestein
liles Arkin
ira Aronson
I Barnetl
jh Berger
Berger
ey Berkowtiz
I Berkowitz
Berlin
imin Bildner
Blank
Bloom
nas A. Bonn
imin Botwinick
lrd Broad
Lloyd Brown
[Brown
pis Bruck
en Canarick
>ol Center
Cooper
Cypen
Darsky
Dean
ild Falick
per Falk
Farr
r"eig
ge Feldenkreis
sel Fischer
Flatau
Fleeman
Frankel
Friedman
ira Fnedson
B (Mikki) Fuiernick
is Futernick
Md Ganz
We Honor
The men and women listed below have expressed their concern
for the continuing welfare of their fellow Jews by signing a letter
indicating their intent to provide for a bequest to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. We honor these individuals for their
important commitment, helping to ensure that Jewish values and
traditions will be preserved and passed on to future generations.
Ellie Ganz
Solomon Garazi
Harvey Gerald
Gary Gerson
Lillian Gertner
Stanley Gilbert
Alfred Golden
Goldie Goldstein
Sol Goldstein
Harry Goldwitz
Jeff Granoff
Rosalie Green
Alex Halberstein
Joseph Handleman
Louis Harris
Phyllis Harte
Samuel Harte
Ruth Herscher
Robbie Herskowitz
Howard J. Hirschfield
Fred Hirt
Brenda (Micki) Hochberg
Arthur Horowitz
Richard Horwich
Joseph Imberman
Martin Kalb
Joel Karp
Gertrude Kartzmer
Melvin Kartzmer
Herman Katz
Marjorie M. Katz
Richard J Katz
Shepard King
Norma Kipnis
Jay I Kislak
Jonathan Kislak
Alan Kluger
Roberta Kohn
Steven Kravitz
Adele Lawrence
Sidney Lefcourt
Donald E Lefton
Frances B. Levey
Jack H. Levine
Ralph Lev it/
Harry A (Hap) Levy
Joel Levy
Richard Levy
Norman Lieberman
Louis Liebowitz
Nancy Lipoff
Norman H. Lipoff
Meryle Loring
Dr. Louis Lytton
Morton Marcus
Ellen Margaretten
Stanley Marks
Neal J. Menachem
Ernie Michel
Sandi Miot
Stanley C. Myers
Gail Jaffe Newman
Jeffrey Newman
Stanley Newmark
Sidney Olson
Evan Olster
Max Orovitz
Edward A Osher
Evelyn Perlman
Aaron Podhurst
Dorothy Podhurst
Hilda Pomerance
Rosalie Prager
-Samuel Rabin
Forrest Raffel
Gloria Raffel
William Ralkmd
Adria Rasken
Robert Rasken
Nan Rich
Anita Robbins
Charles Rosenberg
Edward Rosenthal
Irving Rubin
Robert Russell
Sandra Saxon
David Schaecter
Marvis Schaecter
Howard Scharlin
Gerald Schwartz
Kenneth J Schwartz
Maxine Schwartz
Estelle Segal
Ira Segal
Philip M Segal
Mendall Selig
Dr. Herman Selinsky
Ruth Shack
Edward Shapiro
Oscar Shapiro
Norma Shaw
Roberta Shevin
Fred K Shochet
Suzanne Shochet
Carl Shustak
Elaine Silverstein
Charles Simon
Sandra Simon
Harry B Smith
Marilyn K. Smith
Joseph Stein
Arnold Stern
Sol Stiss
Donald Tescher
Harold Thurman
Eli Timoner
Jacqueline B. Traurig
Robert H Traurig
Charles Treister
Philip I". Warren
Carl Weinkle
Harry Weitzer
Irving Wexler
Reva Wexler
Leonard Wien. Jr
A B. Wiener
Larl Wiener
l)r George V\ im-
Allan Yarkin
Ray Lllen Yarkin
Mrs Louis Zorn
Joseph P Zuckerman
sed

0eWI5H4>H I LANTHRpPieS
of the greater Miami Jewish federation
, L. Kartzmer, Chairman
bh Imberman, Director
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
telephone: (305) 576-4000


Page 14
Federation, October 1985
Samuel Harte appointed jftv president
Samuel Harte
Samuel Harte, president of
Philmoss and Co., a communications
and cable television consulting firm,
and chairman of the board of Enter-
prise Bank of Florida, has agreed to
lend his expertise to Jewish Federa-
tion Cable Television (JFTV) by serv-
ing as the station's president, an-
nounced Federation President
Samuel I. Adler.
"We are very fortunate to have him
as president of JFTV," said Adler.
"It was a rare occurrence for us to
have found an individual who has
spent so much of his professional
career in the field of cable television
and is still willing to donate his time
and energy to this project on a volun-
tary basis."
"Sam's background in cable televi-
sion, along with his practice of being
actively involved in the day-to-day
workings of each of his ventures, will
provide JFTV with the guidance
which every young company needs to
grow and prosper," Adler added.
Harte has had a varied and suc-
cessful career in the pay television in-
dustry and in finance. His previous
company, Dade Cable Television, of
which he was founder and president,
was acquired by Storer Communica-
tions in 1982.
Harte began his involvement with
cable television as a result of his
educational and entrepeneurial
background. He joined Columbia Pic-
tures in 1967 in helping the company
develop a management program and
marketing that program, which, by
1970, became the newly emerging
technology of video cassettes.
Harte later became involved with
Columbia Pictures' teletheater opera-
tion, which pioneered today's paid
television. In 1973 he, along with
others, acquired the rights to Colum-
bia Pictures' paid television pro-
grams in the Middle East, and form-
ed a new company which later was ac-
quired by TelePrompter, now Group
W., Westinghouse.
Born in Ohio, Harte was raised in
New York and attended New York
University. He earned his bachelor's
degree in economics and his master's
degree in business administration
with a major in economic theory.
While attending graduate school,
Harte was awarded the first teaching
fellowship in finance granted by New
York University. He also taught
courses in corporate financial
management at Long Island Univer-
sity and established an international
school of home study, accredited by
the state of New York, offering basic
courses in accounting, finance and
electronic technologies.
Harte attributes many of his ac-
complishments to the guidance of-
fered him by others. "People," he
says, "are the key to success for in-
dividuals as well as for
organizations."
"None of my accomplishments
would have been possible without
people," Harte says. "I consider
myself very fortunate that there
were people in my life who helped to
guide me, whose opinions and advice
I have respected and have tried to
follow."
Harte proves his love for people
and community through his involve-
ment in civic, educational and philan-
thropic organizations. He serves on
the boards of directors of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and its
South Dade Branch and is actively in-
volved in Federation committees.
Harte also serves on the boards of
Spectrum Programs and the
Southeast College of Osteopathic
Medicine Foundation. He is a Trustee
of the Hialeah/Miami Lakes/Miami
Springs Chamber of Commerce, and
a member of Miami Citizens Against
Crime, the Greater Miami Chamber
of Commerce, the Center for the Fine
Arts and the Society of One Thou-
sand of the National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts.
Harte is married to the former
Phyllis L. Kovolick, who also serves
on the board of directors of Federa-
tion's South Dade Branch and is ac-
tively involved in Federation commit-
tees. The Hartes live in Miami with
their two children.
Cable Crams
A new series of television pro-
grams, "Jewish Television
Magazine," made its local debut on
JFTV last month. The second install-
ment in this series, produced by
Jewish Federations throughout the
United States in cooperation with the
Countil of Jewish Federations, will
air on October 12 and 26 at 7:30 p.m.
The show features interviews, enter-
tainment, holiday celebrations, news
about Israel and Federation-related
innovative programs.
"Bet Din,'; the Jewish "People's
Court," continues to be informative
and entertaining, as questions of
Jewish law are explored in a cour-
troom setting. "Bet Din" airs on
Mondays, Wednesdays and Sundays
at 7:00 p.m.
This month JFTV will take viewers
on a "Magical Mitzvah Tour" with an
award-winning children's segment of
the television magazine "Shalom
Baltimore." This half-hour program,
scheduled to air on October 6 and 20
at 6:30 p.m. follows a young com-
puter buff as he journeys into "video
land" and learns the magic of mitz-
vot, and shares with us a day in th^
life of a Jewish Big Brother and his
Little Brother.
"Hello Jerusalem," now aired in
this community exclusively on JFTV,
continues to be the station's most
popular show. This independently-
produced one hour program comes
directly from Israel with segments on
sports, fashion, the sciences, art, ar-
chaelogy, Mediterranean-style
cuisine, interviews with famous
Israelis and other features. Pleasfe
see the schedule below for air times.
Throughout the month of October,
JFTV Bulletin Board, a description of
happenings in the Greater Miami
Jewish community, will be brought to
you directly from Israel.
October 15-24 JFTV will join with
participants on Federation's Com-
munity Mission to Israel. Look for
shows in the coming months chronicl-
ing the mission, on the High School in
Israel program and the Red Mogan
David of Israel, the equivalent of the
American Red Cross.
watch jftv on:
Storer (North Dade)
Storer (South Dade)
Harte-Hanks
Dynamic-
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Channel P-29
Channel 14
Channel 2
Channel 43
Channel 11
Channel 36
* Programming Schedule Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc. | OCTOBER 1985*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenie s Kitchen Film Special Eenies Kitchen Film Special Aleph or Film Special Hello Jerusalem JCC:A Special Place
5:30-6 p.m. Checkup/ Mount Sinai Film Special Hello Jerusalem Checkup/ Mount Slnal Film Special Eenies Kitchen
JFTV Bulletin Board
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust Shalom Baltimore or Film Special Eenies Kitchen we Remember The Holocaust Check up/ Mount Slnal we Remember The Holocaust i
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. bull Small voice or viewpoint JCC:A special Place Film Special Film Special Film Special Shalom Baltimore or Film 10/6 & 10/20: I "Magical I Mitzvah Tour" i 10/13*10/27: | Film Special
7-7:30 p.m. Bet Din: The Jewish people's Court Aleph or Film Special Bet Din: The Jewish People's Court Still small voice or viewpoint Hello Jerusalem special Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Bet Din: The Jewish People's Court
7:30-8 p.m. PillOW Talk Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Film Special Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky 10/12 410/26T"1 "Jewish Television Magazine' 10/5*10/19: Film Special Pillow Talk
I 'Subject to chan ge JFTV Bulletin Board


Federation. October 1985
Page 15
en
^Y, OCTOBER 5
Dade Jewish Community Center
"An Evening with Dr. Ruth
r," at the Coconut Grove Playhouse,
i Highway, Coconut Grove. Dr.
r's topic will be "Sexuality and the
iition." The cost is $50 for Patrons,
.s preferred seating and dessert
irith Dr. Ruth; $25/$20 general admis-
15 senior citizen tickets available only
For more information, please call
^Y, OCTOBER 5
Shores Chapter of Women's
)RT will hold a games night begin-
p.m. in the social hall of Biscayne
;r Building, 18130 NE 31 Court,
li Beach. Couvert is $10 per person,
ides prizes, refreshments and good
more information, please call
lias at 931-3900 or Millie Collins at
LY, OCTOBER 10
1-Ann Russell Jewish Community
ites novice through advanced skiers
ibers only) to an organizational
[its ski club this evening at 8:00. Plans
lulated for the first ski trip. For more
please call Bennett Bramson at
LY, OCTOBER 10
liami Jewish Federation Community
remission leaves for Paris.
OCTOBER 13
li Beach Jewish Community Center,
Tree Drive, will hold a softball game
|m. at Polo Park, with a cookout to
he new JCC Mini-Park. Call the JCC
06 to register and for more
OCTOBER 14
i
liami Jewish Federation Community
ives for Israel.
OCTOBER 15
en's League of the Talmudic Universi-
a membership tea. For more inter-
lease call 534-7050.
|AY. OCTOBER 17
iation of Jewish Philanthropies of the
[iami Jewish Federation will hold its
iial Tax Seminar at noon at the Omni
Inal Hotel. Conrad Teitell will be the
Speaker. For more information, please
sundation office at 576-4000.
OCTOBER 18
Jr Adult Department of the Michael-
ill Jewish Community Center in con-
h Mount Sinai Medical Center
| Special Health Day at the JCC, 18900
Lvenue. For more information, please
200.
OCTOBER 20
lan Day School of Temple Emanu-El
>r its Second Annual Sock Hop. For
Irmation, please call 538-2503.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20
The Dating Game, sponsored by the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community Singles, will be
held this evening at 7:30 at the JCC, 18900 NE
25th Avenue. If you are interested in being a
bachelor or bachelorette, stop by and fill out an
application or call Marilyn Krohngold at
932-4200. The cost is $2 for members, $4 for
non-members.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23
The South Dade Jewish Community Center,
12401 SW 102 Avenue, will present a film detail-
ing Israel, past and present, at the Social Senior
Meeting at 11:00 a.m. For more information,
please call Sherry at 251-1394.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 MONDAY, OC-
TOBER 28
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center will host the Robert Orseck Tennis Tour-
nament, open to all U.S.T.A. members. For
more information, please call the Michael-Ann
Russell JCC Tennis Pro Shop at 932-4200.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27
The Temple Beth Am Concert Series presents
"An Afternoon of Music With the Sequoia Str-
ing Quartet," at 4:00 p.m. in the Temple Sanc-
tuary, 5950 North Kendall Drive. For more in-
formatioo, please call Doreen Marx, concert
chairperson, at 667-6667.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 30
Marilyn K. Smith Leadership Enrichment
Forum. See page 8 for more information.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30
A Brandeis University dinner will be held at
6:30 p.m. at the Turnberry Isle Country Club.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
The New Young Leadership Council of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation will sponsor a
$2500 minimum gift event, "A Celebration of
Giving," on behalf of the 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign. The
black tie event will be held at the Grand Bay
Hotel this evening. For more information,
please call Young Leadership Council at
576-4000.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Temple Emanu-El will hold its semi-annual din-
ner dance this evening. For more information,
please call 538-2503.
THROUGOUT THE MONTH
EVERY MONDAY
An Israeli dance class will be offered at the
Univeristy of Miami Hillel Jewish Center at 8:00
p m The cost is $3.00. For more information,
please call 665-6948.

The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 932-4200, the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center, 251-1394, and the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center, 534-3206 offer a
myriad of classes and programs geared to many
interests. Please call your local JCC for more
information.
i
ig for Jewish Community Calendar
Print or Type)
leadline for November events is October 11,
1985
lization
Time
.( )a.m.
)p.m.
name
Phone No.
TO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 661 6i
Jewish film
festival
premieres
October 15
This month the University of
Miami's Judaic Studies Program will
kick off its Second Annual Jewish
Film Festival with a showing of
"Tevye. Der Milchiker" the 1936
Polish film which inspired the
Hollywood classic, "Fiddler on the
Roof."
In response to the tremendous suc-
cess of last year's Festival, the Judaic
Studies Program, with the coopera-
tion of the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, will offer a series of 12
films this year. The first portion of
the festival consists of four classic
Yiddish films, all with English
subtitles.
"The four Yiddish films selected for
the festival are gems not only for
their subject matter, but also for pro-
viding us with a window into the
past," said Dr. Henry Green, director
of the Judaic Studies Program.
All of the films in the first part of
the series will be shown at the
University of Miami's Beaumont
Cinema on Tuesday nights at 7:30
p.m. The schedule is as follows:
October 15: "Tevye, Der
Milchiker" (Tevye, the Dairyman):
Tevye's daughter falls in love with a
Russian peasant and marries him
against the wishes of her parents.
This story line, coupled with the
Jewish rituals of Havdala, teaching
of Psalms to his grandchild and the
lighting of Sabbath candles, all con-
tribute to the rare beauty of this
story. In contrast to "Fiddler,"
"Tevye" is not a musical, and is con-
sidered a far more realistic telling of
Sholem Aleichem's original story.
October 29: "Gott, Mentsh,
Teivel" (G-d, Man and Devil): In this
1949 American film, a poor Torah
scribe becomes the unwitting partner
of the Devil. The Devil has bet G-d
that he can make this pious man hap-
py with money and that he can make
him forget his religious devotion.
November 5: "Der Purimspieler"
(The Purim Clown): This 1937 Polish
film is a bitter-sweet musical comedy
focusing on a love triangle between
the shoemaker's daughter, a travel-
ing actor and a jester.
November 19: "Yidl Mitn Fidl"
(Yiddle with a Fiddle): This 1937
Polish musical comedy stars Molly
Picon in her first role in Yiddish
cinema. Picon, disguised as a boy in
order to play in a musical band, falls
in love with a male member of the
band. This film was the most com-
mercially successful of all Yiddish
films and has remained a favorite of
Yiddish film enthusiasts.
The second portion of the Jewish
Film Festival will consist of eight
films, to be announced at a later date,
the majority of which will have the
same Jewish actor or director.
Tickets for the Judaic Studies Pro-
gram's Second Annual Jewish Film
Festival are available at the door, or
call Dr. Henry Green at 284-4375.
Costs are as follows:
$20 Entire series (12 films)
$ 8 First portion (first 4 films)
$12 Second portion (last 8 films)
$ 3 Individual tickets
All films are free to University of
Miami students.
The University of Miami Judaic
Studies Program is a member of
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.


r-cilic; 1/
I
a
a
Cheers
L'chaim
Prosit
Salud
Sante
Skoal
Did it ever occur to you that
the .Jewish version is just 2 little bit different
trotn ill the rest"'
It *s not iust 2. toast
it 5 a one-word summary of everything
we believe in.
the 1986 Campaign.
VHc ka difference
L charm
And thanks.
Support the
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal/Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or AXiva Campaign
People
Destiny
AATon Podhurst. Genera Cajnpajgn ChAirman
Greater
S31S7
Q


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