The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02953

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
eJewisHa Flonridliatmi
i,.>58 Number 36
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, September 6.1985
Shochtl By Mail $135
Price 50 Cents
j.

z
iing models display 'young look' Israeli Week opened on Tuesday, Aug. 27 at the new
\ion trends for summer '86. Israel Fashion Ramada Renaissance Hotel in Jerusalem.
"erraro Says
Jerusalem is Israel's Capital City
By RON CSILLAG
IONTO (JTA) -
Jem "is, was and will
eternal capital of the
of Israel, and the
States should move
ibassy there from Tel
former U.S: Vice
[idential candidate
Idine Ferraro told the
ig dinner of Canada's
I United Jewish Appeal
not negotiable," she told
tivited Jewish community
i at the gala black-tie affair
bsh downtown hotel here. "I
i our diplomatic poliey must
}>ize that fact by moving our
sy to the capital city.
^lem must remain undivid-
cannot allow it to be ger-
bdered for the sake of
b," said Ferraro, who was a
esswoman from Queens un-
| ran as the Vice Presidential
late in the 1984 elections.
I SAID that one of the most
tting" issues of her cam-
for the White House was
eparation of church and
"This may not seem an
vhich affects Israel, but it is.
Geraldine Ferraro
Individual belief and the unfet-
tered expression of beliefs were
being questioned for the first time
in years. I didn't welcome those
issues."
Ferraro said she "was disturbed
that so many people seemed to
believe that they were the sole
possessors of moral truths. 1984
saw (Moral Majority leader) Jerry
Falwell boast that he would get
two appointments to the Supreme
Court. This was the man who said,
"The idea that religions and
politics don't mix was invented by
the devil to keep Christians from
running their own country.' We as
a nation asked, since when is
America just a Christian
country?"
Another U.S. Christian fun-
damentalist, Jimmy Swaggart,
has said Jews are "damned," and
Judaism is "a false religion," Fer-
raro stated. "I find these
statements chilling. They're
hateful. They're anti-Semitic and
they're un-American. They should
worry all of us," she declared. But
these factors help shape U.S. ac-
titudes toward Israel and even
Canada, Ferraro said, and North
Americans cannot let them
weaken policy in the Mideast.
THIS FALL, she continued, the
U.S. will enter into a debate on
President Reagan's proposal to
sell high-technology to Jordan and
to Saudi Arabia, which would be
"a tragic mistake." Other sales to
"Israel's enemies" have included
fighter planes and hand-held
Stinger missiles that can fit inside
a suitcase and can easily be smug-
gled from country to country to
shoot down aircraft inside Israel,
Ferraro said.
"That's not a plan for a deal,
Continued on Page 14-A
Hussein Blamed
U.S. Unwilling
To Press For
Mideast Talks
London Chronicle Report
The State Department has
been scrambling to try to
keep the Arab-Israeli peace
process alive despite several
severe setbacks.
First, Assistant Secretary
for Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs Richard Mur-
phy returned to Washington
from a six-day swing
through the region without
any visible progress in the
search for direct Arab-
Israeli peace negotiations.
He had hoped to meet in Am-
man with a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation a
meeting which would supposedly
lead to direct Arab-Israeli talks.
There was much anticipation in
Washington. But it was not meant
to be.
U.S. officials said that Jordan,
at the specific demand of the PLO,
was determined to avoid any
direct contact with Israel outside
the framework of an international
conference including the par-
Richard Murphy
ticipation of the Soviet Union.
THIS WAS the position that
Continued on Page 9-A
Herzog Kills Clemency
Move for 1,500 Prisoners
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
President Chaim Herzog, in
apparent agreement with
Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim, has killed a proposal
by Police Minister Haim
Barlev to grant clemency to
some 1,500 inmates in
Israel's prisons.
The proposal, which would have
shortened by three months the
sentences of prisoners due to be
released in the new Jewish year
some 400 would be released by
Rosh Hashanah was aimed at
easing Israel's overcrowded
prisons.
BARLEV MADE his proposal
during a visit with Premier
Shimon Peres to Ramla prison
last week. He also revealed plans
Continued on Page 6-A
fouth Africa's Jews
They're Walking A Careful Tightrope These Days
By DALE NORMAN
(emergency regulations
[>sing severe curbs on
political expression
the sixth week in
fh Africa, the Jewish
lunity is sharing the
kical fears and harsh
lomic woes facing the
white community.
Travel agents in Johannesburg
indicated that there has been a
sharp increase in the purchase of
one-way tickets out of the coun-
try, since the state of emergency
was declared July 20. In fact, trips
to Australia in the travel business
are known euphemistically as
"LSD Trips" "Look See and
Decide" or "Look Schlep and
Deposit."
"The Jew has an important role
to play here. We are definitely
committed to South Africa and en-
courage people not to panic and
simply leave," stated Rabbi
Mendel Lipskar, 37, director of
the Lubavitch Foundation of
South Africa. Lipskar, who was
born in Germany and grew up in
Canada, has lived in South Africa
for the past 13 years. "There has
been a revival here in religion and
Yiddishkeit over the past 10
years," he said.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR of
the South African Jewish Board
Continued on Page 6-A
President Herzog


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
Brangus Embryo Transfers
Breed New Cattle
Industry in Israel
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The first ranch of Brangus
considered the best beef
cattle in the world outside
the United States is being
established in Israel
through the method of em-
bryo transfer from Brangus
cows in Texas into Israeli
cows.
The purpose of the new under-
taking is to make Israel, which is
number one in the world in the
production of milk per cow, a
center for breeding the Brangus
'First Shot'
Accuracy
For Artillery
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Defense Force's artillery
corps has developed two new
pieces of equipment which give
Israeli gunners "first shot ac-
curacy" and, according to ar-
tillery corps commander Brig.
Gen. Oded Tira, makes maps
"aimo8t superfluous.'
The new measuring systems,
based on computer and laser
technology, were developed and
produced by the Tamam section of
the Israel Aircraft Industries and
are now being put into service in
the corps.
Experts say very few similar
systems have been developed
elsewhere. The gunner is told,
with great speed and accuracy,
exactly where he is in relation to
the target, almost making maps
obsolete, Tira told a press con-
ference, on the occasion of Ar-
tillery Corps Day.
Two pieces of equipment are
now being produced a large
PADS position and Azimuth
determining system for larger for-
mations, and a smaller and
cheaper LANS land navigation
systems model designed for ar-
tillery spotters in forward posi-
tions. The LANS may also go into
service as a navigational aid in
other arms of the land forces.
and developing Brangus ranches
in other countries around the
world.
Israel Rosen, an Israeli
businessman who heads the
Amira Corporation, the developer
of the Bat-Shlomo Brangus
Center of Israel, 10 miles south of
Haifa, says that the project is like-
ly to bring Israel some $10 million
in much needed foreign currency
from the export of Brangus cows
and Brangus embryos in the next
three years.
ROSEN described the process
of developing the Israeli Brangus
as follows, "A donor cow in Texas
is being injected with the sperm of
a $4 million Brangus bull. At
seven days old, the Brangus em-
bryo is flushed from the donor
cow. Each donor cow might have
as many as 20 embryos. The ex-
perts choose the best embryos,
freeze them and then ship them to
Israel. In Israel, at the Bat
Shlomo ranch, the embryos are
implanted into Israeli cows."
After nine months, the "sabra"
Brangus is born in the Holy Land.
According to Rosen, after a year a
Brangus calf is sold for at least
$40,000. He said that Bat Shlomo
ranch has already produced 46
Israeli-born Branguses and that
about 200 cows at the ranch are
presently pregnant.
"By the end of 1986 we expect
to have at Bat Shlomo about 400
Israeli-bom Branguses," Rosen
said. Noting that the Brangus em-
bryo's price is about $9,000,
Rosen said that he is seeking
American investors to participate
in the Bat Shlomo Brangus
Center. He said the total cost of
the project is over $4.6 million and
that investors enjoy meaningful
tax-deduction benefits in the
United States.
Hussein Expected
UNITED NATIONS -
(WNS)- King Hussein of Jordan
will come to New York to address
the United Nations General
Assembly on Sept. 27, only a few
days before Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres is scheduled to ad-
dress the General Assembly on
Oct. 2. Peres is scheduled to con-
tinue on to Washington after his
New York visit to meet with
President Reagan and other U.S.
administration officials.
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Israel D. Rosen with some of the Brangus
calves born on this high-tech cattle ranch from
frozen embryos flown to Israel from Texas.
The Brangus part Brahman, part Angus
is a superior breed that will be grown in Imel
for local consumption and also for export
Soon Israel will be shipping sabra Brangu
embryos to China and around the world.
ROSEN SAID that the Brangus
is a superior breed that excels in
hardiness, beef quality, fertility,
docility and disease resistance. He
said that Israel is a perfect loca-
tion for breeding the Brangus
since it breeds well in difficult hot
climates such as the Arizona
desert.
Rosen said that while the em-
bryo implanting of Brangus suc-
ceeded in Texas in only 25 percent
of the cases, in Israel the success
rate has reached already 41
percent.
Rosen disclosed that his com-
pany has already signed a con-
tract with the People's Republic of
China to provide it with 400
Israeli Brangus embryos in the
next three years. "We also have
contracts to develop Brangus
forms in the next few yean it
Egypt, Turkey, Spain, Italy and i
number of South American coi*
tries," Rosen said.
The 59-year old Rosen and hi
Amira Corp. have been syt-
dicating limited partnerships i
Israeli research and developmn
in hi-tech fields. In the past fivt
years he put together a dozen pi
jects, totalling about $70 million.

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Christian Zionists
Reveal Agenda in Israel's Behalf
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
\
By TAMAR LEVY
BASEL (JTA) The
first Christian Zionist Con-
gress, a three-day event,
ended here last week with
an appeal to all Jews to con-
sider aliya and to all Chris-
tians to give active help to
Israel. The Congress was
organized by the Christian
Embassy in Jerusalem.
The appeals were contained in a
final resolution adopted by 589
delegates from 27 countries, in-
cluding the United States,
Canada, Australia. Britain,
France. West Germany,
Switzerland. Holland, Nigeria,
Ivory Coast, Zaire and Taiwan.
The resolution also provided for
Teation of a special fund to invest
5100 million dollars in industrial
projects in Israel. Investments
from the fund will be made
in rough a company to be based in
Basel.
THE AIM of the fund is to en-
tourage Israeli exports and hous-
ing projects for new immigrants,
mainly from the Soviet Union.
The fund also is designed to help
combat unemployment in Israel
and the resolution stipulates that
part of the funds must be invested
in Judaea and Samaria.
The delegates stressed they
want to prove" that the Israeli
economy can be a worthwhile in-
vestment. A leading Dutch
businessman-delegate said the
fund will be handled in Israel by
the Christian Embassy and an
Israeli firm and that benefits will
be distributed to the investors
abroad.
Another resolution called for a
march on Sept. 15. Rosh
Hashanah Eve, in Nuremberg in
West Germany with some 10,000
participants who will carry Israeli
lags as they march.
The march will mark the 50th
anniversary of the march in
Nuremberg by Germans bran-
dishing swastika emblems.
ANOTHER resolution approv-
ed the convening of 5,000 Chris-
tians who will come to Israel to
celebrate Sukkoth in Israel and
who will be greeted by Jerusalem
Mayor Teddy Kollek.
Another resolution urged active
opposition to any treaty or accord
with the Soviet Union. Ethiopia
and Syria until those countries
permit Jews to emigrate to Israel.
The conference also called on
Spain, the Soviet Union and the
Vatican to recognize Israel and
urged all nations to recognize
Judaea and Samaria as part of
Israel, according to Biblical rights
and international law.
The delegates called on the
World Council of Churches, the
umbrella agency for Protestant
churches, which is based on
Geneva and is very anti-Israel, to
recognize the link between the
Jewish people and "the Promised
Land" and to pray for the day
when Jerusalem will become the
center of mankind's attention and
the "Lord's Kingdom" will
become a reality.
JAN VTLLEN van der Hoeven,
the conference spokesman, ad-
dressing the conference, urged all
Christian Zionists not to be con-
tent with helping Israel financially
and with moral support but also to
be ready to suffer with Israel "in
this difficult period" by settling in
Israel.
At earlier sessions, the
delegates agreed that a person
does not have to be Jewish to be a
Zionist. Johann Luckhoff, director
of the Congress, who was a Pro-
testant pastor in South Africa and
who has lived in Israel since 1980.
said the movement had some 50
million adherents worldwide.
He told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that many Christian
Zionists come to Israel on short
missions and work as volunteers
in hospitals and as social workers.
He said the Christian Embassy
contributes financially t.o institu-
tions in Israel and to other causes.
Haifa Cable Car Must Cease
Operations on Sabbath, Holidays
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) In-
terior Minister Yitzhak
Peretz, of the religious Shas
Party, has ordered Haifa
Labor Party's Mayor Arye
Gurel to halt the planned
operation of the new Mount
Carmel cable car from Stella
Maris to the seashore on
Saturdays and holidays.
But Gurel insisted that
eliminating the operation on the
Sabbath and holiday would render
the enterprise uneconomical and
would make it difficult to find in-
vestors for the project. Peretz
contended however, during a re-
cent visit to Haifa, that economic
considerations pale into in-
significance in the face of Sabbath
observance.
He said that "the effect of a
week-day only operation should
have been taken into considera-
tion when the plans were first
drawn up" for the Swiss-made,
ball-like gondolas to take tourists
and local residents on a breathtak-
ing ride up and down the
mountainside.
Peretz added that if the cable
cars operated on Saturdays,
"thousands of local youngsters
and from the whole northern
district will flock to Haifa to take
a ride, thus causing wholesale
Sabbath desecration."
The municipality says that in-
come on the Sabbath, from
tourists and local residents, was
planned to provide a major part of
the operational budget.
HAIFA IS the only major town
in Israel in which public buses
operate on the Sabbath a carry-
over from the Labor-led City
Council from Mandatory days and
in the early years of the State.
The rabbinical rationale for con-
tinuing this practice is that Haifa
is a mixed city and the buses serve
both the Jewish and Arab popula-
tions. Buses on the Sabbath thus
form part of the "status quo," but
the cable car is a new
phenomenon. Haifa's
underground funicular railway,
built after 1948, is not allowed to
operate on the Sabbath.
But even before the gondolas
start swinging up and down on
their cables, technical problems
have cropped up, quite apart from
the Sabbath problem.
The Swiss-made gondolas cars
were designed for use in the Alps,
carrying skiers in the winter.
They are equipped with quick-
heating devices for the sub-zero
cold. But reporters point out that
in the Haifa summer heat, the big
glass balls, designed to give a
360-degree view, become travell-
ing saunas.
The municipality is pondering
how to overcome the Sabbath ban
and equip the gondolas with air-
conditioners.
Van der Hoeven, who has a son
serving in the Israeli army,
declared, "We Christians must do
something for Israel, speak up for
it and take a stand in a world
becoming more and more anti-
Jewish. We cannot be neutral
about Israel."
He added that he hoped that
"after some years, the whole
Christian world will come to love
Israel. 1 firmly believe that we
have started here in Basel, in this
Congress, a new move of en-
couragement to Israel."
HE ADDED: To the yordim we
say: why not come home? I am ap-
palled when I see all these young
Israelis who have left their
homeland" and seek to settle
elsewhere. I told young Jewish of-
ficers at West Point: why defend
the United States when you must
defend the land of Israel?"
The Rev. Isaac Rothenberg,
who grew up in Holland during
the German occupation, and
whose father died in a concentra-
tion camp, spoke at a panel on
"Israel and the Historical
Churches."
Rothenberg, who was the first
chairman of the Office on
Christian-Jewish Relations,
established by the World Council
of Churches in 1974, criticized the
World Council for being "confus-
ed" about Israel. He supported
the right of Jews to live in Judaea
and Samaria.
"I must admit that my blood
pressure rises whenever I hear of
Jewish settlements" in the West
Bank "being referred to as col-
onies. What an absurdity to speak
of a colonization of a place like
Hebron, one of the most ancient
centers of Jewish life." He also
called for a united Jerusalem
under Jewish sovereignty.
PROF. ALTING von Geusau, a
Roman Catholic from Holland,
said that, as a Catholic, he called
on the Vatican to "courageously
and formally recognize" the State
of Israel and the reunification of
Jerusalem. He aiso said that the
church failed to be aware of
Islamic hatred for Israel. He said
there was 'something fundamen-
tally wrong in relations between
the Catholic Church, the Jews and
the State of Israel."
Bat Yeor, author of a newly-
published book. "The Dhimmi:
Jews and Christians under
Islam," and a refugee from her
native Egypt, appealed to the
Arab world to reject the concept
of holy war, Jihad, and to accept
peaceful co-existence and recogni-
tion of the legitimacy of all na-
tions. She is the Swiss represen-
tative of the World Organization
of Jews from Arab Lands.
Dr. David Lewis, representing
Christians United for Israel,
U.S.A., a leading television
pastor, warned against "a stream
of anti-Semitism" among his own
fundamentalist and evangelical
Christians. He denounced "glib
doctrines" which blame Jews for
the death of Jesus. He said,
"Would anyone deny that the
church contributed to the moral
climate which allowed Hitler to
succeed?"
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to
Switzerland, Yochanan Meroz,
brought greetings from the Israeli
government. Zvi Hurwitz, an aide
to Israel's Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
brought greetings from former
Premier Menachem Begin, whose
message was, "Continue your
good work, defend Israel, always.
We know from the holy books that
a cause that is just will always
triumph."
The Congress took place in the
very same hall in which Theodor
Herzl 88 years ago called fo? the
creation of a Jewish State, and
where the First World Zionist
Congress was held.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, ISMtb
Selichot Services Launch
High Holy Day Season
Saturday at midnight (Hebrew month of
Elul 21), Jews will be going to synagogue to
take part in Selichot services featuring
penitential prayers.
This traditional service takes its name
from the Hebrew word, selichah, meaning
"forgiveness," and it is during the midnight
service that Jews seek penitence for their
sins committed during the Outgoing Hebrew
Year.
Selichot is the plural form of selichah, and
it is in the plural form that the word gives
the prayer service its name, thus opening up
the service to additional prayers which are
recited on all fast days, on special occasions
of pleas for intercession and during the
penitential season of Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur, the High Holy Days.
In this sense, Selichot is historically bound
to the Aseres Yimay Tschuvah, the Ten
Days of Penitence between Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur, during which Jews hope
for forgiveness fo their sins so that they may
be inscribed for the New Year in the Book of
Life.
This practice comes from the earlier tradi-
tion of fasting on the six days prior to Rosh
Hashanah, during which prayers for
selichah were recited after a detailed confes-
sion of evil-doing.
Ancient Jewish Custom
Whatever the intensity of spirit of con-
gregants who recite their Selichot prayers
this Saturday at midnight, those who par-
ticipate in the prayer service contribute to a
Jewish custom that is ancient in origin and
that brings to the individual supplicant in
the synagogue a sense of identification with
Judaism as a continuum in the face of
historic odds.
More important, the Selichot service puts
all Jews into the frame of reference of the
High Holy Day period the Days of Awe -
when men, women and children
acknowledge their frail mortality and ask
for divine intercession in the process of con-
firming the vitality of their living Judaism.
Murder of Poets, Refuseniks
These days, so far as refusenik Jews are
concerned, the Soviet Union continues to
carry a big stick. But it appears to be talking
just a bit more softly.
Whether or not this has anything to do
with the advent to power of the slick, West-
oriented Mikhail Gorbachev, as many
observers seem to suggest, the fact is that
we smell change in the wind.
It is therefore especially necessary that
President Reagan bear this in mind when he
meets with Gorbachev in November, for the
fate of the refuseniks lies at the very heart
of the Soviet Union's human rights policies.
In short, their fate is a symbol of what the
Soviet Union does so far as human rights are
concerned.
More conservative observers of the
Reagan-Gorbachev meeting in November
warn us that Gorbachev may look slicker
than his predecessors, but that it is sheer
fantasy to believe that both the new look and
the new talk are bound to result in new
action.
We tend to agree. Aug. 12 was the 33rd
anniversary of the Night of the Murdered
Jewish Floridian
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SUIANNCIHOCHCT
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Poets. On the night of August 12, 1952, a
total of 24 leading Soviet Jewish, poets and
writers were led to the basement of
Moscow's Lubianka Prison. There, they
were executed the culmination of a brutal
campaign during the final days of the Stalin
era to eradicate Jewish culture in the USSR.
Their murder was more than the murder
of Jewish intellect and art. It was the
murder of Jewish religious and spiritual
identity a warning that such individualism
would no longer be tolerated.
Though the Stalin era has since been
downgraded by the Muscovites, the subse-
quent era of imprisoning Jews in mental in-
stitutions and in Siberia for the crime of
their Jewishness continues unabated in our
own time. This must be a significant issue on
the Reagan agenda when he meets Gor-
bachev, or the certain talk between them of
Mutual Assured Destruction, Strategic
Defense Initiatives and Star Wars is likely
to take an even uglier turn than anticipated.
Aspects of Rosh Hashanah
Teaching of Days of Awe
Is Many-Sided
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Friday, September 6,1985
20 ELUL 5745

i;
By RABBI CHAIM PEARL
London Chronicle Syndicate
Rabbi Eliezer said: "In the
month of Tishri, the world was
created" (Rosh Hashanah, 10b).
"On this day of Rosh Hashanah,
the world was created" (Festival
Prayer Book).
It is hard to believe that the rab-
bis meant these statements to be
taken as historically true. How
could they possibly think that they
knew the exact date of the
Creation?
Then the question remains,
what were they saying? What
were they really trying to em-
phasize? In brief, they were poin-
ting to an aspect of Rosh
Hashanah which is central in the
theology of the Holy Day, and that
is its universalism.
THE TEACHING of the Days
of Awe is many-sided, and we
have already seen something of its
personal and national emphasis.
But it is important to get the
fuller picture by including the
universalistic elements of these
great days. For the human condi-
tion is the same the world over for
all men and women, for noblemen
and paupers, for Jews and
Gentiles.
God is the Creator of the
Universe and of everything and
everyone in it. While we believe
that Jews have a special role in
the unfolding of history, all
mankind is united under the
fatherhood of the One God who
created them all.
This universalistic teaching is
stressed in the Rosh Hashanah
liturgy more than in any other
text. As always, it is the prayer
book which is the safest guide to
Jewish religious doctrine.
Take, for example, the beautiful
paragraph (Adler, New Year
Prayer Book, p. 132): "Now
therefore, 0 Lord, our God, im-
pose Thine awe upon all Thy
Works and Thy dread over all that
Thou hast created, that all Thy
works may fear Thee and all Thy
creatures prostrate themselves
before Thee, that all may form one
band to do Thy will with a perfect
heart."
HERE WE have a pious prayer
for the unity of mankind under the
acknowledgement of the One God.
Or take the religious hope ex-
pressed in the beautiful words,
"Shine forth in the majesty of Thy
triumphant strength over all the
inhabitants of Thy world, that
every form may know that Thou
hast formed it, and every creature
know that Thou has created it,
and that all that hath breath in his
Rosh Hashanah on Sept. 16 and 17 raises the ques-
tion that in original rabbinic texts there is no
reference to Jew. Gentile. Arab or Christian. The
emphasis is on any human being.
nostrils may say: the Lord God of
Israel is King and his dominion
ruleth over all."
The nations of the world are
also included in the concept of the
Day of Judgment: "Thereupon
sentence is pronounced upon
countries which of them is
destined to the sword and which
to peace ."
If further authoritative texts on
the place of universalism in
Judaism were needed, the second
paragraph of the famous Alenu
prayer, which was first included in
the liturgy of Rosh Hashanah, is a
striking example.
It is unfortunately true that to-
day this aspect of the High Holy
Day meaning is somewhat out of
fashion. Unfortunately, the word
"universalism" has become
something of a joke in certain
modern Jewish circles where
ethnocentrism has run wild.
The excuse is that we Jews have
suffered so much at the hands of
others that it is about time we con-
centrated all our efforts on our
own security and welfare. The
generation after the Holocaust
has been steeled with a determina-
tion deriving from the slogan
"Never Again," and so the con-
cept of universalism is being
squeezed out of the Jewish
political vocabulary.
IN ITS place we are witness to
a growing screaming nationalism,
which is defended on the grounds
of past and present suffering. Yet
the most extraordinary fact is
that these universalistic prayers
which we have referred to, and
many more, were composed in
periods of persecution.
Under Rome, in the darkest
years of the Crusades and the In-
quisition, during the medieval
nightmare of exile and physical
oppression, the Jews still wrote
and proclaimed their message of
universalism. There has never
been a people in the whole world
like this who, in spite of
everything which oppressing na-
tions could do against it, con-
tinued to look to the day when all
mankind would be united in a
single fellowship.
How could they do this? Because
universalism is at the center of the
messianic hope. It was precisely
for that reason that, in the
darkest days of oppression, the
Jews sang his song of faith in a
future in which there would be no
more war, or social evil or
injustice.
ONE COULD not be a Jew
without the messianic hope in a
mankind united under God. Who
knows, perhaps without really
recognizing it, many Jewish social
dreamers were living out that
Jewish hope in practice by trying
to bring forward the age of the
Messiah.
As already suggested, some
political fringe groups in Israel,
and their pathetic supporters in
the diaspora, have no room for
this part of the Rosh Hashanah
message, but it would be a gross
distortion of Judaism if one of the
festival's main themes and one of
the noblest teachings of Judaism
were to be ignored.
A final thought. The rabbis
teach: When God created Adam,
He took earth from all parts of the
world and molded the substance
to make the first man. He did this
so that no one should say, "Man
was created from my part of the
world."
They further teach: Why was
man created alone instead of in
multitudes, like all the other
creatures created by God? That
you many learn from this that,
whoever destroys one person, it
as if he had destroyed an entire
world. And whoever saves any
one person, it is as if he had saved
an entire world.
IN THIS original rabbinic text
there is no reference to Jew or
Gentile, Israeli, Arab or Christian.
The emphasis is on any human
being.
To observe Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur in this spirit is
challenge; it is not easy. But then,
whoever said that it is easy to be
Jew? It is rather a glorious charge
upon us. But most of us would noi
have it any other way.
'


Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
rnaay, aeptemDer o, lya&rihe Jewish florid]
E^3e Jews of Ethiopia Make It In Israel?
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( opynght Baltimore Jewish Timvs
Special Publication Hights Reserx-ed
JERUSALEM The
beleaguered Jews of
Ethiopia are being
persecuted again, they say.
This time, though, their op-
pressors are not outsiders
but the religious leaders of
the State of Israel.
At issue is the two chief rabbis'
refusal to recognize the Ethio-
pians as full Jews until they
undergo a symbolic immersion in
a mikvah, or ritual bath, to reaf-
firm their Judaism a decision
the Ethiopian Jews consider an
unendurable affront. They reject
having Jewish status questioned
in Israel, the homeland they
yearned for for so many years.
"They brought us here because
we were Jews," said Mekonen
Avra, a 26-year-old Ethiopian who
was one of hundreds to take part
in a protest march near Tel Aviv
recently. "Now that we are here,
they tell us that we are not Jews.
So why did they bring us here?
"We came as Jews," he con-
tinued. "We go to the army for
three years. We do everything.
We should also have the rights. I
would rather die than undergo
ritual immersion."
THE ISSUE lies at the heart of
a full range of religious complica-
tions compounding what already
promises to be the most difficult
and expensive absorption process
in Israel's history.
On one side of the controversy,
some Orthodox critics demand
that the Jewish Agency (charged
with immigrant absorption)
distribute more tefillin to Ethio-
pians and promote more intense
religious training.
Other critics, concerned that the
Ethiopians may be ill-equipped to
compete in a modern society ex-
cept at its lowest levels, worry
that many schools Ethiopian
children attend lack computers
and other high-tech apparatus.
These and other issues surfaced
iluring recent visits to absorption
and educational facilities in Israel.
well as consultations with of-
ficials and others concerned in
Kthiopian absorption. I.air las!
year, I had also journeyed to
Ethiopia just as the Operation
Moses rescue was getting
underway.
IRONICALLY, the mikvah im-
mersion that the rabbis now re-
quire would have been fully con-
sistent with normal Jewish
religious practice in Ethiopia. For
the Ethiopians in their remote
villages routinely immersed
themselves before every Shabat.
always taking special care to build
their homes conveniently
NEW FACES OF ISRAEL: Israel is rich in
ethnic diversity. Its 8.8 million Jews, among
its/our million peopL <:> / /;. countries '/<
tern Europe, the M'nlilh F.nsl, Surlh unit
sxft-Sahurun Afrtci. the U.S. and elaewhen
Recent immigrants ">> iiki earlier groups oj
Jewish immigrants ami hear basic Israeli
trails us thisi photos show yauthful -
tiiiiism. wisilnm ,,/,.. ,,,>. ,, mother's love
and couragt ><> build tht >r >"/. lives and their
'We go to the army ... we
should also have the rights'.
alongside rivers. In fact, one of
many pejorative terms that their
non-Jewish neighbors apply to
Ethiopian Jews in addition to
Falasha. which means "outsider"
or "stranger" translates as
"people who stink of water."
Mikvah immersion could have
been exlained as a symbolic
renewal of the Covenant im-
mediately upon arrival in Israel, a
rite of passage signifying the exile
left behind and the entry into a
new life as a Jew in the Jewish
homeland. As such it would pro-
bably have gained easy accep-
tance. But the second ceremony, a
symbolic circumcision involving
a tiny cut with a needle to draw a
spot of blood antagonized even
the earliest Ethiopian arrivals in
Israel, who endured it with quiet,
albeit affronted dignity. The re-
quirement was waived late last
year, during the great influx, but
the resentment lingered and
spread.
ALTOGETHER, the network
of Youth Aliyah schools in Israel
(mostly residential, but more and
more offering day facilities) is
educating 19,000 young people, of
whom about 1,500 currently are
Ethipians. By the year's end, ac-
cording to Elie> Amit, Youth
Aliyah's national director, about
2.000 youth of Ethiopian origin
will be attending Youth Aliyah
BChoola. Most are either orphans
"r arrived without their parents
No one is giving out official
figures for the number of Ethio-
pians in Israel, but most observi r
estimate that Operation Moses
brought between 6,000 and 8,000
Ethiopian Jews to Israel, and
some 2,000 to 4,000 had arrived
previously.
All Ethiopian children are in-
itially enrolled in specifically
religious schools, of which Talpiot
is one. Some Orthodox critics,
however, question whether they
are "religious enough" and wish
their own personnel to gain access
to the schools in order to inculcate
the youth with what they consider
to be proper religious devotion.
In response to my question,s
Elie Amit and Mr. Danino, prin-
cipal of Talpiot, affirmed that the
children in their care receive six
hours of religious instruction
weekly. Classes in ritual, Jewish
history and customs are taught by
the school's own staff, not by out-
side rabbis.
THE BOYS at Talpiot wore
yarmulkas. The girls wore blouses
covering their shoulders and up-
per arms, and I saw no shorts at
Talpiot. Although no prayers
preceded the meal that I shared
with the Talpiot students, there
was enthusiastic benching (grace
after meals) by the entire
assemblage at the conclusion of
the meal, led fluently in Hebrew
by one of the older Ethiopian
boys. (It should be noted that
some Ethiopian boys were taught
Hebrew in Ethiopia by their
kessim, who had, in turn, learned
the language thanks to ORT. In
Ethiopia the liturgical language of
both Jews and non-Jews is not
Hebrew but Gez, which only the
kessim among Jews understood).
Children at my table confirmed
that morning prayers are always
recited. They seemed
knowledgeable about putting on
tefillin, and other rituals. They
also now know the full holiday
cycle.
In a dance exhibition for their
visitors, boys and girls of Talpiot's
popular folk dance club never
touched one another or danced
together; rather they danced in
separate lines side by side.
Amit explained that Ethiopian
children are sent to religious in-
stitutions for their first years in
Israel.
"A professional decision was
made to support their faith and
belief as an aid to absorption," he
stated, adding that "they came as
a believing people."
BUT THEIR system of belief -
fundamentalist Torah Judaism in-
nocent until only recently of 2,000
years of rabbinic interpretation
has inevitably come under intense
scrutiny now that they have settl-
ed in Israel.
The kessim. who held religious
communities together in the
Ethiopian villages, have now lost
much of their influence.
"The kessiyn," Amit explained,
"lost much of their stature with
their people, especially in the
refugee camps in Africa waiting
for resuce."
Amit said that the attitude of
the kessim had thus far been very
positive, generally supportive of
the rabbinate, and without any
visible resentment of their
diminished status.
"They try to explain to their
Continued on Page 10-A
SECURITY ORIENTATIONS: As part of
their orientation into Israeli society, these
Ethiopian Jewish teen-agers are par-
ticipating in Gadna, an organization whose
name is derived from the Hebrew acronym for
Youth Battalions. Most Israeli teen-agers join
Gadna, which increases their awareness of
their personal responsibility to help- protect
Israel in a hostile region. During some Israeli
wars, Gadna members have filled in for
Israeli hospital orderlies, postal workers and
others called to emergency military service.
1 would rather die than
ritual conversion/


Page 6-A The Jewish FIoridian/Friday, September 6, 1986
S. Africa's Jews
They're Walking A Careful Tightrope
Continued from Page 1-A
of Deputies, Aleck Goldberg,
related that emigration of the
Jewish community has had enor-
mous repercussions upon family
life. "Many families have split,
and demographic studies show
this is an aging Jewish communi-
ty," explained the 62-year-old
Goldberg.
According to the World Jewish
Congress, somewhere between
20,000 and 30,000 Jews have left
South Africa in the past two
decades. Presently 120,000 Jews
live in South Africa comprising
2.6 percent of the white popula-
tion and .04 percent of the overall
population.
Dr. Israel Abramowitz, former
chairman of the South African
Jewish Board of Deputies, told a
Washington B'nai B'rith public af-
fairs forum in July that the Jewish
population in his country has re-
mained steady since 1970 because
of an influx of Jews from Israel
and Zimbabwe.
IT IS estimated that there are
15,000 Israelis in South Africa but
Abramowitz indicated that the
Jewish population is expected to
shrink to 64,000 by the end of this
century.
In addition, Jewish communities
in outlying areas have continuous-
ly been diminishing in number and
size over the years. In this regard,
statistics compiled by the Board's
Country Communities Depart-
ment, show 10,064 Jews in coun-
try areas in 1951, only 3,080 in
1981.
Towns which once had small but
flourishing communities, are now
left with only a handful of Jews, if
any at all. In these instances com-
munal properties such as
synagogues and hails have been
sold, although a few communities
still maintain a viable Jewish
existence.
Dale Norman, city editor of
the Jewish Advocate in Boston,
recently returned from a three-
week stay in South Africa
where she interviewed secular
and religious leaders of that
country s Jews.
Lipskar, however, spoke
hopefully about the Jewish com-
munity in South Africa. "I believe
there is a future for us. I believe
the Jew is very much part and
parcel of that community which
can enable this country to develop
a harmonious state of economic
and political welfare for the entire
country."
CONCERNING the current
state of emergency, Lipskar
noted, "Honestly This isn't af-
fecting anyone (whites) in Johan-
nesburg, except psychologically."
He added that the suspension of
normal police procedures is
"quite frightening," but the prac-
tical affect is "minimal."
As of last week, police reported
that 2,000 persons had been ar-
rested under the emergency
regulation, with some 1,000 of
those having been released. Still,
regular incidents of violence are
occurring, primarily in the Black
township surrounding Johan-
nesburg and in the eastern section
of Cape Providence around Port
Ellizabeth.
Although authorities have
declined to release figures on total
numbers of people killed since the
state of emergency was declared.
Scores have been killed and
wounded.
Both Goldberg and Lipskar,
however, were reluctant to ad-
dress the situation directly. "It is
important to promote the Jewish
element here rather than political
concerns," Lipskar said, adding,
"Lubavitch does not take a stand
on politics ... In this overheated
Herzog Kills Move To Grant
Clemency to 1,500 Prisoners
Continued from Page 1-A
to build a tent camp in the Negev
to rehabilitate security prisoners.
It would accommodate some 1.000
prisoners.
According to Barlev, the Justice
Ministry considered a proposed
bill to shorten prison sentences by
half instead of a third for good
behavior. However, any decision
on the proposal required
Presidential approval, after a
review of the recommendations by
the Justice Minister.
Herzog and Nissim appeared to
concur that there was no room for
an across-the-board Presidential
pardon. Such clemency, according
to a Presidential spokesman,
could only take place through
Knesset legislation. The Presi-
dent, the spokesman asserted,
reviewed clemency applications
on an individual basis only.
The spokesman also expressed
indirect criticism of Barlev for
making public his proposal as it is
the opinion of the President that
matters of clemency should be
dealt with discreetly. Herzog con-
sulted with Nissim prior to mak-
ing public his decision.
international atmosphere
whatever one says is open to
misinterpretation.
GOLDBERG explained that the
duty of the Board of Deputies is
"to act as a guardian of the civic
and political rights of the Jewish
community against anti-Semitism
and discrimination." He reflected
that it is up to individuals to pro-
mote disapproval of government
actions.
However, during June, the
Board of Deputies rejected apar-
theid and condemned racial
discrimination. In a resolution
adopted after a three-day debate
at its biennial National Assembly
in Johannesburg, the Board en-
dorsed the "removal of all provi-
sions in the laws of South Africa
which discriminate on grounds of
color and race." The resolution
also "rejects apartheid" and
"calls upon all concerned to do
everything possible to ensure the
establishment of a climate of
peace and calm in which dialogue,
negotiation and process of reform
can be continued."
The Board is an affiliate of the
World Jewish Congress, which re-
quested earlier this year that its
affiliates in 70 countries join the
worldwide campaign against apar-
theid and racism.
"WE FELT the situation here
was becoming such that we need-
ed a stronger statement on apar-
theid," Goldberg said. Presently,
it is believed that the Jewish com-
munity is the only ethnic segment
of the white minority in South
Africa to publicly call for an end to
apartheid within the country.
Lipskar and Greenberg agreed
that any racial comparison made
by Nobel Prize winner Bishop
Desmond Tutu between apartheid
and Nazism is untenable. "I do not
agree that Nazism is the same as
apartheid The government is
trying to move away from apar-
theid," stated Goldberg. Lipskar
commented, "Amy racial com-
parison of Nazi atrocities and
apartheid is a misrepresentation
of what people imagine ... As a
Jew I find this to be in poor
taste."
Goldberg indicated that the
Board of Deputies has tried to
establish a dialogue with the black
community and has provided some
educational grants. "We don't
know who the authentic black
leaders are," he said, adding that
more radical elements within the
black community do not accept ad-
vances made by the Board.
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Land Inquiry
Shows West Bank 'Irregularities'
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The State Comptroller's of-
fice, which has been in-
vestigating the sale of land
on the West Bank by Arabs
to Jews, has found that
most of the transactions
have been "irregular."
According to the Comptroller
..and a police unit that was formed
at the national police head-
quarters to deal with this issue,
the large-scale irregularities
might involve as much as some
12,000 acres of 17,000 acres
bought by the state, as well as
numerous private transactions
between Arabs and Jews.
THE SITUATION was
highlighted last month when a
group of Kiryat Arba settlers and
six Likud members moved into an
apartment in the Arab
marketplace in central Hebron,
claiming that it had been purchas-
ed from a local Arab. The squat-
ters were eventually evicted by
the army and the apartment was
sealed off from other intruders.
An investigation of this incident
showed that the apartment had in-
deed been purchased. The in-
vestigation also found that 40
other apartments had been sold by
Arabs, through middlemen, to
Jews.
What makes the situation com-
plicated is that while the sale of
land by an Arab to a Jew may be
formally legal in the transferring
of the deed to a piece of land or
apartment, it is irregular because
the purchase is prohibited under
current law unless it is approved
by the Defense Ministry. Ap-
parently, none of the sales in
Hebron were approved by the
ministry nor were the transac-
tions registered with it
A similar case surfaced two
years ago when a new settlement
E. Jerusalem Fatah Leader
Departs for Jordan With Wife
JERUSALEM (JTA) Khalil Abu-Ziad, described
by Israeli security authorities as a senior Fatah leader in
East Jerusalem and the West Bank, departed with his wife
for Amman last week under an unprecedented agreement
k he reached last weekend with the authorities.
Abu-Ziad, an East Jerusalem resident, had served a
10-year prison term, and another three years under ad-
ministrative house arrest for his involvement in Fatah, the
largest faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
HE WAS SERVED with a deportation order signed by
Gen. Amnon Shakah, head of the Military Command. The
Military Command said Abu-Ziad was a security risk, and
his deportation was essential for the safety of the
population.
He appealed the deportation order to the High Court of
Justice, but even before the court reviewed the case, Abu-
Ziad reached an agreement with the authorities. According
to the agreement, he would voluntarily leave the country
for three years, and would be allowed to return after three
years on the condition that during this period he did not
associate himself in anti-Israeli activities.
&-
project in Ramat Kidron near
Jerusalem was halted because the
developers were unable to
register the land they bought
because of 109 separate objections
filed by local Arab villagers who
denied selling the land to Israeli
developers.
THE CASE of Ramat Kidron
revealed the existence of a com-
plicated and circuitous system
whereby Jews bought land from
Arab middlemen who had pur-
chased the land from the original
owners. Due to a complex land
registration system in the ad-
ministered territories, a legacy
from the Jordanian government
and the lack of sufficient Israeli
government control, the system
enables middlemen to forge
documents for the purpose of sell-
ing land to Jews. The original
Arab owners then complain that
the land had been sold to Jews
without their approval.
Another element in the situa-
tion of irregular land sales to
Jewish individuals, contractors
and companies is that Arab
owners are forbidden by Jordan
and intimidated by the Palestine
Liberation Organisation from
transacting land deals with Jews
directly. A middleman is therefore
required to make the transaction.
Also in August, three Israelis
were jailed as police investigated
cases of possible fraud involving
similar land sales in the West
Bank. Tel Aviv Judge Binyamin
Kohelet said that the cases "could
turn out extremely serious, with
implications beyond the criminal
aspects." The investigation is
continuing.
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Delta Air Lines extends best wishes to our Jewish friends for
the holiday season and for the year to come. May the new year
bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity for everyone.
(JTA/WZN New* Photo)
New Shekel Notes, Coins Unveiled
Finance Minister Modai and Bank of Israel Governor Dr.
Mandelbaum explaining the new shekel notes and coins at a press
conference last week. The currency changeover means that three
zeros will be erased from the country's currency, so that the new
shekel (NSl) will be worth one thousand old shekels (IS 1,000). The
Bank of Israel put the new shekel into circulation on Wednesday.
HWBH
rwiotw.
niY>
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
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of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer...
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IMMfMH


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
Two black-hatted rabbis debate a 'point' of law before Thursday
morning services begin in the small chapel at the Choral Temple
in Bucharest, Rumania. About 15,000 out of the t8,000 Jews who
remain in Rumania live in Bucharest, the capital The communi-
ty which had a post-war population of 350,000, operates under
the direction of Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen and has great vitality.
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC), the
overseas relief arm of the American Jewish community, is pro-
viding $4.3 million to the Federation of Jewish Communities of
Rumania in 1985.
Ex-SS Member Severely Injured
PATERSON, N.J. (WNS) -
Tscherim Soobzokow, the 61-year-
old Soviet-born former member of
the Waff en SS is listed, according
to latest reports, in critical condi-
tion at a hospital here after being
injured when a pipe bomb explod-
ed at his home early on the morn-
ing of Aug. 15.
HMD
tanan
A Happy Mew Year from all of
us at rfanischewitz Wine Co.
As we enter the year 5746, we hope and pray for peo-
ple all over the world, a year of Shotom. peace and
tranquility. and extend our best wishes to you and your
families for a healthy and happy Mew Year.
Manischewitz Wines are made under the careful su-
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Man Who First Reported Nazi Plans
Takes Up Cudgels Against Old Enemy
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
VANCOUVER (JTA)
The man who escaped
from the Auschwitz concen-
tration camp with the first
wartime report about its top
secret extermination
machinery has taken up the
cudgels against modern
Nazis who claim the
Holocaust never occurred
and call the final solution a
Zionist fraud to extort
money from post-Hitler
Germany.
He is Dr. Rudolf Vrba, pro-
fessor of pharmacology at the
University of British Columbia.
He is still only 61 and has the
same head of bushy black hair as
in April. 1944 when he got out of
Auschwitz with another young
Slovak Jew. Alfred Wetzler.
Their aim was not merely to
stay alive but to warn the world of
the horrible fate being prepared at
Auschwitz for the one million
Jews of Hungary who. only weeks
earlier, had fallen into German
hands.
LAST JANUARY, Vrba emerg-
ed from his university campus as
the star prosecution witness in the
Toronto trial of Ernst Zundel,
publisher and distributor of wildly
anti-Semitic tracts dismissing the
Holocaust as a Jewish hoax claim-
ing nobody had ever seen Jews be-
ing gassed.
A previous witness, eminent
Holocaust authority Dr. Raul
Hilberg, had been rattled by
Zundel's counsel's efforts to ex-
ploit historians' inconsistencies
about the details of the Nazi exter-
mination program, including the
number of its victims.
Vrba's strident clashes with
Zundel's lawyer were the turning
point in the trial which ended with
the defendant being jailed for 15
months and barred from publicly
discussing the Holocaust. Since
Zundel, 46, lacks Canadian
citizenship despite living there for
28 years, he is liable to deporta-
tion to his native Germany should
he fail to win an appeal against
the sentence.
INTERVIEWED by the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency at his Van-
couver laboratories, Vrba admit-
ted that at the end of the war it
would never have occurred to him
that 40 years he would again have
to vouch for the veracity about his
encyclopaedic report on
Auschwitz and still less "that I
would find myself being cross-
examined about it by Nazis."
To this day he remains deeply
wounded and embittered by the
reluctance of the wartime Zionist
leaders in Hungary to publicize his
report immediately lest it imperil
their vain efforts to buy some lives
from Adolf Eichmann.
Vrba speaks freely of the
"treason" of the Zionist leaders of
those days, even extending the
charge to Dr. Chaim Weizmann
himself. Prompt publication of the
Vrba-Wetzler report, he insists,
would have guaranteed that
400,000 Hungarian Jews would
not have gone so meekly to the
death camps believing they were
going to be re-settled for the dura-
tion of the war.
FORTY YEARS later, this in-
dependent and courageous scien-
tist is critical of the Canadian
Jewish establishment for its ner-
vious reluctance to bring Zundel
to trial. (The charges had to be
pressed by the independent
Holocaust Remembrance Associa-
tion, headed by Sabina Citron, an
Auschwitz survivor.)
"From experience we know that
by pretending the Nazis do not ex-
ist we wil not make them disap-
pear. Instead, they will just be
able to behave more uninhibited
1y," Vrba says.
Although widely reported in
Canada, the case has received
hardly any attention elsewhere
even though Zundel claims to
distribute his anti-Jewish hate
material throughout 45 countries
in 14 languages.
Vrba, who was called to testify-
by the Ontario provincial ai- '
torney, feels personally responsi-
ble for the outcome of such cases
because of his co-authorship of the
seminal report about Aiuchwitsio
the spring of 1944. His feeling fa
reciprocated by the neo Nazi
historians, intent on dismissing
the Holocaust as a Zionist myth
and therefore implying that Vrba
had knowingly fabricated his ac-
count of Auschwitz.
"I follow neo-Nazi literature
closely and I know that fur years
they have been recording even
word I have written. It was
therefore their dream to put me in
the dock as the accused." he says.
IN THE Zundel case, their
dream had finally come true but
thanks to Vrba's powerful impact
on the court their plans had
backfired.
After compiling his Auschwitz
report, Vrba served with distinc-
tion in Czechoslovakia's I'her par-
tisan unit. Graduating after the
war as a chemist at Prague
University, he embarked on a
scientific career.
In 1958, he left Czechoslovakia,
spent two years in Israel and
another seven at the British
Medical Research Institute where
he gained British nationality. He
then moved to North America and
has lived in Vancouver for the
past 10 years, devoting his days to
science, lecturing on the
Holocaust, Art, literature.
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Hussein Blamed
U.S. Won't Press for Peace Talks
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Continued from Page 1-A
King Hussein had outlined during
his visit to the United States
earlier this year. But the
Americans were not really sure he
meant it.
Murphy had hoped to see any
preliminary meeting with the joint
delegation lead immediately to
direct talks with Israel. Both
Washington and Jerusalem are
^ strongly opposed to bringing the
Soviets back into, the diplomatic
picture, especially before the
Kremlin renews ties with Israel.
But King Hussein's position on
this matter of an "international
umbrella," as he has often called
it, is apparently firm. It was the
source of much disappointment to
Murphy and other senior U.S. of-
ficials who had thought I was
largely a "fig-leaf," and not all
that substantive.
For Hussein personally, by the
way, it might be, but that is cer-
tainly not Uie case for PLO leader
Yasir Arafat who is still very loyal
in attempting to promote the
Soviet position in the region.
WHILE ISRAELI leaders,
especially Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin, believe that Hussein
currently does indeed have the
ability to move ahead without the
PLO, the Jordanian monarch is
not convinced of it. He is in no
such mood. That, in short, was
one of the basic messages brought
back to Washington by Murphy.
Hussein, according to U.S.
sources, does not believe that Jor-
dan can move without the bless-
ings of the PLO. The king may be
very sincere in his quest for peace,
but he is no Anwar Sadat, and Jor-
dan; is no Egypt. The result: a
stalemate, at least for the tune
being.
Then on Aug. 20, an Israeli
diplomat was assassinated in
Cairo, threatening to further
slow-down the peace process and
to further strain Israeli-Egyptian
relations. U.S. officials made it
clear that those responsible for
the murder were almost certainly
anxious to further poison the
atmosphere.
But in the short run, the killing
may have the opposite effect, at
least in the area of bilateral
Israeli-Egyptian relations. The
Egyptian Government of Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak was deeply
embarrassed by the assassination.
Egyptian officials were clearly on
the defensive in seeking to
reassure both Israel and the
United States.
U.S. OFFICIALS, in fact, were
not ruling out some Egyptian
"gesture" toward Israel, although
the long-delayed return of the
Egyptian ambassador to Tel Aviv
is not considered imminent.
"There are other things short of
that which the Egyptians can do,"
a U.S. official said, without
elaboration.
Throughout the week,
moreover, the fighting in Lebanon
took a turn for the worse, in-
dicating that there does not ap-
pear to be any limit to the poten-
tial level of chaos and brutality in-
to which that war-torn country
can sink.
"The civil war in Lebanon is
rooted in unresolved domestic,
constitutional and communal dif-
ferences," State Department
spokesman Charles Redman said
on Aug. 21. "The violence is
deplorable, the more so since it is
possible that some of those
responsible for the recent violence
see their actions as affecting the
peace process."
Redman's linking of the fighting
in Lebanon to the broader Arab-
Israeli peace process was
deliberate. He had been instructed
Shevardnadze
to include in his prepared state-
ment the following warning from
Washington to those who think
they can derail whatever is left of
the peace process: "They're
mistaken."
The spokesman added, "We
believe the peace process will con-
tinue, notwithstanding the
violence in Lebanon, the
assassination of diplomats, and
other senseless and despicable
acts."
BUT PRIVATELY. U.S. of
ficials were by no means convinc-
ed. The mood in much of the Arab
world, they said, is increasingly
hardening, as political extremism
and Islamic fundamentalism gain
in strength.
Hussein, after all, had been
unable to win any flat endorse-
ment of his Feb. 11 peace in-
itiative with Yasir Arafat from
the Arab summit in Casablanca.
There was no serious effort made
to bring Egypt back to the Arab
League, as some hoped. The
Syrians, Libyans and other rejec-
tionists, even in their absence,
could influence the meeting's
outcome.
That and the other trends
toward radicalism in the Arab
world, U.S. officials said, has had
its understandable impact in
Israel. Americans have been
alarmed in recent days by the ap-
parently increasing popularity in
Israel of Rabbi Meir Kahane, cur-
rently on a widely-publicized
speaking and fund-raising tour in
the United States. It may already
be too late to reverse these
trends, according to gloomy U.S.
experts in Washington.
The Administration is tem-
porarily playing its remaining
cards very cautiously. Thus, there
were no immediate indications
what Washington was now
prepared to do. There was no visi-
ble crisis atmosphere at the State
Department where Murphy was
briefing his colleagues. One
reason was that Secretary of
State George Shultz was vacation-
ing as indeed was President
Ronald Reagan.
INDEED, most U.S. officials
did not anticipate any major pro-
gress, if it should be forthcoming
at all, until after much of the U.S.
governmental bureaucracy and
political leadership, including
Congress, return from their
August vacations following the
traditional Sept. 2 Labor Day holi-
day indicating the end of summer.
There will be some activity later
in September. U.S. officials, for
instance, have confirmed in recent
days that the Middle East will be
discussed when Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevardnadze
comes to meet Reagan and Shultz
in Washington late in the month.
The Middle East is considered a
"regional issue," in superpower
rhetoric. At the last Shultz-
Shevardnadze meeting in
Helsinki, it was agreed that they
would review the Middle East in
Washington. "It will be on the
agenda," an American source
said. Most likely, it will be discuss-
ed at the Reagan summit with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
in November as well.
BUT WHETHER the Ad
ministration, with its hardline
anti-Soviet attitude, will move
closer toward the Soviet position
of supporting an international
conference remains to be seen.
Most experts here seriously doubt
it, barring some dramatic develop-
ment such as a Soviet decision to
re-establish ties with Israel. If
that were to occur, an insider
predicted, Israel itself may have a
change of heart about Soviet in-
Continued on Page 14-A
HELP THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
FOR ETHIOPIAN JEWS
SAVE ETHIOPIAN JEWRY
AS WE PREPARE FOR THE NEW YEAR
7000 JEWS REMAIN IN ETHIOPIA
TRAPPED BY HUNGER, PERSECUTION
AND ISOLATION FROM THEIR FAMILIES
You made it possible for 15,000 Ethiopian Jews
to reach Israel and be
inscribed in the Book
of Life.
for AAEJ to motivate the
emergency airlifts that
rescued more than 8000
Jews from Sudan last year.
Those rescue routes are
now closed.
You made it possible
You made it possible
You made it possible
for AAEJ to rescue hundreds
of Jews from Ethiopia.
for AAEJ to provide med-
ical supplies and personnel
to Ethiopian Jews.

You CAN make it possible for AAEJ to continue our life-saving work in Africa, Israel and
Washington, D.C.
for AAEJ to continue its own rescue program for Ethiopian Jewry.
for AAEJ to continue its relief program so that Ethiopian Jews will
not go hungry, will not suffer from lack of medical care.
You CAN make it possible
You CAN make it possible
As we celebrate the New Year amid plenty for ourselves, LET US NOT FORGET the 7000 Jews,
mostly children, women and the infirm who are still trapped in famine stricken Ethiopia.
They wait for your help. There is nothing else they can do. It is up to you to see
that they too are inscribed in the Book of Life. Next year may be too late.
I WANT TO HELP SAVE ETHIOPIAN JEWRY-------NOW!
I enclose my contribution ? $36 ? $72 ? $180 ? $360 ? $1000
I pledge to contact Prime Minister Shimon Peres and my Congressmen to
urge the (IS. and Israeli governments to work together to save the Jews in Ethiopia.
Name:
Address
(Zip)
Make checks payable to:
American Assn. for Ethiopian Jews
2789 Oak Street
Highland Park. Illinois 60035
(Contributions are tax deductible.)
(A-*)
*w*--- v,v>A'i-


V
Page 10-A The Jewiah Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
Can Ethiopian Jews
Make It in Israel?
Continued from Page 5-A
people how Ethiopian Jewry had
been cut off from the mainstream
for 2,000 years," he said. At the
same time, he emphasized that the
keuxm had not been invited to the
schools to convince or coerce
young people into submitting to
immersion. Rather, they were try-
ing to explain the issues so that
the young people could reach their
own informed decisions.
STAFF, he said, also try to
"help their pupils over" the con-
version issue and its attendant
trauma. The director of the Yemin
Or School, for instance, has been
especially successful in presenting
the ritual as a "renewal of the
Covenant," and has succeeded in
defusing resentment among
teenagers.
Probably the strongest driving
force among the young Ethiopians
is their wish to "be like everyone
else," according to Rivkah Ar-
regbee, the psychologist at
Talpiot. No doubt this also con-
cerns Orthodox critics who hope
to enlist Ethiopians.
"What are you doing to help the
Ethiopians preserve their
folkways and culture?" one
American visitor asked.
"We cannot preserve it for
them," Mr. Amit answered. "We
let them exercise their folklore
you can see it here. But all groups
lose something of what they bring
to Israel. What's important is for
us to accept them as they are, and
then they will choose according to
their own free will what they
keep," he concluded.
BUT RIVKAH? the school
psychologist, was not fully
satisfied with his answer.
"You have to distinguish bet-
ween folkways and culture." she
said. "Music, art, dancing these
are not difficult. Culture involves
much more: attitudes, aspirations,
traditions.
"Ethiopian culture is very rich,
yet very different from ours," she
continued, "even among the
young. We need to learn to
understand the unspoken
messages of Ethiopian culture,
and to help them understand
ours."
Rivkah told an anecdote which
she felt precisely illustrated her
point A young Ethiopian boy,
asked by hjs teacher whether he
understood a lesson she had just
taught, answered that he did
understand, but she knew he real-
ly did not. She wondered why he
had said he understood. She
speculated that he might be lazy
or that he might not have wanted
to lose face in admitting that he
hand't caught on.
LATER, when some older
Ethiopian students learned to
trust their Israeli teachers, they
confided that the boy had been
loathe to admit his confusion for
fear of embarrassing the teacher.
The implication was that if he had
admitted not comprehending,
perhaps the teacher hadn't taught
the lesson well enough. He didn't
want to insult her.
Amit agreed that the process of
educating Ethiopian children
would be smoother if there were
Ethiopian teachers there are
none yet at Youth Aliyah schools
or even Ethiopian "mediators"
to assist Israeli teachers. Those
Ethiopians experienced at living
in Israel are assigned to work at
absorption centers, still the
highest priority.
"We don't have enough
mediators to work between us at
the schools and students' families
either," Amit said, even as he
agreed that top priority must go
to absorption centers.
MEANWHILE, a growing
generational and cultural gap is
developing between youth, who
are plunging headlong into the
20th century, and their parents,
who are struggling to learn a new
language and totally new survival
skills for everyday life.
Even Ethiopian Kessim
(priests) agreed at first to conver-
sion. They were anxious for their
people to be accepted. The kessim.
however, were not themselves
granted rabbinic status. Only one
has thus far achieved it, and their
disestablishment has been another
complicating factor in the total ab-
sorption process.
The Orthodox establishment
says that by requiring these two
symbolic ceremonies of mikvah
and circumcision, they are able to
accept the Ethiopians as full and
complete Jews. They point out
that for centuries the Ethiopians
practiced a Judaism based on the
Torah but were unaware of the
later Talmudic laws. They could
not have had divorces or conver-
How to Choose
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Where is
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bit
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Canldrink
it regularly?
1 it well-
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Mountain Valley comes from a natural spring lo-
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The water rising in the spring today (ell as rain 3500
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Mountain Valley, bottled constantly for 112 years, is
the only water popular across the nation.
The main minerals arc calcium and magnesium,
ideal in water. It contains so little sodium it is used in
' a salt-free diet.
Mountain Valley is so light on the system, one
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Some people have been drinking it for 50 to 70 ycar
A glass dome covers the spring. All bottling is in
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Have Mountain Valley Water delivered to your home and office
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696-1333 563-6114
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FROM HOT
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FIRST FOODS IN FREEDOM: Ethiopian
Jews sit down for their first meal in Israel at
a Jewiah Agency absorption center. The meal
consists of potatoes, rice, rolls and tea, to pro-
vide nutrition without complicating common
gastric problems.
sions according to Halacha
(Jewiah law), thus calling into
question the specific status within
Judaism of every member of the
community.
In the current misunderstan-
ding, the chief rabbis feel they are
facilitating an otherwise impossi-
ble situation, paving the way for
all Ethiopians to be fully accepted;
but the Ethiopians feel
humiliated. They say they are be-
ing treated as less than Jews after
risking their lives to maintain
their Jewish identity.
Ethiopians activists argue that
they were brought to Israel
precisely because they are Jews.
They have been officially entitled
to this status under the Israeli
Law of Return since 1975.
ETHIOPIAN Jews resisted -
or died in brutal campaigns by
Emperor Haile Selassie and the
Christian majority to convert
them forcibly. They also have had
to contend in recent times with
the influence, hostility and mis-
sionary zeal of the large Muslim
minority in Ethiopia, now 40 per-
cent of the population.
Mixed marriages were never
sanctioned. Ethiopian Jews also
kept scrupulous track of family
members. In one village I visited,
blacksmiths who greeted us were



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at as goyim by others in
b, and we were urged to
11, with the explanation
i though they might still
[be Jews, they had been
or bribed away from
nunity or intermarried.
hod by which Ethiopian
efugee camps identified
her during Operation
las a rigorous cross ex
on religious practices,
lies and other specialized
that only recognized
lid share. In the melee of
some non-Jews tried
bemselves off as Jews,
[few succeeded.
i Jewish zeal in preser-
ity of their extend -
communities was so
it actually caused a
between keasim (the
workers of ORT (the
n for Rehabilitation
ding). That Jewish-
world organization
for a short time in
ith Mengistu govern
tion during the late
^VIDE educational and
kice6 to Ethiopian Jews,
ties had to serve the en-
unding population as
he Ethiopian Jews ob-
enuously, maintaining
i had traditionally kept
and their children
[from their non-Jewish
often at great
|*n order to protect their
Vtiey resented any sug-
jor requirement, that they
iwith non-Jews in order to
Oervice from a Jewish
_ establishment. Many
I resisted sending their
(%> free, non-religious
.certainly politicized)
established by the
government after the
tttion.
ents feared that the
jrho would have to travel
outside immediate
Ies, or Jewish sections
might be tempted to
their Jewish identity
i subsequently banished
liopian government on
that it was too
snically, some Ethio-
j village leaders thought
ition insufficiently
well as insufficiently
ictical considerations
in recent protests by
in Israel than their
humiliated rejection in
homeland,' signifi-
it is. The arduous ex-
Ethiopia claimed the
ny Jews, first during
idreds of miles across
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11 -A
Israel's Prime Minister Shimon Peres and a Jewish immigrant
child who arrived earlier this year from Ethiopia symbolize the
harmony between older and newer immigrants in Israel. Most of
the thousands of Ethiopian Jewish immigrants are under 1J, and
arrived without parents.
mountains and deserts to
neighboring lands receiving
refugees.
MORE DIED in the festering
camps where the Jews hudled,
fearfully awaiting rescue for mon-
ths or even years. Many of the
first wave of Ethiopians who
made their way to Israel even
before Operation Moses had lived
in the Tigray province, which has
suffered terribly from both the
sub-Saharan drought and the con-
stant warfare being waged by
several contending factions in
civil wars against the Mengistu
government.
When I paid my first visit to
an Israeli absorption facility last
year, I learned that the first act
routinely performed by resident
Ethiopians as a new wave of
refugees arrived was sit shiva.
Who died?" they would asks
their brethren as they arrived.
"Who was lost on the way? Who
was left behind?"
Then they would mourn for
several days. Except for critical
health services, Israeli personnel
at absorption centers would leave
the immigrants to their grief,
making no further demands on
them.
Now safe in Israel, many
widowed Ethiopians wish to
remarry and reestablish their
families. Only Orthodox rabbis are
empowered to perform Jewish
marriages in Israel. There are no
civil marriages.
Only one Ethiopian kes (priest)
has thus far qualified as a rabbi.
Since an Ethiopian's religious
status is in doubt unless he sub-
mits to ritual immersion and
many now refuse the ceremony on
principle these people may not
be legally married in Israel. The
status of any children they might
have will also be be in doubt.
PRIME MINISTER Shimon
Peres managed to defuse the re-
cent angry march on Ben Gurion
Airport by several hundred angry
Ethiopians. First, he agreed to
discuss grievances; then he pro-
mised to interced personally with
the Ashkenazic and Sephardic
chief rabbis.
The Ethiopians had marched
from their homes in the north to
Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion Airport.
"This was the airort they
brought us into," a spokesman
said. Others declared that they
preferred "to die" or to return to
Ethiopia rather than submit to a
ritual which questions the very
Jewish identity they have cherish-
ed for almost 2,000 years.
Officials in Israel have no idea
how seriously to treat threats of
starvation and suicide. "We don't
know these people well enough
yet," one official in Israel said.
"We do know that they are ex-
tremely upset."
The demonstration made the
front page of The New York
Times and virtually every other
U.S. big city daily. Expressly
because of this kind of public rela-
tions success, some observers sug-
gest that Ethiopian activists are
being manipulated by experienc-
ed, non-Ethiopian operatives.
Vocal Jewish activist groups
have long accused the Israeli
government of being indifferent
to the plight of Ethiopian Jews.
Others maintain that the
demonstrations have been
organized by a small but
outspoken segment of young
Ethiopian Jews who are pro-
Marxist and anti-religious.
PRIME MINISTER Peres, in-
terviewed on Israeli radio, said, "I
will try to meet with the chief rab-
bis and see how the suffering of
the Ethiopian Jews can be
prevented. When the immigration
from Ethiopia began, the rab-
binate showed much understan-
ding. I must check what happened
along the way."
Even with much more
"understanding," it is doubtful
whether the full set of religious
and cultural problems confronting
Ethiopians and Israelis will yield
to quick or easy solutions. Some
difficulties seem inevitable, in any
substantial migration. In addition
there is a wide gulf separating
Israel a technological marvel,
despite its current economic
straits and Ethiopia, one of the
least developed of the so-called
"developing" countries.
Despite this, the Israelis report,
and demonstrate, remarkable pro-
gress in integrating many of the
Ethiopians, especially the young,
into their new homeland success
stories abound despite Israel's un-
precedented economic problems
and the Ethiopians' special needs
as a group.
YOUNG ETHIOPIANS have
proven especially effective in the
Israeli Defense Forces. But while
most immigrants usually remain
in Israeli absorption facilities for
about six months before moving
into the general society, the
Ethiopians generally need a full
year and a half of intensive orien-
tation before they can leave the
Continued on Page 13- A
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. Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
Star Soccer-Player Removed
For Smuggling Heroin Into Israel
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami, Florida

By Hl'(.H ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Shlomo Shirari, a popular Israeli
soccer player and fullback in the Betar Jerusalem football
team, has been removed from the national eleven, after he
turned state's witness in a case against himself and seven
others in an alleged burglary and drug ring.
He was detained by police together with the others,
mainly from Netanya, on charges of planning and carrying
out a number of armed thefts in the Netanya area, traffick-
ing in drugs and smuggling heroin into the country.
SHIRAZI AGREED to turn prosecution witness and
the police have accordingly dropped charges against him.
But the national soccer team management said it would be
impossible to allow a man who has implicated himself in
criminal activities to play in the Israeli uniform in interna-
tional games.
The national team said it would be up to the Betar
Jerusalem management to decide whether he could con-
tinue to play for them. The charge sheet against the group
includes a plan to rob the manager of the Betar Jerusalem
team.
Congress Okays Legislation
To Protect Europe's Landmarks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Congress has approved
legislation creating a com-
mission to protect
cemeteries and other land-
marks in Eastern Europe
which are associated with
the religious or ethnic
heritage of American
citizens.
The measure was proposed by
Rep. Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y.), a
member of the United States
Holocaust Memorial Council, and
introduced in the Senate by Sen.
Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.).
"If we permit the decay and
deterioration of the years or
destruction wrought by hostile
and uncaring governments to
undermine the cemeteries,
monuments, or historic buildings
associated with the foreign
heritage of U.S. citizens, all of us
will lose an important part of our
root," Solarz told the House.
SOLARZ WAS also a member
of the Council's predecessor
group, the U.S. Holocaust Com-
mission, which recommended
measures to protect the
cemeteries after it heard a plea
from Rabbi Zvi Kestenbaum of
Brooklyn. New York.
"The Commission found that
many cemeteries in Eastern and
Central Europe were being
destroyed by weather and decay
or by hostile actions," Solarz said.
"Without vigorous action by our
government we risk losing a vital
part of our heritage."
Solarz added that "for nearly 50
years the sacred grave site of our
ancestors have been abused, ig-
nored, vandalized and often
destroyed." He noted that in
Poland, for example, the last re-
maining wall of the Warsaw Ghet-
to was torn down in the
mid-1970's.
BEFORE World War II there
were 800 Jewish cemeteries
there, of which only 434 remain,
only 22 of them in decent condi-
tion. Conditions are the same in
other Eastern Bloc countries.
"Cemeteries, monuments and
historic buildings are often the
last visible reminders of the com-
munities our emigrant ancestors
left behind," Solarz added.
The Commission will be made
up of 21 members, seven ap-
pointed by the President and
seven each from the Senate and
House. The Commission's first
task would be to publish a list of
landmarks abroad associated with
the heritage of U.S. citizens.
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~r\
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
There have been
reports of depression
and suicide attempts
among Ethiopian
N%K
'/
i about to graduate from Beersheba Col-
Practical Technology. He studies
b-optics until mid-afternoon, then
returns to the Beersheba Absorption Center,
where he works as an interpreter and
counselor for Ethiopian Jewish immigrants.
ftiopian Jews
Can They Make It in Israel?
ued from Page 11 -A
[of an absorption facility.
stically compounds ex-
ile Jewish Agency. Even
authorities report an
ness on the part of some
is to leave absorption
[and follow employment
ies. They attribute this
the need for a support
md partly to the Ethio-
iditional attachment to
pre they settle and cluster
ied family groupings.
9s the most visible suc-
absorption can be seen
routh. On a recent visit to
Talpiot, a Youth Aliyah village
located in the countryside bet-
ween Haifa and Tel Aviv, I hardly
recognized in the clean, energetic,
bright youngsters I encountered
there the same filthy, diseased,
albeit engaging and quick-witted
kinds of youngsters, I had seen
only a few months early in
Ethiopia. Already these children
are reading and writing Hebrew,
davening, wearing blue jeans,
posting pictures of Michael
Jackson on their dormitory walls
and declaring that they want to be
just like their Israeli-born
contemporaries.
Talpiot began receiving Ethio-
pian youth in 1977, one of the first
residential institutions to be in-
volved in their absorption. Today,
60 Ethiopian boys and girls bet-
ween the ages of 10 and 16 live
and study at Talpiot alongside 95
other pupils from Israel and 20
other countries, including (accor-
ding to a map at the school tracing
countries of origin) India, Yemen,
China and the United States. Fif-
ty more Ethiopian students are
expected to enroll at Talpiot later
this year after they progress
through initial absorption at
centers.
"The Ethiopian parents who
have students in our schools are
very cooperative," Amit com-
mented. Their children visit home
once every two weeks, and
parents come to see all special
events at the school.
Relations between the Ethio-
pian students and Israeli children
at the school have been har-
monious, he added. Mr. Danino
said that it is a matter of pride
that for the second straight year,
a student from Ethiopia was
elected chairman of the pupil
board of the village.
The 60 Ethiopian children are
integrated with other students in
nine classes. One third of the
children of the school (Ethiopians
and others) are in mehina
(preparatory or remedial) classes,
rather than following the regular
curriculum. Ethiopians are
distributed in both sections. The
school day runs from 8 a.m. to 3
p.m., with homework, music,
ceramics, workshops and films, as
well as religious instruction.
WHILE ETHIOPIAN youth
are progressing impressively, it's
not so easy for their parents'
generation, particularly their
mothers. Religious as well as
cultural matters complicate their
integration.
Overtaxed by the sudden influx
of thousands of Ethiopians, Israeli
absorption centers simply could
not accommodate all. Some Ethio-
pians too many are still living
in small hotels until appartments
in absorption centers are vacated
by previous immigrant groups.
The government is trying to speed
the process, especially through of-
fers of mortgage assistance.
Meanwhile, the Ethiopians have
been parachuted into a confusing
new world which seems to them to
be populated by unknown demons
and strange magic. Running
water. Electricity. Windows.
Unitl a few months ago, most of
the Ethiopians lived in thatch-
roofed mud huts, bathed in rivers
and cooked over open fires. To the
chagrin of Israeli neighbors, some
lls in Wings
lorld-Leading Elscint Recasts Its Financial Structure
Iv HUGH ORGEL
AVIV (JTA) -
je 1 's Elscint
^cated medical imag-
]uipment company,
it one time appeared
the world in its field
invariably cited in
i an example of what
*d-thinking high-
logy firms could do,
sn cut down to size
sting its financial
ture under new
jment.
[Dr. Avraham Suhami,
I as a scientific and finan-
who founded the com-
nd took it to dizzying
lias now left the company
^ly, after having resigned
chairman and managing
|two months ago.
face of large financial
he accepted personal
bility for mismanagement
into "exile" as head of
ipany's U.S. subsidiary
ole for American sales in
[He has now been ousted
^t post, also.
iLACE as head of the
has been taken over by
ilil, his one-time mentor
I of the Elron Electronics
i holds a majority of the
[ws Exit USSR
[SALEM (JTA) Only
left the Soviet Union in
the smallest number of
[leave that country in the
(rears, Leon Dulzin, chair-
I the Jewish Agency Ex-
lid last Wednesday.
.:.VV,V-.YVvV.-
Elscint shares and which helped
Suhami launch his medical imag-
ing design and production
concern.
Financial analysts in Israel are
now saying that Suhami's rise and
fall were inevitable, given the
man's formidable talents both as
scientist and profit-oriented en-
trepreneur and with what com-
mentators described as his "dic-
tatorial managerial style and the
ferocious pace at which he drove
the multi-national concern that he
built up but which left a trail of
casualties and a growing number
of personal enemies that stretch-
ed back over the years."
In effect, they say, Suhami aim-
ed too high too quickly and in the
end over-reached himself. He
went for massive company growth
at a time when the entire market
for medical imaging equipment in
the U.S. was suffering from a
change in the climate of hospital
and health-care financing.
TO BOOST American sales, he
bought the Zonics firm in Boston
which was in financial difficulties
and went bankrupt a few weeks
later.
When he resigned from the
parent firm, Suhami went to
Boston to try and revive the sub-
sidiary there, hoping to increase
Elscint sales and marketing, but
has now been eased out complete-
ly by Galil.
Basically, what set back Suhami
and his plans were the delays in
receiving U.S. Food and Drug Ad-
ministration (FDA) approval for
the Elscint model of medical
resonance imaging equipment.
Production delays in the manufac-
ture of giant magnets which are
/.'*
an essential part of the equipment
made Elscint miss out on a major
medical equipment fair and lose
an entire year in public display.
Only six out of 19 companies in
the field have so far received FDA
clearance, and this, together with
ongoing cost overruns in
numerous Elscint plants in Israel,
Europe and the U.S., established
or bought to cope with what
Suhami had been convinced would
be massive sales, led to turnover
far less than he had optimistically
forecast.
GALIL AND the new Elscint
management have set the com-
pany's sights far lower. If FDA
clearance for the Elscint model is
finally obtained, Elscint may be
on its way to achieving something
of what Suhami had planned,
though considerably less than his
original aims.
0ROWARD
QAPER *
Qackaging
Suhami himself, who holds eight
percent of the Elscint stock, says
he will sit back and rethink his
way and then probably establish a
new company on a smaller scale
but with big long-range hopes
but not a company in compeition
with Elscint, his own brainchild.
women.
Ethiopians in Israel habitually
burn coffee beans under their
beds to protect themselves
against potential evil spirits of the
new land.
FOR WOMEN, there is a crisis
of identity. In Ethiopia, a
woman s role was to tend the
fields, cook for her husband and
children, and perhaps weave and
fashion ciay pottery. Without
cooking facilities, without familiar
foods, without fields of tef
(sorghum-like grain) to tend, what
is she to do with herself? As her
children become integrated into
the new society, what is her role?
There are no menstrual huts in
Israel, not even separate premises
where she may isolate herself at a
hotel or an absorption center to
protect her husband and children
from what she surely regards as
her impurity. A teenage daughter
may vow never to practice
superstitious old ways, but an
adult woman who has always
segregated herself as a matter of
ritual feels intense guilt. There
have been reports of depression
and suicide attempts among
Ethiopian women.
There have also been stories of
marital discord, even violence.
Once they have learned Hebrew
and basic survival skills, Ethio-
pian women often prove more
easily employable than their
husbands. Numerous Ethiopian
women are judged by employers
to be quick-witted, polite, dex-
trous workers at computer compo-
nent assembly plants.
IN A CLASSIC situation of
tense role reversal, women are
becoming breadwinners, asser-
ting increasing independence, and
antagonizing husbands who once
reigned supreme in their
households.
All of us who think we know
what's best for the Ethiopians
religiously, educationally,
culturally will undoubtedly
discover that, in the long run, the
Ethiopians will eventually make
the biggest decision about their
lives for themselves. They are
already demonstrating the capaci-
ty to do so. Those who wish to in-
fluence their ultimate course may
find the best policy is probably the
one advocated by Rivkah, the
school psychologist at Talpiot,
who advised, "Slowly, slowly, we
must study as we teach."
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Page 14-A Ttie Jewisn f ioncuan/f naay, aeptemocr o, xaoo
Hussein Blamed
U.S. Won't Press for Peace Talks
Shamir Warns Labor Not
To Trigger Unity Gov't. Crisis
Continued from Page 9-A
volvement. Israel might then ease
its opposition resulting in a
change in Washington's position
as well.
There will be other visitors to
the United States in September
and October, including Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
several of his Arab counterparts
who are coming to participate in
the opening of the UN General
Assembly.
Prime Minister Shimon Peres.
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak, King Hussein of Jordan,
and several other foreign heads of
state are expected in New York in
Swimmer
Sets Record
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Julie Ridge challenged the
limits of human endurance,
and declared victory after
setting an unprecedented
record of swimming around
Manhattan Island, not once,
but for five consecutive
days. Her fastest time to
complete the 28.5 mile
course was for the final
swim, clocking jn at 8 hours
and 35 minutest
The former Broadway actress,
who appeared in the cast of "Oh!
Calcutta." became the first per-
son in 1983 to swim two con-
secutive laps around Manhattan,
finishing the course in just over 21
hours. She contended that the five
consecutive day swim would be
comparable to a runner competing
in four 26.2 mile marathons every
day for five consecutive days, an
unheard of feat.
The Los Angeles-based sport-
swear manufacturer Jag provided
sponsorship for the swimming
marathon. "I wanted a new and
greater challenge," Ridge said
prior to the swim. "I still don't
know how far I can go. This is big-
ger, tougher, longer and more ex-
citing than anything I've ever
tried, or even thought of trying. I
can't wait to get in."
The 29-year-old Ridge was
originally scheduled to swim
around Manhattan six consecutive
days. But on the first afternoon of
the attempted course, Ridge had
to abandon her efforts after more
than 8 hours as she ran into rough
tides and winds around the Bat-
tery, the lower tip of the island.
Jerusalem Is
Capita] Ferraro
Continued from Page 1-A
that's a plan for disaster," she
warned. "It is absolutely wrong to
sell offensive weapons to those
who use them against our friends.
I say anytime (Jordan's) King
Hussein or (PLO chief) Yasir
Arafat are ready to negotiate with
Israel, they know the address."
The U.S. "must encourage those
talks," just as former President
Jimmy Carter did at Camp David,
she added.
"The best insurance against the
destruction of Israel is lasting
peace in the Middle East, not
aims sales to the Arab states and
ill-conceived efforts to pressure
Israeli leaders."
SHE ALSO called on the au-
dience to speak out on behalf of
Soviet Jews and specifically, to
take up the case of Ida Nudel, a
refusenik who was arrested years
ago for wanting to immigrate to
Israel.
October to join in the 40th an-
niversary celebrations of the
United Nations. Naturally, all of
them will want to meet with Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary Shultz
and not just for photo sessions.
Thus, there is ample opportuni-
ty for some developments.
IN THE meantime, of course,
the White House will have to
decide on additional arms sales to
Jordan and Saudi Arabia. The
brief session of Congress in the
autumn mandates a final decision
before mid-September in order to
give the lawmakers enough time
to consider the sales. With nearly
three-quarters of the U.S. Senate
now opposed to a major weapons
transaction with Jordan in ad-
vance of its entering into direct
peace negotiations with Israel, the
Administration will have its work
cut out for itself.
But Shultz and others feel a
loyalty to Hussein. They believe
he has been genuinely trying.
They want to bolster his standing
in the Arab world. Still, the
Americans recognize there are
limits within which they must
operate, including the limits of
domestic American politics.
U.S. policymakers are also sen-
sitive to the politics of Israel.
They earlier had made clear their
readiness to move away from
Israel's position on the matter of a
preliminary meeting with the joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation.
In July, the State Department in-
sisted that Israel did not have a
"veto" over U.S. actions on this
sensitive matter.
But, U.S. officials asked, why
overly complicate Prime Minister
Peres' position in Israel's
domestic political arena needless-
ly? Peres, after all, is
Washington's preferred Prime
Minister. It would be one thing to
enter into a major battle with his
government over diplomatic
strategy if Hussein were willing to
then join in direct talks with
Israel. The tensions with
Jerusalem might then be worth
the price. But to do so without any
such assurance, U.S. officials said,
would be foolish.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier and Likud
leader Yitzhak Shamir has
warned the Labor Party not
to trigger the break-up of
the national unity govern-
ment while Israel's
economic recovery is still
uncertain.
In a tough speech to Herat Par-
ty members in Tel Aviv, Shamir
spoke of "persons and circles in
the other camp who cannot
restrain their hatred from break-
ing forth They can hardly wait
to bring down the government
and (thereby) disrupt the
economic recovery program.''
Shamir pointed out that the uni-
ty government was set up (almost
a year ago) primarily to rescue
Israel from economic collapse. He
said if elections were advanced
now, "We would have to start all
over again ."
THE DEPUTY Premier con-
tinued, "It is not easy to sit in a
government with another camp
whose political views you so
strongly oppose. Nevertheless, we
must overcome (the economic
crisis) together. It is impossible to
achieve this if we are not
together."
He added, though, that the
Likud would not recoil from the
challenge of elections. "We will
tell the people whose fault it is
that the country is once again
thrown into the maelstrom of a
premature election campaign
which would be so damaging to
the national interests."
Shamir dismissed recent QDJ;'
nion polls which had predicted a
fall in Likud's strength. "We're
used to all sorts of polls," he said,
"and we never fear them."
THE LIKUD leader's harsh
words came against the backdrop
of a dispute in the unity govern-
ment over the takeover and subse-
quent eviction of a group of Kiryat
Arba settlers and six MKs from an
apartment in the Arab
marketplace in central Hebron.
Labor and Likud accused each
other of misinterpreting the
legality of Jewish buying and then
settling into apartments in the
Arab quarter of Hebron.

c^S^ir^^^
to another number, or to time and
no. reject appfccaNe federal, stale and WSHST^SSSS^S^ 3SS&S3?
i VB


wkcase
Worthy 'Rovings' in Rabbi's Work
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
>RTON I. TEICHER
Rovings. By Israel
Iwitz. New York: Ktav
(ling House 1986. 385
In
[its overly-cute title and
generous quota of er-
tabbi Moshowitz's
i is worthy of attention,
its eighteen chapters
| one of his trips and tells
interesting people he
many of these people
Id leaders, the conversa-
tion Rabbi Moshowitz
[in detail are often
hor is a leading New
hodox rabbi who is now
am his congregation
Jewish Center. He works
it for community affairs
[Mario Cuomo of New
|G HIS lengthy tenure
; rabbi, Rabbi Moshowitz
[term as president of the
: Board of Rabbis and as
of its international af-
nittee. It was in these
that he travelled to
i of the world as an "of-
^resentatdve of the Jews.
hority and sanction for
ps based on what appears
equivalent of its own
tment operated by the
If New York rabbis
ed by Rabbi Moshowitz.
of exaggerated self-
Be is reflected by this
Rabbi Moshowitz often
|be negotiating on behalf
rs with his interlocutors.
kample, when meeting
with the Czechoslovakian minister
of ecclesiastical affairs. Rabbi
Moshowitz conveyed the impres-
sion that although he was in-
tervening on behalf of a particular
Czech rabbi, his primary objective
was to improve relationships bet-
ween Czechoslovakia and the
United States.
ANOTHER illustration occur-
red in Beirut in 1975 when Rabbi
Moshowitz met with two promi-
nent members of the PLO. In one
of these interviews, he became in-
volved in discussing recognition
by the Palestinians of Israel's
right to exist and Israeli recogni-
tion of the rights of the
Palestinians.
To achieve this reciprocal
response, Rabbi Moshowitz pro-
posed to someone he calls "the
chief theoretician of the PLO"
that the Palestinians should cease
terrorist activities while negotia-
tions took place between Israel
and the Palestinians. It is indeed
ironic that this discussion took
place in Beirut in view of recent
events.
A final illustration of Rabbi
Moshowitz's taking on
negotiating responsibility happen-
ed in India where he met with the
late Indira Gandhi in 1977. Aside
from attempting to persuade the
Prime Minister of India to soften
India's hostility toward Israel,
Rabbi Moshowitz urged her to lift
the travel restrictions that were
placed by India on the Israeli con-
sul in Bombay.
AS IRRITATING as these and
other examples are, Rabbi
Moshowitz should be given credit
for faithfully reporting on his in-
terviews, thus giving the reader
unusual insights into the attitudes
and behavior of several significant
individuals such as Sadat, Ben-
Gurion, Eshkol and Nkrumah.
He also writes about numerous
other lesser dignitaries, always
revealing a great deal about the
person being interviewed as well
as unwittingly revealing a great
deal about himself.
Another annoying feature of the
book is its sloppy editing.
Spelling errors abound
"evidentally" for "evidently";
"counsul" for "consul"; "excap-
ing" for "escaping"; "upcom-
promising" for "uncompromis-
ing" and so on. Names are given
incorrectly. Walworth Barbour is
called Walter Barbour. Everett
Clinchy is called "Clincy." Harry
Oppenheimer, the South African
mining magnate, is called a Jew,
even though his family converted
to Christianity long before Rabbi
Moshowitz toured South Africa.
A FINAL irritation is the fre-
quency with which questions are
tossed in. It almost appears that,
as he wrote, Rabbi Moshowitz had
close at hand a Jewish equivalent
of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations.
Fortunately, he seems to run out
of quotations as the book goes on.
By the final chapter, the flow of
writing is less frequently disturb-
ed by intrusive quotations.
All these defects are balanced
by a simple, straightforward
writing style and by a few scenes
which are truly memorable. One
chapter describes Rabbi
Moshowitz serving as the "of-
ficial" Jewish representative to
the celebration staged by the Shah
of Iran in 1971 to celebrate the
2500th anniversary of the
establishment of the Persian
Empire.
Another tells of his involvement
Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.) is shoum center during a visit at the
Machanaim-Lubavitch complex of educational institutions at
Kiryat Gat. Left is Sen Chic Hecht (R., Nev.), who made the trip
to Kiryat Gat with Helms as part of a delegation of U.S. Senators
travelling in Israel. Looking on (right) is Rabbi Sholom Dov
Wolpo, director of Lubavitch in Kiryat Gat, where both Helms
and Hecht vowed that the Reagan Administration is pledged to
'continue to help Israel.'
with Operation Crossroads Africa
which served as the model for the
Peace Corps. His account of his
visit to the Soviet Union stirs our
deepest sympathies for Jews
stuck behind the Iron Curtain.
And, most movingly. Rabbi
Moshowitz describes his visits to
Auschwitz and Dachau, conveying
in full measure the horror of those
infamous places.
FINALLY, the book doesn't
really end. It just trails off. The
last chapter tells about a visit to
Morocco but it is a chapter which
could have been inserted any place
in the book since there is no
chronological sequence nor any
other discernible form of logic to
determine which chapter follows
which. The book cries out for a
summary and for drawing conclu-
sions, both completely absent. The
lack of an index further detracts
from the value of the book.
With all these defects,
drawbacks and downright errors,
"A Rabbi's Rovings" is still worth
reading. Rabbi Moshowitz is our
vicarious traveller, taking us to
places and persons most of us
rarely see. He has been privileged
to have a series of unusual ex-
periences and his book brings us
closer to historical individuals and
sites.
Israel Bond Agenda
NEW YORK (WNS) More
than 300 Jewish leaders from 60
major communities in thf United
States and Canada will pian a pro-
gram of action to help Israel in its
efforts to overcome its present
economic crisis at the 1985 na-
tional leadership confe-ence of
Israel Bonds to be held ^-.'i.t '>-*
in Detroit.
I
he Original
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~


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
HeatthGae
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mds Briefs Rabbis for Fall Campaign
Congregations Urged To
Increase Israel Bond Sales
kUSALEM One hundred
took a compact course in
i high technology economics
jlitical affairs recently to
themselves for the for-
High Holy Day cam-
|of Israel Bonds. Over 1,100
nes will hold drives this
lid Israel Bonds Rabbinical
let Co-Chairman, Rabbi
Abramowitz of Miami
| rabbinical group visited Luz
[Energy Co., Ltd., studying
l's most innovative and
It-oriented development in
[energy. At Luz they were
I by vice president of opera-
[ Sherwin Pomerantz, a new
it to Israel who previous-
ved in Chicago as the presi-
| of the Board of Jewish
fttion. At Luz, Pomerantz is
nsible for production, quality
and marketing.
Bonds, which flow into
^velopment budget of Israel,
rgely responsible for most
rch and Development ex-
entation carried on in Israel
|THE KNESSET, the rabbis
told that Israel aims to
ntially increase her exports
technology products as a
|s of strengthening her
ny. Minister of Economics
Planning Gad Ya'acobi told
American and Canadian con-
itional leaders that substan-
progress was being made
fh the "task force" which is
crease the participation of
eas Jewry in the economic
ery of Israel.
Minister spoke of Israel's
is on the micro-economic
in developing innovative
jlogies such as Scitex, Els-
nd Israel Lasers, which have
fed international fame and
ete successfully with the pro-
of multi-national corpora-
| in their own home markets.
he stressed that until a tur-
md is achieved in Israel's
fomy, conventional in-
aents such as Israel Bonds
; remain the main stay of her
Jng for economic recovery
ng to economic growth.
[LEGATES WERE also
a confidential briefing on
fctatus of Jewish communities
Eastern Europe by Am-
dor Zvi Brosh, who only
atly returned from a tour of
as Israel's Ambassador to
inia and is slated soon for a
*' n-own
>,.
Foreign Ministry post in Chicago.
The Rumanian Embassy is the
only Israeli diplomatic representa-
tion in the entire eastern bloc, and
Ambassador Brosh shared with
his listeners impressions and
hopes for the future gleaned dur-
ing his tour of duty. The rabbis
were profoundly impressed by
disclosures contained in the Am-
bassador's briefing.
"We intend the 1985 High Holy
Day campaign in congregations
throughout Canada and the U.S.
to extend all previous levels," said
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz.
Noting that a substantial
number of congregations had join-
ed the roster of those holding
Israel Bond appeals as a result of
an intensive effort launched this
year by Israel Bond President and
Chief Executive Officer. Brig.
Gen. (Res.) Yehudah Halevy, Rab-
bi Abramowitz urged his listening
audience to broaden the base and
increase the extent of Bond pur-
chases in their own
congregations.
"In a world in which nation
after nation defaults on their in-
ternational loans, and pleads for
emergency aid in order to catch
up on interest payments, world
Jewry can be proud of Israel's
ability and commitment to meet
all her international financial
obligations on time and to the last
penny," said Rabbi Abramowitz.
"Your participation and consis-
tent support of the congregational
Israel Bond Campaign is the
surest way to maintain this
laudable record."
Playing a leading role in the
planning of the Israel Bond an-
nual Kahbis' Day was Rabbi Leon
Kronish of Miami Beach, National
Rabbinic Cabinet chairman.
Chaplaincy Conducting
High Holiday Services at
30 Area Institutions
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community
Chaplaincy Service is conducting
High Holy Day services in more
than 30 institutions in the Miami
area this holiday season.
According to Benjamin Bot-
winick, chairman of the Chaplain-
cy Advisory Committee, "The
Community Chaplaincy Service
serves the spiritual needs of some
15,000 persons each year who are
unaffiliated with a synagogue and
who are confined to hospitals, nur-
sing homes, Hospice, correctional
institutions, or homes for the
retarded."
The Service, sponsored by
Federation in association with the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami, seeks to "create and at-
mosphere of tzedakah of car-
ing," according to Botwinick, "on
a communitywide basis. Through
the program, chaplains offer
pastoral care, counseling, friendly
visits, and religious material to
those in need."
The Service also serves as a
referral agency for other Federa-
Benjamin Botwinick
tion services as well as social
welfare agencies of the State and
County, stated Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, director.
Assisting Rabbi Schiff in the
Chaplaincy Service are Rabbis
Maxwell Berger, Joseph A. Gor-
finkel, Warren Kasztl, Allan Mir-
vis and Marvin Rose.
"Jewish Floridia,
Miami, Florida Friday, September 6,1985 Section B
Jean Temkin, of Miami Beach, president of the Miami Beach
Region ofHadassah, stands before the Statue of Liberty, the sym-
bol of a free American -people. Temkin was among Hadassah
leaders from around the country who were in New York atten-
ding the 71st annual national convention at the New York Hilton
Hotel. They represent 385,000 members in more than 1,700
chapters and groups throughout the United States and Puerto
Rico.
Temple Samu-El Dedicates
New Sanctuary Sunday
Temple Samu-El will conduct
High Holy Day services in their
own sanctuary for the first time in
11 years.
Founded by three families in
1974. and led by Rabbi Edwin
Farber, the Temple plans on ex-
pansion from 500 to 700 families.
The new building, at 9353 SW
152 Ave.. will be dedicated Sun-
day with musical entertainment
from "Shachar," a reception, and
visits from Mayor Steve Clark and
other community leaders and
dignitaries.
The new building, providing a
sanctuary, social hall and kitchen,
will seat 1,500 people. Previously,
they have celebrated and worship-
ped in a high school gymnasium, a
roller skating rink and
neighborhood churches.
Rabbi Edwin Farber

f
ttflglS
bassador Zvi Brosh (center), greets Rabbis Mayer Abramowitz
tiami Beach (left) and Paul Dubin of California when the two
ritual leaders were in Jerusalem during a recent trip to Israel
\00 rabbis to observe Israeli high technology economics and
tical affairs. Ambassador Brosh briefed members of the
tin'/ rabbinical group during the Rabbis' Day study-tour of
lavish State.
Selichot Midnight Service
Penitential Prayers Will Launch
High Holy Day Season This Weekend
Selichot penitential prayer services will
launch the High Holy Day season in
synagogues throughout South Florida
this Saturday, Sept. 7. at midnight.
Selichot services, during which are of-
fered pleas for forgiveness of sins com-
mitted during the Outgoing Hebrew
Year, set the tone for Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur and the launching of the
Hebrew New Year 5746.
Rosh Hashanah begins with evening
services Sunday, Sept. 15, and continues
on Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 16 and 17.
Yom Kippur will be launched with Kol
Nidre Eve services Tuesday, Sept. 24.
The Day of Atonement, during which
Yizkor prayers are recited, is on Wednes-
day, Sept. 25.
s



Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Frkfcy, September 6, 1985
Slichot:
Forgiving Others, Forgetting Self
B'nai B'rith Forming Legal Unit
Bv RABBI
RAM I M SHAPIRO
Temple Beth Or
These are the closing moments
if Elul, the Hebrew month of
preparation. These are the final
minutes of expectation, building
toward the thunderous shofar
blast of awakening and renewal
that is Rosh Hashanah. These are
the moments of Slichot.
Slichot is forgiveness; it is the
prerequisite for a New Year. But
what is "forgiveness"? How is it
mastered? With whom is it
shared?
Once upon a time, when a great
draught plagued the Land of
Israel. Rabbi Eliezer stood before
all the congregation and prayed
hard and long for rain. No rain
fell. Rabbi Akiba stepped up to the
bima. and offered a brief prayer.
The rain fell. Suddenly a voice
from heaven thundered: "Not that
Akiba is greater than Eliezer. But
that Eliezer remembers his
wrongs and Akiba forgets them.
Talmud, Taanit, 15).
FORGIVENESS IS the
courage to forget, let go. We do
not pardon others; we forget
ourselves. Forgiveness is the abili-
ty to step beyond the distorting
mirror of our fun-house ego that
insists on seeing itself as God. and
realize that for all our playing at
being God, it is in fact God who is
playing at being us. Forgiveness is
the sacred technology of face-
saving: dropping the masks of
social discourse to encounter our
true face, the face of God.
For so much of our lives we hide
behind masks: caricatures of
ourselves stylized into acceptable
social postures and response.
Even- situation dictates to us the
proper behavior, the correct emo-
tion, and we dip into our collection
of masks and don the one that
most approximates what is
expected.
This is necessary to a point, but
the trouble arises when, after so
many mask changes we forget
the face that hides behind them
all. Forgiveness comes when we
drop the masks, and with them all
the pain and guilt and animosities
tied to masks, and rediscover our
original face smiling with wisdom,
compassion and love.
LETTING GO, forgetting our
wrongs. It sounds so easy, so sim-
ple: yet it is often the simplest of
things that prove to be the most
challenging. It is easy to excuse
our wrongs, but to forget them; to
allow the past to be past that we
might make room for new births
how is such simplicity and
forgiveness mastered? There is
only one path to Slichot:
discipline. Not the cold discipline
of external law, for this invites
rebellion. But the warm heart-felt
discipline of love and will.
Through such discipline we forget
the self and remember our self to
humanity, to life, to God.
Rabbi Rami Shapiro
Once, Rabbi Johanan ben Zak-
kai and Rabbi Joshua were walk-
ing in Jerusalem and came upon
the ruins of the Temple. Rabbi
Joshua lamented: "Woe unto us!
The place where our sins were
forgiven is no more." Rabbi
Johanan replied: "Let not your
heart be heavy. We have another
form of forgiveness which is its
equal. It is the performance of
deeds of loving kindness. As the
prophet Hosea has written: For I
desire mercy not sacrifice; the
knowledge of God rather than
burnt-offerings. 'Hosea. 6.6i."
(Avot de-Rabbi Xathan. +i.
Mercy and wisdom lie at the
heart of forgiveness. They must
begin with me. but not end with-
me. I must let go of myself that I
might become myself. But this is
not yet full forgiveness. In the act
of freeing myself from my false
sense of fragmentation and
alienation from the masks tnat
have come to replace my
awareness of divinity: in the pro-
cess of remembering my true
nature as God in extension. I
merge with all life. I work through
it. with it. as it: just as God works
through, with, and as me. Here is
the great mystery and power of
full forgiveness that was Akiba's.
He forgot his wrongs by
remembering his True Nature as
God in extension.
OUR POWER comes from our
awesome awareness of God as the
essence of our being. Our
forgiveness arises from the pro-
found love such awareness brings.
Our lives are reborn in the
knowledge that Ant Adonai
EloheekhaA, the deepest self, am
the Lord your God.
A man, travelling on a hot day.
grew weary, and sat down to rest
on a rock. He soon fell asleep. A
snake crawled towards him. but a
sudden gust of wind blew down a
branch from a nearby tree and
killed the snake. When the man
RETIREMENT...
NOT ALWAYS AS WE EXPECTED IT TO
BE, IT IS MUCH MORE.
If you, or someone you know needs help,
call and talk with a mental health profes-
sional.
WE Atl JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY
SENIOR HELPLINE 324-8111
Miami, Florida
awoke and stepped off the rock, it
swung loose and fell into an abyss.
Rabbi Abba chanced to pass by
at this very moment, and he said
to the man: "You have been saved
from death twice. Tell me what is
your power and what your good
deeds?*' The man answered: "I
never fail to make peace with
anyone who harms me. I become
his friend and repay good for evil.
And before I lay myself down to
sleep. I forgive all who require
forgiveness."
"You are greater than Joseph,"
Rabbi Abba said. "He forgave his
brothers, but you forgive
strangers as well." (Zohar, t,
200*01).
TO FORGIVE ourselves, our
family, our friends and to
forgive the stranger as well. To be
so in tune with the flow and
rhythm of our dawenen universe
that Life itself seems to conspire
for our survival: this is true
Slichot: the awesome power of liv-
ing with the awareness of God.
This is the gift our tradition holds
out to us as Elul comes to a close.
Who will open to it in peace, and
who will flee from it in horror?
May we have the courage to
stand fast and receive.
Honorable Malcolm H.
Fromberg, Mayor of Miami
Beach, Arthur J. England, Jr.,
former Chief Justice of the
Florida Supreme Court, and Alf-
red A. Golden, President of River-
side Memorial Chapels, became
the first members of the new
Bench and Bar Unit No. 5313
which has been granted a charter
by District V of B'nai B'rith
Internationa!.
"Members of the legal profes-
sion are invited to join in the
special camaraderie of building
this B'nai B'rith unit for lawyers
and judges. Charter membership
is now open. This unit will be uni-
que in its formulation by men and
women of the legal profession and
the experience and expertise of
their years of affiliation in the.
foremost Jewish fraternal
organization," William Sauls
said in making the announcement
"Enrollment can be accomplish
ed by transfer of membershin
from any lodge, chapter or unit in
the world. The Bench and Bar
Unit No. 5313 is eager for the
enrollment of those members of
the bar who have not previously
enjoyed the many pleasures and
benefits of association with the
B'nai B'rith," he added.
Lawyers and judges are invited
to a dinner meeting on Sept. 10 at
6 p.m. at the Federation building
in Honor of Our 40th Anniversary
Beth Kodesh Congregation
(Conservative Synagogue)
1101 S.W. 12th Ave.
FIRST YEAR NEW MEMBERS
HALF PRICE MEMBERSHIP
(INCLUDES Seats For Holidays)
Call Office 858-6334
High Holy Day Seats Available
For Non-Members
(40th Anniversary Celebration
SUNDAY, NOV. 10th 11:00 A.M.)
RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL ^--------------------------,
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Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli.
; 4 cup chiipped i r whi >ie uni
onions
3 cup chopped carr -
2 tables?- on.- butler .r T.arKanrie
'2 package lu n2. i Inzer, wh
jrren beans, cooked and drained
1 an (15Q>.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato -auc<
dash gartc salt
1 tablespoon chopped trtsh
parsley
h cup water
1. Saute onions and oarrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaiiU!^ ingredients; cover and simrner'for
15 minutes. N-rve- 4.
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Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
in
Senator Bill Bradley To Be Presented ORT Award
U.S. Sen Bill Bradley will
receive an American ORT
federation Award in
Secaucus, N.J., on Oct. 28.
U.S. Sen. Bill Bradley (I)..
N.J.) will be presented with the
American ORT Federation Com-
munity Achievement Award at an
AOF testimonial dinner set for
Oct. 28 at the Meadowlands
Hilton in Secaucus, N.J., announc-
ed AOF President Alvin L. Gray.
Funds raised at the dinner will
establish the Sen. Bill Bradley
ORT Scholarship Fund, which will
provide assistance to ORT
students around the world.
Bill Bradley was elected to the
U.S. Senate from New Jersey in
1978 in his first bid for public of-
fice after earning distinction as a
scholar, athlete and author. He is
a strong advocate for increased
federal aid to education, and has
initiated legislation to fund
remedial skills programs for high
school students and to aid gifted
and talented students.
Delegates to the 71st Hadassah
National Convention have
unanimously reelected Ruth
Popkin of New York to a second
term as Hadassah national
president.
Almost 3,000 delegates
representing 385,000 Hadassah
members in 1,700 chapters
throughout the United States and
Puerto Rico also reelected Rose
Goldman of Jersey City, N.J., na-
tional chairman of Hadassah
Magazine, as national secretary,
and Deborah Kaplan of Bayonne,
N.J. as treasurer.
In addition, participants in the
convention which also marked
Hadassah's 73rd anniversary
elected Naomi Gurin of Brooklyn,
N.Y., National Hebrew Studies
chairman, to the position of recor-
ding secretary.
Isramco, Inc., an American
company with oil and gas in-
terests in Israel, has announced
that the company and its partners
will spend between $5 million and
$6 million by March 31, 1986, in
.the first stage of its newly-
expanded development program
for oil and gas in Israel's Negev
Desert.
In making the announcement,
Dr. Joseph Elmaleh, chairman,
also reported that the shooting of
five miles of seismic, the final
testing, had begun for the pro-
gram's first drilling site.
If the final portion of seismic
testing confirms a closure (a
geological structure which traps
hydrocarbon reserves), the Shaul
No. 1 will be drilled to an approx-
imate depth of 4,000 to 4,500 feet,
targeted for natural gas.
Nuclear physicist Edward
Teller has warned that the Soviet
Union is ahead of the United
States in defense strategy and
called on the Western
democracies, including Israel, to
unite in an effort to catch up.
Prof. Teller spoke at a seminar on
the Strategic Defense Initiative
(SDI), popularly known as "Star
Wars,'' held at Tel Aviv Universi-
ty recently.
The seminar was jointly spon-
sored by TAU and the Institute
for Advanced Strategic and
Political Studies, an independent
research center based in
Jerusalem. It was the first
organized public discussion of the
SDI held in Israel.
"The Strategic Defense In-
itiative should rightly be called a
Strategic Defense Response."
Prof. Teller said, "because the
Soviets have a defense monopoly
that they want to keep." He noted
that the USSR has established a
defense shield around Moscow, us-
ing missiles believed to be armed
with nuclear explosives, and
capable of destroying incoming
missiles at an altitude of five
kilometers.
Rabbi Ernst Lorge of Skokie,
111., who last year became the first
American rabbi to conduct Jewish
New Year Services in East Ger-
many since World War II, will
again go to East Berlin this year,
where he will lead Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur services in a
restored synagogue.
Rosh Hashanah will fall this
year on Sept. 16-17. and Yom Kip-
pur on Sept. 25.
Rabbi Lorge's plans were an-
nounced by the American Jewish
Committee, which will again spon-
sor the visit of the retired spiritual
leader of Temple Israel. Said
Eugene DuBow, director of
AJC's Community Services and
coordinator of a recently launched
AJC project aimed at revitalizing
the East Berlin Jewish communi-
ty, "A strong feeling exists in the
German Democratic Republic
among its small number of Jews
that they wish to hold on to their
Jewish identity."
I-
combat racism and anti-Semitism.
He has been a member of the
National Executive Committee,
the National Policy Committee
and the Board of Directors of the
JWV-USA National Memorial.
The Albert A. and Viki List
"Brit HaDorot" peace award will
be given annually by the Shalom
Center to two people who have
demonstrated a strong commit-
ment to ending the arms race, Ira
Silverman, chairman of the Board
of the Shalom ("enter, announces.
Endowed by Albert A. and Viki
List, father and daughter, the
awards will be made to one person
who is well known for his or her
work to prevent nuclear
holocaust, and to one grassroots
activist. They are intended for
Jews who carry out the "Brit
HaDorot," or covenant of the
generations. The awards consist
of $1,800 in cash and a work of
Jewish art.
Nominations for the awards will
be accepted in writing by the
Shalom Center through Oct. 4 at
the Shalom Center, Church Road
and Greenwood Ave., Wyncote,
Pa. 19095.
A new. rapid, home-use
pregnancy test which was
developed by Teva Phar-
maceutical Industries under the
guidance of two Hebrew Universi-
ty of Jerusalem scientists, Prof.
Dov Sulitzeanu and Dr. Yaacov
Flechner, both of the Faculty of
Medicine's Institute of
Microbiology, is now being
manufactured by the Israeli firm
and distributed both in Israel and
abroad. The test is called the TPK
Home Pregnancy Test. (TPK
stands for Teva Pregnancy Kit.)
The two researchers combined
their knowledge and experience
with immunological techniques to
devise a ten-minute test for
pregnancy which can he done at
home as early as five days after a
missed menstrual period.
The test is carried out using
first morning urine. After passing
the urine through a small plastic
column, a blue color reagent is ad-
ded. The blue color is retained in
the test column if the hormone
HCG (human chorionic
gonadotropin), which is produced
by pregnant women, is present. If
the hormone is absent from the
urine, the color reagent is washed
away and the column remains
white.
Ruth Popkin was elected to a
second term as national presi-
dent at Hadassah's 71st annual
convention in New York:
Harvey Friedman, of
Oakhurst, N.J. is new Na-
tional Commander of the
Jewish War Veterans of the
USA.
Harvey S. Friedman, of
Oakhurst, N.J., was unanimously
elected National Commander of
the Jewish War Veterans of the
USA at the group's National Con-
vention in Orlando.
The National Commander
serves as a spokesman for the
organization and represents the
JWV both here and abroad.
Friedman, who served in the
Navy during the Korean War, has
been a member of the JWV for the
past 25 years. He served three
terms as chairman of the National
Action Committee, where he
spearheaded JWV's campaigns to
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
Alexander Gross Hebrew Academy "Head Start
To Install Officers, Directors Lectures at UM
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy will install its
Officers and Board of Directors on
Sunday, at the Friedland
Ballroom of Temple Emanuel.
Dr. David Reinhard, re-elected
to a second term as President,
heads a roster which constitutes a
cross section of Greater Miami
community and religious leaders.
Highlighting the evening's pro-
gram will be the presentation of
the coveted Samuel Reinhard Ser-
vice Award to Dr. David Galbut.
Dr. Galbut, who serves as Vice
President and Chairman of the
Long Range Planning Committee
of the Academy, is a prominent
cardiac and thoracic surgeon. An
alumnus of the Academy, Dr.
Galbut and his wife Gita are
presently parents of four
Academy students.
The Samuel Reinhard Service
Award, established by the
Reinhard Family in memory of
their father, a founder and most
dedicated supporter of the
Academy, is awarded annually to
the person whose service to the
Academy and Jewish Education is
exemplary of the legacy of Sam
Reinhard.
In announcing the award, David
Reinhard stated: "The Academy
is now experiencing a second
generation of nachas. Our own
graduates are returning as
parents of Academy students and
assuming responsible leadershp of
their school. Dr. David Galbut in-
deed represents this movement of
youth carrying on for the future
growth and success of the Hebrew
Academy."
Mrs. Nan Rich, president of the
Central Agency of Jewish Educa-
tion, will install the new slate of
Officers and Directors.
Miami Rabbi Named Field
Director of MSDCS
Rabbi Warren Kasztl has been
named Field Director for Com-
munity Services in the Southeast
Region for the Max Stern Division
of Communal Services (MSDCS),
the communal outreach arm of the
Yeshiva University-affiliated Rab-
bi Elchanan Theological Seminary
(RIETS), Rabbi Robert S. Hirt,
dean of MSDCS, has announced.
In his new position, Rabbi
Kasztl, who was ordained at
RIETS, will represent MSDCS in
the Southeastern United States in
rabbinic and educational program
situations. He will also aid in the
development of new Orthodox
communities and congregations,
and he will organize adult educa-
tion seminars.
Rabbi Kasztl is the first perma-
nent field official from MSDCS to
work outside the New York City
office.
He will be involved in all ac-
tivities of the Southeast Regional
office, working in conjunction
with Chaim Friend, director of
development for the Southeast
Region.
"The addition of Rabbi Kasztl to
our staff enriches our service to
the Jewish community of the
Southeastern United States,"
Rabbi Hirt said, "especially in the
area of Southeastern Florida,
where four new Orthodox con-
gregations have been formed in
the last few years."
Rabbi Kasztl, a native of
Denver, is the founding rabbi of
one of those new congregations,
Shaare Tefillah in Kendall. He
continues to serve as the con-
gregation's spiritual leader.
Other new Orthodox congrega-
tions assisted in this development
are located in Boca Raton,
Hollywood, and North Miami
Beach.
Rabbi Kasztl earned his
undergraduate degree in 1976
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
from Yeshiva College, the men s
liberal arts and sciences division
of the University. He was ordain-
ed at RIETS in 1980. He earned a
Master of Secondary Jewish
Education degree from the
University in 1979.
The Max Stern Division of Com-
munal Services provides educa-
tional, organizational, con-
sultative, and placement services
to rabbis, congregations, schools,
individuals, organizations, and
communities throughout the
United States and Canada.
ORT Meets
The Golden Shores Chapter of
American Women's ORT will hold
its first general meeting on Sept.
12 at 7:30 p.m. at the North Miami
Museum and Art Center, North
Miami.
The program will include a
viewing of an exhibit by Florida
Artists to be followed by psychic,
Iris Saltzman.
Nassau Gardens Apt.
North Miami Beach
1 bedroom adult Apartment.
949-9163
The professor who developed a
home-based pre-school program
for youngsters in Jerusalem is
starting a similar pilot program
this fall for children in Overtown
and Liberty City.
Sponsored by the Dade County
School System, the Home Instruc-
tion Program for Preschool
Youngsters (HIPPY) is the brain-
child of Avima Lombard, who
created the program in Jerusalem
in 1969.
On Sept. 4, Professor Lombard
will describe HIPPY at a free
public lecture at the University of
Miami, in the President's Board
Room in the Ashe Building on the
Coral Gables Campus. The lecture
begins at 8 p.m.
Through HIPPY, mothers are
trained by para-professional aides
to become "teachers" for their
preschool children. Mothers learn
how to teach their children basic
skills at home by reading and play-
ing together.
Lombard's lecture is the first in
a series sponsored by the UM's
Judaic Studies Program, Depart-
ment of Teaching and Learning in
UM's School of Education and
Allied Professions, and the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
Greater Miami Section.
c 1985 BMtnc* Coniotr*m Inc
Helen Weisberg: Elected To
Hadassah National Board
Helen Weisberg of North Miami
Beach, has been elected to the Na-
tional Board of Hadassah, the
Women's Zionist Organization of
America, Ruth Popkin, Hadassah
National President, announced.
Weisberg was one of the eight
members of Hadassah from out-
side the New York Metropolitan
Region elected to the National
Board during the 71st Hadassah
National Convention in New York
City, Popkin said.
"Helen Weisberg's service to
Hadassah and to the Jewish peo-
ple exemplifies the highest ideals
of Judaism and of Zionism,"
Popkin said. "Throughout her
years of leadership, Helen
Weisberg has been instrumental
in carrying on and expanding
Henrietta Szold's vision of active
and involved American Jewish
Schockett Receives
Eleanor Levingston Schockett,
matrimonial attorney has achiev-
ed Board Certification as a
Matrimonial and Family Lawyer.
Recently honored by Town and
Country Magazine as one of the
"Best Lawyers in America,"
Schockett was one of only 56 at-
torneys certified in the Florida
Certification Plan's first year.
"The standards established (by
the Florida Certification Plan)
Helen Weisberg
women effecting positive change
in their own lives and in the lives
of others. It is a privilege to
welcome her to the Hadassah Na-
tional Board."
Board Certification
serve to promote the aims of
specialization by striving for the
maximizing of excellence in areas
of practice," Florida Supreme
Court Chief Justice Joseph A.
Boyd, Jr. said in a letter to the
certified lawyers. "Approval of
the program was granted by this
court with the intent of improving
the process of judicial administra-
tion and enhancing efficiency, ac
cessibility and quality of legal ser
vices rendered to clients."
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Decade of Women
. Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
On the Whole, U.S. Delegates Had Third World Hostility in Hand
By THEODORE FREE DM AN
In 1975, more than 1,000
delegates from 133 countries met
in Mexico City to launch the
United Nations Decade Con-
ference on the Status of Women
and to examine the issues of
equality, development and peace.
Instead of their focusing on the
real issues confronting women
throughout the world, what is
remembered is the Declaration of
Mexico which equated Zionism
with racism.
In 1980, the mid-decade con-
ference was convened in
Copenhagen. This too turned out
to be equally faulted with an enor-
mous amount of politicization
Israel and the United States the
scapegoats, and Jewish women
confronted with anti-Semitism
that was overt, wild and irra-
tional. Jewish women returned
home devastated by the
experience.
1985 was the date set for the
End Decade Conference and the
occasion to review and appraise
the achievements of the United
Nations Decade for Women. As in
the past there would be two
meetings: one, the Forum for non-
governmental organization
representatives, interested
organizations and individuals, and
the second, called The Con-
ference, made up of governmental
delegations from all the countries
represented in the UN.
THERE WAS time to prepare:
time to plan, to organize and to
marshall our resources for the an-
ticipated battle.
To meet the challenge ADL, in
concert with B'nai B'rith Women
and in cooperation with 19 other
Jewish organizations from 17 dif-
ferent countries, sponsored a col-
loquium in Paris in July, 1984, to
examine the issues that very likely
would be dealt with in Nairobi, the
obstacles we would encounter, the
anti-Israel and anti-Semitic pro-
paganda in short, we were
determined to map a battle
strategy and not be caught un-
prepared as in the past.
The colloquium provided infor-
mation, shared experiences and
especially skills, that enabled the
participants to return home with
the know-how to convene similar
meetings with other women's
groups, both Jewish and secular;
to help them gain a better
understanding of the issues and to
set the stage which hopefully
would avoid the hijacking of the
1985 Women's Conference that
had occurred in Mexico City and
Cophenhagen.
IN SHORT, Paris was a suc-
cess. Representatives of the par-
ticipating Jewish organizations
from Europe, North America and
Israel committed themselves to
utilize the one year lead time to
prepare. In the United States
ADL nationally and regionally
disseminated materials and in-
itiated study and action seminars
in Houston, Los Angeles, St.
Louis, Pittsburgh, Washington,
D.C.
Nationally, ADL served as the
resource center and clearing
house. A half dozen meetings
were held with delegates and in-
terested women; ADL distributed
materials from a wide variety of
sources, and just ten days before
the opening of the Nairobi
meetings, we hosted Maureen
Reagan as chairperson of the of-
ficial American delegation.
She briefed some 300 women
representing the widest possible
spectrum of the city on the issues
as seen by her and the American
delegation. She was impressive.
She exhibited a knowledge of
women's issues (though women
clearly differ as to how these are
defined or what should be done
about them); a determination that
the United States would make
Theodore Freedman, na-
tioncU director of the In-
tergroup Relations Division of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, attended the
United Nations women's con-
ference in Nairobi, Kenya, in
July.
every effort to avoid the meetings
being politicized, and strong sup-
port for Israel.
July 9, 1985 was day one of the
Forum, the non-governmental
phase of the End Decade pro-
gram. An estimated 8,000 were
expected over 10,000 attended.
HOW DID we fare? In brief, the
150 Jewish women and handful of
men representing 14 countries
were better prepared, more deter-
mined and more finely honed for
what might take place. Even
traditional institutional rivalries
were set aside. There was an over-
riding sense of cohesiveness and
unity.
A few lines about the Nairobi
Jewish community of some 50
families they proved to be
magnificent. They opened their
hearts and doors and provided
their facilities which became the
command post for our operations.
To name only some would be inac-
curate and unfair, but to thank
Charles Szlapak, the community's
president, provides a symbolic
thanks to the entire community.
Jewish delegates met every day.
There were regular briefing ses-
sions: delegates signed up to cover
workshops and discussions that
were scheduled which were con-
sidered potential trouble spots.
Every effort was made to work as
a team.
ADL lay leaders, Patty Deutsch
of St. Louis, Merita Kern of Paris,
Prof. Esther Broner and Amina
Rahman served as consultants to
our delegation, their trip funded
by the Bruner Foundation, and
ADL staff Roberta Reisman of
Jerusalem. Sally Greenberg of
Washington, D.C, Marcia
Yugend from Minneapolis and
myself were an integral part of
the ongoing operations.
ADL STAFF became part of
the inner circle working directly
with the official Israel delegation
on the counterpropaganda front.
Regrettably the Israelis did not in-
clude a press attache in their
group a serious mistake. Never-
theless, some of us worked on the
press conference phase the
positive stories, while others were
involved in dealing with misinfor-
mation and disinformation (a
week before the Conference was
to end and after pressure from
Jewish representatives, the
Israelis did bring in an experienc-
ed press attache).
ADL had arranged to have an
exhibit of materials and screen-
ings of films, one especially
prepared by the League "Bet-
ween North and South," dealing
with Israel's development pro-
jects in third world countries. All
of the participating organizations
came prepared with materials to
join in the counterpropaganda
battle that would initially take
place at the Forum.
What happened at the Forum?
In brief, it was a carnival
10,000 people attended, 1,000 of-
ficially designated UN workshops
and sessions, plus hundreds that
were set up on an ad hoc basis.
Filtering through all of the
reports of the estimated 1,800
disparate workshops discussions,
meetings and confrontations, the
majority were benign.
WITHOUT diminishing the im-
portance of the subjects, they
dealt with family planning,
prenatal care, development,
employment, etc. For the most
part, these were not politicized.
The balance, a relatively small
part of the whole, were. The
reported 121 Palestinian
delegates (more appropriately
PLO, who displayed the PLO flag
at press conferences and on
posters) along with Arabs from
other countries were determined
to make Israel the issue.
Try, they did. Meetings, though
small (40 to 50 people), were
raucous. Shouting and pushing
took place. British communists
and Israeli communists developed
a ready alliance with Palestinians
to charge the atmosphere. They
made the headlines because they
were the sensational items. Few
newspapers devoted space to the
more constructive, low-keyed and
significant dialogues which took
place away from the crowds and
cameras among Jewish women
(from Israel and the West) and
Palestinian and Arab women. For
the most part the official UN
Forum paper and the local Ke-
nyan papers missed the real
stories.
There were noisy, unruly, anti-
Israel sessions, and in one of
them, which for most delegates
became tiresome, a Kenyan
delegate took over and told the
Palestinians and Israelis, who
were in a heated dispute, to go
solve their differences elsewhere,
that tljey were abusing Kenyan
hospitality. This was greeted with
applause.
ANTMSRAKI. forces were
assiduously at work. Arab women
were making a special effort to
make contact with American
blacks in an effort to win them
over tb the "Palestinian" cause.
Angela Davis held court and in a
session that closed out anyone but
black delegates reportedly
became a spokesperson for the
Palestinian cause.
The days were long and dif-
ficult. There were serious pro-
blems with hotel accommodations.
Delegates, myself included, at one
point expected to be put out of
their rooms and into the streets.
Schedules set by the UN planning
committee were not adhered to.
Facilities were not available as
promised.
Confusion abounded, but in
Continued on Page 6
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1988
U.S. Delegates Had Third World Well in Hand
Continued from Page 6-B
spite of all that one had a sense
that the Jewish delegates had in
large measure kept their cool; had
a unity of purpose and organiza-
tion. The Arabs and Palestinians
in many ways overplayed their
hand. Everything they touched
appeared to be politicized, and
they were beginning to wear on
the nerves of many of the
delegates who under other cir-
cumstances might well have been
open to their ideas.
The conflict between the Ira-
nian and Iraqi women was equally
if not more heated that that bet-
ween the Israelis and Palesti-
nians. It was always a question of
which was more pure and truly
represented Islam. One brochure
being distributed by Iranian
women, in their chadors on the
campus grounds where most of
the Forum sessions took place,
described the actions of the Iraqis
as part of a Ba'thist-Zionist
conspiracy.
WHEN I asked one of them to
explain that to me she quite facile-
ly told me, "But of course the Ira-
qis are doing the bidding of the
Zionists." My comment to her was
that I thought the Iraqis would be
surprised to learn that there was
such a conspiracy of which they
were considered a part. But here,
as in the majority of such en-
counters, facts and rationality had
no place.
ADL sponsored a major screen-
ing of its film which was attended
by a sizable group of black Ke-
nyans who were students at
Israel's Mount Carmel Center,
and who have formed themselves
into Kenya's sole television sta-
tion VOK (Voice of Kenya) which
screened our film to pass the cen-
sors, and we have been promised
that it would be aired during the
last week of the Conference. Also.
members of the Shalom Club have
plans to show the film throughout
the country during the coming
year.
The official Conference has
been reported on in the general
press, but with considerably less
emphasis than might have been
expected. And in the end, through
the efforts of the United States
and the lobbying efforts of many,
the infamous reference to Zionism
as racism has been dropped from
the final document of Nairobi,
though Third World. Arab and
Soviet bloc countries will no doubt
continue to press its continued
usage and reference. In short.
Israel and the Jewish world won
this battle.
THE OFFICIAL Conference
had some high points in the quali-
ty of its chairperson. I was par
ticularly impressed with the
delegate from Mexico, and of
course the United States delega-
tion obviously had done its
homework, worked hard and
made sense in their handling of all
the issues.
The women had come to save
the world but appeared too busy
to save a life. While in Nairobi, the
press reported on a 17-year-old
Kenyan girl who attempted to
commit suicide because of the
beatings she had been receiving
from an uncle. She was sentenced
to two years in jail (but given pro-
bation), and told to behave
herself. What happened to the un-
cle? well, nothing.
I raised the incident with some
of the "leaders" of the women and
suggested, if you really want to
change the world, if you really are
concerned with the well-being of
all women, why not start here in
Nairobi? There was no response.
. they were too busy saving the
world.
One Kenyan woman of
reasonably high status, when ask-
ed by me how she felt the Forum
was going, responded that if it
didn't improve, she was going
back to work. She further sug-
gested that if the women who had
come from great distances and at
great expense had used the same
resources to bring women from
underdeveloped countries to be
trained in learning home skills,
the delegates' time and money
would have been better spent.
THERE IS. of course, an abun-
dance of male arrogance, but then
again there were many aspects of
the Forum and Conference which
reflected that women have their
fair share of arrogance as well.
Many were sexist in how they ran
their meetings; many were sexist
in how they talked about men; and
many came with a naive view of
the world and a readiness to im-
pose their own values on women
from other cultures and tradi-
tions. And there were a number of
women who came from
Rabbi Kingsley To
Be Heard on
'Message To Israel'
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley.
spiritual leader of Temple Sinai of
North Dade. will be heard on the
radio program "The Message of
Israel" on Sunday morning, at
7:15 a.m. The program will be
aired on Fort Lauderdale's
WFTL, 1400 on the AM dial.
Rabbi Kingsley's radio sermon
which will be heard nationally is
titled "God's Cosmic Joke."
The Message of Israel emanates
from New York's Central
Synagogue and is produced by
David Wise.
HEBREW NATIONAL
WISHES YOU ALL
III
YOU DESERVE
IN THE NEW YEAR.
You'll find aH the goodness you deserve this year in wholesome
Hebrew National products. Like our delicious 100% pure
beef salami that contains absolutely no non-meat fillers, meat by-products
and artificial coloring or flavors. And, like all Hebrew National
delicatessen products, our salami is certified Kosher
under the supervision of the eminent Rav Shmuel T. Stem.
So the New Year, look for Hebrew National decatessen
products to make sure you're getting all the goodness you deserve.
DELICATESSEN PHOOUCTS
undemocratic societies as a mat-
ter of special privilege and ap-
peared least likely to want to fur-
ther a system of democratization.
But this is a part of human
nature whether one is dealing
with women or men, and I would
give the Forum high marks for the
opportunity it presented to
women across national, cultural,
racial and even political lines .
who really were interested in
dialogue and the opportunity to
share.
As for the Conference the of-
ficial governmental part of the
End Decade meeting was predic-
table and hued to the ideological
lineup to be found at the United
Nations 365 days a year.
Substance and legitimate issues of
development, equality and peace
as they impact on women,
children and men as well, were
once again left to drift because too
many women, let alone men, do
not wish it to be otherwise.
JTA Service
The Miami Chapter of th<
American Jewish Committei
will present its 1985 Human
Relations Civic Achievement
Award to Lila Greenspan
Heatter on Thursday October
10 at the Pavillion Hotel.

Bet Shira Congregation
7500 S.W. 120th Street 238-2601
MIAMI'S NEWEST CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
A Full Service Synagogue Serving South Oade
Early Childhood Program Religious School
Solomon Schechter Day School
Sisterhood Men's Club Youth Groups
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
Selichot Service, Saturday, September 7,11:30 p.m.
Open to the Entire Community
High Holy Day Services at King's Bay
Membership A Tickets Available Call 238-2601
OR. MICHAEL M ALZEL. Day School Haaomaatar
ARLEEN B SNYDER, RallgtoiM School Aomlnl.ir.io.
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Americans Face Terrorism
hi U.S., Overseas Finger
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish floridiari Page 7-B
TEL AVIV Americans
face terrorism within the
United States as well as
overseas, Justin J. Finger,
director of the Civil Rights
Division of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, warned here.
Addressing an Interna-
tional Conference on World
Terrorism at Tel Aviv
-University in Israel, Finger
said American terrorism
has taken "a surprising
turn."
According to the ADL official,
the techniques of right and left-
wing extremists in the U.S. have
crossed ideological boundaries so
that the types of crimes now com-
mitted by each are practically
indistinguishable.
"FOR THE first time in this
century," Finger said, "hard
liners of the right wing and the
hate movements the merchants
of neo-Nazi racism and religious
bigotry have attempted to
launch a violent political revolu-
tion against the American
government."
In the past, Finger went on,
"right wing extremists loudly ad-
vocated patriotism and law and
order. Now they label the U.S.
government 'ZOG Zionist Oc-
cupation Government' and pro-
claim that their actions constitute
the first stage of a revolution to
overthrow it."
He cited as being among their
recent actions bank robberies,
counterfeiting operations,
holdups of armored vehicles, a
synagogue bombing and at least
one assassination.
THE CONFERENCE, held
earlier this month, was organized
by the Jaffee Center for Strategic
Studies at the University. In addi-
tion to discussing terrorism in the
United States, other sessions
dealt with all aspects of the pro-
blem around the world.
The ADL official told the par-
ticipants that while terrorism in
the U.S. is "fortunately relatively
limited," revolutionaries of the
right and left have stockpiled
weapons and explosives.
The violent activities of both
groups have resulted in the death
of law enforcement officers in the
line of duty, both have fabricated
false identities, established safe
houses and recruited new
members in prisons.
"Both extremist wings would
destroy the American govern-
ment and the American Constitu-
tion," he declared, "and replace
them with a totalitarian system.
Both are elitists who claim a
monopoly on truth and the right
to impose their version of truth on
the majority. Both are sworn
enemies of the State of Israel
and of Jews who support it."
FINGER TOLD of a "Declara-
tion of War" issued by right wing
terrorists on November 25, 1984.
"We," they wrote, "from this
day forward declare that we no
longer consider the regime in
Washington to be a valid and
lawful representative of all
Aryans who refuse to submit to
the coercion and subtle tyranny
placed upon us by Tel Aviv and
their lackeys in Washington. Let
friend and foe alike be made
aware. This is war!"
The declaration, Finger said,
went on to threaten the hanging
of members of Congress and to
designate as targets for killing
federal agents, police officers,
journalists, judges, bankers and
businessmen considered unfriend-
ly to their cause.
HE NOTED the gunning down
of Alan Berg, a radio talk show
host in Denver, who had verbally
attacked Ku Klux Klansmen and
neo-Nazis on his program. Berg,
who was Jewish, was shot some 30
times with a 45 caliber automatic
weapon outside his home.
Among the right wing groups
named by Finger were The Order
(which has been implicated in the
Berg killing), the Posse Comitatus
and the Covenant, the Sword and
the Arm of the Lord.
"Paradoxically," Finger noted,
"this phenomenon of right wing
terrorism has arisen at a time of
decline in the strength and in-
fluence of American's traditional
extreme right hate movement."
Investors Needed
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Jackie Mason To
Officiate High Holy
Days Services
Comedian Jackie Mason returns
to the Rabbinical profession he
left behind close to 25 years ago.
to officiate the Cantorial for the
high Holy Days Services at the all
new Shelborne Hotel this Rosh
Hashana and Yom Kippur
holidays.
Coming from a very religious
family background, Mason shows
great religiosity during High Holy
season. His Cantorial services will
be accompanied by a choir. The
Shelborne Hotel is offering
several Holy Day packages and is
owned and operated by Rabbi
Alexander and Shirley Adams and
the Galbut family.
Lender's Bagels
Attain Certification
Lender's Bagels have been certified by the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations of America, announced Murray Lender,
chairman of the board of Lender's Bagels.
Lender's Bagels have been certified for many years as Kosher
Parve. Now, Lender's Bagels have been recognized and certified
by the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations.
The distinctive '(G) certification stamp will appear on packages
as early as September.
"This certification just reinforces our ongoing commitment to
baking products of the highest quality." said Murray Lender.
Lender's is the world's largest bagel bakery. Founded in 1927,
Lender's is the only brand of frozen bagels sold nationwide.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach
947-1435
SHOFARS IN THE HIGH HOLIDAYS
WITH SLICHOT SERVICES
Midnight Saturday, September 7th
Program 10:00 P.M.
"The Vocabulary of the Holy Days"
Conducted by Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern
and the
Magnificent Adath Yeshurun Choir
Refreshments The Community is Invited
Secretary of State Firestone to Speak
Universal National Bank Sets Dedication
Ceremonies Friday Morning, September 13
Secretary of State George
Firestone will be a featured
speaker Friday, Sept. 13, at the
10 a.m. dedication ceremonies of
the Universal National Bank
Building, under construction ad-
jacent to the current site of the
bank located at 17701 Biscayne
Boulevard.
George Feldenkreis, chair-
man of the board of both
Universal National Bank and
of its publicly-held holding
company, Universal Bancorp,
Inc., announced Firestone's
appearance.
George Feldenkreis
The ceremonies are free and
open to the public, but advance
reservations are requested.
They may be made by telephon-
ing the bank at 937-2265.
Refreshments will be served.
MM*.
The new, three-story Univer-
sal National Bank Building
will provide 10,800 square feet
of banking and office space,
according to vice chairman
Larry Perl. The building will
include facilities for drive-in
tellers, walk-up platforms and
complete elevator service.
Chorowski General Contrac-
tor, Inc., of North Miami has
been designated as general con-
tractor for the building, with
Jaime Salles as architect and
Rodolfo Buigas as banking
design consultant. Rodriguez-
Curry are the mechanical
engineers, Ruben Baran is the
structural engineer and Sebas-
tian Trujillo is interior designer.
Dade County Commissioner
Barry Schreiber, a member of
the Universal board of direc-
tors, and Robert L. Brunner,
president, are coordinating the
dedication ceremonies.
Firestone has served in the
Florida cabinet since his election
as Secretary of State in 1978. He
was reelected in 1982, and serv-
ed 12 years in both the Senate
and House of Representatives,
winning sue consecutive elec-
tions in 1966, 1967, 1968, 1970,
1972 and 1974.
He was selected as the
Outstanding Young Man in
America by the United States
Jaycees 20 years ago. He also
has been named "Conserva-
tionist of the Year" by the
Florida Audubon Society, "Man
of the Year," by the Florida
Consular Corps and has received
special recognition from the Na-
tional Alliance for Arts Educa-
tion and the Florida Art Educa-
tion Association.
Schreiber said top officials of
Dade County, North Miami
Beach, North Miami and North
Dade governmental, business
and civic groups will take part in
the Sept. 13 dedication
ceremonies.
Barry Schreiber
Other members of the
Universal National Bank board
of directors include Moises
Chorowski, certified public ac-
countant Gary Diz, Brunner
and Sam B. Topf, Southern
regional president of the
American Technion Society.
Allen Fuller, Isaac Lif and
Carolyn (Mrs. Leonard) Miller
are director-designates.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
' 'Love In The Afternoon "is the theme of the Sunflower Society an-
nual membership luncheon, Tuesday, at the PaviUion Hotel, Dr.
Connie Morrow, president of the society announced. Proceeds will
benefit Sunflower's new project, a Temporary Care Center for
handicapped individuals who live at home with families. Mrs.
Charles A. Mastronardi is Honorary Chairman and chairper-
sons are Bernice Martinez, Beverly Marlow and Nora Swan.
Models for the fur and lingerie show will include members, Bever-
ly Marlow, Maria Bloom, Connie Morrow, Lyda Fairbanks,
Joan Thompson, Donna Lee and DeAlva Stroud. Men are invited
to "Love In The Afternoon," says Sy Bloom, president of
Sunflower's Men's Committee. Sylvia Barash, executive vice
president, is in charge of arrangements and Carol Jacobs is
public relations chairperson.
g*2 11603 N.E. 2nd AVE. 895-3388 gSuV}
Tf BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS |>5l
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^open7am^7PT^^^ pm"
Not sine. David and Goliath has
something ao tiny mad* it so big.
it's Tansy's tiny little tea leaves. They've been making it big in
Jewish homes for years. Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is true (ex
tea leaves. That's why for rich, refreshing tea, Tetley bags
are packed with tiny little tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier!
TETLEY
For Big lea
Satisfaction
K Certified Kosher
TETLEY. TEA t.n, i, iMt<
Pioneer Women
"The Importance of the Jewish
High Holidays" will be the topic of
a speech by Leah Benson at the
Monday, 1 p.m. meeting of the
Sharon Chapter of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat at their first
meeting of the new organizational
year to take place in the 15th floor
auditorium of the Four Freedoms
House.
International singer Tony
Simone will head the entertain-
ment portion of the program.
Mrs. Benson, former national
vice president of Pioneer Women
and currently serving as vice
president of membership of the
South Florida Council of the
organization, has been a long-time
Zionist leader in New York and
Miami.
Charlotte Cohen is acting presi-
dent of Sharon.
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Inflation 'Behind Us'(?)
But C.O.L. Rose 27.5% in July
Friday .^September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Despite a record-breaking
27.5 percent jump in the
cost of living index in July,
Israel's monthly double-
digit inflation is "behind
us," and economic prospects
for the rest of 1985 are
_ "highly encouraging," Uri
"Oren, an Israeli consul and
government economic
spokesman in New York,
said last week.
Oren explained that inflation
soared in July because govern-
ment subsidies on basic foodstuffs
and public transport were cut or
eliminated on July 1 and Israel's
currency was devalued by an addi-
tional 26 percent.
THE IMMEDIATE result of
these economic austerity
measures, he said, was "vastly
higher prices for consumers."
This in turn will cause an erosion
of wages in real terms during the
next three months of some 25* per-
cent, over and above a wage ero-
sion of some 15 percent in the past
year, Oren noted.
This substantial reduction of
purchasing power, in addition to
the temporary freeze on prices, is
expected to lead to a significant
drop in the inflation rate, Oren
added.
Among the positive indicators
that have already emerged as a
result of the new economic
measures instituted by the
government, the Israeli officials
said, is a halt in the decline in
Israel's foreign currency
reserves. During the month of Ju-
ly these reserves, which had been
declining substantially for the last
year, actually increased by $3
million, he reported.
DURING July, too, for the first
time this year, not only did the
government not print any new
money, but in fact absorbed from
the public some $170 million, he
reported.
"Perhaps the moat important
single step to break the cycle of in-
flation has been the government's
action to eliminate the automatic
'linkage' between prices and
wages, under which every mon-
thly rise in the cost of living was
compensated by a nearly-
matching increase in payments to
employees," Oren said.
The compensation for the 27.5
percent inflation rate during July
was a one-time payment of 12 per-
cent, instead of the automatic 22
percent wage hike workers would
otherwise have received under the
old formula, Oren said.
In other areas of Israel's
economy, Oren reported, "recent
developments are highly en-
couraging." He said Israeli ex-
ports were in a rising trend, runn-
ing ahead of last year's figures by
7.6 percent in the first six months
of 1985.
JULY'S EXPORT figures were
24 percent higher than a year ago,
he said, with most of the increase
coming in high-technology pro-
ducts as well as consumer goods
such as processed foods, jewelry,
plastics and textiles. Trade with
the United States was "leading
the way," Oren disclosed. He said
Israeli exports to the U.S. rose by
25 percent in the first half of 1985.
While exports were rising, im-
ports continued to decline, falling
by 7.5 percent during the first six
months of 1985, Oren said. From
January through July, Israel's
balance-of-trade deficit was reduc-
ed from $1,753 billion in 1984 to
$1,148 billion this year, an im-
provement of 35 percent. Last
year's trade deficit was 29 percent
less than 1983.
Youth Center Hostel
NEW YORK (JTA) Dr.
Alfred Gottschalk, president of
the Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, reported
that the World Union for Pro-
gressive Judaism (WUPJ) is
building a youth center hostel in
Jerusalem, as well as a reception
and administration center.
"Now we can afford to be choosy"
Or why
Paul
Feldstein
kosher
butchers
switched to
Hebrew
National
poultry
We're not just a kosher meat market. We're an institution.
In fact, we've been serving New York's West Side Jewish
community for over fifty years. So when Hebrew National
came out with its own poultry, of course we switched.
Hebrew National birds are better, pure and simple. They're
plumper. They have natural golden color and greater moist-
ness. And they come with larger breasts, which means more
white meat for the family.
Fact is, since our father opened this shop in 1934, our
customers have only known one brand, 'Paul Feldstein.' They
count on us to pick the best cuts of meat and the top birds.
And with a reputation like this to live up to, nothing less than
Hebrew National will do.
When you shop at Paul Feldstein, you
know you're getting a Hebrew National
bird. If you shop somewhere else,
demand it by name.
Concord Plaza
Adult Only Area
Colonial Plaza
Family Area
1 & 2 bedroom, garden apts., A/C, pool, shop-
ping, temples, school, cable TV. Rental.
941N.E.169St
North Miami Beach
Rental Agent Nancy
947-4192
ft
jBrtttftij pallet ^rademy
1872 N.E. Miami Drive, N. Miami Beach
944-7064 895-3622
SEMESTER COMMENCES SEPT. 13
Registrations:
by Appointment
Fully Qualified Tuition in
Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Acrobatics,
Hawaiian, Drama, Childrens
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Junior & Senior performing groups.
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%lkman
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like fresh milk.
But costs less.
SAVE 50<
when you buy on* package of 12 at. size or larger of
Milkman Instant Low Fat Dry Milk Product.
TO THE DEALER: Fomilior Foods. Inc.. will reimburse vo.' 'or face valur o* *his coupon
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J i *-*^pwi"*/*;i v, i*ou
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
IDFAction
Search Operations in Lebanon
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The Israel Defense Force
carried out search opera-
tions last week in three
Lebanese villages at the
edge of the security zone,
according to reports from
Tyre. The IDF troops, in
tanks and armored person-
nel carriers, rounded up
villagers in an area a few
miles from a suicide-car
bombing in a search for ter-
rorists. The bombing was
the seventh such attack on
Israeli troops or the Israeli-
backed South Lebanon Ar-
my since June.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
told Israel Radio that the IDF ac-
tivities in south Lebanon were
designed to impress on members
of the Shiite Amal living in the
area that Israel would not allow
them to act against Israel in the
security zone.
HE SAID: "We wanted to
make it clear, by signalling to the
Amal forces, that we are not go-
ing to tolerate any extension of
the struggle over the security
zone into Israel. And this was the
purpose for the siege on the
village of Kabrikha, which is the
nearest village to the area from
where Katyushas were fired
against targets in Israel" the
previous weekend.
"If there will be a decision
which I hope will not happen we
have warned them that if they do
not keep the peace, nobody in
south Lebanon will enjoy peace."
Rabin said that the IDF had
enclosed the village of Kabrikha
and carried out searches there
because the Katyusha rockets
which fell in the Galilee panhandle
area last week had been fired
from near that village.
The IDF spokesman announced
that the army had operated in
Trial Against Nazi Adjourns After
New Accusations Are Raised
BONN (JTA) A former Nazi, who went on trial in
April, charged with deporting French Jews to Auschwitz,
was adjourned indefinitely today after new accusations
were raised against him in court.
COUNT MODEST KORFF, a former Nazi SS captain,
was charged with the deportation of 185 French Jews to
the Auschwitz concentration camp between June, 1942,
and October, 1942, while he was stationed in Eastern
France at Chalons-Sur-Marne.
New allegations that Korff also aided in the deporta-
tion of 36 Jews in March, 1943 were submitted by French
Nazi-hunter Serge Klarsfeld, a Jewish lawyer and co-
plaintiff in the case, prompting in defense to adjourn the
trial on the ground that it was unprepared for the latest ac-
cusations. There has been no scheduled date for the
resumption of the trial.
Kabrikha village as well as in the
villages of Majdel Silk and Shakra
because they had been the areas
from which the Katyushas had
been fired.
MILITARY SOURCES said
that quantities of arms and ex-
plosives had been found in the
villages. They included Katyushas
and rocket launchers, as well as
roadside charges ready to be laid.
The house in which the ex-
plosives were found was
destroyed, and several residents
were detained. They will
presumably be handed over to the
SLA.
Meanwhile, reports from Sidon
said that a large car-bomb had ex-
ploded near a South Lebanon Ar-
my (SLA) post near Jezzine in
south Lebanon, apparently killing
the terrorist driver and wounding
at least two SLA soldiers.
It was believed that some 300
kilograms of explosives had been
packed into the vehicle, and the
sound of the explosion was heard
in Sidon some 14 kilometers away.
According to reports from Beirut,
about 15 SLA men and Lebanese
civilians had been injured in the
blast.
A Beirut televison broadcast
reported that the terrorist had
been a member of the "Assad
Brigade," said to be part of the
Lebanese branch of the Syrian
Baath Party.
Barenboim Gets Nod
PARIS (JTA) Israeli-born
conductor Daniel Barenboim has
been chosen to head the produc-
tion of five of Richard Wagner's
operas at the 1988 Bayreuth
Festival. The 42-year-old Baren-
boim, who heads the Paris Sym-
phonic Orchestra, was selected
from dozens of top
internationally-renowned
conductors.
OUR ISN'T
A FLASH IN
THE PAN.
SORRY,
BUMBLE
StarKist
FANCY ALACO'
SOLID WHITE TUN*
Star-Kist
FANCY \I.BAlOKJ_
sOLID WHITE TUNA
National Food
FIG AND HONEY SPREAD FOR CHALLAH
From the land of milk, honey and figs comes a simple recipe that
will win a place in the tradition of holidays (and even the usual weeklv
Sabbath) for sliced challah or toasted bagels. It is Fig and Honey
Spread, a modern Israeli recipe. Like a jam, but more flavorful with its
sweet red wine, chopped oranges and cinnamon to flavor the chewy
dried figs, this spread will also find its way as a cake or torte filling in
many a fine home baker's "secret" recipe, one can be sure.
The fig-honey spread is simple to prepare. Those who own a food
processor will want to use it for chopping both the oranges and the
dried figs. Both fruits can also be ground in a traditional food chopper
This spread will keep weeks in the refrigerator but will probably be used
long before in well appreciated snacks by family members. Good to
know that it is nutritious, with the dried figs supplying many vitaminf *1
such as Vitamin B and minerals plus a good amount of fiber, so often
lacking in modern diets. Dried figs also are a good source of calcium and
the oranges, of course, offer Vitamin C.
FIG AND HONEY SPREAD FOR CHALLAH
2 cups finely chopped dried figs
2 navel oranges, finely chopped or ground
1 cup sweet red wine
1 cup honey
2 cinnamon sticks
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Simmer, stirring occasional-
ly until mixture is thick and jam-like. Cool and store in refrigerator until-
needed. Spread on sliced challah, toasted bagels. Makes about 1 quart,
depending on size of oranges.
MANISCHEWITZ ROSH HASHANAH RECIPES
Made exclusively with choice, Kosher, freshwater fish from clear,
cold lakes and streams in Canada and Western United States,
Manischewitz Fishlets (R) will give your holiday meals a taste of tradi-
tion with the following refreshing salad recipes:
HEARTY SUPPER SALAD
12 oz. jar Manischewitz Fishlets, drained
2 Tbsps. French dressing
2 Tbsps. mayonnaise
1 cup sliced celery
2 hard-cooked eggs, diced
y* cup blanched, slivered almonds
Mix the mayonnaise and French dressing. Combine all ingredients
and toss lightly. Chill and serve on crisp lettuce. Serves 4.
SNAPPY FISH SALAD
24 oz. jar Manischewitz Fishlets, drained
1 cup sliced celery
Vi cup chopped kosher dill pickle
2 large tomatoes, diced
V4 cup mayonnaise
A cup buttermilk
2 Tbsps. cider vinegar
1 Tbsp. sugar
Vt Tsp. salt
V* Tsp. pepper
Combine Fishlets with celery, pickle and tomato. Mix mayonnaise,
buttermilk, vinegar, sugar and pepper. Pour over fish mixture and toss
lightly. Serve on crisp lettuce. Serves 4 to 6.
MARINER'S COLE SLAW
24 oz. jar Manischewitz Fishlets, drained
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1/3 cup sour cream
A Tsp. salt
Pinch pepper
3 cups shredded cabbage
lU cup chopped green pepper
"A cup finely minced onion
1 large carrot, grated
Combine mayonnaise, sour cream, salt and pepper. Toss all ingre-
dients together. Serves 4 to 6.
Manischewitz Gefilte Fish, cut into bite-size pieces may be
substituted for Manischewitz Fishlets.
Temple Beth Sholom Announces
School Of Fine Arts Schedule
Star-Kist' is the only major national brand of tuna that has consistently
maintained its certification during the past 30 years.
So whether you prefer the good taste of our delicious solid white tuna
packed in oil or pure spring water, you can have complete confidence in
Star-Kist. After all, no one's been (g) Kosher longer. Sorry, Bumble Bee"
Bumble B*e .s req.slf -d trade mar o' Casl'e J"d CooKe. Ire
I 1985Star-Km Foods. Inc
H>
The Temple Beth Sholom
School of Fine Arts will begin its
16th term Monday, with new and
expanded arts offerings for
children.
"We are adding some new and
exciting classes with our new
teacher-in-residence, Donna Le
Vine," said Judy Drucker,
cultural arts director of the
school. Le Vine will instruct
children in arts and crafts (for
tots), and painting. The fall
trimester includes classes in
ceramics and pottery by Henry
S: .all, and creative drama by Jay
W. Jensen.
Founded in 1969 under the
ciple that every child should
posed to the arts, in addition
academics, Drucker notes,
our goal that the school continue
to serve as a symbol of the ever-
increasing appreciation and par-
ticipation in the arts in Greater
Miami."
According to Dr. Leon
Weissberg, director of education
and youth, pre-registration is
recommended and available im-
mediately in the Cultural Arts Of
fice at the temple. Classes are
open to the public. The school is
located on the premises of Temple
Beth Sholom.


_.!_.. a__ losK/Tho Towioh FlnHHian Pace 17-B .
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
everages Offer Holiday Suggestions
"L'Shona Tova Tikatevu"
"May You Be Inscribed For a Happy Year"
f .JSSSSlwEZ ye"with ^is special selection of good lood ideas
ST 2r w,^fl if6?' Th,e8e Rsh Hash0^ recipes will help start
andSdT accompaniments to share among family
Salmon Mousse Supreme adds a festive flair to your holiday feast.
Made with Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, this luscious appetizer can
be spread on a variety of fresh vegetables and breads; and it tastes as
good as it looks.
Combining popular fruits, such as apple and pineapple, with colorful
vegetables like beets and green peppers, Beet Salad Deluxe provides a
crunchy side dish for the new year. Kraft real mayonnaise makes this
salad creamy and moist.
For dessert serve Carrot Raisin Bars. Tasty treats filled with
raisins, nuts and shredded carrot, these bars are iced with a rich cream
cheese frosting befitting of a special occasion.
So, "eat of the fat and drink of the sweet" and enjoy a happy
healthy and prosperous new year with these holiday recipes from Kraft!
In addition to these recipes, the Kraft Kitchens have compiled 40 of
the most popular Jewish holiday recipes into a 16-page booklet entitled
"Jewish Holiday Recipes from the Kraft Kitchens." From Passover to
Hanukkah, from appetizers to desserts, this recipe collection offers
traditional as well as modern variations on dishes perfect for holiday
meals.
For your free copy, send name and address to: Jewish Holiday
Recipes from the Kraft Kitchens, P.O. Box 805, South Holland IL
60473.
SALMON MOUSSE SUPREME
1 envelope unflavored gelatin
'/z cup cold water
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, softened
1 cup Kraft real mayonnaise
1 8-oz. can tomato sauce
1 15Mb oz. can salmon, drained, flaked
xk cup finely chopped celery
'/ cup finely chopped green pepper
1 Tbsp. finely chopped onion
Cucumber slices
Soften gelatin in water; stir over low heat until dissolved. Combine
cream cheese, mayonnaise and tomato sauce, mixing until well blended.
Gradually add gelatin, mixing until blended. Fold in salmon, celery,
green peppers and onions. Pour into lightly oiled 5-cup mold; chill until
firm. Unmold onto serving plate; surround with cucumbers.
Four to six servings.
FOOD PROCESSOR: Soften gelatin in water; stir over low heat until d-
issolved. Place cream cheese, mayonnaise and tomato sauce in food pro-
cessor work bowl; process with steel blade until smooth. Gradually add
gelatin to cream cheese mixture; process until blended. Add salmon and
vegetables to work bowl; process until blended. Continue as directed.
CARROT RAISIN BARS
1 cup Parkay margarine
1 cup packed brown sugar
3eggs
1 Tsp. vanilla
1 Mb cups flour
Mb Tsp. cinnamon
Vi Tsp. baking soda
V Tsp. ground nutmeg
2 cups shredded carrots
Mb cup raisins
Vt cup chopped nuts
Cream Cheese Frosting
Beat margarine and sugar until light and fluffy. Blend in eggs and
vanilla. Add combined dry ingredients; mix well. Stir in carrots, raisins
and nuts. Spread into greased 15xl0xl-inch jelly roll pan. Bake at 375
degrees, 25 minutes or until golden brown. Cool. Frost with:
Cream Cheese Frosting
1 3-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, softened
Ml cup Parkay margarine
1 Tsp. vanilla
3 cups sifted powdered sugar
Combine cream cheese, margarine and vanilla, mixing until well
Mended. Gradually add sugar, mixing well after each addition.
Aproximately 5 dozen.
RICOTTA STUFFED MUSHROOMS will make a delightful
-'idedish to any fish entree for your holiday festivities prepared for
you by Sorrento.
RICOTTA STUFFED MUSHROOMS
* to 12 large mushrooms
! slice bread
' Tbsp. milk
- cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp. chopped parsley
- eggs, lightly beaten
Wi C. Sorrento Whole Milk Ricotta
^alt and pepper to taste
Olive oil
Grated parmesan or romano cheese
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove stems from mushrooms and
chop fine. Soak bread in milk and squeeze dry. Mix bread, chopped
stems, eggs, garlic, parsley, salt and pepper with ricotta. Fill mushroom
caps with the mixture. Place in buttered baking dish. Drizzle olive ox\
over tops and sprinkle with grated cheese. Bake, uncovered, about 20
minutes.
SUNSWEET PRUNES wants
to help you bring in the New Year
with a delicious Spiced Dark
Prune Cake. This hearty cake is
moist and spicy and will delight
family and friends.
SPICED DARK
PRUNE CAKE
1V cups Sunsweet Pitted Prunes
1 cup water
1 Tsp. whole allspice
Mi Tsp. whole cloves
1 stick cinnamon
2Vi cups sifted all-purpose flour
1Mb Tsps. baking powder
% Tsp. salt
2/3 cup shortening
Vh cups granulated sugar
3 large eggs, beaten
Mb cup liquid from prunes
1 Tbsp. grated orange peel
Orange Syrup
Combine prunes, water and
spices in small saucepan; heat to
boiling. Cover and simmer 15
minutes. Cool. Drain and remove
spices, reserving liquid. Chop
prunes; set aside. Resift flour with
baking powder and salt. Cream
shortening and sugar together
well. Beat in eggs. Add flour mix-
ture alternately with M cup liquid
drained from prunes. (If
necessary, add water to make Mb
cup.) Stir in orange peel and
prunes. Turn into greased and
floured 9-inch tube pan (6-cup
capacity). Bake below oven center
at 325 F. degree for about 1 hour
and 50 minutes, until cake tests
done. Let stand 10 minutes. Turn
cake out onto serving plate; prick
with slender skewer. Slowly spoon
Orange Syrup over cake, allowing
syrup to absorb before adding
more. Cool thoroughly before cut-
ting. Makes one 9-inch cake.
Orange Syrup: Combine 1/3 cup
each orange juice and granulated
sugar, stirring until sugar
dissolves.
RAISIN FLAKE COOKIES
1 cup unsifted all-purpose flour
1Mb Tsps. baking powder
Mb Tsp. salt
'k cup butter or margarine
l cup sugar
1 egg, well beaten
2 Tbsps. milk
1 Tsp. vanilla
2 cups Post (R) Raisin Bran
Mix flour with baking powder
and salt. Cream butter. Gradually
beat in sugar and continue beating
until light and fluffy. Add egg;
beat well. Add flour mixture alter-
nately with miik, beating after
each addition until smooth. Add
vanilla and cereal; mix well. Drop
from teaspoon onto greased bak
ing sheets. Bake at 375 degrees
for 10 to 12 minutes, or until light-
ly browned. Makes about 4 dozen.
Post (R) Raisin Bran thinks
there is more you can do with
cereal than add milk, so they
created these delirious treats to
add something special to your
ho'iday festivities. Enjoy!
A delicious new recipe prepared especially for you from Maxim.
SOLE GOUJONNETTES
6 servings
4 to 6 large sole fillets
% cup milk
celery salt
white pepper
paprika
% to 1 up flour
2 large eggs
2 Tbsps. dry white wine
1 to Mb cups fresh white breadcrumbs, lightly toasted
Oil for frying
Chopped parsley (garnish)
Horseradish Aioli Sauce*
Cut fillets into lengthwise strips 4 to 6 inches long by 1M to 1 Mun-
ches wide. Place in medium baking dish and cover with milk. Allow to
stand 30 minutes. Drain and sprinkle lightly with seasonings. Dip into
flour, shaking off excess. Beat eggs and wine together. Dip fillets into
egg mixture and then into breadcrumbs, patting crumbs firmly onto
each piece. Place on large platter or cookie sheet so that pieces do not
touch. Chill at least Mb hour.
Place Mb inch oil in skillet (preferably electric) and heat to 375
degree. Fry fillets until medium brown, about 1 minute per side. Drain
on absorbent paper. Garnish with parsley and serve with Horseradish
Aioli Sauce.
Whole sole fillets may be prepared in the same manner.
'Horseradish Aioli Sauce
Makes about 1 cup
PwAi0H' arlic;f|avored sauce resembling mayonnaise, is from the
Provence region of France. Excellent with cold poached fish.
2 egg yolks
1 Tbsp. white wine vinegar
1 Tsp. sugar
Mb Tsp. salt
Mi Tsp. white pepper
2/3 cup peanut oil
1/3 cup olive oil
3 Tbsps. prepared white grated horseradish, or to taste
a garlic cloves, minced, or to taste
In food processor or mixer bowl place yolks, vinegar, sugar, salt and
pepper. Mix lightly. Combine oils and add drop by drop to yolk mixture
As sauce thickens, oil can be added in a very toin trickle. (Avoid adding
d w^'tn'J.Tt^enu 2Pand2? Wil1 notblend>Addhorseradish
and garlic to taste. Chill before serving.
Can be prepared 1 week ahead.
FRUIT AND CEREAL BARS
1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
Mb cup Log Cabin (R) Syrup or light corn syrup
M cup butter or margarine
5 cups Post (R) Raisin Bran
Mi cup Baker's (R) Angel Flake (R) Coconut
Mb cup chopped walnuts
Mi cup flour
1 cup chopped pitted dates or dried apricots
1 egg. well beaten
Combine sugar, syrup and butter in saucepan; heat and stir until
sugar is dissolved. Combine cereal, cocounut and nuts in a bowl. Add
flour to dates and mix to coat; add to cereal mixture. Pour syrup over
cereal mixture; then stir in egg and mix well to coat evenly. Spread in
greased 13x9-mch pan, pressing firmly. Bake at 400 degrees for 15 to
20 minutes, until golden brown. Cool 10 minutes; then cut into bars
Makes 2 dozen cookies.
Add some fun to your coffee! A delicious treat from Maxwell House,
Yuban and Sanka.
MIX-YOUR-OWN COFFEE
Hot freshly brewed or prepared Maxwell House, Yuban or Sanka brand
97 percent caffein free coffee
Select-a-" flavor-mate (s)"*
Pour hot coffee into cups. Add one of the suggested flavor-mates to
taste. Stir and serve with cream or milk and sugar, if desired.
* Suggested "flavor-mates"
Baker's semi-sweet chocolate flavored chips
Log Cabin syrup or honey
Tang instant breakfast drink
Almond, rum or vanilla extract
Butterscotch or chocolate sundae sauce
Brown sugar or cinnamon-sugar
Ground cinnamon or nutmeg or stick cinnamon
Grated orange or lemon rind
Thin orange or lemon slices
Apple juice
Chopped crystallized ginger
Crushed peppermint candy
Marshmallows
Red cinnamon candies
Malted milk powder
Mint jelly


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1986
Sisterhood of the Sephardlc Jewish Center of North Miami Beach
will hold a general meeting on Wednesday at the synagogue at 8 p.m.
The program will feature a fashion show of hats.
More than 600 people are expected to attend the grand opening of
Miami Beach's newly renovated 21st Street Recreation Center on
Saturday, Sept. 7.
The historic building, constructed in 1916, recently underwent a
$872,000 rejuvenation which restored It to its former Art Deco gran-
duer. Originally, the structure served as the clubhouse for the city's
first golf course.
Dancers, singers, musicians, actors, artists and writers If a high
school senior this year, are eligible to register for the 1965*6 Arts
Recognition and Talent Search (ARTS) of the National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts. ARTS offers all talented American youth
cash awards, scholarships and the opportunity to be named a U.S.
Presidential Scholar In the Arts.
Registration for ARTS '86 closes on Oct. 1. Young artists who
register for ARTS are also eligible for $3 million In scholarships and
Intemshlpj designated by colleges, universities and professional
arts Institutions.
ARTS registration forms are available by writing or calling ARTS,
office In Miami.
Member* of Variety, a show business organization whose mission
is helping needy children, were on hand at the Hope Center for Men-
tally Disable Citizens to watch their Chief Barker, Irving J. Gottlieb, a
Coral Gables CPA, present the $20,000 "Sunshine Coach" and the
$5,000 check to Dr. Judy Holland, executive director of the Hope
Center.
Voters Incorporated will have a town hall meeting on Tuesday Sept.
10 at 1 p.m. in the auditorium of the American Savings at 1200 Lin-
coln Road. Harry Levi, president will moderate the public meeting.
Five Dade and Broward post offices are accepting applications for
clerk/stenographer positions now through Friday, Sept. 20.
Dr. Jack H. Mlshkln, a diplomats of the American Board of
Periodontology and practicing surgeon In Dade County for the past
27 years, has announced that Alan H. Bresalier, DDS, will Join his
periodontal practice at the Professional Building at 1190 Northeast
163rd Street, North Miami Beach.
Barbara Gillman Galleries will present Gallery Artists from Sept. 6
until Oct. 1. The opening reception to meet the artist Joseph Davoli
will be on Friday from 7 to 10 p.m.
Aventura Jewish Center Singles will have their Rosh Hashana ser-
vices at Aventura Jewish Center on Monday, Sept. 16 at 8:15 p.m. ac-
cording to President Sallie Satin.
The initial meeting of the Dinner-Dance Committee to plan for the
Annual Distinguished Achievement Award Dinner-Dance of the
Florida Friends of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine is schedul-
ed for Nov. 17.
George Kronengold Travel Service is moving to 455 Arthur Godfrey
Road, Miami Beach, on Aug. 30.
Miami Beach's largest senior citizens organization, the Miami
Beach Retirees, will hold its Initial meeting of the 1985-86 year
Wednesday, In the civic auditorium of American Savings and Loan
Association, 1200 Lincoln Road. The 1 p.m. meeting is open to
members snd those wishing to join the organization, according to
Harry Mildner, president of the Retirees.
SPECIALIZED CARE'
FORTHEHOMEBOUND
24 hr. nursing service since 1972
Serving Ail Dade & Broward Counties
R.N.'s, L.P.N.s, Nurses Aides, Homemakers
Specialize in Live-Ins & Post Hospital Care
Insurance Assignments
ALL DADE HOME CARE
| Miami 576-0383 Hwd. 963-1417 Ft. Laud. 566-6503
CARMAN GLASS AND MIRRORS MIRRORS
Service price Experience
756-1 107 M.E. 1 17tf 812 i St. Miami
Jamie Barkin, MD, has been
named Chief of the Division of
Gastroenterology at Mount
Sinai Medical Center of
Greater Miami. Dr. Barkin,
associate professor of medicine
at the University of Miami,
was formerly head of the GI
station attheVA Hospital.
Gordon Roofing
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 N.W.21st Street
Phone: 325*287
Hove your roof repaired now;
you will ave on a new roof later
'Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
"Empire Koeher Foods Announces 'Gift Pack Sale' Fund
Raising Opportunity For Noa-rVofit Organizations
Empire Kosher Foods, the world's largest producer of Kosher
poultry and food products, has just announced a new program
where non-profit groups and organizations can use Empine pro-
ducts in a unique and profitable fund raising program ... the Em-
pire Kosher Gift Pack Sale.
Organizations, such as those associated with synagogues,
schools, community centers, etc., can raise $200, $600, or more,
by selling the Empire Gift Packs.
Each Gift Pack contains a grand assortment of delicious Em-
pire Kosher chicken, turkey and beef products, including chicken
franks, smoked chicken drum sticks, smoked turkey thigh, smok-
ed boneless turkey breast, smoked turkey pastrami, beef franks
and midget beef salami. Each Gift Pack also contains valuable
coupons good for savings on other selected Empire products.
In all, each Gift Pack contains over 5Vt pounds of the finest
Kosher delicacies packaged in an attractive gift box that would be
perfect to give as a gift or as a special taste treat for individuals to
buy for themselves and their families.
Full information about the Empire Gift Pack Sale Program and
how organizations can become involved is available by contacting
Empire Kosher Foods P.O. Box 165, Mifflintown, PA 17059 or by
calling the Empire Consumer Line at 1-800-EMPIRE-4.
K IS
TO CREATE ITS FRESHEST COFFEE EVER,
MAXWELL HOUSE HAD TO BEAT
ITS SINGLE MOST RUTHLESS COMPETITOR.
Time is the enemy of all things fresh.
And, of course, ground coffee is no
exception.
Recognizing that freshness is fleeting.
Maxwell House set out to cut down the
time between grinding and packing. In '
doing so, they have successfully created
their freshest coffee ever.
THE STORY SO FAR.
After a coffee bean is
roasted and ground, it
reaches its very peak of
freshness. That's why. after
grinding, it is essential to seal
coffee into a can as quickly as possible.
But. until now. treshly ground
coffee had to wait before it could be
vacuum packed. And as it waited,
time took its toll on precious freshness
and aroma.
MAXWELL HOUSE
BROKE THE TIME BARRIER.
Now Maxwell House has found an
exclusive new way to pack coffee
. immediately after grinding.
It's called the Fresh Lock"
| packet. It allows Maxwell
House to pack coffee sooner
than ever before. Literally within
minutes of grinding. So now.
Maxwell House can seal into each
can grinder freshness.
GRAND OPENING.
It begins with a "whoosh!"'
the moment you open the
can. A sound that says more
eloquently than words that
Maxwell House is fresh.
And the aroma? Well, it
speaks for itself.
Try the freshest ever Maxwell
House* Coffee. Now more than
ever, it's Good to the last drop:
IT COULDN'T BE ANYTHING BUT MAXWELL HOUSE."
c ilriwmihriil^^a..


Page 17-B

kwish Catacombs
Italy Takes Custody of Historic Site
Friday. September 6, 1985/The Jewish Flqridian
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
By LISA BILLIG
)ME (JTA) The
jsh catacombs of Italy
srground burial net-
cs going back to the
| century BCE and span-
the next five are to
the custody of the
and become the
msibility of Italian
iment authorities, a
Italy's Jews view as
a historic opportunity
cause for concern.
ere are about a dozen major
catacombs known to have
in Italy. Archaeological
itions dating back to the
f s testify to their existence in
Sicily, Sardinia and the
lern region of Apulia
pally Venosa and Bari.
IOLARS estimate that in
Irial Rome, underground
jiiiths were lined with up to
DO tombs. The tombs provide
less information on the daily
I of Jews in the earliest Euro-
1 diaspora.
fee Italy's reunification in
| and more formally since the
Concordat between the
government and the Holy
[some Jewish and Christian
milis in Italy have been
the control of the Vatican's
fical Commission for Sacred
February, 1984, the
fctaries of the State of Italy
if the Vatican signed a revis-
prsion of the Concordat under
the Holy See agrees to
juisii its management of all
l-Christian catacombs."
lOlU.H ITALY'S 35,000
had long and anxiously
this move, they now fear
lack of funds and an-
alogical know-how might well
ie the restoration, further
ation, and above all conser-
of the catacombs thus
Tigering the survival of the
iirect source of information
Available on early Jewish life
dy.
epigraphs in the catacombs
aut 75 percent in Greek, most
rest in Latin and a small
er in Hebrew reveal the
range of arts, trades, and
sions of early Italian Jews:
i artists, actors and scribes to
\ers, bankers, physicians,
tiant s and sailors as well as
family, social, and religious
[unity structures.
wall frescos of the Roman
ambs depict menorahs and
subjects plus peacocks,
\, fish and serpents, winged
lies, and nude athletes. This
les interesting evidence that
enized Jews lived according to
rigorous interpretation of
f commandments to refrain
making graven images, ac-
to Tulia Zevi, president of
Jnion of Italian Jewish Com-
pties (UUC).
1981 archaeological excava-
of the catacombs of Venosa
led the interesting fact that
and Christian sections
i located in "such proximity to
(another" as to suggest "a
level of interaction in these
nunities" up to the Ninth
ury, according to Prof. Eric
ers of Duke University, who
.cted the Italian-American
elogical team with Prof.
ire Colafemmina of Bari
reraity.
st of the Italian Jewish
?.combs were thoroughly
.dered in the long centuries
re the Vatican authorities
over their supervision, and
treasures still surface in
private auctions. These thefts
were halted with the Vatican take-
over.
The methodology of conserva-
tion employed by Vatican
authorities differed for Christian
and Jewish catacombs, however.
The artifacts and inscribed tomb-
stones of Rome's Christian
catacombs were largely kept in
place and the catacombs were
opened to guided tours for visitors
from all over the world.
The archaeological artifacts
found in the Jewish catacombs,
however, were mostly removed
and carefully stored in special
areas of Vatican museums and
later, Italian state museums, as
well. Their safety there is
guaranteed, but due to the wealth
of the museums' stocks and other
priorities, they can presently be
seen only upon special request
from museum directors. A smaller
quantity of tombstones and ar-
tifacts is dispersed in various city
museums in Rome.
OF THE sue known Jewish
catacombs in Rome, only two
were saved from burial beneath
modern buildings. One of these,
the Villa Randanini, is the only
one in all of Italy currently open to
the public. The other Roman
catacomb, the Villa Torlonia, and
its counterpart in Venosa could
conceivably be reopened if proper
"first-aid" treatment were
rendered.
The entrance to the Villa
Torlonia catacomb was sealed off
in 1978 by agreement between the
Pontifical Commission for Sacred
Archaeology, and the Union of
Italian Jewish Communities. This
was done to "protect the
catacombs from vandalism" when
the ground they occupied part
of an estate belonging- to the
Mussolini family was turned in-
to a public park. Today, unfor-
tunately, trucks and other
vehicle occasionally pass over the
unmaiked earth covering the
entrance.
The Venosa catacombs cover a
vast and largely still unexplored
underground area, much of which
was ravaged and despoiled right
up to and into the 20th century.
Excavations were carried out
there in May 1981 by the Italian
American team, with support
from the UUC and the World
Jewish Congress.
AFTER THE earthquake that
same year, the Italian govern-
ment allocated funds for reinforc-
ing the external and internal
structures of the catacombs under
the supervision of Prof.
Mariarosaria Salvatore,
Superintendent of Fine Arts at
Venosa.
Colafemmina, a Catholic priest
fluent in Hebrew who co-directed
the Venosa excavations and has
been largely responsible for main-
taining high public interest in con-
serving the Jewish catacombs,
told the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy of his "dream" of another team
excavation at Venosa. This one,
he said, could also include experts
from Tel Aviv University, with
whom he discussed the idea on the
most recent of his many trips to
Israel.
Zevi would also like to see ex-
ploration of catacombs in addition
to those in Rome and Venosa in-
cluding some whose entrances
have been "lost" under construc-
tion sites but which, she said, still
exist underground. She also envi-
sions a complete inventory of the
contents of the catacombs and the
establishment of a Jewish Ar-
chaeological Museum in Rome to
preserve and display at least part
of the many objects which have
been or will be discovered there.
"But if we are to do any serious
work on the catacombs, we need
to raise several million dollars,"
Zevi told the JTA.
THE ITALIAN government,
though willing to help, can make
only a partial contribution to this
effort, she said, because "with the
best of good will, it already has
more of this country's vast ar-
chaeological, artistic and
historical patrimony to conserve
than it can afford to. And Italy's
small Jewish community has
neither the expertise nor the
funds" to do it alone.
"We Jews always speak of the
centrality to our faith of historical
memory," wrote Zevi in an "Open
Letter on the Catacombs," appeal
to world Jewry for funding. "Now
we have a unique opportunity to
act on our convictions for the sake
of saving a precious testimony
that would, if it were lost, be ab-
solutely irreplaceable."
SWIMMING POOL
CLEANING
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GOOD RECIPES START
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riBe
Fleischmanns
1-sJOOlcomo* A
''WV
:-!"!

1 C*?jk
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t
*'<*'
It's easy to eat
healthful, low
cholesterol food when
delicious Fleischmanns Margarine
is part of the recipe. Fleischmanns is
made from 100% corn oil, has 0% cholesterol
and is low in saturated fat. So try some soon. There's
never been a better time for the great taste of Fleischmanns.
Fleischmann's gives every meal a holiday flavor.
C IMS NalMoo Brand*, mc
SWEET & SOUR STRUDEL
Wcuppkrs2tbp 'OP SSSSL
FlfltoH*AWS4Marganne 2 cups all purpose flour
6 cups shredded cabbage iZSt&S&na
vi cup choppad omoo 2

1 medium apple thHMy sliced Choiesleroi-tree 99%
vi cup dart seedless raisms M Egg Product
2 losp Oder vinegar
7 Ibsp nrmly pacfceO
l^nTbrown sugar
In medwm sloHet over medium heat melt 2 Ibsp FIEISCHMANNS Mar-
garine Add cabbage jnd onion saute 3-4 minutes Slu in apple rawis
brown sugar vinegar and caraway seed Remove from neat
In medium Bowl cut V* cup margarine into Hour until nurture is crumbly
Sin in ice water a tablespoon at a time until mixture torms Ban On floured
surface roll dough into 15 10-incfi rectangle Transfer fo lightly greased
baking sheel Spoon cabbage liihngdmvncemerlengBiolfcMign Fold king
edges over filling .pinch edges together seal ends Carefully turn placing
seam side down
Using sharp unite slash a V-flesign aboullW apart down center Bakeal
4O0 lor ?0 minutes Brush wrth EGG BEATERS Cholesterol Iree 99S Real
[gg Product Bake 10-15 minutes more Serve warm Makes 8 10 servings
15
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A332*.S
fnun o coot" aw wnowM rxowio mm a*
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i imWiiM piiM uaonvamowi fiaMfrtyaUSA
VHwaillHi nywilw Mm HUIIIItt. will
mm i mh wbsco mum nac otn st?i ct nuo
IRMIMM
- **.'<*&>*'. -r--------..------nrrerr*-:.:.'. .v..


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday,,September 6, 1986
Hadassah Chapters
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their regular
meeting on Wednesday at 12:45
p.m. at Morton Towers
Auditorium.
Kinneret Hadassah of Kendale
Lakes will hold its first meeting of
the new season on Sept. 10, at
noon at the El Conquistador
Clubhouse. Nutritionist Jay
Foster will speak.
Renanah Chapter of Hadassah
will meet on Monday at the
Seacoast South Cafe. A board
meeting at 10:30 a.m. will be
followed by a mini lunch at noon.
General membership meeting will
follow. Harriet Cohen will report
on the recent National Conve-
ntion.
Stephen Neal as Max in the temple scene Temple Ner Tamid of
WPBT's production, "The Great Voice."
WPBT's Jewish Holiday Special
The WPBT/Channel 2 production,
"The Great Voice," airing Thurs-
day Sept. 12, 10 p.m., is a Jewish
holiday special shot on location in
Miami with local actors.
The thirty-minute drama is an
original adaptation of three tradi-
tional stories focusing on the high
holidays of Rosh Hashanah and
Yom Kippur. Each story is based
on one of the themes of the New
Year: repentence, forgiveness,
and change. The stories are told
through the eyes of the character
of Yacov portrayed by actor Paul
Winich.
Some of the local sites that
serve as a backdrop for the
dramatic action of "The Great
Voice" are Temple Ner Tamid,
Washington Avenue, and Lincoln
Road in Miami Beach and Jewish
Home for the Aged and, Isaac's
Kosher Kitchen and Catering of
North Miami.
The WPBT special was
Barry Offers
Short Term Classes
Barry University, Academy for
Learning Enrichment, is now of-
fering an array of special, short
term classes, seminars and in-
dividual tutoring to high school,
middle school and lower school
students, as well as, parents and
teachers.
All topics will be presented for
enrichment as well as remedial.
For parents and educators,
Barry will offer two one-day
seminars on: How to Deal With
the Hyperactive Child, Saturday,
Sept. 28 and Allergies and Your
Child, Saturday, Nov. 2. In addi-
tion, Behavior Management of
children at home and in school will
be presented over four Thursdays,
Oct. 3-Oct. 24.
Registration information is
available by calling the Tutoring
Office, Barry University.
Dead Sea Products
Locally available
Dead Sea Products of
Israel are now distributing
and delivering locally. Dead
Sea Mineral Bath Salt and
Facial Mud Products.
The spas and clinics along
the shores of the Dea Sea are
popular for the reported
beneficial cosmetic qualities
of the black mud' and
therapeutic soaking in the
warm sea water. The mineral
rich mud and salts are all
natural and are said to help
stimulate circulation:
These products havetreceiv-
ed national attention in ar-
ticles in national magazines
and newspapers.

produced by Penelope McPhee,
Executive Producer for Cultural
Programming and directed by
WPBT's Alan Levy.
Hatikvah Chapter of Hadassah
will have its first meeting of the
year on September 12. "Focus on
Fashion" will be the program
theme and members will model
fashions. The meeting starts at
7:30 p.m. at Nob Hill West on
Kendall Drive.
Dade County Commissioner Barry Schreiber, second from left,
was the guest speaker at a recent parlor meeting by members of
the Latin-American Community Israel Bond Drive to discuss the
Israel Bond campaign. With Schreiber are, from left to right,
Michael Besso, co-chairman of the Latin-American community
Israel Bond Drive; chairman Roberto Kassin; and co-chairman
Saby Behar. "The Latin-American community has been extreme-
ly supportive of the Israel Bond program, helping to .sell many
bonds with the money being used to alleviate the Jewish State's'
economic crisis," Schreiber pointed out.
where shopping is a pleasure 7doys a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
at Publix Stores with
ah Bakerlea Only,
or Unsllced
Pumpernickel
RrpaH
~69
Available, at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain, Fruit Filled or
Cheese, Individual
Danish Roll
FREE!
one
[When you buy one danteh for 45*.
!
Available at PubHx Stori
Fresh Danish Bskeriee Only,
A New Item! Made with
Pineaoole. Almonds and Mm*
Available at All Publix Store*
and Danish Bakeries.
Deep South
Carrot Cake..................ech$249
Serve with Your Meal or as a Snack
Blueberry Muffins......... KJ *139
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake..................* M69
DOLPH IHMAMiA
Play it at Publix.
Prices Effective
Sept. 5th thru 11th. 1985
i
Quantity
Rights Reserved
S


I IUJ f
fnopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
(Deuteronomy 20. 10)
KI TAVO
tfttS Mfl9!fc2*2*?""* comein""^^eland
ftiJ!itS. *ZF$S& ft?? for *" inhritance ... thou
t take of the first of all the fruit of the ground... and shall eo
ftftS Such ftfttf 5? ^3ha11 choose to sf-
15 rJ .^f!i ISjfc Pnfst sna" take ^e basket out of
K"* I"!861 ^ d?wi *?fore the ^ter of the Lord thy God
Thf?!^ *2 bef0!Suthe ^ thy God- and worship
fc Sf tt rt?y ? When thou hast made an end of
ng all the tithe of thine increase in the third year .. thou
t say before the Lord thy God: "I have put away the hallowed
1 ] "I hUSe' and ^ have given them unto the
e, and unto the stranger, to the fatherless, and to the widow
f have not transgressed any of Thy commandments, neither
il forgotten them (Deuteronomy 26.1-18). "* "it shall be
a ye are passed over the Jordan that ye sha. -ip these
fes which I command you this day, in mount E. and thou
| plaster them with plaster ... And thou shalt write upon the
all the words of this law very plainly" (Deuteronomy
By. The portion goes on to treat of the blessings and curse's
I which Moses charged the children of Israel for further em-
- the covenant made in mount Horeb is reaffirmed in Moab
Bar
Mitzvah
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Stabinski
TODD STABINSKI
Todd Jay Stabinski, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Luis Stabinski (Bell) will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday September 7
at Temple Emanu-El.
Dr. Irving Lehrman will
officiate.
Todd is a student at Lehrman
Day School. He is the editor of the
Yearbook and is a member of the
cabinet of the Student Council.
Special guests include grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Solomon
Zelonker and Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Stabinski and great grandfather
Joseph Falkson.
________________________________I A luncheon will be held after the
- *ii|A I service-, at Temple Emanu-El and
ANE SHUTTERS i&ZZSL*" cnildren a1 hon
PROTECT YOUR HOME & LOVED ONES
Never Worry again!
KONOMIC4I EASY TO INSTALL
he recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
i "The Graphic History of the Jewish HerltaBe," edited by P. Wollman-
nir, *1S, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
i. New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
ting the volume.) '
633-0162
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CARDIAC REHABILITATION GROUP
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DIABETES!
'e carry a full line of
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Our Diabetes
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Lowest Price* In
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665-OS55
Harry Leff
Appointed Page
Harry Leff, son of Sam and
Margy Leff of North Miami
Beach, has been appointed to the
position of Congressional Page for
the United States House of
Representatives, for the fall term.
He received his appointment
through the sponsorship of Con-
gressman William Lehman of
North Dade.
Harry regularly attends school
at the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy, where he is an
honor student, and has been
editor of the Junior High School
Year Book. He will be attending a
Junior Year High School which is
located at the Library of Congress
in Washington, D.C., in addition
to participating in a comprehen-
sive Washington Seminar pro-
gram for the pages. Harry is also
an active member of the youth
group of Adath Yeshurun.
CANTOR WM. W. LIPSON Is
accepting students lor f ha study
of Hazzanuth, Nusach, Yiddish
and liturgical repertoire, and
Cantlllatlon.
Plea.e call:
(305) 596-4818
PWORTH
Wage
DUfTIUfESTTU TMT IS ACTIYE I SECME
"More Abundant Living
99
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Private Apts.-No Entry Fee Housekeeping & Maintenance
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Activities & Religious Services Personal Assistance As Required
Adjacent to Susanna Wesley Health Center
Quality Canng
Staff
(305) 556-3500
EPWORTH VILLAGE, INC. A Not For Profit Facility
. il A.ijuu. initiaTr." ~ 8....."'"*'' """'^ **-***' SI """
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:16 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
lit* Fn. Services 8:15 pm
Dally Minyan 7:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m
Sat 8:30 a m
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Family Worship Frl 7:30p.m. Rabbi Harbart
M, Baumgard "Hooray School Is Opanlng'
Sal Cono Torah Sarvlca 11 15a.m. Bnsi Mltiv
Chad Llabarman and Joy Sllvar
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
Dr. Sol Landau. a
Rabbi Emeritus (tit)
Rev. Milton Freeman, *3v
Ritual Director
Frl. sva. 5.30 In lha Chapai.
Sat. 8:08 ajr. KMdwan lallawHg sarvlcaa
.MtnchM.l7:88p.m^
Sun. 8:00 a.m. *>> p.m
Mo. a Thuta. 7:30 a.m. 4 t:M a.m.
Tuaa. Wed. a Frl. 7:4* a.m. 4 8:30 p.m.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joaaph Krissei
Rosa Berlin: Executive Secretary
858-6334
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath ShmueJ
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534.7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovltch, Rabbi If
Moshe Buryn, Cantor P
Sergio Grobler, Presklan t '
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
| Shabbat Sarvicas 0:30 a.m Sarmon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE EMANU-EL f _^
1701 Wa shlngton Avenue ,' *K'.
Miami Beach I ijgi
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shlfman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat Sarvlca S p.m
Sat Mom t.'vic. 9.m. Or Lahrman -II
praach Cantor ShHman will chan'
Bar Mltnan Todd Stabtnaai twinning with
vladislswOanin. Sovtat Union Salichot
i aarvlea Sat Eva 11 p.m. Rabbi Lahrman will
praach "On tha thrashhold of lha High Holy
Days". Cantor will chant assisted by
Tampla Choir
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlfl
Sat. Silchot Sanlca 10p.m. Public invitad
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's P)onm*t Rttorm Congrwgaiton
137 N E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
Mimar 9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 59^5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rax D Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor Rachalle F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
Kandall: Rabbi Haakall M. Bamat. Cantor
RachallaF Nalson
Downtown: Rabbi Ra> 0. Partmaiar. Cantor
Jacob B. Bornstaln. Fri. ava 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Mlcheel B. Elaanatat, Rabbi
Friday sarvicas 8.15 p.m.
Sllchoa- Midnight Sarvlca Saturday,1
Sopt. 7. Buffat Suppw 11:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi ,__
Moshe Fried ler, Cantor |Y
Dr. Joaaph A Gorfinkel,
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
Friday sarvicas 7 p.m.
Saturday 8:45 a.m. sarvlca.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1S4S Mfaraon Ava., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
rtahhl Py Jahuda Maabe*
Cantor Nlssim Benyamlm
Dally Minyan
sabbath serttaes 8:18 a.m.
A Seaclal ran foe mamaarahla Indodmo
IIckata for tha High Holy Days
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoehanah Raab, Cantor
Saturday Sanlcaa B30 a.m.
High Holyday ticksts ayallabla
Sshchos Sanricas, Sapt. 7lh 9:00 p m
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayor AbramowlU
Cantor Murray Yavneh \(
Momlne sarvlcaa 8 am
Friday lata aamng aarvlca
8:15 pm
Saturday 8 a.m. and 7:45 p.m
886 1346
868-8833
7500 S.W. 120th Streat
238-2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Howard Banoer
Cantor Saul Matsats
Friday Evonlng at 8:00p.m.
Saturday Morning al 9:30 a.m.
m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. 4, 41st St. '538-7231
DR. LEON KROMISM, RASB1 Ub#,_.
HARRY JOLT, AUXILIARY RABBI l"'
PAUL D. CAMJU., AaastTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVtER
Friday 8:15p.m. RabW Harry Jolt sarmon
5p.m HabW Marry Jol
Saturday 1048 am
BETH TORAH CONSR VATI VE
CONGREGATION 947-7628
1051 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Llpechltz, Rabbi
Randall Kontgaburg, Asat. Rabbi
Zvee AronI, Cantor
Harvay L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dally sarvlcaa 7:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m -.
Saturday 8:25 a.m and 7:30 p.m 9t\\
S.t Bar Mllnah of Ronald DandoWc \W)
Sunday 8 a.m.. 5:80 pjn. | BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozancwalg, Rabbi
PLENERTAMID
7902 Carlyle Ava.,
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Eugene LabOVltZ Conaarvadva
Cantor Edward Klein /raStt
Sallchos sarvlcaa Sat. 10 p.m. v*'
Raf raahmants tuNl ba aarvad
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Baach
661-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ava. A 75 St., 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kaszll
Friday sarvlcaa 7:15 p.m.
Saturday 830 a.m and 20 irons
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava.
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi SkTsOIO
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Snulkee, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Admkilatrator
paclal Family Sarvica Fri 7:30 p.m.
Klngsta, "Why Wa Sound Tha Sholar
Sat. mom Bar Mltnah Mlohaal Stam Sat
1 aarrica* at rmdnlghl Conc^ and
social aaejailai at 1 o p
TEMPLE ZiON ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Dr. Conservative
2712311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi'
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
David Rosenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Frl. 8:15 p.m. Sabbath ava sarvlca TMiNx
Chapai, Rabbi Norman N Shapiro Onag lo
follow. Sal. 900 a.m. Sabbath sarvicas Talllar
. Chapai


rage 14-A me Jewisn t lonaian/f naay, aeptemwr o, i30u
Page 16-B The Jewish r loridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
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Regular Conditioning /^Cl
Non-Acetone 4/oz.l tJ
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Petroleum Jelly
123
169
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Cotton Swabs
170's
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Sterile Cotton Balls
130's
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PONDS Cold Creme
Vanishing Creme
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3.5oz.2.2Sl
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RAVE Masque Hair Conditioner 8 oz. I.89
Hairspray Aerosol 11 oz. 1.
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NEW LOCATION
NOW 9472 HARDING AVE.
SPAN 861 8117 SURFS.PE
-J AVAILABLE AJTMiS LOCATION
A. Anthony Noboa
Jefferson Bancorp
Elects Noboa V.P.
Veteran South Florida banking
executive A. Anthony Noboa has
been elected executive vice presi-
dent of Jefferson Bancorp, Inc.,
the publicly-held bank holding
company headquartered in Miami
Beach.
Arthur H. Courshon, chairman
of the board of Jefferson Bancorp,
announced Noboa's election. He
said Noboa also has been elected
executive vice president of Jeffer-
son National Bank and of Jeffer-
son National Bank at Sunny Isles,
which together maintain six of-
fices in Miami Beach, North Dade,
Key Biscayne and Normandy Isle.
Joel N. Minsker. formerly in
private practice, has heen re-
tained by the Trump Group as
general counsel for the luxury
condominium development,
Williams Island, according to
Alan Matus. executive vice
president and chief executive
officer of the Miami-based
group.
Treister Takes
Top Award
Kenneth Treister, ar-
chitect/developer of Mayfair-in-
the-Grove, the Office in the Grove
and Yacht Harbor, has been nafri-
ed a winner in the Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects second an-
nual 1985 Media Awards
Program.
The award is given for outstan-
ding journalism which increases
the public's understanding of ar-
chitecture and the built
environment.
Treister, will be awarded a pla-
que and a $500 scholarship
donated to the school of his choice^
Treiser's winning article, "The
Mosaic of Great Cities," appeared
in the May, 1985 issue of FDQ -
Design South.
__________
_^^_


Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish FlgHdian___Page 174T
Temple Beth Tov To
Dedicate New Torah
Ly, September 8, friends,
ps, and neighbors of
aid Temple Beth Tov join
for the dedication of a
^stivities start at 2:30 p.m.
Miami City Hall, for a
las the new Torah is
to the temple where
jd dancing festivities will
thereafter, the sacred
iy "The Wedding of
will take place. The new
iblic Notice
NOTICE UNDER
ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
riCE IS HEREBY GIVEN
lie undersigned, desiring to
in business under the Re-
name of SUZUKI PIANO
OL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
Ml S.W. 103 Avenue, Miami,
da 33176 intend to register
[name with the Clerk of the
lit Court of Dade County,
(SARAH NEHAM SALZ
SIMON J. SALZ
F. NORTON
ey for Applicants
11201, 19 West Flagler St.
m Florida 33130
1374-3116
August 23,30;
September 6, 13, 1985
PUBLIC NOTICE
B annual return of the Obdulia
Von Bernard Charitable
,_ation Trust is available at
tidress noted below for ins|'<
during regular businesrtours.
ny citizen who so requests
n 180 days after publication
M notice of its availability.
I Obdulia S. De Von Bernard
heritable Foundation Trust
11770 Biscayne Boulevard.
12th Floor
Miami, Florida. 33137
Jie Foundation Manager is
I Stanley Levine, Trustee
plication of this Notice on the
Tday of September. 1985.
September 6,1985
Ithe circuit courtof
ie eleventh judicial
Circuitoc Florida in
MD FOR DADE COUNTY
IENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
: ASE NO. IS 2937 4 CA 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002411
IDERAL NATIONAL
JTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
Delation organized and
kting under the laws ot the
led States of America,
laintiff
N JOESHIPMAN.elal.,
fendants.
HOME MORTGAGE OF
TH FLORIDA, INC. a-k-a
E MORTGAGE OF SOUTH
R IDA, Address Unknown.
U ARE NOTIFIED that an
n lor Foreclosure of Mor
on the following described
rty: Lot 1. in Block 13,
NDED PLAT OF Blocks I
B0 inclusive. BAY VISTA
K, according to the Plat
of, as recorded in Plat Book
at Page 5, of the Public
ords of Dade County,
Ida, has been filed against
and you are required to
a copy of your written
nses, if any, to it, on Stuart
|rti. Attorney for Plaintiff,
address is Suite 214, 1570
ruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Ida, 33146 on or before
mber 13, 19B5 and file the
linal with the Clerk of this
1 either before service on
intiff s attorney or Im-
iately thereafter, otherwise
fault will be entered against
for the relief demanded in
omplaint
ITNESS my hand and the
of this Court this 12th day of
ust, 1985.
RlCHARDP BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
A August 16, 23.30
September 6,1985
Torah replaces a 500-year-old
Torah being retired from daily
use.
Dignitaries from the community
and spiritual leaders of
synagogues in Miami will be pre-
sent to participate in the
ceremonies.
Rabbi Nathan Bryn is spiritual
leader of the temple, located at
6438 S.W. 8 St.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-25292
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RODOLFO MARCHESE.
Petitioner,
and
BRIGIDA MARCHESE,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
Fla. Bar No. 142876
TO: BRIGIDA MARCHESE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the Peti-
tion upon the Petitioner's at-
torney, RONALD S. LIEBER
MAN, P.A., at 8900 S.W. 107
Avenue, Suite 206, Miami, Florida,
and file the original Response or
Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, on or before
the 27 day of September, 1985. If
you fail to do so, a Default Judg-
ment will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the
Petition.
Dated at Miami. Dade County.
Florida, this 26 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of, the Circuit Court
" liv: I) C. Bryant
19278 August 80:
September 6. 13.20. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No.85-30*39 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY
DAVIN & COMPANY. A F'.orldi
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
CLAUDE R. SNELLGROVE;
JAIME A. SIERRA, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by. through,
under or against him: JANE B.
SIERRA: and LESLIE
ESTATES HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION NO. S. INC.. a
Florida corporation.
Defendants.
To: Jaime A. Sierra, whose
residence Is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees. Ilenors,
creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not known to
be dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or Interest In the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property In Dade
County. Florida: Lot 2. In Block
53, Of LESLIE ESTATES
SECTION FIVE, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded In
Plat Book 96. at Page TB, of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defense. If any, to It on Barry 8.
Yarchin. Esquire, of Rosenthal
and Yarchin, P.A.. Attorneys for
Plaintiff. 3050 Biscayne
Boulevard. Suite 800. Miami.
Florida 331S7. on or before
September 13, 1885. and to file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on August 12.1985.
RICHARD P, BRINKER. Clerk
By DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
1B265 August 16. 23.30
Septembers. 1985
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
CASE NO: 1^337 52(11)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN PAULIMA HYPOLITE.
Petitioner,
and
SADIE HYPOLITE.
Respondent.
TO: SADIE HYPOLITE.
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attorney.
812 Northwest 12th Ave., Miami.
Florida. 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
September 20. 1966. otherwise a
default will be entered.
August 14,1985
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
19259 August 18, 23, 30;
Septembere. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURSIDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-23604 (All
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
CENTRI'ST SAVINGS BANK,
F/K/A
DADE SAVINGS & LOAN
ASSOCIATION.
Plaintiff
Vf
ANTHONY BELLO, et ux.. et al..
Defendants.
TO: ANTHONY BELLO and
ELSIE BELLO, his wife
Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida:
Lot 1 in Block 20. of GLADE-
WIND HEIGHTS, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 115, at Pag? 86, of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
or. Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1578 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
September 27. 1985, and file Un-
original with the Clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 20 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19271 August 23,30;
September 6,13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 65-5844
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRIETTE WEINGARTEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of HENRIETTE
WEJNGARTEN. deceased, File
Number 86-6844, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative
and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objecUon by an Interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue,
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WIU. BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 16.1985.
Personal Representative:
Paul Fred Weingarten
68 Fairway Circle North
Manhasset. New York 11030
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ROBERT M. HERMAN. ESQ.
Blank. Rome. Comlnsky and
McCauley
1770 Biscayne Boulevard,
12th Floor
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone. (305| 573-5500
18258 August 16.23. 30:
September6,1985
IN TBE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 85-34722 FC (14)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 3CM1C
In re the marriage of
ALVA W. HOLMES
Petitioner
and
RENEE F. HOLMES
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RENEE F. HOLMES
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J.
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 638 N.E.
167 St., North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162, on or before Oc-
tober 4, 1985, and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
August 21. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19272 August 23, 30;
September 6,13,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-34076
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MERLEANE PATRICIA
POWELL,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
NEVILLE A. POWELL,
Respondent/Husband
TO: Mr. Neville A. Powell
c/o St. Mary's Hospital
1998 St. Marks Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ
ten defenses, if any. to it on AR
MK S MUSKAT. ESQUIRE, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 999 Washington Avenue.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
September 20. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRrNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT. ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 3S139
Telephone: 305-672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
19262 August 23,30;
September 6.13, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT.
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO:85-34666
FC20
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NADINE MIGUEL
and
EDDY L. NADINE
TO: Eddy L. Nadine
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
Ave., Miami, Fla. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
4, 1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
Dated in Miami on August 20,
1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk, Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19269 August 23, 30;
September 6.13.1085
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name REGINA'S OF
MIAMI INC. D/B/A REGINA'S
FASHIONS INC. at 116-118 N.E.
3rd Ave Miami Fla. 33132 intends
to register said namefsi with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Manuel Lacayo, Jr.
19266 August 23, 30;
September 6, 13.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
US THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-31125
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ALFRED DOVER,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MICHELLE DENISE DOVER,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Michelle Denise Dover
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on An-
tonio Torrent. Jr., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 701
S.W. 27 Avenue, Suite 625, Miami,
Florida 38135. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 20,
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
thisH day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Antonio Torrent. Jr.
Rossano. Torrent & l.eyte Vidal.
P.A.
701 S.W. 27th Avenue Suite 625
Miami. Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
19261 August 23, 30;
September 6. 13. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE} NO. 85-33916 CA-12
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION,
as association organized
and existing under the
laws of the United States
of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
GEORGE SAEZ.
at fat,
Defendants.
TO: GEORGE SAEZ
822 Berkerseg Lane
Columbus. Ohio 23205
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 14. Block 15, PLAT NO.
ONE OPA LOCKA. according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded in
Plat Book 25, at Page 44, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Stuart Gitlitz, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
October 4. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 29 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19284 September 6.13.
20. 27, 1986


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
Public Notices!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 15-33275
NOTICE OF ACTION
002411
ENSIGN BANK. FSB., f k a
Community Federal Savings and
Loan Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
BOBBIE L. OVERSTREET, et
al.,
Defendants.
TO: Bobbie L. Overstreet
611 Edgewood Terrace, No.
;oi
Washington, 9.C. 20017
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an j the f0|,wmg described property
action tor Foreclosure of Mor
igage on the following described
property Lot 8, in Block 6, of
PERRINE GARDENS SUB
DIVISION NO. 5, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 103. at Page 13, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florioa, has been filed against
/ou ind you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it. on Shep
pard Faber, Attorney for
Plaint.ft, whose address is Suite
214, lf'O Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 3314a on or
oefore September 13, 19J5 and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 12th day of
August, 1985.
RICHARDP.BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
ByGWEND ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
19253 August 16, 23,30
September 6,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-35651
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIA E. ADRIANO,
Petitioner,
and
MANUEL E. ADRIANO.
Respondent.
TO: MANUEL E. ADRIANO,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 4, 1986, otherwise
a default will be entered.
August 27, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: GWEN D. ZEIGLER
19281 August 30;
September 6,13,20,1986
IN THE CIRCIJIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nukir SS-7463
DiruioaOl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACOB SAAL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JACOB SAAL, deceased, File
Number 86-7468, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
St.. Miami, FL 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OFi
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 6, 1986.
Persona] Representative:
HANNAH FRENKEL
38 Coolidge Street
Malverne, New York 11566
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQ.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100'
19283 September 6.13. 1986 I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-14019 (CA 29)
AMENDED NOTICE
OF ACTION
ERWIN JACOBSOHN.
Plaintiff,
vs.
JACK L'CHITEL. et al..
Defendants.
TO: All parties claiming interests
by, through, under or against. HY
UCHITEL. deceased, and all other
parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
in
Dade County. Florida: The Nor-
thwest '/ of the Northeast % of the
Southeast'', and the East '/ of the
Northeast V of the Northwest ''
of the Southeast 'U of Section 15
Township 53 South. Range 39
East, lying and being in Dade
County. Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to. it on Keith.
Mack. Lewis & Allison. Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street. Miami. Florida
33132. on or before September 20,
1985, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or '
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 14th day of
August. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19266 August 23, 30;
September 6,13,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
( (INSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 84-16360 CC 06
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221361
DORAL HOTEL, INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE R1BAS and ADRIANA
CANTWELL f/k/a ADRIANA
RIBAS,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RIBAS
7090 Crisford, Apt. 1
St. Charles Apartments
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
TO: JOSE RIBAS
8918 Collins Avenue
Apartment No. 6
Miami Beach, FL 33154
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver & Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326,
Miami, Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1985 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County, Florida
By FLORA GONZALEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
19275 August 30;
September 6, 13,20, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fi-
ctitious name F & L Sales Co. at
3590 S. State Rd. 7. Suite 18,
Miramar. FL 33023. intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Lucy A. Finn
Marilyn Lambert
19285 September 6. 13, 20,
27, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY1
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-34265 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
AMERICAN SAVINGS
BANK, f/k/a FRANKLIN
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERTO NODAL,
et ux, et al..
Defendants.
TO: ROBERTO NODAL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4. Block 3. of PRINCETO-
NIAN SUBDIVISION SECTION
ONE. according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
102. at Page 29. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of August
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19279 August 30;
September 6. 13.20. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-31*10 (14)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 068653
IN RE:
MICHAEL ROBERT VOLTS,
Husband
and
DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS,
Wife.
TO: DEBORAH LYNN VOLTS
(Residence Unknown)
Last Known Employment
Address:
c/o Mico Oil, 6606 Martway
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66201
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 9400 South Dadeland
Blvd., Suite 300, Miami, Fl. 33166.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 4, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 28 day of August. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, ESQ.
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite 300
Miami, Fl. 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
Tel. (306) 665-9775
19282 September 6, 13;
20.27,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name E. GRAFTON
EXPORT LIMITED INC.
(D.B.A. INTERNATIONAL
WINES A SPIRITS I at 2400 W 8
Lane. Hialeah. Florida 93010.
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ESTEBAN GRAFTON
President
1240Crane Ave.
Miami Springs, FL33166
19260 August 18.23. 30;
Septembers. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. 85-29043 CA 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
HENRY EVANS and DANE
EVANS, his wife: NIXON DESIR
and FELICITE DESIR a/k/a
FELICITE ALEXIS (DESIR),
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by, through,
under of against them; SCHMIDT
INDUSTRIES, INC., a Missouri
corporation: and SOUTHLAND
INSURANCE COMPANY, a
Florida corporation.
Defendants.
To: Nixon Desir and Felicite Desir
a/k/a/ Felicite Alexis (Desir).
whose residences are unknown,
and the unknown parties who may-
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and ail parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 8. in Block 6.
of VENETIAN DEVELOPMENT
SUBDIVISION, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 46, at Page 87, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosen thai & Yarchin, PA.. At-
torneys for Plaintiff. Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
September 20, 1985, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on August 15. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19263 August 23,30;
September 6,13,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-26828 FC 16
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NESTOR J. MARTIN
and
MARIA A. MARTIN
TO: Maria A. Martin
9220 S.W. 46 Terrace
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. KOSS,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 4343 West
Flagier Street, Suite 404, Miami,
Florida 33134, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 27,
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS, ESQ.
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT LAW
P.A.
4343 West Flagier Street
Suite 404
Miami, Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 443-4343
Attorney for Petitioner
19273 August 30;
September 6, 13.20,1985
i las
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-35011 (20)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JOSEFINA BAUTISTA
RODRIGUEZ
Petitioner,
and
JOSE IGNACIO RODRIGUEZ
Respondent.
TO: Jose Ignacio Rodriguez
11905 S.W. 112th Avenue
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
ififfinI. if any. to it. on R.A. del
Pino, Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1835 West
Flagier Street No. 201. Miami.
Florida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
n or before October 4. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of August, 1985.
RICHARD, P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GOMEZ, FENTE & DEL PINO,
P.A.
1835 West Flagier Street No. 201
Miami, Florida 33136
Phone:(306)541-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19276 August 30;
September 6.13,20,1986

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL, *
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
No. 01449*
IN RE: The marriage of:
CARMEN ADDERLY
LAMARRE.
Petitioner-wife,
and
NICO LAMARRE.
Respondent .husband.
YOU. NICO LAMARRE.
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorneys. Law
Office of HERMAN COHEN 4r
MARTIN COHEN. 822 S.W *r.
Street. Miami. Fla. 33130. on or
before September 20. 1880, or
else petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami. Dade
County. Florida, this August 12.
IUhfl
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
clerk. Circuit Court
By F. J.Foy
Deputy Clerk
LMM August 16. 23, 30;
September 6. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-34868 (16)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 434434
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GREGORY P. COLEMAN,
Petitioner,
and
PAULINE B. WILLIAMS a/k/a
PAULINE B. COLEMAN.
Respondent.
TO: Pauline B. Williams a/k/a
Pauline B. Cole man
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on KEN-
NETH C. BRONCHICK. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A., 3000 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 315, Miami, FL
33137, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kenneth C. Bronchick. Esq.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT. P.A.
3000 Biscayne Boulevard. No. 315
Miami, FL 33137
Attorney for Petitioner
19274 August 30;
September 6,13.20.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVBN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CERTIFICATE IN-
VESTORS SERVICE at 3233
Mary Streeet, Coconut Grove, FL
33133 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE
CONSULTANTS, INC.
By Peggy Bieley, President
WELLISCH, METZGER &
STANTON. PA.
Paul R. Stanton, Esq.
Attorney for Financial Real Estate
Consultants, Inc.
161 Almeria Avenue, Suite 200E
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Telephone: (305) 445-7964
19268 August 23.30;
September 6,13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 85 6909
DIVISION: 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
VERA B. PEARL.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
No. 090723
The administration of the Estate
of VERA B. PEARL. Deceased.
File Number 85 6909. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Dade County,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the Personal Represen-
tative and the Personal Represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with the court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
Estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the Will and Codicil, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue or jurisdic-
tion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this notice
begun on August 30, 1986.
ALBERT SINE.
Personal Representative
MORTON B. ZEMEL
Attorney At Law
16666 N.E. 19 Ave.
N. Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
305 949-4237
Attorney for Personal
Representative
19280 Augusts,
September 6. 1985
u
has
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name HIGH VOLTAGE
v -S83.7. We8t D""e "'ffrway.'
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33180
l"t.ends. ,0 "-mater said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
court of Dade County. Florida
EMOTIONAL OUTLET. INC
19297 August 16. 23. 30:
September 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name HOLY LAND
IMPORTS intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ALL AMERICAN
TRADING COMPANY INC.
a Florida corporation
By: BelaFIorentln,
President
Nelson C.Keshen, Esq.
Attorney for Corporation r*
8006S.W. 87 Avenue.
Suite 20B
Miami. FL3317B
Telephone: 596-1638
19282 August 16. 23,30
Septembers, 1985
M


labette Ackerman Passes
Resident of So. Fla. 59 Years
Ite Ackerman, 75, of
|each passed away August
Ackerman has been a
of South Florida for the
I years. She was a pioneer
[ of Temple Israel of
[Miami, Past Officer of the
federation of Women's
Jewish Families and Chil-
Bervice. Nat ..il Council
Women. Hadassah. the
i Society of Greater Miami
I New Cultural Center.
rman was a charter
of Westview Country
[Patron of the Lowe Art
nd the Opera Guild. She
Vice President and
of Ackerman Insurance
;y, active in the
Blaou Cancer Research In-
She served as a volunteer
the Coast Guard during
nd was a volunteer at the
i C. Myers Health Clinic,
leach.
mother of Gail (Max)
Jman, Miami; devoted
Lorette Sandier, Miami
nd Theodore Simmons,
N.H., adored gran-
Babette Ackerman
dmother of Gary, Larry and Marc.
Funeral services were held at
Temple Israel. Interment followed
at Temple Israel Cemetery.
ipist Sought
He Shot Soldier,
Left Her for Dead
ly HUGH ORGEL
AVIV (JTA) -
re conducting a na-
|e search for leads
ire questioning
in the rape and
of an 18-year-old
|who remains partial-
ralyzed from the
foman, whose identity has
iheld. said the attacker
fen her a lift in his car on
[while she was hitchhiking
army base near Beer-
her home in the Negev.
giving a few miles, the
raped the soldier and
her in the head, leaving
lead. Bleeding profusely,
kged to drag herself some
prom the scene of the at-
was found by local
in the Negev sonic 2<>
er.
)RS SAID she was for-
(having fallen with the in-
fbor, Likud
Lose
fopularity
LVIV (JTA) Both the
farty and the Likud have
llarity, while small parties
right and left have gained
febi Meir Kahane's Kach
rould gain seats in the
feber Knesset if elections
now.
i last elections Kach won
I seat, but according to the
1 Kahane and his followers
come the third largest
phe house after Labor and
iblic opinion poll, taken
st month by the Modi'ln
[Public Research Institute
pv, gives Labor 51 seats,
to 53 in polls in May,
July (and 40 in the last
fe), and the Likud only 24
against 29-30 in the
polls and 41 in the
I
could win 11 seats, as
Jve in the previous polls,
Citizens Rights Party
ly Shulamit Aloni. would
ven seats (up from 4-5 in
lous polls and four in the
jured side of her head lying on
sand, which solidified with her
blood, preventing further
bleeding. In serious condition still,
the girl suffered from brain
damage but has recovered suffi-
ciently to describe the attack and
her attacker.
She was transferred from a
Beersheba hospital to the Beth
Levinstein rehabilitation center
and hospital in Raanana. Doctors
said she would need a lengthy
period of physical and emotional
rehabilitation.
Police received some help from
Menasha Kadishman, a leading ar-
tist, who was able to draw a
likeness of the assailant, from the
victim's information, after police
artists failed to draw a likeness
satisfactory to the victim.
SINCE THE Kadishman draw-
ing was telecast on Israeli televi-
sion, police said scores of viewers
have called in to say they had in-
formation on the rapist, described
as between 28 and 30 years of age,
of average height, fair-skinned
and husky, with light brown hair,
with somewhat protruding iower
teeth. He spoke fluent Hebrew.


?K
1



Obituaries
COHEN, Hannah, of Miami Beach. Ruhin
Zilbert.
FELDMAN. Yetta, of North Miami Beach
Sept. t. The Riverside.
MILLMAN. Morris, of Miami Beach Rubin
Zilbert
BRAl N, Richard F. Services were held.
COHN, Nathaniel H., 95, of Miami Beach
Au 27 The Riverside.
FfRMAN BERNARD 1. of Miami Beach
Rubin-Ziiliert.
SCHWARTZ. Louis, August 27. Services
* ere held.
S( ILOMON, Samuel Jr.. 93, of North Miami.
Autr. 27. Services were held.
SPRUCK, Samuel, 84, of North Miami
Keach. Aug. 29. Levitt-Weinstein.
KAWALER. Muriel. 59 of Miami, Aug. 29.
Riverside
KLEIN. David Miles, 24 of Miami, Aug. 25.
Kl'DIN. Dr. Abraham Alfred. Riverside.
REICHELLE, Calvin M.. of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
ZARETSKY. Sarah, of Miami Beach
Rubin-Zilbert.
ZtNDLER, Fae Kandeil, 80, of North Miami
Beach. The Riverside.
WERNICK. Laura. 88, of North Miami
Beach, Aug. 30. Services were held in
Massachusetts.
MARCUS. Samuel (Stanley), Services were
held.
SIRKIK Sally, of North Miami. Rubin-
Zilbert.
STURM. Harry, of Miami Beach. Blasber^
Chapel
SCHWARTZ, Tillie D., 90, of Bay Harbor
Island. Aug. 29. Graveside services held at
Mt. Nebn.
WEINSTEIN, Dotty M of North Miami
Beach, Aug. 29. Levitt-Weinatein.
MARKS, Norma J., 60, of Miami. Riverside
STARR. Rosalyn, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
KATZ, Norman, 71. Services were held.
BEINER, Sylvia, of Miami Beach. Rubin-
Zilbert. Mt. Nebo.
DESIND. Irving. 76, of Eastern Shores,
August 26. Levitt-Weinatein.
FARBER, Sylvia, 82, of Bay Harbor Island,
August 25. Blasberg Chapel.

*SS8r
z$t>
tS&"
i I c a tt
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
Friday, September 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Gerry Lou Silverman, Actress, Passes
Gerry Lou Silverman of Bal
Harbour, Florida, an actress who
was known by the stage name
Gerry Lou died on Saturday of
cancer .
Gerry Lou, who at various times
also lived in New York City and
Sandisfield, Mass. received her
Bachelor of Arts degree from
Syracuse University and held a
Masters degree in Speech
Pathology from Columbia
University.
Her parents, the late Sylvia and
Joseph M. Rose were prominent
members of the Miami Beach com-
munity who owned and operated
several apartments and hotels
built in the 1930's. Most notable
among those is the Royal Palm
Hotel on Collins Avenue.
Gerry Lou's acting career in-
cluded roles on stage, screen and
television. She starred in such
plays as "In The Boom-Boom
Room," "Cafe Crown," "Intimate
Edith" (the story of Edith Whar-
ton) and "The House Bernarda
Alaba." She appeared in the
movies "Dark August" and "An-
nie Hall." Gerry Lou was seen on
various television shows such as
Strike Force, All My Children,
Texas, and Another World.
Gerry Lou is survived by her
husband Benedict A. Silverman of
Bal Harbour, daughter, Jill Silver-
man Hunter of Boston, Mass. and
son Jonathan Silverman of
Fairfax, Va.; her grandcV'ldren
Devon Jennifer. Mari Shana and
Tristan Ashley Silverman all of
Fairfax, Va.; sister Car,! Rose
Unger and her brother Richard
Rose, both of Miami Beach.
Memorial services will be held
Friday at 11:30 at Riverside Alton
Road Chapel.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
't lu Northeast Phone 7591669
26640 Greenfield Hd
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service Krom Klnrula \n\i
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
11IIH !Hlf IMIUIIIIill
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and.
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2090
Broward County
532-2099
Kcpresenled In KiviTsuir Memorial Chapel. Ine
New York: (212)268-7600 Queens Blvd. & Tt.th Rd., Forest Hills. NY
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL O
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
The Only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arrangements
with
No. Miami Beach Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
No Money In Advance
Main Oftice: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
tm


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, September 6, 1985
IHEHGenMBIBIIDia
Its the stor\- of a nev\-
restaurant that.we're the
first to admit is a product
of an active imagination.
Quite frankly, you've never
seen anything like it
Picture, for example,
a restaurant that keeps on
hand more kinds of fresh
seafood thanyouYe ever
even heard of
\E WSTSTRQT
THE SHOWS
ATONOOW
CENTRE
L0EH\UN\>
PLAZA
NE TH STREET
Imagine a menu that,
along with such a great
variety of fish.also offers
you twentv delicious wavs
to enjoy each one In snles
that come from as near
as New Orleans, and as far
as the South Pacific.
Finally just imagine
a restaurant so concerned
with freshness.you'll find
a fresh seafood market
inside the restaurant.lt s
nowonder this is the best
seafood vouve tasted.
welcome to the new
Big Splash.The Seafood
Emrx)riumlt'sexactlywhat
you'd expect from Rockv
Aoki.who brought you the
famous Benihanaof Tbkvo
Japanese Steakhouses. '
You might have to
follow the map to find it.
But once vou have eaten
there.vou'llprobabhwalk
away with some great fish
stories of vour own.
BIG SPIASIS
< >*.>! ikiih f*lunduith,


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