The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02956

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
rreater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... Special Insert
eTewIslfo Flor idian
>lume 58 Number 39 Three Sections Miami, Florida Friday, September 27,1985
FitdShochtl By Mail $135 PffC4 50 CefltS
JS. Plans Big Arms Sale To Jordan
rostage:
Review
U.S. Policy
Toward Israel
Bj DAVID FRIEDMAN
Washington (ji
The Rev. Benjamin Weir.
v> was released after l>e-
Ig held for 16 months by
?banese terrorists, said
kat the United States
lould "reexamine" its
)licy toward Israel.
[The 61-year-old Presbyterian
(issionary made this statement in
sponse to a question at a press
inference here at which he said
i told President Reagan that his
kptors, in releasing him, made
Be demand that the U.S. put
ressure on Kuwait to release 17
isoners.
[HE SAID his captors said that
the prisoners, responsible for
>mbing the U.S. Embassy and
tier facilities in Kuwait, were
bleased the six other Americans
ping held hostage in Lebanon
ould be let go. But the terrorists
irned that if this did not happen
an they would kidnap other
nericans and would begin ex-
iting them. Weir said.
\'l do not identify myself exactly
th what they (his captors) are
king nor with their point of
bw," Weir said when asked
fiether he identifies himself with
captors' view of Israel.
'But I do feel that there is need
reexamine U.S. foreign policy
| the Middle East and specifically
irding matters relating to
fS. policy with respect to Israel
the effect of that policy upon
banon and neighboring coun-
es in the Middle East. I think
ere is great need to reexamine
it policy and to seek where that
[leading us."
:ARLIER, Weir said that his
Dtors, while stressing their
Bin objective of freeing the
fcsoners in Kuwait, continually
Lii that "they were very much
Jposed to the Israeli invasion of
jth Lebanon and to the continu-
Continued on Page 2-A
Knesset Speaker Shlomo Hillel meeting
TuUcarm notables in his office. Hillel invited
the delegation from the West Bank town after
Netanya Mayor Yoel Elroy declined to accept
(JTAAVZN News Photo)
their condolences on the murder of a Netanya
man in Tulkarm. Hillel termed his guests
'men of goodwill.'
Packing Pistols?
Arafat Said Will Come to New York
To Address UN General Assembly
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The Israel Mission
to the UN has received in-
formation from well placed
sources here that Yasir
Arafat, leader of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization, will come to
New York in the next few
weeks to address the 40th
session and anniversary of
the General Assembly. If
Arafat's visit materializes,
it will be his second to the
world organization. His first
was in 1974, when he ad-
dressed the General
Assembly carrying a gun in
a holster.
PLO Chief Arafat
"According to all signs, Arafat
will come to the UN to address the
General Assembly," Binyamin
Netanyahu, Israel's Ambassador
to the UN, said in a press con-
ference with Israeli reporters on
the occasion of the opening last
week of the General Assembly.
MORE THAN 100 heads of
state and governement are ex-
pected to attend the Assembly.
Among the visiting heads of state
will be Israel's Premier Shimon
Peres. Netanyahu said that Peres
will stay in the United States from
Oct. 20 to 24, and that following
his address to the Assembly he
will go to Washington to meet
with President Reagan.
He said that the Premier's
itinerary is not yet finalized and
the exact dates therefore for his
UN appearance and the meeting
Continued on Page 12-A
Farrakhan
Miami Leaders Condemn His Appearance Here
|The Greater Miami Jewish
ederation reacted Friday
Sth a statement at a press
inference in which Federa-
>n officials and other
Dted personalities and
^ganizations here called
in communal, civic and
lligious leaders "to join
together in affirming that
there is no room in Miami
for the divisiveness Mr.
(Louis) Farrakhan seeks to
create. There is no room for
his bigotry. There is no
room for his hatred."
The statement was read at a
press conference prior to the ap-
pearance Saturday night of Far-
rakhan in Gusman Hall in Miami.
Farrakhan is leader of the Black
Muslim movement headquartered
in Chicago.
THE JOINT STATEMENT
noted that "Farrakhan is current-
ly on a speaking tour of cities
across our nation in which he has
left in his wake a carnage of
divisiveness and anguish. We are
determined that this will not be
the result of his appearance in
Miami on Saturday ."
Affirming that Farrakhan has
the "right to deliver his
message," the statement em-
phasized that "as it is Mr. Far-
rakhan's right to speak his piece.
Continued on Page 15-A
Deemed
'Helpful'
To Peace
Bv DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (.ITA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion plans to go ahead with a
major arms sale to .Ionian
despite strong Congres-
sional opposition because it
believes it will be helpful to
the Middle East peace pro-
cess. Assistant Secretary of
State Ricahrd Murphy
stresses.
Testifying before the House
Foreign Affairs Committee's Sub-
committee on Europe and the
Middle East, Murphy said the sale
is a "signal" to the Arab states of
the intention of the U.S. to stand
behind the peace process for "the
long run." He said the sale is a
"gesture" needed by Jordan to
demonstrate that the U.S.
"recognize both its military needs
and its political needs-."
MURPHY, who heads the State
Department's Near Eastern and
South Asian bureau, was
reiterating the position taken by
Secretary of State George Shultz
before various Congressional com-
mittee in the last few weeks.
Murphy said the U.S. proposes
to sell Jordan advanced anti-
aircraft and aircraft systems but
would not be specific about
whether Jordan would receive
F-16 or F-20 fighter planes. The
Administration has let it be
known that it would not announce
any sale until after Yom Kippur,
which was on Wednesday. Mur-
phy said that while the U.S. plans
to sell Saudi Arabia some spare
parts for military equipment it
now has, no other major arms
sales to any Arab country is
planned.
Saudi Arabia announced earlier
Continued on Page 7-A
Richard Murphy


"= A4.-J .
^^T^^f^^ondWl^hdityT ^ton^7. 1985
I
Attorneys File Brief
For Rabbi's Right To Wear Yarmulke
Hostage Weir Urges U.S.
To Review Policy Toward Israel
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Attorneys for Rabbi Simcha
Goldman report that they
have filed a brief with the
U.S. Supreme Court
challenging the refusal of
the Air Force to allow
Goldman, as an Air Force
chaplain, to wear a skullcap
while on duty.
.Mien Rothenberg. president of
the National Jewish Commission
on Law and Public Affairs, said
the case will represent the first
time that the Supreme Court will
be hearing a case involving a
religious practice in the military
establishment. The brief was filed
Sept. 3 in response to acceptance
of the case by the Supreme Court
last June, he said.
DENNIS RAPPS. COLPA ex-
ecutive director, said that hear-
ings on the appeal are scheduled
to begin before the Supreme
Court on Dec. 10. The Supreme
Court notified the defense at-
torneys last June 17 that it would
hear the case.
Although Goldman has resigned
from the Air Force and is now a
psychologist with a Chabad House
in Los Angeles, the case is still
valid because of damages
Goldman allegedly suffered in lost
promotions and pay increases he
would have received if he had
obeyed the no-yarmulke order.
Rapps said Goldman remained
in the Air Force Reserves. Rapps
also pointed out that, in addition
to the damages issue, COLPA
undertook to present Goldman
because of the religious rights
issue of the case. '.:. .
ROTHENBERG said Nathan
Lewin, COLPA vice president, is
representing Goldman in the
Supreme Court action. A number
of secular Jewish organizations,
including the American Jewish
Committee, American Jewish
Congress and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, filed friend-of-the-court
briefs in support of Goldman.
Rothenberg said that with Lewin
on the brief were David Butler,
COLPA secretary, and Rapps.
Lewin argued in the brief that
wearing a yarmulke is a religious
observance that interferes with no
one and imposes no burden on the
Rabbi Simcha Friedman
military.
The brief also argued that the
record in the case, which includes
a description of Goldman's ap-
proximately four years of wearing
a yarmulke while in uniform,
showed that banning a yarmulke
is not necessary for military
discipline or morale as claimed by
the Air Force.
THE BRIEF argued, in addi-
tion, that the military services do
not have carte blanche in dealing
with the constitutional liberties of
military personnel and that, given y,
the circumstances of the lack of
adverse impact the yarmulke
would occasion, Goldman had a
constitutional right to wear the
yarmulke on duty.
Goldman is an Orthodox Jew
who was ordained as a rabbi in
1970. After serving for two years
as a Navy chaplain, he enrolled in
the Armed Forces Health Profes-
sions Scholarship program, taking
courses in psychology at-Loyola* **%
University. In September; 1977.
after earning a doctorate in
psychology, he entered on active
duty in the Air Force, as a clinical
psychologist, at March Air Force
Base in California.
From the time he entered Air
Force service until early 1981,
Goldman kept his head covered, as
he had always done. This included
hours when he was on duty at the
Air Force hospital.
ROTHENBERG said that dur-
ing his entire three-and-one-half
years in the Air Force, Goldman
received consistently outstanding
performance ratings. No com-
plaints about his yarmulke were
received, nor were there any
other indications that his variance
from Air Force dress restrictions
had any harmful effect on his
handling of his duties or on
anyone else's military
performance.
In April, 1981. Goldman
testified as a defense witness in a
court-martial wearing his yar-
mulke. The opposing counsel then
made a complaint against him to
the hospital commandant.
On May 8, 1981, he was told by
the commandant that by wearing
a yarmulke on duty, he violated
the Air Force Dress Code. He was
given a formal letter of reprimand
and threatened with additional
sanctions, including a court-
martial, if he did not stop wearing
his yarmulke on duty.
GOLDMAN promptly started a
court action for injunctive relief
and damages. A federal district
court in Washington, D.C.
entered a temporary restraining
order and, after a hearing, issued
on April 26, 1982, an injunction
upholding Goldman's constitu-
tional right to wear a yarmulke on
duty. Goldman was awarded
damages for pay lost as a result of
the ban-yarmulke order.
Continued from Page 1-A
ing effect spilling out from the oc-
cupation of south Lebanon.
And most especially, they were
angry and committed against U.S.
policy in support of Israel. They
aim ultimately in the long run
toward bringing about a greater
system of justice to oppressed
people in the Middle East and in
Arab lands and ultimately
establishing what they saw as a
more just Islamic government."
In response to a question from
Jeremy Levin of the Cable News
Network, also a former kidnap
victim in Lebanon, Weir said he
does not believe he is a victim of
the "Stockholm syndrome" where
captives are brainwashed to ac-
cept the views of their captors.
Weir, who had lived in Beirut
since 1953, said that his first five
years there were spent among a
largely Shiite community and he
understands that Shiites, like
others, have different viewpoints.
"I DO NOT believe that my at
titude has changed in any way,"
Weir said. "I deeply resent the in-
justice of my being kidnapped."
But Weir urged the U.S. to accept
the offer of his captors to
negotiate for the release of the six
Americans still being held. He
said that "opportunity for
negotiations should be sei
because time is short and
chance may not come again.
Although Weir was released,
Sept. 14, it was not mad^L
until President Reaean arm~l
edit. Sept 11^33
reason for the secrecy was t\
bqpt Ornt the oflwr AmericJ
might also be released. WhenS
did not happen he decided to \2\
a press conference although^
refused to go into detaillfk
captivity.
Israel's GNP
At $22 Billion
JERUSALEM (jTA)
Jr^m gTOSS nationaI P^t
L '? estimated betwt
$22-$23 billion, and one quarter of
it goes to defense and defense
related needs, according to Pm(
Eitan Berglass. a leadinn
economist, m a report to a joint I
panel of the Knesset's Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee and
finance Committee. Berglass
noted that Israel pavs to the US
each year about $1 billion in in-
terest and principal on military
aid loans. That burden has been
eased.
s
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"hamir Rebuked
For Attack on AJCong. Mission
By DAVID LANDAU
[JERUSALEM (JTA)
A Cabinet colleague has
larply rebuked Foreign
linister Yitzhak Shamir for
|is remarks blasting the re-
nt American Jewish Con-
ress mission to Cairo and
Lmman and his attack on
forld Jewish Congress
president Edgar Bronfman
>r going to Moscow for
ilks with Soviet officials on
Jewish emigration rights.
YOSEF BURG, Minister of
Religious Affairs, veteran leader
if the National Religious Party
|nd the most senior minister in
he unity coalition Cabinet, told
lis reporter he was "astounded
5v Shamir's criticism and even
more astounded that he chose to
fiake it public.
NOTING THAT neither the
UCongress group's visits to
Jairo and Amman earlier this
Imonth nor Bronfman's trip to
I Moscow were undertaken behind
[the back of the Israel government,
Burg declared, "If Shamir was
against the missions, he could
I have aired his criticism in the
I Cabinet."
Shamir, who is Deputy Premier
I and leader of Likud, indicated in
[an exclusive interview with this
reporter that he thought the
I AJCongress group and Bronfman
were trespassing on what he view-
led as Israel's primacy as
Dr. Yosef Burg
negotiator and policy leader not
only where its own national in-
terests are concerned but as
representative of "the Jewish peo-
ple on Jewish problems."
Shamir peppered his remarks
with denigration of the
AJCongress as a "peanut-size
organization," and personal
disparagement of former
AJCongress president Howard
Squadron. He rapped Bronfman
for undertaking negotiations "on
behalf of Israel and the Jewish
people" for which he was "not
authorized."
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"WHY DENIGRATE them in
public?" Burg asked." At least he
(Shamir) should have remembered
that sometimes we need them."
He added that "There is certainly
no moral or political value in a
public attack made a posteriori
and the personal denigration of
Bronfman was just plain wrong."
Sources close to Burg described
Shamir's attack as "typical Herut
bluster." It was recalled that the
creation of the World Jewish Con-
gress in 1936 occasioned a great
sense of hope among Jews at a
time of events that foreshadowed
the Holocaust; that years later the
WJC succeeded in opening chan-
nels in many countries inaccessi-
ble to both Israel and the World
Zionist Organization, such as
Poland, Czechoslovakia and
Yugoslavia.
The AJCongress group, led by
Harvard Prof. Henry Rosovsky,
issued a statement here express-
ing confidence that Egypt and
Jordan seek urgently to broaden
the Middle East peace process.
They based their conviction on
their talks with President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt and King Hus-
sein of Jordan on which they brief-
ed Premier Shimon Peres.
Jewisr
Belgian King Appoints Jewish
Diplomat As Chief of Protocol
BRUSSELS (JTA) King Baudouin of Belgium
last week appointed a Jewish diplomat to serve as "Grand
Marechal de la Cour," equivalent of Chief of Protocol of the
Royal Court and head of the King's civil list and court
administration.
SYLVAIN FREY, 62, a member of a Jewish family in
Antwerp, was appointed to what is one of the highest of-
ficial posts in the country. He will assume his post in
December.
Frey, a career diplomat, has served up until now as the
Belgian Ambassador in Dublin and has occupied various top
level posts at the Foreign Ministry. He is also a former pro-
fessor at the Flemish section of Brussels University. Frey
succeeds Herman Dehennin, who has been appointed
Belgian Ambassador to the United States.
Reaganites Urged To Squash Deal
NEW YORK (JTA) The Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Organizations, speaking for 39
national Jewish religious and secular groups, has called on
the Administration to withdraw the proposed sale of arms
to Jordan, asserting: "This is the wrong sale, at the wrong
time, for the wrong reasons."
KENNETH BIALKIN, chairman of the Conference,
said the sale will not serve American interests, or the cause
of Middle East peace, or the security of our country's
friend and ally Israel." He added: "We recognize of course
that there is good reason to maintain positive relations bet-
ween our country and the so-called 'moderate' Arab na-
tions. But Jordan is no moderate as long as it rejects
negotiations with Israel."
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Sukkoth Rich
With Symbolism
Rabbinic authorities refer to a special
ceremony of "water libation" which, in Tem-
ple times, took place during Sukkoth. The
ceremony is called "Drawing of the
Waters." The Mishnah tells us that "He that
hath not beheld the joy of the drawing of
water hath never seen joy in his life."
The origin of the ceremony is unknown,
but Isaiah mentions it. The ceremony begins
on the second night of Sukkoth, and it lasts
for six nights, through Choi Hamoed. Suk-
koth will be observed on Monday and Tues-
day, Sept. 30 and Oct.^.
In ancient times, long processions left the
Temple, wending their way through
Jerusalem to the pool of Shiloah (Siloam) in a
triumphal march. At the pool, a golden ewer
was filled with water and brought back to
the Temple to be poured over the altar
simultaneously with a libation of wine.
Today, as Isaiah instructs us (12:3):
"Therefore with joy shall ye draw water out
of the wells of salvation."
End of Holy Days
This ceremony is one of the many symbolic
instruments of Sukkoth which help make the
holiday rich with meaning. These derive
from the Book of Leviticus (23:39-43), where
we are enjoined to dwell in booths for seven
days so "that your generations may know
that I made the Children of Israel to dwell in
booths when I brought them out of the land
of Egypt."
And also that the people were to take on
the first day "the fruit of goodly trees, bran-
ches of palm trees and boughs of thick trees
and willows of the brook" to "rejoice before
the Lord."
These constitute the arba'ah minim, the
"four species" that are central to the Suk-
koth festival. They are the etrog, fruit of
goodly trees; hadasim, or myrtle twigs;
lulav, the branch of a palm; and willows.
In the Book of Nehemiah, the arba'ah
minim are documented quite specifically,
where it is pointed out that from the days of
Joshua to Nehemiah, the people had not
dwelt in booths (8:17), but where Jews are
also enjoined: "Go forth unto the mount, and
fetch olive branches, and branches of wild
olive, and myrtle branches, and palm bran-
ches, and branches of thick trees, to make
booths as it is written" (8:15).
In all, Sukkoth offers an opportunity to
end the High Holy Day season on a hopeful
note, a suitable prelude to Simchat Torah,
where the expression of joy in concluding
the reading of the Torah merely opens to
door to the resumption of our reading of "In
the beginning .
This hopeful note and joyous Torah
celebration stand in stark contrast to the
awesomeness of Yom Kippur, at the conclu-
sion of which Jews hope for one another that
each of them has been written into the Book
of Life.
On Sukkoth, the opportunity is taken to
anticipate that they all have.
Give for Survival
Throughout this High Holy Day season,
services in synagogues throughout South
Florida are being sparked by appeals for
Jewish Floridiart
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funds in the cause of numerous organiza-
tions and their programs.
Among these are appeals for assistance to
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation and
for purchase of Israel Bonds. We enter the
New Year with Sukkoth and Simchat Torah
still ahead of us as the final, happy ending of
the holiday season.
No better way is available to us to show
that me meant what we said during our
penitential prayers on Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur than to support these appeals
as a symbol of our participation in Jewish
community life both here and abroad.
Through the Israel Bond Organization and
our purchases of Israel Bonds, we can pro-
vide Israel with the wherewithal to continue
its economic expansion at a time when infla-
tion there is still rampant. This vital flow of
funds also helps Israel to maintain its securi-
ty through monumental defense expen-
ditures, which it could not affort without us.
In effect, our bond purchases give Israel
the kind of options that permit it to keep the
domestic fires going while it bears the
burden of providing for the qualitative
military expenditures that would be impossi-
ble otherwise.
Through the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and Federations elsewhere in
South Florida and across the nation, we pro-
vide Israel with another source of aid gifts
to the United Jewish Appeal.
Equally important, we turn our eyes
homeward, to needy Jews here in Dade
County. Our Federation puts it simply
enough. We are one people with one destiny.
We can't afford to lose a single Jew.
Whether through our Federation gifts we
WERCr56lMfVTltny|
'JTA
assist the furtherance of Jewish education
here, the elderly at the Jewish Home for the
Aged, the sick at Mount Sinai Medical
Center, or the problem-ridden family seek-
ing counseling at Jewish Family and
Children's Service in all of the spheres of
our communal activity, and others of Jewish
concern as well, we help assure that we will
not lose them.
Not here in Miami. And not in Israel.
So when the moments of appeal occur as a
punctuation to our Holy Day prayers, let our
hearts show that we mean what we say.
Make those gifts the gifts that count
toward Jewish survival.
Leo Mindlin
Being 'Chosen' Is More Than Saying So
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Friday, September 27. 1985
Volume 58
12 TISHRI 5746
Number 39
G.K. CHESTERTON once ex
pressed his regret this way: "How
odd of God/ To choose the Jews."
Comes now the pipsqueak Louis
Farrakhan, due to speak in Miami
on Saturday night, who feels pret-
ty much the same way about it.
You don't have to be a poet and an
aesthete like Chesterton to hate
Jews. Farrakhan's performance
in Los Angeles several weeks ago
proves the point.
It was in Los Angeles that Far-
rakhan confessed that he has a
"problem with the Jewish peo-
ple." He cannot, he said there,
reconcile himself with the fact
that they were "chosen." The sim-
ple fact is. he declared before the
world, it is the blacks who are
chosen by God. How the Jews got
into this fix first, he failed to
explain.
NO ONE has authorized me to
speak for the Jews on this matter,
but from my own point view, I am
inclined to say here and now that
Mr. Farrakhan and his minions
are welcome to the honor. Despite
his deviousness and his worst in-
tentions for us, I hereby relinquish
my special status as favorite in the
eyes of God, which he can prompt-
ly transfer to one of his frothing
followers.
Given that all American Jews
are to be charitable and do the
same, just for starters Farrakhan
would promptly be able to crown
about one-third of the American
black community with a chosen
person accolade. Assuming they
wanted to be crowned by him per-
sonally in that cause.
I even have a special lapel pin all
worked out. I leave the color, the
design and the material to him.
But the legend would be simple
enough just three capital let-
ters, CPA, standing for Chosen
Persons' Association.
IN THIS, of course, there
would be a double benefit. Since
the legend also stands for Cer-
tified Public Accountant, the
wearer could masquerade as a
Louis Farrakhan
specially-chosen professional in an
academic and occupational field
that is not only respected but,
above all things, lucrative.
Naturally, the wearer wouldn't
have to masquerade. He could in
fact go through the requisite
tormented disciplines leading to
the CPA designation and then, in
fact, become a Certified Public
Accountant and a participant in
all the good things that the
bourgeois way of life has to offer.
But I am duty-bound to point
out to Mr. Farrakhan that being a
member of the Chosen Persons'
Association is a far less simple
matter than it sounds. There are
no elementary steps to go through
for starters, like merely claiming
that you are a member. In fact,
there aren't even any complicated
ones.
The chosen person status is, if
the truth be known, unutterable in
the same sense that Paul Tillich
called God unutterable. If you can
pin God down describe Him,
paint His picture, worship an im-
age of Him then your God is no
God at all. He is indistinguishable,
say, from a teacup.
I DON'T want to pursue
Tillich's argument any further,
since it would be beyond Mr. Far-
rakhan's capacity to understand.
But a genuinely chosen person
does understand without even
talking about it, since the unut-
terability of it all is so visceral.
Dare I say this? A Jew, for in-
stance, surely knows what God's
unutterability means without any
talk about it because a Jew has liv-
ed with his unutterable God since
the beginning of Judaism in time.
Among many other reasons, that
is why Jews are disinclined to
mention His name. To mention it,
to utter it, is for a Jew to say that
he knows who and what God is.
And that would be absurd.
This is a pretty tough kind of a
God to have not even to be able
to call Him by name. Further-
more, the nature of his own unut-
terability requires of the chosen
person a kind of intellect that is
far from ordinary in a world
where the common experience is
to make statues of God. dress Him
up in gold-threaded duds and then
bow down.
What is even tougher as a con-
struct to understand is that Jews
have been willing throughout the
ages to suffer for their unut-
terable God. They have chosen to
do so, and that is what makes
them the people who have chosen.
THE THING to be made clear is
that it is the Jews who have
chosen God; it is not really wa
who has chosen them to revere
His unutterability.
When Farrakhan spread his
poison in Los Angeles the other
week, little if anything W m
know about this. He merely ex-
pressed his boredom with the six
million holocaustic Jews, how
about our 100 million? he asKea.
meaning those African blacks lorn
to American slavery. And, l
pose, since. But then that raise
some unutterable questions anou
blacks in these civil libertarian
times.
Continued on Page 13-A
..- -



Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Newsman Zion's Zingers Don't Pall Any Punches
By GARY ROSENBLATT
Copyright Baltimore Jewish Time*
All Publications Rights Reserved
Sidney Zion doesn't pull
any punches. In person or in
us writing.
The 51-year-old journalist
Hooks and sounds like a cross
[between a modern-day
Jeremiah and Damon Ru-
nyan. He is The Front Page
come back to life in the
1980s, complete with a
tough New York accent,
drink in hand, his language
lurching from lyrical to
obscene.
Zion has style: his personality
and his writing grab you by the
collar, and he complains bitterly
that young journalists today look
bland, "like Harvard-educated in-
surance salesmen, for Chrissake.
They probably go into journalism
for the security of it rather than
the excitement,'* he says. "Can
you imagine that?"
SIDNEY ZION clearly chose
journalism for the excitement,
giving up a solid law career and vi-
sions of becoming a great trial
lawyer for the "pursuit of the
Goddess" of journalism. Over the
last 20 years he's taken his lumps
at one point he was blacklisted
by the press for identifying Daniel
Ellsberg as the source of the Pen-
tagon Papers "leak," and he's
been fired more than once but
you can see he's loved the battle,
scars and all. He was a reporter
for the New York Post, the New
York Times, started his own
magazine, Scanlan's Monthly, has
won numerous awards and has
been praised by the New York
Times as "The guerilla warrier of
journalism."
He's got wild, wonderful stories
to tell about his colorful career as
a reporter, and provocative opi-
nions on everything from the
Supreme Court ("they're destroy-
ing the First Amendment") to
Ariel Sharon ("he'd make a
helluva prime minister").
Right now he's pacing around
his booklined West Side apart-
ment in Manhattan, railing
against the people he loves most
his fellow Jews. "They're so
shreklich, so afraid," he says,
"that fear in them is always there.
Always. It's terrible. They worry
about what the goyim will think of
them. Maybe Jews really believe
they're not as good as the next
guy. But I sure as hell don't feel
that way. Jews shouldn't be
scared anymore. Never scared.
They should be mad."
ZION IS MAD that during the
1984 Presidential campaign,
American Jews didn't raise as
much of a stink about men like
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger and Sen. Jesse Helms
as they did about Jesse Jackson.
(Not that he's a fan of Rev.
Jackson, whom he calls "dirt
under my feet.")
But Zion is convinced that Jews
are afraid to start up with the
powers that be. "We're still
satisfied with being patted on the
back. We never call in our cards.
We never get tough. Why?
Because we want to make sure
we'll get invited back to the White
House.
"In the main," he says, "we
I always vote against our own best
[interests."
All of this is said with passion
land force, but without rancor.
That's just the way it is, Zion
seems to say. He has about him a
[sense of wonder mixed in with his
[cynicism, and that combination
[keeps him youthful and open-
I minded. It also keeps him honing
^tyin on the truth, doggedly and
"relentlessly, never mind the
consequences.
f
'
enjoyed a fabulous press as presi-
dent of the New York Yankees
and Madison Square Garden until
Zion exposed him as "the Inspec-
tor Clouseau of the sports world."
And Zion took on the music in-
dustry for allegedly keeping
"good music" off the market to
promote rock and roll. He was
also virtually the only American
journalist to assert that there now
exists a Palestinian state, that it
has been a nation since 1948, and
that it is called Jordan.
But more than not Zion's quest
for the truth has found him cham-
pioning the underbelly of almost
any issue or personality. His
writings include warm remem-
brances of Jewish gangsters and
he has defended such unpopular
figures as:
mobster Meyer Lansky for all
he did, quietly, for the fledgling
Jewish state;
Patty Hearst, who "would've
never been in that bank" if she
hadn't been kidnapped;
the much-aligned New York
Yankee owner George Steinbren-
ner, who "wants only to win" and
who "made the Yankees great
again";
the perhaps even more-
maligned Oakland A's owner
Charlie Finley "if everyone
who hated Charlie Finely hated
each other, there would be World
War III" for demanding ex-
cellence of his employees; and, of
course,
Menachem Begin, for having
"led the first Hebrew revolution
in 2,000 years" and "holding his
own against the premier
statesmen of the century."
ZION WROTE passionately
about Begin and his cause often
during Begin's tenure as prime
minister. He is an unabashed ad-
mirer of the Irgun, the
underground army that Begin
took command of in 1943, and an
outspoken critic of Ben-Gurion
and Golda Meir and their
followers.
:::>':: ...... 3**SS
Some Sidney Zion Zaps
Writing Is Only Good When It's Over
IT'S LED HIM to criticize
cred cows like Mike Burke, who
On writing for deadline: "I need deadlines to
work, because I'd rather do almost anything else.
When I was writing a regular column I used to give
myself four hours, but I needed more pressure so I
cut it down to two-and-a-half.
"Writing is the opposite of sex: it's only good
when it's over."
On 'labeling' columnists: "People like to
categorize who they read right away. Oh, he's a
conservative or he's a liberal. But they can't peg
me. All I really go by is the Bill of Rights.
On meeting Ben Hecht: "I only met him once, a
couple of months before he died. It was the day of
Lyndon Johnson's Inauguration, January 1964.
Everyone loved LBJ then, and Hecht asked me
what I thought of his speech. I told him I thought it
was great. And he said, 'I think he's an evil man.'
Ben said, 'I watched him as if I was watching a
potato bug and when I saw his eyes tear over at the
playing of the National Anthem, I knew we were
all in trouble.
On aliyah and Zionist organizations: "Let's
face it, American Jews aren't going to go live in
Israel, so why waste all that money. And anyway,
it's better if all the Jews aren't living at the same
address. There are as many Zionist organizations
now as there were before 1948, and that's crazy. I
mean, there is a state."
On the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith: "Peter Bergson used to say to me, "how
would you like it if there was a league against the
defamation of Sidney Zion?' We just don't need all
that stuff."
On anti-Semitism: "We're always trying to
figure out why the goyim don't like us. But that's
their problem. We should ignore it. Let them
worry about it.
On Ariel Sharon: "He's a friend of mine and I
think he'd make a helluva prime minister. People
say all kinds of terrible things about him, that he'd
be a dictator. But as politicians go, he's honest.
The Arabs respect him. And he's more concerned
about civil liberties than anyone who has ever
headed the Israeli government. The thing about
Arik is, he doesn't take any crap from anyone,
especially American cabinet secretaries and
presidents."
On how to improve Israel's public relations
image: "First of all, it's horrible now, and they
don't seem to realize just how important it is. If I
was in charge I'd fight for people's minds and I'd
make that fight just as vital as the military battles.
I'd set up a war college of the best minds and fight
to win people back. They're losing that war
something terrible."
On Jews vs. Jews: "That's the most serious bat-
tle Israel faces, not the Arabs but the Jews. We
haven't been out of the dungeons of the Diaspora
long enough to respect our fellow Jews. In Israel,
people say, 'why should I do that for him? He's just
another Jew.' It's very sad and very scary."
When Begin was elected to
Israel's highest office in 1977,
Zion wrote in a column for the
Soho Weekly News, "Leave it to
my Jews. They make a revolution
and 29 years later the leader of
the revolution comes to power.
First the collaborators, then the
revolutionaries. The Hebrews
don't just learn it backwards, they
do it backwards."
In July, 1981, when Israel
destroyed an Iraqi nuclear reactor
and bombed Beirut, the press
blasted Israel in what Zion calls "a
media carpet bombing." He
responded with a piece for the
New York Times Op-Ed page call-
ed "Genesis, Rewritten," which
began, "The Middle East memory
bank is empty again." Zion
pointed out how the world's selec-
tive memory chooses to remember
only Israeli military actions while
ignoring far more serious Arab
ones.
. "When more than 90,000 Arabs
dje by Arab,gu.and bombs, it's
just one of those crazy things," he
wrote. "When 300 Arabs die by
Israeli fire, it's a holocaust com-
mitted by a Jewish Mad Bomber.
Begin. It begins with Begin. Read
the papers, watch the television."
ONE OF Zion's popular pieces
was his "political obit" of Begin)
which appeared in the November,
1983 issue of Harper's, shortly
after Begin resigned. It was a
tribute to Begin as a microcosm of
the Jews in the 20th Century, an
outcast but, above all, a survivor.
In the article, Zion asserts that
Israel gained statehood not
because of the United Nations,
Harry Truman or world guilt but
because of the revolutionary war
fought against the British by the
Irgun.
"That this is news, even to most
Israelis, is in its way as
astonishing as the rebirth of the
Jewish state itself. Has any other
nation denied its revolution?"
Zion says that, "the Hebrew
revolution 'never happened'
because the 'wrong people' fought
and won it." His only disappoint-
ment with Begin is that when he
finally came to power, almost
three decades later, he did not
"revise the official history to the
actual truth."
BUT AS FOR charges of Begin
the fanatic, Begin the zealot, Zion
wrote: "I look at it this way: when
a man who has lived through the
seasons of Menachem Begin can
still love his people so much that
he will relinquish his power just
because he's tired and sad well,
nobody better tell me such a man
is a fascist. I never knew a
statesman to walk gentle into the
night. Have you?"
Zion lists Begin, journalist-
playwright Ben Hecht and Peter
Bergson, Revisionists all, among
his bona fide heroes. "Most of my
heroes, the Irgun guys, never
made it to power, he says.
Zion never made it to Israel un-
til after the Six-Day War when he
decided he had been there but I'd
never been, and I'd never written
about Israel, he says. "Being
there didn't change my views, it
just made me more committed and
more excited."
THOUGH passionately commit-
ted to Israel, Zion would prefer to
see an Israeli nation rather than a
Jewish sate, with the vast majori-
ty of the citizens Jewish and with
Judaism playing the pervasive
role Christianity does in America.
"But keep the religious parties
out of politics. It's bad for the
religion and bad for the state," he
says, noting that he prefers to
criticize Israel internally as in
an interview with a Jewish
magazine rather than in the
general press because "Israel has
enough enemies."
Those who criticize Israel for
Continued on Page 10-A


l**Cr** M*9* iflS KTtinoi
Ph M i-- ~ *- !*->---------1--------
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Names in News
Danish Rabbi to Serve
Oslo Jewish Community

The story of how an isolated
European Jewish community,
without a rabbi for more than 20
years, bounced liack from the
Holocaust with the aid of the
Memorial Foundation for Jewish
Culture and the local community,
came to light recently.
From 1958 to 1980. Oslo. Nor-
way, functioned without a rabbi.
It fell upon Michael Melchior, the
eldest son of a Danish family coun-
ting six generations of rabbis, to
rekindle Jewish life in one of
world Jewry's loneliest outposts.
Trained in Israel with the help
of the Foundation and the Oslo
community. Rabbi Melchior open-
ed the first kindergarten in Oslo
since the Holocaust and revitaliz-
ed the afternoon schools, which
teach children from 7 through 13.
In 1979. there were 39 children
receiving religious instruction at
the Jewish Community Center in
Oslo. The number for 1985 is 68.
Walter H. Annenberg has been
installed as first chairman of the
new Moses Aaron Dropsie Ad-
vanced Research Institute in Near
Eastern and Judaic Studies, it is
announced by the president of
Dropsie College. Dr. David M.
Goldenberg.
The Dropsie Institute, a post-
graduate advanced research
center, is the restructured con-
tinuation of Dropsie College,
which was founded in 1907, and
pioneered non-theological Judaic
Studies at the graduate level in
this country.
Arlin Adams, Federal Judge in
the United States Court of Ap-
peals, formally inducted An-
nenberg into his new position at a
recent board meeting in
Philadelphia.
The American Jewish Congress
will present its 1985 Cultural
Achievement Award to Jerry
Leiber and Mike Stoller at an af-
fair at The Pierre in New York Ci-
ty on Oct. 10.
The event will be chaired by
Nesuhi Ertegun, chairman and
co-chief executive officer of WE A
International, one of the nation's
leading recording companies.
The award will be presented by
Henry Siegman, executive direc-
tor of the American Jewish
Congress.
One of America's best-known
songwriting teams, Leiber and
Stoller are generally credited with
creating a new form of music that
came to be known as "rock and
roll."
Rena Costa, a New York
philanthropist and founder of the
Chair in Yiddish Language and
Literature at Bar-Ilan University,
will receive an honorary
fellowship from the Israeli
University at a dinner Oct. 9 in
the Plaza in New York City.
Dr. Emanuel Rackntan, presi-
dent of Bar-Ilan University, will
confer the fellowshipo upon Mrs.
Costa.
Jane Stern, president of Bar-
Ilan's American Board of
Overseers, said the dinner will
also mark the University's in-
augural of degree-granting pro-
grams in Yiddish studies, with
Yiddish as the language of
instruction.
Rabbi Benjamin Bieeh, of the
Young Israel of Oceanside, and
Dr. Elliot Udell, of the Young
Israel of Plainview, have been ap-
pointed to chair the annual Torah
retreat sponsored by the National
Council of Young Israel over the
Thanksgiving Weekend.
Harold M. Jacobs, president of
the National Council, announced
the appointments for the pro-
gram, which will begin Nov. 27
and continue through Dec. 1 at the
Homowack in Spring Glen. NY.
Steve Shaw, of Germantown.
Md.. has been appointed new na-
tional executive director of the
Jewish War Veterans of the
ISA. He succeeds Harris B.
Stone, who announced his retire-
ment in early August.
Shaw has been with the JWV
since January. 1980. when he was
appointed to serve as national
director of programming. He has
been the organization's assistant
national executive director since
August. 1983.
Prior to his association with the
Jewish War Veterans, Shaw
worked for the Jewish Communi-
ty Council of Metropolitan Detroit
as community affairs associate.
A noted Weizmann Institute im-
munologist, Prof. Ruth Anton,
has been chosen to present the
prestigious 1986 Jimenez Diaz
Memorial Lecture in Madrid,
Spain, next May.
The Lecture was established in
1969 to honor the memory of the
late Prof. Carlos Jimenez Diaz,
one of the great figures of Spanish
medicine and research. The roster
of Diaz lectures to date features
some of the most prominent per-
sonalities in biomedical science,
including Nobel Laureates Severs
Ochoa, Hans A. Krebs, and
Cesar Milstein.
Prof. Arnon is known for her
contribution to research in fields
ranging from cancer research to
multiple sclerosis. In 1979, she
was the recipient of the Robert
Koch Prize in Medical Science,
and in 1983 she was elected presi-
dent of the European Federation
of Immunological Societies.
The most important task for the
American Jewish community is
"to help strengthen the undergir-
ding of democracy in Israel,"
declared Leonard Fein at the
United Nations seminar on
Zionism sponsored by the Interna-
tional Council of B'nai B'rith.
Fein, a professor at Dartmouth
College and Columbia University
and editor of Moment magazine,
said the bolstering is important
"not because democracy is in im-
mediate jeopardy, but to prevent
it from falling into disrepute."
In response to a question
whether Israel can remain a
Jewish state and a democracy
from one of the 140 persons atten-
ding the seminar, including some
two dozen foreign ambassadors,
Rabbi Michael Melchior, trained in Israel
with the help of the Memorial Foundation for
Jewish Culture and the Oslo Jewish communi-
ty, helps little girl in lighting Shabbat candles
and saying the blessings. Rabbi Melchior has
revitalized Jewish life in Oslo, which had been
without a rabbi for more than 20 years.
Fein said only Rabbi Meir
Kahane, a member of the Israeli
Knesset, "puts the question that
way." Fein added that Kahane's
vision of Judaism "is manifestly
hostile to democracy ... He has
already chosen a Jewish state
over democracy."
Elaine Sterling of West
Orange, N.J., is new president-
elect of Women in Community
Service (WICS), the 20-year-old
coalition of five major women's
organizations, representing up-
wards of 27 million women
belonging to American GI Forum
Women, Church Women United,
National Council of Catholic
Women, National Council of
Jewish Women, and the National
Council of Negro Women.
Sterling, who represents NC-
JW, will begin her two-year term
of office on Oct. 1 and was install-
ed at the WICS annual meeting in
Albuquerque, N.M. Sterling, who
has served as national vice presi-
dent of WICS since 1983, suc-
ceeds the National Council of
Negro Women's Thelma T. Daley
of Baltimore as president.
New varieties of artichokes and
methods for growing them, which
promise to revolutionize this
branch of agriculture, have been
developed by scientists at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Yehuda Basnitzki and Prof.
Daniel Zohary of the Department
of Genetics at the University's
Alexander Silberman Institute of
Life Sciences have succeeded in
breeding seed-propagated
varieties of artichokes.
Until now, the artichoke has
generally been propagated
vegetatively, that is, by planting
cuttings. With new agrotechni-
ques developed by the Hebrew
University scientists, artichokes
THE PURITY BEGAN
3500 YEARS AGO!
Geologists report that the pure and
delicious spring water emerging from the
Mountain Valley Spring today in Hot
Springs, Ark., first entered the ground as
rain about 3500 years ago. Salt free
Moderately hard. Delivered to your home
or office.
Dade Broward
696-1333 563-6114
c^ountaia'V^ey^Ster
can now be treated as any other
annual, seed-sown vegetable
rather than as a vegetatively-
propagated perennial. The result
is a one-third saving in labor costs
without loss of quality or yields.
Vatican Invites Jewish Studies
Prof. To Set Up Same Project
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Prof.
Daniel Carpi, who has just com-
pleted three years as head of Tel
Aviv University's Chaim
Rosenberg School for Jewish
Studies, has been invited by the
Vatican's Gregoriana University
to help set up a center for Jewish
studies there, TAU has
announced.
It said that in view of the fact
that the Vatican has no diplomatic
ties with Israel, the invitation sets
a new precedent in academic rela-
tions with the Holy See.
The Pontificia Universita
Gregoriana, a major institution of
higher learnng run by the
Vatican, has an important in-
stitute for the study of the Bible,
and is in the process of updating
its curriculum to include modern
Jewish history, according to
Carpi.
The new center, to be named
the Interfaculty Center of Judaic
Studies, will focus on the period
beginning with the expulsion of
the Jews from Spain in 1492, up to
the start of the Zionist movement.
Carpi will spend the fall
semester at Gregoriana. and will
give a course on the Jewish com-
munities of Western Europe and
the Mediterranean during the
same period.
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U.S. Plans Arms Sale to Jordan

Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Israel Fears Britain's Move
To Sell Arms to Saudis, Jordan

Continued from Page 1-A
that it plans to buy 48 Tornado
fighters and 30 Hawk trainers
from Britain. The Saudis
reportedly received approval from
the Reagan Administration to buy
the British planes because the Ad-
ministration feared a major battle
with Congress if it met the Saudi
request for some 40 F-15 fighters
trom the U.S.
Murphy rejected a suggestion
by Rep. Lee Hamilton (D., Ind.),
the Subcommittee's chairman, for
a compromise on the sale to Jor-
dan. Rep. Mel Levine (D., Calif.),
also suggested a compromise,
declaring that rather than helping
the peace process, selling
sophisticated arms to Jordan
would be "counter-productive."
REP. LAWRENCE Smith (D.,
Fla.) said there has been a history
of 35 years of "frustration" in
which arms were linked tothe
peace process and nothing hap-
pened. He said the U.S. has a
"carrot and stick policy" in which
it provides the carrot and "we
beat ourselves with the stick."
Smith said that instead of sup-
plying arms in return for pro-
mises, the U.S. should see the
fulfillment of the promises first.
"We have done everything we
can," he said, adding that it was
not up to King Hussein of Jordan
to cross not the Rubicon but the
Jordan River and begin negotia-
tions with Israel.
Israeli Soldier Shot, Raped
Said To Be Improving
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
18-year-old soldier who was raped
and shot and left for dead in the
Negev six weeks ago is said to be
improving under the physical and
psychological therapy she is
receiving at the Beth Levenstein
Center. The woman, whose identi-
ty is being withheld, remains par-
tially paralyzed from the attack.
The soldier was attacked on
Aug. 16 when a man gave her a
lift in his car while she was hit-
chhiking from her army base near
Beersheba to her home in the
Negev. Police are conducting a
nationwide search for the
assailant. In an effort to get a
positive identification, the police
have issued a portrait compiled by
using an American identikit
system received a few days ago
from the U.S.
The system, said to be the most
efficient now in use, combines
many facial features on separate
transparent plastic sheets which
can be superimposed on each
other to provide a total composite
face. Earlier identifications, in-
cluding that given by the soldier
described the assailant as between
28 and 30 years of age, of average
height, fair-skinned and husky,
with light brown hair, with
somewhat protruding lower teeth.
He spoke fluent Hebrew.
teeoeeeeeeo
Members of the Subcommitee
rejected Murphy's contention that
Hussein has met the requirement
of the 1986 Foreign Aid Act that
before any new arms can be sold
to Jordan, President Reagan must
certify that Jordan is committed
to recognize Israel and negotiate
with the Jewish State. Reagan, in
signing the Act in August, said
those conditions had been met.
MURPHY maintained that Hus-
sein, in his statements during his
visit to Washington last May, said
publicly that he was committed to
the recognition of Israel and
negotiations with Israel. Hussein
was is scheduled to meet with
Reagan in Washigton last
Monday.
Murphy said that Hussein's pro-
posal for a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation to meet
with the U.S. is seen as a "warm-
up" for negotiations with Israel.
He said the U.S. also expected the
meeting to ensure that United Na-
tions Sercurity Council Resolu-
tions 242 and 338 would be seen as
the only basis for negotiations.
But Murphy stressed that the
meeting with the joint delegation
would not be used for negotiations
nor would it be a meeting of the
U.S. with the Palestine Liberation
Organization. He conceded that
there has been no change in the
U.S. position toward the seven
members proposed by Hussein as
the Palestinian representatives on
the joint delegation. Murphy in-
dicated that while the U.S. has ap-
proved two names, it is still argu-
ing with Jordan about whether
the five others are or are not
members of the PLO.
cooooo
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has expressed serious
concern over Britain's 3
billion Pounds Sterling arms
deal with Saudi Arabia and
its proposed sale of advanc-
ed weapons to Jordan,
where Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher has been
visiting.
The British will sell Saudi
Arabia 48 of its highly-rated Tor-
nado jet fighters the attack ver-
sion of the plane according to
reports from London plus 40
Haw training jets. The Foreign
Ministry, noting that both Saudi
Arabia and Jordan are "formally
in a state of war with Israel,"
warned that the weapons could be
used against Israel even though
this was not the seller's intention.
Moreover, the Foreign Ministry
said, the sales will upset the
military balance in the Middle
East.
THATCHER reportedly is try-
ing to interest the Jordanians in
Tornado jets. They may be
amenable to her sales pitch in
view of the looming battle on
Capitol Hill if Jordan sought to
buy equivalent weaponry from the
U.S. But the Reagan Administra-
tion indicated that it plans to go
ahead with major arms sales to
Jordan despite strong Congres-
sional opposition.
The Administration is holding
off, however, on the sale of
weapons to Saudi Arabia, except
for spare parts for military equip-
ment the Saudis already have.
This, apparently, is because it
wants to avoid a major battle with
Congress. The Administration
reportedly gave its blessings to
the Britith sale of combat aircraft
to the Saudis.
The Israeli media report that
there is rising anger in the U.S.
government and the aeronautical
industry over the pro-Israel
lobby's efforts to thwart
American arms sales to both Jor-
dan and Saudi Arabia, with the
result that those countries have
decided to shop elsewhere.
2,000 Israeli
Arabs Back
JERUSALEM (JTA) More
than 2,000 Israeli Arabs have
returned from the annual
pilgrimage to Mecca. They said
they were treated well in Saudi
Arabia but were not welcomed in
Jordan, the country they had to
cross to and from the holiest city
of Islam.
The pilgrimage, or haj, is a
religious rite which every Moslem
is expected to perform at least
once in his lifetime.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Searching for a 'perfect' etrog in a Tel Aviv market.
Sukkoth Next Week
'Perfect' Etrog Needed for Holiday
By CAROL GREEN
For the observant Jew,
part of the annual rites of
fall is the search for an
etrog, the fragrant yellow
fruit which is blessed on the
Sukkoth holiday. Each year,
thousands of observant
Jews crowd market stalls in
Jerusalem's Meah Shearim,
many spending several
hours in search of a perfect
specimen of the traditional
citrus.
According to Jewish law, an
etrog must be completely clean.
Even a slight scratch or blemish
on the skin of the fruit may render
it unusable or posit/. The etrog's
Sukkoth, commonly known
as the Feast of the Tabernacles,
will be celebrated on Monday
and Tuesday, Oct. SO. The
etrog is a dominant symbol of
the holiday, and in this
feature, Carol Green examines
what it is that makes a 'perfect'
etrog for the occasion.
skin should be textured with
bumps and ridges, not smooth like
a lemon and its shape should be as
a tower; wide at its base and
growing narrower until it reaches
the flowering head or pitom. An
attractive etrog is highly prized,
and will sell for up to $30.
NOT ONLY is individual quality
demanded, but the fruit must have
a pedigree as well, for Jewish law
prohibits the blessing of an etrog
grown from hybrid seed. Because
the etrog tree is very weak and
shortlived, there is a great temp-
tation to crossbreed it with the
lemon tree. A crossbred tree can
live for up to 25 years, 15 years
longer than the pure strain, and is
less vulnerable to disease.
However, the fruit it gives is not
an etrog and an educated con-
sumer will not purchase it as such.
In addition, there are factors of
individual taste which come into
play. While the Ashkenazi or
European Jews prefer a slimmer
variety of the fruit, Jews from
North Africa and the Middle East
favor the large, plump, seeded
Temeni or Yemenite etrog.
Although tradition regards the
pitom as the beauty of the fruit,
some consumers specifically
prefer a pitom\ess etrog. An etrog
whose pitom has fallen off while it
is still on the tree is ritually
usable.
However, if the pitom drops off
after the fruit is off the tree the
etrog is posul or unusable.
Parents of small children who
have been known to tear off the
delicate flowering head, have
often opted for pitomless etrogim.
But if scientists at Tel Aviv
University have their way, the
piiowiless etrog may soon become
obsolete. They have developed a
chemical spray to secure the
pitom to the fruit.
WHY ALL the fuss? To the
casual observer, an etrog looks
like little more than an oversized
oblong lemon. However, the etrog
is rich in mystical and symlwlic
significance. In the Bible the etrog
is referred to as "the fruit of the
goodly tree.'" Oral tradition tells
us that this is the etrog. Some
commentators suggest that it was
the etrog fruit that Eve ate from
in the Garden of Eden. In-
terestingly, this does not place the
etrog in a bad light.
Jewish tradition teaches that
the etrog is a symbol for the
perfect Jew because it has both a
good taste, which is compared to
Torah knowledge, and a pleasant
fragrance, which is likened to
good deeds. The other three
species of the Sukkoth holiday
have different combinations of
these properties. The myrtle has
smell but no taste, the willow,
neither taste nor smell, and the
palm sheath, also without taste or
smell bears a tasty fruit. Held
together as lulav and etrog, these
species symbolize the different
types of Jews that make up the
Jewish people.
Like the perfect Jew it sym-
bolizes, the etrog must be
cultivated with great care from
the moment of its planting. An
etrog tree is small and weak. Its
branches and bark are thin and its
roots are exposed.
AN ETROG tree is also verv
shortlived. It can survive for ten
years at most. Because biblical
law forbids the use of fruit grown
during the first three years, its/*
useful life is even shorter. Thus
during the first three years, the
tree is clipped of its fruit to enable
the branches to grow strong. Onh
in the fourth year may the etrog
tree finally bear its precious fruit.
From that point on, the etrog
tree receives daily care. It is
heavily irrigated to enable it to
grow in the sandy soil it favors
and trees in an etrog orchard are
draped with large black nylon net-
ting to protect them from ex-
cessive sunlight and to keep birds
and bugs away from its frag
fruit. The trees' limbs arc bound ->
to poles which encircle the I n
protect them from harsh Hinds.
The leaves are regularly u:-
and pruned to make sure that they
do not scratch the fragile fruit.
A grower expects thai many
etrogim among his crop which ap-
pear most likely to succeed and
lavish on them extra special care.
"Every etrog is worked on in-
dividually," explains a grower in
Israel's Kfar Chabad.
THE GROWING period is fair
ly short. In warm weather an '.
etrog can grow to full maturity in
two months. After harvesting, the
etrogim are cleaned and carefully
packed in plastic to be shipped by
i air all over the world.
For an etrog grower, timing is
everything. A story is told of a
ship which landed in New York
harbor in the days before the Se-
cond World War. Its log reported
no storms at sea and no collisions;
the crossing from Palestine was
calm and uneventful. The trip
simply took several days longer
than expected, long enough to
miss the Sukkoth holiday. The
ship's cargo, thousands of
etrogim, bound for sale in New
York, was now almost worthless.
In Yiddish, "an etrog after Suk-
koth" is a synonym for
uselessness. In reality, the etrog
is a highly versatile fruit. Its flesh
can be boiled to a pulp, together
with oranges and lemons.
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Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A

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Page 10-A The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Zion's Zingers Show Profound Love for Fellow-Jews
Continued from Page 5-A
not being "a light unto the na-
tions" are themselves guilty of a
form of unconscious racism, ac-
cording to Zion. New York Times
columnist Anthony Lewis, he said,
"never writes about how terrible
it is when Arabs kill Arabs or
blacks kill blacks because he ex-
pects them to, and that's racism.
Everyone blamed Israel for the
Sabra and Shatila massacres
because people felt Lebanon is a
zoo, and the Israelis are the
caretakers and hey, you let the
animals kill each other, you let it
happen. But that's not the point.
If you care about human rights,
you've got to care about everyone
and you've got to scrutinize
everyone. Believe me, the double
standard is alive and well."
Zion applies those same stan-
dards to Israel. If it is wrong to
mix church and state in the U.S.,
he said, it's wrong in Israel as
well. "The setp-up over there is a
fake," he says. "Israel is a
theocracy run by atheists."
HE HAS much harsher words
for American Jewish leaders,
believing that the myriad U.S.
Jewish organizations are not only
useless: they are dangerous. "The
organizations don't do us any
good," he said. "I resent them
because they only get us in trou-
ble" with the concept of
"spokesmen" for the Jewish
community.
He calls the members of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
"court Jews" who stand "hat in
hand" in the corridors of power.
Quoting Ben Hecht, Zion adds
that the trouble with American
Jewish leaders is that they always
salute those who do not deign to
return their salute.
Zion has visceral dislike of FDR,
Harry Truman and Adlai Steven-
son, all of whom he regards as
anti-Jewish. He cannot tolerate
those who defend them by citing
their attributes or ac-
complishments."! hate it when
people say, 'Yes, Roosevelt didn't
save the Jews of Europe, but on
the other hand he did this or he
did that,'" says Zion, his voice
rising.
"To me, there is no other hand.
What other hand? WoWd people
say, 'Well Huey Long was a racist
but he built nice highways.' That's
intolerable." i
ZION'S INTERESTS clearly
put Jews first. He has no problem
acknowledging that ifact. "Dual
loyalty is not a false issue," he
says, "because there:w dual loyal-
ty among American Jews and we
shouldn't be afraid i of it. I love
America more than I love Israel,
but I love Jewsi more than
anything else."
He also loves the Work he does,
and it's hard to believe that he
wasn't born to be: a journalist,
having chanced upon his writing
career at the age of 29. Let Zion
explain how he got into the
newspaper business because he
tells it best.
"When I tried criminal cases as
a kid lawyer in New Jersey," he
writes in his long introduction to
"Read All About It," a collection
of some of his best reporting, "I
noticed that my clients had cer-
tain things in common. All of
them were broke, all of them were
innocent, and when asked how
come the cops put the grab on
them, they all said, 'I dunno, I
wasn't doin' nothin' I was just
standing around.'
"I give the same answer to peo-
ple who wonder how I got to be a
newspaperman."
A native of Passaic, N.J. with a
strong Jewish identity that he
calls the flip-side of Philip Roth
"the idea of being ashamed of
one's Jewish heritage was beyond
the pale" Zion graduated from
Yale Law School and became a
Zion asserts thai
Israel gained
statehood not
because of the
United Nations,
Harry Truman or
world guilt, but
because oi the
revolutionary war
fought against the
British by Begin and
the Irgun.
criminal attorney, with plans to
become a trial lawyer.
BUT HIS LIFE changed late on
a December night in 1962, only a
few days before his wedding,
when journalist Victor Navasky, a
buddy of his from Yale Law
School, asked Zion to write a
parody of columnist Murray
Kempton for a special parody of
the New York Post which at the
time was closed by a newspaper
strike, as were the other dailies in
New York.
A newspaper buff and admirer
of Kempton, Zion agreed. His
piece was such a big hit that the
Post's managing editor, Al Davis,
offered him a job.
Zion was stunned.
"Of course, I dismissed the
idea," he later wrote. "Of course,
ten minutes later I called Al
Davis. The secret Navasky spot-
ted was that I wanted to be Ben
Hecht long before I wanted to be
Clarence Darrow."
Zion hooked up with the Post,
which he describes as right out of
Ben Hecht's Front Page, and was
soon exposed to "the dirtiest
secret of journalism: Self-
Censorship." Some of Zion's best
work for the Post ended up "on
the spike" (unpublished), like his
expose on the 1964 New York
World's Fair, proving it would be
a financial disaster. Everything
he'd predicted came true but his
series never ran because the
Fair's organizers advertised
heavily in the Post.
A YEAR LATER, Zion was
hired by "the uptown lady," the
New York Times, where he work-
ed for almost five years, loving
every minute of it. ("I never work-
ed for the Times," he wrote, "I
was a kid on a carousel.") But
Zion grew restless. He resigned
from the Times in 1969, on his
36th birthday, to start his own
magazine, Scanlan's Monthly,
now best remembered for how it
ended a little more than a year
later.
Zion and his partner, Warren
Hinckle, whom he describes as
"the eye-patched, bad-boy editor
of Ramparts," a left-wing
magazine, had decided to launch a
big, brassy muckraking monthly
that would set the journalism
world on its ear. But Scanlan's
had troubles form day one.
Printers refused to print it,
distributors wouldn't distribute it.
Only later did Zion find out,
courtesy of John Dean's memoirs,
that Richard Nixon himself had
ordered Dean, then counsel to the
President, to go after Scanlan's in
part because it had published a
memo from Vice President
Agnew that referred to Rand Cor-
poration studies to cancel the
1972 national elections and repeal
the Bill of Rights.
SCANLAN'S continued to go
after the Nixon Administration
the magazine ran an "Impeach
Nixon" cover long before
Watergate and the Administra-
tion continued to go after
Scanlan's, putting the IRS on the
backs of the magazine's
promoters.
The Administration won.
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Scanlan's lasted only eight
issues, but Zion says he is proud of
them and he's never looked back.
The next chapter of Zion's life is
one of the most unpleasant for
him, but it's the part he's best
remembered for. Indeed, as Zion
notes, his obituary will probably
label him as the man who
"fingered" Daniel Ellsberg in the
Pentagon Papers. It all came
about because of a gentleman's
bet Zion made with his newspaper
colleagues.
In June, 1971, soon after
Scanlan's folded, Zion was work-
ing on a piece for the Sunday New
York Times Magazine and, while
in the newsroom, word came that
a federal judge had issued a tem-
porary order restraining the
Times from continuing publication
of the Pentagon Papers, which
had begun two days earlier. Zion,
with typical bravado, told his bud-
dies he'd find out by the next day
what everyone wanted to know:
namely, who leaked the Papers to
the Times.
AFTER ONLY a few well
placed calls the next morning,
Zion came up with the name
"Daniel Ellsberg" and he confirm-
ed it with two sources. Realizing
he had a hot story and no one to
sell it to he was freelancing at
the time Zion went on a popular
New York talk radio show that
night and named Ellsberg as the
source of the famous leak. The
story made the front pages across
the country but the world of jour-
nalism called him "immoral" for
naming Ellsberg, a hero to all
those who were against the Viet-
nam War.
Zion was blacklisted by the New
York Times he was told not to
set foot in the building as well
as a number of magazines and
newspapers for which he had writ-
ten. One newspaper at the time
described him as "the most
despised man in the American
press."
To Zion, the press was acting
like a bunch of jealous hypocrites.
After all, he was only doing his
job, going after a hot story. He
reasons that his colleagues turned
on him because he wasn't working
for any particular paper at the
time and they were upset that he
"scooped" them. In any event,
about a year later, while holding
court at his usual spot at Sardi's
bar one night, Zion was approach-
ed by Abe Rosen thai, his former
boss at the Times, who had been
avoiding him ever since the.
Ellsberg story. This night
Rosenberg muttered genug in Yid-
dish to Zion ("enough") and in-
vited him to have a drink.
AFTER THAT the writing
market eased a bit, but Zion still
found the going tough enough to
go back to practicing law. When
Pete Hamill wrote a full column
apology to Zion in the Post, where
he had attacked him, Zion sent
him a wire: "I assume this is the
start of a series." Hamill's column
ended with a plea for the blacklist
to stop but it didn't until the Sun-
day New York Times Magazine
gave Zion an assignment in 1977
to profile New York sports
businessman Mike Burke. It
became a cover story, marking
Zion's reentry to the Times
Magazine after almost a decade.
Soon after, Rupert Murdoch
took over New York magazine
and the Post and hired Zion to
write a column for the Post. He
was later canned he still doesn't
know why and immediately
hired as a columnist for New York
magazine.
In the fall of 1978, Zion teamed
up with his friend Uri Dan, a
leading Israeli journalist, to do a
behind-the-scenes story on the
Camp David peace accords. The
New York Times Sunday
Magazine decided to run their
story, 20,000 words, as a two-
parter, though Zion was furious to
learn that rather than being a
cover story it would only get a
"FUNNY AND ENTERTAINING!'
'The picture is ready EXCELLENT as an
ISRAEL TRAVELOG. Jerusalem, the
Dead Sea, a working kibbutz and W Aviv!"
JERUSALEM is nothing short
of AWESOME" s... ,^.
Ntf*'SC>0SSG SM
STARTS FRIDAY, SEPT. 27
i


'C

the
lar
Bowl,l
pu
The edit(
iss the top. The cover
[cEnroe.
the issue was hitting
lion checked the calen-
lled back to remind the
Sunday was the Super
Ithey would look foolish
tennis star on the cover.
agreed, killing the
the
mis cover and putting
eli piece there instead.
hanks to the attention of the
Bays Zion, the article, "The
Story of the Middle East
Bj' made international
jes and ultimately won Zion
Qaii the Overseas Press club
jfor best magazine inter-
im of foreign news.
got Zion fired from New
lagazine. They said he
his exclusive contract,
hough he'd gotten his
permission. Zion's par-
fcot to his editor: "Don't
fthey'll get rid of you, too.
that fire me get fired
lor later."
k what happened, and Zion
joing strong.
tESENT, Zion is working
Mc about Jewish gangsters,
Dm he has always shown a
[fascination and begrudg-
}liration. Never one to hide
Jth, Zion feels the era of
[criminals is a curious one
erves attention. "I don't
' Jews feel a need to read
bat stuff, but they like it,"
"At least some of them
of the funniest pieces in
ection, "Read All About
describes how he and a
ired the pulpit at the 1970
of Izzy Schwarzberg, a
[gangster Zion had known
er the rabbi offered a few
about the deceased,
Izzy's request, delivered
to the overflow crowd.
the congregants that Iz-
fcnade certain requests for
ision," he writes. "He
Tan Alden Whitman obit in
lies, he wanted the obit in-
land he wanted me to give
pgy. He did not expect to
anything like that, but
lies it happens, you can't
Jrou all know," I said, "the
^uple of items have been
lied per his request. We got
len Whitman notice in the
[we got it indexed and we
lead piece to boot. Plus, I
announce that the Miami
ran the Whitman obit on
tie."
browd cheered.
WANTED me to do the
I said, because he didn't
ny rabbi to "tell the truth"
fiis life. "They'll make me
Ice some kind of schmuck
ent to work every moring.
1,1 don't want that. 1 want
[crimes told, no cleaning up
tie."
rabbi, who was standing
me, began to move away.
dice Question
IL AVIV (JTA) -
kyim Mayor Yitzhak Yaron
ne secretaries of the local
town council and of the
[branch of the Labor Party
been questioned by the
f, following a complaint by
leader Rabbi Meir Kahane
hey had assaulted him dur-
i outdoor meeting he tried to
the town earlier in August.
lane and his followers were
to leave the area without
t\g their rally because of a
counter-demonstration dur-
hich Kahane was spattered
I eggs. Yaron denied Kahane's
tion and said that neither
lor the town council members
involved in the counter-
lonstration.
"Jews always worry
about anti-Semitism
and what the goyim
will think of them.
Maybe Jews really
believe they're not
as good as the next
guy. But I sure as
hell don't feel that
way. Jews shouldn't
be scared anymore.
Never scared. They
should be mad."
Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Envoy Cautions:
Attacks on Israel Expected
At New General Assembly
"The only stuff I want you to
leave out," Izzy said, "are those
things on which the statute of
limitations never runs." Of
course, the only crime with no
end, with no statute of limitations,
is murder. But I didn't spell this
out for the audience. All I said was
that I asked Izzy why he would
care about the statute at his
funeral.
"Very good!" Izzy said. But
minutes later he told me to leave it
out anyway. I asked why. He said,
"Suppose they don't accept me
there, suppose they send me back?
Do I need to walk into the hands
of Frank Hogan with a confession
on my back? All my life I took the
Fifth, what am I gonna get stupid
now that I'm dead? Forget about
it!"
THE JOINT cracked up. The
rabbi was not close to the wall. By
the time I finished laying out the
no-longer indictable highlights of
my friend's colorful life, the rabbi
was looking for secret exits. But
no good! He had to get back and
say the final prayer for the
deceased.
"Be of good faith," he said, his
fifty-G voice now down to a
sawbuck. "If he isn't bound up
with the Eternal, he'll be safe
elsewhere."
The rabbi had consigned Izzy to
limbo, and when our conversation
turned to politics again Jewish
and otherwise Zion allowed that
he wasn't so sure American Jews
weren't caught in a limbo of their
own, somehwere between security
and being sold down the river.
Zion has a more than healthy
dose of cynicism about America's
bottom-line commitment to Israel.
"It's a fragile commitment," he
says, "despite all the nice words."
I tell him he sounds like he is
contradicting himself. Earlier, he
had said that Jews are paranoid
and there is no need to fear anti-
Semitism. Yet now, he is saying
that the national commitment to
Israel is tenous.
"Let me think this through,"
Zion says slowly, dead-serious
now, "because I want to get it
right." After a moment's silence,
he responds: "if there wa a real
commitment, why do Jews only
win the exhibition games?" he
asks, citing numerous instances in
recent years when both Jimmy
Carter and Ronald Reagan were
inconsistent in their support of
Israel.
"IT'S IDOLATRY for Jews to
have political heroes in this coun-
try," says Zion, who notes that his
only American political hero is
Thomas Paine, the Revolutionary
War-period idealist whose Com-
mon Sense was a "great book but
they wiped him out of American
history Lincoln was also on my
list but I admire him less as I read
him more."
When it comes to 20th Century
politicians, Zion has kind words
only for Paul O'Dwyer a former
New York City Councilman, for
whom he named his 15-year old-
son, Jedd O'Dwyer Zion. He s a
fine man-in fact, he president of
the Tom Paine Society, the best
job in the world but he loves
Jesse Jackson too much."
Zion says that the Bible and
history have taught Jews not to
put their trust in any politician. "I
can make demands on them even
though I don't for a minute exect
them to fulfill those demands," he
says, explaining, in a way, his
ability to balance his idealism and
skepticism.
"I can't be detached about
anything," he acknowledges.
"You can't lose your passion. You
just gotta keep your sense of
humor or you'll go nuts. It's never
as bad or as good as it looks,
but you've got to keep trying and
making your point. Right now,
our civil liberties are in a crisis in
this country, our schools aren't
educating anyone, but no one's
getting mad, no one's shrying
'gevalt.' "
And if it's true in general, it's
especially true for Jewish life,
Zion believes. "The great tradi-
tion of bawling out the Jews
seems to have ended with the Pro-
phets," he says, "but the Lord
knows we still need it."
NEW YORK Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Nations
has warned Jewish leaders in New
York of a new attack on the
Jewish state during the upcoming
General Assembly session. The
campaign will seek to link Israel
with South Africa and support for
its apartheid policy.
Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu told members of the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York, "The line
that we are now hearing is that
there is a 'New Strategic
Triangle' which includes South
Africa, the United States and
Israel. We can be sure that
numerous resolutions of condem-
nation will be put forward in this
year's General Assembly session
directed at all three members of
this fictitious alliance."
"THE FACT of the matter is,"
Netanyahu observed, "Israel has
a longstanding policy of firm op-
position to apartheid."
The Ambassador noted that
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
recently outlined Israel's stance in
what is now an official UN docu-
ment that has been distributed to
ail UN missions.
According to Netanyahu, the
document was not published in
order to exempt Israel, "but simp-
ly reiterate our utter disdain for
apartheid and what it
represents." The position paper
reflects what Netanyahu and his
predecessors have clearly stated
in UN speeches and documents
for many years.
Netanyahu went on to challenge
the often-stated accusation that
Israel is the "mighty empire that
sustains South Africa from afar."
"On the contrary," he said,
"Israel's trade with South Africa
is dwarfed in comparison with the
business conducted between
South Africa and the Arab
nations."
THE AMBASSADOR produc-
ed International Monetary Fund
and United Nations statistics
which showed that while South
Africa's trade with Israel totalled
$110 million in 1984, its trade
with the Persian Gulf states in oil
alone amounted to a minimun of
$1.5 billion, or close to 15 times
Israel's trade figures.
In addition, Netanyahu revealed
that an estimated 75 percent or
more of all tonnage arriving at
South Africa ports, in violation of
the UN imposed ban, came from
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and other
Arab countries. In contrast,
Israel's trade represents less than
0.5 percent of South Africa's total
trade figures.
"Jewish leadership must make
these findings available,"
Netanyahu asserted, "not only in
preparation for the UN General
Assembly but because this is an
issue that is going to dominate the
agenda for some time."
MALCOLM HOENLEIN, the
JCRC executive director,
underscored the importance of
providing accurate information to
the Jewish community on Israeli
relations with South Africa.
"We see evidence that those
who seek to attack and discredit
Israel, use the issue of relations
with South Africa as a cover. The
facts speak for themselves and
must be made available to the
broadest public possible. This is
also a blatant attempt to link
Zionism with racism by enemies of
Israel and the Jewish people. The
charges are spurious and cannot
be allowed to go unanswered,"
Hoenlein said.
S500 publix
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Eriday..September 27. 198&
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Midwest Farmers Told
Troubles Aren't Related to 'Eastern Bankers/ Jews
NEW YORK Christian
and Jewish religious leaders
have joined with the head of
the Kansas Bureau of In-
vestigation, a
farmers'-organizations of-
ficial, and a political analyst
in denouncing recent ex-
tremist group moves to stir
up anti-Semitism among
Midwestern farmers, warn-
ing that these actions posed
a danger to the farmers and
to democracy as well as to
Christian-Jewish relations.
Issuing the warning, at a news
conference at American Jewish
Committee headquarters here
were Bishop Maurice Dingman,
head of the Catholic Diocese of
Des Moines; Rev. Donald Man-
worren, executive coordinator,
Iowa Interchurch Forum; Rabbi
k. James Rudin, AJC national
director of interreligious affairs;
Thomas Kelly, director, Kansas
Bureau of Investigation; Dixon
Terry, chair. Iowa Farm Unity
Coalition; and Leonard Zeskind,
research director, Center for
Democratic Renewal.
Dr. David M. Gordis, AJC ex-
ecutive vice president, chaired the
meeting.
THE PRINCIPAL charge
leveled by the conference was that
several rightwing groups, preying
on the fears of economically
distressed farmers, were
spreading propaganda alleging
that "Eastern bankers" and an
"international Jewish conspiracy"
were behind the current rural
economic crisis. The specific solu-
tions offered by the six speakers
varied, but all exhorted the
Federal Government to move
quickly to find answers to the
farm crisis, and all called for pro-
grams to make farmers aware of
the falsity and viciousness of anti-
Semitic propaganda.
The two Christian clergymen at
the conference also stressed
heavily that those of the pro-
paganda groups that claimed to be
"Christian" were "in fact making
a mockery of Christianity through
their patently unChristian
message of hate."
Added Rabbi Rudin, expressing
AJC's view and the consensus of
the conference speakers: "We
pledge our continuing opposition
to the destructive 'siren songs' of
the radical right. We will not re-
main silent in the face of bigotry,
and we urge all men and women of
good will throughout our nation to
join with us in a broad-based coali-
tion of concern. The pernicious
Royalty At
Synagogue
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Queen Beatrix of The Netherlands
and Prince Consort Claus were
the guests of honor at a
synagogue service here
celebrating the 350th anniversary
of the Amsterdam Ashkenazic
Congregation. The former
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi of
Amsterdam, Aaron Schuster, who
has been living in Jerusalem since
his retirement, returned to
preside.
The service was held- at the
Sephardic Esnoga synagogue
because none of the Ashkenazic
synagogues is large enough to ac-
commodate all of the invited
guests. Part of the service was
broadcast live on television. It was
followed by a 70-minute documen-
tary film on the Jews who lived in
Amsterdam in 1940 perished dur-
ing the Nazi occupation of
Holland.
virus of hatred must not be allow-
ed to spread."
DESCRIBING the tactics of
some of the groups, Zeskind,
whose agency monitors the ac-
tivities of the Ku Klux Klan and
similar bodies, said:
"Over the last five years the
level of organizing activity by
racists and anti-Semites has
steadily increased. They have
taken advantage of the crisis in
rural America and used that crisis
to put forward their own political
agenda."
"They have used both the more
flamboyant tacticts of
paramilitary training and hate-
mongering," continued Zeskind,
"as well as the established
political tactics of base-building.
Most successfully of all, they sell
farmers a faulty understanding of
legal procedures: they talk of
what they call a 'Christian
understanding of common law,'
and go from there to a Christian
understanding of the Constitution
and civilization,' and before long,
while convincing farmers that
they are offering them a simple
way out of their legal problems,
they have moved on to talk of the
impending 'Jewish destruction of
Western and Christian
civilization.'
"In this way they move down a
slippery slope from simplistic
legalism to out-and-out Nazism."
KELLY, detailing what the
Kansas Bureau of Investigation
has learned of specific groups,
said that one of them, the Sur-
vivalists, "urges the stockpiling of
weapons, food, ammunitions, and
explosives in Survivalist bunkers,
and some of their leaders urge
their members to take violent ac-
tion against Jews and racial
minorities."
Another group, Posse Com-
itatus ("Power of the County"),
Kelly continued, "has as its
philosphy simply a broad spec-
trum of racial, ethnic, and govern-
ment issues singled out by the ex-
tremist and hate groups and of-
fered as a smorgasbord for
bigots."
While the ideas of these groups
are dangerous, Kelly said, "they
have not been received with open
arms by our communities, and we
believe these beliefs and actions
are repugnant to the vast majority
of our farm and rural population."
Moreover, he continued, "our
intelligence information in areas
where there have been terroristic
activities indicates that the people
carrying out these activities
among the farmers are seldom
farmers themselves. We believe
the members of our farm popula-
tion are discerning individuals
who reject extremist viewpoints
for what they are."
TERRY, a dairy farmer who is
active in several farm organiza-
tions and was named by Esquire
magazine as one of its "outstan-
ding men under 40" in 1984, urg-
ed that the problem be attached at
what he considered its roots: the
farmers' economic problems, and
their isolation.
"Farmers across the country
and particularly in the Midwest,"
Arafat May Address
New General Assembly
Continued from Page 1-A
with the President are sill to be
decided.
The Israeli envoy said that a
new positive development has
emerged this year regarding
Israel's diplomatic contacts with
various member-states.
IS a substantial change in the
willingness of member-states to
meet with Israeli represen-
tatives," Netanyahu said. "Many
countries which even do not have
diplomatic ties with us, have
agreed to meet with us during the
Assembly. It seems that past
years' concerns, regarding Arab
sanctions, are no longer a factor
in the decision of many countries
to hold meeting and discussions
with Israel."
He said that Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir who ar-
rived in New York on Sunday
evening, would meet with more
than 40 Foreign Ministers, some
from countries which do not have
diplomatic ties with Israel, such as
East European and African
nations.
Peres, the Ambassador noted,
will meet with no less than a dozen
heads of state, including India and
Hungary, who do not have
diplomatic relations with the
Jewish State.
NOTING THAT the Assembly
will focus on the question of apar-
theid in South Africa, Netanyahu
warned nonetheless, that he an-
ticipates an anti-Israeli campaign
which will seek to link Israel with
Pretoria's racial policies. "The
line that we are now hearing is
that there is a new strategic
triangle, which includes South
Africa, the United States and
Israel," Netanyahu said, in-
dicating that the Arabs will attack
Israel, and the U.S. according to
this line.
Netanyahu stressed Israel's op-
position to apartheid and said that
Israel will extensively publicize its
attitude during the General
Assembly.
BUSINESS
APPRAISAL SEMINAR
CERTIFIED APPRAISERS AND CONSULTANTS
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES SEMINAR
CORAL GABLES HOLIDAY INN
Oct 4-5, 1985 Nov. 15-16, 1985
Call for brochure
(305) 661-4261
Creative Business & Real Estate Investments Co
P.O. Box 1482, S. Miami, FL 33143
Edna Mae Schroeder, Pres.
he said, "are now facing a greater
economic upheaval than any we
have seen in more than half a cen-
tury. Because of economic disloca-
tion, the loss of farms, and the
financial pressures that farmers
and their families are under, there
is an atmosphere of despair and
hopelessness, and in this at-
mosphere many farmers are blind-
ly grabbing at anything that
seems to provide an answer for
them.
"They are thus ripe for the
manipulations of right-wing
groups which provide simplistic
answers, conspiracy theories, and
bogus legal practices that will sup-
posedly solve the farmers' very
serious difficulties.
"The problem is that these
farmers have little or no contact
with other segments of society or
with mainstream media, and so
they are prey to these
manipulations."
NEVERTHELESS, continued
Terry, "although the right-wing
threat in rural communities is the
greatest it has been in a long time,
I think the farmers' progressive
movement has a much broader
base, and the best hope for com-
bating the right-wing anti-
democratic movement lies with
the more progressive forces.
"I think the best route for deal-
ing with the anti-democratic
groups is to deal with the real pro-
blems facing farmers, and to work
to unite farmers with city
workers, with minorities, and
with other people in our society
who are likewise facing problems
and suffer from a lack of political
power."
Also focusing on the farmers'
plight, and suggesting both
political and educational solutions,
Bishop Dingman said:
"Desperate people will look for
scapegoats. Farmers are
desperate. Therefore they are
psychologically and emotionally
prey to the hatemongers who
would blame the devastating farm
crisis on 'Jewish bankers.' There
is of course absolutely no truth to
this charge, and the obvious solu-
tion is twofold: first, remove the
occasion for the hatred by giving
the farmers a just price for their
produce, as called for in the 1985
Farm Reform Act (the Harkin
bill); and secondly, engage in a
strong educational program to
dispel the notion of the so-called
'Jewish conspiracy of bankers'
allegedly trying to take farms
away from family fanners."
ALSO, continued Bishop-
Dingman, "we must unmask
groups like the one that calls
itself Christian Identity that
make a mockery of Christianity by
calling themselves Christian while
spreading a patently unChristian
message. The Christian faith is
love for one's neighbor, and these
groups engender only hate."
Sounding a similar theme,
Reverend Manworren warned
that "while the far right still
represents a fairly small move-
ment in the Midwest, it is a move-
ment that must be taken in all
seriousness," and he added:
"American rural life is undergo-
ing momentous change which
seems clearly beyond the control
of individual farmers or even farm
communities. The sense of
helplessness, rage, and despair
created by these changes makes
people vulnerable to explanations
that seem to fix blame and pro-
mise hope.
"But people of faith know that
hope never lies in the cultivation
of fear, hatred, suspiciop, or
scapegoating.' Those strategies,
which are the methodology of the
far right, always lead to the
destruction of community and
thus the very resource necessary
to a constructive future. Hope lies
in the direction of a reconciled
community that recognizes its
common plight and its common
future."
Security Forces
i
Uncover
Terrorists
TEL AVIV (JTA) Security
forces recently uncovered a ter-
rorist group centered on the
Druze township of Majdal Shams
on the Golan Heights, army
sources report. The gang is
reported to have been responsible
for a number of attacks against
the Israeli Defense Force and
Golan Heights civilians and
villages during the past six
months.
Their activities were said to
have included the planting of a
mine in a local vineyard, from
which a civilian was injured. The
gang also sabotaged water
pipelines and stole arms, equip-
ment and explosives from army
depots.
Etan Liss, chairman of the local
Golan Heights Council, said
Syrian propaganda was rife in
local Arab and Druze schools.
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'


Friday, September 27, 1986/The Jewish Flortdian Page 13-A
Bookcase
Biography Series Highlights Stars
Yr physicist Dr. Alvin Radkowsky (right), a developer of the
J.S. atomic submarine, and Sgt. Reuven Nidam, 23, who
for five years on submarines in the Israeli Navy, view the
'-'. wall at Boy8 Town Jerusalem on which are inscribed
...8 of 61 Boys Town alumni who fell in combat. Dr.
j)8ky is a member of the Boys Town Technical Advisory
\ttee- Sgt. Nidam, a graduate of Boys Town's School of
i Mechanics, returned to the Jerusalem campus this year
the Institute of Advanced Jewish Studies.
>o Mindlin
To Be Chosen, Farrakhan
Needs More Than To Say So
tinned from Page 4-A
farrakhan doesn't accept
tistics of the Holocaust. As
own statistics, I haven't
lis explanation of them, but
Ming to accept his numbers
; question because they are
at to the far more signifi-
keaning of his observation:
BW8 are not the only ones
Ive suffered; so have blacks,
nts us to understand. I con-
that too, although a
able person would be able
that both sufferings were
lid still are not, mutually ex-
i. Numbers are beside the
UNLESS Mr. Farrkahan
not only to transfer the
[of chosen people from my
| to his, but also to change
equirements for chosen
hood, he best understand
^t the start that suffering is
ttugh. Don't forget the com-
|nt to God's unutterability
Drm of reaching out to the
I. But this would be especial-
plesome for Mr. Farrakhan,
Activists
Send Word
YORK (JTA) Three
Soviet Jewish activists
ent high Holy Day messages
I West beseeching the Jewish
^unities and government
i to do all that is possible to
he gates of the Soviet Union
^wish emigration.
three activists are Isai and
Jry Goldstein of Tbilisi, each
I emigration to Israel for 14
|, and Ida Nudel, exiled to
Bri. Grigory Goldstein and
are both former Prisoners
onscience. Their messages
obtained by the Student
kgle for Soviet Jewry.
one of the messages, the
sent their "greetings to the
! of Israel and the Jewish peo-
Ul over the world for a new
[of peace, health and prosperi-
'lease continue to demand
Soviet authorities to end the
Issment of Jews in the USSR
|to let them emigrate to Israel.
reassured of our own deter-
ition to continue in our just
?gle for freedom on behalf of
let Jews."
who sees himself as something of
a godhead all of his own.
When I was a child, we were in-
cessantly regaled with the blan-
dishments of academic achieve-
ment as a way out of the isolation
we experienced because we were
the chosen people. From Schick
through Salk and Sabine (in my
later years), we were exhorted to
make it in the Talmudic world of
the growing scientific mind.
Looking back on my childhood, I
perceive that I lived in a constant
state of high anxiety about the
possibilities of success. And often,
in the dead of night, I think now
that I would rather have been
playing football at the time (if I
could) than given such grownup
problems as achievement to solve
so many years before I was yet to
be presented with my first pair of
longies.
IF THIS is what Mr. Farrakhan
wants for his followers, then he's
got his work cut out for him. and it
has nothing to do, he will discover
in the doing of that work, with be-
ing chosen as a mere designation.
Except maybe as a first feeble
step.
Thereafter, comes the burden
which is profound, relentless and
eternal: to be a light unto the na-
tions, to be moral, to debate the
nature of light and morality in a
world without end as others with
none of these virtues generation
after generation crucify you for
your imperatives to them im-
peratives that are irritating
because they demand of man not
more than men are capable of
understanding but more than they
are willing to give.
And so, Mr. Farrakhan, pay
heed. You'll need more than that
CPA pin to be chosen. And you'll
need more than to claim a capaci-
ty to suffer. If you fail to see what
is yet lacking in you before you
have taken the chosen peoples'
status for your own and put it on
your finger to flourish like some
vulgar, flashy diamond ring, then
the notice you served on the world
in Los Angeles the other week is
absolutely meaningless.
And my willingness to help you
become a CPA is of no
significance either. Your warning
to the world is, indeed, like
Chesterton's pouting poem: a way
to gnash your teeth at your own
limitations as you continue to hunt
after strange Gods.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
A Spy for Freedom: The Story of
Sarah Aaronsohn. By Ida
Cowen and Irene Gunther.
New York: E.P. Dutton, 1984.
159 pp., $14.95.
Isaac Bashevis Singer: The
Story of a Storyteller. By Paul
Kresh. New York: E.P. Dut-
ton, 1984. 150 pp. $13.95.
Under the imprint, Lodestar
Books, the publisher, E.P. Dut-
ton, has inaugurated a Jewish
biography series for young people
with these two books. Judging by
them, one may say that the idea is
excellent and that it has been well
implemented. This promises to fill
an important need.
The story of Sarah Aaronsohn's
life is presented in fictional form
which permits the authors to take
some liberties. They set forth con-
versations and thoughts which
they obviously could not have
recorded. Aside from that,
however, they have stuck closely
to the historical facts.
SARAH AND her brother,
Aaron, led a spy ring for the
British in World War I. They call-
ed it Nili, an acronym for the
Hebrew phrase from Samuel
which says that God will not fail
His people. The information pro-
vided by Nili was of considerable
importance in enabling the British
to oust the Turks from Palestine.
The parents of Sarah and Aaron
came to Palestine from Rumania
in 1882 and helped to establish the
settlement that became Zichron
Yaakov. Aaron was a noted
agronomist who discovered wild
wheat growing in Galilee in 1906.
He cross-bred this with cultivated
wheat to produce a hardy strain
which could grow in the barren
land of Palestine.
Based on his significant
discovery, Aaron was able to
establish an agricultural station at
Athlit, near a Crusader fortress,
close to Zichron Yaakov. This
became the secret base for Nili.
Intelligence information flowed
in, was coded and transmitted to
the British, sometimes by ship and
sometimes by carrier pigeon.
Sarah was in charge of the base
since Aaron was mostly in Egypt
or England.
UNFORTUNATELY, the
Turks eventually uncovered the
operation and arrested most
members of the group. Sarah was
tortured but refused to reveal the
names of her colleagues. In fear of
breaking under further torture
and determined to protect her
comrades, she killed herslef.
Aaron died a year after the war
ended in an airplane crash.
The house of the Aaronsohns in
Isaac Bashevis Singer
Zichron Yaakov is now a museum
and Sarah is a national Israeli
heroine whose grave is visited by
many people. They pay homage to
a courageous woman whose
bravery paved the way for the
establishment of the State of
Israel.
The story of Nili deserves to be
more widely known. While this
particular account is intended for
younger readers, people of all
ages can read the book to learn
about an Israeli pioneer who, as
the sub-title says, was truly "a spy
for freedom."
THE SECOND publication
which inaugurates the new Jewish
biography series of Lodestar
Books tells the story of Isaac
Bashevis Singer. It was adapted
for young people by Paul Kresh
from his adult biography of
Singer, called "Isaac Bashevis
Singer: The Magician of West
86th Street." He might have more
alliteratively called it "The Magi-
cian of Miami Beach," since
Singer regularly spends his
winters in a condominium he owns
here.
Kresh's biography begins and
ends in 1978 when Singer was
awarded the Nobel Prize in
literature. This was a great
distinction for an author who
writes in Yiddish and who grew
up as a poor boy in Poland. Singer
came to the United States in 1935,
assisted by his brother, I.J.
Singer, who was already an
established writer. For many
years, his books, "Yoshe Kalb"
and "The Brothers Ashkenazi,"
overshadowed any of the works by
Isaac Bashevis Singer.
After I.J. Singer died in 1944,
Isaac Bashevis Singer came into
his own as a writer, moving on to
outstrip his brother.
AMONG HIS successful books,
translated from Yiddish into
English were "The Family
Moskat," "The Manor," "The
Magician of LubHn" and
"Shosha." Singer has also written
many short stories, including
"Gimpel the Fool," and a number
of tales for children. Perhaps the
best known of these are his stories
about Chelm, "a legendary village
of fools who think they are the
wisest people in the world."
Several plays and films based on
Singer's work have been made,
most notably, "Yentl," in which
Barbra Streisand starred. Singer
was displeased with the movie,
comparing Streisand unfavorably
to Tova Feldshuh who had the
lead in the Broadway production
of "Yentl."
While the stories on Singer's
early struggles are of interest,
Kresh relates them laboriously,
and his biography is somewhat
less successful than the first book
in the series. Kresh's writing is
marred by chronological incon-
sistencies and by abrupt transi-
tions that interfere with the con-
tinuity. There are also two
careless errors.
ONE OF THESE places
Menachem Begin and Anwar
Sadat in Oslo to receive the Nobel
Peace Prize at the same time as
Singer was there to receive his
Nobel Prize.
In fact, Sadat did not go to Nor-
way. He deliberately stayed away
to protest the stalemated peace
negotiations between Israel and
Egypt. The other error identifies
Singer'8 Miami Beach residence
as being in "Seaside." It is in
Surf side.
These two books mark an
auspicious start for a series that is
scheduled to continue with
biographies of Leo Baeck, Eliezer
Ben-Yehuda and Louis Brandeis.
Young poeple, for whom these
books are written, will have an in-
formed base for pride in their
Jewish heritage.
Population 4.2 Million
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's
population at the end of the
Jewish year 5745 was 4.225
million, the Central Bureau of
Statistics announced. Of the total,
82.5 percent were Jews, 13.5 per-
cent Moslems, 2.3 percent Chris-
tians, and 1.7 percent Druze and.
others. During the past year, the
total population increased by
about 1.8 percent, with the Jewish
population growing by 1.6 percent
and the Moslems by about 3.2
percent.
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Proposed Taba Compromise Frozen;
Labor, Likud Deadlocked
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A proposed compromise to
resolve Israel's border
dispute with Egypt over
Taba remains frozen after a
meeting of the 10-man
Labor-Likud Inner Cabinet
ended in deadlock.
With the five Labor Party
ministers, headed by Premier
Shimon Peres, firmly behind the
proposal and the five Likud
ministers adamantly opposed,
Peres refrained from bringing the
matter to a formal vote. A tie,
which was inevitable in this case,
would have meant defeast of the
compromise.
It was evident, meanwhile, that
the fate of the year-old national
unity coalition government hung
in the balance. Although the
Labor ministers, at a midnight
caucus at Peres' home apparently
decided not to force an all-out con-
frontation with Likud at this time.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
said in radio interviews that he
could not see the government
lasting out its term in a situation
of diplomatic paralysis.
YITZHAK NEVON. Deputy
Premier and Minister of Educa-
tion, also warped that the ongoing
impasse with Egypt could lead to
a serious deterioration in peaceful
relations. "Life does not stand
still. Where'there is no progress,
there is regression," Navon, a
former President of Israel and a
powerful voice in the Labor Party,
warned. .'
The latest in the long series of
crises which have shaken the
uneasy partnership between
Labor and Likud followed Egypt's
agreement to a formula for tackl-
ing the ,Taba dispute. It calls for
conciliation which would
automatically give way to binding
arbitration if the conciliation pro-
cess failed, after a fixed number of
weekg, to produce an agreement
between the two countries.
Both conciliation and arbitra-
tion are provided for in the 1979
Israeli-Egyptian peace reaty to
settle disputes which can't be
resolved through more routine
forms of diplomatic negotiations.
The new formula would involve
Israeli, Egyptian, and American
officials, the latter presenting
ideas for compromise which the
two other parties wuld have to ac-
cept if they were to become a bin-
ding solution. This is a form of
conciliation.
ARBITRATION would differ in
that the two contesting parties
have to agree in advance that the
arbiter's ruling whatever it is,
costitutes a quasi-judicial decision
on the merits of the case and is
therefore binding on them. An ar-
biter's decision in a border dispute
would clearly favor the claims of
one side over the other,
precluding a compromise solution.
The conciliation-leading-to-
arbitration formula evolved as a
face-saving device for Likud
leader Yitzhak Shamir, Foreign
Minister and Deputy Premier,
who has insisted from the outset
that Taba be resolved by concilia-
tion, entailing compromise.
It emerged from recent inten-
sive consultations between the
Director General of the Prime
Minister's Office, Gen. (Res.)
Avraham Tamir, and Egyptian
leaders, including President Hosni
Mubarak. Their meetings were
held in Cairo.
But Shamir spurned that as "a
fig leaf." At the Inner Cabinet
meeting he argued that under the
proposed formula, while Israeli,
Egyptian and American officials
would be ostensibly engaged in
conciliation, others would already
be drafting the documents of
arbitration.
"THIS IS NOT conciliation. It
is merely using the term concilia-
tion as a cover-up" for proceeding
with arbitration, Shamir said.
"Why should we fool ourselves?"
he asked. He said it was "regret-
table" that there are internal dif-
ferences within Israel over Taba.
He maintained that Labor's sup-
port of the Egyptian position only
encouraged Egypt to reject the
Likud position.
Underlying those internal dif-
ferences are diametrically oppos-
ed views over how Israel should
deal with Egypt. The Labor view,
frequently and forcefully
presented by Peres, is that a flexi-
ble approach over Taba a tiny
The design of a United States postage stamp
honoring Dr. Bernard Revel is unveiUd by of-
ficials of Yeshiva University and the Postal
System. Dr. Revel was first president of the in-
stitution. The stamp will be issued in the
"Great American" series in 1986, the year
that the university celebrates its Centennial.
The unveiling of the design marked the 100th
birthday of Dr. Revel. From left are Norman
Levy, whose mother was a half-sister to Dr.
Revel and who represented the family; Jack D.
Weiler, national general chairman of the
university's centennial celebration; Dr. Nor-
man Lamm, president of the university;
Walter E. Duka, assistant postmaster general
for international postal affairs; Herbert
Tenzer, chairman of the university's Board oj
Trustees; and Dr. Israel Miller, senior vice
president of the university.
strip of beach on the Gulf of
Aqaba which both countries agree
is of little or no strategic or
economic value would open the
way to the speedy resolution of far
more important issues outstan-
ding between Jerusalem and
Cairo, such as normalization of
relations and the return of
Egypt's Ambassador to Tel Aviv.
The Likud view is that anything
other than a tough stance toward
Egypt would compromise Israel's
credibility and sacrifice its prin-
ciples. Ariel Sharon, the Minister
of Commerce and Industry,
Likud's most outspoken hardliner,
warned at the Inner Cabinet
meeting against any sign of
"weakness" by Israel.
WHILE SOURCES close to
Shamir insisted that the Deputy
Premier was setting the tone of
Likud on the issue, Labor sources
charged that not Shamir but
Sharon dictated Likud policy.
Shamir, in one of his radio inter-
views, said he did not reject ar-
bitration out-of-hand but needed
clarification from Egypt regar-
ding the proposal now under
consideration.
Rabin, who conceded that ar-
bitration was "objectively the best
way" to determine where the true
inrternational border between
Egypt and Israel is located, said
he could not understand the logic
of Likud's position which seemed
to balk at arbitration only because
the Egyptians demanded it.
Peres, for his part, reportedly
told the Inner Cabinet in solemn
tones that he was determined not
to preside over a government
which was effectively paralyzed in
the diplomatic arena. The latest
crisis developed on the eve of
Shamir's departure for the United
Nations General Assembly in New
York where he has a meeting
scheduled with Egypt's Foreign
Minister, Ismet Abdel Meguid.
PERES, too, will be going to
the UN where he is to meet with
President Mubarak. The Israelis
clearly hope that the General
Assembly's 40th anniversary ses-
sion will offer opportunities for
fruitful diplomacy. But those
hopes might not materialize if the
Israeli government itself is sharp-
ly divided on diplomatic issues.
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Argentine General's'4
Case Sent Evidence
NEW YORK The Ami
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has submitted to the pro-
secutor in the Buenos Aires "Trial
of the Generals" 600 pages of
evidence documenting the disap-
pearance and detention of Jews
and the anti-Semitism they ex-
perienced in Argentine jails from
1976 to 1983.
The trial centers on human
rights abuses, including kidnapp-"
ing, torturing and killing Argen-
tine civilians. The defendants are
nine leaders of the three military
governments that ruled Argen-
tina during the seven years and
General Ramon J. Camps, chief of
police of Buenos Aires at that
time. The ADL submission
documents that anti-Semitism
was often evident in the inter-
rogation and treatment of Jewish
detainees.
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'arrakhan
Miami Leaders Condemn Appearance
Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
JDO Threatens Klan;
Rally Called Off
Continued from Page 1 A
i is it our right and obligation to
i likewise."
The statement continued:
"Mr. Farrakhan has and no
mbt will continue to preach
Icism, bigotry, anti-Semitism
id hate. We reject, unequivocal-
the distorted, repellent and
lious views he espouses.
'MANY IN this tri-ethnic com-
inity have worked together to
Rio Lawyer
Leads Club
Again
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) -
atheus Schnaider, a prominent
ember of the Jewish community,
s been elected to a second three
at term as president of Rio's
estigious Engineers Club (Clube
Engenharia) following a bitter
n Semitic campaign waged by
opponents. Schnaider, 46,
ame the first Jew to head the
kib when he was elected presi-
nt in 1982.
His reelection was opposed by
be party of Rio's Governor,
onel Brizola, and by the leftist
fartidos Dos Trabalhadores
Workers Party) or PT, both of
frhich resorted to anti-Semitic
annards.
I The PT, a strong supporter of
he Palestine Liberation
Organization, accused Schnaider
If being "an agent of interna-
tional Zionism."
overcome the obstacles which
have divided us; and while much
remains to be done, significant
progress has been made. We must
not allow Mr. Farrakhan's brief
visit to undo the good that has
been accomplished."
Pointing out that "As
Americans, we enjoy no more
precious right than that of free
speech," the statement declared:
"Social and economic justice can-
not be achieved by calls to hatred
and violence. While we recognize
that there are inequities and in-
justices in our society, Mr. Far-
rakhan's approach is not the
avenue to their solution. Instead,
we must work together to remedy
them."
The statement was issued joint-
ly by a broad coalition of com-
munity leaders including Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Presi-
dent Samuel I. Adler; Federa-
tion's Community Relations Com-
mittee Chairman Jeffrey
Berkowitz; Manuel Diaz, im-
mediate past chairman of the
Spanish-American League
Against Discrimination; Rev. Ir-
vin Elligan, Jr., past chairman of
the Community Relations Board
of Dade County; former Miami Ci-
ty Manager Howard Gary.
Also, Rabbi Brett Goldstein,
president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami;
Rev. T. Luther Jones, president of
the Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches; Athalie Range, former
commissioner, City of Miami;
Jesse McCrary, former Florida
Secretary of State; Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, executive vice
president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami; and
Msgr. Bryan 0. Walsh, executive
director of Catholic Community
Services.
Meanwhile, Willie Lawson III,
president of the Greater Miami
Branch of the National Associa-
tion of Colored People, has been
joined by Norma Orovitz, presi-
dent of the American Jewish Con-
gress, in a statement condemning
Farrakhan.
"Minister Louis Farrakhan's
impending visit to Miami has rais-
ed two issues in our community
which the NAACP, Greater Miami
Branch, and American Jewish
Congress feel compelled to ad-
dress," the joint statement
declares.
"Our shared experiences with
oppression have taught us the im-
portance of the First Amend-
ment's guarantee of free speech.
We know only too well that when
anyone's right to speak is stifled,
sooner or later our speech will be
stifled. For this reason Mr. Far-
rakhan must be given his forum.
"However, we also have learned
from our histories the importance
of challenging bigotry from
whatever quarter it may arise. We
are, therefore, obligated to con-
demn Louis Farrakhan for the
virulent racism, bigotry, and anti-
Semitism he espouses and incites.
It is our fervent hope that other
responsible communal organiza-
tions and individuals in our com-
munity will join with us."
In a separate action earlier in
September, the Miami Commis-
sion formally denounced Far-
rakhan "for his racial
divisiveness."
TRENTON, N.J. (JTA)
- Plans by the Ku Klux
Klan to hold rallies here, in
Newark, and in Oxford
(Warren County) later this
month have been called off
by New Jersey's KKK
leader, Richard Bondira,
following threats by the
New York-based Jewish
Defense Organization (JDO)
to "destroy the Klan."
Bondira, 34, who resides in the
rural community of Oxford and is
a write-in candidate for governor
of New Jersey, said he cancelled
plans for the rallies because he did
not want to "jeopardize the life,
limb, property or safety of
anyone" in the face of anyone
"whose answer to everything is
kill," a reference to the JDO.
MORDECHAI LEVY, JDO
leader, had warned that he would
bring "tough Jews" who would be
"legally armed" for "death to the
Klan" counter-demonstrations at
the three KKK planned rally sites.
Levy said he was not inciting
violence, only predicting it. He
said that if the rallies were not
called off, they "will be stopped.
One doesn't permit the Klan to
march anymore. One doesn't
debate with the Klan anymore.
One must destroy the Klan."
Levy said he had applied for
permits for counter-
demonstrations to face the KKK
"right in their own den." He said
that "For everyone in a robe,
there's another 100 who would
like to be, but as long as they
know it's an unhealthy situation,
they won't be."
Mayor Arthur Holland of Tren-
ton had, despite public protests,
remained firm in defense of Bon-
dira's constitutional right to hold
the rally Sept. 28, but added that
it would be unwise for the KKK
and the JDO to proceed with their
intended actions. But Bondira
called off his rally in face of the
JDO threats.
MAYOR Kenneth Gibson of
Newark denied a request by the
KKK to hold a rally on the steps of
City Hall Sept. 26. He vowed that
as long as he was mayor, the KKK
would "never" march in New
Jersey's largest city. He said he
based his position as a "black
man, a spokesman for my people
and as mayor of Newark."
An ad hoc coalition of communi-
ty organizations in Newark and
the JDO were among those vow-
ing to hold counter-
demonstrations if the KKK was
allowed to rally. Reacting to Gib-
son's stand, Levy said, "Thank
God the mayor of Newark is a
man, who in this case, had the
moral strength to take a moral
stand. We feel that racism and
anti-Semitism are two sides of the
same coin."
Manuscript Found
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
manuscript with the musical nota-
tion of the Sabbath table melody,
Zur Mixhelo Achalnu. as sung by
Jews in Germany about 500 years
ago, has been discovered at the
Bavarian National and University
Library in Munich by Prof. Israel
Adler, director of the Jewish
Music Center at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem. This is
one of the oldest musical notations
of Jewish music traditions ever
found.
| The Original
s
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Page 16-A The Jewish FloridianyFriday, September 27, 1985
You've got what It takes.
Share the spirit Share the refreshment


"dfewislh Floridia
t Brodie (right), executive vice president
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, is
orn in as a Commissioner on the State of
florida Commission on Ethics in ceremonies
in Tallahassee. Administering the oath of of-
fice is Florida Supreme Court Justice Joseph
A. Boyd, Jr.
1ov. Graham Reveals
[iami Federation Executive Veep Brodie
Appointed to Fla. Ethics Commission
[State of Florida has
elected Myron J. Brodie to
Brve as a commissioner on
State's Commission on
Ethics. Brodie, who is ex-
rutive vice president of the
Ireater Miami Jewish
federation, was sworn in at
eremonies in Tallahassee
|y Florida Supreme Court
ustice Joseph A. Boyd, Jr.
Sept. 3.
Brodie was appointed to a two-
Duetothe
observance of
YomKlppur
The
Jewish Floridian
went to press
early Tuesday.
year term on the Commission by
Gov. Bob Graham. He succeeds
Miamian David B. Fleeman, the
Commission's outgoing chairman.
Named new chairman of the nine-
man body is Kenneth L. Connor,
of Lake Wales.
THE COMMISSION on Ethics
enforces State ethics laws ap-
plicable to public officers and
employees. Its duties include the
investigation of complaints and is-
suance of ethics advisory opinions,
as well as administration of finan-
cial disclosure laws.
Commissioner Brodie, whose
term began officially on July 1,
came to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation in 1968 from his post
as executive director of the
Jewish Welfare Federation and
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, Hollywood. In-
itially serving in Miami as
associate executive vice president
and campaign director, he was
elevated to his present post in
1972.
Brodie currently is a par-
ticipating member of the Inter-
faith Consultation on Social
Welfare, the Advisory Committee
to the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare of the
U.S. Government; past associate
chairman of the National Profes-
sional Planning Committee for
H1AS; and chairman of the JDC-
Overseas Committee on Com-
munity Organization and Fund-
Raising.
FROM 1968-71, Brodie was a
member of the faculty of the
Barry University Graduate School
of Social Work. He presently
serves on the Professional Ad-
visory Committee of the Barry
Graduate School of Social Work.
He is a member of the Greater
Miami United Board of Trustees
and a member of the Visiting
Committee of the University of
Miami School of Education and
Allied Professions.
The new Commissioner holds a
Bachelor's degree in Science from
Western Maryland College and a
Master's degree in Social Work
from Boston University of Social
Work.
Sukkoth
Brings Joyous Climax to
High Holy Day Season
The High Holy Day season, which
egan with a Rosh Hashanah and Yom
lippur, reaches its climax with the
jpration of Sukkoth, or the Feast of
e Tabernacles, with services scheduled
. synagogues Erev Sukkoth on Sunday
[ening, Sept. 29. Services continue Mon-
1 V and Tuesday, Sept. 30 and Oct. 1
"Vom Wednesday through the following
Saturday, Oct. 2-5, are Choi Hamoed Suk-
koth. The holiday is brought to a joyful
close with the observance of Hoshanah
Rabbah on Sunday, Oct. 6, followed by
Shmini Atzereth services on Monday, Oct.
7 (including Yizkor memorial prayers),
and Simchat Torah, or the Feast of the
Rejoicing of the Torah, on Tuesday, Oct.
8.
Miami, Florida Friday, September 27,1985 Section B
ADL Affirms Farrakhan's
Right To Speak, Raps
Muslim Leader's Bigotry
For Related Stories
. See Page 1-A
In a policy memorandum
issued here this week, the
Florida office of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith unequivocally brands
Louis Farrakhan, leader of
the Black Muslim movement
in the United States, "a
demagogue who uses
scapegoating as a primary
tactic."
The ADL memorandum is being
circulated in anticipation of Far-
rakhan's appearance as speaker at
Gusman Hall in Miami on Satur-
day night. It is sharply critical of
Farrakhan's "rhetorical weapons
(which) include anti-Semitism,
racism and occasional calls to
violence."
The memorandum continues:
"Farrakhan's views on economic
matters of black self-
determination, which some may
find reasonable, in no way cure or
excuse his anti-Semitism and
racism."
THE ADL was to join Greater
Miami United at a press con-
ference on Thursday, 11:45 a.m.,
at the Miami Airport Hilton in an-
ticipation of Farrakhan's address
Saturday.
In its memorandum here, the
ADL notes that "Farrakhan's re-
cent message provides a promise
of a better life for blacks through
pride and economic independence,
but also provides devils to hate
whites, Jews, Zionists and
American society.
"The message is all the more
troubling because he draws large
crowds and media attention, and
support and sympathy from some
respected elements in the black
community, implying a degree of
legitimacy and acceptance for a
philosophy poisoned by hate."
The ADL adds: "Farrakhan and
the Nation of Islam (Black
Muslims) remain a serious concern
because of the dangers inherent in
public appeals to bigotry and
racism."
THE MEMORANDUM, issued
by Arthur Teitelbaum. Southern
Area director of the ADL in
Miami, emphasizes that "Far-
rakhan's right to speak at. a
public facility" is "unambiguous.
The First Amendment's free
speech guarantees properly con-
trol this situation," and he has the
right to speak "no matter how ob-
noxious his views."
But, Teitelbaum emphasizes,
"The challenge to our community
comes less from Farrakhan's im-
pending visit, than from the re-
quirement it presents for
thoughtful and determined
response from both leadership and
ordinary citizens. A vacuum of
silence could be very damaging to
intergroup relations in our area; it
would leave center-stage to the
last responsible and most extreme
elements in the community."
For the ten-day period prior to
Farrakhan's appearance here, the
ADL has been urging individuals
and groups "to give voice to their
repudiation of Farrakhan's
bigotry and to their commitment
to intergroup harmony."
EXPLAINS Teitelbaum: "We
have been saying that before Far-
rakhan's speech is the time for all
of us to express confidence in one
another and the multicultural
future of our community."
He warns that "the black com-
munity is not monolithic. While
Farrakhan has recently drawn
large audiences, there are many in
the black community who reject
his bigotry. Those who do not, or
who equivocate, are properly sub-
ject to criticism."
Nathan Skolnick Elected
President Of Health Center
Nathan Skolnick, of Miami
Beach, has been elected president
of the Stanley C. Myers Communi-
ty Health Center. Located at 621
Washington Avenue on South
Beach, the Center is a primary
care medical clinic, treating pa-
tients who reside on Miami Beach.
The Center is named for Stanley
C. Myers, longtime communal
leader and founder of the clinic.
Myers serves as honorary presi-
dent of the Stanley C. Myers Com-
munity Health Center.
Anne Meyer is vice president of
the Center and Solomon Lichter
and Elayne Weisburd are
secretary and treasurer, respec-
tively. Beverly Press is executive
director of the Center, a post she
has held since it was started.
Founded in 1977, the clinic
serves as family doctor for more
than 6,000 individuals who are
unable to afford medical care.
Although it was created principal-
ly to serve the thousands of elder-
ly poor living on South Beach, its
patients are now primarily
Hispanic refugees and the
homeless of the Beach. The elder-
ly, who once were 80 percent of
the patient load are now only 9.4
percent of those using the Center.
The clinic is funded by an annual
grant from the United States
Department of Health and Human
Nathan Skolnick
ding from the City of Miami
Beach.
Skolnick is the retired director
of planning and budgeting of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. He now serves the Federa-
tion as senior consultant. A
graduate of the University of Min-
nesota, he holds a master's degree
in community organization from
Columbia University.
Skolnick ia married to the
former Theodora Fire, and thev


On "*-% e A
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
From the Pulpit
Tender Fruits, High Priorities
Simcha Dinitz, Eli Weisel to
Inaugurate Beth Sholom Series
\U RABBI
MICHAEL B. BISKN8TAT
Temple Judea
Sukkoth i.< MM the easiest holi-
day to bacoiM wrnitori about, par-
ticularly in the I'nitod States, cer-
tainly, here in South Florida. Suk-
koth is a harvest festival that
takes piaee in Israel, oceans away
Our fruits are abroad]! long gone.
r not nearly ready for
Murvoating
The second aapoct of Sukkoth.
namely, dwelling in little tvoths in
conunerooration of the boothi our
ancoaton dwelt in when tboj
OMM out or' Egypt, also leaves BM
untremblmc with excitement,
since it is at Pesaoh that my
"from-slavery to -freedom" juices
really flow.
IF ONE has ever had the
privilege of celebrating Sukkoth
in Israel, one cannot help but note
the contrast in trying to celebrate
it here. Nevertheless, there is a
supreme value in celebrating this
ancient holiday in the I'mted
States, in the Soviet 1'nion. in
Germany. France and wherever
Jews live.
Many nations and people are ac-
customed to harvest festivals.
After the harvest is in. (Treat
celebrations take place There :>
music, dancing, and moments of
high revelry which we might bet
ter leave undiseussed With the
crops in barn and silo, the farmer
is feeling mellow. It is a jrood time
to approach him for "charitable
contributions."
Indeed, if the harvest has beer,
good, it :s d'.ftvu': for ~ :,
refuse, surrounded as he is by so
much bounty He has calculated
the prices his crops I|
what he needs for his far
he needs to put *
dm] Hi wha: he w-.'.l need :.' cv:
started ag*:r -e\: >e.t- \a
tver v cfte" sa .-"a- *. :yc".
I MM "
BIT NOT neeessar-;. sc
.: the ( ; tofe t of first
priorities Ir. his "Owk '-
IVrpiexeci V
a different perspective He pHMl
out that chant) does v\- MJB a:
home The first of every 'J _
Sr devoted to God By so doing
Mamvcudes continues, a persor.
Neeoraes accustomed to reirg
gwmvus and to aauung hss jc-
pecte for eating and Ml iesire Mr
property
The Jewish faravr
:t the entire I about the rae -
worrying
m other
i of baches, sow sees >sst the
of the fruits of hat
Sr frarts. the Hi-
oc*er *=c >.n^ sfon&r
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
in his orchards. His every instinct
is to pick them and to eat them
greedily and to bring them to his
loved ones to eat.
But no. He restrains himself
Not knowing whether the res: of
the crop will mature, not knowing
whether or not some unseasoruL
disaster will rob him of his labors,
he fills a basket with the very-
finest fruits he has and goes to the
Temple to offer thanks for what
little he has and to make an offer-
ing to the Lord for the widow, the
orphan, and the Levite who has no
property of his own.
WHILE Ol'R laws of totiajtol
prohibit a man from im-
poverishing his family for the sake
of Utdakak, nevertheles^
makes plain to us that the aid
maxim. "Charity btgtnl at
home." :s not the only priority by
which one car. live. The laws and
customs of Sukkoth point out that
"charity" ftamlakmk or righteous
giving in a Jewish thoughtframet
does no? begin at home.
Moreover, it certainly does not
end at home. An entire mu- tenth portion or a "tithe" was
given for t;*iakaA when the
harvest was completed. Charity
did not begin at home, and more
important, it did not end at home.
Charity that begins at home and
ends at home is simply ar.
euphemistic way of describing
selfishness
Sukkoth flies in the face of
selfishness, bringing to us a MBM
of the greatness of God's blessings
with which he showers us. and x-
vites us to share those blessings
with others.
Continuing its tradition of
presenting stimulating discussion
on important aspects of Jewish
life. Temple Beth Sholom will in-
augurate its first season of the
Great Speakers Forum with lec-
tures by Israeli Ambassador Sim-
cha Dinitz and the Honorable Elie
Wiesel. educator and novelist, ac-
cording to temple cultural direc-
tor Judy Drucker.
We are honored to be able to
present two of the world's most
distinguished speakers at our tem-
ple." said Neil Amdur. president
of Temple Beth Sholom. The
series is sponsored by the Cultural
Arts Department of Temple Beth
Shol
The Israeli .Ambassador to the
United States from 1972 to 1978.
Dinitz wili speak on "Israel and
the Middle East." Saturday. Oct.
12. at 8 p.m. at the Temple.
Elected last year to the Israeli
Knesset. Dinitz is a member of the
Israeli Foreign Affairs and
Security Council. He held the posi-
tion of Vice President of the
Simcha Dinitz
Hebrew University of Jer
where he was a senior felkw
Leonard Davis Institute of lm
national Relations.
Reception For Micha Paz
A farewell reception in honor of
Micha Pai. Vice President and
Southeast Regional Manager |".--
Am pal Securities Cortvr..
i AMSECO*. w. bi to i (Set 2. :
the Konover Hotel in M:arr..
Beach. jOBBTwag to David Mer
tk} President of AMSECO
'flli scut *7U4tau/idfU
AMSECO in North Arr.e.-.ca for
four years and is retunung tc
Israe. to take oc asxgnrr.er.:s for
A--.pal's Israel office
A.-.:\i- SacaribBi Corpami
. rr-arkeUDg a^MUtory ;:' Ampal
l>-.u .". -it;- tr-i:
* 5 Ar-pa r^-:e .
toVM la) a l>.-ic
' "A' -v
. c
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i-.-. igr.culrira.
eeterprtses [a
Opmir
Swpt.
1965

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, Lila Greenspan Heatter
To Receive AJC Award
Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
The Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee will
present its 1985 Human Relations
Civic Achievement Award to Lila
Greenspan Heatter on Thursday,
October 10 at the Pavilion Hotel.
Past President of the Board of
Trustees of Mount Sinai Medical
Center, Mrs. Heatter is the only
woman to have held this position.
She was the founding president of
the Founders of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged,
and is currently a member of the
Board of that institution. She
serves on the Board of Directors
of the Dade Foundation, and is a
past member of the Board of
Governors of the Medical Division
of the University of Miami.
Lila Greenspan Heatter is
presently the Vice Chair of the
Board of WPBT/Channel 2. Chair-
man of the Federally Funded
Channeling Demonstration Pro-
ject from 1982-1985, Mrs. Heatter
was also a delegate to the 1968
Democratic Convention in
Chicago. Mrs. Heatter is the
daughter of Mrs. S. Harvey
Greenspan and the late Mr.
Greenspan, well-known philan-
"If any single institu-
tion can be named
as supremely vital
to the peace and
survival of Israel and
the entire Middle
East, that institution
is Technion. '
David Ben-Gurion
UTCCHNION
ISRAEL INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
868-5666
Lila Greenspan Heatter
thropists throughout the Jewish
community and long-time sup-
porters of Mount Sinai Medical
Center.
Beth Sholom
Lecture Series
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami will continue its tradition of
providing stimulating discussions
on important aspects of Jewish
life with this year's announcement
of the popular Sunday morning
Omnibus Lecture Series, now in
its ninth season, according to the
temple's cultural director, Judy
Drucker.
Educator and author Dr. Allan
Gould begins the series on Nov.
17, others featured are Wolf
Blitzer, Washington Bureau Chief
of the Jerusalem Post, Leonid
Feldman, the first Soviet Jew to
be ordained a Conservative Rabbi,
Dennis Prager, social and political
commentator, and Per Ahlmark,
former Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Labor of Sweden.
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Children and grandchildren of Abraham and Gertrud Kaluski dedicate the forest in memory
oj IS members of the Kaluski Family who perished in the Holocaust.
Abraham and Gertrud Kaluski
of Miami Beach have established a
10,000 tree forest in the Jewish
National Fund Martyrs Forest in
Israel. The forest is in memory of
the 13 members of their family
who perished in the Holocaust.
"On the memorial marker in the
JNF Martyrs Forest appears the
names of 13 members of the
Kaluski family who perished at
the hands of the Nazis. The trees
represent life and strength and
beauty and will live forever,"
Abraham Kaluski said.
The Kaluskis delegated their
son, Jerry Kaluski. of California,
who with his wife, children and
grandchildren traveled to Israel to
make the dedication. They were
joined by the Kaluskis daughter,
son-in-law and children.
"Our children, grandchildren
and great-grandchildren have ex-
perienced a very moving and
thrilling association with the past.
To commemorate the loss of 13
aunts, uncles and cousins is not an
easy experience, but their
memory is now carved on the land
of Israel forever, and the plaque
bearing the testimony is eternal
proof that they lived on this earth,
and the roots of the trees in the
State of Israel will bind the Jewish
people together in freedom. The
trees will bloom and will add to
the growth, and strength of
Israel, and this is what we wanted
to achieve," the Kaluskis added.

Marker at the site of the Abraham and Gertrud Kaluski
Forest in the Jewish National Fund Martyrs Forest lists
thirteen members of the Kaluski Family who perished in the
Holocaust.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 27, 1985
Fred Hirt Receives Entman Award
Able Holtz Receives Honors
Fred D. Hirt, Executive Direc-
tor of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens, has been honored with
the 1985 Sidney Entman Award.
Presented by the Florida Council
on Aging, a statewide network of
volunteers and professionals, the
award "symbolizes recognition
and appreciation of unequaled
personal and professional con-
tributions by an individual to the
field of aging."
Mr. Hirt accepted the award
from Mike Freeman, President of
the Florida Council on Aging at an
awards breakfast in Tampa. "I am
extremely proud to have been
chosen to receive this year's Ent-
man Award," said Mr. Hirt. "It is
my pleasure to accept it on behalf
of both the pioneers in the field of
gerontology who paved the way
for us. and an up and coming
Fred D. Hirt
Herschel Rosenthal Receives
A.C. Blount Pioneer Award
Herschel Rosenthal, president
of Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association, has become the
1985 recipient of the A.C. Blount
Pioneer Award for "commitment
to public service" by the Florida
Savings and Loan League.
Rosenthal was honored for his
"support of the state and national
trade associations; and outstan-
ding achievement and enhance-
ment of the general well-being of
the savings and loan industry."
In addition to his many com-
munity activities, Rosenthal has
served as a member of the board
of directors of the Florida League
since 1976. He served as the
League's chairman in 1981-82.
He has also served on the Ex-
WANTEO Permanent Rabbi
for Conservative Bnal Zlon
Congregation of K.W. For further
information contact Jack
Elnhom, 1806 Blanche Sir., K.W.
33040.
(305)296-5739
Herschel Rosenthal
ecutive Committee of the United
States League of Savings Institu-
tions since 1982.
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generation of professionals who
are making tremendous strides in
elderly services today."
Mr. Hirt has been Executive
Director of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
since 1969. His affiliations include
the American Association of
Homes for the Aging, the Florida
Nursing Home Association, the
State Long-Term Care Om-
budsman Committee, the Ad-
visory Council of the Community
Care System for the Chronically
Impaired Elderly and the Health
System Agency of South Florida.
He was recently appointed to
the Florida Committee on Aging
and the Certificate of Need Task
Force, two State blue-ribbon
panels whose recommendations
will have far-reaching conse-
quences for the future of elderly
services in Florida.
Pioneer Women
A special "Game Night" to
benefit the Ethiopian children in
the State of Israel has been plann-
ed by the Or Chapter of Pioneer
YVomen/Na'amat Saturday. Oct.
12 at 8 p.m. in the auditorium of
Temple Moses, 1200 Normandy
Drive. Miami Beach.
According to Raquel Rub, presi-
dent of the chapter, the event is
open to the general public with
reservations required.
A Sukkoth mini-luncheon and
travelogue, "We Travel to
Russia" and a bake sale will all be
on tap on Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 11:30
a.m. in the social room of
Winston) Tower 700, Sunny Isles,
sponsored by the liana Chapter of
Pioneer Women/Na'amat.
Lillian Hoffman, president of
the club, said members and poten-
tial members are invited to attend
this session.
Mrs. Hoffman also announced a
luncheon and card party will take
place at Winston Tower on Tues-
day, Oct. 15, 11:30 a.m.
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Abel Holtz, chairman and presi-
dent of Miami-based Capital
Bank, has been selected as the
1985 recipient of the Minority
Banker Award presented by the
Miami/Fort Lauderdale Minority
Business Development Center.
Holtz will receive the award on
Monday, at a dinner banquet to be
held at the Sheraton River House
in Miami. In celebration of Minori-
ty Enterprise Development Week,
the local business development
center also will be honoring
minority entrepreneurs in other
business fields, such as manufac-
turing and trade.
Juan V. Tapia, director of the
Miami/Fort Lauderdale Minority
Business Development Center,
said Holtz was chosen for the
banking award "in recognition of
his contribution to the minority
business community."
Holtz, who founded Capital
Bank in 1974, also will serve as
the development center's keynote
speaker at an Oct. 1 luncheon. The
chairman and president of Capital
Bancorp will discuss the activities
of the parent holding company's
export trading subsidiary. Capital
Trade Services, Inc.
Abel Holtz
Abel Holtz, has also been
selected as "Banker of the Year"
by the Asociacion de Real Estate
Latina (AREL).
Holtz will receive the award on
Saturday at the Everglades Hotel
during AREL's 10th anniversary-
dinner and ceremony.
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Leaving to attend high school in Israel, from
left are Uri Cohen, Director, Israel Aliyah
Center; Michelle Preter; Jonathan Tripp;
Cynthia Salem; liana Rigwan; Randall Leip-
zig and Scott Sternberg.
Students Attend Year-Long School Program In Israel
Eight young people, ages 14 to
'^17, from Dade and Broward, left
to attend Project Discovery, an
American Israeli high school pro-
gram for one year of studies in
Israel.
Sponsored by Youth Aliyah, the
program's main goal is to rein-
force the student's Jewish
heritage and identify with the peo-
ple and the State of Israel. Youth
Aliyah sponsors several high
school programs for youth from
around the world including
England, France, Canada, Cen-
tral and South America.
v Going to school in Tel Aviv at
Kfar Hayarok are Michelle
Preter, Miami Beach, and Hilary
Spiegel, Davie, who both
previously participated in the
Alexander Muss High School in
Israel program. Also, Marc
Labowitz, Fort Lauderdale, son of
Rabbi and Mrs. Phillip Labowitz.
Attending Kfar Silver in
Ashkelon will be liana Rigwan,
Miami Beach, Scott Sternberg of
Hollywood, Cynthia Salem of Fort
Lauderdale, and Randal Leipzig
of Ocean Ridge. Jonathan Tripp,
Fort Lauderdale, will attend
Shimshon in Jerusalem.
Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Marilyn Weil To Be Installed
Jewish Home Auxiliary President
Marilyn Weil will be officially
installed as President of the
Greater Miami Women's Aux-
iliary of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at the
installation luncheon to be held at
noon on October 10 at the Omni
Hotel. Senator Gwen Margolis
will be the featured speaker.
A resident of Coral Gables,
Marilyn Weil is an active
volunteer at the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Joining Ms. Weil on the 1985-86
slate of officers are: Vice
Presidents, Mollie Silverman,
Phyllis Beekman, Lorraine
Women's League
To Hold Meeting
The Lincoln Miami Chapter of
Women's League for Israel will
meet on Wednesday, at 11 a.m. in
the Social Room at 100 Lincoln
Road.
Sandra Friedman, counselor of
Mount Sinai Hospital will speak,
according to President Betty Got-
tesman and Program Chairman,
Dorothy Summer.
Marilyn Weil
Geenberg, Hazel Cypen, Lucille
Chernin, and Bess Stein;
Treasurer, Mae Meyer; Financial
Secretary, Anne Tanenbaum;
Recording Secretary, Augusta
Levine; Corresponding Secretary,
Ruth Lerner; and Parliamen-
tarian, Pauline Marks.
'.-: H i
"
Roberta Fox
Fox To Chair
,*Dade Delegation
State Sen. Roberta Fox was
named as leader of the 28-member
Hade County legislative.delega-
tion when the session opens next
spring in Tallahassee.
Pox, 41, who represents South
Uade, was selected as chairman
during a caucus of the delega-
| tlor's seven senators.
inny Isles ARMDI
Musical Evening
The Sunny Isles Chapter of the
[American Red Magen David for
I Israel (ARMDI) musical evening
[will take place at the Winston
[Towers 300 Building Auditorium,
pt 7:30 p.m. Oct. 4. The program,
consisting of specially arranged
'musical favorites, will involve
piano accompaniment as well as
M5*irumental accompaniment
from the concertina, accordian,
harmonica and trumpet, in addi-
|tion to voice.
Chapter President is Ruth
| Spivak.
LENDER'S AND PHILLY,
A BREAKFAST TRADITION
SINCE 1927
For nearly 60 years sitting
down to breakfast of Lenders
Bagels and PHILADELPHIA
BRAND Cream Cheese has
been a delicious tradition.
Recognized as the first
name in bagels since 1927,
the Lender family still person-
ally supervises the baking of
their bagels-guaranteeing
that every variety has a taste
and texture second to
none. In just minutes,
Lenders Bagels toast
up crispy on the out-
side and soft and
chewy on the inside, ready to
be spread with either plain
PHILLY or one of the tempting
fruit or vegetable flavors. And
because PHILLY has half the
calories of butter or mar-
garine, you can enjoy this
satisfying combination every
day.
And, of course, both are
certified Kosher.
So if you want
to enjoy a tradition
tomorrow, pick up
the Lender's and
Soft PHILLY today.
1985 Krai, inc KRAFT


JO-
I
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Happenings
Sisterhood of the Sephardic Jewish Center of North Miami
Beach will celebrate the "13" Birthday on Saturday night, Oct. 5
at 9 p.m.
Harmony Lodge B'nai B'rith No. 2463 will hold a breakfast
meeting with Burnett Roth as speaker on Sunday, at 9:30 a.m. at
Pythian Hall, North Miami Beach.
The Lehrman Day School PTA will sponsor a Simchat Torah
Street Dance celebrating the receiving of the Torah, Monday,
Oct. 7. Immediately following Simchat Torah services at 7 p.m.,
the street dance featuring Israeli dancing with Yuai Yanich will
begin at 17th Street between James and Washington Avenues.
On Oct. 2, the Next Generation, the newest support group of
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, will host a
cocktail party on the Douglas Gardens Campus in Miami.
Workmen's Circle Celebration
The Southern Region
Workmen's Circle is planning a
commemoration of its 85th an-
niversary on Sunday afternoon,
October 13, at 2:30 p.m. in the
Grand Ballroom of the Seville
Beach Hotel.
A gala concert starring Yiddish
artist Yaki, singer Lydia King,
Jaime Bronzstein and the Klezmer
Band in Jewish Folk Music, and
the opera singer Dario Cassini.
Greetings will be presented by
guest speakers Miami Beach
Mayor Malcolm Fromberg, U.S.
Congressman Claude Pepper,
Florida State Senators Joseph M.
Gersten and Carrie Meeks,
Florida State Representative
Elaine Gordon, Betty Metcalf, and
Irma Rochlin.
The featured speaker will be Dr.
Samuel Portnoy, professor,
Florida Atlantic University.
Lorber Chapter Luncheon Meeting
The Lorber Chapter members
of the National Jewish Center at-
tending the recent convention in
Denver were President Eileen
Charif, Dianne Milberg, Adele
Klugerman, Elaine Palastrant
and National Auxiliary Trustee
Deena Birenbaum, Auxiliary Ex-
ecutive Board members, Ellie
Kaiser, Leta Garvett, and Elaine
Rackoff membership Vice Presi-
dent. Also attending as a member
of the national nominating com-
mittee was Roz Rimland.
A luncheon meeting will take
place at Vizcaya Tuesday, accor-
ding to Ann Logan, publicity
chairman.
BB To Hold Breakfast Meeting
The South Florida Council, con-
sisting of 34 lodges and three
units, with over 6,000 members in
North Dade will hold its first
Breakfast Program at Temple
Beth El of North Bay Village on
Sunday. Judge Paul Backman and
Mayor Malcolm Fromberg, will
highlight the program.
Judge Backman is the newlv in-
stalled President of B'nai B'rith-
District Five and will highlight
what's ahead in District Five.
Malcom H. Fromberg, a Past
President of District Five, and
Past International Senior Vice
President of B'nai B'rith, will give
an international perspective.
George Spitzer, South Florida
Council President, will preside.
Physician
Referral
Service
referral to over 300 doctors I
868-2728 j
first appointment within 2 days I
a community service of
on Miami Beach
u
PATTI PERLMAN PSY. D.
CLINICAL ASSOCIATE
COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE INCLUDES
cmomc rommutoton group
stress managememt
child and a0w.t psychotherapy
persomafclty and intellectual evaluation
premenstrual group
BROWARD PSYCHOLOGICAL GROUP
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4400 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
961-5447
961-5449
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue. Miami, Florida
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Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Give ear, ye heavens, and I will speak: And let the earth hear
the words of my mouth "
t Deuteronomy S2.1).
HAAZINU
HAAZINU Moses' song beginning "Give ear, ye heavens and 1
will speak" contains the principal elements in the unique relation-
ship between God and his people Israel. Moses opens with a call to
heaven and earth to witness his declaration. From the beginning
of time, Moses asserts, the Lord had chosen Israel for a special
place among the nations of the world. He had first singled out
Israel in the desert, whence he lovingly led them into the land of
Canaan. But Israel, Moses prophesies, would abandon their God
for foreign idols. Then God would send a cruel nation to enslave
and torment the children of Israel. Eventually however, God
would have compassion on His beloved people and wreak
vengeance on Israel's tormentors. All the nations would then
behold how the Lord had avenged the blood of His servants and
had made expiation for the land of His people. At God's command,
Moses prepares to ascend mount Nebo, in the land of Moab. From
there at a distance he is to glimpse the Promised Land and die; as
Aaron had died at mount Hor. "Because ye trespassed against Me
in the midst of the children of Israel at the waters of
Meribathkadesh, in the wilderness of Zin; because ye sanctified
Me not in the midst of the children of Israel" (Deuteronomy
SS.51).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and bated
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage/' edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, SIS, published by ShengoM. The volume it available at 75 Maiden
Lane, Now York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang it president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.I
AJCong. Leaders 'Regret'
Criticism Of Trip Voiced by Shamir
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Theodore Mann and Henry
Siegman, president and executive
director, respectively, of the
' American Jewish Congress, ex-
pressed "regret" over the sharp
criticism voiced by Israel's
Foreign Minister and Deputy
Premier Yitzhak Shamir in
Jerusalem of a recent AJCongress
mission to Cairo and Amman, and
of the visit to Moscow by Edgar
Bronfman, president of the World
Jewish Congress. The
AJCongress and WJC are
separate organizations.
Mann and Siegman said, in a
statement released here, that they
"doubt very much that this
criticism serves the interests of
Israel or the Jewish people." They
stressed, however, that they were
not responding to Shamir's
critical remarks per se but to "an
issue of principle that he raised,
namely his assertion that 'Jewish
organizations ought not to under-
take political work except when
israel asks them to.' '
"THIS POSITION we find as
tounding," their statement said,
"for it assumes a,complete lack of
independence on the part of
Jewish communities and Jewish
life everywhere. We understand
the need to consult with Israeli
leaders on issues that affect them.
In fact we consulted with them
with respect to this mission .
I' However, there is an important
distinction between consultation
and instruction. As American
citizens, we do not take instruc-
tion, even from respected friends
in Israel."
The statement added: "The
commitment of the American
Jewish Congress to the well-being
and security of Israel is un-
qualified. We do not believe that
this commitment requires Jewish
organizations to compromise their
independence. There will always
be differences in a democratic
society about the wisdom and ef-
ficacy of specific actions and
policies.
"We are confident that Jewish
life can cope with the stresses that
are caused by such differences .
We are equally convinced that
Jewish life could be seriously im-
poverished and Jewish interests
everywhere seriously damaged if
its free and democratic character
were to be stifled and repressed."
Amit Women
Luncheon Meeting
The Coral Gables Chapter of
Amit Women will hold its first
meeting of the new year, at Tem-
ple Zamora, Coral Gables, with a
luncheon meeting, noon, with a
special program by Chapter Presi-
dent, Rose Shapiro reporting on
the "Mission to Israel."
Business Note
Eugene J. Wolter Jr., has been
elected executive vice president-
lending at Jefferson National
Bank. His election was announced
by Arthur H. Courshon. chairman
of the board of Jefferson National
Bank. _____.
CANTOR WM. W. LIPSON I*
accepting students for the study
of Hazzanuth, Nuaach, Yiddish
and liturgical repertoire, and
Cantlllatlon.
Please call: .J
(305) 596-4818
Thanks!
To our many friends,
from the family of
HELEN SPINGARN
for their kindness during her illness and their
expressions of sympathy and oest
New Year Wishes.
CHARLES SPRINGARN
GUSTAVE and MILDRED SHAW
Sukkoth Services Begin
At Temples, Synagogues,
Sunday Evening
ii
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:01 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B., FL 33130
Tat. 53*4112
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Melbax
Cantor Nlaalm Benyemlni
Dally Miny.n 8:00 a.m. and 7:1Sp.m.
Sal. 8:15 a.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 847-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conaervatlve
Lata Frt. Sarvicas 8:15 p.m
Dally Mlnyan 7:30 am and 6:30 pm
Sal 8 30am
BET SHIRA CONQREQATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601 '*,
Rabbi David H. Auerbach \Wf
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul Melsels
Shibu.t Sarvlcaa Frt. p.m. Sal.8-.J0 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami > Pwnaar Rarorm Congregation
137 N.E. 1th St.. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob Q. Bornsteln
Associate Cantor Recbetle F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldln
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
IDowntown: Rabbi Haakall M. Bomat, "What I*
' At Staka? Your Future ol Court*. Liturgy:
Cantor Jacob Bomatatn.
Kandall: Rabbi Ran 0. Partmatar. "Pllorlma
Progreaar' Liturgy: Cantor Rachaha F. Nalaon.
SukkotSarn.f*

Ion. 11 a.m. Downtown
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Harbart M Baumgard
will apaak on tha thame "Raclam In South
Africa and In Amanca "
Sat. 9:15 a.m. Claudina Bogaga will Da callad
to tha Torah. At 11:15 a.m. Kalth Slbal and
Parry Saidiar will ba callad to tha Torah
Sarmon thama will ba "Tha Oaath ol Moaas."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau,
Rabbi Emeritus I
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Frl. an. 5:30 In tha Chapol.
Sat 9 00 a.m. Klddueh lollowlng aorvicaa
Mlnchah at 7:35 p.m.
Bun. 840 a.m.* 5:30 p.m
Mon. t Thura. 7:30a.m. 5:30p m.
Tuaa.. Wad. Frt. 7:4* a.m. :0 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st St. 538 7231
DR. LEON KRONISH. RABBI LIOW,|
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL D CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVTSER
Succot Sat. (Sukkah Bldg.) 7:00 p.m.
Sun. 7:30 p.m.
Mon 10:45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Daily aarvicat 7:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m
Saturday 8:25 am and 7:30 p.m
Sunday 6 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwaig. Rabbi
TEMPLE JUDEA
,5600 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral Gables 687-5657
Michael B. Eleenstat, Rabbi
Friday aanlcas 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Succot Sarvica Mon. I> Tuaa. 9:30 an
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morning tarvicaa 8am
Friday lata airaning aanrica
8 I5p m
Saturday 9am and 7 45 p m
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conaan.at.va
Cantor Edward Klein
BETH KODESH
Conservative
110lS.W.12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph K rl ssei
ROM Berlin: Executive Secretary
6584334
w
Mftri *is5 *B d& SoJCit,
^-Soa*
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami. FL 33181
801.5806 Coneetvatlve
Dr Israel Jacobs, Rabbi _
Moehe Friedtax. Cantor >
Dr.JoaephAGorflnkel, -%'
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
Sat. 11:45 am. thama "Whara la Moaaa
Buriadr'. Succot Sun. 5:48 p.m. Mon.
Tuaa. 8*5 a.m.
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214 _.
Barry J. Konovltch, Rabbi I Sp-,
Mosne Buryn, Cantor N-X'
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epelbaum. President,
Religious Committee
Shabbal Sarica 8 30 a m Sarmon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE EMAN0EL ^
1701 Washington Avenue r*i
Miami Beach -X'
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda SMfman. Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbal Sarvica 6pm
Sal. S am. Or. Lahrrean will preach on Tha
Waakly Portion ol Oat Mbfct."
Bar Mltivah AlaaandM Bchuatar
Succot Santoa Sunday ava. ftMp.in.
Mon BTuaa.Sa.m.Sarmonal 10:30am
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlft
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beech
851-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. & 75 St., 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kaaztl Mooam orttdo>
I Frt. Sarvica 8:65 p.m. Sat. 9:30 a.m. Mlncha 20
mlnutaa batore aundown
Succot Sarvica Sun 8:50 p.m Mon. a Tuaa.
9: IS a.m. 8:50 p.m
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dado's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
living Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara 8. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl Sarvica 8: t S pm
Sat 10:30 a m
Succot Sun. 7:30 p.m
Mon 10.30 a.m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Senlamin Adler. Cantor
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor


iii I'Rumuwiidiiv. uhiuuiuh!" n, issu
Pap P '""^^^^^^^
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Miami's Jewish agency executives gathered to
wekomt Elton J. KtrntU to his new position
as Executive Director of the Jewish Communi-
ty Centers of South Florida. The get-together,
hosted by Myron J. Brodie Executuv \ ice
President of the Greater Miami Jeuish
Federation, brought representation from
many of Federation a beneficiary agencies.
Pictured here (bottom row. left to right) Elton
J. Kerness. Executive Director, Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Florida; Myron J.
Brodie. Executive Vice President, Greater
Miami Jewish Federation: David B. Saltman.
Executive Director. Jewish Family Sennees;
I top row left to right) Gene Greemweig. Ex-
ecutive Director. Central Agency for Jewish
Education; Fred D. Hirt. Executive Director,
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Ag-
ed; Sidney Goldin, Associate Director, Mount
Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami;
Richard K. Goldstein, Area Director, Hillel
Jewish Centers of Greater Miami; Eugene
Greenspan, Executive Director, Jewish Voca-
tional Service.
i
s500 Publix
Gift Certificate
With Each New Subscription
1 Year
52 Issues
$
18
00
A Check
Must Accompany Order
As A New Subscriber To The Jewish Floridian,
I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
Please Start My Subscription Now!
Name
Address,
.State.
City ___.-------------------------------------------------------
NEW SUBSCRIBER -
DADE COUNTY ONLY A,, *%**
OFFER EXTENDED UNTIL NOVEMBER 15,1965'
.Apt. #_
-Zip_
Mail To:
JEWISH Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
3&i/i/umi*Mp>
A Chorus Line," co-starring its original Tony Award-winning star
Donna McKechnie as Cassie returns to South Florida in a triumphant
Knal touV to launch producer Zev Bufman's 1985-86 theatrical
season when it opens Tuesday. Nov. 5 in a reduced price preview
followed on Wednesday, Nov. 6 by the official premiere through Sun-
day, Nov. 10 as a limited one-week "special at the Miami Beach
Theater of the Performing Arts.
Miami Beach's Economic Development Director Stu Rogel was
unanimously selected as president of the Florida Chapter of the Na-
tional Council for Urban Economic Development.
Martha Goldberg has joined Sun Bank/Miami, N.A. as vice presi-
dent Trust Officer of the Trust Division. Ms. Goldberg formerly was
with Landmark First National Bank of Fort Lauderdale as vice presi-
dent. Trust Department.
Miami Beach Marina will be transformed into a sailor's haven when
the Miami International Sailboat Show makes its world premiere Feb.
21-26.
Biscayne Chapter Women's American ORT will hold their next
meeting on Thursday, at 12:30 p.m. in Morton Towers Auditorium.
PALM FROND S'CHACH
As in keeping with Dade County's efforts to assist the com-
munity wherever possible, palm fronds (s'chach) for the Sukkoth
holiday will be available, free, to anyone wishing to pick them up.
Dates, times and locations as follows:
DATES:
Friday, September 27
Sunday, September 29
TIME: Between 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
LOCATIONS:
North Dade:
Haulover Park Admissions Office
Central Dade:
Museum of Science Admissions Office
South Dade:
Matheson Hammock Admissions Office
For further information call the office of Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, 375-5160.
ONES
'
MOVING & STORAGE
LOCAL LONG DISTANCE
Sr. Citizen Discounts
Packing-Shipping-Storage
Specializing in Aliyah to Israel
374-6027
A Man
Has Gotta
sV.
An Incredible, Original, Contemporary Song
and Dance Musical Portraying Life Around The World
Come Laugh I Come Cry! Come
Applaud This Magnificent PopOpera!
Created. Produced ud Directed by ZIGGY LANE
You'll fall in love with this talented cast of 20
headed by Harriett* Blake, Columbus Smith,
Juan Secada, Ed Holland, Corky Dozier.
Ken Wells and James Dunne. Live orchestra
under the direction of Jeff Laibson. We have won
critical acclaim from press and public alike and
standing ovations nightly.

Showtime* Thnra. thru Son. 8 PM; Matinee Sun. 2 PM
DADE CALL
861-5400
BHOWARD Toil Free
467-1711
Tickets Available at: Deauville Hotel
Base and Select- A-Seat
Box Office Mgr.: Sefana Baron
Group Sales Director
15
6701 Collins Avenue. Miami Beach





>lic Notice
IE CIRCUIT COURT OF
1 ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
JlRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
kSK NO. 85-33916 CA-12
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ERAL NATIONAL
fGAGE ASSOCIATION,
kociation organized
listing under the
\t the United States
erica,
htiff
)E SAEZ,
ndants.
EORGE SAEZ
! Berkerseg Lane
tin minis. Ohio 23205
ARE NOTIFIED that an
Ifor Foreclosure of Mortgage
Le following described
Il4, Block 15, PLAT NO.
DPA LOCKA, according to
y thereof, as recorded in
ok 25. at Page 44. of the
iRecords of Dade County,
i filed against you and you
uired to serve a copy of
^itten defenses, if any, to it,
art Gitlitz. Attorney for
whose address is Suite
70 Madruga Avenue, Coral
| Florida, 33146 on or before
4, 1985 and file the
with the Clerk of this
|either before service on
Ts attorney or immediately
er; otherwise a default will
Bred againsi you for the
emanded in the complaint.
JSS my hand and the seal of
. this 29 day of August,
&HARD P. BRINKER
i Clerk of the Court
I By D. C. Bryant
(As Deputy Clerk
September 6,13;
20, 27,198"
ICE OF ACTION
BTRUCTIVE SERVICE
f (NO PROPERTY)
: CIRCUIT COURT OF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
pUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
I FOR DADE COUNTY
kction No. 85-39889 (03)
>N FOR DISSOLUTION
[OF MARRIAGE
THE MARRIAGE OF
\h\ COTO,
poner/Wife,
|R. COTTO
(onden t/H usband.
R. COTTO
Unknown
ARE HEREBY
ED that an action for
Dn of Marriage has been
linst you and you are re-
1 serve a copy of your writ-
kses, if any, to it on Luis
Esq., attorney for Peti-
piose address is 1840 W.
et, Suite 105, Hialeah,
B012, and file the original
|clerk of the above styled
" or before November 1,
erwise a default will be
gainst you for the relief
in the complaint or
|tice shall be published
week for four con-
eks in THE JEWISH
KN.
SS my hand and the seal
: at Miami, Florida on
ay of September, 1985.
\RD P. BRINKER
Cler, Circuit Court
; County, Florida
MARIE MARCANO
i Deputy Clerk
urtSeal)
fl. Esq.
i Street/Suite 105
orida 33012
I for Petitioner
September 27:
October 4,11,18,1985
NOTICE UNDER
riOUS NAME LAW
CE IS HEREBY GIVEN
] undersigned, desiring to
'i business under the fic-
ne Paper Hangers Father
113281 S.W. 71 St. Miami
intend to register said
h the Clerk of the Circuit
[Dade County, Florida.
T-ARIO CEVASCO
September 20,27;
October 4,11, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38348-14
Florida Bar No. 049834
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SHRAGA GOLDENBERG
Petitioner/Husband
and
RACHEL GOLDENBERG
Respondent/Wife
TO: RACHEL GOLDENBERG
16 Ayarmuh Street
Ramat Hasharon, Israel
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed againstb you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSEPH W. MALEK, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501,
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 18, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK. Esquire
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501
Miami Beach. Florida, 33139
19308 September 20, 27;
October 4, 11,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH CIRCUIT COURT.
IN AND
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 85-28730 (14)
AMENDED
NOTICE OF LIS PENDENS
No. 090723
VENETIAN HEIGHTS, INC., a
Florida corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS and
GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, and any unknown party who
is or may be interested in the sub-
ject matter of this action whose
names and residences, after
diligent search and inquiry are
unknown to Plaintiff in which said
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors. creditors,
trustees or other claimants by,
through, under or against the said
Defendants, WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, or either of them, who are
not known to be dead or alive,
Defendants.
NOTICE is given that a suit was
instituted in the Circuit Court in
and for Dade County, Florida on
the day of 1985. by the Plaintiff.
VENETIAN HEIGHTS. INC.. a
Florida corporation, against the
Defendants, WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, and any unknown party who
is or may be interested in the sub-
ject matter of this actin whose
names and residences, after
diligent search and inquiry are
unknown to Plaintiff in which said
unknown parties may claim as
heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees or other claimants by,
through, under or against the said
Defendants, WAYNE FLOWERS
and GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife, or either of them, who are
not known to be dead or alive, and
the following described real pro-
perty lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, to wit:
Lot 1. in Block 1, of LIBERTY
FARMS, according to the Plat
thereof, as record in Plat Book 51
at Page 46, of the Public Records
of Dade County Florida; commonly
known as 1646 N.W. 68th Street
Dade, Florida.
1. The relief sought in this suit is
the foreclosure of Mortgage.
MORTON B. ZEMEL, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Plaintiff
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue,
Suite 111
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Telephone (305) 949-4237
19320 September 27;
October 4, 11,18, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titous name Payless Video Club
Inc. at 467 N.E. 167th Street!
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
HECTOR RODRIGUEZ
LOURDES M. RODRIGUEZ
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
Attorney for Payless Video Club
Inc.
P.O.Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
11306 September 20,27;
October 4,11. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4637
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JOSEPH RASKIN,
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: Unknown beneficiaries or
Heirs-at-Law.
Living or dead, their respective
heirs and all persons claiming by,
through and under and or may be
infants, incompetents or otherwise
sui juris.
Residence unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Determination of
Heirs has been filed in this court.
You are required to serve written
defenses to the petition not later
than October 28, 1985, on peti-
tioner's attorney, whose name and
address are:
MICHAEL .1. ALMAN ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of this
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on September 23,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CHARLOTTE W. GIRARD
As Deputy Clerk
19321 September 27;
October 4, 1985
DV THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
HV AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-29018 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGATE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized
and existing uder the
laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
FERNANDO DE JESUS
SILVA, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: FERNANDO
DE JESUS SILVA
and DIANA SILVA,
his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against FERNANDO DE
JESUS SILVA and DIANA
SILVA. his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgate on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
The East 36 feet of Lot 14, all of
Lot 15, and all of Lot 16, less the
East 29 feet thereof, in Block 2, of
GARDEN HOMES, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 29. at Page 6, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11. 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19294 September 13,20, 27;
October 4, 1985
Friday. September 27. 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38856
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
SAVINGS ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
IVAN VILLA,
et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: IVAN VILLA and
DIOSELINA VILLA, his wife
Carrera 40, Numero 6948
Meddellin, Colombia
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Unit F-18 of VILLA
VENEZIA, a Condominium, in ac-
cordance with the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as recorded
in Official Records Book 11223, at
Page 1101, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida, has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it, on Shep-
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 33146 on or before Oc-
tober 25, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will he entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 18th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLAR1NDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19314 September 20, 27;
October 4, 11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CROSSINGS WINE
AND LIQUORS at 12991 SW 112
Street, Miami, Florida 33186. in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LENOX LIQUORS
NO. 5. INC.
19324 September 27;
October 4.11,18, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39894 (02)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VICTORIANO GIMENO LEIRA.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
KIMIKOKASUYA
Respondent/Wife.
TO: KAMIKO KASUYA
43 Hin Seng Gardens
West Coast Road
Singapore (S0512)
Republic of Singapore.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Luis
Vidal, Esq., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 1840 W.
49th Street, Suite 105, Hialeah,
Florida 33012 U.S.A., and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 1, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 24th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cler, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 W. 49th Street/Suite 105
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attoreney for Petitioner
19323 September 27;
October 4,11,18, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fi-
ctitious name F & L Sales Co. at
3590 S. State Rd. 7, Suite 18,
Miramar, FL 33023, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Lucy A. Finn
Marilyn Lambert
19285 September 6,13. 20,
27,19<"
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 85-11420-FC-05
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
PAMELA NICKLE
Petitioner
and
WILLIAM NICKLE
Respondent
TO: WILLIAM NICKLE
3619 Bronxwood Ave. No. 1
Bronx. NY 10467
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ.. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, on or before Oc-
tober 25, 1985, and file the original
with the clerk of this court, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: September 16, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19309 September 20, 27;
October 4, 11,1985
-.'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of BUDGET PAIN-
TING at 19814 S.W. 118th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33177 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
KEITH CLEMETSON d/b/a
BUDGET PAINTING
19814 S.W. 118th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33177
DENNIS P. SHEPPARD,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for KEITH
CLEMETSON
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami. Florida 33173
(305) 279-0730
19305 September 20. 27;
October 4, 11,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-38899
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla. Bar No. 147801
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ESPERANZA MATA
and
LUIS MATA
TO: LUIS MATA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. Koss,
Attorney at Law, P.A., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
4343 West Flagler Street, No. 404,
Miami. Florida 33134, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
25, 1985; otherwise a default will
.be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. BYRON
As Depu.y Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
P.A.
4343 West Flagler Street No. 404
Miami, Florida 33134
19315 September 20, 27;
October 4. 11.1985


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1985
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Or
THE ELVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-30031 CA-08
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK.
f/k/a DADE SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERTO PUENTE BLANCO,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: Roberto Puente Blanco
1912 S.W. 17 Avenue. No. 21N
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-1
ty: Condominium Unit No. 206. ol
4011 Professional Center Con-
dominium, Inc., according to the
Declaration of Condominium, as
recorded in Official Records Book
9055, at Page 631, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
together with an undivided in-
terest in the Common Elements
Appurtenant thereto, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it. on Shep-
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables.
Florida, 33146 on or before Oc-
tober 11, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff s at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 9th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19299 September 13.20, 27;
October 4.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ALEX DUVIL at
9355 West Okeechobee Rd. No. 7
Hialeah Gardens Florida 33016 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, florida.
Luis Lamar
9355 West Okeechobee Rd, No. 7
Hialeah Gardens Florida 33016
19310 September 20, 27;
October 4, 11.1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85 37301
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN CLAUDE LORMAND,
Petitioner,
and
BEATRICE LORMAND.
Respondent.
TO: BEATRICE LORMAND.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18,1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19291 September 13,20. 27;
October 4,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-27117 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JORGE L. RAMOS, et ux..
Defendants.
TO: JORGE L. RAMOS and
MARIA M. RAMOS, his wife
359 E. 13th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33010
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Lot 14, in Block 1. of JAC-MO
HOMES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
92, at Page 67. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11. 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deput Clerk
19293 September 13.20,27
October 4, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85 37302
IN RE: The Marriage of:
USA PIERRE.
Petitioner,
and
JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE.
Respondent
TO: JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 812 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18,1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6. 1986.
RICHARD BRJNKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19292 September 13,20,27;
October 4, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38998 (20)
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation.
Plaintiff
vs.
DIETER KRENTZIEN. et al..
Defendants.
TO: DIETER KRENTZIEN and
EGLEE KRENTZIEN, his wife,
a/k/a DIETER KRENTRIEN and
EGLEE KRENTRIEN, his wife
Alto Alegre,
Torre C IB
C. Bello Monte
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County. Florida: Unit 536. in
KEY COLONY NO. 3 CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration recorded August 21.
1980 in Official Records Book
10846. Page 1456. of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
as amended; together with all im-
provements, appliances, and fix-
tures located thereon, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Keith,
Mack. Lewis & Allison, Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street, Miami. Florida
33132, on or before October 25,
1985, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of .J
this Court on the 18th day of
September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: J. BYRON
Deputy Clerk
19318 September 27;
October 4, 11,18, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6525
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
GEORGE J.KRZYZAN1AK,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of GEORGE J. KRZYZANIAK.
deceased, File Number 85-6525, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler, Miami, FL 33160.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All intended persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
aginst the estate and (2) any objec-
tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 27, 1985.
Personal Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative
MICHAEL J. ALMAN,
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19319 September 27;
October 4, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-31910 (14)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 058653
IN RE:
MICHAEL ROBERT VOLTS.
Husband
and
DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS.
Wife.
TO: DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS
(Residence Unknown)
Last Known Employment
Address:
c/o Mico Oil, 6506 Martway
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 9400 South Dadeland
Blvd.. Suite 300, Miami, Fl. 33156.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 4, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, ESQ.
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 300
Miami, Fl. 33166
Attorney for Petitioner
Tel. (305) 666-9775
19282 September 6,13;
20.27.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name HEALTH CARE
SYSTEMS at 220 71st Street, No.
206. Miami Beach. Florida 33141
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
DAVID SCHWARTZ
JOSHUA D. MANASTER.
ESQUIRE
Attorney for DAVID SCHWARTZ
19316 September 27;
October 4, 11.18, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-34263 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID ALVAREZ,
Defendant.
TO: DAVID ALVAREZ
317 N.W. 109 Avenue, No. 2-C
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Condominium Unit No. 317-2C.
Building 317 N.W. 109 Avenue of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded June 5, 1985, in
Official Records Book 9009, Page
1608. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and Amend-
ments to Declaration of Con-
dominium, together with an un-
divided interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto, has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it. on
Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 18, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of This
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19301 September 13.20, 27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Clank Products International at 420
South Dixie Highway, 3rd Floor, Cor-
al Gables, FL 33146 intend to register
saidname(a) with the Clerk of the Cir
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Classic Products International,
Inc. YD Inc.
Lynn W. Fromberg, Esquire of
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross A
Shore, PA.
Attorney for Classic Products
International, Inc. Y-D Inc.
19298 September 13,20,27;
October 4, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.85-33276 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL.
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE HERNANDO VELAZ-
QUEZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE HERNANDO
VELAZQUEZ
Avenida Ipirange. No. 165
Sao Paulo, Brazil
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 27. in Block 4. WOOD-
FIELD, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
113, at Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it.
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
Oct. 11, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19290 September 13,20,27;
October 4,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Catalonia Import Ex-
port at Universal Parts, Inc. 7370
NW 36th St, Suite 319-F. Miami.
Florida 33166, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
DAVID ROMANO
Universal Parts. Inc.
7370 NW 36th St.. Suite 319-F
Miami. Florida 33166
19297 September 13,20,27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-39161-21
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 0475203
IN RE: The Marriage of
HANNIA DARROW.
Petitioner/Wife
and
WILLIAM DARROW,
Respondent/H usband.
TO: WILLIAM DARROW
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Usher
Bryn. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is The Roney Plaza,
Suite M-8, 2301 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 25, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 19th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
USHER BRYN. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach FL 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19317 September 17;
October 4. 11.18. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-38173-16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YOLANDA SANCHEZ
and
FABIO ALBERTO SANCHEZ
TO: Fabio Alberto Sanchez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Luis Vidal,
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1840 West 49th
Street, Suite 105, Hialeah. Florida
33012, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 18, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12th day of September. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 West 49th Street
Hialeah, FL 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
19304 September 20, 27;
October 4. 11. 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-37302
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LISE PIERRE,
Petitioner,
and
JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
Respondent
TO. JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest, 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19292 September 13,20.27
October 4,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL.
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-37244
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK, F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: FREEDOM FINANCIAL
SERVICES
CORPORATION
C. T. Corportion
Systems
Attn: C. R. Ostheimer
208 South La Salle St.
Chicago, IL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 48, of Unrecorded Plat of HID-
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of Tract 11. of FLORIDA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION OF THE NE V, .
OF Section 25. Township 52 South,
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, at Page 17, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida;
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 680.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15' 30" West for
26.02 feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing of Tract of land hereinafter
described; thence continue North 2
degrees 15' 30" West parallel
with the Westline of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 45' 09" West fo I
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of"
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 or or before
October 11, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6 day of September.
1985.
19296 September 13. 20. 27;
October 4. 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-38164
IN RE: The Marriage of;
WESNER THOMAS.
Petitioner,
wd
BEVERLY THOMAS.
Respondent.
TO: BEVERLY THOMAS.
Residence unknown, you shall
lerve copy of your Answer to the
'etition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami. Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 12, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: LISAMARIE MACANO
19303 September 20.27
October 4, 11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EL NINO
CAFETERIA, at 7498 N.W. 8th
Street, Miami. Florida 33126, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court, of
Dade County, Florida.
Fidel Igiesias
1900 S.W. 87th Court
Miami, Florida 33166
19313 September 20.27;
October 4. 11.1985

aansracrion wuarnrnrcx r>"


in**!
Friday, September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
V
, /
V',
.>'
I*
i
rsai National Bank dedication
ties at the site of the new UNB bank
in North Dade bring together for
al ribbon cutting ceremonies, from
kiversal National Bank vice chairman
Perl, bank director Sam B. Topf chair-
Tthe board George Feldenkreis, director
i
Gary Dix, Florida Secretary of State George
Firestone, who was the keynote speaker; North
Miami Beach Vice Mayor Mary Foote; and
Dade County Commissioner Barry Schreiber,
member of the Universal National Bank board
who was master of ceremonies for the dedica-
tion event.
termarriage Confab
Obituaries
INNENBERG, Genevieve S., 68. of Miami.
September 21. The Riverside.
LIPMAN. Sophy, (nee Rabalsky),
September 22. Services held in
Pennsylvania.
SE1KER, Jeannette. 81, of North Miami.
September 21. Services and interment held
at Star of David Memorial Park.
MOSKOW1TZ, Bernard, September 21.
Services held in New York. Riverside in
charge of arrangements.
SPERLING. Arnold Sonny." 61,
September 21. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
BALTER, Merril Max. 68. of Coral Gables.
September 20. The Riverside. Interment at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
BENEDICT. Sylvan .1. of Miami Beach
passed away September lit. The Riverside.
FRANKFURT. Leo of Miami Beach and
New York. Services held in New York.
ROLLER. Sidney of Bay Harbour Islands.
September 16. The Riverside.
I.CDWIN, Samuel. 92, of North Miami
Beach passed away September 20. Services
and interment held at Star of David
Memorial Park.
ROBBINS. Herbert. 52. of North Miami
Beach. September 17. The Riverside.
KURC. Mrs. Bella of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
FEINGOLD. Herman. September 18. Sur-
vived by wife. Mary Ann; daughters. Diane
de la Corre and Elizabeth May. The
Riverside.
RtyHFELD. Emil. Services were held.
SIMMONS, John Raymond, 27. September
13. Menorah Chapels.
WEINBERG. Isador, 78. of Miami,
September 18. Services were held.
ZINKIN, Bamett, 95. of Miami Beach,
September 19. Services were held.
ZINKIN
Bamett, 95, of Miami Beach, passed away
September 19 at home. He is survived by his
beloved wife, Kitty. Graveside funeral ser-
vices were held at Lakeside Memorial Park.
Eternal Light Funeral Directors in charge
of arrangements.
FINKELSTEIN, Jacob, of Morton Towers.
Rubin-Zilbert.
BLECHMAN. Charles. 79, of Miami Beach
Services held in Chicago.
COHEN, Toby, of North Miami Beach. Ser
vices were held.
DANZIGER. Helmut. 79, of Miami Beach.
September 23. Riverside. Interment at Mt.
Nebo.
FINKELSTEIN. Anna. 86, of North Miami
Beach, September 23. Riverside.
PAPERMAN. Manuel, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
RUBIN, Mary. 89. of Miami Beach.
September 23. Blasberg Chapel.
SHAFER, Sophia Alexandria, September
22. Services were held.
BRENNER. Stella. R. (nee Marks). Ser
vices held Piser Weinstein Menorah Chapel.
Skokie III.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888

'Parveh' Couples Air Their Parental Needs
|HINGT0N (JTA)
reveh, the newly-
Alliance for Adult
fen of Jewish-Gentile
rriage, will hold its
ress conference here
lay. The conference
the first time in
' that the descendants
Hsh-Gentile intermar-
^ave formally organiz-
present their needs
bals to their parental
ic and religious
b.
pors of Pareveh (paar-eh-
the organization's name
! variant, lessser-used pro-
ition and spelling of
(paar-va), a Yiddish
to describe foods that
| neither animal nor daily
and can therefore be
ith eigher one without
Jewish dietary laws.
ncept, in the opinion of the
^rs, "humorously" sum-
the family status of the
ing of Jewish-Gentile
je.
IUSE of the steep rise in
iber of American Jewish-
intermarriages from
tian 6 percent of all mar-
involving a Jewish partner
Brcent in Washington, D.C.
alone this year the
' of parevehs has multiplied
entially. Parevehs "now
(r between 400,000 to
), and their numbers are
ig rapidly," according to
Igon Mayer, professor of
^gy at Brooklyn College,
he author of "Love and
^ion: Marriage Between
rid Christians."
[current statistical popula-
ends continue, it is not in-
Ivable that by the year 2050,
Ascendants of Jewish-Gentile
narriages will constitute a
group of American Jews,"
Mayer.
I Cowan, author of "An Or-
. In History: Retrieving A
ph Legacy," explains that his
I intermarriage led to his in-
kment with Pareveh and a
1 that he is writing about the
Pen of these marriages. "The
fen of Jewish-Gentile inter-
riages are the children of the
ferican melting pot," Cowan
es, "but the dream of their
Jewish and Gentile ancestors has
resulted in perplexing dilemmmas
for many of the descendants of
these intermarriages."
Parevehs face both internal and
external identity conflicts. Robin
Margolis, executive director of
Pareveh, and the Jewish daughter
of an intermarriage, finds that
"for every pareveh who identifies
as a Jew or a Christian, or
posesses firm dual secular or
religious indentities, there are
numerous others who suffer from
severe feelings of displacement
and detachment."
These individuals "become the
new 'lost tribes' of Judaism, and
Judaism's loss does not translate
into gains for Christianity or
other cultures. They are cut
adrift," Margolis says.
THE EXTERNAL challenges
confronting parevehs are equally
acute. Pareveh's Washington
representative, Leslie Goodman-
Malamuth, discovered that some
segments of the Jewish communi-
ty welcome parevehs, while other
Jewish groups are ambivalent or
indifferent. "The Christians con-
sider it a mitzvoh to convert us,
but there's no room there for our
Jewish roots," she notes.
Both Margolis and Goodman-
Malamuth are familiar with other
problems facing parevehs: family
pressure to conceal a side of their
dual heritage; questions about
how to celebrate holidays and
such rites of passage as naming
ceremonies, confirmations, mar-
riages, and funerals; and exposure
to Christian anti-Semitism.
Status as a pareveh also ag-
gravates citizenship problems.
Parevehs in the Soviet Union are
frequently legally classified as
Jewish nationals and share in the
misfortunes of Soviet Jewry,
while parevehs in Israel are not
always classified as Jews, and
thus face ambiguous citizenship
status.
Yet these myriad problems can
and do inspire numerous
creative solutions. Whether they
identify as Jews, Christians, or
secularists, parevehs can achieve
a sense of place if these adult
children of intermarriage and
their parents begin work on pro-
jects designed to create construc-
tive dialogue and change on
pareveh identity and status issues
within the Jewish, Christian, and
other major cultural and religious
communities.
PAREVEH'S convenors en-
courage a multiplicity of view-
points within the organization.
The Cowans, for example, are
raising their two parevehs as
Jews. And Lee Gruzen, author of
"Raising Your Jewish/Christian
Child, Celebration of Wise
Choices," is giving her two young
parevehs "a rich exposure to both
religions."
One of Pareveh's major goals
will be assisting its members in
exploring the positive aspects of
their experiences. "I feel very for-
tunate to be the child of a Jewish-
Gentile intermarriage," Marjrolis
comments. "While I identify firm-
ly as a Jew, I do experience great
pleasure in being able to unders-
tand and inhabit two different
worlds."
Margolis thinks that many
parevehs share this feeling,
"because we're living bonds bet-
ween two ancient religious and
ethinic cultures." She hopes that
parevehs will become "inter-
preters between their two paren-
tal worlds, working to end
centuries-old misunderstandings,
prejudices and hatreds."
I**
e
-.<-.
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
"The Man is-Immortal
Who Leaves His Name
On the Face of the Earth."
Superior Monuments, Inc.
14711W. Dixie Highway
No. Miami. Fla. 33181
WE CREATE MONUMENTS
AND
MEMORIALS OF DISTINCTION
945-5621
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. I"JC
New York: (212)263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 7th Rd.. Forest Hills \ V


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 27. 1985
Pi'imiijwih in (i Sktibomt Hotel luncheon honoring former I ,S,
Senator Richard (DiekJ Stout and Miami Beach City Commit-
suoic- AU'X Daoud include, from let}, former Reach Mayor. Dr.
Leonard Haber: Abel Holt;, president of Capital Bank: Sen.
Stout, who endorsed Ihioud for Mayor of Miami Beach: and
Daoud. chatrman of the bo Senior CtttMM Miami Beach chapter and a Beach attorney.
More than .V(X) persons attended the event. Haber was electeti to
the Beach Visitor and Contention Authority by the city conimis-
sion last week.
Top officers of Tent S3. Variety Club of
Florida, were on hand when the show business
organization presented a ^-passenger bus
and a check for $5,000 to Miami s Hope Center
far the Mentally Retarded. Shown deft to
right) are Variety Crew Member Abe
Gurewitz. Fixer Howard Galbut. Crew Chair-
man Howard Salkind. Dr. Judy Holland.
Hope Center executive director: \'nriety
Dough Guy Ralph Maya. Chief Barker Irving
I. Gottlieb. Crew Member Harry Littman and
2nd Chief Assistant Barker Ted Levy. The
new bus was the third that Variety has given
the Hope Center.



Moshe Rurhter. the son of Rabbi
Arnold end Marten* R*chter of
Sorth M\amt Booth, is among
ww S.O young men uho hart
enteree. Yeshtra CoUeae. the
men's nnderfradnate dms%cn
of hbermi arts and sciences of
Yeshira University. A
graduate of the Hebrew
Atmirmu of Greater Miami.
Meehe is an economics major.
Roth Foreman
Presents kuni-Leml
TV Rack Foreman TWatr*
KTNI LKML a ro&rk-
nB*eaL Book by N
pw. Musk by Rapiu*.
Crystal. Lyrics by Richard aW
oatst aad dircctrd by Ruth
F*r#aaa witk previews.
Saaamber SWVtoher l\teir^
aajkt October 10 at tk* Roth
Foresnar TSeaae.
B'nmi Zion To Hold
Opening Luncheon
7v ?-a Oh Vai.- Baaa)
ilajtir No ".* ~2 S>c Art
i i.-v: aard
t. Oct f. sx-
at aooc at
la*
Be = :tia< >e Be::
Ceaaers aac kak
Hi*.- Reta^ee* Caakataan
whefe shopping is q pleasure 7 days a week
PubNi Bakeftea open at 8:00 A.M.
AvaMabfra at PubMx Storaa wtth
Fraah Danish Bakartoa Only.
Ptofca or Saedad,
Sftcad of Unaftcad
. at Pubix Storaa with
F raah Danfcth Bafcariaa Only.
Parfact for Dunking
French
Crueilers
AvaMabla at PuoNx Storas with
Fraah Danish Bakariaa Only.
With Chocolata Icing
Only.
Danish Cherry Strip.....^M"
Bafcad in rfa Own Pan
Chocolate Pecan
Fudge Cake..................a**2
ManiDoouts ^89*
Chocokaaa Caka. wNh Oocoaaaa
and Frosting, with a rant of Rum
Chocolate Sices......
59*
Prices Effective
Saft.26ttvi0ct.M985


Within the past year, 80,000 new-
Jewish residents came to live in
Florida, bringing the concentration
of Jews in our state to 5.2 percent
of the population, the third largest
in the nation. With a substantial
portion of these Jews now living in
Greater Miami, the need for addi-
tional human services within our
Jewish community has expanded
rapidly. This large and sudden in-
crease in the Jewish population
here, accompanied by the greater
need for services, has significant
implications for our community's
future.
In the span of nearly half a cen-
tury, since our Federation was
founded, the Greater Miami Jewish
community has grown almost ten-
fold. Federation's 1985 CJA/IEF
Campaign raised nearly $23 million,
almost 225 times the amount raised
by its first campaign. We have con-
fronted many challenges, achieved
many goals and we have continued
to grow.
As Federation's fiftieth anniver-
sary approaches, this is a time for
celebration but also a time for in-
trospection. It has been said that
yesterday is the past and today is
the future. Our actions today can
make a difference for the rest of
our lives and for the lives of future
generations.
When I travel to other Jewish
communities, I am proud to say
that I use Miami as a yardstick to
measure their accomplishments. As
a community, we have progressed
remarkably and in a very short
period of time. Not only have we
reached out to all segments of our
own Jewish community with pro-
gramming designed to fulfill a wide
variety of human needs, but we
have also maintained a high profile
nationally, maintaining our position
in the forefront of Jewish com-
munities nationwide.
We can all be very proud of the
many wonderful things we have
achieved as a Federation and as a
community over the past 47 years.
We have much to celebrate in our
past, and by examining how our
community has progressed to reach
this point, we can realize even
greater achievements in the years
to come.
Our people's tradition has kept us
together for thousands of years.
This is because we have based our
actions on the belief that we have a
responsibility to our fellow Jews;
this is a basic component of our col-
lective identity. And Federation is
a mirror of that collective Jewish
identity. Through Federation, we
come together as one prople to help
each other and to perpetuate our
heritage and our ideals.
It is not only the financial con-
tributions of our community's
members that help Federation, our
community and our people to sur-
vive and grow. It is the caring and
participation of each of us reaching
out to help one another that truly
makes us one. As a people, we have
a rich and glorious past, and the
very key to our survival has been
our ability to join together for the
fulfillment of our common goals
and ideals.
Our community has been blessed
with many devoted leaders who
have helped build agencies which
have enriched the quality of Jewish
life. These leaders invested their
energies and resources not only for
the present but, just as important-
ly, for the future. Although they
were concerned with immediate
needs, they had the foresight to
plan for the growth we have been
witnessing in recent years. They
knew that their actions or their
failure to act would have an ef-
fect for many years to come.
We are at an important stage in
our development as a strong and
vital Jewish community. We have
come to live in Greater Miami from
all corners of this country and from
throughout the world. We have
become part of one of the fastest
growing Jewish communities in the
United States.
With this growth comes many
new responsibilities. Federation's
primary goal has always been
fulfilling human needs. We aspire
to serve all segments of our Jewish
community with responsive and
caring programs to improve the
quality of life for all of our com-
munity's members.
During 1985 we have made
significant progress toward
meeting both the human service
needs in Miami and also those of
our brothers and sisters in Israel
and in 31 Jewish communities
throughout the world. We have
taken great strides forward in
every area of Jewish life: Jewish
education, care for the elderly,
social development programs for
our youth and cultural and com-
munity awareness programs, to
name a few. We continually
strengthen our partnership with
the State of Israel and we have
built bridges which span the full
spectrum of the Jewish experience
in Miami and wherever Jewish life
flourishes.
We must continue to shoulder the
weighty responsibility of determin-
ing which priorities will be address-
ed by our Jewish community and
which programs will be im-
plemented and maintained to help
perpetuate our people and our
ideals. Our accomplishments have
been many, and we must now
determine how to use our strengths
and talents to handle the challenges
which lie ahead.
Samuel I. Adler
President
It is with a great sense of
wonder that I sometimes pause to
absorb the realization that our
Federation has been a part of our
Greater Miami Jewish community
for just 47 years. We can be very
proud about Federation's stunning
accomplishments within those 47
years, and if I were to attempt to
chronicle all of them, it would seem
inconceivable that all could have
been achieved in such a relatively
short period of time.
Within the past year, our Federa-
tion added to its proud legacy by
helping more people than ever
before. Our achievements in
1984-85 are the result of the efforts
of our community leaders and a
corps of dedicated volunters, all of
whom were committed to meeting
the essential needs of the Jewish
people here in Greater Miami, in
Israel and worldwide.
During 1985 our appeal received
an unprecedented response.
Through the generosity of our com-
munity, the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
received a record $22,750,000,
while the Project RenewalOr
Akiva campaign raised more than
$700,000. Added to this was our
special campaign on behalf of
Israel's newest citizens, the
thousands of Ethiopian Jews who
finally reached their Biblical
homeland through Operation
Moses. We raised in excess of $1
million during this extraordinary ef-
fort. All together, we raised well in
excess of $24 million!
The dollars that we raised are
just a single measure of our com-
munity's concern for the continuing
welfare of our people. There is so
much more that we do which simp-
ly cannot be represented in dollars
and cents. The traditions that we
cherish, the heritage that we hold
so dear, is personified in every one
of us.
Through the efforts of Federa-
tion's leadership, we continued to
meet the challenges of Jewish life
in the 1980s. Federation's Planning
and Budgeting Committee has mov-
ed to implement the recommenda-
tions of the Long Range Planning
Study, adopted by the Federation
Board of Directors a year ago.
Our Women's Division is a
national trend setter. In addition
to achieving a record campaign
with gifts totaling in excess
of $4 million, the Women's Division
continuously offers quality pro-
grams through high-caliber leader-
ship. These innovative programs
help to communicate Federation's
vital mission to countless
individuals.
The Community Relations
Committee (CRC) educates our
Jewish community and the
general public on a number of
critical issues including Soviet
Jewry, Middle East relations and
domestic concerns. And the CRC
has made significant progress in
combatting the pernicious influence
of cults and missionary groups
through a variety of outreach and
awareness programs.
Another source of pride for our
Federation has been the ambitious
programming oriented toward
future leaders for the Jewish com
munity of Greater Miami. This pa.c.
July, we inauguarated the Young
Leadership Council, a new entitj
which will address many aspects of
Jewish communal life.
In South Dade, we are experienc-
ing a rapid growth in the Jewish
population. The South Dade Branch
of Federation provides quality
programming to meet the needs
of this vibrant and dynamic-
community. Building upon its past
successes of broad based campaign
and educational awareness pro-
grams, the South Dade Branch
serves as a major resource for the
Jewish community for all of Dade
County.
The Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies also plays a vital role in
shaping the future of our communi-
ty. With its assets having crested
$30 million, the Foundation offers
individuals unique opportunities to
help meet a wide variety of Jewish
needs which might otherwise not
received support. And the Founda-
tion, through prudent and fiscally
sound investments, has charted a
course which will provide our
Jewish community with a signifi-
cant resources base as we prepare
for life in the 21st century.
I have always been proud of that
fact that Miami has been a leader
among Jewish communities in the
United States. In fact, over the
past five years, our Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign has seen a percen-
tage increase in giving which is
first among large city federations.
We have achieved this because we
do accept our responsibility as
givers and as askers.
We must remember that an op-
portunity to give is also an oppor-
tunity to receive. What we receive
is reassurance that we have met
our obligation to sustain a life
which is dignified for all Jews. It is
a simple premise, and it is one
which is a principle tenet of the
Federation philosophy. Our collec-
tive sense of commitment to each
other truly defines us as a com-
munity of Jews which prospers
greatly in a spirit of unity.
My l>est wishes to all of you in
the year ahead.
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President


l-i, IhP .lounoh PIm-*./p^j... r. ,
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.: :' rf:r :*:* i: least five yean
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recofunendaaocs :. s- h-\^r~ -
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lent : nosohazrre bod] i= veflu
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the osohacve bodj : T-z^r-a-
two's offieen Board of Dveeton
ir.c =*-a' E.-r-.-.c-: acnoairj the;
are mdrnduaa save -ercrrf:
many jrears rf wtstaodmg ^-.-ce
the Jewisc rr.rr.gnm P
FederatiOB t^.-.;. ud firerac
:-r_-r-r.cr:S focoa ETlUcai :j-
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Jewry
Throogfc the ::rr_T_r.4~ srsten
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prtatOW


/.. Jules Arkin Bt rnardo Batiemky Saby Beh
.lurk II. Ilork
Jeffrey Berkowitz Benjamin Botwiniek Alvin Lloyd Brown Jack Buretein Herbert Canarirk
Irving Cypen Terry Drueker Dr.JayEUenby AlvinEntin
Myra Fair Dr. George Feldenkreia Pal P. Fit
f David B. Fleeman Harvey Fritdman Judge Ronald Friedman Morris Futernirk GaryGerson Alfred Golden Rabbi Brett Goldstein Goldie R. Goldstein Sheldon Guren
Alex Halberntein Joseph Handleman Samuel Harte Charlotte Held Kenneth Hoffman Arthur Horowitz Joseph H. Kanter Melvin L. Kartzmer Ezra Katz
ShepardKing Jonathan Kulak Aland Kluger Jeffrey La/court Sidney Lefeourt William Lehman, Jr. Frances B. Levey Jack H. Levine Harry A. tHapi Levy
m"n,in Lieberman Ellen Mandler Neal Menaehem Stanley C. Myen Gerald Olin
irthurPearlman Dorothy Podhurst
Nan Rich
i;m, Ross WiBioMf!so [son HowardR. Seharlin MichaelScheck GeraldK. Schwartz MaxineE. Schwartz FredK. Shoehet
el 71 si
laineSilverstein Harry B. Smith GwllertnoSostchin
John Sumoerg
Robert Traurig Erie Turetsky I'hiLo '/'. Warren
Hurry \Yrtt;< r
''/- .S. Wise
A
Executive Staff
Myron -I Brodic
Executive Vice President
Arthur I.. Flink
Assistant Executive Vice President
Kenneth B. Bierman
Director of Campaign
Robert C. Cohen
Director of Finance
Franklin M Einbinder
Director. Office Management
Mark Freed man
Assistant Director. Communications
Judy (iilbert
Associate Director. Community Relations
Milton Heller
Director, Leadership Development
Joseph C. lmberman
Director, Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Jeffrey I. Klein
Director, Planning and Budget
Penny Marlin
Assistant Director, Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropic-
Jeremy S. Neimand
Director, GMJF South Dade Branch
Deborah Pollans
Director, Women's Division
Edward Koscnthal
Director, Community Relations
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Director of Chaplaincy
BrUCe Silver
Assistant Director of Campaign
Nicholas B Siuimonds
Director. Communications
Jacob Solomon
Associate Director, Planning and Budget


o>o lO./"1 Tt,. r__ 1
i
Administrative Committee
Mormon Braman. Chairman
Recommends the annual internal
operating budget of the Federation
to the board; analyzes and reviews
Federation's expenditures
throughout the year: reviews and
makes recommendations concerning
Federation's personnel policies.
Building Operations Committee
Joseph H. Kanter. Chairman
Responsible for the management
of Federation-owned properties:
establishes rental raws and a
budget for the operation of the
buildings: conducts on-site inspec-
tions of Federation and deficit
financed agencies properties: and
recommends, when appropriate,
any major renovations, repairs or
capital improvements.
Bylaws and Governance
Committee
Fred K. Shochet. Chairman
Established to review and recom-
mend changes in Federation's
bylaws, which govern Federation
activities: the committee helps in-
sure that the bylaws will be respon-
sive to the changing needs and
composition of Greater Miami's
Jewish communitv.
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Steering
Committee
Aaron Podhurnt, Chairman
Composed of persons who hold
major positions in the campaign,
the committee meets regularly to
plan and conduct Federation's an-
nual Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
Members represent a myriad of in-
terests, including professions,
trades, organizations, high-rises,
finance, hotels and others.
Communications Committee
Forrest Raffel. Chairman
Reviews and approves the inter-
nal and external corporate com-
munications programs developed
and implemented by the Com-
munications Department. The
Department communicates
newsworthy stories about the an-
nual Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign
and the Federation's family of local
agencies through newspapers,
radio, television, films, advertising
and other media. The goal of these
efforts is to create a high level of
public awareness and a positive
climate of opinion for Federation
within the community at large.
Community Chaplaincy Committee
Benjamin Boticinick, Chairman
Works in cooperation with the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami to supervise the activities of
the Community Chaplaincy Service,
which provides pastoral care,
counseling and visits to hospitalized
and institutionalized persons unaf-
filiated with a synagogue.
Community Relations Committee
Jeffrey Berkoicitz. Chairman
The Community Relations Com-
mittee, in a sense, is the trouble
shooter of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. It deals with a
broad range of local, national and
international issues, among them:
Israel and the Middle East: Soviet
Jewry; Jews in trouble in such
places as the Arab Lands. Latin
America. South Africa and
Ethiopia: anti-Semitism: civil rights
and civil liberties: intergroup rela-
tions: and cults and missionary ac-
tivities. Its work is channelled
through its sub-groups: The Middle
East and Foreign Jewry Committee.
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry. The Domestic Con-
cerns Committee, and The Commit-
tee on Cults and Missionary
Groups.
Executive Committee
Samuel I. Adler, Chairman
Composed of the officers, im-
mediate past president, president
of the Women's Division, chairman
of the South Dade Board and 11
members of the Federation Board,
the committee acts for the Board of
Directors between Board meetings
Federation/ Agency Relationship
Committee
Irving Cypen, Chairman
The goal of the committee is to
develop a sense of solidarity be-
tween Federation and its agencies
to encourage participation in the in-
tegrated approach to communal
problem solving.
Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies
Melvin L. Kartzmer. Chairman
Acts through its committees to
develop deferred and current finan-
cial resources to provide seed
money for pilot projects, emergen-
cies and future needs of the Jewish
communitv.
?'
f1

'Long Range
Campaign Planning
Committee
'Multiple Appeals
Committee
'Treasure's
Committee
'Nominating
Committee
"Bylaws ana
Governance
Committee
"Community
Relations Committee
"Human Resources
Development
Committee
Foundation ot Jewish
Philanthropies
Middle East ana Foreign jewry Comrrrnee Committee on Cuts ana Missionaries


South Fionaa Conference on Soviet jewry Domestic Concerns Committee

Board ot Trustees
Executive
Commmee
Professional
Advisory
Committee
Development
Committee
investment
Committee
Women s
Committee
' indicates standing commmn
"Sae page 12-13 tor CJA-IEF organizational chart
Women s Division
Executive
Committee
Business and
Professional Women
Southwest Daae
Area
North Dade Area
Miami Beach Area
South Dade Area
[
Campaign


i
Human Resources Development
Committee
Donald K. Leflon, Chairman
The fundamental objective of the
Human Resources Development
Committee is to provide the
Federation, its family of agencies
and the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity with a current and future
cadre of highly motivated and well
trained leaders.
Israel Programs Committee
Linda Minkex, Chairman
Formulates policy for the pro-
grams of the staff shaliach
(emissary), assigned to the com-
munity by the American Zionist
Youth Foundation. These are
designed to promote study and
travel in Israel, provide information
and education, and stimulate in-
terest in Israel.
Long Range Campaign Planning
Committee
Philip T. Warren, Chairman
Meets regularly to project
Federation's needs and how to
meet them with the annual cam-
paign. It evaluates the preceding
year's campaign and makes recom-
mendations to the Campaign Steer-
ing Committee in order to develop
maximum community participation
in the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
Long Range Planning Capital
Needs Implementation Committee
L. Jules Arkin, Chairman
This committee was convened to
implement the recommendations
whih eminated from the Long
Range Planning/Capital Needs
study process of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. This process
served as a blueprint for providing
communal services for the Greater
Miami Jewish community into the
1990s. The Committee restablished
a prioritized agenda for proposed
programs, services and major
capital projects that were approved
by the Board of Directors.
Federation and its local beneficiary
agencies will review and implement
the recommendations, a process
that is expected to last over the
next five to ten years.
Missions Committee
Gerald Olin, Chairman
Developed to increase the recruit-
ment of potential candidates and
encourage greater participation in
Federation's Missions Program.
The committee determines criteria
for mission participants, creates a
mission calendar based on cam-
paign needs and goals, and serves
as the community's representative
to recommend mission itineraries
and programs.
Multiple Appeals Committee
Eli Timoner, Chairman
Reviews requests for approval of
fund raising campaigns directed
toward the Greater Miami Jewish
community. The committee at-
tempts to maintain fund raising
discipline so that the Jewish com-
munity's resources are not over-
burdened by fund raising efforts
taking place simultaneously. The
Committee ensures that the period
of January 1 through March 15 is
reserved exclusive!) for Federa-
tion's annual CJA IEF campaign.
Nominating Committee
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, Chairman
Annually prepares the siate of
nominated officers, Board of Direc-
tors members, trustees and ad-
visory council members that are
voted upon at the Annual Meeting.
Planning and Budget Committee
Jonathan Kulak, Chairman
The Committee, along with its
subcommittees, identifies the
Jewish community's needs, for-
mulates programs and services to
meet these needs, looks into
sources of financing and selects or
designs delivery systems to provide
programs and services. It makes
recommendations to the Board of
Directors concerning which agen-
cies and organizations should
receive allocations from the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund and the amount
of these allocations.
Project Renewal Committee
Stanley C. Myers, Chairman
Responsible for interpreting to
Or Akiva (Miami's twin city) our
participation in Project Renewal,
the UJA program to directly assist
economically disadvantaged com-
munities in Israel. Facilitates the
exchange of information between
the two communities, establishes
accountability between various
organizations involved with Project
Renewal and assists Or Akiva in
developing a set of priorities for its
community.
South Dade Branch Board of
Directors
I'l'in Lloyd Brown, Chairman
Creates, coordinates and
manages a variety of programs and
activities in South Dade, under the
aegis of Federation. \\lii< h are
designed to both service the Jewish
community and enhance the role
and image of Federation in the
area. Offers an opportunity for
responsible leadership to emerge
within the Federation structure and
serves as the primary linkage with
the South Dade Jewish community.
Develops and implements policy
and planning for Federation in
South Dade and formulates recom-
mendations for action by the
Federation Board of Directors.
Treasurer's Committee
Norman H. Lipoff, Chairman
Has the power to employ pro-
cedures designed to obtain expedi-
tions and maximum payment of
pledges made to the Federation
campaign.
Young Leadership Council
Jack H. Levine, Chairman
The Federation's mass activities
outreach program designed to
motivate young men and women
22-40 years of age to become more
actively involved in the Federation.
Women's Division
Dorothy Podhurst, President
Acts as a creative force for in-
volving women in the Federation's
annual campaign, leadership
development and community educa-
tion programs. Promotes an
understanding of the complex net-
work of local, national and interna-
tional agencies serving the needs of
world Jewry.
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH COMMUNITY
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
Cable TV. Inc
Jewish Federation
Housing. Inc
FEDERATION MEMBERSHIP
I
OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Trustees
Leadership and
Advisory Counci
'Planning and Budget
Committee
'Administrative
Committee
'Communications
Committee
Young Leadership
Council
Long Range Planning
Capital Needs
Implementation
Committee on
Education. Culture
and Religion
Committee on
Individual and
_Health Services
Israel Programs
Office
Committee on
Educational
Scholarships
Youth Services
Commission
Gifts in Kind
Committee
Committee on
Group Services
Campaign
Committee
Committee on
Non Local Services
Couples Committee
Committee on
Jewish Community
Centers
Program and
Education
Committee
Community and
Political Involvement
Committee
'Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund
Steering Committee"
South Dade Branch
Community
Chaplaincy
Committee
Missions to Israel
Committee
Volunteer Service
Bureau
Public Relations
Committee
Federation Agency
Relationship
Committee
Proiect Renewal
Committee
Singles Committee
Archives Committee
Agency
Administrative
Practices Committee
Professional
Committee on
Services to Elderly


inc .lewran Pinnrfinn/iiVMa,. ~*___v__ .___
Rl ATER MIAMI .1KW1SH FEDERATION
I VBLEOFALLOCATIONS 1985*86
i. Allocations
A. I.iwal Agenciet and Service*
\ ih Council of South Florida 1
Barr) I'niversitj Jewish Studies Program
Hoth Shira Solomon Schechter Day School
Beth Shalom Day School (Hollywood)
B'nai B'nth Youth Organization
Brandeis Academy
Central Agency for Jewish Education
Teacher Fringe Benefits Program ($158,922)
Community Chaplaincy Service
Federation Cable Television
Federation Information and Referral Service
Rabbi Alexander S. Groat Hebrew Academy
Hillel Community Day School
Hillel Foundations of Florida
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of Greater Miami
Israel Programs Office
Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
Community Care for the F.lderlv ($37.6^1
Michael-Ann Russell Title III ( $7,030)
Senior Ride ($19,346)
South Beach Activities Center ($145,617)
Jewish Family Service of Greater Miami
Guardianship Program ($12,640)
Jewish Hitfh School of South Florida
Jewish Vocational Service
Nutrition Program ($55,357)
Lehrman Pay School
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
Community Mental Health (.'enter ($38,500)
Mount Sinai Medical Center
\ xander Muss High Schoi
(Miami Students)
Rescue and Migration Service NOW
Refugee Resettlement Progran
S ith Dade Hel n Academy
- ithi isti F ridaH a isl Mi mona enter
..: gu Su| plementa S I arsl | -
r.- E" .< Academy
rsitj I Miami
uc Studu s Progr ui $12,000)
Ml: Ik East Pr gran
198.'>-8
6.150
25.000
33.761
3.500
51.229
50,784
1.074.437
106,985
120.296
42.284
430,019
268.619
73.571
277.090
68.621
1.027.551
938.402
153.869
309 -74
37.920
1.029.824
231
177 954
15 301
46.556
54.748
IS

73.910
1 [A1
H. Son-Loco! Agencies and Sen-ices
lilurai 1 .'
Vmer Vcadei \-- atioi :' r
Peaci n the MiddK
\" er Ji i........ii
Amencaj lew shC ngress
v I nation League of E
Sal ith S es Appeu
H.l.A.S
"A B
.. : lucat nServici f S rtl Vmei
li a < Labor C mn itte<
lewis! rel gra| I Vgt ncj
'. W ar Veterans
i 'ultural A| |
Sal a I nf< renc nSo\iei lewrj
Nat al Jew isli I n n in I i -
\ y. -;. C HI
nal JewishRes .-.< C< nu r
N rth America! lewtsl Students Appeal
Pr |ect Interchangi
Sj ig gueC .. f Aim
1985-86
i
-
.
_

2.000
: "4
I

(". I nited Jewish Appeal *
TOTAL $33( '
SI 1 39.692
ir

P. Other Allocation*
ludit Fees for I i Agencies J4.
u tj Ki .'. ns C ...... 2W 25"
' fhFederationsai -
Larj Budgeting
'.---..' f Jewish F
M ." :' .
.

Emerge: F ind Fv.
-

R serve for Losses oi
R. -
\ Total Of All Allocations
II. Income
C mbuwdJewtsl tppea Regu impaigr
Crated Waj of Da;. C< ant)
Federation Rest n I i M;. t Fund- N I
Foundation of Jewisl Psilanthr pies
.' -" C* mn urutt Trust Fui i
4
: :

in -.^fT $22 "S. $41 739 667 942 333.257
$24,592 .-

Total Income
1 In addition to Federations $1L039.692 allocation to
the I'tuted Jewish Appeal. $547,100 has been allo-
cated and earmarked to U J.A on behalf of our Project
Renewal twin city of Or Akiva
" I nitcd Wmy of Dade Couaty-
Federation gratefully acknowledges the allocation
from the United Way of Dade County c>{ $841,739 allo-
cated to four agencies and services Jewish Commu-
nity Centers of South Florida. Jewish Family Service
of Greater Miami. Jewish \ooar.onal Service and the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
Campaign Achievement
Funds Raised HI Gifts Received. Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund
85
84
S22.750.000
33,500
-I
82
81
SO
33.000
33.000
S20.000.000
S19.500.000
S18.500.000
.12.000

29.000
28.500
ill
i l i : i I
28400
28.700
76
S15.561.000
S14.618.000
S14.600.000
S14.500.000
S13.785.000
S-V
26.400

85" -Year end projection as of September 27.1985. .An additional SL000.000 was raised on behalf of Operation
Moses and another $700,000 forFroject Renewal-Or Akiva.
S4""-The 19>4 CJA-IEF Campaign includes funds raised for Project Renewal-Or Akiva.
S3"""-The 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign raised an additional S2 6 million for the L'JA-Special Emergency Fund and
Project Renewal
1984-85 UJA ALLOCATIONS TO
ITS BENEFICLARIES
Z UNITED ISRAEL APPEAL
35 JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE
NTASSOC FOR NEW.AMERICANS
i i*
1985-86 FEDERATION ALLOCATIONS
TO LOCAL BENEFICIARY AGENCIES
? JEWISH EDUCATION
GROUP WORK SERVICE-^
9 IND 4 HEALTH SERVICE
& SPECLAL PROJECTS


Local
This listing is intended to give you an idea of the variety and scope of services provided by Federations beneficiary agencies. For further information
about these agencies or for assistance in locating the specific agency which can best serve your particular needs, please call the Federation
Information and Referral Service at 576-4000. The symbols which appear after agency names indicate affiliated services provided by that agency.
A Jewish Education, Culture and Religion
Individual and Health Services
? Group Work Services
Special Projects
Index
Aliyah Council of South Florida... 7
Barry University Jewish
Studies Program........................8
Bet Shira Solomon Schechter
Day School................................8
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization.. 7
Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE)......................8
CAJE Supplemental Scholarship
Program...................................8
CAJE Teacher Fringe Benefits
Program...................................8
Community Chaplaincy Service....9
Federation Information and
Referral Service.........................9
Group Work Services
Including group experienc-
es designed to enhance
Jewish identity and Jewish
communal involvement;
services to enhance person-
al growth and development
within a group setting;
and programs to enhance
personal and group iden-
tification with Israel.
Aliyah Council of South Florida
Morris Futernick, President
Bunny Goldstein, Coordinator
The Aliyah Council promotes and
develops community awareness and
understanding of the concept of
Aliyah; establishes and maintains
links among community groups and
organizations concerned with
Aliyah; provides ongoing assistance
to the Israel Aliyah Center and
"schlichim" (Israeli emissaries); and
provides encouragement and sup-
port to individuals from the com-
munity who plan to emigrate to
Israel.
The Council maintains a fund to
provide financial assistance, Where
needed, to help insure the success
of Jews from South Florida who
make Aliyah or choose to study in
Israel.
3950 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
573-2556
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization A
Judge Ronald Friedman, President,
Greater Miami Council
Steven M. Klein, Florida Regional
Director
Ginny Rosenberg, Assistant
Regional Director
Marsha Tejeda, Assistant Regional
Director
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion (BBYO) is an international
agency serving Jewish teenagers,
ages 14-18. BBYO helps teens
achieve personal growth according
to their individual capacities so
Government Affairs Office,
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations.............................10
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Cable Television. Inc.................10
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami..........8
Hillel Foundations of Florida.......7
Hillel Jewish Student Centers
of Greater Miami........................7
Israel Programs Office...............7
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida (JCC)....................8
Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami (formerly Jewish Family
and Children's Service)...........9
Jewish Federation Housing,
Inc..........................................10
Jewish High School of South
Florida.....................................8
Jewish Vocational Service...........9
Lehrman Day School of Temple
Emanu-El..................................8
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged................10
Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami..........................10
Members of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organization line up for the tart of the annual
Macabiah, in which BBYO groups compete against one another in various ath-
letic events. Sports is just one of the many areas in which BBYO helps Jewish youth
achieve personal growth. Other areas of BBYO concern are development of
leadership skills, community involvement and the productive use of leisure time.
they will make significant contribu-
tions to the Jewish community and
to the larger community of which
they are a part. Members par-
ticipate in democratically function-
ing groups under the guidance of
volunteer advisors and professional
staff.
BBYO emphasizes development
of leadership skills, community in-
volvement and the productive use
of leisure time. In Bade County
there are presently 650 teenagers
in 18 different BBYO groups par-
ticipating in Judaic, community ser-
vice, athletic, social and cultural
programs. BBYO also sponsors a
group for Jewish educable mentally
retarded youth in Dade County.
14411 South Dixie Highway, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33176
253-7400
Hillel Foundations of Florida ?
Louis Ossinsky, Jr., President
Richard K. Goldstein, State
Director
Hillel Foundations of Florida is a
consortium of 15 Jewish federa-
tions, B'nai B'rith of Florida and
college students and faculty, and is
intended to serve Florida campuses
outside of Dade County. This
governing body oversees the provi-
sion of campus services to students
at almost every college and univer-
sity in the state.
The consortium receives alloca-
tions from organized Jewish com-
munities throughout Florida and,
after examining budget requests
submitted by the Hillel units, deter-
mines how the funds under its
management will be distributed.
Currently there are major Hillel
units operating at the University of
Florida, Florida State University,
the University of South Florida and
in the Broward Palm Beach
County region, with smaller units
located on seven other campuses.
Local Office:
1100 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
661-8549
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of
Greater Miami ?
William F. Saulson, President
Richard K. Goldstein, A rea
Director
Organized and co-sponsored by
B'nai B'rith International, Hillel
Jewish Student Centers provide
services to Jewish college students
throughout Dade County. The staff,
composed of rabbis and social
workers, provides High Holy Day
services, Shabbat services and din-
ners, personal counseling, Israel-
oriented programs, social action ac-
tivities and a wide variety of
cultural, social and athletic programs.
Hillel welcomes all Jewish
students regardless of their affilia-
tion or religious commitment. Hillel
serves as the voice of the Jewish
community on campus and as the
Jewish resource center for students
and faculty. Hillel centers also con-
duct annual United Jewish Appeal
campaigns on behalf of Federation
Alexander Muss High School
in Israel....................................8
Rescue and Migration Service-
National Council of Jewish
Women....................................10
Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School...............9
South Dade Hebrew Academy......9
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, Inc................10
Toras Ernes Academy of
Miami.......................................9
University of Miami Judaic-
Studies Program........................9
University of Miami Middle East
Studies Program........................9
within the college and university
Jewish communities.
Area Office and University of
Miami Office:
1100 Stanford Drive
Coral Gables, Florida 38146
Area Office: 661-8549
UofM Office: 665-6948
South Dade Office:
Florida International University
Tamiami Trail
Miami, Florida 33199
554-2215
North Dade Office:
Bay Vista Campus of Florida Inter-
national University
N.E. 151st Street and Biscayne
Boulevard
Miami, Florida SS181
940-5610
Israel Programs Office
Linda Minkes, Chairman
Raffi Miller, Community Shaliach
and Director
For more than 14 years, the
Israel Programs Office has served
the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity as a resource center for in-
formation about Israel programs.
The Office encourages community
youth to participate in the many
opportunities for work, study, tour-
ing or volunteer programs in Israel.
In addition, the Israel Programs
Office maintains funds to provide
financial aid for deserving
individuals wishing to participate in
approved programs in Israel.
The Office also organizes and
promotes Zionist activities on cam-
puses throughout the Southeastern
United States and provides con-
sultation and assistance to interestei.
groups and organizations wishing to
develop their own Israel programs.
3950 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida ?
Harry A. (Hap) Levy, Chairman of
the Board
Neal J. Menachem, President
Elton J. Kerness, Executive Director
The Jewish Community Centers
j (JCCs) of South Florida, composed
I of a central administrative office
and three branches (Michael-Ann


rage 12-C. The Io,.n0K VU^MraVM...
- I Sooth Da : and
Miami Bea : : -
" .-..-- r Jew if all ages
gather { tr.-e --a-..-:'i- r. :'*.:
variety :' needs and iuuitti
F-orr. pre-act programs tc ser-
vices and aetrrrriea for teak*
adults, the JCCfl serve as a vital
community rtaourta. Eacr. rranch
provides a mmmmmm) raacting pace
where peop.e part*.pate in ac-
tivities designed to enhance per-
sonal growth and intensify Jewish
identity and commitment.
The Jewish Association Serving
Singles MASS) offers the JASSiine.
a 24-hour recorded telephone ser-
vice updated weekly to provide an
entertaining listing of community
activities for Jewish singles
'JASSline: 573-JASS).
Serving the aged on Miami
Beach the Miami Beach JCC
Senior Center provides recrestx n
education, health maintenance
issessment, homemaker friend)}
iitor and sh :: ng services The
bay Care f< r the Frail El lerrj : r
provide a protect etting
: aih ill) frail
......... ,_
(673-606* Th< Seni Ri > : ro-
u ition for
. ..-.- .rears
. ler h an i ise publi
trai er takes
lient ioctors. hos] itaJs lini -
and n ai u n Miami Beach an I
in North Dade 67 The
W rking 1 get! er Pr gran : -
. : nomen akers h n healtl
: me ielivered meals i
and pers ns re
: th Street n Miami bear-:.
672-2242).
' entral Office:
.,'(/o S cay? ( fl e
-,76-1660
Michael-Ann Ru/mell JCC
Gary Y H tzman Prt
Barry M Podi Center Din
18900 N.E 25th Avenue
North Miami Beach.. Florida 33180
932-4200
South Dade JCC
.Vaomt B OUter. President
Edward Rosen, Center Director
12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue
Miami. FUjrida SS176
251-1394
Miami Beach JCC Family Center:
RonaUl W. Shane. M.D.. President
Jer'/me Libhin, Center Director
Gail Weisberg, Director. Older
Adult Services
4221 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
584-3*06
Miami Beach JCC Senior Center:
610 Espanola Way
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
673-6060
In April, the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida threw birth-
day bashes for Israel at all three
centers. Almost 10,000 people cele-
brated "Israel 37" with marches,
entertainment, dancing, Israeli food,
shukx and more.
A Jrwiih Education. Culture and Religion
Individual and Health Service*
? Group Work Service*
Special Project*
8
Jewish Education
Culture and Religion
Including day and religious
schools from preschool
through university levels,
non-degree courses and
Jewish cultural and reli-
gious programs.
Dr. Jeremiah L'nterman. Director
Barry University's Jewish
Stu studies for individuals seeking a
master : degree m Jewish Stadias
Courses are ffereo :n the B.r'e
Rabbinic literature, Jewish tl oghl
Jer* ry and Hebrew.
The Jewish Studies Program als
-:- ns rs t ---es : free put
nires : :"-- interest
-;. guest speakers
rogr .- : i lit) refle ts a
'-- facaden luda i
if : rr.posed of eminent
.-. --.--. |. cive fields
; available : -
-. ients inten i l : orsue
er Fewish education r
mmunai sen
' 2nd All
'' ix Sh -- Florid 161
'"
Bet Shin Solomon Schechter Da*
ool
?' : B 5 huartz Cha
'' H H I : ::'
-. 3 he hter Day
south Dade's C nservai
lav. ffUiated with the
United Synag gue I America is
iccredited by th< S itl i n Ass
' I llegi I Scho Is. Be:
Shira's Ear.;. Childhood Divisii n
which serves pn ers from
ages two through five, remains a
model program and serves as a
"demonstration center'' for univer-
sity student teachers and profes-
sional teacher education programs.
In addition to its highly regarded
reading program. Bet Shira offers
an enriched curriculum of general
and Judaica studies in grades 1-6.
including computer science courses
and resources for gifted and
talented students.
7500 S. W. 120th Street
Miami. Florida 33156
238-2601
Agency for Jewish
San Rich. President
Gene Greenzweig, Executive
Director
Now entering its 42nd year of
operation, the Central Agency for
Jewish Education (CAJE) continues
to serve as South Florida's major
communal agency in the field of
Jewish education. Over the past
decade. CAJE's first priority has
been the continuation of Jewish
education beyond Bar and Bat
Mitzvah age. More than 2,000
students participated this year in
the program, conducted in coopera-
tion with most major synagogues
and Jewish youth organizations in
our community.
A second major priority is enrich-
ment and licensing of Hebrew and
early childhood teachers. CAJE
provides an ever expanding series
of courses and seminars for
teachers' professional enrichment.
In addition. CAJE's growing
Educational Resource
Center/Library houses a major
Jewish film collection and the new
Teacher Resource Center, at which
day, religious and early childhood
teachers can create new classroom
materials using the latest
equipment.
CAJE has expanded in other
areas during the past few years,
with the addition of the Day
School, Jewish Special Education
u S .^ gue S "'
rew School
ents. Son* I the ther
: gram area..- in which CAJE par-
rifirff*** '- rnmunity ser-
vices, publi it iluding
Miarhrr re~ .iree pamphlets; and an
adult education program featuring
outstanding lecturers and artists.
~200 Bxscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
576-4080
Raoin Norman Lipson,
Administrator
This program, funded entirely by
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, provides scholarship
assistance for deserving students in
synagogue schools for Bar and Bat
Mitzvah training.
Rabbi Shimon Azuiay.
Ad'1 mstrator
The CAJE Teacher Fringe
Benefits : ~-^~.. established and
funded by the Greater Miami
' ish Fe ierati n iesigi e I l
maintain high quality licensed
Hebrew general studies and early
1 edu at -- in Jewish
Is I he : r gram ; rovides a
pension ar.a health ns iraro |
: r tea hers nvith ntin ling -
tempi rarj licenses.
., .' .''
M : t
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami
Dr. Da :.' : ndent
Burste Che..... n
'.' D. Fischer Execut V
lent
A da;. -:. accredited by the
S .'.hern Association of Colleges
and Schools, the Hebew Academy
offers classes from nursen.' through
12th grade. With more than 600
students, the Academy is commit-
ted equally to academic excellence
through a full program of Judaic
and general studies and to the
character development of each stu-
dent through the observance of
traditional Jewish practice.
The school offers comprehensive
academic, extracurricular and
cultural enrichment programs.
Science and computer courses are
supplemented by fully equipped
laboratories which contain state-of-
the-art materials. Extracurricular
programs include varsity sports,
art, music, modern dance and com-
munity service.
2\00 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
532-6421
Eleanor Katz. President
Richard Levy, Chairman of the
Boa rd
Rabin Louis Herring. Principal
Sii ce its opening in 1981. the
Jewish High School has provided
high-quality courses in Judaic and
general studies for students in
grades 9-12. A special curriculum
track aters to public school
students with little or no previous
Jewish education.
The school offers an excellent
general studies curriculum, designed
by the University of Miami, and
an experienced and highly qualified
staff in both the Judaic studies and
general studies programs. A
rigorous and comprehensive
academic orientation has resulted
in an outstanding acceptance rate
of Jewish High School graduates in-
to excellent institutions of higher
learning across the United States.
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 33180
935-5620
RochelU Malek, Chairman ofth*
Board
Dr. Amir Barm Dirt*! r if
Education
Rowena E. Kovler, Principal.
L'hrman Day School
Philippa Feldman. Principal. Ear-
ly Childhood Department
The Lehrman Day School, a Con-
servative Hebrew day school for
students in nursery through eighth
grade, combines secular disciplines
with the study of Hebrew language
and Jewish tradition and culture.
Named in honor of Dr. Irving
Lehrman, rabbi of the congregation
for the past 40 years and founder
of the school, it is affiliated with
the Solomon Schechter Day School
movement under the auspices of
the Jewish Theological Seminary of
America. The school is fully ac-
credited by the Solomon Schechter
Day School Association.
The newly renovated school facili-
ty houses a computer center, new
science laboratories and a new
iry. The r< I it r..- were
lesigned with the needs : the
- .:'.-- n mind, and ii id<
arger i e v -fun ssrooms
gh t and a
nth
eras and moniti rs i ins m thi
1 hanges in the Lehrman Day
Schi' facility tl i .
: u : by a full n sion :' the
general studies curric -
> signed by a tear lars
fr : the Universitj :" Miami. The
faculty ii les Amer
u : Israeii tt-;-.. hers I ise the
it modern educat i
les ind metl is v ii il Ii
St ree'
'I in : .'
'66-2771
Alexander Muss High School in Israel
Principal Rabbi Lee Diamond and
students celebrate with dance at a
Torah dedication at the school's cam-
pus in Hod Ha'Shan.n. Israel. This
year more than 400 students from the
Greater Miami area attended the
eight-week program, representing
more than one-half of the school's
total enrollment.
Nelson C. Keshen. President
Rabbi Morris Kipper. Executive
Director
The High School in Israel is an
eight-week intensive study program
using an interdisciplinary cur-
riculum designed to thoroughly ac-
quaint students with Israel, the
birthplace of Judeo-Christian
culture and civilization. The
program uses a chronological
historical perspective beginning
with the Biblical period and ending
with the modern Middle East. The
High School in Israel, which strives
to provide high school youth with
"a permanent Jewish identity.''
received the prestigious William J.
Shroder Award from the Council of
Jewish Federations in 1983.
The School is located at Mosen-
son Regional High School, an
Israeli educational complex 15 miles
northeast of Tel Aviv. It recently
embarked on an expansion program
that will include a variety of new
facilities to accommodate growing
student enrollment. Students are
recruited directly from Greater
Miami high schools to attend the
High School in Israel program.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation provides financial
assistance for students from Miami
to participate in the program. In
1


-**
V V
u

addition, several hundred other
students from throughout the coun-
try al.o attend each year. Over the
past decade, Miami alone has sent
3,500 students to participate in the
program.
.8950 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 3S1S7
576-3286
Michael Seheck, President
Marshall Baltuch, Executive Director
Rabbi Wallace Greene, Principal
Dr. Jerome M. Levy, Vice Principal
Rabbi Jay Neufeld, Assistant
Principal
Dorothy K. Gruen, Director,
Early Childhood Education
Offering a full curriculum of
Judaic and general studies, the
Samuel Seheck Hillel Community
Day School has served North Dade
and Broward counties for 15 years.
The School is accredited by the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools and is a member of the
National Commission on Torah
Education and the Southern
Association of Independent Schools.
The Hillel Community Day School
is the largest Jewish day school in
the Southeastern United States,
with a current enrollment of more
than 750 students in preschool
through ninth grade. The school
emphasizes fundamental skills, and
offers mathematics and reading
laboratories for individualized
enrichment and remedial academic
work.
19000 V E 25th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 88180
981-2881
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 880158
0JU8, Florida 88168
South Dade Hebrew Academy
Jack Goldstrich. President
Marlene Mitchell. Principal
A traditional day school offering
classes from kindergarten through
sixth grade, the South Dade
Hebrew Academy offers students
individualized instruction programs
suited to their achievement levels
in both general and Judaic studies.
The unique reading and
mathematics laboratories, staffed
by educators who possess advanced
degrees, are designed to evaluate
each student and offer appropriate
prescriptive programs.
The newly relocated Academy
also offers a general and Judaic
studies program for children with
severe learning disabilities. This
special education program is the
only one of its kind among Jewish
day schools in the State of Florida.
121,01 S.W. 102nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33176
253-2300
William Gordon, President
Rabbi Bentzion Chait, Principal
Toras Ernes Academy is a com-
munity Orthodox day school serv-
ing Dade County and South
Broward. Students from preschool
through sixth grade receive a
meaningful Torah education under
the direction of an experienced
faculty. The faculty concerns itself
with the welfare of each and every
child as well as with the high quali-
ty of the comprehensive general
studies curriculum.
Nursery-Kindergarten:
195 N. W. 156th Street
North Miami, Florida 33161
947-1959
Grades 1-6:
7902 Carlyle Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33U1
868-1388
..ersity of Miami Judaic
Studien Pro"
Dr. Henry A. Green, Director
The University of Miami Judaic-
Studies Program is an inter-
disciplinary program offering a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Judaic
Studies. Designed to provide con
prehension of Jewish civilization
and the creative cultural experience
of the Jewish people, it offers
classes and other educational pro-
grams for the University and for
the general community. The pro-
gram reaches out to the
community-at-large with film
festivals, lecture series and
conferences.
An outreach program, conducted
at local synagogues, offers Univer-
sity and Centra) Agency for Jewish
Education credits. The Judaic
Studies Program uses resources
from the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation to provide scholarship
support, student stipends and
special enrichment programming
and materials.
University of Miami
Ashe Building
Coral Gables. Florida 33124
284-4375
Stud
Dr. Hiiim Shaked, Director
The Middle East Studies Pro-
gram is affiliated with the Universi-
ty of Miami's Graduate School of
International Studies. With the sup-
port of the Greater Miami .Jewish
Federation, the University hosts an
exchange professor from Israel in
the field of Middle East studies.
who teaches at the University as
well as serves as a resource to the
entire Miami community in matters
relating to the State of Israel.
1581 Bnscm Avenut
Coral Gables, Florida .i-iiin
284-4808
Individual and
Health Services
Including health care,
counseling, vocational
rehabilitation and services
to the elderly.
Benjamin Botunnick, Chairman
Rabbi Solomon Schiff. Director
Since its inception in 1966, the
Community Chaplaincy Service has
brought spiritual solace to unaf-
filiated Jews in various institutions
of Greater Miami through visitation
and religious services by chaplains.
The chaplains visit persons in
general hospitals, mental hospitals,
correctional institutions, homes for
the retarded, nursing homes,
hospices and other locations.
The chaplains, who are members
of the Rabbinical Association, visit
various institutions on a regular
basis, making more than 16.000
visits in the past year. The service
is sponsored and operated by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
in association with the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 88181
576-4000
Martha Cohen. Director
Federation Information and Refer-
ral Service provides a central
resource for people in need of
assistance. Housed in the Federa-
tion building, the Service defines
each client's needs, determines
which agencies can provide the
needed services, and makes ap-
propriate referrals. The Service
later contacts clients to determine
whether help was given by the sug-
gested agency and to provide addi-
tional assistance, if necessary.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000
This year the Jewish Family and Children's Service was renamed Jewish Family
Service of Greater Miami, hut continued to help nearly 9,000 individuals of all
ages with counseling, education and home visits. The Service operated a child
abuse education, identification and prevention pro|(ram in schools and day care
centers so our community's children and their parents can rest easier at night.
Jewish Fam!', of Greater
ii ?
(formerly Jewish Family and
Children's Service)
Dorothy Podhurst, President
Ii,,,-,,i B. Saltman, LCSW, Ex-
ecutive Director
Serving Greater Miami's Jewish
community since 1920, the Jewish
Family Service (JFS) works to
Strengthen Jewish family life and
promote the emotional and social
well-being of people of all ages.
JFS is particularly sensitive to
changing lifestyles, including the
decreased influence of the extended
family, divorced or separated in-
dividuals, single-parent families, the
remarried family, isolated persons
and unmarried couples.
The JFS operates in five loca-
tions throughout Dade County and
has four departments: Family and
Children's Services. Services for
the Aged, the Refugee Resettle-
ment Program and Prevention Ser-
vices. JFS is a member of Family
Service America and the Child
Welfare League of America, and is
accredited by the Council on Ac-
creditation of Family and
Children's Services.
The Services highly qualified
staff offers information and refer-
ral services; individual, group,
marital, family and parent-child
counseling; play therapy; psycho-
social assessment of the elderly;
home visits; family life education:
community workshops; public
education; and school/agency
consultation.
JFS also administers the Refugee
Resettlement Program on behalf of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Experienced resettlement
workers provide financial and social
services to Jewish refugees from
the Soviet Union, Iran. Eastern
Europe, and Central and South
America. With the assistance of the
Jewish Community Centers, the
Jewish Vocational Service, Mount
Sinai Medical ('enter and the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
refugees are assisted in obtaining
employment, housing, and financial,
legal and social stability.
Main Office:
1790 S.W. 27th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145
445-0555
Branch Offices:
2040 N.E. 163rd Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
949-6186
7455 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
868-0888
8905 S. W. 87th Avenue
Miami, Florida 38176
279-6611
1424 Drexel Avenut
Miami Beach, Florida 88189
672-2778
Jewish Vocational Service ?
1'aI I Fine, I'resident
Eugeru Greenspan, Executivt
I h n ctor
Racial I:'. Tannenbaum, Associatt
Executivt Director
Serving the Greater Miami
Jewish Community since 1958, the
Jewish Vocational Service (.IYS) of
lers a wide variety of vocational
rehabilitation, senior adult and
other community services.
The Vocational Rehabilitation
Program, with funding from the
State of Florida, offers comprehen-
sive programs in work adjustment
training, work evaluation and in-
dividual and group counseling. Job
placement for the handicapped in-
cludes a work experience program
as well as a special program for the
deaf. The new Corporate Services
Department has been added to of-
fer cost-effective rehabilitation ser-
vices to insurance companies, at-
torneys, physicians, rehabilitation
firms, businesses and industry.
The South Florida Employment
and Training Consortium supports
two additional JVS rehabilitation
programs. These are the Training
Opportunities Project (TOP), an on-
the-job training program for work-
ready handicapped clients; and the
Productive Older Workers Program
(POW), for low-income elderly in
need of employment assistance.
The JVS Nutritional Project
serves approximately 1,850 hot
kosher meals a day, five days a
week, to the elderly and needy of
Miami Beach and North Miami
Beach. More than 600 of these
meals are delivered to the home-
bound daily; the remainder are
served at eight congregate meal
sites. This service is the only one of
its kind in the United States
operated by a Jewish Vocational
Service.
JVS also operates a Homemaker
Referral Service, which screens and
trains home health aides, home at-
tendants, nurse's aides and compan-
ions to serve the elderly on Miami
Beach. North Miami Beach and
South Dade. A unique aspect of this
project is that initial homei assess-
ments are made prior to match-

a\ Jewish Education, Culture and Religion
Individual and Health Services
? Group Work Service*
Special Project*
9


ra*e 12-C Th* .Tn,r. vi^:..^^.. o,. -
nK a homemaker with the elderly
client. There are no eligibility re-
quirements and fees for services
are based upon competitive rates.
Career Development Counseling,
designed for anyone in need of
assistance in choosing a career, of-
fers vocational interest and ap-
titude tests, individual and group
counseling, college counseling and
counseling for adults considering
midlife career changes or those
entering the job market. Loans for
students in need of financial
assistance are also available
through JVS.
Job Placement Employment
Counseling includes resume
writing, job interviewing techniques,
job-seeking skills and career
information. Both programs are of-
feree! throughout the community in
North Dade and in the JVS central
and South Dade offices.
Central Administrative Offices/
Vocational Rehabilitation!
< (immunity Serrices:
-US N.W. 25th Street
Miami, Florida 88197
576-8X20
TTY number: 576-8878
Training Opportunities Project:
810 N.W. 25th Street
Miami, Florida 88127
576-5644
Elderly Servires/Nutrit ional
Project:
920 Alton Road
Miami Beach. Florida 88139
678-5106
Productive Older Workers Project:
672-2184
Homemaker Referral Service:
672-2182
South Dade Branch Office:
8858 S.W. 124th Street
Miami. Florida 33156
285-9482
Project TASK:
V.A. Hospital Medical Center
324-4455. Ext. 8514
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged
Irving Cypen, Chairman
Arthur Pearlman, President
Fred D. Hirt, Executive Director
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens (MJHHA) is a multifaceted
geriatric care center serving 376
elderly residents in its long-term
care facility and 19,000 persons in
community outreach programs.
Through its wide variety of ser-
vices, MJHHA enables the elderly
to lead active and productive lives
and maintain their independence to
the fullest extent possible. (151
N.E. 52nd Street, Miami, Florida
33137, 751-8626).
In May, almost 200 persons served by
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged participated in the
second MJHHA Senior Olympics. This
annual event is one of many the Home
provides to help seniors remain active
and productive and enjoy their lives
to the fullest extent possible.
The Douglas Gardens Outpatient
Mental Health Center offers mental
health and rehabilitative services
for persons 50 years of age and
older (751-2501).
A Jewish Education, Culture and Religion
Individual and Health Services
? Group Work Services
Special Projects
10
The Ambulatory Health Center
provides a full range of primary
medical care and specialty clinical
services for persons who are eligi-
ble for Medicare (751-8626).
"Channeling" provides a full
range of community services to
frail older adults experiencing pro-
blems with daily activities. Clients
must be age 65 or older, covered by
Medicare A and residents of the Ci-
ty of Miami or the municipalities of
Miami Beach, Bal Harbour, Bay
Harbor, North Bay Village or Surf-
side (751-8644 or 751-8638).
Through Project Independence, a
professionally staffed service for
persons unable to fully manage
their own affairs, seniors receive
personalized assessment and case
management of a complete package
of at-home services tailored to their
individual problems and needs
(751-3095).
The Stein Gerontological Institute
at Douglas Gardens is a research,
planning and training center offer-
ing accredited courses and
seminars to professionals working
with the elderly and the community
at large (751-8626).
The Senior Community Employ-
ment Service program offers part-
time employment at MJHHA and in
the community to supplement the
income of low-income elderly
1751-8626).
151 N.E. 52nd Streeet
Miami. Florida 33136
751-8626
MJHHA Adult Day Health
Centers:
This comprehensive program,
licensed by the State of Florida, is
conducted at two locations and pro-
vides health and social services and
supervised group activities for per-
sons 60 years of age or older.
Douglas Gardens City of Miami
Senior Adult Day Center at Legion
Park:
6447 N.E. 7th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33137
754-1777
Community Care Adult Day Center:
151 N.E. 52nd Street
Miami, Florida S3137
751-8626
Douglas Gardens Community
Mental Health Center of Miami
Beach
A subsidiary corporation of
MJHHA, the Community Mental
Health Center of Miami Beach of-
fers a complete range of mental
health services to all residents of
Miami Beach.
1007 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida SS1S9
531-5341
Irving Cypen Tower:
A 102-unit congregate living
apartment complex for older adults,
the Irving Cypen Tower is designed
for seniors who can live in-
dependently while benefiting from
MJHHA services.
5110 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33137
756-8583
Mount Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami
Cal Kovens. Chairman of the Board
Gary Gerson, President
Mount Sinai is a 700-bed acute-
care medical center providing quali-
ty patient care for those requiring
hospitalization, outpatient or
emergency services. With its
Gumenick Ambulatory Care Center,
the hospital leads the way in same-
day surgery and outpatient medical
services.
A teaching hospital, Mount Sinai
excels in its educational facilities
for physicians-in-training, nurses,
paramedical students and
employees. With research grants
totaling more than $2 million in
1984, the hospital furthers future
medical knowledge. Mount Sinai is
at the forefront of diagnostic
technology with Magnetic
Resonance Imaging at the newly-
opened Mary Ann and James L.
Knight MKI Center.
Through Project Sinai, the
hospital reaches out to the com-
munity by providing health care for
Miami residents at 13 hot meal
sites. Mount Sinai Medical
Center/North is a multispecialty
physician practice serving residents
of North Dade and South Broward.
The hospital's mobile health van
brings educational programs and
health screenings directly to the
community. A series of half-hour
medical programs called "Check
Up" educates the public about
medical care on Jewish Federation
Cable Television.
4300 Alton Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
874-2121
During 1984-85, the Rescue and Migra-
tion Service of the National Council of
Jewish Women assisted and counseled
Jewish immigrants from 45 foreign
countries in documentation, resettle-
ment and absorption into this coun-
try. The agency provides comfort and
hope to immigrants confronted with a
new and strange way of life.
Rescue and Migration Service
National Council of Jewish
Women
Carol Grunberg, President
Charlotte Oliver, Director of Rescue
and Migration
The Rescue and Migration Ser-
vice of the National Council of
Jewish Women (NCJW), Greater
Miami Section, has a distinguished
history of service to this communi-
ty, assisting the foreign-born since
1923. As a local cooperating agency
of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society (HIAS), it provides im-
migration counseling and technical
assistance to Jewish residents of
Dade County, as well as their
relatives and friends throughout
the world. Last year's caseload
represented clients from 45 foreign
countries.
NCJW's Rescue and Migration
Service provides a unique blend of
legal and social services. The Ser-
vice offers help to clients both
before gaining legal entry and after
admittance to the United" States
through the naturalization process.
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
576-4747 or 573-6971
Special Projects
Government Affairs Office,
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations
L. Jules Arkin, Chairman
Elaine Bloom, Director
The Government Affairs Office
deals with various branches of state
government to assure the conserva-
tion of and increase in funds flow-
ing through state agencies to
human service programs of the
Jewish community. It works in
close cooperation with such bodies
as the Florida Association of
United Ways, the United Protes-
tant Appeal, Florida IMPACT and
others.
20435 N.E. 20th Court
North Miami Beach, Florida .;.u?'<
132-3335
When legislature is in session:
Room 127
222 West Pensacola Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(904) 224-6338 or 222-3470
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Cable Television, Inc. A
Samuel Harte, President
Suzanne Lasky, Director of Broad-
cast Operations
A corporation formed to provide
Dade County's Jewish community
with cable television programming.
Federation's cable station. JFTV.
produces and airs evening televi-
sion shows. JFTV programs encom-
pass a variety of formats and
topics, including Jewish culture and
religion, entertainment, Israel, cur-
rent events and human services.
8950 Biscayne Boulei'ard
Miami. Florida 33137
576-4000
Jewish Federation Housing. Inc.
David B. Fleeman. President
Nathan Skolnick. Administrator
A corporation formed to build
and operate low-cost housing for
the elderly. Federation Housing
currently maintains two apartment
buildings. Federation Towers,
located on Miami Beach, has 11-1
residential units; Federation
Gardens, located in South Dade.
has 110 one-bedroom residential
units.
75? West Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 88189
681-2888
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, Inc. A ?
Dr. Abraham S. Fischler. President
Donald E. Lefton, Chairman of the
Executive Committee
Goldie R. Goldstein, Executive Vice
President
Since its inception in November
1979, the Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center has ac-
cumulated more than 300 oral
histories of Holocaust survivors and
their liberators and protectors. A
composite of these testimonies, ac-
companied by a teacher's guide, is
used in public and private schools
for study of the Holocaust. The
Center's goal is to ensure, through
education, that the memory of the
Holocaust is never lost.
The Center offers a 60-hour ac-
credited training course for
volunteer interviewers, as well as a
variety of community service pro-
grams relating to the Holocaust. In
addition, the Center sponsors a
Children of Holocaust Survivors
group whose membership presently
is over 300.
The Center also conducts
seminars and lectures about the
Holocaust and coordinates major
public awareness programs, such as
the annual "Holocaust Awareness
Week" series and commemoration
of "Yom Hashoah," the day of
Holocaust remembrance.
Florida International University
Bay Vista Campus
N.E. 151st Street and Biscayne
Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33181
940-5690
3950 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 3S1S7
576-4000


r *
Miami Beach
Orthodox
Agudath Israel Hebrew
Institute
Rabbi Sheldon Ever
7801 Carlyle Avenue
Miami Beach 33141
866-5226
Beth Hamedrosh Lavi
Yitzchok
Rabbi David Golowinsky
1140 Alton Road
Miami Beach 33139
534-3444
Beth Israel Congregation"
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro
770 40th Street
Miami Beach 33140
538-1251
Beth .Jacob Congregation*
Rabbi Shmaryahu Swirsky
301-311 Washington Avenue
Miami Head, 331311
672 6150 or >;72-1882
Beth Tfilah Congregation
Rabbi Israel M. Tropper
935 Euclid Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
538-1521
Beth Yoseph ('haiin
Congregation
Rabbi Dow Rozencwaig
843 Meridian Avenue
Miami Beach 33130
Congregation Etz Chaim
1544 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
Cuban Hebrew Congregation
Temple Beth Shmuel
Rabbi Barry J. Konovitch*
1700 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
534-7213
Hebrew Academy
Beth El Congregation
2400 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach 33140
532-6421
Jacob C. Cohen Community
Synagogue
Dr. Tibor H. Stern*
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
534-0271
Knesseth Israei
Congregation
Rabbi Joseph Haber
1415 Euclid Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
538 2741
Lubavitch Congregation
Rabbi Sholom Blank
1120 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
673-5755
Mogen David Congregation
9348 Harding Avenue
Miami Beach 33154
865-9714
Ohev Shalom Congregation
Rabbi Phineas A. Weberman
7055 Bonita Drive
Miami Beach 33141
865-9851
Ohr Hachaim Congregation
Rabbi Avrohom C. Feuer
317 47th Street
Miami Beach 33140
674-1326
Sephardic Jewish Center of
Greater Miami
Rabbi Sadi Nahmias*
645 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
534-4092
Shul of Bal Harbour
Rabbi Sholom D. Lipskar
Sheraton Bal Harbour (Sat.
Services)
Harbour House North
(Weekday Services)
School for Continuing
Jewish Studies
868-1411
Talmudic University of
Florida
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig
1910 Alton Road
Miami Beach 33139
534-7050
Temple Moses**
Rabbi Amram J. Amselem
1200 Normandy Drive
Miami Beach 33141
861-6808
Young Israel of Sunny Isles
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin
17274 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach 33160
949-7475
Conservative
Pavillion Hebrew Study
Group
Rabbi Bernard A. Silver
5601 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach 331 10
864-6994
Temple Beth HI of North
Bay Village***
Rabbi Marvin Rose*
7800 Hispanola Avenue
North Baj Village 33141
861-4005
Temple Beth Raphael
Rabbi Jehuda Melber*
1545 Jefferson Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
538-4112
Temple B'nai Zion
Rabbi Jacob S. Green*
200 178th Street
Miami Beach 33160
932-2159
Temple Emanu-El***
Dr. Irving Lehrman*
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach 33139
538-2503
Temple King Solomon
Rabbi David Raab*
910 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach 33139
531 9776
Tempi.' Mcnorah"*'
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz*
620 75th Street
Miami Beach 33Ml
866 0221
Temple Ner Tamid***
Dr. Eugene Labovitz*
7902 Carl vie Avenue
Miami Beach 33141
866-8346
Reform
Temple Beth Sholom****
Dr. Leon Kronish*
4144 Chase Avenue
Miami Beach 33140
538-7231
North Dade
Orthodox
Agudath Achim,
Third Avenue Hebrew
Religious Community
Center
19255 N.E. 3rd Avenue
North Miami Beach 33179
651-5392
B'nai Sephardim
Dr. Leon Suissa
44 N.W. 150th Street
Miami 33168
Congregation Ahavas
Yisroel-Chabad
Rabbi Casriel Brusowankin
2590 N.E. 202nd Street
North Miami Beach 33180
932-7770
Sephardic Jewish Center of
North Miami Beach
Rabbi Nesim Gambach
571 N.E. 171st Street
North Miami Beach 33162
652-2099
Shaaray Tefilah**
Rabbi Yaakov Sprung
991 N.E. 172nd Street
North Miami Beach 33162
651-1562
Young Israel Of Skv Lake"
1850 N.E. 183rd Street
North Miami Beach 33179
945-8712
Young Israel Of Greater-
Miami
Rabbi David Lehrfield
99(1 N.E. 171st Street
North Miami Beach 33162
.151 -3591
South Dade
Orthodox
Ahavat Shalom
Congregation
985 S.W. 67th Avenue
Miami 33144
261-5479
B'nai Israel and Greater
Miami
Youth Synagogue
Rabbi Ralph Glixman
9400 S.W. 52nd Terrace
Miami 33165
Mail to:
P.O. Box 161542
Miami 33116
595-9336
Congregation Shaare
Tefillah of Kendall
Rabbi Zev Warren Kasztl*
15410 S.W. 75th Circle Lane
Miami 33193
382-3343
Conservative
Aventura Jewish Center***
Rabbi David B. Saltzman*
2972 Aventura Boulevard
North Miami Beach 33180
935-0666
Beth Moshe
Congregation** *
Rabbi Israel Jacobs'
2225 N.E. 121st Street
North Miami 33181
891 5508
Beth Torah Congregation*"
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz*
1051 N. Miami Beach
Boulevard
North Miami Beach 33162
947-7528
Temple Adath Yeshurun
Rabbi Simcha Freed man*
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens
Drive
North Miami Beach 33179
947-1435
Temple Tifereth Jacob
Dr. Nathan Zwitman*
951 East 4th Avenue
Hialeah 33010
887-9595
Reform
Temple Israel Of Greater
Miami* ***
Rabbi Haskell Bernat*
137 N.E. 19th Street
Miami 33132
573-5900
Temple Sinai Of North
Dade****
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley*
18801 N.E. 22nd Avenue
North Miami Beach 33180
932-9010
Conservative
Anshe Ernes Congregation
2533 S.W. 19th Avenue
Miami 33133
854-7623
Bet Shira***
Rabbi David Auerbach*
7500 S.W. 120th Street
Miami 33156
238-2601
Beth David Congregation"
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Miami 33129
851 3913
Beth Kodesh***
Rabbi Max Shapiro
1101 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami 33129
858-6334
Homestead Jewish ('enter
Michael Klein, Religious
Leader
183 N.E. 8th Street
Homestead 33030
248-5724
Temple Beth Tov
Rabbi Nathan Bryn
6438 S.W. 8th Street
Miami 33144
261-9821
Temple Or Olom***
Rabbi Samuel Rudy*
8755 S.W. 16th Street
Miami 33165
221-9131
Temple Samu-EI*"
Rabbi Edwin P. Farber*
9353 S.W. 152nd Avenue
Miami 33196
382-3668
Temple Zamora
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant*
44 Zamora Avenue
Coral Gables 33134
448-7132
Temple Zion Israelite
Center* **
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro*
8000 Miller Road
Miami 33155
271-2311
Reform
(longregation Bet
Breira**"
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff*
9ioo S.W. 87th Avenue
Miami 33176
595-1500
B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation
University of Miami
Rabbi Mark Kram*
1100 Stanford Drive
Coral Cables 33146
665-6948 (also Conservative
Services)
Temple Beth Am""
Dr. Herbert M. Baumgard*
5950 N. Kendall Drive
Miami 33156
667-6667
Temple Israel Kendall
Branch* ***
Rabbi Haskell Bernat*
9990 N. Kendall Drive
Miami 33176
595-5055
Temple Judea****
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat*
5500 Granada Boulevard
Coral Gables 33146
667-5657
Temple Shir Ami
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein*
9920 S.W. 131st Street
Miami 33176
258 9666
Reconstruct ionist
HaVUrah of South Florida
Rabbi Mitchell Chcfitz*
7150 S.W. 62nd Avenue
Miami 33143
666-7319
Temple Beth Or
Rabbi Rami Shapiro*
9450 Sunset Drive
Miami 33173
596-4523
Member. Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami
"Member. Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of
America
**'Member. United Synagogue of
America
"'Member, Union of American
Hebrew Congregations
The synagogue is the traditional center of Jewish continui-
ty and the foremost vehicle for communication of our rich
heritage and religious commitment. For additional informa-
tion about area synagogues, please write or call Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, Executive Vice President, Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami. 4200 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami, Florida 33137, 576-4000.
11


Page 12-C Th* .Tria>, VUmu-auj.
^4giencies & Services
America-Israel Cultural Foundation
Supports cultural life in Israel
and promotes cultural exchange
between Israel and North America.
U85 Madison Avenue
New York, N.Y. 100SS
(SIS) 751-2700
American Academic Association
for Peace in the Middle East
An organization of Jewish in-
tellectuals and scholars who inter-
pret the role of the State of Israel
and its relationship with the Arab
countries.
330 7 th Avenue, Suite 606
New York, N.Y. 10001
(21S) 532-5085
American Jewish Committee
Roger Bernstein, President
Van Myers, Vice President
Gary Brooks, Vice President
Neil Alter, Vice President
Faith Mesnekojj, Secretary
Michael Bander, Treasurer
William Gralnick, S.E. Regional
Director
Works to broaden understanding
of Jewish identity, combat bias and
secure equality of opportunity with
full participation in American life.
8000 Biscayne Boulevard,
Suite 1,12
Miami, Florida 8S1S7
576-1,21,0
American Jewish Congress
Norma Orovitz, President
Rabbi Dennis E. Wold, Regional
Director
Works to foster creative,
religious and cultural survival of
Jewish people, and eliminate racial
and religious bigotry.
1,200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida SS1S7
576-USSO
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith
Jerome C. Berlin, Chairman,
Florida Region Board
Arthur Teitelbaum, Southern Area
Director
Through distribution of informa-
tion and individual assistance,
works to combat discrimination and
prevent prejudice.
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 800
Miami, Florida 38181
878-6306
B'nai B'rith National Youth Ser-
vice Appeal
Provides support to B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization, B'nai B'rith
Hillel and B'nai B'rith Career
Counseling Service throughout the
country.
161,0 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
(202) 857-6560
Council of Jewish Federations, Inc.
A central association serving
some 800 Jewish communities to
mobilize maximum support for the
UJA and major national and local
services involving financing, plan-
ning and operating, health, welfare,
cultural, educational, community
relations and other programs.
730 Broadway
New York. N.Y. 10003
(212) 1,75-5000
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(HIAS)
Assists in the processing, protec-
tive services and relocation of Jews
involved in immigration to the
United States.
200 Park Avenue, South
New York, N.Y. 10033
(212) 671,-6800
JWB
National association of Jewish
community centers also provides
for the needs of Jews in the armed
services and veterans' hospitals;
Jewish representative in the USO.
15 East 26th Street
New York, N.Y. 10010
(212) 582-1,91,9
Jewish Education Service of
North America
Coordinates and promotes Jewish
education nationally through com-
munity programs, special projects,
education, research and surveys.
1U Fifth Avenue
New York, N.Y. 10003
(Sit) 675-5656
Jewish Labor Committee
Promotes understanding and sup-
port among the American labor
movement for the State of Israel.
The JLC also maintains support for
the plight of Soviet Jewry, and
works on behalf of social
democratic movements abroad.
25 East Slat Street
New York, N.Y. 10010
(212) 1,77-0707
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Global news-gathering and repor-
ting service links Jewish com-
munities of the world through daily
and weekly reports.
165 West 1,6th Street
Neu- York. NY. 10036
(212) 575-9370
Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A.
Works in many areas for civil
liberties within the veteran
community.
Miami Veterans Administration
Medical Center
P.O. Box 640U
Miami, Florida 33161,

Campaign
Chairwoman &
Steering Committ
Area Campaign
Chairwomen
$10,000-524 999
$25.000-599.999
Pacesetters
$10000 ? Over
Trustee
$5.0O0-$9.999
Guardian
$2 500-$4 999
Benefactor
$' 250-$? 499
Patron
$750-$1.249
Sponsor
$365-$749
Donor
$200-$364
Phone-O-Thon
S1-S199
$100,000 -
Mercantile h n <
_^^^^___^^_^_^^^^
Finance H

Real Estate Bankers. Builders & Allied Trades H

Attorneys T
\
Accountants 1
L


12


oom D-211
koi N. W. 16th Street
iami. Florida SS126
4-4455. ext. 3606
oin( Cultural Appeal
Supports nine national agencies
ivolved in specific aspects of
ultural and historical activity and
nrichment.
12 East 42nd Street.
pom 408
fad York, N.Y. 10017
Ut) 490-2280
national Conference on Soviet Jewry
Works from the national level to
ighten communities' awareness
the serious situation faced by
wish citizens of the Soviet Union.
East 40th Street
ite 907
'ew York. N.Y. 10016
12) 679-6122
Rational Jewish Community Rela-
ons Advisory Council
Consulting, coordinating and na-
nal advisory organization for na-
lonal and local community rela-
pns groups.
13 Park Avenue South
few York. N.Y. 10016
U2) 684-6950
'at ional Jewish Resource Center
NJRC conducts leadership study
oups. institutes, retreats and con-
ences for lay leaders, rabbis and
wish professionals. This enables
[JRC-trained leaders to better
eet the needs of their constituent
wish communities.
1 Seventh Avenue
few York. NY. 10016
\12) 714-9500
|orth American Jewish Students
>peal
[NAJSA is the administrative,
srdinating and fund raising agen-
for national independent student
sups. NAJSA also assists com-
Hunities in understanding the role
Hid function of local human ser-
vices agencies.
15 East 26th Street
Suite 1350
New York. N.Y. 10010
(212) 679-2293
Project Interchange
A division of the America-Israel
Friendship League, offers a series
of intensive seminars held in Israel
for the new generation of U.S. opin-
ion leaders and public policy makers.
1411 K Street N.W.
Suite 1002
Washington. D.C. 20005
1202) 347-5427
Synagogue Council of America
Spokesman and coordinating
body for its affiliated national con-
gregational and rabbinic bodies, in-
cluding Orthodox, Conservative and
Reform, working to further inter-
faith understanding.
327 Lexington Avenue
New York. N.Y. 10016
1212) 686-8670
United Jewish Appeal
The major national organization
through which American Jewish
communities channel their support
for humanitarian programs of social
welfare in Israel and in Jewish
communities throughout the world.
1290 Avenue of the Americas
New York, N.Y. 10019
(212) 757-1500
Local Office:
700 W. Hillsboro Blvd.
Building 2, Suite 202
Deer field Beach, FL 33441
428-6677
United Jewish Appeal directs the
financial resources toward three
major national organizations:
American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee (including ORT and
Malben)
Aids needy Jews with health,
welfare, cultural and religious ser-
vices in the Jewish communities of
nearly 30 countries around the
world, including Israel. 60 East 42nd Street New York, N.Y. 10017 (tit) 687-6200 New York Association for New Americans, Inc. Special resettlement and rehabilitative agency assisting thousands of Jewish newcomers to the New York area. 200 Park Avenue South United Israel Appeal Allocates funds to the Jewish Agency for Israel support immigration and absorption, housing, education, agriculture and numerous programs for social welfare. 515 Park Avenue New York. N.Y. 10022 (tit) 688-0800
New York, N.Y. 10003

(tit) 674-7400

This is one of the many Ethiopian Jewish children, safe, fed and receiving
medical care in Israel, their national homeland. Some 70 percent of Ethiopian
JewB in Israel are under the age of 14 and arrived without parents. The Jewish
Agency, which aids immigrants mainly with funds from I MA/ Federation Cam-
paigns, sees to it that such immigrants not only receive nutritious food, clothing
and shelter, but that their medical and psychological needs are also addressed.

GREATER MIAMI JEWISH COMMUNITY
FEDERATION PRESIDENT ft BOARD OF DIRECTORS
GENERAL CAMPAIGN CHAIRMAN
CAMPAIGN STEERING COMMITTEE
Ktising
Comsjsjnications &
Cntmainmeni
Alliance Division
(Formerly High Rise
Division) ____
Mtry&
Ifjnaportalion
Wesrview Country
Club
Building Chairmen
& Committees
General Solicitation
Insurance
Youth Groups
Healing
Arts D'vision
Friendship Clubs
Local Benelicianes
Workmen s Circle
Young Leadership
Council Campaign
Committee
Worker Training
Hebrew Teachers
Organizations &
Clubs
Farband
Senior Citizens
South Beach
Missions
Special Proiects
Super Sunday-
Super Week
Buddy Up Day
UJA Young Men s
Leadership Cabinet
UJA Young Women s
Leadership Cabinet
Chazak
Chazaka
New Gifts
Synagogue
Campaign
Walk -A-Thon
Boards & Trustees
South Dade
Campaign
I
.13


- I------!-l T*
Following a pattern of continued
healthy growth the average
increase in total Foundation assets
during the last two fiscal periods
ending June 30, 1984 and June 30.
1985 was approximately 29 percent
over the total assets as of June 80,
1983.
Philanthropic Funds
The majority of these assets, or
$30.6 million, exists in philan-
thropic funds. 165 of which have
been created by donors since the in-
ception of the Foundation 13 years
ago. Many important supporters of
the Jewish community have created
these funds at a time of significant
financial transactions in their per-
sonal lives or those of businesses in
which they are involved. By gifting
assets, a charitable deduction may
be taken in the year of the gift and
capita] gains taxes are avoided. In
the 1984-85 fiscal year. 10 new
philanthropic funds were created
and assets of approximately $1.26
million were added to these and ex-
isting funds.
Philanthropic Fund
Distributions
During the 1984-85 fiscal year,
$1.56 million was distributed to a
wide variety of local and national
charitable institutions. While most
allocations from philanthropic funds
are directed to Jewish organiza-
tions, many local non-sectarian
agencies, such as the United Way
of Dade County, have also been
recipients of such grants.
Continuing a long-time partner-
ship between the Federation cam-
paign and the Foundation, $4.8
million was allocated from philan-
thropic funds in 1984-8f>. In
December 1984. in an attempt to
provide as much cash as possible to
the Combined Jewish Appeal/Israel
Kmergency Fund, philanthropic
fund donors suggested distributions
totalling $961,000 to the campaign.
Philanthropic fund donors also
responded generously to the re-
quest of the community to support
"Operation Moses," the United
Jewish Appeal's effort to rescue
and resettle Jewish Ethiopians.
Jewish Community Trust
Fund
The Jewish Community Trust
Fund (JCTF), which represents the
only unrestricted endowment of the
Greater Miami Jewish community,
has grown significantly over the
past years. Testamentary gifts pro-
vided by caring individuals added
$901,000 to this fund in 1984-85.
TOTAL F JP ASSETS COMPARED TO
DISTRIBUTION FOR LAST 3 YEARS
FISCAL YEAR ENDING 6/30/85
$35,000,000
$30,000,000
$25,000,000
$20,000,000
$15,000,000
$30,600,000
$27,703,702
$22,618,106
$10,000,000
$5,000,000
$3,019,841
$4.005489 -
m
$6,355,000
m_
1983
1984
1985
TOTAL ASSETS
TOTAL DISTRIBUTIONS
14
Investment Committee
The assets of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies are managed
by the Investment Committee,
which recommends policies needed
to achieve the Foundation's finan-
cial objectives. The committee
follows the rule that a "prudent
fiduciary" must be exercised in
selecting investments, and it has
been successful in maximizing in-
come while maintaining the safety
of principal values. The committee
has seen fit to invest in United
States Treasury Securities, various
agencies of the Federal Govern-
ment and certificates of deposit. A
substantial investment in floating-
rate Israel Bonds is also held. Dur-
ing the past year the average yield
of investments was 10 percent.
Significant Events
Over the last year, the Founda-
tion's Women's Committee has con-
ducted a number of special pro-
grams for women. A financial
seminar in the Fall of 1984
featured speakers on financial plan-
ning and investments. In June, a
first-of-its-kind reception was
hosted by Burdines Mayfair for
those women who have made a
commitment to the future of the
Jewish community. Women who
had signed a letter of intent or pro-
vided for other gifts to the Founda-
tion were treated to a fashion show
and wine and cheese reception.
Another significant event has
l>een the expansion and restructur-
ing of the Foundation's Legal and
Tax Committee. Now known as the
Professional Advisory Committee,
this important arm of the Founda-
tion is chaired by Martin Kalb, pro-
minent tax attorney with the law
firm of Greenberg, Traurig et al.
This year the committee has made
an effort to involve professionals in
the areas of insurance, finance and
real estate.
The Foundation continues to be
grateful for the participation of
many talented people in the com-
munity who contribute through
various committees to the growth
and management of the Jewish
community's endowment fund.


'
turday,
pt. 28
ednesday,
t. 2
^ursday,
t. 3
Hturday.
t. 5
tdnesday.
t. 9
nday.
t. 13
Andav.
Oct. ii
Hursday.
t. 17

turday.
I. 19
*
b., Oct. 28-
.. Oct. 30
Hednesday.
m 30
Hturday.
By. 2
Bdnesday.
v. 6
Btunlav.
No 9

nday.
s., N'dv. 12
Bn.. \<>v.
B';'
v. VA
1985
GMJF Young Leadership Council
Singles Committee Fall Gala
GMJF Vanguard Division Meeting
GMJF Women's Division
Leadership Institute
D. Ruth Westheimer at South
Dade JCC
GMJF Women's Division Business
and Professional Women
Leadership Parlor Meeting
GMJF Young Leadership Council
Couples Committee Picnic
GMJF Community Mission leaves
for Israel
Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies 13th Annual
Tax Seminar
Temple Judea Annual Dinner
Dance
Marilyn K. Smith Leadership
Enrichment Forum
Special Guest Speaker -
Dr. David Hart man
Brandeis University Dinner
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged Founders Gala
GMJF Young Leadership Council
$2500 Event
GMJF Women's Division Business
and Professional Women
Community Education Night
Federation Tuesday
Michael-Ann Russell JCC Fashion
Show/Luncheon
Mt. Sinai Medical Center Fashion
Show/Luncheon
GMJF South Dade
"Pathfinders" $5,000 Event
South Dade JCC Festival Day/
Jewish Book Fair
Council of Jewish Federations
General Assembly.
Washington I).*'
Greater Miami Women's Division.
American Friends of Hebrew
University Patron Luncheon
NCJW State Legislation Day
Saturday.
Nov. 23
urday,
v. i.;
Hr!;t',
lv 17
rsday,
v. 21
Cedars Medical Ball
Albert Einstein College of
Medicine Distinguished
Achievement Award Dinner
Anti-Defamation League Society
of Fellows Dinner
Temple Emanu-El Founders
Luncheon
Temple Beth Am Tribute to
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard
GMJF Accountants' Division
Cocktail Reception
Sunday,
Nov. 24
Tuesday,
Nov. 26
Sunday,
Dec. 1
Thursday,
Dec. 5
Friday,
Dec. 6
Saturday,
Dec. 7
Sunday,
Dec. 8
Monday,
Dec. 9
Tuesday,
Dec. 10
Wednesday,
Dec. 11
Saturday.
Dec. 14
Monday.
Dec. 16
Tuesday.
Dec. 17
American Technion Society
Annual Dinner
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged "Next Generation"
Mystery Night
Beth Jacob High School Dinner
GMJF Pacesetter Dinner
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged Annual Dinner
50th Anniversary of the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami Convocation/Din-
ner
GMJF Women's Division Ruby 10
Luncheon
"Project Newborn" Luncheon
Israel Bonds Cuban Hebrew
Dinner
American Technion Society
Dinner Dance
Alexander Gross
Hebrew Academy Annual Dinner
GMJF Women's Division Lion of
Judah Luncheon
Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary
"Woman of the Year Lunch"
Boys Town of Jerusalem Dinner
GMJF Campaign Opening Dinner
Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies Women's
Financial Awareness Seminar
GMJF Young Leadership Council
Program and Education
Committee presents David
Wyman
Thursday.
.Ian. 9
Saturday.
Jan. 11
Saturday.
Jan. 18
Wednesday,
Jan. 22
Sunday.
Jan. 26
Wednesday,
Jan. 29
Thursday,
Jan. 30
1986
Temple Emanu-El 1986 Cultural
Series with Art Buchwald
Israel Bonds New Leadership
Dinner Dance
GMJF Young Leadership Council
Social Event
Ninth Annual Luncheon of South
Florida Women's Committee for
Shaare Zedek Hospital
in Jerusalem
Leonard L. Abess Human
Relations Award Luncheon
Mt. Sinai Volunteer Recognition
Luncheon
GMJF Women's Division
Westview Luncheon
Temple Emanu-El 1986 Cultural
Series-Yehuda Shifman in Concert
Sunday,
Feb. 2
Super Sunday
Mon., Feb. 3- Super Week
Thurs., Feb. 6
Thursday,
Feb. 6
Saturday,
Feb. 8
Tuesday,
Feb. 11
Wednesday,
Feb. 12
Saturday,
Feb. 15
Monday,
Feb. 17
Tuesday.
Feb. 18
Thursday,
Feb. 20
Sunday,
Feb. 23
Thursday,
Feb. 27
Friday,
Feb. 28
Saturday,
March 1
Sun., Mar. 2-
Tues.. Mar. 4
Saturday,
March 8
Wednesday,
March 12
Saturdav.
March 15
Saturday,
March 22
Sunday,
March 23
Saturday,
April 5
Tuesday.
April 15
Saturdav.
May 3
Sunday.
May 4
Israel Bonds International Dinner
South Dade Jewish Community
Center Major Cultural Event
GMJF Business and Professional
Women $100 event
Aventura-North Dade Leadership
Gifts Dinner (GMJF)
Diabetes Research Institute Love
and Hope Ball
Hope Center Luncheon
Temple Emanu-El Speakers
Series Geraldine Ferraro
Greater Miami Women's Division
American Friends of Hebrew
University Woman of the
Year Luncheon
GMJF Young Leadership Council
$365 Event
GMJF Women's Division South
Dade Campaign Event
North Dade-Turnberry GMJF
Women's Division Luncheon
NCJW State Legislation Day
National Parkinson Foundation
Gala for Hope
Fifth National Young Leadership
Conference. Washington. D.C.
Nir College of Talmudic Studies
Annual Dinner
Temple Emanu-El Speakers
Series Marvin Kalb
Mental Health Association
Fashion Show Luncheon
University of Miami Donor
Recognition Gala
Hope (".'liter Dinner
Mt. Sinai Medical Center
Founder's Ball
GMJF Aventura Chairmen's
Breakfast
JCC's "Major Community Special
Event" Las Vegas Night
Temple Emanu-El Speakers
Series Abba Eban
Miami Heart Institute Second
Generation Party
Israel 38 (Israel Independence
Day)
Event dates are correct as of September 27, 1985.
They may be subject to change. Inquiries should
be directed to the sponsoring organization.
15


4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137


Full Text
the top. The cover
IcEnroe.
I the issue was hitting
[ion checked the calen-
ed hack to remind the
[Sunday was the Super
Ihey would look foolish
Innis star on the cover.
agreed, killing the
rer and putting the
te there instead.
the attention of the
j Zion, the article, "The
pry of the Middle East
(made international
and ultimately won Zion
he Overseas Press club
best magazine inter-
|of foreign news.
ot Zion fired from New
gazine. They said he
Jiis exclusive contract,
tugh he'd gotten his
ermission. Zion's par-
to his editor: "Don't
Ley'll get rid of you, too.
hat fire me get fired
later."
Iwhat happened, and Zion
king strong.
IESENT, Zion is working
i about Jewish gangsters,
he has always shown a
kscination and begrudg-
ration. Never one to hide
, Zion feels the era of
riminals is a curious one
erves attention. "I don't
fjews feel a need to read
at stuff, but they like it,"
"At least some of them
j of the funniest pieces in
pction, "Read All About
describes how he and a
ared the pulpit at the 1970
Jof Izzy Schwarzberg, a
gangster Zion had known
xer the rabbi offered a few
es about the deceased,
Izzy's request, delivered
r to the overflow crowd.
Id the congregants that Iz-
| made certain requests for
__sion," he writes. "He
I an Alden Whitman obit in
jies, he wanted the obit in-
Jand he wanted me to give
|ogy. He did not expect to
anything like that, but
tones it happens, you can't
[you all know," I said, "the
ouple of items have been
ned per his request. We got
|den Whitman notice in the
we got it indexed and we
_i lead piece to boot. Plus, I
pw announce that the Miami
ran the Whitman obit on
one."
i crowd cheered.
fey WANTED me to do the
iy, I said, because he didn't
[any rabbi to "tell the truth"
1 his life. "They'll make me
(like some kind of schmuck
[went to work every moring.
... J, I don't want that. I want
fie crimes told, no cleaning up
me."
Le rabbi, who was standing
1 to me, began to move away.
'olice Question
Labor Chiefs
"Jews always worry
about anti-Semitism
and what the goyim
will think of them.
Maybe Jews really
believe they're not
as good as the next
guy. But I sure as
hell don't feel that
way. Jews shouldn't
be scared anymore.
Never scared. They
should be mad."
Friday^September 27, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Envoy Cautions:
Attacks on Israel Expected
At New General Assembly
^EL AVIV (JTA) -
atayim Mayor Yitzhak Yaron
the secretaries of the local
or town council and of the
_1 branch of the Labor Party
we been questioned by the
Bice, following a complaint by
teh leader Rabbi Meir Kahane
at they had assaulted him dur-
jg an outdoor meeting he tried to
bid in the town earlier in August.
I Kahane and his followers were
breed to leave the area without
oldng their rally because of a
oisy counter-demonstration dur-
pg which Kahane was spattered
pith eggs. Yaron denied Kahane s
ccusation and said that neither
j nor the town council members
tere involved in the counter-
lemonstration.
"The only stuff I want you to
leave out," Izzy said, "are those
things on which the statute of
limitations never runs." Of
course, the only crime with no
end, with no statute of limitations,
is murder. But I didn't spell this
out for the audience. All I said was
that I asked Izzy why he would
care about the statute at his
funeral.
"Very good!" Izzy said. But
minutes later he told me to leave it
out anyway. I asked why. He said,
"Suppose they don't accept me
there, suppose they send me back?
Do I need to walk into the hands
of Frank Hogan with a confession
on my back? All my life I took the
Fifth, what am I gonna get stupid
now that I'm dead? Forget about
it!"
THE JOINT cracked up. The
rabbi was not close to the wall. By
the time I finished laying out the
no-longer indictable highlights of
my friend's colorful life, the rabbi
was looking for secret exits. But
no good! He had to get back and
say the final prayer for the
deceased.
"Be of good faith," he said, his
fifty-G voice now down to a
sawbuck. "If he isn't bound up
with the Eternal, he'll be safe
elsewhere."
The rabbi had consigned Izzy to
limbo, and when our conversation
turned to politics again Jewish
and otherwise Zion allowed that
he wasn't so sure American Jews
weren't caught in a limbo of their
own, somehwere between security
and being sold down the river.
Zion has a more than healthy
dose of cynicism about America's
bottom-line commitment to Israel.
"It's a fragile commitment," he
says, "despite all the nice words."
I tell him he sounds like he is
contradicting himself. Earlier, he
had said that Jews are paranoid
and there is no need to fear anti-
Semitism. Yet now, he is saying
that the national commitment to
Israel is tenous.
"Let me think this through,"
Zion says slowly, dead-serious
now, "because I want to get it
right." After a moment's silence,
he responds: "if there was a real
commitment, why do Jews only
win the exhibition games? he
asks, citing numerous instances in
recent years when both Jimmy
Carter and Ronald Reagan were
inconsistent in their support of
Israel.
"IT'S IDOLATRY for Jews to
have political heroes inthheoun-
trv says Zion, who notes that his
only American political hero is
Thomas Paine, the Revolutionary
War-period idealist whose Com-
mon Sense was a "great book but
thev wiped him out of American
history-Lincoln was also on my
list but I admire him less as I read
him more."
When it comes to 20th Century
politicians, Zion has kind words
only for Paul O'Dwyer a former
New York City Counc.lman, for
whom he named J^*ft
son, Jedd O'Dwyer Zion. He s a
fine man-in fact, he president of
the Tom Paine Society, the best
job in the world but he loves
Jesse Jackson too much."
Zion says that the Bible and
history have taught Jews not to
put their trust in any politician. "I
can make demands on them even
though I don't for a minute exect
them to fulfill those demands," he
says, explaining, in a way, his
ability to balance his idealism and
skepticism.
"I can't be detached about
anything," he acknowledges.
"You can't lose your passion. You
just gotta keep your sense of
humor or you'll go nuts. It's never
as bad or as good as it looks,
but you've got to keep trying and
making your point. Right now,
our civil liberties are in a crisis in
this country, our schools aren't
educating anyone, but no one's
getting mad, no one's shrying
'gevalt.' "
And if it's true in general, it's
especially true for Jewish life,
Zion believes. "The great tradi-
tion of bawling out the Jews
seems to have ended with the Pro-
phets," he says, "but the Lord
knows we still need it."
NEW YORK Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Nations
has warned Jewish leaders in New
York of a new attack on the
Jewish state during the upcoming
General Assembly session. The
campaign will seek to link Israel
with South Africa and support for
its apartheid policy.
Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu told members of the
Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York, "The line
that we are now hearing is that
there is a 'New Strategic
Triangle' which includes South
Africa, the United States and
Israel. We can be sure that
numerous resolutions of condem-
nation will be put forward in this
year's General Assembly session
directed at all three members of
this fictitious alliance."
"THE FACT of the matter is,"
Netanyahu observed, "Israel has
a longstanding policy of firm op-
position to apartheid."
The Ambassador noted that
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
recently outlined Israel's stance in
what is now an official UN docu-
ment that has been distributed to
all UN missions.
According to Netanyahu, the
document was not published in
order to exempt Israel, "but simp-
ly reiterate our utter disdain for
apartheid and what it
represents." The position paper
reflects what Netanyahu and his
predecessors have clearly stated
in UN speeches and documents
for many years.
Netanyahu went on to challenge
the often-stated accusation that
Israel is the "mighty empire that
sustains South Africa from afar."
"On the contrary," he said,
"Israel's trade with South Africa
is dwarfed in comparison with the
business conducted between
South Africa and the Arab
nations."
THE AMBASSADOR produc-
ed International Monetary Fund
and United Nations statistics
which showed that while South
Africa's trade with Israel totalled
$110 million in 1984, its trade
with the Persian Gulf states in oil
alone amounted to a minimun of
$1.5 billion, or close to 15 times
Israel's trade figures.
In addition. Netanyahu revealed
that an estimated 75 percent or
more of all tonnage arriving at
South Africa ports, in violation of
the UN imposed ban, came from
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and other
Arab countries. In contrast,
Israel's trade represents less than
0.5 percent of South Africa's total
trade figures.
"Jewish leadership must make
these findings available,"
Netanyahu asserted, "not only in
preparation for the UN General
Assembly but because this is an
issue that is going to dominate the
agenda for some time."
MALCOLM HOENLEIN, the
JCRC executive director,
underscored the importance of
providing accurate information to
the Jewish community on Israeli
relations with South Africa.
"We see evidence that those
who seek to attack and discredit
Israel, use the issue of relations
with South Africa as a cover. The
facts speak for themselves and
must be made available to the
broadest public possible. This is
also a blatant attempt to link
Zionism with racism by enemies of
Israel and the Jewish people. The
charges are spurious and cannot
be allowed to go unanswered,"
Hoenlein said.
$500 publix
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With Each New Subscription
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Page 12-C Tb t>mpj, pi
In^^'A" IHK*1 J_ rt
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 27, 1986

Zion's Zingers Show Profound Love for Fellow-Jews
Continued from Page 5-A
not being "a light unto the na-
tions" are themselves guilty of a
form of unconscious racism, ac-
cording to Zion. New York Times
columnist Anthony Lewis, he said,
"never writes about how terrible
it is when Arabs kill Arabs or
blacks kill blacks because he ex-
pects them to, and that's racism.
Everyone blamed Israel for the
Sabra and Shatila massacres
because people felt Lebanon is a
zoo, and the Israelis are the
caretakers and hey, you let the
animals kill each other, you let it
happen. But that's not the point.
If vou care about human rights,
you've got to care about everyone
and you've got to scrutinize
everyone. Believe me, the double
standard is alive and well."
Zion applies those same stan-
dards to Israel. If it is wrong to
mix church and state in the U.S.,
he said, it's wrong in Israel as
well. "The setp-up over there is a
fake," he says. "Israel is a
theocracy run by atheists."
HE HAS much harsher words
for American Jewish leaders,
believing that the myriad U.S.
Jewish organizations are not only
useless: they are dangerous. "The
organizations don't do us any
good," he said. "I resent them
because they only get us in trou-
ble" with the concept of
"spokesmen" for the Jewish
community.
He calls the members, of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
"court Jews" who stand "hat in
hand" in the corridors of power.
Quoting Ben Hecht, Zion adds
that the trouble with American
Jewish leaders is that they always
salute those who do not deign to
return their salute.
Zion has visceral dislike of FDR,
Harry Truman and Adlai Steven-
son, all of whom he regards as
and-Jewish. He cannot tolerate
those who defend them by citing
their attributes or ac-
complishments."! hate it when
people say, 'Yes, Rooseyelt didn't
save the Jews of Europe, but on
the other hand he did this or he
did that,' says Zion,; his voice
rising.
"To me, there is no other hand.
What other hand? Would people
say, 'Well Huey Long fan a racist
but he built nice highways.' That's
intolerable." ,
ZION'S INTERESTS clearly
put Jews first. He has no problem
acknowledging that i fact. "Dual
loyalty is not a false issue," he
says, "because there i.s dual loyal-
ty among American Jews and we
shouldn't be afraid i of it. I love
America more thanJ love Israel,
but I love Jewsi more than
anything else."
He also loves the work he does,
and it's hard to believe that he
wasn't born to be: a journalist,
having chanced upon his writing
career at the age of 29. Let Zion
explain how he got into the
newspaper business because he
tells it best.
"When I tried criminal cases as
a kid lawyer in New Jersey," he
writes in his long introduction to
"Read All About It," a collection
of some of his best reporting, "I
noticed that my clients had cer-
tain things in common. All of
them were broke, all of them were
innocent, and when asked how
come the cops put the grab on
them, they all said, 'I dunno, I
wasn't doin' nothin' I was just
standing around.'
"I give the same answer to peo-
ple who wonder how I got to be a
newspaperman."
A native of Passaic, N.J. with a
strong Jewish identity that he
calls the flip-side of Philip Roth
"the idea of being ashamed of
one's Jewish heritage was beyond
the pale" Zion graduated from
Yale Law School and became a
_____ _________
Zion asserts that
Israel gained
statehood not
because of the
United Nations,
Harry Truman or
world guilt, but
because of the
revolutionary war
fought against the
British by Begin and
the Irgun.
criminal attorney, with plans to
become a trial lawyer.
BUT HIS LIFE changed late on
a December night in 1962, only a
few days before his wedding,
when journalist Victor Navasky, a
buddy of his from Yale Law
School, asked Zion to write a
parody of columnist Murray
Kempton for a special parody of
the New York Post which at the
time was closed by a newspaper
strike, as were the other dailies in
New York.
A newspaper buff and admirer
of Kempton, Zion agreed. His
piece was such a big hit that the
Post's managing editor, Al Davis,
offered him a job.
Zion was stunned.
"Of course, I dismissed the
idea," he later wrote. "Of course,
ten minutes later I called Al
Davis. The secret Navasky spot-
ted was that I wanted to be Ben
Hecht long before I wanted to be
Clarence Darrow."
Zion hooked up with the Post,
which he describes as right out of
Ben Hecht's Front Page, and was
soon exposed to "the dirtiest
secret of journalism: Self-
Censorship." Some of Zion's best
work for the Post ended up "on
the spike" (unpublished), like his
expose on the 1964 New York
World's Fair, proving it would be
a financial disaster. Everything
he'd predicted came true but his
series never ran because the
Fair's organizers advertised
heavily in the Post.
A YEAR LATER, Zion was
hired by "the uptown lady," the
New York Times, where he work-
ed for almost five years, loving
every minute of it. ("I never work-
ed for the Times," he wrote, "I
was a kid on a carousel.") But
Zion grew restless. He resigned
from the Times in 1969, on his
36th birthday, to start his own
magazine, Scanlan's Monthly,
now best remembered for how it
ended a little more than a year
later.
Zion and his partner, Warren
Hinckle, whom he describes as
"the eye-patched, bad-boy editor
of Ramparts," a left-wing
magazine, had decided to launch a
big, brassy muckraking monthly
that would set the journalism
world on its ear. But Scanlan's
had troubles form day one.
Printers refused to print it,
distributors wouldn't distribute it.
Only later did Zion find out,
courtesy of John Dean's memoirs,
that Richard Nixon himself had
ordered Dean, then counsel to the
President, to go after Scanlan's in
part because it had published a
memo from Vice President
Agnew that referred to Rand Cor-
poration studies to cancel the
1972 national elections and repeal
the Bill of Rights.
SCANLAN'S continued to go
after the Nixon Administration
the magazine ran an "Impeach
Nixon" cover long before
Watergate and the Administra-
tion continued to go after
Scanlan's, putting the IRS on the
backs of the magazine's
promoters.
The Administration won.
Scanlan's lasted only eight
issues, but Zion says he is proud of
them and he's never looked back.
The next chapter of Zion's life is
one of the most unpleasant for
him, but it's the part he's best
remembered for. Indeed, as Zion
notes, his obituary will probably
label him as the man who
"fingered" Daniel Ellsberg in the
Pentagon Papers. It all came
about because of a gentleman's
bet Zion made with his newspaper
colleagues.
In June, 1971, soon after
Scanlan's folded, Zion was work-
ing on a piece for the Sunday New
York Times Magazine and, while
in the newsroom, word came that
a federal judge had issued a tem-
porary order restraining the
Times from continuing publication
of the Pentagon Papers, which
had begun two days earlier. Zion,
with typical bravado, told his bud-
dies he'd find out by the next day
what everyone wanted to know:
namely, who leaked the Papers to
the Times.
AFTER ONLY a few well-
placed calls the next morning,
Zion came up with the name
"Daniel Ellsberg" and he confirm-
ed it with two sources. Realizing
he had a hot story and no one to
sell it to he was freelancing at
the time Zion went on a popular
New York talk radio show that
night and named Ellsberg as the
source of the famous leak. The
story made the front pages across
the country but the world of jour-
nalism called him "immoral" for
naming Ellsberg, a hero to all
those who were against the Viet-
nam War.
Zion was blacklisted by the New
York Times he was told not to
set foot in the building as well
as a number of magazines and
newspapers for which he had writ-
ten. One newspaper at the time
described him as "the most
despised man in the American
press."
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To Zion, the press was acting
like a bunch of jealous hypocrites.
After all, he was only doing his
job, going after a hot story. He
reasons that his colleagues turned
on him because he wasn't working
for any particular paper at the
time and they were upset that he
"scooped" them. In any event,
about a year later, while holding
court at his usual spot at Sardi's
bar one night, Zion was approach-
ed by Abe Rosenthal, his former
boss at the Times, who had been
avoiding him ever since the
Ellsberg story. This night
Rosenberg muttered genug in Yid-
dish to Zion ("enough") and in-
vited him to have a drink.
AFTER THAT the writing
market eased a bit, but Zion still
found the going tough enough to
go back to practicing law. When
Pete Hamill wrote a full column
apology to Zion in the Post, where
he had attacked him, Zion sent
him a wire: "I assume this is the
start of a series." Hamill's column
ended with a plea for the blacklist
to stop but it didn't until the Sun-
day New York Times Magazine
gave Zion an assignment in 1977
to profile New York sports
businessman Mike Burke. It
became a cover story, marking
Zion's reentry to the Times
Magazine after almost a decade.
Soon after, Rupert Murdoch
took over New York magazine
and the Post and hired Zion to
write a column for the Post. He
was later canned he still doesn't
know why and immediately
hired as a columnist for New York
magazine.
In the fall of 1978, Zion teamed
up with his friend Uri Dan, a
leading Israeli journalist, to do a
behind-the-scenes story on the
Camp David peace accords. The
New York Times Sunday
Magazine decided to run their
story, 20,000 words, as a two-
parter, though Zion was furious to
learn that rather than being a
cover story it would only get a
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