The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02955

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Fo/n Kippur
Kol Nidre Launches Holiest of Days
Kol Nidre services will launch the
observance of Yom Kippur in synagogues
throughout South Florida on Tuesday
evening, Sept. 24.
The holiday continues through the next
day, Wednesday, Sept. 25, as a time of
fasting and prayer for repentance.
Yizkor, a memorial prayer for the
departed, will be recited during Yom Kip-
pur services Wednesday.
Yom Kippur continues the High Holy
Day season, which began with Rosh
Hashanah and Shabbat Teshuvah, the
Sabbath of Repentance, observed last
weekend.
Next in the High Holy Day observances
will be Sukkoth, or the Feast of Taber-
nacles, which begins the eve of Sunday,
Sept. 29, and continues through Monday,
Sept. 30, and Tuesday, Oct. 1.
RabbVs Cracow Visit
Tallit Was Torn from Her Shoulders
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
["he Reconstructionist rabbi
/ho accompanied Eric
5trom and his family to
'oland for the first Bar
[itzvah celebration in
pracow in some 35 years
described the visit with
lixed emotions.
"I think the experience had lots
f pain as well as joy," said Rabbi
Emily Korzenick, in a telephone
interview from her home in
Scarsdale, N.Y. While visiting the
remnants of the once thriving
Jewish community of Cracow she
said "we were also seeing
memorials to that which was."
AT THE same time, Korzenick
appeared to brush aside the
significance of the dispute which
erupted among Orthodox rabbis
here over the prospects of having
Korzenick participate in services
in an Orthodox synagogue in
Cracow. "I had not come there to
make waves," she asserted.
Korzenick accompanied Eric
Strom on his journey to Cracow
for his Bar Mitzvah, an idea that
developed after a visit here last
April by a group of Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies trustees
and leaders on a UJA-Federation
Campaign of New York trip.
While on that trip, an elderly
woman of the Cracow Jewish com-
munity asked the Federation
leaders to "Send us a Bar Mitz-
vah. Send us life." Arrangements
were made, and on Sept. 2,
13-year-old Eric, his 9-year-old
sister, Holly, his parents, Barry
and Margery Strom, three of his
four grandparents, Korzenick,
and Auschwitz survivor Edward
Blonder, departed for Poland.
THERE WAS some controver-
sy over the selection of the Remu
Synagogue in Cracow. The Rab-
binical Council of America issued
a statement saying "it would be a
betrayal of Jewish history" if the
Jews of Cracow allowed a Reform
Continued on Page 7-A
Shamir Raps
Jewish Units'
Political Trips
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir has blasted the
American Jewish Congress
mission to Cairo and Am-
man, and also World Jewish
Congress president Edgar
Bronfman's mission to
Moscow.
In an exclusive interview with
this reporter, Shamir spoke of the
AJC as a "peanut-size organiza-
tion," and said Bronfman was
"not authorized to negotiate on
behalf of Israel or the Jewish peo-
ple." Shamir acknowledged that
his views differed from those of
Premier Shimon Peres on this
matter.
The AJCongress group met
with President Hosni Mubarak
and King Hussein in an attempt to
ascertain peace prospects. They
reported to Peres in Jerusalem
that both the President and the
King were urging that the PLO
"should be put to the test" of
diplomacy.
THE GROUP, led by Prof.
Henry Rosovsky, the Harvard sa-
vant, issued a statement express-
ing their conviction that Egypt,
and Jordan seek to broaden the
peace process urgently, "before
forces of religious and political ex-
tremism make this task
impossible."
Bronfman's visit to Moscow, at
the head of a group of Seagrams
executives, followed a
preparatory visit some six weeks
ago by his top WJC aide, Israel
Singer, who met with ranking
Soviet officials involved with
Jewish emigration.
Bronfman hoped to meet with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
or other Politburo members. He
reportedly carried with him a let-
ter from Peres to Gorbachev
which Peres conveyed to him two
weeks ago. Israel officials said the
letter had been "couched in
general terms."
Shamir, interviewed here.
Continued on Page 10-A
Foreign Minister Shamir
Press
Deserves
Bashing
By ROBERT SEGAL
Seven Arts Feature
Criticism of media coverage of
the TWA Flight 847 hijacking in
June has been bitter, sometimes
justified, and often employed for
politial advantage. Overall, it
reflects the enduring truth of the
State Control
Far Worse
time-worn observation that when
a messenger brings bad news to
the king, he may be shot.
Newspapers, magazines, radio,
and television are business ven-
tures. They must show profits and
satisfy shareholders. Operating in
Continued on Page 9-A
He Was Jewish Liaison
&
Breger Elevated toJfeapn's Chief of Deregulation
chairman of the Ad- to Breger because there are plans
Marshall Breger
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Marshall Breger, Presi-
dent Reagan's special assis-
tant for liaison with the
Jewish community since
December 15, 1983, has
been named by Reagan to be
ministrative Conference of
the U.S., a job in which he
will be responsible for Ad-
ministration deregulation
efforts.
The White House has indicated
that a successor will not be named
to reorganize the Office of
Liaison, headed by Linda Chavez,
from one centered on relations
with various groups to issues.
Interviewed at this office in the
Old Executive Office Building,
Breger said he was "excited"
about his new job which will give
him the same rank as a Cabinet
deputy secretary. He will be one
of the highest ranking Jews in the
Administration.
ADMINISTRATIVE Con-
ference is the government ad-
visory body on administrative law
the rules, hearings and pro-
Continued on Page 6-A


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Page 2-A Friday, September 20, 1985rThe Jewish Floridian
j
-
[
Klaus Barbie Trial
Postponed to Early Next Year
B'klyn. Cheese Distributor
Sold Non-Kosher As Kosher
Bt EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The
trial of Klaus Barbie, sup-
posed to have opened last
spring and then rescheduled
for November, has been
postponed to early next
year. The prosecution says a
new investigation is re-
quired because some
documents recently found in
the State archives differ
from documents supplied by
Nazi-hunter Serge
Klarsfeld.
Barbie's lawyer, Jacques
Verges, who has promised a fierce
fight on behalf of his client, said
there were discrepancies between
the list of names of Jewish
deportees in the Klarsfeld
documents and those in the ar-
chives. The key list is that of Jews
deported on August 11, 1944
aboard the last "death train" to
leave Lyon.
BARBIE, whose activities as
Gestapo chief in Lyon during
World War II earned him the
sobriquet "Butcher of Lyon,"
faces charges on three counts of
"crimes against humanity."
These include deportation of
650 Jews on August 11, 1944; the
arrest and deportation of 86
members of the Lyon Committee
of French Jews on February 9,
Ethiopians' Strike Was Joined
Dozens of Reform Jews
By
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Ethiopian Jewish immigrant com-
munity's week-long sit-down
strike outside the offices of the
Chief Rabbinate council was join-
ed by dozens of members of the
Reform Jewish community in
Israel who brought with them
food, cold drinks and flowers.
Rabbi Asher Hirsch, world
secretary of the Reform move-
ment, said the fight of the Ethio-
pians for equal treatment as Jews
was also the fight of the Reform
community. The immigrants
began the sit-in strike to protest
the Chief Rabbinate's insistence
that they undergo ritual immer-
sion, a religious conversion rite,
before they are allowed to marry.
documents will have to be submit-
ted to all parties to the case, in-
cluding hundreds of groups and
associations which have filed civil
actions against Barbie.
The former SS officer, now 72.
has been in custody since early
1983. He escaped from Europe
shortly after the war when he was
sentenced to death in absentia by
a French court. He found haven in
Bolivia where he prospered under
the alias. Klaus Altman.
He was expelled in 1983. after
Bolivia's ruling rightwing military
junta was overthrown, and hand-
ed over to French authorities. He
has since been incarcerated in the
same Lyon prison where his vic-
tims were confined, interrogated
and tortured by the Gestapo while
they awaited deportation, usually
to Auschwitz.
HIS VICTIMS were not only
Jews but members of the French
resistance. Barbie is held respon-
sible for the murder of Jean
Moulin, a resistance leader. His
pending trial is expected to have
political repercussions.
It probably will coincide with
France's parliamentary elections
to be held next spring or early
summer.
Barbie is being held in isolation.
His jailers say he spends his time
reading. He and his lawyers have
protested vigorously against a
government plan to install him in
a bullet-proof glass box during the
trial.
His Gestapo cohort, Adolf
Eichmann. was similarly pro-
tected during his trial in
Jerusalem in 1961. Barbie's
lawyer has told Justice Minister
Robert Badinter. "We will never
The.Ethiopians, all deou> ptac^-.agree to a circus atmosphere.'!
Klaus Barbie
1943; and the April 6. 1944 arrest
and deportation of two Jewish
teachers and 52 children who
were hidden by their parents in a
Jewish orphanage in Izieu.
In the iatter case, Barbie is
charged with "kidnapping minors
followed by death," illegal deten-
tion and complicity in murder.
The investigating magistrate.
Christian Riss, has dismissed
charges which fall under the
statute of limitations. Thus, war
crimes cannot be prosecuted 20
years after the events. Crimes
against humanity are not covered
by the statute of limitations.
THE NEWLY discovered
tielng-SewB.- regard--tWs.demaicd
as humiliating and insulting
because it questions their authen-
ticity as Jews. They voted to con-
tinue the strike despite appeals by
Premier Shimon Peres and the
director general of the Religious
Affairs Ministry to end it.
Meanwhile, they have won an
order nisi from the Supreme
Court requiring the Chief Rab-
binate to show cause why the
Ethiopian immigrants must
undergo ritual conversion.
Rabbi Hirsch said, "We regard
them as Jews for all intents and
purposes. It was already decided
they are Jews. We brought them
to Israel, and therefore we must
treat them as full Jews."
By BEN GALLOB
ALBANY, N.Y. (JTA)
An official of the New
York State Department of
Agriculture and Marketing
said he determined that a
Brooklyn distributor of
kosher cheese had
fraudulently distributed
non-kosher cheese as
kosher.
Ralph Laws, first deputy com-
missioner of the department, said
Harold Gottesman. doing business
as Jerusalem Kosher Cheese Co..
Jemco Foods and Tenuva. said the
department had fined Gottesman
$4,800.
Joseph Gerace. department
commissioner, said that if Got-
tesman did not satisfy the penalty
demand for $4,800 by Sept. 13.
the case will be referred to the At-
torney General's office for com-
mencement of a civil action to col-
lect the penalty. Gottesman has
not been available for comment.
LAWS SAID that the specific
charge, examined at a hearing at
the department here, was that
Gottesman had represented that
the cheese he was selling under
the brand name Tenuva was pro-
duced in Israel by the Tenuva
Central Cooperative for Dairy
Products under supervision of the
Chief Rabbi of Afula. Peretz
Zioni.
Laws said that investigation by
inspectors of the Agriculture
Department's division of Kosher
Enforcement indicated the
Tenuva cheese was labeled as
kosher because it was processed
under the supervision of Zioni.
Hearings were ordered under
an administrative law judge, John
Rogers, named by Gerace. The
hearings-Were-held during 1984.
Zioni and Tenuva c
cooperative repre>e...
declared in an affidavit, subn
at the hearings, that Got
had no right to use the
name on the cheese prod
distributed.
LAWS SAID retai: distr_,
were alerted to the p .>sible~f
by World Cheese f". rt> a Ma
tan wholesale firm win
distributes k'.;her chee
throughout the United St
The Jewish Telegraphic ."
was informed that until the*
ing was concluded with an offijj
finding of fraudulent misrepres
tation. the Agriculture Dep
ment could not take any such i
ning action. It was undersu
that the Manhattan firm issue
alert last July.
Laws said that, during theL
ings. Gottesman admitted heh
no right to use the Tenuva nantl
Rogers made his report on J*|
10, and it was dated and
here last Aug. 13.
Laws said kosher enforcen
inspectors made several
stores and seized the susp
cheese. He said the case was i
covered through the diligent i
forts of the kosher law insp
who conducted in-depth inv
tions and, at times, all-n
surveillance to gather evideiwl
during a period of more than ii
year.
HE SAID Zioni met Rabbi]
Schulem Rubin, chief supervisor
of the enforcement division, las j
July 26 at a Manhattan hot;
where Zioni was staying during ij
visit to the United States.
Laws said Zioni gave Rubin at
affidavit appealing to Rubin '
put an end to the misuse of 'J
good name of Tenuva." Zioni said
in the affidavit, that the Tenuv;
cheese was not rnrnf <
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Farrakhan
He Puts Chosen People on Notice
LOS ANGELES Black
[Muslim leader Louis Far-
[rakhan told a crowd of his
[followers at the Forum
I sports arena Saturday night
[that "I have a problem with
[the Jewish people." His pro-
blem, he said, is that the
[Jews are not God's chosen
jople.
And then, in a comment that
[drew cheers from the gathering,
Farrakhan announced: "I am
declaring for the world that they
are not the chosen people of God. I
I am declaring for the world that
| you, the black people, are."
In a blast against Jews, Far
| rakhan warned: "Don't push your
| six-million (victims of the
Holocaust) when we lost 100
million (in slavery)."
FARRAKHAN IS the leader of
a group called POWER People
Organized and Working for
Economic Rebirth. He repeatedly
preaches, as he did Saturday night
here, that black people should be
independent and own the com-
munities in which they live.
During his speech, he urged that
blacks should unite economically
and follow him.
Los Angeles Mayor Tom
Bradley was meanwhile criticized
for refusing to speak out against
Farrakhan before Farrakhan
made his speec here. The
criticism, mostly from Jewish
leaders, was joined several days
before by California Gov. George
Deukmejian, who will be running
for reelection next year and is ex-
pected to be opposed by Mayor
Bradley.
BRADLEY, himself black,
stung by the criticism, said that he
had tried, with the help of other
black leaders, to persuade Far-
rakhan behind-the-scene to tone
down the anti-Semitic remarks
which commonly are contained in
his speeches.
Sunday, Bradley condemned
Farrakhan's speech calling it
frankly anti-Semitic. Bradley add-
ed that in his private effort to get
Farrakhan to be less inflam-
matory he was only "a partial
success."
Bradley said that "The sad
truth is that there were passages
(in the speech) that contained
Louis Farrakhan
undercurrents of anti-Semitism. I
repudiate racism, hatred, violence
and bigotry wherever it occurs. I
make no exception. This includes
Minister Farrakhan."
According to Bradley, "I
reasoned that if I simply joined
the voices of others who all week
long attacked Farrakhan before
he spoke, surely he would be en-
couraged" to make his traditional
anti-Semitic observations.
But, he added, "If, on the other
hand, I tried an appeal for
restraint, and if it worked, it
would be a great victory for Los.
Angeles. It was a calculated risk."
DESPITE THE only "partial
success" that Bradley claimed, he
insisted that Farrakhan had "ton-,
ed down his words" in Los,
Angeles, avoiding the usually
"harsh language" of his other
speeches.
"I tried to do what I thought
was right," Bradley declared, sen-
sitive to the earlier criticism of his
apparent silence.
But Rabbi Allen Freehling,
president of the Board of Rabbis
of Southern California, believes
that Farrakhan once again pro-
moted division between Jews and
blacks in his speech in Los
Angeles.
"Farrakhan suggests there is a
contest between Muslims, Jews
and Christians or between blacks
and whites. That invitation is an
invitation of divisiveness that
down the road leads only to con-
tinue to pit black against white
and Christians and Jews against
Muslims."
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
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IN APPARENT acquiescence
to Mayor Bradley's efforts to get
him to tone down his anti-
Semitism, Farrakhan told his au-
dience in introductory remarks
that he had not come to Los
Angeles to attack Jews. But then
came his admonition that Jews are
not God's chosen people.
"The Jews have an iron grip on
the politicians ... If the mayor
comes out against me tomorrow
(Sunday), they'll say, 'Well, you
waited too long.' You can't please
these people (the Jews)."
Despite Bradley's efforts, Far-
rakhan declared that Bradley
would make a better governor of
California than Deukmejian, who
in his criticism of Farrakhan
before Farrakhan's Saturday
night appearance, called him "a
messenger of hate and bigotry."
Farrakhan also asked why
Deukmejian had criticized him in-
stead of worrying that California
is "filled with homosexuals and
degenerates."
"Can you imagine the governor
calling me a bigot?" Farrakhan
asked. "Mr. Deukmejian, I hope
you are not as ill-informed about
state matters as you are about me.
We need a new governor, maybe
Tom Bradley."
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Explosions Rock Copenhagen
On Eve of Rosh Hashanah
COPENHAGEN A kosher food store here and a
travel agency specializing in trips to Israel were the targets
of bomb explosions Sunday as the Jewish community of
Denmark made preparations for ushering in Rosh
Hashanah.
Police said the first explosion occurred outside the
store, and the second came less than five minutes later at
the Israel Tours travel agency a few hundred yards away.
Police reported that 12 people were injured in both
blasts, which also shattered the peace of the Jewish New
Year.
Herzog Gives Terrorist Clemency
JERUSALEM (JTA) President Chaim Herzog
has granted clemency to Uri Maier, a member of the Jewish
terrorist underground in the West Bank, who was serving
a 30-month sentence. He was immediately released from
jail.
MAIER UNDERWENT spinal surgery recently and
his medical condition was the primary factor in the decision
to grant him clemency. Justice Minister Moshe Nissim, on
whose recommendation Herzog acted, made it clear that
this case will not set a precedent nor does it indicate any
change in policy toward the Jewish underground.
Maier is the first of the more than 20 members of the
underground serving sentences for crimes of violence
against Arabs in the West Bank to receive clemency. He
was convicted for his role in the June, 1980 car-bomb at-
tacks on three Arab mayors.

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Page 4-A The Jewish FioHdJanTFriday, September 20, 1985
Yom Kippur Laws
The Mishnah devotes eight chapters to
Yom Kippur which is called in that work
Yom Ha-Kippurim. Of these eight chapters,
only the last deals with the laws pertaining
to the fast. The first seven describe in far
more dramatic detail the order of its
performance.
From this, it seems reasonably clear that
the codifiers of the Mishnah seemed far
more concerned and therefore placed far
more emphasis on the haluchot of the service
on the Day of Atonement than on the fast
itself.
One explanation for this seeming dispari-
ty, at least in the way that modern Jewry
looks upon the dominant purpose of Yom
Kippur, is that the second part of chapter
eight concludes with a declaration by Rabbi
Akiva, "Happy are you, Israel! Who is it
before whom you are cleansed and who is it
that cleanses you? Your Father Who is in
Heaven."
Some regard the Akiva declaration as a
strangely happy note on which to end the
Mishnah's commentary so far as Yom Kip-
pur is concerned. Take, for example, chapter
five, which is one of those Mishnah tractates
dealing with the order of priestly perfor-
mance in the prayer service.
Of this, Rabbi Meir opined that "Great is
repentance, for on account of an individual
who repents, the sins of all the world are
forgiven." This seems far more in keeping
with the holiday, the second of the Days of
Awe, as the holiday is understood today.
Improving Our Character
Whatever one's view of Yom Kippur,which
Jews throughout the world will celebrate
beginning with the Kol Nidre service on
Tuesday evening, Sept. 24, and continuing
through Wednesday, Sept. 25, one thing is
certain in our own time. We mark the
solemn observance from sundown to sun-
down with individual and communal prayers
to renew our inner life for the coming year.
Furthermore, we commit ourselves to im-
proving our character, to strengthening our
ethical values and moral responsibilities
through Teshuvah (repentance), to turning
away from error and sin. We turn to our
neighbors and ask forgiveness for the hurts
and injustices we may have inflicted upon
them during the previous year, and we
forgive one another in order to start a fresh
relationship.
In short, we sweep away the old. We in-
stall the ancient "new" of Jewish im-
peratives governing all human interrelation-
ships and, in this process, we strive toward
the maximum of our spiritual ideals.
As the New Year begins, may you have a
"good closing." May you be inscribed into
the Book of Life.
Shamir Has a Point
Israel's Deputy Prime Minister and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir has
responded angrily to the contacts made by
the American Jewish Congress with Egypt's
President Hosni Mubarak and Jordan's King
Hussein. Ditto for the trip last week by
World Jewish Congress President Edgar
Bronfman to the Kremlin.
Shamir believes that these organizations
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have set themselves up as diplomatic coun-
cils whose object it is to conduct Israeli
foreign policy with the Arabs and the
Soviets.
There is a certain good sense in Shamir's
angry reaction. Although it is true that no
extra-Israeli force can commit Israel to any
course of conduct in which either the
American Jewish Congress or the World
Jewish Congress finds merit, the fact more
nearly is that such findings may tend to
weigh heavily against Israel should the Uni-
ty Government refuse to agree.
Quite obviously, the weight of these fin-
dings would not only be felt in Cairo and
Moscow, but in the Diaspora as well, whose
funds and political power go a long way
toward supporting Israel whatever
Israel's policies and whether Diaspora
Jewry agrees with these policies or not.
In fact, that is almost certainly what King
Hussein and President Mubarak are coun-
ting upon. They are counting upon a grow-
ing Diaspora irritation toward taxation
without representation toward giving
without the right to speak up a lesson
Diaspora Jewry learned in Lebanon. What
Moscow is counting upon seems far more
difficult to deduce.
Let those Jews who were delegates in
those organizations' councils bear this in
mind: A powerful anguish which Israel holds
against them and all of us in the Diaspora
is that we have failed Israel in its ultimate
hope. We have failed to make cdiyah to
Israel, giving Israel our selves and not mere-
ly our support from afar.
Does this insistence upon our own conve-
nience give us a right to intimidate Israeli
foreign policy by exotic tours to the power-
sources of Israel's enemies, whether in
Cairo or in Moscow, where the potentates
there are sure to say the most fanciful
things?
We think not.
Least-Known Chapter
Finland's Jews Fought Against Soviets
Friday, September 20, 1985
Volume 58
5 TISHRI 5746
Number 38
BY JAMES RICE
One of the strangest and
least known chapters in the
history of World War II was
the participation of Finnish
Jews in Finland's army,
which together with Ger-
man troops, attacked the
USSR on the northern front
in June, 1941.
For democratic Finland, World
War II was the "Continuation
War." The USSR had invaded
Finland in November, 1939, tak-
ing advantage of the protection of
their June 1939 pact with Hitler.
Finnish Jews had loyally served in
that struggle, when the tough Fin-
nish army under its redoubtable
Marshal C. G. Mannerheim, held
off its huge neighbor's armed
forces until March 1940, in what
Finland called the "Winter War."
After its hard-won victory, the
USSR forced Finland to make ma-
jor territorial concessions.
When Germany launched its
surprise attack on the USSR in
June, 1941, Finland welcomed the
Wehrmacht as an ally against
their common enemy on the Nor-
thern Front despite some
misgivings about the Nazis. Fin-
nish Jews again did their patriotic
duty in the Finnish Army.
INCREDIBLE as it may seem,
some Finnish Jewish soldiers
were given German medals for
valor while just 25 miles away,
across the Gulf of Finland, Nazis
were systematically murdering
the Jews of Estonia.
All of this is a matter of
historical record, according to a
soon-to-be-published history of
this aspect of World War II by
Finnish scholar Hannu Rautkallio.
The book is one of a series of
publications sponsored by
"Thanks to Scandinavia," about
the efforts of Scandinavian coun-
tries to save their Jewish citizens
from the Nazis.
The organization honors that
rescue through fellowships in the
U.S. to students, doctors, and
nurses from Denmark, Sweden,
Norway, and Finland. Victor
Borge, the well-known performer,
who was a Jewish refugee from
Denmark, is national chairman,
and Richard Netter, a New York
attorney, is president.
RAUTKALLIO'S manuscript,
recently made available. to. this
reporter (a volunteer for Thanks
to Scandinavia) contains
meticulously researched revela-
tions of the many paradoxes and
cross-currents in Finland during
those turbulent war years. There
are references to the role of the
top Nazi leaders including Hitler,
Himmler, and Eichmann, all of
whom made official visits to
Finland during the war.
In 1942, during Himmler's visit
to Finland, Prime Minister
Rangell replied to Himmler's
question about "the situation with
the Jews":
"In Finland there are roughly a
couple of thousand Jews decent
families and individuals whose
sons are fighting in our army like
the rest of the Finns, and who are
Suite as respected citizens as all
ie rest ... Wir haben keine
Judenfrage."
After that, the Nazis never
seriously threatened Finnish
Jews, although they occasionally
complained about Jews, especially
those on the staff of the Finnish
army.
CERTAINLY the Finnish
government and people were
aware from newspaper reports
and their own diplomats of the
fate of the Jews in Germany and
Nazi-occupied Europe, which the
Finns strongly disapproved. The
Finnish Ambassador in Berlin did
protest the Nazi action against
Danish Jews in October, 1943.
The German Foreign Ministry
coolly rejected the protest as a
matter of "extreme sensitivity"
for which Hitler himself was
responsible. But for Finland, the
common enemy was the USSR
which had attacked it in 1939
Whatever feelings the Finns had
about the Nazis, they had no
choice but to fight alongside them.
As in every country, there cer-
tainly were Nazi sympathizers. In
the early years of the war, when
Germany was riding high, some
pro-German Finns abused Jewish
soldiers but "were swiftly
squelched by other Finns."
THE RECORD shows that the
approximately 200-300 Jewish
refugees in Finland were not so
well protected. The men were sent
to work camps during the. war,
primarily for support of the
military. Conditions were harsh in
the bitter Arctic winters, but in
that respect were apparently no
different than for Finns in the
camps.
Some Jewish refugees com-
plained about "concentration
camps." According to Rautkallio,
this was an unjustified complaint,
for Jewish refugees were not
persecuted despite the real
hardships they endured.
Yet, a few Jewish refugees from
Germany and Central and
Eastern Europe were apparently
turned over to the Nazis for
deportation by Valpo, the Finnish
state police. After the Russian vic-
tory over Finland in 1944, there
were intensive investigations of
the role of Valpo, and its con-
troversiaf director, Arno Anthoni.
He was arrested, but his guilt in
this matter was never clearly
established according to
Rautkallio.
Rautkallio also describes the
work of the Central Council of
Jewish Congregations. The
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee and HICEM
(HIAS) had sent funds for aid to
refugees until June 1941, when
the U.S. Treasury blocked
transfer of funds to Finland.
After that, the congregations met
this responsibility on their own as
best they could.
THE CONGREGATIONS also
provided special assistance to
about 200-300 Russian War
prisoners of Jewish birth
"understandable for the reason
that the family roots of nearly all
the Jews in Finland were in
Russia."
The Rautkallio book will provide
a fascinating analysis of the role
of Finnish Jews who carried out
their patriotic duty to their
democratic nation even when
Finland's ally was Hitlers
Wehrmacht.
A final anomaly during World
War II, the United States broke
Continued on Page 10-A


\IsraeVs Small Size Makes Attack
Possibilities Super-Dangerous
Friday, September 20> 198p7The Jewish Florjdian Page 5-A
A Possible Missile Threat from Jordan
By W. SETH CARL'S
because of Israel's small
;, even strategically im-
Drtant targets are within
jse proximity to enemy
jund forces. This lack of
tategic depth transforms
|ng-range artillery and
lort-range surface-to-
(rface missiles, weapons
>rmally considered tac-
cal, into strategic weapons
j\e to reach many of
pad's air bases. Equally
iportant, such weapons
in also attack surface-to-
jr missile batteries, radars,
>mmand posts, and other
icilities that protect the
jrfield, thus endangering
le air defenses that protect
le air bases from air
Ittack.
Surface-to-surface missiles are
threat of increasing concern to
Israel. Although Arab countries
\ave had such weapons since at
east 1967, it is only recently that
hey have acquired surface-to-
urface missiles with the range,
[curacy, and lethality to destroy
ardened targets deep inside
Brael. The procurement of
Weapons of this type, such as the
|S-21s supplied by the Soviet
Jnion to Syria in 1983, has pro-
hded Arab military forces with
pew capabilities that pose a
erious threat to Israeli security.
DURING THE past twenty
kears, the Soviet Union has sup-
plied Arab ctouitries with more,
(hah' 200 surface-to-surface
nissile launchers that could be us
against Israeli air bases, in-
iluding FROG-7, SCUD-B, and
^S-21 systems. These weapons
ave sufficient range to reach
trategically important targets in-
The following is Chapter S of
"The Military Balance: The
Threat to Israel's Air Bases,"
by W. Seth Carus, and is No.
12 in a series ofAIPAC Papers
on U.S.-Israel Relations. The
papers are copyright 1985 by
the American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee.
side Israel. Until recently,
however, they posed only a
marginal threat to Israel's air
bases, despite the large inven-
tories. Older weapons, like the
FROG and SCUD-B missiles, had
limited accuracy and reliability, in
contrast to the significantly
greater capabilities of SS-21s.
Developed to replace the
FROG-7, the SS-21 is one of a
family of new surface-to-surface
missiles that have entered service
with the Soviet armed forces dur-
ing the past few years. The larger
SS-23, which replaces the
SCUD-B, has not yet been sup-
plied to any Arab country, but un-
doubtedly will be provided by the
end of the decade. Western of-
ficials believe that both the SS-21
and the SS-23 are capable of inflic-
ting serious damage to airfields.
Syria now has as many as 24
SS-21 missiles, and additional
numbers are reported to have
gone to Iraq. The 120 kilometer
range of the SS-21 allows it to be
used against targets too distant
for the FROG-7. When fired from
Syria, the SS-21 can reach only
one of Israel's large air bases,
Ramat David, though several
smaller airfields, also could be at-
tacked. If.-'deployed,'in' Jordan,
however, every Israeli air base
could be brought within range.
Coupled with this longer range is
improved accuracy. The SS-21 is
reported by many sources to have
a CEP of about 300 meters at
maximum range.
The Artillery Threat to Israeli Air Bases
^L. Maior Air
TT Bases
Minor Air
i Bases
Stabile Mi'
IN ADDITION, SS-21 missiles
are armed with warheads of
modern design believed to be
highly effective against airfields.
Besides a cluster bomb warhead,
it has been claimed that there is a
special warhead designed to
destroy runways. Even without
such a warhead, spalling of the
runway by SS-21 bomblets would
make runways too rough for jet
aircraft to use. According to a
U.S. Department of Defense
official:
"The SS-21(s) ... are inxpen-
sive weapons that can be used to
destroy multimillion-dollar air
defense weapons, or more expen-
sive airfields loaded with fighters,
shops, spares and munitions using
conventional warheads. They
could be employed to pin down
NATO and U.S. air bases."
While it is unlikely that SS-21s
could totally incapacitate Israel's
well-protected air bases, they
could easily destroy anti-aircraft
defenses to ease the path of at-
tacking aircraft, damage runways
to prevent defending aircraft
from taking off to intercept at-
tackers, and destroy unprotected
facilities. If reports of an anti-
runway warhead for the SS-21 are
correct, then it is possible that the
missile could suppress runways
altogether.
THUS, it appears that SS-21
missiles launched from sites in
Syria could inflict considerable
damage to runways at Ramat
David and other smaller airfields
and could destroy air defense
systems needed to protect the air
bases from air attack. These at-
tacks would be especially
dangerous if launched during the
first few minutes of a surprise of-
fensive. Syrian and Iraqi SS-21s
launched from Jordan could hit air
bases throughout Israel. Although
Arab inventories of the SS-21
missile are still relatively small,
Syria's existing stocks are pro-
bably sufficient to inflict serious
damage to several Israeli air
bases.
In addition to modern SS-21,
Arab armies continue to operate a
large number of older weapons
that would have some value in a
future conflict. Several Arab
countries operate the FROG-7, in-
cluding Egypt, Iraq, Kuwait,
Libya, and Syria. During the 1973
Arab-Israeli War, the Syrians
fired FROG-78 againt Ramat
David and other Israeli air bases.
These FROGs were able to tem-
porarily prevent Israeli aircraft
from landing at one of the attack-
ed air strips. In addition, the
Egyptians reportedly fired
FROGs against Israeli air bases in
the Sinai. Little or no damage was
inflicted, and most of the
warheads landed at a distance
from the airfields.
Although FROG-7s can tem-
porarily prevent aircrafts from
taking off or landing, they pro-
bably cannot inflict substantial
damage to air base facilities.
First, the FROG-7 is extremely in-
accurate (CEP of 500 to 700
meters), making it unlikely that a
FROG-7 could accurately hit pro-
tected facilities at an Israeli air
base. Second, its 70 kilometer
range is so short that only two
Israeli airfieleds can be hit by
missiles fired from Syria. Finally,
its high explosive warhead was
not designed for use against pro-
tected targets, and probably can-
not inflict serious damage to
hardened facilities. Nevertheless,
as was shown in the 1973 fighting,
the FROG can temporarily close
air bases, and Arab countries have
substantial inventories that would
allow large quantities to be fired.
Kiloi'N
0 25 bO
O 2f>
Statute Miics
Surface-to-surface missiles
are a growing concern.
THE SCUD-B missile is now in
the inventories of Egypt, Iraq,
Libya and Syria. During the 1973
Arab-Israeli War, Egypt fired at
least three SCUD-B missiles at
Israeli targets, but failed to hit
anything. This weapon is extreme-
ly inaccurate, has a slow rate of
fire, and, like the FROG-7, is
dependent on a high explosive
warhead not designed for attacks
against hardened targets. Never-
theless, like the FROG-7, SCUD-B
missiles can temporarily prevent
use of an airfield.
reliability have claimed that the
Soviet Union has provided Iraq
with a number of SS-12
Scaleboard surface-to-surface
missiles. This weapon has a range
of about 900 kilometers, so that
missiles fired from launchers
located in Baghdad could still hit
targets located in Israel. Never-
theless, the danger posed by
SS-12s is limited because of its in-
accuracy, comparable to that of
the SCUD-B. Accordingly, while
the Scaleboard could be used as a
terror weapon against population
Recently, reports of uncertain Continued on Page 2-B
h??l ------- ,' /. ", .' -,~.------y; Arab Tube Artillery; I9&4 ,,- r., ;,4V
Country Normal RAP
Caliber of Range Rang* Current
Type (mm) Origin (km) (km) User Countries
M-II0A2 203 USA 21.3 29.1 Jordan. Saudi Arabia
S-23 180 USSR 30.4 43.8 Egypt. Syria
M-I09A2 155 USA 18.1 24.0 Jordan. Kuwait. Saudi Arabia. Egypt*
GHN-45 155 Austria 30.0 39.0 Iraq. Jordan*
G-5 155 South Africa 37.5 Iraq?*
GCT 155 France 23.5 30.5 Iraq. Saudi Arabia
FH-70 155 Wcsl Germany 24.0 30.0 Saudi Arabia
Palmaria 155 Italy 24.0 30.0 Libya
Ml 976 152 USSR 24.0 37.0 Syria
2S3 152 USSR 18.5 24.0 Iraq. Libya. Syria
D-20 152 USSR 17.4 37.0 Egypt
M-46 130 USSR 27.2 > Egypt. Iraq. Libya, Syria
2SI 122 USSR 15 1 21.9 Iraq. Libya. Syria
D-30 122 USSR i 4 21.0 Egypt. Iraq. Libya. Syria
On order
Source: Pbttt, Jane' \ Armour and Aruller\. /Vrt.f H4


mm niinrwi. t-i.f.w r,.v,k.
10 moc
S?
nviaj, ucpteitiuei i.U, 136D

fife Was Jewish Liaison
Breger Elevated to Reagan's Chief of Deregulation
Continued from Page 1-A
grams of the federal agencies. The
chairman also sits on several
Cabinet councils and is head of an
informal group called the Council
of Independent Regulatory
Agencies.
The 39-year-old Breger, an Or-
thodox Jew and former law pro-
fessor, will continue as liaison un-
til he is confirmed by the Senate
following a hearing by the Senate
Judiciary Committee. The post he
now holds has always been con-
troversial within the Jewish com-
munity since on one hand, all Ad-
ministrations have expected their
liaisons to promote their policies
in the Jewish community while the
Jewish community looked on the
liaison to speak for its views
within the Administrations.
Breger said the most satisfac-
tion he had in his job was to see
the "flowering" of the strategic
cooperation agreement between
the U.S. and Israel and the
establishment of the free trade
agreement between the two
countries.
BREGER NOTED that he first
brought the idea of the free trade
agreement to Reagan and his Na-
tional Sequrity Advisor after it
was suggested during a tour of
Israel by conservatives which he
led when he was a Senior Fellow
at the Heritage Foundation, six
months before he joined the
Administration.
Statement Called 'Puzzling'
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Congress
has called Pope John Paul's
assertion that the Moslem
view of the future status of
Jerusalem is also the
Vatican's view a "puzzling
and distressing" remark.
Henry Siegman, executive
director of AJCongress and
authority on Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions, disputed the Pontiffs state-
ment in Morocco last month that
Moslems view Jerusalem as "the
capital of three monotheistic
religions" Christianity,
Judaism and Islam.
"We are not aware of any
Moslem leader who has ever ex-
pressed such a view of
Jerusalem," Siegman said.
Moslems, he noted, "have con-
sistently called for the removal of
Jerusalem from the State of
Israel."
Siegman called the Pope's state-
ment "an apparent effort to find
some common ground with his
Moroccan hosts."
The AJCongress official, a
founder of the International
Jewish Committee on Inter-
religious Consultations, which in-
cludes leading Jewish organiza-
tions, acknowledged that the
"intention and spirit" of the
Pope's statement may have been
misconstrued and said a clarifica-
tion of his remarks "is most
urgently needed."
But, he said, his "biggest thrill"
came when he heard from the
Sudan that the rescue of Ethopian
Jews had begun. He said a more
personal highlight came in
August, 1984, when his daughter,
Sarah Gabriella, was born and he
had to postpone leaving for the
Republican National Convention
in Dallas. The President heard of
it and invited Breger to go to
Dallas with him aboard Air Force
One.
Breger said his most difficult
period was last spring during the
controversy over the President's
visit to the German military
cemetery at Bitburg. He said it
was hard getting the Administra-
tion to understand the "deep feel-
ings" of the Jewish community on
this issue.
BREGER CAME under heavy
criticism from the Jewish com-
munity when it was learned he
had tried to prevent Elie Wiesel,
chairman of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council, from criticizing
Reagan at a White House
ceremony in which the President
presented Wiesel with the Con-
gressional Medal of Freedom.
Breger was reluctant to discuss
that period except to note that he
had just returned from spending
Passover in Israel and walked into
a "maelstrom." He noted it was a
case of the messenger being blam-
ed for the message.
David Brody, Washington
representative of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, told the JTA that Breger
was "good and effective" at his
job. A spokesman for the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC) said Breger
had done an "excellent job." Call-
ing Breger "intelligent and
dedicated," the AIPAC
spokesman said he had "earned
the respect of all those with whom
he worked." He added, "He
represented the views of
American Jews to the Administra-
tion and those of the Administra-
tion to Jews."
BREGER WAS the third per-
son to hold the post of Jewish
liaison in the Reagan Administra-
tion. When the Administration
first came to office in 1981, it in-
dicated that it did not want any
liaison to various communities,
but then named to the post Jacob
Stein, a leading Jewish supporter
of Reagan and a former chairman
of the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations.
Stein stayed for about a year
and then resigned, to be replaced
in June, 1982, by Michael Gale
who had been congregational
liaison for AIPAC.
When Breger was appointed, he
was given a higher ranking of
special assistant to the President
and was also given the additional
duties of liaison with the academic
community.
Jewish representatives in
Washington have indicated that
even if a successor to Breger is
not appointed, they still will be
able to have contacts at the White
House. Brody noted that Breger
will now be free of the White
House hierarchical structure and
will now be free to call people
there with his views who, in his
present job, he might not have
been able to call as freely.
Shamir Back
From Japan '*-
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Deputy Prime Minister and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
was flying home last week from
his official visit to Japan
satisfied and optimistic," accor-
ding to Foreign Ministry officials
in Jerusalem.
Shamir met with Premier
Yasuhiro Nakasone and Foreign
Minister Shintaro Abe and heard
from both of them that Tokyo ,;a
eager to have closer relations with
Israel.
The group of Israeli business ex-
ecutives who accompanied Shamir
on his visit stayed on for detailed
trade talks with Japanese officials
and representatives of leading
companies.
The Israeli troup met with some
of the top names in Japanese in-
dustry at the prestigious Kei Da-
mien Commercial Centre. Among
those present were represen-
tatives from Toyota, Mitsubishi
and other major firms which have
traditionally shunned direct con-
tact with Israel for fear of losing
Arab markets.
In all his numerous meetings
during five days in Israel, Shamir
stressed Israel's consistent argu-
ment that close ties with Israel,
both commercial and political,
need not weaken Japan's ties with
the Arab states.
Nakasone said Japan was inten-
sifying its political interest and in-
volvement in the Middle East.
"We are interested in a dialogue
with both sides," he was quoted as
saying by Israel sources.
Nakasone noted that Japan's
markets were open and free
and Israeli companies were
welcome to compete for them.
DURING THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
* to
MAKE A DIRECT LOAN TO ISRAEL
HELP OVERCOME ITS ECONOMIC CRISIS
This is not an offering which can be made only
by prospectus available from
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
Development Corporation for Israel
2301 Collins Avenue, M-24 Miami Beach, Florida 33139
TEL. (305) 531-6731
PHILIP T. WARREN
General Campaign C**m nan
RABBI LEON t\<- >N bH
International Associate Cnm:man
SIDNEY COOPERMAN
Winter Resident Chairman
HOWARD KLEIN
Executive Director
Economic axe to fall
Cabinet to determine
dismissals, wage cuts
BfAVlTEMKIN
tmm.......itpi.
The economic axe it finally
expected to fall today when the
cabinet meeu to decide on a
comprehenuve economic
that will involve
role in the elaboration of the
plan
Acconknai to the plan, wage ear-
ner* will have to give up part i "
cou-of-livin
den. Pert* would like to ivotf
harp Hntadret i
To help Israel achieve economic recovery... to provide
jobs... you are urged to make a direct loan to Israel
through a maximum Israel Bond subscription during this
year s High Holy Day Bond Appeal in your synagogue.
2 leading computer makers
getting $58m. in gov't aid
By AARON SITTNER
Jentaalem Port Reporter
A total of $58 million
invested
ited and exports jkj1
With more funds for its high technology and other
industries, Israel can increase its exports and
improve its balance of trade.
Don't exempt yourself from our resp isibility to
Israel. The people of Israel are makr g deep
sacrifices. Do your part.
Join with the hundreds of thousands of North
American Jews who will express their support
S,HnLap WifcKa Holy Day Bond purchase
during RoshHashanah and Yom Kippur



Bonn'8 Ambassador to NATO, Hans-Georg
Wieck (left) replaces Heribert HeUenbroich
(right) as head of the Bundesnachrichtendienst
intelligence service in Munich, West Ger-
many. HeUenbroich, recently transferred
from the anti-espionage Verfassungsschutz in
Cologne, took the blame for the defection of top
anti-espionage official Hansjoachim Tiedge to
East Berlin. (DaD/Sven Simon).
Rabbi's Cracow Visit
Tallit Was Torn from Her Shoulders
Continued from Page 1-A
or Conservative rabbi to officiate
in the synagogue, the oldest in
Cracow.
The site was changed before the
Saturday, Sept. 7 Bar Mitzvah,
either under Orthodox pressure or
to accommodate larger crowds
some 150 persons attended the
services to the 130-year-old
Temple Synagogue. Korzenick
took her place on Saturday morn-
ing with the other women sitting
it a separate section of the
balcony.
She emphasized that they had
not prepared themselves to con-
front the Orthodox rabbi, Nachum
Elbaum, a New York businessman
and travel agent, who along with
an unidentified cantor arrived in
Poland shortly before the Friday
evening services began. Elbaum
conducted Friday night services.
and the Saturday morning ser-
vices. There is no rabbi in Cracow.
BLONDER, who served as a
translator on the visit, read the
Torah portion Saturday. At the
closing of the service, Eric signall-
ed for Korzenick to come to the
Bima as he was preparing to
recite his Haftorah portion, from
Isaiah. Korzenick had helped to
train Eric in his Haf to rah portion.
Korzenick came down to the
Bima, she recalled, and had a
prayer shawl she was going to
place over her shoulders snatched
away by Elbaum. Eric's grand-
father, meanwhile, handed her
another tallit. When she began
her commentary, Elbaum said
several times, "But ladies cannot
speak in synagogue." Korzenick
said the elders in the synagogue
did not take up the chant.
In her English commentary,
Korzenick quoted Isaiah to the ef-
West Bank Land Scandal
Yields Two More Arrests
JERUSALEM (JTA) Two
lawyers were remanded in
custody by a Tel Aviv magistrate,
bringing to eight the number of
suspects arrested during the past
seven weeks in connection with a
West Bank land fraud scandal.
The lawyers, Sami Mualem and
Uri Ben-Yehuda, are believed to
have abetted the illegal acquisi-
tion of land from elderly Arabs in
the territory. According to the
police, they approved forged
powers of attorney used to
transfer land without the true
owners' knowledge. Police said
'he forged documents were found
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in the lawyers' offices.
Forged sales documents were
also found in the possession of
three land dealers, Ahmad Ode,
Yitzhak Yanai and Dina Jan, all of
whom were arrested earlier.
Police sources said the investiga-
tion is still in its early stages and
more arrests were expected. A
leading contractor and four other
lawyers are reportedly under
suspicion and will be questioned
shortly.
feet that "violence shall no more
be heard in the land, and the sun
shall no more go down. Neither
shall thy moon withdraw itself, for
the Lord will be thy everlasting
light, and the days of mourning
shall be ended."
But moreover, Korzenick,
spiritual leader of the Fellowship
of Jewish Learning in Stamford,
Conn., the synagogue with which
the Strom family is affiliated,
asserted that the Bar Mitzvah was
an expression of Jewish "oneness
and concern."
SHE SAID, "One thing I did
see was little tiny germs of
possibility for the future" of
Jewry in Cracow. She noted that
some 20 young Polish Jews had at-
tended the Bar Mitzvah, and that
some of the elderly persons in the
community have tried to increase
the study of Jewish and Yiddish
culture.
She also said that during her
brief visit, which included a show
at the Yiddish Theater in Warsaw,
she felt that the Polish govern-
ment appeared to be encouraging
efforts by the small Jewish com-
munity. Some 15,000 Jews are
estimated to live in Poland.
Cracow's Jewish population prior
to the Holocaust was some 60,000.
It is now several hundred.
Korzenick explained that Polish
Jewry is not in a desperate state.
They have chosen to stay, she
said, though many have family
elsewhere, including in Israel. As
for Eric, Korzenick said, "He
understood he was there as a sym-
bol of joy."
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Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Police Minister Eyes Ways
Of Barring Kahane Rallies
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Police Minister Haim Barlev is
seeking legal ways for the police
to prevent rallies of Rabbi Meir
Kahane's extremist Kach Party
which incite hatred against
Israel's Arab population and fre-
quently lead to violent confronta-
tions. He has asked Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir if there
are any.
Existing laws empower the
police to break up officially per-
mitted rallies if the speakers are
suspected of incitement. The pro-
blem is the legal definition of in-
citement which is a delicate issue.
A government bill specifically
outlawing racism as distinguished
from less specific incitement, has
passed its first reading in the
Knesset. It may make it easier for
police to break up Kach rallies
when it becomes law. But political
and legal observers worry that
Kahane and his henchmen will
tailor their inflammatory remarks
to remain just outside the legal
definition of racism.
Concern over "Kahanism" has
risen since public opinion polls in-
dicate that Kach could win as
many as 11 Knesset seats if elec-
tions were held now. Recent
Knesset legislation banning racist
parties from running for office
may keep Kach out of the next
Knesset.
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rage l^-u I he Jewish Plnririian/fiVM... ,
? -.U-.. 10 *ro^
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 20, 1985
i .
use
Holocaust Report Is Devastating
By MORTON I. TEICHER
The Abandonement Of The
Jews: America And The
Holocaust, 1941-1945. By
David Wyman. New York:
Pantheon Books, 1984. 445 pp.
$19.95.
The profound pain and sor-
rowful suffering of the Holocaust
are exacerbated and intensified by
this remarkable report which
reminds us in devastating fashion
of American indiffernece to the
Nazi murder of six million Jews.
The book is especially notewor-
thy because its author is a Chris-
tian, the grandson of two Protes-
tant ministers. He is a historian
who specializes in the Holocaust,
having previously published a
book on the refugee situation in
the years just before the United
States entered World War II.
THE BOOK contains all the ap-
propriate scholarly apparatus
62 pages of footnotes, an excellent
index, a wide-ranging
bibliography, two appendices and
a list of the people who were inter-
viewed. None of these elements
interferes with the narrative,
which is a depressing saga of how
American officials from Franklin
D. Roosevelt on down deliberately
failed to make an effort to rescue
European Jewry.
WYMAN TELLS the shocking
and heartbreaking story in
straightforward, almost dispas-
sionate, fashion. He relentlessly
piles up the evidence for
American uncaring insensibility.
And, to make matters worse, he
thoroughly documents the total
ineffectiveness of American Jews
to compel government action.
7
David Wyman
This bitter and galling section of
the story details the acriminious
infighting among American
Jewish organizations and leaders
which debilitated their strength
and rendered them impotent in
any attempt to save the Jews of
Europe.
UNHAPPILY, Wyman shows
that there is more than enough
blame to maim the consciousness
and consciences of all Americans.
Roosevelt's indifference was "the
worst failure of his presidency."
The State Department was a cruel
culprit as it determinedly blocked
the possibility of rescue and
maliciously resisted all pressures
for action.
Anti-Semitic and anti-
immigration attitudes in the Con-
gress dammed up all possibilities
for United States intervention.
The print media relegated news of

. .
Schindler Assails Orthodox
Attack on Woman Rabbi

NEW YORK Rabbi Alex-
ander M. Schindler, president of
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, this week assailed
"Orthodox extremists who mar-
red the beauty and sanctity" of
the Bar Mitzvah in Cracow earlier
this month of a Stamford (Conn.)
youth, the first celebrated in the
Polish city in 35 years.
The Reform Jewish leader said
he was expressing the sense of
outrage of Reform Judaism over
the "despicable" behavior of a
New York .Orthodox rabhi and
travel i&nt who Trifci sted that the
Bar Mitzvah be moved to another
synagogue and who, during the
ceremony, tore the prayer shawl
from an American woman rabbi
who had trained the boy for his
Bar Mitzvah and accompanied him
to Cracow.
RABBI SCHINDLER, former
president of the American
Federation of Polish Jews, also
criticized the Orthodox movement
for its "perversion of history to
claim a monopoly on Polish
Jewry." The Union of Orthodox
Rabbis of North America and the
Rabbinical Council of America had
separately attacked the idea of a
non-Orthodox Bar Mitzvah
ceremony conducted by a woman
as a "desecration" and "a
betrayal of Jewish history."
Noting that the Temple
Synagogue, in which the
ceremony took place, was
dedicated as a Reform temple in
1844, Rabbi Schindler declared:
"Polish Jewry was far from
monistic. Among the Jews of
Poland slaughtered by the Nazis
were not only Orthodox Jews, but
also Reform Jews and non-
religious Jews, Zionists and non-
Zionists and even antj-Zionists."
He continued, "i suppose I
ought to understand this kind of
arrogance and intolerance. Or-
thodoxy has suffered a precipitous
decline over the past generations,
and intolerance is a sure sign of
weakness."
Rabbi Schindler concluded his
statement by declaring of the
Reform movement: "We are
Jews, and we will not be read out
of the Jewish fold not in Israel,
not in Europe, nor anywhere on
this earth."
Nazi atrocities to the back pages if
they published anything at all
about the Holocaust. Widespread
and blatant anti-Jewish hatred in
the populace at large created a
public opinion barrier against
solicitude for European Jews.
The dismal and distressing
silence of Christian leaders meant
that no voice was raised in the
churches for rescuing Jews.
Veterans organizations
clangorously bellowed their in-
sistence that all immigration be
banned. The American military
repeatedly refused to heed ap-
peals to bomb the death camps.
The puny efforts of the War
Refugee Board were stifled by
disgracefully inadequate govern-
ment funding.
ALL IN ALL, Wyman's
recapitulation of this grim and
tormenting record brings tears to
the eyes of his readers. It is a mor-
bid tale which mercilessly glares a
harsh light on our ineptitude, our
ineffectiveness and our
inadequacy.
In 1968, Arthur B. Morse
published a similar book called
"While Six Million Died," but
Wyman's scholarship and objec-
tivity have produced a more con-
vincing and more powerful indict-
ment. Just three years ago, Irving
Abella and Harold Troper in
"None is Too Many" set forth the
terrible story of Canadian
heedlessness to the plight of Euro-
pean Jews. Any American who
read that book and complacently
concluded that we were different
from the Canadians must read
Wyman's book to see how much
greater was our failure.
With all the power and the
might of our country, we were
able to save no more than 200,000
Jews, a pitiful and painfully small
number alongside of the millions
who perished.
THIS IS an upsetting and
disconcerting book which gives an
appalling recital of a degrading
and deplorable part of our history.
It deserves the widest possible
readership.
What must clang in our ears and
in our hearts is Wyman's haunting
question, "Would the reaction be
different today? Would
Americans be more sensitive, less
self-centered, more willing to
make sacrifices, less afraid of dif-
ferences now than they were
then?"
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Reaganites Put Off Debate
On Arms to Saudis, Jordan
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion has decided that the
Jewish High Holidays are
not an auspicious time to an-
nounce its intention to sell
sophisticated weapons to
Jordan and Saudi Arabia. It
has postponed official
notification of Congress un-
til the end of the month.
The notification, required by
law, had been expected last week.
Rosh Hashanah began Sunday
night, and Yom Kippur begins the
night of Tuesday, Sept. 24. Ad-
ministration officials have inform-
ed Congressional circles that the
announcement will not be made
until Sept. 26 at the earliest.
AMERICAN JEWS are strong-
ly opposed to the sale of any
weaponry to countries still
technically in a state of war with
Israel and they are supported in
this by substantial majorities in
both houses of Congress. Jordan
is known to be seeking F-16 jet
fighters and both ground-to-air
and air-to-air missiles. Saudi
Arabia is in the market for F-15
jets and mobile improved Hawk
anti-aircraft missiles.
But Congressional opposition
has been strong, and the Ad-
ministration is expected to drop
plans to include 40 F-15s in its
arms sales package to the Saudis,
according to Congressional and
State Department sources. It
would be the first time the U.S.
has rejected a major weapons item
requested by the Saudis.
According to one Administra-
tion official, the decision "was a
judgement on what's obtainable"
on Capitol Hill. Four key Senators
Alan Cranston (D., Calif.),
Robert Packwood (R., Ore.), Alan
Dixon (D., 111.) and Alfonse
D'Amato (R., N.Y.) stated in a
letter to their colleagues that the
proposed arms sales would "fuel
the regional arms competition"
and ^erode Israel's military
superiority in the Middle East.
900 Scholars Meet
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Some 900 scholars of Jewish
studies, including 400 from coun-
tries outside of Israel, gathered
here this summer at the Hebrew
University for the Ninth World
Jewish Congress of Jewish
Studies.
Mount
Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street Miami
INVITES YOU TO ATTEND
Special
Memorial Service
Sunday
September 22,1985
Conducted by
I--.TT
BETH DAVID
Rabbi Sol Landau Reverend Milton Freedman
1 (MX) a.m.
854-3911
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Michael Eisenstat
10:30 a.m.
667-5657
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Dr. Irving Lehrman
11:00 a.m.
538-2503
TEMPLE BETH KODESH
Rabbi Max Shapiro
11:30 a.m.
854-3053
TEMPLE BET SHIRA
Rabbi David Auerbach
12:00 noon
238-2601
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Special Services 12:30 p.m. at Richter Mausoleum
Site, Section K
573-5900


.. ;... ..:..; i fcaV *fl
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
-.'.,-., ... -. ,,-..,.-.
It
op***'
'
h#>
Reagan (center) meets with representatives of the International
J o/ B. Abram, chairman, National Conference on Soviet Jewry, and a
of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission; Leon Dulzin, chairman. World
ce; Claude Kelman, chairman, Council for Somet Jewry, France;
White House Photo
Gregorio Faigon, president, Argentine Jewish community; Isi Liebler, presi-
dent, Board of Deputies of Australian Jews; Gerald Kraft, president, B 'nai
B'rith International; and Jerry Goodman, executive director, National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
\y ofSolidarity
loviet Jews To Be Given Message of Hope on Eve of Summit
IVID FRIEDMAN
[INGTON (JTA)
and non-Jews
ut the world will be
participate in a
Solidarity" in sup-
Soviet Jewry Nov.
eve of the summit
J in Geneva between
lent Reagan and
leader Mikhail
Hev.
as announced by Leon
chairman of the World
bee on Soviet Jewry, at a
inference following the
[meeting of the Interna-
ancil of the World Con-
i Soviet Jewry. He said
to be an "expression of
es as powerfully as
L.D KRAFT, president of
rith International, said
pts would include prayers
fogues, all-night vigils,
I of silence in legislatures
I government bodies, and
nonstrations. Kraft said
I summit "opens a win-
| opportunity the like of
fey never come again."
t said the executive of the
onference will meet in
. 2 when Gorbachev is
to meet with French
[Teachers
iccept Cut
JSALEM (JTA) The
chool year began on
last week afer an 11th
reement between the
union and Education
Yitzhak Navon averted a
lied strike.
i one-and-a-quarter million
_n returned to their
oms, controversy erupted
fen Navon and Finance
fer Yitzhak Modai who com-
_ that the agreement failed
feply with the government's
f a balanced education
"It does not seem to me
_he agreement assures a
[school year," Modai said.
^teachers agreed Aug. 30 to
71.5 percent cut in salary.
President Francois Mitterrand
and in Geneva for the Reagan-
Gorbachev summit.
He said that since its creation
four years ago, the World Con-
ference has not succeeded in br-
inging about renewed large-scale
Jewish emigration from the
USSR. But Dulzin added, "W
came out stronger, more uni
more decisive in continuing our
struggle."
MORRIS ABRAM, chairman of
the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, noted, "I have never seen
the Jewish community so united
on a single issue as it is now."
The two-day meeting, attended
by representatives from 24 coun-
tries at the headquarters of B'nai
B'rith International here, conclud-
ed with a declaration that "as the
world looks forward in hope to the
summit meetings in Paris and
Geneva, the World Conference
delegates draw the attention of
the world to the fact that if the
plight of Soviet Jewry is in-
dicative of Soviet credibility and
the value of the solemn word of
the USSR, then the summit
begins under a heavy cloud. For
humanity's prayers and expecta-
tions from the summit meetings to
be realized, that cloud must be
removed."
The delegates pledged to Soviet
Jews "that we shall never relent
in our efforts until they are free,"
and stressed that "the USSR's
treatment of its Jews will come to
be the test of Soviet sincerity in all
its international relations."
A DELEGATION of seven
Jewish leaders from five con-
tinents led by Abram made that
point to Reagan when they met
with the President at the White
House. Abram reiterated that the
President pledged to bring up the
issue at the summit. He added
that the President "very wisely
left it to his own sense of
statesmanship exactly the form
and substance to which he will ad-
dress the problem; but address it
there is not any doubt."
Dulzin said that Claude Kelman,
chairman of the Council for Soviet
Jewry in France, told Reagan he
plans to meet with Mitterrand to
ask the French President to raise
the issue of Soviet Jewry with
Gorbachev.
Arieh Handler, chairman of the
National Council for Soviet Jewry
in Britain, said that Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher gave
him a written statement to bring
to the Washington meeting in
which she said that in seeking to
improve British and Western rela-
tions with the USSR, "we have
not and will not softpedal ques-
tions of human rights." A copy of
jtoj**\the statement was also given to
Reagan by the Jewish leaders.
AT A DINNER at the Capital-
Hilton Hotel, which concluded the
International Council's two-day
meeting, Michael Armacost,
Undersecretary of State for
Political Affairs, reiterated the
position made continuously by the
Jewish delegates.
Soviet violations of the "obliga-
tions" it undertook under the
1976 Helsinki Accords, "cannot
but affect perceptions of Soviet
willingness to abide by other ac-
cords and erode political con-
fidence needed to make progress
on a variety of issues," he said.
"It is our hope that Soviet
authorities are coming to
recognize that human rights will
remain central to the United.
States-Soviet agenda," Armacost
said.
"We are not asking Soviet
authorities to do the impossible
but only to live up to their interna-
tional obligations, and loosen the
screws of repression tightened so
cruelly in recent years. We watch
the patterns of Soviet-Jewish
emigration, as you do. We are
prepared to respond as im-
provements occur."
ARMACOST NOTED that
"Soviet officials hint that im-
provements in human rights, in-
cluding Jewish emigration, can
follow an upward swing in overall
relations." But he stressed "the
reality is that Soviet abuses of
human rights undermine the
political confidence needed to im-
prove relations, negotiate arms
control agreements, and
cooperatively lessen regional
tensions."
Dulzin, who is also chairman of
the Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Executives,
stressed that Jews live both in the
East and the West and, "by
nature, we are interested in peace
and cooperation and good rela-
tionships." But this must be based
on cooperation between the two
superpowers and cannot be a
"solo dance."
Press Deserves Bashing
But State Control Would Be Far Worse
Continued from Page 1-A
an arena of fierce competition,
managers, newsgatherers, and
photographers are aware of what
the public wants and supply it
feverishly. Often, they overstep
the boundaries of propriety.
SOME interviews are not only
inept but slanted; editorial posi-
tions stir the bile of folks with op-
posing views. In the mad rush to
get on the hijack drama first with
the most, media people naturally
detonated thunder blasts of
anger.
Errors of omission are especial-
ly damaging. Constant scolding of
Israel for holding Shiites rounded
up during Israel's withdrawal
from Lebanon amounted to a
revealing case history. Had jour-
nalists taken the trouble to con-
sult Emeritus Prof. Leo Gross of
the Fletcher School of Diplomacy,
the damage to Israel could have
been avoided.
An Outstanding authority on in-
ternational law, Prof. Gross, in a
July 6 letter to The New York
Times, nailed the lie, widely cir-
culated, that those detained by
Israel had been imprisoned in con-
travention of the Fourth Geneva
Convention. Quoting from Article
49 of the compact, he proved that
Israel's right to proceed as it did
was clearly spelled out.
THAT LEGAL counsel for both
the UN and President Reagan fail-
ed to advise accurately helps in-
dicate why serious reporting
mistakes are made in the rush to
instantaneous coverage of
dramatic events.
Where the media did provide a
fine service was by presenting
views of such well-informed
hostages as Peter Hill, the travel
agent, who pointed out that most
of the hostages themselves, along
with millions of Americans,
couldn't find Lebanon on the map
three weeks prior to the hijacking.
Other hostages, notably Richard
P. Herzberg, Robert Trautman,
and Prof. Arthur W. Toga, helped
with the aid of the media, to make
it clear that they had no sympathy
for the hijackers. These views con-
trasted sharply with other
hostages frequently quoted.
So those who continue to bash
the media have every right to do
so; but they might want to keep in
mind the real damage is done by
the state-controlled media of na-
tions cursed with dictators. By
contrast, we should all be grateful
for our Constitution's guarantee
of a free press, a blessing that is
not only a privilege but a necessity
in a great society.
THE LARGER issue, then, is
whether America's media will be
able to withstand the harm done
by some newspaper chains that
swallow up other newspaper
chains and by folks like Sen. Jesse
Helms and Ted Turner. Helms
and Turner want to grab control
of CBS in order to jettison Dan
Rather. Cable TV Mogul Turner is
on record thus: "The networks
are the greatest enemies that
America has ever had, posing a
greater threat than Nazi Germany
or Tojo's Japan."
Or reflect for a moment of the
injustice done to Pope Paul II by
the media cartel headed by Rupert
Murdoch. On one day, the Mur-
doch organization reported the
Pope would be coming along with
a weekly column; a day or two
later, the Vatican exploded that
claim as something out of a fairy
tale world.
Technology has increased the
speed of gathering and
disseminating news a thousand-
fold. The tempo of change raises
the margin for error. Yet for
every carping critic of so much the
media provides, there is, for-
tunately, an army of understan-
ding consumers certain to con-
tinue thankful for free press
despite its lapses.


Page 12-C The Jewish FJoriHi-n/KW*,... *_u.......-
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 20, 1985
Stung By Criticism
Leaders Say Talks Were Helpful
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A group of prominent
American Jews has come
away from meetings last
week in Amman and Cairo
convinced of Jordan's and
Egypt's urgent wish to
broaden the peace process
with Israel."
The American Jews, leaders of
the American Jewish Congress,
reported to Premier Shimon
Peres in Jerusalem on their talks
with King Hussein, President
Hosni Mubarak, and their top
aides.
One central theme which they
heard repeatedly in the two Arab
capitals, they said, was that sec-
tions of the PLO had indeed
moderated their stance and the
PLO should therefore "be put to
the test" in a diplomatic process.
PROF. HENRY Rosovsky of
Harvard, one of the AJCongress
group, told reporters his private
feeling was that Washington
should set up talks between Assis-
tant Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs
Richard Murphy and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation, on the
clear understanding that the PLO
would respond, within a set time,
by explicitly recognizing Israel
and accepting the United Nations
Security Council Resolution 242.
The AJCongress group had the
clear impression that PLO chief
Yasir Arafat's failure to commit
himself in advance to a significant
move of this kind had thwarted
the American effort last month to
launch a U.S.-Jordanian-
Palestinian dialogue.
The AJC mission has already
triggered controversy in Israel,
and is expected to do so in the
U.S. Jewish community too. Israel
Radio broadcast, without citing a
source, that the AJCongress
group had violated an undertak-
ing given to the Prime Minister's
Office and to the Foreign Ministry
not to engage in Jordan in talks
pertaining to Israel's security
considerations.
THE DISTINCT impression in
Jerusalem, however, is that while
the Foreign Ministry, under
Deputy Premier and Likud leader
Yitzhak Shamir, was indeed op-
posed to the AJC's mission and
Tough Economic Policy Said
To Deal Blow to Inflation
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The government's tough
economic austerity program
has dealt a major blow to in-
flation, preliminary figures
for August indicate. But
civil service employees seem
to be the first casualties of
drastic measures taken to
reduce government expen-
ditures in the war against
inflation, according to a con-
fidential report published in
Haaretz.
Figures for the first two weeks
of August showed the cost-of-
living index up only 3.5 to 4 per-
cent above the July average, com-
pared to a monthly inflation rate
of 20 percent-plus before the
government's program was an-
nounced July 1. The price index
for the full month of August was
released Sunday. Economic ex-
perts expect it will reflect the
trend of the first two weeks.
THE EXPERTS credited the
government's measures for the
improvement. They said August
inflation would have been even
lower but for an unexpected up-
surge in the prices of fruit and
vegetables. This was attributed to
a between-the-seasons shortage
which tripled or quadrupled the
prices of such popular items as
tomatoes and cucumbers.
The good news on the inflation
front greeted Finance Minister
Yitzhak Modai on his return from
Washington. He predicted an
August inflation rate of four per-
cent which, he said, was what the
government was aiming for. He
warned however that even that
achievement is not good enough.
Inflation will have to be curbed
even more before economic
recovery is firmly on track, Modai
said.
Meanwhile, a government study
750 Students Enroll
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Some 750 students from 25 coun-
tries were enrolled in summer
courses this year at the Rothberg
School for overseas students of
the Hebrew UnrVersfty c>f
Jerusalem. .
not for public release was obtain-
ed by Haaretz and published last
week. It showed an erosion of 40
percent in the real value of civil
service wages over the last seven
months. According to the study,
the July austerity package had
devastating effects on the take-
home pay of civil servants, more
than the economic planners
themselves had intended.
THE STUDY found that many
workers in the public sector are
not yet fully aware of their losses
because their July and August
paychecks did not reflect them.
July and August pay included one-
time allowances for vacations and
clothing. The August paychecks,
moreover, included a one-time 12
percent cost of living rise compen-
sation negotiated with Histadrut.
There will be no such compensa-
tion in the September paychecks.
September salaries instead will
reflect the full weight of the
government's cutbacks. These in-
clude limited wage reductions and
a virtual freeze on paid expenses,
such as car maintenance costs
which continue to rise. They are
an important part of the civil ser-
vice workers' take-home pay.
especially for middle and upper
level employees.
made its position clear through
the Embassy in Washington the
Prime Minister's Office gave the
mission at least a tacit nod.
Regarding Israeli concerns over
the location of PLO headquarters
units in Amman, the AJC group
reported that high Jordanian
leaders had offered copious
assurances that the units concern-
ed were low-level and that they
were being closely monitored and
controlled by the Jordanian
authorities.
The group reported that Jorda-
nian and Egyptian leaders sought
to dissociate Arafat from current
terror attacks against Israel.
Specifically, they said, it was
claimed to them that two yachts
recently apprehended by the
Israeli navy had not been carrying
Palestinian terror squads bent on
infiltrating Israel but rather had
been ferrying the Palestinians to
Lebanon for innocent purposes. In
a statement issued by the AJC
group after their meeting with
Peres, they wrote that "we
believe Hussein and .. .
Mubarak now wish to widen the
peace between Egypt and Israel
to include other Arab countries.
They believe in the urgency of do-
ing so now, before forces of
political and religious extremism
make the task impossible."
THE STATEMENT continued:
"Egyptian and Jordanian officials
were unanimous in their declara-
tions that they believed that cer-
tain elements in the PLO have
moderated their extremism and
are prepared to live in peace with
Israel if a Palestinian entity,
federated with Jordan, were to
become a realistic possibility.
They stated that this tendency
towards moderation would be
greatly strengthened if the U.S.
government were to open a
dialogue with these elements of
the PLO.
"It is in this context that Egyp-
tian and Jordanian officials
strongly endorsed the so-called
Murphy meeting. In response to
our skepticism that Arafat would
recognize Israel and renounce ter-
rorism as a result of such a
meeting, they urged that it is time
that the PLO be put to the test.
"We expressed our strong
view that at this time the Prime
Minister of Israel is prepared to
go as far as any Israeli head of
government can in moving
towards peace. Egyptian and Jor-
danian officials concurred We
urged upon them the necessity of
direct face-to-face negotiations
now. while this possibility exists
. We intend to encourage our
own government to assist all of
the parties concerned in meeting
with Israel."
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Shamir Raps Jewish Groups
For Playing Diplomacy Game
'
Continued from Page 1-A
sought to pooh-pooh both mis-
sions. But this did not conceal his
anger at what he plainly feels are
incursions upon Israel's
prerogative to speak for itself,
and also for world Jewry.
HE SAID he was aware that the
Soviets were interested in oil-
drilling equipment which the Du
Pont Company, part-owned by
Bronfman, could sell them. But
this gave Bronfman no standing
to speak for Jewish issues, Shamir
asserted.
Turning to the AJCongress
Mideast mission, Shamir remark-
ed: "Who elected them? Who em-
powered them to enter into
negotiations on the Israel-Arab
conflict? They merely serve as in-
struments in the hands of the
Arabs to score points against us."
Asked "who elects" other
American Jewish organizational
leaders, with whom Shamir and
his ministry regularly and closely
work, Shamir replied: "At least
they (the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations and other
organizations) ask us, consult with
us ... The Anti-Defamation
League (of B'nai B'rith) would
never have done this, nor would
B'nai B'rith, nor the American
Jewish Committee."
He singled out for special
critk;ism Howard Squadron, a
former president of the
AJCongress and a former chair-
man of the Presidents Con-
ference, who was a moving spirit
of! the AJCongress mission.
Shjamir described how Squadron,
on' a previous occasion, had told
him of a lavish welcome he had
received in Cairo, complete with
ntotorcycle out-riders. "So what?"
Shamir said, "Big deal..."
SHAMIR SAID the controver-
sy in Israel over the two missions
Bronfman's and the
AJCongress was "not along
ideological lines. I am sure there
are a great many people in Mr.
Peres' party who would agree
with me."
He recalled how forcefully
Premier Golda Meir had opposed
and eventually prevented
Nahum Goldmann's proposed visit
Howard Squadron
to Egypt to meet with President
Nasser.
It was a matter of principle,
Shamir said. "The world must
know that Israel represents the
Jewish people on Jewish pro-
blems. Jewish organizations ought
not to undertake political work
except when Israel asks them to."
Sometimes, he noted, where
Israel had no access, such efforts
were vital and valuable. But
otherwise it should be Israel that
speaks for Jewry on the world
stage.
Jews Fought
With Finns
Continued from Page 4-A
diplomatic relations but never
declared war on Finland, although
England did.
Thanks To Scandinavia, found-
ed in 1963, with headquarters at
745 Fifth Avenue in New York Ci-
ty, has provided Scandinavian
students, educators and doctors
with more than 700 scholarships
and fellowships at American
Universities and Medical Centers,
including Beth Israel Medical
Center in New York City and
Michael Reese Hospital and
Medical Center in Chicago.
JTA Services
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OPENS FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 27 AT A SELECT THEATRE NEAR V0U


Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
ihane Predicts He'll Become
Prime Minister of Israel
lAVID FRIEDMAN
[INGTON (JTA)
^bi Meir Kahane,
of the extremist
Party in Israel,
ted that he will
Prime Minister of
[because the Israel
lent is unable to
Arab terrorism.
answering questions
|vering a speech to a Na-
ess Club luncheon here.
I American Jewish leaders
rified" of him and that
itest fear is that some
will have to be at
llgton airport to geet
linister Kahane."
[ talk to the National Press
broadcast on National
iadio and C-Band TV,
[used humor and a more
tone than usual to pre-
views to what was pro-
largest non-Jewish au-
ver.
[AMERICAN-BORN rab-
f recently resigned as head
IJewish Defense League
t founded, strongly denied
was a racist, declaring
is against racism "with
jre of my body." He said
[offended by Israel Presi-
lim Herzog's recent state-
jmparing his views with
the Nazis. He said his
tare not "Kahanism, it is
: maintained that there is
"contradiction" between
of Israel being both a
cy and a Jewish State. He
I that Israel cannot be a
feState if the Arab popula-
H*vmg a vote, outnumbers
the Jewish population.
Kahane said that is why he
wants to expel all Arabs, from
Israel proper as well as Judaea
and Samaria. He said he would
allow Arabs to stay in Israel with
full personal rights if they would
give up the right to vote. But. he
said, no self-respecting Arab
under the age of 40 would accept
this.
AT THE same time. Kahane
maintained that if the Arabs left
Israel, the country could remain a
democracy for Jews since while he
would prefer a Jewish state ruled
by the Torah. he would never im-
pose the will of a minority on the
majority.
Kahane denounced a law pen-
ding in the Knesset outlawing
from participation in Knesset
elections parties preaching racism
or which are opposed to
democracy or to Israel being a
Jewish State. He called the law,
which is seen as aimed at Kach,
"stupid and amateurish" and said
if it was introduced in the U.S.
Congress, American Jewish
organizations would be "climbing
the walls."
But when asked what he would
do if Kach was outlawed, he
replied, "If I am banned, like
(Charles) de Gaulle, I'll go home to
wait for the people to call for me."
KAHANE SAID he saw no
chance for the present peace ef-
fort working since all Arabs, in-
cluding the moderates, want the
return of all the land taken in
1967, including East Jerusalem,
which, he noted, no Israeli would
accept. He said for this reason he
has no objection to Israel talking
to the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
American businessman Frederick Weisman
(right) arrives atAtarot Airport in Jerusalem
in his private plane. Weisman is here for the
opening of the exhibition in Jerusalem's Israel
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
Museum of 80 works of art from his own
private collection. Left, is Martin Weyl, direc-
tor of the Israel Museum.
But Kahane warned that if any
Israeli government decided to
give up any part of the West
Bank, he would lead a massive
civil disobedience effort, and "I
would go down in history as did
Dr. Martin Luther King." Kahane
maintained that if he was
Premier, the U.S. would still help
Israel because it was in America's
national interest. He suggested
that America needs Israel more
than Israel needs the U.S. because
"on Judgment Day, God is going
to ask, did you support Israel?"
At the same time, Kahane said
the "best thing the American
government can do for Israel is to
withhold economic aid and force
us to live like we should, not like
Rothschild, importing color TVs
and German cars" but "working
hard."
Peres, Mubarak Meet on Agenda?
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
40th anniversary session of the
United Nations General Assembly
in New York later this month will
give Premier Shimon Peres an op-
portunity to engage in personal
diplomacy. His aides say he hopes
to meet with 15 heads of govern-
ment, in addition to President
Reagan.
High on his list are the leaders
of India, Poland and Hungary,
countries which have no
diplomatic relations with Israel.
Peres also hopes for a summit
meeting with Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak, possibly during
the General Assembly session.
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Page 12-C The Jewish Floridin/RViw c
Page 12-A The Jewish FToridian/Friday, September 20, 1965
Summit Viewed With Hope, Anxiety
Refuseniks Look Toward Reagan-Gorbachev Talks
By JUDITH K OH N
WASHINGTON (JTA)
- With the Reagan-
Gorbachev meeting ap-
proaching against the
background of a virtual halt
in Jewish emigration from
the Soviet Union, the
prevailing feeling among
long-time refuseniks is that
their fate is hanging in the
balance more than ever
before.
Accordingly, some who have
recently been in Moscow conveyed
to participants at last week's
meeting of the World Conference
on Soviet Jewry a profound sense
of urgency, heightened at once by
near-despair and a faint glimmer
of hope.
"The feeling of my friends in
the Soviet Union is that if nothing
is done soon, the Jewish national
movement may be crushed in the
near future," Anatoly Khazanov.
who was permitted to emigrate
two months ago after a five-year
wait, told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency in an interview.
MEANWHILE. Edgar Bronf-
man, president of the World
Jewish Congress, arrived in
Moscow, a participant at the
World Conference meeting told
the JTA. Bronfman, who was in-
vited by the Soviet government
early this year, had planned a visit
last spring, but called it off
because of the death of Konstan-
tin Chernenko.
According to British historian
Martin Gilbert, who recently
visited the Soviet Union and at-
tended the World Conference
meeting, Bronfman went to
Moscow for a two-day visit. No
confirmation was obtainable from
the World Jewish Congress.
Bronfman's visit would come at
Avoid Myths
Edgar Bronfman
the movement for
is urgently appeal-
a time when
Soviet Jewry
ing to the Reagan Administration
to press the question of Jewish
emigration from Russia at Presi-
dent Reagan's upcoming meeting
with Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev. Delegates to the World
Conference meeting conferred
with Reagan last week.
KHAZANOV was one of the
signatories of a letter to Bronf-
man last spring outlining the con-
cerns of refuseniks. In
Washington for the World Con-
ference meeting, he said in his in-
terview with the JTA that he had
no idea "in what capacity" Bronf-
man went to Moscow.
At the same time, many of those
still waiting to emigrate have
taken the step of formulating
terms for an exit visa agreement
that they would like to see the Ad-
ministration present to the Soviet
Union. The suggested terms were
submitted to Gilbert, a professor
at Oxford who has been active in
the campaign for Soviet Jewish
Ann Landers Advised
To Stick To Her Main Skills
NEW YORK Ann
Landers, who advises and
often chides readers of her
widely-syndicated
newspaper column, was
herself admonished last
week by the Union of
American Hebrew Con-
gregations for "unwittingly
perpetuating a myth that
Has been used to justify
persecution of Jews for the
last 2,000 years."
What sparked the concern of
the Reform Judaism movement
was Landers's response to a
reader that ended thus:
"Although the Old Testament
says 'An eye for an eye,' I prefer
the New Testament's "Turn the
other cheek.' "
ANNETTE DAUM, coor-
dinator of the UAHC's Depart-
ment of Interreligious Affairs,
voiced her reproach in a letter to
the columnist observing that "no
biblical passage has been more
misunderstood than 'an eye for an
eye.' She added:
"Christian and Jewish scholars
agree that the phrase is not to be
taken literally but actually reflects
an advanced humane system of
monetary compensation for the
loss sustained.
"This principle limited punish-
ment to no more than what was
considered equitable, assuring
that the same standard of justice
applied to all, whether rich or
poor. In short, it was designed to
let the punishment fit the crime."
The UAHC official noted fur-
ther that the principle of "turn the
other cheek" is found in Hebrew
Scriptures that pre-date the New
Testament, as in:
"Let him give his cheek to him
that 8miteth him" (Lamentations
3:30) and "If your enemy be
hungry, give him or her bread to
eat, and if your enemy be thirsty,
give him or her water to drink.
(Proverbs 25:21).
LANDERS' misunderstanding
is "shared by many Christians and
Jews," Daum wrote. For this
reason, she said, the UAHC in
cooperation with the United
Methodist Church and the Na-
tional Council of Churches has
developed a program that trains
clergy and lay persons in methods
of dialogue emphasizing the
reading and interpretation of the
Bible.
The UAHC official concluded by
suggesting that a just punishment
for Landers might call for "ten
lashes with a wet noddle for not
using your noodle and for failing
to consult biblical experts as you
consult psychologists and physi-
cians on relevant matters." She
added:
"Since 'eye for an eye' was
designed to let the punishment fit
the crime, we will consider the
matter fairly resolved if you urge
your readers to encourage such
dialogue in their own churches
and synagogues in order to
replace the misunderstanding and
mistrust of the last two
millennia."
emigration, when he visited the
Soviet Union last month.
"There the feeling is that the
Administration here must now be
programming into its negotiations
with Gorbachev and beyond ... a
comprehensive exit visa agree-
ment for Soviet Jewry, whereby
everybody in refusal will come out
according to some agreed upon
timetable, whereby everybody
who is refused on security
grounds will come out according
to some internationally recogniz-
ed timetable," Gilbert told the
JTA.
DURING HIS two-week visit in
Moscow and Leningrad. Gilbert
held at least 20 separate meetings
with over 50 refuseniks, including
Galina Zelichenok, wife of
prisoner of conscience Roald
Zelichenok. and Ina Begun, whose
husband losef is also imprisoned.
Among the specific terms strong-
ly urged by the refuseniks. Gilbert
said, was the immediate granting
of exit visas to those in refusal for
10 years or more, with those
waiting five to 10 years being
to leave by the end of
allowed
1987.
Afer that, emigration would be
managed according to a controlled
rate of exit visas for new ap-
plicants, up to an agreed-upon an-
nual limit. One group of
refuseniks suggested that the
West should propse 50,000 as an
annual maximum.
A timetable, possibly based on
the length of time already served
in prison, was suggested for the
POC's as was the immediate gran-
ting of exti visas to former POC's
who are still waiting to emigrate.
THE REFUSENIKS* proposal
also suggested that a maximum
time period beset for the granting
of visas to someone who has held a
position regarded as security-
related. Gilbert presented the pro-
posed terms to the World Con-
ference meeting.
Only 29 Soviet Jews the
lowest number in years were
permitted to emigrate to Israel
last month. In June there were
four arrests of Jewish activists
the most in a single month since
the harassment of Jewish leaders
in the Soviet Union was stepped
up last year.
Reflecting on reasons why the
Soviets under Gorbachev have
disappointed so many who had
reluctantly hoped for an improve-
ment in the situation of Soviet
Jewry. Khazanov. a social an-
thropologist who will begin lectur-
ing at the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem this fall, had no pat
answers.
"I am not a professional politi-
cian. I became a refusenik against
my will and I prefer not to be in-
volved in all kinds of political
discussions,-' Khazanov said.
"The one thing I know for certain
is that if no drastic urgent
Per-
movement in
measures are undertaken on
behalf of Soviet Jewry if J
Soviets in one way or another will
not be persuaded that thev should
change their attitude toward the
Soviet Jews, the refuseniks -
then very sad things might be hap-
pening, not only to certain
sons, but to the
general."
SAYING HE had little groundi
for optimism. Khazanov was hard-
ly wide-eyed over some recent
gestures by Moscow toward Israel
and Soviet Jewry. These gestures
have included a meeting between
the Soviet and Israeli Am-
bassadors in Paris last summer
that was subsequently leaked to
the Israeli press, and the invita-
tion to Bronfman earlier this Year
The unreliability of single
gestures as an indicator of where
Soviet policy is going was
highlighted by Gilbert's visit to
the Soviet Union last month The
official biographer of Winsfc r.
Churchill. Gilbert, who ha
written on the plight of Soviet
Jews, was invited there for a con-
ference by the Soviet Academy of
Sciences the same inat
that revoked Khazanov's me
ship shortly after he applied to
emigrate to Israel.
The invitation was extended to
deliver a paper on the Soviet con-
tribution to the Allied vie-.
World War II. However. Gilbert
had only recently been cited a
Soviet prosecutor as a "Zionist
conspirator" during the trial of
Hebrew teacher Zelichenok in ear-
ly August. Arrested on charges of
defaming the state. Zelichenok
was sentenced to three year- in a
labor camp. Nevertheless. Gilbert
said he was "completely free'' to
meet with refuseniks.
ome men rise to greatness
because of their upbringing.
Joshua did in spite of his.
R
Joshua
Then and Now
lAwSnS^ mm fllM J0 THEM AND NOW
HSSS^ffi1^ SARRAZW-andALAK ARKIN Music fcy PHILIPPE SAROE
SSffi5iH.,E!1 b0flk Mm mm "*< ROBERT LANTOS
n and STEPHEWJ ROTH Directed bv TED KQTCHEFF

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N BROWARD: MOVIES AT PLANTATION. AND MOVIEs'aT TOWN CENTER


Luna Gal
A Water Wonderland
On The Sea of Galilee
NEW YORK The recently-
opened Luna Gal Golan Beach
water amusement park and sports
complex offers its guests a wide
range of aquatic activities.
Located on the picturesque nor-
theastern shore of the Sea of
Galilee, the site has quickly
become a favorite vacation spot
for tourists and Israelis alike.
Founded by five area moshavim,
cooperative settlements, the
enterprise is the largest of its kind
in Israel.
Luna Gal's colorful, high and
winding water slides are its main
attractions. For the very young
(or the timid) there's a mini-slide.
Twin blue "hurricane" slides
specialize in curves and turns. The
park's crowning glories are the
two Kamikaze water slides, 52
feet, the tallest in Israel, definite-
ly not for the faint-hearted, but an
exhilirating experience for the
fearless.
The all-encompassing view of
the Sea of Galilee from the slide's
top is a fringe benefit to be en-
joyed during the short wait for a
turn. The breathtaking ride down
the water-coated, bright orange
slide lasts less than a minute, but
the memory lingers on. The ad-
mission fee to the Lurft Gal area
allows for unlimited access to the
slides, and the tenth trip down is
just as thrilling as the first.
Should one want a diversion
from the slides, the bumper boat
pool offers motorized boats which
dodge and ram into each other, ac-
cording to one's luck and skill.
Children can frolic for hours in a
water amusement pool specifically
designed for the younger set
climbing in and out of gaily col-
ored barrels connected by nets,
bobbing up and down on a bridge
of plastic containers in the water.
For landlubber children, there's a
sandbox with large plastic struc-
tures to crawl through.
Comfortable lounge chairs
abound, as do protective um-
brellas for those who've had
enough sun. Nights at Luna Gal
include disco music, flashing
lights and special live perfor-
mances in addition to the regular
daytime activities.
Water sports to suit every taste
are offered at the adjacent Golan
Beach Marina. The extensive
variety of activities makes it dif-
ficult to choose what to do first, so
one might as well bask in the sun-
shine on the grassy area around
the lake and take a dip in the
refreshing water while deciding.
If one prefers a relaxing,
leisurely way to spend time on the
water, a yacht cruise along the
Sea of Galilee is a pleasant option
it's particularly romantic by
moonlight.
For the more intrepid soul
parascending is a short but intox
icating adventure. Imagine the ex-
citement of flying through the air,
supported by a parachute as you
are towed by a motorboat.
Ready to go back to the surface?
There is a choice of a sedate pedal
boat ride, water-skiing or wind-
surfing. If you've been wanting to
learn the latter, this is an oppor-
tunity to benefit from the Golan
Beach's professional instructors
and first class rental equipment,
as well as the excellent wind direc-
tions and coastline structure
prevailing at the Sea of Galilee.
Searching for something
physically demanding that will
also enable you to see the region's
ughtt? You can paddle around the
lake on your own in a kayak or join
r a group excursion. The three-hour
guided kayak tours to the Zaki
and Majresa lagoons lead you to
areas rich in rare combinations of
flora and fauna. One can hear the
call of the black partridge and see
wild ducks, sandpipers, flam-
ingoes and numerous other exotic
birds.
Most of the area's mammals, in-
cluding wild boar, otters and
jackals, shy away during daylight
but one may just be lucky enough
to cath a glimpse of a graceful
gazelle. Due to the Jordan
Valley's location and its sweet
water lagoons, the region boasts
extremely varied vegetation from
papyrus reed, willows and jujube
trees to desert plants such as jun-
cus and cressa.
The multitude of services and
activities at the a Luna Gal-Golan
Beach resort, combined with the
area's natural beauty, guarantee
an enjoyable vacation. Accom-
modation facilities in the area
range from the nearby Ramot
Holiday Village (which also offers
sporting activities) to the camping
sites of Ein Gev, Maagan and
Haon all located on the Sea of
Galilee and the hotels and youth
hostels of Tiberias on the western
side of the lake.
Congressman Udell
To Receive JNF
'Tree of Life' Award
NEW YORK Arizona Con-
gressman Morris K. Udall will
receive the Jewish National
Funds Tree of Life Award at a
dinner to be held on Oct. 13 in the
Camelback Inn of Scottsdale,
Ariz.
Chairmen of the event are Dar-
win Aycock, secretary treasurer
of the Arizona state AFL-CIO;
Robert Begam, attorney; D.
Michael Rappaport, assistant
general manager of government
affairs for the Salt River Project;
William R. Schulz, Arizona
businessman; James P. Simmons,
chairman of the board and chief
executive officer of the United
Bank of Arizona; Keith L. Turley,
chairman of the board and chief
executive officer of the Arizona
Public Service Company; and
Charles Wahlheim, corporate
developer for the Western Sav-
ings and Loan Association and the
Joe E. Woods Construction
Company.
UDALL HAS repeatedly been
cited in U.S. News and World
Report polls as one of the "most
effective committee chairmen" by
Democratic and Republican col-
leagues. As chairman of the In-
terior Committee, he is actively
involved in legislation concerning
nuclear energy, public lands, na-
tional parks, and Indian affairs.
He is responsible for much
significant legislation, including
the Alaska Lands Bill, the 1974
campaign finance reform laws,
and the 1982 Nuclear Waste
Management Policy Act.
As a recipient of the Tree of
Life Award, Udall's record of
Morris K. Udall
public service and leadership is be-
ing recognized by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund, the agency responsi-
ble for land development and af-
forestation in Israel.
Udall has represented Arizona's
Second Congressional District in
the U.S. House of Represen-
tatives since May, 1961, serves on
the House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee, and is the alternating
chairman of the Office of
Technology Assessment. He has
been an active supporter of the
Israel Bond Committee of Tucson,
Ariz., and, in 1983, was named
honorary chairman of the
American Parkinson's Disease
Association.
W. Germany Names
New Envoy To Israel
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Wilhelm
Haas, a 54-year-old career
diplomat, has been named to
replace Nils Hansen as West Ger-
many's Ambassador to Israel in a
reshuffling of foreign service ap-
pointments that is a direct conse-
quence of the latest espionage
scandal here.
Hansen, who has served in
Israel less than four years, has
been nominated to represent the
Federal Republic at North Atlan-
tic Treaty Organization (NATO)
headquarters in Brussels. The
vacancy came about when
Chancellor Helmut Kohl decided
to remove Heribert Hellenbroich
from his post as head of the in-
Twisting network of water slides at Luna Gal offer children oj all
ages endless hours of fun and amusement. The adjacent Golan
Beach Marina on the Sea of Galilee boasts a wide range of sports
activities ranging from sailing to kayaking through lush lagoons
in the Jordan Valley.
Tel Aviv Univ. Professor
Call To Organize Judaic
Studies Center at Vatican U.
NEW YORK Prof. Daniel
Carpi of Tel Aviv University has
been invited to help organize the
first center for Jewish studies at
the Vatican's Gregoriana Univer-
sity in Rome. The invitation sets a
new precedent in Israeli academic
relations with the Holy See, which
has no diplomatic ties with Israel.
Prof. Carpi, who recently com-
pleted three years as director of
the Chaim Rosenberg School for
Jewish Studies at Tel Aviv
University, will spend the fall
semester at Gregoriana, where he
will give a course on the Jewish
communities of Western Europe
and the Mediterranean from the
expulsion of the Jews from Spain
in 1492 to the beginning of the
Zionist movement.
The Pontificia Universita
Gregoriana, the Vatican's major
institution of higher learning, has
an institute for the study of Bible,
and is in the process of updating
its curriculum to include modern
Jewish history, Prof. Carpi said.
The new center to be named the
Interfaculty Center of Judaic
Studies, will focus on this period.
"The appointment could usher
in a new era of academic exchange
between Tel Aviv and Gregoriana
University," according to Prof.
Gabriel Cohen, Tel Aviv's dean of
Humanities. Prof. Ary R. Crollius,
the dean of Gregoriana's faculty
of theology, visited the Tel Aviv
telligence service.
HE WILL BE replaced by
Hans-Georg Wieck, Bonn's pre-
sent representative to NATO who
is to be succeeded in Brussels by
Hansen. A Foreign Ministry
spokesman said Hansen will re-
main in Tel Aviv until after West
German President Richard von
Weizsaecker's official visit to
Israel next month.
Hansen is one of the most
popular diplomats in Israel where,
during his relatively brief tenure,
he learned Hebrew with sufficient
fluency to deliver speeches it at
language without using notes. His
main field of activity has been to
enhance cultural ties between
West Germany and Israel.
Prof. Daniel Carpi
University campus earlier this
year to discuss the possibility of
joint research projects and the ex-
change of professors and students
with Prof. Carpi and Prof. Cohen.
"Professor Crollius mentioned a
number of possible topics for joint
research and subscribed to some
our periodicals," Prof. Cohen
said, adding:
"It would be premature to go in-
to further details, but the invita-
tion to Prof. Carpi a Jew and an
Israeli is in itself a major
breakthrough."
Israel Enjoying Tourism Boom
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has enjoyed a boom in
tourism over the past 12 months,
and leaders of the industry are
confident they can repeat the suc-
cess and do even better in the year
ahead.
They told a press cnmference
here that a record 865,000
tourists visited Israel in the period
January-July, 1985, a 19 percent
increase over the same period last
year. In the last 12 months, 1.5
million tourists came, represen-
ting $1.5 billion in revenues.
Rafi Farber, director general of
the Ministry of Tourism, said
Israel could increase its tourist
business without investing in a
larger infrastructure.
He pointed out that there are
now some 30,000 hotel rooms in
the country which can accom-
modate more than two million
tourists a year. This means Israel
can absorb an additional 600,000
visitors without building more
hotels.
dfewisHn Floridla
Miami, Florida Friday, September 20.1985 Section B


*ftC 14.-V
ine jewisn i< kmrtiannvj-
rage z-ts me Jewish Klondian/Kriday, September 20, 1985


Israel's Small Size Makes Attack
Possibilities Super Dangerous

Continued from Page 5-A
centers, it is unlikely that it would
pose a significant danger to
Israel's air bases.
Israel's only defense against
surface-to-surface missiles is to
destroy the launchers before the
missiles are fired. This means that
nothing can be done to defend
against surface-to-surface
missiles launched in the opening
minutes of a war. If Arab forces
are the ones to initiate hostilities,
they can expect to be able to in-
flict sufficient damage to Israeli
air bases to retard their operation
during at least the first hours of a
war, even if Israel knows that the
attack is about to take place.
ALTHOUGH ISRAEL may be
able to locate and destroy laun-
chers once a war is underway, this
capability would do little to reduce
the damage inflicted by missiles
launched in the opening minutes
of a conflict. If the missile attacks
are sufficiently effective, they
could do enough damage to reduce
the number of aircraft sorties that
can be generated until repairs are
completed.
Reducing the number of aircraft
that Israel can put into the air also
makes it less likely that strike mis-
sions could be sent against
surface-to-surface missile laun-
chers. In any case, the number of
launchers in the Arab arsenal is so
great that Israel simply cannot
anticiapte being able to destroy all
of them. Accordingly, it appears
that Israel can do little to prevent
Arab missiles from hitting and
damaging air bases and vital air
defense installations.
In summary, it is evident that
Arab armies have devoted
substantial efforts since the 1973
war to increase the strength of
their surface-to-surface missile
forces. They now have more than
200 surface-to-surface missile
launchers, and hundreds of
missiles. Although most of the ex-
isting missiles are older model
systems, the new SS-21s are some
of the most capable tactical
surface-to-surface missiles in the
world. The existing inventories
are sufficient to make it possible
for Arab forces to attack targets
deep inside Israel, and to tem-
porarily suppress even well-
protected air bases.
UNTIL THE 1967 Arab-Israeli
War, most Israeli air bases were
within range of Arab artillery.
The ability of Arab ground forces
to take advantage of Israel's
vulnerability to artillery fire was
marginal in 1967 when compared
to the capabilities that exist today.
Only one Israeli air base, Ramat
David, was subjected to artillery
attack, and even there only
minimal damage was inflicted. Im-
provements in military doctrine
and planning, command and con-
trol, and deployed equipment are
such that in a future conflict vir-
tually all Arab armies would be
able to direct artillery fire on a
high priority target like an air
base. Equally important, artillery
weapons can attack the vulnerable
air base defense systems, in-
cluding radar and antiaircraft
missile battery sites, that protect
the air fields.
The Arab artillery threat has in-
creased enormously in recent
years, in part because the effec-
tive range of artillery available to
Middle Eastern countries has in-
creased substantially during the
past 20 years. In 1967, the best
Arab artillery piece was the
Soviet 130mm M-46 field gun with
a range of 27.5 kilometers, and it
was available only to the Egyp-
tians. The Jordanians were depen-
dent on the American Ml "Long
Tom" with a 22 kilometer range.
Effective ranges are now con-
siderably greater. AllArab armies,
now have artillery with a range of
The Missile Threat from Svria
Syria
Kilometer i.
2i 50
0 25
Slahite Miles
Ma|Or Air
Bases
Minor Air
Bases
at least 30 kilometers, and many
possess weapons with ranges ap-
proaching 40 kilometers.
THE JORDANIANS have the
Austrian-built GHN-45, which has
a 39 kilometer range when firing
rocket assisted (RAP) rounds, and
the Syrians and Egyptians
possess the Soviet 180mm S-23
with a 30 kilometer range that can
be increased to 44 kilometers
when firing rocket assisted projec-
tiles. According to a recent
report, Iraq may have purchased
100 G-5 155mm guns from South
Africa. This weapon has a range
of 37.5 kilometers without use of
rocket-assisted ammunition.
The effectiveness of the ar-
tillery can be enhanced by the use
of new types of munitions. Guns
and howitzers now can fire im-
proved conventional munitions
(shells filled with bomblets) and
artillery-delivered mines are now
a reality. Thus, not only has the
lethality of artillery increased, but
it also has been improved by the
availability of new munitions that
could be of use in air base denial.
For example, anti-tank and anti-
personnel mines delivered by ar-
tillery could prevent aircraft from
using an airfield, and at the same
time inhibit efforts to repair run-
ways. While no Arab country cur-
rently has artillery-delivered
mines, it seems certain that they
will have such weapons by the ear-
ly 1990s.
Besides the tube artillery, Arab
countries have begun to acquire
rocket artillery in significant
numbers. Artillery rockets with a
range of 20 kilometers are now
widely available, and systems with
ranges of up to 40 kilometers are
becoming increasingly common.
For example, Egypt has the
Sakr-30 with a 30 kilometer
range; Iraq and Syria reportedly
have the Soviet 220mm BM-27
multiple rocket launcher with a 35
to 40 kilometer range; and Saudi
Arabia has expressed a strong in-
terest in the American-built
MLRS with its 40 kilometer
range.
Significantly, several Arab
countries have acquired an ar-
tillery weapon with a range of
nearly 70 kilometers: the
Brazilian-made Astros 2 long-
range bombardment rocket.
When fired from positions in Jor-
dan, the Astros 2 could hit most
Israeli air bases. Iraq has taken
delivery of a number of Astros 2
systems, and Libya reportedly
also ordered it. Saudi Arabia is
the latest Arab country to acquire
the Astros 2, and apparently in-
tends to co-produce it. When
equipped with the SS-60 rocket,
the Astros 2 has a range of about
68 kilometers.
Surface-to-Surface Missiles
FROG-7 SS-21 SS-23 SCUD-B SS.17
Country of Origin USSR USSR USSR USSR
Warhead Weight (kg) 550 ? ? 1000
USSR
Warhead Type
Maximum Range
(km I
Time to Fire
(minutes)
Accuracy: CEP
(meters)
User Countries
high cluster; cluster; high high
explosive; anti- chemical explosive: explosive
chemical runaway?;
chemical
chemical
70
20-30
5(H)-700
Egypt.
Iraq.
Kuwait.
Libya.
Syria
120
50-300
Iraq?.
Syria
500
None
28(1 90(1
60 120-180
1000 900
Egypt. Iraq. Libya. Syria Iraq*
Source kby. Weapam anil Taclh > of tht Savin Army, p 211; Million Bulunn /w<4 ;*.<
The increasing capability of ar-
tillery weaponry has profound
strategic implications in an en-
vironment where a lack of depth
puts air bases so close to the front
lines. Under existing conditions,
any Israeli air base within 30
kilometers of Arab-held territory
can be subjected to intensive ar-
tillery bombardment from guns
and rockets. Air bases located up
to 40 kilometers from Arab
ground forces could be subjected
to artillery fire sufficiently in-
tense to prevent aircraft from tak-
ing off or landing. Even air bases
located up to 70 kilometers from
Arab artillery positions are now
vulnerable to attack from conven-
tional artillery rockets.
Because only one Israeli base is
within 40 kilometers of Syria, and
only two are within 70 kilometers,
Syrian artillery has only limited
opportunities to attack Israeli air-
fields, Syrian SS-21 missiles pose
a more significant threat, but one
that is still limited by geographic
considerations/Only four Israeli,
military airfields are within range
of the SS-21, and this includes on-
ly one major air base. While the
Syrians also have the longer-
ranged SCUD missile, the effec-
tiveness of that weapon must be
considered doubtful. Thus, ar-
tillery and missile fire would pre-
sent a serious but not crippling
threat to Israeli air bases in the
event of an Arab-Israeli war that
involved only Syria, or if the
fighting was restricted to Syrian
territory only.
THE THREAT would increase
if the Soviet Union decided to sup
ply Syria with the SS-23 surface
to-surface missile in moderate
quantities. SS-23s launched from
Syria would have sufficient range
to hit any of Israel's air bases, and
would be able to inflict sufficient
damage to runways to temporari-
ly incapacitate even the best pro-
tected facilities.
If Jordan becomes involved in a
conflict, however, the threat pos-
ed by artillery and missiles
becomes significantly greater,
since all of Israel's air bases are
within 75 kilometers of Jordan.
Although only one Israeli air base
is within range of Jordan's ex-
isting artillery, Israel's antiair-
craft defenses and radar sites
would still be vulnerable. By at-
tacking air defense sites, the Jor-
Arab Surface-to-Surface Missile Launchers, 1984
FROG-7 SCUD-B SS-21 SS-12 TOTAL
Egypt
Iraq
Kuwait
Libya
Syria
12
24
4
48
18
12
12
70
18
12
24
36
4
118
48
TOTAL 106
112
12 +
230'
SOWCCI Mihlan B.ilum, IWU-KS. The MiJJIr EaU Mtlmirx Balum. /WW
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inians would ease the way>fer
rike aircraft.
[Expeditionary forces deployed
Jordan and equipped with
irface-to-surface missiles and
range artillery would pose a
irticularly serious threat. When
fiiivcd to positions on Jordanian
jil, SS-21 surface-to-surface
iissile launchers from Iraq and
yria and Astros 2 rocket laun-
ders from Iraq, Libya, or Saudi
abia would provide an Arab
Balition with the range, accuracy,
I lethality to strike every one of
Gael's air bases. At the very
these weapons could pre-
ent aircraft from using the run-
ways, effectively neutralizing the
bases. Thus, during the crucial
ening minutes of an attack,
forces could keep a signifi-
int portion of Israel's air force
rom ever leaving the ground.
ISRAELI AIR BASES will
ecome increasingly vulnerable to
Vrab ground weaponry as the
^990s approach. The inventories
existing sophisticated long-
inged weapons, like the Astros 2
rid the SS-21, will continue to
row, and it is likely that other ad-
vanced weapons will be acquired.
I i is possible that by the end of the
decade the Soviets could supply
5S-23 missiles to Syria and Iraq.
Sophisticated weapons also could
obtained from Western sup-
iliers. NATO countries in par-
ticular have shown considerable
Interest in developing new
nissiles and rockets specifically
designed to carry anti-runway
dunitions. For example, the U.S.
i examined modified surface at-
Arab Rocket Artillery, 1984
Country
Caliber of Range
Type (mm) Origin (km) User Countries
Aattos 2/SS-60 300 Brazil 68.0 Iraq. Libya, Saudi Arabia*
MLRS 227 USA 40.0 +
BM-27 220 USSR 35.0 + Iraq?, Syria?
BM-21 122 USSR 20.4 Egypt. Iraq, Libya. Syria
RM-70 122 Czechoslovakia 20.5 Libya
Sakr-30 122 Egypt 30.0 Egypt
Firos 25 122 Italy 25.0
*On order
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish FToridiari Page 3-B
Strong Jewish Identity
Among Soviet Newcomers
Sowed Fow Jane'\ Armour und Artillery. IVH.1-H4.
tack versions of the Lance and
Patriot missiles that would be
armed with anti-runway muni-
tions. It is possible that some of
those weapons might be made
available to Arab forces by the
early 1990s.
In the final analysis, however,
the magnitude of the threat will
be determined less by the
weapons themselves than by the
question of whether or not they
are deployed against Israel from
Jordanian soil. When based in
Syria, most of these weapons lack
the range needed to attack more
than a few Israeli air bases. In
contrast, the same weapons fired
from Jordan can hit strategic
targets throughout Israel.
Even when Arab forces acquire
effective long-range missiles, like
the SS-23, Jordan will still offer
important geographic advantages
to an attacking Arab force. There
will always be far more of the
weapons with shorter ranges, and
the closer an Arab force can come
to its intended targets, the more
damage that can be done. It is this
vulnerability to attacks launched
from Jordan territory that largely
explains the sensitivity of Israeli
military planners to efforts by the
Jordanians to enhance their offen-
sive capabilities.
^Letter to the Editor
Neatest Hoax Against Jews
|EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The greatest hoax ever
I perpetuated against the Jews was
i that they were referred to as
"God's Chosen Children."
Another great hoax was that the
Son of God, known and worship-
ped as the Christian Messiah, was
born, raised, lived and died a
"religious Jew.
Religious fundamentalists have
acquired their prejudices, jealousy
and hate in the cauldron of these
misconceptions. It is therefore
understandable why, for almost
2,000 years, Jews have suffered
from the indignities and cruelty of
bigotry born from ignorance.
Politics and the need for religious
scapegoats served as weapons for
their damnation. These prejudices
were heightened here as a result
of their being a miniscule minority
in America, not more than 2-3 per-
cent of the population.
In my travels through the Bible
Belt in the early '20's, the
I greatest interest inhabitants
. W^found in me was when I was called
' upon to explain to them what a
Jew is really like. In truth,
millions of people in our country
had no idea what constitutes being
a Jew.
Jews were barred from working in
many commercial, banking, and
industrial houses. These restric-
tions forced thousands of Jews to
become itinerant peddlers.
An anecdote will show how
many Jews, without roots or
funds, found success and roots in
states where they were received
with prejudice and suspicion.
In Knoxville, Tenn., recently
the citv honored its oldest active
and m< ;t philanthropic citizen a
Jew. When asked why he settled
in Knoxville so many years ago, he
said, "An an itinerant peddler,
while passing through town,
hawking my wares, my horse
died."
JACK H. LEVIN
North Miami Beach
Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, presi-
dent of Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
will be the guest speaker for
Yom Kippur services of Temple
Beth Sholom.
By BEN GALLOB
A new study of Soviet Jewish
settlers indicates that many com-
monly held perceptions by
American-born Jews about them
are inaccurate, particularly in
evidence that such Jews have a
stronger perception of themselves
as Jews than had been believed.
The study, sponsored by the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York, also found
that the newcomers want very
much to be part of the Jewish
community where they have settl-
ed and that their attitudes are
very much like those of native
American-born Jews.
Findings of the study led to
recommendations for changes of
the current programs of Federa-
tion agencies for the Jewish
emigres and a shift to greater em-
phasis on family programs. The
study also recommended that the
agencies extend more service for
the emigre community, according
to Dr. Seymour Lachman, chair-
man of the Federation subcommit-
tee on services to new Jewish im-
migrants. The subcommittee con-
ducted the research with grants
from the Baron de Hirsch Fund
and the Brookdale Endowment
Fund.
THE RESEARCHERS inter-
viewed 233 Soviet newcomers,
with the goal of helping the
Federation and its member agen-
cies to encourage Jewish iden-
tification and affiliation among
the estimated 50,000 Soviet
Jewish newcomers in New York.
Lachman said the study found
that "the desire to affiliate had
been there all along but that it
emerged only after the immediate
needs of housing and employment
were solved." He said many of the
migrants had been in the United
States since the mid-1970s.
He listed four major study finds.
First, the emigres have mostly
positive feelings about being
Jewish. Between 85 and 95 per-
cent of the respondents react
positively to such symbols as mat-
zoh in a supermarket, seeing a
synagogue or hearing Jewish
music.
Second, they mirror Jewish
behavior in many ways. The "vast
majority" observe Jewish
holidays. At least 70 percent take
part in seders, attend synagogue
on the High Holy Days, and light a
Menorah or Chanukah. A majority
58 percent give money to
Jewish causes, mostly to Israel.
Third, they have a strong com-
mitment to transmitting Jewish
identity to their children, most in-
dicating they feel it is important
that their children learn about
Jewish history and culture. More
than 80 percent want their
children to marry .lews and to
observe Jewish holidays.
Fourth, they report that they
had mainly good experiences with
Jewish institutions and that their
association with synagogues,
Jewish centers and Jewish Ys has
encouraged many to seek involve-
ment with the broader Jewish
community.
BUT THE study also pointed
out significant differences. For
example, the newcomers are not
used to making their Jewishness
public and have no tradition of for-
mal affiliation with Jewish
organizations, a practice which
could be dangerous in the Soviet
Union.
Another finding was that while
adult emigres limit their social
lives to their fellow-emigres, their
children include American-born
Jewish children among their close
friends.
The study showed that most of
the Soviet Jews are between 30
and 50 years of age; most living in
Brooklyn or Queens, either with
or near parents or in-laws; most
have been in the U.S. for at least
five yars and plan to become
American citizens; two-thirds
have at least adequate com-
petence in English; they are well
educated. Sixty percent have at
least the equivalent of a bachelor's
degree and had professional jobs
in Russia; and 70 percent know
some Yiddish.
After the researchers met and
interviewed the Russian Jews,
they met with Federation agen-
cies and other Jewish community
agencies for evaluations of ser-
vices presently offered to Soviet
Jews. The Federation reported
that, since 1978, the Federation
and its agencies have provided
about $12 million for services to
Russian Jews, including scholar-
ships through the Fund for Jewish
Education.
It will
earlier
in
be remembered that
the nation's history
Temple Beth Am
Breakfast Forum
"Who is a Jew" will be the topic
of discussion at the Brotherhood
Breakfast Forum of Temple Beth
] Am, on Sunday morning, Sept.
I 29, at 9:30 a.m., in the Temple
Youth Lounge.
Participants will be Rabbi War-
[ ren Kasztl, of Congregation
I Shaare Tefillah, Franklin D.
I Kreutzer, National Vice Presi-
Tti8nt, United Synagogues of
J America.
Myron Kahn, President of Beth
Am Brotherhood, will act as
moderator.
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1965 Nbi.o Untruly I m |
--------1


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. _-------
Page4-B The Jewish FToridian/Friday. September 20. 1985
From the Pulpit
Three Type of Returnees
i
By DR. CASL KLEIN
HaJlandale Jewish Center
On Koi Nkire night, most Jews
usually come to the synagogue,
and no matter how far they have
wandered from the fold, they find
their way back to the house of
worship. The returning Jews
represent every color and shade in
the spectrum of Jewish commit-
ment. We recite everyday in the
synagogue, and especially on the
High Holy Days, a certain prayer
that suggests at least three types
of returnees "0 Guardian of
Israel, guard the remnant of
Israel, and let no destruction be
for the Israel who proclaim daily
. 'Hear 0 Israel.' 0 Guardian of
the 'one' people, guard the rem-
nant of the 'one' people. 0 Guar-
dian of the 'holy' people, guard
the remnant of the 'holy' people."
One type of returning Jew is the
"remnant" of the flock. He is the
Jew who lives on the periphery of
Jewish life, a marginal Jew whose
spiritual life is frail. Such an in-
dividual's life is usually wrapped
up in material things and material
values.
HIS WHOLE strength, force
and vitality is spent on things
other than spiritual attainment.
Whatever identification with God
and Torah is present, is Skeerit.
leftover Judaism, the fading
values of a dimly remembered
grandfather or grandmother.
Such a Jew lives in the "twilight
zone" of Judaism where Jewish
confusion reigns, where it is im-
possible to distinguish between
the authentic and imitation. It is
remarkable that on Yom Kippur
night he. too, pronounces Sk'ma
Yisroel Hear 0 Israel, the Lord
our God, the Lord is One."
A second, tyfie. of .reluming Je w
is one who places his entire em-'
phasis on Am Ehad. the one na-
tion. This is the Jewish nationalist
whose Jewish identity rests on the
t
Dr. Carl Klein
peoplehood of Israel. Basically
devoid of Jewish spiritual con-
sciousness, of observances and
commandments, he has pride in
his people and is willing to fight
for its survival in the State of
Israel as well as in the Diaspora.
He might be found on college cam-
puses, he might fight against anti-
Semitism.
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HIS INTENSE nationalism at
times moves him to say that Jews
should be like "all nations."
However, he is ignorant of Jewish
values and puts nation before
God, secularism before religion,
patriotism before prayer. He, too,
is in the Synagogue on Yom Kip-
pur. He comes to the synagogue
with many Jewish credits and
needs only to be instructed to
understand. To him the world
Shema means not only to hear but,
also to understand.
The third Jewish type who is in
the synagogue on Kol Nidre night
is neither a Skeerit, a remnant of
the flock of Israel living on the
periphery, nor only a nationalistic
Jew, but a whole Jew, a commit-
ted Jew, sensing that he belongs
to a holy nation and who values
Jewish tradition and Jewish
heritage as a vital part of his
everyday life.
He is not only a Jew who listens
but also a Jew who learns, who is
part of the Am Kadosh, commit-
ted to the totality of Jewish life.
Such a Jew knows that the word
Keduska is the basic key to
Judaism.
So on Yom Kippur. the
peripheral Jew, the nationalistic
Jew, and the totally committed
Jew knock on the doors of their
hearts and at the same time knock
on the doors of Heaven that God
may answer their prayers.
The Fractured Heart
Of American Religious Judaism
By BEN GALLOB
The adherents of the conflicting
ideologies of American fundamen-
talist and liberal Judaism live in
an uneasy co-existence, represen
ting conditions within an ap
parently quiescent volcano frorr
which molten lava erupts with un
predictable but dependable
frequency.
There are areas of common
Jewish concern so compelling that
extremists in both camps have
grumblingly accepted Orthodox
group cooperation with Conser-
vative and Reform represen-
tatives. Such areas are served
through the Synagogue Council of
America, the Jewish Chaplaincy
Commission and dozens of boards
of Orthodox. Conservative and
Reform Jewish rabbis functioning
at state and local levels.
Foes of such cooperation in the
Orthodox camp maintain a cons-
tant pressure on the Rabbinical
Council of America, the "cen-
trist" aggregation of Orthodox
rabbis, to quit the Synagogue
Council of America. They go
public when either Conservative
or Reform spokesmen take
stances which Jews of the Or-
thodox consider indefensible
violations of Jewish Religious
Law (Halacha).
BUT THE lava eventually
cools, no damage is done to the
cooperative arrangements and
this is likely to be the outcome of
one of the most recent controver-
sies the appearance of Rabbi
Louis Bernstein, president of the
Rabbinical Council, at an annual
convention of the Rabbinical
Assembly, the association of Con-
servative rabbis, in an exchange
arrangement under which Rabbi
Alexander Shapiro, RA president,
spoke at the 50th anniversary con-
vention of the Rabbinical Council.
The exchange of appearances,
admittedly unprecedented, was
initiated by Rabbi Shapiro. Berns-
tein addressed the Assembly con-
vention and in return Shapiro
spoke to the Rabbinical Council
delegates.
Shapiro in effect told his Or-
thodox listeners that the needs
which justified such cooperation in
the Synagogue Council and in
hundreds of local boards of rabbis
should be pursued "for the sur-
vival of Judaism in our time." and
that a common approach,
ideological differences aside,
needed to be made to stem the
damage wrought by the admitted
spiraling of mixed marriages in a
secular world.
He stressed that close coopera-
tion between the three branches
would strengthen religious
Judaism in America, help Israel,
and receive a favorable response
from thousands of unaffiliated
Jews "turned off to religious
Judaism" by the "bickering"
among the branches.
EN' ARGUING that "despite our
differences in ideology and for the
same of the Jewish people, we
must work more closely
together." Shapiro stressed that
such cooperation did not mean Or-
thodox approval "of any doctrines
practiced by either Conservative
or Reform Judaism."
In his appearance before the RA
convention. Bernstein said the
real differences between Or-
thodox and non-Orthodox
Judaism were the laws governing
marriage, divorce and conversion.
Shapiro responded, in his ad-
dress to the Orthodox convention,
with a proposal for a national
Court of Jewish Law (Beth Din) to
enable all branches of Jews to con-
vert non-Jews according to Jewish
Religious Laws.
Pulling no punches. Shapiro
took the opportunity to charge the
Israeli rabbinate, which is both
Orthodox and endowed with
governmental authority, with
"disgraceful" treatment of Con-
servative Judaism in Israel such
as urging Jews to stay away from
Conservative synagogues during
the High Holy Days. He said that
was not the only example of
mistreatment of non-Orthodox
Jews in Israel but "I have never
heard a single voice of protest
from anyone here" over the fact,
as Shapiro described it. that Jews
wish to be Jews "in their own
way."
SHAPIRO ARGUED an
enlighted Orthodox leadership
must not permit an intransigent
rightwing to triumph as the domi-
nant force "even if the future
belongs to you. as the rightw-
ingers assert, and there is no
room for non-Orthodox rabbis and
non-Orthodox Judaism, you will
face a Jewish population of the
future much smaller than today,
much less able to protect the in-
terests of Israel and much less
susceptible to reconversion to the
true Judaism as you understand
it."
Five Rabbinical Council rabbis
walked out in protest when
Shapiro began to speak, sug-
gesting that for them, at least,
civility to a guest speaker took se-
cond place to ideological commit-
ment. But some 150 other rab-
binical delegates listened politely
and even gave Shapiro a mild
round of applause when he com-
pleted his double-barreled appeal
for interreligious cooperation
among American religious Jews
and his denunciation of Israel's
Orthodox state rabbinate
It was not clear whether when
he spoke, Shapiro had been awn
of an uproarious test of the
philosophy of his appeai which
happened only a few hours before
at the same convention.
Bernstein, clearly defending
himself, had denounced certain
rightwing groups" which used
what he called "high pressure tac-
tics" in an effort to force the Rab-
binical Council to rescind the in-
vitation to Shapiro.
BERNSTEIN declared several
times, in his presidential address
that the invitation to Shapiro in no
way implied recognition of the
religious ideology of the Conser
vative movement, asserting that
the differences were "too great to
bridge."
HE SAID some "extreme"
rightwing Orthodox groups tried
to "vilify" the Rabbinical Council,
going so far as "to pressure our
wives." Bernstein added that
some of the groups issued "false
ads" in the United States, put up
posters in Jerusalem denouncing
the Rabbinical Council, and mak
ing many "pressure" telephone
calls late at night to him
He said he felt compelled to tell
his rightwing critics that the ex-
change of visits" between him and
Rabbi Shapiro had been approved
"every step of the way by the ex-
ecutive committee of the Rab-
binical Council. It is a one-time ex-
change and no precedent for the
future."
But it is a certainty that the
latest unburst of lava will cool and
subside and it appears equally cer
tain that the fundamentalists and
the liberal wings in American
Judaism will continue their day-
to-day cooperation in areas where
the need for such cooperation is .
perceived to be more powerful
than the ideological hostilities of
the components of American
religious Judaism.
JTA Services
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bom, Ml 48124.
(313)278-8775
All responses
to be confidential.
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Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "And Moses wrote this law, and delivered it unto the priests
. and unto all th elders of Israel"
(Deuteronomy SI.9).
VAYELEKH
VAYELEKH "And Moses went and spoke these words unto
all Israel. And he said unto them 'I am a hundred and twenty
years old this day. I can no more go out and come in, and the Lord
hath said unto me. Thou shalt not go over this Jordan. .' And
Moses called unto Joshua, and said unto him in the sight of all
Israel: 'Be strong and of good courage, for thou shalt go with this
people into the land which the Lord hath sworn unto their fathers
to give them; and thou shalt cause them to inherit it. ..' And
Moses wrote this law, and delivered it unto the priests the sons of
Levi, that bore the ark of the covenant of the Lord, and unto all
the elders of Israel. Now therefore write ye this song for you,
and teach thou it the children of Israel; put it in their mouths, that
this song may be a witness for Me against the children of Israel"
(Deuteronomy SI. 1-19).
(The recounting of flit Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "Tht Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume if available at 7s Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Dolphins Accommodate Jews Fans
The Miami Dolphins, in order to accommodate the religious
needs of their many Jewish fans, changed the kick-off time of the
Sunday, September 15 game against the Indianapolis Colts from
4 p.m. to 1 p.m. Since Rosh Hashanah began Sunday night at
sunset, the 4 p.m. time would have prohibited many Jewish fans
from attending the game.
In a letter by Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Executive Vice President
of the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami dated April 18 to
Mr. Joseph Robbie, Miami Dolphins President, he wrote, "Since
that evening (September 15) is Rosh Hashanah, I would suggest
that the game be changed to 1 p.m., if at all possible. This change
would be most helpful for the many Jewish fans, in allowing them
to see the game and attend synagogue services as well."
The Miami Dolphins, sensitive to the religious needs of their
fans, have made similar changes in the past where such conflicts
existed.
Chaim Boneh Appointed AMSECO
Southeast Regional Manager
David Mersky, President of
Ampal Securities Corporation
(AMSECO) announced a farewell
reception in honor of Micha Paz,
Vice President and Southeast
Regional Manager for AMSECO,
to be held Oct. 2, at the Konover
Hotel in Miami Beach.
During his stay, Mr. Paz opened
"The best of our
officers in the Air
Force, the Tank
Corps, the Navy.
Communications.
Artillery and the
Engineering Corps
are nearly all of
them Technion
graduates."
Gen. Moshe Das/an
UTECHNION
ISRAEL INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
868-5666
new markets for the sale of Am-
pal's securities and renewed ties
between the Florida and Israeli
business communities. Mr. Paz
has served AMSECO in North
America for four years and is
returning to Israel to take on
assignments for Ampal's Israel
office.
Replacing Mr. Paz is Chaim
Boneh .'ho, for the past eight
years, has represented AMSECO
in the southwest. Mr. Boneh will
continue as Vice President and
Southwest Regional Manager in
addition to his new responsibilities
in the southeast.
Ampal Securities Corporation is
a marketing subsidiary of Ampal-
American Israel Corporation that
sells Ampal's long-term deben-
tures. Ampal-American Israel
Corporation is a New York-based
corporation principally engaged in
financing and investing in finan-
cial, industrial, advanced
technological and agricultural
enterprises in Israel.
CANTOR WM. W. LIPSON Is
accepting students for the study
of Hazzanuth, Nusach, Yiddish
and liturgical repertoire, and
Cantlllatlon.
Please call:
(305)596-4818
PATTI PERLMAN PSY. D
CLINICAL ASSOCIATE
COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE INCLUDES
CARDIAC REHABILITATION GROUP
STRESS MANAGEMENT
CHILD AND ADULT PSYCHOTHERAPY
PERSONALITY AND INTELLECTUAL EVALUATION
PREMENSTRUAL GROUP
BROWARD PSYCHOLOGICAL GROUP
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4400 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
961-5447
961-5449

Yom Kippur Services Begin
At Temples, Synagogues,
Tuesday Evening
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellghting Time
7:01 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Fr**dman
Cantor Ian Alpom Conservative
Late Frl. S.iyic.1 8 ISp m
Daily Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. and 6:30 p m
Sal. 8 30 am
TEMPLE BETH AM
5050 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Or. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Jamas L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl. am 8:15 p m Rabbi Jemea L. Simon will
speak on the lhama ol "Atoning For Tha Sin
ol Gossip Sat. 11:15 a.m. Bar Mltivah
Michaal Savltz. Yom Kippur E.a. 6:30 and
9 p.m Yom Kippur morn. 915 a.m.
Altarnoon 3:30 p.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau, /fit*-
Rabbi Emeritus (W)
Rev. Milton Freeman, v^*'
Ritual Director
Frl. eve 5:30 In tha Chapai.
Sat 9:00 a.m. Kidduan following edrvlcee
Mlnchahat7:3Sp.m.
Sun. 8:00 a.m. a 8:S0 p.m.
Mon. A Thura. 7:30 a.m. I 5:30 p.m.
lux Wad. 1 Frl. 7:45 a.m. 5:30p.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., MB., FL 33138
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nisslm Benyamini
Daily Mlnyan
Sabbath services a 15 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 8.W. 120th Street
236-2601 i
Rabbl David H. Auerbach ',
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Melsels
Shabbat Servtcee Frl. S p.m. Sal. 9:30 a.m.
KolNldraTuaa., 7 p.m. Yom Kippur Wad. 9 a.m
King* lay Country Club
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. 41st St. 538-7231
i DR. LEON KRONISH, RABBI iiba.al
HARRYJOLr.AUXILIARY RABBI l "***
PAUL 0. CAPLAN, ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CON VISE R
Kol Nldra Tuaa 6:15 p.m. A 6:45 p.m.
Yom Kippur Wad. 9:15 a.m. 1:15 p.m.
ChHdran'a earvlce.
| BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Llpschltz, Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally aarvlcaa 7:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:25 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mfamr'i Pionmtr Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomstein
Associate Cantor RacheHa F. Nekton
Executive Director Philip S. Goldln
Director ol Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
Kendall: Rabbl Haakall M. Ba-rnat "Shabbat ol
Downtown: RabblRe. D Perimeter "Sabbath
ol Rapanlanoa"
Frl. ova. S p.m.
Kol Nldra Tuaa 6 p.m. Yom Kippur Wad. 10 a.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 687-5667
Michael B. Elsens tat, Rabbl
Friday aarvlcaa 6-15 p.m
| TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
' 910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
I Shoehanah Raab, Cantor
Yom Kippur Tuaa. 7:00 p.m.
Wad. 6:00 a.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh ( w>
Morning) aarvlcaa 6 a.m
Friday lata availing aarvica
6:15 pm
, Saturday 9 a.m. and 7:45 p.m
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwaig, Rabbi
)
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbl Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krlssel
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
8586334
(I?
Kol Nldral Tuaa 6:30 p.m. Rabbi
Man Shapiro and Cantor Sol Chaaln
will officlata Rabbl will dlacuaa tha
thamaa "I Remember Whan!" and "Terrorism"
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbl
Moshe Frledler, Cantor ((
Dr. Joseph A. Gorf Inkel, ,
Rabbl Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
Friday aarvlcaa 7 p.m.
Saturday 6:45 a.m. aarvtca.

CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 ^
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi
Moshe Buryn, Cantor
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epelbaum. President.
Religious Committee
Shabbal Servicas 8 30 a m Sarmon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue (
Miami Beach _
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Shabbat aarvica Frl. 6 p.m.
Shabbal Shuvah Sat. 9 a.m.
Kol Nldra Tuaa. 7:30 p.m.
Yom Kippur Wad. 9:30 a.m Theatre ol
Performing Aria.
Rabbl Lahrman will preach: Cantor Shllman
will chant accompanied by tha temple
choir. Rabbl Lehrman will preach Nallah Service.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE NERTAMID 868-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 688-9833
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene LabOVitZ Conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. & 75 St., 362-3343
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modom orthodo>
Frl. 7:15 p.m. Sal. 9:30 a.m. Kol Nldra Tuaa. 6:55
p.m Yom Kippur Wad. a 30 a.m. and Ylakor
service 10 a.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Roah Hashanah: Sun eve. 6 p.m.
Mon. 9 a.m. Children 10:30 a.m. Adulla
Tuaa 10 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 /1g.N
Dr. Norman N.Shapiro, Rabbi (Sb)
Benjamin Adler, Cantor v-?v
JDavid Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Kol Nldra Tuaa. 6:45 p.m. Yom Kippur Wad.
9 a.m.: ChBdrone Service 10 a.m.; Youth
Service 1140 a.m.


f age'fr-p fhe Jewish Klondkn/Friday, September 20, 1985
3t%/tfte*t*t
Singles Support Group meets for group discussions followed by
social and dancing Monday and Fnday from 8 p.m.. at the INN on the
Bay 1819 79 St causeway Facilitator is Dr. Marshall Zipper PhD.
Kenneth Treister. Miami architect, will participate in an exhibition
of furniture Sept. 27 through Oct. 26 with an artists' reception open-
ing night at 7 p.m. sponsored by the Netsky Gallery.
The League of Women Voters of Dade County will introduce a pro-
gram about Women and Politics at the Museum of Science on Thurs-
day at 5:30 p.m.
Carol Wien. designer and author of The Great American Log Cabin
Quilt Book will teach a class in Log Cabin Patchwork Quilting at the
South Dade Jewish Community Center for four sessions beginning
Friday. Oct. 4 at 10 a.m until noon Beginners are welcome
Sunday. Oct. 6, at 3 p.m. Elaine Gordon, speaker Pro Tempore of the
Florida House of Representatives, will officiate at the Plaque In-
stallation Ceremony at Hospice House, located on the campus of
North Shore Medical Center. 1100 Northwest 95 Street. The dedica-
tion honors Sigma Nu Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi for having com-
pletely furnished one room, the Yellow Room, at Hospice House
Former United States Senator Richard (Dick) Stone will be in Miami
Thursday, Sept 19. for a noon luncheon honoring him and City Com-
missioner Alex Daoud, candidate for mayor
Pre-view for the "Direct from Broadway Hit Kuni-Leml starts Sept
26. officially opening Oct 10.
Dr. Mark Nelson, a pharamacologist in the University of Miami
School of Medicine, has been chosen as a five-year Established In-
vestigator by the American Heart Association.
The Association for Retarded Citizens. Dade, needs volunteers to
speak and answer questions about our many programs and services
at special events, health fairs *nd in educational settings. If in-
terested, call 576-9675. v
Raimondo's
HOLIDAY AWARD RESTAURANT
OPEN 7DAYS
AMERICAN EXPRESS ACCEPTED
4612 LeJEUNE Rd CORAL GABLES. RES. 666-9919
MR. and MRS. WILLIAM CARMEL and CHILDREN
MR. and MRS. ALLAN (BARBARA) CARMEL
MICHELLE and MARC
MRS. BARBARA KRAKOW. DAVID and BETH
DR. and MRS. JERALD (ANDREA) CARMEL
BRETT, JENNIFER and AMANDA
MR. and MRS. ROBERT (LINDA) SOSSIN
RHONDA. ANDREW and DEANNA
Wishing a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous
New Year To Their Relatives and All Their Friends
One of Three Jews Marries A Christian
M I Ji
TIk book Hiji explores and
explain*
V\hal lpe ol men and Morm-n
inlrrmarrt?
Hm do ihrv put their
relationship in perspevlite wiih
Ifceir famri> and heritage?
Mow do their .hildrrn ifcaj their
religious and elhnk status?
Dr. Lgon Ma>cr hj\ studied
hundred" ol intermarried couples
and lheir children over a decade lo
capture the meaning ol inter -
marriage as dl as how intohed
indi\ JjjI- have struggled lorn
io*e and iradihoii
'Offen /H-rteiruling insight mm
ike problems of inierniamugr .
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-Rabbi Alexander M. Schtndlcr.
President. Lnion of American
Hebre* Congregation.
'Mayer's findings punciun te\
prevailing myths This
should he read In everyone inter-
mad in the futun < Jewish
Amenta."
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liu Jewish Theological
Seminar) ol America
Otclci ,i eup> loi yuursdl m loi
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4
- *N > >
> .*<.
edding

LEFF WARSH
The marriage of Geri Jo Leff to Jeffrey Alan
Warsh took place on Aug. 31 at Temple Emanu-El.
Rabbi Simcha Freedman and Rabbi David
Lehrfield officiated. The bride is the daughter of
Samuel and Margery Leff of North Miami Beach.
She is the granddaughter of Miriam Goldstein of
Bay Harbor Islands and Ruth Leff of Miami Beach.
The groom is the son of Leonard and Estelle
Warsh of Edison, New Jersey.
Roni Leff, sister of the bride, served as maid of
honor. The bridesmaids were Dana Leff, cousin of
the bride, Erica Wald, Lisa Hirsch, Bonnie Cam-
meyer, Cathy Laupheimer. The best man was Alan
.Shapiro. Harry Leff, brother of the bride, Joel
Isler, cousin of the groom, David Gropper, and
Steven Brog served as ushers.
Mrs. Warsh is a graduate of the Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross Hebrew Academy and Emory University.
She also attended Hebrew University in
Jerusalem.
Mrs. Warsh is presently employed as an assis-
tant director of the Anti-Defamation League in
New York City.
Mr. Warsh is a graduate of Franklin and Mar-
shall College and Emory University Law School.
He is currently employed as an executive director
for the Republican Party in New Jersey.
Mr. and Mrs. Warsh are residing in Edison, New
Jersey.
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Alan Warsh
Dr. Grimberg Medical Center
7321 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 33140 Phone 868-6557
Wishes His Patients, Friends & The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy & Healthy New Year
A Happy New Year To All
ROSE AND IR VING NE WMAN
Newman Insurance
Agency, Inc.
1558 NE 162 St.
North Miami Beach, Florida
Dade 940-7515 Broward 921-0616
HEBREW HOME FOR THE AGED
OF MIAMI BEACH AND ITS
NORTH DADE FACILITIES
A Happy
NEW YEAR WISH
True And Sincere
Health, Peace and Happiness
Throughout
The Coming Year
From the Board of Directors,
Ladies Organization, Residents
And Staff.
Leonard Zilbert
PruManl
Sidney Siegel
Exscullvt Vic. PrMld.nl
Rabbi Yaacov S. Weinberg
Rabbi Weinberg
To Open
Lecture Series
Rabbi Yaacov S. Weinberg
Rosh Yeshiva of the Ner Israe
Rabbinical College, Md.. and foun
ding Dean of its Graduate Divi
sion, will inaugurate Congrega
tion Shaaray Tefilah's annual lee
ture series on Sunday evening at 8
p.m. Rabbi Yaakov Sprung,
spiritual leader of the synagogue,
announced that Rabbi Weinberg
will address himself to "Repen-
tance Today; Confronting Tradi-
tion and Women Tomorrow; Aids
and Free-Style Living."
Rabbi Weinberg, who presides
over a student enrollment of 500
pupils at the Ner Israel Rabbinical
College, is considered to be one of
the outstanding authorities on
Jewish Law.
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Pan Am to Begin
Tel Aviv Service Oct. 27
Pan American World Airways, in the midst of a vast expansion
of flights which will boost the number of European cities served
by the airline, announced that it will begin its first ever scheduled
service to Tel Aviv starting oct. 27.
John Krimsky, Jr., Senior Vice President-Marketing, said Pan
Am is announcing the new Tel Aviv service for the Fail of 1985 to
"take advantage of the good winter market potential that Tel
Aviv offers. Although we have served Tel Aviv with charter
flights previously, we are pleased to be extending schedule ser-
vice to Israel."
Krimsky noted that the announcement of new Tel Aviv service,
when coupled with the additional flights to Europe which Pan Am
will offer in 1986. will mean that the airline's transatlantic opera-
tions will be up 41 percent during the peak season.
Flights to Tel Aviv will initially be five times a week with depar-
tures from the U.S. daily except Mondays and Tuesdays. Boeing
747 flights from Pan Am's WorldPort Terminal at New York's
Kennedy International Airport and Washington Dulles Interna-
tional will connect in Paris with a Boeing 727 aircraft for the
nonstop Paris-Tel Aviv portion of the trip. Service from Tel Aviv
to the U.S. will be daily except Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
Twenty-two U.S. cities, in addition to New York and
Washington, will have single-carrier service by Pan Am to Tel
Aviv under the new schedule: Boston, Philadelphia,
Raleigh/Durham, Charlotte. Cleveland, Detroit. Indianapolis,
Cincinnati, Nashville, Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago, Pitt-
sburgh, Orlando, Miami, Tampa, Houston, Dallas/Ft. Worth, San
Antonio, Austin, Los Angeles and San Francisco.
Tel Aviv will be an integral part of Pan Am's 1986 spring/sum
mer transatlantic schedule with service to Israel increased from
five times weekly this fall to daily flights during the peak season.
Pan Am previously announced that it will be increasing tran-
satlantic service next year with new flights between Chicago-
Frankfurt, Chicago-Paris, New York-Milan, New York-Brussels,
Washington-Madrid, Los Angeles and San Francisco to Paris
and, most recently. New York-Shannon.
Altogether Pan Am will operate 206 weekly transatlantic cross-
ings in each direction during the peak 1986 summer travel period
versus 146 in 1985. The airline will be flying to 27 European
tourist and business centers during the peak season, more than
any other U.S. carrier.
Sol and Eleanor Rosenkranz and Family
Wish All Their Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
Federal Precious Metal
250 N.E. 17th Terrace. Miami 33132 Phone 37^-577^
Wish All Clients & Friends & The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy & Healthy New Year
Holiday Inn Golden Glades
148 N.W. 167th St.. North Miami Beach 33169
Wishes All Customers fi Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Southgate Apartments
900 West Avenue
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
672-2414


r>~ -__ */"
fageS-B___The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 20, 1985
Community Corner
Lakes Branch, National Council of Jewish Women, will hold a
meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 11 a.m. at Michael Ann Russell
JCC, North Miami Beach.
The Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization will hold its an-
nual Hadassah Bond-with-Israel Prevue Luncheon on Thursday
Oct. 17, at Temple Emanu-El in Miami Beach.
The children of the Lehrman Day School will decorate their
Succah in celebration of the holiday on Friday, Sept. 27 at 1:30
p.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Jewish patients at Mount Sinai Medical Center will not have to
miss Yom Kippur services.
Those patients who are able to get out of bed will enjoy an ab-
breviated Yom Kippur service in the hospital's cafeteria on Mon-
day at 3 p.m.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director of the Chaplaincy of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and Chaplain at Mount Sinai,
will conduct the service.
Tropical Cancer League will be holding its first meeting of the
new season at the Ocean Pavilion on Friday. Luncheon will be
served at 11:45 with the meeting at 1 p.m.
Jay SUrkman, son of Dade County Judge and Mrs. Milton
Starkman has been accepted as a student at the University of
Miami School of Law.
Jonah Kiken of Beth Torah Congregation attended the 53rd In-
ternational Convention of the Federation of Jewish Men's Club
held at the Concord Hotel.
Bnai Zion Southeast Region will hold its Executive Board
meeting on Sept. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Sunrise Savings and Loan,
1110 East Hallandale Beach Blvd. in Hallandale, announced
Regional President Arthur Y. Klein. Mr. David Cohen, of the
Israel Consulate office will greet members and friends of Bnai
Zion.
Q*!^* VL ^^"J_JkB,0d,,e^ 8on of retired A- Force Col.
hSSS JV^ KS ***? Miami- entred the Air Force
Institute of Technology (AFIT) to study for a master's degree in
SKSfBurgtrHe is a mi *of SKBB
. .
Peter S. Tytell, son of Richard S. and Mariaa L. Tytell, Miami
has completed training in fundamental military skills at the Army'
ROTC nin V if 0rVKnXi^y- Tyte" Plans to enter 2
KOTC program at Valley Forge Military Junior College, Wayne,
NOW*"
OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER 1966 BEST MUSICAL
The Ruth Foreman
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Book by Nahma Sandrow .
Music by Raphaal Crystal
Lyrics by Richard Enqulst
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Jewish Repertory Theatre
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Hadassah University Hospital on Mount
Scopus dedicated a three-bed patient room in
memory of Fannie and Samuel Rosenbluth
and Sylvia Rosenbluth made possible by
George Rosenbluth, of Miami Beach. Pictured
left to right Dr. Omni Lernau, of the Depart-
ment of Surgery; Sylvia h'isen, Chairman of
Donor Recognition and Ceremonies Depart-
ment in Hadassah; George Rosenbluth; and
Professor Michael Mayer, Administrator of
the Mount Scopus Hospital.
-
U.S. Jewish Organization Sponsors
$750,000 Mercy Airlift To Mozambique
m~$
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEWYORK-(JTA)-A
mercy airlift, sponsored by
the American Jewish World
Service (AJWS), left with
$750,000 worth of gravely
needed medical supplies to
drought and starvation-
ravaged Mozambique, ac-
cording to an AJWS an-
nouncement here at a press
conference.
"In 1984 we estimated that four
million people of a population of
more than 12 million were at risk
of famine," explained AJWS
president, Larry Simon. "More
than 100,000 people have died of
starvation in Mozqmbique in the
past year," he said of the ailing
country, reported by the United
Nations to be one of the six
African nations most devastated
by drought.
"Millions will die and it is our
fault," asserted Elie Wiesel,
chairman of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council and a member
of the AJWS Board. He pointed
out that "there is enough food and
medicine in this country to help
the sick and poor" in distant na-
tions and "if they die, we are
guilty."
THIS MISSION, inspired by
Dr. Paul Epstein, a physician who
was the Chief of Medicine at Cen-
tral Hospital in Beira, Mozambi-
que in 1980. will be the first major
medical relief effort of the AJWS.
Last January, when Epstein
returned to Mozambique after a
five-year absense, he noted that
There were hospitals and rural
clinics that had no medicines
whatsoever. I spoke with doctors
who could do nothing at all to help
the people they were treating .
many of whom were dying."
In response to the emergency
c."dltlons in Mozambique, the
AJWS designed a twofold project
Simon explained that the
chartered aircraft, donated by the
London-based Live-Aid Founda-
tion, was part of-the short-term
plan that would distribute the an-
tibiotics, anti-malarial and anti-
parasitic drugs, supplied primarily
by pharmaceutical firms, to as
many of the victims as possible.
Simon emphasized that the
,u .l ..W HM^lMln,8try of Health and
UNICEF to assure the speedy
delivery most likely within a
matter of days of the medicines,
utilizing various forms of
transportation such as light air-
craft, truck convoy and boats.
THE AJWS is also coordinating
a long-term development project
to meet Mozambique's basic
needs, including the production of
low cost latrines to prevent con-
taminated water and plans for
two intravenous production units
will provide FVs for the entire
country within two years.
Simon also mentioned the goal
of creating an element of self-
sufficiency by working on
agricultural development and in-
corporating women into that
development. He expressed the
hope of preventing a "recurring
famine situation" by building
longer-term community projects.
Valeriano Ferrao, Ambassador
Plenipotentiary of the People's
Republic of Mozambique, respond-
ed to the AJWS relief project:
"The people of Mozambique, in
their hour of need, wish to express
their gratitude to the American
Jewish community for their
generous humanitarian efforts."
AJWS CHAIRMAN and presi
dent of Phillips Van-Heusen Cor-
poration, Lawrence Phillips,
pointed to the Ambassador's
message as showing "the neutrali-
ty of the organization" as it
prefers to work as "a people to
people organization." primarily
non-governmental, as it aims to
steer clear of the political rhetoric
that could "bog down the
humanitarian effort."
The arrival in Mozambique of
the aircraft, named L'Chayim,
meaning "To Life," coincided
with the beginning of Rosh
Hashanah. It landed in Mozambi-
que on Sept. 15. Wiesel views the
date as symbolic and believes that
on these Jewish High Holidays
days of judgment "we (Jews)
are being judged."
_ While Wiesel conceded that
"the enterprise should have
started long ago," he noted that
the first priority of Jewish
organizations was to devote all
their time to the Jewish cause,
"but now we have learned that if
one group suffers we all suffer.
It's late but not too late."
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Israel's gross national product
(GNP) is estimated between
$22-$23 billion and one quarter of
it goes to defense and defense
related needs, according to Prof.
Eitan Berglass, a leading
economist, in a report to a joint
panel of the Knesset's Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee and
the Finance Committee. Berglass
noted that Israel pays to the U.S
each year about $1 billion in in-
terest and principal on military
aid loans.
VIKING CLEANERS
11603 N.E. 2nd AVE. 895-3388
lftn% 2? 8CBS8L SPECIALS
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* -
Notices
fcCUIT COURT OF
(NTH JUDICIAL
F FLORIDA IN
[ DADE COUNTY
, JURISDICTION
VISION
j 85-30031 CA-08
i OF ACTION
[002481
SAVINGS BANK,
SAVINGS AND
NATION,
[PUENTE BLANCO,
i Puente Blanco
|7 Avenue, No. 21N
NOTIFIED that an
j>reclosure of Mortgage
ring described proper -
linium Unit No. 206, of
sional Center Con-
fine., according to the
of Condominium, as
i Official Records Book
631. of the Public
! Dade County, Florida,
rith an undivided in-
he Common Elements
at thereto, has been fil-
you and you are re-
9rve a copy of your writ-
s. if any, to it, on Shep-
\, Attorney for Plaintiff,
ess is Suite 214, 1570
Ivenue, Coral Gables,
1146 on or before Oc-
Bx:> and file the original
erk of this Court either
rice on Plaintiffs at-
nmediately thereafter;
I default will be entered
i for the relief demand-
omplaint.
^S my hand and the seal
ourt this 9th day of
1985.
VRD P. BRINKER
^A^lerk of the Court
t DC. BRYANT
i Deputy Clerk
September 13, 20,27;
October 4,1985
Friday, September 20, 1985/the Jewish Floridian Page 9-g^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA W
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-27117 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JORGE L. RAMOS, et ux.,
Defendants.
TO: JORGE L. RAMOS and
MARIA M. RAMOS, his wife
359 E. 13th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33010
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Lot 14, in Block 1, of J AC MO
HOMES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
92, at Page 67, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deput Clerk
19293 September 13, 20, 27
October 4,1985
! CIRCUIT COURT
DOUNTY, FLORIDA
IE NO: 85-35651
i Marriage of:
. ADRIANO,
Br,
E. ADRIANO,
ent.
TOEL E. ADRIANO,
unknown, you shall
of your Answer to the
or Dissolution of Mar-
i GEORGE NICHOLAS,
612 Northwest 12th
ni, Florida, 33136, and
I with Court Clerk on or
Bber 4, 1985, otherwise
ill be entered.
[27, 1985.
IARD BRINKER
7EN D. ZEIGLER
August 30;
ptember6,13,20,1985
I CIRCUIT COURT
[COUNTY, FLORIDA
mSE NO: 85 37301
|. Hne Marriage of:
iKaude LORMAND,
oner,
|tje LORMAND.
ndent.
IATRICE LORMAND,
unknown, you shall
1 of your Answer to the
for Dissolution of Mar
b GEORGE NICHOLAS,
612 Northwest 12th
_____ ni, Florida, 33136, and
^k Kal with Court Clerk on or
October 18, 1985, otherwise
; will be entered.
liber 6, 1985.
3HARD BRINKER
f: C.P. COPELAND
September 13,20,27;
October 4.1985
_NTH CIRCUITCOURT
IE COUNTY. FHWUDA
CASE NO: 85 37302
I The Marriage of:
PIERRE,
tioner,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 84-16360 CC 05
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221351
DORAL HOTEL, INC., : .1
Plaintiff,
V8.
JOSE RIBAS and ADRIANA
CANTWELL f/k/a ADRIANA
RIBAS,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RIBAS
7090 Crisford, Apt. 1
St. Charles Apartments
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
TO: JOSE RIBA 3
8918 Collins Avenue
Apartment No. 6
Miami Beach, FL 33154
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver & Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326,
Miami, Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1985 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, County Court
Dade County, Florida
By FLORA GONZALEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33181
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
19275 August 30;
September 6,13,20.1985
SAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
.'Hespondent.
KEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
ence unknown, you shall
copy of your Answer to the
jn for Dissolution of Mar
pon GEORGE NICHOLAS
ley 612 Northwest 12th
Miami, Florida, 33136, and
rinal with Court Clerk on or
October 18, 1985, otherwise
t will be entered,
inber 6, 1986.
foCHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
September 18, 20, 27;
October 4,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-34265 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
AMERICAN SAVINGS
BANK, f/k/a FRANKLIN
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERTO NODAL,
et ux, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ROBERTO NODAL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4, Block 3, of PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SECTION
ONE, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
102, at Page 29, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19279 August 30;
_______September 6.13.20.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-31910 (14)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE $i ,
FLA. BAR NO. 058653
IN RE:
MICHAEL ROBERT VOLTS.
Husband
and
DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS,
Wife.
TO: DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS
(Residence Unknown)
Last Known Employment
Address:
do Mico Oil, 6506 Martway
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 9400 South Dadeland
Blvd.. Suite 300, Miami, Fl. 33156.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct 4, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be jiublished
once each week for Tour con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, ESQ.
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 300
Miami, Fl. 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
Tel. (306) 665-9776
19282 September 6,13;
20,27,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-342*3 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID ALVAREZ,
Defendant.
TO: DAVID ALVAREZ
317 N.W. 109 Avenue. No. 2-C
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Condominium Unit No. 317-2C,
Building 317 N.W. 109 Avenue of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded June 5, 1985, in
Official Records Book 9009, Page
1608, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and Amend-
ments to Declaration of Con-
dominium, together with an un-
divided interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto, has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it, on
Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 18, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19301 September 13,20,27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-35011(20)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JOSEFINA BAUTISTA
RODRIGUEZ
Petitioner,
and
JOSE IGNACIO RODRIGUEZ
Respondent.
TO: Jose Ignacio Rodriguez
11905 S.W. 112th Avenue
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
F1ED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on R.A. del
Pino, Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1835 West
Flagler Street No. 201, Miami,
Florida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of August, 1985.
RICHARD, P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GOMEZ, FENTE & DEL PINO,
P.A.
1835 West Flagler Street No. 201
Miami, Florida 33135
Phone:(305)541-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19276 August 30;
September 6, 13,20.1985

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.85-33276 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE HERNANDO VELAZ-
QUEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE HERNANDO
VELAZQUEZ
Avenida Ipirange, No. 165
Sao Paulo, Brazil
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 27, in Block 4, WOOD
FIELD, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
113, at Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
Y Oct. 11, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6th day of
September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19290 September 13, 20,27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fi-
ctitious name F & L Sales Co. at
3590 S. State Rd. 7. Suite 18.
Miramar, FL 33023. intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Lucy A. Finn
Marilyn Lambert
19285 September 6,13,20,
1 27, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Classic Products International at 420
South Dixie Highway. 3rd Floor, Cor-
al Gables, FL 33146 intend to register
said name(8) with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County. Florida.
Classic Products International.
Inc. YD Inc.
Lynn W. Fromberg. Esquire of
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross 4
Shore, P.A.
Attorney for Classic Products
International. Inc. Y-D Inc.
19298 September 13.20.27;
October 4, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Catalonia Import Ex-
port at Universal Parts, Inc. 7370
NW 36th St., Suite 319-F. Miami,
Florida 33166, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DAVID ROMANO
Universal Parts, Inc.
7370 NW 36th St., Suite 319-F
Miami, Florida 33166
19297 September 13,20,27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-38173-16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YOLANDA SANCHEZ
and
FABIO ALBERTO SANCHEZ
TO: Fabio Alberto Sanchez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Luis Vidal,
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1840 West 49th
Street, Suite 106, Hialeah, Florida
33012, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 18. 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDHN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12th day of September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 West 49th Street
Hialeah, FL 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
19304 September 20, 27;
October 4. 11.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. H5-S7244
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: FREEDOM FINANCIAL
SERVICES
CORPORATION
C. T. Corportion
Systems
Attn: C. R. Ostheimer
208 South La SaDe St.
Chicago, IL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 48, of Unrecorded Plat of HD>
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor
ner of Tract 11. of FLORIDA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION OF THE NE *
OF Section 26, Township 62 South,
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, at Page 17, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida;
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15' 30" West for
25.02 feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing of Tract of land hereinafter
described; thence continue North 2
degrees 15' 30" West parallel
with the Westline of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 46' 09" West for
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 26 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 or or before
October 11, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6 day of September,
1985.
19296 September 13, 20,27;
October 4,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-37302
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LISE PIERRE,
Petitioner,
and '
JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
Respondent.
TO: JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest, 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANb FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-9637 (01)
Florida Bar No. 241849
ACTION FOR TERMINATION
OF GUARDIANSHIP
IN RE: The Guardianship of
JANE SILVER,
Incompetent
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Termina-
tion of Guardianship has been filed
relating to Change of Domicile of
Resident Ward.
You are required to serve a copy
of your written objections, if any,
to it on Sanford A. Freedman,
P.A., Attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 12700 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 410, North
Miami, Florida, 33181, and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
October 1, 1985; otherwise, the
guardianship shall be terminated.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and sal at
Miami, Dade County, Florida, on
this 30th day of August, 1985.
SANFORD A. FREEDMAN. P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner
12700 Biscayne Boulevard
hSuite 410
IjNorth Miami, FL 33181
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19292 September 13. 20, 27 llrelephone: 891-5852
October 4, 1985 l9289 September 13, 20, 1985


iniir \nn
rage z-ts i ne Jewish fciorHtian/tfri/W KtAmiw.. o
rage iv-b Tne Jewish r londian/Fnday, September 20, 1985
on inoc
Public Notice\
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33916 CA-12
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
as association organized
and existing under the
laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
GEORGE SAEZ,
etal.,
Defendants.
TO: GEORGE SAEZ
822 Berkerseg Lane
Columbus, Ohio 23205
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14, Block 15, PLAT NO.
ONE OPA LOCKA, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 25, at Page 44, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 4, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 29 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19284 September 6, 13;
20,27,19 '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
File N.mber 85-7478
DmrioaOl
Florida Bar No. 061041
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EUGENE FALKENSTEIN. SR.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EUGENE FALKENSTEIN,
SR., deceased, File Number
' 85-7478, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Courthouse,
73 W. Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
son ob whom this notice was serv-
ed the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 13, 1985.
Personal Representative:
CAROLE AULT
525 N.W. 202nd Terrace
Miami, Florida 33169 ,
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HERBERT Z. MARVIN,
ESQUIRE
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, Florida 33173
Telephone: (305) 279-0730
19288 September 13,20,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titous name Payless Video Club,
Inc. at 467 N.E. 167th Street,;
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
HECTOR RODRIGUEZ
LOURDES M. RODRIGUEZ
Myron B. Berman, Esq.
Attorney for Payless Video Clubi
Inc. I
P.O. Box 1113
N.M.B., Fla 33160
932-7222
19306 September 20,27'
October 4,11,1 "
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-38348-14
Florida Bar No. 049834
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SHRAGA GOLDENBERG
Petitioner/Husband
and
RACHEL GOLDENBERG
Respondent/Wife
TO: RACHEL GOLDENBERG
16 Ayarmuh Street
Ramat Hasharon, Israel
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed againstb you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSEPH W. MALEK, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501,
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
October 18, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. SNEEDEN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK, Esquire
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139
19308 September 20, 27;
October 4,11,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE E LEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-26828 FC 15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NESTOR J. MARTIN
and
MARIA A. MARTIN
TO: Maria A. Martin
9220 S.W. 45 Terrace
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. KOSS,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner.
whose address is 4343 West
Flagler Street, Suite 404, Miami,
Florida 33134, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 27.
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS, ESQ.
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
P.A. ,
4343 West Flagler Street
Suite 404
Miami, Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 443-4343
Attorney for Petitioner
19273 August 30;
September 6,13,20,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fk-
titious name EUNINO
CAFETERIA, at 7498 N.W. 8th
Street, Miami, Florida 33126, in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Fidel Iglesias
1900 S.W. 87th Court
Miami, Florida 33166
19tfl3 September 20,27;
Octobers 11,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ALEX DUVIL at
9365 West Okeechobee Rd. No. 7
Hialeah Gardens Florida 33016 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, florida.
Luis Lamar
9355 West Okeechobee Rd. No. 7
Hialeah Gardens Florida 33016
19310 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-25292
IS RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RODOLFO MARCHESE.
Petitioner,
and
BRIGIDA MARCHESE,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
Fla. Bar No. 142876
TO: BRIGIDA MARCHESE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the Peti-
tion upon the Petitioner's at-
torney. RONALD S. LIEBER-
MAN, PA., at 8900 S.W. 107
Avenue. Suite 206. Miami, Florida,
and file the original Response or
Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, on or before
the 27 day of September, 1985. If
you fail to do so, a Default Judg-
ment will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the
Petition.
Dated at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this 26 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
19278 August 30;
September 6,13,20,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 86-29018 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGATE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized
and existing uder the
laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
FERNANDO DE JESUS
SILVA, et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: FERNANDO
DE JESUS SILVA
and DIANA SILVA,
his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by. through,
under or against FERNANDO DE
JESUS SILVA and DIANA
SILVA, his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgate on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
The East 36 feet of Lot 14, all of
Lot 15, and all of Lot 16, less the
East 29 feet thereof, in Block 2 of
GARDEN HOMES, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 29, at Page 6, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 6th day of
September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19294 September 13,20,27;
October 4,1985
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT D>J AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 86-11420-F<-05
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
PAMELA NICKLE
Petitioner
and
WILLIAM NICKLE
Respondent
TO: WILLIAM NICKLE
3619 Bronxwood Ave. No. 1
Bronx, NY 10467
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, on or before Oc-
tober 25,1986, and file the original
with the clerk of this court, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: September 16, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19309 September 20, 27;
October 4,11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of BUDGET PAIN-
TING at 19814 S.W. 118th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33177 in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
KEITH CLEMETSON d/b/a
BUDGET PAINTING
19814 S.W. 118th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33177
DENNIS P. SHEPPARD,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for KEITH
CLEMETSON
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, Florida 33173
(305) 279-0730
19305 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-7726
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT THOMAS
EDWARDS
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALBERT THOMAS ED-
WARDS, deceased, File Number
85-7725. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
son on whom this notice was serv-
ed that challenges the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 13, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Glendena C. Edwards
1480 Northwest 65th Terrace
Miami, Florida, 33124
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Stanley M. Pred
1515 Northwest 7th Street,
Suite 106
Miami, Florida 33125
Telephone: (305) 642-5300
19287 September 13,20, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fi-
ctitious name F 4 L Sales Co. at
3590 S. State Rd. 7, Suite 18
Miramar, FL 33023, intend to
register said name with the Cleric
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Lucy A. Finn
Marilyn Lambert
19286 September 6,13,20,
27,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-34858 (16)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 434434
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GREGORY P. COLEMAN,
Petitioner,
and
PAULINE B. WILLIAMS a/k/a
PAULDME B. COLEMAN,
Respondent.
TO: Pauline B. Williams a/k/a
Pauline B. Coleman
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on KEN-
NETH C. BRONCHICK, ESQ., at
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A., 3000 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 315, Miami, FL
33137, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kenneth C. Bronchick, Esq.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A.
3000 Biscayne Boulevard, No. 315
Miami. FL 33137
Attorney for Petitioner
19274 August 30;
September 6.13,20, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-38899
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla. Bar No. 147801
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ESPERANZA MATA
and
LUIS MATA
TO: LUIS MATA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. Koss,
Attorney at Law, P.A., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
4343 West Flagler Street, No. 404,
Miami, Florida 33134, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
25, 1985; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
PA.
4343 West Flagler Street No. 404
Miami, Florida 33134
19315 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titous name Paper Hangers Father
& Son at 13281 S.W. 71 St. Miami
Fl 33183 intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
HILARIO CEVASCO
19307 September 20,27;
October 4,11,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA f
CASE NO: 86-38164
IN RE: The Marriage of;
WESNER THOMAS,-
Petitioner,
ind
BEVERLY THOMAS,
Respondent.
TO: BEVERLY THOMAS,
:tesidence unknown, you shall
lerve copy of your Answer to the
'etition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 12, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER "'
BY: LISAMARIE MACANO
19303 September 20,27
October 4,11,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-38856
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, .lt.
Plaintiff
vs.
IVAN VILLA,
et ux., et al.,
Defendants.
TO: IVAN VILLA and
DIOSELINA VILLA, his wife
Carrera 40, Numero 6948
Meddellin, Colombia
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Unit F-18 of VILLA
VENEZIA, a Condominium, in ac-
cordance with the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, as recorded
in Official Records Book 11223, at
Page 1101, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida, has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it, on Shep-
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 33146 on or before Oc-
tober 25. 1986 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 18th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19314 September 20, 27;
October 4,11,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6586
Division 02 Williams
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEANETTE RAMPELL A/K/A
JENNIE RAMPELL
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Jeanette Rampell. a/k/a Jennie
Rampell. deceased, File Number
85-6586, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida, *
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
represesntative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 13, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Edward Rampell
300 Colonial Road
West Palm Beach, Florida
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
I-ouis H. Stallman
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 532-9939
19300 September 13,20, 1985
_J


Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Exception To The Rule


5KELL COHEN
^e of 82, not too
Die are active in
field of work, par-
lin the realm of
Jam Sharrow of
I exception to this
srving as the
[president of the
rish Golf Associa-
row, a former pro-
linksman, gets
spite the slight in-
irhich afflict peo-
age. His biggest
at this time of his
ie sponsorship of
>tion in Israel.
the only golf course
ened in Caesarea in
w has been a guiding
" a strong benefactor
i addition to retaining
ining close affiliation
|ility and with its pro-
rom South Africa,
udelstam, who has
re of the operation in
rer since the course
is now impatiently
arrival in the U.S. of
lers from Israel who
in the Annual Sam
Mf Tournament. Shar-
ch over and guide the
Israelis around the
[particularly in Jewish
ng their stay in this
er the Jewish High
JW is among the first
Bsional golfers in the
nks career started in
when he was in his
fter which he would
lew York where he
le'gdlf field for over 80
Be stationed in New
Jharrow opened a shop
is and right next to it
in which he taught
would be aspirants,
He middle of Times
over a quarter of a
lions of golf balls were
the nets which hung
nptu school course,
good living for the
pro and didn't offer
hallenge to him until
1 Al pilot walked into
oent and told Shar-
tie opening of a golf
srael. Lured by the
iption of the new
irrow immediately
Httention to Israeli golf
Bed used and new golf
Balls that were flown to
(obr fend by the El Al pilot
Ben his informant. Shar-
t Ben involved with Israeli
nee that time.
"|n "if"" of the golf com-
i Bhe Maccabiah Games,
isdiction of the U.S.
Sports for Israel,
iopted many Israeli
[who were in the U.S.
i to donate monies for
____ amen t o f a golf unit for
the D8 # Maccabiah team and
went to el to compete in 1965.
AS (MATTER of fact,
V"unfc--B" from Florida served
and manager of the
-f: golf teams during the
and 1973 Games. As
''< Be U.S.A. Clubs, both
all the golf medals of-
ig the 1965 and 1969
pal Games. After his
oach for the American-
Hts, Sharrow made it his
visit Israel once a year
So give clinics and to
the progress of the pro
Caesarea. He provided
to groups and in
Tthat arrived from the
arranging golf matches
ibers of various clubs
aide of the Atlantic.
In the past two years, he has im-
proved connections and relation-
ships between the Caesarea club
and Jewish clubs in the U.S. to
become even closer and stronger
and has been instrumental in pro-
moting the game of golf among
the young Israelis. When
Rachamin Asayag, the junior golf
champion of Israel, came to the
U.S. to compete, recently in the
World Junior Golf Tournament,
Sharrow took him under his wing
and arranged for various golf
clubs to extend hospitality to
Asayag in order for him to gain in-
ternational experience.
As a result of the special rela-
tionship and work that Sharrow
put into the Israeli golf program,
it was decided to hold a special
tournament in his honor which
took place in August 1984. The
winners of this annual tourna-
ment were sent to the U.S. and all
future winners will be sent to the
U.S. for tournament plays and
social meetings in various Jewish
golf clubs located around the
nation.
IN HELPING to develop the
Israeli golf game, the oc-
togenarian pro visited Israel again
recently to be honored and at that
time he presented Asayag with a
set of new clubs for use on his up-
coming trip to the U.S. and
Canada together with six other
Israeli top-flight linksmen. He will
host the team on its visit. This
marks the fourth time he has
followed this procedure and sees
to it that the visitors play clubs
throughout North America in
goodwill tournaments.
Among the players who came
under the guidance of Sharrow
are Bruce Fleischer, who won the
United States Amateur title in
1969, the same year that he par-
ticipated an the Maccabiah Games.
Perhaps his most outstanding pro-
tege is Corey Pavin, the Profes-
sional Golf Association's Rookie of
the Year in 1984, who was among
the money leaders last year and
currently is running fourth in the
U.S. among the professionals so
far as earnings are concerned,
having passed the quarter of a
million dollar mark, some weeks
ago.
It's extremely likely that Pavin
will earn somewhere between
$400,000-$500,000 for the year
1985 and perhaps some credit for
his stature in the golf world is due
to the influence exerted on him by
Sharrow, lifetime member of the
PGA, who helped pick Corey as a
^e>
<\ee
Kit < 12
&&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
member of the 1981 Maccabiah
link squad. Pavin was. incidental-
ly, the gold medal winner in the
1981 Games, and led the U.S. con-
tingent to first place in the overall
competition, a feat it could not
duplicate this past summer, in the
Maccabiah Games.
The Boston-reared Sharrow
likes to point out that many of the
members of the Caesarea club
were born in such places as
Morocco, Iran and Tangiers and,
like himself, each one holds a com
mon bond in his attempt to pro-
mote the game in the Holy Land.
JTA Services
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Israel has enjoyed a boom in
tourism over the past 12 months
and leaders of the industry are
confident they can repeat the suc-
cess and do even better in the year
ahead. They told a press con-
ference here Sept. 10 that a
record 865,000 tourists visited
Israel in the period January-July
1985, a 19 percent increase over
the same period last year. In the
last 12 months, 1.5 million tourists
came, representing $1.5 billion in
revenue.
Obituaries
SPINGARN
Helen. 73. of Coral Gables. Passed away
September 13. Mrs. Spingarn had made her
home in South Florida for the past 37 years
coming from Laurelton, New York. She was
a member of Beth David Synagogue and
fundraiser for the Sisterhood. Member of
Menorah Chapter of Hadassah. American
Jewish Congress. National Council of
Jewish Women, Technion and the Jewish
Asthmatic Home and Hospital. She is sur-
vived by her husband Charles '/.., brother
Gustav Shaw of Miami. Max and Yehuda
Mokotow. Tivon. Israel. Services were held
at Beth David Synagogue.
GROSSMAN
Murray, 67, of Miami. Passed away
September 14. Survived by his wife, Esther;
laughters, Joan Granat, Paula Shield and
Vikki Obuhanych and four granddaughters.
Services were held September 18 at River-
side, S.W. 37 Avenue Chapel with inter-
ment in the Star of David Cemetery.
MALAKOFF
Mrs. Betty, of Miami Beach. Wife of the late
Milton S Malakoff. She was a resident here
since 1946, formerly of New York City. Sur-
vived by chldren, Marion Williams and Fred
(Patricia) Malakoff; her brother. Dr. Morris
Feldstein. grandchildren. Dina Malakoff,
Ruth and Jessica Williams; sisters-in-law.
Nettie Malakoff and Edith Weiss. She serv-
ed as Administrator of Temple Beth Shalom
of Miami Beach for over 30 years and work-
ed closely with Rabbi Leon Kronish and the
Temple Sisterhood and Brotherhood. Ser-
vices were held. Rubin-Zilbert in charge of
arrangements.
ROSENBLATT. Rose Stein, of Miami,
September 11. Riverside.
MITTELMAN. Elias, September 9
Riverside.
SILVERMAN, Jacob, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
STECKLOFF, Diane Lewis, 78, of Miami
Beach, September 11.
GOLOD, Sarah, 86, of Miami Beach. Ser-
vices in New Hampshire. Riverside in
charge of arrangements.
BACKER, Andres, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Gilbert.
ULECHMAN, Alexander S. Services in
New York. Forest Park Chapel.
KLAVANS. Sidney, of Miami, September
12. Riverside.
KRAKAUER, Edna, of Miami Beach,
September 12. Blasberg Chapel.
MORSEL. Sam. of Miami, September 12.
Levitt-Weinstein.
ZAHLER, Edward D., 82, of Bal Harbour,
September 12. Riverside.
SKLAR. Mitchel L., of Miami Beach.
BENSTOCK, Louise of Miami. Rubin-
Zilbert.
FRANKFORD, Joseph, of Miami. Rubin
Zilbert.
FRIEDMAN, Irving, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
SOLNICK. Hyman, September 14. Services
were held in New York.
STERN, Nelly (nee Wetiler). Riverside.
BERKOWITZ, Alfred, 76, of North Miami
Beach. September lf> Riverside.
DIENSTAG, Hyman. 83, of North Miami
Beach, September 16. Riverside.
WALTERS, Abe, 73. of North Miami
Beach. September 15. Menorah Chapels.
BERNSTEIN. Betty, 90. of Miami,
September 14. Interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
DUBE, Minnie Frances. Services in New
York. Riverside.
-WMIM.ri-i-ilfi.-lcl Kd
Oak Park. Michigan 4H2U7
(3131 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
I'ompU'lf Shipping Scrviic Krniii KlnruLi \rel
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
' .'
When a loss occurs
away froirt home.

FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Kiverside Memorial Chapel. Inc
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL #
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
The Only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arrangements
with
No. Miami Beach-Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


rrrttm
Catholic-Jewish Rapport Ruffled
- -


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FrMriiDMMjUBA
Fteirofoflc^_
Ice Cream Cakel
COMpon)
t AM PuMbc StorcM
A BmmmmI TMtt Traat
R*iWng.....................^^1^
Bran Muffins................. t$1*
MUw
Danish Pecan Ring.......Ch$1d9
Prices Effective
Sept. 19th thru 25th, 1985
Availabfe art Pubfix Store, with Fresh
t>aaish Bakeries Only.
Topped with Crsamy Chocolate
Eclairs...........................2 *, *1
Many Oareeh Bakeriee have a fuN ana of Jewisb
Item* available. Choose from s eiectton which
Includes, Sponge Cake, Rainbow Bar Cake
Almond Tarts, Coconut Macaroons, Tegtach
Bowtfes and many other items.
^OOOOOO0dOOOOOOOOOOOOOfl8*flOOflAOO(rt
2.00 OFF!
J^J*** Coupon ONLY and tna Purchase
FIHad with your Favorita Flavor
lea Craam, 8-mch Stca
Ice Cream Cake
(Coupon ExpfcM Wad.. Sapt 25.1985)
(On coupon pr itam purchaaad.)
' o (Accounting II)


Full Text
.....

Ibtices
IT COURT OF
[JUDICIAL
(FLORIDA IN
U)E COUNTY
JRISDICTION
ISION
6-30031 CA-08
)F ACTION
1481
lAVINGS BANK,
[SAVINGS AND
IATION.
JENTE BLANCO,
Bente Blanco
Uenue, No. 21N
NOTIFIED that an
closure of Mortgage
; described proper-
Unit No. 206, ol
lional Center Con-
, according to the
Condominium, as
final Records Book
631. of the Public
de County, Florida,
an undivided in-
Common Elements
t thereto, has been Al-
and you are re-
s a copy of your writ-
if any, to it, on Shep-
kttorney for Plaintiff,
is Suite 214, 1570
enue. Coral Gables,
|6 on or before Oc-
i and file the original
; of this Court either
on Plaintiffs at-
nediately thereafter;
efault will be entered
or the relief demand-
iplaint.
f my hand and the seal
this 9th day of
1985.
I P. BRINKER
; of the Court
l.C. BRYANT
eputy Clerk
I September 13. 20, 27;
October 4, 1985
Friday, September 20, J985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B^
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-27117 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
JORGE L. RAMOS, et ux..
Defendants.
TO: JORGE L. RAMOS and
MARIA M. RAMOS, his wife
359 E. 13th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33010
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Lot 14, in Block 1, of JAC-MO
HOMES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
92, at Page 67, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deput Clerk
19293 September 13,20,27
October 4,1985
i CIRCUIT COURT
,FLORIDA
! NO: 85-35661
[Marriage of:
DRIANO,
r. ADRIANO,
Bt.
JEL E. ADRIANO,
[ unknown, you shall
' your Answer to the
Dissolution of Mar-
fcEORGE NICHOLAS,
812 Northwest 12th
Florida, 33136, and
rith Court Clerk on or
er 4, 1986, otherwise
I be entered.
1985.
> BRINKER
EN D. ZEIGLER
August 30;
nber 6,13,20.1985
! CIRCUIT COURT
MJNTY. FLORIDA
NO: 86 37301
i Marriage of:
^UDE LORMAND.
LORMAND,
ant.
ITRICE LORMAND.
i unknown, you shall
{of your Answer to the
Dissolution of Mar
ftJEORGE NICHOLAS,
[612 Northwest 12th
Florida, 33136, and
i with Court Clerk on or
er 18, 1985, otherwise
BriD be entered.
6, 1985.
LARD BRINKER
IHCP COPELAND
IMS! September 13, 20.27;
October 4.1986
S*T1NTH CIRCUITCOURT
FBlR
'^COUNTY. FBPRIDA
BE NO: 86 37302
fcThe Marriage of:
I Bbrre.
Petitioner.
and
AM CLAUDE PIERRE.
, Itapondent
En CLAUDE PIERRE,
ieoce unknown, you shall
> copy of your Answer to the
for Dissolution of Mar-
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
by 012 Northwest 12th
ami, Florida, 33136, and
with Court Clerk on or
r 18,1985, otherwise
will be entered.
jr 6, 1985.
HARD BRINKER
BY C.P. COPELAND
September 13, 20, 27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 84-16360 CC 05
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221351
DORAL HOTELi IMC... I .1
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE RIBAS and ADRIANA
CANTWELL f/k/a ADRIANA
RIBAS,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RIBAS
7090 Crisford, Apt. 1
St. Charles Apartments
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
TO: JOSE RIB* S
8918 Collins Avenue
Apartment No. 6
Miami Beach, FL 33154
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver & Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326,
Miami, Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1985 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County, Florida
By FLORA GONZALEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
160 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
19276 August 30;
September 6.13,20,1985
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-34265 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
AMERICAN SAVINGS
BANK, f/k/a FRANKLIN
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERTO NODAL,
et ux, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ROBERTO NODAL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4, Block 3, of PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SECTION
ONE, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
102, at Page 29, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19279 August 30;
_______September 6.13.20.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-31910 (14)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE ,-, ;
FLA. BAR NO. 058653
IN RE:
MICHAEL ROBERT VOLTS.
Husband
and
DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS.
Wife.
TO: DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS
(Residence Unknown)
Last Known Employment
Address:
c/o Mico Oil, 6506 Martway
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 9400 South Dadeland
Blvd.. Suite 300, Miami, PL 33156,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 4, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be miblished
once each week for lour con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, ESQ.
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 300
Miami. Fl. 33166
Attorney for Petitioner
Tel. (306) 666-9775
19282 September 6,13;
20, 27, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fi-
ctitious name F & L Sales Co. at
3590 S. State Rd. 7, Suite 18,
Miramar, FL 33023, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Lucy A. Finn
Marilyn Lambert
19285 September 6,13, 20,
la,i80 V 27,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-34263 C A-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
DAVID ALVAREZ.
Defendant.
TO: DAVID ALVAREZ
317 N.W. 109 Avenue, No. 2-C
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Condominium Unit No. 317-2C,
Building 317 N.W. 109 Avenue of
LACUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded June 5, 1985, in
Official Records Book 9009, Page
1608, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and Amend-
ments to Declaration of Con-
dominium, together with an un-
divided interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto, has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 18, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19301 September 13.20,27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-35011 (20)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JOSEFINA BAUTISTA
RODRIGUEZ
Petitioner,
and
JOSE IGNACIO RODRIGUEZ
Respondent.
TO: Jose Ignacio Rodriguez
11905 S.W. 112th Avenue
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on R.A. del
Pino, Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1835 West
Flagler Street No. 201. Miami,
Florida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of August, 1985.
RICHARD. P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GOMEZ, FENTE & DEL PINO,
PA.
1835 West Flagler Street No. 201
Miami, Florida 33135
Phone: (305) 541-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19276 August 30;
September 6, 13,20, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Classic Products International at 420
South Dixie Highway, 3rd Floor. Cor
al Gables, FL 33146 intend to register
said name(s) with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Classic Products International,
Inc. YD Inc.
Lynn W. Fromberg, Esquire of
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross &
Shore. PA.
Attorney for Classic Products
International, Inc. Y-D Inc.
19298 September 13, 20.27;
October 4, 1985
Di THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.85-33276 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE HERNANDO VELAZ-
QUEZ, et al..
Defendants.
TO: JOSE HERNANDO
VELAZQUEZ
Avenida Ipirange. No. 165
Sao Paulo, Brazil
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 27, in Block 4, WOOD
FIELD, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
113, at Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
Oct. 11. 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6th day of
September. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19290 September 13, 20,27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Catalonia Import Ex-
port at Universal Parts, Inc. 7870
NW 36th St., Suite 319-F, Miami,
Florida 33166. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
DAVID ROMANO
Universal Parts, Inc.
7370 NW 36th St., Suite 319-F
Miami, Florida 33166
19297 September 13,20.27;
October 4. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-38173-16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YOLANDA SANCHEZ
and
FABIO ALBERTO SANCHEZ
TO: Fabio Alberto Sanchez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Luis Vidal.
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1840 West 49th
Street, Suite 106, Hialeah, Florida
33012, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 18, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 12th day of September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 West 49th Street
Hialeah, FL 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
19304 September 20, 27;
October 4.11.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-37244
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: FREEDOM FINANCIAL
SERVICES
CORPORATION
C. T. Corportion
Systems
Attn: C. R. Ostheimer
208 South La SaDe St.
Chicago, IL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 48, of Unrecorded Plat of HD>
DEN LAKE described as follows:
Commence at the Southwest cor-
ner of Tract 11, of FLORUJA
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION OF THE NE >U
OF Section 25, Township 52 South,
Range 40 East, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 2, at Page 17, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida;
thence run East along the South
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 feet
to a point; thence run North 2
degrees 15" 30" West for
25.02 feet to the Point of Beginn-
ing of Tract of land hereinafter
described; thence continue North 2
degrees 15' 30" West parallel
with the Westline of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the South
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South 18
degrees 46' 09" West for
125.08 feet to a point on a circular
curve; thence run Westerly along a
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 75
feet through a central angle of 17
degrees 23' 14" for an arc
distance of 22.76 feet to a point of
Tangency with a line that is 25 feet
North of and parallel with the
South line of said Tract 11; thence
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of said
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 or or before
October 11, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6 day of September,
1985.
192% September 13.20, 27;
October 4.1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-37302
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LISEPIERRE,
Petitioner,
and
JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE,
Respondent.
TO: JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest. 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19292 September 13. 20. 27
October 4,1985
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Irl AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-9637 (01)
Florida Bar No. 241849
ACTION FOR TERMINATION
OF GUARDIANSHIP
IN RE: The Guardianship of
JANE SILVER,
Incompetent
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Termina-
tion of Guardianship has been filed
relating to Change of Domicile of
Resident Ward.
You are required to serve a copy
of your written objections, if any,
to it on Sanford A. Freedman,
P.A., Attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 12700 Biacayne
Boulevard, Suite 410, North
Miami, Florida, 33181, and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
October 1, 1985; otherwise, the
guardianshp shall be terminated.
This notice shall be published
once a week for two consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and sal at
Miami. Dade County. Florida, on
this 30th day of August. 1985.
SANFORD A. FREEDMAN. PA.
Attorney for Petitioner
12700 Biscayne Boulevard
Suite 410
North Miami. FL 33181
Irelephone: 891-5852
119289 September 13, 20, 1985


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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 20, 1985
Community Corner
Lakes Branch, National Council of Jewish Women, will hold a
meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 11 a.m. at Michael Ann Russell
JCC, North Miami Beach.
The Greater Miami Israel Bond Organization will hold its an-
nual Hadassah Bond-with-Israel Prevue Luncheon on Thursday,
Oct. 17, at Temple Emanu-El in Miami Beach.
The children of the Lehrman Day School will decorate their
Succah in celebration of the holiday on Friday, Sept. 27 at 1:30
p.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
Jewish patients at Mount Sinai Medical Center will not have to
miss Yom Kippur services.
Those patients who are able to get out of bed will enjoy an ab-
breviated Yom Kippur service in the hospital's cafeteria on Mon-
day at 3 p.m.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director of the Chaplaincy of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation and Chaplain at Mount Sinai,
will conduct the service.
Tropical Cancer League will be holding its first meeting of the
new season at the Ocean Pavilion on Friday. Luncheon will be
served at 11:45 with the meeting at 1 p.m.
Jay SUrkman. son of Dade County Judge and Mrs. Milton
Starkman has been accepted as a student at the University of
Miami School of Law.
Jonah Kiken of Beth Torah Congregation attended the 53rd In-
ternational Convention of the Federation of Jewish Men's Club
held at the Concord Hotel.
Bnai Zion Southeast Region will hold its Executive Board
meeting on Sept. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Sunrise Savings and Loan,
1110 East Hallandale Beach Blvd. in Hallandale, announced
Regional President Arthur Y. Klein. Mr. David Cohen, of the
Israel Consulate office will greet members and friends of Bnai
Zion.
Firrt U. Bryan J. Bodner, son of retired Air Force Col.
TSS5. imSr ?IM?,r Bodner' Mianii. "as entered the Air Force
Institute of Technology (AFIT) to study for a master's degree in
civil engineering and structures at the University of Texas at
Austin. His wife, Lori, is the daughter of Bernard Swichkow
^odMhSu Wgn' He is a 1977 *raduate of Palmetto High
Peter S. Tytell, son of Richard S. and Marina L. Tytell, Miami,
Bn?>,e.ted tnumn*in fundamental military skills at the Army
J ba81c ft Port Knox, Ky. Tytell plans to enter the
KOTC program at Valley Forge Military Junior College, Wayne
MOW-
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Hadassah University Hospital on Mount
Scopus dedicated a three-bed patient room in
memory of Fannie and Samuel Rosenbluth
and Sylvia Rosenbluth made possible by
George Rosenbluth, of Miami Beach. Pictured
left to right Dr. Omni Lernau, of the Depart-
ment of Surgery; Sylvia Eisen, Chairman of
Donor Recognition and Ceremonies Depart-
ment in Hadassah; George Rosenbluth; and
Professor Michael Mayer, Administrator of
the Mount Scopus Hospital.
U.S. Jewish Organization Sponsors
$750,000 Mercy Airlift To Mozambique
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A
mercy airlift, sponsored by
the American Jewish World
Service (AJWS), left with
$750,000 worth of gravely
needed medical supplies to
drought and starvation-
ravaged Mozambique, ac-
cording to an AJWS an-
nouncement here at a press
conference.
"In 1984 we estimated that four
million people of a population of
more than 12 million were at risk
of famine," explained AJWS
president, Larry Simon. "More
than 100,000 people have died of
starvation in Mozqmbique in the
past year," he said of the ailing
country, reported by the United
Nations to be one of the six
African nations most devastated
by drought.
"Millions will die and it is our
fault," asserted Elie Wiesel,
chairman of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council and a member
of the AJWS Board. He pointed
out that "there is enough food and
medicine in this country to help
the sick and poor" in distant na-
tions and "if they die, we are
guilty."
THIS MISSION, inspired by
Dr. Paul Epstein, a physician who
was the Chief of Medicine at Cen-
tral Hospital in Beira, Mozambi-
que in 1980. will be the first major
medical relief effort of the AJWS.
Last January, when Epstein
returned to Mozambique after a
five-year absense, he noted that
"There were hospitals and rural
clinics that had no medicines
whatsoever. I spoke with doctors
who could do nothing at all to help
the people they were treating
many of whom were dying."
In response to the emergency
conditions in Mozambique, the
AJWS designed a twofold project
Simon explained that the
chartered aircraft, donated by the
London-based Live-Aid Founda-
tion, was part of-the short-term
plan that would distribute the an-
tibiotics, anti-malarial and anti-
parasitic drugs, supplied primarily
by pharmaceutical firms, to as
many of the victims as possible.
a mT^u .emI*d that the
AJ ^Shadworked in conjunction
ni^lN!,niStry of Health ^d
UNICEF to assure the speedv
delivery most likely within a
matter of days of the medicines,
utilizing various forms of
transportation such as light air-
craft, truck convoy and boats.
THE AJWS is also coordinating
a long-term development project
to meet Mozambique's basic
needs, including the production of
low cost latrines to prevent con-
taminated water and plans for
two intravenous production units
will provide IVs for the entire
country within two years.
Simon also mentioned the goal
of creating an element of self-
sufficiency by working on
agricultural development and in-
corporating women into that
development. He expressed the
hope of preventing a "recurring
famine situation" by building
longer-term community projects.
Valeriano Ferrao, Ambassador
Plenipotentiary of the People's
Republic of Mozambique, respond-
ed to the AJWS relief project:
"The people of Mozambique, in
their hour of need, wish to express
their gratitude to the American
Jewish community for their
generous humanitarian efforts."
AJWS CHAIRMAN and presi-
dent of Phillips Van-Heusen Cor-
poration, Lawrence Phillips,
pointed to the Ambassador's
message as showing "the neutrali-
ty of the organization" as it
prefers to work as "a people to
people organization," primarily
non-governmental, as it aims to
steer clear of the political rhetoric
that could "bog down the
humanitarian effort."
The arrival in Mozambique of
the aircraft, named L'Chayim,
meaning "To Life," coincided
with the beginning of Rosh
Hashanah. It landed in Mozambi-
que on Sept. 15. Wiesel views the
date as symbolic and believes that
on these Jewish High Holidays
days of judgment "we (Jews)
are being judged."
While Wiesel conceded that
"the enterprise should have
started long ago," he noted that
the first priority of Jewish
organizations was to devote all
their time to the Jewish cause,
"but now we have learned that if
one group suffers we all suffer.
It's late but not too late."
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Israel's gross national product
(GNP) is estimated between
$22-$23 billion and one quarter of
it goes to defense and defense
related needs, according to Prof.
Eitan Berglass, a leading
economist, in a report to a joint
panel of the Knesset's Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee and
the Finance Committee. Berglass
noted that Israel pays to the U.S.
each year about $1 billion in in-
terest and principal on military
aid loans.
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