The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02954

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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eTewlslh. Flaridian.

1985 Rosh hashanah Qpeetinqs 5746
HHHHBMHH


The Jew^sfe Floridhuv/Friday, September 13. 1985
General Assembly Tuesday
Focus on Israel May Move To South Africa
Bt YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) There is an air of
expectancy, and anticipa-
tion here these days on the
eve of the opening of the
40th anniversary session of
the UN General Assembly
next Tuesday.
Even experienced diplomats.
who do not easily express op-
timism when it comes to the UN.
acknowledge that the anniversary
session is going to be unlike
previous General Assemblys. and
that Israel, barring a last-minute
surprise, will not be the focus of
repeated attacks and condemna-
tions as was the case in the last
few years.
BINYAMIN Netanyahu.
Israel's Ambassador to the UN,
believes that this year's Assembly
will focus primarily on South
Africa and its apartheid policy
But, he says, he has no illusion
that the anti-Israeli campaign and
the rhetoric against the Jewish
State will disappear. He says that
he does not rule out a repeated at-
tempt by the extremist Arabs and
Iran to deprive Israel of its
credentials to the 40th anniver-
sary session.
Netanyahu notes, however, that
the failure of the Arabs to deprive
Israel of its credentials has in-
creased with every passing
Assembly. The attempt to expel
Israel from the General Assembly,
by denying it its credentials, has
become in Netanyahu's view, a
yardstick by which to assess
Israel's position at the UN. since
more and more countries vote
against the Arab scheme.
Secretary General Javier Perei
de Cueilar. aware of the danger
that the 40th session anniversary
could easily resembie previous
and-Israel-. sessions at the world
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOWWONDEPFUL
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rates Atso local moving 4
long distance moving
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A B VAN LINES INC
.of Miami)
organization, vowed recently, dur-
ing a meeting with Netanyahu, to
fight and strongly resist any at-
tempts to turn this Assembly into
an unruly anti-Israeli arena. "This
could gravely harm the UN." the
Secretary reportedly said
THE FIRST speaker, opening
the "General Debate"' of the
Assembly on Sept. 23. is Presi-
dent Reagan. King Hussein of Jor-
dan will address the Assembly on
Sept. 27. and Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir on Oct.
D
But some 90 other heads of
states and governments will also
address the Assembly during a
special Commemorative Session,
to mark the UN's 40th birthday,
from Oct. 14-24. This will be one
of the largest international
gatherings of heads of states ever
held, with hundreds of behind-the
scene contacts and sessions of
quiet diplomacy.
Israel's Premier Shimon Peres
is tentatively scheduled to address
the Commemorative Session on
Oct. 16. In addition to his schedul-
ed meeting with Reagan. Peres
hopes to meet with at least 15
other heads of government.
High on his list are the leaders
of India. Poland and Hungary,
countries which have no
diplomatic ties with Israel. He
also hopes to meet with Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak who is
scheduled to attend the Assembly
around the same time as Peres
WITH ALL the guarded op-
timism of some diplomats that the
UN will not be obsessed" with
Israel this year the provisional
agenda of the 40th General
Assembly does not indicate that
trend.
Of 144 items, some 12 items per-
tain to the Middle East, most of
which are or could be related to
Israel, including a nuclear free
zone, cooperation between the ON
and the Arab League and Financ-
ing DM peace-keeping forces-
Most of the items concerning
Israel on the agendas of previous
Assemblys are found here as well
Anti-Israeli resolutions are.
therefore, expected to be adopted
by the General Assembly on items
such as the "Question of
Palestine" and "The Situation in
the Mideast" with a call for
total Israel: withdrawal from the
territories and the establishment
of a Palestinian state.
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"Israeli Nuclear Armament"
and the "Israeli Aggression
Against the Iraqi Nuclear Installa-
tions" in 1981 are also on the
agenda, for the fifth time since the
attack took place.
ONE OF the agenda items
shows clearly the intentions of the
Arabs to assail Israel "at any
cost." as one observer noted.
Despite the fact that Israel public-
ly announced that its plan to con-
struct a canal between the
Mediterranean and the Dead Sea
has been cancelled, the Assembly
has nevertheless scheduled a
discussion on: "Israel's decision to
link the Mediterranean to the
Dead Sea" (Item 81).
Apart from marking the 40th
anniversary of the UN. this
General Assembly also marks the
10th anniversary of the infamous
Assembly resolution equating
Zionism with racism. Will this
Assembly dredge up this resolu-
tion and seek to inject it into its
discussions?
Diplomats here say that they
are encouraged by the results of
the End of the Decade Women's
Conference in Nairobi this sum-
mer where the Arabs' attempt to
inject this resolution into the con-
ference's final document on
strategies to the year 2000 was
defeated. "We hope this trend will
continue here." Netanyahu says.
but is quick to add that he will not
be surprised if the Arabs will try-
to find new grounds to defame
Israel and slur the Jewish people.
ON THE eve of the 40th session
of the General Assembly.
Netanyahu assesses Israel's situa-
tion in the world organization as
being "relatively beWr th,
has been for many yewoV
points out. for instance that J
in 1980. the Security cjjfl
at least 40 times againaEi
the request of Arab countn*
1984 there were only six ffi
Council meetings' conceS
Israel, and in 1985 onlv i-i
meetings.
There are three major faa-l
contributing to Israel's imprZl
position the Ambassador beli I
The decline of the Arab oOtoSI
the division of the PL0 at thenjl
and in the Mideast, and the i '
position taken by the
States at the UN and
and its strong support of Is
Unite
Happy New Year
Alfred Golden, President
Leo Hack. V.P.
William Saulson. V.P.
Douglas Lazarus. V.P.. F.D.
William Seitles
Barney Selby
Jack Kasdan
Edward Dobin
Fred Snyder
Jay Lewis
Abraham Daoud
Joshua Schlinsky
Carl Grossberg
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U.S. Armed Forces
Friday, September 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
They're Set To Celebrate Rosh Hashanah
NEW YORK Jews in
[the U.S. armed forces sta-
Itioned throughout the con-
tinental U.S. and around the
world, their families and pa-
jtients in Veterans Ad-
I ministration hospitals will
be able to observe Rosh
[Hashanah and Yom Kippur
nth the assistance of
Jewish chaplains, lay
leaders and JWB's Commis-
sion on Jewish Chaplaincy.
The announcement was made
Iby Rabbi Barry H. Greene, chair-
Iman, JWB Commission on Jewish
|Chaplaincy.
This year Rosh Hashanah
Ibegins at sundown on Sunday,
ISept. 15, and ends at dark on
|Tuesday, Sept. 17. Yom Kippur
egins with the chanting of Kol
tfdre on the evening of Tuesday,
Sept. 24, and concludes at
lightfall on Wednesday, Sept. 25.
FOR THE High Holy Days, ac-
cording to Rabbi David Lapp,
jirector, JWB Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy, "U.S. Air
force Chaplains Theodore H.
Stainman in Greece, Morris M.
Taierstein in Germany, and
Clliott Marmon in England will be
broviding all U.S. Jewish Air
force personnel and their families
rith High Holy Day liturgical
ervices.
[ "Senior Jewish Chaplain Philip
pilverstein in Heidelberg will
:>rdinate High Holy Day ser-
ices with U.S. Army Jewish
fehaplains assigned to Nuremberg,
leidelberg, Stuttgart, Frankfurt,
lunich and Naples.
"Chaplain James Apple of the
Sixth Fleet will provide Jewish
>Javy personnel with JWB High
Joly Day prayer books, kipot
Bkull caps), taleisim (prayer
awls) and other Jewish supplies
Dr those unable to attend shore
eligious services but required to
on duty at sea."
"SINCE THERE are only 50
ill-time Jewish military chaplains
in active duty with American
orces and 13 more at Veterans
Administration hospitals," said
obi Greene, "the JWB Commis-
Kon will help mobilize 140 part
me and 151 reserve chaplains, as
fell as 100 lay leaders, to conduct
osh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
ervices at every base where Jews
Brve."
"In Europe," he added, "High
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American Jewish serviceman blows shofar on High Holy Days.
Scene is typical of those in which U.S. Jewish military personnel,
their families and hospitalized VA patients will participate in
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur observances with assistance of
JWB and Jewish chaplains.
Holy Day services will take place
in Spain and Turkey, as well as
Germany, Greece, Italy, and
England. In the Far East, there
will be services in Korea, Japan,
Guam, the Philippines and
Okinawa."
In its role as a full support
system to Jewish chaplains and
lay leaders, the JWB Commission
on Jewish Chaplaincy will provide
JWB calendars 1985-86, inspira-
tional literature, Selihot (peniten-
tial prayers), cassettes, and, as
needed, ram's horns (ahofrot),
prayer shawls and skull caps.
TRADITIONALLY, the first of
the services will occur on the
island of Guam in the South
Pacific, just east of the Interna-
tional Date Line. Since services
follow the sun, Pearl Harbor in
Hawaii will be the last base to
sound the shofar blast trumpeting
the end of the High Holy Days.
The full-time and part-time
Jewish chaplains covering the VA
hospitals have made plans to pro-
vide religious services for all
hospitalized veterans. Am-
bulatory patients will be provided
the opportunity to attend services
in the hospital chapels and bed-
ridden patients will receive special
coverage by the chaplains.
"Break-the-fast" suppers for
military personnel and VA pa-
tients arranged by the chaplains
will mark the conclusion of Yom
Kippur.
All of the U.S. services en-
courage and foster liberal leave
and pass policies for Jewish per-
sonnel and in many instances, ser-
vice men and women who cannot
get home for the holidays are in-
vited to share the warm "home
hospitality" of Jewish families in
the locale where they are station-
ed. Frequently, single men and
women are guests of Jewish
military families on their bases.
LOCAL JEWISH communal
organizations cooperate fully
Shamir in Tokyo
Reveals Release of Last Prisoners
By DAVID LANDAU
I JERUSALEM (JTA) The
femaining 120 Lebanese Shiite
risoners held by Israel in the
xlit detention camp were releas-
1 Monday, Foreign Minister Yit-
bak Shamir announced. He made
le announcement in Tokyo
We he is on an official visit, the
Nt ever by an Israeli Foreign
jinister and Deputy Premier to
)pan.
le said Israel's action was in
sponse, among other things, to
frproaches by the Japanese
?vernment on behalf of the
(isoners. All of them had been
ptured in Lebanon and detained
security violations or
ppected violations. They have
en released in batches ever
ce the TWA Flight 847 hostage
crisis in Beirut last June when the
key demand of the hostage-takers
was the immediate release of all
the prisoners.
The release of the last of the de-
tainees was known to be immi-
nent. Shamir was the first Israeli
official to say when. The Foreign
Minister was reportedly hard at
work promoting Israeli
technology and agriculture in
Japan. He has been meeting with
top Japanese officials, including
two Deputy Ministers of Interna-
tional Trade and Industry.
Reports from Tokyo say
Shamir's visit has aroused great
and generally positive interest in
the mass media there. The Israeli
diplomat has made a point of
meeting with Japan's leading
editors and broadcasters. He
toured Tokyo's "Expo-85" exhibi-
tion, remarking that it was a pity
budgetary considerations
prevented Israel from being
represented.
He said Israeli agricultural
techniques would certainly be of
interest to Japanese and other
visitors to the fair.
Shamir's trip, at the invitation
of the Japanese government, was
seen here as a signal that Japan is
interested in warming relations
with Israel. They have been
cautious and cool until now, large-
ly owing to Japan's dependence
on the Arab oil producing states
for its petroleum. Shamir has ex-
pressed keen interest in closer
relations with Japan in both com-
merce and political dialogue.
holiday planning for service per-
sonnel with the Jewish chaplains,
the JWB Chaplaincy Commission,
the Armed Forces and Veterans
Services Committee, and JWB's
Women's Organizations' Services.
The JWB is the U.S.
government-accredited agency
that provides religious, Jewish
educational, and morale services
to Jews in the armed forces, their
families and hospitalized veterans
on behalf of the American Jewish
community.
At the same time, JWB is the
leadership network of and central
service agency for Jewish Com-
munity Centers, YM and YWHAs
and camps in the U.S. and Canada
serving one million Jews.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985


On Rosh Hashanah, Jews Pray in Shadow of Judgment j
Speaking of
God, the Prophet Micah
spes
declared: "And Thou wilt cast (ve-tashlich)
all their sins into the depths of the sea
(7:19)." What God casts are the sins of
Israel. It is for this reason that on the first
afternoon of Rosh Hashanah Jews go to a
place where there is a running water.
It is at this site that they recite Micah, as
well as other scriptural and penitential
prayers.
Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown this
Sunday evening and continues on Monday
and Tuesday, Sept. 16 and 17. Because the
holiday has long been regarded with great
solemnity, far exceeding its beginnings as
an autumnal late harvest festival, Rosh
Hashanah is above all things considered to
be a time of judgment.
For this reason, Jews pray: "Now,
therefore, 0 Lord our God, impose Thine
awe upon all Thy works, and Thy dread upon
all that Thou hast created, that all works
may revere Thee and all creatures prostrate
themselves before Thee, that they may all
form a single band to do Thy will with a
perfect heart."
For this reason, Jews on Rosh Hashanah
greet one another with: "May you be inscrib-
ed in the Book of Life for a good year." For
this reason, they dip the piece of bread over
which grace has been recited into honey as a
token of the sweet year it is hoped will come.
And, for this same reason, they also dip a
piece of apple into the honey, praying for
renewal of "a good and sweet year" if only it
is "Thy will, O Lord our God and God of our
fathers ..."
Blowing of the Shofar
Perhaps one of the most exciting customs
on the Days of Awe is the blowing of the
shofar. Saadiah Gaon attributes this custom
to the fact that trumpets are sounded at a
coronation, and so we hail God as King on
Rosh Hashanah with blasts of the shofar.
Among his other ten reasons for blowing of
the shofar, he observed that the shofar
heralds the beginning of the penitential
season, which continues through Yom Kip-
pur. And, on a sorrowful note, that the con-
quering armies that destroyed the Temple
sounded trumpet blasts to celebrate their oc-
casion. It is as if the divinely-inspired good
in our history must be recalled on Rosh
Hashanah along with the agony of our
defeats.
Even such considerations as relating to
why the shofar is the horn of any other
animal sheep, goat, antelope rather
than a cow's adds to the luster of the
custom. One explanation is that the horn of a
cow would remind us of the golden calf and
the moment of degradation during the Ex-
odus from Egypt when the Israelites in the
desert lost their faith even as Moses was
atop Mt. Sinai to receive God's
Commandments.
A second explanation suggests that when
the horn of a ram became customary it was
to remind us of the binding of Isaac for
whom a ram was substituted when, at the
last moment before his sacrifice of his only
son, Abraham found his hand stayed by an
Angel of God.
Rosh Hashanah is, indeed, so rich in tradi-
tion, custom and meaning that it amply sym-
bolizes the various other names affixed to
the holiday, such as Yom Ha-Din (Judgment
Day) and Yom Ha-Zikaron (Day of
Remembrance).
Jewish Floridian
onia>>_>kiiiii rv_ r>o.
f o htiiriNMfwiiii[
nUD JHOCHFT LEO HINDU* Sl'UMIWOTr
Like a kaleidoscope of meaning, analogy
and metaphor, Rosh Hashanah speaks to us
in the present from the dim past, reminding
us as Jews that our presence is eternal and
that the cost of our eternality is the annual
Holy Day examination of our souls and
declaration of our transgressions to cleanse
us for this august role.
It Was A Year of Discontent
Friday. September 13,1985
Volume 58
27 ELUL 5745
Number 37
By ARNO HERZBERG
It was a year of disappointment
and discontent. The Kaleidoscopic
array of events was hardly en-
couraging. There were blows and
they came in rapid succession. It
took all our strength to see it
through.
The 40-year hunt for Joseph
Mengele. the Auschwitz "Angel of
Death," ended in some graveyard.
The questions that arose from
that cemetery left us confused and
perplexed. They will never be
answered. How could he disap-
pear during all those years, while
the hunters looked for him? What
were the sources of their disinfor-
mation? Why was the German
government not more forthcom-
ing in tracing his family's and
manager's movements from that
little town in Germany to that lit-
tle town in Brazil?
There was another strange
story of a Nazi murderer. Klaus
Barbie, the "Butcher of Lyon,"
once sentenced to death by a
French court, is about to escape
just punishment. It took two years
for a French judge to decide that
Barbie was innocent of charges in-
volving "assassinations, arresta-
tions and deportations." He could
only be charged of complicity in
the deportation of 452 French
Jews in 1943 and 1944 while he
was head of the gestapo in Lyon.
AFTER A 17-month trial
another Gestapo murderer, Harri
Schulz, was cleared of charges
having murdered Jews among
5.000 transported in 1942 to the
death camp in Auschwitz. A court
in Hamburg, Germany, found that
after 40 years charges could not
be proved beyond a reasonable
doubt.
Another war criminal who had
gained American citizenship in
spite of his Nazi past was to be
deported from America to Israel
to stand trial. In this and other
cases. American judges granted
delay after delay and gave
murderers the opportunity to
escape just punishment. Further-
more, a German "scientist" who
had lied about his Nazi past was
permitted to slip out of the United
States. He escaped with a
presidential medal given him for
his efforts in our space program.
Then there was Bitburg.
Presidential logic stood on his
head. We and the Germans were
victims of the same evil called
Nazism! It was the Jews who
made so much fuss about the
President honoring German
soldiers. It was almost a replay of
words written by Franz Werfel, a
German-Jewish literary figure of
the twenties: "Not the murderer
is guilty, but the one whom he
murdered."
THIS LIST of distasteful
events could be extended at will.
We could add the obvious bias of
the media, the corroding influence
of newscasters and paid pro-
pagandists. We could include
judgments rendered with a
political flavor and some baffling
acrobatics. If anything, this year
severely tested our sense of
justice. It has created doubts, a
kind of numbness that has
descended on many of us and a
cynical "What's next?" might not
be far from our minds.
Still, not all these happenings
are directed against Jews or are
the result of anit-Jewish bias.
They are an expression of the
moral devastation that has engulf-
ed the world. There is enough of it
to go around and affect the lives
of Jews and non-Jews. There is
the crime wave all over the world,
the terrorism, the purse snat-
ching, the corrupting influence of
Arab oil money, accumulated by
extortion, and the obvious
paralysis of politicians, police and
legal authorities to cope with it.
Everywhere we see moral eva-
sion, a growing incompetence to
meet pressing problems and an
appalling ineptness accompanied
by an extensive polarization.
How much have Jews been af-
fected by this malaise? How far
has it guided actions, or inactions.
in our midst? How much does it
prevail in the body politics of
Israel? Is it not time to put these
questions on our agenda?
THE TURN of the century is
not too far away. It should in-
fluence our thinking now, today.
The demographic time bomb,
short of a miracle, will be with
American Jewry and their
number will decline. Will we con-
tinue to be able to afford the great
number of Jewish organizations
and the manifold purposes they
represent? Will the political clout
American Jews carry today be the
same 15 years from now? To what
extent will this affect aid to
Israel? Should we exert any in-
fluence on Israel for a change in
politics and the economy?
The future raises still a host of
Continued on Page 12-A


2 Top Stories of the Year
In South Africa, Israel Aims
To Balance Ideals and Interests
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A

By KENNETH JACOBSON
As South Africa moves
deeper into crisis, the
democratic nations of the
West seek a proper
response. All kinds of ques-
tions are being asked.
Should they disinvest? Does
constructive engagement
bring results? Will South
African blacks be the ones
most hurt by Western sanc-
tions? How will the West's
strategic interests be af-
fected should the current
government in South Africa
fall?
It is generally recognized in the
United States and Western
Europe that events within South
Africa will be the determining fac-
tor in its future. But as the
primary trading and financial
partners with the South Africans,
the major Western nations have a
say as well the urgent visit of
South African economic leaders to
the West for talks concerning
outstanding loans to Western
banks highlights this point.
FOR ONE democracy, Israel,
the problem is somewhat dif-
ferent. There the question is not
how Israel can affect change in
the South African regime it
can't but rather how Israel can
live up to its highest ideals in a
world that makes it difficult to ig-
nore its narrow self-interests.
ISRAEL IS a rather insignifi-
cant player in South Africa's in-
ternational economic picCtoe/Qh-
ly about 0.5 percent of South
Africa's trade takes place with
As early as the 1950's, Golda
Meir, who was heavily involved
in the process, called Israel's
broad technological assistance
to the then-newly independent
nations of Africa and Asia a
'great satisfaction.'
Israel; the vast majority occurs
with the United States, Japan,
Great Britain, France, West Ger-
many and Black Africa itself.
Should Israel stop all business
with South Africa tomorrow the
impact on the South Africa
regime would be nil.
Therefore, what Israel may or
may not do should not be a matter
of moment to those who view in-
ternational pressure on South
Africa economic institutions as a
key to change.
But for Israel itself the issue is
one of profound significance. It
highlights in the starkest terms
the dilemma of a nation in crisis
since its creation, trying to live up
to its ideals while often forced to
take extreme measures to protect
its interests. Unlike other
Western nations with far more in-
volved relations with Pretoria.
Israel's relationship has been
shaped by harsh realities.
IN THE 1950's and 1960's, an
outspoken opponent of apartheid.
Israel built up a series of relation-
ships with newly-independent
Black African states. In the eyes
of these states, Israel held a
special place alongside China in
the way it provided technological
assistance. Later Prime Minister
Golda Meir, heavily involved in
this process, described it well:
"There was one great satisfac-
tion in those 10 years, and that
was the relationship we establish-
ed with the new independent
countries of Africa and Asia. That
really gave me satisfaction,
because I saw in it not only a
political gain. Here were these
people beginning to tacke pro-
blems and face challenges they
were not always prepared to
meet.
"It was natural that we, as
Jews, with our past history, would
have a lot in common with them,
and should join hands with them
and share with them our
Prime Minister Shimon Peres greets Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Gat-
sha Buthelezi on the occasion of the Chiefs recent visit to Israel.
In terms of South Africa, Israel seeks to be true to its longterm op-
position to apartheid while at the same time rebuilding its rela-
tionships with the nations of Black Africa that were severed by
Arab oil pressures in the wake of the Yom Kippur War of 197b.
experiences."
THE 1973 war and Arab oil;
pressure brought about an end to
that era. Suddenly, Israel, long
the subject of the Arab and other
international boycotts, now found
itself virtually excluded from a
part of the world that had welcom-
ed it earlier. Increasingly being
forced into a greater sense of
isolation, Israel accepted friends
wherever they might appear.
Pretoria was more than ready.
Today, as Israel works diligent-
ly to recoup its former place in
Black Africa, it still finds itself
relatively isolated on the conti-
nent, and thus does not have the
latitude of decision-making in its
dealings with South Africa that
the rest of the West with its full
relations with Black Africa has.
Another reality for Israel, a
land dedicated to the well-being of
Jews wherever they may be, is the
presence of more than 100,000
Jews in South Africa. As Prime
Continued on Page 11-A
No Reconciliation With History
Reagan Made A 'Painful Mistake' When He Visited Bitburg Cemetery
WNS Services
There can be no recon-
ciliation with history;
lessons must be learned
from it, President Chaim
Herzog declared to
representatives from 18
countries who gathered at
the Presidential residency
May 6 to mark the 40th an-
niversary of the defeat of
Nazi Germany.
Premier Shimon Peres, ad-
dressing a special session of the
Knesset convened for the occa-
sion, said Israel noted with "deep
sorrow and
mistake" by
United State
wreath at the
burg, West
members of
buried along
war dead.
But, Peres
pain" the "painful
the President of the
s who had placed a
war cemetery in Bit-
Germany, where
the Waffen SS are
with other German
added, he regards
President Reagan as a true friend
of the Jewish people and of Israel.
Hatred, he said, should not be
answered by hatred, "but death
cannot obliterate the difference
between those buried as
murderers and those buried as the
murder victims ... no monument
can bridge the abysmal gap bet-
ween those who led to murder and
those who died in the murder.
DEFENSE MINISTER Yit-
zhak Rabin spoke in much the
same vein when he unveiled a
monument at the Heroes and Mar-
tyrs Memorial at the Yad Vashem
May 6 before an audience of
3.000. There can be "no recon-
ciliation, not with Nazism, and not
with the Nazis." Rabin declared.
The monument, massive granite
blocks in the shape of a hexagon,
represents the six million Jews
who perished in the Holocaust and
is also a tribute to the 1.5 million
Jewish resistance fighters and
partisans of World War II.
All of these events were held in
the shadow of Reagan's visit to
Bitburg. juxtaposed with an
earlier visit May 5 to the Jewish
memorial at the Bergen-Belsen
concentration camp site. Reagan's
act aroused anger and anguish
among Jews all over the world
and an unexpected controversy
among Israelis.
Rabin expressed what was pro-
bably the most forceful criticism
of Reagan at the Yad Vashem
ceremony when he declared:
"There can be no reconciliation
with Nazism, with the Nazis and
all related to them. The American
President's historic mistake was
to equate the murderers and their
victims. He can never be forgiven
for that equation neither by
progressive mankind nor by the
Jewish people.
KENNETH BIALKIN, chair
man of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, asserted
that President Reagan's visit to
the Bitburg military cemetery,
where 49 Waffen SS* soldiers are
buried, did not damage the rela-
tionship between the Administra-
tion and the American Jewish
community. He said the Jewish
leadership in America will con-
tinue to work hand in hand with
the Administration on behalf of
Israel and Soviet Jews.
"I would like to think that the
Continued on Page 12-A
President Reagan is being welcomed here to
the Federal Republic of Germany by West Ger-
man President Richard von Weizsaecker. The
two leaders stand at attention as the national
anthems are played. Ceremony was held on
May 10. (DaD/Bundesbildstelle).
His act aroused anger,
anguish all over the world.


MM
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Settlers Back Off
Avoid Confrontation on West Bank
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Jewish settlers in the West
Bank backed off from con-
frontation with the
authorities Monday after
the government made clear
it would not tolerate
reprisals or vigilantism as a
way to curb terrorist
activity.
Otniel Schneller, head of the
council of Jewish settlements in
the West Bank, said that the set-
tlers have no intention of clashing
with security forces. He said they
fully respected the efforts by
police and the Israel Defense
Force to maintain security.
However, the settlers will con-
tinue to pressure the government
and Knesset for drastic political
measures against Arab terrorism,
he said.
THE STATEMENT was ap-
parently in response to the sharp
criticism of settler tactics express-
ed by Deputy Premier David
Levy, a powerful voice in the
Likud leadership who is sym-
pathetic to the settlers' aims.
Kohl Salutes Jews of Augsburg
BONN (JTA) Chancellor Helmut Kohl has con-
gratulated the Jewish community in Augsburg on the
reopening of the synagogue there, destroyed during the
notorious Kristallnacht of 1938. "Your temple may be in
the diaspora, but you, the members of the Jewish communi-
ty, are here at home," Kohl said in a cable.
The federal state of Baden Wuertemberg and the
Augsburg municipality made public funds available to
rebuild and restore the synagogue. Augsburg, one of the
oldest cities in Germany, is currently celebrating its
2,000th anniversary.
Mount
Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street Miami
INVITES YOU TO ATTEND
Special
Memorial Service
Sunday
September 22,1985
Conducted by ,
JL I '
BETH DAVID
Rabbi Sol Landau Reverend Milton Freedman
IIM
854-3911
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Michael Eisenstat
10:30 a.m.
667-5657
TEMPLE EMANUEL
Dr. Irving Lehnnan
11.-00 a.m.
538-2503
TEMPLE BETH KODESH
Rabbi Max Shapiro
11:30 a.m.
854-3053
TEMPLE BET SHIRA
Rabbi David Anerbach
12:00 noon
238-2601
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Rabbi HaakeU Benat
Special Service* 12 JO p.m. at Richter Mausoleum
Site, Section K
573-5900
He said their harassment of
Arabs in the territory has become
a nuisance for the security forces.
Instead of coping with terrorism,
the security echelons are forced to
deal with Jewish settlers trying to
take the law into their own hands,
Levy said.
His remarks followed Sunday's
Cabinet decision banning armed
patrols by Jewish settlers in Arab
towns. That decision and Levy's
statement sent a clear message to
the settler leadership that the
public atmosphere is not in their
favor. Their zeal was also curbed
by the strong presence of soldiers
and police under orders to get
tough with anyone, Arab or Jew,
who breaches the peace.
Border police, Sunday night,
prevented settlers from reopening
a blocked passageway from the
Jewish quarter in Hebron to the
casba or marketplace which has
been under curfew since an Israel
soldier was fatally stabbed there.
GROUPS OF armed settlers
could be seen in the streets of
Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarem and
Kalilya. The settlers said they
were there to teach the Arabs that
Jews would not be intimidated by
recent attacks in Hebron and
elsewhere. There were no in-
cidents. The settlers said, after
the Cabinet decision, that they
would lower their profile.
Jewish settlers in Gaza backed
out of a plan to establish a yeshiva
at an old synagogue on the water-
front of that Arab city. They cited
the intervention of unforeseen
elements.
The settlers have been harass-
ing convicted Arab terrorists
released from prison last May and
allowed to return to their homes.
A report that they set fire to the
house of one of them was not en-
tirely accurate. They tried but fail-
ed to torch a house which turned
out to be the wrong house. The '
terrorists they were trying to oust
were sleeping peacefully in a
building a few yards away.
Golan Heights Traffic
May Be Closed at Night
JERUSALEM (JTA) Certain areas of the Golan
Heights may be closed to nighttime traffic as a means of
preventing terrorist incursions. The army is considering
the measure which would affect Jewish settlers and Druze
resident.
SENIOR OFFICERS of the Israel Defense Force
discussed the idea last week with leaders of the Jewish set-
tlements and found them favorably disposed. Although the
Golan Heights have been peaceful in recent years, the up-
surge of terrorist incidents elsewhere has raised concern
that it too might become a target.
Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe Levy and other senior of-
ficers toured the region following a special meeting of the
IDF high command in the Israeli border town of Kiryat
Shemona. The meeting was held there as a demonstration
of IDF attention to the security of the northern villages.
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wishes you peace
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We hope the coming months will
include the closeness of family and
friends and the good health
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MEDIC At CENTER ^3
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Miami, Florida S3136
(305) 325-5000


^Investigation Continues
Bomb Blast Outside L.I. Home
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Flofidfan Page 7-A
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
federal and local police
[authorities are continuing
Itheir investigation of a
Ibomb blast outside the front
Idoor of the Long Island
Ihome of Elmars Sprogis, a
170-year-old former Latvian
oliceman once accused by
the government of Nazi war
Lrtmes.
While Sprogis and his wife
escaped injury, a passerby,
123-year-old Robert Seifreid, was
[seriously injured. Seifreid had
[gone to the front door of the home
[ to alert the couple that it was on
[ fire. He apparently set off the
blast when he kicked a small ob-
ject as he was leading the couple
out the door of the home.
Following the explosion last Fri-
day, the Long Island newspaper
Nrfwsday received a phone call in
which a male voice said, "Listen
carefully. Jewish Defense League.
Nazi war criminal. Bomb. Never
again." The message sounded, ac-
cording to Newsday reports, as if
it had been taped.
THE BLAST outside Sprogis'
home was similar to that which oc-
* *
curred last month outside the
Paterson, New Jersey home of
Tscherim Soobzokov, a 61-year-
old former member of the Nazi
88. Soobzokov, who was seriously
injured by a bomb blast when he
emerged from his home August 15
in response to a call from a
neighbor who had found Soob-
zokov's car on fire, died last Fri-
day of his wounds. No one has
claimed responsibility for the at-
tack in Paterson.
Soobzokov lost his right leg and
suffered extensive injuries of the
lower body from the bomb attack.
The Justice Department has
sought unsuccessfully to deport
Soobzokov for concealing his war-
time activities when he applied for
entry into the United States.
The Department dropped the
charges in 1980 after Soobzokov
provided evidence that he had
disclosed his Waffen SS member-
ship and wartime record when ap-
plying for entry to the U.S.
SPROGIS, a retired construc-
tion worker living in Brentwood,
came to the U.S. in 1951 and is a
naturalized American citizen. In
1982, the government filed
charges against him seeking to
have him deported for his wartime
activities as a police chief in Nazi-
occupied Latvia in World War II.
In 1984, a Federal District
Court Judge dismissed the
charges, ruling that while Sprogis
had been present during Nazi
persecution of Jews and other
civilians, there had been no
evidence that he had taken part.
The government appealed the
court decision, but an Appeals
Court last June upheld Judge
Francis Altimari's ruling.
According to police reports,
Seifreid, who was not acquainted
with Sprogis, was shopping in a
store when he spotted the fire at
Sprogis' front door shortly before
4:30 a.m. last Friday. He ran
across the street, pounded on the
door to alert the Sprogis family
who had been asleep.
SEIFREID TOLD Newsday
from his hospital bed that he had
been inside the couple's home for
several minutes trying to per-
suade them to leave.
Seifreid said the bomb blew up,
hurling him 25 feet to the street
curb, when he kicked it as he was
leading the couple out the door.
The heel and bone of Seifreid's
right foot was shattered by the
bomb. Reports said he is expected
to undergo surgery this week to
remove his right foot.
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ever need
more medicine than this.
V. .
But, if you should, isn't it good to know
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insisted all along: There's a lot of healing
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But. we all know there are times when
illness or injury demands services which only
a hospital can provide. Pof more than thirty
years. Mount Sinai Medical Center has been
the hospital to which the community looks for
state-of-the-art health care.
At Mount Sinai, we know that caring is as
important as curing We care not only for your
physical well being, but your spiritual comfort
as well, no matter what your race, creed or
color. We understand and honor tradition.
That's whv, for example, we provide
candelabras for Shabbat. a kosher kitchen for
those who choose, and religious services
tor every holiday on our closed-circuit TV
system.
At Mount Sinai, we not only understand
your personal culture, we gladly become
a part of it. And we also understand what
is needed to provide the highest quality in
health care. Our modern facilities, our
sophisticated technology, and our expert,
dedicated health care team combine to
create an environment in which medicine is
practiced at the forefront of science.
Mount Sinai Medical Center
4300 Alton Road Miami Beach. Florida
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl (right) and French President
Francois Mitterrand meet in the south of France for talks dealing
with closer security cooperation between France and the Federal
Republic of Germany. (DaD/Sven Simon).
Jewish National Fund
PnlHc^Keren Kayemeth LeisraeDJ
I Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF
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Remember the JNF in your Will
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JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Kd Suite 353. Miami Beach. FL 33139
Phone 538-6464



Page8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
We Won't Talk With Groups
Responsible for Violence Shultz
Newsmen Nettle Him
Fail to Ask Economic Questions
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State
George Shultz, stressing
that the U.S. still maintain-
ed the conditions the PLO
must meet before the U.S.
will talk with the terrorist
organization, declared that
any group responsible for
violence cannot be part of
the Middle East peace
process.
Speaking to reporters after an
hour-long meeting with Israeli
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Modai
at the State Department Friday,
Shultz said the U.S. is concerned
about the recent "upsurge of
violence" and the efforts of
"radicals" to use violence "to
derail the peace process."
He said this cannot be allowed,
adding, "It is very clear to us that
those who perpetuate violence
deal themselves out of the peace
process."
Modai stressed that Israel will
never negotiate with any delega-
tion that included members of the
PLO. He said he welcomed the
U.S. position stated by Shultz a
few minutes earlier on terrorist
groups. Shultz also noted that
"for talks with the PLO our condi-
tions remain as they have been for
many years." While he did not
state them, the conditions are
PLO's acceptance of UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and 338
and Israel's right to exist.
THE TWO officials said they
spent most of their time discuss-
ing Israel's economic austerity
program, with Shultz expressing
his "admiration" for the efforts
taken by Premier Shimon Peres
and his government.
Most
Favor
Amnesty
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Sixty
percent of the Israeli adult public
favor amnesty for the imprisoned
members of the Jewish terrorist
underground, while only 34 per-
cent are against their pardon, ac-
cording to a public opinion poll
published in Maariv recently. The
poll was taken by the Modi'in
Ezrachi Research Institute.
A profile of the responders in-
dicated the usual breakdown on
such political questions most of
those in favor of amnesty were
said to be from Asian and African
countries or the children of Orien-
tal communities, with lower
education and in the lower income
brackets.
A FURTHER breakdown show-
ed that while people voting for the
Labor Alignment were evenly
split, 86 percent of those who said
they voted for the Likud favor
pardon, and 96 percent of Kach
support-rs want the Jewish
underground prisoners pardoned.
A Hanoch and Rafi Smith poll in
the Jerusalem Po^ gave results
similar to that of a Modi'in
Ezrachi poll on the popularity of
political parties that was publish-
ed in Maariv earlier.
The Smith poll gives Labor 38
percent, with another 11 percent
favoring small parties "close to
Labor." giving the "Labor Bloc"
49 percent; the Likud polled 22
percent; Tehiya and Kach
together^ 22 percent; the religious
partiea eight percent, giving what
the pollsters termed the "Likud-
religious bloc" 30 pescent of the
total.
Secretary Shultz
The Secretary announced that
Israel will receive in the next few
days about half of the $750 million
supplemental appropriation for
1985. Modai said that this will be
the last supplemental request that
Israel would make.
In response to a question, Shultz
said Jordan would receive U.S.
arms but gave no details. "It is
clear to us that Jordan has
definite security problems," he
said. "We feel that help from the
U.S. is justified." However, he ad-
ded that President Reagan has
made "no decision on what he
might propose or when he might
propose it."
But Modai said, "Israel resents
any supply of arms to any country
in the region which does not
recognize the State of Israel and
which does not have diplomatic
relations with the State of Israel."
He said that Israel is grateful for
U.S. military aid but by giving
arms to its enemies, the U.S. off-
sets the military balance and
places the situation back to where
it was before Israel received the
aid.
OUTLINING the U.S. policy in
the Mideast, Shultz said the main
effort was to help to try to bring
the parties in the region together.
"Our effort needs to be and is to
do everything we can to bring
about direct negotiations between
an Arab interlocutor able to speak
authoritatively and Israel."
Modai stressed that Israel is
committed to peace talks and
under the Camp David accords is
also committed to "direct negotia-
tions with King Hussein and a
delegation which would include
representatives of the Arab
population in Judaea, Samaria
and the Gaza Strip."
He added that if the U.S. does
engage in talks with a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation,
"they can only be very general,
very brief, because the only par-
ties that can discuss a peace pro-
cess in the area are those who live
in the area."
SHULTZ NOTED that
sometimes when he reads the
"rumor mills" about supposed
changes in U.S. Mideast policy he
begins to think that somebody
must "think we lost our marbles."
While he did not say what he was
referring to, he may have been
pointing to reports all week here
that the U.S. is considering accep-
ting Nabil Shaath, the close per-
sonal adviser to PLO leader Yasir
Arafat, as one of the four Palesti-
nians on a joint delegation.
During his two days of talks in
Washington, Modai also met with
Vice President George Bush and
Treasury Secretary James Baker.
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of State
George Shultz and Israeli
Finance Minister Yitzhak
Modai answered questions
from reporters following
the two officials' hour-long
meeting at the State
Department Friday, and
Shultz appeared annoyed
toward the end of the press
conference that there had
been no questions on
economics.
The Secretary, who had headed
the Office of Management and
Budget and was Secretary of
Labor in the Nixon Administra-
tion, noted that "it used to be that
I thought economics was impor-
tant." He added, "It's a new
day."
After all, as Shultz pointed out,
he had just announced that Israel
is to receive immediately half of
the $750 million in supplementary
economic aid for the 1985 fiscal
year. He also praised Premier
Shimon Peres, Modai and their
Cabinet colleagues by expressing
his "admiration" for the steps
they have taken in Israel's
austerity program.
"IT IS QUITE apparent that
they have taken strong and
necessary measures which I
believe as they are fully im-
plemented, will do a great deal to
return the economy of Israel to
the kind of stability and set the
groundwork for prosperity that is
perfectly capable" of taking place
in Israel, Shultz said.
He said the supplementary ap-
propriation is "designed to be
helpful at a time when the govern-
ment of Israel is taking decisive
and difficult measures to help tide
over in that period so that the
measures will have a chance to
operate in the fullest way."
He said the U.S. will work with
Israel for long-term economic
gains "for I'm sure that's when
the real pay-off comes in the
growth and economic prosperity.'
Modai, thanking Shultz. Presi-
dent Reagan and Congress, said
Israel's measures are designed to
put his country back on "our own
feet." Later, speaking to
reporters at the Israel Embassy,
Modai said there was still "a lot to
be done" in order to stabilize the
Israeli economy and begin a
period of growth.
MODAI CONCEDED that the
U.S. was correct earlier this year
in not being pleased by the Israel
government's economic proposals
"because we did not have a com-
prehensive plan." But, he added,
"Now they are very pleased with
the plan and its implementation
up to this stage."
As outlined by Modai, the plan
calls for cutting the rate of infla-
tion and eventually eliminating it,
maintaining Israel's foreign cur-
rency reserves at an acceptable
level and stabilizing the Shekel.
Modai stressed that the pro-
gram is being implemented with
the consensus of the Histadrut
and business organizations He
also maintained it has the support
of the public in spite of the cutsin
subsidies, the reduction of govern
ment employees, higher taxes on
luxury items and the travel tax
which, he said, reduced by half the
number of Israelis who went
abroad this summer as compared
to the summer of 1984.
MODAI SAID Israel has just" J
about reached its goal for the cur-
rent fiscal year which began April
1 of bringing the rate of
unemployment to 7.4 percent or
92,000 jobless. He said the aim is
to reduce unemployment in the
next fiscal year.
The Finance Minister said he
did not believe higher unemploy-
ment would contribute to social
unrest in Israel. But he conceded
it might increase the number of
Israelis leaving the country. He
said this happened in 1980, the
last time unemployment rose, but
"after the situation improved,
many of them came back."
Israel Won't Be Able To Play Chess
VIENNA (JTA) Israel will not be allowed to par-
ticipate in next year's chess Olympiad in the United Arab
Emirates (UAE) because the World Chess Federation's
General Assembly decided last year to hold the tournament
in Dubai, which has since refused entry permits to Israeli
players. i
UAE SAID it did not grant the permits because
Israel and the UAE are in a state of conflict. The discussion
of this ban was a major topic of discussion at the Federa-
tion's conference last week in the Austrian city of Graz.
Israel Belfer, the Israeli delegate to the conference,
said Israel is. realistic enough to knoittfttt it will not be able
to break the'ban for 1986. But, he s25cf;"uwe want the prin-
ciple reviewed that never again in the future could a
Federation event take place without Federation members
being granted visas."
Rabbi Irving Lehrman and Mayor Malcolm FYomberg
join hands and together extend best wishes for a
Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year.
pd.ix-i


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A

r -
. a
Happy
5746
From The
Airline That
Began In
5688.

Pan Am.You Can't Beat TTie Experience.


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Kidnapped Jews
Reported Alive in Hetzbollah Hands
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The six
prominent Lebanese Jews
Kidnapped in recent months
are alive and in the hands of
the Hetzbollah, the ex-
tremist pro-Iranian Shiite
faction, according to a
senior Lebanese govern-
ment official.
President Amin Gemayel's
Chief of Protocol, Marun Haimari,
said in a cable to Paris that the six
Jewish hostages were alive.
Haimari advised the president of
the Representative Council of
French Jews (CRIF), Theo Klein,
to intercede on their behalf
through the Syrian and Libyan
governments. Haimari also men-
tioned Lebanese Education
Minister Selim Hoss and Hetz-
bo|Jah leader Sheikh Mohammed
Hussein Fadlallah as possible
contacts.
KLEIN HAS repeatedly cabled
and written Gemayel and other
Lebanese leaders to try and ob-
tain the liberation of the six, or at
least to ascertain their fate.
Wednesday's cable is the first for-
mal acknowledgement that the six
are alive.
Elie Hallack, 55, vice presi-
dent of the Central Committee of
the Lebanese Jewish community.
A respected doctor, he was kid-
napped from his home at 3 a.m. on
March 30.
Elie Srour, 50, was kidnapped
on that same day at 7 p.m. outside
his electrical equipment store in
central Beirut. He was in charge
of the community's funeral
arrangements.
Haim Cohen, 50, a
businessman, was also kidnapped
on March 30, at 7:30 a.m. from his
home.
Isac Sasson, 65, president of
the Lebanese Jewish community.
He was kidnapped by an armed
gang on Mar. 31 while on his way
from Beirut International Airport
to the center of the city. Eye-
witnesses said that Sasson, a pro-
minent business executive, was
accompanied by an armed military
escort which offered no resistance
to the kidnappers.
Isaac Tallab, a bachelor, was
kidnapped sometime in July,
1985. He was a teacher at the
cinn imm
Ia
9S*OC
\ca
itfti
on
o
f
opea
t
ev mitfm
The Dade County members of the Association, comprised
of Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstruc-
I tionist Rabbis extend warm wishes for a Shanah Tovah
| to the entire community.
The Association encourages Jewish education and
philanthropy and fosters civic betterment and interfaith
communications.
May the New Year, 5746, usher in an era of peace for
Israel and all mankind.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Rabbi Herbert M.
Baumgard
Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant
Rabbi Paul D. Caplan
Rabbi Julian I. Cook
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
Rabbi Edwin Farber
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Rabbi Gary A.
' Glickstein
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
Rabbi Jacob S. Green
Rabbi Israel Jacobs
Rabbi Harry Jolt
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley
Rabbi Randall J.
Konigsburg
Rabbi Mark Kram
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Rabbi Norman S. Lipson
Rabbi Lewis C. Littman
Rabbi Meir Matzliah
Melamed
Rabbi Jehuda Melber
Rabbi David Raab
Rabbi Menachem Raab
Rabbi Samuel Rudy
Rabbi David B. Saltzman
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro
Rabbi Rami M. Shapiro
Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter
Rabbi Bernard A. Silver
Rabbi James L. Simon
Rabbi Shmaryahu T.
Swirsky
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Rabbi Jordan I. Taxon
Rabbi Dennis E. Wald
Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitman
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone 576-4000
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
President
>
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
French high school.
Selim Jamous, the Jewish
community's former secretary
general, has been missing since
August 1984. He was kidnapped
from his office in the community
building in Beirut, and his family
had had no confirmation since
that he is alive.
OF THE four Frenchmen kid-
napped earlier this year in Beirut,
one is a Jew: Jean Paul Kauff-
mann, 43. A reporter, he was kid-
napped while on his way from the
airport to the air terminal in Cen-
tral Beirut. He is believed to be in
the hands of the Hetzbollah who
have promised to release him
after Israel frees the last Shiite
prisoners still held at Atlit prison.
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres
said last week that the last
prisoners will be set free within a
week or 10 days at the utmost.
Israel has formally thanked United Jewish Appeal and, through
UJA, Jewish Federations and communities for successful comple-
tion of the historic Operation Moses campaign. The thanks were
symbolized by a plaque presented to UJA National Chairman
Alex Grass (center) and UJA President Stanley B. Horowitz
(right) by Minister Elyakim Rubinstein-Migdal. deputy chief of
Missions in Israel's Embassy, at the recent UJA national officers
meeting in New York. Operation Moses has raised $62.5 million,
exceeding its $60 million goal. Already $52.4 million has been
collected.

_____
,-/nC mn d women whose names are herein inscribed
hate toft a legacy of low to the Jewish Conuntinity. We honor
the memtny of those whose lives serve as an inspiration for
future generations. Their gifts reach across time-creating
alh-hhetsKJSii yesterdays dreaeas, todays hop, and the
prosaise of tossorrom May their bencsolcncc ho an wnfs.Hng
Evelyn Platoff
IrvinPollak
Annie Popiel
Jbxif RyjfHHUT
Myron Retzky
RoseRich
RmtRa&iSkOiM-:l! ^''^' ^
LibbyRost
Gertrude Rothenberg
Harry Rothenberg
Bernice Rothman
Robert Russell
Jacob A. Sachs
EveSchacht
Edward Schlussel
Bernard Schmukler
Alexander Schneiderman
Edward Schuchman
Perry Schwarcz
Hannah Schwartz
Jerome Schwartz
Murray C Seifert
Samuel Shiger
RoaeShloss
Betty Siegel
Philip Siegel
Morris Silver
Benjamin Simon
Harry Sley
Marilyn K. Smith
Louis Spiegel
Hyman Stern
CeliaStutz
George St utz
JackStutz
Betty Weinstein
Lena Wolf
FredWolkowitz
DaridAlper
Peter Amazon
Martha Arnstein
Herman Auerbach
Celia Barer
Sarah Barkln
Henry Baron
Milton Bauchner
Jacob Bernstein
IdaBflfelt
PaulRBlau
Simon M. Bressler
Noel Bring
Daniel Brody
Benjamin Brosgol
FayBuckner
E Franklin Carson
WUliam Cbersky
Louis G Cohen
Jordan Davidson
LeeDeLaViez
IrvinEpstan
Nathan Epstein
Jacob Eatreicher
Etta Evans
Ethel Feldman
WUliam Feldman
Morrie Flower
Jeannie Jean Frankel
Morris Freeman
Florence Friedlander
Rose Friedman
Lillian Geldzahler
ErnaGulia
Esther Goldberg
Lucille Goldsmith
Sylvester Goldsmith
Esther Goodman
Daviti Gordon
Rose Gould
George Green
Morris Greenfield
Shirley Greenfield
Esther Greenstein
Harry Harrison
John Heifer
Ida Herskowitz
William Hertz
Rosa Horowitz
Frances Hallos
AdeleKamlot
Amelia Kaplan
ErnaKarpfen
Mildred Kaye
Harry Kramer
Philip Kraus
Joseph Krefetz
Harry Kurzman
Irving Lannin
Samuel Lazarus
Dorothy Lebovitz
William Levenson
Moe Levin
Louis Levy
Samuel Lincenberg
Charles Lippon
Arthur Leopold
Rose Loewy
Howard Maier
Laurette Maier
Benjamin Miller
Martin Minkoff
Blanche Swift Morris
ElsaOppenheimer
of Jewish Philanthro-
Thursday, September 19th
4:80 RM.
at the Federation Building
BR_1_^___ 42<*> Biscayne Boulevard
lor inJormation, please caH the Inundation at 576-4000
-


Reaganites Admit There's No
[nderstanding on Saudi Bases
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
hy DAVID FRIEDMAN
Washington (jta)
he Reagan Administra-
maintains that while
[U.S. has no agreement
Saudi Arabia allowing
U.S. to use Saudi
bases in case of a
tary emergency, the
ig-standing relation-
between the two
feries has resulted in
requests being
red.
State Department
nan Bernard Kalb, in mak-
statement, could give no
ale of when the Saudis had
to such a request in order
a U.S. mission rather than
Saudi need. Kalb also in-
that the Administration
lose to announcing new arms
j for Saudi Arabia and Jordan.
[here, too, he would not be
5c.
IE ADMINISTRATION'S
lent came after a report in
Jew York Times that Richard
fiy, Assistant Secretary of
i for Near Eastern and South
i Affairs, has given members
Congress a memorandum
states that the Saudis will
the U.S. to use its bases in
of "aggression" by the
Bt Union or if Saudi Arabia
jnable to handle a situation in
Persian Gulf.
|e memorandum was a
re summary of the Ad-
dition's recently completed
! of arms sales to the Middle
i refused to comment direct-
he newspaper story. But he
("Saudi Arabia has no agree-
| with the U.S. on the use of
I military facilities. However,
ve long-standing relation-
! based on mutual interest in
Dility of the region. When
assistance has been re-
and provided in response
cific threats, the facilities
isary to support such
ince have been made
3le.
EXAMPLE, Kalb gave
ktationing of four U.S.
Bernard Kalb
AWACS electronic surveillance
aircraft in Saudi Arabia after the
outbreak of the Iran-Iraq war.
These were to provide warning of
any attack on Saudi Arabia. But
when pressed to give an example
of a request being approved on
purely U.S. interests, he could
not.
Asked about arms sales to Jor-
dan and Saudi Arabia, Kalb noted
that all weapons sales to the Mid-
dle East have been held up pen-
ding the just completed study on
which members of Congress are
now being briefed on a classified
basis. "I would therefore expect a
number of programs which have
been on hold to go forward short-
ly," he said. But he would not give
either specific nations or
numbers.
Saudi Arabia has been seeking
to buy 40 F-15 jet fighters and
Stinger shoulder-fired anti-
aircraft missiles and Sidewinder
air-to-air missiles. Jordan wants
to buy F-16 fighters as well as
anti-aircraft missiles.
The Administration has held up
the announcement of a sale to
either country for more than a
year because of strong opposition
in the House and Senate where a
majority in both chambers are
against the sale of any weapons to
Arab countries until Jordan
agrees to direct negotiations with
Israel.
Israel's Anti-Apartheid
Can't Move South Africa
intinued from Page 5-A
er Shimon Peres recently
Israeli policymakers can-
nore the impact on those
[of Israel's position vis-a-vis
Africa.
tAELI POLICY on South
involves factors not faced
ker states. At the same time,
fer, there is for Israel a fun-
&tal issue which touches on
meaning of its existence.
"the United Nations has
itself with the lie that
i is racism, the leaders and
of Israel know that one of
i purposes of Zionism is re-
of racism. The Jewish
| is a testament to combating
I the most virulent forms of
anti-Semitism. And the
drive within Israel is to
|se today's most ugly
festation of racism
beid.
el's current government
Prime Minister Peres
stands these various forces
k. It knows that what Israel
|>r does not do vis-a-vis South
will not affect the apar-
I regime's future. It knows
[Israel, still treated as a
by so many nations under
iray of the Arabs or Soviets,
afford to dispose of a
African relationship as
( as the other nations of the
hows that Israel has to con-
Kenneth Jacobson is director
of Middle Eastern Affairs
Department of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
sider the future of the South
African Jewish community when
it considers its relations with the
regime. But it also knows that
Israel must be true to its own
ideals and must act within its
limited sphere, particularly at a
time that the international com-
munity has finally begun to take a
serious stand against Pretoria.
THE RECENT visit to Israel of
Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Gatsha
Buthelezi, the meetings in South
Africa and in Israel between
Israeli representatives and black
community leaders point to
Israel's pursuit of its ideals. Pro-
grams of technical and educa-
tional assistance to the black com-
munity, similar to those with
Black African states in the 1960's,
are being developed.
Increasingly, Israel will show its
solidarity with those who oppose
apartheid not only by condemning
the regime and the system, but by
working on a day-to-day basis
with those working for change.
Considering its marginal in-
fluence and its own harsh
realities, Israel can do no more.
Considering its profound iden-
tification with the forces against
racism, Israel can do no less.
\y the New Year
be one of Health, Happiness
and Prosperity for you and
your family
Mr. and Mrs. Fred K. Shochet
and Family
Best Wishes For A Happy New Year
Make A Donation To Your City's Museum
The Bass Museum of Art accepts gifts of
art and contributions toward its program,
collection and building funds. Your gifts
to Miami Beach's premier cultural
attraction will be enjoyed by museum
visitors for generations to come.
IMPLOSION. 1966
Roy LicMtnstiin, Utfcofrapfc
Gift IS
6
MUS(
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24-hour licensed nurse
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ADDITIONAL SERVICES AVAILABLE:
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Telephone: (305) 371-3035.


age u-A me jewisn r lonuuui/r naav. i&eDUJiiioer o. isou
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
. -.
< '. .
A Cartoonist's Views of the Bitburg Cemetery Affair
Reagan Can't Reconcile Nazi SS History
Continued from Page 5-A
relationship (between the Reagan
Administration and America's
Jews) are not damaged," Bialkin
said in a news conference May 7.
But he was quick to add that
Reagan's Bitburg visit "was most
regrettable."
Characterizing the visit as an
"essentially symbolic act," a
result of a "series of mistakes,''
Bialkin added: "We do not accuse
the President of ill-will. It was a
failure to recognize how deeply we
feel and millions of Americans
as well that led to the series of
errors he (the President) made."
IN A low-keyed prepared state-
ment, which he read at the open-
ing of the press conference,
Bialkin said that although Jews
and many non-Jews were hurt and
disturbed by the Bitburg visit,
"We must recognize the words
President Reagan spoke at the
U.S. airbase in Bitburg and
Bergen-Belsen, words that con-
firm our confidence in his compas-
sion and understanding. "He may
have made a choice with which we
disagree, yet we must state
honestly that the policies of his
Administration have strengthen-
ed the safety and security of the
State of Israel, and his understan-
ding of the true nature of Arab
political leadership has produced a
sensible foreign policy in the
Mideast."
Continuing, Bialkin stated that
Reagan's "commitment to the
freedom of Jews living in the
Soviet Union, his actions in behalf
of Ethiopian Jewry, his sympathy
for many of our community's con-
cerns all these must not and
should not be either forgotten or
overlooked. We also join with the
President in hailing the develop-
ment of democracy in West Ger-
many and in rejecting the concept
of collective guilt."
BUT, Bialkin said, the rejection
of collective guilt "does not in-
volve forgiveness of or reconcilia-
tion with the Nazi movement, or
those who consciously or wilfully
advanced or supported it. For
them there can be no forgiveness
from us."
Bialkin's mild criticism of the
President over the Bitburg visit
was in sharp contrast to criticism
made by Jewish leaders before the
WHY KEEP YOUR HOUSE
AIR CONDITIONED
WHEN YOU'RE NOT IN IT?
The choice is easy.
Instead of putting your money into air conditioning to
cool an empty house, keep it in your pocket. Just remember
to turn off your air conditioner if you're away from home for
four hours or more.
And choose from 24 more energy-smart ideas. Budget
Billing, Time- of-Use Rates (lower rates injpff-peak hours) and
CashBack Conservation Incentives. Call 1-800-821-7700.
PPlfiRfP
visit and indicated a wish to
minimize the^irnpact^f the event
on relations between the Ad-
ministration and American Jewry.
THE FIASCO, or what is being
called the Blunder at Bitburg
where President Reagan found it
somehow necessary to place the
wreath at the military cemetery
honoring German war dead, over-
shadowed, to say the least, two
significant developments in
Washington.
First was Capitol Hill's approval
establishing a free trade area bet-
ween Israel and the United
States. It eliminates tariffs and
other trade barriers in phases
over a 10-year period and is a
precedent setting action by the
United States with a foreign
country.
Together, the United States and
Israel do about $3 billion in trade a
year. The American Israel Public-
Affairs Committee, or AIPAC.
predicts substantial net gains for
lx)th sides possibly even more
for the United States than Israel.
A chief benefit for Israel, accor-
ding to some observers, is a spurt
in development of science-based
high technology.
ELSEWHERE, the Ad-
ministration officially notified
Israel that it will get the $1.5
billion in additional aid it had re-
quested from the U.S. While
Secretary of State George Shultz
had appeared initially hesitant on
granting the request, he now says
the U.S. appreciates the efforts
undertaken by the unity govern-
ment of Premier Shimon Peres to
implement economic reforms.
Both the Free Trade bill and the
Administration's approval of addi-
tional economic aid to Israel ..
wjthout doubt two sitmiL
developments in the reBKff
between than tfi"5"SJ
trade act will have a'lastinK J*
pact in Israel's economic visihW
while the additional economS
.sr^rtofana.dprogramaimLai
maintaining stability and sZ.l
in the Jewish State ength
But the President's visit to Bit
burg remains in a ,
category. Defense Minister^
perhaps overstated his fjj
that.Mr.Reagan'^^
forgiven but neither will ,h!
visit be forgotten. Not for",the
time. r a ,ot>g
Events
Were
Discouraging
Continued from Page 4-A
other questions. There is, not onlvl
for Jews, the distinct possibilihl
that, at the turn of the centurd
the economies .,t' th<' West will
have to face fierce competition!
from the economies of the \ear|
and Far East. The center f |,rJ
ductive capacities might shift tcl
some Arab countries and to the!
Far East. The changing currentsI
of economic and political ad-
justments will affect everyone |
For Jews the selection of trades
and professions should be a mat
ter of concern right now.
It all boils down to the necessity
to think beyond established pat-
terns and conventional methods of
the past. There must be a new
agenda for a New Year.

Wishing All Tenants
& Friends
A Happy & Healthy
New Year
rrir5^\
jOMNYHOUSI
Tiffany house
Gracious Living for Senior Adults
T^pr
2900 Riomar Street
Fort Lauderdale
Phone (305) 563-3116
(call collect)
We're working hatd at being the kind erf power company you want.
fiSmDeka
ties.

Delta Air Lines extends best wishes to our Jewish friends for
the holiday season and for the year to come. May the new year
bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity for everyone
*


!! lie
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
^
s.
-~
u
>R, The Jewish Floridian:
Bill 47, which is called
pluntary School Prayer Act
," is really an assault on
pderal Constitution and
l recognized as such by all
interested in preserving
ferican way of life. This bill,
pd by Sen. Jesse Helms,
an from the" State of
arolina, would strip from
fal Courts, including the
I Court, jurisdiction of all
rolving school prayer or
meetings in public
' public buildings.
I 47 is a grave threat
hocratic society. It clear-
Its to destroy our con-
system of checks and
vh\\e violating the con-
paration of church and
American public and
plators have clearly
opposition to prayer in
I. and, Jesse Helms is
Imeans to circumvent
pf the people.
pit of the Dade South
Women's American
^anization of 145,000
ss the nation and
area, I am deeply
It if this bill passes
Be erosion of other
pivil liberties in the
Women's American
lization dedicated
luation of our
bts in a pluralistic
I will probably be
loor of the Senate
of Sept. 9. I urge
lere who are in-
America the
to urge our
against this bill.
EL SHAPIRO
* 'Jtwish Floridian:
Mge article in your
Aug B, "Helms To Seek
Pact With Israel," Hugh
Mms, while at one
regarded ;is highly
!'->Ml, has recently
i i Jews..."
a Jewish conser-
rtligiously and
i tofamiliar with
ver having Ix-en
hallenge Orgel to
reasons for Sen.
Helms' "change of views."
For too long and wrongly, most
of the Jewish and liberal press
have labeled conservatives as anti-
Israel and therefore naturally
anti-Semitic. I reject this.
I think that when a columnist
writes a line such as Mr. Orgel's,
that he owes it to his readers to
document his accusations.
BURTGENELES
Delray Beach
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The Church of the Latter Day
Saints is building a multi-million-
dollar Mormon institution on Mt.
Scopus near the Hebrew Universi-
ty in Israel. The ultimate (secret)
goal of this Mormon "Academic"
Center is to convert the Israelis,
particularly unsuspecting Jewish
students.
The Mormons have succeeded in
persuading Israel government of-
ficials that they are benign. The
truth is that they are one of the
most aggressive of Christian mis-
sionary groups operating all over
the world. Jews, as well as all true
friends of Israel, must organize
and make their voices heard to
stop these "soul-snatchers" from
completing this missionizing
center.
THE MORMONS' support for
the return of the Jews to Israel
and for the restoration of the
Temple, however, does not mean
that Mormons want Jews to re-
main Jews. For Mormons view the
establishment of the Jewish state
as a necessary precursor to the
mass conversion of Jews. This
conversion will usher in the return
of Jesus Christ, they believe.
One way to protest this Mormon
project is to write letters to Israel,
primarily to Prime Minister
Shimon Peres, c/o The Knesset,
Jerusalem, Israel. For more infor-
mation and advice on this subject,
write to a Jewish (anti-missionary)
organization such as Yad
L'Achim, P.O. Box 5195,
Jerusalem, Israel.
Haven't we lost enough of our
youth already through intermar-
riage and to the various cult
groups and missionaries that prey
on Jews? Act now as time is short.
Do not delay. Let's prevent a
spiritual holocaust. Inform others
and protest to Israel.
LESLIE MILLER
New York City
Bookcase
A Difference Between Historians
her Kashri is one of many Israelis who lost their jobs during
continuing national economic crisis. He is concerned but
ieful about being able to support his wife and daughter at their
-in Kiryat Shmona in Israel's Galilee. The Jewish Agency,
J receives most of its funds from United Jewish Ap-
Wederation Campaigns, plans to build high-technology-based
hnunitifs in the Galilee, but needs additional fiends. Such
munities will alleviate unemployment and improve Israel's
tty to compete in other countries.
Readers Write: Senate Bill
lAssaults Federal Constitution
By MORTON I. TEICHER
A Special Legacy: An Oral
History of Soviet Jewish
Emigres in the United States.
By Sylvia Rothchild. New
York: Simon and Schuster
1985. 336 pp. $17.95.
The Jews of Hope. By Martin
Gilbert. New York: Viking
Press, 1985. 237 pp. $15.95.
The invention of the tape-
recorder has created a tribe of ins-
tant historians who mistakenly
assume that their assortment of
electronically-preserved inter-
views is the equivalent of
historical analysis. They confuse
raw data with history, and they
have pretentiously assigned the ti-
tle "oral history" to their collec-
tions. Just because you substitute
a gadget for a pencil and paper to
remind you of what was said in an
interview does not make you a
historian.
Sylvia Rothchild is a member of
this tribe, once removed. Rather
than making her own recordings,
she listened to taped interviews
with Soviet Jews who came to the
United States in the 1970's and
picked excerpts for presentation
in her book.
The loosely-connected material
is set forth in disjointed, almost
disorganized, fashion. Pieces of in-
terviews with the same individual
appear in different parts of the
book, presumably to illuminate
the theme of a particular section.
What results instead is broken-up,
hard-to-read and difficult to
follow.
A TRUE historian would have
woven the data into a coherent
pattern. Miss Rothchild failed to
do so. She tried to give a picture
of Jewish life in Russia and of the
adaptation to America made by
these immigrants. However, the
reader can only glean bits and
pieces of information about these
important and interesting sub-
jects. Bridging comments are pro-
vided by the author to connect the
quotations from the interviews.
These comments miss their pur-
pose and only contribute to the
problem of comprehending the
book.
By sharp contrast, Martin
Gilbert, a true historian, has writ-
ten an interesting account of
Soviet Jewish life. In 1983, he
visited the Soviet Union and met
many refuseniks. The information
he gathered about their plight and
his determination to help them led
to this book. It is both an eloquent
plea to remember Soviet Jewry
and heart-rending description of
what they are forced to endure.
As a professional historian,
Gilbert deftly weaves in facts
Martin Gilbert
about the long-standing persecu-
tion of Russian Jews, dating back
to the days of the Czars. He also
gives an excellent account of
Jewish participation in the Soviet
armed forces during World War II
and of the Nazi slaughter of Jews
in the Soviet territory occupied by
the Germans during the war. He
mentions the little known fact
that more than 200 Soviet Jews
achieved the rank of general.
GILBERT TELLS the story of
several refuseniks, highlighting
the pain and problems of their
situation. Application for permis-
sion to leave the Soviet Union in-
evitably leads to loss of one's job,
followed by arrest for
"parasitism" because the in-
dividual is unemployed. Waiting
for exit visas during the decade
when they were being granted
was interminable. One refusenik
compared it to waiting at a train
station for a train that took ten
years to arrive.
When Gilbert made his visit in
1983, the exit door was closed, but
many of the Jews he met did not
give up hope. It was clear to them
that the possibilities of leaving are
dependent on the state of
U.S.-USSR relations, but they
also emphasized the importance of
"noise" loud protests by people
in the West.
The rallies, the marches and the
mass meetings have some impact.
At the very least, as Gilbert em-
phasizes, they assure the Jews of
the Soviet Union that we have not
forgotten them.
DESPITE the limitations of
Sylvia Rothchild's book, reading it
together with Gilbert's far
superior work gives a lasting pic-
ture that stamps on our minds an
indelible concern for Soviet
Jewry.
That picture will be enhanced if,
while reading the books, one
listens to a powerful song, "Leav-
ing Mother Russia," with words
and music composed by Robbie
Solomon. The record is called
"Encore," made by Comet
Records, New York and recorded
in Boston by a fine musical group
called Safam.
Strom Bar Mitzvah in Cracow
NEW YORK (JTA) Eric Strom, an eighth grader
from Stamford Conn., had his Bar Mitzvah in Cracow on
Saturday.
He and a delegation of 12 persons accompanying him, in-
cluding his family and Rabbi Emily Korzenick, spiritual
leader of the Stamford Fellowship for Jewish Learning,
were greeted by the Warsaw Jewish community upon their
arrival in the country.
Korzenick is a member of the Reconstructionist Rab-
binical Assembly which is affiliated with the Reconstruc-
tionist movement. Strom's Bar Mitzvah is the first in
Cracow in 35 years.
THE VENUE OF the Bar Mitzvah was changed from
the Remu Synagogue to the Temple Synagogue to accom-
modate the anticipated increased attendance. The Temple
Synagogue is used only on special occasions, not regularly
throughout the year.
The Bar Mitzvah was the outgrowth of a visit to
Cracow last April organized by the UJA-Federation Cam-
paign of New York for leaders of the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies.
cater to the finest.
Because we cater the best.
Food plays an important role in any social
gathering. From weddings to Bar Mitzvahs, from
conventioneers to ambassadors, from the largest
groups to the most intimate of parties.
That's why those planning catered events call
theKonover. Our catering professional, Bill Cold ring
brings unparalleled expertise, insight and, of course
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TELEPHONE: (305) 865-1500
TOLL FREE: (800) 327-0555
TELEX: 512615
mm


Page 14-A The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1986
Reagan Told
Russians Must Live Up To Human Rights Vows
Claude Kelman, chairman of the beginning of the year and that the
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHIGNTON (JTA)
Seven Jewish leaders
from the United States,
Israel and other countries
have stressed to President
Reagan, while Jews want
Reagan's summit con-
ference with Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev in
November to be successful,
that will depend on the
Soviets living up to their
agreements on human
rights for Jews and others
in the USSR.
"If the Soviet Union cannot be
trusted to keep its word on a mat-
ter of humanity such as human
rights on which their national
security is not at stake, can we
trust the Soviet Union to keep its
word with respect to an arms
agreement or matters affecting
their national security," Morris
Abram, chairman of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry, said
to reporters after the 15-minute
White House meeting.
ABRAM SAID that Reagan
assured the group of his "dedica-
tion" to human rights concerns
and his "deep interest" in obtain-
ing increased emigration and
other rights for Jews. He told the
group that "we can rest assured it
Ethiopians
Demonstrate
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ethiopian Jewish immigrants
demonstrated outside the offices
ot the Chief Rabbinical Council
last week, charging that the Coun-
cil was not honoring an agreement
to facilitate marriages within the
Ethiopian community.
Leaders of the community met
with Premier Shimon Peres last
week to air their complaints.
Peres was instrumental in getting
the Chief Rabbinate to agree to
sanction marriages of Ethiopian
couples who could prove they are
Jewish. Otherwise they would
have to undergo ritual immersion,
a religious conversion rite.
The Chief Rabbi originally
demanded that all members of the
Ethiopian emigre community per-
form the ritual and would not
allow them to marry if they refus-
ed. The Ethiopians, all devout
practitioners of Judaism, de-
nounced this as an insult which
cast doubt on their authenticity as
Jews.
The agreement was expected to
end the conflict which has marred
the absorption of the Ethiopian
Jews since their arrival in Israel
last year. The community leaders
now say it has not been honored.
Absorption Minister Yaacov Tsur.
who visited the demonstrators,
said he agreed with them that the
Chief Rabbinical Council was
dragging its feet.
Our Frontispiece
The Jewish Floridian Rosh
Hashanah Edition fron-
tispiece is by Karen Benzian.
of the UJA Press Service.
Photo shows two-year-old
Aliza playing a bean bag
game at a community center
in Jerusalem. The game helps
Aliza, who is from a financial-
ly disadvantaged family,
become more aware of touch,
sound and sight. Her second
High Holy Days celebration
will be supported in part by
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee.
Morris Abram
will be a matter to be discussed"
at the Geneva summit.
The visit was held as part of the
meeting of the International
Council of the World Conference
on Soviet Jewry in which
delegates from 25 countries par-
ticipated at the B'nai B'rith Inter-
national headquarters here. Also
meeting with Reagan were:
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Conference on Soviet
Jewry; Gerald Kraft, president of
B'nai B'rith Internaitonal; Isi
Leibler, president of the Board of
Deputies of Australian Jews;
French Council for Soviet Jewry;
Gregories Faigon, president of
the Argentine Jewish community;
and Jerry Goodman, executive
director of the NCSJ.
"IF THE Soviet Union serious-
ly wants disarmament and
detente the easiest way they can
accomplish a climate in which to
achieve this is by living up to their
agreement (in the Helsinki Ac-
cords) on which the ink is not real-
ly dry," Abram declared.
He stressed that while "we do
not ask that there be any formal
linkage" between any agreement
with the Soviet Union on arms or
anything else and the plight of
Soviet Jewry, there is an
"unavoidable linkage arising and
deriving from the fact that any
agreement with the Soviet Union
must be based on the credibility of
the Soviet plighted word."
Abram pointed out that while it
may be difficult to verify Soviet
violations of the SALT II agree-
ment, "there is no doubt that they
are in flagrant violation of their
undertakings under the Helsinki
Accords. Only 11 Jews left the
Soviet Union last August, the
smallest number of Jews to leave
that country in the past 12 years.
As examples of other violations,
Abram said the Soviets are ar-
resting Hebrew teachers at the
rate of one a month since the
persecution of Jews is increasing,
with refuseniks "increasingly
harassed, arrested, imprisoned."
He said this situation has worsen-
ed since Gorbachev came to
power.
ABRAM SAID that Jews are
"delighted" that there will be a
summit conference since Reagan
will be able to raise these issues
with Gorbachev. "We hope these
conversations will be successful,"
he said. "We hope the Soviet
Union will change its posture and
attitude. We want peace, we want
freedom, we want detente." but
Abram stressed that "we feel the
question of credibility and trust is
in Soviet hands and so far that
record isn't good.
Abram noted that Secretary of
State George Shultz has raised
the issue of Soviet Jewry at every
meeting with Soviet officials on all
levels.
Earlier, speaking to the World
Conference, Allan Gotlieb, the
Canadian Ambassador to the
U.S., said his government follows
the same policy. Gotlieb said he re-
jected the views of those who
wanted the Western nations to
abandon the Helsinki Accords
because he believes the agreement
gives the west the "right to de-
mand" of the Soviet Union why
human rights are being violated.
DELEGATES TO the World
Conference took time out of their
meeting to joint in an Interna-
tional Solidarity Vigil for Soviet
Jews outside the Soviet Embassy. ^
"We are here in an act otr
solidarity with this great Jewish
community of Washington, in an
act of solidarity with Soviet
Jewry, with all the Jews
throughout the world and with all
the nations in the world now
engaged in a great struggle,"
Dulzin, told some 60
demonstrators at the vigil. "But
we believe that justice will be ac-
complished for our brethren in
Soviet Russia,' he said.
Coordinated by the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Greater
Washington, a 15-minute vigil for -
Soviet Jews has been held daily -
opposite the Russian Embassy for
the past 14 years.
In addition to Dulzin, the rally
was addressed by Helene Karpa,
president of the JCC, Judge
Nelson Diaz, of Philadelphia and
Norwegian Rabbi Michael
Melchior. Melchior urged the new
Soviet regime to "show that we
can trust them when they sign in-
ternational agreements.
NO ATTEMPT was made by
the representatives at the^
demonstration to gain admission'
to the Embassy.
Rep. Dante Fascell (D., Fla.),
chairman of the House Foreign
Affairs Committee, told the con-
ference earlier in the day that the
condition for Jews in the USSR
"are deplorable and getting
worse." He said he was
pessimistic about any im-
provements from the new regime
and didn't expect "any miracles"
from them.
!:i
The people of CenTrust sincerely wish
you and your family the happiest, healthiest
and most prosperous of New Years.
CenTrust
Savings Bank
Your future is our future
[ 1985 CenTrust



;">.: .:..,;. .;>,:>,,. ;* fyg*l "
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
ana
k
greeting
s
NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA
OFFICERS
JOSEPH H. KANTER
Chairman of the Board
IGNATIUS J.FAZIO
President
DIRECTORS
NORMAN S. EDELCUP
Chairman & President
ConfidataCorp.
GWYNN M. ELIAS
Real Estate Developer
IGNATIUS J.FAZIO
President
National Bank of Florida
GEORGE M. GOOD
President, Bertram Yacht Co.,
A Div. of WhittakerCorp.
HARRY S. KANTER
Vice Chairman, National Bank of Fla.
-
JOSEPH H. KANTER
Chairman, The Kanter Corporation
Chairman, National Bank of Florida
EDWARD A. KELLY
Senior Vice President
National Bank of Florida
FREDK.SHOCHET
Publisher, Jewish Floridian
Group Newspapers
FRANKLIN TOLIN
President
Tolin Construction, Inc.
ROBERT E. WILDERMUTH
President
The Kanter Corporation
National Bonk of Florida
BANK OF FLORIDA
OFFICERS
JOSEPH H. KANTER
Chairman of the Board
DIRECTORS
NORMAN S. EDELCUP
Chairman
Confidata Corp.
IGNATIUS J.FAZIO
President
National Bank of Florida
CAROLYN FURLONG
President
Furlong Insurance
JOSEPH KANTER
Chairman, The Kanter Corporation
Chairman, National Bank of Florida
RICHARD E. RECKSON, ESQ.
Partner
Blank, Rome, Comisky & McCauley
CHARLES H. ROSENBERG
Builder Developer
FREDK.SHOCHET
Publisher,
Jewish Floridian
Group Newspapers
WILLIE TAYLOR
President
Ambassadors Fifty-Four, Inc.
JOSEPH SHULMAN
Retired President
Bank of Florida
MONROE ZALKIN
Moss Manufacturing, Inc.
SALLY FLASH
Sr. Vice President and
Cashier
Bank of Florida
. :
'
Bonk of Florido
and the Kanter Family

-
5000 Biscayne Boulevard
3550 Biscayne Boulevard
265 S.E. First Street
20099 Biscayne Boulevard
(305) 576-4200
.
i
6101 Sunset Drive
South Miami
(305) 665-1106
MEMBER FDIC


K
I
Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
I
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av. pet cigarette by FTC meihod.


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-A
Miami's Leaders Greet The Jewish Community
Myron J. Brodie
By SAMUEL I. ADLER
President
And MYRON J. BRODIE
Executive Vice President
freiter Miami Jewish
Federation
Rosh I lashanah is a happy time
^r the Jewish people. It is a time
think abut, and to be thankful
}r, the good things that the past
has brought to us and our
aple.
[During the past year, Israel
lined 15,000 new citizens
hiopian Jews saved from near
nth in their native country;
vs everywhere shared collec-
ts relief over Israel's freedom
bin involvement in the turmoil
Inch is Lebanon; the United
ates reconfirmed its solidarity
pith Israel by joining in mutual
olve not to bow to the demands
terrorists during the TWA
bstage crisis; and in our own
immunity, a wide variety of
aman services were made
irailable to an increasing number
7 Jews in need.
AS WE enter the New Year, let
j he happy for the good fortune
past year has brought to us
our people. But let us also
nember that we remain a
pnerable people.
This year, the bones of a man
und in Brazil convinced many
perts that the "Angel of
ith," Josef Mengele, is dead;
his spirit lives on in the anti-
Jmitism of our enemies. During
hijicking of TWA Flight 847,
terrorists requested the
Bsports of those "with Jewish
anding names," instilling in the
irts of everywhere the fear of
another "selection."
It has become too easy for us to
te for granted the simple fact
ft. if we wish to do so, we may
to synagogue and join with
her Jews in prayer and
inksgiving on this holiday. It is
By for us to forget that in the
viet Union and in other op-
^ssed countries, Jews do not en-
' this privilege.
Ve sometimes take for granted
plentiful meals we may enjoy
our families on the holidays,
often forget that many Jews,
i in our own community, bare-
Bubsist on the food they have.
ny are hemeless; many do not
ve families or friends with
Dm to enjoy the holidays.
LET US remember these things
[that, in the coming year, we
i wok to better our lives and the
les of our fellow Jews
krywhere. Let us remember
pays that we are not alone; we
members of a family which
is the entire globe. We are one
f>ple with one destiny. And each
is responsible for the well-
ng of his fellow Jew.
et us hope that through our
kerosity and our commitment
Samuel I. Adler
to our people, 5746 can be a better
year for those less fortunate than
ourselves.
On behalf of the Officers, Board
of Directors and staff of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, we extend to you, your fami-
ly, and all Jews everywhere, best
wishes for a New Year of health,
happiness and peace.
By PHILIP T. WARREN
General Campaign Chairman
Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organisation
With the ordeal of Lebanon
behind it, Israel faces the New
Year with a greater sense of
security but with a deeper concern
about its domestic situation,
especially its economic problems.
In recent months, we have seen
how the Israel government's
austerity policy and its various
wage and price controls have af-
fected almost every section of the
population. More budgetary cuts,
unemployment and greater
sacrifices lie ahead in die New
Year.
However, belt tightening is not
the entire answer if the country's
economy is not to suffer mhre
than a temporary slowdown.
Operation Economic In-
dependence, which Prime
Minister Shimon Peres initiated
six months ago, has focused on
production for export and finding
new markets for Israel's in-
dustrial products, notably high
technology. This priority task re-
Philip T. Warren
quires the active support of world
Jewry in the areas of experience
and large-scale investment.
EXACTLY 35 years ago, Prime
Minister David Ben-Gurion asked
American Jewry to assume
responsibility for a Bond issue for
economic development. In the
May
the year
5746
__bless
you with
health and
happiness.
midst of an economic crisis of
overwhelming proportions, the
launching of the Israel Bond pro-
gram at that time was not con-
sidered a practical idea. But it pro-
ved to be a crucial step in
demonstrating the ability of the
people of Israel to convert invest-
ment dollars into solid industrial
growth.
In some respects, the present
situation is comparable to the
state of affairs of 35 years ago.
However, today the quality of the
skills and technological know-how
of the Israelis is beyond question.
Promise has turned into im-
pressive performance. Conse-
quently, even in the face of the
severest economic difficulties, one
can count on Israel to weather the
crisis, provided substantial addi-
tional support and participation
are forthcoming from the Jewish
communities in the Diaspora.
Israel Bonds are a major source
of investment capital. They will
play a most important role in the
coming year to help make it a year
of growth, stability and peace for
Israel.
AMERICAN M
SAVINGS r
AND IOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA ^^F
ov-<-c
Shepard Broad
Chairman
Executive Committee
Morris N. Broad
Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer
SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA SINCE 5711
M


Page 18-A The Jewish.Floriflan/Friday,.September 13, ^985
New Year Message
Rabbis Pledge Continued Activity
In Cause Of Jewish Community
By RABBI
BRETT S. GOLDSTEIN
President
And RABBI
SOLOMON SCHIFF
Executive Vice President
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
It is our privilege, on behalf of
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, to extend
warmest wishes to our fellow
Jews for the New Year 5746. May
the New Year bring Israel and
mankind closer to peace by "all
His children uniting in one
fellowship to do His will with a
perfect heart."
As spokesmen for the rabbinate,
the fourth largest Jewish com-
munity in the United States, we
are particularly sensitive to the
deep spiritual scars that need to
be healed on the body organism of
our society to make our hopes, our
aspirations and our prayers for
the New Year more than poetic
expressions.
ABOVE ALL, the Rabbinical
Association attempts to fulfill its
sacred task by serving as the
religious information and coor-
dination center of the Jewish com-
munity. In the closest relationship
Rabbi Brett Goldstein
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
with the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the leadership of
the total community, the Associa-
tion analyzes and guides the total
development and growth of its
people.
Our rabbinic organization is
comprised of colleagues of all
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branches of American Judaism
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform,
and Reconstructionist and
meets on a monthly basis for a
discussion of current problems.
Rabbis represent the Association
in many community bodies, agen-
cies and institutions spanning the
spectrum from Jewish education,
Israel, youth, chaplaincy, through
community relations. Thus, the
rabbis have their continuous input
into the shaping of our community
programs and, in turn, are kept
informed of the lay points of view
on all issues.
The Rabbinical Association also
sponsors educational programs
through the communication
media. Among those programs
are the ."Still. Small .Voice'' on
Channel -7- -the "Jewish"- Worship
Hour" on Channel 10, the inter-
faith program, "Viewpoint" on
Channel 2, and special educational
material that appears regularly in
The Jewish Floridian. From time
to time special programs are
prepared and presented by the
Association on other television
and radio stations.
THE COMMUNITY Chaplain
cy Service, sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
in association with the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami,
provides visitation and spiritual
counseling to unaffiliated Jews in
hospitals, nursing homes, homes
for retarded, hospice, correctional
and other institutions.
This representative rabbinate
works with all major Jewish
organizations for important
causes. At the same time, it is in
close contact with the school
authorities from elementary to
university, providing them with
calendars of Jewish holidays so as
to avoid conflicting events.
The Rabbinical Association
works closely in the area of inter-
faith activities and many projects
in cooperation with the Catholic
Archdiocese of Miami and with
the Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches, Ministerial Association,
National Conference of Christians
and Jews, Interfaith Commission,
Miami Citizens Against Crime,
Greater Miami Religious Leaders
Coalition and other appropriate
organizations.
WE WORK closely with JFTV,
sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation on the develop-
ment and operation of Cable
Television which is a new source
of education for our community.
We hope that in the New Year
we will be able to further extend
and deepen our activities for an
even more committed and more
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PACs Suggest Big
Election Show in '86
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
The November, 1986 Con-
gressional elections will un-
doubtedly mark a new high
for Jewish political par-
ticipation. This prediction is
based on the unprecedented
figure of $70 million raised
by federal candidates during
the first six months of 1985
a non-election year.
This faster pace can be at-
tributed to the proliferation of
political action committees
(PACs) and their skill in attrac-
ting contributions. Concurrently,
the number of pro-Israel PACs is
on the rise with close to one hun-
dred expected to be in operation
nationwide by next year.
THESE PACs distribute funds
on the basis of a congressional
candidate's positions and votes on
Middle East issues principally
foreign aid to Israel and U.S.
arms to Israel's Arab foes and,
significantly face scant opposition
from the other side.
Those who point to the major oil
companies' lobbying activities as a
counterweight fail to recognize
that the issues most important to
them lie not in the foreign policy
realm, but rather in their "bread
and butter issues" such as reten-
tion of tax breaks for the oil
industry.
Arab American political ac-
tivism in this country remains in
its relative infancy. Extremist
views expressed by spokesmen of
the prominent pro-Arab groups
are not palatable to the majority
of Arab Americans, many of
whom are of Lebanese Christian
descent, and most .of whom can.' t
get too excited about supporting
the likes of a Yasir Arafat.
WITH THE field virtually to
themselves, debate over whether
single issue Jewish PACs are good
or bad is largely irrelevant. The
fact remains that PACs are sanc-
tioned by law, are regulated by
the Federal Election Commission
and do represent every stripe of
political thinking and cause im-
aginable. With more than 4,000
PACs in operation, supporters of
Israel would actually be remiss if
they did not use all the means
available to acquire access and
influence.
If American Jews feel strongly
that a secure Israel is in the best
interests of the United States, and
want to pool their resources to
help candidates who agree with
this basic premise, why not take
advantage of the provisions per-
mitting PACs to contribute more
to a campaign $5,000 per elec-
tion as opposed to Sl.OOO for,
individual?
After all, which group in ,_
country is so accustomed tobebl
asked to give to all kindsof*.|
thy causes and responds/
generously? Despite being
over-organized community tuj
seems to be room for one nwj
community-based organizati
serving a worthwhile, and in i
case, unique purpose.
Besides, this kind of politicalj
tivity generates excitement as i
brings PAC members in dir.
contact with Representatives!
Senators giving them the opwl
tunity for give and take with the,
whose actions and votes impiiu
so directly on Israel's future.
CRITICISM of pro-Israel PAfJ
is sometimes heard froj
American Jews active in tn
tional liberal causes arguing t_
American Jews are failing to W
coalitions and are neglecfif
other subjects of concern to I
Jewish community.
If anything, American Jewsi
over-represented both in nu
and financial support in the i
rights, pro-choice, nuclear:
and similar movements, and i
tainly need not apologize
anyone for their lack of invoh|
ment. What has been
however, has been orgai
political activity specifically
Israel's behalf. This activity i
almost 100 percent Jewish
there are no potential coalijj
partners who will be willing t
pend the requisite energy il
resources, simply because theyil
not share the same passional
commitment.
Also, as a practical mane]
_.yb^n. you-present a
with a 'laundry fist" of posit}M!|
you advocate, the message iil
diluted. But when lobbying efforcl
are concentrated on a speci&|
issue you are more likely to I
heard and heeded. As far as i
port for Israel in the Congress
concerned, it comes from boc|
Democrats and Republicans, i
servatives and liberals. Ten
and New Yorkers. Thus, a
Israel PAC can contribute
Ted Kennedy or a Jack Ken
since there is a single isi
motivating all the PACs memh
despite individual differences oni|
host of other subjects.
Instead of continuing a fruitial
debate on whether the emergewl
of pro-Israel PACs is good or bail
these energies would be betterol
pended on creating more of theml
Because at this juncture |
Israel facing so many serious proj
blems and needing continiwl
American support more PAC
are better than fewer.
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Flink J
rrtfl
f*pi
PSI
PREMIUM SAVERS. INC.
Insurance Market Specialist
ALAN O. GOLDBERG
1041 IVES DAIRY RD.
SOTTE 137, MIAMI FL 33179
(305) 633-8891


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-A
Classic Rosh Hashanah
Texts And Customs
Reviewed In New Machzor
By YAAKOV KORNREICH
A new English translated edi-
tion of the Rosh Hashanah prayer
book, the ArtScroll Machzor, will
greatly enhance the spiritual ex-
perience of the High Holy Days
i this year for tens of thousands of
[-Jews throughout the world.
The new Machzor strives to
[ meet the needs of both those who
have attended synagogue
throughout their lives as well as
the total newcomer to the prayer
service. It translates into English,
for the first time, many of the
most beautiful and moving
prayers ever written, and includes
a variety of special features
designed to augment the spiritual
inspiration of the High Holidays
experience.
THE NEW Machzor follows the
I pattern set in the ArtScroll Sid-
dur, a year-round prayer book
I published last year, of which over
100,000 copies are in world-wide
I distribution. According to the
translator and author of both
books, Rabbi Nosson Scherman,
["the ArtScroll Machzor and Sid-
dur both feature clear and detail-
led instructions and explanations
I to help the reader follow and
understand the services. Because
many of the prayers in the Rosh
J Hashanah services are not recited
' year-round, even one who attends
^synagogue regularly can easily
become as lost and confused as the
[novice. This Machzor is therefore
[designed to take the reader step
by step through the entire Rosh
Hashanah synagogue service, as
well as all of the home obser-
vances of the holiday."
RABBI SCHERMAN notes in
his introductory Overview to the
Machzor that Rosh Hashanah
marks the anniversary of the crea-
tion of the first man and woman,
but, according to the Biblical ac-
count, "creation began five days
earlier. (Therefore,), why is it
(Rosh Hashanah) called the 'first
day' rather than the fifth?"
Rabbi Scherman answers that
this can only be understood if we
accept that man is "the primary
star in the firmament of creation
... The purpose of the universe is
man's inner struggle to choose
between good and evil, so the day
he was created is ... the first
day."
"In the same spirit," explains
Rabbi Meir Zlotowitz, founder and
general editor of the ArtScroll
series, "The ArtScroll Machzor is
designed to meet the needs of the
many men and women for whom
the English translation will be the
primary text for their Rosh
Hashanah prayers. Its purpose is
to serve as an inspirational and
religious tool for today's Jews,
rather than a collection'of transla-
tions of medieval liturgical
poetry."
THE NEW Machzor contains
explicit instructions guiding the
reader through every detail in the
synagogue services, such as when
to stand up or sit down, or when
the congregation might depart
from the printed order of the
prayers. Rabbi Scherman's

English commentary, running
throughout the Machzor, clarifies
and emphasizes the spiritual
meaning of each prayer.
The ArtScroll Machzor includes
a unique condensed guide to the
laws and customs of the High
Holiday observance, and special
introductions to various unique
features of the Rosh Hashanah
services. For example, the in-
troduction to the Shofar explains
the historical reason why it no
longer is blown as part of the mor-
ning prayers, going back to the
time when Israel was part of the
Roman Empire:
"Roman authorities, suspicious
of Jewish uprising, once inter-
preted the early morning shofar
blast as a call to arms, like a
bugler alerting the troops. They
burst into the synagogue and
massacred the inhabitants. Realiz-
ing that this could happen again,
the Sages changed the time of the
Shofar blowing to the Mussaf ser-
vice (later in the day)."
ARTSCROLL MACHZOR
makes available to the English
reader for the first time many
beautiful Rosh Hashanah prayers
that had never before been
translated. Rabbi Zlotowitz noted
that, "the classic all-Hebrew edi-
tions of the Machzor include some
of the finest examples of the
Jewish liturgical art, with special
prayers expressing the broad
range of religious and emotional
feelings. Unfortunately, previous
popular English editions of the
Machzor have eliminated all but
the most universally accepted
prayers, and failed to translate
some of the remaining texts. Due
to these omissions, the High Holi-
day prayer experience has all too
often been reduced to rote recita-
tion for the many Jews who do
not read or understand Hebrew
well."
Rabbi Zlotowitz cited such wide-
ly recited prayers as "Achos
Ketanah," by Avram Chazzan, or
the "Shir Hayichud," by Rabbi
Shmuel bar Klonymos, as ex-
amples of the special Rosh
Hashanah prayers called Piyyut,
written by some of the greatest
scholars in Jewish history, which
were not available in English in
previous translated editions.
Another unique feature of the
ArtScroll Machzor is the inclusion
of translated Kabbalistic prayers,
designed to be inserted at the in-
dividual's option, wherein one
may ask for Divine inspiration,
financial sustenance, or dutiful
children.
Continued on Page 20A

DURING THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
MAKE A DIRECT LOAN TO ISRAEL
HELP OVERCOME ITS ECONOMIC CRISIS
This is not an offering which can be made only
by prospectus available from
STATE OF ISRAEL BONDS
Development Corporation for Israel
2301 Collins Avenue, M-24 Miami Beach, Florida 33139
TEL. (305) 531-6731
PHILIP T. WARREN
General Campaign Chairman
RABBI LEON KRONISH
International Associate Chairman
SIDNEY COOPERMAN
Winter Resident Chairman
HOWARD KLEIN
Executive Director
Economic axe to fall
Cabinet to determine
dismissals, wage cuts
I, AVI TtMKIN
Pelf isisslrKegrSsr
The economic axe is finally
expected to fall today when the nen will have to give up pan of
cabinet meets to decide on a cost-of-Kv
comprehensive economic plsri them
that will involve dis
role in the elaboration of the den, Peres would like to avotd_
plan, sharp Histadnit re*
According to the plan, wage ear-
To help Israel achieve economic recovery... to provide
jobs.. you are urged to make a direct loan to Israel
through a maximum Israel Bond subscription during this
year's High Holy Day Bond Appeal in your synagogue.
2 leading computer makers
getting $58m. in gov't aid
treated and exports jgi'1
.iround.5iJ.W-'-''"
B> AARON SITTNER
Jerusalem Post Reporter
A total of S58 million
invested^
With more funds for its high technology and other
industries, Israel can increase its exports and
improve its balance of trade.
Don't exempt yourself from our responsibility to
Israel. The people of Israel are making deep
sacrifices. Do your part.
Join with the hundreds of thousands of North
American Jews who will express their support
for Israel with a High Holy Day Bond purchase
during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.


Page 20-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Jewish Theology Changes
Back to the Dark Ages?
children because some people in
their home town may have watch-
ed a film on the Sabbath.
The sociologist and historian
will have to analyze what is going
on and why. Meanwhile, I fear f0
the purity, the rationality and the
ethics of Judaism. I fear that we
are witnesses to the first
back to the Dark Ages.
By DR. CHAIM PEARL
London Chronicle Syndicate
Jewish theology is changing.
No: perhaps that should be put dif-
ferently. The truths of Judaism
never change, but the emphasis
frequently shifts from one doc-
trine to another. Most of this
change depends on historical fac-
tors. A few observations will
make this point clear.
In the days of the biblical pro-
phets, the religious emphasis was
on monotheism. Surrounded by
pagan beliefs and practices, the
prophets were unceasing in their
warnings against the heinous of-
fence of idolatry.
During the Roman period, cen-
turies later, the chief emphasis
was on the importance of Torah
study and the dissemination of
Torah knowledge. With this went
an earnest effort to clarify the law
and to popularize its observance.
All this was of prime importance
in the new conditions of a wide
dispersal of the Jews and the loss
of an independent state and
Temple.
IN THE Middle Ages, the em-
phasis shifted again when, under
the influence of Christian and
Mohammedan pressures and
claims of superiority, the Jewish
philosophers felt compelled to de-
fend Judaism by defining and
defending its beliefs. A scientific
and systematic philosophy of
Judaism was thus born.
From the Sixteenth Century,
being totally cut off from contact
with European culture and its
renaissance, the Jews found ade-
quate compensation within the
walls of their ghettoes by
strengthening and adding to the
dimension of a narrow rabbinic
discipline. It was a legalistic and
bookish culture based on commen-
taries and super-commentaries of
the sacred texts, often with a dose
of Kabbalah.
The Middle Ages did not come
to an end for the Jews until the
Emancipation at the end of the
Eighteenth Century. Under the
influence of new thought and
broader educational oppor-
tunities, Judaism and Jewish life
entered a new, scientific
enlightened and liberal period.
For the next two hundred years,
Jews learned and relearned about
values which had been put on the
back burner. There was a replay
of prophetic Judaism with its
acknowledgement of social ethics
and universalism.
MOREOVER. Jews were
shown that one could be fully
observant of rabbinic law while at
the same time accepting the need
to live in the modern world. To
use the phrase of Samson Raphael
Hirsch, the Jew aspired to become
an Israel-Mensch by a combina-
tion of a life of Torah with derech
eretz.
Today, we are the astonished
witnesses of a reaction to all of
this. We see a rejection of univer-
salism, a return to mysticism, a
new emphasis on nitpicking
minutia of ritual laws, a neglect of
ethical values, and a return to fun-
damentalist theological concepts
which seem to outrage and even
horrify large numbers of people
educated in Western culture.
Ten years ago. after a Palesti-
nian terrorist attack on the
Galilee town of Maalot in which
more than 20 children were killed.
Lubavitch Chasidim asserted that
the tragedy may have occurred
because the homes of the victims
did not have kosher mezuzot.
Last December, Rabbi Shimon
Shlomo declared that Israel's
casualties in Lebanon were the
punishment of God for the sluttish
behavior of Israel's women
soldiers. And now we have the
well-publicized remarks of Rabbi
Itzhak Peretz suggesting that God
allowed innocent children to die in
a bus crash because he wanted to
punish the people of Petach Tikva
for desecrating the Sabbath.
THESE ARE a few of the more
visible and audible signs of a
return to the Dark Ages. It is no
comfort that, for the time being,
such views are expressed by few
people, because the unfortunate
fact is that the number of such
obscurantists is growing fast.
Some extreme yeshivot are turn-
ing them out by the hundreds.
It is not easy to discover the fac-
tors which triggered off this wave
of Dark Age theology. It may be a
natural historical reaction to the
liberalism of the last period. Fur-
ther, there is always some connec-
tion between a people's political
experience and its contemporary
thought.
As we noted before, under
persecution the people are en-
couraged to withdraw into their
own community, where they find
comfort in the strength of their
own particularism. With this in
mind, it is possible to argue that
the post-Holocaust generation
suffers from a delayed trauma,
and hence its withdrawal into a
narrow "Jewishness."
When the world wants us dead,
it is natural for Jews to defend
more zealously every Jewish idea.
every Jewish belief, every Jewish
custom.
ON THE other hand, it is still
difficult to accept that any of this
should attract Jewish leaders into
a medievalism where symbols are
worshipped, or where God is por-
trayed not as the God of love and
compassion, but as the God of
vengeance, who kills innocent
Classic Rosh Hashanah Texts
Continued from Page 19A
The ArtScroll Machzor also in-
cludes many other texts, prayers
and customs common to classic
Hebrew editions of the Machzor,
but which have been totally omit-
ted or drastically abridged in
popular English translations.
These include the Hebrew and
Egnlish texts of the classic ethical
work. "The Foundation of
Teshuvah" by Rabbi Yonah of
Gerona. who lived in the 13th Cen-
tury; the traditional procedure for
the annulment of vows prior to
the beginning of the holiday; the
complete text of the Tashlich ser-
vice; and a list of nine different
special foods traditionally eaten at
the Rosh Hashanah dinner table
and their blessings.
THE NEW Machzor provides
the complete translated text of
the Mishnah tractate Rosh
Hashanah, which is traditionally
studied at the holiday table, along
with an original ArtScroll English
commentary. It even has the
translated text of the Prozbul, a
special legal document introduced
by Hillel the Elder to transfer
private debts to Jewish courts to
prevent them from being voided
it the close of the Sabbatical year.
Rabbi Zlotowitz emphasized the
formidable artistic challenge
presented by each Machzor page,
integrating the numerous English
and Hebrew elements of text,
translation, commentary and in-
structions into an easily readable
and atractive whole. He credited
ArtScroll's graphic designer,
Sheah Brander. for the esthetic
quality of the Machzor, achieved
only through thousands of hours
of painstaking effort.
As with each of the almost 100
other titles in the ArtScroll series,
all isssued by Mesorah Publica-
tions of Brooklyn, the new
Machzor is based exclusively upon
classical sources of Jewish
scholarship for its translations
and commentaries. The Machzor
remains faithful to the pattern set
ten years ago by the first book in
the ArtScroll series, "Megilas
Esther" which represented a
technological, conceptual and
stylistic breakthrough and tap-
ped a vast segment of today's
Jewish book market for the first
time.
Chase Federal (Savings
and Loan Association
Commemorates
the New Year
with a-prayer for
Peace, Health and Love
Savings
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. ,,','.' .' I ..'.....,,
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Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 21-A
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Page 22-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Why Shofar Is Not Blown on Sabbath
By RABBI
EZRA BOYARSKY
What is the reason that the
shofar is not blown on Rosh
Hashanah when it falls on the
Sabbath?
In order to fully appreciate the
reason for not blowing the shofar
(rani's horn) when Rosh Hashanah
coincides with the Sabbath, it is
necessary to acquaint oneself with
some of the basic principles gover-
ning the observance of the
Sabbath.
In the Mishnah (tractate Sab-
bath 73a), the Talmud enumerates
39 major classes of work the per-
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formance of which are prohibited
on the Sabbath. These categories
and their derivatives are further
discussed and elucidated in subse-
quent chapters of the above-
mentioned tractate.
IT SHOULD be noted that the
term "work" as employed in rela-
tion to the Sabbath does not
necessarily carry the usual and
popular connotation but encom-
passes any constructive or
creative activity even if it required
but little physical exertion.
Among the 39 categories of
"work" there is one that is ger-
mane to the prohibition of blowing
the shofar on the Sabbath. And
that is the Biblical injunction not
to carry any object on the Sabbath
from the private domain (one's
home., a private yard, etc.) into a
public domain (streets, roads, etc.)
or vice versa. The same rule ap-
plies to carrying articles just
within a public domain.
However, since the Talmudic
sages do not regard the blowing of
the shofar as work but rather as a
skill, on what Halachic grounds
does the restriction then rest?
THE RESPONSE to this ques-
tion is found in the tractate Rosh
Hashanah 29b where Rabbah rul-
ed that even though the sounding
of the shofar on Rosh Hashanah is
a positive command, prescribed by
Law of the Torah, yet it is forbid-
den to handle the shofar and use it
on the Sabbath lest it be carried in
a public domain.
This ordinance was enacted as a
precautionary measure in order to
prevent the violation of the Sab-
bath which is the very heartbeat
of Judaism.
THANK YOU
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
As we begin a New Year, we wish to thank our community for its support of our
Thrift Shops during the past year.
Your generous donations of resalable merchandise and your continued
patronage of our stores, have enabled us to provide quality health care and needed
social services to thousands of indigent elderly persons.
DOUGLAS GARDENS THRIFT SHOPS
A division of the Miami Jewish Home & Hospital for the Aged
5713 N.W. 27 Ave., Miami 3149 Hallandale Bch. Blvd., Hallandale
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board / Arthur Pearlman, President
Aaron Kravltz, Chm. Thrift Shop Comm. / Fnd D. Hlrt, Executive Director
Free pickup 751-3988 (Dade) 981-8245 (Broward)
Good Merchandise at a Good Price.
The North Dade Vaad Ha-Kashruth wishes the entire community a healthy,
happy and peaceful New Year.
As the New Year is about to begin allow us to remind you that the following establish-
ments and only these establishments are under our supervision.
MENDELSON & SONS KOSHER
MEAT MARKET
1354 N.E. 163rd Street
NEW DEAL KOSHER
MEAT & POULTRY MARKET
1362 N.E. 163rd Street
NORMANDY KOSHER
MEAT MARKET
1112 Normandy Drive
SURF KOSHER MEAT
* POULTRY
7432 Collins Avenue
I Rabbi Max Lipschitz,
I President
Rabbi Beth Torah Congregation
BAYSHORE CONVALESCENT CENTER
16650 W.Dixie Highway
EXECUTIVE CATERERS OF BETH TORAH
CONGREGATION
1051 North Miami Beach Boulevard
TAKE OUT GOURMET
1730 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
SHEPUDAY AHUVA RESTAURANT
1330 N.E. 163 Street
KOSHER TREATS INC.
1678 N.E. 164th Street
Rabbi Simcha Freedman,
Vice President and Secretary
Rabbi Temple Adath Yeshurun
The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
Happy
New
Year
'aineit
note
Barnett Bank of
South Florida, N.A.
4* ft ft **M ***********}
The Washington
Connection*

and
The Republican State
Executive Committee
of Florida
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
i
*
*
*
Wish the Jewish Community *
*
A Happy New Year *
* Jewish Women's Outreach $
of the Republican National *
Committee J
310 First Street SE, J
Washington, D.C. 10003 *
Paid for by The Republican National Committee and
The Republican State Executive Committee of Florida
*
*
^
......


Black and Jewish Teens
Share Heritage
In Africa and Israel
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridiari Page 23-A
By LORRAINE MEYER
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) A
roup of 12 black and Jewish teen-
^ers from this city shed tears
ogether at Yad Vashem in
Jerusalem and at He Goree in
genegal. West Africa, site of slave
tiipments to America. They spent
month visiting Israel and
tiegal on a trip planned by black
Ind Jewish leadership in
Philadelphia led by George Ross,
Drmer board chairman of the
Imerican Jewish Committee's
Philadelphia chapter, and U.S.
{.p. William Gray III (D., Pa.).
saw the strength of both peo-
ile." said Loree Jones, recalling
:>th countries upon her return
kome. "The slaves got by by being
Jtrong. And in Israel, Jews had
ipe and courage to protect their
Les and their homeland."
7THE THEMES of strength
lined from history and hope to
shaped in the future were
lepeated frequently as the
tudents spoke of black-Jewish
elations and the lessons learned
rom their travels.
"We participated in something
hat's never been done before.
^ne of the main points that came
ut is how close we got. We bared
ur souls to each other," said
Iteven Segal, a senior from
firard College in Philadelphia.
; "We learned so much," they all
reed. "Each night, we met to
icuss how different things af-
cted us," said Tamara Ross of
dine High School for Interna-
onal Affairs. "We each found
jr place in the group and learned
work together," Jones added.
fAnd it wasn't just us, but we
ould look to the adults, like Con-
ressman Gray and Mr. Ross
irorking together, to see what
klack-Jewish relations could be,"
he continued.
[4THE PROJECT, over 11 mon-
ns in the planning was originally
uggested by Gray after he learn-
of a black student trip to an
Dance Masters
Of N. Miami
and
Hollywood
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Israeli Kibbutz. He expanded the
idea to include black and Jewish
students and a visit to African
culture.
For the Jewish students, seeing
their own roots with black friends
took on special poignancy.*'If you
grow up not knowing you should
hate each other, we can start
young and be an example for
others to show we can get along. I
want to share with everyone in
Philadelphia and everywhere that
it can be done, and it will be
done," stated Steve Segal.
At Beit Hatefutzot in Tel Aviv,
the students began to understand
the history of exile and dispersion
of Jewry around the world and the
centrality of Israel to Jews.
"I brought back an impression
about the culture, the state of
mind, the hopes and fears of the
Jewish people," Jones explained.
"They will be strong to protect
their homeland and Blacks
know what it means to be strong."
Tony Stills was impressed that
"no matter what happened to
Jews, they are a family."
PART OF the itinerary was
planned to allow the students time
to discuss the differences in
perceptions, feelings and history
about themselves and the two
other countries. In Senegal "peo-
ple were very proud of their
heritage and also of their
technological advances. Past and
present were mixed together
wherever we went," added Brett
Singer of George Washington
High School.
Singer learned that Senegalese
today often repeat their names in
greeting since "slaves were strip-
ped of everything their identi-
ty, their names, their clothes. So,
to say your name over and over
meant you were proud of who you
were." Jews and blacks alike were
impressed with Senegalese
hospitality. "There is so much
poverty, and yet they shared
anything they had with you," said
Michele Seligman, of Girls High
School.
The students will be speaking to
the press, radio and television
before returning to school and ad-
dressing assemblies and youth
groups throughout the year. Irv-
ing Broudy, a member of the
board of the AJC Committee's
Philadelphia chapter, added "the
leadership and planning commit-
tee made lasting friendships in
working on the project, and that is
one important result too. And the
parents formed a network
when one child would call from
overseas, they let each other know
the latest news. So at all levels,
we made friendships that will
last." The Planning Committee
hopes to make the project an an-
nual event.
WHETHER pushing the tour
bus out of the mud in rainy-season
Senegal, or having the "incredi-
ble, unbelievable" experience of
climbing Masada, the students
agreed with Steve Segal's sum-
mary: "We can start young and be
an example for others to show
how we got along. Barriers that
might exist can be broken down."
Our warmest greetings to all our Friends
May the New Year bring peace
throughout the world
Officers and Staff of the
American Friends of
The Hebrew University
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Page24-A Pie
FlondattTTiday.
IS, 1986
Peres Outlines Four Goals
To Be Achieved in New Year
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The following is Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres'
Rosh Hashanah message:
Tur 'Common Values9 -
President Reagan's New Year Messas
Oc the threshold of the New
Year 5?46.1 shoaad tie to aawti
to jou *ry sincere good wishes
frofc Jem lit. oar eternal
rac-.tal. Duiiug the first year of
the naoooal anrr. .-nest.
we 9K oarserres four major foals
which we owed to carry oe:
res: :r:;:r.v. patiently and
farthfofcy
We deoded IB bring home oar
^feting sons frotr. Lefaanoc and
to ensure the peace and seconrv
: _- r Haw BBsttwfckges
I bm within oar own borders.
We declared war or rarr.nar.: jv-
flatior We formulated at
economic prograc: :*: while
reducing oar dependence oc
forest a*i wiE lead to .'eoewec
ecoomc grvwtfc and to the
mmafttr^'-t laad i bbbUbb!
parid -
WE HAVE undertaker to
laduuiwf oar efforts to revitalise
the peace *-.- Egypt. Both Israes
and Egypt not breathe new life
into the eTK.'raj agreements, time
does not s^ar>i stkL We cannot
gyraaa- hesitation and
to haie the coarse
of.
At the sarae cme. we most seek
to oper t+tanT^i* of peace wits
Jordan and the Palesamar Araba.
Terronsm w-Z not make as yield
and w rot deter as from oar
sincere efforts. Humanistic
aspirations net military
pressure hare been the
keystone of oar national strategy
tfaroagboat oar history. It ts with
this belief that we shall witiriue
to bve.
Whfc the rarrmtrtmepx of the
new Jewish year, there goes forth
from here, from Zion. a fervent
caE to aE our brethren, BBRWBBBM
they may be, to come and irre here
wr^i js tc be parsers w-.tn u s.
o^r great task: the nafwrrg
State that strrres tc oase in con-
doct not onry oc strength, bat aisc
. -. ^stiai
THE BEGINNING of the
Jewish year is ar appropriate ome
to remember oar oppressed
brethren m the Sonet Union, as
Syria and a: Iran and to tow that
we wm not rest anal we succeed
m freeang them and """"f
them to their historic homeiand.
Tfca year we have proved, once
that the Jewish peopie are
for one another.
The great mission for the saha-
aon of the Jews of Ethiopia is
drawing to a dose, and this
remote and a underfill tribe has
bees restored to oar midst. It the
face of a skeptical world, we
demonstrated spciraa! and prac-
tical solidarity. Let as wwtinue to
bear witness that in routine times,
as in times of tziaL we are i
of fancaomnsj as a
oar hearts haling, as one
May the prayers of aE oar
forefathers be reabaed m oar
time
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan, in his Rosh
IIBatumi miaiarr said that the
Jewish High Holy Days is a
nimiiiiiT to Americans of the
"commoc vahxs" that tie the
United States and Israel together
Tbe President* s message, reieas-
ed by me White House, said:
T--15 a i BMMl Henri BBBa si
the year in the Jewish tradJboc.
aad n is also a ome when we are
recrunded of the depth of oar na-
^ac's inheritaDce free, that trad:-
uoc Danag this period, members
of the Jewish community look
both forward and back in a spirit
: repentance. This theme of
repentance is one that ali
Americans can understand
recause K is an inextrjcabie part
of America's oldest traditions.
The Jewish High Hoh Days
provide as aE with an opportunity
to reflect on our responsibilities
past.
TWi time of year also rJ
us of the dose and ^ndun^l
tiooahip betweer. :h* ftS
States and Israel. .^^^J
are joined not by the 21
strands of temporary :nteS|
but rather by the deep bondul
our common values
'The Jewish Higr. Holy I**
mind us of the permanent 1
depth of those rallies. All
shofar's call ushers in the]
Year, let us prav that -Jie va_
this season wil! be reflected Tt
own lives and in the creation U
world at peace."
President Reagan
toward God and our fellow mar.
and to resoive to do better in the
future in meeting those respon-
sJbflities than we have done in the
WANTED Permanent
far Conaarvatnra Bnn &J
Congregation of K W. For fund
lasaassswaa conttct jm|
Bnhom. 1805 Blanch* Sir MM
(305)296-5739
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES AFFILIATED WITH
'United Synagogue ofcy\merica
SOUTHEAST REGION-SOUTHERN COUNCIL
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FRAN KLIN D. KREUTZER
Natk>nat Vice President
BRUCE R. KLASNERl
Youth Director
DR. ALAN M ARCO VITZ
Treasurer
MARSHALL BALTUCN
Southern Coond
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ROBERT RAPAPORT
National Vice President
. WISH ALL A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAR
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GB Beat Him Up
The Knife Has Been Drawn
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 25-A
VLADIMIR BRODSKY
n name is Brodsky. I am an
esthesiologist by profession,
family suffered a lot under
Bolsheviks and Nazis. Many
Ambers also died under Stalin,
family contained many physi-
08, and the "Doctors' Plot" did
[ pass them by. My uncle surviv-
the labor camps, but my aunt
id after being charged with Ul-
ulating patients with cancer.
encountered anti-Semitism for
first time in high school. My
^ssmates used to beat me up.
hen they called me zhid
Site" some switch would turn.
popped thinking what I was do-
and fought, no matter what
odds.
/HEN THE Six-Day War
jran. the Jewish students at my
Diversity came together. We
feren't thinking of leaving, but
cause we were all Jewish and
the oppression. The Israeli
fctory united us. We met for no
are than a month. I was then
spitalized, and this saved me.
1 the other men at the meetings
fcre removed from the institute
' the army. They announced at
Komsomol meeting that "a
mist group had been
covered."
In 1979,1 began attending unof-
ba.1 Jewish seminars. During the
BO Olympics, two friends and I
clared a hunger strike, pro
^ting the refusal to let us leave
Israel. Seven KGB men sat at
i entrance to our house. Hardly
yone wishing to see us was
owed through. Yet we were
Bud since we were fighting for
rights.
I participated in a demonstra-
tion on Prisoners for Zion Day,
Dec. 24. "Demonstration" is real-
ly too loud of a word. We didn't
march, shout or hold up placards
we couldn't afford to. We simp-
ly stood at the Lenin Library,
looking at the Presidium of the
Supreme Soviet with mute
reproach. However, this was suffi-
cient to have me arrested on
charges of hooliganism, using
obscene language and refusing to
listen to police orders.
IN 1882, a patient, already dy-
ing, was brought to my hospital,
and passed away as I treated her.
A general meeting of all the doc-
tors was called under the chair-
manship of a professor, a Jew,
who said I was responsible for the
death. The medical records were
immediately sent to the pro-
secutor. I was dismissed from
work and was unemployed for a
long time.
My apartment was set on fire.
Neighbors saw a man pouring a li-
quid under my door, and the fire
started. When I came home I saw
four or five familiar KGB men
across the street. They stood
there, leaning against their car,
smiling. This happened after I
spoke to someone in Israel by
phone and said persecutions
against those who taught the
Torah had begun.
I was under round-the-clock
surveillance, then beaten up in the
entrance hall of my house. Sum-
mons to the KGB and prosecutor
continued. Neighbors informed
the police who had come to visit
us. Many of my friends went to
prison during this period.
IN AUGUST. 1984,1 completed
a difficult 24-hour shift at work,
and went into the hospital yard.
Four KGB men seized me. One
began beating me, while the
others stood around us, all in the
presence of patients and doctors.
Some tried to intervene, but the
men kept them away. I was
thrown into a car and brought to a
police station, then to court. The
judge asked if I understood why I
was being tried. I replied that I
was proud of being put on trial
because of my desire to go to my
homeland, Israel.
The KGB has started planting
"drugs" and "weapons." Despite
all the intimidation tactics, Soviet
Jews have not given up our inten-
tion to go to Eretz Israel.
Brother Jews! I've always been
interested in Jewish history, par-
ticularly that of modern German
Jews. It still has not been decided
whether everything was done to
save them. History repeats itself.
Perhaps it will happen here
tomorrow, or the day after. God
forbid! The knife has been drawn.
LET EACH of you think if you
have done everything possible to
save Soviet Jews. Think about it
now; tomorrow might be too late.
I'm often asked by American
Jews, "How can we help you?" If
Jews in prison find their lives
there easier to bear, if Dr. Joseph
Begun and Anatoly Sharansky
stop being persecuted in the labor
camps, if the authorities stop sen-
ding us to prison, your assistance
is effective.
Leningrad refusenik Isaac Kogan, who is among the increasing
number of Jews in the USSR becoming religiously observant,
prepares homemade kosher wine for the High Holy Day season in
a photo obtained by the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry.
If emigration is resumed, this
will be the most important in-
dicator of your assistance.
Dr. Brodsky was married only
three months when he was sentenc-
ed. The SSSJ requests letters of
support to his wife, Dina
Zisserman-Brodsky, Ulitsa
Aro8hina SSlt, Apt. SUS, Moscow,
USSR.





Page 26-A The Jewish, Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Defense Ministry Official Was
Prepared To Invite A PLO Biggie
By JEAN COHEN
ATHENS (JTA) In
1982 and 1983, an official of
the Israel Defense Ministry
was prepared to issue a for-
mal invitition to Itam Sar-
tawi or any other ranking
member of the Palestine
Liberation Organization to
come to Jerusalem as an of-
ficial guest of the Israel
government.
This, at least, is the story
related here by Ferdinand Hen-
nerbiler who. until last June, was
an aide to the Austrian Am-
bassador to Greece, the late
Herbet Amry. There has been no
independent confirmation of this
disclosure.
According to Hennerbicler.
Amry, former Chancellor Bruno
Kveisky of Austria and Arie Eliav.
a leading Israeli dove, were in-
volved in the complicated, top
secret arrangements.
THOSE THREE, and Sartawi,
who had close contacts with
Kreisky and was reputed to be
seeking peace between the PLO
and Israel, were in Vienna in the
autumn of 1982. At that time.
Kreisky was involved in the in-
direct negotiations of a prisoner
exchange in Lebanon between
Israel and the PLO. He proposed
to use those negotiations to
establish higher political contacts
between the two parties, and the
others concurred.
Eliav. who had met with Sar-
tawi abroad on past occasions,
suggested that the plan be carried
out bv Arie Mannski. an Israeli
lawyer who was at the time
military adviser to the then
Defense Minister, Moshe Arens.
Marinski, who had been a member
of Irgun, described himself as a
former terrorist. "If there is so-
meone who can do it, it is only
Marinski," Eliav said, according
to Hennerbicler.
Early in 1983, Eliav returned to
Vienna and informed Amry that
Marinski was prepared to meet
Sartawi or any PLO official that
PLO chief Yasir Arafat would
delegate. Hennerbicler says.
Marinski visited Vienna in March.
1983, accompanied by Eliav. He
did not meet directly with Sartawi
who was there at the time, or with
Kreisky.
HOWEVER, according to Hen-
nerbicler. he gave Eliav an oral in-
vitation for Ambassador Amry to
convey to any PLO official, which
included several terms.
Marinski would issue an official
invitation to a duly appointed
PLO representative to come to
Jerusalem. The invitation would
be valid for Sartawi or anyone else
Arafat would nominate. The PLO
official would be treated as an of-
ficial guest of the Israeli govern-
ment. His safety would be
guaranteed by Israel.
Upon arrival in Jerusalem, the
PLO official would meet Marinski
and stay overnight. The next day
he. along with Marinski and Eliav,
would travel by helicopter to visit
the prison camp at Ansar in south
Lebanon. The PLO representative
would enter and leave Israel by
the Allenby Bridge over the Jor-
dan River.
The invitation and terms were
raw 7
warn
GUT
YOMTOV
HAPPY
ROSHHASHANA
Happy New Year
Sun Bank/Miami, N.A.
Member FDIC
submitted orally to Amry by Eliav
at a meeting in the federal
chancellory in Vienna. When ask-
ed if the}- understood the conse-
quences, Eliav replied that he and
Marinski understood. Marinski
said, furthermore, that both
Arens and Premier Menachem
Begin had knowledge of the in-
%itation. He did not say it had
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r w
their blessings but stressed that
they knew about it.
SARTAWI, for his part, accor-
ding to Hennerbicler, said he
would be delighted to go to
Jerusalem. But he needed
Arafat's approval.
During Easter, 1983, Amry
went to Jerusalem to make sure
the invitation still held. He met
again with Marinski and Eliav on
the matter. Hennerbicler quotes
Marinski as saying that after all
these years "it is about time we
talk to the gang. (PLO) I was a
terrorist too and I know what I'm
talking about."
But two months later, Sartawi
met again with Amry in Vienna to
report that Arafat refused to give
him a mandate to go to Jerusalem
because that would weaken his
(Arafat's) position.
Kreisky. who knew Arafat per-
sonally, reentered the picture at
that time. He decided to write to
Arafat explaining the invitation.
and its terms so there would be n, *
misunderstanding. Hennerbicler "
says Kreisky hoped he would be
able to save the scheme
HIS LETTER repeatea the ver
bal proposals by Eliav, and added
"This offer is certainly important
and it contains such "possibilities
for the future that I had to inform
you personally about it in this
way."
Kreisky signed the letter but
delayed dating it. According to
hennerbicler, the Chancellor in-
tended to post it on April 10
1983. It was never posted. On that
date Sartawi, considered the*;
leading voice for peace and con- *
ciliation within the PLO. was gun-
ned down by assassins while at-
tending a meeting of the Socialist
International in Lisbon. The pro-
jected invitation died with him.
n NEW YEAR n
Kenneth Myers
4200 Biacayiw Blvd.
Miami. Ra. 33137
(305)573-2556
SHUUi!
PESTconnKxeomMnr
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MIAMI. FLORIDA 33155


We 're Unresponsive
To Plight of Broken Marriages
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 27-A
NEW YORK The
[divorce rate among Jews
has risen sharply along with
(that of the general popula-
tion, and Jews, facing all the
problems associated with
jthe breakup of marriage, all
(too often find that the
|Jewish community is indif-
rent and unresponsive to
[their plight.
These were among the conclu-
sions of a new study published by
the American Jewish Committee's
William Petschek National Jewish
Family Center. Entitled "The
Divorced Parent and the Jewish
Community," the 58-page report
was written by Nathalie Friedman
land Theresa F. Rogers, both
senior research scholars and ad-
junct professors of sociology at
Bolumbia University.
Based on in-depth personal in
erviews with 40 divorced Jewish
fcouples of Orthodox, Conser-
vative, Reform and unaffiliated
backgrounds, the publication
sheds light on the causes of Jewish
pivorce and on the post-divorce
consequences for the families in-
Irolved. It is the third of a William
Petschek National Jewish Family
Center series investigating the
mpact of divorce on Jewish
amilies' religious affiliations and
ommunity participation.
SOME OF the divorces
eportedly were caused by
ehavioral problems such as
buse, infidelity, and alcoholism.
Dthers were the result of "incom-
patibility" differences of
emperament or values.
Among the key findings were
he following:
1 At the time of their divorces,
nost of the women (but few of the
nen) found friends and parents
Supportive. Most of the women
and some of the men) sought pro-
essional counseling or therapy.
My ten individuals sought
ounseling from their rabbis.
Custodial parents who had been
religiously affiliated during their
marriages remained affiliated
afterwards, though a few changed
their affiliation.
Ten formerly unaffiliated
custodial parents joined
synagogues or temples after their
divorces. Half of these new affilia-
tions represented "returnees" to
the community since the custodial
parents had come from affiliated
homes.
The presence of young children
in the post-divorce family was
largely responsible for the
family's continued or new con-
gregational affiliation.
Many single parents complained
of obstacles to their participation
in the Jewish community after
their divorces. Some felt a stigma
in being divorced and single in
congregations geared to married
couples.
"THEY RECOMMENDED
that synagogues and schools be
more aware of the special pro-
blems of children of divorce," the
authors state, "including the need
for parent-child activities within a
Jewish context; that the communi-
ty provide formal or informal
mechanisms to provide emotional
support to single parents and to
facilitate their remarriage.
"They felt that Jewish institu-
tions of all kinds should recognize
that single-parent families are a
significant and permanent part of
their constituencies."
Commenting on the study,
Yehuda Rosenman, director of the
William Petschek National Jewish
Family Center and of AJC's
Jewish Communal Affairs Depart-
ment, stated:
"Over the last decade there has
been a swift, unprecedented rise
in the American divorce rate.
Whereas divorce used to be a rare
occurrence, it is now estimated
that half of all couples who marry
today will eventually divorce.
Although divorce in the Jewish
community has not yet reached
We Wish All Customers & Friends
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that level, it certainly is on the
rise, and seems likely to approach
the overall American rate in the
near future.
"PUBLIC AWARENESS of
the accelerating divorce rate has
gradually made divorce socially
acceptable, almost as 'normal' as
marriage itself. This undoubtedly
influences young people, who, en-
countering the usual problems in
adjusting to marriage, resort to
quick divorces rather than work at
resolving their difficulties."
Rosenman added: "There is a
need for synagogues and other
Jewish communal agencies to pre-
vent such divorces by changing
the climate of opinion about the
routine nature of divorce and by
developing premarital and
postmarital counseling and other
programs that enhance com-
munication between spouses.
"There are no victimiess |
divorces, and the chief victim is I
the child. The Jewish community
must plan strategies to prevent
divorce wherever possible, and to
provide help once the divorce oc-
curs. We hope that publication of
this study will help advance both
of these goals."
E. Robert Goodkind is chairman
of the William Petschek National
Jewish Family Center.
29 Leave Russia
JERUSALEM (JTA) Only
29 Jews left the Soviet Union this
month.
This report comes just one
month after almost 200 Soviet
Jews were allowed to leave in
July.
Mr'
Mr. & Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
and Family
Mildred S. Falk
Wishes All The Good People
Of Miami Beach
A Happy Holiday
COUPLES unable to have
children willing to pay
$10,000 fee and expenses
to woman to carry their
child. Conception to be by
artificial insemination.
Contact NOEL P. KEANE,
Attorney, 930 Mason, Dear-
bom, Ml 48124.
(313)278-8775
All responses
to be confidential.
How Much Salt
Are You Drinking ?
It's hard to escape salt. You'll find it in almost
everything you eat and drink.
But you won't find it in Mountain Valley Water. It's
so negligible, Mountain Valley can be used in a salt-free
diet.
Known for natural hardness and
delicious taste, Mountain Valley's spring
is nestled in virgin timberland at Hot
Springs, Arkansas. Geologists report the
water takes 3500 years from rain back to
the spring. It's protected still more, in
glass bottles to you.
Have Mountain Valley Water Delivered
to your home and office. It's good, all the
time.
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c^oimtaiii^ey^ter
FROM HOT SPRINGS, ARK.
<



Page 28-A The Jewish Flondiap/Friday, September 13, 1985
Terrorists Seized Aboard A Yacht
Were Members Of An Elite PLO Unit
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A yacht seized by the Israel
Navy off the Lebanese coast
on Aug. 31 carried ter-
rorists from an elite unit of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization whose mission
was to infiltrate Israel from
south Lebanon and kill as
many people as possible.
Premier Shimon Peres has
told reporters here.
The yacht. Ganda, intercepted
while enroute from
- to south Lebanon, was
earn ing officers of Fon
PLO
especially clos<
pwo ere* members

other British
THE GANDA was the m
tern riat vessel seized by the
lane Navy in the past few weeks.
Another yacht, the Kasilradi. was
intercepted west of Sidon during
the night of Aug. 24-25. It too had
sailed from Cyprus and carried
eight members of El Fatah, the
PLO's terrorist wing and two
Westerners, an American and an
Australian, reportedly the
owners.
Peres said there was no doubt
that the Ganda set sail on its ter-
rorist mission with the full
knowledge of the PLO leadership.
It was stopped at sea after it fail-
ed to respond to warnings and at-
tempted evasive action.
Security sources said that over a
dozen attempts have been made
by terrorists in recent years to
land in Israel by sea to carry out
indiscriminate attacks on
civilians. The sources said the ter-
rorists have turned to the sea
because Jordan and Syria refuse
to allow them to operate against
Israel from their territory and it
has liecome increasingly difficult
to infiltrate from south Lebanon.
NEVERTHELESS, the
the Ganda and
ing for
Lebanon and planned to infiltraU
overland Tit i weeka (
. lil radi w ai s
Lebanese militiamen turned hack
another ship attempting to land
terrorists at Sidon.
Interrogation of the Kasilradi
terrorists disclosed they had been
trained in Algeria in the use of
weapons and parachutes for about
a year. Afterwards they went to
Tunisia and thence to Athens
where they boarded the yacht and
sailed for Cyprus.
The owners of the yacht have
been detained but military sources
said apparently they were not in-
to Honor of Our 40th Anniversary
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volved in the terrorist plot and
had intended to return to Greece
after landing the El Fatah men at
Sidon. The two owners have been
visited in jail by consular
representatives of their respec-
tive countries. They have not re-
quested lawyers because they
have not been charged with any
crimes.
MEANWHILE. Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin warned
that Yasir Arafat's supporters
were the most murderous
elements in the divided PLO and
their goal is to kill as many Jews
as possible.
Addressing a United Jew ish Ap-
peal delegation. Rabin
felt free to operate against ter-
- wherever and
appear. Chief if S
Moshe Levy totd reporters that
terrorists are likely to resume
their attacks on Israel from
Lebanon. The Israel Defense
Force is taking every precaution
to prevent this, he -
He stressed that the IDF would
be flexible and deal with each ter-
rorist attempt according to the
circumstances. There is no one
routine response, he said. Levy
observed that the security belt
along the Lebanese border was
one of the more effective means to
prevent terrorist activity in nor-
thern Israel.
Bet Shira Congregation
7500 S.W. 120th Street 238-2601
MIAMI'S NEWEST CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
A Full Service Synagogue Serving South Dade
Early Childhood Program Religious School
Solomon Schechter Day School
Sisterhood Men's Club Youth Groups
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
Selichot Service, Saturday, September 7,11:30 p.m.
Open to the Entire Community
High Holy Day Services at King's Bay
Membership & Tickets Available Call 236 2601 t
DAVID H. AUERBACH Rabbi
HOWARD BENDER. Cinlof
SAUL MEISCLS. Canlot
OR MICHAEL HA12EL. Dy School -tomtit.
ARLEEN B. SNYDER. fl.llfltoui School Mnfetoa.
RICHARD C MILSTEIN. PTMItMn!
Nassau Gardens Apt.
North Miami Beach
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** aeemMJitMt uevu-unt *t4idme*
18001 Collins Ave., Sunny Isles -
Mo. Miami Bench, Fl. 33160
(305)932-1800
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy & Healthy New Year
HAPPY HOLIDAYS
INTRCONTINNTAL
fi A II] 1^ ^=j. The best way we can grow
Ur\l l .^ ^=== is to help you grow.
i
SURF5IDE BRANCH
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Miami Beach 673-6900
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.. ,*i
Friday, Septembel- 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 29-A

IN ISRAEL,
SOMETHINGS
EVK CH4NGE.
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-


Page 30-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Court Asked To Overturn
Appeals Ruling on Yarmulke
NEW YORK The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has asked the U.S.
Supreme Court to overrule
an appeals court decision
permitting the Air Force to
bar a Jewish officer from
wearing a yarmulke while
on duty.
In an amicus airiae brief in the
case of S. Simcha Goldman v.
Caspar Weinberger, Secretary of
Defense, the League called the
prohibition "unconstitutional."
In 1981, the Air Force ordered
Capt. Goldman, who was then
employed at the Air Force
Regional Hospital at March AFB,
Riverside, Calif., to stop wearing
a yarmulke which he used at all
times to cover his head in confor-
mity with his Orthodox Jewish
beliefs.
WHEN CAPT. GOLDMAN
refused, he was reprimanded and
his application for a one-year ex-
tension of his military service was
met with a "negative recommen-
dation" despite his "highly prais-
ed" performance as an Air Force
psychologist.
The Air Force's yarmulke ban
was subsequently struck down by
a federal district court in the
District of Columbia but was later
upheld by the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals there.
The League said Capt.
Goldman, who is an ordained rab-
bi, served as a Navy chaplain bet-
ween 1970 and 1972 and wore a
yarmulke without incident. He
also wore one for four years at
March AFB and, until 1981, no
superior officer raised any
objection.
JEFFREY P. SINENSKY.
director of ADL's Legal Affairs
Department, pointed out that the
Court of Appeals conceded that
the Air Force dress regulation,
which was used against Capt.
Goldman, was "arbitrary."
Declaring that the Air Force
violated the constitutional right of
Americans to practice their
religion without "interference by
the state," Sinensky said the first
Amendment "cannot be cast aside
simply because the setting for
religious observance is in the
military."
Emphasizing that historically
the U.S. military "has endeavored
to promote, not obstruct, a ser-
viceman's religious practice," the
League brief declared:
"If the constitutional
guarantees afforded service per-
sonnel are to have genuine im-
port, the military must be re-
quired to distinguish those
religious practices that com-
promise legitimate military ends
and those, such as petitioner's
practice of wearing a yarmulke,
that do not."
AS AN AIR FORCE
psychologist, the League said,
Capt. Goldman's "station is a
military hospital, not the bat-
tlefield or the barracks. The yar-
mulke that he must wear accor-
ding to the religious dictates of his
conscience is a small and unob-
trusive head covering, hardly in-
congruous with Capt. Goldman's
otherwise conforming and well-
kempt military attire."
The brief was prepared by
Daniel P. Levitt, Sigmund S.
Wissnergross and Abbe L.
Dienstag of a New York City law
firm in conjunction with ADL's
Legal Affairs Department Staff.
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\ehind the Headlines
Black and Jewish Leaders Striving
To Restore the 'Old Alliance'
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 31-A
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
survey of the views of black
Congressmen indicates that
many feel the once strong
alliance of blacks and Jews
deteriorated during 1984
but that the alliance still en-
dures, according to the
World Jewish Congress.
One Jewish view of the condi-
tion of those relations was ex-
pressed by Israel Singer, WJC ex-
ecutive director, who said that
"we have not yet arrived at the
point we would like to be with the
black community," and he
described details of Jewish-
sponsored programs to increase
understanding among blacks
about Jews and Israel.
The report, described as the
first of its kind, was based on in-
dividual interviews conducted
over a five-month period with
members of the Congressional
Black Caucus. The report
surveyed the attitudes of the black
Congressmen on social and
political issues affecting relation-
ships between the two groups.
THE FINDINGS were assessed
at the first of a series of private
meetings between black and
Jewish leaders, held in the House
of Representatives, convened by
Edgar Bronfman, WJC president,
and Rep. Mickey Leland (D.,
Tex.), chairman of the Caucus.
Bronfman said the purpose of the
survey and of the meeting, "was
to lay the groundwork for en-
couraging mutual understanding
on the leadership level and for
promoting substantive coopera-
tion between the two
eommuiy^;^^..,, _.
The report is based on inter-
views with 16 of the 21 members
of the Caucus in the 98th Con-
gress. The survey, conducted by
Dr. Kitty Cohen, faculty member
- of the American University in
Washington, D.C. and a consul-
tant to the WJC, was commission-
ed by the WJC and the inter-
religious and community relations
department of the World Zionist
Organization.
The image of the Jewish com-
munity, as perceived by the black
community, is of an ethnic com-
munity economically well-off,
politically organized, powerful
and part of the ruling establish-
ment. But the Jewish community,
though considered part of the
white community, is still
remembered as an ally in the civil
rights movement and still a strong
partner in the social change
process.
THE MAJORITY of the black
Congressmen attribute the
deterioration in relations to
Jewish reactions to Democratic
Presidential contender Jesse
Jackson's hateful and scornful
remarks involving Jews and
Israel.
The Congressmen are aware of
differences with Jews on affir-
mative action and on quotas. The
Congressmen feel that Jews see
quotas as a ceiling to their aspira-
tions, but blacks see quotas as a
means of achieving the goal of
sociel justice. Blacks see quotas as
a floor.
The respondents are almost
unanimous in believing that joint
black-Jewish efforts can help in-
fluence policy-making on such
issues as appointment policy to
the Civil Rights Commission, and
appointment of minority
representatives to the Supreme
Court. The Caucus members
share the conviction that the two
.communities can achieve more
together than they can separately.
IMPEDIMENTS to coopera-
tion between the two groups are
seen mainly in the misconceptions
they hold about each other, and
lack of mutual understanding.
Other obstacles are priorities dif-
ferences, an obvious example be-
ing Jewish preoccupation with
Israel.
All agreed that there is social
discrimination against Jews but
some said it is not as bad as in the
past and not as bad as that against
the blacks. Most agreed that
Jews, directly or indirectly,
discriminate against blacks.
Israel's ties with South Africa
are cited for the negative view in
the black community of the ties
between the American Jewish
community and Israel.
Notwithstanding the negative
perception by blacks of Israel as
theocracy, most of the black
answers reflect a positive view of
Israel as a democracy and as a na-
tion whose problems are not
primarily racial. They unanimous-
ly support aid to Israel, differing
only in the amount of aid they
favor.
MOST Congressmen proved to
be unaware of Israeli opposition to
apartheid. Many pointed out that
American blacks are simply
unaware of Jewish opposition to
apartheid.
Jackson's primary campaign
was seen as having a positive im-
pact on the black community, but
the respondents understood it had
a negative impact on black-Jewish
relations.
Jackson's position both on inter-
national issues, such as Israel and
Wishes For A
Healthy New Year
Dr. Barry N. Burak
Burak Chiropractic Clinic
9404 S. Dixie Highway Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 666-8883
the Palestinian Arabs, and on
domestic matters, relating to his
"Hymietown" remark and Black
Muslim leader Louis Farrakhan -
and the media's major reporting
on such matters increased ten-
sion between Jews and blacks.
Singer, in his comments, said
Jews were "somewhat disap-
pointed at the lack of a black out-
cry about Farrakhan, both in Con-
gress and in the black
community."
SINGER SAID, "We Jews
don't fear that kind of
phenomenon. We attack (Rabbi
Meir) Kahane when Jewish racism
lifts its ugly head, often and early,
and we expect the same from our
co-dissidents in the black-Jewish
dialogue."
He added that Jews understood
"the fear" blacks have about "the
thugs" around Farrakhan. "What
we are trying to do in this
dialogue is to strengthen the
center and the intelligent
moderates in the black community
by meeting them halfway and
even further on their concerns,
domestic and international."
On specific actions, Singer said
there are students visiting Israel
this summer, and there are
scholarship programs for such
visits by black students. He said a
program was in place for this fall
for visits to Israel by groups of
American black leaders, including
Congressmen, to observe at first
hand the process of absorption of
Ethiopian Jewish newcomers.
OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT
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Happy & Healthy
Rosh Hashanah
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(305)651-7110
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Best Wishes for
Good Health and Happiness
Throughout the New Year
Congressman and Mrs. Lawrence J. Smith
Grant and Lauren
Paid for by Larry Smith for Congmi Campaign. Juwph A. Epatcin. CPA. Treanurer
We wish the Jewish Community
a very Happy New Year.
B
PAN AMERICAN BANK, N.A
250 S.E. 1st Street, Miami. Florida 33151 Telephone 57^5600
Member FDIC


Page 32-A The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, September 13, 1986

LIGHTS 10ffs: 10 mg. "taT. 0.8 mg. ntcotme. KIN& T7 mg. "tar". 1.3 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette by FTC method.
You've got what It takes.
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.


Rosh Hashanah To Be
Observed At Synagogues,
Temples Sunday Evening
Rosh Hashanah will bring Jews to
prayer services in synagogues throughout
South Florida beginning at sundown Sun-
day evening and continuing Monday and
Tuesday, Sept. 16 and 17.
Sunday services at sundown, Sept. 15,
launch the Aseret Yimay Tschuvah, the
ten days of penitence between Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur, with Shabbat
Tschuvah, the Sabbath of Repentance fall-
ing between the two holidays, scheduled
tor Sept. 21.
i YT S^PHT' the most awesome of the
Jewish Holy Days, will be observed at Kol
Nidre serv.ces Tuesday. Sept. 24, follow-
ed by Yom Kippur on Wednesday, Sept
Young Political Activists
Prepare For Fall
\ \SHINGTON One hun-
ind twenty of the most
-.illy sophisticated pro-Israel
[student activists in the country
[met recently at the University of
Maryland to exchange strategies
and discuss Middle East issues
I with the experts.
Their forum was the American
I Israel Public Affairs Committee's
two-day National Political Leader-
| ship Training Seminar.
STUART WEICHSEL of Boca
I Raton, and Elise Lipopff and
I Carolyn Chabrow, both of Miami,
I joined other activists representing
la wide range of campuses across
the nation. Some of the schools
have very small Jewish popula-
tions, others have histories of
|a>.ri Israel activity.
"The politics, atmospheres, and
[demographics of their schools
vary, but the students are united
!in their support for a strong
U.S.-Israel relationship," said
[Jonathan Kessler. head of
AIPAC's Political Leadership
Development Program.
Leading discussions on effective
campus activism were Nathan
Siegel, who organized his Duke
University classmates into con-
gressional caucuses; Mark Rosen,
who led a response campaign to
anti-Israel propaganda at Yale;
and Michelle Katz, who directed a
lobbying campaign on the
U.S.-Israel Free Trade Agree-
ment from her University of
Alabama sorority.
MICHAEL RUTLAND, a black
pro-Israel activist from Indiana
University, described his ex-
periences organizing blacks and
Jews to lobby for aid to Israel.
"There is nothing as exciting as
hearing from another activist how
an impact was made," said Gil
Fried of Palo Alto, Calif. "To be
an activist in the 80's is to be a
pioneer, utilizing approaches that
work, rejecting those that don't,
trying new approaches."
"The lessons of Yale apply to
Berkeley; those of Michigan apply
to Florida State," he continued.
AIPAC Executive Director
Thomas A. Dine, speaking at the
conference, told the students,
"You've proven you can do it, but
you must do more. I know your
potential but you must reach your
potential in every battle. We need
JTOU."
WORKSHOPS, led by experts
such as Bill Morton, former head
(>f the NAACP's youth division,
and Win Meiselman, president of
the Committee for Accuracy in
Middle East Reporting, were
designed to increase the students'
knowledge of nuts and bolts
organizing. The sessions focused
n campaign politics, lobbying,
and coalition building.
Because the campaign to
discredit Israel is increasingly ac-
,j-tive, this year's NPLTS also em-
^ phasized techniques to combat the
I anti-Israel effort, with workshops
I on "The Anti-Israel Lobby" and
L.....................'......
Techniques."
"We teach and we learn at the
same time," said Jeffrey Pamess
of the University of Michigan,
who assisted in Rep. Paul Simon's
upset victory over Sen. Charles
Percy. "I teach what I've done, I
learn what everyone else has
done, and I'm learning from the
professionals."
"All the enthusiasm you absorb
makes you want to do more," he
continued.
SEVEN CANADIAN college
students were among those atten-
ding. "Each campus is an in-
cubator in which new approaches
are tried," said Marcel Weider of
Toronto. "As a result of attending
NPLTS two years ago, I brought
a new sophistication to my cam-
pus. I've come back to show what
we did and see how other students
have worked on their campuses."
Weider convinced four of his
compatriots to attend their first
NPLTS. "We rented an
Oldsmobile in Toronto for 225
Canadian dollars," said Weider.
"It only took us nine hours to
drive."
Ten Christian students also at-
tended the weekend conference.
"I always felt I was on my own as
a Christian friend of Israel," said
Kathy Rappolt, a senior at the
University of the South
(Sewanee). "Now I see I'm part of
a community, that there are
resources available to me. I'm go-
ing back to campus with new ideas
of how to motivate my non-Jewish
friends."
Evolution in religious fashion is taking place in Jerusalem as
preparations are made for rebuilding of the Third Temple. Com-
mon thread among those creating garments for the modem
Israelite is the revival of ancient regional Themes. By-passing the
mode of 18th Century Polish and Russian nobility, adopted as a
uniform of yesterday's devout, today's Israelis search for
fashions for the observant that produce long, fluid, tunic-style
shirts fringed at the corners. One such modern Israeli is Reuvan
Prager. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prager, who are
members of Temple Emanu-El, Miami Beach.
Israel's Relationship With Africa
Robert B. Goldmann is co-
chairman of the Middle
Eastern Affairs Committee of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
By ROBERT B. GOLDMANN
In Abidjan, the capital of the
Ivory Coast, an Israeli construc-
tion company is building the
world's largest cathedral (next to
St. Peter's, which the Church
does not allow to be exceeded in
size). That company is also
building a large number of public
structures, roads and housing in
this important and large West
African country.
In Cameroon, a small group of
Israelis is beginning to develop
projects in construction, in-
dustrial enterprise and
agricultural modernization. And
in Liberia, agricultural experts
and engineers are operating in dif-
ficult conditions, while an Israeli
ophthalmologist rides up and
down the dirt roads of the bush in
his jeep setting up simple clinics
and movable operating rooms to
perform surgery and give eye care
to people who never knew that
something can be done about fail-
ing sight.
These are impressions from a
recent trip under the auspices of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith to learn about Israel's
relationships with West African
countries. They demonstrate a
level and type of technical
assistance and economic partner-
ship between a small Middle
Eastern country and African na-
tions unique in the complex and
often frustrating relationship bet-
ween aid providers and recipients.
THE STRIKING feature, in
contrast to more uneasy relation-
ships between providers from
larger countries and developing
nations, is the easy compatibility
the host countries have with
Israelis. It seems that it's simpler
for them to work with people from
a small country which itself still
faces large development tasks and
whose needs and aspirations they
Dr. Lucjan Dobroszycki (center), noted historian of Jewish life in
Poland before and during the Holocaust, is welcomed to the
Yeshiva University faculty by Rabbi Robert S. Hirt (left), director
of Holocaust studies at the university and dean of the Max Stern
Division of Communal Services at the university-affiliated Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary, and Dr. Jeffrey Gurock,
program coordinator of Holocaust studies at the university and
associate professor of American Jewish history at the univer-
sity's Bernard Revel Graduate School.
can relate to than with those
whose size and level of develop-
ment are beyond their grasp or
aspiration.
In Abidjan and Yaounde, the
capital of Cameroon, I attended
Independence Day celebrations of
the Israeli residents employed by
the companies or agencies doing
development work.
They were in a festive mood,
finding satisfaction in their work
and making the most of an oppor-
tunity to be helpful to another
developing country as well as to
their own. They seemed to find it
as natural and normal to observe
their Independence Day in these
unlikely places as I found it thrill-
ing to behold.
ISRAEL ONCE had some 30
diplomatic missions in Africa.
After the Yom Kippur War and
the rise of Arab oil power, virtual-
ly all these diplomatic links were
cut. Many of the African countries
made the break reluctantly, but
with Arab pressure increasing,
there was little else they could do.
Also, there were threats from
Libya of terror and personal at-
tacks on African heads of state.
In recent years, the tide has
begun to turn. Zaire and Liberia
have reestablished full diplomatic
relations, and Israel has "interest
officers" diplomats just below
the level of Ambassador in
several other African countries.
Some countries are likely to nor-
malize their diplomatic ties with
Israel in the near future. The
reason: officially, because Israel
no longer occupies African ter-
ritory (the Sinai) and if Egypt,
following Israel's withdrawal
from that peninsula, could make a
peace treaty with Jerusalem, why
need African countries be holier
than Cairo?
Unofficially and more impor-
tant, the Africans were disap-
pointed by the inadequacy of the
Arab response to their break with
Israel, and never lost their ap-
preciation for the value of Israeli
aid and technical know-how,
which in quite a few countries con-
tinued even as diplomatic rela-
tions remained suspended.
THE STORY of Israel's wide-
ranging development work, and of
the changing relationships bet-
ween Israel and many African na-
tions, also tells us something
about these countries themselves.
For example, Liberia is a country
close to the United States and the
West in general, struggling with
vast development tasks against
heavy odds and open to help from
those who are not daunted by the
challenge.
In the Ivory Coast, development
has made impressive strides and
offers opportunities for more
sophisticated forms of assistance
and investment. And in
Cameroon. President Biya bases
his development policy on a
vigorous ag icultural sector as the
source of national strength and
economic growth a refreshing
contrast to many developing coun-
tries where policies that have fail-
ed are being perpetuated in the
face of failure.
It is thus not by accident, but by
perceived opportunity to be of
help where countries want to help
themselves, that Israel is welcome
and assisting development. Other
Western aid providers might
benefit from the Israeli
experience.
"dfewislhi Floiridla
Miami, Florida September 13,1985 Section B


Page 2-B. The Jewish radian/Friday, September 13,1985
From the Pulpit
Let Us Overcome Our
Obstacles
Bv RABBI
NORMAN SHAPIRO
Temple Zion
Israelite Center
In the Talmud we are taught
Yagati umatzati taamm. 'He
who achieves results by deter-
mination and persistence should
be believed." Conversely, the
sages of old were dubious of the
one who spoke of succeeding
without trying.
Throughout history, we know of
many instances of men blessed
with great resoluteness and firm-
ness of will, who overcame their
handicaps and left indelible im-
prints on their contemporaries, as
well as future generations. In this
vein, we think of Abraham ex-
periencing many trials and
tribulations in his quest for one
God. The Torah reading for Rosh
Hashanah stresses the akeda. the
binding of Isaac and Abrahams
willingness to offer up Isaac, his
beloved and only son by Sarah.
THE BIBLICAL narrative in
Bereshit also gives us keen in-
sights into the other patriarchs
Isaac's blindness and Jacob's
wrestling with God and man. We
recall Moses who suffered from a
speech impediment and yet ap-
peared before Pharaoh, challeng-
ed both Egyptian and Hebrew,
and lived to lead the Israelites
from bondage.
We remember Jeremiah, endur-
ing imprisonment for his beliefs
and yet becoming the great pro-
phet of his people. And Rabbi
Akiba who. at the age of forty,
began to study the Hebrew
alphabet and lived to master
Judaism and inspire thousands of
disciples.
So many additional examples
can be cited of ultimate ac-
complishment and lasting faith
where sacrifice, personal pain and
privation did not diminish achieve-
ment or prevent fulfillment and
fame. Cripple a man. and yet you
have a Sir Walter Scott. Imprison
Rabbi Norman Shapiro
him. and a John Bunyan emerges.
Bun.' one in snow at Valley Forge,
and George Washington is the
hero. Have him raised in abject
poverty and Abraham Lincoln is
the result. Load him with bitter
prejudice, and still you have a
Benjamin Disraeli. Afflict him
with asthma as a boy. and with all
that. Theodore Roosevelt makes
history. Stab him with rheumatic
pain, and nonetheless you have a
Charles Steinmetz. Paralyze his
legs with polio, and a Franklin
Delano Roosevelt still eventuates.
Give him a severe back injury. and
you have a "Profile in Courage.''
the late President John F.
Kennedy.
WITH THE arrival of the High
Holy Days and beginning" of
another year in the Jewish calen-
dar, we tend to indulge in soul-
searching and recollect last year's
setbacks and extenuations. We
know that there are many trouble
spots in the world and in our own
personal histories and ex-
New Violence
On The West Bank
JERUSALEM (JTA) New
violence erupted on the West
Bank Monday where Israeli
troops, cracking down on terrorist
activity, shot and wounded four
Arab youths who ignored warning
shots as they fled from a military
checkpoint in Hebron.
A military spokesman said the
troops fired into the air before hit-
ting the youths, one of whom is
12-years-old. All four were
treated on the spot by medical cor-
psmen and taken to a hospital.
They had been stopped for a
routine identity check but turned
and ran.
Meanwhile, parts of the Arab
t'^wn of Ramallah were placed
under curfew after an Israeli bus
was pelted with stones. A
firebomb was thrown at another
bus near Mt. Zion in Jerusalem.
A bomb was discovered and
safely defused in the Jerusalem
suburb of Gilo, at a school crossing
not far from the spot where six
pedestrians were slightly injured
by an explosive de%ice last week
There were no injuries in any of
the incidents.
A crowd of angry local residents
gathered, and there was con-
siderable shouting in support of
Rabbi Meir Kahane and his ex-
tremist Kach Party which
demands the expulon of every
The military authorities an-
nounced the six-month closure of
an East Jerusalem book store. Al-
Mannar. on grounds that it was a
front for the Popular Democratic
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine, a terrorist group.
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and Yom Kippur. with stress on
judgment and hope, have a univer-
sal message, not only for our peo-
ple but for all mankind.
Let us overcome our obstacles
and make the most of life, not by
blinking facts or burying our
heads in the sand, but by never
giving up. by always hoping and
believing in God. in ourselves, in
the destiny of our people and
country.
We can not and dare not live out
our lives in constant fear or sor-
row, although admittedly peril
seemingly casts its shadow over
our lives.
At times, true, sorrow and
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should mature and refine us. but
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Young Leadership Council To
Hold 'Fall Gala9For Singles
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
The Singles Committee of the
Jreater Miami Jewish Federa-
on's Young Leadership Council
/ill lead off its social calendar for
he season with a "Fall Gala." The.
t will be held Saturday, Sept.
i, at 8 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel, Ina Felsher and Brian
jCovler, co-chairmen of the Gala's
planning committee, announced.
'Fall Gala will provide a
tremendous opportunity for
young, single professionals and
business people from the Greater
.diami Jewish community to meet
one another and just have a ter-
.fic time," said Ellen Rose, vice
Chairman of the Young Leader-
hip Council.
The agenda for Kail Gala in-
cludes dancing to the music of the
andy Ross Orchestra of the
Uusic Associates group. There
urill be a lavish fruit and desert
table and a cash bar.
All singles, ages 22-40, who are
currently members of the Young
Leadership Council or are in-
terested in becoming members
are urged to attend the Fall Gala.
Involved in planning this Gala
are Ina Felsher and Brian Kovler,
co-chairmen of the planning com-
mittee, Barbara Black, Jeff
Cynamon, Brian Daniels, Pamela
Fogel, Ian Kaplan, Tamara Klor-
fien, Marcia Kramer, Jeffrey
Levine, Arden Magoon, Britt
Rosen, Steven Silvers and Susan
Vogel, planning committee
members.
Michael H. Novak, Singles Com-
mittee chairman; Zena F. Inden,
Singles Committee vice chairman,
Jack H. Levine, Young Leader-
ship Council chairman and Ellen
Rose, Young Leadership Council
vice chairman.

Lvt*

Louis Meltzer Leon L. Poistein
Veterans Leader Wins Award
Col. Maurice Weinman, com-
nander of Miami Beach Post No.
30. of the Jewish War Veterans
the U.S.A. has been awarded
lifetime title of "National
cruiter." Col Weinman, a 38
ear resident of Miami Beach, was
resented the award by National
ommander Samuel Greenberg at
he National Convention in
rlando.
[Col. Weinman, is veterans ad
|sor to Riverside Memorial
hapels, executive secretary for
nerican Legion Post 85, and a
ustee of the Disabled American
eterans Chapter 24.
| Weinman is a combat-veteran of
i\\ with service in England,
!, Belgium and Germany
Sth the 479 Air Service Group
(id 78th Infantry Division.
Col. Maurice Weinman

ggBSggL
SSSESSSs
^assess ^assr^
11 DAYS/10 NIGHTS $7711 ** ^
4 DAYS/3 WOKTS $M Xc
tt Eft miS&kl S- **"*&^ 1
United Synagogue
Region Convention
Chairman Appointed
Louis Meltzer, president of the
Southeast Region of the United
Synagogue of America, has an-
nounced the appointment of Leon
L. Poistein as Biennial Conven-
tion Chairman for the Region.
The Central Convention Chair-
man is Franklin D. Kreutzer of
Miami, formerly president of
Southeast Region, who will be in-
stalled as International President
of the United Synagogue during
this convention. Mr. Marshall
Wolke of Chicago, is current
President.
The Convention will be held at
the Concord in Kiamesha Lake,
from Nov. 17 to 21.
Pioneer Women
A musicale featuring Yiddish
and English songs will be on tap
at the opening meeting of the new
organizational year for the Golda
Meir Chapter of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat on Thursday,
September 19 at noon in the lower
level auditorium of the 100 Lin-
coln Road Building.
Sophie Kemper, an activist with
the group, will present the
musical portion of the afternoon.
Katherine Lippman is presi-
dent. She will discuss the Jewish
High Holy Days.
Technion Women
Hold Luncheon
The Miami Beach Chapter,
Women's Division, American
Society for Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology, announces
the opening luncheon meeting at
the Shelborne Hotel, Miami
Beach, on Thursday, Oct. 10, 12
noon. Entertainment will follow
the meeting.
No One Caters To \bu Like
The Airport Marriott Hotel.
Your next special occasion can be even
more memorable when it includes catering
by the Miami Airport Marriott Hotel,
especially if it's held in our completely
redesigned and redecorated Grand
! Ballroom.
Our custom catering services include
specially designed menus and decorating.
So if you're planning an important business
meeting or a theme party, our catering staff
will take care of every detail.
The hotel is centrally located at Le
Jeune Rd. at 836, minutes from just about
everywhere.
For more information about custom
catering and our brand new Grand
Ballroom, call Ellen Morse at 649-5000.
MIAMI
AIRPORT
Marriott
1201 N.W. LeJeune Road. Miami. Florida 33126 (305) 649-5000
Community Corner
Miami Beach City Commissioner Alex Daoud has been ap-
pointed Miami Beach campaign coordinator for the statewide
drive to place a lottery on the 1986 ballot throughout Florida.
The Dade/Broward Lupus Foundation's monthly meeting at
Parkway Regional Medical Center, will be held on Sept. 20 at 8
p.m. Guest speaker will be Dr. James Wiener, a Psychiatrist,
discussing "The Psychiatric Effects of Lups."
National Parkinson Foundation, major nationwide non-profit
health facility headquartered in South Florida, is hosting a Golf
Tournament Thursday, Oct. 24, at Miami Lakes Country Club to
raise funds for research, treatment and rehabilitation programs.
Harold Teitelbaum, president of the Simcha-Aventura
Chapter of the B'nai B'rith, has announced that the lodge will
honor two South Florida residents, Danish brothers Jorgen and
Mogens Moller at their pre-Rosh Hashanah breakfast meeting on
Sunday at 10 a.m. The brothers will be honored on behalf of the
Moller family's efforts in helping Jews escape Nazi-occupied Den-
mark nearly 42 years ago. The meeting will be held at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center, in North Miami
Beach.
The Aliyah Chapter of Hadassah will be having their Gala
Premiere Dinner Dance on Saturday evening, Oct. 5, at 7:30. It
will be held at the Mayfair Ballroom in Coconut Grove.
Selina Decky has finished her third movie, which will be shown
in England. She starred with Jackie Mason.
Amit Women Of South Florida Expanding
Amit Women is expanding and
has opened an additional office in
North Miami Beach, in the First
Nationwide Bank building at 633
N.E. 167th Street, suite 815. The
telephone number is 651-1444.
This office will serve Amit
members in the North Dade and
Broward area.
The Amit office which serves
members in the Miami Beach and
South Miami area, has relocated
their Miami Beach office at 420
Lincoln Road, from suite 430 to
suite 402A. The 531-5344
telephone number remains the
same.
DON'T FORGET YOUR
MOST IMPORTANT RELATIVE!
THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL
OVER 85% OF ISRAEL'S PEOPLE ARE SERVED
BY THE HEALTH, EDUCATION AND SOCIAL
SERVICE AGENCIES OF THE HISTADRUT.
The Israel ^5^
Histadrut Foundation
INVITES YOU TO PLAN YOUR CHARITABLE
WILL "THE HISTADRUT WAY" TO
BENEFIT ISRAEL.
The Israel Histadrut Foundation I
Can show you how a Bequest in Your Will can perpetuate your
name at one of the following Histadrut Institutions in Israel:
17 HOSPITALS THROUGHOUT ISRAEL
1300 MEDICAL CLINICS
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& HOMELESS CHILDREN
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. SHARE YOUR TODAY WITH
ISRAELS TOMORROW BY REMEMBERING
The Israel HisLadrul foundation
IN YOUR WILL, SO THAT YOUR NAME OR
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FOREVER WITH THE LAND OF ISRAEL.
can or write Israel flistadrut Foundation
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 389 Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Tel: (305) 531-8702 BROWARD: 462-5740
Attention: Lewis Alpert, Director
Dear Mr. Alpert:
D Please send me the HISTADRUT PORTFOLIO FOR A
"CHARITABLE WILL".
O Please call me for a confidential appointment
NAME.
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ADDRESS-
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Page 4-B
Members of Beth Torah in North Miami Beach
hold an award given to them by the Greater
Miami Israel Bond Organization for the
staunch support the temple and its congrega-
tion members have given the Jewish State
through the Israel Bond program. Accepting
the award are, from left to right, Robert
Billig, executive vice president of the temple's
congregation; Rabbi Max Lipschitz; and
Robert Whitebook, president of the
congregation.
Chances Improve For A Peres-
Mubarak Summit Meeting
Stern To Serve On Two Panels
Elliot Stern, an associate direc-
tor of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, has been
elected to the Board of Trustees
of the Florida Association of
Homes for the Aging (FAHA) and
appointed to the State's Hospital
Cost Containment Nursing Home
Advisory Council.
Mr. Stern, a leader in the field
of health-care management, was
elected to a three year term on the
Board of FAHA, a statewide
organization representing over
150 facilities in Florida. FAHA is
committed to promoting the cause
of non-profit institutions that
deliver quality healthcare to the
hundreds of thousands of elderly
who are served by member
facilities.
Elliot Stern
Israel Jets Hit
Terrorist Base
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel Air Force jets attacked a,
Palestinian terrorist base in the Syrian-controlled Bekaa
Valley in eastern Lebanon and returned safely to their
bases.
A MILITARY SPOKESMAN said the target was a
base used by a group known as the Palestinian Arab
Revolutionary Committees for staging terrorist attacks in
Israel.
He said hits were scored on four buildings. The air raid
was the first since Aug. 8 when Israeli war planes hit a
Palestinian base near Barr Elias in the Bekaa Valley.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prospects seem to have im-
proved for a summit
meeting between Premier
Shimon Peres and President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt,
sources close to Peres in-
dicate. The two leaders will
be in New York at the same
time later this month to at-
tend the 40th anniversary
session of the United Na-
tions General Assembly.
The chances of a summit may
have been enhanced, these
sources hinted, by the discreet
visit to Cairo of Gen. (Res.)
Avraham Tamir, director general
of the Prime Ministers Office.
They described it as "a great suc-
cess" noting that Tamir met twice
in 24 hours with Mubarak.
WELL-PLACED sources said
that Tamir's primary mission was
to convey new Israeli proposals
for a solution of the Taba dispute.
Taba is a tiny strip of beach west
of Eilat which is claimed by both
Israel and Egypt.
The sources said Peres informed
Deputy Premier and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir of
Tamir's mission but did not seek
his approval. They said Shamir
received a preliminary report of
Tamir's talks in Cairo before he
left today on an official visit to
Japan. The sources would not
divulge the contents of a personal
message from Peres which Tamir
delivered to Mubarak.
Shamir insists that the Taba
dispute be resolved by concilia-
tion. Egypt will accept only bin-
ding arbitration. While Peres and
his Labor Party ministers are
prepared to accede to Egypt on
this, Shamir and his Likud col-
President Hosni Mubarak
leagues in the Inner Cabinet have
blocked any concessions. The In-
ner Cabinet consists of five Labor
and five Likud ministers.
NEVERTHELESS, the
deadlock has not prevented a
meeting being set up in New York
this month between Shamir and
Egyptian Foreign Minister Ismet
Abdul Meguid.
While in Cairo. Tamir met the
newly installed Egyptian Prime
Minister Ali Lufty, who is an
economist by training. Lufty has
replaced Prune Minister Kemal
Hassan Ali who resigned,
reportedly for health reasons. His
departure is deeply regretted in
Israeli circles. Hassan Ali is
regarded as one of the "last of the
Mohicans." an astute Egyptian
diplomat who was intimately in-
volved in the Israeli-Egyptian
peace process since its beginning
in 1979.
E L
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Monthly Departures OptionarWeek in Tel Aviv
also TWO WEEK VACATIONS From $510. piusat
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"Now we can afford to be choosy
Or why
Paul
Feldstein
kosher
butchers
switched to
Hebrew
National
poultry
We're not just a kosher meat market. We're an institution.
In fact, we've been servins New York's West Side Jewish
community for over fifty years. So when Hebrew National
came out with its own poultry, of course we switched.
Hebrew National birds are better, pure and simple. They're
plumper. They have natural solden color and greater moist-
ness. And they come with larger breasts, which means more
white meat for the family.
Fact is, since our father opened this shop in 1934, our
customers have only known one brand, 'Paul Feldstein. They
count on us to pick the best cuts of meat and the top birds.
And with a reputation like this to live up to, nothing less than
Hebrew National will do
When you shop at Paul Feldstein, you
know you're getting a Hebrew National
f bird. If you shop somewhere else,
demand it by name.


Adath Yeshurun Appoints
Baltuch Education Director
Dr. Benjamin Lechner, pres-
dient, Adath Yeshurun Con-
gregatio, announces the appoint-
ment of Mrs. Rochelle Baltuch as
Education Director.
Mrs. Baltuch has been teaching
in the Religious School since 1976.
She was instrumental in expan-
ding the Hai class curriculum and
Eileen Cohen
Eileen Cohen
Coordinator Of
Student Organization
Eileen Cohen has recently
become the new Southeast
Regional Coordinator of the Stu-
dent Zionist Council. The SZC is a
national student/organization con-
fronting Jewisfl identity and
Zionism on college campuses, as
f well as promoting short- and long-
| term programs- in Israel. The
| region includes Georgia,
Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee,
South Carolina/and Florida.
Eileen is a graduate of the
University of California at Santa
Barbara and has studied at the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
She has headquarters in Israel
Aliyah Center, Atlanta.
initiated the annual Hai class trip
to Jewish New York." She has
taught all grade levels and for the
past three years has concentrated
on a resource program for late en-
trants learning disabled and
those having difficulty in class.
Before joining the faculty at
Adath Yeshurun, Rochelle taught
for four years at Beth Torah
Congregation.
"I believe role models play a
most important part in a child's
religious education. The more he
sees and the more he is able to
touch and experience, the easier it
will be for him to understand and
develop a love for and a commit-
ment to Judaism," said Mrs.
Baltuch.
Rochelle has been active in
many communal organizations.
She has served as Education vice
president and Study Group
teacher of Hadassah. in various
capacities of Womens' League for
Conservative Judaism, including
State President and currently Af-
filiation and Retention Chairman
and a member of its National
Board.
Mrs. Baltuch is a member of the
Coalition for Alternatives in
Jewish Education. She is a
member of the Camp Ramah in
New England Committee and a
member of the National Youth
Commission of United Synagogue
of America. She is also president
of the Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School PTA and a
member of their Executive Board.
JWV Announces
Combined Social
Harvey Rashkind, Commander
of the Jewish War Veterans South
Dade Post 778, announces a com-
bined social will be held with the
Auxiliary on September 26 at 8
p.m. at Temple Israel South.
Guest speaker will be Bill
Saulson, discussing the plight of
the Russian Jews.
gp
Not since David and Goliath has
something so tiny mad* it so big.
*
It's Tetley's tiny little tea leaves. They've been making it big in
Jewish homes for years. Tetley knows that )ust as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is true for
tea leaves. That's why for rich, refreshing tea, Tetley bags
are packed with liny little tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier!
TETLEY
forBiqVi
Satisfaction
w .tv.--
K Cortiffod Kosher
TETIiEY.TEAiiHVi. Torah Chapter
Of Hadassah
Installs Officers
Vera Fiedler was installed as
president of the Torah Chapter of
Hadassah at the first meeting of
the year. Installing officer was
Area Vice President, Bess
Lieblich.
Mrs. Fiedler heads the following
slate of officers for 1985-86: Ad-
ministrative Vice President, Olga
Jssenberg; Education Vice
Presidents, Rebecca Goldy, Melba
Stern; Fundraising Vice Presi-
dent. Rose Lauretz; Membership
Vice President and Dues
Secretary, Dorothy Spector; Pro-
gram Vice Presidents, Libby
Lieberman, Diane Nichtberger.
Financial Secretary. Jeanne
Fishman; Treasurerr, Lee
Stiglitz; Recording Secretary,
Ann Young; Corresponding
Secretary. Mary Zack; Parliamen-
tarian, Ann Goldstein.
Friday, -September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
YUM!
^AGHETTI SAUCE
^M
PAC-MAN is a big macher with all the kids' So Ihey II really gobble up
PAC-MAN shaped pasta in spaghetti sauce with cheese flavor
It's delicious and it's packed with goodness From Chel Boy-ar-dee'
:*nwdlM' I960 iw B*i> M4UI Ulg Co V' 9M1 'nord
MAY THE NEW YEAR
BRING YOU
GOOD HEALTH AND HAPPINESS
THE SINGER FAMILY
COMMISSIONER BRUCE SINGER
RONNIE FURLONG SINGER
ANDY & JENNIFER
Jarlsberg.
It'sabig
wheel with
all lovers of
fine cheese.
The flavor of Jarlsberg* Brand Cheese is as natural as the Norwegians who
make it. The full, rich, distinctive, nut-like taste makes it a favorite for noshing
nibbling, serving with fruit or wine, and using it in your recipes. Jarlsbero
Every good store carries it.
Also enjoy Ski Queen Brand Gjrtost cheese, Nafckckwt
spfced cheese arid many other fine cheeses from Nrwy.
t NcreWdfood, mc Siamtard. CTOaKn


p- tn r*
Page 6-B The Jewish Florkhan/Friday, September 13, 1985
Names In News
Gov. O'Neill to Receive ORT Award
William A. O'Neill, Governor
of the State of Connecticut, will
receive the American ORT
Federation Community Achieve-
ment Award at an AOF
testimonial dinner in his honor
Nov. 6 at the Parkview Hilton
Hotel in Hartford, Conn., an-
nounced AOF President Alvia L.
Gray. Proceeds from the dinner
will establish the Gov. William A.
O'Neill ORT Scholarship Fund,
which will provide assistance to
ORT students around the world.
As Governor, O'Neill has in-
itiated a comprehensive
reorganization of higher educa-
tion and expansion of vocational
and technical education as part of
his economic development pro-
grams for creating and retaining
jobs in Connecticut.
The American ORT Federation
consists of members and sup-
porters among the American
Jewish community committed to
the goals of ORT providing
quality vocational and technical
education to Jews around the
world.
Yeshiva University has received
a $250,000 grant from the New
York Telephone Company to
cover costs of improved facilities
and equipment which will
strengthen computer education
and enhance computer services,
Dr. Norman Lamm, president of
Yeshiva University, has
announced.
Over the next three years, the
capital improvements will comple-
ment the University's intensive
programs in computer education
at its two undergraduate divi-
sions, Yeshiva College for men at
the Main Center in the
Washington Heights section of
Manhattan, and Stern College for
Women at the Midtown Center.
The grant to the University was
facilitated by William C.
Ferguson, president and chief ex-
ecutive officer of New York
Telephone Co.
Gov. William A. O'Neill of
Connecticut is the recipient of
the American ORT Federation
Community Achievement
Award. Presentation will be
made in November.
state "comparable worth" rule
strikes a blow to all working
women in this country, according
to B'nai B'rith Women President
Beverly Davis.
A three-judge panel of the 9th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in
San Francisco last week ruled
that the 1964 Civil Rights Act
"does not obligate (Washington
state) to eliminate an economic in-
equality which it did not create."
The ruling follows a 1983 deci-
sion ordering comparable pay to
Washington state employees.
"The concept of evaluating jobs
is not revolutionary," said Mrs.
Davis. "All comparable worth
does is take 'gender' out of that
evaluation."
Haggai Erlich, associate pro-
fessor of history at Tel Aviv
University in Israel and a
specialist in Ethiopian studies, has
been appointed visiting Israeli
professor at Georgetown Univer-
sity for 1985-86. A distinguished
Georgetown's government faculty
each year since 1979.
As visiting Israeli professor.
Erlich will teach "Issues of
Mideast International Relations"
and "Israeli Foreign Policy."
Erlich has taught history of the
Middle East and Africa at Tel
Aviv University since 1966. He
served as chairman of its African
history section from 1979 to 1983.
He has received scholarships
from the Ford Foundation, British
Council, Italian Israeli Cultural
Exchange, and Tel Aviv Universi-
ty "Peace Project."
Marshall T. Meyer, the
American-born human rights ac-
tivist who served as counselor and
confessor to thousands of victims
of government oppression in
Argentina during the 1970's, has
been named senior rabbi of Con-
gregation B'nai Jeshurun on
Manhattan's Upper West Side, it
was announced this week.
The announcement was made at
a news conference by Erneat S.
Schwartz, president of the Con-
servative synagogue, which was
Overturning of the Washington Israeli scholar has joined
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Rabbi Meyer, who went to
Argentina in 1959 as an assistant
rabbi in a German synagogue in
Buenos Aires, remained in that
country for a quarter of a century.
The synagogue, built in 1918 in
the ornate Byzantine-Moorish
style, is now undergoing exten-
sive reconstruction.
Boys Town Jerusalem has been
awarded a $300,000 U.S. Govern-
ment grant from the Agency for
International Development (AID)
to acquire new technical equip-
ment for its College of Applied
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this week by Joe Nakash, presi-
dent of the Boys Town JeruaJ
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ding Boys Town has rec^
through the Office 0f2|
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tdon of the College's new acaden|
building, scheduled for completi*!
next spring, and a second mm J
$250,000 in 1983 for techJI
equipment for the College." f
Attorney Samuel N L
Rabinowitz of Philadelphia"!
president of Boys Town's Mid-1
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the region's executive direcWi
represented Boys Town in obujl
ing all three grants.
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MWM,


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridten Page 7-B
A False Messiah
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK Wrapped up in
[a neat little package of ex-
hilarating song and dance is a con-
Itroversial message that places the
lOff-Broadway production of Rath
\boni on a missionary list. But
I rather than confine its bid for a
universal acceptance of Jesus as
Ithe Messiah, aimed primarily at
[Jews, to dogmatic preaching,
[Jeremiah Ginsberg, author/com-
Iposer, and winner of the Bronze
PHalo Award from the Southern
[California Motion Picture Council
[for this play, weaves his convic-
Itions in with a thoroughly enter-
|taining musical.
Rabboni, which means "leader"
lor "master" in Hebrew, imparts
Ithe view that Jesus, also called
lYeshua in the play, is "Israel's
[Messiah." The plot, simplistic in
Iform, yet conveying subliminal
Iconiplexities as it combines the
[Old and New Testaments, is
II usually the conflict between
IJesus and Beelzebub the age-
lold good vs. evil. Ginsberg, a Jew
[who 13 years ago joined the Mes-
sianic Synagogue in Los Angeles
[which teaches that Jesus was the
Messiah, attempts to spread the
[belief that Satan is responsible for
[those who reject Jesus.
WHILE THE message raises
I questions among Jews as to
I whether Ginsberg is proselytizing,
[there is no question that from a
[theatrical point of view, the
[material is an up-tempo, cap-
tivating success. Under the direc-
tion and choreography of Alan
[Weeks, Rabboni, playing at the
[Perry Street Theater until Aug.
[25 when it moved uptown, never
[grows tired or stale.
The ir>-member cast is led by
iPaul Clark and Ned York, Yeshua
land Beelzebub, respectively, who
[both immerse themselves into
[their well-drawn characters.
[Clark, glowing with wholesome
[purity, appeals to the audience
[with his pleasant voice and sincere
[acting. On the other side, York
[sizzles in his portrayal of the
[classic villain and compensates for
[his sub-par singing by adding a
[comedic lightness to his dark and
|evil character.
Although the overall effects of
| Rabboni are delightful and en-
[joyable, the musical is burdened
| by its share of flaws. Beelzebub's
entourage, while more intriguing
land electrifying than Yeshua's
disciples, are underdeveloped as
[many, such as Hate and Pride,
seem to have no definite character
and no purpose. It is also disturb-
ing that their costumes, black and
red with spike belts and bracelets,
(resemble outfits worn to a punk
[club rather than those of biblical
I demons.
YESHUA'S BOYS vibrate the
I theater with their resounding
voices that leave an enchanting
residue in the minds of the au-
Phoenix Society
Open Meeting
An open meeting of the Phoenix
Society is scheduled for Sept. 18
at 7:30 p.m. at the Bay Harbor Ci-
ty Hall.
According to Ruth Dickson,
president of the non-profit cor-
poration, "Every woman who has
attained midlife is an expert at
something, whether or not she
realizes it. The Institute functions
3th as a clearing house and as a
[training center for all midlife
I women who want to share
1 knowledge and experience in any
area of life."
dience. But their spirit cannot
mask the fact that the women,
Miriam and Mother Miriam,
although acted well enough, are
dull, second-class characters that
are sometimes guilty of lowering
the high voltage of the play.
Rabboni, with many strong sup-
porting performances, including
Wilbur Archie (Fear), Diana
Myron (Liar) and Scott Elliot
(James), overcomes its handicaps
much like Yeshua overcomes
Beelzebub. The thought lingers,
however, that this crafty musical
is also the tool through which
Ginsberg is instilling his message
that Jesus is the Messiah. Many
Jews will have trouble accepting
his play because of that.
Perhaps Ginsberg was inspired
by the old lyric, "A spoonful of
sugar makes the medicine go
down," when he concealed his
missionary work in two sugar-
coated hours of pleasurable enter-
tainment. But if Ginsberg expects
a high conversion rate from Rab-
boni, he should have substituted
all that sugar with nutra-sweet.
From our family to yours
Best wishes
for a year of peace
and abundant blessings.
THE ARK1N FAMILY
Stanley. Jill. Robert. Greg, & Bradley
Pd Pol Adv

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T
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Available at Publix Stores with
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:
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Cinnamon
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Old Fashioned
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Prices Effective
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Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
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Many Danish Bakeries have a full line of Jewish
Items available. Choose from a selection which
includes, Sponge Cake, Rainbow Bar Cake,
Almond Tarts, Coconut Macaroons, Teglach,
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Happy
Rosfi
Hashanah


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Effort Launched To
Increase U.S.
Tourism To Israel
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Officials and represen-
tatives of leading hotel,
airline and tourism groups
met with prominent Jewish
business leaders for two
hours here in an effort to
devise new methods to in-
crease American tourism to
Israel to boost Israel's
beleaguered economy.
Max Fiaber of Detroit told
reporters after the private
meeting that tourism is the second
fastest growing international in-
dustry, second only to the
petroleum industry. He also said
that Israel's tourist facilities are
currently being used even with
tourism growing at only about
half :heir capacity.
THE MEETING was under the
auspices of the tourism committee
of Operation Independence, a
group formed officially last
February and consisting of a task
force of some 100 international
Jewish business leaders seeking to
help strengthen Israel"s economy.
Fisher is chairman of Operation
Independence, and of the tourism
committee.
While he did not reveal details
of the meeting. Fisher announced
that Operation Independence has
recieved a commitment from na-
tional rabbinical and congrega-
tional leadership of the major
branches of Judaism for rabbis in
some 2,500 synagogues in the
United States and Canada to an-
nounce a new program to expand
Jewish tourism in Israel.
At High Holy Day services
beginning Sunday, Sept. 15,
leaders of synagogues wUI call on
their members to form at least
one minyan or quorum of 10
that will visit Israel during the
next Jewish year. "We are confi-
dent that this will give rise to a
positive indeed, enthusiastic
response resulting in tens of
thousands of additional visitors to
Israel," Fisher asserted.
FISHER, an industrialist and
long time activist within the
American Jewish community he
was founding chairman of the
Board of Governors of the Jewish
Agency told reporters at the
Max Fisher
Harmonie Club that Operation In-
dependence is a 10-year project
that will deal with other economic
issues such as exports from Israel.
"Israel within the next decade
has to establish its economic in-
dependence, and not depend on
handouts" from the U.S.. Fisher
said. Israel is provided with some
$4 billion a year in economic and
military aid from the United
States.
Fisher said the goal of the
tourism effort is to increase the
number of visitors to Israel by
some 500,000 after five years. It
was noted that more citizens of
West Germany visit Israel than
American Jews on a yearly basis.
OPERATION Independence
leaders held their first plenary
meeting in Jerusalem Tuesday to
Friday. Premier Shimon Peres
has said Operation Independence
has assumed "critical impor-
tance" in Israel's efforts to arrest
inflation and stabilize its trade
deficit. He addressed the plenary
meeting.
In Jerusalem, the task force was
divided into eight working groups,
each dealing with a specific field
of business activity. They are ex-
ports of consumer goods to the
U.S.; exports of industrial goods
to the U.S.; tourism; capital in-
vestment; trade with Europe and
Africa; sale of government-owned
companies; special projects; and
legislation.
Happy New Year
from your friends
and neighbors at
Savings & Loan \vvx u(K>n
It takes hometown people
to understand the needs of a hometown.
Prominent Businessmen Launch Worldwide
Initiative To Help Develop Israel's Ecomomy
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Max Fisher, the noted
Detroit industrialist and
founding chairman of the
Jewish Agency Board of
Governors, announced that
"an initiative to develop
the Israeli economy has
recently been undertaken
by a prominent group of
businessmen from Israel
and throughout the world."
This private enterprise
initiative, Mfcd "Operation
Independence," is "aimed at
advancing the economic in-
dependence of the Jewish State,"
Fisher said. He noted that the
decision to establish an in-
ternational task force for this
purpose was made at a planning
meeting in Jerusalem last
February, initiated by Premier
Shimon Peres and attended by
Israeli and worldwide business
leaders.
FISHER co-chairmen are
Morton Mandel of Cleveland and
Charles Bronfman of Montreal.
Other members of the recently
established task force executive
committee include Eli Hurwitz.
president of the Israel
Manufacturers Association;
Dani Rosoho, secretary general
of Hevrat Ha'ovdim (the
economic arm of the Histadrut
Labor Federation); Gad Yaacobi,
Israel's Minister of Economy
and Planning, on behalf of the
special ministerial committee
involved in the launching of
Operation Independence; and
Mo she Arena, Minister-Without-
Portfolio and Israel's former
Defense Minister.
Zvi Zur, who served as
managing director of Clal
Industries, has been appointed
chief coordinator; and Jacob
Burak. a distinguished Israeli
businessman consultant, has
been selected as chief operating
officer.
THE OPERATION
Independence task force will
utilize the experience and
professional expertise of task
force members and others to
further effective economic action
in Israel. Areas under con-
sideration include exports,
tourism, joint ventures, direct
investments and venture capital.
Working groups composed of
Israeli and worldwide business
leaders wul shortly be an-
nounced.
The steering committee of
Operation Independence r*t,
February in Jerusalem ^
executive committee met in
York on Apr. 16 to form2
plans for the task fora^
duding an international \1
SliSSt*9CheduW k'*
In commenting on this m
enterprise. Fisher said, Z
colleagues and I congratulatS
Prime Minister for his initiativ.
d launching this program %
are encouraged by the Z
thusiasm of those busin
leaders with whom we hZ
already consulted. We
hopeful that we can meet tl
challenge of enhancing Israel',
economy in the coming decadt
We are very pleased that the
government of Israel has a-
pressed its vital support and is
prepared to serve as facilitator
for this essential project."
RETIREMENT...
NOT ALWAYS AS WE EXPECTED IT TO
BE, IT IS MUCH MORE.
If you, or someone you know needs help,
call and talk with a mental health profes-
sional.
WE ARE JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY
SENIOR HELPLINE 324-8111
Highland Park Hospital mvA <\cQ
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III
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(I

**| ** ** "**
J


5745
he High Price of Freedom
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
trry Wall is director of the
i-Defamation League of
[i B'rith'8 Israel Office in
salem.
By HARRY WALL
he release by Israel of
1,100 Arab prisoners
ig the outgoing Hebrew
among them some
fcrious murderers for
Israeli POW's held
ive since 1982 has
I a great challenge to a
j-held Israeli tenet:
er capitulate to the
ands of terrorists.
le nation which has paid an
rbitantly high price to defend
against terrorism most
tally over 650 Israelis killed
i war in Lebanon is asking
virtually an unprecedented
jon: "Why bother if we are
to turn these killers loose
f"
tAEL IS used to the grotes-
fimbalance of numbers in
ner exchanges. As far back
le Sinai campaign of 1956,
] Egyptian POW's were trad-
one Israeli pilot. In 1983, in
nge for six IDF soldiers held
pe PLO in Lebanon, Israel
4,500 prisoners from
kon, along with 100 PLO
ers from Israeli jails.
1 has always considered the
i of soldiers captured in bat-
i a matter of highest princi-
Lpart from the humanitarian
psts, as Defense Minister Yit-
bin told a startled nation,
is concern for military
|e: that every Israeli soldier
into battle with the
urance that should he be
i hostage, his country will be
Jenting in securing his
om.
t what made this exchange so
pnt and controversial in
I is that among the terrorists
ed are unregenerate killers
erpetrators of some of the
^vicious attacks against inno-
ople. These include Kozo
ioto, a member of the
ese Red Army Squad that
127 at Ben Gurion Airport in
terrorists responsible for
|978 coastal road massacre,
26 Israelis were gunned
| and many other murderers.
oner exchanges in the past
I usually marked by joyous
rats. But this exchange trig-
an unprecedented barrage
titism, renewed appeals for
' punishment, and embroil
coalition government in a
versy over amnesty for a
Icted ring of Jewish
lists.
Pe the Israeli Government
pparently united on the ex-
despite the high cost en-
the reaction of the media,
[ opinion leaders, and most
canvassed was decisively
of the deal. Many voiced
Iview that Israel gave too
|to Ahmed Jabril's popular
and, had the government
more patient, could have
|a better deal. Of particular
m was the release of hun-
lof Palestinians to the West
ndGaza.
RAL commentators felt
curity risks did not justify
change and would under-
Israel's anti-terror effort.
the release of hundreds of
ers who are allowed to re-
nong us, our leaders have
Mr moral right to order
j> to risk their lives in stor-
bjectives," said Ze'ev Shiff,
jpected military correspon-
' Ha'Aretz, referring to the
rescue and olher IDF
^-terror assaults.
Terming the agreement
"humiliating and frustrating,"
Shiff claimed the exchange is
"another layer in Israel's
psychological enfeeblement which
began with the war in Lebanon."
Yediot Ahronot the country's
largest daily newspaper, chided
the Israeli POW's families for
their incessant pressure for an ex-
change. Calling the release date
"a holiday for the parents and the
POWs, but a trying one for their
country," the paper criticized the
families for "preferring to en-
danger Israel's security rather
than wait another year or two for
their loved ones."
THE GOVERNMENT'S deci
sion, on the other hand, won some
backing for giving preeminence to
the ethical considerations involv-'
ed. "Sensitivity to human life is
what differentiates Israel from its
neighbors," opined Hatzofeh, the
religious party daily. 'This extra
sensitivity sometimes weakens
Israel's bargaining position ...
but stems from greatness," said
its editors.
Several security experts felt the
heavy price paid by Israel in the
exchange compromised the state
in its stand against international
terror. "Never again will Israel be
able to condemn other countries
for submitting to blackmail," said
General (res.) Shlomo Gazit,
former IDF chief of military in-
telligence. "We can no longer say
Israel is in the forefront of
fighting terror," he added.
Some officials in the defense
establishment believe that the ex-
change will fuel further terror at-
tacks against Israel. "Now, an
Arab terrorist setting out on kill-
ing spree knows if he is captured
alive he will only sit in jail for a
few years, until a prisoner swap is
concluded," said a veteran
counter-terrorist operator.
THE CONTROVERSIAL ex-
change gave rise to demands for
the death penalty for terrorist
killers. "Executions are
preferable to the killing of
prisoners by our own soldiers or
the release of murderers out of
surrender," said Ze'ev Shiff.
Others, however, disagree on the
deterrent value of capital punish-
ment, noting the spate of suicide
terrorist attacks in Lebanon
recently.
The release of so many
dangerous terrorists by Israel
generated pressure, and in-
evitably created a more favorable
political climate for the pardoning
of the Jewish terror conspirators.
With the "Jewish underground"
trials wrapping up soon, the Gush
Emmunim settlers' lobby and
other nationalists have mounted a
campaign for the pardon of those
Jews already convicted of ter-
rorism against Arabs and release
of those still facing proceedings.
Their argument "why should
Jews goaded into counter-terror
sit in jail while the worst
murderers are set free?" has
gained considerable support, par-
ticularly in Likud circles.
Several Likud officials, among
them party leaders Yitzhak
Shamir and Ariel Sharon, have
called for the release of the Jewish
underground members.
Significantly, they did not receive
the backing of former Prime
Minister Begin who said that the
prisoners' exchange and Jewish
underground issues ought not be
linked. Peres was able to quell a
brewing coalition crisis by
threatening to resign over the
clemency issue.
DESPITE the criticism in
Israel over the release of the Arab
terrorists, there was no
widespread support for pardoning
the Jewish underground. "It is
one thing to give in to blackmail to
save innocent lives. It is quite
another to exonerate Israeli
citizens who acted as vigilantes,"
said a Jerusalem eductor.
Echoing this view, the
Jerusalem Post editorialized that
the price of three Israeli soldiers
has been painfully high, but it
should not now be used as an ex-
cuse to rip up Israel's leijal
system."
Some people fear that the
release of the terrorists will also
fuel Kahanism and anti-Arab feel-
ings in Israel. "The image of
Israel as being 'soft on terror' is
just the kind of issue that can win
Kahane new followers," said one
former Likud official.
HAS ISRAEL gone soft on ter-
ror? Surely in its intentions it has
not, but what the implications will
be only time will tell. "Each issue
must be considered on its own
merits," said Rabin, who as Prime
Minister in 1976 gave the order
for the Entebbe rescue.
Israel's frustration and despair
over the high cost of freedom for
its captured soldiers should not be
confused for lack of resolve to
stop terrorism. This is an attitude
Israel can ill afford. The debate
over the hostage exchange will
soon come to an end. The terrorist
threat against Israel and its in-
habitants, unfortunately will not.
Empire Kosher Provides Tips For
Preparing Your Holiday Turkey
As the holiday season approaches, good cooks everywhere will
be planning a traditional family holiday dinner featuring a big,
beautiful roast turkey. At the same time, many of these cooks will
have some major questions about how to go about preparing and
cooking the turkey.
To help provide some answers to these questions, the good
cooks at Empire Kosher Poultry offer the following suggestions
and guides for roasting a turkey.
The preferred method of cooking a fresh or thawed turkey is to
place the whole bird, breast side up, on a rack in a shallow
roasting pan about 2% inches deep. A meat thermometer should
be inserted into the thickest part of the thigh, not touching the
bone.
Once placed in the pan, the turkey should be covered loosely
with a tent made from foil (shiny side down), leaving an air space
between bird and the foil. The pan should then be placed in a 325
degrees oven.
To enhance the appearance of the skin, the turkey should be
basted about every half-hour. The foil tent should be removed dur-
ing the final half-hour of cooking for the final browning.
How long should you cook your turkey? The following are some
approximate cooking times for birds of different weights: 6 to 8
pounds 3 to 3Vi hours, if stuffed; 2'/. to 3'A hours, if unstuffed.
Eight to 12 pounds 3% to 4'/2 hours, if stuffed; 3 to 4 hours if
unstuffed. Twelve to 16 pounds \Vt to 5'/z hours, if stuffed; 3V2 to
4'/z hours, if unstuffed. Sixteen to 20 pounds 5V2 to 6'/% hours, if
stuffed; 4 to 5 hours, if unstuffed.
These are all 'approximate cooking times" only. There are
several tests to determine actual doneness. First, the meat ther-
mometer inserted in the thigh should read 180-185 degrees. Thigh
meat should feel soft when pinched with a paper towel. Juices
should no longer be pink when skin is pricked. And, when you
move the drumstick up and down, the leg joint should give or
break easily.
For a stuffed turkey, the stuffing in the turkey must reach a
temperature of 165 degrees to be properly cooked.
When the bird is done, remove from the pan and place on a plat-
ter. Allow the bird to sit 20 minutes at room pemperature for
easier carving.
For additional information about preparing and cooking your
holiday turkey, call the Empire Kosher Poultry "Consumer Infor-
mation Line" at 1-800-EMPIRE-4. Or, write to P.O. Box 165,
Mifflintown, PA 17059.
SECURITY, COMFORT,
INDEPENDENCE...
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* Olympic siie pool I
private beach
NO ENTRANCE FEE GUARANTEED YEARLY RATES
Far Free Information without obligation
Call Jim Down at (305) 932-1100, or mail the coupon below.
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{ NAMi: _
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Senior Meadows Rosiaential Hotel
18001 Comns Avenue No. Miami leach, Fl. 331*0
#11
1 PHONE: I
IP


ii ii- n M ...,*..,. V +*. L o
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Jerusalem's Israel Museum
Celebrates Its 20th Year
By LILI EYLON
Once upon a time, not so long
ago, a man had a dream. He
dreamed of a beautiful edifice
which would house the artistic
feats of his people as well as the
creation of others. He wanted a
repository which would be a fit-
ting showplace for an old people,
who, someone once remarked,
"possesses too much history and
not enough geography."
And because that man happened
to be persistent, hard-working
Teddy Kollek. undoubtedly the
world's best-known mayor, and
because the edifice he dreamed of
was to be in his beloved
Jerusalem, his dream came true.
The Israel Museum, a series of
low, modern interconnected
pavilions crowning a hill above the
Valley of the Cross, in May of this
year celebrated its 20th birthday.
THROUGH THE years, it has
become a place of pilgrimage not
only for a never-ending stream of
tourists, but also for Israelis from
all over the country. Unique in its
collection, which makes the Bible
come alive, serving a population,
much of which had never seen a
museum, it is a young, burgeoning
institution, buzzing with activity,
ever on the move, ever bringing
new eye openers to its public. It
particularly prides itself on the
fact that one-third of its member-
ship are children. "It is for the
sake of young Israelis who are not
able to travel abroad that we must
also show the heritage of other
cultures," says Kollek, still the
museum's moving spirit.
Fortunately, along with
visitors, the museum also attracts
collectors and artists who are hap-
py to donate their art works to its
impressive showrooms. Thus,
Baron Edmond de Rothschild con-
tributed a resplendent 18th Cen-
tury roccoco salon, which became
the first period room in the
museum, followed by the donation
by David Berg of New York of an
English period room, complete
with Sheraton and Chippendale
furniture and 18th century
English silver.
In addition, two complete
synagogues are on the premises:
one from a town near Venice, built
in 1701, the other from Horb-am-
Main in Germany, the only hand-
painted wooden synagogue to
have survived the Holocaust.
THE BRONFMAN family of
Canada and the Gottesman Foun-
dation helped finance the Samuel
Bronfman Biblical and Ar-
chaeological Museum which mir-
rors the 5,000-year-old history of
the Jewish people. Pottery from
Second Temple days is on display
as well as Canaanite sacrificial
altars, fertility figures, jugs from
the Israelite period, artifacts from
Maccabean times, mosaic floors,
even games children played in an-
cient days. A major collection has
recently been added that of the
late Moshe Dayan.
A separate building distinguish-
ed by a white dome composed of
thousands of mosaic tiles is the
Shrine of the Book, home of the
Dead Sea Scrolls. The white
dome, poised against the abrupt
black wall at its entrance, sym-
bolizes the theme of the Scrolls of
the Sons of Light against the Sons
of Darkness. It was the late Yigael
Yadin who discovered the papyrus
scrolls in a cave near the Dead
Sea; they survived the centuries
because of the dry desert climate.
Among the artists who
presented some of their works to
the museum, Belgian surrealist
Rene Magritte figures prominent-
ly. One of the earliest acquisitions
of the Israel Museum which in
its brief 20 year existence has
quintupled in size is the
scultpure collection of the late
Broadway showman Billy Rose.
Located in a beautiful garden
designed by Japanese Isamu
Naguchi, the sculptures include
such famous names as Rodin,
Maillol, Picasso and Archipenko,
as well as many contemporary
works.
ALMOST ON any given after-
noon one can see, outlined against
the blue Jerusalem sky, children
of all ages happily climbing on the
smooth round figure (the work of
Henry Moore) which graces the
top of the hill. The original fear
that the extreme Orthodox would
object to the sculptures as being
idolatrous has fortunately proven
unfounded.
Avant garde sculpture by both
Israeli and other artists is shown
in a corner of the garden, named
the Billy Rose Pavilion, while the
neighboring Jacques Lipshitz
Pavilion harbors some 140 Lip-
shitz bronzes.
The largest of the intercon-
nected nine buildings is the
Bezalel Pavilion which contains
both classical and contemporary
paintings, Judaica (including the
two synagogues) and the Palevsky
Design Pavilion which shows in-
ternational design displays. One
of the most striking permanent
exhibits is devoted to pre-
Columbian art from Central
America, with figures, jewelry
and other objects presented most
dramatically.
The overwhelming membership
of young people is due mainly to
the unusual Ruth Youth Wing,
named in memory of Ruth Rod-
man Freiman of Washington,
D.C. A packing crate which
brought a shipment of 17th Cen-
tury Dutch furniture to the
museum was, in fact, the first
children's museum, recalls Karl
Katz, the former Bezalel curator
who had urged the creation of a
special place for children. "We
painted the crate, cut a doorway
and some windows. There was
room for ten or twelve children
who drew and saw slides."
THE FIRST real building open-
ed in 1966, with four classrooms, a
small exhibition area, an
auditorium and a yard. The pre-
sent building, opened formally in
1978, contains some 12,000
square feet ten classrooms, a
storage area, an auditorium, two
exhibition areas, a library, a
recycling area and offices. Some
35,000 children are members at
the annual cost to them of two
dollars.
Ayala Gordon, chief curator of
the youth wing says, "We see in
this an educational tool of the first
order." The children, who are
given maximum freedom to ex-
press themselves spontaneously,
are far from passive observers.
For to appreciate the work of
others, the curator insists, the
children must themselves create.
And create they do, whether they
participate in a miniature ar-
chaeological dig, or draw their
self-portraits, or, dressed in
period costumes, dance a minuet
in the museum's French period
room.
In addition to the daily visits of
some 400 pupils, coming from
schools in Jerusalem and outlying
villages as well as from kibbutzim
throughout the country, children
and adults can also participate in
more than the one hundred year-
long courses embracing a wide
range of subjects, from ceramics
to photography, from weaving to
film making.
THIS YEAR, some 1,500
children and 500 adults are taking
part in these courses. Also under
the aegis of the Ruth Youth Wing
are the programs at the Paley Art
Center, named after William S.
Paley, former chairman of CBS.
and serving Arab children in East
Jerusalem. And for those who find
it difficult or impossible to come to
the museum, the museum comes
to them in traveling exhibits pack-
ed in suitcases, and using models,
reproductions, tapes and slides.
These days, as the museum
LOCATION
IS
EVERYTHING
THE TROPICS IN 0LDE NAPLES
STEPS FROM THE BEACH. BIG ENOUGH TO
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The interior of the Shrine of the Book at Jerusalem's Isndl
Museum, where the Dead Sea Scrolls are exhibited. WZPSPhoh\
by Richard Nowitz.
celebrates its end-of-teen birth-
day, it has launched a number of
new projects. Probably the most
interesting of these is the new
Irene and Davide Sala Wing for
Israel Communities Traditions
and Heritage. The life cycle
birth, childhood. Bar Mitzvah,
engagement and wedding
customs, as well as typical Jewish
homes from east and west, and a
large collection of costumes, head-
dresses and jewelry of vanished
Jewish communities will be shown
in a permanent, three-dimensional
display. "We have been collecting
for the past 20 years and now we
will have the space and opportuni-
ty to show our collection under op-
timal conditions." says Dr. Shifra
Epstein, the curator for Jewish
ethnography.
She adds that the new wing is p.
natural outgrowth of past tem-
porary exhibitions such as those
which brought into prominent
relief Jews of Morocco. Yemen,
Bokhara and Kurdistan. In fact,
more than 300 objects alone have
been obtained from Israelis oil
Kurdish origin objects whid|
they had carried with them 11
their new homeland.
OTHER SPECIAL anniversinl
events include the dedication i\
the Selma Picciotto Gallery ::|
Asian Art, the largest comprehal
sive exhibition of Asian Art on the I
Asian continent, and the Aerotl
and Blrma,lFhick'man Old Masters I
Gallery. More than 200 works of I
art which have been promised to I
the Israel Museum by the owners I
either as gifts or bequests will goj
on view as the "Promised Gifo*^
exhibition. Included are I
Klee's "A group of masks." and I
"Variete" by the German-Jewiij
artist Max Beckmann. the verjl
first Beckmann to be exhibited ii|
this country.
Later on, the Ayala Zackil
Abramov Pavilion for Israeli Anl
and the Dr. Julius and Hilde Men I
bacher Gallery within it will btl
dedicated, bringing to an end the!
museum's 20th birthda;|
celebration.
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Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
... "Ye are standing this day all of you before the Lord your God-
your heads, your tribes, your elders, and your officers"
(Deuteronomy 29.9)
NITZAVIM
NITZAVIM "Ye are standing this day all of you before the
Lord your God .. that thou shouldest enter into the covenant of
the Lord thy God and into His oath which the Lord thy God
maketh with thee this day; that he may establish thee this day un-
to Himself for a people, and that He may be unto thee a God, as
He spoke unto thee, and as He swore unto thy fathers, to
Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob. Neither with you only do I make
this covenant and this oath but with him that standeth here with
as this day before the Lord our God, and also with him that is not
here with us this day The secret things belong unto the Lord
our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to
our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law"
(Deuteronomy 29.9-28). "I call heaven and earth to witness
against you this day, that I have set before thee life and death, the
blessing and the curse; therefore choose life, that thou mayest
live, thou and thy seed" (Deuteronomy 30.19).
(The recounting of Mm Wookly Portion of the Law it extracted and bated
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Wollman
Tsemlr, *15, puMlshod by StiongoM. The volume It available at 7j Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang It president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.) '
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Bar Mitzvah
ANDREW FELDMAN
Andrew Ezra Feldman, son of
Jr. and Mrs. Michael K. Feldman
JO'hilippa) will be called to the
iTorah September 14 as a Bar
|Mitzvah at Temple Emanu-El.
Dr. Irving Lehrman will
lofficiate.
Andrew is a student at Lehrman
Day School.
Andrew is Vice President of
Kadima. He is Editor of the
1985-86 Yearbook. He is studying
;lriiiiis, and excells in tennis and
Bnow skiing. Mrs. Feldman is
principal of Early Childoods at
Lehrman Day School.
Special guests include grand-
mothers Mrs. Tanya Wein and
Mrs. Henrietta Berger, aunts,
uncles and cousins from out of
town.
Temple Emanu-El
Trivia Night
Temple Emanu-El will test
their trivia IQs at Trivia Night,
Saturday at 8 p.m. in the
synagogue's Friedland Ballroom.
"Events lik this really put the
fun in fundraising," said Temple
Emanu-El Family League Presi-
dent Jay Horowitz. "We hope
everyone will join us and have a
great time for a great cause."
Physician
i Referral
Service
referral to over 300 doctors
868-2728
a community service of
on Miami Beach
Medical Sales Reps.
Exciting F/P Time
High Paying Salary
& Commission
Telephone and or Field
Sales at Home or in Office.
Triton Shalom Medical Center
2891 Collins Ave.
CALL GEORGIE 538-7374
PATTI PERLMAN PSY. D.
CLINICAL ASSOCIATE
COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE INCLUDES
CARDIAC REHABILITATION GROUP
STRESS MANAGEMERT
CHILD AND ADULT PSYCHOTHERAPY
PERSONALITY AND INTELLECTUAL EVALUATION
PRE-MENSTRUAl GROUP
BROWARD PSYCHOLOGICAL GROUP
EMERALD HILLS MEDICAL SQUARE
4400 SHERIDAN STREET
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
961-5447
961-5449
Rosh Hashanah To Be
Observed At Synagogues,
Temples Sunday Evening
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:09 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Froadman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Lala Frl. Sanrlcaa : 1 5 p.m.
Dally Mlnyan 7:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Sal 8:30 am
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 967-6667
Or. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
Jamaa L. Simon, Aaaoclate Rabbi
' Frl.. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Harbari M. Baumgard:
"Why Prayar li Pilnlul t Thraatanlng To
The Doubter."
Sit 9:15 a.m Laura Kaplan Dana Youkllla
will ba callad to Ina Torah.
Roan Haahanah Sun 6:30 p.m.
Monday 8:30 a.m.
: TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S46 Jefferson Ave., MB. FL 33139
,Tol.53aV4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melbex
.Cantor Nlaalm Benyemlni
Dally Mlnyan
Sabbath aervteaa 8:18 a.m.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 1201h Street
236-2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul Meltels
Roah Haahanah Mon. 8 Tuoa 9 a.m. King. Bay
Country Club Sat.9.30 a.m. Bat Mltj.ah
Kim Strochak. Shabbat Frl. p.m.
. TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
' Chaee Ave. & 41 at St. 538-7231
I DH LEON KRONISM, RABBI LIbaral
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBl L"*"
1 PAUL 0. CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTON DAVID CONVISER
I Roah Haahanah -Sunday 8:15* 6:45 p.m.
Monday 9:15 a.m. CMMran'a Samoa 3:1 i p.m
Tuaa-15am
L
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONQREQATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A LlMChltz, Rabbi
Randall Konlgtburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exac. Director
Dally aatlcaa 7:30 am..5:30 p.m. !
Saturday 8:25 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m., 5:30 p.m.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avanue
Dr. Sol Landau, ^>.
Rabbi Emeritus ()
Rev. Milton Fraaman, n3j>
Ritual Director
Frl. ava 5:30 in tha Chapel,
Sat. 6:00 am. Kldduah toHoartng aarvlcas
Mlnchah at 7:36 p.m.
Sun. 8:00 a.m. 6 5:30 p.m.
Mon. 6 Thura 7:30 a.m. 5.30 p.m.
Tuaa Wed. 6 Fit. 7:46 a.m. 4 5:30 p.m
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Kriaaaf
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
856-6334
('
Roah Haahanah- Sun 8:30 pjn.
Mon. I uaa a.m. flabbl Mai Shapiro
S Cantor Sol Cnaaln will otllclata
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi
Moshe Frledler, Cantor Dr.JosephA.Gorflnkel,
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
Friday aanrtcaa 7 p.m
Saturday 8:45 a.m. aanrtca.
(ft
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwaig, Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ava.. Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214 _^
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi .'Jh",
Moshe Buryn, Cantor *SJ
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
Shabbal Sarncai 8 30 a m Satmon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot Greater Miami
Miami's Flanaar Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskeil Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rax 0. Perimeter
Cantor Jacob Q. Bomatain
Associate Cantor RachaHa F. Nesaon
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Director ol Education
I And Programming Jack L. Sparks
I Frl. eve. 6:00 pjn.
Kandall: Rabbi Rax 0. Perimeter.
Cantor Jacob Bomatain.
' Downtown: Rabbi Haakall M. Bamat,
Cantor Rachalla F. Nalaon
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
Friday aamcaa 6:15p.m.
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Roah Haahanah Senrlcee:
Sunday7;00pm
Monday 6 00 a m
Tuesday 8 00 a m
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh f
Mornlnf aarvlcaa Sam
Friday lala avanlng aanrlca
6:15pm
Saturday Sam and 7 45 p.m
TEMPLE NERTAMIO 866-8345
7902 Cartyte Ava., 866-9833
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz conservative
Cantor Edward Klain
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Baach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue f
Miami Baach \
' Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbaiai Shabbat Santos 6 p.m
Sat. Mom. senses > a.m. Di Lehtmen will
praach Cantor Shltman anil chant
Roah Haahanah Saorlcaa Sun. 6 Mon. n*.
7:30 pjn.
Mon. Tuoa. momlnga (jxellmlnary)
4:15 a.m Bwvtoa i a.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Baach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlff
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W 154 Ava. 8 75 St., 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kasztl ModaraOrthodox
Friday aarvlcaa 7:15 p.m.
Saturday 9 30 am and 20 mint
balora tundown
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava.
North Dede's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngsley, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Roah Haahanah: Sun ova. 6 p.m.
Mon. I am Children 10:30 a.m. Adulta
Tuaa 10 a.m.
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Dr. Conservetlve
271-2311
{Or. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
David Rosanthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Sat. 9 a.m. Sabbath Service. Teltle. Chapal.
Sun. 10 a.m. Final Membership Opan Houaa
[ Roah Hashanah Sun. 7:30 p m Mon. 9 a.m.,
Tuoa- 9 a.m Mlnyan 7 a.m. Monday 6 Thursday
I M^^Moitfii!?^^. BB"


i rti-r: i-i
rif .lumich Ui.l;.l'.:.
Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
3 German Rocket Engineers Reportedly
Worked With Accused Nazi Scientist
l
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The World Jewish Congress
made public here the names
of three German rocket
engineers said to have work-
ed with accused Nazi scien-
tist Arthur Rudolph first at
the Mittelwerk
underground missile factory
which used slave labor
from the Dora-Nordhausen
concentration camp and
later, on the Wernher Von
Braun rocket team in the
U.S.
They are Gunther Haukohl,
Dieter Grau, and Erich Ball. All
three were brought to the U.S.
after the war under Project
Paperclip. This program imported
756 German and Austrian scien-
tists and technical and intelligence
specialists. All three are retired
and living in Huntsville, Ala., loca-
tion of the Marshall Space Flight
Center where the Von Braun
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-34263 CA-30
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
SHADOW LAWN SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
PUintiff
vs.
DAVID ALVAREZ,
Defendant.
TO: DAVID ALVAREZ
317 N.W. 109 Avenue, No. 2-C
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Condominium Unit No. 317-2C,
Building 317 N.W. 109 Avenue of
LAGUNA CLUB CON-
DOMINIUM, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, recorded June 5, 1985, in
Official Records Book 9009, Page
1608, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, and Amend-
ments to Declaration of Con-
dominium, together with an un-
divided interest in the common
elements appurtenant thereto, has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it. on
Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida. 33146 on or before
October 18, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 11th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKBR
As Clerk of the Courf
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19301 September 13.20,27;
October 4,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85 37301
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN CLAUDE LORMAND.
Petitioner,
and
BEATRICE LORMAND,
Respondent.
TO: BEATRICE LORMAND,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33186, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 18,1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19291 September 13. 20,27;
October 4. life
team worked.
Rudolph, the production
manager for V-2 rockets at Mit-
telwerk in the Harz Mountains of
Germany, is also a Paperclip alum-
nus. Joining Von Braun's rocket
team, he became managing
engineer of NASA's Saturn Five
project, which took astronauts to
the moon in 1969 and netted him a
Distinguished Service Award that
same year.
THE JUSTICE Department's
Office of Special Investigations
(OSI) ascertained Rudolph's Nazi
background he joined the Nazi
Party in 1931, became an SS cap-
tain in 1940, and holds NSDAP
card No. 193418. In interroga-
tions conducted in 1982-83, he
was confronted with charges of
having worked thousands of slave
laborers to death at Mittelwerk
during World War II.
Rather than face denationaliza-
tion and deportation hearings,
Rudolph signed an agreement
with the Justice Department,
under which it agreed not to pro-
secute him and he agreed to leave
the country and renounce his
citizenship, which he did in the
spring of 1984. He is living in
Hamburg and retains his govern-
ment pension.
Some members bf the Von
Braun rocket team Have set up an
"Old Timers Defense Fund" for
Rudolph and clamored for a
Senate Judiciary Committee hear-
ing on his case. They petitioned
President Reagan, in July to
restore Rudolph's citizenship and
welcome him back ''in honor."
Attorney Eli Rosenbaum, the
OSI prosecutor who had inter-
rogated Rudolph, wrote in July a
letter to the Senate committee
that, "if such hearings are held it
will take me no more than 90
seconds to establish that Rudolph
has admitted to committing acts
constituting crimes against
humanity under the charter of the
International Military Tribunal"
at Nuremburg.
THIS WAS a reference to
charges of his having worked
slave laborers to death at Mit-
telwerk. Of the 60,000 prisoners
of Dora-Nordhausen one-third to
one-half died from the brutal con-
ditions there, described even by
SS men as "a hell worse than
Auschwitz."
Rosenbaum, in his letter, called
attention to two other Von Braun
team members who had worked
with Rudolph at Mittelwerk, ac-
cording to Kalman Sultanik, vice
president of the WJC. Although
the copy of Rosenbaum's letter
obtained by the WJC had the
names blocked out, the WJC con-
firmed through Congressional
sources that they are Haukohl and
Grau.
Haukohl was described in a 1974
U.S. Army report as an SS
member and noted stormtrooper
whose record, is "indicative of an
instilled believer in Nazism .. ."
and as a "potential security threat
to the U.S." The final "Army
Mogan David
18th Anniversary
Mogan David Congregation of
Surf side will celebrate its 18th an-
niversary this month. The con-
gregation was founded by the late
Rabbi I.D. Vine and his wife
Mollie, with the help of Surfside
Mayor Ben Levine.
During the High Holidays,
Mogan David Congregation
moves its services to the Surfside
Community Center. Rabbi Julius
L. Baker from Netanya, Israel,
will officiate.
report, on him" in 1948, prior to
his being brought to the U.S., said
"there is nothing in his records in-
dicating he is a war criminal, an
ardent Nazi or otherwise objec-
tionable for admission into the
U.S. as an immigrant."
GRAU HAS admitted to a
reporter for the Atlanta Constitu-
tion that he was posted briefly in
Mittelwerk for "debugging," un-
covering sabotage by prisoners.
Punishment for suspected
sabotage there consisted of hang-
ing by a crane in the factory's
main hall, with the electric crane
being slowly raised to prolong the
agony.
The WJC has also uncovered a
third German scientist, Erich
Ball, who was both on the Von
Braun team and worked at Mit-
telwerk, as chief administrator of
the factory's main assembly line.
The information came from the
factory's captured files, now in
the Imperial War Museum in Lon-
don. Ball, too, is living in retire-
ment in Huntsville, Ala.
Sen. Jeremiah Denton (R.,
Ala.), approached for assistance
by Rudolph's supporters, told a
news conference in June that the
FBI has assured him that
Rudolph's "history is such that
there is no question that he is a
war criminal."
ROSENBAUM, who is no
longer with the OSI, said in his let-
ter that if the Senate Judiciary
Committee does hold hearings on
Rudolph, it will only be necessary
to read the transcript of his
testimony taken by the OSI to
establish his admission of guilt.
The transcript is in the records on
Rudolph, sealed as part of his
agreement with the Justice
Department.
Miami girls liana Apelker, 6, and her sister, Dalia, 3, learned
how to make challah in preparation for Rosh Hashanah at their
paternal grandparents' home in Grand Cayman, British West
Indies. Batya, standing, and Baruch, who is manager of the Bank
Leumi in Grand Cayman, conduct Shabbat services each week.
Baruch, an Israeli, will again be the cantor for the High Holidays |
this year at Commodore Plaza Century 21. The grandchildref
are the children of Sherry Martin Apelker and Shaul Apelker
and the grandchildren ofMiamians Mr. and Mrs. Leo Martin.
Workmen's Circle Holds First Meeting
soprano Rosalie Williams, in a
special selection of Yiddish,
Hebrew and English songs.
Dinner will be served.
The first meeting of the Yiddish
Branch No. 679, Workmen's Cir-
cle will be held on Sept. 29, 1 p.m.
at the Newport Pub.
Guest entertainer will be
J
Everybody Would Like to Get a
Long-term Rate On a Short-term CD.
That's Why Your Shirt Sleeve Banker
Is Offering 8.60% On This 12-month CD.
Usually you have to commit your money
for a good long time to get a good Interest
rate. Not at Ensign Bank.
Your Shirt Sleeve Banker has 12-month
CDs at a new 8.60% rate. And he has
6-month CDs and 18-month CDs at attrac-
tive rates, too. So you can earn a good
rate with a short-term commitment.
If you want the benefits of a long-term
rate with a short-term CO, talk to your
Shirt Sleeve Banker. He can give you the
best of both worlds. For more information,
call (305) 887-5511.
ENSIGN BANK
*
FSB
The Hard-working, Straight talking. Shirt Sleeve Bank.
SSffflJjSw"S^1!fit5^0S!^ S01 H,aleah D"ve. Hialeah. Florida 33010
^^^^le?^^^-^^" 12255 N E 16,h Ave. North
^^S161J^L!91981 "NO* MIAMI BEACH BRANCH 16300
XEPZSZKS^**!*** 20400 Biscayne Boulevard. Miami, Florida ,
***5! Lc S31"3140 Pfemature withdrawal may be subiect to substantial
i


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Public Notice
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33916 CA-12
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
-EDERAL NATIONAL
lORTGAGE ASSOCIATION.
T association organized
\a existing under the
HI of the United States
I America,
JJaintiff
)RGE SAEZ,
I..
efendants.
GEORGE SAEZ
822 Berkerseg Lane
Columbus, Ohio 23205
K'Ol" ARE NOTIFIED that an
Ition for Foreclosure of Mortgage
the following described
rty:
ot 14, Block 15, PLAT NO.
YE OPA LOCKA. according to
Plat thereof, as recorded in
Book 25. at Page 44, of the
blic Records of Dade County,
Mb.
s been filed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
ur written defenses, if any, to it,
Stuart Gitlitz. Attorney for
lintiff, whose address is Suite
4, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
bles, Florida, 33146 on or before
ober 4, 1985 and file the
!inal with the Clerk of this
either before service on
untiff s attorney or immediately
ereafter; otherwise a default will
entered against you for the
lief demanded in the complaint.
pTNESS my hand and the seal of
i Court this 29 day of August,
B5.
.RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
I September 6,13;
20, 27,19" "
NOTICE UNDER
[ FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
at the undersigned, desiring to
ge in business under the fic-
lious name REGINA'S OF
pAMI INC. D/B/A REGINA'S
\SHIONS INC. at 116-118 N.E.
I Ave Miami Fla. 33132 intends
jregister said name(s) with the
lerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
punty. Florida.
Manuel Lacayo, Jr.
1266 August 23, 30;
September 6,13. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
I1N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
|THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-31125
lACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
| ALFRED DOVER.
Petitioner/Husband.
I
MICHELLE DENISE DOVER,
Respondent/Wife.
10: Michelle Denise Dover
Residence Unknown
[YOU ARE HEREBY
lOTIFIED that a petition for
nssolution of Marriage has been
fed against you and you are re-
Uired to serve a copy of your writ-
fcn defenses, if any, to it on An-
bnio Torrent, Jr., attorney for
letitioner, whose address is 701
IW. 27 Avenue, Suite 625, Miami,
Jlorida 33135, and file the original
pith the clerk of the above styled
ourt on or before September 20,
|985; otherwise a default will be
ntered against you for the relief
handed in the complaint or
tition.
[This notice shall be published
l>ce each week for four con-
cutive weeks in THE JEWISH
ILORIDIAN.
[WITNESS my hand and the seal
said court at Miami, Florida on
kis 14 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
lircuit Court Seal)
ntonio Torrent. Jr.
Ijywsano, Torrent & l-eyte-Vidal,
S.W. 27th Venue. Suite 625
ami. Florida 33135
orney for Petitioner
Augusts. 30;
September 6. 13, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-27117 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
V8.
JORGE L. RAMOS, et ux..
Defendants.
TO: JORGE L. RAMOS and
MARIA M. RAMOS, his wife
359 E. 13th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33010
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Lot 14, in Block 1, of JAC-MO
HOMES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
92. at Page 67, of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deput Clerk
19293 September 13,20,27
October 4,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Catalonia Import Ex-
port at Universal Parts, Inc. 7370
NW 36th St., Suite 319-F. Miami,
Florida 33166, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DAVID ROMANO
Universal Parts, Inc.
7370 NW 36th St., Suite 319-F
Miami, Florida 33166
19297 September 13, 20, 27;
October 4,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-34076
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MERLEANE PATRICIA
POWELL.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
NEVILLE A. POWELL,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr. Neville A. Powell
c/o St. Mary's Hospital
1998 St. Marks Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
NIE S. MUSKAT, ESQUIRE, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 999 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
September 20, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy CBrk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT, ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 306-672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
19262 August 23, 30;
September 6.13. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURSIDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-23604 CA-14
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK,
F/K/A
DADE SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
ANTHONY BELLO. et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: ANTHONY BELLO and
ELSIE BELLO. his wife
Residence Cnknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 1 in Block 20, of GLADE-
WIND HEIGHTS, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 115, at Page 86, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985, and file the
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 20 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19271 August 23, 30;
September 6,13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-29018 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGATE ASSOCIATION,
an association organized
and existing uder the
laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
FERNANDO DE JESUS
SILVA, et ux., et al..
Defendants.
TO: FERNANDO
DE JESUS SILVA
and DIANA SILVA.
his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all parties
claiming interest by, through.
under or against FERNANDO DE
JESUS SILVA and DIANA
SILVA, his wife, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the pro-
perty herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgate on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida:
The East 36 feet of Lot 14, all of
Lot 15, and all of Lot 16, less the
East 29 feet thereof, in Block 2, of
GARDEN HOMES, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 29, at Page 6, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 11, 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demand^ in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 6tn day ^
September, 1985.
RICHARD P, BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19294 September 13, 20. 27;
October 4, )985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
File Nuaber 85-7478
Division 01
Florida Bar No. 051041
IN RE:ESTATE OF
EUGENE FALKENSTEIN, SR.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EUGENE FALKENSTEIN.
SR., deceased, File Number
85-7478, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Courthouse,
73 W. Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
son on whom this notice was serv-
ed the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 13, 1985.
Personal Representative:
CAROLE AULT
525 N.W. 202nd Terrace
Miami, Florida 33169
Attorney -for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HERBERT Z. MARVIN,
ESQUIRE
9995 Sunset Drive, Suite 108
Miami, Florida 33173
Telephone: (305) 279-0730
19288 September 13,20,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 86-34722 FC (14)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ALVA W. HOLMES
Petitioner
and
RENEE F. HOLMES
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RENEE F. HOLMES
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
arc required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, on or before Oc-
tober 4, 1985, and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
August 21, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19272 August 23,30;
September 6.13,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUZUKI PIANO
SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
at 12241 S.W. 103 Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33176 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
SARAH NEHAM SALZ
SIMON J. SALZ
RITA F. NORTON
Attorney for Applicants
Suite 1201, 19 West Flagler St.
Miami, Florida 33130
(305)374-3116
19267 August 23, 30;
September 6,13,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CERTIFICATE IN-
VESTORS SERVICE at 3233
Mary Streeet, Coconut Grove, FL
33133 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE
CONSULTANTS, INC.
By Peggy Bieley, President
WELLISCH. METZGER &
STANTON, PA.
"Paul R. Stanton, Esq.
Attorney for Financial Real Estate
Consultants. Inc.
161 Almeria Avenue, Suite'200E
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-7954
19268 August 23,30:
September 6. 13. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO.85-33276 CA-09
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
GREAT FINANCIAL
FEDERAL,
Plaintiff
vs.
JOSE HERNANDO VELAZ-
QUEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE HERNANDO
VELAZQUEZ
Avenida Ipirange. No. 165
Sao Paulo, Brazil
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 27, in Block 4. WOOD-
FIELD, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
113, at Page 97, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
Oct. 11, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6th day of
September, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19290 September 13. 20, 27;
October 4,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-25292
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RODOLFO MARCHESE,
Petitioner,
and
BRIGIDA MARCHESE.
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
Fla. Bar No. 142876
TO: BRIGIDA MARCHESE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the Peti-
tion upon the Petitioner's at-
torney, RONALD S. LIEBER-
MAN. P.A., at 8900 S.W. 107
Avenue, Suite 206, Miami. Florida,
and file the original Response or
Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, on or before
the 27 day of September, 1985. If
you fail to do so, a Default Judg-
ment will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the
Petition.
Dated at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this 26 day of August.
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
19278 August 30;
September 6, 13,20. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO:85-34666
FC20
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NADINE MIGUEL
and
EDDY L. NADINE
TO: Eddy L. Nadine
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
Ave., Miami, Fla. and'file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
4. 1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
Dated in Miami on August 20,
1985.
. RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk, Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19269 August 28, 80;
September II. W, 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86 37302
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LISA PIERRE,
Petitioner,
and
JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE.
Respondent.
TO: JEAN CLAUDE PIERRE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida, 33136. and
file original with ("ourt Clerk on or
before October 18. 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
September 6. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19292 September 13. 20, 27;
October 4, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6586
Division 02 Williams
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEANETTE RAMPELL A/K/A
JENNIE RAMPELL
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Jeanette Rampell, a/k/a Jennie
Rampell, deceased, File Number
85-6586, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
represesntative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 13, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Edward Rampell
300 Colonial Road
West Palm Beach, Florida
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Louis H. Stallman
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone. (305) 532-9939
19300 September 13. 20, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-7725
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT THOMAS
EDWARDS
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ALBERT THOMAS ED
WARDS, deceased. File Number
85-7725, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court: (1) all
claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested per-
Jon whom this notice was serv-
that challenges the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
| begun on September 13. 1985.
Personal Representative:
Glendena C. Edwards
1480 Northwest 55th Terrace
Miami, Florida, 33124
Attorney- for Personal Repre-
sentative:
Stanley M. Pred '. .
1516 Northwest 7th Street.
Suite 106 .
Miami. Florida 33125
Telephone: (806)642-6800
Ffc87 September IS, 20,1986


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
/dblic Notices!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-30031 CA-08
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK,
f/k/a DADE SAVINGS AND
LOAN ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff
ROBERTO PUENTE BLANCO,
etaL,
Defendants.
TO: Roberto Puente Blanco
1912 S.W. 17 Avenue, No. 21N
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Condominium Unit No. 206, oi
4011 Professional Center Con-
dominium, Inc., according to the
Declaration of Condominium, as
recorded in Official Records Book
9055, at Page 681, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
together with an undivided in-
terest in the Common Elements
Appurtenant thereto, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any, to it, on Shep-
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 38146 on or before Oc-
tober 11, 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
ed in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of tins Court this 9th day of
September, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19299 September 13,20,27;
October 4.1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-85651
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIA E. ADRIANO.
Petitioner,
and
MANUEL E. ADRIANO.
Respondent.
TO: MANUEL E. ADRIANO.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Are., Miami, Florida, 33186, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 4. 1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
August 27. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: GWEN D. ZEIGLER
19281 August 80;
September 6,13,20,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaker 85-7444
DHWaatl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACOB SAAL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACOB SAAL, dicaaud. File
Number 85-7468, ia pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
St, Miami, FL 33180. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims,
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 6, 1985.
Personal Representative:
HANNAH FRENKEL
38 Cootidge Street
Malverne, New York 11566
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQ.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (806) 6724108
19288 3epteDar,ia,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-14819 (CA 29)
AMENDED NOTICE
OF ACTION
ERWIN JACOBSOHN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JACK UCHITEL, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: All parties claiming interests
by, through, under or against, HY
UCHITEL, deceased, and all other
parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: The Nor-
thwest Ht of the Northeast Ht at the
Southeast V and the East "A of the
Northeast % of the Northwest '/
of the Southeast V of Section 16
Township 53 South, Range 39
East, lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Keith,
Mack, Lewis & Allison, Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street, Miami, Florida
33132, on or before September 20,
1985, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 14th day of
August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19265 August 23,30;
September 6,13,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 84-14340 CC 86
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221361
DORAL HOTEL. INC.,
Plaintiff,
JOSE RIBAS and ADRIANA
CANTWELL f/k/a ADRIANA
RIBAS,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RIBAS
7090 Crisford, Apt 1
St. Charles Apartments
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
TO: JOSE RIBAS
8918 Collins Avenue
Apartment No. 6
Miami Beach, FL 88164
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver A Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326,
Miami. Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1985 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County, Florida
By FLORA GONZALEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
19275 August 30;
September 6,13.20.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fi-
ctitious name F A L Sales Co. st
8690 S. State Rd. 7, Suite 18,
Miramar, FL 88028, intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Lacy A. Finn
- Marilyn Lambert
19285 September 6,13,20,
27.1986
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OFj
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL!
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA ,
m AND FOR DADE COUNTY!
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 8644266 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
AMERICAN SAVINGS
BANK, f/k/a FRANKLIN
SAVTNGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERTO NODAL,
et ux, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ROBERTO NODAL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4, Block 3, of PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SECTION
ONE, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
102, at Page 29, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19279 August 30;
September 6.13.20.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVTL ACTION
NO. 8541910 (14)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 068663
DM RE:
MICHAEL ROBERT VOLTS,
Husband
and
DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS,
Wife.
TO: DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS
(Residence Unknown)
Last Known Employment
Address:
c/o Mico Oil, 6506 Martway
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY M NEWMARK, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 9400 South Dadeland
Blvd.. Suite 300. Miami, Fl. 38156.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 4, 1985; otherwise s
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, ESQ.
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 300
Miami, Fl. 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
Tel. (305) 665-9775
19282 September 6, 13;
20,27,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Classic Products International at 420
South Dixie Highway, 3rd Floor, Cor-
al Gables, FL 33146 intend to register
said ium(i| with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
Classic Products International,
Inc. YD Inc.
Lynn W. Fromberg. Esquire of
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross &
Shore, P.A.
Attorney for Classic Products
International, Inc. Y-D Inc.
19298 September 13,20.27;
October 4,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-29043 CA 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN A COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
HENRY EVANS and DANE
EVANS, his wife; NIXON DESIR
and FELICITE DESIR a/k/a
FELICITE ALEXIS (DESIR).
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by, through,
under of against them; SCHMIDT
INDUSTRIES, INC., a Missouri
corporation; and SOUTHLAND
INSURANCE COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Defendants.
To: Nixon Desir and Felicite Desir
a/k/a/ Felicite Alexis (Desir),
whose residences are unknown,
and the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, sssignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block 6,
of VENETIAN DEVELOPMENT
SUBDIVISION, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 45, at Page 87, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Roeenthal A Yarchin, P.A.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
September 20,1986, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on August 15, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19263 August 23.30;
September 6.13.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-26828 FC 16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NESTOR J. MARTTN
and
MARIA A. MARTTN
TO: Maria A. Martin
9220 S.W. 46 Terrace
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. KOSS,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 4343 West
Flagier Street, Suite 404. Miami,
Florida 33134. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 27,
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS, ESQ.
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW
P.A.
4343 West Flagier Street
Suite 404
Miami, Florida 33134
Telephone: (306) 443-4343
Attorney for Petitioner
19273 August 30;
September 6,13,20,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-35011 (20)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JOSEFINA BAUTISTA
RODRIGUEZ
Petitioner,
and
JOSE IGNACIO RODRIGUEZ
Respondent
TO: Jose Ignacio Rodriguez
11905 S.W. 112th Avenue
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on R.A. del
Pino, Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1835 West
Flagier Street No. 201, Miami,
Florida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of August, 1985.
RICHARD. P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GOMEZ, FENTE DEL PINO,
P.A.
1835 West Flagier Street No. 201
Miami, Florida 33136
Phone: (305) 541-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19276 August 30;
September 6,13,20, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 8644868 (15)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 4S44S4
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GREGORY P. OOLEMAN,
Petitioner,
and
PAULINE B. WILLIAMS a/k/a
PAULINE B. COLEMAN,
Respondent
TO: Pauline B. Williams a/k/a
Pauline B. Coleman
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on KEN-
NETH C. BRONCHICK, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A.. 3000 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 315, Miami, FL
33137, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
21st day of August. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kenneth C. Bronchick, Esq.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A.
3000 Biscayne Boulevard, No. 315
Miami, FL 33137
Attorney for Petitioner
19274 August 30;
September 6.13, 20,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name REGINA'S OF
MIAMI INC. D/B/A REGINA'S
FASHIONS INC. at 116-118 N.E.
3rd Ave Miami Fla. 33132 intends
to register said namefs) with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo, Jr.
19266 August 28,80;
September 6, 13. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT n
THE ELEVENTH roE?
CIRCUIT OF FWRdW
AND FOR DADE COUm
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85472(4
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK, F.S.B.
f/k/a Community Federal
Savings and Loan
Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
HERBERT R. WEBB,
et ux., et si..
Defendants.
TO: FREEDOM FINANCIAL
SERVICES
CORPORATION
C. T. Corportion
Systems
Attn: C. R. Ostheimer
208 South La Salle St
Chicago, IL
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
action for Foreclosure of Mortgip
on the following describe
property:
Lot 48, of Unrecorded Plat of HD>
DEN LAKE described as follow
Commence at the Southwest at
ner of Tract 11, of FLORID*
FRUIT LAND COMPANY'S
SUBDIVISION OF THE NE | I
OF Section 25, Township 52 Bask L
Range 40 East, according to %'
Plat thereof, as recorded in Pat "
Book 2, at Page 17, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Floritk;
thence run East along the Soutt
line of said Tract 11 for 580.03 fact
to a point; thence run North I
degrees 15' 30" West lor
26.02 feet to the Point of Begird-
ing of Tract of land hereinafter j
described; thence continue North;
degrees 15' 30" West ptrtlU
with the Westline of said Tract 11
for 115.09 feet to a point; thence
run East parallel with the Sooth
line of said Tract 11 for 100.93 feet
to a point; thence run South II
degrees 45' 09" West for j
125.08 feet to s point on s <
curve; thence run Westerly along 11
circular curve concave to the
Southwest, having a Radius of 15
feet through a central angle of 1'
degrees 23' 14" for an in I
distance of 22.76 feet to a point A
Tangency with a line that is 26 fee |
North of and parallel with the |
South line of said Tract 11; than
run West parallel to and 25 feet
North of the South line of aid
Tract 11 for 33.77 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
has been filed against you and yot
are required to serve a copy of I
your written defenses, if any, toft*.'
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney to
Plaintiff, whose address is Sate
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Cars I
Gsbles, Florida, 33146 or or beta
October 11, 1985 and file the !
original with the Clerk of tha
Court either before service a
Plaintiff's attorney or immediate!; \
thereafter; otherwise a default wi
be entered against you for the J
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6 day of September, [
1986
19296 September 13,20, B
October 4,1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-9637 (01)
Florida Bar No. 241MJ
ACTION FOR TERMINATION
OF GUARDIANSHIP
IN RE: The Guardianship of
JANE SILVER,
Incompetent
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCH*
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT
FIED that an action for Tenw*
tion of Guardianship has beJ
relating to Change of Domicile I
Resident Ward.
You are required to serve B
of your written objections, if!
to it on Sanford A- FT***
P.A., Attorney for Petit*** f
whose address is 12700 HMg ,
Boulevard. Suite 410, W
Miami, Florida. 33181. and fite*
original with the Clerk of*
sbove styled Court on or now
October 1. 1985; otherwise.
guardianshp shall be IM&fgj
This notice shall be pub**-
once a week for two ^ |
weeks in THt. ""
FLORIDIAN. .,
WITNESS my hand and*
MMmi. D*Je County, FlomU.
this 30th day of August L
SANFORD A. FREEDMAN, P-A-i
Attorney for Petitioner
12700 Biscayne Boulevard r .
Suite 410
North Miami, FL 33181
Telephone: 891-6852 0
19289 September 13, ""


Hebron Tense After Two Israeli
[Soldiers Are Stabbed, One Fatally
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Pagej'SpB
jEfcter Weinkle, 80
Community Pioneer

By GIL SEDAN
HEBRON (JTA) An
[atmosphere of tension
[engulfed this West Bank
I town after the fatal stabb-
ling of an Israeli soldier and
Ithe wounding of another in
Ithe casba. It is mainly bet-
[ween enraged Jewish set-
ters who blame govern-
lent policies for the
tragedy and the defense
sstablishment which is try-
ing to maintain order and
ivoid new confrontations
etween Jews and Arabs.
The latest victim of the moun-
ting violence between the two was
Wraham Sorek, a 38-year-old
Reservist who died of knife
vounds on the way to Hadassah
jospital in Jerusalem. He was
juried at Kibbutz Beit Oren, his
^ome. Sorek, who immigrated to
srael from Chile several years
go, is survived by his wife, his
[4-year-old daughter and two sons
Ejed nine and five.
ALSO STABBED but reported
|r stable condition following
pirgery at the Hadassah Hospital
another reserve soldier, Arye
Jornstein of Haifa. He and Sorek
irere standing guard outside a va-
ant two-story flat in the old
narket section of Hebron known
^s the casba when they were at-
cked. Military sources said both
bldiers, armed with assault rifles
nd grenades, were apparently
aken by surprise.
It is not clear whether there
Jrere one or two assailants. A
pght curfew was clamped on the
sba and pthe/^partSnO^ central
lebron. The city itself was
declared a military zone. No one
nn enter or leave without a per-
lit. The streets were deserted.
ill Arab residents remained in
beir homes and the normally
Rustling market was empty.
Shortly after the stabbings.
|ewish settlers tore down a wall
eparating the casba from the
|ewish quarter of town. They said
was a symbolic reply to those
kho do not want Jews in the
aba.
BUT ISRAELI soldiers quickly
replaced the wall. Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin made it
clear in messages to settler
leaders that they would not be
allowed to use the tragedy to ex-
pand the Jewish presence in the
predominantly Arab town. Rabin
personally visited the scene of the
attack. He would not talk to
reporters and refused to meet
with representatives of the
settlers.
While senior army officers met
in Hebron to discuss security, the
settlers gathered in the Jewish
quarter to map their own
response to the deteriorating
situation. They said later that
they would continue to act
through political channels but also
on the spot to improve the
situation.
The settlers are demanding,
among other measures, that the
authorities rearrest Palestinian
terrorists who were released in a
prisoner exchange last May, that
deportation proceedings for
trouble-makers be speeded up and
that the ban on further Jewish set-
tlement in Hebron be lifted.
EFFORTS BY militant settlers
to increase the Jewish presence
there set in motion the events
which led to the stabbings. The
flat the two soldiers were guar-
ding was occupied last month by
settlers who claimed it belonged
to Jews.
The squatters were replaced by
rightwing Knesset members who
support the settlers' aims. But
they were evicted by order of the
Defense Ministry and soldiers
were posted to guard the deserted
premises against attempts by
Jewish militants to return.
Violence against Jews in the
West Bank increased last month.
An Israeli was murdered in
Tulkarem on Aug. 24 and Jews
were wounded in Jenin and
Nablus. Settlers said they would
go to the market places in several
Arab towns in the territory in the
next few days to demonstrate that
Jews will not be intimidated by
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the series of attacks.
The security situation in the
West Bank has serious political
ramifications for the national uni-
ty government. The Labor Party
is determined to keep the peace
and punish violators, Jewish or
Arab. Their Likud partners are
equally determined to live
anywhere in the West Bank under
the protection of Israel's armed
forces.
THE 10-MAN Inner Cabinet -
five Labor and five Likud
ministers met in Jerusalem to
discuss the security problems.
Premier Shimon Peres and
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
stressed that terrorism must be
countered by military operations.
The Likud ministers argued that
the government, in addition, must
support and reenforce Jewish set-
tlement activity in the territory.
The ministers agreed that Israel
would renew its demand on Jor-
dan to get rid of the Palestine
Liberation Organization leader-
ship elements which have
established themselves in Amman
recently. They agreed that Israel
would make clear to Jordan that
the terrorists would not be im-
mune and could be reached
anywhere. This seemed to imply
military strikes against them in-
side Jordan if necessary.
Obituaries
MAYER
Rita, 66, of Kendall passed away September
5. Mrs. Mayer had made her home here for
the past 40 years coming from Far
Rockaway, N. Y. She was a Founder of West
Miami Jewish Center which later became
Temple Zion and active in Temple Judea for
many years. She is survived by her husband
Max; son Bob (Bonnie): brother Archie
Gradinger and Henrietta Randall of Miami
Services were held
HOWARD. Herman. 85, of Miami Beach
The Riverside.
LEON. Isidoro. 65, of Miami. September 7.
The Riverside.
DASH, Saul M.. 80. September 6. The
Riverside.
LEFK. Benjamin L.. of Homestead.
WEISS, Jerome S., 70. of Miami.
September 7. The Riverside.
CARMEN. Sadie (Sybil), September 6. The
Riverside.
CHERNOFF. Rae K.. of North Bay Village.
KAUFMAN, Robert E., 44, of North Miami.
September 4. The Riverside.
SOLOMON. Samuel, 79, of North Miami.
The Riverside.
MALAND, Richard, 69, Miami, September
4. Interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
HOFFMAN, Mildred K. (Bunnie).
September 3.
Esther Silver Weinkle, who
worked side by side with her
husbad Carl to build one small
Lemon City grocery store into a
chain of 19 supermarkets
throughout South Florida, died
September 9 of cancer. She was
80.
In 1925, the Weinkles came to
Miami from Georgia and opened
their store, Carl's Market. Thirty
years later, Carl's Markets merg-
ed with Food Fair, predecessors
of Pantry Pride.
In the mid-1940s, Mrs. Weinkle
organized B'nai B'rith for girls in
Miami and the Young Men's and
Young Women's Hebrew
Associated of Miami. She organiz-
ed a college scholarship program
for deserving students.
Among Mrs. Weinkle's other
community efforts were the foun-
ding of Mount Sinai Medical
Center, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the United Jewish
Appeal.
In 1963, Mrs. Weinkle was the
first recipient of the Israel-
Eleanor Roosevelt Humanitarian
Award, given by the Israel Bonds,
for her services in Israel.
Mrs. Weinkle is survived by her
husband Carl; son Julien W. (Mary
Norma); daughter Ernice
Preston; grandchildren, Martin,
Jeanne (Craig), Bill (Astrid), An-
drew, Jim, Tom and Kathy, great-
SCHWARTZ
Meyer, 88, of Kendall passed away
September 5. Mr. Schwartz had made his
home in Miami for the past 61 years, coming
from Charlotte, N.C. He built the first blimp
hanger at the Opa Locka Airport; operated
the first scrap yard on the Miami River; he
developed the first industrial site in Hialeah
and removed the first streetcar tracks in
Miami. He was a member of Biscayne Bay
Lodge F. and A.M. No. 124, a member of
BPOE Miami Elks No. 948. He is survived
by his wife Sophie: a son, Howard (Eleanor)
of Miami: a daughter Sara (Norman) Som-
mers of Miami; two brothers, William of
Santa Barbara. Calif.. Harry of Charlotte,
N.C; a sister. Anne Licker of Bridgewater,
Mass.: seven grandchildren and one great-
grandchild. Services were held
-
Esther Silver Weinkle
grandchildren, Tristan, Brian,
Brette and Annie.
Services were held at Temple
Emanu-El, under the direction of
Blasberg Memorial Chapel. Inter-
ment followed at Mount Nebo
Cemetery.
BRANDSTATTER, Clara, 88. of Miami
Beach, September 8. The Riverside.
DANIELS, Sydney. 76, of North Miami.
September 9.
PASSOF, Hannah (nee Friedman).
September 8.
ELLNER. Elsie. Services were held.
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i*-^ ine Jewish Unndian/PriHo.. Cw^i___10 mor
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985

-~ :d rev5- .
along v
? -int training
<*** workers,
actions, the
j
'- Of Maureep !
Mr* 1
May the sound of the shofar awaken us to the flight
of time and summon us to spend our days with purpose
Warmest wishes to the Greater Miami Jewish community for
health happiness and prosperity from the Officers andBoard
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
William Lehman, Jr.
Frances B. Levey
Jack H. Levine
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Norman Lieberman
Ellen Mandler
Neal Menachem
Stanley C. Myers
Gerald Olin
Sidney Olson
Arthur Pearlman
Dorothy Podhurst
Robin Prever
Nan Rich
Barry Ross
President
Samuel I. Adler
Immediate Past President
Norman H. Lipoff
vice Presidents
Norman Braman
Cal Kovens
Donald E. Lefton
Joel Levy
Aaron Podhurst
Forrest Raffel
Secretary
Steven J. Kravitz
Associate Secretary
Helene Berger
Treasurer
Nancy Lipoff
Associate Treasurer
Michael M. Adler
Executive vice President
Myron J Brodie
Board of Directors
*L. Jules Arkin
Bernardo Batievsky
Saby Behar
Jack Bollock
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Benjamin Botwinick
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Jack Burstein
Herbert Canarick
Dr. Sol Center
Tim R. Cohen
Irving Cypen
Terry Drucker
Dr. Jay Ellenby
Alvin Entin
Myra Farr
Dr. George Feldenkreis
Pat P. Fine
David B Fleeman
Harvey Friedman
Judge Ronald Friedman
Morris Futernick
Gary Gerson
Alfred Golden
Rabbi Brett Goldstein
Goldie R. Goldstein
Sheldon Guren
Alex Halberstein
Joseph Handleman
Samuel Harte
Charlotte Held
Kenneth Hoffman
Arthur Horowitz
Joseph H. Kanter
Melvin L. Kartzmer
Ezra Katz
Shepard King
Jonathan Kislak
Alan J. Kluger
Jeffrey Lefcourt
'Sidney Lefcourt
a year of
of Directors
William F. Saulson
Howard R Scharlin
Michael Scheck
Gerald K. Schwartz
Maxine E. Schwartz
Fred K. Shochet
Norman Sholk
Elaine Silverstein
Harry 6 Smith
Guillermo Sostchin
John Sumberg
Eli Timoner
Robert Traurig
Eric Turetsky
Philip T Warren
Harry Weitzer
Dr. George S. Wise
'Past President
Board of Directors of the South
Dade Branch of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
Chairman
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Vice Chairmen
Paul Berkowitz
Norman Lieberman
Lawrence Metsch
Judge Robert Newman
Board of Directors
Judy Adler
Arnold Altman
Rabbi David Auerbach
Sharon Azoulay
Robert Berrin
Thomas Borin
Mel Brazer
Shelly Brodie
Carol Cantor
Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz
Howard Cherna
Dr. Eugene Eisner
Sidney Fagin
Mikki Futernick
Jay Gamberg
Stanley Gilbert
Bernard Goodman
Debby Grodnick
Phyllis Harte
Samuel Harte
Leonard Hayet
Paul Kade
Dr Robert Karl
Nelson Keshen
Marilyn Kohn
M. Ronald Krongold
Richard Kwal
Dr Gail Kwal
Frances B. Levey
Ellen Mandler
Dr. Robert Marlm
Sandi Miot
Sanford Miot
Gail Jatfe Newman
Sydney Newmark
Nedra Oren
Judge Steven Robinson
Dr Stanley Rosenberg
Elaine Ross
Myron Samole
Sandi Samole
William Saulson
Dr. Bernard Schechterman
Norman Sholk
Fran Storper
Dr. Alan Swartz
Barry White
Dror Zadok
Daniel Zelonker


nr
An Answer To Israel
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
kin
abi;
By Gil
JEFUSALE
f Daily protests
I ing h front of ti (D., Hi.) is the
mining by metratic member of
Le Achirp. 'opriations sub-
; :*.. v. foreign aid. This
Hide is excerpted from his
uddress at a breakfast session
f. of ADL's National Commis-
sion meetings.
By DANIEL K. INOUYE
Economic and financial forces
threaten to do what hostile
neighbors have tried to do in three
wars and 37 years of unremitting
ted antipathy towards Israel,
e is no question that Israel is
arily strong and confident,
in talking with their leaders I
_e a concern that economic
weakness and the almost insur-
mountable difficulty of confron-
\ig a complex array of financial
v ohlems may force them to alter
A' very character of the govern-
ment and the society.
Americans should begin to ad-
dress the contradiction that
Israel, in order to avoid destruc-
tion by more numerous and better
quipped adversaries, has been
creed by us to spend itself close
' to ruin. I believe that we must act
in the American national interest
- not in the interest of Israel but
in our national interest to in-
sure that the weight of debt does
not crush this little democracy and
center of freedom in the Middle
East.
I am convinced that Israel is in
danger despite steps which have
I been taken. For example, there
has been a 20 percent pay cut for
all government employees. The
ambassador of the State of Israel,
[who receives less than $15,000 a
I year, is the lowest paid am-
|bassador in our nation's capital.
THERE HAS been a reduction
i government forces in excess of
20,000 employees, and for a small
pountry like Israel, 20,000 is
ossibly the equivalent of 400,000
i the United States. The Bank of
Israel is in the process of being
^organized to become more
lutonomous and independent. A
pajor charge made against the
overnment of Israel was that the
ank was the arm of the cabinet.
hat is going to change.
|The State of Israel owes other
pvernments $24 billion. This is
to its annual gross national
duct and 678 percent more
an its annual export earnings,
ital debt service today is about
billion per year, slightly more
an 40 percent of the Israeli
dget, and about 27 percent of
at is debt service to the U.S.
vernment.
bis year, Israel will repay the
d States $158 million in prin-
and $1,018 million in in-
est. Over the next several
rs these amounts will increase.
he repayment schedule is not
raged by the year 2020, Israel
have paid the United States
1.897 billion in principal and in-
fcst. This debt is almost totally
the form of military sales
)ME AMERICANS have the
ession that we just give
v to Israel. On the contrary,
has been paying prime rates
dozens of other countries
- not necessarily friendly to
United States receive
erred concessionary rates.
| burdet of this debt and the
ct upd) Israel's security and
y catiot and should not be
erestimted. And, these pur-
es by hrael, were made for
y hardware which is being
I in the font line of American
ense te Middle East. We
fveniently jrget that.
i total, Isrkl's per capita debt
he highestjn the world. The
ghtening pitpect of repaying
i debt is cofounded with the
bognition tit the external
rces which cfced Israel to go
into debt have not changed.
In the past ten years, Israel's
economy was dealt three severe
blows. First, the cost of petroleum
sharply increased following the
return of the Sinai as a result of
the Camp David Accords. The cost
of energy imports increased from
$100 million in 1972 to $1 billion,
500 million in 1984.
ABOUT SIX months after the
signing of the Accords, I told
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
that I thought Israel had gotten a
bum deal. For the first time in the
history of mankind, a country was
literally forced let's face it, we
told them what do do to give up
lands that were acquired by con-
quest, land adjacent to theirs, in-
volved in their external security.
Certainly, the U.S. gave up the
Philippines, halfway around the
world, but we refused to give up
Puerto Rico, California, Arizona
or New Mexico.
At the time the Accords were
signed there were other
agreements, not in writing but by
handshake. One told Israel to give
up the Sinai Oil wells, and the
U.S. would make certain that
Israelis would not suffer from the
loss. Soon after that, the whole
world faced an oil crisis.
Americans lined up at gas pumps,
and we forgot Israel's problem
because we were concerned with
our own. Israel, not able to go to
its neighbors for oil, turned to the
Netherlands and paid the highest
prices.
Then the U.S. told Israel that
we would replace two airfields in
the Sinai. Construction began,
and so did inflation, fueled by the
oil crisis. The U.S. said our agree-
ment was strictly for the cost as of
1972. In 1972, Israeli defense
spending was $1.5 billion. It is
now $4.5 billion for expenditures
needed to maintain a deterrent
and a defense capability against
an enormous Arab buildup,
financed by oil dollars and the
Soviet Union. Israel has increased
her defense expenditures three-
fold; the Arabs, 700 percent dur-
ing the same time period. The four
largest importers of arms in the
world today are Arab countries
Libya, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Iraq.
IN 1981, I asked the
Undersecretary of State for
Security Assistance, James
Buckley, what impact the provi-
sion of advanced military equip-
ment such as enhanced F-15s and
the AWACS to the Arab countries
would have on Israel. The official
response of the government was
that the threat could be met
through the purchase of additional
F-15s, F-16s or other mixes that
the Israeli military may believe to
be necessary or desirable. I told
the Secretary that the implica-
tions of this policy were ominous.
Our arms sales policy will only
put Israel further and further into
debt and will engage Israel in a
war of economic attrition which it
cannot possibly win. With their
enormous oil wealth, all the Arabs
have to do is to purchase more
arms. Israel, already indebted,
will not be able to keep up.
This is the most severe of the
blows which have been dealt to the
Israeli economy over the past ten
years. Gradually, Israel has mor-
tgaged control over the economy
to its creditors, the largest, the
United States of America. The
amount of principal to be paid at
high interest rates for a pro-
tracted period obviously will
undermine Israel's ability to deal
with its current crisis.
I HAVE a very simple proposal
which I've discussed with several
of my colleagues. The interest
rates in Israel's loan portfolio
range from 11 to 15 percent, all
prime rates with a weighted
average of 12 percent. My pro-
posal would reduce this 12 percent
to five. We have accorded this
treatment to other countries
where the economic conditions
were such that repayment would
be difficult. This amendment
would not forgive Israel its debt.
Israel would continue to repay
the interest, but at five percent,
reducing the interest charges over
the life of the existing portfolio by
$8,417 billion. That would make a
significant impact on the economy
of this little state which would be
strengthened in its ability to han-
dle both emergency and long-term
economic concerns. Just cutting
interest rates to five percent
would cut Israel's spending on
debt service in half. In turn, this
would reduce the need to borrow
to finance debt and increase the
availability of funds for defense
and other essential services.
And, more important, the peo-
ple of Israel would be strengthen-
ed in their conviction that the
United States supports them and
recognizes their very real
sacrifices for peace in the Middle
East. We have been sending
garbled, conflicting messages
over the years. For example, our
President, Secretary of State or
members of Congress would say:
"We stand by Israel; we will de-
fend Israel to the last man; Israel
is important; it is the only
democracy." Then we sell the
AWACS, the enhanced F-15s.
IT'S TIME we sent a strong,
clear, unhampered message that
we stand by Israel and I think, by
this proposal to cut the interest
rate, that message would be sent.
One of my colleagues called my
proposal "an extraordinary and
unprecedented step." But what if,
for comparison, we put the Israeli
appropriations under the Defense
Department. We give $129 billion
to NATO compared to $3 billion to
Israel. What do we get from
NATO and what do we get from
Israel? When Israel gave us the
secret on how to knock out the
Russian SAM missile sites, that
made up for more than $4 billion.
When the Israelis captured ar-
maments enough to supply five
PLO armies, that set back the
Soviets for many years. That
meant something to us. We've
been getting our money's worth
from the standpoint of in-
telligence information from the
Mossad, versus intelligence infor-
mation from NATO. There's no
comparison.
JEWISH
rwioiw
FHHD
Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
LATIN DIVISION
Extends Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
to its friends and supporters.
May the New Year bring peace and prosperity
to the State of Israel, to the Jewish People
everywhere and to all mankind
MOROECHAI DAYAN
World CoChrmn KKL
NILYFALIC
Director KKL
Latin Dlv'n.
ZEV W. KOOAN
Pres. JNF
So. Region
420 Lincoln Road Suit* 340 Miami Beach, Fla. 33130
Phone: 532-8706 538-6464
Miami
General
Hospital
17300 NW 7th Avenue, Miami, FL 33169 652-4200


I tif. .Jewish Wlnririian/VviA*.. O___?___l .
rage 1B-B Ttie Jewisn r ionaian/f naay, &p^eTfioer ia, iaoo
Hadassah Calls For Stronger U.S.-Israel Ties

NEW YORK Delegates
representing 385,000 American
Zionist women nationwide
unanimously called for stronger
ties between the United States
and Israel, at the 71st annual Na-
tional Convention of Hadassah,
the Women's Zionist Organization
of America held here.
The convention delegates also
reaffirmed Hadassah's commit-
ment to Zionism, condemned the
apartheid policies of South Africa
and demanded that the Soviet
Union permit that nation's Jews
to emigrate to Israel in resolu-
tions on issues of major concern
ranging from peace in the Middle
East to child care for working
parents.
THE RESOLUTION on
U.S.-Israel ties commends Presi-
dent Reagan "for his strong affir-
mation of Israel as a friend,
democratic ally and invaluable
strategic partner of the United
States in a region vital to Western
interests."
It also states that Hadassah
believes that "the best interests of
the United States are served by
its close relationship with and sup-
port of the State of Israel" and
urges "the continuation of signifi-
cant financial assistance" to
Israel. "We believe that the
heightened measure of economic,
political and strategic cooperation
between our country and Israel
will enhance the cause of freedom,
of Middle East stability and world
peace," the resolution adds.
The delegates from 1,700
Hadassah chapters throughout
the U.S., Puerto Rico, Europe and
Israel also adopted a resolution
opposing an international con-
ference on the Middle East con-
flict "because we believe such an
international forum would result
in granting the Soviet Union and
the most extreme elements in the
Arab world veto power over any
real movement toward peace."
"We urge the Administration to
remain firm in its insistence on
direct, face-to-face negotiations
between Israel and the Arab
states without preconditions," the
resolution reads. "The United
States' role in moving the peace
process forward should be to en-
courage and facilitate direct
negotiations between the parties
to the conflict."
THE RESOLUTION also calls
LILLIAN C.ALEINKOFF
Wishes Everyone A Happy New Year
ALBERT and ROSE ASTER
Wishes The Jewish Community
A Very Happy New Year
From The Skylark Hotel
MR. and MRS. BERNARDO BATIEVSKY
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. SHELDON BECHER
Wishes Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Sincere Wishes For A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. DONALD BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. AL BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. AND MRS. ABE BERKOWITZ
and Family
MR. and MRS. HAROLD BERKOWITZ
and Family
DR. and MRS. LEO BRAVERMAN
and Family
MR. WALTER MACKAUF and Family
ftNIWYMRA
MR. and MRS. R. BOTT
Wish All Friends and Family A Happy New Year
JUDY and IRA BLITT
DIANE, STUART, JERILYN and PHILIP BOTWINIK
CYNTHIA, MICHAEL, WILLIAM
and ANDREW KORENVAES
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. JACK BRENNER
Wishes Family, Friends and Patients
A Happy and Healthy New Year

for Egypt to "live up to its com-
mitments" in the Camp David Ac-
cords and "to normalize relations
with Israel ... We believe that
the enhancement of the relation-
ship between Israel and Egypt
will contribute to confidence in
the peace process..."
In other resolutions on
U.S.-Israel relations, the conven-
tion delegates commended the
Reagan Administration for its
stand on international terrorism
and opposed arms sales to "Arab
countries that do not negotiate
directly and make peace with
Israel." The delegates also called
on the U.S. government "to
recognize and support the
established status of Jerusalem as
the capital of Israel... by moving
its embassy from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem."
The convention also resolved to
reaffirm Hadassah's "belief that
Zionism is the fulfillment of the
Jewish People's right to self-
determination and to live in
freedom, democracy and in-
dependence in their ancient
homeland, Israel."
"We condemn any linkage bet-
ween Zionism and racism," the
resolution reads. "We believe that
the United Nations General
Assembly Resolution 3379,
adopted ten years ago on
November 10, 1975, which falsely
and slanderously equates Zionism
with racism, is itself a form of
bigotry and anti-Semitism."
THE RESOLUTION pledges
Hadassah support to the U.S.
government "in its efforts to take
all appropriate measures
necessary to repudiate and erase
this hateful resolution from the
records of the United Nations." In
a companion resolution, the
delegates commended the, U.S.
Congress for its passage of a joint
resolution condemning the
General Assembly action.
The Hadassah convention
delegates were sharply critical of
Russia's "ruthless suppression"
of Jews and the "virtual closing of
the gates of the Soviet Union to
Jewish emigration." The resolu-
tion expresses Hadassah's "anger
and indignation" over harassment
of Jews who apply for exit visas
and added that "we unequivocally
condemn the growing number of
arrests, trials and imprisonment
of Soviet Jews."
"On this, the 10th anniversary
of the signing of the Helsinki Ac-
cords and its human rights provi-
sions," the resolution states, "we
call upon the Soviet government
to observe the terms of the inter-
national treaties to which it is a
signatory; to restore emigration
and to desist from the persecution
of Jews who wish to emigrate to
Israel to be reunited with their
families, and to end the prohibi-
tion of Jewish religious, cultural
and educational activities."
IN AN EQUALLY sharply-
worded resolution on South
Africa, Hadassah affirmed "its
deep abhorrence of apartheid"
which it described as a "system of
legalized racial discrimination."
"It is a system which denies the
most basic human rights to the
overwhelming majority of its
population simply because of their
color or race," the resolution says.
"We deplore the state of
emergency imposed by the South
African government which has
resulted in brutal victimization of
its citizens," it continues. "We
condemn the arbitrary measures
which subject the black majority
to search, seizure, arrest and in-
definite detention without the pro-
tection of due process of law."
The convention delegates were
equally critical of Meir Kahane,
the American rabbi who made
aliyah to Israel and who has called
for the deportation of Israel's
rtfe
Arab population. They approved a
resolution which "strongly con-
demns the racist overtones of
Meir Kahane's ideology," and
adds that "We deplore Kahane's
attempts to redefine Zionism as
incompatible with democracy .
Kahane's distortion of our sacred
Jewish traditions and our Zionist
principle is reprehensible and
unacceptable."
The resolution also cites
"Israel's record as a model of
democracy," and quotes from the
nation's Declaration of the
Establishment of the State of
Israel which ensures "complete
equality of social and political
rights to all its inhabitants, ir-
respective of religion, race or
sex."
On the domestic front, the
delegates adopted a resolution
which states that Hadassah "in
light of the teachings of our peo-
ple, consider adequate and
available child care programs
necessary and of prime impor-
tance to the welfare of families
and to the well being of American
society."
"Hadassah supports measures
which will improve federal, state
Sty
and private standai
monitoring, licensing ar;
ing day care facilities *
provisions for suffi .
of qualified child ^g*
the resolution sta. worKers.
IN OTHErtion8>,the
delegates:
Praised the w -Maur Reagan and the U.S. the United Nations Decade ft
Women's Conference in Nairobi in 1
July and applauded their success
in blocking the inclusion of the
word "Zionism" in a portion of I
the final conference document
branding racism and apartheid ai |
"obstacles to development";
Commended the "valiatl
rescue, aliyah and absorption i\
Ethiopian Jews by the govaw
ment of Israel" and the support*.
the U.S. for the Ethiopian res effort, while also express^]
"deep concern over the plight dl
those Jews who still remain itl
Ethiopia" and pledging to "cod{
tinue our efforts to ensure thai
the entire Ethiopian communiti
will soon be reunited in Israel"; ]
Affirmed aliyah "as thei
highest ideal of Zionist commit- j
ment and actively encourage and L-
supports this act of personal \
fulfillment" and committed
Hadassah to intensify its support
and implementation of aliyah
programs.
MR. and MRS. WILLIAM CARMEL and Children
MR. and MRS. ALLAN (BARBARA) CARMEL
MICHAEL and MARC
MRS. BARBARA KRAKOW, DAVID and BETH
DR. and MRS. GERALD (ANDREA) CARMEL
BRETT, JENNIFER and AMANDA
MR. and MRS. ROBERT (LINDA) SOSSIN
RHONDA, ANDREW and DIANNA
Wishing a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous
New Year To Their Relatives and All Their Friends
LEWIS and BARBARA COHEN
DIANNEandLAURI
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. MAXWELL DAUER
MR. and MRS. ROGER A. DAUER
DR. and MRS. EDWARD A. DAUER
Wish All Their Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. MAX DEAKTER
and Family
Wish To AHA Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. GABRIEL DEUTSCH and Family
Wish Friends A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. G. ENERFELD
Wish Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. L. EPSTEIN
Wish Friends, Family and Patients
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. JEFFERY FEINGOLD
and Family
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. AINSLEE FERDIE
And Their Children
Wish The Entire Jewish Community, Frienls
and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
'


protests Continue Against Mormons
{v GIL SEDAN
'.JERUSALEM (JTA)-
feaily protests are continu-
ing h front of the municipal
EuiMing by members of Yad
,e Achim, an anti-
Ijjsionary group, who are
landing that the con-
jction of the Jerusalem
jnsion of the Mormon
^gham Young University
halted. The group
^rges that the university
ild serve as a center for
bsionary activities.
Jarlier, in August, Prof. Jef-
Holland, the president of the
Jersity, submitted a written
|ge to Mayor Teddy Kollek
; there would be no missionary
vity in the educational center
\s constructing next to the
:>rew University on Mt.
Ipus. But Holland's efforts to
Ivinee the Israeli public that the
Iter would serve only as an
Wemic institution have been
eted with skepticism by many
elis.
SOURCES IN the mayor's of-
said that Holland's written
ige apparently was not suffi-
it to allay anxieties over the
bsibilitv that the center might in
fact become the focal point for
missionary activities. They said
that the Knesset Interior Commit-
tee unofficially demanded a $1
million guarantee to back up the
pledge a demand which was re-
jected by Holland.
City officials are now saying
that Holland's pledge was merely
a gesture of good will, and not
necessarily binding by law, as the
authorities had no legal means of
halting the construction of the
multi-million dollar project on Mt.
Scopus. The university had receiv-
ed all the necessary building per-
mits as well as recommendations
by the Foreign and Education
ministries.
The construction of the Mormon
center has been under large-scale
attack by Orthodox circles, in-
cluding the two Chief Rabbis, who
have warned that its real purpose
was to try to convert Jews.
THE CONSTRUCTION of the
center was approved in 1977 by
the Likud government of Premier
Menachem Begin, and by the
Jerusalem municipality. Located
on five acres of land, the center
will contain housing and catering
services for nearly 200 students,
as well as classrooms and an
auditorium.
According to Dr. Ellis
LAURA and RICHARD FINK
Wish Friends, Family and Clients
A Happy New Year
MRS. CELIA FINKELSTEIN
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. LOUIS QADON and FAMILY
Wish Friends and Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. PAUL QAIER
Wishes Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. ROBERT GARBER
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. GARY GERSON
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MS. ROSALIND GETTIS and
MR. LES WINSTON
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MRS. MYRIAMGINGOLD
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. BARTON S. GOLDBERG
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD GORDON
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Rasmussen, former dean of
Religious Education at Brigham
Young University, the purpose of
the center was to enable Mormon
students to get to know Israel.
Meanwhile, a city official said a
report published in some
American Jewish newspapers that
the Jerusalem Foundation has a
financial interest in a Mormon
corporation was "incitement to
violence." According to the
report, the Mormons acquired
their permission to build the
center by making large contribu-
tions of company shares to the
Jerusalem Foundation, which is
headed by Kollek. Municipal
spokesman Rafi Dabara said the
report was "absolutely
ridiculous."
Jewish Book
Publisher
Denied Visa
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
president of the Association of
Jewish Book Publishers, Bernard
Levinson, has been denied a visa
to attend the biennial Moscow In-
ternational Book Fair scheduled
to open in the Soviet Union this
month. No explanation was given.
Saying he had "no idea why" his
visa was rejected, Levinson im-
mediately fired off a telegram to
Igor Kazansky, book fair chair-
man, to request that the visa be
approved. Levinson suggested
that perhaps the visa rejection
amounted to a bureaucratic foul-
up. "We have to assume that at
this point," he told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in a
telephone interview from
Philadelphia.
The exhibit booth of the Jewish
book publishers at the Moscow
fair, featuring some 1,000 various
titles on Jewish themes, has been
a central attraction for Soviet
Jews who come from all parts of
the Soviet Union. Soviet
authorities barred 49 books on
Jewish issues from the 1983 book
fair, and in 1981, five titles were
barred from the exhibit. This
year's booth at the book fair will
cost the Jewish publishers associa-
tion some $2,000.
Besides exhibiting many books,
the association distributes during
the fair a 64-page catalogue which
includes a listing of 1,300 titles
from more than 80 publishers, in-
cluding commercial, university
and private presses. Rules for the
book fair assert that an exhibitor
canot sell or give away books. In
addition to listing various titles,
the catalogue includes a two-page
Russian translation of Abba
Eban's introduction to "Heritage:
Civilization and the Jews," the
eight-part Public Broadcasting
Service series.
The catalogue also includes a
time line of Jewish history; a
biographical sketch of
Maimonides, the Jewish
philosopher and educator whose
850th birthday is being marked
this year; and four-year Jewish
calendar.
The catalogue also includes a
list of famous Jewish scientists, a
description of Yom Kippur and
Rosh Hashanah, recipes for
Jewish food, Hebrew blessings
and a popular Hebrew song,
Bashana Haba'ah. The Jewish
Publishers Association last year
distributed, according to reports
from Moscow, some 10,000
catalogues with similar
information.
fS^^!Se^^?S\^^^^^ Page 19-B
Chaplain Hails
'Invaluable' Chance
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Student-rabbi Julie
Schwartz, the first Jewish
woman to be sworn into the
United States armed forces
as a military chaplain, has
expressed the view that
"it's very exciting to see
women rabbis move into all
aspects of religious life."
Her comment was reported in
the current issue of the "Chroni-
cle," the publication of the
Hebrew Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion.
According to the HUC-JIR
publication, she is spending the
summer in Newport, R.I. at the
U.S. Navy Chaplaincy school, ac-
companied by her husband and
fellow rabbinic student, Steven
Ballaban, also a fourth year stu-
dent at the Reform seminary in
Cincinnati. She will join the Navy
after she is ordained in the sum-
mer of 1986. Her husband also has
been sworn in as a member of the
Navy's Theological Program at
Newport.
That program is offered for
chaplaincy candidates of all faiths,
according to a newletter of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis (CCAR), the association of
American Reform rabbis. The
newsletter said they will be the
first husband-and-wife rabbinic
team in the Armed Forces.
According to the "Chronicle,"
the student-rabbi said her plans
after ordination "are to continue
in the Naval Reserves, together
with holding a regular congrega-
tional position. My husband will
pursue further studies while also a
reserve chaplain."
Schwartz said, "This is an ex-
citing and invaluable opportunity
that can provide a completely dif-
ferent perspective on being a rab-
bi. People who are serving in the
armed forces need support, and
this is our chance to help meet the
spiritual needs of Jewish men and
women in the Navy."
She said she was particularly
pleased that she had been sworn
into the Navy by Chaplain Ed-
ward Rosenthal, also a Reform
rabbinic student.
HARRIET and MILT GREEN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. RICHARD J. HORWICH
FRANCINE and RONALD
MITCHELL, SHERRY and JENINE
Wish Relatives and Friends
A Very Healthy and Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JERRY ISAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. GEORGE JACOBSON
Wish Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. H. KORENVAES
Wish The Entire Jewish Community
And Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MRS. JOSEPH LANDSMAN
Wish Friends, Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. EDWARD LAWRENCE
Wish All Family, Friends and Clients
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. SIDNEY LEFCOURT
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. BENJAMIN LEIGH
Wish All Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. SHELDON LELCHUK and Family
Wish Friends A Happy and Healthy New Year


i 12-C
Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Ukrainian and Baltic Groups Said To Be
Seeking $l-million To Thwart Inquiry
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) A
loose coalition of nationalist
Ukrainian, Estonian, Lat-
vian and Lithuanian
organizations has launched
a $1 million "information
campaign" designed to
thwart the Commission of
enquiry on War Criminals in
Canada and weaken Parlia-
ment's will to bring Nazi
war criminals to justice, ac-
cording to the Canadian
representative of the Simon
Wiesenthal Center.
"The coalition is working hard
to convince Canada's political
leaders that any effort to bring
Nazi war criminals to justice will
be unpopular, futile and politically
dangerous," says Sol Littman, the
Center's representative.
"They're also preparing a
number of propaganda
smokescreens designed to per-
suade the Commission of Enquiry
that there aren't enough war
criminals in Canada to merit the
government's attention despite
the fact that hundreds of war
criminals made it to Canada after
the war and are living here in
relative comfort and security."
AS EVIDENCE, Littman
points to the May, 1985 edition of
New Perspectives, the official
publication of the Ukrainian Na-
tional Youth Federation, which
describes the war crimes inquiry
headed by Jules Deschenes,
former justice of the Quebec
Superior Court, as "the single
greatest threat to the Ukrainian
diaspora that we have faced since
the Second World War."
In the same article, Lubomir
Luciuk, a spokesman for the Civil
Liberties Commission of the
Ukrainian Canadian Committee is
quoted as saying: "The (Ukrai-
nian) community must realize that
this is an attack on the Ukrainian
National Federation and any
other Ukrainians who came to
Canada from Eastern Europe."
Luciuk urged Ukrainian Cana-
dians to contribute to the $1
million war chest, explaining that
the money will be used for travel,
legal fees and research. Some
MR. PETER LOPEZ
Wish All Clients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. EDWARD LUSTIQ
Wish Family and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
New Year Greetings
From
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH W. MALEK
ADAM and ROBYN
MR. and MRS. SAMUEL MATTER
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. MARTIN MAYER
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
COUNCILMAN and MRS. TED NELSON
Happy New Year To Everyone
DR. and MRS. SOL NUSSBAUM
Wish The Entire Jewish Community,
Friends, Patients and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. FRED OBER
and HEIDI LEE
Wish Their Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD PELZNER and FAMILY
With Friends A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. EARL PERTNOY
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
$250,000 will be set aside for top-
ranking legal talent to help the
Ukrainian Canadian Committee
prepare its submission to the
Royal Commission.
SIMILAR ARTICLES have ap-
peared in the New Pathway, a
Ukrainian-language publication
printed in Toronto and other
Ukrainian and Baltic weeklies ac-
cross the country.
"A similar campaign, intended
to blunt the work of the U.S.
Justice Department's Nazi-
hunting Office of Special In-
vestigations, has been underway
in the United States for the past
five years," Littman said. "It
hasn't been effective there and
it's unlikely to succeed in
Canada."
Judging from articles which
have already appeared in some of
the nationalist Ukrainian
newspapers, Littman said, the
following bugaboos will be raised:
Any attempt to root out war
criminals of Ukrainian or Baltic
origin is an attack on all members
of the Ukrainian and Baltic
communities.
All "Soviet evidence" is
tainted and should be spurned by
the Deschenes Commission.
The Ukrainian SS division,
which fought on the Nazi's side in
World war II, committed no
atrocities, burned down no
villages and did nothing to hinder
the allied cause. (As many as
2,000 members of that division
are believed to have settled in
Canada.)
Organizations such as the
Simon Wiesenthal Center, the
Canadian'; Jewish Congress and '
the B'nai B'rith League of Human
Rights, which are pressing the
government to take action against
war criminals who found shelter
in Canada, are engaged in a
"witch hunt" in which "mere
membership" in a Nazi SS divi-
sion or pro-Nazi political organiza-
tion will ,be seen as proof of
criminality.
Service in the ranks of the
Waffen (military) SS was no dif-
ferent than serving in the regular
German army (the Wehrmacht) or
the British Commandos.
Millions of Ukrainians and
Baits died at Nazi hands, and hun-
dreds of Jewish lives were saved
by Latvians, Estonians, Lithua-
nians and Ukrainians at the risk of
their own lives.
"WE HAVE always recognized
that many heroic Baltic and
Ukrainian families sheltered
Jewish families at the risk of their
own lives," Littman said. "We
honor them. May their names live
forever.
"But the alleged war criminals
were not among them. Indeed,
those Baits and Ukrainians who
served in Nazi-led police and
military units would have been the
first to denounce their fellow
countrymen for sheltering Jews.
They also helped round up their
own people for slave labor in Ger-
many and took brutal revenge on
the families of the young men who
took to the woods to fight the
Nazis.
"There is no 'witch hunt' under-
way. The Simon Wiesenthal
Center although it will not ban-
dy names about in the press is
operating on the basis of rather
good information."
Nor is the search for war
criminals in any sense an attack
on the whole of the Ukrainian and
Baltic communities, Littman em-
phasized. "In the very first
paragraphs of the Wiesenthal
Center's presentation before the
Deschenes Commission, we made
it clear that we were interested
only in that very small percentage
of individuals in any group that is
alleged to have committed war
crimes. We do not believe that the
sins of the fathers should be
visited on the children; nor do we
believe in collective guilt or group
liability."
THE TERM "mere member-
ship" is also intended to confuse,
said the Wiesenthal Center
representative. "At minimum,
mere membership in an SS aux-
iliary police or military unit meant
taking up arms against the
Allies," Littman said. "It meant
rounding up Jews and Gypsies and
forcing them into ghettos. At
minimum it meant scheduling the
death trains and preparing the
mass graves of the victims."
The biggest bugaboo, Littman
said, will be the question of
"Soviet evidence."
"It's just plain silly to argue
that because we mistrust the
Soviet legal system that all
evidence from Soviet sources be
automatically rejected," Littman
said. "It would be equally silly to
insist that because we do trust our
own legal system that all evidence
from Western sources should be
automatically admissible. These
are matters for the courts to
decide."
West Germany, Holland and the
United States have been making
effective use of documents and
witnesses from the Soviet Union
for a number of years now, Litt-
man pointed out. Soviet archives
in Lvov, Kiev, Vilnius, Riga and
Tallin contain large caches of cap-
tured German documents which
offer the best, most .~
evidence of Nazi war c 1
THERE ARE a|
witnesses to atrocities \
in the Soviet Union, wk
of the worst Nazi crip
committed. "While one i
ly skeptical of Soviet ev!
most of the Soviet doeta
witnesses are verifiable *
other sources," Littman saidl
"The Office of Special \
vestigations of the Us \A
Department states that' vD.
the Soviet documents emp
German or U.S. trials has
been found to be forged and i
of the Soviet witnesses his <
been found to be false."
Last Feb. 24, Fr. Myron Sti
a veteran of the 14th Grew
Waffen SS Division and pastel
St. Mary's Ukrainian Cathi
Church in Toronto, repeatl
many of the ancient shibbolthl
about Jews in a speech madeovol
a local milticultural radio station.!
Stasiw offered the following er
planations for 300 years
periodic pogroms against
Jews in the Ukraine:
"(The Jews) do not say whatl
were the causes of these antii
Jewish pogroms, that they held!
the keys to the Christian churches!
and would not allow the people to
enter to pray. They were th
tavernkeepers who robbed tht]
peasants of their land in exchangd
for whiskey, and made them their]
serfs." Fr. Stasiw ended hishomi-J
ly with the warning: "Let them]
not call the wolf from the forest."!
DR. and MRS. DAVID PINOSKY
Wish Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. PAUL RICHMAN and Family
Wish All Patients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. LESTER ROGERS
Wishes Clients and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
BOB, GLORIA, RENEE SHARi,
and TODD ALAN ROSEN
of 9242 SW 78th Place
Pepperwood, Miami
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. MORTON ROSENBLUTH
Wishes Patients, Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS JACK ROSENTHAL
AVI and OREN
Wish Friends and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. NORMAN SANDMAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD SCHARLIN
and Family
With The Entire Jewish Community,
Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. JULIEN and DR. SCHATZ
1680 Meridian Ave., M.B. 531-3476
We Wish All A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. LEONARD SCHWALB
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year



The Labor-Likud Coalition Has A
'Reasonable Chance' To Survive
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
MK Dan Meridor of Likud,
who is a close associate of
Foreign Minister and Depu-
ty Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
says he believes that there is
a ^reasonable chance" that
the Labor-Likud coalition
government will survive its
full term and that Shamir
will replace Shimon Peres
as Premier, as agreed, in
October, 1986.
"I am not a prophet but I
believe that the coalition govern-
ment will complete its full term
despite the differences between
Labor and Likud," Meridor, who
is a member of the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee, said in an interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency here.
"There are some members of
the Labor Party who are pressur-
ing Peres to dissolve the govern-
ment and not let Shamir assume
the Premiership as the 'rotation
agreement' (between Labor and
Likud) stipulates," Meridor
asserted.
"BUT I probably have more
moral faith in Peres than those
members of the Labor Party. I do
not believe that Peres will play a
trick and break the unity govern-
ment just to stop Shamir from be-
ing the Premier. We agreed to a
national unity government only
because it had the 'rotation agree-
ment' in it."
The 38-year-old Meridor, who
was the Cabinet Secretary from
1982 to 1984 while the Likud was
in power, said there are no serious
differences at present between
Labor and Likud to warrant the
dissolution of the coalition and
holding new elections.
"Look," Meridor said, "had
King Hussein come forward and
said that he agrees to a territorial
compromise with Israel, then,
maybe, there would be reason to
dissolve the coalition government.
But the differences between
Labor and Likud all can be dealt
with according to the agreed
guidelines of the coalition govern-
ment, which were the basis for the
unity government."
MERIDOR SAID that the
disagreement between Labor and
MRS. REBEL SOLLOWAY
BENES and ALAN GLACKMAN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. IRVIN STEINBERG
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH SURES
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MR. and MRS. SANDFORD SUSMAN and Family
Wish All Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. EDWARD SWERDLIN
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. RODNEY R. TEICHNER and Family
Wish All Friends and Patients
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. HUGH UNGER
Wish Patients and Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOEL VOGEL and Family
Wish Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. MORTON B. ZEMEL
JOE, PNINA, FRED
ALISA, BRUCE and AVIVA
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year
Likud as to how to solve the
dispute with Egypt over Taba, the
tiny strip of beachfront south of
Eilat, is a marginal one. "You do
not dissolve a government on such
an issue. This is a technical issue
whether to go to arbitration or
reach a compromise. Sooner or
later, I believe, a solution will be
found, "he said.
As to the issue of Judaea and
Samaria, Meridor said that the
guidelines of the coalition govern-
ment clearly show that Labor has
agreed to continue to build new
settlements in the territories, to
adhere to the Camp David
Agreements, and to oppose the
creation of a Palestinian state.
Therefore, Meridor pointed out,
all the major aspects of Israel's
foreign policy, over which Labor
and Likud sometimes have sharp-
ly different approaches, were
dealt with before the coalition was
formed and cannot now serve as a
cause for not completing the
scheduled term of the
government.
ASKED ABOUT the possibility
that the power struggle among
top Herut leaders, such as
Shamir, Ariel Sharon and David
Levy, might influence the future
of the coalition government,
Meridor stressed that Shamir is
the leader of Herut who will
replace Peres as Premier in Oc-
tober next year.
"The question of Herut's leader-
ship is clearly solved until 1988, if
not beyond that. Shamir was
elected by the Party (Herut) to be
the candidate for Premier twice.
There are political arguments in
Herut," Meridor continued, "but I
don't think they can have an im-
pact on the future of the coalition
government."
Meridor, who was in New York
after attending the conference of
the Coalition for Alternatives in
Jewish Education in Chicago, was
asked about reports that Rabbi
Meir Kahane's popularity in Israel
is growing steadily and that the
Kach Party which he heads might
increase its power at the expense
of Herut and other rightwing
parties.
"Kahane is the opposite of
Herut," Meridor responded
somewhat passionately. "He is a
man with dangerous, immoral and
un Jewish ideas that revolt me
and and are against all the basic
ideals I was brought up on. In
order to fight this dangerous
phenomenon we recently passed a
bill in the Knesset that will outlaw
racist lists from participating in
the election. Kahane advocates
and incites racism ..."
CONTINUING. Meridor
said:"there is some exaggeration
on the part of the media regarding
Kahane's growing power. When
Jews are murdered by Arab ter-
rorists there is a surge of anger
and growing emotions, and some
people in the margin of society
tend to support Kahane.
"But when people calm down
they see that Kahane is not the
answer, because if you develop an
attitude that all the Arabs are ter-
rorists and they have to be ousted
(from israel) that in itself can turn
a great deal of Arabs into ter-
rorists. In a way, the stronger
Kahane gets the stronger the
PLO gets. Kahane claims that
Jews and Arabs cannot live
together in a Jewish state this
is exactly what the PLO wants to
prove.
"But we, the Zionists, say that
Arabs and Jews can indeed coex-
ist in a Jewish state. It is difficult.
But we have to learn together how
to do it. We Jews cannot make
generalizations (about the Arabs)
as Kahane does, especially
because we were victims of
generalizations throughout our
history."
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 21-B
JVS Opens Office In Palo Alto
To Help Jews Hit By Volatile
Job Market In Silicon Valley
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) The plight of Jewish
professionals and technicians battered by the volatile job
market in Silicon Valley has led the Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice here to open a branch office in Palo Alto.
Fierce competition for dwindling opportunities as hard-
hit computer firms close or transfer operations overseas
were cited by Susan Schenck, manager of the Palo Alto
branch.
u S?5 S11? she was ^ing to applicants who have
been laid off who at one time were much in demand. She
said the new JVS branch will not only help people skilled in
high technology, who have been made jobless, but also
those m enterprises providing business services to high-
tech firms and those offering retail goods and services to
laid-off employees.
Schenck said the JVS decided to open the branch to
make closer contact with employers and their needs and to
the needs of the rapidly growing Jewish community. The
JVS services in the new branch include job listings and
referrals, workshops in job-hunting skills and group career
counseling.
GREETINGS
From
ALBERT ZEMLOCK
MR. and MRS. BARRY ZIMBLER
Wish Friends and Family and
The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Cartel Imports Inc.
7495 N.W. 48 St., Miami 592-2760
Afr. and Mrs. George Feldenkreis Wish Everyone
A Happy New Year
S and S Discount
7306 Collins Ave., M.B. 861-0694
Happy New Year To All Our Friends and Customers
Gables Health Mart
1426 Ponce De Leon Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Happy New Year
FEDCO
1605 Washington Ave., Miami
531-5583
Happy New Year
Central Taxi
740 Alton Rd., Miami Beach
538-1525
Happy New Year
Bay Harbor Fine Foods
Phone Orders Prime Meats Fancy Groc.
1077 95th St., Bay Harbor Island Phone 865-0331
Happy New Year
Mario Chuy Hair Salon
715 NE 167th St., North Miami Beach
651-4061
Happy New Year
^


te iz
Page 22-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Harry Starr: An Untiring Champion of Jewish
Intellectual and Humanitarian Pursuits

By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
A recent New York Times arti-
cle featured a rebirth in new
swaddling clothes of an old ugly
issue: quotas at Ivy League
universities. This time, it wasn't
Jews who were the subject of in-
quiry, but Asian Americans. "We
have enough of them," the article
quoted a Princeton professor.
"And someone said, 'You have to
admit, there are a lot.' "
The article went on to refer to
these new challenges as "reminis-
cent of those made by Jews on the
same campuses 30 years ago."
But it was over 60 years ago
that Harry Starr, then a recent
graduate of Harvard and in his
first year at Harvard Law School,
faced the same issue regarding
Jews. At that time, too, the fear,
expressed in private meetings,
was "overrepresentation."
In 1922. Starr was president of
the Harvard Menorah Society.
The society had been established
in 1960 by Henry Hurwit and the
interrelationship of Jewish tradi-
tion and belief. And no one em-
bodied these principles more than
Starr, an immigrant boy from a
poor working-class home, a
devoted scholar, a true
Renaissance man.
CONFRONTED by the revela-
tion of a growing anti-Semitic
undercurrent at Harvard, the
"fear of a new Jerusalem" at the
prestigious old Brahmin institu-
tion, Starr tackled head-on the
possibility of a quota system. The
quiet diplomacy with which the
young Starr negotiated himself in
a series of meetings with Chris-
tian representatives of te faculty
and student body won for Jews a
noble victory, and, amazingly,
made Harvard the first and
foremost American university to
establish a Jewish studies
program.
Beyond that, the episode made
of Starr an untiring champion of
Jewish intellectual and
humanitarian pursuits who would
continue for the rest of his life to
devote all his time to the establish-
ment and endowment of Jewish
studies, and to being an eloquent
spokesman for the nobility of all
mankind.
Now in his 85th year, Starr, im-
mensely kind and quick-witted,
wonders at the attention paid him.
Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Miami
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Rabbi
Sidney Cooperman
President
A Joyous New Year To All
The Sisterhood The Men's Club The P. T.A.
The Players The Forty-Niners The Family League
and all Affiliated Youth Groups
Temple Israel
Of Greater Miami
Miami't Pioneer efo/m Cottgrmgattof
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskeil Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perimeter Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Director of Education and Programming Jack L. Sparks
Wishing the Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year.
Gerald K. Schwartz, President
Temple Samu-El
9353 SW 152nd Ave., Miami 382-3668
'A Conservative Synagogue Serving South Dade'
Edwin P. Farfacr. Rabbi
Murray H. Knopf, Executive Director
Steven Krana, Education Director
Howard Roaenbloom. President
Phyllis Greenfield. Sisterhood President
Jack Miller. Men's Club President
Eileen Moore, Young At Heart President
Deborah Safra, Couples' Club President
Happy New Year To The Entire Jewish Community
Hallandale Jewish Center, Inc.
BETH TEFILAH (CONSERVATIVE)
416 Northeast 8th Avenue Hallandale, Florida 33009
Phone 454-9100
Happy New Year 1985
RiBOi. Dr. Ctrl Kiin
Prsi.dsnt. Mr. Jk Soiaosl
a man who for all his unceasing ef-
forts and magnanimous gifts is
still the humble gentleman he has
always been. An astounding
raconteur, Starr recalled in an in-
terview all the events which made
and colored his life, from his birth
in Vitebsk (that Russian-Jewish
cosmos imprinted indelibly in our
memories by another great Jew,
Marc Chagall) to his boyhood in
Gloversville, N.Y., his sojourn at
his beloved Harvard University,
and his many long years as direc-
tor of the Lucius N. Littauer
Foundation, a small giant of
benefaction to Jewish intellectual
pursuits whose story unfolds
along with Starr's.
For 56 years, Starr has been
president of the Littauer Founda-
tion, a source of funding for
Jewish studies programs and.
above all, a patron saint, Jewish
style, of scholars whose books
may not have ever been completed
and published if not for the
assistance and. even more,
supreme interest that he Founda-
tion, in the person of Starr, has in-
vested in them.
THE FOUNDATION'S exten-
sive list of publications bespeaks
the personal involvement that
Lucius Littauer, and Starr, took
in realizing the dreams of such
tremendous historians as Salo
Baron, Lucy Dawidowicz, Harry
Wolfson, Raphael Patai, Amitai
Etzioni, S.D. Goitein, Yehuda
Bauer, and other writers of
historical, scientific, art and fic-
tional works far too numerous to
ist.
Starr and Littauer shared a
mutual boyhood home, a small city
in upstate New York whose name,
Gloversville, reveals its origins,
and on which Starr can expound
to such extent that a gorgeious
microcosm of worlds all flow
together into one amazing pic-
ture. Starr's areas of expertise
are vast. He can talk as readily
and knowledgeably of the leather
tanning industry as of Jewish life
in small towns, in Europe as well
as America; of classical and
American history; changing
fashions and new technologies;
politics and human foibles. His
acute memory provides thumbnail
sketches and marvelous vignettes
of 20th Century Jewish life as it
went through its tremendous
changes.
He has stored away, for exam-
ple, vivid pictures of Jewish
workers, socialists, atheists,
capitalists one and all gathered
at the synagogue on Saturdays
("It was the social center hard
to understand that sort of thing")
or eating only kosher meat, pro-
vided by his mother's butcher
shop, the only one in town.
His recollections, his knowledge
of the workers' origins in Warsaw
and Grenoble, create a crazy quilt
of "curious paradoxes" radical
workers, founders of the
Workmen's Circle, future
businessmen, '"kosher
freethinkers" living together in
a small but cosmopolitan town in
northern New York State.
"They created a little Jewish
world up there," recalled Starr,
his eyes misting over as he slipped
for a moment back into a life that
had receded pleasantly into his
past. "You'd call it a ghetto ex-
cept they weren't restricted. They
could live anywhere they wanted,
but they associated with each
other."
STARR'S BOYHOOD was ex
emplary, winning prizes for best
essay and public speaking, from
the DAR as well as from Mr. Lit-
tauer. who had become a wealthy
man. a U.S. Congressman, a
benefactor of multiple causes. But
not yet acquainted with the
remarkable young man who would
in later years be hi* adviser, his
legal counsel, is literary critic.
Young Starr, before the school
day began, would deliver meat for
his mother, along wit his brother
and sister, then attend both public
and Hebrew school.
Starr recalls with pride how, no
matter how little money there
was, his mother always put aside
the 50 cents a week needed for
each of her children to have
Hebrew lessons. His mother was a
feminist, Starr remarked, without
ever having heard the term, work-
ing from down to dusk, and
evidently instilling in her children
the diligence and devotion to fami-
ly and Jewish life that would
forever be their legacy, their
guidance.
His mother had been widowed
before she ever got the chance to
join her husband in America, he
who had gone ahead to start the
butcher shop and make a new life
for his family waiting, as did so
many others, in Russia, waiting
for the tickets to the new land of
promise.
SPEAKING NO English,
knowing nothing of business.
Starr's mother, nonetheless, went
ahead as she had to, raising her
children to be Jewish American
citizens with a keen sense of both
cultures. Harry Starr applied this
confluence of ideals to his studies,
his goals, his life's work.
By the age of five, he
remembered, he was translating
the Bible from Hebrew to Yiddish
("It wasn't at all unusual"). An
assiduous reader, he would read
anything he could get his hands
on. And he particularly recalls
reading magazine articles about
Harvard, until his desire to attend
that university went unbounded,
so that he declined all the scholar-
ships offered him for almost any
American university and worked
while he prepared and read for the
exams Harvard gave to any boy
who had enough of a wish to go
there.
In the fall of 1917, with about
$200 saved, Starr went to Cam-
bridge to sit for five days of writ-
ten examinations for entrance in-
to the class that would begin in a
few weeks time. He succeeded.
Starr's excellent career at Har-
vard never changed his Jewish
Beth Torah Congregation
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
North Miami Beach Phone 947-7528
Wishes The Entire Community and Members
A Happy and Healthy New Year.
Dr. Max A. Lipechiu, Rabbi
Randall J. Konigsburg, Assistant Rabbi Zvee Aroni. Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Executive Director -
Rhea Schwartzberg. Religious School Principal
Shulamit Gittelson. Early Childhood Director -
Rev. Mordecbai Adler. Ritual Director David Brook. Youth Director
May the travails of last year nourish wisdom tor
this year's dreams and aspirations
Temple Judea
Of Coral Gables
A Reform Congregation
5500 Granada Blvd Phone 667-565'
MICHAEL B. EISENSTAT. RABBI
Executive Director Cantonal So _
ESTELLE P. MICHELSON LAUREL N. SWERDIN
President Education Directo'
STANLEY D.BULBIN RAY BERMAN
Happy, Healthy New Year
National Council
Of Jewish Women
Greater Miami Section
Temple Sinai
18801 N.E. 22nd Ave. North Miami Beach 3313
Phone-932-9010
Wishes Members and Family A Happy and Healthy New W
Ralph P. Kingeley. Rabbi
Julian I. Cook, AssociaU Rabbi
Irving Sbulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
George J. Berlin. President
I


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 23-B
Bciousness. He recalled his
iish class, for which he had to
Ite a daily theme, and how he
h>te stories centering on his
twish upbringing which he would
Lad in class. An outstanding stu-
Int in all his studies, he was
|ways able to maintain his
stinct Jewish heritage. A very
live member of the Menorah
Lsociation, Starr mixed both
orlds without ever blurring the
les between them, and has never
toe strayed from that patch of a
Ih dual heritage.
(cultural pluralism,
king part in an orchestra of
^ny ethnic groups playing
i ther, that isn't so." Reflec-
on the assimilationist trends
ling ground as the years pre-
ssed and more doors were
^ned to Jews, Starr raised the
ctre of the perils of assimila-
"After a generation or so,
1st immigrants forget their
:>le ancestry." Starr in this
was speaking not only of
k s but of all ethnic groups who
;ht haven in the "melting
" children of immigrants who
't speak a word of their
ents' mother tongue.
Karr spoke of "the old
lioned Americanization idea,
you have to prove you're
kericanized." For example,
pr said, all the early Jewish
ney went into settlement
Jses, educational programs,
with the object "to Americanize.
They wanted to become adapted
to the world in which they lived
And they've been successful in a
certain way. Because the very
people who had all the memories
did nothing in their whole lives to
build up these memories in the
next generation." And how, he
asked, could their children "resist
the embrace of the new World?'"
The ghetto, said Starr, "meant
something good. It not only kept
the enemy out it kept the Jew
in. It preserved the Jew." In
Lurope, he recalled, many doors
opened up only upon formal bap-
tism. But in the U.S., he stressed,
where Jews are not being baptiz-
ed, they just disappear."
Starr's entire life has been
devoted to the cancellation of this
trend toward "just disappearing."
Starr's dedication to Jewish pride
has been lifelong, but it may be
most notable in his involvement in
"The Affair at Harvard," which is
also the title of the article he
wrote for the Menorah Journal of
October, 1922. Starr's role in the
"affair," of which he speaks
modestly and only when asked if
there weren't quotas on Jews in
the Harvard of his day, is a clear
forerunner of his total involve-
ment in the Jewish presence in
university life, particularly
Harvard.
STARR'S monograph bears
repeating, for it is within its

New Year Greetings From
Dep. of Florida Ladies Auxiliary
Jewish War Veterans of U.S.A.
Edith Novins, President
YIDDISH CULTURE WINKLE
Happy New Ytar
:
Menashe Feldsteln, President
Sarah Kaufman, Vice President
Sheva Bertand, Financial Sacratary
Roaa Lusky, Recording Sacratary
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE MIAMI GAKIIKNS DRIVE 947 1435
RABBI SIMCHA FREEDMAN CANTOR IAN ALPERN
CoaffrfaraUoil Praaldrat. Samuel 1. Left
Sisterhood Praaidaat. Barbara Roarn Mra'a Club Prnuorau Alan Dania
Ezeeativr Dirartor. Robert A. Kfavtti
Educatioaal Director. Dr. lit n|amin Lechner
Early Childhood Director. Joan BergaanB
Rtlariou School Fried pal. Stuart Marhowiir
Happy New Year
Ami t Women
(Formerly American Mlzrachi Women)
Best Wishes for Blessings of Good Health and Good Fortune
For This Year and Ever After. With An Added Prayer For Peace
In Israel And The Entire World
Florida Council
L'Shana Tova
MIAMI CHAPTER
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE
Roger Beretein. President
William A (iralnick. Southeast Regional Director
Julie Roeen. Aeeistanl Area Director
Temple Or-Olom
8755 SW 16th St., Miami 221-9131
Rabbi Samuel Rudy
Cantor David Ka'zanataln
Pieeldent Paler F. Homlk
i Happy and Healthy New Year To The Jewish Community
?MP\,E ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
A CASINO CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
Withes Our People Everywhere
A dealthy, Happy & Peaceful New Year
. Shapiro, labbi Marshall II Cohan. Prae.
*. Cantor Dorothy H. Grant. Exec. Dir./Admin.
Davtd Hoeenthal. Aux. Cantor
TEMPLE BETH-EL
100 Hlspmola Ave., North Bay Village 33141
^nt Irtng Bunl Cantor Danny Tadmora
. We WishThe Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Ithe New Year b a bountiful one and bring
[measure of happ.ness to our members and
the entire Jewish community
aE NER TA1V.ID SISTERHOOD
Mrs. Oouue Cohen, President
carefully worded phrases that can
be found the cornerstone not only
of Jewish academic freedoms, but
of American democracy as it en-
compasses all Americans.
In it, he wrote: "To us there
could be no 'Jewish problem,' it
was an entirely subjective pro-
blem; the Jew canot look upon
himself as a problem. He is a full
American with the right to
domicile not only on the soil but in
the institutions arising from that
soil. We sought to eliminate all
talk of special treatment for any
group. You cannot compromise on
principle: you cannot disguise in-
tolerance by talking of expedien-
cy, or of balancing 'racial
interests.'
"It was the most natural thing,"
wrote Starr, "for these kindly-
mannered men, who bore not the
slighest trace of malice, to admit
that a few good Jews were quite
delightful at the club, or hotel
but that they must not 'for their
own sake accumulate.' "
The Jewish members present at
the several meetings on the sub-
ject of quotas at Harvard resolved
to organize Jewish life through
the Menorah Association "so that
not an element of reproach might
be laid to Jewish men." But, Starr
wrote, "we were not doing this in
any sense to justify our right to be
here, but to justify ourselves, as
heirs to the Jewish tradition; to
elevate ourselves."
AND, he continued, "the whole
system of American dmeocracy
was lost if it taught them to coddle
a prejudice instead of tearing it
out of their hearts. Perhaps," he
wrote, "some of us had a lucky
100 years' start on the others in
getting here ... We were all the
American race in the forming."
There has never been a quota
system at Harvard.
Beyond that, because of the con-
stant work of Harry Starr and
Lucius Littauer, Harvard has
since 1926 been the seat of the
Nathan Littauer Professorship of
Hebrew Literature and
Philosophy, the first endowed
chair in Jewish Studies at an
American university held for
many years by Prof. Harry
Wolfson; the Nathan Littauer en-
dowment for Hebrew books in the
Harvard University Library,
which was the first major endow-
ment for Judaica library resources
at an American university; the
Littauer School of Public Ad-
ministration at Harvard, now the
John F. Kennedy School of
Government in the Littauer
Center; and, since 1978, the
Harry S. Starr Professorship in
Jewish Studies.
Starr has served, or currently
serves, as officer or board
member of 22 organizations in the
U.S. and Israel dedicated to the
provision of educational, civic and
philanthropic activities. A
widower, with loving memories of
his late wife, Cecil Aaronson
Starr, Starr lives modestly in New
York City, surrounded by the
scores of books which to this day,
he reads voraciously.
Six People
Injured In
Bomb Blast
JERUSALEM (JTA) Six
people were slightly injured when
a bomb exploded in a bus stop in
Gilo, a suburn of Jerusalem. They
were rushed to a hospital and
released several hours later after
being treated for their injuries
and shock. Police detained 11
suspects in the bombing. The
bomb was planted in a bush near
the bus stop. The explosion
demolished ^tht bus stop and an
adjacent fence. Windows were
smashed in nearby houses.
El Al Conducting Intensive Safety
Tests On Its Boeing Jets
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) El Al
is conducting exhaustive safety
tests on its Boeing jumbo jets,
both on the ground and in the air,
in the aftermath of recent fatal ac-
cidents involving the American-
built aircraft.
The company's engineers are
using X-ray and other
sophisticated equipment to search
for invisible cracks in the Pratt
and Whitney engines that power
the Boeing 737. Such faults are
believed responsible for the fire
that destroyed a British Airways
737 at Manchester Airport last
month with the loss of 50 lives.
Guided by the Boeing com-
pany's own crash data analysis, El
Al's overhaul unit at Ben Gurion
Airport is also examining and
testing the engines of the larger
747 jets. Last month's Japan
Airlines crash that took more than
500 lives and the Air India plane
that crashed off the coast of
Ireland in June were both Boeing
747s.
"We religiously implement all of
the bulletins regarding safety
regardless of cost," Arieh
Fruchter, head of El Al's overhaul
unit, told The Jerusalem Post.
With far fewer Israelis flying
abroad this summer because of
the steep travel tax. El Al cannot
afford to ground its planes in peak
season.
Some maintenance work is be-
ing carried out in flight. Top
technicians aboard the planes
monitor their performance while
airborne.
train tramm vr\\xa\ TOrS
rsi e m e a
HEBREW EDUCATORS ALLIANCE
Of llllll MIAMI
A HAPPY NEW YEAR AND
GREETINGS OF THE SEASON
Benjamin Ben-Art, President Gladys Diamond,Vlce-Pres
Zahava Sukanfc, Past Pros. Shula Ban-David, I Vlce-Pres.
_______ **** Shimon Alay, Hon. Pres.
Temple Menorah
620 75th St. Miami Beach Phone 866-0221
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Wishes Member* A Happy New Year
Beth David Congregation
Wishes The Jewish Community A Happy New Year
Sol Landau Rabbi Emeritus
Sam Badanea President
Temple Bnai Zion
200 178th St. Miami Beach, Fla. 33160
Phone -932-2159
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Temple King Solomon
Of Miami Beach Extend New Year Greetings to
All Their Members and Friends
Dr. David Raab. Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab, Cantor
Morrla Klotz, Praaldant
Temple Moses
1200 Normandy Dr., Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Phone 868-2233
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Temple Israel of Miramar
6920 S. W. 35th St.. Miramar, Florida 33023
Wishes The Entire Community and Members
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Temple Beth Am
5950 N. Kendall Dr., Miami Phone 667-6667
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Beth Kodesh Congregation
Sisterhood and Men's Club
Extend New Year Greetings To All!
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Sol Chaaln, Cantor, High Holy Daya
_________1101 S.W. 12th Ave., Miami
Hadassah
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MIAMI BEACH REGION
JEAN TEMKIN. PraaKJanl
MIAMI REGION
MANE EISSENBERG Pratlrjant
Aventura Turnberry Florists
Italian Elegance Italian Imports Italian Florists
Bar Mitzvabs Weddings Fruit Baskets Parties
Flow-'s For All Occasions Order by Phone AMX Visa Mastercard
2962 C Aventura Blvd. 931-6231
Happy New Year
ad


Page 24-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1,985
* '
Holocaust Survivors Examine Growing
Phenomenon Of Holocaust Deniers
Two More U.S. Book Publishers
Denied Visas To Moscow Book ? J
By MICHAEL 80LOMON
OTTAWA (JTA) -
The growing phenomenon
of Holocaust denial and the
"moral obscenity" of the
presence in Canada of as
many as 2,000 Nazi war
criminals, more than a few
of them naturalized
citizens, was examined at a
day-long forum of the
Gathering of Holocaust
Survivors and their
children here.
The three-day gathering heard
speakers representing the
Canadian government,
academics, parliamentarians,
jurists, leaders of the Jewish
community and the survivors
themselves.
The gathering marked the
40th anniversary of the
liberation of the Nazi death
camps. The occasion was fraught
with irony because four decades
after the event1 commemorated,
the victims have come under
attack in many quarters.
ADDRESSING the forum.
Manuel Prutschi, national
director of community relations
of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, observed that
Holocaust denial is the newest of
the intertwined strands of anti-
Semitism which include the age-
old stereotype of Jews as
crooked financiers, an in-
ternational conspiracy by Jews
to rule the world, and anti-
Zionism.
The latter, according to
Prutschi, "is the cutting edge
and the point of the knife of anti-
Semitism."
Irving Arbella, a professor at
Glendon College at York
University and co-author of the
book, "None is too Many,"
which dealt with th exclusion of
Jewish refugees from Canada
before, during and after World
War II, referred to this situation
in his address to the gathering.
"We live in a society that is not
racist, but, in fact, had racism
written in black and white in
(its) immigration rules long
before the war with 'preferential
and non-preferential' im-
migrants," he said.
BERNARD OSTRY, Deputy
Minister of Culture in the
J.M. Upton
Insurance Agency
i Ronald A. Lipton, President
7000 SW 62 Ave., Suite C-219
S.Miami, Florida33143
662-2862
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year
To Our Clients & Friends
I
Mr. & Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
and Family
Tugboat Annie's
555 N.E. 15th St. Miami Phone 374-2815
Wish All Friends and Customers
A Happy and Healthy New Year
GRAND BA HOTEL
2669 South Bay shore Drive
Coconut Grove. Florida 33133
Ontario government, who
chaired the afternoon session,
contrasted the exclusion of
Jewish refugees with the open
door for Nazi war criminals,
among whom are the Holocaust
deniers. He reminded his
audience of several thousand
that the late Prime Minister
Wiliam McKenzie King signed
an Order in Council permitting
three war criminals to remain in
Canada after the Supreme Court
had ordered them deported.
"You could not enter Canada
if suspected to be a Communist
and Jews were suspected of
sympathizing with the Com-
munists. But nobody asked the
5,000 members of the Waff en SS
Galicia division what they did
during the war," Ostry said.
Sol Littman, Canadian
representative of the Los
Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal
Center, called Canada today "a
haven for Nazi war criminals."
He noted that it took 20 years to
deport the notorious Albert
Helmut Rauca, an accused mass
murderer of Lithuanian Jews,
although everyone knew where
to find him. "Why did it take so
long? Because nobody really
cared," Littman said.
RAUCA, a Gestapo officer in
Kaunas, Lithuania during the
war, became a Canadian citizen
in 1966. He was arrested in June,
1962, subsequently densturalized
and deported in 1983 to West
Germany where he was tried by
a Frankfurt court on charges of
murdering 11,583 Lithuanian
Jews.
littman noted that (he Rauca
-episode sent a "shudder '
through the Lithuanian,
Ukrainian, Estonian and
Slovakian communities in
Canada. Members of those
ethnic groups were among the
most vicious Nazi collaborators
during the war, serving as death
camp guards and in some cases
operating the extermination
machinery for the Germans.
Littman affirmed that there
are as many as 2,000 war
criminals living in Canada, by no
means all German, who should
lawfully be prosecuted.
Irwin Cotler, a professor of
law at McGill University,
declared that "the presence of
Nazis in Canada is a moral
obscenity. The Canadian
government should understand
that one Nazi war criminal is too
many."
MILTON HARRIS, president
of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, spoke about the
denaturalization procedure as a
possibility. He said Justice
Minister John Crosbie will soon
introduce new legislation to
speed up prosecution. "But to
pass such a law, a lot of political
pressure will be needed," he
added.
CIGA
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W
Wishing All of Our Friends a
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Happy New Year
NEW YORK (JTA) Two
more American book publishers
have been denied visas to the
Soviet Union to participate in the
Fifth Moscow International book
Fair beginning last Tuesday.
Robert Bernstein, president of
Random House and chairman of
the Helsinki Watch Committee, a
human rights group which
monitors compliance with tne
1975 Helsinki accords, and Jen
Laber, a staff member of the
Association of American
Publishers and executive director
of Helsinki Watch, were d
visas by the Soviet governZI
Bernard Levinson, the presidr*
of the Association of Jewish Bl
Publishers, has also been den^l
visa
All
1 three have participated!
previous Moscow Book P-
|iii-viuua iTiustuw dook Fain
Denial of the visas has taken til
publishing industry by surpriJ
according to reports here, -J
vmnnf nffinnilr imuv,.'..__1
Soviet officials p
that there would .
with visa approval
U.S. Rejects Israel's Charg
oblems
WASHINGTON (JTA) The
State Department indicated that
it does not accept Israel's charge
that Jordan is allowing the
Palestine Liberation Organization
to reestablish terrorist bases on
its territory.
The Department's deputy
spokesman, Charles Redman,
repeated his earlier statement
that while the PLO has
"facilities" in Jordan, it does not
have bases from which to launch
terrorist operations against
Israel. He refused to commJ
a report that the Israel fjl
has decided to ask the Reap]
ministration to persuade Jf
to close down any such I
Redman said Jordan has
"quite consistent" in its a
tion to terrorism. "Jordan is
ly opposed to terrorism," he|
"Indeed (Jordan) has
greatly from it and has | t
positive role in preserving i
ty in the area."
Federal Discount Center
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Miami 758-1653
Happy New Year
Stein Paint Co.
546WestFlaglerSt.
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Happy New Year
Samsons Furniture
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Fine Distributing Co.
3485 NW 65 St., Miami 691-0231
Holiday Greetings To The Entire Jewish Community
Place Pigalle
215 22nd St., Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 538-OWj
Happy New Year
Edward Greenspan, a Toronto
lawyer, explained that war
criminals are not brought to
justice in Canada because the
1949 Geneva Convention covers
only future crimes, not crimes of
the past. "The honor of Canada
is diminished by the fact that
many war criminals got
Canadian citizenship," he said.
Cotler expressed the
prevailing sentiment at the
gathering when he said "We
must bring war criminals to
justice if we wish justice to reign
in Canada."
Svend Robinson, a member of
Parliament for the New
Democratic Party, aaid, "If the
evidence is strong let us put
them on trial- If a criminal gets
old be is still a criminal."
Farm Fresh Products
1672 Alton Road, Miami Beach 672-172F
Happy New Year To All My Custome*
Seville Photographers
2935 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 6/2-536.
Happy New Year
Walters, Costango, RusaH|
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Happy New Year
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ALAN KESSLER
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Wishes His Cfents A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year


Javajos, Chicanos, Women, Interfaith
roject Among 13 Recipients Of Grants
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 25-B
Shamir:
Attacks Against Israeli Citizens
Will Have Serious Consequences
I By KEVIN FREEMAN
JEW YORK (JTA) -
Navajo Nation in
eona, the Jewish Council
Urban Affairs in
fcago, and the Southern
(fornia Interfaith Project
s Angeles, are three of
;ipients of the first
its provided by
led American
itmaking foun-
rish Fund for
Fund, based in
igton, D.C., is designed to
an outlet for American
[to respond to issues of
in the United States. The
"offers American Jews a
i context for expressing our
lonal passion for social
said Si Kahn, acting
chairman and director of
rassroots Leadership Pro-
| Charlotte, North Carolina.
ROISMAN, the Fund's
Ive director, said the grants
intended to compete with
ig philanthropic efforts
|the Jewish community, but
as a supplement to those
"We are funding groups
trying to change the cir-
nces that keep them poor,"
nan explained: "Rather
^livering health services to
erly in Montana, we are
a group that is trying to
[Medicare payments to ac-
tor full services. We are
with causes rather than
fences."
13 gfqpts, totalling some
are to* support efforts
social change by forging
sual partnership," accor-
the Fund. The grant of
to the Navajo Nation in
ff, for example, will pro-
rids to bring a team of
I agricultural consultants to
the Painted Desert to assist with
the adaption of Israeli techniques
of drip irrigation and intensive
crop production programs.
THE TOTAL one-year project
in the Painted Desert, is expected
to cost around $150,000. To meet
these additional costs, the Fund
has announced the establishment
of the Tu B'Shevat Fund within
the foundation to receive addi-
tional contributions for the
project.
Three of the 13 grants are
challenge grants. For example,
the Fund provided a challenge
grant to the Chicago Jewish com-
munity for the Task Force on
Community Economic Develop-
ment of the Jewish Council on Ur-
ban Affairs which works with min-
ority businesses and community
organizations in low income areas
to leverage economic develop-
ment and the creation of new jobs.
In Los Angeles, a challenge
grant has been provided for the
Los Angeles Jewish community
for the Southern California
Interfaith Hunger Project which
works with local groups on the
issue of hunger, including ad-
vocacy, education and coordina-
tion of joint community efforts.
THE THIRD challenge grant -
to be matched by members of the
local Jewish community is in
Philadelphia for the city's Jubilee
Project. The project includes the
work of a group of interdenomina-
tional leaders using a capital
revolving loan fund for communi-
ty based enterprises, creating new
employment opportunities and
new ownership among low income
people. yA i
The eight other grants were to
For the Love of Children in
Washington, D.C., an advocacy
center for the rights and interests
of children in the custody of the
District of Columbia; JONAH in
Jackson, Tennessee, an organiza-
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Sept. 5 to Oct. 30,1985
July 2 to Sept. 4, 1986
tion comprising low and moderate
income blacks working to improve
black neighborhoods and to in-
crease representation of blacks on
city and county government
committees.
The Minnesota Citizens
Organizations Acting Together,
or COACT, working on a broad
range of social and economic
issues affecting rural Minnesota,
received a grant from the Fund as
did the Mississippi Action for
Community Education group b-
ased in Greenville, a community
economic development corpora-
tion working to bring social and
economic benefits to the rural
poor of the Mississippi Delta.
OTHER GRANTS were provid
ed to the Montana Senior Citizens
Association in Helena, the Poor
People's United Fund in Boston;
the Saguache County Community
Council in Center, Colorado; the
United Passaic Organization in
New Jersey; and Women in the
Work Force in Highpoint, North
Carolina.
The Fund is described as the
first national Jewish grantmaking
organization devoted solely to
supporting efforts in the com-
munity at large that nurture social
and economic justice in the U.S.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir warned that attacks
against Israeli civilians such
as the two which took place
in Jenin and Tulkarem
recently will have serious
consequences for the non-
Jewish population.
Addressing a gathering in
Ashkelon, Shamir said that if in-
nocent Jews are endangered, in-
nocent Arabs must suffer. "We
must not allow a situation to occur
in Tulkarem or Jenin, or
anywhere else, in which, when a
Jew is killed, life goes on as usual,
as if nothing had happened,"
Shamir declared.
ANDRE ALOUSH, 40, of
Netanya was shot and killed in
Tulkarem, some 15 miles west of
Nablus, two weeks ago. Several
hours later, Uri Ovad of Tiberias
was seriously wounded after be-
ing shot in the back at very close
range in Jenin, some 20 miles
north of Nablus. The assailants
escaped.
A curfew immediately imposed
on the two cities continued last
week as security fources stepped
up efforts to apprehend the
assailants. The curfew was lifted
in the two cities for several hours
to allow residents to purchase
food supplies. Security forces said
the curfew would continue as long
as it was necessary for the pur-
pose of the investigation.
Mayor Hilmi Handoun of
Tulkarem condemned the murder
in a rare statement from a West
Bank leader. The statement was
placed in the context of the large-
scale interest among Tulkarem
merchants to continue commercial
relations with the neighboring
Jewish towns.
SHAMIR, meanwhile, said ter-
rorism was a threat to Israel's ex-
istence, and had to be dealt with
as such. He added that terrorist
organizations were forced to
resort to methods such as those
used in Jenin and Tulkarem
because their bases in Lebanon
were destroyed, and because they
were unable to conduct large-scale
attacks.
Shamir also cited the renewed
presence of Palestinian terrorist
bases in Jordan as a reason for the
increase in terrorist attacks on
Jews in the West Bank and Israel.
Minister Mordechai Gur (Labor)
also discussed the presence of
these bases in Jordan at the week-
ly Cabinet session.
Gur was more cautious in his
assessment of how to handle the
presence of the terrorist bases in
Jordan.
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-rwm
ivx
*-
Page 26-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13. 1985
First Nazi Party
Formed In Switzerland
By TAMAR LEVY
ZURICH (JTA) The
founder of the fledgling
Swiss National Socialist
Party said here that his im-
mediate goal is to improve
the image of the Nazis with
the public and that he also
intends to present a list for
the communal elections to
be held here next year.
While the press in general con-
siders Ernst Meister a screwball,
the formation of the first National
Socialist Party in the country has
evoked some concern among
Jews. Most Jews interviewed,
however, said that the open anti-
Jewish attitudes of the party are
not likely to generate wide
support.
MEISTER, 40, agrees that the
name and the image of his party
leaves a lot to be desired, but not
so the ideas it promotes. The
former member of National Ac-
tion, a fascist movement, and the
vice president of its Zurich sec-
tion, Meister told a local weekly,
Zveriwoche, that "many in other
parties support my ideas. The only
problem is that they are irritated
by the name. Our primary pro-
blem is one of image."
But Meister said he has no in-
tention of changing the name of
his party and will do all he can to
legitimize it with the public. In re-
cent interviews he said that
Switzerland is ripe for a new Nazi
Party to rise to its previous
glamor. Asked about the mass kill-
ing of Jews by Hitler, Meister
said, "That is not so tragic. Again,
the problem is the lack of a good
image."
He is described as an electrical
engineer, and according to press
reports he lives alone in an apart-
ment on Zaehringer Street.
Meister reportedly has angered
the National Action, from which
he was expelled in 1983, because
he is conducting a recruiting drive
among its members and sup-
porters, who are much less stri-
dent in their public statements.
THERE IS no indication of how
many members Meister's party
has. Most reports note that it is
composed of a few persons.
Nevertheless, the spokesman
for the Public Ministry of the
regional confederation, Roland
Hauenstein, said that his office
will carefully monitor the party's
activities. But he added that
political activities in Switzerland
that remain within the law and do
not threaten the internal or exter-
nal security of the state cannot be
curbed.
L'Shana Tova
The Officers and Board of Directors
of the
1 Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida (
join in wishing you a
Happy and Healthy New Yaar
' 5746
HARRY A. "HA*" LEVY NEAL J. MENACHEM
Chairman of the Board President
ELTON J. KERN ESS
Executive Director
Happy New Year
To Friends & Neighbors of
Harbour House
10275 Collins Avenue
Bal Harbour, Fla. 33154
Louis B. ( ha> kin. M.IK, P.A.
Is Pleased To Announce
The Association off
Carlos E. Coelho, M.D.
Fe*r The Practice off
Internal Medicine, Diabetes A
Endocrinology
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By Ampt. M5-944-73S5 .YUB, II. 33162
Suspected Nazis Living In Canada
Evidence Being Weighed For Action
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
A federal commission an-
nounced here that it has
compiled a list of 660
suspended Nazi war
criminals who now live in
Canada or may have lived
here and is weighing
evidence against them.
Former Quebec Superior Court
Justice Jules Deschenes who com-
prises the one-man commission
outlined his next steps in the in-
vestigation. He has established a
committee of six lawyers chaired
by Douglas Adra, of Winnipeg, to
review the evidence and report
back on Sept. 1.
He has also set up of panel of
lawyers and academicians to
recommend by Sept. 1 how Nazi
war criminals found to be living in
Canada might be brought to
justice under existing or new
legislation.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT
stated: "It is our mission to do
everything humanly possible to
avoid doing an injustice to anyone
through ignorance of the facts,
and the commission must work
through an immense quantity of
documents that have been ac-
cumulating in public and private
archives both in Canada and
abroad for the last 40 years."
Former Solicitor General
Robert Kaplan, a Liberal member
of Parliament, was expected to
testify before the commission on
Tuesday. He has complained that
the present Solicitor General,
Elmer MacKay, has denied him
access to records and files to aid
his testimony.
The Deschenes commission
must render its final report and
recommendations by December
31, 1985. It has yet to decide
whether to travel abroad to
gather more evidence before con-
cluding its investigation. It must
also decide whether or not to go to
the Soviet Union for records of
alleged war criminals. Soviet
justice and legal procedures are
considered unreliable here.
/HE U.S Dpartm
Justice has made extensive S
evidence provided by the W
Union in tracing' s:u
criminals living in the ( S 9
has brought an outcry from hJ
and Ukrainian ethnic groumj
the U.S. which consider anvthJ
from a Communist source susp3
Most of the war crimi J
rounded up in the US. so a
from Baltic or Eastern EuroS
countries occupied bv the fiT
mans in World War II tv,
Justice Department has said tl
all material from Soviet source^
carefully scrutinized and tesw
under U.S. rules of evidence
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The Management and
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wish our passengers,
friends and Jewish People
everywhere,
Health, Prosperity & Peace
in 5746.
AiyH^ECZl/AClK^EiyjMCJN^rBO
X

'


;er Over Pending State Appeal
Jewish Underground Members
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 27-B
ly DAVID LANDAU
fuSALEM (JTA) -
were angry reactions
[the Likud and other
Iwing parties last
lend at the news that
Btete will appeal for
^er sentences to be im-
on five members of
Jewish underground.
decision, by the State Pro-
p's Department, was taken
he guidance and instruction
homey General Yitzhak
- and it was against him
bulk of the political
m was directed.
taty Premier and Likud
[Yitzhak Shamir gave vent
own displeasure in a radio
fcw. Minister Yosef Shapira
aa) accused Zamir of insen-
to public opinion and
[faction chief Haim Kauf-
id he would revive con-
ins between the Likud and
[rightist parties on special
ion designed to grant all of
rish underground members
cy and reprieves.
FIVE were among 15
round men sentenced to
terms of jail on July 22.
fier members of the group
Seen sentenced earlier,
ng plea bargaining between
Dunsel and the state. The
en involved are:
rak Nir's most serious con-
i was for his participation in
illing of students at the
in College. He was, sentenc-
six years imprisoiflKMfldtW
iree-man JerusalerfK^lfstrRS^
I of the district court judges,
minority ruling, felt Nir
|d serve 15 years and this is
the state prosecution will
the Supreme Court where
ppeals will be heard. Nir was
also involved in the plot to blow up
the Mosque of Omar, in the at-
tacks on the West Bank mayors,
and in other crimes committed by
the underground.
Haim Ben-David was sentenc-
ed to 42 months in prison for his
role in plotting to blow up the
Arab buses, plotting to blow up
the Mosque, involvement in the at-
tacks on the mayors, and a string
of lesser crimes. The state, in its
appeal, points out that Gilad Peli,
one of the underground who was
tried before a different bench,
received 10 years for similar con-
victions. Peli, meanwhile, has filed
an appeal against the severity of
his sentence.
Yitzhak Novik, Haggai Segal
and Nathan Natanson all received
three years imprisonment, and an
additional suspended term, for
their roles in the attacks on the
mayors. The court accepted the
defense contention that these at-
tacks were not meant to kill and
thus the conviction was for caus-
ing grievous bodily harm.
BUT THE prosecution never-
theless contends that the gravity
of this crime, and the string of
lesser crimes proven against the
three membership in a terrorist
organization, illegal possession of
weapons, illegal transportation of
explosives should have drawn
heavier penalties.
In the appeal papers, drawn up
by Deputy State Prosecutor Dorit
Beinish, the state argues that the
lower court gave inordinate
weight to the personal cir-
.Qf-
i^the-accasAl men,-Haainsufficient
weight to the gravity of their
offenses.
Binish cites from the district
court's own judgement that the
crimes threatened the foundations
of Israeli democracy and that they
were especially serious because
they were perpetrated with
weapons and explosives stolen
from the Israel Defense Force.
Sources in the Prosecutor's
Department made it clear they
felt other sentences were also too
light. But they had decided to ap-
peal only against the excessively
light terms.
THE APPEAL decision follow-
ed a formal consultation between
Zamir and Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim (Likud-Liberal), but
Nissim's office made it clear in a
statement that the prerogative
and responsibility were Zamir's
alone.
In a separate court proceeding,
meanwhile, the Supreme Court
last week rejected an appeal by
Alan Goodman, the 43-year-old
American who is serving a life
sentence for murder committed
on the Temple Mount in April
1982.
Goodman killed an Arab guard
and wounded another guard and a
policeman when he sprayed the
Mount precinct with bullets from
his army-issue automatic rifle. His
lawyers argued that he was men-
tally disturbed, suffering from
paranoid schizophrenia, and
therefore not responsible for his
actions.
BUT THE Supreme Court ruled
that he had feigned the illness to
psychiatric examiners. In fact, the
court held, while his loathing of
Arabs was deep and passionate,
he was sufficiently in command of
his mental faculties to be able to
control himself.
The court ruled, though, that a
20-year-term imposed on him in
.addition to his life term should run
I KMKWtnteftorttodsly with his life
'terrrv. ;" "'
Mr. and Mrs. Myron Brodie
Extend New Year Greetings
Happy New Year
Suzanne & Bertram Schild
L
Happy New Year Greetings and Peace For All
Judge and Mrs. David L. Trask
Mr. and Mrs. David Phillip and Family
Seth Daniel Lefkow and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Smith and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Robbin and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Turkish and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Brody and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Lefkow
Mrs. Paul Lefkow and Family
_____tthiaoig dlw& lo________
Dr. Jules and Linda Minkus
and Family
Wish A Happy New Year
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Miami-358-7710
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Happy New Year
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Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
happy and Healthy New Year
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FILLED WITH PEACE
AND CONTENTMENT
We hope the coming months will be
filled with many shining moments.
Including the warmth of new friendships
and the Joy of old ties with those you
love and surmounting them all,
the happiness of dreams come true.,.


lordan
Jmarsn
FLORIDA
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Page 2&-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Boston Peace Now Unit Shmuel ********-**i
Challenges Kahane Visit
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Peace Now, a Jewish group
functioning in the United
States, Canada and Israel
for peace between Israel
and the Arabs, worked out a
strategy to neutralize both
an appearance by Rabbi
Meir Kahane in Boston and
an equally controversial
anti-Kahane and anti-Israel
rally of Arab students
earlier this year.
A report of the debate within
the Boston chapter of Peace Now
and about its successful effort to
involve other local Jewish groups
in its response to the problem ap-
peared in the current issue of the
organization's newsletter. "Peace
Now."
WHEN THE Boston unit board
learned Kahane was coming to
town, its members saw the pro-
blem this way: "Could we afford
to let his appearance go un-
challenged, or would we be help-
ing him if we made a public issue
of his policies and activities?"
After agreeing not to leave the
field ("and the media") to Kahane.
members also decided to attempt
"for the first time a joint activity
with mainstream organizations in
the Boston Jewish community."
The Peace Now unit board call-
ed a meeting "out of which grew a
unified demonstration on behalf of
the local Jewish communities" to
be held at the school where
Kahane was to speak last
January.
Marching behind a banner that
said "Israel Yea Kahane No!",
and "Boston Jews Reject
Kahane's Racism," more than 150
people from many organizations
"listed as rabbis, community
workers and three members of the
State Legislature" assailed
Kahane.
Across the street a group of
Arab students had assembled,
with placards which condemned
Kahane but also proclaimed "a
nasty anti-Israel stance, equating
Zionism with racism and boosting
the PLO."
ALL LOCAL TV stations and
many radio stations gave con-
siderable attention to "the three-
sided event: Kahane inside the
school speaking to 300 or so peo-
ple, and the Jews and Arabs out-
side." But the event was given
less play by local newspapers.
The small steering committee
organized by the Boston unit
"operated as a group of concerned
individuals and did not consider it
necessary or feasible to obtain for-
mal organizational endorsements
Election Reform
Recommended
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
ministerial committee on electoral
reform has recommended a series
of measures that would sharply
reduce the time and the cost
of election campaigns. If the
Knesset approves them, election
campaigning would be restricted
to 45 days before the voters go to
the polls.
Radio and television election
campaigning would be broadcast
only in the 21 days preceding elec-
tion day. Knesset elections and
elections to local offices would be
held simultaneously if the reforms
become law.
The committee, chaired by
Laborite Gad Yaacobi. Minister of
Economic Planning, has yet to
tackle a fundamental reform
replacing the present system of
proportional representation with
one in which each Knesset
member would represent a
specific constituency. Likud has
opposed this in the past but may
be persuaded to reconsider in
view of the rise of extreme
rightwing parties.
The end of proportional
representation would eliminate
the many splinter parties which
siphon off enough votes from the
major parties to make it impossi-
ble for either of them to form a
government without entering into
unwieldly coalition agreements.
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of the demonstration. Although
Kahane's appearance at a public
high school had stirred up much
controversy, the committee decid-
ed not to oppose his right to
speak, but to attack his policies."
Leaflets condemning Kahane's
position were distributed at the
rally. The leaflets bore the names
of 31 rabbis. Peace Now, the
Jewish Community Council, the
local branches of the American
Jewish Committee, the American
Jewish Congress, the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
the Jewish Peace Fellowship, and
the local chapter of Hadassah. The
leaflets contained the text of a
statement by Israeli Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir on "The
Danger of Kahanism."
The report concluded that,
"given Kahane's outrageous
statements and the Arabs'
virulent anti-Israeli banners, it
was felt on balance that the com-
bined Jewish protest had served a
very good purpose. Without it. the
field would indeed have been left
to the two extremes of hatred and
hostility."
Maestro and Mrs. Shmuel Fer-
shko have just returned from their
annual summer vacation in Israel.
Mr. Fershko has served as
Musical Director of Temple
Emanu-El for the past 18 years
and was the Musical Director of
Israel's Broadcasting System Kol
Israel, during and after the
establishment of the State of
Israel.
Every summer Mr. Fershko
participates with Israel TV and
media, updating his musical ac-
tivities in the United States.
Highlight of the summer was an
evening of Fershko compositions
at the Chaim Weitzmann
Auditorium in Tel Aviv with two
personal friends, Shoshana
Damari and Yaffa Yarkoni, promi-
nent Israeli stars adding to the
presentation. Composer Neomi
Shemer joined the group. Mr. Fer-
shko performed his Nahalal Piano
Suite, dedicated to the late
General Moshe Dayan. as climax
of the evening.
M
I
Shmuel Fershko
His Broadway show "It's Ne
Too Late For Happiness" i _
production at the Theatre of j
Performing Arts "Israelis
Coming" for many seasons I
added to his musit
achievements.
Harriels Tobacco Shop
7291 Dadeland Mall
Miami 661-9898
Happy New Year
From John Forte
FORTE TOWERS
1000 West Avenue
Miami Beach
Florida
672-7815
We wish the entire Jewish Community
A Healthy and Happy New Year
May you be inscribed in the book of life.
GaWesC
Coral
Government Securities
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442-4242
te Plaza. 2100 Ponce de Leon Boulevard. 12th Floor
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?n Rosh hashanah: A question ABOut Jews and Judaism
By MICHAEL RABINOWITZ
Despite their long and tragic
kistory, Jews managed to survive
this day.
What is the secret of Jewish sur-
ival? Whence did Jews derive
heir fortitude, their will, their
ope? The answer can be summed
ip in one word belief. Jews sur-
rived because of their belief in
i, in man, in themselves, in a
iture.
Judaism, the religion of the
Jewish people, speaks always of
lie future. It is concerned with
fie present only for the creation
a more promising future.
ndaism is optimistic because
ews are optimists. No matter
ow pleasant any period of Jewish
iistory happened to have been, it
as never regarded by Jews as
heir finest hour. And, by the
ime token, Jews never regarded
lie most distressing period of
their existence as their final fate.
IN OUR period of flux, change,
revolution, transition, it appears
as if everything is falling apart, as
if the past has little to offer to the
present or the future. At this mo-
ment Jews wonder if there is still
anything in Judaism which can be
meaningful and relevant to their
lives.
What is there in Judaism that a
Jew can believe in today? Judaism
is a vast and complex, institution.
It embodies within itself different
periods of thought, teachings and
attitudes. It consists of many cen-
turies of varied experiences and
doctrines.
For, as a way of life, Judaism
continuously made adjustments
and frequently assimilated within
its make-up, ideas and
philosophies which were current
in the different ages and stages of
Jewish and world history.
WITHIN THE body of Judaism
there are, therefore, precepts
which were meant only for a cer-
tain period. There are ancient
customs and practices which are
not even of Jewish origin and are
often mistaken for
commandments.
At the same time, it is impor-
tant to remember that there are
certain basic tenets in Judaism,
which are unchangeable and are
as vital today as they were in ages
gone by.
Jews believed and can believe
today in one universal God, one
principle, one creative force that
is responsible for all mankind.
Jews believed and can still
believe that the one universal God
is an ethical God who demands
that our relationships with one
another be based on truth and
justice, and that the sacredness
and dignity of all human beings be
respected.
Jews believed and still can
believe, that God insists upon
human freedom, that no man shall
have the right to dominate
another, that human liberty is a
person's inalienable right and that
democracy must be the ruling
principle of society.
JEWS BELIEVED and still
can believe that creed alone is not
sufficient. Creed must be express-
ed through deed. Whatever we
hold dear, whatever we love,
honor and respect, needs to be
shown by our actions. Jews believ-
ed and can still believe in being
charged with the mission of
teaching the meaning of God and
religion among the peoples of the
world, and that this mission be
discharged not by preaching, not
by theological stunts and not by
Continued on Page 5-C


Page 2-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 13. 1985 -..
Will QoRBachev's ascension mean a
a new 6ra foR Soviet jewRy?
By SIMON GRIVER
With the promotion of Mikhail
Gorbachev to the pinnacle of
Sonet power, the West's political
pundits are acclaiming the dawn-
ing of a new era in the USSR. This
expectation, however, stems more
from Gorbachev's relative youth
he is 54 and outgoing media
charm, than any concrete
evidence that he intends pursuing
different policies.
Dr. Baruch Gur. director-
al of the Israel Public Coun-
cil for Soviet Jewry, describes
Gorbachev as an unknown quanti-
ty Power has been in transition
in recent years in the Soviet
Union." he obser.es. "Thus many
- nave not been taker.. If
there is now to be greater stability
at the top then for better or
the Soviet leadership may soon
decide to tackle the issue of S
Jewry. That decision could involve
opening the gates to Jewish
emigration, or more harsh inter-
nal suppression. The important
fact is that the future of Soviet
Jewry is in the balance, and conse-
quently it is vital to intensify the
struggle."
Gur concedes that Soviet Jewry-
is a pawn in the hands of super-
power diplomacy. However, he
still asserts that much can be done
to influence their final fate. From
Israel and the west, he maintains,
pressure can be kept on the Soviet
Union to embarrass them by ex-
posing their suppressive approach
towards the Jewish desire to
emigrate. At the same time,
western governments, in par-
ticular the United States, must be
kept aware of the problem so that
it remains high on their agenda
during any negotiations with the
Soviet air
PERHAPS MOST import..
all. the Jews of the Soviet Union
must remain resolute despite the
harassment and hardship that
such a stance entails. The flow of
information coming out of the
Soviet Union indicates that even
in adversity. Zionist identification
is growing. At a recent meeting of
the World Jewish Congress' Israel
Chapter. Avraham Harman.
I. Brown Sales
4380 East 11th Ave.. Hialeah 685-7622
Wishes All Their Customers And Friends
A Happy New Year
Animal Lovers West
8454 SW 24 Street
233-7141
Happy New Year To All
COUNTRY CLUB WE CARE
DRY CLEANERS FOR YOUR
NORTH MIAMI CLOTHES
436 N. 125 St. 7 A.M.-6 P.M. 893-6101
Moo.-Sat. Quality Cleaning
New Year OreeMMs Te Ow Frtanda i
Abrahams Kosher
Bakery
7423 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach 861-0291
We Wish You And Your Family
A Happy New Year
Bob White's Bowling
Pro Shop a Billiard SuppilM
915 NE 79 St.. Miami 866-8513
New Year Greetings
Bergman & Kane, PA.
CPA.
8001 NW 36 Street. Suite 100. Miami
591-3631
Happy Mam Year
Acme Industrial Sheet
Metal Inc.
555 West 18 St.. Hiaieah 885-4943
Happy New Year
Arno Comfort Shoe Store
486 NE 125 St.. No. Miami S93-1224
We Wish AU Our Friends A Customers
A Happy New Year
Joseph Custom Tailor
220 Miracle Mile Suite 206. Coral Gables
.443-8893
Happy New Year
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NE 163 St. No. Miami Beach
949-0801
Happy New Year
chairman of the Israel Public
Council for Soviet Jewry,
presented documents that
reflected a continued revival of
Jewish awareness within the
Soviet Union.
The most important of these
documents was a 20-page letter
that was prepared for the visit to
the Soviet Union of former Israeli
President Ephraim Katzir.
Ultimately Katzir was prevented
from meeting with the Jews, but
the letter has since been smuggled
out. The tone of the letter is an op-
timistic mixture of confidence and
defiance, though fear of the might
of tht Soviet -" rites ever
present.
"The last fouryeara,"
-..- were not just year-
decline and stagnation but were
also a period of inner growd
the formation of a national
nucleus. This process has found its
expression in the appearance,
after a iong break, of certain signs
of Jewish communal living
(seminars. Hebrew study groups,
religious study groups, amateur
musical and drama groups,
children's groups, communal
festival celebrations, etc.)."
THE LETTER stresses that
"everything we do stands in com-
plete accordance with the norms
of Soviet and International law
and it does not have any anti-
Soviet aims or intentions." Indeed
the letter goes on to repeat what
was also emphasized in a com-
munication to French President
Francois Mitterrand by 127
Soviet Jewish activists. These ac-
tivists claim that they are not
dissidents, nor do they have any
ambitions to subvert the Soviet
system. Instead they see
themselves as Jewish nationals
who simply want to be
repatriated, just as Soviet Poles.
Germans, Greeks and many of
their fellow Jews have already
been repatriated.
The 20-page letter estimates
that there are 1.8 million Jews left
in the Soviet Union. Some 100.000
speak Yiddish, and for the rest,
except for a small number of
Eastern Jews in the southern
Soviet Union. Russian is their
first language. While 896 Jews
were allowed to leave the Soviet
Union in 1984. as against 51.000
in 1979. it is estimated that almost
400.000 Jews still in the USSR
have received notarized invita-
tions from relatives in Israel, and
would if possible leave the Soviet
Union.
More than 10.000 of these per
sons are considered "refuseniks"
because they have applied for exit
visas and having received an of-
ficial refusal have engaged in a
confrontation with the authorities
over the matter Over 120 families
have been waiting more than 10
years for an exit visa, and worst of
1 maw* are some 20 "refuser.:?:;
serving prisor s^r.tences. the
most famous of whom are Ana:.:.;.
Sharansky and Yo-sef Begun.
GUR NOTES tna: the maamati
ma Zionist movement
thodox and that it :s centered
around Moscow and l.*nifl
I Jews who
would wish to come to Israei are
scared to identify- with Israel as
the Soviet authorities have
unleashed an intensified pro-
paganda campaign of ant:-
BeaaitiaB faamj ammaami *s mat
Zwobm. Magazine article* and
cartoons compare 7iiwi k,
Nazism, though in actual fact
moat of this Soviet propaganda is
itself actually copied from classic
ano-Semmc Nazi material.
And for those Sonet Jews who
are actually prepared to openly
declare their Zionist sympathies.
j>e penis are manifold- Such peo-
pte are ostracized from Soviet
iPag**-C
Sh'ilach et ami.' Let my people go. With the M'khod
Gorbachev to the Soviet leadership, it is hoped that the isw<>[
Soviet Jeu-ry may soon be tackled.
Carpet Mart
12645 South Dixie Hwy., Miami
232-2430
Happy New Year
Associated Photographer
19 SW 6th St.. Miami
373-4774
Happy New Year
Sun Chevrolet
7220 N. Kendall Dr.. Miami Phone 661-2521
Wishes His Clients A Friends
A Happy A Healthy New Year
Miller Decorating Centers
32 Years Experience
16507 NE 6th Ave.. N.M.B. 947-2020
New Years Greetings
American Plumbing
And Electrical Supply
1735 Alton Road. Miami Bch. 532-3446
Happy New Year To Our Friends A Customers
Creative Doors &
Window Corp.
7371 SW 8th St.. Miami 264-6057
Happy New Year
J
Floridian Furniture
4795 SW 8th St.. Miami. Fla.
448-2639
Happy New Year
1
Bellmar Flowers & Gifts
17508 Biscayne Blvd.
North Miami Beach Phone 940-5173
Ms Lee Jubehrer Wishes All A Good Year
Fulton Pest Control
1981 NE 153 St.. North Miami Beach
945-6525
Happy New Year To AU
Triton Shalom
Medical Center
2881 Collins Ave Miami Beach 33140 Phone S38-7374
*>*** AN TIM (Meet* Friends
A Nappr 4 Heettkf Hew *r


Jews have thpee Or
Pour new yeaas
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-C
^
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
On Rosh Hashanah the shofar is
blown. The Jewish New Year is
different in other ways, too.
Most people have only one New
Year. But if a thing is good, why
have only one? Jews like things
wholesale. They have three or
four New Years. There is one in
Nisan, and there is a New Year
lor trees around February, and
there is one in Tishri. And I think
there is another one also of a
minor type. But the real grand
nne of course is that in Tishri,
usually falling in September.
The Western world largely
holds its New Year in January.
Bui Jews like to gather around
the synagogue and talk, and it is
too cold and snowy for that in
January.
The Chinese have their New
Year towards summer, but right
in the midst of everything, who
wants to have a New Year then?
So Jews selected autumn. The
weather then is neither too cold
nor too hot. The leaves are turn-
ing a beautiful color and the peo-
ple rested from vacation are ready
to return to sinning again and
since it is some months before you
have to pay the income tax, you
still have enough left for tickets
for the temple.
I SUPPOSE everyone knows
the story of how Rabbi Levi Yit-
zhak of Berditchev auditioned
shofar blowers. Well, anyway, he
asked all the candidates for the
job what passed through their
minds when they blew the shofar.
One man said he thought of
Moses leading the Israelites out of
Egypt.
A second man said he thought of
the high priest at the Temple ser-
vice in Jerusalem.
A third said, "When I blow the
shofar, I say, 'Dear God, you know
I am a poor man. I have three
daughters and I would appreciate
it if you could manage to help me
get them married off.' "
The third man got the job. The
Rabbi realized that he was an
honest man and when you get
down to it, what is life but a lot of
simple things like that?
On Rosh Hashanah we ask
Bressers Cross
Index Directory
853 NE 79th St.. Miami 758-6787
Happy New Year
Brooks American
Sprinkler
2430 NW 79th St.. Miami. Fla. 33147 691-1182
Happy New Year To All
A-1 Ideal
Business Machine
3672 Coral Way, Miami 448-2784
1206 NE 163rd St., No. Miami Beach944-3917
Happy New Year
Del Amo Plumbing Inc.
7223 N.W. 8th St.. Miami 264-9712
Happy New Year To All
Andalusia Bake Shop
248 Andalusia Ave., Coral Gables445-8696
Happy New Year
Ben Grabers Ladies Wear
1325 NE 163rd St.. N. Miami Beach
945-4171
Happy New Year
Good Times
Travel Centers
9421 Harding Ave., Miami Beach
868-1608
_____ Happy New Year
Fox's Sherron Inn
6030 So. Dixie Hwy., Miami
666-2230
Happy New Year
Certified Poultry
& Egg Co.
763 West 18 St., Hialeah 887-7591
Happy New Year
Gottex of Israel
777 NW 72 Ave., Miami
261-4700
Happy New Year
forgiveness for our sins. Sin is a
kind of complex subject. The Kot-
zker Rebbe thought that even sin
had its good side. He said that sin
gave God the opportunity of
revealing his noblest aspect
that of compassion.
WHAT ARE our sins? Have we
held up any banks, broken any in-
to homes? Do we face indictment
by the grand jury? Most of us are
not guilty of these things.
A sage of the Talmud said we
will be punished in the next world
for the legitimate pleasures we
have denied ourselves. It reflects
on God if we have not availed
ourselves of his creations.
Maybe we should have gone to a
picnic or taken a drink and we
didn't.
It may seem a bit odd that we
should be punished for not going
to a picnic, but then again, a picnic
has its religious side. It brings
people together fosters
brotherhood.
Perhaps if we joined a Hebrew
class or a class in gardening or
new 6ra fop
Soviet Jews
Continued from Page 2-C
society with little chance of
employment and no educational
prospect* for their children. As
the Soviet activists letter outlines,
it is the younger children who are
hardest hit by the situation.
"Children are much more
defenseless before ordeals than
adults. Many parents set out to
create, by much effort, childrens'
groups and they organize holiday
celebrations and different studies.
And all this friction visits of
policemen and people in uniform
which upsets adults, leaves
deeper scars on the psyche of the
child. But despite this we cannot
renounce such a line of education
for our children. For us that would
be equal to repudiating ourselves
and our ideals."
THE LETTER also highlights
the importance of international
support. "As long as it is possible
for the international public to
follow the development of
events," it asserts, "we can retain
the hope that our situation will not
deteriorate and that a certain
restraint will be practiced in
regard to us."
Thus the struggle must be
escalated from outside the Soviet
Union. As Abe Harman, says, "If
Jews in Israel are quiet, why
should other Jews speak out? And
if Jews are quiet, why should non-
Jews speak <>ut? Let us remember
that in the 1970's a quarter of a
million Soviet Jews were allowed
to leave, and what happened oner
can happen again."
ceramics, we should have gotten
some pleasure. We didn't so we
sinned.
What the rabbi is saying is that
sin consists not only in acts of
commission, but in acts of omis-
sion. They are the greatest part of
our sins. We do not lead full lives.
Anyway, be sure to go to that
picnic.
Reg's Fresh Fish Market
Smelly Kohc Undr 0.R.C Rabbinical Supervision
Wishes Happy New Year To All Customers & Friends
1676 NE. 164 St. Phone 940-1718
General Plumbing Supply
7216 SW 117 Ave.. Miami
279-2404
Happy New Year
Decor Inc.
9487 Harding Ave., Surfside
866-0905
Happy New Year
Elsie Undergarment Co.
8295 West 20th Ave., Hialeah 822-6891
Elsie and Isaac Silverberg and Family
Wish All Their Friends .
A Very Happy New Year
CU Associates Inc.
Electrical Contractors
Miami 551-4700
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
Happy New Year
SIKES TILE DISTRIBUTORS INC.
1601 NW 82nd Avenue
Miami 591-0012
Happy New Year
Farr Tours & Travel
2323 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
531-5327
Happy New Year
Dependable Printing
& Offset
1675 West 8th Ave., Hialeah-885-4521
Happy New Year
Robinson & Sons
Shutter Co.
8400 N.W. 96 St., Miami Phone 884-1128
Wishes His Clients A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Central Hardware Co.
545 Arthur Godfrey Rd.. Miami Meach
531-0836
Happy New Year


Page 4-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 198;')
the Abab Lobby
them new focus on Reelectinq Conqpessmen
By BORIS SMOLAR
Jewish organizations, like other
organizations deeply interested in
this country's political life, are
beginning to focus on the reelec-
tions in 1986 of members of both
houses of Congress, a campaign
that is just around the corner.
All 435 House members are up
for reelection. So are 34 Senators,
including 11 members of the
Senate Appropriations Commit
tee and six of the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee. Among the
Senators who will run for reelec-
tion will be a substantial number
who have consistently voted for
stronger American-Israeli rela-
tions and for increased U.S. aid to
Israel. The House support for
Israel has always been strong.
The Arab lobby, composed of
American-born Arabs and financ-
ed by the Arab oil companies with
petrodollars and by powerful
U.S. firms doing big business with
the governments of the Arab oil
countries is already mobilizing
strong forces for a vigorous cam-
paign to defeat those members of
Congress who are known to be
friendly to Israel.
LIKE ALL organizations in the
U.S. which are tax exempt, none
of the leading Jewish organiza-
tions can declare itself for or
against any candidate running for
Congress. Only one Jewish
organization which seeks no tax
exemption, and is officially
registered in Washington as a
domestic Jewish body lobbying
the Congress and the Administra-
tion can do it. This is the
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
AIPAC has about 50,000
members who make non-
deductible contributions, as in-
dividuals, believing that American
Jews must stand up to the flood of
millions of dollars being raised by
Arab groups in this country and
by PACs of American industries
dealing with Arab countries for
the purpose of defeating in
political campaigns candidates
friendly to Israel.
Under an existing law, any in-
dividual may contribute $1,000
Holiday Greetings
from
Wometco Theatres
and the
Miami Seaquarium
Southeastern Public
Service Co.
P.O. Box 41000 R
(Normandy Branch) Miami 33141 866-7771
Happy New Year
Kings Point Travel Tour Inc.
6626 W. Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. Florida 33446
Phone 1-498-1106
Wishes Friends, Clients A Family
A Happy A Healthy New Year
We Make Group Tours.
Dr. Richard A. Weiss
1400 N.E. Miami Gardens Dr. Suite 202
North Miami Beach 33179
Phone 940-2311
Wishes All His Clients A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Federal Discount Pharmacy
45 NE 1st Ave.
Miami 358-5165
maximum to any candidate who is
running for Congress. The
AIPAC, through its national PAC
labeled NatPAC a pool of con-
tributions by Jewish individuals
is able to make a maximum of
$5,000 contribution to any can-
didate for Congress for his elec-
tion campaign. In the 1984 elec-
tions NatPAC distributed
$779,000 in 153 gifts. NatPAC
does not receive any assistance
from any Jewish organization in
this country, nor does it get any
contributions whatsoever from
Israel or from any other foreign
country.
ITS CONTRIBUTIONS come
only from individuals in this coun-
try. Its pooling of the contribu-
tions received makes it possible
for small contributors to have a
major impact in hundreds of Con-
gressional races. It helps can-
didates from the Democratic and
the Republican Parties who
believe that Israel is a strategic
asset to the U.S. and its only
reliable ally in the Middle East.
In the 1984 elections, the funds
provided for the Arab and pro-
Arab lobbying under different
disguises were hundreds of dollars
more for every dollar spent by the
NatPAC. The AIPAC believes
that the threats against can-
didates seeking election or reelec-
tion who are known to be friendly
to Israel will be more ominous in
1986 than in 1984.
Contributions helping the Arab
lobby in efforts to defeat can-
didates who are friendly to Israel
come to individual candidates also
from PACS maintained by giant
U.S. firms dealing with the Arab
oil governments.
THE AMERICAN Jewish Com-
mittee, Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith and the American
Jewish Congress are engaged in
exploring Arab influence in the
U.S. as well as Arab investments
and the manner and degree to
which they contribute to the
growth of Arab influence and
power over the shaping and exer-
cise of U.S. policy decisions and
private sector behavior.
They monitor Arab transactions
in this country and review from
year to year other instruments of
Arab influence and power
especially the growing political
and economic influence in the U.S.
of Saudi Arabia which is a favorite
of the Administration.
The Treasury Department stub-
bornly refuses to disclose its
records showing the dollar
holdings in the U.S. of Saudi
Arabia. Kuwait, and the United
Arab Emirates. These holdings
are estimated by the ADL and by
some members of Congress to be
between $75 billion and $200
billion. The Treasury Secretary
had estimated the holdings of
Saudi Arabia alone to be between
$50 and $70 billion.
HOWEVER, syndicated colum- Mortgage Corporation (Fanny
nist Jack Anderson reported that May) bonds and have quietly made
the Saudis are the largest single private loans of $300 million to
owner of Federal Home Loan AT&T and three of its operating
MEffCHA/VrS
BANK
OFMM/W
Main Office:
950 SW 57th Avenue
Branches:
6600 SW 8th Street
11439 Bird Road
MEMBER F.D.I.C___________
Happy New Year
Federal Discount Pharmacy
1120 West 49th St.
Hialeah 556-5270
New Year's Greeting
Don Mullen
Favorite Fashions
232 Miracle Mile
Coral Gables 443-3009
Happy New Year
Cye's Rivergate
Lounge & Restaurant
444 Brickell Ave.
Miami 358-9100
Happy New Year
Baron's
Happy New Year
MILLER & SOLOMON
460 So. Dixie Hwy.
Miami661-3403
A Happy New Year
To The Entire Jewish Community


Friday. September 18, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-C
companies. The Saudis also made
a $200 million loan to U.S. Steel, a
$160 million loan to Schering-
Plough, and smaller amounts to B
number of electric utilities.
Individual Saudis are also seek-
ing participation in U.S. com-
panies. One of them, Ghaith
Pharaon, has succeeded in obtain-
ing control of the National Bank
of Georgia, once headed by Bert
Lance, close friend of former
President Jimmy Carter.
Pharaon is now a banking part-
ner of Lance and John Connally,
one-time Republican presidential
aspirant. He has offered to buy
the Hyatt International Corpora-
tion which operates or manages
22 hotels. He invested millions of
dollars acquiring interest in
various other important American
firms.
The largest acquisition by an
Arab country of an important
U.S. corporation is the purchase
of the Santa Fe International Cor-
poration by Kuwait for $2.5
billion. The California-based San-
ta Fe International is in the
forefront of technological develop-
ment of synthetic fuels. It is a
company whose wholly owned
subsidiary. C.F. Braun and Co.,
has performed extensive design
and engineering work at several
U.S. government sensitive
nuclear weapons facilities. The
targets of investments of Arab oil
countries are increasingly in Mil
Bitive sectors of the U.S
economy, including high
technology and energy firms.
THE DIRECT investments of
Arab oil countries in the U.S. is
estimated to be two to three times
greater than the official U.S.
estimate of all foreign in-
vestments, and close to the total
of U.S. investments throughout
the entire world which was, accor-
ding to available figures, about
$213 billion at the end of 1980. An
agreement between the U.S.
Treasury Department in 1974
with Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and
the United Arab Emirates to keep
confidential the bulk of their in-
vestments in this country makes it
difficult to estimate their extent
with any degree of precision.
Leading Jewish organizations
request that this agreement be
terminated. So do some members
of Congress who assert that the
secrecy surrounding petrodollar
investments can make the U.S. a
hostage to control by Arab
governments and could in time
alter the economic and political
character of the U.S. under Arab
influence.
Some economic experts point to
the danger that if the Arabs
Individual Saudis are also
seeking participation in
U.S. companies. One
of them, Ghaith Pharaoh,
has succeeded in
obtaining control .of. the
National Bank of Georgia,
once headed by Bert Lance,
close friend of former
President Jimmy Carter.
choose to liquidate their assets
held in Treasury bills and notes,
they could seriously disrupt the
financial markets in the country,
with results that no one can con-
fidently predict.
ARAB BANKS nourish in the
U.S. There were more than 25 of
them at the beginning of 1984.
Most of them are located in New
York State, including 14 in New
York City. An Arab Bankers
Association of North America has
been established.
The largest Arab-led financial
institution in the U.S. with
assets of almost $4 billion is the
Financial General Bankshares. a
multi-state holding company with
a network of outlets in New York,
Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee
and the District of Columbia.
Among its large stockholders is
the son of the ruler of Kuwait. The
longest established Arab bank in
the U.S. is UBAF. Arab-
American, capitalized at $100
million. Petra Capitol, the first
Arab-owned investment bank
established in the U.S., has
recently merged with a brokerage
house in New York.
A Saudi merchant, Abdullah
Bakhsh. acquired a 15 percent in-
terest in a large regional bank in
Milwaukee owned by Marine
Corp. He put $60 million of new
capital into the bank holding firm.
Another Arab capitalist, Khalid
bin Mahfous, acquired a 92 per-
cent interest in a Houston bank.
A partial listing of direct in-
vestments by Kuwait in the U.S.
in addition to the purchase of
Santa Fe International totals
more than $132 million in banks,
real estate and business in Texas.
South Carolina, Arizona and New
York.
LARGE AMOUNTS of money
are now being offered by Arab oil
governments to American col-
leges and universities seeking to
influence programs and policies of
some of these institutions. An
estimated $5 million grant was of-
fered by Saudi Arabia to the
University of Southern California.
When educational institutions
are in dire need of financial sup-
port, as they all seem to be today,
it may be difficult to turn down
the kind of money some of the
Arab governments seem willing to
spread around under certain con-
ditions. However, several major
universities including Southern
California, Pennsylvania, and
others have discovered that the
price can be too high.
While the grants by the Arab
governments may be used for
legitimate purposes, such as
Islamic studies and the study of
the contemporary Arab world,
these universities fear that the
gifts may lead to underwriting
biased anti-Israel programs, en-
courage admission and faculty hir-
ing policies that might
discriminate against qualified
Jewish students and professors,
and support Arab propaganda ac-
tivities on the campus.
Oliver Drugs and Pharmacy
93 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables 445-1059
Happy New.Y*qr
mm
Spec's Music Co.
1570 So. Dixie Hwy.
661-3451 Miami
Happy New Year To our Friends & Customers
Lily an Cortez
6700 NE 77th Ct., Miami
Phones: 592-8000 or 592-8111
Wall-Co-Imperial-"Waltex"
"Imperial Scrubbal Glendura"
We Are The Wall Covering Leader In The South
DADE TIRE CO.
1501 No. Miami Ave.
Miami 373-8445
Happy New Year
To Our Friends & Customers
Balogh Jewelers
Wishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
K&KTrailer Supplies
23215 South US Hwy. 1
South Miami 245-1212
A question
ABOut Jews
&n& Ju&aism
Continued on Page 1 -C
intellectual feats, but by a living
example in every sphere of daily
life.
Jews believed and still can
believe in a Messianic age, the
promise of a happier future,
through the perfectibility of man.
through the advancement of the
human mind.
More than once it appeared as if
Judaism had played out its role,
its purpose and is relevance. Yet,
it came back in full force. It came
back in other forms but with the
same essence which is eternal and
essential to social progress, sane,
sound living.
JEWS MORE than any other
people are by make-up socially
minded. The idea of the great
society was ever present in the
mind of the Jewish people. It was
the paramount goal of their ex-
istence, the very core of their mis-
sion. It was not a historical acci-
dent that Jewry gave rise to pro-
phets who clamored for a society
built on the foundation of justice,
love, brotherhood, peace and
equality. The voice of the prophet
was simply the voice, the cons-
cience of the people from whom
they stemmed. At the same time,
the voice of the people was always
the voice of Judaism.
Yes, there is reason to hope,
even in this depressing, discourag-
ing period, that the Jews will yet
return to the faith of their fathers.
When the saturation point of
negativism and estrangement will
have been reached. Jews will sure-
ly awaken to the realization that
without an ideal life becomes void
and empty. And, in pursuit of an
ideal they will find that there is no
greater, finer, more satisfying
ideal than that which Judaism
offers.
As we listen to the sound of the
Shofar on the New Year may
we hear its call to return to the
source of OUT strength Judaism
that way of life which has
preserved us through the ages, en-
nobled our own lives and has con
tributed to the enrichment of
IvHization ai .
Zev Buf man
& Family
Happy New Year To All

Clara & Seymour Smoller
Planet Ocean
Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, Fla. 33149
Happy New Year
Opening at Planet Ocean, Dec. 1,1985 The Crossroads
Of the Ancient Worlds Exhibit
Israel's Archaeological Heritage
A
I Poe AA&sociates.Inc
Hup i Year
Lincoln Souare. Suite 100
18441 NW 2nd Avenue
Post Office Box 694-730
Miami 33169
(305)653-6610 Dade


Page 6-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday. September 13. 1985
mishnah Speaks of Pour
Rosh hashanah peRio&s
IN THE BIBLE. The name
Rosh Hashanah, as it is in the Bi-
ble (Ezek. 40:1). simply means the
beginning of the year and does not
designate the festival. The months
of the year wore counted from the
spring month, later called by the
Babylonian name Xisan. The
month known by the Babylonian
name Tiskh is. therefore, called
the "seventh month" in the Pen-
tateuch. In the Bible, the festival
lasts for one day only: the two-day
festival arose out of the difficulty
of determining when the new
moon actually appeared.
I N R A B B I N I C
LITERATURE. The Mishnah
speaks of four periods of the year,
each known as Rosh Hashanah.
One of these is the first of Tishri.
and it is to this day that the name
generally refers. It is a day when
all mankind is judged. In the Rosh
Hashanah liturgy, the reference
to the day as the day on which the
world was created, follows the
opinion of R. Eliezer.
The theme of God as King is
particularly stressed on Rosh
The following is excerpted
from the Encyclopaedia
Judaica and has to do with
various aspect.* of both Rosh
Hashanah and Yam Kippur:
Hashanah because of the day's
association with His judgment.
During the prayers of the day. it is
sary to recite 10 biblical
texts which have the theme of Sod
as King. He who remembers, and
which have reference to the
shofar.
The four names of the festival in
Jewish tradition are: Rosh
Hashanah. Yom Teru'ah (day of
blowing the horn), Yom Ha-Din
(judgment day), and Yom Ha-
Zikkaron (day of remembrance).
Three books are opened on Rosh
Hashanah: one for the completely
righteous, one for the completely-
wicked, and one for the average
persons. The completely righteous
are immediately inscribed in the
Book of Life. The completely
wicked are immediately inscribed
in the Book of Death. The average
PAMPERED LADY
1589 Dadeland Mall Miami 665-4531
Happy New Year
Tropical Jewelers
1100 SW 57th Ave., Miami
PHONES: 266-2681 or 266-2651
Happy New Year
Silver Plumbing & Sewer
Service Inc.
1071 NE79SL 672-1741
Happy New Year
Reason For Men
9528 Harding Ave. Surf side, Fla. 33154
Phone-865-0164
Wishes Clients A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Twin City Glass Co.
122016th Street
Miami Beach 673-2967
Happy New Year
Pep Boy Auto
3984 West 12 Ave.. Hialeah 821-4670
Happy New Year
Tony & Medora
* IMl Mraen Dancfcw
o Bcwrootn Dancing
18200 Biscayne Blvd. 931-1822
Wish AU Their Friends & Patrons A Happy New Year
Continental Tailoring
1220 N.E. 163 St.
940-1129
Happy New Year
Holland Machinery Co., Inc.
Happy New Year
405 E. 10th Ave., Hialeah 885-2575
Tropical Paper Box Co.
7000 NW 25th Street, Miami 592-5520
. Happy New Year ToAU
.
persons are kept in suspension
from Rosh Hashanah to Yom Kip-
pur. If they deserve well, they are
inscribed in the Book of Life; if
they do not deserve well, they are
inscribed in the Book of Death.
THE SHOFAR. The essential
ritual of Rosh Hashanah is the
sounding of the Shofar. The
Mishnah rules that the horn of any
animal except the cow (e.g..
sheep, goat, antelope) may be us-
ed as a shofar on Rosh Hashanah.
At a later period the ram*s horn
was preferred in order to recall
the binding of Isaac, for whom a
ram was substituted. It is con-
sidered meritorious to use a curv-
ed shofar. symbolic of man bowing
in submission to God's will.
There are 10 frequently quoted
reasons why the horn is blown on
this day: 1) Trumpets are sounded
at a coronation, and God is hailed
as King on this day. 2) The shofar
heralds the beginning of the
penitential season. 3) The Torah
was given on Sinai accompanied
by blasts of the shofar. 4) The pro-
phets compare their message to
the sound of the shofar. 5) The
conquering armies that destroyed
the Temple sounded trumpet
blasts. 6) The ram was substituted
for Isaac. 7) The prophet asks:
"Shall the horn be blown in a city,
and the people not tremble?" 8)
The prophet Zephaniah speaks of
the great "day of the Lord"
(Judgment Day) as a "day of the
horn and alarm." 9) The prophet
Isaiah speaks of the great shofar
which will herald the messianic
age. 10) The shofar will be sound-
ed at the resurrection.
LAWS AND CUSTOMS. On
the first night of Rosh Hashanah,
it is customary to greet one's
friends with: "May you be inscrib-
ed (in the Book of Life) for a good
year." The Sephardi version is:
"May you be inscribed for a good
year, may you be worthy of abun-
dant years."
At the festive meal, it is
customary to dip the piece of
bread, over which grace has been
recited, into honey as a token of
the sweet year it is hoped will
come. For the same reason, a
piece of apple is dipped in honey.
The custom of sending greeting
cards before Rosh Hashanah is
not supported by Jewish tradition,
though it is now a widespread
practice.
The prophet Micah spaks of God
casting the sins of Israel into the
depths of the sea. On the basis of
this, the Tashlikh ceremony arose
in which Jews go to a place where
there is running water to recite
that verse and other scriptural
< .', .. i- 'i4.
Coatiaaed on Page 7-C i
CYNTHIA APTS.
2115 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
Wish You A Good Year
Seybold Building
36 NE 1st St.. Miami 374-7922
Happy New Year
Nature's Garden Bakery
600 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach 534-1877
We Specialize in Natural, Whole Grain & Special
Diet Items, Pritikin Sugar Free < Salt Free Diets
Happy New Year
Sheldon, Ribotsky,
Levine, P.A.
Extends A Happy New Year
ToAU Our Friends & Clients
Ocean Electric
1526 Alton Road, Miami Beach 672-7233
Happy New Year
Smith Terminal Warehouse Co.
12300 NW 32 Ave.
Miami 685-0325
Happy New Year
Pyke Bros. & Son Body Shop
35 NE 29 St., Miami 573-6800
Happy New Year
Taj-Mahal of N.M.B.
20320 NW 2nd Ave., N.M.B. 944-7923
Happy New Year
Southgate Apartments
980 West Ave., Miami Beach 672-2414
Happy New Year
Pastry Lane Bakery
1688 NE 164 St., North Miami Beach
Phone: 944-5934
Happy New Year ToAU


I
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-C
ShoPAR Reminds Us of the Way to Wisdom Or folly
By DOV WINCKLER
Here we are again.
We are standing on a peak at
the top of a New Year. The last
365 days are linked to the ir-
retrievable past. Nothing can now
be gained from them, nothing but
memories and that residue we like
to call experience.
Nonetheless we are glad that
they are over, glad that they are
over and that we are still alive and
able to look back at them. Con-
trarily, the 365 days ahead of us
are utterly open, utterly free, tit-
Ntrly subject to what the Lord
I makes new, vital and unexpected.
There is no telling what these
days will yield, whether the crop
wiil prove thick or the crop will
prove thin, whether the cattle will
multiply or whether the herd will
diminish, whether the fruit-
bearing tree will prosper and bear
18 bushels or not prosper and bear
cine.
HOWEVER FREELY we fancy
we can foresee, we can in fact
foresee nothing. Whether the
i hand that rests on us shall lie
lightly or with heaviness, in good
measure or in bad, is not
penetrable and will not be known.
All that we can know from here,
now, from the narrow vantage of
our limited perspective, is that
time alone will go on, and will go
on with us or without us, whether
we are awake in it or asleep in it,
and that it matters little whether
we rise to meet it or it rises to
meet us.
The significance of this continui-
ty in time should not be lost on us,
particularly at the beginning of a
New Year.
Juvenile Center Inc.
2031 NE 163 St., No. Miami Beach 947-1771
Happy New Year To Our Friends And Customers
Goody's Quality Cleaners
16990 NE 19 Ave., No. Miami Beach 949-8391
Happy New Year To Our
Clients and Friends
House of Duplicating
765 W. FlaglerSt., Miami 545-6542
Happy New Year To All
Renee de Paris Inc.
French Jewelry Inc.
6608 Collins Ave., Miami beach 865-7631
Happy New Year
Florida Smoked Fish
1111NW 159 Dr., Miami-625-5112
Happy New Year
Johnnie & Mack Body Shop
3647 NW 36 St., Miami 633-0181
Happy New Year To Our Friends & Customers
Linen Chest of Florida
18703 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 931-8530
Happy New Year
Frank's Jewelers
7271 SW 57 Ave., Miami 661-7627
Happy New Year
Conger Life Insurance
5050 Biscayne Blvd.. Miami 754-3291
Happy New Year
Miami Rug Co.
Happy New Year To All
That is why, as a man grows
older, his experience of time
grows continually more complex
and why it increasingly appears to
him as if time were almost a living
substance drawn simultaneously
from many dimensions and not
merely a specific measure of or-
dinary duration.
Time then being what it is, a
vessel in which events and images
move, some of which it is given us
to see and some of which it is not
given us to see, it is best, especial-
ly at this season of the year, not to
think of it as something we can
too easily forge or too easily bend
to our will. It should, rather, be
viewed as an unfolding in and
against which the tale life means
to tell will be portrayed, and day
by day and night by night be pro-
jected.
BUT EVEN if viewed as a
pageant, it is not the story alone
which time has to tell that is
significant. What is significant of
course is both what that story
means and what it is the symbol
of.
According to the sages, only
Torah will yield the meaning and
only Torah will unravel the sym-
mishnah Sees
Pour Rosh
hashanah pewods
Continued from Page 6-C
verses, as well as penitential
hymns and prayers on the first
afternoon of Rosh Hashanah.
DAY OF ATONEMENT
(Yom ha-Kippur-im)
One of the "appointed seasons
of the Lord, a holy convocation"
a day of fasting and atonement,
occurring on the tenth of Tishri
this day climaxes the ten days of
penitence and is the most impor-
tant day in the liturgical year.
IN THE BIBLE. All manner of
work is forbidden on the Day of
Atonement, as it is on the Sab-
bath, and the soul is to be "af-
flicted," the punishment for tran-
sgressing these commandments
being destruction and extirpation.
IN THE HALAKHAH. The
Pentateuch does not explain what
is to be understood by "afflicting
the soul" on the Day of Atone-
ment. However, other passages in
the Scriptures speak explicitly of
afflicting the soul by fasting. Ac-
cording to the sages, there are
five ways in which the duty of af-
flicting the soul applies: by pro-
hibitions against eating and drink-
ing, washing oneself (for
pleasure), anointing the body,
wearing shoes (of leather), and
cohabitation. The same kinds of
work are forbidden on the Day of
Atonement as are forbidden on
the Sabbath, and danger to life
(pikku'ak nefesh) overrides all the
prohibitions of the Day of Atone-
ment, just as it does those of the
Sabbath.
bol. And it is to awaken us to this
admonition that the shofar is
sounded on the new moon of the
seventh month.
Concerning the blowing of the
shofar that day Maimonides
asserts: "The Scriptural injunc-
tion of the Shofar for the New
Year's Day has a profound mean-
ing. It says: Awake, ye sleepers,
and ponder over your deeds;
remember your Creator and go
back to Him in penitence. Be not
of those who miss realities in their
pursuit of shadows and waste
their years in seeking after vain
things which cannot profit or
deliver. Look well to your souls
and consider your acts, and return
to God so that He may have mercy
on you."
Whal else is Maimonides
saying?
HE IS saying that the shofar
blows on Rosh Hashanah to
awaken us to the implications of
the year before us, of the time-
stretch we now face. Though in
that time-stretch there will be
many stories for all of us to
observe, in it too there is great op-
portunity not only for interpreta-
tion but for action, since our ac-
tions are largely what make those
stories and fashion them to turn
out as they do.
Hence, when the shofar blows it
is to awaken us to the con-
sciousness that in the year before
us there is both a way to wisdom
and to folly.
So take care of this time, that
time and the other time and have
the happiest time ever this year
too!
Expose Hair Design
6629 So. Dixie Hwy., Miami 666-7984
Happy New Year
Miami Tobacco & Candy Co.
8607 NW61stSt., Miami 5940063
Happy New Year To Our Friends & Customers
Berkshire Life Insurance
8401 N.W. 53rd Terrace, Suite 202
Miami 33166 Phone 593-1564
Wishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy Monahan's Electric Company
4050 NW 29th St., Miami 871-3163
New Year Greetings '
Jones Moving & Storage
444 Brickell Ave., Miami 33131 Phone 374-6027
Wish All Clients & Friends A Happy New Year
Lear School
11211 Biscayne Blvd.. Miami 893-5351
Happy New Year
Kane's Masterbuilt Furniture
5851 NW35th Avenue, Miami 633-0542
Happy New Year Greetings To All
Joe's Stone Crabs Restaurant
Holiday Magazine Award Since 1961
Open For Lunch Weekends
227 Biscayne St. at Washington Miami Beach 673-0365
Happi Nw Ytar
Lee's Prescription Pharmacy
2525 S.W. 3 Ave.. Miami 854-3625
Happy New Year
Kendall Radiator Works
8711 S.W. 129 Terrace, Miami 233-4554
Happy New Year To All
aa-Ban>>>>>nBB>>aaBBsTBsfasT.a


li/UU
Page 8-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Jews of ethiopiA have Come to Study topah
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ ^- -^^ae^ajaaarK By GERALD S. NAGEL
Some 70 percent o/ Ethiopian Jews in Israel
are under 14, but here is a rare family in
which three generations of an Ethiopian
Jewish family are all in Israel. 'Two of my
prayers have been answered,' said the grand-
mother. 'My family and I are in Israel, and
my grandchild has been born in the Promised
Land.'
By GERALD S. NAGEL
A clear majority of the approx-
imately 24,500 Ethiopian Jews
are now in Israel. Like earlier
groups, they have come for many
reasons and after a dangerous
trek. They have come to study
Torah in their national homeland,
fulfill mitzvot (commandments) in
Judaism's historical center, speed
the advent of Messiah by in-
gathering, and escape terrible
persecution and famine.
Like other groups of Jews,
those from Ethiopia, who are
black, bring their own culture and
heritage, enriching the diversified
mosaic of Israeli life. The Ethio-
pian branch of the world Jewish
family was certified as Jewish by
both the Chief Ashkenazic and
Chief Sephardic rabbis of Israel in
1973.
When Independence was
declared (5 lyar 5708, May 14,
1948). there were fewer than
700,000 Jews in Eretz Israel, but
their numbers would double in
three years as Jews would begin
to return to the homeland they
had lacked for nearly 2,000 years.
Here are highlights of some major
waves of immigration, that may
in iSR&el
show Ethiopian Jewish immigra-
tion in perspective.
THE FIR8T Jews to arrive
after Independence were 25,000
Eastern European Jews whom
Britain had jailed on Cyprus for
daring to seek entry into what
was then a British Mandate with
strict immigration quotas barring
Jews. They were soon joined to-
other Holocaust survivors men
and women with battered lives
and tattered clothing, the vestiges
of once-large and prosperous
Eastern European families. Thev,-i,
were, like immigrants to folio*'* ',
without funds but with confidence
and hope.
In 1949-50, Operation Magic
Carpet provided a dramatic exam
pie of aliyah or the "going up" to
Israel by ohm (immigrants) fore
seen by the Prophets (Ezra 1:3}
Operation Magic Carpet airlifted
to Israel virtually all 47,1.....Jews
in Yemen, who first had to survive
an arduous journey on foot to
Aden. The Yemenite Jews called
the planes 'eagles' wings" after
God's words, "And I bore you on
eagles' wings and I brought you
unto myself (Exodus 19:4).
Operation Ezra soon followed
Rosh hashanah question Box: What Is the ORiQin of Jewish new yeau Capos?
BAGEL EMPORIUM
1238 S. Dixie Highway, Miami, Ha. 33146 666-9519
Happy New Year
Happy New Year
To the Entire Jewish Community of Dade
County From The
Republican Party of Dade County
Jeb Bush Chairman
Golden Razor Barber Salon
9700 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 865-2779
Wishes A Happy New Year To All
Health & Fitness Vacation
Your Spa Specialist
Israel, Switzerland, Italy, Czechoslovakia & Australia
2911 Grand Ave., Suite 3A Ph. (305) 445-3876.
(For Outside Res. Call Collect)
Happy New Veer To The Community
ANTHONY'S COIFFURES
17604 Collins Ave. 935-1919
A Happy New Year To Our
Friends and Customers
Pumperniks Restaurant
917 E. Hallandale Blvd.
Hallandale, Fla. 33009 944-6663
Happy New Year
Holiday Inn Golden Glades
148 N.W. 167th St., North Miami Beach 33169
Wishes All Customers A Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
MR. CARMEN BEAUTY SHOP
1604 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 534-2900
Happy Naw Year
Rhodes Furniture
1261 N.E. 163 St.. N. Miami Beach, Fla. 33162 885-9581
Happy New Year A
Purity Pest Control
8257 S.W. 124 St., Miami, Fla. 33156 238-9303
Mr. Jack Levine Wishes The Community
' A Happy New Year
By RABBI
SAMUEL J. FOX
What is the origin of sending
New Year cards for the Jewish
New Year Festival?
In the 14th Century it is already
metioned that during the month
before Rosh Hashanah one should
extend good wishes to his friends
by saying "May you be inscribed
and sealed for a good year"
(Maharil). There was also a
custom at that time of adding the
salutation to a letter during the
month before Rosh Hashanah ex-
pressing good wishes for the New
Year.
In the 19th Century we find
greeting cards made in Germany
expressing such wishes. The form
of the greeting in which one
wishes one's friend that he be in-
scribed for a good year is taken
from a characterization in the
Talmud (Rosh Hashanah 16:B)
where the rabbis claim that three
books are open for the recording
of judgment during Rosh
Hashanah. One is for the
righteous who are immediately in-
scribed and sealed for a good life.
One is for the wicked, who are im-
mediately inscribed and sealed for
death and punishment. The third
is for the in-between class whose
judgment is extended until Yom
Kippur, the Day of Atonement.
Why is it that the first day of
Rosh Hashanah can never fall on a
Sunday:'
Actually, Rosh Hashanah can-
not fall on three days during the
week, Sunday, Wednesday or Fri-
day. This arrangement was made
so as to prevent both Yom Kippur
and Hoshanah Rabbah from fall-
ing on days which would bring up
problems.
The idea was to prevent Yom
Kippur from falling on Friday or
Sunday, since if it did so, one
could not prepare food two days in
a row nor could one bury the dead
for two days in a row, thus making
a very difficult situation.
It was also intended to prevent
Hoshanah Rabbah from falling on
a Saturday since the Sabbath
would prohibit the beating of the
willow twigs which is an impor-
tant observance that day. The
result of these two considerations
made the rabbis arrange the
calendar in such a way that Rosh
Hashanah would never fall on
Sunday, Wednesday or Friday.
Martha's Flower Shop
3921 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, Fla. 33140
538-5523
Happy New Year
Furniture Artist
783 N.E. 125 St., Miami, Fla. 33161
895-6951
Happy New Year
Miami Beach Police
Athletic League
99911 St., Miami Beach 531-5636
Exec. Dir. Off. A J. Daoud Prea.-Anue Noikin
Happy New Year
All People's Synagogue
And Rabbi Dr. Emmet Allen Frank
Pray For World Peace
7455 Collins Ave. 861-5554 Happy New Year
Lef f, Pesetsky and Zack
1367 NE 162nd Street
North Miami Beach 945-7501
Happy New Year
Flo & Ben Kram Print-Rite Co.
748 NE 79th St., Miami 691-5452
Happy New Year To The Entire Jewish Community
RAND INCOME TAX
27 N.W. 37th Ave. 445-7948
Happy New Year
Camp Shalom
and
Dave. Shelly Sokol and Family
Jan, Jerry, Heidi and Michael
Wish All A Happy New Year
The Palette
125 NE26 St., Miami 573-0980
Happy New Year
Metro Insurance Agency
12556 N. Kendall Dr., Miami, Fla. 33186 271-1044
Happy New Year


Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-C
(1950-51), bringing out 114,000
Jews from Iraq, after Iraq
enacted the Special Law Authoriz-
ing Emigration of the Jews that
permitted their exodus if all their
property would be left behind.
They came by sea and air, over 18
months.
Throughout the 1950's, the
return of Jews to their homeland
continued, including many from
Arab lands such as Tunisia and
Morocco, where oppressive anti-
Spmitism sparked departure.
IN THE early 1960's, Brazilian
and Argentinian Jews came in
large numbers, and after the Six-
Day War in 1967, Jews flocked
from Britain, France, the U.S.,
Canada, Australia, South Africa
and New Zealand.
Since the early 1970's. when
Soviet emigration restrictions
cased somewhat, 163.000 Soviet
Jews made aliyah. And in the
1980's Jews continue to come, in-
cluding those from Ethiopia,
fulfilling the mitzvot of living in
Israel.
The decision by Ethiopian Jews
to exercise their right to make
aliyah under the Law of Return
[-^1950), which grants every Jew
the right to settle in Israel, and
ihe Citizenship Law (1952), which
confers Israeli citizenship on ar-
rival on all Jewish immigrants,
fulfills an ancient dream that
Like other groups of Jews, those from
Ethiopia, who are black, bring their
own culture and heritage, enriching the
diversified mosaic of Israeli life. The
Ethiopian branch of the world Jewish
family was certified as Jewish by both
the Chief Ashkenazic and Chief
Sephardic rabbis of Israel in 1973.
scores of their generations have
kept alive.
They leave behind rampant anti-
Semitism, persecution,
discrimination and oppression;
domestic political, economic and
military turmoil; and a sub-
Saharan famine of shocking
proportions.
JEWISH IMMIGRANTS from
Ethiopia have many problems
common to other olini. but include
a far higher proportion 70 per-
cent of children under 14 who
arrived without parents. And each
is challenged by the needed transi-
tion from an ancient culture to a
contemporary Western-style
democracy.
They are being helped, as- have
all 1.8 million other olim since
1948, by the Jewish Agency, the
main beneficiary agency of the
United Jewish Appeal/Federation
Campaigns in the U.S. The cam-
paigns enable American Jews to
play a role in pidyon hasheimxm,
redemption of the captives, and
help improve the economic and
social life of the people of Israel.
JTA Press Service
Ethiopian Jews have maintained the Torah as a handwritten
book, not as a scroll. This Torah is hundreds of years old, these
men's only possession from Ethiopia. The man on the right is a
'Kes,' a religious leader, which means he conducts services and
performs marriages, but his position comes by heredity, not
ordination.
The Studio Restaurant
2340 SW 32 Ave.
Miami 445-5371
Happy New Year
The Unicorn
Natural Food Restaurant
16454 N.E. 6th Ave. 944-5595
Happy New Year

Spectors & Sons Realty
575 N.W. 22nd Ave. 642-3153
Happy New Year
R.E.A. AIR CONDITIONING
8860 S.W. 82 St. 266-6627
Happy New Year
Window Mart
12330 N.W. 7th Ave.
687-0808
Happy New Year
SEA VIEW AWNINGS
3750 NW 46 St., Miami 633-9650
A Happy New Year To All
Pampered Lady
8787 S.W. 132nd St.
238-5239 665-4531
Happy New Year
Touche Ross & Co.
TAX CONSULTANTS
100 Chopin Plaza, 7th Floor
377-4000
We Wish A Happy New Year To AU
Christy's Restaurant
3101 Ponce De Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33145
Happy New Year
SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN
20255 S. Dixie Highway
Miami, Fla. 33187
Happy New Year
Beta Israel:
theiR ancient
ORiqins
For more than 2,000 years, a
community of devout Jews has en-
dured in the highlands of
Ethiopia. They call themselves
"Beta Israel," the House of
Israel, and believe themselves to
be descendants of King Solomon
and the Queen of Sheba. Some
sources maintain that they were
originally part of the lost tribe of
Dan which separated from Moses
on the journey to Israel. Others
believe they were migrants from
Yemen or arrived after fleeing
from ancient Israel upon the
destruction of the First Temple in
586 BCE.
From the 10th to the 16th Cen-
turies, Jews in Ethiopia formed an
independent kingdom with a
population reaching 500,000. But
in 1632, their independence was
crushed, their land was con-
fiscated, and they were reduced to
second-class citizenship. They
became targets of severe persecu-
tion and of anti-Semitism which
continue today.
In the 17th Century, they were
conquered. Many were massacred
and others were sold into slavery.
Their lands were confiscated and
conversion was forced upon many
of them.
FROM THEN until the over-
throw of Emperor Haile Selassie
in 1974, Ethiopia's Jews toiled as
serfs in a feudal aristocracy, tagg-
ed with the derogatory label of
Folosha (stranger).
The passing of Haile Selassie
went unmourned by Ethiopia's
28,000 oppressed Jews, but life in
the Jewish villages was not to im-
prove for some time. The Marxist
military regime that emerged
after the Emperor's downfall was
confronted with a secessionist war
in Eritrea, a war with Somalia in
the Ogaden, and civil war and
tribal insurrection at home as well
as widespread poverty, ignorance
and disease.
During the years of political
upheaval in the 1970s, Ethiopia's
Jews suffered greatly as the
fighting ebbed and flowed around
them, and their sons were con-
scripted into battle. They also
became restricted in religious
practice and are suspect because
Continued on Page 10-C
Car Recycling, Inc.
8130 N.W. 74th St.
Miami, Fla. 33166
592-6880
Happy New Year
Palm Island of Miami
Children's Wear
100 N.E. 39th St. Miami. 33137
Happy New Year
576-0280
The Salvation Army
P.O. Box 350667 Miami 33135-0677 643-4900
Major Powell Wishes The Entire Community
A Happy New Year
Travel By Rusty
16360 NE 26th Ave., No. Miami Beach 944-0666
We Wish All Our Friends < Clients
A Very Happy New Yea/
Levison Loans
' 22 NW 1 St. Miami371-6437
Happy New Year
Health Care Communications
11550 S.W. 82 Terr., Miami, Fla. 33173 274-0999
Happy New Year
From Larry M. Strum and Associates
Discount Optical
7145 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, 33141
Happy New Year
Elio and Helen's Tailoring
9532 Harding Ave., Surfside, Fla. 33154 865-1014
Happy New Year Special Holiday Offer -
With This Ad 20% OFFAU Made To Measure Clothing
Mederi
A HOME HEALTH AGENCY
4111 Le Jeune Road, Coral Gables. Fla. 33146
Wishing Our Friends A Peaceful 5.
And Prosperous New Year '>
Dean Witter Reynolds
10800 Biscayne Blvd. Suite 900 Miami, Fla. 33161
Wishes AU Our Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
i


ft-----------* A A
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Page 10-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
Tel Aviv Satuoday mopninq:
A Par Way ppom Af rica ^3
By WENDY ELLIMAN
Tel Aviv on a Saturday morning
in summer: observant Jews mak-
ing their way home from
synagogue, prayerbooks in hand.
But for most of Tel Aviv, the Sab-
bath is a day for the beach or
sidewalk cafes, for visiting
relatives or household chores.
Cars honk their way down hot,
crowded streets. Through open
windows of homes comes the
aroma of cooking and the blare of
radios.
Israel's secular Jews are more
astonishing to the ingathering
Jews of Ethiopia than any of the
technological wonders of the
Jewish State. In Ethiopia, a Jew
who defiled the Sabbath was no
longer welcome in his community.
In the villages around Lake
Tan'a back in Ethiopia, these
Jews began preparing for the
week's holiest day on Thursdays,
as their fathers had for genera-
tions before them. First came
laundry, bathing and ritual im-
mersion, because only after they
had bathed were women permit-
ted to cook the Sabbath food.
BY MIDDAY on Friday, all
work had ceased. Homes were
tidied, stoves extinguished and
embers dampened because the
Torah (Exodus 35:3) requires:
"You shall kindle no fire
throughout your habitations on
the Sabbath day."
Weekday clothes were exchang-
ed for special Sabbath garments
worn without belts or sashes
because the Torah teaches that ty-
ing a knot transgresses the holy
day.
When a man's shadow lengthen-
ed to 12 paces under the setting
sun, Ethiopia's Jews knew that
the Sabbath had begun. The
village converged on the beit
makdas (synagogue). Removing
their shoes as they entered, the
men gathered on one side, the
women on the other, and the kes
(priest) and his aides their
heads covered assembled in the
kadusta kadustan (inner
sanctum).
Facing Jerusalem, the con-
Lazere Financial Corp.
444 Brickell Ave., Miami. Fla. 33131 358-5430
Happy New Year
SYKESACE HARD WARE
284 N.E. 79th St., Miami, Fla. 33138 754-2556
Happy New Year From Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shor
Lincoln Marti Schools
904 S.W. 23rd Ave., Miami, Fla. 33135
643-4888
Happy New Year
Kimberly Furniture
1014 E. 29th St., Hialeah. Fla. 33013
691-1481
Happy New Year
Aladdin Upholstery
452 NE 167 St., N. Miami, Fla. 33162
940-4771
Happy New Year
Swim-n-Sport Shops
Wishes A Happy New Year
To The Entire Jewish Community
From All Our South Florida Stores
Dorwins
1574 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Happy New Year
Mimosa Coffee Shop
4747 Collins Ave., Miami Beach Phone 532-6414
Wishes All Customers A Friends A Happy New Year
Anna & Otto
f
Federal Precious Metal
250 N.E. 17th Terrace. Miami 33132 Phone 379-5772
Wish All Clients & Friends & The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy & Healthy New Year
Laura McCarthy Inc.
8601 Biscayne Blvd., Miami Shores 751-1641
Happy New Year
At the Kiryat Gat Absorption Center near
Ashkelon, Israel, Marva Perrin of Palm
Beach, a National Women's Division Board
member, visits with Ethiopian Jewish
children. Ms. Perrin participated in the Na-
tional Women's Division Aviv Mission, one
gregation followed the kes as he
prayed in the ancient Semitic
tongue of Je'ez. The traditional
prayers of Ethiopian Jewry attest
to the Oneness of God. They recall
the Temple in Jerusalem was
destroyed, and implore redemp-
tion, the return of the exiled Jews
to Zion and the coming of the
Messiah.
way that American Jews have reached out and
aided Israel's newest citizens. The absorption
of Jews from around the world is supported by
the Jewish Agency, most of whose funds come
from American Jews throughout UJA/Federa-
tion Campaign.
THE SERVICE over, the kes
blessed the special Sabbath bread
the women had baked. Sanbat
Salam (A Peaceful Sabbath), the
Jews of Ethiopia wished one
another.
The Sabbath is meticulously
observed by Ethiopia's Jews
celebrated as the stern Mosaic law
of the Torah commands, uninter-
preted by the rabbinic law record-
ed in the Talmud which developed
after these Jews (possibly descen-
dants of the lost tribe of Dan)
were separated from other Jews
by circumstance.
Isolated from mainstream
Judaism while the Second Temple
still stood. Ethiopian Jews knew
neither the Talmud nor the
festivals of Chanukah and Purim.
The Hebrew language was lost in
time, and mezuzot, tefillin and
tzitzit vanished from Ethiopian
practices.
But their sons are circumcised
on the eighth day as the Torah
prescribes, and the law of family
purity so literally maintained that
a wife leaves the home of her hus-
band altogether during her
menstrual period.
ROSH HASHANAH is a time
of repentance. It is known as the
festival of Trumpeting (Berhan
Matka), even though Ethiopian
Jews blew no shofar. Yom Kippur
'Ba'ala Asterai) is a solemn fast
day. Sukkot (Ma'ala Masalat) is
an eight-day harvest festival, dur-
ing which Ethiopian Jews dwell in
thatched huts.
Beta isnaek
th6IR ORiqins
Continued from Page 9-C
they aspire to live in Israel.
Ahya, or the "going up" to
Israel of Ethiopian Jews, did not
become possible until after the
revolution in 1979, when
disorganized conditions permitted
movement within the country.
TODAY, thousands of Ethio-
pian Jews live in safety and peace
in Israel. There, Ethiopian im-
migrants have begun the difficult
and costly absorption program
conducted by the Jewish Agency.
UJA Press Service
J.B. Hanauer & Co.
2960 Aventura Blvd., Miami 932-6300
Happy New Year
Hi-Grade Food Co.
240 NE 71 Street
Miami 758-0516
Happy New Year
Holbert Electric Co.
1434 Alton Road, Miami Beach 672-6611
Happy New Year To All Our Friends & Clients
Engler Engineering
1099 East 47 St., Hialeah 688-8581
Wish All Their Friends & Customers
A Happy New Year
Heres Gift Center
607 Lincoln Rd. Mall, Miami Beach 673-1706
Happy New Year To Our Friends & Customers
Jefferson Hotel
121 15th Street, Miami Beach 33139 531-1141
Wishes Customers & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
Biscayne Miracle Mile
Cafeteria
147 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables 444-9005
Happy New Year
Home Lumber Industrial
Supply Corporation
1050 E. 25 St., Hialeah 691-8515
Happy New Year
Green-Brook Corp.
1086 East 14th St., Hialeah 888-6300
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
Meridian Apothecary Shop
1608 Meridian Ave\, Miami Beach 538-0424
Happy New Year


aRChaeoloqical toeasuRes
peatuRinq 9,000-yeAR-olfc
actifacts now on exhiBit
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 1 1-C
By SIMON GRIVER
|.\trliaeological treasures of un-
\, cedentea antiquity have
cently been placed on exhibition
the Israel Museum in
| iiem. The collection of
liiiMi year-old artifacts has
uiutionary anthropological im-
because they provide
first ever opportunity for ex-
;<> study the civilization of
ilithic man (late Stone Age)
r
rhe sensational aspect of these
is,'' explains Dr. Tamar Noy,
p-ator of prehistory at the Israel
|useum, "is that they comprise
almost complete picture of
hat society must have been like
|iring that age. We have found
Id hits and pieces in the past but
ing as revealing and as
nisticated as this. Some of the
brics and designs are so ex-
lisite that they give us a new
ew of what our ancestors were
and they should banish
forever any popular notions that
Neolithic man was brutish and
dull."
This archaeological cache was
discovered in a cave in the Judean
Desert 30 miles south of
Jerusalem. The desert's caves
have been a favorite hunting
ground for archaeologists and for-
tune seeking Bedouins, ever since
the Dead Sea Scrolls were un-
covered in a similar cave in the
1940's.
IN FACT, the cave containing
the Neolithic objects had been
searched by Bedouin shepherds,
but in 1983 David Alon of the
Education Ministry's Department
of Antiquities and Museums, and
Prof. Ofer Bar-Yosef of the
Hebrew University probed deeper
into the cave and unearthed their
magnificent find.
The cave is located in Nahal
Hemer (Hebrew for Asphalt
River) and over the centuries it
has been frequented for shelter by
hyenas and passing shepherds.
AAA Fence
19510 NW 48 Ct.
620-6270
Happy New Year
Well-Built Kitchen Inc.
5561 NW 36 Ave. Miami 635-8621
We Wish All Our Customers And Friends
A Very Happy New Year
Professional Arts Pharmacy
1150 NW 14 ST. 324-0803
Holiday Greetings To All
Sofas & Chairs
89 NE 27 St.
Miami 573-0760
Happy New Year
King David
800 Washington Ave. Miami Beach 33139
Wish All Tenants, Friends A The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy A Healthy New Year
The Marble Terrace Apts.
Wishes The Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
Reliable Auto Leasing
1130 5th St., Miami Beach 672-1250
The Holtzman Family
Happy New Year To All
Sheet Metal Associates
2463 NW 76 St., Miami 836-6011
Happy New Year
PHILIPPE
3403 Main Highway
448-2290
Coconut Grove
448-0942
Happy New Year
S. & S. Air Conditioning
7320 NW 58th St., Miami 592-3412
Happy New Year
Three figurines of human heads, carved in
bone and Carbon 1J, dated to approximately
7,000 BCE. These and other fascinating finds
recently went on display for the first time at
the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.
Evidence suggests that the cave
was also in use during the
Canaanite-Israelite period and
later during the time of the Se-
cond Temple. Carbon 14 tests pro-
ved beyond doubt that the ar-
tifacts do indeed date from some
9,000 years ago and the collection
was kept under wraps for more
than a year to provide the Israel
Museum with a display of ap-
propriate importance to celebrate
its 20th anniversary.
Among the most remarkable of
these delicate objects are fabrics
woven in 11 intricate designs us-
ing diverse methods of knotting
and meshing. Another fascinating
find is a human skull decorated
with asphalt, while a painted mask
and some cloth fragments are the
oldest examples ever found. A
range of ornaments and jewelry
include wooden, clay and green
stone beads, while a collection of
shells must have been brought
from either the Mediterranean or
Red Sea.
ON THE utilitarian side, the
Neolithic objects include flint tools
such as blades, knives and ar-
rowheads. There are bone objects
like spatulas, pointed tools and
something resembling a buckle,
while wooden artifacts include
digging sticks, arrowheads and
something shaped like a fish hook,
as well as a sickle with three flint
blades held together by resin. The
collection also includes a rodent
carved from limestone, a painted
clay human statue and four bone
depictions of the human head
decorated with asphalt coating
and bands of red and green.
These unique organic finds have
survived intact due to the
darkness and dryness of their
cave in the Judean Desert. Conse-
quently, the authorities of the
Israel Museum have taken
elaborate precautions to ensure
that light and humidity do not
damage such an irreplaceable col-
lection. The objects have been
placed in a darkened room.
The showcases themselves are
kept in the dark and only when the
visitor wants to view the object
does he press a button which turns
on lights which last for 90 seconds
and are filtered to block out any
potentially destructive ultra-violet
rays.
ACCORDING TO Dr. Tamar
Noy, the Israel Museum will keep
the collection, which is entitled "A
Cave in the Desert," on display
until the end of the summer. The
museum officials will then check
on the condition of the objects
following exposure to albeit
limited amounts of light and
moisture. If possible some of the
Neolithic finds will then be placed
on permanent exhibition. At the
same time researchers will be
busy piecing together what these
-Mifacts can tell us about civiliza-
tion in the late Stone Age.
The textiles offer new insights
into how man began weaving both
baskets and cloth, while the cultic
nature of many of the objects will
offer an opportunity to learn more
about the rites, rituals and
religion of the era. Dr. Noy
estimates that research will take
at least four years.
Wong Shanghai Restaurant
12420 Biscayne Blvd.,
Miami 891-4313
Happy New Year
Pepe Auto Parts
1225 West 49 St., Hialeah 823-3891
Happy New Year
Reliatex Inc.
2201 NW72Ave.
Miami 592-3220
Happy New Year
Pouparina Florist
700 SW 17th Ave., Miami 643-0312
Specializing in Weddings & Bar Mitzvahs
Happy New Year
S & S Discount Market
7306 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 861-0694
Happy New Year
Rothman's Shoe Salon
9700 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach 866-1172
Happy New Year
Tides Hotel-Apartments
1220 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach 531-6701
Happy New Year
Sunny side Motel & Trailer Park
6024 SW 8th St.
Miami 266-1727
Happy New Year
WARREN HENRY VOLVO
17777 NW 2nd Ave.
Miami -652-6511
Happy New Year
Southern Wine & Spirits, Inc.
1600 NW 163 St., Miami 625-4171
A Joyous New Year To All
-


Page 12-C The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
mitzpe Ramon.- museum
And 'machtesh' a testament
to the poweps of nature
BY AVI GOLDSTEIN
If one drives south from Beer-
sheva, capital of Israel's Negev
desert, past Kibbutz Mashabei
Sadeh, continuing through the
desert to Sde Boker, one eventual-
ly reaches the desert town of Mitz-
pe Ramon. Here the newly-opened
Park Ramon Visitor's Center and
Machtesh Ramon (Ramon Crater)
can be found, the largest nature
reserve in Israel and a testament
to the powers of nature.
"We have an area here that has
been largely untouched by man."
says Aryeh Cohen, one of two
rangers at the Machtesh Ramon
Nature Reserve. Forty kilometers
in length, nine kilometers in width
and half-a-kilometer in depth.
Machtesh Ramon has been carved
out by nature through the ages
and its roots go back five to seven
million years.
PARK RAMON Visitors
Center, which has been named in
honor of the late Gen. Yekutiel
Adam, is an attempt to harness
the natural beauty of this vast
crater and serve it to the public in
usable portions. Exhibits and
photographs depicting Machtesh
Ramon and its development are
displayed in the Center as well as
explanations of its history,
vegetation and geology.
Fascinating artifacts from the Ca-
naanite, Nabatean and Byzantine
periods can be found as well as
pictures showing animals in-
digenous to the region, such as
ibex, gazelles, wolves, foxes and
leopards.
Visitors to Machtesh Ramon can
take advantage of a 15-minute
slide show, available in both
Hebrew and English, which is
shown at the Center's auditorium.
Those brave enough to want to
venture down into the crater
itself, will find a variety of useful
information, including maps on
trails available.
The opening of the Visitors'
Center is just the first stage in the
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photoQRaphs depicting awesome Beauty of CR&ten.
A- small auditorium within the Park Ramon
Visitor's Center showing photographs depic-
ting the awesome beauty of the U0 kilometer
development of the park by the
Nature Reserves Authority,
which is slated to become a focal
point for scientists and tourists
alike. A research and study center
will provide the resources and
facilities for scientific study of the
area while tourist facilities will in-
clude a much needed hostel,
equivalent to a three-star hotel,
and cafeteria-restaurant. A
library is also to be established
which will condense all the scien-
tific material connected with
Ramon and the Negev plateau and
will be open to visitors.
PLANS ARE underway for im-
proving trails within the crater,
which in the future will'include
combined vehicle and walking
tours. On some trails hikers will
be dropped off at one end and be
picked up several hours or days
later at the other end, whilst other
trails will be circular. Vehicles will
be parked at a central area, from
which the hikers will set out and
to which they will eventually
return.
Being desert creatures most of
the natural inhabitants of
Machtesh Ramon avoid the hot,
daylight hours, and only appear
during the cooler, nighttime
period. For this reason a special
bird and animal watching center is
planned which will make use of
infra-red lighting. In this way
nature lovers will be able to see
without being seen.
Mitzpe Ramon Mayor Shmuel
Cohen is confident that
developments at the park are a
sign of improved economic times
ahead for his community.
Already, in the short time since
the Visitors' Center opened in
mid-January, an average of 200
people per day have come. This is
an astounding figure, says ranger
Cohen, considering the
geographical isolation of Mitzpe
Ramon. (The two closest major
centers are Beer Sheva, 100
kilometers to the north, and Eilat,
140 kilometers to the south.)
THE SOON to be built hostel is
expected to provide work for 30
people. This along with the plann-
ed opening of a metal factory ex-
pected to employ 100 people
within a year, will remove
unemployment as the major pro-
blem facing the town, says Mayor
Cohen. At present, of Mitzpe
Ramon's 4.200 residents some 300
are unemployed.
Apart from encouraging
tourism to the region, an industry
which is the key to Mitzpe
Ramon's future, the Park Ramon
Visitor's Center has raised the
profile of the town and given a
much needed boost to the
] r<>mniunitA.
long Ramon Crater, a model of which can be
seen in the center.
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Happy New Year


>py of the yeaa: ]osef
mengele is 6e&6
JERT E. SEGAL
bngele. judged dead
kutgoing Hebrew year
fin forensic medicine,
imitment to the Nazi
liscent of a similar
that characterized
nann.
Iir believed written in
le went out of his way
contempt for Albert
Irchitect of the Hitler
ine. Mengele, the
monster, in the
rated Speer for the
Hitler set forth in
noirs. "You did not
lengele wrote, "that
i would be regarded by
one of the most
bee the time of Alex-
ireat."
By as 1981, reports in-
pgele was working for
nent of Uruguay, ad-
to torture Jewish
lillgruber, a West
>rian, after examin-
counts of Mengele's
r
Dr. Josef Mengele
career, concluded that the "Angel
of Death" appears as "an
unreconstructed Nazi who held to
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idy Mary's Hair Studio
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everything he did without
regret."
EICHMANN spelled out his
fealty to Nazism shortly before
the collapse of the Third Reich
with this fiendish boast: "I shall
leap into my grave laughing
because the feeling that 1 have the
deaths of 5.000,000 people on my
conscience will be for me a source
of extraordinary satisfaction."
The chief of operations struc-
tured to carry out Hitler's plan to
exterminate all European Jewry.
Eichmann like Mengele miss-
ed trial at Nuremberg by finding
his way to South America in part
with the aid of Nazi sympathizers.
The net spread by Israelis to catch
Eichmann in Argentina in 1960
came close to writing finis for
Mengele also, according to Isser
Harel, former chief of Israel's
secret service. Eichmann was
hanged in Jerusalem in May.
By yeaa 2000
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-C
In the search for Eichmann,
Israel had to go it alone. Disregar-
ding cricisism in some quarters
for kidnapping the monster, the
Nazi-hunters in 1960 pointed to
American precedent for such dar
ing. In the hunt for Mengele, by
contrast, the government of Israel
was joined by West Germany and
U.S. officialdom.
The magnitude of the crimes
committed by both Eichmann and
Mengele, coupled with their
shameless gloating over their
malicious deeds, should spur new
efforts to bring other living Nazi
war criminals to justice. The work
of John Loftus, a former Justice
Department investigator, who has
for three years studied and writ
ten about the use of Nazis for in-
telligence purposes when he was
probing Nazi war criminals for the
U.S. government, has been ex-
Continued on Page 1 .">-('
President Von Weizsaecker
1962; Mengele outlived Eichmann
by 19 years.
One Jewish people Still?
By RABBI DOW MARMUR
London Chronicle Syndicate
Irving Greenberg is president of
the National Jewish Resource
Center in New York, an institu-
tion which has as its aim "to
educate leaders for the new era of
Jewish history in the spirit of Klal
Yisrael the unity and totality of
the Jewish people."
As a professor at Yeshiva
University and rabbi of a
distinguished congregation, as
well as a writer and lecturer, he is
one of the most articulate ex-
ponents of modern Orthodoxy.
When Prof. Greenberg speaks,
the Jewish world must listen. For
he is today also the most ar-
ticulate and most persuasive ad-
vocate of Jewish unity.
HIS LATEST contribution,
"Will There Be One Jewish Peo-
ple By the Year 2000?" (published
in June, 1985, by the Center), in-
cludes this startling conclusion:
"In the past, anti-Semites built
their plans on the expectation and
hope that the Jews will disappear.
We have come to a tragic situation
where good and committed Jews
are predicating their survival
strategies on the disappearance of
other Jews."
The shocking prognosis that we
may now be doing to each other
what the anti-Semites have been
doing to us for a long time is based
on Greenberg's analysis of the
American Jewish community.
He asserts that the Reform,
Conservative and Orthodox
movements each seeks to promote
their own cause at the expense of
the others, with little regard for
the long-term consequences for
Judaism as a whole.
The major antagonists in the
United States are Reform and Or-
thodoxy, with Conservative
Judaism finding itself increasingly
in the camp of the former,
especially on the "Who is a Jew?"
issue.
OSTENSIBLY in response to
Orthodox intransigence and its in-
ability to face the problems of
emancipated diaspora Jewry,
Reform rabbis and lay leaders ap-
pear to have taken halacha
(Jewish law) into their own hands.
By performing conversions that
do not fulfil the requirements of
Jewish law, and by giving equal
status to children where only the
mother or only the father is a Jew,
Reform stands accused of making
it increasingly impossible for Or-
thodox Jews to marry outside
their own communities, thus
creating a permanent split in
Jewry.
Greenberg makes the ominous
prediction that, within the next
couple of decades, some 20 per
cent of American Jewry will not
be considered fit to marry Or-
thodox Jews. In the face of this
danger, he pleads for unity.
"Theologically, the separation
of the Jewish people is an outrage.
We live after the Holocaust and
the rebirth of Israel. Cleariy, the
overwhelming message of those
two events is the unity of the
Jewish people .. .
Continued on Page 15-C
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1553 N.E. 164th St. 944-9504
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La Salle Cleaners
2341 Le Jeune Road 444-7376
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Dade Dental Center
1225 Washington Ave. 532-3300 532-4009
Dr. Irving Grebin & Dr. Steven Benenfeld
Happy New Year A Best Wishes To All
Lincoln Market
1633 Collins Ave. 531-3444
Happy New Year To All My Customers


Page 14-C The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, September 13, 1985
A Yemenite blows a shofar at Jerusalem's Western Wall.
00
ambulatory
centre ^ ..u.-nn..
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$2.00 OFF Holiday Rower Arrangements with Coupon
Happy New Year
------------------------
The Salvation Army
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Happy New Year
El CidRestaurant & Lounge
Le Jeune and Flagler Street
541-3514
Happy New Year To All
Morris Wolf Photography
1615 NE 163rd Street
No. Miami Beach 944-2424
Happy New Year
Mandarin Garden Restaurant
3266 Grand Avenue
Coconut Grove 446-9996
Happy New Year
Hearne Electric
14801 NE 20 Ave., No. Miami Beach 944-7799
Happy New Year
JACK THOMAS REALTOR
311 NE 13 Terrace
Miami 358-5517
Happy New Year
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A Very Happy & Healthy New Year To All
puapose of pilqaimaqe
to Visit an& Wopship divine OccuRRence
By JACOB PELED
The purpose of a religious
pilgrimage is to visit and worship
at a shrine where a unique
manifestation of Divine activity
occurred.
At a time when the worship of
the nation was centered around
the Temple, every male Israelite
was required to visit the Temple
three times a year with ap-
propriate offerings. The three
festivals, Pesach, Shavuoth and
Sukkoth are known as Shalosh
Regalim. meaning literally, the
three Pilgrim Festivals. They
were of agricultural and religious
as well as of political significance.
The pilgrimage served to unite the
people in a common cultural and
religious entity, while at the same
time benefiting commerce and
industry.
THE MEASURES of Jeroboam
I to establish rival sanctuaries at
Beth El and Dan show how power-
ful the central attraction of the
Temple had become. He attemp-
ted to counteract its influence by
changing the time and place of
pilgrimages. The fifteenth of Ab
was later proclaimed a holiday in
order to commemorate the day
when Jeroboam's guards, station-
ed to prevent the Israelites from
reaching Jerusalem, were
removed.
After the building of the Second
Temple, Jerusalem the Holy City
was without rival the objective of
Jewish pilgrimage. Visiting
Jerusalem became a fond dream
and sacred obligation of faithful
Jews in the Dispersion. Jews
journeyed there from
Mesopotamia and daily prayers
for rain were postponed until 15
days after festivals "in order to
grant time for the last of the
Israelis to return to the Euphrates
without being inconvenienced by
the rain."
The Talmud relates that King
Agrippa once desired to take a
census of the pilgrims. He ordered
the priests to take one hind leg of
every paschal lamb and they
counted 1,200,000 legs.
JOSEPHUS, too, tells us in his
"Jewish War," that Gesius Floras
(44-66) counted 256,000 paschal
lambs at one festival. The fact
that sufficient accommodation
was found in an area of 2,000,000
square yards is listed by the
Mishna as one of the minor
miracles associated with the
Temple.
After the Second Temple was
destroyed, conditions changed.
Pilgrimages ceased to be an
obligatory act. It assumed a per-
sonal and emotional character.
Pilgrims to the Temple site now
come principally to mourn and to
pray for the restoration of Zion
and they were not always welcom-
ed by the non-Jewish population
of the land.
By the Fourth Century, Jews
were allowed only once a year to
enter the Temple site. "All Jews
come once a year to this place,"
writes the Pilgrim from Bordeaux
in the year 333, "weeping and
lamenting near a stone which re-
mains of the Holy Temple"
THE CHRISTIAN theologian
Jerome (342-420) in his commen-
tary to Zephaniah writes: "Up to
this very day the faithless in-
habitants are forbidden to enter
Jerusalem, and it is that they may
weep over the ruins of their state
that they pay a price."
At around this time Jewish
literature begins to refer to the
sanctity of the Western Wall.
"The Divine presence has never
departed from the Western
Wall," says Rabbi Aha, who lived
in the first half of the Fourth Cen-
tury. "The Western Wall of the
Temple," our rabbis state, "will
never be destroyed'because the
Shechinah is in the West."
During the first Moslem occupa-
tion of the Holy Land (637-1099)
the Jews were allowed to enter
the sacred area, "to make rounds
of the Temple gate and to pray
there with a loud voice." They
were even permitted to build a
house of prayer near the site.
From the Tenth Century on-
wards, regular services were held
not only on fast-days and festivals
but also every Friday afternoon.
Here generations of pilgrims
would chant the sorrowful verses
of the Book of Lamentations.
MANY MEDIEVAL travelers
corroborate this ancient Jewish
custom. Maimonides, who visited
Jerusalem in 1165 writes: "I
entered the great and holy house
and prayed there." Benjamin of
Tudela, writing in 1167, says:
"They call it the Gate of Mercy;
thither all the Jews go to pray
before it."
Five hundred years later, in
1688, the Karaite, Rabbi Ben-
jamin Yerashalmi ben Elijah,
noted: "Afterwards we went to
the Western Wall to pray if
anyone desires to go every dav tn
the Western Wall the Ishmaeiites
permit him to go and pray."
A prescribed ritual was already
in use at the time. The first
printed "ritual" is dated 1601. It
indicats that the Jew would take
off his shoes as he approached the
Wall, kiss the stones and recite a
special prayer The B-Klleian
Library, Oxford, has a co]
such a prayer book, printed <-
Venice in 1702.
IN THE Nineteenth Centun
there is a plethora of evidence
regarding pill-images to Holy
Sites. Sultan Abdul Majid issued
in 1841 a decree according the
Jews the right to praj there
without interference.
Sir Moses Montefiore in his
1866 report to the Board of
Deputies, writes: "The Governor
of Jerusalem, Izzet Pasha, kindly
gave me permission to erect jw,
awning for the 'Wailing Place' so
as to afford shelter and to protect
from rain and heat pious persons
visiting this sacred spot."
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Happy New Year To All
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Happy New Year
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720 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach 531-5891
Happy New Year To All From The
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'


I -
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-C
By yeaR 2000
One Jewish people?
Continued from Page 13-C
"There were no distinctions in
the gas chambers. To elevate the
distinctions between Jews to ab-
solute status is to deny the truth
that all Jews carry the fate of the
covenant, or run the risks of suf-
fering for it. All Jews are God's
witnesses."
ALTHOUGH Greenberg's pro-
gnosis is hardly relevant in Bri-
tain, where all Reform and many
Liberal conversions are perform-
ed according to Jewish law and
where there is much greater
on the Gel (the religious bill
ol divorce), the problem cannot be
ignored in Britain either.
Thus, despite the fact that the
Progressive rabbinate in Britain
and elsewhere in Europe is
prepared to preserve Jewish unity
- or perhaps because of it Or-
piodox intransigence appears to
no less resolute than
Jsewhere.
[The growth of Orthodox ex-
femism. reflected in the well-
Vchestrated campaign by the
Rabbi Greenberg
Lubavitch movement to
manipulate the Knesset to amend
the Law of Return in order to
disenfranchise non-Orthodox rab-
bis has, no doubt, many sup-
porters in Britain too.
American Electric
of Miami, Inc.
11371 SW 208 Drive, Miami 253-9131
Happy New Year
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1325 NE 1 Ave., Miami
379-8401
Happy New Year
Electronic Equipment Inc.
4027 NW 24th Street, Miami
871-3500
Happy New Year To All
A.B.C. Sitters &
Convalescent Home
16499 NE 19th Ave.. No. 206
No. Miami Beach944-7488
Happy New Year To All
Captain John Callan
Of The "Helen C"
|6375 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 947-4081
Happy New Year
Atlas Metal Industries
1135 NW 159 Dr., Miami
Wishes All His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
[alman Bacheikov, D.D.S.
120 Lincoln Rd., Suite 344 Phone 532-6795
Wishes His Clients & Friends
A Happy & Healthy New Year
imerican Mailing Service
1 5050 E. 11th Ave., Hialeah 685-6401
Happy New Year To All
George C. Whitney
Realtor
1 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach Phone 538-7401
Wishes His Friends & Clients
A Happy & Healthy New Year
'he Forge Restaurant
12 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Miami Beach
538-8533
mds To The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy New Year
The fact that I have been among
those to alert fellow Reform Jews
to the need to offer an authentic
alternative and, in the second in-
stance, to urge non-Orthodox
Jews not to support any organiza-
tion that seeks to delegitimize
them should in no way be
understood as a refusal to
cooperate.
ONLY WHEN Reform Jews
know what they are. and only
when Orthodox Jews will meet
them as equal partners, can the
search for unity be pursued with
honesty and integrity.
It is from this perspective that
Reform Jews should respond with
enthusiasm to Greenberg's call.
Whether his figures are accurate
or not, and whether the crisis will
come within the next two decades
or later, is irrelevant. His basic-
contention is unassailable and we
must all take note.
The way we call each other
names is an apt illustration of the
crisis. For an Orthodox Jew to be
described as "Reform" or
"Conservative" is equivalent to
being labeled "bourgeois
cosmopolitan Zionist" in Soviet
Russia. To be known as "Or-
thodox" in Reform circles is to be
designated a heretic.
menqele
Is 0ea6
Continued from Page 13-C
emplary. Recently, the General
Accounting Office confirmed Lof-
tus' findings, and Loftus insists
U.S. intelligence services continue
to employ old Nazis without the
knowledge of Congress.
ANY EFFORTS to flush out
Hitler's accomplices will not sit
well with the people in France
who are delaying the trial of Klaus
Barbie. Revisionists who write
monstrous lies about the
Holocaust will be dismayed. So
will America's homespun Nazis
operating under the broad battle
tent of the "Aryan Army."
The search must go on. Leads
must be pursued for catching
Walter Kutschmann, a former
Gestapo leader said to have been
sighted recently in Argentina, and
for one of Eichmann's deputies,
Alois Brunner, believed living in
Syria.
Nor is there justification for
dimming the Nazi past, as some
suggest. Austria learned early
this year how ill-advised it is to
give a warm welcome to a Nazi
convicted of mass murder. When
Austria's Minister of Defense,
Friedhelm Frischenschlager,
greeted SS sub-Fuehrer Walter
Reder as if he were a hero, a
storm of anger and protest swept
Vienna. (Italy, where Reder ran a
killing field of his own devising
during World War II, had releas-
ed Reder.)
To the credit of West Germany,
responsible leaders continue to
recognize 'he importance of and
justification for hunting Nazi ter-
rorists still in hiding. That na-
tion's president, Richard von
Weizsaecker, expressed the
challenge well when he said: "No
discerning person can expect our
young to wear a penitential robe
simply because they are Germans;
but their forefathers have left
them a grave legacy. All of us,
whether guilty or not, whether
young or old, must accept the
past. We are all affected by the
consequences and liable for them.
The young and old generations
must and can help each other to
understand it is vital to keep the
memories alive."
And one of the major problems
of Conservative Judaism in
America today is its quest for
identity: if it looks "Right," it is
identified as Orthodox: if it turns
"Left," it becomes Reform. And
both terms are used as anti-
symbols.
THE TIME has come to
recognize that the adjectives "Or-
thodox," "Conservative,"
"Reform," Reconstructionist"
are political terms, more in-
dicative of institutional affiliation
than of religious conviction.
I happen to be a Jew who
believes that the best way to ex-
press my Judaism is in the context
of Reform, but I know that it is
not the only way. The theological
limitations of "adjectival
Judaism" are there for all to Bee.
The time has come to en-
courage, even challenge, others -
notably "mainstream" Orthodox
and Conservative rabbis to
make similar declarations of both
allegiance to their own and
tolerance of others, so thai a basis
for closer cooperation on religious
matters could be established.
The cooperation in communal
matters that already exists is com-
mendable and should be con-
tinuously reaffirmed, but political
action is inadequate to meet the
problems that Greenberg
articulates.
It is religious intolerance that
threatens the unity of the Jewish
people. There is nothing wrong in
polemics and arguments about
ideas, but there is everything
wrong with actions that may
jeopardize our survival.
Reform rabbis in Britain have
gone a long way towards avoiding
the split that Irving Greenberg
predicts. The next move must
come from Orthodoxy; here an Or-
thodox rabbi offers interesting
suggestions as to how it can be
made without loss of conviction or
integrity.
EVEN MODEST signs that Or-
thodox isolationism is being aban-
doned would lead to further
moves of c(.operation by Reform.
The same considerations that
necessitate territorial sacrifices
for the sake of peace for the
Jewish State compel us to make
institutional sacrifices for the
sake ot peace for the Jewish peo-
ple. In both cases survival is at
stake: we must act responsibly.
The prospect of accord with Or-
thodoxy would even bring the
Liberals and the Reform together.
They are already untied in
ideology and purpose.
Rabbi Dow Marmur is senior
rabbi at the Holy Blossom Tem-
ple of Toronto. Canada.
Dr. Grimberg
Medical Center
7321 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 33140 Phone 868-6557
Wishes His Patients, Friends & The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy & Healthy New Year
Joseph Shuman, M.D.
2020 N.E. 163 St., North Miami Beach 33162
Phone 944-1566
Wiihei All Hit Patients, Friends A The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy A Healthy New Year
Endurance Floor Co.
18460 NE 2 Ave., Miami
652-6481
Happy New Year
Charade Restaurant
2900 Ponce de Leon, Coral Gables
448-6077
Happy New Year
South gate Towers
900 West Ave., Miami Beach, Fla. 33139 Phone 672-2412
Wishes His Tenants A Friends & The Entire
Jewish Community A Happy & Healthy New Year
Flair of Miami
1051 East 32 Ave., Miami 835-2744
Happy New Year
Continental Stamps
&Seal
8744 SW 133 St., Miami 232-2226
Happy New Year
Video Shack
2248 S.W. 57 Ave., Miami Phone 262-1120
Wishes All His Clients A Friends
A Happy A Healthy New Year
Diabetes Research
Institute
7525 NW 74th Ave., Miami 888-3437
Happy New Year
Bay Plumbing
3029 SW 28 St.. Miami
446-8141
Happy New Year



Page 16-C The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, September 13, 1985

in
Loving
memopy
Harriet S. Jackman
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gxtend Qest Woks 3T<*
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and ^4ndq ^Davtd artend best wtenes ^oa
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^Wa. and l>Wa. Stephen Jtacfeman
Aid Cn((!d*en. Jk$ and Aiank. and QA/cndi and Stephanie
Srfend u* Wappu and 'pAospeKws u\lew Qjeeu 9"o u4#
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and uWas. Qumfoelld
u4nd CMdK* *n and >sttn 3b* u* 9Japptj and cPospe*o o\Jcw ^jeert 'Do u^CP
uUa. and uMas. ^ai/td JL 9Ja(!bag
3a* u4 3Jappu and Seitlin and Company
Insurance
8125 N.W. 53rd Street, Suite 200, Miami, Fl. 33166
Phone (Dade) 591 -0090 (Broward) 763-6771
our smceRe
wishes
f or a
happy new yeaR
****

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[Black and Jewish Teens
Share Heritage
In Africa and Israel
Friday, September 13, 1985/The Jewish Floridiari Page 23-A
By LORRAINE MEYER
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) A
Dup of 12 black and Jewish teen-
ers from this city shed tears
tether at Yad Vashem in
jsalem and at He Goree in
negal, West Africa, site of slave
pments to America. They spent
[month visiting Israel and
negal on a trip planned by black
Id Jewish leadership in
pladelphia led by George Ross,
ner board chairman of the
herican Jewish Committee's
jladelphia chapter, and U.S.
V William Gray III (D., Pa.).
PI saw the strength of both peo-
l" said Loree Jones, recalling
lh countries upon her return
ne. "The slaves got by by being
ang. And in Israel, Jews had
f>e and courage to protect their
and their homeland."
tHE THEMES of strength
ned from history and hope to
shaped in the future were
beated frequently as the
jdents spoke of black-Jewish
ftfions and the lessons learned
their travels.
|We participated in something
t*s never been done before.
of the main points that came
[ is how close we got. We bared
souls to each other," said
fen Segal, a senior from
rd College in Philadelphia.
Ve learned so much," they all
Bed. "Each night, we met to
jss how different things af-
" us," said Tamara Ross of
Pine High School for Interna-
Affairs. "We each found
| place in the group and learned
vork together," Jones added.
Od it wasn't just us, but we
U sman Gray and Mr. Ross
ting together, to see what
(-Jewish relations could be,"
I continued.
IE PROJECT, over 11 mon-
I in the planning was originally
gested by Gray after he learn-
Df a black student trip to an
>ance Masters
|Of N.Miami
and
Hollywood
Wish All
Happy New Year
' Hollywood Location -
19th Ave. and
Hollywood Blvd.
923-0010
Party Nights:
North Miami:
W-F-Sat.Sun.
8-11:30 p.m.
Hollywood:
T-Th.-Sat.
8-11:30 p.m.
Israeli Kibbutz. He expanded the
idea to include black and Jewish
students and a visit to African
culture.
For the Jewish students, seeing
their own roots with black friends
took on special poignancy.*'If you
grow up not knowing you should
hate each other, we can start
young and be an example for
others to show we can get along. I
want to share with everyone in
Philadelphia and everywhere that
it can be done, and it will be
done," stated Steve Segal.
At Beit Hatefutzot in Tel Aviv,
the students began to understand
the history of exile and dispersion
of Jewry around the world and the
centrality of Israel to Jews.
"I brought back an impression
about the culture, the state of
mind, the hopes and fears of the
Jewish people," Jones explained.
"They will be strong to protect
their homeland and Blacks
know what it means to be strong."
Tony Stills was impressed that
"no matter what happened to
Jews, they are a family."
PART OF the itinerary was
planned to allow the students time
to discuss the differences in
perceptions, feelings and history
about themselves and the two
other countries. In Senegal "peo-
ple were very proud of their
heritage and also of their
technological advances. Past and
present were mixed together
wherever we went," added Brett
Singer of George Washington
High School.
Singer learned that Senegalese
today often repeat their names in
greeting since "slaves were strip-
ped of everything their identi-
ty, their names, their clothes. So,
to say your name over and over
meant you were proud of who you
were." Jews and blacks alike were
impressed with Senegalese
hospitality. "There is so much
poverty, and yet they shared
anything they had with you," said
Michele Seligman, of Girls High
School.
The students will be speaking to
the press, radio and television
before returning to school and ad-
dressing assemblies and youth
groups throughout the year. Irv-
ing Broudy, a member of the
board of the AJC Committee's
Philadelphia chapter, added "the
leadership and planning commit-
tee made lasting friendships in
working on the project, and that is
one important result too. And the
parents formed a network
when one child would call from
overseas, they let each other know
the latest news. So at all levels,
we made friendships that will
last." The Planning Committee
hopes to make the project an an-
nual event.
WHETHER pushing the tour
bus out of the mud in rainy-season
Senegal, or having the "incredi-
ble, unbelievable" experience of
climbing Masada, the students
agreed with Steve Segal's sum-
mary: "We can start young and be
an example for others to show
how we got along. Barriers that
might exist can be broken down."
Our warmest greetings to all our Friends
May the New Year bring peace
throughout the world
Officers and Staff of the
American Friends of
The Hebrew University
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami. Florida
IVORY
Dishwashing
Liquid
22 oz.
$1.29
CAMPHO-
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s1.49
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Neutrogena-
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ANACIN
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Tablets
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VISALENS
WETTING SOLUTION
FOR HARD CONTACT LENSES
2<*. s2.59
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40,. s2.59
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Neutrogena Bars
Available in:
Original Formula
Original Formula
(Unscented)
Dry Skin Formula
Drv Skin Formula
(unscented)
Oily Skin Formula
3.5 oz.'1.59
VISINE
A.C.
EYE DROPS
ALLERGY & COLDS
EYE RELIEF
Vi oz.
1oz.
s1.99
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NEUTROGENA
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Bar
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tt
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3.5 oz. S1.59
Liquid
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Facial
Cleansing
Formula
8oz.
s5.99
NEUTROGENA
Acne
Mask
2oz.
s3.19
BRECK*
SHAMPOO-IN HAIR
COLOR
IlKKk
2.19


""
Page 22-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 18,1966
Why Shofar Is Not Blown on Sabbath
By RABBI
EZRA BOYARSKY
What is the reason that the
shofar is not blown on Rosh
Hashanah when it falls on the
Sabbath?
In order to fully appreciate the
reason for not blowing the shofar
(ram's horn) when Rosh Hashanah
coincides with the Sabbath, it is
necessary to acquaint oneself with
some of the basic principles gover-
ning the observance of the
Sabbath.
In the Mishnah (tractate Sab-
bath 73a), the Talmud enumerates
39 major classes of work the per-
Happy New Year To All of You
From All of Us
HILCRAFT
INCORPORATED
Creators of Award Winning
Steel-Die Engraved Stationery
Business/Industry/Banks
Hotels/Professions
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formance of which are prohibited
on the Sabbath. These categories
and their derivatives are further
discussed and elucidated in subse-
quent chapters of the above-
mentioned tractate.
IT SHOULD be noted that the
term "work" as employed in rela-
tion to the Sabbath does not
necessarily carry the usual and
popular connotation but encom-
passes any constructive or
creative activity even if it required
but little physical exertion.
Among the 39 categories of
"work" there is one that is ger-
mane to the prohibition of blowing
the shofar on the Sabbath. And
that is the Biblical injunction not
to carry any object on the Sabbath
from the private domain (one's
home, a private yard, etc.) into a
public domain (streets, roads, etc.)
or vice versa. The same rule ap-
plies to carrying articles just
within a public domain.
However, since the Talmudic
sages do not regard the blowing of
the shofar as work but rather as a
skill, on what Halachic grounds
does the restriction then rest?
THE RESPONSE to this ques-
tion is found in the tractate Rosh
Hashanah 29b where Kabbah rul-
ed that even though the sounding
of the shofar on Rosh Hashanah is
a positive command, prescribed by
Law of the Torah, yet it is forbid-
den to handle the shofar and use it
on the Sabbath lest it be carried in
a public domain.
This ordinance was enacted as a
precautionary measure in order to
prevent the violation of the Sab-
bath which is the very heartbeat
of Judaism.
THANK YOU
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
As we begin a New Year, we wish to thank our community for its support of our
Thrift Shops during the past year.
Your generous donations of resalable merchandise and your continued
patronage of our stores, have enabled us to provide quality health care and needed
social services to thousands of indigent elderly persons.
DOUGLAS GARDENS THRIFT SHOPS
A division of the Miami Jewish Home & Hospital for the Aged.
5713 N.W. 27 Ave., Miami 3149 Hallandale Bch. Blvd., Hallandale
Irving Cypan, Chairman of the Board / Arthur Pearlman, President
Aaron Kravitz, Chm. Thrift Shop Comm. / Fred D. Hlrt, Executive Director
Free pickup 751-3988 (Dade) 981-8245 (Broward)
Good Merchandise at a Good Price.
The North Dade Vaad Ha-Kashruth wishes the entire community a healthy,
happy and peaceful New Year.
As the New Year is about to begin allow us to remind you that the following establish-
ments and only these establishments are under our supervision.
MENDELSON & SONS KOSHER
MEAT MARKET
1354 N.E. 163rd Street
NEW DEAL KOSHER
MEAT & POULTRY MARKET
1362 N.E. 163rd Street
NORMANDY KOSHER
MEAT MARKET
1112 Normandy Drive
SURF KOSHER MEAT
* POULTRY
7432 Collins Avenue
BAYSHORE CONVALESCENT CENTER
16850 W.Dixie Highway
EXECUTIVE CATERERS OF BETH TORAH
CONGREGATION
1051 North Miami Beach Boulevard
TAKE OUT GOURMET
1730 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
SHEPUDAY AHUVA RESTAURANT
1330 N.E. 163 Street
KOSHER TREATS INC.
1678 N.E. 164th Street
Rabbi Max Lipschitz,
I President
I Rabbi Beth Torah Congregation
Rabbi Simcha Freedman,
Vice President and Secretary
Rabbi Temple Adath Yeshurun
,M,/i/ty > lot* fyevA
Mayor Maurice & Mercedes Ferrel
The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
Happy
New
Year
arneu
note
Barnett Bank of
South Florida, N.A.
The Washington
Connection*
**

and
The Republican State
Executive Committee
of Florida
Wish the Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
* Jewish Women's Outreach
of the Republican National
Committee
310 First Street SE,
Washington, D.C. 10003
Paid for by The Republican National Committee and
i ne Kepubucan State Executive Committee of Florida.